Science.gov

Sample records for adequate tissue oxygenation

  1. Adipose Tissue - Adequate, Accessible Regenerative Material.

    PubMed

    Kolaparthy, Lakshmi Kanth; Sanivarapu, Sahitya; Moogla, Srinivas; Kutcham, Rupa Sruthi

    2015-11-01

    The potential use of stem cell based therapies for the repair and regeneration of various tissues offers a paradigm shift that may provide alternative therapeutic solutions for a number of diseases. The use of either embryonic stem cells (ESCs) or induced pluripotent stem cells in clinical situations is limited due to cell regulations and to technical and ethical considerations involved in genetic manipulation of human ESCs, even though these cells are highly beneficial. Mesenchymal stem cells seen to be an ideal population of stem cells in particular, Adipose derived stem cells (ASCs) which can be obtained in large number and easily harvested from adipose tissue. It is ubiquitously available and has several advantages compared to other sources as easily accessible in large quantities with minimal invasive harvesting procedure, and isolation of adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells yield a high amount of stem cells which is essential for stem cell based therapies and tissue engineering. Recently, periodontal tissue regeneration using ASCs has been examined in some animal models. This method has potential in the regeneration of functional periodontal tissues because various secreted growth factors from ASCs might not only promote the regeneration of periodontal tissues but also encourage neovascularization of the damaged tissues. This review summarizes the sources, isolation and characteristics of adipose derived stem cells and its potential role in periodontal regeneration is discussed. PMID:26634060

  2. Adipose Tissue - Adequate, Accessible Regenerative Material

    PubMed Central

    Kolaparthy, Lakshmi Kanth.; Sanivarapu, Sahitya; Moogla, Srinivas; Kutcham, Rupa Sruthi

    2015-01-01

    The potential use of stem cell based therapies for the repair and regeneration of various tissues offers a paradigm shift that may provide alternative therapeutic solutions for a number of diseases. The use of either embryonic stem cells (ESCs) or induced pluripotent stem cells in clinical situations is limited due to cell regulations and to technical and ethical considerations involved in genetic manipulation of human ESCs, even though these cells are highly beneficial. Mesenchymal stem cells seen to be an ideal population of stem cells in particular, Adipose derived stem cells (ASCs) which can be obtained in large number and easily harvested from adipose tissue. It is ubiquitously available and has several advantages compared to other sources as easily accessible in large quantities with minimal invasive harvesting procedure, and isolation of adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells yield a high amount of stem cells which is essential for stem cell based therapies and tissue engineering. Recently, periodontal tissue regeneration using ASCs has been examined in some animal models. This method has potential in the regeneration of functional periodontal tissues because various secreted growth factors from ASCs might not only promote the regeneration of periodontal tissues but also encourage neovascularization of the damaged tissues. This review summarizes the sources, isolation and characteristics of adipose derived stem cells and its potential role in periodontal regeneration is discussed. PMID:26634060

  3. Measuring tissue oxygenation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soyemi, Olusola O. (Inventor); Soller, Babs R. (Inventor); Yang, Ye (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Methods and systems for calculating tissue oxygenation, e.g., oxygen saturation, in a target tissue are disclosed. In some embodiments, the methods include: (a) directing incident radiation to a target tissue and determining reflectance spectra of the target tissue by measuring intensities of reflected radiation from the target tissue at a plurality of radiation wavelengths; (b) correcting the measured intensities of the reflectance spectra to reduce contributions thereto from skin and fat layers through which the incident radiation propagates; (c) determining oxygen saturation in the target tissue based on the corrected reflectance spectra; and (d) outputting the determined value of oxygen saturation.

  4. Assessment of tissue oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Robertson, P W; Hart, B B

    1999-06-01

    A continuous supply of oxygen to all tissues is necessary for the efficient production of ATP, and this supply is considered sufficient when aerobic metabolism is maintained. Nonhealing wounds, necrotizing infections, radiation-induced necrosis, crush injury, decompression illness, and CO poisoning all exhibit impaired tissue oxygenation. The need for efficacy of HBO therapy in such conditions is in part determined by the prevailing state of tissue oxygen supply and demand. The methods currently available or under development for assessing the adequacy of tissue oxygenation include blood gas analysis, transcutaneous oxygen measurement, gastric tonometry, pulse oximetry, near-infrared spectroscopy, functional MR imaging, MR spectroscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance, positron emission tomography, and single photon emission computed tomography. The clinical and experimental applications of these methods are discussed and emphasis is placed on their role in hyperbaric medicine. PMID:10333450

  5. Tissue oxygen measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soller, Babs R. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A device and method in accordance with the invention for determining the oxygen partial pressure (PO.sub.2) of a tissue by irradiating the tissue with optical radiation such that the light is emitted from the tissue, and by collecting the reflected or transmitted light from the tissue to form an optical spectrum. A spectral processor determines the PO.sub.2 level in tissue by processing this spectrum with a previously-constructed spectral calibration model. The tissue may, for example, be disposed underneath a covering tissue, such as skin, of a patient, and the tissue illuminated and light collected through the skin. Alternatively, direct tissue illumination and collection may be effected with a hand-held or endoscopic probe. A preferred system also determines pH from the same spectrum, and the processor may determine critical conditions and issue warnings based on parameter values.

  6. Oxygen Delivering Biomaterials for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Farris, Ashley L.; Rindone, Alexandra N.; Grayson, Warren L.

    2016-01-01

    Tissue engineering (TE) has provided promising strategies for regenerating tissue defects, but few TE approaches have been translated for clinical applications. One major barrier in TE is providing adequate oxygen supply to implanted tissue scaffolds, since oxygen diffusion from surrounding vasculature in vivo is limited to the periphery of the scaffolds. Moreover, oxygen is also an important signaling molecule for controlling stem cell differentiation within TE scaffolds. Various technologies have been developed to increase oxygen delivery in vivo and enhance the effectiveness of TE strategies. Such technologies include hyperbaric oxygen therapy, perfluorocarbon- and hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers, and oxygen-generating, peroxide-based materials. Here, we provide an overview of the underlying mechanisms and how these technologies have been utilized for in vivo TE applications. Emerging technologies and future prospects for oxygen delivery in TE are also discussed to evaluate the progress of this field towards clinical translation. PMID:27453782

  7. Mapping tissue oxygen in vivo by photoacoustic lifetime imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Qi; Morgounova, Ekaterina; Choi, Jeung-Hwan; Jiang, Chunlan; Bischof, John; Ashkenazi, Shai

    2013-03-01

    Oxygen plays a key role in the energy metabolism of living organisms. Any imbalance in the oxygen levels will affect the metabolic homeostasis and lead to pathophysiological diseases. Hypoxia, a status of low tissue oxygen, is a key factor in tumor biology as it is highly prominent in tumor tissues. However, clinical tools for assessing tissue oxygenation are limited. The gold standard is polarographic needle electrode which is invasive and not capable of mapping (imaging) the oxygen content in tissue. We applied the method of photoacoustic lifetime imaging (PALI) of oxygen-sensitive dye to small animal tissue hypoxia research. PALI is new technology for direct, non-invasive imaging of oxygen. The technique is based on mapping the oxygen-dependent transient optical absorption of Methylene Blue (MB) by pump-probe photoacoustic imaging. Our studies show the feasibility of imaging of dissolved oxygen distribution in phantoms. In vivo experiments demonstrate that the hypoxia region is consistent with the site of subcutaneously xenografted prostate tumor in mice with adequate spatial resolution and penetration depth.

  8. Microcirculatory dysfunction and tissue oxygenation in critical illness.

    PubMed

    Østergaard, L; Granfeldt, A; Secher, N; Tietze, A; Iversen, N K; Jensen, M S; Andersen, K K; Nagenthiraja, K; Gutiérrez-Lizardi, P; Mouridsen, K; Jespersen, S N; Tønnesen, E K

    2015-11-01

    Severe sepsis is defined by organ failure, often of the kidneys, heart, and brain. It has been proposed that inadequate delivery of oxygen, or insufficient extraction of oxygen in tissue, may explain organ failure. Despite adequate maintenance of systemic oxygen delivery in septic patients, their morbidity and mortality remain high. The assumption that tissue oxygenation can be preserved by maintaining its blood supply follows from physiological models that only apply to tissue with uniformly perfused capillaries. In sepsis, the microcirculation is profoundly disturbed, and the blood supply of individual organs may therefore no longer reflect their access to oxygen. We review how capillary flow patterns affect oxygen extraction efficacy in tissue, and how the regulation of tissue blood flow must be adjusted to meet the metabolic needs of the tissue as capillary flows become disturbed as observed in critical illness. Using the brain, heart, and kidney as examples, we discuss whether disturbed capillary flow patterns might explain the apparent mismatch between organ blood flow and organ function in sepsis. Finally, we discuss diagnostic means of detecting capillary flow disturbance in animal models and in critically ill patients, and address therapeutic strategies that might improve tissue oxygenation by modifying capillary flow patterns. PMID:26149711

  9. Measuring tissue oxygen saturation using NIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sircan-Kucuksayan, Aslinur; Uyuklu, Mehmet; Canpolat, Murat

    2014-05-01

    Tissue oxygen saturation (StO2) is known quite useful parameter for medical applications. A spectroscopic method has been developed to diagnose pathologic tissues due to lack of normal blood circulation by measuring tissue oxygen saturation. In the study, human blood samples with different level of oxygen saturations have been prepared and spectra were taken using an optical fiber probe to investigate correlation between the oxygen saturations and the spectra. The experimental set up for the spectroscopic measurements was consists of a miniature NIR light spectrometer, an optical fiber probe, a halogen-tungsten light source and a laptop. A linear correlation between the oxygen saturation of the blood samples and the ratio of the light of wavelengths 660 nm to 790 nm has been found from the spectra. Then, oxygen saturations of the blood samples were estimated from the spectroscopic measurements within an error of 2.9%. Furthermore, it has been shown that the linear dependence between the ratio and the oxygen saturation of the blood samples was valid for the blood samples with different hematocrits. Tissue oxygen saturation has been estimated from the spectroscopic measurements were taken from the fingers of healthy volunteers using the correlation between the spectra and blood oxygen saturation. The tissue StO2 measured was 80% as expected. The technique developed to measure tissue oxygen saturation has potential to diagnose premalignant tissues, follow up prognosis of cancerous tissues, and evaluation of ischemia reperfusion tissues.

  10. Factors Affecting Tissue Oxygenation in Erythrocyte Transfusions

    PubMed Central

    Aykut, Güçlü; Yürük, Koray; İnce, Can

    2014-01-01

    Red blood cell transfusions are used to increase the oxygen-carrying capacity of blood in anemic states. But, because of the changes during storage of blood components and the specifics of preparation, erythrocytes may have controversial effects on tissue oxygenation and microcirculation. Also, the patient situation may play a role in the differing responses in oxygenation and microcirculation. In this review, the studies concerning the effects of banked blood and patient characteristics on microcirculation and tissue oxygenation are summarized. PMID:27366403

  11. Differences in breast tissue oxygenation following radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dornfeld, Ken; Gessert, Charles E; Renier, Colleen M; McNaney, David D; Urias, Rodolfo E; Knowles, Denise M; Beauduy, Jean L; Widell, Sherry L; McDonald, Bonita L

    2011-08-01

    Tissue perfusion and oxygenation changes following radiotherapy may result from and/or contribute to the toxicity of treatment. Breast tissue oxygenation levels were determined in the treated and non-treated breast 1 year after radiotherapy for breast conserving treatment. Transcutaneous oxygenation varied between subjects in both treated and non-treated breast. Subjects without diabetes mellitus (n=16) had an average oxygenation level of 64.8 ± 19.9mmHg in the irradiated breast and an average of 72.3 ± 18.1mmHg (p=0.018) at the corresponding location in the control breast. Patients with diabetes (n=4) showed a different oxygenation pattern, with lower oxygenation levels in control tissue and no decrease in the irradiated breast. This study suggests oxygenation levels in normal tissues vary between patients and may respond differently after radiotherapy. PMID:21356563

  12. Oxygen Releasing Biomaterials for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Camci-Unal, Gulden; Alemdar, Neslihan; Annabi, Nasim; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Due to the increasing demand to generate thick and vascularized tissue engineered constructs, novel strategies are currently being developed. An emerging example is the generation of oxygen-releasing biomaterials to tackle mass transport and diffusion limitations within engineered tissue-like constructs. Biomaterials containing oxygen releasing molecules can be fabricated in various forms such as, hybrid thin films, microparticles, or three dimensional (3D) scaffolds. In this perspective, we will summarize various oxygen-releasing reagents and their potential applications in regenerative engineering. Moreover, we will review the main approaches to fabricate oxygen-releasing biomaterials for a range of tissue engineering applications. PMID:23853426

  13. Oxygen distributions within tissue by phosphorescence quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, David F.; Grosul, Pavel; Rozhkov, Vladimir; Dugan, Benjamin W.; Reitveld, Ivo; Vinogradov, Sergei A.

    2002-06-01

    Oxygen dependent quenching of phosphorescence is a powerful method for measuring oxygen. Phosphors are now available that absorb and emit in the near IR region of the spectrum, are nontoxic, and remain in the blood, allowing rapid measure of oxygen through out selected tissue volumes. In vivo measurements are non-invasive except for the need to inject phosphor into the blood, and phosphorescence lifetimes can be measured without interference by tissue pigments that absorb or fluorescence at the measurement wavelengths. Phosphorescence quenching is uniquely useful for: (1) imaging oxygen in optically clear media or in the surface layer of the tissue, such as in the retina of the eye; (2) determining the distribution of oxygen in media, such as tissue, which have heterogeneous distributions by deconvoluting phosphorescence decay dat. These can be used to calculate the corresponding oxygen histograms. Measurement in 2D grids can b used to construct contour maps of the fraction of the sampled tissue volume with any selected range of oxygen pressures. These maps accurately show the location and size of any regions of hypoxia within the sampled tissue.

  14. Large arteriolar component of oxygen delivery implies safe margin of oxygen supply to cerebral tissue

    PubMed Central

    Sakadžić, Sava; Mandeville, Emiri T.; Gagnon, Louis; Musacchia, Joseph J.; Yaseen, Mohammad A.; Yucel, Meryem A; Lefebvre, Joel; Lesage, Frédéric; Dale, Anders M.; Eikermann-Haerter, Katharina; Ayata, Cenk; Srinivasan, Vivek J.; Lo, Eng H.; Devor, Anna; Boas, David A.

    2014-01-01

    What is the organization of cerebral microvascular oxygenation and morphology that allows adequate tissue oxygenation at different activity levels? We address this question in the mouse cerebral cortex using microscopic imaging of intravascular O2 partial pressure and blood flow combined with numerical modeling. Here we show that parenchymal arterioles are responsible for 50% of the extracted O2 at baseline activity and the majority of the remaining O2 exchange takes place within the first few capillary branches. Most capillaries release little O2 at baseline acting as an O2 reserve that is recruited during increased neuronal activity or decreased blood flow. Our results challenge the common perception that capillaries are the major site of O2 delivery to cerebral tissue. The understanding of oxygenation distribution along arterio-capillary paths may have profound implications for the interpretation of BOLD fMRI signal and for evaluating microvascular O2 delivery capacity to support cerebral tissue in disease. PMID:25483924

  15. The flux of oxygen within tissues.

    PubMed

    McCabe, Michael G P; Maguire, David J; Bourgain, Renaat

    2003-01-01

    Diffusive flux of oxygen through tissues which are essentially connective and have few cells, display reduced diffusion coefficients when compared to that through an equivalent lamina of water. In general even significant reductions can be explained in terms of the exclusions imposed on small molecular weight diffusates by the large hydrodynamic domains of the connective tissue components. An alternative way of explaining this large exclusion is to point to the very large microscopic viscosities which large interacting polymers impose upon the solvent (water). By contrast, the diffusive flux of oxygen through tissues composed of contiguously packed and actively respiring cells, shows an increased diffusive flux for oxygen when compared to that through an equivalent water lamina. This increase can be explained in terms of the substantial solubility of oxygen within the membrane phase of the cells. This high oxygen partition coefficient into cell lipids has several consequences. Firstly oxygen diffusion will be directed and two dimensional rather than random and three dimensional. Secondly this diffusion will be directed towards the oxygen-consuming sites which are located at lipid surfaces. Thirdly the aqueous oxygen partial pressure will be kept low (since re-supply is constrained while consumption is continuous). This low aqueous environment permits all of the cell soluble redox systems to be maintained efficiently at low metabolic cost, as well as minimising the risk of unscheduled oxidations. Viewed from this perspective, the high value found for oxygen partition coefficient into the erythrocyte membrane suggests that evolution of membrane structure and components may have been driven in part by the selective advantages of high oxygen solubility. PMID:15174633

  16. Phosphorescent imaging of oxygen gradients in tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, Curtis J.; Kitakis, F.

    1995-08-01

    Until recently, the ability to measure the changing oxygen gradients in perfused tissues in response to metabolic demand, has been limited to point-measurements and/or averaged A-V oxygen differences during perfusion using oxygen electrodes. With the recent introduction of novel phosphorescent probes specifically quenched by oxygen, the ability to spacially map oxygen gradients in real-time may offer new insights into the dynamics of microvascular design and supply. Accordingly, this paper provides initial image data on Langendorff perfused rat hearts wherein the relative change in phosphorescent intensity of Pd-meso-tetra(4- carboxyphenyl)phorphine (2micrometers ) as the reporter probe, is quantitatively related to spacial oxygen gradients as seen on the left-ventricle during changing gassing conditions. Digital image analysis (frame advance), after proper calibration and alignment, provides images which can be usefully interpreted. Clinical applications of such emerging technologies could have wide-spread diagnostic applications not only as applied to the coronary bed, but other tissue surfaces displaying various degrees of aschemia and/or hypoxia.

  17. Metabolic Prosthesis for Oxygenation of Ischemic Tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, Elias

    2009-01-01

    This communication discloses new ideas and preliminary results on the development of a "metabolic prosthesis" for local oxygenation of ischemic tissue under physiological neutral conditions. We report for the first time the selective electrolysis of physiological saline by repetitively pulsed charge-limited electrolysis for the production of oxygen and suppression of free chlorine. For example, using 800 A amplitude current pulses and <200 sec pulse durations, we demonstrated prompt oxygen production and delayed chlorine production at the surface of a shiny 0.85 mm diameter spherical platinum electrode. The data, interpreted in terms of the ionic structure of the electric double layer, suggest a strategy for in situ production of metabolic oxygen via a new class of "smart" prosthetic implants for dealing with ischemic disease such as diabetic retinopathy. We also present data indicating that drift of the local pH of the oxygenated environment can be held constant using a feedback-controlled three electrode electrolysis system that chooses anode and cathode pair based on pH data provided by local microsensors. The work is discussed in the context of diabetic retinopathy since surgical techniques for multielectrode prosthetic implants aimed at retinal degenerative diseases have been developed.

  18. Measuring tissue oxygen tension: a review.

    PubMed

    Sheffield, P J

    1998-01-01

    Because of technological advances in tissue oximetry, clinicians and scientists have a better understanding of the role of oxygen in wound healing. In wound care and hyperbaric medicine applications, an oximeter is principally used with vascular assessment to help determine amputation level and to estimate healing potential. With the current emphasis on cost savings in the managed care setting, transcutaneous oximetry (PtcO2) has gained importance as a tool for predicting potential candidates for hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) therapy. It is used to identify the presence of hypoxia in wounded tissue, to predict the responders to hyperoxia and in some instances to determine when HBO2 treatment is complete. This literature review describes the principal current methods for measuring tissue O2 and the values obtained in normal and wounded tissue under both normobaric and hyperbaric conditions. The review includes the Jefferson C. Davis Wound Care and Hyperbaric Medicine Center protocol for PtcO2 assessment of potential HBO2 candidates and suggestions for obtaining reproducible PtcO2 data. PMID:9789339

  19. Precise ablation of dental hard tissues with ultra-short pulsed lasers. Preliminary exploratory investigation on adequate laser parameters.

    PubMed

    Bello-Silva, Marina Stella; Wehner, Martin; Eduardo, Carlos de Paula; Lampert, Friedrich; Poprawe, Reinhart; Hermans, Martin; Esteves-Oliveira, Marcella

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the possibility of introducing ultra-short pulsed lasers (USPL) in restorative dentistry by maintaining the well-known benefits of lasers for caries removal, but also overcoming disadvantages, such as thermal damage of irradiated substrate. USPL ablation of dental hard tissues was investigated in two phases. Phase 1--different wavelengths (355, 532, 1,045, and 1,064 nm), pulse durations (picoseconds and femtoseconds) and irradiation parameters (scanning speed, output power, and pulse repetition rate) were assessed for enamel and dentin. Ablation rate was determined, and the temperature increase measured in real time. Phase 2--the most favorable laser parameters were evaluated to correlate temperature increase to ablation rate and ablation efficiency. The influence of cooling methods (air, air-water spray) on ablation process was further analyzed. All parameters tested provided precise and selective tissue ablation. For all lasers, faster scanning speeds resulted in better interaction and reduced temperature increase. The most adequate results were observed for the 1064-nm ps-laser and the 1045-nm fs-laser. Forced cooling caused moderate changes in temperature increase, but reduced ablation, being considered unnecessary during irradiation with USPL. For dentin, the correlation between temperature increase and ablation efficiency was satisfactory for both pulse durations, while for enamel, the best correlation was observed for fs-laser, independently of the power used. USPL may be suitable for cavity preparation in dentin and enamel, since effective ablation and low temperature increase were observed. If adequate laser parameters are selected, this technique seems to be promising for promoting the laser-assisted, minimally invasive approach. PMID:22565342

  20. Quantitative Cherenkov emission spectroscopy for tissue oxygenation assessment

    PubMed Central

    Axelsson, Johan; Glaser, Adam K.; Gladstone, David J.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of Cherenkov emission in tissue during radiation therapy are shown to enable estimation of hemoglobin oxygen saturation non-invasively, through spectral fitting of the spontaneous emissions from the treated tissue. Tissue oxygenation plays a critical role in the efficacy of radiation therapy to kill tumor tissue. Yet in-vivo measurement of this has remained elusive in routine use because of the complexity of oxygen measurement techniques. There is a spectrally broad emission of Cherenkov light that is induced during the time of irradiation, and as this travels through tissue from the point of the radiation deposition, the tissue absorption and scatter impart spectral changes. These changes can be quantified by diffuse spectral fitting of the signal. Thus Cherenkov emission spectroscopy is demonstrated for the first time quantitatively in vitro and qualitatively in vivo, and has potential for real-time online tracking of tissue oxygen during radiation therapy when fully characterized and developed. PMID:22418319

  1. Photoacoustic lifetime imaging for direct in vivo tissue oxygen monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Qi; Ashkenazi, Shai

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Measuring the partial pressure of oxygen (pO2) in tissue may provide physicians with essential information about the physiological state of tissue. However, currently available methods for measuring or imaging tissue pO2 have significant limitations, preventing them from being widely used in clinics. Recently, we have reported a direct and noninvasive in vivo imaging modality based on the photoacoustic lifetime which overcomes certain drawbacks of the existing methods. The technique maps the excited triplet state of oxygen-sensitive dye, thus reflecting the spatial and temporal distributions of tissue oxygen. Here, we present two studies which apply photoacoustic lifetime imaging (PALI) to monitor changes of tissue oxygen induced by external modulations. The first study modulates tissue oxygen by controlling the percentage of oxygen a normal mouse inhales. We demonstrate that PALI is able to reflect the change in oxygen level with respect to normal, oxygen-rich, and oxygen-poor breathing conditions. The second study involves an acute ischemia model using a thin thread tied around the hindlimb of a normal mouse to reduce the blood flow. PALI images were acquired before, during, and after the restriction. The drop of tissue pO2 and recovery from hypoxia due to reperfusion were tracked and observed by PALI. PMID:25748857

  2. Photoacoustic lifetime imaging for direct in vivo tissue oxygen monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Qi; Ashkenazi, Shai

    2015-03-01

    Measuring the partial pressure of oxygen (pO2) in tissue may provide physicians with essential information about the physiological state of tissue. However, currently available methods for measuring or imaging tissue pO2 have significant limitations, preventing them from being widely used in clinics. Recently, we have reported a direct and noninvasive in vivo imaging modality based on the photoacoustic lifetime which overcomes certain drawbacks of the existing methods. The technique maps the excited triplet state of oxygen-sensitive dye, thus reflecting the spatial and temporal distributions of tissue oxygen. Here, we present two studies which apply photoacoustic lifetime imaging (PALI) to monitor changes of tissue oxygen induced by external modulations. The first study modulates tissue oxygen by controlling the percentage of oxygen a normal mouse inhales. We demonstrate that PALI is able to reflect the change in oxygen level with respect to normal, oxygen-rich, and oxygen-poor breathing conditions. The second study involves an acute ischemia model using a thin thread tied around the hindlimb of a normal mouse to reduce the blood flow. PALI images were acquired before, during, and after the restriction. The drop of tissue pO2 and recovery from hypoxia due to reperfusion were tracked and observed by PALI.

  3. MRI of brain tissue oxygen tension under hyperbaric conditions.

    PubMed

    Muir, Eric R; Cardenas, Damon P; Duong, Timothy Q

    2016-06-01

    The brain depends on a continuous supply of oxygen to maintain its structural and functional integrity. This study measured T1 from MRI under normobaric air, normobaric oxygen, hyperbaric air, and hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) conditions as a marker of tissue pO2 since dissolved molecular oxygen acts as an endogenous contrast agent. Brain tissue T1 decreased corresponding to increased pO2 with increasing inhaled oxygen concentrations, and tissue oxygenation was estimated from the T1 changes between different inhaled oxygen levels. Tissue pO2 difference maps between different oxygen conditions showed heterogeneous pO2 changes in the brain. MRI-derived tissue pO2 was markedly lower than the arterial pO2 but was slightly higher than venous pO2. Additionally, for comparison with published extracellular tissue pO2 data obtained using oxygen electrodes and other invasive techniques, a model was used to estimate extracellular and intracellular pO2 from the MRI-derived mean tissue pO2. This required multiple assumptions, and so the effects of the assumptions and parameters used in modeling brain pO2 were evaluated. MRI-derived pO2 values were strongly dependent on assumptions about the extra- and intracellular compartments but were relatively less sensitive to variations in the relaxivity constant of oxygen and contribution from oxygen in the cerebral blood compartment. This approach may prove useful in evaluating tissue oxygenation in disease states such as stroke. PMID:27033683

  4. In Vivo Chemiluminescent Imaging Agents for Nitroreductase and Tissue Oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jian; Campbell, James; Liu, Li; Mason, Ralph P; Lippert, Alexander R

    2016-05-01

    Tissue oxygenation is a driving parameter of the tumor microenvironment, and hypoxia can be a prognostic indicator of aggressiveness, metastasis, and poor response to therapy. Here, we report a chemiluminescence imaging (CLI) agent based on the oxygen-dependent reduction of a nitroaromatic spiroadamantane 1,2-dioxetane scaffold. Hypoxia ChemiLuminescent Probe 2 (HyCL-2) responds to nitroreductase with ∼170-fold increase in luminescence intensity and high selectivity for enzymatic reductase versus other small molecule reductants. HyCL-2 can image exogenous nitroreductase in vitro and in vivo in living mice, and total luminescent intensity is increased by ∼5-fold under low oxygen conditions. HyCL-2 is demonstrated to report on tumor oxygenation during an oxygen challenge in H1299 lung tumor xenografts grown in a murine model as independently confirmed using multispectral optoacoustic tomography (MSOT) imaging of hemoglobin oxygenation. PMID:27054463

  5. Assessment of global tissue perfusion and oxygenation in neonates and infants after open-heart surgery†

    PubMed Central

    Gergely, Mihály; Ablonczy, László; Székely, Edgár A.; Sápi, Erzsébet; Gál, János; Szatmári, András; Székely, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Monitoring and preserving adequate perfusion and oxygen balance is a primary objective of critical care. This prospective observational study aimed to assess the relationship between global haemodynamic parameters and variables reflecting tissue oxygenation during the early period following corrective cardiac surgery in neonates and infants. The postoperative time course of oxygen delivery and consumption was evaluated. As surrogate markers of oxygen balance, the central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2) and venoarterial PCO2 difference (PvaCO2) were thoroughly investigated. METHODS Thirteen children <1 year of age who underwent open-heart surgery were prospectively enrolled. In addition to conventional postoperative monitoring, transpulmonary thermodilution (TPTD) was used to monitor cardiac output and calculate oxygen delivery and consumption. In parallel with each TPTD measurement, arterial and central venous blood gas values were recorded. Global haemodynamic parameters and oxygenation measurements were compared with weighted linear regression statistics and Pearson's correlation coefficient. RESULTS Data from 145 TPTD measurements and 304 blood gas samples were recorded. The early postoperative period was characterized by a supply-dependent oxygen consumption, as demonstrated by the direct correlation between the change in oxygen delivery and consumption (r = 0.62, P < 0.001). Regarding haemodynamic parameters, none of the heart rate, mean arterial pressure or cardiac index correlated with the measured ScvO2. However, the ScvO2 and PvaCO2 were found to correlate significantly (r = −0.49, P < 0.001), and both strongly related to oxygen extraction. CONCLUSIONS Both the ScvO2 and PvaCO2 are reliable and comparable parameters in following tissue oxygen balance during the early postoperative course after open-heart surgery in neonates and infants. As part of multiparameter monitoring, our data highlight the importance of regular ScvO2 measurements and

  6. Effect of normobaric hyperoxic therapy on tissue oxygenation in diabetic feet: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Moon, Kyung-Chul; Han, Seung-Kyu; Lee, Ye-Na; Jeong, Seong-Ho; Dhong, Eun-Sang; Kim, Woo-Kyung

    2014-11-01

    Adequate tissue oxygenation is an essential factor in diabetic foot management. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy has been successfully used as adjunctive treatment to improve the healing of diabetic foot ulcers. However, the clinical uses of HBO therapy are limited due to the low availability of HBO chambers, poor patient compliance, and high oxidative potential. Normobaric hyperoxic (NBO) therapy may be a potentially attractive alternative to HBO therapy because of its high availability, good patient compliance, and few technical requirements. Several studies on NBO therapy to attenuate infarct volume after stroke have provided compelling evidence. However, there have been no reports regarding the effect of NBO therapy in the field of wound healing. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of NBO therapy on tissue oxygenation of diabetic feet. This study included 100 patients with diabetic foot ulcers (64 males and 36 females). Transcutaneous partial oxygen tension (TcPO₂) values of diabetic feet were measured before, during, and after NBO therapy. The mean TcPO₂ values before, during, and after therapy were 46.6 ± 21.5, 88.9 ± 48.0, and 49.9 ± 23.8 mmHg (p < 0.001), respectively. The lower the initial TcPO₂ level, the more TcPO₂ increased. The results reveal that NBO therapy significantly increases the tissue oxygenation level of diabetic feet. PMID:25086687

  7. Zinc content of selected tissues and taste perception in rats fed zinc deficient and zinc adequate rations

    SciTech Connect

    Boeckner, L.S.; Kies, C.

    1986-03-05

    The objective of the study was to determine the effects of feeding zinc sufficient and zinc deficient rations on taste sensitivity and zinc contents of selected organs in rats. The 36 Sprague-Dawley male weanling rats were divided into 2 groups and fed zinc deficient or zinc adequate rations. The animals were subjected to 4 trial periods in which a choice of deionized distilled water or a solution of quinine sulfate at 1.28 x 10/sup -6/ was given. A randomized schedule for rat sacrifice was used. No differences were found between zinc deficient and zinc adequate rats in taste preference aversion scores for quinine sulfate in the first three trial periods; however, in the last trial period rats in the zinc sufficient group drank somewhat less water containing quinine sulfate as a percentage of total water consumption than did rats fed the zinc deficient ration. Significantly higher zinc contents of kidney, brain and parotid salivary glands were seen in zinc adequate rats compared to zinc deficient rats at the end of the study. However, liver and tongue zinc levels were lower for both groups at the close of the study than were those of rats sacrificed at the beginning of the study.

  8. Luminescence lifetime determination for oxygen imaging in human tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lochmann, C.; Häupl, T.; Beuthan, J.

    2008-02-01

    Imaging and monitoring of biochemical parameters in vitro and in vivo have become the goal of many investigations in medical physics. The main imaging technique used is laser-induced luminescence due to its cost effectiveness and diversity of applications [1]. One key parameter in medical investigations, for instance to control photodynamic therapy, is the molecular oxygen concentration. The use of optical methods provides possible means of measuring molecular oxygen. The basis of such a method is the measurement of the luminescence lifetime of a dye which is quenched by molecular oxygen. The molecular oxygen concentration can be monitored two-dimensionally by pixel-wise determination of the luminescence lifetime with a CCD-camera. An oxygen imaging system based on this principle was built and tested with a commercially available oxygen sensitive sol gel-layer. The embedded ruthenium complex is quenched by molecular oxygen and because of the oxygen permeability of the layer; it is suitable for oxygen measurements. The characteristics and dependence on the pH-value and temperature of the luminescence lifetime of the layer were examined in preparation for measurements on tissue to exclude cross-correlation of other quenching processes.

  9. [Current views on oxygen transport from blood to tissues].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, K P

    2001-01-01

    During the recent 25-30 years, sophisticated experiments and mathematical simulation significantly changed the generally accepted theory of oxygen transport in tissue, which was based on two major postulates, namely: 1) Blood flows in capillaries continuously at uniform velocity, 2) Gas circulation between blood and tissue takes place exclusively in capillaries. As was shown by modern research techniques, blood flow in microvessels has irregular sharp velocity fluctuations in very short time intervals (seconds). In addition, mean velocity of blood flow in microvessels of the same caliber and the same micro-region of tissue may differ several times. Therefore, efficiency of microcirculation reactions may be assessed exclusively witH mean blood velocity in capillaries of the whole micro-region, and with complicated changes of the histogram of mean velocity distribution in capillaries. It was shown that arteriolas and venulas of inactive muscles and brain account for 30 to 50% of gas circulation between blood and tissue. This resulted in fundamental change of the previous postulates in the area of tissue gas circulation physiology, and, in effect, in replacement of oxygen transport paradigm created by A. Krog. This study is an attempt to present a new modern concept of oxygen transport in tissue, to show its research significance, and possible applications. PMID:11764645

  10. Algorithm for mapping cutaneous tissue oxygen concentration using hyperspectral imaging

    PubMed Central

    Miclos, Sorin; Parasca, Sorin Viorel; Calin, Mihaela Antonina; Savastru, Dan; Manea, Dragos

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of tissue oxygenation plays an important role in the diagnosis and therapeutic assessment of a large variety of diseases. Many different methods have been developed and are currently applied in clinical practice for the measurement of tissue oxygenation. Unfortunately, each of these methods has its own limitations. In this paper we proposed the use of hyperspectral imaging as new method for the assessment of the tissue oxygenation level. To extract this information from hyperspectral images a new algorithm for mapping cutaneous tissue oxygen concentration was developed. This algorithm takes into account and solves some problems related to setting and calculation of some parameters derived from hyperspectral images. The algorithm was tested with good results on synthetic images and then validated on the fingers of a hand with different blood irrigation states. The results obtained have proved the ability of hyperspectral imaging together with the developed algorithm to map the oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin distribution on the analyzed fingers. These are only preliminary results and other studies should be done before this approach to be used in the clinical setting for the diagnosis and monitoring of various diseases. PMID:26417511

  11. Simultaneous sampling of tissue oxygenation and oxygen consumption in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Nugent, William H; Song, Bjorn K; Pittman, Roland N; Golub, Aleksander S

    2016-05-01

    Under physiologic conditions, microvascular oxygen delivery appears to be well matched to oxygen consumption in respiring tissues. We present a technique to measure interstitial oxygen tension (PISFO2) and oxygen consumption (VO2) under steady-state conditions, as well as during the transitions from rest to activity and back. Phosphorescence Quenching Microscopy (PQM) was employed with pneumatic compression cycling to achieve 1 to 10Hz sampling rates of interstitial PO2 and simultaneous recurrent sampling of VO2 (3/min) in the exteriorized rat spinotrapezius muscle. The compression pressure was optimized to 120-130mmHg without adverse effect on the tissue preparation. A cycle of 5s compression followed by 15s recovery yielded a resting VO2 of 0.98±0.03ml O2/100cm(3)min while preserving microvascular oxygen delivery. The measurement system was then used to assess VO2 dependence on PISFO2 at rest and further tested under conditions of isometric muscle contraction to demonstrate a robust ability to monitor the on-kinetics of tissue respiration and the compensatory changes in PISFO2 during contraction and recovery. The temporal and spatial resolution of this approach is well suited to studies seeking to characterize microvascular oxygen supply and demand in thin tissues. PMID:26683232

  12. Study of tissue oxygen supply rate in a macroscopic photodynamic therapy singlet oxygen model

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Timothy C.; Liu, Baochang; Penjweini, Rozhin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. An appropriate expression for the oxygen supply rate (Γs) is required for the macroscopic modeling of the complex mechanisms of photodynamic therapy (PDT). It is unrealistic to model the actual heterogeneous tumor microvascular networks coupled with the PDT processes because of the large computational requirement. In this study, a theoretical microscopic model based on uniformly distributed Krogh cylinders is used to calculate Γs=g (1−[O32]/[O32]0) that can replace the complex modeling of blood vasculature while maintaining a reasonable resemblance to reality; g is the maximum oxygen supply rate and [O32]/[O32]0 is the volume-average tissue oxygen concentration normalized to its value prior to PDT. The model incorporates kinetic equations of oxygen diffusion and convection within capillaries and oxygen saturation from oxyhemoglobin. Oxygen supply to the tissue is via diffusion from the uniformly distributed blood vessels. Oxygen can also diffuse along the radius and the longitudinal axis of the cylinder within tissue. The relations of Γs to [3O2]/[3O2]0 are examined for a biologically reasonable range of the physiological parameters for the microvasculature and several light fluence rates (ϕ). The results show a linear relationship between Γs and [3O2]/[3O2]0, independent of ϕ and photochemical parameters; the obtained g ranges from 0.4 to 1390  μM/s. PMID:25741665

  13. Biomedical application of laser-induced tissue oxygenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asimov, M. M.

    2007-03-01

    Concentration of oxygen in tissue plays an important role in enhancing in vivo wide variety of biochemical reactions including cell metabolism. Aerobic cell metabolism is primary mechanism in energy production in tissue. Controlling this mechanism gives unique possibility of biological stimulation to reach therapeutic effect. This goal could be reached by laser-induced photodissociation of oxyhemoglobin in cutaneous blood vessels. This phenomenon is considered as a main mechanism of biostimulating and therapeutic effect of low energy laser radiation. Laser-induced photodissociation of oxyhemoglobin in vivo manifests itself through the changes of the value of arterial blood saturation before and during the laser irradiation. High sensitive pulse oxymeter could be used for the measurements of the level of arterial blood saturation. Unique possibility is reached in local increase the concentration of oxygen by additional releasing it into tissue. Laser-induced enrichment of tissue oxygenation stimulates of cell metabolism and allows develop new effective methods for laser therapy as well as phototherapy of pathologies where elimination of local tissue hypoxia is critical.

  14. Tissue oxygen saturation mapping with magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Christen, Thomas; Bouzat, Pierre; Pannetier, Nicolas; Coquery, Nicolas; Moisan, Anaïck; Lemasson, Benjamin; Thomas, Sébastien; Grillon, Emmanuelle; Detante, Olivier; Rémy, Chantal; Payen, Jean-François; Barbier, Emmanuel Luc

    2014-01-01

    A quantitative estimate of cerebral blood oxygen saturation is of critical importance in the investigation of cerebrovascular disease. While positron emission tomography can map in vivo the oxygen level in blood, it has limited availability and requires ionizing radiation. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers an alternative through the blood oxygen level-dependent contrast. Here, we describe an in vivo and non-invasive approach to map brain tissue oxygen saturation (StO2) with high spatial resolution. StO2 obtained with MRI correlated well with results from blood gas analyses for various oxygen and hematocrit challenges. In a stroke model, the hypoxic areas delineated in vivo by MRI spatially matched those observed ex vivo by pimonidazole staining. In a model of diffuse traumatic brain injury, MRI was able to detect even a reduction in StO2 that was too small to be detected by histology. In a F98 glioma model, MRI was able to map oxygenation heterogeneity. Thus, the MRI technique may improve our understanding of the pathophysiology of several brain diseases involving impaired oxygenation. PMID:25005878

  15. Oxygen diffusion in marine-derived tissue engineering scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Boccardi, E; Belova, I V; Murch, G E; Boccaccini, A R; Fiedler, T

    2015-06-01

    This paper addresses the computation of the effective diffusivity in new bioactive glass (BG) based tissue engineering scaffolds. High diffusivities facilitate the supply of oxygen and nutrients to grown tissue as well as the rapid disposal of toxic waste products. The present study addresses required novel types of bone tissue engineering BG scaffolds that are derived from natural marine sponges. Using the foam replication method, the scaffold geometry is defined by the porous structure of Spongia Agaricina and Spongia Lamella. These sponges present the advantage of attaining scaffolds with higher mechanical properties (2-4 MPa) due to a decrease in porosity (68-76%). The effective diffusivities of these structures are compared with that of conventional scaffolds based on polyurethane (PU) foam templates, characterised by high porosity (>90%) and lower mechanical properties (>0.05 MPa). Both the spatial and directional variations of diffusivity are investigated. Furthermore, the effect of scaffold decomposition due to immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) on the diffusivity is addressed. Scaffolds based on natural marine sponges are characterised by lower oxygen diffusivity due to their lower porosity compared with the PU replica foams, which should enable the best oxygen supply to newly formed bone according the numerical results. The oxygen diffusivity of these new BG scaffolds increases over time as a consequence of the degradation in SBF. PMID:26111951

  16. Monitoring microvascular free flaps with tissue oxygen measurement and PET.

    PubMed

    Schrey, Aleksi R; Kinnunen, Ilpo A J; Grénman, Reidar A; Minn, Heikki R I; Aitasalo, Kalle M J

    2008-07-01

    Tissue oxygen measurement and positron emission tomography (PET) were evaluated as methods for predicting ischemia in microvascular free flaps of the head and neck. Ten patients with head and neck squamous cell cancer underwent resection of the tumour followed by microvascular reconstruction with a free flap. Tissue oxygenation of the flap (P(ti)O(2)) was continuously monitored for three postoperative (POP) days and the blood flow of the flap was assessed using oxygen-15 labelled water and PET. In three free flaps a perfusion problem was suspected due to a remarkable drop in P(ti)O(2)-values, due to two anastomosis problems and due to POP turgor. No flap losses occurred. During the blood flow measurements with PET [mean 8.5 mL 100 g(-1) min(-1 )(SD 2.5)], the mean P(ti)O(2) of the flaps [46.8 mmHg (SD 17.0)] appeared to correlate with each other in each patient (p<0.05, n=10). Tissue oxygenation measurement is a feasible monitoring system of free flaps. The perfusion-study with PET correlates with P(ti)O(2)-measurement. PMID:18231800

  17. Reactive Oxygen Species in Inflammation and Tissue Injury

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Manish; Siddiqui, Mohammad Rizwan; Tran, Khiem; Reddy, Sekhar P.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are key signaling molecules that play an important role in the progression of inflammatory disorders. An enhanced ROS generation by polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) at the site of inflammation causes endothelial dysfunction and tissue injury. The vascular endothelium plays an important role in passage of macromolecules and inflammatory cells from the blood to tissue. Under the inflammatory conditions, oxidative stress produced by PMNs leads to the opening of inter-endothelial junctions and promotes the migration of inflammatory cells across the endothelial barrier. The migrated inflammatory cells not only help in the clearance of pathogens and foreign particles but also lead to tissue injury. The current review compiles the past and current research in the area of inflammation with particular emphasis on oxidative stress-mediated signaling mechanisms that are involved in inflammation and tissue injury. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1126–1167. PMID:23991888

  18. Cerebral tissue oxygenation impairment during experimental cerebral malaria

    PubMed Central

    Cabrales, Pedro; Martins, Yuri C; Ong, Peng Kai; Zanini, Graziela M; Frangos, John A; Carvalho, Leonardo JM

    2013-01-01

    Ischemia and hypoxia have been implicated in cerebral malaria (CM) pathogenesis, although direct measurements of hypoxia have not been conducted. C57BL/6 mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA) develop a neurological syndrome known as experimental cerebral malaria (ECM), whereas BALB/c mice are resistant to ECM. In this study, intravital microscopy methods were used to quantify hemodynamic changes, vascular/tissue oxygen (O2) tension (PO2), and perivascular pH in vivo in ECM and non-ECM models, employing a closed cranial window model. ECM mice on day 6 of infection showed marked decreases in pial blood flow, vascular (arteriolar, venular), and perivascular PO2, perivascular pH, and systemic hemoglobin levels. Changes were more dramatic in mice with late-stage ECM compared with mice with early-stage ECM. These changes led to drastic decreases in O2 delivery to the brain tissue. In addition, ECM animals required a greater PO2 gradient to extract the same amount of O2 compared with non-infected animals, as the pial tissues extract O2 from the steepest portion of the blood O2 equilibrium curve. ECM animals also showed increased leukocyte adherence in postcapillary venules, and the intensity of adhesion was inversely correlated with blood flow and O2 extraction. PbA-infected BALB/c mice displayed no neurological signs on day 6 and while they did show changes similar to those observed in C57BL/6 mice (decreased pial blood flow, vascular/tissue PO2, perivascular pH, hemoglobin levels), non-ECM animals preserved superior perfusion and oxygenation compared with ECM animals at similar anemia and parasitemia levels, resulting in better O2 delivery and O2 extraction by the brain tissue. In conclusion, direct quantitative assessment of pial hemodynamics and oxygenation in vivo revealed that ECM is associated with severe progressive brain tissue hypoxia and acidosis. PMID:24128424

  19. Tissue oxygen tension in the cerebral cortex of the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Fennema, M; Wessel, J N; Faithful, N S; Erdmann, W

    1989-01-01

    Polarographic techniques were employed to measure oxygen partial pressure using 10 micron glass-protected gold microelectrodes. When inserting the electrode into the cortex, a PO2-profile is produced. The average PO2 was about 9 mm Hg. Nearly all measurements were below 25 mm Hg and measurements above 50 mm Hg were rare. When the FiO2 was increased from 0.3 to 1.0, tissue PO2 increased, then gradually decreased. This is probably due to vasoconstriction of pre-capillary sphincters. Acute hypoxia showed the opposite effect, but the autoregulation does not seem to be so effective. When CO2 was added to the inspiratory gas mixture the PO2 increased and showed little tendency to return to normal values. This increase in PO2 is due to the direct effect of CO2 and H+ on the blood vessels, causing vasodilation, and therefore an increase in blood flow and tissue oxygenation. PMID:2506739

  20. [Reactive oxygen species and fibrosis in tissues and organs - review].

    PubMed

    Meng, Juan-Xia; Zhao, Ming-Feng

    2012-10-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a kind of molecules derived by oxygen in the metabolic process of aerobic cells, which mainly includes superoxide, hydroxyl radicals, alkoxyl, hydrogen peroxide, hypochlorous acid, ozone, etc. They can destroy the structure and function of cells through the damage of biological macromolecules such as DNA, proteins and the lipid peroxidation. ROS also can regulate the proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis of cells through several signaling pathways and participate in fibrogenesis of many organs including hepatic and pulmonary fibrosis. Recent study shows that ROS might have an important effect on the forming of myelofibrosis. Consequently, ROS plays a significant role in the fibrogenesis of tissues and organs. In this review, the relevance between ROS and common tissues and organs fibrosis is summarized. PMID:23114165

  1. Photothermal imaging bundle system for estimating tissue oxygen saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milstein, Yonat; Allon, Dror M.; Harrington, James; Bledt, Carlos; Gannot, Israel

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to validate a method for the measurement of tissue oxygen saturation level via a thermal imaging bundle in-vitro and in-vivo. The method consists of a thermal imaging system and an algorithm which estimates the compound concentration according to the temperature rise of the tissue. A temperature rise is obtained by illuminating the tissue in the NIR range and is measured using a thermal camera and a coherent thermal imaging bundle for non-invasive transendoscopic use. The system was validated using agar phantoms of varying concentrations of Methylene Blue and ICG as well as blood samples. The algorithm estimated the Methylene Blue relative amount and the results were compared to the real relative amount. The calculated RMS of the error was 5.12%, a satisfying value for this stage. In the blood samples, for oxygenation levels higher than 50% the RMS of the error was 5.79%. Once the system was verified a portable system was built for clinical use, this system was also evaluated on agar phantoms and the RMS of the error was 10.64%. As a result of the encouraging experiments in-vivo, animal trials were performed. The oxygenation levels of mice were decreased and were estimated respectively using our system. The system determined a small decrease in the tissue oxygen saturation of the mice. These results verify the algorithm's and bundle's suitability for the use in a non-invasive system. They provide motivation for performing more complex in-vitro experiments and moving on to clinical trials.

  2. Tissue oxygen saturation during hyperthermic progressive central hypovolemia.

    PubMed

    Schlader, Zachary J; Rivas, Eric; Soller, Babs R; Convertino, Victor A; Crandall, Craig G

    2014-09-15

    During normothermia, a reduction in near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)-derived tissue oxygen saturation (So2) is an indicator of central hypovolemia. Hyperthermia increases skin blood flow and reduces tolerance to central hypovolemia, both of which may alter the interpretation of tissue So2 during central hypovolemia. This study tested the hypothesis that maximal reductions in tissue So2 would be similar throughout normothermic and hyperthermic central hypovolemia to presyncope. Ten healthy males (means ± SD; 32 ± 5 yr) underwent central hypovolemia via progressive lower-body negative pressure (LBNP) to presyncope during normothermia (skin temperature ≈34°C) and hyperthermia (+1.2 ± 0.1°C increase in internal temperature via a water-perfused suit, skin temperature ≈39°C). NIRS-derived forearm (flexor digitorum profundus) tissue So2 was measured throughout and analyzed as the absolute change from pre-LBNP. Hyperthermia reduced (P < 0.001) LBNP tolerance by 49 ± 33% (from 16.7 ± 7.9 to 7.2 ± 3.9 min). Pre-LBNP, tissue So2 was similar (P = 0.654) between normothermia (74 ± 5%) and hyperthermia (73 ± 7%). Tissue So2 decreased (P < 0.001) throughout LBNP, but the reduction from pre-LBNP to presyncope was greater during normothermia (-10 ± 6%) than during hyperthermia (-6 ± 5%; P = 0.041). Contrary to our hypothesis, these findings indicate that hyperthermia is associated with a smaller maximal reduction in tissue So2 during central hypovolemia to presyncope. PMID:25031230

  3. A unique mode of tissue oxygenation and the adaptive radiation of teleost fishes.

    PubMed

    Randall, D J; Rummer, J L; Wilson, J M; Wang, S; Brauner, C J

    2014-04-15

    Teleost fishes constitute 95% of extant aquatic vertebrates, and we suggest that this is related in part to their unique mode of tissue oxygenation. We propose the following sequence of events in the evolution of their oxygen delivery system. First, loss of plasma-accessible carbonic anhydrase (CA) in the gill and venous circulations slowed the Jacobs-Stewart cycle and the transfer of acid between the plasma and the red blood cells (RBCs). This ameliorated the effects of a generalised acidosis (associated with an increased capacity for burst swimming) on haemoglobin (Hb)-O2 binding. Because RBC pH was uncoupled from plasma pH, the importance of Hb as a buffer was reduced. The decrease in buffering was mediated by a reduction in the number of histidine residues on the Hb molecule and resulted in enhanced coupling of O2 and CO2 transfer through the RBCs. In the absence of plasma CA, nearly all plasma bicarbonate ultimately dehydrated to CO2 occurred via the RBCs, and chloride/bicarbonate exchange was the rate-limiting step in CO2 excretion. This pattern of CO2 excretion across the gills resulted in disequilibrium states for CO2 hydration/dehydration reactions and thus elevated arterial and venous plasma bicarbonate levels. Plasma-accessible CA embedded in arterial endothelia was retained, which eliminated the localized bicarbonate disequilibrium forming CO2 that then moved into the RBCs. Consequently, RBC pH decreased which, in conjunction with pH-sensitive Bohr/Root Hbs, elevated arterial oxygen tensions and thus enhanced tissue oxygenation. Counter-current arrangement of capillaries (retia) at the eye and later the swim bladder evolved along with the gas gland at the swim bladder. Both arrangements enhanced and magnified CO2 and acid production and, therefore, oxygen secretion to those specialised tissues. The evolution of β-adrenergically stimulated RBC Na(+)/H(+) exchange protected gill O2 uptake during stress and further augmented plasma disequilibrium states

  4. Algorithms for muscle oxygenation monitoring corrected for adipose tissue thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraskin, Dmitri; Platen, Petra; Franke, Julia; Kohl-Bareis, Matthias

    2007-07-01

    The measurement of skeletal muscle oxygenation by NIRS methods is obstructed by the subcutaneous adipose tissue which might vary between < 1 mm to more than 12 mm in thickness. A new algorithm is developed to minimize the large scattering effect of this lipid layer on the calculation of muscle haemoglobin / myoglobin concentrations. First, we demonstrate by comparison with ultrasound imaging that the optical lipid signal peaking at 930 nm is a good predictor of the adipose tissue thickness (ATT). Second, the algorithm is based on measurements of the wavelength dependence of the slope ΔA/Δρ of attenuation A with respect to source detector distance ρ and Monte Carlo simulations which estimate the muscle absorption coefficient based on this slope and the additional information of the ATT. Third, we illustrate the influence of the wavelength dependent transport scattering coefficient of the new algorithm by using the solution of the diffusion equation for a two-layered turbid medium. This method is tested on experimental data measured on the vastus lateralis muscle of volunteers during an incremental cycling exercise under normal and hypoxic conditions (corresponding to 0, 2000 and 4000 m altitude). The experimental setup uses broad band detection between 700 and 1000 nm at six source-detector distances. We demonstrate that the description of the experimental data as judged by the residual spectrum is significantly improved and the calculated changes in oxygen saturation are markedly different when the ATT correction is included.

  5. Hemodynamics and tissue oxygenation during balanced anesthesia with a high antinociceptive contribution: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In particular surgical conditions, a balanced anesthesia with a high-antinociceptive contribution is required. This may induce cardiovascular impairment and thus compromise tissue oxygenation. In this prospective observational study, we investigated the hemodynamic stability and tissue oxygen saturation (StO2) in 40 patients with a high-antinociceptive general anesthesia, goal-directed fluid therapy, and norepinephrine. In addition, optimal surgical conditions and safe and fast emergence are pivotal parts of anesthetic management. Methods In high-antinociceptive propofol/remifentanil anesthesia with bispectral index (BIS) between 40 and 60, norepinephrine was administered to maintain mean arterial pressure (MAP) above 80% of individual baseline. Fluid was administered if the ∆ plethysmographic waveform amplitude exceeded 10%. Surgical and recovery conditions, hemodynamic responses, and tissue oxygenation were investigated. Results Mean (SD) StO2 at the left thenar eminence increased from 83 (6)% before to 86 (4)% 20 min after induction of anesthesia (p <0.05). Cardiac index dropped from 3.0 (0.7) to 2.1 (0.4) L min-1 (p <0.05), MAP from 109 (16) to 83 (14) mm Hg, and heart rate from 73 (12) to 54 (8) bpm (p <0.05). Thirteen out of 40 patients received a fluid bolus. The median (range) norepinephrine administration rate was 0.05 (0.0–0.10) μg kg-1 min-1. After complete akinesia in all patients during surgery, a median (IQR) extubation time of 311 (253–386) s was observed. Conclusions This high-antinociceptive balanced anesthesia with goal-directed fluid and vasopressor therapy adequately preserved StO2 and hemodynamic homeostasis. Trial registration ISRCTN20153044 PMID:25632346

  6. [Intraoperative monitoring of oxygen tissue pressure: Applications in vascular neurosurgery].

    PubMed

    Arikan, Fuat; Vilalta, Jordi; Torne, Ramon; Chocron, Ivette; Rodriguez-Tesouro, Ana; Sahuquillo, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic lesions related to surgical procedures are a major cause of postoperative morbidity in patients with cerebral vascular disease. There are different systems of neuromonitoring to detect intraoperative ischemic events, including intraoperative monitoring of oxygen tissue pressure (PtiO2). The aim of this article was to describe, through the discussion of 4 cases, the usefulness of intraoperative PtiO2 monitoring during vascular neurosurgery. In presenting these cases, we demonstrate that monitoring PtiO2 is a reliable way to detect early ischemic events during surgical procedures. Continuous monitoring of PtiO2 in an area at risk allows the surgeon to resolve the cause of the ischemic event before it evolves to an established cerebral infarction. PMID:24934513

  7. Development of an ultrasound sensitive oxygen carrier for oxygen delivery to hypoxic tissue.

    PubMed

    Eisenbrey, John R; Albala, Lorenzo; Kramer, Michael R; Daroshefski, Nick; Brown, David; Liu, Ji-Bin; Stanczak, Maria; O'Kane, Patrick; Forsberg, Flemming; Wheatley, Margaret A

    2015-01-15

    Radiation therapy is frequently used in the treatment of malignancies, but tumors are often more resistant than the surrounding normal tissue to radiation effects, because the tumor microenvironment is hypoxic. This manuscript details the fabrication and characterization of an ultrasound-sensitive, injectable oxygen microbubble platform (SE61O2) for overcoming tumor hypoxia. SE61O2 was fabricated by first sonicating a mixture of Span 60 and water-soluble vitamin E purged with perfluorocarbon gas. SE61O2 microbubbles were separated from the foam by flotation, then freeze dried under vacuum to remove all perfluorocarbon, and reconstituted with oxygen. Visually, SE61O2 microbubbles were smooth, spherical, with an average diameter of 3.1 μm and were reconstituted to a concentration of 6.5 E7 microbubbles/ml. Oxygen-filled SE61O2 provides 16.9 ± 1.0 dB of enhancement at a dose of 880 μl/l (5.7 E7 microbubbles/l) with a half-life under insonation of approximately 15 min. In in vitro release experiments, 2 ml of SE61O2 (1.3 E8 microbubbles) triggered with ultrasound was found to elevate oxygen partial pressures of 100ml of degassed saline 13.8 mmHg more than untriggered bubbles and 20.6 mmHg more than ultrasound triggered nitrogen-filled bubbles. In preliminary in vivo delivery experiments, triggered SE61O2 resulted in a 30.4 mmHg and 27.4 mmHg increase in oxygen partial pressures in two breast tumor mouse xenografts. PMID:25448552

  8. Direct tissue oxygen monitoring by in vivo photoacoustic lifetime imaging (PALI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Qi; Morgounova, Ekaterina; Ashkenazi, Shai

    2014-03-01

    Tissue oxygen plays a critical role in maintaining tissue viability and in various diseases, including response to therapy. Images of oxygen distribution provide the history of tissue hypoxia and evidence of oxygen availability in the circulatory system. Currently available methods of direct measuring or imaging tissue oxygen all have significant limitations. Previously, we have reported a non-invasive in vivo imaging modality based on photoacoustic lifetime. The technique maps the excited triplet state of oxygen-sensitive dye, thus reflects the spatial and temporal distribution of tissue oxygen. We have applied PALI on tumor hypoxia in small animals, and the hypoxic region imaged by PALI is consistent with the site of the tumor imaged by ultrasound. Here, we present two studies of applying PALI to monitor changes of tissue oxygen by modulations. The first study involves an acute ischemia model using a thin thread tied around the hind limb of a normal mouse to reduce the blood flow. PALI images were acquired before, during, and after the restriction. The drop of muscle pO2 and recovery from hypoxia due to reperfusion were observed by PALI tracking the same region. The second study modulates tissue oxygen by controlling the percentage of oxygen the mouse inhales. We demonstrate that PALI is able to reflect the change of oxygen level with respect to both hyperbaric and hypobaric conditions. We expect this technique to be very attractive for a range of clinical applications in which tissue oxygen mapping would improve therapy decision making and treatment planning.

  9. Effect of sepsis on skeletal muscle oxygen consumption and tissue oxygenation: interpreting capillary oxygen transport data using a mathematical model.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Daniel; Bateman, Ryon M; Ellis, Christopher G

    2004-12-01

    Inherent in the inflammatory response to sepsis is abnormal microvascular perfusion. Maldistribution of capillary red blood cell (RBC) flow in rat skeletal muscle has been characterized by increased 1) stopped-flow capillaries, 2) capillary oxygen extraction, and 3) ratio of fast-flow to normal-flow capillaries. On the basis of experimental data for functional capillary density (FCD), RBC velocity, and hemoglobin O2 saturation during sepsis, a mathematical model was used to calculate tissue O2 consumption (Vo2), tissue Po2 (Pt) profiles, and O2 delivery by fast-flow capillaries, which could not be measured experimentally. The model describes coupled capillary and tissue O2 transport using realistic blood and tissue biophysics and three-dimensional arrays of heterogeneously spaced capillaries and was solved numerically using a previously validated scheme. While total blood flow was maintained, capillary flow distribution was varied from 60/30/10% (normal/fast/stopped) in control to 33/33/33% (normal/fast/stopped) in average sepsis (AS) and 25/25/50% (normal/fast/stopped) in extreme sepsis (ES). Simulations found approximately two- and fourfold increases in tissue Vo2 in AS and ES, respectively. Average (minimum) Pt decreased from 43 (40) mmHg in control to 34 (27) and 26 (15) mmHg in AS and ES, respectively, and clustering fast-flow capillaries (increased flow heterogeneity) reduced minimum Pt to 14.5 mmHg. Thus, although fast capillaries prevented tissue dysoxia, they did not prevent increased hypoxia as the degree of microvascular injury increased. The model predicts that decreased FCD, increased fast flow, and increased Vo2 in sepsis expose skeletal muscle to significant regions of hypoxia, which could affect local cellular and organ function. PMID:15319199

  10. Comparative Changes in Tissue Oxygenation Between Laparoscopic and Open Cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Bablekos, George D.; Michaelides, Stylianos A.; Analitis, Antonis; Lymperi, Maria H.; Charalabopoulos, Konstantinos A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous studies examined the effect of laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) versus open cholecystectomy (OC) on physiological variables of the respiratory system. In this study we compared changes in arterial blood gases-related parameters between LC and OC to assess their comparative influence on gas exchange. Methods We studied 28 patients, operated under identical anesthetic protocol (LC: 18 patients, OC: 10 patients). Measurements were made on the morning before surgery (BS), the second (AS2) and the eighth (AS8) postoperative day. Studied parameters, including alveolar-arterial difference in PO2 ((A-a)DO2) and oxygen content (Oct in vol%), were statistically compared. Results On AS2 a greater increase was found in ((A-a)DO2) for the OC compared to LC (4.673 ± 0.966 kPa versus 3.773 ± 1.357 kPa, respectively). Between BS and AS2, Oct in vol% decreased from 17.55 ± 1.90 to 15.69 ± 1.88 in the LC and from 16.99 ± 2.37 to 14.62 ± 2.23 in the OC, whilst a reduction (P = 0.093) between AS2 and AS8 was also found for the open method. Besides, on AS2, SaO2% decrease was greater in OC compared to LC (P = 0.096). Conclusions On AS2, the greater increase in OC-((A-a)DO2) associated with Oct in vol% and SaO2% findings also in OC group suggest that LC might be associated with lower risk for impaired tissue oxygenation. PMID:25699119

  11. Impact of hemoglobin concentration and affinity for oxygen on tissue oxygenation: the case of hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers.

    PubMed

    Samaja, Michele; Terraneo, Laura

    2012-02-01

    In patients undergoing exchange-transfusion with hemoglobin (Hb)-based oxygen (O₂) carriers (HBOC), native Hb coexists with newly transfused Hb. The two Hb types share the same arterial and venous PO₂, but their affinities for O₂ vary. A simple spreadsheet model is described aiming at evaluating the contribution of each Hb type to the overall O₂ transport characteristics as a function of the batch Hb concentration and O₂ affinity in the HBOC solution, of the fraction of exchange-transfused blood/HBOC, and of the arterial PO₂. This model helps to yield a quantitative estimate of how tissues with high or low O₂ extraction respond to the changes cited above. The results show that the higher the exchange-transfusion ratio, the O₂ transport to tissues becomes progressively impaired. However, this effect is more critical at low batch Hb concentration and high O₂ affinity of the HBOC, especially for tissues/organs with high O₂ extraction, whereas the arterial PO₂ does not appear as critical. PMID:21848930

  12. [Effect of aktovegin on dynamics of the oxygen methabolism in tissues].

    PubMed

    Pavlov, O O

    2009-01-01

    The analysis of aktovegin impact on methabolism dynamics of oxygen in tissues was performed. Indirect impact of aktovegin on the oxygen cascade dynamics is provided through the mechanism of the erythrocytes saturation by oxygen. The efficacy of aktovegin application as antihypoxic preparation in patients with an acute gastric strees-affection was proved. PMID:19670751

  13. A dynamic model of oxygen transport from capillaries to tissue with moving red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Lücker, Adrien; Weber, Bruno; Jenny, Patrick

    2015-02-01

    Most oxygen required to support the energy needs of vertebrate tissues is delivered by diffusion from microvessels. The presence of red blood cells (RBCs) makes blood flow in the microcirculation highly heterogeneous. Additionally, flow regulation mechanisms dynamically respond to changes in tissue energy demand. These spatiotemporal variations directly affect the supply of oxygen to parenchymal cells. Due to various limiting assumptions, current models of oxygen transport cannot fully capture the consequences of complex hemodynamic effects on tissue oxygenation and are often not suitable for studying unsteady phenomena. With our new approach based on moving RBCs, the impact of blood flow heterogeneity on oxygen partial pressure (Po2) in the tissue can be quantified. Oxygen transport was simulated using parachute-shaped solid RBCs flowing through a capillary. With the use of a conical tissue domain with radii 19 and 13 μm, respectively, our computations indicate that Po2 at the RBC membrane exceeds Po2 between RBCs by 30 mmHg on average and that the mean plasma Po2 decreases by 9 mmHg over 50 μm. These results reproduce well recent intravascular Po2 measurements in the rodent brain. We also demonstrate that instantaneous variations of capillary hematocrit cause associated fluctuations of tissue Po2. Furthermore, our results suggest that homogeneous tissue oxygenation requires capillary networks to be denser on venular side than on arteriolar side. Our new model for oxygen transport will make it possible to quantify in detail the effects of blood flow heterogeneity on tissue oxygenation in realistic capillary networks. PMID:25398979

  14. Dual-mode imaging of cutaneous tissue oxygenation and vascular function.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ronald X; Huang, Kun; Qin, Ruogu; Huang, Jiwei; Xu, Jeff S; Ding, Liya; Gnyawali, Urmila S; Gordillo, Gayle M; Gnyawali, Surya C; Sen, Chandan K

    2010-01-01

    Accurate assessment of cutaneous tissue oxygenation and vascular function is important for appropriate detection, staging, and treatment of many health disorders such as chronic wounds. We report the development of a dual-mode imaging system for non-invasive and non-contact imaging of cutaneous tissue oxygenation and vascular function. The imaging system integrated an infrared camera, a CCD camera, a liquid crystal tunable filter and a high intensity fiber light source. A Labview interface was programmed for equipment control, synchronization, image acquisition, processing, and visualization. Multispectral images captured by the CCD camera were used to reconstruct the tissue oxygenation map. Dynamic thermographic images captured by the infrared camera were used to reconstruct the vascular function map. Cutaneous tissue oxygenation and vascular function images were co-registered through fiduciary markers. The performance characteristics of the dual-mode image system were tested in humans. PMID:21178967

  15. Why is the partial oxygen pressure of human tissues a crucial parameter? Small molecules and hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Carreau, Aude; Hafny-Rahbi, Bouchra El; Matejuk, Agata; Grillon, Catherine; Kieda, Claudine

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Oxygen supply and diffusion into tissues are necessary for survival. The oxygen partial pressure (pO2), which is a key component of the physiological state of an organ, results from the balance between oxygen delivery and its consumption. In mammals, oxygen is transported by red blood cells circulating in a well-organized vasculature. Oxygen delivery is dependent on the metabolic requirements and functional status of each organ. Consequently, in a physiological condition, organ and tissue are characterized by their own unique ‘tissue normoxia’ or ‘physioxia’ status. Tissue oxygenation is severely disturbed during pathological conditions such as cancer, diabetes, coronary heart disease, stroke, etc., which are associated with decrease in pO2, i.e. ‘hypoxia’. In this review, we present an array of methods currently used for assessing tissue oxygenation. We show that hypoxia is marked during tumour development and has strong consequences for oxygenation and its influence upon chemotherapy efficiency. Then we compare this to physiological pO2 values of human organs. Finally we evaluate consequences of physioxia on cell activity and its molecular modulations. More importantly we emphasize the discrepancy between in vivo and in vitro tissue and cells oxygen status which can have detrimental effects on experimental outcome. It appears that the values corresponding to the physioxia are ranging between 11% and 1% O2 whereas current in vitro experimentations are usually performed in 19.95% O2, an artificial context as far as oxygen balance is concerned. It is important to realize that most of the experiments performed in so-called normoxia might be dangerously misleading. PMID:21251211

  16. Determination of oxygen tension in the subcutaneous tissue of cosmonauts during the Salyut-6 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baranski, S.; Bloszczynski, R.; Hermaszewski, M.; Kubiczkowa, J.; Piorko, A.; Saganiak, R.; Sarol, Z.; Skibniewsky, F.; Stendera, J.; Walichnowski, W.

