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Sample records for adh1 locus region

  1. Influence of ADH1B polymorphism on alcohol use and its subjective effects in a Jewish population.

    PubMed

    Carr, Lucinda G; Foroud, Tatiana; Stewart, Trent; Castelluccio, Peter; Edenberg, Howard J; Li, Ting-Kai

    2002-10-01

    Class I alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs) are the principal enzymes responsible for ethanol metabolism in humans. Genetic polymorphism at the ADH1B locus (old nomenclature ADH2) results in isozymes with quite different catalytic properties. The frequency of the ADH1B*2 allele varies among ethnic groups. ADH1B*2 is most often observed in Asian populations, and has been shown to be protective against alcoholism. The Jewish population has a higher frequency of the ADH1B*2 allele and lower rates of alcohol-related problems as compared to other Caucasian populations. Thus, it would be of interest to determine whether the ADH1B*2 allele is associated with alcohol consumption and its subjective effects in this group. Four groups of Jewish subjects (male and female college-age samples, and male and female general samples) were recruited from the same region of the United States. All subjects completed a questionnaire to delineate alcohol consumption and its subjective consequences. Genotype at the ADH1B locus was determined for each participant. ADH1B*2 allele frequencies were similar for the Jewish college-age and general population samples. Men in both the college-age and general population in the ADH1B*2 group reported more unpleasant reactions following alcohol consumption than men in the ADH1B*1 group. Men in the general population in the ADH1B*2 group drank alcohol less frequently than men who were homozygous ADH1B*1; there was a similar trend among the women. The ADH1B polymorphism is associated with unpleasant reactions after alcohol consumption, and frequency of alcohol consumption in these Jewish samples. PMID:12244546

  2. A genetic analysis of Adh1 regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Freeling, M.

    1992-01-01

    The overall goal of our research proposal is to understand the meaning of the various cis-acting sites responsible for AdH1 expression in the entire maize plant. Progress is reported in the following areas: Studies on the TATA box and analysis of revertants of the Adh1-3F1124 allele; screening for more different mutants that affect Adh1 expression differentially; studies on cis-acting sequences required for root-specific Adh1 expression; refinement of the use of the particle gun; and functional analysis of a non- glycolytic anaerobic protein.

  3. Delineation of Cis-Acting Sequences Required for Expression of Drosophila Mojavensis Adh-1

    PubMed Central

    Bayer, C. A.; Curtiss, S. W.; Weaver, J. A.; Sullivan, D. T.

    1992-01-01

    The control of expression of the Adh-1 gene of Drosophila mojavensis has been analyzed by transforming ADH null Drosophila melanogaster hosts with P element constructs which contain D. mojavensis Adh-1 having deletions of different extent in the 5' and 3' ends. Adh-1 expression in the D. melanogaster hosts is qualitatively similar to expression in D. mojavensis, although expression is quantitatively lower in transformants. Deletions of the 5' end indicate that information required for normal temporal and tissue expression in larvae is contained within 70 bp of the transcription start site. However, deletion constructs to -70 are deficient in ovarian nurse cell expression, whereas the additional upstream sequences present in constructs containing deletions to -257 do support expression in the ovary. Comparison of the nucleotide sequence in the -257 to -70 region of Adh-1 of four species: D. mojavensis and Drosophila arizona, which express Adh-1 in the ovary, and Drosophila mulleri and Drosophila navojoa, which do not, has led to the identification of regions of sequence similarity that correlate with ovary expression. One of these bears a striking similarity to a conserved sequence located upstream of the three heat shock genes that have constitutive ovarian expression and may be an ovarian control element. We have identified an aberrant aspect of Adh-1 expression. In transformants which carry an Adh-1 gene without a functional upstream Adh-2 gene Adh-1 expression continues into the adult stage instead of ceasing at the onset of metamorphosis. In transformants with a functional Adh-2 gene, Adh-1 expression ceases in the third larval instar stage and aberrant expression in the adult stage does not occur. PMID:1317314

  4. Exceptionally High Levels of Restriction Site Polymorphism in DNA near the Maize Adh1 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Johns, Mitrick A.; Strommer, Judith N.; Freeling, Michael

    1983-01-01

    Restriction maps have been prepared for the chromosomal region near seven biochemically and genetically distinct maize alcohol dehydrogenase-1 (Adh1) alleles using a small cDNA probe for Adh1. Five restriction sites spanning about 4 kb in and near the Adh1 transcription unit appear identical in all seven alleles. Outside this conserved region, variation in restriction site position is the rule. Six of the seven alleles are distinguishable, and the alleles appear to fall into four groups. The DNA flanking the 1S-type alleles seems to share no restriction site homology with the DNA near the 1F-type alleles. Several hypotheses are put forward to explain how such high levels of polymorphism could have arisen in a species that has been domesticated for only about 10,000 years. PMID:17246173

  5. High diversity and no significant selection signal of human ADH1B gene in Tibet

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background ADH1B is one of the most studied human genes with many polymorphic sites. One of the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs1229984, coding for the Arg48His substitution, have been associated with many serious diseases including alcoholism and cancers of the digestive system. The derived allele, ADH1B*48His, reaches high frequency only in East Asia and Southwest Asia, and is highly associated with agriculture. Micro-evolutionary study has defined seven haplogroups for ADH1B based on seven SNPs encompassing the gene. Three of those haplogroups, H5, H6, and H7, contain the ADH1B*48His allele. H5 occurs in Southwest Asia and the other two are found in East Asia. H7 is derived from H6 by the derived allele of rs3811801. The H7 haplotype has been shown to have undergone significant positive selection in Han Chinese, Hmong, Koreans, Japanese, Khazak, Mongols, and so on. Methods In the present study, we tested whether Tibetans also showed evidence for selection by typing 23 SNPs in the region covering the ADH1B gene in 1,175 individuals from 12 Tibetan populations representing all districts of the Tibet Autonomous Region. Multiple statistics were estimated to examine the gene diversities and positive selection signals among the Tibetans and other populations in East Asia. Results The larger Tibetan populations (Qamdo, Lhasa, Nagqu, Nyingchi, Shannan, and Shigatse) comprised mostly farmers, have around 12% of H7, and 2% of H6. The smaller populations, living on hunting or recently switched to farming, have lower H7 frequencies (Tingri 9%, Gongbo 8%, Monba and Sherpa 6%). Luoba (2%) and Deng (0%) have even lower frequencies. Long-range haplotype analyses revealed very weak signals of positive selection for H7 among Tibetans. Interestingly, the haplotype diversity of H7 is higher in Tibetans than in any other populations studied, indicating a longer diversification history for that haplogroup in Tibetans. Network analysis on the long-range haplotypes revealed

  6. Genetic polymorphisms of ADH1B, ADH1C and ALDH2 in Turkish alcoholics: lack of association with alcoholism and alcoholic cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Vatansever, Sezgin; Tekin, Fatih; Salman, Esin; Altintoprak, Ender; Coskunol, Hakan; Akarca, Ulus Salih

    2015-01-01

    No data exists regarding the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) gene polymorphisms in Turkish alcoholic cirrhotics. We studied the polymorphisms of ADH1B, ADH1C and ALDH2 genes in alcoholic cirrhotics and compared the results with non-cirrhotic alcoholics and healthy volunteers. Overall, 237 subjects were included for the study: 156 alcoholic patients (78 cirrhotics, 78 non-cirrhotic alcoholics) and 81 healthy volunteers. Three different single-nucleotide-polymorphism genotyping methods were used. ADH1C genotyping was performed using a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. The identified ADH1C genotypes were named according to the presence or absence of the enzyme restriction sites. ADH1B (Arg47Hys) genotyping was performed using the allele specific primer extension method, and ALDH2 (Glu487Lys) genotyping was performed by a multiplex polymerase chain reaction using two allele-specific primer pairs. For ADH1B, the frequency of allele *1 in the cirrhotics, non-cirrhotic alcoholics and healthy volunteers was 97.4%, 94.9% and 99.4%, respectively. For ADH1C, the frequency of allele *1 in the cirrhotics, non-cirrhotic alcoholics and healthy volunteers was 47%, 36.3% and 45%, respectively. There was no statistical difference between the groups for ADH1B and ADH1C (p>0.05). All alcoholic and non-alcoholic subjects (100%) had the allele *1 for ALDH2. The obtained results for ADH1B, ADH1C, and ALDH gene polymorphisms in the present study are similar to the results of Caucasian studies. ADH1B and ADH1C genetic variations are not related to the development of alcoholism or susceptibility to alcoholic cirrhosis. ALDH2 gene has no genetic variation in the Turkish population. PMID:26042511

  7. A genetic analysis of Adh1 regulation. Progress report, June 1991--February 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Freeling, M.

    1992-03-01

    The overall goal of our research proposal is to understand the meaning of the various cis-acting sites responsible for AdH1 expression in the entire maize plant. Progress is reported in the following areas: Studies on the TATA box and analysis of revertants of the Adh1-3F1124 allele; screening for more different mutants that affect Adh1 expression differentially; studies on cis-acting sequences required for root-specific Adh1 expression; refinement of the use of the particle gun; and functional analysis of a non- glycolytic anaerobic protein.

  8. ADH1A variation predisposes to personality traits and substance dependence

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Lingjun; Gelernter, Joel; Kranzler, Henry R.; Stein, Murray B.; Zhang, Huiping; Wei, Feng; Sen, Srijan; Poling, James; Luo, Xingguang

    2010-01-01

    Background Human personality traits are strong predictors or characteristics of many psychiatric disorders including substance dependence (SD). Recently, significant associations between ADH1A and SD have been reported, which led us to investigate the impact of ADH1A variation on personality traits and risk of SD. Methods Five hundred fifty-eight subjects with SD [398 European-Americans (EAs) and 160 African-Americans (AAs)], 517 college students (384 EAs and 133 European-origin Hispanics) and 448 healthy subjects (385 EAs, 48 AAs and 15 European-origin Hispanics) participated. Personality traits were assessed in 247 subjects with SD (179 EAs and 68 AAs), all 517 college students, and 332 healthy subjects (285 EAs, 40 AAs and 7 European-origin Hispanics). The relationships between ADH1A and personality traits were comprehensively examined using stepwise multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA), and then decomposed by stepwise analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). The relationship between ADH1A and SD was examined using stepwise logistic regression analysis. Admixture effects on analyses were considered. Results Overall, Agreeableness and Conscientiousness were associated with the diplotypes, haplotypes, genotypes and/or alleles of ADH1A in three of four phenotype groups including European-American SD subjects, healthy subjects, and African-American SD subjects (1.7×10-4≤p≤0.055), but not college students. Neuroticism was associated with diplotype, haplotypes and genotypes in African-American SD subjects (0.001≤p≤0.031). In addition, SD was associated with diplotypes, haplotypes, genotypes and/or alleles of ADH1A (0.008≤p≤0.060). Conclusions The present study demonstrates that the ADH1A variation may contribute to the genetic component of variation in personality traits and SD. PMID:19526455

  9. Which alcohol use disorder criteria contribute to the association of ADH1B with alcohol dependence?

    PubMed

    Hart, Amy B; Lynch, Kevin G; Farrer, Lindsay; Gelernter, Joel; Kranzler, Henry R

    2016-07-01

    Although alcohol dependence (AD) is approximately 50% heritable, little is known about how specific genetic loci affect AD risk. In a genome-wide association study (GWAS), we identified highly significant associations between two population-specific functional variants in the alcohol dehydrogenase 1B gene (ADH1B) and AD in African-Americans (AAs; rs2066702) and European-Americans (EAs; rs1229984). In the current study, we determined which specific diagnostic criteria contributed to the observed associations of ADH1B SNPs with AD. Our analysis included both the DSM-IV and DSM-5 diagnostic systems. We also investigated the relationship of ADH1B variants to the maximum number of drinks consumed in a 24-hour period (MaxDrinks), a presumed intermediate phenotype of AD. We found that, although all criteria made strong individual contributions to the associations, the largest contributions came from those reflecting neuroadaptation: tolerance (rs2066702) and withdrawal (rs1229984). Overall, evidence for association with DSM-5 criteria was slightly stronger than for DSM-IV criteria. For rs2066702, results were similar for DSM-IV and DSM-5 criteria. However, the most significant DSM-5 criterion associated with rs1229984 was alcohol-related social/interpersonal problems. Both ADH1B variants were associated with MaxDrinks, a measure of innate tolerance, and MaxDrinks mediated the associations between ADH1B and alcohol outcomes. We replicated the findings for rs2066702 and tolerance in an independent sample of AAs. Taken together, these results suggest that variation in ADH1B affects the adaptation to heavy drinking, highlighting population-specific differences in genetic risk for AUD. They also suggest that the revisions reflected in DSM-5 AUD may enhance the utility of that diagnosis for gene finding. PMID:25828809

  10. Meta-Analyses of ALDH2 and ADH1B with Alcohol Dependence in Asians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luczak, Susan E.; Glatt, Stephen J.; Wall, Tamara J.

    2006-01-01

    Meta-analyses were conducted to determine the magnitude of relationships between polymorphisms in 2 genes, ALDH2 and ADH1B, with alcohol dependence in Asians. For each gene, possession of 1 variant [asterisk]2 allele was protective against alcohol dependence, and possession of a 2nd [asterisk]2 allele did not offer significant additional…

  11. Polymorphisms in Alcohol Metabolism Genes ADH1B and ALDH2, Alcohol Consumption and Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Crous-Bou, Marta; Rennert, Gad; Cuadras, Daniel; Salazar, Ramon; Cordero, David; Saltz Rennert, Hedy; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Kopelovich, Levy; Monroe Lipkin, Steven; Bernard Gruber, Stephen; Moreno, Victor

    2013-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Epidemiological risk factors for CRC included alcohol intake, which is mainly metabolized to acetaldehyde by alcohol dehydrogenase and further oxidized to acetate by aldehyde dehydrogenase; consequently, the role of genes in the alcohol metabolism pathways is of particular interest. The aim of this study is to analyze the association between SNPs in ADH1B and ALDH2 genes and CRC risk, and also the main effect of alcohol consumption on CRC risk in the study population. Methodology/Principal Findings SNPs from ADH1B and ALDH2 genes, included in alcohol metabolism pathway, were genotyped in 1694 CRC cases and 1851 matched controls from the Molecular Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer study. Information on clinicopathological characteristics, lifestyle and dietary habits were also obtained. Logistic regression and association analysis were conducted. A positive association between alcohol consumption and CRC risk was observed in male participants from the Molecular Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer study (MECC) study (OR = 1.47; 95%CI = 1.18-1.81). Moreover, the SNPs rs1229984 in ADH1B gene was found to be associated with CRC risk: under the recessive model, the OR was 1.75 for A/A genotype (95%CI = 1.21-2.52; p-value = 0.0025). A path analysis based on structural equation modeling showed a direct effect of ADH1B gene polymorphisms on colorectal carcinogenesis and also an indirect effect mediated through alcohol consumption. Conclusions/Significance Genetic polymorphisms in the alcohol metabolism pathways have a potential role in colorectal carcinogenesis, probably due to the differences in the ethanol metabolism and acetaldehyde oxidation of these enzyme variants. PMID:24282520

  12. Alcohol Consumption Mediates the Relationship Between ADH1B and DSM-IV Alcohol Use Disorder and Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Kilcoyne, Bari; Shmulewitz, Dvora; Meyers, Jacquelyn L; Aharonovich, Efrat; Greenstein, Eliana; Frisch, Amos; Weizman, Abraham; Spivak, Baruch; Edenberg, Howard J; Gelernter, Joel; Hasin, Deborah S

    2014-01-01

    Objective: A single nucleotide variation in the alcohol dehydrogenase 1B (ADH1B) gene, rs1229984, produces an ADH1B enzyme with faster acetaldehyde production. This protective variant is associated with lower alcohol consumption and lower risk for alcohol use disorders (AUDs). Based on the premise that faster ADH1B kinetics decreases alcohol consumption, we formally tested if the association between ADH1B variant rs1229984 and AUDs occurs through consumption. We also tested whether the association between rs1 229984 and each of the 11 Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV), AUD criteria occurs through consumption. Method: A total of 1,130 lifetime drinkers from an Israeli household sample were assessed with a structured interview and genotyped for rs1229984 (protective allele frequency = 0.28). Logistic regression evaluated the association between rs1229984 and each phenotype (AUDs, 11 individual DSM-IV criteria). For phenotypes significantly related to rs1229984, the effect through consumption was tested with logistic regression and bootstrapping. Results: ADH1B rs1229984 was significantly associated with AUDs and six criteria, with odds ratios ranging from 1.32 to 1.96. The effect through consumption was significant for these relationships, explaining 23%–74% of the total ADH1B effect. Conclusions: This is the first study to show that ADH1B rs1229984 is related to 6 of the 11 DSM-IV AUD criteria and that alcohol consumption explained a significant proportion of these associations and the association of ADH1B with AUDs. Better understanding of the relationship between ADH1B and the DSM-IV AUD criteria, including effects through consumption, will enhance our understanding of the etiologic model through which AUDs can occur. PMID:24988262

  13. Childhood adversity moderates the effect of ADH1B on risk for alcohol-related phenotypes in Jewish Israeli drinkers.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Jacquelyn L; Shmulewitz, Dvora; Wall, Melanie M; Keyes, Katherine M; Aharonovich, Efrat; Spivak, Baruch; Weizman, Abraham; Frisch, Amos; Edenberg, Howard J; Gelernter, Joel; Grant, Bridget F; Hasin, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Childhood adversity and genetic variant ADH1B-rs1229984 have each been shown to influence heavy alcohol consumption and disorders. However, little is known about how these factors jointly influence these outcomes. We assessed the main and additive interactive effects of childhood adversity (abuse, neglect and parental divorce) and the ADH1B-rs1229984 on the quantitative phenotypes 'maximum drinks in a day' (Maxdrinks) and DSM-Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD) severity, adjusting for demographic variables, in an Israeli sample of adult household residents (n = 1143) evaluated between 2007 and 2009. Childhood adversity and absence of the protective ADH1B-rs1229984 A allele were associated with greater mean Maxdrinks (mean differences: 1.50; 1.13, respectively) and AUD severity (mean ratios: 0.71; 0.27, respectively). In addition, childhood adversity moderated the ADH1B-rs1229984 effect on Maxdrinks (P < 0.01) and AUD severity (P < 0.05), in that there was a stronger effect of ADH1B-rs1229984 genotype on Maxdrinks and AUD severity among those who had experienced childhood adversity compared with those who had not. ADH1B-rs1229984 impacts alcohol metabolism. Therefore, among those at risk for greater consumption, e.g. those who experienced childhood adversity, ADH1B-rs1229984 appears to have a stronger effect on alcohol consumption and consequently on risk for AUD symptom severity. Evidence for the interaction of genetic vulnerability and early life adversity on alcohol-related phenotypes provides further insight into the complex relationships between genetic and environmental risk factors. PMID:24164917

  14. Childhood adversity moderates the effect of ADH1B on risk for alcohol-related phenotypes in Jewish Israeli drinkers

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, Jacquelyn L.; Shmulewitz, Dvora; Wall, Melanie M.; Keyes, Katherine M.; Aharonovich, Efrat; Spivak, Baruch; Weizman, Abraham; Frisch, Amos; Edenberg, Howard J.; Gelernter, Joel; Grant, Bridget F.; Hasin, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Childhood adversity and genetic variant ADH1B-rs1229984 have each been shown to influence heavy alcohol consumption and disorders. However, little is known about how these factors jointly influence these outcomes. We assessed the main and additive interactive effects of childhood adversity (abuse, neglect, parental divorce) and the ADH1B-rs1229984 on the quantitative phenotypes “maximum drinks in a day” (Maxdrinks) and DSM-Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD) severity, adjusting for demographic variables, in an Israeli sample of adult household residents (n=1,143) evaluated between 2007–2009. Childhood adversity and absence of the protective ADH1B-rs1229984 A allele were associated with greater mean Maxdrinks [Mean Differences: 1.50; 1.13 respectively] and AUD severity [Mean Ratios: 0.71; 0.27 respectively]). In addition, childhood adversity moderated the ADH1B-rs1229984 effect on Maxdrinks (p<0.01) and AUD severity (p<0.05), in that there was a stronger effect of ADH1B-rs1229984 genotype on Maxdrinks and AUD severity among those who had experienced childhood adversity compared to those who had not. ADH1B-rs1229984 impacts alcohol metabolism. Therefore, among those at risk for greater consumption, e.g., those who experienced childhood adversity, ADH1B-rs1229984 appears to have a stronger effect on alcohol consumption and consequently on risk for AUD symptom severity. Evidence for the interaction of genetic vulnerability and early life adversity on alcohol-related phenotypes provides further insight into the complex relationships between genetic and environmental risk factors. PMID:24164917

  15. Selection variability for Arg48His in alcohol dehydrogenase ADH1B among Asian populations.

    PubMed

    Evsyukov, Alexey; Ivanov, Denis

    2013-08-01

    The variant His at codon 48 of the alcohol dehydrogenase gene (ADH1B) results in more efficient ethanol metabolism than with the "typical" codon 48Arg. In this study we introduced selection properties of Arg48His genotypes of ADH1B and estimated fitness in four ethnic-geographical clusters in Asia. Population genetics models were employed that derive observed gene frequencies from fitness relationships among genotypes, to infer the selection pattern of polymorphisms in an indirect manner. The data were analyzed using the model of "complete stationary distribution" by Wright that takes into account random genetic drift, pressure of migrations, mutations, and selection as influential factors of gene frequency. We found that the different population groups showed some variation in the types of selection for Arg48His. Han Chinese from eastern and southeastern China and the Japanese and Korean populations showed stabilizing selection, while the groups from Central Asian and Indochina showed divergent selection. However, all the groups demonstrated a strong positive selection for Arg48His. PMID:25019189

  16. Improvement of tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to hot-compressed water-treated cellulose by expression of ADH1.

