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Sample records for adequate tissue perfusion

  1. Developing a tissue perfusion sensor.

    PubMed

    Harvey, S L R; Parker, K H; O'Hare, D

    2007-01-01

    The development of a electrochemical tissue perfusion sensor is presented. The sensor is a platinum/platinum ring-disc microelectrode that relies on the principle of collector-generator to monitor mass transport within its vicinity. Tissue perfusion is a mass transport mechanism that describes the movement of respiratory gases, nutrients and metabolites in tissue. The sensor's capability of detecting perfusion at the cellular level in a continuous fashion is unique. This sensor will provide insight into the way nutrients and metabolites are transported in tissue especially in cases were perfusion is low such as in wounds or ischemic tissue. We present experimental work for the development and testing of the sensors in vitro. Experimental flow recordings in free steam solutions as well as the flow through tissue-like media are shown. Tests on post operative human tissue are also presented. The sensor's feature such as the continuous recoding capacities, spatial resolution and the measurement range from ml/min to microl/min are highlighted. PMID:18002549

  2. Adipose Tissue - Adequate, Accessible Regenerative Material.

    PubMed

    Kolaparthy, Lakshmi Kanth; Sanivarapu, Sahitya; Moogla, Srinivas; Kutcham, Rupa Sruthi

    2015-11-01

    The potential use of stem cell based therapies for the repair and regeneration of various tissues offers a paradigm shift that may provide alternative therapeutic solutions for a number of diseases. The use of either embryonic stem cells (ESCs) or induced pluripotent stem cells in clinical situations is limited due to cell regulations and to technical and ethical considerations involved in genetic manipulation of human ESCs, even though these cells are highly beneficial. Mesenchymal stem cells seen to be an ideal population of stem cells in particular, Adipose derived stem cells (ASCs) which can be obtained in large number and easily harvested from adipose tissue. It is ubiquitously available and has several advantages compared to other sources as easily accessible in large quantities with minimal invasive harvesting procedure, and isolation of adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells yield a high amount of stem cells which is essential for stem cell based therapies and tissue engineering. Recently, periodontal tissue regeneration using ASCs has been examined in some animal models. This method has potential in the regeneration of functional periodontal tissues because various secreted growth factors from ASCs might not only promote the regeneration of periodontal tissues but also encourage neovascularization of the damaged tissues. This review summarizes the sources, isolation and characteristics of adipose derived stem cells and its potential role in periodontal regeneration is discussed. PMID:26634060

  3. Adipose Tissue - Adequate, Accessible Regenerative Material

    PubMed Central

    Kolaparthy, Lakshmi Kanth.; Sanivarapu, Sahitya; Moogla, Srinivas; Kutcham, Rupa Sruthi

    2015-01-01

    The potential use of stem cell based therapies for the repair and regeneration of various tissues offers a paradigm shift that may provide alternative therapeutic solutions for a number of diseases. The use of either embryonic stem cells (ESCs) or induced pluripotent stem cells in clinical situations is limited due to cell regulations and to technical and ethical considerations involved in genetic manipulation of human ESCs, even though these cells are highly beneficial. Mesenchymal stem cells seen to be an ideal population of stem cells in particular, Adipose derived stem cells (ASCs) which can be obtained in large number and easily harvested from adipose tissue. It is ubiquitously available and has several advantages compared to other sources as easily accessible in large quantities with minimal invasive harvesting procedure, and isolation of adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells yield a high amount of stem cells which is essential for stem cell based therapies and tissue engineering. Recently, periodontal tissue regeneration using ASCs has been examined in some animal models. This method has potential in the regeneration of functional periodontal tissues because various secreted growth factors from ASCs might not only promote the regeneration of periodontal tissues but also encourage neovascularization of the damaged tissues. This review summarizes the sources, isolation and characteristics of adipose derived stem cells and its potential role in periodontal regeneration is discussed. PMID:26634060

  4. Cardiac tissue engineering using perfusion bioreactor systems

    PubMed Central

    Radisic, Milica; Marsano, Anna; Maidhof, Robert; Wang, Yadong; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2009-01-01

    This protocol describes tissue engineering of synchronously contractile cardiac constructs by culturing cardiac cell populations on porous scaffolds (in some cases with an array of channels) and bioreactors with perfusion of culture medium (in some cases supplemented with an oxygen carrier). The overall approach is ‘biomimetic’ in nature as it tends to provide in vivo-like oxygen supply to cultured cells and thereby overcome inherent limitations of diffusional transport in conventional culture systems. In order to mimic the capillary network, cells are cultured on channeled elastomer scaffolds that are perfused with culture medium that can contain oxygen carriers. The overall protocol takes 2–4 weeks, including assembly of the perfusion systems, preparation of scaffolds, cell seeding and cultivation, and on-line and end-point assessment methods. This model is well suited for a wide range of cardiac tissue engineering applications, including the use of human stem cells, and high-fidelity models for biological research. PMID:18388955

  5. TISSUE ENGINEERING PERFUSABLE CANCER MODELS

    PubMed Central

    Fong, E.L.; Santoro, M.; Farach-Carson, M.C.; Kasper, F.K.; Mikos, A.G.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of fluid flow on cancer progression is currently not well understood, highlighting the need for perfused tumor models to close this gap in knowledge. Enabling biological processes at the cellular level to be modeled with high spatiotemporal control, microfluidic tumor models have demonstrated applicability as platforms to study cell-cell interactions, effect of interstitial flow on tumor migration and the role of vascular barrier function. To account for the multi-scale nature of cancer growth and invasion, macroscale models are also necessary. The consideration of fluid dynamics within tumor models at both the micro- and macroscopic levels may greatly improve our ability to more fully mimic the tumor microenvironment. PMID:24634812

  6. Adequate Systemic Perfusion Maintained by a CentriMag during Acute Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Favaloro, Roberto R.; Bertolotti, Alejandro; Diez, Mirta; Favaloro, Liliana; Gomez, Carmen; Peradejordi, Margarita; Trentadue, Julio; Hellman, Lorena; Arzani, Yanina; Otero, Pilar Varela

    2008-01-01

    Mechanical circulatory support during severe acute heart failure presents options for myocardial recovery or cardiac replacement. Short-term circulatory support with the newest generation of magnetically levitated centrifugal-flow pumps affords several potential advantages. Herein, we present our experience with such a pump—the CentriMag® (Levitronix LLC; Waltham, Mass) centrifugal-flow ventricular assist device—in 4 critically ill patients who were in cardiogenic shock. From November 2007 through March 2008, 3 patients were supported after cardiac surgery, and 1 after chronic heart failure worsened. Two patients were bridged to heart transplantation, and 2 died during support. Perfusion during support was evaluated in terms of serum lactic acid levels and oxygenation values. In all of the patients, the CentriMag's pump flow was adequate, and continuous mechanical ventilation support was provided. Lactic acid levels substantially improved with CentriMag support and were maintained at near-normal levels throughout. At the same time, arterial pH, PO2, and carbon dioxide levels remained within acceptable ranges. No thromboembolic events or mechanical failures occurred. Our experience indicates that short-term use of the CentriMag ventricular assist device during acute heart failure can restore and adequately support circulation until recovery or until the application of definitive therapy. PMID:18941648

  7. A Phantom Tissue System for the Calibration of Perfusion Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Mudaliar, Ashvinikumar V.; Ellis, Brent E.; Ricketts, Patricia L.; Lanz, Otto I.; Scott, Elaine P.; Diller, Thomas E.

    2008-01-01

    A convenient method for testing and calibrating surface perfusion sensors has been developed. A phantom tissue model is used to simulate the nondirectional blood flow of tissue perfusion. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was constructed in Fluent® to design the phantom tissue and validate the experimental results. The phantom perfusion system was used with a perfusion sensor based on clearance of thermal energy. A heat flux gage measures the heat flux response of tissue when a thermal event (convective cooling) is applied. The blood perfusion and contact resistance are estimated by a parameter estimation code. From the experimental and analytical results, it was concluded that the probe displayed good measurement repeatability and sensitivity. The experimental perfusion measurements in the tissue were in good agreement with those of the CFD models and demonstrated the value of the phantom tissue system. PMID:19045509

  8. Measuring Tissue Perfusion During Pressure Relief Maneuvers: Insights Into Preventing Pressure Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Makhsous, Mohsen; Priebe, Michael; Bankard, James; Rowles, Diana; Zeigler, Mary; Chen, David; Lin, Fang

    2007-01-01

    Background/Objective: To study the effect on tissue perfusion of relieving interface pressure using standard wheelchair pushups compared with a mechanical automated dynamic pressure relief system. Design: Repeated measures in 2 protocols on 3 groups of subjects. Participants: Twenty individuals with motor-complete paraplegia below T4, 20 with motor-complete tetraplegia, and 20 able-bodied subjects. Methods: Two 1-hour sitting protocols: dynamic protocol, sitting configuration alternated every 10 minutes between a normal sitting configuration and an off-loading configuration; wheelchair pushup protocol, normal sitting configuration with standard wheelchair pushup once every 20 minutes. Main Outcome Measures: Transcutaneous partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide measured from buttock overlying the ischial tuberosity and interface pressure measured at the seat back and buttocks. Perfusion deterioration and recovery times were calculated during changes in interface pressures. Results: In the off-loading configuration, concentrated interface pressure during the normal sitting configuration was significantly diminished, and tissue perfusion was significantly improved. Wheelchair pushups showed complete relief of interface pressure but incomplete recovery of tissue perfusion. Conclusions: Interface pressure analysis does not provide complete information about the effectiveness of pressure relief maneuvers. Measures of tissue perfusion may help establish more effective strategies. Relief achieved by standard wheelchair pushups may not be sufficient to recover tissue perfusion compromised during sitting; alternate maneuvers may be necessary. The dynamic seating system provided effective pressure relief with sustained reduction in interface pressure adequate for complete recovery of tissue perfusion. Differences in perfusion recovery times between subjects with spinal cord injury (SCI) and controls raise questions about the importance of changes in vascular responses

  9. Vascular Tissue Engineering: Building Perfusable Vasculature for Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Gui, Liqiong; Niklason, Laura E.

    2014-01-01

    Tissue and organ replacement is required when there are no alternative therapies available. Although vascular tissue engineering was originally developed to meet the clinical demands of small-diameter vascular conduits as bypass grafts, it has evolved into a highly advanced field where perfusable vasculatures are generated for implantation. Herein, we review several cutting-edge techniques that have led to implantable human blood vessels in clinical trials, the novel approaches that build complex perfusable microvascular networks in functional tissues, the use of stem cells to generate endothelial cells for vascularization, as well as the challenges in bringing vascular tissue engineering technologies into the clinics. PMID:24533306

  10. Biomimetic perfusion and electrical stimulation applied in concert improved the assembly of engineered cardiac tissue.

    PubMed

    Maidhof, Robert; Tandon, Nina; Lee, Eun Jung; Luo, Jianwen; Duan, Yi; Yeager, Keith; Konofagou, Elisa; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2012-11-01

    Maintenance of normal myocardial function depends intimately on synchronous tissue contraction, driven by electrical activation and on adequate nutrient perfusion in support thereof. Bioreactors have been used to mimic aspects of these factors in vitro to engineer cardiac tissue but, due to design limitations, previous bioreactor systems have yet to simultaneously support nutrient perfusion, electrical stimulation and unconstrained (i.e. not isometric) tissue contraction. To the best of our knowledge, the bioreactor system described herein is the first to integrate these three key factors in concert. We present the design of our bioreactor and characterize its capability in integrated experimental and mathematical modelling studies. We then cultured cardiac cells obtained from neonatal rats in porous, channelled elastomer scaffolds with the simultaneous application of perfusion and electrical stimulation, with controls excluding either one or both of these two conditions. After 8 days of culture, constructs grown with simultaneous perfusion and electrical stimulation exhibited substantially improved functional properties, as evidenced by a significant increase in contraction amplitude (0.23 ± 0.10% vs 0.14 ± 0.05%, 0.13 ± 0.08% or 0.09 ± 0.02% in control constructs grown without stimulation, without perfusion, or either stimulation or perfusion, respectively). Consistently, these constructs had significantly improved DNA contents, cell distribution throughout the scaffold thickness, cardiac protein expression, cell morphology and overall tissue organization compared to control groups. Thus, the simultaneous application of medium perfusion and electrical conditioning enabled by the use of the novel bioreactor system may accelerate the generation of fully functional, clinically sized cardiac tissue constructs. PMID:22170772

  11. Perfused Multiwell Plate for 3D Liver Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Domansky, Karel; Inman, Walker; Serdy, James; Dash, Ajit; Lim, Matthew H. M.

    2014-01-01

    In vitro models that capture the complexity of in vivo tissue and organ behaviors in a scalable and easy-to-use format are desirable for drug discovery. To address this, we have developed a bioreactor that fosters maintenance of 3D tissue cultures under constant perfusion and we have integrated multiple bioreactors into an array in a multiwell plate format. All bioreactors are fluidically isolated from each other. Each bioreactor in the array contains a scaffold that supports formation of hundreds of 3D microscale tissue units. The tissue units are perfused with cell culture medium circulated within the bioreactor by integrated pneumatic diaphragm micropumps. Electronic controls for the pumps are kept outside the incubator and connected to the perfused multiwell by pneumatic lines. The docking design and open-well bioreactor layout make handling perfused multiwell plates similar to using standard multiwell tissue culture plates. A model of oxygen consumption and transport in the circulating culture medium was used to predict appropriate operating parameters for primary liver cultures. Oxygen concentrations at key locations in the system were then measured as a function of flow rate and time after initiation of culture to determine oxygen consumption rates. After seven days in culture, tissue formed from cells seeded in the perfused multiwell reactor remained functionally viable as assessed by immunostaining for hepatocyte and liver sinusoidal endothelial cell (LSEC) phenotypic markers. PMID:20024050

  12. Contactless mapping of rhythmical phenomena in tissue perfusion using PPGI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huelsbusch, Markus; Blazek, Vladimir

    2002-04-01

    This paper presents the experimental setup and preliminary results of a near infrared CCD camera based Photoplethysmography Imaging (PPGI) system, which has been shown to be suitable for contactless and spatially resolved assessment of rhythmical blood volume changes in the skin. To visualize the complex rhythmical patterns in the dermal perfusion the Wavelet Transform is utilized. It is able to jointly assess time and frequency behavior of signals and thus allows to analyze instationary oscillations and variabilities in the different human rhythmics. The presented system is expected to provide new insights into the functional sequences of physiological tissue perfusion as well as of the perfusion status in ulcer formation and wound healing.

  13. The role of perfusion bioreactors in bone tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Gaspar, Diana Alves; Gomide, Viviane; Monteiro, Fernando Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Tissue engineering has emerged as a possible alternative to current treatments for bone injuries and defects. However, the common tissue engineering approach presents some obstacles to the development of functional tissues, such as insufficient nutrient and metabolite transport and non-homogenous cell distribution. Culture of bone cells in three-dimensional constructs in bioreactor systems is a solution for those problems as it improves mass transport in the culture system. For bone tissue engineering spinner flasks, rotating wall vessels and perfusion systems have been investigated, and based on these, variations that support cell seeding and mechanical stimulation have also been researched. This review aims at providing an overview of the concepts, advantages and future applications of bioreactor systems for bone tissue engineering with emphasis on the design of different perfusion systems and parameters that can be optimized. PMID:23507883

  14. New vessel formation in the context of cardiomyocyte regeneration – the role and importance of an adequate perfusing vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Michelis, Katherine C.; Boehm, Manfred; Kovacic, Jason C.

    2014-01-01

    The history of revascularization for cardiac ischemia dates back to the early 1960's when the first coronary artery bypass graft procedures were performed in humans. With this 50 year history of providing a new vasculature to ischemic and hibernating myocardium, a profound depth of experience has been amassed in clinical cardiovascular medicine as to what does, and does not work in the context of cardiac revascularization, alleviating ischemia and adequacy of myocardial perfusion. These issues are of central relevance to contemporary cell-based cardiac regenerative approaches. While the cardiovascular cell therapy field is surging forward on many exciting fronts, several well accepted clinical axioms related to the cardiac arterial supply appear to be almost overlooked by some of our current basic conceptual and experimental cell therapy paradigms. We present here information drawn from five decades of the clinical revascularization experience, review relevant new data on vascular formation via cell therapy, and put forward the case that for optimal cell-based cardiac regeneration due attention must be paid to providing an adequate vascular supply. PMID:24841067

  15. Photoplethysmographic sensors for perfusion measurements in spinal cord tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, J. P.; Kyriacou, P. A.

    2011-08-01

    Sensors for recording photoplethysmographic signals from the nervous tissue of the spinal cord are described. The purpose of these sensors is to establish whether perfusion is compromised in various states of injury which occur in certain animal models of spinal cord injury, for example compression injury. Various measures of perfusion are applicable such as the amplitude of the photoplethysmograph signal and the oxygen saturation, measured using a dual wavelength configuration. Signals are usually compared to baseline measurements made in uninjured subjects. This paper describes two types of probe, one based on optical fibres, and one in which optotes are placed in direct contact with the tissue surface. Results from a study based on a compression model utilising a fibreoptic sensor are presented.

  16. Reflectance Photoplethysmography as Noninvasive Monitoring of Tissue Blood Perfusion.

    PubMed

    Abay, Tomas Ysehak; Kyriacou, Panayiotis A

    2015-09-01

    In the last decades, photoplethysmography (PPG) has been used as a noninvasive technique for monitoring arterial oxygen saturation by pulse oximetry (PO), whereas near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has been employed for monitoring tissue blood perfusion. While NIRS offers more parameters to evaluate oxygen delivery and consumption in deep tissues, PO only assesses the state of oxygen delivery. For a broader assessment of blood perfusion, this paper explores the utilization of dual-wavelength PPG by using the pulsatile (ac) and continuous (dc) PPG for the estimation of arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2) by conventional PO. Additionally, the Beer-Lambert law is applied to the dc components only for the estimation of changes in deoxyhemoglobin (HHb), oxyhemoglobin (HbO2), and total hemoglobin (tHb) as in NIRS. The system was evaluated on the forearm of 21 healthy volunteers during induction of venous occlusion (VO) and total occlusion (TO). A reflectance PPG probe and NIRS sensor were applied above the brachioradialis, PO sensors were applied on the fingers, and all the signals were acquired simultaneously. While NIRS and forearm SpO2 indicated VO, SpO2 from the finger did not exhibit any significant drop from baseline. During TO, all the indexes indicated the change in blood perfusion. HHb, HbO2, and tHb changes estimated by PPG presented high correlation with the same parameters obtained by NIRS during VO (r(2) = 0.960, r(2) = 0.821, and r(2) = 0.974, respectively) and during TO (r(2) = 0.988, r(2) = 0.940, and r(2) = 0.938, respectively). The system demonstrated the ability to extract valuable information from PPG signals for a broader assessment of tissue blood perfusion. PMID:25838515

  17. Tissue Thermal Property Reconstruction by Stopping Heating And Perfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumi, C.; Uchida, T.; Ooba, T.; Inoue, K.

    In this paper, we report robust noninvasive techniques for reconstructing the thermal properties of living tissues, such as thermal conductivity, thermal capacity and thermal diffusivity, for the diagnosis, monitoring and planning of thermal treatments such as high-intensity focus ultrasound (HIFU). Internal tissue temperature distributions can be measured using ultrasonic imaging or magnetic resonance imaging. Provided that the reference thermal properties of living tissues are given in the region of interest (ROI) as initial conditions, we can determine thermal property distributions by solving bioheat transfer equations as simultaneous first-order partial differential equations having temperature distributions as inhomogeneous coefficients. By using the reported technique, the perfusion by blood flow and thermal sources or sinks can also be reconstructed. However, in this study, we perform reconstruction after stopping heating and perfusion; only the thermal properties of living tissues can be reconstructed under such conditions. Simulations were conducted to verify the feasibility of the reconstruction. A minimally invasive thermal treatment will be realized by using our proposed reconstruction technique.

  18. Application of an acoustofluidic perfusion bioreactor for cartilage tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Li, Siwei; Glynne-Jones, Peter; Andriotis, Orestis G.; Ching, Kuan Y.; Jonnalagadda, Umesh S.; Oreffo, Richard O. C.; Hill, Martyn

    2014-01-01

    Cartilage grafts generated using conventional static tissue engineering strategies are characterised by low cell viability, suboptimal hyaline cartilage formation and, critically, inferior mechanical competency, which limit their application for resurfacing articular cartilage defects. To address the limitations of conventional static cartilage bioengineering strategies and generate robust, scaffold-free neocartilage grafts of human articular chondrocytes, the present study utilised custom-built microfluidic perfusion bioreactors with integrated ultrasound standing wave traps. The system employed sweeping acoustic drive frequencies over the range of 890 to 910 kHz and continuous perfusion of the chondrogenic culture medium at a low-shear flow rate to promote the generation of three-dimensional agglomerates of human articular chondrocytes, and enhance cartilage formation by cells of the agglomerates via improved mechanical stimulation and mass transfer rates. Histological examination and assessment of micromechanical properties using indentation-type atomic force microscopy confirmed that the neocartilage grafts were analogous to native hyaline cartilage. Furthermore, in the ex vivo organ culture partial thickness cartilage defect model, implantation of the neocartilage grafts into defects for 16 weeks resulted in the formation of hyaline cartilage-like repair tissue that adhered to the host cartilage and contributed to significant improvements to the tissue architecture within the defects, compared to the empty defects. The study has demonstrated the first successful application of the acoustofluidic perfusion bioreactors to bioengineer scaffold-free neocartilage grafts of human articular chondrocytes that have the potential for subsequent use in second generation autologous chondrocyte implantation procedures for the repair of partial thickness cartilage defects. PMID:25272195

  19. Color-Doppler sonographic tissue perfusion measurements reveal significantly diminished renal cortical perfusion in kidneys with vesicoureteral reflux

    PubMed Central

    Scholbach, T. M.; Sachse, C.

    2016-01-01

    Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) and its sequelae may lead to reduced renal perfusion and loss of renal function. Methods to describe and monitor tissue perfusion are needed. We investigated dynamic tissue perfusion measurement (DTPM) with the PixelFlux-software to measure microvascular changes in the renal cortex in 35 children with VUR and 28 healthy children. DTPM of defined horizontal slices of the renal cortex was carried out. A kidney was assigned to the “low grade reflux”-group if the reflux grade of the voiding cystourethrogram was 1 to 3 and to the “high grade reflux”-group if the reflux grade was 4 to 5. Kidneys with VUR showed a significantly reduced cortical perfusion. Compared to healthy kidneys, this decline reached in low and high grade refluxes within the proximal 50% of the cortex: 3% and 12 %, in the distal 50% of the cortex: 21% and 44 % and in the most distal 20 % of the cortex 41% and 44%. DTPM reveals a perfusion loss in kidneys depending on the degree of VUR, which is most pronounced in the peripheral cortex. Thus, DTPM offers the tool to evaluate microvascular perfusion, to help planning treatment decisions in children with VUR. PMID:27051133

  20. Restricted passage of insulin across capillary endothelium in perfused rat adipose tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Chernick, S.S.; Gardiner, R.J.; Scow, R.O. )

    1987-11-01

    Passage of insulin across capillary endothelium was monitored in perfused rat parametrial adipose tissue by the effect of intra-arterially infused insulin on oxidation of (U-{sup 14}C)glucose to CO{sub 2}. Glucose oxidation was constant at 34 nmol C {center dot} g{sup {minus}1} {center dot} min{sup {minus}1} for 90 min in tissues perfused with 0 or 50 {mu}U/ml. The rate of oxidation was doubled in 90 min at 100 {mu}U/ml and maximal in 40 min at 200 {mu}U/ml and in 20-30 min at 500 {mu}U/ml. The slow decline in oxidation rate when insulin infusion was stopped suggested that insulin was sequestered in the tissue. Although half-maximal response to insulin occurred in perfused tissues at 100 {mu}U/ml, it occurred at 8 {mu}U/ml in incubated adipocytes and at 30 {mu}U/ml in incubated tissue. In addition, the time required for maximal response to insulin was longer in perfused adipose tissue than in incubated cells and tissues. The data indicate that the transfer of insulin from blood to parenchymal cells in perfused tissue was restricted. The minimal amount of insulin needed for a response by adipocytes in perfused tissue was estimated at be <1% of that in blood. The findings are consistent with the concept that insulin is transferred across capillary endothelium by a receptor-mediated process.

  1. Inosculation and perfusion of pre-vascularized tissue patches containing aligned human microvessels after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Riemenschneider, Sonja B; Mattia, Donald J; Wendel, Jacqueline S; Schaefer, Jeremy A; Ye, Lei; Guzman, Pilar A; Tranquillo, Robert T

    2016-08-01

    A major goal of tissue engineering is the creation of pre-vascularized tissues that have a high density of organized microvessels that can be rapidly perfused following implantation. This is especially critical for highly metabolic tissues like myocardium, where a thick myocardial engineered tissue would require rapid perfusion within the first several days to survive transplantation. In the present work, tissue patches containing human microvessels that were either randomly oriented or aligned were placed acutely on rat hearts post-infarction and for each case it was determined whether rapid inosculation could occur and perfusion of the patch could be maintained for 6 days in an infarct environment. Patches containing self-assembled microvessels were formed by co-entrapment of human blood outgrowth endothelial cells and human pericytes in fibrin gel. Cell-induced gel contraction was mechanically-constrained resulting in samples with high densities of microvessels that were either randomly oriented (with 420 ± 140 lumens/mm(2)) or uniaxially aligned (with 940 ± 240 lumens/mm(2)) at the time of implantation. These patches were sutured onto the epicardial surface of the hearts of athymic rats following permanent ligation of the left anterior descending artery. In both aligned and randomly oriented microvessel patches, inosculation occurred and perfusion of the transplanted human microvessels was maintained, proving the in vivo vascularization potential of these engineered tissues. No difference was found in the number of human microvessels that were perfused in the randomly oriented (111 ± 75 perfused lumens/mm(2)) and aligned (173 ± 97 perfused lumens/mm(2)) patches. Our results demonstrate that tissue patches containing a high density of either aligned or randomly oriented human pre-formed microvessels achieve rapid perfusion in the myocardial infarct environment - a necessary first-step toward the creation of a thick, perfusable heart patch. PMID

  2. Tissue distribution of oxacillin and ampicillin in the isolated perfused bovine udder.

    PubMed

    Ehinger, A M; Kietzmann, M

    2000-04-01

    In vivo, tissue distribution of intra-mammarily administered antibiotics is mostly only assessed by sampling milk and blood. Therefore, the described study analysed whether measurement of tissue concentrations makes sense in vitro instead. Isolated bovine udders were perfused with gassed and warmed Tyrode solution. To four front and rear quarters each, 1000 mg oxacillin in 7.5 ml vehicle was administered intracisternally, completely formulated as sodium monohydrate in two lactation ointments (with or without sodium dodecylsulphate) or 80% as benzathine salt in a dry-off ointment. Over 3 h, perfusate and glandular tissue from different locations were sampled and analysed by high pressure liquid chromatography. With increasing vertical distance to the teat base, the tissue concentration of antibiotics decreased. With the lactation ointment containing sodium dodecylsulphate, lower oxacillin concentrations were reached in glandular tissue and lymph nodes compared to those without. The ointments led to a higher recovery of oxacillin in glandular tissue than in perfusate. Aluminium monostearate in the dry-off ointment caused an even poorer absorption of oxacillin into perfusate. The isolated perfused bovine udder is suitable to study the tissue distribution of antibiotics, since the results were mainly comparable with the few existing in vivo studies and show the influence of different formulations. PMID:10842465

  3. Rapid casting of patterned vascular networks for perfusable engineered three-dimensional tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Jordan S.; Stevens, Kelly R.; Yang, Michael T.; Baker, Brendon M.; Nguyen, Duc-Huy T.; Cohen, Daniel M.; Toro, Esteban; Chen, Alice A.; Galie, Peter A.; Yu, Xiang; Chaturvedi, Ritika; Bhatia, Sangeeta N.; Chen, Christopher S.

    2012-09-01

    In the absence of perfusable vascular networks, three-dimensional (3D) engineered tissues densely populated with cells quickly develop a necrotic core. Yet the lack of a general approach to rapidly construct such networks remains a major challenge for 3D tissue culture. Here, we printed rigid 3D filament networks of carbohydrate glass, and used them as a cytocompatible sacrificial template in engineered tissues containing living cells to generate cylindrical networks that could be lined with endothelial cells and perfused with blood under high-pressure pulsatile flow. Because this simple vascular casting approach allows independent control of network geometry, endothelialization and extravascular tissue, it is compatible with a wide variety of cell types, synthetic and natural extracellular matrices, and crosslinking strategies. We also demonstrated that the perfused vascular channels sustained the metabolic function of primary rat hepatocytes in engineered tissue constructs that otherwise exhibited suppressed function in their core.

  4. Quasi-simultaneous multimodal imaging of cutaneous tissue oxygenation and perfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Wenqi; Gan, Qi; Wu, Qiang; Zhang, Shiwu; Xu, Ronald

    2015-12-01

    Simultaneous and quantitative assessment of multiple tissue parameters may facilitate more effective diagnosis and therapy in many clinical applications, such as wound healing. However, existing wound assessment methods are typically subjective and qualitative, with the need for sequential data acquisition and coregistration between modalities, and lack of reliable standards for performance evaluation or calibration. To overcome these limitations, we developed a multimodal imaging system for quasi-simultaneous assessment of cutaneous tissue oxygenation and perfusion in a quantitative and noninvasive fashion. The system integrated multispectral and laser speckle imaging technologies into one experimental setup. Tissue oxygenation and perfusion were reconstructed by advanced algorithms. The accuracy and reliability of the imaging system were quantitatively validated in calibration experiments and a tissue-simulating phantom test. The experimental results were compared with a commercial oxygenation and perfusion monitor. Dynamic detection of cutaneous tissue oxygenation and perfusion was also demonstrated in vivo by a postocclusion reactive hyperemia procedure in a human subject and a wound healing process in a wounded mouse model. Our in vivo experiments not only validated the performance of the multimodal imaging system for cutaneous tissue oxygenation and perfusion imaging but also demonstrated its technical potential for wound healing assessment in clinical practice.

  5. Spatial optimization in perfusion bioreactors improves bone tissue-engineered construct quality attributes.

    PubMed

    Papantoniou, Ioannis; Guyot, Yann; Sonnaert, Maarten; Kerckhofs, Greet; Luyten, Frank P; Geris, Liesbet; Schrooten, Jan

    2014-12-01

    Perfusion bioreactors have shown great promise for tissue engineering applications providing a homogeneous and consistent distribution of nutrients and flow-induced shear stresses throughout tissue-engineered constructs. However, non-uniform fluid-flow profiles found in the perfusion chamber entrance region have been shown to affect tissue-engineered construct quality characteristics during culture. In this study a whole perfusion and construct, three dimensional (3D) computational fluid dynamics approach was used in order to optimize a critical design parameter such as the location of the regular pore scaffolds within the perfusion bioreactor chamber. Computational studies were coupled to bioreactor experiments for a case-study flow rate. Two cases were compared in the first instance seeded scaffolds were positioned immediately after the perfusion chamber inlet while a second group was positioned at the computationally determined optimum distance were a steady state flow profile had been reached. Experimental data showed that scaffold location affected significantly cell content and neo-tissue distribution, as determined and quantified by contrast enhanced nanoCT, within the constructs both at 14 and 21 days of culture. However, gene expression level of osteopontin and osteocalcin was not affected by the scaffold location. This study demonstrates that the bioreactor chamber environment, incorporating a scaffold and its location within it, affects the flow patterns within the pores throughout the scaffold requiring therefore dedicated optimization that can lead to bone tissue engineered constructs with improved quality attributes. PMID:24902541

  6. Changes in lung composition and regional perfusion and tissue distribution in patients with ARDS

    PubMed Central

    Dakin, Jonathan; Jones, Andrew T; Hansell, David M; Hoffman, Eric A; Evans, Timothy W

    2011-01-01

    Background & objective ARDS is characterised by bilateral pulmonary infiltrates and refractory hypoxemia attributed to V/Q mismatch. We used dynamic CT to characterise changes in lung composition, regional perfusion and tissue distribution in patients with ARDS in comparison to healthy subjects. Methods The Fick principle was applied to serial attenuation measurements constructed from sequential CT images acquired during the passage of a bolus of iodinated contrast medium in healthy subjects (n=3) and patients with ARDS (n=11). Perfusion was calculated by the Mullani-Gould method and mapped throughout both lungs. Gradients of perfusion and tissue density against vertical height were constructed. Results In comparison to normal individuals, the tissue component of lungs from patients with ARDS was significantly increased (p<0.05). Blood fraction was unchanged. There was a discernable gradient in tissue density from non dependent to dependent regions in the patients with ARDS that was significantly different from controls. The proportion of perfusion applied to consolidated areas (ie shunt) correlated significantly (p<0.05) with the severity of hypoxaemia. Conclusions In patients with ARDS there are changes in both lung composition and the distribution of tissue and perfusion that may account in part for the physiological changes that define the syndrome. PMID:21883676

  7. Trophoblast viability in perfused term placental tissue and explant cultures limited to 7-24 hours.

    PubMed

    Di Santo, S; Malek, A; Sager, R; Andres, A-C; Schneider, H

    2003-01-01

    Human term-placental culture techniques such as villous explant or dual perfusion are commonly used to study trophoblast function under control and experimentally manipulated conditions. We have compared trophoblast viability during perfusion and in explants cultured under various conditions by monitoring glucose consumption, protein synthesis and secretion, expression of differentiation-specific genes, induction of stress proteins and apoptotic cell death. The tissue was obtained from term-placentae of uncomplicated pregnancies after elective Caesarean delivery. We observed a severe loss of trophoblast viability in explants irrespective of the culture conditions used. Over 7 h of culture the amount of the differentiation specific placental hormones hCG, hPL and leptin accumulated in the medium dropped significantly. Analysis of their expression by semi-quantitative and real-time RT-PCR revealed that the down-regulation of expression occurred at the transcriptional level. This transcriptional repression was accompanied by induction of the stress-proteins RTP and BiP/GRP78. Analysis of apoptotic cell death by TUNEL assay and immunohistochemical detection of the caspase-3-specific degradation product of cytokeratin 18 revealed prominent cell death after 7 h of culture. These results are in contrast to the findings obtained in perfused placental tissue where, after 7 h of culture, hormone secretion, expression of stress proteins and cell death were similar as in native tissue. This difference between villous explant incubation and dual perfusion is also reflected by a significantly higher consumption of glucose in perfused tissue. PMID:13129686

  8. Surface fluorescence studies of tissue mitochondrial redox state in isolated perfused rat lungs.

    PubMed

    Staniszewski, Kevin; Audi, Said H; Sepehr, Reyhaneh; Jacobs, Elizabeth R; Ranji, Mahsa

    2013-04-01

    We designed a fiber-optic-based optoelectronic fluorometer to measure emitted fluorescence from the auto-fluorescent electron carriers NADH and FAD of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC). The ratio of NADH to FAD is called the redox ratio (RR = NADH/FAD) and is an indicator of the oxidoreductive state of tissue. We evaluated the fluorometer by measuring the fluorescence intensities of NADH and FAD at the surface of isolated, perfused rat lungs. Alterations of lung mitochondrial metabolic state were achieved by the addition of rotenone (complex I inhibitor), potassium cyanide (KCN, complex IV inhibitor) and/or pentachlorophenol (PCP, uncoupler) into the perfusate recirculating through the lung. Rotenone- or KCN-containing perfusate increased RR by 21 and 30%, respectively. In contrast, PCP-containing perfusate decreased RR by 27%. These changes are consistent with the established effects of rotenone, KCN, and PCP on the redox status of the ETC. Addition of blood to perfusate quenched NADH and FAD signal, but had no effect on RR. This study demonstrates the capacity of fluorometry to detect a change in mitochondrial redox state in isolated perfused lungs, and suggests the potential of fluorometry for use in in vivo experiments to extract a sensitive measure of lung tissue health in real-time. PMID:23238793

  9. Renal handling of cadmium in perfused rat kidney and effects on renal function and tissue composition.

    PubMed

    Diamond, G L; Cohen, J J; Weinstein, S L

    1986-11-01

    Isolated rat kidneys perfused with a Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate (KRB) solution containing 1 microM CdCl2 plus 6% substrate-free albumin (SFA) and a mixture of substrates accumulated substantially less cadmium in tissue than kidneys perfused with 1 microM CdCl2 in a protein-free KRB solution containing the same substrates: 11 vs. 205 nmol Cd/g dry wt. Decreasing the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) by occluding the ureters of kidneys perfused in the absence of albumin did not change the rate of net tissue uptake of cadmium (Cd), suggesting that the kidney can extract Cd from the peritubular capillary fluid and that net uptake of Cd is not dependent on the reabsorption of filtered Cd. The tissue accumulation of large quantities of Cd (1.8 mumol Cd/g dry wt), which established levels of non-metallothionein-bound Cd exceeding 1 mumol Cd/g dry wt, caused no changes in either GFR, perfusion flow rate, fractional reabsorption of Na+, fractional reabsorption of K+, fractional reabsorption of glucose, or free-water clearance. However, discrete changes in renal tissue K+ content were observed. Exposure to 1 microM CdCl2 resulted in a net loss of renal tissue K+ in rat kidneys perfused with substrate-enriched KRB containing 6% albumin. Exposure to 0.8 microM or 7 microM CdCl2 completely prevented K+ loss from kidneys perfused with a substrate-enriched, protein-free KRB solution. PMID:3777178

  10. Ghrelin protects musculocutaneous tissue from ischemic necrosis by improving microvascular perfusion.

    PubMed

    Rezaeian, F; Wettstein, R; Scheuer, C; Bäumker, K; Bächle, A; Vollmar, B; Menger, M D; Harder, Y

    2012-02-01

    Persistent ischemia in musculocutaneous tissue may lead to wound breakdown and necrosis. The objective of this experimental study was to analyze, whether the gastric peptide ghrelin prevents musculocutaneous tissue from necrosis and to elucidate underlying mechanisms. Thirty-two C57BL/6 mice equipped with a dorsal skinfold chamber containing ischemic musculocutaneous tissue were allocated to four groups: 1) ghrelin; 2) N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME); 3) ghrelin and l-NAME; and 4) control. Microcirculation, inflammation, angiogenesis, and tissue survival were assessed by fluorescence microscopy. Inducible and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (iNOS I and eNOS), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), as well as nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) were assessed by Western blot analysis. Ghrelin-treated animals showed an increased expression of iNOS and eNOS in critically perfused tissue compared with controls. This was associated with arteriolar dilation, increased arteriolar perfusion, and a sustained functional capillary density. Ghrelin further upregulated NF-κB and VEGF and induced angiogenesis. Finally, ghrelin reduced microvascular leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions, apoptosis, and overall tissue necrosis (P < 0.05 vs. control). Inhibition of nitric oxide by l-NAME did not affect the anti-inflammatory and angiogenic action of ghrelin but completely blunted the ghrelin-induced tissue protection by abrogating the arteriolar dilation, the improved capillary perfusion, and the increased tissue survival. Ghrelin prevents critically perfused tissue from ischemic necrosis. Tissue protection is the result of a nitric oxide synthase-mediated improvement of the microcirculation but not due to induction of angiogenesis or attenuation of inflammation. This might represent a promising, noninvasive, and clinically applicable approach to protect musculocutaneous tissue from ischemia. PMID:22159999

  11. Tissue distribution of cloxacillin after intramammary administration in the isolated perfused bovine udder

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Various intramammary suspensions containing cloxacillin benzathine are registered for use in cattle as antibiotics for intramammary use at drying off. To ensure antibacterial efficacy, the glandular tissue concentration of an antimicrobial agent must be sufficient. Since the possibilities to measure concentrations in the different areas of the glandular tissue in vivo are very limited, it was the aim of the present study to examine the distribution of cloxacillin in vitro using the isolated perfused bovine udder. Methods Mammary glands taken at slaughter from healthy lactating cows were perfused in vitro with warmed and gassed Tyrode solution. 600 mg cloxacillin benzathine were administered as Orbenin Extra Dry Cow by the intramammary route to six front and rear quarters each. Samples of glandular tissue - at different distances from and vertical to the teat right up to the udder base - were gathered from the treated quarters after 6 h. Perfusate was also sampled before and hourly after treatment for 6 h. The cloxacillin content of the tissue samples and perfusate samples was analysed by high performance liquid chromatography. Results The concentration of cloxacillin in the glandular tissue of front quarters measured 6 h after administration tended to decrease with increasing vertical distance from the teat. The decrease pattern of the concentration was not quite clear in rear quarters. A considerable variation in the tissue concentrations of cloxacillin was obvious, which reflects in vivo conditions. The concentrations measured in the perfusate samples were below the limit of quantification at all time points, indicating limited absorption of the antibiotic from the glandular tissue. Conclusion After intramammary administration of the dry off product containing cloxacillin benzathine concentrations of more than 0.5 μg/g (MIC) were reached in all regions of the front and rear quarters. PMID:20925913

  12. Tissue-engineering bioreactors: a new combined cell-seeding and perfusion system for vascular tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Sodian, Ralf; Lemke, Thees; Fritsche, Clemens; Hoerstrup, Simon P; Fu, Ping; Potapov, Evgenij V; Hausmann, Harald; Hetzer, Roland

    2002-10-01

    One approach to the tissue engineering of vascular structures is to develop in vitro conditions in order ultimately to fabricate functional vascular tissues before final implantation. In our experiment, we aimed to develop a new combined cell seeding and perfusion system that provides sterile conditions during cell seeding and biomechanical stimuli in order to fabricate autologous human vascular tissue in vitro. The cell seeding and perfusion system is made of Plexiglas and is completely transparent (Berlin Heart, Berlin, Germany; University Hospital Benjamin Franklin, Berlin, Germany). The whole system consists of a cell seeding chamber that can be incorporated into the perfusion system and an air-driven respirator pump connected to the bioreactor. The cell culture medium continuously circulates through a closed-loop system. We thus developed a cell seeding device for static and dynamic seeding of vascular cells onto a polymeric vascular scaffold and a closed-loop perfused bioreactor for long-term vascular conditioning. The cell seeding chamber can be easily connected to the bioreactor, which combines continuous, pulsatile perfusion and mechanical stimulation to the tissue-engineered conduit. Adjusting the stroke volume, the stroke rate, and the inspiration/expiration time of the ventilator allows various pulsatile flows and different levels of pressure. The whole system is a highly isolated cell culture setting, which provides a high level of sterility and a gas supply and fits into a standard humidified incubator. The device can be sterilized by ethylene oxide and assembled with a standard screwdriver. Our newly developed combination of a cell seeding and conditioning device provides sterile conditions and biodynamic stimuli for controlled tissue development and in vitro conditioning of an autologous tissue-engineered vessel. PMID:12459065

  13. Assessment of global tissue perfusion and oxygenation in neonates and infants after open-heart surgery†

    PubMed Central

    Gergely, Mihály; Ablonczy, László; Székely, Edgár A.; Sápi, Erzsébet; Gál, János; Szatmári, András; Székely, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Monitoring and preserving adequate perfusion and oxygen balance is a primary objective of critical care. This prospective observational study aimed to assess the relationship between global haemodynamic parameters and variables reflecting tissue oxygenation during the early period following corrective cardiac surgery in neonates and infants. The postoperative time course of oxygen delivery and consumption was evaluated. As surrogate markers of oxygen balance, the central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2) and venoarterial PCO2 difference (PvaCO2) were thoroughly investigated. METHODS Thirteen children <1 year of age who underwent open-heart surgery were prospectively enrolled. In addition to conventional postoperative monitoring, transpulmonary thermodilution (TPTD) was used to monitor cardiac output and calculate oxygen delivery and consumption. In parallel with each TPTD measurement, arterial and central venous blood gas values were recorded. Global haemodynamic parameters and oxygenation measurements were compared with weighted linear regression statistics and Pearson's correlation coefficient. RESULTS Data from 145 TPTD measurements and 304 blood gas samples were recorded. The early postoperative period was characterized by a supply-dependent oxygen consumption, as demonstrated by the direct correlation between the change in oxygen delivery and consumption (r = 0.62, P < 0.001). Regarding haemodynamic parameters, none of the heart rate, mean arterial pressure or cardiac index correlated with the measured ScvO2. However, the ScvO2 and PvaCO2 were found to correlate significantly (r = −0.49, P < 0.001), and both strongly related to oxygen extraction. CONCLUSIONS Both the ScvO2 and PvaCO2 are reliable and comparable parameters in following tissue oxygen balance during the early postoperative course after open-heart surgery in neonates and infants. As part of multiparameter monitoring, our data highlight the importance of regular ScvO2 measurements and

  14. A Technique to Perfuse Cadavers that Extends the Useful Life of Fresh Tissues: The Duke Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messmer, Caroline; Kellogg, Ryan T.; Zhang, Yixin; Baiak, Andresa; Leiweke, Clinton; Marcus, Jeffrey R.; Levin, L. Scott; Zenn, Michael R.; Erdmann, Detlev

    2010-01-01

    The demand for laboratory-based teaching and training is increasing worldwide as medical training and education confront the pressures of shorter training time and rising costs. This article presents a cost-effective perfusion technique that extends the useful life of fresh tissue. Refrigerated cadavers are preserved in their natural state for up…

  15. Quantitative monitoring of drug-tissue interaction in perfused organs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, Manfred D.; Nastac, Dumitru I.; Frank, Klaus H.

    2002-06-01

    In pharmacology many optical sensors are applied for investigations in vitro and in reduced systems. Due to a lack of sensors for optical imaging of functional structures in capillaries as well as in subcellular spaces the drug-tissue interaction in organs could not be monitored systematically. However, recent developments opened the door of this microcosm of life in its smallest entities. This will enable a better understanding of the questions of area and quality of drug action in tissue.

  16. Portable bioreactor for perfusion and electrical stimulation of engineered cardiac tissue

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Nina; Taubman, Alanna; Cimetta, Elisa; Saccenti, Laetitia; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac tissue engineering aims to create functional tissue constructs that can reestablish the structure and function of injured myocardium. Although bioreactors have facilitated the engineering of cardiac patches of clinically relevant size in vitro, a major drawback remains the transportation of the engineered tissues from a production facility to a medical operation facility while maintaining tissue viability and preventing contamination. Furthermore, after implantation, most of the cells are endangered by hypoxic conditions that exist before vascular flow is established. We developed a portable device that provides the perfusion and electrical stimulation necessary to engineer cardiac tissue in vitro, and to transport it to the site where it will be implantated. The micropump-powered perfusion apparatus may additionally function as an extracorporeal active pumping system providing nutrients and oxygen supply to the graft post-implantation. Such a system, through perfusion of oxygenated media and bioactive molecules (e.g. growth factors), could transiently support the tissue construct until it connects to the host vasculature and heart muscle, after which it could be taken away or let biodegrade. PMID:24111161

  17. Photoacoustic imaging of blood perfusion in tissue and phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilatou, Magdalena C.; Kolkman, Roy G. M.; Hondebrink, Erwin; Bolt, Rene A.; de Mul, Frits F. M.

    2001-06-01

    To localize and monitor the blood content in tissue we developed a very sensitive photo-acoustical detector. PVDF has been used as piezo-electric material. In this detector also fibers for the illumination of the sample are integrated. Resolution is about 20 (m in depth and about 50-100 m laterally). We use 532 nm light. We will show how photoacoustics can be used for measuring the thickness of tissue above bone. We will also report measurements on tissue phantoms: e.g. a vessel delta from the epigastric artery branching of a Wistar rat, filled with an artificial blood-resembling absorber. The measurements have been carried out on phantoms containing vessels at several depths. Signal processing was enhanced by Fourier processing of the data.

  18. A Device for Long-Term Perfusion, Imaging, and Electrical Interfacing of Brain Tissue In vitro

    PubMed Central

    Killian, Nathaniel J.; Vernekar, Varadraj N.; Potter, Steve M.; Vukasinovic, Jelena

    2016-01-01

    Distributed microelectrode array (MEA) recordings from consistent, viable, ≥500 μm thick tissue preparations over time periods from days to weeks may aid in studying a wide range of problems in neurobiology that require in vivo-like organotypic morphology. Existing tools for electrically interfacing with organotypic slices do not address necrosis that inevitably occurs within thick slices with limited diffusion of nutrients and gas, and limited removal of waste. We developed an integrated device that enables long-term maintenance of thick, functionally active, brain tissue models using interstitial perfusion and distributed recordings from thick sections of explanted tissue on a perforated multi-electrode array. This novel device allows for automated culturing, in situ imaging, and extracellular multi-electrode interfacing with brain slices, 3-D cell cultures, and potentially other tissue culture models. The device is economical, easy to assemble, and integrable with standard electrophysiology tools. We found that convective perfusion through the culture thickness provided a functional benefit to the preparations as firing rates were generally higher in perfused cultures compared to their respective unperfused controls. This work is a step toward the development of integrated tools for days-long experiments with more consistent, healthier, thicker, and functionally more active tissue cultures with built-in distributed electrophysiological recording and stimulation functionality. The results may be useful for the study of normal processes, pathological conditions, and drug screening strategies currently hindered by the limitations of acute (a few hours long) brain slice preparations. PMID:27065793

  19. Ectopic Osteogenesis of Macroscopic Tissue Constructs Assembled from Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Laden Microcarriers through In Vitro Perfusion Culture

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Maiqin; Zhou, Min; Ye, Zhaoyang; Zhou, Yan; Tan, Wen-Song

    2014-01-01

    We had previously demonstrated the feasibility of preparing a centimeter-sized bone tissue construct by following a modular approach. In the present study, the objectives were to evaluate osteogenesis and tissue formation of human amniotic mesenchymal stem cells-laden CultiSpher S microcarriers during in vitro perfusion culture and after subcutaneous implantation. Microtissues were prepared in dynamic culture using spinner flasks in 28 days. In comparison with 1-week perfusion culture, microtissues became more obviously fused, demonstrating significantly higher cellularity, metabolic activity, ALP activity and calcium content while maintaining cell viability after 2-week perfusion. After subcutaneous implantation in nude mice for 6 and 12 weeks, all explants showed tight contexture, suggesting profound tissue remodeling in vivo. In addition, 12-week implantation resulted in slightly better tissue properties. However, in vitro perfusion culture time exerted great influence on the properties of corresponding explants. Degradation of microcarriers was more pronounced in the explants of 2-week perfused macrotissues compared to those of 1-week perfusion and directly implanted microtissues. Moreover, more blood vessel infiltration and bone matrix deposition with homogeneous spatial distribution were found in the explants of 2-week perfused macrotissues. Taken together, in vitro perfusion culture time is critical in engineering bone tissue replacements using such a modular approach, which holds great promise for bone regeneration. PMID:25275528

  20. A Glycosaminoglycan Based, Modular Tissue Scaffold System for Rapid Assembly of Perfusable, High Cell Density, Engineered Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Tiruvannamalai-Annamalai, Ramkumar; Armant, David Randall; Matthew, Howard W. T.

    2014-01-01

    The limited ability to vascularize and perfuse thick, cell-laden tissue constructs has hindered efforts to engineer complex tissues and organs, including liver, heart and kidney. The emerging field of modular tissue engineering aims to address this limitation by fabricating constructs from the bottom up, with the objective of recreating native tissue architecture and promoting extensive vascularization. In this paper, we report the elements of a simple yet efficient method for fabricating vascularized tissue constructs by fusing biodegradable microcapsules with tunable interior environments. Parenchymal cells of various types, (i.e. trophoblasts, vascular smooth muscle cells, hepatocytes) were suspended in glycosaminoglycan (GAG) solutions (4%/1.5% chondroitin sulfate/carboxymethyl cellulose, or 1.5 wt% hyaluronan) and encapsulated by forming chitosan-GAG polyelectrolyte complex membranes around droplets of the cell suspension. The interior capsule environment could be further tuned by blending collagen with or suspending microcarriers in the GAG solution These capsule modules were seeded externally with vascular endothelial cells (VEC), and subsequently fused into tissue constructs possessing VEC-lined, inter-capsule channels. The microcapsules supported high density growth achieving clinically significant cell densities. Fusion of the endothelialized, capsules generated three dimensional constructs with an embedded network of interconnected channels that enabled long-term perfusion culture of the construct. A prototype, engineered liver tissue, formed by fusion of hepatocyte-containing capsules exhibited urea synthesis rates and albumin synthesis rates comparable to standard collagen sandwich hepatocyte cultures. The capsule based, modular approach described here has the potential to allow rapid assembly of tissue constructs with clinically significant cell densities, uniform cell distribution, and endothelialized, perfusable channels. PMID:24465401

  1. Bio-Pick, Place, and Perfuse: A New Instrument for Three-Dimensional Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Blakely, Andrew M.; Manning, Kali L.; Tripathi, Anubhav

    2015-01-01

    A grand challenge of tissue engineering is the fabrication of large constructs with a high density of living cells. By adapting the principles of pick-and-place machines used in the high-speed assembly of electronics, we have developed an innovative instrument, the Bio-Pick, Place, and Perfuse (Bio-P3), which picks up large complex multicellular building parts, transports them to a build area, and precisely places the parts at desired locations while perfusing the parts. These assembled parts subsequently fuse to form a larger contiguous tissue construct. Multicellular microtissues were formed by seeding cells into nonadhesive micro-molds, wherein cells self-assembled scaffold-free parts in the shape of spheroids, toroids, and honeycombs. After removal from the molds, the parts were gripped, transported (using an x, y, z controller), and released using the Bio-P3 with little to no effect on cell viability or part structure. As many as 16 toroids were stacked over a 170 μm diameter post where they fused over the course of 48 h to form a single tissue. Larger honeycomb parts were also gripped and stacked onto a build head that, like the gripper head, provided fluid suction to hold and perfuse the parts during assembly. Scaffold-free building parts help to address several of the engineering and biological challenges to large tissue biofabrication, and the Bio-P3 described in this article is a novel instrument for the controlled gripping, placing, stacking, and perfusing of living building parts for solid organ fabrication. PMID:25530515

  2. Angiogenesis in tissue-engineered nerves evaluated objectively using MICROFIL perfusion and micro-CT scanning

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong-kui; Wang, Ya-xian; Xue, Cheng-bin; Li, Zhen-mei-yu; Huang, Jing; Zhao, Ya-hong; Yang, Yu-min; Gu, Xiao-song

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a key process in regenerative medicine generally, as well as in the specific field of nerve regeneration. However, no convenient and objective method for evaluating the angiogenesis of tissue-engineered nerves has been reported. In this study, tissue-engineered nerves were constructed in vitro using Schwann cells differentiated from rat skin-derived precursors as supporting cells and chitosan nerve conduits combined with silk fibroin fibers as scaffolds to bridge 10-mm sciatic nerve defects in rats. Four weeks after surgery, three-dimensional blood vessel reconstructions were made through MICROFIL perfusion and micro-CT scanning, and parameter analysis of the tissue-engineered nerves was performed. New blood vessels grew into the tissue-engineered nerves from three main directions: the proximal end, the distal end, and the middle. The parameter analysis of the three-dimensional blood vessel images yielded several parameters, including the number, diameter, connection, and spatial distribution of blood vessels. The new blood vessels were mainly capillaries and microvessels, with diameters ranging from 9 to 301 μm. The blood vessels with diameters from 27 to 155 μm accounted for 82.84% of the new vessels. The microvessels in the tissue-engineered nerves implanted in vivo were relatively well-identified using the MICROFIL perfusion and micro-CT scanning method, which allows the evaluation and comparison of differences and changes of angiogenesis in tissue-engineered nerves implanted in vivo. PMID:26981108

  3. Cyclic Stretch and Perfusion Bioreactor for Conditioning Large Diameter Engineered Tissue Tubes.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Jillian B; Tranquillo, Robert T

    2016-05-01

    A cyclic stretch and perfusion bioreactor was designed to culture large diameter engineered tissue tubes for heart valve applications. In this bioreactor, tubular tissues consisting of dermal fibroblasts in a sacrificial fibrin gel scaffold were placed over porated latex support sleeves and mounted in a custom bioreactor. Pulsatile flow of culture medium into the system resulted in cyclic stretching as well as ablumenal, lumenal, and transmural flow (perfusion). In this study, lumenal remodeling, composition, and mechanical strength and stiffness were compared for tissues cyclically stretched in this bioreactor on either the porated latex sleeves or solid latex sleeves, which did not permit lumenal or transmural flow. Tissues cyclically stretched on porated sleeves had regions of increased lumenal remodeling and cellularity that were localized to the columns of pores in the latex sleeve. A CFD model was developed with COMSOL Multiphysics(®) to predict flow of culture medium in and around the tissue, and the predictions suggest that the enhanced lumenal remodeling was likely a result of elevated shear stresses and transmural velocity in these regions. This work highlights the beneficial effects of increased nutrient transport and flow stimulation for accelerating in vitro tissue remodeling. PMID:26307332

  4. Flap raising on pulsatile perfused cadaveric tissue: a novel method for surgical teaching and exercise.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Fichter, Andreas; Braun, Christian; Bauer, Florian; Humbs, Martin

    2014-10-01

    Exercising flap raising procedures on cadavers is considered a prerequisite to prepare for clinical practise. To improve teaching and create conditions as realistic as possible, a perfusion device was developed providing pulsatile flow through the vessels of different donor sites. A plastic bag filled with red stained tab water was placed into a pump, which was driven by an electric motor. The bag was set under rhythmic compression with variable frequency and pressure. The pedicles of the radial forearm, anterolateral thigh, rectus abdominis, fibular and iliac crest flap were cannulated at the origin from their source arteries. Flap raising was performed under pulsatile perfusion in 15 fresh bodies and subsequently in 6 Thiel-embalmed cadavers during a flap raising course. We regularly observed staining of the skin and skin bleeding in fresh bodies and less reliable in embalmed cadavers. All flap pedicles showed pulsatile movements, and the radial pulse became palpable. Most perforators of the anterolateral thigh and osteocutaneous fibular flap could be identified by their pulse. Bleeding from bony tissue and venous return was seldom observed. We conclude that pulsatile perfusion of cadaveric tissue creates more realistic conditions for flap raising and improves teaching for beginners and advanced surgeons. PMID:24938642

  5. Positron emission tomography detects tissue metabolic activity in myocardial segments with persistent thallium perfusion defects

    SciTech Connect

    Brunken, R.; Schwaiger, M.; Grover-McKay, M.; Phelps, M.E.; Tillisch, J.; Schelbert, H.R.

    1987-09-01

    Positron emission tomography with /sup 13/N-ammonia and /sup 18/F-2-deoxyglucose was used to assess myocardial perfusion and glucose utilization in 51 myocardial segments with a stress thallium defect in 12 patients. Myocardial infarction was defined by a concordant reduction in segmental perfusion and glucose utilization, and myocardial ischemia was identified by preservation of glucose utilization in segments with rest hypoperfusion. Of the 51 segments studied, 36 had a fixed thallium defect, 11 had a partially reversible defect and 4 had a completely reversible defect. Only 15 (42%) of the 36 segments with a fixed defect and 4 (36%) of the 11 segments with a partially reversible defect exhibited myocardial infarction on study with positron tomography. In contrast, residual myocardial glucose utilization was identified in the majority of segments with a fixed (58%) or a partially reversible (64%) thallium defect. All of the segments with a completely reversible defect appeared normal on positron tomography. Apparent improvement in the thallium defect on delayed images did not distinguish segments with ischemia from infarction. Thus, positron emission tomography reveals evidence of persistent tissue metabolism in the majority of segments with a fixed or partially resolving stress thallium defect, implying that markers of perfusion alone may underestimate the extent of viable tissue in hypoperfused myocardial segments.

  6. Precise ablation of dental hard tissues with ultra-short pulsed lasers. Preliminary exploratory investigation on adequate laser parameters.

    PubMed

    Bello-Silva, Marina Stella; Wehner, Martin; Eduardo, Carlos de Paula; Lampert, Friedrich; Poprawe, Reinhart; Hermans, Martin; Esteves-Oliveira, Marcella

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the possibility of introducing ultra-short pulsed lasers (USPL) in restorative dentistry by maintaining the well-known benefits of lasers for caries removal, but also overcoming disadvantages, such as thermal damage of irradiated substrate. USPL ablation of dental hard tissues was investigated in two phases. Phase 1--different wavelengths (355, 532, 1,045, and 1,064 nm), pulse durations (picoseconds and femtoseconds) and irradiation parameters (scanning speed, output power, and pulse repetition rate) were assessed for enamel and dentin. Ablation rate was determined, and the temperature increase measured in real time. Phase 2--the most favorable laser parameters were evaluated to correlate temperature increase to ablation rate and ablation efficiency. The influence of cooling methods (air, air-water spray) on ablation process was further analyzed. All parameters tested provided precise and selective tissue ablation. For all lasers, faster scanning speeds resulted in better interaction and reduced temperature increase. The most adequate results were observed for the 1064-nm ps-laser and the 1045-nm fs-laser. Forced cooling caused moderate changes in temperature increase, but reduced ablation, being considered unnecessary during irradiation with USPL. For dentin, the correlation between temperature increase and ablation efficiency was satisfactory for both pulse durations, while for enamel, the best correlation was observed for fs-laser, independently of the power used. USPL may be suitable for cavity preparation in dentin and enamel, since effective ablation and low temperature increase were observed. If adequate laser parameters are selected, this technique seems to be promising for promoting the laser-assisted, minimally invasive approach. PMID:22565342

  7. AUGMENTATION OF LIMB PERFUSION AND REVERSAL OF TISSUE ISCHEMIA PRODUCED BY ULTRASOUND-MEDIATED MICROBUBBLE CAVITATION

    PubMed Central

    Belcik, J. Todd; Mott, Brian H.; Xie, Aris; Zhao, Yan; Kim, Sajeevani; Lindner, Nathan J.; Ammi, Azzdine; Linden, Joel M.; Lindner, Jonathan R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Ultrasound can increase tissue blood flow in part through the intravascular shear produced by oscillatory pressure fluctuations. We hypothesized that ultrasound-mediated increases in perfusion can be augmented by microbubble contrast agents that undergo ultrasound-mediated cavitation, and sought to characterize the biologic mediators. Methods and Results Contrast ultrasound perfusion imaging of hindlimb skeletal muscle and femoral artery diameter measurement were performed in non-ischemic mice after unilateral 10 min exposure to intermittent ultrasound alone (mechanical index [MI] 0.6 or 1.3) or ultrasound with lipid microbubbles (2×108 I.V.). Studies were also performed after inhibiting shear- or pressure-dependent vasodilator pathways, and in mice with hindlimb ischemia. Ultrasound alone produced a 2-fold increase (p<0.05) in muscle perfusion regardless of ultrasound power. Ultrasound-mediated augmentation in flow was greater with microbubbles (3-fold and 10-fold higher than control for MI 0.6 and 1.3, respectively; p<0.05), as was femoral artery dilation. Inhibition of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) attenuated flow augmentation produced by ultrasound and microbubbles by 70% (p<0.01), whereas inhibition of adenosine-A2a receptors and epoxyeicosatrienoic acids had minimal effect. Limb nitric oxide (NO) production and muscle phospho-eNOS increased in a stepwise fashion by ultrasound and ultrasound with microbubbles. In mice with unilateral hindlimb ischemia (40–50% reduction in flow), ultrasound (MI 1.3) with microbubbles increased perfusion by 2-fold to a degree that was greater than the control non-ischemic limb. Conclusions Increases in muscle blood flow during high-power ultrasound are markedly amplified by the intravascular presence of microbubbles and can reverse tissue ischemia. These effects are most likely mediated by cavitation-related increases in shear and activation of eNOS. PMID:25834183

  8. Automated prediction of tissue outcome after acute ischemic stroke in computed tomography perfusion images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vos, Pieter C.; Bennink, Edwin; de Jong, Hugo; Velthuis, Birgitta K.; Viergever, Max A.; Dankbaar, Jan Willem

    2015-03-01

    Assessment of the extent of cerebral damage on admission in patients with acute ischemic stroke could play an important role in treatment decision making. Computed tomography perfusion (CTP) imaging can be used to determine the extent of damage. However, clinical application is hindered by differences among vendors and used methodology. As a result, threshold based methods and visual assessment of CTP images has not yet shown to be useful in treatment decision making and predicting clinical outcome. Preliminary results in MR studies have shown the benefit of using supervised classifiers for predicting tissue outcome, but this has not been demonstrated for CTP. We present a novel method for the automatic prediction of tissue outcome by combining multi-parametric CTP images into a tissue outcome probability map. A supervised classification scheme was developed to extract absolute and relative perfusion values from processed CTP images that are summarized by a trained classifier into a likelihood of infarction. Training was performed using follow-up CT scans of 20 acute stroke patients with complete recanalization of the vessel that was occluded on admission. Infarcted regions were annotated by expert neuroradiologists. Multiple classifiers were evaluated in a leave-one-patient-out strategy for their discriminating performance using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) statistics. Results showed that a RandomForest classifier performed optimally with an area under the ROC of 0.90 for discriminating infarct tissue. The obtained results are an improvement over existing thresholding methods and are in line with results found in literature where MR perfusion was used.

  9. Well plate-based perfusion culture device for tissue and tumor microenvironment replication.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W; Gu, Y; Hao, Y; Sun, Q; Konior, K; Wang, H; Zilberberg, J; Lee, W Y

    2015-07-01

    There are significant challenges in developing in vitro human tissue and tumor models that can be used to support new drug development and evaluate personalized therapeutics. The challenges include: (1) working with primary cells which are often difficult to maintain ex vivo, (2) mimicking native microenvironments from which primary cells are harvested, and (3) the lack of culture devices that can support these microenvironments to evaluate drug responses in a high-throughput manner. Here we report a versatile well plate-based perfusion culture device that was designed, fabricated and used to: (1) ascertain the role of perfusion in facilitating the expansion of human multiple myeloma cells and evaluate drug response of the cells, (2) preserve the physiological phenotype of primary murine osteocytes by reconstructing the 3D cellular network of osteocytes, and (3) circulate primary murine T cells through a layer of primary murine intestine epithelial cells to recapitulate the interaction of the immune cells with the epithelial cells. Through these diverse case studies, we demonstrate the device's design features to support: (1) the convenient and spatiotemporal placement of cells and biomaterials into the culture wells of the device; (2) the replication of tissues and tumor microenvironments using perfusion, stromal cells, and/or biomaterials; (3) the circulation of non-adherent cells through the culture chambers; and (4) conventional tissue and cell characterization by plate reading, histology, and flow cytometry. Future challenges are identified and discussed from the perspective of manufacturing the device and making its operation for routine and wide use. PMID:26021852

  10. Optical studies of tissue mitochondrial redox in isolated perfused rat lungs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepehr, R.; Staniszewski, K.; Jacobs, E. R.; Audi, S.; Ranji, M.

    2012-02-01

    Through the monitoring of the auto-fluorescent mitochondrial metabolic coenzymes, NADH (Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide) and FAD (Flavoprotein Adenine Dinucleotide), the redox state of metabolism can be probed in real time in many intact organs, but its use has not been fully developed in lungs. The ratio of these fluorophores, (NADH/FAD), referred to as the mitochondrial redox ratio (RR), can be used as a quantitative metabolic marker of tissue. We have designed a fluorometer that can be used to monitor lung surface NADH and FAD fluorescence in isolated perfused lungs. Surface fluorescence NADH and FAD signals were acquired in the absence (control) and presence of pentachlorophenol (PCP), rotenone, and potassium cyanide (KCN). Rotenone, an inhibitor of complex I, increased RR by 18%, predominantly due to an increase in NADH signal. KCN, an inhibitor of complex IV reduced the chain and resulted in an increase of 33% in RR, as a result of 23% increase in NADH and 8% in FAD . PCP, an uncoupler which oxidizes the respiratory chain, decreased RR by 18% as a result of 14% decrease in NADH signal and 4% increase in FAD signal. These results demonstrate the ability of surface fluorometry to detect changes in lung tissue mitochondrial redox state in isolated perfused lungs.

  11. Anger camera imaging of perfused and nonperfused brain tissue with intra-arterial 133Xenon technique.

    PubMed

    Guldberg, C; Karle, A; Jørgensen, P B

    1977-12-30

    The regional cerebral blood flow, the regional blood flow distribution, and the regional distribution of perfused (= vital) brain tissue been imaged with a digitalized conventional Anger camer. An analog scaler was placed behind the PM-tubes to reduce dead-time loss. The input pulse rate was doubled to counteract the effect of scaling on counting statistics, and the gamma emission was filtered through 1 mm of brass to increase the fraction of the integral count rate within the 40% window. In this way the 31 keV peak disappears, and Compton scatter and disturbing coincidences are markedly reduced. This improves spatial resolution. The flow parameters are imaged regionally in 3 X 3 mm2 matrix elements after flat field correction and smoothing. The matrix is 64 X 64 interpolated to 128 X 128. Patient studies emphasized the importance of imaging the distribution of perfused and nonperfused tissue in cases of infarctions, dilacerations, etc., where angiography and conventional brain scanning may often be negative. PMID:415863

  12. Tissue perfusability assessment from capillary velocimetry data via the multicompartment Windkessel model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiukhina, Elena S.; Kurochkin, Maxim A.; Klochkov, Victor A.; Fedosov, Ivan V.; Postnov, Dmitry E.

    2015-03-01

    A method is presented to obtain information on tissue perfusability from capillary velocimetry experiments coupled with venous occlusion probe. The method based on data fitting to developed mathematical model describing the blood flow redistribution caused by the introduced occlusion. Using mathematical modeling, we identify the segment of velocity time courses that corresponds to tissue swelling process and thus allows ones quantify it. We also compared the results of direct measurement of red blood cells (RBCs) velocity with time courses obtained from finger-placed sensors of two types: (i) photoplethysmographic sensor used in pulsometry and (ii) piezoelectric sensor for sphygmography. The obtained results suggest the measurable contribution of RBCs aggregation process in optical pulse signal formation.

  13. Perfusion assessment in rat spinal cord tissue using photoplethysmography and laser Doppler flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Justin P.; Cibert-Goton, Vincent; Langford, Richard M.; Shortland, Peter J.

    2013-03-01

    Animal models are widely used to investigate the pathological mechanisms of spinal cord injury (SCI), most commonly in rats. It is well known that compromised blood flow caused by mechanical disruption of the vasculature can produce irreversible damage and cell death in hypoperfused tissue regions and spinal cord tissue is particularly susceptible to such damage. A fiberoptic photoplethysmography (PPG) probe and instrumentation system were used to investigate the practical considerations of making measurements from rat spinal cord and to assess its suitability for use in SCI models. Experiments to assess the regional perfusion of exposed spinal cord in anesthetized adult rats using both PPG and laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) were performed. It was found that signals could be obtained reliably from all subjects, although considerable intersite and intersubject variability was seen in the PPG signal amplitude compared to LDF. We present results from 30 measurements in five subjects, the two methods are compared, and practical application to SCI animal models is discussed.