    1982-01-01

    A polarographic technique was used to measure the oxygen tension in subcutaneous tissue of the forearm of a cosmonaut prior to, after, and on the fourth day of a space mission performed by Salut-6. A drop in the oxygen exchange rate in the peripheral tissues during weightlessness was observed. The mechanisms of this change are studied, taking into consideration the blood distribution in the organism and microcirculation disorders reflected by a decreased blood flow rate in arterial-venous junctions.

  17. Oxygen regimen in the human peripheral tissue during space flights.

    PubMed

    Haase, H; Kovalenko, E A; Vacek, A; Bobrovnickij, M P; Jarsumbeck, B; Semencov, V N; Sarol, Z; Hideg, J; Zlatarev, K

    1986-05-01

    A survey of the results of the experiment "Oxygen," carried out within the scope of the INTER-KOSMOS program in members of the permanent crews and of international visiting expeditions to the Soviet orbital station Salyut-6, is given. During the 7-day space flights of the international visiting expeditions a significant decrease in pO2ic by 3.28 kPa was observed. Local oxygen utilization reduced significantly by 0.44 kPa. During hyperventilation testing after return to earth a statistically significant decrease in the peak value by 1.39 kPa was noted. In the long-term crews of the orbital station Salyut-6 the highest decrease in pO2ic of 3.8 kPa and the absolutely lowest value of 3.4 -/+ 0.5 kPa during space flight were observed. The decrease in local oxygen utilization during the flight of 0.8 kPa/min was greater than that of the visiting crews. The results indicate the importance of investigating the dynamics of the oxygen regimen for medical control of the crew members both during the space flight and during the readaptation phase after return to earth. PMID:11542832

  18. A modelling study of atrial septostomy for pulmonary arterial hypertension, and its effect on the state of tissue oxygenation and systemic blood flow.

    PubMed

    Diller, Gerhard-Paul; Lammers, Astrid E; Haworth, Sheila G; Dimopoulos, Konstantinos; Derrick, Graham; Bonhoeffer, Philipp; Gatzoulis, Michael A; Francis, Darrel P

    2010-02-01

    Atrial septostomy is performed in patients with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension, and has been shown to improve symptoms, quality of life and survival. Despite recognized clinical benefits, the underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms are poorly understood. We aimed to assess the effects of right-to-left shunting on arterial delivery of oxygen, mixed venous content of oxygen, and systemic cardiac output in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension and a fixed flow of blood to the lungs. We formulated equations defining the mandatory relationship between physiologic variables and delivery of oxygen in patients with right-to-left shunting. Using calculus and computer modelling, we considered the simultaneous effects of right-to-left shunting on physiologies with different pulmonary flows, total metabolic rates, and capacities for carrying oxygen. Our study indicates that, when the flow of blood to the lungs is fixed, increasing right-to-left shunting improves systemic cardiac output, arterial blood pressure, and arterial delivery of oxygen. In contrast, the mixed venous content of oxygen, which mirrors the average state of tissue oxygenation, remains unchanged. Our model suggests that increasing the volume of right-to-left shunting cannot compensate for right ventricular failure. Atrial septostomy in the setting of pulmonary arterial hypertension, therefore, increases the arterial delivery of oxygen, but the mixed systemic saturation of oxygen, arguably the most important index of tissue oxygenation, stays constant. Our data suggest that the clinically observed beneficial effects of atrial septostomy are the result of improved flow of blood rather than augmented tissue oxygenation, provided that right ventricular function is adequate. PMID:20144254

  19. Tissue Oxygenation Response to Mild Hypercapnia during Cardiopulmonary Bypass with Constant Pump Output

    PubMed Central

    Akça, Ozan; Sessler, Daniel I; DeLong, Diane; Keijner, Raymond; Ganzel, Brian; Doufas, Anthony G

    2006-01-01

    Background Tissue oxygenation is the primary determinant of wound infection risk. Mild hypercapnia markedly improves cutaneous, subcutaneous, and muscular tissue oxygenation in volunteers and patients. However, relative contributions of increased cardiac output and peripheral vasodilation to this response remains unknown. We thus tested the hypothesis that increased cardiac output is the dominant mechanism. Methods We recruited 10 ASA III patients, aged 40–65 years, undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass for this crossover trial. After induction of anaesthesia, a Silastic tonometer was inserted subcutaneously in the upper arm. Subcutaneous tissue oxygen tension was measured with both polarographic electrode and fluorescence-based systems. Oximeter probes were placed bilaterally on the forehead to monitor cerebral oxygenation. After initiation of cardiopulmonary bypass, in random order patients were exposed to two arterial CO2 partial pressures for 30 minutes each: 35 (normocapnia) or 50 mmHg (hypercapnia). Bypass pump flow was kept constant throughout the measurement periods. Results Hypercapnia during bypass had essentially no effect on PaO2, mean arterial pressure, or tissue temperature. PaCO2 and pH differed significantly. Subcutaneous tissue oxygenation was virtually identical during the two PaCO2 periods (139 [50,163] vs. 145 [38,158], P=0.335) (median [range]). In contrast, cerebral oxygen saturation (our positive control measurement) was significantly less during normocapnia (57 [28,67]%) than hypercapnia (64 [37,89]%, P=0.025). Conclusions Mild hypercapnia, which normally markedly increases tissue oxygenation, did not do so during cardiopulmonary bypass with fixed pump output. This suggests that hypercapnia normally increases tissue oxygenation by increasing cardiac output rather than direct dilation of peripheral vessels. PMID:16675511

  20. Implementing oxygen control in chip-based cell and tissue culture systems.

    PubMed

    Oomen, Pieter E; Skolimowski, Maciej D; Verpoorte, Elisabeth

    2016-09-21

    Oxygen is essential in the energy metabolism of cells, as well as being an important regulatory parameter influencing cell differentiation and function. Interest in precise oxygen control for in vitro cultures of tissues and cells continues to grow, especially with the emergence of the organ-on-a-chip and the desire to emulate in vivo conditions. This was recently discussed in this journal in a Critical Review by Brennan et al. (Lab Chip (2014). DOI: ). Microfluidics can be used to introduce flow to facilitate nutrient supply to and waste removal from in vitro culture systems. Well-defined oxygen gradients can also be established. However, cells can quickly alter the oxygen balance in their vicinity. In this Tutorial Review, we expand on the Brennan paper to focus on the implementation of oxygen analysis in these systems to achieve continuous monitoring. Both electrochemical and optical approaches for the integration of oxygen monitoring in microfluidic tissue and cell culture systems will be discussed. Differences in oxygen requirements from one organ to the next are a challenging problem, as oxygen delivery is limited by its uptake into medium. Hence, we discuss the factors determining oxygen concentrations in solutions and consider the possible use of artificial oxygen carriers to increase dissolved oxygen concentrations. The selection of device material for applications requiring precise oxygen control is discussed in detail, focusing on oxygen permeability. Lastly, a variety of devices is presented, showing the diversity of approaches that can be employed to control and monitor oxygen concentrations in in vitro experiments. PMID:27492338

  1. Effects of compression on muscle tissue oxygenation at the onset of exercise.

    PubMed

    Coza, Aurel; Dunn, Jeff F; Anderson, Brady; Nigg, Benno M

    2012-06-01

    The effects of compression on gastrocnemius medialis muscle oxygenation and hemodynamics during a short-term dynamic exercise was investigated in a sample of 15 male subjects (mean ± SD; age 25.8 ± 4.9 years; mass 70.6 ± 4.3 kg). Elastic compression sleeves were used to apply multiple levels of compression to the calf muscles during exercise, and noncompressive garments were used for the control condition. Tissue hemoglobin oxygen saturation was measured as the relative "tissue oxygen index" (TOI) with a near-infrared spectrometer. The recovery of TOI during exercise was determined from the slope of oxygenation recovery in a nonoccluded situation. The TOI recovery rate during the first 2 minutes of the exercise was 24% higher (p = 0.042) for the compression condition than for the control condition. A significant correlation (r = 0.61, p = 0.012) between the level of compression and the tissue oxygenation recovery during exercise was observed. Muscle energy use was determined from the rate of decline of TOI immediately upon arterial occlusion during early exercise. Muscle energy use measured during the occluded situation was not significantly influenced by compression. Based on these results, it was concluded that compression induced changes in tissue blood flow and perfusion appear to result in improved oxygenation during short-term exercise. Assuming that increased muscle oxygen availability positively influences performance, compression of muscles may enhance performance especially in sports that require repeated short bouts of exercise. PMID:22465988

  2. High-spatial-resolution mapping of the oxygen concentration in cortical tissue (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaswal, Rajeshwer S.; Yaseen, Mohammad A.; Fu, Buyin; Boas, David A.; Sakadžic, Sava

    2016-03-01

    Due to a lack of imaging tools for high-resolution imaging of cortical tissue oxygenation, the detailed maps of the oxygen partial pressure (PO2) around arterioles, venules, and capillaries remain largely unknown. Therefore, we have limited knowledge about the mechanisms that secure sufficient oxygen delivery in microvascular domains during brain activation, and provide some metabolic reserve capacity in diseases that affect either microvascular networks or the regulation of cerebral blood flow (CBF). To address this challenge, we applied a Two-Photon PO2 Microscopy to map PO2 at different depths in mice cortices. Measurements were performed through the cranial window in the anesthetized healthy mice as well as in the mouse models of microvascular dysfunctions. In addition, microvascular morphology was recorded by the two-photon microscopy at the end of each experiment and subsequently segmented. Co-registration of the PO2 measurements and exact microvascular morphology enabled quantification of the tissue PO2 dependence on distance from the arterioles, capillaries, and venules at various depths. Our measurements reveal significant spatial heterogeneity of the cortical tissue PO2 distribution that is dominated by the high oxygenation in periarteriolar spaces. In cases of impaired oxygen delivery due to microvascular dysfunction, significant reduction in tissue oxygenation away from the arterioles was observed. These tissue domains may be the initial sites of cortical injury that can further exacerbate the progression of the disease.

  3. Combined effect of protein and oxygen on reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in the plasma treatment of tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaur, Nishtha; Szili, Endre J.; Oh, Jun-Seok; Hong, Sung-Ha; Michelmore, Andrew; Graves, David B.; Hatta, Akimitsu; Short, Robert D.

    2015-09-01

    The influence of protein and molecular, ground state oxygen (O2) on the plasma generation, and transport of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) in tissue are investigated. A tissue target, comprising a 1 mm thick gelatin film (a surrogate for real tissue), is placed on top of a 96-well plate; each well is filled with phosphate buffered saline (PBS, pH 7.4) containing one fluorescent or colorimetric reporter that is specific for one of three RONS (i.e., H2O2, NO2-, or OH•) or a broad spectrum reactive oxygen species reporter (2,7-dichlorodihydrofluorescein). A helium cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) jet contacts the top of the gelatin surface, and the concentrations of RONS generated in PBS are measured on a microplate reader. The data show that H2O2, NO2-, or OH• are generated in PBS underneath the target. Independently, measurements are made of the O2 concentration in the PBS with and without the gelatin target. Adding bovine serum albumin protein to the PBS or gelatin shows that protein either raises or inhibits RONS depending upon the O2 concentration. Our results are discussed in the context of plasma-soft tissue interactions that are important in the development of CAP technology for medicine, biology, and food manufacturing.

  4. Quasi-simultaneous multimodal imaging of cutaneous tissue oxygenation and perfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Wenqi; Gan, Qi; Wu, Qiang; Zhang, Shiwu; Xu, Ronald

    2015-12-01

    Simultaneous and quantitative assessment of multiple tissue parameters may facilitate more effective diagnosis and therapy in many clinical applications, such as wound healing. However, existing wound assessment methods are typically subjective and qualitative, with the need for sequential data acquisition and coregistration between modalities, and lack of reliable standards for performance evaluation or calibration. To overcome these limitations, we developed a multimodal imaging system for quasi-simultaneous assessment of cutaneous tissue oxygenation and perfusion in a quantitative and noninvasive fashion. The system integrated multispectral and laser speckle imaging technologies into one experimental setup. Tissue oxygenation and perfusion were reconstructed by advanced algorithms. The accuracy and reliability of the imaging system were quantitatively validated in calibration experiments and a tissue-simulating phantom test. The experimental results were compared with a commercial oxygenation and perfusion monitor. Dynamic detection of cutaneous tissue oxygenation and perfusion was also demonstrated in vivo by a postocclusion reactive hyperemia procedure in a human subject and a wound healing process in a wounded mouse model. Our in vivo experiments not only validated the performance of the multimodal imaging system for cutaneous tissue oxygenation and perfusion imaging but also demonstrated its technical potential for wound healing assessment in clinical practice.

  5. Noninvasive imaging of the distribution in oxygen in tissue in vivo using near-infrared phosphors.

    PubMed Central

    Vinogradov, S A; Lo, L W; Jenkins, W T; Evans, S M; Koch, C; Wilson, D F

    1996-01-01

    A newly developed water-soluble phosphor suitable for measuring oxygen pressure in the blood (Green 2W) was used for noninvasive, in vivo imaging of oxygen distribution in the vascular systems of mice. Oxygen quenches the phosphorescence of Green 2W, measured in the presence of 2% albumin, according to the Stern-volmer relationship. This oxygen-dependent quenching of phosphorescence has been used to obtain digital maps of the oxygen distribution in the tissue vasculature. EMT-6 mammary carcinoma tumors were grown by injecting 1 x 10(6) cells in 0.1-ml carrier into the subcutaneous space over the muscle on the hindquarter. When the tumors were approximately 8 mm in diameter, 300 micrograms of phosphorescence probe (Green 2W; absorption maximum 636 nm) was injected into the tail vein. The mice were immobilized with intraperotoneal Ketamine (133 mg/kg) and Xylazine (10 mg/kg) and illuminated with flashes (< 4-microseconds t1/2) of light of 630 +/- 12 nm. The emitted phosphorescence (790-nm maximum) was imaged an intensified CCD camera. Images were collected beginning at 30, 50, 80, 120, 180, 240, 420, and 2500 microseconds after the flash and used to calculate digital maps of the phosphorescence lifetimes and oxygen pressure. Both the illumination light and the phosphorescence were in the near-infrared region of the spectrum, where tissue has greatly decreased absorbance. The light therefore readily passed through the skin and centimeter thicknesses of tissue. The oxygen maps could be obtained by illuminating from the side of the mouse opposite the camera (and tumor). The tumors were readily observed as regions with oxygen pressures substantially below those of the surrounding tissue. Thus, phosphorescence measurements can noninvasively detect volumes of tissue with below-normal oxygen pressure in the presence of much larger volumes of tissue with normal oxygen pressures. In addition, tissue oxygen pressures can be monitored in real time, even through centimeter

  6. Development of 200-channel mapping system for tissue oxygenation measured by near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niwayama, Masatsugu; Kohata, Daisuke; Shao, Jun; Kudo, Nobuki; Hamaoka, Takatumi; Katsumura, Toshihito; Yamamoto, Katsuyuki

    2000-07-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a very useful technique for noninvasive measurement of tissue oxygenation. Among various methods of NIRS, continuous wave near-infrared spectroscopy (CW- NIRS) is especially suitable for real-time measurement and for practical use. CW-NIRS has recently been applied in vivo reflectance imaging of muscle oxygenation and brain activity. However, conventional mapping systems do not have a sufficient mapping area at present. Moreover, they do not enable quantitative measurement of tissue oxygenation because conventional NIRS is based on the inappropriate assumption that tissue is homogeneous. In this study, we developed a 200-channel mapping system that enables measurement of changes in oxygenation and blood volume and that covers a wider area (30 cm x 20 cm) than do conventional systems. The spatial resolution (source- detector separation) of this system is 15 mm. As for the effcts of tissue inhomogeneity on muscle oxygenation measurement, subcutaneous adipose tissue greatly reduces measurement sensitivity. Therefore, we also used a correction method for influence of the subcutaneous fat layer so that we could obtain quantitative changes in concentrations of oxy- and deoxy- hemoglobin. We conducted exercise tests and measured the changed in hemoglobin concentration in the thigh using the new system. The working muscles in the exercises could be imaged, and the heterogeneity of the muscles was shown. These results demonstrated the new 200-channel mapping system enables observation of the distribution of muscle metabolism and localization of muscle function.

  7. Serum, milk, and tissue monensin concentrations in cattle with adequate and potentially toxic dietary levels of monensin: pharmacokinetics and diagnostic interpretation.

    PubMed

    Puschner, B; Bautista, A C; McKemie, D S; Gallego, S M; Woods, L W; Moore, C E; Knych, H K

    2016-08-01

    Used in both beef cattle and dairy cows, monensin can provide many health benefits but can, when unintended overexposures occur, result in adverse effects. Information on serum and tissue concentrations following overexposure and/or overt toxicosis which may aid in diagnostics and clinical outcome is lacking. The aim of this study was to determine concentrations of monensin in biological specimens following oral exposure for 10 days to an approved dose (1 mg/kg) and a higher dose (5 mg/kg) of monensin given daily on a body weight basis to 10 dairy cows. No deaths were reported; cows receiving 5 mg/kg showed early signs of toxicosis including depression, decreased feed intake, and diarrhea after 4 days of exposure. Histopathological findings were minimal in most cows. Pharmacokinetic modeling of the detected serum concentrations for the 1 and 5 mg/kg dose groups determined the Cmax , Tmax, and t1/2λ to be 0.87 and 1.68 ng/mL, 2.0 and 1.0 h, and 1.76 and 2.32 days, respectively. Mixed regression models showed that the dose level and days since last dose were significantly associated with monensin concentrations in all four tissues, and with cardiac troponin levels. The high dose resulted in a significant elevation of monensin in tissues at approximately 4.7 times compared to the monensin concentrations in the tissues of animals from the low-dose group. The cTnI concentrations in the high-dose group were 2.1 times that of cTnI in the low-dose group. Thus, the ability to diagnose monensin overexposure and/or toxicosis will improve from knowledge of biological monensin concentrations from this study. PMID:26763112

  8. Propagation of damage in brain tissue: coupling the mechanics of oedema and oxygen delivery.

    PubMed

    Lang, Georgina E; Vella, Dominic; Waters, Sarah L; Goriely, Alain

    2015-11-01

    Brain tissue swelling, or oedema, is a dangerous consequence of traumatic brain injury and stroke. In particular, a locally swollen region can cause the injury to propagate further through the brain: swelling causes mechanical compression of the vasculature in the surrounding tissue and so can cut off that tissue's oxygen supply. We use a triphasic mathematical model to investigate this propagation, and couple tissue mechanics with oxygen delivery. Starting from a fully coupled, finite elasticity, model, we show that simplifications can be made that allow us to express the volume of the propagating region of damage analytically in terms of key parameters. Our results show that performing a craniectomy, to alleviate pressure in the brain and allow the tissue to swell outwards, reduces the propagation of damage; this finding agrees with experimental observations. PMID:25822263

  9. Second derivative multispectral algorithm for quantitative assessment of cutaneous tissue oxygenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jiwei; Zhang, Shiwu; Gnyawali, Surya; Sen, Chandan K.; Xu, Ronald X.

    2015-03-01

    We report a second derivative multispectral algorithm for quantitative assessment of cutaneous tissue oxygen saturation (StO2). The algorithm is based on a forward model of light transport in multilayered skin tissue and an inverse algorithm for StO2 reconstruction. Based on the forward simulation results, a parameter of a second derivative ratio (SDR) is derived as a function of cutaneous tissue StO2. The SDR function is optimized at a wavelength set of 544, 552, 568, 576, 592, and 600 nm so that cutaneous tissue StO2 can be derived with minimal artifacts by blood concentration, tissue scattering, and melanin concentration. The proposed multispectral StO2 imaging algorithm is verified in both benchtop and in vivo experiments. The experimental results show that the proposed multispectral imaging algorithm is able to map cutaneous tissue StO2 in high temporal resolution with reduced measurement artifacts induced by different skin conditions in comparison with other three commercial tissue oxygen measurement systems. These results indicate that the multispectral StO2 imaging technique has the potential for noninvasive and quantitative assessment of skin tissue oxygenation with a high temporal resolution.

  10. Second derivative multispectral algorithm for quantitative assessment of cutaneous tissue oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jiwei; Zhang, Shiwu; Gnyawali, Surya; Sen, Chandan K.; Xu, Ronald X.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. We report a second derivative multispectral algorithm for quantitative assessment of cutaneous tissue oxygen saturation (StO2). The algorithm is based on a forward model of light transport in multilayered skin tissue and an inverse algorithm for StO2 reconstruction. Based on the forward simulation results, a parameter of a second derivative ratio (SDR) is derived as a function of cutaneous tissue StO2. The SDR function is optimized at a wavelength set of 544, 552, 568, 576, 592, and 600 nm so that cutaneous tissue StO2 can be derived with minimal artifacts by blood concentration, tissue scattering, and melanin concentration. The proposed multispectral StO2 imaging algorithm is verified in both benchtop and in vivo experiments. The experimental results show that the proposed multispectral imaging algorithm is able to map cutaneous tissue StO2 in high temporal resolution with reduced measurement artifacts induced by different skin conditions in comparison with other three commercial tissue oxygen measurement systems. These results indicate that the multispectral StO2 imaging technique has the potential for noninvasive and quantitative assessment of skin tissue oxygenation with a high temporal resolution. PMID:25734405

  11. Efficacy of SpyGlassTM-directed biopsy compared to brush cytology in obtaining adequate tissue for diagnosis in patients with biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Rey, Johannes Wilhelm; Hansen, Torsten; Dümcke, Sebastian; Tresch, Achim; Kramer, Katja; Galle, Peter Robert; Goetz, Martin; Schuchmann, Marcus; Kiesslich, Ralf; Hoffman, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the diagnostic yield (inflammatory activity) and efficiency (size of the biopsy specimen) of SpyGlassTM-guided biopsy vs standard brush cytology in patients with and without primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). METHODS: At the University Medical Center Mainz, Germany, 35 consecutive patients with unclear biliary lesions (16 patients) or long-standing PSC (19 patients) were screened for the study. All patients underwent a physical examination, lab analyses, and abdominal ultrasound. Thirty-one patients with non-PSC strictures or with PSC were scheduled to undergo endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC) and subsequent peroral cholangioscopy (POC). Standard ERC was initially performed, and any lesions or strictures were localized. POC was performed later during the same session. The Boston Scientific SpyGlass SystemTM (Natick, MA, United States) was used for choledochoscopy. The biliary tree was visualized, and suspected lesions or strictures were biopsied, followed by brush cytology of the same area. The study endpoints (for both techniques) were the degree of inflammation, tissue specimen size, and the patient populations (PSC vs non-PSC). Inflammatory changes were divided into three categories: none, low activity, and high activity. The specimen quantity was rated as low, moderate, or sufficient. RESULTS: SpyGlassTM imaging and brush cytology with material retrieval were performed in 29 of 31 (93.5%) patients (23 of the 29 patients were male). The median patient age was 45 years (min, 20 years; max, 76 years). Nineteen patients had known PSC, and 10 showed non-PSC strictures. No procedure-related complications were encountered. However, for both methods, tissues could only be retrieved from 29 patients. In cases of inflammation of the biliary tract, the diagnostic yield of the SpyGlassTM-directed biopsies was greater than that using brush cytology. More tissue material was obtained for the biopsy method than for the brush cytology method (P

  12. NADPH Oxidase 1 and Its Derived Reactive Oxygen Species Mediated Tissue Injury and Repair

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xiu-Jun; Peng, Ying-Bo; Hu, Yi-Ping; Shi, You-Zhen; Yao, Min; Zhang, Xiong

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species are mostly viewed to cause oxidative damage to various cells and induce organ dysfunction after ischemia-reperfusion injury. However, they are also considered as crucial molecules for cellular signal transduction in biology. NADPH oxidase, whose only function is reactive oxygen species production, has been extensively investigated in many cell types especially phagocytes. The deficiency of NADPH oxidase extends the process of inflammation and delays tissue repair, which causes chronic granulomatous disease in patients. NADPH oxidase 1, one member of the NADPH oxidase family, is not only constitutively expressed in a variety of tissues, but also induced to increase expression in both mRNA and protein levels under many circumstances. NADPH oxidase 1 and its derived reactive oxygen species are suggested to be able to regulate inflammation reaction, cell proliferation and migration, and extracellular matrix synthesis, which contribute to the processes of tissue injury and repair. PMID:24669283

  13. An irradiation system for photodynamic therapy with a fiber-optic sensor for measuring tissue oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintanar, L.; Fabila, D.; Stolik, S.; de la Rosa, J. M.

    2013-11-01

    Photodynamic Therapy is a well known treatment based on the interaction of light of specific wavelength with a photosensitizing drug. In the presence of oxygen molecules, the illumination of the photosensitizer can activate the production of reactive oxygen species, which leads to the death of target cells within the treated tissue. In order to obtain the best therapy response, the tissue oxygen concentration should be measured to adjust the therapy parameters before and during the treatment. In this work, an irradiation system for 5-Aminolevulinic Acid Photodynamic Therapy is presented. It allows the application of visible light radiation of 630 nm using as a light source a high-brightness light emitting diode with an optical-power automatic control considering a light depth-distribution model. A module to measure the tissue oxygen saturation has been implemented into the system. It is based on two light emitting diodes of 660 nm and 940 nm as light sources, a photodiode as a detector and a new handheld fiber optic reflectance pulse oximetry sensor for estimating the blood oxygen saturation within the tissue. The pulse oximetry sensor was modeled through multilayered Monte Carlo simulations to study the behavior of the sensor with changes in skin thickness and melanin content.

  14. Effect of combined recompression and air, oxygen, or heliox breathing on air bubbles in rat tissues.

    PubMed

    Hyldegaard, O; Kerem, D; Melamed, Y

    2001-05-01

    The fate of bubbles formed in tissues during the ascent from a real or simulated air dive and subjected to therapeutic recompression has only been indirectly inferred from theoretical modeling and clinical observations. We visually followed the resolution of micro air bubbles injected into adipose tissue, spinal white matter, muscle, and tendon of anesthetized rats recompressed to and held at 284 kPa while rats breathed air, oxygen, heliox 80:20, or heliox 50:50. The rats underwent a prolonged hyperbaric air exposure before bubble injection and recompression. In all tissues, bubbles disappeared faster during breathing of oxygen or heliox mixtures than during air breathing. In some of the experiments, oxygen breathing caused a transient growth of the bubbles. In spinal white matter, heliox 50:50 or oxygen breathing resulted in significantly faster bubble resolution than did heliox 80:20 breathing. In conclusion, air bubbles in lipid and aqueous tissues shrink and disappear faster during recompression during breathing of heliox mixtures or oxygen compared with air breathing. The clinical implication of these findings might be that heliox 50:50 is the mixture of choice for the treatment of decompression sickness. PMID:11299250

  15. Noninvasive Oxygen Monitoring in Three-Dimensional Tissue Cultures Under Static and Dynamic Culture Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Weyand, Birgit; Nöhre, Mariel; Schmälzlin, Elmar; Stolz, Marvin; Israelowitz, Meir; Gille, Christoph; von Schroeder, Herb P.; Reimers, Kerstin; Vogt, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We present a new method for noninvasive real-time oxygen measurement inside three-dimensional tissue-engineered cell constructs in static and dynamic culture settings in a laminar flow bioreactor. The OPAL system (optical oxygen measurement system) determines the oxygen-dependent phosphorescence lifetime of spherical microprobes and uses a two-frequency phase-modulation technique, which fades out the interference of background fluorescence from the cell carrier and culture medium. Higher cell densities in the centrum of the scaffolds correlated with lower values of oxygen concentration obtained with the OPAL system. When scaffolds were placed in the bioreactor, higher oxygen values were measured compared to statically cultured scaffolds in a Petri dish, which were significantly different at day 1–3 of culture. This technique allows the use of signal-weak microprobes in biological environments and monitors the culture process inside a bioreactor. PMID:26309802

  16. Eigenspectra optoacoustic tomography achieves quantitative blood oxygenation imaging deep in tissues

    PubMed Central

    Tzoumas, Stratis; Nunes, Antonio; Olefir, Ivan; Stangl, Stefan; Symvoulidis, Panagiotis; Glasl, Sarah; Bayer, Christine; Multhoff, Gabriele; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2016-01-01

    Light propagating in tissue attains a spectrum that varies with location due to wavelength-dependent fluence attenuation, an effect that causes spectral corruption. Spectral corruption has limited the quantification accuracy of optical and optoacoustic spectroscopic methods, and impeded the goal of imaging blood oxygen saturation (sO2) deep in tissues; a critical goal for the assessment of oxygenation in physiological processes and disease. Here we describe light fluence in the spectral domain and introduce eigenspectra multispectral optoacoustic tomography (eMSOT) to account for wavelength-dependent light attenuation, and estimate blood sO2 within deep tissue. We validate eMSOT in simulations, phantoms and animal measurements and spatially resolve sO2 in muscle and tumours, validating our measurements with histology data. eMSOT shows substantial sO2 accuracy enhancement over previous optoacoustic methods, potentially serving as a valuable tool for imaging tissue pathophysiology. PMID:27358000

  17. Eigenspectra optoacoustic tomography achieves quantitative blood oxygenation imaging deep in tissues.

    PubMed

    Tzoumas, Stratis; Nunes, Antonio; Olefir, Ivan; Stangl, Stefan; Symvoulidis, Panagiotis; Glasl, Sarah; Bayer, Christine; Multhoff, Gabriele; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2016-01-01

    Light propagating in tissue attains a spectrum that varies with location due to wavelength-dependent fluence attenuation, an effect that causes spectral corruption. Spectral corruption has limited the quantification accuracy of optical and optoacoustic spectroscopic methods, and impeded the goal of imaging blood oxygen saturation (sO2) deep in tissues; a critical goal for the assessment of oxygenation in physiological processes and disease. Here we describe light fluence in the spectral domain and introduce eigenspectra multispectral optoacoustic tomography (eMSOT) to account for wavelength-dependent light attenuation, and estimate blood sO2 within deep tissue. We validate eMSOT in simulations, phantoms and animal measurements and spatially resolve sO2 in muscle and tumours, validating our measurements with histology data. eMSOT shows substantial sO2 accuracy enhancement over previous optoacoustic methods, potentially serving as a valuable tool for imaging tissue pathophysiology. PMID:27358000

  18. Eigenspectra optoacoustic tomography achieves quantitative blood oxygenation imaging deep in tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzoumas, Stratis; Nunes, Antonio; Olefir, Ivan; Stangl, Stefan; Symvoulidis, Panagiotis; Glasl, Sarah; Bayer, Christine; Multhoff, Gabriele; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2016-06-01

    Light propagating in tissue attains a spectrum that varies with location due to wavelength-dependent fluence attenuation, an effect that causes spectral corruption. Spectral corruption has limited the quantification accuracy of optical and optoacoustic spectroscopic methods, and impeded the goal of imaging blood oxygen saturation (sO2) deep in tissues; a critical goal for the assessment of oxygenation in physiological processes and disease. Here we describe light fluence in the spectral domain and introduce eigenspectra multispectral optoacoustic tomography (eMSOT) to account for wavelength-dependent light attenuation, and estimate blood sO2 within deep tissue. We validate eMSOT in simulations, phantoms and animal measurements and spatially resolve sO2 in muscle and tumours, validating our measurements with histology data. eMSOT shows substantial sO2 accuracy enhancement over previous optoacoustic methods, potentially serving as a valuable tool for imaging tissue pathophysiology.

  19. Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation: tissue oxygen sensor for regulation of coronary flow.

    PubMed

    Nuutinen, E M; Wilson, D F; Erecińska, M

    1984-01-01

    The observation that mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in vivo is dependent on oxygen tension throughout the physiological range (Wilson et al., 1979a , 1979b ) has made this metabolic pathway the most probable candidate for the tissue oxygen sensor in the regulation of local blood flow. We have utilized the oxygen dependent regulatory system for coronary blood flow to examine this possibility. Alterations in coronary flow were induced by: 1. Varied work load; 2. Infusion of Amytal (an inhibitor of mitochondrial respiration); 3. Infusion of DNP; 4. Hypoxia. Increased work load caused increased coronary flow with no decrease in effluent oxygen tension while Amytal infusion and hypoxia caused vasodilation with increased and decreased O2 tension respectively. This indicates that oxygen tension per se cannot be responsible for the observed vasodilation. Tissue energy metabolism was evaluated by measuring metabolite levels in hearts which were freeze-clamped in each state of perfusion. In all four methods of vasodilation, a decrease in cellular energy state ratio ([ATP]f/[ADP]f[Pi]) expressed as the calculated ratio of free adenine nucleotides, was observed for conditions which increased flow. Systematic variation of work load, Amytal or DNP concentration resulted in quantitatively the same correlation between tissue [ATP]f/[ADP]f[Pi] and coronary flow. It is concluded that mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation is the oxygen sensor for the regulation of coronary blood flow by tissue oxygen tension. Infusion of adenosine, a known coronary vasodilator, induced vasodilation which was completely blocked by theophylline.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6731096

  20. Validation of adequate endogenous reference genes for reverse transcription-qPCR studies in human post-mortem brain tissue of SIDS cases.

    PubMed

    El-Kashef, Noha; Gomes, Iva; Mercer-Chalmers-Bender, Katja; Schneider, Peter M; Rothschild, Markus A; Juebner, Martin

    2015-12-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is the main cause of post-neonatal infant death in most developed countries. It is still of ambiguous etiology. Gene expression studies of relevant target genes using reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) in SIDS cases, and comparing them with age-matched controls, could help in understanding the pathogenesis of SIDS. However, selecting inadequate reference genes used for normalization of the RT-qPCR gene expression data can give misleading results. The aim of the present study was to identify reference genes with the most stable expression in post-mortem brainstem samples of SIDS and control cases. Among the five candidate reference genes (GAPDH, GUSB, HMBS, SDHA, UBXN6) studied in both groups, SDHA and UBXN6 were identified as the most stable. To further demonstrate the importance of using validated genes for RT-qPCR data normalization, the expression of a potential gene of interest in SIDS, the RPS27A gene, was evaluated using validated versus non-validated reference genes for normalization. This gene encodes the ubiquitin protein that has been shown in other pathological studies to be induced in SIDS. Using the identified most stable genes for normalization of RPS27A gene expression data revealed, as expected, a statistically significant up-regulation in SIDS as compared to the controls. However, using a single unstable reference gene for normalization resulted in no significant differences in transcript abundance of RPS27A between SIDS and the controls. This emphasizes the need for validation of the suitability of reference genes used in a given tissue type under certain experimental conditions. PMID:26434654

  1. Estimating oxygen distribution from vasculature in three-dimensional tumour tissue.

    PubMed

    Grimes, David Robert; Kannan, Pavitra; Warren, Daniel R; Markelc, Bostjan; Bates, Russell; Muschel, Ruth; Partridge, Mike

    2016-03-01

    Regions of tissue which are well oxygenated respond better to radiotherapy than hypoxic regions by up to a factor of three. If these volumes could be accurately estimated, then it might be possible to selectively boost dose to radio-resistant regions, a concept known as dose-painting. While imaging modalities such as 18F-fluoromisonidazole positron emission tomography (PET) allow identification of hypoxic regions, they are intrinsically limited by the physics of such systems to the millimetre domain, whereas tumour oxygenation is known to vary over a micrometre scale. Mathematical modelling of microscopic tumour oxygen distribution therefore has the potential to complement and enhance macroscopic information derived from PET. In this work, we develop a general method of estimating oxygen distribution in three dimensions from a source vessel map. The method is applied analytically to line sources and quasi-linear idealized line source maps, and also applied to full three-dimensional vessel distributions through a kernel method and compared with oxygen distribution in tumour sections. The model outlined is flexible and stable, and can readily be applied to estimating likely microscopic oxygen distribution from any source geometry. We also investigate the problem of reconstructing three-dimensional oxygen maps from histological and confocal two-dimensional sections, concluding that two-dimensional histological sections are generally inadequate representations of the three-dimensional oxygen distribution. PMID:26935806

  2. Estimating oxygen distribution from vasculature in three-dimensional tumour tissue

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Pavitra; Warren, Daniel R.; Markelc, Bostjan; Bates, Russell; Muschel, Ruth; Partridge, Mike

    2016-01-01

    Regions of tissue which are well oxygenated respond better to radiotherapy than hypoxic regions by up to a factor of three. If these volumes could be accurately estimated, then it might be possible to selectively boost dose to radio-resistant regions, a concept known as dose-painting. While imaging modalities such as 18F-fluoromisonidazole positron emission tomography (PET) allow identification of hypoxic regions, they are intrinsically limited by the physics of such systems to the millimetre domain, whereas tumour oxygenation is known to vary over a micrometre scale. Mathematical modelling of microscopic tumour oxygen distribution therefore has the potential to complement and enhance macroscopic information derived from PET. In this work, we develop a general method of estimating oxygen distribution in three dimensions from a source vessel map. The method is applied analytically to line sources and quasi-linear idealized line source maps, and also applied to full three-dimensional vessel distributions through a kernel method and compared with oxygen distribution in tumour sections. The model outlined is flexible and stable, and can readily be applied to estimating likely microscopic oxygen distribution from any source geometry. We also investigate the problem of reconstructing three-dimensional oxygen maps from histological and confocal two-dimensional sections, concluding that two-dimensional histological sections are generally inadequate representations of the three-dimensional oxygen distribution. PMID:26935806

  3. Design of a tissue oxygenation monitor and verification on human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongyuan; Kohl-Bareis, Matthias; Huang, Xiabing

    2011-07-01

    We report the design of a tissue oxygen and temperature monitor. The non-invasive, fibre based device monitors tissue haemoglobin (Hb) and oxygen saturation (SO2) and is based on white-light reflectance spectroscopy.Visible light with wavelengths in the 500 - 650nm range is utilized. The spectroscopic algorithm takes into account the tissue scattering and melanin absorption for the calculation of tissue haemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation. The monitor can probe superficial layers of tissue with a high spatial resolution (mm3) and a high temporal resolution (40 Hz). It provides an accurate measurement with the accuracy of SO2 at 2 % and high reliability with less than 2 % variation of continuous SO2 measurement over 12 hours. It can also form a modular system when used in conjunction with a laser Doppler monitor, enabling simultaneous measurements of Hb, SO2 and blood flow. We found experimentally that the influence of the source-detector separation on the haemoglobin parameters is small. This finding is discussed by Monte Carlo simulations for the depth sensitivity profile. The influence of probe pressure and the skin pigmentation on the measurement parameters are assessed before in vivo experimental data is presented. The combination with laser Doppler flowmetry demonstrates the importance of a measurement of both the haemoglobin and the blood flow parameters for a full description of blood tissue perfusion. This is discussed in experimental data on human skin during cuff occlusion and after hyperemisation by a pharmacological cream. Strong correlation is observed between tissue oxygen (Hb and SO2) and blood flow measurements.

  4. "Overshoot" of O₂ is required to maintain baseline tissue oxygenation at locations distal to blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Devor, Anna; Sakadzic, Sava; Saisan, Payam A; Yaseen, Mohammad A; Roussakis, Emmanuel; Srinivasan, Vivek J; Vinogradov, Sergei A; Rosen, Bruce R; Buxton, Richard B; Dale, Anders M; Boas, David A

    2011-09-21

    In vivo imaging of cerebral tissue oxygenation is important in defining healthy physiology and pathological departures associated with cerebral disease. We used a recently developed two-photon microscopy method, based on a novel phosphorescent nanoprobe, to image tissue oxygenation in the rat primary sensory cortex in response to sensory stimulation. Our measurements showed that a stimulus-evoked increase in tissue pO₂ depended on the baseline pO₂ level. In particular, during sustained stimulation, the steady-state pO₂ at low-baseline locations remained at the baseline, despite large pO₂ increases elsewhere. In contrast to the steady state, where pO₂ never decreased below the baseline, transient decreases occurred during the "initial dip" and "poststimulus undershoot." These results suggest that the increase in blood oxygenation during the hemodynamic response, which has been perceived as a paradox, may serve to prevent a sustained oxygenation drop at tissue locations that are remote from the vascular feeding sources. PMID:21940458

  5. Contrast enhancement for in vivo visible reflectance imaging of tissue oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Crane, Nicole J; Schultz, Zachary D; Levin, Ira W

    2007-08-01

    Results are presented illustrating a straightforward algorithm to be used for real-time monitoring of oxygenation levels in blood cells and tissue based on the visible spectrum of hemoglobin. Absorbance images obtained from the visible reflection of white light through separate red and blue bandpass filters recorded by monochrome charge-coupled devices (CCDs) are combined to create enhanced images that suggest a quantitative correlation between the degree of oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin in red blood cells. The filter bandpass regions are chosen specifically to mimic the color response of commercial 3-CCD cameras, representative of detectors with which the operating room laparoscopic tower systems are equipped. Adaptation of this filter approach is demonstrated for laparoscopic donor nephrectomies in which images are analyzed in terms of real-time in vivo monitoring of tissue oxygenation. PMID:17716397

  6. Evolution of oxygen utilization in multicellular organisms and implications for cell signalling in tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Stamati, Katerina; Mudera, Vivek

    2011-01-01

    Oxygen is one of the critically defining elements resulting in the existence of eukaryotic life on this planet. The rise and fall of this element can be tracked through time and corresponds with the evolution of diverse life forms, development of efficient energy production (oxidative phosphorylation) in single cell organisms, the evolution of multicellular organisms and the regulation of complex cell phenotypes. By understanding these events, we can plot the effect of oxygen on evolution and its direct influence on different forms of life today, from the whole organism to specific cells within multicellular organisms. In the emerging field of tissue engineering, understanding the role of different levels of oxygen for normal cell function as well as control of complex signalling cascades is paramount to effectively build 3D tissues in vitro and their subsequent survival when implanted. PMID:22292107

  7. A comparison of the tissue oxygenation achieved using different oxygen delivery devices and flow rates.

    PubMed

    2016-03-01

    Consistent with the Committee on Publication Ethics guidelines, we the above authors are initiating a partial retraction of our paper: Blake DF, Naidoo P, Brown LH, Young DA, Lippmann J: A comparison of the tissue oxygenation achieved using different oxygen delivery devices and flow rates. Diving Hyperb Med. 2015;45:79-83. We wish to make the following statement: "The authors voluntarily retract aspects of this article after discovering a critical error associated with the instrumentation used in the study, namely the fitting of incorrect sensor membranes on the electrodes of the transcutaneous oximetry device used in the study. This resulted in transcutaneous oxygen tension (PtcO₂) measurements that were consistently lower than those that would be recorded with the correct electrode membranes in place. This measurement error was consistent across all arms of the study. This non-differential information error would have created a bias toward the null hypothesis. Therefore, whilst the absolute values for the data were incorrect, the direction and implications of the significant associations reported in this study are unchanged." PMID:27044467

  8. Radiosensitization by nicotinamide in tumors and normal tissues: the importance of tissue oxygenation status

    SciTech Connect

    Horsman, M.R.; Hansen, P.V.; Overgaard, J.

    1989-05-01

    Nicotinamide induced radiosensitization of tumors has been suggested to be a consequence of a reduction in tumor hypoxia. We have investigated the possibility that nicotinamide may produce significant radiosensitization in a normal tissue in which the radiation response is also influenced by hypoxia. The normal tissue studied was testis and radiation damage was assessed by measuring survival of spermatogonial stem cells. The radiosensitizing action of nicotinamide in testis was compared to that observed in a C3H mammary carcinoma when assayed by both regrowth delay and local tumor control. Our results show that nicotinamide (1000 mg/kg; i.p.) enhanced radiation damage in both tissue types when the radiation was given up to at least 3 hr after drug injection. Enhancement ratios obtained when the drug and radiation were separated by a 1 hr time interval were between 1.1 to 1.2 for the testis and 1.0 to 1.5 for the tumor. The results suggest that nicotinamide will produce radiosensitization in testis, but the effect is small and less than that observed in tumors.

  9. The effects of progressive anemia on jejunal mucosal and serosal tissue oxygenation in pigs.

    PubMed

    Haisjackl, M; Luz, G; Sparr, H; Germann, R; Salak, N; Friesenecker, B; Deusch, E; Meusburger, S; Hasibeder, W

    1997-03-01

    Anemia may promote intestinal hypoxia. We studied the effects of progressive isovolemic hemodilution on jejunal mucosal (Po2muc), and serosal tissue oxygen tension (Po2ser, Clark-type surface electrodes), mucosal microvascular hemoglobin oxygen saturation (Hbo2muc), and hematocrit (Hctmuc; tissue reflectance spectophotometry) in a jejunal segment. Twelve domestic pigs were anesthetized, paralyzed, and mechanically ventilated. Laparatomy was performed, arterial supply of a jejunal segment isolated, and constant pressure pump perfused. Seven animals were progressively hemodiluted to systemic hematocrits (Hctsys) of 20%, 15%, 10%, and 6%. Baseline for Po2muc, Po2ser and Hbo2muc was 23.5 +/- 2.1 mm Hg, 57.5 +/- 4 mm Hg, and 47.0% +/- 6.4% which were not different from the five controls. Despite a significant increase in jejunal blood flow, jejunal oxygen delivery decreased and oxygen extraction ratio increased significantly at Hctsys 10% and 6%. Po2ser decreased significantly below or at Hctsys of 15%, whereas Po2muc and Hbo2muc were maintained to Hctsys of 10%, but less than 10% Hbo2muc and mesenteric venous pH decreased significantly, implying that physiological limits of jejunal microvascular adaptation to severe anemia were reached. Decrease of Hctmuc was less pronounced than Hctsys. In conclusion, redistribution of jejunal blood flow and an increase in the ratio of mucosal to systemic hematocrit are the main mechanisms maintaining mucosal oxygen supply during progressive anemia. PMID:9052297

  10. Quantitative Tissue Oxygen Measurement in Multiple Organs Using 19F MRI in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Siyuan; Shah, Sameer J.; Wilmes, Lisa J.; Feiner, John; Kodibagkar, Vikram D.; Wendland, Michael F.; Mason, Ralph P.; Hylton, Nola; Hopf, Harriet W.; Rollins, Mark D.

    2011-01-01

    Measurement of individual organ tissue oxygen levels can provide information to help evaluate and optimize medical interventions in many areas including wound healing, resuscitation strategies, and cancer therapeutics. Echo planar 19F MRI has previously focused on tumor oxygen measurement at low oxygen levels (pO2) < 30 mmHg. It uses the linear relationship between spin-lattice relaxation rate (R1) of hexafluorobenzene (HFB) and pO2. The feasibility of this technique for a wider range of pO2 values and individual organ tissue pO2 measurement was investigated in a rat model. Spin-lattice relaxation times (T1=1/R1) of HFB were measured using 19F saturation recovery echo planar imaging (EPI). Initial in vitro studies validated the linear relationship between R1 and pO2 from 0 mmHg to 760 mmHg oxygen partial pressure at 25°C, 37°C, and 41°C at 7 Tesla for HFB. In vivo experiments measured rat tissue oxygen (ptO2) levels of brain, kidney, liver, gut, muscle and skin during inhalation of both 30% and 100% oxygen. All organ ptO2 values significantly increased with hyperoxia (p<0.001). This study demonstrates that 19F MRI of HFB offers a feasible tool to measure regional ptO2 in vivo, and that hyperoxia significantly increases ptO2 of multiple organs in a rat model. PMID:21688315

  11. Artificial membrane-binding proteins stimulate oxygenation of stem cells during engineering of large cartilage tissue

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, James P. K.; Shakur, Rameen; Horne, Joseph P.; Dickinson, Sally C.; Armstrong, Craig T.; Lau, Katherine; Kadiwala, Juned; Lowe, Robert; Seddon, Annela; Mann, Stephen; Anderson, J. L. Ross; Perriman, Adam W.; Hollander, Anthony P.

    2015-01-01

    Restricted oxygen diffusion can result in central cell necrosis in engineered tissue, a problem that is exacerbated when engineering large tissue constructs for clinical application. Here we show that pre-treating human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) with synthetic membrane-active myoglobin-polymer–surfactant complexes can provide a reservoir of oxygen capable of alleviating necrosis at the centre of hyaline cartilage. This is achieved through the development of a new cell functionalization methodology based on polymer–surfactant conjugation, which allows the delivery of functional proteins to the hMSC membrane. This new approach circumvents the need for cell surface engineering using protein chimerization or genetic transfection, and we demonstrate that the surface-modified hMSCs retain their ability to proliferate and to undergo multilineage differentiation. The functionalization technology is facile, versatile and non-disruptive, and in addition to tissue oxygenation, it should have far-reaching application in a host of tissue engineering and cell-based therapies. PMID:26080734

  12. Artificial membrane-binding proteins stimulate oxygenation of stem cells during engineering of large cartilage tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, James P. K.; Shakur, Rameen; Horne, Joseph P.; Dickinson, Sally C.; Armstrong, Craig T.; Lau, Katherine; Kadiwala, Juned; Lowe, Robert; Seddon, Annela; Mann, Stephen; Anderson, J. L. Ross; Perriman, Adam W.; Hollander, Anthony P.

    2015-06-01

    Restricted oxygen diffusion can result in central cell necrosis in engineered tissue, a problem that is exacerbated when engineering large tissue constructs for clinical application. Here we show that pre-treating human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) with synthetic membrane-active myoglobin-polymer-surfactant complexes can provide a reservoir of oxygen capable of alleviating necrosis at the centre of hyaline cartilage. This is achieved through the development of a new cell functionalization methodology based on polymer-surfactant conjugation, which allows the delivery of functional proteins to the hMSC membrane. This new approach circumvents the need for cell surface engineering using protein chimerization or genetic transfection, and we demonstrate that the surface-modified hMSCs retain their ability to proliferate and to undergo multilineage differentiation. The functionalization technology is facile, versatile and non-disruptive, and in addition to tissue oxygenation, it should have far-reaching application in a host of tissue engineering and cell-based therapies.

  13. Tissue oxygen monitoring by photoacoustic lifetime imaging (PALI) and its application to image-guided photodynamic therapy (PDT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Qi; Morgounova, Ekaterina; Ashkenazi, Shai

    2015-03-01

    The oxygen partial pressure (pO2), which results from the balance between oxygen delivery and its consumption, is a key component of the physiological state of a tissue. Images of oxygen distribution can provide essential information for identifying hypoxic tissue and optimizing cancer treatment. Previously, we have reported a noninvasive in vivo imaging modality based on photoacoustic lifetime. The technique maps the excited triplet state of oxygen-sensitive dye, thus reflects the spatial and temporal distribution of tissue oxygen. We have applied PALI on tumor on small animals to identify hypoxia area. We also showed that PALI is able monitor changes of tissue oxygen, in an acute ischemia and breathing modulation model. Here we present our work on developing a treatment/imaging modality (PDT-PALI) that integrates PDT and a combined ultrasound/photoacoustic imaging system. The system provides real-time feedback of three essential parameters namely: tissue oxygen, light penetration in tumor location, and distribution of photosensitizer. Tissue oxygen imaging is performed by applying PALI, which relies on photoacoustic probing of oxygen-dependent, excitation lifetime of Methylene Blue (MB) photosensitizer. Lifetime information can also be used to generate image showing the distribution of photosensitizer. The level and penetration depth of PDT illumination can be deduced from photoacoustic imaging at the same wavelength. All images will be combined with ultrasound B-mode images for anatomical reference.

  14. Tissue blood flow and oxygen consumption measured with near-infrared frequency-domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paunescu, Lelia Adelina

    2001-12-01

    For decades, researchers have contributed with new ways of applying physics' principles to medicine. Moreover, researchers were involved in developing new, non-invasive instrumentation for medical applications. Recently, application of optical techniques in biology and medicine became an important field. Researchers found a non- invasive approach of using visible and near-infrared light as a probe for tissue investigation. Optical methods can contribute to medicine by offering the possibility of rapid, low-resolution, functional images and real-time devices. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a useful technique for the investigation of biological tissues because of the relatively low absorption of water and high absorption of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin in the near- infrared region of 750-900 nm. Due to these properties, the near-infrared light can penetrate biological tissues in the range of 0.5-2 cm, offering investigation possibility of deep tissues and differentiate among healthy and diseased tissues. This work represents the initial steps towards understanding and improving of the promising near- infrared frequency-domain technique. This instrument has a very important advantage: it can be used non-invasively to investigate many parts of the human body, including the brain. My research consists primarily of in vivo measurements of optical parameters such as absorption and reduced scattering coefficients and consequently, blood parameters such as oxy, deoxy, and total hemoglobin concentrations, tissue oxygen saturation, blood flow and oxygen consumption of skeletal muscle of healthy and diseased subjects. This research gives a solid background towards a ready- to-use instrument that can continuously, in real-time, measure blood parameters and especially blood oxygenation. This is a very important information in emergency medicine, for persons under intensive care, or undergoing surgery, organ transplant or other interventions.

  15. Localized Increase of Tissue Oxygen Tension by Magnetic Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Liong, Celine; Ortiz, Daniel; Ao-ieong, Eilleen; Navati, Mahantesh S.; Friedman, Joel M.; Cabrales, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia is the major hindrance to successful radiation therapy of tumors. Attempts to increase the oxygen (O2) tension (PO2) of tissue by delivering more O2 have been clinically disappointing, largely due to the way O2 is transported and released by the hemoglobin (Hb) within the red blood cells (RBCs). Systemic manipulation of O2 transport increases vascular resistance due to metabolic autoregulation of blood flow to prevent over oxygenation. This study investigates a new technology to increase O2 delivery to a target tissue by decreasing the Hb-O2 affinity of the blood circulating within the targeted tissue. As the Hb-O2 affinity decreases, the tissue PO2 to satisfy tissue O2 metabolic needs increases, without increasing O2 delivery or extraction. Paramagnetic nanoparticles (PMNPs) synthetized using gadolinium oxide, were coated with the cell permeable Hb allosteric effector, L35 (3,5-trichlorophenylureido-phenoxy-methylpropionic acid). L35 decreases Hb affinity for O2 and favors the release of O2. The L35-coaded PMNPs (L35-PMNPs) were intravenously infused (10 mg/kg) to hamster instrumented with the dorsal window chamber model. Magnetic field of 3 mT was applied to localize the effects of the L35-PMNPs to the window chamber. Systemic O2 transport characteristics and microvascular tissue oxygenation were measured after L35-PMNPs administration with and without magnetic field. The tissue PO2 untreated control animals was 25.2 mmHg. L35-PMNP without magnetic field decreased tissue PO2 to 23.4 mmHg, increased blood pressure and reduced blood flow, largely due to systemic modification of Hb-O2 affinity. L35-PMNP with magnetic field increased tissue PO2 to 27.9 mmHg, without systemic or microhemodynamics changes. These results indicate that localized modification of Hb-O2 affinity can increase PO2 of target tissue, without affecting systemic O2 delivery or triggering O2 autoregulation mechanisms. This technology can be used to treat local hypoxia and to increase O2 in

  16. Localized increase of tissue oxygen tension by magnetic targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liong, Celine; Ortiz, Daniel; Ao-ieong, Eilleen; Navati, Mahantesh S.; Friedman, Joel M.; Cabrales, Pedro

    2014-07-01

    Hypoxia is the major hindrance to successful radiation therapy of tumors. Attempts to increase the oxygen (O2) tension (PO2) of tissue by delivering more O2 have been clinically disappointing, largely due to the way O2 is transported and released by the hemoglobin (Hb) within the red blood cells (RBCs). Systemic manipulation of O2 transport increases vascular resistance due to metabolic autoregulation of blood flow to prevent over oxygenation. This study investigates a new technology to increase O2 delivery to a target tissue by decreasing the Hb-O2 affinity of the blood circulating within the targeted tissue. As the Hb-O2 affinity decreases, the tissue PO2 to satisfy tissue O2 metabolic needs increases without increasing O2 delivery or extraction. Paramagnetic nanoparticles (PMNPs), synthetized using gadolinium oxide, were coated with the cell permeable Hb allosteric effector L35 (3,5-trichlorophenylureido-phenoxy-methylpropionic acid). L35 decreases Hb affinity for O2 and favors the release of O2. The L35-coated PMNPs (L35-PMNPs) were intravenously infused (10 mg kg-1) to hamsters instrumented with the dorsal window chamber model. A magnetic field of 3 mT was applied to localize the effects of the L35-PMNPs to the window chamber. Systemic O2 transport characteristics and microvascular tissue oxygenation were measured after administration of L35-PMNPs with and without magnetic field. The tissue PO2 in untreated control animals was 25.2 mmHg. L35-PMNPs without magnetic field decreased tissue PO2 to 23.4 mmHg, increased blood pressure, and reduced blood flow, largely due to systemic modification of Hb-O2 affinity. L35-PMNPs with magnetic field increased tissue PO2 to 27.9 mmHg, without systemic or microhemodynamic changes. These results indicate that localized modification of Hb-O2 affinity can increase PO2 of target tissue without affecting systemic O2 delivery or triggering O2 autoregulation mechanisms. This technology can be used to treat local hypoxia and to

  17. Tissue oxygenation during exercise measured with NIRS: reproducibility and influence of wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Gerz, Erwin; Geraskin, Dmitri; Franke, Julia; Platen, Petra; Steimers, André; Kohl-Bareis, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is widely used for the measurement of skeletal muscle oxygenation during exercise as it reflects muscle metabolism, and most studies report a large variability between subjects. Here we assess the data quality of tissue oxygen saturation (SO2) and oxygenated (oxyHb) and deoxygenated (deoxyHb) haemoglobin concentrations recorded during an incremental cycling protocol in nine healthy volunteers. The protocol was repeated three times on the same day and a fourth session on a different day to estimate the reproducibility of the method with a broadband, spatially resolved spectroscopy (SRS) system. We found that the inter-subject variation in SO2 (standard deviation ≈ 6 %) was considerably larger than the reproducibility (≈ 1.5 %) both for the same-day and different-day tests. The reproducibility of changes in SO2 was better than 1 %. PMID:23852492

  18. Expression of nodule-specific uricase in soybean callus tissue is regulated by oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Knud; Jochimsen, Bjarne U.

    1986-01-01

    In soybean root nodules the enzyme uricase is expressed concomitantly with nodule development. The initial expression of this protein does not depend on active nitrogen fixation, as demonstrated by analysis of uricase activity in effective and ineffective root nodules. However, the maximal level of uricase activity is determined by the infecting Rhizobium japonicum strain. Sterile root cultures and callus tissue, devoid of the microsymbiont, were incubated at varying oxygen concentrations and analyzed for uricase activity. The specific activity of uricase was increased by lowering the oxygen concentration, with the highest activity obtained around 4−5% oxygen. The increase in uricase activity was due to increased uricase synthesis, as demonstrated by in vivo labelling of callus culture followed by immunoprecipitation with antibodies raised against highly purified nodule uricase. ImagesFig. 6. PMID:16453663

  19. Optical fiber probe spectroscopy for laparoscopic monitoring of tissue oxygenation during esophagectomies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gareau, Daniel S.; Truffer, Frederic; Perry, Kyle; Pham, Thai; Enestvedt, C. Kristian; Dolan, James; Hunter, John G.; Jacques, Steven L.

    2010-11-01

    Anastomotic complication is a major morbidity associated with esophagectomy. Gastric ischemia after conduit creation contributes to anastomotic complications, but a reliable method to assess oxygenation in the gastric conduit is lacking. We hypothesize that fiber optic spectroscopy can reliably assess conduit oxygenation, and that intraoperative gastric ischemia will correlate with the development of anastomotic complications. A simple optical fiber probe spectrometer is designed for nondestructive laparoscopic measurement of blood content and hemoglobin oxygen saturation in the stomach tissue microvasculature during human esophagectomies. In 22 patients, the probe measured the light transport in stomach tissue between two fibers spaced 3-mm apart (500- to 650-nm wavelength range). The stomach tissue site of measurement becomes the site of a gastroesophageal anastamosis following excision of the cancerous esophagus and surgical ligation of two of the three gastric arteries that provide blood perfusion to the anastamosis. Measurements are made at each of five steps throughout the surgery. The resting baseline saturation is 0.51+/-0.15 and decreases to 0.35+/-0.20 with ligation. Seven patients develop anastomotic complications, and a decreased saturation at either of the last two steps (completion of conduit and completion of anastamosis) is predictive of complication with a sensitivity of 0.71 when the specificity equaled 0.71.

  20. [Disturbances of oxygen-dependent processes in periodontal tissues under prolonged immobilization stress and ways of their pharmacological correction].

    PubMed

    Opanasenko, H B; Bratus', L V; Havenauskas, B L; Honchar, O O; Man'kovs'ka, I M; Nosar, V I; Frantsuzova, S B

    2013-01-01

    Influence of prolonged immobilization (6 h strict horizontal position of rats in the tight containers daily for 2 weeks) on oxygen tension, oxygen consumption, pro-/antioxidant balance, and energetic metabolism of soft and hard periodontal tissues has been investigated. It was established that prolonged immobilization stress resulted in marked decrease in the gum tissue PO2 (36%) and in the bone tissue oxygen consumption rate (46%) compared to control. It was also determined that prolonged stress led to a reduction in the gum mitochondrial respiration rate. The latter was more expressed in case of the NAD-dependent substrate oxidation than of the FAD- dependent one. It was determined that the prolonged stress results in intensification of peroxide processes and depletion of antioxidant protection of soft tissues of periodontum. It was found that Thiotriazolin and Actovegin have modified and diminished stress-induced disorders in the soft and hard periodontal tissues oxygen homeostasis under prolonged immobilization stress. PMID:23713346

  1. Open lung ventilation in neurosurgery: an update on brain tissue oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Wolf, S; Plev, D V; Trost, H A; Lumenta, C B

    2005-01-01

    Recently, we showed the feasibility of ventilating neurosurgical patients with acute intracranial pathology and concomitant acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) according the so-called Open Lung approach. This technique consists of low tidal volume, elevated positive expiratory pressure (PEEP) level and initial recruitment maneuvers to open up collapsed alveoli. In this report, we focus on our experience to guide recruitment with brain tissue oxygenation (pbrO2) probes. We studied recruitment maneuvers in thirteen patients with ARDS and acute brain injury such as subarachnoid hemorrhage and traumatic brain injury. A pbrO2 probe was implanted in brain tissue at risk for hypoxia. Recruitment maneuvers were performed at an inspired oxygen frcation (FiO2) of 1.0 and a PEEP level of 30 40 cmH2O for 40 seconds. The mean FiO2 necessary for normoxemia could be decreased from 0.85 +/- 0.17 before recruitment to 0.55 +/- 0.12 after 24 hours, while mean PbrO2 (24.6 mmHg before recruitment) did not change. At a mean of 17 minutes after the first recruitment maneuver, PbrO2 showed peak a value of 35.6 +/- 16.6 mmHg, reflecting improvement in arterial oxygenation at an FiO2 of 1.0. Brain tissue oxygenation monitoring provides a useful adjunct to estimate the effects of recruitment maneuvers and ventilator settings in neurosurgical patients with acute lung injury. PMID:16463830

  2. Oxygen consumption rate of early pre-antral follicles from vitrified human ovarian cortical tissue.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Takayuki; Kyoya, Toshihiko; Nakamura, Yusuke; Sato, Eimei; Tomiyama, Tatsuhiro; Kyono, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    The study of human ovarian tissue transplantation and cryopreservation has advanced significantly. Autotransplantation of human pre-antral follicles isolated from cryopreserved cortical tissue is a promising option for the preservation of fertility in young cancer patients. The purpose of the present study was to reveal the effect of vitrification after low-temperature transportation of human pre-antral follicles by using the oxygen consumption rate (OCR). Cortical tissues from 9 ovaries of female-to-male transsexuals were vitrified after transportation (6 or 18 h). The follicles were enzymatically isolated from nonvitrified tissue (group I, 18 h of transportation), vitrified-warmed tissue (group II, 6 and 18 h of transportation) and vitrified-warmed tissue that had been incubated for 24 h (group III, 6 and 18 h of transportation). OCR measurement and the LIVE/DEAD viability assay were performed. Despite the ischemic condition, the isolated pre-antral follicles in group I consumed oxygen, and the mean OCRs increased with developmental stage. Neither the transportation time nor patient age seemed to affect the OCR in this group. Meanwhile, the mean OCR was significantly lower (P < 0.05) in group II but was comparable to that of group I after 24 h of incubation. The integrity of vitrified-warmed primordial and primary follicles was clearly corroborated by the LIVE/DEAD viability assay. These results demonstrate that the OCR can be used to directly estimate the effect of vitrification on the viability of primordial and primary follicles and to select the viable primordial and primary follicles from vitrified-warmed follicles. PMID:25262776

  3. Oxygen consumption rate of early pre-antral follicles from vitrified human ovarian cortical tissue

    PubMed Central

    ISHIKAWA, Takayuki; KYOYA, Toshihiko; NAKAMURA, Yusuke; SATO, Eimei; TOMIYAMA, Tatsuhiro; KYONO, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    The study of human ovarian tissue transplantation and cryopreservation has advanced significantly. Autotransplantation of human pre-antral follicles isolated from cryopreserved cortical tissue is a promising option for the preservation of fertility in young cancer patients. The purpose of the present study was to reveal the effect of vitrification after low-temperature transportation of human pre-antral follicles by using the oxygen consumption rate (OCR). Cortical tissues from 9 ovaries of female-to-male transsexuals were vitrified after transportation (6 or 18 h). The follicles were enzymatically isolated from nonvitrified tissue (group I, 18 h of transportation), vitrified-warmed tissue (group II, 6 and 18 h of transportation) and vitrified-warmed tissue that had been incubated for 24 h (group III, 6 and 18 h of transportation). OCR measurement and the LIVE/DEAD viability assay were performed. Despite the ischemic condition, the isolated pre-antral follicles in group I consumed oxygen, and the mean OCRs increased with developmental stage. Neither the transportation time nor patient age seemed to affect the OCR in this group. Meanwhile, the mean OCR was significantly lower (P < 0.05) in group II but was comparable to that of group I after 24 h of incubation. The integrity of vitrified-warmed primordial and primary follicles was clearly corroborated by the LIVE/DEAD viability assay. These results demonstrate that the OCR can be used to directly estimate the effect of vitrification on the viability of primordial and primary follicles and to select the viable primordial and primary follicles from vitrified-warmed follicles. PMID:25262776

  4. Effect of oxygen breathing on micro oxygen bubbles in nitrogen-depleted rat adipose tissue at sea level and 25 kPa altitude exposures.