    PubMed

    Jayakody, Lahiru N; Horie, Kenta; Hayashi, Nobuyuki; Kitagaki, Hiroshi

    2012-04-01

    Hot-compressed water treatment of cellulose and hemicellulose for subsequent bioethanol production is a novel, economically feasible, and nonhazardous method for recovering sugars. However, the hot-compressed water-treated cellulose and hemicellulose inhibit subsequent ethanol fermentation by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To overcome this problem, we engineered a yeast strain with improved tolerance to hot-compressed water-treated cellulose. We first determined that glycolaldehyde has a greater inhibitory effect than 5-HMF and furfural and a combinational effect with them. On the basis of the hypothesis that the reduction of glycolaldehyde to ethylene glycol should detoxify glycolaldehyde, we developed a strain overexpressing the alcohol dehydrogenase gene ADH1. The ADH1-overexpressing strain exhibits an improved fermentation profile in a glycolaldehyde-containing medium. The conversion ratio of glycolaldehyde to ethylene glycol is 30 ± 1.9% when the control strain is used; this ratio increases to 77 ± 3.6% in the case of the ADH1-overexpressing strain. A glycolaldehyde treatment and the overexpression of ADH1 cause changes in the fermentation products so as to balance the metabolic carbon flux and the redox status. Finally, the ADH1-overexpressing strain shows a statistically significantly improved fermentation profile in a hot-compressed water-treated cellulose-containing medium. The conversion ratio of glycolaldehyde to ethylene glycol is 33 ± 0.85% when the control strain is used but increases to 72 ± 1.7% in the case of the ADH1-overexpressing strain. These results show that the reduction of glycolaldehyde to ethylene glycol is a promising strategy to decrease the toxicity of hot-compressed water-treated cellulose. This is the first report on the improvement of yeast tolerance to hot-compressed water-treated cellulose and glycolaldehyde. PMID:22311646

  17. Unexpected properties of NADP-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH-1) in Trichomonas vaginalis and other microaerophilic parasites.

    PubMed

    Leitsch, David; Williams, Catrin F; Lloyd, David; Duchêne, Michael

    2013-07-01

    Our previous observation that NADP-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH-1) is down-regulated in metronidazole-resistant Trichomonas vaginalis isolates prompted us to further characterise the enzyme. In addition to its canonical enzyme activity as a secondary alcohol dehydrogenase, a pronounced, so far unknown, background NADPH-oxidising activity in absence of any added substrate was observed when the recombinant enzyme or T. vaginalis extract were used. This activity was strongly enhanced at low oxygen concentrations. Unexpectedly, all functions of ADH-1 were efficiently inhibited by coenzyme A which is a cofactor of a number of key enzymes in T. vaginalis metabolism, i.e. pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR). These observations could be extended to Entamoeba histolytica and Tritrichomonas foetus, both of which have a homologue of ADH-1, but not to Giardia lamblia which lacks an NADP-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase. Although we could not identify the substrate of the observed background activity, we propose that ADH-1 functions as a major sink for NADPH in microaerophilic parasites at low oxygen tension. PMID:23578856

  18. Interaction of vitamin A supplementation level with ADH1C genotype on intramuscular fat in beef steers.

    PubMed

    Krone, K G; Ward, A K; Madder, K M; Hendrick, S; McKinnon, J J; Buchanan, F C

    2016-03-01

    Previously, the single nucleotide polymorphism in alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH1C c.-64T>C) was shown to have an association with intramuscular fat (IMF) in the longissimus thoracis (LT) muscle when vitamin A was limited in finishing rations of beef steers. The purpose of this study was to determine the optimum vitamin A supplementation level, in combination with ADH1C genotype, to increase IMF of the LT muscle. In total, 45 TT genotype, 45 CT and 27 CC Black Angus crossbred steers were backgrounded on a commercial ration containing 3360 IU vitamin A/kg dry matter (DM). During finishing, the steers were randomly assigned to one of three vitamin A treatments at 25%, 50% and 75% of the National Research Council recommendation of 2200 IU/kg DM. Treatments were administered via an oral bolus. Carcass quality was evaluated and a sample from the LT muscle was collected for analysis of IMF. A treatment×genotype interaction (P=0.04) was observed for IMF; TT steers on the 75% treatment had higher IMF relative to CT and CC steers on the same treatment. Western blot analysis showed that TT steers had higher (P=0.02) ADH1C protein expression in hepatic tissue. Previously, TT steers exhibited increased IMF when fed limited vitamin A. In the current study, the lack of variation in IMF between treatments and genotypes at the lower vitamin A treatment levels was likely due to the majority of the steers grading Canada AAA (USDA Choice). However, the western blot data supports that TT steers are expected to have higher IMF deposition, due to an increased production of ADH1C. The interaction between ADH1C genotype and vitamin A supplementation level has the potential for use in marker-assisted management programs to target niche markets based on increased marbling. PMID:26511067

  19. New cis-regulatory elements in the Rht-D1b locus region of wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fifteen gene-containing BACs with accumulated length of 1.82-Mb from the Rht-D1b locus region weresequenced and compared in detail with the orthologous regions of rice, sorghum, and maize. Our results show that Rht-D1b represents a conserved genomic region as implied by high gene sequence identity...

  20. CvADH1, a member of short-chain alcohol dehydrogenase family, is inducible by gibberellin and sucrose in developing watermelon seeds.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joonyul; Kang, Hong-Gyu; Jun, Sung-Hoon; Lee, Jinwon; Yim, Jieun; An, Gynheung

    2003-01-01

    To understand the molecular mechanisms that control seed formation, we selected a seed-preferential gene (CvADH1) from the ESTs of developing watermelon seeds. RNA blot analysis and in situ localization showed that CvADH1 was preferentially expressed in the nucellar tissue. The CvADH1 protein shared about 50% homology with short-chain alcohol dehydrogenase including ABA2 in Arabidopsis thaliana, stem secoisolariciresinol dehydrogenase in Forsythia intermedia, and 3beta-hydroxysterol dehydrogenase in Digitalis lanata. We investigated gene-expression levels in seeds from both normally pollinated fruits and those made parthenocarpic via N-(2-chloro-4-pyridyl)-N'-phenylurea treatment, the latter of which lack zygotic tissues. Whereas the transcripts of CvADH1 rapidly started to accumulate from about the pre-heart stage in normal seeds, they were not detectable in the parthenocarpic seeds. Treating the parthenogenic fruit with GA(3) strongly induced gene expression, up to the level accumulated in pollinated seeds. These results suggest that the CvADH1 gene is induced in maternal tissues by signals made in the zygotic tissues, and that gibberellin might be one of those signals. We also observed that CvADH1 expression was induced by sucrose in the parthenocarpic seeds. Therefore, we propose that the CvADH1 gene is inducible by gibberellin, and that sucrose plays an important role in the maternal tissues of watermelon during early seed development. PMID:12552151

  1. The Adh1 gene of the fungus Metarhizium anisopliae is expressed during insect colonization and required for full virulence.

    PubMed

    Callejas-Negrete, Olga Alicia; Torres-Guzmán, Juan Carlos; Padilla-Guerrero, Israel Enrique; Esquivel-Naranjo, Ulises; Padilla-Ballesteros, Maria Fernanda; García-Tapia, Adriana; Schrank, Augusto; Salazar-Solís, Eduardo; Gutiérrez-Corona, Félix; González-Hernández, Gloria Angélica

    2015-03-01

    Zymography of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity in the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae grown under various conditions revealed that micro-aerobic growth was associated with increased ADH activity. The major ADH protein, AdhIp, was purified to homogeneity by affinity chromatography and has an estimated molecular weight of 41kDa and an isoelectric point (pI) of 6.4. Peptide mass fingerprint analysis allowed the identification and cloning of the gene that encodes this protein, Adh1, as annotated in the M. anisopliae genome database. AdhIp is related to the medium-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (MDR)/zinc-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase-like family and contains conserved ADH sequence motifs, such as the zinc-containing ADH signature, the FAD/NAD binding domain and amino acid residues that are conserved in most microbial ADHs. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that Adh1 gene expression occurs at low levels during early Plutella xylostella infection and that the Adh1 gene was primarily expressed at larval death and as mycelia emerge from the insect cuticle before conidiation. Antisense-RNA experiments indicated that NAD(+)-dependent ADH activity was diminished by 20-75% in the transformants, and the transformants that had lower ADH activity showed allyl alcohol resistance, which indicates that reduction in ADH activity also occurs in vivo. Bioassays performed using antisense adh1 transformants, which have lower ADH activity, showed that LC50 values were two to five times higher than the wild-type, indicating that AdhIp is required for full capability of the fungus to penetrate and/or colonize the insect. PMID:25534970

  2. Alcohol dehydrogenase 1C (ADH1C) gene polymorphism and alcoholic liver cirrhosis risk: a meta analysis

    PubMed Central

    He, Lei; Deng, Tao; Luo, He-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    The association between alcohol dehydrogenase 1C (ADH1C) gene polymorphism and alcoholic liver cirrhosis (ALC) has been analyzed in several studies, but results have been conflicting. In this study, a meta-analysis was performed to assess the associations between the ADH1C polymorphism and risk of ALC. Relevant studies were identified using PubMed, Web of Science, CNKI and Wanfang databases up to January 10, 2015. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to assess the strength of the association using the fixed or random effect model. A total of 16 case-control studies, including 1375 cases and 1802 controls, were included. Overall, no significant association between the ADH1C polymorphism and ALC risk was found (dominant model: OR=0.87, 95% CI: 0.62-1.23; recessive model: OR=1.30, 95% CI: 0.84-1.99; *1/*2 vs. *1/*1: OR=0.87, 95% CI: 0.63-1.21; *2/*2 vs. *1/*1: OR=1.10, 95% CI: 0.71-1.70). In the subgroup analysis by ethnicity, we observed a significant association in Asian descent (*1/*2 vs. *1/*1: OR=1.63, 95% CI: 1.07-2.49), while a decreased risk was found among Caucasians (dominant model: OR=0.81, 95% CI: 0.66-0.99; *1/*2 vs. *1/*1: OR=0.76, 95% CI: 0.61-0.95). This meta-analysis demonstrated that the ADH1C polymorphism might increase the risk of ALC in Asians, while it may be a protective factor for ALC among Caucasians. PMID:26379912

  3. Activity of Yeast Alcohol Dehydrogenases on Benzyl Alcohols and Benzaldehydes. Characterization of ADH1 from Saccharomyces carlsbergensis and Transition State Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Suresh; Park, Doo-Hong; Plapp, Bryce V.

    2009-01-01

    The substrate specificities of yeast alcohol dehydrogenases I and II from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (SceADH1 and SceADH2) and Saccharomyces carlsbergensis (ScbADH1) were studied. For this work, the gene for the S. carlsbergensis ADH1 was cloned, sequenced and expressed. The amino acid sequence of ScbADH1 differs at four positions as compared to SceADH1, including substitutions of two glutamine residues with glutamic acid residues, and has the same sequence as the commercial yeast enzyme, which apparently is prepared from S. carlsbergensis. The electrophoretic mobilities of ScbADH1, SceADH2 and commercial ADH are similar. The kinetics and specificities of ScbADH1 and SceADH1 acting on branched, long-chain and benzyl alcohols are very similar, but the catalytic efficiency of SceADH2 is about 10 to 100-fold higher on these substrates. A three dimensional structure of SceADH1 shows that the substrate binding pocket has Met-270, whereas SceADH2 has Leu-270, which allows larger substrates to bind. The reduction of a series of p-substituted benzaldehydes catalyzed by SceADH2 is significantly enhanced by electron-withdrawing groups, whereas the oxidation of p-substituted aromatic alcohols may be only slightly affected by the substituents. The substituent effects on catalysis generally reflect the effects on the equilibrium constant for the reaction, where electron-withdrawing substituents favor alcohol. The results are consistent with a transition state that is electronically similar to the alcohol, supporting previous results obtained with commercial yeast ADH. PMID:19022233

  4. Molecular characterization of a region of DNA associated with mutations at the agouti locus in the mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Bultman, S J; Russell, L B; Gutierrez-Espeleta, G A; Woychik, R P

    1991-01-01

    Molecular characterization of a radiation-induced agouti (a)-locus mutation has resulted in the isolation of a segment of DNA that maps at or near the a locus on chromosome 2 in the mouse. This region of DNA is deleted in several radiation- or chemical-induced homozygous-lethal a-locus mutations and is associated with specific DNA structural alterations in two viable a-locus mutations. We propose that DNA probes from this region of chromosome 2 will be useful for ultimately characterizing the individual gene or genes associated with a-locus function. Images PMID:1896452

  5. Epigenetic Regulation of Individual Modules of the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus 3' Regulatory Region.

    PubMed

    Birshtein, Barbara K

    2014-01-01

    The Igh locus undergoes an amazing array of DNA rearrangements and modifications during B cell development. During early stages, the variable region gene is constructed from constituent variable (V), diversity (D), and joining (J) segments (VDJ joining). B cells that successfully express an antibody can be activated, leading to somatic hypermutation (SHM) focused on the variable region, and class switch recombination (CSR), which substitutes downstream constant region genes for the originally used Cμ constant region gene. Many investigators, ourselves included, have sought to understand how these processes specifically target the Igh locus and avoid other loci and potential deleterious consequences of malignant transformation. Our laboratory has concentrated on a complex regulatory region (RR) that is located downstream of Cα, the most 3' of the Igh constant region genes. The ~40 kb 3' RR, which is predicted to serve as a downstream major regulator of the Igh locus, contains two distinct segments: an ~28 kb region comprising four enhancers, and an adjacent ~12 kb region containing multiple CTCF and Pax5 binding sites. Analysis of targeted mutations in mice by a number of investigators has concluded that the entire 3' RR enhancer region is essential for SHM and CSR (but not for VDJ joining) and for high levels of expression of multiple isotypes. The CTCF/Pax5 binding region is a candidate for influencing VDJ joining early in B cell development and serving as a potential insulator of the Igh locus. Components of the 3' RR are subject to a variety of epigenetic changes during B cell development, i.e., DNAse I hypersensitivity, histone modifications, and DNA methylation, in association with transcription factor binding. I propose that these changes provide a foundation by which regulatory elements in modules of the 3' RR function by interacting with each other and with target sequences of the Igh locus. PMID:24795714

  6. Unusually high recombination rate detected in the sex locus region of the honey bee (Apis mellifera).

    PubMed Central

    Beye, M; Hunt, G J; Page, R E; Fondrk, M K; Grohmann, L; Moritz, R F

    1999-01-01

    Sex determination in Hymenoptera is controlled by haplo-diploidy in which unfertilized eggs develop into fertile haploid males. A single sex determination locus with several complementary alleles was proposed for Hymenoptera [so-called complementary sex determination (CSD)]. Heterozygotes at the sex determination locus are normal, fertile females, whereas diploid zygotes that are homozygous develop into sterile males. This results in a strong heterozygote advantage, and the sex locus exhibits extreme polymorphism maintained by overdominant selection. We characterized the sex-determining region by genetic linkage and physical mapping analyses. Detailed linkage and physical mapping studies showed that the recombination rate is <44 kb/cM in the sex-determining region. Comparing genetic map distance along the linkage group III in three crosses revealed a large marker gap in the sex-determining region, suggesting that the recombination rate is high. We suggest that a "hotspot" for recombination has resulted here because of selection for combining favorable genotypes, and perhaps as a result of selection against deleterious mutations. The mapping data, based on long-range restriction mapping, suggest that the Q DNA-marker is within 20,000 bp of the sex locus, which should accelerate molecular analyses. PMID:10581277

  7. Further mapping of an ataxia-telangiectasia locus to the chromosome 11q23 region.

    PubMed Central

    Sanal, O; Wei, S; Foroud, T; Malhotra, U; Concannon, P; Charmley, P; Salser, W; Lange, K; Gatti, R A

    1990-01-01

    We recently mapped the gene for ataxia-telangiectasia group A (ATA) to chromosome 11q22-23 by linkage analysis, using the genetic markers THY1 and pYNB3.12 (D11S144). The most likely order was cent-AT-S144-THY1. The present paper describes further mapping of the AT locus by means of a panel of 10 markers that span approximately 60 cM in the 11q22-23 region centered around S144 and THY1. Location scores indicate that three contiguous subsegments within the [S144-THY1] segment, as well as three contiguous segments telomeric to THY1, are each unlikely to contain the AT locus, while the more centromeric [STMY-S144] segment is most likely to contain the AT locus. These data, together with recent refinements in the linkage and physical maps of 11q22-23, place the AT locus at 11q23. PMID:2220826

  8. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) and alcohol dehydrogenase 1B (ADH1B) polymorphisms exacerbate bladder cancer risk associated with alcohol drinking: gene-environment interaction.

