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Sample records for adequate tissue oxygenation

  1. Adipose Tissue - Adequate, Accessible Regenerative Material

    PubMed Central

    Kolaparthy, Lakshmi Kanth.; Sanivarapu, Sahitya; Moogla, Srinivas; Kutcham, Rupa Sruthi

    2015-01-01

    The potential use of stem cell based therapies for the repair and regeneration of various tissues offers a paradigm shift that may provide alternative therapeutic solutions for a number of diseases. The use of either embryonic stem cells (ESCs) or induced pluripotent stem cells in clinical situations is limited due to cell regulations and to technical and ethical considerations involved in genetic manipulation of human ESCs, even though these cells are highly beneficial. Mesenchymal stem cells seen to be an ideal population of stem cells in particular, Adipose derived stem cells (ASCs) which can be obtained in large number and easily harvested from adipose tissue. It is ubiquitously available and has several advantages compared to other sources as easily accessible in large quantities with minimal invasive harvesting procedure, and isolation of adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells yield a high amount of stem cells which is essential for stem cell based therapies and tissue engineering. Recently, periodontal tissue regeneration using ASCs has been examined in some animal models. This method has potential in the regeneration of functional periodontal tissues because various secreted growth factors from ASCs might not only promote the regeneration of periodontal tissues but also encourage neovascularization of the damaged tissues. This review summarizes the sources, isolation and characteristics of adipose derived stem cells and its potential role in periodontal regeneration is discussed. PMID:26634060

  2. Adipose Tissue - Adequate, Accessible Regenerative Material.

    PubMed

    Kolaparthy, Lakshmi Kanth; Sanivarapu, Sahitya; Moogla, Srinivas; Kutcham, Rupa Sruthi

    2015-11-01

    The potential use of stem cell based therapies for the repair and regeneration of various tissues offers a paradigm shift that may provide alternative therapeutic solutions for a number of diseases. The use of either embryonic stem cells (ESCs) or induced pluripotent stem cells in clinical situations is limited due to cell regulations and to technical and ethical considerations involved in genetic manipulation of human ESCs, even though these cells are highly beneficial. Mesenchymal stem cells seen to be an ideal population of stem cells in particular, Adipose derived stem cells (ASCs) which can be obtained in large number and easily harvested from adipose tissue. It is ubiquitously available and has several advantages compared to other sources as easily accessible in large quantities with minimal invasive harvesting procedure, and isolation of adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells yield a high amount of stem cells which is essential for stem cell based therapies and tissue engineering. Recently, periodontal tissue regeneration using ASCs has been examined in some animal models. This method has potential in the regeneration of functional periodontal tissues because various secreted growth factors from ASCs might not only promote the regeneration of periodontal tissues but also encourage neovascularization of the damaged tissues. This review summarizes the sources, isolation and characteristics of adipose derived stem cells and its potential role in periodontal regeneration is discussed. PMID:26634060

  3. Measuring tissue oxygenation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soyemi, Olusola O. (Inventor); Soller, Babs R. (Inventor); Yang, Ye (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Methods and systems for calculating tissue oxygenation, e.g., oxygen saturation, in a target tissue are disclosed. In some embodiments, the methods include: (a) directing incident radiation to a target tissue and determining reflectance spectra of the target tissue by measuring intensities of reflected radiation from the target tissue at a plurality of radiation wavelengths; (b) correcting the measured intensities of the reflectance spectra to reduce contributions thereto from skin and fat layers through which the incident radiation propagates; (c) determining oxygen saturation in the target tissue based on the corrected reflectance spectra; and (d) outputting the determined value of oxygen saturation.

  4. Tissue oxygen measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soller, Babs R. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A device and method in accordance with the invention for determining the oxygen partial pressure (PO.sub.2) of a tissue by irradiating the tissue with optical radiation such that the light is emitted from the tissue, and by collecting the reflected or transmitted light from the tissue to form an optical spectrum. A spectral processor determines the PO.sub.2 level in tissue by processing this spectrum with a previously-constructed spectral calibration model. The tissue may, for example, be disposed underneath a covering tissue, such as skin, of a patient, and the tissue illuminated and light collected through the skin. Alternatively, direct tissue illumination and collection may be effected with a hand-held or endoscopic probe. A preferred system also determines pH from the same spectrum, and the processor may determine critical conditions and issue warnings based on parameter values.

  5. Oxygen Delivering Biomaterials for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Farris, Ashley L.; Rindone, Alexandra N.; Grayson, Warren L.

    2016-01-01

    Tissue engineering (TE) has provided promising strategies for regenerating tissue defects, but few TE approaches have been translated for clinical applications. One major barrier in TE is providing adequate oxygen supply to implanted tissue scaffolds, since oxygen diffusion from surrounding vasculature in vivo is limited to the periphery of the scaffolds. Moreover, oxygen is also an important signaling molecule for controlling stem cell differentiation within TE scaffolds. Various technologies have been developed to increase oxygen delivery in vivo and enhance the effectiveness of TE strategies. Such technologies include hyperbaric oxygen therapy, perfluorocarbon- and hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers, and oxygen-generating, peroxide-based materials. Here, we provide an overview of the underlying mechanisms and how these technologies have been utilized for in vivo TE applications. Emerging technologies and future prospects for oxygen delivery in TE are also discussed to evaluate the progress of this field towards clinical translation. PMID:27453782

  6. Microcirculatory dysfunction and tissue oxygenation in critical illness.

    PubMed

    Østergaard, L; Granfeldt, A; Secher, N; Tietze, A; Iversen, N K; Jensen, M S; Andersen, K K; Nagenthiraja, K; Gutiérrez-Lizardi, P; Mouridsen, K; Jespersen, S N; Tønnesen, E K

    2015-11-01

    Severe sepsis is defined by organ failure, often of the kidneys, heart, and brain. It has been proposed that inadequate delivery of oxygen, or insufficient extraction of oxygen in tissue, may explain organ failure. Despite adequate maintenance of systemic oxygen delivery in septic patients, their morbidity and mortality remain high. The assumption that tissue oxygenation can be preserved by maintaining its blood supply follows from physiological models that only apply to tissue with uniformly perfused capillaries. In sepsis, the microcirculation is profoundly disturbed, and the blood supply of individual organs may therefore no longer reflect their access to oxygen. We review how capillary flow patterns affect oxygen extraction efficacy in tissue, and how the regulation of tissue blood flow must be adjusted to meet the metabolic needs of the tissue as capillary flows become disturbed as observed in critical illness. Using the brain, heart, and kidney as examples, we discuss whether disturbed capillary flow patterns might explain the apparent mismatch between organ blood flow and organ function in sepsis. Finally, we discuss diagnostic means of detecting capillary flow disturbance in animal models and in critically ill patients, and address therapeutic strategies that might improve tissue oxygenation by modifying capillary flow patterns. PMID:26149711

  7. Nonsteady state oxygen transport in engineered tissue: implications for design.

    PubMed

    Ehsan, Seema M; George, Steven C

    2013-06-01

    Engineered tissue constructs are limited in size, and thus clinical relevance, when diffusion is the primary mode of oxygen transport. Understanding the extent of oxygen diffusion and cellular consumption is necessary for the design of engineered tissues, particularly those intended for implantation into hypoxic wound sites. This study presents a combined experimental and computation model to predict design constraints for cellularized fibrin tissues subjected to a step change in the oxygen concentration to simulate transplantation. Nonsteady state analysis of oxygen diffusion and consumption was used to estimate the diffusion coefficient of oxygen (mean±SD, 1.7×10(-9)±8.4×10(-11) m(2)/s) in fibrin hydrogels as well as the Michaelis-Menten parameters, Vmax (1.3×10(-17)±9.2×10(-19) mol·cell(-1)·s(-1)), and Km (8.0×10(-3)±3.5×0(-3) mol/m(3)), of normal human lung fibroblasts. Nondimensionalization of the governing diffusion-reaction equation enabled the creation of a single dimensionless parameter, the Thiele modulus (φ), which encompasses the combined effects of oxygen diffusion, consumption, and tissue dimensions. Tissue thickness is the design parameter with the most pronounced influence on the distribution of oxygen within the system. Additionally, tissues designed such that φ<1 achieve a near spatially uniform and adequate oxygen concentration following the step change. Understanding and optimizing the Thiele modulus will improve the design of engineered tissue implants.

  8. Theory of oxygen transport to tissue.

    PubMed

    Popel, A S

    1989-01-01

    This review focuses on the theory of oxygen transport to tissue and presents the state of the art in mathematical modeling of transport phenomena. Results obtained with the classic Krogh tissue-cylinder model and recent advances in mathematical modeling of hemoglobin-oxygen kinetics, the role of hemoglobin and myoglobin in facilitating oxygen diffusion, and the role of morphologic and hemodynamic heterogeneities in oxygen transport in the microcirculation are critically discussed. Mathematical models simulate different parts of the pathway of oxygen molecules from the red blood cell, through the plasma, the endothelial cell, other elements of the vascular wall, and the extra- and intracellular space. Special attention in the review is devoted to intracapillary transport, which has been the subject of intensive theoretical research in the last decade. Models of pre- and postcapillary oxygen transport are also discussed. Applications to specific organs and tissues are reviewed, including skeletal muscle, myocardium, brain, lungs, arterial wall, and skin. Unresolved problems and major gaps in our knowledge of the mechanisms of oxygen transport are identified.

  9. Brain Tissue Oxygen Monitoring in Neurocritical Care.

    PubMed

    De Georgia, Michael A

    2015-12-01

    Brain injury results from ischemia, tissue hypoxia, and a cascade of secondary events. The cornerstone of neurocritical care management is optimization and maintenance of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and oxygen and substrate delivery to prevent or attenuate this secondary damage. New techniques for monitoring brain tissue oxygen tension (PtiO2) are now available. Brain PtiO2 reflects both oxygen delivery and consumption. Brain hypoxia (low brain PtiO2) has been associated with poor outcomes in patients with brain injury. Strategies to improve brain PtiO2 have focused mainly on increasing oxygen delivery either by increasing CBF or by increasing arterial oxygen content. The results of nonrandomized studies comparing brain PtiO2-guided therapy with intracranial pressure/cerebral perfusion pressure-guided therapy, while promising, have been mixed. More studies are needed including prospective, randomized controlled trials to assess the true value of this approach. The following is a review of the physiology of brain tissue oxygenation, the effect of brain hypoxia on outcome, strategies to increase oxygen delivery, and outcome studies of brain PtiO2-guided therapy in neurocritical care.

  10. Metabolic Prosthesis for Oxygenation of Ischemic Tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, Elias

    2009-01-01

    This communication discloses new ideas and preliminary results on the development of a "metabolic prosthesis" for local oxygenation of ischemic tissue under physiological neutral conditions. We report for the first time the selective electrolysis of physiological saline by repetitively pulsed charge-limited electrolysis for the production of oxygen and suppression of free chlorine. For example, using 800 A amplitude current pulses and <200 sec pulse durations, we demonstrated prompt oxygen production and delayed chlorine production at the surface of a shiny 0.85 mm diameter spherical platinum electrode. The data, interpreted in terms of the ionic structure of the electric double layer, suggest a strategy for in situ production of metabolic oxygen via a new class of "smart" prosthetic implants for dealing with ischemic disease such as diabetic retinopathy. We also present data indicating that drift of the local pH of the oxygenated environment can be held constant using a feedback-controlled three electrode electrolysis system that chooses anode and cathode pair based on pH data provided by local microsensors. The work is discussed in the context of diabetic retinopathy since surgical techniques for multielectrode prosthetic implants aimed at retinal degenerative diseases have been developed.

  11. Relationship of oxygen dose to angiogenesis induction in irradiated tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Marx, R.E.; Ehler, W.J.; Tayapongsak, P.; Pierce, L.W. )

    1990-11-01

    This study was accomplished in an irradiated rabbit model to assess the angiogenic properties of normobaric oxygen and hyperbaric oxygen as compared with air-breathing controls. Results indicated that normobaric oxygen had no angiogenic properties above normal revascularization of irradiated tissue than did air-breathing controls (p = 0.89). Hyperbaric oxygen demonstrated an eight- to ninefold increased vascular density over both normobaric oxygen and air-breathing controls (p = 0.001). Irradiated tissue develops a hypovascular-hypocellular-hypoxic tissue that does not revascularize spontaneously. Results failed to demonstrate an angiogenic effect of normobaric oxygen. It is suggested that oxygen in this sense is a drug requiring hyperbaric pressures to generate therapeutic effects on chronically hypovascular irradiated tissue.

  12. Precise ablation of dental hard tissues with ultra-short pulsed lasers. Preliminary exploratory investigation on adequate laser parameters.

    PubMed

    Bello-Silva, Marina Stella; Wehner, Martin; Eduardo, Carlos de Paula; Lampert, Friedrich; Poprawe, Reinhart; Hermans, Martin; Esteves-Oliveira, Marcella

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the possibility of introducing ultra-short pulsed lasers (USPL) in restorative dentistry by maintaining the well-known benefits of lasers for caries removal, but also overcoming disadvantages, such as thermal damage of irradiated substrate. USPL ablation of dental hard tissues was investigated in two phases. Phase 1--different wavelengths (355, 532, 1,045, and 1,064 nm), pulse durations (picoseconds and femtoseconds) and irradiation parameters (scanning speed, output power, and pulse repetition rate) were assessed for enamel and dentin. Ablation rate was determined, and the temperature increase measured in real time. Phase 2--the most favorable laser parameters were evaluated to correlate temperature increase to ablation rate and ablation efficiency. The influence of cooling methods (air, air-water spray) on ablation process was further analyzed. All parameters tested provided precise and selective tissue ablation. For all lasers, faster scanning speeds resulted in better interaction and reduced temperature increase. The most adequate results were observed for the 1064-nm ps-laser and the 1045-nm fs-laser. Forced cooling caused moderate changes in temperature increase, but reduced ablation, being considered unnecessary during irradiation with USPL. For dentin, the correlation between temperature increase and ablation efficiency was satisfactory for both pulse durations, while for enamel, the best correlation was observed for fs-laser, independently of the power used. USPL may be suitable for cavity preparation in dentin and enamel, since effective ablation and low temperature increase were observed. If adequate laser parameters are selected, this technique seems to be promising for promoting the laser-assisted, minimally invasive approach.

  13. A comparative study of oxygen diffusion in tissue engineering scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Fiedler, T; Belova, I V; Murch, G E; Poologasundarampillai, G; Jones, J R; Roether, J A; Boccaccini, A R

    2014-11-01

    Tissue engineering scaffolds are designed to support tissue self-healing within physiological environments by promoting the attachment, growth and differentiation of relevant cells. Newly formed tissue must be supplied with sufficient levels of oxygen to prevent necrosis. Oxygen diffusion is the major transport mechanism before vascularization is completed and oxygen is predominantly supplied via blood vessels. The present study compares different designs for scaffolds in the context of their oxygen diffusion ability. In all cases, oxygen diffusion is confined to the scaffold pores that are assumed to be completely occupied by newly formed tissue. The solid phase of the scaffolds acts as diffusion barrier that locally inhibits oxygen diffusion, i.e. no oxygen passes through the scaffold material. As a result, the oxygen diffusivity is determined by the scaffold porosity and pore architecture. Lattice Monte Carlo simulations are performed to compare the normalized oxygen diffusivities in scaffolds obtained by the foam replication (FR) method, robocasting and sol-gel foaming. Scaffolds made by the FR method were found to have the highest oxygen diffusivity due to their high porosity and interconnected pores. These structures enable the best oxygen supply for newly formed tissue among the scaffold types considered according to the present numerical predictions.

  14. MRI of brain tissue oxygen tension under hyperbaric conditions.

    PubMed

    Muir, Eric R; Cardenas, Damon P; Duong, Timothy Q

    2016-06-01

    The brain depends on a continuous supply of oxygen to maintain its structural and functional integrity. This study measured T1 from MRI under normobaric air, normobaric oxygen, hyperbaric air, and hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) conditions as a marker of tissue pO2 since dissolved molecular oxygen acts as an endogenous contrast agent. Brain tissue T1 decreased corresponding to increased pO2 with increasing inhaled oxygen concentrations, and tissue oxygenation was estimated from the T1 changes between different inhaled oxygen levels. Tissue pO2 difference maps between different oxygen conditions showed heterogeneous pO2 changes in the brain. MRI-derived tissue pO2 was markedly lower than the arterial pO2 but was slightly higher than venous pO2. Additionally, for comparison with published extracellular tissue pO2 data obtained using oxygen electrodes and other invasive techniques, a model was used to estimate extracellular and intracellular pO2 from the MRI-derived mean tissue pO2. This required multiple assumptions, and so the effects of the assumptions and parameters used in modeling brain pO2 were evaluated. MRI-derived pO2 values were strongly dependent on assumptions about the extra- and intracellular compartments but were relatively less sensitive to variations in the relaxivity constant of oxygen and contribution from oxygen in the cerebral blood compartment. This approach may prove useful in evaluating tissue oxygenation in disease states such as stroke.

  15. Hypercapnia Improves Tissue Oxygenation in Morbidly Obese Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hager, Helmut; Reddy, Dayakar; Mandadi, Goutham; Pulley, Debra; Eagon, J Chris; Sessler, Daniel I; Kurz, Andrea

    2006-01-01

    Risk of wound infection is increased in morbidly obese surgical patients, in part because a major determinant of wound infection risk, tissue oxygenation, is marginal. Unlike in lean patients, supplemental inspired oxygen (FIO2) only slightly improves tissue oxygenation in obese patients. Mild hypercapnia improves tissue oxygenation in lean, but has not been evaluated in obese patients. We thus tested the hypothesis that mild hypercapnia markedly improves tissue oxygenation in morbidly obese patients given FIO2 80% during major abdominal surgery. Thirty obese patients (body mass index 61.5±17 kg/m2) scheduled for open gastric bypass were randomly assigned to normocapnia (n=15, end-tidal PCO2 35 mmHg) or hypercapnia (n=15, end-tidal PCO2 50 mmHg); FIO2 was 80%. Anesthetic management and other confounding factors were controlled. Tissue oxygen tension was measured subcutaneously at the upper arm using a polarographic probe in a silastic tonometer. Demographic characteristics, cardiovascular measurements, and PaO2 (222±48 versus 230±68 mmHg in normocapnic versus hypercapnic; mean±SD, P=0.705) were comparable in the groups. Tissue oxygen tension, however, was greater in hypercapnic than in normocapnic patients (78±31 versus 56±13 mmHg, P=0.029). Mild hypercapnia increased tissue oxygenation by an amount believed to be clinically important and could potentially reduce the risk of surgical wound infection in morbidly obese patients. PMID:16931680

  16. [Recognition of tissue oxygen debt in clinical settings].

    PubMed

    Kopić, J; Jelić, J

    1998-01-01

    Despite intensive treatment, a great proportion of ICU patients is resuscitated incompletely. Presence of tissue oxygen debt is the crucial pathophysiologic element of multiple organ failure development and death in these patients. Parameters of oxygen metabolism, monitored in time, except prognostic value give us the possibility of therapeutic intervention, oriented to the prevention of multiple organ failure. In addition to parameters of global oxygen transport and utilization, gastric tonometry has been used in recent years, as a method for organ specific identification of tissue oxygen debt. In the article are considered acceptable and available options of solving this problem in everyday clinical work. PMID:9769634

  17. Is mean blood saturation a useful marker of tissue oxygenation?

    PubMed

    Thorn, Clare E; Matcher, Stephen J; Meglinski, Igor V; Shore, Angela C

    2009-05-01

    Increasingly we are monitoring the distribution of oxygen through the microcirculation using optical techniques such as optical reflectance spectroscopy (ORS) and near-infrared spectroscopy. Mean blood oxygen saturation (S(mb)O(2)) and tissue oxygenation index measured by these two techniques, respectively, evoke a concept of the measurement of oxygen delivery to tissue. This study aims to establish whether S(mb)O(2) is an appropriate indicator of tissue oxygenation. Spontaneous fluctuations in S(mb)O(2) observed as changes in concentration of oxyhemoglobin ([HbO(2)]) and deoxyhemoglobin ([Hb]) were measured by ORS in the skin microcirculation of 30 healthy subjects (15 men, age 21-42 yr). Fourier analysis identified two distinctly different spontaneous falls in S(mb)O(2). The first type of swing, thought to be induced by fluctuations in arterial blood volume, resulted from the effects of respiration, endothelial, sympathetic, and myogenic activity. There was no apparent change in [Hb]. In contrast, a second type of swing resulted from a fall in [HbO(2)] accompanied by a rise in [Hb] and was only induced by endothelial and sympathetic activity. Thus the same fall in S(mb)O(2) can be induced by two distinct responses. A "type I" swing does not suggest an inadequacy in oxygen delivery whereas a "type II" swing may indicate a change in oxygen delivery from blood to tissue. S(mb)O(2) alone cannot therefore be accepted as a definitive marker of tissue oxygenation.

  18. Adequate evaluation of HSL mass and activity in rat adipose tissue in fasting and aging-related obesity.

    PubMed

    Tsujita, Takahiro; Sumiyoshi, Maho; Morimoto, Chie; Kameda, Kenji; Okuda, Hiromichi

    2002-04-01

    Adipose tissue is a unique tissue because its mass is readily changed by altering nutritional conditions. Therefore the activity and content of enzyme in the adipose tissue is significantly differed according to the way of their presentation: per g tissue, per whole tissue, or per cell number. In the present study, the effects of the ways of expressing the hormone sensitive lipase (HSL) activity and content were studied in rat by decreasing or increasing adipose tissue. Fasting caused a progressive decline in body weight and in the weight of the epididymal fat pad. When the HSL content was expressed per g of adipose tissue, the lipase activity and immunoreactive HSL protein content in fasting rats were higher than those in fed rats. On the other hand, when they were expressed as per fat pad, the lipase activity and immunoreactive HSL protein in fasting rats were lower than those in fed rats. The opposite results were observed in obesity. When the HSL content was expressed per g of adipose tissue, the lipase activity and immunoreactive HSL protein in obese rats were lower than in control rats. However, when the HSL content was expressed per fat pad, the lipase activity and immunoreactive HSL protein in the obese rats were higher than in the control rats. Therefore we must pay careful attention to the way of presentation of adipose tissue enzyme contents.

  19. Noncontact tissue oxygenation measurement using near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niwayama, Masatsugu; Murata, Hideaki; Shinohara, Shigenobu

    2006-07-01

    Here, we present a noncontact tissue oxygenation monitor that uses near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). We examined changes in sensitivity of tissue oxygenation measurement due to changes in the distance between the optical probe and the skin surface using a Monte Carlo simulation and in vivo tests. We also examined the effects of skin and fat layer thickness. Photon migration was analyzed in a model consisting of the skin, fat, and muscle layers. The relationship between measurement sensitivity and the probe-tissue distance was obtained from the results of the simulation and was used for correction of measurements. A noncontact tissue oximeter was used to perform the in vivo tests and measure oxygen consumption of the forearm muscle. The value of corrected oxygen consumption was 0.12±0.03ml/(100gmin), which is consistent with previously reported values obtained using contact NIRS measurement and magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Quantitative measurement of oxygenation using noncontact NIRS is potentially useful for novel applications such as quantification of inflammation.

  20. Luminescence lifetime determination for oxygen imaging in human tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lochmann, C.; Häupl, T.; Beuthan, J.

    2008-02-01

    Imaging and monitoring of biochemical parameters in vitro and in vivo have become the goal of many investigations in medical physics. The main imaging technique used is laser-induced luminescence due to its cost effectiveness and diversity of applications [1]. One key parameter in medical investigations, for instance to control photodynamic therapy, is the molecular oxygen concentration. The use of optical methods provides possible means of measuring molecular oxygen. The basis of such a method is the measurement of the luminescence lifetime of a dye which is quenched by molecular oxygen. The molecular oxygen concentration can be monitored two-dimensionally by pixel-wise determination of the luminescence lifetime with a CCD-camera. An oxygen imaging system based on this principle was built and tested with a commercially available oxygen sensitive sol gel-layer. The embedded ruthenium complex is quenched by molecular oxygen and because of the oxygen permeability of the layer; it is suitable for oxygen measurements. The characteristics and dependence on the pH-value and temperature of the luminescence lifetime of the layer were examined in preparation for measurements on tissue to exclude cross-correlation of other quenching processes.

  1. Zinc content of selected tissues and taste perception in rats fed zinc deficient and zinc adequate rations

    SciTech Connect

    Boeckner, L.S.; Kies, C.

    1986-03-05

    The objective of the study was to determine the effects of feeding zinc sufficient and zinc deficient rations on taste sensitivity and zinc contents of selected organs in rats. The 36 Sprague-Dawley male weanling rats were divided into 2 groups and fed zinc deficient or zinc adequate rations. The animals were subjected to 4 trial periods in which a choice of deionized distilled water or a solution of quinine sulfate at 1.28 x 10/sup -6/ was given. A randomized schedule for rat sacrifice was used. No differences were found between zinc deficient and zinc adequate rats in taste preference aversion scores for quinine sulfate in the first three trial periods; however, in the last trial period rats in the zinc sufficient group drank somewhat less water containing quinine sulfate as a percentage of total water consumption than did rats fed the zinc deficient ration. Significantly higher zinc contents of kidney, brain and parotid salivary glands were seen in zinc adequate rats compared to zinc deficient rats at the end of the study. However, liver and tongue zinc levels were lower for both groups at the close of the study than were those of rats sacrificed at the beginning of the study.

  2. [Current views on oxygen transport from blood to tissues].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, K P

    2001-01-01

    During the recent 25-30 years, sophisticated experiments and mathematical simulation significantly changed the generally accepted theory of oxygen transport in tissue, which was based on two major postulates, namely: 1) Blood flows in capillaries continuously at uniform velocity, 2) Gas circulation between blood and tissue takes place exclusively in capillaries. As was shown by modern research techniques, blood flow in microvessels has irregular sharp velocity fluctuations in very short time intervals (seconds). In addition, mean velocity of blood flow in microvessels of the same caliber and the same micro-region of tissue may differ several times. Therefore, efficiency of microcirculation reactions may be assessed exclusively witH mean blood velocity in capillaries of the whole micro-region, and with complicated changes of the histogram of mean velocity distribution in capillaries. It was shown that arteriolas and venulas of inactive muscles and brain account for 30 to 50% of gas circulation between blood and tissue. This resulted in fundamental change of the previous postulates in the area of tissue gas circulation physiology, and, in effect, in replacement of oxygen transport paradigm created by A. Krog. This study is an attempt to present a new modern concept of oxygen transport in tissue, to show its research significance, and possible applications. PMID:11764645

  3. Simultaneous sampling of tissue oxygenation and oxygen consumption in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Nugent, William H; Song, Bjorn K; Pittman, Roland N; Golub, Aleksander S

    2016-05-01

    Under physiologic conditions, microvascular oxygen delivery appears to be well matched to oxygen consumption in respiring tissues. We present a technique to measure interstitial oxygen tension (PISFO2) and oxygen consumption (VO2) under steady-state conditions, as well as during the transitions from rest to activity and back. Phosphorescence Quenching Microscopy (PQM) was employed with pneumatic compression cycling to achieve 1 to 10 Hz sampling rates of interstitial PO2 and simultaneous recurrent sampling of VO2 (3/min) in the exteriorized rat spinotrapezius muscle. The compression pressure was optimized to 120-130 mmHg without adverse effect on the tissue preparation. A cycle of 5s compression followed by 15s recovery yielded a resting VO2 of 0.98 ± 0.03 ml O2/100 cm(3)min while preserving microvascular oxygen delivery. The measurement system was then used to assess VO2 dependence on PISFO2 at rest and further tested under conditions of isometric muscle contraction to demonstrate a robust ability to monitor the on-kinetics of tissue respiration and the compensatory changes in PISFO2 during contraction and recovery. The temporal and spatial resolution of this approach is well suited to studies seeking to characterize microvascular oxygen supply and demand in thin tissues. PMID:26683232

  4. Electron paramagnetic resonance oxygen mapping (EPROM): direct visualization of oxygen concentration in tissue.

    PubMed

    Velan, S S; Spencer, R G; Zweier, J L; Kuppusamy, P

    2000-06-01

    Tissue oxygen content is a central parameter in physiology but is difficult to measure. We report a novel procedure for spatial mapping of oxygen by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) utilizing a spectral-spatial imaging data set, in which an EPR spectrum is obtained from each image volume element. From this data set, spatial maps corresponding to local spin density and maximum EPR spectral line amplitude are generated. A map of local EPR spectral linewidth is then computed. Because linewidth directly correlates with oxygen concentration, the linewidth image provides a map of oxygenation. This method avoids a difficulty inherent in other oxygen content mapping techniques using EPR, that is, the unwanted influence of local spin probe density on the image. We provide simulation results and data from phantom studies demonstrating the validity of this method. We then apply the method to map oxygen content in rat tail tissue and vasculature. This method provides a new, widely applicable, approach to direct visualization of oxygen concentration in living tissue. Magn Reson Med 43:804-809, 2000.

  5. Abnormal tissue oxygenation and cardiovascular changes in endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Anning, P B; Sair, M; Winlove, C P; Evans, T W

    1999-06-01

    Experimental sepsis induces disturbances in microcirculatory flow and nutrient exchange that may result in impaired tissue oxygenation. Volume resuscitation is a principal clinical intervention in patients with sepsis. Nitric oxide (NO) has been implicated in the pathophysiology of endotoxemia, but few data exist concerning the effects of either NO synthase inhibition (NOSi) or volume resuscitation on microvascular regulation and tissue oxygenation. Amperometric measurements were made of skeletal muscle (tissue) oxygen tension (PtO2) and its response to changes in fraction of inspired oxygen (FIO2) in rats rendered endotoxemic. Simultaneous measurements were made of systemic hemodynamic indices and arterial blood gas tensions. At normal PaO2, PtO2 in endotoxemic animals was significantly lower than in control animals, with marked attenuation of the response to increasing FIO2. These changes were associated with significant metabolic acidemia. In volume-resuscitated endotoxemic rats, PtO2 and blood pH were unchanged. A significant reduction in the PtO2 response to hyperoxia was observed in animals treated with the NOS inhibitor NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), an effect not reversed by fluid resuscitation. These data suggest that significant tissue hypoxia and abnormal microvascular control occur in endotoxemia. Volume resuscitation can reverse the changes in PtO2, whereas nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition has deleterious effects on muscle PtO2 in both control and endotoxemic animals. PMID:10351908

  6. Oxygen diffusion in marine-derived tissue engineering scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Boccardi, E; Belova, I V; Murch, G E; Boccaccini, A R; Fiedler, T

    2015-06-01

    This paper addresses the computation of the effective diffusivity in new bioactive glass (BG) based tissue engineering scaffolds. High diffusivities facilitate the supply of oxygen and nutrients to grown tissue as well as the rapid disposal of toxic waste products. The present study addresses required novel types of bone tissue engineering BG scaffolds that are derived from natural marine sponges. Using the foam replication method, the scaffold geometry is defined by the porous structure of Spongia Agaricina and Spongia Lamella. These sponges present the advantage of attaining scaffolds with higher mechanical properties (2-4 MPa) due to a decrease in porosity (68-76%). The effective diffusivities of these structures are compared with that of conventional scaffolds based on polyurethane (PU) foam templates, characterised by high porosity (>90%) and lower mechanical properties (>0.05 MPa). Both the spatial and directional variations of diffusivity are investigated. Furthermore, the effect of scaffold decomposition due to immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) on the diffusivity is addressed. Scaffolds based on natural marine sponges are characterised by lower oxygen diffusivity due to their lower porosity compared with the PU replica foams, which should enable the best oxygen supply to newly formed bone according the numerical results. The oxygen diffusivity of these new BG scaffolds increases over time as a consequence of the degradation in SBF.

  7. The realistic prediction of oxygen transport in a tissue-engineered scaffold by introducing time-varying effective diffusion coefficients.

    PubMed

    Kang, Tae-Yun; Kang, Hyun-Wook; Hwang, Chang Mo; Lee, Sang Jin; Park, Jaesung; Yoo, James J; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2011-09-01

    An adequate oxygen supply is one of the most important factors needed in order to regenerate or engineer thick tissues or complex organs. To devise a method for maximizing the amount of oxygen available to cells, it is necessary to understand and to realistically predict oxygen transport within an engineered tissue. In this study, we focused on the fact that oxygen transport through a tissue-engineered scaffold may vary with time as cells proliferate. To confirm this viewpoint, effective oxygen diffusion coefficients (D(e)(,)(s)) of scaffolds were deduced from experimental measurements and simulations of oxygen-concentration profiles were performed using these D(e)(,)(s) values in a two-dimensional (2-D) perfusion model. The results of this study indicate that higher porosity, hydraulic permeability and interconnectivity of scaffolds with no cells are responsible for the prominent diffusion capability quantified using D(e)(,)(s). On the other hand, the D(e)(,)(s) of scaffolds with cells has a negative linear relationship with cell density. Cell proliferation with time leads to a significant decrease in oxygen concentration in the 2-D perfusion model. This result demonstrates the gradual restriction of oxygen transport in a porous scaffold during cell culture. Therefore, the realistic prediction of oxygen transport using a time-varying D(e)(,)(s) will provide an appropriate basis for designing optimal transport networks within a thick scaffold.

  8. Reactive Oxygen Species in Inflammation and Tissue Injury

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Manish; Siddiqui, Mohammad Rizwan; Tran, Khiem; Reddy, Sekhar P.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are key signaling molecules that play an important role in the progression of inflammatory disorders. An enhanced ROS generation by polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) at the site of inflammation causes endothelial dysfunction and tissue injury. The vascular endothelium plays an important role in passage of macromolecules and inflammatory cells from the blood to tissue. Under the inflammatory conditions, oxidative stress produced by PMNs leads to the opening of inter-endothelial junctions and promotes the migration of inflammatory cells across the endothelial barrier. The migrated inflammatory cells not only help in the clearance of pathogens and foreign particles but also lead to tissue injury. The current review compiles the past and current research in the area of inflammation with particular emphasis on oxidative stress-mediated signaling mechanisms that are involved in inflammation and tissue injury. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1126–1167. PMID:23991888

  9. Photothermal imaging bundle system for estimating tissue oxygen saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milstein, Yonat; Allon, Dror M.; Harrington, James; Bledt, Carlos; Gannot, Israel

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to validate a method for the measurement of tissue oxygen saturation level via a thermal imaging bundle in-vitro and in-vivo. The method consists of a thermal imaging system and an algorithm which estimates the compound concentration according to the temperature rise of the tissue. A temperature rise is obtained by illuminating the tissue in the NIR range and is measured using a thermal camera and a coherent thermal imaging bundle for non-invasive transendoscopic use. The system was validated using agar phantoms of varying concentrations of Methylene Blue and ICG as well as blood samples. The algorithm estimated the Methylene Blue relative amount and the results were compared to the real relative amount. The calculated RMS of the error was 5.12%, a satisfying value for this stage. In the blood samples, for oxygenation levels higher than 50% the RMS of the error was 5.79%. Once the system was verified a portable system was built for clinical use, this system was also evaluated on agar phantoms and the RMS of the error was 10.64%. As a result of the encouraging experiments in-vivo, animal trials were performed. The oxygenation levels of mice were decreased and were estimated respectively using our system. The system determined a small decrease in the tissue oxygen saturation of the mice. These results verify the algorithm's and bundle's suitability for the use in a non-invasive system. They provide motivation for performing more complex in-vitro experiments and moving on to clinical trials.

  10. [Several indicators of tissue oxygen during modeling of extravehicular activity of man].

    PubMed

    Lan'shina, O E; Loginov, V A; Akinfiev, A V; Kovalenko, E A

    1995-01-01

    Investigations of tissue oxygen indices during simulation of extravehicular activity (EVA) of cosmonauts demonstrated that breathing pure oxygen at approximately 280 mmHg elevates oxygen tension in capillary blood, and capillary-tissue gradient during physical work. Physical work alone stimulates tissue oxygenation due to, apparently, intensification of the processes of oxidative phosphorylation. The observed shifts in oxygen status reverse significantly within the first 5 min after completion of the experiment.

  11. A unique mode of tissue oxygenation and the adaptive radiation of teleost fishes.

    PubMed

    Randall, D J; Rummer, J L; Wilson, J M; Wang, S; Brauner, C J

    2014-04-15

    Teleost fishes constitute 95% of extant aquatic vertebrates, and we suggest that this is related in part to their unique mode of tissue oxygenation. We propose the following sequence of events in the evolution of their oxygen delivery system. First, loss of plasma-accessible carbonic anhydrase (CA) in the gill and venous circulations slowed the Jacobs-Stewart cycle and the transfer of acid between the plasma and the red blood cells (RBCs). This ameliorated the effects of a generalised acidosis (associated with an increased capacity for burst swimming) on haemoglobin (Hb)-O2 binding. Because RBC pH was uncoupled from plasma pH, the importance of Hb as a buffer was reduced. The decrease in buffering was mediated by a reduction in the number of histidine residues on the Hb molecule and resulted in enhanced coupling of O2 and CO2 transfer through the RBCs. In the absence of plasma CA, nearly all plasma bicarbonate ultimately dehydrated to CO2 occurred via the RBCs, and chloride/bicarbonate exchange was the rate-limiting step in CO2 excretion. This pattern of CO2 excretion across the gills resulted in disequilibrium states for CO2 hydration/dehydration reactions and thus elevated arterial and venous plasma bicarbonate levels. Plasma-accessible CA embedded in arterial endothelia was retained, which eliminated the localized bicarbonate disequilibrium forming CO2 that then moved into the RBCs. Consequently, RBC pH decreased which, in conjunction with pH-sensitive Bohr/Root Hbs, elevated arterial oxygen tensions and thus enhanced tissue oxygenation. Counter-current arrangement of capillaries (retia) at the eye and later the swim bladder evolved along with the gas gland at the swim bladder. Both arrangements enhanced and magnified CO2 and acid production and, therefore, oxygen secretion to those specialised tissues. The evolution of β-adrenergically stimulated RBC Na(+)/H(+) exchange protected gill O2 uptake during stress and further augmented plasma disequilibrium states

  12. A unique mode of tissue oxygenation and the adaptive radiation of teleost fishes.

    PubMed

    Randall, D J; Rummer, J L; Wilson, J M; Wang, S; Brauner, C J

    2014-04-15

    Teleost fishes constitute 95% of extant aquatic vertebrates, and we suggest that this is related in part to their unique mode of tissue oxygenation. We propose the following sequence of events in the evolution of their oxygen delivery system. First, loss of plasma-accessible carbonic anhydrase (CA) in the gill and venous circulations slowed the Jacobs-Stewart cycle and the transfer of acid between the plasma and the red blood cells (RBCs). This ameliorated the effects of a generalised acidosis (associated with an increased capacity for burst swimming) on haemoglobin (Hb)-O2 binding. Because RBC pH was uncoupled from plasma pH, the importance of Hb as a buffer was reduced. The decrease in buffering was mediated by a reduction in the number of histidine residues on the Hb molecule and resulted in enhanced coupling of O2 and CO2 transfer through the RBCs. In the absence of plasma CA, nearly all plasma bicarbonate ultimately dehydrated to CO2 occurred via the RBCs, and chloride/bicarbonate exchange was the rate-limiting step in CO2 excretion. This pattern of CO2 excretion across the gills resulted in disequilibrium states for CO2 hydration/dehydration reactions and thus elevated arterial and venous plasma bicarbonate levels. Plasma-accessible CA embedded in arterial endothelia was retained, which eliminated the localized bicarbonate disequilibrium forming CO2 that then moved into the RBCs. Consequently, RBC pH decreased which, in conjunction with pH-sensitive Bohr/Root Hbs, elevated arterial oxygen tensions and thus enhanced tissue oxygenation. Counter-current arrangement of capillaries (retia) at the eye and later the swim bladder evolved along with the gas gland at the swim bladder. Both arrangements enhanced and magnified CO2 and acid production and, therefore, oxygen secretion to those specialised tissues. The evolution of β-adrenergically stimulated RBC Na(+)/H(+) exchange protected gill O2 uptake during stress and further augmented plasma disequilibrium states

  13. Cerebral tissue oxygenation index in very premature infants

    PubMed Central

    Naulaers, G; Morren, G; Van Huffel, S; Casaer, P; Devlieger, H

    2002-01-01

    Aim: To describe normal values of the cerebral tissue oxygenation index (TOI) in premature infants. Methods: TOI was measured by spatially resolved spectroscopy in preterm infants on the first 3 days of life. Infants with an abnormal cranial ultrasound were excluded. Other simultaneously measured variables were PaO2, PaCO2, pH, mean arterial blood pressure, heart rate, haemoglobin, glycaemia, and peripheral oxygen saturation. Results: Fifteen patients with a median postmenstrual age of 28 weeks were measured. There was a significant increase in median TOI over the first 3 days of life: 57% on day 1, 66.1% on day 2, and 76.1% on day 3. Multiple regression analysis showed no correlation between TOI and postmenstrual age, peripheral oxygen saturation, mean arterial blood pressure, PaO2, PaCO2, and haemoglobin concentration. Conclusion: Cerebral TOI increases significantly in the first 3 days of life in premature babies. This increase probably reflects the increase in cerebral blood flow at this time. PMID:12390989

  14. Tissue oxygen tension monitoring of organ perfusion: rationale, methodologies, and literature review.

    PubMed

    De Santis, V; Singer, M

    2015-09-01

    Tissue oxygen tension is the partial pressure of oxygen within the interstitial space of an organ bed. As it represents the balance between local oxygen delivery and consumption at any given time, it offers a ready monitoring capability to assess the adequacy of tissue perfusion relative to local demands. This review covers the various methodologies used to measure tissue oxygen tension, describes the underlying physiological and pathophysiological principles, and summarizes human and laboratory data published to date.

  15. [Tissue oxygen saturation in the critically ill patient].

    PubMed

    Gruartmoner, G; Mesquida, J; Baigorri, F

    2014-05-01

    Hemodynamic resuscitation seeks to correct global macrocirculatory parameters of pressure and flow. However, current evidence has shown that despite the normalization of these global parameters, microcirculatory and regional perfusion alterations can persist, and these alterations have been independently associated with a poorer patient prognosis. This in turn has lead to growing interest in new technologies for exploring regional circulation and microcirculation. Near infra-red spectroscopy allows us to monitor tissue oxygen saturation, and has been proposed as a noninvasive, continuous and easy-to-obtain measure of regional circulation. The present review aims to summarize the existing evidence on near infra-red spectroscopy and its potential clinical role in the resuscitation of critically ill patients in shock.

  16. [Intraoperative monitoring of oxygen tissue pressure: Applications in vascular neurosurgery].

    PubMed

    Arikan, Fuat; Vilalta, Jordi; Torne, Ramon; Chocron, Ivette; Rodriguez-Tesouro, Ana; Sahuquillo, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic lesions related to surgical procedures are a major cause of postoperative morbidity in patients with cerebral vascular disease. There are different systems of neuromonitoring to detect intraoperative ischemic events, including intraoperative monitoring of oxygen tissue pressure (PtiO2). The aim of this article was to describe, through the discussion of 4 cases, the usefulness of intraoperative PtiO2 monitoring during vascular neurosurgery. In presenting these cases, we demonstrate that monitoring PtiO2 is a reliable way to detect early ischemic events during surgical procedures. Continuous monitoring of PtiO2 in an area at risk allows the surgeon to resolve the cause of the ischemic event before it evolves to an established cerebral infarction. PMID:24934513

  17. Development of an ultrasound sensitive oxygen carrier for oxygen delivery to hypoxic tissue.

    PubMed

    Eisenbrey, John R; Albala, Lorenzo; Kramer, Michael R; Daroshefski, Nick; Brown, David; Liu, Ji-Bin; Stanczak, Maria; O'Kane, Patrick; Forsberg, Flemming; Wheatley, Margaret A

    2015-01-15

    Radiation therapy is frequently used in the treatment of malignancies, but tumors are often more resistant than the surrounding normal tissue to radiation effects, because the tumor microenvironment is hypoxic. This manuscript details the fabrication and characterization of an ultrasound-sensitive, injectable oxygen microbubble platform (SE61O2) for overcoming tumor hypoxia. SE61O2 was fabricated by first sonicating a mixture of Span 60 and water-soluble vitamin E purged with perfluorocarbon gas. SE61O2 microbubbles were separated from the foam by flotation, then freeze dried under vacuum to remove all perfluorocarbon, and reconstituted with oxygen. Visually, SE61O2 microbubbles were smooth, spherical, with an average diameter of 3.1 μm and were reconstituted to a concentration of 6.5 E7 microbubbles/ml. Oxygen-filled SE61O2 provides 16.9 ± 1.0 dB of enhancement at a dose of 880 μl/l (5.7 E7 microbubbles/l) with a half-life under insonation of approximately 15 min. In in vitro release experiments, 2 ml of SE61O2 (1.3 E8 microbubbles) triggered with ultrasound was found to elevate oxygen partial pressures of 100ml of degassed saline 13.8 mmHg more than untriggered bubbles and 20.6 mmHg more than ultrasound triggered nitrogen-filled bubbles. In preliminary in vivo delivery experiments, triggered SE61O2 resulted in a 30.4 mmHg and 27.4 mmHg increase in oxygen partial pressures in two breast tumor mouse xenografts.

  18. Blood Flow Versus Hematocrit in Optimization of Oxygen Transfer to Tissue During Fluid Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Siam, Jamal; Kadan, Marwa; Flaishon, Ron; Barnea, Ofer

    2015-12-01

    The effectiveness of fluid resuscitation regimens in hemorrhagic trauma is assessed based on its ability to increase oxygen concentration in tissue. Fluid resuscitation using both crystalloids and colloids fluids, creates a dilemma due to its opposing effects on oxygen transfer. It increases blood flow thereby augmenting oxygen transport but it also dilutes the blood simultaneously and reduces oxygen concentration thereby reducing oxygen transport. In this work we have studied these two opposing effects of fluid therapy on oxygen delivery to tissue. A mathematical model of oxygen diffusion from capillaries to tissue and its distribution in tissue was developed and integrated into a previously developed hemodynamic model. The capillary-tissue model was based on the Krogh structure. Compared to other models, fewer simplifying assumptions were made leading to different boundary conditions and less constraints, especially regarding capillary oxygen content at its venous end. Results showed that oxygen content in blood is the dominant factor in oxygen transport to tissue and its effect is greater than the effect of flow. The integration of the capillary/tissue model with the hemodynamic model that links administered fluids with flow and blood dilution indicated that fluid resuscitation may reduce oxygen transport to tissue.

  19. Direct tissue oxygen monitoring by in vivo photoacoustic lifetime imaging (PALI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Qi; Morgounova, Ekaterina; Ashkenazi, Shai

    2014-03-01

    Tissue oxygen plays a critical role in maintaining tissue viability and in various diseases, including response to therapy. Images of oxygen distribution provide the history of tissue hypoxia and evidence of oxygen availability in the circulatory system. Currently available methods of direct measuring or imaging tissue oxygen all have significant limitations. Previously, we have reported a non-invasive in vivo imaging modality based on photoacoustic lifetime. The technique maps the excited triplet state of oxygen-sensitive dye, thus reflects the spatial and temporal distribution of tissue oxygen. We have applied PALI on tumor hypoxia in small animals, and the hypoxic region imaged by PALI is consistent with the site of the tumor imaged by ultrasound. Here, we present two studies of applying PALI to monitor changes of tissue oxygen by modulations. The first study involves an acute ischemia model using a thin thread tied around the hind limb of a normal mouse to reduce the blood flow. PALI images were acquired before, during, and after the restriction. The drop of muscle pO2 and recovery from hypoxia due to reperfusion were observed by PALI tracking the same region. The second study modulates tissue oxygen by controlling the percentage of oxygen the mouse inhales. We demonstrate that PALI is able to reflect the change of oxygen level with respect to both hyperbaric and hypobaric conditions. We expect this technique to be very attractive for a range of clinical applications in which tissue oxygen mapping would improve therapy decision making and treatment planning.

  20. Coupling between arterial pressure, cerebral blood velocity, and cerebral tissue oxygenation with spontaneous and forced oscillations.

    PubMed

    Rickards, Caroline A; Sprick, Justin D; Colby, Hannah B; Kay, Victoria L; Tzeng, Yu-Chieh

    2015-04-01

    We tested the hypothesis that transmission of arterial pressure to brain tissue oxygenation is low under conditions of arterial pressure instability. Two experimental models of hemodynamic instability were used in healthy human volunteers; (1) oscillatory lower body negative pressure (OLBNP) (N = 8; 5 male, 3 female), and; (2) maximal LBNP to presyncope (N = 21; 13 male, 8 female). Mean arterial pressure (MAP), middle cerebral artery velocity (MCAv), and cerebral tissue oxygen saturation (ScO2) were measured non-invasively. For the OLBNP protocol, between 0 and -60 mmHg negative pressure was applied for 20 cycles at 0.05 Hz, then 20 cycles at 0.1 Hz. For the maximal LBNP protocol, progressive 5 min stages of chamber decompression were applied until the onset of presyncope. Spectral power of MAP, mean MCAv, and ScO2 were calculated within the VLF (0.04-0.07 Hz), and LF (0.07-0.2 Hz) ranges, and cross-spectral coherence was calculated for MAP-mean MCAv, MAP-ScO2, and mean MCAv-ScO2 at baseline, during each OLBNP protocol, and at the level prior to pre-syncope during maximal LBNP (sub-max). The key findings are (1) both 0.1 Hz OLBNP and sub-max LBNP elicited increases in LF power for MAP, mean MCAv, and ScO2 (p ≤ 0.08); (2) 0.05 Hz OLBNP increased VLF power in MAP and ScO2 only (p ≤ 0.06); (3) coherence between MAP-mean MCAv was consistently higher (≥0.71) compared with MAP-ScO2, and mean MCAv-ScO2 (≤0.43) during both OLBNP protocols, and sub-max LBNP (p ≤ 0.04). These data indicate high linearity between pressure and cerebral blood flow variations, but reduced linearity between cerebral tissue oxygenation and both arterial pressure and cerebral blood flow. Measuring arterial pressure variability may not always provide adequate information about the downstream effects on cerebral tissue oxygenation, the key end-point of interest for neuronal viability.

  1. Association of intraoperative tissue oxygenation with suspected risk factors for tissue hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Spruit, R J; Schwarte, L A; Hakenberg, O W; Scheeren, T W L

    2013-10-01

    Tissue hypoxia may cause organ dysfunction, but not much is known about tissue oxygenation in the intraoperative setting. We studied microcirculatory tissue oxygen saturation (StO₂) to determine representative values for anesthetized patients undergoing urological surgery and to test the hypothesis that StO₂ is associated with known perioperative risk factors for morbidity and mortality, conventionally monitored variables, and hypotension requiring norepinephrine. Using near-infrared spectroscopy, we measured StO₂ on the thenar eminence in 160 patients undergoing open urological surgery under general anesthesia (FiO2 0.35-0.4), and calculated its correlations with age, risk level for general perioperative complications and mortality (high if age ≥70 and procedure is radical cystectomy), mean arterial pressure (MAP), hemoglobin concentration (Hb), central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO₂), and norepinephrine use. The time averaged StO₂ was 86 ± 6 % (mean ± SD). In the multivariate analysis, Hb [standardized coefficient (SC) 0.21, p = 0.003], ScvO₂ (SC 0.53, p < 0.001) and high risk level (SC 0.06, p = 0.03) were significant independent variables correlated with StO₂. SStO₂ was partly dependent on MAP only when this was below 65 mmHg (lowest MAP SC 0.20, p = 0.006, MAP area under the curve <65 mmHg SC 0.03, p = 0.02). Finally, StO₂ was slightly lower in patients requiring norepinephrine (85 ± 6 vs. 89 ± 6 %, p = 0.001). Intraoperative StO₂ in urological patients was comparable to that of healthy volunteers breathing room air as reported in the literature and correlated with known perioperative risk factors. Further research should investigate its association with outcome and the effect of interventions aimed at optimizing StO₂.

  2. Comparative Changes in Tissue Oxygenation Between Laparoscopic and Open Cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Bablekos, George D.; Michaelides, Stylianos A.; Analitis, Antonis; Lymperi, Maria H.; Charalabopoulos, Konstantinos A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous studies examined the effect of laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) versus open cholecystectomy (OC) on physiological variables of the respiratory system. In this study we compared changes in arterial blood gases-related parameters between LC and OC to assess their comparative influence on gas exchange. Methods We studied 28 patients, operated under identical anesthetic protocol (LC: 18 patients, OC: 10 patients). Measurements were made on the morning before surgery (BS), the second (AS2) and the eighth (AS8) postoperative day. Studied parameters, including alveolar-arterial difference in PO2 ((A-a)DO2) and oxygen content (Oct in vol%), were statistically compared. Results On AS2 a greater increase was found in ((A-a)DO2) for the OC compared to LC (4.673 ± 0.966 kPa versus 3.773 ± 1.357 kPa, respectively). Between BS and AS2, Oct in vol% decreased from 17.55 ± 1.90 to 15.69 ± 1.88 in the LC and from 16.99 ± 2.37 to 14.62 ± 2.23 in the OC, whilst a reduction (P = 0.093) between AS2 and AS8 was also found for the open method. Besides, on AS2, SaO2% decrease was greater in OC compared to LC (P = 0.096). Conclusions On AS2, the greater increase in OC-((A-a)DO2) associated with Oct in vol% and SaO2% findings also in OC group suggest that LC might be associated with lower risk for impaired tissue oxygenation. PMID:25699119

  3. Implementing oxygen control in chip-based cell and tissue culture systems.

    PubMed

    Oomen, Pieter E; Skolimowski, Maciej D; Verpoorte, Elisabeth

    2016-09-21

    Oxygen is essential in the energy metabolism of cells, as well as being an important regulatory parameter influencing cell differentiation and function. Interest in precise oxygen control for in vitro cultures of tissues and cells continues to grow, especially with the emergence of the organ-on-a-chip and the desire to emulate in vivo conditions. This was recently discussed in this journal in a Critical Review by Brennan et al. (Lab Chip (2014). DOI: ). Microfluidics can be used to introduce flow to facilitate nutrient supply to and waste removal from in vitro culture systems. Well-defined oxygen gradients can also be established. However, cells can quickly alter the oxygen balance in their vicinity. In this Tutorial Review, we expand on the Brennan paper to focus on the implementation of oxygen analysis in these systems to achieve continuous monitoring. Both electrochemical and optical approaches for the integration of oxygen monitoring in microfluidic tissue and cell culture systems will be discussed. Differences in oxygen requirements from one organ to the next are a challenging problem, as oxygen delivery is limited by its uptake into medium. Hence, we discuss the factors determining oxygen concentrations in solutions and consider the possible use of artificial oxygen carriers to increase dissolved oxygen concentrations. The selection of device material for applications requiring precise oxygen control is discussed in detail, focusing on oxygen permeability. Lastly, a variety of devices is presented, showing the diversity of approaches that can be employed to control and monitor oxygen concentrations in in vitro experiments.

  4. A dynamic model of oxygen transport from capillaries to tissue with moving red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Lücker, Adrien; Weber, Bruno; Jenny, Patrick

    2015-02-01

    Most oxygen required to support the energy needs of vertebrate tissues is delivered by diffusion from microvessels. The presence of red blood cells (RBCs) makes blood flow in the microcirculation highly heterogeneous. Additionally, flow regulation mechanisms dynamically respond to changes in tissue energy demand. These spatiotemporal variations directly affect the supply of oxygen to parenchymal cells. Due to various limiting assumptions, current models of oxygen transport cannot fully capture the consequences of complex hemodynamic effects on tissue oxygenation and are often not suitable for studying unsteady phenomena. With our new approach based on moving RBCs, the impact of blood flow heterogeneity on oxygen partial pressure (Po2) in the tissue can be quantified. Oxygen transport was simulated using parachute-shaped solid RBCs flowing through a capillary. With the use of a conical tissue domain with radii 19 and 13 μm, respectively, our computations indicate that Po2 at the RBC membrane exceeds Po2 between RBCs by 30 mmHg on average and that the mean plasma Po2 decreases by 9 mmHg over 50 μm. These results reproduce well recent intravascular Po2 measurements in the rodent brain. We also demonstrate that instantaneous variations of capillary hematocrit cause associated fluctuations of tissue Po2. Furthermore, our results suggest that homogeneous tissue oxygenation requires capillary networks to be denser on venular side than on arteriolar side. Our new model for oxygen transport will make it possible to quantify in detail the effects of blood flow heterogeneity on tissue oxygenation in realistic capillary networks.

  5. A dynamic model of oxygen transport from capillaries to tissue with moving red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Lücker, Adrien; Weber, Bruno; Jenny, Patrick

    2015-02-01

    Most oxygen required to support the energy needs of vertebrate tissues is delivered by diffusion from microvessels. The presence of red blood cells (RBCs) makes blood flow in the microcirculation highly heterogeneous. Additionally, flow regulation mechanisms dynamically respond to changes in tissue energy demand. These spatiotemporal variations directly affect the supply of oxygen to parenchymal cells. Due to various limiting assumptions, current models of oxygen transport cannot fully capture the consequences of complex hemodynamic effects on tissue oxygenation and are often not suitable for studying unsteady phenomena. With our new approach based on moving RBCs, the impact of blood flow heterogeneity on oxygen partial pressure (Po2) in the tissue can be quantified. Oxygen transport was simulated using parachute-shaped solid RBCs flowing through a capillary. With the use of a conical tissue domain with radii 19 and 13 μm, respectively, our computations indicate that Po2 at the RBC membrane exceeds Po2 between RBCs by 30 mmHg on average and that the mean plasma Po2 decreases by 9 mmHg over 50 μm. These results reproduce well recent intravascular Po2 measurements in the rodent brain. We also demonstrate that instantaneous variations of capillary hematocrit cause associated fluctuations of tissue Po2. Furthermore, our results suggest that homogeneous tissue oxygenation requires capillary networks to be denser on venular side than on arteriolar side. Our new model for oxygen transport will make it possible to quantify in detail the effects of blood flow heterogeneity on tissue oxygenation in realistic capillary networks. PMID:25398979

  6. Determination of oxygen tension in the subcutaneous tissue of cosmonauts during the Salyut-6 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baranski, S.; Bloszczynski, R.; Hermaszewski, M.; Kubiczkowa, J.; Piorko, A.; Saganiak, R.; Sarol, Z.; Skibniewsky, F.; Stendera, J.; Walichnowski, W.

    1982-01-01

    A polarographic technique was used to measure the oxygen tension in subcutaneous tissue of the forearm of a cosmonaut prior to, after, and on the fourth day of a space mission performed by Salut-6. A drop in the oxygen exchange rate in the peripheral tissues during weightlessness was observed. The mechanisms of this change are studied, taking into consideration the blood distribution in the organism and microcirculation disorders reflected by a decreased blood flow rate in arterial-venous junctions.

  7. Tissue Oxygenation Response to Mild Hypercapnia during Cardiopulmonary Bypass with Constant Pump Output

    PubMed Central

    Akça, Ozan; Sessler, Daniel I; DeLong, Diane; Keijner, Raymond; Ganzel, Brian; Doufas, Anthony G

    2006-01-01

    Background Tissue oxygenation is the primary determinant of wound infection risk. Mild hypercapnia markedly improves cutaneous, subcutaneous, and muscular tissue oxygenation in volunteers and patients. However, relative contributions of increased cardiac output and peripheral vasodilation to this response remains unknown. We thus tested the hypothesis that increased cardiac output is the dominant mechanism. Methods We recruited 10 ASA III patients, aged 40–65 years, undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass for this crossover trial. After induction of anaesthesia, a Silastic tonometer was inserted subcutaneously in the upper arm. Subcutaneous tissue oxygen tension was measured with both polarographic electrode and fluorescence-based systems. Oximeter probes were placed bilaterally on the forehead to monitor cerebral oxygenation. After initiation of cardiopulmonary bypass, in random order patients were exposed to two arterial CO2 partial pressures for 30 minutes each: 35 (normocapnia) or 50 mmHg (hypercapnia). Bypass pump flow was kept constant throughout the measurement periods. Results Hypercapnia during bypass had essentially no effect on PaO2, mean arterial pressure, or tissue temperature. PaCO2 and pH differed significantly. Subcutaneous tissue oxygenation was virtually identical during the two PaCO2 periods (139 [50,163] vs. 145 [38,158], P=0.335) (median [range]). In contrast, cerebral oxygen saturation (our positive control measurement) was significantly less during normocapnia (57 [28,67]%) than hypercapnia (64 [37,89]%, P=0.025). Conclusions Mild hypercapnia, which normally markedly increases tissue oxygenation, did not do so during cardiopulmonary bypass with fixed pump output. This suggests that hypercapnia normally increases tissue oxygenation by increasing cardiac output rather than direct dilation of peripheral vessels. PMID:16675511

  8. Implementing oxygen control in chip-based cell and tissue culture systems.

    PubMed

    Oomen, Pieter E; Skolimowski, Maciej D; Verpoorte, Elisabeth

    2016-09-21

    Oxygen is essential in the energy metabolism of cells, as well as being an important regulatory parameter influencing cell differentiation and function. Interest in precise oxygen control for in vitro cultures of tissues and cells continues to grow, especially with the emergence of the organ-on-a-chip and the desire to emulate in vivo conditions. This was recently discussed in this journal in a Critical Review by Brennan et al. (Lab Chip (2014). DOI: ). Microfluidics can be used to introduce flow to facilitate nutrient supply to and waste removal from in vitro culture systems. Well-defined oxygen gradients can also be established. However, cells can quickly alter the oxygen balance in their vicinity. In this Tutorial Review, we expand on the Brennan paper to focus on the implementation of oxygen analysis in these systems to achieve continuous monitoring. Both electrochemical and optical approaches for the integration of oxygen monitoring in microfluidic tissue and cell culture systems will be discussed. Differences in oxygen requirements from one organ to the next are a challenging problem, as oxygen delivery is limited by its uptake into medium. Hence, we discuss the factors determining oxygen concentrations in solutions and consider the possible use of artificial oxygen carriers to increase dissolved oxygen concentrations. The selection of device material for applications requiring precise oxygen control is discussed in detail, focusing on oxygen permeability. Lastly, a variety of devices is presented, showing the diversity of approaches that can be employed to control and monitor oxygen concentrations in in vitro experiments. PMID:27492338

  9. Combined effect of protein and oxygen on reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in the plasma treatment of tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaur, Nishtha; Szili, Endre J.; Oh, Jun-Seok; Hong, Sung-Ha; Michelmore, Andrew; Graves, David B.; Hatta, Akimitsu; Short, Robert D.

    2015-09-01

    The influence of protein and molecular, ground state oxygen (O2) on the plasma generation, and transport of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) in tissue are investigated. A tissue target, comprising a 1 mm thick gelatin film (a surrogate for real tissue), is placed on top of a 96-well plate; each well is filled with phosphate buffered saline (PBS, pH 7.4) containing one fluorescent or colorimetric reporter that is specific for one of three RONS (i.e., H2O2, NO2-, or OH•) or a broad spectrum reactive oxygen species reporter (2,7-dichlorodihydrofluorescein). A helium cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) jet contacts the top of the gelatin surface, and the concentrations of RONS generated in PBS are measured on a microplate reader. The data show that H2O2, NO2-, or OH• are generated in PBS underneath the target. Independently, measurements are made of the O2 concentration in the PBS with and without the gelatin target. Adding bovine serum albumin protein to the PBS or gelatin shows that protein either raises or inhibits RONS depending upon the O2 concentration. Our results are discussed in the context of plasma-soft tissue interactions that are important in the development of CAP technology for medicine, biology, and food manufacturing.

  10. Effect of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty on tissue oxygenation in ischemic diabetic feet.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hong-Ryul; Han, Seung-Kyu; Rha, Seung-Woon; Kim, Hyun-Surk; Kim, Woo-Kyung

    2011-01-01

    Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) has been performed as an alternative to bypass surgery for improving tissue oxygenation in ischemic diabetic feet because the former is less invasive than the latter. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of PTA on tissue oxygenation in ischemic diabetic feet. This study included 29 ischemic diabetic feet, as determined by a transcutaneous oxygen pressure (TcPO(2) )<30 mmHg. The PTA was carried out in 29 limbs. The PTA procedure was considered successful, acceptable, and failed when residual stenosis was<30%, between 30 and 50%, and>50%, respectively. For evaluation of tissue oxygenation, the foot TcPO(2) was measured before PTA and weekly for 6 weeks after PTA. Immediately after PTA, 26 feet were evaluated as being successful and the remaining three as acceptable. Before PTA, the average foot TcPO(2) was 12.7 ± 8.9 mmHg. The TcPO(2) values were increased to 43.6 ± 24.1, 51.0 ± 22.6, 58.3 ± 23.0, 61.3 ± 24.2, 59.0 ± 22.2, and 53.8 ± 21.0 mmHg 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 weeks after PTA, respectively (p<0.01). The PTA procedure significantly increases tissue oxygenation in ischemic diabetic feet. The maximal level of tissue oxygenation was measured on the fourth week following PTA.