    PubMed

    Randsoe, Thomas; Hyldegaard, Ole

    2012-08-01

    The standard treatment of altitude decompression sickness (aDCS) caused by nitrogen bubble formation is oxygen breathing and recompression. However, micro air bubbles (containing 79% nitrogen), injected into adipose tissue, grow and stabilize at 25 kPa regardless of continued oxygen breathing and the tissue nitrogen pressure. To quantify the contribution of oxygen to bubble growth at altitude, micro oxygen bubbles (containing 0% nitrogen) were injected into the adipose tissue of rats depleted from nitrogen by means of preoxygenation (fraction of inspired oxygen = 1.0; 100%) and the bubbles studied at 101.3 kPa (sea level) or at 25 kPa altitude exposures during continued oxygen breathing. In keeping with previous observations and bubble kinetic models, we hypothesize that oxygen breathing may contribute to oxygen bubble growth at altitude. Anesthetized rats were exposed to 3 h of oxygen prebreathing at 101.3 kPa (sea level). Micro oxygen bubbles of 500-800 nl were then injected into the exposed abdominal adipose tissue. The oxygen bubbles were studied for up to 3.5 h during continued oxygen breathing at either 101.3 or 25 kPa ambient pressures. At 101.3 kPa, all bubbles shrank consistently until they disappeared from view at a net disappearance rate (0.02 mm(2) × min(-1)) significantly faster than for similar bubbles at 25 kPa altitude (0.01 mm(2) × min(-1)). At 25 kPa, most bubbles initially grew for 2-40 min, after which they shrank and disappeared. Four bubbles did not disappear while at 25 kPa. The results support bubble kinetic models based on Fick's first law of diffusion, Boyles law, and the oxygen window effect, predicting that oxygen contributes more to bubble volume and growth during hypobaric conditions. As the effect of oxygen increases, the lower the ambient pressure. The results indicate that recompression is instrumental in the treatment of aDCS. PMID:22653987

  5. Tissue injury by reactive oxygen species and the protective effects of flavonoids.

    PubMed

    de Groot, H; Rauen, U

    1998-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species contribute decisively to a great variety of diseases. Flavonoids are benzo-gamma-pyrone derivatives of plant origin found in various fruits and vegetables but also in tea and in red wine. Some of the flavonoids, such as quercetin and silibinin, can effectively protect cells and tissues against the deleterious effects of reactive oxygen species. Their antioxidant activity results from scavenging of free radicals and other oxidizing intermediates, from the chelation of iron or copper ions and from inhibition of oxidases. For their free radical scavenging properties, scavenging of lipid- and protein-derived radicals is presumably of special importance. A non-radical reactive oxygen species effectively trapped by flavonoids is hypochlorous acid. In general, the antioxidative properties of flavonoids are favoured by a high degree of OH substitution. On the other hand, inhibition of enzymatic functions other than oxidases, e.g., inhibition of lipoxygenase and thus prevention of the formation of leukotrienes, may also participate in the cell and tissue protective properties of flavonoids. PMID:9646056

  6. Tissue gas and blood analyses of human subjects breathing 80% argon and 20% oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horrigan, D. J.; Wells, C. H.; Guest, M. M.; Hart, G. B.; Goodpasture, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    Eight human volunteers, individually studied in a hyperbaric chamber, breathed: (1) air at 1 ATA; (2) 80% argon and 20% oxygen at 1 ATA for 30 min; (3) air at 1 ATA for 30 min; (4) 100% O2 at 1 ATA for 30 min; (5) air at 1 ATA for 30 min; (6) 100% O2 at 2 ATA for 60 min; and (7) 80% argon and 20% oxygen at 1 ATA for 30 min. Oxygen, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and argon tensions were measured in muscle and subcutaneous tissue by mass spectroscopic analyses. Venous blood obtained at regular intervals was analyzed for coagulation and fibrinolytic factors. Inert gas narcosis was not observed. After breathing argon for 30 min, muscle argon tensions were almost three times the subcutaneous tensions. Argon wash-in mirrored nitrogen wash-out. Argon wash-in and wash-out had no effect on tissue PO2 or PCO2. Coagulation and fibrinolytic changes usually associated with vascular bubbles were absent.

  7. Plasma jet-induced tissue oxygenation: potentialities for new therapeutic strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collet, G.; Robert, E.; Lenoir, A.; Vandamme, M.; Darny, T.; Dozias, S.; Kieda, C.; Pouvesle, J. M.

    2014-02-01

    The lack of oxygen is a major reason for the resistance of tumor cells to treatments such as radiotherapies. A large number of recent publications on non-thermal plasma applications in medicine report cell behavior modifications and modulation of soluble factors. This in vivo study tested whether such modifications can lead to vascular changes in response to plasma application. Two in situ optical-based methods were used simultaneously, in real time, to assess the effect of non-thermal plasma on tissue vasculature. Tissue oxygen partial pressure (pO2) was measured using a time-resolved luminescence-based optical probe, and the microvascular erythrocyte flow was determined by laser Doppler flowmetry. When plasma treatment was applied on mouse skin, a rapid pO2 increase (up to 4 times) was subcutaneously measured and correlated with blood flow improvement. Such short duration, i.e. 5 min, plasma-induced effects were shown to be locally restricted to the treated area and lasted over 120 min. Further investigations should elucidate the molecular mechanisms of these processes. However, improvement of oxygenation and perfusion open new opportunities for tumor treatments in combination with radiotherapy, and for tumor blood vessel normalization based strategies.

  8. A Porous Tissue Engineering Scaffold Selectively Degraded by Cell-Generated Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Martin, John R.; Gupta, Mukesh K.; Page, Jonathan M.; Yu, Fang; Davidson, Jeffrey M.; Guelcher, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Biodegradable tissue engineering scaffolds are commonly fabricated from poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) or similar polyesters that degrade by hydrolysis. PLGA hydrolysis generates acidic breakdown products that trigger an accelerated, autocatalytic degradation mechanism that can create mismatched rates of biomaterial breakdown and tissue formation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are key mediators of cell function in both health and disease, especially at sites of inflammation and tissue healing, and induction of inflammation and ROS are natural components of the in vivo response to biomaterial implantation. Thus, polymeric biomaterials that are selectively degraded by cell-generated ROS may have potential for creating tissue engineering scaffolds with better matched rates of tissue in-growth and cell-mediated scaffold biodegradation. To explore this approach, a series of poly(thioketal) (PTK) urethane (PTK-UR) biomaterial scaffolds were synthesized that degrade specifically by an ROS-dependent mechanism. PTK-UR scaffolds had significantly higher compressive moduli than analogous poly(ester urethane) (PEUR) scaffolds formed from hydrolytically-degradable ester-based diols (p < 0.05). Unlike PEUR scaffolds, the PTK-UR scaffolds were stable under aqueous conditions out to 25 weeks but were selectively degraded by ROS, indicating that their biodegradation would be exclusively cell-mediated. The in vitro oxidative degradation rates of the PTK-URs followed first-order degradation kinetics, were significantly dependent on PTK composition (p < 0.05), and correlated to ROS concentration. In subcutaneous rat wounds, PTK-UR scaffolds supported cellular infiltration and granulation tissue formation, followed first-order degradation kinetics over 7 weeks, and produced significantly greater stenting of subcutaneous wounds compared to PEUR scaffolds. These combined results indicate that ROS-degradable PTK-UR tissue engineering scaffolds have significant advantages over analogous

  9. Brain tissue oxygen, carbon dioxide, and pH in neurosurgical patients at risk for ischemia.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, W E; Charbel, F T; Edelman, G

    1996-03-01

    A sensor that measures oxygen pressure (PO2), carbon dioxide pressure (PCO2), and pH was evaluated in brain tissue of patients at risk for ischemia. The sensor is 0.5 mm in diameter and was inserted into cortex tissue in 14 patients undergoing craniotomy for cerebrovascular surgery. A compromised cerebral circulation was identified in 8 of 14 patients by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scan, cerebral angiography, and transient ischemic episodes before surgery. Under baseline conditions with isoflurane anesthesia and normal blood gases, tissue P02 was lower in the eight compromised compared to six noncompromised patients (noncompromised 37 +/- 12 mm Hg, compromised 10 +/- 5 mm Hg; P < 0.05), PCO2 was increased (noncompromised 49 +/- 5 mm Hg, compromised 72 +/- 23 mm Hg; P < 0.05), and pH was decreased (noncompromised 7.16 +/- 0.08, compromised 6.82 +/- 0.21; P < 0.05). Critical tissue values for the identification of ischemia were a P02 of 20 mm Hg, PCO2 of 60 mm Hg, and a pH of 7.0. These results suggest that brain tissue measures of P02, PCO2, and pH provide information on the adequacy of cerebral perfusion in neurosurgical patients. PMID:8623965

  10. Effect of oxygen and heliox breathing on air bubbles in adipose tissue during 25-kPa altitude exposures.

    PubMed

    Randsøe, T; Kvist, T M; Hyldegaard, O

    2008-11-01

    At altitude, bubbles are known to form and grow in blood and tissues causing altitude decompression sickness. Previous reports indicate that treatment of decompression sickness by means of oxygen breathing at altitude may cause unwanted bubble growth. In this report we visually followed the in vivo changes of micro air bubbles injected into adipose tissue of anesthetized rats at 101.3 kPa (sea level) after which they were decompressed from 101.3 kPa to and held at 25 kPa (10,350 m), during breathing of oxygen or a heliox(34:66) mixture (34% helium and 66% oxygen). Furthermore, bubbles were studied during oxygen breathing preceded by a 3-h period of preoxygenation to eliminate tissue nitrogen before decompression. During oxygen breathing, bubbles grew from 11 to 198 min (mean: 121 min, +/-SD 53.4) after which they remained stable or began to shrink slowly. During heliox breathing bubbles grew from 30 to 130 min (mean: 67 min, +/-SD 31.0) from which point they stabilized or shrank slowly. No bubbles disappeared during either oxygen or heliox breathing. Preoxygenation followed by continuous oxygen breathing at altitude caused most bubbles to grow from 19 to 179 min (mean: 51 min, +/-SD 47.7) after which they started shrinking or remained stable throughout the observation period. Bubble growth time was significantly longer during oxygen breathing compared with heliox breathing and preoxygenated animals. Significantly more bubbles disappeared in preoxygenated animals compared with oxygen and heliox breathing. Preoxygenation enhanced bubble disappearance compared with oxygen and heliox breathing but did not prevent bubble growth. The results indicate that oxygen breathing at 25 kPa promotes air bubble growth in adipose tissue regardless of the tissue nitrogen pressure. PMID:18756005

  11. Pionic carbon/oxygen capture ratios in blood and muscle tissue of pig.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, C; Mares, V; Blattmann, H

    1987-10-01

    The pionic carbon/oxygen capture ratio for the blood and muscle tissue of a pig was measured using an intrinsic Ge detector in order to investigate possible explanations for an enhanced lesion observed in the autopsy of pion-irradiated patients. Pure iron was also irradiated in order to determine the energies and intensities of pionic x-rays from iron. It was expected that some of them originated from haemoglobin and could be observed in the spectrum for a blood sample. TE plastic (Shonka A-150) and Lucite were also investigated for comparison with other work. PMID:3685101

  12. Investigation of endocrine and immunological response in fat tissue to hyperbaric oxygen administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Şen, H; Erbağ, G; Ovali, M A; Öztopuz, R Ö; Uzun, M

    2016-01-01

    Though HBO treatment is becoming more common, the mechanism of action is not fully known. The positive effects of HBO administration on the inflammatory response is thought to be a possible basic mechanism. As a result, we aimed to research whether endocrine and immunological response of fat tissue changes in rats given HBO treatment model. This research was carried out on Wistar albino rats, they were treated with hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Their fatty tissue were taken from the abdomen, gene expression of the cytokines and adipokines were analyzed with Real time PCR method. When the gene expression of hormones and cytokines by fat tissue was examined, the leptin, visfatin, TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-10 levels in the HBO treatment group were statistically significantly increased compared to the control group (p=0.0313, p=0.0156, p=0.0156, p=0.0156, p=0.0313). In conclusion, in our study we identified that HBO administration affected the endochrinological functions of fat tissue. PMID:27188864

  13. Nanoparticle-enhanced spectral photoacoustic tomography: effect of oxygen saturation and tissue heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, William C.; Jia, Congxian; Wear, Keith A.; Garra, Brian S.; Pfefer, T. Joshua

    2016-03-01

    Molecular imaging for breast cancer detection, infectious disease diagnostics and preclinical animal research may be achievable through combined use of targeted exogenous agents - such as nanoparticles - and spectral Photoacoustic Tomography (PAT). However, tissue heterogeneity can alter fluence distributions and acoustic propagation, corrupting measured PAT absorption spectra and complicating in vivo nanoparticle detection and quantitation. Highly absorptive vascular structures represent a common confounding factor, and variations in vessel hemoglobin saturation (SO2) may alter spectral content of signals from adjacent/deeper regions. To evaluate the impact of this effect on PAT nanoparticle detectability, we constructed heterogeneous phantoms with well-characterized channel-inclusion geometries and biologically relevant optical and acoustic properties. Phantoms contained an array of tubes at several depths filled with hemoglobin solutions doped with varying concentrations of gold nanorods with an absorption peak at 780 nm. Both overlying and target network SO2 was tuned using sodium dithionite. Phantoms were imaged from 700 to 900 nm using a custom PAT system comprised of a tunable pulsed laser and a research-grade ultrasound system. Recovered nanoparticle spectra were analyzed and compared with results from both spectrophotometry and PAT data from waterimmersed tubes containing blood and nanoparticle solutions. Results suggested that nanoparticle selection for a given PAT application should take into account expected oxygenation states of both target blood vessel and background tissue oxygenation to achieve optimal performance.

  14. Changes in Tissue Oxygen Saturation in Response to Different Calf Compression Sleeves

    PubMed Central

    Dermont, T.; Morizot, L.; Bouhaddi, M.; Ménétrier, A.

    2015-01-01

    Aim. The purpose was to examine the changes in tissue oxygen saturation (StO2) in response to the application of different commercially available calf compression sleeves. Methods. Eight subjects came to the laboratory to complete a session in seated position including 10 min of quiet rest followed by 3 min measuring calf StO2 without compression sleeves and then alternating of 3 min of passive rest and 3 min measuring StO2 with calf compression sleeves. A total of 15 different commercially available compression sleeves were studied in a randomized order. Calf StO2 was recorded using near-infrared spectroscopy. Results. StO2 was significantly increased with all compression sleeves (p < 0.05) compared with no compression (from +6.9% for the least effective to +22.6% for the most effective). Large differences were observed between compression sleeves (p < 0.05). StO2 was positively correlated with compression pressure (p < 0.05; r = 0.84). Conclusion. This study shows that wearing compression sleeves from various brands differently affects tissue oxygen saturation. Differences were linked to the compression pressure: higher compression pressures were associated with higher StO2. PMID:26464899

  15. Alveolar gas exchange, oxygen delivery and tissue deoxygenation in men and women during incremental exercise.

    PubMed

    Peltonen, Juha E; Hägglund, Harriet; Koskela-Koivisto, Tiina; Koponen, Anne S; Aho, Jyrki M; Rissanen, Antti-Pekka E; Shoemaker, J Kevin; Tiitinen, Aila; Tikkanen, Heikki O

    2013-08-15

    We investigated whether leg and arm skeletal muscle, and cerebral deoxygenation, differ during incremental cycling exercise in men and women, and if women's lower capacity to deliver O2 affects tissue deoxygenation. Men (n=10) compared to women (n=10), had greater cardiac output, which with greater hemoglobin concentration produced greater absolute (QaO2) and body size-adjusted oxygen delivery (QaO2i) at peak exercise. Despite women's lower peak QaO2, their leg muscle deoxygenation was similar at a given work rate and QaO2, but less than in men at peak exercise (Δtissue saturation index -27.1 ± 13.2% vs. -11.8 ± 5.7%, P<0.01; Δ[deoxyhemoglobin] 15.03 ± 8.57 μM vs. 3.73 ± 3.98 μM, P<0.001). At peak exercise, oxygen uptake was associated both with QaO2 and leg muscle deoxygenation (both P<0.01). Arm muscle and cerebral deoxygenation did not differ between sexes at peak exercise. Thus, both high O2 delivery and severe active muscle deoxygenation are determinants of good exercise performance, and active muscle deoxygenation responses are regulated partly in a sex-specific manner with an influence of exercise capacity. PMID:23707876

  16. Effect of ginkgolide B on brain metabolism and tissue oxygenation in severe haemorrhagic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Chun-Ling; Shen, Dong-Fang; Wang, Peng-Jun; Li, Hu-Lun; Zhang, Li

    2015-01-01

    Ginkgolide B, a diterpene, is an herbal constituent isolated from the leaves of Ginkgo biloba tree. The present study demonstrates the effect of ginkgolide B in osmotherapy on brain metabolism and tissue oxygenation. Multimodality monitoring including intracranial pressure (ICP), cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), partial pressure of brain tissue oxygen (PbtO2), lactate/pyruvate ratio (LPR) and microdialysis were employed to study the effect of ginkgolide B osmotherapy. The results demonstrated that administration of 15% solution of ginkgolide B to the comatose patients with raised ICP (> 20 mm Hg) and resistant to standard therapy led to a significant decrease in ICP. The cerebral microdialysis was used to compare mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), ICP, CPP, PbtO2, brain lactate, pyruvate and glucose level after hourly intervals starting 3 h before and up to 4 h after hyperosmolar therapy. There was a decrease in ICP in 45 min from 23 ± 14 mm Hg (P < 0.001) to 18 ± 24 mm Hg and increase in CPP after 1 h of gingkolide B infusion from 74 ± 18 to 85 ± 22 mm Hg (P < 0.002). However there was no significant effect on MAP but PbtO2 was maintained in the range of 22-26. The peak lactate/pyruvate ratio was recorded at the time of initiation of osmotherapy (44 ± 20) with an 18% decrease over 2 h following gingkolide B therapy. Also the brain glucose remained unaffected. PMID:26064244

  17. Red blood cell (RBC) deformability, RBC aggregability and tissue oxygenation in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Cicco, G; Pirrelli, A

    1999-01-01

    Arterial hypertension could be considered a progressive ischaemic syndrome interesting the macro and the microcirculation. In order to improve the clinical and therapeutic approach to the treatment of arterial hypertension, research has centered on blood flow to evaluate the different components and their very intricate relationships influencing the micro- and the macrocirculation. Of course the main problem is to study the link between the blood flow and the peripheral tissue oxygenation. During hypertension very important alterations in rheological, mechanical and biochemical characteristics of erythrocytes and of blood flow have been shown. It is very relevant the increase in blood viscosity, the decrease in red blood cell (RBC) deformability, the formation of RBC "rouleaux" and RBC aggregates. These hemorheological determinants can favour an increase of peripheral resistances and of arterial blood pressure, causing or worsening hypertension, a decrease in oxygen transport to tissue and peripheral perfusion, a decrease of the active exchange surface area in the microvasculature, especially in complicated hypertension. We have studied 320 patients: 123 with Essential Hypertension (EH) (M 59, F 64 aged 50 +/- 25 years); 81 with Secondary Hypertension (SH) without associated other pathologies influencing hemorheology (M 42, F 39 aged 48 +/- 20 years); 116 SH with other pathologies or conditions associated influencing hemorheology such as: diabetes, lipoidoproteinosis, obesity, smoking, HD, elderly, etc. (M 48, F 68 aged 46 +/- 20 years). Using a Laser-assisted Optical Rotational Red Cell Analyzer (LORCA) acc. to Hardeman (1994) we studied Elongation Index (EI) and aggregation kinetics of red blood cells in these patients. We also evaluated TcpO2 and TcpCO2 using a transcutaneous oxymeter (Microgas 7650, Kontron Instruments). In hypertensives we found a decrease in erythrocyte deformability (evaluated with EI), in erythrocyte aggregation time, a fibrinogenaemia

  18. Iron-induced tissue damage and cancer: the role of reactive oxygen species-free radicals.

    PubMed

    Okada, S

    1996-05-01

    Oxygen is poisonous, but we cannot live without it. The high oxidizing potential of oxygen molecules (dioxygen) is a valuable source of energy for the organism and its reactivity is low; that is, spin forbidden. However, the dioxygen itself is a 'free radical' and, especially in the presence of transition metals, it is a major promoter of radical reactions in the cell. Humans survive only by virtue of their elaborate defense mechanisms against oxygen toxicity. Iron is the most abundant transition metal in the human body. Because iron shows wide variation in redox potential with different co-ordination ligands, it may be used as a redox intermediate in many biological mechanism. However, it is precisely this redox activeness that makes iron a key participant in free radical production. The current research on the relationship between iron and cancer is briefly reviewed. Research results are reported here which indicate that iron, when bound to certain ligands, can cause free-radical mediated tissue damage and become carcinogenic. The present study also suggests that iron may also have a significant role in spontaneous human cancer. PMID:8809878

  19. Real-Time, In Vivo Determination of Dynamic Changes in Lung and Heart Tissue Oxygenation Using EPR Oximetry

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Brian K.; Naidu, Shan K.; Subramanian, Kamal; Joseph, Matthew; Hou, Huagang; Khan, Nadeem; Swartz, Harold M.

    2015-01-01

    The use of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) oximetry for oxygen measurements in deep tissues (>1 cm) is challenging due to the limited penetration depth of the microwave energy. To overcome this limitation, implantable resonators, having a small (0 5 mm diameter) sensory loop containing the oxygen-sensing paramagnetic material connected by a pair of twisted copper wire to a coupling loop (8–10 mm diameter), have been developed, which enable repeated measurements of deep-tissue oxygen levels (pO2, partial pressure of oxygen) in the brain and tumors of rodents. In this study, we have demonstrated the feasibility of measuring dynamic changes in pO2 in the heart and lung of rats using deep-tissue implantable oxygen sensors. The sensory loop of the resonator contained lithium octa-n-butoxynaphthalocyanine (LiNc-BuO) crystals embedded in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer and was implanted in the myocardial tissue or lung pleura. The external coupling loop was secured subcutaneously above chest. The rats were exposed to different breathing gas mixtures while undergoing EPR measurements. The results demonstrated that implantable oxygen sensors provide reliable measurements of pO2 in deep tissues such as heart and lung under adverse conditions of cardiac and respiratory motions. PMID:24729218

  20. Validation of NIRS in measuring tissue hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation on ex vivo and isolated limb models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaorong; Zhu, Wen; Padival, Vikram; Xia, Mengna; Cheng, Xuefeng; Bush, Robin; Christenson, Linda; Chan, Tim; Doherty, Tim; Iatridis, Angelo

    2003-07-01

    Photonify"s tissue spectrometer uses Near-Infrared Spectroscopy for real-time, noninvasive measurement of hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation [SO2] of biological tissues. The technology was validated by a series of ex vivo and animal studies. In the ex vivo experiment, a close loop blood circulation system was built, precisely controlling the oxygen saturation and the hemoglobin concentration of a liquid phantom. Photonify"s tissue spectrometer was placed on the surface of the liquid phantom for real time measurement and compared with a gas analyzer, considered the gold standard to measure oxygen saturation and hemoglobin concentration. In the animal experiment, the right hind limb of each dog accepted onto the study was surgically removed. The limb was kept viable by connecting the femoral vein and artery to a blood-primed extracorporeal circuit. Different concentrations of hemoglobin were obtained by adding designated amount of saline solution into the perfusion circuit. Photonify"s tissue spectrometers measured oxygen saturation and hemoglobin concentration at various locations on the limb and compared with gas analyzer results. The test results demonstrated that Photonify"s tissue spectrometers were able to detect the relative changes in tissue oxygen saturation and hemoglobin concentration with a high linear correlation compared to the gas analyzer

  1. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for late radiation tissue injury in gynecologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Craighead, P.; Shea–Budgell, M.A.; Nation, J.; Esmail, R.; Evans, A.W.; Parliament, M.; Oliver, T.K.; Hagen, N.A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Late radiation tissue injury is a serious complication of radiotherapy for patients with gynecologic malignancies. Strategies for managing pain and other clinical features have limited efficacy; however, hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO2) may be an effective option for some patients. Methods In a systematic review of the literature, the Ovid medline, embase, Cochrane Library, National Guidelines Clearinghouse, and Canadian Medical Association Infobase databases were searched to June 2009 for clinical practice guidelines, systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials, or other relevant evidence. Studies that did not evaluate soft tissue necrosis, cystitis, proctitis, bone necrosis, and other complications were excluded. Results Two randomized trials, eleven nonrandomized studies, and five supporting documents comprise the evidence base. In addition, information on the harms and safety of treatment with HBO2 were reported in three additional sources. There is modest direct evidence and emerging indirect evidence that the use of HBO2 is broadly effective for late radiation tissue injury of the pelvis in women treated for gynecologic malignancies. Conclusions Based on the evidence and expert consensus opinion, HBO2 is likely effective for late radiation tissue injury of the pelvis, with demonstrated efficacy specifically for radiation damage to the anus and rectum;the main indication for HBO2 therapy in gynecologic oncology is in the management of otherwise refractory chronic radiation injury;HBO2 may provide symptomatic benefit in certain clinical settings (for example, cystitis, soft-tissue necrosis, and osteonecrosis); andHBO2 may reduce the complications of gynecologic surgery in patients undergoing surgical removal of necrosis. PMID:21980249

  2. Alveolar gas exchange and tissue oxygenation during incremental treadmill exercise, and their associations with blood O2 carrying capacity

    PubMed Central

    Rissanen, Antti-Pekka E.; Tikkanen, Heikki O.; Koponen, Anne S.; Aho, Jyrki M.; Hägglund, Harriet; Lindholm, Harri; Peltonen, Juha E.

    2012-01-01

    The magnitude and timing of oxygenation responses in highly active leg muscle, less active arm muscle, and cerebral tissue, have not been studied with simultaneous alveolar gas exchange measurement during incremental treadmill exercise. Nor is it known, if blood O2 carrying capacity affects the tissue-specific oxygenation responses. Thus, we investigated alveolar gas exchange and tissue (m. vastus lateralis, m. biceps brachii, cerebral cortex) oxygenation during incremental treadmill exercise until volitional fatigue, and their associations with blood O2 carrying capacity in 22 healthy men. Alveolar gas exchange was measured, and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) was used to monitor relative concentration changes in oxy- (Δ[O2Hb]), deoxy- (Δ[HHb]) and total hemoglobin (Δ[tHb]), and tissue saturation index (TSI). NIRS inflection points (NIP), reflecting changes in tissue-specific oxygenation, were determined and their coincidence with ventilatory thresholds [anaerobic threshold (AT), respiratory compensation point (RC); V-slope method] was examined. Blood O2 carrying capacity [total hemoglobin mass (tHb-mass)] was determined with the CO-rebreathing method. In all tissues, NIPs coincided with AT, whereas RC was followed by NIPs. High tHb-mass associated with leg muscle deoxygenation at peak exercise (e.g., Δ[HHb] from baseline walking to peak exercise vs. tHb-mass: r = 0.64, p < 0.01), but not with arm muscle- or cerebral deoxygenation. In conclusion, regional tissue oxygenation was characterized by inflection points, and tissue oxygenation in relation to alveolar gas exchange during incremental treadmill exercise resembled previous findings made during incremental cycling. It was also found out, that O2 delivery to less active m. biceps brachii may be limited by an accelerated increase in ventilation at high running intensities. In addition, high capacity for blood O2 carrying was associated with a high level of m. vastus lateralis deoxygenation at peak exercise

  3. Influence of oxygen tension on myocardial performance. Evaluation by tissue Doppler imaging

    PubMed Central

    Frøbert, Ole; Moesgaard, Jacob; Toft, Egon; Poulsen, Steen Hvitfeldt; Søgaard, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Background Low O2 tension dilates coronary arteries and high O2 tension is a coronary vasoconstrictor but reports on O2-dependent effects on ventricular performance diverge. Yet oxygen supplementation remains first line treatment in cardiovascular disease. We hypothesized that hypoxia improves and hyperoxia worsens myocardial performance. Methods Seven male volunteers (mean age 38 ± 3 years) were examined with echocardiography at respiratory equilibrium during: 1) normoxia (≈21% O2, 79% N2), 2) while inhaling a hypoxic gas mixture (≈11% O2, 89% N2), and 3) while inhaling 100% O2. Tissue Doppler recordings were acquired in the apical 4-chamber, 2-chamber, and long-axis views. Strain rate and tissue tracking displacement analyses were carried out in each segment of the 16-segment left ventricular model and in the basal, middle and apical portions of the right ventricle. Results Heart rate increased with hypoxia (68 ± 4 bpm at normoxia vs. 79 ± 5 bpm, P < 0.001) and decreased with hyperoxia (59 ± 5 bpm, P < 0.001 vs. normoxia). Hypoxia increased strain rate in four left ventricular segments and global systolic contraction amplitude was increased (normoxia: 9.76 ± 0.41 vs hypoxia: 10.87 ± 0.42, P < 0.001). Tissue tracking displacement was reduced in the right ventricular segments and tricuspid regurgitation increased with hypoxia (7.5 ± 1.9 mmHg vs. 33.5 ± 1.8 mmHg, P < 0.001). The TEI index and E/E' did not change with hypoxia. Hyperoxia reduced strain rate in 10 left ventricular segments, global systolic contraction amplitude was decreased (8.83 ± 0.38, P < 0.001 vs. normoxia) while right ventricular function was unchanged. The spectral and tissue Doppler TEI indexes were significantly increased but E/E' did not change with hyperoxia. Conclusion Hypoxia improves and hyperoxia worsens systolic myocardial performance in healthy male volunteers. Tissue Doppler measures of diastolic function are unaffected by hypoxia/hyperoxia which support that the changes

  4. Roles of Reactive Oxygen Species on Insulin Resistance in Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Obesity resulting from the delivery of an excess amount of energy to adipose tissue from glucose or free fatty acids is associated with insulin resistance and adipose tissue inflammation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated as contributors to both the onset and the progression of insulin resistance. ROS can be generated by overloading the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation system, and also by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidases (NOX) produced by either adipocytes, which only produce NOX4, or by macrophages, which produce mainly NOX2. The source of the ROS might differ in the early, intermediate and late stages of obesity, switching from NOX4-dependence in the early phases to NOX2-dependence, in the intermediate phase, and transiting to mitochondria-dependence later in the time course of obesity. Thus, depending on the stage of obesity, ROS can be generated by three distinct mechanisms: i.e., NOX4, NOX2, and mitochondria. In this review, we will discuss whether NOX4-, NOX2-, and/or mitochondria-derived ROS is/are causal in the onset of adipocyte insulin resistance as obesity progresses. Moreover, we will review the pathophysiological roles of NOX4, NOX2, and mitochondria-derived ROS on adipose tissue inflammation. PMID:27352152

  5. A new measuring device for non-invasive determination of oxygen partial pressure and oxygen conductance of the skin and other tissues.

    PubMed

    Niehoff, K; Barnikol, W K

    1999-01-01

    .2.10(-5) ml O2 (STPD)/(atm.s.cm2) at 42 degrees C skin surface temperature; the intracutaneous partial pressure obtained was 5.5 kPa (41 mmHg) (STPD: "standard temperature pressure dry" conditions of the gas). At 42 degrees C skin temperature no burning occurs. The determined O2-conductance is in the same range as estimated formerly (see above). The intracutaneous oxygen partial pressure determined seems to be a realistic value of the tissue at 42 degrees C. By in vitro measurements with technical membranes the new device and procedure was validated giving precise values of the oxygen conductance. Hence the new method may be used for calibration of the oxygen flux optode (Holst et al., 1993). The O2-permeation coefficient (P) could be an important parameter for evaluating dermatological applications (which attempt to increase P) in the treatment of local dermal oxygen deficiency. The intracutaneous oxygen partial pressure found is a reasonable value for a surface temperature of 42 degrees. Because of the independence of the O2-partial pressure determined and the O2-consumption the new device exhibits no stirring effect and it provides more insight into the limitations of conventional transcutaneous oxygen measurement. PMID:10659205

  6. Endogenous Generation of Singlet Oxygen and Ozone in Human and Animal Tissues: Mechanisms, Biological Significance, and Influence of Dietary Components

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that exposing antibodies or amino acids to singlet oxygen results in the formation of ozone (or an ozone-like oxidant) and hydrogen peroxide and that human neutrophils produce both singlet oxygen and ozone during bacterial killing. There is also mounting evidence that endogenous singlet oxygen production may be a common occurrence in cells through various mechanisms. Thus, the ozone-producing combination of singlet oxygen and amino acids might be a common cellular occurrence. This paper reviews the potential pathways of formation of singlet oxygen and ozone in vivo and also proposes some new pathways for singlet oxygen formation. Physiological consequences of the endogenous formation of these oxidants in human tissues are discussed, as well as examples of how dietary factors may promote or inhibit their generation and activity. PMID:27042259

  7. Simultaneous measurement of deep tissue blood flow and oxygenation using noncontact diffuse correlation spectroscopy flow-oximeter

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ting; Lin, Yu; Shang, Yu; He, Lian; Huang, Chong; Szabunio, Margaret; Yu, Guoqiang

    2013-01-01

    We report a novel noncontact diffuse correlation spectroscopy flow-oximeter for simultaneous quantification of relative changes in tissue blood flow (rBF) and oxygenation (Δ[oxygenation]). The noncontact probe was compared against a contact probe in tissue-like phantoms and forearm muscles (n = 10), and the dynamic trends in both rBF and Δ[oxygenation] were found to be highly correlated. However, the magnitudes of Δ[oxygenation] measured by the two probes were significantly different. Monte Carlo simulations and phantom experiments revealed that the arm curvature resulted in a significant underestimation (~−20%) for the noncontact measurements in Δ[oxygenation], but not in rBF. Other factors that may cause the residual discrepancies between the contact and noncontact measurements were discussed, and further comparisons with other established technologies are needed to identify/quantify these factors. Our research paves the way for noncontact and simultaneous monitoring of blood flow and oxygenation in soft and vulnerable tissues without distorting tissue hemodynamics. PMID:23446991

  8. Measurement of characteristic prompt gamma rays emitted from oxygen and carbon in tissue-equivalent samples during proton beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polf, Jerimy C.; Panthi, Rajesh; Mackin, Dennis S.; McCleskey, Matt; Saastamoinen, Antti; Roeder, Brian T.; Beddar, Sam

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to characterize how prompt gamma (PG) emission from tissue changes as a function of carbon and oxygen concentration, and to assess the feasibility of determining elemental concentration in tissues irradiated with proton beams. For this study, four tissue-equivalent water-sucrose samples with differing densities and concentrations of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen were irradiated with a 48 MeV proton pencil beam. The PG spectrum emitted from each sample was measured using a high-purity germanium detector, and the absolute detection efficiency of the detector, average beam current, and delivered dose distribution were also measured. Changes to the total PG emission from 12C (4.44 MeV) and 16O (6.13 MeV) per incident proton and per Gray of absorbed dose were characterized as a function of carbon and oxygen concentration in the sample. The intensity of the 4.44 MeV PG emission per incident proton was found to be nearly constant for all samples regardless of their carbon concentration. However, we found that the 6.13 MeV PG emission increased linearly with the total amount (in grams) of oxygen irradiated in the sample. From the measured PG data, we determined that 1.64 × 107 oxygen PGs were emitted per gram of oxygen irradiated per Gray of absorbed dose delivered with a 48 MeV proton beam. These results indicate that the 6.13 MeV PG emission from 16O is proportional to the concentration of oxygen in tissue irradiated with proton beams, showing that it is possible to determine the concentration of oxygen within tissues irradiated with proton beams by measuring 16O PG emission.

  9. Measurement of characteristic prompt gamma rays emitted from oxygen and carbon in tissue-equivalent samples during proton beam irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Polf, Jerimy C; Panthi, Rajesh; Mackin, Dennis S; McCleskey, Matt; Saastamoinen, Antti; Roeder, Brian T; Beddar, Sam

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to characterize how prompt gamma (PG) emission from tissue changes as a function of carbon and oxygen concentration, and to assess the feasibility of determining elemental concentration in tissues irradiated with proton beams. For this study, four tissue-equivalent water-sucrose samples with differing densities and concentrations of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen were irradiated with a 48 MeV proton pencil beam. The PG spectrum emitted from each sample was measured using a high-purity germanium detector, and the absolute detection efficiency of the detector, average beam current, and delivered dose distribution were also measured. Changes to the total PG emission from 12C (4.44 MeV) and 16O (6.13 MeV) per incident proton and per Gray of absorbed dose were characterized as a function of carbon and oxygen concentration in the sample. The intensity of the 4.44 MeV PG emission per incident proton was found to be nearly constant for all samples regardless of their carbon concentration. However, we found that the 6.13 MeV PG emission increased linearly with the total amount (in grams) of oxygen irradiated in the sample. From the measured PG data, we determined that 1.64 × 107 oxygen PGs were emitted per gram of oxygen irradiated per Gray of absorbed dose delivered with a 48 MeV proton beam. These results indicate that the 6.13 MeV PG emission from 16O is proportional to the concentration of oxygen in tissue irradiated with proton beams, showing that it is possible to determine the concentration of oxygen within tissues irradiated with proton beams by measuring 16O PG emission. PMID:23920051

  10. Near infrared spectroscopy-derived interstitial hydrogen ion concentration and tissue oxygen saturation during ambulation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Stuart M C; Clarke, Mark S F; O'Connor, Daniel P; Stroud, Leah; Ellerby, Gwenn E C; Soller, Babs R

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether walking and running at different treadmill speeds resulted in different metabolic and cardiovascular responses in the vastus lateralis (VL) and lateral gastrocnemius (LG) by examining metabolite accumulation and tissue oxygen saturation. Ten healthy subjects (6 males, 4 females) completed a submaximal treadmill exercise test, beginning at 3.2 km h(-1) and increasing by 1.6 km h(-1) increments every 3 min until reaching 85% of age-predicted maximal heart rate. Muscle tissue oxygenation (SO(2)), total hemoglobin (HbT) and interstitial hydrogen ion concentration ([H(+)]) were calculated from near infrared spectra collected from VL and LG. The [H(+)] threshold for each muscle was determined using a simultaneous bilinear regression. Muscle and treadmill speed effects were analyzed using a linear mixed model analysis. Paired t-tests were used to test for differences between muscles in the [H(+)] threshold. SO(2) decreased (P = 0.001) during running in the VL and LG, but the SO(2) response across treadmill speeds was different between muscles (P = 0.047). In both muscles, HbT and [H(+)] increased as treadmill speed increased (P < 0.001), but the response to exercise was not different between muscles. The [H(+)] threshold occurred at a lower whole-body VO(2) in the LG (1.22 ± 0.63 L min(-1)) than in the VL (1.46 ± 0.58 L min(-1), P = 0.01). In conclusion, interstitial [H(+)] and SO(2) are aggregate measures of local metabolite production and the cardiovascular response. Inferred from simultaneous SO(2) and [H(+)] measures in the VL and LG muscles, muscle perfusion is well matched to VL and LG work during walking, but not running. PMID:21212975

  11. Intermittent high oxygen influences the formation of neural retinal tissue from human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lixiong; Chen, Xi; Zeng, Yuxiao; Li, Qiyou; Zou, Ting; Chen, Siyu; Wu, Qian; Fu, Caiyun; Xu, Haiwei; Yin, Zheng Qin

    2016-01-01

    The vertebrate retina is a highly multilayered nervous tissue with a large diversity of cellular components. With the development of stem cell technologies, human retinas can be generated in three-dimensional (3-D) culture in vitro. However, understanding the factors modulating key productive processes and the way that they influence development are far from clear. Oxygen, as the most essential element participating in metabolism, is a critical factor regulating organic development. In this study, using 3-D culture of human stem cells, we examined the effect of intermittent high oxygen treatment (40% O2) on the formation and cellular behavior of neural retinas (NR) in the embryonic body (EB). The volume of EB and number of proliferating cells increased significantly under 40% O2 on day 38, 50, and 62. Additionally, the ratio of PAX6+ cells within NR was significantly increased. The neural rosettes could only develop with correct apical-basal polarity under 40% O2. In addition, the generation, migration and maturation of retinal ganglion cells were enhanced under 40% O2. All of these results illustrated that 40% O2 strengthened the formation of NR in EB with characteristics similar to the in vivo state, suggesting that the hyperoxic state facilitated the retinal development in vitro. PMID:27435522

  12. A pilot study of a new spectrophotometry device to measure tissue oxygen saturation.

    PubMed

    Abel, Gemma; Allen, John; Drinnan, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Tissue oxygen saturation (SO2) measurements have the potential for far wider use than at present but are limited by device availability and portability for many potential applications. A device based on a small, low-cost general-purpose spectrophotometer (the Harrison device) might facilitate wider use. The aim of this study was to compare the Harrison device with a commercial instrument, the LEA O2C.Measurements were carried out on the forearm and finger of 20 healthy volunteers, using a blood pressure cuff on the upper arm to induce different levels of oxygenation. Repeatability of both devices was assessed, and the Bland-Altman method was used to assess agreement between them.The devices showed agreement in overall tracking of changes in SO2. Test-retest agreement for the Harrison device was worse than for O2C, with SD repeatability of 10.6% (forearm) or 18.6% (finger). There was no overall bias between devices, but mean (SD) difference of 1.2 (11.8%) (forearm) or 4.4 (11.5%) (finger) were outside of a clinically acceptable range.Disagreements were attributed to the stability of the Harrison probe and the natural SO2 variations across the skin surface increasing the random error. Therefore, though not equivalent to the LEA O2C, a probe redesign and averaged measurements may help establish the Harrison device as a low cost alternative. PMID:25119876

  13. Reproducibility of cerebral tissue oxygen saturation measurements by near-infrared spectroscopy in newborn infants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenny, Carmen; Biallas, Martin; Trajkovic, Ivo; Fauchère, Jean-Claude; Bucher, Hans Ulrich; Wolf, Martin

    2011-09-01

    Early detection of cerebral hypoxemia is an important aim in neonatology. A relevant parameter to assess brain oxygenation may be the cerebral tissue oxygen saturation (StO2) measured by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). So far the reproducibility of StO2 measurements was too low for clinical application, probably due to inhomogeneities. The aim of this study was to test a novel sensor geometry which reduces the influence of inhomogeneities. Thirty clinically stable newborn infants, with a gestational age of median 33.9 (range 26.9 to 41.9) weeks, birth weight of 2220 (820 to 4230) g, postnatal age of 5 (1 to 71) days were studied. At least four StO2 measurements of 1 min duration were carried out using NIRS on the lateral head. The sensor was repositioned between measurements. Reproducibility was calculated by a linear mixed effects model. The mean StO2 was 79.99 +/- 4.47% with a reproducibility of 2.76% and a between-infant variability of 4.20%. Thus, the error of measurement only accounts for 30.1% of the variability. The novel sensor geometry leads to considerably more precise measurements compared to previous studies with, e.g., ~5% reproducibility for the NIRO 300. The novel StO2 values hence have a higher clinical relevance.

  14. Intermittent high oxygen influences the formation of neural retinal tissue from human embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Lixiong; Chen, Xi; Zeng, Yuxiao; Li, Qiyou; Zou, Ting; Chen, Siyu; Wu, Qian; Fu, Caiyun; Xu, Haiwei; Yin, Zheng Qin

    2016-01-01

    The vertebrate retina is a highly multilayered nervous tissue with a large diversity of cellular components. With the development of stem cell technologies, human retinas can be generated in three-dimensional (3-D) culture in vitro. However, understanding the factors modulating key productive processes and the way that they influence development are far from clear. Oxygen, as the most essential element participating in metabolism, is a critical factor regulating organic development. In this study, using 3-D culture of human stem cells, we examined the effect of intermittent high oxygen treatment (40% O2) on the formation and cellular behavior of neural retinas (NR) in the embryonic body (EB). The volume of EB and number of proliferating cells increased significantly under 40% O2 on day 38, 50, and 62. Additionally, the ratio of PAX6+ cells within NR was significantly increased. The neural rosettes could only develop with correct apical-basal polarity under 40% O2. In addition, the generation, migration and maturation of retinal ganglion cells were enhanced under 40% O2. All of these results illustrated that 40% O2 strengthened the formation of NR in EB with characteristics similar to the in vivo state, suggesting that the hyperoxic state facilitated the retinal development in vitro. PMID:27435522

  15. Near-infrared spectroscopy for monitoring of tissue oxygenation of exercising skeletal muscle in a chronic compartment syndrome model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breit, G. A.; Gross, J. H.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Chance, B.; Hargens, A. R.

    1997-01-01

    Variations in the levels of muscle hemoglobin and of myoglobin oxygen saturation can be detected non-invasively with near-infrared spectroscopy. This technique could be applied to the diagnosis of chronic compartment syndrome, in which invasive testing has shown increased intramuscular pressure associated with ischemia and pain during exercise. We simulated chronic compartment syndrome in ten healthy subjects (seven men and three women) by applying external compression, through a wide inflatable cuff, to increase the intramuscular pressure in the anterior compartment of the leg. The tissue oxygenation of the tibialis anterior muscle was measured with near-infrared spectroscopy during gradual inflation of the cuff to a pressure of forty millimeters of mercury (5.33 kilopascals) during fourteen minutes of cyclic isokinetic dorsiflexion and plantar flexion of the ankle. The subjects exercised with and without external compression. The data on tissue oxygenation for each subject then were normalized to a scale of 100 per cent (the baseline value, or the value at rest) to 0 per cent (the physiological minimum, or the level of oxygenation achieved by exercise to exhaustion during arterial occlusion of the lower extremity). With external compression, tissue oxygenation declined at a rate of 1.4 +/- 0.3 per cent per minute (mean and standard error) during exercise. After an initial decrease at the onset, tissue oxygenation did not decline during exercise without compression. The recovery of tissue oxygenation after exercise was twice as slow with compression (2.5 +/- 0.6 minutes) than it was without the use of compression (1.3 +/- 0.2 minutes).

  16. Acetazolamide during acute hypoxia improves tissue oxygenation in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kang; Smith, Zachary M; Buxton, Richard B; Swenson, Erik R; Dubowitz, David J

    2015-12-15

    Low doses of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor acetazolamide provides accelerated acclimatization to high-altitude hypoxia and prevention of cerebral and other symptoms of acute mountain sickness. We previously observed increases in cerebral O2 metabolism (CMRO2 ) during hypoxia. In this study, we investigate whether low-dose oral acetazolamide (250 mg) reduces this elevated CMRO2 and in turn might improve cerebral tissue oxygenation (PtiO2 ) during acute hypoxia. Six normal human subjects were exposed to 6 h of normobaric hypoxia with and without acetazolamide prophylaxis. We determined CMRO2 and cerebral PtiO2 from MRI measurements of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral venous O2 saturation. During normoxia, low-dose acetazolamide resulted in no significant change in CBF, CMRO2 , or PtiO2 . During hypoxia, we observed increases in CBF [48.5 (SD 12.4) (normoxia) to 65.5 (20.4) ml·100 ml(-1)·min(-1) (hypoxia), P < 0.05] and CMRO2 [1.54 (0.19) to 1.79 (0.25) μmol·ml(-1)·min(-1), P < 0.05] and a dramatic decline in PtiO2 [25.0 to 11.4 (2.7) mmHg, P < 0.05]. Acetazolamide prophylaxis mitigated these rises in CBF [53.7 (20.7) ml·100 ml(-1)·min(-1) (hypoxia + acetazolamide)] and CMRO2 [1.41 (0.09) μmol·ml(-1)·min(-1) (hypoxia + acetazolamide)] associated with acute hypoxia but also reduced O2 delivery [6.92 (1.45) (hypoxia) to 5.60 (1.14) mmol/min (hypoxia + acetazolamide), P < 0.05]. The net effect was improved cerebral tissue PtiO2 during acute hypoxia [11.4 (2.7) (hypoxia) to 16.5 (3.0) mmHg (hypoxia + acetazolamide), P < 0.05]. In addition to its renal effect, low-dose acetazolamide is effective at the capillary endothelium, and we hypothesize that local interruption in cerebral CO2 excretion accounts for the improvements in CMRO2 and ultimately in cerebral tissue oxygenation during hypoxia. This study suggests a potentially pivotal role of cerebral CO2 and pH in modulating CMRO2 and PtiO2 during acute hypoxia. PMID:26472861

  17. Effect of air, heliox, and oxygen breathing on air bubbles in aqueous tissues in the rat.

    PubMed

    Hyldegaard, O; Madsen, J

    1994-12-01

    Our purpose was to examine the behavior of air bubbles in three non-lipid tissues (skeletal muscle, tendon, and the anterior chamber of the eye) during breathing of air, helium-oxygen (heliox, 80:20), or oxygen. Air bubbles were injected into skeletal muscle or tendon in rats after decompression from a 1-h air exposure at 3.5 atm abs (355 kPa) or into the anterior chamber of the rat eye without any previous pressure exposure. The bubbles were studied by photomicroscopy at 1 atm abs (101 kPa) during either air breathing or during air breathing followed by heliox or O2 breathing. Muscle: during air breathing, all bubbles initially increased in size for a period of 55-100 min after decompression and then started to shrink. Both heliox and O2 breathing increased the shrinking rate as compared to air. Bubble size decreased more rapidly during O2 than heliox breathing. Tendon: during air breathing, bubble size decreased at a constant rate; in one bubble the decrease was preceded by a small increase. During heliox breathing most bubbles decreased faster than during breathing of air. O2 breathing caused a short-term increase in bubble size in 4 out of 10 bubbles. Otherwise, the shrinkage rate was increased in six bubbles and uninfluenced in four bubbles during breathing of O2. Rat eye: during air breathing all bubbles shrank in the observation period. When heliox breathing was started, all bubbles transiently grew for 10-35 min, after which they began shrinking faster than during air breathing. When O2 breathing was started, five out of seven bubbles initially grew or stopped shrinking for 5-15 min, after which they decreased in size faster than during both air and heliox breathing. We conclude that breathing of either heliox or O2 will cause air bubbles in aqueous tissues to disappear faster than during breathing of air. Since heliox breathing promoted bubble shrinking in both muscle and tendon, gas exchange was probably not primarily limited by extravascular diffusion in

  18. Blood flow and oxygenation in peritendinous tissue and calf muscle during dynamic exercise in humans

    PubMed Central

    Boushel, Robert; Langberg, Henning; Green, Simon; Skovgaard, Dorthe; Bülow, Jens; Kjær, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Circulation around tendons may act as a shunt for muscle during exercise. The perfusion and oxygenation of Achilles' peritendinous tissue was measured in parallel with that of calf muscle during exercise to determine (1) whether blood flow is restricted in peritendinous tissue during exercise, and (2) whether blood flow is coupled to oxidative metabolism. Seven individuals performed dynamic plantar flexion from 1 to 9 W. Radial artery and popliteal venous blood were sampled for O2, peritendinous blood flow was determined by 133Xe-washout, calf blood flow by plethysmography, cardiac output by dye dilution, arterial pressure by an arterial catheter-transducer, and muscle and peritendinous O2 saturation by spatially resolved spectroscopy (SRS). Calf blood flow rose 20-fold with exercise, reaching 44 ± 7 ml (100 g)−1 min−1 (mean ± s.e.m.) at 9 W, while Achilles' peritendinous flow increased (7-fold) to 14 ± 4 ml (100 g)−1 min−1, which was 18 % of the maximal flow established during reactive hyperaemia. SRS-O2 saturation fell both in muscle (from 66 ± 2 % at rest to 57 ± 3 %, P < 0.05) and in peritendinous regions (58 ± 4 to 52 ± 4 %, P < 0.05) during exercise along with a rise in leg vascular conductance and microvascular haemoglobin volume, despite elevated systemic vascular resistance. The parallel rise in calf muscle and peritendinous blood flow and fall in O2 saturation during exercise indicate that blood flow is coupled to oxidative metabolism in both tissue regions. Increased leg vascular conductance accompanied by elevated microvascular haemoglobin volume reflect vasodilatation in both muscle and peritendinous regions. However, peak exercise peritendinous blood flow reaches only ≈20 % of its maximal blood flow capacity. PMID:10747200

  19. In Vivo Imaging of Flavoprotein Fluorescence During Hypoxia Reveals the Importance of Direct Arterial Oxygen Supply to Cerebral Cortex Tissue.

    PubMed

    Chisholm, K I; Ida, K K; Davies, A L; Papkovsky, D B; Singer, M; Dyson, A; Tachtsidis, I; Duchen, M R; Smith, K J

    2016-01-01

    Live imaging of mitochondrial function is crucial to understand the important role played by these organelles in a wide range of diseases. The mitochondrial redox potential is a particularly informative measure of mitochondrial function, and can be monitored using the endogenous green fluorescence of oxidized mitochondrial flavoproteins. Here, we have observed flavoprotein fluorescence in the exposed murine cerebral cortex in vivo using confocal imaging; the mitochondrial origin of the signal was confirmed using agents known to manipulate mitochondrial redox potential. The effects of cerebral oxygenation on flavoprotein fluorescence were determined by manipulating the inspired oxygen concentration. We report that flavoprotein fluorescence is sensitive to reductions in cortical oxygenation, such that reductions in inspired oxygen resulted in loss of flavoprotein fluorescence with the exception of a preserved 'halo' of signal in periarterial regions. The findings are consistent with reports that arteries play an important role in supplying oxygen directly to tissue in the cerebral cortex, maintaining mitochondrial function. PMID:26782217

  20. Myocardial ischemia and reperfusion: the role of oxygen radicals in tissue injury.

    PubMed

    Werns, S W; Lucchesi, B R

    1989-01-01

    Thrombolytic therapy has gained widespread acceptance as a means of treating coronary artery thrombosis in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Although experimental data have demonstrated that timely reperfusion limits the extent of infarction caused by regional ischemia, there is growing evidence that reperfusion is associated with an inflammatory response to ischemia that exacerbates the tissue injury. Ischemic myocardium releases archidonate and complement-derived chemotactic factors, e.g., leukotriene B4 and C5a, which attract and activate neutrophils. Reperfusion of ischemic myocardium accelerates the influx of neutrophils, which release reactive oxygen products, such as superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide, resulting in the formation of a hydroxyl radical and hypochlorous acid. The latter two species may damage viable endothelial cells and myocytes via the peroxidation of lipids and oxidation of protein sulfhydryl groups, leading to perturbations of membrane permeability and enzyme function. Neutrophil depletion by antiserum and inhibition of neutrophil function by drugs, e.g., ibuprofen, prostaglandins (prostacyclin and PGE1), or a monoclonal antibody, to the adherence-promoting glycoprotein Mo-1 receptor, have been shown to limit the extent of canine myocardial injury due to coronary artery occlusion/reperfusion. Recent studies have challenged the hypothesis that xanthine-oxidase-derived oxygen radicals are a cause of reperfusion injury. Treatment with allopurinol or oxypurinol may exert beneficial effects on ischemic myocardium that are unrelated to the inhibition of xanthine oxidase. Furthermore, the human heart may lack xanthine oxidase activity. Further basic research is needed, therefore, to clarify the importance of xanthine oxidase in the pathophysiology of reperfusion injury.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2488090

  1. NIRS-Derived Tissue Oxygen Saturation and Hydrogen Ion Concentration Following Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. M. C.; Everett, M. E.; Crowell, J. B.; Westby, C. M.; Soller, B. R.

    2010-01-01

    Long-term bed rest (BR), a model of spaceflight, results in a decrease in aerobic capacity and altered submaximal exercise responses. The strongest BR-induced effects on exercise appear to be centrally-mediated, but longer BR durations may result in peripheral adaptations (e.g., decreased mitochondrial and capillary density) which are likely to influence exercise responses. PURPOSE: To measure tissue oxygen saturation (SO2) and hydrogen ion concentration ([H+]) in the vastus lateralis (VL) using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) during cycle ergometry before and after . 30 d of BR. METHODS: Eight subjects performed a graded exercise test on a cycle ergometer to volitional fatigue 7 d before (pre-BR) and at the end or 1 day after BR (post-BR). NIRS spectra were collected from a sensor adhered to the skin overlying the VL. Oxygen consumption (VO2) was measured by open circuit spirometry. Blood volume (BV) was measured before and after BR using the carbon monoxide rebreathing technique. Changes in pre- and post-BR SO2 and [H+] data were compared using mixed model analyses. BV and peak exercise data were compared using paired t-tests. RESULTS: BV (pre-BR: 4.3+/-0.3, post-BR: 3.7+/-0.2 L, mean+/-SE, p=.01) and peak VO2 (pre-BR: 1.98+/-0.24, post-BR: 1.48 +/-0.21 L/min, p<.01) were reduced after BR. As expected, SO2 decreased with exercise before and after BR. However, SO2 was lower post compared with pre-BR throughout exercise, including at peak exercise (pre-BR: 50+/-3, post-BR: 43+/-4%, p=.01). After BR, [H+] was higher at the start of exercise and did not increase at the same rate as pre-BR. Peak [H+] was not different from pre to post-BR (pre-BR: 36+/-2; post-BR: 38+/-2 nmol/L). CONCLUSIONS: Lower SO2 during exercise suggests that oxygen extraction in the VL is higher after BR, perhaps due to lower circulating blood volume. The higher [H+] after BR suggests a greater reliance upon glycolysis during submaximal exercise, although [H+] at peak exercise was unchanged

  2. “Overshoot” of O2 is required to maintain baseline tissue oxygenation at locations distal to blood vessels

    PubMed Central

    Devor, Anna; Sakadžić, Sava; Saisan, Payam A.; Yaseen, Mohammad A.; Roussakis, Emmanuel; Srinivasan, Vivek J.; Vinogradov, Sergei A.; Rosen, Bruce R.; Buxton, Richard B.; Dale, Anders M.; Boas, David A.

    2011-01-01

    In vivo imaging of cerebral tissue oxygenation is of key importance in defining healthy physiology and pathological departures associated with cerebral disease. We used a recently developed two-photon microscopy method, based on a novel phosphorescent nanoprobe, to image tissue oxygenation in the rat primary sensory cortex (SI) in response to sensory stimulation. Our measurements showed that a stimulus-evoked increase in tissue pO2 depended on the baseline pO2 level. In particular, during sustained stimulation, the steady-state pO2 at low-baseline locations remained at the baseline, despite large pO2 increases elsewhere. In contrast to the steady state, where pO2 never decreased below the baseline, transient decreases occurred during the “initial dip” and “post-stimulus undershoot.” These results suggest that the increase in blood oxygenation during the hemodynamic response, which has been perceived as a paradox, may serve to prevent a sustained oxygenation drop at tissue locations remote from the vascular feeding sources. PMID:21940458

  3. Simultaneous blood-tissue exchange of oxygen, carbon dioxide, bicarbonate, and hydrogen ion.

    PubMed

    Dash, Ranjan K; Bassingthwaighte, James B

    2006-07-01

    A detailed nonlinear four-region (red blood cell, plasma, interstitial fluid, and parenchymal cell) axially distributed convection-diffusion-permeation-reaction-binding computational model is developed to study the simultaneous transport and exchange of oxygen (O2) and carbon dioxide (CO2) in the blood-tissue exchange system of the heart. Since the pH variation in blood and tissue influences the transport and exchange of O2 and CO2 (Bohr and Haldane effects), and since most CO2 is transported as HCO3(-) (bicarbonate) via the CO2 hydration (buffering) reaction, the transport and exchange of HCO3(-) and H+ are also simulated along with that of O2 and CO2. Furthermore, the model accounts for the competitive nonlinear binding of O2 and CO2 with the hemoglobin inside the red blood cells (nonlinear O2-CO2 interactions, Bohr and Haldane effects), and myoglobin-facilitated transport of O2 inside the parenchymal cells. The consumption of O2 through cytochrome-c oxidase reaction inside the parenchymal cells is based on Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The corresponding production of CO2 is determined by respiratory quotient (RQ), depending on the relative consumption of carbohydrate, protein, and fat. The model gives a physiologically realistic description of O2 transport and metabolism in the microcirculation of the heart. Furthermore, because model solutions for tracer transients and steady states can be computed highly efficiently, this model may be the preferred vehicle for routine data analysis where repetitive solutions and parameter optimization are required, as is the case in PET imaging for estimating myocardial O2 consumption. PMID:16775761

  4. Activity-induced tissue oxygenation changes in rat cerebellar cortex: interplay of postsynaptic activation and blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Offenhauser, Nikolas; Thomsen, Kirsten; Caesar, Kirsten; Lauritzen, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging relies on the robust coupling between neuronal activity, metabolism and cerebral blood flow (CBF), but the physiological basis of the neuroimaging signals is still poorly understood. We examined the mechanisms of activity-dependent changes in tissue oxygenation in relation to variations in CBF responses and postsynaptic activity in rat cerebellar cortex. To increase synaptic activity we stimulated the monosynaptic, glutamatergic climbing fibres that excite Purkinje cells via AMPA receptors. We used local field potentials to indicate synaptic activity, and recorded tissue oxygen partial pressure (Ptiss,O2) by polarographic microelectrodes, and CBF using laser-Doppler flowmetry. The disappearance rate of oxygen in the tissue increased linearly with synaptic activity. This indicated that, without a threshold, oxygen consumption increased as a linear function of synaptic activity. The reduction in Ptiss,O2 preceded the rise in CBF. The time integral (area) of the negative Ptiss,O2 response increased non-linearly showing saturation at high levels of synaptic activity, concomitant with a steep rise in CBF. This was accompanied by a positive change in Ptiss,O2. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibition enhanced the initial negative Ptiss,O2 response (‘dip’), while attenuating the evoked CBF increase and positive Ptiss,O2 response equally. This indicates that increases in CBF counteract activity-induced reductions in Ptiss,O2, and suggests the presence of a tissue oxygen reserve. The changes in Ptiss,O2 and CBF were strongly attenuated by AMPA receptor blockade. Our findings suggest an inverse relationship between negative Ptiss,O2 and CBF responses, and provide direct in vivo evidence for a tight coupling between activity in postsynaptic AMPA receptors and cerebellar oxygen consumption. PMID:15774524

  5. Application of perfluorocarbon emulsions as fluorine-19 nuclear magnetic resonance molecular probes of cardiac tissues oxygen tension

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, H.P.

    1994-01-01

    The basic and universal need for oxygen in mammalian tissue has long been recognized. The quantitation of oxygen tension (pO[sub 2]) in cardiac tissue is available by many techniques, but these are generally invasive or superficial. In addition, the role of cardiac pO[sub 2] along the oxygen gradient has yet to be defined. To date, no single method fits the ideal, i.e. non-invasive, sensitive, accurate, rapid, three-dimensional, and economical. The use of perfluorocarbon emulsions as tissue oximeters by [sup 19]F NMR relaxometry has the potential to fulfill many of these requirements. Development of a novel method requires the assessment of validity, reproducibility, and practicality. To this end, I have characterized the linear relationship between pO[sub 2] and the [sup 19]F spin-lattice relaxation rate (R1) for several perfluorocarbon (PFC) emulsions at high magnetic fields. The physical basis of underlying [sup 19]F relaxation mechanisms were modeled with respect to the structure and thermal behavior of perfluorocarbon molecules. Utility of these molecules in vivo was tested by spectroscopy and imaging of perfluorocarbons sequestered in the perfused rat heart. Under a wide range of steady-state oxygenation, the global cardiac tissue pO[sub 2] of perfused rat hearts responded in a manner consistent with physiological processes. The cardiac pO[sub 2] was measured by MRS either with high reproducibility ([plus minus]20 torr) or temporal resolution (1 sec). Independent validation of this method was provided in the total absence of oxygen consumption by the heart. Localized pO[sub 2] measurements in tissue were accomplished by [sup 19]F MRI of PFCs in arrested, perfused rat hearts, and found to change significantly with ischemia. It was concluded that the measurement of pO[sub 2] by NMR can provide important information about the physiological condition of the heart.

  6. Noninvasive Intracranial Pressure and Tissue Oxygen Measurements for Space and Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargens, A. R.; Ballard, R. E.; Murthy, G.; Watenpaugh, D. E.