    PubMed

    Masaoka, Hiroyuki; Ito, Hidemi; Soga, Norihito; Hosono, Satoyo; Oze, Isao; Watanabe, Miki; Tanaka, Hideo; Yokomizo, Akira; Hayashi, Norio; Eto, Masatoshi; Matsuo, Keitaro

    2016-06-01

    Although a range of chemical exposures (cigarette smoking and occupational exposure) are recognized risk factors for the development of bladder cancer (BCa), many epidemiological studies have demonstrated that alcohol drinking is not associated with BCa risk. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2; rs671, Glu504Lys) and alcohol dehydrogenase 1B (ADH1B; rs1229984, His47Arg) polymorphisms impact the accumulation of acetaldehyde, resulting in an increased risk of various cancers. To date, however, no studies evaluating the association between BCa risk and alcohol drinking have considered these polymorphisms. Here, we conducted a matched case-control study to investigate whether ALDH2 and ADH1B polymorphisms influence BCa risk associated with alcohol drinking. Cases were 74 BCa patients and controls were 740 first-visit outpatients without cancer at Aichi Cancer Center Hospital between January 2001 and December 2005. Odds ratio (OR), 95% confidence interval (CI) and gene-environment interaction were assessed by conditional logistic regression analysis with adjustment for potential confounders. Results showed that ALDH2 Glu/Lys was associated with a significantly increased risk of BCa compared with Glu/Glu (OR 2.03, 95% CI 1.14-3.62, P = 0.017). In contrast, ALDH2 Glu/Lys showed no increase in risk among the stratum of never drinkers compared with Glu/Glu, indicating a gene-environment interaction. ADH1B His/Arg had an OR of 1.98 (1.20-3.24, P = 0.007) compared with His/His. ADH1B Arg+ showed a similar OR and 95% CI. Individuals with ALDH2 Glu/Lys and ADH1B Arg+ had the highest risk of BCa compared with ALDH2 Glu/Glu and ADH1B His/His [OR 4.00 (1.81-8.87), P = 0.001]. PMID:26992901

  9. Transcription mapping of the region containing the locus for Treacher Collins syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, C.A.; Gallardo, T.D.; Li, X.

    1994-09-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome, an autosomal dominant craniofacial disorder and the most common mandibulofacial dysostosis disorder, has been genetically localized to chromosome 5q32. We have previously constructed a YAC contig of approximately 3 megabases cross the region that includes this locus. A single 1.6 Mb YAC from within this contig contains the genetic markers that flank the disease locus as well as two known genes, osteonectin (SPARC) and annexin VI (ANX6). This was converted to cosmid clones by using inter-Alu PCR products from the YAC to screen the LANL chromosome 5-specific cosmid library. One hundred and seventy five cosmids covering the candidate interval were used in a direct selection strategy to enrich for cDNAs encoded by this region. Over 30 selected cDNAs derived from fetal face, fetal brain, activated T cells, placenta, and fetal cranial tissues have been mapped to the region and DNA sequenced. The majority of these cDNAs show little or no homology to previously described DNA sequences. However, one known gene encoding the G (M2) activator protein was selected as a cDNA and mapped to the region immediately flanking the ANX6 locus. A partial cosmid contig covering the critical interval was built from the cosmids by a combination of end walking and fingerprinting methods. Additional polymorphic markers developed from the contig have allowed the Treacher Collins critical region to be further refined to less than 500 kb. Full length cDNA clones that map to this smaller critical region are currently being derived and evaluated in affected pedigrees.

  10. A Phylogenetic Analysis of the Genus Fragaria (Strawberry) Using Intron-Containing Sequence from the ADH-1 Gene

    PubMed Central

    DiMeglio, Laura M.; Yu, Hongrun; Davis, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    The genus Fragaria encompasses species at ploidy levels ranging from diploid to decaploid. The cultivated strawberry, Fragaria×ananassa, and its two immediate progenitors, F. chiloensis and F. virginiana, are octoploids. To elucidate the ancestries of these octoploid species, we performed a phylogenetic analysis using intron-containing sequences of the nuclear ADH-1 gene from 39 germplasm accessions representing nineteen Fragaria species and one outgroup species, Dasiphora fruticosa. All trees from Maximum Parsimony and Maximum Likelihood analyses showed two major clades, Clade A and Clade B. Each of the sampled octoploids contributed alleles to both major clades. All octoploid-derived alleles in Clade A clustered with alleles of diploid F. vesca, with the exception of one octoploid allele that clustered with the alleles of diploid F. mandshurica. All octoploid-derived alleles in clade B clustered with the alleles of only one diploid species, F. iinumae. When gaps encoded as binary characters were included in the Maximum Parsimony analysis, tree resolution was improved with the addition of six nodes, and the bootstrap support was generally higher, rising above the 50% threshold for an additional nine branches. These results, coupled with the congruence of the sequence data and the coded gap data, validate and encourage the employment of sequence sets containing gaps for phylogenetic analysis. Our phylogenetic conclusions, based upon sequence data from the ADH-1 gene located on F. vesca linkage group II, complement and generally agree with those obtained from analyses of protein-encoding genes GBSSI-2 and DHAR located on F. vesca linkage groups V and VII, respectively, but differ from a previous study that utilized rDNA sequences and did not detect the ancestral role of F. iinumae. PMID:25078607

  11. The Finnish lapphund retinal atrophy locus maps to the centromeric region of CFA9

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre-Hernández, Jesús; Wickström, Kaisa; Sargan, David R

    2007-01-01

    Background Dogs have the second largest number of genetic diseases, after humans. Among the diseases present in dogs, progressive retinal atrophy has been reported in more than a hundred breeds. In some of them, the mutation has been identified and genetic tests have allowed the identification of carriers, thus enabling a drastic reduction in the incidence of the disease. The Finnish lapphund is a dog breed presenting late-onset progressive retinal atrophy for which the disease locus remains unknown. Results In this study we mapped the progressive retinal atrophy locus in the Finnish lapphund using a DNA pooling approach, assuming that all affected dogs within the breed share the same identical-by descent-mutation as the cause of the disease (genetic homogeneity). Autosomal recessive inheritance was also assumed, after ruling out, from pedigree analysis, dominant and X-linked inheritance. DNA from 12 Finnish lapphund cases was mixed in one pool, and DNA from 12 first-degree relatives of these cases was mixed to serve as the control pool. The 2 pools were tested with 133 microsatellite markers, 3 of which showed a shift towards homozygosity in the cases. Individual genotyping with these 3 markers confirmed homozygosity for the GALK1 microsatellite only (chromosome 9). Further individual genotyping with additional samples (4 cases and 59 controls) confirmed the association between this marker and the disease locus (p < 0.001). Closely related to this breed are the Swedish lapphund and the Lapponian herder for which a small number of retinal atrophy cases have been reported. Swedish lapphund cases, but not Lapponian herder cases, had the same GALK1 microsatellite genotype as Finnish lapphund cases. Conclusion The locus for progressive rod-cone degeneration is known to be close to the GALK1 locus, on the telomeric region of chromosome 9, where the retinal atrophy locus of the Finnish lapphund has been mapped. This suggests that the disease in this breed, as well as in

  12. Candidate regions for Waardenburg syndrome type II: Search for a second WS locus

    SciTech Connect

    Nance, W.E.; Pandya, A.; Blanton, S.H.

    1994-09-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by deafness and pigmentary abnormalities such as heterochromia of irides, hypopigmented skin patches, white forlock and premature graying. Clinically the syndrome has been classified into three types. Type II differs from type I in that dystopia canthorum is generally absent, and type III has associated limb anomalies. Recently linkage analysis localized the gene for WSI to chromosome 2q. PAX-3, which is a human analogue of the murine pax-3 locus, maps to this region and mutations in this gene have been found to segregate with WSI. However genetic heterogeneity clearly exists: most if not all WSII families are unlinked to PAX-3 while most if not all WSI cases are linked. We ascertained a four-year-old female child with an interstitial deletion of chromosome 13 who had features of WS including bilateral congenital sensorineural hearing loss, pale blue irides and pinched nostrils as well as hypertelorism microcephaly, bilateral eyelid ptosis, digitalization of thumbs and fifth finger clinodactyly. High resolution chromosomal analysis revealed a de novo interstitial deletion of 13q22-33.2. There was no family history of WS or retardation. A similar deletion in the region of 13q21-32 has been described in a 13-year-old boy with features of WSII. These two cases strongly suggested that this chromosomal region may include a second locus for WS. We have identified eight families with clinical features of WS type I which have been excluded from linkage to the PAX-3 locus. We have typed these families for microsatellite markers spanning chromosome 13. Linkage between WSII and the chromosome 13 markers was excluded in these families. Hirschsprung disease has been associated with WS and it has recently been mapped to chromosome 10q11.2-q21.1. We are currently typing the 8 families for microsatellites in this region.

  13. The human growth hormone gene is regulated by a multicomponent locus control region

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, B.; Cooke, N.E.; Liebhaber, S.A.; Monks, B.R.

    1995-12-01

    This article describes research involving the five-member human growth hormone (hGH)/chorionic somatomammotropin (hCS) gene cluster and its expression in the placenta. The results indicate that interactions among multiple elements are required to restrict hGH transcription to the pituitary and generate appropriate levels of expression in the mouse genome. In addition, the results suggest a role for shared and unique regulatory sequences in locus control region-mediated expression of the hGH/hCS gene cluster in the pituitary and possibly the placenta. 67 refs., 9 figs.

  14. Region-Urbanicity Differences in Locus of Control: Social Disadvantage, Structure, or Cultural Exceptionalism?

    PubMed Central

    Shifrer, Dara; Sutton, April

    2014-01-01

    People with internal rather than external locus of control experience better outcomes in multiple domains. Previous studies on spatial differences in control within America only focused on the South, relied on aggregate level data or historical evidence, or did not account for other confounding regional distinctions (such as variation in urbanicity). Using data from the National Education Longitudinal Study, we find differences in adolescents' loci of control depending on their region and urbanicity are largely attributable to differences in their social background, and only minimally to structural differences (i.e., differences in the qualities of adolescents' schools). Differences that persist net of differences across adolescents and their schools suggest the less internal control of rural Southern adolescents, and the more internal control of rural and urban Northeastern adolescents, may be due to cultural distinctions in those areas. Results indicate region is more closely associated than urbanicity with differences in locus of control, with Western and Northeastern cultures seemingly fostering more internal control than Midwestern and Southern cultures. These findings contribute to research on spatial variation in a variety of psychological traits. PMID:25382875

  15. The Joint Effects of ADH1B Variants and Childhood Adversity on Alcohol-Related Phenotypes in African-American and European-American Women and Men

    PubMed Central

    Sartor, Carolyn E.; Wang, Zuoheng; Xu, Ke; Kranzler, Henry R.; Gelernter, Joel

    2015-01-01

    Background The ADH1B gene has consistently been implicated in problem drinking, but rarely incorporated into gene by environment investigations of alcohol phenotypes. This study examined the joint effects of variation in ADH1B and childhood adversity – a well-documented risk factor for alcohol problems and moderator of genetic liability to psychiatric outcomes – on maximum drinks consumed in a 24-hour period (maxdrinks) and alcohol use disorder (AUD) symptoms. Methods Data were drawn from 2,617 African-American (AA) and 1,436 European-American (EA) participants (42% female) in a multisite genetic study of substance dependence. We tested the most significant ADH1B SNPs for alcohol dependence from a genomewide association study with this sample, ADH1B-rs1229984 (Arg48His) and ADH1B-rs2066702 (Arg370Cys), in EA and AA subsamples, respectively. Results Ordinal regression analyses conducted separately by sex and population revealed significant main effects for childhood adversity both for alcohol phenotypes in AA women and men and for maxdrinks in EA women. A significant rs1229984 by childhood adversity interaction was observed for AUD symptoms in EA men. Unexposed His-allele carriers reported a mean of 3.6 AUD criteria, but adversity-exposed His-allele carriers endorsed approximately the same number (6.3) as those without the protective allele (6.3 and 7.0 for adversity-exposed and adversity-unexposed groups, respectively). Conclusions Results suggest that under conditions of childhood adversity, the His allele does not exert its protective effects in EA men (OR=0.57, CI:0.32–1.01; p=0.056). Findings highlight the robust risk effect conferred by childhood adversity and the importance of considering population and sex in genetically informative investigations of its association with alcohol outcomes. PMID:25410943

  16. The huastec region: a second locus for the production of bronze alloys in ancient mesoamerica.

    PubMed

    Hosler, D; Stresser-Pean, G

    1992-08-28

    Chemical analyses of 51 metal artifacts, one ingot, and two pieces of intermediate processed material from two Late Post Classic archeological sites in the Huastec area of Eastern Mesoamerica point to a second production locus for copper-arsenic-tin alloys, copper-arsenic-tin artifacts, and probably copper-tin and copper-arsenic bronze artifacts. Earlier evidence had indicated that these bronze alloys were produced exclusively in West Mexico. West Mexico was the region where metallurgy first developed in Mesoamerica, although major elements of that technology had been introduced from the metallurgies of Central and South America. The bronze working component of Huastec metallurgy was transmitted from the metalworking regions of West Mexico, most likely through market systems that distributed Aztec goods. PMID:17742754

  17. Fast Principal-Component Analysis Reveals Convergent Evolution of ADH1B in Europe and East Asia.

    PubMed

    Galinsky, Kevin J; Bhatia, Gaurav; Loh, Po-Ru; Georgiev, Stoyan; Mukherjee, Sayan; Patterson, Nick J; Price, Alkes L

    2016-03-01

    Searching for genetic variants with unusual differentiation between subpopulations is an established approach for identifying signals of natural selection. However, existing methods generally require discrete subpopulations. We introduce a method that infers selection using principal components (PCs) by identifying variants whose differentiation along top PCs is significantly greater than the null distribution of genetic drift. To enable the application of this method to large datasets, we developed the FastPCA software, which employs recent advances in random matrix theory to accurately approximate top PCs while reducing time and memory cost from quadratic to linear in the number of individuals, a computational improvement of many orders of magnitude. We apply FastPCA to a cohort of 54,734 European Americans, identifying 5 distinct subpopulations spanning the top 4 PCs. Using the PC-based test for natural selection, we replicate previously known selected loci and identify three new genome-wide significant signals of selection, including selection in Europeans at ADH1B. The coding variant rs1229984(∗)T has previously been associated to a decreased risk of alcoholism and shown to be under selection in East Asians; we show that it is a rare example of independent evolution on two continents. We also detect selection signals at IGFBP3 and IGH, which have also previously been associated to human disease. PMID:26924531

  18. Fast Principal-Component Analysis Reveals Convergent Evolution of ADH1B in Europe and East Asia

    PubMed Central

    Galinsky, Kevin J.; Bhatia, Gaurav; Loh, Po-Ru; Georgiev, Stoyan; Mukherjee, Sayan; Patterson, Nick J.; Price, Alkes L.

    2016-01-01

    Searching for genetic variants with unusual differentiation between subpopulations is an established approach for identifying signals of natural selection. However, existing methods generally require discrete subpopulations. We introduce a method that infers selection using principal components (PCs) by identifying variants whose differentiation along top PCs is significantly greater than the null distribution of genetic drift. To enable the application of this method to large datasets, we developed the FastPCA software, which employs recent advances in random matrix theory to accurately approximate top PCs while reducing time and memory cost from quadratic to linear in the number of individuals, a computational improvement of many orders of magnitude. We apply FastPCA to a cohort of 54,734 European Americans, identifying 5 distinct subpopulations spanning the top 4 PCs. Using the PC-based test for natural selection, we replicate previously known selected loci and identify three new genome-wide significant signals of selection, including selection in Europeans at ADH1B. The coding variant rs1229984∗T has previously been associated to a decreased risk of alcoholism and shown to be under selection in East Asians; we show that it is a rare example of independent evolution on two continents. We also detect selection signals at IGFBP3 and IGH, which have also previously been associated to human disease. PMID:26924531

  19. Comprehensive genetic assessment of the ESR1 locus identifies a risk region for endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    O'Mara, Tracy A; Glubb, Dylan M; Painter, Jodie N; Cheng, Timothy; Dennis, Joe; Attia, John; Holliday, Elizabeth G; McEvoy, Mark; Scott, Rodney J; Ashton, Katie; Proietto, Tony; Otton, Geoffrey; Shah, Mitul; Ahmed, Shahana; Healey, Catherine S; Gorman, Maggie; Martin, Lynn; Hodgson, Shirley; Fasching, Peter A; Hein, Alexander; Beckmann, Matthias W; Ekici, Arif B; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Li, Jingmei; Dürst, Matthias; Runnebaum, Ingo; Hillemanns, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Lambrechts, Diether; Depreeuw, Jeroen; Annibali, Daniela; Amant, Frederic; Zhao, Hui; Goode, Ellen L; Dowdy, Sean C; Fridley, Brooke L; Winham, Stacey J; Salvesen, Helga B; Njølstad, Tormund S; Trovik, Jone; Werner, Henrica M J; Tham, Emma; Liu, Tao; Mints, Miriam; Bolla, Manjeet K; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Wang, Qin; Hopper, John L; Peto, Julian; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Burwinkel, Barbara; Brenner, Hermann; Meindl, Alfons; Brauch, Hiltrud; Lindblom, Annika; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Couch, Fergus J; Giles, Graham G; Kristensen, Vessela N; Cox, Angela; Pharoah, Paul D P; Dunning, Alison M; Tomlinson, Ian; Easton, Douglas F; Thompson, Deborah J; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2015-10-01

    Excessive exposure to estrogen is a well-established risk factor for endometrial cancer (EC), particularly for cancers of endometrioid histology. The physiological function of estrogen is primarily mediated by estrogen receptor alpha, encoded by ESR1. Consequently, several studies have investigated whether variation at the ESR1 locus is associated with risk of EC, with conflicting results. We performed comprehensive fine-mapping analyses of 3633 genotyped and imputed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 6607 EC cases and 37 925 controls. There was evidence of an EC risk signal located at a potential alternative promoter of the ESR1 gene (lead SNP rs79575945, P=1.86×10(-5)), which was stronger for cancers of endometrioid subtype (P=3.76×10(-6)). Bioinformatic analysis suggests that this risk signal is in a functionally important region targeting ESR1, and eQTL analysis found that rs79575945 was associated with expression of SYNE1, a neighbouring gene. In summary, we have identified a single EC risk signal located at ESR1, at study-wide significance. Given SNPs located at this locus have been associated with risk for breast cancer, also a hormonally driven cancer, this study adds weight to the rationale for performing informed candidate fine-scale genetic studies across cancer types. PMID:26330482

  20. Comprehensive genetic assessment of the ESR1 locus identifies a risk region for endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    O’Mara, Tracy A; Glubb, Dylan M; Painter, Jodie N; Cheng, Timothy; Dennis, Joe; Attia, John; Holliday, Elizabeth G; McEvoy, Mark; Scott, Rodney J; Ashton, Katie; Proietto, Tony; Otton, Geoffrey; Shah, Mitul; Ahmed, Shahana; Healey, Catherine S; Gorman, Maggie; Martin, Lynn; Hodgson, Shirley; Fasching, Peter A; Hein, Alexander; Beckmann, Matthias W; Ekici, Arif B; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Li, Jingmei; Dürst, Matthias; Runnebaum, Ingo; Hillemanns, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Lambrechts, Diether; Depreeuw, Jeroen; Annibali, Daniela; Amant, Frederic; Zhao, Hui; Goode, Ellen L; Dowdy, Sean C; Fridley, Brooke L; Winham, Stacey J; Salvesen, Helga B; Njølstad, Tormund S; Trovik, Jone; Werner, Henrica MJ; Tham, Emma; Liu, Tao; Mints, Miriam; Bolla, Manjeet K; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Wang, Qin; Hopper, John L; Peto, Julian; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Burwinkel, Barbara; Brenner, Hermann; Meindl, Alfons; Brauch, Hiltrud; Lindblom, Annika; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Couch, Fergus J; Giles, Graham G; Kristensen, Vessela N; Cox, Angela; Pharoah, Paul D P; Dunning, Alison M; Tomlinson, Ian; Easton, Douglas F; Thompson, Deborah J; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2015-01-01

    Excessive exposure to estrogen is a well-established risk factor for endometrial cancer (EC), particularly for cancers of endometrioid histology. The physiological function of estrogen is primarily mediated by estrogen receptor alpha, encoded by ESR1. Consequently, several studies have investigated whether variation at the ESR1 locus is associated with risk of EC, with conflicting results. We performed comprehensive fine-mapping analyses of 3,633 genotyped and imputed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 6,607 EC cases and 37,925 controls. There was evidence of an EC risk signal located at a potential alternative promoter of the ESR1 gene (lead SNP rs79575945, P = 1.86 × 10−5), which was stronger for cancers of endometrioid subtype (P = 3.76 × 10−6). Bioinformatic analysis suggests that this risk signal is in a functionally important region targeting ESR1, and eQTL analysis found that rs79575945 was associated with expression of SYNE1, a neighbouring gene. In summary, we have identified a single EC risk signal located at ESR1, at study-wide significance. Given SNPs located at this locus have been associated with risk for breast cancer, also a hormonally driven cancer, this study adds weight to the rationale for performing informed candidate fine-scale genetic studies across cancer types. PMID:26330482

  1. A possible role of the locus coeruleus in complex regional pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, Peter D.