  14. Assessment of Tissue Viability Following Electroosmotic Push–Pull Perfusion from Organotypic Hippocampal Slice Cultures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a novel sampling technique that allows both introduction and removal of fluid from the extracellular space of living tissue. This method is based on the fluidics of push–pull perfusion but flow is driven by electroosmosis. We have applied this method to organotypic hippocampal cultures. A source capillary is inserted into the tissue and a collection capillary is in contact with the tissue surface through a thin layer of fluid. A voltage is applied across the proximal ends of source and collection capillary. In the applied field, fluid will move from source, into the tissue, and then be collected. In this process, damage to cells may occur. To understand better what sampling conditions influence damage most, we tested various sampling geometries and applied voltages, quantifying damage 16–24 h later using propidium iodide as a cell death marker. We found that damage correlates with both voltage drop and power dissipated in the tissue, but that voltage drop is a better indicator of damage when comparing models in which capillary arrangement and length are different. PMID:23639590

  15. Tissue distribution of exogenous amino acids during transport across the vascularly perfused anuran small intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Cheeseman, C I; King, I; Smith, M W

    1983-01-01

    Microdensitometric analysis of autoradiographs has been used to measure the distribution and intracellular concentration of L-leucine and L-lysine during transport across the vascularly perfused small intestine of Rana pipiens. L-leucine was not accumulated in the mucosal epithelium to a concentration higher than that in the lumen under steady-state conditions, whereas L-lysine was concentrated on average three- to four-fold. 2. At the end of 30 min loading, the majority of both amino acids were found in the mucosal epithelium and the villous core, although significant amounts were also present in the muscle. Lysine showed a gradient of accumulation within the mucosal epithelium along the length of the villous folds, the highest concentrations being achieved in the cells near the tip. Leucine showed no such gradient under steady-state conditions. 3. Superfusion of the mucosal surface of the tissue with leucine for only 3 min did reveal a gradient for uptake into the mucosal epithelium, although it was still not as steep as that seen for lysine. 4. The presence of leucine in the vascular bed while lysine was perfused through the lumen significantly lowered the concentration of lysine in the mucosal epithelium and villous core and eliminated the concentration gradient in the mucosal epithelium seen along the villous fold. 5. When leucine was perfused on its own through the vascular bed, the uptake into the muscle was greatly increased compared to when the amino acid was presented from the lumen. At the same time, the uptake into the mucosal epithelium was reduced by 45%. 6. Analysis of the tissue content of leucine after loading for 30 min from the lumen and then washing out the amino acid for 15 min showed that the mucosal epithelium, villous core and muscle had contributed 74%, 17% and 9% respectively to the total amino acid lost from the tissue. 7. These results are discussed with regard to the significance of the exit mechanisms for these amino acids and the

  16. A 3D aligned microfibrous myocardial tissue construct cultured under transient perfusion.

    PubMed

    Kenar, Halime; Kose, Gamze T; Toner, Mehmet; Kaplan, David L; Hasirci, Vasif

    2011-08-01

    The goal of this study was to design and develop a myocardial patch to use in the repair of myocardial infarctions or to slow down tissue damage and improve long-term heart function. The basic 3D construct design involved two biodegradable macroporous tubes, to allow transport of growth media to the cells within the construct, and cell seeded, aligned fiber mats wrapped around them. The microfibrous mat housed mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from human umbilical cord matrix (Wharton's Jelly) aligned in parallel to each other in a similar way to cell organization in native myocardium. Aligned micron-sized fiber mats were obtained by electrospinning a polyester blend (PHBV (5% HV), P(L-D,L)LA (70:30) and poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS)). The micron-sized electrospun parallel fibers were effective in Wharton's Jelly (WJ) MSCs alignment and the cells were able to retract the mat. The 3D construct was cultured in a microbioreactor by perfusing the growth media transiently through the macroporous tubing for two weeks and examined by fluorescence microscopy for cell distribution and preservation of alignment. The fluorescence images of thin sections of 3D constructs from static and perfused cultures confirmed enhanced cell viability, uniform cell distribution and alignment due to nutrient provision from inside the 3D structure. PMID:21570112

  17. Ischaemia-related cell damage in extracorporeal preserved tissue – new findings with a novel perfusion model

    PubMed Central

    Taeger, Christian D; Müller-Seubert, Wibke; Horch, Raymund E; Präbst, Konstantin; Münch, Frank; Geppert, Carol I; Birkholz, Torsten; Dragu, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Tissue undergoing free transfer in transplant or reconstructive surgery always is at high risk of ischaemia-related cell damage. This study aims at assessing different procedures using an extracorporeal perfusion and oxygenation system to investigate the expression of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1-α as marker for hypoxia and of the pro-apoptotic protein Caspase-3 in skeletal muscle to elucidate potential improvements in tissue conservation. Twenty-four porcine rectus abdominis muscles were assigned to five different groups and examined after they had been extracorporeally preserved for 60 min. time. Group I was left untreated (control), group II was perfused with a cardioplegic solution, group III was flushed with 10 ml of a cardioplegic solution and then left untreated. Group IV and V were perfused and oxygenated with either an isotone crystalloid solution or a cardioplegic solution. Among others, immunohistochemistry (Caspase-3 and HIF-1-α) of muscle samples was performed. Furthermore, oxygen partial pressure in the perfusate at the arterial and venous branch was measured. Expression of Caspase-3 after 60 min. was reduced in all groups compared to the control group. Furthermore, all groups (except group III) expressed less HIF-1-α than the control group. Oxygenation leads to higher oxygen levels at the venous branch compared to groups without oxygenation. Using an extracorporeal perfusion and oxygenation system cell damage could be reduced as indicated by stabilized expressions of Caspase-3 and HIF-1-α for 60 min. of tissue preservation. Complete depletion of oxygen at the venous branch can be prevented by oxygenation of the perfusate with ambient air. PMID:24636195

  18. Instrument-assisted cross fiber massage increases tissue perfusion and alters microvascular morphology in the vicinity of healing knee ligaments

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ligament injuries are common clinical problems for which there are few established interventions. Instrument-assisted cross fiber massage (IACFM) was recently shown to accelerate the restoration of biomechanical properties in injured rodent knee medial collateral ligaments (MCL). The current study aimed to investigate the influence of IACFM on regional perfusion and vascularity in the vicinity of healing rodent knee MCL injuries. Methods Bilateral knee MCL injuries were induced in female Sprague–Dawley rats. Commencing 1 week post-injury, 1 minute of IACFM was introduced unilaterally 3 times/week for 3 weeks. The contralateral injured MCL served as an internal control. Regional tissue perfusion was assessed in vivo throughout healing using laser Doppler imaging, whereas regional microvascular morphology was assessed ex vivo via micro-computed tomography of vessels filled with contrast. Results IACFM had no effect on tissue perfusion when assessed immediately, or at 5, 10, 15 or 20 min following intervention (all p > 0.05). However, IACFM-treated hindlimbs had enhanced tissue perfusion when assessed 1 day following the 4th and 9th (last) treatment sessions (all p < 0.05). IACFM-treated hindlimbs also had greater perfusion when assessed 1 wk following the final treatment session (32 days post-injury) (p < 0.05). Subsequent investigation of microvascular morphology found IACFM to increase the proportion of arteriole-sized blood vessels (5.9 to <41.2 μm) in the tibial third of the ligament (p < 0.05). Conclusions These findings suggest IACFM alters regional perfusion and vascularity in the vicinity of healing rodent knee MCL injuries. This effect may contribute to the beneficial effect of IACFM observed on the recovery of knee ligament biomechanical properties following injury. PMID:24073942

  19. How to choose the therapeutic goals to improve tissue perfusion in septic shock

    PubMed Central

    de Assuncao, Murillo Santucci Cesar; Corrêa, Thiago Domingos; Bravim, Bruno de Arruda; Silva, Eliézer

    2015-01-01

    The early recognition and treatment of severe sepsis and septic shock is the key to a successful outcome. The longer the delay in starting treatment, the worse the prognosis due to persistent tissue hypoperfusion and consequent development and worsening of organ dysfunction. One of the main mechanisms responsible for the development of cellular dysfunction is tissue hypoxia. The adjustments necessary for adequate tissue blood flow and therefore of oxygen supply to metabolic demand according to the assessment of the cardiac index and oxygen extraction rate should be performed during resuscitation period, especially in high complexity patients. New technologies, easily handled at the bedside, and new studies that directly assess the impact of macro-hemodynamic parameter optimization on microcirculation and in the clinical outcome of septic patients, are needed. PMID:26313438

  20. Bioreactor perfusion system for the long-term maintenance of tissue-engineered skeletal muscle organoids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chromiak, J. A.; Shansky, J.; Perrone, C.; Vandenburgh, H. H.

    1998-01-01

    Three-dimensional skeletal muscle organ-like structures (organoids) formed in tissue culture by fusion of proliferating myoblasts into parallel networks of long, unbranched myofibers provide an in vivo-like model for examining the effects of growth factors, tension, and space flight on muscle cell growth and metabolism. To determine the feasibility of maintaining either avian or mammalian muscle organoids in a commercial perfusion bioreactor system, we measured metabolism, protein turnover. and autocrine/paracrine growth factor release rates. Medium glucose was metabolized at a constant rate in both low-serum- and serum-free media for up to 30 d. Total organoid noncollagenous protein and DNA content decreased approximately 22-28% (P < 0.05) over a 13-d period. Total protein synthesis rates could be determined accurately in the bioreactors for up to 30 h and total protein degradation rates could be measured for up to 3 wk. Special fixation and storage conditions necessary for space flight studies were validated as part of the studies. For example, the anabolic autocrine/paracrine skeletal muscle growth factors prostaglandin F2alpha (PGF2alpha) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) could be measured accurately in collected media fractions, even after storage at 37 degrees C for up to 10 d. In contrast, creatine kinase activity (a marker of cell damage) in collected media fractions was unreliable. These results provide initial benchmarks for long-term ex vivo studies of tissue-engineered skeletal muscle.

  1. Evaluation of Cerebral Perfusion in Patients Undergoing Intravenous Recombinant Tissue Plasminogen Activator Thrombolysis

    PubMed Central

    HIRANO, Teruyuki

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the indication for thrombolytic therapy using intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) is restricted strictly to patients with acute ischemic stroke within 4.5 h of onset. The effect of rt-PA declines over time; therefore, we need to minimize the time delay while generating imaging information. The use of cerebral blood flow imaging is not recommended within this time window. Conversely, the balance of efficacy and the risk of bleeding complications differ among patients > 4.5 h after onset. Several ongoing studies are using mismatch concepts to extend the therapeutic time window for rt-PA. Long-awaited reliable software, such as RAPID and PMA, are now available to analyze computed tomography/magnetic resonance perfusion data. Patients with wake-up stroke (WUS) are another group that can be used to expand rt-PA candidates. Diffusion fluid- attenuated inversion recovery mismatch is a promising imaging surrogate to select good candidates with WUS. These trials will cause a therapeutic paradigm shift from time-based to tissue-based strategies in the near future. PMID:26369875

  2. Perfusion and Characterization of an Endothelial Cell-Seeded Modular Tissue Engineered Construct Formed in a Microfluidic Remodeling Chamber

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Omar F.

    2010-01-01

    Tissue engineered constructs containing tortuous endothelial cell-lined perfusion channels were formed by randomly assembling endothelial cell-seeded submillimeter-sized collagen cylinders (modules) into a microfluidic perfusion chamber. The interconnected void space produced by random module packing created flow channels that were lined with endothelial cells. The effect of perfusion (0.5 mL min−1, Re* = 14.36 and shear stress = 0.64 dyn cm−2) through the tortuous channels on construct remodeling and endothelium quiescence was studied. Over time, modules fused at their points of contact and as they contracted, decreased the internal void space, which reduced the overall perfusion through the construct. As compared to static controls, perfusion caused a transient increase in activation (ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression) after 1 hour followed by a decrease after 24 hours. Proliferation (by BrdU) was reduced significantly, while KLF2, which is upregulated with atheroprotective laminar shear stress, was upregulated significantly after 24 hours. VE-cadherin became discontinuous and was significantly downregulated after 24 hours, which was likely caused by the dismantling of the endothelial cell adherens junctions during remodeling. Collectively, these outcomes suggest that flow through the construct did not drive the endothelial cells towards an inflamed, “atherosclerotic like” disturbed flow pathology. PMID:20678792

  3. Zinc content of selected tissues and taste perception in rats fed zinc deficient and zinc adequate rations

    SciTech Connect

    Boeckner, L.S.; Kies, C.

    1986-03-05

    The objective of the study was to determine the effects of feeding zinc sufficient and zinc deficient rations on taste sensitivity and zinc contents of selected organs in rats. The 36 Sprague-Dawley male weanling rats were divided into 2 groups and fed zinc deficient or zinc adequate rations. The animals were subjected to 4 trial periods in which a choice of deionized distilled water or a solution of quinine sulfate at 1.28 x 10/sup -6/ was given. A randomized schedule for rat sacrifice was used. No differences were found between zinc deficient and zinc adequate rats in taste preference aversion scores for quinine sulfate in the first three trial periods; however, in the last trial period rats in the zinc sufficient group drank somewhat less water containing quinine sulfate as a percentage of total water consumption than did rats fed the zinc deficient ration. Significantly higher zinc contents of kidney, brain and parotid salivary glands were seen in zinc adequate rats compared to zinc deficient rats at the end of the study. However, liver and tongue zinc levels were lower for both groups at the close of the study than were those of rats sacrificed at the beginning of the study.

  4. An integrated in vitro model of perfused tumor and cardiac tissue

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Cancer and cardiovascular disease remain the two leading causes of death in the United States. Progress in treatment to reduce morbidity and mortality will include the development of new drugs. Recent advances in induced pluripotent stem cell technology, tissue engineering, and microfabrication techniques have created a unique opportunity to develop three-dimensional (3D) microphysiological systems that more accurately reflect in vivo human biology when compared with two-dimensional flat systems or animal models. Our group is working to develop 3D microphysiological systems using induced pluripotent stem cell technology that simulates the microcirculation, the cardiac muscle, and the solid tumor, and then to combine these systems into an integrated microphysiological system that simulates perfused cardiac muscle and solid tumor on a single platform. The platform will be initially validated to predict anti-cancer efficacy while minimizing cardiac muscle toxicity. A critical feature will be blood flow through a human microcirculation (capillaries and larger microvessels), which is necessary to overcome diffusion limitations of nutrients and waste products in realistic 3D cultures, and serves to integrate multiple organ systems. This is a necessary and critical feature of any platform that seeks to simulate integrated human organ systems. The results of our project should produce a new paradigm for efficient and accurate drug and toxicity screening, initially for anti-cancer drugs with minimal cardiac side effects, and a platform technology that can be eventually used to integrate multiple major organ systems of the human body. PMID:24565445

  5. Response to deep hypoglycemia does not involve glucoreceptors in carotid perfused tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Cane, P.; Haun, C.K.; Evered, J.; Youn, J.H.; Bergman, R.N. )

    1988-11-01

    In the present study the authors examined whether the magnified hormonal counter-regulatory response seen during deep hypoglycemia (40 mg/dl) could be attenuated by supplying the forebrain with glucose furnished through carotid infusion. Two protocols were performed in conscious dogs. In the first protocol they infused glucose bilaterally into the carotid circulation to produce a forebrain glycemia of 55 {plus minus} 1 mg/dl whereas systemic glycemia declined to 39 {plus minus} 2 mg/dl. In the second protocol as a control they infused glucose into the systemic circulation at a rate matched to protocol 1 so that both systemic and jugular plasma glucose concentrations were equivalent to the systemic glucose concentrations in protocol 1. In spite of a substantial difference in forebrain glycemia there were no differences in the counter-regulatory responses of catecholamines or glucagon. In addition, through the use of radiolabeled microspheres, they defined the precise regions of the forebrain irrigated during bilateral intracarotid glucose infusions. The concentration of microspheres was high in the forebrain but very low in the hindbrain. The results indicate that glucoreceptor cells in tissues perfused by carotid arteries may play a tautological role in the sympathetic response to hypoglycemia and imply that glucose-sensitive receptors must also be located elsewhere in the central nervous system or in the periphery.

  6. [Evaluation of tissue perfusion by simultaneous monitoring of aortic flow rate and capnography].

    PubMed

    Brunel, D; Muchada, R

    1991-10-26

    Ten patients under general anaesthesia were subjected to non-invasive haemodynamic monitoring, together with arterial gasometry and capnography. When enflurane was administered for maintenance anaesthesia, a 33 percent fall in aortic flow rate was observed (P less than 0.01), together with prolongation of the pre-ejection period and left ventricular pre-ejection/ejection ratio, an increase of central venous pressure and total vascular systemic resistances. The end-expiratory CO2 (Pet CO2) was reduced by 13 percent (P less than 0.05). There was no significant variation in arteriolo-alveolar CO2 difference (P(a-A)CO2). Under dobutamine (mean dose: 3.4 +/- 0.5 micrograms/kg/min), the haemodynamic parameters returned to their initial values. Pet CO2 rose above its initial level (+ 12 percent; P less than 0.05), but P(a-A)CO2 was not significantly modified. The variations of Pet CO2 were parallel with those of aortic flow rate. It is concluded that the changes in Pet CO2 observed during haemodynamic modifications could be used as markers for qualitative evaluation of tissue perfusion. PMID:1836570

  7. Detecting the subregion proceeding to infarction in hypoperfused cerebral tissue: a study with diffusion and perfusion weighted MRI.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Karonen, J O; Vanninen, R L; Nuutinen, J; Perkiö, J; Vainio, P A; Soimakallio, S; Aronen, H J

    2003-06-01

    Diffusion and perfusion weighted MRI have been widely used in ischaemic stroke. We studied 17 patients in whom ischaemic areas showed an ischaemic core, an area of infarct growth and hypoperfused but ultimately surviving tissue. Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) were measured on days 1, 2, and 8 in the three subregions and in contralateral control areas. Cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), and mean transit time (MTT) were measured in these regions on day 1 perfusion maps. On day 1, the ischaemic core had very low ADC and CBF and increased MTT. The ADC in the ischaemic core gradually increased during the week. The area of infarct growth on day 1 had slightly but significantly decreased ADC (96% of control, P=0.028), moderately decreased CBF and increased MTT. On day 1 the hypoperfused but surviving tissue had slightly but significantly increased ADC (103% of control, P=0.001), mildly decreased CBF and increased CBV and MTT. The ADC of the area of infarct growth decreased to the same level as in the ischaemic core on days 2 and 8. That of surviving tissue was still above normal on day 2 (103% of control), but had returned to the normal level by day 8. Measurement of ADC combined with perfusion MRI may help distinguish different subregions in acutely hypoperfused brain. PMID:12750863

  8. Evaluation of Hemodynamic and Regional Tissue Perfusion Effects of Minimized Extracorporeal Circulation (MECC®)

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Adrian; Diez, Claudius; Schubel, Jens; El-Shouki, Nagi; Metz, Dietrich; Eberle, T.; Hausmann, Harald

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: Minimized extracorporeal circulation (MECC®, Maquet, Cardiopulmonary AG, Hirrlingen, Germany) is an established procedure to perform coronary revascularization. Studies showed positive effects of MECC compared to conventional cardiopulmonary bypass (CCPB) procedures in terms of transfusion requirements, less inflammation reactions, and neurological impairments. Recent retrospective studies showed higher mean arterial pressure (MAP) and a lower frequency of vasoactive drug use. We addressed this issue in this study. The hypothesis was to find a higher MAP during coronary bypass grafting surgery in patients treated with MECC systems. We performed a prospective, controlled, randomized trial with 40 patients either assigned to MECC (n = 18) or CCPB (n = 22) undergoing coronary bypass grafting. Primary endpoints were the perioperative course of mean arterial pressure, and the consumption of norepinephrine. Secondary endpoints were the regional cerebral and renal oxygen saturation (rSO2) as an indicator of area perfusion and the course of hematocrit. Clinical and demographic characteristics did not significantly differ between both groups. Thirty-day mortality was 0%. At four of five time points during extracorporeal circulation (ECC) MAP values were significantly higher in the MECC group compared to CCPB patients (after starting the ECC 60 ± 11 mmHg vs. 49 ± 10 mmHg, p = .002). MECC patients received significantly less norepinephrine (MECC 22.5 ± 35 μg vs. CCPB 60.5 ± 75 μg, p = .045). The rSO2 measured at right and left forehead and the renal area was similar for both groups during ECC and significantly higher at CCPB group 1 and 4 hours after termination of CPB. Minimized extracorporeal circulation provides a higher mean arterial pressure during ECC and we found a lower consumption of vasoactive drugs in the MECC group. There was a decrease in regional tissue saturation at 1 and 4 hours post bypass in the MECC group possibly due to increased systemic

  9. Angiography in the Isolated Perfused Kidney: Radiological Evaluation of Vascular Protection in Tissue Ablation by Nonthermal Irreversible Electroporation

    SciTech Connect

    Wendler, Johann Jakob; Pech, Maciej; Blaschke, Simon; Porsch, Markus; Janitzky, Andreas; Ulrich, Matthias; Dudeck, Oliver; Ricke, Jens; Liehr, Uwe-Bernd

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: The nonthermal irreversible electroporation (NTIRE) is a novel nonthermal tissue ablation technique by local application of high-voltage current within microseconds leading to a delayed apoptosis. The purpose of this experimental study was the first angiographic evaluation of the acute damage of renal vascular structure in NTIRE. Methods: Results of conventional dynamic digital substraction angiography (DSA) and visualization of the terminal vascular bed of renal parenchyma by high-resolution X-ray in mammography technique were evaluated before, during, and after NTIRE of three isolated perfused porcine ex vivo kidneys. Results: In the dedicated investigation, no acute vascular destruction of the renal parenchyma and no dysfunction of the kidney perfusion model were observed during or after NTIRE. Conspicuous were concentric wave-like fluctuations of the DSA contrast agent simultaneous to the NTIRE pulses resulting from NTIRE pulse shock wave. Conclusion: The NTIRE offers an ablation method with no acute collateral vascular damage in angiographic evaluation.

  10. Improved markers for burn wound perfusion in the severely burned patient: the role for tissue and gastric Pco2.

    PubMed

    Jeng, James C; Jaskille, Amin D; Lunsford, Patricia M; Jordan, Marion H

    2008-01-01

    Improved markers of resuscitation are needed in patients with severe burn injuries. In previous animal and human work, we showed 1) wound hypoperfusion plays a role in burn depth progression, 2) that there are periods of repetitive ischemia and reperfusion which correlate closely to wound hypoperfusion, and 3) that wound and splanchnic bed CO2 measurements are dependent on the adequacy of resuscitation. We and others believe that current markers for resuscitation, urine output (U/O), and mean arterial pressure (MAP), lag behind in reflecting wound perfusion. In this study, we explore whether gastric and tissue tonometry are better in reflecting minute-to-minute changes in wound perfusion in humans. During the 48-hour experimental period, burn wound, gastric, and arterial pH, Pco2, and PaO2 were measured every 6 seconds using a Paratrend 7 monitor in four patients with life threatening burns. Slopes of change were analyzed and a proportion derived relative to pooled data on 5-minute intervals. Serum lactate, U/O, and MAP were recorded. Laser Doppler Imager (LDI) scans were performed on burn areas every 4 hours, allowing real-time determination of burn perfusion. Resuscitation followed current clinical guidelines. All four patients eventually succumbed, one doing so during the observation period. In the remaining three, U/O and MAP goals were met within 2 hours of resuscitation. Our analysis shows cyclic changes in burn wound pH, CO2, and PaO2, gastric CO2, and PaO2, and arterial base deficit (all P < .005). LDI showed cyclic changes in perfusion (P < .0001) which closely mimic the changes in wound pH, gastric CO2, and arterial base deficit. These changes preceded changes in U/O, MAP, and lactate. Although U/O, MAP, and serum lactate reflect changes in burn wound perfusion, they lag behind other markers. Tissue pH and CO2 and gastric CO2 seem to be more timely related to changes in actual burn perfusion. PMID:18182897

  11. Lumped-parameter tissue temperature-blood perfusion model of a cold-stressed fingertip.

    PubMed

    Shitzer, A; Stroschein, L A; Gonzalez, R R; Pandolf, K B

    1996-05-01

    A lumped-parameter model of a fingertip is presented. The semispherical model includes the effects of heat storage, heat exchange with the environment, and heat transport by blood perfusion. The thermal insulation on the surface of the fingertip is represented by the overall heat transfer coefficient that is calculated by common engineering formulas. The model is solved analytically for the simple case of constant blood perfusion rate. The general case of variable blood perfusion rates is solved by an Euler finite difference technique. At this stage, the model does not include active control mechanisms of blood perfusion. Thus the effects of cold-induced vasodilatation have to be superimposed and are modeled by symmetrical triangular waveforms because these were found to best depict the behavior of fingers exposed to cold environments. Results of this model were compared with experimental data obtained in two separate studies. One included 60-min infrared thermograms of the dorsal surface of bare hands of sedentary subjects horizontally suspended on a fish net in a 0 degree C environment. Another study, on gloved finger temperatures, involved 0 and -6.7 degrees C environments. Fingertip (nail bed) temperatures of both these studies were compared with model predictions. Blood perfusion rates were assumed and adjusted within physiologically reasonable limits. Comparison of measured and computed temperature records showed very good conformity in both cases studied. PMID:8727573

  12. An automated method for analysis of microcirculation videos for accurate assessment of tissue perfusion

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Imaging of the human microcirculation in real-time has the potential to detect injuries and illnesses that disturb the microcirculation at earlier stages and may improve the efficacy of resuscitation. Despite advanced imaging techniques to monitor the microcirculation, there are currently no tools for the near real-time analysis of the videos produced by these imaging systems. An automated system tool that can extract microvasculature information and monitor changes in tissue perfusion quantitatively might be invaluable as a diagnostic and therapeutic endpoint for resuscitation. Methods The experimental algorithm automatically extracts microvascular network and quantitatively measures changes in the microcirculation. There are two main parts in the algorithm: video processing and vessel segmentation. Microcirculatory videos are first stabilized in a video processing step to remove motion artifacts. In the vessel segmentation process, the microvascular network is extracted using multiple level thresholding and pixel verification techniques. Threshold levels are selected using histogram information of a set of training video recordings. Pixel-by-pixel differences are calculated throughout the frames to identify active blood vessels and capillaries with flow. Results Sublingual microcirculatory videos are recorded from anesthetized swine at baseline and during hemorrhage using a hand-held Side-stream Dark Field (SDF) imaging device to track changes in the microvasculature during hemorrhage. Automatically segmented vessels in the recordings are analyzed visually and the functional capillary density (FCD) values calculated by the algorithm are compared for both health baseline and hemorrhagic conditions. These results were compared to independently made FCD measurements using a well-known semi-automated method. Results of the fully automated algorithm demonstrated a significant decrease of FCD values. Similar, but more variable FCD values were calculated

  13. Cultivation of Human Bone-Like Tissue from Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Osteogenic Progenitors in Perfusion Bioreactors

    PubMed Central

    de Peppo, Giuseppe Maria; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Marolt, Darja

    2014-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells represent an unlimited source of skeletal tissue progenitors for studies of bone biology, pathogenesis, and the development of new approaches for bone reconstruction and therapies. In order to construct in vitro models of bone tissue development and to grow functional, clinical-size bone substitutes for transplantation, cell cultivation in three-dimensional environments composed of porous osteoconductive scaffolds and dynamic culture systems—bioreactors—has been studied. Here, we describe a stepwise procedure for the induction of human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells (collectively termed PSCs) into mesenchymal-like progenitors, and their subsequent cultivation on decellularized bovine bone scaffolds in perfusion bioreactors, to support the development of viable, stable bone-like tissue in defined geometries. PMID:24281874

  14. Contrast-enhanced, real-time volumetric ultrasound imaging of tissue perfusion: preliminary results in a rabbit model of testicular torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paltiel, H. J.; Padua, H. M.; Gargollo, P. C.; Cannon, G. M., Jr.; Alomari, A. I.; Yu, R.; Clement, G. T.

    2011-04-01

    Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (US) imaging is potentially applicable to the clinical investigation of a wide variety of perfusion disorders. Quantitative analysis of perfusion is not widely performed, and is limited by the fact that data are acquired from a single tissue plane, a situation that is unlikely to accurately reflect global perfusion. Real-time perfusion information from a tissue volume in an experimental rabbit model of testicular torsion was obtained with a two-dimensional matrix phased array US transducer. Contrast-enhanced imaging was performed in 20 rabbits during intravenous infusion of the microbubble contrast agent Definity® before and after unilateral testicular torsion and contralateral orchiopexy. The degree of torsion was 0° in 4 (sham surgery), 180° in 4, 360° in 4, 540° in 4, and 720° in 4. An automated technique was developed to analyze the time history of US image intensity in experimental and control testes. Comparison of mean US intensity rate of change and of ratios between mean US intensity rate of change in experimental and control testes demonstrated good correlation with testicular perfusion and mean perfusion ratios obtained with radiolabeled microspheres, an accepted 'gold standard'. This method is of potential utility in the clinical evaluation of testicular and other organ perfusion.

  15. CONTRAST-ENHANCED ULTRASOUND ASSESSMENT OF IMPAIRED ADIPOSE TISSUE AND MUSCLE PERFUSION IN INSULIN-RESISTANT MICE

    PubMed Central

    Belcik, J. Todd; Davidson, Brian P.; Foster, Ted; Qi, Yue; Zhao, Yan; Peters, Dawn; Lindner, Jonathan R.

    2015-01-01

    Background In diabetes mellitus reduced perfusion and capillary surface area in skeletal muscle, which is a major glucose storage site, contributes to abnormal glucose homeostasis. Using contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEU) we investigated whether abdominal adipose tissue perfusion is abnormal in insulin resistance (IR) and correlates with glycemic control. Methods and Results Abdominal adipose tissue and skeletal muscle CEU perfusion imaging was performed in obese IR (db/db) mice at 11-12 or 14-16 weeks of age, and in control lean mice. Time-intensity data were analyzed to quantify microvascular blood flow (MBF) and capillary blood volume (CBV). Blood glucose response over one hour was measured after insulin challenge (1 u/Kg, I.P.). Compared to control mice, db/db mice at 11-12 and 14-16 weeks had a higher glucose concentration area-under-the-curve after insulin (11.8±2.8, 20.6±4.3, and 28.4±5.9 mg·min/dL [×1000], respectively, p=0.0002), and also had lower adipose MBF (0.094±0.038, 0.035±0.010, and 0.023±0.01 mL/min/g, p=0.0002) and CBV (1.6±0.6, 1.0±0.3, and 0.5±0.1 mL/100 g, p=0.0017). The glucose area-under-the-curve correlated in a non-linear fashion with both adipose and skeletal muscle MBF and CBV. There were significant linear correlations between adipose and muscle MBF (r=0.81) and CBV (r=0.66). Adipocyte cell volume on histology was 25-fold higher in 14-16 week db/db versus control mice. Conclusions Abnormal adipose MBF and CBV in IR can be detected by CEU and correlates with the degree of impairment in glucose storage. Abnormalities in adipose tissue and muscle appear to be coupled. Impaired adipose tissue perfusion is in part explained by an increase in adipocyte size without proportional vascular response. PMID:25855669

  16. Insulin-like growth factor-I and slow, bi-directional perfusion enhance the formation of tissue-engineered cardiac grafts.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Mingyu; Moretti, Matteo; Engelmayr, George C; Freed, Lisa E

    2009-03-01

    Biochemical and mechanical signals enabling cardiac regeneration can be elucidated using in vitro tissue-engineering models. We hypothesized that insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF) and slow, bi-directional perfusion could act independently and interactively to enhance the survival, differentiation, and contractile performance of tissue-engineered cardiac grafts. Heart cells were cultured on three-dimensional porous scaffolds in medium with or without supplemental IGF and in the presence or absence of slow, bi-directional perfusion that enhanced transport and provided shear stress. Structural, molecular, and electrophysiologic properties of the resulting grafts were quantified on culture day 8. IGF had independent, beneficial effects on apoptosis (p < 0.01), cellular viability (p < 0.01), contractile amplitude (p < 0.01), and excitation threshold (p < 0.01). Perfusion independently affected the four aforementioned parameters and also increased amounts of cardiac troponin-I (p < 0.01), connexin-43 (p < 0.05), and total protein (p < 0.01) in the grafts. Interactive effects of IGF and perfusion on apoptosis were also present (p < 0.01). Myofibrillogenesis and spontaneous contractility were present only in grafts cultured with perfusion, although contractility was inducible by electrical field stimulation of grafts from all groups. Our findings demonstrate that multi-factorial stimulation of tissue-engineered cardiac grafts using IGF and perfusion resulted in independent and interactive effects on heart cell survival, differentiation, and contractility. PMID:18759675

  17. [Development of rotating perfusion bioreactor system and application for bone tissue engineering].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Li, Dichen; Wang, Lin; Wang, Zhen; Lu, Bingheng

    2007-02-01

    A rotating perfusion bioreactor system has recently been developed in our laboratory to produce 3D dynamic culture condition, and the critical-sized scaffolds with interconnected microchennels were fabricated. Gas exchange occurs by semipermeable membrane covered on each side of bioreactor and gas-permeable peristaltic pump tube. Rotation and perfusion of culture media through large scaffolds enhance well mixing and mass transport of oxygen and nutrients in the bioreactor. Osteoblastic cells attached to microchennels are exposed to a low fluid flow-induced shear stress level. This bioreactor system overcomes several defects exited in static culture condition, improves the culture environment, facilitates osteoblast proliferation, differntiation, significant matrix production and mineralization, and the controllability of culture process is enhanced. Large scaffolds/osteoblast constructs were cultured in the bioreactor system for 14 days. Osteoblastic cells attached to microchannels of scaffolds were observed under scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results indicated that cells grew extensively in the microchennels of large scaffolds. PMID:17333894

  18. Tissue-Muscle Perfusion Scintigraphy of the Lower Limbs in a Patient with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Manevska, Nevena; Gjorceva, Daniela Pop; Ahmeti, Irfan; Todorovska, Lidija; Stojanoski, Sinisa; Kocovska, Marina Zdraveska

    2016-01-01

    The estimation of tissue perfusion as a hemodynamic consequence of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in diabetic patients is of great importance in the management of these patients.We present a noninvasive, functional method of 99mTc-MIBI (methoxy-isobutyl-isonitrile) tissue-muscle perfusion scintigraphy (TMPS) of the lower limbs, which assesses tissue perfusion in basal conditions (“rest” study) and exercise conditions (“stress” study). Emphasis is given on perfusion reserve (PR) as an important indicator of preservation of microcirculation and its local autoregulatory mechanisms in PAD. We present a case of a 71-year-old male diabetic patient with skin ulcers of the right foot and an ankle-brachial index >1.2 (0.9-1.1). Dynamic phase TMPS of the lower limbs showed decreased and late arterial vascularization of the right calf (RC) with lower percentage of radioactivity in the 1st minute: RC 66%, left calf (LC) 84%. PR was borderline with a value of 57% for LC and decreased for RC (42%). Functional assessment of hemodynamic consequences of PAD is important in evaluating both advanced and early PAD, especially the asymptomatic form. The method used to determine the TMPS of the lower limbs, can differentiate subtle changes in microcirculation and tissue perfusion. PMID:27299288

  19. Technical and theoretical considerations about gradient perfusion culture for epithelia used in tissue engineering, biomaterial testing and pharmaceutical research.

    PubMed

    Minuth, Will W; Strehl, Raimund

    2007-06-01

    Epithelia act as biological barriers, which are exposed to different environments at the luminal and basal sides. To simulate this situation and to improve functional features an in vitro gradient perfusion culture technique was developed in our laboratory. This innovative technique appears to be simple at first sight, but the performance needs practical and theoretical knowledge. To harvest intact epithelia after a long-term gradient culture period of many days, leakage, edge damage and pressure differences in the system have to be avoided so that the epithelial barrier function is maintained continuously. Unexpectedly, one of the major obstacles are micro-injuries in the epithelia caused by gas bubbles, which arise during transportation of the medium or due to respiration of the cultured tissue. Gas bubbles randomly accumulate either at the luminal or basal fluid flow of the gradient perfusion culture container. This phenomenon results in fluid pressure differences between the luminal and basal perfusion compartments of the gradient container, which in turn leads to damage of the barrier function. Consequently, the content of gas bubbles in the transported culture medium has to be minimized. Thus, our technical concept is the reduction of gas bubbles while keeping the content of oxygen constant. To follow this strategy we developed a new type of screw cap for media bottles specifically designed to allow fluid contact only with tube and not with cap material. Furthermore, a gas expander module separates gas bubbles from the liquid phase during transportation of the medium. Finally, a new type of gradient culture container allows a permanent elimination of transported gas bubbles. Application of this innovative equipment optimizes the parallel transportation of fluid in the luminal and basal compartments of a gradient culture container. PMID:18458434

  20. Construction of Mesenchymal Stem Cell–Containing Collagen Gel with a Macrochanneled Polycaprolactone Scaffold and the Flow Perfusion Culturing for Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hye-Sun; Won, Jong-Eun; Jin, Guang-Zhen

    2012-01-01

    Abstract A novel bone tissue-engineering construct was developed by using poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL)-macrochanneled scaffolds combined with stem cell-seeded collagen hydrogels and then applying flow perfusion culture. Rat mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were loaded into collagen hydrogels, which were then combined with macrochanneled PCL scaffolds. Collagen hydrogels were demonstrated to provide favorable growth environments for MSCs and to foster proliferation. Cell number determination identified retention of substantially fewer (50–60%) cells when they were seeded directly onto macrochanneled PCL than of cells engineered within collagen hydrogels. Additionally, the cells actively proliferated within the combined scaffold for up to 7 days. MSC-loaded collagen–PCL scaffolds were subsequently cultured under flow perfusion to promote proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. Cells proliferated to levels significantly higher in flow perfusion culture than that under static conditions during 21 days. A quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) assay revealed significant alterations in the transcription of bone-related genes such as osteopontin (OPN), osteocalcin (OCN), and bone sialoprotein (BSP), such as 8-, 2.5-, and 3-fold induction, respectively, after 10 days of flow perfusion relative to those in static culture. OPN and OCN protein levels, as determined by Western blot, increased under flow perfusion. Cellular mineralization was significantly enhanced by the flow perfusion during 21 and 28 days. Analyses of mechanosensitive gene expression induced by flow perfusion shear stress revealed significant upregulation of c-fos and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) during the initial culture period (3–5 days), suggesting that osteogenic stimulation was possible as a result of mechanical force-driven transduction. These results provide valuable information for the design of a new bone tissue-engineering system by combining stem cell-loaded collagen hydrogels with

  1. Pulsed Doppler tissue imaging for the assessment of myocardial viability: comparison with 99mTc sestamibi perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Minamihaba, O; Takeishi, Y; Hirono, O; Yamauchi, S; Arimoto, T; Fukui, A; Okuyama, M; Nozaki, N; Akiyama, H; Fatema, K; Miyamoto, T; Takahashi, H; Fujiwara, S; Okada, A; Takahashi, K; Kubota, I

    2002-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine whether Doppler tissue imaging demonstrated comparable diagnostic performance for the detection of viable myocardium compared to myocardial perfusion imaging with Tc hexakis-2-methoxyisobutylisonitrile (MIBI). We studied 30 patients with old myocardial infarction who underwent percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA). Myocardial single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with Tc-MIBI and two-dimensional echocardiography were carried out within 7 days before PTCA. We measured regional Tc-MIBI uptake for each myocardial segment from SPECT and peak systolic velocity and a ratio of regional pre-ejection period to regional ejection time (PEP/ET) from pulsed Doppler tissue imaging. Biplane left ventriculography was performed before interventional procedures and repeated 3 months after PTCA. Myocardial viability was determined when wall motion was improved at least one grade after PTCA. The peak systolic velocity was positively correlated with regional Tc-MIBI uptake (R =0.59, P<0.01). The PEP/ET demonstrated inverse correlation with Tc-MIBI uptake ( R=-0.59, P<0.01). Peak systolic velocity of viable segments was higher than that of non-viable segments ( P<0.05). The PEP/ET was lower in viable segments than in non-viable segments ( P<0.05). Peak systolic velocity and PEP/ET demonstrated high diagnostic accuracy for detecting viable myocardium compared with Tc-MIBI perfusion imaging (80% and 79% vs 90%). These data indicate that measurements of regional peak systolic velocity and PEP/ET by Doppler tissue imaging are useful for evaluating myocardial viability quantitatively and provide helpful information for a clinical judgment in an interventional strategy. PMID:12464785

  2. A novel bidirectional continuous perfusion bioreactor for the culture of large-sized bone tissue-engineered constructs.

    PubMed

    Gardel, Leandro S; Correia-Gomes, Carla; Serra, Luís A; Gomes, Manuela E; Reis, Rui L

    2013-11-01

    This works reports the development and preliminary assessment of a new bioreactor for culturing large-sized three-dimensional constructs in bone tissue engineering. The bidirectional continuous perfusion bioreactor (BCPB) promotes mechanical stimulation of cells through the creation of shear forces induced by flow perfusion. The main innovation consists in the possibility of culturing scaffolds of large dimensions that can be suitable for the regeneration of critical sized defects. The functionality of BCPB was preliminarily evaluated by culturing starch-polycaprolactone scaffolds/goat bone marrow stromal cells for 14 and 21 days. Cylindrical blocks were stacked (42 mm thick). Static culture was used as controls. The samples were collected for DNA, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and histological analysis. The results showed higher ALP levels in the bioreactor cultures than those obtained under static conditions. The number of cells in constructs cultured in the bioreactor showed lower values compared to static cultures, suggesting that static conditions tend to privilege the metabolic path way for cellular proliferation while dynamic conditions tend to privilege the metabolic path for osteogenic differentiation. SEM observations show that, the migration and cell distribution was observed in the bioreactor. These results demonstrate the feasibility and the benefit of culturing constructs in BCPB. PMID:23681695

  3. Comparison of TTP and Tmax estimation techniques in perfusion-weighted MR datasets for tissue-at-risk definition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forkert, Nils Daniel; Kaesemann, Philipp; Fiehler, Jens; Thomalla, Götz

    2012-03-01

    Acute stroke is a major cause for death and disability among adults in the western hemisphere. Time-resolved perfusion-weighted (PWI) and diffusion-weighted (DWI) MR datasets are typically used for the estimation of tissue-at-risk, which is an important variable for acute stroke therapy decision-making. Although several parameters, which can be estimated based on PWI concentration curves, have been proposed for tissue-at-risk definition in the past, the time-to-peak (TTP) or time-to-max (Tmax) parameter is used most frequently in recent trials. Unfortunately, there is no clear consensus which method should be used for estimation of Tmax or TTP maps. Consequently, tissue-at-risk estimations and following treatment decision might vary considerably with the method used. In this work, 5 PWI datasets of acute stroke patients were used to calculate TTP or Tmax maps using 10 different estimation techniques. The resulting maps were segmented using a typical threshold of +4s and the corresponding PWI-lesions were calculated. The first results suggest that the TTP or Tmax method used has a major impact on the resulting tissue-at-risk volume. Numerically, the calculated volumes differed up to a factor of 3. In general, the deconvolution-based Tmax techniques estimate the ischemic penumbra rather smaller compared to direct TTP based techniques. In conclusion, the comparison of different methods for TTP or Tmax estimation revealed high variations regarding the resulting tissue-at-risk volume, which might lead to different therapy decisions. Therefore, a consensus how TTP or Tmax maps should be calculated seems necessary.

  4. Insulin-like Growth Factor-I and Slow, Bi-directional Perfusion Enhance the Formation of Tissue-Engineered Cardiac Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Mingyu; Moretti, Matteo; Engelmayr, George C.

    2009-01-01

    Biochemical and mechanical signals enabling cardiac regeneration can be elucidated using in vitro tissue-engineering models. We hypothesized that insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF) and slow, bi-directional perfusion could act independently and interactively to enhance the survival, differentiation, and contractile performance of tissue-engineered cardiac grafts. Heart cells were cultured on three-dimensional porous scaffolds in medium with or without supplemental IGF and in the presence or absence of slow, bi-directional perfusion that enhanced transport and provided shear stress. Structural, molecular, and electrophysiologic properties of the resulting grafts were quantified on culture day 8. IGF had independent, beneficial effects on apoptosis (p < 0.01), cellular viability (p < 0.01), contractile amplitude (p < 0.01), and excitation threshold (p < 0.01). Perfusion independently affected the four aforementioned parameters and also increased amounts of cardiac troponin-I (p < 0.01), connexin-43 (p < 0.05), and total protein (p < 0.01) in the grafts. Interactive effects of IGF and perfusion on apoptosis were also present (p < 0.01). Myofibrillogenesis and spontaneous contractility were present only in grafts cultured with perfusion, although contractility was inducible by electrical field stimulation of grafts from all groups. Our findings demonstrate that multi-factorial stimulation of tissue-engineered cardiac grafts using IGF and perfusion resulted in independent and interactive effects on heart cell survival, differentiation, and contractility. PMID:18759675

  5. Retrograde Cerebral Perfusion Results in Better Perfusion to the Striatum Than the Cerebral Cortex During Deep Hypothermic Circulatory Arrest: A Microdialysis Study.

    PubMed

    Liang, Meng-Ya; Chen, Guang-Xian; Tang, Zhi-Xian; Rong, Jian; Yao, Jian-ping; Wu, Zhong-Kai

    2016-03-01

    It remains controversial whether contemporary cerebral perfusion techniques, utilized during deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA), establish adequate perfusion to deep structures in the brain. This study aimed to investigate whether selective antegrade cerebral perfusion (SACP) or retrograde cerebral perfusion (RCP) can provide perfusion equally to various anatomical positions in the brain using metabolic evidence obtained from microdialysis. Eighteen piglets were randomly assigned to 40 min of circulatory arrest (CA) at 18°C without cerebral perfusion (DHCA group, n = 6) or with SACP (SACP group, n = 6) or RCP (RCP group, n = 6). Microdialysis parameters (glucose, lactate, pyruvate, and glutamate) were measured every 30 min in cortex and striatum. After 3 h of reperfusion, brain tissue was harvested for Western blot measurement of α-spectrin. After 40 min of CA, the DHCA group showed marked elevations of lactate and glycerol and a reduction in glucose in the microdialysis perfusate (all P < 0.05). The changes in glucose, lactate, and glycerol in the perfusate and α-spectrin expression in brain tissue were similar between cortex and striatum in the SACP group (all P > 0.05). In the RCP group, the cortex exhibited lower glucose, higher lactate, and higher glycerol in the perfusate and higher α-spectrin expression in brain tissue compared with the striatum (all P < 0.05). Glutamate showed no difference between cortex and striatum in all groups (all P > 0.05). In summary, SACP provided uniform and continuous cerebral perfusion to most anatomical sites in the brain, whereas RCP resulted in less sufficient perfusion to the cortex but better perfusion to the striatum. PMID:26333187

  6. Relationship of brown adipose tissue perfusion and function: a study through β2-adrenoreceptor stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ernande, Laura; Stanford, Kristin I; Thoonen, Robrecht; Zhang, Haihua; Clerte, Maëva; Hirshman, Michael F; Goodyear, Laurie J; Bloch, Kenneth D; Buys, Emmanuel S; Scherrer-Crosbie, Marielle

    2016-04-15

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) activation increases glucose and lipid consumption; as such, it is been considered as a potential therapy to decrease obesity. BAT is highly vascularized and its activation is associated with a necessary increase in blood flow. However, whether increasing BAT blood flow per se increases BAT activity is unknown. To examine this hypothesis, we investigated whether an isolated increase in BAT blood flow obtained by β2-adrenoreceptor (β2-AR) stimulation with salbutamol increased BAT activity. BAT blood flow was estimated in vivo in mice using contrast-enhanced ultrasound. The absence of direct effect of salbutamol on the function of isolated brown adipocytes was assessed by measuring oxygen consumption. The effect of salbutamol on BAT activity was investigated by measuring BAT glucose uptake in vivo. BAT blood flow increased by 2.3 ± 0.6-fold during β2-AR stimulation using salbutamol infusion in mice (P= 0.003). β2-AR gene expression was detectable in BAT but was extremely low in isolated brown adipocytes. Oxygen consumption of isolated brown adipocytes did not change with salbutamol exposure, confirming the absence of a direct effect of β2-AR agonist on brown adipocytes. Finally, β2-AR stimulation by salbutamol increased BAT glucose uptake in vivo (991 ± 358 vs. 135 ± 49 ng glucose/mg tissue/45 min in salbutamol vs. saline injected mice, respectively,P= 0.046). In conclusion, an increase in BAT blood flow without direct stimulation of the brown adipocytes is associated with increased BAT metabolic activity. Increasing BAT blood flow might represent a new therapeutic target in obesity. PMID:26823340

  7. Integrated Electroosmotic Perfusion of Tissue with Online Microfluidic Analysis to Track the Metabolism of Cystamine, Pantethine and Coenzyme A

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Juanfang; Sandberg, Mats; Weber, Stephen G.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed an approach that integrates electroosmotic perfusion of tissue with a substrate-containing solution and online microfluidic analysis of products, in this case thiols. Using this approach we have tracked the metabolism of cystamine, pantethine and CoA in the extracellular space of organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSCs). Currently, little is known about coenzyme A (CoA) biodegradation and even less is known about the regulation and kinetic characteristics for this sequential multi-enzyme reaction. We found that the steady state percentage yields of cysteamine from cystamine and pantethine during the transit through OHSCs were 91% ± 4% (SEM) and 0.01%–0.03%, respectively. The large difference in the yields of cysteamine can be used to explain the drugs’ different toxicities and clinical effectiveness against cystinosis. The kinetic parameters of the enzyme reaction catalyzed by the ectoenzyme pantetheinase are KM,C/α = 4.4 ± 1.1 mM and Vmax,C = 29 ± 3 nM/s, where α is the percentage yield of pantethine to pantetheine through disulfide exchange. We estimate that the percentage yield of pantethine to pantetheine through disulfide exchange is approximately 0.5%. Based on the formation rate of cysteamine in the OHSCs, we obtained the overall apparent Michaelis constant and maximum reaction rate for sequential, extracellular CoA degradation in an in situ environment, which are K′M = 16 ± 4 μM, V′max = 7.1 ± 0.5 nM/s. Kinetic parameters obtained in situ, although difficult to measure, are better representations of the biochemical flux in the living organism than those from isolated enzymes in vitro. PMID:24215585

  8. Integrated electroosmotic perfusion of tissue with online microfluidic analysis to track the metabolism of cystamine, pantethine, and coenzyme A.

    PubMed

    Wu, Juanfang; Sandberg, Mats; Weber, Stephen G

    2013-12-17

    We have developed an approach that integrates electroosmotic perfusion of tissue with a substrate-containing solution and online microfluidic analysis of products, in this case thiols. Using this approach we have tracked the metabolism of cystamine, pantethine and CoA in the extracellular space of organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSCs). Currently, little is known about coenzyme A (CoA) biodegradation and even less is known about the regulation and kinetic characteristics for this sequential multienzyme reaction. We found that the steady state percentage yields of cysteamine from cystamine and pantethine during the transit through OHSCs were 91% ± 4% (SEM) and 0.01%-0.03%, respectively. The large difference in the yields of cysteamine can be used to explain the drugs' different toxicities and clinical effectiveness against cystinosis. The kinetic parameters of the enzyme reaction catalyzed by the ectoenzyme pantetheinase are KM,C/α = 4.4 ± 1.1 mM and Vmax,C = 29 ± 3 nM/s, where α is the percentage yield of pantethine to pantetheine through disulfide exchange. We estimate that the percentage yield of pantethine to pantetheine through disulfide exchange is approximately 0.5%. Based on the formation rate of cysteamine in the OHSCs, we obtained the overall apparent Michaelis constant and maximum reaction rate for sequential, extracellular CoA degradation in an in situ environment, which are K'M = 16 ± 4 μM, V'max = 7.1 ± 0.5 nM/s. Kinetic parameters obtained in situ, although difficult to measure, are better representations of the biochemical flux in the living organism than those from isolated enzymes in vitro. PMID:24215585

  9. Non-contact tissue perfusion and oxygenation imaging using a LED based multispectral and a thermal imaging system, first results of clinical intervention studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaessens, John H. G. M.; Nelisse, Martin; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.; Noordmans, Herke Jan

    2013-03-01

    During clinical interventions objective and quantitative information of the tissue perfusion, oxygenation or temperature can be useful for the surgical strategy. Local (point) measurements give limited information and affected areas can easily be missed, therefore imaging large areas is required. In this study a LED based multispectral imaging system (MSI, 17 different wavelengths 370nm-880nm) and a thermo camera were applied during clinical interventions: tissue flap transplantations (ENT), local anesthetic block and during open brain surgery (epileptic seizure). The images covered an area of 20x20 cm, when doing measurements in an (operating) room, they turned out to be more complicated than laboratory experiments due to light fluctuations, movement of the patient and limited angle of view. By constantly measuring the background light and the use of a white reference, light fluctuations and movement were corrected. Oxygenation concentration images could be calculated and combined with the thermal images. The effectively of local anesthesia of a hand could be predicted in an early stage using the thermal camera and the reperfusion of transplanted skin flap could be imaged. During brain surgery, a temporary hyper-perfused area was witnessed which was probably related to an epileptic attack. A LED based multispectral imaging system combined with thermal imaging provide complementary information on perfusion and oxygenation changes and are promising techniques for real-time diagnostics during clinical interventions.

  10. Assessing the repair of critical size bone defects performed in a goat tibia model using tissue-engineered constructs cultured in a bidirectional flow perfusion bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Gardel, Ls; Afonso, M; Frias, C; Gomes, Me; Reis, Rl

    2014-01-01

    This work evaluated in vivo performance of a tissue-engineered bone-like matrix obtained by culturing cell-scaffold constructs in a flow perfusion bioreactor, designed to enable culture of large constructs, envisioning the regeneration of critical-sized defects. A blend of starch with polycaprolactone scaffolds was seeded with goat bone marrow stromal cells (GBMSCs) cultured in the perfusion bioreactor for 14 days using osteogenic medium. Cell seeded scaffolds cultured in static conditions acted as controls. After 14 days, constructs (42 mm length and 16 mm in diameter) were implanted in critical size defects performed in the tibial bone of six adult goats from which the bone marrow had been collected previously. Explants were retrieved after six and 12 weeks of implantation and characterized using scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, micro-computed tomography and radiographic analysis to assess tissue morphology and calcification. Explants were histologically analyzed, using Hematoxylin & Eosin and Masson Trichrome staining. Results provided relevant information about the performance and functionality of starch with polycaprolactone-goat bone marrow stromal cell constructs in a critical size orthotopic defect performed in a large animal model and demonstrated that culture of the starch with polycaprolactone scaffolds with the autologous cells in perfusion culture provide a good therapy for the healing and regenerative process of bone defects. PMID:24413026

  11. Optimising Golgi–Cox staining for use with perfusion-fixed brain tissue validated in the zQ175 mouse model of Huntington's disease

    PubMed Central

    Bayram-Weston, Zubeyde; Olsen, Elliott; Harrison, David J.; Dunnett, Stephen B.; Brooks, Simon P.

    2016-01-01

    Background The Golgi–Cox stain is an established method for characterising neuron cell morphology. The method highlights neurite processes of stained cells allowing the complexity of dendritic branching to be measured. New methods Conventional rapid Golgi and Golgi–Cox methods all require fresh impregnation in unfixed brain blocks. Here, we describe a modified method that gives high quality staining on brain tissue blocks perfusion-fixed with 4% paraformaldehyde (PFA) and post-fixed by immersion for 24 h. Results Tissue perfused with 4% PFA and post fixed for 24 h remained viable for the modified Golgi–Cox silver impregnation staining of mouse striatum from perfused wild type and zQ175. It was not found necessary to impregnate tissue blocks with Golgi solutions prior to sectioning, as post-sectioned tissues yielded equally good impregnation. Impregnation for 14 days resulted in optimal visualisation of striatal neuron and dendritic morphology. Although no modifications applied to the rapid Golgi method were reliable, the modified Golgi–Cox method yielded consistently reliable high-quality staining. Comparison with existing methods The current method used fixed tissues to reduce damage and preserve cell morphology. The revised method was found to be fast, reliable and cost effective without the need for expensive staining kits and could be performed in any neuroscience lab with limited specialist equipment. Conclusions The present study introduces a robust reproducible and inexpensive staining method for identifying neuronal morphological changes in the post fixed mouse brain, and is suitable for assessing changes in cell morphology in models of neurodegeneration and in response to experimental treatment. PMID:26459195

  12. Intravoxel Incoherent Motion MR Imaging: Comparison of Diffusion and Perfusion Characteristics for Differential Diagnosis of Soft Tissue Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jun; Li, Kun; Zhang, Weisheng; Wang, Shaowu; Song, Qingwei; Liu, Ailian; Miao, Yanwei; Lang, Zhijin; Zhang, Lina; Zheng, Minting

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We used intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to explore the possibility of preoperative diagnosis of soft tissue tumors (STTs). This prospective study enrolled 23 patients. Conventional MRI and IVIM examinations were performed on a 3.0T MR imager. Eight (35%) hemangiomas, 11 (47%) benign soft tissue tumors excluding hemangiomas (BSTTEHs) and 4 soft tissue sarcomas (STSs) were assessed. The mean tumor size was about 1652.36 ± 233.66 mm2. Ten b values (0–800 s/mm2) were used to evaluate diffusion and perfusion characteristics of IVIM. IVIM parameters (ADCstandard, ADCslow, ADCfast, and f) of STTs were measured and evaluated for differentiating hemangiomas, BSTTEHs, and STSs. ADCslow and ADCfast value were different for hemangiomas, BSTTEHs, and STSs separately (P < 0.001, P < 0.001, and P = 0.001). ADCslow, cut-off value smaller than 0.93 × 10–3 mm2/s, was the best parameter to differ STSs (0.689 ± 0.173 × 10−3 mm2/s) from hemangiomas (0.933 ± 0.237 × 10−3 mm2/s) and BSTTEHs (1.156 ± 0.120 × 10−3 mm2/s) (P = 0.001). ADCslow (0.93 × 10−3 mm2/s

  13. Serum, milk, and tissue monensin concentrations in cattle with adequate and potentially toxic dietary levels of monensin: pharmacokinetics and diagnostic interpretation.

    PubMed

    Puschner, B; Bautista, A C; McKemie, D S; Gallego, S M; Woods, L W; Moore, C E; Knych, H K

    2016-08-01

    Used in both beef cattle and dairy cows, monensin can provide many health benefits but can, when unintended overexposures occur, result in adverse effects. Information on serum and tissue concentrations following overexposure and/or overt toxicosis which may aid in diagnostics and clinical outcome is lacking. The aim of this study was to determine concentrations of monensin in biological specimens following oral exposure for 10 days to an approved dose (1 mg/kg) and a higher dose (5 mg/kg) of monensin given daily on a body weight basis to 10 dairy cows. No deaths were reported; cows receiving 5 mg/kg showed early signs of toxicosis including depression, decreased feed intake, and diarrhea after 4 days of exposure. Histopathological findings were minimal in most cows. Pharmacokinetic modeling of the detected serum concentrations for the 1 and 5 mg/kg dose groups determined the Cmax , Tmax, and t1/2λ to be 0.87 and 1.68 ng/mL, 2.0 and 1.0 h, and 1.76 and 2.32 days, respectively. Mixed regression models showed that the dose level and days since last dose were significantly associated with monensin concentrations in all four tissues, and with cardiac troponin levels. The high dose resulted in a significant elevation of monensin in tissues at approximately 4.7 times compared to the monensin concentrations in the tissues of animals from the low-dose group. The cTnI concentrations in the high-dose group were 2.1 times that of cTnI in the low-dose group. Thus, the ability to diagnose monensin overexposure and/or toxicosis will improve from knowledge of biological monensin concentrations from this study. PMID:26763112

  14. Efficacy of SpyGlassTM-directed biopsy compared to brush cytology in obtaining adequate tissue for diagnosis in patients with biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Rey, Johannes Wilhelm; Hansen, Torsten; Dümcke, Sebastian; Tresch, Achim; Kramer, Katja; Galle, Peter Robert; Goetz, Martin; Schuchmann, Marcus; Kiesslich, Ralf; Hoffman, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the diagnostic yield (inflammatory activity) and efficiency (size of the biopsy specimen) of SpyGlassTM-guided biopsy vs standard brush cytology in patients with and without primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). METHODS: At the University Medical Center Mainz, Germany, 35 consecutive patients with unclear biliary lesions (16 patients) or long-standing PSC (19 patients) were screened for the study. All patients underwent a physical examination, lab analyses, and abdominal ultrasound. Thirty-one patients with non-PSC strictures or with PSC were scheduled to undergo endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC) and subsequent peroral cholangioscopy (POC). Standard ERC was initially performed, and any lesions or strictures were localized. POC was performed later during the same session. The Boston Scientific SpyGlass SystemTM (Natick, MA, United States) was used for choledochoscopy. The biliary tree was visualized, and suspected lesions or strictures were biopsied, followed by brush cytology of the same area. The study endpoints (for both techniques) were the degree of inflammation, tissue specimen size, and the patient populations (PSC vs non-PSC). Inflammatory changes were divided into three categories: none, low activity, and high activity. The specimen quantity was rated as low, moderate, or sufficient. RESULTS: SpyGlassTM imaging and brush cytology with material retrieval were performed in 29 of 31 (93.5%) patients (23 of the 29 patients were male). The median patient age was 45 years (min, 20 years; max, 76 years). Nineteen patients had known PSC, and 10 showed non-PSC strictures. No procedure-related complications were encountered. However, for both methods, tissues could only be retrieved from 29 patients. In cases of inflammation of the biliary tract, the diagnostic yield of the SpyGlassTM-directed biopsies was greater than that using brush cytology. More tissue material was obtained for the biopsy method than for the brush cytology method (P

  15. Recombinant activated protein C treatment improves tissue perfusion and oxygenation in septic patients measured by near-infrared spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The purpose was to test the hypothesis that muscle perfusion, oxygenation, and microvascular reactivity would improve in patients with severe sepsis or septic shock during treatment with recombinant activated protein C (rh-aPC) (n = 11) and to explore whether these parameters are related to macrohemodynamic indices, metabolic status or Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score. Patients with contraindications to rh-aPC were used as a control group (n = 5). Materials and methods Patients were sedated, intubated, mechanically ventilated, and hemodynamically monitored with the PiCCO system. Tissue oxygen saturation (StO2) was measured using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) during the vascular occlusion test (VOT). Baseline StO2 (StO2 baseline), rate of decrease in StO2 during VOT (StO2 downslope), and rate of increase in StO2 during the reperfusion phase were (StO2 upslope) determined. Data were collected before (T0), during (24 hours (T1a), 48 hours (T1b), 72 hours (T1c) and 96 hours (T1d)) and 6 hours after stopping rh-aPC treatment (T2) and at the same times in the controls. At every assessment, hemodynamic and metabolic parameters were registered and the SOFA score calculated. Results The mean ± standard deviation Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score was 26.3 ± 6.6 and 28.6 ± 5.3 in rh-aPC and control groups, respectively. There were no significant differences in macrohemodynamic parameters between the groups at all the time points. In the rh-aPC group, base excess was corrected (P < 0.01) from T1a until T2, and blood lactate was significantly decreased at T1d and T2 (2.8 ± 1.3 vs. 1.9 ± 0.7 mmol/l; P < 0.05). In the control group, base excess was significantly corrected at T1a, T1b, T1c, and T2 (P < 0.05). The SOFA score was significantly lower in the rh-aPC group compared with the controls at T2 (7.9 ± 2.2 vs. 12.2 ± 3.2; P < 0.05). There were no differences between groups in StO2 baseline. StO2 downslope in the rh

  16. A mathematical model and computational framework for three-dimensional chondrocyte cell growth in a porous tissue scaffold placed inside a bi-directional flow perfusion bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Shakhawath Hossain, Md; Bergstrom, D J; Chen, X B

    2015-12-01

    The in vitro chondrocyte cell culture for cartilage tissue regeneration in a perfusion bioreactor is a complex process. Mathematical modeling and computational simulation can provide important insights into the culture process, which would be helpful for selecting culture conditions to improve the quality of the developed tissue constructs. However, simulation of the cell culture process is a challenging task due to the complicated interaction between the cells and local fluid flow and nutrient transport inside the complex porous scaffolds. In this study, a mathematical model and computational framework has been developed to simulate the three-dimensional (3D) cell growth in a porous scaffold placed inside a bi-directional flow perfusion bioreactor. The model was developed by taking into account the two-way coupling between the cell growth and local flow field and associated glucose concentration, and then used to perform a resolved-scale simulation based on the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). The simulation predicts the local shear stress, glucose concentration, and 3D cell growth inside the porous scaffold for a period of 30 days of cell culture. The predicted cell growth rate was in good overall agreement with the experimental results available in the literature. This study demonstrates that the bi-directional flow perfusion culture system can enhance the homogeneity of the cell growth inside the scaffold. The model and computational framework developed is capable of providing significant insight into the culture process, thus providing a powerful tool for the design and optimization of the cell culture process. PMID:26061385

  17. Electroosmotic perfusion of tissue: sampling the extracellular space and quantitative assessment of membrane-bound enzyme activity in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Yangguang; Wu, Juanfang; Sandberg, Mats

    2014-01-01

    This review covers recent advances in sampling fluid from the extracellular space of brain tissue by electroosmosis (EO). Two techniques, EO sampling with a single fused-silica capillary and EO push–pull perfusion, have been developed. These tools were used to investigate the function of membrane-bound enzymes with outward-facing active sites, or ectoenzymes, in modulating the activity of the neuropeptides leu-enkephalin and galanin in organotypic-hippocampal-slice cultures (OHSCs). In addition, the approach was used to determine the endogenous concentration of a thiol, cysteamine, in OHSCs. We have also investigated the degradation of coenzyme A in the extracellular space. The approach provides information on ectoenzyme activity, including Michaelis constants, in tissue, which, as far as we are aware, has not been done before. On the basis of computational evidence, EO push–pull perfusion can distinguish ectoenzyme activity with a ~100 µm spatial resolution, which is important for studies of enzyme kinetics in adjacent regions of the rat hippocampus. PMID:25168111

  18. Validation of adequate endogenous reference genes for reverse transcription-qPCR studies in human post-mortem brain tissue of SIDS cases.

    PubMed

    El-Kashef, Noha; Gomes, Iva; Mercer-Chalmers-Bender, Katja; Schneider, Peter M; Rothschild, Markus A; Juebner, Martin

    2015-12-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is the main cause of post-neonatal infant death in most developed countries. It is still of ambiguous etiology. Gene expression studies of relevant target genes using reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) in SIDS cases, and comparing them with age-matched controls, could help in understanding the pathogenesis of SIDS. However, selecting inadequate reference genes used for normalization of the RT-qPCR gene expression data can give misleading results. The aim of the present study was to identify reference genes with the most stable expression in post-mortem brainstem samples of SIDS and control cases. Among the five candidate reference genes (GAPDH, GUSB, HMBS, SDHA, UBXN6) studied in both groups, SDHA and UBXN6 were identified as the most stable. To further demonstrate the importance of using validated genes for RT-qPCR data normalization, the expression of a potential gene of interest in SIDS, the RPS27A gene, was evaluated using validated versus non-validated reference genes for normalization. This gene encodes the ubiquitin protein that has been shown in other pathological studies to be induced in SIDS. Using the identified most stable genes for normalization of RPS27A gene expression data revealed, as expected, a statistically significant up-regulation in SIDS as compared to the controls. However, using a single unstable reference gene for normalization resulted in no significant differences in transcript abundance of RPS27A between SIDS and the controls. This emphasizes the need for validation of the suitability of reference genes used in a given tissue type under certain experimental conditions. PMID:26434654

  19. Evaluation of Microvascular Perfusion and Resuscitation after Severe Injury.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yann-Leei L; Simmons, Jon D; Gillespie, Mark N; Alvarez, Diego F; Gonzalez, Richard P; Brevard, Sidney B; Frotan, Mohammad A; Schneider, Andrew M; Richards, William O

    2015-12-01

    Achieving adequate perfusion is a key goal of treatment in severe trauma; however, tissue perfusion has classically been measured by indirect means. Direct visualization of capillary flow has been applied in sepsis, but application of this technology to the trauma population has been limited. The purpose of this investigation was to compare the efficacy of standard indirect measures of perfusion to direct imaging of the sublingual microcirculatory flow during trauma resuscitation. Patients with injury severity scores >15 were serially examined using a handheld sidestream dark-field video microscope. In addition, measurements were also made from healthy volunteers. The De Backer score, a morphometric capillary density score, and total vessel density (TVD) as cumulative vessel area within the image, were calculated using Automated Vascular Analysis (AVA3.0) software. These indices were compared against clinical and laboratory parameters of organ function and systemic metabolic status as well as mortality. Twenty severely injured patients had lower TVD (X = 14.6 ± 0.22 vs 17.66 ± 0.51) and De Backer scores (X = 9.62 ± 0.16 vs 11.55 ± 0.37) compared with healthy controls. These scores best correlated with serum lactate (TVD R(2) = 0.525, De Backer R(2) = 0.576, P < 0.05). Mean arterial pressure, heart rate, oxygen saturation, pH, bicarbonate, base deficit, hematocrit, and coagulation parameters correlated poorly with both TVD and De Backer score. Direct measurement of sublingual microvascular perfusion is technically feasible in trauma patients, and seems to provide real-time assessment of microcirculatory perfusion. This study suggests that in severe trauma, many indirect measurements of perfusion do not correlate with microvascular perfusion. However, visualized perfusion deficiencies do reflect a shift toward anaerobic metabolism. PMID:26736167

  20. The influence of Sildenafil citrate on uterine tissue perfusion and the cardiovascular system during the luteal phase of the ovarian cycle in cows.

    PubMed

    Dzięcioł, Michał; Stańczyk, Ewa; Noszczyk-Nowak, Agnieszka; Michlik, Katarzyna; Kozdrowski, Roland; Niżański, Wojciech; Pasławskab, Urszula; Mrowiec, Jacek; Twardoń, Jan

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of the Sildenafil citrate on the blood flow in the uterus of cows during dioestrus. Uterine blood flow was examined in five, healthy, adult cows. Between day 6-8 of the ovarian cycle, each cow received 200mg of sildenafil diluted in 10ml of warm saline into the body of the uterus. Analysis of the blood pressure, ECG and the maximum velocity in m/s (V max) in the aorta was performed and selected parameters of the blood flow (PI, pulsatile index; RI, resistance index; SPV, systolic peak velocity; EDV, end diastolic velocity; FVI, flow velocity integral; SV/DV, systolic peak velocity: end-diastolic velocity ratio) were measured in the uterine artery (Arteria uterine) before and after sildenafil infusion. In addition, Color Doppler examination of the uterine wall perfusion was analyzed. A significant decrease of values of PI and SV/DV ratio as well as an increase of end diastolic velocity and time averaged maximum velocity was noted. With the use of color coded sonography, the increased intensity of the blood flow in the uterine wall was observed. It was concluded that intrauterine administration of sildenafil during dioestrus can increase uterine tissue perfusion. PMID:24139689

  1. Effects of laser acupuncture on blood perfusion rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xian-ju; Zeng, Chang-chun; Liu, Han-ping; Liu, Song-hao; Liu, Liang-gang

    2006-09-01

    Based on Pennes equation, the influences of the intensity and the impulse frequency of laser acupuncture on the point tissues' blood flow perfusion rate are discussed. We find that the blood perfusion rate of point tissue increases with the intensity of laser acupuncture increasing. After impulse laser acupuncture the point tissue blood perfusion rate increase little, but after continuum laser acupuncture the point tissues blood perfusion rate increase much.

  2. Analysis of gravity-induced particle motion and fluid perfusion flow in the NASA-designed rotating zero-head-space tissue culture vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, David A.; Schwarz, Ray P.

    1991-01-01

    The gravity induced motions, through the culture media, is calculated of living tissue segments cultured in the NASA rotating zero head space culture vessels. This is then compared with the media perfusion speed which is independent of gravity. The results may be interpreted as a change in the physical environment which will occur by operating the NASA tissue culture systems in actual microgravity (versus unit gravity). The equations governing particle motions which induce flows at the surface of tissues contain g terms. This allows calculation of the fluid flow speed, with respect to a cultured particle, as a function of the external gravitational field strength. The analysis is approached from a flow field perspective. Flow is proportional to the shear exerted on a structure which maintains position within the field. The equations are solved for the deviation of a particle from its original position in a circular streamline as a function of time. The radial deviation is important for defining the operating limits and dimensions of the vessel because of the finite radius at which particles necessarily intercept the wall. This analysis uses a rotating reference frame concept.

  3. Intraoperative indocyanine green fluorescence angiography--an objective evaluation of anastomotic perfusion in colorectal surgery.