  11. High-spatial-resolution mapping of the oxygen concentration in cortical tissue (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaswal, Rajeshwer S.; Yaseen, Mohammad A.; Fu, Buyin; Boas, David A.; Sakadžic, Sava

    2016-03-01

    Due to a lack of imaging tools for high-resolution imaging of cortical tissue oxygenation, the detailed maps of the oxygen partial pressure (PO2) around arterioles, venules, and capillaries remain largely unknown. Therefore, we have limited knowledge about the mechanisms that secure sufficient oxygen delivery in microvascular domains during brain activation, and provide some metabolic reserve capacity in diseases that affect either microvascular networks or the regulation of cerebral blood flow (CBF). To address this challenge, we applied a Two-Photon PO2 Microscopy to map PO2 at different depths in mice cortices. Measurements were performed through the cranial window in the anesthetized healthy mice as well as in the mouse models of microvascular dysfunctions. In addition, microvascular morphology was recorded by the two-photon microscopy at the end of each experiment and subsequently segmented. Co-registration of the PO2 measurements and exact microvascular morphology enabled quantification of the tissue PO2 dependence on distance from the arterioles, capillaries, and venules at various depths. Our measurements reveal significant spatial heterogeneity of the cortical tissue PO2 distribution that is dominated by the high oxygenation in periarteriolar spaces. In cases of impaired oxygen delivery due to microvascular dysfunction, significant reduction in tissue oxygenation away from the arterioles was observed. These tissue domains may be the initial sites of cortical injury that can further exacerbate the progression of the disease.

  12. A stochastic model for the transport of oxygen to brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Bruley, D F; Groome, L J; Bicher, H; Knisely, M H

    1976-01-01

    Material balances around a small, but finite volume element have formed the basis for previous mathematical models describing the transport of oxygen in the brain microcirculation. Seeking a model which would be both simple and versatile, a stochastic model was proposed based on the assumption that oxygenation of the brain can be described quantitatively by simulating the activity of only one erythrocyte and the oxygen molecules surrounding it. Compared with existing deterministic models, the capillary space-average oxygen partial pressure profiles were in close agreement. Tissue tensions were decidedly different.

  13. Quasi-simultaneous multimodal imaging of cutaneous tissue oxygenation and perfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Wenqi; Gan, Qi; Wu, Qiang; Zhang, Shiwu; Xu, Ronald

    2015-12-01

    Simultaneous and quantitative assessment of multiple tissue parameters may facilitate more effective diagnosis and therapy in many clinical applications, such as wound healing. However, existing wound assessment methods are typically subjective and qualitative, with the need for sequential data acquisition and coregistration between modalities, and lack of reliable standards for performance evaluation or calibration. To overcome these limitations, we developed a multimodal imaging system for quasi-simultaneous assessment of cutaneous tissue oxygenation and perfusion in a quantitative and noninvasive fashion. The system integrated multispectral and laser speckle imaging technologies into one experimental setup. Tissue oxygenation and perfusion were reconstructed by advanced algorithms. The accuracy and reliability of the imaging system were quantitatively validated in calibration experiments and a tissue-simulating phantom test. The experimental results were compared with a commercial oxygenation and perfusion monitor. Dynamic detection of cutaneous tissue oxygenation and perfusion was also demonstrated in vivo by a postocclusion reactive hyperemia procedure in a human subject and a wound healing process in a wounded mouse model. Our in vivo experiments not only validated the performance of the multimodal imaging system for cutaneous tissue oxygenation and perfusion imaging but also demonstrated its technical potential for wound healing assessment in clinical practice.

  14. Noninvasive imaging of the distribution in oxygen in tissue in vivo using near-infrared phosphors.

    PubMed Central

    Vinogradov, S A; Lo, L W; Jenkins, W T; Evans, S M; Koch, C; Wilson, D F

    1996-01-01

    A newly developed water-soluble phosphor suitable for measuring oxygen pressure in the blood (Green 2W) was used for noninvasive, in vivo imaging of oxygen distribution in the vascular systems of mice. Oxygen quenches the phosphorescence of Green 2W, measured in the presence of 2% albumin, according to the Stern-volmer relationship. This oxygen-dependent quenching of phosphorescence has been used to obtain digital maps of the oxygen distribution in the tissue vasculature. EMT-6 mammary carcinoma tumors were grown by injecting 1 x 10(6) cells in 0.1-ml carrier into the subcutaneous space over the muscle on the hindquarter. When the tumors were approximately 8 mm in diameter, 300 micrograms of phosphorescence probe (Green 2W; absorption maximum 636 nm) was injected into the tail vein. The mice were immobilized with intraperotoneal Ketamine (133 mg/kg) and Xylazine (10 mg/kg) and illuminated with flashes (< 4-microseconds t1/2) of light of 630 +/- 12 nm. The emitted phosphorescence (790-nm maximum) was imaged an intensified CCD camera. Images were collected beginning at 30, 50, 80, 120, 180, 240, 420, and 2500 microseconds after the flash and used to calculate digital maps of the phosphorescence lifetimes and oxygen pressure. Both the illumination light and the phosphorescence were in the near-infrared region of the spectrum, where tissue has greatly decreased absorbance. The light therefore readily passed through the skin and centimeter thicknesses of tissue. The oxygen maps could be obtained by illuminating from the side of the mouse opposite the camera (and tumor). The tumors were readily observed as regions with oxygen pressures substantially below those of the surrounding tissue. Thus, phosphorescence measurements can noninvasively detect volumes of tissue with below-normal oxygen pressure in the presence of much larger volumes of tissue with normal oxygen pressures. In addition, tissue oxygen pressures can be monitored in real time, even through centimeter

  15. Effect of oxygen tension on tissue-engineered human nasal septal chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Twu, Chih-Wen; Reuther, Marsha S.; Briggs, Kristen K.; Sah, Robert L.; Masuda, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Tissue-engineered nasal septal cartilage may provide a source of autologous tissue for repair of craniofacial defects. Although advances have been made in manipulating the chondrocyte culture environment for production of neocartilage, consensus on the best oxygen tension for in vitro growth of tissue-engineered cartilage has not been reached. The objective of this study was to determine whether in vitro oxygen tension influences chondrocyte expansion and redifferentiation. Proliferation of chondrocytes from 12 patients expanded in monolayer under hypoxic (5% or 10%) or normoxic (21%) oxygen tension was compared over 14 days of culture. The highest performing oxygen level was used for further expansion of the monolayer cultures. At confluency, chondrocytes were redifferentiated by encapsulation in alginate beads and cultured for 14 days under hypoxic (5 or 10%) or normoxic (21%) oxygen tension. Biochemical and histological properties were evaluated. Chondrocyte proliferation in monolayer and redifferentiation in alginate beads were supported by all oxygen tensions tested. Chondrocytes in monolayer culture had increased proliferation at normoxic oxygen tension (p = 0.06), as well as greater accumulation of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) during chondrocyte redifferentiation (p < 0.05). Chondrocytes released from beads cultured under all three oxygen levels showed robust accumulation of GAG and type II collagen with a lower degree of type I collagen immunoreactivity. Finally, formation of chondrocyte clusters was associated with decreasing oxygen tension (p < 0.05). Expansion of human septal chondrocytes in monolayer culture was greatest at normoxic oxygen tension. Both normoxic and hypoxic culture of human septal chondrocytes embedded in alginate beads supported robust extracellular matrix deposition. However, GAG accumulation was significantly enhanced under normoxic culture conditions. Chondrocyte cluster formation was associated with hypoxic oxygen tension. PMID:25565047

  16. Continuous tissue oxygen tension measurement as a monitor of free-flap viability.

    PubMed

    Hirigoyen, M B; Blackwell, K E; Zhang, W X; Silver, L; Weinberg, H; Urken, M L

    1997-03-01

    Early recognition of vascular compromise within microvascular free-tissue transfers is essential if reexploration is to prove successful. Tissue oxygen tension is increasingly recognized to be a sensitive and reliable index of tissue perfusion, and preliminary studies suggest that it may be of value in the assessment of free-flap viability. We describe our investigation into the application of an implantable microcatheter oxygen sensor in the monitoring of free flaps used in head and neck and extremity reconstruction. In a preliminary study using the rabbit model, we sought to evaluate the response of oxygen tension as an index of tissue perfusion in myocutaneous (n = 20) and osteomyocutaneous flaps (n = 5) under conditions of arterial and venous occlusion. A clinical study was then undertaken to evaluate the role of this method in the monitoring of surface and buried free flaps. In 30 heterogeneous free-tissue transfers, sensors placed intraoperatively were used to provide continuous information about flap oxygen tension (mean monitoring period 3.2 +/- 0.8 days). The data generated were correlated with changes in clinical parameters and routine flap observations. Results for experimental and clinical data have confirmed the efficacy of continuous tissue oxygen measurements using this device as a method that provides an objective, recordable index of free-tissue transfer viability in a variety of circumstances and vascular events. Tissue oxygen tension is a suitable index by which to evaluate flap viability with the probe placed in muscle or bone but is unreliable when used for the monitoring of revascularized cutaneous flaps. PMID:9047197

  17. Dual-mode quantitative imaging of wound tissue oxygenation and perfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Ruogu; Huang, Jiwei; Xu, Jeff S.; Ding, Liya; Gnyawali, Surya; Sen, Chandan K.; Huang, Kun; Xu, Ronald X.

    2010-02-01

    Accurate assessment of wound oxygenation and perfusion is important for evaluating wound healing/regression and guiding following therapeutic processes. However, many existing techniques and clinical practices are subjective and qualitative due to background bias, tissue heterogeneity, and inter-patient variation. To overcome these limitations, we developed a dual-modal imaging system for in vivo, non-invasive, real-time quantitative assessment of wound tissue oxygenation and perfusion. The imaging system integrated a broadband light source, a high-resolution CCD camera, a highly sensitive thermal camera, and a liquid crystal tunable filter. A user-friendly interface was developed to control all the components systematically. Advanced algorithms were explored for reliable reconstruction of tissue oxygenation and appropriate co-registration between thermal images and multispectral images. Dual-mode oxygenation and perfusion imaging was demonstrated on both benchtop models and human subjects, and compared with measurements using other methods, such as Laser Doppler and tissue oximeter. The test results suggested that the dual-modal imaging system has the potential for non-contact real-time imaging of wound tissue oxygenation and perfusion.

  18. Development of 200-channel mapping system for tissue oxygenation measured by near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niwayama, Masatsugu; Kohata, Daisuke; Shao, Jun; Kudo, Nobuki; Hamaoka, Takatumi; Katsumura, Toshihito; Yamamoto, Katsuyuki

    2000-07-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a very useful technique for noninvasive measurement of tissue oxygenation. Among various methods of NIRS, continuous wave near-infrared spectroscopy (CW- NIRS) is especially suitable for real-time measurement and for practical use. CW-NIRS has recently been applied in vivo reflectance imaging of muscle oxygenation and brain activity. However, conventional mapping systems do not have a sufficient mapping area at present. Moreover, they do not enable quantitative measurement of tissue oxygenation because conventional NIRS is based on the inappropriate assumption that tissue is homogeneous. In this study, we developed a 200-channel mapping system that enables measurement of changes in oxygenation and blood volume and that covers a wider area (30 cm x 20 cm) than do conventional systems. The spatial resolution (source- detector separation) of this system is 15 mm. As for the effcts of tissue inhomogeneity on muscle oxygenation measurement, subcutaneous adipose tissue greatly reduces measurement sensitivity. Therefore, we also used a correction method for influence of the subcutaneous fat layer so that we could obtain quantitative changes in concentrations of oxy- and deoxy- hemoglobin. We conducted exercise tests and measured the changed in hemoglobin concentration in the thigh using the new system. The working muscles in the exercises could be imaged, and the heterogeneity of the muscles was shown. These results demonstrated the new 200-channel mapping system enables observation of the distribution of muscle metabolism and localization of muscle function.

  19. Second derivative multispectral algorithm for quantitative assessment of cutaneous tissue oxygenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jiwei; Zhang, Shiwu; Gnyawali, Surya; Sen, Chandan K.; Xu, Ronald X.

    2015-03-01

    We report a second derivative multispectral algorithm for quantitative assessment of cutaneous tissue oxygen saturation (StO2). The algorithm is based on a forward model of light transport in multilayered skin tissue and an inverse algorithm for StO2 reconstruction. Based on the forward simulation results, a parameter of a second derivative ratio (SDR) is derived as a function of cutaneous tissue StO2. The SDR function is optimized at a wavelength set of 544, 552, 568, 576, 592, and 600 nm so that cutaneous tissue StO2 can be derived with minimal artifacts by blood concentration, tissue scattering, and melanin concentration. The proposed multispectral StO2 imaging algorithm is verified in both benchtop and in vivo experiments. The experimental results show that the proposed multispectral imaging algorithm is able to map cutaneous tissue StO2 in high temporal resolution with reduced measurement artifacts induced by different skin conditions in comparison with other three commercial tissue oxygen measurement systems. These results indicate that the multispectral StO2 imaging technique has the potential for noninvasive and quantitative assessment of skin tissue oxygenation with a high temporal resolution.

  20. Second derivative multispectral algorithm for quantitative assessment of cutaneous tissue oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jiwei; Zhang, Shiwu; Gnyawali, Surya; Sen, Chandan K.; Xu, Ronald X.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. We report a second derivative multispectral algorithm for quantitative assessment of cutaneous tissue oxygen saturation (StO2). The algorithm is based on a forward model of light transport in multilayered skin tissue and an inverse algorithm for StO2 reconstruction. Based on the forward simulation results, a parameter of a second derivative ratio (SDR) is derived as a function of cutaneous tissue StO2. The SDR function is optimized at a wavelength set of 544, 552, 568, 576, 592, and 600 nm so that cutaneous tissue StO2 can be derived with minimal artifacts by blood concentration, tissue scattering, and melanin concentration. The proposed multispectral StO2 imaging algorithm is verified in both benchtop and in vivo experiments. The experimental results show that the proposed multispectral imaging algorithm is able to map cutaneous tissue StO2 in high temporal resolution with reduced measurement artifacts induced by different skin conditions in comparison with other three commercial tissue oxygen measurement systems. These results indicate that the multispectral StO2 imaging technique has the potential for noninvasive and quantitative assessment of skin tissue oxygenation with a high temporal resolution. PMID:25734405

  1. 'Multi-associations': predisposed to misinterpretation of peripheral tissue oxygenation and circulation in neonates.

    PubMed

    Pichler, Gerhard; Pocivalnik, Mirjam; Riedl, Regina; Pichler-Stachl, Elisabeth; Morris, Nicholas; Zotter, Heinz; Müller, Wilhelm; Urlesberger, Berndt

    2011-08-01

    Interpretation of peripheral circulation in ill neonates is crucial but difficult. The aim was to analyse parameters potentially influencing peripheral oxygenation and circulation. In a prospective observational cohort study in 116 cardio-circulatory stable neonates, peripheral muscle near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) with venous occlusion was performed. Tissue oxygenation index (TOI), mixed venous oxygenation (SvO(2)), fractional oxygen extraction (FOE), fractional tissue oxygen extraction (FTOE), haemoglobin flow (Hbflow), oxygen delivery (DO(2)), oxygen consumption (VO(2)), and vascular resistance (VR) were assessed. Correlation coefficients between NIRS parameters and demographic parameters (gestational age, birth weight, age, actual weight, diameter of calf, subcutaneous adipose tissue), monitoring parameters (heart rate, arterial oxygen saturation (SaO(2)), mean blood pressure (MAP), core/peripheral temperature, central/peripheral capillary refill time) and laboratory parameters (haemoglobin concentration (Hb-blood), pCO(2)) were calculated. All demographic parameters except for Hbflow and DO(2) correlated with NIRS parameters. Heart rate correlated with TOI, SvO(2), VO(2) and VR. SaO(2) correlated with FOE/FTOE. MAP correlated with Hbflow, DO(2), VO(2) and VR. Core temperature correlated with FTOE. Peripheral temperature correlated with all NIRS parameters except VO(2). Hb-blood correlated with FOE and VR. pCO(2) levels correlated with TOI and SvO(2). The presence of multiple interdependent factors associated with peripheral oxygenation and circulation highlights the difficulty in interpreting NIRS data. Nevertheless, these findings have to be taken into account when analysing peripheral oxygenation and circulation data.

  2. NADPH Oxidase 1 and Its Derived Reactive Oxygen Species Mediated Tissue Injury and Repair

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xiu-Jun; Peng, Ying-Bo; Hu, Yi-Ping; Shi, You-Zhen; Yao, Min; Zhang, Xiong

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species are mostly viewed to cause oxidative damage to various cells and induce organ dysfunction after ischemia-reperfusion injury. However, they are also considered as crucial molecules for cellular signal transduction in biology. NADPH oxidase, whose only function is reactive oxygen species production, has been extensively investigated in many cell types especially phagocytes. The deficiency of NADPH oxidase extends the process of inflammation and delays tissue repair, which causes chronic granulomatous disease in patients. NADPH oxidase 1, one member of the NADPH oxidase family, is not only constitutively expressed in a variety of tissues, but also induced to increase expression in both mRNA and protein levels under many circumstances. NADPH oxidase 1 and its derived reactive oxygen species are suggested to be able to regulate inflammation reaction, cell proliferation and migration, and extracellular matrix synthesis, which contribute to the processes of tissue injury and repair. PMID:24669283

  3. An irradiation system for photodynamic therapy with a fiber-optic sensor for measuring tissue oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintanar, L.; Fabila, D.; Stolik, S.; de la Rosa, J. M.

    2013-11-01

    Photodynamic Therapy is a well known treatment based on the interaction of light of specific wavelength with a photosensitizing drug. In the presence of oxygen molecules, the illumination of the photosensitizer can activate the production of reactive oxygen species, which leads to the death of target cells within the treated tissue. In order to obtain the best therapy response, the tissue oxygen concentration should be measured to adjust the therapy parameters before and during the treatment. In this work, an irradiation system for 5-Aminolevulinic Acid Photodynamic Therapy is presented. It allows the application of visible light radiation of 630 nm using as a light source a high-brightness light emitting diode with an optical-power automatic control considering a light depth-distribution model. A module to measure the tissue oxygen saturation has been implemented into the system. It is based on two light emitting diodes of 660 nm and 940 nm as light sources, a photodiode as a detector and a new handheld fiber optic reflectance pulse oximetry sensor for estimating the blood oxygen saturation within the tissue. The pulse oximetry sensor was modeled through multilayered Monte Carlo simulations to study the behavior of the sensor with changes in skin thickness and melanin content.

  4. Noninvasive Oxygen Monitoring in Three-Dimensional Tissue Cultures Under Static and Dynamic Culture Conditions.

    PubMed

    Weyand, Birgit; Nöhre, Mariel; Schmälzlin, Elmar; Stolz, Marvin; Israelowitz, Meir; Gille, Christoph; von Schroeder, Herb P; Reimers, Kerstin; Vogt, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    We present a new method for noninvasive real-time oxygen measurement inside three-dimensional tissue-engineered cell constructs in static and dynamic culture settings in a laminar flow bioreactor. The OPAL system (optical oxygen measurement system) determines the oxygen-dependent phosphorescence lifetime of spherical microprobes and uses a two-frequency phase-modulation technique, which fades out the interference of background fluorescence from the cell carrier and culture medium. Higher cell densities in the centrum of the scaffolds correlated with lower values of oxygen concentration obtained with the OPAL system. When scaffolds were placed in the bioreactor, higher oxygen values were measured compared to statically cultured scaffolds in a Petri dish, which were significantly different at day 1-3 of culture. This technique allows the use of signal-weak microprobes in biological environments and monitors the culture process inside a bioreactor.

  5. Noninvasive Oxygen Monitoring in Three-Dimensional Tissue Cultures Under Static and Dynamic Culture Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Weyand, Birgit; Nöhre, Mariel; Schmälzlin, Elmar; Stolz, Marvin; Israelowitz, Meir; Gille, Christoph; von Schroeder, Herb P.; Reimers, Kerstin; Vogt, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We present a new method for noninvasive real-time oxygen measurement inside three-dimensional tissue-engineered cell constructs in static and dynamic culture settings in a laminar flow bioreactor. The OPAL system (optical oxygen measurement system) determines the oxygen-dependent phosphorescence lifetime of spherical microprobes and uses a two-frequency phase-modulation technique, which fades out the interference of background fluorescence from the cell carrier and culture medium. Higher cell densities in the centrum of the scaffolds correlated with lower values of oxygen concentration obtained with the OPAL system. When scaffolds were placed in the bioreactor, higher oxygen values were measured compared to statically cultured scaffolds in a Petri dish, which were significantly different at day 1–3 of culture. This technique allows the use of signal-weak microprobes in biological environments and monitors the culture process inside a bioreactor. PMID:26309802

  6. Measurements of tissue oxygen tension in vascularised jejunal autografts in pigs.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, I M; Riis, A; Jahn, H; Gottrup, F

    1995-12-01

    Tissue oxygen measurements were evaluated as a monitor of the jejunal flap in seven female landrace pigs. A small polarographic sensor (diameter 0.55 mm) was used in which interstitial tissue oxygen tension was measured continuously in a jejunal flap and a muscle flap (rectus abdominis) during arterial and venous occlusion. Mean (SEM) tissue oxygen tension in the two types of flap were 44(9) mmHg (jejunal flap) and 47(8) mmHg (rectus flap). After arterial occlusion for 30 minutes the values dropped to 17(4) mmHg for the jejunal flap and 12(2) mmHg for the muscle flap. The decline became significant after five minutes. During venous occlusion (30 minutes) the values fell to 20(4) mmHg and 14(1) mmHg. The arterial occlusion was undetectable by the naked eye, but the enteric tissue after venous occlusion became severely congested and blue-black in colour. The condition returned to normal after release of the clamp. We conclude that direct measurement of tissue oxygen tension in a jejunal flap is a reliable method of detecting impaired perfusion. This method may in the future be used to monitor vascularised jejunal autografts. PMID:8771255

  7. Eigenspectra optoacoustic tomography achieves quantitative blood oxygenation imaging deep in tissues.

    PubMed

    Tzoumas, Stratis; Nunes, Antonio; Olefir, Ivan; Stangl, Stefan; Symvoulidis, Panagiotis; Glasl, Sarah; Bayer, Christine; Multhoff, Gabriele; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2016-01-01

    Light propagating in tissue attains a spectrum that varies with location due to wavelength-dependent fluence attenuation, an effect that causes spectral corruption. Spectral corruption has limited the quantification accuracy of optical and optoacoustic spectroscopic methods, and impeded the goal of imaging blood oxygen saturation (sO2) deep in tissues; a critical goal for the assessment of oxygenation in physiological processes and disease. Here we describe light fluence in the spectral domain and introduce eigenspectra multispectral optoacoustic tomography (eMSOT) to account for wavelength-dependent light attenuation, and estimate blood sO2 within deep tissue. We validate eMSOT in simulations, phantoms and animal measurements and spatially resolve sO2 in muscle and tumours, validating our measurements with histology data. eMSOT shows substantial sO2 accuracy enhancement over previous optoacoustic methods, potentially serving as a valuable tool for imaging tissue pathophysiology. PMID:27358000

  8. Eigenspectra optoacoustic tomography achieves quantitative blood oxygenation imaging deep in tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzoumas, Stratis; Nunes, Antonio; Olefir, Ivan; Stangl, Stefan; Symvoulidis, Panagiotis; Glasl, Sarah; Bayer, Christine; Multhoff, Gabriele; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2016-06-01

    Light propagating in tissue attains a spectrum that varies with location due to wavelength-dependent fluence attenuation, an effect that causes spectral corruption. Spectral corruption has limited the quantification accuracy of optical and optoacoustic spectroscopic methods, and impeded the goal of imaging blood oxygen saturation (sO2) deep in tissues; a critical goal for the assessment of oxygenation in physiological processes and disease. Here we describe light fluence in the spectral domain and introduce eigenspectra multispectral optoacoustic tomography (eMSOT) to account for wavelength-dependent light attenuation, and estimate blood sO2 within deep tissue. We validate eMSOT in simulations, phantoms and animal measurements and spatially resolve sO2 in muscle and tumours, validating our measurements with histology data. eMSOT shows substantial sO2 accuracy enhancement over previous optoacoustic methods, potentially serving as a valuable tool for imaging tissue pathophysiology.

  9. Eigenspectra optoacoustic tomography achieves quantitative blood oxygenation imaging deep in tissues

    PubMed Central

    Tzoumas, Stratis; Nunes, Antonio; Olefir, Ivan; Stangl, Stefan; Symvoulidis, Panagiotis; Glasl, Sarah; Bayer, Christine; Multhoff, Gabriele; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2016-01-01

    Light propagating in tissue attains a spectrum that varies with location due to wavelength-dependent fluence attenuation, an effect that causes spectral corruption. Spectral corruption has limited the quantification accuracy of optical and optoacoustic spectroscopic methods, and impeded the goal of imaging blood oxygen saturation (sO2) deep in tissues; a critical goal for the assessment of oxygenation in physiological processes and disease. Here we describe light fluence in the spectral domain and introduce eigenspectra multispectral optoacoustic tomography (eMSOT) to account for wavelength-dependent light attenuation, and estimate blood sO2 within deep tissue. We validate eMSOT in simulations, phantoms and animal measurements and spatially resolve sO2 in muscle and tumours, validating our measurements with histology data. eMSOT shows substantial sO2 accuracy enhancement over previous optoacoustic methods, potentially serving as a valuable tool for imaging tissue pathophysiology. PMID:27358000

  10. Eigenspectra optoacoustic tomography achieves quantitative blood oxygenation imaging deep in tissues.

    PubMed

    Tzoumas, Stratis; Nunes, Antonio; Olefir, Ivan; Stangl, Stefan; Symvoulidis, Panagiotis; Glasl, Sarah; Bayer, Christine; Multhoff, Gabriele; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2016-06-30

    Light propagating in tissue attains a spectrum that varies with location due to wavelength-dependent fluence attenuation, an effect that causes spectral corruption. Spectral corruption has limited the quantification accuracy of optical and optoacoustic spectroscopic methods, and impeded the goal of imaging blood oxygen saturation (sO2) deep in tissues; a critical goal for the assessment of oxygenation in physiological processes and disease. Here we describe light fluence in the spectral domain and introduce eigenspectra multispectral optoacoustic tomography (eMSOT) to account for wavelength-dependent light attenuation, and estimate blood sO2 within deep tissue. We validate eMSOT in simulations, phantoms and animal measurements and spatially resolve sO2 in muscle and tumours, validating our measurements with histology data. eMSOT shows substantial sO2 accuracy enhancement over previous optoacoustic methods, potentially serving as a valuable tool for imaging tissue pathophysiology.

  11. Estimating oxygen distribution from vasculature in three-dimensional tumour tissue

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Pavitra; Warren, Daniel R.; Markelc, Bostjan; Bates, Russell; Muschel, Ruth; Partridge, Mike

    2016-01-01

    Regions of tissue which are well oxygenated respond better to radiotherapy than hypoxic regions by up to a factor of three. If these volumes could be accurately estimated, then it might be possible to selectively boost dose to radio-resistant regions, a concept known as dose-painting. While imaging modalities such as 18F-fluoromisonidazole positron emission tomography (PET) allow identification of hypoxic regions, they are intrinsically limited by the physics of such systems to the millimetre domain, whereas tumour oxygenation is known to vary over a micrometre scale. Mathematical modelling of microscopic tumour oxygen distribution therefore has the potential to complement and enhance macroscopic information derived from PET. In this work, we develop a general method of estimating oxygen distribution in three dimensions from a source vessel map. The method is applied analytically to line sources and quasi-linear idealized line source maps, and also applied to full three-dimensional vessel distributions through a kernel method and compared with oxygen distribution in tumour sections. The model outlined is flexible and stable, and can readily be applied to estimating likely microscopic oxygen distribution from any source geometry. We also investigate the problem of reconstructing three-dimensional oxygen maps from histological and confocal two-dimensional sections, concluding that two-dimensional histological sections are generally inadequate representations of the three-dimensional oxygen distribution. PMID:26935806

  12. Estimating oxygen distribution from vasculature in three-dimensional tumour tissue.

    PubMed

    Grimes, David Robert; Kannan, Pavitra; Warren, Daniel R; Markelc, Bostjan; Bates, Russell; Muschel, Ruth; Partridge, Mike

    2016-03-01

    Regions of tissue which are well oxygenated respond better to radiotherapy than hypoxic regions by up to a factor of three. If these volumes could be accurately estimated, then it might be possible to selectively boost dose to radio-resistant regions, a concept known as dose-painting. While imaging modalities such as 18F-fluoromisonidazole positron emission tomography (PET) allow identification of hypoxic regions, they are intrinsically limited by the physics of such systems to the millimetre domain, whereas tumour oxygenation is known to vary over a micrometre scale. Mathematical modelling of microscopic tumour oxygen distribution therefore has the potential to complement and enhance macroscopic information derived from PET. In this work, we develop a general method of estimating oxygen distribution in three dimensions from a source vessel map. The method is applied analytically to line sources and quasi-linear idealized line source maps, and also applied to full three-dimensional vessel distributions through a kernel method and compared with oxygen distribution in tumour sections. The model outlined is flexible and stable, and can readily be applied to estimating likely microscopic oxygen distribution from any source geometry. We also investigate the problem of reconstructing three-dimensional oxygen maps from histological and confocal two-dimensional sections, concluding that two-dimensional histological sections are generally inadequate representations of the three-dimensional oxygen distribution. PMID:26935806

  13. Design of a tissue oxygenation monitor and verification on human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongyuan; Kohl-Bareis, Matthias; Huang, Xiabing

    2011-07-01

    We report the design of a tissue oxygen and temperature monitor. The non-invasive, fibre based device monitors tissue haemoglobin (Hb) and oxygen saturation (SO2) and is based on white-light reflectance spectroscopy.Visible light with wavelengths in the 500 - 650nm range is utilized. The spectroscopic algorithm takes into account the tissue scattering and melanin absorption for the calculation of tissue haemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation. The monitor can probe superficial layers of tissue with a high spatial resolution (mm3) and a high temporal resolution (40 Hz). It provides an accurate measurement with the accuracy of SO2 at 2 % and high reliability with less than 2 % variation of continuous SO2 measurement over 12 hours. It can also form a modular system when used in conjunction with a laser Doppler monitor, enabling simultaneous measurements of Hb, SO2 and blood flow. We found experimentally that the influence of the source-detector separation on the haemoglobin parameters is small. This finding is discussed by Monte Carlo simulations for the depth sensitivity profile. The influence of probe pressure and the skin pigmentation on the measurement parameters are assessed before in vivo experimental data is presented. The combination with laser Doppler flowmetry demonstrates the importance of a measurement of both the haemoglobin and the blood flow parameters for a full description of blood tissue perfusion. This is discussed in experimental data on human skin during cuff occlusion and after hyperemisation by a pharmacological cream. Strong correlation is observed between tissue oxygen (Hb and SO2) and blood flow measurements.

  14. Imaging oxygen in neural cell and tissue models by means of anionic cell-permeable phosphorescent nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dmitriev, Ruslan I; Borisov, Sergey M; Kondrashina, Alina V; Pakan, Janelle M P; Anilkumar, Ujval; Prehn, Jochen H M; Zhdanov, Alexander V; McDermott, Kieran W; Klimant, Ingo; Papkovsky, Dmitri B

    2015-01-01

    Cell-permeable phosphorescent probes enable the study of cell and tissue oxygenation, bioenergetics, metabolism, and pathological states such as stroke and hypoxia. A number of such probes have been described in recent years, the majority consisting of cationic small molecule and nanoparticle structures. While these probes continue to advance, adequate staining for the study of certain cell types using live imaging techniques remains elusive; this is particularly true for neural cells. Here we introduce novel probes for the analysis of neural cells and tissues: negatively charged poly(methyl methacrylate-co-methacrylic acid)-based nanoparticles impregnated with a phosphorescent Pt(II)-tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)porphyrin (PtPFPP) dye (this form is referred to as PA1), and with an additional reference/antennae dye poly(9,9-diheptylfluorene-alt-9,9-di-p-tolyl-9H-fluorene) (this form is referred to as PA2). PA1 and PA2 are internalised by endocytosis, result in efficient staining in primary neurons, astrocytes, and PC12 cells and multi-cellular aggregates, and allow for the monitoring of local O(2) levels on a time-resolved fluorescence plate reader and PLIM microscope. PA2 also efficiently stains rat brain slices and permits detailed O(2) imaging experiments using both one and two-photon intensity-based modes and PLIM modes. Multiplexed analysis of embryonic rat brain slices reveals age-dependent staining patterns for PA2 and a highly heterogeneous distribution of O(2) in tissues, which we relate to the localisation of specific progenitor cell populations. Overall, these anionic probes are useful for sensing O(2) levels in various cells and tissues, particularly in neural cells, and facilitate high-resolution imaging of O(2) in 3D tissue models.

  15. Evolution of oxygen utilization in multicellular organisms and implications for cell signalling in tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Stamati, Katerina; Mudera, Vivek

    2011-01-01

    Oxygen is one of the critically defining elements resulting in the existence of eukaryotic life on this planet. The rise and fall of this element can be tracked through time and corresponds with the evolution of diverse life forms, development of efficient energy production (oxidative phosphorylation) in single cell organisms, the evolution of multicellular organisms and the regulation of complex cell phenotypes. By understanding these events, we can plot the effect of oxygen on evolution and its direct influence on different forms of life today, from the whole organism to specific cells within multicellular organisms. In the emerging field of tissue engineering, understanding the role of different levels of oxygen for normal cell function as well as control of complex signalling cascades is paramount to effectively build 3D tissues in vitro and their subsequent survival when implanted. PMID:22292107

  16. Radiosensitization by nicotinamide in tumors and normal tissues: the importance of tissue oxygenation status

    SciTech Connect

    Horsman, M.R.; Hansen, P.V.; Overgaard, J.

    1989-05-01

    Nicotinamide induced radiosensitization of tumors has been suggested to be a consequence of a reduction in tumor hypoxia. We have investigated the possibility that nicotinamide may produce significant radiosensitization in a normal tissue in which the radiation response is also influenced by hypoxia. The normal tissue studied was testis and radiation damage was assessed by measuring survival of spermatogonial stem cells. The radiosensitizing action of nicotinamide in testis was compared to that observed in a C3H mammary carcinoma when assayed by both regrowth delay and local tumor control. Our results show that nicotinamide (1000 mg/kg; i.p.) enhanced radiation damage in both tissue types when the radiation was given up to at least 3 hr after drug injection. Enhancement ratios obtained when the drug and radiation were separated by a 1 hr time interval were between 1.1 to 1.2 for the testis and 1.0 to 1.5 for the tumor. The results suggest that nicotinamide will produce radiosensitization in testis, but the effect is small and less than that observed in tumors.

  17. Artificial membrane-binding proteins stimulate oxygenation of stem cells during engineering of large cartilage tissue

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, James P. K.; Shakur, Rameen; Horne, Joseph P.; Dickinson, Sally C.; Armstrong, Craig T.; Lau, Katherine; Kadiwala, Juned; Lowe, Robert; Seddon, Annela; Mann, Stephen; Anderson, J. L. Ross; Perriman, Adam W.; Hollander, Anthony P.

    2015-01-01

    Restricted oxygen diffusion can result in central cell necrosis in engineered tissue, a problem that is exacerbated when engineering large tissue constructs for clinical application. Here we show that pre-treating human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) with synthetic membrane-active myoglobin-polymer–surfactant complexes can provide a reservoir of oxygen capable of alleviating necrosis at the centre of hyaline cartilage. This is achieved through the development of a new cell functionalization methodology based on polymer–surfactant conjugation, which allows the delivery of functional proteins to the hMSC membrane. This new approach circumvents the need for cell surface engineering using protein chimerization or genetic transfection, and we demonstrate that the surface-modified hMSCs retain their ability to proliferate and to undergo multilineage differentiation. The functionalization technology is facile, versatile and non-disruptive, and in addition to tissue oxygenation, it should have far-reaching application in a host of tissue engineering and cell-based therapies. PMID:26080734

  18. Artificial membrane-binding proteins stimulate oxygenation of stem cells during engineering of large cartilage tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, James P. K.; Shakur, Rameen; Horne, Joseph P.; Dickinson, Sally C.; Armstrong, Craig T.; Lau, Katherine; Kadiwala, Juned; Lowe, Robert; Seddon, Annela; Mann, Stephen; Anderson, J. L. Ross; Perriman, Adam W.; Hollander, Anthony P.

    2015-06-01

    Restricted oxygen diffusion can result in central cell necrosis in engineered tissue, a problem that is exacerbated when engineering large tissue constructs for clinical application. Here we show that pre-treating human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) with synthetic membrane-active myoglobin-polymer-surfactant complexes can provide a reservoir of oxygen capable of alleviating necrosis at the centre of hyaline cartilage. This is achieved through the development of a new cell functionalization methodology based on polymer-surfactant conjugation, which allows the delivery of functional proteins to the hMSC membrane. This new approach circumvents the need for cell surface engineering using protein chimerization or genetic transfection, and we demonstrate that the surface-modified hMSCs retain their ability to proliferate and to undergo multilineage differentiation. The functionalization technology is facile, versatile and non-disruptive, and in addition to tissue oxygenation, it should have far-reaching application in a host of tissue engineering and cell-based therapies.

  19. [Effect of hyperbaric oxygenation on local tissue blood flow to a small intestine transplant intended for esophagoplasty].

    PubMed

    Vinnitskiĭ, L I; Piuskiulian, L I; Zhidkov, I L; Demurov, E A

    1981-04-01

    The time course of the local tissue blood flow in the small intestinal graft used for esophagoplasty was studied in 54 acute experiments on rabbits exposed to hyperbaric oxygenation (1 hour, 2 ata). It has been shown that hyperbaric oxygenation prevents alterations in the local tissue blood flow in the small intestine. This fact provides evidence in favour of hyperbaric oxygenation application under clinical conditions.

  20. Tissue oxygen monitoring by photoacoustic lifetime imaging (PALI) and its application to image-guided photodynamic therapy (PDT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Qi; Morgounova, Ekaterina; Ashkenazi, Shai

    2015-03-01

    The oxygen partial pressure (pO2), which results from the balance between oxygen delivery and its consumption, is a key component of the physiological state of a tissue. Images of oxygen distribution can provide essential information for identifying hypoxic tissue and optimizing cancer treatment. Previously, we have reported a noninvasive in vivo imaging modality based on photoacoustic lifetime. The technique maps the excited triplet state of oxygen-sensitive dye, thus reflects the spatial and temporal distribution of tissue oxygen. We have applied PALI on tumor on small animals to identify hypoxia area. We also showed that PALI is able monitor changes of tissue oxygen, in an acute ischemia and breathing modulation model. Here we present our work on developing a treatment/imaging modality (PDT-PALI) that integrates PDT and a combined ultrasound/photoacoustic imaging system. The system provides real-time feedback of three essential parameters namely: tissue oxygen, light penetration in tumor location, and distribution of photosensitizer. Tissue oxygen imaging is performed by applying PALI, which relies on photoacoustic probing of oxygen-dependent, excitation lifetime of Methylene Blue (MB) photosensitizer. Lifetime information can also be used to generate image showing the distribution of photosensitizer. The level and penetration depth of PDT illumination can be deduced from photoacoustic imaging at the same wavelength. All images will be combined with ultrasound B-mode images for anatomical reference.

  1. Localized increase of tissue oxygen tension by magnetic targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liong, Celine; Ortiz, Daniel; Ao-ieong, Eilleen; Navati, Mahantesh S.; Friedman, Joel M.; Cabrales, Pedro

    2014-07-01

    Hypoxia is the major hindrance to successful radiation therapy of tumors. Attempts to increase the oxygen (O2) tension (PO2) of tissue by delivering more O2 have been clinically disappointing, largely due to the way O2 is transported and released by the hemoglobin (Hb) within the red blood cells (RBCs). Systemic manipulation of O2 transport increases vascular resistance due to metabolic autoregulation of blood flow to prevent over oxygenation. This study investigates a new technology to increase O2 delivery to a target tissue by decreasing the Hb-O2 affinity of the blood circulating within the targeted tissue. As the Hb-O2 affinity decreases, the tissue PO2 to satisfy tissue O2 metabolic needs increases without increasing O2 delivery or extraction. Paramagnetic nanoparticles (PMNPs), synthetized using gadolinium oxide, were coated with the cell permeable Hb allosteric effector L35 (3,5-trichlorophenylureido-phenoxy-methylpropionic acid). L35 decreases Hb affinity for O2 and favors the release of O2. The L35-coated PMNPs (L35-PMNPs) were intravenously infused (10 mg kg-1) to hamsters instrumented with the dorsal window chamber model. A magnetic field of 3 mT was applied to localize the effects of the L35-PMNPs to the window chamber. Systemic O2 transport characteristics and microvascular tissue oxygenation were measured after administration of L35-PMNPs with and without magnetic field. The tissue PO2 in untreated control animals was 25.2 mmHg. L35-PMNPs without magnetic field decreased tissue PO2 to 23.4 mmHg, increased blood pressure, and reduced blood flow, largely due to systemic modification of Hb-O2 affinity. L35-PMNPs with magnetic field increased tissue PO2 to 27.9 mmHg, without systemic or microhemodynamic changes. These results indicate that localized modification of Hb-O2 affinity can increase PO2 of target tissue without affecting systemic O2 delivery or triggering O2 autoregulation mechanisms. This technology can be used to treat local hypoxia and to

  2. Optical fiber probe spectroscopy for laparoscopic monitoring of tissue oxygenation during esophagectomies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gareau, Daniel S.; Truffer, Frederic; Perry, Kyle; Pham, Thai; Enestvedt, C. Kristian; Dolan, James; Hunter, John G.; Jacques, Steven L.

    2010-11-01

    Anastomotic complication is a major morbidity associated with esophagectomy. Gastric ischemia after conduit creation contributes to anastomotic complications, but a reliable method to assess oxygenation in the gastric conduit is lacking. We hypothesize that fiber optic spectroscopy can reliably assess conduit oxygenation, and that intraoperative gastric ischemia will correlate with the development of anastomotic complications. A simple optical fiber probe spectrometer is designed for nondestructive laparoscopic measurement of blood content and hemoglobin oxygen saturation in the stomach tissue microvasculature during human esophagectomies. In 22 patients, the probe measured the light transport in stomach tissue between two fibers spaced 3-mm apart (500- to 650-nm wavelength range). The stomach tissue site of measurement becomes the site of a gastroesophageal anastamosis following excision of the cancerous esophagus and surgical ligation of two of the three gastric arteries that provide blood perfusion to the anastamosis. Measurements are made at each of five steps throughout the surgery. The resting baseline saturation is 0.51+/-0.15 and decreases to 0.35+/-0.20 with ligation. Seven patients develop anastomotic complications, and a decreased saturation at either of the last two steps (completion of conduit and completion of anastamosis) is predictive of complication with a sensitivity of 0.71 when the specificity equaled 0.71.

  3. Single-photon emission computed tomography and positron-emission tomography assays for tissue oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Chapman, J D; Schneider, R F; Urbain, J L; Hanks, G E

    2001-01-01

    Radiotherapy prescription can now be customized to target the major mechanism(s) of resistance of individual tumors. In that regard, functional imaging techniques should be exploited to identify the dominant mechanism(s). Tumor biology research has identified several mechanisms of tumor resistance that may be unique to radiation treatments. These fall into 3 broad areas associated with (1) tumor hypoxic fraction, (2) tumor growth rate, (3) and the intrinsic radiosensitivity of tumor clonogens. Imaging research has markers in various stages of development for quantifying relevant information about each of these mechanisms, and those that measure tumor oxygenation and predict for radioresistance are the most advanced. Positron-emission tomography (PET) measurement of oxygen 15 has yielded important information, particularly about brain tissue perfusion, metabolism, and function. Indirect markers of tumor hypoxia have exploited the covalent binding of bioreductive intermediates of azomycin-containing compounds whose uptakes are inversely proportional to intracellular oxygen concentrations. Pilot clinical studies with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and PET detection of radiolabeled markers to tumor hypoxia have been reported. Recently, other studies have attempted to exploit the reduction properties of both technetium and copper chelates for the selective deposition of radioactive metals in hypoxic tissues. A growing number of potentially useful isotopes are now available for labeling several novel chemicals that could have the appropriate specificity and sensitivity. Preclinical studies with "microSPECT" and "microPET" will be important to define the optimal radiodiagnostic(s) for measuring tissue oxygenation and for determining the time after their administration for optimal hypoxic signal acquisition. Radiolabeled markers of growth kinetics and intrinsic radiosensitivity of cells in solid tumors are also being developed. We conclude that

  4. Oxygen consumption rate of early pre-antral follicles from vitrified human ovarian cortical tissue

    PubMed Central

    ISHIKAWA, Takayuki; KYOYA, Toshihiko; NAKAMURA, Yusuke; SATO, Eimei; TOMIYAMA, Tatsuhiro; KYONO, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    The study of human ovarian tissue transplantation and cryopreservation has advanced significantly. Autotransplantation of human pre-antral follicles isolated from cryopreserved cortical tissue is a promising option for the preservation of fertility in young cancer patients. The purpose of the present study was to reveal the effect of vitrification after low-temperature transportation of human pre-antral follicles by using the oxygen consumption rate (OCR). Cortical tissues from 9 ovaries of female-to-male transsexuals were vitrified after transportation (6 or 18 h). The follicles were enzymatically isolated from nonvitrified tissue (group I, 18 h of transportation), vitrified-warmed tissue (group II, 6 and 18 h of transportation) and vitrified-warmed tissue that had been incubated for 24 h (group III, 6 and 18 h of transportation). OCR measurement and the LIVE/DEAD viability assay were performed. Despite the ischemic condition, the isolated pre-antral follicles in group I consumed oxygen, and the mean OCRs increased with developmental stage. Neither the transportation time nor patient age seemed to affect the OCR in this group. Meanwhile, the mean OCR was significantly lower (P < 0.05) in group II but was comparable to that of group I after 24 h of incubation. The integrity of vitrified-warmed primordial and primary follicles was clearly corroborated by the LIVE/DEAD viability assay. These results demonstrate that the OCR can be used to directly estimate the effect of vitrification on the viability of primordial and primary follicles and to select the viable primordial and primary follicles from vitrified-warmed follicles. PMID:25262776

  5. Effect of oxygen breathing on micro oxygen bubbles in nitrogen-depleted rat adipose tissue at sea level and 25 kPa altitude exposures.

    PubMed

    Randsoe, Thomas; Hyldegaard, Ole

    2012-08-01

    The standard treatment of altitude decompression sickness (aDCS) caused by nitrogen bubble formation is oxygen breathing and recompression. However, micro air bubbles (containing 79% nitrogen), injected into adipose tissue, grow and stabilize at 25 kPa regardless of continued oxygen breathing and the tissue nitrogen pressure. To quantify the contribution of oxygen to bubble growth at altitude, micro oxygen bubbles (containing 0% nitrogen) were injected into the adipose tissue of rats depleted from nitrogen by means of preoxygenation (fraction of inspired oxygen = 1.0; 100%) and the bubbles studied at 101.3 kPa (sea level) or at 25 kPa altitude exposures during continued oxygen breathing. In keeping with previous observations and bubble kinetic models, we hypothesize that oxygen breathing may contribute to oxygen bubble growth at altitude. Anesthetized rats were exposed to 3 h of oxygen prebreathing at 101.3 kPa (sea level). Micro oxygen bubbles of 500-800 nl were then injected into the exposed abdominal adipose tissue. The oxygen bubbles were studied for up to 3.5 h during continued oxygen breathing at either 101.3 or 25 kPa ambient pressures. At 101.3 kPa, all bubbles shrank consistently until they disappeared from view at a net disappearance rate (0.02 mm(2) × min(-1)) significantly faster than for similar bubbles at 25 kPa altitude (0.01 mm(2) × min(-1)). At 25 kPa, most bubbles initially grew for 2-40 min, after which they shrank and disappeared. Four bubbles did not disappear while at 25 kPa. The results support bubble kinetic models based on Fick's first law of diffusion, Boyles law, and the oxygen window effect, predicting that oxygen contributes more to bubble volume and growth during hypobaric conditions. As the effect of oxygen increases, the lower the ambient pressure. The results indicate that recompression is instrumental in the treatment of aDCS. PMID:22653987

  6. Effect of oxygen breathing on micro oxygen bubbles in nitrogen-depleted rat adipose tissue at sea level and 25 kPa altitude exposures.

    PubMed

    Randsoe, Thomas; Hyldegaard, Ole

    2012-08-01

    The standard treatment of altitude decompression sickness (aDCS) caused by nitrogen bubble formation is oxygen breathing and recompression. However, micro air bubbles (containing 79% nitrogen), injected into adipose tissue, grow and stabilize at 25 kPa regardless of continued oxygen breathing and the tissue nitrogen pressure. To quantify the contribution of oxygen to bubble growth at altitude, micro oxygen bubbles (containing 0% nitrogen) were injected into the adipose tissue of rats depleted from nitrogen by means of preoxygenation (fraction of inspired oxygen = 1.0; 100%) and the bubbles studied at 101.3 kPa (sea level) or at 25 kPa altitude exposures during continued oxygen breathing. In keeping with previous observations and bubble kinetic models, we hypothesize that oxygen breathing may contribute to oxygen bubble growth at altitude. Anesthetized rats were exposed to 3 h of oxygen prebreathing at 101.3 kPa (sea level). Micro oxygen bubbles of 500-800 nl were then injected into the exposed abdominal adipose tissue. The oxygen bubbles were studied for up to 3.5 h during continued oxygen breathing at either 101.3 or 25 kPa ambient pressures. At 101.3 kPa, all bubbles shrank consistently until they disappeared from view at a net disappearance rate (0.02 mm(2) × min(-1)) significantly faster than for similar bubbles at 25 kPa altitude (0.01 mm(2) × min(-1)). At 25 kPa, most bubbles initially grew for 2-40 min, after which they shrank and disappeared. Four bubbles did not disappear while at 25 kPa. The results support bubble kinetic models based on Fick's first law of diffusion, Boyles law, and the oxygen window effect, predicting that oxygen contributes more to bubble volume and growth during hypobaric conditions. As the effect of oxygen increases, the lower the ambient pressure. The results indicate that recompression is instrumental in the treatment of aDCS.

  7. Continuous-wave near-infrared spectroscopy is not related to brain tissue oxygen tension.

    PubMed

    Kerz, Thomas; Beyer, Christian; Huthmann, Alexandra; Kalasauskas, Darius; Amr, Amr Nimer; Boor, Stephan; Welschehold, Stefan

    2016-10-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has gained acceptance for cerebral monitoring, especially during cardiac surgery, though there are few data showing its validity. We therefore aimed to correlate invasive brain tissue oxygen measurements (PtiO2) with the corresponding NIRS-values (regional oxygen saturation, rSO2). We also studied whether NIRS was able to detect ischemic events, defined as a PtiO2-value of <15 mmHg. Eleven patients were studied with invasive brain tissue oxygen monitoring and continuous-wave NIRS. PtiO2-correlation with corresponding NIRS-values was calculated. We found no correlation between PtiO2- and NIRS-readings. Measurement of rSO2 was no better than flipping a coin in the detection of cerebral ischemia when a commonly agreed ischemic PtiO2 cut-off value of <15 mmHg was chosen. Continuous-wave-NIRS was unable to reliably detect ischemic cerebral episodes, defined as a PtiO2 value <15 mmHg. Displayed NIRS-values did not correlate with invasively measured PtiO2-values. CW-NIRS should not be used for the detection of cerebral ischemia. PMID:26289038

  8. Plasma jet-induced tissue oxygenation: potentialities for new therapeutic strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collet, G.; Robert, E.; Lenoir, A.; Vandamme, M.; Darny, T.; Dozias, S.; Kieda, C.; Pouvesle, J. M.

    2014-02-01

    The lack of oxygen is a major reason for the resistance of tumor cells to treatments such as radiotherapies. A large number of recent publications on non-thermal plasma applications in medicine report cell behavior modifications and modulation of soluble factors. This in vivo study tested whether such modifications can lead to vascular changes in response to plasma application. Two in situ optical-based methods were used simultaneously, in real time, to assess the effect of non-thermal plasma on tissue vasculature. Tissue oxygen partial pressure (pO2) was measured using a time-resolved luminescence-based optical probe, and the microvascular erythrocyte flow was determined by laser Doppler flowmetry. When plasma treatment was applied on mouse skin, a rapid pO2 increase (up to 4 times) was subcutaneously measured and correlated with blood flow improvement. Such short duration, i.e. 5 min, plasma-induced effects were shown to be locally restricted to the treated area and lasted over 120 min. Further investigations should elucidate the molecular mechanisms of these processes. However, improvement of oxygenation and perfusion open new opportunities for tumor treatments in combination with radiotherapy, and for tumor blood vessel normalization based strategies.

  9. A Porous Tissue Engineering Scaffold Selectively Degraded by Cell-Generated Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Martin, John R.; Gupta, Mukesh K.; Page, Jonathan M.; Yu, Fang; Davidson, Jeffrey M.; Guelcher, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Biodegradable tissue engineering scaffolds are commonly fabricated from poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) or similar polyesters that degrade by hydrolysis. PLGA hydrolysis generates acidic breakdown products that trigger an accelerated, autocatalytic degradation mechanism that can create mismatched rates of biomaterial breakdown and tissue formation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are key mediators of cell function in both health and disease, especially at sites of inflammation and tissue healing, and induction of inflammation and ROS are natural components of the in vivo response to biomaterial implantation. Thus, polymeric biomaterials that are selectively degraded by cell-generated ROS may have potential for creating tissue engineering scaffolds with better matched rates of tissue in-growth and cell-mediated scaffold biodegradation. To explore this approach, a series of poly(thioketal) (PTK) urethane (PTK-UR) biomaterial scaffolds were synthesized that degrade specifically by an ROS-dependent mechanism. PTK-UR scaffolds had significantly higher compressive moduli than analogous poly(ester urethane) (PEUR) scaffolds formed from hydrolytically-degradable ester-based diols (p < 0.05). Unlike PEUR scaffolds, the PTK-UR scaffolds were stable under aqueous conditions out to 25 weeks but were selectively degraded by ROS, indicating that their biodegradation would be exclusively cell-mediated. The in vitro oxidative degradation rates of the PTK-URs followed first-order degradation kinetics, were significantly dependent on PTK composition (p < 0.05), and correlated to ROS concentration. In subcutaneous rat wounds, PTK-UR scaffolds supported cellular infiltration and granulation tissue formation, followed first-order degradation kinetics over 7 weeks, and produced significantly greater stenting of subcutaneous wounds compared to PEUR scaffolds. These combined results indicate that ROS-degradable PTK-UR tissue engineering scaffolds have significant advantages over analogous

  10. A porous tissue engineering scaffold selectively degraded by cell-generated reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Martin, John R; Gupta, Mukesh K; Page, Jonathan M; Yu, Fang; Davidson, Jeffrey M; Guelcher, Scott A; Duvall, Craig L

    2014-04-01

    Biodegradable tissue engineering scaffolds are commonly fabricated from poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) or similar polyesters that degrade by hydrolysis. PLGA hydrolysis generates acidic breakdown products that trigger an accelerated, autocatalytic degradation mechanism that can create mismatched rates of biomaterial breakdown and tissue formation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are key mediators of cell function in both health and disease, especially at sites of inflammation and tissue healing, and induction of inflammation and ROS are natural components of the in vivo response to biomaterial implantation. Thus, polymeric biomaterials that are selectively degraded by cell-generated ROS may have potential for creating tissue engineering scaffolds with better matched rates of tissue in-growth and cell-mediated scaffold biodegradation. To explore this approach, a series of poly(thioketal) (PTK) urethane (PTK-UR) biomaterial scaffolds were synthesized that degrade specifically by an ROS-dependent mechanism. PTK-UR scaffolds had significantly higher compressive moduli than analogous poly(ester urethane) (PEUR) scaffolds formed from hydrolytically-degradable ester-based diols (p < 0.05). Unlike PEUR scaffolds, the PTK-UR scaffolds were stable under aqueous conditions out to 25 weeks but were selectively degraded by ROS, indicating that their biodegradation would be exclusively cell-mediated. The in vitro oxidative degradation rates of the PTK-URs followed first-order degradation kinetics, were significantly dependent on PTK composition (p < 0.05), and correlated to ROS concentration. In subcutaneous rat wounds, PTK-UR scaffolds supported cellular infiltration and granulation tissue formation, followed first-order degradation kinetics over 7 weeks, and produced significantly greater stenting of subcutaneous wounds compared to PEUR scaffolds. These combined results indicate that ROS-degradable PTK-UR tissue engineering scaffolds have significant advantages over

  11. Effect of oxygen breathing and perfluorocarbon emulsion treatment on air bubbles in adipose tissue during decompression sickness.

    PubMed

    Randsoe, T; Hyldegaard, O

    2009-12-01

    Decompression sickness (DCS) after air diving has been treated with success by means of combined normobaric oxygen breathing and intravascular perfluorocarbon (PFC) emulsions causing increased survival rate and faster bubble clearance from the intravascular compartment. The beneficial PFC effect has been explained by the increased transport capacity of oxygen and inert gases in blood. However, previous reports have shown that extravascular bubbles in lipid tissue of rats suffering from DCS will initially grow during oxygen breathing at normobaric conditions. We hypothesize that the combined effect of normobaric oxygen breathing and intravascular PFC infusion could lead to either enhanced extravascular bubble growth on decompression due to the increased oxygen supply, or that PFC infusion could lead to faster bubble elimination due to the increased solubility and transport capacity in blood for nitrogen causing faster nitrogen tissue desaturation. In anesthetized rats decompressed from a 60-min hyperbaric exposure breathing air at 385 kPa, we visually followed the resolution of micro-air bubbles injected into abdominal adipose tissue while the rats breathed either air, oxygen, or oxygen breathing combined with PFC infusion. All bubble observations were done at 101.3 kPa pressure. During oxygen breathing with or without combined PFC infusion, bubbles disappeared faster compared with air breathing. Combined oxygen breathing and PFC infusion caused faster bubble disappearance compared with oxygen breathing. The combined effect of oxygen breathing and PFC infusion neither prevented nor increased transient bubble growth time, rate, or growth ratio compared with oxygen breathing alone. We conclude that oxygen breathing in combination with PFC infusion causes faster bubble disappearance and does not exacerbate transient bubble growth. PFC infusion may be a valuable adjunct therapy during the first-aid treatment of DCS at normobaric conditions.

  12. Nanoparticle-enhanced spectral photoacoustic tomography: effect of oxygen saturation and tissue heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, William C.; Jia, Congxian; Wear, Keith A.; Garra, Brian S.; Pfefer, T. Joshua

    2016-03-01

    Molecular imaging for breast cancer detection, infectious disease diagnostics and preclinical animal research may be achievable through combined use of targeted exogenous agents - such as nanoparticles - and spectral Photoacoustic Tomography (PAT). However, tissue heterogeneity can alter fluence distributions and acoustic propagation, corrupting measured PAT absorption spectra and complicating in vivo nanoparticle detection and quantitation. Highly absorptive vascular structures represent a common confounding factor, and variations in vessel hemoglobin saturation (SO2) may alter spectral content of signals from adjacent/deeper regions. To evaluate the impact of this effect on PAT nanoparticle detectability, we constructed heterogeneous phantoms with well-characterized channel-inclusion geometries and biologically relevant optical and acoustic properties. Phantoms contained an array of tubes at several depths filled with hemoglobin solutions doped with varying concentrations of gold nanorods with an absorption peak at 780 nm. Both overlying and target network SO2 was tuned using sodium dithionite. Phantoms were imaged from 700 to 900 nm using a custom PAT system comprised of a tunable pulsed laser and a research-grade ultrasound system. Recovered nanoparticle spectra were analyzed and compared with results from both spectrophotometry and PAT data from waterimmersed tubes containing blood and nanoparticle solutions. Results suggested that nanoparticle selection for a given PAT application should take into account expected oxygenation states of both target blood vessel and background tissue oxygenation to achieve optimal performance.

  13. In vivo noninvasive monitoring of dissolved oxygen concentration within an implanted tissue-engineered pancreatic construct.

    PubMed

    Goh, Fernie; Sambanis, Athanassios

    2011-09-01

    The function of an implanted tissue-engineered pancreatic construct is influenced by many in vivo factors; however, assessing its function is based primarily on end physiologic effects. As oxygen significantly affects cell function, we established a dual perfluorocarbon method that utilizes (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, with perfluorocarbons as oxygen concentration markers, to noninvasively monitor dissolved oxygen concentration (DO) in βTC-tet cell-containing alginate beads and at the implantation milieu. Beads were implanted in the peritoneal cavity of normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. Using this method, the feasibility of acquiring real-time in vivo DO measurements was demonstrated. Results showed that the mouse peritoneal environment is hypoxic and the DO is further reduced when βTC-tet cell constructs were implanted. The DO within cell-containing beads decreased considerably over time and could be correlated with the relative changes in the number of viable encapsulated cells. The reduction of construct DO due to the metabolic activity of the βTC-tet cells was also compatible with the implant therapeutic function, as observed in the reversal of hyperglycemia in diabetic mice. The importance of these findings in assessing implant functionality and host animal physiology is discussed.

  14. Iron-induced tissue damage and cancer: the role of reactive oxygen species-free radicals.

    PubMed

    Okada, S

    1996-05-01

    Oxygen is poisonous, but we cannot live without it. The high oxidizing potential of oxygen molecules (dioxygen) is a valuable source of energy for the organism and its reactivity is low; that is, spin forbidden. However, the dioxygen itself is a 'free radical' and, especially in the presence of transition metals, it is a major promoter of radical reactions in the cell. Humans survive only by virtue of their elaborate defense mechanisms against oxygen toxicity. Iron is the most abundant transition metal in the human body. Because iron shows wide variation in redox potential with different co-ordination ligands, it may be used as a redox intermediate in many biological mechanism. However, it is precisely this redox activeness that makes iron a key participant in free radical production. The current research on the relationship between iron and cancer is briefly reviewed. Research results are reported here which indicate that iron, when bound to certain ligands, can cause free-radical mediated tissue damage and become carcinogenic. The present study also suggests that iron may also have a significant role in spontaneous human cancer. PMID:8809878

  15. Validation of NIRS in measuring tissue hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation on ex vivo and isolated limb models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaorong; Zhu, Wen; Padival, Vikram; Xia, Mengna; Cheng, Xuefeng; Bush, Robin; Christenson, Linda; Chan, Tim; Doherty, Tim; Iatridis, Angelo

    2003-07-01

    Photonify"s tissue spectrometer uses Near-Infrared Spectroscopy for real-time, noninvasive measurement of hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation [SO2] of biological tissues. The technology was validated by a series of ex vivo and animal studies. In the ex vivo experiment, a close loop blood circulation system was built, precisely controlling the oxygen saturation and the hemoglobin concentration of a liquid phantom. Photonify"s tissue spectrometer was placed on the surface of the liquid phantom for real time measurement and compared with a gas analyzer, considered the gold standard to measure oxygen saturation and hemoglobin concentration. In the animal experiment, the right hind limb of each dog accepted onto the study was surgically removed. The limb was kept viable by connecting the femoral vein and artery to a blood-primed extracorporeal circuit. Different concentrations of hemoglobin were obtained by adding designated amount of saline solution into the perfusion circuit. Photonify"s tissue spectrometers measured oxygen saturation and hemoglobin concentration at various locations on the limb and compared with gas analyzer results. The test results demonstrated that Photonify"s tissue spectrometers were able to detect the relative changes in tissue oxygen saturation and hemoglobin concentration with a high linear correlation compared to the gas analyzer

  16. Roles of Reactive Oxygen Species on Insulin Resistance in Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Obesity resulting from the delivery of an excess amount of energy to adipose tissue from glucose or free fatty acids is associated with insulin resistance and adipose tissue inflammation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated as contributors to both the onset and the progression of insulin resistance. ROS can be generated by overloading the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation system, and also by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidases (NOX) produced by either adipocytes, which only produce NOX4, or by macrophages, which produce mainly NOX2. The source of the ROS might differ in the early, intermediate and late stages of obesity, switching from NOX4-dependence in the early phases to NOX2-dependence, in the intermediate phase, and transiting to mitochondria-dependence later in the time course of obesity. Thus, depending on the stage of obesity, ROS can be generated by three distinct mechanisms: i.e., NOX4, NOX2, and mitochondria. In this review, we will discuss whether NOX4-, NOX2-, and/or mitochondria-derived ROS is/are causal in the onset of adipocyte insulin resistance as obesity progresses. Moreover, we will review the pathophysiological roles of NOX4, NOX2, and mitochondria-derived ROS on adipose tissue inflammation. PMID:27352152

  17. Endogenous Generation of Singlet Oxygen and Ozone in Human and Animal Tissues: Mechanisms, Biological Significance, and Influence of Dietary Components

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that exposing antibodies or amino acids to singlet oxygen results in the formation of ozone (or an ozone-like oxidant) and hydrogen peroxide and that human neutrophils produce both singlet oxygen and ozone during bacterial killing. There is also mounting evidence that endogenous singlet oxygen production may be a common occurrence in cells through various mechanisms. Thus, the ozone-producing combination of singlet oxygen and amino acids might be a common cellular occurrence. This paper reviews the potential pathways of formation of singlet oxygen and ozone in vivo and also proposes some new pathways for singlet oxygen formation. Physiological consequences of the endogenous formation of these oxidants in human tissues are discussed, as well as examples of how dietary factors may promote or inhibit their generation and activity. PMID:27042259

  18. Simultaneous measurement of deep tissue blood flow and oxygenation using noncontact diffuse correlation spectroscopy flow-oximeter

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ting; Lin, Yu; Shang, Yu; He, Lian; Huang, Chong; Szabunio, Margaret; Yu, Guoqiang

    2013-01-01

    We report a novel noncontact diffuse correlation spectroscopy flow-oximeter for simultaneous quantification of relative changes in tissue blood flow (rBF) and oxygenation (Δ[oxygenation]). The noncontact probe was compared against a contact probe in tissue-like phantoms and forearm muscles (n = 10), and the dynamic trends in both rBF and Δ[oxygenation] were found to be highly correlated. However, the magnitudes of Δ[oxygenation] measured by the two probes were significantly different. Monte Carlo simulations and phantom experiments revealed that the arm curvature resulted in a significant underestimation (~−20%) for the noncontact measurements in Δ[oxygenation], but not in rBF. Other factors that may cause the residual discrepancies between the contact and noncontact measurements were discussed, and further comparisons with other established technologies are needed to identify/quantify these factors. Our research paves the way for noncontact and simultaneous monitoring of blood flow and oxygenation in soft and vulnerable tissues without distorting tissue hemodynamics. PMID:23446991

  19. Measurement of characteristic prompt gamma rays emitted from oxygen and carbon in tissue-equivalent samples during proton beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polf, Jerimy C.; Panthi, Rajesh; Mackin, Dennis S.; McCleskey, Matt; Saastamoinen, Antti; Roeder, Brian T.; Beddar, Sam

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to characterize how prompt gamma (PG) emission from tissue changes as a function of carbon and oxygen concentration, and to assess the feasibility of determining elemental concentration in tissues irradiated with proton beams. For this study, four tissue-equivalent water-sucrose samples with differing densities and concentrations of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen were irradiated with a 48 MeV proton pencil beam. The PG spectrum emitted from each sample was measured using a high-purity germanium detector, and the absolute detection efficiency of the detector, average beam current, and delivered dose distribution were also measured. Changes to the total PG emission from 12C (4.44 MeV) and 16O (6.13 MeV) per incident proton and per Gray of absorbed dose were characterized as a function of carbon and oxygen concentration in the sample. The intensity of the 4.44 MeV PG emission per incident proton was found to be nearly constant for all samples regardless of their carbon concentration. However, we found that the 6.13 MeV PG emission increased linearly with the total amount (in grams) of oxygen irradiated in the sample. From the measured PG data, we determined that 1.64 × 107 oxygen PGs were emitted per gram of oxygen irradiated per Gray of absorbed dose delivered with a 48 MeV proton beam. These results indicate that the 6.13 MeV PG emission from 16O is proportional to the concentration of oxygen in tissue irradiated with proton beams, showing that it is possible to determine the concentration of oxygen within tissues irradiated with proton beams by measuring 16O PG emission.