    2012-01-01

    Heightened sensitivity to painful stimulation commonly spreads from the affected limb to the ipsilateral forehead in patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). In addition, acoustic startle evokes greater auditory discomfort and increases in limb pain when presented on the affected than unaffected side. In contrast, limb pain ordinarily evokes analgesia in the ipsilateral forehead of healthy participants, and acoustic startle suppresses limb pain. Together, these findings suggest that hemilateral and generalized pain control mechanisms are disrupted in CRPS, and that multisensory integrative processes are compromised. Failure to inhibit nociceptive input from the CRPS-affected limb could sensitize spinal and supraspinal neurons that receive convergent nociceptive and auditory information from hemilateral body sites. Somatosensory, auditory, and emotional inputs may then aggravate pain by feeding into this sensitized nociceptive network. In particular, a disturbance in hemilateral pain processing that involves the locus coeruleus could exacerbate the symptoms of CRPS in some patients. PMID:23162445

  2. Retroviral vectors encoding ADA regulatory locus control region provide enhanced T-cell-specific transgene expression

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Murine retroviral vectors have been used in several hundred gene therapy clinical trials, but have fallen out of favor for a number of reasons. One issue is that gene expression from viral or internal promoters is highly variable and essentially unregulated. Moreover, with retroviral vectors, gene expression is usually silenced over time. Mammalian genes, in contrast, are characterized by highly regulated, precise levels of expression in both a temporal and a cell-specific manner. To ascertain if recapitulation of endogenous adenosine deaminase (ADA) expression can be achieved in a vector construct we created a new series of Moloney murine leukemia virus (MuLV) based retroviral vector that carry human regulatory elements including combinations of the ADA promoter, the ADA locus control region (LCR), ADA introns and human polyadenylation sequences in a self-inactivating vector backbone. Methods A MuLV-based retroviral vector with a self-inactivating (SIN) backbone, the phosphoglycerate kinase promoter (PGK) and the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP), as a reporter gene, was generated. Subsequent vectors were constructed from this basic vector by deletion or addition of certain elements. The added elements that were assessed are the human ADA promoter, human ADA locus control region (LCR), introns 7, 8, and 11 from the human ADA gene, and human growth hormone polyadenylation signal. Retroviral vector particles were produced by transient three-plasmid transfection of 293T cells. Retroviral vectors encoding eGFP were titered by transducing 293A cells, and then the proportion of GFP-positive cells was determined using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Non T-cell and T-cell lines were transduced at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 0.1 and the yield of eGFP transgene expression was evaluated by FACS analysis using mean fluorescent intensity (MFI) detection. Results Vectors that contained the ADA LCR were preferentially expressed in T

  3. Detailed comparative mapping of cereal chromosome regions corresponding to the Ph1 locus in wheat

    SciTech Connect

    Foote, T.; Roberts, M.; Kurata, N.

    1997-10-01

    Detailed physical mapping of markers from rich chromosome 9, and from syntenous (at the genetic level) regions of other cereal genomes, has resulted in rice yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) contigs spanning parts of rice 9. This physical mapping, together with comparative genetic mapping, has demonstrated that synteny has been largely maintained between the genomes of several cereals at the level of contiged YACs. Markers located in one region of rice chromosome 9 encompassed by the YAC contigs have exhibited restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) using deletion lines for the Ph1 locus. This has allowed demarcation of the region of rice chromosome 9 syntenous with the phlb and phlc deletions in wheat chromosome 5B. A group of probes located in wheat homoeologous group 5 and barley chromosome 5H, however, have synteny with rice chromosomes other than 9. This suggests that the usefulness of comparative trait analysis and of the rice genome as a tool to facilitate gene isolation will differ from one region to the next, and implies that the rice genome is more ancestral in structure than those of the Triticeae. 38 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Detailed Comparative Mapping of Cereal Chromosome Regions Corresponding to the Ph1 Locus in Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Foote, T.; Roberts, M.; Kurata, N.; Sasaki, T.; Moore, G.

    1997-01-01

    Detailed physical mapping of markers from rice chromosome 9, and from syntenous (at the genetic level) regions of other cereal genomes, has resulted in rice yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) contigs spanning parts of rice 9. This physical mapping, together with comparative genetic mapping, has demonstrated that synteny has been largely maintained between the genomes of several cereals at the level of contiged YACs. Markers located in one region of rice chromosome 9 encompassed by the YAC contigs have exhibited restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) using deletion lines for the Ph1 locus. This has allowed demarcation of the region of rice chromosome 9 syntenous with the ph1b and ph1c deletions in wheat chromosome 5B. A group of probes located in wheat homoeologous group 5 and barley chromosome 5H, however, have synteny with rice chromosomes other than 9. This suggests that the usefulness of comparative trait analysis and of the rice genome as a tool to facilitate gene isolation will differ from one region to the next, and implies that the rice genome is more ancestral in structure than those of the Triticeae. PMID:9335614

  5. Metabolism of trans, trans-muconaldehyde, a cytotoxic metabolite of benzene, in mouse liver by alcohol dehydrogenase Adh1 and aldehyde reductase AKR1A4

    SciTech Connect

    Short, Duncan M.; Lyon, Robert; Watson, David G.; Barski, Oleg A.; McGarvie, Gail; Ellis, Elizabeth M. . E-mail: Elizabeth.ellis@strath.ac.uk

    2006-01-15

    The reductive metabolism of trans, trans-muconaldehyde, a cytotoxic metabolite of benzene, was studied in mouse liver. Using an HPLC-based stopped assay, the primary reduced metabolite was identified as 6-hydroxy-trans, trans-2,4-hexadienal (OH/CHO) and the secondary metabolite as 1,6-dihydroxy-trans, trans-2,4-hexadiene (OH/OH). The main enzymes responsible for the highest levels of reductase activity towards trans, trans-muconaldehyde were purified from mouse liver soluble fraction first by Q-sepharose chromatography followed by either blue or red dye affinity chromatography. In mouse liver, trans, trans-muconaldehyde is predominantly reduced by an NADH-dependent enzyme, which was identified as alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh1). Kinetic constants obtained for trans, trans-muconaldehyde with the native Adh1 enzyme showed a V {sub max} of 2141 {+-} 500 nmol/min/mg and a K {sub m} of 11 {+-} 4 {mu}M. This enzyme was inhibited by pyrazole with a K {sub I} of 3.1 {+-} 0.57 {mu}M. Other fractions were found to contain muconaldehyde reductase activity independent of Adh1, and one enzyme was identified as the NADPH-dependent aldehyde reductase AKR1A4. This showed a V {sub max} of 115 nmol/min/mg and a K {sub m} of 15 {+-} 2 {mu}M and was not inhibited by pyrazole.

  6. Genomic analysis of the Xp21 region around the RP3 locus

    SciTech Connect

    Navia, B.A.; Eisenman, R.E.; Bruns, G.A.

    1994-09-01

    One form of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa has been localized by deletion and linkage analysis to proximal Xp21 near the OTC locus and the proximal breakpoint of the BB deletion. A deletion junction clone, previously isolated from this region, was used to initiate a series of bidirectional walks in a human genomic library in EMBL3A. A phage contig of nearly 70 kb has been cloned and systematically searched for conserved sequences and CA repeats. A number of unique sequences around the breakpoint have been sequenced and analyzed with exon identification programs. An HTF island was identified approximately 35 kb distal to the centromeric breakpoint of the BB deletion and several CA repeat-containing areas were found in the contig. Two YACs that contain the breakpoint and surrounding region were isolated. A phage sublibrary was constructed from one of the YACs and is being used to extend the contig map further centromeric. To isolate transcripts from the region, two rounds of cDNA selection from a combined short insert human retinal and fetal brain library were performed against the pooled phage clones from the contig and against the pooled phage from the YAC derived sublibrary. Among the selected cDNAs, several unique sequences have been identified and are currently being mapped and sequenced.

  7. A novel locus of resistance to severe malaria in a region of ancient balancing selection.

    PubMed

    Band, Gavin; Rockett, Kirk A; Spencer, Chris C A; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P

    2015-10-01

    The high prevalence of sickle haemoglobin in Africa shows that malaria has been a major force for human evolutionary selection, but surprisingly few other polymorphisms have been proven to confer resistance to malaria in large epidemiological studies. To address this problem, we conducted a multi-centre genome-wide association study (GWAS) of life-threatening Plasmodium falciparum infection (severe malaria) in over 11,000 African children, with replication data in a further 14,000 individuals. Here we report a novel malaria resistance locus close to a cluster of genes encoding glycophorins that are receptors for erythrocyte invasion by P. falciparum. We identify a haplotype at this locus that provides 33% protection against severe malaria (odds ratio = 0.67, 95% confidence interval = 0.60-0.76, P value = 9.5 × 10(-11)) and is linked to polymorphisms that have previously been shown to have features of ancient balancing selection, on the basis of haplotype sharing between humans and chimpanzees. Taken together with previous observations on the malaria-protective role of blood group O, these data reveal that two of the strongest GWAS signals for severe malaria lie in or close to genes encoding the glycosylated surface coat of the erythrocyte cell membrane, both within regions of the genome where it appears that evolution has maintained diversity for millions of years. These findings provide new insights into the host-parasite interactions that are critical in determining the outcome of malaria infection. PMID:26416757

  8. Comparative analysis of the primate X-inactivation center region and reconstruction of the ancestral primate XIST locus

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, Julie E.; Sheedy, Christina B.; Merrett, Stephanie L.; Diallo, Abdoulaye Banire; Swofford, David L.; NISC Comparative Sequencing Program; Green, Eric D.; Willard, Huntington F.

    2011-01-01

    Here we provide a detailed comparative analysis across the candidate X-Inactivation Center (XIC) region and the XIST locus in the genomes of six primates and three mammalian outgroup species. Since lemurs and other strepsirrhine primates represent the sister lineage to all other primates, this analysis focuses on lemurs to reconstruct the ancestral primate sequences and to gain insight into the evolution of this region and the genes within it. This comparative evolutionary genomics approach reveals significant expansion in genomic size across the XIC region in higher primates, with minimal size alterations across the XIST locus itself. Reconstructed primate ancestral XIC sequences show that the most dramatic changes during the past 80 million years occurred between the ancestral primate and the lineage leading to Old World monkeys. In contrast, the XIST locus compared between human and the primate ancestor does not indicate any dramatic changes to exons or XIST-specific repeats; rather, evolution of this locus reflects small incremental changes in overall sequence identity and short repeat insertions. While this comparative analysis reinforces that the region around XIST has been subject to significant genomic change, even among primates, our data suggest that evolution of the XIST sequences themselves represents only small lineage-specific changes across the past 80 million years. PMID:21518738

  9. Structure of the Catfish IGH Locus: Analysis of the Region Including the Single Functional IGHM Gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The catfish IGH locus is large (~1Mb) and complex, having undergone multiple internal duplications and transpositions. To define the structure of the locus that contains the single expressed IGHM gene, two overlapping bacterial-artificial-chromosome (BAC) clones spanning the most 3’ end of the chann...

  10. Autosomal dominant familial spastic paraplegia: reduction of the FSP1 candidate region on chromosome 14q to 7 cM and locus heterogeneity.

    PubMed Central

    Gispert, S; Santos, N; Damen, R; Voit, T; Schulz, J; Klockgether, T; Orozco, G; Kreuz, F; Weissenbach, J; Auburger, G

    1995-01-01

    Three large pedigrees of German descent with autosomal dominant "pure" familial spastic paraplegia (FSP) were characterized clinically and genetically. Haplotype and linkage analyses, with microsatellites covering the FSP region on chromosome 14q (locus FSP1), were performed. In pedigree W, we found a haplotype that cosegregates with the disease and observed three crossing-over events, reducing the FSP1 candidate region to 7 cM; in addition, the observation of apparent anticipation in this family suggests a trinucleotide repeat expansion as the mutation. In pedigrees D and S, the gene locus could be excluded from the whole FSP1 region, confirming the locus heterogeneity of autosomal dominant FSP. PMID:7825576

  11. Analysis of the Albino-Locus Region of the Mouse. I. Origin and Viability

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Liane B.; Russell, W. L.; Kelly, E. M.

    1979-01-01

    Numerous specific-locus experiments designed to test the mutagenic effect of external radiation have yielded, in over 3,600,000 animals observed, altogether 119 presumed mutations involving the c locus. Of these, 55 were viable and albino (cav), 13 were viable and of various intermediate pigment types (cxv), four were subvital (cas and cxs), seven were neonatally lethal albinos (cal), 28 prenatally lethal albinos (cal); 12 died untested. All of the prenatally lethal and at least one of the neonatally lethal c-locus mutations (cal classes) are probably deficiencies that we have analyzed extensively in other experiments. Since absence of the locus mimics albino in phenotype, the intermediates (cxv and cxs groups) probably resulted from intragenic changes. The class of viable albino mutants (cav) might include, in addition to intragenic changes, some extremely small deficiencies.—The effects on viability of c-locus lethals (cal's) in heterozygous condition are not drastic enough to be perceived in stocks of mixed genetic background except in the case of the two longest known deficiencies and a few others.—Analysis of the relation between radiation treatment and type of c-locus mutants obtained shows that the relative frequency of viable mutations, for each germ-cell type, is greater for low-LET than for neutron irradiation; however, the difference for any individual cell type is not significant. The majority (66.7%) of mutations derived from X- or γ-ray irradiated spermatogonia are viable, and the proportion of "intermediates" among these viables is similar to that among presumed spontaneous c-locus mutations. No significant dose-rate effect on the proportion of lethals could be demonstrated within the set of mutants induced by low-LET irradiation of spermatogonia. Although sets from other germ-cell stages are too small for statistical tests, the results for oocytes are similar, as far as they go. Furthermore, most of the c-locus mutations induced in

  12. Mapping of the chromosome 1p36 region surrounding the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2A locus

    SciTech Connect

    Denton, P.; Gere, S.; Wolpert, C.

    1994-09-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is the most common inherited peripheral neuropathy. Although CMT2 is clinically indistinguishable from CMT1, the two forms can be differentiated by pathological and neurophysiological methods. We have established one locus, CMT2A on chromosome 1p36, and have established genetic heterogeneity. This locus maps to the region of the deletions associated with neuroblastoma. We have now identified an additional 11 CMT2 families. Three families are linked to chromosome 1p36 while six families are excluded from this region. Another six families are currently under analysis and collection. To date the CMT2A families represent one third of those CMT2 families examined. We have established a microdissection library of the 1p36 region which is currently being characterized for microsatellite repeats and STSs using standard hybridization techniques and a modified degenerate primer method. In addition, new markers (D1S253, D1S450, D1S489, D1S503, GATA27E04, and GATA4H04) placed in this region are being mapped using critical recombinants in the CEPH reference pedigrees. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) has been used to confirm mapping. A YAC contig is being assembled from the CEPH megabase library using STSs to isolate key YACs which are extended by vectorette end clone and Alu-PCR. These findings suggest that the CMT2 phenotype is secondary to at least two different genes and demonstrates further heterogeneity in the CMT phenotype.

  13. Comparative analysis of the 100 kb region containing the Pi-k(h) locus between indica and japonica rice lines.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S P; Dalai, V; Singh, N K; Sharma, T R

    2007-02-01

    We have recently cloned a pathogen inducible blast resistance gene Pi-k(h) from the indica rice line Tetep using a positional cloning approach. In this study, we carried out structural organization analysis of the Pi-k(h) locus in both indica and japonica rice lines. A 100 kb region containing 50 kb upstream and 50 kb downstream sequences flanking to the Pi-k(h) locus was selected for the investigation. A total of 16 genes in indica and 15 genes in japonica were predicted and annotated in this region. The average GC content of indica and japonica genes in this region was 53.15% and 49.3%, respectively. Both indica and japonica sequences were polymorphic for simple sequence repeats having mono-, di-, tri-, tetra-, and pentanucleotides. Sequence analysis of the specific blast resistant Pi-k(h) allele of Tetep and the susceptible Pi-k(h) allele of the japonica rice line Nipponbare showed differences in the number and distribution of motifs involved in phosphorylation, resulting in the resistance phenotype in Tetep. PMID:17572362

  14. Saturation germ line mutagenesis of the murine t region including a lethal allele at the quaking locus.

    PubMed Central

    Shedlovsky, A; King, T R; Dove, W F

    1988-01-01

    The proximal region of mouse chromosome 17 contains many genes affecting embryonic development, germ cell differentiation, and the immune system. Although the study of natural variation, including t haplotypes, has yielded some information about the function of these genes, spontaneous variants often exhibit manifold genetic effects and are generally not carried on inbred backgrounds. To clearly connect phenotypes with the actions of individual genes, mutants in which genes are altered singly are needed. Therefore, we used a highly efficient point mutagen, N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea, in combination with classical breeding schemes to induce and identify recessive lethal mutations in the t region. Of 350 mutagenized gametes examined, at least 10 independent recessive embryonic lethal mutations have been identified; an additional two are perinatal lethals. A spontaneous brachyury mutation, TWis, arose on a genetic background that permits high-resolution mapping of the induced recessive mutations against cloned DNA sequences from the t region. One lethal mutation is an allele at the quaking locus. The multiple alleles of quaking and the feasibility of high-resolution mapping permit investigation of the pleiotropic action of this locus in mammalian development. Images PMID:3422415

  15. Suppression of Transgene Silencing by Matrix Attachment Regions in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Brouwer, Cory; Bruce, Wesley; Maddock, Sheila; Avramova, Zoya; Bowen, Ben

    2002-01-01

    Matrix attachment regions (MARs) are DNA sequences that bind an internal nuclear network of nonhistone proteins called the nuclear matrix. Thus, they may define discrete gene-containing chromatin loops in vivo. We have studied the effects of flanking transgenes with MARs on transgene expression levels in maize callus and in transformed maize plants. Three MAR elements, two from maize (Adh1 5′ MAR and Mha1 5′ MAR) and one from yeast (ARS1), had very different effects on transgene expression that bore no relation to their affinity for the nuclear matrix in vitro. In callus, two of the MAR elements (Adh1 5′ MAR and ARS1) reduced transgene silencing but had no effect on the variability of expression. In transgenic plants, Adh1 5′ MAR had the effect of localizing β-glucuronidase expression to lateral root initiation sites. A possible model accounting for the function of Adh1 5′ MAR is discussed. PMID:12215518

  16. Quantitative trait locus mapping reveals regions of the maize genome controlling root system architecture.

    PubMed

    Zurek, Paul R; Topp, Christopher N; Benfey, Philip N

    2015-04-01

    The quest to determine the genetic basis of root system architecture (RSA) has been greatly facilitated by recent developments in root phenotyping techniques. Methods that are accurate, high throughput, and control for environmental factors are especially attractive for quantitative trait locus mapping. Here, we describe the adaptation of a nondestructive in vivo gel-based root imaging platform for use in maize (Zea mays). We identify a large number of contrasting RSA traits among 25 founder lines of the maize nested association mapping population and locate 102 quantitative trait loci using the B73 (compact RSA)×Ki3 (exploratory RSA) mapping population. Our results suggest that a phenotypic tradeoff exists between small, compact RSA and large, exploratory RSA. PMID:25673779

  17. Quantitative Trait Locus Mapping Reveals Regions of the Maize Genome Controlling Root System Architecture1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Benfey, Philip N.