    1994-01-01

    The paper discusses the following: Increasing intracranial pressure in humans during simulated microgravity. and near-infrared monitoring of model chronic compartment syndrome in exercising skeletal muscle. Compared to upright-seated posture, 0 deg. supine, 6 deg. HDT, and 15 deg. HDT produced TMD changes of 317 +/- 112, 403 +/- 114, and 474 +/- 112 n1 (means +/- S.E.), respectively. Furthermore, postural transitions from 0 deg. supine to 6 deg. HDT and from 6 deg. to 15 deg. HDT generated significant TMD changes (p less than 0.05). There was no hysteresis when postural transitions to HDT were compared to reciprocal transitions toward upright seated posture. Currently, diagnosis of chronic compartment syndrome (CCS) depends on measurement of intramuscular pressure by invasive catheterization. We hypothesized that this syndrome can be detected noninvasively by near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy, which tracks variations in muscle hemoglobin/myoglobin oxygen saturation. CCS was simulated in the tibialis anterior muscle of 7 male and 3 female subjects by gradual inflation of a cuff placed around the leg to 40 mmHg during 14 minutes of cyclic isokinetic dorsiflexion exercise. On a separate day, subjects underwent the identical exercise protocol with no external compression. In both cases, tissue oxygenation (T(sub O2) was measured in the tibialis anterior by NIR spectroscopy and normalized to a percentage scale between baseline and a T(sub O2) nadir reached during exercise to ischemic exhaustion. Over the course of exercise, T(sub O2) declined at a rate of 1.4 +/- 0.3% per minute with model CCS, yet did not decrease during control exercise. Post-exercise recovery of T(sub O2) was slower with model CCS (2.5 +/- 0.6 min) than in control (1.3 +/- 0.2 min). These results demonstrate that NIR spectroscopy can detect muscle deoxygenation caused by pathologically elevated intramuscular pressure in exercising skeletal muscle. Consequently, this technique shows promise as a

  7. Resuscitation with Na+/H+ exchanger inhibitor in traumatic haemorrhagic shock: cardiopulmonary performance, oxygen transport and tissue inflammation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dongmei; Qi, Jiansong; Dai, Hui; Doods, Henri; Abraham, William M

    2010-03-01

    1. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of inhibition of the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE-1) on cardiopulmonary performance, oxygen carrying capacity and tissue inflammation in a pig model of traumatic haemorrhage-resuscitation. 2. In 12 instrumented anaesthetized pigs, traumatic haemorrhage was modelled by producing tibia fractures, followed by haemorrhage of 25 mL/kg for 20 min, and then a 4 mm hepatic arterial tear with surgical repair after 20 min. Animals then underwent low-volume fluid resuscitation with either Hextend (vehicle; n = 6; Hospira, Lake Forest, IL, USA) or 3 mg/kg BIIB513 (an NHE-1 inhibitor) + Hextend (n = 6). The experiment was terminated 6 h after the beginning of resuscitation. 3. Compared with vehicle-treated controls, the addition of NHE-1 inhibition with BIIB513 significantly improved the left ventricle stroke work index and attenuated increases in pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance. Furthermore, BIIB513 treatment significantly increased the oxygenated haemoglobin ratio, blood oxygen content and mixed venous blood oxygen saturation and improved blood oxygen delivery. In addition, BIIB513 treatment reduced lung tissue levels of interleukin-6 by 80%, tumour necrosis factor-alpha by 37% and myeloperoxidase activity by 38%. Nuclear factor-kappaB DNA binding activity in the lung was also slightly and significantly attenuated following BIIB513 treatment. 4. In conclusion, the present study shows that NHE-1 inhibition facilitates the response to fluid resuscitation after traumatic haemorrhage by improving cardiac function, pulmonary vascular function and oxygen carrying capacity, which results in reduced tissue inflammatory injury. PMID:19769605

  8. Online oxygen kinetic isotope effects using membrane inlet mass spectrometry can differentiate between oxidases for mechanistic studies and calculation of their contributions to oxygen consumption in whole tissues.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Mun Hon; Millar, A Harvey; Myers, Ruth C; Day, David A; Roth, Justine; Hillier, Warwick; Badger, Murray R

    2014-05-20

    The reduction chemistry of molecular oxygen underpins the energy metabolism of multicellular organisms, liberating free energy needed to catalyze a plethora of enzymatic reactions. Measuring the isotope signatures of (16)O and (18)O during O2 reduction can provide insights into both kinetic and equilibrium isotope effects. However, current methods to measure O2 isotope signatures are time-consuming and disruptive. This paper describes the application of membrane inlet mass spectrometry to determine the oxygen isotope discrimination of a range of O2-consuming reactions, providing a rapid and convenient method for determining these values. A survey of oxygenase and oxidase reactions provides new insights into previously uncharacterized amino acid oxidase enzymes. Liquid and gas phase measurements show the ease of assays using this approach for purified enzymes, biological extracts and intact tissues. PMID:24786640

  9. 2H,3H-Decafluoropentane-Based Nanodroplets: New Perspectives for Oxygen Delivery to Hypoxic Cutaneous Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Jithin; Khadjavi, Amina; Cavallo, Federica; Quaglino, Elena; Panariti, Alice; Rivolta, Ilaria; Benintende, Emilio; Varetto, Gianfranco; Argenziano, Monica; Troia, Adriano; Cavalli, Roberta; Guiot, Caterina

    2015-01-01

    Perfluoropentane (PFP)-based oxygen-loaded nanobubbles (OLNBs) were previously proposed as adjuvant therapeutic tools for pathologies of different etiology sharing hypoxia as a common feature, including cancer, infection, and autoimmunity. Here we introduce a new platform of oxygen nanocarriers, based on 2H,3H-decafluoropentane (DFP) as core fluorocarbon. These new nanocarriers have been named oxygen-loaded nanodroplets (OLNDs) since DFP is liquid at body temperature, unlike gaseous PFP. Dextran-shelled OLNDs, available either in liquid or gel formulations, display spherical morphology, ~600 nm diameters, anionic charge, good oxygen carrying capacity, and no toxic effects on human keratinocytes after cell internalization. In vitro OLNDs result more effective in releasing oxygen to hypoxic environments than former OLNBs, as demonstrated by analysis through oxymetry. In vivo, OLNDs effectively enhance oxy-hemoglobin levels, as emerged from investigation by photoacoustic imaging. Interestingly, ultrasound (US) treatment further improves transdermal oxygen release from OLNDs. Taken together, these data suggest that US-activated, DFP-based OLNDs might be innovative, suitable and cost-effective devices to topically treat hypoxia-associated pathologies of the cutaneous tissues. PMID:25781463

  10. 2H,3H-decafluoropentane-based nanodroplets: new perspectives for oxygen delivery to hypoxic cutaneous tissues.

    PubMed

    Prato, Mauro; Magnetto, Chiara; Jose, Jithin; Khadjavi, Amina; Cavallo, Federica; Quaglino, Elena; Panariti, Alice; Rivolta, Ilaria; Benintende, Emilio; Varetto, Gianfranco; Argenziano, Monica; Troia, Adriano; Cavalli, Roberta; Guiot, Caterina

    2015-01-01

    Perfluoropentane (PFP)-based oxygen-loaded nanobubbles (OLNBs) were previously proposed as adjuvant therapeutic tools for pathologies of different etiology sharing hypoxia as a common feature, including cancer, infection, and autoimmunity. Here we introduce a new platform of oxygen nanocarriers, based on 2H,3H-decafluoropentane (DFP) as core fluorocarbon. These new nanocarriers have been named oxygen-loaded nanodroplets (OLNDs) since DFP is liquid at body temperature, unlike gaseous PFP. Dextran-shelled OLNDs, available either in liquid or gel formulations, display spherical morphology, ~600 nm diameters, anionic charge, good oxygen carrying capacity, and no toxic effects on human keratinocytes after cell internalization. In vitro OLNDs result more effective in releasing oxygen to hypoxic environments than former OLNBs, as demonstrated by analysis through oxymetry. In vivo, OLNDs effectively enhance oxy-hemoglobin levels, as emerged from investigation by photoacoustic imaging. Interestingly, ultrasound (US) treatment further improves transdermal oxygen release from OLNDs. Taken together, these data suggest that US-activated, DFP-based OLNDs might be innovative, suitable and cost-effective devices to topically treat hypoxia-associated pathologies of the cutaneous tissues. PMID:25781463

  11. Achilles tendon suture deteriorates tendon capillary blood flow with sustained tissue oxygen saturation – an animal study

    PubMed Central

    Kraemer, Robert; Lorenzen, Johan; Rotter, Robert; Vogt, Peter M; Knobloch, Karsten

    2009-01-01

    Background Treatment of ruptured Achilles tendons currently constitutes of conservative early functional treatment or surgical treatment either by open or minimal invasive techniques. We hypothesize that an experimental Achilles tendon suture in an animal model significantly deteriorates Achilles tendon microcirculation immediately following suturing. Methods Fifteen Achilles tendons of eight male Wistar rats (275–325 g) were included. After preparation of the Achilles tendon with a medial paratendinous approach, Achilles tendon microcirculation was assessed using combined Laser-Doppler and spectrophotometry (Oxygen-to-see) regarding: - tendinous capillary blood flow [arbitrary units AU] - tendinous tissue oxygen saturation [%] - tendinous venous filling pressure [rAU] The main body of the Achilles tendon was measured in the center of the suture with 50 Hz. 10 minutes after Achilles tendon suture (6-0 Prolene), a second assessment of microcirculatory parameters was performed. Results Achilles tendon capillary blood flow decreased by 57% following the suture (70 ± 30 AU vs. 31 ± 16 AU; p < 0.001). Tendinous tissue oxygen saturation remained at the same level before and after suture (78 ± 17% vs. 77 ± 22%; p = 0.904). Tendinous venous filling pressure increased by 33% (54 ± 16 AU vs. 72 ± 20 AU; p = 0.019) after suture. Conclusion Achilles tendon suture in anaesthetised rats causes an acute loss of capillary perfusion and increases postcapillary venous filling pressures indicating venous stasis. The primary hypothesis of this study was confirmed. In contrast, tendinous tissue oxygen saturation remains unchanged excluding acute intratendinous hypoxia within the first 10 minutes after suture. Further changes of oxygen saturation remain unclear. Furthermore, it remains to be determined to what extent reduced capillary blood flow as well as increased postcapillary stasis might influence tendon healing from a microcirculatory point of view in this animal setting

  12. Comparative analysis of sensitivity of different light-scattering techniques to blood oxygenation on the basis of multilayer tissue model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillin, Mikhail Yu.; Priezzhev, Alexander V.; Myllylä, Risto

    2006-08-01

    This paper compares sensitivity to blood oxygenation of different schemes of detecting light scattered from or transmitted through a slab of tissue considered in the frames of a multilayer model. Comparison is made from the viewpoint of the sensitivity to oxygen saturation of certain blood volume confined within lower layers of different average thicknesses mimicking the upper and lower plexuses of skin, dermis and hypodermis. The model also includes upper layers, mimicking stratum corneum and epidermis, consisting of prickle and basal cell layers. The following signals were simulated with Monte Carlo technique and compared: diffuse scattering indicatrice, OCT signal, spatially resolved diffuse reflectance, time-of-flight and spectrophotometry signals. The optical parameters of the layers were chosen within the ranges corresponding to experimental data published in literature and our own OCT measurements. Heyney-Greenstein function was used as a phase function for all considered layers with anisotropy factor value varying for various layers. Blood fractions of different layers were chosen according to available data for diastolic state. We considered two wavelengths of 660 and 890 nm, located at different sides of the isobestic point of 805 nm, where the absorption coefficients of oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin are equal. These wavelengths are used in pulse oximetry. Our simulation results show, that the highest sensitivity to changes in oxygen content in blood is at the wavelength of 660 nm, where the difference between absorption coefficient values is significant. For this wavelength all the techniques except OCT show good sensitivity to blood oxygenation in the model tissue. For the second wavelength goniophotometry, spatially resolved diffuse reflectance, and spectorphotometry exhibit sensitivity to oxygenation, but it is lower than for 660 nm due to a smaller absorption coefficient mismatch.

  13. Heat treatment of human esophageal tissues: Effect on esophageal cancer detection using oxygenated hemoglobin diffuse reflectance ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Q. L.; Guo, Z. Y.; Si, J. L.; Wei, H. J.; Yang, H. Q.; Wu, G. Y.; Xie, S. S.; Guo, X.; Zhong, H. Q.; Li, L. Q.; Li, X. Y.

    2011-03-01

    The main objective of the present work is to study the influence of heat treatment on the esophageal cancer detection using the diffuse reflectance (DR) spectral intensity ratio R540/R575 of oxygenated hemoglobin (HbO2) absorption bands to distinguish the epithelial tissues of normal human esophagus and moderately differentiated esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) at different heat treatment temperature of 20, 37, 42, 50, and 60°C, respectively. The DR spectra for the epithelial tissues of the normal esophagus and ESCC in vitro at different heat-treatment temperature in the wavelength range 400-650 nm were measured with a commercial optical fiber spectrometer. The results indicate that the average DR spectral intensity overall enhancement with concomitant increase of heat-treatment temperature for the epithelial tissues of normal esophagus and ESCC, but the average DR spectral intensity for the normal esophageal epithelial tissues is relatively higher than that for ESCC epithelial tissues at the same heat-treatment temperature. The mean R540/R575 ratios of ESCC epithelial tissues were always lower than that of normal esophageal epithelial tissues at the same temperature, and the mean R540/R575 ratios of the epithelial tissues of the normal esophagus and ESCC were decreasing with the increase of different heat-treatment temperatures. The differences in the mean R540/R575 ratios between the epithelial tissues of normal esophagus and ESCC were 13.33, 13.59, 11.76, and 11.11% at different heat-treatment temperature of 20, 37, 42, and 50°C, respectively. These results also indicate that the DR intensity ratio R540/R575 of the hemoglobin bands is a useful tool for discrimination between the epithelial tissues of normal esophagus and ESCC in the temperature range from room temperature to 50°C, but it was non-effective at 60°C or over 60°C.

  14. Histochemical and functional improvement of adipose-derived stem cell-based tissue-engineered cartilage by hyperbaric oxygen/air treatment in a rabbit articular defect model.

    PubMed

    Dai, Niann-Tzyy; Fan, Gang-Yi; Liou, Nien-Hsien; Wang, Yi-Wen; Fu, Keng-Yen; Ma, Kuo-Hsing; Liu, Jiang-Chuan; Chang, Shun-Cheng; Huang, Kun-Lun; Dai, Lien-Guo; Chen, Shyi-Gen; Chen, Tim-Mo

    2015-05-01

    Cartilage is exposed to compression forces during joint loading. Therefore, exogenous stimuli are frequently used in cartilage tissue engineering strategies to enhance chondrocyte differentiation and extracellular matrix (ECM) secretion. In this study, human adipose-derived stem cells were seeded on a gelatin/polycaprolactone scaffold to evaluate the histochemical and functional improvement of tissue-engineered cartilage after hyperbaric oxygen/air treatment in a rabbit articular defect model. Behavior tests showed beneficial effects on weight-bearing and rear leg-supporting capacities after treatment of tissue-engineered cartilage with 2.5 ATA oxygen or air. Moreover, positron emission tomography images and immunohistochemistry staining demonstrated hydroxyapatite formation and increased ECM synthesis, respectively, at the tissue-engineered cartilage graft site after high pressure oxygen/air treatment. Based on these results, we concluded that hyperbaric oxygen and air treatment can improve the quality of tissue-engineered cartilage in vivo by increasing the synthesis of ECM. PMID:25695443

  15. Deriving concentrations of oxygen and carbon in human tissues using single- and dual-energy CT for ion therapy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, Guillaume; Parodi, Katia; Wildberger, Joachim E.; Verhaegen, Frank

    2013-08-01

    Dedicated methods of in-vivo verification of ion treatment based on the detection of secondary emitted radiation, such as positron-emission-tomography and prompt gamma detection require high accuracy in the assignment of the elemental composition. This especially concerns the content in carbon and oxygen, which are the most abundant elements of human tissue. The standard single-energy computed tomography (SECT) approach to carbon and oxygen concentration determination has been shown to introduce significant discrepancies in the carbon and oxygen content of tissues. We propose a dual-energy CT (DECT)-based approach for carbon and oxygen content assignment and investigate the accuracy gains of the method. SECT and DECT Hounsfield units (HU) were calculated using the stoichiometric calibration procedure for a comprehensive set of human tissues. Fit parameters for the stoichiometric calibration were obtained from phantom scans. Gaussian distributions with standard deviations equal to those derived from phantom scans were subsequently generated for each tissue for several values of the computed tomography dose index (CTDIvol). The assignment of %weight carbon and oxygen (%wC,%wO) was performed based on SECT and DECT. The SECT scheme employed a HU versus %wC,O approach while for DECT we explored a Zeff versus %wC,O approach and a (Zeff, ρe) space approach. The accuracy of each scheme was estimated by calculating the root mean square (RMS) error on %wC,O derived from the input Gaussian distribution of HU for each tissue and also for the noiseless case as a limiting case. The (Zeff, ρe) space approach was also compared to SECT by comparing RMS error for hydrogen and nitrogen (%wH,%wN). Systematic shifts were applied to the tissue HU distributions to assess the robustness of the method against systematic uncertainties in the stoichiometric calibration procedure. In the absence of noise the (Zeff, ρe) space approach showed more accurate %wC,O assignment (largest error of

  16. An upgraded camera-based imaging system for mapping venous blood oxygenation in human skin tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun; Zhang, Xiao; Qiu, Lina; Leotta, Daniel F.

    2016-07-01

    A camera-based imaging system was previously developed for mapping venous blood oxygenation in human skin. However, several limitations were realized in later applications, which could lead to either significant bias in the estimated oxygen saturation value or poor spatial resolution in the map of the oxygen saturation. To overcome these issues, an upgraded system was developed using improved modeling and image processing algorithms. In the modeling, Monte Carlo (MC) simulation was used to verify the effectiveness of the ratio-to-ratio method for semi-infinite and two-layer skin models, and then the relationship between the venous oxygen saturation and the ratio-to-ratio was determined. The improved image processing algorithms included surface curvature correction and motion compensation. The curvature correction is necessary when the imaged skin surface is uneven. The motion compensation is critical for the imaging system because surface motion is inevitable when the venous volume alteration is induced by cuff inflation. In addition to the modeling and image processing algorithms in the upgraded system, a ring light guide was used to achieve perpendicular and uniform incidence of light. Cross-polarization detection was also adopted to suppress surface specular reflection. The upgraded system was applied to mapping of venous oxygen saturation in the palm, opisthenar and forearm of human subjects. The spatial resolution of the oxygenation map achieved is much better than that of the original system. In addition, the mean values of the venous oxygen saturation for the three locations were verified with a commercial near-infrared spectroscopy system and were consistent with previously published data.

  17. Identification and expression profiling of low oxygen regulated genes from Citrus flavedo tissues using RT-PCR differential display.

    PubMed

    Pasentsis, Konstantinos; Falara, Vasiliki; Pateraki, Irene; Gerasopoulos, Dimitrios; Kanellis, Angelos K

    2007-01-01

    The molecular basis for the adaptation of fruit tissues to low oxygen treatments remains largely unknown. RT-PCR differential display (DD) was employed to isolate anoxic and/or hypoxic genes whose expression responded to short, low-oxygen regimes. This approach led to the isolation, cloning, successful sequencing, and bioinformatic analysis of 98 transcripts from Citrus flavedo tissues that were differentially expressed in DD gels in response to 0, 0.5, 3, and 21% O(2) for 24 h. RNA blot analysis of 25 DD clones revealed that 11 genes were induced under hypoxia and/or anoxia, 11 exhibited constitutive expression and three transcripts were suppressed by low oxygen levels. Almost half of the DD cDNAs were either of unknown function or shared no apparent homology to any expressed sequences in the GenBank/EMBL databases. Six DD genes were similar to molecules of the following functions: C-compound and carbohydrate utilization, plant development, amino acid metabolism, and biosynthesis of brasinosteroids. Time-course and stress-related experiments of low O(2)-regulated genes indicated that these genes responded differently in terms of their earliness, band intensity, and their specificity to stresses, showing that some of them can be termed hypoxia- or anoxia-induced genes. PMID:17525081

  18. Craniofacial tissue oxygen saturation is associated with blood pH using an examiner's finger-mounted tissue oximetry in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Toshiyuki; Kanayama, Naohiro; Kawai, Kenta; Niwayama, Masatsugu

    2016-04-01

    Although fetal scalp blood sampling is an examination to assess fetal acidosis during the intrapartum period, it has not been widely used by obstetricians because of its invasiveness. We have developed a small, portable oximetry with a sensor attached to the examiner's finger. Our previous report using this oximetry concluded that fetal head tissue oxygen saturation (StO2) correlated with umbilical cord artery blood pH. We investigated whether the association between StO2 and blood pH in mice could be validated using this oximetry. Eleven the Institute for Cancer Research (ICR) mice were measured using a near-infrared spectroscopy probe at the craniofacial site in a closed polyethylene bag while changing the oxygen concentration. A total of nine blood samples were collected and analyzed for pH. The StO2 and tissue blood pH showed a strong positive correlation (r=0.90 and P=0.0009). The StO2 and total hemoglobin index also showed a positive correlation (r=0.84 and P=0.0049). Thus, the results of the present study support those of our previous report on clinical cases and allow examiners to easily check the status of fetal acidosis. Fetal management using this oximetry might gain popularity with obstetricians in the near future.

  19. Real-time monitoring of brain tissue oxygen using a miniaturized biotelemetric device implanted in freely moving rats.

    PubMed

    Bazzu, Gianfranco; Puggioni, Giulia G M; Dedola, Sonia; Calia, Giammario; Rocchitta, Gaia; Migheli, Rossana; Desole, Maria S; Lowry, John P; O'Neill, Robert D; Serra, Pier A

    2009-03-15

    A miniaturized biotelemetric device for the amperometric detection of brain tissue oxygen is presented. The new system, derived from a previous design, has been coupled with a carbon microsensor for the real-time detection of dissolved O(2) in the striatum of freely moving rats. The implantable device consists of a single-supply sensor driver, a current-to-voltage converter, a microcontroller, and a miniaturized data transmitter. The oxygen current is converted to a digital value by means of an analog-to-digital converter integrated in a peripheral interface controller (PIC). The digital data is sent to a personal computer using a six-byte packet protocol by means of a miniaturized 434 MHz amplitude modulation (AM) transmitter. The receiver unit is connected to a personal computer (PC) via a universal serial bus. Custom developed software allows the PC to store and plot received data. The electronics were calibrated and tested in vitro under different experimental conditions and exhibited high stability, low power consumption, and good linear response in the nanoampere current range. The in vivo results confirmed previously published observations on oxygen dynamics in the striatum of freely moving rats. The system serves as a rapid and reliable model for studying the effects of different drugs on brain oxygen and brain blood flow and it is suited to work with direct-reduction sensors or O(2)-consuming biosensors. PMID:19222224

  20. Measurement of Local Partial Pressure of Oxygen in the Brain Tissue under Normoxia and Epilepsy with Phosphorescence Lifetime Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cong; Bélanger, Samuel; Pouliot, Philippe; Lesage, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    In this work a method for measuring brain oxygen partial pressure with confocal phosphorescence lifetime microscopy system is reported. When used in conjunction with a dendritic phosphorescent probe, Oxyphor G4, this system enabled minimally invasive measurements of oxygen partial pressure (pO2) in cerebral tissue with high spatial and temporal resolution during 4-AP induced epileptic seizures. Investigating epileptic events, we characterized the spatio-temporal distribution of the "initial dip" in pO2 near the probe injection site and along nearby arterioles. Our results reveal a correlation between the percent change in the pO2 signal during the "initial dip" and the duration of seizure-like activity, which can help localize the epileptic focus and predict the length of seizure. PMID:26305777

  1. The effect of oxygen partial pressure on protein synthesis and collagen hydroxylation by mature periodontal tissues maintained in organ cultures

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Edwin H. K.; Sodek, Jaro; Melcher, Antony H.

    1979-01-01

    Mature periodontal tissues from adult-mouse first mandibular molars were cultured in a continuous-flow organ-culture system which allowed the regulation of both ascorbic acid concentration and pO2 (oxygen partial pressure). Protein synthesis was measured by analysing the incorporation of [3H]proline into collagenous and non-collagenous proteins during the last 24h of a 2-day culture. At low pO2 [16.0kPa (approx. 120mmHg)] approx. 60% of protein-incorporated [3H]proline was found in collagenous proteins. However, it was evident that this collagen was considerably underhydroxylated. At high pO2 [56.0kPa (approx. 420mmHg)], both the amount of collagen deposited in the tissues and the degree of hydroxylation were increased considerably. In contrast, no significant effect on non-collagenous protein was observed. Tissues cultured at low pO2 for the first 48h were unable to respond to a subsequent increase in pO2 during the last 24h. Analysis of pepsin-solubilized collagen α-chains labelled with [14C]glycine demonstrated the synthesis of both type-I and type-III collagens by explants cultured for 48h at high pO2. Type-III collagen comprised 20–30% of the radioactivity in α-chains in both the periodontal ligament and the tissues of the alveolar process. The pattern of protein synthesis in the alveolar tissues at high pO2 was similar to that observed in these tissues in vivo. However, in the cultured periodontal ligament the proportions of non-collagenous proteins and type-III collagens were increased in comparison with the tissue in vivo. PMID:454369

  2. Imaging of oxygenation in 3D tissue models with multi-modal phosphorescent probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papkovsky, Dmitri B.; Dmitriev, Ruslan I.; Borisov, Sergei

    2015-03-01

    Cell-penetrating phosphorescence based probes allow real-time, high-resolution imaging of O2 concentration in respiring cells and 3D tissue models. We have developed a panel of such probes, small molecule and nanoparticle structures, which have different spectral characteristics, cell penetrating and tissue staining behavior. The probes are compatible with conventional live cell imaging platforms and can be used in different detection modalities, including ratiometric intensity and PLIM (Phosphorescence Lifetime IMaging) under one- or two-photon excitation. Analytical performance of these probes and utility of the O2 imaging method have been demonstrated with different types of samples: 2D cell cultures, multi-cellular spheroids from cancer cell lines and primary neurons, excised slices from mouse brain, colon and bladder tissue, and live animals. They are particularly useful for hypoxia research, ex-vivo studies of tissue physiology, cell metabolism, cancer, inflammation, and multiplexing with many conventional fluorophors and markers of cellular function.

  3. Quantitative assessment of brain tissue oxygenation in porcine models of cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation using hyperspectral near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotfabadi, Shahin S.; Toronov, Vladislav; Ramadeen, Andrew; Hu, Xudong; Kim, Siwook; Dorian, Paul; Hare, Gregory M. T.

    2014-03-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a non-invasive tool to measure real-time tissue oxygenation in the brain. In an invasive animal experiment we were able to directly compare non-invasive NIRS measurements on the skull with invasive measurements directly on the brain dura matter. We used a broad-band, continuous-wave hyper-spectral approach to measure tissue oxygenation in the brain of pigs under the conditions of cardiac arrest, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), and defibrillation. An additional purpose of this research was to find a correlation between mortality due to cardiac arrest and inadequacy of the tissue perfusion during attempts at resuscitation. Using this technique we measured the changes in concentrations of oxy-hemoglobin [HbO2] and deoxy-hemoglobin [HHb] to quantify the tissue oxygenation in the brain. We also extracted cytochrome c oxidase changes Δ[Cyt-Ox] under the same conditions to determine increase or decrease in cerebral oxygen delivery. In this paper we proved that applying CPR, [HbO2] concentration and tissue oxygenation in the brain increase while [HHb] concentration decreases which was not possible using other measurement techniques. We also discovered a similar trend in changes of both [Cyt-Ox] concentration and tissue oxygen saturation (StO2). Both invasive and non-invasive measurements showed similar results.

  4. An in vitro characterization of a silicone tonometer system for synchronous measurement of tissue oxygen- and carbon dioxide tension.

    PubMed

    Larsen, P N; Pedersen, I; Moesgaard, F

    1993-07-01

    A new tonometry system for continuous and synchronous measurement of tissue oxygen- and carbon dioxide tension is described and characterized in vitro. The tonometer system consists of an O2 and CO2 permeable silicone tube continuously flushed with isotonic saline by an injection pump. When the saline passes through the tonometer tube it equilibrates with O2 and CO2 outside the tube. The oxygen- and carbon dioxide tension of the flushing solution after passage of the tonometer tube are measured by a transcutaneous combined oxygen/carbon dioxide electrode (E5280 Radiometer A/S, Copenhagen, Denmark), connected to the tonometer tube via an airtight polycarbonate chamber. In order to characterize the tonometer system in vitro the tonometer tube was submerged in a test chamber containing isotonic saline, 33 degrees C to 41 degrees C, with varying partial pressures of O2 and CO2. For various lengths of the tonometer and flushing rates through the tonometer the partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the flushing solution (pO2eq and pCO2eq), after passage through the tonometer were recorded and compared to the known partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the test chamber solution (pO2 test and pCO2test). PO2eq and pCO2eq approached pO2test and pCO2test, when the length of the tonometer was increased, and the flushing rate through the tonometer was decreased. The relative differences (D) between pO2eq and pCO2eq at the one hand and pO2test and pCO2test at the other hand were calculated, and equilibration curves were constructed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8378734

  5. A Microperfusion and In-Bore Oxygenator System Designed for Magnetic Resonance Microscopy Studies on Living Tissue Explants.

    PubMed

    Flint, Jeremy J; Menon, Kannan; Hansen, Brian; Forder, John; Blackband, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    Spectrometers now offer the field strengths necessary to visualize mammalian cells but were not designed to accommodate imaging of live tissues. As such, spectrometers pose significant challenges--the most evident of which are spatial limitations--to conducting experiments in living tissue. This limitation becomes problematic upon trying to employ commercial perfusion equipment which is bulky and--being designed almost exclusively for light microscopy or electrophysiology studies--seldom includes MR-compatibility as a design criterion. To overcome problems exclusive to ultra-high magnetic field environments with limited spatial access, we have designed microperfusion and in-bore oxygenation systems capable of interfacing with Bruker's series of micro surface-coils. These devices are designed for supporting cellular resolution imaging in MR studies of excised, living tissue. The combined system allows for precise control of both dissolved gas and pH levels in the perfusate thus demonstrating applicability for a wide range of tissue types. Its compactness, linear architecture, and MR-compatible material content are key design features intended to provide a versatile hardware interface compatible with any NMR spectrometer. Such attributes will ensure the microperfusion rig's continued utility as it may be used with a multitude of contemporary NMR systems in addition to those which are currently in development. PMID:26666980

  6. A Microperfusion and In-Bore Oxygenator System Designed for Magnetic Resonance Microscopy Studies on Living Tissue Explants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flint, Jeremy J.; Menon, Kannan; Hansen, Brian; Forder, John; Blackband, Stephen J.

    2015-12-01

    Spectrometers now offer the field strengths necessary to visualize mammalian cells but were not designed to accommodate imaging of live tissues. As such, spectrometers pose significant challenges—the most evident of which are spatial limitations—to conducting experiments in living tissue. This limitation becomes problematic upon trying to employ commercial perfusion equipment which is bulky and—being designed almost exclusively for light microscopy or electrophysiology studies—seldom includes MR-compatibility as a design criterion. To overcome problems exclusive to ultra-high magnetic field environments with limited spatial access, we have designed microperfusion and in-bore oxygenation systems capable of interfacing with Bruker’s series of micro surface-coils. These devices are designed for supporting cellular resolution imaging in MR studies of excised, living tissue. The combined system allows for precise control of both dissolved gas and pH levels in the perfusate thus demonstrating applicability for a wide range of tissue types. Its compactness, linear architecture, and MR-compatible material content are key design features intended to provide a versatile hardware interface compatible with any NMR spectrometer. Such attributes will ensure the microperfusion rig’s continued utility as it may be used with a multitude of contemporary NMR systems in addition to those which are currently in development.

  7. Real-time electrochemical monitoring of brain tissue oxygen: a surrogate for functional magnetic resonance imaging in rodents.

    PubMed

    Lowry, John P; Griffin, Karen; McHugh, Stephen B; Lowe, Andrew S; Tricklebank, Mark; Sibson, Nicola R

    2010-08-15

    Long-term in-vivo electrochemistry (LIVE) enables real-time monitoring and measurement of brain metabolites. In this study we have simultaneously obtained blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) fMRI and amperometric tissue O(2) data from rat cerebral cortex, during both increases and decreases in inspired O(2) content. BOLD and tissue O(2) measurements demonstrated close correlation (r=0.7898) during complete (0%) O(2) removal, with marked negative responses occurring ca. 30s after the onset of O(2) removal. Conversely, when the inspired O(2) was increased (50, 70 and 100% O(2) for 1min) similar positive rapid changes (ca. 15s) in both the BOLD and tissue O(2) signals were observed. These findings demonstrate, for the first time, the practical feasibility of obtaining real-time metabolite information during fMRI acquisition, and that tissue O(2) concentration monitored using an O(2) sensor can serve as an index of changes in the magnitude of the BOLD response. As LIVE O(2) sensors can be used in awake animals performing specific behavioural tasks the technique provides a viable animal surrogate of human fMRI experimentation. PMID:20417284

  8. A Microperfusion and In-Bore Oxygenator System Designed for Magnetic Resonance Microscopy Studies on Living Tissue Explants

    PubMed Central

    Flint, Jeremy J.; Menon, Kannan; Hansen, Brian; Forder, John; Blackband, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Spectrometers now offer the field strengths necessary to visualize mammalian cells but were not designed to accommodate imaging of live tissues. As such, spectrometers pose significant challenges—the most evident of which are spatial limitations—to conducting experiments in living tissue. This limitation becomes problematic upon trying to employ commercial perfusion equipment which is bulky and—being designed almost exclusively for light microscopy or electrophysiology studies—seldom includes MR-compatibility as a design criterion. To overcome problems exclusive to ultra-high magnetic field environments with limited spatial access, we have designed microperfusion and in-bore oxygenation systems capable of interfacing with Bruker’s series of micro surface-coils. These devices are designed for supporting cellular resolution imaging in MR studies of excised, living tissue. The combined system allows for precise control of both dissolved gas and pH levels in the perfusate thus demonstrating applicability for a wide range of tissue types. Its compactness, linear architecture, and MR-compatible material content are key design features intended to provide a versatile hardware interface compatible with any NMR spectrometer. Such attributes will ensure the microperfusion rig’s continued utility as it may be used with a multitude of contemporary NMR systems in addition to those which are currently in development. PMID:26666980

  9. Evidence of a heterogeneous tissue oxygenation: renal ischemia/reperfusion injury in a large animal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, Nicole J.; Huffman, Scott W.; Alemozaffar, Mehrdad; Gage, Frederick A.; Levin, Ira W.; Elster, Eric A.

    2013-03-01

    Renal ischemia that occurs intraoperatively during procedures requiring clamping of the renal artery (such as renal procurement for transplantation and partial nephrectomy for renal cancer) is known to have a significant impact on the viability of that kidney. To better understand the dynamics of intraoperative renal ischemia and recovery of renal oxygenation during reperfusion, a visible reflectance imaging system (VRIS) was developed to measure renal oxygenation during renal artery clamping in both cooled and warm porcine kidneys. For all kidneys, normothermic and hypothermic, visible reflectance imaging demonstrated a spatially distinct decrease in the relative oxy-hemoglobin concentration (%HbO2) of the superior pole of the kidney compared to the middle or inferior pole. Mean relative oxy-hemoglobin concentrations decrease more significantly during ischemia for normothermic kidneys compared to hypothermic kidneys. VRIS may be broadly applicable to provide an indicator of organ ischemia during open and laparoscopic procedures.

  10. Pilot study to visualise and measure skin tissue oxygenation, erythema, total haemoglobin and melanin content using index maps in healthy controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poxon, Ian; Wilkinson, Jack; Herrick, Ariane; Dickinson, Mark; Murray, Andrea

    2014-02-01

    We report on a method for analysing multispectral images of skin in vivo for the measurement and visualisation of skin characteristics. Four different indices were used to characterise skin tissue oxygenation, erythema, total haemoglobin and melanin content. Index values were calculated pixel-wise and combined to create index maps to visualise skin properties. Quantitative measurement of tissue oxygenation saturation was possible by calibrating the oxygenation index using a commercial, calibrated oximeter. Index maps were tested by arterial occlusion of the index finger with multispectral images taken before, during and after occlusion in a pilot study with 10 healthy controls.

  11. The relationship between tissue oxygenation and redox status using magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    HYODO, FUMINORI; DAVIS, RYAN M.; HYODO, EMI; MATSUMOTO, SHINGO; KRISHNA, MURALI C.; MITCHELL, JAMES B.

    2012-01-01

    The recent development of a bi-modality magnetic resonance imaging/electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (MRI/EPRI) platform has enabled longitudinal monitoring of both tumor oxygenation and redox status in murine cancer models. The current study used this imaging platform to test the hypothesis that a more reducing tumor microenvironment accompanies the development of tumor hypoxia. To test this, the redox status of the tumor was measured using Tempol as a redox-sensitive MRI contrast agent, and tumor hypoxia was measured with Oxo63, which is an oxygen-sensitive EPRI spin probe. Images were acquired every 1–2 days in mice bearing SCCVII tumors. The median pO2 decreased from 14 mmHg at 7 days after tumor implantation to 7 mmHg at 15 days after implantation. Additionally, the hypoxic fraction, defined as the percentage of the tumor that exhibited a pO2<10 mmHg, increased with tumor size (from 10% at 500 mm3 to 60% at 3,500 mm3). The rate of Tempol reduction increased as a function of tumor volume (0.4 min−1 at 500 mm3 to 1.7 min−1 at 3,500 mm3), suggesting that the tumor microenvironment became more reduced as the tumor grew. The results show that rapid Tempol reduction correlates with decreased tumor oxygenation, and that the Tempol decay rate constant may be a surrogate marker for tumor hypoxia. PMID:23007796

  12. Two-photon high-resolution measurement of partial pressure of oxygen in cerebral vasculature and tissue.

    PubMed

    Sakadzić, Sava; Roussakis, Emmanuel; Yaseen, Mohammad A; Mandeville, Emiri T; Srinivasan, Vivek J; Arai, Ken; Ruvinskaya, Svetlana; Devor, Anna; Lo, Eng H; Vinogradov, Sergei A; Boas, David A

    2010-09-01

    Measurements of oxygen partial pressure (pO(2)) with high temporal and spatial resolution in three dimensions is crucial for understanding oxygen delivery and consumption in normal and diseased brain. Among existing pO(2) measurement methods, phosphorescence quenching is optimally suited for the task. However, previous attempts to couple phosphorescence with two-photon laser scanning microscopy have faced substantial difficulties because of extremely low two-photon absorption cross-sections of conventional phosphorescent probes. Here we report to our knowledge the first practical in vivo two-photon high-resolution pO(2) measurements in small rodents' cortical microvasculature and tissue, made possible by combining an optimized imaging system with a two-photon-enhanced phosphorescent nanoprobe. The method features a measurement depth of up to 250 microm, sub-second temporal resolution and requires low probe concentration. The properties of the probe allowed for direct high-resolution measurement of cortical extravascular (tissue) pO(2), opening many possibilities for functional metabolic brain studies. PMID:20693997

  13. Two-photon high-resolution measurement of partial pressure of oxygen in cerebral vasculature and tissue

    PubMed Central

    Sakadžić, Sava; Roussakis, Emmanuel; Yaseen, Mohammad A.; Mandeville, Emiri T.; Srinivasan, Vivek J.; Arai, Ken; Ruvinskaya, Svetlana; Devor, Anna; Lo, Eng H.; Vinogradov, Sergei A.; Boas, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The ability to measure oxygen partial pressure (pO2) with high temporal and spatial resolution in three dimensions is crucial for understanding oxygen delivery and consumption in normal and diseased brain. Among existing pO2 measurement methods, phosphorescence quenching is optimally suited for the task. However, previous attempts to couple phosphorescence with two-photon laser scanning microscopy have faced substantial difficulties because of extremely low two-photon absorption cross-sections of conventional phosphorescent probes. Here, we report the first practical in vivo two-photon high-resolution pO2 measurements in small rodents’ cortical microvasculature and tissue, made possible by combining an optimized imaging system with a two-photon-enhanced phosphorescent nanoprobe. The method features a measurement depth of up to 250 µm, sub-second temporal resolution and requires low probe concentration. Most importantly, the properties of the probe allowed for the first direct high-resolution measurement of cortical extravascular (tissue) pO2, opening numerous possibilities for functional metabolic brain studies. PMID:20693997

  14. Brain tissue partial pressure of oxygen predicts the outcome of severe traumatic brain injury under mild hypothermia treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hongtao; Zheng, Maohua; Wang, Yanmin; Diao, Yunfeng; Zhao, Wanyong; Wei, Zhengjun

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical significance and changes of brain tissue partial pressure of oxygen (PbtO2) in the course of mild hypothermia treatment (MHT) for treating severe traumatic brain injury (sTBI). Methods There were 68 cases with sTBI undergoing MHT. PbtO2, intracranial pressure (ICP), jugular venous oxygen saturation (SjvO2), and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) were continuously monitored, and clinical outcomes were evaluated using the Glasgow Outcome Scale score. Results Of 68 patients with sTBI, PbtO2, SjvO2, and CPP were obviously increased, but decreased ICP level was observed throughout the MHT. PbtO2 and ICP were negatively linearly correlated, while there was a positive linear correlation between PbtO2 and SjvO2. Monitoring CPP and SjvO2 was performed under normal circumstances, and a large proportion of patients were detected with low PbtO2. Decreased PbtO2 was also found after MHT. Conclusion Continuous PbtO2 monitoring could be introduced to evaluate the condition of regional cerebral oxygen metabolism, thereby guiding the clinical treatment and predicting the outcome. PMID:27601907

  15. Tissue oxygenation in a murine SCC VII tumor after X-ray irradiation as determined by EPR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Hirotada; Sakata, Koh-ichi; Katsumata, Yoshihiro; Sato, Rikiya; Kinouchi, Makoto; Someya, Masanori; Masunaga, Shin-ichiro; Hareyama, Masato; Swartz, Harold M.; Hirata, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    Purpose The goal of this study was to clarify the dynamics of tumor oxygen (partial pressure of oxygen, pO2) in SCC VII murine tumors in mice after X-ray irradiation. Materials and methods Changes in pO2 in tumors were measured by 1.2-GHz electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy after they were exposed to various doses of irradiation. The pO2 in tumors was followed for up to six days after irradiation at doses of 0, 5, 10, 15, and 20 Gy. Paramagnetic crystals were used as an oximetry probe and implanted into normal or tumor tissues in mice for prolonged periods. Results The pattern of tumor oxygen after a single dose of radiation with the 5-Gy dose was different from those with other doses (10, 15, and 20 Gy). After 5 Gy, pO2 increased rapidly (P < 0.01, Student’s t test) and then returned to the level observed before irradiation by 12 hours (P < 0.01). In contrast, after 10, 15, or 20 Gy, pO2 increased rapidly by 6 h after irradiation, continued to increase until at least 24 h (P < 0.01), and then gradually decreased. Conclusion In tumors that received 5 Gy, post-irradiation increases in pO2 at 4 h after irradiation were detected by EPR oximetry (P < 0.01) noninvasively. PMID:18077029

  16. Enantioselective S-oxygenation of para-methoxyphenyl-1,3-dithiolane by various tissue preparations: effect of estradiol.

    PubMed

    Cashman, J R; Olsen, L D; Lambert, C E; Presas, M J

    1990-02-01

    Liver, kidney, and lung microsomes prepared from nonpretreated female Sprague-Dawley rats catalyze the NADPH- and oxygen-dependent S-oxygenation of para-methoxyphenyl-1,3-dithiolane. Studies on the biochemical mechanism of dithiolane S-oxygenation in liver, kidney, and lung microsomes suggest that this reaction is catalyzed in a diastereoselective and enantioselective fashion by the flavin-containing monooxygenase and, to a lesser extent, the cytochromes P-450. This conclusion is based on results examining the effects of selective cytochrome P-450 inhibitors and positive effectors, microsome heat-inactivation treatment, and alternate substrates for the flavin-containing monooxygenase. Liver and kidney microsomes prepared from ovarectomized female rats tended to have decreased S-oxygenase activity, compared with nonpretreated female rats, whereas ovarectomized rats pretreated with estradiol had markedly lower S-oxygenase activity. In contrast, lung microsomal S-oxygenase activity, which is low in pulmonary microsomes from nonpretreated female rats, increases 2-4-fold after ovariectomization and estradiol pretreatment. In female Sprague-Dawley rats, estradiol pretreatment is mainly responsible for the large decrease (or increase) in S-oxygenase activity observed in the tissues examined, although it is unlikely that estradiol alone controls flavin-containing monooxygenase S-oxygenase activity. PMID:2304455

  17. Alteration in regional tissue oxygenation of preterm infants during placement in the semi-upright seating position.

    PubMed

    Petrova, Anna; Mehta, Rajeev

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether the cerebral (rSO2-C %) and renal (rSO2-R %) tissue oxygenation of preterm infants is altered by repositioning from the supine to semi-upright position for pre-discharge car seat testing. Near-infrared spectroscopy was used to measure rSO2-C and rSO2-R, which were recorded simultaneously with vital signs in 15 preterm infants for 30 minutes in supine, 60 minutes in the semi-upright (at 45 degrees in a car seat), and 30 minutes in the post-semi-upright (supine) position. Changes in rSO2-C and SO2-R were mostly within 1 Standard Deviation (SD) of baseline mean levels in the supine position. Decrease in rSO2-C and rSO2-R (more than 1SD below baseline mean) was recorded in 26.7% and 6.6% of infants respectively, which persisted even after adjustment for variation in heart and respiratory rate, and pulse oximeter measured oxygen saturation (P, 0.0001). Re-positioning the infants from the car seat to supine position was associated with normalization of the rSO2-C. Alteration in rSO2-C and rSO2-R in a car seat was independent from the gestational and post-conception age, weight and presence of anemia. We concluded that approximately one-third of preterm infants show minor reduction of cerebral tissue oxygenation in the semi-upright (car seat) position. PMID:25661986

  18. Potato chip intake increases ascorbic acid levels and decreases reactive oxygen species in SMP30/GNL knockout mouse tissues.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Yoshitaka; Sakuma, Rui; Ichisawa, Megumi; Ishihara, Katsuyuki; Kubo, Misako; Handa, Setsuko; Mugita, Hiroyuki; Maruyama, Naoki; Koga, Hidenori; Ishigami, Akihito

    2014-09-24

    Potato chips (PC) contain abundant amounts of the free radical scavenger ascorbic acid (AA) due to the rapid dehydration of potato tubers (Solanum tuberosum) that occurs during frying. To evaluate the antioxidant activity of PC, this study examined reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in tissues from SMP30/GNL knockout (KO) mice that cannot synthesize AA and determined AA and ROS levels after the animals were fed 20 and 10% PC diets for 7 weeks. Compared with AA-sufficient mice, AA-depleted SMP30/GNL KO mice showed high ROS levels in tissues. SMP30/GNL KO mice fed a PC diet showed high AA and low ROS levels in the brain, heart, lung, testis, soleus muscle, plantaris muscle, stomach, small intestine, large intestine, eyeball, and epididymal fat compared with AA-depleted mice. The data suggest that PC intake increases AA levels and enhances ROS scavenging activity in tissues of SMP30/GNL KO mice, which are a promising model for evaluating the antioxidant activity of foods. PMID:25180784

  19. In vivo evidence of methamphetamine induced attenuation of brain tissue oxygenation as measured by EPR oximetry

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, John; Yang, Yirong; Purvis, Rebecca; Weatherwax, Theodore; Rosen, Gerald M.; Liu, Ke Jian

    2014-03-01

    Abuse of methamphetamine (METH) is a major and significant societal problem in the US, as a number of studies have suggested that METH is associated with increased cerebrovascular events, hemorrhage or vasospasm. Although cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in METH-induced toxicity are not completely understood, changes in brain O{sub 2} may play an important role and contribute to METH-induced neurotoxicity including dopaminergic receptor degradation. Given that O{sub 2} is the terminal electron acceptor for many enzymes that are important in brain function, the impact of METH on brain tissue pO{sub 2}in vivo remains largely uncharacterized. This study investigated striatal tissue pO{sub 2} changes in male C57BL/6 mice (16–20 g) following METH administration using EPR oximetry, a highly sensitive modality to measure pO{sub 2}in vivo, in situ and in real time. We demonstrate that 20 min after a single injection of METH (8 mg/kg i.v.), the striatal pO{sub 2} was reduced to 81% of the pretreatment level and exposure to METH for 3 consecutive days further attenuated striatal pO{sub 2} to 64%. More importantly, pO{sub 2} did not recover fully to control levels even 24 h after administration of a single dose of METH and continual exposure to METH exacerbates the condition. We also show a reduction in cerebral blood flow associated with a decreased brain pO{sub 2} indicating an ischemic condition. Our findings suggests that administration of METH can attenuate brain tissue pO{sub 2}, which may lead to hypoxic insult, thus a risk factor for METH-induced brain injury and the development of stroke in young adults. - Highlights: • Explored striatal tissue pO{sub 2}in vivo after METH administration by EPR oximetry. • pO{sub 2} was reduced by 81% after a single dose and 64% after 3 consecutive daily doses. • pO{sub 2} did not recover fully to control levels even 24 h after a single dose. • Decrease in brain tissue pO{sub 2} may be associated with a decrease in

  20. Comparison of regional skeletal muscle tissue oxygenation in college athletes and sedentary control subjects using quantitative BOLD MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Stacy, Mitchel R; Caracciolo, Christopher M; Qiu, Maolin; Pal, Prasanta; Varga, Tyler; Constable, Robert Todd; Sinusas, Albert J

    2016-08-01

    Blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging permits noninvasive assessment of tissue oxygenation. We hypothesized that BOLD imaging would allow for regional evaluation of differences in skeletal muscle oxygenation between athletes and sedentary control subjects, and dynamic BOLD responses to ischemia (i.e., proximal cuff occlusion) and reactive hyperemia (i.e., rapid cuff deflation) would relate to lower extremity function, as assessed by jumping ability. College football athletes (linemen, defensive backs/wide receivers) were compared to sedentary healthy controls. BOLD signal of the gastrocnemius, soleus, anterior tibialis, and peroneus longus was assessed for peak hyperemic value (PHV), time to peak (TTP), minimum ischemic value (MIV), and time to recovery (TTR). Significantly higher PHVs were identified in athletes versus controls for the gastrocnemius (linemen, 15.8 ± 9.1%; defensive backs/wide receivers, 17.9 ± 5.1%; controls, 7.4 ± 3.5%), soleus (linemen, 25.9 ± 11.5%; backs/receivers, 22.0 ± 9.4%; controls, 12.9 ± 5.8%), and anterior tibialis (linemen, 12.8 ± 5.3%; backs/receivers, 12.6 ± 3.9%; controls, 7.7 ± 4.0%), whereas no differences in PHV were found for the peroneus longus (linemen, 14.1 ± 6.9%; backs/receivers, 11.7 ± 4.6%; controls, 9.0 ± 4.9%). In all subject groups, the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles exhibited the lowest MIVs during cuff occlusion. No differences in TTR were found between muscles for any subject group. PHV of the gastrocnemius muscle was significantly and positively related to maximal vertical (r = 0.56, P = 0.002) and broad jump (r = 0.47, P = 0.01). These results suggest that BOLD MR imaging is a useful noninvasive tool for evaluating differences in tissue oxygenation of specific muscles between active and sedentary individuals, and peak BOLD responses may relate to functional capacity. PMID:27535483

  1. 21 CFR 1404.900 - Adequate evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adequate evidence. 1404.900 Section 1404.900 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 1404.900 Adequate evidence. Adequate evidence means information sufficient to support the reasonable belief that a particular...

  2. 29 CFR 98.900 - Adequate evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Adequate evidence. 98.900 Section 98.900 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 98.900 Adequate evidence. Adequate evidence means information sufficient to support the reasonable belief that a...

  3. Necrotising soft tissue infections: the effect of hyperbaric oxygen on mortality.

    PubMed

    Devaney, B; Frawley, G; Frawley, L; Pilcher, D V

    2015-11-01

    In a single-centre, retrospective, case-controlled study of patients attending the Alfred Hospital in Prahran, Victoria, we assessed the effect of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) in reducing mortality or morbidity in patients with necrotising fasciitis (NF) over a 13-year period from 2002 to 2014. A total of three hundred and forty-one patients with NF were included in the study, of whom 275 received HBOT and 66 did not. The most commonly involved sites were the perineum (33.7%), lower limb (29.9%) and trunk (18.2%). The commonest predisposing factor was diabetes mellitus (34.8%). Polymicrobial NF (type 1 NF) occurred in 50.7% and Group A streptococcal fasciitis (type 2 NF) occurred in 25.8% of patients. Mortality was 14.4% overall, 12% in those treated with, and 24.3% in those not treated with, HBOT. ICU support was required in 248 (72.7%) patients. Independent factors impacting on mortality included HBOT (odds ratio [OR] 0.42 [0.22 to 0.83], P=0.01), increased age (OR 1.06 [1.03 to 1.08], P=0.001) and immunosuppression (OR 2.6 [1.23 to 5.51], P=0.01). Mortality was linked to illness severity at presentation, however when adjusted for severity score and need for intensive care management, HBOT was associated with significant reduction in mortality. PMID:26603791

  4. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy and delayed radiation injuries (soft tissue and bony necrosis): 2012 update.

    PubMed

    Feldmeier, John J

    2012-01-01

    Informal surveys at CME meetings have shown that approximately one-third of patients in the United States receive hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) for delayed radiation injury. More than 600,000 patients receive radiation for malignancy in our country annually, and about one-half will be long-term survivors. Serious radiation complications occur in 5-10% of survivors. A large population of patients is therefore at risk for radiation injury. HBO2 has been applied to treat patients with radiation injury since the mid-1970s. Published results are consistently positive, but the level of evidence for individual publications is usually not high level, consisting mostly of case series and case reports. Only a rare randomized controlled trial has been accomplished. Radiation injury is one of the UHMS "approved" indications, and third-party payors will usually reimburse for this application. This updated review summarizes the publications available reporting results in treating radiation-injured patients. Mechanisms of HBO2 in radiation injury are discussed briefly. Outcome is reported on a mostly anatomic basis though due to the nature of the injury a positive outcome at one anatomic site is supportive of HBO2 at other sites. The potential benefit of prophylactic HBO2 before frank damage is also discussed in high-risk patients. The concerns of HBO2 enhancing growth of or precipitating recurrence of malignancy is discussed and largely refuted. PMID:23342770

  5. [Serum lactate level as a indicator of tissue hypoxia in severely ill patients].

    PubMed

    Bakker, J; Schieveld, S J; Brinkert, W

    2000-04-15

    Adequate oxygen supply to the tissues is of vital importance to survive critical illness and trauma. Shock can be defined as an imbalance between oxygen demand and oxygen supply. Clinical features of shock, like hypotension, tachycardia, cold clammy skin et cetera, are poorly correlated with presence of tissue hypoxia. A high lactate level is an early sign of tissue hypoxia. In severely ill patients tissue hypoxia is the most important cause of increased lactate levels. Increased blood lactate levels are related to increased mortality. Optimizing oxygen supply by fluid resuscitation is the intervention of first choice. PMID:10812440

  6. Detection of free oxygen in tissues and testing of primary step of photodynamics action by time-resolved phosphorescence of photosensitizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losev, Anatoly P.; Knukshto, Valentin N.; Zhuravkin, Ivan N.

    1995-01-01

    Highly phosphorescent photosensitizer Pd-tetra (o-methoxy-p-sulfo) phenyl porphyrin (Pd- MSPP) was used to follow the primary events of photodynamic action -- quenching of triplet states by free oxygen in different systems: water solutions of proteins, cells and tissues in vivo and in vitro. The photosensitizer forms complexes with proteins in solutions and biosystems showing remarkable hypsochromic shifts of band and an increase of the quantum yield and lifetime of phosphorescence at the binding to proteins. In absence of oxygen the lifetime of phosphorescence is almost single exponential, depends on the energy of the lowest triplet state of the sensitizer. The photochemical quenching of the triplets by cell components is negligible. In the presence of free oxygen the quenching of the sensitizer triplets takes place. The emission spectrum of singlet oxygen with maximum 1271 nm was recorded in water protein solutions and quantum yield of sensitized luminescence was measured. In the systems studied oxygen consumption was detected and oxygen concentration was estimated in the course of photodynamics by an increase in photosensitizer phosphorescence lifetime, using laser flash photolysis technique. At least two exponential kinetic of the phosphorescence decay shows that the distribution of the free oxygen is not uniform in tissues. The unexpected effect of photoinduced hyperoxia was observed just after the several minutes of tumor exposition with following slow development of a hyposia in a course of continual light exposition.

  7. A method for measuring brain partial pressure of oxygen in unanesthetized unrestrained subjects: the effect of acute and chronic hypoxia on brain tissue PO2

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Prado, E.; Natah, Siraj; Srinivasan, Sathyanarayanan; Dunn, Jeff F.

    2011-01-01

    The level of tissue oxygenation provides information related to the balance between oxygen delivery, oxygen utilization, tissue reactivity and morphology during physiological conditions. Tissue partial pressure of oxygen (PtO2) is influenced by the use of anesthesia or restraint. These factors may impact the absolute level of PtO2. In this study we present a novel fibre optic method to measure brain PtO2. This method can be used in unanesthetized, unrestrained animals, provides absolute values for PO2, has a stable calibration, does not consume oxygen and is MRI compatible. Brain PtO2 was studied during acute hypoxia, as well as before and after 28 days of high altitude acclimatization. A sensor was chronically implanted in the frontal cortex of 8 Wistar rats. It is comprised of a fiber optic probe with a tip containing material that fluoresces with an oxygen dependent lifetime. Brain PtO2 declines by 80% and 76% pre- and post-acclimatization respectively, when the fraction of inspired oxygen declines from 0.21 to 0.08. In addition, a linear relationship between brain PtO2 and inspired O2 levels was demonstrated r2=0.98 and r2=0.99 (pre- and post-acclimatization). Hypoxia acclimatization resulted in an increase in the overall brain PtO2 by approximately 35%. This paper demonstrates the use of a novel chronically implanted fibre optic based sensor for measuring absolute PtO2. It shows a very strong linear relationship in awake animals between inspired O2 and tissue O2, and shows that there is a proportional increase in PtO2 over a range of inspired values after exposure to chronic hypoxia. PMID:20817029

  8. Specificity of Compensatory Reserve and Tissue Oxygenation as Early Predictors of Tolerance to Progressive Reductions in Central Blood Volume.

    PubMed

    Howard, Jeffrey T; Janak, Jud C; Hinojosa-Laborde, Carmen; Convertino, Victor A

    2016-09-01

    We previously reported that measurements of muscle oxygen saturation (SmO2) and the compensatory reserve index (CRI) provided earlier indication of reduced central blood volume than standard vital signs (e.g., blood pressure, heart rate, arterial oxygen saturation). In the present study, we hypothesized that the CRI would provide greater sensitivity and specificity to detect progressive decrease in central circulating blood volume compared with SmO2. Continuous noninvasive measures of CRI (calculated from feature changes in the photoplethysmographic arterial waveforms) were collected from 55 healthy volunteer subjects before and during stepwise lower body negative pressure (LBNP) to the onset of hemodynamic decompensation. Near infrared spectroscopy was used on the forearm to obtain deep SmO2, hydrogen ion concentration ([H]), and hemoglobin volume (HbT; decreases reflect vasoconstriction). CRI decreased by 97% in a linear fashion across progressive blood volume loss, with no clinically significant alterations in vital signs. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) area under the curve (AUC) for the CRI was 0.91, with a sensitivity of 0.87 and specificity of 0.80, when predicting decompensation at progressive levels of LBNP. In comparison, SmO2, [H], and HbT had significantly lower ROC AUC, sensitivity and specificity values for detecting the same outcome. Consistent with our hypothesis, CRI detected central hypovolemia with significantly greater specificity than measures of tissue metabolism. Single measurement of CRI may enable more accurate triage, while CRI monitoring may allow for earlier detection of casualty deterioration. PMID:27058052

  9. Light-Addressable Measurement of in Vivo Tissue Oxygenation in an Unanesthetized Zebrafish Embryo via Phase-Based Phosphorescence Lifetime Detection

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shih-Hao; Yu, Chu-Hung; Chien, Yi-Lung

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a digital light modulation system that utilizes a modified commercial projector equipped with a laser diode as a light source for quantitative measurements of in vivo tissue oxygenation in an unanesthetized zebrafish embryo via phase-based phosphorescence lifetime detection. The oxygen-sensitive phosphorescent probe (Oxyphor G4) was first inoculated into the bloodstream of 48 h post-fertilization (48 hpf) zebrafish embryos via the circulation valley to rapidly disperse probes throughout the embryo. The unanesthetized zebrafish embryo was introduced into the microfluidic device and immobilized on its lateral side by using a pneumatically actuated membrane. By controlling the illumination pattern on the digital micromirror device in the projector, the modulated excitation light can be spatially projected to illuminate arbitrarily-shaped regions of tissue of interest for in vivo oxygen measurements. We have successfully measured in vivo oxygen changes in the cardiac region and cardinal vein of a 48 hpf zebrafish embryo that experience hypoxia and subsequent normoxic conditions. Our proposed platform provides the potential for the real-time investigation of oxygen distribution in tissue microvasculature that relates to physiological stimulation and diseases in a developing organism. PMID:25856326

  10. In vivo measurement of tissue oxygenation by time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy: advantageous properties of dichlorotris(1, 10-phenanthroline)-ruthenium(II) hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huntosova, Veronika; Gay, Sandrine; Nowak-Sliwinska, Patrycja; Rajendran, Senthil Kumar; Zellweger, Matthieu; van den Bergh, Hubert; Wagnières, Georges

    2014-07-01

    Measuring tissue oxygenation in vivo is of interest in fundamental biological as well as medical applications. One minimally invasive approach to assess the oxygen partial pressure in tissue (pO2) is to measure the oxygen-dependent luminescence lifetime of molecular probes. The relation between tissue pO and the probes' luminescence lifetime is governed by the Stern-Volmer equation. Unfortunately, virtually all oxygen-sensitive probes based on this principle induce some degree of phototoxicity. For that reason, we studied the oxygen sensitivity and phototoxicity of dichlorotris(1, 10-phenanthroline)-ruthenium(II) hydrate [Ru(Phen)] using a dedicated optical fiber-based, time-resolved spectrometer in the chicken embryo chorioallantoic membrane. We demonstrated that, after intravenous injection, Ru(Phen)'s luminescence lifetime presents an easily detectable pO dependence at a low drug dose (1 mg/kg) and low fluence (120 mJ/cm2 at 470 nm). The phototoxic threshold was found to be at 10 J/cm2 with the same wavelength and drug dose, i.e., about two orders of magnitude larger than the fluence necessary to perform a pO measurement. Finally, an illustrative application of this pO measurement approach in a hypoxic tumor environment is presented.

  11. 34 CFR 85.900 - Adequate evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Definitions § 85.900 Adequate evidence. Adequate evidence means information sufficient to support the reasonable belief that a particular act or omission has occurred. Authority: E.O. 12549 (3 CFR, 1986 Comp., p. 189); E.O 12689 (3 CFR, 1989 Comp., p. 235); 20 U.S.C. 1082, 1094, 1221e-3 and 3474; and Sec....

  12. 29 CFR 452.110 - Adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Adequate safeguards. 452.110 Section 452.110 Labor... DISCLOSURE ACT OF 1959 Election Procedures; Rights of Members § 452.110 Adequate safeguards. (a) In addition to the election safeguards discussed in this part, the Act contains a general mandate in section...

  13. 29 CFR 452.110 - Adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Adequate safeguards. 452.110 Section 452.110 Labor... DISCLOSURE ACT OF 1959 Election Procedures; Rights of Members § 452.110 Adequate safeguards. (a) In addition to the election safeguards discussed in this part, the Act contains a general mandate in section...

  14. Cerebral and Muscle Tissue Oxygenation During Incremental Cycling in Male Adolescents Measured by Time-Resolved Near-Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Goutham; Leu, Szu-Yun; Cerussi, Albert; Tromberg, Bruce; Cooper, Dan M; Galassetti, Pietro

    2016-05-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy has long been used to measure tissue-specific O2 dynamics in exercise, but most published data have used continuous wave devices incapable of quantifying absolute Hemoglobin (Hb) concentrations. We used time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy to study exercising muscle (Vastus Lateralis, VL) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) Hb oxygenation in 11 young males (15.3 ± 2.1 yrs) performing incremental cycling until exhaustion (peak VO2 = 42.7 ± 6.1 ml/min/kg, mean peak power = 181 ± 38 W). Time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy measurements of reduced scattering (μs´) and absorption (μa) at three wavelengths (759, 796, and 833 nm) were used to calculate concentrations of oxyHb ([HbO2]), deoxy Hb ([HbR]), total Hb ([THb]), and O2 saturation (stO2). In PFC, significant increases were observed in both [HbO2] and [HbR] during intense exercise. PFC stO2% remained stable until 80% of total exercise time, then dropped (-2.95%, p = .0064). In VL, stO2% decreased until peak time (-6.8%, p = .01). Segmented linear regression identified thresholds for PFC [HbO2], [HbR], VL [THb]. There was a strong correlation between timing of second ventilatory threshold and decline in PFC [HbO2] (r = .84). These findings show that time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy can be used to study physiological threshold phenomena in children during maximal exercise, providing insight into tissue specific hemodynamics and metabolism. PMID:26451845

  15. Dynamic model for the tissue concentration and oxygen saturation of hemoglobin in relation to blood volume, flow velocity, and oxygen consumption: Implications for functional neuroimaging and coherent hemodynamics spectroscopy (CHS)

    PubMed Central

    Fantini, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a dynamic model that quantifies the temporal evolution of the concentration and oxygen saturation of hemoglobin in tissue, as determined by time-varying hemodynamic and metabolic parameters: blood volume, flow velocity, and oxygen consumption. This multi-compartment model determines separate contributions from arterioles, capillaries, and venules that comprise the tissue microvasculature, and treats them as a complete network, without making assumptions on the details of the architecture and morphology of the microvascular bed. A key parameter in the model is the effective blood transit time through the capillaries and its associated probability of oxygen release from hemoglobin to tissue, as described by a rate constant for oxygen diffusion. The solution of the model in the time domain predicts the signals measured by hemodynamic-based neuroimaging techniques such as functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in response to brain activation. In the frequency domain, the model yields an analytical solution based on a phasor representation that provides a framework for quantitative spectroscopy of coherent hemodynamic oscillations. I term this novel technique coherent hemodynamics spectroscopy (CHS), and this article describes how it can be used for the assessment of cerebral autoregulation and the study of hemodynamic oscillations resulting from a variety of periodic physiological challenges, brain activation protocols, or physical maneuvers. PMID:23583744

  16. Three-Dimensional Spectral-Spatial EPR Imaging of Free Radicals in the Heart: A Technique for Imaging Tissue Metabolism and Oxygenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuppusamy, Periannan; Chzhan, Michael; Vij, Kamal; Shteynbuk, Michael; Lefer, David J.; Giannella, Eliana; Zweier, Jay L.

    1994-04-01

    It has been hypothesized that free radical metabolism and oxygenation in living organs and tissues such as the heart may vary over the spatially defined tissue structure. In an effort to study these spatially defined differences, we have developed electron paramagnetic resonance imaging instrumentation enabling the performance of three-dimensional spectral-spatial images of free radicals infused into the heart and large vessels. Using this instrumentation, high-quality three-dimensional spectral-spatial images of isolated perfused rat hearts and rabbit aortas are obtained. In the isolated aorta, it is shown that spatially and spectrally accurate images of the vessel lumen and wall could be obtained in this living vascular tissue. In the isolated rat heart, imaging experiments were performed to determine the kinetics of radical clearance at different spatial locations within the heart during myocardial ischemia. The kinetic data show the existence of regional and transmural differences in myocardial free radical clearance. It is further demonstrated that EPR imaging can be used to noninvasively measure spatially localized oxygen concentrations in the heart. Thus, the technique of spectral-spatial EPR imaging is shown to be a powerful tool in providing spatial information regarding the free radical distribution, metabolism, and tissue oxygenation in living biological organs and tissues.

  17. Effects of ketamine on the circulatory functions and body tissue oxygenation in dogs under normal and hypovolemic conditions.