  20. Measurement of characteristic prompt gamma rays emitted from oxygen and carbon in tissue-equivalent samples during proton beam irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Polf, Jerimy C; Panthi, Rajesh; Mackin, Dennis S; McCleskey, Matt; Saastamoinen, Antti; Roeder, Brian T; Beddar, Sam

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to characterize how prompt gamma (PG) emission from tissue changes as a function of carbon and oxygen concentration, and to assess the feasibility of determining elemental concentration in tissues irradiated with proton beams. For this study, four tissue-equivalent water-sucrose samples with differing densities and concentrations of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen were irradiated with a 48 MeV proton pencil beam. The PG spectrum emitted from each sample was measured using a high-purity germanium detector, and the absolute detection efficiency of the detector, average beam current, and delivered dose distribution were also measured. Changes to the total PG emission from 12C (4.44 MeV) and 16O (6.13 MeV) per incident proton and per Gray of absorbed dose were characterized as a function of carbon and oxygen concentration in the sample. The intensity of the 4.44 MeV PG emission per incident proton was found to be nearly constant for all samples regardless of their carbon concentration. However, we found that the 6.13 MeV PG emission increased linearly with the total amount (in grams) of oxygen irradiated in the sample. From the measured PG data, we determined that 1.64 × 107 oxygen PGs were emitted per gram of oxygen irradiated per Gray of absorbed dose delivered with a 48 MeV proton beam. These results indicate that the 6.13 MeV PG emission from 16O is proportional to the concentration of oxygen in tissue irradiated with proton beams, showing that it is possible to determine the concentration of oxygen within tissues irradiated with proton beams by measuring 16O PG emission. PMID:23920051

  1. Brain tissue oxygen-based therapy and outcome after severe traumatic brain injury: a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Nangunoori, Raj; Maloney-Wilensky, Eileen; Stiefel, Michael; Park, Soojin; Andrew Kofke, W; Levine, Joshua M; Yang, Wei; Le Roux, Peter D

    2012-08-01

    Observational clinical studies demonstrate that brain hypoxia is associated with poor outcome after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). In this study, available medical literature was reviewed to examine whether brain tissue oxygen (PbtO2)-based therapy is associated with improved patient outcome after severe TBI. Clinical studies published between 1993 and 2010 that compared PbtO2-based therapy combined with intracranial and cerebral perfusion pressure (ICP/CPP)-based therapy to ICP/CPP-based therapy alone were identified from electronic databases, Index Medicus, bibliographies of pertinent articles, and expert consultation. For analysis, each selected paper had to have adequate data to determine odds ratios (ORs) and confidence intervals (CIs) of outcome described by the Glasgow outcome score (GOS). Seven studies that compared ICP/CPP and PbtO2- to ICP/CPP-based therapy were identified. There were no randomized studies and no comparison studies in children. Four studies, published in 2003, 2009, and 2010 that included 491 evaluable patients were used in the final analysis. Among patients who received PbtO2-based therapy, 121(38.8%) had unfavorable and 191 (61.2%) had a favorable outcome. Among the patients who received ICP/CPP-based therapy 104 (58.1%) had unfavorable and 75 (41.9%) had a favorable outcome. Overall PbtO2-based therapy was associated with favorable outcome (OR 2.1; 95% CI 1.4-3.1). Summary results suggest that combined ICP/CPP- and PbtO2-based therapy is associated with better outcome after severe TBI than ICP/CPP-based therapy alone. Cross-organizational practice variances cannot be controlled for in this type of review and so we cannot answer whether PbtO2-based therapy improves outcome. However, the potentially large incremental value of PbtO2-based therapy provides justification for a randomized clinical trial.

  2. Non-Invasive, Simultaneous Quantification of Vascular Oxygenation and Glucose Uptake in Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Rajaram, Narasimhan; Reesor, Andrew F.; Mulvey, Christine S.; Frees, Amy E.; Ramanujam, Nirmala

    2015-01-01

    We report the development of non-invasive, fiber-based diffuse optical spectroscopy for simultaneously quantifying vascular oxygenation (SO2) and glucose uptake in solid tumors in vivo. Glucose uptake was measured using a fluorescent glucose analog, 2-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diaxol-4-yl)amino]-2-deoxyglucose (2-NBDG). Quantification of label-free SO2 and 2-NBDG-fluorescence-based glucose uptake 60 minutes after administration of the tracer (2-NBDG60) was performed using computational models of light-tissue interaction. This study was carried out on normal tissue and 4T1 and 4T07 murine mammary tumor xenografts in vivo. Injection of 2-NBDG did not cause a significant change in optical measurements of SO2, demonstrating its suitability as a functional reporter of tumor glucose uptake. Correction of measured 2-NBDG-fluorescence for the effects of absorption and scattering significantly improved contrast between tumor and normal tissue. The 4T1 and 4T07 tumors showed significantly decreased SO2, and 4T1 tumors demonstrated increased 2-NBDG60 compared with normal tissue (60 minutes after the administration of 2-NBDG when perfusion-mediated effects have cleared). 2-NBDG-fluorescence was found to be highly sensitive to food deprivation-induced reduction in blood glucose levels, demonstrating that this endpoint is indeed sensitive to glycolytic demand. 2-NBDG60 was also found to be linearly related to dose, underscoring the importance of calibrating for dose when comparing across animals or experiments. 4T1 tumors demonstrated an inverse relationship between 2-NBDG60 and SO2 that was consistent with the Pasteur effect, particularly when exposed to hypoxic gas breathing. Our results illustrate the potential of optical spectroscopy to provide valuable information about the metabolic status of tumors, with important implications for cancer prognosis. PMID:25635865

  3. Reproducibility of cerebral tissue oxygen saturation measurements by near-infrared spectroscopy in newborn infants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenny, Carmen; Biallas, Martin; Trajkovic, Ivo; Fauchère, Jean-Claude; Bucher, Hans Ulrich; Wolf, Martin

    2011-09-01

    Early detection of cerebral hypoxemia is an important aim in neonatology. A relevant parameter to assess brain oxygenation may be the cerebral tissue oxygen saturation (StO2) measured by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). So far the reproducibility of StO2 measurements was too low for clinical application, probably due to inhomogeneities. The aim of this study was to test a novel sensor geometry which reduces the influence of inhomogeneities. Thirty clinically stable newborn infants, with a gestational age of median 33.9 (range 26.9 to 41.9) weeks, birth weight of 2220 (820 to 4230) g, postnatal age of 5 (1 to 71) days were studied. At least four StO2 measurements of 1 min duration were carried out using NIRS on the lateral head. The sensor was repositioned between measurements. Reproducibility was calculated by a linear mixed effects model. The mean StO2 was 79.99 +/- 4.47% with a reproducibility of 2.76% and a between-infant variability of 4.20%. Thus, the error of measurement only accounts for 30.1% of the variability. The novel sensor geometry leads to considerably more precise measurements compared to previous studies with, e.g., ~5% reproducibility for the NIRO 300. The novel StO2 values hence have a higher clinical relevance.

  4. Oscillation of tissue oxygen index in non-exercising muscle during exercise.

    PubMed

    Yano, T; Afroundeh, R; Shirakawa, K; Lian, C-S; Shibata, K; Xiao, Z; Yunoki, T

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine how oscillation of tissue oxygen index (TOI) in non-exercising exercise is affected during high-intensity and low-intensity exercises. Three exercises were performed with exercise intensities of 30% and 70% peak oxygen uptake (Vo(2)peak) for 12 min and with exercise intensity of 70% Vo(2)peak for 30 s. TOI in non-exercising muscle (biceps brachii) during the exercises for 12 min was determined by nearinfrared spectroscopy. TOI in the non-exercising muscle during the exercises was analyzed by fast Fourier transform (FFT) to obtain power spectra density (PSD). The frequency at which maximal PSD appeared (Fmax) during the exercise with 70% Vo(2)peak for 12 min (0.00477 ± 0.00172 Hz) was significantly lower than that during the exercise with 30% Vo2peak for 12 min (0.00781 ± 0.00338 Hz). There were significant differences in blood pH and blood lactate between the exercise with 70% Vo(2)peak and the exercise with 30% Vo(2)peak. It is concluded that TOI in nonexercising muscle oscillates during low-intensity exercise as well as during high-intensity exercise and that the difference in Fmax between the two exercises is associated with the difference in increase in blood lactate derived from the exercise.

  5. Intermittent high oxygen influences the formation of neural retinal tissue from human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lixiong; Chen, Xi; Zeng, Yuxiao; Li, Qiyou; Zou, Ting; Chen, Siyu; Wu, Qian; Fu, Caiyun; Xu, Haiwei; Yin, Zheng Qin

    2016-01-01

    The vertebrate retina is a highly multilayered nervous tissue with a large diversity of cellular components. With the development of stem cell technologies, human retinas can be generated in three-dimensional (3-D) culture in vitro. However, understanding the factors modulating key productive processes and the way that they influence development are far from clear. Oxygen, as the most essential element participating in metabolism, is a critical factor regulating organic development. In this study, using 3-D culture of human stem cells, we examined the effect of intermittent high oxygen treatment (40% O2) on the formation and cellular behavior of neural retinas (NR) in the embryonic body (EB). The volume of EB and number of proliferating cells increased significantly under 40% O2 on day 38, 50, and 62. Additionally, the ratio of PAX6+ cells within NR was significantly increased. The neural rosettes could only develop with correct apical-basal polarity under 40% O2. In addition, the generation, migration and maturation of retinal ganglion cells were enhanced under 40% O2. All of these results illustrated that 40% O2 strengthened the formation of NR in EB with characteristics similar to the in vivo state, suggesting that the hyperoxic state facilitated the retinal development in vitro. PMID:27435522

  6. Intermittent high oxygen influences the formation of neural retinal tissue from human embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Lixiong; Chen, Xi; Zeng, Yuxiao; Li, Qiyou; Zou, Ting; Chen, Siyu; Wu, Qian; Fu, Caiyun; Xu, Haiwei; Yin, Zheng Qin

    2016-01-01

    The vertebrate retina is a highly multilayered nervous tissue with a large diversity of cellular components. With the development of stem cell technologies, human retinas can be generated in three-dimensional (3-D) culture in vitro. However, understanding the factors modulating key productive processes and the way that they influence development are far from clear. Oxygen, as the most essential element participating in metabolism, is a critical factor regulating organic development. In this study, using 3-D culture of human stem cells, we examined the effect of intermittent high oxygen treatment (40% O2) on the formation and cellular behavior of neural retinas (NR) in the embryonic body (EB). The volume of EB and number of proliferating cells increased significantly under 40% O2 on day 38, 50, and 62. Additionally, the ratio of PAX6+ cells within NR was significantly increased. The neural rosettes could only develop with correct apical-basal polarity under 40% O2. In addition, the generation, migration and maturation of retinal ganglion cells were enhanced under 40% O2. All of these results illustrated that 40% O2 strengthened the formation of NR in EB with characteristics similar to the in vivo state, suggesting that the hyperoxic state facilitated the retinal development in vitro. PMID:27435522

  7. A pilot study of a new spectrophotometry device to measure tissue oxygen saturation.

    PubMed

    Abel, Gemma; Allen, John; Drinnan, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Tissue oxygen saturation (SO2) measurements have the potential for far wider use than at present but are limited by device availability and portability for many potential applications. A device based on a small, low-cost general-purpose spectrophotometer (the Harrison device) might facilitate wider use. The aim of this study was to compare the Harrison device with a commercial instrument, the LEA O2C.Measurements were carried out on the forearm and finger of 20 healthy volunteers, using a blood pressure cuff on the upper arm to induce different levels of oxygenation. Repeatability of both devices was assessed, and the Bland-Altman method was used to assess agreement between them.The devices showed agreement in overall tracking of changes in SO2. Test-retest agreement for the Harrison device was worse than for O2C, with SD repeatability of 10.6% (forearm) or 18.6% (finger). There was no overall bias between devices, but mean (SD) difference of 1.2 (11.8%) (forearm) or 4.4 (11.5%) (finger) were outside of a clinically acceptable range.Disagreements were attributed to the stability of the Harrison probe and the natural SO2 variations across the skin surface increasing the random error. Therefore, though not equivalent to the LEA O2C, a probe redesign and averaged measurements may help establish the Harrison device as a low cost alternative.

  8. Near-infrared spectroscopy for monitoring of tissue oxygenation of exercising skeletal muscle in a chronic compartment syndrome model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breit, G. A.; Gross, J. H.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Chance, B.; Hargens, A. R.

    1997-01-01

    Variations in the levels of muscle hemoglobin and of myoglobin oxygen saturation can be detected non-invasively with near-infrared spectroscopy. This technique could be applied to the diagnosis of chronic compartment syndrome, in which invasive testing has shown increased intramuscular pressure associated with ischemia and pain during exercise. We simulated chronic compartment syndrome in ten healthy subjects (seven men and three women) by applying external compression, through a wide inflatable cuff, to increase the intramuscular pressure in the anterior compartment of the leg. The tissue oxygenation of the tibialis anterior muscle was measured with near-infrared spectroscopy during gradual inflation of the cuff to a pressure of forty millimeters of mercury (5.33 kilopascals) during fourteen minutes of cyclic isokinetic dorsiflexion and plantar flexion of the ankle. The subjects exercised with and without external compression. The data on tissue oxygenation for each subject then were normalized to a scale of 100 per cent (the baseline value, or the value at rest) to 0 per cent (the physiological minimum, or the level of oxygenation achieved by exercise to exhaustion during arterial occlusion of the lower extremity). With external compression, tissue oxygenation declined at a rate of 1.4 +/- 0.3 per cent per minute (mean and standard error) during exercise. After an initial decrease at the onset, tissue oxygenation did not decline during exercise without compression. The recovery of tissue oxygenation after exercise was twice as slow with compression (2.5 +/- 0.6 minutes) than it was without the use of compression (1.3 +/- 0.2 minutes).

  9. Investigating tissue respiration and skin microhaemocirculation under adaptive changes and the synchronization of blood flow and oxygen saturation rhythms.

    PubMed

    Dunaev, A V; Sidorov, V V; Krupatkin, A I; Rafailov, I E; Palmer, S G; Stewart, N A; Sokolovski, S G; Rafailov, E U

    2014-04-01

    Multi-functional laser non-invasive diagnostic systems allow the study of a number of microcirculatory parameters, including index of blood microcirculation (Im) (by laser Doppler flowmetry, LDF) and oxygen saturation (StO2) of skin tissue (by tissue reflectance oximetry, TRO). This research aimed to use such a system to investigate the synchronization of microvascular blood flow and oxygen saturation rhythms under normal and adaptive change conditions. Studies were conducted on eight healthy volunteers of 21-49 years. These volunteers were observed between one and six months, totalling 422 basic tests (3 min each). Measurements were performed on the palmar surface of the right middle finger and the lower forearm's medial surface. Rhythmic oscillations of LDF and TRO were studied using wavelet analysis. Combined tissue oxygen consumption data for all volunteers during 'adaptive changes' increased relative to normal conditions with and without arteriovenous anastomoses. Data analysis revealed resonance and synchronized rhythms in microvascular blood flow and oxygen saturation as an adaptive change in myogenic oscillation (vasomotion) resulting from exercise and possibly psychoemotional stress. Synchronization of myogenic rhythms during adaptive changes may lead to increased oxygen consumption as a result of increased microvascular blood flow velocity.

  10. NIRS-Derived Tissue Oxygen Saturation and Hydrogen Ion Concentration Following Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. M. C.; Everett, M. E.; Crowell, J. B.; Westby, C. M.; Soller, B. R.

    2010-01-01

    Long-term bed rest (BR), a model of spaceflight, results in a decrease in aerobic capacity and altered submaximal exercise responses. The strongest BR-induced effects on exercise appear to be centrally-mediated, but longer BR durations may result in peripheral adaptations (e.g., decreased mitochondrial and capillary density) which are likely to influence exercise responses. PURPOSE: To measure tissue oxygen saturation (SO2) and hydrogen ion concentration ([H+]) in the vastus lateralis (VL) using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) during cycle ergometry before and after . 30 d of BR. METHODS: Eight subjects performed a graded exercise test on a cycle ergometer to volitional fatigue 7 d before (pre-BR) and at the end or 1 day after BR (post-BR). NIRS spectra were collected from a sensor adhered to the skin overlying the VL. Oxygen consumption (VO2) was measured by open circuit spirometry. Blood volume (BV) was measured before and after BR using the carbon monoxide rebreathing technique. Changes in pre- and post-BR SO2 and [H+] data were compared using mixed model analyses. BV and peak exercise data were compared using paired t-tests. RESULTS: BV (pre-BR: 4.3+/-0.3, post-BR: 3.7+/-0.2 L, mean+/-SE, p=.01) and peak VO2 (pre-BR: 1.98+/-0.24, post-BR: 1.48 +/-0.21 L/min, p<.01) were reduced after BR. As expected, SO2 decreased with exercise before and after BR. However, SO2 was lower post compared with pre-BR throughout exercise, including at peak exercise (pre-BR: 50+/-3, post-BR: 43+/-4%, p=.01). After BR, [H+] was higher at the start of exercise and did not increase at the same rate as pre-BR. Peak [H+] was not different from pre to post-BR (pre-BR: 36+/-2; post-BR: 38+/-2 nmol/L). CONCLUSIONS: Lower SO2 during exercise suggests that oxygen extraction in the VL is higher after BR, perhaps due to lower circulating blood volume. The higher [H+] after BR suggests a greater reliance upon glycolysis during submaximal exercise, although [H+] at peak exercise was unchanged

  11. Brain Tissue Oxygenation and Cerebral Metabolic Patterns in Focal and Diffuse Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Purins, Karlis; Lewén, Anders; Hillered, Lars; Howells, Tim; Enblad, Per

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Neurointensive care of traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients is currently based on intracranial pressure (ICP) and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) targeted protocols. There are reasons to believe that knowledge of brain tissue oxygenation (BtipO2) would add information with the potential of improving patient outcome. The aim of this study was to examine BtipO2 and cerebral metabolism using the Neurovent-PTO probe and cerebral microdialysis (MD) in TBI patients. Methods: Twenty-three severe TBI patients with monitoring of physiological parameters, ICP, CPP, BtipO2, and MD for biomarkers of energy metabolism (glucose, lactate, and pyruvate) and cellular distress (glutamate, glycerol) were included. Patients were grouped according to injury type (focal/diffuse) and placement of the Neurovent-PTO probe and MD catheter (injured/non-injured hemisphere). Results: We observed different patterns in BtipO2 and MD biomarkers in diffuse and focal injury where placement of the probe also influenced the results (ipsilateral/contralateral). In all groups, despite fairly normal levels of ICP and CPP, increased MD levels of glutamate, glycerol, or the L/P ratio were observed at BtipO2 <5 mmHg, indicating increased vulnerability of the brain at this level. Conclusion: Monitoring of BtipO2 adds important information in addition to traditional ICP and CPP surveillance. Because of the different metabolic responses to very low BtipO2 in the individual patient groups we submit that brain tissue oximetry is a complementary tool rather than an alternative to MD monitoring. PMID:24817863

  12. Oxygen Tension and Formation of Cervical-Like Tissue in Two-Dimensional and Three-Dimensional Culture

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Jennifer; Elstad, Kirigin; Socrate, Simona; Kaplan, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Cervical dysfunction contributes to a significant number of preterm births and is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in newborn infants. Cervical dysfunction is related to weakened load bearing properties of the collagen-rich cervical stroma. However, the mechanisms responsible for cervical collagen changes during pregnancy are not well defined. It is known that blood flow and oxygen tension significantly increase in reproductive tissues during pregnancy. To examine the effect of oxygen tension, a key mediator of tissue homeostasis, on the formation of cervical-like tissue in vitro, we grew primary human cervical cells in both two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) culture systems at 5% and 20% oxygen. Immunofluorescence studies revealed a stable fibroblast phenotype across six passages in all subjects studied (n=5). In 2D culture for 2 weeks, 20% oxygen was associated with significantly increased collagen gene expression (p<0.01), increased tissue wet weight (p<0.01), and increased collagen concentration (p=0.046). 3D cultures could be followed for significantly longer time frames than 2D cultures (12 weeks vs. 2 weeks). In contrast to 2D cultures, 20% oxygen in 3D cultures was associated with decreased collagen concentration (p<0.01) and unchanged collagen gene expression, which is similar to cervical collagen changes seen during pregnancy. We infer that 3D culture is more relevant for studying cervical collagen changes in vitro. The data suggest that increased oxygen tension may be related to significant cervical collagen changes seen in pregnancy. PMID:21919792

  13. Monitoring cerebral tissue oxygen saturation at frontal and parietal regions during carotid artery stenting.

    PubMed

    Meng, Lingzhong; Hall, Melanie; Settecase, Fabio; Higashida, Randall T; Gelb, Adrian W

    2016-04-01

    Cerebral oximetry is normally placed on the upper forehead to monitor the frontal lobe cerebral tissue oxygen saturation (SctO2). We present a case in which the SctO2 was simultaneously monitored at both frontal and parietal regions during internal carotid artery (ICA) stenting. Our case involves a 79-year-old man who presented after a sudden fall and was later diagnosed with a watershed ischemic stroke in the distal fields perfused by the left middle cerebral artery. He had diffuse atherosclerotic occlusive lesions in the carotid and cerebral arterial systems including an 85 % stenotic lesion in the left distal cervical ICA. The brain territory perfused by the left ICA was devoid of collateral flow from anterior and posterior communicating arteries due to an abnormal circle of Willis. During stenting, the SctO2 monitored at both frontal and parietal regions tracked the procedure-induced acute flow change. However, the baseline SctO2 values of frontal and parietal regions differed. The SctO2-MAP correlation was more consistent on the stroked hemisphere than the non-stroked hemisphere. This case showed that SctO2 can be reliably monitored at the parietal region, which is primarily perfused by the ICA. SctO2 of the stroked brain is more pressure dependent than the non-stroked brain.

  14. Noninvasive Intracranial Pressure and Tissue Oxygen Measurements for Space and Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargens, A. R.; Ballard, R. E.; Murthy, G.; Watenpaugh, D. E.

    1994-01-01

    The paper discusses the following: Increasing intracranial pressure in humans during simulated microgravity. and near-infrared monitoring of model chronic compartment syndrome in exercising skeletal muscle. Compared to upright-seated posture, 0 deg. supine, 6 deg. HDT, and 15 deg. HDT produced TMD changes of 317 +/- 112, 403 +/- 114, and 474 +/- 112 n1 (means +/- S.E.), respectively. Furthermore, postural transitions from 0 deg. supine to 6 deg. HDT and from 6 deg. to 15 deg. HDT generated significant TMD changes (p less than 0.05). There was no hysteresis when postural transitions to HDT were compared to reciprocal transitions toward upright seated posture. Currently, diagnosis of chronic compartment syndrome (CCS) depends on measurement of intramuscular pressure by invasive catheterization. We hypothesized that this syndrome can be detected noninvasively by near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy, which tracks variations in muscle hemoglobin/myoglobin oxygen saturation. CCS was simulated in the tibialis anterior muscle of 7 male and 3 female subjects by gradual inflation of a cuff placed around the leg to 40 mmHg during 14 minutes of cyclic isokinetic dorsiflexion exercise. On a separate day, subjects underwent the identical exercise protocol with no external compression. In both cases, tissue oxygenation (T(sub O2) was measured in the tibialis anterior by NIR spectroscopy and normalized to a percentage scale between baseline and a T(sub O2) nadir reached during exercise to ischemic exhaustion. Over the course of exercise, T(sub O2) declined at a rate of 1.4 +/- 0.3% per minute with model CCS, yet did not decrease during control exercise. Post-exercise recovery of T(sub O2) was slower with model CCS (2.5 +/- 0.6 min) than in control (1.3 +/- 0.2 min). These results demonstrate that NIR spectroscopy can detect muscle deoxygenation caused by pathologically elevated intramuscular pressure in exercising skeletal muscle. Consequently, this technique shows promise as a

  15. 2H,3H-Decafluoropentane-Based Nanodroplets: New Perspectives for Oxygen Delivery to Hypoxic Cutaneous Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Jithin; Khadjavi, Amina; Cavallo, Federica; Quaglino, Elena; Panariti, Alice; Rivolta, Ilaria; Benintende, Emilio; Varetto, Gianfranco; Argenziano, Monica; Troia, Adriano; Cavalli, Roberta; Guiot, Caterina

    2015-01-01

    Perfluoropentane (PFP)-based oxygen-loaded nanobubbles (OLNBs) were previously proposed as adjuvant therapeutic tools for pathologies of different etiology sharing hypoxia as a common feature, including cancer, infection, and autoimmunity. Here we introduce a new platform of oxygen nanocarriers, based on 2H,3H-decafluoropentane (DFP) as core fluorocarbon. These new nanocarriers have been named oxygen-loaded nanodroplets (OLNDs) since DFP is liquid at body temperature, unlike gaseous PFP. Dextran-shelled OLNDs, available either in liquid or gel formulations, display spherical morphology, ~600 nm diameters, anionic charge, good oxygen carrying capacity, and no toxic effects on human keratinocytes after cell internalization. In vitro OLNDs result more effective in releasing oxygen to hypoxic environments than former OLNBs, as demonstrated by analysis through oxymetry. In vivo, OLNDs effectively enhance oxy-hemoglobin levels, as emerged from investigation by photoacoustic imaging. Interestingly, ultrasound (US) treatment further improves transdermal oxygen release from OLNDs. Taken together, these data suggest that US-activated, DFP-based OLNDs might be innovative, suitable and cost-effective devices to topically treat hypoxia-associated pathologies of the cutaneous tissues. PMID:25781463

  16. Oxygen therapy in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Cherian, S; Morris, I; Evans, J; Kotecha, S

    2014-06-01

    Despite being the most widely used and vital therapy in neonatology, optimal strategies for the use of oxygen in preterm infants remain controversial. Achieving the balance between attaining adequate tissue oxygenation and avoiding oxygen toxicity is challenging. There remains a paucity of clear evidence based guidance for clinicians on safe oxygen saturation targets. What does seem apparent is that these targets vary over time in the life of a preterm infant. This article summarises the evidence behind current practice of oxygen monitoring and administration from the first few minutes after birth, through to the acute neonatal and later convalescent periods. Finally, we review the use of home oxygen for preterm infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia including administration and weaning from domically home oxygen.

  17. Achilles tendon suture deteriorates tendon capillary blood flow with sustained tissue oxygen saturation – an animal study

    PubMed Central

    Kraemer, Robert; Lorenzen, Johan; Rotter, Robert; Vogt, Peter M; Knobloch, Karsten

    2009-01-01

    Background Treatment of ruptured Achilles tendons currently constitutes of conservative early functional treatment or surgical treatment either by open or minimal invasive techniques. We hypothesize that an experimental Achilles tendon suture in an animal model significantly deteriorates Achilles tendon microcirculation immediately following suturing. Methods Fifteen Achilles tendons of eight male Wistar rats (275–325 g) were included. After preparation of the Achilles tendon with a medial paratendinous approach, Achilles tendon microcirculation was assessed using combined Laser-Doppler and spectrophotometry (Oxygen-to-see) regarding: - tendinous capillary blood flow [arbitrary units AU] - tendinous tissue oxygen saturation [%] - tendinous venous filling pressure [rAU] The main body of the Achilles tendon was measured in the center of the suture with 50 Hz. 10 minutes after Achilles tendon suture (6-0 Prolene), a second assessment of microcirculatory parameters was performed. Results Achilles tendon capillary blood flow decreased by 57% following the suture (70 ± 30 AU vs. 31 ± 16 AU; p < 0.001). Tendinous tissue oxygen saturation remained at the same level before and after suture (78 ± 17% vs. 77 ± 22%; p = 0.904). Tendinous venous filling pressure increased by 33% (54 ± 16 AU vs. 72 ± 20 AU; p = 0.019) after suture. Conclusion Achilles tendon suture in anaesthetised rats causes an acute loss of capillary perfusion and increases postcapillary venous filling pressures indicating venous stasis. The primary hypothesis of this study was confirmed. In contrast, tendinous tissue oxygen saturation remains unchanged excluding acute intratendinous hypoxia within the first 10 minutes after suture. Further changes of oxygen saturation remain unclear. Furthermore, it remains to be determined to what extent reduced capillary blood flow as well as increased postcapillary stasis might influence tendon healing from a microcirculatory point of view in this animal setting

  18. Human mammary carcinomas in nude rats--a new approach for investigating oxygen transport and substrate utilization in tumor tissues.

    PubMed

    Vaupel, P; Kallinowski, F; Dave, S; Gabbert, H; Bastert, G

    1985-01-01

    A new model is presented for the study of oxygen supply and substrate utilization in human tumor tissue. In this approach human tumor material thrives in immune-deficient nude rats. The host chosen allows the continuous evaluation of all relevant parameters. From the data obtained so far it is concluded that this model is a valid tool in investigation of the metabolic status of human tumors.

  19. Experimental manipulations of tissue oxygen supply do not affect warming tolerance of European perch.

    PubMed

    Brijs, Jeroen; Jutfelt, Fredrik; Clark, Timothy D; Gräns, Albin; Ekström, Andreas; Sandblom, Erik

    2015-08-01

    A progressive inability of the cardiorespiratory system to maintain systemic oxygen supply at elevated temperatures has been suggested to reduce aerobic scope and the upper thermal limit of aquatic ectotherms. However, few studies have directly investigated the dependence of thermal limits on oxygen transport capacity. By manipulating oxygen availability (via environmental hyperoxia) and blood oxygen carrying capacity (via experimentally induced anaemia) in European perch (Perca fluviatilis Linneaus), we investigated the effects of oxygen transport capacity on aerobic scope and the critical thermal maximum (CT(max)). Hyperoxia resulted in a twofold increase in aerobic scope at the control temperature of 23°C, but this did not translate to an elevated CT(max) in comparison with control fish (34.6±0.1 versus 34.0±0.5°C, respectively). Anaemia (∼43% reduction in haemoglobin concentration) did not cause a reduction in aerobic scope or CT(max) (33.8±0.3°C) compared with control fish. Additionally, oxygen consumption rates of anaemic perch during thermal ramping increased in a similar exponential manner to that in control fish, highlighting that perch have an impressive capacity to compensate for a substantial reduction in blood oxygen carrying capacity. Taken together, these results indicate that oxygen limitation is not a universal mechanism determining the CT(max) of fishes.

  20. Tissue plasminogen activator protects hippocampal neurons from oxygen-glucose deprivation injury.

    PubMed

    Flavin, M P; Zhao, G

    2001-03-01

    We have previously shown that tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) participates in the neurotoxicity of microglial conditioned medium (MgCM). Killing of hippocampal neurons by MgCM was prevented by both plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and anti-tPA antibody. An N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor blocker protected neurons from MgCM, suggesting that this subtype of glutamate receptor is involved. Whereas glutamate receptor-mediated events are important in cerebral ischemia and tPA has previously been shown to enhance excitotoxicity in hippocampus, we hypothesized that tPA would exaggerate oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD) injury in cultures of hippocampal neurons. Dissociated rat hippocampal cells were grown under conditions designed to optimize neuronal growth while minimizing glial replication. At 7--10 days, cultures were subjected to OGD for 2.5 hr. Recombinant human tPA (1,000 IU) was added immediately after OGD. Viability was assessed 24 hr later. Viable, apoptotic, and necrotic cells were classified and quantified based on staining patterns of acridine orange and ethidium bromide under fluorescence microscopy. tPA alone did not alter neuronal integrity. OGD produced significant neuronal death (viability reduced by 45%, P < 0.001). tPA completely protected OGD-exposed cultures. Potential mechanisms of tPA protection were explored. Whereas tPA antibody abolished the protective effect of tPA, its proteolytic inhibitor PAI-1 did not alter the effect. The effect of tPA was tested in separate free radical and excitatory amino acid insults. It did not protect neurons from hydrogen peroxide (1 microM), S-nitro-acetylpenicillamine (10 microM), glutamate (50 microM), or NMDA (10 microM) damage but significantly attenuated injury caused by 250 microM kainate. We conclude that tPA is capable of protecting hippocampal neurons from OGD by a nonproteolytic action. The mechanism of protection was not defined, although attenuation of AMPA/kainate glutamate receptors

  1. Histochemical and functional improvement of adipose-derived stem cell-based tissue-engineered cartilage by hyperbaric oxygen/air treatment in a rabbit articular defect model.

    PubMed

    Dai, Niann-Tzyy; Fan, Gang-Yi; Liou, Nien-Hsien; Wang, Yi-Wen; Fu, Keng-Yen; Ma, Kuo-Hsing; Liu, Jiang-Chuan; Chang, Shun-Cheng; Huang, Kun-Lun; Dai, Lien-Guo; Chen, Shyi-Gen; Chen, Tim-Mo

    2015-05-01

    Cartilage is exposed to compression forces during joint loading. Therefore, exogenous stimuli are frequently used in cartilage tissue engineering strategies to enhance chondrocyte differentiation and extracellular matrix (ECM) secretion. In this study, human adipose-derived stem cells were seeded on a gelatin/polycaprolactone scaffold to evaluate the histochemical and functional improvement of tissue-engineered cartilage after hyperbaric oxygen/air treatment in a rabbit articular defect model. Behavior tests showed beneficial effects on weight-bearing and rear leg-supporting capacities after treatment of tissue-engineered cartilage with 2.5 ATA oxygen or air. Moreover, positron emission tomography images and immunohistochemistry staining demonstrated hydroxyapatite formation and increased ECM synthesis, respectively, at the tissue-engineered cartilage graft site after high pressure oxygen/air treatment. Based on these results, we concluded that hyperbaric oxygen and air treatment can improve the quality of tissue-engineered cartilage in vivo by increasing the synthesis of ECM.

  2. An upgraded camera-based imaging system for mapping venous blood oxygenation in human skin tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun; Zhang, Xiao; Qiu, Lina; Leotta, Daniel F.

    2016-07-01

    A camera-based imaging system was previously developed for mapping venous blood oxygenation in human skin. However, several limitations were realized in later applications, which could lead to either significant bias in the estimated oxygen saturation value or poor spatial resolution in the map of the oxygen saturation. To overcome these issues, an upgraded system was developed using improved modeling and image processing algorithms. In the modeling, Monte Carlo (MC) simulation was used to verify the effectiveness of the ratio-to-ratio method for semi-infinite and two-layer skin models, and then the relationship between the venous oxygen saturation and the ratio-to-ratio was determined. The improved image processing algorithms included surface curvature correction and motion compensation. The curvature correction is necessary when the imaged skin surface is uneven. The motion compensation is critical for the imaging system because surface motion is inevitable when the venous volume alteration is induced by cuff inflation. In addition to the modeling and image processing algorithms in the upgraded system, a ring light guide was used to achieve perpendicular and uniform incidence of light. Cross-polarization detection was also adopted to suppress surface specular reflection. The upgraded system was applied to mapping of venous oxygen saturation in the palm, opisthenar and forearm of human subjects. The spatial resolution of the oxygenation map achieved is much better than that of the original system. In addition, the mean values of the venous oxygen saturation for the three locations were verified with a commercial near-infrared spectroscopy system and were consistent with previously published data.

  3. Multimodal Ultrasound-Photoacoustic Imaging of Tissue Engineering Scaffolds and Blood Oxygen Saturation In and Around the Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Talukdar, Yahfi; Avti, Pramod; Sun, John

    2014-01-01

    Preclinical, noninvasive imaging of tissue engineering polymeric scaffold structure and/or the physiological processes such as blood oxygenation remains a challenge. In vitro or ex vivo, the widely used scaffold characterization modalities such as porosimetry, electron or optical microscopy, and X-ray microcomputed tomography have limitations or disadvantages—some are invasive or destructive, others have limited tissue penetration (few hundred micrometers) and/or show poor contrast under physiological conditions. Postmortem histological analysis, the most robust technique for the evaluation of neovascularization is obviously not appropriate for acquiring physiological or longitudinal data. In this study, we have explored the potential of ultrasound (US)-coregistered photoacoustic (PA) imaging as a noninvasive multimodal imaging modality to overcome some of the above challenges and/or provide complementary information. US-PA imaging was employed to characterize poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) polymer scaffolds or single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)-incorporated PLGA (SWCNT-PLGA) polymer scaffolds as well as blood oxygen saturation within and around the scaffolds. Ex vivo, PLGA and SWCNT-PLGA scaffolds were placed at 0.5, 2, and 6 mm depths in chicken breast tissues. PLGA scaffolds could be localized with US imaging, but generate no PA signal (excitation wavelengths 680 and 780 nm). SWCNT-PLGA scaffolds generated strong PA signals at both wavelengths due to the presence of the SWCNTs and could be localized with both US and PA imaging depths between 0.5–6 mm (lateral resolution=90 μm, axial resolution=40 μm). In vivo, PLGA and SWCNT-PLGA scaffolds were implanted in subcutaneous pockets at 2 mm depth in rats, and imaged at 7 and 14 days postsurgery. The anatomical position of both the scaffolds could be determined from the US images. Only SWCNT-PLGA scaffolds could be easily detected in the US-PA images. SWCNT-PLGA scaffolds had significant

  4. Multimodal ultrasound-photoacoustic imaging of tissue engineering scaffolds and blood oxygen saturation in and around the scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Talukdar, Yahfi; Avti, Pramod; Sun, John; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2014-05-01

    Preclinical, noninvasive imaging of tissue engineering polymeric scaffold structure and/or the physiological processes such as blood oxygenation remains a challenge. In vitro or ex vivo, the widely used scaffold characterization modalities such as porosimetry, electron or optical microscopy, and X-ray microcomputed tomography have limitations or disadvantages-some are invasive or destructive, others have limited tissue penetration (few hundred micrometers) and/or show poor contrast under physiological conditions. Postmortem histological analysis, the most robust technique for the evaluation of neovascularization is obviously not appropriate for acquiring physiological or longitudinal data. In this study, we have explored the potential of ultrasound (US)-coregistered photoacoustic (PA) imaging as a noninvasive multimodal imaging modality to overcome some of the above challenges and/or provide complementary information. US-PA imaging was employed to characterize poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) polymer scaffolds or single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)-incorporated PLGA (SWCNT-PLGA) polymer scaffolds as well as blood oxygen saturation within and around the scaffolds. Ex vivo, PLGA and SWCNT-PLGA scaffolds were placed at 0.5, 2, and 6 mm depths in chicken breast tissues. PLGA scaffolds could be localized with US imaging, but generate no PA signal (excitation wavelengths 680 and 780 nm). SWCNT-PLGA scaffolds generated strong PA signals at both wavelengths due to the presence of the SWCNTs and could be localized with both US and PA imaging depths between 0.5-6 mm (lateral resolution = 90 μm, axial resolution = 40 μm). In vivo, PLGA and SWCNT-PLGA scaffolds were implanted in subcutaneous pockets at 2 mm depth in rats, and imaged at 7 and 14 days postsurgery. The anatomical position of both the scaffolds could be determined from the US images. Only SWCNT-PLGA scaffolds could be easily detected in the US-PA images. SWCNT-PLGA scaffolds had significant four times

  5. Significance of the Bohr effect for tissue oxygenation in a model with counter-current blood flow.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, H; Pelster, B; Piiper, J; Scheid, P

    1989-06-01

    Counter-current arrangement of afferent and efferent blood flow in tissues is commonly considered to be detrimental to tissue oxygenation, since O2 diffusion would shunt O2 away from the tissue. We have investigated the combined effects of counter-current CO2 and O2 exchange in a simple model, paying particular attention to the Bohr effect. We have obtained the following main results. (1) Back-diffusion of CO2 leads to increasing CO2 partial pressure (PCO2) and CO2 content along the afferent vessel. This is enhanced when fixed acid is released by the tissue into the venous blood, e.g. during hypoxia, which leads to a further PCO2 increase therein. (2) The increasing PCO2, with concomitant decrease in pH, in the afferent blood leads to a decrease in blood O2 affinity (Bohr effect) and thus results in increased PO2. (3) The resulting O2 diffusion shunt diminishes the O2 content in afferent blood, but for most conditions its PO2 remains higher than without the Bohr effect. (4) During hypoxia, both the PO2 in blood reaching the tissue (Pta) as well as in that leaving it (Ptv) are significantly elevated above the level without the Bohr effect. Moreover, with fixed acid release both Pta and Ptv for O2 can be higher than the arterial PO2 value. (5) During hyperoxia, O2 diffusion shunt prevents the tissue PO2 levels from increasing to levels that might be regarded as toxic. It is concluded that a diffusion shunt in tissues stabilizes the O2 partial pressure at the tissue when it varies in arterial blood (hypoxia or hyperoxia).

  6. Craniofacial tissue oxygen saturation is associated with blood pH using an examiner's finger-mounted tissue oximetry in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Toshiyuki; Kanayama, Naohiro; Kawai, Kenta; Niwayama, Masatsugu

    2016-04-01

    Although fetal scalp blood sampling is an examination to assess fetal acidosis during the intrapartum period, it has not been widely used by obstetricians because of its invasiveness. We have developed a small, portable oximetry with a sensor attached to the examiner's finger. Our previous report using this oximetry concluded that fetal head tissue oxygen saturation (StO2) correlated with umbilical cord artery blood pH. We investigated whether the association between StO2 and blood pH in mice could be validated using this oximetry. Eleven the Institute for Cancer Research (ICR) mice were measured using a near-infrared spectroscopy probe at the craniofacial site in a closed polyethylene bag while changing the oxygen concentration. A total of nine blood samples were collected and analyzed for pH. The StO2 and tissue blood pH showed a strong positive correlation (r=0.90 and P=0.0009). The StO2 and total hemoglobin index also showed a positive correlation (r=0.84 and P=0.0049). Thus, the results of the present study support those of our previous report on clinical cases and allow examiners to easily check the status of fetal acidosis. Fetal management using this oximetry might gain popularity with obstetricians in the near future.

  7. Real-time monitoring of brain tissue oxygen using a miniaturized biotelemetric device implanted in freely moving rats.

    PubMed

    Bazzu, Gianfranco; Puggioni, Giulia G M; Dedola, Sonia; Calia, Giammario; Rocchitta, Gaia; Migheli, Rossana; Desole, Maria S; Lowry, John P; O'Neill, Robert D; Serra, Pier A

    2009-03-15

    A miniaturized biotelemetric device for the amperometric detection of brain tissue oxygen is presented. The new system, derived from a previous design, has been coupled with a carbon microsensor for the real-time detection of dissolved O(2) in the striatum of freely moving rats. The implantable device consists of a single-supply sensor driver, a current-to-voltage converter, a microcontroller, and a miniaturized data transmitter. The oxygen current is converted to a digital value by means of an analog-to-digital converter integrated in a peripheral interface controller (PIC). The digital data is sent to a personal computer using a six-byte packet protocol by means of a miniaturized 434 MHz amplitude modulation (AM) transmitter. The receiver unit is connected to a personal computer (PC) via a universal serial bus. Custom developed software allows the PC to store and plot received data. The electronics were calibrated and tested in vitro under different experimental conditions and exhibited high stability, low power consumption, and good linear response in the nanoampere current range. The in vivo results confirmed previously published observations on oxygen dynamics in the striatum of freely moving rats. The system serves as a rapid and reliable model for studying the effects of different drugs on brain oxygen and brain blood flow and it is suited to work with direct-reduction sensors or O(2)-consuming biosensors. PMID:19222224

  8. Measurement of Local Partial Pressure of Oxygen in the Brain Tissue under Normoxia and Epilepsy with Phosphorescence Lifetime Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cong; Bélanger, Samuel; Pouliot, Philippe; Lesage, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    In this work a method for measuring brain oxygen partial pressure with confocal phosphorescence lifetime microscopy system is reported. When used in conjunction with a dendritic phosphorescent probe, Oxyphor G4, this system enabled minimally invasive measurements of oxygen partial pressure (pO2) in cerebral tissue with high spatial and temporal resolution during 4-AP induced epileptic seizures. Investigating epileptic events, we characterized the spatio-temporal distribution of the "initial dip" in pO2 near the probe injection site and along nearby arterioles. Our results reveal a correlation between the percent change in the pO2 signal during the "initial dip" and the duration of seizure-like activity, which can help localize the epileptic focus and predict the length of seizure. PMID:26305777

  9. The effect of oxygen partial pressure on protein synthesis and collagen hydroxylation by mature periodontal tissues maintained in organ cultures

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Edwin H. K.; Sodek, Jaro; Melcher, Antony H.

    1979-01-01

    Mature periodontal tissues from adult-mouse first mandibular molars were cultured in a continuous-flow organ-culture system which allowed the regulation of both ascorbic acid concentration and pO2 (oxygen partial pressure). Protein synthesis was measured by analysing the incorporation of [3H]proline into collagenous and non-collagenous proteins during the last 24h of a 2-day culture. At low pO2 [16.0kPa (approx. 120mmHg)] approx. 60% of protein-incorporated [3H]proline was found in collagenous proteins. However, it was evident that this collagen was considerably underhydroxylated. At high pO2 [56.0kPa (approx. 420mmHg)], both the amount of collagen deposited in the tissues and the degree of hydroxylation were increased considerably. In contrast, no significant effect on non-collagenous protein was observed. Tissues cultured at low pO2 for the first 48h were unable to respond to a subsequent increase in pO2 during the last 24h. Analysis of pepsin-solubilized collagen α-chains labelled with [14C]glycine demonstrated the synthesis of both type-I and type-III collagens by explants cultured for 48h at high pO2. Type-III collagen comprised 20–30% of the radioactivity in α-chains in both the periodontal ligament and the tissues of the alveolar process. The pattern of protein synthesis in the alveolar tissues at high pO2 was similar to that observed in these tissues in vivo. However, in the cultured periodontal ligament the proportions of non-collagenous proteins and type-III collagens were increased in comparison with the tissue in vivo. PMID:454369

  10. Imaging of oxygenation in 3D tissue models with multi-modal phosphorescent probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papkovsky, Dmitri B.; Dmitriev, Ruslan I.; Borisov, Sergei

    2015-03-01

    Cell-penetrating phosphorescence based probes allow real-time, high-resolution imaging of O2 concentration in respiring cells and 3D tissue models. We have developed a panel of such probes, small molecule and nanoparticle structures, which have different spectral characteristics, cell penetrating and tissue staining behavior. The probes are compatible with conventional live cell imaging platforms and can be used in different detection modalities, including ratiometric intensity and PLIM (Phosphorescence Lifetime IMaging) under one- or two-photon excitation. Analytical performance of these probes and utility of the O2 imaging method have been demonstrated with different types of samples: 2D cell cultures, multi-cellular spheroids from cancer cell lines and primary neurons, excised slices from mouse brain, colon and bladder tissue, and live animals. They are particularly useful for hypoxia research, ex-vivo studies of tissue physiology, cell metabolism, cancer, inflammation, and multiplexing with many conventional fluorophors and markers of cellular function.

  11. Quantitative assessment of brain tissue oxygenation in porcine models of cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation using hyperspectral near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotfabadi, Shahin S.; Toronov, Vladislav; Ramadeen, Andrew; Hu, Xudong; Kim, Siwook; Dorian, Paul; Hare, Gregory M. T.

    2014-03-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a non-invasive tool to measure real-time tissue oxygenation in the brain. In an invasive animal experiment we were able to directly compare non-invasive NIRS measurements on the skull with invasive measurements directly on the brain dura matter. We used a broad-band, continuous-wave hyper-spectral approach to measure tissue oxygenation in the brain of pigs under the conditions of cardiac arrest, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), and defibrillation. An additional purpose of this research was to find a correlation between mortality due to cardiac arrest and inadequacy of the tissue perfusion during attempts at resuscitation. Using this technique we measured the changes in concentrations of oxy-hemoglobin [HbO2] and deoxy-hemoglobin [HHb] to quantify the tissue oxygenation in the brain. We also extracted cytochrome c oxidase changes Δ[Cyt-Ox] under the same conditions to determine increase or decrease in cerebral oxygen delivery. In this paper we proved that applying CPR, [HbO2] concentration and tissue oxygenation in the brain increase while [HHb] concentration decreases which was not possible using other measurement techniques. We also discovered a similar trend in changes of both [Cyt-Ox] concentration and tissue oxygen saturation (StO2). Both invasive and non-invasive measurements showed similar results.

  12. An in vitro characterization of a silicone tonometer system for synchronous measurement of tissue oxygen- and carbon dioxide tension.

    PubMed

    Larsen, P N; Pedersen, I; Moesgaard, F

    1993-07-01

    A new tonometry system for continuous and synchronous measurement of tissue oxygen- and carbon dioxide tension is described and characterized in vitro. The tonometer system consists of an O2 and CO2 permeable silicone tube continuously flushed with isotonic saline by an injection pump. When the saline passes through the tonometer tube it equilibrates with O2 and CO2 outside the tube. The oxygen- and carbon dioxide tension of the flushing solution after passage of the tonometer tube are measured by a transcutaneous combined oxygen/carbon dioxide electrode (E5280 Radiometer A/S, Copenhagen, Denmark), connected to the tonometer tube via an airtight polycarbonate chamber. In order to characterize the tonometer system in vitro the tonometer tube was submerged in a test chamber containing isotonic saline, 33 degrees C to 41 degrees C, with varying partial pressures of O2 and CO2. For various lengths of the tonometer and flushing rates through the tonometer the partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the flushing solution (pO2eq and pCO2eq), after passage through the tonometer were recorded and compared to the known partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the test chamber solution (pO2 test and pCO2test). PO2eq and pCO2eq approached pO2test and pCO2test, when the length of the tonometer was increased, and the flushing rate through the tonometer was decreased. The relative differences (D) between pO2eq and pCO2eq at the one hand and pO2test and pCO2test at the other hand were calculated, and equilibration curves were constructed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Evidence of a heterogeneous tissue oxygenation: renal ischemia/reperfusion injury in a large animal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, Nicole J.; Huffman, Scott W.; Alemozaffar, Mehrdad; Gage, Frederick A.; Levin, Ira W.; Elster, Eric A.

    2013-03-01

    Renal ischemia that occurs intraoperatively during procedures requiring clamping of the renal artery (such as renal procurement for transplantation and partial nephrectomy for renal cancer) is known to have a significant impact on the viability of that kidney. To better understand the dynamics of intraoperative renal ischemia and recovery of renal oxygenation during reperfusion, a visible reflectance imaging system (VRIS) was developed to measure renal oxygenation during renal artery clamping in both cooled and warm porcine kidneys. For all kidneys, normothermic and hypothermic, visible reflectance imaging demonstrated a spatially distinct decrease in the relative oxy-hemoglobin concentration (%HbO2) of the superior pole of the kidney compared to the middle or inferior pole. Mean relative oxy-hemoglobin concentrations decrease more significantly during ischemia for normothermic kidneys compared to hypothermic kidneys. VRIS may be broadly applicable to provide an indicator of organ ischemia during open and laparoscopic procedures.

  14. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation circuitry.

    PubMed

    Lequier, Laurance; Horton, Stephen B; McMullan, D Michael; Bartlett, Robert H

    2013-06-01

    The extracorporeal membrane oxygenation circuit is made of a number of components that have been customized to provide adequate tissue oxygen delivery in patients with severe cardiac and/or respiratory failure for a prolonged period of time (days to weeks). A standard extracorporeal membrane oxygenation circuit consists of a mechanical blood pump, gas-exchange device, and a heat exchanger all connected together with circuit tubing. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation circuits can vary from simple to complex and may include a variety of blood flow and pressure monitors, continuous oxyhemoglobin saturation monitors, circuit access sites, and a bridge connecting the venous access and arterial infusion limbs of the circuit. Significant technical advancements have been made in the equipment available for short- and long-term extracorporeal membrane oxygenation applications. Contemporary extracorporeal membrane oxygenation circuits have greater biocompatibility and allow for more prolonged cardiopulmonary support time while minimizing the procedure-related complications of bleeding, thrombosis, and other physiologic derangements, which were so common with the early application of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Modern era extracorporeal membrane oxygenation circuitry and components are simpler, safer, more compact, and can be used across a wide variety of patient sizes from neonates to adults. PMID:23735989

  15. Spectroscopy and imaging of oxygen delivery to tissue under strenuous conditions (NIR in athletes)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, Britton; Nioka, Shoko; Long, Hong; Xie, Chunhua; Ma, XuHui; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Luo, Qingming

    2000-04-01

    It was demonstrated that the dynamics of muscle oxygen utilization can readily be measured using dual wavelength hemoglobin oximetry. This method can be used for muscle training exercise and also for evaluation of exercise performance where the anaerobic threshold must be avoided. It was shown that CW imaging technology gives images along the surface of the muscle while the time resolved spectroscopy gives images transverse to the muscle.

  16. A Microperfusion and In-Bore Oxygenator System Designed for Magnetic Resonance Microscopy Studies on Living Tissue Explants

    PubMed Central

    Flint, Jeremy J.; Menon, Kannan; Hansen, Brian; Forder, John; Blackband, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Spectrometers now offer the field strengths necessary to visualize mammalian cells but were not designed to accommodate imaging of live tissues. As such, spectrometers pose significant challenges—the most evident of which are spatial limitations—to conducting experiments in living tissue. This limitation becomes problematic upon trying to employ commercial perfusion equipment which is bulky and—being designed almost exclusively for light microscopy or electrophysiology studies—seldom includes MR-compatibility as a design criterion. To overcome problems exclusive to ultra-high magnetic field environments with limited spatial access, we have designed microperfusion and in-bore oxygenation systems capable of interfacing with Bruker’s series of micro surface-coils. These devices are designed for supporting cellular resolution imaging in MR studies of excised, living tissue. The combined system allows for precise control of both dissolved gas and pH levels in the perfusate thus demonstrating applicability for a wide range of tissue types. Its compactness, linear architecture, and MR-compatible material content are key design features intended to provide a versatile hardware interface compatible with any NMR spectrometer. Such attributes will ensure the microperfusion rig’s continued utility as it may be used with a multitude of contemporary NMR systems in addition to those which are currently in development. PMID:26666980

  17. A Microperfusion and In-Bore Oxygenator System Designed for Magnetic Resonance Microscopy Studies on Living Tissue Explants.

    PubMed

    Flint, Jeremy J; Menon, Kannan; Hansen, Brian; Forder, John; Blackband, Stephen J

    2015-12-15

    Spectrometers now offer the field strengths necessary to visualize mammalian cells but were not designed to accommodate imaging of live tissues. As such, spectrometers pose significant challenges--the most evident of which are spatial limitations--to conducting experiments in living tissue. This limitation becomes problematic upon trying to employ commercial perfusion equipment which is bulky and--being designed almost exclusively for light microscopy or electrophysiology studies--seldom includes MR-compatibility as a design criterion. To overcome problems exclusive to ultra-high magnetic field environments with limited spatial access, we have designed microperfusion and in-bore oxygenation systems capable of interfacing with Bruker's series of micro surface-coils. These devices are designed for supporting cellular resolution imaging in MR studies of excised, living tissue. The combined system allows for precise control of both dissolved gas and pH levels in the perfusate thus demonstrating applicability for a wide range of tissue types. Its compactness, linear architecture, and MR-compatible material content are key design features intended to provide a versatile hardware interface compatible with any NMR spectrometer. Such attributes will ensure the microperfusion rig's continued utility as it may be used with a multitude of contemporary NMR systems in addition to those which are currently in development.

  18. A Microperfusion and In-Bore Oxygenator System Designed for Magnetic Resonance Microscopy Studies on Living Tissue Explants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flint, Jeremy J.; Menon, Kannan; Hansen, Brian; Forder, John; Blackband, Stephen J.

    2015-12-01

    Spectrometers now offer the field strengths necessary to visualize mammalian cells but were not designed to accommodate imaging of live tissues. As such, spectrometers pose significant challenges—the most evident of which are spatial limitations—to conducting experiments in living tissue. This limitation becomes problematic upon trying to employ commercial perfusion equipment which is bulky and—being designed almost exclusively for light microscopy or electrophysiology studies—seldom includes MR-compatibility as a design criterion. To overcome problems exclusive to ultra-high magnetic field environments with limited spatial access, we have designed microperfusion and in-bore oxygenation systems capable of interfacing with Bruker’s series of micro surface-coils. These devices are designed for supporting cellular resolution imaging in MR studies of excised, living tissue. The combined system allows for precise control of both dissolved gas and pH levels in the perfusate thus demonstrating applicability for a wide range of tissue types. Its compactness, linear architecture, and MR-compatible material content are key design features intended to provide a versatile hardware interface compatible with any NMR spectrometer. Such attributes will ensure the microperfusion rig’s continued utility as it may be used with a multitude of contemporary NMR systems in addition to those which are currently in development.

  19. Pilot study to visualise and measure skin tissue oxygenation, erythema, total haemoglobin and melanin content using index maps in healthy controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poxon, Ian; Wilkinson, Jack; Herrick, Ariane; Dickinson, Mark; Murray, Andrea

    2014-02-01

    We report on a method for analysing multispectral images of skin in vivo for the measurement and visualisation of skin characteristics. Four different indices were used to characterise skin tissue oxygenation, erythema, total haemoglobin and melanin content. Index values were calculated pixel-wise and combined to create index maps to visualise skin properties. Quantitative measurement of tissue oxygenation saturation was possible by calibrating the oxygenation index using a commercial, calibrated oximeter. Index maps were tested by arterial occlusion of the index finger with multispectral images taken before, during and after occlusion in a pilot study with 10 healthy controls.

  20. The Effects of Walking or Walking-with-Poles Training on Tissue Oxygenation in Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Eileen G.; McBurney, Conor; Butler, Jolene; Jelinek, Christine; O'Connell, Susan; Fritschi, Cynthia; Reda, Domenic

    2012-01-01

    This randomized trial proposed to determine if there were differences in calf muscle StO2 parameters in patients before and after 12 weeks of a traditional walking or walking-with-poles exercise program. Data were collected on 85 patients who were randomized to a traditional walking program (n = 40) or walking-with-poles program (n = 45) of exercise training. Patients walked for 3 times weekly for 12 weeks. Seventy-one patients completed both the baseline and the 12-week follow-up progressive treadmill tests (n = 36 traditional walking and n = 35 walking-with-poles). Using the near-infrared spectroscopy measures, StO2 was measured prior to, during, and after exercise. At baseline, calf muscle oxygenation decreased from 56 ± 17% prior to the treadmill test to 16 ± 18% at peak exercise. The time elapsed prior to reaching nadir StO2 values increased more in the traditional walking group when compared to the walking-with-poles group. Likewise, absolute walking time increased more in the traditional walking group than in the walking-with-poles group. Tissue oxygenation decline during treadmill testing was less for patients assigned to a 12-week traditional walking program when compared to those assigned to a 12-week walking-with-poles program. In conclusion, the 12-week traditional walking program was superior to walking-with-poles in improving tissue deoxygenation in patients with PAD. PMID:23050152

  1. Brain tissue partial pressure of oxygen predicts the outcome of severe traumatic brain injury under mild hypothermia treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hongtao; Zheng, Maohua; Wang, Yanmin; Diao, Yunfeng; Zhao, Wanyong; Wei, Zhengjun

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical significance and changes of brain tissue partial pressure of oxygen (PbtO2) in the course of mild hypothermia treatment (MHT) for treating severe traumatic brain injury (sTBI). Methods There were 68 cases with sTBI undergoing MHT. PbtO2, intracranial pressure (ICP), jugular venous oxygen saturation (SjvO2), and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) were continuously monitored, and clinical outcomes were evaluated using the Glasgow Outcome Scale score. Results Of 68 patients with sTBI, PbtO2, SjvO2, and CPP were obviously increased, but decreased ICP level was observed throughout the MHT. PbtO2 and ICP were negatively linearly correlated, while there was a positive linear correlation between PbtO2 and SjvO2. Monitoring CPP and SjvO2 was performed under normal circumstances, and a large proportion of patients were detected with low PbtO2. Decreased PbtO2 was also found after MHT. Conclusion Continuous PbtO2 monitoring could be introduced to evaluate the condition of regional cerebral oxygen metabolism, thereby guiding the clinical treatment and predicting the outcome. PMID:27601907

  2. Brain tissue partial pressure of oxygen predicts the outcome of severe traumatic brain injury under mild hypothermia treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hongtao; Zheng, Maohua; Wang, Yanmin; Diao, Yunfeng; Zhao, Wanyong; Wei, Zhengjun

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical significance and changes of brain tissue partial pressure of oxygen (PbtO2) in the course of mild hypothermia treatment (MHT) for treating severe traumatic brain injury (sTBI). Methods There were 68 cases with sTBI undergoing MHT. PbtO2, intracranial pressure (ICP), jugular venous oxygen saturation (SjvO2), and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) were continuously monitored, and clinical outcomes were evaluated using the Glasgow Outcome Scale score. Results Of 68 patients with sTBI, PbtO2, SjvO2, and CPP were obviously increased, but decreased ICP level was observed throughout the MHT. PbtO2 and ICP were negatively linearly correlated, while there was a positive linear correlation between PbtO2 and SjvO2. Monitoring CPP and SjvO2 was performed under normal circumstances, and a large proportion of patients were detected with low PbtO2. Decreased PbtO2 was also found after MHT. Conclusion Continuous PbtO2 monitoring could be introduced to evaluate the condition of regional cerebral oxygen metabolism, thereby guiding the clinical treatment and predicting the outcome.

  3. Measurement of tissue perfusion by oxygen transport patterns in experimental shock and in high-risk surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Shoemaker, W C; Appel, P L; Kram, H B

    1990-01-01

    Survivors of high-risk general (noncardiac) surgery were observed to have cardiac index (CI) values averaging 4.5 l/min.m2, oxygen delivery (DO2) of greater than 600 ml/min.m2, and oxygen consumption (VO2) of 170 ml/min.m2. In contrast, these values were relatively normal in patients who subsequently died. A very early predictive index based on these observations was found to predict outcome in 94% of high-risk patients. The hypotheses that increased DO2 and VO2 in the survivors represent compensatory physiologic responses and that these values were appropriate therapeutic goals were tested in prospective randomized clinical trials and found to reduce mortality and morbidity significantly. The optimal goals were more easily attained with colloids, red cells, dobutamine, and vasodilators, according to their capacity to improve tissue perfusion, as reflected by increased flow and oxygen transport. The extremely complex interactions between DO2 and VO2 are reviewed.