    2015-01-01

    The quest to determine the genetic basis of root system architecture (RSA) has been greatly facilitated by recent developments in root phenotyping techniques. Methods that are accurate, high throughput, and control for environmental factors are especially attractive for quantitative trait locus mapping. Here, we describe the adaptation of a nondestructive in vivo gel-based root imaging platform for use in maize (Zea mays). We identify a large number of contrasting RSA traits among 25 founder lines of the maize nested association mapping population and locate 102 quantitative trait loci using the B73 (compact RSA) × Ki3 (exploratory RSA) mapping population. Our results suggest that a phenotypic tradeoff exists between small, compact RSA and large, exploratory RSA. PMID:25673779

  18. A polymorphic and hypervariable locus in the pseudoautosomal region of the CBA/H mouse sex chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Fennelly, J.; Laval, S.; Wright, E.; Plumb, M.

    1996-04-01

    We have identified a genomic locus (DXYH1) that is polymorphic and hypervariable within the CBA/H colony. Using a panel of C57BL/6 x Mus spretus backcross offspring, it was mapped to the distal end of the X chromosome. Pseudoautosomal inheritance was demonstrated through three generations of CBA/H x CBA/H and CBA/H x C57BL/6 crosses and confirmed through linkage to the Sxr locus in X/Y Sxr x 3H1 crosses. Meiotic recombination frequencies place DXYH1 {approximately}28% into the pseudoautosomal region from the boundary. The de novo generation of CBA/H variant DXYH1 restriction fragment length polymorphisms during spermatogenesis is suggestive of the germline instability associated with hypermutable human minisatellites. The absence of DXY1-related sequences in Mus spretus provides DNA sequence evidence to support the observed failure of X-Y pairing during meiosis and consequent hybrid infertility in C57BL/6 x Mus spretus male F1 offspring. 19 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Vasopressin-immunoreactive cells in the dorsomedial hypothalamic region, medial amygdaloid nucleus and locus coeruleus of the rat.

    PubMed

    Caffé, A R; van Leeuwen, F W

    1983-01-01

    Recently, the existence of a vasopressin-immunoreactive cell group was described in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (van Leeuwen and Caffé 1983). In the present investigation additional nuclei containing vasopressin-immunoreactive cells were found, after colchicine pretreatment, in the dorsomedial hypothalamus, medial amygdaloid nucleus and the locus coeruleus. Vasopressin-immunoreactive cells in the dorsomedial hypothalamus and medial amygdaloid nucleus are small (8--14 micrometers and 10--14 micrometers, respectively), while those in the locus coeruleus are medium-sized (20--25 micrometers). Incubation with anti-bovine neurophysin II and anti-rat neurophysin revealed staining of the same cell group in the above-mentioned areas. None of these cell groups show stained cells after incubation with anti-oxytocin and anti-bovine neurophysin I. When sections of the homozygous Brattleboro rat, which shows a deficiency in vasopressin synthesis, are incubated with anti-vasopressin, anti-bovine neurophysin II, or anti-rat neurophysin, no immunoreactivity can be observed in these brain regions. The above-mentioned cell groups may contribute to the vasopressinergic innervation of brain sites that have been reported to persist after lesioning of the suprachiasmatic, paraventricular and bed nuclei of the stria terminalis. PMID:6616564

  20. Comparative Genomic Analyses of the Human NPHP1 Locus Reveal Complex Genomic Architecture and Its Regional Evolution in Primates

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Bo; Liu, Pengfei; Gupta, Aditya; Beck, Christine R.; Tejomurtula, Anusha; Campbell, Ian M.; Gambin, Tomasz; Simmons, Alexandra D.; Withers, Marjorie A.; Harris, R. Alan; Rogers, Jeffrey; Schwartz, David C.; Lupski, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Many loci in the human genome harbor complex genomic structures that can result in susceptibility to genomic rearrangements leading to various genomic disorders. Nephronophthisis 1 (NPHP1, MIM# 256100) is an autosomal recessive disorder that can be caused by defects of NPHP1; the gene maps within the human 2q13 region where low copy repeats (LCRs) are abundant. Loss of function of NPHP1 is responsible for approximately 85% of the NPHP1 cases—about 80% of such individuals carry a large recurrent homozygous NPHP1 deletion that occurs via nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR) between two flanking directly oriented ~45 kb LCRs. Published data revealed a non-pathogenic inversion polymorphism involving the NPHP1 gene flanked by two inverted ~358 kb LCRs. Using optical mapping and array-comparative genomic hybridization, we identified three potential novel structural variant (SV) haplotypes at the NPHP1 locus that may protect a haploid genome from the NPHP1 deletion. Inter-species comparative genomic analyses among primate genomes revealed massive genomic changes during evolution. The aggregated data suggest that dynamic genomic rearrangements occurred historically within the NPHP1 locus and generated SV haplotypes observed in the human population today, which may confer differential susceptibility to genomic instability and the NPHP1 deletion within a personal genome. Our study documents diverse SV haplotypes at a complex LCR-laden human genomic region. Comparative analyses provide a model for how this complex region arose during primate evolution, and studies among humans suggest that intra-species polymorphism may potentially modulate an individual’s susceptibility to acquiring disease-associated alleles. PMID:26641089

  1. Genetic Association and Gene-Gene Interaction Reveal Genetic Variations in ADH1B, GSTM1 and MnSOD Independently Confer Risk to Alcoholic Liver Diseases in India

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Indranil; Chatterjee, Ankita; Das, Kausik; Bhowmik, Pradip; Das, Soumyajit; Basu, Priyadarshi; Santra, Amal K.; Datta, Simanti; Dhali, Gopal Krishna; Chowdhury, Abhijit; Banerjee, Soma

    2016-01-01

    Genetic susceptibility is an important modifier of clinical outcome and natural history of progression in Alcoholic liver disease (ALD). While the significance of ethnicity in this evolution is very clear, subtle inter-individual genetic variant(s) might be important and thus we investigated those in an Indian population. Fourteen markers were genotyped within two alcohol metabolism genes [Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) gene clusters (ADH1B and ADH1C) and Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2)], one microsomal ethanol oxidizing enzyme cytochrome p450 (CYP2E1) and three oxidative stress response (OSR) genes (MnSOD, GSTT1 and GSTM1) among 490 Bengali individuals (322 ALD and 168 control) from Eastern and North-Eastern India and validation was performed in a new cohort of 150 Bengali patients including 100 ALD and 50 advanced non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Out of 14 genetic variants, carriage of 5 genotypes (rs2066701CC in ADH1B, rs1693425TT in ADH1C, rs4880TT in MnSOD and GSTT1/GSTM1 null, p-value <0.05) were noted significantly higher among ALD patients while inter or intra group gene-gene interaction analysis revealed that addition of risk genotype of any OSR gene enhanced the possibility of ALD synergistically. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed independent association of rs2066701CC, rs4880TT and GSTM1 null genotype with ALD while lower frequencies of those genotypes in advanced NASH patients further confirmed their causal relation to ALD. Thus these findings suggest that the three variants of ADH1C, MnSOD and GSTM1 can be used to identify individuals who are at high risk to develop ALD and may be helpful in proper management of Indian alcoholics. PMID:26937962

  2. Genetic linkage studies in familial partial epilepsy: Exclusion of the human chromosome regions syntenic to the El-1 mouse locus

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes-Cendes, I.; Mulley, J.C.; Andermann, E.

    1994-09-01

    Recently, six families with a familial form of partial epilepsy were described. All pedigrees showed autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance. Affected individuals present with predominantly nocturnal seizures with frontal lobe semiology. In 1959, a genetic mouse model for partial epilepsy, the El mouse, was reported. In the El mouse, a major seizure susceptibility gene, El-1, segregates in an autosomal dominant fashion and has been localized to a region distal to the centromere of mouse chromosome 9. Comparative genetic maps between man and mouse have been used for prediction of localization of several human disease genes. Because the region of mouse chromosome 9 that is the most likely to contain the El-1 locus is syntenic to regions on human chromosomes 3q21-p22, 3q21-q23.3, 6q12 and 15q24, we adopted the candidate gene approach as an initial linkage strategy. Twenty-two polymorphic microsatellite markers covering these regions were used for genotyping individuals in the three larger families ascertained, two of which are Australian and one French-Canadian. Negative two-point lod scores were obtained separately for each family. The analysis of all three families combined significantly excludes the candidate regions on chromosomes 3, 6 and 15.

  3. A Locus on Chromosome 8 Controlling Tumor Regionality -- a New Type of Tumor Diversity in the Mouse Lung

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Lei; Hutson, Alan; Demant, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Regional specificity of lung tumor formation has rarely been studied in mouse or human. By using crosses of strains semi-congenic for lung cancer susceptibility locus Sluc20, we have analyzed the genetic influences of Sluc20 and five other loci on tumor regionality in the mouse lung. We have mapped Sluc20 to a 27.92MB proximal region of chromosome 8 and found that it controls the number and load of only those tumors that surround or are directly adjacent to the bronchi or bronchioli (peribronchial tumors). These tumors lie outside the bronchial basement membrane and tend to reach a larger size than the tumors at other locations in the lung. Similarly to tumors of alveolar lineage at other locations, peribronchial tumors stain with SP-C but not CC-10 antibody. The effects of Sluc20 alleles are additive as the number of peribronchial tumors in heterozygotes is intermediate. These findings reveal that tumor regionality in the mouse lung, which represents a novel level of lung tumor heterogeneity, is under specific genetic control. The identification of genes controlling lung tumor regionality will provide novel insights into biology of lung tumors and potentially improve the possibilities of individualized prognosis and treatment in human lung cancer. PMID:19847808

  4. A preliminary study on population genetic structure and phylogeography of the wild and cultivated Zizania latifolia (Poaceae) based on Adh1a sequences.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xin-Wei; Ke, Wei-Dong; Yu, Xiao-Ping; Wen, Jun; Ge, Song

    2008-04-01

    Recent decades have witnessed growing interests in exploring the population genetics and phylogeography of crop plants and their wild relatives because of their important value as genetic resources. In this study, sequence variation of the nuclear Adh1a gene was used to investigate the genetic diversity and phylogeographic pattern of the wild and cultivated Zizania latifolia Turcz. Sequence data were obtained from 126 individuals representing 21 wild populations in China and 65 varieties of the cultivated Zizania latifolia. Low to medium level nucleotide diversity was found in the wild populations, with northeastern populations being the most variable. We detected significant population subdivision (F (ST) = 0.481) but no significant phylogeogaphical structure, suggesting limited gene flow and dispersal among populations. The current pattern of genetic variation in the wild populations might be explained by a fragmentation of ancient populations due to habitat destruction and degradation during recent decades. The heterogeneous levels and spatial apportionment of genetic diversity among wild populations also suggested a history of gradual colonization of Zizania latifolia populations from the northeast to the south of China. Interestingly, all 65 varieties of the cultivated Zizania latifolia possessed a single identical genotype, implying a single domestication associated with very few initial individuals. PMID:18283426

  5. Overexpression of the genes PDC1 and ADH1 activates glycerol conversion to ethanol in the thermotolerant yeast Ogataea (Hansenula) polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Kata, Iwona; Semkiv, Marta V; Ruchala, Justyna; Dmytruk, Kostyantyn V; Sibirny, Andriy A

    2016-08-01

    Conversion of byproduct from biodiesel production glycerol to high-value compounds is of great importance. Ethanol is considered a promising product of glycerol bioconversion. The methylotrophic thermotolerant yeast Ogataea (Hansenula) polymorpha is of great interest for this purpose as the glycerol byproduct contains methanol and heavy metals as contaminants, and this yeast utilizes methanol and is relatively resistant to heavy metals. Besides, O. polymorpha shows robust growth on glycerol and produces ethanol from various carbon sources. The thermotolerance of this yeast is an additional advantage, allowing increased fermentation temperature to 45-48 °C, leading to increased rate of the fermentation process and a fall in the cost of distillation. The wild-type strain of O. polymorpha produces insignificant amounts of ethanol from glycerol (0.8 g/l). Overexpression of PDC1 coding for pyruvate decarboxylase enhanced ethanol production up to 3.1 g/l, whereas simultaneous overexpression of PDC1 and ADH1 (coding for alcohol dehydrogenase) led to further increase in ethanol production from glycerol. Moreover, the increased temperature of fermentation up to 45 °C stimulated the production of ethanol from glycerol used as the only carbon source up to 5.0 g/l, which exceeds the data obtained by methylotrophic yeast strains reported so far. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27256876

  6. Fine mapping of the McLeod locus (XK) to a 150-380-kb region in Xp21

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, M.F.; Monaco, A.P. ); Blonden, L.A.J.; Ommen, G.J.B. van ); Affara, N.A.; Ferguson-Smith, M.A. ); Lehrach, H. )

    1992-02-01

    McLeod syndrome characterized by acanthocytosis and the absence of a red-blood-cell Kell antigen (Kx), is a multisystem disorder involving a late-onset myopathy, splenomegaly, and neurological defects. The locus for this syndrome has been mapped, by deletion analysis, to a region between the loci for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). In this study, the authors describe a new marker, 3BH/R 0.3 (DXS 709), isolated by cloning the deletion breakpoint of a DMD patient. A long-range restriction map of Xp21, encompassing the gene loci for McLeod and CGD, was constructed, and multiple CpG islands were found clustered in a 700-kb region. Using the new marker, they have limited the McLeod syndrome critical region to 150-380-kb. Within this interval, two CpG-rich islands which may represent candidate sites for the McLeod gene were identified.

  7. Robust physical methods that enrich genomic regions identical by descent for linkage studies: confirmation of a locus for osteogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Peter; Marcaillou, Charles; Vanpeene, Maud; Saraiva, Jean-Paul; Stockholm, Daniel; Francke, Stephan; Favis, Reyna; Cohen, Nadine; Rousseau, Francis; Tores, Frédéric; Lindenbaum, Pierre; Hager, Jörg; Philippi, Anne

    2009-01-01

    Background The monogenic disease osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is due to single mutations in either of the collagen genes ColA1 or ColA2, but within the same family a given mutation is accompanied by a wide range of disease severity. Although this phenotypic variability implies the existence of modifier gene variants, genome wide scanning of DNA from OI patients has not been reported. Promising genome wide marker-independent physical methods for identifying disease-related loci have lacked robustness for widespread applicability. Therefore we sought to improve these methods and demonstrate their performance to identify known and novel loci relevant to OI. Results We have improved methods for enriching regions of identity-by-descent (IBD) shared between related, afflicted individuals. The extent of enrichment exceeds 10- to 50-fold for some loci. The efficiency of the new process is shown by confirmation of the identification of the Col1A2 locus in osteogenesis imperfecta patients from Amish families. Moreover the analysis revealed additional candidate linkage loci that may harbour modifier genes for OI; a locus on chromosome 1q includes COX-2, a gene implicated in osteogenesis. Conclusion Technology for physical enrichment of IBD loci is now robust and applicable for finding genes for monogenic diseases and genes for complex diseases. The data support the further investigation of genetic loci other than collagen gene loci to identify genes affecting the clinical expression of osteogenesis imperfecta. The discrimination of IBD mapping will be enhanced when the IBD enrichment procedure is coupled with deep resequencing. PMID:19331686

  8. Phylogenetic comparisons suggest that distance from the locus control region guides developmental expression of primate beta-type globin genes.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Robert M; Prychitko, Tom; Gumucio, Deborah; Wildman, Derek E; Uddin, Monica; Goodman, Morris

    2006-02-28

    Phylogenetic inferences drawn from comparative data on mammalian beta-globin gene clusters indicate that the ancestral primate cluster contained a locus control region (LCR) and five paralogously related beta-type globin loci (5'-LCR-epsilon-gamma-psieta-delta-beta-3'), with epsilon and gamma expressed solely during embryonic life. A gamma locus tandem duplication (5'-gamma(1)-gamma(2)-3') triggered gamma's evolution toward fetal expression but by a different trajectory in platyrrhines (New World monkeys) than in catarrhines (Old World monkeys and apes, including humans). In platyrrhine (e.g., Cebus) fetuses, gamma(1) at the ancestral distance from epsilon is down-regulated, whereas gamma(2) at increased distance is up-regulated. Catarrhine gamma(1) and gamma(2) acquired longer distances from epsilon (14 and 19 kb, respectively), and both are up-regulated throughout fetal life with gamma(1)'s expression predominating over gamma(2)'s. On enlarging the platyrrhine expression data, we find Aotus gamma is embryonic, Alouatta gamma is inactive at term, and in Callithrix, gamma(1) is down-regulated fetally, whereas gamma(2) is up-regulated. Of eight mammalian taxa now represented per taxon by embryonic, fetal, and postnatal beta-type globin gene expression data, four taxa are primates, and data for three of these primates are from this laboratory. Our results support a model in which a short distance (<10 kb) between epsilon and the adjacent gamma is a plesiomorphic character that allows the LCR to drive embryonic expression of both genes, whereas a longer distance (>10 kb) impedes embryonic activation of the downstream gene. PMID:16488971

  9. A 1.6-Mb contig of yeast artificial chromosomes around the human factor VIII gene reveals three regions homologous to probes for the DXS115 locus and two for the DXYS64 locus.

    PubMed Central

    Freije, D; Schlessinger, D

    1992-01-01

    Two yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) libraries were screened for probes in Xq28, around the gene for coagulation factor VIII (F8). A set of 30 YACs were recovered and assembled into a contig spanning at least 1.6 Mb from the DXYS64 locus to the glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (G6PD). Overlaps among the YACs were determined by several fingerprinting techniques and by additional probes generated from YAC inserts by using Alu-vector or ligation-mediated PCR. Analysis of more than 30 probes and sequence-tagged sites (STSs) made from the region revealed the presence of several homologous genomic segments. For example, a probe for the DXYS64 locus, which maps less than 500 kb 5' of F8, detects a similar but not identical locus between F8 and G6PD. Also, a probe for the DXS115 locus detects at least three identical copies in this region, one in intron 22 of F8 and at least two more, which are upstream of the 5' end of the gene. Comparisons of genomic and YAC DNA suggest that the multiple loci are not created artifactually during cloning but reflect the structure of uncloned human DNA. On the basis of these data, the most likely order for the loci analyzed is tel-DXYS61-DXYS64-(DXS115-3-DXS115-2)-5'F8-(D XS115-1)-3'F8-G6PD. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:1609806

  10. Exploring the diploid wheat ancestral A genome through sequence comparison at the high-molecular-weight glutenin locus region.