    PubMed

    Protyniak, Bogdan; Dinallo, Anthony M; Boyan, William P; Dressner, Roy M; Arvanitis, Michael L

    2015-06-01

    The essentials for any bowel anastomosis are: adequate perfusion, tension free, accurate tissue apposition, and minimal local spillage. Traditionally, perfusion is measured by assessing palpable pulses in the mesentery, active bleeding at cut edges, and lack of tissue discoloration. However, subjective methods lack predictive accuracy for an anastomotic leak. We used intraoperative indocyanine green (ICG) fluorescence angiography to objectively assess colon perfusion before a bowel anastomosis. Seventy-seven laparoscopic colorectal operations, between June 2013 and June 2014, were retrospectively reviewed. The perfusion to the colon and ileum was clinically assessed, and then measured using the SPY Elite Imaging System. The absolute value provided an objective number on a 0-256 gray-scale to represent differences in ICG fluorescence intensity. The lowest absolute value was used in data analysis for each anastomosis (including small bowel) to represent the theoretical least perfused/weakest anastomotic area. The lowest absolute value recorded was 20 in a patient who underwent a laparoscopic right hemicolectomy for an adenoma, with no postoperative complications. Four low anterior resection patients had additional segments of descending colon resected. There was one mortality in a patient who underwent a laparoscopic right hemicolectomy. This study illustrates an initial experience with the SPY system in colorectal surgery. The SPY provides an objective, numerical value of bowel perfusion. However, evidence is scant as to the significance of these numbers. Large-scale randomized controlled trials are required to determine specific cutoff values correlated with surgical outcomes, specifically anastomotic leak rates. PMID:26031270

  4. Do you mind if I vape? Immediate effects of electronic cigarettes on perfusion in buccal mucosal tissue - a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Reuther, William J; Hale, Beverley; Matharu, Jas; Blythe, John N; Brennan, Peter A

    2016-04-01

    The association between smoking and postoperative complications is compounded in patients who have oral and maxillofacial operations by an additional local effect, and patients often continue to smoke after operation despite advice to stop. Recent studies have suggested that nicotine may reduce inflammation and improve angiogenesis, so topical application may be beneficial for smokers. The electronic cigarette is increasing in popularity and more patients ask whether they can vape after operation. We investigated the effect of electronic cigarettes (of which half contained nicotine and half did not) on blood flow in the buccal mucosa in 10 volunteers immediately after vaping. Smokers were excluded as this was considered an additional variable in a small pilot study and our Trust has a no-smoking policy. After vaping for 5minutes, capillary blood flow was measured in the buccal mucosa at 5-minute intervals using a laser Doppler probe, and the results were expressed as arbitrary perfusion units. There was a wide variation in results and a small but significant rise (p=0.008) as a result of nicotine vaping, but these fell to the same levels as before within 30minutes. Electronic cigarettes may have an effect on blood flow to the oral mucosa, although further studies are needed to show whether they improve healing time after operation. Additional work is also needed to compare them with cigarettes. PMID:26809237

  5. Noninvasive, near infrared spectroscopic-measured muscle pH and PO2 indicate tissue perfusion for cardiac surgical patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soller, Babs R.; Idwasi, Patrick O.; Balaguer, Jorge; Levin, Steven; Simsir, Sinan A.; Vander Salm, Thomas J.; Collette, Helen; Heard, Stephen O.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether near infrared spectroscopic measurement of tissue pH and Po2 has sufficient accuracy to assess variation in tissue perfusion resulting from changes in blood pressure and metabolic demand during cardiopulmonary bypass. DESIGN: Prospective clinical study. SETTING: Academic medical center. SUBJECTS: Eighteen elective cardiac surgical patients. INTERVENTION: Cardiac surgery under cardiopulmonary bypass. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: A near infrared spectroscopic fiber optic probe was placed over the hypothenar eminence. Reference Po2 and pH sensors were inserted in the abductor digiti minimi (V). Data were collected every 30 secs during surgery and for 6 hrs following cardiopulmonary bypass. Calibration equations developed from one third of the data were used with the remaining data to investigate sensitivity of the near infrared spectroscopic measurement to physiologic changes resulting from cardiopulmonary bypass. Near infrared spectroscopic and reference pH and Po2 measurements were compared for each subject using standard error of prediction. Near infrared spectroscopic pH and Po2 at baseline were compared with values during cardiopulmonary bypass just before rewarming commenced (hypotensive, hypothermic), after rewarming (hypotensive, normothermic) just before discontinuation of cardiopulmonary bypass, and at 6 hrs following cardiopulmonary bypass (normotensive, normothermic) using mixed-model analysis of variance. Near infrared spectroscopic pH and Po2 were well correlated with the invasive measurement of pH (R2 =.84) and Po2 (R 2 =.66) with an average standard error of prediction of 0.022 +/- 0.008 pH units and 6 +/- 3 mm Hg, respectively. The average difference between the invasive and near infrared spectroscopic measurement was near zero for both the pH and Po2 measurements. Near infrared spectroscopic Po2 significantly decreased 50% on initiation of cardiopulmonary bypass and remained depressed throughout the bypass and

  6. The Role of Intraoperative Perfusion Assessment: What Is the Current State and How Can I Use It in My Practice?

    PubMed

    Phillips, Brett T; Munabi, Naikhoba C O; Roeder, Rosiane A; Ascherman, Jeffrey A; Guo, Lifei; Zenn, Michael R

    2016-02-01

    Evolving intraoperative technology has an increased presence and usefulness in aiding surgeon clinical judgment. Many surgical devices are readily available as an adjunct to this gold standard assessment of adequate tissue perfusion. Intraoperative perfusion monitoring provides surgeons with the ability to interpret additional information that enhances surgical decision-making in real-time. Technologies include various dye-based and non-dye-based near-infrared angiography, tissue oximetry measurements, and ultrasound-based tools. This review summarizes the available intraoperative technologies for planning and assessment of tissue perfusion in plastic and reconstructive surgery. The authors discuss the available literature for the individual devices and supporting evidence for their use. The authors recommend the evidence-based use of these tools in indicated surgical cases to improve clinical outcomes. PMID:26818312

  7. Experimental Approach to Evaluate the 11C Perfusion and Diffusion in Small Animal Tissues for HadronPET Applications

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Rovira, Immaculada; Boisgard, Raphaël; Pottier, Géraldine; Kuhnast, Bertrand; Jan, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    The development of a reliable dose monitoring system in hadron therapy is essential in order to control the treatment plan delivery. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is the only method used in clinics nowadays for quality assurance. However, the accuracy of this method is limited by the loss of signal due to the biological washout processes. Up to the moment, very few studies measured the washout processes and there is no database of washout data as a function of the tissue and radioisotope. One of the main difficulties is related to the complexity of such measurements, along with the limited time slots available in hadron therapy facilities. Thus, in this work, we proposed an alternative in vivo methodology for the measurement and modeling of the biological washout parameters without any radiative devices. It consists in the implementation of a point-like radioisotope source by direct injection on the tissues of interest and its measurement by means of high-resolution preclinical PET systems. In particular, the washout of 11C carbonate radioisotopes was assessed, considering that 11C is is the most abundant β+ emitter produced by carbon beams. 11C washout measurements were performed in several tissues of interest (brain, muscle and 9L tumor xenograf) in rodents (Wistar rat). Results show that the methodology presented is sensitive to the washout variations depending on the selected tissue. Finally, a first qualitative correlation between 11C tumor washout properties and tumor metabolism (via 18F-FDG tracer uptake) was found. PMID:27015269

  8. Experimental Approach to Evaluate the 11C Perfusion and Diffusion in Small Animal Tissues for HadronPET Applications.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Rovira, Immaculada; Boisgard, Raphaël; Pottier, Géraldine; Kuhnast, Bertrand; Jan, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    The development of a reliable dose monitoring system in hadron therapy is essential in order to control the treatment plan delivery. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is the only method used in clinics nowadays for quality assurance. However, the accuracy of this method is limited by the loss of signal due to the biological washout processes. Up to the moment, very few studies measured the washout processes and there is no database of washout data as a function of the tissue and radioisotope. One of the main difficulties is related to the complexity of such measurements, along with the limited time slots available in hadron therapy facilities. Thus, in this work, we proposed an alternative in vivo methodology for the measurement and modeling of the biological washout parameters without any radiative devices. It consists in the implementation of a point-like radioisotope source by direct injection on the tissues of interest and its measurement by means of high-resolution preclinical PET systems. In particular, the washout of 11C carbonate radioisotopes was assessed, considering that 11C is is the most abundant β+ emitter produced by carbon beams. 11C washout measurements were performed in several tissues of interest (brain, muscle and 9L tumor xenograf) in rodents (Wistar rat). Results show that the methodology presented is sensitive to the washout variations depending on the selected tissue. Finally, a first qualitative correlation between 11C tumor washout properties and tumor metabolism (via 18F-FDG tracer uptake) was found. PMID:27015269

  9. Perfusion analyses in advanced breast carcinoma during hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Lagendijk, J J; Hofman, P; Schipper, J

    1988-01-01

    Blood flow in tumours and healthy tissue determines the ability of obtaining satisfactory temperature distributions in clinical hyperthermia, as well as the success of hyperthermia and radiation treatment. During the hyperthermia treatment, diagnostic data related to tissue blood flow can be determined by analysing the relationship between the amount of power absorbed in the tissue and the resulting temperature rise. The interpretation of the perfusion data (PERF) is highly complicated by the lack of an adequate theory to describe the heat transport in vascularized tissues. In vascularized breast tissues about 10 times as much power is needed to maintain therapeutic temperatures as is necessary in a stationary breast phantom. This large difference in maintenance power levels indicates the extreme importance of blood flow in tissue heat transport. PERF has been determined in 23 patients with advanced breast tumours. In this series (a) perfusion typically did not change during the stationary part of the individual hyperthermic sessions, (b) minimum tumour PERF was not related to tumour volume, and (c) there was no relation between tumour PERF and the ability to heat tumours. PERF can both increase and decrease after successful hyperthermia. PMID:3292667

  10. Long term perfusion system supporting adipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Rosalyn D.; Raja, Waseem K.; Wang, Rebecca Y.; Stinson, Jordan A.; Glettig, Dean L.; Burke, Kelly A.; Kaplan, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Adipose tissue engineered models are needed to enhance our understanding of disease mechanisms and for soft tissue regenerative strategies. Perfusion systems generate more physiologically relevant and sustainable adipose tissue models, however adipocytes have unique properties that make culturing them in a perfusion environment challenging. In this paper we describe the methods involved in the development of two perfusion culture systems (2D and 3D) to test their applicability for long term in vitro adipogenic cultures. It was hypothesized that a silk protein biomaterial scaffold would provide a 3D framework, in combination with perfusion flow, to generate a more physiologically relevant sustainable adipose tissue engineered model than 2D cell culture. Consistent with other studies evaluating 2D and 3D culture systems for adipogenesis we found that both systems successfully model adipogensis, however 3D culture systems were more robust, providing the mechanical structure required to contain the large, fragile adipocytes that were lost in 2D perfused culture systems. 3D perfusion also stimulated greater lipogenesis and lipolysis and resulted in decreased secretion of LDH compared to 2D perfusion. Regardless of culture configuration (2D or 3D) greater glycerol was secreted with the increased nutritional supply provided by perfusion of fresh media. These results are promising for adipose tissue engineering applications including long term cultures for studying disease mechanisms and regenerative approaches, where both acute (days to weeks) and chronic (weeks to months) cultivation are critical for useful insight. PMID:25843606

  11. Left ventricular dyssynchrony assessed by two three-dimensional imaging modalities: phase analysis of gated myocardial perfusion SPECT and tri-plane tissue Doppler imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ajmone Marsan, Nina; Henneman, Maureen M.; Chen, Ji; Ypenburg, Claudia; Dibbets, Petra; Ghio, Stefano; Bleeker, Gabe B.; Stokkel, Marcel P.; van der Wall, Ernst E.; Tavazzi, Luigi; Garcia, Ernest V.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To compare left ventricular (LV) dyssynchrony assessment by phase analysis from gated myocardial perfusion SPECT (GMPS) with LV dyssynchrony assessment by tri-plane tissue Doppler imaging (TDI). Baseline LV dyssynchrony assessed with standard deviation (SD) of time-to-peak systolic velocity of 12 LV segments (Ts-SD) with TDI has proven to be a powerful predictor of response to CRT. Information on LV dyssynchrony can also be provided by GMPS with phase analysis of regional LV maximal count changes throughout the cardiac cycle. Methods Forty heart failure patients, referred for evaluation of potential eligibility for CRT, underwent both 3D echocardiography, with tri-plane TDI, and resting GMPS. From tri-plane TDI, Ts-SD was used as a validated parameter of LV dyssynchrony and compared with different indices (histogram bandwidth, phase SD, histogram skewness and kurtosis) derived from phase analysis of GMPS. Results Histogram bandwidth and phase SD showed good correlation with Ts-SD (r=0.77 and r=0.74, p<0.0001, respectively). Patients with substantial LV dyssynchrony assessed with tri-plane TDI (Ts-SD ≥33 ms) had also significantly higher values of histogram bandwidth and phase SD. Conclusions The results of this study support the use of phase analysis by GMPS to evaluate LV dyssynchrony. Histogram bandwidth and phase SD showed the best correlation with Ts-SD assessed with tri-plane TDI and appeared the most optimal variables for assessment of LV dyssynchrony with GMPS. PMID:17874098

  12. Isolated Limb Perfusion of Melphalan With or Without Tumor Necrosis Factor in Treating Patients With Soft Tissue Sarcoma of the Arm or Leg

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-03-14

    Stage IVB Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IIB Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IIC Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IVA Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

  13. Ultrasound perfusion signal processing for tumor detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, MinWoo; Abbey, Craig K.; Insana, Michael F.

    2016-04-01

    Enhanced blood perfusion in a tissue mass is an indication of neo-vascularity and a sign of a potential malignancy. Ultrasonic pulsed-Doppler imaging is a preferred modality for noninvasive monitoring of blood flow. However, the weak blood echoes and disorganized slow flow make it difficult to detect perfusion using standard methods without the expense and risk of contrast enhancement. Our research measures the efficiency of conventional power-Doppler (PD) methods at discriminating flow states by comparing measurement performance to that of an ideal discriminator. ROC analysis applied to the experimental results shows that power Doppler methods are just 30-50 % efficient at perfusion flows less than 1ml/min, suggesting an opportunity to improve perfusion assessment through signal processing. A new perfusion estimator is proposed by extending the statistical discriminator approach. We show that 2-D perfusion color imaging may be enhanced using this approach.

  14. Evaluation of changes in the parameters of brain tissue perfusion in multi-slice computed tomography in patients after carotid artery stenting

    PubMed Central

    Szarmach, Arkadiusz; Halena, Grzegorz; Buczny, Jacek; Studniarek, Michał; Markiet, Karolina; Szurowska, Edyta; Retkowski, Mariusz; Piskunowicz, Maciej

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background: CT perfusion of the brain allows functional evaluation of cerebral blood flow. Patients with chronic internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis may suffer from malperfusion. Improvement of cerebral blood flow and remission of neurological symptoms indicate the effectiveness of treatment of internal carotid artery stenosis. Material/Methods: The aim of the study was to analyze alterations within cerebral perfusion parameters in CT brain perfusion examination in patients who were scheduled for endovascular therapy due to ICA stenosis. Forty patients with ICA stenosis of over 79% who were included in this prospective study underwent perfusion CT examination twice – 24 hours prior to stenting and after 6–8 weeks following the procedure. CBF, CBV, MTT and TTP were evaluated. Results: Prior to endovascular therapy, an increase in MTT and TTP, and a decrease in CBV and CBF were observed within arterial supply of the hemisphere ipsilateral to stenosis. After the procedure, a decrease in MTT and TTP was seen in all cases, while no statistically significant changes of CBF or CBV were observed. MTT proved to be the most sensitive indicator of ICA stenosis, as its values allowed differentiation between critical and non-critical stenosis. No correlation between the degree of ICA stenosis and TTP values was found. Mild cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome (CHS) was observed in only one patient and the difference between pre-treatment MTT values calculated for both hemispheres was shown to be a prognostic factor for CHS incidence. Conclusions: Endovascular stent placing in patients with hemodynamically significant internal carotid artery stenosis results in alteration of perfusion parameters, especially concerning TTP and MTT. PMID:22802836

  15. Tissue oximetry in anaesthesia and intensive care.

    PubMed

    Biedrzycka, Aleksandra; Lango, Romuald

    2016-01-01

    Conventional monitoring during surgery and intensive care is not sufficiently sensitive to detect acute changes in vital organs perfusion, while its good quality is critical for maintaining their function. Disturbed vital organ perfusion may lead to the development of postoperative complications, including neurological sequel and renal failure. Near-infra-red spectroscopy (NIRS) represents one of up-to-date techniques of patient monitoring which is commonly used for the assessment of brain oximetry in thoracic aorta surgery, and - increasingly more often -in open-heart surgery. Algorithms for maintaining adequate brain saturation may result in a decrease of neurological complications and cognitive dysfunction following cardiac surgery. The assessment of kidney and visceral perfusion with tissue oximetry is gaining increasing interest during pediatric cardiac surgery. Attempts at decreasing complications by the use of brain oximetry during carotid endarterectomy, as well as thoracic and abdominal surgery demonstrated conflicting results. In recent years NIRS technique was proposed as a tool for muscle perfusion assessment under short term ischemia and reperfusion, referred to as vascular occlusion test (VOT). This monitoring extension allows for the identification of early disturbances in tissue perfusion. Results of recent studies utilizing VOT suggest that the muscle saturation decrease rate is reduced in septic shock patients, while decreased speed of saturation recovery on reperfusion is related to disturbed microcirculation. Being non-invasive and feasible technique, NIRS offers an improvement of preoperative risk assessment in cardiac surgery and promises more comprehensive intraoperative and ICU patient monitoring allowing for better outcome. PMID:26966109

  16. The effects of perfusion conditions on melphalan distribution in the isolated perfused rat hindlimb bearing a human melanoma xenograft.

    PubMed

    Wu, Z Y; Smithers, B M; Parsons, P G; Roberts, M S

    1997-01-01

    An isolated rat hindlimb perfusion model carrying xenografts of the human melanoma cell line MM96 was used to study the effects of perfusion conditions on melphalan distribution. Krebs-Henseleit buffer and Hartmann's solution containing 4.7% bovine serum albumin (BSA) or 2.8% dextran 40 were used as perfusates. Melphalan concentrations in perfusate, tumour nodules and normal tissues were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Increasing the perfusion flow rates (from 4 to 8 ml min(-1)) resulted in higher tissue blood flow (determined with 51Cr-labelled microspheres) and melphalan uptake by tumour and normal tissues. The distribution of melphalan within tumour nodules and normal tissues was similar for both Krebs-Henseleit buffer and Hartmann's solution; however, tissue concentrations of melphalan were significantly higher for a perfusate containing 2.8% dextran 40 than for one containing 4.7% BSA. The melphalan concentration in the tumour was one-third of that found in the skin if the perfusate contained 4.7% BSA. In conclusion, this study has shown that a high perfusion flow enhances the delivery of melphalan into implanted tumour nodules and normal tissues, and a perfusate with low melphalan binding (no albumin) is preferred for maximum uptake of drug by the tumour. PMID:9099965

  17. Pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan

    MedlinePlus

    V/Q scan; Ventilation/perfusion scan; Lung ventilation/perfusion scan ... A pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan is actually two tests. They may be done separately or together. During the perfusion scan, a health ...

  18. Autologous Mesenchymal Stem Cells Produce Concordant Improvements in Regional Function, Tissue Perfusion and Fibrotic Burden when Administered to Patients Undergoing Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting – The PROMETHEUS Trial

    PubMed Central

    Karantalis, Vasileios; DiFede, Darcy L.; Gerstenblith, Gary; Pham, Si; Symes, James; Zambrano, Juan Pablo; Fishman, Joel; Pattany, Pradip; McNiece, Ian; Conte, John; Schulman, Steven; Wu, Katherine; Shah, Ashish; Breton, Elayne; Davis-Sproul, Janice; Schwarz, Richard; Feigenbaum, Gary; Mushtaq, Muzammil; Suncion, Viky Y.; Lardo, Albert C.; Borrello, Ivan; Mendizabal, Adam; Karas, Tomer Z.; Byrnes, John; Lowery, Maureen; Heldman, Alan W.; Hare, Joshua M.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale While accumulating data support the efficacy of intramyocardial cell-based therapy to improve LV function in patients with chronic ischemic cardiomyopathy undergoing CABG, the underlying mechanism and impact of cell injection site remain controversial.Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) improve LV structure and function through several effects including: reducing fibrosis, neoangiogenesis and neomyogenesis. Objective To test the hypothesis that the impact on cardiac structure and function following intramyocardial injections of autologous MSCs results from a concordance of pro-recovery phenotypic effects. Methods and Results Six patients were injected with autologous MSCs into akinetic/hypokinetic myocardial territories not receiving bypass graft for clinical reasons. MRI was used to measure scar, perfusion, wall thickness and contractility at baseline, 3, 6 and 18 months and to compare structural and functional recovery in regions that received MSC injections alone, revascularization alone, or neither. A composite score of MRI variables was used to assess concordance of antifibrotic effects, perfusion, and contraction at different regions. After 18 months, subjects receiving MSCs exhibited increased LVEF (+9.4±1.7%, p=0.0002) and decreased scar mass (-47.5±8.1%; p<0.0001) compared to baseline. MSC-injected segments had concordant reduction in scar size, perfusion and contractile improvement (concordant score: 2.93±0.07), whereas revascularized (0.5±0.21) and non-treated segments (-0.07±0.34) demonstrated non-concordant changes (p<0.0001 vs. injected segments). Conclusions Intramyocardial injection of autologous MSCs into akinetic yet non-revascularized segments produces comprehensive regional functional restitution, which in turn drives improvement in global LV function. These findings, although inconclusive due to lack of placebo group, have important therapeutic and mechanistic hypothesis-generating implications. PMID:24565698

  19. Radionuclide Tracers for Myocardial Perfusion Imaging and Blood Flow Quantification.

    PubMed

    deKemp, Robert A; Renaud, Jennifer M; Klein, Ran; Beanlands, Rob S B

    2016-02-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging is performed most commonly using Tc-99m-sestamibi or tetrofosmin SPECT as well as Rb-82-rubidium or N-13-ammonia PET. Diseased-to-normal tissue contrast is determined by the tracer retention fraction, which decreases nonlinearly with flow. Reduced tissue perfusion results in reduced tracer retention, but the severity of perfusion defects is typically underestimated by 20% to 40%. Compared to SPECT, retention of the PET tracers is more linearly related to flow, and therefore, the perfusion defects are measured more accurately using N-13-ammonia or Rb-82. PMID:26590778

  20. Intestinal perfusion monitoring using photoplethysmography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akl, Tony J.; Wilson, Mark A.; Ericson, M. Nance; Coté, Gerard L.

    2013-08-01

    In abdominal trauma patients, monitoring intestinal perfusion and oxygen consumption is essential during the resuscitation period. Photoplethysmography is an optical technique potentially capable of monitoring these changes in real time to provide the medical staff with a timely and quantitative measure of the adequacy of resuscitation. The challenges for using optical techniques in monitoring hemodynamics in intestinal tissue are discussed, and the solutions to these challenges are presented using a combination of Monte Carlo modeling and theoretical analysis of light propagation in tissue. In particular, it is shown that by using visible wavelengths (i.e., 470 and 525 nm), the perfusion signal is enhanced and the background contribution is decreased compared with using traditional near-infrared wavelengths leading to an order of magnitude enhancement in the signal-to-background ratio. It was further shown that, using the visible wavelengths, similar sensitivity to oxygenation changes could be obtained (over 50% compared with that of near-infrared wavelengths). This is mainly due to the increased contrast between tissue and blood in that spectral region and the confinement of the photons to the thickness of the small intestine. Moreover, the modeling results show that the source to detector separation should be limited to roughly 6 mm while using traditional near-infrared light, with a few centimeters source to detector separation leads to poor signal-to-background ratio. Finally, a visible wavelength system is tested in an in vivo porcine study, and the possibility of monitoring intestinal perfusion changes is showed.

  1. Methodology for ventilation/perfusion SPECT.

    PubMed

    Bajc, Marika; Neilly, Brian; Miniati, Massimo; Mortensen, Jan; Jonson, Björn

    2010-11-01

    Ventilation/perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (V/Q SPECT) is the scintigraphic technique of choice for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism and many other disorders that affect lung function. Data from recent ventilation studies show that the theoretic advantages of Technegas over radiolabeled liquid aerosols are not restricted to the presence of obstructive lung disease. Radiolabeled macroaggregated human albumin is the imaging agent of choice for perfusion scintigraphy. An optimal combination of nuclide activities and acquisition times for ventilation and perfusion, collimators, and imaging matrix yields an adequate V/Q SPECT study in approximately 20 minutes of imaging time. The recommended protocol based on the patient remaining in an unchanged position during the initial ventilation study and the perfusion study allows presentation of matching ventilation and perfusion slices in all projections as well as in rotating volume images based upon maximum intensity projections. Probabilistic interpretation of V/Q SPECT should be replaced by a holistic interpretation strategy on the basis of all relevant information about the patient and all ventilation/perfusion patterns. PE is diagnosed when there is more than one subsegment showing a V/Q mismatch representing an anatomic lung unit. Apart from pulmonary embolism, other pathologies should be identified and reported, for example, obstructive disease, heart failure, and pneumonia. Pitfalls exist both with respect to imaging technique and scan interpretation. PMID:20920632

  2. The effect of head size/shape, miscentering, and bowtie filter on peak patient tissue doses from modern brain perfusion 256-slice CT: How can we minimize the risk for deterministic effects?

    SciTech Connect

    Perisinakis, Kostas; Seimenis, Ioannis; Tzedakis, Antonis; Papadakis, Antonios E.; Damilakis, John

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: To determine patient-specific absorbed peak doses to skin, eye lens, brain parenchyma, and cranial red bone marrow (RBM) of adult individuals subjected to low-dose brain perfusion CT studies on a 256-slice CT scanner, and investigate the effect of patient head size/shape, head position during the examination and bowtie filter used on peak tissue doses. Methods: The peak doses to eye lens, skin, brain, and RBM were measured in 106 individual-specific adult head phantoms subjected to the standard low-dose brain perfusion CT on a 256-slice CT scanner using a novel Monte Carlo simulation software dedicated for patient CT dosimetry. Peak tissue doses were compared to corresponding thresholds for induction of cataract, erythema, cerebrovascular disease, and depression of hematopoiesis, respectively. The effects of patient head size/shape, head position during acquisition and bowtie filter used on resulting peak patient tissue doses were investigated. The effect of eye-lens position in the scanned head region was also investigated. The effect of miscentering and use of narrow bowtie filter on image quality was assessed. Results: The mean peak doses to eye lens, skin, brain, and RBM were found to be 124, 120, 95, and 163 mGy, respectively. The effect of patient head size and shape on peak tissue doses was found to be minimal since maximum differences were less than 7%. Patient head miscentering and bowtie filter selection were found to have a considerable effect on peak tissue doses. The peak eye-lens dose saving achieved by elevating head by 4 cm with respect to isocenter and using a narrow wedge filter was found to approach 50%. When the eye lies outside of the primarily irradiated head region, the dose to eye lens was found to drop to less than 20% of the corresponding dose measured when the eye lens was located in the middle of the x-ray beam. Positioning head phantom off-isocenter by 4 cm and employing a narrow wedge filter results in a moderate reduction of

  3. Improved visualization of lung metastases at single cell resolution in mice by combined in-situ perfusion of lung tissue and X-Gal staining of lacZ-tagged tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Arlt, Matthias J E; Born, Walter; Fuchs, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    in-situ lung perfusion, a technique that was recently established by Borsig et al. who perfused the lungs of mice under anesthesia to clear them from blood and to fix and embed them in-situ under inflation through the trachea. This method prevents also the collapse of the lung and thereby maintains the morphology of functional lung alveoli, which improves the quality of the tissue for histological analysis. In the present study, we describe a new protocol, which takes advantage of a combination of X-gal staining of lacZ-expressing tumor cells and in-situ perfusion and fixation of lung tissue. This refined protocol allows high-sensitivity detection of single metastatic cells in the lung and enabled us in a recent study to detect "dormant" lung micrometastases in a mouse model, which was originally described to be non-metastatic. PMID:22929213

  4. CT Perfusion ASPECTS in the Evaluation of Acute Ischemic Stroke: Thrombolytic Therapy Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Sillanpaa, Niko; Saarinen, Jukka T.; Rusanen, Harri; Hakomaki, Jari; Lahteela, Arto; Numminen, Heikki; Elovaara, Irina; Dastidar, Prasun; Soimakallio, Seppo

    2011-01-01

    that the CT perfusion ASPECTS mismatch adequately identifies the amount of potentially salvageable ischemic brain tissue. Conclusions Parameters derived from the use of CT perfusion ASPECTS can detect reversible ischemia and are correlated with clinical outcome. PMID:22566978

  5. Isolated limb perfusion with biochemotherapy and oncolytic virotherapy combines with radiotherapy and surgery to overcome treatment resistance in an animal model of extremity soft tissue sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Michelle J; Smith, Henry G; Pencavel, Timothy D; Mansfield, David C; Kyula-Currie, Joan; Khan, Aadil A; McEntee, Gráinne; Roulstone, Victoria; Hayes, Andrew J; Harrington, Kevin J

    2016-09-15

    The management of locally advanced or recurrent extremity sarcoma often necessitates multimodal therapy to preserve a limb, of which isolated limb perfusion (ILP) is a key component. However, with standard chemotherapeutic agents used in ILP, the duration of response is limited. Novel agents or treatment combinations are urgently needed to improve outcomes. Previous work in an animal model has demonstrated the efficacy of oncolytic virotherapy when delivered by ILP and, in this study, we report further improvements from combining ILP-delivered oncolytic virotherapy with radiation and surgical resection. In vitro, the combination of radiation with an oncolytic vaccinia virus (GLV-1h68) and melphalan demonstrated increased cytotoxicity in a panel of sarcoma cell lines. The effects were mediated through activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. In vivo, combinations of radiation, oncolytic virotherapy and standard ILP resulted in delayed tumour growth and prolonged survival when compared with standard ILP alone. However, local disease control could only be secured when such treatment was combined with surgical resection, the timing of which was crucial in determining outcome. Combinations of oncolytic virotherapy with surgical resection and radiation have direct clinical relevance in extremity sarcoma and represent an exciting prospect for improving outcomes in this pathology. PMID:27116656

  6. NADH fluorescence/UV reflectance ratio provides a semi-quantitative measure for NADH fluorometry of blood-perfused rat heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coremans, J. M. C. C.; Ince, C.; Bruining, Hajo A.; Puppels, Gerwin J.

    1996-12-01

    A procedure for semi-quantitative analysis of NADH fluorescence image is presented which enables non-invasive monitoring of the metabolic state of tissue in vivo. In blood perfused tissue, the NADH fluorescence intensity can be disturbed by movement and by hemodynamic and oximetric effects. These factors alter the tissue absorbance of UV excitation light and thereby the NADH fluorescence excitation efficiency. Combination of the theories of front- face fluorimetry and Kubelka and Munk for description of NADH fluorescence (FNADH) and UV reflectance (R365d) of optically thick samples, predicts that the FNADH/R365d ratio provides adequate compensation for changes in tissue absorbance. The validity of this correction procedure is verified in tissue phantoms, in Langendorff perfused rat hearts and for rat hearts in vivo. Movement artifacts were eliminated using a CCD video camera with a biprism configuration for simultaneous measurement of fluorescence and reflectance images. Therefore, the FNADH/Rd ratio can be used to monitor the metabolic state of blood perfused tissue.

  7. 21 CFR 1404.900 - Adequate evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adequate evidence. 1404.900 Section 1404.900 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 1404.900 Adequate evidence. Adequate evidence means information sufficient to support the reasonable belief that a particular...

  8. 29 CFR 98.900 - Adequate evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Adequate evidence. 98.900 Section 98.900 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 98.900 Adequate evidence. Adequate evidence means information sufficient to support the reasonable belief that a...

  9. Cerebral Metabolic Profiling of Hypothermic Circulatory Arrest with and Without Antegrade Selective Cerebral Perfusion: Evidence from Nontargeted Tissue Metabolomics in a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Li-Hua; Liu, Jin-Ping; Zhang, Hao; Wu, Shu-Bin; Ji, Bing-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Antegrade selective cerebral perfusion (ASCP) is regarded to perform cerebral protection during the thoracic aorta surgery as an adjunctive technique to deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA). However, brain metabolism profile after ASCP has not been systematically investigated by metabolomics technology. Methods: To clarify the metabolomics profiling of ASCP, 12 New Zealand white rabbits were randomly assigned into 60 min DHCA with (DHCA+ASCP [DA] group, n = 6) and without (DHCA [D] group, n = 6) ASCP according to the random number table. ASCP was conducted by cannulation on the right subclavian artery and cross-clamping of the innominate artery. Rabbits were sacrificed 60 min after weaning off cardiopulmonary bypass. The metabolic features of the cerebral cortex were analyzed by a nontargeted metabolic profiling strategy based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Variable importance projection values exceeding 1.0 were selected as potentially changed metabolites, and then Student's t-test was applied to test for statistical significance between the two groups. Results: Metabolic profiling of brain was distinctive significantly between the two groups (Q2Y = 0.88 for partial least squares-DA model). In comparing to group D, 62 definable metabolites were varied significantly after ASCP, which were mainly related to amino acid metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism, and lipid metabolism. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes analysis revealed that metabolic pathways after DHCA with ASCP were mainly involved in the activated glycolytic pathway, subdued anaerobic metabolism, and oxidative stress. In addition, L-kynurenine (P = 0.0019), 5-methoxyindole-3-acetic acid (P = 0.0499), and 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid (P = 0.0495) in tryptophan metabolism pathways were decreased, and citrulline (P = 0.0158) in urea cycle was increased in group DA comparing to group D. Conclusions: The present study applied metabolomics analysis to identify the cerebral

  10. Metabolism of 7-ethyoxycoumarin by Isolated Perfused Rainbow Trout Livers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Isolated trout livers were perfused using methods designed to preserve tissue viability and function. Liver performance was evaluated by measuring O2 consumption, vascular resistance, K+ leakage, glucose flux, lactate flux, alanine aminotransferase leakage, and metabolic clearanc...

  11. Whole Animal Perfusion Fixation for Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Gage, Gregory J.; Kipke, Daryl R.; Shain, William

    2012-01-01

    The goal of fixation is to rapidly and uniformly preserve tissue in a life-like state. While placing tissue directly in fixative works well for small pieces of tissue, larger specimens like the intact brain pose a problem for immersion fixation because the fixative does not reach all regions of the tissue at the same rate 5,7. Often, changes in response to hypoxia begin before the tissue can be preserved 12. The advantage of directly perfusing fixative through the circulatory system is that the chemical can quickly reach every corner of the organism using the natural vascular network. In order to utilize the circulatory system most effectively, care must be taken to match physiological pressures 3. It is important to note that physiological pressures are dependent on the species used. Techniques for perfusion fixation vary depending on the tissue to be fixed and how the tissue will be processed following fixation. In this video, we describe a low-cost, rapid, controlled and uniform fixation procedure using 4% paraformaldehyde perfused via the vascular system: through the heart of the rat to obtain the best possible preservation of the brain for immunohistochemistry. The main advantage of this technique (vs. gravity-fed systems) is that the circulatory system is utilized most effectively. PMID:22871843

  12. Tissue blood flow mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, G. E.

    1997-01-01

    The operating principles of Laser Doppler Perfusion Imaging (LDPI) for visualization of the tissue blood perfusion are explained. Using this emerging technology skin perfusion has been investigated in healthy volunteers and in patients with various conditions that affect skin blood flow. LDPI is anticipated to be particularly useful in evaluation of peripheral circulation in diabetics, as an objective tool in irritancy patch testing, assessment of burnt skin and visualization of spot-wise hyperperfusion in breast skin in association with carcinoma.

  13. 34 CFR 85.900 - Adequate evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Definitions § 85.900 Adequate evidence. Adequate evidence means information sufficient to support the reasonable belief that a particular act or omission has occurred. Authority: E.O. 12549 (3 CFR, 1986 Comp., p. 189); E.O 12689 (3 CFR, 1989 Comp., p. 235); 20 U.S.C. 1082, 1094, 1221e-3 and 3474; and Sec....

  14. 29 CFR 452.110 - Adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Adequate safeguards. 452.110 Section 452.110 Labor... DISCLOSURE ACT OF 1959 Election Procedures; Rights of Members § 452.110 Adequate safeguards. (a) In addition to the election safeguards discussed in this part, the Act contains a general mandate in section...

  15. 29 CFR 452.110 - Adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Adequate safeguards. 452.110 Section 452.110 Labor... DISCLOSURE ACT OF 1959 Election Procedures; Rights of Members § 452.110 Adequate safeguards. (a) In addition to the election safeguards discussed in this part, the Act contains a general mandate in section...

  16. [Antegrade unilateral perfusion of the brain through the brachiocephalic trunk in operations on the aortic arch].

    PubMed

    Kozlov, B N; Panfilov, D S; Kuznetsov, M S; Ponomarenko, I V; Nasrashvili, G G; Shipulin, V M

    2016-01-01

    Presented herein is a technique of unilateral antegrade perfusion of the brain in operations on the aortic arch. The method makes it possible to perform both systemic artificial circulation and adequate physiological perfusion of the brain, promoting minimization of the number of neurological complications. PMID:27100557

  17. A slice chamber for intracellular and extracellular recording during continuous perfusion.

    PubMed

    Kelso, S R; Nelson, D O; Silva, N L; Boulant, J A

    1983-06-01

    The design of a tissue slice perfusion system is described, and examples are given showing the stability of this system for intracellular and extracellular recordings during changes in perfusion media. The stability of this system is attributed to several features. Mini-drips serve to cushion transient changes in flow rate when switching from one medium to another. Solenoid valves are used to quickly switch perfusion media with minimal mechanical movement. A finely-controlled adjustable flow valve provides a uniform flow rate for all media. Constant tissue temperature is maintained by media perfusion through a thermoelectric Peltier assembly. In addition, a filter paper wick insures that the perfusate is constantly removed without movement in the tissue slices. With this design, the slices are supported on a net at the interface between the perfusion medium and a humidified, oxygenated atmosphere. This arrangement appears to be conducive to tissue viability and facilitates the placement of microelectrodes in the slices. PMID:6311362

  18. Noninvasive Blood Perfusion Measurements of an Isolated Rat Liver and an Anesthetized Rat Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Mudaliar, Ashvinikumar V.; Ellis, Brent E.; Ricketts, Patricia L.; Lanz, Otto I.; Lee, Charles Y.; Diller, Thomas E.; Scott, Elaine P.

    2008-01-01

    A simple, cost effective, and noninvasive blood perfusion system is tested in animal models. The system uses a small sensor to measure the heat transfer response to a thermal event (convective cooling) imposed on the tissue surface. Heat flux data are compared with a mathematical model of the tissue to estimate both blood perfusion and thermal contact resistance between the tissue and the probe. The perfusion system was evaluated for repeatability and sensitivity using isolated rat liver and exposed rat kidney tests. Perfusion in the isolated liver tests was varied by controlling the flow of the perfusate into the liver, and the perfusion in the exposed kidney tests was varied by temporarily occluding blood flow through the renal artery and vein. The perfusion estimated by the convective perfusion probe was in good agreement with that of the metered flow of the perfusate into the liver model. The liver tests indicated that the probe can be used to detect small changes in perfusion (0.005 ml/ml/s). The probe qualitatively tracked the changes in the perfusion in the kidney model due to occlusion of the renal artery and vein. PMID:19045542

  19. Americans Getting Adequate Water Daily, CDC Finds

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus/news/fullstory_158510.html Americans Getting Adequate Water Daily, CDC Finds Men take in an average ... new government report finds most are getting enough water each day. The data, from the U.S. National ...

  20. Americans Getting Adequate Water Daily, CDC Finds

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_158510.html Americans Getting Adequate Water Daily, CDC Finds Men take in an average ... new government report finds most are getting enough water each day. The data, from the U.S. National ...

  1. Ex vivo lung perfusion.

    PubMed

    Reeb, Jeremie; Cypel, Marcelo

    2016-03-01

    Lung transplantation is an established life-saving therapy for patients with end-stage lung disease. Unfortunately, greater success in lung transplantation is hindered by a shortage of lung donors and the relatively poor early-, mid-, and long-term outcomes associated with severe primary graft dysfunction. Ex vivo lung perfusion has emerged as a modern preservation technique that allows for a more accurate lung assessment and improvement in lung quality. This review outlines the: (i) rationale behind the method; (ii) techniques and protocols; (iii) Toronto ex vivo lung perfusion method; (iv) devices available; and (v) clinical experience worldwide. We also highlight the potential of ex vivo lung perfusion in leading a new era of lung preservation. PMID:26700566

  2. Asbestos/NESHAP adequately wet guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Shafer, R.; Throwe, S.; Salgado, O.; Garlow, C.; Hoerath, E.

    1990-12-01

    The Asbestos NESHAP requires facility owners and/or operators involved in demolition and renovation activities to control emissions of particulate asbestos to the outside air because no safe concentration of airborne asbestos has ever been established. The primary method used to control asbestos emissions is to adequately wet the Asbestos Containing Material (ACM) with a wetting agent prior to, during and after demolition/renovation activities. The purpose of the document is to provide guidance to asbestos inspectors and the regulated community on how to determine if friable ACM is adequately wet as required by the Asbestos NESHAP.

  3. Noncontact blood perfusion mapping in clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iakovlev, Dmitry; Dwyer, Vincent; Hu, Sijung; Silberschmidt, Vadim

    2016-04-01

    Non-contact imaging photoplethysmography (iPPG) to detect pulsatile blood microcirculation in tissue has been selected as a successor to low spatial resolution and slow scanning blood perfusion techniques currently employed by clinicians. The proposed iPPG system employs a novel illumination source constructed of multiple high power LEDs with narrow spectral emission, which are temporally modulated and synchronised with a high performance sCMOS sensor. To ensure spectrum stability and prevent thermal wavelength drift due to junction temperature variations, each LED features a custom-designed thermal management system to effectively dissipate generated heat and auto-adjust current flow. The use of a multi-wavelength approach has resulted in simultaneous microvascular perfusion monitoring at various tissue depths, which is an added benefit for specific clinical applications. A synchronous detection algorithm to extract weak photoplethysmographic pulse-waveforms demonstrated robustness and high efficiency when applied to even small regions of 5 mm2. The experimental results showed evidences that the proposed system could achieve noticeable accuracy in blood perfusion monitoring by creating complex amplitude and phase maps for the tissue under examination.

  4. Towards robust deconvolution of low-dose perfusion CT: sparse perfusion deconvolution using online dictionary learning.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ruogu; Chen, Tsuhan; Sanelli, Pina C

    2013-05-01

    Computed tomography perfusion (CTP) is an important functional imaging modality in the evaluation of cerebrovascular diseases, particularly in acute stroke and vasospasm. However, the post-processed parametric maps of blood flow tend to be noisy, especially in low-dose CTP, due to the noisy contrast enhancement profile and the oscillatory nature of the results generated by the current computational methods. In this paper, we propose a robust sparse perfusion deconvolution method (SPD) to estimate cerebral blood flow in CTP performed at low radiation dose. We first build a dictionary from high-dose perfusion maps using online dictionary learning and then perform deconvolution-based hemodynamic parameters estimation on the low-dose CTP data. Our method is validated on clinical data of patients with normal and pathological CBF maps. The results show that we achieve superior performance than existing methods, and potentially improve the differentiation between normal and ischemic tissue in the brain. PMID:23542422

  5. Towards robust deconvolution of low-dose perfusion CT: Sparse perfusion deconvolution using online dictionary learning

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ruogu; Chen, Tsuhan; Sanelli, Pina C.

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomography perfusion (CTP) is an important functional imaging modality in the evaluation of cerebrovascular diseases, particularly in acute stroke and vasospasm. However, the post-processed parametric maps of blood flow tend to be noisy, especially in low-dose CTP, due to the noisy contrast enhancement profile and the oscillatory nature of the results generated by the current computational methods. In this paper, we propose a robust sparse perfusion deconvolution method (SPD) to estimate cerebral blood flow in CTP performed at low radiation dose. We first build a dictionary from high-dose perfusion maps using online dictionary learning and then perform deconvolution-based hemodynamic parameters estimation on the low-dose CTP data. Our method is validated on clinical data of patients with normal and pathological CBF maps. The results show that we achieve superior performance than existing methods, and potentially improve the differentiation between normal and ischemic tissue in the brain. PMID:23542422

  6. Adequate supervision for children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Anderst, James; Moffatt, Mary

    2014-11-01

    Primary care providers (PCPs) have the opportunity to improve child health and well-being by addressing supervision issues before an injury or exposure has occurred and/or after an injury or exposure has occurred. Appropriate anticipatory guidance on supervision at well-child visits can improve supervision of children, and may prevent future harm. Adequate supervision varies based on the child's development and maturity, and the risks in the child's environment. Consideration should be given to issues as wide ranging as swimming pools, falls, dating violence, and social media. By considering the likelihood of harm and the severity of the potential harm, caregivers may provide adequate supervision by minimizing risks to the child while still allowing the child to take "small" risks as needed for healthy development. Caregivers should initially focus on direct (visual, auditory, and proximity) supervision of the young child. Gradually, supervision needs to be adjusted as the child develops, emphasizing a safe environment and safe social interactions, with graduated independence. PCPs may foster adequate supervision by providing concrete guidance to caregivers. In addition to preventing injury, supervision includes fostering a safe, stable, and nurturing relationship with every child. PCPs should be familiar with age/developmentally based supervision risks, adequate supervision based on those risks, characteristics of neglectful supervision based on age/development, and ways to encourage appropriate supervision throughout childhood. PMID:25369578

  7. Small Rural Schools CAN Have Adequate Curriculums.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loustaunau, Martha

    The small rural school's foremost and largest problem is providing an adequate curriculum for students in a changing world. Often the small district cannot or is not willing to pay the per-pupil cost of curriculum specialists, specialized courses using expensive equipment no more than one period a day, and remodeled rooms to accommodate new…

  8. Funding the Formula Adequately in Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    This report is a longevity, simulational study that looks at how the ratio of state support to local support effects the number of school districts that breaks the common school's funding formula which in turns effects the equity of distribution to the common schools. After nearly two decades of adequately supporting the funding formula, Oklahoma…

  9. Distribution of perfusion.

    PubMed

    Glenny, Robb; Robertson, H Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Local driving pressures and resistances within the pulmonary vascular tree determine the distribution of perfusion in the lung. Unlike other organs, these local determinants are significantly influenced by regional hydrostatic and alveolar pressures. Those effects on blood flow distribution are further magnified by the large vertical height of the human lung and the relatively low intravascular pressures in the pulmonary circulation. While the distribution of perfusion is largely due to passive determinants such as vascular geometry and hydrostatic pressures, active mechanisms such as vasoconstriction induced by local hypoxia can also redistribute blood flow. This chapter reviews the determinants of regional lung perfusion with a focus on vascular tree geometry, vertical gradients induced by gravity, the interactions between vascular and surrounding alveolar pressures, and hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction. While each of these determinants of perfusion distribution can be examined in isolation, the distribution of blood flow is dynamically determined and each component interacts with the others so that a change in one region of the lung influences the distribution of blood flow in other lung regions. PMID:23737171

  10. Importance of capillary perfusion.

    PubMed

    Hardaway, R M

    1979-11-01

    Perfusion is more critical than oxygen in the maintenance of cell viability. A high hematocrit or high fibrinogen level increases blood viscosity and predisposes to disseminated intravascular coagulation. It is recommended that a hematocrit of about 30 be maintained in periods of circulatory stress such as shock or extracorporeal circulation. PMID:495856

  11. Gradient-enhanced FAWSETS perfusion measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marro, Kenneth I.; Lee, Donghoon; Hyyti, Outi M.

    2005-08-01

    This work describes the use of custom-built gradients to enhance skeletal muscle perfusion measurements acquired with a previously described arterial spin labeling technique known as FAWSETS (flow-driven arterial water stimulation with elimination of tissue signal). Custom-built gradients provide active control of the static magnetic field gradient on which FAWSETS relies for labeling. This allows selective, 180° modulations of the phase of the perfusion component of the signal. Phase cycling can then be implemented to eliminate all extraneous components leaving a signal that exclusively reflects capillary-level perfusion. Gradient-enhancement substantially reduces acquisition time and eliminates the need to acquire an ischemic signal to quantify perfusion. This removes critical obstacles to application of FAWSETS in organs other than skeletal muscle and makes the measurements more desirable for clinical environments. The basic physical principles of gradient-enhancement are demonstrated in flow phantom experiments and in vivo utility is demonstrated in rat hind limb during stimulated exercise.

  12. Asynchronicity of Facial Blood Perfusion in Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Zaproudina, Nina; Teplov, Victor; Nippolainen, Ervin; Lipponen, Jukka A.; Kamshilin, Alexei A.; Närhi, Matti; Karjalainen, Pasi A.; Giniatullin, Rashid

    2013-01-01

    Asymmetrical changes in blood perfusion and asynchronous blood supply to head tissues likely contribute to migraine pathophysiology. Imaging was widely used in order to understand hemodynamic variations in migraine. However, mapping of blood pulsations in the face of migraineurs has not been performed so far. We used the Blood Pulsation Imaging (BPI) technique, which was recently developed in our group, to establish whether 2D-imaging of blood pulsations parameters can reveal new biomarkers of migraine. BPI characteristics were measured in migraineurs during the attack-free interval and compared to healthy subjects with and without a family history of migraine. We found a novel phenomenon of transverse waves of facial blood perfusion in migraineurs in contrast to healthy subjects who showed synchronous blood delivery to both sides of the face. Moreover, the amplitude of blood pulsations was symmetrically distributed over the face of healthy subjects, but asymmetrically in migraineurs and subjects with a family history of migraine. In the migraine patients we found a remarkable correlation between the side of unilateral headache and the direction of the blood perfusion wave. Our data suggest that migraine is associated with lateralization of blood perfusion and asynchronous blood pulsations in the facial area, which could be due to essential dysfunction of the autonomic vascular control in the face. These findings may further enhance our understanding of migraine pathophysiology and suggest new easily available biomarkers of this pathology. PMID:24324592

  13. In-vivo quantitative evaluation of perfusion zones and perfusion gradient in the deep inferior epigastric artery perforator flap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saint-Cyr, Michel; Lakhiani, Chrisovalantis; Cheng, Angela; Mangum, Michael; Liang, Jinyang; Teotia, Sumeet; Livingston, Edward H.; Zuzak, Karel J.

    2013-03-01

    The selection of well-vascularized tissue during DIEP flap harvest remains controversial. While several studies have elucidated cross-midline perfusion, further characterization of perfusion to the ipsilateral hemiabdomen is necessary for minimizing rates of fat necrosis or partial fat necrosis in bilateral DIEP flaps. Eighteen patients (29 flaps) underwent DIEP flap harvest using a prospectively designed protocol. Perforators were marked and imaged with a novel system for quantitatively measuring tissue oxygenation, the Digital Light Hyperspectral Imager. Images were then analyzed to determine if perforator selection influenced ipsilateral flap perfusion. Flaps based on a single lateral row perforator (SLRP) were found to have a higher level of hemoglobin oxygenation in Zone I (mean %HbO2 = 76.1) compared to single medial row perforator (SMRP) flaps (%HbO2 = 71.6). Perfusion of Zone III relative to Zone I was similar between SLRP and SMRP flaps (97.4% vs. 97.9%, respectively). These differences were not statistically significant (p>0.05). Perfusion to the lateral edge of the flap was slightly greater for SLRP flaps compared SMRP flaps (92.1% vs. 89.5%, respectively). SMRP flaps had superior perfusion travelling inferiorly compared to SLRP flaps (88.8% vs. 83.9%, respectively). Overall, it was observed that flaps were better perfused in the lateral direction than inferiorly. Significant differences in perfusion gradients directed inferiorly or laterally were observed, and perforator selection influenced perfusion in the most distal or inferior aspects of the flap. This suggests broader clinical implications for flap design that merit further investigation.

  14. Regulation of skeletal muscle perfusion during exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delp, M. D.; Laughlin, M. H.

    1998-01-01

    For exercise to be sustained, it is essential that adequate blood flow be provided to skeletal muscle. The local vascular control mechanisms involved in regulating muscle perfusion during exercise include metabolic control, endothelium-mediated control, propagated responses, myogenic control, and the muscle pump. The primary determinant of muscle perfusion during sustained exercise is the metabolic rate of the muscle. Metabolites from contracting muscle diffuse to resistance arterioles and act directly to induce vasodilation, or indirectly to inhibit noradrenaline release from sympathetic nerve endings and oppose alpha-adrenoreceptor-mediated vasoconstriction. The vascular endothelium also releases vasodilator substances (e.g., prostacyclin and nitric oxide) that are prominent in establishing basal vascular tone, but these substances do not appear to contribute to the exercise hyperemia in muscle. Endothelial and smooth muscle cells may also be involved in propagating vasodilator signals along arterioles to parent and daughter vessels. Myogenic autoregulation does not appear to be involved in the exercise hyperemia in muscle, but the rhythmic propulsion of blood from skeletal muscle veins facilitates venous return to the heart and muscle perfusion. It appears that the primary determinants of sustained exercise hyperemia in skeletal muscle are metabolic vasodilation and increased vascular conductance via the muscle pump. Additionally, sympathetic neural control is important in regulating muscle blood flow during exercise.

  15. Real-time vascular mechanosensation through ex vivo artery perfusion

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cell-based perfusion studies have provided great insight into fluid-sensing mechanisms, such as primary cilia in the renal and vascular systems. However, the intrinsic limitations of in vitro cell culture, such as the inability to reflect cellular organization within tissues, has distanced observed paradigms from possible clinical developments. Here we describe a protocol that applies ex vivo artery perfusion and calcium imaging to observe real-time cellular responses to fluid-shear stress. Results Through our ex vivo artery perfusion method, we were able to simulate physiological flow and initiate distinct fluid shear stress mechanosensory responses, as well as induced acetylcholine responses in mouse aortic tissue. The observed calcium profiles confirm results found through previous in vitro cell culture experiments. The overall procedure, including dissection, sample preparation and perfusion, takes around 3 hours to complete. Conclusion Through our unique method, we are able to induce laminar flow within intact mouse aortic tissue and illicit subsequent cellular responses. This method of ex vivo artery perfusion provides the opportunity to bridge the novel findings of in vitro studies with subsequent physiological models of fluid-shear stress mechanosensation in vascular tissues. PMID:24685068

  16. Development of an Extracorporeal Perfusion Device for Small Animal Free Flaps

    PubMed Central

    Fichter, Andreas M.; Ritschl, Lucas M.; Borgmann, Anna; Humbs, Martin; Luppa, Peter B.; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Mücke, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Background Extracorporeal perfusion (ECP) might prolong the vital storage capabilities of composite free flaps, potentially opening a wide range of clinical applications. Aim of the study was the development a validated low-cost extracorporeal perfusion model for further research in small animal free flaps. Methods After establishing optimal perfusion settings, a specially designed extracorporeal perfusion system was evaluated during 8-hour perfusion of rat epigastric flaps followed by microvascular free flap transfer. Controls comprised sham-operation, ischemia and in vivo perfusion. Flaps and perfusate (diluted blood) were closely monitored by blood gas analysis, combined laser Doppler flowmetry and remission spectroscopy and Indocyanine-Green angiography. Evaluations were complemented by assessment of necrotic area and light microscopy at day 7. Results ECP was established and maintained for 8 hours with constant potassium and pH levels. Subsequent flap transfer was successful. Notably, the rate of necrosis of extracorporeally perfused flaps (27%) was even lower than after in vivo perfusion (49%), although not statistically significant (P = 0,083). After sham-operation, only 6% of the total flap area became necrotic, while 8-hour ischemia led to total flap loss (98%). Angiographic and histological findings confirmed these observations. Conclusions Vital storage capabilities of microvascular flaps can be prolonged by temporary ECP. Our study provides important insights on the pathophysiological processes during extracorporeal tissue perfusion and provides a validated small animal perfusion model for further studies. PMID:26808996

  17. EFFECT ON PERFUSION VALUES OF SAMPLING INTERVAL OF CT PERFUSION ACQUISITIONS IN NEUROENDOCRINE LIVER METASTASES AND NORMAL LIVER

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Chaan S.; Hobbs, Brian P.; Wei, Wei; Anderson, Ella F.; Herron, Delise H.; Yao, James C.; Chandler, Adam G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the effects of sampling interval (SI) of CT perfusion acquisitions on CT perfusion values in normal liver and liver metastases from neuroendocrine tumors. Methods CT perfusion in 16 patients with neuroendocrine liver metastases were analyzed by distributed parameter modeling to yield tissue blood flow, blood volume, mean transit time, permeability, and hepatic arterial fraction, for tumor and normal liver. CT perfusion values for the reference sampling interval of 0.5s (SI0.5) were compared with those of SI datasets of 1s, 2s, 3s and 4s, using mixed-effects model analyses. Results Increases in SI beyond 1s were associated with significant and increasing departures of CT perfusion parameters from reference values at SI0.5 (p≤0.0009). CT perfusion values deviated from reference with increasing uncertainty with increasing SIs. Findings for normal liver were concordant. Conclusion Increasing SIs beyond 1s yield significantly different CT perfusion parameter values compared to reference values at SI0.5. PMID:25626401

  18. Coronary artery occlusion extends perfusion territory boundaries through microvascular collaterals.

    PubMed

    Cicutti, N; Rakusan, K; Downey, H F

    1994-01-01

    Simultaneous in vivo infusions of two different colored 10 microns microsphere suspensions into the left anterior descending (LAD; red spheres) and left circumflex (LCx; blue spheres) coronary arteries of nine anesthetized dogs identified a specific region of canine myocardium perfused by both arterial branches. Subsequently, the LAD was ligated and a third (green) set of micropheres was infused into the patent LCx artery. Analysis of 40 microns serial sections of tissue revealed interface zones with capillaries perfused by both arteries. The first zone, defined as the Interface Transistion Zone (ITZ) was formed by an intermingling of microvessels supplied by the parent arteries of the adjacent perfusion territories; it separated tissue containing only one or the other colored microspheres. Another zone, defined as the Boundary Watershed Zone was located within the ITZ and had capillaries containing both red and blue microspheres. The width of ITZ was 53377 +/- 817 microns (mean +/- SD), and the width of the BWZ was 3358 +/- 618 microns. Green microspheres, infused into the LCx following coronary occlusion were also found in the ITZ and BWZ. Furthermore, capillaries perfused exclusively by the LAD before occlusion (tissue with red but not blue microspheres) adjacent to the perfusion interface contained green microspheres as well as red/green aggregates, indicating lateral extension of the LCx perfusion territory. This extension of the LCx territory was quantitated by comparing the location at which densities of green microspheres or green/red aggregates decreased abruptly compared to the location of the original ITZ and BWZ boundaries, respectively. Results showed that LAD occlusion caused a 24% expansion of the ITZ and a 48% expansion of the BWZ. In addition, all expansions were significantly greater in subepicardial compared to subendocardial regions (p < 0.001). These results clearly demonstrate the capability of microvascular anastomoses in providing blood flow

  19. Vascular communications between donor and recipient tissues after successful full face transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kumamaru, K K; Sisk, G C; Mitsouras, D; Schultz, K; Steigner, M L; George, E; Enterline, D S; Bueno, E M; Pomahac, B; Rybicki, F J

    2014-03-01

    The vascular reorganization after facial transplantation has important implications on future surgical planning. The purpose of this study was to evaluate blood flow (BF) after full face transplantation using wide area-detector computed tomography (CT) techniques. Three subjects with severe craniofacial injury who underwent full face transplantation were included. All subjects underwent a single anastomosis bilaterally of the artery and vein, and the recipient tongue was preserved. Before and after surgery, dynamic volume CT studies were analyzed for vascular anatomy and blood perfusion. Postsurgical CT showed extensive vascular reorganization for external carotid artery (ECA) angiosome; collateral flows from vertebral, ascending pharyngeal or maxillary arteries supplied the branches from the recipient ECAs distal to the ligation. While allograft tissue was slightly less perfused when the facial artery was the only donor artery when compared to an ECA-ECA anastomosis (4.4 ± 0.4% vs. 5.7 ± 0.7%), allograft perfusion was higher than the recipient normal neck tissue. BF for the recipient tongue was maintained from contralateral/donor arteries when the lingual artery was sacrificed. Venous drainage was adequate for all subjects, even when the recipient internal jugular vein was anastomosed in end-to-end fashion on one side. In conclusion, dynamic CT identified adequate BF for facial allografts via extensive vascular reorganization. PMID:24502329

  20. Perfusion computed tomography in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Das, Chandan J; Thingujam, Usha; Panda, Ananya; Sharma, Sanjay; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2015-07-28

    Various imaging modalities are available for the diagnosis, staging and response evaluation of patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC). While contrast enhanced computed tomography (CT) is used as the standard of imaging for size, morphological evaluation and response assessment in RCC, a new functional imaging technique like perfusion CT (pCT), goes down to the molecular level and provides new perspectives in imaging of RCC. pCT depicts regional tumor perfusion and vascular permeability which are indirect parameters of tumor angiogenesis and thereby provides vital information regarding tumor microenvironment. Also response evaluation using pCT may predate the size criteria used in Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors, as changes in the perfusion occurs earlier following tissue kinase inhibitors before any actual change in size. This may potentially help in predicting prognosis, better selection of therapy and more accurate and better response evaluation in patients with RCC. This article describes the techniques and role of pCT in staging and response assessment in patients with RCCs. PMID:26217456

  1. Lung Ventilation/Perfusion Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is a Lung Ventilation/Perfusion Scan? A lung ventilation/perfusion scan, or VQ scan, is a ... that measures air and blood flow in your lungs. A VQ scan most often is used to ...

  2. Measuring perfusion with light (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Sanne M. A.; de Bruin, Daniel M.; Faber, Dirk J.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.

    2016-03-01

    There is no gold standard test for perfusion evaluation in surgery. Optical Imaging techniques are able to image tissue at high resolution and in real-time. Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging, Optical Coherence Tomography, Sidestream Darkfield and Incident Darkfield all use the interaction of light with tissue to create an image. To test their feasibility and explore validity in a controlled setting, we created a phantom with the optical properties of tissue and microvascular channels of 30-400 micrometer. With a Hamilton Syringe Pump we mimicked blood flow velocities of 0-20 mm/sec. Images of all different modalities at different blood flow velocities were compared in terms of imaging depth, resoluation and hemodynamic parameters.

  3. Hydrogels for Engineering of Perfusable Vascular Networks

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Juan; Zheng, Huaiyuan; Poh, Patrina S. P.; Machens, Hans-Günther; Schilling, Arndt F.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogels are commonly used biomaterials for tissue engineering. With their high-water content, good biocompatibility and biodegradability they resemble the natural extracellular environment and have been widely used as scaffolds for 3D cell culture and studies of cell biology. The possible size of such hydrogel constructs with embedded cells is limited by the cellular demand for oxygen and nutrients. For the fabrication of large and complex tissue constructs, vascular structures become necessary within the hydrogels to supply the encapsulated cells. In this review, we discuss the types of hydrogels that are currently used for the fabrication of constructs with embedded vascular networks, the key properties of hydrogels needed for this purpose and current techniques to engineer perfusable vascular structures into these hydrogels. We then discuss directions for future research aimed at engineering of vascularized tissue for implantation. PMID:26184185

  4. Is a vegetarian diet adequate for children.

    PubMed

    Hackett, A; Nathan, I; Burgess, L

    1998-01-01

    The number of people who avoid eating meat is growing, especially among young people. Benefits to health from a vegetarian diet have been reported in adults but it is not clear to what extent these benefits are due to diet or to other aspects of lifestyles. In children concern has been expressed concerning the adequacy of vegetarian diets especially with regard to growth. The risks/benefits seem to be related to the degree of restriction of he diet; anaemia is probably both the main and the most serious risk but this also applies to omnivores. Vegan diets are more likely to be associated with malnutrition, especially if the diets are the result of authoritarian dogma. Overall, lacto-ovo-vegetarian children consume diets closer to recommendations than omnivores and their pre-pubertal growth is at least as good. The simplest strategy when becoming vegetarian may involve reliance on vegetarian convenience foods which are not necessarily superior in nutritional composition. The vegetarian sector of the food industry could do more to produce foods closer to recommendations. Vegetarian diets can be, but are not necessarily, adequate for children, providing vigilance is maintained, particularly to ensure variety. Identical comments apply to omnivorous diets. Three threats to the diet of children are too much reliance on convenience foods, lack of variety and lack of exercise. PMID:9670174

  5. Gluconeogenesis in the perfused rat liver.

    PubMed

    Hems, R; Ross, B D; Berry, M N; Krebs, H A

    1966-11-01

    1. A modification of the methods of Miller and of Schimassek for the perfusion of the isolated rat liver, suitable for the study of gluconeogenesis, is described. 2. The main modifications concern the operative technique (reducing the period of anoxia during the operation to 3min.) and the use of aged (non-glycolysing) red cells in the semi-synthetic perfusion medium. 3. The performance of the perfused liver was tested by measuring the rate of gluconeogenesis, of urea synthesis and the stability of adenine nucleotides. Higher rates of gluconeogenesis (1mumole/min./g.) from excess of lactate and of urea synthesis from excess of ammonia (4mumoles/min./g. in the presence of ornithine) were observed than are likely to occur in vivo where rates are limited by the rate of supply of precursor. The concentrations of the three adenine nucleotides in the liver tissue were maintained within 15% over a perfusion period of 135min. 4. Ca(2+), Na(+), K(+), Mg(2+) and phosphate were found to be required at physiological concentrations for optimum gluconeogenesis but bicarbonate and carbon dioxide could be largely replaced by phosphate buffer without affecting the rate of gluconeogenesis. 5. Maximal gluconeogenesis did not decrease maximal urea synthesis in the presence of ornithine and ammonia and vice versa. This indicates that the energy requirements were not limiting the rates of gluconeogenesis or of urea synthesis. 6. Addition of lactate, and especially ammonium salts, increased the uptake of oxygen more than expected on the basis of the ATP requirements of the gluconeogenesis and urea synthesis. PMID:5966267

  6. An Appeal to Standardize CT- and MR-Perfusion.

    PubMed

    Turowski, B; Schramm, P

    2015-10-01

    Multiple treatment options and risk assessment in cerebrovascular diseases are the actual challenges in diagnostic as well as in interventional neuroradiology.Acute ischemic stroke essentially requires rapid detection of the location and extent of infarction and tissue at risk for making treatment decisions. In the acute setting, modern multiparametric perfusion imaging protocols help to determine infarct core and adjacent penumbral tissue, and they enable the estimation of collateral flow of intra- and extracranial arteries. In subacute delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) or chronic occlusive neurovascular diseases estimation of residual and collateral flow may be even more difficult.Prediction of sufficient or insufficient supply of brain tissue may be essential to balance conservative against interventional therapies. However, so far no established reliable thresholds are available for determining tissue at acute, subacute, chronic progressive, or chronic risk.Reliable and reproducible thresholds require quantitative perfusion measurements with a calibrated instrument. But the measurement instrument is not at all defined-a variety of parameter settings, different algorithms based on multiple assumptions and a wide variety of published normal and pathologic values for perfusion parameters indicate the problem. In the following text, we explain how deep the problem may be enrooted within techniques and algorithms impeding broad use of perfusion for many clinical issues. PMID:26289412

  7. A panel data set on harvest and perfusion decellularization of porcine rectus abdominis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Cheng, Wen Yue; Hu, Zhi Qian; Turner, Neill J; Zhang, Li; Wang, Qiang; Badylak, Stephen F

    2016-06-01

    In this dataset, we particularly depicted the harvest and perfusion decellularization of porcine rectus abdominis (RA), accompanied with displaying of the retained vascular trees within the perfusion-decellularized skeletal muscle matrix (pM-ECM) using vascular corrosion casting. In addition, several important tips for successful pM-ECM preparation were emphasized, which including using anatomically isolated skeletal muscle as tissue source with all main feeding and draining vessels perfused, preserving the internal microcirculation availability, aseptic technique and pyrogen free in all steps, sequential perfusion via artery or vein, and longtime washing after decellularization. The data are supplemental to our original research article describing detailed associations of pM-ECM as a clinically relevant scale, three-dimensional scaffold with a vascular network template for tissue-specific regeneration, "Perfusion-decellularized skeletal muscle as a three-dimensional scaffold with a vascular network template" Zhang et al. (2016) [1]. PMID:27158653

  8. A panel data set on harvest and perfusion decellularization of porcine rectus abdominis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Cheng, Wen Yue; Hu, Zhi Qian; Turner, Neill J.; Zhang, Li; Wang, Qiang; Badylak, Stephen F.

    2016-01-01

    In this dataset, we particularly depicted the harvest and perfusion decellularization of porcine rectus abdominis (RA), accompanied with displaying of the retained vascular trees within the perfusion-decellularized skeletal muscle matrix (pM-ECM) using vascular corrosion casting. In addition, several important tips for successful pM-ECM preparation were emphasized, which including using anatomically isolated skeletal muscle as tissue source with all main feeding and draining vessels perfused, preserving the internal microcirculation availability, aseptic technique and pyrogen free in all steps, sequential perfusion via artery or vein, and longtime washing after decellularization. The data are supplemental to our original research article describing detailed associations of pM-ECM as a clinically relevant scale, three-dimensional scaffold with a vascular network template for tissue-specific regeneration, “Perfusion-decellularized skeletal muscle as a three-dimensional scaffold with a vascular network template” Zhang et al. (2016) [1]. PMID:27158653

  9. Optimization of an Isolated Perfused Rainbow Trout Liver Model: Clearance Studies with 7-Ethoxycoumarin

    EPA Science Inventory

    Isolated trout livers were perfused using methods designed to preserve tissue viability and function. Liver performance was evaluated by measuring O2 consumption (VO2), vascular resistance, K+ leakage, glucose flux, lactate flux, alanine aminotransferase (ALT) leakage, and meta...

  10. Ex vivo lung perfusion.

    PubMed

    Machuca, Tiago N; Cypel, Marcelo

    2014-08-01

    Lung transplantation (LTx) is an established treatment option for eligible patients with end-stage lung disease. Nevertheless, the imbalance between suitable donor lungs available and the increasing number of patients considered for LTx reflects in considerable waitlist mortality. Among potential alternatives to address this issue, ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) has emerged as a modern preservation technique that allows for more accurate lung assessment and also improvement of lung function. Its application in high-risk donor lungs has been successful and resulted in safe expansion of the donor pool. This article will: (I) review the technical details of EVLP; (II) the rationale behind the method; (III) report the worldwide clinical experience with the EVLP, including the Toronto technique and others; (IV) finally, discuss the growing literature on EVLP application for donation after cardiac death (DCD) lungs. PMID:25132972

  11. Ex vivo lung perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Machuca, Tiago N.

    2014-01-01

    Lung transplantation (LTx) is an established treatment option for eligible patients with end-stage lung disease. Nevertheless, the imbalance between suitable donor lungs available and the increasing number of patients considered for LTx reflects in considerable waitlist mortality. Among potential alternatives to address this issue, ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) has emerged as a modern preservation technique that allows for more accurate lung assessment and also improvement of lung function. Its application in high-risk donor lungs has been successful and resulted in safe expansion of the donor pool. This article will: (I) review the technical details of EVLP; (II) the rationale behind the method; (III) report the worldwide clinical experience with the EVLP, including the Toronto technique and others; (IV) finally, discuss the growing literature on EVLP application for donation after cardiac death (DCD) lungs. PMID:25132972

  12. Adenosine thallium 201 myocardial perfusion scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Verani, M.S. )

    1991-07-01

    Pharmacologic coronary vasodilation as an adjunct to myocardial perfusion imaging has become increasingly important in the evaluation of patients with coronary artery disease, in view of the large number of patients who cannot perform an adequate exercise test or in whom contraindications render exercise inappropriate. Adenosine is a very potent coronary vasodilator and when combined with thallium 201 scintigraphy produces images of high quality, with the added advantages of a very short half-life (less than 10 seconds) and the ability to adjust the dose during the infusion, which may enhance safety and curtail the duration of side effects. The reported sensitivity and specificity of adenosine thallium 201 scintigraphy for the detection of coronary artery disease are high and at least comparable with imaging after exercise or dipyridamole administration. 23 refs.

  13. Blue Laser Light Increases Perfusion of a Skin Flap Via Release of Nitric Oxide from Hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Mittermayr, Rainer; Osipov, Anatoly; Piskernik, Christina; Haindl, Susanne; Dungel, Peter; Weber, Carina; Vladimirov, Yuri A; Redl, Heinz; Kozlov, Andrey V

    2007-01-01

    It has recently been shown that nitrosyl complexes of hemoglobin (NO-Hb) are sensitive to low-level blue laser irradiation, suggesting that laser irradiation can facilitate the release of biologically active nitric oxide (NO), which can affect tissue perfusion. The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic value of blue laser irradiation for local tissue perfusion after surgical intervention. Blood was withdrawn from a rat, exposed to NO and infused back to the same rat or used for in vitro experiments. In vitro, an increase of NO-Hb levels (electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy) up to 15 μM in rat blood did not result in the release of detectable amounts of NO (NO selective electrode). Blue laser irradiation of NO-Hb in blood caused decomposition of NO-Hb complexes and release of free NO. Systemic infusion of NO-Hb in rats affected neither systemic circulation (mean arterial pressure) nor local tissue perfusion (Doppler blood flow imaging system). In contrast, a clear enhancement of local tissue perfusion was observed in epigastric flap when elevated NO-Hb levels in blood were combined with local He-Cd laser irradiation focused on the left epigastric artery. The enhancement of regional tissue perfusion was not accompanied by any detectable changes in systemic circulation. This study demonstrates that blue laser irradiation improves local tissue perfusion in a controlled manner stimulating NO release from NO-Hb complexes. PMID:17515954

  14. Whole ovine ovaries as a model for human: perfusion with cryoprotectants in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Isachenko, Vladimir; Rahimi, Gohar; Dattena, Maria; Mallmann, Peter; Baikoshkarova, Saltanat; Kellerwessel, Elisabeth; Otarbaev, Marat; Shalakhmetova, Tamara; Isachenko, Evgenia

    2014-01-01

    These experiments were performed to test the perfusion of ovine as a model for human ovaries by cryoprotectants in vivo at high temperature when the permeability of capillaries is high and when blood is insensibly replaced by the solution of cryoprotectants. By our hypothetical supposition, ovaries could be saturated by cryoprotectants before their surgical removal. The objective was to examine the effectiveness of perfusion of ovine ovaries with vascular pedicle in vivo and in vitro. Arteria ovarica was cannuled and ovaries were perfused by Leibovitz L-15 medium + 100 IU/mL heparin + 5% bovine calf serum + 6% dimethyl sulfoxide + 6% ethylene glycol + 0.15 M sucrose + Indian ink in vivo and in vitro. In the first and second cycle of experiments, ovaries (n = 13 and n = 23) were perfused in vivo and in vitro, respectively, during 60 min with the rate of perfusion 50 mL/h (0.8 mL/min). It was established with in vivo perfusion that only about 10% of ovarian tissues were perfused due to an appearance of multiple anastomoses when the perfusion medium goes from arteria ovarica to arteria uterina without inflow into the ovaries. It was concluded that in vitro perfusion of ovine intact ovaries with vascular pedicle by freezing medium is more effective than this manipulation performed in vivo. PMID:24701576

  15. Rate of change in central corneal thickness: a viability indicator for conventional drainage tissues in organ culture.

    PubMed

    Wan, Z; Brigatti, L; Ranger-Moore, J; Ethier, C R; Stamer, W D

    2006-06-01

    Organ culture of human anterior segments is a powerful tool for understanding trabecular meshwork biology. However, data from a significant percentage of cultured anterior segments are unusable because tissues fail to meet quality control requirements, such as having adequate trabecular meshwork histology. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate a novel, real time method for assessing the viability of conventional drainage tissues in the human anterior segment perfusion model. Twenty-two human anterior segments were perfusion cultured using standard techniques for one week while measuring outflow facility and central corneal thickness (CCT). After perfusion-fixation, toludine blue-stained histological sections of drainage tissues from all four quadrants of each anterior segment were graded and endothelial cell nuclei from cornea centers were stained with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole and counted. We found that most anterior segments with a stable outflow facility had a CCT that decreased over time, while anterior segments with an unstable outflow facility had CCT measurements that failed to decrease over time (P<0.01). When comparing CCT measurements to histological appearance of outflow tissues, we found that in 11/11 cases, anterior segments with an acceptable histological score had a negative CCT slope (P<0.01). Conversely in 3/4 instances, anterior segments with an unacceptable histological score had a positive CCT slope. Lastly, we observed a significant relationship between CCT measurements and corneal endothelial density (P<0.01). Thus, the simple procedure of measuring CCT during anterior segment perfusion provides a second useful measure to assess the viability of the anterior segment during the perfusion process. PMID:16466713

  16. Modelling Brain Temperature and Perfusion for Cerebral Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blowers, Stephen; Valluri, Prashant; Marshall, Ian; Andrews, Peter; Harris, Bridget; Thrippleton, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Brain temperature relies heavily on two aspects: i) blood perfusion and porous heat transport through tissue and ii) blood flow and heat transfer through embedded arterial and venous vasculature. Moreover brain temperature cannot be measured directly unless highly invasive surgical procedures are used. A 3D two-phase fluid-porous model for mapping flow and temperature in brain is presented with arterial and venous vessels extracted from MRI scans. Heat generation through metabolism is also included. The model is robust and reveals flow and temperature maps in unprecedented 3D detail. However, the Karmen-Kozeny parameters of the porous (tissue) phase need to be optimised for expected perfusion profiles. In order to optimise the K-K parameters a reduced order two-phase model is developed where 1D vessels are created with a tree generation algorithm embedded inside a 3D porous domain. Results reveal that blood perfusion is a strong function of the porosity distribution in the tissue. We present a qualitative comparison between the simulated perfusion maps and those obtained clinically. We also present results studying the effect of scalp cooling on core brain temperature and preliminary results agree with those observed clinically.