  4. Alteration in regional tissue oxygenation of preterm infants during placement in the semi-upright seating position.

    PubMed

    Petrova, Anna; Mehta, Rajeev

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether the cerebral (rSO2-C %) and renal (rSO2-R %) tissue oxygenation of preterm infants is altered by repositioning from the supine to semi-upright position for pre-discharge car seat testing. Near-infrared spectroscopy was used to measure rSO2-C and rSO2-R, which were recorded simultaneously with vital signs in 15 preterm infants for 30 minutes in supine, 60 minutes in the semi-upright (at 45 degrees in a car seat), and 30 minutes in the post-semi-upright (supine) position. Changes in rSO2-C and SO2-R were mostly within 1 Standard Deviation (SD) of baseline mean levels in the supine position. Decrease in rSO2-C and rSO2-R (more than 1SD below baseline mean) was recorded in 26.7% and 6.6% of infants respectively, which persisted even after adjustment for variation in heart and respiratory rate, and pulse oximeter measured oxygen saturation (P, 0.0001). Re-positioning the infants from the car seat to supine position was associated with normalization of the rSO2-C. Alteration in rSO2-C and rSO2-R in a car seat was independent from the gestational and post-conception age, weight and presence of anemia. We concluded that approximately one-third of preterm infants show minor reduction of cerebral tissue oxygenation in the semi-upright (car seat) position. PMID:25661986

  5. Design and assessment of a microfluidic network system for oxygen transport in engineered tissue.

    PubMed

    Kang, Tae-Yun; Hong, Jung Min; Jung, Jin Woo; Yoo, James J; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2013-01-15

    Oxygen and nutrients cannot be delivered to cells residing in the interior of large-volume scaffolds via diffusion alone. Several efforts have been made to meet the metabolic needs of cells in a scaffold by constructing mass transport channels, particularly in the form of bifurcated networks. In contrast to progress in fabrication technologies, however, an approach to designing an optimal network based on experimental evaluation has not been actively reported. The main objective of this study was to establish a procedure for designing an effective microfluidic network system for a cell-seeded scaffold and to develop an experimental model to evaluate the design. We proposed a process to design a microfluidic network by combining an oxygen transport simulation with biomimetic principles governing biological vascular trees. The simulation was performed with the effective diffusion coefficient (D(e,s)), which was experimentally measured in our previous study. Porous scaffolds containing an embedded microfluidic network were fabricated using the lost mold shape-forming process and salt leaching method. The reliability of the procedure was demonstrated by experiments using the scaffolds. This approach established a practical basis for designing an effective microfluidic network in a cell-seeded scaffold.

  6. In vivo evidence of methamphetamine induced attenuation of brain tissue oxygenation as measured by EPR oximetry

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, John; Yang, Yirong; Purvis, Rebecca; Weatherwax, Theodore; Rosen, Gerald M.; Liu, Ke Jian

    2014-03-01

    Abuse of methamphetamine (METH) is a major and significant societal problem in the US, as a number of studies have suggested that METH is associated with increased cerebrovascular events, hemorrhage or vasospasm. Although cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in METH-induced toxicity are not completely understood, changes in brain O{sub 2} may play an important role and contribute to METH-induced neurotoxicity including dopaminergic receptor degradation. Given that O{sub 2} is the terminal electron acceptor for many enzymes that are important in brain function, the impact of METH on brain tissue pO{sub 2}in vivo remains largely uncharacterized. This study investigated striatal tissue pO{sub 2} changes in male C57BL/6 mice (16–20 g) following METH administration using EPR oximetry, a highly sensitive modality to measure pO{sub 2}in vivo, in situ and in real time. We demonstrate that 20 min after a single injection of METH (8 mg/kg i.v.), the striatal pO{sub 2} was reduced to 81% of the pretreatment level and exposure to METH for 3 consecutive days further attenuated striatal pO{sub 2} to 64%. More importantly, pO{sub 2} did not recover fully to control levels even 24 h after administration of a single dose of METH and continual exposure to METH exacerbates the condition. We also show a reduction in cerebral blood flow associated with a decreased brain pO{sub 2} indicating an ischemic condition. Our findings suggests that administration of METH can attenuate brain tissue pO{sub 2}, which may lead to hypoxic insult, thus a risk factor for METH-induced brain injury and the development of stroke in young adults. - Highlights: • Explored striatal tissue pO{sub 2}in vivo after METH administration by EPR oximetry. • pO{sub 2} was reduced by 81% after a single dose and 64% after 3 consecutive daily doses. • pO{sub 2} did not recover fully to control levels even 24 h after a single dose. • Decrease in brain tissue pO{sub 2} may be associated with a decrease in

  7. The effects of cilostazol on tissue oxygenation upon an ischemic-reperfusion injury in the mouse cerebrum.

    PubMed

    Morikawa, Takayuki; Hattori, Katsuji; Kajimura, Mayumi; Suematsu, Makoto

    2010-01-01

    Although cilostazol, an inhibitor of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase 3 (PDE3), is known to exert a potent antiplatelet function by raising intracellular cAMP concentration, its effect on cerebral microcirculation upon an ischemic insult is not clearly understood. To examine effects of cilostazol on the global ischemic injury in the brain, we first measured the plasma leakage using modified Miles assay after mice had been subjected to 60 min of a bilateral common carotid artery (BCCA) occlusion followed by reperfusion for 4 h. Oral treatment with cilostazol (30 mg/kg) significantly increased plasma leakage. This result led us to examine if the treatment with cilostazol recruits more capillaries leading to an increase in surface area for exchange and oxygen transport to tissues. To do so, we simultaneously measured degrees of tissue hypoxia and vessel perfusion. Pimonidazol was injected intraperitoneally 1 h before sacrifice and capillary patency was assessed by fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled Lycopersicon esculentum lectin bound to the endothelial surface. Treatment with cilostazol markedly increased the capillary patency which was accompanied by a reduction in the hypoxic area. Although the treatment with cilostazol caused an increase in the flux of plasma proteins across endothelial barrier that may imply an adverse role after a BCCA occlusion, this increase in protein leakage was attributable to the increased surface area for exchange which in turn brought about a reduction in tissue hypoxia. Taken together cilostazol appears to produce a protective effect against the ischemic-reperfusion injury.

  8. Potato chip intake increases ascorbic acid levels and decreases reactive oxygen species in SMP30/GNL knockout mouse tissues.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Yoshitaka; Sakuma, Rui; Ichisawa, Megumi; Ishihara, Katsuyuki; Kubo, Misako; Handa, Setsuko; Mugita, Hiroyuki; Maruyama, Naoki; Koga, Hidenori; Ishigami, Akihito

    2014-09-24

    Potato chips (PC) contain abundant amounts of the free radical scavenger ascorbic acid (AA) due to the rapid dehydration of potato tubers (Solanum tuberosum) that occurs during frying. To evaluate the antioxidant activity of PC, this study examined reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in tissues from SMP30/GNL knockout (KO) mice that cannot synthesize AA and determined AA and ROS levels after the animals were fed 20 and 10% PC diets for 7 weeks. Compared with AA-sufficient mice, AA-depleted SMP30/GNL KO mice showed high ROS levels in tissues. SMP30/GNL KO mice fed a PC diet showed high AA and low ROS levels in the brain, heart, lung, testis, soleus muscle, plantaris muscle, stomach, small intestine, large intestine, eyeball, and epididymal fat compared with AA-depleted mice. The data suggest that PC intake increases AA levels and enhances ROS scavenging activity in tissues of SMP30/GNL KO mice, which are a promising model for evaluating the antioxidant activity of foods. PMID:25180784

  9. 34 CFR 85.900 - Adequate evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Adequate evidence. 85.900 Section 85.900 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 85.900 Adequate evidence. Adequate evidence means information sufficient to support...

  10. 12 CFR 380.52 - Adequate protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Adequate protection. 380.52 Section 380.52... ORDERLY LIQUIDATION AUTHORITY Receivership Administrative Claims Process § 380.52 Adequate protection. (a... interest of a claimant, the receiver shall provide adequate protection by any of the following means:...

  11. 12 CFR 380.52 - Adequate protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Adequate protection. 380.52 Section 380.52... ORDERLY LIQUIDATION AUTHORITY Receivership Administrative Claims Process § 380.52 Adequate protection. (a... interest of a claimant, the receiver shall provide adequate protection by any of the following means:...

  12. 12 CFR 380.52 - Adequate protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Adequate protection. 380.52 Section 380.52... ORDERLY LIQUIDATION AUTHORITY Receivership Administrative Claims Process § 380.52 Adequate protection. (a... interest of a claimant, the receiver shall provide adequate protection by any of the following means:...

  13. 21 CFR 1404.900 - Adequate evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adequate evidence. 1404.900 Section 1404.900 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 1404.900 Adequate evidence. Adequate evidence means information sufficient...

  14. Comparison of regional skeletal muscle tissue oxygenation in college athletes and sedentary control subjects using quantitative BOLD MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Stacy, Mitchel R; Caracciolo, Christopher M; Qiu, Maolin; Pal, Prasanta; Varga, Tyler; Constable, Robert Todd; Sinusas, Albert J

    2016-08-01

    Blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging permits noninvasive assessment of tissue oxygenation. We hypothesized that BOLD imaging would allow for regional evaluation of differences in skeletal muscle oxygenation between athletes and sedentary control subjects, and dynamic BOLD responses to ischemia (i.e., proximal cuff occlusion) and reactive hyperemia (i.e., rapid cuff deflation) would relate to lower extremity function, as assessed by jumping ability. College football athletes (linemen, defensive backs/wide receivers) were compared to sedentary healthy controls. BOLD signal of the gastrocnemius, soleus, anterior tibialis, and peroneus longus was assessed for peak hyperemic value (PHV), time to peak (TTP), minimum ischemic value (MIV), and time to recovery (TTR). Significantly higher PHVs were identified in athletes versus controls for the gastrocnemius (linemen, 15.8 ± 9.1%; defensive backs/wide receivers, 17.9 ± 5.1%; controls, 7.4 ± 3.5%), soleus (linemen, 25.9 ± 11.5%; backs/receivers, 22.0 ± 9.4%; controls, 12.9 ± 5.8%), and anterior tibialis (linemen, 12.8 ± 5.3%; backs/receivers, 12.6 ± 3.9%; controls, 7.7 ± 4.0%), whereas no differences in PHV were found for the peroneus longus (linemen, 14.1 ± 6.9%; backs/receivers, 11.7 ± 4.6%; controls, 9.0 ± 4.9%). In all subject groups, the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles exhibited the lowest MIVs during cuff occlusion. No differences in TTR were found between muscles for any subject group. PHV of the gastrocnemius muscle was significantly and positively related to maximal vertical (r = 0.56, P = 0.002) and broad jump (r = 0.47, P = 0.01). These results suggest that BOLD MR imaging is a useful noninvasive tool for evaluating differences in tissue oxygenation of specific muscles between active and sedentary individuals, and peak BOLD responses may relate to functional capacity.

  15. Comparison of regional skeletal muscle tissue oxygenation in college athletes and sedentary control subjects using quantitative BOLD MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Stacy, Mitchel R; Caracciolo, Christopher M; Qiu, Maolin; Pal, Prasanta; Varga, Tyler; Constable, Robert Todd; Sinusas, Albert J

    2016-08-01

    Blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging permits noninvasive assessment of tissue oxygenation. We hypothesized that BOLD imaging would allow for regional evaluation of differences in skeletal muscle oxygenation between athletes and sedentary control subjects, and dynamic BOLD responses to ischemia (i.e., proximal cuff occlusion) and reactive hyperemia (i.e., rapid cuff deflation) would relate to lower extremity function, as assessed by jumping ability. College football athletes (linemen, defensive backs/wide receivers) were compared to sedentary healthy controls. BOLD signal of the gastrocnemius, soleus, anterior tibialis, and peroneus longus was assessed for peak hyperemic value (PHV), time to peak (TTP), minimum ischemic value (MIV), and time to recovery (TTR). Significantly higher PHVs were identified in athletes versus controls for the gastrocnemius (linemen, 15.8 ± 9.1%; defensive backs/wide receivers, 17.9 ± 5.1%; controls, 7.4 ± 3.5%), soleus (linemen, 25.9 ± 11.5%; backs/receivers, 22.0 ± 9.4%; controls, 12.9 ± 5.8%), and anterior tibialis (linemen, 12.8 ± 5.3%; backs/receivers, 12.6 ± 3.9%; controls, 7.7 ± 4.0%), whereas no differences in PHV were found for the peroneus longus (linemen, 14.1 ± 6.9%; backs/receivers, 11.7 ± 4.6%; controls, 9.0 ± 4.9%). In all subject groups, the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles exhibited the lowest MIVs during cuff occlusion. No differences in TTR were found between muscles for any subject group. PHV of the gastrocnemius muscle was significantly and positively related to maximal vertical (r = 0.56, P = 0.002) and broad jump (r = 0.47, P = 0.01). These results suggest that BOLD MR imaging is a useful noninvasive tool for evaluating differences in tissue oxygenation of specific muscles between active and sedentary individuals, and peak BOLD responses may relate to functional capacity. PMID:27535483

  16. Feasibility of mapping the tissue mass corrected bioscale of cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption using 17-oxygen and 23-sodium MR imaging in a human brain at 9.4 T.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Ian C; Thulborn, Keith R

    2010-06-01

    The reduction of molecular oxygen to water is the final step of oxidative phosphorylation that couples adenosine triphosphate production to the reoxidation of reducing equivalents formed during the oxidation of glucose to carbon dioxide. This coupling makes the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (CMRO(2)) an excellent reflection of the metabolic health of the brain. A multi-nuclear magnetic resonance (MR) imaging based method for CMRO(2) mapping is proposed. Oxygen consumption is determined by applying a new three-phase metabolic model for water generation and clearance to the changing 17-oxygen ((17)O) labeled water MR signal measured using quantitative (17)O MR imaging during inhalation of (17)O-enriched oxygen gas. These CMRO(2) data are corrected for the regional brain tissue mass computed from quantitative 23-sodium MR imaging of endogenous tissue sodium ions to derive quantitative results of oxygen consumption in micromoles O(2)/g tissue/minute that agree with literature results reported from positron emission tomography. The proposed technique is demonstrated in the human brain using a 9.4 T MR scanner optimized for human brain imaging.

  17. Model-based cell number quantification using online single-oxygen sensor data for tissue engineering perfusion bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Lambrechts, T; Papantoniou, I; Sonnaert, M; Schrooten, J; Aerts, J-M

    2014-10-01

    Online and non-invasive quantification of critical tissue engineering (TE) construct quality attributes in TE bioreactors is indispensable for the cost-effective up-scaling and automation of cellular construct manufacturing. However, appropriate monitoring techniques for cellular constructs in bioreactors are still lacking. This study presents a generic and robust approach to determine cell number and metabolic activity of cell-based TE constructs in perfusion bioreactors based on single oxygen sensor data in dynamic perfusion conditions. A data-based mechanistic modeling technique was used that is able to correlate the number of cells within the scaffold (R(2)  = 0.80) and the metabolic activity of the cells (R(2)  = 0.82) to the dynamics of the oxygen response to step changes in the perfusion rate. This generic non-destructive measurement technique is effective for a large range of cells, from as low as 1.0 × 10(5) cells to potentially multiple millions of cells, and can open-up new possibilities for effective bioprocess monitoring.

  18. Model-based cell number quantification using online single-oxygen sensor data for tissue engineering perfusion bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Lambrechts, T; Papantoniou, I; Sonnaert, M; Schrooten, J; Aerts, J-M

    2014-10-01

    Online and non-invasive quantification of critical tissue engineering (TE) construct quality attributes in TE bioreactors is indispensable for the cost-effective up-scaling and automation of cellular construct manufacturing. However, appropriate monitoring techniques for cellular constructs in bioreactors are still lacking. This study presents a generic and robust approach to determine cell number and metabolic activity of cell-based TE constructs in perfusion bioreactors based on single oxygen sensor data in dynamic perfusion conditions. A data-based mechanistic modeling technique was used that is able to correlate the number of cells within the scaffold (R(2)  = 0.80) and the metabolic activity of the cells (R(2)  = 0.82) to the dynamics of the oxygen response to step changes in the perfusion rate. This generic non-destructive measurement technique is effective for a large range of cells, from as low as 1.0 × 10(5) cells to potentially multiple millions of cells, and can open-up new possibilities for effective bioprocess monitoring. PMID:24771348

  19. Medical oxygen and air travel.

    PubMed

    Lyznicki, J M; Williams, M A; Deitchman, S D; Howe, J P

    2000-08-01

    This report responds to a resolution that asked the American Medical Association (AMA) to take action to improve airport and airline accommodations for passengers requiring medical oxygen. Information for the report was derived from a search of the MEDLINE database and references listed in pertinent articles, as well as through communications with experts in aerospace and emergency medicine. Based on this information, the AMA Council on Scientific Affairs determined that commercial air travel exposes passengers to altitude-related hypoxia and gas expansion, which may cause some passengers to experience significant symptoms and medical complications during flight. Medical guidelines are available to help physicians evaluate and counsel potential passengers who are at increased risk of inflight hypoxemia. Supplemental oxygen may be needed for some passengers to maintain adequate tissue oxygenation and prevent hypoxemic complications. For safety and security reasons, federal regulations prohibit travelers from using their own portable oxygen system onboard commercial aircraft. Many U.S. airlines supply medical oxygen for use during flight but policies and procedures vary. Oxygen-dependent passengers must make additional arrangements for the use of supplemental oxygen in airports. Uniform standards are needed to specify procedures and equipment for the use of medical oxygen in airports and aboard commercial aircraft. Revision of federal regulations should be considered to accommodate oxygen-dependent passengers and permit them to have an uninterrupted source of oxygen from departure to destination.

  20. [Serum lactate level as a indicator of tissue hypoxia in severely ill patients].

    PubMed

    Bakker, J; Schieveld, S J; Brinkert, W

    2000-04-15

    Adequate oxygen supply to the tissues is of vital importance to survive critical illness and trauma. Shock can be defined as an imbalance between oxygen demand and oxygen supply. Clinical features of shock, like hypotension, tachycardia, cold clammy skin et cetera, are poorly correlated with presence of tissue hypoxia. A high lactate level is an early sign of tissue hypoxia. In severely ill patients tissue hypoxia is the most important cause of increased lactate levels. Increased blood lactate levels are related to increased mortality. Optimizing oxygen supply by fluid resuscitation is the intervention of first choice. PMID:10812440

  1. In vivo EPR oximetry using an isotopically-substituted nitroxide: Potential for quantitative measurement of tissue oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, John; Burks, Scott R.; Liu, Ke Jian; Kao, Joseph P. Y.; Rosen, Gerald M.

    2016-10-01

    Variations in brain oxygen (O2) concentration can have profound effects on brain physiology. Thus, the ability to quantitate local O2 concentrations noninvasively in vivo could significantly enhance understanding of several brain pathologies. However, quantitative O2 mapping in the brain has proven difficult. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of nitroxides are sensitive to molecular O2 and can be used to estimate O2 concentrations in aqueous media. We recently synthesized labile-ester-containing nitroxides, such as 3-acetoxymethoxycarbonyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1-pyrrolidinyloxyl (nitroxide 4), which accumulate in cerebral tissue after in situ hydrolysis, and thus enable spatial mapping of O2 concentrations in the mouse brain by EPR imaging. In an effort to improve O2 quantitation, we prepared 3-acetoxymethoxycarbonyl-2,2,5,5-tetra(2H3)methyl-1-(3,4,4-2H3,1-15N)pyrrolidinyloxyl (nitroxide 2), which proved to be a more sensitive probe than its normo-isotopic version for quantifying O2 in aqueous solutions of various O2 concentrations. We now demonstrate that this isotopically substituted nitroxide is ∼2-fold more sensitive in vivo than the normo-isotopic nitroxide 4. Moreover, in vitro and in vivo EPR spectral-spatial imaging results with nitroxide 2 demonstrate significant improvement in resolution, reconstruction and spectral response to local O2 concentrations in cerebral tissue. Thus, isotopic-substituted nitroxides, such as 2, are excellent sensors for in vivo O2 quantitation in tissues, such as the brain.

  2. In vivo EPR oximetry using an isotopically-substituted nitroxide: Potential for quantitative measurement of tissue oxygen.

    PubMed

    Weaver, John; Burks, Scott R; Liu, Ke Jian; Kao, Joseph P Y; Rosen, Gerald M

    2016-10-01

    Variations in brain oxygen (O2) concentration can have profound effects on brain physiology. Thus, the ability to quantitate local O2 concentrations noninvasively in vivo could significantly enhance understanding of several brain pathologies. However, quantitative O2 mapping in the brain has proven difficult. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of nitroxides are sensitive to molecular O2 and can be used to estimate O2 concentrations in aqueous media. We recently synthesized labile-ester-containing nitroxides, such as 3-acetoxymethoxycarbonyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1-pyrrolidinyloxyl (nitroxide 4), which accumulate in cerebral tissue after in situ hydrolysis, and thus enable spatial mapping of O2 concentrations in the mouse brain by EPR imaging. In an effort to improve O2 quantitation, we prepared 3-acetoxymethoxycarbonyl-2,2,5,5-tetra((2)H3)methyl-1-(3,4,4-(2)H3,1-(15)N)pyrrolidinyloxyl (nitroxide 2), which proved to be a more sensitive probe than its normo-isotopic version for quantifying O2 in aqueous solutions of various O2 concentrations. We now demonstrate that this isotopically substituted nitroxide is ∼2-fold more sensitive in vivo than the normo-isotopic nitroxide 4. Moreover, in vitro and in vivo EPR spectral-spatial imaging results with nitroxide 2 demonstrate significant improvement in resolution, reconstruction and spectral response to local O2 concentrations in cerebral tissue. Thus, isotopic-substituted nitroxides, such as 2, are excellent sensors for in vivo O2 quantitation in tissues, such as the brain.

  3. In vivo EPR oximetry using an isotopically-substituted nitroxide: Potential for quantitative measurement of tissue oxygen.

    PubMed

    Weaver, John; Burks, Scott R; Liu, Ke Jian; Kao, Joseph P Y; Rosen, Gerald M

    2016-10-01

    Variations in brain oxygen (O2) concentration can have profound effects on brain physiology. Thus, the ability to quantitate local O2 concentrations noninvasively in vivo could significantly enhance understanding of several brain pathologies. However, quantitative O2 mapping in the brain has proven difficult. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of nitroxides are sensitive to molecular O2 and can be used to estimate O2 concentrations in aqueous media. We recently synthesized labile-ester-containing nitroxides, such as 3-acetoxymethoxycarbonyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1-pyrrolidinyloxyl (nitroxide 4), which accumulate in cerebral tissue after in situ hydrolysis, and thus enable spatial mapping of O2 concentrations in the mouse brain by EPR imaging. In an effort to improve O2 quantitation, we prepared 3-acetoxymethoxycarbonyl-2,2,5,5-tetra((2)H3)methyl-1-(3,4,4-(2)H3,1-(15)N)pyrrolidinyloxyl (nitroxide 2), which proved to be a more sensitive probe than its normo-isotopic version for quantifying O2 in aqueous solutions of various O2 concentrations. We now demonstrate that this isotopically substituted nitroxide is ∼2-fold more sensitive in vivo than the normo-isotopic nitroxide 4. Moreover, in vitro and in vivo EPR spectral-spatial imaging results with nitroxide 2 demonstrate significant improvement in resolution, reconstruction and spectral response to local O2 concentrations in cerebral tissue. Thus, isotopic-substituted nitroxides, such as 2, are excellent sensors for in vivo O2 quantitation in tissues, such as the brain. PMID:27567323

  4. Light-Addressable Measurement of in Vivo Tissue Oxygenation in an Unanesthetized Zebrafish Embryo via Phase-Based Phosphorescence Lifetime Detection

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shih-Hao; Yu, Chu-Hung; Chien, Yi-Lung

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a digital light modulation system that utilizes a modified commercial projector equipped with a laser diode as a light source for quantitative measurements of in vivo tissue oxygenation in an unanesthetized zebrafish embryo via phase-based phosphorescence lifetime detection. The oxygen-sensitive phosphorescent probe (Oxyphor G4) was first inoculated into the bloodstream of 48 h post-fertilization (48 hpf) zebrafish embryos via the circulation valley to rapidly disperse probes throughout the embryo. The unanesthetized zebrafish embryo was introduced into the microfluidic device and immobilized on its lateral side by using a pneumatically actuated membrane. By controlling the illumination pattern on the digital micromirror device in the projector, the modulated excitation light can be spatially projected to illuminate arbitrarily-shaped regions of tissue of interest for in vivo oxygen measurements. We have successfully measured in vivo oxygen changes in the cardiac region and cardinal vein of a 48 hpf zebrafish embryo that experience hypoxia and subsequent normoxic conditions. Our proposed platform provides the potential for the real-time investigation of oxygen distribution in tissue microvasculature that relates to physiological stimulation and diseases in a developing organism. PMID:25856326

  5. Cerebral and Muscle Tissue Oxygenation During Incremental Cycling in Male Adolescents Measured by Time-Resolved Near-Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Goutham; Leu, Szu-Yun; Cerussi, Albert; Tromberg, Bruce; Cooper, Dan M; Galassetti, Pietro

    2016-05-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy has long been used to measure tissue-specific O2 dynamics in exercise, but most published data have used continuous wave devices incapable of quantifying absolute Hemoglobin (Hb) concentrations. We used time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy to study exercising muscle (Vastus Lateralis, VL) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) Hb oxygenation in 11 young males (15.3 ± 2.1 yrs) performing incremental cycling until exhaustion (peak VO2 = 42.7 ± 6.1 ml/min/kg, mean peak power = 181 ± 38 W). Time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy measurements of reduced scattering (μs´) and absorption (μa) at three wavelengths (759, 796, and 833 nm) were used to calculate concentrations of oxyHb ([HbO2]), deoxy Hb ([HbR]), total Hb ([THb]), and O2 saturation (stO2). In PFC, significant increases were observed in both [HbO2] and [HbR] during intense exercise. PFC stO2% remained stable until 80% of total exercise time, then dropped (-2.95%, p = .0064). In VL, stO2% decreased until peak time (-6.8%, p = .01). Segmented linear regression identified thresholds for PFC [HbO2], [HbR], VL [THb]. There was a strong correlation between timing of second ventilatory threshold and decline in PFC [HbO2] (r = .84). These findings show that time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy can be used to study physiological threshold phenomena in children during maximal exercise, providing insight into tissue specific hemodynamics and metabolism. PMID:26451845

  6. Near-infrared spectroscopy with Spectroscopic technique with wide range of wavelength information detects tissue oxygenation level clearly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eda, Hideo; Aoki, Hiromichi; Eura, Shigeru; Ebe, Kazutoshi

    2010-02-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is based on the modified-Lambert-Beer's law that changes in absorbance are proportional to changes in hemoglobin parameters. Majority of the conventional measurement methods uses only two or three wavelengths. In this research, basic examination of NIRS measurement was approached by acquiring wide range of wavelength information. Arterial occlusion task was performed by using the blood pressure cuff around the upper arm. Pressure of 200mmHg was then applied for about 3 minutes. During the arterial occlusion, the spectrum of the lower arm muscles was measured every 15 seconds, within the range of 600 to 1100nm. The secondary derivative spectrum was calculated from the measured spectrum. Arterial occlusion is a task which changes the oxygenation level of the tissue. The change can be regarded as the change of the spectrum form, not as the change of the baseline. Furthermore, it was found that other wavelength bands hold information correlating to this arterial occlusion task.

  7. Analytic Models of Oxygen and Nutrient Diffusion, Metabolism Dynamics, and Architecture Optimization in Three-Dimensional Tissue Constructs with Applications and Insights in Cerebral Organoids

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion models are important in tissue engineering as they enable an understanding of gas, nutrient, and signaling molecule delivery to cells in cell cultures and tissue constructs. As three-dimensional (3D) tissue constructs become larger, more intricate, and more clinically applicable, it will be essential to understand internal dynamics and signaling molecule concentrations throughout the tissue and whether cells are receiving appropriate nutrient delivery. Diffusion characteristics present a significant limitation in many engineered tissues, particularly for avascular tissues and for cells whose viability, differentiation, or function are affected by concentrations of oxygen and nutrients. This article seeks to provide novel analytic solutions for certain cases of steady-state and nonsteady-state diffusion and metabolism in basic 3D construct designs (planar, cylindrical, and spherical forms), solutions that would otherwise require mathematical approximations achieved through numerical methods. This model is applied to cerebral organoids, where it is shown that limitations in diffusion and organoid size can be partially overcome by localizing metabolically active cells to an outer layer in a sphere, a regionalization process that is known to occur through neuroglial precursor migration both in organoids and in early brain development. The given prototypical solutions include a review of metabolic information for many cell types and can be broadly applied to many forms of tissue constructs. This work enables researchers to model oxygen and nutrient delivery to cells, predict cell viability, study dynamics of mass transport in 3D tissue constructs, design constructs with improved diffusion capabilities, and accurately control molecular concentrations in tissue constructs that may be used in studying models of development and disease or for conditioning cells to enhance survival after insults like ischemia or implantation into the body, thereby providing a

  8. Increasing mean arterial pressure in cardiogenic shock secondary to myocardial infarction: effects on hemodynamics and tissue oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Perez, Pierre; Kimmoun, Antoine; Blime, Vincent; Levy, Bruno

    2014-04-01

    There are very few data regarding the effects of norepinephrine uptitration on global and regional hemodynamics in cardiogenic shock. We studied 25 patients with shock secondary to myocardial infarction successfully treated with percutaneous coronary intervention. Before the inclusion, 16 of 25 patients presented a cardiac arrest in the presence of medical staff. Norepinephrine was titrated to increase mean arterial pressure (MAP) from 65 to 85 mmHg during 1 h. Swan-Ganz variables, arterial and mixed venous blood gases, lactate, and thenar near-infrared spectroscopy variables (muscle tissue oxygen saturation [StO2] and its changes during a vascular occlusion test) were measured before, 1 h after norepinephrine uptitration, and 1 h after norepinephrine downtitration. To obtain a MAP at 85 mmHg, norepinephrine was increased from 0.6 (0.28-1.2) to 1.53 µg · kg · min (0.76-2.6 µg · kg · min) (P < 0.00001) (median and interquartile range), with no change in heart rate. Norepinephrine uptitration significantly increased cardiac index (2.3 ± 0.5 to 2.8 ± 0.1 L · min · m), cardiac power index (0.40 ± 0.1 to 0.55 ± 0.1 W/m), mixed venous oxygen saturation (69% ± 9% to 73% ± 9%), and coronary perfusion pressure (32 ± 3 to 43 ± 4 mmHg). Lactate level decreased from 2.6 ± 1.7 to 1.6 ± 0.4 mmol/L (P < 0.05). Pulmonary artery occlusion pressure remained unchanged. Regarding near-infrared spectroscopy variables, all values except StO2 were significantly pathological when compared with healthy volunteers. The StO2 recovery slope and delta StO2, respectively, increased from 3.0% ± 1.3%/s to 3.6% ± 1.3%/s and 10% ± 3% to 14% ± 4%, whereas StO2 did not change (83% ± 6% to 83% ± 7%). After H1, norepinephrine was decreased to basal values, and all variables returned to baseline. In conclusion, a short-term increase in MAP with norepinephrine in resuscitated cardiogenic shock complicated by postreperfusion disease is associated with better cardiac performance and

  9. Oxygen Mapping within Healthy and Acutely Infarcted Brain Tissue in Humans Using the NMR Relaxation of Lipids: A Proof-Of-Concept Translational Study.

    PubMed

    Colliez, Florence; Safronova, Marta M; Magat, Julie; Joudiou, Nicolas; Peeters, André P; Jordan, Bénédicte F; Gallez, Bernard; Duprez, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    The clinical applicability of brain oxygenation mapping using the MOBILE (Mapping of Oxygen By Imaging Lipids relaxation Enhancement) magnetic resonance (MR) technique was assessed in the clinical setting of normal brain and of acute cerebral ischemia as a founding proof-of-concept translational study. Changes in the oxygenation level within healthy brain tissue can be detected by analyzing the spin-lattice proton relaxation ('Global T1' combining water and lipid protons) because of the paramagnetic properties of molecular oxygen. It was hypothesized that selective measurement of the relaxation of the lipid protons ('Lipids T1') would result in enhanced sensitivity of pO2 mapping because of higher solubility of oxygen in lipids than in water, and this was demonstrated in pre-clinical models using the MOBILE technique. In the present study, 12 healthy volunteers and eight patients with acute (48-72 hours) brain infarction were examined with the same clinical 3T MR system. Both Lipids R1 (R1 = 1/T1) and Global R1 were significantly different in the infarcted area and the contralateral unaffected brain tissue, with a higher statistical significance for Lipids R1 (median difference: 0.408 s-1; p<0.0001) than for Global R1 (median difference: 0.154 s-1; p = 0.027). Both Lipids R1 and Global R1 values in the unaffected contralateral brain tissue of stroke patients were not significantly different from the R1 values calculated in the brain tissue of healthy volunteers. The main limitations of the present prototypic version of the MOBILE sequence are the long acquisition time (4 min), hampering robustness of data in uncooperative patients, and a 2 mm slice thickness precluding accurate measurements in small infarcts because of partial volume averaging effects. PMID:26267901

  10. Oxygen delivery: the principal role of the circulation.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Christopher B

    2013-01-01

    Autoregulation of blood flow to most individual organs is well known. The balance of oxygen supply relative to the rate of oxygen consumption ensures normal function. There is less reserve as regards oxygen supply than for any other necessary metabolite or waste product so oxygen supply is flow dependent. Reduced rate of supply compromises tissue oxygenation long before any other substance. The present report reiterates evidence from earlier studies demonstrating that the rate of oxygen delivery (DO2), for most individual tissues, is well sustained at a value bearing a ratio to oxygen consumption (VO2) which is specific for the organ concerned. For the brain DO2 is sustained at approximately three times the rate of oxygen consumption and for exercising skeletal muscle (below the anaerobic threshold), a ratio close to 1.5. The tissue-specific ratios are sustained in the face of alterations in local VO2 and lowered arterial oxygen content (CaO2). Tolerance varies between different organs. Hence, the role of the circulation is predominantly one of ensuring an adequate supply of oxygen. The precise values of the individual tissue DO2:VO2 ratios apply within physiological ranges which require further investigation. PMID:23852474

  11. Preparation of Scaffold-Free Tissue-Engineered Constructs Derived from Human Synovial Mesenchymal Stem Cells Under Low Oxygen Tension Enhances Their Chondrogenic Differentiation Capacity.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Yukihiko; Chijimatsu, Ryota; Hart, David A; Koizumi, Kota; Sugita, Norihiko; Shimomura, Kazunori; Myoui, Akira; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Nakamura, Norimasa

    2016-03-01

    Low oxygen tension (LOT) has been reported to promote chondrogenic differentiation and prevent cellular senescence of stem cells. Therefore, the introduction of LOT conditions into conventional tissue engineering processes could further improve the potential of the constructs generated for cartilage repair. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the feasibility of LOT preparation on the chondrogenic differentiation of a scaffold-free tissue-engineered construct (TEC) derived from synovial mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), construct whose feasibility for cartilage repair has been demonstrated in previous preclinical and clinical studies. Culture of MSCs under LOT conditions prevented cellular senescence and promoted the proliferative capacity of human synovial MSCs. In addition, TEC prepared from human synovial MSCs under LOT conditions (5% O2; LOT-TEC) showed superior in vitro chondrogenic differentiation capacity compared to that prepared under the usual 20% O2 (normal oxygen tension [NOT]; NOT-TEC), with elevated glycosaminoglycan production and elevated levels of chondrogenic marker gene expression. Notably, LOT-TEC differentiated into a hyaline-like cartilaginous tissue of approximately 1 cm in diameter without the detectable presence of fibrous tissue, while conventional NOT-TEC differentiated into a mixture of hyaline-like and fibrocartilaginous tissues. This is the first demonstration of in vitro development of a hyaline-like cartilaginous tissue of an implantable size to chondral lesion that was derived from human MSCs without the use of an exogenous scaffold. The manipulation of oxygen tension is a safe procedure with low cost and, thus, may be a clinically relevant option to improve the quality of TEC-mediated cartilage repair. PMID:26974507

  12. Asbestos/NESHAP adequately wet guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Shafer, R.; Throwe, S.; Salgado, O.; Garlow, C.; Hoerath, E.

    1990-12-01

    The Asbestos NESHAP requires facility owners and/or operators involved in demolition and renovation activities to control emissions of particulate asbestos to the outside air because no safe concentration of airborne asbestos has ever been established. The primary method used to control asbestos emissions is to adequately wet the Asbestos Containing Material (ACM) with a wetting agent prior to, during and after demolition/renovation activities. The purpose of the document is to provide guidance to asbestos inspectors and the regulated community on how to determine if friable ACM is adequately wet as required by the Asbestos NESHAP.

  13. Oral tissue changes of radiation-oncology and their management

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, T.J. )

    1990-04-01

    The cytologic effects of radiation therapy involve all tissues and most significantly bone within the treated area. Of greatest concern is the permanence of the compromised healing and resistance to infection of the irradiated tissues. Those dental procedures that do not cause tissue trauma are considered nonrisk. Any procedure that traumatizes previously irradiated tissues can exceed the healing potential of the compromised tissue and frequently results in an uncontrollable necrosis. The adequate utilization of hyperbaric oxygen therapy has been shown to be 95% effective in preventing osteoradionecrosis in postirradiated tissues. 9 references.

  14. Optoacoustic measurements of human placenta and umbilical blood oxygenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanovskaya, T. N.; Petrov, I. Y.; Petrov, Y.; Patrikeeva, S. L.; Ahmed, M. S.; Hankins, G. D. V.; Prough, D. S.; Esenaliev, R. O.

    2016-03-01

    Adequate oxygenation is essential for normal embryogenesis and fetal growth. Perturbations in the intrauterine oxidative environment during pregnancy are associated with several pathophysiological disorders such as pregnancy loss, preeclampsia, and intrauterine growth restriction. We proposed to use optoacoustic technology for monitoring placental and fetal umbilical blood oxygenation. In this work, we studied optoacoustic monitoring of oxygenation in placenta and umbilical cord blood ex vivo using technique of placenta perfusion. We used a medical grade, nearinfrared, tunable, optoacoustic system developed and built for oxygenation monitoring in blood vessels and in tissues. First, we calibrated the system for cord blood oxygenation measurements by using a CO-Oximeter (gold standard). Then we performed validation in cord blood circulating through the catheters localized on the fetal side of an isolated placental lobule. Finally, the oxygenation measurements were performed in the perfused placental tissue. To increase or decrease blood oxygenation, we used infusion of a gas mixture of 95% O2 + 5% CO2 and 95% N2 + 5% CO2, respectively. In placental tissue, up to four cycles of changes in oxygenation were performed. The optoacoustically measured oxygenation in circulating cord blood and in placental lobule closely correlated with the actual oxygenation data measured by CO-Oximeter. We plan to further test the placental and cord blood oxygenation monitoring with optoacoustics in animal and clinical studies.

  15. Involvement of reactive oxygen species in the induction of (S)-N-p-coumaroyloctopamine accumulation by beta-1,3-glucooligosaccharide elicitors in potato tuber tissues.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, F; Miyagawa, H; Ueno, T

    2001-01-01

    Treatment of potato tuber tissues with beta-1,3-glucooligosaccharide induces accumulation of (S)-N-p-coumaroyloctopamine (p-CO). We examined the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) in the signal transduction leading to p-CO accumulation. Induction was suppressed by an NADPH-oxidase inhibitor, diphenyleneiodonium chloride, and oxygen radical scavengers. H2O2 was generated in the tuber tissue within a few minutes of treatment with beta-1,3-glucooligosaccharide. On the other hand, treatment with NO specific scavenger, nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, and serine protease inhibitor did not inhibit p-CO induction. Our findings suggest that ROS generated by the action of NADPH-oxidase play an important role in this system, while NO and serine protease are unlikely to be involved in this process. PMID:11371013

  16. Effects of exposing rats to 100% oxygen at 450 and 600 mm Hg on in vitro liver and adipose tissue lipid synthesis.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feller, D. D.; Neville, E. D.; Talarico, K. S.

    1972-01-01

    Male rats (260-285 gm) were exposed to 100% oxygen at 450 or 600 mm Hg for 1 to 4 days. Rats maintained at 450 mm Hg ate 92% the amount of food eaten by ad libitum controls maintained at sea level conditions. At 600 mm Hg, the food intake was 77% of the ad libitum controls. No difference was found in the plasma level of glucose, free fatty acids, and corticosterone between oxygen exposed rats and their respective pair-fed controls. The in vitro conversion of acetate into fatty acids by adipose tissue from rats exposed at 450 mm Hg for 2, 3, or 4 days was significantly increased above pair-fed controls and ad libitum controls. Increasing the oxygen pressure to 600 mm Hg abolished this increase, and in fact, reversed the increased synthesis to a significant decrease for the 4-day exposure.

  17. Supervision of Student Teachers: How Adequate?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Ken

    This study attempted to ascertain how adequately student teachers are supervised by college supervisors and supervising teachers. Questions to be answered were as follows: a) How do student teachers rate the adequacy of supervision given them by college supervisors and supervising teachers? and b) Are there significant differences between ratings…

  18. Small Rural Schools CAN Have Adequate Curriculums.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loustaunau, Martha

    The small rural school's foremost and largest problem is providing an adequate curriculum for students in a changing world. Often the small district cannot or is not willing to pay the per-pupil cost of curriculum specialists, specialized courses using expensive equipment no more than one period a day, and remodeled rooms to accommodate new…

  19. Toward More Adequate Quantitative Instructional Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanSickle, Ronald L.

    1986-01-01

    Sets an agenda for improving instructional research conducted with classical quantitative experimental or quasi-experimental methodology. Includes guidelines regarding the role of a social perspective, adequate conceptual and operational definition, quality instrumentation, control of threats to internal and external validity, and the use of…

  20. An Adequate Education Defined. Fastback 476.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, M. Donald; Davis, E. E. (Gene)

    Court decisions historically have dealt with educational equity; now they are helping to establish "adequacy" as a standard in education. Legislatures, however, have been slow to enact remedies. One debate over education adequacy, though, is settled: Schools are not financed at an adequate level. This fastback is divided into three sections.…

  1. Funding the Formula Adequately in Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    This report is a longevity, simulational study that looks at how the ratio of state support to local support effects the number of school districts that breaks the common school's funding formula which in turns effects the equity of distribution to the common schools. After nearly two decades of adequately supporting the funding formula, Oklahoma…

  2. Rapid bioassay to measure early reactive oxygen species production in Arabidopsis leave tissue in response to living Pseudomonas syringae

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Arabidopsis thaliana and Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato (Pto) provide an excellent plant-bacteria model system to study innate immunity. During pattern-triggered immunity (PTI), cognate host receptors perceive pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) as non-self molecules. Pto harbors many PAMPs; thus for experimental ease, many studies utilize single synthesized PAMPs such as flg22, a short protein peptide derived from Pseudomonas flagellin. Flg22 recognition by Arabidopsis Flagellin Sensing 2 (FLS2) initiates a plethora of signaling responses including rapid production of apoplastic reactive oxygen species (ROS). Assessing flg22-ROS has been instrumental in identifying novel PAMP-signaling components; but comparably little is known whether in Arabidopsis, ROS is produced in response to intact live Pto and whether this response can be used to dissect genetic requirements of the plant host and live bacterial pathogens in planta. Results Here, we report of a fast and robust bioassay to quantitatively assess early ROS in Arabidopsis leaves, a tissue commonly used for pathogen infection assays, in response to living bacterial Pto strains. We establish that live Pto elicits a transient and dose-dependent ROS that differed in timing of initiation, amplitude and duration compared to flg22-induced ROS. Our control experiments confirmed that the detected ROS was dependent on the presence of the bacterial cells. Utilizing Arabidopsis mutants previously shown to be defective in flg22-induced ROS, we demonstrate that ROS elicited by live Pto was fully or in part dependent on RbohD and BAK1, respectively. Because fls2 mutants did not produce any ROS, flagellin perception by FLS2 is the predominant recognition event in live Pto-elicited ROS in Arabidopsis leaves. Furthermore using different Pto strains, our in planta results indicate that early ROS production appeared to be independent of the Type III Secretion System. Conclusions We provide evidence and

  3. Monitoring the Oxygen Dynamics of Brain Tissue In Vivo by Fast Acousto-Optic Scanning Microscopy: A Proposed Instrument.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhenqiao; Chen, Dayu; Huang, Zhiqiang; Wang, Shaofang; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2016-01-01

    The function of the brain neural circuit is highly dependent on oxygen supply. Imaging the precise oxygen distribution and dynamics are critical for understanding the relationship between neuronal activity and oxygen dynamics of the nearby capillaries. Here, we develop fast acousto-optic scanning two-photon microscopy. Combined with oxygen probes, such as PtP-C343, we can monitor oxygen dynamics at the submicron level by this real-time microscopy. In this fast acousto-optic scanning microscopy, an acousto-optic deflector (AOD), an inertia-less scanner, is used to scan the femtosecond laser. A cylindrical lens is used to compensate the 'cylindrical lens effect' of AOD and a prism is used to compensate the chromatic dispersion of AOD. An electro-optical modulator (EOM) and a sCMOS camera are gated to measure the phosphorescence lifetime. With a 40× water objective lens, this set-up can image a 100 μm × 100 μm field of view at a speed of 20 frames per second and a 25 μm × 8 μm field of view at a speed of 500 frames per second. This real-time two-photon microscopy is expected to be a good tool for observing and recording the precise rapid oxygen dynamics in the cerebral cortex, which will facilitate studies of oxygen metabolism in neurosciences. PMID:27526168

  4. Low-oxygen tensions found in Salmonella-infected gut tissue boost Salmonella replication in macrophages by impairing antimicrobial activity and augmenting Salmonella virulence.

    PubMed

    Jennewein, Jonas; Matuszak, Jasmin; Walter, Steffi; Felmy, Boas; Gendera, Kathrin; Schatz, Valentin; Nowottny, Monika; Liebsch, Gregor; Hensel, Michael; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich; Gerlach, Roman G; Jantsch, Jonathan

    2015-12-01

    In Salmonella infection, the Salmonella pathogenicity island-2 (SPI-2)-encoded type three secretion system (T3SS2) is of key importance for systemic disease and survival in host cells. For instance, in the streptomycin-pretreated mouse model SPI-2-dependent Salmonella replication in lamina propria CD11c(-)CXCR1(-) monocytic phagocytes/macrophages (MΦ) is required for the development of colitis. In addition, containment of intracellular Salmonella in the gut critically depends on the antimicrobial effects of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase (PHOX), and possibly type 2 nitric oxide synthase (NOS2). For both antimicrobial enzyme complexes, oxygen is an essential substrate. However, the amount of available oxygen upon enteroinvasive Salmonella infection in the gut tissue and its impact on Salmonella-MΦ interactions was unknown. Therefore, we measured the gut tissue oxygen levels in a model of Salmonella enterocolitis using luminescence two-dimensional in vivo oxygen imaging. We found that gut tissue oxygen levels dropped from ∼78 Torr (∼11% O2) to values of ∼16 Torr (∼2% O2) during infection. Because in vivo virulence of Salmonella depends on the Salmonella survival in MΦ, Salmonella-MΦ interaction was analysed under such low oxygen values. These experiments revealed an increased intracellular replication and survival of wild-type and t3ss2 non-expressing Salmonella. These findings were paralleled by blunted nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and reduced Salmonella ROS perception. In addition, hypoxia enhanced SPI-2 transcription and translocation of SPI-2-encoded virulence protein. Neither pharmacological blockade of PHOX and NOS2 nor impairment of T3SS2 virulence function alone mimicked the effect of hypoxia on Salmonella replication under normoxic conditions. However, if t3ss2 non-expressing Salmonella were used, hypoxia did not further enhance Salmonella recovery in a PHOX and NOS2-deficient situation. Hence, these data suggest that

  5. Variability in splanchnic tissue oxygenation during preterm red blood cell transfusion given for symptomatic anaemia may reveal a potential mechanism of transfusion-related acute gut injury

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Sean M.; Hendricks-Muñoz, Karen D.; Mally, Pradeep V.

    2015-01-01

    Background There is increasing evidence indicating an association between red blood cell (RBC) transfusions and necrotising enterocolitis (NEC) in preterm infants, especially late-onset NEC. This phenomenon is referred to as transfusion-related acute gut injury (TRAGI). One theory as to a pathophysiological mechanism is that transfusion may result in an ischemia-reperfusion injury to intestinal tissue. We tested the hypothesis that there is significantly greater variability during transfusion in splanchnic tissue oxygen saturation (SrSO2) than in cerebral tissue oxygen saturation (CrSO2). Materials and methods This was a prospective, observational study using near-infrared spectroscopy to monitor SrSO2 and CrSO2 in preterm neonates undergoing RBC transfusion for symptomatic anaemia. Mean, standard deviation, highest and lowest SrSO2 and CrSO2 values during each transfusion were determined. The greatest difference in SrSO2 and CrSO2 during each transfusion was calculated, along with the coefficient of variation. Results We studied 37 subjects. Throughout all transfusions, the mean SrSO2 was 45.6% ±13.8 and the mean CrSO2 was 65.4% ±6.9 (p<0.001). The variability of SrSO2 was significantly greater than that of CrSO2. Averaging data from all subjects, the greatest difference in SrSO2 was 43.8% ±13.4 compared with 23.3% ±7.6 for CrSO2 (p<0.001). The mean coefficient of variation in all transfusions was 20.5% for SrSO2 and 6.0% for CrSO2 (p<0.001). Increasing post-conceptional age did not affect SrSO2 variability (R2 =0.022; p=0.379), whereas CrSO2 variability during transfusion decreased with increasing post-conceptional age (R2=0.209; p=0.004). Discussion In preterm infants, there is a large degree of tissue oxygenation variability in splanchnic tissue during RBC transfusion and this does not change with increasing maturity. We speculate that these findings, combined with lower average tissue oxygenation, may demonstrate susceptibility of the preterm gut to TRAGI

  6. Phosphonated Trityl Probes for Concurrent in Vivo Tissue Oxygen and pH Monitoring Using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance-Based Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Dhimitruka, Ilirian; Bobko, Andrey A.; Eubank, Timothy D.; Komarov, Denis A.; Khramtsov, Valery V.

    2014-01-01

    Previously we proposed the concept of dual function pH and oxygen paramagnetic probes based on the incorporation of ionizable groups into the structure of persistent triarylmethyl radicals, TAMs (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2007, 129, 7240–7241). In this paper, we synthesized an asymmetric monophosphonated TAM probe with the simplest doublet hfs pattern ideally suited for dual function electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)-based applications. An extraordinary low line width of the synthesized deuterated derivative, p1TAM-D (ΔHpp ≤ 50 mG, Lorentz line width, ≤20 mG) results in high sensitivity to pO2 due to oxygen-induced line broadening (ΔLW/ΔpO2 ≈ 0.5 mG/mmHg or ≈400 mG/mM); accuracy of pO2 measurement, ≈1 mmHg). The presence of a phosphono group in the p1TAM-D structure provides pH sensitivity to its EPR spectra in the physiological range of pH from 5.9 to 8.2 with the ratio of signal intensities of protonated and deprotonated states being a reliable pH marker (accuracy of pH measurements, ± 0.05). The independent character of pH and [O2] effects on the EPR spectra of p1TAM-D provides dual functionality to this probe. The L-band EPR studies performed in breast tumor-bearing mice show a significant difference in extracellular pH and pO2 between tumor and normal mammary gland tissues, as well as the effect of animal breathing with 100% O2 on tissue oxygenation. The developed dual function phosphonated p1TAM-D probe provides a unique tool for in vivo concurrent tissue oxygen and pH monitoring. PMID:23517077

  7. Phosphonated trityl probes for concurrent in vivo tissue oxygen and pH monitoring using electron paramagnetic resonance-based techniques.

    PubMed

    Dhimitruka, Ilirian; Bobko, Andrey A; Eubank, Timothy D; Komarov, Denis A; Khramtsov, Valery V

    2013-04-17

    Previously we proposed the concept of dual function pH and oxygen paramagnetic probes based on the incorporation of ionizable groups into the structure of persistent triarylmethyl radicals, TAMs (J. Am. Chem. Soc.2007, 129, 7240-7241). In this paper, we synthesized an asymmetric monophosphonated TAM probe with the simplest doublet hfs pattern ideally suited for dual function electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)-based applications. An extraordinary low line width of the synthesized deuterated derivative, p1TAM-D (ΔHpp ≤ 50 mG, Lorentz line width, ≤20 mG) results in high sensitivity to pO2 due to oxygen-induced line broadening (ΔLW/ΔpO2 ≈ 0.5 mG/mmHg or ≈400 mG/mM); accuracy of pO2 measurement, ≈1 mmHg). The presence of a phosphono group in the p1TAM-D structure provides pH sensitivity to its EPR spectra in the physiological range of pH from 5.9 to 8.2 with the ratio of signal intensities of protonated and deprotonated states being a reliable pH marker (accuracy of pH measurements, ± 0.05). The independent character of pH and [O2] effects on the EPR spectra of p1TAM-D provides dual functionality to this probe. The L-band EPR studies performed in breast tumor-bearing mice show a significant difference in extracellular pH and pO2 between tumor and normal mammary gland tissues, as well as the effect of animal breathing with 100% O2 on tissue oxygenation. The developed dual function phosphonated p1TAM-D probe provides a unique tool for in vivo concurrent tissue oxygen and pH monitoring.

  8. Impact of environmental oxygen, exercise, salinity, and metabolic rate on the uptake and tissue-specific distribution of 17α-ethynylestradiol in the euryhaline teleost Fundulus heteroclitus.

    PubMed

    Blewett, Tamzin A; Robertson, Lisa M; Maclatchy, Deborah L; Wood, Chris M

    2013-08-15

    17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2) is a synthetic estrogen that is an endocrine disruptive toxicant in aquatic environments. The aim of this study was to determine whether metabolic rate influenced EE2 uptake in male killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus), based on the hypothesis that the mechanism of EE2 uptake at the gills is similar to that of oxygen. F. heteroclitus were exposed to 100 ng/L radiolabeled [³H]EE2 for 2 h while swimming at 0, 15, and 40 cm/s. A positive linear correlation between the rates of oxygen consumption (MO₂) and EE2 accumulation was seen (r² = 0.99, p<0.01), with more EE2 taken up at higher swimming speeds, suggesting that oxygen uptake predicts EE2 uptake. EE2 tended to accumulate in the liver (where lipophilic toxicants are metabolized), the gall bladder (where metabolized toxicants enter bile), and the gut (where bile is received). In a subsequent experiment killifish were exposed to both hypoxic and hyperoxic conditions (PO₂=70-80 Torr, and PO₂=400-500 Torr respectively). Despite significant decreases in MO₂ during hypoxia, EE2 uptake rates increased only slightly with hypoxia, but in individual fish there was still a significant correlation between MO₂ and EE2 uptake. This correlation was lost during hyperoxia, and EE2 uptake rates did not change significantly in hyperoxia. Marked influences of salinity on EE2 uptake rate occurred regardless of the oxygen condition, with higher uptake rates in 50% seawater than in freshwater or 100% seawater. Tissue distribution of EE2 in these exposures may have been influenced by changes in tissue blood flow patterns and oxygen supply. These data will be useful in eventually constructing a predictive model to manage the optimal timing for discharge of EE2 from sewage treatment plants into receiving waters.

  9. Non-contact tissue perfusion and oxygenation imaging using a LED based multispectral and a thermal imaging system, first results of clinical intervention studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaessens, John H. G. M.; Nelisse, Martin; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.; Noordmans, Herke Jan

    2013-03-01

    During clinical interventions objective and quantitative information of the tissue perfusion, oxygenation or temperature can be useful for the surgical strategy. Local (point) measurements give limited information and affected areas can easily be missed, therefore imaging large areas is required. In this study a LED based multispectral imaging system (MSI, 17 different wavelengths 370nm-880nm) and a thermo camera were applied during clinical interventions: tissue flap transplantations (ENT), local anesthetic block and during open brain surgery (epileptic seizure). The images covered an area of 20x20 cm, when doing measurements in an (operating) room, they turned out to be more complicated than laboratory experiments due to light fluctuations, movement of the patient and limited angle of view. By constantly measuring the background light and the use of a white reference, light fluctuations and movement were corrected. Oxygenation concentration images could be calculated and combined with the thermal images. The effectively of local anesthesia of a hand could be predicted in an early stage using the thermal camera and the reperfusion of transplanted skin flap could be imaged. During brain surgery, a temporary hyper-perfused area was witnessed which was probably related to an epileptic attack. A LED based multispectral imaging system combined with thermal imaging provide complementary information on perfusion and oxygenation changes and are promising techniques for real-time diagnostics during clinical interventions.

  10. Decrease of reactive oxygen species-related biomarkers in the tissue-mimic 3D spheroid culture of human lung cells exposed to zinc oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunjoo; Jeon, Won Bae; Kim, Soonhyun; Lee, Soo-Keun

    2014-05-01

    Common 2-dimensional (2D) cell cultures do not adequately represent cell-cell and cell-matrix signaling and substantially different diffusion/transport pathways. To obtain tissue-mimic information on nanoparticle toxicity from in vitro cell tests, we used a 3-dimensional (3D) culture of human lung cells (A549) prepared with elastin-like peptides modified with an arginine-glycine-aspartate motif. The 3D cells showed different cellular phenotypes, gene expression profiles, and functionalities compared to the 2D cultured cells. In gene array analysis, 3D cells displayed the induced extracellular matrix (ECM)-related biological functions such as cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, cellular function and maintenance, connective tissue development and function, molecular transport, and tissue morphology. Additionally, the expression of ECM-related molecules, such as laminin, fibronectin, and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP3), was simultaneously induced at both mRNA and protein levels. When 0.08-50 microg/ml zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs) were administered to 2D and 3D cells, the cell proliferation was not significantly changed. The level of molecular markers for oxidative stress, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), Bcl-2, ATP synthase, and Complex IV (cytochrome C oxidase), was significantly reduced in 2D culture when exposed to 10 microg/ml ZnO-NPs, but no significant decrease was detected in 3D culture when exposed to the same concentration of ZnO-NPs. In conclusion, the tissue-mimic phenotype and functionality of 3D cells could be achieved through the elevated expression of ECM components. The 3D cells were expected to help to better predict the nanotoxicity of ZnO-NPs at tissue-level by increased cell-cell and cell-ECM adhesion and signaling. The tissue-mimic morphology would also be useful to simulate the diffusion/transport of the nanoparticles in vitro. PMID:24734552

  11. Decrease of reactive oxygen species-related biomarkers in the tissue-mimic 3D spheroid culture of human lung cells exposed to zinc oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunjoo; Jeon, Won Bae; Kim, Soonhyun; Lee, Soo-Keun

    2014-05-01

    Common 2-dimensional (2D) cell cultures do not adequately represent cell-cell and cell-matrix signaling and substantially different diffusion/transport pathways. To obtain tissue-mimic information on nanoparticle toxicity from in vitro cell tests, we used a 3-dimensional (3D) culture of human lung cells (A549) prepared with elastin-like peptides modified with an arginine-glycine-aspartate motif. The 3D cells showed different cellular phenotypes, gene expression profiles, and functionalities compared to the 2D cultured cells. In gene array analysis, 3D cells displayed the induced extracellular matrix (ECM)-related biological functions such as cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, cellular function and maintenance, connective tissue development and function, molecular transport, and tissue morphology. Additionally, the expression of ECM-related molecules, such as laminin, fibronectin, and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP3), was simultaneously induced at both mRNA and protein levels. When 0.08-50 microg/ml zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs) were administered to 2D and 3D cells, the cell proliferation was not significantly changed. The level of molecular markers for oxidative stress, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), Bcl-2, ATP synthase, and Complex IV (cytochrome C oxidase), was significantly reduced in 2D culture when exposed to 10 microg/ml ZnO-NPs, but no significant decrease was detected in 3D culture when exposed to the same concentration of ZnO-NPs. In conclusion, the tissue-mimic phenotype and functionality of 3D cells could be achieved through the elevated expression of ECM components. The 3D cells were expected to help to better predict the nanotoxicity of ZnO-NPs at tissue-level by increased cell-cell and cell-ECM adhesion and signaling. The tissue-mimic morphology would also be useful to simulate the diffusion/transport of the nanoparticles in vitro.

  12. Decreased Endothelial Nitric Oxide Bioavailability, Impaired Microvascular Function, and Increased Tissue Oxygen Consumption in Children with Falciparum Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Tsin W.; Lampah, Daniel A.; Kenangalem, Enny; Tjitra, Emiliana; Weinberg, J. Brice; Granger, Donald L.; Price, Ric N.; Anstey, Nicholas M.

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, microvascular function, and host oxygen consumption have not been assessed in pediatric malaria. We measured NO-dependent endothelial function by using peripheral artery tonometry to determine the reactive hyperemia index (RHI), and microvascular function and oxygen consumption (VO2) using near infrared resonance spectroscopy in 13 Indonesian children with severe falciparum malaria and 15 with moderately severe falciparum malaria. Compared with 19 controls, children with severe malaria and those with moderately severe malaria had lower RHIs (P = .03); 12% and 8% lower microvascular function, respectively (P = .03); and 29% and 25% higher VO2, respectively. RHIs correlated with microvascular function in all children with malaria (P < .001) and all with severe malaria (P < .001). Children with malaria have decreased endothelial and microvascular function and increased oxygen consumption, likely contributing to the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:24879801

  13. Decreased endothelial nitric oxide bioavailability, impaired microvascular function, and increased tissue oxygen consumption in children with falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Tsin W; Lampah, Daniel A; Kenangalem, Enny; Tjitra, Emiliana; Weinberg, J Brice; Granger, Donald L; Price, Ric N; Anstey, Nicholas M

    2014-11-15

    Endothelial nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, microvascular function, and host oxygen consumption have not been assessed in pediatric malaria. We measured NO-dependent endothelial function by using peripheral artery tonometry to determine the reactive hyperemia index (RHI), and microvascular function and oxygen consumption (VO2) using near infrared resonance spectroscopy in 13 Indonesian children with severe falciparum malaria and 15 with moderately severe falciparum malaria. Compared with 19 controls, children with severe malaria and those with moderately severe malaria had lower RHIs (P = .03); 12% and 8% lower microvascular function, respectively (P = .03); and 29% and 25% higher VO2, respectively. RHIs correlated with microvascular function in all children with malaria (P < .001) and all with severe malaria (P < .001). Children with malaria have decreased endothelial and microvascular function and increased oxygen consumption, likely contributing to the pathogenesis of the disease.

  14. Validation of quantitative estimation of tissue oxygen extraction fraction and deoxygenated blood volume fraction in phantom and in vivo experiments by using MRI.

    PubMed

    Sedlacik, Jan; Reichenbach, Jürgen R

    2010-04-01

    The blood oxygenation level dependent signal of cerebral tissue can be theoretically derived using a network model formed by randomly oriented infinitely long cylinders. The validation of this model by phantom and in vivo experiments is still an object of research. A network phantom was constructed of solid polypropylene strings immersed in silicone oil, which essentially eliminated the effect of spin diffusion. The volume fraction and magnetic property of the string network was predetermined by independent methods. Ten healthy volunteers were measured for in vivo demonstration. The gradient echo sampled spin echo signal was evaluated with the cylinder network model. We found a strong interdependency between the two network characterizing parameters deoxygenated blood volume and oxygen extraction fraction. Here, different sets of deoxygenated blood volume/oxygen extraction fraction values were able to describe the measured signal equally well. However, by setting one parameter constant to a predetermined value, reasonable estimates of the other parameter were obtained. The same behavior was found for the in vivo demonstration. The signal theory of the cylinder network was validated by a well-characterized phantom. However, the found interdependency that was found between deoxygenated blood volume and oxygen extraction fraction requires an independent estimation of one variable to determine reliable values of the other parameter. PMID:20373392

  15. Structural and functional evaluation of oxygenating keratin/silk fibroin scaffold and initial assessment of their potential for urethral tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Lv, XiangGuo; Li, Zhe; Chen, ShiYan; Xie, MinKai; Huang, JianWen; Peng, XuFeng; Yang, RanXing; Wang, HuaPing; Xu, YueMin; Feng, Chao

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we report a new type of oxygen-generating scaffold, composed of human keratin, silk, gelatin and calcium peroxide (CPO). After mixing the silk/keratin (60:40) with 2% gelatin and 20% CPO, the film demonstrated excellent mechanical properties, non-cytotoxicity and oxygen-generative ability. The detailed structure of scaffold was revealed by confocal laser and electronic scanning microscopy. The gelatin formed the network structure, which mixed with silk fibroin and keratin. The CPOs were embedded into scaffold. A shell-core structure was formed in the CPO particles, in which the CPO was located in the core and the gelatin was mainly wrapped around the CPO. Furthermore, the oxygen-release test showed that scaffold was able to steadily release high level of oxygen over two weeks in vitro. In addition, the anti-bacterial function was also proved in the scaffold. Films with CPO enhanced the repair in dog urethral defect models, resulting in patent urethra. Improved organized muscle bundles and epithelial layer were observed in animals treated with CPO films compared with those treated with non-CPO films. This study suggests that this biomaterial could be suitable for tissue engineered urinary tract reconstruction.