    PubMed

    Dong, Lingli; Huo, Naxin; Wang, Yi; Deal, Karin; Luo, Ming-Cheng; Wang, Daowen; Anderson, Olin D; Gu, Yong Qiang

    2012-12-01

    The polyploid nature of hexaploid wheat (T. aestivum, AABBDD) often represents a great challenge in various aspects of research including genetic mapping, map-based cloning of important genes, and sequencing and accurately assembly of its genome. To explore the utility of ancestral diploid species of polyploid wheat, sequence variation of T. urartu (A(u)A(u)) was analyzed by comparing its 277-kb large genomic region carrying the important Glu-1 locus with the homologous regions from the A genomes of the diploid T. monococcum (A(m)A(m)), tetraploid T. turgidum (AABB), and hexaploid T. aestivum (AABBDD). Our results revealed that in addition to a high degree of the gene collinearity, nested retroelement structures were also considerably conserved among the A(u) genome and the A genomes in polyploid wheats, suggesting that the majority of the repetitive sequences in the A genomes of polyploid wheats originated from the diploid A(u) genome. The difference in the compared region between A(u) and A is mainly caused by four differential TE insertion and two deletion events between these genomes. The estimated divergence time of A genomes calculated on nucleotide substitution rate in both shared TEs and collinear genes further supports the closer evolutionary relationship of A to A(u) than to A(m). The structure conservation in the repetitive regions promoted us to develop repeat junction markers based on the A(u) sequence for mapping the A genome in hexaploid wheat. Eighty percent of these repeat junction markers were successfully mapped to the corresponding region in hexaploid wheat, suggesting that T. urartu could serve as a useful resource for developing molecular markers for genetic and breeding studies in hexaploid wheat. PMID:23052831

  11. Development of a YAC contig covering the minimal region of a CSNB1 locus in Xp11

    SciTech Connect

    Boycott, K.M.; Gratton, K.J.; Moore, B.J.

    1994-09-01

    X-linked congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB1) is an eye disorder that includes impairment of night vision, reduced visual acuity and, in some cases, myopia and congenital nystagmus. Electroretinography reveals a marked reduction of the b-wave in affected individuals suggesting that X-linked CSNB is due to a molecular defect in the bipolar layer of the retina. Based on our studies of a large four generation family with X-linked CSNB, a CSNB1 locus was mapped to a 4-5 cM region at Xp11.23-Xp11.22 bounded telomerically by DXS426 and centromerically by DXS988. Using a panel of radiation and conventional somatic cell hybrids, a detailed map of new and published STSs has been generated for the minimal region of CSNB1. PCR primer pairs for STSs has been generated for the minimal region of CSNB1. PCR primer pairs for twenty-five STSs, including eleven end-clones, were used to isolate YAC clones from CEPH, mega-CEPH, and X chromosome-specific YAC libraries. In total, fifty-two YACs were characterized for STS overlaps and assembled to provide a minimum of 3 Mb of physical coverage in the region between DXS426 and DXS988. Five gaps proximal to SYP are still to be closed. Our physical map suggests the following gene order: Xpter-OTAL1-GF1-DXS1011E-MG81-HUMCRAS2P-SYP-Xcen. STS analysis of the YACs revealed three subregions of the physical map which appear to be particularly susceptible to internal deletions and end-clone analysis demonstrated chimerism in six of seventeen YACs. A physical map of Xp11.23-Xp11.22 will provide a resource for the isolation of candidate genes for the X-linked CSNB gene which maps to this region.

  12. Conservation of the primary structure, organization, and function of the human and mouse beta-globin locus-activating regions.

    PubMed Central

    Moon, A M; Ley, T J

    1990-01-01

    DNA sequences located in a region 6-18 kilobases (kb) upstream from the human epsilon-globin gene are known as the locus-activating region (LAR) or dominant control region. This region is thought to play a key role in chromatin organization of the beta-like globin gene cluster during erythroid development. The beta-globin LAR activates linked globin genes in transiently or stably transfected erythroleukemia cells and in erythroid cells of transgenic mice. Since the human beta-globin LAR is functional in mice, we reasoned that critical LAR sequence elements might be conserved between mice and humans. We therefore cloned murine genomic sequences homologous to one portion of the human LAR (site II, positions -11,054 to -10,322 with respect to the human epsilon gene). We found that this murine DNA fragment (mouse LAR site II) and sequences homologous to human LAR sites I and III are located upstream from the mouse beta-like globin gene cluster and determined that their locations relative to the cluster are similar to that of their human counterparts. The homologous site II sequences are 70% identical between mice and humans over a stretch of approximately 800 base pairs. Multiple core sequences with greater than 80% identity were present within this region. Transient and stable transfection assays of K562 erythroleukemia cells demonstrated that both human and mouse LAR elements contain enhancer activity and confer hemin inducibility on a linked human gamma-globin promoter. These results suggest that primary structural elements--and the spatial organization of these elements--are important for function of the beta-globin LAR. Images PMID:2217202

  13. Discovery of functional non-coding conserved regions in the α-synuclein gene locus

    PubMed Central

    Sterling, Lori; Walter, Michael; Ting, Dennis; Schüle, Birgitt

    2014-01-01

    Several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and the Rep-1 microsatellite marker of the α-synuclein ( SNCA) gene have consistently been shown to be associated with Parkinson’s disease, but the functional relevance is unclear. Based on these findings we hypothesized that conserved cis-regulatory elements in the SNCA genomic region regulate expression of SNCA, and that SNPs in these regions could be functionally modulating the expression of SNCA, thus contributing to neuronal demise and predisposing to Parkinson’s disease. In a pair-wise comparison of a 206kb genomic region encompassing the SNCA gene, we revealed 34 evolutionary conserved DNA sequences between human and mouse. All elements were cloned into reporter vectors and assessed for expression modulation in dual luciferase reporter assays.  We found that 12 out of 34 elements exhibited either an enhancement or reduction of the expression of the reporter gene. Three elements upstream of the SNCA gene displayed an approximately 1.5 fold (p<0.009) increase in expression. Of the intronic regions, three showed a 1.5 fold increase and two others indicated a 2 and 2.5 fold increase in expression (p<0.002). Three elements downstream of the SNCA gene showed 1.5 fold and 2.5 fold increase (p<0.0009). One element downstream of SNCA had a reduced expression of the reporter gene of 0.35 fold (p<0.0009) of normal activity. Our results demonstrate that the SNCA gene contains cis-regulatory regions that might regulate the transcription and expression of SNCA. Further studies in disease-relevant tissue types will be important to understand the functional impact of regulatory regions and specific Parkinson’s disease-associated SNPs and its function in the disease process. PMID:25566351

  14. Identification and regional localization of a human IMP dehydrogenase-like locus (IMPHDL1) at 16p13. 13

    SciTech Connect

    Doggett, N.A.; Tesmer, J.G.; Duesing, L.A. ); Callen, D.F.; Chen, Z.L.; Moore, S. ); Stallings, R.L. )

    1993-12-01

    Sequence-tagged sites (STS)s are versatile chromosomal markers for a variety of genome mapping efforts. In this report, the authors describe a randomly generated STS (323F4) from human chromosome 16 genomic DNA that has 90.0% sequence identity to the type I human inosine-5[prime]-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH1) gene and 72% identity to the type II human inosine-5[prime]-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH2) gene. Additional sequencing by primer walking has provided a total of 1380 bp of the human chromosome 16 sequence. The IMPDH-like sequence 323F4 was regionally localized by PCR analysis of a panel of somatic cell hybrids containing different portions of human chromosome 16 to 16p13.3-13.12, between the breakpoints found in hybrids CY196/CY197 and CY198. This regional mapping assignment was further refined to subband 16p13.3 by high-resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization using cosmid 323F4 as a probe. The authors conclude that a third, previously undescribed IMPDH locus, termed IMPDHL1, exists at human chromosome 16p13.13. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  15. A novel deletion/insertion caused by a replication error in the β-globin gene locus control region.

    PubMed

    Joly, Philippe; Lacan, Philippe; Garcia, Caroline; Meley, Roland; Pondarré, Corinne; Francina, Alain

    2011-01-01

    Deletions in the β-globin locus control region (β-LCR) lead to (εγδβ)(0)-thalassemia [(εγδβ)(0)-thal]. In patients suffering from these rare deletions, a normal hemoglobin (Hb), phenotype is found, contrasting with a hematological thalassemic phenotype. Multiplex-ligation probe amplification (MLPA) is an efficient tool to detect β-LCR deletions combined with long-range polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing to pinpoint deletion breakpoints. We present here a novel 11,155 bp β-LCR deletion found in a French Caucasian patient which removes DNase I hypersensitive site 2 (HS2) to HS4 of the β-LCR. Interestingly, a 197 bp insertion of two inverted sequences issued from the HS2-HS3 inter-region is present and suggests a complex rearrangement during replication. Carriers of this type of thalassemia can be misdiagnosed as an α-thal trait. Consequently, a complete α- and β-globin gene cluster analysis is required to prevent a potentially damaging misdiagnosis in genetic counselling. PMID:21797698

  16. A central role for a single c-Myb binding site in a thymic locus control region.

    PubMed Central

    Ess, K C; Whitaker, T L; Cost, G J; Witte, D P; Hutton, J J; Aronow, B J

    1995-01-01

    Locus control regions (LCRs) are powerful assemblies of cis elements that organize the actions of cell-type-specific trans-acting factors. A 2.3-kb LCR in the human adenosine deaminase (ADA) gene first intron, which controls expression in thymocytes, is composed of a 200-bp enhancer domain and extended flanking sequences that facilitate activation from within chromatin. Prior analyses have demonstrated that the enhancer contains a 28-bp core region and local adjacent augmentative cis elements. We now show that the core contains a single critical c-Myb binding site. In both transiently cotransfected human cells and stable chromatin-integrated yeast cells, c-Myb strongly transactivated reporter constructs that contained polymerized core sequences. c-Myb protein was strongly evident in T lymphoblasts in which the enhancer was active and was localized within discrete nuclear structures. Fetal murine thymus exhibited a striking concordance of endogenous c-myb expression with that of mouse ADA and human ADA LCR-directed transgene expression. Point mutation of the c-Myb site within the intact 2.3-kb LCR severely attenuated enhancer activity in transfections and LCR activity in transgenic thymocytes. Within the context of a complex enhancer and LCR, c-Myb can act as an organizer of thymocyte-specific gene expression via a single binding site. PMID:7565722

  17. Characterization of a DNA binding activity in DNAse I hypersensitive site 4 of the human globin locus control region.

    PubMed Central

    Walters, M; Kim, C; Gelinas, R

    1991-01-01

    A portion of the beta-globin Locus Control Region (LCR), which included DNAse I hypersensitive site 4 (HS4), was analyzed for its interactions with nuclear extracts and its contribution to LCR activity in a functional assay. In gel retardation assays, a short fragment from HS4 formed complexes with nuclear extracts from both erythroid and nonerythroid cells, and a core protected sequence 5'GACTGGC3' was revealed by DNAse I protection and methylation interference studies. This sequence resembles the binding sites of CCAAT-family members. Purified CP-2 but not CP-1 was shown to bind this HS4 sequence in a gel shift reaction, suggesting that the HS4 binding activity shares some sequence specificity with the CCAAT-factor family. Utilizing a transient expression assay in murine erythroleukemia cells, steady-state RNA levels were measured from pairs of LCR constructs linked to distinguishable beta-globin reporter genes. A short DNA fragment from HS4 which included the binding site for this novel binding activity accounted for most of the contribution to high level expression made by the entire HS4 region. Images PMID:1923823

  18. Bat Accelerated Regions Identify a Bat Forelimb Specific Enhancer in the HoxD Locus.

    PubMed

    Booker, Betty M; Friedrich, Tara; Mason, Mandy K; VanderMeer, Julia E; Zhao, Jingjing; Eckalbar, Walter L; Logan, Malcolm; Illing, Nicola; Pollard, Katherine S; Ahituv, Nadav

    2016-03-01

    The molecular events leading to the development of the bat wing remain largely unknown, and are thought to be caused, in part, by changes in gene expression during limb development. These expression changes could be instigated by variations in gene regulatory enhancers. Here, we used a comparative genomics approach to identify regions that evolved rapidly in the bat ancestor, but are highly conserved in other vertebrates. We discovered 166 bat accelerated regions (BARs) that overlap H3K27ac and p300 ChIP-seq peaks in developing mouse limbs. Using a mouse enhancer assay, we show that five Myotis lucifugus BARs drive gene expression in the developing mouse limb, with the majority showing differential enhancer activity compared to the mouse orthologous BAR sequences. These include BAR116, which is located telomeric to the HoxD cluster and had robust forelimb expression for the M. lucifugus sequence and no activity for the mouse sequence at embryonic day 12.5. Developing limb expression analysis of Hoxd10-Hoxd13 in Miniopterus natalensis bats showed a high-forelimb weak-hindlimb expression for Hoxd10-Hoxd11, similar to the expression trend observed for M. lucifugus BAR116 in mice, suggesting that it could be involved in the regulation of the bat HoxD complex. Combined, our results highlight novel regulatory regions that could be instrumental for the morphological differences leading to the development of the bat wing. PMID:27019019

  19. Bat Accelerated Regions Identify a Bat Forelimb Specific Enhancer in the HoxD Locus

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Mandy K.; VanderMeer, Julia E.; Zhao, Jingjing; Eckalbar, Walter L.; Logan, Malcolm; Illing, Nicola; Pollard, Katherine S.; Ahituv, Nadav

    2016-01-01

    The molecular events leading to the development of the bat wing remain largely unknown, and are thought to be caused, in part, by changes in gene expression during limb development. These expression changes could be instigated by variations in gene regulatory enhancers. Here, we used a comparative genomics approach to identify regions that evolved rapidly in the bat ancestor, but are highly conserved in other vertebrates. We discovered 166 bat accelerated regions (BARs) that overlap H3K27ac and p300 ChIP-seq peaks in developing mouse limbs. Using a mouse enhancer assay, we show that five Myotis lucifugus BARs drive gene expression in the developing mouse limb, with the majority showing differential enhancer activity compared to the mouse orthologous BAR sequences. These include BAR116, which is located telomeric to the HoxD cluster and had robust forelimb expression for the M. lucifugus sequence and no activity for the mouse sequence at embryonic day 12.5. Developing limb expression analysis of Hoxd10-Hoxd13 in Miniopterus natalensis bats showed a high-forelimb weak-hindlimb expression for Hoxd10-Hoxd11, similar to the expression trend observed for M. lucifugus BAR116 in mice, suggesting that it could be involved in the regulation of the bat HoxD complex. Combined, our results highlight novel regulatory regions that could be instrumental for the morphological differences leading to the development of the bat wing. PMID:27019019

  20. Long-range looping of a locus control region drives tissue-specific chromatin packing within a multigene cluster.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yu-Cheng; Cooke, Nancy E; Liebhaber, Stephen A

    2016-06-01

    The relationships of higher order chromatin organization to mammalian gene expression remain incompletely defined. The human Growth Hormone (hGH) multigene cluster contains five gene paralogs. These genes are selectively activated in either the pituitary or the placenta by distinct components of a remote locus control region (LCR). Prior studies have revealed that appropriate activation of the placental genes is dependent not only on the actions of the LCR, but also on the multigene composition of the cluster itself. Here, we demonstrate that the hGH LCR 'loops' over a distance of 28 kb in primary placental nuclei to make specific contacts with the promoters of the two GH genes in the cluster. This long-range interaction sequesters the GH genes from the three hCS genes which co-assemble into a tightly packed 'hCS chromatin hub'. Elimination of the long-range looping, via specific deletion of the placental LCR components, triggers a dramatic disruption of the hCS chromatin hub. These data reveal a higher-order structural pathway by which long-range looping from an LCR impacts on local chromatin architecture that is linked to tissue-specific gene regulation within a multigene cluster. PMID:26893355

  1. Evolution of the recombination signal sequences in the Ig heavy-chain variable region locus of mammals

    PubMed Central

    Hassanin, Alexandre; Golub, Rachel; Lewis, Susanna M.; Wu, Gillian E.

    2000-01-01

    The Ig and T cell receptor (TCR) loci have an exceptionally dynamic evolutionary history, but the mechanisms responsible remain a subject of speculation. Ig and TCR genes are unique in vertebrates in that they are assembled from V, D, and J segments by site-specific recombination in developing lymphocytes. Here we examine the extent to which the V(D)J recombination in germline cells may have been responsible for remodeling Ig and TCR loci in mammals by asking whether gene segments have evolved as a unit, or whether, instead, recombination signal sequences (RSSs) and coding sequences have different phylogenies. Four distinct types of RSS have been defined in the human Ig heavy-chain variable region (Vh) locus, namely H1, H2, H3, and H5, and no other RSS type has been detected in other mammalian species. There is a well-supported discrepancy between the evolutionary history of the RSSs as compared with the Vh coding sequences: the RSS type H2 of one Vh gene segment has clearly become replaced by a RSS type H3 during mammalian evolution, between 115 and 65 million years ago. Two general models might explain the RSS swap: the first involves an unequal crossing over, and the second implicates germline activation of V(D)J recombination. The Vh-H2/RSS-H3 recombination product has likely been selected during the evolution of mammals because it provides better V(D)J recombination efficiency. PMID:11027341

  2. Long-range looping of a locus control region drives tissue-specific chromatin packing within a multigene cluster

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Yu-Cheng; Cooke, Nancy E.; Liebhaber, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    The relationships of higher order chromatin organization to mammalian gene expression remain incompletely defined. The human Growth Hormone (hGH) multigene cluster contains five gene paralogs. These genes are selectively activated in either the pituitary or the placenta by distinct components of a remote locus control region (LCR). Prior studies have revealed that appropriate activation of the placental genes is dependent not only on the actions of the LCR, but also on the multigene composition of the cluster itself. Here, we demonstrate that the hGH LCR ‘loops’ over a distance of 28 kb in primary placental nuclei to make specific contacts with the promoters of the two GH genes in the cluster. This long-range interaction sequesters the GH genes from the three hCS genes which co-assemble into a tightly packed ‘hCS chromatin hub’. Elimination of the long-range looping, via specific deletion of the placental LCR components, triggers a dramatic disruption of the hCS chromatin hub. These data reveal a higher-order structural pathway by which long-range looping from an LCR impacts on local chromatin architecture that is linked to tissue-specific gene regulation within a multigene cluster. PMID:26893355

  3. Human dopamine {beta}-hydroxylase locus and the chromosome 9q34 region in alcoholism

    SciTech Connect

    Parsian. A.; Suarez, B.K.; Hampe, C.

    1994-09-01

    Human dopamine {beta}-hydroxylase (DBH) is responsible for conversion of dopamine to norepinephrine in catecholamine neurons. Potential inhibitors of this enzyme do exist, but they are generally not effective in vivo in reducing tissue concentrations of catecholamines. The gene for DBH has been localized to 9q34 by linkage analysis and in situ hybridization. Recently there have been reports indicating a suggestive evidence of linkage between DNA markers in 9q34 region and alcoholism. In order to test for this suggestive linkage, we have genotyped a sample of 134 subjects with alcoholism, 30 alcoholic families (n=302) and 92 normal controls. The alcoholic subjects are probands of multiple incidence families. The normal controls are an epidemiologically ascertained samples of middle-aged, unrelated individuals. The two groups were matched for sex and ethnic background. The markers used in this study were dinucleotide repeats in the DBH gene, and two highly informative (CA) markers (D9S64, D9S66) flanking the DBH gene. A preliminary affected-sib-pair analysis was carried out under two diagnostic schemes. Regardless of whether `probable` alcoholics are classified as unaffected (t=0.63) or affected (t=1.50), these data do not reveal a significant excess in DBH marker sharing among affected-sib-pairs. However, the comparison of the DBH marker allele frequencies between the unrelated alcoholic panel and the unrelated normal control panel was significant at the p=0.04 level.