    PubMed

    Chen, T S; Yeh, F C; Chou, Y P; Chen, H I

    1984-04-01

    Anesthetic induction with ketamine may cause cardiovascular (CV) stimulation and depression. The study was conducted in dogs to evaluate the dependence of ketamine-induced CV effects upon the dosage, mode of administration and experimental hypovolemic conditions. Slow ketamine infusion (n = 12) at 3 dose levels (5 mg/kg/min for 1, 2 and 4 min to a total dose of 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg) consistently increased the arterial pressure (AP) and heart rate (HR). Rapid bolus injections at 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg (n = 16) produced biphasic changes--decreases followed by increases in AP and HR. Profound depressor and bradycardic responses were readily observed with large dose, rapid bolus injection and during hemorrhagic hypotension. The striking CV depression in some cases became irreversible and led to death. Further study in 8 open-chest dogs revealed that ketamine infusion (a total dose of 10 mg/kg) caused slight increases in cardiac output (CO) and tissue oxygen uptake (VO2). However, the marked depressor response to bolus injection was associated with decreases in CO, total peripheral resistance, stroke volume and VO2. These inhibitory effects were prolonged after hemorrhagic hypotension. In a few cases, CO and VO2 became severely and progressively depressed and death ensued shortly following the injection. PMID:6571587

  18. Near-infrared spectroscopy with Spectroscopic technique with wide range of wavelength information detects tissue oxygenation level clearly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eda, Hideo; Aoki, Hiromichi; Eura, Shigeru; Ebe, Kazutoshi

    2010-02-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is based on the modified-Lambert-Beer's law that changes in absorbance are proportional to changes in hemoglobin parameters. Majority of the conventional measurement methods uses only two or three wavelengths. In this research, basic examination of NIRS measurement was approached by acquiring wide range of wavelength information. Arterial occlusion task was performed by using the blood pressure cuff around the upper arm. Pressure of 200mmHg was then applied for about 3 minutes. During the arterial occlusion, the spectrum of the lower arm muscles was measured every 15 seconds, within the range of 600 to 1100nm. The secondary derivative spectrum was calculated from the measured spectrum. Arterial occlusion is a task which changes the oxygenation level of the tissue. The change can be regarded as the change of the spectrum form, not as the change of the baseline. Furthermore, it was found that other wavelength bands hold information correlating to this arterial occlusion task.

  19. Treadmill Exercise Induces Neutrophil Recruitment into Muscle Tissue in a Reactive Oxygen Species-Dependent Manner. An Intravital Microscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Nunes-Silva, Albená; Bernardes, Priscila T. T.; Rezende, Bárbara M.; Lopes, Fernando; Gomes, Elisa C.; Marques, Pedro E.; Lima, Paulo M. A.; Coimbra, Cândido C.; Menezes, Gustavo B.; Teixeira, Mauro M.; Pinho, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    Intense exercise is a physiological stress capable of inducing the interaction of neutrophils with muscle endothelial cells and their transmigration into tissue. Mechanisms driving this physiological inflammatory response are not known. Here, we investigate whether production of reactive oxygen species is relevant for neutrophil interaction with endothelial cells and recruitment into the quadriceps muscle in mice subjected to the treadmill fatiguing exercise protocol. Mice exercised until fatigue by running for 56.3±6.8 min on an electric treadmill. Skeletal muscle was evaluated by intravital microscopy at different time points after exercise, and then removed to assess local oxidative stress and histopathological analysis. We observed an increase in plasma lactate and creatine kinase (CK) concentrations after exercise. The numbers of monocytes, neutrophils, and lymphocytes in blood increased 12 and 24 hours after the exercise. Numbers of rolling and adherent leukocytes increased 3, 6, 12, and 24 hours post-exercise, as assessed by intravital microscopy. Using LysM-eGFP mice and confocal intravital microscopy technology, we show that the number of transmigrating neutrophils increased 12 hours post-exercise. Mutant gp91phox-/- (non-functional NADPH oxidase) mice and mice treated with apocynin showed diminished neutrophil recruitment. SOD treatment promoted further adhesion and transmigration of leukocytes 12 hours after the exercise. These findings confirm our hypothesis that treadmill exercise increases the recruitment of leukocytes to the postcapillary venules, and NADPH oxidase-induced ROS plays an important role in this process. PMID:24798414

  20. Edaravone (MCI-186) scavenges reactive oxygen species and ameliorates tissue damage in the murine spinal cord injury model.

    PubMed

    Aoyama, Takeshi; Hida, Kazutoshi; Kuroda, Satoshi; Seki, Toshitaka; Yano, Shunsuke; Shichinohe, Hideo; Iwasaki, Yoshinobu

    2008-12-01

    The present study evaluated the effect of the free radical scavenger edaravone on lesion volume and neurological dysfunction after spinal cord injury (SCI) in mice, and investigated its protective effects on superoxide generation. Female C57BL/6 mice were subjected to SCI using a pneumatic impact device and were treated with 3 mg/kg of edaravone or vehicle 30 minutes before the insult. Motor functions were quantitatively evaluated. Lesion volume was assessed by Dohrmann's two-cone method after one week. In situ detection of superoxide in the injured cord was carried out using the superoxide-sensitive dye dihydroethidium (DHE) staining technique. Pretreatment with edaravone significantly improved motor dysfunction and reduced the lesion volume to about 63% of the control (p < 0.05). Semi-quantitative measurements of red fluorescence emitted from DHE revealed that the superoxide concentration increased in the lesion periphery at 1 and 3 hours after the insult, and that pretreatment with edaravone significantly inhibited the increase of superoxide concentration in the lesion periphery at both time points (p < 0.0001). Double staining with DHE and monoclonal antibody against MAP2 showed that most cells positive for DHE were also positive for MAP2. These findings suggest that edaravone ameliorates tissue damage by scavenging reactive oxygen species, especially in the neurons, after SCI. PMID:19106491

  1. Recombinant activated protein C treatment improves tissue perfusion and oxygenation in septic patients measured by near-infrared spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The purpose was to test the hypothesis that muscle perfusion, oxygenation, and microvascular reactivity would improve in patients with severe sepsis or septic shock during treatment with recombinant activated protein C (rh-aPC) (n = 11) and to explore whether these parameters are related to macrohemodynamic indices, metabolic status or Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score. Patients with contraindications to rh-aPC were used as a control group (n = 5). Materials and methods Patients were sedated, intubated, mechanically ventilated, and hemodynamically monitored with the PiCCO system. Tissue oxygen saturation (StO2) was measured using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) during the vascular occlusion test (VOT). Baseline StO2 (StO2 baseline), rate of decrease in StO2 during VOT (StO2 downslope), and rate of increase in StO2 during the reperfusion phase were (StO2 upslope) determined. Data were collected before (T0), during (24 hours (T1a), 48 hours (T1b), 72 hours (T1c) and 96 hours (T1d)) and 6 hours after stopping rh-aPC treatment (T2) and at the same times in the controls. At every assessment, hemodynamic and metabolic parameters were registered and the SOFA score calculated. Results The mean ± standard deviation Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score was 26.3 ± 6.6 and 28.6 ± 5.3 in rh-aPC and control groups, respectively. There were no significant differences in macrohemodynamic parameters between the groups at all the time points. In the rh-aPC group, base excess was corrected (P < 0.01) from T1a until T2, and blood lactate was significantly decreased at T1d and T2 (2.8 ± 1.3 vs. 1.9 ± 0.7 mmol/l; P < 0.05). In the control group, base excess was significantly corrected at T1a, T1b, T1c, and T2 (P < 0.05). The SOFA score was significantly lower in the rh-aPC group compared with the controls at T2 (7.9 ± 2.2 vs. 12.2 ± 3.2; P < 0.05). There were no differences between groups in StO2 baseline. StO2 downslope in the rh

  2. Conjugatable water-soluble Pt(II) and Pd(II) porphyrin complexes: novel nano- and molecular probes for optical oxygen tension measurement in tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Giuntini, F; Chauhan, V M; Aylott, J W; Rosser, G A; Athanasiadis, A; Beeby, A; MacRobert, A J; Brown, R A; Boyle, R W

    2014-07-01

    Measurement of oxygen tension in compressed collagen sheets was performed using matrix-embedded optical oxygen sensors based on platinum(II) and palladium(II) porphyrins supported on polyacrylamide nanoparticles. Bespoke, fully water-soluble, mono-functionalised Pt(II) and Pd(II) porphyrin complexes designed for conjugation under mild conditions were obtained using microwave-assisted metallation. The new sensors display a linear response (1/τ vs. O2) to varying oxygen tension over a biologically relevant range (7.0 × 10(-4) to 2.7 × 10(-1) mM) in aqueous solutions; a behaviour that is maintained following conjugation to polyacrylamide nanoparticles, and following embedding of the nanosensors in compressed collagen sheets, paving the way to innovative approaches for real-time resolution of oxygen gradients throughout 3D matrices useful for tissue regeneration. PMID:24818569

  3. Analytic Models of Oxygen and Nutrient Diffusion, Metabolism Dynamics, and Architecture Optimization in Three-Dimensional Tissue Constructs with Applications and Insights in Cerebral Organoids.

    PubMed

    McMurtrey, Richard J

    2016-03-01

    Diffusion models are important in tissue engineering as they enable an understanding of gas, nutrient, and signaling molecule delivery to cells in cell cultures and tissue constructs. As three-dimensional (3D) tissue constructs become larger, more intricate, and more clinically applicable, it will be essential to understand internal dynamics and signaling molecule concentrations throughout the tissue and whether cells are receiving appropriate nutrient delivery. Diffusion characteristics present a significant limitation in many engineered tissues, particularly for avascular tissues and for cells whose viability, differentiation, or function are affected by concentrations of oxygen and nutrients. This article seeks to provide novel analytic solutions for certain cases of steady-state and nonsteady-state diffusion and metabolism in basic 3D construct designs (planar, cylindrical, and spherical forms), solutions that would otherwise require mathematical approximations achieved through numerical methods. This model is applied to cerebral organoids, where it is shown that limitations in diffusion and organoid size can be partially overcome by localizing metabolically active cells to an outer layer in a sphere, a regionalization process that is known to occur through neuroglial precursor migration both in organoids and in early brain development. The given prototypical solutions include a review of metabolic information for many cell types and can be broadly applied to many forms of tissue constructs. This work enables researchers to model oxygen and nutrient delivery to cells, predict cell viability, study dynamics of mass transport in 3D tissue constructs, design constructs with improved diffusion capabilities, and accurately control molecular concentrations in tissue constructs that may be used in studying models of development and disease or for conditioning cells to enhance survival after insults like ischemia or implantation into the body, thereby providing a

  4. Americans Getting Adequate Water Daily, CDC Finds

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus/news/fullstory_158510.html Americans Getting Adequate Water Daily, CDC Finds Men take in an average ... new government report finds most are getting enough water each day. The data, from the U.S. National ...

  5. Americans Getting Adequate Water Daily, CDC Finds

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_158510.html Americans Getting Adequate Water Daily, CDC Finds Men take in an average ... new government report finds most are getting enough water each day. The data, from the U.S. National ...

  6. Oxygen Mapping within Healthy and Acutely Infarcted Brain Tissue in Humans Using the NMR Relaxation of Lipids: A Proof-Of-Concept Translational Study

    PubMed Central

    Magat, Julie; Joudiou, Nicolas; Peeters, André P.; Jordan, Bénédicte F.; Gallez, Bernard; Duprez, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    The clinical applicability of brain oxygenation mapping using the MOBILE (Mapping of Oxygen By Imaging Lipids relaxation Enhancement) magnetic resonance (MR) technique was assessed in the clinical setting of normal brain and of acute cerebral ischemia as a founding proof-of-concept translational study. Changes in the oxygenation level within healthy brain tissue can be detected by analyzing the spin-lattice proton relaxation (‘Global T1’ combining water and lipid protons) because of the paramagnetic properties of molecular oxygen. It was hypothesized that selective measurement of the relaxation of the lipid protons (‘Lipids T1’) would result in enhanced sensitivity of pO2 mapping because of higher solubility of oxygen in lipids than in water, and this was demonstrated in pre-clinical models using the MOBILE technique. In the present study, 12 healthy volunteers and eight patients with acute (48–72 hours) brain infarction were examined with the same clinical 3T MR system. Both Lipids R1 (R1 = 1/T1) and Global R1 were significantly different in the infarcted area and the contralateral unaffected brain tissue, with a higher statistical significance for Lipids R1 (median difference: 0.408 s-1; p<0.0001) than for Global R1 (median difference: 0.154 s-1; p = 0.027). Both Lipids R1 and Global R1 values in the unaffected contralateral brain tissue of stroke patients were not significantly different from the R1 values calculated in the brain tissue of healthy volunteers. The main limitations of the present prototypic version of the MOBILE sequence are the long acquisition time (4 min), hampering robustness of data in uncooperative patients, and a 2 mm slice thickness precluding accurate measurements in small infarcts because of partial volume averaging effects. PMID:26267901

  7. Functional and anatomical characterization of brown adipose tissue in heart failure with blood oxygen level dependent magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Panagia, Marcello; Chen, Yin-Ching Iris; Chen, Howard H; Ernande, Laura; Chen, Chan; Chao, Wei; Kwong, Kenneth; Scherrer-Crosbie, Marielle; Sosnovik, David E

    2016-07-01

    Recent studies have suggested that brown adipose tissue (BAT) plays an important role in obesity, insulin resistance and heart failure. The characterization of BAT in vivo, however, has been challenging. No technique to comprehensively image BAT anatomy and function has been described. Moreover, the impact on BAT of the neuroendocrine activation seen in heart failure has only recently begun to be evaluated in vivo. The aim of this study was to use MRI to characterize the impact of heart failure on the morphology and function of BAT. Mice subjected to permanent ligation of the left coronary artery were imaged with MRI 6 weeks later. T2 weighted MRI of BAT volume and blood oxygen level dependent MRI of BAT function were performed. T2 * maps of BAT were obtained at multiple time points before and after administration of the β3 adrenergic agonist CL 316 243 (CL). Blood flow to BAT was studied after CL injection using the flow alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) approach. Excised BAT tissue was analyzed for lipid droplet content and for uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) mRNA expression. BAT volume was significantly lower in heart failure (51 ± 1 mm(3) versus 65 ± 3 mm(3) ; p < 0.05), and characterized by a reduction in lipid globules and a fourfold increase in UCP1 mRNA (p < 0.05). CL injection increased BAT T2 * in healthy animals but not in mice with heart failure (24 ± 4% versus 6 ± 2%; p < 0.01), consistent with an increase in flow in control BAT. This was confirmed by a significant difference in the FAIR response in BAT in control and heart failure mice. Heart failure results in the chronic activation of BAT, decreased BAT lipid stores and decreased BAT volume, and it is associated with a marked decrease in ability to respond to acute physiological stimuli. This may have important implications for substrate utilization and overall metabolic homeostasis in heart failure. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27226402

  8. Oral tissue changes of radiation-oncology and their management

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, T.J. )

    1990-04-01

    The cytologic effects of radiation therapy involve all tissues and most significantly bone within the treated area. Of greatest concern is the permanence of the compromised healing and resistance to infection of the irradiated tissues. Those dental procedures that do not cause tissue trauma are considered nonrisk. Any procedure that traumatizes previously irradiated tissues can exceed the healing potential of the compromised tissue and frequently results in an uncontrollable necrosis. The adequate utilization of hyperbaric oxygen therapy has been shown to be 95% effective in preventing osteoradionecrosis in postirradiated tissues. 9 references.

  9. Supplemental Oxygen Therapy for Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Barjaktarevic, Igor; Cooper, Christopher B

    2015-08-01

    Oxygen is necessary for aerobic metabolism. Since the human body cannot produce or store oxygen, a continuous and adequate delivery of oxygen needs to be secured by oxygen uptake from inhaled air via the respiratory system and oxygen delivery to body tissues via the circulation. Severely reduced lung function in advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) may be a limiting factor for adequate oxygen uptake and patients with this disease may require supplemental oxygen therapy. While the methodology of oxygen delivery in home settings represents a continuously evolving field, oxygen therapy itself has been an integral part of the management of severely hypoxemic patients with COPD for more than 50 years despite the lack of full understanding of its effects and the relative paucity of clinical evidence supporting its use. In this article, we review the physiological effects and discuss the clinical benefits of oxygen therapy. We also evaluate the evidence supporting and arguing against its use in the published literature, discuss its risks and benefits, define criteria for prescribing oxygen therapy, and review methods of oxygen delivery in home settings. PMID:26238641

  10. Involvement of reactive oxygen species in the induction of (S)-N-p-coumaroyloctopamine accumulation by beta-1,3-glucooligosaccharide elicitors in potato tuber tissues.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, F; Miyagawa, H; Ueno, T

    2001-01-01

    Treatment of potato tuber tissues with beta-1,3-glucooligosaccharide induces accumulation of (S)-N-p-coumaroyloctopamine (p-CO). We examined the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) in the signal transduction leading to p-CO accumulation. Induction was suppressed by an NADPH-oxidase inhibitor, diphenyleneiodonium chloride, and oxygen radical scavengers. H2O2 was generated in the tuber tissue within a few minutes of treatment with beta-1,3-glucooligosaccharide. On the other hand, treatment with NO specific scavenger, nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, and serine protease inhibitor did not inhibit p-CO induction. Our findings suggest that ROS generated by the action of NADPH-oxidase play an important role in this system, while NO and serine protease are unlikely to be involved in this process. PMID:11371013

  11. The problems of tissue oxygenation in diabetes mellitus. III. The "three-in-one concept" for the development of diabetic microangiopathy and a rational approach to its prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Ditzel, J

    1975-01-01

    Evidence for a causative relationship between prolonged tissue hypoxia and diabetic retinopathy and glomerulosclerosis are presented. Based on the assumption that one of the most fundamental requirements for optimal cellular metabolism is a constant cellular oxygen tension, the "three-in-one concept" for the development of diabetic microangiopathy is formulated. The term "three-in-one" is employed because this concept partly or completely includes "the glycoprotein-", "the hypoxia-", and "the growth hormone hypothesis". Diabetics show evidence of variability in the tissue oxygen availability/demand ratio which is compensated by three self-regulating factors: 1) an increase in local flow, 2) an increase in red cell 2,3-DPG leading to a shift to the right of the oxyhaemoglobin dissociation curve, and 3) an increase in the oxygen-binding capacity or the haemoglobin concentration. The level of plasma inorganic phosphate (Pi) is of importance in maintaining high 2,3-DPG levels. However, since Pi fluctuates depending upon changes in the control of diabetes, the regulatory mechanism of the 2,3-DPG modulated unloading of oxygen from the erythrocytes often becomes insufficient, and therefore in poorly regulated diabetics with less than optimal 2,3-DPG levels, the main load of compensation against tissue hypoxia is placed on an adjustment in the microcirculation of the organ involved. However, in order for the microvascular dilatation to occur, the cells must experience a hypoxic stimulus. The summation of the infinite number of discrete and occasionally pronounced hypoxic injuries to the tissue cells in association with the adverse effect of local vasodilatation with increased plasma permeation through the vessel walls might over the years lead to diabetic microangiopathy. Based on this theory the high level of Pi in diabetes becomes of particular significance. Our experience with a high phosphate diabetes diet in the treatment of diabetics is presented. This dietary

  12. Asbestos/NESHAP adequately wet guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Shafer, R.; Throwe, S.; Salgado, O.; Garlow, C.; Hoerath, E.

    1990-12-01

    The Asbestos NESHAP requires facility owners and/or operators involved in demolition and renovation activities to control emissions of particulate asbestos to the outside air because no safe concentration of airborne asbestos has ever been established. The primary method used to control asbestos emissions is to adequately wet the Asbestos Containing Material (ACM) with a wetting agent prior to, during and after demolition/renovation activities. The purpose of the document is to provide guidance to asbestos inspectors and the regulated community on how to determine if friable ACM is adequately wet as required by the Asbestos NESHAP.

  13. Effect of hypobaric air, oxygen, heliox (50:50), or heliox (80:20) breathing on air bubbles in adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Hyldegaard, O; Madsen, J

    2007-09-01

    The fate of bubbles formed in tissues during decompression to altitude after diving or due to accidental loss of cabin pressure during flight has only been indirectly inferred from theoretical modeling and clinical observations with noninvasive bubble-measuring techniques of intravascular bubbles. In this report we visually followed the in vivo resolution of micro-air bubbles injected into adipose tissue of anesthetized rats decompressed from 101.3 kPa to and held at 71 kPa corresponding to approximately 2.750 m above sea level, while the rats breathed air, oxygen, heliox (50:50), or heliox (80:20). During air breathing, bubbles initially grew for 30-80 min, after which they remained stable or began to shrink slowly. Oxygen breathing caused an initial growth of all bubbles for 15-85 min, after which they shrank until they disappeared from view. Bubble growth was significantly greater during breathing of oxygen compared with air and heliox breathing mixtures. During heliox (50:50) breathing, bubbles initially grew for 5-30 min, from which point they shrank until they disappeared from view. After a shift to heliox (80:20) breathing, some bubbles grew slightly for 20-30 min, then shrank until they disappeared from view. Bubble disappearance was significantly faster during breathing of oxygen and heliox mixtures compared with air. In conclusion, the present results show that oxygen breathing at 71 kPa promotes bubble growth in lipid tissue, and it is possible that breathing of heliox may be beneficial in treating decompression sickness during flight. PMID:17600159

  14. Effects of exposing rats to 100% oxygen at 450 and 600 mm Hg on in vitro liver and adipose tissue lipid synthesis.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feller, D. D.; Neville, E. D.; Talarico, K. S.

    1972-01-01

    Male rats (260-285 gm) were exposed to 100% oxygen at 450 or 600 mm Hg for 1 to 4 days. Rats maintained at 450 mm Hg ate 92% the amount of food eaten by ad libitum controls maintained at sea level conditions. At 600 mm Hg, the food intake was 77% of the ad libitum controls. No difference was found in the plasma level of glucose, free fatty acids, and corticosterone between oxygen exposed rats and their respective pair-fed controls. The in vitro conversion of acetate into fatty acids by adipose tissue from rats exposed at 450 mm Hg for 2, 3, or 4 days was significantly increased above pair-fed controls and ad libitum controls. Increasing the oxygen pressure to 600 mm Hg abolished this increase, and in fact, reversed the increased synthesis to a significant decrease for the 4-day exposure.

  15. Optoacoustic measurements of human placenta and umbilical blood oxygenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanovskaya, T. N.; Petrov, I. Y.; Petrov, Y.; Patrikeeva, S. L.; Ahmed, M. S.; Hankins, G. D. V.; Prough, D. S.; Esenaliev, R. O.

    2016-03-01

    Adequate oxygenation is essential for normal embryogenesis and fetal growth. Perturbations in the intrauterine oxidative environment during pregnancy are associated with several pathophysiological disorders such as pregnancy loss, preeclampsia, and intrauterine growth restriction. We proposed to use optoacoustic technology for monitoring placental and fetal umbilical blood oxygenation. In this work, we studied optoacoustic monitoring of oxygenation in placenta and umbilical cord blood ex vivo using technique of placenta perfusion. We used a medical grade, nearinfrared, tunable, optoacoustic system developed and built for oxygenation monitoring in blood vessels and in tissues. First, we calibrated the system for cord blood oxygenation measurements by using a CO-Oximeter (gold standard). Then we performed validation in cord blood circulating through the catheters localized on the fetal side of an isolated placental lobule. Finally, the oxygenation measurements were performed in the perfused placental tissue. To increase or decrease blood oxygenation, we used infusion of a gas mixture of 95% O2 + 5% CO2 and 95% N2 + 5% CO2, respectively. In placental tissue, up to four cycles of changes in oxygenation were performed. The optoacoustically measured oxygenation in circulating cord blood and in placental lobule closely correlated with the actual oxygenation data measured by CO-Oximeter. We plan to further test the placental and cord blood oxygenation monitoring with optoacoustics in animal and clinical studies.

  16. Adequate supervision for children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Anderst, James; Moffatt, Mary

    2014-11-01

    Primary care providers (PCPs) have the opportunity to improve child health and well-being by addressing supervision issues before an injury or exposure has occurred and/or after an injury or exposure has occurred. Appropriate anticipatory guidance on supervision at well-child visits can improve supervision of children, and may prevent future harm. Adequate supervision varies based on the child's development and maturity, and the risks in the child's environment. Consideration should be given to issues as wide ranging as swimming pools, falls, dating violence, and social media. By considering the likelihood of harm and the severity of the potential harm, caregivers may provide adequate supervision by minimizing risks to the child while still allowing the child to take "small" risks as needed for healthy development. Caregivers should initially focus on direct (visual, auditory, and proximity) supervision of the young child. Gradually, supervision needs to be adjusted as the child develops, emphasizing a safe environment and safe social interactions, with graduated independence. PCPs may foster adequate supervision by providing concrete guidance to caregivers. In addition to preventing injury, supervision includes fostering a safe, stable, and nurturing relationship with every child. PCPs should be familiar with age/developmentally based supervision risks, adequate supervision based on those risks, characteristics of neglectful supervision based on age/development, and ways to encourage appropriate supervision throughout childhood. PMID:25369578

  17. Small Rural Schools CAN Have Adequate Curriculums.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loustaunau, Martha

    The small rural school's foremost and largest problem is providing an adequate curriculum for students in a changing world. Often the small district cannot or is not willing to pay the per-pupil cost of curriculum specialists, specialized courses using expensive equipment no more than one period a day, and remodeled rooms to accommodate new…

  18. Funding the Formula Adequately in Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    This report is a longevity, simulational study that looks at how the ratio of state support to local support effects the number of school districts that breaks the common school's funding formula which in turns effects the equity of distribution to the common schools. After nearly two decades of adequately supporting the funding formula, Oklahoma…

  19. Čerenkov radiation emission and excited luminescence (CREL) sensitivity during external beam radiation therapy: Monte Carlo and tissue oxygenation phantom studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rongxiao; Glaser, Adam; Esipova, Tatiana V.; Kanick, Stephen C.; Davis, Scott C.; Vinogradov, Sergei; Gladstone, David; Pogue, Brian W.

    2012-01-01

    Radiotherapy generates Čerenkov radiation emission in tissue, and spectral absorption features appearing in the emission spectrum can be used to quantify blood oxygen saturation (StO2) from the known absorptions of hemoglobin. Additionally, the Čerenkov light can be used to excite oxygen-sensitive phosphorescence of probe PtG4, whose emission lifetime directly reports on tissue oxygen partial pressure (pO2). Thus, it is feasible to probe both hemoglobin StO2 and pO2 using external radiation therapy beam to create as an internal light source in tumor tissue. In this study, the sensitivity and spatial origins of these two signals were examined. Emission was detected using a fiber-optic coupled intensifier-gated CCD camera interfaced to a spectrometer. The phosphorescence lifetimes were quantified and compared with StO2 changes previously measured. Monte Carlo simulations of the linear accelerator beam were used together with tracking of the optical signals, to predict the spatial distribution and zone sensitivity within the phantom. As the fiber-to-beam distance (FBD) varied from 0 to 30 mm, i.e. the distance from the fiber tip to the nearest side of the radiotherapy beam, the effective sampling depth for CR emission changed from 4 to 29 mm for the wavelengths in the range of 600-1000 nm. For the secondary emission (phosphorescence) the effective sampling depth was determined to be in the range of 9 to 19 mm. These results indicate that sampling of StO2 and pO2 in tissue should be feasible during radiation therapy, and that the radiation beam and fiber sampling geometry can be set up to acquire signals that originate as deep as a few centimeters in the tissue. PMID:23082280

  20. Low-oxygen tensions found in Salmonella-infected gut tissue boost Salmonella replication in macrophages by impairing antimicrobial activity and augmenting Salmonella virulence.

    PubMed

    Jennewein, Jonas; Matuszak, Jasmin; Walter, Steffi; Felmy, Boas; Gendera, Kathrin; Schatz, Valentin; Nowottny, Monika; Liebsch, Gregor; Hensel, Michael; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich; Gerlach, Roman G; Jantsch, Jonathan

    2015-12-01

    In Salmonella infection, the Salmonella pathogenicity island-2 (SPI-2)-encoded type three secretion system (T3SS2) is of key importance for systemic disease and survival in host cells. For instance, in the streptomycin-pretreated mouse model SPI-2-dependent Salmonella replication in lamina propria CD11c(-)CXCR1(-) monocytic phagocytes/macrophages (MΦ) is required for the development of colitis. In addition, containment of intracellular Salmonella in the gut critically depends on the antimicrobial effects of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase (PHOX), and possibly type 2 nitric oxide synthase (NOS2). For both antimicrobial enzyme complexes, oxygen is an essential substrate. However, the amount of available oxygen upon enteroinvasive Salmonella infection in the gut tissue and its impact on Salmonella-MΦ interactions was unknown. Therefore, we measured the gut tissue oxygen levels in a model of Salmonella enterocolitis using luminescence two-dimensional in vivo oxygen imaging. We found that gut tissue oxygen levels dropped from ∼78 Torr (∼11% O2) to values of ∼16 Torr (∼2% O2) during infection. Because in vivo virulence of Salmonella depends on the Salmonella survival in MΦ, Salmonella-MΦ interaction was analysed under such low oxygen values. These experiments revealed an increased intracellular replication and survival of wild-type and t3ss2 non-expressing Salmonella. These findings were paralleled by blunted nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and reduced Salmonella ROS perception. In addition, hypoxia enhanced SPI-2 transcription and translocation of SPI-2-encoded virulence protein. Neither pharmacological blockade of PHOX and NOS2 nor impairment of T3SS2 virulence function alone mimicked the effect of hypoxia on Salmonella replication under normoxic conditions. However, if t3ss2 non-expressing Salmonella were used, hypoxia did not further enhance Salmonella recovery in a PHOX and NOS2-deficient situation. Hence, these data suggest that

  1. Variability in splanchnic tissue oxygenation during preterm red blood cell transfusion given for symptomatic anaemia may reveal a potential mechanism of transfusion-related acute gut injury

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Sean M.; Hendricks-Muñoz, Karen D.; Mally, Pradeep V.

    2015-01-01

    Background There is increasing evidence indicating an association between red blood cell (RBC) transfusions and necrotising enterocolitis (NEC) in preterm infants, especially late-onset NEC. This phenomenon is referred to as transfusion-related acute gut injury (TRAGI). One theory as to a pathophysiological mechanism is that transfusion may result in an ischemia-reperfusion injury to intestinal tissue. We tested the hypothesis that there is significantly greater variability during transfusion in splanchnic tissue oxygen saturation (SrSO2) than in cerebral tissue oxygen saturation (CrSO2). Materials and methods This was a prospective, observational study using near-infrared spectroscopy to monitor SrSO2 and CrSO2 in preterm neonates undergoing RBC transfusion for symptomatic anaemia. Mean, standard deviation, highest and lowest SrSO2 and CrSO2 values during each transfusion were determined. The greatest difference in SrSO2 and CrSO2 during each transfusion was calculated, along with the coefficient of variation. Results We studied 37 subjects. Throughout all transfusions, the mean SrSO2 was 45.6% ±13.8 and the mean CrSO2 was 65.4% ±6.9 (p<0.001). The variability of SrSO2 was significantly greater than that of CrSO2. Averaging data from all subjects, the greatest difference in SrSO2 was 43.8% ±13.4 compared with 23.3% ±7.6 for CrSO2 (p<0.001). The mean coefficient of variation in all transfusions was 20.5% for SrSO2 and 6.0% for CrSO2 (p<0.001). Increasing post-conceptional age did not affect SrSO2 variability (R2 =0.022; p=0.379), whereas CrSO2 variability during transfusion decreased with increasing post-conceptional age (R2=0.209; p=0.004). Discussion In preterm infants, there is a large degree of tissue oxygenation variability in splanchnic tissue during RBC transfusion and this does not change with increasing maturity. We speculate that these findings, combined with lower average tissue oxygenation, may demonstrate susceptibility of the preterm gut to TRAGI

  2. Non-contact tissue perfusion and oxygenation imaging using a LED based multispectral and a thermal imaging system, first results of clinical intervention studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaessens, John H. G. M.; Nelisse, Martin; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.; Noordmans, Herke Jan

    2013-03-01

    During clinical interventions objective and quantitative information of the tissue perfusion, oxygenation or temperature can be useful for the surgical strategy. Local (point) measurements give limited information and affected areas can easily be missed, therefore imaging large areas is required. In this study a LED based multispectral imaging system (MSI, 17 different wavelengths 370nm-880nm) and a thermo camera were applied during clinical interventions: tissue flap transplantations (ENT), local anesthetic block and during open brain surgery (epileptic seizure). The images covered an area of 20x20 cm, when doing measurements in an (operating) room, they turned out to be more complicated than laboratory experiments due to light fluctuations, movement of the patient and limited angle of view. By constantly measuring the background light and the use of a white reference, light fluctuations and movement were corrected. Oxygenation concentration images could be calculated and combined with the thermal images. The effectively of local anesthesia of a hand could be predicted in an early stage using the thermal camera and the reperfusion of transplanted skin flap could be imaged. During brain surgery, a temporary hyper-perfused area was witnessed which was probably related to an epileptic attack. A LED based multispectral imaging system combined with thermal imaging provide complementary information on perfusion and oxygenation changes and are promising techniques for real-time diagnostics during clinical interventions.

  3. Stress-mediated progression of solid tumors: effect of mechanical stress on tissue oxygenation, cancer cell proliferation, and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Mpekris, Fotios; Angeli, Stelios; Pirentis, Athanassios P; Stylianopoulos, Triantafyllos

    2015-11-01

    Oxygen supply plays a central role in cancer cell proliferation. While vascular density increases at the early stages of carcinogenesis, mechanical solid stresses developed during growth compress tumor blood vessels and, thus, drastically reduce not only the supply of oxygen, but also the delivery of drugs at inner tumor regions. Among other effects, hypoxia and reduced drug delivery compromise the efficacy of radiation and chemo/nanotherapy, respectively. In the present study, we developed a mathematical model of tumor growth to investigate the interconnections among tumor oxygenation that supports cancer cell proliferation, the heterogeneous accumulation of mechanical stresses owing to tumor growth, the non-uniform compression of intratumoral blood vessels due to the mechanical stresses, and the insufficient delivery of oxygen and therapeutic agents because of vessel compression. We found that the high vascular density and increased cancer cell proliferation often observed in the periphery compared to the interior of a tumor can be attributed to heterogeneous solid stress accumulation. Highly vascularized peripheral regions are also associated with greater oxygenation compared with the compressed, less vascularized inner regions. We also modeled the delivery of drugs of two distinct sizes, namely chemotherapy and nanomedicine. Model predictions suggest that drug delivery is affected negatively by vessel compression independently of the size of the therapeutic agent. Finally, we demonstrated the applicability of our model to actual geometries, employing a breast tumor model derived from MR images. PMID:25968141

  4. Stress-mediated progression of solid tumors: effect of mechanical stress on tissue oxygenation, cancer cell proliferation and drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Mpekris, Fotios; Angeli, Stelios; Pirentis, Athanassios P.; Stylianopoulos, Triantafyllos

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen supply plays a central role in cancer cell proliferation. While vascular density increases at the early stages of carcinogenesis, mechanical solid stresses developed during growth compress tumor blood vessels and, thus, drastically reduce the supply of oxygen, but also the delivery of drugs at inner tumor regions. Among other effects, hypoxia and reduced drug delivery compromise the efficacy of radiation and chemo/nano therapy, respectively. In the present study, we developed a mathematical model of tumor growth to investigate the interconnections among tumor oxygenation that supports cancer cell proliferation, the heterogeneous accumulation of mechanical stresses owing to tumor growth, the non-uniform compression of intratumoral blood vessels due to the mechanical stresses, and the insufficient delivery of oxygen and therapeutic agents because of vessel compression. We found that the high vascular density and increased cancer cell proliferation often observed in the periphery compared to the interior of a tumor can be attributed to heterogeneous solid stress accumulation. Highly vascularized peripheral regions are also associated with greater oxygenation compared with the compressed, less vascularized inner regions. We also modeled the delivery of drugs of two distinct sizes, namely chemotherapy and nanomedicine. Model predictions suggest that drug delivery is affected negatively by vessel compression independently of the size of the therapeutic agent. Finally, we demonstrated the applicability of our model to actual geometries, employing a breast tumor model derived from MR images. PMID:25968141

  5. Decrease of reactive oxygen species-related biomarkers in the tissue-mimic 3D spheroid culture of human lung cells exposed to zinc oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunjoo; Jeon, Won Bae; Kim, Soonhyun; Lee, Soo-Keun

    2014-05-01

    Common 2-dimensional (2D) cell cultures do not adequately represent cell-cell and cell-matrix signaling and substantially different diffusion/transport pathways. To obtain tissue-mimic information on nanoparticle toxicity from in vitro cell tests, we used a 3-dimensional (3D) culture of human lung cells (A549) prepared with elastin-like peptides modified with an arginine-glycine-aspartate motif. The 3D cells showed different cellular phenotypes, gene expression profiles, and functionalities compared to the 2D cultured cells. In gene array analysis, 3D cells displayed the induced extracellular matrix (ECM)-related biological functions such as cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, cellular function and maintenance, connective tissue development and function, molecular transport, and tissue morphology. Additionally, the expression of ECM-related molecules, such as laminin, fibronectin, and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP3), was simultaneously induced at both mRNA and protein levels. When 0.08-50 microg/ml zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs) were administered to 2D and 3D cells, the cell proliferation was not significantly changed. The level of molecular markers for oxidative stress, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), Bcl-2, ATP synthase, and Complex IV (cytochrome C oxidase), was significantly reduced in 2D culture when exposed to 10 microg/ml ZnO-NPs, but no significant decrease was detected in 3D culture when exposed to the same concentration of ZnO-NPs. In conclusion, the tissue-mimic phenotype and functionality of 3D cells could be achieved through the elevated expression of ECM components. The 3D cells were expected to help to better predict the nanotoxicity of ZnO-NPs at tissue-level by increased cell-cell and cell-ECM adhesion and signaling. The tissue-mimic morphology would also be useful to simulate the diffusion/transport of the nanoparticles in vitro. PMID:24734552

  6. Validation of quantitative estimation of tissue oxygen extraction fraction and deoxygenated blood volume fraction in phantom and in vivo experiments by using MRI.

    PubMed

    Sedlacik, Jan; Reichenbach, Jürgen R

    2010-04-01

    The blood oxygenation level dependent signal of cerebral tissue can be theoretically derived using a network model formed by randomly oriented infinitely long cylinders. The validation of this model by phantom and in vivo experiments is still an object of research. A network phantom was constructed of solid polypropylene strings immersed in silicone oil, which essentially eliminated the effect of spin diffusion. The volume fraction and magnetic property of the string network was predetermined by independent methods. Ten healthy volunteers were measured for in vivo demonstration. The gradient echo sampled spin echo signal was evaluated with the cylinder network model. We found a strong interdependency between the two network characterizing parameters deoxygenated blood volume and oxygen extraction fraction. Here, different sets of deoxygenated blood volume/oxygen extraction fraction values were able to describe the measured signal equally well. However, by setting one parameter constant to a predetermined value, reasonable estimates of the other parameter were obtained. The same behavior was found for the in vivo demonstration. The signal theory of the cylinder network was validated by a well-characterized phantom. However, the found interdependency that was found between deoxygenated blood volume and oxygen extraction fraction requires an independent estimation of one variable to determine reliable values of the other parameter. PMID:20373392

  7. Structural and functional evaluation of oxygenating keratin/silk fibroin scaffold and initial assessment of their potential for urethral tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Lv, XiangGuo; Li, Zhe; Chen, ShiYan; Xie, MinKai; Huang, JianWen; Peng, XuFeng; Yang, RanXing; Wang, HuaPing; Xu, YueMin; Feng, Chao

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we report a new type of oxygen-generating scaffold, composed of human keratin, silk, gelatin and calcium peroxide (CPO). After mixing the silk/keratin (60:40) with 2% gelatin and 20% CPO, the film demonstrated excellent mechanical properties, non-cytotoxicity and oxygen-generative ability. The detailed structure of scaffold was revealed by confocal laser and electronic scanning microscopy. The gelatin formed the network structure, which mixed with silk fibroin and keratin. The CPOs were embedded into scaffold. A shell-core structure was formed in the CPO particles, in which the CPO was located in the core and the gelatin was mainly wrapped around the CPO. Furthermore, the oxygen-release test showed that scaffold was able to steadily release high level of oxygen over two weeks in vitro. In addition, the anti-bacterial function was also proved in the scaffold. Films with CPO enhanced the repair in dog urethral defect models, resulting in patent urethra. Improved organized muscle bundles and epithelial layer were observed in animals treated with CPO films compared with those treated with non-CPO films. This study suggests that this biomaterial could be suitable for tissue engineered urinary tract reconstruction. PMID:26826299

  8. Decreased Endothelial Nitric Oxide Bioavailability, Impaired Microvascular Function, and Increased Tissue Oxygen Consumption in Children with Falciparum Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Tsin W.; Lampah, Daniel A.; Kenangalem, Enny; Tjitra, Emiliana; Weinberg, J. Brice; Granger, Donald L.; Price, Ric N.; Anstey, Nicholas M.

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, microvascular function, and host oxygen consumption have not been assessed in pediatric malaria. We measured NO-dependent endothelial function by using peripheral artery tonometry to determine the reactive hyperemia index (RHI), and microvascular function and oxygen consumption (VO2) using near infrared resonance spectroscopy in 13 Indonesian children with severe falciparum malaria and 15 with moderately severe falciparum malaria. Compared with 19 controls, children with severe malaria and those with moderately severe malaria had lower RHIs (P = .03); 12% and 8% lower microvascular function, respectively (P = .03); and 29% and 25% higher VO2, respectively. RHIs correlated with microvascular function in all children with malaria (P < .001) and all with severe malaria (P < .001). Children with malaria have decreased endothelial and microvascular function and increased oxygen consumption, likely contributing to the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:24879801

  9. A role for iron and oxygen chemistry in preserving soft tissues, cells and molecules from deep time

    PubMed Central

    Schweitzer, Mary H.; Zheng, Wenxia; Cleland, Timothy P.; Goodwin, Mark B.; Boatman, Elizabeth; Theil, Elizabeth; Marcus, Matthew A.; Fakra, Sirine C.

    2014-01-01

    The persistence of original soft tissues in Mesozoic fossil bone is not explained by current chemical degradation models. We identified iron particles (goethite-αFeO(OH)) associated with soft tissues recovered from two Mesozoic dinosaurs, using transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, micro-X-ray diffraction and Fe micro-X-ray absorption near-edge structure. Iron chelators increased fossil tissue immunoreactivity to multiple antibodies dramatically, suggesting a role for iron in both preserving and masking proteins in fossil tissues. Haemoglobin (HB) increased tissue stability more than 200-fold, from approximately 3 days to more than two years at room temperature (25°C) in an ostrich blood vessel model developed to test post-mortem ‘tissue fixation’ by cross-linking or peroxidation. HB-induced solution hypoxia coupled with iron chelation enhances preservation as follows: HB + O2 > HB − O2 > −O2 ≫ +O2. The well-known O2/haeme interactions in the chemistry of life, such as respiration and bioenergetics, are complemented by O2/haeme interactions in the preservation of fossil soft tissues. PMID:24285202

  10. Two-dimensional concentration distribution of reactive oxygen species transported through a tissue phantom by atmospheric-pressure plasma-jet irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Toshiyuki; Sato, Akihiro; Kusumegi, Shota; Kudo, Akihiro; Sakanoshita, Tomohiro; Tsurumaru, Takuya; Uchida, Giichiro; Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2016-07-01

    The two-dimensional concentration distribution of reactive oxygen species (ROSs) transported through an agarose-film tissue phantom by atmospheric-pressure plasma-jet irradiation is visualized using a KI-starch gel reagent. Oxygen addition to helium enhances ROS transportation through the film. A radial ROS distribution pattern at the plasma-irradiated film surface changes into a doughnut-shaped pattern after passing through the film. The ROS transportation speed is 0.14–0.2 mm/min. We suggest that there are two types of ROS transportation pathways in the plasma-irradiated film: linear and circular. The majority of ROSs are transported through the circular pathway. ROS concentration distributions changed markedly with irradiation distance. Diffusive ROS transportation due to a concentration gradient is negligible in plasma-irradiated films.

  11. Comparison of two devices using near-infrared spectroscopy for the measurement of tissue oxygenation during a vascular occlusion test in healthy volunteers (INVOS® vs. InSpectra™).

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Hyun; Park, Yong-Hee; Kim, Hee-Soo; Kim, Jin-Tae

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare tissue oxygen saturation as measured by INVOS® and InSpectra™ during a vascular occlusion test (VOT) in the same subject. Twenty healthy adults were investigated. The INVOS® and InSpectra™ probes were placed randomly on the right and left thenar eminence in the same participant and monitoring of tissue oxygen saturation (SrO2 from INVOS® and StO2 from InSpectra™) were begun. Pneumatic cuffs placed around each upper arm were inflated simultaneously to 30 mmHg above the initial systolic blood pressure and maintained until the tissue oxygen saturation had decreased to 40% or below. The cuff pressure was then released rapidly. The time to achieve initial stability, the baseline value, the time from the baseline value to 40%, the rate of deoxygenation, the rate of reoxygenation, and the hyperemic area under the curve were calculated from SrO2 and StO2. The baseline value by INVOS® was lower than that by InSpectra™ (75.6±8.2 vs. 81.8±3.4%, p<0.01). The time to reach stable baseline value was significantly longer for SrO2 than for StO2 (249±86 and 54±40 s respectively; p<0.01). SrO2 declined to 40% more rapidly than did the StO2 (147±38 vs. 199±41 s, p<0.01). The deoxygenation and reoxygenation rates were higher (p<0.01) and the reactive hyperemic area was more extensive for INVOS® than for InSpectra™ (p=0.015). In conclusion, the VOT on the thenar muscle using INVOS® was as clinically applicable as InSpectra™, but baseline values and dynamic changes of INVOS® differed from those of InSpectra™. PMID:25005912

  12. Anemia and Oxygen Delivery.

    PubMed

    Bliss, Stuart

    2015-09-01

    Clinical assessment of tissue oxygenation is challenging. Anemia reflects a decreased oxygen carrying capacity of the blood and its significance in the perioperative setting relates largely to the associated risk of insufficient oxygen delivery and cellular hypoxia. Until meaningful clinical measures of tissue oxygenation are available in veterinary practice, clinicians must rely on evaluation of a patient's hemodynamic and ventilatory performance, along with biochemical and hemogasometric measurements. Blood transfusion is used commonly for treatment of perioperative anemia, and may improve tissue oxygenation by normalizing the rheologic properties of blood and enhancing perfusion, independent of increases in oxygen carrying capacity. PMID:26033442

  13. The limitations of tissue-oxygen measurement and positron emission tomography as additional methods for postoperative breast reconstruction free-flap monitoring.

    PubMed

    Schrey, Aleksi; Niemi, Tarja; Kinnunen, Ilpo; Minn, Heikki; Vahlberg, Tero; Kalliokoski, Kari; Suominen, Erkki; Grénman, Reidar; Aitasalo, Kalle

    2010-02-01

    Twelve patients who underwent breast reconstruction with a microvascular flap were monitored postoperatively with continuous partial tissue oxygenation (p(ti)O(2)) measurement. The regional blood flow (BF) of the entire flap was evaluated with positron emission tomography (PET) using oxygen-15-labelled water on the first postoperative (POP) morning to achieve data of the perfusion of the entire flap. A re-exploration was carried out if the p(ti)O(2) value remained lower than 15 mmHg for over 30 min. The mean p(ti)O(2) value of the flaps was 52.9+/-5.5 mmHg, whereas the mean BF values were 3.3+/-1.0 ml per 100 g min(-1). One false-positive result was detected by p(ti)O(2) measurement, resulting in an unnecessary re-exploration. Another re-operation suggested by the low p(ti)O(2) results was avoided due to the normal BF results assessed with PET. Totally, three flaps were re-explored. This prospective study suggests that continuous tissue-oxygen measurement with a polarographic needle probe is reliable for monitoring free breast flaps from one part of the flap, but assessing perfusion of the entire flap requires more complex monitoring methods, for example, PET. Clinical examination by experienced personnel remains important in free-breast-flap monitoring. PET could be useful in assessing free-flap perfusion in selected high-risk patients as an alternative to a re-operation when clinical examination and evaluation by other means are unreliable or present controversial results. PMID:19059818

  14. In-vivo measurements of penetration depth, oxygenation, and drug concentration using broadband absorption spectroscopy in human tissues before and after photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hsing-Wen; Zhu, Timothy C.; Solonenko, Michael; Hahn, Stephen M.; Metz, James M.; Dimofte, Andrea; Mile, Jermy; Yodh, Arjun G.

    2003-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) employs a combination of photosensitizing chemical, light, and oxygen Knowledge of tissue optical properties, including absorption (μa) and reduce scattering coefficients (μs"), makes possible to derive blood oxygen saturation, light penetration depth, and drug concentration, which are important to ensure PDT treatment efficacy at the specific wavelengths. We have developed an absorption spectroscopy system to measure μa and μs" in the spectral range 600-800nm using a contact linear probe with a source fiber and multiple source-detector separation distances less than 1 cm. The μa and μs" were recovered based on diffusion approximations of the photon transport equation. We measured tissue optical properties among various organs of patients with intraperitoneal malignancies for an on-going Phase II PDT protocol. The results from 12 patients showed various effective penetration depth from site to site and from organ to organ. The percentage oxygen saturation (%StO2) are similar before and after PDT. Before PDT, meff (mean (standard deviation) (number of patients)) in cm-1 at 630nm are 2.4 (0.2) (12) in small bowel, 2.2(0.4) (9) in large bowel, 4.2(2.7) (7) in tumor, 3.3 (0.3) (10) in peritoneum, 2.7 (0.3) (11) in skin, and 10.1 (0.6) (10) in liver. %StO2 is 60-80% for most organs but 30-40% for tumor.

  15. Characterizing Fluctuations of Arterial and Cerebral Tissue Oxygenation in Preterm Neonates by Means of Data Analysis Techniques for Nonlinear Dynamical Systems.

    PubMed

    Kleiser, Stefan; Pastewski, Marcin; Hapuarachchi, Tharindi; Hagmann, Cornelia; Fauchère, Jean-Claude; Tachtsidis, Ilias; Wolf, Martin; Scholkmann, Felix

    2016-01-01

    The cerebral autoregulatory state as well as fluctuations in arterial (SpO2) and cerebral tissue oxygen saturation (StO2) are potentially new relevant clinical parameters in preterm neonates. The aim of the present study was to test the investigative capabilities of data analysis techniques for nonlinear dynamical systems, looking at fluctuations and their interdependence. StO2, SpO2 and the heart rate (HR) were measured on four preterm neonates for several hours. The fractional tissue oxygenation extraction (FTOE) was calculated. To characterize the fluctuations in StO2, SpO2, FTOE and HR, two methods were employed: (1) phase-space modeling and application of the recurrence quantification analysis (RQA), and (2) maximum entropy spectral analysis (MESA). The correlation between StO2 and SpO2 as well as FTOE and HR was quantified by (1) nonparametric nonlinear regression based on the alternating conditional expectation (ACE) algorithm, and (2) the maximal information-based nonparametric exploration (MINE) technique. We found that (1) each neonate showed individual characteristics, (2) a ~60 min oscillation was observed in all of the signals, (3) the nonlinear correlation strength between StO2 and SpO2 as well as FTOE and HR was specific for each neonate and showed a high value for a neonate with a reduced health status, possibly indicating an impaired cerebral autoregulation. In conclusion, our data analysis framework enabled novel insights into the characteristics of hemodynamic and oxygenation changes in preterm infants. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first application of RQA, MESA, ACE and MINE to human StO2 data measured with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). PMID:26782252

  16. Is a vegetarian diet adequate for children.

    PubMed

    Hackett, A; Nathan, I; Burgess, L

    1998-01-01

    The number of people who avoid eating meat is growing, especially among young people. Benefits to health from a vegetarian diet have been reported in adults but it is not clear to what extent these benefits are due to diet or to other aspects of lifestyles. In children concern has been expressed concerning the adequacy of vegetarian diets especially with regard to growth. The risks/benefits seem to be related to the degree of restriction of he diet; anaemia is probably both the main and the most serious risk but this also applies to omnivores. Vegan diets are more likely to be associated with malnutrition, especially if the diets are the result of authoritarian dogma. Overall, lacto-ovo-vegetarian children consume diets closer to recommendations than omnivores and their pre-pubertal growth is at least as good. The simplest strategy when becoming vegetarian may involve reliance on vegetarian convenience foods which are not necessarily superior in nutritional composition. The vegetarian sector of the food industry could do more to produce foods closer to recommendations. Vegetarian diets can be, but are not necessarily, adequate for children, providing vigilance is maintained, particularly to ensure variety. Identical comments apply to omnivorous diets. Three threats to the diet of children are too much reliance on convenience foods, lack of variety and lack of exercise. PMID:9670174

  17. Effects of In Vitro Low Oxygen Tension Preconditioning of Adipose Stromal Cells on Their In Vivo Chondrogenic Potential: Application in Cartilage Tissue Repair

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, Olivier; Lesoeur, Julie; Sourice, Sophie; Masson, Martial; Fellah, Borhane Hakim; Geffroy, Olivier; Lallemand, Elodie; Weiss, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Multipotent stromal cell (MSC)-based regenerative strategy has shown promise for the repair of cartilage, an avascular tissue in which cells experience hypoxia. Hypoxia is known to promote the early chondrogenic differentiation of MSC. The aim of our study was therefore to determine whether low oxygen tension could be used to enhance the regenerative potential of MSC for cartilage repair. Methods MSC from rabbit or human adipose stromal cells (ASC) were preconditioned in vitro in control or chondrogenic (ITS and TGF-β) medium and in 21 or 5% O2. Chondrogenic commitment was monitored by measuring COL2A1 and ACAN expression (real-time PCR). Preconditioned rabbit and human ASC were then incorporated into an Si-HPMC hydrogel and injected (i) into rabbit articular cartilage defects for 18 weeks or (ii) subcutaneously into nude mice for five weeks. The newly formed tissue was qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated by cartilage-specific immunohistological staining and scoring. The phenotype of ASC cultured in a monolayer or within Si-HPMC in control or chondrogenic medium and in 21 or 5% O2 was finally evaluated using real-time PCR. Results/Conclusions 5% O2 increased the in vitro expression of chondrogenic markers in ASC cultured in induction medium. Cells implanted within Si-HPMC hydrogel and preconditioned in chondrogenic medium formed a cartilaginous tissue, regardless of the level of oxygen. In addition, the 3D in vitro culture of ASC within Si-HPMC hydrogel was found to reinforce the pro-chondrogenic effects of the induction medium and 5% O2. These data together indicate that although 5% O2 enhances the in vitro chondrogenic differentiation of ASC, it does not enhance their in vivo chondrogenesis. These results also highlight the in vivo chondrogenic potential of ASC and their potential value in cartilage repair. PMID:23638053

  18. Post-hypoxic hypoperfusion is associated with suppression of cerebral metabolism and increased tissue oxygenation in near-term fetal sheep

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, E C; Bennet, L; Hunter, C J; Power, G C; Gunn, A J

    2006-01-01

    Secondary cerebral hypoperfusion is common following perinatal hypoxia–ischaemia. However, it remains unclear whether this represents a true failure to provide sufficient oxygen and nutrients to tissues, or whether it is simply a consequence of reduced cerebral metabolic demand. We therefore examined the hypothesis that cerebral oxygenation would be reduced during hypoperfusion after severe asphyxia, and further, that the greater neural injury associated with blockade of the adenosine A1 receptor during the insult would be associated with greater hypoperfusion and deoxygenation. Sixteen near-term fetal sheep received either vehicle or 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX) for 1 h, followed by 10 min of severe asphyxia induced by complete occlusion of the umbilical cord. Infusions were discontinued at the end of the occlusion and data were analysed for the following 8 h. A transient, secondary fall in carotid artery blood flow and laser Doppler flow was seen from approximately 1–4 h after occlusion (P < 0.001), with no significant differences between vehicle and DPCPX. Changes in laser Doppler blood flow were highly correlated with carotid blood flow (r2 = 0.81, P < 0.001). Cortical metabolism was suppressed, reaching a nadir 1 h after occlusion and then resolving. Cortical tissue PO2 was significantly increased at 1, 2 and 3 h after occlusion compared to baseline, and inversely correlated with carotid blood flow (r2 = 0.69, P < 0.001). In conclusion, contrary to our initial hypothesis, delayed posthypoxic hypoperfusion was associated with suppression of cerebral metabolism and increased tissue PO2, and was not significantly affected by preceding adenosine A1 blockade. These data suggest that posthypoxic hypoperfusion is actively mediated and reflects suppressed cerebral metabolism. PMID:16484307

  19. Beyond the classic eicosanoids: Peripherally-acting oxygenated metabolites of polyunsaturated fatty acids mediate pain associated with tissue injury and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Haim; Singer, Pierre; Ariel, Amiram

    2016-08-01

    Pain is a complex sensation that may be protective or cause undue suffering and loss of function, depending on the circumstances. Peripheral nociceptor neurons (PNs) innervate most tissues, and express ion channels, nocisensors, which depolarize the cell in response to intense stimuli and numerous substances. Inflamed tissues manifest inflammatory hyperalgesia in which the threshold for pain and the response to painful stimuli are decreased and increased, respectively. Constituents of the inflammatory milieu sensitize PNs, thereby contributing to hyperalgesia. Polyunsaturated fatty acids undergo enzymatic and free radical-mediated oxygenation into an array of bioactive metabolites, oxygenated polyunsaturated fatty acids (oxy-PUFAs), including the classic eicosanoids. Oxy-PUFA production is enhanced during inflammation. Pioneering studies by Vane and colleagues from the early 1970s first implicated classic eicosanoids in the pain associated with inflammation. Here, we review the production and action of oxy-PUFAs that are not classic eicosanoids, but nevertheless are produced in injured/ inflamed tissues and activate or sensitize PNs. In general, oxy-PUFAs that sensitize PNs may do so directly, by activation of nocisensors, ion channels or GPCRs expressed on the surface of PNs, or indirectly, by increasing the production of inflammatory mediators that activate or sensitize PNs. We focus on oxy-PUFAs that act directly on PNs. Specifically, we discuss the role of arachidonic acid-derived 12S-HpETE, HNE, ONE, PGA2, iso-PGA2 and 15d-PGJ2, 5,6-and 8,9-EET, PGE2-G and 8R,15S-diHETE, as well as the linoleic acid-derived 9-and 13-HODE in inducing acute nocifensive behavior and/or inflammatory hyperalgesia in rodents. The nocisensors TRPV1, TRPV4 and TRPA1, and putative Gαs-type GPCRs are the PN targets of these oxy-PUFAs. PMID:27067460

  20. Solid state oxygen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Garzon, Fernando H.; Chung, Brandon W.; Raistrick, Ian D.; Brosha, Eric L.

    1996-01-01

    Solid state oxygen sensors are provided with a yttria-doped zirconia as an electrolyte and use the electrochemical oxygen pumping of the zirconia electrolyte. A linear relationship between oxygen concentration and the voltage arising at a current plateau occurs when oxygen accessing the electrolyte is limited by a diffusion barrier. A diffusion barrier is formed herein with a mixed electronic and oxygen ion-conducting membrane of lanthanum-containing perovskite or zirconia-containing fluorite. A heater may be used to maintain an adequate oxygen diffusion coefficient in the mixed conducting layer.

  1. Solid state oxygen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Garzon, F.H.; Chung, B.W.; Raistrick, I.D.; Brosha, E.L.

    1996-08-06

    Solid state oxygen sensors are provided with a yttria-doped zirconia as an electrolyte and use the electrochemical oxygen pumping of the zirconia electrolyte. A linear relationship between oxygen concentration and the voltage arising at a current plateau occurs when oxygen accessing the electrolyte is limited by a diffusion barrier. A diffusion barrier is formed herein with a mixed electronic and oxygen ion-conducting membrane of lanthanum-containing perovskite or zirconia-containing fluorite. A heater may be used to maintain an adequate oxygen diffusion coefficient in the mixed conducting layer. 4 figs.

  2. Tissue oxygen is reduced in white matter of spontaneously hypertensive-stroke prone rats: a longitudinal study with electron paramagnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Weaver, John; Jalal, Fakhreya Y; Yang, Yi; Thompson, Jeffrey; Rosenberg, Gary A; Liu, Ke J

    2014-05-01

    Small vessel disease is associated with white-matter (WM) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) hyperintensities (WMHs) in patients with vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) and subsequent damage to the WM. Although WM is vulnerable to hypoxic-ischemic injury and O₂ is critical in brain physiology, tissue O₂ level in the WM has not been measured and explored in vivo. We hypothesized that spontaneously hypertensive stroke-prone rat (SHR/SP) fed a Japanese permissive diet (JPD) and subjected to unilateral carotid artery occlusion (UCAO), a model to study VCI, would lead to reduced tissue oxygen (pO₂) in the deep WM. We tested this hypothesis by monitoring WM tissue pO₂ using in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) oximetry in SHR/SP rats over weeks before and after JPD/UCAO. The SHR/SP rats experienced an increase in WM pO₂ from 9 to 12 weeks with a maximal 32% increase at week 12, followed by a dramatic decrease in WM pO₂ to near hypoxic conditions during weeks 13 to 16 after JPD/UCAO. The decreased WM pO₂ was accompanied with WM damage and hemorrhages surrounding microvessels. Our findings suggest that changes in WM pO₂ may contribute to WM damage in SHR/SP rat model, and that EPR oximetry can monitor brain pO₂ in the WM of small animals. PMID:24549186

  3. Photodynamic treatment of the RIF-1 tumor with verteporfin with online monitoring of tissue oxygen using electron paramagnetic resonance oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogue, Brian W.; O'Hara, Julia A.; Liu, Ke J.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Swartz, Harold

    1999-06-01

    In this study, treatment of the RIF-1 tumor was examined with photodynamic therapy using Verteprofin (formerly benzoporphyrin derivative, BPD). The effects of two different optical dose rates were examined, with no detectable difference in the tumor regrowth time. Oxygen consumption during PDT could reliably be monitored with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) oximetry using an implanted paramagnetic material within the tumor. A reduction of the tumor pO2 was detected in the animals that were followed after treatment, suggesting that there was a compromise to the tumor vasculature that persisted throughout the measurements. At high total doses some of the tumors did not regrow. Altogether these results are indicative of the tumor destruction being caused by destruction of the blood vessels from the treatment.

  4. Oxygen Deprivation and the Cellular Response to Hypoxia in Adipocytes – Perspectives on White and Brown Adipose Tissues in Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Trayhurn, Paul; Alomar, Suliman Yousef

    2015-01-01

    Relative hypoxia has been shown to develop in white adipose tissue depots of different types of obese mouse (genetic, dietary), and this leads to substantial changes in white adipocyte function. These changes include increased production of inflammation-related adipokines (such as IL-6, leptin, Angptl4, and VEGF), an increase in glucose utilization and lactate production, and the induction of fibrosis and insulin resistance. Whether hypoxia also occurs in brown adipose tissue depots in obesity has been little considered. However, a recent study has reported low pO2 in brown fat of obese mice, this involving mitochondrial loss and dysfunction. We suggest that obesity-linked hypoxia may lead to similar alterations in brown adipocytes as in white fat cells – particularly changes in adipokine production, increased glucose uptake and lactate release, and insulin resistance. This would be expected to compromise thermogenic activity and the role of brown fat in glucose homeostasis and triglyceride clearance, underpinning the development of the metabolic syndrome. Hypoxia-induced augmentation of lactate production may also stimulate the “browning” of white fat depots through recruitment of UCP1 and the development of brite adipocytes. PMID:25745415

  5. Insulin improves in vitro survival of equine preantral follicles enclosed in ovarian tissue and reduces reactive oxygen species production after culture.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, F L N; Lunardi, F O; Lima, L F; Rocha, R M P; Bruno, J B; Magalhães-Padilha, D M; Cibin, F W S; Rodrigues, A P R; Gastal, M O; Gastal, E L; Figueiredo, J R

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the effect of insulin concentration on the in vitro culture of equine preantral follicles enclosed in ovarian tissue. Ovarian tissue samples were immediately fixed (noncultured control) or cultured for 1 or 7 days in α-MEM(+) supplemented with 0 ng/mL, 10 ng/mL, or 10 μg/mL insulin. Ovarian tissues were processed and analyzed by classical histology. Culture medium samples were collected after 1 and 7 days of culture for steroid and reactive oxygen species (ROS) analyses. The percentage of morphologically normal follicles was greater (P < 0.001) in insulin-treated groups after 1 day of culture; likewise, more (P < 0.02) normal follicles were observed after 7 days of culture in medium supplemented with 10-ng/mL insulin. Furthermore, an increase (P < 0.01) in developing (transition, primary, and secondary) follicles between Days 1 and 7 of culture was observed only with the 10-ng/mL insulin treatment. ROS production after 1 or 7 days of culture was lower (P < 0.0001) in medium with 10-ng/mL insulin than the other treatments. Ovarian tissues containing preantral follicles were able to produce estradiol and progesterone after 1 and 7 days of culture; however, treatments did not differ in steroid production. In conclusion, the use of a physiological concentration (10 ng/mL) of insulin rather than the previously reported concentration (10 μg/mL) for in vitro culture of equine preantral follicles improved follicular survival and growth and lowered oxidative stress. Results from this study shed light on new perspectives for producing an appropriate medium to improve equine preantral follicle in vitro survival and growth. PMID:26777561

  6. Intra-Operative Tissue Oxygen Tension Is Increased by Local Insufflation of Humidified-Warm CO2 during Open Abdominal Surgery in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Jean K.; Lindner, Pernilla; Tait, Noel; Maddocks, Tracy; Riepsamen, Angelique; van der Linden, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Maintenance of high tissue oxygenation (PtO2) is recommended during surgery because PtO2 is highly predictive of surgical site infection and colonic anastomotic leakage. However, surgical site perfusion is often sub-optimal, creating an obstructive hurdle for traditional, systemically applied therapies to maintain or increase surgical site PtO2. This research tested the hypothesis that insufflation of humidified-warm CO2 into the abdominal cavity would increase sub-peritoneal PtO2 during open abdominal surgery. Materials and Methods 15 Wistar rats underwent laparotomy under general anesthesia. Three sets of randomized cross-over experiments were conducted in which the abdominal cavity was subjected to alternating exposure to 1) humidified-warm CO2 & ambient air; 2) humidified-warm CO2 & dry-cold CO2; and 3) dry-cold CO2 & ambient air. Sub-peritoneal PtO2 and tissue temperature were measured with a polarographic oxygen probe. Results Upon insufflation of humidified-warm CO2, PtO2 increased by 29.8 mmHg (SD 13.3; p<0.001), or 96.6% (SD 51.9), and tissue temperature by 3.0°C (SD 1.7 p<0.001), in comparison with exposure to ambient air. Smaller, but significant, increases in PtO2 were seen in experiments 2 and 3. Tissue temperature decreased upon exposure to dry-cold CO2 compared with ambient air (-1.4°C, SD 0.5, p = 0.001). Conclusions In a rat model, insufflation of humidified-warm CO2 into the abdominal cavity during open abdominal surgery causes an immediate and potentially clinically significant increase in PtO2. The effect is an additive result of the delivery of CO2 and avoidance of evaporative cooling via the delivery of the CO2 gas humidified at body temperature. PMID:25835954

  7. High-Resolution Respirometry for Simultaneous Measurement of Oxygen and Hydrogen Peroxide Fluxes in Permeabilized Cells, Tissue Homogenate and Isolated Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Makrecka-Kuka, Marina; Krumschnabel, Gerhard; Gnaiger, Erich

    2015-01-01

    Whereas mitochondria are well established as the source of ATP in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), it is debated if they are also the major cellular sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here we describe the novel approach of combining high-resolution respirometry and fluorometric measurement of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production, applied to mitochondrial preparations (permeabilized cells, tissue homogenate, isolated mitochondria). The widely used H2O2 probe Amplex Red inhibited respiration in intact and permeabilized cells and should not be applied at concentrations above 10 µM. H2O2 fluxes were generally less than 1% of oxygen fluxes in physiological substrate and coupling states, specifically in permeabilized cells. H2O2 flux was consistently highest in the Complex II-linked LEAK state, reduced with CI&II-linked convergent electron flow and in mitochondria respiring at OXPHOS capacity, and were further diminished in uncoupled mitochondria respiring at electron transfer system capacity. Simultaneous measurement of mitochondrial respiration and H2O2 flux requires careful optimization of assay conditions and reveals information on mitochondrial function beyond separate analysis of ROS production. PMID:26131977

  8. High-Resolution Respirometry for Simultaneous Measurement of Oxygen and Hydrogen Peroxide Fluxes in Permeabilized Cells, Tissue Homogenate and Isolated Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Makrecka-Kuka, Marina; Krumschnabel, Gerhard; Gnaiger, Erich

    2015-01-01

    Whereas mitochondria are well established as the source of ATP in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), it is debated if they are also the major cellular sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here we describe the novel approach of combining high-resolution respirometry and fluorometric measurement of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production, applied to mitochondrial preparations (permeabilized cells, tissue homogenate, isolated mitochondria). The widely used H2O2 probe Amplex Red inhibited respiration in intact and permeabilized cells and should not be applied at concentrations above 10 µM. H2O2 fluxes were generally less than 1% of oxygen fluxes in physiological substrate and coupling states, specifically in permeabilized cells. H2O2 flux was consistently highest in the Complex II-linked LEAK state, reduced with CI&II-linked convergent electron flow and in mitochondria respiring at OXPHOS capacity, and were further diminished in noncoupled mitochondria respiring at electron transfer system capacity. Simultaneous measurement of mitochondrial respiration and H2O2 flux requires careful optimization of assay conditions and reveals information on mitochondrial function beyond separate analysis of ROS production. PMID:26131977

  9. Changes in whole tissue heme concentration dissociates muscle deoxygenation from muscle oxygen extraction during passive head-up tilt.