  16. A role for iron and oxygen chemistry in preserving soft tissues, cells and molecules from deep time.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, Mary H; Zheng, Wenxia; Cleland, Timothy P; Goodwin, Mark B; Boatman, Elizabeth; Theil, Elizabeth; Marcus, Matthew A; Fakra, Sirine C

    2014-01-22

    The persistence of original soft tissues in Mesozoic fossil bone is not explained by current chemical degradation models. We identified iron particles (goethite-αFeO(OH)) associated with soft tissues recovered from two Mesozoic dinosaurs, using transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, micro-X-ray diffraction and Fe micro-X-ray absorption near-edge structure. Iron chelators increased fossil tissue immunoreactivity to multiple antibodies dramatically, suggesting a role for iron in both preserving and masking proteins in fossil tissues. Haemoglobin (HB) increased tissue stability more than 200-fold, from approximately 3 days to more than two years at room temperature (25°C) in an ostrich blood vessel model developed to test post-mortem 'tissue fixation' by cross-linking or peroxidation. HB-induced solution hypoxia coupled with iron chelation enhances preservation as follows: HB + O2 > HB - O2 > -O2 > +O2. The well-known O2/haeme interactions in the chemistry of life, such as respiration and bioenergetics, are complemented by O2/haeme interactions in the preservation of fossil soft tissues.

  17. Two-dimensional concentration distribution of reactive oxygen species transported through a tissue phantom by atmospheric-pressure plasma-jet irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Toshiyuki; Sato, Akihiro; Kusumegi, Shota; Kudo, Akihiro; Sakanoshita, Tomohiro; Tsurumaru, Takuya; Uchida, Giichiro; Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2016-07-01

    The two-dimensional concentration distribution of reactive oxygen species (ROSs) transported through an agarose-film tissue phantom by atmospheric-pressure plasma-jet irradiation is visualized using a KI-starch gel reagent. Oxygen addition to helium enhances ROS transportation through the film. A radial ROS distribution pattern at the plasma-irradiated film surface changes into a doughnut-shaped pattern after passing through the film. The ROS transportation speed is 0.14-0.2 mm/min. We suggest that there are two types of ROS transportation pathways in the plasma-irradiated film: linear and circular. The majority of ROSs are transported through the circular pathway. ROS concentration distributions changed markedly with irradiation distance. Diffusive ROS transportation due to a concentration gradient is negligible in plasma-irradiated films.

  18. Two-dimensional concentration distribution of reactive oxygen species transported through a tissue phantom by atmospheric-pressure plasma-jet irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Toshiyuki; Sato, Akihiro; Kusumegi, Shota; Kudo, Akihiro; Sakanoshita, Tomohiro; Tsurumaru, Takuya; Uchida, Giichiro; Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2016-07-01

    The two-dimensional concentration distribution of reactive oxygen species (ROSs) transported through an agarose-film tissue phantom by atmospheric-pressure plasma-jet irradiation is visualized using a KI-starch gel reagent. Oxygen addition to helium enhances ROS transportation through the film. A radial ROS distribution pattern at the plasma-irradiated film surface changes into a doughnut-shaped pattern after passing through the film. The ROS transportation speed is 0.14–0.2 mm/min. We suggest that there are two types of ROS transportation pathways in the plasma-irradiated film: linear and circular. The majority of ROSs are transported through the circular pathway. ROS concentration distributions changed markedly with irradiation distance. Diffusive ROS transportation due to a concentration gradient is negligible in plasma-irradiated films.

  19. Adequate iron stores and the 'Nil nocere' principle.

    PubMed

    Hollán, S; Johansen, K S

    1993-01-01

    There is a need to change the policy of unselective iron supplementation during periods of life with physiologically increased cell proliferation. Levels of iron stores to be regarded as adequate during infancy and pregnancy are still not well established. Recent data support the view that it is not justified to interfere with physiological adaptations developed through millions of years by sophisticated and precisely coordinated regulation of iron absorption, utilization and storage. Recent data suggest that the chelatable intracellular iron pool regulates the expression of proteins with central importance in cellular iron metabolism (TfR, ferritin, and erythroid 5-aminolevulinic synthetase) in a coordinately controlled way through an iron dependent cytosolic mRNA binding protein, the iron regulating factor (IRF). This factor is simultaneously a sensor and a regulator of iron levels. The reduction of ferritin levels during highly increased cell proliferation is a mirror of the increased density of TfRs. An abundance of data support the vigorous competition for growth-essential iron between microbial pathogens and their vertebrate hosts. The highly coordinated regulation of iron metabolism is probably crucial in achieving a balance between the blockade of readily accessible iron to invading organisms and yet providing sufficient iron for the immune system of the host. The most evident adverse clinical effects of excess iron have been observed in immunodeficient patients in tropical countries and in AIDS patients. Excess iron also increases the risk of initiation and promotion of malignant processes by iron binding to DNA and by the iron-catalysed release of free radicals. Oxygen radicals were shown to damage critical biomolecules leading, apart from cancer, to a variety of human disease states, including inflammation and atherosclerosis. They are also involved in processes of aging and thrombosis. Recent clinical trials have suggested that the use of iron

  20. Solid state oxygen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Garzon, Fernando H.; Chung, Brandon W.; Raistrick, Ian D.; Brosha, Eric L.

    1996-01-01

    Solid state oxygen sensors are provided with a yttria-doped zirconia as an electrolyte and use the electrochemical oxygen pumping of the zirconia electrolyte. A linear relationship between oxygen concentration and the voltage arising at a current plateau occurs when oxygen accessing the electrolyte is limited by a diffusion barrier. A diffusion barrier is formed herein with a mixed electronic and oxygen ion-conducting membrane of lanthanum-containing perovskite or zirconia-containing fluorite. A heater may be used to maintain an adequate oxygen diffusion coefficient in the mixed conducting layer.

  1. Solid state oxygen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Garzon, F.H.; Chung, B.W.; Raistrick, I.D.; Brosha, E.L.

    1996-08-06

    Solid state oxygen sensors are provided with a yttria-doped zirconia as an electrolyte and use the electrochemical oxygen pumping of the zirconia electrolyte. A linear relationship between oxygen concentration and the voltage arising at a current plateau occurs when oxygen accessing the electrolyte is limited by a diffusion barrier. A diffusion barrier is formed herein with a mixed electronic and oxygen ion-conducting membrane of lanthanum-containing perovskite or zirconia-containing fluorite. A heater may be used to maintain an adequate oxygen diffusion coefficient in the mixed conducting layer. 4 figs.

  2. Is a vegetarian diet adequate for children.

    PubMed

    Hackett, A; Nathan, I; Burgess, L

    1998-01-01

    The number of people who avoid eating meat is growing, especially among young people. Benefits to health from a vegetarian diet have been reported in adults but it is not clear to what extent these benefits are due to diet or to other aspects of lifestyles. In children concern has been expressed concerning the adequacy of vegetarian diets especially with regard to growth. The risks/benefits seem to be related to the degree of restriction of he diet; anaemia is probably both the main and the most serious risk but this also applies to omnivores. Vegan diets are more likely to be associated with malnutrition, especially if the diets are the result of authoritarian dogma. Overall, lacto-ovo-vegetarian children consume diets closer to recommendations than omnivores and their pre-pubertal growth is at least as good. The simplest strategy when becoming vegetarian may involve reliance on vegetarian convenience foods which are not necessarily superior in nutritional composition. The vegetarian sector of the food industry could do more to produce foods closer to recommendations. Vegetarian diets can be, but are not necessarily, adequate for children, providing vigilance is maintained, particularly to ensure variety. Identical comments apply to omnivorous diets. Three threats to the diet of children are too much reliance on convenience foods, lack of variety and lack of exercise.

  3. Characterizing Fluctuations of Arterial and Cerebral Tissue Oxygenation in Preterm Neonates by Means of Data Analysis Techniques for Nonlinear Dynamical Systems.

    PubMed

    Kleiser, Stefan; Pastewski, Marcin; Hapuarachchi, Tharindi; Hagmann, Cornelia; Fauchère, Jean-Claude; Tachtsidis, Ilias; Wolf, Martin; Scholkmann, Felix

    2016-01-01

    The cerebral autoregulatory state as well as fluctuations in arterial (SpO2) and cerebral tissue oxygen saturation (StO2) are potentially new relevant clinical parameters in preterm neonates. The aim of the present study was to test the investigative capabilities of data analysis techniques for nonlinear dynamical systems, looking at fluctuations and their interdependence. StO2, SpO2 and the heart rate (HR) were measured on four preterm neonates for several hours. The fractional tissue oxygenation extraction (FTOE) was calculated. To characterize the fluctuations in StO2, SpO2, FTOE and HR, two methods were employed: (1) phase-space modeling and application of the recurrence quantification analysis (RQA), and (2) maximum entropy spectral analysis (MESA). The correlation between StO2 and SpO2 as well as FTOE and HR was quantified by (1) nonparametric nonlinear regression based on the alternating conditional expectation (ACE) algorithm, and (2) the maximal information-based nonparametric exploration (MINE) technique. We found that (1) each neonate showed individual characteristics, (2) a ~60 min oscillation was observed in all of the signals, (3) the nonlinear correlation strength between StO2 and SpO2 as well as FTOE and HR was specific for each neonate and showed a high value for a neonate with a reduced health status, possibly indicating an impaired cerebral autoregulation. In conclusion, our data analysis framework enabled novel insights into the characteristics of hemodynamic and oxygenation changes in preterm infants. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first application of RQA, MESA, ACE and MINE to human StO2 data measured with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). PMID:26782252

  4. Oxygen safety

    MedlinePlus

    COPD - oxygen safety; Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - oxygen safety; Chronic obstructive airways disease - oxygen safety; Emphysema - oxygen safety; Heart failure - oxygen-safety; Palliative care - oxygen safety; ...

  5. The Effect of Active versus Passive Recovery Periods during High Intensity Intermittent Exercise on Local Tissue Oxygenation in 18 – 30 Year Old Sedentary Men

    PubMed Central

    Kerhervé, Hugo A.; Askew, Christopher D.; Solomon, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose High intensity interval training (HIIT) has been proposed as a time-efficient format of exercise to reduce the chronic disease burden associated with sedentary behaviour. Changes in oxygen utilisation at the local tissue level during an acute session of HIIT could be the primary stimulus for the health benefits associated with this format of exercise. The recovery periods of HIIT effect the physiological responses that occur during the session. It was hypothesised that in sedentary individuals, local and systemic oxygen utilisation would be higher during HIIT interspersed with active recovery periods, when compared to passive recovery periods. Methods Twelve sedentary males (mean ± SD; age 23 ± 3 yr) completed three conditions on a cycle ergometer: 1) HIIT with passive recovery periods between four bouts (HIITPASS) 2) HIIT with active recovery periods between four bouts (HIITACT) 3) HIITACT with four HIIT bouts replaced with passive periods (REC). Deoxygenated haemoglobin (HHb) in the vastus lateralis (VL) and gastrocnemius (GN) muscles and the pre-frontal cortex (FH), oxygen consumption (VO2), power output and heart rate (HR) were measured continuously during the three conditions. Results There was a significant increase in HHb at VL during bouts 2 (p = 0.017), 3 (p = 0.035) and 4 (p = 0.035) in HIITACT, compared to HIITPASS. Mean power output was significantly lower in HIITACT, compared to HIITPASS (p < 0.001). There was a significant main effect for site in both HIITPASS (p = 0.029) and HIITACT (p = 0.005). There were no significant differences in VO2 and HR between HIITPASS and HIITACT. Conclusions The increase in HHb at VL and the lower mean power output during HIITACT could indicate that a higher level of deoxygenation contributes to decreased mechanical power in sedentary participants. The significant differences in HHb between sites indicates the specificity of oxygen utilisation. PMID:27677081

  6. Nonthermal Ablation by Using Intravascular Oxygen Radical Generation with WST11: Dynamic Tissue Effects and Implications for Focal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Kimm, Simon Y; Tarin, Tatum V; Monette, Sébastien; Srimathveeravalli, Govindarajan; Gerber, Daniel; Durack, Jeremy C; Solomon, Stephen B; Scardino, Peter T; Scherz, Avigdor; Coleman, Jonathan

    2016-10-01

    Purpose To examine the hypothesis that vascular-targeted photodynamic therapy (VTP) with WST11 and clinically relevant parameters can be used to ablate target tissues in a non-tumor-bearing large-animal model while selectively sparing blood vessels and collagen. Materials and Methods By using an institutional animal care and use committee-approved protocol, 68 ablations were performed in the kidneys (cortex and medulla) and livers of 27 adult pigs. Posttreatment evaluation was conducted with contrast material-enhanced computed tomography in the live animals at 24 hours. Immunohistochemistry was evaluated and histologic examination with hematoxylin-eosin staining was performed at 4 hours, 24 hours, and 7 days. Intravenous infusion of WST11 (4 mg per kilogram of body weight) was followed by using near-infrared illumination (753 nm for 20 minutes) through optical fibers prepositioned in target tissues by using a fixed template. Treated areas were scanned, measured, and statistically analyzed by using the Student t test and two-way analysis of variance. Results Focal WST11 VTP treatment in the liver and kidney by using a single optical fiber resulted in well-demarcated cylindrical zones of nonthermal necrosis concentrically oriented around the light-emitting diffuser, with no intervening viable parenchymal cells. The radius of ablated tissue increased from approximately 5 mm at 150 mW to approximately 7 mm at 415 mW (P < .01). Illumination through fiber triads at 1-cm separation resulted in confluent homogeneous necrosis. Patterns of acute injury within 24 hours were consistent with microcirculatory flow arrest and collagen preservation (demonstrated with trichrome staining). In the peripheral ablation zone, blood vessels at least 40 μm in diameter were selectively preserved and remained functional at 7 days. Ablated tissues exhibited progressive fibrosis and chronic inflammatory cell infiltrates. No histologic changes consistent with thermal injury were observed in

  7. Nonthermal Ablation by Using Intravascular Oxygen Radical Generation with WST11: Dynamic Tissue Effects and Implications for Focal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Kimm, Simon Y; Tarin, Tatum V; Monette, Sébastien; Srimathveeravalli, Govindarajan; Gerber, Daniel; Durack, Jeremy C; Solomon, Stephen B; Scardino, Peter T; Scherz, Avigdor; Coleman, Jonathan

    2016-10-01

    Purpose To examine the hypothesis that vascular-targeted photodynamic therapy (VTP) with WST11 and clinically relevant parameters can be used to ablate target tissues in a non-tumor-bearing large-animal model while selectively sparing blood vessels and collagen. Materials and Methods By using an institutional animal care and use committee-approved protocol, 68 ablations were performed in the kidneys (cortex and medulla) and livers of 27 adult pigs. Posttreatment evaluation was conducted with contrast material-enhanced computed tomography in the live animals at 24 hours. Immunohistochemistry was evaluated and histologic examination with hematoxylin-eosin staining was performed at 4 hours, 24 hours, and 7 days. Intravenous infusion of WST11 (4 mg per kilogram of body weight) was followed by using near-infrared illumination (753 nm for 20 minutes) through optical fibers prepositioned in target tissues by using a fixed template. Treated areas were scanned, measured, and statistically analyzed by using the Student t test and two-way analysis of variance. Results Focal WST11 VTP treatment in the liver and kidney by using a single optical fiber resulted in well-demarcated cylindrical zones of nonthermal necrosis concentrically oriented around the light-emitting diffuser, with no intervening viable parenchymal cells. The radius of ablated tissue increased from approximately 5 mm at 150 mW to approximately 7 mm at 415 mW (P < .01). Illumination through fiber triads at 1-cm separation resulted in confluent homogeneous necrosis. Patterns of acute injury within 24 hours were consistent with microcirculatory flow arrest and collagen preservation (demonstrated with trichrome staining). In the peripheral ablation zone, blood vessels at least 40 μm in diameter were selectively preserved and remained functional at 7 days. Ablated tissues exhibited progressive fibrosis and chronic inflammatory cell infiltrates. No histologic changes consistent with thermal injury were observed in

  8. Beyond the classic eicosanoids: Peripherally-acting oxygenated metabolites of polyunsaturated fatty acids mediate pain associated with tissue injury and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Haim; Singer, Pierre; Ariel, Amiram

    2016-08-01

    Pain is a complex sensation that may be protective or cause undue suffering and loss of function, depending on the circumstances. Peripheral nociceptor neurons (PNs) innervate most tissues, and express ion channels, nocisensors, which depolarize the cell in response to intense stimuli and numerous substances. Inflamed tissues manifest inflammatory hyperalgesia in which the threshold for pain and the response to painful stimuli are decreased and increased, respectively. Constituents of the inflammatory milieu sensitize PNs, thereby contributing to hyperalgesia. Polyunsaturated fatty acids undergo enzymatic and free radical-mediated oxygenation into an array of bioactive metabolites, oxygenated polyunsaturated fatty acids (oxy-PUFAs), including the classic eicosanoids. Oxy-PUFA production is enhanced during inflammation. Pioneering studies by Vane and colleagues from the early 1970s first implicated classic eicosanoids in the pain associated with inflammation. Here, we review the production and action of oxy-PUFAs that are not classic eicosanoids, but nevertheless are produced in injured/ inflamed tissues and activate or sensitize PNs. In general, oxy-PUFAs that sensitize PNs may do so directly, by activation of nocisensors, ion channels or GPCRs expressed on the surface of PNs, or indirectly, by increasing the production of inflammatory mediators that activate or sensitize PNs. We focus on oxy-PUFAs that act directly on PNs. Specifically, we discuss the role of arachidonic acid-derived 12S-HpETE, HNE, ONE, PGA2, iso-PGA2 and 15d-PGJ2, 5,6-and 8,9-EET, PGE2-G and 8R,15S-diHETE, as well as the linoleic acid-derived 9-and 13-HODE in inducing acute nocifensive behavior and/or inflammatory hyperalgesia in rodents. The nocisensors TRPV1, TRPV4 and TRPA1, and putative Gαs-type GPCRs are the PN targets of these oxy-PUFAs. PMID:27067460

  9. Control of scaffold degradation in tissue engineering: a review.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongbo; Zhou, Li; Zhang, Wenjun

    2014-10-01

    Tissue engineering has shown a great promise as a solution to the high demand for tissue and organ transplantations. Biomaterial scaffolds serve to house and direct cells to grow, exposing them to an adequate perfusion of nutrients, oxygen, metabolic products, and appropriate growth factors to enhance their differentiation and function. The degradation of biomaterial scaffolds is a key factor to successful tissue regeneration. In this article, the existing degradation control approaches in the context of scaffold tissue engineering were reviewed and a new paradigm of thinking called active control of scaffold degradation, proposed elsewhere by us, was also revisited and discussed in light of its benefit and requirement of this new technology.

  10. Adequate mathematical modelling of environmental processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chashechkin, Yu. D.

    2012-04-01

    In environmental observations and laboratory visualization both large scale flow components like currents, jets, vortices, waves and a fine structure are registered (different examples are given). The conventional mathematical modeling both analytical and numerical is directed mostly on description of energetically important flow components. The role of a fine structures is still remains obscured. A variety of existing models makes it difficult to choose the most adequate and to estimate mutual assessment of their degree of correspondence. The goal of the talk is to give scrutiny analysis of kinematics and dynamics of flows. A difference between the concept of "motion" as transformation of vector space into itself with a distance conservation and the concept of "flow" as displacement and rotation of deformable "fluid particles" is underlined. Basic physical quantities of the flow that are density, momentum, energy (entropy) and admixture concentration are selected as physical parameters defined by the fundamental set which includes differential D'Alembert, Navier-Stokes, Fourier's and/or Fick's equations and closing equation of state. All of them are observable and independent. Calculations of continuous Lie groups shown that only the fundamental set is characterized by the ten-parametric Galilelian groups reflecting based principles of mechanics. Presented analysis demonstrates that conventionally used approximations dramatically change the symmetries of the governing equations sets which leads to their incompatibility or even degeneration. The fundamental set is analyzed taking into account condition of compatibility. A high order of the set indicated on complex structure of complete solutions corresponding to physical structure of real flows. Analytical solutions of a number problems including flows induced by diffusion on topography, generation of the periodic internal waves a compact sources in week-dissipative media as well as numerical solutions of the same

  11. Quinclorac-induced cell death is accompanied by generation of reactive oxygen species in maize root tissue.

    PubMed

    Sunohara, Yukari; Matsumoto, Hiroshi

    2008-09-01

    The importance of reactive oxygen species for herbicide quinclorac (3,7-dichloro-8-quinolinecarboxylic acid)-induced cell death in roots was investigated. This was in order to understand its mode of action in grass species grown in the dark. Under these dark conditions, quinclorac suppressed the shoot and root growth of maize (Zea mays L. cv. Honey Bantam) in a concentration-dependent manner (50microM), although the inhibition level was less than that observed under growth conditions in the light. Analysis of cell viability using Evans blue or fluorescein diacetate-propidium iodide (FDA-PI) staining showed that the maize root cells significantly lost their viability after 14h root treatment with 10microM quinclorac, but not 10microM 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). Determination of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in maize roots using a superoxide anion (O2-)-specific indicator, dihydroethidium (DHE), indicated that 50microM quinclorac induced a high level of O2- production in maize roots after 14h root treatment than that of either the control (non-treated) or with 50microM 2,4-D. Moreover, either cell death or ethane evolution, an indicator of lipid peroxide formation, in maize root segments was significantly enhanced by 50microM quinclorac, but not by 50microM 2,4-D. On the other hand, the 50microM 2,4-D treatment induced much higher ethylene and cyanide production in the root segments than with the 50microM quinclorac. These results suggest that quinclorac-induced cell death in maize roots may be caused by ROS and lipid peroxidation, but not by ethylene and its biosynthetic pathway-related substances including cyanide, which have been thought to be the causative factor of quinclorac-induced phytotoxicity in susceptible grass weeds such as Echinochloa, Digitaria, and Setaria. PMID:18674787

  12. Quinclorac-induced cell death is accompanied by generation of reactive oxygen species in maize root tissue.

    PubMed

    Sunohara, Yukari; Matsumoto, Hiroshi

    2008-09-01

    The importance of reactive oxygen species for herbicide quinclorac (3,7-dichloro-8-quinolinecarboxylic acid)-induced cell death in roots was investigated. This was in order to understand its mode of action in grass species grown in the dark. Under these dark conditions, quinclorac suppressed the shoot and root growth of maize (Zea mays L. cv. Honey Bantam) in a concentration-dependent manner (50microM), although the inhibition level was less than that observed under growth conditions in the light. Analysis of cell viability using Evans blue or fluorescein diacetate-propidium iodide (FDA-PI) staining showed that the maize root cells significantly lost their viability after 14h root treatment with 10microM quinclorac, but not 10microM 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). Determination of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in maize roots using a superoxide anion (O2-)-specific indicator, dihydroethidium (DHE), indicated that 50microM quinclorac induced a high level of O2- production in maize roots after 14h root treatment than that of either the control (non-treated) or with 50microM 2,4-D. Moreover, either cell death or ethane evolution, an indicator of lipid peroxide formation, in maize root segments was significantly enhanced by 50microM quinclorac, but not by 50microM 2,4-D. On the other hand, the 50microM 2,4-D treatment induced much higher ethylene and cyanide production in the root segments than with the 50microM quinclorac. These results suggest that quinclorac-induced cell death in maize roots may be caused by ROS and lipid peroxidation, but not by ethylene and its biosynthetic pathway-related substances including cyanide, which have been thought to be the causative factor of quinclorac-induced phytotoxicity in susceptible grass weeds such as Echinochloa, Digitaria, and Setaria.

  13. Oxygen deprivation and the cellular response to hypoxia in adipocytes - perspectives on white and brown adipose tissues in obesity.

    PubMed

    Trayhurn, Paul; Alomar, Suliman Yousef

    2015-01-01

    Relative hypoxia has been shown to develop in white adipose tissue depots of different types of obese mouse (genetic, dietary), and this leads to substantial changes in white adipocyte function. These changes include increased production of inflammation-related adipokines (such as IL-6, leptin, Angptl4, and VEGF), an increase in glucose utilization and lactate production, and the induction of fibrosis and insulin resistance. Whether hypoxia also occurs in brown adipose tissue depots in obesity has been little considered. However, a recent study has reported low pO2 in brown fat of obese mice, this involving mitochondrial loss and dysfunction. We suggest that obesity-linked hypoxia may lead to similar alterations in brown adipocytes as in white fat cells - particularly changes in adipokine production, increased glucose uptake and lactate release, and insulin resistance. This would be expected to compromise thermogenic activity and the role of brown fat in glucose homeostasis and triglyceride clearance, underpinning the development of the metabolic syndrome. Hypoxia-induced augmentation of lactate production may also stimulate the "browning" of white fat depots through recruitment of UCP1 and the development of brite adipocytes.

  14. Oxygen Deprivation and the Cellular Response to Hypoxia in Adipocytes – Perspectives on White and Brown Adipose Tissues in Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Trayhurn, Paul; Alomar, Suliman Yousef

    2015-01-01

    Relative hypoxia has been shown to develop in white adipose tissue depots of different types of obese mouse (genetic, dietary), and this leads to substantial changes in white adipocyte function. These changes include increased production of inflammation-related adipokines (such as IL-6, leptin, Angptl4, and VEGF), an increase in glucose utilization and lactate production, and the induction of fibrosis and insulin resistance. Whether hypoxia also occurs in brown adipose tissue depots in obesity has been little considered. However, a recent study has reported low pO2 in brown fat of obese mice, this involving mitochondrial loss and dysfunction. We suggest that obesity-linked hypoxia may lead to similar alterations in brown adipocytes as in white fat cells – particularly changes in adipokine production, increased glucose uptake and lactate release, and insulin resistance. This would be expected to compromise thermogenic activity and the role of brown fat in glucose homeostasis and triglyceride clearance, underpinning the development of the metabolic syndrome. Hypoxia-induced augmentation of lactate production may also stimulate the “browning” of white fat depots through recruitment of UCP1 and the development of brite adipocytes. PMID:25745415

  15. Insulin improves in vitro survival of equine preantral follicles enclosed in ovarian tissue and reduces reactive oxygen species production after culture.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, F L N; Lunardi, F O; Lima, L F; Rocha, R M P; Bruno, J B; Magalhães-Padilha, D M; Cibin, F W S; Rodrigues, A P R; Gastal, M O; Gastal, E L; Figueiredo, J R

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the effect of insulin concentration on the in vitro culture of equine preantral follicles enclosed in ovarian tissue. Ovarian tissue samples were immediately fixed (noncultured control) or cultured for 1 or 7 days in α-MEM(+) supplemented with 0 ng/mL, 10 ng/mL, or 10 μg/mL insulin. Ovarian tissues were processed and analyzed by classical histology. Culture medium samples were collected after 1 and 7 days of culture for steroid and reactive oxygen species (ROS) analyses. The percentage of morphologically normal follicles was greater (P < 0.001) in insulin-treated groups after 1 day of culture; likewise, more (P < 0.02) normal follicles were observed after 7 days of culture in medium supplemented with 10-ng/mL insulin. Furthermore, an increase (P < 0.01) in developing (transition, primary, and secondary) follicles between Days 1 and 7 of culture was observed only with the 10-ng/mL insulin treatment. ROS production after 1 or 7 days of culture was lower (P < 0.0001) in medium with 10-ng/mL insulin than the other treatments. Ovarian tissues containing preantral follicles were able to produce estradiol and progesterone after 1 and 7 days of culture; however, treatments did not differ in steroid production. In conclusion, the use of a physiological concentration (10 ng/mL) of insulin rather than the previously reported concentration (10 μg/mL) for in vitro culture of equine preantral follicles improved follicular survival and growth and lowered oxidative stress. Results from this study shed light on new perspectives for producing an appropriate medium to improve equine preantral follicle in vitro survival and growth.

  16. Intra-Operative Tissue Oxygen Tension Is Increased by Local Insufflation of Humidified-Warm CO2 during Open Abdominal Surgery in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Jean K.; Lindner, Pernilla; Tait, Noel; Maddocks, Tracy; Riepsamen, Angelique; van der Linden, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Maintenance of high tissue oxygenation (PtO2) is recommended during surgery because PtO2 is highly predictive of surgical site infection and colonic anastomotic leakage. However, surgical site perfusion is often sub-optimal, creating an obstructive hurdle for traditional, systemically applied therapies to maintain or increase surgical site PtO2. This research tested the hypothesis that insufflation of humidified-warm CO2 into the abdominal cavity would increase sub-peritoneal PtO2 during open abdominal surgery. Materials and Methods 15 Wistar rats underwent laparotomy under general anesthesia. Three sets of randomized cross-over experiments were conducted in which the abdominal cavity was subjected to alternating exposure to 1) humidified-warm CO2 & ambient air; 2) humidified-warm CO2 & dry-cold CO2; and 3) dry-cold CO2 & ambient air. Sub-peritoneal PtO2 and tissue temperature were measured with a polarographic oxygen probe. Results Upon insufflation of humidified-warm CO2, PtO2 increased by 29.8 mmHg (SD 13.3; p<0.001), or 96.6% (SD 51.9), and tissue temperature by 3.0°C (SD 1.7 p<0.001), in comparison with exposure to ambient air. Smaller, but significant, increases in PtO2 were seen in experiments 2 and 3. Tissue temperature decreased upon exposure to dry-cold CO2 compared with ambient air (-1.4°C, SD 0.5, p = 0.001). Conclusions In a rat model, insufflation of humidified-warm CO2 into the abdominal cavity during open abdominal surgery causes an immediate and potentially clinically significant increase in PtO2. The effect is an additive result of the delivery of CO2 and avoidance of evaporative cooling via the delivery of the CO2 gas humidified at body temperature. PMID:25835954

  17. Quantitative spatially resolved measurement of tissue chromophore concentrations using photoacoustic spectroscopy: application to the measurement of blood oxygenation and haemoglobin concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laufer, Jan; Delpy, Dave; Elwell, Clare; Beard, Paul

    2007-01-01

    A new approach based on pulsed photoacoustic spectroscopy for non-invasively quantifying tissue chromophore concentrations with high spatial resolution has been developed. The technique is applicable to the quantification of tissue chromophores such as oxyhaemoglobin (HbO2) and deoxyhaemoglobin (HHb) for the measurement of physiological parameters such as blood oxygen saturation (SO2) and total haemoglobin concentration. It can also be used to quantify the local accumulation of targeted contrast agents used in photoacoustic molecular imaging. The technique employs a model-based inversion scheme to recover the chromophore concentrations from photoacoustic measurements. This comprises a numerical forward model of the detected time-dependent photoacoustic signal that incorporates a multiwavelength diffusion-based finite element light propagation model to describe the light transport and a time-domain acoustic model to describe the generation, propagation and detection of the photoacoustic wave. The forward model is then inverted by iteratively fitting it to measurements of photoacoustic signals acquired at different wavelengths to recover the chromophore concentrations. To validate this approach, photoacoustic signals were generated in a tissue phantom using nanosecond laser pulses between 740 nm and 1040 nm. The tissue phantom comprised a suspension of intralipid, blood and a near-infrared dye in which three tubes were immersed. Blood at physiological haemoglobin concentrations and oxygen saturation levels ranging from 2% to 100% was circulated through the tubes. The signal amplitude from different temporal sections of the detected photoacoustic waveforms was plotted as a function of wavelength and the forward model fitted to these data to recover the concentrations of HbO2 and HHb, total haemoglobin concentration and SO2. The performance was found to compare favourably to that of a laboratory CO-oximeter with measurement resolutions of ±3.8 g l-1 (±58 µM) and ±4

  18. The acute effects of hemorrhagic shock on cerebral blood flow, brain tissue oxygen tension, and spreading depolarization following penetrating ballistic-like brain injury.

    PubMed

    Leung, Lai Yee; Wei, Guo; Shear, Deborah A; Tortella, Frank C

    2013-07-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) often occurs in conjunction with additional trauma, resulting in secondary complications, such as hypotension as a result of blood loss. This study investigated the combined effects of penetrating ballistic-like brain injury (PBBI) and hemorrhagic shock (HS) on physiological parameters, including acute changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), brain tissue oxygen tension (P(bt)O₂), and cortical spreading depolarizations (CSDs). All recordings were initiated before injury (PBBI/HS/both) and maintained for 2.5 h. Results showed that PBBI alone and combined PBBI and HS produced a sustained impairment of ipsilateral rCBF that decreased by 70% from baseline (p<0.05). Significant and sustained reductions in P(bt)O₂ (50% baseline; p<0.05) were also observed in the injured hemisphere of the animals subjected to both PBBI and HS (PBBI+HS). In contrast, PBBI alone produced smaller, more transient reductions in P(bt)O₂ levels. The lower limit of cerebral autoregulation was significantly higher in the PBBI+HS group (p<0.05, compared to HS alone). Critically, combined injury resulted in twice the number of spontaneous CSDs as in PBBI alone (p<0.05). It also lowered the propagation speed of CSD and the threshold of CSD occurrence [induced CSD at higher mean arterial pressure (MAP)]. However, rCBF and P(bt)O₂ were not responsive to the depolarizations. Our data suggest that PBBI together with HS causes persistent impairment of CBF and brain tissue oxygen tension, increasing the probability of CSDs that likely contribute to secondary neuropathology and compromise neurological recovery. PMID:23461630

  19. High-Resolution Respirometry for Simultaneous Measurement of Oxygen and Hydrogen Peroxide Fluxes in Permeabilized Cells, Tissue Homogenate and Isolated Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Makrecka-Kuka, Marina; Krumschnabel, Gerhard; Gnaiger, Erich

    2015-01-01

    Whereas mitochondria are well established as the source of ATP in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), it is debated if they are also the major cellular sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here we describe the novel approach of combining high-resolution respirometry and fluorometric measurement of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production, applied to mitochondrial preparations (permeabilized cells, tissue homogenate, isolated mitochondria). The widely used H2O2 probe Amplex Red inhibited respiration in intact and permeabilized cells and should not be applied at concentrations above 10 µM. H2O2 fluxes were generally less than 1% of oxygen fluxes in physiological substrate and coupling states, specifically in permeabilized cells. H2O2 flux was consistently highest in the Complex II-linked LEAK state, reduced with CI&II-linked convergent electron flow and in mitochondria respiring at OXPHOS capacity, and were further diminished in uncoupled mitochondria respiring at electron transfer system capacity. Simultaneous measurement of mitochondrial respiration and H2O2 flux requires careful optimization of assay conditions and reveals information on mitochondrial function beyond separate analysis of ROS production.

  20. Risks and benefits of oxygen in the delivery room.

    PubMed

    Solberg, Rønnaug; Perrone, Serafina; Saugstad, Ola Didrik; Buonocore, Giuseppe

    2012-04-01

    Oxygen is an essential element of aerobic life, and oxidative metabolism represents a principal source of energy. Nevertheless, oxygen may also be toxic and mutagenic with the potential to cause damage through the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS generation can be considered a double-edged sword. Beneficial effects of ROS occur at moderate concentrations and involve physiological roles in cellular responses to noxia, as in defense against infectious agents, in the function of a number of cellular signaling pathways and the induction of a mitogenic response. The overproduction of ROS and the insufficiency of an antioxidant mechanism results in oxidative stress (OS), a deleterious process and important mediator of damage to cell structures and tissues. Newborns, especially if preterm, are particularly susceptible to OS and damage due to increased generation of ROS, the lack of adequate antioxidant protection, and the inability to induce antioxidant defenses during the hyperoxic challenge at birth. Hence the "Oxygen Paradox": higher eukaryotic aerobic organisms cannot exist without oxygen and without OS, yet oxygen and ROS are dangerous to their existence. Originally, the oxygen paradox described that the injury was aggravated by giving oxygen after hypoxia. Today, we know this is caused by production of oxygen radicals. Therefore, it is mandatory in the handling of newborns to use oxygen as a medication when clinical surveillance indicates a need.

  1. [Management of oxygen delivery and consumption during sepsis].

    PubMed

    Regueira, Tomas; Andresen, Max

    2010-02-01

    Maintaining an adequate tissue oxygen delivery (DO(2)) and consumption (VO(2)) is crucial in the treatment of septic patients. A fall in V0(2) is associated with a higher mortality. The early recognition of shock or tissue hypo perfusion impacts on patient prognosis. In occasions, hypovolemia or important regional oxygen debts are not recognized, since macro homodynamic variables have been compensated. In this situation, the use of metabolic hypo perfusion markers such as lactate, central venous oxygen saturation and gastric goniometry, can be helpful. However, interpretation of these markers should be cautious and always considering the overall clinical status of the patient. In the initial stages of sepsis, the dependency of V0(2) on DO(2) predominates as histopathological mechanism of multiple organic failure. In late stages, other factors predominate as determinants of multiple organic failure and mortality, such as hyper or hypo immune response, microcirculatory alterations and cytopathic hypoxia.

  2. Measurement of parenchymal extravascular R2* and tissue oxygen extraction fraction using multi-echo vascular space occupancy MRI at 7 T.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ying; van Zijl, Peter C M; Hua, Jun

    2015-02-01

    Parenchymal extravascular R2* is an important parameter for quantitative blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) studies. Total and intravascular R2* values and changes in R2* values during functional stimulations have been reported in a number of studies. The purpose of this study was to measure absolute extravascular R2* values in human visual cortex and to estimate the intra- and extravascular contributions to the BOLD effect at 7 T. Vascular space occupancy (VASO) MRI was employed to separate out the extravascular tissue signal. Multi-echo VASO and BOLD functional MRI (fMRI) with visual stimulation were performed at 7 T for R2* measurement at a spatial resolution of 2.5 × 2.5 × 2.5 mm(3) in healthy volunteers (n = 6). The ratio of changes in extravascular and total R2* (ΔR2*) was used to estimate the extravascular fraction of the BOLD effect. Extravascular R2* values were found to be 44.66 ± 1.55 and 43.38 ± 1.51 s(-1) (mean ± standard error of the mean, n = 6) at rest and activation, respectively, in human visual cortex at 7 T. The extravascular BOLD fraction was estimated to be 91 ± 3%. The parenchymal oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) during activation was estimated to be 0.24 ± 0.01 based on the R2* measurements, indicating an approximately 37% decrease compared with OEF at rest.

  3. Understanding the pelvic pain mechanism is key to find an adequate therapeutic approach.

    PubMed

    Van Kerrebroeck, Philip

    2016-06-25

    Pain is a natural mechanism to actual or potential tissue damage and involves both a sensory and an emotional experience. In chronic pelvic pain, localisation of pain can be widespread and can cause considerable distress. A multidisciplinary approach is needed in order to fully understand the pelvic pain mechanism and to identify an adequate therapeutic approach.

  4. A prospective, randomized, controlled study of hyperbaric oxygen therapy: effects on healing and oxidative stress of ulcer tissue in patients with a diabetic foot ulcer.

    PubMed

    Ma, Le; Li, Pingsong; Shi, Zehong; Hou, Tuanjie; Chen, Xiao; Du, Jin

    2013-03-01

    Although hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy has been reported to help heal chronic foot ulcers in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), production of HBO-related oxidative stress is a concern. To assess the therapeutic effect and oxidative stress of HBO, a 2-week, prospective, randomized, controlled clinical study was conducted from January 1, 2010 to January1, 2012 among 36 consecutively admitted patients with diabetic foot ulcers (DFU). Average patient age was 60.08 ± 5.97 years and average DM duration was 16.4 ± 11.3 years; 86.1% had type 2 DM, and 47.2% had Wagner grade-III foot ulcers. Patients randomized to the control group (n = 18) received standard care including offloading, wound debridement, and glucose control. HBO treatment group patients (n = 18) received standard care and twice-daily HBO sessions for 90 minutes at 2.5 atmospheres absolute (ATA) 5 days a week for 2 weeks. Transcutaneous oxygen pressure (TcPo2) at the edge of the ulcer and wound size were measured at baseline and after 7 and 14 days of treatment. Ulcer tissues were harvested on days 7 and 14 to determine oxidative stress by measuring malondialdehyde (MDA) and antioxidant enzyme (superoxide dismutase [SOD], catalase [CAT], and glutathione peroxidase [GPx]) levels. Compared to baseline, TcPo2 in the HBO group increased on day 7 (477.8 ± 118.2 mm Hg versus 37.06 ± 5.23 mm Hg, P <0.01) and day 14 (501.1 ± 137.7 mm Hg versus 35.61 ± 4.85 mm Hg, P <0.01). Ulcer size reduction in the HBO group was greater than that of the control group (42.4% ± 20.0% versus 18.1% ± 6.5%, P <0.05). MDA levels, SOD, and CAT were all significantly higher in the HBO than in the control group on day 14 (P<0.05). The results of this study suggest HBO treatment for 2 weeks initiates a healing response in chronic DFUs, but the observed oxidative stress in local ulcer tissue may offset this effect long-term. Until needed additional research has been conducted, prolonged and/or inappropriate HBO treatment should

  5. Wound Healing Essentials: Let There Be Oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Chandan K.

    2009-01-01

    The state of wound oxygenation is a key determinant of healing outcomes. From a diagnostic standpoint, measurements of wound oxygenation are commonly used to guide treatment planning such as amputation decision. In preventive applications, optimizing wound perfusion and providing supplemental O2 in the peri-operative period reduces the incidence of post-operative infections. Correction of wound pO2 may, by itself, trigger some healing responses. Importantly, approaches to correct wound pO2 favorably influence outcomes of other therapies such as responsiveness to growth factors and acceptance of grafts. Chronic ischemic wounds are essentially hypoxic. Primarily based on the tumor literature, hypoxia is generally viewed as being angiogenic. This is true with the condition that hypoxia be acute and mild to modest in magnitude. Extreme near-anoxic hypoxia, as commonly noted in problem wounds, is not compatible with tissue repair. Adequate wound tissue oxygenation is required but may not be sufficient to favorably influence healing outcomes. Success in wound care may be improved by a personalized health care approach. The key lies in our ability to specifically identify the key limitations of a given wound and in developing a multifaceted strategy to specifically address those limitations. In considering approaches to oxygenate the wound tissue it is important to recognize that both too little as well as too much may impede the healing process. Oxygen dosing based on the specific need of a wound therefore seems prudent. Therapeutic approaches targeting the oxygen sensing and redox signaling pathways are promising. PMID:19152646

  6. Identification in pituitary tissue of a peptide alpha-amidation activity that acts on glycine-extended peptides and requires molecular oxygen, copper, and ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Eipper, B A; Mains, R E; Glembotski, C C

    1983-08-01

    An enzymatic activity capable of producing an alpha-amidated peptide product from its glycine-extended precursor has been identified in secretory granules of rat anterior, intermediate, and neural pituitary and bovine intermediate pituitary. High levels of endogenous inhibitors of this alpha-amidation activity have also been found in tissue homogenates. The alpha-amidation activity is totally inhibited by addition of divalent metal ion chelators such as diethyldithiocarbamate, o-phenanthroline, and EDTA; alpha-amidation activity is restored to above control levels upon addition of copper. The alpha-amidation reaction requires the presence of molecular oxygen. Of the various cofactors tested, ascorbic acid was the most potent stimulator of alpha-amidation. The alpha-amidation activity has a neutral pH optimum and is primarily soluble following several cycles of freezing and thawing. Kinetic studies with the bovine intermediate pituitary granule-associated activity demonstrated a linear Lineweaver-Burk plot when D-Tyr-Val-Gly was the varied substrate; the apparent Km and Vmax varied with the concentration of ascorbic acid. The substrate specificity of the alpha-amidation activity appears to be quite broad; the conversion of D-Tyr-Val-Gly into D-Tyr-Val-NH2 is inhibited by the addition of a variety of glycine-extended peptides.

  7. Plants as biofactories: physiological role of reactive oxygen species on the accumulation of phenolic antioxidants in carrot tissue under wounding and hyperoxia stress.

    PubMed

    Jacobo-Velázquez, Daniel A; Martínez-Hernández, Ginés B; Del C Rodríguez, Silvia; Cao, Cong-Mei; Cisneros-Zevallos, Luis

    2011-06-22

    Plants subjected to postharvest abiotic stresses synthesize secondary metabolites with health-promoting properties. Here, we report the potential use of carrots (Daucus carota) as biofactories of caffeoylquinic acids when subjected to wounding and hyperoxia stresses. Wounding stress induced an increase of ∼287% in total phenolic content (PC) in carrots stored for 48 h at 20 °C. This increase was higher (∼349%) in the wounded tissue treated with hyperoxia stress. To further understand the physiological role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a signaling molecule for the stress-induced accumulation of phenolics in carrots, the respiration rate as well as the enzymatic activities of NADPH oxidase, superoxide dismutase, ascorbate peroxidase, and catalase were evaluated. Likewise, shredded carrots were treated with diphenyleneiodonium chloride solution to block NADPH oxidase ROS productions, and the phenylalanine ammonia lyase activity and total PC were evaluated. Results demonstrated that ROS play a key role as a signaling molecule for the stress-induced accumulation of PC in carrots.

  8. 40 CFR 51.354 - Adequate tools and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Adequate tools and resources. 51.354... Requirements § 51.354 Adequate tools and resources. (a) Administrative resources. The program shall maintain the administrative resources necessary to perform all of the program functions including...

  9. 40 CFR 51.354 - Adequate tools and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Adequate tools and resources. 51.354... Requirements § 51.354 Adequate tools and resources. (a) Administrative resources. The program shall maintain the administrative resources necessary to perform all of the program functions including...

  10. 40 CFR 51.354 - Adequate tools and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Adequate tools and resources. 51.354... Requirements § 51.354 Adequate tools and resources. (a) Administrative resources. The program shall maintain the administrative resources necessary to perform all of the program functions including...

  11. 10 CFR 1304.114 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. 1304.114 Section 1304.114 Energy NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 1304.114 Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. The Board has the responsibility for maintaining...

  12. 13 CFR 108.200 - Adequate capital for NMVC Companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... VENTURE CAPITAL (âNMVCâ) PROGRAM Qualifications for the NMVC Program Capitalizing A Nmvc Company § 108.200 Adequate capital for NMVC Companies. You must meet the requirements of §§ 108.200-108.230 in order to... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Adequate capital for...

  13. 34 CFR 200.20 - Making adequate yearly progress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Making adequate yearly progress. 200.20 Section 200.20... Basic Programs Operated by Local Educational Agencies Adequate Yearly Progress (ayp) § 200.20 Making... State data system; (vi) Include, as separate factors in determining whether schools are making AYP for...

  14. 34 CFR 200.20 - Making adequate yearly progress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Making adequate yearly progress. 200.20 Section 200.20... Basic Programs Operated by Local Educational Agencies Adequate Yearly Progress (ayp) § 200.20 Making... State data system; (vi) Include, as separate factors in determining whether schools are making AYP for...

  15. 34 CFR 200.20 - Making adequate yearly progress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Making adequate yearly progress. 200.20 Section 200.20... Basic Programs Operated by Local Educational Agencies Adequate Yearly Progress (ayp) § 200.20 Making... State data system; (vi) Include, as separate factors in determining whether schools are making AYP for...

  16. 34 CFR 200.20 - Making adequate yearly progress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Making adequate yearly progress. 200.20 Section 200.20... Basic Programs Operated by Local Educational Agencies Adequate Yearly Progress (ayp) § 200.20 Making... State data system; (vi) Include, as separate factors in determining whether schools are making AYP for...

  17. 34 CFR 200.20 - Making adequate yearly progress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Making adequate yearly progress. 200.20 Section 200.20... Basic Programs Operated by Local Educational Agencies Adequate Yearly Progress (ayp) § 200.20 Making... State data system; (vi) Include, as separate factors in determining whether schools are making AYP for...

  18. 40 CFR 716.25 - Adequate file search.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Adequate file search. 716.25 Section... ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING General Provisions § 716.25 Adequate file search. The scope of a person's responsibility to search records is limited to records in the location(s) where the...

  19. 40 CFR 716.25 - Adequate file search.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Adequate file search. 716.25 Section... ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING General Provisions § 716.25 Adequate file search. The scope of a person's responsibility to search records is limited to records in the location(s) where the...

  20. 40 CFR 716.25 - Adequate file search.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Adequate file search. 716.25 Section... ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING General Provisions § 716.25 Adequate file search. The scope of a person's responsibility to search records is limited to records in the location(s) where the...

  1. 40 CFR 716.25 - Adequate file search.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Adequate file search. 716.25 Section... ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING General Provisions § 716.25 Adequate file search. The scope of a person's responsibility to search records is limited to records in the location(s) where the...

  2. 40 CFR 716.25 - Adequate file search.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Adequate file search. 716.25 Section... ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING General Provisions § 716.25 Adequate file search. The scope of a person's responsibility to search records is limited to records in the location(s) where the...

  3. 9 CFR 305.3 - Sanitation and adequate facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sanitation and adequate facilities. 305.3 Section 305.3 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... OF VIOLATION § 305.3 Sanitation and adequate facilities. Inspection shall not be inaugurated if...

  4. 9 CFR 305.3 - Sanitation and adequate facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Sanitation and adequate facilities. 305.3 Section 305.3 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... OF VIOLATION § 305.3 Sanitation and adequate facilities. Inspection shall not be inaugurated if...

  5. 40 CFR 51.354 - Adequate tools and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Adequate tools and resources. 51.354... Requirements § 51.354 Adequate tools and resources. (a) Administrative resources. The program shall maintain the administrative resources necessary to perform all of the program functions including...

  6. 40 CFR 51.354 - Adequate tools and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Adequate tools and resources. 51.354... Requirements § 51.354 Adequate tools and resources. (a) Administrative resources. The program shall maintain the administrative resources necessary to perform all of the program functions including...

  7. 10 CFR 1304.114 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. 1304.114 Section 1304.114 Energy NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 1304.114 Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. The Board has the responsibility for maintaining...

  8. 10 CFR 1304.114 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. 1304.114 Section 1304.114 Energy NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 1304.114 Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. The Board has the responsibility for maintaining...

  9. 10 CFR 1304.114 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. 1304.114 Section 1304.114 Energy NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 1304.114 Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. The Board has the responsibility for maintaining...

  10. 10 CFR 1304.114 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. 1304.114 Section 1304.114 Energy NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 1304.114 Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. The Board has the responsibility for maintaining...

  11. 13 CFR 107.200 - Adequate capital for Licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Adequate capital for Licensees. 107.200 Section 107.200 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Qualifying for an SBIC License Capitalizing An Sbic § 107.200 Adequate capital...

  12. 21 CFR 201.5 - Drugs; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drugs; adequate directions for use. 201.5 Section 201.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 201.5 Drugs; adequate directions for use....

  13. 21 CFR 201.5 - Drugs; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Drugs; adequate directions for use. 201.5 Section 201.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 201.5 Drugs; adequate directions for use....

  14. 7 CFR 4290.200 - Adequate capital for RBICs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Adequate capital for RBICs. 4290.200 Section 4290.200 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE AND... Qualifications for the RBIC Program Capitalizing A Rbic § 4290.200 Adequate capital for RBICs. You must meet...

  15. "Something Adequate"? In Memoriam Seamus Heaney, Sister Quinlan, Nirbhaya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Seamus Heaney talked of poetry's responsibility to represent the "bloody miracle", the "terrible beauty" of atrocity; to create "something adequate". This article asks, what is adequate to the burning and eating of a nun and the murderous gang rape and evisceration of a medical student? It considers Njabulo…

  16. Comparison of cerebral tissue oxygenation values in full term and preterm newborns by the simultaneous use of two near-infrared spectroscopy devices: an absolute and a relative trending oximeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczapa, Tomasz; Karpiński, Łukasz; Moczko, Jerzy; Weindling, Michael; Kornacka, Alicja; Wróblewska, Katarzyna; Adamczak, Aleksandra; Jopek, Aleksandra; Chojnacka, Karolina; Gadzinowski, Janusz

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study is to compare a two-wavelength light emitting diode-based tissue oximeter (INVOS), which is designed to show trends in tissue oxygenation, with a four-wavelength laser-based oximeter (FORE-SIGHT), designed to deliver absolute values of tissue oxygenation. Simultaneous values of cerebral tissue oxygenation (StO2) are measured using both devices in 15 term and 15 preterm clinically stable newborns on the first and third day of life. Values are recorded simultaneously in two periods between which oximeter sensor positions are switched to the contralateral side. Agreement between StO2 values before and after the change of sensor position is analyzed. We find that mean cerebral StO2 values are similar between devices for term and preterm babies, but INVOS shows StO2 values spread over a wider range, with wider standard deviations than shown by the FORE-SIGHT. There is relatively good agreement with a bias up to 3.5% and limits of agreement up to 11.8%. Measurements from each side of the forehead show better repeatability for the FORE-SIGHT monitor. We conclude that performance of the two devices is probably acceptable for clinical purposes. Both performed sufficiently well, but the use of FORE-SIGHT may be associated with tighter range and better repeatability of data.

  17. Calcification rate and the stable carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen isotopes in the skeleton, host tissue, and zooxanthellae of bleached and recovering Hawaiian corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Lisa J.; Grottoli, Andréa G.

    2006-06-01

    We tested the effectiveness of stable isotopes as recorders of physiological changes that occur during coral bleaching and recovery. Montipora capitata and Porites compressa fragments were bleached in outdoor tanks with seawater temperature raised to 30 °C (treatment corals) for one month. Additional fragments were maintained at 27 °C in separate tanks (control corals). After one month, (0 months recovery), buoyant weight was measured and a subset of fragments was frozen. Remaining fragments were returned to the reef for recovery. After 1.5, 4, and 8 months, fragments were collected, measured for buoyant weight, and frozen. Fragments were analyzed for stable carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions of the skeleton (δ 13C s; δ 18O s) and nitrogen and carbon isotopic compositions of the host tissue (δ 15N h; δ 13C h) and zooxanthellae (δ 15N z; δ 13C z). δ 13C s decreased immediately after bleaching in M. capitata, but not in P. compressa. δ 18O s of both species failed to record the warming event. During the remaining months of recovery, δ 13C s and δ 18O s were more enriched in treatment than control corals due to decreases in calcification and metabolic fractionation during that time. Increased δ 15N h of treatment P. compressa may be due to expelled zooxanthellae during bleaching and recovery. Increased δ 15N z at 1.5 months in treatment fragments of both species reflects the increased incorporation of dissolved inorganic nitrogen to facilitate mitotic cell division and/or chl a/cell recovery. Changes in δ 13C h and δ 13C z at 1.5 months in treatment M. capitata indicated a large increase in heterotrophically acquired carbon relative to photosynthetically fixed carbon. We experimentally show that isotopes in coral skeleton, host tissue and zooxanthellae can be used to verify physiological changes during bleaching and recovery, but their use as a proxy for past bleaching events in the skeletal record is limited.

  18. Effects of the neurological wake-up test on clinical examination, intracranial pressure, brain metabolism and brain tissue oxygenation in severely brain-injured patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Daily interruption of sedation (IS) has been implemented in 30 to 40% of intensive care units worldwide and may improve outcome in medical intensive care patients. Little is known about the benefit of IS in acutely brain-injured patients. Methods This prospective observational study was performed in a neuroscience intensive care unit in a tertiary-care academic center. Twenty consecutive severely brain-injured patients with multimodal neuromonitoring were analyzed for levels of brain lactate, pyruvate and glucose, intracranial pressure (ICP), cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) and brain tissue oxygen tension (PbtO2) during IS trials. Results Of the 82 trial days, 54 IS-trials were performed as interruption of sedation and analgesics were not considered safe on 28 days (34%). An increase in the FOUR Score (Full Outline of UnResponsiveness score) was observed in 50% of IS-trials by a median of three (two to four) points. Detection of a new neurologic deficit occurred in one trial (2%), and in one-third of IS-trials the trial had to be stopped due to an ICP-crisis (> 20 mmHg), agitation or systemic desaturation. In IS-trials that had to be aborted, a significant increase in ICP and decrease in PbtO2 (P < 0.05), including 67% with critical values of PbtO2 < 20 mmHg, a tendency to brain metabolic distress (P < 0.07) was observed. Conclusions Interruption of sedation revealed new relevant clinical information in only one trial and a large number of trials could not be performed or had to be stopped due to safety issues. Weighing pros and cons of IS-trials in patients with acute brain injury seems important as related side effects may overcome the clinical benefit. PMID:23186037

  19. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy for Late Radiation-Associated Tissue Necroses: Is It Safe in Patients With Locoregionally Recurrent and Then Successfully Salvaged Head-and-Neck Cancers?

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, H.-Y.; Ku, C.-H.; Liu, D.-W.; Chao, H.-L.; Lin, C.-S.; Jen, Y.-M.

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: To test, in a retrospective matched-pair study, whether necrosis-rescuing hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) increases the risk of cancer re-recurrence in patients with locoregionally recurrent and then successfully salvaged head-and-neck cancers. Methods and materials: Between January 1995 and July 2004, we retrospectively identified 22 patients with locoregionally recurrent and then successfully salvaged head-and-neck cancers. We defined two groups: the HBOT group, 11 patients with HBOT for rescuing late radiation-associated tissue necroses; and the non-HBOT group, the other 11 matched-pair patients without HBOT. Between the two groups, the following four factors were matched for case pairing: primary cancer subsite, initial cancer stage, age, and gender. Results: Three findings indicate that HBOT increases the risk of cancer re-recurrence. First, we observed more cancer re-recurrences in the HBOT group than in the non-HBOT group: 9 of 11 vs. 4 of 11, with 5-year disease-free survival rates after salvage of 32.7% vs. 70.0% (hazard ratio 3.2; 95% confidence interval 1.03-10.7; p = 0.048). Second, re-recurrences developed rapidly after HBOT in 6 patients. Third, 3 patients had unusual cancer re-recurrences after HBOT. Remarkably, of 9 patients with cancer re-recurrences in the HBOT group, 4 patients had cancer disease-free intervals of 9 months or less before HBOT. Conclusions: Necrosis-rescuing HBOT should be given with caution in patients with locoregionally recurrent and then successfully salvaged head-and-neck cancers; if it cannot be omitted entirely, deferring HBOT 9 months or longer after cancer re-treatment may be prudent.

  20. Tissue hypoxia correlates with intensity of interictal spikes

    PubMed Central

    Geneslaw, Andrew S; Zhao, Mingrui; Ma, Hongtao; Schwartz, Theodore H

    2011-01-01

    Interictal spikes (IISs) represent burst firing of a small focal population of hypersynchronous, hyperexcitable cells. Whether cerebral blood flow (CBF) is adequate to meet the metabolic demands of this dramatic increase in membrane excitability is unknown. Positron emission tomography, single photon emission computed tomography, and functional magnetic resonance imaging studies have shown increases in CBF and hypometabolism, thus indicating the likelihood of adequate perfusion. We measured tissue oxygenation and CBF in a rat model of IIS using oxygen electrodes and laser-Doppler flowmetry. A ∼3-second dip in tissue oxygenation was shown, followed by more prolonged tissue hyperoxygenation, in spite of a 25% increase in CBF. Increases in the number of spikes, as well as in their amplitude and spike width further amplified these responses, and a decrease in interspike interval decreased the CBF response. Altering the anesthetic did not influence our results. Taken together, these findings indicate that frequent, high-amplitude IISs may produce significant tissue hypoxia, which has implications for patients with epilepsy and noninvasive techniques of seizure localization. PMID:21343943

  1. Oxygen Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    Oxygen therapy is a treatment that provides you with extra oxygen. Oxygen is a gas that your body needs to function. Normally, your lungs absorb ... in your home. A different kind of oxygen therapy is called hyperbaric oxygen therapy. It uses oxygen ...

  2. Understanding Your Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP), 2011-2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The "No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) of 2001" requires all schools, districts/local education agencies (LEAs) and states to show that students are making Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP). NCLB requires states to establish targets in the following ways: (1) Annual Proficiency Target; (2) Attendance/Graduation Rates; and (3) Participation Rates.…

  3. 15 CFR 970.404 - Adequate exploration plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Adequate exploration plan. 970.404...) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL REGULATIONS OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR EXPLORATION LICENSES Certification of...

  4. 15 CFR 970.404 - Adequate exploration plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Adequate exploration plan. 970.404...) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL REGULATIONS OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR EXPLORATION LICENSES Certification of...

  5. 15 CFR 970.404 - Adequate exploration plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Adequate exploration plan. 970.404...) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL REGULATIONS OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR EXPLORATION LICENSES Certification of...

  6. 15 CFR 970.404 - Adequate exploration plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Adequate exploration plan. 970.404...) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL REGULATIONS OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR EXPLORATION LICENSES Certification of...

  7. 15 CFR 970.404 - Adequate exploration plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Adequate exploration plan. 970.404...) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL REGULATIONS OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR EXPLORATION LICENSES Certification of...

  8. Adequate Schools and Inadequate Education: An Anthropological Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolcott, Harry F.

    To illustrate his claim that schools generally do a remarkably good job of schooling while the society makes inadequate use of other means to educate young people, the author presents a case history of a young American (identified pseudonymously as "Brad") whose schooling was adequate but whose education was not. Brad, jobless and homeless,…

  9. Comparability and Reliability Considerations of Adequate Yearly Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maier, Kimberly S.; Maiti, Tapabrata; Dass, Sarat C.; Lim, Chae Young

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop an estimate of Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) that will allow for reliable and valid comparisons among student subgroups, schools, and districts. A shrinkage-type estimator of AYP using the Bayesian framework is described. Using simulated data, the performance of the Bayes estimator will be compared to…

  10. 13 CFR 107.200 - Adequate capital for Licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Adequate capital for Licensees. 107.200 Section 107.200 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS... operate actively in accordance with your Articles and within the context of your business plan,...

  11. Assessing Juvenile Sex Offenders to Determine Adequate Levels of Supervision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerdes, Karen E.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    This study analyzed the internal consistency of four inventories used by Utah probation officers to determine adequate and efficacious supervision levels and placement for juvenile sex offenders. Three factors accounted for 41.2 percent of variance (custodian's and juvenile's attitude toward intervention, offense characteristics, and historical…

  12. 4 CFR 200.14 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... identifiable personal data and automated systems shall be adequately trained in the security and privacy of... records in which identifiable personal data are processed or maintained, including all reports and output... personal records or data; must minimize, to the extent practicable, the risk that skilled technicians...