  4. Several regions in the major histocompatibility complex confer risk for anti-CCP-antibody positive rheumatoid arthritis, independent of the DRB1 locus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye-Soon; Lee, Annette T; Criswell, Lindsey A; Seldin, Michael F; Amos, Christopher I; Carulli, John P; Navarrete, Cristina; Remmers, Elaine F; Kastner, Daniel L; Plenge, Robert M; Li, Wentian; Gregersen, Peter K

    2008-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that additional risk loci for RA are present in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), independent of the class II HLA-DRB1 locus. We have now tested a total of 1,769 SNPs across 7.5Mb of the MHC located from 6p22.2 (26.03 Mb) to 6p21.32 (33.59 Mb) derived from the Illumina 550K Beadchip (Illumina, San Diego, CA, USA). For an initial analysis in the whole dataset (869 RA CCP + cases, 1,193 controls), the strongest association signal was observed in markers near the HLA-DRB1 locus, with additional evidence for association extending out into the Class I HLA region. To avoid confounding that may arise due to linkage disequilibrium with DRB1 alleles, we analyzed a subset of the data by matching cases and controls by DRB1 genotype (both alleles matched 1:1), yielding a set of 372 cases with 372 controls. This analysis revealed the presence of at least two regions of association with RA in the Class I region, independent of DRB1 genotype. SNP alleles found on the conserved A1-B8-DR3 (8.1) haplotype show the strongest evidence of positive association (P ~ 0.00005) clustered in the region around the HLA-C locus. In addition, we identified risk alleles that are not present on the 8.1 haplotype, with maximal association signals (P ~ 0.001-0.0027) located near the ZNF311 locus. This latter association is enriched in DRB1*0404 individuals. Finally, several additional association signals were found in the extreme centromeric portion of the MHC, in regions containing the DOB1, TAP2, DPB1, and COL11A2 genes. These data emphasize that further analysis of the MHC is likely to reveal genetic risk factors for rheumatoid arthritis that are independent of the DRB1 shared epitope alleles. PMID:18309376

  5. Hinf I/Tsp509 I and BsoF I polymorphisms in the flanking regions of the human VNTR locus D1S80.

    PubMed

    Duncan, G T; Balamurugan, K; Budowle, B; Tracey, M L

    1996-11-01

    The minisatellite locus D1S80 (1p35-p36), is a highly polymorphic VNTR that also contains a Hinf I polymorphism in the 5' flanking region. Our data suggest that the Hinf I polymorphism is a G > T transversion 58 bases downstream from the forward primer. This G > T transversion also creates a Tsp509 I restriction site. Additionally, a G > C transversion polymorphism was identified in the 3' flanking region by the creation of a BsoF I restriction site immediately adjacent to the repeat region. PMID:9021400

  6. Corticosterone administration upregulated expression of norepinephrine transporter and dopamine β-hydroxylase in rat locus coeruleus and its terminal regions

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yan; Chen, Ping; Li, Ying; Cui, Kui; Noel, Daniel M.; Cummins, Elizabeth D.; Brown, Russell W.; Zhu, Meng-Yang

    2013-01-01

    Stress has been reported to activate the locus coeruleus (LC)–noradrenergic system. In the present study, corticosterone (CORT) was orally administrated to rats for 21 days to mimic stress status. In situ hybridization measurements showed that CORT ingestion significantly increased mRNA levels of norepinephrine transporter (NET) and dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH) in the LC region. Immunofluorescence staining and western blotting revealed that CORT treatment also increased protein levels of NET and DBH in the LC, as well as NET protein levels in the hippocampus, the frontal cortex and the amygdala. However, CORT-induced increase of DBH protein levels only appeared in the hippocampus and the amygdala. Elevated NET and DBH expression in most of these areas (except for NET protein levels in the LC) was abolished by simultaneous treatment with combination of corticosteroid receptor antagonist mifepristone and spironolactone (s.c. for 21 days). Also, treatment with mifepristone alone prevented CORT-induced increases of NET expression and DBH protein levels in the LC. In addition, behavioral tasks showed that CORT ingestion facilitated escape in avoidance trials using an elevated T-maze, but interestingly, there was no significant effect on the escape trial. Corticosteroid receptor antagonists failed to counteract this response in CORT-treated rats. In the open-field task, CORT treatment resulted in less activity in a defined central zone compared to controls and corticosteroid receptor antagonist treatment alleviated this increase. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that chronic exposure to CORT results in a phenotype that mimics stress-induced alteration of noradrenergic phenotypes, but the effects on behavior are task-dependent. As the sucrose consumption test strongly suggests CORT ingestion-induced depression-like behavior, further elucidation of underlying mechanisms may improve our understanding of the correlation between stress and the development of

  7. Molecular bases of genetic diversity and evolution of the immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region (IGHV) gene locus in leporids

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Ana; Lanning, Dennis; Alves, Paulo C.; Mage, Rose G.; Knight, Katherine L.; van der Loo, Wessel; Esteves, Pedro J.

    2012-01-01

    The rabbit has long been a model for studies of the immune system. Work using rabbits contributed both to the battle against infectious diseases such as rabies and syphilis, and to our knowledge of antibodies' structure, function, and regulated expression. With the description of rabbit Ig allotypes, the discovery of different gene segments encoding immunoglobulins became possible. This challenged the “one gene-one protein” dogma. The observation that rabbit allotypic specificities of the variable regions were present on IgM and IgG molecules also led to the hypothesis of Ig class switching. Rabbit allotypes contributed to the documentation of phenomena such as allelic exclusion and imbalance in production of allelic gene products. During the last 30 years, the rabbit Ig allotypes revealed a number of unique features, setting them apart from mice, humans and other mammals. Here, we review the most relevant findings concerning the rabbit IGHV. Among these are the preferential usage of one VH gene in VDJ rearrangements, the existence of trans-species polymorphism in the IGHV locus revealed by serology and confirmed by sequencing IGHV genes in Lepus, the unusually large genetic distances between allelic lineages and the fact that the antibody repertoire is diversified in this species only after birth. The Whole Genome Sequence of rabbit, plus re-sequencing of additional strains and related genera, will allow further evolutionary investigations of antibody variation. Continued research will help define the roles that genetic, allelic and population diversity at antibody loci may play in host-parasite interactions. PMID:21594770

  8. Locus control region HS2 point mutations are generally not responsible for elevated fetal hemoglobin expression of sickle cell patients

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, J.G.

    1994-09-01

    The locus control region (LCR), composed of four hypersensitive sites (HS1-4) 5{prime} of the {epsilon} globin gene, confers strong, copy-number dependent expression on globin genes in transgenic mice. Several {beta}-globin gene cluster haplotypes carry the sickle cell gene, and show variable levels of fetal hemoglobin (Hb F) expression in association with DNA sequence differences in HS2, {gamma} and {beta} globin promoters, and {gamma}IVSII: The Senegal (SEN or No. 3) haplotype generally has high (>10%) Hb F, Benin (BEN or No. 19) has intermediate Hb F (but some low and some high), and Banu (BAN or No. 20) generally has low Hb F. Huisman and colleagues have proposed that `factors produced under conditions of hematopoietic stress, together with genetic determinants on the haplotype-3 like LCR sequences, allow for high level expression of {gamma} globin genes`. We have now used slot blot to screen high Hb F (>9.5%) and low Hb F cases for two of the three HS2 point mutations described by Oener et al. Comparing eight high Hb F BEN/BEN with two low Hb F BEN/BEN, all ten had the BEN mutations considered by Oener et al. to be associated with low Hb F. Comparing three high Hb F BEN/BAN with two low Hb F BEN/BAN, all five were heterozygous at three positions; this is consistent with BEN having G and T and BAN having A at both positions. DNA sequencing of HS2 for BAN, which is generally associated with low HB F, showed that the point mutations at all three positions were those seen in SEN (generally high Hb F); only the AT repeat region showed major differences, confirming results of Huisman and colleagues. Hence, if there is any effect of HS2 of the Senegal sickle cell haplotype in causing elevated Hb F under hematopoietic stress, it must be due to specific variation in the AT repeat region, which Oener et al. have suggested may bind a silencer.

  9. Positional cloning of the nude locus: Genetic, physical, and transcription maps of the region and mutations in the mouse and rat

    SciTech Connect

    Segre, J.A.; Lander, E.S. |; Taylor, B.A.

    1995-08-10

    Mutations in the nude locus in mice and rats produce the pleiotropic phenotype of hairlessness and athymia, resulting in severely compromised immune system. To identify the causative gene, we utilized modern tools and techniques of positional cloning. Specifically, spanning the region in which the nude locus resides, we constructed a genetic map of polymorphic markers, a physical map of yeast artificial chromosomes and bacteriophage P1 clones, and a transcription map of genes obtained by direct cDNA selection and exon trapping. We identified seven novel transcripts with similarity to genes from Drosophila, Caenorhabditis elegans, rat or human and three previously identified mouse genes. Based on our transcription mapping results, we present a novel approach to estimate that the nude locus resides in a region approximately threefold enriched for genes. We confirm a recently published report that the nude phenotype is caused by mutations in a gene encoding a novel winged helix or fork head domain transcription factor, whn. We report as well as the mutations in the rat rnu allele and the complete coding sequence of the rat whn mRNA. 42 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Novel paternity testing by distinguishing parental alleles at a VNTR locus in the differentially methylated region upstream of the human H19 gene.

    PubMed

    Naito, Emiko; Dewa, Koji; Fukuda, Masaaki; Sumi, Hirokazu; Wakabayashi, Yui-ichi; Umetsu, Kazuo; Yuasa, Isao; Yamanouchi, Haruo

    2003-11-01

    Conventional PCR-based genotyping is useful for forensic testing but cannot be used to determine parental origins of alleles in DNA specimens. Here we describe a novel method of combined conventional genotyping and PIA typing (parentally imprinted allele typing) at a minisatellite region upstream from the H19 locus. The PIA typing uses two sets of primers and DNA digested with methylation-sensitive Hha I enzyme. The first amplification produces only the methylated fragment of paternal H19 allele, and the second detects polymorphism in the minisatellite. Hence, this distinguishes paternal and maternal alleles by difference in the DNA methylation. Furthermore, the polymorphism in this polymorphic locus was examined using 199 unrelated Japanese and 171 unrelated Germans, their polymorphism information content being 0.671 and 0.705, respectively. Feasibility of this typing is demonstrated for six families, and the usefulness is shown by application to paternity testing. PMID:14640270

  11. Transcriptomic Identification of ADH1B as a Novel Candidate Gene for Obesity and Insulin Resistance in Human Adipose Tissue in Mexican Americans from the Veterans Administration Genetic Epidemiology Study (VAGES)

    PubMed Central

    Winnier, Deidre A.; Fourcaudot, Marcel; Norton, Luke; Abdul-Ghani, Muhammad A.; Hu, Shirley L.; Farook, Vidya S.; Coletta, Dawn K.; Kumar, Satish; Puppala, Sobha; Chittoor, Geetha; Dyer, Thomas D.; Arya, Rector; Carless, Melanie; Lehman, Donna M.; Curran, Joanne E.; Cromack, Douglas T.; Tripathy, Devjit; Blangero, John; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Göring, Harald H. H.; DeFronzo, Ralph A.; Jenkinson, Christopher P.

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a complex metabolic disease that is more prevalent in ethnic groups such as Mexican Americans, and is strongly associated with the risk factors obesity and insulin resistance. The goal of this study was to perform whole genome gene expression profiling in adipose tissue to detect common patterns of gene regulation associated with obesity and insulin resistance. We used phenotypic and genotypic data from 308 Mexican American participants from the Veterans Administration Genetic Epidemiology Study (VAGES). Basal fasting RNA was extracted from adipose tissue biopsies from a subset of 75 unrelated individuals, and gene expression data generated on the Illumina BeadArray platform. The number of gene probes with significant expression above baseline was approximately 31,000. We performed multiple regression analysis of all probes with 15 metabolic traits. Adipose tissue had 3,012 genes significantly associated with the traits of interest (false discovery rate, FDR ≤ 0.05). The significance of gene expression changes was used to select 52 genes with significant (FDR ≤ 10-4) gene expression changes across multiple traits. Gene sets/Pathways analysis identified one gene, alcohol dehydrogenase 1B (ADH1B) that was significantly enriched (P < 10-60) as a prime candidate for involvement in multiple relevant metabolic pathways. Illumina BeadChip derived ADH1B expression data was consistent with quantitative real time PCR data. We observed significant inverse correlations with waist circumference (2.8 x 10-9), BMI (5.4 x 10-6), and fasting plasma insulin (P < 0.001). These findings are consistent with a central role for ADH1B in obesity and insulin resistance and provide evidence for a novel genetic regulatory mechanism for human metabolic diseases related to these traits. PMID:25830378

  12. Transcriptomic identification of ADH1B as a novel candidate gene for obesity and insulin resistance in human adipose tissue in Mexican Americans from the Veterans Administration Genetic Epidemiology Study (VAGES).

    PubMed

    Winnier, Deidre A; Fourcaudot, Marcel; Norton, Luke; Abdul-Ghani, Muhammad A; Hu, Shirley L; Farook, Vidya S; Coletta, Dawn K; Kumar, Satish; Puppala, Sobha; Chittoor, Geetha; Dyer, Thomas D; Arya, Rector; Carless, Melanie; Lehman, Donna M; Curran, Joanne E; Cromack, Douglas T; Tripathy, Devjit; Blangero, John; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Göring, Harald H H; DeFronzo, Ralph A; Jenkinson, Christopher P

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a complex metabolic disease that is more prevalent in ethnic groups such as Mexican Americans, and is strongly associated with the risk factors obesity and insulin resistance. The goal of this study was to perform whole genome gene expression profiling in adipose tissue to detect common patterns of gene regulation associated with obesity and insulin resistance. We used phenotypic and genotypic data from 308 Mexican American participants from the Veterans Administration Genetic Epidemiology Study (VAGES). Basal fasting RNA was extracted from adipose tissue biopsies from a subset of 75 unrelated individuals, and gene expression data generated on the Illumina BeadArray platform. The number of gene probes with significant expression above baseline was approximately 31,000. We performed multiple regression analysis of all probes with 15 metabolic traits. Adipose tissue had 3,012 genes significantly associated with the traits of interest (false discovery rate, FDR ≤ 0.05). The significance of gene expression changes was used to select 52 genes with significant (FDR ≤ 10(-4)) gene expression changes across multiple traits. Gene sets/Pathways analysis identified one gene, alcohol dehydrogenase 1B (ADH1B) that was significantly enriched (P < 10(-60)) as a prime candidate for involvement in multiple relevant metabolic pathways. Illumina BeadChip derived ADH1B expression data was consistent with quantitative real time PCR data. We observed significant inverse correlations with waist circumference (2.8 x 10(-9)), BMI (5.4 x 10(-6)), and fasting plasma insulin (P < 0.001). These findings are consistent with a central role for ADH1B in obesity and insulin resistance and provide evidence for a novel genetic regulatory mechanism for human metabolic diseases related to these traits. PMID:25830378

  13. Cultural Meaning of Perceived Control: A Meta-Analysis of Locus of Control and Psychological Symptoms across 18 Cultural Regions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Cecilia; Cheung, Shu-fai; Chio, Jasmine Hin-man; Chan, Man-pui Sally

    2013-01-01

    Integrating more than 40 years of studies on locus of control (LOC), this meta-analysis investigated whether (a) the magnitude of the relationship between LOC and psychological symptoms differed among cultures with distinct individualist orientations and (b) depression and anxiety symptoms yielded different patterns of cultural findings with LOC.…

  14. The IGF2 Locus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) is a peptide hormone regulating various cellular processes such as proliferation and apoptosis. IGF2 is vital to embryo development. The IGF2 locus covers approximately 150-kb genomic region on human chromosome 11, containing two imprinted genes, IGF2 and H19, sha...

  15. A Two-Locus Global DNA Barcode for Land Plants: The Coding rbcL Gene Complements the Non-Coding trnH-psbA Spacer Region

    PubMed Central

    Kress, W. John; Erickson, David L.

    2007-01-01

    Background A useful DNA barcode requires sufficient sequence variation to distinguish between species and ease of application across a broad range of taxa. Discovery of a DNA barcode for land plants has been limited by intrinsically lower rates of sequence evolution in plant genomes than that observed in animals. This low rate has complicated the trade-off in finding a locus that is universal and readily sequenced and has sufficiently high sequence divergence at the species-level. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, a global plant DNA barcode system is evaluated by comparing universal application and degree of sequence divergence for nine putative barcode loci, including coding and non-coding regions, singly and in pairs across a phylogenetically diverse set of 48 genera (two species per genus). No single locus could discriminate among species in a pair in more than 79% of genera, whereas discrimination increased to nearly 88% when the non-coding trnH-psbA spacer was paired with one of three coding loci, including rbcL. In silico trials were conducted in which DNA sequences from GenBank were used to further evaluate the discriminatory power of a subset of these loci. These trials supported the earlier observation that trnH-psbA coupled with rbcL can correctly identify and discriminate among related species. Conclusions/Significance A combination of the non-coding trnH-psbA spacer region and a portion of the coding rbcL gene is recommended as a two-locus global land plant barcode that provides the necessary universality and species discrimination. PMID:17551588

  16. Genetic and physical mapping of the Treacher Collins syndrome locus with respect to loci in the chromosome 5q3 region

    SciTech Connect

    Jabs, E.W.; Li, Xiang; Coss, C.; Taylor, E. ); Lovett, M. ); Yamaoka, L.H.; Speer, M.C. ); Cadle, R.; Hall, B. ); Brown, K. )

    1993-10-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome is an autosomal dominant, craniofacial developmental disorder, and its locus (TCOF1) has been mapped to chromosome 5q3. To refine the location of the gene within this region, linkage analysis was performed among the TCOF1 locus and 12 loci (IL9, FGFA, GRL, D5S207, D5S210, D5S376, CSF1R, SPARC, D5S119, D5S209, D5S527, FGFR4) in 13 Treacher Collins syndrome families. The highest maximum lod score was obtained between loci TCOF1 and D5S210 (Z = 10.52; [theta] = 0.02 [+-] 0.07). The best order, IL9-GRL-D5S207/D5S210-CSF1R-SPARC-D5S119, and genetic distances among these loci were determined in the 40 CEPH families by multipoint linkage analysis. YAC clones were used to establish the order of loci, centromere-5[prime]GRL3[prime]-D5S207-D5S210-D5S376-CSF1R-SPARC-D5S119-telomere. By combining known physical mapping data with ours, the order of chromosome 5q3 markers is centomere-IL9-FGFA-5[prime]GRL3[prime]-D5s207-D5S210-D5S376-CSF1R-SPARC-D5S119-D5S209-FGFR4-telomere. Based on this order, haplotype analysis suggests that the TCOF1 locus resides distal CSF1R and proximal to SPARC within a region less than 1 Mb in size. 29 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Transcripts of the MHM region on the chicken Z chromosome accumulate as non-coding RNA in the nucleus of female cells adjacent to the DMRT1 locus.

    PubMed

    Teranishi, M; Shimada, Y; Hori, T; Nakabayashi, O; Kikuchi, T; Macleod, T; Pym, R; Sheldon, B; Solovei, I; Macgregor, H; Mizuno, S

    2001-01-01

    The male hypermethylated (MHM) region, located near the middle of the short arm of the Z chromosome of chickens, consists of approximately 210 tandem repeats of a BamHI 2.2-kb sequence unit. Cytosines of the CpG dinucleotides of this region are extensively methylated on the two Z chromosomes in the male but much less methylated on the single Z chromosome in the female. The state of methylation of the MHM region is established after fertilization by about the 1-day embryonic stage. The MHM region is transcribed only in the female from the particular strand into heterogeneous, high molecular-mass, non-coding RNA, which is accumulated at the site of transcription, adjacent to the DMRT1 locus, in the nucleus. The transcriptional silence of the MHM region in the male is most likely caused by the CpG methylation, since treatment of the male embryonic fibroblasts with 5-azacytidine results in hypo-methylation and active transcription of this region. In ZZW triploid chickens, MHM regions are hypomethylated and transcribed on the two Z chromosomes, whereas MHM regions are hypermethylated and transcriptionally inactive on the three Z chromosomes in ZZZ triploid chickens, suggesting a possible role of the W chromosome on the state of the MHM region. PMID:11321370

  18. Ectopic T Cell Receptor-α Locus Control Region Activity in B Cells Is Suppressed by Direct Linkage to Two Flanking Genes at Once

    PubMed Central

    Andino, Blanca E.; Harrow, Faith; Erhard, Karl F.; Kovalovsky, Damian; Sant'Angelo, Derek B.; Ortiz, Benjamin D.