  17. Short inhalation exposures of the isolated and perfused rat lung to respirable dry particle aerosols; the detailed pharmacokinetics of budesonide, formoterol, and terbutaline.

    PubMed

    Ewing, Per; Eirefelt, Stefan J; Andersson, Paul; Blomgren, Anders; Ryrfeldt, Ake; Gerde, Per

    2008-06-01

    There is an increasing interest in using the lung as a route of entry for both local and systemic administration of drugs. However, because adequate technologies have been missing in the preclinical setting, few investigators have addressed the detailed disposition of drugs in the lung following short inhalation exposures to highly concentrated dry powder aerosols. New methods are needed to explore the disposition of drugs after short inhalation exposures, thus mimicking a future clinical use. Our aim was to study the pulmonary disposition of budesonide, formoterol, and terbutaline, which are clinically used for the treatment of bronchial asthma. Using the recently developed DustGun aerosol technology, we exposed by inhalation for approximately 1 min the isolated and perfused rat lung (IPL) to respirable dry particle aerosols of the three drugs at high concentrations. The typical aerosol concentration was 1 mug/mL, and the particle size distribution of the tested substances varied with a MMAD ranging from 2.3 to 5.3 mum. The IPL was perfused in single pass mode and repeated samples of the perfusate were taken for up to 80 min postexposure. The concentration of drug in perfusate and in lung extracts was measured using LC-MS/MS. The deposited dose was determined by adding the amounts of drug collected in perfusate to the amount extracted from the tissues at 80 min. Deposited amounts of budesonide, formoterol fumarate, and terbutaline sulphate were 23 +/- 17, 36 +/- 8, and 60 +/- 3.2 mug (mean +/- SD, n = 3), respectively. Retention in lung tissues at the end of the perfusion period expressed as fraction of deposited dose was 0.19 +/- 0.05, 0.19 +/- 0.06, and 0.04 +/- 0.01 (mean +/- SD, n = 3) for budesonide, formoterol, and terbutaline, respectively. Each short inhalation exposure to the highly concentrated aerosols consumed 1-3 mg powder. Hence, this system can be particularly useful for obtaining a detailed pharmacokinetic characterization of inhaled compounds in

  18. Parametric perfusion imaging based on low-cost ultrasound platform.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xiaolin; Zhong, Hui; Wan, Mingxi; Hu, Xiaowen; Lv, Dan; Shen, Liang; Zhang, Xiaomei

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we attempted to implement parametric perfusion imaging to quantify blood perfusion based on modified low-cost ultrasound platform. A novel ultrasound contrast-specific imaging method called pulse-inversion harmonic sum-squared-differences (PIHSSD) was proposed for improving the sensitivity for detecting contrast agents and the accuracy of parametric perfusion imaging, which combined pulse-inversion harmonic (PIH) with pulse-inversion sum-squared-differences (PISSD) threshold-based decision. PIHSSD method just involved simple operations including addition and multiplication and was easy to realize. The sequences of contrast images without logarithmic compression were used to acquire time intensity curves (TICs) from numerous equal-sized regions-of-interest (ROI) covering the entire image plane. Parametric perfusion images were obtained based on the parameters extracted from the TICs, including peak value (PV), area under curve (AUC), mean transit time (MTT), peak value time (PVT), peak width (PW) and climbing rate (CR). Flow phantom was used for validation and the results suggested that PIHSSD method provided 9.6 to 20.3 dB higher contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) than PIH method. The results of the experiments of rabbit kidney also showed that the CTR of PIHSSD images was higher than that of PIH images, and the parametric perfusion images based on PIHSSD method provided more accurate quantification of blood perfusion compared with those based on PIH and PISSD methods. It demonstrated that the parametric perfusion imaging achieved good performance though implemented on low-cost ultrasound platform. (E-mail: mxwan@mail.xjtu.edu.cn). PMID:19931972

  19. Laser-induced macular holes demonstrate impaired choroidal perfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Jeremiah, Jr.; Allen, Ronald D.; Zwick, Harry; Schuschereba, Steven T.; Lund, David J.; Stuck, Bruce E.

    2003-06-01

    Choroidal perfusion was evaluated following the creation of a laser induced macular hole in a nonhuman primate model. Two Rhesus monkeys underwent macular exposures delivered by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. The lesions were evaluated with fluorescein angiography and indocyanine green (ICG) angiography . Each lesion produced vitreous hemorrhage and progressed to a full thickness macular hole. ICG angiography revealed no perfusion of the choriocapillaris beneath the lesion centers. Histopathologic evaluation showed replacement of the choriocapillaris with fibroblasts and connective tissue. Nd:YAG, laser-induced macular holes result in long term impairment of choroidal perfusion at the base of the hole due to choroidal scarring and obliteration of the choriocapillaris.

  20. A numerical analysis of a focused ultrasound technique to measure perfusion.

    PubMed

    Anderson, G T; Ye, X

    1994-05-01

    A noninvasive technique to measure perfusion using a focused ultrasound heating source and a thermistor placed on the surface of a tissue is proposed. The method is numerically examined in a model of the canine kidney. The perfusion measurement is shown to depend on several transducer and tissue thermal properties. A two level fractional factorial design simulation is used to map out a parameter value combination that maximizes the sensitivity of the measurement. A technique to numerically assess the uncertainty in the measurement due to uncertainties in the tissue and transducer parameter values is also described. The effects of the medulla and a subcapsular surface layer in the kidney are examined. It is determined that the maximum error in the measured perfusion rate due to all the factors considered is 17 percent for a kidney with a nominal perfusion rate of 300 mL/100g-min and a surface layer of 0.04 cm thickness. PMID:8078324

  1. Modelling of temperature and perfusion during scalp cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, F. E. M.; Van Leeuwen, G. M. J.; Van Steenhoven, A. A.

    2005-09-01

    Hair loss is a feared side effect of chemotherapy treatment. It may be prevented by cooling the scalp during administration of cytostatics. The supposed mechanism is that by cooling the scalp, both temperature and perfusion are diminished, affecting drug supply and drug uptake in the hair follicle. However, the effect of scalp cooling varies strongly. To gain more insight into the effect of cooling, a computer model has been developed that describes heat transfer in the human head during scalp cooling. Of main interest in this study are the mutual influences of scalp temperature and perfusion during cooling. Results of the standard head model show that the temperature of the scalp skin is reduced from 34.4 °C to 18.3 °C, reducing tissue blood flow to 25%. Based upon variations in both thermal properties and head anatomies found in the literature, a parameter study was performed. The results of this parameter study show that the most important parameters affecting both temperature and perfusion are the perfusion coefficient Q10 and the thermal resistances of both the fat and the hair layer. The variations in the parameter study led to skin temperature ranging from 10.1 °C to 21.8 °C, which in turn reduced relative perfusion to 13% and 33%, respectively.

  2. Hyperventilation induces release of cytokines from perfused mouse lung.

    PubMed

    von Bethmann, A N; Brasch, F; Nüsing, R; Vogt, K; Volk, H D; Müller, K M; Wendel, A; Uhlig, S

    1998-01-01

    Artificial mechanical ventilation represents a major cause of iatrogenic lung damage in intensive care. It is largely unknown which mediators, if any, contribute to the onset of such complications. We investigated whether stress caused by artificial mechanical ventilation leads to induction, synthesis, and release of cytokines or eicosanoids from lung tissue. We used the isolated perfused and ventilated mouse lung where frequent perfusate sampling allows determination of mediator release into the perfusate. Hyperventilation was executed with either negative (NPV) or positive pressure ventilation (PPV) at a transpulmonary pressure that was increased 2.5-fold above normal. Both modes of hyperventilation resulted in an approximately 1.75-fold increased expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) mRNA, but not of cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA. After switching to hyperventilation, prostacyclin release into the perfusate increased almost instantaneously from 19 +/- 17 pg/min to 230 +/- 160 pg/min (PPV) or 115 +/- 87 pg/min (NPV). The enhancement in TNFalpha and IL-6 production developed more slowly. In control lungs after 150 min of perfusion and ventilation, TNFalpha and IL-6 production was 23 +/- 20 pg/min and 330 +/- 210 pg/min, respectively. In lungs hyperventilated for 150 min, TNFalpha and IL-6 production were increased to 287 +/- 180 pg/min and more than 1,000 pg/min, respectively. We conclude that artificial ventilation might cause pulmonary and systemic adverse reactions by inducing the release of mediators into the circulation. PMID:9445308

  3. Hydrostatic determinants of cerebral perfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, E.M.; Traystman, R.J.

    1986-05-01

    We examined the cerebral blood flow response to alterations in perfusion pressure mediated through decreases in mean arterial pressure, increases in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure, and increases in jugular venous (JV) pressure in 42 pentobarbital anesthetized dogs. Each of these three pressures was independently controlled. Cerebral perfusion pressure was defined as mean arterial pressure minus JV or CSF pressure, depending on which was greater. Mean hemispheric blood flow was measured with the radiolabeled microsphere technique. Despite 30-mm Hg reductions in mean arterial pressure or increases in CSF or JV pressure, CBF did not change as long as the perfusion pressure remained greater than approximately 60 mm Hg. However, whenever perfusion pressure was reduced to an average of 48 mm Hg, cerebral blood flow decreased 27% to 33%. These results demonstrate the capacity of the cerebral vascular bed to respond similarly to changes in the perfusion pressure gradient obtained by decreasing mean arterial pressure, increasing JV pressure or increasing CSF pressure, and thereby support the above definition of cerebral perfusion pressure.

  4. Motility patterns of ex vivo intestine segments depend on perfusion mode

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Dominik; Jost, Viktor; Bischof, Michael; Seebach, Kristina; Lammers, Wim JEP; Douglas, Rees; Schäfer, Karl-Herbert

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate and characterize motility patterns from small intestinal gut segments depending on different perfusion media and pressures. METHODS: Experiments were carried out in a custom designed perfusion chamber system to validate and standardise the perfusion technique used. The perfusion chamber was built with a transparent front wall allowing for optical motility recordings and a custom made fastener to hold the intestinal segments. Experiments with different perfusion and storage media combined with different luminal pressures were carried out to evaluate the effects on rat small intestine motility. Software tools which enable the visualization and characterization of intestinal motility in response to different stimuli were used to evaluate the videotaped experiments. The data collected was presented in so called heatmaps thus providing a concise overview of form and strength of contractility patterns. Furthermore, the effect of different storage media on tissue quality was evaluated. Haematoxylin-Eosin stainings were used to compare tissue quality depending on storage and perfusion mode. RESULTS: Intestinal motility is characterized by different repetitive motility patterns, depending on the actual situation of the gut. Different motility patterns could be recorded and characterized depending on the perfusion pressure and media used. We were able to describe at least three different repetitive patterns of intestinal motility in vitro. Patterns with an oral, anal and oro-anal propagation direction could be recorded. Each type of pattern finalized its movement with or without a subsequent distension of the wavefront. Motility patterns could clearly be distinguished in heatmap diagrams. Furthermore undirected motility could be observed. The quantity of the different patterns varies and is highly dependent on the perfusion medium used. Tissue preservation varies depending on the perfusion medium utilized, therefore media with a simple composition as Tyrode

  5. CAD of myocardial perfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storm, Corstiaan J.; Slump, Cornelis H.

    2007-03-01

    Our purpose is in the automated evaluation of the physiological relevance of lesions in coronary angiograms. We aim to extract as much as possible quantitative information about the physiological condition of the heart from standard angiographic image sequences. Coronary angiography is still the gold standard for evaluating and diagnosing coronary abnormalities as it is able to locate precisely the coronary artery lesions. The dimensions of the stenosis can be assessed nowadays successfully with image processing based Quantitative Coronary Angiography (QCA) techniques. Our purpose is to assess the clinical relevance of the pertinent stenosis. We therefore analyze the myocardial perfusion as revealed in standard angiographic image sequences. In a Region-of-Interest (ROI) on the angiogram (without an overlaying major blood vessel) the contrast is measured as a function of time (the so-called time-density curve). The required hyperemic state of exercise is induced artificially by the injection of a vasodilator drug e.g. papaverine. In order to minimize motion artifacts we select based on the recorded ECG signal end-diastolic images in both a basal and a hyperemic run in the same projection to position the ROI. We present the development of the algorithms together with results of a small study of 20 patients which have been catheterized following the standard protocol.

  6. Brief ex vivo perfusion with heparinized and/or citrated whole blood enhances tolerance of free muscle flaps to prolonged ischemia.

    PubMed

    Fowler, J D; Li, X; Cooley, B C

    1999-01-01

    This study investigated the use of heparinized and/or citrated whole blood as a perfusate for enhancing muscle tolerance to warm ischemia. Unilateral cutaneous trunci muscle flaps were harvested from Sprague-Dawley rats and stored for 10 hr at 22-24 degrees C prior to transplantation to the groin. One group served as a non-perfused control. In three experimental groups, the flaps were hand-perfused ex vivo with 1.0 ml of heparinized, citrated, or heparinized and citrated autogenous whole blood at physiological pressures. Perfusion was administered over a 10-min period 5 hr into the ischemic period. Flaps were revascularized on the femoral vessels and then harvested 48 hr following revascularization. Tissue injury was assessed by calculation of flap weight change (indicator of tissue edema), histochemical evaluation of muscle dehydrogenase activity (nitroblue tetrazolium assay), and light microscopy. All perfused groups had significantly higher muscle dehydrogenase activity compared with non-perfused controls (P < 0.005). Perfusion with combined heparin-citrated blood was significantly more protective than perfusion with either anticoagulant alone (P < 0.025). The only statistically significant reduction in percent flap edema was seen in the combined heparin-citrate perfusion of flaps compared with nonperfused controls (P < 0.05). Histologic evaluation confirmed a reduction in tissue edema in the perfused flaps. We conclude that mid-ischemic perfusion with heparinized and/or citrated blood limits the deleterious effects of extended warm ischemia. PMID:10231122

  7. A recapitulative three-dimensional model of breast carcinoma requires perfusion for multi-week growth

    PubMed Central

    Goliwas, Kayla F; Marshall, Lauren E; Ransaw, Evette L; Berry, Joel L; Frost, Andra R

    2016-01-01

    Breast carcinomas are complex, three-dimensional tissues composed of cancer epithelial cells and stromal components, including fibroblasts and extracellular matrix. In vitro models that more faithfully recapitulate this dimensionality and stromal microenvironment should more accurately elucidate the processes driving carcinogenesis, tumor progression, and therapeutic response. Herein, novel in vitro breast carcinoma surrogates, distinguished by a relevant dimensionality and stromal microenvironment, are described and characterized. A perfusion bioreactor system was used to deliver medium to surrogates containing engineered microchannels and the effects of perfusion, medium composition, and the method of cell incorporation and density of initial cell seeding on the growth and morphology of surrogates were assessed. Perfused surrogates demonstrated significantly greater cell density and proliferation and were more histologically recapitulative of human breast carcinoma than surrogates maintained without perfusion. Although other parameters of the surrogate system, such as medium composition and cell seeding density, affected cell growth, perfusion was the most influential parameter. PMID:27516850

  8. A recapitulative three-dimensional model of breast carcinoma requires perfusion for multi-week growth.

    PubMed

    Goliwas, Kayla F; Marshall, Lauren E; Ransaw, Evette L; Berry, Joel L; Frost, Andra R

    2016-01-01

    Breast carcinomas are complex, three-dimensional tissues composed of cancer epithelial cells and stromal components, including fibroblasts and extracellular matrix. In vitro models that more faithfully recapitulate this dimensionality and stromal microenvironment should more accurately elucidate the processes driving carcinogenesis, tumor progression, and therapeutic response. Herein, novel in vitro breast carcinoma surrogates, distinguished by a relevant dimensionality and stromal microenvironment, are described and characterized. A perfusion bioreactor system was used to deliver medium to surrogates containing engineered microchannels and the effects of perfusion, medium composition, and the method of cell incorporation and density of initial cell seeding on the growth and morphology of surrogates were assessed. Perfused surrogates demonstrated significantly greater cell density and proliferation and were more histologically recapitulative of human breast carcinoma than surrogates maintained without perfusion. Although other parameters of the surrogate system, such as medium composition and cell seeding density, affected cell growth, perfusion was the most influential parameter. PMID:27516850

  9. MR Perfusion Imaging in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Copen, William A.; Schaefer, Pamela W.; Wu, Ona

    2011-01-01

    MR perfusion imaging offers the potential for measuring brain perfusion in acute stroke patients, at a time when treatment decisions based upon these measurements may affect outcomes dramatically. Rapid advancements in both acute stroke therapy and perfusion imaging techniques have resulted in continuing redefinition of the role that perfusion imaging should play in patient management. This review first discusses the basic pathophysiology of acute stroke, with specific attention to alterations in the various perfusion-related parameters that can be studied by MR perfusion imaging. Although these parameters are sometimes treated as somewhat interchangeable, they reveal greatly different information about brain perfusion. Therefore, subsequent discussion of the utility of different kinds of perfusion images focuses on the differences between them, as well as important artifacts that can complicate their interpretation. Finally, research on the continually evolving role of MR perfusion imaging in acute stroke care is summarized. PMID:21640299

  10. 21 CFR 201.5 - Drugs; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drugs; adequate directions for use. 201.5 Section...) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 201.5 Drugs; adequate directions for use. Adequate directions for use means directions under which the layman can use a drug safely and for the purposes...

  11. 21 CFR 201.5 - Drugs; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Drugs; adequate directions for use. 201.5 Section...) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 201.5 Drugs; adequate directions for use. Adequate directions for use means directions under which the layman can use a drug safely and for the purposes...

  12. 4 CFR 200.14 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 4 Accounts 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. 200.14 Section 200.14 Accounts RECOVERY ACCOUNTABILITY AND TRANSPARENCY BOARD PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 200.14 Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. The Board has the responsibility for maintaining adequate technical, physical, and...

  13. 10 CFR 1304.114 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. 1304.114 Section 1304.114 Energy NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 1304.114 Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. The Board has the responsibility for maintaining adequate technical, physical, and security...

  14. 10 CFR 1304.114 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. 1304.114 Section 1304.114 Energy NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 1304.114 Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. The Board has the responsibility for maintaining adequate technical, physical, and security...

  15. 4 CFR 200.14 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 4 Accounts 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. 200....14 Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. The Board has the responsibility for maintaining adequate technical, physical, and security safeguards to prevent unauthorized disclosure...

  16. Dynamic CT head phantom for perfusion and angiography studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, K.; Blazeski, A.; Dannecker, K.; Lee, Q. Y.; Holscher, C.; Donahue, C.; van Kampen, W.

    2010-03-01

    Contrast imaging is a compelling enhancement for the portable, flat panel-based brain CT scanner currently under development at Xoran. Due to the relative low temporal resolution of flat panel detectors, enabling tomographic imaging on such platform requires optimizing the imaging and injection protocols. A dynamic CT head phantom was designed to facilitate this task. The Dynamic Perfusion and Angiography Model (PAM), mimics tissue attenuation in CT images, provides physiological timing for angiography and perfusion studies, and moves fluid with properties similar to those of blood. The design consists of an arterial system, which contains bifurcating vessels that feed into perfusion chambers, mimicking blood flow through capillaries and smaller vessels, and a venous system, which is symmetrical to the arterial side and drains the perfusion chambers. The variation of geometry and flow rate in the phantom provides the physiological total time that fluid spends in the head, and the difference in material densities correlates to CT numbers for biological tissues. This paper discusses the design of Dynamic PAM and shows experimental results demonstrating its ability to realistically simulate blood flow. Results of dynamic imaging studies of the phantom are also presented.

  17. Optimization of arterial spin labeling MRI for quantitative tumor perfusion in a mouse xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Reshmi; Liang, Jieming; Tang, Mei Yee Annie; Henry, Brian; Chuang, Kai-Hsiang

    2015-08-01

    Perfusion is an important biomarker of tissue function and has been associated with tumor pathophysiology such as angiogenesis and hypoxia. Arterial spin labeling (ASL) MRI allows noninvasive and quantitative imaging of perfusion; however, the application in mouse xenograft tumor models has been challenging due to the low sensitivity and high perfusion heterogeneity. In this study, flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) ASL was optimized for a mouse xenograft tumor. To assess the sensitivity and reliability for measuring low perfusion, the lumbar muscle was used as a reference region. By optimizing the number of averages and inversion times, muscle perfusion as low as 32.4 ± 4.8 (mean ± standard deviation) ml/100 g/min could be measured in 20 min at 7 T with a quantification error of 14.4 ± 9.1%. Applying the optimized protocol, heterogeneous perfusion ranging from 49.5 to 211.2 ml/100 g/min in a renal carcinoma was observed. To understand the relationship with tumor pathology, global and regional tumor perfusion was compared with histological staining of blood vessels (CD34), hypoxia (CAIX) and apoptosis (TUNEL). No correlation was observed when the global tumor perfusion was compared with these pathological parameters. Regional analysis shows that areas of high perfusion had low microvessel density, which was due to larger vessel area compared with areas of low perfusion. Nonetheless, these were not correlated with hypoxia or apoptosis. The results suggest that tumor perfusion may reflect certain aspect of angiogenesis, but its relationship with other pathologies needs further investigation. PMID:26104980

  18. Functional Human Liver Preservation and Recovery by Means of Subnormothermic Machine Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Weeder, Pepijn D.; Sridharan, Gautham V.; Uygun, Basak E.; Karimian, Negin G.; Porte, Robert J.; Markmann, James F.; Yeh, Heidi; Uygun, Korkut

    2015-01-01

    There is currently a severe shortage of liver grafts available for transplantation. Novel organ preservation techniques are needed to expand the pool of donor livers. Machine perfusion of donor liver grafts is an alternative to traditional cold storage of livers and holds much promise as a modality to expand the donor organ pool. We have recently described the potential benefit of subnormothermic machine perfusion of human livers. Machine perfused livers showed improving function and restoration of tissue ATP levels. Additionally, machine perfusion of liver grafts at subnormothermic temperatures allows for objective assessment of the functionality and suitability of a liver for transplantation. In these ways a great many livers that were previously discarded due to their suboptimal quality can be rescued via the restorative effects of machine perfusion and utilized for transplantation. Here we describe this technique of subnormothermic machine perfusion in detail. Human liver grafts allocated for research are perfused via the hepatic artery and portal vein with an acellular oxygenated perfusate at 21 °C. PMID:25938299

  19. Microcirculatory dysfunction and tissue oxygenation in critical illness.

    PubMed

    Østergaard, L; Granfeldt, A; Secher, N; Tietze, A; Iversen, N K; Jensen, M S; Andersen, K K; Nagenthiraja, K; Gutiérrez-Lizardi, P; Mouridsen, K; Jespersen, S N; Tønnesen, E K

    2015-11-01

    Severe sepsis is defined by organ failure, often of the kidneys, heart, and brain. It has been proposed that inadequate delivery of oxygen, or insufficient extraction of oxygen in tissue, may explain organ failure. Despite adequate maintenance of systemic oxygen delivery in septic patients, their morbidity and mortality remain high. The assumption that tissue oxygenation can be preserved by maintaining its blood supply follows from physiological models that only apply to tissue with uniformly perfused capillaries. In sepsis, the microcirculation is profoundly disturbed, and the blood supply of individual organs may therefore no longer reflect their access to oxygen. We review how capillary flow patterns affect oxygen extraction efficacy in tissue, and how the regulation of tissue blood flow must be adjusted to meet the metabolic needs of the tissue as capillary flows become disturbed as observed in critical illness. Using the brain, heart, and kidney as examples, we discuss whether disturbed capillary flow patterns might explain the apparent mismatch between organ blood flow and organ function in sepsis. Finally, we discuss diagnostic means of detecting capillary flow disturbance in animal models and in critically ill patients, and address therapeutic strategies that might improve tissue oxygenation by modifying capillary flow patterns. PMID:26149711

  20. Framework for cognitive analysis of dynamic perfusion computed tomography with visualization of large volumetric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachaj, Tomasz; Ogiela, Marek R.

    2012-10-01

    The proposed framework for cognitive analysis of perfusion computed tomography images is a fusion of image processing, pattern recognition, and image analysis procedures. The output data of the algorithm consists of: regions of perfusion abnormalities, anatomy atlas description of brain tissues, measures of perfusion parameters, and prognosis for infracted tissues. That information is superimposed onto volumetric computed tomography data and displayed to radiologists. Our rendering algorithm enables rendering large volumes on off-the-shelf hardware. This portability of rendering solution is very important because our framework can be run without using expensive dedicated hardware. The other important factors are theoretically unlimited size of rendered volume and possibility of trading of image quality for rendering speed. Such rendered, high quality visualizations may be further used for intelligent brain perfusion abnormality identification, and computer aided-diagnosis of selected types of pathologies.

  1. Preservation of Donor Hearts Using Hypothermic Oxygenated Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Sebastian G.; La Muraglia, Glenn M.; Madariaga, Maria Lucia L.; Titus, James S.; Selig, Martin K.; Farkash, Evan A.; Allan, James S.; Anderson, Lisa M.; Madsen, Joren C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hypothermic machine perfusion of donor hearts enables continuous aerobic metabolism and washout of toxic metabolic byproducts. We evaluated the effect of machine perfusion on cardiac myocyte integrity in hearts preserved for 4 h in a novel device that provides pulsatile oxygenated hypothermic perfusion (Paragonix Sherpa Perfusion™ Cardiac Transport System). Material/Methods Pig hearts were harvested and stored in Celsior® solution for 4 h using either conventional cold storage on ice (4-h CS, n=6) or the Sherpa device (4-h pulsatile perfusion (PP), n=6). After cold preservation, hearts were evaluated using a non-working heart Langendorff system. Controls (n=3) were reperfused immediately after organ harvest. Biopsies were taken from the apex of the left ventricle before storage, after storage, and after reperfusion to measure ATP content and endothelin-1 in the tissue. Ultrastructural analysis using electron microscopy was performed. Results Four-hour CS, 4-h PP, and control group did not show any significant differences in systolic or diastolic function (+dP/dt, −dP/dt, EDP). Four-hour PP hearts showed significantly more weight gain than 4-h CS after preservation, which shows that machine perfusion led to myocardial edema. Four-hour CS led to higher endothelin-1 levels after preservation, suggesting more endothelial dysfunction compared to 4-h PP. Electron microscopy revealed endothelial cell rupture and damaged muscle fibers in the 4-h CS group after reperfusion, but the cell structures were preserved in the 4-h PP group. Conclusions Hypothermic pulsatile perfusion of donor hearts leads to a better-preserved cell structure compared to the conventional cold storage method. This may lead to less risk of primary graft failure after orthotopic heart transplantation. PMID:25139381

  2. CT-perfusion imaging of the human brain: advanced deconvolution analysis using circulant singular value decomposition.

    PubMed

    Wittsack, H J; Wohlschläger, A M; Ritzl, E K; Kleiser, R; Cohnen, M; Seitz, R J; Mödder, U

    2008-01-01

    According to indicator dilution theory tissue time-concentration curves have to be deconvolved with arterial input curves in order to get valid perfusion results. Our aim was to adapt and validate a deconvolution method originating from magnetic resonance techniques and apply it to the calculation of dynamic contrast enhanced computed tomography perfusion imaging. The application of a block-circulant matrix approach for singular value decomposition renders the analysis independent of tracer arrival time to improve the results. PMID:18029143

  3. Retrograde heart perfusion: the Langendorff technique of isolated heart perfusion.

    PubMed

    Bell, Robert M; Mocanu, Mihaela M; Yellon, Derek M

    2011-06-01

    In the late 19th century, a number of investigators were working on perfecting isolated heart model, but it was Oscar Langendorff who, in 1895, pioneered the isolated perfused mammalian heart. Since that time, the Langendorff preparation has evolved and provided a wealth of data underpinning our understanding of the fundamental physiology of the heart: its contractile function, coronary blood flow regulation and cardiac metabolism. In more recent times, the procedure has been used to probe pathophysiology of ischaemia/reperfusion and disease states, and with the dawn of molecular biology and genetic manipulation, the Langendorff perfused heart has remained a stalwart tool in the study of the impact upon the physiology of the heart by pharmacological inhibitors and targeted deletion or up-regulation of genes and their impact upon intracellular signalling and adaption to clinically relevant stressful stimuli. We present here the basic structure of the Langendorff system and the fundamental experimental rules which warrant a viable heart preparation. In addition, we discuss the use of the isolated retrograde perfused heart in the model of ischaemia-reperfusion injury ex-vivo, and its applicability to other areas of study. The Langendorff perfusion apparatus is highly adaptable and this is reflected not only in the procedure's longevity but also in the number of different applications to which it has been turned. PMID:21385587

  4. Photoacoustic perfusion measurements: a comparison with power Doppler in phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heres, H. M.; Arabul, M. Ü.; Tchang, B. C.; van de Vosse, F. N.; Rutten, M. C.; Lopata, R. G.

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound-based measurements using Doppler, contrast, and more recently photoacoustics (PA), have emerged as techniques for tissue perfusion measurements. In this study, the feasibility of in vitro perfusion measurements with a fully integrated, hand-held, photoacoustic probe was investigated and compared to Power Doppler (PD). Three cylindrical polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) phantoms were made (diameter = 15 mm) containing 100, 200 and 400 parallel polysulfone tubes (diameter = 0.2 mm), resulting in a perfused cross-sectional area of 1.8, 3.6 and 7.1% respectively. Each phantom was perfused with porcine blood (15 mL/min). Cross-sectional PA images (λ = 805nm, frame rate = 10Hz) and PD images (PRF = 750Hz) were acquired with a MyLab One and MyLab 70 scanner (Esaote, NL), respectively. Data were averaged over 70 frames. The average PA signal intensity was calculated in a region-of-interest of 4 mm by 6 mm. The percentage of colored PD pixels was measured in the entire phantom region. The average signal intensity of the PA images increased linearly with perfusion density, being 0.54 (+/- 0.01), 0.56 (+/- 0.01), 0.58 (+/- 0.01) with an average background signal of 0.53 in the three phantoms, respectively. For PD, the percentage of colored pixels in the phantom area (1.5% (+/- 0.2%), 4.4% (+/- 0.2%), 13.7% (+/- 0.8%)) also increased linearly. The preliminary results suggest that PA, like PD, is capable of detecting an increase of blood volume in tissue. In the future, in vivo measurements will be explored, although validation will be more complex.

  5. Effects of lung ventilation–perfusion and muscle metabolism–perfusion heterogeneities on maximal O2 transport and utilization

    PubMed Central

    Cano, I; Roca, J; Wagner, P D

    2015-01-01

    Previous models of O2 transport and utilization in health considered diffusive exchange of O2 in lung and muscle, but, reasonably, neglected functional heterogeneities in these tissues. However, in disease, disregarding such heterogeneities would not be justified. Here, pulmonary ventilation–perfusion and skeletal muscle metabolism–perfusion mismatching were added to a prior model of only diffusive exchange. Previously ignored O2 exchange in non-exercising tissues was also included. We simulated maximal exercise in (a) healthy subjects at sea level and altitude, and (b) COPD patients at sea level, to assess the separate and combined effects of pulmonary and peripheral functional heterogeneities on overall muscle O2 uptake ( and on mitochondrial (). In healthy subjects at maximal exercise, the combined effects of pulmonary and peripheral heterogeneities reduced arterial () at sea level by 32 mmHg, but muscle by only 122 ml min−1 (–3.5%). At the altitude of Mt Everest, lung and tissue heterogeneity together reduced by less than 1 mmHg and by 32 ml min−1 (–2.4%). Skeletal muscle heterogeneity led to a wide range of potential among muscle regions, a range that becomes narrower as increases, and in regions with a low ratio of metabolic capacity to blood flow, can exceed that of mixed muscle venous blood. For patients with severe COPD, peak was insensitive to substantial changes in the mitochondrial characteristics for O2 consumption or the extent of muscle heterogeneity. This integrative computational model of O2 transport and utilization offers the potential for estimating profiles of both in health and in diseases such as COPD if the extent for both lung ventilation–perfusion and tissue metabolism–perfusion heterogeneity is known. PMID:25640017

  6. 7 CFR 4290.200 - Adequate capital for RBICs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Adequate capital for RBICs. 4290.200 Section 4290.200 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE AND... Qualifications for the RBIC Program Capitalizing A Rbic § 4290.200 Adequate capital for RBICs. You must meet...

  7. 13 CFR 107.200 - Adequate capital for Licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Adequate capital for Licensees... INVESTMENT COMPANIES Qualifying for an SBIC License Capitalizing An Sbic § 107.200 Adequate capital for... Licensee, and to receive Leverage. (a) You must have enough Regulatory Capital to provide...

  8. 13 CFR 107.200 - Adequate capital for Licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Adequate capital for Licensees... INVESTMENT COMPANIES Qualifying for an SBIC License Capitalizing An Sbic § 107.200 Adequate capital for... Licensee, and to receive Leverage. (a) You must have enough Regulatory Capital to provide...

  9. 7 CFR 4290.200 - Adequate capital for RBICs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Adequate capital for RBICs. 4290.200 Section 4290.200 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE AND... Qualifications for the RBIC Program Capitalizing A Rbic § 4290.200 Adequate capital for RBICs. You must meet...

  10. 10 CFR 1304.114 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. 1304.114 Section 1304.114 Energy NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 1304.114 Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. The Board has the responsibility for maintaining...

  11. 40 CFR 716.25 - Adequate file search.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Adequate file search. 716.25 Section 716.25 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING General Provisions § 716.25 Adequate file search. The scope of...

  12. 40 CFR 51.354 - Adequate tools and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Adequate tools and resources. 51.354... Requirements § 51.354 Adequate tools and resources. (a) Administrative resources. The program shall maintain the administrative resources necessary to perform all of the program functions including...

  13. 40 CFR 51.354 - Adequate tools and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Adequate tools and resources. 51.354... Requirements § 51.354 Adequate tools and resources. (a) Administrative resources. The program shall maintain the administrative resources necessary to perform all of the program functions including...

  14. 40 CFR 51.354 - Adequate tools and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Adequate tools and resources. 51.354... Requirements § 51.354 Adequate tools and resources. (a) Administrative resources. The program shall maintain the administrative resources necessary to perform all of the program functions including...

  15. 40 CFR 51.354 - Adequate tools and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Adequate tools and resources. 51.354... Requirements § 51.354 Adequate tools and resources. (a) Administrative resources. The program shall maintain the administrative resources necessary to perform all of the program functions including...

  16. 40 CFR 716.25 - Adequate file search.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Adequate file search. 716.25 Section... ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING General Provisions § 716.25 Adequate file search. The scope of a person's responsibility to search records is limited to records in the location(s) where the...

  17. 40 CFR 716.25 - Adequate file search.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Adequate file search. 716.25 Section... ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING General Provisions § 716.25 Adequate file search. The scope of a person's responsibility to search records is limited to records in the location(s) where the...

  18. 40 CFR 716.25 - Adequate file search.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Adequate file search. 716.25 Section... ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING General Provisions § 716.25 Adequate file search. The scope of a person's responsibility to search records is limited to records in the location(s) where the...

  19. 40 CFR 716.25 - Adequate file search.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Adequate file search. 716.25 Section... ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING General Provisions § 716.25 Adequate file search. The scope of a person's responsibility to search records is limited to records in the location(s) where the...

  20. 10 CFR 1304.114 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. 1304.114 Section 1304.114 Energy NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 1304.114 Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. The Board has the responsibility for maintaining...

  1. 10 CFR 1304.114 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. 1304.114 Section 1304.114 Energy NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 1304.114 Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. The Board has the responsibility for maintaining...

  2. 10 CFR 503.35 - Inability to obtain adequate capital.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Inability to obtain adequate capital. 503.35 Section 503.35 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS NEW FACILITIES Permanent Exemptions for New Facilities § 503.35 Inability to obtain adequate capital. (a) Eligibility. Section 212(a)(1)(D)...

  3. 10 CFR 503.35 - Inability to obtain adequate capital.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Inability to obtain adequate capital. 503.35 Section 503.35 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS NEW FACILITIES Permanent Exemptions for New Facilities § 503.35 Inability to obtain adequate capital. (a) Eligibility. Section 212(a)(1)(D)...

  4. 15 CFR 970.404 - Adequate exploration plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR EXPLORATION LICENSES Certification of Applications § 970.404 Adequate exploration plan. Before he may certify an application, the Administrator must find... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Adequate exploration plan....

  5. 15 CFR 970.404 - Adequate exploration plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR EXPLORATION LICENSES Certification of Applications § 970.404 Adequate exploration plan. Before he may certify an application, the Administrator must find... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Adequate exploration plan....

  6. "Something Adequate"? In Memoriam Seamus Heaney, Sister Quinlan, Nirbhaya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Seamus Heaney talked of poetry's responsibility to represent the "bloody miracle", the "terrible beauty" of atrocity; to create "something adequate". This article asks, what is adequate to the burning and eating of a nun and the murderous gang rape and evisceration of a medical student? It considers Njabulo…

  7. Steady-state first pass perfusion (SSFPP): A new approach to 3D first-pass myocardial perfusion imaging

    PubMed Central

    Giri, Shivraman; Xue, Hui; Maiseyeu, Andrei; Kroeker, Randall; Rajagopalan, Sanjay; White, Richard D.; Zuehlsdorff, Sven; Raman, Subha V.; Simonetti, Orlando P

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To describe and characterize a new approach to first-pass myocardial perfusion utilizing balanced steady-state free precession acquisition without the use of saturation recovery or other magnetization preparation. Theory The balanced steady-state free precession sequence is inherently sensitive to contrast agent enhancement of the myocardium. This sensitivity can be used to advantage in first-pass myocardial perfusion imaging by eliminating the need for magnetization preparation. Methods Bloch equation simulations, phantom experiments, and in vivo 2D imaging studies were run comparing the proposed technique with three other methods: saturation recovery spoiled gradient echo, saturation recovery steady-state free precession, and steady-state spoiled gradient echo without magnetization preparation. Additionally, an acquisition-reconstruction strategy for 3D perfusion imaging is proposed and initial experience with this approach is demonstrated in healthy subjects and one patient. Results Phantom experiments verified simulation results showing the sensitivity of the balanced steady-state free precession sequence to contrast agent enhancement in solid tissue is similar to that of magnetization-prepared acquisitions. Images acquired in normal volunteers showed the proposed technique provided superior signal and signal-to-noise ratio compared with all other sequences at baseline as well as post-contrast. Conclusion A new approach to first-pass myocardial perfusion is presented that obviates the need for magnetization preparation and provides high signal-to-noise ratio. PMID:23440705

  8. Sublingual microvascular perfusion is altered during normobaric and hyperbaric hyperoxia.

    PubMed

    Milstein, Dan M J; Helmers, Renée; Hackmann, Sanne; Belterman, Charly N W; van Hulst, Robert A; de Lange, Jan

    2016-05-01

    Hyperoxia and hyperbaric oxygen therapy can restore oxygen tensions in tissues distressed by ischemic injury and poor vascularization and is believed to also yield angiogenesis and regulate tissue perfusion. The aim of this study was to develop a model in which hyperoxia-driven microvascular changes could be quantified and to test the hypothesis that microcirculatory responses to both normobaric (NB) and hyperbaric (HB) hyperoxic maneuvers are reversible. Sublingual mucosa microcirculation vessel density, proportion of perfused vessels, vessel diameters, microvascular flow index, macrohemodynamic, and blood gas parameters were examined in male rabbits breathing sequential O2/air mixtures of 21%, 55%, 100%, and return to 21% during NB (1.0bar) and HB (2.5bar) conditions. The results indicate that NB hyperoxia (55% and 100%) produced significant decreases in microvascular density and vascular diameters (p<0.01 and p<0.05, respectively) accompanied by significant increases in systolic and mean arterial blood pressure (p<0.05, respectively) with no changes in blood flow indices when compared to NB normoxia. HB normoxia/hyperoxia resulted in significant decreases in microvascular density (p<0.05), a transient rise in systolic blood pressure at 55% (p<0.01), and no changes in blood vessel diameter and blood flow indices when compared to NB hyperoxia. All microcirculation parameters reverted back to normal values upon return to NB normoxia. We conclude that NB/HB hyperoxia-driven changes elicit reversible physiological control of sublingual mucosa blood perfusion in the presence of steady cardiovascular function and that the absence of microvascular vasoconstriction during HB conditions suggests a beneficial mechanism associated with maintaining peak tissue perfusion states. PMID:26851620

  9. In vivo perfusion assessment of an anastomosis surgery on porcine intestinal model (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Hanh N. D.; Opferman, Justin; Decker, Ryan; Cheon, Gyeong W.; Kim, Peter C. W.; Kang, Jin U.; Krieger, Axel

    2016-04-01

    Anastomosis, the connection of two structures, is a critical procedure for reconstructive surgery with over 1 million cases/year for visceral indication alone. However, complication rates such as strictures and leakage affect up to 19% of cases for colorectal anastomoses and up to 30% for visceral transplantation anastomoses. Local ischemia plays a critical role in anastomotic complications, making blood perfusion an important indicator for tissue health and predictor for healing following anastomosis. In this work, we apply a real time multispectral imaging technique to monitor impact on tissue perfusion due to varying interrupted suture spacing and suture tensions. Multispectral tissue images at 470, 540, 560, 580, 670 and 760 nm are analyzed in conjunction with an empirical model based on diffuse reflectance process to quantify the hemoglobin oxygen saturation within the suture site. The investigated tissues for anastomoses include porcine small (jejunum and ileum) and large (transverse colon) intestines. Two experiments using interrupted suturing with suture spacing of 1, 2, and 3 mm and tension levels from 0 N to 2.5 N are conducted. Tissue perfusion at 5, 10, 20 and 30 min after suturing are recorded and compared with the initial normal state. The result indicates the contrast between healthy and ischemic tissue areas and assists the determination of suturing spacing and tension. Therefore, the assessment of tissue perfusion will permit the development and intra-surgical monitoring of an optimal suture protocol during anastomosis with less complications and improved functional outcome.

  10. Validating a local Arterial Input Function method for improved perfusion quantification in stroke

    PubMed Central

    Willats, Lisa; Christensen, Soren; K Ma, Henry; A Donnan, Geoffrey; Connelly, Alan; Calamante, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    In bolus-tracking perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), temporal dispersion of the contrast bolus due to stenosis or collateral supply presents a significant problem for accurate perfusion quantification in stroke. One means to reduce the associated perfusion errors is to deconvolve the bolus concentration time-course data with local Arterial Input Functions (AIFs) measured close to the capillary bed and downstream of the arterial abnormalities causing dispersion. Because the MRI voxel resolution precludes direct local AIF measurements, they must be extrapolated from the surrounding data. To date, there have been no published studies directly validating these local AIFs. We assess the effectiveness of local AIFs in reducing dispersion-induced perfusion error by measuring the residual dispersion remaining in the local AIF deconvolved perfusion maps. Two approaches to locating the local AIF voxels are assessed and compared with a global AIF deconvolution across 19 bolus-tracking data sets from patients with stroke. The local AIF methods reduced dispersion in the majority of data sets, suggesting more accurate perfusion quantification. Importantly, the validation inherently identifies potential areas for perfusion underestimation. This is valuable information for the identification of at-risk tissue and management of stroke patients. PMID:21629260

  11. A low-cost, small volume circuit for autologous blood normothermic perfusion of rabbit organs.

    PubMed

    Worner, Murray; Poore, Samuel; Tilkorn, Daniel; Lokmic, Zerina; Penington, Anthony J

    2014-04-01

    We have designed a laboratory extracorporeal normothermic blood perfusion system for whole organs (e.g., kidney) that achieves pulsatile flow, low levels of hemolysis, and a blood priming volume of 60 mL or less. Using this uniquely designed extracorporeal circuit, we have achieved perfusion of two isolated ex vivo constructs. In the first experiment, we successfully perfused a rabbit epigastric flap based on the femoral vessels. In the second experiment, we were able to perfuse the isolated rabbit kidney for 48 h (range for all kidneys was 12-48 h) with excellent urine output, normal arterial blood gasses at 24 h, and normal ex vivo kidney histology at the conclusion of the experiments. These parameters have not been achieved before with any known or previously published laboratory extracorporeal circuits. The study has implications for prolonged organ perfusion prior to transplantation and for tissue engineering of vascularized tissues, such as by the perfusion of decellularized organs. PMID:23981068

  12. Ex vivo lung graft perfusion.

    PubMed

    Briot, Raphaël; Gennai, Stéphane; Maignan, Maxime; Souilamas, Redha; Pison, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    This review proposes an update of the state of the art and the ongoing clinical trials of ex vivo lung perfusion for lung transplantation in patients. Ex vivo lung perfusion techniques (EVLP) can be used to evaluate a lung graft outside of the body. The goal of EVLP is to study the functional status of lung grafts that were first rejected for transplantation because they did not match all criteria for a conventional transplantation. After an EVLP evaluation, some of these lungs may be requalified for a possible transplantation in patients. This article proposes an overview of the developments of EVLP techniques. During EVLP, the perfusion and ventilation of the isolated lung preparation are very progressive in order to avoid oedema due to ischaemia-reperfusion injuries. Lung evaluation is mainly based on gasometric (PaO2/FiO2) and rheological criteria (low pulmonary arterial resistance). Several series of patients transplanted with EVLP evaluated lungs have been recently published with promising results. EVLP preparations also allow a better understanding of the physiopathology and treatments of ischaemia-reperfusion injuries. Organ procurements from "non-heart-beating" donors will probably require a wider application of these ex vivo techniques. The development of semi-automated systems might facilitate the clinical use of EVLP techniques. PMID:26746565

  13. In Vitro Perfused Human Capillary Networks

    PubMed Central

    Moya, Monica L.; Hsu, Yu-Hsiang; Lee, Abraham P.; Hughes, Christopher C.W.

    2013-01-01

    Replicating in vitro the complex in vivo tissue microenvironment has the potential to transform our approach to medicine and also our understanding of biology. In order to accurately model the 3D arrangement and interaction of cells and extracellular matrix, new microphysiological systems must include a vascular supply. The vasculature not only provides the necessary convective transport of oxygen, nutrients, and waste in 3D culture, but also couples and integrates the responses of organ systems. Here we combine tissue engineering and microfluidic technology to create an in vitro 3D metabolically active stroma (∼1 mm3) that, for the first time, contains a perfused, living, dynamic, interconnected human capillary network. The range of flow rate (μm/s) and shear rate (s−1) within the network was 0–4000 and 0–1000, respectively, and thus included the normal physiological range. Infusion of FITC dextran demonstrated microvessels (15–50 μm) to be largely impermeable to 70 kDa. Our high-throughput biology-directed platform has the potential to impact a broad range of fields that intersect with the microcirculation, including tumor metastasis, drug discovery, vascular disease, and environmental chemical toxicity. PMID:23320912

  14. Scalable Approach for Extrusion and Perfusion of Tubular, Heterotypic Biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeronimo, Mark David

    Soft material tubes are critical in the vasculature of mammalian tissues, forming networks of blood vessels and airways. Homogeneous and heterogeneous hydrogel tubes were extruded in a one-step process using a three layer microfluidic device. Co-axial cylindrical flow of crosslinking solutions and an alginate matrix is generated by a radial arrangement of microfluidic channels at the device's vertical extrusion outlet. The flow is confined and begins a sol-gel transition immediately as it extrudes at velocities upwards of 4 mm/s. This approach allows for predictive control over the dimensions of the rapidly formed tubular structures for outer diameters from 600 microm to 3 mm. A second microfluidic device hosts tube segments for controlled perfusion and pressurization using a reversible vacuum seal. On-chip tube deflection is observed and modeled as a measure of material compliance and circumferential elasticity. I anticipate applications of these devices for perfusion cell culture of cell-laden hydrogel tubes.

  15. Optical modeling toward optimizing monitoring of intestinal perfusion in trauma patients

    SciTech Connect

    Akl, Tony; Wilson, Mark A.; Ericson, Milton Nance; Cote, Gerard L.

    2013-01-01

    Trauma is the number one cause of death for people between the ages 1 and 44 years in the United States. In addition, according to the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention, injury results in over 31 million emergency department visits annually. Minimizing the resuscitation period in major abdominal injuries increases survival rates by correcting impaired tissue oxygen delivery. Optimization of resuscitation requires a monitoring method to determine sufficient tissue oxygenation. Oxygenation can be assessed by determining the adequacy of tissue perfusion. In this work, we present the design of a wireless perfusion and oxygenation sensor based on photoplethysmography. Through optical modeling, the benefit of using the visible wavelengths 470, 525 and 590nm (around the 525nm hemoglobin isobestic point) for intestinal perfusion monitoring is compared to the typical near infrared (NIR) wavelengths (805nm isobestic point) used in such sensors. Specifically, NIR wavelengths penetrate through the thin intestinal wall (~4mm) leading to high background signals. However, these visible wavelengths have two times shorter penetration depth that the NIR wavelengths. Monte-Carlo simulations show that the transmittance of the three selected wavelengths is lower by 5 orders of magnitude depending on the perfusion state. Due to the high absorbance of hemoglobin in the visible range, the perfusion signal carried by diffusely reflected light is also enhanced by an order of magnitude while oxygenation signal levels are maintained. In addition, short source-detector separations proved to be beneficial for limiting the probing depth to the thickness of the intestinal wall.

  16. Self-driven perfusion culture system using a paper-based double-layered scaffold.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Ai; Arisaka, Yoshinori; Takeda, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    Shear stress caused by fluid flow is known to promote tissue development from cells in vivo. Therefore, perfusion cultures have been studied to investigate the mechanisms involved and to fabricate engineered tissues in vitro, particularly those that include blood vessels. Microfluidic devices, which function with fine machinery of chambers and microsyringes for fluid flow and have small culture areas, are conventionally used for perfusion culture. In contrast, we have developed a self-driven perfusion culture system by using a paper-based double-layered scaffold as the fundamental component. Gelatin microfibers were electrospun onto a paper material to prepare the scaffold system, in which the constant perfusion of the medium and the scaffold for cell adhesion/proliferation were functionally divided into a paper and a gelatin microfiber layer, respectively. By applying both the capillary action and siphon phenomenon of the paper-based scaffold, which bridged two medium chambers at different height levels, a self-driven medium flow was achieved and the flow rate was also stable, constant, and quantitatively controllable. Moreover, the culture area was enlargeable to the cm(2) scale. The endothelial cells cultivated on this system oriented along the medium-flow direction, suggesting that the shear stress caused by medium flow was effectively applied. This perfusion culture system is expected to be useful for fabricating three-dimensional and large engineered tissues in the future. PMID:27550929

  17. Uterine perfusion model for analyzing barriers to transport in fibroids.

    PubMed

    Stirland, Darren L; Nichols, Joseph W; Jarboe, Elke; Adelman, Marisa; Dassel, Mark; Janát-Amsbury, Margit-Maria; Bae, You Han

    2015-09-28

    This project uses an ex vivo human perfusion model for studying transport in benign, fibrous tumors. The uterine arteries were cannulated to perfuse the organ with a buffer solution containing blood vessel stain and methylene blue to analyze intratumoral transport. Gross examination revealed tissue expansion effects and a visual lack of methylene blue in the fibroids. Some fibroids exhibited regions with partial methylene blue penetration into the tumor environment. Histological analysis comparing representative sections of fibroids and normal myometrium showed a smaller number of vessels with decreased diameters within the fibroid. Imaging of fluorescently stained vessels exposed a stark contrast between fluorescence within the myometrium and relatively little within the fibroid tissues. Imaging at higher magnification revealed that fibroid blood vessels were indeed perfused and stained with the lipophilic membrane dye; however, the vessels were only the size of small capillaries and the blood vessel coverage was only 12% that of the normal myometrium. The majority of sampled fibroids had a strong negative correlation (Pearson's r=-0.68 or beyond) between collagen and methylene blue staining. As methylene blue was able to passively diffuse into fibroid tissue, the true barrier to transport in these fibroids is likely high interstitial fluid pressure, correlating with high collagen content and solid stress observed in the fibroid tissue. Fibroids had an average elevated interstitial fluid pressure of 4mmHg compared to -1mmHg in normal myometrium. Our findings signify relationships between drug distribution in fibroids and between vasculature characteristics, collagen levels, and interstitial fluid pressure. Understanding these barriers to transport can lead to developments in drug delivery for the treatment of uterine fibroids and tumors of similar composition. PMID:26184049

  18. Myocardial perfusion imaging using contrast echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Pathan, Faraz; Marwick, Thomas H

    2015-01-01

    Microbubbles are an excellent intravascular tracer, and both the rate of myocardial opacification (analogous to coronary microvascular perfusion) and contrast intensity (analogous to myocardial blood volume) provide unique insights into myocardial perfusion. A strong evidence base has been accumulated to show comparability with nuclear perfusion imaging and incremental diagnostic and prognostic value relative to wall motion analysis. This technique also provides the possibility to measure myocardial perfusion at the bedside. Despite all of these advantages, the technique is complicated, technically challenging, and has failed to scale legislative and financial hurdles. The development of targeted imaging and therapeutic interventions will hopefully rekindle interest in this interesting modality. PMID:25817740

  19. Estimating a regional ventilation-perfusion index

    PubMed Central

    Muller, P A; Li, T; Isaacson, D; Newell, J C; Saulnier, G J; Kao, Tzu-Jen; Ashe, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    This is a methods paper, where an approximation to the local ventilation-perfusion ratio is derived. This approximation, called the ventilation-perfusion index since it is not exactly the physiological ventilation-perfusion ratio, is calculated using conductivity reconstructions obtained using electrical impedance tomography. Since computation of the ventilation-perfusion index only requires knowledge of the internal conductivity, any conductivity reconstruction method may be used. The method is explained, and results are presented using conductivities obtained from two EIT systems, one using an iterative method and the other a linearization method. PMID:26006279

  20. Assessment of foot perfusion in patients with a diabetic foot ulcer.

    PubMed

    Forsythe, Rachael O; Hinchliffe, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of foot perfusion is a vital step in the management of patients with diabetic foot ulceration, in order to understand the risk of amputation and likelihood of wound healing. Underlying peripheral artery disease is a common finding in patients with foot ulceration and is associated with poor outcomes. Assessment of foot perfusion should therefore focus on identifying the presence of peripheral artery disease and to subsequently estimate the effect this may have on wound healing. Assessment of perfusion can be difficult because of the often complex, diffuse and distal nature of peripheral artery disease in patients with diabetes, as well as poor collateralisation and heavy vascular calcification. Conventional methods of assessing tissue perfusion in the peripheral circulation may be unreliable in patients with diabetes, and it may therefore be difficult to determine the extent to which poor perfusion contributes to foot ulceration. Anatomical data obtained on cross-sectional imaging is important but must be combined with measurements of tissue perfusion (such as transcutaneous oxygen tension) in order to understand the global and regional perfusion deficit present in a patient with diabetic foot ulceration. Ankle-brachial pressure index is routinely used to screen for peripheral artery disease, but its use in patients with diabetes is limited in the presence of neuropathy and medial arterial calcification. Toe pressure index may be more useful because of the relative sparing of pedal arteries from medial calcification but may not always be possible in patients with ulceration. Fluorescence angiography is a non-invasive technique that can provide rapid quantitative information about regional tissue perfusion; capillaroscopy, iontophoresis and hyperspectral imaging may also be useful in assessing physiological perfusion but are not widely available. There may be a future role for specialized perfusion imaging of these patients, including magnetic resonance

  1. [The isolated perfused porcine kidney model for investigations concerning surgical therapy procedures].

    PubMed

    Peters, Kristina; Michel, Maurice Stephan; Matis, Ulrike; Häcker, Axel

    2006-01-01

    Experiments to develop innovative surgical therapy procedures are conventionally conducted on animals, as crucial aspects like tissue removal and bleeding disposition cannot be investigated in vitro. Extracorporeal organ models however reflect these aspects and could thus reduce the use of animals for this purpose fundamentally in the future. The aim of this work was to validate the isolated perfused porcine kidney model with regard to its use for surgical purposes on the basis of histological and radiological procedures. The results show that neither storage nor artificial perfusion led to any structural or functional damage which would affect the quality of the organ. The kidney model is highly suitable for simulating the main aspects of renal physiology and allows a constant calibration of perfusion pressure and tissue temperature. Thus, with only a moderate amount of work involved, the kidney model provides a cheap and readily available alternative to conventional animal experiments; it allows standardised experimental settings and provides valid results. PMID:17086351

  2. The relationship between red blood cell deformability metrics and perfusion of an artificial microvascular network

    PubMed Central

    Sosa, Jose M.; Nielsen, Nathan D.; Vignes, Seth M.; Chen, Tanya G.; Shevkoplyas, Sergey S.

    2013-01-01

    The ability of red blood cells (RBC) to undergo a wide range of deformations while traversing the microvasculature is crucial for adequate perfusion. Interpretation of RBC deformability measurements performed in vitro in the context of microvascular perfusion has been notoriously difficult. This study compares the measurements of RBC deformability performed using micropore filtration and ektacytometry with the RBC ability to perfuse an artificial microvascular network (AMVN). Human RBCs were collected from healthy consenting volunteers, leukoreduced, washed and exposed to graded concentrations (0% – 0.08%) of glutaraldehyde (a non-specific protein cross-linker) and diamide (a spectrin-specific protein cross-linker) to impair the deformability of RBCs. Samples comprising cells with two different levels of deformability were created by adding non-deformable RBCs (hardened by exposure to 0.08% glutaraldehyde) to the sample of normal healthy RBCs. Ektacytometry indicated a nearly linear decline in RBC deformability with increasing glutaraldehyde concentration. Micropore filtration showed a significant reduction only for concentrations of glutaraldehyde higher than 0.04%. Neither micropore filtration nor ektacytometry measurements could accurately predict the AMVN perfusion. Treatment with diamide reduced RBC deformability as indicated by ektacytometry, but had no significant effect on either micropore filtration or the AMVN perfusion. Both micropore filtration and ektacytometry showed a linear decline in effective RBC deformability with increasing fraction of non-deformable RBCs in the sample. The corresponding decline in the AMVN perfusion plateaued above 50%, reflecting the innate ability of blood flow in the microvasculature to bypass occluded capillaries. Our results suggest that in vitro measurements of RBC deformability performed using either micropore filtration or ektacytometry may not represent the ability of same RBCs to perfuse microvascular networks

  3. Arabidopsis: An Adequate Model for Dicot Root Systems?

    PubMed

    Zobel, Richard W

    2016-01-01

    The Arabidopsis root system is frequently considered to have only three classes of root: primary, lateral, and adventitious. Research with other plant species has suggested up to eight different developmental/functional classes of root for a given plant root system. If Arabidopsis has only three classes of root, it may not be an adequate model for eudicot plant root systems. Recent research, however, can be interpreted to suggest that pre-flowering Arabidopsis does have at least five (5) of these classes of root. This then suggests that Arabidopsis root research can be considered an adequate model for dicot plant root systems. PMID:26904040

  4. Effects of some anesthetic agents on skin microcirculation evaluated by laser Doppler perfusion imaging in mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Anesthetic agents alter microcirculation, influencing tissue oxygenation and delivery of vital substrates. Laser Doppler perfusion imaging is a widespread technique in the field of microvascular research that can evaluate noninvasively and in real time the effects of environmental conditions, physical manipulations, diseases and treatments on peripheral perfusion. This study aims to evaluate laser Doppler perfusion imaging as a means to detect changes in skin microcirculation induced by some popular anesthetic agents in a murine model. Twenty-four age- and gender-matched healthy CD1 mice were examined by laser Doppler perfusion imaging. The skin microcirculatory response was measured at the level of plantar surfaces during isoflurane anesthesia with or without subsequent dexmedetomidine or acepromazine. At the end of the procedure, dexmedetomidine was reversed by atipamezole administration. Results In all mice, skin blood flow under isoflurane anesthesia did not show significant differences over time (P = 0.1). The serial perfusion pattern and values following acepromazine or dexmedetomidine administration differed significantly (P < 0.05). Conclusions We standardized a reliable laser Doppler perfusion imaging protocol to non-invasively assess changes in skin microcirculation induced by anesthesia in mice, considering the advantages and drawbacks of this technique and its translational value. PMID:24341447

  5. Excorporeal Normothermic Machine Perfusion Resuscitates Pig DCD Livers with Extended Warm Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hongzhi; Berendsen, Tim; Kim, Karen; Soto-Gutiérrez, Alejandro; Bertheium, Francios; Yarmush, Martin L.; Hertl, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Background The shortage in donor livers has led to increased use of allografts derived from donation after cardiac death (DCD). The compromised viability in these livers leads to inferior post-transplantation allograft function and survival compared with donation after brain death (DBD) donor grafts. In this study, we reconditioned DCD livers using an optimized normothermic machine perfusion system. Methods Livers from 12 Yorkshire pigs (20–30 kg) were subjected to either 0 min (WI-0 group, n = 6) or 60 min (WI-60 group, n = 6) of warm ischemia and 2 h of cold storage in UW solution, followed by 4 h of oxygenated sanguineous normothermic machine perfusion. Liver viability and metabolic function were analyzed hourly. Results Warm ischemic livers showed elevated transaminase levels and reduced ATP concentration. After the start of machine perfusion, transaminase levels stabilized and there was recovery of tissue ATP, coinciding with an increase in bile production. These parameters reached comparable levels to the control group after 1 h of machine perfusion. Histology and gross morphology confirmed recovery of the ischemic allografts. Conclusion Our data demonstrate that metabolic and functional parameters of livers with extended warm ischemic time (60 min) can be significantly improved using normothermic machine perfusion. We hereby compound the existing body of evidence that machine perfusion is a viable solution for reconditioning marginal organs. PMID:22099594

  6. Kinetic assessment of manganese using magnetic resonance imaging in the dually perfused human placenta in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.K.; Mattison, D.R.; Panigel, M.; Ceckler, T.; Bryant, R.; Thomford, P.

    1987-10-01

    The transfer and distribution of paramagnetic manganese was investigated in the dually perfused human placenta in vitro (using 10, 20, 100 ..mu..M Mn with and without /sup 54/Mn) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and conventional radiochemical techniques. The human placenta concentrated /sup 54/Mn rapidly during the first 15 min of perfusion and by 4 hr was four times greater than the concentrations of Mn in the maternal perfusate, while the concentration of Mn in the fetal perfusate was 25% of the maternal perfusate levels. Within placentae, 45% of the /sup 54/Mn was free in the 100,000g supernatant, with 45% in the 1000g pellet. The magnetic field dependence of proton nuclear spin-lattice relaxation time (T/sub 1/) in placental tissue supports this Mn binding. Mn primarily affected the MRI partial saturation rather than spin-echo images of the human placenta, which provided for the separation of perfusate contributions from those produced by Mn. The washout of the Mn from the placenta was slow compared with its uptake, as determined by MRI. Thus, Mn was concentrated by the human placenta, but transfer of Mn across the placenta was limited in either direction. These studies also illustrate the opportunity for studies of human placental function using magnetic resonance imaging as a noninvasive biomarker.

  7. Perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Comprehensive Update on Principles and Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ka-Loh; Ostergaard, Leif; Calamante, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Perfusion is a fundamental biological function that refers to the delivery of oxygen and nutrients to tissue by means of blood flow. Perfusion MRI is sensitive to microvasculature and has been applied in a wide variety of clinical applications, including the classification of tumors, identification of stroke regions, and characterization of other diseases. Perfusion MRI techniques are classified with or without using an exogenous contrast agent. Bolus methods, with injections of a contrast agent, provide better sensitivity with higher spatial resolution, and are therefore more widely used in clinical applications. However, arterial spin-labeling methods provide a unique opportunity to measure cerebral blood flow without requiring an exogenous contrast agent and have better accuracy for quantification. Importantly, MRI-based perfusion measurements are minimally invasive overall, and do not use any radiation and radioisotopes. In this review, we describe the principles and techniques of perfusion MRI. This review summarizes comprehensive updated knowledge on the physical principles and techniques of perfusion MRI. PMID:25246817

  8. Blood perfusion and pH monitoring in organs by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vari, Sandor G.; Papazoglou, Theodore G.; Pergadia, Vani R.; Stavridi, Marigo; Snyder, Wendy J.; Papaioannou, Thanassis; Duffy, J. T.; Weiss, Andrew B.; Thomas, Reem; Grundfest, Warren S.

    1994-01-01

    Sensitivity of laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) in detecting a change in tissue pH, and blood perfusion was determined. Rabbits were anesthetized, paralyzed, and mechanically ventilated. The arterial and venous blood supplies of the kidney were isolated and ligated to alter the perfusion. The femoral artery was cannulated to extract samples for blood gas analysis. A 308-nm XeCl was used as an excitation source. A 600 micrometers core diameter fiber was used for fluorescence acquisition, and the spectra analyzed by an optical multichannel analyzer (EG & G, OMA III). the corresponding intensity ratio R equals INADH / ICOLL was used as an index for respiratory acidosis. Blood perfusion was assessed using the following algorithm: (IELAS minus ICOLL) divided by (INADH minus ICOLL). The intensity ratio linearly decreased with the reduction of blood perfusion. When we totally occluded the artery the ratio decreased tenfold when compared to the ratio of a fully perfused kidney. Results of monitoring blood acidosis by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy shows a significant trend between pH and intensity ratio. Since all the slopes were negative, there is an obvious significant correlation between the pH and NADH.COLLAGEN RATIO. Blue-light-induced fluorescence measurements and ratio fluorometry is a sensitive method for monitoring blood perfusion and acidity or alkalinity of an organ.

  9. A microfluidically perfused three dimensional human liver model.

    PubMed

    Rennert, Knut; Steinborn, Sandra; Gröger, Marko; Ungerböck, Birgit; Jank, Anne-Marie; Ehgartner, Josef; Nietzsche, Sandor; Dinger, Julia; Kiehntopf, Michael; Funke, Harald; Peters, Frank T; Lupp, Amelie; Gärtner, Claudia; Mayr, Torsten; Bauer, Michael; Huber, Otmar; Mosig, Alexander S

    2015-12-01

    Within the liver, non-parenchymal cells (NPCs) are critically involved in the regulation of hepatocyte polarization and maintenance of metabolic function. We here report the establishment of a liver organoid that integrates NPCs in a vascular layer composed of endothelial cells and tissue macrophages and a hepatic layer comprising stellate cells co-cultured with hepatocytes. The three-dimensional liver organoid is embedded in a microfluidically perfused biochip that enables sufficient nutrition supply and resembles morphological aspects of the human liver sinusoid. It utilizes a suspended membrane as a cell substrate mimicking the space of Disse. Luminescence-based sensor spots were integrated into the chip to allow online measurement of cellular oxygen consumption. Application of microfluidic flow induces defined expression of ZO-1, transferrin, ASGPR-1 along with an increased expression of MRP-2 transporter protein within the liver organoids. Moreover, perfusion was accompanied by an increased hepatobiliary secretion of 5(6)-carboxy-2',7'-dichlorofluorescein and an enhanced formation of hepatocyte microvilli. From this we conclude that the perfused liver organoid shares relevant morphological and functional characteristics with the human liver and represents a new in vitro research tool to study human hepatocellular physiology at the cellular level under conditions close to the physiological situation. PMID:26322723

  10. Effect of graded hypoxia on retention of technetium-99m-nitroheterocycle in perfused rat heart

    SciTech Connect

    Rumsey, W.L.; Patel, B.; Linder, K.E.

    1995-04-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effects of graded hypoxia on the retention of a {sup 99m}Tc-labeled nitroimidazole. Rat hearts were perfused retrogradely with Krebs-Henseleit buffer at 37{degrees}C and paced at 5 Hz. After a 20-min stabilization period, coronary flow was maintained at 8 ml/min/g wet wt and the hearts were perfused with media equilibrated with gas mixtures containing 5% CO{sub 2} and various levels of O{sub 2}, from 544 to 29 Torr. Technetium-99m-O(PnAO-1-(2-nitroimidazole)), BMS-181321, was infused for 20 min into a side port of the aortic cannula. Perfusion continued for an additional 40 min to allow for compound clearance. Each decrease of perfusate PO{sub 2} brought about an increase in the retention of BMS-181321, resulting in a good correlation between its retention and perfusate PO{sub 2} (r=0.97). Myocardial oxygen consumption was independent of oxygen delivery when the perfusate oxygen pressure was greater than 350 Torr. Below this value, oxygen consumption declined markedly as influent PO{sub 2}. A good correlation was obtained between retention of the nitroheterocycle and the cytosolic lactate/pyruvate ratio (r=0.98). When glucose was omitted from the perfusate (PO{sub 2}=27 Torr), retention of the nitroheterocycle was increased by about 25% as compared to hearts perfused in the presence of this substrate. These results indicate that myocardial retention of BMS-181321 is coupled to the level of tissue oxygenation and that hypoxic retention may be affected by substrate input. 24 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. A non-linear regression method for CT brain perfusion analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennink, E.; Oosterbroek, J.; Viergever, M. A.; Velthuis, B. K.; de Jong, H. W. A. M.

    2015-03-01

    CT perfusion (CTP) imaging allows for rapid diagnosis of ischemic stroke. Generation of perfusion maps from CTP data usually involves deconvolution algorithms providing estimates for the impulse response function in the tissue. We propose the use of a fast non-linear regression (NLR) method that we postulate has similar performance to the current academic state-of-art method (bSVD), but that has some important advantages, including the estimation of vascular permeability, improved robustness to tracer-delay, and very few tuning parameters, that are all important in stroke assessment. The aim of this study is to evaluate the fast NLR method against bSVD and a commercial clinical state-of-art method. The three methods were tested against a published digital perfusion phantom earlier used to illustrate the superiority of bSVD. In addition, the NLR and clinical methods were also tested against bSVD on 20 clinical scans. Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated for each of the tested methods. All three methods showed high correlation coefficients (>0.9) with the ground truth in the phantom. With respect to the clinical scans, the NLR perfusion maps showed higher correlation with bSVD than the perfusion maps from the clinical method. Furthermore, the perfusion maps showed that the fast NLR estimates are robust to tracer-delay. In conclusion, the proposed fast NLR method provides a simple and flexible way of estimating perfusion parameters from CT perfusion scans, with high correlation coefficients. This suggests that it could be a better alternative to the current clinical and academic state-of-art methods.

  12. Is the Marketing Concept Adequate for Continuing Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rittenburg, Terri L.

    1984-01-01

    Because educators have a social responsibility to those they teach, the marketing concept may not be adequate as a philosophy for continuing education. In attempting to broaden the audience for continuing education, educators should consider a societal marketing concept to meet the needs of the educationally disadvantaged. (SK)

  13. Comparability and Reliability Considerations of Adequate Yearly Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maier, Kimberly S.; Maiti, Tapabrata; Dass, Sarat C.; Lim, Chae Young

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop an estimate of Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) that will allow for reliable and valid comparisons among student subgroups, schools, and districts. A shrinkage-type estimator of AYP using the Bayesian framework is described. Using simulated data, the performance of the Bayes estimator will be compared to…

  14. 9 CFR 305.3 - Sanitation and adequate facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sanitation and adequate facilities. 305.3 Section 305.3 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION...

  15. Understanding Your Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP), 2011-2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The "No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) of 2001" requires all schools, districts/local education agencies (LEAs) and states to show that students are making Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP). NCLB requires states to establish targets in the following ways: (1) Annual Proficiency Target; (2) Attendance/Graduation Rates; and (3) Participation Rates.…

  16. Assessing Juvenile Sex Offenders to Determine Adequate Levels of Supervision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerdes, Karen E.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    This study analyzed the internal consistency of four inventories used by Utah probation officers to determine adequate and efficacious supervision levels and placement for juvenile sex offenders. Three factors accounted for 41.2 percent of variance (custodian's and juvenile's attitude toward intervention, offense characteristics, and historical…

  17. 34 CFR 200.13 - Adequate yearly progress in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Adequate yearly progress in general. 200.13 Section 200.13 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION TITLE I-IMPROVING THE ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT OF THE...

  18. 34 CFR 200.20 - Making adequate yearly progress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Making adequate yearly progress. 200.20 Section 200.20 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION TITLE I-IMPROVING THE ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT OF THE DISADVANTAGED...

  19. Do Beginning Teachers Receive Adequate Support from Their Headteachers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menon, Maria Eliophotou

    2012-01-01

    The article examines the problems faced by beginning teachers in Cyprus and the extent to which headteachers are considered to provide adequate guidance and support to them. Data were collected through interviews with 25 school teachers in Cyprus, who had recently entered teaching (within 1-5 years) in public primary schools. According to the…

  20. Myocardial perfusion with rubidium-82. III. Theory relating severity of coronary stenosis to perfusion deficit

    SciTech Connect

    Mullani, N.A.