  13. Do Beginning Teachers Receive Adequate Support from Their Headteachers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menon, Maria Eliophotou

    2012-01-01

    The article examines the problems faced by beginning teachers in Cyprus and the extent to which headteachers are considered to provide adequate guidance and support to them. Data were collected through interviews with 25 school teachers in Cyprus, who had recently entered teaching (within 1-5 years) in public primary schools. According to the…

  14. Modelling the effects of cerebral microvasculature morphology on oxygen transport

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chang Sub; Payne, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    The cerebral microvasculature plays a vital role in adequately supplying blood to the brain. Determining the health of the cerebral microvasculature is important during pathological conditions, such as stroke and dementia. Recent studies have shown the complex relationship between cerebral metabolic rate and transit time distribution, the transit times of all the possible pathways available dependent on network topology. In this paper, we extend a recently developed technique to solve for residue function, the amount of tracer left in the vasculature at any time, and transit time distribution in an existing model of the cerebral microvasculature to calculate cerebral metabolism. We present the mathematical theory needed to solve for oxygen concentration followed by results of the simulations. It is found that oxygen extraction fraction, the fraction of oxygen removed from the blood in the capillary network by the tissue, and cerebral metabolic rate are dependent on both mean and heterogeneity of the transit time distribution. For changes in cerebral blood flow, a positive correlation can be observed between mean transit time and oxygen extraction fraction, and a negative correlation between mean transit time and metabolic rate of oxygen. A negative correlation can also be observed between transit time heterogeneity and the metabolic rate of oxygen for a constant cerebral blood flow. A sensitivity analysis on the mean and heterogeneity of the transit time distribution was able to quantify their respective contributions to oxygen extraction fraction and metabolic rate of oxygen. Mean transit time has a greater contribution than the heterogeneity for oxygen extraction fraction. This is found to be opposite for metabolic rate of oxygen. These results provide information on the role of the cerebral microvasculature and its effects on flow and metabolism. They thus open up the possibility of obtaining additional valuable clinical information for diagnosing and treating

  15. Modelling the effects of cerebral microvasculature morphology on oxygen transport.

    PubMed

    Park, Chang Sub; Payne, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    The cerebral microvasculature plays a vital role in adequately supplying blood to the brain. Determining the health of the cerebral microvasculature is important during pathological conditions, such as stroke and dementia. Recent studies have shown the complex relationship between cerebral metabolic rate and transit time distribution, the transit times of all the possible pathways available dependent on network topology. In this paper, we extend a recently developed technique to solve for residue function, the amount of tracer left in the vasculature at any time, and transit time distribution in an existing model of the cerebral microvasculature to calculate cerebral metabolism. We present the mathematical theory needed to solve for oxygen concentration followed by results of the simulations. It is found that oxygen extraction fraction, the fraction of oxygen removed from the blood in the capillary network by the tissue, and cerebral metabolic rate are dependent on both mean and heterogeneity of the transit time distribution. For changes in cerebral blood flow, a positive correlation can be observed between mean transit time and oxygen extraction fraction, and a negative correlation between mean transit time and metabolic rate of oxygen. A negative correlation can also be observed between transit time heterogeneity and the metabolic rate of oxygen for a constant cerebral blood flow. A sensitivity analysis on the mean and heterogeneity of the transit time distribution was able to quantify their respective contributions to oxygen extraction fraction and metabolic rate of oxygen. Mean transit time has a greater contribution than the heterogeneity for oxygen extraction fraction. This is found to be opposite for metabolic rate of oxygen. These results provide information on the role of the cerebral microvasculature and its effects on flow and metabolism. They thus open up the possibility of obtaining additional valuable clinical information for diagnosing and treating

  16. Improved ASTM G72 Test Method for Ensuring Adequate Fuel-to-Oxidizer Ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juarez, Alfredo; Harper, Susana Tapia

    2016-01-01

    The ASTM G72/G72M-15 Standard Test Method for Autogenous Ignition Temperature of Liquids and Solids in a High-Pressure Oxygen-Enriched Environment is currently used to evaluate materials for the ignition susceptibility driven by exposure to external heat in an enriched oxygen environment. Testing performed on highly volatile liquids such as cleaning solvents has proven problematic due to inconsistent test results (non-ignitions). Non-ignition results can be misinterpreted as favorable oxygen compatibility, although they are more likely associated with inadequate fuel-to-oxidizer ratios. Forced evaporation during purging and inadequate sample size were identified as two potential causes for inadequate available sample material during testing. In an effort to maintain adequate fuel-to-oxidizer ratios within the reaction vessel during test, several parameters were considered, including sample size, pretest sample chilling, pretest purging, and test pressure. Tests on a variety of solvents exhibiting a range of volatilities are presented in this paper. A proposed improvement to the standard test protocol as a result of this evaluation is also presented. Execution of the final proposed improved test protocol outlines an incremental step method of determining optimal conditions using increased sample sizes while considering test system safety limits. The proposed improved test method increases confidence in results obtained by utilizing the ASTM G72 autogenous ignition temperature test method and can aid in the oxygen compatibility assessment of highly volatile liquids and other conditions that may lead to false non-ignition results.

  17. Monitoring oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Severinghaus, John W

    2011-06-01

    Cyanosis was used for a century after dentists began pulling teeth under 100% N(2)O in 1844 because brief (2 min) severe hypoxia is harmless. Deaths came with curare and potent anesthetic respiratory arrest. Leland Clark's invention of a polarographic blood oxygen tension electrode (1954) was introduced for transcutaneous PO2 monitoring to adjust PEEP and CPAP PO2 to prevent premature infant blindness from excess O2 (1972). Oximetry for warning military aviators was tried after WW II but not used for routine monitoring until Takuo Aoyagi (1973) discovered an equation to measure SaO2 by the ratio of ratios of red and IR light transmitted through tissue as it changed with arterial pulses. Pulse oximetry (1982) depended on simultaneous technology improvements of light emitting red and IR diodes, tiny cheap solid state sensors and micro-chip computers. Continuous monitoring of airway anesthetic concentration and oxygen also became very common after 1980. Death from anesthesia fell 10 fold between 1985 and 2000 as pulse oximetry became universally used, but no proof of a causative relationship to pulse oximetry exists. It is now assumed that all anesthesiologist became much more aware of the dangers of prolonged hypoxia, perhaps by using the pulse oximeters. PMID:21717228

  18. Scaffold porosity and oxygenation of printed hydrogel constructs affect functionality of embedded osteogenic progenitors.

    PubMed

    Fedorovich, Natalja E; Kuipers, Elske; Gawlitta, Debby; Dhert, Wouter J A; Alblas, Jacqueline

    2011-10-01

    Insufficient supply of oxygen and nutrients throughout the graft is considered one of the principal limitations in development of large, tissue-engineered bone grafts. Organ or tissue printing by means of three-dimensional (3D) fiber deposition is a novel modality in regenerative medicine that combines pore formation and defined cell placement, and is used here for development of cell-laden hydrogel structures with reproducible internal architecture to sustain oxygen supply and to support adequate tissue development. In this study we tested the effect of porosity on multipotent stromal cells (MSCs) embedded in hydrogel constructs printed with a 3D fiber deposition (3DF) machine. For this, porous and solid alginate hydrogel scaffolds, with MSCs homogeneously dispersed throughout the construct, were printed and analyzed in vitro for the presence of hypoxia markers, metabolism, survival, and osteogenic differentiation. We demonstrated that porosity promotes oxygenation of MSCs in printed hydrogel scaffolds and supported the viability and osteogenic differentiation of embedded cells. Porous and solid printed constructs were subsequently implanted subcutaneously in immunodeficient mice to analyze tissue formation in relation to hypoxia responses of embedded cells. Implantation of printed grafts resulted in ingrowth of vascularized tissue and significantly enhanced oxygenation of embedded MSCs. In conclusion, the introduction of pores significantly enhances the conductive properties of printed hydrogel constructs and contributes to the functionality of embedded osteogenic progenitors.

  19. Isolation-hypoxia and re-oxygenation of the pallial cavity of female Crepipatella dilatata during estuarine salinity changes requires increased glyoxylase activity and antioxidant metabolism to avoid oxidative damage to female tissues and developing embryos.

    PubMed

    Cubillos, Víctor; Chaparro, Oscar; Segura, Cristian; Montory, Jaime; Cruces, Edgardo; Burritt, David

    2016-08-01

    The estuarine slipper limpet Crepipatella dilatata is a gastropod that can survive prolonged periods of low salinities (< 24 PSU) caused by tidal changes and/or prolonged periods of rain. During low salinity events, C. dilatata can isolate its body from the outside environment, by sealing its shell against the substrate on which it grows. Prolonged isolation periods from the surrounding environment can greatly lower available oxygen levels inside of the pallial cavity, impacting on the physiology of both females and their incubated encapsulated embryos. When salinity levels return to normal, isolation is terminated and the inflow of seawater results in re-oxygenation. In this study we show that when re-oxygenation of the pallial cavity takes place, oxidative damage, in the form of increased levels of lipid peroxides and protein carbonyls, occurs in both maternal tissues and in incubated embryos. To avoid terminal oxidative damage both females and their embryos increase their levels of the glyoxalase pathway enzymes (GLX-I and GLX-II) and general antioxidant metabolism (SOD, CAT, GR, GPOX and GST). As a result the levels of oxidative damage decline to basal levels within 24 h of reoxygenation. Thus the combination of isolation, a behavioural strategy, combined with encapsulation of embryos and a capacity to up regulate relatively rapidly the glyoxylase pathway and general antioxidant metabolism, play major roles in facilitating the survival of C. dilatata in the small estuaries of Southern Chile. PMID:27232979

  20. [Abdominal cure procedures. Adequate use of Nobecutan Spray].

    PubMed

    López Soto, Rosa María

    2009-12-01

    Open abdominal wounds, complicated by infection and/or risk of eventration tend to become chronic and usually require frequent prolonged cure. Habitual changing of bandages develop into one of the clearest risk factors leading to the deterioration of perilesional cutaneous integrity. This brings with it new complications which draw out the evolution of the process, provoking an important deterioration in quality of life for the person who suffers this and a considerable increase in health costs. What is needed is a product and a procedure which control the risk of irritation, which protect the skin, which favor a patient's comfort and which shorten treatment requirements while lowering health care expenses. This report invites medical personnel to think seriously about the scientific rationale, and treatment practice, as to why and how to apply Nobecutan adequately, this reports concludes stating the benefits in the adequate use of this product. The objective of this report is to guarantee the adequate use of this product in treatment of complicated abdominal wounds. This product responds to the needs which are present in these clinical cases favoring skin care apt isolation and protection, while at the same time, facilitating the placement and stability of dressings and bandages used to cure wounds. In order for this to happen, the correct use of this product is essential; medical personnel must pay attention to precautions and recommendations for proper application. The author's experiences in habitual handling of this product during various years, included in the procedures for standardized cures for these wounds, corroborates its usefulness; the author considers use of this product to be highly effective while being simple to apply; furthermore, one succeeds in providing quality care and optimizes resources employed.

  1. Oxygen in the delivery room.

    PubMed

    Cernada, María; Cubells, Elena; Torres-Cuevas, Isabel; Kuligowski, Julia; Escobar, Javier; Aguar, Marta; Escrig, Raquel; Vento, Maximo

    2013-06-01

    Immediately after birth the newly born infant aerates the lungs, diminishes pulmonary vascular resistance, and initiates gas exchange. However, under certain circumstances this process will not be adequately accomplished. Asphyxia is characterized by periods of hypoxia and ischemia leading frequently to hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. The mainstay of newborn resuscitation resides in the establishment of a functional residual capacity and an adequate oxygenation. Recent guidelines have established guidelines which provide counsel on the use of oxygen in term infants. However, preterm oxygenation in the delivery room (DR) has only been defined very vaguely. Herewith, we will address available information regarding the use of oxygen supplementation in the DR both in term and preterm babies for a satisfactory postnatal adaptation. PMID:23809339

  2. Quantifying dose to the reconstructed breast: Can we adequately treat?

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Eugene; Marsh, Robin B.; Griffith, Kent A.; Moran, Jean M.; Pierce, Lori J.

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate how immediate reconstruction (IR) impacts postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) dose distributions to the reconstructed breast (RB), internal mammary nodes (IMN), heart, and lungs using quantifiable dosimetric end points. 3D conformal plans were developed for 20 IR patients, 10 autologous reconstruction (AR), and 10 expander-implant (EI) reconstruction. For each reconstruction type, 5 right- and 5 left-sided reconstructions were selected. Two plans were created for each patient, 1 with RB coverage alone and 1 with RB + IMN coverage. Left-sided EI plans without IMN coverage had higher heart Dmean than left-sided AR plans (2.97 and 0.84 Gy, p = 0.03). Otherwise, results did not vary by reconstruction type and all remaining metrics were evaluated using a combined AR and EI dataset. RB coverage was adequate regardless of laterality or IMN coverage (Dmean 50.61 Gy, D95 45.76 Gy). When included, IMN Dmean and D95 were 49.57 and 40.96 Gy, respectively. Mean heart doses increased with left-sided treatment plans and IMN inclusion. Right-sided treatment plans and IMN inclusion increased mean lung V{sub 20}. Using standard field arrangements and 3D planning, we observed excellent coverage of the RB and IMN, regardless of laterality or reconstruction type. Our results demonstrate that adequate doses can be delivered to the RB with or without IMN coverage.

  3. Oxygen in demand: How oxygen has shaped vertebrate physiology.

    PubMed

    Dzal, Yvonne A; Jenkin, Sarah E M; Lague, Sabine L; Reichert, Michelle N; York, Julia M; Pamenter, Matthew E

    2015-08-01

    In response to varying environmental and physiological challenges, vertebrates have evolved complex and often overlapping systems. These systems detect changes in environmental oxygen availability and respond by increasing oxygen supply to the tissues and/or by decreasing oxygen demand at the cellular level. This suite of responses is termed the oxygen transport cascade and is comprised of several components. These components include 1) chemosensory detectors that sense changes in oxygen, carbon dioxide, and pH in the blood, and initiate changes in 2) ventilation and 3) cardiac work, thereby altering the rate of oxygen delivery to, and carbon dioxide clearance from, the tissues. In addition, changes in 4) cellular and systemic metabolism alters tissue-level metabolic demand. Thus the need for oxygen can be managed locally when increasing oxygen supply is not sufficient or possible. Together, these mechanisms provide a spectrum of responses that facilitate the maintenance of systemic oxygen homeostasis in the face of environmental hypoxia or physiological oxygen depletion (i.e. due to exercise or disease). Bill Milsom has dedicated his career to the study of these responses across phylogenies, repeatedly demonstrating the power of applying the comparative approach to physiological questions. The focus of this review is to discuss the anatomy, signalling pathways, and mechanics of each step of the oxygen transport cascade from the perspective of a Milsomite. That is, by taking into account the developmental, physiological, and evolutionary components of questions related to oxygen transport. We also highlight examples of some of the remarkable species that have captured Bill's attention through their unique adaptations in multiple components of the oxygen transport cascade, which allow them to achieve astounding physiological feats. Bill's research examining the oxygen transport cascade has provided important insight and leadership to the study of the diverse suite

  4. Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Measurement of Abdominal Tissue Oxygenation is a Useful Indicator of Intestinal Blood Flow and Necrotizing Enterocolitis in Premature Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Andre N.; Lazar, David A.; Stoll, Barbara; Naik-Mathuria, Bindi; Mushin, Oren P.; Rodriguez, Manuel A.; Burrin, Doug; Olutoye, Oluyinka

    2011-01-01

    Purpose A major objective of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) research is to devise a non-invasive method of early detection. We hypothesized that abdominal near-infrared spectroscopy (A-NIRS) readings will identify impending NEC in a large animal model. Methods Piglets were prematurely delivered and received parenteral nutrition followed by enteral feedings. Serial A-NIRS readings were obtained for five days, and animals were monitored for NEC. Separately, A-NIRS readings were obtained in healthy piglets to validate the correlation of A-NIRS with splanchnic oxygen delivery. Results Three of twenty-nine piglets developed NEC. Eleven piglets without NEC died prematurely. Fifteen piglets remained healthy, had normal histologic assessment of their intestines, and served as controls. A-NIRS readings within twelve hours of birth were significantly lower in animals that developed NEC compared to healthy littermates (4% vs 33%, p=0.02). For all time-points measured, ANIRS readings were significantly lower in NEC group compared to controls (21% vs 55%, p<0.001). A-NIRS readings correlated with both decreased pulse oximetry readings during apneic episodes (r=0.96) and increased superior mesenteric artery flow in response to glucagon-like peptide-2 (r=0.67). Conclusion A-NIRS is capable of detecting alterations in intestinal oxygenation and perfusion in neonatal piglets and may allow early detection of neonates at risk for NEC. PMID:21683194

  5. Choices for achieving adequate dietary calcium with a vegetarian diet.

    PubMed

    Weaver, C M; Proulx, W R; Heaney, R

    1999-09-01

    To achieve adequate dietary calcium intake, several choices are available that accommodate a variety of lifestyles and tastes. Liberal consumption of dairy products in the diet is the approach of most Americans. Some plants provide absorbable calcium, but the quantity of vegetables required to reach sufficient calcium intake make an exclusively plant-based diet impractical for most individuals unless fortified foods or supplements are included. Also, dietary constituents that decrease calcium retention, such as salt, protein, and caffeine, can be high in the vegetarian diet. Although it is possible to obtain calcium balance from a plant-based diet in a Western lifestyle, it may be more convenient to achieve calcium balance by increasing calcium consumption than by limiting other dietary factors.

  6. Genetic Modification of Preimplantation Embryos: Toward Adequate Human Research Policies

    PubMed Central

    Dresser, Rebecca

    2004-01-01

    Citing advances in transgenic animal research and setbacks in human trials of somatic cell genetic interventions, some scientists and others want to begin planning for research involving the genetic modification of human embryos. Because this form of genetic modification could affect later-born children and their offspring, the protection of human subjects should be a priority in decisions about whether to proceed with such research. Yet because of gaps in existing federal policies, embryo modification proposals might not receive adequate scientific and ethical scrutiny. This article describes current policy shortcomings and recommends policy actions designed to ensure that the investigational genetic modification of embryos meets accepted standards for research on human subjects. PMID:15016248

  7. Effect of Feeding On The Carbon and Oxygen Isotopic Composition In The Tissues and Skeleton of The Zooxanthellate Coral Stylophora Pistillata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynaud-Vaganay, S.; Ferrier-Pagès, C.; Sambrotto, R.; Juillet-Leclerc, A.; Jaubert, J.

    and J.-P. Gattuso4 1Centre Scientifique de Monaco, Avenue Saint Martin, MC-98000, Principality of Monaco 2Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, 61 Rt. 9W/ P.O. Box 1000, Palisades, NY 10964 U.S.A 3Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement, Laboratoire mixte CNRS- CEA, F-91180 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex, France 4Observatoire Océanologique, Laboratoire d'Océanographie, CNRS-UPMC, BP 28, F- 06234 Villefranche-sur-mer Cedex, France The effect of feeding on the carbon isotopic composition of zooxanthellae, animal tissue and skeleton was investigated in the scleractinian coral Stylophora pistillata. Two sets of corals were grown with filtered seawater under controlled conditions. One group of colonies was fed with Artemia nauplii and compared to a control group that was starved. Fed corals exhibited higher concentrations of chlorophyll protein calcification rates than starved colonies. The net photosynthetic rate was higher in starved than in fed corals, whereas dark respiration was not significantly different. The average ? C value of Artemia nauplii used for feeding was -12. ? C was 13 13 significantly heavier in zooxanthellae than in animal tissues, for both fed (-10.1vs. -11.7) and starved colonies (-10.9vs. -13.2). Isotopic data reflected the incorporation of Artemia carbon into the coral tissue in that the ? C was 13 significantly heavier in fed than in starved colonies (-11.7 to -13.2 respectively), although there was no difference in the ? C of the zooxanthellae fraction. Skeletal 13 ? C was similar in fed and starved colonies (mean = -4.6). Skeletal ? O 13 18 composition was, however, significantly different between the two treatments (-4.24 to -4.05 for fed and starved colonies respectively). These data are used to establish a conceptual model of the carbon flow between the various compartments of a symbiotic coral.

  8. Oxygen transport by hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Mairbäurl, Heimo; Weber, Roy E

    2012-04-01

    Hemoglobin (Hb) constitutes a vital link between ambient O2 availability and aerobic metabolism by transporting oxygen (O2) from the respiratory surfaces of the lungs or gills to the O2-consuming tissues. The amount of O2 available to tissues depends on the blood-perfusion rate, as well as the arterio-venous difference in blood O2 contents, which is determined by the respective loading and unloading O2 tensions and Hb-O2-affinity. Short-term adjustments in tissue oxygen delivery in response to decreased O2 supply or increased O2 demand (under exercise, hypoxia at high altitude, cardiovascular disease, and ischemia) are mediated by metabolically induced changes in the red cell levels of allosteric effectors such as protons (H(+)), carbon dioxide (CO2), organic phosphates, and chloride (Cl(-)) that modulate Hb-O2 affinity. The long-term, genetically coded adaptations in oxygen transport encountered in animals that permanently are subjected to low environmental O2 tensions commonly result from changes in the molecular structure of Hb, notably amino acid exchanges that alter Hb's intrinsic O2 affinity or its sensitivity to allosteric effectors. Structure-function studies of animal Hbs and human Hb mutants illustrate the different strategies for adjusting Hb-O2 affinity and optimizing tissue oxygen supply.

  9. Oxygen Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 85-95% pure oxygen. The concentrator runs on electricity or a battery. A concentrator for home usually ... systems deliver 100% oxygen, and do not require electricity. A small canister can be filled from the ...

  10. Oxygen analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Benner, William H.

    1986-01-01

    An oxygen analyzer which identifies and classifies microgram quantities of oxygen in ambient particulate matter and for quantitating organic oxygen in solvent extracts of ambient particulate matter. A sample is pyrolyzed in oxygen-free nitrogen gas (N.sub.2), and the resulting oxygen quantitatively converted to carbon monoxide (CO) by contact with hot granular carbon (C). Two analysis modes are made possible: (1) rapid determination of total pyrolyzable oxygen obtained by decomposing the sample at 1135.degree. C., or (2) temperature-programmed oxygen thermal analysis obtained by heating the sample from room temperature to 1135.degree. C. as a function of time. The analyzer basically comprises a pyrolysis tube containing a bed of granular carbon under N.sub.2, ovens used to heat the carbon and/or decompose the sample, and a non-dispersive infrared CO detector coupled to a mini-computer to quantitate oxygen in the decomposition products and control oven heating.

  11. How to choose the therapeutic goals to improve tissue perfusion in septic shock

    PubMed Central

    de Assuncao, Murillo Santucci Cesar; Corrêa, Thiago Domingos; Bravim, Bruno de Arruda; Silva, Eliézer

    2015-01-01

    The early recognition and treatment of severe sepsis and septic shock is the key to a successful outcome. The longer the delay in starting treatment, the worse the prognosis due to persistent tissue hypoperfusion and consequent development and worsening of organ dysfunction. One of the main mechanisms responsible for the development of cellular dysfunction is tissue hypoxia. The adjustments necessary for adequate tissue blood flow and therefore of oxygen supply to metabolic demand according to the assessment of the cardiac index and oxygen extraction rate should be performed during resuscitation period, especially in high complexity patients. New technologies, easily handled at the bedside, and new studies that directly assess the impact of macro-hemodynamic parameter optimization on microcirculation and in the clinical outcome of septic patients, are needed. PMID:26313438

  12. Intraoperative assessment of tissue oxygen saturation of the remnant stomach by near-infrared spectroscopy in two cases of pancreatectomy following gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Akabane, Shintaro; Ohira, Masahiro; Ishiyama, Kohei; Kobayashi, Tsuyoshi; Ide, Kentaro; Tahara, Hiroyuki; Kuroda, Shintaro; Tanimine, Naoki; Shimizu, Seiichi; Tanabe, Kazuaki; Ohdan, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Objective and quantitative intraoperative methods of bowel viability assessment could decrease the risk of postoperative ischemic complications in gastrointestinal surgery. Because the remnant stomach and the pancreas share an arterial blood supply, it is often unclear whether the remnant stomach can be safely preserved when performing pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) or distal pancreatectomy (DP) post gastrectomy. We herein report two cases in which the remnant stomach was safely preserved using near-infrared spectroscopy to assess the regional saturation of oxygen (rSO2) in the remnant stomach during operation. Presentation of case The first patient, a 68-year-old man, was diagnosed with cancer of the pancreatic head and underwent PD a year after proximal gastrectomy for gastric cancer. The remnant stomach was safely preserved by evaluation of the rSO2 before and after reconstruction of the arteries. The second patient, an 82-year-old woman with a history of distal gastrectomy for gastric cancer 40 years previously, was diagnosed with a main duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreatic body, requiring DP. As in the previous case, we could safely preserve the remnant stomach through assessing the intraoperative rSO2 of the remnant stomach. Discussion Through comparing changes in the rSO2 during surgery, near-infrared spectroscopy provides objective and quantitative assessments of intestinal viability to predict ischemic complications. Conclusion This method may be a viable option to evaluate the blood supply to the alimentary tract. PMID:27061481

  13. Dose Limits for Man do not Adequately Protect the Ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Higley, Kathryn A.; Alexakhin, Rudolf M.; McDonald, Joseph C.

    2004-08-01

    It has been known for quite some time that different organisms display differing degrees of sensitivity to the effects of ionizing radiations. Some microorganisms such as the bacterium Micrococcus radiodurans, along with many species of invertebrates, are extremely radio-resistant. Humans might be categorized as being relatively sensitive to radiation, and are a bit more resistant than some pine trees. Therefore, it could be argued that maintaining the dose limits necessary to protect humans will also result in the protection of most other species of flora and fauna. This concept is usually referred to as the anthropocentric approach. In other words, if man is protected then the environment is also adequately protected. The ecocentric approach might be stated as; the health of humans is effectively protected only when the environment is not unduly exposed to radiation. The ICRP is working on new recommendations dealing with the protection of the environment, and this debate should help to highlight a number of relevant issues concerning that topic.

  14. DARHT - an `adequate` EIS: A NEPA case study

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, M.D.

    1997-08-01

    The Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) Facility Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) provides a case study that is interesting for many reasons. The EIS was prepared quickly, in the face of a lawsuit, for a project with unforeseen environmental impacts, for a facility that was deemed urgently essential to national security. Following judicial review the EIS was deemed to be {open_quotes}adequate.{close_quotes} DARHT is a facility now being built at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) as part of the Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear weapons stockpile stewardship program. DARHT will be used to evaluate the safety and reliability of nuclear weapons, evaluate conventional munitions and study high-velocity impact phenomena. DARHT will be equipped with two accelerator-driven, high-intensity X-ray machines to record images of materials driven by high explosives. DARHT will be used for a variety of hydrodynamic tests, and DOE plans to conduct some dynamic experiments using plutonium at DARHT as well.

  15. ENSURING ADEQUATE SAFETY WHEN USING HYDROGEN AS A FUEL

    SciTech Connect

    Coutts, D

    2007-01-22

    Demonstration projects using hydrogen as a fuel are becoming very common. Often these projects rely on project-specific risk evaluations to support project safety decisions. This is necessary because regulations, codes, and standards (hereafter referred to as standards) are just being developed. This paper will review some of the approaches being used in these evolving standards, and techniques which demonstration projects can implement to bridge the gap between current requirements and stakeholder desires. Many of the evolving standards for hydrogen-fuel use performance-based language, which establishes minimum performance and safety objectives, as compared with prescriptive-based language that prescribes specific design solutions. This is being done for several reasons including: (1) concern that establishing specific design solutions too early will stifle invention, (2) sparse performance data necessary to support selection of design approaches, and (3) a risk-adverse public which is unwilling to accept losses that were incurred in developing previous prescriptive design standards. The evolving standards often contain words such as: ''The manufacturer shall implement the measures and provide the information necessary to minimize the risk of endangering a person's safety or health''. This typically implies that the manufacturer or project manager must produce and document an acceptable level of risk. If accomplished using comprehensive and systematic process the demonstration project risk assessment can ease the transition to widespread commercialization. An approach to adequately evaluate and document the safety risk will be presented.

  16. Quantifying variability within water samples: the need for adequate subsampling.

    PubMed

    Donohue, Ian; Irvine, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    Accurate and precise determination of the concentration of nutrients and other substances in waterbodies is an essential requirement for supporting effective management and legislation. Owing primarily to logistic and financial constraints, however, national and regional agencies responsible for monitoring surface waters tend to quantify chemical indicators of water quality using a single sample from each waterbody, thus largely ignoring spatial variability. We show here that total sample variability, which comprises both analytical variability and within-sample heterogeneity, of a number of important chemical indicators of water quality (chlorophyll a, total phosphorus, total nitrogen, soluble molybdate-reactive phosphorus and dissolved inorganic nitrogen) varies significantly both over time and among determinands, and can be extremely high. Within-sample heterogeneity, whose mean contribution to total sample variability ranged between 62% and 100%, was significantly higher in samples taken from rivers compared with those from lakes, and was shown to be reduced by filtration. Our results show clearly that neither a single sample, nor even two sub-samples from that sample is adequate for the reliable, and statistically robust, detection of changes in the quality of surface waters. We recommend strongly that, in situations where it is practicable to take only a single sample from a waterbody, a minimum of three sub-samples are analysed from that sample for robust quantification of both the concentrations of determinands and total sample variability. PMID:17706740

  17. [A case of ventilation disorder and poor oxygenation after changing position from prone to supine].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Hirakawa, Kei; Kitamura, Jiro

    2013-01-01

    A 68-year-old obese woman (BMI 35) underwent posterior lumbar interbody fusion in prone position. Immediately after changing position postoperatively from prone to supine, severe ventilation disorder and poor oxygenation occured. Chest X-ray showed severe atelectasis. Poor oxygenation was suspected to be the result of the atelectasis by the pressure of massive abdominal fatty tissue to the diaphragm. Ventilation disorder was suspected of the bronchospasm associated with inadequate anesthesia. We ventilated her manually with a bag in Fowler position for twenty minutes, and then mechanically by pressure controlled ventilation. She recovered gradually. It is concluded that in obese patients undergoing operation in prone position, changing position should be done very carefully during adequate anesthesia, understanding respiratory physiology in positioning and considering the effect of the abdominal fatty tissue to the diaphragm.

  18. Cardiac catecholamines in rats fed copper deficient or copper adequate diets containing fructose or starch

    SciTech Connect

    Scholfield, D.J.; Fields, M.; Beal, T.; Lewis, C.G.; Behall, K.M. )

    1989-02-09

    The symptoms of copper (Cu) deficiency are known to be more severe when rats are fed a diet with fructose (F) as the principal carbohydrate. Mortality, in males, due to cardiac abnormalities usually occurs after five weeks of a 62% F, 0.6 ppm Cu deficient diet. These effects are not observed if cornstarch (CS) is the carbohydrate (CHO) source. Studies with F containing diets have shown increased catecholamine (C) turnover rates while diets deficient in Cu result in decreased norepinephrine (N) levels in tissues. Dopamine B-hydroxylase (EC 1.14.17.1) is a Cu dependent enzyme which catalyzes the conversion of dopamine (D) to N. An experiment was designed to investigate the effects of CHO and dietary Cu on levels of three C in cardiac tissue. Thirty-two male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were fed Cu deficient or adequate diets with 60% of calories from F or CS for 6 weeks. N, epinephrine (E) and D were measured by HPLC. Statistical analysis indicates that Cu deficiency tends to decrease N levels, while having the reverse effect on E. D did not appear to change. These findings indicate that Cu deficiency but not dietary CHO can affect the concentration of N and E in rat cardiac tissue.

  19. Oxygen analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Benner, W.H.

    1984-05-08

    An oxygen analyzer which identifies and classifies microgram quantities of oxygen in ambient particulate matter and for quantitating organic oxygen in solvent extracts of ambient particulate matter. A sample is pyrolyzed in oxygen-free nitrogen gas (N/sub 2/), and the resulting oxygen quantitatively converted to carbon monoxide (CO) by contact with hot granular carbon (C). Two analysis modes are made possible: (1) rapid determination of total pyrolyzable obtained by decomposing the sample at 1135/sup 0/C, or (2) temperature-programmed oxygen thermal analysis obtained by heating the sample from room temperature to 1135/sup 0/C as a function of time. The analyzer basically comprises a pyrolysis tube containing a bed of granular carbon under N/sub 2/, ovens used to heat the carbon and/or decompose the sample, and a non-dispersive infrared CO detector coupled to a mini-computer to quantitate oxygen in the decomposition products and control oven heating.

  20. Metabolomic Analyses of Brain Tissue in Sepsis Induced by Cecal Ligation Reveal Specific Redox Alterations--Protective Effects of the Oxygen Radical Scavenger Edaravone.

    PubMed

    Hara, Naomi; Chijiiwa, Miyuki; Yara, Miki; Ishida, Yusuke; Ogiwara, Yukihiko; Inazu, Masato; Kuroda, Masahiko; Karlsson, Michael; Sjovall, Fredrik; Elmér, Eskil; Uchino, Hiroyuki

    2015-12-01

    The pathophysiology of sepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE) is complex and remains incompletely elucidated. Dysregulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and mitochondrial-mediated necrotic-apoptotic pathway have been proposed as part of the pathogenesis. The present study aimed at analyzing the preventive effect of the free radical scavenger edaravone on sepsis-induced brain alterations. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) and the mice were divided into three groups-CLP vehicle (CLPV), CLP and edaravone (MCI-186, 3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one) (CLPE), and sham-operated (Sham). Mice in CLPV and CLPE were injected with saline or edaravone intraperitoneally at a dose of 10 mg/kg twice daily. The treatments were initiated 4 days prior to the surgical procedure. Mortality, histological changes, electron microscopy (EM), and expression of Bcl-2 family genes (Bcl-2 and Bax) were analyzed in selected brain regions. CLPE showed significant improvement in survival compared with CLPV 18 h postinduction of sepsis (P < 0.05). At the same time point, pathohistological analysis also showed marked reduction of neuronal cell death in both parietal cortex and hippocampus in the CLPE (P < 0.05). RT-PCR and immunoblotting directed at the Bcl-2 family revealed increased Bax mRNA levels in hippocampus at 12 h in CLPV as well as an increased Bax/Bcl-2 protein ratio, changes that were significantly suppressed in CLPE. In conclusion, our study suggests that sepsis induced by cecal ligation alters cerebral redox status and supports a proapoptotic phenotype. The free radical scavenger edavarone reduces mortality of septic mice and protects against sepsis-induced neuronal cell death.

  1. On Adequate Comparisons of Antenna Phase Center Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoen, S.; Kersten, T.

    2013-12-01

    One important part for ensuring the high quality of the International GNSS Service's (IGS) products is the collection and publication of receiver - and satellite antenna phase center variations (PCV). The PCV are crucial for global and regional networks, since they introduce a global scale factor of up to 16ppb or changes in the height component with an amount of up to 10cm, respectively. Furthermore, antenna phase center variations are also important for precise orbit determination, navigation and positioning of mobile platforms, like e.g. the GOCE and GRACE gravity missions, or for the accurate Precise Point Positioning (PPP) processing. Using the EUREF Permanent Network (EPN), Baire et al. (2012) showed that individual PCV values have a significant impact on the geodetic positioning. The statements are further supported by studies of Steigenberger et al. (2013) where the impact of PCV for local-ties are analysed. Currently, there are five calibration institutions including the Institut für Erdmessung (IfE) contributing to the IGS PCV file. Different approaches like field calibrations and anechoic chamber measurements are in use. Additionally, the computation and parameterization of the PCV are completely different within the methods. Therefore, every new approach has to pass a benchmark test in order to ensure that variations of PCV values of an identical antenna obtained from different methods are as consistent as possible. Since the number of approaches to obtain these PCV values rises with the number of calibration institutions, there is the necessity for an adequate comparison concept, taking into account not only the numerical values but also stochastic information and computational issues of the determined PCVs. This is of special importance, since the majority of calibrated receiver antennas published by the IGS origin from absolute field calibrations based on the Hannover Concept, Wübbena et al. (2000). In this contribution, a concept for the adequate

  2. Improving access to adequate pain management in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Scholten, Willem

    2015-06-01

    There is a global crisis in access to pain management in the world. WHO estimates that 4.65 billion people live in countries where medical opioid consumption is near to zero. For 2010, WHO considered a per capita consumption of 216.7 mg morphine equivalents adequate, while Taiwan had a per capita consumption of 0.05 mg morphine equivalents in 2007. In Asia, the use of opioids is sensitive because of the Opium Wars in the 19th century and for this reason, the focus of controlled substances policies has been on the prevention of diversion and dependence. However, an optimal public health outcome requires that also the beneficial aspects of these substances are acknowledged. Therefore, WHO recommends a policy based on the Principle of Balance: ensuring access for medical and scientific purposes while preventing diversion, harmful use and dependence. Furthermore, international law requires that countries ensure access to opioid analgesics for medical and scientific purposes. There is evidence that opioid analgesics for chronic pain are not associated with a major risk for developing dependence. Barriers for access can be classified in the categories of overly restrictive laws and regulations; insufficient medical training on pain management and problems related to assessment of medical needs; attitudes like an excessive fear for dependence or diversion; and economic and logistical problems. The GOPI project found many examples of such barriers in Asia. Access to opioid medicines in Taiwan can be improved by analysing the national situation and drafting a plan. The WHO policy guidelines Ensuring Balance in National Policies on Controlled Substances can be helpful for achieving this purpose, as well as international guidelines for pain treatment.

  3. Are women with psychosis receiving adequate cervical cancer screening?

    PubMed Central

    Tilbrook, Devon; Polsky, Jane; Lofters, Aisha

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To investigate the rates of cervical cancer screening among female patients with psychosis compared with similar patients without psychosis, as an indicator of the quality of primary preventive health care. DESIGN A retrospective cohort study using medical records between November 1, 2004, and November 1, 2007. SETTING Two urban family medicine clinics associated with an academic hospital in Toronto, Ont. PARTICIPANTS A random sample of female patients with and without psychosis between the ages of 20 and 69 years. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Number of Papanicolaou tests in a 3-year period. RESULTS Charts for 51 female patients with psychosis and 118 female patients without psychosis were reviewed. Of those women with psychosis, 62.7% were diagnosed with schizophrenia, 19.6% with bipolar disorder, 17.6% with schizoaffective disorder, and 29.4% with other psychotic disorders. Women in both groups were similar in age, rate of comorbidities, and number of full physical examinations. Women with psychosis were significantly more likely to smoke (P < .0001), to have more primary care appointments (P = .035), and to miss appointments (P = .0002) than women without psychosis. After adjustment for age, other psychiatric illnesses, number of physical examinations, number of missed appointments, and having a gynecologist, women with psychosis were significantly less likely to have had a Pap test in the previous 3 years compared with women without psychosis (47.1% vs 73.7%, respectively; odds ratio 0.19, 95% confidence interval 0.06 to 0.58). CONCLUSION Women with psychosis are more than 5 times less likely to receive adequate Pap screening compared with the general population despite their increased rates of smoking and increased number of primary care visits. PMID:20393098

  4. Improving access to adequate pain management in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Scholten, Willem

    2015-06-01

    There is a global crisis in access to pain management in the world. WHO estimates that 4.65 billion people live in countries where medical opioid consumption is near to zero. For 2010, WHO considered a per capita consumption of 216.7 mg morphine equivalents adequate, while Taiwan had a per capita consumption of 0.05 mg morphine equivalents in 2007. In Asia, the use of opioids is sensitive because of the Opium Wars in the 19th century and for this reason, the focus of controlled substances policies has been on the prevention of diversion and dependence. However, an optimal public health outcome requires that also the beneficial aspects of these substances are acknowledged. Therefore, WHO recommends a policy based on the Principle of Balance: ensuring access for medical and scientific purposes while preventing diversion, harmful use and dependence. Furthermore, international law requires that countries ensure access to opioid analgesics for medical and scientific purposes. There is evidence that opioid analgesics for chronic pain are not associated with a major risk for developing dependence. Barriers for access can be classified in the categories of overly restrictive laws and regulations; insufficient medical training on pain management and problems related to assessment of medical needs; attitudes like an excessive fear for dependence or diversion; and economic and logistical problems. The GOPI project found many examples of such barriers in Asia. Access to opioid medicines in Taiwan can be improved by analysing the national situation and drafting a plan. The WHO policy guidelines Ensuring Balance in National Policies on Controlled Substances can be helpful for achieving this purpose, as well as international guidelines for pain treatment. PMID:26068436

  5. Highly roughened polycaprolactone surfaces using oxygen plasma-etching and in vitro mineralization for bone tissue regeneration: fabrication, characterization, and cellular activities.

    PubMed

    Kim, YongBok; Kim, GeunHyung

    2015-01-01

    Herein, poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) surfaces were treated to form various roughness values (R(a)=290-445 nm) and polar functional groups on the surfaces using a plasma-etching process, followed by immersion into simulated body fluid (SBF) for apatite formation. The surface morphology, chemical composition, and mean roughness of the plasma-etched PCL surfaces were measured, and various physical and morphological properties (water contact angles, protein absorption ability, and crystallite size of the apatite layer) of the in vitro mineralized PCL surfaces were evaluated. The roughened PCL surface P-3, which was treated with a sufficient plasma exposure time (4 h), achieved homogeneously distributed apatite formation after soaking in SBF for 7 days, as compared with other surfaces that were untreated or plasma-treated for 30 min or 2 h. Furthermore, to demonstrate their feasibility as a biomimetic surface, pre-osteoblast cells (MC3T3-E1) were cultured on the mineralized PCL surfaces, and cell viability, DAPI-phalloidin fluorescence assay, and alizarin red-staining of the P-3 surface were highly improved compared to the P-1 surface treated with a 30-min plasma exposure time; compared to untreated mineralized PCL surface (N-P), P-3 showed even greater improvements in cell viability and DAPI-phalloidin fluorescence assay. Based on these results, we found that the mineralized PCL surface supplemented with the appropriate plasma treatment can be implicitly helpful to achieve rapid hard tissue regeneration. PMID:25486326

  6. Brain Maturity and Variation of Oxygen Extraction in Premature Infants.

    PubMed

    El-Dib, Mohamed; Aly, Safwat; Govindan, Rathinaswamy; Mohamed, Mohamed; du Plessis, Adre; Aly, Hany

    2016-07-01

    Objectives The ability of the premature brain to extract and use oxygen has not been studied adequately. This study aimed to determine factors that influence fractional tissue oxygen extraction (FTOE) of the brain in premature infants using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and pulse oximetry. Study Design We prospectively studied FTOE in very low birth weight (BW) infants (< 1,500 g and ≤ 34 weeks' gestation). Factors affecting FTOE and its variability were examined using bivariate and linear regression models. FTOE variability was measured on two scales: short scales (3-20 seconds) and long scales (20-150 seconds). Results We examined 147 simultaneous NIRS and pulse oximetry recordings that were collected from 72 premature infants (gestational age [GA] = 28 weeks and BW = 1,036 g). In regression models, average FTOE correlated negatively with hemoglobin (Hb) and increased significantly in patients with severe intraventricular hemorrhage/periventricular leukomalacia. Both FTOE short- and long-scale variabilities correlated negatively with GA and positively with postnatal age (PNA). Moreover, FTOE long-scale variability was significantly reduced in infants supported with invasive ventilation. Conclusions In premature infants, cerebral oxygen extraction increased with reduced Hb and severe brain injury. Variability in oxygen extraction showed differential changes with GA and PNAs and was affected by invasive ventilation. PMID:26906179

  7. Retinal oxygen extraction in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werkmeister, René M.; Schmidl, Doreen; Aschinger, Gerold; Doblhoff-Dier, Veronika; Palkovits, Stefan; Wirth, Magdalena; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Linsenmeier, Robert A.; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2015-10-01

    Adequate function of the retina is dependent on proper oxygen supply. In humans, the inner retina is oxygenated via the retinal circulation. We present a method to calculate total retinal oxygen extraction based on measurement of total retinal blood flow using dual-beam bidirectional Doppler optical coherence tomography and measurement of oxygen saturation by spectrophotometry. These measurements were done on 8 healthy subjects while breathing ambient room air and 100% oxygen. Total retinal blood flow was 44.3 ± 9.0 μl/min during baseline and decreased to 18.7 ± 4.2 μl/min during 100% oxygen breathing (P < 0.001) resulting in a pronounced decrease in retinal oxygen extraction from 2.33 ± 0.51 μl(O2)/min to 0.88 ± 0.14 μl(O2)/min during breathing of 100% oxygen. The method presented in this paper may have significant potential to study oxygen metabolism in hypoxic retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy.

  8. Appreciating Oxygen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Hilton M.

    2008-01-01

    Photosynthetic flora and microfauna utilize light from the sun to convert carbon dioxide and water into carbohydrates and oxygen. While these carbohydrates and their derivative hydrocarbons are generally considered to be fuels, it is the thermodynamically energetic oxygen molecule that traps, stores, and provides almost all of the energy that…

  9. Development of tissue bank

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, R. P.

    2012-01-01

    The history of tissue banking is as old as the use of skin grafting for resurfacing of burn wounds. Beneficial effects of tissue grafts led to wide spread use of auto and allograft for management of varied clinical conditions like skin wounds, bone defects following trauma or tumor ablation. Availability of adequate amount of tissues at the time of requirement was the biggest challenge that forced clinicians to find out techniques to preserve the living tissue for prolonged period of time for later use and thus the foundation of tissue banking was started in early twentieth century. Harvesting, processing, storage and transportation of human tissues for clinical use is the major activity of tissue banks. Low temperature storage of processed tissue is the best preservation technique at present. Tissue banking organization is a very complex system and needs high technical expertise and skilled personnel for proper functioning in a dedicated facility. A small lapse/deviation from the established protocol leads to loss of precious tissues and or harm to recipients as well as the risk of transmission of deadly diseases and tumors. Strict tissue transplant acts and stringent regulations help to streamline the whole process of tissue banking safe for recipients and to community as whole. PMID:23162240

  10. [Hypoxia and oxygen content during dialysis].

    PubMed

    Tulli, G; Vignali, G; Guadagnucci, A; Mondello, V; Pacciani, S; Pappagallo, S

    1992-03-01

    In a study of 72 patients treated with acetate and bicarbonate dialysis, the Authors verified if hypoxic hypoxia caused by dialysis depends on a deficit in oxygen content with an inherent risk of tissue hypoxia. PO2uv (uncompensated venous oxygen partial pressure) and CQ (cardiac compensation factor) derived from the oxygen absorption curve were studied by a new Ole Siggard-Andersen algorithm. The results do not show a risk of tissue hypoxia in the postdialytic period. PMID:1589077

  11. Angiogenesis in tissue engineering: from concept to the vascularization of scaffold construct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirah Ishak, Siti; Pangestu Djuansjah, J. R.; Kadir, M. R. Abdul; Sukmana, Irza

    2014-06-01

    Angiogenesis, the formation of micro-vascular network from the preexisting vascular vessels, has been studied in the connection to the normal developmental process as well as numerous diseases. In tissue engineering research, angiogenesis is also essential to promote micro-vascular network inside engineered tissue constructs, mimicking a functional blood vessel in vivo. Micro-vascular network can be used to maintain adequate tissue oxygenation, nutrient transfer and waste removal. One of the problems faced by angiogenesis researchers is to find suitable in vitro assays and methods for assessing the effect of regulators on angiogenesis and micro-vessel formation. The assay would be reliable and repeatable with easily quantifiable with physiologically relevant. This review aims to highlights recent advanced and future challenges in developing and using an in vitro angiogenesis assay for the application on biomedical and tissue engineering research.

  12. The placental pursuit for an adequate oxidant balance between the mother and the fetus

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Emilio A.; Krause, Bernardo; Ebensperger, German; Reyes, Roberto V.; Casanello, Paola; Parra-Cordero, Mauro; Llanos, Anibal J.

    2014-01-01

    The placenta is the exchange organ that regulates metabolic processes between the mother and her developing fetus. The adequate function of this organ is clearly vital for a physiologic gestational process and a healthy baby as final outcome. The umbilico-placental vasculature has the capacity to respond to variations in the materno-fetal milieu. Depending on the intensity and the extensity of the insult, these responses may be immediate-, mediate-, and long-lasting, deriving in potential morphostructural and functional changes later in life. These adjustments usually compensate the initial insults, but occasionally may switch to long-lasting remodeling and dysfunctional processes, arising maladaptation. One of the most challenging conditions in modern perinatology is hypoxia and oxidative stress during development, both disorders occurring in high-altitude and in low-altitude placental insufficiency. Hypoxia and oxidative stress may induce endothelial dysfunction and thus, reduction in the perfusion of the placenta and restriction in the fetal growth and development. This Review will focus on placental responses to hypoxic conditions, usually related with high-altitude and placental insufficiency, deriving in oxidative stress and vascular disorders, altering fetal and maternal health. Although day-to-day clinical practice, basic and clinical research are clearly providing evidence of the severe impact of oxygen deficiency and oxidative stress establishment during pregnancy, further research on umbilical and placental vascular function under these conditions is badly needed to clarify the myriad of questions still unsettled. PMID:25009498

  13. Percentage of Adults with High Blood Pressure Whose Hypertension Is Adequately Controlled

    MedlinePlus

    ... is Adequately Controlled Percentage of Adults with High Blood Pressure Whose Hypertension is Adequately Controlled Heart disease ... Survey. Age Group Percentage of People with High Blood Pressure that is Controlled by Age Group f94q- ...

  14. Cerebral and Tissue Oximetry

    PubMed Central

    Steppan, Jochen; Hogue, Charles W.

    2014-01-01

    The use of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has been increasingly adopted in cardiac surgery to measure regional cerebral oxygen saturation. This method takes advantage of the fact that light in the near-infrared spectrum penetrates tissue, including bone and muscle. Sensors are placed at fixed distances from a light emitter, and algorithms subtract superficial light absorption from deep absorption to provide an index of tissue oxygenation. Although the popularity of NIRS monitoring is growing, definitive data that prove outcome benefits with its use remain sparse. Therefore, widespread, routine use of NIRS as a standard-of-care monitor cannot be recommended at present. Recent investigations have focused on the use of NIRS in subgroups that may benefit from NIRS monitoring, such as pediatric patients. Furthermore, a novel application of processed NIRS information for monitoring cerebral autoregulation and tissue oxygenation (e.g., kidneys and the gut) is promising. PMID:25480772

  15. OXYGEN POISONING IN MAMMALS.

    PubMed

    Binger, C A; Faulkner, J M; Moore, R L

    1927-04-30

    1. Oxygen in concentrations of over 70 per cent of an atmosphere is poisonous to dogs, rabbits, guinea pigs and mice. 2. The poisonous effects manifest themselves in drowsiness, anorexia, loss of weight, increasing dyspnea, cyanosis and death from oxygen want. 3. The cause of oxygen want is a destructive lesion of the lungs. 4. The lesion may be characterized grossly as an hemorrhagic edema. Microscopically there is to be seen in varying degrees of intensity (a) capillary engorgement with hemorrhage, (b) the presence of interstitial and intraalveolar serum, (c) hypertrophy and desquamation of alveolar cells, (d) interstitial and alveolar infiltration of mononuclear cells. 5. The type of tissue reaction is not characteristic of an infectious process and no organisms have been recovered at autopsy from the heart's blood or from lung puncture. 6. The poisonous effects of inhalations of oxygen-rich mixtures do not appear to be related to impurities in the oxygen, nor are they related to faulty ventilation, excessive moisture or increased carbon dioxide in the atmosphere of the chambers in which the experimental animals were confined. PMID:19869294

  16. 76 FR 51041 - Hemoglobin Standards and Maintaining Adequate Iron Stores in Blood Donors; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Hemoglobin Standards and Maintaining Adequate Iron Stores in... Standards and Maintaining Adequate Iron Stores in Blood Donors.'' The purpose of this public workshop is to... donor safety and blood availability, and potential measures to maintain adequate iron stores in...

  17. 21 CFR 801.5 - Medical devices; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical devices; adequate directions for use. 801... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.5 Medical devices; adequate directions for use. Adequate directions for use means directions under which the layman can use a device...

  18. 36 CFR 13.960 - Who determines when there is adequate snow cover?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... adequate snow cover? 13.960 Section 13.960 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE... Preserve Snowmachine (snowmobile) Operations § 13.960 Who determines when there is adequate snow cover? The superintendent will determine when snow cover is adequate for snowmachine use. The superintendent will follow...

  19. 36 CFR 13.960 - Who determines when there is adequate snow cover?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... adequate snow cover? 13.960 Section 13.960 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE... Preserve Snowmachine (snowmobile) Operations § 13.960 Who determines when there is adequate snow cover? The superintendent will determine when snow cover is adequate for snowmachine use. The superintendent will follow...

  20. 36 CFR 13.960 - Who determines when there is adequate snow cover?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... adequate snow cover? 13.960 Section 13.960 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE... Preserve Snowmachine (snowmobile) Operations § 13.960 Who determines when there is adequate snow cover? The superintendent will determine when snow cover is adequate for snowmachine use. The superintendent will follow...

  1. 36 CFR 13.960 - Who determines when there is adequate snow cover?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... adequate snow cover? 13.960 Section 13.960 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE... Preserve Snowmachine (snowmobile) Operations § 13.960 Who determines when there is adequate snow cover? The superintendent will determine when snow cover is adequate for snowmachine use. The superintendent will follow...

  2. Oxygen sensing and metabolic homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Biff F; Clegg, Deborah J

    2014-11-01

    Oxygen-sensing mechanisms have evolved to maintain cell and tissue homeostasis since the ability to sense and respond to changes in oxygen is essential for survival. The primary site of oxygen sensing occurs at the level of the carotid body which in response to hypoxia signals increased ventilation without the need for new protein synthesis. Chronic hypoxia activates cellular sensing mechanisms which lead to protein synthesis designed to alter cellular metabolism so cells can adapt to the low oxygen environment without suffering toxicity. The master regulator of the cellular response is hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF). Activation of this system under condition of hypobaric hypoxia leads to weight loss accompanied by increased basal metabolic rate and suppression of appetite. These effects are dose dependent, gender and genetic specific, and results in adverse effects if the exposure is extreme. Hypoxic adipose tissue may represent a unified cellular mechanism for variety of metabolic disorders, and insulin resistance in patients with metabolic syndrome.

  3. Determination of the need for selenium by chicks fed practical diets adequate in vitamin E

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, G.F. Jr.; Su, Q.; Liu, C.H.; Sinisalo, M.; Combs, S.B.

    1986-03-01

    Experiments were conducted to compare the dietary needs for selenium (Se) by chicks fed either purified (amino acid-based) or practical (corn- and soy-based) diets that were adequate with respect to vitamin E (i.e., contained 100 IU/kg) and all other known nutrients with the single exception of Se (i.e., contained only 0.10 ppm Se). Studies were conducted in Ithaca using Single Comb White Leghorn chicks fed the purified basal diet and in Beijing using chicks of the same breed fed either the same purified basal diet or the practical diet formulated to be similar to that used in poultry production in some parts of China and the US. Results showed that each basal diet produced severe depletion of Se-dependent glutathione peroxidase (SeGSHpx) in plasma, liver and pancreas according to the same time-course, but that other consequences of severe uncomplicated Se deficiency were much more severe among chicks fed the purified diet (e.g., growth depression, pancreatic dysfunction as indicated by elevated plasma amylase and abnormal pancreatic histology). Chicks fed the practical Se-deficient diet showed reduced pancreas levels of copper, zinc and molybdenum and elevated plasma levels of iron; they required ca. 0.10 ppm dietary Se to sustain normal SeGSHpx in several tissues and to prevent elevated amylase in plasma. The dietary Se requirement of the chick is, therefore, estimated to be 0.10 ppm.

  4. Options for home oxygen therapy equipment: storage and metering of oxygen in the home.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Robert W

    2013-01-01

    Home oxygen therapy equipment options have increased over the past several decades, in response to innovations in technology, economic pressure from third-party payers, and patient demands. The delivery of oxygen in the home has evolved from packaged gas systems containing 99% United States Pharmacopeia oxygen provided by continuous-flow delivery to intermittent-flow delivery, with oxygen concentrators delivering < 99% oxygen purity. The majority of published papers indicating the value of long-term oxygen therapy have been based on continuous-flow delivery of 99% United States Pharmacopeia oxygen. The lack of research on new home oxygen therapy devices requires more clinical involvement from physician and respiratory therapist to evaluate the performance of oxygen devices used in the home to ensure the patient is provided adequate oxygenation at all activity levels. New standards of care are required to address the need to have consistent titration of long-term oxygen therapy to meet the patient's home needs at all activity levels. Consistent labeling of metering devices on home oxygen equipment will need to be developed by professional medical societies to be implemented by standards organizations that direct industrial manufacturers. Home oxygen therapy will need professionally trained respiratory therapists reimbursed for skills and service to ensure that patients receive optimal benefits from home oxygen equipment to improve patient outcomes and prevent complications and associated costs.

  5. Oxygen Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... therapy works, it helps to understand how your respiratory system works. This system is a group of organs and tissues that help you breathe. The respiratory system includes the airways and lungs. The airways carry ...

  6. Oxygen-Concentrating Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, K.

    1986-01-01

    High-purity oxygen produced from breathing air or from propellantgrade oxygen in oxygen-concentrating cell. Operating economics of concentrator attractive: Energy consumption about 4 Wh per liter of oxygen, slightly lower than conventional electrochemical oxygen extractors.

  7. Functional Oxygen Sensitivity of Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Angelova, Plamena R; Kasymov, Vitaliy; Christie, Isabel; Sheikhbahaei, Shahriar; Turovsky, Egor; Marina, Nephtali; Korsak, Alla; Zwicker, Jennifer; Teschemacher, Anja G; Ackland, Gareth L; Funk, Gregory D; Kasparov, Sergey; Abramov, Andrey Y; Gourine, Alexander V

    2015-07-22

    In terrestrial mammals, the oxygen storage capacity of the CNS is limited, and neuronal function is rapidly impaired if oxygen supply is interrupted even for a short period of time. However, oxygen tension monitored by the peripheral (arterial) chemoreceptors is not sensitive to regional CNS differences in partial pressure of oxygen (PO2 ) that reflect variable levels of neuronal activity or local tissue hypoxia, pointing to the necessity of a functional brain oxygen sensor. This experimental animal (rats and mice) study shows that astrocytes, the most numerous brain glial cells, are sensitive to physiological changes in PO2 . Astrocytes respond to decreases in PO2 a few millimeters of mercury below normal brain oxygenation with elevations in intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]i). The hypoxia sensor of astrocytes resides in the mitochondria in which oxygen is consumed. Physiological decrease in PO2 inhibits astroglial mitochondrial respiration, leading to mitochondrial depolarization, production of free radicals, lipid peroxidation, activation of phospholipase C, IP3 receptors, and release of Ca(2+) from the intracellular stores. Hypoxia-induced [Ca(2+)]i increases in astrocytes trigger fusion of vesicular compartments containing ATP. Blockade of astrocytic signaling by overexpression of ATP-degrading enzymes or targeted astrocyte-specific expression of tetanus toxin light chain (to interfere with vesicular release mechanisms) within the brainstem respiratory rhythm-generating circuits reveals the fundamental physiological role of astroglial oxygen sensitivity; in low-oxygen conditions (environmental hypoxia), this mechanism increases breathing activity even in the absence of peripheral chemoreceptor oxygen sensing. These results demonstrate that astrocytes are functionally specialized CNS oxygen sensors tuned for rapid detection of physiological changes in brain oxygenation. Significance statement: Most, if not all, animal cells possess mechanisms that allow them to

  8. Anaemia: can we define haemoglobin thresholds for impaired oxygen homeostasis and suggest new strategies for treatment?

    PubMed

    Hare, Gregory M T; Tsui, Albert K Y; Ozawa, Sherri; Shander, Aryeh

    2013-03-01

    Observational clinical studies in perioperative medicine have defined a progressive increase in mortality that is proportional to both chronic preoperative anaemia and acute interpretative reductions in haemoglobin concentration (Hb). However, this knowledge has not yet helped to define the critical Hb threshold for organ injury and mortality in specific patient populations or in individual patients. Nor has this knowledge enabled us to develop effective treatment strategies for anaemia, as evident from the lack of a demonstrable improvement in survival in patients randomised to higher Hb levels by various treatment strategies including allogeneic red blood cell transfusion, erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) and haemoglobin-based oxygen carriers (HBOCs). These findings emphasise the need for a clearer understanding of the mechanism of anaemia-induced mortality. Towards achieving this goal, experimental studies have defined adaptive mechanism by which oxygen homeostasis is maintained during acute anaemia. The mechanisms include: (1) effective sensing of anaemia-induced tissue hypoxia; (2) adaptive cardiovascular responses to maintain adequate tissue oxygen delivery; (3) heterogeneity of organ-specific oxygen delivery to preferentially sustain vital organs which are essential for acute survival (heart and brain); (4) evidence of increased vital organ injury with interruption of cardiovascular responses to anaemia and (5) evidence of activation of adaptive cellular responses to maintain oxygen homeostasis and support survival during acute anaemia. Understanding these mechanisms may allow us to define treatment thresholds and novel treatment strategies for acute anaemia based on biological markers of tissue hypoxia. The overall goal of these approaches is to improve patient outcomes, including event-free perioperative survival.

  9. Heme biomolecule as redox mediator and oxygen shuttle for efficient charging of lithium-oxygen batteries

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Won-Hee; Gittleson, Forrest S.; Thomsen, Julianne M.; Li, Jinyang; Schwab, Mark J.; Brudvig, Gary W.; Taylor, André D.

    2016-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges with lithium-oxygen batteries involves identifying catalysts that facilitate the growth and evolution of cathode species on an oxygen electrode. Heterogeneous solid catalysts cannot adequately address the problematic overpotentials when the surfaces become passivated. However, there exists a class of biomolecules which have been designed by nature to guide complex solution-based oxygen chemistries. Here, we show that the heme molecule, a common porphyrin cofactor in blood, can function as a soluble redox catalyst and oxygen shuttle for efficient oxygen evolution in non-aqueous Li-O2 batteries. The heme's oxygen binding capability facilitates battery recharge by accepting and releasing dissociated oxygen species while benefiting charge transfer with the cathode. We reveal the chemical change of heme redox molecules where synergy exists with the electrolyte species. This study brings focus to the rational design of solution-based catalysts and suggests a sustainable cross-link between biomolecules and advanced energy storage. PMID:27759005

  10. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Promoting healing in difficult cases

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, G.H.

    1986-02-01

    Inhalation of pressurized 100% oxygen is a helpful adjunctive treatment for certain patients, because the increased oxygen carried by the blood to the tissue enhances new growth of microcirculation and, thus, healing. Patients with tissue breakdown after radiation therapy, refractory osteomyelitis, gas gangrene, soft-tissue infection with necrosis from mixed aerobic and anaerobic organisms, crush injuries resulting in acute ischemia, and compromised skin grafts or non-healing wounds are likely to benefit from hyperbaric oxygen therapy.

  11. OXYGEN ABUNDANCES IN CEPHEIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Luck, R. E.; Andrievsky, S. M.; Korotin, S. N.; Kovtyukh, V. V. E-mail: serkor@skyline.od.ua E-mail: scan@deneb1.odessa.ua

    2013-07-01

    Oxygen abundances in later-type stars, and intermediate-mass stars in particular, are usually determined from the [O I] line at 630.0 nm, and to a lesser extent, from the O I triplet at 615.7 nm. The near-IR triplets at 777.4 nm and 844.6 nm are strong in these stars and generally do not suffer from severe blending with other species. However, these latter two triplets suffer from strong non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) effects and thus see limited use in abundance analyses. In this paper, we derive oxygen abundances in a large sample of Cepheids using the near-IR triplets from an NLTE analysis, and compare those abundances to values derived from a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) analysis of the [O I] 630.0 nm line and the O I 615.7 nm triplet as well as LTE abundances for the 777.4 nm triplet. All of these lines suffer from line strength problems making them sensitive to either measurement complications (weak lines) or to line saturation difficulties (strong lines). Upon this realization, the LTE results for the [O I] lines and the O I 615.7 nm triplet are in adequate agreement with the abundance from the NLTE analysis of the near-IR triplets.

  12. Biomimetic 3D tissue printing for soft tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Pati, Falguni; Ha, Dong-Heon; Jang, Jinah; Han, Hyun Ho; Rhie, Jong-Won; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2015-09-01

    Engineered adipose tissue constructs that are capable of reconstructing soft tissue with adequate volume would be worthwhile in plastic and reconstructive surgery. Tissue printing offers the possibility of fabricating anatomically relevant tissue constructs by delivering suitable matrix materials and living cells. Here, we devise a biomimetic approach for printing adipose tissue constructs employing decellularized adipose tissue (DAT) matrix bioink encapsulating human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hASCs). We designed and printed precisely-defined and flexible dome-shaped structures with engineered porosity using DAT bioink that facilitated high cell viability over 2 weeks and induced expression of standard adipogenic genes without any supplemented adipogenic factors. The printed DAT constructs expressed adipogenic genes more intensely than did non-printed DAT gel. To evaluate the efficacy of our printed tissue constructs for adipose tissue regeneration, we implanted them subcutaneously in mice. The constructs did not induce chronic inflammation or cytotoxicity postimplantation, but supported positive tissue infiltration, constructive tissue remodeling, and adipose tissue formation. This study demonstrates that direct printing of spatially on-demand customized tissue analogs is a promising approach to soft tissue regeneration.

  13. Calculation of the Cost of an Adequate Education in Kentucky: A Professional Judgment Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verstegen, Deborah A.

    2004-01-01

    What is an adequate education and how much does it cost? In 1989, Kentucky's State Supreme Court found the entire system of education unconstitutional--"all of its parts and parcels". The Court called for all children to have access to an adequate education, one that is uniform and has as its goal the development of seven capacities, including:…

  14. 40 CFR 152.20 - Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exemptions for pesticides adequately... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION PROCEDURES Exemptions § 152.20 Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency. The...

  15. 40 CFR 152.20 - Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Exemptions for pesticides adequately... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION PROCEDURES Exemptions § 152.20 Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency. The...

  16. 21 CFR 801.5 - Medical devices; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical devices; adequate directions for use. 801.5 Section 801.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.5 Medical devices; adequate...

  17. 21 CFR 801.5 - Medical devices; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical devices; adequate directions for use. 801.5 Section 801.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.5 Medical devices; adequate...

  18. 21 CFR 801.5 - Medical devices; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical devices; adequate directions for use. 801.5 Section 801.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.5 Medical devices; adequate...

  19. 21 CFR 801.5 - Medical devices; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medical devices; adequate directions for use. 801.5 Section 801.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.5 Medical devices; adequate...

  20. 40 CFR 152.20 - Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... regulated by another Federal agency. 152.20 Section 152.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Exemptions § 152.20 Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency. The pesticides... has determined, in accordance with FIFRA sec. 25(b)(1), that they are adequately regulated by...

  1. 40 CFR 152.20 - Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... regulated by another Federal agency. 152.20 Section 152.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Exemptions § 152.20 Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency. The pesticides... has determined, in accordance with FIFRA sec. 25(b)(1), that they are adequately regulated by...