    PubMed

    Adami, Alessandra; Koga, Shunsaku; Kondo, Narihiko; Cannon, Daniel T; Kowalchuk, John M; Amano, Tatsuro; Rossiter, Harry B

    2015-05-01

    Skeletal muscle deoxygenated hemoglobin and myoglobin concentration ([HHb]), assessed by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), is commonly used as a surrogate of regional O2 extraction (reflecting the O2 delivery-to-consumption ratio, Q̇/V̇o2). However, [HHb] change (Δ[HHb]) is also influenced by capillary-venous heme concentration, and/or small blood vessel volume (reflected in total heme; [THb]). We tested the hypotheses that Δ[HHb] is associated with O2 extraction, and insensitive to [THb], over a wide range of Q̇/V̇o2 elicited by passive head-up tilt (HUT; 10-min, 15° increments, between -10° and 75°). Steady-state common femoral artery blood flow (FBF) was measured by echo-Doppler, and time-resolved NIRS measured [HHb] and [THb] of vastus lateralis (VL) and gastrocnemius (GS) in 13 men. EMG confirmed muscles were inactive. During HUT in VL [HHb] increased linearly (57 ± 10 to 101 ± 16 μM; P < 0.05 above 15°) and was associated (r(2) ∼ 0.80) with the reduction in FBF (618 ± 75 ml/min at 0° to 268 ± 52 ml/min at 75°; P < 0.05 above 30°) and the increase in [THb] (228 ± 30 vs. 252 ± 32 μM; P < 0.05 above 15°). GS response was qualitatively similar to VL. However, there was wide variation within and among individuals, such that the overall limits of agreement between Δ[HHb] and ΔFBF ranged from -35 to +19% across both muscles. Neither knowledge of tissue O2 saturation nor vascular compliance could appropriately account for the Δ[HHb]-ΔFBF dissociation. Thus, under passive tilt, [HHb] is influenced by Q̇/V̇o2, as well as microvascular hematocrit and/or tissue blood vessel volume, complicating its use as a noninvasive surrogate for muscle microvascular O2 extraction. PMID:25678700

  10. Influence of heliox, oxygen, and N2O-O2 breathing on N2 bubbles in adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Hyldegaard, O; Madsen, J

    1989-05-01

    Bubbles in rat adipose tissue were studied at 1 bar after decompression from an exposure to air at 3.3 bars (absolute) for 4 h. During air breathing the bubbles grew throughout the observation period. During heliox (80:20) breathing they shrank and eventually disappeared from view. If the breathing gas was changed from heliox back to air or to N2O-O2 (80:20) while the bubbles still had an appreciable size, they started growing again. If the change to N2O was done after or a few minutes before a bubble disappeared from view, it did not reappear. During breathing of 100% O2, most bubbles containing N2 initially grew and then maintained their size for a while before diminishing. However, some bubbles did not start shrinking during the 2-3-h observation period. The relevance of the findings to heliox treatment of CNS decompression sickness after air dives is discussed. PMID:2741253

  11. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Stephen B.; McMullan, D. Michael; Bartlett, Robert H

    2013-01-01

    The extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) circuit is made of a number of components that have been customized to provide adequate tissue oxygen delivery in patients with severe cardiac and/or respiratory failure for a prolonged period of time (days to weeks). A standard ECMO circuit consists of a mechanical blood pump, gas exchange device, and a heat exchanger all connected together with circuit tubing. ECMO circuits can vary from simple to complex and may include a variety of blood flow and pressure monitors, continuous oxyhemoglobin saturation monitors, circuit access sites and a bridge connecting the venous access and arterial infusion limbs of the circuit. Significant technical advancements have been made in the equipment available for short and long term ECMO applications. Contemporary ECMO circuits have greater biocompatibility and allow for more prolonged cardiopulmonary support time, while minimizing the procedure-related complications of bleeding, thrombosis and other physiologic derangements that were so common with the early application of ECMO. Modern era ECMO circuitry and components are simpler, safer, more compact and can be used across a wide variety of patient sizes from neonates to adults. PMID:23735989

  12. [The tissue oxygen partial pressure in organs of hens in the second half of embryogenesis and in the first days after hatching].

    PubMed

    Belichenko, V M; Turganbaeva, A S; Khodyrev, E V; Kisliakova, L P; Kisliakov, Iu Ia; Shoshenko, K A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was measure the development chick tissue partial pressure of oxygen (pO2) in the brain cerebral hemispheres, liver, M. pectoralis, M. gastrocnemius, and to estimate the correlation of this index with our previously measured values (laser-Doppler flowmetry) volume blood flow (BF) in these organs. We studied 10-, 15-, and 19-day embryos and 4-day chickens thatwere anesthetized with urethane. pO2 measurements were made in thesurface layers of organs by the membrane amperometric Clark-type O2-electrode with a diameter of about 50 microm of the cathode placed in the center of the sensor with an outer diameter of 3.4 mm. Disclosed noticeable distinction of both the organ tissue pO2 values, and the dynamics of their changes duringthe study period. The most important of them: (1) the lowest pO2 (and BF) is observed in the brain and particularly in the liver of 10-day embryos; (2) in the subsequent period of embryogenesis pO2 in the brain increases 1.9 times (rising and BF) in M. pectoralis it falls by 1.7 times and in the liver.and in M. gastrocnemius changes little wherein the BF in both liver and muscles is not changed, (3) after hatching pO2 in the liver and M. petoralis fold increased (also increasing and BF), and in the brain and M. gastrocnemius, despite the increase BF (greater in the niuscle) did not significant change. In the analysis ofthedata are considered two possible mechanisms of change of tissue pO2 in the developing organs of chickens, one is due to the peculiarities of intracardiac blood flows; and the other is related to thesingularity of the oxyhemoglobin dissociation in the blood capillary bed of organ, determined by the specifics of its oxidative metabolism. PMID:25752150

  13. 21 CFR 201.5 - Drugs; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drugs; adequate directions for use. 201.5 Section...) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 201.5 Drugs; adequate directions for use. Adequate directions for use means directions under which the layman can use a drug safely and for the purposes...

  14. 21 CFR 201.5 - Drugs; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Drugs; adequate directions for use. 201.5 Section...) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 201.5 Drugs; adequate directions for use. Adequate directions for use means directions under which the layman can use a drug safely and for the purposes...

  15. 4 CFR 200.14 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 4 Accounts 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. 200.14 Section 200.14 Accounts RECOVERY ACCOUNTABILITY AND TRANSPARENCY BOARD PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 200.14 Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. The Board has the responsibility for maintaining adequate technical, physical, and...

  16. 10 CFR 1304.114 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. 1304.114 Section 1304.114 Energy NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 1304.114 Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. The Board has the responsibility for maintaining adequate technical, physical, and security...

  17. 10 CFR 1304.114 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. 1304.114 Section 1304.114 Energy NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 1304.114 Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. The Board has the responsibility for maintaining adequate technical, physical, and security...

  18. 4 CFR 200.14 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 4 Accounts 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. 200....14 Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. The Board has the responsibility for maintaining adequate technical, physical, and security safeguards to prevent unauthorized disclosure...

  19. Changes in hemodynamics and tissue oxygenation saturation in the brain and skeletal muscle induced by speech therapy - a near-infrared spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Wolf, U; Scholkmann, F; Rosenberger, R; Wolf, M; Nelle, M

    2011-01-01

    Arts speech therapy (AST) is a therapeutic method within complementary medicine and has been practiced for decades for various medical conditions. It comprises listening and the recitation of different forms of speech exercises under the guidance of a licensed speech therapist. The aim of our study was to noninvasively investigate whether different types of recitation influence hemodynamics and oxygenation in the brain and skeletal leg muscle using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Seventeen healthy volunteers (eight men and nine women, mean age ± standard deviation 35.6 ± 12.7 years) were enrolled in the study. Each subject was measured three times on different days with the different types of recitation: hexameter, alliteration, and prose verse. Before, during, and after recitation, relative concentration changes of oxyhemoglobin (Δ[O2Hb]), deoxyhemoglobin (Δ[HHb]), total hemoglobin (Δ[tHb]), and tissue oxygenation saturation (StO2) were measured in the brain and skeletal leg muscle using a NIRS device. The study was performed with a randomized crossover design. Significant concentration changes were found during recitation of all verses, with mainly a decrease in Δ[O2Hb] and ΔStO2 in the brain, and an increase in Δ[O2Hb] and Δ[tHb] in the leg muscle during recitation. After the recitations, significant changes were mainly increases of Δ[HHb] and Δ[tHb] in the calf muscle. The Mayer wave spectral power (MWP) was also significantly affected, i.e., mainly the MWP of the Δ[O2Hb] and Δ[tHb] increased in the brain during recitation of hexameter and prose verse. The changes in MWP were also significantly different between hexameter and alliteration, and hexameter and prose. Possible physiological explanations for these changes are discussed. A probable reason is a different effect of recitations on the sympathetic nervous system. In conclusion, these changes show that AST has relevant effects on the hemodynamics and oxygenation of the brain and muscle

  20. Relationships among One-Minute Oscillations in Oxygen Saturation Level of Blood and Hemoglobin Volume in Calf Muscular Tissue and One-Minute Wave in Body Fluid Volume Change during Upright Standing in Humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inamura, Kinsaku; Mano, Tadaaki; Iwase, Satoshi

    2005-08-01

    One-minute oscillations in the oxygen saturation level of blood and the hemoglobin volume in calf muscular tissue were found during upright standing in humans. Spectral analyses indicated that one source of the one-minute wave in body fluid volume change is the spontaneous constriction of blood vessels triggered by an elevation of transmural pressure when blood pooling is evoked.

  1. An Implantable Depot That Can Generate Oxygen in Situ for Overcoming Hypoxia-Induced Resistance to Anticancer Drugs in Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chieh-Cheng; Chia, Wei-Tso; Chung, Ming-Fan; Lin, Kun-Ju; Hsiao, Chun-Wen; Jin, Chuan; Lim, Woon-Hui; Chen, Chun-Chieh; Sung, Hsing-Wen

    2016-04-27

    In the absence of adequate oxygen, cancer cells that are grown in hypoxic solid tumors resist treatment using antitumor drugs (such as doxorubicin, DOX), owing to their attenuated intracellular production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy favorably improves oxygen transport to the hypoxic tumor tissues, thereby increasing the sensitivity of tumor cells to DOX. However, the use of HBO with DOX potentiates the ROS-mediated cytotoxicity of the drug toward normal tissues. In this work, we hypothesize that regional oxygen treatment by an implanted oxygen-generating depot may enhance the cytotoxicity of DOX against malignant tissues in a highly site-specific manner, without raising systemic oxygen levels. Upon implantation close to the tumor, the oxygen-generating depot reacts with the interstitial medium to produce oxygen in situ, effectively shrinking the hypoxic regions in the tumor tissues. Increasing the local availability of oxygen causes the cytotoxicity of DOX that is accumulated in the tumors to be significantly enhanced by the elevated production of ROS, ultimately allaying the hypoxia-induced DOX resistance in solid malignancies. Importantly, this enhancement of cytotoxicity is limited to the site of the tumors, and this feature of the system that is proposed herein is unique. PMID:27075956

  2. Oxygen exchange in the isolated, arrested guinea pig heart: theoretical and experimental observations.

    PubMed Central

    Mawson, D A; Hunter, P J; Kenwright, D N; Loiselle, D S

    1994-01-01

    A model of oxygen transport in perfused myocardial tissue is presented. Steady-state conditions are assumed in order to mimic the metabolic rate of the arrested heart. The model incorporates Michaelis-Menten dependence of mitochondrial oxygen consumption, oxymyoglobin saturation and oxyhemoglobin saturation on oxygen partial pressure (PO2). The transport equations model both the advective supply of oxygen via the coronary circulation and the diffusive exchange of oxygen between tissues and environment across the epicardial and endocardial surfaces. The left ventricle is approximated by an axisymmetric prolate spheroid and the transport equations solved numerically using finite element techniques. Solution yields the PO2 profile across the heart wall. Integration of this profile yields the simulated rate of metabolic oxygen uptake determined according to the Fick principle. Correction for the diffusive flux of oxygen across the surfaces yields the simulated true metabolic rate of oxygen consumption. Simulated values of oxygen uptake are compared with those measured experimentally according to the Fick principle, using saline-perfused, Langendorff-circulated, K(+)-arrested, guinea pig hearts. Four perfusion variables were manipulated: arterial PO2, environmental PO2, coronary flow and perfusion pressure. In each case agreement between simulated and experimentally determined rates of oxygen consumption gives confidence that the model adequately describes the advective and diffusive transport of oxygen in the isolated, arrested, saline-perfused heart. Images FIGURE A1 PMID:8011911

  3. Artificial oxygen carriers as a possible alternative to red cells in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Fabiano Timbó; Jucá, Mário Jorge; Castro, Aldemar Araujo; Duarte, José Lira; Barbosa, Luciano Timbó

    2009-05-01

    Fluid resuscitation is intended to eliminate microcirculatory disorders and restore adequate tissue oxygenation. The safety limits for a restrictive transfusion policy are given by patients' individual tolerance of acute normovolemic anemia. Artificial oxygen carriers based on perfluorocarbon or hemoglobin are attractive alternatives to allogenic red blood cells. There are many risks involved in allogenic blood transfusions and they include transmission of infections, delayed postoperative wound healing, transfusion reactions, immunomodulation and cancer recurrence. Regardless of whether artificial oxygen carriers are available for routine clinical use, further studies are needed in order to show the safety and efficacy of these substances for clinical practice. PMID:19597685

  4. Wound Healing Essentials: Let There Be Oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Chandan K.

    2009-01-01

    The state of wound oxygenation is a key determinant of healing outcomes. From a diagnostic standpoint, measurements of wound oxygenation are commonly used to guide treatment planning such as amputation decision. In preventive applications, optimizing wound perfusion and providing supplemental O2 in the peri-operative period reduces the incidence of post-operative infections. Correction of wound pO2 may, by itself, trigger some healing responses. Importantly, approaches to correct wound pO2 favorably influence outcomes of other therapies such as responsiveness to growth factors and acceptance of grafts. Chronic ischemic wounds are essentially hypoxic. Primarily based on the tumor literature, hypoxia is generally viewed as being angiogenic. This is true with the condition that hypoxia be acute and mild to modest in magnitude. Extreme near-anoxic hypoxia, as commonly noted in problem wounds, is not compatible with tissue repair. Adequate wound tissue oxygenation is required but may not be sufficient to favorably influence healing outcomes. Success in wound care may be improved by a personalized health care approach. The key lies in our ability to specifically identify the key limitations of a given wound and in developing a multifaceted strategy to specifically address those limitations. In considering approaches to oxygenate the wound tissue it is important to recognize that both too little as well as too much may impede the healing process. Oxygen dosing based on the specific need of a wound therefore seems prudent. Therapeutic approaches targeting the oxygen sensing and redox signaling pathways are promising. PMID:19152646

  5. Retinal oxygen distribution and the role of neuroglobin.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Paul A; Gaffney, Eamonn A; Luthert, Philip J; Foss, Alexander J E; Byrne, Helen M

    2016-07-01

    The retina is the tissue layer at the back of the eye that is responsible for light detection. Whilst equipped with a rich supply of oxygen, it has one of the highest oxygen demands of any tissue in the body and, as such, supply and demand are finely balanced. It has been suggested that the protein neuroglobin (Ngb), which is found in high concentrations within the retina, may help to maintain an adequate supply of oxygen via the processes of transport and storage. We construct mathematical models, formulated as systems of reaction-diffusion equations in one-dimension, to test this hypothesis. Numerical simulations show that Ngb may play an important role in oxygen transport, but not in storage. Our models predict that the retina is most susceptible to hypoxia in the regions of the photoreceptor inner segment and inner plexiform layers, where Ngb has the potential to prevent hypoxia and increase oxygen uptake by 30-40 %. Analysis of a simplified model confirms the utility of Ngb in transport and shows that its oxygen affinity ([Formula: see text] value) is near optimal for this process. Lastly, asymptotic analysis enables us to identify conditions under which the piecewise linear and quadratic approximations to the retinal oxygen profile, used in the literature, are valid. PMID:26370669

  6. Comparison of cerebral tissue oxygenation values in full term and preterm newborns by the simultaneous use of two near-infrared spectroscopy devices: an absolute and a relative trending oximeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczapa, Tomasz; Karpiński, Łukasz; Moczko, Jerzy; Weindling, Michael; Kornacka, Alicja; Wróblewska, Katarzyna; Adamczak, Aleksandra; Jopek, Aleksandra; Chojnacka, Karolina; Gadzinowski, Janusz

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study is to compare a two-wavelength light emitting diode-based tissue oximeter (INVOS), which is designed to show trends in tissue oxygenation, with a four-wavelength laser-based oximeter (FORE-SIGHT), designed to deliver absolute values of tissue oxygenation. Simultaneous values of cerebral tissue oxygenation (StO2) are measured using both devices in 15 term and 15 preterm clinically stable newborns on the first and third day of life. Values are recorded simultaneously in two periods between which oximeter sensor positions are switched to the contralateral side. Agreement between StO2 values before and after the change of sensor position is analyzed. We find that mean cerebral StO2 values are similar between devices for term and preterm babies, but INVOS shows StO2 values spread over a wider range, with wider standard deviations than shown by the FORE-SIGHT. There is relatively good agreement with a bias up to 3.5% and limits of agreement up to 11.8%. Measurements from each side of the forehead show better repeatability for the FORE-SIGHT monitor. We conclude that performance of the two devices is probably acceptable for clinical purposes. Both performed sufficiently well, but the use of FORE-SIGHT may be associated with tighter range and better repeatability of data.

  7. Calcification rate and the stable carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen isotopes in the skeleton, host tissue, and zooxanthellae of bleached and recovering Hawaiian corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Lisa J.; Grottoli, Andréa G.

    2006-06-01

    We tested the effectiveness of stable isotopes as recorders of physiological changes that occur during coral bleaching and recovery. Montipora capitata and Porites compressa fragments were bleached in outdoor tanks with seawater temperature raised to 30 °C (treatment corals) for one month. Additional fragments were maintained at 27 °C in separate tanks (control corals). After one month, (0 months recovery), buoyant weight was measured and a subset of fragments was frozen. Remaining fragments were returned to the reef for recovery. After 1.5, 4, and 8 months, fragments were collected, measured for buoyant weight, and frozen. Fragments were analyzed for stable carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions of the skeleton (δ 13C s; δ 18O s) and nitrogen and carbon isotopic compositions of the host tissue (δ 15N h; δ 13C h) and zooxanthellae (δ 15N z; δ 13C z). δ 13C s decreased immediately after bleaching in M. capitata, but not in P. compressa. δ 18O s of both species failed to record the warming event. During the remaining months of recovery, δ 13C s and δ 18O s were more enriched in treatment than control corals due to decreases in calcification and metabolic fractionation during that time. Increased δ 15N h of treatment P. compressa may be due to expelled zooxanthellae during bleaching and recovery. Increased δ 15N z at 1.5 months in treatment fragments of both species reflects the increased incorporation of dissolved inorganic nitrogen to facilitate mitotic cell division and/or chl a/cell recovery. Changes in δ 13C h and δ 13C z at 1.5 months in treatment M. capitata indicated a large increase in heterotrophically acquired carbon relative to photosynthetically fixed carbon. We experimentally show that isotopes in coral skeleton, host tissue and zooxanthellae can be used to verify physiological changes during bleaching and recovery, but their use as a proxy for past bleaching events in the skeletal record is limited.

  8. 7 CFR 4290.200 - Adequate capital for RBICs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Adequate capital for RBICs. 4290.200 Section 4290.200 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE AND... Qualifications for the RBIC Program Capitalizing A Rbic § 4290.200 Adequate capital for RBICs. You must meet...

  9. 13 CFR 107.200 - Adequate capital for Licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Adequate capital for Licensees... INVESTMENT COMPANIES Qualifying for an SBIC License Capitalizing An Sbic § 107.200 Adequate capital for... Licensee, and to receive Leverage. (a) You must have enough Regulatory Capital to provide...

  10. 13 CFR 107.200 - Adequate capital for Licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Adequate capital for Licensees... INVESTMENT COMPANIES Qualifying for an SBIC License Capitalizing An Sbic § 107.200 Adequate capital for... Licensee, and to receive Leverage. (a) You must have enough Regulatory Capital to provide...

  11. 7 CFR 4290.200 - Adequate capital for RBICs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Adequate capital for RBICs. 4290.200 Section 4290.200 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE AND... Qualifications for the RBIC Program Capitalizing A Rbic § 4290.200 Adequate capital for RBICs. You must meet...

  12. 10 CFR 1304.114 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. 1304.114 Section 1304.114 Energy NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 1304.114 Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. The Board has the responsibility for maintaining...

  13. 40 CFR 716.25 - Adequate file search.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Adequate file search. 716.25 Section 716.25 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING General Provisions § 716.25 Adequate file search. The scope of...

  14. 40 CFR 51.354 - Adequate tools and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Adequate tools and resources. 51.354... Requirements § 51.354 Adequate tools and resources. (a) Administrative resources. The program shall maintain the administrative resources necessary to perform all of the program functions including...

  15. 40 CFR 51.354 - Adequate tools and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Adequate tools and resources. 51.354... Requirements § 51.354 Adequate tools and resources. (a) Administrative resources. The program shall maintain the administrative resources necessary to perform all of the program functions including...

  16. 40 CFR 51.354 - Adequate tools and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Adequate tools and resources. 51.354... Requirements § 51.354 Adequate tools and resources. (a) Administrative resources. The program shall maintain the administrative resources necessary to perform all of the program functions including...

  17. 40 CFR 51.354 - Adequate tools and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Adequate tools and resources. 51.354... Requirements § 51.354 Adequate tools and resources. (a) Administrative resources. The program shall maintain the administrative resources necessary to perform all of the program functions including...

  18. 40 CFR 716.25 - Adequate file search.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Adequate file search. 716.25 Section... ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING General Provisions § 716.25 Adequate file search. The scope of a person's responsibility to search records is limited to records in the location(s) where the...

  19. 40 CFR 716.25 - Adequate file search.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Adequate file search. 716.25 Section... ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING General Provisions § 716.25 Adequate file search. The scope of a person's responsibility to search records is limited to records in the location(s) where the...

  20. 40 CFR 716.25 - Adequate file search.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Adequate file search. 716.25 Section... ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING General Provisions § 716.25 Adequate file search. The scope of a person's responsibility to search records is limited to records in the location(s) where the...

  1. 40 CFR 716.25 - Adequate file search.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Adequate file search. 716.25 Section... ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING General Provisions § 716.25 Adequate file search. The scope of a person's responsibility to search records is limited to records in the location(s) where the...

  2. 10 CFR 1304.114 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. 1304.114 Section 1304.114 Energy NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 1304.114 Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. The Board has the responsibility for maintaining...

  3. 10 CFR 1304.114 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. 1304.114 Section 1304.114 Energy NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 1304.114 Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. The Board has the responsibility for maintaining...

  4. 10 CFR 503.35 - Inability to obtain adequate capital.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Inability to obtain adequate capital. 503.35 Section 503.35 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS NEW FACILITIES Permanent Exemptions for New Facilities § 503.35 Inability to obtain adequate capital. (a) Eligibility. Section 212(a)(1)(D)...

  5. 10 CFR 503.35 - Inability to obtain adequate capital.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Inability to obtain adequate capital. 503.35 Section 503.35 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS NEW FACILITIES Permanent Exemptions for New Facilities § 503.35 Inability to obtain adequate capital. (a) Eligibility. Section 212(a)(1)(D)...

  6. 15 CFR 970.404 - Adequate exploration plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR EXPLORATION LICENSES Certification of Applications § 970.404 Adequate exploration plan. Before he may certify an application, the Administrator must find... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Adequate exploration plan....

  7. 15 CFR 970.404 - Adequate exploration plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR EXPLORATION LICENSES Certification of Applications § 970.404 Adequate exploration plan. Before he may certify an application, the Administrator must find... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Adequate exploration plan....

  8. "Something Adequate"? In Memoriam Seamus Heaney, Sister Quinlan, Nirbhaya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Seamus Heaney talked of poetry's responsibility to represent the "bloody miracle", the "terrible beauty" of atrocity; to create "something adequate". This article asks, what is adequate to the burning and eating of a nun and the murderous gang rape and evisceration of a medical student? It considers Njabulo…

  9. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy for Late Radiation-Associated Tissue Necroses: Is It Safe in Patients With Locoregionally Recurrent and Then Successfully Salvaged Head-and-Neck Cancers?

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, H.-Y.; Ku, C.-H.; Liu, D.-W.; Chao, H.-L.; Lin, C.-S.; Jen, Y.-M.

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: To test, in a retrospective matched-pair study, whether necrosis-rescuing hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) increases the risk of cancer re-recurrence in patients with locoregionally recurrent and then successfully salvaged head-and-neck cancers. Methods and materials: Between January 1995 and July 2004, we retrospectively identified 22 patients with locoregionally recurrent and then successfully salvaged head-and-neck cancers. We defined two groups: the HBOT group, 11 patients with HBOT for rescuing late radiation-associated tissue necroses; and the non-HBOT group, the other 11 matched-pair patients without HBOT. Between the two groups, the following four factors were matched for case pairing: primary cancer subsite, initial cancer stage, age, and gender. Results: Three findings indicate that HBOT increases the risk of cancer re-recurrence. First, we observed more cancer re-recurrences in the HBOT group than in the non-HBOT group: 9 of 11 vs. 4 of 11, with 5-year disease-free survival rates after salvage of 32.7% vs. 70.0% (hazard ratio 3.2; 95% confidence interval 1.03-10.7; p = 0.048). Second, re-recurrences developed rapidly after HBOT in 6 patients. Third, 3 patients had unusual cancer re-recurrences after HBOT. Remarkably, of 9 patients with cancer re-recurrences in the HBOT group, 4 patients had cancer disease-free intervals of 9 months or less before HBOT. Conclusions: Necrosis-rescuing HBOT should be given with caution in patients with locoregionally recurrent and then successfully salvaged head-and-neck cancers; if it cannot be omitted entirely, deferring HBOT 9 months or longer after cancer re-treatment may be prudent.

  10. Spatio-temporal course of macrophage-like cell accumulation after experimental embolic stroke depending on treatment with tissue plasminogen activator and its combination with hyperbaric oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Michalski, D.; Heindl, M.; Kacza, J.; Laignel, F.; Küppers-Tiedt, L.; Schneider, D.; Grosche, J.; Boltze, J.; Löhr, M.; Hobohm, C.; Härtig, W.

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation following ischaemic stroke attracts high priority in current research, particularly using human-like models and long-term observation periods considering translational aspects. The present study aimed on the spatio-temporal course of macrophage-like cell accumulation after experimental thromboembolic stroke and addressed microglial and astroglial reactions in the ischaemic border zone. Further, effects of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) as currently best treatment for stroke and the potentially neuroprotective co-administration of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) were investigated. Rats underwent middle cerebral artery occlusion and were assigned to control, tPA or tPA+HBO. Twenty-four hours, 7, 14 and 28 days were determined as observation time points. The accumulation of macrophage-like cells was semiquantitatively assessed by CD68 staining in the ischaemic area and ischaemic border zone, and linked to the clinical course. CD11b, ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and Neuronal Nuclei (NeuN) were applied to reveal delayed glial and neuronal alterations. In all groups, the accumulation of macrophage-like cells increased distinctly from 24 hours to 7 days post ischaemia. tPA+HBO tended to decrease macrophage-like cell accumulation at day 14 and 28. Overall, a trend towards an association of increased accumulation and pronounced reduction of the neurological deficit was found. Concerning delayed inflammatory reactions, an activation of microglia and astrocytes with co-occurring neuronal loss was observed on day 28. Thereby, astrogliosis was found circularly in contrast to microglial activation directly in the ischaemic area. This study supports previous data on long-lasting inflammatory processes following experimental stroke, and additionally provides region-specific details on glial reactions. The tendency towards a decreasing macrophage-like cell accumulation after tPA+HBO needs to be discussed

  11. The Effect of Acetazolamide on Cerebral Blood Flow and Oxygen Utilization in the Rhesus Monkey

    PubMed Central

    Laux, B. E.; Raichle, M. E.

    1978-01-01

    The brain is critically dependent for its moment to moment function and survival on an adequate supply of oxygen. The enzyme carbonic anhydrase (EC 4.2.1.1) may play an important role in oxygen delivery to brain tissue by facilitating the hydration of metabolically produced carbon dioxide in erythrocytes in brain capillaries, thus permitting the Bohr effect to occur. We examined the effect of 30 mg/kg i.v. acetazolamide, a potent inhibitor of carbonic anhydrase, upon cerebral blood flow and oxygen consumption in lightly anesthetized, passively ventilated rhesus monkeys. Cerebral blood flow and oxygen consumption were measured with oxygen-15-labeled water and oxygen-15-labeled oxyhemoglobin, respectively, injected into the internal carotid artery and monitored externally. Acetazolamide produced an immediate and significant increase in cerebral blood flow (from a mean of 64.7 to 83.8 ml/100 g per min), an increase in arterial carbon dioxide tension (from a mean of 40.7 to 47.5 torr), and a decrease in cerebral oxygen consumption (from a mean of 4.16 to 2.82 ml/100 g per min). Because the change in cerebral oxygen consumption occurred within minutes of the administration of acetazolamide, we believe that this effect probably was not due to a direct action on brain cells but was achieved by an interference with oxygen unloading in brain capillaries. A resultant tissue hypoxia might well explain part of the observed increase in cerebral blood flow. PMID:99455

  12. Oxygen Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    Oxygen therapy is a treatment that provides you with extra oxygen. Oxygen is a gas that your body needs to function. Normally, your lungs absorb oxygen from the air you breathe. But some conditions ...

  13. Arabidopsis: An Adequate Model for Dicot Root Systems?

    PubMed

    Zobel, Richard W

    2016-01-01

    The Arabidopsis root system is frequently considered to have only three classes of root: primary, lateral, and adventitious. Research with other plant species has suggested up to eight different developmental/functional classes of root for a given plant root system. If Arabidopsis has only three classes of root, it may not be an adequate model for eudicot plant root systems. Recent research, however, can be interpreted to suggest that pre-flowering Arabidopsis does have at least five (5) of these classes of root. This then suggests that Arabidopsis root research can be considered an adequate model for dicot plant root systems. PMID:26904040

  14. Overcome of Carbon Catabolite Repression of Bioinsecticides Production by Sporeless Bacillus thuringiensis through Adequate Fermentation Technology.

    PubMed

    Ben Khedher, Saoussen; Jaoua, Samir; Zouari, Nabil

    2014-01-01

    The overcoming of catabolite repression, in bioinsecticides production by sporeless Bacillus thuringiensis strain S22 was investigated into fully controlled 3 L fermenter, using glucose based medium. When applying adequate oxygen profile throughout the fermentation period (75% oxygen saturation), it was possible to partially overcome the catabolite repression, normally occurring at high initial glucose concentrations (30 and 40 g/L glucose). Moreover, toxin production yield by sporeless strain S22 was markedly improved by the adoption of the fed-batch intermittent cultures technology. With 22.5 g/L glucose used into culture medium, toxin production was improved by about 36% when applying fed-batch culture compared to one batch. Consequently, the proposed fed-batch strategy was efficient for the overcome of the carbon catabolite repression. So, it was possible to overproduce insecticidal crystal proteins into highly concentrated medium. PMID:25309756

  15. Is the Marketing Concept Adequate for Continuing Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rittenburg, Terri L.

    1984-01-01

    Because educators have a social responsibility to those they teach, the marketing concept may not be adequate as a philosophy for continuing education. In attempting to broaden the audience for continuing education, educators should consider a societal marketing concept to meet the needs of the educationally disadvantaged. (SK)

  16. Comparability and Reliability Considerations of Adequate Yearly Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maier, Kimberly S.; Maiti, Tapabrata; Dass, Sarat C.; Lim, Chae Young

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop an estimate of Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) that will allow for reliable and valid comparisons among student subgroups, schools, and districts. A shrinkage-type estimator of AYP using the Bayesian framework is described. Using simulated data, the performance of the Bayes estimator will be compared to…

  17. 9 CFR 305.3 - Sanitation and adequate facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sanitation and adequate facilities. 305.3 Section 305.3 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION...

  18. Understanding Your Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP), 2011-2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The "No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) of 2001" requires all schools, districts/local education agencies (LEAs) and states to show that students are making Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP). NCLB requires states to establish targets in the following ways: (1) Annual Proficiency Target; (2) Attendance/Graduation Rates; and (3) Participation Rates.…

  19. Assessing Juvenile Sex Offenders to Determine Adequate Levels of Supervision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerdes, Karen E.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    This study analyzed the internal consistency of four inventories used by Utah probation officers to determine adequate and efficacious supervision levels and placement for juvenile sex offenders. Three factors accounted for 41.2 percent of variance (custodian's and juvenile's attitude toward intervention, offense characteristics, and historical…

  20. 34 CFR 200.13 - Adequate yearly progress in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Adequate yearly progress in general. 200.13 Section 200.13 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION TITLE I-IMPROVING THE ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT OF THE...

  1. 34 CFR 200.20 - Making adequate yearly progress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Making adequate yearly progress. 200.20 Section 200.20 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION TITLE I-IMPROVING THE ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT OF THE DISADVANTAGED...

  2. Do Beginning Teachers Receive Adequate Support from Their Headteachers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menon, Maria Eliophotou

    2012-01-01

    The article examines the problems faced by beginning teachers in Cyprus and the extent to which headteachers are considered to provide adequate guidance and support to them. Data were collected through interviews with 25 school teachers in Cyprus, who had recently entered teaching (within 1-5 years) in public primary schools. According to the…

  3. Improved ASTM G72 Test Method for Ensuring Adequate Fuel-to-Oxidizer Ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juarez, Alfredo; Harper, Susana A.

    2016-01-01

    The ASTM G72/G72M-15 Standard Test Method for Autogenous Ignition Temperature of Liquids and Solids in a High-Pressure Oxygen-Enriched Environment is currently used to evaluate materials for the ignition susceptibility driven by exposure to external heat in an enriched oxygen environment. Testing performed on highly volatile liquids such as cleaning solvents has proven problematic due to inconsistent test results (non-ignitions). Non-ignition results can be misinterpreted as favorable oxygen compatibility, although they are more likely associated with inadequate fuel-to-oxidizer ratios. Forced evaporation during purging and inadequate sample size were identified as two potential causes for inadequate available sample material during testing. In an effort to maintain adequate fuel-to-oxidizer ratios within the reaction vessel during test, several parameters were considered, including sample size, pretest sample chilling, pretest purging, and test pressure. Tests on a variety of solvents exhibiting a range of volatilities are presented in this paper. A proposed improvement to the standard test protocol as a result of this evaluation is also presented. Execution of the final proposed improved test protocol outlines an incremental step method of determining optimal conditions using increased sample sizes while considering test system safety limits. The proposed improved test method increases confidence in results obtained by utilizing the ASTM G72 autogenous ignition temperature test method and can aid in the oxygen compatibility assessment of highly volatile liquids and other conditions that may lead to false non-ignition results.

  4. Modelling the effects of cerebral microvasculature morphology on oxygen transport

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chang Sub; Payne, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    The cerebral microvasculature plays a vital role in adequately supplying blood to the brain. Determining the health of the cerebral microvasculature is important during pathological conditions, such as stroke and dementia. Recent studies have shown the complex relationship between cerebral metabolic rate and transit time distribution, the transit times of all the possible pathways available dependent on network topology. In this paper, we extend a recently developed technique to solve for residue function, the amount of tracer left in the vasculature at any time, and transit time distribution in an existing model of the cerebral microvasculature to calculate cerebral metabolism. We present the mathematical theory needed to solve for oxygen concentration followed by results of the simulations. It is found that oxygen extraction fraction, the fraction of oxygen removed from the blood in the capillary network by the tissue, and cerebral metabolic rate are dependent on both mean and heterogeneity of the transit time distribution. For changes in cerebral blood flow, a positive correlation can be observed between mean transit time and oxygen extraction fraction, and a negative correlation between mean transit time and metabolic rate of oxygen. A negative correlation can also be observed between transit time heterogeneity and the metabolic rate of oxygen for a constant cerebral blood flow. A sensitivity analysis on the mean and heterogeneity of the transit time distribution was able to quantify their respective contributions to oxygen extraction fraction and metabolic rate of oxygen. Mean transit time has a greater contribution than the heterogeneity for oxygen extraction fraction. This is found to be opposite for metabolic rate of oxygen. These results provide information on the role of the cerebral microvasculature and its effects on flow and metabolism. They thus open up the possibility of obtaining additional valuable clinical information for diagnosing and treating

  5. Oxygen gradients in the microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Pittman, R N

    2011-07-01

    Early in the last century August Krogh embarked on a series of seminal studies to understand the connection between tissue metabolism and mechanisms by which the cardiovascular system supplied oxygen to meet those needs. Krogh recognized that oxygen was supplied from blood to the tissues by passive diffusion and that the most likely site for oxygen exchange was the capillary network. Studies of tissue oxygen consumption and diffusion coefficient, coupled with anatomical studies of capillarity in various tissues, led him to formulate a model of oxygen diffusion from a single capillary. Fifty years after the publication of this work, new methods were developed which allowed the direct measurement of oxygen in and around microvessels. These direct measurements have confirmed the predictions by Krogh and have led to extensions of his ideas resulting in our current understanding of oxygenation within the microcirculation. Developments during the last 40 years are reviewed, including studies of oxygen gradients in arterioles, capillaries, venules, microvessel wall and surrounding tissue. These measurements were made possible by the development and use of new methods to investigate oxygen in the microcirculation, so mention is made of oxygen microelectrodes, microspectrophotometry of haemoglobin and phosphorescence quenching microscopy. Our understanding of oxygen transport from the perspective of the microcirculation has gone from a consideration of oxygen gradients in capillaries and tissue to the realization that oxygen has the ability to diffuse from any microvessel to another location under the conditions that there exists a large enough PO(2) gradient and that the permeability for oxygen along the intervening pathway is sufficient. PMID:21281453

  6. Maintaining adequate hydration and nutrition in adult enteral tube feeding.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Sasha

    2015-01-01

    Predicting the nutritional and fluid requirements of enterally-fed patients can be challenging and the practicalities of ensuring adequate delivery must be taken into consideration. Patients who are enterally fed can be more reliant on clinicians, family members and carers to meet their nutrition and hydration needs and identify any deficiencies, excesses or problems with delivery. Estimating a patient's requirements can be challenging due to the limitations of using predictive equations in the clinical setting. Close monitoring by all those involved in the patient's care, as well as regular review by a dietitian, is therefore required to balance the delivery of adequate feed and fluids to meet each patient's individual needs and prevent the complications of malnutrition and dehydration. Increasing the awareness of the signs of malnutrition and dehydration in patients receiving enteral tube feeding among those involved in a patient's care will help any deficiencies to be detected early on and rectified before complications occur. PMID:26087203

  7. Assessing juvenile sex offenders to determine adequate levels of supervision.

    PubMed

    Gerdes, K E; Gourley, M M; Cash, M C

    1995-08-01

    The present study analyzed the internal consistency of four inventories currently being used by probation officers in the state of Utah to determine adequate and efficacious supervision levels and placement for juvenile sex offenders. The internal consistency or reliability of the inventories ranged from moderate to good. Factor analysis was utilized to significantly increase the reliability of the four inventories by collapsing them into the following three factors: (a) Custodian's and Juvenile's Attitude Toward Intervention; (b) Offense Characteristics; and (c) Historical Risk Factors. These three inventories/factors explained 41.2% of the variance in the combined inventories' scores. Suggestions are made regarding the creation of an additional inventory. "Characteristics of the Victim" to account for more of the variance. In addition, suggestions as to how these inventories can be used by probation officers to make objective and consistent decisions about adequate supervision levels and placement for juvenile sex offenders are discussed. PMID:7583754

  8. Monitoring oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Severinghaus, John W

    2011-06-01

    Cyanosis was used for a century after dentists began pulling teeth under 100% N(2)O in 1844 because brief (2 min) severe hypoxia is harmless. Deaths came with curare and potent anesthetic respiratory arrest. Leland Clark's invention of a polarographic blood oxygen tension electrode (1954) was introduced for transcutaneous PO2 monitoring to adjust PEEP and CPAP PO2 to prevent premature infant blindness from excess O2 (1972). Oximetry for warning military aviators was tried after WW II but not used for routine monitoring until Takuo Aoyagi (1973) discovered an equation to measure SaO2 by the ratio of ratios of red and IR light transmitted through tissue as it changed with arterial pulses. Pulse oximetry (1982) depended on simultaneous technology improvements of light emitting red and IR diodes, tiny cheap solid state sensors and micro-chip computers. Continuous monitoring of airway anesthetic concentration and oxygen also became very common after 1980. Death from anesthesia fell 10 fold between 1985 and 2000 as pulse oximetry became universally used, but no proof of a causative relationship to pulse oximetry exists. It is now assumed that all anesthesiologist became much more aware of the dangers of prolonged hypoxia, perhaps by using the pulse oximeters. PMID:21717228

  9. Scaffold porosity and oxygenation of printed hydrogel constructs affect functionality of embedded osteogenic progenitors.

    PubMed

    Fedorovich, Natalja E; Kuipers, Elske; Gawlitta, Debby; Dhert, Wouter J A; Alblas, Jacqueline

    2011-10-01

    Insufficient supply of oxygen and nutrients throughout the graft is considered one of the principal limitations in development of large, tissue-engineered bone grafts. Organ or tissue printing by means of three-dimensional (3D) fiber deposition is a novel modality in regenerative medicine that combines pore formation and defined cell placement, and is used here for development of cell-laden hydrogel structures with reproducible internal architecture to sustain oxygen supply and to support adequate tissue development. In this study we tested the effect of porosity on multipotent stromal cells (MSCs) embedded in hydrogel constructs printed with a 3D fiber deposition (3DF) machine. For this, porous and solid alginate hydrogel scaffolds, with MSCs homogeneously dispersed throughout the construct, were printed and analyzed in vitro for the presence of hypoxia markers, metabolism, survival, and osteogenic differentiation. We demonstrated that porosity promotes oxygenation of MSCs in printed hydrogel scaffolds and supported the viability and osteogenic differentiation of embedded cells. Porous and solid printed constructs were subsequently implanted subcutaneously in immunodeficient mice to analyze tissue formation in relation to hypoxia responses of embedded cells. Implantation of printed grafts resulted in ingrowth of vascularized tissue and significantly enhanced oxygenation of embedded MSCs. In conclusion, the introduction of pores significantly enhances the conductive properties of printed hydrogel constructs and contributes to the functionality of embedded osteogenic progenitors. PMID:21599540

  10. Isolation-hypoxia and re-oxygenation of the pallial cavity of female Crepipatella dilatata during estuarine salinity changes requires increased glyoxylase activity and antioxidant metabolism to avoid oxidative damage to female tissues and developing embryos.

    PubMed

    Cubillos, Víctor; Chaparro, Oscar; Segura, Cristian; Montory, Jaime; Cruces, Edgardo; Burritt, David

    2016-08-01

    The estuarine slipper limpet Crepipatella dilatata is a gastropod that can survive prolonged periods of low salinities (< 24 PSU) caused by tidal changes and/or prolonged periods of rain. During low salinity events, C. dilatata can isolate its body from the outside environment, by sealing its shell against the substrate on which it grows. Prolonged isolation periods from the surrounding environment can greatly lower available oxygen levels inside of the pallial cavity, impacting on the physiology of both females and their incubated encapsulated embryos. When salinity levels return to normal, isolation is terminated and the inflow of seawater results in re-oxygenation. In this study we show that when re-oxygenation of the pallial cavity takes place, oxidative damage, in the form of increased levels of lipid peroxides and protein carbonyls, occurs in both maternal tissues and in incubated embryos. To avoid terminal oxidative damage both females and their embryos increase their levels of the glyoxalase pathway enzymes (GLX-I and GLX-II) and general antioxidant metabolism (SOD, CAT, GR, GPOX and GST). As a result the levels of oxidative damage decline to basal levels within 24 h of reoxygenation. Thus the combination of isolation, a behavioural strategy, combined with encapsulation of embryos and a capacity to up regulate relatively rapidly the glyoxylase pathway and general antioxidant metabolism, play major roles in facilitating the survival of C. dilatata in the small estuaries of Southern Chile. PMID:27232979

  11. Adequation of mini satellites to oceanic altimetry missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellaieche, G.; Aguttes, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    Association of the mini satellite concept and oceanic altimetry missions is discussed. Mission definition and most constraining requirements (mesoscale for example) demonstrate mini satellites to be quite adequate for such missions. Progress in altimeter characteristics, orbit determination, and position reporting allow consideration of oceanic altimetry missions using low Earth orbit satellites. Satellite constellation, trace keeping and orbital period, and required payload characteristics are exposed. The mission requirements covering Sun synchronous orbit, service area, ground system, and launcher characteristics as well as constellation maintenance strategy are specified. Two options for the satellite, orbital mechanics, propulsion, onboard power and stabilizing subsystems, onboard management, satellite ground linkings, mechanical and thermal subsystems, budgets, and planning are discussed.

  12. Quantifying dose to the reconstructed breast: Can we adequately treat?

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Eugene; Marsh, Robin B.; Griffith, Kent A.; Moran, Jean M.; Pierce, Lori J.

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate how immediate reconstruction (IR) impacts postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) dose distributions to the reconstructed breast (RB), internal mammary nodes (IMN), heart, and lungs using quantifiable dosimetric end points. 3D conformal plans were developed for 20 IR patients, 10 autologous reconstruction (AR), and 10 expander-implant (EI) reconstruction. For each reconstruction type, 5 right- and 5 left-sided reconstructions were selected. Two plans were created for each patient, 1 with RB coverage alone and 1 with RB + IMN coverage. Left-sided EI plans without IMN coverage had higher heart Dmean than left-sided AR plans (2.97 and 0.84 Gy, p = 0.03). Otherwise, results did not vary by reconstruction type and all remaining metrics were evaluated using a combined AR and EI dataset. RB coverage was adequate regardless of laterality or IMN coverage (Dmean 50.61 Gy, D95 45.76 Gy). When included, IMN Dmean and D95 were 49.57 and 40.96 Gy, respectively. Mean heart doses increased with left-sided treatment plans and IMN inclusion. Right-sided treatment plans and IMN inclusion increased mean lung V{sub 20}. Using standard field arrangements and 3D planning, we observed excellent coverage of the RB and IMN, regardless of laterality or reconstruction type. Our results demonstrate that adequate doses can be delivered to the RB with or without IMN coverage.

  13. Purchasing a cycle helmet: are retailers providing adequate advice?

    PubMed Central

    Plumridge, E.; McCool, J.; Chetwynd, J.; Langley, J. D.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to examine the selling of cycle helmets in retail stores with particular reference to the adequacy of advice offered about the fit and securing of helmets. METHODS: All 55 retail outlets selling cycle helmets in Christchurch, New Zealand were studied by participant observation. A research entered each store as a prospective customer and requested assistance to purchase a helmet. She took detailed field notes of the ensuing encounter and these were subsequently transcribed, coded, and analysed. RESULTS: Adequate advice for helmet purchase was given in less than half of the stores. In general the sales assistants in specialist cycle shops were better informed and gave more adequate advice than those in department stores. Those who have good advice also tended to be more good advice also tended to be more active in helping with fitting the helmet. Knowledge about safety standards was apparent in one third of sales assistants. Few stores displayed information for customers about the correct fit of cycle helmets. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that the advice and assistance being given to ensure that cycle helmets fit properly is often inadequate and thus the helmets may fail to fulfil their purpose in preventing injury. Consultation between retailers and policy makers is a necessary first step to improving this situation. PMID:9346053

  14. Adequate drainage system design for heap leaching structures.

    PubMed

    Majdi, Abbas; Amini, Mehdi; Nasab, Saeed Karimi

    2007-08-17

    The paper describes an optimum design of a drainage system for a heap leaching structure which has positive impacts on both mine environment and mine economics. In order to properly design a drainage system the causes of an increase in the acid level of the heap which in turn produces severe problems in the hydrometallurgy processes must be evaluated. One of the most significant negative impacts induced by an increase in the acid level within a heap structure is the increase of pore acid pressure which in turn increases the potential of a heap-slide that may endanger the mine environment. In this paper, initially the thickness of gravelly drainage layer is determined via existing empirical equations. Then by assuming that the calculated thickness is constant throughout the heap structure, an approach has been proposed to calculate the required internal diameter of the slotted polyethylene pipes which are used for auxiliary drainage purposes. In order to adequately design this diameter, the pipe's cross-sectional deformation due to stepped heap structure overburden pressure is taken into account. Finally, a design of an adequate drainage system for the heap structure 2 at Sarcheshmeh copper mine is presented and the results are compared with those calculated by exiting equations. PMID:17321044

  15. Oxygen in demand: How oxygen has shaped vertebrate physiology.

    PubMed

    Dzal, Yvonne A; Jenkin, Sarah E M; Lague, Sabine L; Reichert, Michelle N; York, Julia M; Pamenter, Matthew E

    2015-08-01

    In response to varying environmental and physiological challenges, vertebrates have evolved complex and often overlapping systems. These systems detect changes in environmental oxygen availability and respond by increasing oxygen supply to the tissues and/or by decreasing oxygen demand at the cellular level. This suite of responses is termed the oxygen transport cascade and is comprised of several components. These components include 1) chemosensory detectors that sense changes in oxygen, carbon dioxide, and pH in the blood, and initiate changes in 2) ventilation and 3) cardiac work, thereby altering the rate of oxygen delivery to, and carbon dioxide clearance from, the tissues. In addition, changes in 4) cellular and systemic metabolism alters tissue-level metabolic demand. Thus the need for oxygen can be managed locally when increasing oxygen supply is not sufficient or possible. Together, these mechanisms provide a spectrum of responses that facilitate the maintenance of systemic oxygen homeostasis in the face of environmental hypoxia or physiological oxygen depletion (i.e. due to exercise or disease). Bill Milsom has dedicated his career to the study of these responses across phylogenies, repeatedly demonstrating the power of applying the comparative approach to physiological questions. The focus of this review is to discuss the anatomy, signalling pathways, and mechanics of each step of the oxygen transport cascade from the perspective of a Milsomite. That is, by taking into account the developmental, physiological, and evolutionary components of questions related to oxygen transport. We also highlight examples of some of the remarkable species that have captured Bill's attention through their unique adaptations in multiple components of the oxygen transport cascade, which allow them to achieve astounding physiological feats. Bill's research examining the oxygen transport cascade has provided important insight and leadership to the study of the diverse suite

  16. Are PPS payments adequate? Issues for updating and assessing rates

    PubMed Central

    Sheingold, Steven H.; Richter, Elizabeth

    1992-01-01

    Declining operating margins under Medicare's prospective payment system (PPS) have focused attention on the adequacy of payment rates. The question of whether annual updates to the rates have been too low or cost increases too high has become important. In this article we discuss issues relevant to updating PPS rates and judging their adequacy. We describe a modification to the current framework for recommending annual update factors. This framework is then used to retrospectively assess PPS payment and cost growth since 1985. The preliminary results suggest that current rates are more than adequate to support the cost of efficient care. Also discussed are why using financial margins to evaluate rates is problematic and alternative methods that might be employed. PMID:10127450

  17. Effect of Feeding On The Carbon and Oxygen Isotopic Composition In The Tissues and Skeleton of The Zooxanthellate Coral Stylophora Pistillata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynaud-Vaganay, S.; Ferrier-Pagès, C.; Sambrotto, R.; Juillet-Leclerc, A.; Jaubert, J.

    and J.-P. Gattuso4 1Centre Scientifique de Monaco, Avenue Saint Martin, MC-98000, Principality of Monaco 2Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, 61 Rt. 9W/ P.O. Box 1000, Palisades, NY 10964 U.S.A 3Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement, Laboratoire mixte CNRS- CEA, F-91180 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex, France 4Observatoire Océanologique, Laboratoire d'Océanographie, CNRS-UPMC, BP 28, F- 06234 Villefranche-sur-mer Cedex, France The effect of feeding on the carbon isotopic composition of zooxanthellae, animal tissue and skeleton was investigated in the scleractinian coral Stylophora pistillata. Two sets of corals were grown with filtered seawater under controlled conditions. One group of colonies was fed with Artemia nauplii and compared to a control group that was starved. Fed corals exhibited higher concentrations of chlorophyll protein calcification rates than starved colonies. The net photosynthetic rate was higher in starved than in fed corals, whereas dark respiration was not significantly different. The average ? C value of Artemia nauplii used for feeding was -12. ? C was 13 13 significantly heavier in zooxanthellae than in animal tissues, for both fed (-10.1vs. -11.7) and starved colonies (-10.9vs. -13.2). Isotopic data reflected the incorporation of Artemia carbon into the coral tissue in that the ? C was 13 significantly heavier in fed than in starved colonies (-11.7 to -13.2 respectively), although there was no difference in the ? C of the zooxanthellae fraction. Skeletal 13 ? C was similar in fed and starved colonies (mean = -4.6). Skeletal ? O 13 18 composition was, however, significantly different between the two treatments (-4.24 to -4.05 for fed and starved colonies respectively). These data are used to establish a conceptual model of the carbon flow between the various compartments of a symbiotic coral.

  18. How to choose the therapeutic goals to improve tissue perfusion in septic shock

    PubMed Central

    de Assuncao, Murillo Santucci Cesar; Corrêa, Thiago Domingos; Bravim, Bruno de Arruda; Silva, Eliézer

    2015-01-01

    The early recognition and treatment of severe sepsis and septic shock is the key to a successful outcome. The longer the delay in starting treatment, the worse the prognosis due to persistent tissue hypoperfusion and consequent development and worsening of organ dysfunction. One of the main mechanisms responsible for the development of cellular dysfunction is tissue hypoxia. The adjustments necessary for adequate tissue blood flow and therefore of oxygen supply to metabolic demand according to the assessment of the cardiac index and oxygen extraction rate should be performed during resuscitation period, especially in high complexity patients. New technologies, easily handled at the bedside, and new studies that directly assess the impact of macro-hemodynamic parameter optimization on microcirculation and in the clinical outcome of septic patients, are needed. PMID:26313438

  19. Adequate Systemic Perfusion Maintained by a CentriMag during Acute Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Favaloro, Roberto R.; Bertolotti, Alejandro; Diez, Mirta; Favaloro, Liliana; Gomez, Carmen; Peradejordi, Margarita; Trentadue, Julio; Hellman, Lorena; Arzani, Yanina; Otero, Pilar Varela

    2008-01-01

    Mechanical circulatory support during severe acute heart failure presents options for myocardial recovery or cardiac replacement. Short-term circulatory support with the newest generation of magnetically levitated centrifugal-flow pumps affords several potential advantages. Herein, we present our experience with such a pump—the CentriMag® (Levitronix LLC; Waltham, Mass) centrifugal-flow ventricular assist device—in 4 critically ill patients who were in cardiogenic shock. From November 2007 through March 2008, 3 patients were supported after cardiac surgery, and 1 after chronic heart failure worsened. Two patients were bridged to heart transplantation, and 2 died during support. Perfusion during support was evaluated in terms of serum lactic acid levels and oxygenation values. In all of the patients, the CentriMag's pump flow was adequate, and continuous mechanical ventilation support was provided. Lactic acid levels substantially improved with CentriMag support and were maintained at near-normal levels throughout. At the same time, arterial pH, PO2, and carbon dioxide levels remained within acceptable ranges. No thromboembolic events or mechanical failures occurred. Our experience indicates that short-term use of the CentriMag ventricular assist device during acute heart failure can restore and adequately support circulation until recovery or until the application of definitive therapy. PMID:18941648

  20. Intraoperative assessment of tissue oxygen saturation of the remnant stomach by near-infrared spectroscopy in two cases of pancreatectomy following gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Akabane, Shintaro; Ohira, Masahiro; Ishiyama, Kohei; Kobayashi, Tsuyoshi; Ide, Kentaro; Tahara, Hiroyuki; Kuroda, Shintaro; Tanimine, Naoki; Shimizu, Seiichi; Tanabe, Kazuaki; Ohdan, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Objective and quantitative intraoperative methods of bowel viability assessment could decrease the risk of postoperative ischemic complications in gastrointestinal surgery. Because the remnant stomach and the pancreas share an arterial blood supply, it is often unclear whether the remnant stomach can be safely preserved when performing pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) or distal pancreatectomy (DP) post gastrectomy. We herein report two cases in which the remnant stomach was safely preserved using near-infrared spectroscopy to assess the regional saturation of oxygen (rSO2) in the remnant stomach during operation. Presentation of case The first patient, a 68-year-old man, was diagnosed with cancer of the pancreatic head and underwent PD a year after proximal gastrectomy for gastric cancer. The remnant stomach was safely preserved by evaluation of the rSO2 before and after reconstruction of the arteries. The second patient, an 82-year-old woman with a history of distal gastrectomy for gastric cancer 40 years previously, was diagnosed with a main duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreatic body, requiring DP. As in the previous case, we could safely preserve the remnant stomach through assessing the intraoperative rSO2 of the remnant stomach. Discussion Through comparing changes in the rSO2 during surgery, near-infrared spectroscopy provides objective and quantitative assessments of intestinal viability to predict ischemic complications. Conclusion This method may be a viable option to evaluate the blood supply to the alimentary tract. PMID:27061481

  1. Sufficient oxygen can be transported to resting skeletal muscle via arterialization of the vein: theoretical considerations in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Tomiyasu; Koyama, Tomiyasu; Sasajima, Tadahiro

    2011-01-01

    The blood supply to the lower limbs is often interrupted in patients suffering from arteriosclerosis obliterans (AO). In this condition, it is necessary to establish an oxygen supply via an alternative route. In the present theoretical study on rats, the possibility that adequate oxygen could be supplied through the venous system has been considered using simple calculations. The study was undertaken in the light of a report of a successful surgical approach in which the capillary bed is bypassed [1].The total lengths of the collecting venules and of the arcade venules per mm3 are reported to be 2.32 and 2.11 mm, respectively [2]. If these vessels were stretched out and connected to form a single, narrow venular tube, the total density would be 4.43 mm/mm(3). From the reciprocal of this value, the tissue cylinder surrounding the venule would have a radius of 268 µm. Taking an oxygen consumption rate for resting skeletal muscle of 0.16 ml/100g/min, and pO2 value of 40 mmHg, the one-dimensional diffusion equation gives a maximal diffusion distance of 328 µm. This is larger than the radius of the tissue cylinder surrounding the venular tube. A calculation for Krogh's tissue cylinder gives an oxygen partial pressure gradient of 54 mmHg between the inflow and the outflow terminals. These calculations suggest the oxygen content of the venous blood is adequate to supply sufficient oxygen to resting skeletal muscle. This is consistent with the successful outcome in patients with direct A-V anastomoses and implies that the capillary network is not essential for oxygen transport to resting skeletal muscle. PMID:21445806

  2. Oxygen Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 85-95% pure oxygen. The concentrator runs on electricity or a battery. A concentrator for home usually ... systems deliver 100% oxygen, and do not require electricity. A small canister can be filled from the ...

  3. Oxygen analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Benner, William H.

    1986-01-01

    An oxygen analyzer which identifies and classifies microgram quantities of oxygen in ambient particulate matter and for quantitating organic oxygen in solvent extracts of ambient particulate matter. A sample is pyrolyzed in oxygen-free nitrogen gas (N.sub.2), and the resulting oxygen quantitatively converted to carbon monoxide (CO) by contact with hot granular carbon (C). Two analysis modes are made possible: (1) rapid determination of total pyrolyzable oxygen obtained by decomposing the sample at 1135.degree. C., or (2) temperature-programmed oxygen thermal analysis obtained by heating the sample from room temperature to 1135.degree. C. as a function of time. The analyzer basically comprises a pyrolysis tube containing a bed of granular carbon under N.sub.2, ovens used to heat the carbon and/or decompose the sample, and a non-dispersive infrared CO detector coupled to a mini-computer to quantitate oxygen in the decomposition products and control oven heating.

  4. Dose Limits for Man do not Adequately Protect the Ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Higley, Kathryn A.; Alexakhin, Rudolf M.; McDonald, Joseph C.

    2004-08-01

    It has been known for quite some time that different organisms display differing degrees of sensitivity to the effects of ionizing radiations. Some microorganisms such as the bacterium Micrococcus radiodurans, along with many species of invertebrates, are extremely radio-resistant. Humans might be categorized as being relatively sensitive to radiation, and are a bit more resistant than some pine trees. Therefore, it could be argued that maintaining the dose limits necessary to protect humans will also result in the protection of most other species of flora and fauna. This concept is usually referred to as the anthropocentric approach. In other words, if man is protected then the environment is also adequately protected. The ecocentric approach might be stated as; the health of humans is effectively protected only when the environment is not unduly exposed to radiation. The ICRP is working on new recommendations dealing with the protection of the environment, and this debate should help to highlight a number of relevant issues concerning that topic.

  5. ENSURING ADEQUATE SAFETY WHEN USING HYDROGEN AS A FUEL

    SciTech Connect

    Coutts, D

    2007-01-22

    Demonstration projects using hydrogen as a fuel are becoming very common. Often these projects rely on project-specific risk evaluations to support project safety decisions. This is necessary because regulations, codes, and standards (hereafter referred to as standards) are just being developed. This paper will review some of the approaches being used in these evolving standards, and techniques which demonstration projects can implement to bridge the gap between current requirements and stakeholder desires. Many of the evolving standards for hydrogen-fuel use performance-based language, which establishes minimum performance and safety objectives, as compared with prescriptive-based language that prescribes specific design solutions. This is being done for several reasons including: (1) concern that establishing specific design solutions too early will stifle invention, (2) sparse performance data necessary to support selection of design approaches, and (3) a risk-adverse public which is unwilling to accept losses that were incurred in developing previous prescriptive design standards. The evolving standards often contain words such as: ''The manufacturer shall implement the measures and provide the information necessary to minimize the risk of endangering a person's safety or health''. This typically implies that the manufacturer or project manager must produce and document an acceptable level of risk. If accomplished using comprehensive and systematic process the demonstration project risk assessment can ease the transition to widespread commercialization. An approach to adequately evaluate and document the safety risk will be presented.

  6. Adequate peritoneal dialysis: theoretical model and patient treatment.

    PubMed

    Tast, C

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between adequate PD with sufficient weekly Kt/V (2.0) and Creatinine clearance (CCR) (60l) and necessary daily dialysate volume. This recommended parameter was the result of a recent multi-centre study (CANUSA). For this there were 40 patients in our hospital examined and compared in 1996, who carried out PD for at least 8 weeks and up to 6 years. These goals (CANUSA) are easily attainable in the early treatment of many individuals with a low body surface area (BSA). With higher BSA or missing RRF (Residual Renal Function) the daily dose of dialysis must be adjusted. We found it difficult to obtain the recommended parameters and tried to find a solution to this problem. The simplest method is to increase the volume or exchange rate. The most expensive method is to change from CAPD to APD with the possibility of higher volume or exchange rates. Selection of therapy must take into consideration: 1. patient preference, 2. body mass, 3. peritoneal transport rates, 4. ability to perform therapy, 5. cost of therapy and 6. risk of peritonitis. With this information in mind, an individual prescription can be formulated and matched to the appropriate modality of PD. PMID:10392062

  7. DARHT - an `adequate` EIS: A NEPA case study

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, M.D.

    1997-08-01

    The Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) Facility Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) provides a case study that is interesting for many reasons. The EIS was prepared quickly, in the face of a lawsuit, for a project with unforeseen environmental impacts, for a facility that was deemed urgently essential to national security. Following judicial review the EIS was deemed to be {open_quotes}adequate.{close_quotes} DARHT is a facility now being built at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) as part of the Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear weapons stockpile stewardship program. DARHT will be used to evaluate the safety and reliability of nuclear weapons, evaluate conventional munitions and study high-velocity impact phenomena. DARHT will be equipped with two accelerator-driven, high-intensity X-ray machines to record images of materials driven by high explosives. DARHT will be used for a variety of hydrodynamic tests, and DOE plans to conduct some dynamic experiments using plutonium at DARHT as well.

  8. Cardiac catecholamines in rats fed copper deficient or copper adequate diets containing fructose or starch

    SciTech Connect

    Scholfield, D.J.; Fields, M.; Beal, T.; Lewis, C.G.; Behall, K.M. )

    1989-02-09

    The symptoms of copper (Cu) deficiency are known to be more severe when rats are fed a diet with fructose (F) as the principal carbohydrate. Mortality, in males, due to cardiac abnormalities usually occurs after five weeks of a 62% F, 0.6 ppm Cu deficient diet. These effects are not observed if cornstarch (CS) is the carbohydrate (CHO) source. Studies with F containing diets have shown increased catecholamine (C) turnover rates while diets deficient in Cu result in decreased norepinephrine (N) levels in tissues. Dopamine B-hydroxylase (EC 1.14.17.1) is a Cu dependent enzyme which catalyzes the conversion of dopamine (D) to N. An experiment was designed to investigate the effects of CHO and dietary Cu on levels of three C in cardiac tissue. Thirty-two male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were fed Cu deficient or adequate diets with 60% of calories from F or CS for 6 weeks. N, epinephrine (E) and D were measured by HPLC. Statistical analysis indicates that Cu deficiency tends to decrease N levels, while having the reverse effect on E. D did not appear to change. These findings indicate that Cu deficiency but not dietary CHO can affect the concentration of N and E in rat cardiac tissue.