    1984-11-01

    The relation between the quantitative perfusion deficit, as measured by emission computerized tomography, and the severity of coronary artery stenosis is important for the noninvasive clinical evaluation of coronary artery disease in man. Positron emission tomography allows direct noninvasive measurement of myocardial perfusion and quantification of the size of the perfusion defect. Given this important imformation, a mathematical model has been derived to gauge the severity of a coronary stenosis from quantitative perfusion measurements in the normal and poststenotic regions of the heart. The theoretical basis is presented for relating regional myocardial perfusion and regional perfusion resistance to total, coronary blood flow and resistance at normal resting flow and during maximal coronary vasodilation. The concept of perfusion reserve is presented as a clinical measure of the severity of a stenosis.

  1. The placental pursuit for an adequate oxidant balance between the mother and the fetus

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Emilio A.; Krause, Bernardo; Ebensperger, German; Reyes, Roberto V.; Casanello, Paola; Parra-Cordero, Mauro; Llanos, Anibal J.

    2014-01-01

    The placenta is the exchange organ that regulates metabolic processes between the mother and her developing fetus. The adequate function of this organ is clearly vital for a physiologic gestational process and a healthy baby as final outcome. The umbilico-placental vasculature has the capacity to respond to variations in the materno-fetal milieu. Depending on the intensity and the extensity of the insult, these responses may be immediate-, mediate-, and long-lasting, deriving in potential morphostructural and functional changes later in life. These adjustments usually compensate the initial insults, but occasionally may switch to long-lasting remodeling and dysfunctional processes, arising maladaptation. One of the most challenging conditions in modern perinatology is hypoxia and oxidative stress during development, both disorders occurring in high-altitude and in low-altitude placental insufficiency. Hypoxia and oxidative stress may induce endothelial dysfunction and thus, reduction in the perfusion of the placenta and restriction in the fetal growth and development. This Review will focus on placental responses to hypoxic conditions, usually related with high-altitude and placental insufficiency, deriving in oxidative stress and vascular disorders, altering fetal and maternal health. Although day-to-day clinical practice, basic and clinical research are clearly providing evidence of the severe impact of oxygen deficiency and oxidative stress establishment during pregnancy, further research on umbilical and placental vascular function under these conditions is badly needed to clarify the myriad of questions still unsettled. PMID:25009498

  2. Impaired microcirculatory perfusion in a rat model of cardiopulmonary bypass: the role of hemodilution.

    PubMed

    Koning, Nick J; de Lange, Fellery; Vonk, Alexander B A; Ahmed, Yunus; van den Brom, Charissa E; Bogaards, Sylvia; van Meurs, Matijs; Jongman, Rianne M; Schalkwijk, Casper G; Begieneman, Mark P V; Niessen, Hans W; Baufreton, Christophe; Boer, Christa

    2016-03-01

    Although hemodilution is attributed as the main cause of microcirculatory impairment during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), this relationship has never been investigated. We investigated the distinct effects of hemodilution with or without CPB on microvascular perfusion and subsequent renal tissue injury in a rat model. Male Wistar rats (375-425 g) were anesthetized, prepared for cremaster muscle intravital microscopy, and subjected to CPB (n = 9), hemodilution alone (n = 9), or a sham procedure (n = 6). Microcirculatory recordings were performed at multiple time points and analyzed for perfusion characteristics. Kidney and lung tissue were investigated for mRNA expression for genes regulating inflammation and endothelial adhesion molecule expression. Renal injury was assessed with immunohistochemistry. Hematocrit levels dropped to 0.24 ± 0.03 l/l and 0.22 ± 0.02 l/l after onset of hemodilution with or without CPB. Microcirculatory perfusion remained unaltered in sham rats. Hemodilution alone induced a 13% decrease in perfused capillaries, after which recovery was observed. Onset of CPB reduced the perfused capillaries by 40% (9.2 ± 0.9 to 5.5 ± 1.5 perfused capillaries per microscope field; P < 0.001), and this reduction persisted throughout the experiment. Endothelial and inflammatory activation and renal histological injury were increased after CPB compared with hemodilution or sham procedure. Hemodilution leads to minor and transient disturbances in microcirculatory perfusion, which cannot fully explain impaired microcirculation following cardiopulmonary bypass. CPB led to increased renal injury and endothelial adhesion molecule expression in the kidney and lung compared with hemodilution. Our findings suggest that microcirculatory impairment during CPB may play a role in the development of kidney injury. PMID:26747506

  3. Perfusion Angiography in Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Scalzo, Fabien; Liebeskind, David S

    2016-01-01

    Visualization and quantification of blood flow are essential for the diagnosis and treatment evaluation of cerebrovascular diseases. For rapid imaging of the cerebrovasculature, digital subtraction angiography (DSA) remains the gold standard as it offers high spatial resolution. This paper lays out a methodological framework, named perfusion angiography, for the quantitative analysis and visualization of blood flow parameters from DSA images. The parameters, including cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral blood volume (CBV), mean transit time (MTT), time-to-peak (TTP), and T max, are computed using a bolus tracking method based on the deconvolution of the time-density curve on a pixel-by-pixel basis. The method is tested on 66 acute ischemic stroke patients treated with thrombectomy and/or tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and also evaluated on an estimation task with known ground truth. This novel imaging tool provides unique insights into flow mechanisms that cannot be observed directly in DSA sequences and might be used to evaluate the impact of endovascular interventions more precisely. PMID:27446232

  4. Perfusion Angiography in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Liebeskind, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Visualization and quantification of blood flow are essential for the diagnosis and treatment evaluation of cerebrovascular diseases. For rapid imaging of the cerebrovasculature, digital subtraction angiography (DSA) remains the gold standard as it offers high spatial resolution. This paper lays out a methodological framework, named perfusion angiography, for the quantitative analysis and visualization of blood flow parameters from DSA images. The parameters, including cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral blood volume (CBV), mean transit time (MTT), time-to-peak (TTP), and Tmax, are computed using a bolus tracking method based on the deconvolution of the time-density curve on a pixel-by-pixel basis. The method is tested on 66 acute ischemic stroke patients treated with thrombectomy and/or tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and also evaluated on an estimation task with known ground truth. This novel imaging tool provides unique insights into flow mechanisms that cannot be observed directly in DSA sequences and might be used to evaluate the impact of endovascular interventions more precisely. PMID:27446232

  5. Quantification of brain perfusion with tracers retained by the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Pupi, A.; Bacciottini, L.; De Cristofaro, M.T.R.; Formiconi, A.R.; Castagnoli, A.

    1991-12-31

    Almost a decade ago, tracers, labelled with {sup 123}I and {sup 99m}Tc, that are retained by the brain, started to be used for studies of regional brain perfusion (regional cerebral blood flow, rCBF). To date, these tracers have been used for brain perfusion imaging with SPECT in brain disorders as well as for physiological activation protocols. Only seldom, however, have they been used in protocols that quantitatively measure rCBF. Nevertheless, comparative studies with perfusion reference tracers have repeatedly demonstrated that the brain uptake of these brain-retained tracers is correlated to perfusion, the major determinant of the distribution of these tracers in the brain. The brain kinetics of {sup 99m}Tc HMPAO, which is the tracer most commonly used, was described with a two-compartment tissue model. The theoretical approach, which is, in itself, sufficient for modeling quantitative measurements with {sup 99m}Tc HMPAO, initially suggested the possibility of empirically narrowing the distance between the brain`s regional uptake of the tracer and rCBF with a linearization algorithm which uses the cerebellum as the reference region. The value of this empirical method is hampered by the fact that the cerebellum can be involved in cerebrovascular disease (i.e. cerebellar diaschisis) as well as in several other brain disorders (e.g. anxiety, and dementia of the Alzheimer type). It also was proposed that different reference regions (occipital, whole slice, or whole brain) should be selected in relation to the brain disorder under study. However, this approach does not solve the main problem because it does not equip us with a reliable tool to evaluate rCBF with a high predictive value, and, at the same time, to reduce intersubject variability. The solution would be to measure a quantitative parameter which directly reflects rCBF, such as the unidirectional influx constant of the freely diffusible flow-limited tracers. 45 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Simple Machine Perfusion Significantly Enhances Hepatocyte Yields of Ischemic and Fresh Rat Livers

    PubMed Central

    Izamis, Maria-Louisa; Calhoun, Candice; Uygun, Basak E.; Guzzardi, Maria Angela; Price, Gavrielle; Luitje, Martha; Saeidi, Nima; Yarmush, Martin L.; Uygun, Korkut

    2013-01-01

    The scarcity of viable hepatocytes is a significant bottleneck in cell transplantation, drug discovery, toxicology, tissue engineering, and bioartificial assist devices, where trillions of high-functioning hepatocytes are needed annually. We took the novel approach of using machine perfusion to maximize cell recovery, specifically from uncontrolled cardiac death donors, the largest source of disqualified donor organs. In a rat model, we developed a simple 3-h room temperature (20 ± 2°C) machine perfusion protocol to treat nonpremedicated livers exposed to 1 h of warm (34°C) ischemia. Treated ischemic livers were compared to fresh, fresh-treated, and untreated ischemic livers using viable hepatocyte yields and in vitro performance as quantitative endpoints. Perfusion treatment resulted in both a 25-fold increase in viable hepatocytes from ischemic livers and a 40% increase from fresh livers. While cell morphology and function in suspension and plate cultures of untreated warm ischemic cells was significantly impaired, treated warm ischemic cells were indistinguishable from fresh hepatocytes. Furthermore, a strong linear correlation between tissue ATP and cell yield enabled accurate evaluation of the extent of perfusion recovery. Maximal recovery of warm ischemic liver ATP content appears to be correlated with optimal flow through the microvasculature. These data demonstrate that the inclusion of a simple perfusion-preconditioning step can significantly increase the efficiency of functional hepatocyte yields and the number of donor livers that can be gainfully utilized. PMID:25431743

  7. Perfusion-decellularized skeletal muscle as a three-dimensional scaffold with a vascular network template.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Hu, Zhi Qian; Turner, Neill J; Teng, Shi Feng; Cheng, Wen Yue; Zhou, Hai Yang; Zhang, Li; Hu, Hong Wei; Wang, Qiang; Badylak, Stephen F

    2016-05-01

    There exists a great need for repair grafts with similar volume to human skeletal muscle that can promote the innate ability of muscle to regenerate following volumetric muscle loss. Perfusion decellularization is an attractive technique for extracellular matrix (ECM) scaffold from intact mammalian organ or tissue which has been successfully used in tissue reconstruction. The perfusion-decellularization of skeletal muscle has been poorly assessed and characterized, but the bioactivity and functional capacity of the obtained perfusion skeletal muscle ECM (pM-ECM) to remodel in vivo is unknown. In the present study, pM-ECM was prepared from porcine rectus abdominis (RA). Perfusion-decellularization of porcine RA effectively removed cellular and nuclear material while retaining the intricate three-dimensional microarchitecture and vasculature networks of the native RA, and many of the bioactive ECM components and mechanical properties. In vivo, partial-thickness abdominal wall defects in rats repaired with pM-ECM showed improved neovascularization, myogenesis and functional recellularization compared to porcine-derived small intestinal submucosa (SIS). These findings show the biologic potential of RA pM-ECM as a scaffold for supporting site appropriate, tissue reconstruction, and provide a better understanding of the importance maintaining the tissue-specific complex three-dimensional architecture of ECM during decellularization and regeneration. PMID:26963901

  8. Organ perfusion during voluntary pulmonary hyperinflation; a magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Kyhl, Kasper; Drvis, Ivan; Barak, Otto; Mijacika, Tanja; Engstrøm, Thomas; Secher, Niels H; Dujic, Zeljko; Buca, Ante; Madsen, Per Lav

    2016-02-01

    Pulmonary hyperinflation is used by competitive breath-hold divers and is accomplished by glossopharyngeal insufflation (GPI), which is known to compress the heart and pulmonary vessels, increasing sympathetic activity and lowering cardiac output (CO) without known consequence for organ perfusion. Myocardial, pulmonary, skeletal muscle, kidney, and liver perfusion were evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging in 10 elite breath-hold divers at rest and during moderate GPI. Cardiac chamber volumes, stroke volume, and thus CO were determined from cardiac short-axis cine images. Organ volumes were assessed from gradient echo sequences, and organ perfusion was evaluated from first-pass images after gadolinium injection. During GPI, lung volume increased by 5.2 ± 1.5 liters (mean ± SD; P < 0.001), while spleen and liver volume decreased by 46 ± 39 and 210 ± 160 ml, respectively (P < 0.05), and inferior caval vein diameter by 4 ± 3 mm (P < 0.05). Heart rate tended to increase (67 ± 10 to 86 ± 20 beats/min; P = 0.052) as right and left ventricular volumes were reduced (P < 0.05). Stroke volume (107 ± 21 to 53 ± 15 ml) and CO (7.2 ± 1.6 to 4.2 ± 0.8 l/min) decreased as assessed after 1 min of GPI (P < 0.01). Left ventricular myocardial perfusion maximum upslope and its perfusion index decreased by 1.52 ± 0.15 s(-1) (P < 0.001) and 0.02 ± 0.01 s(-1) (P < 0.05), respectively, without transmural differences. Pulmonary tissue, spleen, kidney, and pectoral-muscle perfusion also decreased (P < 0.05), and yet liver perfusion was maintained. Thus, during pulmonary hyperinflation by GPI, CO and organ perfusion, including the myocardium, as well as perfusion of skeletal muscles, are reduced, and yet perfusion of the liver is maintained. Liver perfusion seems to be prioritized when CO decreases during GPI. PMID:26589331

  9. Perfusion imaging with non-contrast ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tierney, Jaime E.; Dumont, Douglas M.; Byram, Brett C.

    2016-04-01

    A Doppler ultrasound clutter filter that enables estimation of low velocity blood flow could considerably improve ultrasound as a tool for clinical diagnosis and monitoring, including for the evaluation of vascular diseases and tumor perfusion. Conventional Doppler ultrasound is currently used for visualizing and estimating blood flow. However, conventional Doppler is limited by frame rate and tissue clutter caused by involuntary movement of the patient or sonographer. Spectral broadening of the clutter due to tissue motion limits ultrasound's ability to detect blood flow less than about 5mm/s at an 8MHz center frequency. We propose a clutter filtering technique that may increase the sensitivity of Doppler measurements to at least as low as 0.41mm/s. The proposed filter uses an adaptive demodulation scheme that decreases the bandwidth of the clutter. To test the performance of the adaptive demodulation method at removing sonographer hand motion, six volunteer subjects acquired data from a basic quality assurance phantom. Additionally, to test initial in vivo feasibility, an arterial occlusion reactive hyperemia study was performed to assess the efficiency of the proposed filter at preserving signals from blood velocities 2mm/s or greater. The hand motion study resulted in initial average bandwidths of 577Hz (28.5mm/s), which were decreased to 7.28Hz (0.36mm/s) at -60 dB at 3cm using our approach. The in vivo power Doppler study resulted in 15.2dB and 0.15dB dynamic ranges between the lowest and highest blood flow time points for the proposed filter and conventional 50Hz high pass filter, respectively.

  10. The release and vascular action of bradykinin in the isolated perfused bovine udder

    PubMed Central

    Zeitlin, I J; Eshraghi, H R

    2002-01-01

    It has been postulated that the mammary kinin system may play a role in modulating mammary blood flow. Until the present study, the local release of bradykinin (BK) or other kinin system constituents into the mammary vasculature had not been reported and there were also conflicting findings on the action of BK on udder vasculature. Udders were removed from healthy lactating cows at slaughter. Pairs of ipsilateral quarters were perfused with Tyrode solution through the external pudendalis artery and drained via the cranial superficial epigastric vein. Mammary secretion was collected through teat cannulae. The perfusion pressure was linearly related to perfusate flux between 60 and 210 ml min−1 and the flow rate was adjusted (110-150 ml min−1) to give a basal pressure of 85 mmHg. PO2, PCO2 and pH in the venous effluent perfusate stabilised at 157 ± 10 mmHg, 50.1 ± 2.4 mmHg and 7.1 ± 0.03, respectively. The venous effluent contained immunoreactive BK and BK precursor, tissue kallikrein activity, and bradykinin-destroying enzyme. The concentration of BK stabilised at 378 ± 48 pg (ml perfusate)−1, that of trypsin-activated BK precursor was 679 ± 59 pg BK equivalents ml−1 and that of tissue kallikrein, measured as cleavage of d-Val.Leu.Arg-p-nitroanilide (d-Val.Leu.Arg-pNA), was 5.5 ± 1.7 nmol p-NA h−1 ml−1. Arterial infusion of phenylephrine (0.49-490 μM) produced increases in perfusion pressure (vasoconstriction). Acetylcholine (ACh) (0.55-55 μM) and BK (0.1-10 μM) produced only vasodilatation. BK (EC50 = 1.00±0.04 μM) was a more potent vasodilator than ACh (EC50 = 9.57±0.49 μM). The basal BK concentration was 250 times below the threshold for vasoactivity. The udder produced a milk-like secretion, which was dependent on perfusate flow and contained a concentration of BK which remained unchanged from 60 to 180 min of perfusion (231 ± 31 pg ml−1) unlike that in the venous effluent which doubled between 60 and 120 min. Thus, in addition to its

  11. Bile Acid Synthesis in the Isolated, Perfused Rabbit Liver

    PubMed Central

    Mosbach, E. H.; Rothschild, M. A.; Bekersky, I.; Oratz, M.; Mongelli, J.

    1971-01-01

    These experiments were carried out to demonstrate the usefulness of the perfused rabbit liver for studies of bile acid metabolism, and to determine the rate-limiting enzyme of bile acid synthesis. Rabbits were fed a semisynthetic diet, with or without the addition of 1% cholestyramine, under controlled conditions. At the end of 2-5 wk, the livers were removed and perfused for 2.5 hr employing various 14C-labeled precursors to measure de novo cholic acid synthesis. The livers were then analyzed for cholesterol, and the bile collected during the perfusion was analyzed for cholesterol and bile acids. Control bile contained, on the average, 0.34 mg of glycocholate, 7.4 mg of glycodeoxycholate, and 0.06 mg of cholesterol. After cholestyramine treatment of the donor rabbits, the bile contained 3.3 mg of glycocholate, 3.7 mg of glycodeoxycholate, and 0.05 mg of cholesterol. It was assumed that in cholestyramine-treated animals the enterohepatic circulation of the bile acids had been interrupted sufficiently to release the feedback inhibition of the rate-controlling enzyme of bile acid synthesis. Therefore, a given precursor should be incorporated into bile acids at a more rapid rate in livers of cholestyramine-treated animals, provided that the precursor was acted upon by the rate-controlling enzyme. It was found that the incorporation of acetate-14C, mevalonolactone-14C, and cholesterol-14C into cholate was 5-20 times greater in the livers of cholestyramine-treated animals than in the controls. In contrast, there was no difference in the incorporation of 7α-hydroxycholesterol-14C into cholate regardless of dietary pretreatment. It was concluded that given an adequate precursor pool, the 7α-hydroxylation of cholesterol is the rate-limiting step in bile acid formation. PMID:5097576

  12. Maintaining adequate hydration and nutrition in adult enteral tube feeding.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Sasha

    2015-01-01

    Predicting the nutritional and fluid requirements of enterally-fed patients can be challenging and the practicalities of ensuring adequate delivery must be taken into consideration. Patients who are enterally fed can be more reliant on clinicians, family members and carers to meet their nutrition and hydration needs and identify any deficiencies, excesses or problems with delivery. Estimating a patient's requirements can be challenging due to the limitations of using predictive equations in the clinical setting. Close monitoring by all those involved in the patient's care, as well as regular review by a dietitian, is therefore required to balance the delivery of adequate feed and fluids to meet each patient's individual needs and prevent the complications of malnutrition and dehydration. Increasing the awareness of the signs of malnutrition and dehydration in patients receiving enteral tube feeding among those involved in a patient's care will help any deficiencies to be detected early on and rectified before complications occur. PMID:26087203

  13. Assessing juvenile sex offenders to determine adequate levels of supervision.

    PubMed

    Gerdes, K E; Gourley, M M; Cash, M C

    1995-08-01

    The present study analyzed the internal consistency of four inventories currently being used by probation officers in the state of Utah to determine adequate and efficacious supervision levels and placement for juvenile sex offenders. The internal consistency or reliability of the inventories ranged from moderate to good. Factor analysis was utilized to significantly increase the reliability of the four inventories by collapsing them into the following three factors: (a) Custodian's and Juvenile's Attitude Toward Intervention; (b) Offense Characteristics; and (c) Historical Risk Factors. These three inventories/factors explained 41.2% of the variance in the combined inventories' scores. Suggestions are made regarding the creation of an additional inventory. "Characteristics of the Victim" to account for more of the variance. In addition, suggestions as to how these inventories can be used by probation officers to make objective and consistent decisions about adequate supervision levels and placement for juvenile sex offenders are discussed. PMID:7583754

  14. Ventilation-perfusion imaging in pulmonary papillomatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Espinola, D.; Rupani, H.; Camargo, E.E.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1981-11-01

    Three children with laryngeal papillomas involving the lungs had serial ventilation-perfusion scintigrams to assess results of therapy designed to reduce the bronchial involvement. Different imaging patterns were observed depending on size, number, and location of lesions. In early parenchymal involvement a ventilation-perfusion mismatch was seen. The initial and follow-up studies correlated well with clinical and radiographic findings. This noninvasive procedure is helpful in evaluating ventilatory and perfusion impairment in these patients as well as their response to treatment.

  15. Cochlear perfusion with a viscous fluid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Olson, Elizabeth S

    2016-07-01

    The flow of viscous fluid in the cochlea induces shear forces, which could provide benefit in clinical practice, for example to guide cochlear implant insertion or produce static pressure to the cochlear partition or wall. From a research standpoint, studying the effects of a viscous fluid in the cochlea provides data for better understanding cochlear fluid mechanics. However, cochlear perfusion with a viscous fluid may damage the cochlea. In this work we studied the physiological and anatomical effects of perfusing the cochlea with a viscous fluid. Gerbil cochleae were perfused at a rate of 2.4 μL/min with artificial perilymph (AP) and sodium hyaluronate (Healon, HA) in four different concentrations (0.0625%, 0.125%, 0.25%, 0.5%). The different HA concentrations were applied either sequentially in the same cochlea or individually in different cochleae. The perfusion fluid entered from the round window and was withdrawn from basal scala vestibuli, in order to perfuse the entire perilymphatic space. Compound action potentials (CAP) were measured after each perfusion. After perfusion with increasing concentrations of HA in the order of increasing viscosity, the CAP thresholds generally increased. The threshold elevation after AP and 0.0625% HA perfusion was small or almost zero, and the 0.125% HA was a borderline case, while the higher concentrations significantly elevated CAP thresholds. Histology of the cochleae perfused with the 0.0625% HA showed an intact Reissner's membrane (RM), while in cochleae perfused with 0.125% and 0.25% HA RM was torn. Thus, the CAP threshold elevation was likely due to the broken RM, likely caused by the shear stress produced by the flow of the viscous fluid. Our results and analysis indicate that the cochlea can sustain, without a significant CAP threshold shift, up to a 1.5 Pa shear stress. Beside these finding, in the 0.125% and 0.25% HA perfusion cases, a temporary CAP threshold shift was observed, perhaps due to the presence and

  16. Technical Pitfalls of Signal Truncation in Perfusion MRI of Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kelvin K.; Fung, Steve H.; New, Pamela Z.; Wong, Stephen T. C.

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) is widely used in clinical settings for the radiological diagnosis of brain tumor. The signal change in brain tissue in gradient echo-based DSC PWI is much higher than in spin echo-based DSC PWI. Due to its exquisite sensitivity, gradient echo-based sequence is the preferred method for imaging of all tumors except those near the base of the skull. However, high sensitivity also comes with a dynamic range problem. It is not unusual for blood volume to increase in gene-mediated cytotoxic immunotherapy-treated glioblastoma patients. The increase of fractional blood volume sometimes saturates the MRI signal during first-pass contrast bolus arrival and presents signal truncation artifacts of various degrees in the tumor when a significant amount of blood exists in the image pixels. It presents a hidden challenge in PWI, as this signal floor can be either close to noise level or just above and can go no lower. This signal truncation in the signal intensity time course is a significant issue that deserves attention in DSC PWI. In this paper, we demonstrate that relative cerebral blood volume and relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) are underestimated due to signal truncation in DSC perfusion, in glioblastoma patients. We propose the use of second-pass tissue residue function in rCBF calculation using least-absolute-deviation deconvolution to avoid the underestimation problem. PMID:27531989

  17. Technical Pitfalls of Signal Truncation in Perfusion MRI of Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kelvin K; Fung, Steve H; New, Pamela Z; Wong, Stephen T C

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) is widely used in clinical settings for the radiological diagnosis of brain tumor. The signal change in brain tissue in gradient echo-based DSC PWI is much higher than in spin echo-based DSC PWI. Due to its exquisite sensitivity, gradient echo-based sequence is the preferred method for imaging of all tumors except those near the base of the skull. However, high sensitivity also comes with a dynamic range problem. It is not unusual for blood volume to increase in gene-mediated cytotoxic immunotherapy-treated glioblastoma patients. The increase of fractional blood volume sometimes saturates the MRI signal during first-pass contrast bolus arrival and presents signal truncation artifacts of various degrees in the tumor when a significant amount of blood exists in the image pixels. It presents a hidden challenge in PWI, as this signal floor can be either close to noise level or just above and can go no lower. This signal truncation in the signal intensity time course is a significant issue that deserves attention in DSC PWI. In this paper, we demonstrate that relative cerebral blood volume and relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) are underestimated due to signal truncation in DSC perfusion, in glioblastoma patients. We propose the use of second-pass tissue residue function in rCBF calculation using least-absolute-deviation deconvolution to avoid the underestimation problem. PMID:27531989

  18. Clinical hyperbaric oxygen therapy, wound perfusion, and transcutaneous oximetry.

    PubMed

    Niinikoski, Juha H A

    2004-03-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is an important adjunct in the management of problem wounds which exist in chronic oxygen deficiency and in which the local oxygen tension is below optimal for healing. In the treatment of hypoxic and ischemic wounds, the most important effects of hyperbaric oxygenation are the stimulation of fibroblast proliferation and differentiation, increased collagen formation and cross-linking, augmented neovascularization, and the stimulation of leukocyte microbial killing. Ischemic soft tissues also benefit from hyperoxygenation through improved preservation of energy metabolism and reduction of edema. Hyperbaric oxygen is administered in either a multiplace or a monoplace hyperbaric chamber. Normally, pressures of 2 to 2.5 ATA are used for a period of 90 minutes once or twice daily. For an objective assessment of wound perfusion and oxygenation, transcutaneous oximetry provides a simple, reliable, noninvasive, diagnostic technique. It can be used for assessment of tissue perfusion in the vicinity of the problem wound. Transcutaneous oximetry may be used in the assessment of wound healing potential, selection of amputation level, and patient selection for HBOT. In diabetic patients with chronic foot ulcers peri-wound transcutaneous oxygen tensions (TcP(O2)) over 400 mmHg in 2.5 ATA hyperbaric oxygen or over 50 mmHg in normobaric pure oxygen predict healing success with adjuncted HBOT with high accuracy. PMID:14961187

  19. Correction for partial volume effects in brain perfusion ECT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koole, Michel; Staelens, Steven; Van de Walle, Rik; Lemahieu, Ignace L.

    2003-05-01

    The accurate quantification of brain perfusion for emission computed tomography data (PET-SPECT) is limited by partial volume effects (PVE). This study presents a new approach to estimate accurately the true tissue tracer activity within the grey matter tissue compartment. The methodology is based on the availability of additional anatomical side information and on the assumption that activity concentration within the white matter tissue compartment is constant. Starting from an initial estimate for the white matter grey matter activity, the true tracer activity within the grey matter tissue compartment is estimated by an alternating ML-EM-algorithm. During the updating step the constant activity concentration within the white matter compartment is modelled in the forward projection in order to reconstruct the true activity distribution within the grey matter tissue compartment, hence reducing partial volume averaging. Consequently the estimate for the constant activity in the white matter tissue compartment is updated based on the new estimated activity distribution in the grey matter tissue compartment. We have tested this methodology by means of computer simulations. A T1-weighted MR brainscan of a patient was segmented into white matter, grey matter and cerebrospinal fluid, using the segmentation package of the SPM-software (Statistical Parametric Mapping). The segmented grey and white matter were used to simulate a SPECT acquisition, modelling the noise and the distance dependant detector response. Scatter and attenuation were ignored. Following the above described strategy, simulations have shown it is possible to reconstruct the true activity distribution for the grey matter tissue compartment (activity/tissue volume), assuming constant activity in the white matter tissue compartment.

  20. Cerebrospinal fluid reconstitution via a perfusion-based cadaveric model: feasibility study demonstrating surgical simulation of neuroendoscopic procedures.

    PubMed

    Winer, Jesse L; Kramer, Daniel R; Robison, Richard A; Ohiorhenuan, Ifije; Minneti, Michael; Giannotta, Steven; Zada, Gabriel

    2015-11-01

    Cadaveric surgical simulation carries the advantage of realistic anatomy and haptic feedback but has been historically difficult to model for intraventricular approaches given the need for active flow of CSF. This feasibility study was designed to simulate intraventricular neuroendoscopic approaches and techniques by reconstituting natural CSF flow in a cadaveric model. In 10 fresh human cadavers, a simple cervical laminectomy and dural opening were made, and a 12-gauge arterial catheter was introduced. Saline was continuously perfused at physiological CSF pressures to reconstitute the subarachnoid space and ventricles. A neuroendoscope was subsequently inserted via a standard right frontal bur hole. In 8 of the 10 cadavers, adequate reconstitution and endoscopic access of the lateral and third ventricles were achieved. In 2 cadavers, ventricular access was not feasible, perhaps because of a small ventricle size and/or deteriorated tissue quality. In all 8 cadavers with successful CSF flow reconstitution and endoscopic access, identifying the foramen of Monro was possible, as was performing septum pellucidotomy and endoscopic third ventriculostomy. Furthermore, navigation of the cerebral aqueduct, fourth ventricle, prepontine cistern, and suprasellar cistern via the lamina terminalis was possible, providing a complementary educational paradigm for resident education that cannot typically be performed in live surgery. Surgical simulation plays a critical and increasingly prominent role in surgical education, particularly for techniques with steep learning curves including intraventricular neuroendoscopic procedures. This novel model provides feasible and realistic surgical simulation of neuroendoscopic intraventricular procedures and approaches. PMID:25859805

  1. Effects of vascular elastosis on uterine blood flow and perfusion in anesthetized mares.

    PubMed

    Esteller-Vico, A; Liu, I K M; Vaughan, B; Steffey, E P; Brosnan, R J

    2015-04-01

    In the uterus of the mare, data obtained using transrectal Doppler ultrasonography indicate that uterine blood flow (UBF) is dynamic and changes throughout the estrous cycle. Degenerative lesions in the uterus are associated with subfertility and infertility. Among these lesions, vascular elastosis has been reported in aged, multiparous, and infertile mares. Angiosis of the uterine vasculature could potentially compromise UBF. The objectives of this experiment are to determine levels of UBF and perfusion of reproductively healthy mares and compare them to levels of subfertile/infertile mares affected by uterine vascular elastosis. Twenty mares were classified on the basis of degree of vascular degeneration and stage of cycle. A fluorescent microsphere technique was used to measure reproductive organ perfusion, where microspheres were injected into the left ventricle of the heart and became trapped in capillary beds in proportion to blood flow and tissue perfusion. The reproductive tract was removed, sectioned, and the fluorescent intensity evaluated to measure blood flow and perfusion. Additionally, full-thickness samples of the uterine wall were examined postmortem to further assess the degree of vascular degeneration in all layers of uterine wall. The mean value of uterine perfusion for the control mares during estrus (n = 5) was higher (P < 0.01) than that during diestrus (n = 5); 17.6 and 11.9 mL/min/100g, respectively. For the subfertile/infertile mares, the mean value of tissue perfusion was not different (P > 0.05) during estrus (n = 5) and diestrus (n = 5); 5.9 and 7.2 mL/min/100g, respectively. Uterine perfusion in subfertile/infertile mares affected by elastosis was lower than that of control mares during both estrus (P < 0.01) and diestrus (P < 0.01). The differences in baseline levels of perfusion between the control and elastosis groups indicate that elastosis of the uterine vasculature is associated with decreased uterine perfusion

  2. Quantification of myocardial perfusion based on signal intensity of flow sensitized MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeykoon, Sumeda B.

    The quantitative assessment of perfusion is important for early recognition of a variety of heart diseases, determination of disease severity and their cure. In conventional approach of measuring cardiac perfusion by arterial spin labeling, the relative difference in the apparent T1 relaxation times in response to selective and non-selective inversion of blood entering the region of interest is related to perfusion via a two-compartment tissue model. But accurate determination of T1 in small animal hearts is difficult and prone to errors due to long scan times. The purpose of this study is to develop a fast, robust and simple method to quantitatively assess myocardial perfusion using arterial spin labeling. The proposed method is based on signal intensities (SI) of inversion recovery slice-select, non-select and steady-state images. Especially in this method data are acquired at a single inversion time and at short repetition times. This study began by investigating the accuracy of assessment of perfusion using a two compartment system. First, determination of perfusion by T1 and SI were implemented to a simple, two-compartment phantom model. Mathematical model developed for full spin exchange models (in-vivo experiments) by solving a modified Bloch equation was modified to develop mathematical models (T1 and SI) for a phantom (zero spin exchange). The phantom result at different flow rates shows remarkable evidence of accuracy of the two-compartment model and SI, T1 methods: the SI method has less propagation error and less scan time. Next, twelve healthy C57BL/6 mice were scanned for quantitative perfusion assessment and three of them were repeatedly scanned at three different time points for a reproducibility test. The myocardial perfusion of healthy mice obtained by the SI-method, 5.7+/-1.6 ml/g/min, was similar (p=0.38) to that obtained by the conventional T1 method, 5.6+/- 2.3 ml/g/min. The reproducibility of the SI method shows acceptable results: the

  3. Adequation of mini satellites to oceanic altimetry missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellaieche, G.; Aguttes, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    Association of the mini satellite concept and oceanic altimetry missions is discussed. Mission definition and most constraining requirements (mesoscale for example) demonstrate mini satellites to be quite adequate for such missions. Progress in altimeter characteristics, orbit determination, and position reporting allow consideration of oceanic altimetry missions using low Earth orbit satellites. Satellite constellation, trace keeping and orbital period, and required payload characteristics are exposed. The mission requirements covering Sun synchronous orbit, service area, ground system, and launcher characteristics as well as constellation maintenance strategy are specified. Two options for the satellite, orbital mechanics, propulsion, onboard power and stabilizing subsystems, onboard management, satellite ground linkings, mechanical and thermal subsystems, budgets, and planning are discussed.

  4. Optimization of perfusion CT protocol for imaging of extracranial head and neck tumors.

    PubMed

    Bisdas, Sotirios; Foo, Chuan Zhi; Thng, Choon Hua; Vogl, Thomas J; Koh, Tong San

    2009-10-01

    The in vivo assessment of physiological processes associated with microcirculation in the head and neck tissue by means of perfusion computed tomography is widely used in the management of patients with head and neck tumors. However, there is no systematic consideration of the total acquisition duration and placement of the scans. A simulation study for optimizing perfusion studies of extracranial head and neck tumors, with considerations of reducing radiation dose while maintaining accuracy of the perfusion parameters, is demonstrated here. The suggested that dual-phase optimized protocols may provide reliable estimations of the permeability surface area product as well as blood flow and volume without additional radiation burden and serious patient discomfort. These optimized protocols can potentially be useful in the clinical setting of examining patients with extracranial head and neck tumors. PMID:18454289

  5. Fluorescence-based enhanced reality (FLER) for real-time estimation of bowel perfusion in minimally invasive surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diana, Michele

    2016-03-01

    Pre-anastomotic bowel perfusion is a key factor for a successful healing process. Clinical judgment has limited accuracy to evaluate intestinal microperfusion. Fluorescence videography is a promising tool for image-guided intraoperative assessment of the bowel perfusion at the future anastomotic site in the setting of minimally invasive procedures. The standard configuration for fluorescence videography includes a Near-Infrared endoscope able to detect the signal emitted by a fluorescent dye, more frequently Indocyanine Green (ICG), which is administered by intravenous injection. Fluorescence intensity is proportional to the amount of fluorescent dye diffusing in the tissue and consequently is a surrogate marker of tissue perfusion. However, fluorescence intensity alone remains a subjective approach and an integrated computer-based analysis of the over-time evolution of the fluorescence signal is required to obtain quantitative data. We have developed a solution integrating computer-based analysis for intra-operative evaluation of the optimal resection site, based on the bowel perfusion as determined by the dynamic fluorescence intensity. The software can generate a "virtual perfusion cartography", based on the "fluorescence time-to-peak". The virtual perfusion cartography can be overlapped onto real-time laparoscopic images to obtain the Enhanced Reality effect. We have defined this approach FLuorescence-based Enhanced Reality (FLER). This manuscript describes the stepwise development of the FLER concept.

  6. Luminal distension as a possible consequence of experimental intestinal perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Wingate, David; Hyams, Ashley; Phillips, Sidney

    1974-01-01

    In an experimental jejunal perfusion study, distress in healthy subjects occurred during eight out of 16 perfusions in which intestinal secretion was provoked. Calculation demonstrates the volumetric consequences of inadequate recovery of secretory perfusates, and analysis of the perfusion studies shows that distress was significantly associated with poor recovery of the perfusate. These observations are pertinent to increasing interest in the phenomenon of intestinal fluid secretion. PMID:4435588

  7. Perfusion education and training in Europe.

    PubMed

    Merkle, Frank

    2006-01-01

    Perfusion education and training varies considerably throughout Europe. Unlike in the US, where a common curriculum for perfusion education has been established, each European country has its own education system. This fact is further complicated by a multitude of national languages and cultures. Thus, perfusion education programmes vary, not only in content, but also in their academic levels. This article aims to give a comprehensive overview of the situation in each of the 20 member states of the European Board of Cardiovascular Perfusion (EBCP). The EBCP delegates were polled for a description of the process of training and education of clinical perfusionists in their respective countries. Following the initial delegate poll in 2001, an update of the material was performed in spring 2005. In summary, training of clinical perfusionists in Europe varies considerably between countries. A professional body is necessary to oversee the training process and to guarantee a minimum level of clinical competency for cardiovascular perfusionists. PMID:16485693

  8. Modeling laser speckle imaging of perfusion in the skin (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regan, Caitlin; Hayakawa, Carole K.; Choi, Bernard

    2016-02-01

    Laser speckle imaging (LSI) enables visualization of relative blood flow and perfusion in the skin. It is frequently applied to monitor treatment of vascular malformations such as port wine stain birthmarks, and measure changes in perfusion due to peripheral vascular disease. We developed a computational Monte Carlo simulation of laser speckle contrast imaging to quantify how tissue optical properties, blood vessel depths and speeds, and tissue perfusion affect speckle contrast values originating from coherent excitation. The simulated tissue geometry consisted of multiple layers to simulate the skin, or incorporated an inclusion such as a vessel or tumor at different depths. Our simulation used a 30x30mm uniform flat light source to optically excite the region of interest in our sample to better mimic wide-field imaging. We used our model to simulate how dynamically scattered photons from a buried blood vessel affect speckle contrast at different lateral distances (0-1mm) away from the vessel, and how these speckle contrast changes vary with depth (0-1mm) and flow speed (0-10mm/s). We applied the model to simulate perfusion in the skin, and observed how different optical properties, such as epidermal melanin concentration (1%-50%) affected speckle contrast. We simulated perfusion during a systolic forearm occlusion and found that contrast decreased by 35% (exposure time = 10ms). Monte Carlo simulations of laser speckle contrast give us a tool to quantify what regions of the skin are probed with laser speckle imaging, and measure how the tissue optical properties and blood flow affect the resulting images.

  9. A micro-perfusion bioreactor for on line investigation of ECM remodeling under hydrodynamic and biochemical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Garziano, A; Urciuolo, F; Imparato, G; Martorina, F; Corrado, B; Netti, P

    2016-03-01

    Tissue-on-chip (TOC) systems aim at replicating complex biological dynamics in vitro with the potential either to improve the understanding of human biology or to develop more accurate therapeutic strategies. To replicate faithfully the intricate interrelationships between cells and their surrounding microenvironment, the three-dimensional (3D) tissue model must possess a responsive extracellular matrix (ECM). ECM remodeling plays a pivotal role in guiding cells and tissues functions and such aspect is somewhat denied during in vitro studies. For this purpose, we fabricated a micro-perfusion bioreactor capable to sustain the viability of 3D engineered tissue models recapitulating the process of the native ECM deposition and assembly. Engineered human dermis micro-tissue precursors (HD-μTP) were used as building blocks to generate a final tissue. HD-μTP were loaded in the perfusion space of the micro-perfusion bioreactor and, under the superimposition of different fluid dynamic regimes and biochemical stimulation, they synthesized new collagen proteins that were, then, assembled in the perfusion space forming a continuum of cells embedded in their own ECM. The micro-perfusion bioreactor was fabricated to allow the on-line monitoring of the oxygen consumption and the assembly of the newly formed collagen network via real time acquisition of the second harmonic generation (SHG) signal. The possibility to detect the collagen reorganization due to both fluid dynamic and biochemical stimulation, let us to define the optimal perfusion configuration in order to obtain a TOC system based on an endogenous and responsive ECM. PMID:26860053

  10. Myocardial perfusion imaging with 201Tl.

    PubMed

    Pagnanelli, Robert A; Basso, Danny A

    2010-03-01

    The object of this review is to provide information about (201)Tl-thallous chloride in radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging. This technique has experienced a recent resurgence because of the shortage of (99m)Tc. After reading this article, the technologist will be able to describe the properties and uptake mechanism of (201)Tl, the procedure for myocardial perfusion imaging with this agent, and the advantages and disadvantages of thallium, compared with the technetium agents. PMID:20159930

  11. Improved exercise myocardial perfusion during lidoflazine therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, W.; Narahara, K.A.; Park, J.

    1983-11-01

    Lidoflazine is a synthetic drug with calcium-channel blocking effects. In a study of 6 patients with severe classic angina pectoris, single-blind administration of lidoflazine was associated with improved myocardial perfusion during exercise as determined by thallium-201 stress scintigraphy. These studies demonstrate that lidoflazine therapy is associated with relief of angina, an increased physical work capacity, and improved regional myocardial perfusion during exercise.

  12. Multimodal imaging of cutaneous wound tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shiwu; Gnyawali, Surya; Huang, Jiwei; Ren, Wenqi; Gordillo, Gayle; Sen, Chandan K.; Xu, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of wound tissue ischemia, perfusion, and inflammation provides critical information for appropriate detection, staging, and treatment of chronic wounds. However, few methods are available for simultaneous assessment of these tissue parameters in a noninvasive and quantitative fashion. We integrated hyperspectral, laser speckle, and thermographic imaging modalities in a single-experimental setup for multimodal assessment of tissue oxygenation, perfusion, and inflammation characteristics. Algorithms were developed for appropriate coregistration between wound images acquired by different imaging modalities at different times. The multimodal wound imaging system was validated in an occlusion experiment, where oxygenation and perfusion maps of a healthy subject's upper extremity were continuously monitored during a postocclusive reactive hyperemia procedure and compared with standard measurements. The system was also tested in a clinical trial where a wound of three millimeters in diameter was introduced on a healthy subject's lower extremity and the healing process was continuously monitored. Our in vivo experiments demonstrated the clinical feasibility of multimodal cutaneous wound imaging.

  13. The cerebral imaging using vessel-around method in the perfusion CT of the human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Choong-Il; Choi, Seung-Wook; Park, Seung-Chul; Shin, Yeong-Gil; Kim, Jae-Hyoung; Chong, Gi-Bong

    2005-04-01

    Perfusion CT has been successfully used as a functional imaging technique for diagnosis of patients with hyperacute stroke. However, the commonly used methods based on curve-fitting are time consuming. Numerous researchers have investigated to what extent Perfusion CT can be used for the quantitative assessment of cerebral ischemia and to rapidly obtain comprehensive information regarding the extent of ischemic damage in acute stroke patients. The aim of this study is to propose an alternative approach to rapidly obtain the brain perfusion mapping and to show the proposed cerebral flow imaging of the vessel and tissue in human brain be reliable and useful. Our main design concern was algorithmic speed, robustness and automation in order to allow its potential use in the emergency situation of acute stroke. To obtain a more effective mapping, we analyzed the signal characteristics of Perfusion CT and defined the vessel-around model which includes the vessel and tissue. We proposed a nonparametric vessel-around approach which automatically discriminates the vessel and tissue around vessel from non-interested brain matter stratifying the level of maximum enhancement of pixel-based TAC. The stratification of pixel-based TAC was executed using the mean and standard deviation of the signal intensity of each pixel and mapped to the cerebral flow imaging. The defined vessel-around model was used to show the cerebral flow imaging and to specify the area of markedly reduced perfusion with loss of function of still viable neurons. Perfusion CT is a fast and practical technique for routine clinical application. It provides substantial and important additional information for the selection of the optimal treatment strategy for patients with hyperacute stroke. The vessel-around approach reduces the computation time significantly when compared with the perfusion imaging using the GVF. The proposed cerebral imaging shows reliable results which are validated by physicians and

  14. Quantifying dose to the reconstructed breast: Can we adequately treat?

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Eugene; Marsh, Robin B.; Griffith, Kent A.; Moran, Jean M.; Pierce, Lori J.

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate how immediate reconstruction (IR) impacts postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) dose distributions to the reconstructed breast (RB), internal mammary nodes (IMN), heart, and lungs using quantifiable dosimetric end points. 3D conformal plans were developed for 20 IR patients, 10 autologous reconstruction (AR), and 10 expander-implant (EI) reconstruction. For each reconstruction type, 5 right- and 5 left-sided reconstructions were selected. Two plans were created for each patient, 1 with RB coverage alone and 1 with RB + IMN coverage. Left-sided EI plans without IMN coverage had higher heart Dmean than left-sided AR plans (2.97 and 0.84 Gy, p = 0.03). Otherwise, results did not vary by reconstruction type and all remaining metrics were evaluated using a combined AR and EI dataset. RB coverage was adequate regardless of laterality or IMN coverage (Dmean 50.61 Gy, D95 45.76 Gy). When included, IMN Dmean and D95 were 49.57 and 40.96 Gy, respectively. Mean heart doses increased with left-sided treatment plans and IMN inclusion. Right-sided treatment plans and IMN inclusion increased mean lung V{sub 20}. Using standard field arrangements and 3D planning, we observed excellent coverage of the RB and IMN, regardless of laterality or reconstruction type. Our results demonstrate that adequate doses can be delivered to the RB with or without IMN coverage.

  15. Purchasing a cycle helmet: are retailers providing adequate advice?

    PubMed Central

    Plumridge, E.; McCool, J.; Chetwynd, J.; Langley, J. D.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to examine the selling of cycle helmets in retail stores with particular reference to the adequacy of advice offered about the fit and securing of helmets. METHODS: All 55 retail outlets selling cycle helmets in Christchurch, New Zealand were studied by participant observation. A research entered each store as a prospective customer and requested assistance to purchase a helmet. She took detailed field notes of the ensuing encounter and these were subsequently transcribed, coded, and analysed. RESULTS: Adequate advice for helmet purchase was given in less than half of the stores. In general the sales assistants in specialist cycle shops were better informed and gave more adequate advice than those in department stores. Those who have good advice also tended to be more good advice also tended to be more active in helping with fitting the helmet. Knowledge about safety standards was apparent in one third of sales assistants. Few stores displayed information for customers about the correct fit of cycle helmets. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that the advice and assistance being given to ensure that cycle helmets fit properly is often inadequate and thus the helmets may fail to fulfil their purpose in preventing injury. Consultation between retailers and policy makers is a necessary first step to improving this situation. PMID:9346053

  16. Adequate drainage system design for heap leaching structures.

    PubMed

    Majdi, Abbas; Amini, Mehdi; Nasab, Saeed Karimi

    2007-08-17

    The paper describes an optimum design of a drainage system for a heap leaching structure which has positive impacts on both mine environment and mine economics. In order to properly design a drainage system the causes of an increase in the acid level of the heap which in turn produces severe problems in the hydrometallurgy processes must be evaluated. One of the most significant negative impacts induced by an increase in the acid level within a heap structure is the increase of pore acid pressure which in turn increases the potential of a heap-slide that may endanger the mine environment. In this paper, initially the thickness of gravelly drainage layer is determined via existing empirical equations. Then by assuming that the calculated thickness is constant throughout the heap structure, an approach has been proposed to calculate the required internal diameter of the slotted polyethylene pipes which are used for auxiliary drainage purposes. In order to adequately design this diameter, the pipe's cross-sectional deformation due to stepped heap structure overburden pressure is taken into account. Finally, a design of an adequate drainage system for the heap structure 2 at Sarcheshmeh copper mine is presented and the results are compared with those calculated by exiting equations. PMID:17321044

  17. Comparative studies on the toxicity of mercury, cadmium, and copper toward the isolated perfused rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Strubelt, O.; Kremer, J.; Tilse, A.; Keogh, J.; Pentz, K.R.; Younes, M.

    1996-02-01

    The toxic effects of cadmium, mercury, and copper were compared over the range 0.01, 0.03, and 0.1 mM using the isolated perfused rat liver preparation. All metals caused similar changes in various parameters used to describe general toxicity. Reductions in oxygen consumption, perfusion flow, and biliary secretion were found, while lactate dehydrogenase release , as well as liver weight, increased in a dose-dependent fashion. Each metal caused similar magnitudes of changes and exerted similar potency. Measurement of other parameters revealed a number of differences. Although all metals reduced hepatic ATP concentration, mercury and cadmium were more potent than copper. Cadmium was the most potent at decreasing reduced glutathione levels. Mercury was most effective at increasing tissue calcium content, while copper was less so, and cadmium ineffective. Only copper significantly increased tissue malondialdehyde (MDA) content, while all metals increased its release into perfusate, cadmium seemed the most potent metal in increasing MDA release, but it was least efficacious, while copper was the most. Antioxidants such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, and Trolox C only reduced cadmium`s influence on MDA in perfusate; but did not affect cadmium`s ability to alter most other parameters of vitality. Albumin reversed the toxic effects of copper and mercury, but not cadmium. While metal-induced reductions in perfusion flow accounted for some of the toxic effects of the metals, the results as a whole supported the suggestion that all metals exerted toxicity at the mitochondria, since ATP levels were reduced in a manner that could not be reproduced by perfusion flow reduction alone. Lipid peroxidation appears to play little role in determining toxicity induced by any of these metals. Furthermore, albumin may play an important physiological role in preventing hepatic injury that might otherwise be induced through acute metal intoxication. 40 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Preliminary Study of Open Quotient in an Ex-Vivo Perfused Human Larynx Model

    PubMed Central

    Mendelsohn, Abie H.; Zhang, Zhaoyan; Luegmair, Georg; Orestes, Michael; Berke, Gerald S.

    2016-01-01

    Importance Scientific understanding human voice production to date is a product of indirect investigations including animal models, cadaveric tissue study, or computational modeling. Due to its invasive nature, direct experimentation of human voice production has previously not been possible. The feasibility of an ex-vivo perfused human phonatory model has recently allowed systematic investigation in virtually living human larynges with parametric laryngeal muscle stimulation. Objective In this study, the relationship between adductor muscle group stimulation and the open quotient (OQ) of vocal fold vibration was investigated using an ex-vivo perfused human larynx. Design Human perfused tissue study. Setting Physiology Laboratory. Participants Human larynx is recovered from research-consented organ donors within two hours of cardiac death. Interventions, Main Outcomes and Measures Perfusion with donated human blood is re-established shortly after cardiac death. Human perfused phonation is achieved by providing subglottal airflow under graded neuromuscular electrical stimulation bilaterally to the intrinsic adductor groups and cricothyroid muscles. The phonation resulting from the graded states of neuromuscular stimulations are evaluated through high-speed vibratory imaging. OQ is derived through digital kymography and glottal area waveform analysis. Results Under constant glottal flow, step-wise increase in adductor muscle group stimulation decreased OQ. Quantitatively, OQ values reached a lower limit of 0.42. Increased stimulation above maximal muscle deformation was unable to affect OQ beyond this lower limit. Conclusions and Relevance For the first time in a neuromuscularly activated human larynx, a negative relationship between adductor muscle group stimulation and phonatory OQ was demonstrated. Further experience with the ex-vivo perfused human phonatory model will work to systematically define this causal relationship. PMID:26181642

  19. The imaging of myocardial perfusion with 81mKr during coronary arteriography.

    PubMed

    Kleynhans, P H; Lötter, M G; van Aswegen, A; Herbst, C P; Marx, J D; Minnaar, P C

    1982-01-01

    The use of 81mKr was investigated for imaging myocardial perfusion during coronary arteriography using conventional catheters. When the significance of stenosis judged by arteriography is unclear, the effect on tissue perfusion can be established and the contribution to collateral flow by each artery separately evaluated. The distribution of 81mKr, due to its 13-s half-life, represents regional blood flow. In order to evaluate interventions, studies can be repeated at a low radiation risk to patients. A sterile pyrogen-free 81Rb-81Kr generator was developed. With slow infusion, inadequate mixing and streaming takes place due to laminar flow in coronary arteries. Fast intermittent 3-ml 81Kr-dextrose bolus injections convincingly eliminated streaming artefacts. Imaging was performed in 13 patients with a mobile scintillation camera and digital imaging system. Blood flow was calculated using the inert gas washout technique. There was good correlation (r = 0.91) between coronary blood flow determinations using 81mKr and 133Xe respectively. The perfusion images correlated well with the coronary angiograms. Total coronary arterial occlusions as demonstrated by arteriography were all shown as perfusion defects during rest. During atrial pacing myocardial flow was increased two-fold in normal coronary arteries and to a lesser extent in arteries with significant disease. The most critical lesion in a branch of a left coronary artery leads to a redistribution of perfusion during pacing. PMID:7128629

  20. Phase-based metamorphosis of diffusion lesion in relation to perfusion values in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Rekik, Islem; Allassonnière, Stéphanie; Luby, Marie; Carpenter, Trevor K; Wardlaw, Joanna M

    2015-01-01

    Examining the dynamics of stroke ischemia is limited by the standard use of 2D-volume or voxel-based analysis techniques. Recently developed spatiotemporal models such as the 4D metamorphosis model showed promise for capturing ischemia dynamics. We used a 4D metamorphosis model to evaluate acute ischemic stroke lesion morphology from the acute diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) to final T2-weighted imaging (T2-w). In 20 representative patients, we metamorphosed the acute lesion to subacute lesion to final infarct. From the DWI lesion deformation maps we identified dynamic lesion areas and examined their association with perfusion values inside and around the lesion edges, blinded to reperfusion status. We then tested the model in ten independent patients from the STroke Imaging Repository (STIR). Perfusion values varied widely between and within patients, and were similar in contracting and expanding DWI areas in many patients in both datasets. In 25% of patients, the perfusion values were higher in DWI-contracting than DWI-expanding areas. A similar wide range of perfusion values and ongoing expansion and contraction of the DWI lesion were seen subacutely. There was more DWI contraction and less expansion in patients who received thrombolysis, although with widely ranging perfusion values that did not differ. 4D metamorphosis modeling shows promise as a method to improve use of multimodal imaging to understand the evolution of acute ischemic tissue towards its fate. PMID:26288755

  1. Controlled oxygenated rewarming of cold stored liver grafts by thermally graduated machine perfusion prior to reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Minor, T; Efferz, P; Fox, M; Wohlschlaeger, J; Lüer, B

    2013-06-01

    The quality of cold-stored livers declines with the extension of ischemic time, increasing the risk of primary dys or nonfunction. A new concept to rescue preserved marginal liver grafts by gentle oxygenated warming-up prior to blood reperfusion was investigated. Porcine livers were preserved by cold storage (CS) in modified HTK-solution for 18 h. Some grafts were subsequently subjected to 90 min of controlled oxygenated rewarming (COR) by machine perfusion with gradual increase of perfusate temperature up to 20°C or simple oxygenated machine perfusion in hypothermia (HMP) or subnormothermia (SNP). Graft viability was assessed thereafter by 4 h of normothermic blood reperfusion ex vivo. Endischemic tissue energetics were significantly improved by COR or SNP and to a notably lesser extent by HMP. COR significantly reduced cellular enzyme loss, gene expression and perfusate activities of TNF-alpha, radical mediated lipid peroxidation (LPO) and increase of portal vascular perfusion resistance upon reperfusion, while HMP or SNP were less protective. Only COR resulted in significantly more bile production than after CS. Histological injury score and caspase 3-activation were significantly lower after COR than after CS. Oxygenated rewarming prior to reperfusion seems to be a promising technique to improve subsequent organ recovery upon reperfusion of long preserved liver grafts. PMID:23617781

  2. Perfusion visualization and analysis for pulmonary embolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, Michael S.; Kiraly, Atilla P.; Naidich, David P.; Novak, Carol L.

    2005-04-01

    Given the nature of pulmonary embolism (PE), timely and accurate diagnosis is critical. Contrast enhanced high-resolution CT images allow physicians to accurately identify segmental and sub-segmental emboli. However, it is also important to assess the effect of such emboli on the blood flow in the lungs. Expanding upon previous research, we propose a method for 3D visualization of lung perfusion. The proposed method allows users to examine perfusion throughout the entire lung volume at a single glance, with areas of diminished perfusion highlighted so that they are visible independent of the viewing location. This may be particularly valuable for better accuracy in assessing the extent of hemodynamic alterations resulting from pulmonary emboli. The method also facilitates user interaction and may help identify small peripheral sub-segmental emboli otherwise overlooked. 19 patients referred for possible PE were evaluated by CT following the administration of IV contrast media. An experienced thoracic radiologist assessed the 19 datasets with 17 diagnosed as being positive for PE with multiple emboli. Since anomalies in lung perfusion due to PE can alter the distribution of parenchymal densities, we analyzed features collected from histograms of the computed perfusion maps and demonstrate their potential usefulness as a preliminary test to suggest the presence of PE. These histogram features also offer the possibility of distinguishing distinct patterns associated with chronic PE and may even be useful for further characterization of changes in perfusion or overall density resulting from associated conditions such as pneumonia or diffuse lung disease.

  3. Hemodynamic Segmentation of Brain Perfusion Images with Delay and Dispersion Effects Using an Expectation-Maximization Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chia-Feng; Guo, Wan-Yuo; Chang, Feng-Chi; Huang, Shang-Ran; Chou, Yen-Chun; Wu, Yu-Te

    2013-01-01

    Automatic identification of various perfusion compartments from dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance brain images can assist in clinical diagnosis and treatment of cerebrovascular diseases. The principle of segmentation methods was based on the clustering of bolus transit-time profiles to discern areas of different tissues. However, the cerebrovascular diseases may result in a delayed and dispersed local perfusion and therefore alter the hemodynamic signal profiles. Assessing the accuracy of the segmentation technique under delayed/dispersed circumstance is critical to accurately evaluate the severity of the vascular disease. In this study, we improved the segmentation method of expectation-maximization algorithm by using the results of hierarchical clustering on whitened perfusion data as initial parameters for a mixture of multivariate Gaussians model. In addition, Monte Carlo simulations were conducted to evaluate the performance of proposed method under different levels of delay, dispersion, and noise of signal profiles in tissue segmentation. The proposed method was used to classify brain tissue types using perfusion data from five normal participants, a patient with unilateral stenosis of the internal carotid artery, and a patient with moyamoya disease. Our results showed that the normal, delayed or dispersed hemodynamics can be well differentiated for patients, and therefore the local arterial input function for impaired tissues can be recognized to minimize the error when estimating the cerebral blood flow. Furthermore, the tissue in the risk of infarct and the tissue with or without the complementary blood supply from the communicating arteries can be identified. PMID:23894386

  4. Modulation of Perfusion and Oxygenation by Red Blood Cell Oxygen Affinity during Acute Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Cabrales, Pedro; Tsai, Amy G.; Intaglietta, Marcos

    2008-01-01

    Responses to exchange transfusion using red blood cells (RBCs) with modified hemoglobin (Hb) oxygen (O2) affinity were studied in the hamster window chamber model during acute anemia to determine its role on microvascular perfusion and tissue oxygenation. Allosteric effectors were introduced in the RBCs by electroporation. Inositol hexaphosphate (IHP) and 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural (5HMF) were used to decrease and increase Hb-O2 affinity. In vitro P50s (partial pressure of O2 at 50% Hb saturation) were modified to 10, 25, 45, and 50 mm Hg (normal P50 is 32 mm Hg). Allosteric effectors also decreased the Hill coefficient. Anemic condition was induced by isovolemic hemodilution exchanges using 6% dextran 70 kD to 18% hematocrit (Hct). Modified RBCs (at 18% Hct in 5% albumin solution) were infused by exchange transfusion of 35% of blood volume. Systemic parameters, microvascular perfusion, capillary perfusion (functional capillary density, FCD), and microvascular Po2 levels were measured. RBcs with P50 of 45 mm Hg increased tissue Po2 and decreased O2 delivery (Do2) and extraction (Vo2) and RBCs with P50 of 60 mmHg reduced FCD, microvascular flow, tissue Po2, Do2 and Vo2. Erythrocytes with increased Hb-O2 affinity maintained hemodynamic conditions, Do2 and decreased tissue Po2. This study shows that in an anemic condition, maximal tissue Po2 does not correspond to maximal Do2 and Vo2. PMID:17884988

  5. Induction of Hepatic and Endothelial Differentiation by Perfusion in a Three-Dimensional Cell Culture Model of Human Fetal Liver

    PubMed Central

    Pekor, Christopher; Gerlach, Jörg C.; Nettleship, Ian

    2015-01-01

    The development of functional engineered tissue constructs depends on high cell densities and appropriate vascularization. In this study we implemented a four-compartment three-dimensional perfusion bioreactor culture model for studying the effects of medium perfusion on endothelial, hepatic, and hematopoietic cell populations of primary human fetal liver in an in vivo-like environment. Human fetal liver cells were cultured in bioreactors configured to provide either perfusion or diffusion conditions. Metabolic activities of the cultures were monitored daily by measuring glucose consumption and lactate production. Cell viability during culture was analyzed by lactate dehydrogenase activity. Hepatic functionality was determined by the release of albumin and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) in culture medium samples. After 4 days of culture, cells were analyzed for the expression of a variety of endothelial, hepatic, and hematopoietic genes, as well as the surface marker expression of CD31 and CD34 in flow cytometry. We found that medium perfusion increased the gene expression of endothelial markers such as CD31, von Willebrand factor (vWF), CD140b, CD309, and CD144 while decreasing the gene expression of the erythrocyte-surface marker CD235a. Hepatic differentiation was promoted under perfusion conditions as demonstrated by lower AFP and higher albumin secretion compared with cultures not exposed to medium perfusion. Additionally, cultures exposed to medium perfusion gave higher rates of glucose consumption and lactate production, indicating increased metabolic activity. In conclusion, high-density bioreactors configured to provide constant medium perfusion significantly induced hepatic and endothelial cell differentiation and provided improved conditions for the culture of human fetal liver cells compared with cultures without perfusion. PMID:25559936

  6. Induction of Hepatic and Endothelial Differentiation by Perfusion in a Three-Dimensional Cell Culture Model of Human Fetal Liver.

    PubMed

    Pekor, Christopher; Gerlach, Jörg C; Nettleship, Ian; Schmelzer, Eva

    2015-07-01

    The development of functional engineered tissue constructs depends on high cell densities and appropriate vascularization. In this study we implemented a four-compartment three-dimensional perfusion bioreactor culture model for studying the effects of medium perfusion on endothelial, hepatic, and hematopoietic cell populations of primary human fetal liver in an in vivo-like environment. Human fetal liver cells were cultured in bioreactors configured to provide either perfusion or diffusion conditions. Metabolic activities of the cultures were monitored daily by measuring glucose consumption and lactate production. Cell viability during culture was analyzed by lactate dehydrogenase activity. Hepatic functionality was determined by the release of albumin and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) in culture medium samples. After 4 days of culture, cells were analyzed for the expression of a variety of endothelial, hepatic, and hematopoietic genes, as well as the surface marker expression of CD31 and CD34 in flow cytometry. We found that medium perfusion increased the gene expression of endothelial markers such as CD31, von Willebrand factor (vWF), CD140b, CD309, and CD144 while decreasing the gene expression of the erythrocyte-surface marker CD235a. Hepatic differentiation was promoted under perfusion conditions as demonstrated by lower AFP and higher albumin secretion compared with cultures not exposed to medium perfusion. Additionally, cultures exposed to medium perfusion gave higher rates of glucose consumption and lactate production, indicating increased metabolic activity. In conclusion, high-density bioreactors configured to provide constant medium perfusion significantly induced hepatic and endothelial cell differentiation and provided improved conditions for the culture of human fetal liver cells compared with cultures without perfusion. PMID:25559936

  7. Dipyridamole-thallium-201 tomography documenting improved myocardial perfusion with therapy in Kawasaki disease

    SciTech Connect

    Nienaber, C.A.; Spielmann, R.P.; Hausdorf, G.

    1988-12-01

    Thallium-201 tomographic perfusion studies after pharmacologic vasodilation were performed in seven children (aged 2 years 8 months to 8 years 7 months), 3 to 20 months after the acute stage of the disease. In all patients coronary aneurysms were seen on cross-sectional echocardiograms. The scintigrams of six children showed no significant regional reduction of myocardial thallium-201 uptake. These children had remained asymptomatic in the follow-up period after the acute inflammatory stage of Kawasaki disease. Persistent and transient thallium defects were present in one child with acute posterolateral myocardial infarction; obstruction of two coronary vessels supplying the defect zones was confirmed by contrast angiography. After 8 months of treatment a follow-up nuclear scan showed marked reduction in the size of the defect and almost complete abolishment of the ischemic reaction. Thus tomographic thallium-201 perfusion scintigraphy in conjunction with vasodilation stress is useful to assess myocardial perfusion in children with Kawasaki disease and demonstrates marked improvement in regional perfusion after adequate medical therapy.

  8. In-vivo regional myocardial perfusion measurements in a porcine model by ECG-gated multislice computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stantz, Keith M.; Liang, Yun; Meyer, Cristopher A.; Teague, Shawn; Stecker, Michael; Hutchins, Gary; McLennan, Gordon; Persohn, Scott

    2003-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether functional multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) can identify regional areas of normally perfused and ischemic myocardium in a porcine model. Material and Methods: Three out bred pigs, two of which had ameroids surgically implanted to constrict flow within the LAD and LCx coronary arteries, were injected with 25 mL of iopromide (Isovue) at a rate of 5 mL/second via the femoral or jugular vein. Sixty axial scans along the short axis of the heart was acquired on a 16-slice CT scanner (Philips MX8000-IDT) triggered at end-diastole of the cardiac cycle and acquiring an image within 270 msec. A second series of scans were taken after an intravenous injection of a vasodilator, 150 μg/kg/min of adenosine. ROIs were drawn around the myocardial tissue and the resulting time-density curves were used to extract perfusion values. Results: Determination of the myocardial perfusion and fractional blood volume implementing three different perfusion models. A 5-point averaging or 'smoothing' algorithm was employed to effectively filter the data due to its noisy nature. The (preliminary) average perfusion and fractional blood volume values over selected axial slices for the pig without an artificially induced stenosis were measured to be 84 +/- 22 mL/min/100g-tissue and 0.17 +/- 0.04 mL/g-tissue, the former is consistent with PET scan and EBCT results. The pig with a stenosis in the left LAD coronary artery showed a reduced global perfusion value -- 45 mL/min/100g-tissue. Correlations in regional perfusion values relative to the stenosis were weak. During the infusion of adenosine, averaged perfusion values for the three subjects increased by 46 (+/-45) percent, comparable to increases measured with PET. Conclusion: Quantifying global perfusion values using MDCT appear encouraging. Future work will focus resolving the systematic effects from noise due to signal fluctuation from the porcine tachyardia (80-93 BPM) and provide a more robust measurement

  9. Hypothermic machine perfusion of the liver and the critical balance between perfusion pressures and endothelial injury.

    PubMed

    't Hart, N A; van der Plaats, A; Leuvenink, H G D; van Goor, H; Wiersema-Buist, J; Verkerke, G J; Rakhorst, G; Ploeg, R J

    2005-01-01

    Hypothermic machine perfusion (HMP) provides better protection against cold ischemic injury than cold storage in marginal donor kidneys. Also, in liver transplantation a switch from static cold storage to HMP could be beneficial as it would allow longer preservation times and the use of marginal donors. A critical question concerning application of HMP in liver preservation is the crucial balance between perfusion pressure and occurrence of endothelial injury. Rat livers were cold-perfused for 24 hours to study perfusion pressures for both hepatic artery and portal vein. Cold storage served as control and was compared to HMP-preserved livers using a mean arterial perfusion pressure of 25 mm Hg and a portal perfusion pressure of 4 mm Hg (25% of normothermic liver circulation) and to HMP at 50 mm Hg and 8 mm Hg perfusion, respectively (50% of normothermic liver circulation). UW solution was enriched with 14.9 micromol/L propidium iodide (PI) to stain for dead cells and with an additional 13.5 micromol/L acridine orange to stain for viable hepatocytes. A low PI-positive cell count was found using HMP at 25% of normal circulation compared to cold storage. The PI count was high for the HMP group perfused at just 50% of normal circulation compared to HMP at 25% and compared to cold storage. In summary, for liver HMP, perfusion at 25% showed complete perfusion with minimal cellular injury. HMP using perfusion pressures of 25 mm Hg for the hepatic artery and 4 mm Hg for the portal vein is feasible without induction of endothelial injury. PMID:15808634

  10. Multislice perfusion imaging in human brain using the C-FOCI inversion pulse: comparison with hyperbolic secant.

    PubMed

    Yongbi, M N; Yang, Y; Frank, J A; Duyn, J H

    1999-12-01

    Perfusion studies based on pulsed arterial spin labeling have primarily applied hyperbolic secant (HS) pulses for spin inversion. To optimize perfusion sensitivity, it is highly desirable to implement the HS pulse with the same slice width as the width of the imaging pulse. Unfortunately, this approach causes interactions between the slice profiles and manifests as residual signal from static tissue in the resultant perfusion image. This problem is currently overcome by increasing the selective HS width relative to the imaging slice width. However, this solution increases the time for the labeled blood to reach the imaging slice (transit time), causing loss of perfusion sensitivity as a result of T(1) relaxation effects. In this study, we demonstrate that the preceding problems can be largely overcome by use of the C-shaped frequency offset corrected inversion (FOCI) pulse [Ordidge et al., Magn Reson Med 1996;36:562]. The implementation of this pulse for multislice perfusion imaging on the cerebrum is presented, showing substantial improvement in slice definition in vivo compared with the HS pulse. The sharper FOCI profile is shown to reduce the physical gap (or "safety margin") between the inversion and imaging slabs, resulting in a significant increase in perfusion signal without residual contamination from static tissue. The mean +/- SE (n = 6) gray matter perfusion-weighted signal (DeltaM/M(o)) without the application of vascular signal suppression gradients were 1.19 +/- 0. 10% (HS-flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery [FAIR]), and 1. 51 +/- 0.11% for the FOCI-FAIR sequence. The corresponding values with vascular signal suppression were 0.64 +/- 0.14%, and 0.91 +/- 0. 08% using the HS- and FOCI-FAIR sequences, respectively. Compared with the HS-based data, the FOCI-FAIR results correspond to an average increase in perfusion signal of up to between 26%-30%. Magn Reson Med 42:1098-1105, 1999. PMID:10571931

  11. [Pulmonary ventilation/perfusion ratio].