  2. 40 CFR 152.20 - Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... regulated by another Federal agency. 152.20 Section 152.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Exemptions § 152.20 Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency. The pesticides... has determined, in accordance with FIFRA sec. 25(b)(1), that they are adequately regulated by...

  3. 42 CFR 417.568 - Adequate financial records, statistical data, and cost finding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Adequate financial records, statistical data, and....568 Adequate financial records, statistical data, and cost finding. (a) Maintenance of records. (1) An HMO or CMP must maintain sufficient financial records and statistical data for proper determination...

  4. 42 CFR 417.568 - Adequate financial records, statistical data, and cost finding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Adequate financial records, statistical data, and....568 Adequate financial records, statistical data, and cost finding. (a) Maintenance of records. (1) An HMO or CMP must maintain sufficient financial records and statistical data for proper determination...

  5. 42 CFR 417.568 - Adequate financial records, statistical data, and cost finding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Adequate financial records, statistical data, and....568 Adequate financial records, statistical data, and cost finding. (a) Maintenance of records. (1) An HMO or CMP must maintain sufficient financial records and statistical data for proper determination...

  6. Oxygen supplies during a mass casualty situation.

    PubMed

    Ritz, Ray H; Previtera, Joseph E

    2008-02-01

    Mass casualty and pandemic events pose a substantial challenge to the resources available in our current health care system. The ability to provide adequate oxygen therapy is one of the systems that could be out-stripped in certain conditions. Natural disasters can disrupt manufacturing or delivery, and pandemic events can increase consumption beyond the available supply. Patients may require manual resuscitation, basic oxygen therapy, or positive-pressure ventilation during these scenarios. Available sources of oxygen include bulk liquid oxygen systems, compressed gas cylinders, portable liquid oxygen (LOX) systems, and oxygen concentrators. The last two are available in a variety of configurations, which include personal and home systems that are suitable for individual patients, and larger systems that can provide oxygen to multiple patients or entire institutions. Bulk oxygen systems are robust and are probably sustainable during periods of high consumption, but are at risk if manufacturing or delivery is disrupted. Compressed gas cylinders offer support during temporary periods of need but are not a solution for extended periods of therapy. Personal oxygen concentrators and LOX systems are limited in their application during mass casualty scenarios. Large-capacity oxygen concentrators and LOX systems may effectively provide support to alternative care sites or larger institutions. They may also be appropriate selections for governmental emergency-response scenarios. Careful consideration of the strengths and limitations of each of these options can reduce the impact of a mass casualty event. PMID:18218152

  7. Reversible Oxygenation of Oxygen Transport Proteins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drain, C. M.; Corden, Barry B.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a lecture demonstration which illustrates changes in the visible spectra of oxygen transport proteins upon reversible oxygen binding. Provides a comparison of the physical characteristics of oxygen storage and transport proteins. Reviews essentials for preparation of the materials. (ML)

  8. Arterial blood oxygen saturation during blood pressure cuff-induced hypoperfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyriacou, P. A.; Shafqat, K.; Pal, S. K.

    2007-10-01

    Pulse oximetry has been one of the most significant technological advances in clinical monitoring in the last two decades. Pulse oximetry is a non-invasive photometric technique that provides information about the arterial blood oxygen saturation (SpO2) and heart rate, and has widespread clinical applications. When peripheral perfusion is poor, as in states of hypovolaemia, hypothermia and vasoconstriction, oxygenation readings become unreliable or cease. The problem arises because conventional pulse oximetry sensors must be attached to the most peripheral parts of the body, such as finger, ear or toe, where pulsatile flow is most easily compromised. Pulse oximeters estimate arterial oxygen saturation by shining light at two different wavelengths, red and infrared, through vascular tissue. In this method the ac pulsatile photoplethysmographic (PPG) signal associated with cardiac contraction is assumed to be attributable solely to the arterial blood component. The amplitudes of the red and infrared ac PPG signals are sensitive to changes in arterial oxygen saturation because of differences in the light absorption of oxygenated and deoxygenated haemoglobin at these two wavelengths. From the ratios of these amplitudes, and the corresponding dc photoplethysmographic components, arterial blood oxygen saturation (SpO2) is estimated. Hence, the technique of pulse oximetry relies on the presence of adequate peripheral arterial pulsations, which are detected as photoplethysmographic (PPG) signals. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of pressure cuff-induced hypoperfusion on photoplethysmographic signals and arterial blood oxygen saturation using a custom made finger blood oxygen saturation PPG/SpO2 sensor and a commercial finger pulse oximeter. Blood oxygen saturation values from the custom oxygen saturation sensor and a commercial finger oxygen saturation sensor were recorded from 14 healthy volunteers at various induced brachial pressures. Both pulse

  9. Oxygen: the poison is in the dose.

    PubMed

    Winslow, Robert M

    2013-02-01

    Cell-free hemoglobin (Hb) has been blamed for a spectrum of problems, including vasoconstriction pancreatitis, myocardial infarction, and pulmonary hypertension in hemolytic anemia, malaria, and sickle cell anemia, and from Hb-based oxygen carriers (HBOCs). Toxicities have been attributed to scavenging of nitric oxide (NO). However, while NO scavenging may explain many in vitro effects, and some effects in animal models and clinical trials with HBOCs, key inconsistencies in the theory require alternative explanations. This review considers the hypothesis that cell-free Hb oversupplies oxygen to tissues, leading to oxygen-related toxicity, possibly through formation of reactive oxygen species and local destruction of NO. Evidence for this hypothesis comes from various sources, establishing that tissue oxygen levels are maintained over very narrow (and low) levels, even at high oxygen consumption. Tissue is normally protected from excessive oxygen by its extremely low solubility in plasma, but introduction of cell-free Hb, even at low concentration, greatly augments oxygen supply, engaging protective mechanisms that include vasoconstriction and ischemia. The requirement to limit oxygen supply by cell-free Hb suggests novel ways to modify it to overcome vasoconstriction, independent of the intrinsic reaction of Hb with NO. This control is essential to the design of a safe and effective cell-free HBOC.

  10. 45 CFR 1159.15 - Who has the responsibility for maintaining adequate technical, physical, and security safeguards...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... adequate technical, physical, and security safeguards to prevent unauthorized disclosure or destruction of... adequate technical, physical, and security safeguards to prevent unauthorized disclosure or destruction of... of maintaining adequate technical, physical, and security safeguards to prevent...

  11. Oxygen requirements of the earliest animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Daniel B.; Ward, Lewis M.; Jones, CarriAyne; Sweeten, Brittany; Forth, Michael; Treusch, Alexander H.; Canfield, Donald E.

    2014-03-01

    A rise in the oxygen content of the atmosphere and oceans is one of the most popular explanations for the relatively late and abrupt appearance of animal life on Earth. In this scenario, Earth's surface environment failed to meet the high oxygen requirements of animals up until the middle to late Neoproterozoic Era (850-542 million years ago), when oxygen concentrations sufficiently rose to permit the existence of animal life for the first time. Although multiple lines of geochemical evidence support an oxygenation of the Ediacaran oceans (635-542 million years ago), roughly corresponding with the first appearance of metazoans in the fossil record, the oxygen requirements of basal animals remain unclear. Here we show that modern demosponges, serving as analogs for early animals, can survive under low-oxygen conditions of 0.5-4.0% present atmospheric levels. Because the last common ancestor of metazoans likely exhibited a physiology and morphology similar to that of a modern sponge, its oxygen demands may have been met well before the enhanced oxygenation of the Ediacaran Period. Therefore, the origin of animals may not have been triggered by a contemporaneous rise in the oxygen content of the atmosphere and oceans. Instead, other ecological and developmental processes are needed to adequately explain the origin and earliest evolution of animal life on Earth.

  12. Oxygen requirements of the earliest animals

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Daniel B.; Ward, Lewis M.; Jones, CarriAyne; Sweeten, Brittany; Forth, Michael; Treusch, Alexander H.; Canfield, Donald E.

    2014-01-01

    A rise in the oxygen content of the atmosphere and oceans is one of the most popular explanations for the relatively late and abrupt appearance of animal life on Earth. In this scenario, Earth’s surface environment failed to meet the high oxygen requirements of animals up until the middle to late Neoproterozoic Era (850–542 million years ago), when oxygen concentrations sufficiently rose to permit the existence of animal life for the first time. Although multiple lines of geochemical evidence support an oxygenation of the Ediacaran oceans (635–542 million years ago), roughly corresponding with the first appearance of metazoans in the fossil record, the oxygen requirements of basal animals remain unclear. Here we show that modern demosponges, serving as analogs for early animals, can survive under low-oxygen conditions of 0.5–4.0% present atmospheric levels. Because the last common ancestor of metazoans likely exhibited a physiology and morphology similar to that of a modern sponge, its oxygen demands may have been met well before the enhanced oxygenation of the Ediacaran Period. Therefore, the origin of animals may not have been triggered by a contemporaneous rise in the oxygen content of the atmosphere and oceans. Instead, other ecological and developmental processes are needed to adequately explain the origin and earliest evolution of animal life on Earth. PMID:24550467

  13. The Need for Domestic Violence Laws with Adequate Legal and Social Support Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemmons, Willa M.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the need for comprehensive domestic violence programs that include medical, legal, economic, psychological, and child care services. Although most states have family violence legislation, more work is needed to adequately implement these programs. (Author/JAC)

  14. Patient acceptance of adequately filled breast implants using the tilt test.

    PubMed

    Tebbetts, J B

    2000-07-01

    Adequate fill of any breast implant, regardless of shell characteristics, shape, or filler material, is important to prevent implant shell wrinkling, folding, or collapse that could potentially decrease the life of the implant. Implant shell life is a major factor that affects reoperation rates. The greater the necessity of reoperations, regardless of implant type, the greater the rate of local complications, necessitating additional surgery with additional risks and costs to patients. Palpable shell folding, visible wrinkling or rippling, palpable shifts of filler material, sloshing, and compromised aesthetic results can result from an under-filled implant. Any of these complications can necessitate reoperations with increased risks and costs to patients. This is a study of 609 consecutive patients from January of 1993 to December of 1998 who were given detailed preoperative informed consent and a choice of implant shape and type and who chose the increased firmness associated with an implant that is adequately filled to pass the tilt test. This study addresses two questions: (1) Will patients accept the increased firmness of an implant that is filled to pass the tilt test? and (2) Is adequate fill by the tilt test useful clinically to help reduce the incidence of postoperative rippling, wrinkling, and spontaneous deflation in saline implants? Patients were followed by postoperative examinations and questionnaires. No patient requested implant replacement to a softer implant postoperatively, and no reoperations were performed for visible rippling or wrinkling. The spontaneous deflation rate over this 6-year period was 9 of 1218 implants, or 0.739 percent. If patients will accept more firmness with an adequately filled implant, regardless of the filler material, surgeons might worry less about recommending an adequately filled implant to patients, and manufacturers might feel more comfortable producing adequately filled implants and redefining fill volumes for

  15. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infectious Keratitis in a High Oxygen Transmissible Rigid Contact Lens Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Cynthia; Zhu, Meifang; Petroll, W. Matthew; Robertson, Danielle M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To establish a rabbit model of infectious Pseudomonas aeruginosa keratitis using ultrahigh oxygen transmissible rigid lenses and characterize the frequency and severity of infection when compared to a non–oxygen transmissible lens material. Methods. Rabbits were fit with rigid lenses composed of ultrahigh and non–oxygen transmissible materials. Prior to wear, lenses were inoculated with an invasive corneal isolate of P. aeruginosa stably conjugated to green fluorescent protein (GFP). Corneas were examined before and after lens wear using a modified Heidelberg Rostock Tomograph in vivo confocal microscope. Viable bacteria adherent to unworn and worn lenses were assessed by standard plate counts. The presence of P. aeruginosa-GFP and myeloperoxidase-labeled neutrophils in infected corneal tissue was evaluated using laser scanning confocal microscopy. Results. The frequency and severity of infectious keratitis was significantly greater with inoculated ultrahigh oxygen transmissible lenses. Infection severity was associated with increasing neutrophil infiltration and in severe cases, corneal melting. In vivo confocal microscopic analysis of control corneas following lens wear confirmed that hypoxic lens wear was associated with mechanical surface damage, whereas no ocular surface damage was evident in the high-oxygen lens group. Conclusions. These data indicate that in the absence of adequate tear clearance, the presence of P. aeruginosa trapped under the lens overrides the protective effects of oxygen on surface epithelial cells. These findings also suggest that alternative pathophysiological mechanisms exist whereby changes under the lens in the absence of frank hypoxic damage result in P. aeruginosa infection in the otherwise healthy corneal epithelium. PMID:25125601

  16. Necrotizing soft tissue infections

    PubMed Central

    Urschel, J.

    1999-01-01

    Necrotizing soft tissue infections are a group of highly lethal infections that typically occur after trauma or surgery. Many individual infectious entities have been described, but they all have similar pathophysiologies, clinical features, and treatment approaches. The essentials of successful treatment include early diagnosis, aggressive surgical debridement, antibiotics, and supportive intensive treatment unit care. The two commonest pitfalls in management are failure of early diagnosis and inadequate surgical debridement. These life-threatening infections are often mistaken for cellulitis or innocent wound infections, and this is responsible for diagnostic delay. Tissue gas is not a universal finding in necrotizing soft tissue infections. This misconception also contributes to diagnostic errors. Incision and drainage is an inappropriate surgical strategy for necrotizing soft tissue infections; excisional debridement is needed. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy may be useful, but it is not as important as aggressive surgical therapy. Despite advances in antibiotic therapy and intensive treatment unit medicine, the mortality of necrotizing soft tissue infections is still high. This article emphasizes common treatment principles for all of these infections, and reviews some of the more important individual necrotizing soft tissue infectious entities.


Keywords: fasciitis; gas gangrene; clostridium infections; streptococcal infections; necrosis; debridement; surgical infections; soft tissue infections PMID:10621873

  17. Technical basis for flawed cylinder test specification to assure adequate fracture resistance of ISO high strength steel cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Rana, M.D.; Smith, J.H.; Tribolet, R.O.

    1996-12-01

    High pressure industrial gases (such as oxygen, nitrogen, argon, hydrogen, etc.) are stored and transported in portable cylinders. ISO TC58 SC3 has developed a draft specification 9809 for design and fabrication of high pressure cylinders with maximum tensile strength limitation of 1,100 N/mm{sup 2}. In order to extend the ISO 9809 rules for higher than 1,100 N/mm{sup 2} strength level cylinders, a working group WG14 was formed in 1989 to develop new rules to assure adequate fracture resistance. In 1994, WG14 recommended a simple, but unique flawed cylinder test method for design qualification of the cylinder and acceptance criteria to assure adequate fracture resistance. WG14 also recommended Charpy-V-Notch impact tests to control the required fracture resistance on production cylinders. This paper presents the technical basis that was employed in developing the flawed cylinder test method and acceptance criteria. The specification was developed for seamless steel cylinders having actual strength in the range of 1,100 to 1,400 N/mm{sup 2} and cylindrical section wall thickness in the range of 3mm to 10mm. Flawed cylinder tests were conducted on several hundred cylinders of varying sizes and strength levels. The specification requires to demonstrate LEAK-BEFORE-BREAK performance of the cylinder having flaw length equal to 1.6(O.D. {times} t{sub design}){sup 0.5} at failure pressure = (t{sub design}/t{sub actual}) {times} Design Pressure.

  18. Technical basis for flawed cylinder test specification to assure adequate fracture resistance of ISO high-strength steel cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Rana, M.D.; Smith, J.H.; Tribolet, R.O.

    1997-11-01

    High-pressure industrial gases (such as oxygen, nitrogen, argon, hydrogen, etc.) are stored and transported in portable cylinders. ISO TC58 SC3 has developed a draft specification 9809 for design and fabrication of high-pressure cylinders with maximum tensile strength limitation of 1,100 N/mm{sup 2}. In order to extend the ISO 9809 rules for higher than 1,100 N/mm{sup 2} strength level cylinders, a working group WG14 was formed in 1989 to develop new rules to assure adequate fracture resistance. In 1994, WG14 recommended a simple, but unique flawed cylinder test method for design qualification of the cylinder and acceptance criteria to assure adequate fracture resistance. WG14 also recommended Charpy-V-notch impact tests to control the required fracture resistance on production cylinders. This paper presents the technical basis that was employed in developing the flawed cylinder test method and acceptance criteria. The specification was developed for seamless steel cylinders having actual strength in the range of 1,100 to 1,400 N/mm{sup 2} and cylindrical section wall thickness in the range of 3 to 10 mm. Flawed cylinder tests were conducted on several hundred cylinders of varying sizes and strength levels. The specification requires to demonstrate LEAK-BEFORE-BREAK performance of the cylinder having flaw length equal to 1.6 (o.d. {times} t{sub design}){sup 0.5} at failure pressure = (t{sub design}/t{sub actual}) x Design Pressure.

  19. Broadband inversion of 1J(CC) responses in 1,n-ADEQUATE spectra.

    PubMed

    Reibarkh, Mikhail; Williamson, R Thomas; Martin, Gary E; Bermel, Wolfgang

    2013-11-01

    Establishing the carbon skeleton of a molecule greatly facilitates the process of structure elucidation, both manual and computer-assisted. Recent advances in the family of ADEQUATE experiments demonstrated their potential in this regard. 1,1-ADEQUATE, which provides direct (13)C-(13)C correlation via (1)J(CC), and 1,n-ADEQUATE, which typically yields (3)J(CC) and (1)J(CC) correlations, are more sensitive and more widely applicable experiments than INADEQUATE and PANACEA. A recently reported modified pulse sequence that semi-selectively inverts (1)J(CC) correlations in 1,n-ADEQUATE spectra provided a significant improvement, allowing (1)J(CC) and (n)J(CC) correlations to be discerned in the same spectrum. However, the reported experiment requires a careful matching of the amplitude transfer function with (1)J(CC) coupling constants in order to achieve the inversion, and even then some (1)J(CC) correlations could still have positive intensity due to the oscillatory nature of the transfer function. Both shortcomings limit the practicality of the method. We now report a new, dual-optimized inverted (1)J(CC) 1,n-ADEQUATE experiment, which provides more uniform inversion of (1)J(CC) correlations across the range of 29-82 Hz. Unlike the original method, the dual optimization experiment does not require fine-tuning for the molecule's (1)J(CC) coupling constant values. Even more usefully, the dual-optimized version provides up to two-fold improvement in signal-to-noise for some long-range correlations. Using modern, cryogenically-cooled probes, the experiment can be successfully applied to samples of ~1 mg under favorable circumstances. The improvements afforded by dual optimization inverted (1)J(CC) 1,n-ADEQUATE experiment make it a useful and practical tool for NMR structure elucidation and should facilitate the implementation and utilization of the experiment.

  20. Self-reported segregation experience throughout the life course and its association with adequate health literacy.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Melody S; Gaskin, Darrell J; Si, Xuemei; Stafford, Jewel D; Lachance, Christina; Kaphingst, Kimberly A

    2012-09-01

    Residential segregation has been shown to be associated with health outcomes and health care utilization. We examined the association between racial composition of five physical environments throughout the life course and adequate health literacy among 836 community health center patients in Suffolk County, NY. Respondents who attended a mostly White junior high school or currently lived in a mostly White neighborhood were more likely to have adequate health literacy compared to those educated or living in predominantly minority or diverse environments. This association was independent of the respondent's race, ethnicity, age, education, and country of birth.

  1. Living with Oxygen Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Oxygen Therapy Oxygen therapy helps many people function better and be ... chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) Although you may need oxygen therapy continuously or for long periods, it doesn' ...

  2. The Presence of Oxygen in Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Kimmel, Howard M; Grant, Anthony; Ditata, James

    2016-08-01

    Oxygen must be tightly governed in all phases of wound healing to produce viable granulation tissue. This idea of tight regulation has yet to be disputed; however, the role of oxygen at the cellular and molecular levels still is not fully understood as it pertains to its place in healing wounds. In an attempt to better understand the dynamics of oxygen on living tissue and its potential role as a therapy in wound healing, a substantial literature review of the role of oxygen in wound healing was performed and the following key points were extrapolated: 1) During energy metabolism, oxygen is needed for mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase as it produces high-energy phosphates that are needed for many cellular functions, 2) oxygen is also involved in the hydroxylation of proline and lysine into procollagen, which leads to collagen maturation, 3) in angiogenesis, hypoxia is required to start the process of wound healing, but it has been shown that if oxygen is administered it can accelerate and sustain vessel growth, 4) the antimicrobial action of oxygen occurs when nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-linked oxygenase acts as a catalyst for the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), a superoxide ion which kills bacteria, and 5) the level of evidence is moderate for the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) for diabetic foot ulcers, crush injuries, and soft-tissue infections. The authors hypothesized that HBOT would be beneficial to arterial insufficiency wounds and other ailments, but at this time further study is needed before HBOT would be indicated. PMID:27560469

  3. Tissue types (image)

    MedlinePlus

    There are 4 basic types of tissue: connective tissue, epithelial tissue, muscle tissue, and nervous tissue. Connective tissue supports other tissues and binds them together (bone, blood, and lymph tissues). Epithelial tissue ...

  4. Quadriceps oxygenation changes during walking and running on a treadmill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quaresima, Valentina; Pizzi, Assunta; De Blasi, Roberto A.; Ferrari, Adriano; de Angelis, Marco; Ferrari, Marco

    1995-04-01

    Vastus lateralis muscle oxygenation was investigated on volunteers as well as muscular dystrophy patients during a walking test, and on volunteers during a free running by a continuous wave near infrared instrument. The data were analyzed using an oxygenation index independent on pathlength changes. Walking did not significantly affect the oxygenation of volunteers and patients. A relative deoxygenation was found only during free running indicating an unbalance between oxygen supply and tissue oxygen extraction. Preliminary measurements of exercising muscle oxygen saturation were performed by a 110 MHz frequency-domain, multisource instrument.

  5. Engineering of implantable liver tissues.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Yasuyuki; Nishikawa, M; Evenou, F; Hamon, M; Huang, H; Montagne, K P; Kojima, N; Fujii, T; Niino, T

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter, from the engineering point of view, we introduce the results from our group and related research on three typical configurations of engineered liver tissues; cell sheet-based tissues, sheet-like macroporous scaffold-based tissues, and tissues based on special scaffolds that comprise a flow channel network. The former two do not necessitate in vitro prevascularization and are thus promising in actual human clinical trials for liver diseases that can be recovered by relatively smaller tissue mass. The third approach can implant a much larger mass but is still not yet feasible. In all cases, oxygen supply is the key engineering factor. For the first configuration, direct oxygen supply using an oxygen-permeable polydimethylsiloxane membrane enables various liver cells to exhibit distinct behaviors, complete double layers of mature hepatocytes and fibroblasts, spontaneous thick tissue formation of hepatocarcinoma cells and fetal hepatocytes. Actual oxygen concentration at the cell level can be strictly controlled in this culture system. Using this property, we found that initially low then subsequently high oxygen concentrations were favorable to growth and maturation of fetal cells. For the second configuration, combination of poly-L: -lactic acid 3D scaffolds and appropriate growth factor cocktails provides a suitable microenvironment for the maturation of cells in vitro but the cell growth is limited to a certain distance from the inner surfaces of the macropores. However, implantation to the mesentery leaves of animals allows the cells again to proliferate and pack the remaining spaces of the macroporous structure, suggesting the high feasibility of 3D culture of hepatocyte progenitors for liver tissue-based therapies. For the third configuration, we proposed a design criterion concerning the dimensions of flow channels based on oxygen diffusion and consumption around the channel. Due to the current limitation in the resolution of 3D

  6. Modelling and Detecting Tumour Oxygenation Levels

    PubMed Central

    Skeldon, Anne C.; Chaffey, Gary; Lloyd, David J. B.; Mohan, Vineet; Bradley, David A.; Nisbet, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Tumours that are low in oxygen (hypoxic) tend to be more aggressive and respond less well to treatment. Knowing the spatial distribution of oxygen within a tumour could therefore play an important role in treatment planning, enabling treatment to be targeted in such a way that higher doses of radiation are given to the more radioresistant tissue. Mapping the spatial distribution of oxygen in vivo is difficult. Radioactive tracers that are sensitive to different levels of oxygen are under development and in the early stages of clinical use. The concentration of these tracer chemicals can be detected via positron emission tomography resulting in a time dependent concentration profile known as a tissue activity curve (TAC). Pharmaco-kinetic models have then been used to deduce oxygen concentration from TACs. Some such models have included the fact that the spatial distribution of oxygen is often highly inhomogeneous and some have not. We show that the oxygen distribution has little impact on the form of a TAC; it is only the mean oxygen concentration that matters. This has significant consequences both in terms of the computational power needed, and in the amount of information that can be deduced from TACs. PMID:22761687

  7. Barometric calibration of a luminescent oxygen probe.

    PubMed

    Golub, Aleksander S; Pittman, Roland N

    2016-04-01

    The invention of the phosphorescence quenching method for the measurement of oxygen concentration in blood and tissue revolutionized physiological studies of oxygen transport in living organisms. Since the pioneering publication by Vanderkooi and Wilson in 1987, many researchers have contributed to the measurement of oxygen in the microcirculation, to oxygen imaging in tissues and microvessels, and to the development of new extracellular and intracellular phosphorescent probes. However, there is a problem of congruency in data from different laboratories, because of interlaboratory variability of the calibration coefficients in the Stern-Volmer equation. Published calibrations for a common oxygen probe, Pd-porphyrin + bovine serum albumin (BSA), vary because of differences in the techniques used. These methods are used for the formation of oxygen standards: chemical titration, calibrated gas mixtures, and an oxygen electrode. Each method in turn also needs calibration. We have designed a barometric method for the calibration of oxygen probes by using a regulated vacuum to set multiple PO2 standards. The method is fast and accurate and can be applied to biological fluids obtained during or after an experiment. Calibration over the full physiological PO2 range (1-120 mmHg) takes ∼15 min and requires 1-2 mg of probe. PMID:26846556

  8. 75 FR 5893 - Suspension of Community Eligibility for Failure To Maintain Adequate Floodplain Management...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-05

    ... FR 51735. Executive Order 13132, Federalism. This rule involves no policies that have ] federalism....C. 4001 et seq., Reorganization Plan No. 3 of 1978, 3 CFR, 1978 Comp., p. 329; E.O. 12127, 44 FR... To Maintain Adequate Floodplain Management Regulations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management...

  9. 26 CFR 1.467-2 - Rent accrual for section 467 rental agreements without adequate interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... interest (the stated rate of interest) on deferred or prepaid fixed rent at a single fixed rate (as defined in § 1.1273-1(c)(1)(iii)); (B) The stated rate of interest on fixed rent is no lower than 110 percent... provide for a variable rate of interest. For purposes of the adequate interest test under paragraph...

  10. Towards Defining Adequate Lithium Trials for Individuals with Mental Retardation and Mental Illness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pary, Robert J.

    1991-01-01

    Use of lithium with mentally retarded individuals with psychiatric conditions and/or behavior disturbances is discussed. The paper describes components of an adequate clinical trial and reviews case studies and double-blind cases. The paper concludes that aggression is the best indicator for lithium use, and reviews treatment parameters and…

  11. How Much and What Kind? Identifying an Adequate Technology Infrastructure for Early Childhood Education. Policy Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daugherty, Lindsay; Dossani, Rafiq; Johnson, Erin-Elizabeth; Wright, Cameron

    2014-01-01

    To realize the potential benefits of technology use in early childhood education (ECE), and to ensure that technology can help to address the digital divide, providers, families of young children, and young children themselves must have access to an adequate technology infrastructure. The goals for technology use in ECE that a technology…

  12. Evaluating the Reliability of Selected School-Based Indices of Adequate Reading Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Courtney E.

    2010-01-01

    The present study examined the stability (i.e., 4-month and 12-month test-retest reliability) of six selected school-based indices of adequate reading progress. The total sampling frame included between 3970 and 5655 schools depending on the index and research question. Each school had at least 40 second-grade students that had complete Oral…

  13. 33 CFR 155.4050 - Ensuring that the salvors and marine firefighters are adequate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ensuring that the salvors and marine firefighters are adequate. 155.4050 Section 155.4050 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL POLLUTION...

  14. Performance Effects of Failure to Make Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP): Evidence from a Regression Discontinuity Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemelt, Steven W.

    2011-01-01

    As the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) law moves through the reauthorization process, it is important to understand the basic performance impacts of its central structure of accountability. In this paper, I examine the effects of failure to make Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) under NCLB on subsequent student math and reading performance at the school…

  15. Determining Adequate Yearly Progress in a State Performance or Proficiency Index Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erpenbach, William J.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present an overview regarding how several states use a performance or proficiency index in their determination of adequate yearly progress (AYP) under the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB). Typically, indexes are based on one of two weighting schemes: (1) either they weight academic performance levels--also…

  16. The Relationship between Parental Involvement and Adequate Yearly Progress among Urban, Suburban, and Rural Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Xin; Shen, Jianping; Krenn, Huilan Y.

    2014-01-01

    Using national data from the 2007-08 School and Staffing Survey, we compared the relationships between parental involvement and school outcomes related to adequate yearly progress (AYP) in urban, suburban, and rural schools. Parent-initiated parental involvement demonstrated significantly positive relationships with both making AYP and staying off…

  17. Effect of tranquilizers on animal resistance to the adequate stimuli of the vestibular apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maksimovich, Y. B.; Khinchikashvili, N. V.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of tranquilizers on vestibulospinal reflexes and motor activity was studied in 900 centrifuged albino mice. Actometric studies have shown that the tranquilizers have a group capacity for increasing animal resistance to the action of adequate stimuli to the vestibular apparatus.

  18. Human milk feeding supports adequate growth in infants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite current nutritional strategies, premature infants remain at high risk for extrauterine growth restriction. The use of an exclusive human milk-based diet is associated with decreased incidence of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), but concerns exist about infants achieving adequate growth. The ...

  19. [Factors associated with adequate fruit and vegetable intake by schoolchildren in Santa Catarina State, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Costa, Larissa da Cunha Feio; Vasconcelos, Francisco de Assis Guedes de; Corso, Arlete Catarina Tittoni

    2012-06-01

    This study aimed to estimate fruit and vegetable intake and identify associated factors among schoolchildren in Santa Catarina State, Brazil. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 4,964 students from public and private schools in eight districts in the State, analyzing socioeconomic and anthropometric data and dietary intake. Adequate fruit and vegetable intake was defined as five or more servings per day. Poisson regression was performed to test associations between fruit and vegetable intake and independent variables (p < 0.05). Adequate intake was found in 2.7% of children, while 26.6% of the sample did not consume any fruits and vegetables. In the analysis of the association between independent variables and adequate fruit and vegetable intake in the total sample, only geographic region (residents in western Santa Catarina) and consumption of candy were significantly associated. In the stratified analysis by sex, for boys, only geographic region was associated, while among girls, region and candy consumption were significantly associated with adequate fruit and vegetable intake. The findings indicate the need for specific strategies in the school community to improve fruit and vegetable intake by schoolchildren.

  20. 42 CFR 438.207 - Assurances of adequate capacity and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Assurances of adequate capacity and services. 438.207 Section 438.207 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS MANAGED CARE Quality Assessment and...

  1. 42 CFR 438.207 - Assurances of adequate capacity and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Assurances of adequate capacity and services. 438.207 Section 438.207 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS MANAGED CARE Quality Assessment and...

  2. 42 CFR 438.207 - Assurances of adequate capacity and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Assurances of adequate capacity and services. 438.207 Section 438.207 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS MANAGED CARE Quality Assessment and...

  3. 42 CFR 438.207 - Assurances of adequate capacity and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Assurances of adequate capacity and services. 438.207 Section 438.207 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS MANAGED CARE Quality Assessment and...

  4. Percentage of Adults with High Cholesterol Whose LDL Cholesterol Levels Are Adequately Controlled

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Adults with High Cholesterol Whose LDL Cholesterol Levels are Adequately Controlled High cholesterol can double a ... with High Cholesterol that is Controlled by Education Level 8k4c-k22f Download these data » Click on legends ...

  5. Perceptions of Teachers in Their First Year of School Restructuring: Failure to Make Adequate Yearly Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moser, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    The 2007-2008 school year marked the first year Florida's Title I schools that did not made Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) for five consecutive years entered into restructuring as mandated by the "No Child Left Behind Act" of 2001. My study examines the perceptions of teacher entering into their first year of school restructuring due to failure to…

  6. The Unequal Effect of Adequate Yearly Progress: Evidence from School Visits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Abigail B.; Clift, Jack W.

    2010-01-01

    The authors report insights, based on annual site visits to elementary and middle schools in three states from 2004 to 2006, into the incentive effect of the No Child Left Behind Act's requirement that increasing percentages of students make Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) in every public school. They develop a framework, drawing on the physics…

  7. Influenza 2005-2006: vaccine supplies adequate, but bird flu looms.

    PubMed

    Mossad, Sherif B

    2005-11-01

    Influenza vaccine supplies appear to be adequate for the 2005-2006 season, though delivery has been somewhat delayed. However, in the event of a pandemic of avian flu-considered inevitable by most experts, although no one knows when it will happen-the United States would be woefully unprepared. PMID:16315443

  8. Prenatal zinc supplementation of zinc-adequate rats adversely affects immunity in offspring

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We previously showed that zinc (Zn) supplementation of Zn-adequate dams induced immunosuppressive effects that persist in the offspring after weaning. We investigated whether the immunosuppressive effects were due to in utero exposure and/or mediated via milk using a cross-fostering design. Pregnant...

  9. Inferential Processing among Adequate and Struggling Adolescent Comprehenders and Relations to Reading Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barth, Amy E.; Barnes, Marcia; Francis, David; Vaughn, Sharon; York, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Separate mixed model analyses of variance were conducted to examine the effect of textual distance on the accuracy and speed of text consistency judgments among adequate and struggling comprehenders across grades 6-12 (n = 1,203). Multiple regressions examined whether accuracy in text consistency judgments uniquely accounted for variance in…

  10. What Is the Cost of an Adequate Vermont High School Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rucker, Frank D.

    2010-01-01

    Access to an adequate education has been widely considered an undeniable right since Chief Justice Warren stated in his landmark decision that "Today, education is perhaps the most important function of state and local governments...it is doubtful that any child may reasonably be expected to succeed in life if he is denied the opportunity of an…

  11. Calculating and Reducing Errors Associated with the Evaluation of Adequate Yearly Progress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Richard

    In the Spring, 1996, issue of "CRESST Line," E. Baker and R. Linn commented that, in efforts to measure the progress of schools, "the fluctuations due to differences in the students themselves could conceal differences in instructional effects." This is particularly true in the context of the evaluation of adequate yearly progress required by…

  12. 26 CFR 1.467-2 - Rent accrual for section 467 rental agreements without adequate interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... provide for a variable rate of interest. For purposes of the adequate interest test under paragraph (b)(1) of this section, if a section 467 rental agreement provides for variable interest, the rental... date as the issue date) for the variable rates called for by the rental agreement. For purposes of...

  13. 26 CFR 1.467-2 - Rent accrual for section 467 rental agreements without adequate interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... provide for a variable rate of interest. For purposes of the adequate interest test under paragraph (b)(1) of this section, if a section 467 rental agreement provides for variable interest, the rental... date as the issue date) for the variable rates called for by the rental agreement. For purposes of...

  14. 9 CFR 2.40 - Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care (dealers and exhibitors).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care (dealers and exhibitors). 2.40 Section 2.40 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Attending...

  15. 9 CFR 2.40 - Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care (dealers and exhibitors).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care (dealers and exhibitors). 2.40 Section 2.40 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Attending...

  16. 9 CFR 2.33 - Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care. 2.33 Section 2.33 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Research Facilities § 2.33 Attending veterinarian...

  17. 9 CFR 2.40 - Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care (dealers and exhibitors).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care (dealers and exhibitors). 2.40 Section 2.40 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Attending...

  18. 9 CFR 2.40 - Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care (dealers and exhibitors).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care (dealers and exhibitors). 2.40 Section 2.40 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Attending...

  19. 9 CFR 2.33 - Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care. 2.33 Section 2.33 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Research Facilities § 2.33 Attending veterinarian...

  20. 9 CFR 2.33 - Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care. 2.33 Section 2.33 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Research Facilities § 2.33 Attending veterinarian...

  1. 9 CFR 2.33 - Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care. 2.33 Section 2.33 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Research Facilities § 2.33 Attending veterinarian...

  2. 9 CFR 2.40 - Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care (dealers and exhibitors).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care (dealers and exhibitors). 2.40 Section 2.40 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Attending...

  3. 9 CFR 2.33 - Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care. 2.33 Section 2.33 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Research Facilities § 2.33 Attending veterinarian...

  4. 36 CFR 13.960 - Who determines when there is adequate snow cover?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Who determines when there is adequate snow cover? 13.960 Section 13.960 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Denali National Park...

  5. 42 CFR 417.568 - Adequate financial records, statistical data, and cost finding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Adequate financial records, statistical data, and... financial records, statistical data, and cost finding. (a) Maintenance of records. (1) An HMO or CMP must maintain sufficient financial records and statistical data for proper determination of costs payable by...

  6. Oxygen-derived species: Their relation to human disease and environmental stress

    SciTech Connect

    Halliwell, B. |; Cross, C.E.

    1994-12-01

    Free radicals and other reactive oxygen species (ROS) are constantly formed in the human body, often for useful metabolic purposes. Antioxidant defenses protect against them, but these defenses are not completely adequate, and systems that repair damage by ROS are also necessary. Mild oxidative stress often induces antioxidant defense enzymes, but severe stress can cause oxidative damage to lipids, proteins, and DNA within cells, leading to such events as DNA strand breakage and disruption of calcium ion metabolism. Oxidative stress can result from exposure to toxic agents, and by the process of tissue injury itself. Ozone, oxides of nitrogen, and cigarette smoke can cause oxidative damage; but the molecular targets that they damage may not be the same. 88 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  7. Effect of 6-day hypokinesia on oxygen metabolism indices in elderly and senile subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanov, L. A.; Orlov, P. A.

    1978-01-01

    After a strict 6 day confinement to bed of elderly and senile subjects the oxygen supply of the subcutaneous cellular tissue was impaired, and the intensity of its tissue respiration was somewhat reduced. The vacat-oxygen of the blood and urine, the coefficient of incomplete oxidation, and the oxygen deficiency in the organism were increased.

  8. Measurement of arterial plasma oxygenation in dynamic oxygen-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Kershaw, Lucy E; Naish, Josephine H; McGrath, Deirdre M; Waterton, John C; Parker, Geoffrey J M

    2010-12-01

    Inhaled oxygen can be used as a contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging, due to the T(1) shortening effect of the oxygen dissolved in blood and tissue water. In this study, blood T(1) was measured dynamically in 14 volunteers (seven smokers, seven never-smokers) as the inhaled gas was switched from medical air to 100% oxygen and back to medical air. These T(1) values were converted to changes in partial pressure of oxygen, which were found to be in agreement with literature values. There were differences in curve shape and curve height between the smoker and never-smoker groups, suggesting differences in lung function due to smoking-related damage. These curves could be used as an input function for modeling of oxygen uptake in tissues. The differences between groups highlight the importance of measuring such an input function for each individual rather than relying on an assumed measurement.

  9. Science to practice: is t2* enough to assess oxygenation?

    PubMed

    Bryan, R Nick

    2012-02-01

    As initially reported by Ogawa et al (1), the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging T2* blood oxygen level–dependent (BOLD) signal is sensitive to blood oxygen concentration; however, this signal is also sensitive to a number of other normal and abnormal tissue features. As a result, T2* imaging alone cannot be used to accurately measure vascular oxygenation, much less tissue oxygenation. However, with separate MR imaging measurements of other tissue factors influencing T2*, it might be possible to noninvasively image local tissue oxygen. Such a capability could be of great clinical importance, not only in patients with hypoxic or ischemic disease states, but also in patients with other pathologic conditions that have abnormal respiratory metabolism, such as cancer.

  10. Rapid Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Overcomes Fulminant Myocarditis Induced by 5‑Fluorouracil

    PubMed Central

    Pachika, Ajay; Grubb, Kendra J.; DeFilippis, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    Fulminant myocarditis is a rare but potentially life-threatening illness caused by 5-fluorouracil cardiotoxicity. Data supporting the use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for the treatment of fulminant myocarditis are limited. A 49-year-old, previously healthy white man, recently diagnosed with anal squamous cell carcinoma, developed severe chest pain hours after completing his first 96-hour intravenous 5-fluorouracil treatment. Over a period of 3 days from onset of symptoms, the patient developed cardiogenic shock secondary to fulminant myocarditis induced by 5-fluorouracil cardiotoxicity. This required emergency initiation of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. The patient's systolic function recovered by day 5, and on the 17th day he was discharged in hemodynamically stable condition, without symptoms of heart failure. This case shows the importance of prompt recognition of cardiogenic shock secondary to 5-fluorouracil–induced myocarditis and how the immediate initiation of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation can restore adequate tissue perfusion, leading to myocardial recovery and ultimately the survival of the patient. PMID:27127440

  11. Artificial oxygen transport protein

    DOEpatents

    Dutton, P. Leslie

    2014-09-30

    This invention provides heme-containing peptides capable of binding molecular oxygen at room temperature. These compounds may be useful in the absorption of molecular oxygen from molecular oxygen-containing atmospheres. Also included in the invention are methods for treating an oxygen transport deficiency in a mammal.

  12. Biomechanics of brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Prevost, Thibault P; Balakrishnan, Asha; Suresh, Subra; Socrate, Simona

    2011-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of porcine brain tissue, obtained from a series of in vitro observations and experiments, is analyzed and described here with the aid of a large strain, nonlinear, viscoelastic constitutive model. Mixed gray and white matter samples excised from the superior cortex were tested in unconfined uniaxial compression within 15h post mortem. The test sequence consisted of three successive load-unload segments at strain rates of 1, 0.1 and 0.01 s⁻¹, followed by stress relaxation (n=25). The volumetric compliance of the tissue was assessed for a subset of specimens (n=7) using video extensometry techniques. The tissue response exhibited moderate compressibility, substantial nonlinearity, hysteresis, conditioning and rate dependence. A large strain kinematics nonlinear viscoelastic model was developed to account for the essential features of the tissue response over the entire deformation history. The corresponding material parameters were obtained by fitting the model to the measured conditioned response (axial and volumetric) via a numerical optimization scheme. The model successfully captures the observed complexities of the material response in loading, unloading and relaxation over the entire range of strain rates. The accuracy of the model was further verified by comparing model predictions with the tissue response in unconfined compression at higher strain rate (10 s⁻¹) and with literature data in uniaxial tension. The proposed constitutive framework was also found to be adequate to model the loading response of brain tissue in uniaxial compression over a wider range of strain rates (0.01-3000 s⁻¹), thereby providing a valuable tool for simulations of dynamic transients (impact, blast/shock wave propagation) leading to traumatic brain injury.

  13. Reactions of singlet oxygen with pine pollen.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowty, B.; Laseter, J. L.; Griffin, G. W.; Politzer, I. R.; Walkinshaw, C. H.

    1973-01-01

    A study was initiated to determine whether viable atmospheric particles such as plant pollens and fungal spores containing unsaturated lipids can interact with singlet oxygen to give oxygenated products that are potentially toxic. The results obtained confirm that surface and near surface components of common viable particulate matter in the atmosphere may be subject to rapid oxidation by singlet oxygen, leading to products which are probably allylic hydroperoxides. In connection with increasing atmospheric pollution, it is important to note that materials toxic to mammalian lung tissue may be oxidatively produced on the surfaces of viable particulate matter.

  14. Oxygen Sensing and Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, Nanduri R; Semenza, Gregg L

    2015-09-01

    The discovery of carotid bodies as sensory receptors for detecting arterial blood oxygen levels, and the identification and elucidation of the roles of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) in oxygen homeostasis have propelled the field of oxygen biology. This review highlights the gas-messenger signaling mechanisms associated with oxygen sensing, as well as transcriptional and non-transcriptional mechanisms underlying the maintenance of oxygen homeostasis by HIFs and their relevance to physiology and pathology.

  15. Poly-methyl pentene oxygenators have improved gas exchange capability and reduced transfusion requirements in adult extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Khoshbin, Espeed; Roberts, Neil; Harvey, Chris; Machin, David; Killer, Hilliary; Peek, Giles J; Sosnowski, Andrzej W; Firmin, Richard K

    2005-01-01

    The performance of poly-methyl pentene (PMP) oxygenators (Medos Hilite 7000LT) was compared with that of silicone membrane (SM) oxygenators (Medtronic 1-4500-2A) for adult extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Forty consecutive patients were selected retrospectively pre- and post-introduction of PMP oxygenators. They were selected according to the dates they received ECMO and were separated into two equal groups with similar backgrounds. The flow path resistance, gas and heat exchange efficiency, consumption of coagulation factors and platelets, blood transfusion requirements, and incidence of clots for each oxygenator type was assessed. Adult PMP oxygenators showed lower blood path resistance than SM oxygenators. However, lower consumption of blood products in these oxygenators was a direct result of their smaller surface area and heparin coated design, reducing contact activation of coagulation factors. These oxygenators are noticeably smaller, require lower priming volumes, and have better gas exchange capability than SM oxygenators. They showed greater stability and preservation of coagulation factors and platelets compared with SM oxygenators. They also had the advantage of a functioning integrated heat exchanger. Using a single PMP oxygenator in the first instance may be adequate for the majority of patients and would significantly reduce red blood cell consumption during ECMO.

  16. Ensuring smokers are adequately informed: reflections on consumer rights, manufacturer responsibilities, and policy implications

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, S; Liberman, J

    2005-01-01

    The right to information is a fundamental consumer value. Following the advent of health warnings, the tobacco industry has repeatedly asserted that smokers are fully informed of the risks they take, while evidence demonstrates widespread superficial levels of awareness and understanding. There remains much that tobacco companies could do to fulfil their responsibilities to inform smokers. We explore issues involved in the meaning of "adequately informed" smoking and discuss some of the key policy and regulatory implications. We use the idea of a smoker licensing scheme—under which it would be illegal to sell to smokers who had not demonstrated an adequate level of awareness—as a device to explore some of these issues. We also explore some of the difficulties that addiction poses for the notion that smokers might ever voluntarily assume the risks of smoking. PMID:16046703

  17. The concept of adequate causation and Max Weber's comparative sociology of religion.

    PubMed

    Buss, A

    1999-06-01

    Max Weber's The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism, studied in isolation, shows mainly an elective affinity or an adequacy on the level of meaning between the Protestant ethic and the 'spirit' of capitalism. Here it is suggested that Weber's subsequent essays on 'The Economic Ethics of World Religions' are the result of his opinion that adequacy on the level of meaning needs and can be verified by causal adequacy. After some introductory remarks, particularly on elective affinity, the paper tries to develop the concept of adequate causation and the related concept of objective possibility on the basis of the work of v. Kries on whom Weber heavily relied. In the second part, this concept is used to show how the study of the economic ethics of India, China, Rome and orthodox Russia can support the thesis that the 'spirit' of capitalism, although it may not have been caused by the Protestant ethic, was perhaps adequately caused by it. PMID:15260028

  18. Ensuring smokers are adequately informed: reflections on consumer rights, manufacturer responsibilities, and policy implications.

    PubMed

    Chapman, S; Liberman, J

    2005-08-01

    The right to information is a fundamental consumer value. Following the advent of health warnings, the tobacco industry has repeatedly asserted that smokers are fully informed of the risks they take, while evidence demonstrates widespread superficial levels of awareness and understanding. There remains much that tobacco companies could do to fulfil their responsibilities to inform smokers. We explore issues involved in the meaning of "adequately informed" smoking and discuss some of the key policy and regulatory implications. We use the idea of a smoker licensing scheme-under which it would be illegal to sell to smokers who had not demonstrated an adequate level of awareness-as a device to explore some of these issues. We also explore some of the difficulties that addiction poses for the notion that smokers might ever voluntarily assume the risks of smoking. PMID:16046703

  19. The Rate of Oxygen Utilization by Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Brett A.; Venkataraman, Sujatha; Buettner, Garry R.

    2011-01-01

    The discovery of oxygen is considered by some to be the most important scientific discovery of all time – from both physical-chemical/astrophysics and biology/evolution viewpoints. One of the major developments during evolution is the ability to capture dioxygen in the environment and deliver it to each cell in the multicellular, complex mammalian body -- on demand, i.e. just-in-time. Humans use oxygen to extract approximately 2550 Calories (10.4 MJ) from food to meet daily energy requirements. This combustion requires about 22 moles of dioxygen per day, or 2.5 × 10-4 mol s-1. This is an average rate of oxygen utilization of 2.5 × 10-18 mol cell-1 s-1, i.e. 2.5 amol cell-1 s-1. Cells have a wide range of oxygen utilization, depending on cell type, function, and biological status. Measured rates of oxygen utilization by mammalian cells in culture range from <1 to >350 amol cell-1 s-1. There is a loose positive linear correlation of the rate of oxygen consumption (OCR) by mammalian cells in culture with cell volume and cell protein. The use of oxygen by cells and tissues is an essential aspect of the basic redox biology of cells and tissues. This type of quantitative information is fundamental to investigations in quantitative redox biology, especially redox systems biology. PMID:21664270

  20. Low flow oxygen therapy from a portable oxygen concentrator or an oxygen cylinder effectively treats hypoxemia in anesthetized white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus).

    PubMed

    Fahlman, Asa; Caulkett, Nigel; Woodbury, Murray; Duke-Novakovski, Tanya; Wourms, Vincent

    2014-06-01

    For treatment of hypoxemia, delivery of the minimum effective oxygen flow rate is advantageous during field anesthesia because it prolongs the life of the oxygen cylinder. Portable oxygen concentrators as the oxygen source require less logistical considerations than cylinders and are a safer alternative during helicopter field work because they are nonexplosive devices. The objective of this study was to evaluate low oxygen flow rates by continuous or pulsed intranasal delivery for treatment of hypoxemia in anesthetized white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). Nine captive adult female deer (body mass 56-72 kg) were physically restrained in a drop-floor chute and hand injected intramuscularly with medetomidine (0.1-0.14 mg/kg) and ketamine (2.5-4.3 mg/kg). Intranasal oxygen was delivered from an oxygen cylinder at continuous flow rates of 1 and 2 L/min or from a battery driven oxygen concentrator (EverGo Portable Oxygen Concentrator, Respironics) with pulse-dose delivery (maximum capacity of 1.05 L/min). The pulse-dose setting (pulse volume 12-70 ml) was adjusted according to the respiratory rate. Arterial blood gases were analyzed before, during, and after O2 supplementation. A 10-min washout period was allowed between treatment groups. All three treatments adequately treated hypoxemia. The partial pressure of arterial oxygenation increased significantly from baseline values of 55 +/- 10 to 115 +/- 31 mm Hg during supplementation from the oxygen concentrator, to 138 +/- 21 mm Hg during supplementation from the oxygen cylinder at 1 L/min, and to 201 +/- 42 mm Hg at 2 L/min. In conclusion, low flow rates of intranasal oxygen supplemented continuously from an oxygen cylinder or by pulsed delivery from a portable oxygen concentrator effectively treated hypoxemia in anesthetized white-tailed deer.

  1. Myth 19: Is Advanced Placement an Adequate Program for Gifted Students?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Shelagh A.

    2009-01-01

    Is it a myth that Advanced Placement (AP) is an adequate program for gifted students? AP is so covered with myths and assumptions that it is hard to get a clear view of the issues. In this article, the author finds the answer about AP by looking at current realties. First, AP is hard for gifted students to avoid. Second, AP never was a program…

  2. Balancing the Risks and Benefits of Oxygen Therapy in Critically III Adults

    PubMed Central

    Mutlu, Gökhan M.

    2013-01-01

    Oxygen therapy is an integral part of the treatment of critically ill patients. Maintenance of adequate oxygen delivery to vital organs often requires the administration of supplemental oxygen, sometimes at high concentrations. Although oxygen therapy is lifesaving, it may be associated with deleterious effects when administered for prolonged periods at high concentrations. Here, we review the recent advances in our understanding of the molecular responses to hypoxia and high levels of oxygen and review the current guidelines for oxygen therapy in critically ill patients. PMID:23546490

  3. Bioelement effects on thyroid gland in children living in iodine-adequate territory.

    PubMed

    Gorbachev, Anatoly L; Skalny, Anatoly V; Koubassov, Roman V

    2007-01-01

    Endemic goitre is a primary pathology of thyroid gland and critical medico social problem in many countries. A dominant cause of endemic goitre is iodine deficiency. However, besides primary iodine deficiency, the goitre may probably develop due to effects of other bioelement imbalances, essential to thyroid function maintenance. Here we studied 44 cases of endemic goitre in prepubertal children (7-10 y.o.) living in iodine-adequate territory. Thyroid volume was estimated by ultrasonometry. Main bioelements (Al, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, I, Mg, Mn, Pb, Se, Si, Zn) were determined in hair samples by ICP-OES/ICP-MS method. Relationships between hair content of bioelements and thyroid gland size were estimated by multiple regressions. The regression model revealed significant positive relations between thyroid volume and Cr, Si, Mn contents. However, the actual factor of thyroid gland increase was only Si excess in organism. Significant negative relations of thyroid volume were revealed with I, Mg, Zn, Se, Co and Cd. In spite of this, the actual factors of thyroid gland volume increasing were I, Co, Mg and Se deficiency. Total bioelement contribution in thyroid impairment was estimated as 24%. Thus, it was suggested that endemic goitre in iodine-adequate territory can be formed by bioelement imbalances, namely Si excess and Co, Mg, Se shortage as well as endogenous I deficiency in spite of iodine-adequate environment.

  4. Global Risk Assessment of Aflatoxins in Maize and Peanuts: Are Regulatory Standards Adequately Protective?

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Felicia

    2013-01-01

    The aflatoxins are a group of fungal metabolites that contaminate a variety of staple crops, including maize and peanuts, and cause an array of acute and chronic human health effects. Aflatoxin B1 in particular is a potent liver carcinogen, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) risk is multiplicatively higher for individuals exposed to both aflatoxin and chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV). In this work, we sought to answer the question: do current aflatoxin regulatory standards around the world adequately protect human health? Depending upon the level of protection desired, the answer to this question varies. Currently, most nations have a maximum tolerable level of total aflatoxins in maize and peanuts ranging from 4 to 20ng/g. If the level of protection desired is that aflatoxin exposures would not increase lifetime HCC risk by more than 1 in 100,000 cases in the population, then most current regulatory standards are not adequately protective even if enforced, especially in low-income countries where large amounts of maize and peanuts are consumed and HBV prevalence is high. At the protection level of 1 in 10,000 lifetime HCC cases in the population, however, almost all aflatoxin regulations worldwide are adequately protective, with the exception of several nations in Africa and Latin America. PMID:23761295

  5. Global risk assessment of aflatoxins in maize and peanuts: are regulatory standards adequately protective?

    PubMed

    Wu, Felicia; Stacy, Shaina L; Kensler, Thomas W

    2013-09-01

    The aflatoxins are a group of fungal metabolites that contaminate a variety of staple crops, including maize and peanuts, and cause an array of acute and chronic human health effects. Aflatoxin B1 in particular is a potent liver carcinogen, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) risk is multiplicatively higher for individuals exposed to both aflatoxin and chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV). In this work, we sought to answer the question: do current aflatoxin regulatory standards around the world adequately protect human health? Depending upon the level of protection desired, the answer to this question varies. Currently, most nations have a maximum tolerable level of total aflatoxins in maize and peanuts ranging from 4 to 20ng/g. If the level of protection desired is that aflatoxin exposures would not increase lifetime HCC risk by more than 1 in 100,000 cases in the population, then most current regulatory standards are not adequately protective even if enforced, especially in low-income countries where large amounts of maize and peanuts are consumed and HBV prevalence is high. At the protection level of 1 in 10,000 lifetime HCC cases in the population, however, almost all aflatoxin regulations worldwide are adequately protective, with the exception of several nations in Africa and Latin America.

  6. An adequate Fe nutritional status of maize suppresses infection and biotrophic growth of Colletotrichum graminicola.

    PubMed

    Ye, Fanghua; Albarouki, Emad; Lingam, Brahmasivasenkar; Deising, Holger B; von Wirén, Nicolaus

    2014-07-01

    Iron (Fe) is an essential element for plant pathogens as well as for their host plants. As Fe plays a central role in pathogen virulence, most plants have evolved Fe-withholding strategies to reduce Fe availability to pathogens. On the other hand, plants need Fe for an oxidative burst in their basal defense response against pathogens. To investigate how the plant Fe nutritional status affects plant tolerance to a hemibiotrophic fungal pathogen, we employed the maize-Colletotrichum graminicola pathosystem. Fungal infection progressed rapidly via biotrophic to necrotrophic growth in Fe-deficient leaves, while an adequate Fe nutritional status suppressed the formation of infection structures of C. graminicola already during the early biotrophic growth phase. As indicated by Prussian blue and 3,3'-diaminobenzidine (DAB) staining, the retarding effect of an adequate Fe nutritional status on fungal development coincided temporally and spatially with the recruitment of Fe to infection sites and a local production of H2 O2 . A similar coincidence between local Fe and H2 O2 accumulation was found in a parallel approach employing C. graminicola mutants affected in Fe acquisition and differing in virulence. These results indicate that an adequate Fe nutritional status delays and partially suppresses the fungal infection process and the biotrophic growth phase of C. graminicola, most likely via the recruitment of free Fe to the fungal infection site for a timely oxidative burst.

  7. Oxygen radicals shaping evolution: why fatty acid catabolism leads to peroxisomes while neurons do without it: FADH₂/NADH flux ratios determining mitochondrial radical formation were crucial for the eukaryotic invention of peroxisomes and catabolic tissue differentiation.

    PubMed

    Speijer, Dave

    2011-02-01

    Oxygen radical formation in mitochondria is a highly important, but incompletely understood, attribute of eukaryotic cells. I propose a kinetic model in which the ratio between electrons entering the respiratory chain via FADH₂ or NADH is a major determinant in radical formation. During the breakdown of glucose, this ratio is low; during fatty acid breakdown, this ratio is much higher. The longer the fatty acid, the higher the ratio and the higher the level of radical formation. This means that very long chain fatty acids should be broken down without generation of FADH₂ for mitochondria. This is accomplished in peroxisomes, thus explaining their role and evolution. The model explains many recent observations regarding radical formation by the respiratory chain. It also sheds light on the reasons for the lack of neuronal fatty acid (beta-) oxidation and for beneficial aspects of unsaturated fatty acids. Last but not least, it has very important implications for all models describing eukaryotic origins. PMID:21137096

  8. Tissue Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Dancau, Ana-Maria; Simon, Ronald; Mirlacher, Martina; Sauter, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Modern next-generation sequencing and microarray technologies allow for the simultaneous analysis of all human genes on the DNA, RNA, miRNA, and methylation RNA level. Studies using such techniques have lead to the identification of hundreds of genes with a potential role in cancer or other diseases. The validation of all of these candidate genes requires in situ analysis of high numbers of clinical tissues samples. The tissue microarray technology greatly facilitates such analysis. In this method minute tissue samples (typically 0.6 mm in diameter) from up to 1000 different tissues can be analyzed on one microscope glass slide. All in situ methods suitable for histological studies can be applied to TMAs without major changes of protocols, including immunohistochemistry, fluorescence in situ hybridization, or RNA in situ hybridization. Because all tissues are analyzed simultaneously with the same batch of reagents, TMA studies provide an unprecedented degree of standardization, speed, and cost efficiency.

  9. Tissue Tregs.

    PubMed

    Panduro, Marisella; Benoist, Christophe; Mathis, Diane

    2016-05-20

    The immune system is responsible for defending an organism against the myriad of microbial invaders it constantly confronts. It has become increasingly clear that the immune system has a second major function: the maintenance of organismal homeostasis. Foxp3(+)CD4(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) are important contributors to both of these critical activities, defense being the primary purview of Tregs circulating through lymphoid organs, and homeostasis ensured mainly by their counterparts residing in parenchymal tissues. This review focuses on so-called tissue Tregs. We first survey existing information on the phenotype, function, sustaining factors, and human equivalents of the three best-characterized tissue-Treg populations-those operating in visceral adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, and the colonic lamina propria. We then attempt to distill general principles from this body of work-as concerns the provenance, local adaptation, molecular sustenance, and targets of action of tissue Tregs, in particular.

  10. Intramyocardial oxygen transport by quantitative diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in calves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindbergh, Tobias; Larsson, Marcus; Szabó, Zoltán; Casimir-Ahn, Henrik; Strömberg, Tomas

    2010-03-01

    Intramyocardial oxygen transport was assessed during open-chest surgery in calves by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy using a small intramuscular fiber-optic probe. The sum of hemo- and myoglobin tissue fraction and oxygen saturation, the tissue fraction and oxidation of cytochrome aa3, and the tissue fraction of methemoglobin were estimated using a calibrated empirical light transport model. Increasing the oxygen content in the inhaled gas, 21%-50%-100%, in five calves (group A) gave an increasing oxygen saturation of 19+/-4%, 24+/-5%, and 28+/-8% (p<0.001, ANOVA repeated measures design) and mean tissue fractions of 1.6% (cytochrome aa3) and 1.1% (hemo- and myoglobin). Cardiac arrest in two calves gave an oxygen saturation lower than 5%. In two calves (group B), a left ventricular assistive device (LVAD pump) was implanted. Oxygen saturation in group B animals increased with LVAD pump speed (p<0.001, ANOVA) and with oxygen content in inhaled gas (p<0.001, ANOVA). The cytochrome aa3 oxidation level was above 96% in both group A and group B calves, including the two cases involving cardiac arrest. In conclusion, the estimated tissue fractions and oxygenation/oxidation levels of the myocardial chromophores during respiratory and hemodynamic provocations were in agreement with previously presented results, demonstrating the potential of the method.

  11. Oxygen chemisorption cryogenic refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    The present invention relates to a chemisorption compressor cryogenic refrigerator which employs oxygen to provide cooling at 60 to 100 K. The invention includes dual vessels containing an oxygen absorbent material, alternately heated and cooled to provide a continuous flow of high pressure oxygen, multiple heat exchangers for precooling the oxygen, a Joule-Thomson expansion valve system for expanding the oxygen to partially liquefy it and a liquid oxygen pressure vessel. The primary novelty is that, while it was believed that once oxygen combined with an element or compound the reaction could not reverse to release gaseous oxygen, in this case oxygen will indeed react in a reversible fashion with certain materials and will do so at temperatures and pressures which make it practical for incorporation into a cryogenic refrigeration system.

  12. Titanium-Oxygen Reactivity Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chafey, J. E.; Scheck, W. G.; Witzell, W. E.

    1962-01-01

    A program has been conducted at Astronautics to investigate the likelihood of occurrence of the catastrophic oxidation of titanium alloy sheet under conditions which simulate certain cases of accidental failure of the metal while it is in contact with liquid or gaseous oxygen. Three methods of fracturing the metal were used; they consisted of mechanical puncture, tensile fracture of welded joints, and perforation by very high velocity particles. The results of the tests which have been conducted provide further evidence of the reactivity of titanium with liquid and gaseous oxygen. The evidence indicates that the rapid fracturing of titanium sheet while it is in contact with oxygen initiates the catastrophic oxidation reaction. Initiation occurred when the speed of the fracture was some few feet per second, as in both the drop-weight puncture tests and the static tensile fracture tests of welded joints, as well as when the speed was several thousand feet per second, as in the simulated micrometeoroid penetration tests. The slow propagation of a crack, however, did not initiate the reaction. It may logically be concluded that the localized frictional heat of rapid fracture and/or spontaneous oxidation (exothermic) of minute particles emanating from the fracture cause initiation of the reaction. Under conditions of slow fracture, however, the small heat generated may be adequately dissipated and the reaction is not initiated. A portion of the study conducted consisted of investigating various means by which the reaction might be retarded or prevented. Providing a "barrier" at the titanium-oxygen interface consisting of either aluminum metal or a coating of a petroleum base corrosion inhibitor appeared to be only partially effective in retarding the reaction. The accidental puncturing or similar rupturing of thin-walled pressurized oxygen tanks on missiles and space vehicle will usually constitute loss of function, and may sometimes cause their catastrophic destruction

  13. The Universal Oxygen Connector.

    PubMed

    Lauer, Mark A; Gombkoto, Rebecca L M

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the benefits of using the Universal Oxygen Connector. Until now, an oxygen hose was only able to connect to a 22-mm fitting, such as those found on humidifiers used in the recovery room, and oxygen tubing was only able to connect to a Christmas tree type adapter. The Universal Oxygen Connector, manufactured and sold by International Medical, Inc (Burnsville, Minn), was developed to allow the practitioner to attach either a 22-mm oxygen hose, oxygen tubing, or a 15-mm oxygen adapter to the same connector. Patients benefit from the administration of supplemental oxygen in the perioperative period. Supplemental oxygen has been shown to decrease postoperative hypoxemia, infection, and in some cases, nausea and vomiting. As such, oxygen should be administered during transport from the operating room to the recovery room, in the recovery room, and at times during transport to the patient room and in the patient room. Oxygen also should be administered whenever a patient receiving oxygen is transported. Use of the Universal Oxygen Connector decreases material waste, decreases hospital costs, saves time and effort and, most importantly, promotes patient safety by providing a versatile system for oxygen delivery.