  9. Highly roughened polycaprolactone surfaces using oxygen plasma-etching and in vitro mineralization for bone tissue regeneration: fabrication, characterization, and cellular activities.

    PubMed

    Kim, YongBok; Kim, GeunHyung

    2015-01-01

    Herein, poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) surfaces were treated to form various roughness values (R(a)=290-445 nm) and polar functional groups on the surfaces using a plasma-etching process, followed by immersion into simulated body fluid (SBF) for apatite formation. The surface morphology, chemical composition, and mean roughness of the plasma-etched PCL surfaces were measured, and various physical and morphological properties (water contact angles, protein absorption ability, and crystallite size of the apatite layer) of the in vitro mineralized PCL surfaces were evaluated. The roughened PCL surface P-3, which was treated with a sufficient plasma exposure time (4 h), achieved homogeneously distributed apatite formation after soaking in SBF for 7 days, as compared with other surfaces that were untreated or plasma-treated for 30 min or 2 h. Furthermore, to demonstrate their feasibility as a biomimetic surface, pre-osteoblast cells (MC3T3-E1) were cultured on the mineralized PCL surfaces, and cell viability, DAPI-phalloidin fluorescence assay, and alizarin red-staining of the P-3 surface were highly improved compared to the P-1 surface treated with a 30-min plasma exposure time; compared to untreated mineralized PCL surface (N-P), P-3 showed even greater improvements in cell viability and DAPI-phalloidin fluorescence assay. Based on these results, we found that the mineralized PCL surface supplemented with the appropriate plasma treatment can be implicitly helpful to achieve rapid hard tissue regeneration. PMID:25486326

  10. On Adequate Comparisons of Antenna Phase Center Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoen, S.; Kersten, T.

    2013-12-01

    One important part for ensuring the high quality of the International GNSS Service's (IGS) products is the collection and publication of receiver - and satellite antenna phase center variations (PCV). The PCV are crucial for global and regional networks, since they introduce a global scale factor of up to 16ppb or changes in the height component with an amount of up to 10cm, respectively. Furthermore, antenna phase center variations are also important for precise orbit determination, navigation and positioning of mobile platforms, like e.g. the GOCE and GRACE gravity missions, or for the accurate Precise Point Positioning (PPP) processing. Using the EUREF Permanent Network (EPN), Baire et al. (2012) showed that individual PCV values have a significant impact on the geodetic positioning. The statements are further supported by studies of Steigenberger et al. (2013) where the impact of PCV for local-ties are analysed. Currently, there are five calibration institutions including the Institut für Erdmessung (IfE) contributing to the IGS PCV file. Different approaches like field calibrations and anechoic chamber measurements are in use. Additionally, the computation and parameterization of the PCV are completely different within the methods. Therefore, every new approach has to pass a benchmark test in order to ensure that variations of PCV values of an identical antenna obtained from different methods are as consistent as possible. Since the number of approaches to obtain these PCV values rises with the number of calibration institutions, there is the necessity for an adequate comparison concept, taking into account not only the numerical values but also stochastic information and computational issues of the determined PCVs. This is of special importance, since the majority of calibrated receiver antennas published by the IGS origin from absolute field calibrations based on the Hannover Concept, Wübbena et al. (2000). In this contribution, a concept for the adequate

  11. Improving access to adequate pain management in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Scholten, Willem

    2015-06-01

    There is a global crisis in access to pain management in the world. WHO estimates that 4.65 billion people live in countries where medical opioid consumption is near to zero. For 2010, WHO considered a per capita consumption of 216.7 mg morphine equivalents adequate, while Taiwan had a per capita consumption of 0.05 mg morphine equivalents in 2007. In Asia, the use of opioids is sensitive because of the Opium Wars in the 19th century and for this reason, the focus of controlled substances policies has been on the prevention of diversion and dependence. However, an optimal public health outcome requires that also the beneficial aspects of these substances are acknowledged. Therefore, WHO recommends a policy based on the Principle of Balance: ensuring access for medical and scientific purposes while preventing diversion, harmful use and dependence. Furthermore, international law requires that countries ensure access to opioid analgesics for medical and scientific purposes. There is evidence that opioid analgesics for chronic pain are not associated with a major risk for developing dependence. Barriers for access can be classified in the categories of overly restrictive laws and regulations; insufficient medical training on pain management and problems related to assessment of medical needs; attitudes like an excessive fear for dependence or diversion; and economic and logistical problems. The GOPI project found many examples of such barriers in Asia. Access to opioid medicines in Taiwan can be improved by analysing the national situation and drafting a plan. The WHO policy guidelines Ensuring Balance in National Policies on Controlled Substances can be helpful for achieving this purpose, as well as international guidelines for pain treatment. PMID:26068436

  12. Estrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) regulates oxygen-dependent expression of voltage-gated potassium (K+) channels and tissue kallikrein during human trophoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yanmin; Kumar, Premlata; Mendelson, Carole R

    2013-06-01

    Estrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) serves a critical O2-dependent regulatory role in the differentiation of human cytotrophoblasts to syncytiotrophoblast. In this study, we investigated expression of genes encoding tissue kallikrein (KLK1) and voltage-gated K(+) channels (KV7) during differentiation of human trophoblasts in culture and the roles of ERRγ and O2 tension in their regulation. Expression of KLK1 and the KV7 channel subunits, KCNQ1, KCNE1, KCNE3, and KCNE5, increased during differentiation of cultured human trophoblast cells in a 20% O2 environment. Notably, together with ERRγ, expression of KLK1, KCNQ1, KCNE1, KCNE3, and KCNE5 was markedly reduced when cells were cultured in a hypoxic environment (2% O2). Moreover, upon transduction of trophoblast cells with short hairpin RNAs for endogenous ERRγ, KLK1, KCNQ1, KCNE1, and KCNE3 expression was significantly decreased. Promoter and site-directed mutagenesis studies in transfected cells identified putative ERRγ response elements within the KLK1 and KCNE1 5'-flanking regions required for ERRγ-stimulated transcriptional activity. Binding of endogenous ERRγ to these ERRγ response elements increased during trophoblast differentiation in culture and was inhibited by hypoxia. The KV7 blocker linopirdine reduced human chorionic gonadotropin secretion and aggregation of cultured human trophoblasts, suggesting a possible role of KV7 channels in cell fusion and differentiation. Illumina gene expression arrays of cultured human trophoblast cells revealed several genes upregulated during syncytiotrophoblast differentiation and downregulated upon ERRγ knockdown involved in cell differentiation, adhesion, and synthesis of steroid and peptide hormones required for placental development and function. Collectively, these findings suggest that ERRγ mediates O2-dependent expression of genes involved in human trophoblast differentiation, function, and vascular homeostasis. PMID:23584901

  13. Estrogen-Related Receptor γ (ERRγ) Regulates Oxygen-Dependent Expression of Voltage-gated Potassium (K+) Channels and Tissue Kallikrein during Human Trophoblast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yanmin; Kumar, Premlata

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) serves a critical O2-dependent regulatory role in the differentiation of human cytotrophoblasts to syncytiotrophoblast. In this study, we investigated expression of genes encoding tissue kallikrein (KLK1) and voltage-gated K+ channels (KV7) during differentiation of human trophoblasts in culture and the roles of ERRγ and O2 tension in their regulation. Expression of KLK1 and the KV7 channel subunits, KCNQ1, KCNE1, KCNE3, and KCNE5, increased during differentiation of cultured human trophoblast cells in a 20% O2 environment. Notably, together with ERRγ, expression of KLK1, KCNQ1, KCNE1, KCNE3, and KCNE5 was markedly reduced when cells were cultured in a hypoxic environment (2% O2). Moreover, upon transduction of trophoblast cells with short hairpin RNAs for endogenous ERRγ, KLK1, KCNQ1, KCNE1, and KCNE3 expression was significantly decreased. Promoter and site-directed mutagenesis studies in transfected cells identified putative ERRγ response elements within the KLK1 and KCNE1 5′-flanking regions required for ERRγ-stimulated transcriptional activity. Binding of endogenous ERRγ to these ERRγ response elements increased during trophoblast differentiation in culture and was inhibited by hypoxia. The KV7 blocker linopirdine reduced human chorionic gonadotropin secretion and aggregation of cultured human trophoblasts, suggesting a possible role of KV7 channels in cell fusion and differentiation. Illumina gene expression arrays of cultured human trophoblast cells revealed several genes upregulated during syncytiotrophoblast differentiation and downregulated upon ERRγ knockdown involved in cell differentiation, adhesion, and synthesis of steroid and peptide hormones required for placental development and function. Collectively, these findings suggest that ERRγ mediates O2-dependent expression of genes involved in human trophoblast differentiation, function, and vascular homeostasis. PMID:23584901

  14. Oxygen analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Benner, W.H.

    1984-05-08

    An oxygen analyzer which identifies and classifies microgram quantities of oxygen in ambient particulate matter and for quantitating organic oxygen in solvent extracts of ambient particulate matter. A sample is pyrolyzed in oxygen-free nitrogen gas (N/sub 2/), and the resulting oxygen quantitatively converted to carbon monoxide (CO) by contact with hot granular carbon (C). Two analysis modes are made possible: (1) rapid determination of total pyrolyzable obtained by decomposing the sample at 1135/sup 0/C, or (2) temperature-programmed oxygen thermal analysis obtained by heating the sample from room temperature to 1135/sup 0/C as a function of time. The analyzer basically comprises a pyrolysis tube containing a bed of granular carbon under N/sub 2/, ovens used to heat the carbon and/or decompose the sample, and a non-dispersive infrared CO detector coupled to a mini-computer to quantitate oxygen in the decomposition products and control oven heating.

  15. Adipose tissue fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Buechler, Christa; Krautbauer, Sabrina; Eisinger, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of obesity causes a major interest in white adipose tissue biology. Adipose tissue cells are surrounded by extracellular matrix proteins whose composition and remodeling is of crucial importance for cell function. The expansion of adipose tissue in obesity is linked to an inappropriate supply with oxygen and hypoxia development. Subsequent activation of hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) inhibits preadipocyte differentiation and initiates adipose tissue fibrosis. Thereby adipose tissue growth is limited and excess triglycerides are stored in ectopic tissues. Stressed adipocytes and hypoxia contribute to immune cell immigration and activation which further aggravates adipose tissue fibrosis. There is substantial evidence that adipose tissue fibrosis is linked to metabolic dysfunction, both in rodent models and in the clinical setting. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma agonists and adiponectin both reduce adipose tissue fibrosis, inflammation and insulin resistance. Current knowledge suggests that antifibrotic drugs, increasing adipose tissue oxygen supply or HIF-1 antagonists will improve adipose tissue function and thereby ameliorate metabolic diseases. PMID:25987952

  16. Brain Maturity and Variation of Oxygen Extraction in Premature Infants.

    PubMed

    El-Dib, Mohamed; Aly, Safwat; Govindan, Rathinaswamy; Mohamed, Mohamed; du Plessis, Adre; Aly, Hany

    2016-07-01

    Objectives The ability of the premature brain to extract and use oxygen has not been studied adequately. This study aimed to determine factors that influence fractional tissue oxygen extraction (FTOE) of the brain in premature infants using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and pulse oximetry. Study Design We prospectively studied FTOE in very low birth weight (BW) infants (< 1,500 g and ≤ 34 weeks' gestation). Factors affecting FTOE and its variability were examined using bivariate and linear regression models. FTOE variability was measured on two scales: short scales (3-20 seconds) and long scales (20-150 seconds). Results We examined 147 simultaneous NIRS and pulse oximetry recordings that were collected from 72 premature infants (gestational age [GA] = 28 weeks and BW = 1,036 g). In regression models, average FTOE correlated negatively with hemoglobin (Hb) and increased significantly in patients with severe intraventricular hemorrhage/periventricular leukomalacia. Both FTOE short- and long-scale variabilities correlated negatively with GA and positively with postnatal age (PNA). Moreover, FTOE long-scale variability was significantly reduced in infants supported with invasive ventilation. Conclusions In premature infants, cerebral oxygen extraction increased with reduced Hb and severe brain injury. Variability in oxygen extraction showed differential changes with GA and PNAs and was affected by invasive ventilation. PMID:26906179

  17. Development of tissue bank.

    PubMed

    Narayan, R P

    2012-05-01

    The history of tissue banking is as old as the use of skin grafting for resurfacing of burn wounds. Beneficial effects of tissue grafts led to wide spread use of auto and allograft for management of varied clinical conditions like skin wounds, bone defects following trauma or tumor ablation. Availability of adequate amount of tissues at the time of requirement was the biggest challenge that forced clinicians to find out techniques to preserve the living tissue for prolonged period of time for later use and thus the foundation of tissue banking was started in early twentieth century. Harvesting, processing, storage and transportation of human tissues for clinical use is the major activity of tissue banks. Low temperature storage of processed tissue is the best preservation technique at present. Tissue banking organization is a very complex system and needs high technical expertise and skilled personnel for proper functioning in a dedicated facility. A small lapse/deviation from the established protocol leads to loss of precious tissues and or harm to recipients as well as the risk of transmission of deadly diseases and tumors. Strict tissue transplant acts and stringent regulations help to streamline the whole process of tissue banking safe for recipients and to community as whole. PMID:23162240

  18. Retinal oxygen extraction in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werkmeister, René M.; Schmidl, Doreen; Aschinger, Gerold; Doblhoff-Dier, Veronika; Palkovits, Stefan; Wirth, Magdalena; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Linsenmeier, Robert A.; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2015-10-01

    Adequate function of the retina is dependent on proper oxygen supply. In humans, the inner retina is oxygenated via the retinal circulation. We present a method to calculate total retinal oxygen extraction based on measurement of total retinal blood flow using dual-beam bidirectional Doppler optical coherence tomography and measurement of oxygen saturation by spectrophotometry. These measurements were done on 8 healthy subjects while breathing ambient room air and 100% oxygen. Total retinal blood flow was 44.3 ± 9.0 μl/min during baseline and decreased to 18.7 ± 4.2 μl/min during 100% oxygen breathing (P < 0.001) resulting in a pronounced decrease in retinal oxygen extraction from 2.33 ± 0.51 μl(O2)/min to 0.88 ± 0.14 μl(O2)/min during breathing of 100% oxygen. The method presented in this paper may have significant potential to study oxygen metabolism in hypoxic retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy.

  19. Retinal oxygen extraction in humans.

    PubMed

    Werkmeister, René M; Schmidl, Doreen; Aschinger, Gerold; Doblhoff-Dier, Veronika; Palkovits, Stefan; Wirth, Magdalena; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Linsenmeier, Robert A; Leitgeb, Rainer A; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2015-01-01

    Adequate function of the retina is dependent on proper oxygen supply. In humans, the inner retina is oxygenated via the retinal circulation. We present a method to calculate total retinal oxygen extraction based on measurement of total retinal blood flow using dual-beam bidirectional Doppler optical coherence tomography and measurement of oxygen saturation by spectrophotometry. These measurements were done on 8 healthy subjects while breathing ambient room air and 100% oxygen. Total retinal blood flow was 44.3 ± 9.0 μl/min during baseline and decreased to 18.7 ± 4.2 μl/min during 100% oxygen breathing (P < 0.001) resulting in a pronounced decrease in retinal oxygen extraction from 2.33 ± 0.51 μl(O2)/min to 0.88 ± 0.14 μl(O2)/min during breathing of 100% oxygen. The method presented in this paper may have significant potential to study oxygen metabolism in hypoxic retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy. PMID:26503332

  20. Retinal oxygen extraction in humans

    PubMed Central

    Werkmeister, René M.; Schmidl, Doreen; Aschinger, Gerold; Doblhoff-Dier, Veronika; Palkovits, Stefan; Wirth, Magdalena; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Linsenmeier, Robert A.; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2015-01-01

    Adequate function of the retina is dependent on proper oxygen supply. In humans, the inner retina is oxygenated via the retinal circulation. We present a method to calculate total retinal oxygen extraction based on measurement of total retinal blood flow using dual-beam bidirectional Doppler optical coherence tomography and measurement of oxygen saturation by spectrophotometry. These measurements were done on 8 healthy subjects while breathing ambient room air and 100% oxygen. Total retinal blood flow was 44.3 ± 9.0 μl/min during baseline and decreased to 18.7 ± 4.2 μl/min during 100% oxygen breathing (P < 0.001) resulting in a pronounced decrease in retinal oxygen extraction from 2.33 ± 0.51 μl(O2)/min to 0.88 ± 0.14 μl(O2)/min during breathing of 100% oxygen. The method presented in this paper may have significant potential to study oxygen metabolism in hypoxic retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy. PMID:26503332

  1. Activation of the ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas pathway reduces oxygen-glucose deprivation induced tissue swelling, ROS production, and cell death in mouse brain with angiotensin II overproduction

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jiaolin; Li, Guangze; Chen, Shuzhen; Chen, Ji; Buck, Joshua; Zhu, Yulan; Xia, Huijing; Lazartigues, Eric; Chen, Yanfang; Olson, James E.

    2014-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that mice which overexpress human renin and angiotensinogen (R+A+) show enhanced cerebral damage in both in vivo and in vitro experimental ischemia models. Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) counteracts the effects of angiotensin (Ang-II) by transforming it into Ang-(1-7), thus reducing the ligand for the AT1 receptor and increasing stimulation of the Mas receptor. Triple transgenic mice, SARA, which specifically overexpress ACE2 in neurons of R+A+ mice were used to study the role of ACE2 in ischemic stroke using oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) of brain slices as an in vitro model. We examined tissue swelling, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and cell death in cerebral cortex (CX) and the hippocampal CA1 region during OGD. Expression levels of NADPH oxidase isoforms, Nox2 and Nox4 were measured using western blots. Results show that SARA mice and R+A+ mice treated with the Mas receptor agonist Ang-(1-7) had less swelling, cell death, and ROS production in CX and CA1 areas compared to those in R+A+ animals. Treatment of slices from SARA mice with the Mas antagonist A779 eliminated this protection. Finally, western blots revealed less Nox2 and Nox4 expression in SARA mice compared with R+A+ mice both before and after OGD. We suggest that reduced brain swelling and cell death observed in SARA animals exposed to OGD results from diminished ROS production coupled with lower expression of NADPH oxidases. Thus, the ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas receptor pathway plays a protective role in brain ischemic damage by counteracting the detrimental effects of Ang-II-induced ROS production. PMID:24814023

  2. Activation of the ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas pathway reduces oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced tissue swelling, ROS production, and cell death in mouse brain with angiotensin II overproduction.

    PubMed

    Zheng, J; Li, G; Chen, S; Bihl, J; Buck, J; Zhu, Y; Xia, H; Lazartigues, E; Chen, Y; Olson, J E

    2014-07-25

    We previously demonstrated that mice which overexpress human renin and angiotensinogen (R+A+) show enhanced cerebral damage in both in vivo and in vitro experimental ischemia models. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) counteracts the effects of angiotensin (Ang-II) by transforming it into Ang-(1-7), thus reducing the ligand for the AT1 receptor and increasing stimulation of the Mas receptor. Triple transgenic mice, SARA, which specifically overexpress ACE2 in neurons of R+A+ mice were used to study the role of ACE2 in ischemic stroke using oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) of brain slices as an in vitro model. We examined tissue swelling, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and cell death in the cerebral cortex (CX) and the hippocampal CA1 region during OGD. Expression levels of NADPH oxidase (Nox) isoforms, Nox2 and Nox4 were measured using western blots. Results show that SARA mice and R+A+ mice treated with the Mas receptor agonist Ang-(1-7) had less swelling, cell death, and ROS production in CX and CA1 areas compared to those in R+A+ animals. Treatment of slices from SARA mice with the Mas antagonist A779 eliminated this protection. Finally, western blots revealed less Nox2 and Nox4 expression in SARA mice compared with R+A+ mice both before and after OGD. We suggest that reduced brain swelling and cell death observed in SARA animals exposed to OGD result from diminished ROS production coupled with lower expression of Nox isoforms. Thus, the ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas receptor pathway plays a protective role in brain ischemic damage by counteracting the detrimental effects of Ang-II-induced ROS production. PMID:24814023

  3. Angiogenesis in tissue engineering: from concept to the vascularization of scaffold construct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirah Ishak, Siti; Pangestu Djuansjah, J. R.; Kadir, M. R. Abdul; Sukmana, Irza

    2014-06-01

    Angiogenesis, the formation of micro-vascular network from the preexisting vascular vessels, has been studied in the connection to the normal developmental process as well as numerous diseases. In tissue engineering research, angiogenesis is also essential to promote micro-vascular network inside engineered tissue constructs, mimicking a functional blood vessel in vivo. Micro-vascular network can be used to maintain adequate tissue oxygenation, nutrient transfer and waste removal. One of the problems faced by angiogenesis researchers is to find suitable in vitro assays and methods for assessing the effect of regulators on angiogenesis and micro-vessel formation. The assay would be reliable and repeatable with easily quantifiable with physiologically relevant. This review aims to highlights recent advanced and future challenges in developing and using an in vitro angiogenesis assay for the application on biomedical and tissue engineering research.

  4. Modeling [15O] oxygen tracer data for estimating oxygen consumption

    PubMed Central

    Deussen, Andreas; Bassingthwaighte, James B.

    2010-01-01

    The most direct measure of oxidative tissue metabolism is the conversion rate of oxygen to water via mitochondrial respiration. To calculate oxygen consumption from the analysis of tissue residue curves or outflow dilution curves after injection of labeled oxygen one needs realistic mathematical models that account for convection, diffusion, and transformation in the tissue. A linear, three-region, axially distributed model accounts for intravascular convection, penetration of capillary and parenchymal cell barriers (with the use of appropriate binding spaces to account for oxygen binding to hemoglobin and myoglobin), the metabolism to [15O]water in parenchymal cells, and [15O]water transport into the venous effluent. Model solutions fit residue and outflow dilution data obtained in an isolated, red blood cell-perfused rabbit heart preparation and give estimates of the rate of oxygen consumption similar to those obtained experimentally from the flow times the arteriovenous differences in oxygen contents. The proposed application is for the assessment of regional oxidative metabolism in vivo from tissue 15O-residue curves obtained by positron emission tomography. PMID:8780210

  5. Appreciating Oxygen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Hilton M.

    2008-01-01

    Photosynthetic flora and microfauna utilize light from the sun to convert carbon dioxide and water into carbohydrates and oxygen. While these carbohydrates and their derivative hydrocarbons are generally considered to be fuels, it is the thermodynamically energetic oxygen molecule that traps, stores, and provides almost all of the energy that…

  6. Oxygen safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Watch out for splattering grease. It can catch fire. Keep children with oxygen away from the stove top and oven. Cooking ... under the bed. Keep liquids that may catch fire away from your oxygen. This includes cleaning products that contain oil, grease, ...

  7. Regional and systemic oxygen delivery/uptake relations and lactate flux in hyperdynamic, endotoxin-treated dogs.

    PubMed

    Curtis, S E; Cain, S M

    1992-02-01

    Pathologic oxygen supply dependency (PO2SD) may be etiologic in multisystem organ failure (MSOF) and has been related to mortality in sepsis. Although elevated lactate levels are generally assumed to be a marker of anaerobiosis in these patients, endotoxin may increase serum lactate by inactivation of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), unrelated to tissue PO2. We hypothesized that regional lactate flux may correlate poorly with local oxygen delivery in sepsis. This study examined both the whole-body (WB) and regional (isolated hind limb L and gut G) responses to endotoxin infusion in terms of oxygen delivery, oxygen uptake, and lactate flux in 12 pentobarbital-anesthetized dogs. To separate hypoxia-induced lactate production from that related to inactivation of PDH by endotoxin, half the dogs received dichloroacetate (DCA), a PDH activator. After endotoxin and volume resuscitation, each animal had low systemic vascular resistance with normal to high cardiac output. Despite adequate oxygen delivery to WB, L, and G, arterial lactate levels rose significantly. A 30-min hypoxic challenge (12% FIO2) did not increase lactate levels but did increase WB O2 uptake. DCA normalized lactate levels without influencing oxygen delivery and uptake relations. These data show that lactate levels in endotoxic states may be a poor marker of tissue hypoxia and may be more related to PDH activity. PMID:1736740

  8. The placental pursuit for an adequate oxidant balance between the mother and the fetus

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Emilio A.; Krause, Bernardo; Ebensperger, German; Reyes, Roberto V.; Casanello, Paola; Parra-Cordero, Mauro; Llanos, Anibal J.

    2014-01-01

    The placenta is the exchange organ that regulates metabolic processes between the mother and her developing fetus. The adequate function of this organ is clearly vital for a physiologic gestational process and a healthy baby as final outcome. The umbilico-placental vasculature has the capacity to respond to variations in the materno-fetal milieu. Depending on the intensity and the extensity of the insult, these responses may be immediate-, mediate-, and long-lasting, deriving in potential morphostructural and functional changes later in life. These adjustments usually compensate the initial insults, but occasionally may switch to long-lasting remodeling and dysfunctional processes, arising maladaptation. One of the most challenging conditions in modern perinatology is hypoxia and oxidative stress during development, both disorders occurring in high-altitude and in low-altitude placental insufficiency. Hypoxia and oxidative stress may induce endothelial dysfunction and thus, reduction in the perfusion of the placenta and restriction in the fetal growth and development. This Review will focus on placental responses to hypoxic conditions, usually related with high-altitude and placental insufficiency, deriving in oxidative stress and vascular disorders, altering fetal and maternal health. Although day-to-day clinical practice, basic and clinical research are clearly providing evidence of the severe impact of oxygen deficiency and oxidative stress establishment during pregnancy, further research on umbilical and placental vascular function under these conditions is badly needed to clarify the myriad of questions still unsettled. PMID:25009498

  9. Percentage of Adults with High Blood Pressure Whose Hypertension Is Adequately Controlled

    MedlinePlus

    ... is Adequately Controlled Percentage of Adults with High Blood Pressure Whose Hypertension is Adequately Controlled Heart disease ... Survey. Age Group Percentage of People with High Blood Pressure that is Controlled by Age Group f94q- ...

  10. Oxygen therapy and intraocular oxygenation.

    PubMed Central

    Jampol, L M

    1987-01-01

    When delivered to the corneal surface of rabbits or monkeys, 100% oxygen can significantly increase the pO2 in the aqueous humor. Under hyperbaric conditions (two atmospheres), an observed rise in the aqueous pO2 in rabbits breathing room air can be increased further by exposing the rabbit cornea to 100% oxygen. The high oxygen levels under hyperbaric conditions are mediated by intravascular and transcorneal delivery of oxygen. The increase in the pO2 levels in the aqueous can prevent sickling of intracameral human erythrocytes containing sickle hemoglobin. Thus, oxygen therapy transcorneally or systemically could potentially be used to treat a sickle cell hyphema. The exposure of rabbit eyes to 100% oxygen at the corneal surface is followed by autoregulation (constriction) of the iris vasculature. We could demonstrate no constriction in the eyes of two normal human volunteers or of four patients with chronic stable rubeosis iridis. Preretinal vitreous pO2 levels can be significantly raised by exposing monkeys to hyperbaric 100% oxygen. This procedure may be of value in treating acute, reversible ischemic inner retinal diseases. Transcorneal or vascular delivery of oxygen to the eye under normobaric or hyperbaric conditions may be effective in treating ischemic diseases of the anterior segment, such as anterior segment necrosis or rubeosis iridis, or ischemic inner retinal diseases. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 B FIGURE 5 C FIGURE 5 A FIGURE 6 PMID:3447339

  11. 21 CFR 514.117 - Adequate and well-controlled studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... production performance, or biased observation. One or more adequate and well-controlled studies are required... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Adequate and well-controlled studies. 514.117... Applications § 514.117 Adequate and well-controlled studies. (a) Purpose. The primary purpose of...

  12. 21 CFR 514.117 - Adequate and well-controlled studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... production performance, or biased observation. One or more adequate and well-controlled studies are required... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Adequate and well-controlled studies. 514.117... Applications § 514.117 Adequate and well-controlled studies. (a) Purpose. The primary purpose of...

  13. 21 CFR 514.117 - Adequate and well-controlled studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... production performance, or biased observation. One or more adequate and well-controlled studies are required... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Adequate and well-controlled studies. 514.117... Applications § 514.117 Adequate and well-controlled studies. (a) Purpose. The primary purpose of...

  14. 21 CFR 514.117 - Adequate and well-controlled studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... production performance, or biased observation. One or more adequate and well-controlled studies are required... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adequate and well-controlled studies. 514.117... Applications § 514.117 Adequate and well-controlled studies. (a) Purpose. The primary purpose of...

  15. 21 CFR 514.117 - Adequate and well-controlled studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... production performance, or biased observation. One or more adequate and well-controlled studies are required... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Adequate and well-controlled studies. 514.117... Applications § 514.117 Adequate and well-controlled studies. (a) Purpose. The primary purpose of...

  16. 21 CFR 801.5 - Medical devices; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical devices; adequate directions for use. 801... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.5 Medical devices; adequate directions for use. Adequate directions for use means directions under which the layman can use a device...

  17. 21 CFR 801.5 - Medical devices; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical devices; adequate directions for use. 801... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.5 Medical devices; adequate directions for use. Adequate directions for use means directions under which the layman can use a device...

  18. 21 CFR 801.5 - Medical devices; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical devices; adequate directions for use. 801... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.5 Medical devices; adequate directions for use. Adequate directions for use means directions under which the layman can use a device...

  19. 21 CFR 801.5 - Medical devices; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical devices; adequate directions for use. 801... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.5 Medical devices; adequate directions for use. Adequate directions for use means directions under which the layman can use a device...

  20. 21 CFR 801.5 - Medical devices; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medical devices; adequate directions for use. 801... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.5 Medical devices; adequate directions for use. Adequate directions for use means directions under which the layman can use a device...

  1. 76 FR 51041 - Hemoglobin Standards and Maintaining Adequate Iron Stores in Blood Donors; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Hemoglobin Standards and Maintaining Adequate Iron Stores in... Standards and Maintaining Adequate Iron Stores in Blood Donors.'' The purpose of this public workshop is to... donor safety and blood availability, and potential measures to maintain adequate iron stores in...

  2. 36 CFR 13.960 - Who determines when there is adequate snow cover?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... adequate snow cover? 13.960 Section 13.960 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE... Preserve Snowmachine (snowmobile) Operations § 13.960 Who determines when there is adequate snow cover? The superintendent will determine when snow cover is adequate for snowmachine use. The superintendent will follow...

  3. 36 CFR 13.960 - Who determines when there is adequate snow cover?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... adequate snow cover? 13.960 Section 13.960 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE... Preserve Snowmachine (snowmobile) Operations § 13.960 Who determines when there is adequate snow cover? The superintendent will determine when snow cover is adequate for snowmachine use. The superintendent will follow...

  4. 36 CFR 13.960 - Who determines when there is adequate snow cover?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... adequate snow cover? 13.960 Section 13.960 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE... Preserve Snowmachine (snowmobile) Operations § 13.960 Who determines when there is adequate snow cover? The superintendent will determine when snow cover is adequate for snowmachine use. The superintendent will follow...

  5. 36 CFR 13.960 - Who determines when there is adequate snow cover?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... adequate snow cover? 13.960 Section 13.960 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE... Preserve Snowmachine (snowmobile) Operations § 13.960 Who determines when there is adequate snow cover? The superintendent will determine when snow cover is adequate for snowmachine use. The superintendent will follow...

  6. 36 CFR 13.960 - Who determines when there is adequate snow cover?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... adequate snow cover? 13.960 Section 13.960 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE... Preserve Snowmachine (snowmobile) Operations § 13.960 Who determines when there is adequate snow cover? The superintendent will determine when snow cover is adequate for snowmachine use. The superintendent will follow...

  7. OXYGEN POISONING IN MAMMALS.

    PubMed

    Binger, C A; Faulkner, J M; Moore, R L

    1927-04-30

    1. Oxygen in concentrations of over 70 per cent of an atmosphere is poisonous to dogs, rabbits, guinea pigs and mice. 2. The poisonous effects manifest themselves in drowsiness, anorexia, loss of weight, increasing dyspnea, cyanosis and death from oxygen want. 3. The cause of oxygen want is a destructive lesion of the lungs. 4. The lesion may be characterized grossly as an hemorrhagic edema. Microscopically there is to be seen in varying degrees of intensity (a) capillary engorgement with hemorrhage, (b) the presence of interstitial and intraalveolar serum, (c) hypertrophy and desquamation of alveolar cells, (d) interstitial and alveolar infiltration of mononuclear cells. 5. The type of tissue reaction is not characteristic of an infectious process and no organisms have been recovered at autopsy from the heart's blood or from lung puncture. 6. The poisonous effects of inhalations of oxygen-rich mixtures do not appear to be related to impurities in the oxygen, nor are they related to faulty ventilation, excessive moisture or increased carbon dioxide in the atmosphere of the chambers in which the experimental animals were confined. PMID:19869294

  8. Renal oxygenation: preglomerular vasculature is an unlikely contributor to renal oxygen shunting.

    PubMed

    Olgac, Ufuk; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan

    2015-04-01

    The primary aim of this study was to assess the plausibility of preglomerular arterial-to-venous oxygen shunting in the kidney. To this end, we have developed a segment-wise three-dimensional computational model that takes into account transport processes in arteries, veins, cortical tissue, and capillaries. Our model suggests that the amount of preglomerular oxygen shunting is negligible. Consequently, it is improbable that preglomerular shunting contributes to the hypothesized regulation of renal oxygenation. Cortical tissue oxygenation is more likely determined by the interplay between oxygen supply, either from the preglomerular vasculature or from capillaries, and oxygen consumption. We show that reported differences in permeability to oxygen between perfused and unperfused tissue may be explained by what we refer to as advection-facilitated diffusion. We further show that the preglomerular vasculature is the primary source of oxygen for the tissue when cortical consumption is high or renal arterial blood is highly oxygenated, i.e., under hyperoxemic conditions. Conversely, when oxygen demand in the tissue is decreased, or under hypoxemic conditions, oxygen is supplied predominantly by capillaries. PMID:25503734

  9. The Role of Oxygen during Fracture Healing

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chuanyong; Saless, Neema; Wang, Xiaodong; Sinha, Arjun; Decker, Sebastian; Kazakia, Galateia; Hou, Huagang; Williams, Benjamin; Swartz, Harold M.; Hunt, Thomas K.; Miclau, Theodore; Marcucio, Ralph S.

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen affects the activity of multiple skeletogenic cells and is involved in many processes that are important for fracture healing. However, the role of oxygen in fracture healing has not been fully studied. Here we systematically examine the effects of oxygen tension on fracture healing and test the ability of hyperoxia to rescue healing defects in a mouse model of ischemic fracture healing. Mice with tibia fracture were housed in custom-built gas chambers and groups breathed a constant atmosphere of 13% oxygen (hypoxia), 21% oxygen (normoxia), or 50% oxygen (hyperoxia). The influx of inflammatory cells to the fracture site, stem cell differentiation, tissue vascularization, and fracture healing were analyzed. In addition, the efficacy of hyperoxia (50% breathing oxygen) as a treatment regimen for fracture nonunion was tested. Hypoxic animals had decreased tissue vascularity, decreased bone formation, and delayed callus remodeling. Hyperoxia increased tissue vascularization, altered fracture healing in un-complicated fractures, and improved bone repair in ischemia-induced delayed fracture union. However, neither hypoxia nor hyperoxia significantly altered chondrogenesis or osteogenesis during early stages of fracture healing, and infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils was not affected by environmental oxygen after bone injury. In conclusion, our results indicate that environmental oxygen levels affect tissue vascularization and fracture healing, and that providing oxygen to patients with fractures accompanied by ischemia may be beneficial. PMID:23063782

  10. Determination of the need for selenium by chicks fed practical diets adequate in vitamin E

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, G.F. Jr.; Su, Q.; Liu, C.H.; Sinisalo, M.; Combs, S.B.

    1986-03-01

    Experiments were conducted to compare the dietary needs for selenium (Se) by chicks fed either purified (amino acid-based) or practical (corn- and soy-based) diets that were adequate with respect to vitamin E (i.e., contained 100 IU/kg) and all other known nutrients with the single exception of Se (i.e., contained only 0.10 ppm Se). Studies were conducted in Ithaca using Single Comb White Leghorn chicks fed the purified basal diet and in Beijing using chicks of the same breed fed either the same purified basal diet or the practical diet formulated to be similar to that used in poultry production in some parts of China and the US. Results showed that each basal diet produced severe depletion of Se-dependent glutathione peroxidase (SeGSHpx) in plasma, liver and pancreas according to the same time-course, but that other consequences of severe uncomplicated Se deficiency were much more severe among chicks fed the purified diet (e.g., growth depression, pancreatic dysfunction as indicated by elevated plasma amylase and abnormal pancreatic histology). Chicks fed the practical Se-deficient diet showed reduced pancreas levels of copper, zinc and molybdenum and elevated plasma levels of iron; they required ca. 0.10 ppm dietary Se to sustain normal SeGSHpx in several tissues and to prevent elevated amylase in plasma. The dietary Se requirement of the chick is, therefore, estimated to be 0.10 ppm.

  11. Neovascularization in Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jennifer C.-Y.; Shum-Tim, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    A prerequisite for successful tissue engineering is adequate vascularization that would allow tissue engineering constructs to survive and grow. Angiogenic growth factors, alone and in combination, have been used to achieve this, and gene therapy has been used as a tool to enable sustained release of these angiogenic proteins. Cell-based therapy using endothelial cells and their precursors presents an alternative approach to tackling this challenge. These studies have occurred on a background of advancements in scaffold design and assays for assessing neovascularization. Finally, several studies have already attempted to translate research in neovascularization to clinical use in the blossoming field of therapeutic angiogenesis. PMID:24710553

  12. Biomimetic 3D tissue printing for soft tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Pati, Falguni; Ha, Dong-Heon; Jang, Jinah; Han, Hyun Ho; Rhie, Jong-Won; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2015-09-01

    Engineered adipose tissue constructs that are capable of reconstructing soft tissue with adequate volume would be worthwhile in plastic and reconstructive surgery. Tissue printing offers the possibility of fabricating anatomically relevant tissue constructs by delivering suitable matrix materials and living cells. Here, we devise a biomimetic approach for printing adipose tissue constructs employing decellularized adipose tissue (DAT) matrix bioink encapsulating human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hASCs). We designed and printed precisely-defined and flexible dome-shaped structures with engineered porosity using DAT bioink that facilitated high cell viability over 2 weeks and induced expression of standard adipogenic genes without any supplemented adipogenic factors. The printed DAT constructs expressed adipogenic genes more intensely than did non-printed DAT gel. To evaluate the efficacy of our printed tissue constructs for adipose tissue regeneration, we implanted them subcutaneously in mice. The constructs did not induce chronic inflammation or cytotoxicity postimplantation, but supported positive tissue infiltration, constructive tissue remodeling, and adipose tissue formation. This study demonstrates that direct printing of spatially on-demand customized tissue analogs is a promising approach to soft tissue regeneration. PMID:26056727

  13. Oxygen Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... therapy works, it helps to understand how your respiratory system works. This system is a group of organs and tissues that help you breathe. The respiratory system includes the airways and lungs. The airways carry ...

  14. Oxygen toxicity during artificial ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Brewis, R. A. L.

    1969-01-01

    Repeated pulmonary collapse and changes suggestive of a severe alveolar-capillary diffusion defect were observed over a period of 20 days in a patient who was receiving artificial ventilation because of status epilepticus. Profound cyanosis followed attempts to discontinue assisted ventilation. The Bird Mark 8 respirator employed was found to be delivering approximately 90% oxygen on the air-mix setting and pulmonary oxygen toxicity was suspected. Radiological improvement and progressive resolution of the alveolar-capillary block followed gradual reduction of the inspired concentration over nine days. The management and prevention of this complication are discussed. The inspired oxygen concentration should be routinely monitored in patients receiving intermittent positive pressure ventilation, and the concentration should not be higher than that required to maintain adequate oxygenation. The Bird Mark 8 respirator has an inherent tendency to develop high oxygen concentrations on the air-mix setting, and the machine should therefore be driven from a compressed air source unless high concentrations of oxygen are essential. Images PMID:4900444

  15. URIC ACID AND TISSUE REPAIR

    PubMed Central

    NERY, Rodrigo Araldi; KAHLOW, Barbara Stadler; SKARE, Thelma L; TABUSHI, Fernando Issamu; CASTRO, Adham do Amaral e

    2015-01-01

    Uric acid, a metabolic product of purines, may exert a role in tissue healing. In this review we will explore its role as an alarm initiating the inflammatory process that is necessary for tissue repair, as a scavenger of oxygen free radicals, as a mobilizer of progenitor endothelial cells and as supporter of adaptive immune system. PMID:26734804

  16. Functional Oxygen Sensitivity of Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Angelova, Plamena R.; Kasymov, Vitaliy; Christie, Isabel; Sheikhbahaei, Shahriar; Turovsky, Egor; Marina, Nephtali; Korsak, Alla; Zwicker, Jennifer; Teschemacher, Anja G.; Ackland, Gareth L.; Funk, Gregory D.; Kasparov, Sergey; Abramov, Andrey Y.

    2015-01-01

    In terrestrial mammals, the oxygen storage capacity of the CNS is limited, and neuronal function is rapidly impaired if oxygen supply is interrupted even for a short period of time. However, oxygen tension monitored by the peripheral (arterial) chemoreceptors is not sensitive to regional CNS differences in partial pressure of oxygen (PO2) that reflect variable levels of neuronal activity or local tissue hypoxia, pointing to the necessity of a functional brain oxygen sensor. This experimental animal (rats and mice) study shows that astrocytes, the most numerous brain glial cells, are sensitive to physiological changes in PO2. Astrocytes respond to decreases in PO2 a few millimeters of mercury below normal brain oxygenation with elevations in intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i). The hypoxia sensor of astrocytes resides in the mitochondria in which oxygen is consumed. Physiological decrease in PO2 inhibits astroglial mitochondrial respiration, leading to mitochondrial depolarization, production of free radicals, lipid peroxidation, activation of phospholipase C, IP3 receptors, and release of Ca2+ from the intracellular stores. Hypoxia-induced [Ca2+]i increases in astrocytes trigger fusion of vesicular compartments containing ATP. Blockade of astrocytic signaling by overexpression of ATP-degrading enzymes or targeted astrocyte-specific expression of tetanus toxin light chain (to interfere with vesicular release mechanisms) within the brainstem respiratory rhythm-generating circuits reveals the fundamental physiological role of astroglial oxygen sensitivity; in low-oxygen conditions (environmental hypoxia), this mechanism increases breathing activity even in the absence of peripheral chemoreceptor oxygen sensing. These results demonstrate that astrocytes are functionally specialized CNS oxygen sensors tuned for rapid detection of physiological changes in brain oxygenation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Most, if not all, animal cells possess mechanisms that allow them to detect

  17. Functional Oxygen Sensitivity of Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Angelova, Plamena R; Kasymov, Vitaliy; Christie, Isabel; Sheikhbahaei, Shahriar; Turovsky, Egor; Marina, Nephtali; Korsak, Alla; Zwicker, Jennifer; Teschemacher, Anja G; Ackland, Gareth L; Funk, Gregory D; Kasparov, Sergey; Abramov, Andrey Y; Gourine, Alexander V

    2015-07-22

    In terrestrial mammals, the oxygen storage capacity of the CNS is limited, and neuronal function is rapidly impaired if oxygen supply is interrupted even for a short period of time. However, oxygen tension monitored by the peripheral (arterial) chemoreceptors is not sensitive to regional CNS differences in partial pressure of oxygen (PO2 ) that reflect variable levels of neuronal activity or local tissue hypoxia, pointing to the necessity of a functional brain oxygen sensor. This experimental animal (rats and mice) study shows that astrocytes, the most numerous brain glial cells, are sensitive to physiological changes in PO2 . Astrocytes respond to decreases in PO2 a few millimeters of mercury below normal brain oxygenation with elevations in intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]i). The hypoxia sensor of astrocytes resides in the mitochondria in which oxygen is consumed. Physiological decrease in PO2 inhibits astroglial mitochondrial respiration, leading to mitochondrial depolarization, production of free radicals, lipid peroxidation, activation of phospholipase C, IP3 receptors, and release of Ca(2+) from the intracellular stores. Hypoxia-induced [Ca(2+)]i increases in astrocytes trigger fusion of vesicular compartments containing ATP. Blockade of astrocytic signaling by overexpression of ATP-degrading enzymes or targeted astrocyte-specific expression of tetanus toxin light chain (to interfere with vesicular release mechanisms) within the brainstem respiratory rhythm-generating circuits reveals the fundamental physiological role of astroglial oxygen sensitivity; in low-oxygen conditions (environmental hypoxia), this mechanism increases breathing activity even in the absence of peripheral chemoreceptor oxygen sensing. These results demonstrate that astrocytes are functionally specialized CNS oxygen sensors tuned for rapid detection of physiological changes in brain oxygenation. Significance statement: Most, if not all, animal cells possess mechanisms that allow them to

  18. Oxygen-Concentrating Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, K.

    1986-01-01

    High-purity oxygen produced from breathing air or from propellantgrade oxygen in oxygen-concentrating cell. Operating economics of concentrator attractive: Energy consumption about 4 Wh per liter of oxygen, slightly lower than conventional electrochemical oxygen extractors.

  19. Using oxygen at home

    MedlinePlus

    ... DO NOT use oil-based products, such as petroleum jelly (Vaseline). Ask your oxygen equipment provider about ... oxygen; Hypoxia - home oxygen; Hospice - home oxygen References American Thoracic Society. Why do I need oxygen therapy? ...

  20. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Promoting healing in difficult cases

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, G.H.

    1986-02-01

    Inhalation of pressurized 100% oxygen is a helpful adjunctive treatment for certain patients, because the increased oxygen carried by the blood to the tissue enhances new growth of microcirculation and, thus, healing. Patients with tissue breakdown after radiation therapy, refractory osteomyelitis, gas gangrene, soft-tissue infection with necrosis from mixed aerobic and anaerobic organisms, crush injuries resulting in acute ischemia, and compromised skin grafts or non-healing wounds are likely to benefit from hyperbaric oxygen therapy.

  1. Physiologic effects of transfusing red blood cells with high or low affinity for oxygen to passively hyperventilated, anemic baboons: systemic and cerebral oxygen extraction.

    PubMed Central

    Valeri, C R; Rorth, M; Zaroulis, C G; Jakubowski, M S; Vescera, S V

    1975-01-01

    Anemic, passively hyperventilated baboons were given preserved red blood cells either with increased or with slightly reduced affinity for oxygen to restore the red cell volume. In the high affinity group there was a 50% increase in cerebral blood flow immediately after the transfusion, but there was no significant change in the low affinity group. The cardiac output decreased slightly in the low affinity group, and increased slightly but insignificantly in the high affinity group. Two hours after transfusion the cerebral blood flow had returned to normal in the high affinity group. In both groups there was a decrease in arterial blood pH and an increase in Po2 in blood from the pulmonary artery and the jugular vein after transfusion. A 40% restoration of the 2,3 DPG level occurred within 4 hours of the transfusion of red cells with high affinity for oxygen, and this rapid increase was associated with increases in blood pH and inorganic phosphorus levels. Preserved red cells with high affinity for oxygen and low 2, 3 DPG levels significantly increased the cerebral circulation during the 2-hour posttransfusion period. These findings lend support to the recommendation that preserved red cells with normal or elevated 2,3 DPG levels be administered to patients in hemorrhagic or septic shock, and to patients subjected to extracorporeal circulation during cardiac surgery in order to lessen the demand for increased blood flow and to ensure adequate tissue oxygenation during the postoperative period. PMID:1119857

  2. 21 CFR 314.126 - Adequate and well-controlled studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...-evident (general anesthetics, drug metabolism). (3) The method of selection of subjects provides adequate... respect to pertinent variables such as age, sex, severity of disease, duration of disease, and use of... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Adequate and well-controlled studies....

  3. 40 CFR 152.20 - Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Exemptions for pesticides adequately... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION PROCEDURES Exemptions § 152.20 Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency. The...

  4. 40 CFR 152.20 - Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Exemptions for pesticides adequately... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION PROCEDURES Exemptions § 152.20 Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency. The...

  5. Calculation of the Cost of an Adequate Education in Kentucky: A Professional Judgment Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verstegen, Deborah A.

    2004-01-01

    What is an adequate education and how much does it cost? In 1989, Kentucky's State Supreme Court found the entire system of education unconstitutional--"all of its parts and parcels". The Court called for all children to have access to an adequate education, one that is uniform and has as its goal the development of seven capacities, including:…

  6. 9 CFR 2.33 - Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care. 2.33 Section 2.33 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Research Facilities § 2.33 Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care. (a)...

  7. 9 CFR 2.40 - Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care (dealers and exhibitors).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care (dealers and exhibitors). 2.40 Section 2.40 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Attending Veterinarian and Adequate Veterinary Care §...

  8. 75 FR 69648 - Safety Analysis Requirements for Defining Adequate Protection for the Public and the Workers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-15

    ... SAFETY BOARD Safety Analysis Requirements for Defining Adequate Protection for the Public and the Workers... TO THE SECRETARY OF ENERGY Safety Analysis Requirements for Defining Adequate Protection for the... safety analysis, or DSA, is to be prepared for every DOE nuclear facility. This DSA, once approved by...

  9. 42 CFR 417.568 - Adequate financial records, statistical data, and cost finding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Adequate financial records, statistical data, and....568 Adequate financial records, statistical data, and cost finding. (a) Maintenance of records. (1) An HMO or CMP must maintain sufficient financial records and statistical data for proper determination...

  10. 42 CFR 417.568 - Adequate financial records, statistical data, and cost finding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Adequate financial records, statistical data, and....568 Adequate financial records, statistical data, and cost finding. (a) Maintenance of records. (1) An HMO or CMP must maintain sufficient financial records and statistical data for proper determination...

  11. 42 CFR 417.568 - Adequate financial records, statistical data, and cost finding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Adequate financial records, statistical data, and....568 Adequate financial records, statistical data, and cost finding. (a) Maintenance of records. (1) An HMO or CMP must maintain sufficient financial records and statistical data for proper determination...

  12. Cerebral oxygenation and hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Bain, Anthony R.; Morrison, Shawnda A.; Ainslie, Philip N.

    2014-01-01

    Hyperthermia is associated with marked reductions in cerebral blood flow (CBF). Increased distribution of cardiac output to the periphery, increases in alveolar ventilation and resultant hypocapnia each contribute to the fall in CBF during passive hyperthermia; however, their relative contribution remains a point of contention, and probably depends on the experimental condition (e.g., posture and degree of hyperthermia). The hyperthermia-induced hyperventilatory response reduces arterial CO2 pressure (PaCO2) causing cerebral vasoconstriction and subsequent reductions in flow. During supine passive hyperthermia, the majority of recent data indicate that reductions in PaCO2 may be the primary, if not sole, culprit for reduced CBF. On the other hand, during more dynamic conditions (e.g., hemorrhage or orthostatic challenges), an inability to appropriately decrease peripheral vascular conductance presents a condition whereby adequate cerebral perfusion pressure may be compromised secondary to reductions in systemic blood pressure. Although studies have reported maintenance of pre-frontal cortex oxygenation (assessed by near-infrared spectroscopy) during exercise and severe heat stress, the influence of cutaneous blood flow is known to contaminate this measure. This review discusses the governing mechanisms associated with changes in CBF and oxygenation during moderate to severe (i.e., 1.0°C to 2.0°C increase in body core temperature) levels of hyperthermia. Future research directions are provided. PMID:24624095

  13. OXYGEN ABUNDANCES IN CEPHEIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Luck, R. E.; Andrievsky, S. M.; Korotin, S. N.; Kovtyukh, V. V. E-mail: serkor@skyline.od.ua E-mail: scan@deneb1.odessa.ua

    2013-07-01

    Oxygen abundances in later-type stars, and intermediate-mass stars in particular, are usually determined from the [O I] line at 630.0 nm, and to a lesser extent, from the O I triplet at 615.7 nm. The near-IR triplets at 777.4 nm and 844.6 nm are strong in these stars and generally do not suffer from severe blending with other species. However, these latter two triplets suffer from strong non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) effects and thus see limited use in abundance analyses. In this paper, we derive oxygen abundances in a large sample of Cepheids using the near-IR triplets from an NLTE analysis, and compare those abundances to values derived from a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) analysis of the [O I] 630.0 nm line and the O I 615.7 nm triplet as well as LTE abundances for the 777.4 nm triplet. All of these lines suffer from line strength problems making them sensitive to either measurement complications (weak lines) or to line saturation difficulties (strong lines). Upon this realization, the LTE results for the [O I] lines and the O I 615.7 nm triplet are in adequate agreement with the abundance from the NLTE analysis of the near-IR triplets.

  14. Bovine hemoglobin as the sole source of dietary iron does not support adequate iron status in copper-adequate or copper-deficient rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This experiment was designed to determine whether hemoglobin as the sole source of dietary iron (Fe) could sustain normal Fe status in growing rats. Because adequate copper (Cu) status is required for efficient Fe absorption in the rat, we also determined the effects of Cu deficiency on Fe status of...

  15. Oxygen supplies during a mass casualty situation.

    PubMed

    Ritz, Ray H; Previtera, Joseph E

    2008-02-01

    Mass casualty and pandemic events pose a substantial challenge to the resources available in our current health care system. The ability to provide adequate oxygen therapy is one of the systems that could be out-stripped in certain conditions. Natural disasters can disrupt manufacturing or delivery, and pandemic events can increase consumption beyond the available supply. Patients may require manual resuscitation, basic oxygen therapy, or positive-pressure ventilation during these scenarios. Available sources of oxygen include bulk liquid oxygen systems, compressed gas cylinders, portable liquid oxygen (LOX) systems, and oxygen concentrators. The last two are available in a variety of configurations, which include personal and home systems that are suitable for individual patients, and larger systems that can provide oxygen to multiple patients or entire institutions. Bulk oxygen systems are robust and are probably sustainable during periods of high consumption, but are at risk if manufacturing or delivery is disrupted. Compressed gas cylinders offer support during temporary periods of need but are not a solution for extended periods of therapy. Personal oxygen concentrators and LOX systems are limited in their application during mass casualty scenarios. Large-capacity oxygen concentrators and LOX systems may effectively provide support to alternative care sites or larger institutions. They may also be appropriate selections for governmental emergency-response scenarios. Careful consideration of the strengths and limitations of each of these options can reduce the impact of a mass casualty event. PMID:18218152

  16. Arterial blood oxygen saturation during blood pressure cuff-induced hypoperfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyriacou, P. A.; Shafqat, K.; Pal, S. K.

    2007-10-01

    Pulse oximetry has been one of the most significant technological advances in clinical monitoring in the last two decades. Pulse oximetry is a non-invasive photometric technique that provides information about the arterial blood oxygen saturation (SpO2) and heart rate, and has widespread clinical applications. When peripheral perfusion is poor, as in states of hypovolaemia, hypothermia and vasoconstriction, oxygenation readings become unreliable or cease. The problem arises because conventional pulse oximetry sensors must be attached to the most peripheral parts of the body, such as finger, ear or toe, where pulsatile flow is most easily compromised. Pulse oximeters estimate arterial oxygen saturation by shining light at two different wavelengths, red and infrared, through vascular tissue. In this method the ac pulsatile photoplethysmographic (PPG) signal associated with cardiac contraction is assumed to be attributable solely to the arterial blood component. The amplitudes of the red and infrared ac PPG signals are sensitive to changes in arterial oxygen saturation because of differences in the light absorption of oxygenated and deoxygenated haemoglobin at these two wavelengths. From the ratios of these amplitudes, and the corresponding dc photoplethysmographic components, arterial blood oxygen saturation (SpO2) is estimated. Hence, the technique of pulse oximetry relies on the presence of adequate peripheral arterial pulsations, which are detected as photoplethysmographic (PPG) signals. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of pressure cuff-induced hypoperfusion on photoplethysmographic signals and arterial blood oxygen saturation using a custom made finger blood oxygen saturation PPG/SpO2 sensor and a commercial finger pulse oximeter. Blood oxygen saturation values from the custom oxygen saturation sensor and a commercial finger oxygen saturation sensor were recorded from 14 healthy volunteers at various induced brachial pressures. Both pulse

  17. 45 CFR 1159.15 - Who has the responsibility for maintaining adequate technical, physical, and security safeguards...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... adequate technical, physical, and security safeguards to prevent unauthorized disclosure or destruction of... adequate technical, physical, and security safeguards to prevent unauthorized disclosure or destruction of... of maintaining adequate technical, physical, and security safeguards to prevent...

  18. Thermodynamic approach to oxygen delivery in vivo by natural and artificial oxygen carriers.

    PubMed

    Bucci, Enrico

    2009-06-01

    Oxygen is a toxic gas, still indispensable to aerobic life. This paper explores how normal physiology uses the physico-chemical and thermodynamic characteristics of oxygen for transforming a toxic gas into a non toxic indispensable metabolite. Plasma oxygen concentration is in the range of 10(-5) M, insufficient to sustain metabolism. Oxygen carriers, present in blood, release oxygen into plasma, thereby replacing consumed oxygen and buffering PO(2) near their P(50). They are the natural cell-bound carriers, like hemoglobin inside red cells, myoglobin inside myocytes, and artificial cell-free hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers (HBOC) dissolved in plasma. Metabolic oxygen replacement can be defined as cell-bound and cell-free delivery. Cell-bound delivery is retarded by the slow diffusion of oxygen in plasma and interstitial fluids. The 40% hematocrit of normal blood compensates for the delay, coping with the fast oxygen consumption by mitochondria. Facilitated oxygen diffusion by HBOCs corrects for the slow diffusion, making cell-free delivery relatively independent from P(50). At all oxygen affinities, HBOCs produce hyperoxygenations that are compensated by vasoconstrictions. There is a strict direct correlation between the rate of oxygen replacement and hemoglobin content of blood. The free energy loss of the gradient adds a relevant regulation of tissues oxygenation. Oxygen is retained intravascularly by the limited permeability to gases of vessel walls. PMID:19349106

  19. Inferential Processing among Adequate and Struggling Adolescent Comprehenders and Relations to Reading Comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Amy E.; Barnes, Marcia; Francis, David J.; Vaughn, Sharon; York, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Separate mixed model analyses of variance (ANOVA) were conducted to examine the effect of textual distance on the accuracy and speed of text consistency judgments among adequate and struggling comprehenders across grades 6–12 (n = 1203). Multiple regressions examined whether accuracy in text consistency judgments uniquely accounted for variance in comprehension. Results suggest that there is considerable growth across the middle and high school years, particularly for adequate comprehenders in those text integration processes that maintain local coherence. Accuracy in text consistency judgments accounted for significant unique variance for passage-level, but not sentence-level comprehension, particularly for adequate comprehenders. PMID:26166946

  20. Oxygen requirements of the earliest animals

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Daniel B.; Ward, Lewis M.; Jones, CarriAyne; Sweeten, Brittany; Forth, Michael; Treusch, Alexander H.; Canfield, Donald E.

    2014-01-01

    A rise in the oxygen content of the atmosphere and oceans is one of the most popular explanations for the relatively late and abrupt appearance of animal life on Earth. In this scenario, Earth’s surface environment failed to meet the high oxygen requirements of animals up until the middle to late Neoproterozoic Era (850–542 million years ago), when oxygen concentrations sufficiently rose to permit the existence of animal life for the first time. Although multiple lines of geochemical evidence support an oxygenation of the Ediacaran oceans (635–542 million years ago), roughly corresponding with the first appearance of metazoans in the fossil record, the oxygen requirements of basal animals remain unclear. Here we show that modern demosponges, serving as analogs for early animals, can survive under low-oxygen conditions of 0.5–4.0% present atmospheric levels. Because the last common ancestor of metazoans likely exhibited a physiology and morphology similar to that of a modern sponge, its oxygen demands may have been met well before the enhanced oxygenation of the Ediacaran Period. Therefore, the origin of animals may not have been triggered by a contemporaneous rise in the oxygen content of the atmosphere and oceans. Instead, other ecological and developmental processes are needed to adequately explain the origin and earliest evolution of animal life on Earth. PMID:24550467

  1. Inner retinal metabolic rate of oxygen by oxygen tension and blood flow imaging in rat

    PubMed Central

    Wanek, Justin; Teng, Pang-yu; Albers, John; Blair, Norman P.; Shahidi, Mahnaz

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The metabolic function of inner retinal cells relies on the availability of nutrients and oxygen that are supplied by the retinal circulation. Assessment of retinal tissue vitality and function requires knowledge of both the rate of oxygen delivery and consumption. The purpose of the current study is to report a novel technique for assessment of the inner retinal metabolic rate of oxygen (MO2) by combined measurements of retinal blood flow and vascular oxygen tension (PO2) in rat. The application of this technology has the potential to broaden knowledge of retinal oxygen dynamics and advance understanding of disease pathophysiology. PMID:21991548

  2. Nasal high flow oxygen therapy in patients with COPD reduces respiratory rate and tissue carbon dioxide while increasing tidal and end-expiratory lung volumes: a randomised crossover trial

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, John F; Spooner, Amy J; Dunster, Kimble R; Anstey, Chris M; Corley, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patients with COPD using long-term oxygen therapy (LTOT) over 15 h per day have improved outcomes. As inhalation of dry cold gas is detrimental to mucociliary clearance, humidified nasal high flow (NHF) oxygen may reduce frequency of exacerbations, while improving lung function and quality of life in this cohort. In this randomised crossover study, we assessed short-term physiological responses to NHF therapy in 30 males chronically treated with LTOT. LTOT (2–4 L/min) through nasal cannula was compared with NHF at 30 L/min from an AIRVO through an Optiflow nasal interface with entrained supplemental oxygen. Comparing NHF with LTOT: transcutaneous carbon dioxide (TcCO2) (43.3 vs 46.7 mm Hg, p<0.001), transcutaneous oxygen (TcO2) (97.1 vs 101.2 mm Hg, p=0.01), I:E ratio (0.75 vs 0.86, p=0.02) and respiratory rate (RR) (15.4 vs 19.2 bpm, p<0.001) were lower; and tidal volume (Vt) (0.50 vs 0.40, p=0.003) and end-expiratory lung volume (EELV) (174% vs 113%, p<0.001) were higher. EELV is expressed as relative change from baseline (%Δ). Subjective dyspnoea and interface comfort favoured LTOT. NHF decreased TcCO2, I:E ratio and RR, with a concurrent increase in EELV and Vt compared with LTOT. This demonstrates a potential mechanistic rationale behind the improved outcomes observed in long-term treatment with NHF in oxygen-dependent patients. Trial registration number ACTRN12613000028707. PMID:27015801

  3. Improved cannulation method for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Read, R; St Cyr, J; Tornabene, S; Whitman, G

    1990-10-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation has been shown to be useful for patients in reversible cardiogenic shock. Effective arterial cannulation techniques for infants have been developed that are simple to use and require minimal subsequent vascular repair or reconstruction after removal. Groin cannulation in adults frequently requires bidirectional arterial cannulation to ensure adequate distal perfusion as well as frequent complex arterial repairs after discontinuation. We describe a simple arterial cannulation technique using a single right-angle, high-flow arterial cannula. With this technique adequate bidirectional arterial perfusion is maintained with a single arterial cannula while the need for vascular repairs or reconstruction is minimized. PMID:2222065

  4. Animal Models for Adipose Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Uthamanthil, Rajesh; Beahm, Elisabeth; Frye, Cindy

    2008-01-01

    Abstract There is a critical need for adequate reconstruction of soft tissue defects resulting from tumor resection, trauma, and congenital abnormalities. To be sure, adipose tissue engineering strategies offer promising solutions. However, before clinical translation can occur, efficacy must be proven in animal studies. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of animal models currently employed for adipose tissue engineering. PMID:18544014

  5. Engineering of implantable liver tissues.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Yasuyuki; Nishikawa, M; Evenou, F; Hamon, M; Huang, H; Montagne, K P; Kojima, N; Fujii, T; Niino, T

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter, from the engineering point of view, we introduce the results from our group and related research on three typical configurations of engineered liver tissues; cell sheet-based tissues, sheet-like macroporous scaffold-based tissues, and tissues based on special scaffolds that comprise a flow channel network. The former two do not necessitate in vitro prevascularization and are thus promising in actual human clinical trials for liver diseases that can be recovered by relatively smaller tissue mass. The third approach can implant a much larger mass but is still not yet feasible. In all cases, oxygen supply is the key engineering factor. For the first configuration, direct oxygen supply using an oxygen-permeable polydimethylsiloxane membrane enables various liver cells to exhibit distinct behaviors, complete double layers of mature hepatocytes and fibroblasts, spontaneous thick tissue formation of hepatocarcinoma cells and fetal hepatocytes. Actual oxygen concentration at the cell level can be strictly controlled in this culture system. Using this property, we found that initially low then subsequently high oxygen concentrations were favorable to growth and maturation of fetal cells. For the second configuration, combination of poly-L: -lactic acid 3D scaffolds and appropriate growth factor cocktails provides a suitable microenvironment for the maturation of cells in vitro but the cell growth is limited to a certain distance from the inner surfaces of the macropores. However, implantation to the mesentery leaves of animals allows the cells again to proliferate and pack the remaining spaces of the macroporous structure, suggesting the high feasibility of 3D culture of hepatocyte progenitors for liver tissue-based therapies. For the third configuration, we proposed a design criterion concerning the dimensions of flow channels based on oxygen diffusion and consumption around the channel. Due to the current limitation in the resolution of 3D

  6. Technical basis for flawed cylinder test specification to assure adequate fracture resistance of ISO high-strength steel cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Rana, M.D.; Smith, J.H.; Tribolet, R.O.

    1997-11-01

    High-pressure industrial gases (such as oxygen, nitrogen, argon, hydrogen, etc.) are stored and transported in portable cylinders. ISO TC58 SC3 has developed a draft specification 9809 for design and fabrication of high-pressure cylinders with maximum tensile strength limitation of 1,100 N/mm{sup 2}. In order to extend the ISO 9809 rules for higher than 1,100 N/mm{sup 2} strength level cylinders, a working group WG14 was formed in 1989 to develop new rules to assure adequate fracture resistance. In 1994, WG14 recommended a simple, but unique flawed cylinder test method for design qualification of the cylinder and acceptance criteria to assure adequate fracture resistance. WG14 also recommended Charpy-V-notch impact tests to control the required fracture resistance on production cylinders. This paper presents the technical basis that was employed in developing the flawed cylinder test method and acceptance criteria. The specification was developed for seamless steel cylinders having actual strength in the range of 1,100 to 1,400 N/mm{sup 2} and cylindrical section wall thickness in the range of 3 to 10 mm. Flawed cylinder tests were conducted on several hundred cylinders of varying sizes and strength levels. The specification requires to demonstrate LEAK-BEFORE-BREAK performance of the cylinder having flaw length equal to 1.6 (o.d. {times} t{sub design}){sup 0.5} at failure pressure = (t{sub design}/t{sub actual}) x Design Pressure.