    PubMed

    Guenard, H

    1987-01-01

    The ratios of ventilatory (V) and perfusion (Q) flow rates in the lung are to a large extent responsible for the efficiency of gas exchange. In a simplified monocompartmental model of the lung, the arterial partial pressure of a given gas (Pa) is a function of several factors: the solubility of this gas in blood, its venous and inspired partial pressures and the V/Q ratio. In a multicompartemental model, the mean arterial partial pressure of the gas is a function of the individual values of Pa in each compartment as well as the distribution of V/Q ratios in the lung and the relationship between the concentration and the partial pressure of the gas. The heterogeneity of the distribution of V/Q results from those of both V and Q. Two factors are mainly responsible for this heterogeneity: the gravity and the morphometric characteristics of bronchi and vessels. V/Q ratios are partially controlled at least in low V/Q compartments since hypoxia in these compartments leads to pulmonary arteriolar vasoconstriction. However lungs V/Q ratios range from 0.1 to 10 with a mode around 1. Age, muscular exercise, posture, accelerations, anesthesia, O2 breathing, pulmonary pathology are factors which may alter the distribution of V/Q ratios. PMID:3332289

  12. Are PPS payments adequate? Issues for updating and assessing rates

    PubMed Central

    Sheingold, Steven H.; Richter, Elizabeth

    1992-01-01

    Declining operating margins under Medicare's prospective payment system (PPS) have focused attention on the adequacy of payment rates. The question of whether annual updates to the rates have been too low or cost increases too high has become important. In this article we discuss issues relevant to updating PPS rates and judging their adequacy. We describe a modification to the current framework for recommending annual update factors. This framework is then used to retrospectively assess PPS payment and cost growth since 1985. The preliminary results suggest that current rates are more than adequate to support the cost of efficient care. Also discussed are why using financial margins to evaluate rates is problematic and alternative methods that might be employed. PMID:10127450

  13. Effects of Steroid Hormones on Sex Differences in Cerebral Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Ghisleni, Carmen; Bollmann, Steffen; Biason-Lauber, Anna; Poil, Simon-Shlomo; Brandeis, Daniel; Martin, Ernst; Michels, Lars; Hersberger, Martin; Suckling, John

    2015-01-01

    Sex differences in the brain appear to play an important role in the prevalence and progression of various neuropsychiatric disorders, but to date little is known about the cerebral mechanisms underlying these differences. One widely reported finding is that women demonstrate higher cerebral perfusion than men, but the underlying cause of this difference in perfusion is not known. This study investigated the putative role of steroid hormones such as oestradiol, testosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS) as underlying factors influencing cerebral perfusion. We acquired arterial spin labelling perfusion images of 36 healthy adult subjects (16 men, 20 women). Analyses on average whole brain perfusion levels included a multiple regression analysis to test for the relative impact of each hormone on the global perfusion. Additionally, voxel-based analyses were performed to investigate the sex difference in regional perfusion as well as the correlations between local perfusion and serum oestradiol, testosterone, and DHEAS concentrations. Our results replicated the known sex difference in perfusion, with women showing significantly higher global and regional perfusion. For the global perfusion, DHEAS was the only significant predictor amongst the steroid hormones, showing a strong negative correlation with cerebral perfusion. The voxel-based analyses revealed modest sex-dependent correlations between local perfusion and testosterone, in addition to a strong modulatory effect of DHEAS in cortical, subcortical, and cerebellar regions. We conclude that DHEAS in particular may play an important role as an underlying factor driving the difference in cerebral perfusion between men and women. PMID:26356576

  14. GPU-accelerated voxelwise hepatic perfusion quantification.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Cao, Y

    2012-09-01

    Voxelwise quantification of hepatic perfusion parameters from dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) imaging greatly contributes to assessment of liver function in response to radiation therapy. However, the efficiency of the estimation of hepatic perfusion parameters voxel-by-voxel in the whole liver using a dual-input single-compartment model requires substantial improvement for routine clinical applications. In this paper, we utilize the parallel computation power of a graphics processing unit (GPU) to accelerate the computation, while maintaining the same accuracy as the conventional method. Using compute unified device architecture-GPU, the hepatic perfusion computations over multiple voxels are run across the GPU blocks concurrently but independently. At each voxel, nonlinear least-squares fitting the time series of the liver DCE data to the compartmental model is distributed to multiple threads in a block, and the computations of different time points are performed simultaneously and synchronically. An efficient fast Fourier transform in a block is also developed for the convolution computation in the model. The GPU computations of the voxel-by-voxel hepatic perfusion images are compared with ones by the CPU using the simulated DCE data and the experimental DCE MR images from patients. The computation speed is improved by 30 times using a NVIDIA Tesla C2050 GPU compared to a 2.67 GHz Intel Xeon CPU processor. To obtain liver perfusion maps with 626 400 voxels in a patient's liver, it takes 0.9 min with the GPU-accelerated voxelwise computation, compared to 110 min with the CPU, while both methods result in perfusion parameters differences less than 10(-6). The method will be useful for generating liver perfusion images in clinical settings. PMID:22892645

  15. Effect of methotrexate on perfusion and nitrogen-13 glutamate uptake in the Walker-256 carcinosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, W.H.; Panzer, M.; Helus, F.; Layer, K.; Sinn, H.J.; Ostertag, H.

    1988-02-01

    The tissue uptake of (/sup 13/N)glutamate (glu) was related to that of (/sup 11/C)butanol (but), a highly diffusible perfusion tracer. In 25 rats bearing Walker-256 carcinomas tumor-to-muscle glu uptake averaged 6.34 +/- 2.84 (s.d.) prior to interventions and the respective uptake of but was 6.79 +/- 3.08 (y = 0.03 + 0.94x). One hour after selective intraarterial administration of methotrexate (mtx), glu uptake fell by 47%, whereas blood flow remained within the pretreatment range (N = 9). Four hours after mtx, perfusion was reduced by approximately 40%, and 2 days later both perfusion and glu uptake reached extremely low levels. No significant difference in the effect of 10 and 50 mg/kg mtx was observed. Regional tissue mtx uptake estimations using /sup 77/Br-labeled bromomethotrexate did not reveal any significant uptake in muscle. The relationship between tumor-to-muscle uptake of glu and but (/sup 13/N//sup 11/C-index) was 0.94 +/- 0.015 (s.e.m., N = 25) before intervention. After methotrexate (1 hr, 4 hr, and 2 days) this index was 0.58 +/- 0.06 (N = 9), and 0.85 +/- 0.04 (N = 11) and 1.03 +/- 0.05 (N = 5), respectively. These values demonstrate an early mtx-induced uncoupling of glu uptake with respect to perfusion.

  16. Effects of pressure on the shear modulus, mass and thickness of the perfused porcine kidney.

    PubMed

    Helfenstein, C; Gennisson, J-L; Tanter, M; Beillas, P

    2015-01-01

    Eleven fresh ex vivo porcine kidneys were perfused in the artery, vein and ureter with degassed Dulbecco׳s Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM). The effect of perfusion pressure was evaluated using ten different pressures combinations. The shear modulus of the tissues was estimated during perfusion using shear wave elastography. The organ weight change was measured by a digital scale and cameras were used to follow the changes of the dimensions after each pressure combination. The effect of perfusion on the weight and the thickness was non-reversible, whereas the effect on the shear modulus was reversible. Pressure was found to increase the average shear modulus in the cortex by as much as 73%. A pressure of 80 mmHg was needed to observe tissues shear modulus in the same range as in vivo tests (Gcortex=9.1 kPa, Gmedulla=8.5 kPa ex vivo versus Gcortex=9.1 kPa, Gmedulla=8.7 kPa in vivo in Gennisson et al., 2012). PMID:25435383

  17. Functional cluster analysis of CT perfusion maps: a new tool for diagnosis of acute stroke?

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Christian; Gautsch, Kurt; Böhm, Christian; Felber, Stephan

    2005-09-01

    CT perfusion imaging constitutes an important contribution to the early diagnosis of acute stroke. Cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV) and time-to-peak (TTP) maps are used to estimate the severity of cerebral damage after acute ischemia. We introduce functional cluster analysis as a new tool to evaluate CT perfusion in order to identify normal brain, ischemic tissue and large vessels. CBF, CBV and TTP maps represent the basis for cluster analysis applying a partitioning (k-means) and density-based (density-based spatial clustering of applications with noise, DBSCAN) paradigm. In patients with transient ischemic attack and stroke, cluster analysis identified brain areas with distinct hemodynamic properties (gray and white matter) and segmented territorial ischemia. CBF, CBV and TTP values of each detected cluster were displayed. Our preliminary results indicate that functional cluster analysis of CT perfusion maps may become a helpful tool for the interpretation of perfusion maps and provide a rapid means for the segmentation of ischemic tissue. PMID:15827821

  18. FATTY ACID CHAIN-ELONGATION IN PERFUSED RAT HEART: SYNTHESIS OF STEAROYLCARNITINE FROM PERFUSED PALMITATE

    PubMed Central

    Kerner, Janos; Minkler, Paul E.; Lesnefsky, Edward J.; Hoppel, Charles L.

    2009-01-01

    Rat hearts perfused for up to 60 min in the working mode with palmitate, but not with glucose, resulted in substantial formation of palmitoylcarnitine and stearoylcarnitine. To test whether lipolysis of endogenous lipids was responsible for the increased stearoylcarnitine content or whether some of the perfused palmitate underwent chain elongation, hearts were perfused with hexadecanoic-16,16,16-d3 acid (M+3). The pentafluorophenacyl ester of deuterium labeled stearoylcarnitine had an M+3 (639.4 m/z) compared to the unlabeled M+0 (636.3 m/z) consistent with a direct chain elongation of the perfused palmitate. Furthermore, the near equal isotope enrichment of palmitoyl- (90.2 ± 5.8 %) and stearoylcarnitine (78.0 ± 7.1 %) suggest that both palmitoyl- and stearoyl-CoA have ready access to mitochondrial carnitine palmitoyltransferase and that most of the stearoylcarnitine is derived from the perfused palmitate. PMID:17761175

  19. Temperature effects on surface pressure-induced changes in rat skin perfusion: implications in pressure ulcer development.

    PubMed

    Patel, S; Knapp, C F; Donofrio, J C; Salcido, R

    1999-07-01

    The effect of varying local skin temperature on surface pressure-induced changes in skin perfusion and deformation was determined in hairless fuzzy rats (13.5+/-3 mo, 474+/-25 g). Skin surface pressure was applied by a computer-controlled plunger with corresponding skin deformation measured by a linear variable differential transformer while a laser Doppler flowmeter measured skin perfusion. In Protocol I, skin surface perfusion was measured without heating (control, T=28 degrees C), with heating (T=36 degrees C), for control (probe just touching skin, 3.7 mmHg), and at two different skin surface pressures, 18 mmHg and 73 mmHg. Heating caused perfusion to increase at control and 18 mmHg pressure, but not at 73 mmHg. In Protocol II, skin perfusion was measured with and without heating as in Protocol I, but this time skin surface pressure was increased from 3.7 to 62 mmHg in increments of 3.7 mmHg. For unheated skin, perfusion increased as skin surface pressure increased from 3.7 to 18 mmHg. Further increases in surface pressure caused a decrease in perfusion until zero perfusion was reached for pressures over 55 mmHg. Heating increased skin perfusion for surface pressures from 3.7 to 18 mmHg, but not for pressures greater than 18 mmHg. After the release of surface pressure, the reactive hyperemia peak of perfusion increased with heating. In Protocol III, where skin deformation (creep and relaxation) was measured during the application of 3.7 and 18 mmHg, heating caused the tissue to be stiffer, allowing less deformation. It was found that for surface pressures below 18 mmHg, increasing skin temperature significantly increased skin perfusion and tissue stiffness. The clinical significance of these findings may have relevance in evaluating temperature and pressure effects on skin blood flow and deformation as well as the efficacy of using temperature as a therapeutic modality in the treatment of pressure ulcers. PMID:10659802

  20. Development and validation of a segmentation-free polyenergetic algorithm for dynamic perfusion computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuan; Samei, Ehsan

    2016-07-01

    Dynamic perfusion imaging can provide the morphologic details of the scanned organs as well as the dynamic information of blood perfusion. However, due to the polyenergetic property of the x-ray spectra, beam hardening effect results in undesirable artifacts and inaccurate CT values. To address this problem, this study proposes a segmentation-free polyenergetic dynamic perfusion imaging algorithm (pDP) to provide superior perfusion imaging. Dynamic perfusion usually is composed of two phases, i.e., a precontrast phase and a postcontrast phase. In the precontrast phase, the attenuation properties of diverse base materials (e.g., in a thorax perfusion exam, base materials can include lung, fat, breast, soft tissue, bone, and metal implants) can be incorporated to reconstruct artifact-free precontrast images. If patient motions are negligible or can be corrected by registration, the precontrast images can then be employed as a priori information to derive linearized iodine projections from the postcontrast images. With the linearized iodine projections, iodine perfusion maps can be reconstructed directly without the influence of various influential factors, such as iodine location, patient size, x-ray spectrum, and background tissue type. A series of simulations were conducted on a dynamic iodine calibration phantom and a dynamic anthropomorphic thorax phantom to validate the proposed algorithm. The simulations with the dynamic iodine calibration phantom showed that the proposed algorithm could effectively eliminate the beam hardening effect and enable quantitative iodine map reconstruction across various influential factors. The error range of the iodine concentration factors ([Formula: see text]) was reduced from [Formula: see text] for filtered back-projection (FBP) to [Formula: see text] for pDP. The quantitative results of the simulations with the dynamic anthropomorphic thorax phantom indicated that the maximum error of iodine concentrations can be reduced from

  1. Spatio-temporal simulation of first pass drug perfusion in the liver.

    PubMed

    Schwen, Lars Ole; Krauss, Markus; Niederalt, Christoph; Gremse, Felix; Kiessling, Fabian; Schenk, Andrea; Preusser, Tobias; Kuepfer, Lars

    2014-03-01

    The liver is the central organ for detoxification of xenobiotics in the body. In pharmacokinetic modeling, hepatic metabolization capacity is typically quantified as hepatic clearance computed as degradation in well-stirred compartments. This is an accurate mechanistic description once a quasi-equilibrium between blood and surrounding tissue is established. However, this model structure cannot be used to simulate spatio-temporal distribution during the first instants after drug injection. In this paper, we introduce a new spatially resolved model to simulate first pass perfusion of compounds within the naive liver. The model is based on vascular structures obtained from computed tomography as well as physiologically based mass transfer descriptions obtained from pharmacokinetic modeling. The physiological architecture of hepatic tissue in our model is governed by both vascular geometry and the composition of the connecting hepatic tissue. In particular, we here consider locally distributed mass flow in liver tissue instead of considering well-stirred compartments. Experimentally, the model structure corresponds to an isolated perfused liver and provides an ideal platform to address first pass effects and questions of hepatic heterogeneity. The model was evaluated for three exemplary compounds covering key aspects of perfusion, distribution and metabolization within the liver. As pathophysiological states we considered the influence of steatosis and carbon tetrachloride-induced liver necrosis on total hepatic distribution and metabolic capacity. Notably, we found that our computational predictions are in qualitative agreement with previously published experimental data. The simulation results provide an unprecedented level of detail in compound concentration profiles during first pass perfusion, both spatio-temporally in liver tissue itself and temporally in the outflowing blood. We expect our model to be the foundation of further spatially resolved models of the

  2. Spatio-Temporal Simulation of First Pass Drug Perfusion in the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Schwen, Lars Ole; Krauss, Markus; Niederalt, Christoph; Gremse, Felix; Kiessling, Fabian; Schenk, Andrea; Preusser, Tobias; Kuepfer, Lars

    2014-01-01

    The liver is the central organ for detoxification of xenobiotics in the body. In pharmacokinetic modeling, hepatic metabolization capacity is typically quantified as hepatic clearance computed as degradation in well-stirred compartments. This is an accurate mechanistic description once a quasi-equilibrium between blood and surrounding tissue is established. However, this model structure cannot be used to simulate spatio-temporal distribution during the first instants after drug injection. In this paper, we introduce a new spatially resolved model to simulate first pass perfusion of compounds within the naive liver. The model is based on vascular structures obtained from computed tomography as well as physiologically based mass transfer descriptions obtained from pharmacokinetic modeling. The physiological architecture of hepatic tissue in our model is governed by both vascular geometry and the composition of the connecting hepatic tissue. In particular, we here consider locally distributed mass flow in liver tissue instead of considering well-stirred compartments. Experimentally, the model structure corresponds to an isolated perfused liver and provides an ideal platform to address first pass effects and questions of hepatic heterogeneity. The model was evaluated for three exemplary compounds covering key aspects of perfusion, distribution and metabolization within the liver. As pathophysiological states we considered the influence of steatosis and carbon tetrachloride-induced liver necrosis on total hepatic distribution and metabolic capacity. Notably, we found that our computational predictions are in qualitative agreement with previously published experimental data. The simulation results provide an unprecedented level of detail in compound concentration profiles during first pass perfusion, both spatio-temporally in liver tissue itself and temporally in the outflowing blood. We expect our model to be the foundation of further spatially resolved models of the

  3. Effects of scaffold architecture on mechanical characteristics and osteoblast response to static and perfusion bioreactor cultures.

    PubMed

    Bartnikowski, Michal; Klein, Travis J; Melchels, Ferry P W; Woodruff, Maria A

    2014-07-01

    Tissue engineering focuses on the repair and regeneration of tissues through the use of biodegradable scaffold systems that structurally support regions of injury while recruiting and/or stimulating cell populations to rebuild the target tissue. Within bone tissue engineering, the effects of scaffold architecture on cellular response have not been conclusively characterized in a controlled-density environment. We present a theoretical and practical assessment of the effects of polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffold architectural modifications on mechanical and flow characteristics as well as MC3T3-E1 preosteoblast cellular response in an in vitro static plate and custom-designed perfusion bioreactor model. Four scaffold architectures were contrasted, which varied in inter-layer lay-down angle and offset between layers, while maintaining a structural porosity of 60 ± 5%. We established that as layer angle was decreased (90° vs. 60°) and offset was introduced (0 vs. 0.5 between layers), structural stiffness, yield stress, strength, pore size, and permeability decreased, while computational fluid dynamics-modeled wall shear stress was increased. Most significant effects were noted with layer offset. Seeding efficiencies in static culture were also dramatically increased due to offset (∼ 45% to ∼ 86%), with static culture exhibiting a much higher seeding efficiency than perfusion culture. Scaffold architecture had minimal effect on cell response in static culture. However, architecture influenced osteogenic differentiation in perfusion culture, likely by modifying the microfluidic environment. PMID:24473931

  4. Radionuclide cerebral perfusion imaging: Normal pattern

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, S.J.; Stritzke, P.; Losonczy, M.; Vallabhajosula, S.; Holan, V.; DaCosta, M.; Muzinic, M.

    1991-12-31

    Regional cerebral perfusion imaging using a new class of {sup 99m}Tc and {sup 123}I labeled compounds which traverse the blood brain barrier and SPECT imaging technology provides an opportunity to assess this physiologic phenomenon during normal cerebral function and as a manifestation of disease in the central nervous system disease. These applications pose a challenge to the nuclear medicine physician for several reasons: (a) the complex and somewhat unfamiliar functional anatomy, (b) the marked regional differences in regional cerebral perfusion at rest, (c) the lack of understanding of the effect of variations in ambient conditions on regional cerebral perfusion. The difficulties in interpretation are augmented by the display itself. There is frequently no difficulty in differentiating between gray and white matter. However, the frequently used {open_quotes}hot body{close_quotes} color maps, introduce a good deal of contrast, producing displays with apparent interruption in regional cortical perfusion whereas black and white displays provide minimal contrast in the regional cortical activity. The authors sought to define how much variation in regional cerebral perfusion is {open_quotes}allowed{close_quotes} under controlled conditions, to establish a basis to interpret if changes in the environment, psychological interventions, or disease states are accompanied by a measurable change. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Pulmonary perfusion during anesthesia and mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Hedenstierna, G

    2005-06-01

    Cardiac output and the pulmonary perfusion can be affected by anesthesia and by mechanical ventilation. The changes contribute to impeded oxygenation of the blood. The major determinant of perfusion distribution in the lung is the relation between alveolar and pulmonary capillary pressures. Perfusion increases down the lung, due to hydrostatic forces. Since atelectasis is located in dependent lung regions, perfusion of non-ventilated lung parenchyma is common, producing shunt of around 8-10% of cardiac output. In addition, non-gravitational inhomogeneity of perfusion, that can be greater than the gravitational inhomogeneity, adds to impeded oxygenation of blood. Essentially all anaesthetics exert some, although mild, cardiodepressant action with one exception, ketamine. Ketamine may also increase pulmonary artery pressure, whereas other agents have little effect on pulmonary vascular tone. Mechanical ventilation impedes venous return and pushes blood flow downwards to dependent lung regions, and the effect may be striking with higher levels of PEEP. During one-lung anesthesia, there is shunt blood flow both in the non-ventilated and the ventilated lung, and shunt can be much larger in the ventilated lung than thought of. Recruitment manoeuvres shall be directed to the ventilated lung and other physical and pharmacological measures can be taken to manipulate blood flow in one lung anesthesia. PMID:15886595

  6. Perfusion harmonic imaging of the human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzler, Volker H.; Seidel, Guenter; Wiesmann, Martin; Meyer, Karsten; Aach, Til

    2003-05-01

    The fast visualisation of cerebral microcirculation supports diagnosis of acute cerebrovascular diseases. However, the commonly used CT/MRI-based methods are time consuming and, moreover, costly. Therefore we propose an alternative approach to brain perfusion imaging by means of ultrasonography. In spite of the low signal/noise-ratio of transcranial ultrasound and the high impedance of the skull, flow images of cerebral blood flow can be derived by capturing the kinetics of appropriate contrast agents by harmonic ultrasound image sequences. In this paper we propose three different methods for human brain perfusion imaging, each of which yielding flow images indicating the status of the patient's cerebral microcirculation by visualising local flow parameters. Bolus harmonic imaging (BHI) displays the flow kinetics of bolus injections, while replenishment (RHI) and diminution harmonic imaging (DHI) compute flow characteristics from contrast agent continuous infusions. RHI measures the contrast agents kinetics in the influx phase and DHI displays the diminution kinetics of the contrast agent acquired from the decay phase. In clinical studies, BHI- and RHI-parameter images were found to represent comprehensive and reproducible distributions of physiological cerebral blood flow. For DHI it is shown, that bubble destruction and hence perfusion phenomena principally can be displayed. Generally, perfusion harmonic imaging enables reliable and fast bedside imaging of human brain perfusion. Due to its cost efficiency it complements cerebrovascular diagnostics by established CT/MRI-based methods.

  7. Iterative blind deconvolution in magnetic resonance brain perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Grüner, Renate; Taxt, Torfinn

    2006-04-01

    In first pass magnetic resonance brain perfusion imaging, arterial input functions are used in the deconvolution of the observed contrast concentrations to obtain quantitative hemodynamic parameters. Ideally, arterial input functions should be measured in each imaged voxel to eliminate the effects of delay and dispersion of the contrast agent from the injection site. An approach based on iterative blind deconvolution with the Richardson-Lucy algorithm is proposed for the simultaneous estimation of voxel-specific arterial input functions and voxel-specific tissue residue functions. An extended contrast concentration model was used to separate the first pass bolus from additional recirculation and leakage signals. The extended model was evaluated using in vivo data. Computer simulations examined the feasibility of iterative blind deconvolution in perfusion imaging. Preliminary in vivo results from a patient with fibromuscular dysplasia showed territories with delayed/dispersed arterial input functions that coincided with the location of territories supplied by collateral circulation as described from the complete radiologic examination. Higher flow values and shorter mean transit times compared to conventional methods were obtained in these areas, suggesting that the effects of dispersion were minimized. The in vivo estimated arterial input functions visualized the patient's blood supply patterns as a function of time. PMID:16526016

  8. Ocular perfusion pressure and ocular blood flow in glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Cherecheanu, A Popa; Garhofer, G; Schmidl, D; Werkmeister, R; Schmetterer, L

    2013-01-01

    Glaucoma is a progressive optic neuropathy of unknown origin. It has been hypothesized that a vascular component is involved in glaucoma pathophysiology. This hypothesis has gained support from studies showing that reduced ocular perfusion pressure is a risk factor for the disease. The exact nature of the involvement is, however, still a matter of debate. Based on recent evidence we propose a model including primary and secondary insults in glaucoma. The primary insult appears to happen at the optic nerve head. Increased intraocular pressure and ischemia at the post-laminar optic nerve head affects retinal ganglion cell axons. Modulating factors are the biomechanical properties of the tissues and cerebrospinal fluid pressure. After this primary insult retinal ganglion cells function at a reduced energy level and are sensitive to secondary insults. These secondary insults may happen if ocular perfusion pressure falls below the lower limit of autoregulation or if neurovascular coupling fails. Evidence for both faulty autoregulation and reduced hyperemic response to neuronal stimulation has been provided in glaucoma patients. The mechanisms appear to involve vascular endothelial dysfunction and impaired astrocyte-vessel signaling. A more detailed understanding of these pathways is required to direct neuroprotective strategies via the neurovascular pathway. PMID:23009741

  9. Ocular perfusion pressure and ocular blood flow in glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Cherecheanu, A Popa; Garhofer, G; Schmidl, D; Werkmeister, R; Schmetterer, L

    2013-02-01

    Glaucoma is a progressive optic neuropathy of unknown origin. It has been hypothesized that a vascular component is involved in glaucoma pathophysiology. This hypothesis has gained support from studies showing that reduced ocular perfusion pressure is a risk factor for the disease. The exact nature of the involvement is, however, still a matter of debate. Based on recent evidence we propose a model including primary and secondary insults in glaucoma. The primary insult appears to happen at the optic nerve head. Increased intraocular pressure and ischemia at the post-laminar optic nerve head affects retinal ganglion cell axons. Modulating factors are the biomechanical properties of the tissues and cerebrospinal fluid pressure. After this primary insult retinal ganglion cells function at a reduced energy level and are sensitive to secondary insults. These secondary insults may happen if ocular perfusion pressure falls below the lower limit of autoregulation or if neurovascular coupling fails. Evidence for both faulty autoregulation and reduced hyperemic response to neuronal stimulation has been provided in glaucoma patients. The mechanisms appear to involve vascular endothelial dysfunction and impaired astrocyte-vessel signaling. A more detailed understanding of these pathways is required to direct neuroprotective strategies via the neurovascular pathway. PMID:23009741

  10. Computed tomography perfusion imaging denoising using Gaussian process regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Fan; Carpenter, Trevor; Rodriguez Gonzalez, David; Atkinson, Malcolm; Wardlaw, Joanna

    2012-06-01

    Brain perfusion weighted images acquired using dynamic contrast studies have an important clinical role in acute stroke diagnosis and treatment decisions. However, computed tomography (CT) images suffer from low contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) as a consequence of the limitation of the exposure to radiation of the patient. As a consequence, the developments of methods for improving the CNR are valuable. The majority of existing approaches for denoising CT images are optimized for 3D (spatial) information, including spatial decimation (spatially weighted mean filters) and techniques based on wavelet and curvelet transforms. However, perfusion imaging data is 4D as it also contains temporal information. Our approach using Gaussian process regression (GPR), which takes advantage of the temporal information, to reduce the noise level. Over the entire image, GPR gains a 99% CNR improvement over the raw images and also improves the quality of haemodynamic maps allowing a better identification of edges and detailed information. At the level of individual voxel, GPR provides a stable baseline, helps us to identify key parameters from tissue time-concentration curves and reduces the oscillations in the curve. GPR is superior to the comparable techniques used in this study.

  11. Computed tomography perfusion imaging denoising using gaussian process regression.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fan; Carpenter, Trevor; Rodriguez Gonzalez, David; Atkinson, Malcolm; Wardlaw, Joanna

    2012-06-21

    Brain perfusion weighted images acquired using dynamic contrast studies have an important clinical role in acute stroke diagnosis and treatment decisions. However, computed tomography (CT) images suffer from low contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) as a consequence of the limitation of the exposure to radiation of the patient. As a consequence, the developments of methods for improving the CNR are valuable. The majority of existing approaches for denoising CT images are optimized for 3D (spatial) information, including spatial decimation (spatially weighted mean filters) and techniques based on wavelet and curvelet transforms. However, perfusion imaging data is 4D as it also contains temporal information. Our approach using gaussian process regression (GPR), which takes advantage of the temporal information, to reduce the noise level. Over the entire image, GPR gains a 99% CNR improvement over the raw images and also improves the quality of haemodynamic maps allowing a better identification of edges and detailed information. At the level of individual voxel, GPR provides a stable baseline, helps us to identify key parameters from tissue time-concentration curves and reduces the oscillations in the curve. GPR is superior to the comparable techniques used in this study. PMID:22617159

  12. Dose Limits for Man do not Adequately Protect the Ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Higley, Kathryn A.; Alexakhin, Rudolf M.; McDonald, Joseph C.

    2004-08-01

    It has been known for quite some time that different organisms display differing degrees of sensitivity to the effects of ionizing radiations. Some microorganisms such as the bacterium Micrococcus radiodurans, along with many species of invertebrates, are extremely radio-resistant. Humans might be categorized as being relatively sensitive to radiation, and are a bit more resistant than some pine trees. Therefore, it could be argued that maintaining the dose limits necessary to protect humans will also result in the protection of most other species of flora and fauna. This concept is usually referred to as the anthropocentric approach. In other words, if man is protected then the environment is also adequately protected. The ecocentric approach might be stated as; the health of humans is effectively protected only when the environment is not unduly exposed to radiation. The ICRP is working on new recommendations dealing with the protection of the environment, and this debate should help to highlight a number of relevant issues concerning that topic.

  13. ENSURING ADEQUATE SAFETY WHEN USING HYDROGEN AS A FUEL

    SciTech Connect

    Coutts, D

    2007-01-22

    Demonstration projects using hydrogen as a fuel are becoming very common. Often these projects rely on project-specific risk evaluations to support project safety decisions. This is necessary because regulations, codes, and standards (hereafter referred to as standards) are just being developed. This paper will review some of the approaches being used in these evolving standards, and techniques which demonstration projects can implement to bridge the gap between current requirements and stakeholder desires. Many of the evolving standards for hydrogen-fuel use performance-based language, which establishes minimum performance and safety objectives, as compared with prescriptive-based language that prescribes specific design solutions. This is being done for several reasons including: (1) concern that establishing specific design solutions too early will stifle invention, (2) sparse performance data necessary to support selection of design approaches, and (3) a risk-adverse public which is unwilling to accept losses that were incurred in developing previous prescriptive design standards. The evolving standards often contain words such as: ''The manufacturer shall implement the measures and provide the information necessary to minimize the risk of endangering a person's safety or health''. This typically implies that the manufacturer or project manager must produce and document an acceptable level of risk. If accomplished using comprehensive and systematic process the demonstration project risk assessment can ease the transition to widespread commercialization. An approach to adequately evaluate and document the safety risk will be presented.

  14. Adequate peritoneal dialysis: theoretical model and patient treatment.

    PubMed

    Tast, C

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between adequate PD with sufficient weekly Kt/V (2.0) and Creatinine clearance (CCR) (60l) and necessary daily dialysate volume. This recommended parameter was the result of a recent multi-centre study (CANUSA). For this there were 40 patients in our hospital examined and compared in 1996, who carried out PD for at least 8 weeks and up to 6 years. These goals (CANUSA) are easily attainable in the early treatment of many individuals with a low body surface area (BSA). With higher BSA or missing RRF (Residual Renal Function) the daily dose of dialysis must be adjusted. We found it difficult to obtain the recommended parameters and tried to find a solution to this problem. The simplest method is to increase the volume or exchange rate. The most expensive method is to change from CAPD to APD with the possibility of higher volume or exchange rates. Selection of therapy must take into consideration: 1. patient preference, 2. body mass, 3. peritoneal transport rates, 4. ability to perform therapy, 5. cost of therapy and 6. risk of peritonitis. With this information in mind, an individual prescription can be formulated and matched to the appropriate modality of PD. PMID:10392062

  15. DARHT - an `adequate` EIS: A NEPA case study

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, M.D.

    1997-08-01

    The Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) Facility Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) provides a case study that is interesting for many reasons. The EIS was prepared quickly, in the face of a lawsuit, for a project with unforeseen environmental impacts, for a facility that was deemed urgently essential to national security. Following judicial review the EIS was deemed to be {open_quotes}adequate.{close_quotes} DARHT is a facility now being built at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) as part of the Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear weapons stockpile stewardship program. DARHT will be used to evaluate the safety and reliability of nuclear weapons, evaluate conventional munitions and study high-velocity impact phenomena. DARHT will be equipped with two accelerator-driven, high-intensity X-ray machines to record images of materials driven by high explosives. DARHT will be used for a variety of hydrodynamic tests, and DOE plans to conduct some dynamic experiments using plutonium at DARHT as well.

  16. Cardiac catecholamines in rats fed copper deficient or copper adequate diets containing fructose or starch

    SciTech Connect

    Scholfield, D.J.; Fields, M.; Beal, T.; Lewis, C.G.; Behall, K.M. )

    1989-02-09

    The symptoms of copper (Cu) deficiency are known to be more severe when rats are fed a diet with fructose (F) as the principal carbohydrate. Mortality, in males, due to cardiac abnormalities usually occurs after five weeks of a 62% F, 0.6 ppm Cu deficient diet. These effects are not observed if cornstarch (CS) is the carbohydrate (CHO) source. Studies with F containing diets have shown increased catecholamine (C) turnover rates while diets deficient in Cu result in decreased norepinephrine (N) levels in tissues. Dopamine B-hydroxylase (EC 1.14.17.1) is a Cu dependent enzyme which catalyzes the conversion of dopamine (D) to N. An experiment was designed to investigate the effects of CHO and dietary Cu on levels of three C in cardiac tissue. Thirty-two male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were fed Cu deficient or adequate diets with 60% of calories from F or CS for 6 weeks. N, epinephrine (E) and D were measured by HPLC. Statistical analysis indicates that Cu deficiency tends to decrease N levels, while having the reverse effect on E. D did not appear to change. These findings indicate that Cu deficiency but not dietary CHO can affect the concentration of N and E in rat cardiac tissue.

  17. Liver Fat Content in Type 2 Diabetes: Relationship With Hepatic Perfusion and Substrate Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Rijzewijk, Luuk J.; van der Meer, Rutger W.; Lubberink, Mark; Lamb, Hildo J.; Romijn, Johannes A.; de Roos, Albert; Twisk, Jos W.; Heine, Robert J.; Lammertsma, Adriaan A.; Smit, Johannes W.A.; Diamant, Michaela

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Hepatic steatosis is common in type 2 diabetes. It is causally linked to the features of the metabolic syndrome, liver cirrhosis, and cardiovascular disease. Experimental data have indicated that increased liver fat may impair hepatic perfusion and metabolism. The aim of the current study was to assess hepatic parenchymal perfusion, together with glucose and fatty acid metabolism, in relation to hepatic triglyceride content. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Fifty-nine men with well controlled type 2 diabetes and 18 age-matched healthy normoglycemic men were studied using positron emission tomography to assess hepatic tissue perfusion, insulin-stimulated glucose, and fasting fatty acid metabolism, respectively, in relation to hepatic triglyceride content, quantified by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Patients were divided into two groups with hepatic triglyceride content below (type 2 diabetes-low) or above (type 2 diabetes-high) the median of 8.6%. RESULTS Type 2 diabetes-high patients had the highest BMI and A1C and lowest whole-body insulin sensitivity (ANOVA, all P < 0.001). Compared with control subjects and type 2 diabetes-low patients, type 2 diabetes-high patients had the lowest hepatic parenchymal perfusion (P = 0.004) and insulin-stimulated hepatic glucose uptake (P = 0.013). The observed decrease in hepatic fatty acid influx rate constant, however, only reached borderline significance (P = 0.088). In type 2 diabetic patients, hepatic parenchymal perfusion (r = −0.360, P = 0.007) and hepatic fatty acid influx rate constant (r = −0.407, P = 0.007) correlated inversely with hepatic triglyceride content. In a pooled analysis, hepatic fat correlated with hepatic glucose uptake (r = −0.329, P = 0.004). CONCLUSIONS In conclusion, type 2 diabetic patients with increased hepatic triglyceride content showed decreased hepatic parenchymal perfusion and hepatic insulin mediated glucose uptake, suggesting a potential modulating effect of hepatic fat

  18. Renal Perfusion Index Reflects Cardiac Systolic Function in Chronic Cardio-Renal Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lubas, Arkadiusz; Ryczek, Robert; Kade, Grzegorz; Niemczyk, Stanisław

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiac dysfunction can modify renal perfusion, which is crucial to maintain sufficient kidney tissue oxygenation. Renal cortex perfusion assessed by dynamic ultrasound method is related both to renal function and cardiac hemodynamics. The aim of the study was to test the hypothesis that Renal Perfusion Index (RPI) can more closely reflect cardiac hemodynamics and differentiate etiology of chronic cardio-renal syndrome. Material/Methods Twenty-four patients with hypertension and chronic kidney disease (CKD) at 2–4 stage (12 with hypertensive nephropathy and 12 with CKD prior to hypertension) were enrolled in the study. Blood tests, 24-h ABPM, echocardiography, and ultrasonography with estimation of Total renal Cortical Perfusion intensity and Renal Perfusion Index (RPI) were performed. Results In the group of all patients, RPI correlated with left ventricular stoke volume (LVSV), and cardiac index, but not with markers of renal function. In multiple stepwise regression analysis CKD-EPI(Cys-Cr) (b=−0.360), LVSV (b=0.924) and MAP (b=0.376) together independently influenced RPI (R2=0.74; p<0.0001). RPI<0.567 allowed for the identification of patients with chronic cardio-renal syndrome with sensitivity of 41.7% and specificity of 83.3%. Conclusions Renal perfusion index relates more strongly to cardiac output than to renal function, and could be helpful in recognizing chronic cardio-renal syndrome. Applicability of RPI in diagnosing early abnormalities in the cardio-renal axis requires further investigation. PMID:25881555

  19. Perfusion and ventilation of isolated canine lungs

    PubMed Central

    Otto, T. J.; Trenkner, M.; Stopczyk, A.; Gawdziński, M.; Chełstowska, B.

    1968-01-01

    In order to evaluate methods of preserving lungs for use in transplantation, experiments on 28 mongrel dogs were carried out. Two methods were tried—first, mechanical respiration of isolated lungs under deep hypothermia, with the vascular bed filled with blood; and, secondly, the perfusion of isolated lungs with the aid of a modified DeWall's apparatus. Allogenic transplantations of lungs preserved in both ways were carried out. Gasometric and histological examinations of preserved lungs, before and after transplantation, were performed. The best results were obtained with perfusion under hypothermic conditions; ventilation without perfusion resulted in failure. Lung transplantation was successful when, after being preserved, the lung remained unchanged. Major discrepancies between the macroscopic and microscopic findings in preserved lungs were observed. An original classification of the changes occurring in preserved lungs is proposed. PMID:4886091

  20. Perfusion in Britain: the early days.

    PubMed

    Braimbridge, Mark V

    2004-07-01

    Experimental perfusion was largely the province of Germany in the nineteenth century but in the mid-twentieth century the focus of perfusion switched to the USA with the explosive clinical advances of Lillehei, Kirklin and Cooley. British clinical perfusion started with Melrose in 1953 at the Postgraduate Medical School in London but, as in other centres at that time, stopped due to the high mortality. The arrival of hands-on experience of American expertise via returning research fellows and other visitors to the USA enabled the first successful on-going series to begin at the Hammersmith Hospital with Cleland in 1957 and then to spread around the country. The various problems of those early 1950s days are described in the units starting then. PMID:15376765

  1. Myocardial perfusion scintigraphy: the evidence.

    PubMed

    Underwood, S R; Anagnostopoulos, C; Cerqueira, M; Ell, P J; Flint, E J; Harbinson, M; Kelion, A D; Al-Mohammad, A; Prvulovich, E M; Shaw, L J; Tweddel, A C

    2004-02-01

    This review summarises the evidence for the role of myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) in patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease. It is the product of a consensus conference organised by the British Cardiac Society, the British Nuclear Cardiology Society and the British Nuclear Medicine Society and is endorsed by the Royal College of Physicians of London and the Royal College of Radiologists. It was used to inform the UK National Institute of Clinical Excellence in their appraisal of MPS in patients with chest pain and myocardial infarction. MPS is a well-established, non-invasive imaging technique with a large body of evidence to support its effectiveness in the diagnosis and management of angina and myocardial infarction. It is more accurate than the exercise ECG in detecting myocardial ischaemia and it is the single most powerful technique for predicting future coronary events. The high diagnostic accuracy of MPS allows reliable risk stratification and guides the selection of patients for further interventions, such as revascularisation. This in turn allows more appropriate utilisation of resources, with the potential for both improved clinical outcomes and greater cost-effectiveness. Evidence from modelling and observational studies supports the enhanced cost-effectiveness associated with MPS use. In patients presenting with stable or acute chest pain, strategies of investigation involving MPS are more cost-effective than those not using the technique. MPS also has particular advantages over alternative techniques in the management of a number of patient subgroups, including women, the elderly and those with diabetes, and its use will have a favourable impact on cost-effectiveness in these groups. MPS is already an integral part of many clinical guidelines for the investigation and management of angina and myocardial infarction. However, the technique is underutilised in the UK, as judged by the inappropriately long waiting times and by

  2. On Adequate Comparisons of Antenna Phase Center Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoen, S.; Kersten, T.

    2013-12-01

    One important part for ensuring the high quality of the International GNSS Service's (IGS) products is the collection and publication of receiver - and satellite antenna phase center variations (PCV). The PCV are crucial for global and regional networks, since they introduce a global scale factor of up to 16ppb or changes in the height component with an amount of up to 10cm, respectively. Furthermore, antenna phase center variations are also important for precise orbit determination, navigation and positioning of mobile platforms, like e.g. the GOCE and GRACE gravity missions, or for the accurate Precise Point Positioning (PPP) processing. Using the EUREF Permanent Network (EPN), Baire et al. (2012) showed that individual PCV values have a significant impact on the geodetic positioning. The statements are further supported by studies of Steigenberger et al. (2013) where the impact of PCV for local-ties are analysed. Currently, there are five calibration institutions including the Institut für Erdmessung (IfE) contributing to the IGS PCV file. Different approaches like field calibrations and anechoic chamber measurements are in use. Additionally, the computation and parameterization of the PCV are completely different within the methods. Therefore, every new approach has to pass a benchmark test in order to ensure that variations of PCV values of an identical antenna obtained from different methods are as consistent as possible. Since the number of approaches to obtain these PCV values rises with the number of calibration institutions, there is the necessity for an adequate comparison concept, taking into account not only the numerical values but also stochastic information and computational issues of the determined PCVs. This is of special importance, since the majority of calibrated receiver antennas published by the IGS origin from absolute field calibrations based on the Hannover Concept, Wübbena et al. (2000). In this contribution, a concept for the adequate

  3. Estimation of Radiation Exposure of 128-Slice 4D-Perfusion CT for the Assessment of Tumor Vascularity

    PubMed Central

    Horger, Marius; Buchgeister, Markus; Fenchel, Michael; Thomas, Christoph; Boehringer, Nadine; Schulze, Maximilian; Tsiflikas, Ilias; Claussen, Claus D.; Heuschmid, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Objective We aimed to estimate the effective dose of 4D-Perfusion-CT protocols of the lung, liver, and pelvis for the assessment of tumor vascularity. Materials and Methods An Alderson-Rando phantom equipped with thermoluminescent dosimeters was used to determine the effective dose values of 4D-Perfusion-CT. Phantom measurements were performed on a 128-slice single-source scanner in adaptive 4D-spiral-mode with bidirectional table movement and a total scan range of 69 mm over a time period of nearly 120 seconds (26 scans). Perfusion measurements were simulated for the lung, liver, and pelvis under the following conditions: lung (80 kV, 60 mAs), liver (80 kV/80 mAs and 80 kV/120 mAs), pelvis (100 kV/80 mAs and 100 kV/120 mAs). Results Depending on gender, the evaluated body region and scan protocol, an effective whole-body dose between 2.9-12.2 mSv, was determined. The radiation exposure administered to gender-specific organs like the female breast tissue (lung perfusion) or to the ovaries (pelvic perfusion) led to an increase in the female specific dose by 86% and 100% in perfusion scans of the lung and the pelvis, respectively. Conclusion Due to a significant radiation dose of 4D-perfusion-CT protocols, the responsible use of this new promising technique is mandatory. Gender- and organ-specific differences should be considered for indication and planning of tumor perfusion scans. PMID:20808699

  4. Partial volume correction of brain perfusion estimates using the inherent signal data of time-resolved arterial spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Ahlgren, André; Wirestam, Ronnie; Petersen, Esben Thade; Ståhlberg, Freddy; Knutsson, Linda

    2014-09-01

    estimation is feasible, and provides a promising tool for decoupling perfusion and tissue volume. PMID:25066601

  5. Voxel-by-voxel correlations of perfusion, substrate, and metabolite signals in dynamic hyperpolarized (13) C imaging.

    PubMed

    Lau, Justin Y C; Chen, Albert P; Gu, Yi-Ping; Cunningham, Charles H

    2016-08-01

    In this study, a mixture of pyruvic acid and the perfusion agent HP001 was co-polarized for simultaneous assessment of perfusion and metabolism in vivo. The pre-polarized mixture was administered to rats with subcutaneous MDA-MB-231 breast cancer xenografts and imaged using an interleaved sequence with designed spectral-spatial pulses and flyback echo-planar readouts. Voxel-by-voxel signal correlations from 10 animals (15 data sets) were analyzed for tumour, kidney, and muscle regions of interest. The relationship between perfusion and hyperpolarized signal was explored on a voxel-by-voxel basis in various metabolically active tissues, including tumour, healthy kidneys, and skeletal muscle. Positive pairwise correlations between lactate, pyruvate, and HP001 observed in all 10 tumours suggested that substrate delivery was the dominant factor limiting the conversion of pyruvate to lactate in the tumour model used in this study. On the other hand, in cases where conversion is the limiting factor, such as in healthy kidneys, both pyruvate and lactate can act as excellent perfusion markers. In intermediate cases between the two limits, such as in skeletal muscle, some perfusion information may be inferred from the (pyruvate + lactate) signal distribution. Co-administration of pyruvate with a dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) perfusion agent is an effective approach for distinguishing between slow metabolism and poor perfusion and a practical strategy for lactate signal normalization to account for substrate delivery, especially in cases of rapid pyruvate-to-lactate conversion and in poorly perfused regions with inadequate pyruvate signal-to-noise ratio for reliable determination of the lactate-to-pyruvate ratio. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27295304

  6. Improving access to adequate pain management in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Scholten, Willem

    2015-06-01

    There is a global crisis in access to pain management in the world. WHO estimates that 4.65 billion people live in countries where medical opioid consumption is near to zero. For 2010, WHO considered a per capita consumption of 216.7 mg morphine equivalents adequate, while Taiwan had a per capita consumption of 0.05 mg morphine equivalents in 2007. In Asia, the use of opioids is sensitive because of the Opium Wars in the 19th century and for this reason, the focus of controlled substances policies has been on the prevention of diversion and dependence. However, an optimal public health outcome requires that also the beneficial aspects of these substances are acknowledged. Therefore, WHO recommends a policy based on the Principle of Balance: ensuring access for medical and scientific purposes while preventing diversion, harmful use and dependence. Furthermore, international law requires that countries ensure access to opioid analgesics for medical and scientific purposes. There is evidence that opioid analgesics for chronic pain are not associated with a major risk for developing dependence. Barriers for access can be classified in the categories of overly restrictive laws and regulations; insufficient medical training on pain management and problems related to assessment of medical needs; attitudes like an excessive fear for dependence or diversion; and economic and logistical problems. The GOPI project found many examples of such barriers in Asia. Access to opioid medicines in Taiwan can be improved by analysing the national situation and drafting a plan. The WHO policy guidelines Ensuring Balance in National Policies on Controlled Substances can be helpful for achieving this purpose, as well as international guidelines for pain treatment. PMID:26068436

  7. Suivi in situ de cultures tridimensionnelles en bioreacteur a perfusion grace a la tomographie d'emission par positrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouinard, Julie

    The continuous assessment of developing tissue substitutes is crucial to understand their evolution over time. However, this represents quite a challenge when thick samples must be evaluated with standard microscopy techniques. Common characterization methods are time consuming and usually result in the destruction of the culture. Real-time, in situ, non-invasive and non-destructives methods are needed to monitor the growth of large non-transparent constructs in tissue engineering. Medical imaging modalities, which can provide information on the structure and function of internal organs and tissues in living organisms, have the potential of allowing repetitive monitoring of these 3D cultures in vitro. The working hypothesis of this thesis was to establish standard noninvasive and nondestructive real-time bioreactor imaging protocols for in situ monitoring of the viability and metabolism of endothelial cells when grown in perfused 3D fibrin gel scaffolds. To achieve this goal, a culture chamber with hollow fibers was designed and a pulsatile perfusion bioreactor system, able to promote cell survival and proliferation, was constructed and validated. Standard imaging protocols in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) are not adapted to image bioreactor systems. A suitable method had to be devised using the well-known radiotracer 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18FDG), a marker of glucose metabolism. Optimal uptake conditions were determined using cell monolayers and the best parameters were then applied on perfused 3D cultures to evaluate perfusion, cell viability and emerging cell structures. After only 12 hours of culture, the cell density could be estimated and cell structures were localized within the fibrin gels after 1-2 weeks of culture. PET is a promising tool for tissue engineering with many specific tracers available that might eventually be able to reveal new information on tissue development. Key words: Endothelial cells, Perfusion bioreactor, Positron Emission

  8. CAD system for automatic analysis of CT perfusion maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachaj, T.; Ogiela, M. R.

    2011-03-01

    In this article, authors present novel algorithms developed for the computer-assisted diagnosis (CAD) system for analysis of dynamic brain perfusion, computer tomography (CT) maps, cerebral blood flow (CBF), and cerebral blood volume (CBV). Those methods perform both quantitative analysis [detection and measurement and description with brain anatomy atlas (AA) of potential asymmetries/lesions] and qualitative analysis (semantic interpretation of visualized symptoms). The semantic interpretation (decision about type of lesion: ischemic/hemorrhagic, is the brain tissue at risk of infraction or not) of visualized symptoms is done by, so-called, cognitive inference processes allowing for reasoning on character of pathological regions based on specialist image knowledge. The whole system is implemented in.NET platform (C# programming language) and can be used on any standard PC computer with.NET framework installed.

  9. Imaging considerations for a technetium-99m myocardial perfusion agent

    SciTech Connect

    English, R.J.; Jones, A.G.; Davison, A.; Lister-James, J.; Campbell, S.; Holman, B.L.

    1986-03-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging with /sup 201/Tl chloride suffers from a number of physical, geometric, and dosimetric constraints that could be diminished if an agent labeled with /sup 99m/Tc were available. The cationic complex /sup 99m/Tc hexakis-(t-butylisonitrile)technetium(I) ((/sup 99m/Tc)TBI) has been shown to concentrate in the myocardial tissue of both animals and humans, with preliminary clinical studies demonstrating a number of technical attributes not possible with /sup 201/Tl. Technetium-99m-TBI is a promising myocardial imaging agent that may permit high quality planar, gated, and tomographic imaging of both myocardial ischemia and infarction with reduced imaging times and improved resolution.

  10. Persufflation (gaseous oxygen perfusion) as a method of heart preservation.

    PubMed

    Suszynski, Thomas M; Rizzari, Michael D; Scott, William E; Eckman, Peter M; Fonger, James D; John, Ranjit; Chronos, Nicolas; Tempelman, Linda A; Sutherland, David E R; Papas, Klearchos K

    2013-01-01

    Persufflation (PSF; gaseous oxygen perfusion) is an organ preservation technique with a potential for use in donor heart preservation. Improved heart preservation with PSF may improve outcomes by maintaining cardiac tissue quality in the setting of longer cold ischemia times and possibly increasing the number of donor hearts available for allotransplant. Published data suggests that PSF is able to extend the cold storage times for porcine hearts up to 14 hours without compromising viability and function, and has been shown to resuscitate porcine hearts following donation after cardiac death. This review summarizes key published work on heart PSF, including prospective implications and future directions for PSF in heart transplantation. We emphasize the potential impact of extending preservation times and expanding donor selection criteria in heart allotransplant. Additionally, the key issues that need to be addressed before PSF were to become a widely utilized preservation strategy prior to clinical heart transplantation are summarized and discussed. PMID:23607734

  11. Selective cerebro-myocardial perfusion in complex congenital aortic arch pathology: a novel technique.

    PubMed

    De Rita, Fabrizio; Lucchese, Gianluca; Barozzi, Luca; Menon, Tiziano; Faggian, Giuseppe; Mazzucco, Alessandro; Luciani, Giovanni Battista

    2011-11-01

    . Renal function proved satisfactory in all, while liver function was adequate in all but one. The present experience suggests that selective and independent cerebro-myocardial perfusion is feasible in patients with complex or recurrent aortic arch disease, starting from premature newborn less than 2.0 kg of body weight to adults. The technique is as safe as previously reported methods of cerebro-myocardial perfusion and possibly more versatile. PMID:21995675

  12. Rheology of perfusates and fluid dynamical effects during whole organ decellularization: a perspective to individualize decellularization protocols for single organs.

    PubMed

    Hülsmann, Jörn; Aubin, Hug; Bandesha, Shahbaz T; Kranz, Alexander; Stoldt, Volker R; Lichtenberg, Artur; Akhyari, Payam

    2015-09-01

    The approach of whole organ decellularization is rapidly becoming more widespread within the tissue engineering community. Today it is well known that the effects of decellularization protocols may vary with the particular type of treated tissue. However, there are no methods known to individualize decellularization protocols while automatically ensuring a standard level of quality to minimize adverse effects on the resulting extracellular matrix. Here we follow this idea by introducing two novel components into the current practice. First, a non-invasive method for online monitoring of resulting fluid dynamical characteristics of the coronary system is demonstrated for application during the perfusion decellularization of whole hearts. Second, the observation of the underlying rheological characteristics of the perfusates is employed to detect ongoing progress and maturation of the decellularization process. Measured data were contrasted to the respective release of specific cellular components. We demonstrate rheological measurements to be capable of detecting cellular debris along with a discriminative capture of DNA and protein ratios. We demonstrate that this perfusate biomass is well correlated to the biomass loss in the extracellular matrix produced by decellularization. The appearance of biomass components in the perfusates could specifically reflect the appearance of fluid dynamical characteristics that we monitored during the decellularization process. As rheological measuring of perfusate samples can be done within minutes, without any time-consuming preparation steps, we predict this to be a promising novel analytic strategy to control decellularization protocols, in time, by the actual conditions of the processed organ. PMID:26335521

  13. Perfusion in free breast reconstruction flap zones assessed with positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Schrey, Aleksi; Kinnunen, Ilpo; Kalliokoski, Kari; Minn, Heikki; Grénman, Reidar; Vahlberg, Tero; Niemi, Tarja; Suominen, Erkki; Aitasalo, Kalle

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to determine the postoperative blood perfusion (BF(PET)) and perfusion heterogeneity (BF(PET) HG) in free microvascular breast reconstruction flap zones with positron emission tomography (PET). Regional BF(PET) and BF(PET) HG of the adipose tissue in medial, central, and lateral parts of 13 free flaps were assessed on the first postoperative morning with PET using oxygen-15-labeled water ([(15)O]H(2)O) in 12 patients undergoing breast reconstruction with a deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) or a transverse rectus abdominis muscle (TRAM) flap. The mean BF(PET) values did not differ between DIEP and TRAM flaps (P = 0.791). The mean BF(PET) values were higher in zone III compared with zone I (P = 0.024). During follow-up, fat necrosis was identified in three patients in the medial part (zone II) of the flap. However, the adipose tissue BF(PET) assessed on the first postoperative day from all zones of the flap using PET with radiowater was normal. The BF(PET) HG was higher in the control side (i.e., in the healthy breast tissue) compared with the flap (P = 0.042). The BF(PET) HG was lower in zone III than in zone I (P = 0.03) and in zone II (P < 0.001). In this pilot study, PET was used for the first time for studying the adipose tissue perfusion in different zones in free flaps in a clinical setup, finding that the mean BF(PET) values did not differ between DIEP and TRAM flaps, and that zone II was sometimes not as well perfused as zone III supporting revisited zone division. PMID:20878725

  14. Development of tissue bank.

    PubMed

    Narayan, R P

    2012-05-01

    The history of tissue banking is as old as the use of skin grafting for resurfacing of burn wounds. Beneficial effects of tissue grafts led to wide spread use of auto and allograft for management of varied clinical conditions like skin wounds, bone defects following trauma or tumor ablation. Availability of adequate amount of tissues at the time of requirement was the biggest challenge that forced clinicians to find out techniques to preserve the living tissue for prolonged period of time for later use and thus the foundation of tissue banking was started in early twentieth century. Harvesting, processing, storage and transportation of human tissues for clinical use is the major activity of tissue banks. Low temperature storage of processed tissue is the best preservation technique at present. Tissue banking organization is a very complex system and needs high technical expertise and skilled personnel for proper functioning in a dedicated facility. A small lapse/deviation from the established protocol leads to loss of precious tissues and or harm to recipients as well as the risk of transmission of deadly diseases and tumors. Strict tissue transplant acts and stringent regulations help to streamline the whole process of tissue banking safe for recipients and to community as whole. PMID:23162240

  15. Spectral imaging technique for retinal perfusion detection using confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasta, Seyed Hossein; Manivannan, Ayyakkannu; Sharp, Peter F.

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate retinal perfusion in the human eye, a dual-wavelength confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (cSLO) was developed that provides spectral imaging of the fundus using a combination of red (670 nm) and near-infrared (810 nm) wavelengths. The image of the ocular fundus was analyzed to find out if quantitative measurements of the reflectivity of tissue permit assessment of the oxygen perfusion of tissue. We explored problems that affect the reproducibility of patient measurements such as non-uniformity errors on the image. For the first time, an image processing technique was designed and used to minimize the errors of oxygen saturation measurements by illumination correction in retina wide field by increasing SNR. Retinal images were taken from healthy and diabetic retinopathy eyes using the cSLO with a confocal aperture of 100 μm. The ratio image (RI) of red/IR, as oxygen saturation (SO2) index, was calculated for normal eyes. The image correction technique improved the reproducibility of the measurements. Average RI intensity variation of healthy retina tissue was determined within a range of about 5.5%. The capability of the new technique to discriminate oxygenation levels of retinal artery and vein was successfully demonstrated and showed good promise in the diagnosis of the perfused retina.

  16. Automated scoring of regional lung perfusion in children from contrast enhanced 3D MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimann, Tobias; Eichinger, Monika; Bauman, Grzegorz; Bischoff, Arved; Puderbach, Michael; Meinzer, Hans-Peter

    2012-03-01

    MRI perfusion images give information about regional lung function and can be used to detect pulmonary pathologies in cystic fibrosis (CF) children. However, manual assessment of the percentage of pathologic tissue in defined lung subvolumes features large inter- and intra-observer variation, making it difficult to determine disease progression consistently. We present an automated method to calculate a regional score for this purpose. First, lungs are located based on thresholding and morphological operations. Second, statistical shape models of left and right children's lungs are initialized at the determined locations and used to precisely segment morphological images. Segmentation results are transferred to perfusion maps and employed as masks to calculate perfusion statistics. An automated threshold to determine pathologic tissue is calculated and used to determine accurate regional scores. We evaluated the method on 10 MRI images and achieved an average surface distance of less than 1.5 mm compared to manual reference segmentations. Pathologic tissue was detected correctly in 9 cases. The approach seems suitable for detecting early signs of CF and monitoring response to therapy.

  17. Tissue-Engineered Microvasculature to Reperfuse Isolated Renal Glomeruli.

    PubMed

    Chang, William Gee; Fornoni, Alessia; Tietjen, Gregory; Mendez, Julio J; Niklason, Laura E; Saltzman, W Mark; Pober, Jordan S

    2015-11-01

    Kidney transplantation is often the most effective therapy for end-stage renal disease, but there are not enough donor organs to meet the rising demand. Tissue engineering of kidneys is a potential solution to this organ shortage. Achieving microvascular perfusion has been a major barrier to engineering tissues beyond thin muscularized sheets such as the bladder wall. Our laboratory has previously reported that human umbilical vein endothelial cells (ECs) transduced with the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 will spontaneously organize into perfused microvessels within type I collagen gels when implanted in immunodeficient mice. To test if this system can be used to perfuse more complex structures, we combined Bcl-2-transduced ECs (Bcl-2-ECs) with renal glomeruli, the specialized vascular filtration units of the kidney. Microdissected green fluorescent protein-expressing rat glomeruli suspended in type I collagen gels were implanted within immunodeficient mice with or without the inclusion of Bcl-2-ECs. Survival of rat glomeruli was enhanced by coimplantation with Bcl-2-ECs. Intravital rhodamine dextran injections demonstrated that surviving glomeruli were perfused through Bcl-2-EC-derived microvessels. Perfused glomeruli maintained podocin staining, but transmission electron microscopy revealed endothelial swelling and podocyte foot process effacement. Anastomosis of microvessels derived from Bcl-2-ECs with glomerular capillaries provides proof of concept that self-assembled microvessels can perfuse specialized organ structures such as glomeruli, but that perfusion alone may be insufficient to maintain normal structure. PMID:26414101

  18. The prognostic value of non-perfusion variables obtained during vasodilator stress myocardial perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Navkaranbir S; Singh, Siddharth; Farag, Ayman; El-Hajj, Stephanie; Heo, Jack; Iskandrian, Ami E; Hage, Fadi G

    2016-06-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) is an established diagnostic test that provides useful prognostic data in patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease. In more than half of the patients referred for stress testing, vasodilator stress is used in lieu of exercise. Unlike exercise, vasodilator stress does not provide information on exercise and functional capacity, heart rate recovery, and chronotropy, and ECG changes are less frequent. These non-perfusion data provide important prognostic and patient management information. Further, event rates in patients undergoing vasodilator MPI are higher than in those undergoing exercise MPI and even in those with normal images probably due to higher pretest risk. However, there are a number of non-perfusion variables that are obtained during vasodilator stress testing, which have prognostic relevance but their use has not been well emphasized. The purpose of this review is to summarize the prognostic values of these non-perfusion data obtained during vasodilator MPI. PMID:26940574

  19. Diffusion–Perfusion Mismatch: An Opportunity for Improvement in Cortical Function

    PubMed Central

    Motta, Melissa; Ramadan, Amanda; Hillis, Argye E.; Gottesman, Rebecca F.; Leigh, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Objective: There has been controversy over whether diffusion–perfusion mismatch provides a biomarker for the ischemic penumbra. In the context of clinical stroke trials, regions of the diffusion–perfusion mismatch that do not progress to infarct in the absence of reperfusion are considered to represent “benign oligemia.” However, at least in some cases (particularly large vessel stenosis), some of this hypoperfused tissue may remain dysfunctional for a prolonged period without progressing to infarct and may recover function if eventually reperfused. We hypothesized that patients with persistent diffusion–perfusion mismatch using a hypoperfusion threshold of 4–5.9 s delay on time-to-peak (TTP) maps at least sometimes have persistent cognitive deficits relative to those who show some reperfusion of this hypoperfused tissue. Methods: We tested this hypothesis in 38 patients with acute ischemic stroke who had simple cognitive tests (naming or line cancelation) and MRI with diffusion and perfusion imaging within 24 h of onset and again within 10 days, most of whom had large vessel stenosis or occlusion. Results: A persistent perfusion deficit of 4–5.9 s delay in TTP on follow up MRI was associated with a persistent cognitive deficit at that time point (p < 0.001). When we evaluated only patients who did not have infarct growth (n = 14), persistent hypoperfusion (persistent mismatch) was associated with a lack of cognitive improvement compared with those who had reperfused. The initial volume of hypoperfusion did not correlate with the later infarct volume (progression to infarct), but change in volume of hypoperfusion correlated with change in cognitive performance (p = 0.0001). Moreover, multivariable regression showed that the change in volume of hypoperfused tissue of 4–5.9 s delay (p = 0.002), and change in volume of ischemic tissue on diffusion weighted imaging (p = 0.02) were independently associated with change in

  20. Urate synthesis in the perfused chick liver

    PubMed Central

    Barratt, Eileen; Buttery, Peter J.; Boorman, K. Neil

    1974-01-01

    Urate synthesis was studied in a perfused chicken liver preparation. The perfused liver had an ATP/ADP ratio of 0.29±0.05(6) compared with 0.34±0.07(10) in liver obtained from chicks under ether anaesthesia. Lactate/pyruvate ratios were 9.4±1.7(5) in the perfused liver and 14.8±1.8(5) in the rapidly sampled liver. Urate synthesis was only marginally stimulated by glycine, glutamine, aspartic acid or NH4Cl, but significant increases were observed with phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate, aminoimidazolecarboxylic acid riboside, inosine, inosinic acid and xanthine. Urate synthesis from glycine, glutamine, NH4Cl, asparagine, alanine, histidine and a mixture of 21 amino acids was obtained on inclusion of insulin in the perfusion medium. Evidence for the inclusion of the carbon of histidine into uric acid was obtained. Aspects of the energy consumption associated with the conversion of excess of amino acid into uric acid are considered. PMID:4462579

  1. Automated sonographic evaluation of testicular perfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thierman, Jonathan S.; Clement, Gregory T.; Kalish, Leslie A.; O'Kane, Patrick L.; Frauscher, Ferdinand; Paltiel, Harriet J.

    2006-07-01

    Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (US) imaging is potentially applicable to the investigation of vascular disorders of the testis. We investigated the ability of two automated computer algorithms to analyse contrast-enhanced pulse inversion US data in a rabbit model of unilateral testicular ischaemia and to correctly determine relative testicular perfusion: nonlinear curve fitting of the US backscatter intensity as a function of time; and spectral analysis of the intensity time trace. We compared (i) five metrics based on the algorithmic data to testicular perfusion ratios obtained with radiolabelled microspheres, a reference standard; (ii) qualitative assessment of the US images by two independent readers blinded to the side of the experimental and control testes to the radiolabelled microsphere perfusion ratios; and (iii) results of the algorithmically-derived metrics to the qualitative assessments of the two readers. For the curve fit method, the algorithmically-derived metrics agreed with the reference standard in 54% to 68% of all cases. For the spectral method, the results agreed in 70% of all cases. The two readers agreed with the reference standard in 40% and 35% of all cases, respectively. These results suggest that automated methods of analysis may provide useful information in the assessment of testicular perfusion.

  2. Simplified prototyping of perfusable polystyrene microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Reginald; Ahn, Byungwook; R. Myers, David; Qiu, Yongzhi; Sakurai, Yumiko; Moot, Robert; Mihevc, Emma; Trent Spencer, H.; Doering, Christopher; A. Lam, Wilbur

    2014-01-01

    Cell culture in microfluidic systems has primarily been conducted in devices comprised of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) or other elastomers. As polystyrene (PS) is the most characterized and commonly used substrate material for cell culture, microfluidic cell culture would ideally be conducted in PS-based microsystems that also enable tight control of perfusion and hydrodynamic conditions, which are especially important for culture of vascular cell types. Here, we report a simple method to prototype perfusable PS microfluidics for endothelial cell culture under flow that can be fabricated using standard lithography and wet laboratory equipment to enable stable perfusion at shear stresses up to 300 dyn/cm2 and pumping pressures up to 26 kPa for at least 100 h. This technique can also be extended to fabricate perfusable hybrid PS-PDMS microfluidics of which one application is for increased efficiency of viral transduction in non-adherent suspension cells by leveraging the high surface area to volume ratio of microfluidics and adhesion molecules that are optimized for PS substrates. These biologically compatible microfluidic devices can be made more accessible to biological-based laboratories through the outsourcing of lithography to various available microfluidic foundries. PMID:25379106

  3. Nuclear cardiology: Myocardial perfusion and function

    SciTech Connect

    Seldin, D.W. )

    1991-08-01

    Myocardial perfusion studies continue to be a major focus of research, with new investigations of the relationship of exercise-redistribution thallium imaging to diagnosis, prognosis, and case management. The redistribution phenomenon, which seemed to be fairly well understood a few years ago, is now recognized to be much more complex than originally thought, and various strategies have been proposed to clarify the meaning of persistent defects. Pharmacologic intervention with dipyridamole and adenosine has become available as an alternative to exercise, and comparisons with exercise imaging and catheterization results have been described. Thallium itself is no longer the sole single-photon perfusion radiopharmaceutical; two new technetium agents are now widely available. In addition to perfusion studies, advances in the study of ventricular function have been made, including reports of studies performed in conjunction with technetium perfusion studies, new insights into cardiac physiology, and the prognostic and case-management information that function studies provide. Finally, work has continued with monoclonal antibodies for the identification of areas of myocyte necrosis. 41 references.

  4. Comparison of Indocyanine Green Angiography and Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging for the Assessment of Vasculature Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Towle, Erica L.; Richards, Lisa M.; Kazmi, S. M. Shams; Fox, Douglas J.; Dunn, Andrew K.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Assessment of the vasculature is critical for overall success in cranial vascular neurological surgery procedures. Although several methods of monitoring cortical perfusion intraoperatively are available, not all are appropriate or convenient in a surgical environment. Recently, 2 optical methods of care have emerged that are able to obtain high spatial resolution images with easily implemented instrumentation: indocyanine green (ICG) angiography and laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI). OBJECTIVE To evaluate the usefulness of ICG and LSCI in measuring vessel perfusion. METHODS An experimental setup was developed that simultaneously collects measurements of ICG fluorescence and LSCI in a rodent model. A 785-nm laser diode was used for both excitation of the ICG dye and the LSCI illumination. A photothrombotic clot model was used to occlude specific vessels within the field of view to enable comparison of the 2 methods for monitoring vessel perfusion. RESULTS The induced blood flow change demonstrated that ICG is an excellent method for visualizing the volume and type of vessel at a single point in time; however, it is not always an accurate representation of blood flow. In contrast, LSCI provides a continuous and accurate measurement of blood flow changes without the need of an external contrast agent. CONCLUSION These 2 methods should be used together to obtain a complete understanding of tissue perfusion. PMID:22843129

  5. Polydimethylsiloxane embedded mouse aorta ex vivo perfusion model: proof-of-concept study focusing on atherosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xueya; Wolf, Marc P.; Keel, Rahel Bänziger; Lehner, Roman; Hunziker, Patrick R.

    2012-07-01

    Existing mouse artery ex vivo perfusion models have utilized arteries such as carotid, uterine, and mesenteric arteries, but not the aorta. However, the aorta is the principal vessel analyzed for atherosclerosis studies in vivo. We have devised a mouse aorta ex vivo perfusion model that can bridge this gap. Aortas from apoE(-/-) mice are embedded in a transparent, gas-permeable, and elastic polymer matrix [polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)] and artificially perfused with cell culture medium under cell culture conditions. After 24 h of artificial ex vivo perfusion, no evidence of cellular apoptosis is detected. Utilizing a standard confocal microscope, it is possible to image specific receptor targeting of cells in atherosclerotic plaques during 24 h. Imaging motion artifacts are minimal due to the polymer matrix embedding. Re-embedding of the aorta enables tissue sectioning and immuno-histochemical analysis. The ex vivo data are validated by comparison with in vivo experiments. This model can save animal lives via production of multiple endpoints in a single experiment, is easy to apply, and enables straightforward comparability with pre-existing atherosclerosis in vivo data. It is suited to investigate atherosclerotic disease in particular and vascular biology in general.

  6. The cadaveric perfusion and angiography as a teaching tool: imaging the intracranial vasculature in cadavers.

    PubMed

    Turkoglu, Erhan; Seckin, Hakan; Gurer, Bora; Ahmed, Azam; Uluc, Kutluay; Pulfer, Kari; Arat, Anıl; Niemann, David; Baskaya, Mustafa K

    2014-12-01

    Background and Study Aim To enhance the visualization of the intracranial vasculature of cadavers under gross examination with a combination of imaging modalities. Material and Methods A total of 20 cadaver heads were used to test two different perfusion techniques. First, fixed cadaver heads were perfused with water; second, fresh cadavers were perfused with saline and 10% formalin. Subsequently, brains were removed and fixed. The compounds used were silicone rubber, silicone rubber mixed with powdered barium sulfate, and silicone rubber mixed with tantalum dioxide prepared by the first perfusion technique and gelatin mixed with liquid barium prepared with the second technique. Conventional X-ray imaging, computed tomography (CT), dynamic computed tomography (dCT), and postprocessing three-dimensional (3D) images were used to evaluate all the heads. Results Gelatinized barium was better visualized when compared with tantalum dioxide in conventional X-ray images. The blood vessels injected with either tantalum dioxide or gelatinized barium demonstrated a higher enhancement than the surrounding soft tissues with CT or dCT. The quality of the 3D reconstruction of the intracranial vasculature was significantly better in the CT images obtained from the gelatinized barium group. Conclusions Radiologic examinations of the heads injected with gelatinized barium facilitates the 3D understanding of cerebrovascular anatomy as an important tool for neuroanatomy training. PMID:25452903

  7. The Cadaveric Perfusion and Angiography as a Teaching Tool: Imaging the Intracranial Vasculature in Cadavers

    PubMed Central

    Turkoglu, Erhan; Seckin, Hakan; Gurer, Bora; Ahmed, Azam; Uluc, Kutluay; Pulfer, Kari; Arat, Anıl; Niemann, David; Baskaya, Mustafa K.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Study Aim To enhance the visualization of the intracranial vasculature of cadavers under gross examination with a combination of imaging modalities. Material and Methods A total of 20 cadaver heads were used to test two different perfusion techniques. First, fixed cadaver heads were perfused with water; second, fresh cadavers were perfused with saline and 10% formalin. Subsequently, brains were removed and fixed. The compounds used were silicone rubber, silicone rubber mixed with powdered barium sulfate, and silicone rubber mixed with tantalum dioxide prepared by the first perfusion technique and gelatin mixed with liquid barium prepared with the second technique. Conventional X-ray imaging, computed tomography (CT), dynamic computed tomography (dCT), and postprocessing three-dimensional (3D) images were used to evaluate all the heads. Results Gelatinized barium was better visualized when compared with tantalum dioxide in conventional X-ray images. The blood vessels injected with either tantalum dioxide or gelatinized barium demonstrated a higher enhancement than the surrounding soft tissues with CT or dCT. The quality of the 3D reconstruction of the intracranial vasculature was significantly better in the CT images obtained from the gelatinized barium group. Conclusions Radiologic examinations of the heads injected with gelatinized barium facilitates the 3D understanding of cerebrovascular anatomy as an important tool for neuroanatomy training. PMID:25452903

  8. Initial testing of a 3D printed perfusion phantom using digital subtraction angiography

    PubMed Central

    Khobragade, Parag; Ying, Leslie; Snyder, Kenneth; Wack, David; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Rudin, Stephen; Ionita, Ciprian N.