  14. Forearm muscle oxygenation decreases with low levels of voluntary contraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Kahan, N. J.; Hargens, A. R.; Rempel, D. M.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of our investigation was to determine if the near infrared spectroscopy technique was sensitive to changes in tissue oxygenation at low levels of isometric contraction in the extensor carpi radialis brevis muscle. Nine subjects were seated with the right arm abducted to 45 degrees, elbow flexed to 85 degrees, forearm pronated 45 degrees, and wrist and forearm supported on an armrest throughout the protocol. Altered tissue oxygenation was measured noninvasively with near infrared spectroscopy. The near infrared spectroscopy probe was placed over the extensor carpi radialis brevis of the subject's right forearm and secured with an elastic wrap. After 1 minute of baseline measurements taken with the muscle relaxed, four different loads were applied just proximal to the metacarpophalangeal joint such that the subjects isometrically contracted the extensor carpi radialis brevis at 5, 10, 15, and 50% of the maximum voluntary contraction for 1 minute each. A 3-minute recovery period followed each level of contraction. At the end of the protocol, with the probe still in place, a value for ischemic tissue oxygenation was obtained for each subject. This value was considered the physiological zero and hence 0% tissue oxygenation. Mean tissue oxygenation (+/-SE) decreased from resting baseline (100% tissue oxygenation) to 89 +/- 4, 81 +/- 8, 78 +/- 8, and 47 +/- 8% at 5, 10, 15, and 50% of the maximum voluntary contraction, respectively. Tissue oxygenation levels at 10, 15, and 50% of the maximum voluntary contraction were significantly lower (p < 0.05) than the baseline value. Our results indicate that tissue oxygenation significantly decreases during brief, low levels of static muscle contraction and that near infrared spectroscopy is a sensitive technique for detecting deoxygenation noninvasively at low levels of forearm muscle contraction. Our findings have important implications in occupational medicine because oxygen depletion induced by low levels of muscle

  15. Measurement of tumor oxygenation using new frequency domain phosphorometers.

    PubMed

    Wilson, David F; Vinogradov, Sergei A; Dugan, Benjamin W; Biruski, Dubravko; Waldron, Lee; Evans, Sydney A

    2002-05-01

    Oxygen dependent quenching of phosphorescence allows for non-invasive measurements of oxygen in tissue. We have designed and constructed a novel multi-frequency instrument for measurement of phosphorescence lifetimes and developed algorithms for determining the distribution of oxygen (oxygen histogram) in the microvasculature of tissue with good temporal resolution (Vinogradov et al., 2002, Compar. Biochem. A, these proceedings). This technology, in combination with a new water soluble near infra red phosphor (Oxyphor G2), was used to examine the oxygenation of subcutaneous Q7 tumors grown on the flank of Buffalo rats and their response to giving the rats oxygen or carbogen to breathe. Phosphorescence was measured using excitation at 635 nm and emission at >700 nm (the phosphorescence maximum is near 800 nm). The excitation and collection light guides were placed on the surface of the skin of the anesthetized animals separated by approximately 0.8 cm. A 6 x 6 or 7 x 7 grid (approx. 4 cm x 4 cm) was drawn on the flank and oxygen histograms were measured in each square, providing 'images' of the oxygen distribution in the tissue. This procedure determines the tissue oxygen distribution at each position in the grid. Regions of relative hypoxia (associated with the tumor) can be readily localized and the extent of hypoxia quantitatively evaluated.

  16. High PEEP in acute respiratory distress syndrome: quantitative evaluation between improved arterial oxygenation and decreased oxygen delivery

    PubMed Central

    Das, A.; Haque, M.; Wang, W.; Bates, D. G.; Hardman, J. G.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) is widely used to improve oxygenation and prevent alveolar collapse in mechanically ventilated patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Although PEEP improves arterial oxygenation predictably, high-PEEP strategies have demonstrated equivocal improvements in ARDS-related mortality. The effect of PEEP on tissue oxygen delivery is poorly understood and is difficult to quantify or investigate in the clinical environment. Methods. We investigated the effects of PEEP on tissue oxygen delivery in ARDS using a new, high-fidelity, computational model with highly integrated respiratory and cardiovascular systems. The model was configured to replicate published clinical trial data on the responses of 12 individual ARDS patients to changes in PEEP. These virtual patients were subjected to increasing PEEP levels during a lung-protective ventilation strategy (0–20 cm H2O). Measured variables included arterial oxygenation, cardiac output, peripheral oxygen delivery, and alveolar strain. Results. As PEEP increased, tissue oxygen delivery decreased in all subjects (mean reduction of 25% at 20 cm H2O PEEP), despite an increase in arterial oxygen tension (mean increase 6.7 kPa at 20 cm H2O PEEP). Changes in arterial oxygenation and tissue oxygen delivery differed between subjects but showed a consistent pattern. Static and dynamic alveolar strain decreased in all patients as PEEP increased. Conclusions. Incremental PEEP in ARDS appears to protect alveoli and improve arterial oxygenation, but also appears to impair tissue oxygen delivery significantly because of reduced cardiac output. We propose that this trade-off may explain the poor improvements in mortality associated with high-PEEP ventilation strategies. PMID:27799180

  17. BID Mediates Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation-Induced Neuronal Injury in Organotypic Hippocampal Slice Cultures and Modulates Tissue Inflammation in a Transient Focal Cerebral Ischemia Model without Changing Lesion Volume

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Nellie Anne; Bonner, Helena; Elkjær, Maria Louise; D’Orsi, Beatrice; Chen, Gang; König, Hans Georg; Svensson, Martina; Deierborg, Tomas; Pfeiffer, Shona; Prehn, Jochen H.; Lambertsen, Kate Lykke

    2016-01-01

    The BH3 interacting-domain death agonist (BID) is a pro-apoptotic protein involved in death receptor-induced and mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. Recently, it has also been suggested that BID is involved in the regulation of inflammatory responses in the central nervous system. We found that BID deficiency protected organotypic hippocampal slice cultures in vitro from neuronal injury induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation. In vivo, BID-knockout (KO) mice and wild type (WT) mice were subjected to 60 min of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) to induce focal cerebral ischemia, and allowed to recover for 24 h. Infarct volumes and functional outcome were assessed and the inflammatory response was evaluated using immunofluorescence, Western blotting, quantitative PCR (qPCR) and Mesoscale multiplex analysis. We observed no difference in the infarct volume or neurological outcome between BID-KO and WT mice. The inflammatory response was reduced by BID deficiency as indicated by a change in microglial/leukocyte response. In conclusion, our data suggest that BID deficiency is neuroprotective in an in vitro model and modulates the inflammatory response to focal cerebral ischemia in vivo. However, this is not translated into a robust neuroprotection in vivo. PMID:26869884

  18. Adequate Iodine Status in New Zealand School Children Post-Fortification of Bread with Iodised Salt.

    PubMed

    Jones, Emma; McLean, Rachael; Davies, Briar; Hawkins, Rochelle; Meiklejohn, Eva; Ma, Zheng Feei; Skeaff, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    Iodine deficiency re-emerged in New Zealand in the 1990s, prompting the mandatory fortification of bread with iodised salt from 2009. This study aimed to determine the iodine status of New Zealand children when the fortification of bread was well established. A cross-sectional survey of children aged 8-10 years was conducted in the cities of Auckland and Christchurch, New Zealand, from March to May 2015. Children provided a spot urine sample for the determination of urinary iodine concentration (UIC), a fingerpick blood sample for Thyroglobulin (Tg) concentration, and completed a questionnaire ascertaining socio-demographic information that also included an iodine-specific food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). The FFQ was used to estimate iodine intake from all main food sources including bread and iodised salt. The median UIC for all children (n = 415) was 116 μg/L (females 106 μg/L, males 131 μg/L) indicative of adequate iodine status according to the World Health Organisation (WHO, i.e., median UIC of 100-199 μg/L). The median Tg concentration was 8.7 μg/L, which was <10 μg/L confirming adequate iodine status. There was a significant difference in UIC by sex (p = 0.001) and ethnicity (p = 0.006). The mean iodine intake from the food-only model was 65 μg/day. Bread contributed 51% of total iodine intake in the food-only model, providing a mean iodine intake of 35 μg/day. The mean iodine intake from the food-plus-iodised salt model was 101 μg/day. In conclusion, the results of this study confirm that the iodine status in New Zealand school children is now adequate. PMID:27196925

  19. Are the current Australian sun exposure guidelines effective in maintaining adequate levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D?

    PubMed

    Kimlin, Michael; Sun, Jiandong; Sinclair, Craig; Heward, Sue; Hill, Jane; Dunstone, Kimberley; Brodie, Alison

    2016-01-01

    An adequate vitamin D status, as measured by serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentration, is important in humans for maintenance of healthy bones and muscle function. Serum 25(OH)D concentration was assessed in participants from Melbourne, Australia (37.81S, 144.96E), who were provided with the current Australian guidelines on sun exposure for 25(OH)D adequacy (25(OH)D ≥50 nmol/L). Participants were interviewed in February (summer, n=104) and August (winter, n=99) of 2013. Serum 25(OH)D concentration was examined as a function of measures of sun exposure and sun protection habits with control of key characteristics such as dietary intake of vitamin D, body mass index (BMI) and skin colour, that may modify this relationship. The mean 25(OH)D concentration in participants who complied with the current sun exposure guidelines was 67.3 nmol/L in summer and 41.9 nmol/L in winter. At the end of the study, 69.3% of participants who complied with the summer sun exposure guidelines were 25(OH)D adequate, while only 27.6% of participants who complied with the winter sun exposure guidelines were 25(OH)D adequate at the end of the study. The results suggest that the current Australian guidelines for sun exposure for 25(OH)D adequacy are effective for most in summer and ineffective for most in winter. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled '17th Vitamin D Workshop'.

  20. Adequate Iodine Status in New Zealand School Children Post-Fortification of Bread with Iodised Salt

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Emma; McLean, Rachael; Davies, Briar; Hawkins, Rochelle; Meiklejohn, Eva; Ma, Zheng Feei; Skeaff, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    Iodine deficiency re-emerged in New Zealand in the 1990s, prompting the mandatory fortification of bread with iodised salt from 2009. This study aimed to determine the iodine status of New Zealand children when the fortification of bread was well established. A cross-sectional survey of children aged 8–10 years was conducted in the cities of Auckland and Christchurch, New Zealand, from March to May 2015. Children provided a spot urine sample for the determination of urinary iodine concentration (UIC), a fingerpick blood sample for Thyroglobulin (Tg) concentration, and completed a questionnaire ascertaining socio-demographic information that also included an iodine-specific food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). The FFQ was used to estimate iodine intake from all main food sources including bread and iodised salt. The median UIC for all children (n = 415) was 116 μg/L (females 106 μg/L, males 131 μg/L) indicative of adequate iodine status according to the World Health Organisation (WHO, i.e., median UIC of 100–199 μg/L). The median Tg concentration was 8.7 μg/L, which was <10 μg/L confirming adequate iodine status. There was a significant difference in UIC by sex (p = 0.001) and ethnicity (p = 0.006). The mean iodine intake from the food-only model was 65 μg/day. Bread contributed 51% of total iodine intake in the food-only model, providing a mean iodine intake of 35 μg/day. The mean iodine intake from the food-plus-iodised salt model was 101 μg/day. In conclusion, the results of this study confirm that the iodine status in New Zealand school children is now adequate. PMID:27196925

  1. Thrombography reveals thrombin generation potential continues to deteriorate following cardiopulmonary bypass surgery despite adequate hemostasis.

    PubMed

    Wong, Raymond K; Sleep, Joseph R; Visner, Allison J; Raasch, David J; Lanza, Louis A; DeValeria, Patrick A; Torloni, Antonio S; Arabia, Francisco A

    2011-03-01

    The intrinsic and extrinsic activation pathways of the hemostatic system converge when prothrombin is converted to thrombin. The ability to generate an adequate thrombin burst is the most central aspect of the coagulation cascade. The thrombin-generating potential in patients following cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) may be indicative of their hemostatic status. In this report, thrombography, a unique technique for directly measuring the potential of patients' blood samples to generate adequate thrombin bursts, is used to characterize the coagulopathic profile in post-CPB patients. Post-CPB hemostasis is typically achieved with protamine reversal of heparin anticoagulation and occasionally supplemented with blood product component transfusions. In this pilot study, platelet poor plasma samples were derived from 11 primary cardiac surgery patients at five time points: prior to CPB, immediately post-protamine, upon arrival to the intensive care unit (ICU), 3 hours post-ICU admission, and 24 hours after ICU arrival. Thrombography revealed that the Endogenous Thrombin Potential (ETP) was not different between [Baseline] and [PostProtamine] but proceeded to deteriorate in the immediate postoperative period. At the [3HourPostICU] time point, the ETP was significantly lower than the [Baseline] values, 1233 +/- 591 versus 595 +/- 379 nM.min (mean +/- SD; n=9, p < .005), despite continued adequacy of hemostasis. ETPs returned to baseline values the day after surgery. Transfusions received, conventional blood coagulation testing results, and blood loss volumes are also presented. Despite adequate hemostasis, thrombography reveals an underlying coagulopathic process that could put some cardiac surgical patients at risk for postoperative bleeding. Thrombography is a novel technique that could be developed into a useful tool for perfusionists and physicians to identify coagulopathies and optimize blood management following CPB. PMID:21449230

  2. Chronic leg ulcer: does a patient always get a correct diagnosis and adequate treatment?

    PubMed

    Mooij, Michael C; Huisman, Laurens C

    2016-03-01

    Patients with chronic leg ulcers have severely impaired quality of life and account for a high percentage of annual healthcare costs. To establish the cause of a chronic leg ulcer, referral to a center with a multidisciplinary team of professionals is often necessary. Treating the underlying cause diminishes healing time and reduces costs. In venous leg ulcers adequate compression therapy is still a problem. It can be improved by training the professionals with pressure measuring devices. A perfect fitting of elastic stockings is important to prevent venous leg ulcer recurrence. In most cases, custom-made stockings are the best choice for this purpose. PMID:26916772

  3. Determining Adequate Margins in Head and Neck Cancers: Practice and Continued Challenges.

    PubMed

    Williams, Michelle D

    2016-09-01

    Margin assessment remains a critical component of oncologic care for head and neck cancer patients. As an integrated team, both surgeons and pathologists work together to assess margins in these complex patients. Differences in method of margin sampling can impact obtainable information and effect outcomes. Additionally, what distance is an "adequate or clear" margin for patient care continues to be debated. Ultimately, future studies and potentially secondary modalities to augment pathologic assessment of margin assessment (i.e., in situ imaging or molecular assessment) may enhance local control in head and neck cancer patients. PMID:27469263

  4. Nebulized antibiotics. An adequate option for treating ventilator-associated respiratory infection?

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, A; Barcenilla, F

    2015-03-01

    Ventilator-associated tracheobronchitis (VAT) is a frequent complication in critical patients. The 90% of those who develop it receive broad-spectrum antibiotic (ATB) treatment, without any strong evidence of its favorable impact. The use of nebulized ATB could be a valid treatment option, to reduce the use of systemic ATB and the pressure of selection on the local flora. Several studies suggest that an adequate nebulization technique can ensure high levels of ATB even in areas of lung consolidation, and to obtain clinical and microbiological cure. New studies are needed to properly assess the impact of treatment with nebulized ATB on the emergence of resistance.

  5. Developing an adequate "pneumatraumatology": understanding the spiritual impacts of traumatic injury.

    PubMed

    Bidwell, Duane R

    2002-01-01

    Psychosocial interventions and systematic theology are primary resources for chaplains and congregational pastors who care for victims of physical trauma. Yet these resources may not be adequate to address the spiritual impacts of trauma. This article proposes a preliminary "pneumatraumatology," drawing on early Christian asceticism and Buddhist mysticism to describe one way of understanding the spiritual impacts of traumatic injury. It also suggests possible responses to these impacts informed by narrative/constructionist perspectives and Breggemann's understanding of the dimensions of spiritual transformation in the Hebrew Bible.

  6. Optimal detection pinhole for lowering speckle noise while maintaining adequate optical sectioning in confocal reflectance microscopes.

    PubMed

    Glazowski, Christopher; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2012-08-01

    Coherent speckle influences the resulting image when narrow spectral line-width and single spatial mode illumination are used, though these are the same light-source properties that provide the best radiance-to-cost ratio. However, a suitable size of the detection pinhole can be chosen to maintain adequate optical sectioning while making the probability density of the speckle noise more normal and reducing its effect. The result is a qualitatively better image with improved contrast, which is easier to read. With theoretical statistics and experimental results, we show that the detection pinhole size is a fundamental parameter for designing imaging systems for use in turbid media.

  7. Home Oxygen Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... important advantage of liquid oxygen is you can transfer some of the liquid oxygen into a smaller, ... from gas stoves, candles, lighted fireplaces, or other heat sources. Don't use any flammable products like ...

  8. Biogeochemistry: Oxygen burrowed away

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meysman, Filip J. R.

    2014-09-01

    Multicellular animals probably evolved at the seafloor after a rise in oceanic oxygen levels. Biogeochemical model simulations suggest that as these animals started to rework the seafloor, they triggered a negative feedback that reduced global oxygen.

  9. Tissue Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metz, James

    2016-01-01

    Every day, 27,000 trees are used to make bathroom tissue. Americans use an average of 23.6 rolls per person per year, and more than 7 billion rolls of toilet paper are sold yearly in the United States alone. Perhaps the amount of bathroom tissue used can be reduced by changing the dimensions of the paper or the core. This brief article presents…

  10. Oxygen persufflation as adjunct in liver preservation (OPAL): Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Early graft dysfunction due to preservation/reperfusion injury represents a dramatic event after liver transplantation. Enhancement of donor organ criteria, in order to cope with the ever increasing donor shortage, further increases graft susceptibility to ischemic alterations. Major parts of post-preservation injury, however, occur at the time of warm reperfusion but not during ischemic storage; successful reperfusion of ischemic tissue in turn depends on an adequate redox and intracellular signal homeostasis. The latter has been shown experimentally to be favorably influenced by oxygen persufflation within short time spans. Thus viability of marginally preserved liver grafts could still be augmented by transient hypothermic reconditioning even after normal procurement and static cold storage. The present study is aimed to confirm the conceptual expectations, that hypothermic reconditioning by gaseous oxygen persufflation is a useful method to suppress injurious cellular activation cascades and to improve post-ischemic recovery of marginally preserved liver grafts. Methods/Design OPAL is a prospective single center randomized proof of concept study, including two parallel groups in a total of 116 liver transplant patients. The effect of an in hospital treatment of the isolated liver graft by 2 hours of oxygen persufflation immediately prior to transplantation will be assesses as compared to standard procedure (cold storage without further intervention). The primary endpoint is the peak transaminase serum level (AST) during the first three days after transplantation as a surrogate readout for parenchymal liver injury. Other outcomes comprise patient and graft survival, time of intensive care requirement, hepatic tissue perfusion 1h after revascularisation, early onset of graft dysfunction based on coagulation parameters, as well as the use of a refined scoring-system for initial graft function based on a multi-parameter (AST, ALT, Quick and bilirubin

  11. Thermomechanical analysis of soft-tissue thermotherapy.

    PubMed

    Aksan, Alptekin; McGrath, John J

    2003-10-01

    Soft-tissue thermotherapy based on sub-ablative heating of collagenous tissues finds wide-spread application in medicine such as tissue welding, thermokeratoplasty, skin resurfacing, elimination of discogenic pain in the spine and treatment of joint instability. In this paper, heat-induced thermomechanical response characteristics of collagenous tissues are quantified by means of in vitro experimentation with a representative model tissue (New Zealand white rabbit patellar tendon). Three distinct heat-induced thermomechanical response regimes (defined by the rate of deformation and the variation of material properties) are identified. Arrhenius damage integral representation of collagenous tissue thermal history is shown to be adequate in establishing the master response curves for quantification of thermomechanical response for modeling purposes. The trade-off between the improved kinematical stability and compromised mechanical stability of the heated collagenous tissue is shown to be the major challenge hindering the success of subablative thermotherapies.

  12. Multi-spectral imaging of oxygen saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savelieva, Tatiana A.; Stratonnikov, Aleksander A.; Loschenov, Victor B.

    2008-06-01

    The system of multi-spectral imaging of oxygen saturation is an instrument that can record both spectral and spatial information about a sample. In this project, the spectral imaging technique is used for monitoring of oxygen saturation of hemoglobin in human tissues. This system can be used for monitoring spatial distribution of oxygen saturation in photodynamic therapy, surgery or sports medicine. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in the visible range is an effective and extensively used technique for the non-invasive study and characterization of various biological tissues. In this article, a short review of modeling techniques being currently in use for diffuse reflection from semi-infinite turbid media is presented. A simple and practical model for use with a real-time imaging system is proposed. This model is based on linear approximation of the dependence of the diffuse reflectance coefficient on relation between absorbance and reduced scattering coefficient. This dependence was obtained with the Monte Carlo simulation of photon propagation in turbid media. Spectra of the oxygenated and deoxygenated forms of hemoglobin differ mostly in the red area (520 - 600 nm) and have several characteristic points there. Thus four band-pass filters were used for multi-spectral imaging. After having measured the reflectance, the data obtained are used for fitting the concentration of oxygenated and free hemoglobin, and hemoglobin oxygen saturation.

  13. Timeline: Cellular Oxygen Sensing.

    PubMed

    Szewczak, Lara

    2016-09-22

    Since the 1950s, researchers have recognized that red blood cell numbers expand or contract as needed, according to the amount of available oxygen. The later discoveries that erythropoietin and VEGF levels adapt to oxygen levels launched a new field aimed at understanding how cells sense and respond to normal- and low-oxygen environments. The 2016 Albert Lasker Basic Medical Research Award recognizes key discoveries about this global oxygen sensing pathway and its impacts on pathogenesis, including cancer and inflammation. PMID:27662095

  14. Oxygen evolution reaction catalysis

    DOEpatents

    Haber, Joel A.; Jin, Jian; Xiang, Chengxiang; Gregoire, John M.; Jones, Ryan J.; Guevarra, Dan W.; Shinde, Aniketa A.

    2016-09-06

    An Oxygen Evolution Reaction (OER) catalyst includes a metal oxide that includes oxygen, cerium, and one or more second metals. In some instances, the cerium is 10 to 80 molar % of the metals in the metal oxide and/or the catalyst includes two or more second metals. The OER catalyst can be included in or on an electrode. The electrode can be arranged in an oxygen evolution system such that the Oxygen Evolution Reaction occurs at the electrode.

  15. Solid state oxygen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Garzon, Fernando H.; Brosha, Eric L.

    1997-01-01

    A potentiometric oxygen sensor is formed having a logarithmic response to a differential oxygen concentration while operating as a Nernstian-type sensor. Very thin films of mixed conducting oxide materials form electrode services while permitting diffusional oxygen access to the interface between the zirconia electrolyte and the electrode. Diffusion of oxygen through the mixed oxide is not rate-limiting. Metal electrodes are not used so that morphological changes in the electrode structure do not occur during extended operation at elevated temperatures.

  16. Maintaining Adequate CO2 Washout for an Advanced EMU via a New Rapid Cycle Amine Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chullen, Cinda; Conger, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    Over the past several years, NASA has realized tremendous progress in Extravehicular Activity (EVA) technology development. This has been evidenced by the progressive development of a new Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) system for the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (AEMU) Portable Life Support Subsystem (PLSS). The PLSS is responsible for the life support of the crew member in the spacesuit. The RCA technology is responsible for carbon dioxide (CO2) and humidity control. Another aspect of the RCA is that it is on-back vacuum-regenerable, efficient, and reliable. The RCA also simplifies the PLSS schematic by eliminating the need for a condensing heat exchanger for humidity control in the current EMU. As development progresses on the RCA, it is important that the sizing be optimized so that the demand on the PLSS battery is minimized. As well, maintaining the CO2 washout at adequate levels during an EVA is an absolute requirement of the RCA and associated ventilation system. Testing has been underway in-house at NASA Johnson Space Center and analysis has been initiated to evaluate whether the technology provides exemplary performance in ensuring that the CO2 is removed sufficiently and the ventilation flow is adequate for maintaining CO2 washout in the AEMU spacesuit helmet of the crew member during an EVA. This paper will review the recent developments of the RCA unit, testing planned in-house with a spacesuit simulator, and the associated analytical work along with insights from the medical aspect on the testing. 1

  17. Polarized light interaction with tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuchin, Valery V.

    2016-07-01

    This tutorial-review introduces the fundamentals of polarized light interaction with biological tissues and presents some of the recent key polarization optical methods that have made possible the quantitative studies essential for biomedical diagnostics. Tissue structures and the corresponding models showing linear and circular birefringence, dichroism, and chirality are analyzed. As the basis for a quantitative description of the interaction of polarized light with tissues, the theory of polarization transfer in a random medium is used. This theory employs the modified transfer equation for Stokes parameters to predict the polarization properties of single- and multiple-scattered optical fields. The near-order of scatterers in tissues is accounted for to provide an adequate description of tissue polarization properties. Biomedical diagnostic techniques based on polarized light detection, including polarization imaging and spectroscopy, amplitude and intensity light scattering matrix measurements, and polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography are described. Examples of biomedical applications of these techniques for early diagnostics of cataracts, detection of precancer, and prediction of skin disease are presented. The substantial reduction of light scattering multiplicity at tissue optical clearing that leads to a lesser influence of scattering on the measured intrinsic polarization properties of the tissue and allows for more precise quantification of these properties is demonstrated.

  18. Patterns of dissolved oxygen dynamics in a Pacific Northwest slough and tide channel - CERF 2015

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pacific Northwest (PNW) estuaries and tide channels are habitats or migratory corridors for societally prized salmonids. These fish have high oxygen requirements, and an adequate level of dissolved oxygen is considered an important gauge of a PNW water body’s condition. W...

  19. Patterns of dissolved oxygen dynamics in a Pacific Northwest slough and tide channel.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pacific Northwest (PNW) estuaries and tide channels are habitats or migratory corridors for societally prized salmonids. These fish have high oxygen requirements, and an adequate level of dissolved oxygen is considered an important gauge of a PNW water body’s condition. W...

  20. Cerebral Microcirculation and Oxygen Tension in the Human Secondary Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Linninger, A. A.; Gould, I. G.; Marinnan, T.; Hsu, C.-Y.; Chojecki, M.; Alaraj, A.

    2013-01-01

    The three-dimensional spatial arrangement of the cortical microcirculatory system is critical for understanding oxygen exchange between blood vessels and brain cells. A three-dimensional computer model of a 3 × 3 × 3 mm3 subsection of the human secondary cortex was constructed to quantify oxygen advection in the microcirculation, tissue oxygen perfusion, and consumption in the human cortex. This computer model accounts for all arterial, capillary and venous blood vessels of the cerebral microvascular bed as well as brain tissue occupying the extravascular space. Microvessels were assembled with optimization algorithms emulating angiogenic growth; a realistic capillary bed was built with space filling procedures. The extravascular tissue was modeled as a porous medium supplied with oxygen by advection–diffusion to match normal metabolic oxygen demand. The resulting synthetic computer generated network matches prior measured morphometrics and fractal patterns of the cortical microvasculature. This morphologically accurate, physiologically consistent, multi-scale computer network of the cerebral microcirculation predicts the oxygen exchange of cortical blood vessels with the surrounding gray matter. Oxygen tension subject to blood pressure and flow conditions were computed and validated for the blood as well as brain tissue. Oxygen gradients along arterioles, capillaries and veins agreed with in vivo trends observed recently in imaging studies within experimental tolerances and uncertainty. PMID:23842693

  1. Tumor Hypoxia: Causative Mechanisms, Microregional Heterogeneities, and the Role of Tissue-Based Hypoxia Markers.

    PubMed

    Vaupel, Peter; Mayer, Arnulf

    2016-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia is a hallmark of solid malignant tumor growth, profoundly influences malignant progression and contributes to the development of therapeutic resistance. Pathogenesis of tumor hypoxia is multifactorial, with contributions from both acute and chronic factors. Spatial distribution of hypoxia within tumors is markedly heterogeneous and often changes over time, e.g., during a course of radiotherapy. Substantial changes in the oxygenation status can occur within the distance of a few cell layers, explaining the inability of currently used molecular imaging techniques to adequately assess this crucial trait. Due to the possible importance of tumor hypoxia for clinical decision-making, there is a great demand for molecular tools which may provide the necessary resolution down to the single cell level. Exogenous and endogenous markers of tumor hypoxia have been investigated for this purpose. Their potential use may be greatly enhanced by multiparametric in situ methods in experimental and human tumor tissue. PMID:27526128

  2. Oxygen defects in phosphorene.

    PubMed

    Ziletti, A; Carvalho, A; Campbell, D K; Coker, D F; Castro Neto, A H

    2015-01-30

    Surface reactions with oxygen are a fundamental cause of the degradation of phosphorene. Using first-principles calculations, we show that for each oxygen atom adsorbed onto phosphorene there is an energy release of about 2 eV. Although the most stable oxygen adsorbed forms are electrically inactive and lead only to minor distortions of the lattice, there are low energy metastable forms which introduce deep donor and/or acceptor levels in the gap. We also propose a mechanism for phosphorene oxidation involving reactive dangling oxygen atoms and we suggest that dangling oxygen atoms increase the hydrophilicity of phosphorene.

  3. Brain Oxygenation Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Kirkman, Matthew A; Smith, Martin

    2016-09-01

    A mismatch between cerebral oxygen supply and demand can lead to cerebral hypoxia/ischemia and deleterious outcomes. Cerebral oxygenation monitoring is an important aspect of multimodality neuromonitoring. It is increasingly deployed whenever intracranial pressure monitoring is indicated. Although there is a large body of evidence demonstrating an association between cerebral hypoxia/ischemia and poor outcomes, it remains to be determined whether restoring cerebral oxygenation leads to improved outcomes. Randomized prospective studies are required to address uncertainties about cerebral oxygenation monitoring and management. This article describes the different methods of monitoring cerebral oxygenation, their indications, evidence base, limitations, and future perspectives. PMID:27521197

  4. Severe methaemoglobinaemia treated with adjunctive hyperbaric oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Lindenmann, Jörg; Fink-Neuboeck, Nicole; Schilcher, Gernot; Smolle-Juettner, Freyja Maria

    2015-06-01

    Methaemoglobinaemia results from exposure to oxidizing substances such as nitrates or nitrites. Iron within haemoglobin is oxidized from the ferrous to the ferric state, which blocks the transport of oxygen and carbon dioxide, with subsequent inhibition of the respiratory chain. We describe the case of a 23-year-old male suffering from severe methaemoglobinaemia of 68% after consumption of nitrites ('poppers') in association with considerable ethanol consumption. Toluidine-blue was administered as first-line antidotal therapy immediately followed by hyperbaric oxygenation (HBOT). HBOT resulted in enhanced reduction of methaemoglobin, and rapid tissue re-oxygenation by the oxygen dissolved in plasma was provided, independent of the degree of methaemoglobinaemia. The patient recovered uneventfully and was discharged three days later. This case illustrates the potential of supportive HBOT as a time-saving therapeutic tool in this unusual situation, enabling a quick and sustained reduction in methaemoglobinaemia. PMID:26165539

  5. Preliminary Results of Oxygen Saturation with a Prototype of Continuous Wave Laser Oximeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tommasi, R.; Leo, M. G.; Cicco, G.; Cassano, T.; Nitti, L.; Lugarà, P. M.

    Near-infrared tissue spectroscopy is a non invasive, innocuous technique to measure oxygen saturation in tissues. NIR oximetry can be used in almost any area of the body, according to the type of analysis to be done.

  6. Oxygen pressure measurement using singlet oxygen emission

    SciTech Connect

    Khalil, Gamal E.; Chang, Alvin; Gouterman, Martin; Callis, James B.; Dalton, Larry R.; Turro, Nicholas J.; Jockusch, Steffen

    2005-05-15

    Pressure sensitive paint (PSP) provides a visualization of two-dimensional pressure distributions on airfoil and model automobile surfaces. One type of PSP utilizes platinum tetra(pentafluorophenyl)porphine (PtTFPP) dissolved in a fluoro-polymer film. Since the intense 650 nm triplet emission of PtTFPP is quenched by ground state oxygen, it is possible to measure two-dimensional oxygen concentration from the 650 nm emission intensity using a Stern-Volmer-type relationship. This article reports an alternative luminescence method to measure oxygen concentration based on the porphyrin-sensitized 1270 nm singlet oxygen emission, which can be imaged with an InGaAs near infrared camera. This direct measurement of oxygen emission complements and further validates the oxygen measurement based on PtTFPP phosphorescence quenching. Initial success at obtaining a negative correlation between the 650 nm PtTFPP emission and the 1270 nm O{sub 2} emission in solution led us to additional two-dimensional film studies using surfaces coated with PtTFPP, MgTFPP, and H{sub 2}TFPP in polymers in a pressure and temperature controlled chamber.

  7. Oxygen pressure measurement using singlet oxygen emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, Gamal E.; Chang, Alvin; Gouterman, Martin; Callis, James B.; Dalton, Larry R.; Turro, Nicholas J.; Jockusch, Steffen

    2005-05-01

    Pressure sensitive paint (PSP) provides a visualization of two-dimensional pressure distributions on airfoil and model automobile surfaces. One type of PSP utilizes platinum tetra(pentafluorophenyl)porphine (PtTFPP) dissolved in a fluoro-polymer film. Since the intense 650nm triplet emission of PtTFPP is quenched by ground state oxygen, it is possible to measure two-dimensional oxygen concentration from the 650nm emission intensity using a Stern-Volmer-type relationship. This article reports an alternative luminescence method to measure oxygen concentration based on the porphyrin-sensitized 1270nm singlet oxygen emission, which can be imaged with an InGaAs near infrared camera. This direct measurement of oxygen emission complements and further validates the oxygen measurement based on PtTFPP phosphorescence quenching. Initial success at obtaining a negative correlation between the 650nm PtTFPP emission and the 1270nm O2 emission in solution led us to additional two-dimensional film studies using surfaces coated with PtTFPP, MgTFPP, and H2TFPP in polymers in a pressure and temperature controlled chamber.

  8. What happens to plant mitochondria under low oxygen? An omics review of the responses to low oxygen and reoxygenation.

    PubMed

    Shingaki-Wells, Rachel; Millar, A Harvey; Whelan, James; Narsai, Reena

    2014-10-01

    Floods can rapidly submerge plants, limiting oxygen to the extent that oxidative phosphorylation no longer generates adequate ATP supplies. Low-oxygen tolerant plants, such as rice, are able to adequately respond to low oxygen by successfully remodelling primary and mitochondrial metabolism to partially counteract the energy crisis that ensues. In this review, we discuss how plants respond to low-oxygen stress at the transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolomic and enzyme activity levels, particularly focusing on mitochondria and interacting pathways. The role of reactive oxygen species and nitrite as an alternative electron acceptor as well as their links to respiratory chain components is discussed. By making intra-kingdom as well as cross-kingdom comparisons, conserved mechanisms of anoxia tolerance are highlighted as well as tolerance mechanisms that are specific to anoxia-tolerant rice during germination and in coleoptiles. We discuss reoxygenation as an often overlooked, yet essential stage of this environmental stress and consider the possibility that changes occurring during low oxygen may also provide benefits upon re-aeration. Finally, we consider what it takes to be low-oxygen tolerant and argue that alternative mechanisms of ATP production, glucose signalling, starch/sucrose signalling as well as reverse metabolism of fermentation end products promote the survival of rice after this debilitating stress.

  9. Oxygen partial pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dees, D.W.

    1994-09-06

    A method for detecting oxygen partial pressure and an oxygen partial pressure sensor are provided. The method for measuring oxygen partial pressure includes contacting oxygen to a solid oxide electrolyte and measuring the subsequent change in electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte. A solid oxide electrolyte is utilized that contacts both a porous electrode and a nonporous electrode. The electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte is affected when oxygen from an exhaust stream permeates through the porous electrode to establish an equilibrium of oxygen anions in the electrolyte, thereby displacing electrons throughout the electrolyte to form an electron gradient. By adapting the two electrodes to sense a voltage potential between them, the change in electrolyte conductivity due to oxygen presence can be measured. 1 fig.

  10. Oxygen partial pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dees, Dennis W.

    1994-01-01

    A method for detecting oxygen partial pressure and an oxygen partial pressure sensor are provided. The method for measuring oxygen partial pressure includes contacting oxygen to a solid oxide electrolyte and measuring the subsequent change in electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte. A solid oxide electrolyte is utilized that contacts both a porous electrode and a nonporous electrode. The electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte is affected when oxygen from an exhaust stream permeates through the porous electrode to establish an equilibrium of oxygen anions in the electrolyte, thereby displacing electrons throughout the electrolyte to form an electron gradient. By adapting the two electrodes to sense a voltage potential between them, the change in electrolyte conductivity due to oxygen presence can be measured.

  11. Blood oxygenation monitoring by diffuse optical tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Patachia, M; Dutu, D.C.A.; Dumitras, D.C.

    2011-01-24

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) makes it possible to reconstruct, in two or three dimensions, the internal structure of the biological tissues based on the distribution of the absorption coefficient and the reduced scattering coefficient, using optical measurements at multiple source - detector positions on the tissue surface. The measurement of the light intensity transmitted through the tissue can be also used to compute the haemoglobin and oxyhaemoglobin concentrations, measuring the selective absorption of the main blood chromophores by near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). The spectral selectivity of the system and the evaluation of the blood volume and blood oxygenation (BV and OXY distributions), together with the reconstruction of the inner structure of the tissue, can improve the accuracy of early cancer diagnosis, based on the tissue angiogenesis characterisation. (application of lasers and laser-optical methods in life sciences)

  12. Oxygen, ecology, and the Cambrian radiation of animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperling, Erik A.; Frieder, Christina A.; Raman, Akkur V.; Girguis, Peter R.; Levin, Lisa A.; Knoll, Andrew H.

    2013-08-01

    The Proterozoic-Cambrian transition records the appearance of essentially all animal body plans (phyla), yet to date no single hypothesis adequately explains both the timing of the event and the evident increase in diversity and disparity. Ecological triggers focused on escalatory predator-prey "arms races" can explain the evolutionary pattern but not its timing, whereas environmental triggers, particularly ocean/atmosphere oxygenation, do the reverse. Using modern oxygen minimum zones as an analog for Proterozoic oceans, we explore the effect of low oxygen levels on the feeding ecology of polychaetes, the dominant macrofaunal animals in deep-sea sediments. Here we show that low oxygen is clearly linked to low proportions of carnivores in a community and low diversity of carnivorous taxa, whereas higher oxygen levels support more complex food webs. The recognition of a physiological control on carnivory therefore links environmental triggers and ecological drivers, providing an integrated explanation for both the pattern and timing of Cambrian animal radiation.

  13. Vitreal Oxygenation in Retinal Ischemia Reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Walid; Ameri, Hossein; Barron, Ernesto; Chader, Gerald J.; Greenbaum, Elias; Hinton, David R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To study the feasibility of anterior vitreal oxygenation for the treatment of acute retinal ischemia. Methods. Twenty rabbits were randomized into an oxygenation group, a sham treatment group, and a no treatment group. Baseline electroretinography (ERG) and preretinal oxygen (Po2) measurements were obtained 3 to 5 days before surgery. Intraocular pressure was raised to 100 mm Hg for 90 minutes and then normalized. The oxygenation group underwent vitreal oxygenation for 30 minutes using intravitreal electrodes. The sham treatment group received inactive electrodes for 30 minutes while there was no intervention for the no treatment group. Preretinal Po2 in the posterior vitreous was measured 30 minutes after intervention or 30 minutes after reperfusion (no treatment group) and on postoperative days (d) 3, 6, 9, and 12. On d14, rabbits underwent ERG and were euthanatized. Results. Mean final (d12) Po2 was 10.64 ± 0.77 mm Hg for the oxygenation group, 2.14 ± 0.61 mm Hg for the sham group, and 1.98 ± 0.63 mm Hg for the no treatment group. On ERG, scotopic b-wave amplitude was significantly preserved in the oxygenation group compared with the other two groups. Superoxide dismutase assay showed higher activity in the operated eyes than in the nonoperated control eyes in the sham treatment group and no treatment group only. Histopathology showed preservation of retinal architecture and choroidal vasculature in the oxygenation group, whereas the sham-treated and nontreated groups showed retinal thinning and choroidal atrophy. Conclusions. In severe total ocular ischemia, anterior vitreal oxygenation supplies enough oxygen to penetrate the retinal thickness, resulting in rescue of the RPE/choriocapillaris that continues to perfuse, hence sparing the retinal tissue from damage. PMID:21051734

  14. Oxygen tension affects lubricin expression in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hatta, Taku; Kishimoto, Koshi N; Okuno, Hiroshi; Itoi, Eiji

    2014-10-01

    We assessed the effects of oxygen tension on lubricin expression in bovine chondrocytes and cartilage explants and a role for hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF)-1α in regulating lubricin expression was investigated using a murine chondroprogenitor cell line, ATDC5, and bovine chondrocytes isolated from superficial and middle/deep zones of femoral cartilage. ATDC5 cells and bovine chondrocytes were cultured in micromass under different oxygen tensions (21%, 5%, and 1%). ATDC5 cells and middle/deep zone chondrocytes that initially had low lubricin expression levels were also cultured with or without transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1. Quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR was used to determine lubricin and chondrogenic marker gene mRNA levels and immunohistochemistry was used to assess lubricin protein expression. Explant cartilage plugs cultured under different oxygen tensions were also subjected to immunohistological analysis for lubricin. HIF-1α gene silencing was achieved by electroporatic transfer into ATDC5 cells. A low oxygen tension reduced lubricin gene expression levels in bovine superficial chondrocytes, TGF-β1-treated middle/deep zone chondrocytes, and TGF-β1-treated ATDC5 cells. Lubricin expression in explant cartilage was also suppressed under hypoxia. HIF-1α gene silencing in ATDC5 cells attenuated the lubricin expression response to the oxygen tension. These results corroborate with previous studies that the oxygen tension regulates lubricin gene expression and suggest that HIF-1α plays an important role in this regulation. The normal distribution of lubricin in articular cartilage may be due to the hypoxic oxygen environment of cartilage as it is an avascular tissue. An oxygen tension gradient may be a key factor for engineering cartilage tissue with a layered morphology.

  15. Adequate bases of phase space master integrals for gg → h at NNLO and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höschele, Maik; Hoff, Jens; Ueda, Takahiro

    2014-09-01

    We study master integrals needed to compute the Higgs boson production cross section via gluon fusion in the infinite top quark mass limit, using a canonical form of differential equations for master integrals, recently identified by Henn, which makes their solution possible in a straightforward algebraic way. We apply the known criteria to derive such a suitable basis for all the phase space master integrals in afore mentioned process at next-to-next-to-leading order in QCD and demonstrate that the method is applicable to next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order as well by solving a non-planar topology. Furthermore, we discuss in great detail how to find an adequate basis using practical examples. Special emphasis is devoted to master integrals which are coupled by their differential equations.

  16. Theranostic Oxygen Delivery Using Ultrasound and Microbubbles

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, James J.; Kaya, Mehmet; Borden, Mark A.; Dayton, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    Means to overcome tumor hypoxia have been the subject of clinical investigations since the 1960's; however these studies have yet to find a treatment which is widely accepted. It has been known for nearly a century that hypoxic cells are more resistant to radiotherapy than aerobic cells, and tumor hypoxia is a major factor leading to the resistance of tumors to radiation treatment as well as several cytotoxic agents. In this manuscript, the application of ultrasound combined with oxygen-carrier microbubbles is demonstrated as a method to locally increase dissolved oxygen. Microbubbles can also be imaged by ultrasound, thus providing the opportunity for image-guided oxygen delivery. Simulations of gas diffusion and microbubble gas exchange show that small amounts (down to 5 vol%) of a low-solubility osmotic gas can substantially increase microbubble persistence and therefore production rates and stability of oxygen-carrier microbubbles. Simulations also indicate that the lipid shell can be engineered with long-chain lipids to increase oxygen payload during in vivo transit. Experimental results demonstrate that the application of ultrasound to destroy the microbubbles significantly enhances the local oxygen release. We propose this technology as an application for ultrasound image-guided release of oxygen directly to hypoxic tissue, such as tumor sites to enhance radiotherapy. PMID:23382774

  17. Dietary intake of nutrients with adequate intake values in the dietary reference intakes for Japanese.

    PubMed

    Tsuboyama-Kasaoka, Nobuyo; Takizawa, Asuka; Tsubota-Utsugi, Megumi; Nakade, Makiko; Imai, Eri; Kondo, Akiko; Yoshida, Kazue; Okuda, Nagako; Nishi, Nobuo; Takimoto, Hidemi

    2013-01-01

    The Adequate Intake (AI) values in the Dietary Reference Intakes for Japanese (DRIs-J) 2010 were mainly determined based on the median intakes from 2 y of pooled data (2005-2006) from the National Health and Nutrition Survey-Japan (NHNS-J). However, it remains unclear whether 2 y of pooled data from the NHNS-J are appropriate for evaluating the intake of the population. To clarify the differences in nutrient intakes determined from 2 and 7 y of pooled data, we analyzed selected nutrient intake levels by sex and age groups using NHNS-J data. Intake data were obtained from 64,624 individuals (age: ≥1 y; 47.4% men) who completed a semi-weighed 1-d household dietary record that was part of the NHNS-J conducted annually in Japan from 2003 to 2009. There were no large differences between the median intakes calculated from 2 or 7 y of pooled data for n-6 or n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), vitamin D, pantothenic acid, potassium, or phosphorus. When the AI values and median intakes were compared, there was no large difference in the values for n-6 or n-3 PUFAs, pantothenic acid, or phosphorus. Conversely, the AI values for vitamin D and potassium differed from the median intakes of these nutrients for specific sex and age groups, because values were not based on NHNS-J data. Our results indicate that 2 y of pooled data from the NHNS-J adequately reflect the population's intake, and that the current system for determination of AI values will be applicable for future revisions.

  18. Intersection of race/ethnicity and gender in depression care: screening, access, and minimally adequate treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hahm, Hyeouk Chris; Cook, Benjamin; Ault-Brutus, Andrea; Alegria, Margarita

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study was conducted to understand the interaction of race/ethnicity and gender in depression screening, any mental health care, and adequate care. Methods 2010–2012 electronic health records data of adult primary care patients from a New England urban health care system was used (n = 65,079). Multivariate logit regression models were used to assess the associations between race/ethnicity, gender, and other covariates with depression screening, any depression care among those screened positive, and adequate depression care among users. Secondly, disparities were evaluated by race/ethnicity and gender and incorporated differences due to insurance, marital status, and area-level SES measures. Findings Black and Asian males and females were less likely to be screened for depression compared to their white counterparts, while Latino males and females were more likely to be screened. Among those that screened PHQ-9>10, black males and females, Latino males, and Asian males and females were less likely to receive any mental health care than their white counterparts. The black-white disparity in screening was greater for females compared to males. The Latino-white disparity for any mental health care and adequacy of care was greater for males compared to females. Conclusions Our approach underscores the importance of identifying disparities at each step of depression care by both race/ethnicity and gender. Targeting certain groups in specific stages of care would be more effective (i.e., screening of black females, any mental health care and adequacy of care for Latino males) than a blanket approach to disparities reduction. PMID:25727113

  19. Are the Psychological Needs of Adolescent Survivors of Pediatric Cancer Adequately Identified and Treated?

    PubMed Central

    Kahalley, Lisa S.; Wilson, Stephanie J.; Tyc, Vida L.; Conklin, Heather M.; Hudson, Melissa M.; Wu, Shengjie; Xiong, Xiaoping; Stancel, Heather H.; Hinds, Pamela S.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To describe the psychological needs of adolescent survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) or brain tumor (BT), we examined: (a) the occurrence of cognitive, behavioral, and emotional concerns identified during a comprehensive psychological evaluation, and (b) the frequency of referrals for psychological follow-up services to address identified concerns. Methods Psychological concerns were identified on measures according to predetermined criteria for 100 adolescent survivors. Referrals for psychological follow-up services were made for concerns previously unidentified in formal assessment or not adequately addressed by current services. Results Most survivors (82%) exhibited at least one concern across domains: behavioral (76%), cognitive (47%), and emotional (19%). Behavioral concerns emerged most often on scales associated with executive dysfunction, inattention, learning, and peer difficulties. CRT was associated with cognitive concerns, χ2(1,N=100)=5.63, p<0.05. Lower income was associated with more cognitive concerns for ALL survivors, t(47)=3.28, p<0.01, and more behavioral concerns for BT survivors, t(48)=2.93, p<0.01. Of survivors with concerns, 38% were referred for psychological follow-up services. Lower-income ALL survivors received more referrals for follow-up, χ2(1,N=41)=8.05, p<0.01. Referred survivors had more concerns across domains than non-referred survivors, ALL: t(39)=2.96, p<0.01, BT: t(39)=3.52, p<0.01. Trends suggest ALL survivors may be at risk for experiencing unaddressed cognitive needs. Conclusions Many adolescent survivors of cancer experience psychological difficulties that are not adequately managed by current services, underscoring the need for long-term surveillance. In addition to prescribing regular psychological evaluations, clinicians should closely monitor whether current support services appropriately meet survivors’ needs, particularly for lower-income survivors and those treated with CRT. PMID:22278930

  20. Use of Linear Programming to Develop Cost-Minimized Nutritionally Adequate Health Promoting Food Baskets

    PubMed Central

    Tetens, Inge; Dejgård Jensen, Jørgen; Smed, Sinne; Gabrijelčič Blenkuš, Mojca; Rayner, Mike; Darmon, Nicole; Robertson, Aileen

    2016-01-01

    Background Food-Based Dietary Guidelines (FBDGs) are developed to promote healthier eating patterns, but increasing food prices may make healthy eating less affordable. The aim of this study was to design a range of cost-minimized nutritionally adequate health-promoting food baskets (FBs) that help prevent both micronutrient inadequacy and diet-related non-communicable diseases at lowest cost. Methods Average prices for 312 foods were collected within the Greater Copenhagen area. The cost and nutrient content of five different cost-minimized FBs for a family of four were calculated per day using linear programming. The FBs were defined using five different constraints: cultural acceptability (CA), or dietary guidelines (DG), or nutrient recommendations (N), or cultural acceptability and nutrient recommendations (CAN), or dietary guidelines and nutrient recommendations (DGN). The variety and number of foods in each of the resulting five baskets was increased through limiting the relative share of individual foods. Results The one-day version of N contained only 12 foods at the minimum cost of DKK 27 (€ 3.6). The CA, DG, and DGN were about twice of this and the CAN cost ~DKK 81 (€ 10.8). The baskets with the greater variety of foods contained from 70 (CAN) to 134 (DGN) foods and cost between DKK 60 (€ 8.1, N) and DKK 125 (€ 16.8, DGN). Ensuring that the food baskets cover both dietary guidelines and nutrient recommendations doubled the cost while cultural acceptability (CAN) tripled it. Conclusion Use of linear programming facilitates the generation of low-cost food baskets that are nutritionally adequate, health promoting, and culturally acceptable. PMID:27760131

  1. Maintaining Adequate CO2 Washout for an Advanced EMU via a New Rapid Cycle Amine Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chullen, Cinda

    2011-01-01

    Over the past several years, NASA has realized tremendous progress in Extravehicular Activity (EVA) technology development. This has been evidenced by the progressive development of a new Rapic Cycle Amine (RCA) system for the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (AEMU) Portable Life Support Subsystem (PLSS). The PLSS is responsible for the life support of the crew member in the spacesuit. The RCA technology is responsible for carbon dioxide (CO2) and humidity control. Another aspect of the RCA is that it is on-back vacuum-regenerable, efficient, and reliable. The RCA also simplifies the PLSS schematic by eliminating the need for a condensing heat exchanger for humidity control in the current EMU. As development progresses on the RCA, it is important that the sizing be optimized so that the demand on the PLSS battery is minimized. As well, maintaining the CO2 washout at adequate levels during an EVA is an absolute requirement of the RCA and associated ventilation system. Testing has been underway in-house at NASA Johnson Space Center and analysis has been initiated to evaluate whether the technology provides exemplary performance in ensuring that the CO2 is removed sufficiently enough and the ventilation flow is adequate enough to maintain CO2 1 Project Engineer, Space Suit and Crew Survival Systems Branch, Crew and Thermal Systems Division, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, TX 77058/EC5. washout in the AEMU spacesuit helmet of the crew member during an EVA. This paper will review the recent developments of the RCA unit, the testing results performed in-house with a spacesuit simulator, and the associated analytical work along with insights from the medical aspect on the testing.

  2. [Hyperbaric oxygenation therapy, basic concepts].

    PubMed

    García-Covarrubias, L; Cuauhtémoc Sánchez-Rodríguez, E

    2000-01-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO) is defined as a treatment in which a patient breathes 100% oxygen in a pressurized environment of at least 1.4 absolute atmospheres. The first written reports data from the 15th century, when it was used to treat respiratory diseases. For some time its applications lacked scientific support until the second half of this century when scientific publications were carried out using current methodology. This type of therapy is grounded basically in three gas laws: Henry's Law, Dalton's Law and Boyle's Law. The beneficial effects are: wound healing enhancement; increased neutrophil bactericidal capacity; direct toxic effect against some microorganisms; arteriolar vasoconstriction with subsequent edema reduction and decreased ischemia/reperfusion injury, among others. These are the result of increased environmental pressure and high oxygen tension in body tissues. Currently there are 13 accepted conditions to be treated with HBO and others are still under investigation. Following UHMS-accepted treatment protocols, complications and/or adverse effects are limited. PMID:10721602

  3. [Hyperbaric oxygenation therapy, basic concepts].

    PubMed

    García-Covarrubias, L; Cuauhtémoc Sánchez-Rodríguez, E

    2000-01-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO) is defined as a treatment in which a patient breathes 100% oxygen in a pressurized environment of at least 1.4 absolute atmospheres. The first written reports data from the 15th century, when it was used to treat respiratory diseases. For some time its applications lacked scientific support until the second half of this century when scientific publications were carried out using current methodology. This type of therapy is grounded basically in three gas laws: Henry's Law, Dalton's Law and Boyle's Law. The beneficial effects are: wound healing enhancement; increased neutrophil bactericidal capacity; direct toxic effect against some microorganisms; arteriolar vasoconstriction with subsequent edema reduction and decreased ischemia/reperfusion injury, among others. These are the result of increased environmental pressure and high oxygen tension in body tissues. Currently there are 13 accepted conditions to be treated with HBO and others are still under investigation. Following UHMS-accepted treatment protocols, complications and/or adverse effects are limited.

  4. Mitochondrial complex III: an essential component of universal oxygen sensing machinery?

    PubMed

    Chandel, Navdeep S

    2010-12-31

    Oxygen is necessary for the survival of mammalian cells. In order to maintain adequate cellular oxygenation, mammals have evolved multiple acute and long-term adaptive responses to hypoxia. These include hypoxic increases in erythropoiesis, pulmonary vasoconstriction and carotid body neurosecretion. Collectively, these responses help maintain oxygen homeostasis as oxygen levels remain scarce. There are multiple effectors proposed to underlie these diverse responses to hypoxia including PHD2, AMPK, NADPH oxidases, and mitochondrial complex III. Here I propose a model wherein complex III is integral to oxygen sensing in regulating diverse response to hypoxia.

  5. 42 CFR 414.226 - Oxygen and oxygen equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... only (gaseous or liquid tanks). (iii) Oxygen generating portable equipment only. (iv) Stationary oxygen... stationary oxygen equipment that requires delivery of gaseous or liquid oxygen contents; or (ii) Rents stationary oxygen equipment that requires delivery of gaseous or liquid oxygen contents after the period...

  6. 40 CFR 141.522 - How does the State determine whether my system's watershed control requirements are adequate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... my system's watershed control requirements are adequate? 141.522 Section 141.522 Protection of... Additional Watershed Control Requirements for Unfiltered Systems § 141.522 How does the State determine whether my system's watershed control requirements are adequate? During an onsite inspection...

  7. 40 CFR 141.522 - How does the State determine whether my system's watershed control requirements are adequate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... my system's watershed control requirements are adequate? 141.522 Section 141.522 Protection of... Additional Watershed Control Requirements for Unfiltered Systems § 141.522 How does the State determine whether my system's watershed control requirements are adequate? During an onsite inspection...

  8. 40 CFR 141.522 - How does the State determine whether my system's watershed control requirements are adequate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... my system's watershed control requirements are adequate? 141.522 Section 141.522 Protection of... Additional Watershed Control Requirements for Unfiltered Systems § 141.522 How does the State determine whether my system's watershed control requirements are adequate? During an onsite inspection...

  9. 21 CFR 740.10 - Labeling of cosmetic products for which adequate substantiation of safety has not been obtained.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Labeling of cosmetic products for which adequate..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS COSMETIC PRODUCT WARNING STATEMENTS Warning Statements § 740.10 Labeling of cosmetic products for which adequate substantiation of safety has not...

  10. 21 CFR 740.10 - Labeling of cosmetic products for which adequate substantiation of safety has not been obtained.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Labeling of cosmetic products for which adequate..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS COSMETIC PRODUCT WARNING STATEMENTS Warning Statements § 740.10 Labeling of cosmetic products for which adequate substantiation of safety has not...

  11. 21 CFR 740.10 - Labeling of cosmetic products for which adequate substantiation of safety has not been obtained.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Labeling of cosmetic products for which adequate..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS COSMETIC PRODUCT WARNING STATEMENTS Warning Statements § 740.10 Labeling of cosmetic products for which adequate substantiation of safety has not...

  12. 21 CFR 740.10 - Labeling of cosmetic products for which adequate substantiation of safety has not been obtained.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Labeling of cosmetic products for which adequate..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS COSMETIC PRODUCT WARNING STATEMENTS Warning Statements § 740.10 Labeling of cosmetic products for which adequate substantiation of safety has not...

  13. 21 CFR 740.10 - Labeling of cosmetic products for which adequate substantiation of safety has not been obtained.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Labeling of cosmetic products for which adequate..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS COSMETIC PRODUCT WARNING STATEMENTS Warning Statements § 740.10 Labeling of cosmetic products for which adequate substantiation of safety has not...

  14. Injectable tissue-engineered soft tissue for tissue augmentation.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Sung-Mi; You, Hi-Jin; Han, Seung-Kyu

    2014-11-01

    Soft tissue augmentation is a process of implanting tissues or materials to treat wrinkles or soft tissue defects in the body. Over the years, various materials have evolved to correct soft tissue defects, including a number of tissues and polymers. Autogenous dermis, autogenous fat, autogenous dermis-fat, allogenic dermis, synthetic implants, and fillers have been widely accepted for soft tissue augmentations. Tissue engineering technology has also been introduced and opened a new venue of opportunities in this field. In particular, a long-lasting filler consisting of hyaluronic acid filler and living human mesenchymal cells called "injectable tissue-engineered soft tissue" has been created and applied clinically, as this strategy has many advantages over conventional methods. Fibroblasts and adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction cells can be clinically used as injectable tissue-engineered soft tissue at present. In this review, information on the soft tissue augmentation method using the injectable tissue-engineered soft tissue is provided.

  15. Adequate hypoxia inducible factor 1α signaling is indispensable for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Stegen, Steve; Deprez, Sanne; Eelen, Guy; Torrekens, Sophie; Van Looveren, Riet; Goveia, Jermaine; Ghesquière, Bart; Carmeliet, Peter; Carmeliet, Geert

    2016-06-01

    Engineered cell-based constructs are an appealing strategy to treat large skeletal defects. However, transplanted cells are often confronted with an environment that is deprived of oxygen and nutrients. Upon hypoxia, most cell types activate hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) signaling, but its importance for implanted osteoprogenitor cells during bone regeneration is not elucidated. To this end, we specifically deleted the HIF--1α isoform in periosteal progenitor cells and show that activation of HIF-1α signaling in these cells is critical for bone repair by modulating angiogenic and metabolic processes. Activation of HIF-1α is not only crucial for blood vessel invasion, by enhancing angiogenic growth factor production, but also for periosteal cell survival early after implantation, when blood vessels have not yet invaded the construct. HIF-1α signaling limits oxygen consumption to avoid accumulation of harmful ROS and preserve redox balance, and additionally induces a switch to glycolysis to prevent energetic distress. Altogether, our results indicate that the proangiogenic capacity of implanted periosteal cells is HIF-1α regulated and that metabolic adaptations mediate post-implantation cell survival. PMID:27058876

  16. Growth Factor-Free Pre-vascularization of Cell Sheets for Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Costa, Marina; Pirraco, Rogério P; Cerqueira, Mariana T; Reis, Rui L; Marques, Alexandra P

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic efficacy of tissue-engineered constructs is often compromised by inadequate inosculation and neo-vascularization. This problem is considered one of the biggest hurdles in the field and finding a solution is currently the focus of a great fraction of the research community. Many of the methodologies designed to address this issue propose the use of endothelial cells and angiogenic growth factors, or combinations of both, to accelerate neo-vascularization after transplantation. However, an adequate solution is still elusive. In this context, we describe a methodology that combines the use of the stromal vascular fraction (SVF) isolated from adipose tissue with low oxygen culture to produce pre-vascularized cell sheets as angiogenic tools for Tissue Engineering. The herein proposed approach takes advantage of the SVF angiogenic nature conferred by adipose stem cells, endothelial progenitors, endothelial and hematopoietic cells, and pericytes and further potentiates it using low oxygen, or hypoxic, culture. Freshly isolated nucleated SVF cells are cultured in hyperconfluent conditions under hypoxia (pO2 = 5 %) for up to 5 days in medium without extrinsic growth factors enabling the generation of contiguous sheets as described by the cell sheet engineering technique. Flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry allow confirming the phenotype of the different cell types composing the cell-sheets as well the organization of the CD31(+) cells in branched and highly complex tube-like structures. Overall, a simple and flexible approach to promote growth factor-free pre-vascularization of cell sheets for tissue engineering (TE) applications is described. PMID:27250706

  17. Integrated turbomachine oxygen plant

    DOEpatents

    Anand, Ashok Kumar; DePuy, Richard Anthony; Muthaiah, Veerappan

    2014-06-17

    An integrated turbomachine oxygen plant includes a turbomachine and an air separation unit. One or more compressor pathways flow compressed air from a compressor through one or more of a combustor and a turbine expander to cool the combustor and/or the turbine expander. An air separation unit is operably connected to the one or more compressor pathways and is configured to separate the compressed air into oxygen and oxygen-depleted air. A method of air separation in an integrated turbomachine oxygen plant includes compressing a flow of air in a compressor of a turbomachine. The compressed flow of air is flowed through one or more of a combustor and a turbine expander of the turbomachine to cool the combustor and/or the turbine expander. The compressed flow of air is directed to an air separation unit and is separated into oxygen and oxygen-depleted air.

  18. Oxygen ion conducting materials

    DOEpatents

    Vaughey, John; Krumpelt, Michael; Wang, Xiaoping; Carter, J. David

    2005-07-12

    An oxygen ion conducting ceramic oxide that has applications in industry including fuel cells, oxygen pumps, oxygen sensors, and separation membranes. The material is based on the idea that substituting a dopant into the host perovskite lattice of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 that prefers a coordination number lower than 6 will induce oxygen ion vacancies to form in the lattice. Because the oxygen ion conductivity of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 is low over a very large temperature range, the material exhibits a high overpotential when used. The inclusion of oxygen vacancies into the lattice by doping the material has been found to maintain the desirable properties of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3, while significantly decreasing the experimentally observed overpotential.

  19. Oxygen ion conducting materials

    DOEpatents

    Carter, J. David; Wang, Xiaoping; Vaughey, John; Krumpelt, Michael

    2004-11-23

    An oxygen ion conducting ceramic oxide that has applications in industry including fuel cells, oxygen pumps, oxygen sensors, and separation membranes. The material is based on the idea that substituting a dopant into the host perovskite lattice of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 that prefers a coordination number lower than 6 will induce oxygen ion vacancies to form in the lattice. Because the oxygen ion conductivity of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 is low over a very large temperature range, the material exhibits a high overpotential when used. The inclusion of oxygen vacancies into the lattice by doping the material has been found to maintain the desirable properties of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3, while significantly decreasing the experimentally observed overpotential.

  20. Oxygen ion conducting materials

    DOEpatents

    Vaughey, John; Krumpelt, Michael; Wang, Xiaoping; Carter, J. David

    2003-01-01

    An oxygen ion conducting ceramic oxide that has applications in industry including fuel cells, oxygen pumps, oxygen sensors, and separation membranes. The material is based on the idea that substituting a dopant into the host perovskite lattice of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 that prefers a coordination number lower than 6 will induce oxygen ion vacancies to form in the lattice. Because the oxygen ion conductivity of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 is low over a very large temperature range, the material exhibits a high overpotential when used. The inclusion of oxygen vacancies into the lattice by doping the material has been found to maintain the desirable properties of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3, while significantly decreasing the experimentally observed overpotential.