  7. Inspired oxygen concentrations with or without an oxygen economizer during ether draw-over anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Khaing, T T; Yu, S; Brock-Utne, J G

    1997-08-01

    An oxygen economizer tube is attached to draw-over vaporizers and acts as a reservoir of supplemental oxygen. The clinical importance of the presence or absence of the economizer tube (volume 130 ml) has not been adequately studied in manually ventilated patients using ether from an Ohmeda Cyprane Portable Anesthesia Complete (PAC) draw-over vaporizer. A total of sixteen patients ASA 1-2, undergoing elective surgery for peripheral orthopaedic procedures were studied with and without an economizer tube. Each patient acted as his or her own control. Standard procedures were used for anaesthetic induction with muscle relaxant, endotracheal intubation and anaesthetic maintenance. Supplemental oxygen was supplied by an oxygen concentrator. Using the draw-over vaporizer without an oxygen economizer tube, there was a slight increase in FiO2 of 20%, 23%, 27%, 30%, 33% and 33%, with increasing oxygen supplementation of 0 to 5 l/min, respectively. With an economizer tube, the FiO2 values increased to 20%, 26%, 35%, 46%, 54% and 66% at 0 to 5 l/min of oxygen respectively. The FiO2 values were significantly different at 3, 4, and 5 l/min (P < 0.05), showing the potential advantages of an oxygen economizer tube attached to a draw-over vaporizer in this setting. No significant differences were seen in the oxygen saturations of these healthy patients with or without an oxygen economizer. PMID:9288387

  8. Oxygenation of intensive cell-culture system.

    PubMed

    Emery, A N; Jan, D C; al-Rubeai, M

    1995-11-01

    The abilities of various methods of oxygenation to meet the demands of high-cell-density culture were investigated using a spin filter perfusion system in a bench-top bioreactor. Oxygen demand at high cell density could not be met by sparging with air inside a spin filter (oxygen transfer values in this condition were comparable with those for surface aeration). Sparging with air outside a spin filter gave adequate oxygen transfer for the support of cell concentrations above 10(7) ml-1 in fully aerobic conditions but the addition of antifoam to control foaming caused blockage of the spinfilter mesh. Bubble-free aeration through immersed silicone tubing with pure oxygen gave similar oxygen transfer rates to that of sparging with air but without the problems of bubble damage and fouling of the spin filter. A supra-optimal level of dissolved oxygen (478% air saturation) inhibited cell growth. However, cells could recover from this stress and reach high density after reduction of the dissolved oxygen level to 50% air saturation. PMID:8590652

  9. A method for determining adequate resistance form of complete cast crown preparations.

    PubMed

    Weed, R M; Baez, R J

    1984-09-01

    A diagram with various degrees of occlusal convergence, which takes into consideration the length and diameter of complete crown preparations, was designed as a guide to assist the dentist to obtain adequate resistance form. To test the validity of the diagram, five groups of complete cast crown stainless steel dies were prepared (3.5 mm long, occlusal convergence 10, 13, 16, 19, and 22 degrees). Gold copings were cast for each of the 50 preparations. Displacement force was applied to the casting perpendicularly to a simulated 30-degree cuspal incline until the casting was displaced. Castings were deformed at margins except for the 22-degree group. Castings from this group were displaced without deformation, and it was concluded that there was a lack of adequate resistance form as predicted by the diagram. The hypothesis that the diagram could be used to predict adequate or inadequate resistance form was confirmed by this study. PMID:6384470

  10. Comparison of four standards for determining adequate water intake of nursing home residents.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Phyllis M

    2011-01-01

    Adequate hydration for nursing home residents is problematic. The purpose of this study was to compare four standards used to determine a recommended water intake among nursing home residents. Inconsistencies in the amount of water intake recommended based on the standards compared were identified. The standard based on height and weight provides the most individualized recommendation. An individualized recommendation would facilitate goal setting for the care plan of each older person and assist in the prevention of dehydration. It is essential that a cost-effective and clinically feasible approach to determine adequate water intake be determined for this population to prevent the adverse outcomes associated with dehydration. PMID:21469538

  11. Hyperbaric oxygen pretreatment and preconditioning.

    PubMed

    Camporesi, Enrico M; Bosco, Gerardo

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) before a crucial event, with the plan to create a preventing therapeutic situation, has been defined "preconditioning" and is emerging as a useful adjunct both in diving medicine as well before ischemic or inflammatory events. Oxygen pre-breathing before diving has been extensively documented in recreational, technical, commercial and military diving for tissue denitrogenation, resulting in reduced post-diving bubble loads, reduced decompression requirements and more rapid return to normal platelet function after a decompression. Preoxygenation at high atmospheric pressure has also been used in patients before exposure to clinical situations with beneficial effects, but the mechanisms of action have not yet been ascertained. During the reperfusion of ischemic tissue, oxygenated blood increases numbers and activities of oxidants generated in tissues. Previous reports showed that HBO2 preconditioning caused the activation of antioxidative enzymes and related genes in the central nervous system, including catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase and heme oxygenase-1. Despite the increasing number of basic science publications on this issue, studies describing HBO2 preconditioning in the clinical practice remain scarce. To date, only a few studies have investigated the preconditioning effects of HBO2 in relation to the human brain and myocardium with robust and promising results. PMID:24984322

  12. Tissue types (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... are 4 basic types of tissue: connective tissue, epithelial tissue, muscle tissue, and nervous tissue. Connective tissue supports ... binds them together (bone, blood, and lymph tissues). Epithelial tissue provides a covering (skin, the linings of the ...

  13. The Presence of Oxygen in Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Kimmel, Howard M; Grant, Anthony; Ditata, James

    2016-08-01

    Oxygen must be tightly governed in all phases of wound healing to produce viable granulation tissue. This idea of tight regulation has yet to be disputed; however, the role of oxygen at the cellular and molecular levels still is not fully understood as it pertains to its place in healing wounds. In an attempt to better understand the dynamics of oxygen on living tissue and its potential role as a therapy in wound healing, a substantial literature review of the role of oxygen in wound healing was performed and the following key points were extrapolated: 1) During energy metabolism, oxygen is needed for mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase as it produces high-energy phosphates that are needed for many cellular functions, 2) oxygen is also involved in the hydroxylation of proline and lysine into procollagen, which leads to collagen maturation, 3) in angiogenesis, hypoxia is required to start the process of wound healing, but it has been shown that if oxygen is administered it can accelerate and sustain vessel growth, 4) the antimicrobial action of oxygen occurs when nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-linked oxygenase acts as a catalyst for the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), a superoxide ion which kills bacteria, and 5) the level of evidence is moderate for the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) for diabetic foot ulcers, crush injuries, and soft-tissue infections. The authors hypothesized that HBOT would be beneficial to arterial insufficiency wounds and other ailments, but at this time further study is needed before HBOT would be indicated. PMID:27560469

  14. Quadriceps oxygenation changes during walking and running on a treadmill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quaresima, Valentina; Pizzi, Assunta; De Blasi, Roberto A.; Ferrari, Adriano; de Angelis, Marco; Ferrari, Marco

    1995-04-01

    Vastus lateralis muscle oxygenation was investigated on volunteers as well as muscular dystrophy patients during a walking test, and on volunteers during a free running by a continuous wave near infrared instrument. The data were analyzed using an oxygenation index independent on pathlength changes. Walking did not significantly affect the oxygenation of volunteers and patients. A relative deoxygenation was found only during free running indicating an unbalance between oxygen supply and tissue oxygen extraction. Preliminary measurements of exercising muscle oxygen saturation were performed by a 110 MHz frequency-domain, multisource instrument.

  15. Barometric calibration of a luminescent oxygen probe.

    PubMed

    Golub, Aleksander S; Pittman, Roland N

    2016-04-01

    The invention of the phosphorescence quenching method for the measurement of oxygen concentration in blood and tissue revolutionized physiological studies of oxygen transport in living organisms. Since the pioneering publication by Vanderkooi and Wilson in 1987, many researchers have contributed to the measurement of oxygen in the microcirculation, to oxygen imaging in tissues and microvessels, and to the development of new extracellular and intracellular phosphorescent probes. However, there is a problem of congruency in data from different laboratories, because of interlaboratory variability of the calibration coefficients in the Stern-Volmer equation. Published calibrations for a common oxygen probe, Pd-porphyrin + bovine serum albumin (BSA), vary because of differences in the techniques used. These methods are used for the formation of oxygen standards: chemical titration, calibrated gas mixtures, and an oxygen electrode. Each method in turn also needs calibration. We have designed a barometric method for the calibration of oxygen probes by using a regulated vacuum to set multiple PO2 standards. The method is fast and accurate and can be applied to biological fluids obtained during or after an experiment. Calibration over the full physiological PO2 range (1-120 mmHg) takes ∼15 min and requires 1-2 mg of probe. PMID:26846556

  16. Living with Oxygen Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Oxygen Therapy Oxygen therapy helps many people function better and be ... chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) Although you may need oxygen therapy continuously or for long periods, it doesn' ...

  17. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy

    MedlinePlus

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy uses a special pressure chamber to increase the amount of oxygen in the blood. ... outpatient centers. The air pressure inside a hyperbaric oxygen chamber is about two and a half times ...

  18. The Relationship between Parental Involvement and Adequate Yearly Progress among Urban, Suburban, and Rural Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Xin; Shen, Jianping; Krenn, Huilan Y.

    2014-01-01

    Using national data from the 2007-08 School and Staffing Survey, we compared the relationships between parental involvement and school outcomes related to adequate yearly progress (AYP) in urban, suburban, and rural schools. Parent-initiated parental involvement demonstrated significantly positive relationships with both making AYP and staying off…

  19. Influenza 2005-2006: vaccine supplies adequate, but bird flu looms.

    PubMed

    Mossad, Sherif B

    2005-11-01

    Influenza vaccine supplies appear to be adequate for the 2005-2006 season, though delivery has been somewhat delayed. However, in the event of a pandemic of avian flu-considered inevitable by most experts, although no one knows when it will happen-the United States would be woefully unprepared. PMID:16315443

  20. Calculating and Reducing Errors Associated with the Evaluation of Adequate Yearly Progress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Richard

    In the Spring, 1996, issue of "CRESST Line," E. Baker and R. Linn commented that, in efforts to measure the progress of schools, "the fluctuations due to differences in the students themselves could conceal differences in instructional effects." This is particularly true in the context of the evaluation of adequate yearly progress required by…

  1. How Much and What Kind? Identifying an Adequate Technology Infrastructure for Early Childhood Education. Policy Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daugherty, Lindsay; Dossani, Rafiq; Johnson, Erin-Elizabeth; Wright, Cameron

    2014-01-01

    To realize the potential benefits of technology use in early childhood education (ECE), and to ensure that technology can help to address the digital divide, providers, families of young children, and young children themselves must have access to an adequate technology infrastructure. The goals for technology use in ECE that a technology…

  2. Prenatal zinc supplementation of zinc-adequate rats adversely affects immunity in offspring

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We previously showed that zinc (Zn) supplementation of Zn-adequate dams induced immunosuppressive effects that persist in the offspring after weaning. We investigated whether the immunosuppressive effects were due to in utero exposure and/or mediated via milk using a cross-fostering design. Pregnant...

  3. 75 FR 5893 - Suspension of Community Eligibility for Failure To Maintain Adequate Floodplain Management...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-05

    ... FR 51735. Executive Order 13132, Federalism. This rule involves no policies that have ] federalism....C. 4001 et seq., Reorganization Plan No. 3 of 1978, 3 CFR, 1978 Comp., p. 329; E.O. 12127, 44 FR... To Maintain Adequate Floodplain Management Regulations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management...

  4. 26 CFR 1.467-2 - Rent accrual for section 467 rental agreements without adequate interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... provide for a variable rate of interest. For purposes of the adequate interest test under paragraph (b)(1) of this section, if a section 467 rental agreement provides for variable interest, the rental... date as the issue date) for the variable rates called for by the rental agreement. For purposes of...

  5. The Unequal Effect of Adequate Yearly Progress: Evidence from School Visits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Abigail B.; Clift, Jack W.

    2010-01-01

    The authors report insights, based on annual site visits to elementary and middle schools in three states from 2004 to 2006, into the incentive effect of the No Child Left Behind Act's requirement that increasing percentages of students make Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) in every public school. They develop a framework, drawing on the physics…

  6. 9 CFR 2.33 - Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care. 2.33 Section 2.33 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Research Facilities § 2.33 Attending veterinarian...

  7. 9 CFR 2.33 - Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care. 2.33 Section 2.33 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Research Facilities § 2.33 Attending veterinarian...

  8. Perceptions of Teachers in Their First Year of School Restructuring: Failure to Make Adequate Yearly Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moser, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    The 2007-2008 school year marked the first year Florida's Title I schools that did not made Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) for five consecutive years entered into restructuring as mandated by the "No Child Left Behind Act" of 2001. My study examines the perceptions of teacher entering into their first year of school restructuring due to failure to…

  9. A Model for Touch Technique and Computation of Adequate Cane Length.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plain-Switzer, Karen

    1993-01-01

    This article presents a model for the motion of a long-cane executing the touch technique and presents formulas for the projected length of a cane adequate to protect an individual with blindness against wall-type and pole-type hazards. The paper concludes that the long-cane should reach from the floor to the user's armpit. (JDD)

  10. Towards Defining Adequate Lithium Trials for Individuals with Mental Retardation and Mental Illness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pary, Robert J.

    1991-01-01

    Use of lithium with mentally retarded individuals with psychiatric conditions and/or behavior disturbances is discussed. The paper describes components of an adequate clinical trial and reviews case studies and double-blind cases. The paper concludes that aggression is the best indicator for lithium use, and reviews treatment parameters and…

  11. 9 CFR 2.33 - Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... animal health, behavior, and well-being is conveyed to the attending veterinarian; (4) Guidance to... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care. 2.33 Section 2.33 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION...

  12. 9 CFR 2.40 - Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care (dealers and exhibitors).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... on problems of animal health, behavior, and well-being is conveyed to the attending veterinarian; (4... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care (dealers and exhibitors). 2.40 Section 2.40 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND...

  13. 9 CFR 2.40 - Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care (dealers and exhibitors).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... on problems of animal health, behavior, and well-being is conveyed to the attending veterinarian; (4... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care (dealers and exhibitors). 2.40 Section 2.40 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND...

  14. 9 CFR 2.40 - Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care (dealers and exhibitors).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... on problems of animal health, behavior, and well-being is conveyed to the attending veterinarian; (4... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care (dealers and exhibitors). 2.40 Section 2.40 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND...

  15. 9 CFR 2.33 - Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... animal health, behavior, and well-being is conveyed to the attending veterinarian; (4) Guidance to... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care. 2.33 Section 2.33 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION...

  16. 9 CFR 2.40 - Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care (dealers and exhibitors).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... on problems of animal health, behavior, and well-being is conveyed to the attending veterinarian; (4... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care (dealers and exhibitors). 2.40 Section 2.40 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND...

  17. Special or Not so Special: Special Education Background Experiences of Principals and Adequate Yearly Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox, Jennifer E.

    2011-01-01

    This mixed-methods study researched the special education background experience of principals and the effect on students in the subgroup of Students with Disabilities in making Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP). In the state of Ohio, schools and districts are expected to make AYP as a whole and additionally make AYP for each subgroup (various…

  18. Inferential Processing among Adequate and Struggling Adolescent Comprehenders and Relations to Reading Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barth, Amy E.; Barnes, Marcia; Francis, David; Vaughn, Sharon; York, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Separate mixed model analyses of variance were conducted to examine the effect of textual distance on the accuracy and speed of text consistency judgments among adequate and struggling comprehenders across grades 6-12 (n = 1,203). Multiple regressions examined whether accuracy in text consistency judgments uniquely accounted for variance in…

  19. 42 CFR 438.207 - Assurances of adequate capacity and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... with the State's requirements for availability of services, as set forth in § 438.206. (e) CMS' right... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS MANAGED CARE Quality Assessment and Performance... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Assurances of adequate capacity and services....

  20. 42 CFR 438.207 - Assurances of adequate capacity and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... requirements: (1) Offers an appropriate range of preventive, primary care, and specialty services that is adequate for the anticipated number of enrollees for the service area. (2) Maintains a network of providers... enrollment in its service area in accordance with the State's standards for access to care under this...

  1. 42 CFR 438.207 - Assurances of adequate capacity and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... requirements: (1) Offers an appropriate range of preventive, primary care, and specialty services that is adequate for the anticipated number of enrollees for the service area. (2) Maintains a network of providers... enrollment in its service area in accordance with the State's standards for access to care under this...

  2. 42 CFR 438.207 - Assurances of adequate capacity and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... requirements: (1) Offers an appropriate range of preventive, primary care, and specialty services that is adequate for the anticipated number of enrollees for the service area. (2) Maintains a network of providers... enrollment in its service area in accordance with the State's standards for access to care under this...

  3. Effect of tranquilizers on animal resistance to the adequate stimuli of the vestibular apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maksimovich, Y. B.; Khinchikashvili, N. V.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of tranquilizers on vestibulospinal reflexes and motor activity was studied in 900 centrifuged albino mice. Actometric studies have shown that the tranquilizers have a group capacity for increasing animal resistance to the action of adequate stimuli to the vestibular apparatus.

  4. 21 CFR 314.126 - Adequate and well-controlled studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... conducting clinical investigations of a drug is to distinguish the effect of a drug from other influences... recognized by the scientific community as the essentials of an adequate and well-controlled clinical... randomization and blinding of patients or investigators, or both. If the intent of the trial is to...

  5. Final 2004 Report on Adequate Yearly Progress in the Montgomery County Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Jose W.

    2005-01-01

    The vast majority of Montgomery County public schools made sufficient progress on state testing and accountability standards in 2004 to comply with the adequate yearly progress (AYP) requirements under the "No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001." Information released by the Maryland State Department of Education (MSDE) in October 2004 shows that…

  6. 42 CFR 417.568 - Adequate financial records, statistical data, and cost finding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Adequate financial records, statistical data, and... financial records, statistical data, and cost finding. (a) Maintenance of records. (1) An HMO or CMP must maintain sufficient financial records and statistical data for proper determination of costs payable by...

  7. 42 CFR 417.568 - Adequate financial records, statistical data, and cost finding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Adequate financial records, statistical data, and... financial records, statistical data, and cost finding. (a) Maintenance of records. (1) An HMO or CMP must maintain sufficient financial records and statistical data for proper determination of costs payable by...

  8. Estimates of Adequate School Spending by State Based on National Average Service Levels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miner, Jerry

    1983-01-01

    Proposes a method for estimating expenditures per student needed to provide educational adequacy in each state. Illustrates the method using U.S., Arkansas, New York, Texas, and Washington State data, covering instruction, special needs, operations and maintenance, administration, and other costs. Estimates ratios of "adequate" to actual spending…

  9. Leadership Style and Adequate Yearly Progress: A Correlational Study of Effective Principal Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leapley-Portscheller, Claudia Iris

    2008-01-01

    Principals are responsible for leading efforts to reach increasingly higher levels of student academic proficiency in schools associated with adequate yearly progress (AYP) requirements. The purpose of this quantitative, correlational study was to identify the degree to which perceptions of principal transformational, transactional, and…

  10. Percentage of Adults with High Cholesterol Whose LDL Cholesterol Levels Are Adequately Controlled

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Adults with High Cholesterol Whose LDL Cholesterol Levels are Adequately Controlled High cholesterol can double a ... with High Cholesterol that is Controlled by Education Level 8k4c-k22f Download these data » Click on legends ...

  11. 42 CFR 413.24 - Adequate cost data and cost finding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Adequate cost data and cost finding. 413.24 Section 413.24 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PRINCIPLES OF REASONABLE COST REIMBURSEMENT; PAYMENT FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE SERVICES; OPTIONAL PROSPECTIVELY...

  12. Principals' Perceptions of Effective Strategies in Meeting Adequate Yearly Progress in Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Jadie K.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions of principals who have met Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) with the special education subgroup. This was a qualitative study, utilizing interviews to answer the research questions. The first three research questions analyzed the areas of assessment, building-level leadership, and curriculum…

  13. Human milk feeding supports adequate growth in infants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite current nutritional strategies, premature infants remain at high risk for extrauterine growth restriction. The use of an exclusive human milk-based diet is associated with decreased incidence of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), but concerns exist about infants achieving adequate growth. The ...

  14. 75 FR 74022 - Safety Analysis Requirements for Defining Adequate Protection for the Public and the Workers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-30

    ... November 15, 2010 (75 FR 69648). The corrected text of the recommendation approved by the Board is below... or telephone number (202) 694-7000. Correction: In the Federal Register of November 15, 2010 (75 FR... SAFETY BOARD Safety Analysis Requirements for Defining Adequate Protection for the Public and the...

  15. Evaluating Rural Progress in Mathematics Achievement: Threats to the Validity of "Adequate Yearly Progress"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jaekyung

    2003-01-01

    This article examines major threats to the validity of Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) in the context of rural schools. Although rural students and their schools made significant academic progress in the past on national and state assessments, the current goal of AYP turns out to be highly unrealistic for them unless states set far lower…

  16. 40 CFR 152.20 - Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency. 152.20 Section 152.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION...

  17. 40 CFR 152.20 - Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency. 152.20 Section 152.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION...

  18. 40 CFR 152.20 - Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency. 152.20 Section 152.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION...

  19. What Is the Cost of an Adequate Vermont High School Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rucker, Frank D.

    2010-01-01

    Access to an adequate education has been widely considered an undeniable right since Chief Justice Warren stated in his landmark decision that "Today, education is perhaps the most important function of state and local governments...it is doubtful that any child may reasonably be expected to succeed in life if he is denied the opportunity of an…

  20. Oxygen supply dependency in the critically ill--a continuing conundrum.

    PubMed

    Cain, S M

    1992-01-01

    There was little dispute that endotoxin treatment of experimental animals could recreate the O2 extraction defect that had been observed in critically ill patients. The remaining question was whether or not this necessarily signified pervasive tissue hypoxia. Some limitation to O2 diffusion in the tissues had been postulated because of known effects of endotoxin that ultimately result in damage to endothelium. We were unable to alter the critical DO2 or 0(2)ER in endotoxic dogs by manipulating the arterial PO2. This tended to rule against there being a diffusion limitation created by the endotoxin as a result of endothelial disruption or microvascular dysfunction. The results of the DCA and dopexamine experiments served to remind us that arterial lactate measurements may or may not indicate widespread tissue hypoxia. Sepsis, as emulated by endotoxin infusions, is also a metabolic disease that can cause inactivation of PDH and thus cause lactacidosis without tissue hypoxia. Regional measurements of lactate flux indicated that gut was hypoxic in spite of DO2 above critical because of maldistribution of blood flow between muscularis and mucosa. The questions persist of how much tissue hypoxia is caused by sepsis or endotoxin when DO2 is supported at supposedly adequate levels and whether there are marked regional differences. Such questions still await answers. Newer technological advances that permit assessment of tissue oxygenation by noninvasive methods, such as near infrared spectrophotometry or nuclear magnetic resonance measurement of tissue energy potential, may soon be feasible in critically ill patients. This kind of information will be of vast importance in designing the most effective therapeutic regimen. PMID:1288144

  1. Effect of 6-day hypokinesia on oxygen metabolism indices in elderly and senile subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanov, L. A.; Orlov, P. A.

    1978-01-01

    After a strict 6 day confinement to bed of elderly and senile subjects the oxygen supply of the subcutaneous cellular tissue was impaired, and the intensity of its tissue respiration was somewhat reduced. The vacat-oxygen of the blood and urine, the coefficient of incomplete oxidation, and the oxygen deficiency in the organism were increased.

  2. Oxygen-derived species: their relation to human disease and environmental stress.

    PubMed Central

    Halliwell, B; Cross, C E

    1994-01-01

    Free radicals and other reactive oxygen species (ROS) are constantly formed in the human body, often for useful metabolic purposes. Antioxidant defenses protect against them, but these defenses are not completely adequate, and systems that repair damage by ROS are also necessary. Mild oxidative stress often induces antioxidant defense enzymes, but severe stress can cause oxidative damage to lipids, proteins, and DNA within cells, leading to such events as DNA strand breakage and disruption of calcium ion metabolism. Oxidative stress can result from exposure to toxic agents, and by the process of tissue injury itself. Ozone, oxides of nitrogen, and cigarette smoke can cause oxidative damage; but the molecular targets that they damage may not be the same. PMID:7705305

  3. Tissue Microdissection.

    PubMed

    Rabien, Anja; Kristiansen, Glen

    2016-01-01

    The new opportunities of modern assays of molecular biology can only be exploited fully if the results can be accurately correlated to the tissue phenotype under investigation. This is a general problem of non-in situ techniques, whereas results from in situ techniques are often difficult to quantify. The use of bulk tissue, which is not precisely characterized in terms of histology, has long been the basis for molecular analysis. It has, however, become apparent, that this simple approach is not sufficient for a detailed analysis of molecular alterations, which might be restricted to a specific tissue phenotype (e.g., tumor or normal tissue, stromal or epithelial cells). Microdissection is a method to provide minute amounts of histologically characterized tissues for molecular analysis with non-in situ techniques and has become an indispensable research tool. If tissue diversity is moderate and negligible, manual microdissection can be an easy and cost-efficient method of choice. In contrast, the advantage of laser microdissection is a very exact selection down to the level of a single cell, but often with a considerable time exposure to get enough material for the following analyses. The latter issue and the method of tissue preparation needed for laser microdissection are the main problems to solve if RNA, highly sensitive to degradation, shall be analyzed. This chapter focuses on optimized procedures for manual microdissection and laser microdissection to analyze RNA of malignant and nonmalignant prostate tissue. PMID:26667453

  4. Oxygen therapy in neonatal intensive care units in Khartoum State

    PubMed Central

    Omer, Ilham M; Ibrahim, Nada G; Nasr, Abdalhalim M A

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen is a drug that is essential in the treatment and prevention of neonatal hypoxia. The goal of oxygen therapy is to deliver sufficient oxygen to tissues while minimizing oxygen toxicity and oxidative stress. Improvement in monitoring technology of oxygen therapy has helped to improve clinicians’ ability to appropriately apply and deliver oxygen. The objectives of this prospective observational descriptive hospital based study were: to evaluate the practice of oxygen therapy in the neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in Khartoum State, to identify guidelines of oxygen therapy in NICUs, to determine the mode of oxygen delivery to the neonates, and to assess the practice of long term follow up of patients who used oxygen. During the period January – June 2014, 139 neonates were included. Oxygen was delivered to the neonates in the study depending on the clinical assessment. Saturation was not measured at the time of oxygen administration in 119 (85.6%) neonates. Oxygen was delivered by central device in 135 neonates (97.1%). The majority of the staff did not know the practice of long-term follow up. Hundred and sixteen (83.5%) of the nursing staff knew that oxygen has complications but the majority didn’t know the nature of the complications and what causes them. The study showed that there is lack of guidelines of oxygen therapy in the NICUs and lack of monitoring procedures, which is important to be highlighted to overcome the complications and to improve the practice of oxygen therapy.

  5. Tissue Tregs.

    PubMed

    Panduro, Marisella; Benoist, Christophe; Mathis, Diane

    2016-05-20

    The immune system is responsible for defending an organism against the myriad of microbial invaders it constantly confronts. It has become increasingly clear that the immune system has a second major function: the maintenance of organismal homeostasis. Foxp3(+)CD4(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) are important contributors to both of these critical activities, defense being the primary purview of Tregs circulating through lymphoid organs, and homeostasis ensured mainly by their counterparts residing in parenchymal tissues. This review focuses on so-called tissue Tregs. We first survey existing information on the phenotype, function, sustaining factors, and human equivalents of the three best-characterized tissue-Treg populations-those operating in visceral adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, and the colonic lamina propria. We then attempt to distill general principles from this body of work-as concerns the provenance, local adaptation, molecular sustenance, and targets of action of tissue Tregs, in particular. PMID:27168246

  6. Rapid Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Overcomes Fulminant Myocarditis Induced by 5‑Fluorouracil

    PubMed Central

    Pachika, Ajay; Grubb, Kendra J.; DeFilippis, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    Fulminant myocarditis is a rare but potentially life-threatening illness caused by 5-fluorouracil cardiotoxicity. Data supporting the use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for the treatment of fulminant myocarditis are limited. A 49-year-old, previously healthy white man, recently diagnosed with anal squamous cell carcinoma, developed severe chest pain hours after completing his first 96-hour intravenous 5-fluorouracil treatment. Over a period of 3 days from onset of symptoms, the patient developed cardiogenic shock secondary to fulminant myocarditis induced by 5-fluorouracil cardiotoxicity. This required emergency initiation of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. The patient's systolic function recovered by day 5, and on the 17th day he was discharged in hemodynamically stable condition, without symptoms of heart failure. This case shows the importance of prompt recognition of cardiogenic shock secondary to 5-fluorouracil–induced myocarditis and how the immediate initiation of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation can restore adequate tissue perfusion, leading to myocardial recovery and ultimately the survival of the patient. PMID:27127440

  7. Rapid Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Overcomes Fulminant Myocarditis Induced by 5‑Fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Amraotkar, Alok R; Pachika, Ajay; Grubb, Kendra J; DeFilippis, Andrew P

    2016-04-01

    Fulminant myocarditis is a rare but potentially life-threatening illness caused by 5-fluorouracil cardiotoxicity. Data supporting the use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for the treatment of fulminant myocarditis are limited. A 49-year-old, previously healthy white man, recently diagnosed with anal squamous cell carcinoma, developed severe chest pain hours after completing his first 96-hour intravenous 5-fluorouracil treatment. Over a period of 3 days from onset of symptoms, the patient developed cardiogenic shock secondary to fulminant myocarditis induced by 5-fluorouracil cardiotoxicity. This required emergency initiation of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. The patient's systolic function recovered by day 5, and on the 17th day he was discharged in hemodynamically stable condition, without symptoms of heart failure. This case shows the importance of prompt recognition of cardiogenic shock secondary to 5-fluorouracil-induced myocarditis and how the immediate initiation of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation can restore adequate tissue perfusion, leading to myocardial recovery and ultimately the survival of the patient. PMID:27127440

  8. Renal oxidative stress, oxygenation, and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Palm, Fredrik; Nordquist, Lina

    2011-11-01

    Hypertension is closely associated with progressive kidney dysfunction, manifested as glomerulosclerosis, interstitial fibrosis, proteinuria, and eventually declining glomerular filtration. The postulated mechanism for development of glomerulosclerosis is barotrauma caused by increased capillary pressure, but the reason for development of interstitial fibrosis and the subsequently reduced kidney function is less clear. However, it has been hypothesized that tissue hypoxia induces fibrogenesis and progressive renal failure. This is very interesting, since recent reports highlight several different mechanisms resulting in altered oxygen handling and availability in the hypertensive kidney. Such mechanisms include decreased renal blood flow due to increased vascular tone induced by ANG II that limits oxygen delivery and increases oxidative stress, resulting in increased mitochondrial oxygen usage, increased oxygen usage for tubular electrolyte transport, and shunting of oxygen from arterial to venous blood in preglomerular vessels. It has been shown in several studies that interventions to prevent oxidative stress and to restore kidney tissue oxygenation prevent progression of kidney dysfunction. Furthermore, inhibition of ANG II activity, by either blocking ANG II type 1 receptors or angiotensin-converting enzyme, or by preventing oxidative stress by administration of antioxidants also results in improved blood pressure control. Therefore, it seems likely that tissue hypoxia in the hypertensive kidney contributes to progression of kidney damage, and perhaps also persistence the high blood pressure. PMID:21832206

  9. Myoglobin function evaluated in working heart tissue.

    PubMed

    Gardner, J D; Schubert, R W

    1998-01-01

    Previous modeling efforts suggest that myoglobin-facilitated diffusion contributes very little to oxygen transport in a Krebs-Henseleit perfused isolated heart when literature-derived values for the diffusion coefficient of myoglobin (DMb) were used. Simulations have strongly suggested that the contractile mechanisms of muscle may augment diffusion in working preparations. Myoglobin-facilitated oxygen diffusion may be augmented by the same mechanism. In this study, parameters of an oxygen transport to tissue model are optimized to investigate the possibility of elevated diffusion coefficients for oxygen and myoglobin in working heart tissue. The Radially-Averaged, Axially-Distributed (RAAD) model considers axial diffusion of oxygen in tissue, myoglobin facilitation of oxygen transport, and pO2-dependent oxygen consumption (Michaelis-Menten kinetics). Models are solved numerically using a variable-mesh finite-difference scheme. Parameters are optimized using a Nelder-Mead simplex routine and are chosen to minimize the sum-of-squares error (SSE) between model oxygen partial pressure (pO2) predictions and experimental pO2 data. Models are solved both with and without myoglobin facilitation. Myoglobin was found to have little effect on the oxygen distribution predicted by the models. Optimized values for the oxygen diffusion coefficient remained elevated. However, optimized values for myoglobin diffusion coefficient were found to be less than measured values. The RAAD model optimization results suggest that myoglobin does not significantly facilitate oxygen diffusion to tissue in the steady state and that myoglobin diffusion is not elevated in working heart. PMID:9889930

  10. The concept of adequate causation and Max Weber's comparative sociology of religion.

    PubMed

    Buss, A

    1999-06-01

    Max Weber's The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism, studied in isolation, shows mainly an elective affinity or an adequacy on the level of meaning between the Protestant ethic and the 'spirit' of capitalism. Here it is suggested that Weber's subsequent essays on 'The Economic Ethics of World Religions' are the result of his opinion that adequacy on the level of meaning needs and can be verified by causal adequacy. After some introductory remarks, particularly on elective affinity, the paper tries to develop the concept of adequate causation and the related concept of objective possibility on the basis of the work of v. Kries on whom Weber heavily relied. In the second part, this concept is used to show how the study of the economic ethics of India, China, Rome and orthodox Russia can support the thesis that the 'spirit' of capitalism, although it may not have been caused by the Protestant ethic, was perhaps adequately caused by it. PMID:15260028

  11. Reactions of singlet oxygen with pine pollen.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowty, B.; Laseter, J. L.; Griffin, G. W.; Politzer, I. R.; Walkinshaw, C. H.

    1973-01-01

    A study was initiated to determine whether viable atmospheric particles such as plant pollens and fungal spores containing unsaturated lipids can interact with singlet oxygen to give oxygenated products that are potentially toxic. The results obtained confirm that surface and near surface components of common viable particulate matter in the atmosphere may be subject to rapid oxidation by singlet oxygen, leading to products which are probably allylic hydroperoxides. In connection with increasing atmospheric pollution, it is important to note that materials toxic to mammalian lung tissue may be oxidatively produced on the surfaces of viable particulate matter.

  12. A novel strategy to overcome resistance in stent placement at lesion site after adequate predilatation.

    PubMed

    Jain, D; Tolg, R; Katus, H A; Richardt, G

    2000-12-01

    Resistance was encountered in passing a 3 x 18 mm stent across a lesion in the proximal left anterior descending coronary artery. Successive changes in stent with repeated balloon dilatations did not succeed. Finally, a 9 mm stent was passed across the lesion and deployed at the site of maximal resistance. The 18 mm stent was then placed through this stent. A novel strategy to overcome resistance in the stent passage through the lesion after an adequate balloon predilatation is reported. PMID:11103034

  13. Myth 19: Is Advanced Placement an Adequate Program for Gifted Students?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Shelagh A.

    2009-01-01

    Is it a myth that Advanced Placement (AP) is an adequate program for gifted students? AP is so covered with myths and assumptions that it is hard to get a clear view of the issues. In this article, the author finds the answer about AP by looking at current realties. First, AP is hard for gifted students to avoid. Second, AP never was a program…

  14. Artificial oxygen transport protein

    SciTech Connect

    Dutton, P. Leslie

    2014-09-30

    This invention provides heme-containing peptides capable of binding molecular oxygen at room temperature. These compounds may be useful in the absorption of molecular oxygen from molecular oxygen-containing atmospheres. Also included in the invention are methods for treating an oxygen transport deficiency in a mammal.

  15. Global risk assessment of aflatoxins in maize and peanuts: are regulatory standards adequately protective?

    PubMed

    Wu, Felicia; Stacy, Shaina L; Kensler, Thomas W

    2013-09-01

    The aflatoxins are a group of fungal metabolites that contaminate a variety of staple crops, including maize and peanuts, and cause an array of acute and chronic human health effects. Aflatoxin B1 in particular is a potent liver carcinogen, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) risk is multiplicatively higher for individuals exposed to both aflatoxin and chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV). In this work, we sought to answer the question: do current aflatoxin regulatory standards around the world adequately protect human health? Depending upon the level of protection desired, the answer to this question varies. Currently, most nations have a maximum tolerable level of total aflatoxins in maize and peanuts ranging from 4 to 20ng/g. If the level of protection desired is that aflatoxin exposures would not increase lifetime HCC risk by more than 1 in 100,000 cases in the population, then most current regulatory standards are not adequately protective even if enforced, especially in low-income countries where large amounts of maize and peanuts are consumed and HBV prevalence is high. At the protection level of 1 in 10,000 lifetime HCC cases in the population, however, almost all aflatoxin regulations worldwide are adequately protective, with the exception of several nations in Africa and Latin America. PMID:23761295

  16. Global Risk Assessment of Aflatoxins in Maize and Peanuts: Are Regulatory Standards Adequately Protective?

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Felicia

    2013-01-01

    The aflatoxins are a group of fungal metabolites that contaminate a variety of staple crops, including maize and peanuts, and cause an array of acute and chronic human health effects. Aflatoxin B1 in particular is a potent liver carcinogen, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) risk is multiplicatively higher for individuals exposed to both aflatoxin and chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV). In this work, we sought to answer the question: do current aflatoxin regulatory standards around the world adequately protect human health? Depending upon the level of protection desired, the answer to this question varies. Currently, most nations have a maximum tolerable level of total aflatoxins in maize and peanuts ranging from 4 to 20ng/g. If the level of protection desired is that aflatoxin exposures would not increase lifetime HCC risk by more than 1 in 100,000 cases in the population, then most current regulatory standards are not adequately protective even if enforced, especially in low-income countries where large amounts of maize and peanuts are consumed and HBV prevalence is high. At the protection level of 1 in 10,000 lifetime HCC cases in the population, however, almost all aflatoxin regulations worldwide are adequately protective, with the exception of several nations in Africa and Latin America. PMID:23761295

  17. Self-esteem, social support, and satisfaction differences in women with adequate and inadequate prenatal care.

    PubMed

    Higgins, P; Murray, M L; Williams, E M

    1994-03-01

    This descriptive, retrospective study examined levels of self-esteem, social support, and satisfaction with prenatal care in 193 low-risk postpartal women who obtained adequate and inadequate care. The participants were drawn from a regional medical center and university teaching hospital in New Mexico. A demographic questionnaire, the Coopersmith self-esteem inventory, the personal resource questionnaire part 2, and the prenatal care satisfaction inventory were used for data collection. Significant differences were found in the level of education, income, insurance, and ethnicity between women who received adequate prenatal care and those who received inadequate care. Women who were likely to seek either adequate or inadequate prenatal care were those whose total family income was $10,000 to $19,999 per year and high school graduates. Statistically significant differences were found in self-esteem, social support, and satisfaction between the two groups of women. Strategies to enhance self-esteem and social support have to be developed to reach women at risk for receiving inadequate prenatal care. PMID:8155221

  18. Tissue repair

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    As living beings that encounter every kind of traumatic event from paper cut to myocardial infarction, we must possess ways to heal damaged tissues. While some animals are able to regrow complete body parts following injury (such as the earthworm who grows a new head following bisection), humans are sadly incapable of such feats. Our means of recovery following tissue damage consists largely of repair rather than pure regeneration. Thousands of times in our lives, a meticulously scripted but unseen wound healing drama plays, with cells serving as actors, extracellular matrix as the setting and growth factors as the means of communication. This article briefly reviews the cells involved in tissue repair, their signaling and proliferation mechanisms and the function of the extracellular matrix, then presents the actors and script for the three acts of the tissue repair drama. PMID:21220961

  19. The Rate of Oxygen Utilization by Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Brett A.; Venkataraman, Sujatha; Buettner, Garry R.

    2011-01-01

    The discovery of oxygen is considered by some to be the most important scientific discovery of all time – from both physical-chemical/astrophysics and biology/evolution viewpoints. One of the major developments during evolution is the ability to capture dioxygen in the environment and deliver it to each cell in the multicellular, complex mammalian body -- on demand, i.e. just-in-time. Humans use oxygen to extract approximately 2550 Calories (10.4 MJ) from food to meet daily energy requirements. This combustion requires about 22 moles of dioxygen per day, or 2.5 × 10-4 mol s-1. This is an average rate of oxygen utilization of 2.5 × 10-18 mol cell-1 s-1, i.e. 2.5 amol cell-1 s-1. Cells have a wide range of oxygen utilization, depending on cell type, function, and biological status. Measured rates of oxygen utilization by mammalian cells in culture range from <1 to >350 amol cell-1 s-1. There is a loose positive linear correlation of the rate of oxygen consumption (OCR) by mammalian cells in culture with cell volume and cell protein. The use of oxygen by cells and tissues is an essential aspect of the basic redox biology of cells and tissues. This type of quantitative information is fundamental to investigations in quantitative redox biology, especially redox systems biology. PMID:21664270

  20. Reproducibility of muscle oxygen saturation.

    PubMed

    Thiel, C; Vogt, L; Himmelreich, H; Hübscher, M; Banzer, W

    2011-04-01

    The present study evaluated the reproducibility of tissue oxygenation in relation to oxygen consumption (VO2) across cycle exercise intensities in a test-retest design. 12 subjects (25.7±2.1 years; 24.7±1.9 kg · m(-2)) twice performed an incremental bicycle exercise protocol, while tissue oxygen saturation (StO2) in the vastus lateralis muscle was monitored by a commercially available NIRS unit and VO2 determined by an open-circuit indirect calorimetric system. Coefficients of variation across rest, workloads corresponding to 25, 50 and 75% of individual maximum capacity, and maximum load were 5.8, 4.6, 6.1, 8.0, 11.0% (StO2) and 7.6, 6.0, 3.7, 3.4, 3.1% (VO2), respectively. 95 % CI of relative test-retest differences ranged from -5.6 to +5.4% at 25% load to -17.2 to +7.5% at maximum load for StO2 and from -7.3 to +7.7% at rest to -3.3 to +3.2% at maximum load for VO2. With advancing exercise intensity, within-subject variability of StO2 was augmented, whereas VO2 variability slightly attenuated. NIRS measurements at higher workloads need to be interpreted with caution. PMID:21271493

  1. Low flow oxygen therapy from a portable oxygen concentrator or an oxygen cylinder effectively treats hypoxemia in anesthetized white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus).

    PubMed

    Fahlman, Asa; Caulkett, Nigel; Woodbury, Murray; Duke-Novakovski, Tanya; Wourms, Vincent

    2014-06-01

    For treatment of hypoxemia, delivery of the minimum effective oxygen flow rate is advantageous during field anesthesia because it prolongs the life of the oxygen cylinder. Portable oxygen concentrators as the oxygen source require less logistical considerations than cylinders and are a safer alternative during helicopter field work because they are nonexplosive devices. The objective of this study was to evaluate low oxygen flow rates by continuous or pulsed intranasal delivery for treatment of hypoxemia in anesthetized white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). Nine captive adult female deer (body mass 56-72 kg) were physically restrained in a drop-floor chute and hand injected intramuscularly with medetomidine (0.1-0.14 mg/kg) and ketamine (2.5-4.3 mg/kg). Intranasal oxygen was delivered from an oxygen cylinder at continuous flow rates of 1 and 2 L/min or from a battery driven oxygen concentrator (EverGo Portable Oxygen Concentrator, Respironics) with pulse-dose delivery (maximum capacity of 1.05 L/min). The pulse-dose setting (pulse volume 12-70 ml) was adjusted according to the respiratory rate. Arterial blood gases were analyzed before, during, and after O2 supplementation. A 10-min washout period was allowed between treatment groups. All three treatments adequately treated hypoxemia. The partial pressure of arterial oxygenation increased significantly from baseline values of 55 +/- 10 to 115 +/- 31 mm Hg during supplementation from the oxygen concentrator, to 138 +/- 21 mm Hg during supplementation from the oxygen cylinder at 1 L/min, and to 201 +/- 42 mm Hg at 2 L/min. In conclusion, low flow rates of intranasal oxygen supplemented continuously from an oxygen cylinder or by pulsed delivery from a portable oxygen concentrator effectively treated hypoxemia in anesthetized white-tailed deer. PMID:25000687

  2. Balancing the Risks and Benefits of Oxygen Therapy in Critically III Adults

    PubMed Central

    Mutlu, Gökhan M.

    2013-01-01

    Oxygen therapy is an integral part of the treatment of critically ill patients. Maintenance of adequate oxygen delivery to vital organs often requires the administration of supplemental oxygen, sometimes at high concentrations. Although oxygen therapy is lifesaving, it may be associated with deleterious effects when administered for prolonged periods at high concentrations. Here, we review the recent advances in our understanding of the molecular responses to hypoxia and high levels of oxygen and review the current guidelines for oxygen therapy in critically ill patients. PMID:23546490

  3. Intramyocardial oxygen transport by quantitative diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in calves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindbergh, Tobias; Larsson, Marcus; Szabó, Zoltán; Casimir-Ahn, Henrik; Strömberg, Tomas

    2010-03-01

    Intramyocardial oxygen transport was assessed during open-chest surgery in calves by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy using a small intramuscular fiber-optic probe. The sum of hemo- and myoglobin tissue fraction and oxygen saturation, the tissue fraction and oxidation of cytochrome aa3, and the tissue fraction of methemoglobin were estimated using a calibrated empirical light transport model. Increasing the oxygen content in the inhaled gas, 21%-50%-100%, in five calves (group A) gave an increasing oxygen saturation of 19+/-4%, 24+/-5%, and 28+/-8% (p<0.001, ANOVA repeated measures design) and mean tissue fractions of 1.6% (cytochrome aa3) and 1.1% (hemo- and myoglobin). Cardiac arrest in two calves gave an oxygen saturation lower than 5%. In two calves (group B), a left ventricular assistive device (LVAD pump) was implanted. Oxygen saturation in group B animals increased with LVAD pump speed (p<0.001, ANOVA) and with oxygen content in inhaled gas (p<0.001, ANOVA). The cytochrome aa3 oxidation level was above 96% in both group A and group B calves, including the two cases involving cardiac arrest. In conclusion, the estimated tissue fractions and oxygenation/oxidation levels of the myocardial chromophores during respiratory and hemodynamic provocations were in agreement with previously presented results, demonstrating the potential of the method.

  4. Forearm muscle oxygenation decreases with low levels of voluntary contraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Kahan, N. J.; Hargens, A. R.; Rempel, D. M.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of our investigation was to determine if the near infrared spectroscopy technique was sensitive to changes in tissue oxygenation at low levels of isometric contraction in the extensor carpi radialis brevis muscle. Nine subjects were seated with the right arm abducted to 45 degrees, elbow flexed to 85 degrees, forearm pronated 45 degrees, and wrist and forearm supported on an armrest throughout the protocol. Altered tissue oxygenation was measured noninvasively with near infrared spectroscopy. The near infrared spectroscopy probe was placed over the extensor carpi radialis brevis of the subject's right forearm and secured with an elastic wrap. After 1 minute of baseline measurements taken with the muscle relaxed, four different loads were applied just proximal to the metacarpophalangeal joint such that the subjects isometrically contracted the extensor carpi radialis brevis at 5, 10, 15, and 50% of the maximum voluntary contraction for 1 minute each. A 3-minute recovery period followed each level of contraction. At the end of the protocol, with the probe still in place, a value for ischemic tissue oxygenation was obtained for each subject. This value was considered the physiological zero and hence 0% tissue oxygenation. Mean tissue oxygenation (+/-SE) decreased from resting baseline (100% tissue oxygenation) to 89 +/- 4, 81 +/- 8, 78 +/- 8, and 47 +/- 8% at 5, 10, 15, and 50% of the maximum voluntary contraction, respectively. Tissue oxygenation levels at 10, 15, and 50% of the maximum voluntary contraction were significantly lower (p < 0.05) than the baseline value. Our results indicate that tissue oxygenation significantly decreases during brief, low levels of static muscle contraction and that near infrared spectroscopy is a sensitive technique for detecting deoxygenation noninvasively at low levels of forearm muscle contraction. Our findings have important implications in occupational medicine because oxygen depletion induced by low levels of muscle

  5. BID Mediates Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation-Induced Neuronal Injury in Organotypic Hippocampal Slice Cultures and Modulates Tissue Inflammation in a Transient Focal Cerebral Ischemia Model without Changing Lesion Volume

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Nellie Anne; Bonner, Helena; Elkjær, Maria Louise; D’Orsi, Beatrice; Chen, Gang; König, Hans Georg; Svensson, Martina; Deierborg, Tomas; Pfeiffer, Shona; Prehn, Jochen H.; Lambertsen, Kate Lykke

    2016-01-01

    The BH3 interacting-domain death agonist (BID) is a pro-apoptotic protein involved in death receptor-induced and mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. Recently, it has also been suggested that BID is involved in the regulation of inflammatory responses in the central nervous system. We found that BID deficiency protected organotypic hippocampal slice cultures in vitro from neuronal injury induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation. In vivo, BID-knockout (KO) mice and wild type (WT) mice were subjected to 60 min of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) to induce focal cerebral ischemia, and allowed to recover for 24 h. Infarct volumes and functional outcome were assessed and the inflammatory response was evaluated using immunofluorescence, Western blotting, quantitative PCR (qPCR) and Mesoscale multiplex analysis. We observed no difference in the infarct volume or neurological outcome between BID-KO and WT mice. The inflammatory response was reduced by BID deficiency as indicated by a change in microglial/leukocyte response. In conclusion, our data suggest that BID deficiency is neuroprotective in an in vitro model and modulates the inflammatory response to focal cerebral ischemia in vivo. However, this is not translated into a robust neuroprotection in vivo. PMID:26869884

  6. Titanium-Oxygen Reactivity Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chafey, J. E.; Scheck, W. G.; Witzell, W. E.

    1962-01-01

    A program has been conducted at Astronautics to investigate the likelihood of occurrence of the catastrophic oxidation of titanium alloy sheet under conditions which simulate certain cases of accidental failure of the metal while it is in contact with liquid or gaseous oxygen. Three methods of fracturing the metal were used; they consisted of mechanical puncture, tensile fracture of welded joints, and perforation by very high velocity particles. The results of the tests which have been conducted provide further evidence of the reactivity of titanium with liquid and gaseous oxygen. The evidence indicates that the rapid fracturing of titanium sheet while it is in contact with oxygen initiates the catastrophic oxidation reaction. Initiation occurred when the speed of the fracture was some few feet per second, as in both the drop-weight puncture tests and the static tensile fracture tests of welded joints, as well as when the speed was several thousand feet per second, as in the simulated micrometeoroid penetration tests. The slow propagation of a crack, however, did not initiate the reaction. It may logically be concluded that the localized frictional heat of rapid fracture and/or spontaneous oxidation (exothermic) of minute particles emanating from the fracture cause initiation of the reaction. Under conditions of slow fracture, however, the small heat generated may be adequately dissipated and the reaction is not initiated. A portion of the study conducted consisted of investigating various means by which the reaction might be retarded or prevented. Providing a "barrier" at the titanium-oxygen interface consisting of either aluminum metal or a coating of a petroleum base corrosion inhibitor appeared to be only partially effective in retarding the reaction. The accidental puncturing or similar rupturing of thin-walled pressurized oxygen tanks on missiles and space vehicle will usually constitute loss of function, and may sometimes cause their catastrophic destruction

  7. Oxygen chemisorption cryogenic refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    The present invention relates to a chemisorption compressor cryogenic refrigerator which employs oxygen to provide cooling at 60 to 100 K. The invention includes dual vessels containing an oxygen absorbent material, alternately heated and cooled to provide a continuous flow of high pressure oxygen, multiple heat exchangers for precooling the oxygen, a Joule-Thomson expansion valve system for expanding the oxygen to partially liquefy it and a liquid oxygen pressure vessel. The primary novelty is that, while it was believed that once oxygen combined with an element or compound the reaction could not reverse to release gaseous oxygen, in this case oxygen will indeed react in a reversible fashion with certain materials and will do so at temperatures and pressures which make it practical for incorporation into a cryogenic refrigeration system.

  8. The story of oxygen.

    PubMed

    Heffner, John E

    2013-01-01

    The history of oxygen from discovery to clinical application for patients with chronic lung disease represents a long and storied journey. Within a relatively short period, early investigators not only discovered oxygen but also recognized its importance to life and its role in respiration. The application of oxygen to chronic lung disease, however, took several centuries. In the modern era, physiologists pursued the chemical nature of oxygen and its physiologic interaction with cellular metabolism and gas transport. It took brazen clinicians, however, to pursue oxygen as a therapeutic resource for patients with chronic lung disease because of the concern in the 20th century of the risks of oxygen toxicity. Application of ambulatory oxygen devices allowed landmark investigations of the long-term effects of continuous oxygen that established its safety and efficacy. Although now well established for hypoxic patients, many questions remain regarding the benefits of oxygen for varying severity and types of chronic lung disease. PMID:23271817

  9. Adequate Iodine Status in New Zealand School Children Post-Fortification of Bread with Iodised Salt

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Emma; McLean, Rachael; Davies, Briar; Hawkins, Rochelle; Meiklejohn, Eva; Ma, Zheng Feei; Skeaff, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    Iodine deficiency re-emerged in New Zealand in the 1990s, prompting the mandatory fortification of bread with iodised salt from 2009. This study aimed to determine the iodine status of New Zealand children when the fortification of bread was well established. A cross-sectional survey of children aged 8–10 years was conducted in the cities of Auckland and Christchurch, New Zealand, from March to May 2015. Children provided a spot urine sample for the determination of urinary iodine concentration (UIC), a fingerpick blood sample for Thyroglobulin (Tg) concentration, and completed a questionnaire ascertaining socio-demographic information that also included an iodine-specific food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). The FFQ was used to estimate iodine intake from all main food sources including bread and iodised salt. The median UIC for all children (n = 415) was 116 μg/L (females 106 μg/L, males 131 μg/L) indicative of adequate iodine status according to the World Health Organisation (WHO, i.e., median UIC of 100–199 μg/L). The median Tg concentration was 8.7 μg/L, which was <10 μg/L confirming adequate iodine status. There was a significant difference in UIC by sex (p = 0.001) and ethnicity (p = 0.006). The mean iodine intake from the food-only model was 65 μg/day. Bread contributed 51% of total iodine intake in the food-only model, providing a mean iodine intake of 35 μg/day. The mean iodine intake from the food-plus-iodised salt model was 101 μg/day. In conclusion, the results of this study confirm that the iodine status in New Zealand school children is now adequate. PMID:27196925

  10. Adequate Iodine Status in New Zealand School Children Post-Fortification of Bread with Iodised Salt.

    PubMed

    Jones, Emma; McLean, Rachael; Davies, Briar; Hawkins, Rochelle; Meiklejohn, Eva; Ma, Zheng Feei; Skeaff, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    Iodine deficiency re-emerged in New Zealand in the 1990s, prompting the mandatory fortification of bread with iodised salt from 2009. This study aimed to determine the iodine status of New Zealand children when the fortification of bread was well established. A cross-sectional survey of children aged 8-10 years was conducted in the cities of Auckland and Christchurch, New Zealand, from March to May 2015. Children provided a spot urine sample for the determination of urinary iodine concentration (UIC), a fingerpick blood sample for Thyroglobulin (Tg) concentration, and completed a questionnaire ascertaining socio-demographic information that also included an iodine-specific food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). The FFQ was used to estimate iodine intake from all main food sources including bread and iodised salt. The median UIC for all children (n = 415) was 116 μg/L (females 106 μg/L, males 131 μg/L) indicative of adequate iodine status according to the World Health Organisation (WHO, i.e., median UIC of 100-199 μg/L). The median Tg concentration was 8.7 μg/L, which was <10 μg/L confirming adequate iodine status. There was a significant difference in UIC by sex (p = 0.001) and ethnicity (p = 0.006). The mean iodine intake from the food-only model was 65 μg/day. Bread contributed 51% of total iodine intake in the food-only model, providing a mean iodine intake of 35 μg/day. The mean iodine intake from the food-plus-iodised salt model was 101 μg/day. In conclusion, the results of this study confirm that the iodine status in New Zealand school children is now adequate. PMID:27196925

  11. Chronic leg ulcer: does a patient always get a correct diagnosis and adequate treatment?

    PubMed

    Mooij, Michael C; Huisman, Laurens C

    2016-03-01

    Patients with chronic leg ulcers have severely impaired quality of life and account for a high percentage of annual healthcare costs. To establish the cause of a chronic leg ulcer, referral to a center with a multidisciplinary team of professionals is often necessary. Treating the underlying cause diminishes healing time and reduces costs. In venous leg ulcers adequate compression therapy is still a problem. It can be improved by training the professionals with pressure measuring devices. A perfect fitting of elastic stockings is important to prevent venous leg ulcer recurrence. In most cases, custom-made stockings are the best choice for this purpose. PMID:26916772

  12. Determining Adequate Margins in Head and Neck Cancers: Practice and Continued Challenges.

    PubMed

    Williams, Michelle D

    2016-09-01

    Margin assessment remains a critical component of oncologic care for head and neck cancer patients. As an integrated team, both surgeons and pathologists work together to assess margins in these complex patients. Differences in method of margin sampling can impact obtainable information and effect outcomes. Additionally, what distance is an "adequate or clear" margin for patient care continues to be debated. Ultimately, future studies and potentially secondary modalities to augment pathologic assessment of margin assessment (i.e., in situ imaging or molecular assessment) may enhance local control in head and neck cancer patients. PMID:27469263

  13. Family Structure Types and Adequate Utilization of Antenatal Care in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Owili, Patrick Opiyo; Muga, Miriam Adoyo; Chou, Yiing-Jenq; Hsu, Yi-Hsin Elsa; Huang, Nicole; Chien, Li-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Features of the health care delivery system may not be the only expounding factors of adequate utilization of antenatal care among women. Other social factors such as the family structure and its environment contribute toward pregnant women's utilization of antenatal care. An understanding of how women in different family structure types and social groups use basic maternal health services is important toward developing and implementing maternal health care policy in the post-Millennium Development Goal era, especially in the sub-Saharan Africa where maternal mortality still remains high. PMID:27214674

  14. Working group on the “adequate minimum” V=volcanic observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tilling, R.I.

    1982-01-01

    A working group consisting of R. I. Tilling (United States, Chairman), M. Espendola (Mexico), E. Malavassi (Costa Rica), L. Villari (Italy), and J.P Viode (France) met on the island of Guadeloupe on February 20, 1981, to discuss informally the requirements for a "Minimum" volcano observatory, one which would have the essential monitoring equipment and staff to provide reliable information on the state of an active volcno. Given the premise that any monitoring of a volcano is better than none at all, the owrking group then proceeded to consider the concept of an "adequate minimum" observatory. 

  15. Atomic transport of oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Routbort, J.L.; Tomlins, G.W.

    1994-06-15

    Atomic transport of oxygen in nonstoichiometric oxides is an extremely important topic which overlaps science and technology. In many cases the diffusion of oxygen controls sintering, grain growth, and creep. High oxygen diffusivity is critical for efficient operation of many fuel cells. Additionally, oxygen diffusivities are an essential ingredient in any point defect model. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) is the most accurate modern technique to measure oxygen tracer diffusion. This paper briefly reviews the principles and applications of SIMS for the measurement of oxygen transport. Case studies are taken from recent work on ZnO and some high-temperature superconductors.

  16. Perioperative use of oxygen: variabilities across age.

    PubMed

    Habre, W; Peták, F

    2014-12-01

    Enormous interest has emerged in the perioperative use of high concentrations of inspired oxygen in an attempt to increase tissue oxygenation and thereby improve postoperative outcome. An extensive debate has arisen regarding the risk/benefit ratio of oxygen therapy, with some researchers advocating the benefits of perioperative hyperoxia, particularly with regard to surgical site infection, whereas others emphasize its detrimental consequences on multiple organs, particularly the lungs and the brain. As one aspect of this debate, there is increased awareness of effects of reactive oxygen metabolites, a feature that contributes to the complexity of achieving consensus regarding optimum oxygen concentration in the perioperative period. Many reviews have discussed the pros and cons in the use of perioperative oxygen supplementation, but the potential importance of age-related factors in hyperoxia has not been addressed. The present narrative review provides a comprehensive overview of the physiological mechanisms and clinical outcomes across the age range from neonates to the elderly. Risks greatly outweigh the benefits of hyperoxia both in the very young, where growth and development are the hallmarks, and in the elderly, where ageing increases sensitivity to oxidative stress. Conversely, in middle age, benefits of short-term administration of perioperative oxygen therapy exceed potential adverse change effects, and thus, oxygen supplementation can be considered an important therapy to improve anaesthesia management. PMID:25498579

  17. Oxygen consumption dynamics in steady-state tumour models.

    PubMed

    Grimes, David Robert; Fletcher, Alexander G; Partridge, Mike

    2014-09-01

    Oxygen levels in cancerous tissue can have a significant effect on treatment response: hypoxic tissue is both more radioresistant and more chemoresistant than well-oxygenated tissue. While recent advances in medical imaging have facilitated real-time observation of macroscopic oxygenation, the underlying physics limits the resolution to the millimetre domain, whereas oxygen tension varies over a micrometre scale. If the distribution of oxygen in the tumour micro-environment can be accurately estimated, then the effect of potential dose escalation to these hypoxic regions could be better modelled, allowing more realistic simulation of biologically adaptive treatments. Reaction-diffusion models are commonly used for modelling oxygen dynamics, with a variety of functional forms assumed for the dependence of oxygen consumption rate (OCR) on cellular status and local oxygen availability. In this work, we examine reaction-diffusion models of oxygen consumption in spherically and cylindrically symmetric geometries. We consider two different descriptions of oxygen consumption: one in which the rate of consumption is constant and one in which it varies with oxygen tension in a hyperbolic manner. In each case, we derive analytic approximations to the steady-state oxygen distribution, which are shown to closely match the numerical solutions of the equations and accurately predict the extent to which oxygen can diffuse. The derived expressions relate the limit to which oxygen can diffuse into a tissue to the OCR of that tissue. We also demonstrate that differences between these functional forms are likely to be negligible within the range of literature estimates of the hyperbolic oxygen constant, suggesting that the constant consumption rate approximation suffices for modelling oxygen dynamics for most values of OCR. These approximations also allow the rapid identification of situations where hyperbolic consumption forms can result in significant differences from constant

  18. Hyperbaric oxygenation in fluid microembolism.

    PubMed

    James, Philip B

    2007-03-01

    Because clinicians require objectively demonstrable neurological deficits to confirm a diagnosis, the recognition of embolic events in the nervous system is generally restricted to the effects of ischemic necrosis produced by arterial occlusion. However, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has shown that lesser degrees of damage associated with small emboli are common, especially in the mid brain, and are usually clinically silent. They are frequently associated with atheromatous embolism in the elderly, but microembolic debris, such as fat, is common in the systemic venous return of healthy people and generally trapped in the microcirculation of the lung being removed by phagocytosis. However, pulmonary filtration may fail and microemboli may also pass through an atrial septal defect in so-called 'paradoxical' embolism. Studies of bubbles formed on decompression in diving have demonstrated the importance of pulmonary filtration in the protection of the nervous system and that filtration is size dependant, as small bubbles may escape entrapment. Fluid and even small solid emboli, arresting in or passing through the cerebral circulation, do not cause infarction, but disturb the blood-brain barrier inducing what has been termed the 'perivenous syndrome'. The nutrition of areas of the white matter of both the cerebral medulla and the spinal cord depends on long draining veins which have been shown to have surrounding capillary free zones. Because of the high oxygen extraction in the microcirculation of the gray matter of the central nervous system, the venous blood has low oxygen content. When this is reduced further by embolic events, tissue oxygenation may fall to critically low levels, leading to blood-brain barrier dysfunction, inflammation, demyelination and eventually, axonal damage. These are the hallmarks of the early lesions of multiple sclerosis where MR spectroscopy has also shown the presence of lactic acid. Significant elevation of the venous oxygen tension

  19. Maintaining Adequate CO2 Washout for an Advanced EMU via a New Rapid Cycle Amine Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chullen, Cinda; Conger, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    Over the past several years, NASA has realized tremendous progress in Extravehicular Activity (EVA) technology development. This has been evidenced by the progressive development of a new Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) system for the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (AEMU) Portable Life Support Subsystem (PLSS). The PLSS is responsible for the life support of the crew member in the spacesuit. The RCA technology is responsible for carbon dioxide (CO2) and humidity control. Another aspect of the RCA is that it is on-back vacuum-regenerable, efficient, and reliable. The RCA also simplifies the PLSS schematic by eliminating the need for a condensing heat exchanger for humidity control in the current EMU. As development progresses on the RCA, it is important that the sizing be optimized so that the demand on the PLSS battery is minimized. As well, maintaining the CO2 washout at adequate levels during an EVA is an absolute requirement of the RCA and associated ventilation system. Testing has been underway in-house at NASA Johnson Space Center and analysis has been initiated to evaluate whether the technology provides exemplary performance in ensuring that the CO2 is removed sufficiently and the ventilation flow is adequate for maintaining CO2 washout in the AEMU spacesuit helmet of the crew member during an EVA. This paper will review the recent developments of the RCA unit, testing planned in-house with a spacesuit simulator, and the associated analytical work along with insights from the medical aspect on the testing. 1

  20. Adequately-Sized Nanocarriers Allow Sustained Targeted Drug Delivery to Neointimal Lesions in Rat Arteries.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Ryosuke; Miura, Yutaka; Koyama, Hiroyuki; Chida, Tsukasa; Anraku, Yasutaka; Kishimura, Akihiro; Shigematsu, Kunihiro; Kataoka, Kazunori; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2016-06-01

    In atherosclerotic lesions, the endothelial barrier against the bloodstream can become compromised, resulting in the exposure of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and intimal cells beneath. In theory, this allows adequately sized nanocarriers in circulation to infiltrate into the intimal lesion intravascularly. We sought to evaluate this possibility using rat carotid arteries with induced neointima. Cy5-labeled polyethylene glycol-conjugated polyion complex (PIC) micelles and vesicles, with diameters of 40, 100, or 200 nm (PICs-40, PICs-100, and PICs-200, respectively) were intravenously administered to rats after injury to the carotid artery using a balloon catheter. High accumulation and long retention of PICs-40 in the induced neointima was confirmed by in vivo imaging, while the accumulation of PICs-100 and PICs-200 was limited, indicating that the size of nanocarriers is a crucial factor for efficient delivery. Furthermore, epirubicin-incorporated polymeric micelles with a diameter similar to that of PICs-40 showed significant curative effects in rats with induced neointima, in terms of lesion size and cell number. Specific and effective drug delivery to pre-existing neointimal lesions was demonstrated with adequate size control of the nanocarriers. We consider that this nanocarrier-based drug delivery system could be utilized for the treatment of atherosclerosis. PMID:27183493