    2015-01-01

    Perfusion imaging is the most applied modality for the assessment of acute stroke. Parameters such as Cerebral Blood Flow (CBF), Cerebral Blood volume (CBV) and Mean Transit Time (MTT) are used to distinguish the tissue infarct core and ischemic penumbra. Due to lack of standardization these parameters vary significantly between vendors and software even when provided with the same data set. There is a critical need to standardize the systems and make them more reliable. We have designed a uniform phantom to test and verify the perfusion systems. We implemented a flow loop with different flow rates (250, 300, 350 ml/min) and injected the same amount of contrast. The images of the phantom were acquired using a Digital Angiographic system. Since this phantom is uniform, projection images obtained using DSA is sufficient for initial validation. To validate the phantom we measured the contrast concentration at three regions of interest (arterial input, venous output, perfused area) and derived time density curves (TDC). We then calculated the maximum slope, area under the TDCs and flow. The maximum slope calculations were linearly increasing with increase in flow rate, the area under the curve decreases with increase in flow rate. There was 25% error between the calculated flow and measured flow. The derived TDCs were clinically relevant and the calculated flow, maximum slope and areas under the curve were sensitive to the measured flow. We have created a systematic way to calibrate existing perfusion systems and assess their reliability. PMID:26633914

  9. The culture of human embryonic stem cells in microchannel perfusion bioreactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korin, Natanel; Bransky, Avishay; Dinnar, Uri; Levenberg, Shulamit

    2007-12-01

    The culture of human Embryonic Stem (ES) cells in microchannel bioreactors can be highly beneficial for ES cell biology studies and ES tissue engineering applications. In the present study we examine the use of Human Foreskin Fibroblasts (HFF) cells as feeder cells for human ES culture in a microchannel perfusion bioreactor. PDMS microchannels (depth:130 micron) were fabricated using conventional soft-lithography techniques. The channels were sterilized, coated with a human fibronectin solution and seeded with cells. Following a period of static incubation, culture medium was perfused through the channels at various flow rates and cell growth was monitored throughout the culture process. Mass transport and fluid mechanics models were used to evaluate the culture conditions (shear stress, oxygen levels within the micro-bioreactor as a function of the medium flow rate. The conditions for successful long-term culture (>7 days) of HFF under flow were established. Experiments with human embryonic stem cells cultured in microchannels show that the conditions essential to co-culture human ES cell on HFF cells under perfusion differ from the conditions necessary for HFF cell culture. Human ES cells were found to be highly sensitive to flow and culture conditions and did not grow under flow rates which were suitable for HFF long-term culture. Successful culture of undifferentiated human ES cell colonies in a perfusion micro-bioreactor is a basic step towards utilizing microfluidic techniques to explore stem cell biology.

  10. In vitro performance of a perfusion and oxygenation optical sensor using a unique liver phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akl, Tony J.; King, Travis J.; Long, Ruiqi; Ericson, M. N.; Wilson, Mark A.; McShane, Michael J.; Coté, Gerard L.

    2012-03-01

    Between the years 1999 and 2008, on average 2,052 people died per year on the waiting list for liver transplants. Monitoring perfusion and oxygenation in transplanted organs in the 7 to 14 days period post-transplant can enhance graft and patient survival rates, and resultantly increase the availability of organs. In this work, we present in vitro results using a unique liver phantom that support the ability of our sensor to detect perfusion changes in the portal vein at low levels (50 mL/min . 4.5% of normal level). Our sensor measures diffuse reflection from three wavelengths (735, 805 and 940 nm) around the hemoglobin isobestic point (805 nm) to determine perfusion and oxygenation separately. To assess the sensitivity of our sensor to flow changes in the low range, we used two peristaltic pumps to pump a dye solution mimicking the optical properties of oxygenated blood, at various rates, through a PDMS based phantom mimicking the optical properties of liver tissue. The collected pulsatile signal increased by 120% (2.2X) for every 100 mL/min flow rise for all three wavelengths in the range 50 to 500 mL/min. In addition, we used different dye mixtures to mimic oxygenation changes at constant perfusion/flow levels. The optical properties of the dye mixtures mimic oxygen saturations ranging between 0 and 100%. The sensor was shown to be sensitive to changes in oxygen saturations above 50%.

  11. Perfused drop microfluidic device for brain slice culture-based drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Pan, Liping; Cheng, Xuanhong; Berdichevsky, Yevgeny

    2016-06-01

    Living slices of brain tissue are widely used to model brain processes in vitro. In addition to basic neurophysiology studies, brain slices are also extensively used for pharmacology, toxicology, and drug discovery research. In these experiments, high parallelism and throughput are critical. Capability to conduct long-term electrical recording experiments may also be necessary to address disease processes that require protein synthesis and neural circuit rewiring. We developed a novel perfused drop microfluidic device for use with long term cultures of brain slices (organotypic cultures). Slices of hippocampus were placed into wells cut in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) film. Fluid level in the wells was hydrostatically controlled such that a drop was formed around each slice. The drops were continuously perfused with culture medium through microchannels. We found that viable organotypic hippocampal slice cultures could be maintained for at least 9 days in vitro. PDMS microfluidic network could be readily integrated with substrate-printed microelectrodes for parallel electrical recordings of multiple perfused organotypic cultures on a single MEA chip. We expect that this highly scalable perfused drop microfluidic device will facilitate high-throughput drug discovery and toxicology. PMID:27194028

  12. Comparing Normothermic Machine Perfusion Preservation With Different Perfusates on Porcine Livers From Donors After Circulatory Death.

    PubMed

    Liu, Q; Nassar, A; Farias, K; Buccini, L; Mangino, M J; Baldwin, W; Bennett, A; O'Rourke, C; Iuppa, G; Soliman, B G; Urcuyo-Llanes, D; Okamoto, T; Uso, T D; Fung, J; Abu-Elmagd, K; Miller, C; Quintini, C

    2016-03-01

    The utilization of normothermic machine perfusion (NMP) may be an effective strategy to resuscitate livers from donation after circulatory death (DCD). There is no consensus regarding the efficacy of different perfusates on graft and bile duct viability. The aim of this study was to compare, in an NMP porcine DCD model, the preservation potential of three different perfusates. Twenty porcine livers with 60 min of warm ischemia were separated into four preservation groups: cold storage (CS), NMP with Steen solution (Steen; XVIVO Perfusion Inc., Denver, CO), Steen plus red blood cells (RBCs), or whole blood (WB). All livers were preserved for 10 h and reperfused to simulate transplantation for 24 h. During preservation, the NMP with Steen group presented the highest hepatocellular injury. At reperfusion, the CS group had the lowest bile production and the worst hepatocellular injury compared with all other groups, followed by NMP with Steen; the Steen plus RBC and WB groups presented the best functional and hepatocellular injury outcomes, with WB livers showing lower aspartate aminotransferase release and a trend toward better results for most parameters. Based on our results, a perfusate that contains an oxygen carrier is most effective in a model of NMP porcine DCD livers compared with Steen solution. Specifically, WB-perfused livers showed a trend toward better outcomes compared with Steen plus RBCs. PMID:26663737

  13. Epileptiform activity in the dentate gyrus during low-calcium perfusion and exposure to transient electric fields.

    PubMed

    Richardson, T L; O'Reilly, C N

    1995-07-01

    1. The dentate gyrus fails to develop epileptiform activity in many experimental models of epilepsy, including the in vitro low-Ca2+ model. Although manipulating the K+ concentration or osmolality of normal low-Ca2+ perfusion mediums can enhance the propensity of the dentate gyrus to develop seizure activity, the specific mechanisms contributing to this change are still under investigation. Identification of these mechanisms should improve our understanding of epileptogenesis and of the factors contributing to the propensity for seizure discharge in other tissues. 2. In the present experiments we used externally generated electric fields to depolarize the somata of large populations of dentate granule cells during exposure to a perfusion medium with no added Ca2+ (low-Ca2+ medium). Uniform electric fields were generated across an individual slice by passing current between two parallel AgCl-coated silver wires placed on the surface of the artificial cerebral spinal fluid. The wires were positioned to straddle the slice such that the current flow was parallel to the dendrosomatic axis of the cell population under investigation. 3. Under control conditions (low-Ca2+ medium, no applied field), stimulation of the dentate hilus evoked a single antidromic population spike in 89% of the slices studied (n = 27). During application of electric fields the same stimulus evoked epileptiform activity in all trials. Well-formed bursts first occurred at an average field intensity of +22.9 +/- 2.5 (SE) mV/mm (n = 24). The amplitude of individual spikes and the total number of spikes, within a burst increased in a graded fashion as the magnitude of the applied field was increased. 4. High field intensities evoked epileptiform activity in the absence of a synchronizing antidromic stimulus. These field-induced bursts occurred after a progressive buildup of rhythmic activity recorded in the extrasomatic space and could persist for the entire duration of an applied field, lasting for

  14. Videofluorometer for imaging tissue metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Jeffrey J.; Rorvik, Dawn A.; Richmond, Keith N.; Barlow, Clyde H.

    1989-11-01

    A videofluorometer is described that directly acquires digital metabolic images of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) fluorescence in tissue. NADH fluorescence provides an intrinsic indicator of the state of tissue mitochondrial oxidative metabolism. The device combines a computer-controlled fluorescence excitation system with digital image acquisition to quantify tissue bioenergetics in both spatial and time domains. Localized ischemia following coronary artery ligation in a perfused rat heart (model for a coronary artery occlusion heart attack) is used as an example to demonstrate the capabilities of the system. This videofluorometer permits monitoring changes in physiological state of organs and tissue without interfering with tissue metabolism. The digital nature of the acquired image allows detailed analysis of physiological features and their time dependence.

  15. Perivascular Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Maille, Nicole; Clas, Darren; Osol, George

    2015-01-01

    Perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT) contributes to vasoregulation. The role of this adipose tissue bed in pregnancy has not been examined. Here, we tested the hypothesis that PVAT in pregnant rats decreases resistance artery tone. Mesenteric arteries from nonpregnant (NP) and late pregnant (LP) rats were exposed to phenylephrine (PHE) or KCl in the presence (+) versus absence (−) of PVAT. The LP PVAT(+) vessels showed a 44% decrease in sensitivity to PHE in the presence of PVAT. There was no attenuation of the contractile response to KCl when PVAT was present. The LP arteries perfused with LP or NP PVAT underwent vasodilation; unexpectedly, NP vessels in the presence of PVAT from LP rats sustained a 48% vasoconstriction. The PVAT attenuates vasoconstriction by a mechanism that involves hyperpolarization. The vasoconstriction observed when nonpregnant vessels were exposed to pregnant PVAT suggests pregnant vessels adapt to the vasoconstricting influence of pregnant PVAT. PMID:25527422

  16. Perfusion-Decellularization of Porcine Lung and Trachea for Respiratory Bioengineering.

    PubMed

    Weymann, Alexander; Patil, Nikhil Prakash; Sabashnikov, Anton; Korkmaz, Sevil; Li, Shiliang; Soos, Pal; Ishtok, Roland; Chaimow, Nicole; Pätzold, Ines; Czerny, Natalie; Schmack, Bastian; Popov, Aron-Frederik; Simon, Andre Rüdiger; Karck, Matthias; Szabo, Gabor

    2015-12-01

    Decellularization of native organs may provide an acellular tissue platform for organ regeneration. However, decellularization involves a trade-off between removal of immunogenic cellular elements and preservation of biomechanical integrity. We sought to develop a bioartificial scaffold for respiratory tissue engineering by decellularization of porcine lungs and trachea while preserving organ architecture and vasculature. Lung-trachea preparations from 25 German Landrace pigs were perfused in a modified Langendorff circuit and decellularized by an SDC (sodium deoxycholate)-based perfusion protocol. Decellularization was evaluated by histology and fluorescence microscopy, and residual DNA quantified spectrophotometrically and compared with controls. Airway compliance was evaluated by endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation to simulate physiological breathing-induced stretch. Structural integrity was evaluated by bronchoscopy and biomechanical stress/strain analysis by measuring passive tensile strength, all compared with controls. Decellularized lungs and trachea lacked intracellular components but retained specific collagen fibers and elastin. Quantitative DNA analysis demonstrated a significant reduction of DNA compared with controls (32.8 ± 12.4 μg DNA/mg tissue vs. 179.7 ± 35.8 μg DNA/mg tissue, P < 0.05). Lungs and trachea decellularized by our perfusion protocol demonstrated increased airway compliance but preserved biomechanical integrity as compared with native tissue. Whole porcine lungs-tracheae can be successfully decellularized to create an acellular scaffold that preserves extracellular matrix and retains structral integrity and three-dimensional architecture to provide a bioartifical platform for respiratory tissue engineering. PMID:25894696

  17. Vascular Complications following Isolated Limb Perfusion for Local Recurrence of Extremity Melanoma: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Trezzi, M; Parolari, A; Loardi, C; Alamanni, F

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. To evaluate the role of hyperthermic isolated limb perfusion (HILP) in arterial thrombosis following melanoma-soft tissue sarcoma chemotherapy. Report. Here is presented one case of iliac-common femoral artery subacute thrombosis and a review of the appropriate literature performed using a MEDLINE search. Acute/subacute arterial occlusion is one of the most feared vascular complications of HILP, located nearly always in the external iliac-femoral artery axis, being those vessels cannulated for perfusion. Conclusions. The small number of reported cases indicates either the rarity of this complication or unawareness of its existence. The true incidence of this complication is probably underreported. PMID:21776393

  18. Vascular Complications following Isolated Limb Perfusion for Local Recurrence of Extremity Melanoma: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Trezzi, M.; Parolari, A.; Loardi, C.; Alamanni, F.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. To evaluate the role of hyperthermic isolated limb perfusion (HILP) in arterial thrombosis following melanoma-soft tissue sarcoma chemotherapy. Report. Here is presented one case of iliac-common femoral artery subacute thrombosis and a review of the appropriate literature performed using a MEDLINE search. Acute/subacute arterial occlusion is one of the most feared vascular complications of HILP, located nearly always in the external iliac-femoral artery axis, being those vessels cannulated for perfusion. Conclusions. The small number of reported cases indicates either the rarity of this complication or unawareness of its existence. The true incidence of this complication is probably underreported. PMID:21776393

  19. Effects of increased heart work on glycolysis and adenine nucleotides in the perfused heart of normal and diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Opie, L. H.; Mansford, K. R. L.; Owen, Patricia

    1971-01-01

    1. In the isolated perfused rat heart, the contractile activity and the oxygen uptake were varied by altering the aortic perfusion pressure, or by the atrial perfusion technique (`working heart'). 2. The maximum increase in the contractile activity brought about an eightfold increase in the oxygen uptake. The rate of glycolytic flux rose, while tissue contents of hexose monophosphates, citrate, ATP and creatine phosphate decreased, and contents of ADP and AMP rose. 3. The changes in tissue contents of adenine nucleotides during increased heart work were time-dependent. The ATP content fell temporarily (30s and 2min) after the start of left-atrial perfusion; at 5 and 10min values were normal; and at 30 and 60min values were decreased. ADP and AMP values were increased in the first 15min, but were at control values 30 or 60min after the onset of increased heart work. 4. During increased heart work changes in the tissue contents of adenine nucleotide and of citrate appeared to play a role in altered regulation of glycolysis at the level of phosphofructokinase activity. 5. In recirculation experiments increased heart work for 30min was associated with increased entry of [14C]glucose (11.1mm) and glycogen into glycolysis and a comparable increase in formation of products of glycolysis (lactate, pyruvate and 14CO2). There was no major accumulation of intermediates. Glycogen was not a major fuel for respiration. 6. Increased glycolytic flux in Langendorff perfused and working hearts was obtained by the addition of insulin to the perfusion medium. The concomitant increases in the tissue values of hexose phosphates and of citrate contrasted with the decreased values of hexose monophosphates and of citrate during increased glycolytic flux obtained by increased heart work. 7. Decreased glycolytic flux in Langendorff perfused hearts was obtained by using acute alloxan-diabetic and chronic streptozotocin-diabetic rats; in the latter condition there were decreased tissue

  20. Clinical Neuroimaging Using Arterial Spin-Labeled Perfusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Ronald L.; Detre, John A.

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY The two most common methods for measuring perfusion with MRI are based on dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) and arterial spin labeling (ASL). Although clinical experience to date is much more extensive with DSC perfusion MRI, ASL methods offer several advantages. The primary advantages are that completely noninvasive absolute cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurements are possible with relative insensitivity to permeability, and that multiple repeated measurements can be obtained to evaluate one or more interventions or to perform perfusion-based functional MRI. ASL perfusion and perfusion-based fMRI methods have been applied in many clinical settings, including acute and chronic cerebrovascular disease, CNS neoplasms, epilepsy, aging and development, neurodegenerative disorders, and neuropsychiatric diseases. Recent technical advances have improved the sensitivity of ASL perfusion MRI, and increasing use is expected in the coming years. This review focuses on ASL perfusion MRI and applications in clinical neuroimaging. PMID:17599701

  1. Cyanide metabolism in the isolated, perfused, bloodless hindlimbs or liver of the rat.

    PubMed

    Devlin, D J; Smith, R P; Thron, C D

    1989-04-01

    Female CD1 rats weighing 250-300 g were anesthetized with ip pentobarbital, 50 mg/kg, and either the liver or the hindlimbs were surgically isolated and perfused in situ with a Krebs-Henseleit buffer, pH 7.4, at 38 degrees C, containing 40 g/liter dextran and 30 mg/liter papaverine. Perfusion pressure was continuously monitored, and in most experiments, flow was maintained at the physiological rate of 8.5 ml/min. In-line Clark-type electrodes allowed the continuous measurement of oxygen extraction. Potassium cyanide to 0.15 mM was usually added to the perfusate just prior to the start of a run. After a period of equilibration, samples of the perfusate were taken periodically for cyanide (CN) and thiocyanate (SCN) analyses. The results were used to determine CN extraction ratios or clearance and rates of SCN formation. When it was apparent that a steady state had been reached with respect to the above, sodium thiosulfate (TS) was added to the perfusate (to 0.1, 1.0, or 2.0 mM), and periodic samples were again collected after an equilibration period. In the absence of albumin, TS rapidly and significantly increased the rate of conversion of CN to SCN in both the liver and the hindlimbs. The rate of CN clearance in milliliters per minute per kilogram perfused tissue was 20-fold greater in the liver than in the hindlimbs. However, when the results from hindlimbs were extrapolated to the total body skeletal muscle mass, the rate of CN clearance by the total liver mass was only 1.5-fold greater than in total muscle mass. In the absence of TS, total muscle mass cleared CN at a rate that was 2.6-fold greater than the total liver mass, but the rates in both tissues were very much less than in the presence of TS. The extraction ratio for CN in the liver was 0.8 and the clearance was dependent on the flow rate. The extraction ratio for CN in the hindlimbs was 0.2, and the clearance was independent of the flow rate. Thus, CN clearance by the liver probably increases (within

  2. Engineering a perfusable 3D human liver platform from iPS cells.

    PubMed

    Schepers, Arnout; Li, Cheri; Chhabra, Arnav; Seney, Benjamin Tschudy; Bhatia, Sangeeta

    2016-07-01

    In vitro models of human tissue are crucial to our ability to study human disease as well as develop safe and effective drug therapies. Models of single organs in static and microfluidic culture have been established and shown utility for modeling some aspects of health and disease; however, these systems lack multi-organ interactions that are critical to some aspects of drug metabolism and toxicity. Thus, as part of a consortium of researchers, we have developed a liver chip that meets the following criteria: (1) employs human iPS cells from a patient of interest, (2) cultures cells in perfusable 3D organoids, and (3) is robust to variations in perfusion rate so as to be compatible in series with other specialized tissue chips (e.g. heart, lung). In order to achieve this, we describe methods to form hepatocyte aggregates from primary and iPS-derived cells, alone and in co-culture with support cells. This necessitated a novel culture protocol for the interrupted differentiation of iPS cells that permits their removal from a plated surface and aggregation while maintaining phenotypic hepatic functions. In order to incorporate these 3D aggregates in a perfusable platform, we next encapsulated the cells in a PEG hydrogel to prevent aggregation and overgrowth once on chip. We adapted a C-trap chip architecture from the literature that enabled robust loading with encapsulated organoids and culture over a range of flow rates. Finally, we characterize the liver functions of this iHep organoid chip under perfusion and demonstrate a lifetime of at least 28 days. We envision that such this strategy can be generalized to other microfluidic tissue models and provides an opportunity to query patient-specific liver responses in vitro. PMID:27296616

  3. Improved preservation of warm ischemic livers by hypothermic machine perfusion with supplemented University of Wisconsin solution.

    PubMed

    Jain, Shailendra; Lee, Sang Ho; Korneszczuk, Katarzyna; Culberson, Catherine R; Southard, James H; Berthiaume, François; Zhang, Jian X; Clemens, Mark G; Lee, Charles Y

    2008-01-01

    Hypothermic machine perfusion (HMP) has the potential to improve recovery and preservation of Donation after Cardiac Death (DCD) livers, including uncontrolled DCD livers. However, current perfusion solutions lack the needed substrates to improve energy recovery and minimize hepatic injury, if warm ischemic time (WIT) is extended. This proof-of-concept study tested the hypothesis that the University of Wisconsin (UW) solution supplemented with anaplerotic substrates, calcium chloride, thromboxane A2 inhibitor, and antioxidants could improve HMP preservation and minimize reperfusion injury of warm ischemic livers. Preflushed rat livers subjected to 60 min WIT were preserved for 5 h with standard UW or supplemented UW (SUW) solution. Post preservation hepatic functions and viability were assessed during isolated perfusion with Krebs-Henseleit solution. Livers preserved with SUW showed significantly (p < .001) improved recovery of tissue ATP levels (micromol/g liver), 2.06 +/- 0.10 (mean +/- SE), as compared to the UW group, 0.70 +/- 0.10, and the level was 80% of that of fresh control livers (2.60 +/- 0.13). At the end of 1 h of rewarming, lactate dehydrogenase (U/L) in the perfusate was significantly (p < .05) lower in the SUW group (429 +/- 58) as compared to ischemia-reperfusion (IR) (781 +/- 12) and the UW group (1151 +/- 83). Bile production (microg/min/g liver) was significantly (p < .05) higher in the SUW group (280 +/- 13) as compared to the IR (224 +/- 24) and the UW group (114 +/- 14). The tissue edema formation assessed by tissue wet-dry ratio was significantly (p < .05) higher in UW group. Histology showed well-preserved hepatic structure in the SUW group. In conclusion, this study suggests that HMP with SUW solution has the potential to restore and preserve livers with extended WIT. PMID:18340625

  4. Three-dimensional MRI perfusion maps: a step beyond volumetric analysis in mental disorders

    PubMed Central

    Fabene, Paolo F; Farace, Paolo; Brambilla, Paolo; Andreone, Nicola; Cerini, Roberto; Pelizza, Luisa; Versace, Amelia; Rambaldelli, Gianluca; Birbaumer, Niels; Tansella, Michele; Sbarbati, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    A new type of magnetic resonance imaging analysis, based on fusion of three-dimensional reconstructions of time-to-peak parametric maps and high-resolution T1-weighted images, is proposed in order to evaluate the perfusion of selected volumes of interest. Because in recent years a wealth of data have suggested the crucial involvement of vascular alterations in mental diseases, we tested our new method on a restricted sample of schizophrenic patients and matched healthy controls. The perfusion of the whole brain was compared with that of the caudate nucleus by means of intrasubject analysis. As expected, owing to the encephalic vascular pattern, a significantly lower time-to-peak was observed in the caudate nucleus than in the whole brain in all healthy controls, indicating that the suggested method has enough sensitivity to detect subtle perfusion changes even in small volumes of interest. Interestingly, a less uniform pattern was observed in the schizophrenic patients. The latter finding needs to be replicated in an adequate number of subjects. In summary, the three-dimensional analysis method we propose has been shown to be a feasible tool for revealing subtle vascular changes both in normal subjects and in pathological conditions. PMID:17229290

  5. Bioreactors for tissue engineering--a new role for perfusionists?

    PubMed

    Sistino, Joseph J

    2003-09-01

    Tissue engineering is an exciting new area of medicine with rapid growth and expansion over the last decade. It has the potential to have a profound impact on the practice of medicine and influence the economic development in the industry of biotechnology. In almost every specialty of medicine, the ability to generate replacement cells and develop tissues will change the focus from artificial organs and transplantation to growing replacement organs from the patient's own stem cells. Once these organs are at a size that requires perfusion to maintain oxygen and nutrient delivery, then automated perfusion systems termed "bioreactors" will be necessary to sustain the organ until harvesting. The design of these "bioreactors" will have a crucial role in the maintenance of cellular function throughout the growth period. The perfusion schemes necessary to determine the optimal conditions have not been well elucidated and will undergo extensive research over the next decade. The key to progress in this endeavor will development of long-term perfusion techniques and identifying the ideal pressures, flow rates, type of flow (pulsatile/nonpulsatile), and perfusate solution. Perfusionists are considered experts in the field of whole body perfusion, and it is possible that they can participate in the development and operation of these "bioreactors." Additional education of perfusionists in the area of tissue engineering is necessary in order for them to become integral parts of this exciting new area of medicine. PMID:14653420

  6. Multi-modality imaging for the assessment of myocardial perfusion with emphasis on stress perfusion CT and MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Ko, Sung Min; Hwang, Hweung Kon; Kim, Sung Mok; Cho, Ihn Ho

    2015-06-01

    High-quality and non-invasive diagnostic tools for assessing myocardial ischemia are necessary for therapeutic decisions regarding coronary artery disease. Myocardial perfusion has been studied using myocardial contrast echo perfusion, single-photon emission computed tomography, positron emission tomography, cardiovascular magnetic resonance, and, more recently, computed tomography. The addition of coronary computed tomography angiography to myocardial perfusion imaging improves the specificity and overall diagnostic accuracy of detecting the hemodynamic significance of coronary artery stenosis. This study reviews the benefits, limitations, and imaging findings of various imaging modalities for assessing myocardial perfusion, with particular emphasis on stress perfusion computed tomography and cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:25809387

  7. The blood perfusion and NADH/FAD content combined analysis in patients with diabetes foot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dremin, Victor V.; Sidorov, Victor V.; Krupatkin, Alexander I.; Galstyan, Gagik R.; Novikova, Irina N.; Zherebtsova, Angelina I.; Zherebtsov, Evgeny A.; Dunaev, Andrey V.; Abdulvapova, Zera N.; Litvinova, Karina S.; Rafailov, Ilya E.; Sokolovski, Sergei G.; Rafailov, Edik U.

    2016-03-01

    Skin blood microcirculation and the metabolism activity of tissue were examined on the patients with type 2 diabetes. Laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) with 1064 nm laser light source and fluorescence spectroscopy (FS) with excitation light of 365 nm and 450 nm have been used to monitor the blood perfusion and the content of coenzymes NADH and FAD. Concluding, the proposed combined LDF and tissue FS approach allows to identify the significant violations in the blood microcirculation and metabolic activity for type 2 diabetes patients.

  8. Effect of prolonged hypokinesia on tissue blood flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levites, Z. P.; Fedotova, V. F.

    1979-01-01

    The influence of hypokinesia on the blood flow in the tissues of rabbits was studied. Motor activity of animals was restricted during 90 days and blood flow recorded through resorption rate of NaI-131. Perfusion of tissues under the influence of hypokinesia was found to be reduced.

  9. Luminal perfusion of isolated gastric glands.

    PubMed

    Waisbren, S J; Geibel, J; Boron, W F; Modlin, I M

    1994-04-01

    We have extended to rabbit gastric glands the technique for perfusing single isolated renal tubules. We isolated glands by hand dissection and used concentric glass pipettes to hold them and perfuse their lumina. Parietal cells (PCs), which tended to be located toward the gland opening, were identified by their pyramidal shape, large size, and autofluorescence. Chief cells (CCs) were identified by their round shape and smaller size. In some experiments, we perfused the lumen with hydroxypyrenetrisulfonate, a pH-sensitive fluorophore, at pH 7.4 and used digital image processing to monitor luminal pH (pH1). Solutions were buffered with N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid to pH 7.4 at 37 degrees C. With fast perfusion, we found no evidence of decreased pH1, even with stimulation by 10 microM carbachol. With slow perfusion, pH1 often fell below the dye's sensitive range (pH < 5), especially at low perfusate buffering power. In other experiments, we loaded cells with the pH-sensitive dye 2',7'-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein and monitored intracellular pH (pHi) in multiple individual PCs and CCs in a single gland. Mean pHi was 7.21 +/- 0.02 (n = 136 cells) for PCs and 7.27 +/- 0.03 (n = 103) for CCs. To examine the response to decreased pH1 and basolateral pH (pHb), we lowered pHb to 6.4 or lowered pH1 to 3.4 or 1.4. Lowering pHb to 6.4 for approximately 1 min caused pHi to fall reversibly by 0.39 +/- 0.05 (n = 53) in PCs and 0.58 +/- 0.03 (n = 50) in CCs. Lowering pH1 to 3.4 or 1.4 caused no significant pHi changes in PCs (n = 38 and 82) or in CCs (n = 44 and 77). Carbachol did not affect the response to changes in pH1 or pHb. We conclude that the apical surfaces of PCs and CCs are unusually resistant to extreme pH gradients. PMID:8178950

  10. Early Time Points Perfusion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kwong, Kenneth K.; Reese, Timothy G.; Nelissen, Koen; Wu, Ona; Chan, Suk-Tak; Benner, Thomas; Mandeville, Joseph B.; Foley, Mary; Vanduffel, Wim; Chesler, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The aim was to investigate the feasibility of making relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) maps from MR images acquired with short TR by measuring the initial arrival amount of Gd-DTPA evaluated within a time window before any contrast agent has a chance to leave the tissue. We named this rCBF measurement technique utilizing the early data points of the Gd-DTPA bolus the “early time points” method (ET), based on the hypothesis that early time point signals were proportional to rCBF. Simulation data were used successfully to examine the ideal behavior of ET while monkey’s MRI results offered encouraging support to the utility of ET for rCBF calculation. A better brain coverage for ET could be obtained by applying the Simultaneous Echo Refocusing (SER) EPI technique. A recipe to run ET was presented, with attention paid to the noise problem around the time of arrival (TOA) of the contrast agent. PMID:20851196

  11. A method of determining electrical potential gradient across mitochondrial membrane in perfused rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Wan, B; Doumen, C; Duszynski, J; Salama, G; LaNoue, K F

    1993-08-01

    The electrical potential gradient across the mitochondrial membrane (delta psi m) in perfused rat hearts was estimated by calculating the equilibrium distribution of the lipophilic cation tetraphenylphosphonium (TPP+), using measured kinetic constants of uptake and release of TPP+. First-order rate constants of TPP+ uptake were measured during 30-min perfusions of intact rat hearts with tracer amounts (5.0 nM) of tritium-labeled TPP+ ([3H]TPP+) in the perfusate. This was followed by a 30-min washout, during which the first-order rate constant of efflux was estimated. Values of [3H]TPP+ outside the heart and total [3H]TPP+ inside the heart at equilibrium were calculated. From this information and separately estimated time-averaged plasma membrane potentials (delta psi c) it was possible to calculate free cytosolic [3H]TPP+ at equilibrium. It was also possible to calculate free intramitochondrial [3H]TPP+ at equilibrium as the difference between total tissue [3H]TPP+ minus free cytosolic TPP+ and the sum of all the bound [3H]TPP+. Bound [3H]TPP+ was determined from [3H]TPP+ binding constants measured in separate experiments, using both isolated mitochondria and isolated cardiac myocytes under conditions where both delta psi m and delta psi c were zero. Delta psi m was calculated from the intramitochondrial and cytosolic free TPP+ concentrations using the Nernst equation. Values of delta psi m were 144.9 +/- 2.0 mV in hearts perfused with 5 mM pyruvate and 118.2 +/- 1.4 mV in hearts perfused with 11 mM glucose, in good agreement with delta psi m obtained from isolated rat heart mitochondria.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8368347

  12. Perfusion magnetic resonance imaging correlates of neuropsychological impairment in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Inglese, Matilde; Adhya, Sumita; Johnson, Glyn; Babb, James S; Miles, Laura; Jaggi, Hina; Herbert, Joseph; Grossman, Robert I

    2008-01-01

    Although cognitive impairment is common in multiple sclerosis (MS), its pathophysiology is still poorly understood. Abnormalities of cerebral blood flow (CBF) have long been acknowledged in MS and advances in perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allow for their assessment in vivo. We investigated the relationship between regional perfusion changes and neuropsychological (NP) dysfunctions in patients with relapsing-remitting and primary-progressive MS. Absolute CBF, cerebral blood volume (CBV) and mean transit time were measured in 32 MS patients and 11 healthy controls using dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced T2*-weighted MRI. A comprehensive NP test battery was administered to all patients. A mixed model analysis of covariance was performed for group comparisons in terms of perfusion measures in normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) and deep gray matter (GM). Pearson’s correlations were used to describe the association of perfusion metrics with NP Z-scores. CBF and CBV values were significantly decreased in both NAWM and deep GM in MS patients compared with controls (P = 0.01). In all patients, deep GM CBF was significantly associated with Rey Complex Figure Test (RCFT)-Copy (r = 0.5; P = 0.001) and deep GM CBV and NAWM CBV were significantly associated with Color-Word Interference Inhibition Switching test (D-KEFSIS) (r = 0.4; P = 0.008 and r = 0.4; P = 0.02). However, the only associations that remained significant after Bonferroni correction were between deep GM CBF and RCFT-Copy (P = 0.006), and deep GM CBV and D-KEFSIS (P = 0.04). Our results suggest a role for tissue perfusion impairment in NP dysfunction in MS. Large-scale studies are needed to characterize better this association. PMID:17473851

  13. Estimation of intra-operator variability in perfusion parameter measurements using DCE-US

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, Marianne; Leguerney, Ingrid; Thalmensi, Jessie; Chebil, Mohamed; Parisot, Sarah; Peronneau, Pierre; Roche, Alain; Lassau, Nathalie

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate intra-operator variability of semi-quantitative perfusion parameters using dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (DCE-US), following bolus injections of SonoVue®. METHODS: The in vitro experiments were conducted using three in-house sets up based on pumping a fluid through a phantom placed in a water tank. In the in vivo experiments, B16F10 melanoma cells were xenografted to five nude mice. Both in vitro and in vivo, images were acquired following bolus injections of the ultrasound contrast agent SonoVue® (Bracco, Milan, Italy) and using a Toshiba Aplio® ultrasound scanner connected to a 2.9-5.8 MHz linear transducer (PZT, PLT 604AT probe) (Toshiba, Japan) allowing harmonic imaging (“Vascular Recognition Imaging”) involving linear raw data. A mathematical model based on the dye-dilution theory was developed by the Gustave Roussy Institute, Villejuif, France and used to evaluate seven perfusion parameters from time-intensity curves. Intra-operator variability analyses were based on determining perfusion parameter coefficients of variation (CV). RESULTS: In vitro, different volumes of SonoVue® were tested with the three phantoms: intra-operator variability was found to range from 2.33% to 23.72%. In vivo, experiments were performed on tumor tissues and perfusion parameters exhibited values ranging from 1.48% to 29.97%. In addition, the area under the curve (AUC) and the area under the wash-out (AUWO) were two of the parameters of great interest since throughout in vitro and in vivo experiments their variability was lower than 15.79%. CONCLUSION: AUC and AUWO appear to be the most reliable parameters for assessing tumor perfusion using DCE-US as they exhibited the lowest CV values. PMID:21512654

  14. Contact-free monitoring of circulation and perfusion dynamics based on the analysis of thermal imagery

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Carina Barbosa; Czaplik, Michael; Blanik, Nikolai; Rossaint, Rolf; Blazek, Vladimir; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    Acute circulatory disorders are commonly associated with systemic inflammatory response (SIRS) and sepsis. During sepsis, microcirculatory perfusion is compromised leading to tissue hypoperfusion and potentially to multiple organ dysfunction. In the present study, acute lung injury (ALI), one of the major causes leading to SIRS and sepsis, was experimentally induced in six female pigs. To investigate the progress of body temperature distribution, measurements with a long-wave infrared camera were carried out. Temperature centralization was evidenced during ALI owing to impairments of peripheral perfusion. In addition, statistical analysis demonstrated strong correlations between (a) standard deviation of the skin temperature distribution (SD) and shock index (SI) (p<0.0005), (b) SD and mean arterial pressure (MAP) (p<0.0005), (c) ΔT/Δx and SI (p<0.0005), as well as between (d) ΔT/Δx and MAP (p<0.0005). For clarification purposes, ΔT/Δx is a parameter implemented to quantify the spatial temperature gradient. This pioneering study created promising results. It demonstrated the capacity of infrared thermography as well as of the indexes, SD and ΔT/Δx, to detect impairments in both circulation and tissue perfusion. PMID:24761290

  15. The isolated perfused equine distal limb as an ex vivo model for pharmacokinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Friebe, M; Stahl, J; Kietzmann, M

    2013-06-01

    Even though intra-articular injections play an important role in the treatment of joint-related lameness in horses, little is known about pharmacokinetic properties of substances used. Therefore, an ex vivo model for pharmacokinetic studies was developed using distal forelimbs of slaughtered horses. The extremity was perfused with gassed Tyrode solution for up to 8 h. Tissue viability was confirmed by measurements of glucose consumption, lactate production, and lactate dehydrogenase activity in the perfusate. Standard criteria for tissue viability had been determined in preliminary experiments (n = 11), which also included histological examinations of the joint capsule. As the model's first implementation, the articular efflux rate of betamethasone (BM), administered as BM disodium phosphate intra-articularly to the fetlock joint (4 mg BM/joint), was investigated. The concentration of BM in the venous perfusate of the radial vein was measured by means of high-performance liquid chromatography. The average BM efflux rate per minute was calculated to be 5.1 μg/min with values ranging from 9 μg/min to 2.9 μg/min. 7.5 h after i.a. application, 2.3 mg BM had left the joint via the radial vein. Using this inexpensive setup, the presented model allows studying a variety of pharmacological topics without the ethical limitations of animal studies. PMID:22913456

  16. C-arm cone beam CT perfusion imaging using the SMART-RECON algorithm to improve temporal sampling density and temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yinsheng; Niu, Kai; Li, Ke; Schafer, Sebastian; Royalty, Kevin; Strother, Charles; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2016-03-01

    In this work, a newly developed reconstruction algorithm, Synchronized MultiArtifact Reduction with Tomographic RECONstruction (SMART-RECON), was applied to C-arm cone beam CT perfusion (CBCTP) imaging. This algorithm contains a special rank regularizer, designed to reduce limited-view artifacts associated with super- short scan reconstructions. As a result, high temporal sampling and temporal resolution image reconstructions were achieved using an interventional C-arm x-ray system. The algorithm was evaluated in terms of the fidelity of the dynamic contrast update curves and the accuracy of perfusion parameters through numerical simulation studies. Results shows that, not only were the dynamic curves accurately recovered (relative root mean square error ∈ [3%, 5%] compared with [13%, 22%] for FBP), but also the noise in the final perfusion maps was dramatically reduced. Compared with filtered backprojection, SMART-RECON generated CBCTP maps with much improved capability in differentiating lesions with perfusion deficits from the surrounding healthy brain tissues.

  17. Percentage of Adults with High Blood Pressure Whose Hypertension Is Adequately Controlled

    MedlinePlus

    ... is Adequately Controlled Percentage of Adults with High Blood Pressure Whose Hypertension is Adequately Controlled Heart disease ... Survey. Age Group Percentage of People with High Blood Pressure that is Controlled by Age Group f94q- ...

  18. Coronary microcirculation changes in non-ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy identified by novel perfusion CT

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Wayne L.; Behrenbeck, Thomas R.; McCollough, Cynthia H.; Williamson, Eric E.; Leng, Shuai; Kline, Timothy L.

    2015-01-01

    Intramyocardial microvessels demonstrate functional changes in cardiomyopathies. However, clinical computed tomography (CT) does not have adequate spatial resolution to assess the microvessels. Our hypothesis is that these functional changes manifest as altered heterogeneity of the spatial distribution of arteriolar perfusion territories. Our goal was to determine whether the spatial analysis of perfusion CT could clinically detect changes in the function and structure of the intramyocardial microcirculation in a non-ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Two groups were studied: (1) a Control group (12 male plus 12 female) with no risk factors nor evidence of coronary artery disease, and (2) a DCM group (12 male plus 12 female)with left ventricular ejection fraction ≤40 %and no evidence of coronary artery disease. Using the CT scan, the LV free wall thickness and its radius of curvature were measured. The DCM group was sub divided into those with LV free wall thickness <11.5 mm and those with thickness≥11.5 mm. In themyocardial opacification phase of the CT scan sequence, myocardial perfusion (F) and intramyocardial blood volume (Bv) for multiple intramyocardial regions were computed. No significant differences between the groups were demonstrable in overall myocardial F or Bv. However, the myocardial regional data showed significantly increased spatial heterogeneity in the DCM group when compared to the Control group. The findings demonstrate that altered function of the subresolution intramyocardial microcirculation can be quantified with myocardial perfusion CT and that significant changes in these parameters occur in the DCM subjects with LV wall thickness greater than 11.5 mm. PMID:25712168

  19. Perfusion techniques for minimally invasive valve procedures.

    PubMed

    de Jong, A; Popa, B A; Stelian, E; Karazanishvili, L; Lanzillo, G; Simonini, S; Renzi, L; Diena, M; Tesler, U F

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we present, in detail, the simplified perfusion technique that we have adopted since January 2009 and that we have utilized in 200 cases for cardiac minimally invasive valvular procedures that were performed through a right lateral mini-thoracotomy in the 3(rd)-4(th) intercostal space. Cardiopulmonary bypass was achieved by means of the direct cannulation of the ascending aorta and the insertion of a percutaneous venous cannula in the femoral vein. A flexible aortic cross-clamp was applied through the skin incision and cardioplegic arrest was obtained with the antegrade delivery of a crystalloid solution. Gravity drainage was enhanced by vacuum-assisted aspiration. There were no technical complications related to this perfusion technique that we have adopted in minimally invasive surgical procedures. PMID:25280878

  20. Assessment of cerebral perfusion in childhood strokes

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, G.F.; Fishman, L.S.; Segall, H.D.

    1982-11-01

    Thirty-three children who had strokes were studied by dynamic and static scintigraphy, 29 by CT scanning, and 10 by cerebral angiography. The accuracy of dynamic scintigraphy in stroke detection during the first week of clinical symptoms was 94% while CT scanning was 60% accurate and static scintigraphy 11% accurate. During the second week the accuracy of CT scanning increased to 100%, but static scintigraphy improved to only 50%. Fifty percent of scintiangiograms performed during the first week showed either luxuriant perfusion or flip-flop patterns. In some patients these two flow patterns changed to that of cerebral hemispheric ischemia after going through a phase during which perfusion appeared to be equal in the two hemispheres. Dynamic scintigraphy is believed to be the test of choice for stroke detection in children during the first week.

  1. Visual analysis of longitudinal brain tumor perfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaßer, Sylvia; Oeltze, Steffen; Preim, Uta; Bjørnerud, Atle; Hauser, Helwig; Preim, Bernhard

    2013-02-01

    In clinical research on diagnosis and evaluation of brain tumors, longitudinal perfusion MRI studies are acquired for tumor grading as well as to monitor and assess treatment response and patient prognosis. Within this work, we demonstrate how visual analysis techniques can be adapted to multidimensional datasets from such studies within a framework to support the computer-aided diagnosis of brain tumors. Our solution builds on two innovations: First, we introduce a pipeline yielding comparative, co-registered quantitative perfusion parameter maps over all time steps of the longitudinal study. Second, based on these time-dependent parameter maps, visual analysis methods were developed and adapted to reveal valuable insight into tumor progression, especially regarding the clinical research area of low grade glioma transformation into high grade gliomas. Our examination of four longitudinal brain studies demonstrates the suitability of the presented visual analysis methods and comprises new possibilities for the clinical researcher to characterize the development of low grade gliomas.

  2. Dynamic CT perfusion measurement in a cardiac phantom.

    PubMed

    Ziemer, Benjamin P; Hubbard, Logan; Lipinski, Jerry; Molloi, Sabee

    2015-10-01

    Widespread clinical implementation of dynamic CT myocardial perfusion has been hampered by its limited accuracy and high radiation dose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and radiation dose reduction of a dynamic CT myocardial perfusion technique based on first pass analysis (FPA). To test the FPA technique, a pulsatile pump was used to generate known perfusion rates in a range of 0.96-2.49 mL/min/g. All the known perfusion rates were determined using an ultrasonic flow probe and the known mass of the perfusion volume. FPA and maximum slope model (MSM) perfusion rates were measured using volume scans acquired from a 320-slice CT scanner, and then compared to the known perfusion rates. The measured perfusion using FPA (P(FPA)), with two volume scans, and the maximum slope model (P(MSM)) were related to known perfusion (P(K)) by P(FPA) = 0.91P(K) + 0.06 (r = 0.98) and P(MSM) = 0.25P(K) - 0.02 (r = 0.96), respectively. The standard error of estimate for the FPA technique, using two volume scans, and the MSM was 0.14 and 0.30 mL/min/g, respectively. The estimated radiation dose required for the FPA technique with two volume scans and the MSM was 2.6 and 11.7-17.5 mSv, respectively. Therefore, the FPA technique can yield accurate perfusion measurements using as few as two volume scans, corresponding to approximately a factor of four reductions in radiation dose as compared with the currently available MSM. In conclusion, the results of the study indicate that the FPA technique can make accurate dynamic CT perfusion measurements over a range of clinically relevant perfusion rates, while substantially reducing radiation dose, as compared to currently available dynamic CT perfusion techniques. PMID:26156231

  3. Non Tumor Perfusion Changes Following Stereotactic Radiosurgery to Brain Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Jakubovic, Raphael; Sahgal, Arjun; Ruschin, Mark; Pejović-Milić, Ana; Milwid, Rachael; Aviv, Richard I.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate early perfusion changes in normal tissue following stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods: Nineteen patients harboring twenty-two brain metastases treated with SRS were imaged with dynamic susceptibility magnetic resonance imaging (DSC MRI) at baseline, 1 week and 1 month post SRS. Relative cerebral blood volume and flow (rCBV and rCBF) ratios were evaluated outside of tumor within a combined region of interest (ROI) and separately within gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) ROIs. Three-dimensional dose distribution from each SRS plan was divided into six regions: (1) <2 Gy; (2) 2-5 Gy; (3) 5-10 Gy; (4) 10-12 Gy; (5) 12-16 Gy; and (6) >16 Gy. rCBV and rCBF ratio differences between baseline, 1 week and 1 month were compared. Best linear fit plots quantified normal tissue dose-dependency. Results: Significant rCBV ratio increases were present between baseline and 1 month for all ROIs and dose ranges except for WM ROI receiving <2 Gy. rCBV ratio for all ROIs was maximally increased from baseline to 1 month with the greatest changes occurring within the 5-10 Gy dose range (53.1%). rCBF ratio was maximally increased from baseline to 1 month for all ROIs within the 5-10 Gy dose range (33.9-45.0%). Both rCBV and rCBF ratios were most elevated within GM ROIs. A weak, positive but not significant association between dose, rCBV and rCBF ratio was demonstrated. Progressive rCBV and rCBF ratio increased with dose up to 10 Gy at 1 month. Conclusion: Normal tissue response following SRS can be characterized by dose, tissue, and time specific increases in rCBV and rCBF ratio. PMID:26269612

  4. Inhomogeneity of pulmonary perfusion during sustained microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prisk, G. Kim; Guy, Harold J. B.; Elliott, Ann R.; West, John B.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of gravity on the inhomogeneity of pulmonary perfusion in man were studied by performing hyperventilation-breathhold single-breath measurements before, during and after 9 days of continuous exposure to microgravity. In microgravity the indicators of inhomogeneity of perfusion, especially the size of cardiogenic oscillations in expired CO2 and the height of phase 4, were both markedly reduced. Cardiogenic oscillations were reduced to approximately 60 of their preflight standing size, while the height of phase 4 was between 0 and -8% (a terminal fall became a small terminal rise) of preflights standing. The terminal change in CO2 was nearly abolished in microgravity indicating more uniformity of blood flow between lung units that close at the end of expiration and units that remain open. This may result from the disappearance of gravity-dependent topographical inequality of blood flow. The residual cardiographic oscillations in expired CO2 imply a persisting inhomogeneity of perfusion in the absence of gravity at a level larger than acinar.

  5. Parallel perfusion imaging processing using GPGPU

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Fan; Gonzalez, David Rodriguez; Carpenter, Trevor; Atkinson, Malcolm; Wardlaw, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose The objective of brain perfusion quantification is to generate parametric maps of relevant hemodynamic quantities such as cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV) and mean transit time (MTT) that can be used in diagnosis of acute stroke. These calculations involve deconvolution operations that can be very computationally expensive when using local Arterial Input Functions (AIF). As time is vitally important in the case of acute stroke, reducing the analysis time will reduce the number of brain cells damaged and increase the potential for recovery. Methods GPUs originated as graphics generation dedicated co-processors, but modern GPUs have evolved to become a more general processor capable of executing scientific computations. It provides a highly parallel computing environment due to its large number of computing cores and constitutes an affordable high performance computing method. In this paper, we will present the implementation of a deconvolution algorithm for brain perfusion quantification on GPGPU (General Purpose Graphics Processor Units) using the CUDA programming model. We present the serial and parallel implementations of such algorithms and the evaluation of the performance gains using GPUs. Results Our method has gained a 5.56 and 3.75 speedup for CT and MR images respectively. Conclusions It seems that using GPGPU is a desirable approach in perfusion imaging analysis, which does not harm the quality of cerebral hemodynamic maps but delivers results faster than the traditional computation. PMID:22824549

  6. 21 CFR 514.117 - Adequate and well-controlled studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... production performance, or biased observation. One or more adequate and well-controlled studies are required... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Adequate and well-controlled studies. 514.117... Applications § 514.117 Adequate and well-controlled studies. (a) Purpose. The primary purpose of...

  7. 21 CFR 514.117 - Adequate and well-controlled studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... production performance, or biased observation. One or more adequate and well-controlled studies are required... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Adequate and well-controlled studies. 514.117... Applications § 514.117 Adequate and well-controlled studies. (a) Purpose. The primary purpose of...

  8. 21 CFR 514.117 - Adequate and well-controlled studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... production performance, or biased observation. One or more adequate and well-controlled studies are required... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Adequate and well-controlled studies. 514.117... Applications § 514.117 Adequate and well-controlled studies. (a) Purpose. The primary purpose of...

  9. 21 CFR 514.117 - Adequate and well-controlled studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... production performance, or biased observation. One or more adequate and well-controlled studies are required... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adequate and well-controlled studies. 514.117... Applications § 514.117 Adequate and well-controlled studies. (a) Purpose. The primary purpose of...

  10. 21 CFR 514.117 - Adequate and well-controlled studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... production performance, or biased observation. One or more adequate and well-controlled studies are required... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Adequate and well-controlled studies. 514.117... Applications § 514.117 Adequate and well-controlled studies. (a) Purpose. The primary purpose of...

  11. 21 CFR 801.5 - Medical devices; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical devices; adequate directions for use. 801... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.5 Medical devices; adequate directions for use. Adequate directions for use means directions under which the layman can use a device...

  12. 21 CFR 801.5 - Medical devices; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical devices; adequate directions for use. 801... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.5 Medical devices; adequate directions for use. Adequate directions for use means directions under which the layman can use a device...

  13. 21 CFR 801.5 - Medical devices; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical devices; adequate directions for use. 801... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.5 Medical devices; adequate directions for use. Adequate directions for use means directions under which the layman can use a device...

  14. 21 CFR 801.5 - Medical devices; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical devices; adequate directions for use. 801... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.5 Medical devices; adequate directions for use. Adequate directions for use means directions under which the layman can use a device...

  15. 21 CFR 801.5 - Medical devices; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medical devices; adequate directions for use. 801... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.5 Medical devices; adequate directions for use. Adequate directions for use means directions under which the layman can use a device...

  16. 76 FR 51041 - Hemoglobin Standards and Maintaining Adequate Iron Stores in Blood Donors; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Hemoglobin Standards and Maintaining Adequate Iron Stores in... Standards and Maintaining Adequate Iron Stores in Blood Donors.'' The purpose of this public workshop is to... donor safety and blood availability, and potential measures to maintain adequate iron stores in...

  17. 36 CFR 13.960 - Who determines when there is adequate snow cover?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... adequate snow cover? 13.960 Section 13.960 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE... Preserve Snowmachine (snowmobile) Operations § 13.960 Who determines when there is adequate snow cover? The superintendent will determine when snow cover is adequate for snowmachine use. The superintendent will follow...

  18. 36 CFR 13.960 - Who determines when there is adequate snow cover?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... adequate snow cover? 13.960 Section 13.960 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE... Preserve Snowmachine (snowmobile) Operations § 13.960 Who determines when there is adequate snow cover? The superintendent will determine when snow cover is adequate for snowmachine use. The superintendent will follow...

  19. 36 CFR 13.960 - Who determines when there is adequate snow cover?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... adequate snow cover? 13.960 Section 13.960 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE... Preserve Snowmachine (snowmobile) Operations § 13.960 Who determines when there is adequate snow cover? The superintendent will determine when snow cover is adequate for snowmachine use. The superintendent will follow...

  20. 36 CFR 13.960 - Who determines when there is adequate snow cover?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... adequate snow cover? 13.960 Section 13.960 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE... Preserve Snowmachine (snowmobile) Operations § 13.960 Who determines when there is adequate snow cover? The superintendent will determine when snow cover is adequate for snowmachine use. The superintendent will follow...

  1. 36 CFR 13.960 - Who determines when there is adequate snow cover?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... adequate snow cover? 13.960 Section 13.960 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE... Preserve Snowmachine (snowmobile) Operations § 13.960 Who determines when there is adequate snow cover? The superintendent will determine when snow cover is adequate for snowmachine use. The superintendent will follow...

  2. Cerebral hemodynamics in human acute ischemic stroke: a study with diffusion- and perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and SPECT.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Karonen, J O; Vanninen, R L; Ostergaard, L; Roivainen, R; Nuutinen, J; Perkiö, J; Könönen, M; Hämäläinen, A; Vanninen, E J; Soimakallio, S; Kuikka, J T; Aronen, H J

    2000-06-01

    Nineteen patients with acute ischemic stroke (<24 hours) underwent diffusion-weighted and perfusion-weighted (PWI) magnetic resonance imaging at the acute stage and 1 week later. Eleven patients also underwent technetium-99m ethyl cysteinate dimer single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) at the acute stage. Relative (ischemic vs. contralateral control) cerebral blood flow (relCBF), relative cerebral blood volume, and relative mean transit time were measured in the ischemic core, in the area of infarct growth, and in the eventually viable ischemic tissue on PWI maps. The relCBF was also measured from SPECT. There was a curvilinear relationship between the relCBF measured from PWI and SPECT (r = 0.854; P < 0.001). The tissue proceeding to infarction during the follow-up had significantly lower initial CBF and cerebral blood volume values on PWI maps (P < 0.001) than the eventually viable ischemic tissue had. The best value for discriminating the area of infarct growth from the eventually viable ischemic tissue was 48% for PWI relCBF and 87% for PWI relative cerebral blood volume. Combined diffusion and perfusion-weighted imaging enables one to detect hemodynamically different subregions inside the initial perfusion abnormality. Tissue survival may be different in these subregions and may be predicted. PMID:10894174

  3. Comparison of stroke infarction between CT perfusion and diffusion weighted imaging: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd. Rahni, Ashrani Aizzuddin; Arka, Israna Hossain; Chellappan, Kalaivani; Mukari, Shahizon Azura; Law, Zhe Kang; Sahathevan, Ramesh

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we present preliminary results of comparison of automatic segmentations of the infarct core, between that obtained from CT perfusion (based on time to peak parameter) and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI). For each patient, the two imaging volumes were automatically co-registered to a common frame of reference based on an acquired CT angiography image. The accuracy of image registration is measured by the overlap of the segmented brain from both images (CT perfusion and DWI), measured within their common field of view. Due to the limitations of the study, DWI was acquired as a follow up scan up to a week after initial CT based imaging. However, we found significant overlap of the segmented brain (Jaccard indices of approximately 0.8) and the percentage of infarcted brain tissue from the two modalities were still fairly highly correlated (correlation coefficient of approximately 0.9). The results are promising with more data needed in future for clinical inference.

  4. Ultrasound Contrast Materials in Cardiovascular Medicine: from Perfusion Assessment to Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Klibanov, Alexander L

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound imaging is widely used in cardiovascular diagnostics. Contrast agents expand the range of tasks that ultrasound can perform. In the clinic in US, endocardial border delineation and left ventricle opacification have been an approved indication for more than a decade. However, myocardial perfusion contrast ultrasound studies are still at the clinical trials stage. Blood pool contrast and perfusion in other tissues might be an easier indication to achieve: general blood pool ultrasound contrast is in wider use in Europe, Canada, Japan, and China. Targeted (molecular) contrast microbubbles will be the next generation of ultrasound imaging probes, capable of specific delineation of the areas of disease by adherence to molecular targets. The shell of targeted microbubbles (currently in the preclinical research and early stage clinical trials) is decorated with the ligands (antibodies, peptides or mimetics, hormones, carbohydrates) that ensure firm binding to the molecular markers of disease. PMID:23913363

  5. Fluorescence spectroscopy and cryoimaging of rat lung tissue mitochondrial redox state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepehr, R.; Audi, S.; Staniszewski, K.; Maleki, S.; Ranji, M.

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the utility of optical cryoimaging and fluorometry to evaluate tissue redox state of the mitochondrial metabolic coenzymes NADH (Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide) and FAD (Flavin Adenine Dinucleotide) in intact rat lungs. The ratio (NADH/FAD), referred to as mitochondrial redox ratio (RR), is a measure of the lung tissue mitochondrial redox state. Isolated rat lungs were connected to a ventilation-perfused system. Surface NADH and FAD fluorescence signals were acquired before and after lung perfusion in the absence (control perfusate) or presence of potassium cyanide (KCN, complex IV inhibitor) to reduce the mitochondrial respiratory chain (state 5 respiration). Another group of lungs were perfused with control perfusate or KCN-containing perfusate as above, after which the lungs were deflated and frozen rapidly for subsequent 3D cryoimaging. Results demonstrate that lung treatment with KCN increased lung surface NADH signal by 22%, decreased FAD signal by 8%, and as result increased RR by 31% as compared to control perfusate (baseline) values. Cryoimaging results also show that KCN increased mean lung tissue NADH signal by 37%, decreased mean FAD signal by 4%, and increased mean RR by 47%. These results demonstrate the utility of these optical techniques to evaluate the effect of pulmonary oxidative stress on tissue mitochondrial redox state in intact lungs.

  6. CT Perfusion Dynamics of Intracranial Tuberculomas

    PubMed Central

    N., Jayakumar Peruvumba; Shivashankar, Ravishankar

    2015-01-01

    Aims To study perfusion characteristics of intracranial tuberculomas and analyze changes with anti tubercular treatment. Materials and Methods Nineteen patients of histologically proven intracranial tuberculomas were included in the study of which 9 were not on antitubercular treatment and ten were on antitubercular treatment (6 patients on treatment for less than 2 months and 4 were more than 6 months). All patients underwent CT perfusion (CTP) and CTP parameters like rCBV and rCBF were obtained from entire lesion, center and capsule of lesions and compared. Results CTP parameters like rCBF and rCBV were significantly low in all the three ROIs in the group not on treatment compared to that of on treatment ; rCBF and rCBV of entire lesion (p=0.018 and p=0.005 respectively), capsule (p=0.045 and p=0.010 respectively) and center of the lesion (p=0.020 and p=0.009) respectively). Tuberculomas on antitubercular treatment of more than six months showed reduced rCBF and rCBV in entire lesion (p=0.01 & p=0.01 respectively), capsule (p=0.04 & p=0.03 respectively) and center (p=0.08 & p=0.05 respectively) compared to those on treatment for less than two months. Similarly tuberculomas on treatment for six months did not show significant difference in rCBF and rCBV compared to tuberculomas who were not on treatment. Tuberculomas on treatment for less than two months showed statistically increased rCBF and rCBV in entire lesion (p=0.01 & p=0.04 respectively), capsule (p=0.03 & p=0.01 respectively) and center (p= 0.03 &=0.01) compared to those not on treatment. Conclusion Intracranial tuberculomas not on treatment and those on treatment for around six months show low perfusion and tuberculomas on treatment for less than two months show high perfusion. These findings suggest that serial perfusion profiles of tuberculomas on treatment could possibly be seen as surrogate markers of response to treatment. PMID:26155528

  7. C-arm perfusion imaging with a fast penalized maximum-likelihood approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frysch, Robert; Pfeiffer, Tim; Bannasch, Sebastian; Serowy, Steffen; Gugel, Sebastian; Skalej, Martin; Rose, Georg

    2014-03-01

    Perfusion imaging is an essential method for stroke diagnostics. One of the most important factors for a successful therapy is to get the diagnosis as fast as possible. Therefore our approach aims at perfusion imaging (PI) with a cone beam C-arm system providing perfusion information directly in the interventional suite. For PI the imaging system has to provide excellent soft tissue contrast resolution in order to allow the detection of small attenuation enhancement due to contrast agent in the capillary vessels. The limited dynamic range of flat panel detectors as well as the sparse sampling of the slow rotating C-arm in combination with standard reconstruction methods results in limited soft tissue contrast. We choose a penalized maximum-likelihood reconstruction method to get suitable results. To minimize the computational load, the 4D reconstruction task is reduced to several static 3D reconstructions. We also include an ordered subset technique with transitioning to a small number of subsets, which adds sharpness to the image with less iterations while also suppressing the noise. Instead of the standard multiplicative EM correction, we apply a Newton-based optimization to further accelerate the reconstruction algorithm. The latter optimization reduces the computation time by up to 70%. Further acceleration is provided by a multi-GPU implementation of the forward and backward projection, which fulfills the demands of cone beam geometry. In this preliminary study we evaluate this procedure on clinical data. Perfusion maps are computed and compared with reference images from magnetic resonance scans. We found a high correlation between both images.

  8. A simultaneous multimodal imaging system for tissue functional parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Wenqi; Zhang, Zhiwu; Wu, Qiang; Zhang, Shiwu; Xu, Ronald

    2014-02-01

    Simultaneous and quantitative assessment of skin functional characteristics in different modalities will facilitate diagnosis and therapy in many clinical applications such as wound healing. However, many existing clinical practices and multimodal imaging systems are subjective, qualitative, sequential for multimodal data collection, and need co-registration between different modalities. To overcome these limitations, we developed a multimodal imaging system for quantitative, non-invasive, and simultaneous imaging of cutaneous tissue oxygenation and blood perfusion parameters. The imaging system integrated multispectral and laser speckle imaging technologies into one experimental setup. A Labview interface was developed for equipment control, synchronization, and image acquisition. Advanced algorithms based on a wide gap second derivative reflectometry and laser speckle contrast analysis (LASCA) were developed for accurate reconstruction of tissue oxygenation and blood perfusion respectively. Quantitative calibration experiments and a new style of skinsimulating phantom were designed to verify the accuracy and reliability of the imaging system. The experimental results were compared with a Moor tissue oxygenation and perfusion monitor. For In vivo testing, a post-occlusion reactive hyperemia (PORH) procedure in human subject and an ongoing wound healing monitoring experiment using dorsal skinfold chamber models were conducted to validate the usability of our system for dynamic detection of oxygenation and perfusion parameters. In this study, we have not only setup an advanced multimodal imaging system for cutaneous tissue oxygenation and perfusion parameters but also elucidated its potential for wound healing assessment in clinical practice.

  9. Developing a Benchmarking Process in Perfusion: A Report of the Perfusion Downunder Collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Robert A.; Newland, Richard F.; Fenton, Carmel; McDonald, Michael; Willcox, Timothy W.; Merry, Alan F.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: Improving and understanding clinical practice is an appropriate goal for the perfusion community. The Perfusion Downunder Collaboration has established a multi-center perfusion focused database aimed at achieving these goals through the development of quantitative quality indicators for clinical improvement through benchmarking. Data were collected using the Perfusion Downunder Collaboration database from procedures performed in eight Australian and New Zealand cardiac centers between March 2007 and February 2011. At the Perfusion Downunder Meeting in 2010, it was agreed by consensus, to report quality indicators (QI) for glucose level, arterial outlet temperature, and pCO2 management during cardiopulmonary bypass. The values chosen for each QI were: blood glucose ≥4 mmol/L and ≤10 mmol/L; arterial outlet temperature ≤37°C; and arterial blood gas pCO2 ≥ 35 and ≤45 mmHg. The QI data were used to derive benchmarks using the Achievable Benchmark of Care (ABC™) methodology to identify the incidence of QIs at the best performing centers. Five thousand four hundred and sixty-five procedures were evaluated to derive QI and benchmark data. The incidence of the blood glucose QI ranged from 37–96% of procedures, with a benchmark value of 90%. The arterial outlet temperature QI occurred in 16–98% of procedures with the benchmark of 94%; while the arterial pCO2 QI occurred in 21–91%, with the benchmark value of 80%. We have derived QIs and benchmark calculations for the management of several key aspects of cardiopulmonary bypass to provide a platform for improving the quality of perfusion practice. PMID:22730861

  10. In vivo monitoring of external pressure induced hemodynamics in skin tissue using optical coherence tomography angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Woo June; Wang, Hequn; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2015-03-01

    Characterization of the relationship between external pressure and blood flow is important in the examination of pressure-induced disturbance in tissue microcirculation. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) angiography is a promising imaging technique, capable of providing the noninvasive extraction of functional vessels within the skin tissue with capillary-scale resolution. Here, we present a feasibility study of OCT angiography to monitor effect of external pressures on blood perfusion in human skin tissue in vivo. Graded external pressure is loaded normal to the surface of the nailfold tissue of a healthy human. The incremental loading is applied step by step and then followed by an immediate release. Concurrent OCT imaging of the nailfold is performed during the pre/post loading. Blood perfusion images including baseline (at pre-loading) and corresponding tissue strain maps are calculated from 3D OCT dataset obtained at the different applied pressures, allowing visualization of capillary perfusion events at stressed nailfold tissue. The results indicate that the perfusion progressively decreases with the constant increase of tissue strain. Reactive hyperemia is occurred right after the removal of the pressure corresponding to quick drop of the increased strain. The perfusion is returned to the baseline level after a few minutes. These findings suggest that OCT microangiography may have great potential for quantitatively assessing tissue microcirculation in the locally pressed tissue in vivo.

  11. Measurement of continuous distributions of ventilation-perfusion ratios - Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, P. D.; Saltzman, H. A.; West, J. B.

    1974-01-01

    The resolution of the technique considered is sufficient to describe smooth distributions containing blood flow to unventilated regions (shunt), ventilation to unperfused regions (dead space), and up to three additional modes over the range of finite ventilation-perfusion ratios. In particular, areas whose ventilation-perfusion ratios are low can be separated from unventilated regions and those whose ventilation-perfusion ratios are high can similarly be distinguished from unperfused areas.

  12. Scintigraphic perfusion patterns in patients with diffuse lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, G.E.; Sullivan, D.C.; Gottschalk, A.; Putman, C.E.

    1982-04-01

    Perfusion scintigrams of 55 patients with radiographic evidence of diffuse lung disease were reviewed. Thirty-nine had acute and/or chronic changes caused by congestive heart failure, and 16 had diffuse reticulonodular disease. A normal or near-normal perfusion pattern was seen in 40/55 (73%), and this finding was equally common in the two groups. The authors conclude that perfusion scintigraphy is useful in excluding pulmonary embolism in patients with radiographic evidence of diffuse, symmetrical lung disease.

  13. A method of thymic perfusion and its evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Ekwueme, O.

    1973-01-01

    The development and evaluation of a method of isolated ex vivo perfusion of the rabbit thymus using diluted autologous blood is described. The data indicate that the viability of the preparation is maintained at a satisfactory level during the period of perfusion. These results suggest that the isolated perfused thymus would be a useful new approach to studies of thymus function. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11 PMID:4747584

  14. Perfusion Scintigraphy and Patient Selection for Lung Volume Reduction Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Divay; Lipson, David A.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Hansen-Flaschen, John; Sciurba, Frank C.; DeCamp, Malcolm M.; Reilly, John J.; Washko, George R.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: It is unclear if lung perfusion can predict response to lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS). Objectives: To study the role of perfusion scintigraphy in patient selection for LVRS. Methods: We performed an intention-to-treat analysis of 1,045 of 1,218 patients enrolled in the National Emphysema Treatment Trial who were non–high risk for LVRS and had complete perfusion scintigraphy results at baseline. The median follow-up was 6.0 years. Patients were classified as having upper or non–upper lobe–predominant emphysema on visual examination of the chest computed tomography and high or low exercise capacity on cardiopulmonary exercise testing at baseline. Low upper zone perfusion was defined as less than 20% of total lung perfusion distributed to the upper third of both lungs as measured on perfusion scintigraphy. Measurements and Main Results: Among 284 of 1,045 patients with upper lobe–predominant emphysema and low exercise capacity at baseline, the 202 with low upper zone perfusion had lower mortality with LVRS versus medical management (risk ratio [RR], 0.56; P = 0.008) unlike the remaining 82 with high perfusion where mortality was unchanged (RR, 0.97; P = 0.62). Similarly, among 404 of 1,045 patients with upper lobe–predominant emphysema and high exercise capacity, the 278 with low upper zone perfusion had lower mortality with LVRS (RR, 0.70; P = 0.02) unlike the remaining 126 with high perfusion (RR, 1.05; P = 1.00). Among the 357 patients with non–upper lobe–predominant emphysema (75 with low and 282 with high exercise capacity) there was no improvement in survival with LVRS and measurement of upper zone perfusion did not contribute new prognostic information. Conclusions: Compared with optimal medical management, LVRS reduces mortality in patients with upper lobe–predominant emphysema when there is low rather than high perfusion to the upper lung. PMID:20538961

  15. Determination of the need for selenium by chicks fed practical diets adequate in vitamin E

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, G.F. Jr.; Su, Q.; Liu, C.H.; Sinisalo, M.; Combs, S.B.

    1986-03-01

    Experiments were conducted to compare the dietary needs for selenium (Se) by chicks fed either purified (amino acid-based) or practical (corn- and soy-based) diets that were adequate with respect to vitamin E (i.e., contained 100 IU/kg) and all other known nutrients with the single exception of Se (i.e., contained only 0.10 ppm Se). Studies were conducted in Ithaca using Single Comb White Leghorn chicks fed the purified basal diet and in Beijing using chicks of the same breed fed either the same purified basal diet or the practical diet formulated to be similar to that used in poultry production in some parts of China and the US. Results showed that each basal diet produced severe depletion of Se-dependent glutathione peroxidase (SeGSHpx) in plasma, liver and pancreas according to the same time-course, but that other consequences of severe uncomplicated Se deficiency were much more severe among chicks fed the purified diet (e.g., growth depression, pancreatic dysfunction as indicated by elevated plasma amylase and abnormal pancreatic histology). Chicks fed the practical Se-deficient diet showed reduced pancreas levels of copper, zinc and molybdenum and elevated plasma levels of iron; they required ca. 0.10 ppm dietary Se to sustain normal SeGSHpx in several tissues and to prevent elevated amylase in plasma. The dietary Se requirement of the chick is, therefore, estimated to be 0.10 ppm.

  16. Perfusion CT estimates photosensitizer uptake and biodistribution in a rabbit orthotopic pancreas cancer model: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Jonathan T.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Gunn, Jason R.; Stewart, Errol E.; Gardner, Timothy B.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Lee, Ting-Yim; Hoopes, P. Jack; Pereira, Stephen P.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives It was hypothesized that perfusion computed tomography (CT) blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV) and vascular permeability surface-area (PS) product parameters would be predictive of therapeutic anti-cancer agent uptake in pancreatic cancer, facilitating image-guided interpretation of human treatments. The hypothesis was tested in an orthotopic rabbit model of pancreatic cancer, by establishing the model, imaging with endoscopic ultrasound and contrast CT, and spatially comparing the perfusion maps to the ex vivo uptake values of injected photosensitizer, vertepofin. Materials and Methods Nine New Zealand White rabbits underwent direct pancreas implantation of VX2 tumors and CT perfusion or endoscopic ultrasound was performed 10 days post-implantation. Verteporfin was injected during CT imaging and tissue was removed 1 h post-injection for frozen tissue fluorescence scanning. Region-of-interest comparisons of CT data with ex vivo fluorescence and histopathological staining were performed. Results DCE-CT showed enhanced BF, BV, and PS in the tumor rim, and decreased BF, BV and PS in the tumor core. Significant correlations were found between ex vivo verteporfin concentration and each of BF, BV, and PS. Conclusions The efficacy of verteporfin delivery in tumors is estimated by perfusion CT, providing a non-invasive method of mapping photosensitizer dose. PMID:25683500

  17. Comparison of Perfusion- and Diffusion-weighted Imaging Parameters in Brain Tumor Studies Processed Using Different Software Platforms

    PubMed Central

    Milchenko, Mikhail V.; Rajderkar, Dhanashree; LaMontagne, Pamela; Massoumzadeh, Parinaz; Bogdasarian, Ronald; Schweitzer, Gordon; Benzinger, Tammie; Marcus, Dan; Shimony, Joshua S.; Fouke, Sarah Jost

    2015-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives To compare quantitative imaging parameter measures from diffusion- and perfusion-weighted imaging magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences in subjects with brain tumors that have been processed with different software platforms. Materials and Methods Scans from 20 subjects with primary brain tumors were selected from the Comprehensive Neuro-oncology Data Repository at Washington University School of Medicine (WUSM) and the Swedish Neuroscience Institute. MR images were coregistered, and each subject's data set was processed by three software packages: 1) vendor-specific scanner software, 2) research software developed at WUSM, and 3) a commercially available, Food and Drug Administration–approved, processing platform (Nordic Ice). Regions of interest (ROIs) were chosen within the brain tumor and normal nontumor tissue. The results obtained using these methods were compared. Results For diffusion parameters, including mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy, concordance was high when comparing different processing methods. For perfusion-imaging parameters, a significant variance in cerebral blood volume, cerebral blood flow, and mean transit time (MTT) values was seen when comparing the same raw data processed using different software platforms. Correlation was better with larger ROIs (radii ≥ 5 mm). Greatest variance was observed in MTT. Conclusions Diffusion parameter values were consistent across different software processing platforms. Perfusion parameter values were more variable and were influenced by the software used. Variation in the MTT was especially large suggesting that MTT estimation may be unreliable in tumor tissues using current MRI perfusion methods. PMID:25088833

  18. Ramiprilat prevents PAF-induced myocellular and endothelial injury in a neutrophil-perfused heart preparation.

    PubMed

    Schrör, K; Felsch, A

    1992-01-01

    This study investigates the action of PAF-stimulated human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) on myocardial integrity and function in Langendorff-perfused guinea-pig hearts. Infusion of 10(6) PMN/ml resulted in a negative inotropic effect without larger biochemical evidence for myocardial tissue injury while infusion of PAF (1 microM) did not cause any permanent effect at all. However, the combined administration of PAF-stimulated PMN resulted in severely depressed myocardial contractile function and biochemical evidence for myocardial tissue injury. This was probably due to an enhanced uptake of PMN from the coronary perfusate and accumulation within the myocardial tissue. Ramiprilat, (10 microM) significantly improved left ventricular function and myocardial cell integrity. Similar results were obtained with bradykinin (1 nM). The data suggest a PAF-induced, PMN-mediated myocardial tissue injury as well as cardioprotective actions of ACE inhibition which are possibly related to stimulation of the kinin/prostacyclin axis. PMID:1334351

  19. Extracorporeal Free Flap Perfusion in Case of Prolonged Ischemia Time

    PubMed Central

    Präbst, K.; Beier, J. P.; Meyer, A.; Horch, R. E.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: In free flap surgery, a clinically established concept still has to be found for the reduction of ischemia-related cell damage in the case of prolonged ischemia. Although promising results using extracorporeal free flap perfusion in the laboratory have been published in the past, until now this concept has not yet paved its way into clinical routine. This might be due to the complexity of perfusion systems and a lack of standardized tools. Here, we want to present the results of the first extracorporeal free flap perfusion in a clinical setting using a simple approach without the application of a complex perfusion machinery. PMID:27200244

  20. New imaging technology: measurement of myocardial perfusion by contrast echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, D. N.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging has long been a goal for the non-invasive echocardiographic assessment of the heart. However, many factors at play in perfusion imaging have made this goal elusive. Harmonic imaging and triggered imaging with newer contrast agents have made myocardial perfusion imaging potentially practical in the very near future. The application of indicator dilution theory to the coronary circulation and bubble contrast agents is fraught with complexities and sources of error. Therefore, quantification of myocardial perfusion by non-invasive echocardiographic imaging requires further investigation in order to make this technique clinically viable.

  1. Perfusion CT imaging of the liver: review of clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Oğul, Hayri; Kantarcı, Mecit; Genç, Berhan; Pirimoğlu, Berhan; Çullu, Neşat; Kızrak, Yeşim; Yılmaz, Ömer; Karabulut, Nevzat

    2014-01-01

    Perfusion computed tomography (CT) has a great potential for determining hepatic and portal blood flow; it offers the advantages of quantitative determination of lesion hemodynamics, distinguishing malignant and benign processes, as well as providing morphological data. Many studies have reported the use of this method in the assessment of hepatic tumors, hepatic fibrosis associated with chronic liver disease, treatment response following radiotherapy and chemotherapy, and hepatic perfusion changes after radiological or surgical interventions. The main goal of liver perfusion imaging is to improve the accuracy in the characterization of liver disorders. In this study, we reviewed the clinical application of perfusion CT in various hepatic diseases. PMID:24834487

  2. Neovascularization in Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jennifer C.-Y.; Shum-Tim, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    A prerequisite for successful tissue engineering is adequate vascularization that would allow tissue engineering constructs to survive and grow. Angiogenic growth factors, alone and in combination, have been used to achieve this, and gene therapy has been used as a tool to enable sustained release of these angiogenic proteins. Cell-based therapy using endothelial cells and their precursors presents an alternative approach to tackling this challenge. These studies have occurred on a background of advancements in scaffold design and assays for assessing neovascularization. Finally, several studies have already attempted to translate research in neovascularization to clinical use in the blossoming field of therapeutic angiogenesis. PMID:24710553

  3. Hepatic microcirculatory perfusion failure is a determinant of liver dysfunction in warm ischemia-reperfusion.

    PubMed Central

    Vollmar, B.; Glasz, J.; Leiderer, R.; Post, S.; Menger, M. D.

    1994-01-01

    Hepatic ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) is characterized by circulatory and metabolic derangements, liver dysfunction, and tissue damage. However, little is known about the causative role of I/R-induced microcirculatory disturbance on the manifestation of postischemic reperfusion injury. Therefore, the intention of the study was to assess changes of hepatic microvascular perfusion (intravital fluorescence microscopy) as related to hepatic morphology (light/electron microscopy), hepatocellular integrity (serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activities), and excretory function (bile flow). Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 20 minutes (group B, n = 9) and 60 minutes (group C, n = 9) of left hepatic lobar ischemia followed by 60 minutes of reperfusion. Sham-operated animals without ischemia served as controls (group A, n = 10). Lobar ischemia for 20 minutes followed by reperfusion resulted in a significant reduction of sinusoidal perfusion rate (93.9 +/- 1.4%; P < 0.05) and a decrease in erythrocyte flux (90.0 +/- 5.6%) when compared with controls (99.4 +/- 0.2 and 97.9 +/- 2.7%). This was accompanied by a significant increase of serum AST and ALT activities (P < 0.05) and a reduction of bile flow (P < 0.05). Prolongation of lobar ischemia (group C, 60 minutes) aggravated postischemic reperfusion injury (sinusoidal perfusion rate: 87.4 +/- 2.9%; erythrocyte flux: 62.1 +/- 8.4%) and was paralleled by severed hepatocellular damage. Electron microscopy of postischemic tissue demonstrated alteration of nonparenchymal cells (swelling of sinusoidal lining cells and widening of Disse's space) and substantial parenchymal cell damage (swelling of mitochondria, disarrangement of rough endoplasmatic reticulum, vacuolization, complete cytoplasmic degeneration). Initial postischemic increase in serum AST and ALT activities and reduction of bile flow directly correlated with the extent of microcirculatory failure (P < 0.01), ie, impairment of

  4. Application of perfusion culture system improves in vitro and in vivo osteogenesis of bone marrow-derived osteoblastic cells in porous ceramic materials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yichao; Uemura, Toshimasa; Dong, Jian; Kojima, Hiroko; Tanaka, Junzo; Tateishi, Tetsuya

    2003-12-01

    Composites of bone marrow-derived osteoblasts (BMOs) and porous ceramics have been widely used as a bone graft model for bone tissue engineering. Perfusion culture has potential utility for many cell types in three-dimensional (3D) culture. Our hypothesis was that perfusion of medium would increase the cell viability and biosynthetic activity of BMOs in porous ceramic materials, which would be revealed by increased levels of alkaline phosphate (ALP) activity and osteocalcin (OCN) and enhanced bone formation in vivo. For testing in vitro, BMO/beta-tricalcium phosphate composites were cultured in a perfusion container (Minucells and Minutissue, Bad Abbach, Germany) with fresh medium delivered at a rate of 2 mL/h by a peristaltic pump. The ALP activity and OCN content of composites were measured at the end of 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks of subculture. For testing in vivo, after subculturing for 2 weeks, the composites were subcutaneously implanted into syngeneic rats. These implants were harvested 4 or 8 weeks later. The samples then underwent a biochemical analysis of ALP activity and OCN content and were observed by light microscopy. The levels of ALP activity and OCN in the composites were significantly higher in the perfusion group than in the control group (p < 0.01), both in vitro and in vivo. Histomorphometric analysis of the hematoxylin- and eosin-stained sections revealed a higher average ratio of bone to pore in BMO/beta-TCP composites of the perfusion group after implantation: 47.64 +/- 6.16 for the perfusion group and 26.22 +/- 4.84 for control at 4 weeks (n = 6, p < 0.01); 67.97 +/- 3.58 for the perfusion group and 47.39 +/- 4.10 for control at 8 weeks (n = 6, p < 0.05). These results show that the application of a perfusion culture system during the subculture of BMOs in a porous ceramic scaffold is beneficial to their osteogenesis. After differentiation culture in vitro with the perfusion culture system, the activity of the osteoblastic cells and the

  5. Biomimetic 3D tissue printing for soft tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Pati, Falguni; Ha, Dong-Heon; Jang, Jinah; Han, Hyun Ho; Rhie, Jong-Won; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2015-09-01

    Engineered adipose tissue constructs that are capable of reconstructing soft tissue with adequate volume would be worthwhile in plastic and reconstructive surgery. Tissue printing offers the possibility of fabricating anatomically relevant tissue constructs by delivering suitable matrix materials and living cells. Here, we devise a biomimetic approach for printing adipose tissue constructs employing decellularized adipose tissue (DAT) matrix bioink encapsulating human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hASCs). We designed and printed precisely-defined and flexible dome-shaped structures with engineered porosity using DAT bioink that facilitated high cell viability over 2 weeks and induced expression of standard adipogenic genes without any supplemented adipogenic factors. The printed DAT constructs expressed adipogenic genes more intensely than did non-printed DAT gel. To evaluate the efficacy of our printed tissue constructs for adipose tissue regeneration, we implanted them subcutaneously in mice. The constructs did not induce chronic inflammation or cytotoxicity postimplantation, but supported positive tissue infiltration, constructive tissue remodeling, and adipose tissue formation. This study demonstrates that direct printing of spatially on-demand customized tissue analogs is a promising approach to soft tissue regeneration. PMID:26056727

  6. Experimental glomerulonephritis in the isolated perfused rat kidney.

    PubMed Central

    Couser, W G; Steinmuller, D R; Stilmant, M M; Salant, D J; Lowenstein, L M

    1978-01-01

    The development of immune deposits on the subepithelial surface of the glomerular capillary wall was studied in isolated rat kidneys perfused at controlled perfusion pressure, pH, temperature, and flow rates with recirculating oxygenated perfusate containing bovine serum albumin (BSA) in buffer and sheep antibody to rat proximal tubular epithelial cell brush border antigen (Fx1A). Control kidney were perfused with equal concentrations of non-antibody immunoglobulin (Ig)G. Renal function was monitored by measuring inulin clearance, sodium reabsorption, and urine flow as well as BSA excretion and fractional clearance. Perfused kidneys were studied by light, immunofluorescence, and electron microscopy. All kidneys perfused with anti-Fx1A developed diffuse, finely granular deposits of IgG along the glomerular capillary wall by immunofluorescence. Electron microscopy revealed these deposits to be localized exclusively in the subepithelial space and slit pores. Similar deposits were produced in a nonrecirculating perfusion system, thereby excluding the formation of immune complexes in the perfusate caused by renal release of tubular antigen. Control kidneys perfused with nonantibody IgG did not develop glomerular immune deposits. Renal function and BSA excretion were the same in experimental and control kidneys. Glomerular deposits in antibody perfused kidneys were indistinguishable from deposits in rats injected with anti-Fx1A or immunized with Fx1A to produce autologous immune complex nephropathy. These studies demonstrate that subepithelial immune deposits can be produced in the isolated rat kidney by perfusion with specific antibody to Fx1A in the absence of circulating immune complexes. In this model deposits result from in situ complex formation rather than circulating immune complex deposition. Images PMID:372233

  7. Temperature-dependent versus constant-rate blood perfusion modelling in ferromagnetic thermoseed hyperthermia: results with a model of the human prostate.

    PubMed

    Tompkins, D T; Vanderby, R; Klein, S A; Beckman, W A; Steeves, R A; Frye, D M; Paliwal, B R

    1994-01-01

    Finite-element solutions to the Pennes bioheat equation are obtained with a model of a tumour-containing, human prostate and surrounding normal tissues. Simulations of ferromagnetic hyperthermia treatments are conducted on the tissue model in which the prostate is implanted with an irregularly spaced array of thermoseeds. Several combinations of thermoseed temperatures with different Curie points are investigated. Non-uniform, constant-rate blood perfusion models are studied and compared with temperature-dependent descriptions of blood perfusion. Blood perfusions in the temperature-dependent models initially increase with tissue temperature and then decrease at higher temperatures. Simulations with temperature-dependent versus constant-rate blood perfusion models reveal significant differences in temperature distributions in and surrounding the tumour-containing prostate. Results from the simulations include differences (between temperature-dependent and constant-rate models) in (1) the percentage of normal tissue volume and tumour volume at temperatures > 42 degrees C, and (2) temperature descriptors in the tumour (subscript t) and normal (subscript n) tissues including Tmax.t, Tmin.t and Tmax.n. Isotherms and grey-scale contours in the tumour and surrounding normal tissues are presented for four simulations that model a combination of high-temperature thermoseeds. Several simulations show that Tmin.t is between 1.7 and 2.6 degrees C higher and Tmax.n is between 2.1 and 3.3 degrees C higher with a temperature-dependent versus a comparable constant-rate blood perfusion model. The same simulations reveal that the percentages of tumour volume at temperatures > 42 degrees C are between 0 and 68% higher with the temperature-dependent versus the constant-rate perfusion model over all seed combinations studied. In summary, a numerical method is presented which makes it possible to investigate temperature-dependent, continuous functions of blood perfusion in simulations

  8. Effects of microwave radiation on living tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Surrell, J.A.; Alexander, R.C.; Cohle, S.D.; Lovell, F.R. Jr.; Wehrenberg, R.A.

    1987-08-01

    Prompted by an alleged case of child abuse resulting from microwave oven burns and the discovery of one other case, an animal model was chosen to explore microwave burn characteristics upon living, perfusing tissue. Anesthetized piglets were exposed to radiation from a standard household microwave oven for varying lengths of time, sufficient to result in full-thickness skin and visceral burns. Characteristic burn patterns were grossly identified. Biopsies studied with both light and electron microscopy demonstrated a pattern of relative layered tissue sparing. Layered tissue sparing is characterized by burned skin and muscle, with relatively unburned subcutaneous fat between these two layers. These findings have important forensic and patient care implications.

  9. An in vivo autotransplant model of renal preservation: cold storage versus machine perfusion in the prevention of ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    La Manna, Gaetano; Conte, Diletta; Cappuccilli, Maria Laura; Nardo, Bruno; D'Addio, Francesca; Puviani, Lorenza; Comai, Giorgia; Bianchi, Francesca; Bertelli, Riccardo; Lanci, Nicole; Donati, Gabriele; Scolari, Maria Piera; Faenza, Alessandro; Stefoni, Sergio

    2009-07-01

    There is increasing proof that organ preservation by machine perfusion is able to limit ischemia/reperfusion injury in kidney transplantation. This study was designed to compare the efficiency in hypothermic organ preservation by machine perfusion or cold storage in an animal model of kidney autotransplantation. Twelve pigs underwent left nephrectomy after warm ischemic time; the organs were preserved in machine perfusion (n = 6) or cold storage (n = 6) and then autotransplanted with immediate contralateral nephrectomy. The following parameters were compared between the two groups of animals: hematological and urine indexes of renal function, blood/gas analysis values, histological features, tissue adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) content, perforin gene expression in kidney biopsies, and organ weight changes were compared before and after preservation. The amount of cellular ATP was significantly higher in organs preserved by machine perfusion; moreover, the study of apoptosis induction revealed an enhanced perforin expression in the kidneys, which underwent simple hypothermic preservation compared to the machine-preserved ones. Organ weight was significantly decreased after cold storage, but it remained quite stable for machine-perfused kidneys. The present model seems to suggest that organ preservation by hypothermic machine perfusion is able to better control cellular impairment in comparison with cold storage. PMID:19566736

  10. NCX 4016, a nitric oxide-releasing aspirin, modulates adrenergic vasoconstriction in the perfused rat tail artery

    PubMed Central

    Rossoni, Giuseppe; Manfredi, Barbara; Soldato, Piero Del; Berti, Ferruccio

    2002-01-01

    The ability of the nitric oxide (NO)-releasing aspirin, NCX 4016, to control vasoconstrictor responses induced by electrical field stimulation (TNS) or by exogenous norepinephrine (NE) was investigated in perfused rat tail artery with intact endothelium. NCX 4016 (25, 50 and 100 μM) dose-dependently antagonized the vasoconstriction caused by TNS (from 0.5 to 64 Hz) and by NE (from 0.01 to 10 μM). The vasorelaxant activity of NCX 4016 (100 μM) in NE-precontracted arteries was concomitant with a marked increase of tissue cyclic GMP (4.9 fold, P<0.001) and was significantly antagonized by the inhibitors of soluble guanylate cyclase, methylene blue and 1H-[1,2,4]Oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one. The effect of NCX 4016 was endothelium NO-independent since, in preparations perfused with NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (10 μM), this compound prevented the rise in basal perfusion pressure and reversed the accentuation of vasoconstrictor responses caused by NO synthase inhibition. Aspirin-moiety released by NCX 4016 inhibited the 6-keto-PGF1α formation without interfering with the vasorelaxant activity of NCX 4016, while aspirin (100 μM) was devoid of any activity against vasoconstriction induced by both TNS and NE in perfused rat tail artery. NCX 4016 moderated adrenergic vasoconstriction in perfused rat tail arteries by a direct donation of NO without involving the relaxant factors such as PGI2 and NO from endothelial cells. The results obtained with NCX 4016 in perfused rat tail artery bears some therapeutical potential in conditions associated with vascular smooth muscle hyperreactivity to adrenergic stimulation. PMID:12208780

  11. Quantification of myocardial perfusion using CMR with a radial data acquisition: comparison with a dual-bolus method

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Quantitative estimates of myocardial perfusion generally require accurate measurement of the arterial input function (AIF). The saturation of signal intensity in the blood that occurs with most doses of contrast agent makes obtaining an accurate AIF challenging. This work seeks to evaluate the performance of a method that uses a radial k-space perfusion sequence and multiple saturation recovery times (SRT) to quantify myocardial perfusion with cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). Methods Perfusion CMR was performed at 3 Tesla with a saturation recovery radial turboFLASH sequence with 72 rays. Fourteen subjects were given a low dose (0.004 mmol/kg) of dilute (1/5 concentration) contrast agent (Gd-BOPTA) and then a higher non-dilute dose of the same volume (0.02 mmol/kg). AIFs were calculated from the blood signal in three sub-images with differing effective saturation recovery times. The full and sub-images were reconstructed iteratively with a total variation constraint. The images from the full 72 ray data were processed to obtain six tissue enhancement curves in two slices of the left ventricle in each subject. A 2-compartment model was used to determine absolute flows Results The proposed multi-SRT method resulted in AIFs that were similar to those obtained with the dual-bolus method. Myocardial blood flow (MBF) estimates from the dual-bolus and the multi-SRT methods were related by MBFmulti-SRT = 0.85MBFdual-bolus + 0.18 (r = 0.91). Conclusions The multi-SRT method, which uses a radial k-space perfusion sequence, can be used to obtain an accurate AIF and thus quantify myocardial perfusion for doses of contrast agent that result in a relatively saturated AIF. PMID:20653961

  12. Human placental perfusion method in the assessment of transplacental passage of antiepileptic drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Myllynen, Paeivi . E-mail: paivi.k.myllynen@oulu.fi; Pienimaeki, Paeivi; Vaehaekangas, Kirsi

    2005-09-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological diseases, affecting about 0.5 to 1% of pregnant women. It is commonly accepted that older antiepileptic drugs bear teratogenic potential. So far, no agreement has been reached about the safest antiepileptic drug during pregnancy. It is known that nearly all drugs cross the placenta at least to some extent. Nowadays, there is very little information available of the pharmacokinetics of drugs in the feto-placental unit. Detailed information about drug transport across the placenta would be valuable for the development of safe and effective treatments. For reasons of safety, human studies on placental transfer are restricted to a limited number of drugs. Interspecies differences limit the extrapolation of animal data to humans. Several in vitro methods for the study of placental transfer have been developed over the past decades. The placental perfusion method is the only experimental method that has been used to study human placental transfer of substances in organized placental tissue. The aim of this article is to review human placental perfusion data on antiepileptic drugs. According to perfusion data, it seems that most of the antiepileptic drugs are transferred across the placenta meaning significant fetal exposure.

  13. An automated perfusion bioreactor for the streamlined production of engineered osteogenic grafts.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ming; Henriksen, Susan S; Wendt, David; Overgaard, Søren

    2016-04-01

    A computer-controlled perfusion bioreactor was developed for the streamlined production of engineered osteogenic grafts. This system automated the required bioprocesses, from the initial filling of the system through the phases of cell seeding and prolonged cell/tissue culture. Flow through chemo-optic micro-sensors allowed to non-invasively monitor the levels of oxygen and pH in the perfused culture medium throughout the culture period. To validate its performance, freshly isolated ovine bone marrow stromal cells were directly seeded on porous scaffold granules (hydroxyapatite/β-tricalcium-phosphate/poly-lactic acid), bypassing the phase of monolayer cell expansion in flasks. Either 10 or 20 days after culture, engineered cell-granule grafts were implanted in an ectopic mouse model to quantify new bone formation. After four weeks of implantation, histomorphometry showed more bone in bioreactor-generated grafts than cell-free granule controls, while bone formation did not show significant differences between 10 days and 20 days of incubation. The implanted granules without cells had no bone formation. This novel perfusion bioreactor has revealed the capability of activation larger viable bone graft material, even after shorter incubation time of graft material. This study has demonstrated the feasibility of engineering osteogenic grafts in an automated bioreactor system, laying the foundation for a safe, regulatory-compliant, and cost-effective manufacturing process. PMID:25952142

  14. Design and Functional Testing of a Multichamber Perfusion Platform for Three-Dimensional Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Soncini, Monica; Cantini, Marco; Ferrario, Giulio; Fiore, Gianfranco B.

    2013-01-01

    Perfusion culture systems are widely used in tissue engineering applications for enhancing cell culture viability in the core of three-dimensional scaffolds. In this work, we present a multichamber confined-flow perfusion system, designed to provide a straightforward platform for three-dimensional dynamic cell cultures. The device comprises 6 culture chambers allowing independent and simultaneous experiments in controlled conditions. Each chamber consists of three parts: a housing, a deformable scaffold-holder cartridge, and a 7 mL reservoir, which couples water-tightly with the housing compressing the cartridge. Short-term dynamic cell seeding experiments were carried out with MC3T3-E1 cells seeded into polycaprolactone porous scaffolds. Preliminary results revealed that the application of flow perfusion through the scaffold favored the penetration of the cells to its interior, producing a more homogeneous distribution of cells with respect to dropwise or injection seeding methods. The culture chamber layout was conceived with the aim of simplifying the user operations under laminar flow hood and minimizing the risks for contamination during handling and operation. Furthermore, a compact size, a small number of components, and the use of bayonet couplings ensured a simple, fast, and sterility-promoting assembling. Finally, preliminary in vitro tests proved the efficacy of the system in enhancing cell seeding efficiency, opening the way for further studies addressing long-term scaffold colonization. PMID:24453787

  15. Using intraoperative laser angiography to safeguard nipple perfusion in nipple-sparing mastectomies.

    PubMed

    Dua, Monica M; Bertoni, Danielle M; Nguyen, Dung; Meyer, Shannon; Gurtner, Geoffrey C; Wapnir, Irene L

    2015-12-01

    The superior aesthetic outcomes of nipple-sparing mastectomies (NSM) explain their increased use and rising popularity. Fortunately, cancer recurrences involving the nipple-areolar complex (NAC) have been reassuringly low in the range of 1%. Technical considerations and challenges of this procedure are centered on nipple ischemia and necrosis. Patient selection, reconstructive strategies and incision placement have lowered ischemic complications. In this context, rates of full NAC necrosis are 3% or less. The emergence of noninvasive tissue angiography provides surgeons with a practical tool to assess real-time breast skin and NAC perfusion. Herein, we review our classification system of NAC perfusion patterns defined as V1 (from subjacent breast), V2 (surrounding skin), and V3 (combination of V1 + V2). Additionally, we describe the benefits of a first stage operation to devascularize the NAC as a means of improving blood flow to the NAC in preparation for NSM, helping extend the use of NSM to more women. Intraoperative evaluation of skin perfusion allows surgeons to detect ischemia and modify the operative approach to optimize outcomes. PMID:26645004

  16. Using intraoperative laser angiography to safeguard nipple perfusion in nipple-sparing mastectomies

    PubMed Central

    Dua, Monica M.; Bertoni, Danielle M.; Nguyen, Dung; Meyer, Shannon; Gurtner, Geoffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    The superior aesthetic outcomes of nipple-sparing mastectomies (NSM) explain their increased use and rising popularity. Fortunately, cancer recurrences involving the nipple-areolar complex (NAC) have been reassuringly low in the range of 1%. Technical considerations and challenges of this procedure are centered on nipple ischemia and necrosis. Patient selection, reconstructive strategies and incision placement have lowered ischemic complications. In this context, rates of full NAC necrosis are 3% or less. The emergence of noninvasive tissue angiography provides surgeons with a practical tool to assess real-time breast skin and NAC perfusion. Herein, we review our classification system of NAC perfusion patterns defined as V1 (from subjacent breast), V2 (surrounding skin), and V3 (combination of V1 + V2). Additionally, we describe the benefits of a first stage operation to devascularize the NAC as a means of improving blood flow to the NAC in preparation for NSM, helping extend the use of NSM to more women. Intraoperative evaluation of skin perfusion allows surgeons to detect ischemia and modify the operative approach to optimize outcomes. PMID:26645004

  17. Measurement of cerebrospinal fluid formation and absorption by ventriculo-cisternal perfusion: what is really measured?

    PubMed Central

    Orešković, Darko; Klarica, Marijan

    2014-01-01

    The generally accepted hypothesis on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hydrodynamics suggests that CSF is actively formed mainly by choroid plexuses, circulates unidirectionally along the brain ventricles and subarachnoid space, and is passively absorbed mainly into the dural venous sinuses. CSF formation rate (Vf) has been extensively studied using the ventriculo-cisternal perfusion technique and the results have been used as the key evidence confirming the mentioned hypothesis. This method and the equation for Vf calculation are based on the assumption that the dilution of the indicator substance is a consequence of the newly formed CSF, ie, that a higher CSF formation rate will result in a higher degree of dilution. However, it has been experimentally shown that the indicator substance dilution inside the CSF system does not occur because of a “newly formed” CSF, but as consequence of a number of other factors (departure of substances into the surrounding tissue, flowing around the collecting cannula into the cortical and spinal subarachnoid space, departure into the contralateral ventricle, etc). This technique allows “calculation” of the CSF formation even in dead animals, in an in vitro model, and in any other part of the CSF system outside the ventricles that is being perfused. Therefore, this method is indirect and any dilution of the indicator substance in the perfusate caused by other reasons would result in questionable and often contradictory conclusions regarding CSF formation rates. PMID:25165046

  18. Laser-tissue photothermal interaction and tissue temperature change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ives, Andrea K.; Chen, Wei R.; Jassemnejad, Baha; Bartels, Kenneth E.; Liu, Hong; Nordquist, John A.; Nordquist, Robert E.

    2000-06-01

    Responses of tissue to laser stimulation are crucial in both disease diagnostics and treatment. In general, when tissue absorbs laser energy photothermal interaction occurs. The most important signature of the photothermal reaction is the tissue temperature change during and after the laser irradiation. Experimentally, the tissue reaction to laser irradiation can be measured by numerous methods including direct temperature measurement and measurement of perfusion change. In this study, a multiple-channel temperature probe was used to measure tissue temperature change during irradiation of lasers with different wavelengths at different power settings. Tissue temperature in chicken breast tissue as well as skin and breast tumor of rats was measured during irradiation of an 805-nm diode laser. The vertical profiles of temperature were obtained using simultaneous measurement at several different locations. The absorption of laser energy by tissue was enhanced by injecting laser-absorbing dye into the tissue. A Nd:YAG laser of 1064-nm wavelength was also used to irradiate turkey breast tissue. Our results showed that both laser penetration ability and photothermal reaction depended on the wavelength of lasers. In the case of 805-nm laser, the temperature increased rapidly only in the region close to the laser source and the thermal equilibrium could be reached within a short time period. The laser absorbing dye drastically enhanced the thermal reaction, resulting in approximately 4-fold temperature increase. On the contrary, the laser beam with 1064-nm wavelength penetrated deeply into tissue and the tissue temperature continued increasing even after a 10-minute laser irradiation.

  19. Four-dimensional Transcatheter Intra-arterial Perfusion MR Imaging Before and After Uterine Artery Embolization in the Rabbit VX2 Tumor Model

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Johnathan C.; Wang, Dingxin; Lewandowski, Robert J.; Tang, Richard; Chrisman, Howard B.; Vogelzang, Robert L.; Woloschak, Gayle E.; Larson, Andrew C.; Omary, Reed A.; Ryu, Robert K.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To test the hypothesis that four-dimensional (4D) transcatheter intra-arterial perfusion (TRIP) MR imaging can measure uterine fibroid perfusion changes immediately before and after uterine artery embolization (UAE) in the rabbit VX2 tumor model. Materials and Methods Eight VX2 uterine tumors were grown in 6 rabbits. After positioning a catheter within the uterine artery, we performed 4D TRIP-MRI measurements with 3 mL injections of 2.5% gadopentetate dimeglumine. We used a dynamic 3D spoiled-GRE sequence with in vivo B1-field correction for improved accuracy during perfusion quantification. We performed UAE using 1 mL of gelatin microspheres (2×106 particles; diameter 40-120 μm). Two regions-of-interest were drawn within each tumor upon perfusion maps. Functional embolic endpoints were reported as the mean percent reduction in fibroid tumor perfusion. Measurements before and after UAE were compared using paired t-tests (α = 0.05). Results VX2 uterine tumor perfusion decreased significantly from 27.1 at baseline to 7.09 after UAE (mL/min/100 mL tissue, p < 0.0001). Overall perfusion reduction was 76.3% (95% CI: 66.3%-86.3%). Conclusion 4D TRIP MRI can objectively quantify uterine fibroid perfusion reductions during UAE in VX2 rabbits. This technique could be used clinically to potentially determine an optimal embolic endpoint with the long-term goals of improving UAE success rates and minimizing procedure-related ischemic pain. PMID:20432349

  20. Acceleration of Vascular Sprouting from Fabricated Perfusable Vascular-Like Structures

    PubMed Central

    Osaki, Tatsuya; Kakegawa, Takahiro; Kageyama, Tatsuto; Enomoto, Junko; Nittami, Tadashi; Fukuda, Junji

    2015-01-01

    Fabrication of vascular networks is essential for engineering three-dimensional thick tissues and organs in the emerging fields of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. In this study, we describe the fabrication of perfusable vascular-like structures by transferring endothelial cells using an electrochemical reaction as well as acceleration of subsequent endothelial sprouting by two stimuli: phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and fluidic shear stress. The electrochemical transfer of cells was achieved using an oligopeptide that formed a dense molecular layer on a gold surface and was then electrochemically desorbed from the surface. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), adhered to gold-coated needles (ϕ600 μm) via the oligopeptide, were transferred to collagen gel along with electrochemical desorption of the molecular layer, resulting in the formation of endothelial cell-lined vascular-like structures. In the following culture, the endothelial cells migrated into the collagen gel and formed branched luminal structures. However, this branching process was strikingly slow (>14 d) and the cell layers on the internal surfaces became disrupted in some regions. To address these issues, we examined the effects of the protein kinase C (PKC) activator, PMA, and shear stress generated by medium flow. Addition of PMA at an optimum concentration significantly accelerated migration, vascular network formation, and its stabilization. Exposure to shear stress reoriented the cells in the direction of the medium flow and further accelerated vascular network formation. Because of the synergistic effects, HUVECs began to sprout as early as 3 d of perfusion culture and neighboring vascular-like structures were bridged within 5 d. Although further investigations of vascular functions need to be performed, this approach may be an effective strategy for rapid fabrication of perfusable microvascular networks when engineering three-dimensional fully vascularized

  1. Magnetic Resonance Perfusion Imaging in the Study of Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillis, Argye E.

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides a brief review of various uses of magnetic resonance perfusion imaging in the investigation of brain/language relationships. The reviewed studies illustrate how perfusion imaging can reveal areas of brain where dysfunction due to low blood flow is associated with specific language deficits, and where restoration of blood flow…

  2. Perfusion Electronic Record Documentation Using Epic Systems Software.

    PubMed

    Riley, Jeffrey B; Justison, George A

    2015-12-01

    The authors comment on Steffens and Gunser's article describing the University of Wisconsin adoption of the Epic anesthesia record to include perfusion information from the cardiopulmonary bypass patient experience. We highlight the current-day lessons and the valuable quality and safety principles the Wisconsin-Epic model anesthesia-perfusion record provides. PMID:26834289

  3. Sustained ventilation: perfusion imbalance during hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Milner, L S; Rothberg, A D; Thomson, P D; Stothart, M

    1983-06-01

    Five children between the ages of 6 and 15 years, who required chronic hemodialysis (HD) for renal failure, were studied to evaluate the central and pulmonary effects of HD on gas exchange. Acetate dialysate was used, and dialysate pO2 and pCO2, arterial pO2 and pCO2, endtidal CO2 and minute ventilation were measured pre-HD and 15, 30, 60, 120 and 240 minutes after commencement of HD. Arterial-alveolar CO2 gradient (aADCO2) was calculated to determine the ventilation: perfusion (V/Q) status. Minute ventilation did not change significantly from the pre-HD value of 8.9 +/- 1.1 l/min (mean +/- SD). The aADCO2 increased significantly from 3.2 +/- 3.7 mmHg to 8.4 +/- 2.4 mmHg at 15 mins (p less than .01) and was still elevated at 120 mins. (9.1 +/- 3.4 mmHg, p less than .02). There was a weak but significant inverse relationship between aADCO2 and arterial pO2 (r -0.42, p less than 0.05). The results suggest that, in these children, dialysed at altitude, dialysis-related hypoxemia appears to be the result of a sustained V/Q mismatch, possibly related to a decrease in pulmonary perfusion. PMID:6413444

  4. Diagnosing acute lacunar infarction using CT perfusion.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wenjie; Yassi, Nawaf; Sharma, Gagan; Yan, Bernard; Desmond, Patricia M; Davis, Stephen M; Campbell, Bruce C V

    2016-07-01

    The value of CT perfusion (CTP) in detecting acute lacunar infarcts (LACI) has not been well established. We tested the sensitivity of CTP for LACI. CTP maps of consecutive stroke patients from 2009-2013 were examined. MRI diffusion imaging was used to identify those with LACI. Two stroke neurologists independently evaluated the CTP maps for evidence of a perfusion lesion in a deep perforating artery territory. Cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral blood flow (CBF), mean transit time (MTT) and time to maximum (Tmax) maps were first examined in isolation and then in combination. Inter-observer agreement was measured using Cohen's κ. The lesions identified were later confirmed against the diffusion MRI reference and the sensitivity and specificity of CTP maps calculated. A total of 63 patient scans were analysed. There were 32 patients with MRI-confirmed LACI within the coverage of CTP; 18 in the striatum, 10 thalamic, and four in the corona radiata. Another 31 patients had normal MRI. Inter-rater agreement was good (κ=0.83). Sensitivity (blinded consensus) was highest for MTT (56.2%) compared to Tmax (25%, p<0.001), CBV (9.3%, p=0.021) and CBF (43.7%, p<0.001). MTT maps enable detection of a significant proportion of LACI using CTP. PMID:26899357

  5. The pediatric template of brain perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Avants, Brian B; Duda, Jeffrey T; Kilroy, Emily; Krasileva, Kate; Jann, Kay; Kandel, Benjamin T; Tustison, Nicholas J; Yan, Lirong; Jog, Mayank; Smith, Robert; Wang, Yi; Dapretto, Mirella; Wang, Danny J J

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) captures the dynamics of brain development with multiple modalities that quantify both structure and function. These measurements may yield valuable insights into the neural patterns that mark healthy maturation or that identify early risk for psychiatric disorder. The Pediatric Template of Brain Perfusion (PTBP) is a free and public neuroimaging resource that will help accelerate the understanding of childhood brain development as seen through the lens of multiple modality neuroimaging and in relation to cognitive and environmental factors. The PTBP uses cross-sectional and longitudinal MRI to quantify cortex, white matter, resting state functional connectivity and brain perfusion, as measured by Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL), in 120 children 7–18 years of age. We describe the PTBP and show, as a demonstration of validity, that global summary measurements capture the trajectories that demarcate critical turning points in brain maturation. This novel resource will allow a more detailed understanding of the network-level, structural and functional landmarks that are obtained during normal adolescent brain development. PMID:25977810

  6. Rapid onset of perfused blood vessels after implantation of ECFCs and MPCs in collagen, PuraMatrix and fibrin provisional matrices.

    PubMed

    Allen, Patrick; Kang, Kyu-Tae; Bischoff, Joyce

    2015-05-01

    We developed an in vivo vascularization model in which human endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) and human mesenchymal progenitor cells (MPCs) form blood vessel networks when co-injected (ECFC + MPC) into nude mice in rat tail type I collagen, bovine fibrin or synthetic peptide PuraMatrix matrices. We used three approaches to determine the onset of functional vascularization when ECFC + MPC suspended in these matrices were implanted in vivo. The first was immunohistochemistry to detect vessels lined by human endothelial cells and filled with red blood cells. The second was in vivo vascular staining by tail vein injection of a mixture of Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-I), a lectin specific for human endothelium, and Griffonia simplicifolia isolectin B4 (GS-IB4 ), a lectin specific for rodent endothelium. The third approach employed contrast-enhanced ultrasound to measure the perfusion volumes of implants in individual animals over time. Human endothelial-lined tubular structures were detected in vivo on days 1 and 2 after implantation, with perfused human vessels detected on days 3 and 4. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound revealed significant perfusion of ECFC + MPC/collagen implants on days 1-4, at up to 14% perfused vascular volume. ECFC + MPC implanted in fibrin and PuraMatrix matrices also supported perfusion at day 1, as assessed by ultrasound (at 12% and 23% perfused vascular volume, respectively). This model demonstrates that ECFC + MPC suspended in any of the three matrices initiated a rapid onset of vascularization. We propose that ECFC + MPC delivered in vivo provide a means to achieve rapid perfusion of tissue-engineered organs or for in situ tissue repair. PMID:23955835

  7. Diffusion-perfusion relationships in skeletal muscle: models and experimental evidence from inert gas washout.

    PubMed

    Piiper, J; Meyer, M

    1984-01-01

    In order to study the dependence of blood-tissue gas exchange upon diffusion, the simultaneous washout of two inert gases of differing diffusivity was investigated in isolated-perfused dog gastrocnemius preparations. The muscles were equilibrated with CH4 and SF6 via arterial blood. The washout kinetics were determined from venous blood samples analyzed by gas chromatography. The results revealed the following features: The washout of the test gases was pronouncedly multi-exponential, and could be described by three exponential components when analyzed to 5% of the initial value. The non-exponential washout was attributed to unequal distribution of capillary blood flow to tissue volume. The mean ratio of washout rate constants CH4/SF6 was within 1.10-1.25 and was even smaller than the ratio expected for pure perfusion limitation (1.46). Therefore, no evidence for effective tissue-blood diffusion limitation was obtained. The observed washout rate constant ratio could be explained by a model with veno-arterial back diffusion which more strongly retards washout kinetics of the better diffusible gas (CH4) as compared to the less diffusible gas (SF6). PMID:6731103

  8. Bioreactor design for perfusion-based, highly-vascularized organ regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bijonowski, Brent M.; Miller, William M.; Wertheim, Jason A.

    2012-01-01

    Bioartificial or laboratory-grown organs is a growing field centered on developing replacement organs and tissues to restore body function and providing a potential solution to the shortage of donor organs for transplantation. With the entry of engineered planar tissues, such as bladder and trachea, into clinical studies, an increasing focus is being given to designing complex, three-dimensional solid organs. As tissues become larger, thicker and more complex, the vascular network becomes crucial for supplying nutrients and maintaining viability and growth of the neo-organ. Perfusion decellularization, the process of removing cells from an entire organ, leaves the matrix of the vascular network intact. Organ engineering requires a delicate process of decellularization, sterilization, reseeding with appropriate cells, and organ maturation and stimulation to ensure optimal development. The design of bioreactors to facilitate this sequence of events has been refined to the extent that some bioartificial organs grown in these systems have been transplanted into recipient animals with sustained, though limited, function. This review focuses on the state-of-art in bioreactor development for perfusion-based bioartificial organs and highlights specific design components in need of further refinement. PMID:23542907

  9. Stroke prognosis by applying double thresholds on CT-perfusion-brain images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chokchaitam, Somchart; Santipromwong, Nittaya; Muengtaweepongsa, Sombat

    2013-03-01

    The CT-perfusion image shows information of brain abnormalities such as its size and location. Generally, neurologist diagnoses stroke disease using CT-perfusion images such as Cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV). In our previous report, we applied threshold technique to divide amount of CBV and CBF into low and high level. Then, their levels are applied to identify normal tissue areas, dead tissue areas (infract core) and blood-cot tissue areas (infract penumbra). However, it's not totally correct, if the same threshold is applied to the whole area (it must depend on size of blood vessel in that area. In this report, we propose double thresholds to divided CBV and CBF into 3 levels: very low, medium and very high levels. Very low and very high levels are definitely implied to bad areas and good areas, respectively. The proposed double thresholds makes stroke prognosis more accurate. The simulation results confirm that our proposed results closed to results defined from neurologist comparing to the conventional results.

  10. Intravital lectin perfusion analysis of vascular permeability in human micro- and macro- blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Debbage, P L; Sölder, E; Seidl, S; Hutzler, P; Hugl, B; Ofner, D; Kreczy, A

    2001-10-01

    We previously applied intravital lectin perfusion in mouse models to elucidate mechanisms underlying vascular permeability. The present work transfers this technique to human models, analysing vascular permeability in macro- and microvessels. Human vascular endothelial surface carbohydrate biochemistry differs significantly from its murine counterpart, lacking alpha-galactosyl epitopes and expressing the L-fucose moiety in the glycocalyx; the poly-N-lactosamine glycan backbone is common to all mammals. We examined extensively lectin binding specificities in sections and in vivo, and then applied the poly-N-lactosamine-specific lectin LEA and the L-fucose-specific lectin UEA-I in human intravital perfusions. Transendothelial transport differed in macrovessels and microvessels. In microvessels of adult human fat tissue, rectal wall and rectal carcinomas, slow transendothelial transport by vesicles was followed by significant retention at the subendothelial basement membrane; paracellular passage was not observed. Passage time exceeded 1 h. Thus we found barrier mechanisms resembling those we described previously in murine tissues. In both adult and fetal macrovessels, the vena saphena magna and the umbilical vein, respectively, rapid passage across the endothelial lining was observed, the tracer localising completely in the subendothelial tissues within 15 min; vesicular transport was more rapid than in microvessels, and retention at the subendothelial basement membrane briefer. PMID:11702193

  11. Methylene blue treatment delays progression of perfusion-diffusion mismatch to infarct in permanent ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Pavel; Jiang, Zhao; Huang, Shiliang; Shen, Qiang; Duong, Timothy Q

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the world. Low-dose methylene blue (MB), which has been used safely to treat methemoglobinemia and cyanide poisoning in humans, has energy enhancing and antioxidant properties. We tested the hypothesis that methylene blue treatment delays progression of at-risk tissue (ca. perfusion-diffusion mismatch) to infarct in permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats at two MB treatment doses. Serial MRI was used to evaluate MB treatment efficacy. The major findings were: (i) MB significantly prolonged the perfusion-diffusion mismatch, (ii) MB mildly increased the CBF in the hypoperfused tissue, (iii) MB did not change the final infarct volume in permanent ischemic stroke, and (iv) there were no dose-dependent effects on mismatch progression for the 1 and 3mg/kg doses studied. This neuroprotective effect is likely the result of sustained ATP production and increased CBF to tissue at risk. This work has the potential to readily lead to clinical stroke trials given MB's excellent safety profile. PMID:25218555

  12. 3D microtumors in vitro supported by perfused vascular networks

    PubMed Central

    Sobrino, Agua; Phan, Duc T. T.; Datta, Rupsa; Wang, Xiaolin; Hachey, Stephanie J.; Romero-López, Mónica; Gratton, Enrico; Lee, Abraham P.; George, Steven C.; Hughes, Christopher C. W.

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing interest in developing microphysiological systems that can be used to model both normal and pathological human organs in vitro. This “organs-on-chips” approach aims to capture key structural and physiological characteristics of the target tissue. Here we describe in vitro vascularized microtumors (VMTs). This “tumor-on-a-chip” platform incorporates human tumor and stromal cells that grow in a 3D extracellular matrix and that depend for survival on nutrient delivery through living, perfused microvessels. Both colorectal and breast cancer cells grow vigorously in the platform and respond to standard-of-care therapies, showing reduced growth and/or regression. Vascular-targeting agents with different mechanisms of action can also be distinguished, and we find that drugs targeting only VEGFRs (Apatinib and Vandetanib) are not effective, whereas drugs that target VEGFRs, PDGFR and Tie2 (Linifanib and Cabozantinib) do regress the vasculature. Tumors in the VMT show strong metabolic heterogeneity when imaged using NADH Fluorescent Lifetime Imaging Microscopy and, compared to their surrounding stroma, many show a higher free/bound NADH ratio consistent with their known preference for aerobic glycolysis. The VMT platform provides a unique model for studying vascularized solid tumors in vitro. PMID:27549930

  13. Myocardial Perfusion: Characteristics of Distal Intramyocardial Arteriolar Trees.

    PubMed

    Zamir, Mair; Vercnocke, Andrew J; Edwards, Phillip K; Anderson, Jill L; Jorgensen, Steven M; Ritman, Erik L

    2015-11-01

    A combination of experimental, theoretical, and imaging methodologies is used to examine the hierarchical structure and function of intramyocardial arteriolar trees in porcine hearts to provide a window onto a region of myocardial microvasculature which has been difficult to fully explore so far. A total of 66 microvascular trees from 6 isolated myocardial specimens were analyzed, with a cumulative number of 2438 arteriolar branches greater than or equal to 40 μm lumen diameter. The distribution of flow rates within each tree was derived from an assumed power law relationship for that tree between the diameter of vessel segments and flow rates that are consistent with that power law and subject to conservation of mass along hierarchical structure of the tree. The results indicate that the power law index increases at levels of arteriolar vasculature closer to the capillary level, consistent with a concomitant decrease in shear stress acting on endothelial tissue. These results resolve a long standing predicament which could not be resolved previously because of lack of data about the 3D, interconnected, arterioles. In the context of myocardial perfusion, the results indicate that the coefficient of variation of flow rate in pre-capillary distal arterioles is high, suggesting that heterogeneity of flow rate in these arterioles is not entirely random but may be due at least in part to active control. PMID:25952363

  14. Cerebral perfusion reserve indexes determined by fluoromethane positron emission scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, R.L.; Sunderland, J.J.; Lagreze, H.L.; Nickles, R.J.; Rowe, B.R.; Turski, P.A.

    1988-01-01

    An index of cerebral perfusion reserve (RES%), defined as the percent change of regional cerebral blood flow over baseline per mm Hg of end-tidal CO/sub 2/ tension, was determined for each middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory in patients with unilateral carotid distribution transient ischemic attacks or minor cerebrovascular accidents and was compared with that of age-matched, neurologically normal volunteers. Vasodilator responses to induced hypercapnia were tested during inhalation of 5% CO/sub 2/ in 95% O/sub 2/ while regional cerebral blood flow was measured by fluoromethane inhalation positron emission tomography. Mean RES% for 24 normal MCA territories was 5.2 +/- 0.8%. Mean RES% for 15 patient nonischemic MCA territories was 3.8 +/- 1.3% and for 15 ischemic MCA territories was 2.8 +/- 1.9% (both p less than 0.001). Individual RES% values and symmetry ratios between ischemic and nonischemic regions were also determined and compared with angiographic data. Areas of diminished, asymmetric, or paradoxical (two patients) CO/sub 2/ reactivity appear to correspond to areas of compensatory vasodilation. We found this technique to be a safe and reproducible method for defining and recording localized areas of cerebral tissue at apparent risk for hemodynamically related damage.

  15. 3D microtumors in vitro supported by perfused vascular networks.

    PubMed

    Sobrino, Agua; Phan, Duc T T; Datta, Rupsa; Wang, Xiaolin; Hachey, Stephanie J; Romero-López, Mónica; Gratton, Enrico; Lee, Abraham P; George, Steven C; Hughes, Christopher C W

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing interest in developing microphysiological systems that can be used to model both normal and pathological human organs in vitro. This "organs-on-chips" approach aims to capture key structural and physiological characteristics of the target tissue. Here we describe in vitro vascularized microtumors (VMTs). This "tumor-on-a-chip" platform incorporates human tumor and stromal cells that grow in a 3D extracellular matrix and that depend for survival on nutrient delivery through living, perfused microvessels. Both colorectal and breast cancer cells grow vigorously in the platform and respond to standard-of-care therapies, showing reduced growth and/or regression. Vascular-targeting agents with different mechanisms of action can also be distinguished, and we find that drugs targeting only VEGFRs (Apatinib and Vandetanib) are not effective, whereas drugs that target VEGFRs, PDGFR and Tie2 (Linifanib and Cabozantinib) do regress the vasculature. Tumors in the VMT show strong metabolic heterogeneity when imaged using NADH Fluorescent Lifetime Imaging Microscopy and, compared to their surrounding stroma, many show a higher free/bound NADH ratio consistent with their known preference for aerobic glycolysis. The VMT platform provides a unique model for studying vascularized solid tumors in vitro. PMID:27549930

  16. Diffusion and Perfusion: The Keys to Fat Grafting

    PubMed Central

    Khouri, Roger K.; Khouri, Raoul-Emil R.; Lujan-Hernandez, Jorge R.; Khouri, Khalil R.; Lancerotto, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Background: Fat grafting is now widely used in plastic surgery. Long-term graft retention can be unpredictable. Fat grafts must obtain oxygen via diffusion until neovascularization occurs, so oxygen delivery may be the overarching variable in graft retention. Methods: We studied the peer-reviewed literature to determine which aspects of a fat graft and the microenvironment surrounding a fat graft affect oxygen delivery and created 3 models relating distinct variables to oxygen delivery and graft retention. Results: Our models confirm that thin microribbons of fat maximize oxygen transport when injected into a large, compliant, well-vascularized recipient site. The “Microribbon Model” predicts that, in a typical human, fat injections larger than 0.16 cm in radius will have a region of central necrosis. Our “Fluid Accommodation Model” predicts that once grafted tissues approach a critical interstitial fluid pressure of 9 mm Hg, any additional fluid will drastically increase interstitial fluid pressure and reduce capillary perfusion and oxygen delivery. Our “External Volume Expansion Effect Model” predicts the effect of vascular changes induced by preoperative external volume expansion that allow for greater volumes of fat to be successfully grafted. Conclusions: These models confirm that initial fat grafting survival is limited by oxygen diffusion. Preoperative expansion increases oxygen diffusion capacity allowing for additional graft retention. These models provide a scientific framework for testing the current fat grafting theories. PMID:25426403

  17. Hepatic perfusion abnormalities during CT angiography: Detection and interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Freeny, P.C.; Marks, W.M.

    1986-06-01

    Twenty-seven perfusion abnormalities were detected in 17 of 50 patients who underwent computed tomographic angiography (CTA) of the liver. All but one of the perfusion abnormalities occurred in patients with primary or metastatic liver tumors. Perfusion abnormalities were lobar in nine cases, segmental in 11, and subsegmental in seven; 14 were hypoperfusion and 13 were hyperperfusion abnormalities. The causes for the abnormalities included nonperfusion of a replaced hepatic artery (n = 11), cirrhosis and nodular regeneration (n = 3), altered hepatic hemodynamics (e.g., siphoning, laminar flow) caused by tumor (n = 7), contrast media washout from a nonperfused vessel (n = 1), compression of adjacent hepatic parenchyma (n = 1), and unknown (n = 4). Differentiation of perfusion abnormalities from tumor usually can be made by comparing the morphology of the known tumor with the suspected perfusion abnormality, changes of each on delayed CTA scans, and review of initial angiograms and other imaging studies.

  18. [Ocular perfusion pressure and its relevance for glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Schmidl, D; Werkmeister, R; Garhöfer, G; Schmetterer, L

    2015-02-01

    Ocular perfusion pressure is defined as the difference between arterial and venous pressure in ocular vessels. In practice, mean arterial pressure is used to substitute for arterial pressure in ocular vessels while intraocular pressure gives an estimate for ocular venous pressure. This results in a value that is easy to calculate and which is of importance since several studies have shown that it is correlated to the prevalence, incidence and progression of primary open angle glaucoma. Today, ocular perfusion pressure is used to estimate individual risks. Since no target value for ocular perfusion pressure can be defined, direct therapeutic intervention is difficult. Still, it has to be kept in mind that lowering intraocular pressure automatically leads to an increase in ocular perfusion pressure. The present article also points out problems and limitations in the concept of ocular perfusion pressure and suggests possible solutions for these problems in the future. PMID:25700252

  19. Factors in myocardial "perfusion" imaging with ultrafast MRI and Gd-DTPA administration.

    PubMed

    Burstein, D; Taratuta, E; Manning, W J

    1991-08-01

    Ultrafast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and first pass observation of an interstitial contrast agent are currently being used to study myocardial perfusion. Image intensity, however, is a function of several parameters, including the delivery of the contrast agent to the interstitium (coronary flow rate and diffusion into the interstitium) and the relaxation properties of the tissue (contrast agent concentration, proton exchange rates, and relative intra- and extracellular volume fractions). In this study, image intensity during gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA) administration with T1-weighted ultrafast MR imaging was assessed in an isolated heart preparation. With increasing Gd-DTPA concentration, the steady-state myocardial image intensity increased but the time to reach steady state remained unchanged, resulting in an increased slope of image intensity change. A range of physiologic perfusion pressures (and resulting coronary flow rates) had insignificant effects on kinetics of Gd-DTPA wash-in or steady-state image intensity, suggesting that diffusion of Gd-DTPA into the interstitium is the rate limiting step in image intensity change with this preparation. Following global ischemia and reperfusion, transmural differences in the slope of image intensity change were apparent. However, the altered steady-state image intensity (due to postischemic edema) makes interpretation of this finding difficult. The studies described here demonstrate that although Gd-DTPA administration combined with ultrafast imaging may be a sensitive indicator of perfusion abnormalities, factors other than perfusion will affect image intensity. Extensive studies will be required before image intensity with this protocol is fully understood. PMID:1775055

  20. Performance assessment of a new dynamic scan mode for perfusion computed tomography using a biological phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberland, U.; Klotz, E.,; Abolmaali, N.

    2010-04-01

    Perfusion computed tomography is increasingly being used for stroke and tumor assessment. Using continuous periodic table movement the spatial coverage can be increased beyond the detector width with a new adaptive spiral scanning technique (A4DS). The purpose of this study was to compare perfusion values acquired with the A4DS technique with results from standard dynamic scans at different temporal sampling rates. A biological perfusion phantom (preserved porcine kidney) was scanned with both techniques. In standard mode three scans were performed at adjacent overlapping positions (detector width 38.4 mm) covering the whole phantom. Data were reconstructed with temporal resolutions of 0.5, 1 and 1.5 s. The A4DS scan was performed with a cycle time of 1.5 s and scan ranges of 100 and 148 mm respectively. The phantom was not repositioned between scans in order to assure that identical image slices showed identical phantom slices. Tissue flow was calculated with a deconvolution type algorithm. Regions of interest were drawn in strongly and moderately enhancing areas and around the whole cortex in three slices in the upper, central and lower portion of the phantom. In the flow range of 40 to 100 ml/100ml/min values did not differ by more than 5 ml/100ml/min between any of the scan protocols used. The correlation between the continuous table movement modes and the 0.5 s standard mode was excellent (r2>0.98) indicating that the new mode is well suited for perfusion measurements and allows increasing the coverage by almost a factor of four.

  1. Clearance of. cap alpha. -aminoisobutyric acid during in-situ perfusion of the guinea pig placenta

    SciTech Connect

    Kelman, B.J.; Sikov, M.R.

    1983-05-01

    Extensive investigation of the transport of ..cap alpha..-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB; a nonmetabolized amino acid) has shown that AIB is actively transported from mother to fetus across the hemochorial placenta of the guinea pig. As a step towards clarifying the relative rolls of active and passive movements of amino acids across the placenta, it would be useful to obtain concurrent measurements of transplacental movements of a substance which crosses the placenta rapidly by simple diffusion (water) and of a substance which is actively transported across the placenta (AIB). In our study, placentas from guinea pigs between 59 and 61 days of gestation were perfused in situ through cannulated umbilical vessels with the maternal circulation left intact. Tritiated water and /sup 14/C-AIB were injected into a maternal jugular vein and maternal blood samples were obtained at 1 to 10 minute intervals; perfusate samples were collected sequentially after one pass through the placenta. Clearance of /sup 14/C-AIB from mother to fetus (AIB/sub MF/) and AIB concentrations in placental tissue, maternal plasma, and perfusate were consistent in magnitude with data obtained by other invetigators who have clearly shown an active transport of AIB in the placenta. On the other hand, in this study AIB/sub MF/ ranged from approximately 50% to 96% of the clearance of /sup 3/H-labeled water from mother to fetus (T/sub MF/) and that changes in AIB/sub MF/ correlated closely with changes in T/sub MF/ in all perfusions. Thus, it appears that AIB/sub MF/ closely paralleled T/sub MF/ and these data suggest that a relatively large component of AIB/sub MF/ is of passive origin in the in situ placenta.

  2. Cardiac perfusion imaging using hyperpolarized 13c urea using flow sensitizing gradients

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jack J.; Robson, Matthew D.; Tyler, Damian J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate the feasibility of imaging the first passage of a bolus of hyperpolarized 13C urea through the rodent heart using flow‐sensitizing gradients to reduce signal from the blood pool. Methods A flow‐sensitizing bipolar gradient was optimized to reduce the bright signal within the cardiac chambers, enabling improved contrast of the agent within the tissue capillary bed. The gradient was incorporated into a dynamic golden angle spiral 13C imaging sequence. Healthy rats were scanned during rest (n = 3) and under adenosine stress‐induced hyperemia (n = 3). Results A two‐fold increase in myocardial perfusion relative to rest was detected during adenosine stress‐induced hyperemia, consistent with a myocardial perfusion reserve of two in rodents. Conclusion The new pulse sequence was used to obtain dynamic images of the first passage of hyperpolarized 13C urea in the rodent heart, without contamination from bright signal within the neighboring cardiac lumen. This probe of myocardial perfusion is expected to enable new hyperpolarized 13C studies in which the cardiac metabolism/perfusion mismatch can be identified. Magn Reson Med, 2015. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Magn Reson Med 75:1474–1483, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance. PMID:25991580

  3. PREOPERATIVE PREDICTION OF LUNG FUNCTION IN PNEUMONECTOMY BY SPIROMETRY AND LUNG PERFUSION SCINTIGRAPHY

    PubMed Central

    Cukic, Vesna

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Nowadays an increasing number of lung resections are being done because of the rising prevalence of lung cancer that occurs mainly in patients with limited lung function, what is caused by common etiologic factor - smoking cigarettes. Loss of lung tissue in such patients can worsen much the postoperative pulmonary function. So it is necessary to asses the postoperative pulmonary function especially after maximal resection, i.e. pneumonectomy. Objective: To check over the accuracy of preoperative prognosis of postoperative lung function after pneumonectomy using spirometry and lung perfusion scinigraphy. Material and methods: The study was done on 17 patients operated at the Clinic for thoracic surgery, who were treated previously at the Clinic for Pulmonary Diseases “Podhrastovi” in the period from 01. 12. 2008. to 01. 06. 2011. Postoperative pulmonary function expressed as ppoFEV1 (predicted postoperative forced expiratory volume in one second) was prognosticated preoperatively using spirometry, i.e.. simple calculation according to the number of the pulmonary segments to be removed and perfusion lung scintigraphy. Results: There is no significant deviation of postoperative achieved values of FEV1 from predicted ones obtained by both methods, and there is no significant differences between predicted values (ppoFEV1) obtained by spirometry and perfusion scintigraphy. Conclusion: It is necessary to asses the postoperative pulmonary function before lung resection to avoid postoperative respiratory failure and other cardiopulmonary complications. It is absolutely necessary for pneumonectomy, i.e.. maximal pulmonary resection. It can be done with great possibility using spirometry or perfusion lung scintigraphy. PMID:23378687

  4. Current State of Hypothermic Machine Perfusion Preservation of Organs: The Clinical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Michael J.; Baicu, Simona, C.

    2009-01-01

    This review focuses on the application of hypothermic perfusion technology as a topic of current interest with the potential to have a salutary impact on the mounting clinical challenges to improve the quantity and quality of donor organs and the outcome of transplantation. The ex vivo perfusion of donor organs on a machine prior to transplant, as opposed to static cold storage on ice, is not a new idea but is being re-visited because of the prospects of making available more and better organs for transplantation. The rationale for pursuing perfusion technology will be discussed in relation to emerging data on clinical outcomes and economic benefits for kidney transplantation. Reference will also be made to on-going research using other organs with special emphasis on the pancreas for both segmental pancreas and isolated islet transplantation. Anticipated and emerging benefits of hypothermic machine perfusion of organs are: i) maintaining the patency of the vascular bed, ii) providing nutrients and low demand oxygen to support reduced energy demands, iii) removal of metabolic by-products and toxins, iv) provision of access for administration of cytoprotective agents and/or immunomodulatory drugs, v) increase of available assays for organ viability assessment and tissue matching, vi) facilitation of a change from emergency to elective scheduled surgery with reduced costs and improved outcomes, vii) improved clinical outcomes as demonstrated by reduced PNF and DGF parameters, viii) improved stabilization or rescue of ECD kidneys or organs from NHBD that increase the size of the donor pool, ix) significant economic benefit for the transplant centers and reduced health care costs, and x) provision of a technology for ex vivo use of non-transplanted human organs for pharmaceutical development research. PMID:19857479

  5. Computational fluid dynamics modelling of perfusion measurements in dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography: development, validation and clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peladeau-Pigeon, M.; Coolens, C.

    2013-09-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) is an imaging tool that aids in evaluating functional characteristics of tissue at different stages of disease management: diagnostic, radiation treatment planning, treatment effectiveness, and monitoring. Clinical validation of DCE-derived perfusion parameters remains an outstanding problem to address prior to perfusion imaging becoming a widespread standard as a non-invasive quantitative measurement tool. One approach to this validation process has been the development of quality assurance phantoms in order to facilitate controlled perfusion ex vivo. However, most of these systems fail to establish and accurately replicate physiologically relevant capillary permeability and exchange performance. The current work presents the first step in the development of a prospective suite of physics-based perfusion simulations based on coupled fluid flow and particle transport phenomena with the goal of enhancing the understanding of clinical contrast agent kinetics. Existing knowledge about a controllable, two-compartmental fluid exchange phantom was used to validate the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation model presented herein. The sensitivity of CFD-derived contrast uptake curves to contrast injection parameters, including injection duration and flow rate, were quantified and found to be within 10% accuracy. The CFD model was employed to evaluate two commonly used clinical kinetic algorithms used to derive perfusion parameters: Fick's principle and the modified Tofts model. Neither kinetic model was able to capture the true transport phenomena it aimed to represent but if the overall contrast concentration after injection remained identical, then successive DCE-CT evaluations could be compared and could indeed reflect differences in regional tissue flow. This study sets the groundwork for future explorations in phantom development and pharmaco-kinetic modelling, as well as the development of novel contrast

  6. The isolated perfused bovine udder as an in vitro model of percutaneous drug absorption. Skin viability and percutaneous absorption of dexamethasone, benzoyl peroxide, and etofenamate.

    PubMed

    Kietzmann, M; Löscher, W; Arens, D; Maass, P; Lubach, D

    1993-10-01

    Using udders from slaughtered cows as a new in vitro model of percutaneous drug absorption, the tissue viability and the percutaneous absorption of dexamethasone, benzoyl peroxide, and etofenamate were studied. The organ was perfused with gassed tyrode solution for up to 6 hr. As shown by measurement of glucose consumption, lactate production, lactate dehydrogenase activity, and pH in the perfusate, the tissue was viable over a 6-hr period. This was confirmed by a histological examination. Determination of the udder skin-fold thickness demonstrated that no edema developed within the perfusion period. A maximum skin penetration of dexamethasone was found after administration of dexamethasone dissolved in acetone with dimethyl sulfoxide, followed by ointment with salicylic acid, ointment without salicylic acid, and acetone solution. Experiments with benzoyl peroxide and etofenamate demonstrated that the perfused udder skin was capable of metabolizing drugs in vitro. In conclusion, the isolated perfused bovine udder is a new in vitro model, which maintains bovine udder skin with an isolated vasculature in a viable state. Using this in vitro model, we note it is possible to compare the dermal penetration, metabolism, and absorption of substances after topical administration of different drug formulations. PMID:8298184

  7. Mismatch between iodine-123 IMP and technetium-99m HM-PAO brain perfusion imaging in a patient with meningioma

    SciTech Connect

    Hoshi, H.; Jinnouchi, S.; Watanabe, K.; Nakano, S.; Kinoshita, K.

    1987-09-01

    The discrepancy between three methods for cerebral perfusion imagings in the case of a man with meningioma is presented. Imaging with N-isopropyl-P-(I-123) iodoamphetamine (IMP) showed no activity in the tumor. Imaging with Tc-99m hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (HM-PAO) and the local cerebral blood flow (LCBF) image with Xe-133 inhalation showed high tumor activity. IMP is a more accurate method for imaging the brain tissue blood flow.

  8. Isolated hypoxic hepatic perfusion with tumor necrosis factor-alpha, melphalan, and mitomycin C using balloon catheter techniques: a pharmacokinetic study in pigs.

    PubMed Central

    van Ijken, M G; de Bruijn, E A; de Boeck, G; ten Hagen, T L; van der Sijp, J R; Eggermont, A M

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To validate the methodology of isolated hypoxic hepatic perfusion (IHHP) using balloon catheter techniques and to gain insight into the distribution of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF), melphalan, and mitomycin C (MMC) through the regional and systemic blood compartments when applying these techniques. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: There is no standard treatment for unresectable liver tumors. Clinical results of isolated limb perfusion with high-dose TNF and melphalan for the treatment of melanoma and sarcoma have been promising, and attempts have been made to extrapolate this success to the isolated liver perfusion setting. The magnitude and toxicity of the surgical procedure, however, have limited clinical applicability. METHODS: Pigs underwent IHHP with TNF, melphalan, and MMC using balloon catheters or served as controls, receiving equivalent dosages of these agents intravenously. After a 20-minute perfusion, a washout procedure was performed for 10 minutes, after which isolation was terminated. Throughout the procedure and afterward, blood samples were obtained from the hepatic and systemic blood compartments and concentrations of perfused agents were determined. RESULTS: During perfusion, locoregional plasma drug concentrations were 20- to 40-fold higher than systemic concentrations. Compared with systemic concentrations after intravenous administration, regional concentrations during IHHP were up to 10-fold higher. Regional MMC and melphalan levels steadily declined during perfusion, indicating rapid uptake by the liver tissue; minimal systemic concentrations indicated virtually no leakage to the systemic blood compartment. During isolation, concentrations of TNF in the perfusate declined only slightly, indicating limited uptake by the liver tissue; no leakage of TNF to the systemic circulation was observed. After termination of isolation, systemic TNF levels showed only a minor transient elevation, indicating that the washout procedure at the end of

  9. Nifedipine and thallium-201 myocardial perfusion in progressive systemic sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Kahan, A.; Devaux, J.Y.; Amor, B.; Menkes, C.J.; Weber, S.; Nitenberg, A.; Venot, A.; Guerin, F.; Degeorges, M.; Roucayrol, J.C.

    1986-05-29

    Heart disease in patients with progressive systemic sclerosis may be due in part to myocardial ischemia caused by a disturbance of the coronary microcirculation. To determine whether abnormalities of myocardial perfusion in this disorder are potentially reversible, we evaluated the effect of the coronary vasodilator nifedipine on myocardial perfusion assessed by thallium-201 scanning in 20 patients. Thallium-201 single-photon-emission computerized tomography was performed under control conditions and 90 minutes after 20 mg of oral nifedipine. The mean (+/- SD) number of left ventricular segments with perfusion defects decreased from 5.3 +/- 2.0 to 3.3 +/- 2.2 after nifedipine (P = 0.0003). Perfusion abnormalities were quantified by a perfusion score (0 to 2.0) assigned to each left ventricular segment and by a global perfusion score (0 to 18) for the entire left ventricle. The mean perfusion score in segments with resting defects increased from 0.97 +/- 0.24 to 1.26 +/- 0.44 after nifedipine (P less than 0.00001). The mean global perfusion score increased from 11.2 +/- 1.7 to 12.8 +/- 2.4 after nifedipine (P = 0.003). The global perfusion score increased by at least 2.0 in 10 patients and decreased by at least 2.0 in only 1. These observations reveal short-term improvement in thallium-201 myocardial perfusion with nifedipine in patients with progressive systemic sclerosis. The results are consistent with a potentially reversible abnormality of coronary vasomotion in this disorder, but the long-term therapeutic effects of nifedipine remain to be determined.

  10. 21 CFR 314.126 - Adequate and well-controlled studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...-evident (general anesthetics, drug metabolism). (3) The method of selection of subjects provides adequate... respect to pertinent variables such as age, sex, severity of disease, duration of disease, and use of... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Adequate and well-controlled studies....

  11. 40 CFR 152.20 - Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Exemptions for pesticides adequately... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION PROCEDURES Exemptions § 152.20 Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency. The...

  12. 40 CFR 152.20 - Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Exemptions for pesticides adequately... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION PROCEDURES Exemptions § 152.20 Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency. The...

  13. Calculation of the Cost of an Adequate Education in Kentucky: A Professional Judgment Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verstegen, Deborah A.

    2004-01-01

    What is an adequate education and how much does it cost? In 1989, Kentucky's State Supreme Court found the entire system of education unconstitutional--"all of its parts and parcels". The Court called for all children to have access to an adequate education, one that is uniform and has as its goal the development of seven capacities, including:…

  14. 9 CFR 2.33 - Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care. 2.33 Section 2.33 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Research Facilities § 2.33 Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care. (a)...

  15. 9 CFR 2.40 - Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care (dealers and exhibitors).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care (dealers and exhibitors). 2.40 Section 2.40 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Attending Veterinarian and Adequate Veterinary Care §...

  16. 75 FR 69648 - Safety Analysis Requirements for Defining Adequate Protection for the Public and the Workers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-15

    ... SAFETY BOARD Safety Analysis Requirements for Defining Adequate Protection for the Public and the Workers... TO THE SECRETARY OF ENERGY Safety Analysis Requirements for Defining Adequate Protection for the... safety analysis, or DSA, is to be prepared for every DOE nuclear facility. This DSA, once approved by...

  17. 42 CFR 417.568 - Adequate financial records, statistical data, and cost finding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Adequate financial records, statistical data, and....568 Adequate financial records, statistical data, and cost finding. (a) Maintenance of records. (1) An HMO or CMP must maintain sufficient financial records and statistical data for proper determination...

  18. 42 CFR 417.568 - Adequate financial records, statistical data, and cost finding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Adequate financial records, statistical data, and....568 Adequate financial records, statistical data, and cost finding. (a) Maintenance of records. (1) An HMO or CMP must maintain sufficient financial records and statistical data for proper determination...

  19. 42 CFR 417.568 - Adequate financial records, statistical data, and cost finding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Adequate financial records, statistical data, and....568 Adequate financial records, statistical data, and cost finding. (a) Maintenance of records. (1) An HMO or CMP must maintain sufficient financial records and statistical data for proper determination...

  20. The in vitro growth of a three-dimensional human dermal replacement using a single-pass perfusion system.

    PubMed

    Halberstadt, C R; Hardin, R; Bezverkov, K; Snyder, D; Allen, L; Landeen, L

    1994-04-01

    A human dermal replacement has been developed by seeding human neonatal dermal fibroblasts onto a biosorbable polyglactin (polyglycolide/polylactide) mesh and culturing in a bioreactor. The mesh provides the proper environment for the cells to attach, grow in a three-dimensional array, and establish a tissue matrix over a 2- to 3-week culture period. The dermal replacement has been characterized and found to contain a variety of naturally occurring dermal matrix proteins, including fibronectin, glycosaminoglycans, and collagen types I and III. To efficiently and reproducibly produce this dermal tissue equivalent, a closed, single-pass perfusion system was developed and compared with a static process. In the single-pas perfusion system, growth medium (containing ascorbic acid) was perfused around the 4 x 6 in. pieces of mesh at specific flow rates determined by nutrient consumption and waste production rates. The flow rates used for this system indicate that a diffusion-limited regime exists with a mean residence time greater than 1 h for essential nutrients and factors. By controlling glucose concentrations in the system to a delta of 0.70 g/L from the inlet to the outlet of the bioreactor, it took 6 fewer days to grow a tissue similar to that produced by the static system. PMID:18615797