    2010-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms regulating the activity of the TCRα gene are required for the production of the circulating T cell repertoire. Elements of the mouse TCRα locus control region (LCR) play a role in these processes. We previously reported that TCRα LCR DNA supports a gene expression pattern that mimics proper thymus-stage, TCRα gene-like developmental regulation. It also produces transcription of linked reporter genes in peripheral T cells. However, TCRα LCR-driven transgenes display ectopic transcription in B cells in multiple reporter gene systems. The reasons for this important deviation from the normal TCRα gene regulation pattern are unclear. In its natural locus, two genes flank the TCRα LCR, TCRα (upstream) and Dad1 (downstream). We investigated the significance of this gene arrangement to TCRα LCR activity by examining transgenic mice bearing a construct where the LCR was flanked by two separate reporter genes. Surprisingly, the presence of a second, distinct, reporter gene downstream of the LCR virtually eliminated the ectopic B cell expression of the upstream reporter observed in earlier studies. Downstream reporter gene activity was unaffected by the presence of a second gene upstream of the LCR. Our findings indicate that a gene arrangement in which the TCRα LCR is flanked by two distinct transcription units helps to restrict its activity, selectively, on its 5′-flanking gene, the natural TCRα gene position with respect to the LCR. Consistent with these findings, a TCRα/Dad1 locus bacterial artificial chromosome dual-reporter construct did not display the ectopic upstream (TCRα) reporter expression in B cells previously reported for single TCRα transgenes. PMID:21124935

  19. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in an STS region linked to the Ncc-tmp1A locus are informative for characterizing the differentiation of chromosome 1A in wheat.

    PubMed

    Asakura, N; Mori, N; Ishido, T; Ohtsuka, I; Nakamura, C

    2001-10-01

    Homoeoalleles of Ncc confer nucleus-cytoplasm (NC) compatibility on NC hybrids of wheat with the D plasmon of Aegilops squarrosa. To dissect the chromosomal region containing Ncc, a RAPD marker linked to the Ncc-tmplA locus, which is located on chromosome 1A of T timopheevi, was sequenced and converted to a PCR-based sequence-tagged-site (STS) marker. Five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) between T timopheevi and T turgidum. were detected in a 509-bp genomic DNA fragment. Based on the SNPs, the STS alleles in 164 accessions from emmer wheat, timopheevi wheat and two einkorn wheats, T. urartu and T. boeoticum were surveyed by PCR-RFLP analysis. The sequence comparisons and PCR-RFLP analyses revealed nine alleles based on six SNPs. These SNPs were highly conserved within each group of wheat, and all groups could be distinguished by particular combinations of the SNPs. All accessions of T. urartu had one unique STS allele as compared with the others. Our results indicate that the SNPs in the STS marker linked to the Ncc-tmplA locus would be informative for studies of the differentiation of chromosome 1A in wheat. PMID:11817645

  20. Germline deletion of Igh 3′ regulatory region elements hs5-7 affects B cell specific regulation, rearrangement and insulation of the Igh locus1

    PubMed Central

    Volpi, Sabrina A.; Verma-Gaur, Jiyoti; Hassan, Rabih; Ju, Zhongliang; Roa, Sergio; Chatterjee, Sanjukta; Werling, Uwe; Hou, Harry; Will, Britta; Steidl, Ulrich; Scharff, Matthew; Edelman, Winfried; Feeney, Ann J.; Birshtein, Barbara K.

    2012-01-01

    Regulatory elements located within a ~28 kb region 3′ of the Igh gene cluster (3′ regulatory region, 3′ RR) are required for class switch recombination and for high levels of IgH expression in plasma cells. We previously defined novel DNase I hypersensitive (hs) sites, i.e. hs5-7, immediately downstream of this region. Hs5-7 contains a high density of binding sites for CTCF, a zinc finger protein associated with mammalian insulator activity and is an anchor for interactions with CTCF sites flanking the DH region. To test the function of hs5-7, we have generated mice with an 8 kb deletion encompassing all three hs elements. B cells from hs5-7 KO mice showed a modest increase in expression of the nearest downstream gene. In addition, Igh alleles in hs5-7 KO mice were in a less contracted configuration compared to WT Igh alleles and showed a two-fold increase in the usage of proximal VH7183 gene families. Hs5-7 KO mice were essentially indistinguishable from wild type mice in B cell development, allelic regulation, class switch recombination, and chromosomal looping. We conclude that hs5-7--a high-density CTCF binding region at the 3′ end of the Igh locus--impacts usage of VH regions as far as 500 kb away. PMID:22345664

  1. Genome-Wide Analysis in Swine Associates Corneal Graft Rejection with Donor-Recipient Mismatches in Three Novel Histocompatibility Regions and One Locus Homologous to the Mouse H-3 Locus.

    PubMed

    Nicholls, Susan; Pong-Wong, Ricardo; Mitchard, Louisa; Harley, Ross; Archibald, Alan; Dick, Andrew; Bailey, Michael

    2016-01-01

    In rodents, immune responses to minor histocompatibility antigens are the most important drivers of corneal graft rejection. However, this has not been confirmed in humans or in a large animal model and the genetic loci are poorly characterised, even in mice. The gene sequence data now available for a range of relevant species permits the use of genome-wide association (GWA) techniques to identify minor antigens associated with transplant rejection. We have used this technique in a pre-clinical model of corneal transplantation in semi-inbred NIH minipigs and Babraham swine to search for novel minor histocompatibility loci and to determine whether rodent findings have wider applicability. DNA from a cohort of MHC-matched and MHC-mismatched donors and recipients was analysed for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The level of SNP homozygosity for each line was assessed. Genome-wide analysis of the association of SNP disparities with rejection was performed using log-likelihood ratios. Four genomic blocks containing four or more SNPs significantly linked to rejection were identified (on chromosomes 1, 4, 6 and 9), none at the location of the MHC. One block of 36 SNPs spanned a region that exhibits conservation of synteny with the mouse H-3 histocompatibility locus and contains the pig homologue of the mouse Zfp106 gene, which encodes peptide epitopes known to mediate corneal graft rejection. The other three regions are novel minor histocompatibility loci. The results suggest that rejection can be predicted from SNP analysis prior to transplant in this model and that a similar GWA analysis is merited in humans. PMID:27010211

  2. Genome-Wide Analysis in Swine Associates Corneal Graft Rejection with Donor-Recipient Mismatches in Three Novel Histocompatibility Regions and One Locus Homologous to the Mouse H-3 Locus

    PubMed Central

    Nicholls, Susan; Pong-Wong, Ricardo; Mitchard, Louisa; Harley, Ross; Archibald, Alan; Dick, Andrew; Bailey, Michael

    2016-01-01

    In rodents, immune responses to minor histocompatibility antigens are the most important drivers of corneal graft rejection. However, this has not been confirmed in humans or in a large animal model and the genetic loci are poorly characterised, even in mice. The gene sequence data now available for a range of relevant species permits the use of genome-wide association (GWA) techniques to identify minor antigens associated with transplant rejection. We have used this technique in a pre-clinical model of corneal transplantation in semi-inbred NIH minipigs and Babraham swine to search for novel minor histocompatibility loci and to determine whether rodent findings have wider applicability. DNA from a cohort of MHC-matched and MHC-mismatched donors and recipients was analysed for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The level of SNP homozygosity for each line was assessed. Genome-wide analysis of the association of SNP disparities with rejection was performed using log-likelihood ratios. Four genomic blocks containing four or more SNPs significantly linked to rejection were identified (on chromosomes 1, 4, 6 and 9), none at the location of the MHC. One block of 36 SNPs spanned a region that exhibits conservation of synteny with the mouse H-3 histocompatibility locus and contains the pig homologue of the mouse Zfp106 gene, which encodes peptide epitopes known to mediate corneal graft rejection. The other three regions are novel minor histocompatibility loci. The results suggest that rejection can be predicted from SNP analysis prior to transplant in this model and that a similar GWA analysis is merited in humans. PMID:27010211

  3. Comparative mapping of the Brassica S locus region and its homeolog in Arabidopsis. Implications for the evolution of mating systems in the Brassicaceae.

    PubMed Central

    Conner, J A; Conner, P; Nasrallah, M E; Nasrallah, J B

    1998-01-01

    The crucifer family includes self-incompatible genera, such as Brassica, and self-fertile genera, such as Arabidopsis. To gain insight into mechanisms underlying the evolution of mating systems in this family, we used a selective comparative mapping approach between Brassica campestris plants homozygous for the S8 haplotype and Arabidopsis. Starting with markers flanking the self-incompatibility genes in Brassica, we identified the homeologous region in Arabidopsis as a previously uncharacterized segment of chromosome 1 in the immediate vicinity of the ethylene response gene ETR1. A total of 26 genomic and 21 cDNA markers derived from Arabidopsis yeast artificial and bacterial artificial chromosome clones were used to analyze this region in the two genomes. Approximately half of the cDNAs isolated from the region represent novel expressed sequence tags that do not match entries in the DNA and protein databases. The physical maps that we derived by using these markers as well as markers isolated from bacteriophage clones spanning the S8 haplotype revealed a high degree of synteny at the submegabase scale between the two homeologous regions. However, no sequences similar to the Brassica S locus genes that are known to be required for the self-incompatibility response were detected within this interval or other regions of the Arabidopsis genome. This observation is consistent with deletion of self-recognition genes as a mechanism for the evolution of autogamy in the Arabidopsis lineage. PMID:9596638

  4. Molecular Evolution of the Duplicated Amy Locus in the Drosophila Melanogaster Species Subgroup: Concerted Evolution Only in the Coding Region and an Excess of Nonsynonymous Substitutions in Speciation

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, H.; Yamazaki, T.

    1995-01-01

    From the analysis of restriction maps of the Amy region in eight sibling species belonging to the Drosophila melanogaster species subgroup, we herein show that the patterns of duplication of the Amy gene are almost the same in all species. This indicates that duplication occurred before speciation within this species subgroup. From the nucleotide sequence data, we show a strong within-species similarity between the duplicated loci in the Amy coding region. This is in contrast to a strong similarity in the 5' and 3' flanking regions within each locus (proximal or distal) throughout the species subgroup. This means that concerted evolution occurred only in the Amy coding region and that differentiated evolution between the duplication occurred in the flanking regions. Moreover, when comparing the species, we also found a significant excess of nonsynonymous substitutions. In particular, all the fixed substitutions specific to D. erecta were found to be nonsynonymous. We thus conclude that adaptive protein evolution occurred in the lineage of D. erecta that is a ``specialist'' species for host plants and probably also occurs in the process of speciation in general. PMID:8536970

  5. Usefulness of double locus sequence typing (DLST) for regional and international epidemiological surveillance of methicilin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Basset, P; Senn, L; Prod'hom, G; Bille, J; Francioli, P; Zanetti, G; Blanc, D S

    2010-08-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major cause of nosocomial infections worldwide. To differentiate reliably among S. aureus isolates, we recently developed double locus sequence typing (DLST) based on the analysis of partial sequences of clfB and spa genes. In the present study, we evaluated the usefulness of DLST for epidemiological investigations of MRSA by routinely typing 1242 strains isolated in Western Switzerland. Additionally, particular local and international collections were typed by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and DLST to check the compatibility of DLST with the results obtained by PFGE, and for international comparisons. Using DLST, we identified the major MRSA clones of Western Switzerland, and demonstrated the close relationship between local and international clones. The congruence of 88% between the major PFGE and DLST clones indicated that our results obtained by DLST were compatible with earlier results obtained by PFGE. DLST could thus easily be incorporated in a routine surveillance procedure. In addition, the unambiguous definition of DLST types makes this method more suitable than PFGE for long-term epidemiological surveillance. Finally, the comparison of the results obtained by DLST, multilocus sequence typing, PFGE, Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec typing and the detection of Panton-Valentine leukocidin genes indicated that no typing scheme should be used on its own. It is only the combination of data from different methods that gives the best chance of describing precisely the epidemiology and phylogeny of MRSA. PMID:19832717

  6. Localization of a type 1 diabetes locus in the IL2RA/CD25 region by use of tag single-nucleotide polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Vella, Adrian; Cooper, Jason D; Lowe, Christopher E; Walker, Neil; Nutland, Sarah; Widmer, Barry; Jones, Richard; Ring, Susan M; McArdle, Wendy; Pembrey, Marcus E; Strachan, David P; Dunger, David B; Twells, Rebecca C J; Clayton, David G; Todd, John A

    2005-05-01

    As part of an ongoing search for genes associated with type 1 diabetes (T1D), a common autoimmune disease, we tested the biological candidate gene IL2RA (CD25), which encodes a subunit (IL-2R alpha) of the high-affinity interleukin-2 (IL-2) receptor complex. We employed a tag single-nucleotide polymorphism (tag SNP) approach in large T1D sample collections consisting of 7,457 cases and controls and 725 multiplex families. Tag SNPs were analyzed using a multilocus test to provide a regional test for association. We found strong statistical evidence in the case-control collection (P=6.5x10(-8)) for a T1D locus in the CD25 region of chromosome 10p15 and replicated the association in the family collection (P=7.3x10(-3); combined P=1.3x10(-10)). These results illustrate the utility of tag SNPs in a chromosome-regional test of disease association and justify future fine mapping of the causal variant in the region. PMID:15776395

  7. Internal Duplications of DH, JH, and C Region Genes Create an Unusual IgH Gene Locus in Cattle.

    PubMed

    Ma, Li; Qin, Tong; Chu, Dan; Cheng, Xueqian; Wang, Jing; Wang, Xifeng; Wang, Peng; Han, Haitang; Ren, Liming; Aitken, Robert; Hammarström, Lennart; Li, Ning; Zhao, Yaofeng

    2016-05-15

    It has been suspected for many years that cattle possess two functional IgH gene loci, located on Bos taurus autosome (BTA) 21 and BTA11, respectively. In this study, based on fluorescence in situ hybridization and additional experiments, we showed that all functional bovine IgH genes were located on BTA21, and only a truncated μCH2 exon was present on BTA11. By sequencing of seven bacterial artificial chromosome clones screened from a Hostein cow bacterial artificial chromosome library, we generated a 678-kb continuous genomic sequence covering the bovine IGHV, IGHD, IGHJ, and IGHC genes, which are organized as IGHVn-IGHDn-IGHJn-IGHM1-(IGHDP-IGHV3-IGHDn)3-IGHJn-IGHM2-IGHD-IGHG3-IGHG1-IGHG2-IGHE-IGHA. Although both of two functional IGHM genes, IGHM1 and IGHM2, can be expressed via independent VDJ recombinations, the IGHM2 can also be expressed through class switch recombination. Likely because more IGHD segments can be involved in the expression of IGHM2, the IGHM2 gene was shown to be dominantly expressed in most tissues throughout different developmental stages. Based on the length and identity of the coding sequence, the 23 IGHD segments identified in the locus could be divided into nine subgroups (termed IGHD1 to IGHD9). Except two members of IGHD9 (14 nt in size), all other functional IGHD segments are longer than 30 nt, with the IGHD8 gene (149 bp) to be the longest. These remarkably long germline IGHD segments play a pivotal role in generating the exceptionally great H chain CDR 3 length variability in cattle. PMID:27053761

  8. A functional AT/G polymorphism in the 5'-untranslated region of SETDB2 in the IgE locus on human chromosome 13q14.

    PubMed

    Holt, R J; Vandiedonck, C; Willis-Owen, S A; Knight, J C; Cookson, W O; Moffatt, M F; Zhang, Y

    2015-10-01

    The immunoglobulin E (IgE)-associated locus on human chromosome 13q14 influencing asthma-related traits contains the genes PHF11 and SETDB2. SETDB2 is located in the same linkage disequilibrium region as PHF11 and polymorphisms within SETDB2 have been shown to associate with total serum IgE levels. In this report, we sequenced the 15 exons of SETDB2 and identified a single previously ungenotyped mutation (AT/G, rs386770867) in the 5'-untranslated region of the gene. The polymorphism was found to be significantly associated with serum IgE levels in our asthma cohort (P=0.0012). Electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed that the transcription factor Ying Yang 1 binds to the AT allele, whereas SRY (Sex determining Region Y) binds to the G allele. Allele-specific transcription analysis (allelotyping) was performed in 35 individuals heterozygous for rs386770867 from a panel of 200 British families ascertained through probands with severe stage 3 asthma. The AT allele was found to be significantly overexpressed in these individuals (P=1.26×10(-21)). A dual-luciferase assay with the pGL3 luciferase reporter gene showed that the AT allele significantly affects transcriptional activities. Our results indicate that the IgE-associated AT/G polymorphism (rs386770867) regulates transcription of SETDB2. PMID:26378653

  9. A functional AT/G polymorphism in the 5′-untranslated region of SETDB2 in the IgE locus on human chromosome 13q14

    PubMed Central

    Holt, R J; Vandiedonck, C; Willis-Owen, S A; Knight, J C; Cookson, W O; Moffatt, M F; Zhang, Y

    2015-01-01

    The immunoglobulin E (IgE)-associated locus on human chromosome 13q14 influencing asthma-related traits contains the genes PHF11 and SETDB2. SETDB2 is located in the same linkage disequilibrium region as PHF11 and polymorphisms within SETDB2 have been shown to associate with total serum IgE levels. In this report, we sequenced the 15 exons of SETDB2 and identified a single previously ungenotyped mutation (AT/G, rs386770867) in the 5′-untranslated region of the gene. The polymorphism was found to be significantly associated with serum IgE levels in our asthma cohort (P=0.0012). Electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed that the transcription factor Ying Yang 1 binds to the AT allele, whereas SRY (Sex determining Region Y) binds to the G allele. Allele-specific transcription analysis (allelotyping) was performed in 35 individuals heterozygous for rs386770867 from a panel of 200 British families ascertained through probands with severe stage 3 asthma. The AT allele was found to be significantly overexpressed in these individuals (P=1.26 × 10−21). A dual-luciferase assay with the pGL3 luciferase reporter gene showed that the AT allele significantly affects transcriptional activities. Our results indicate that the IgE-associated AT/G polymorphism (rs386770867) regulates transcription of SETDB2. PMID:26378653

  10. A melanocyte-specific gene, Pmel 17, maps near the silver coat color locus on mouse chromosome 10 and is in a syntenic region on human chromosome 12

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, B.S.; Chintamaneni, C.; Kobayashi, Y.; Kim, K.K. ); Kozak, C.A. ); Copeland, N.G.; Gilbert, D.J.; Jenkins, N. ); Barton, D.; Francke, U. )

    1991-10-15

    Melanocytes preferentially express an mRNA species, Pmel 17, whose protein product cross-reacts with anti-tyrosinase antibodies and whose expression correlates with the melanin content. The authors have now analyzed the deduced protein structure and mapped its chromosomal location in mouse and human. The amino acid sequence deduced from the nucleotide sequence of the Pmel 17 cDNA showed that the protein is composed of 645 amino acids with a molecular weight of 68,600. The Pmel 17 protein contains a putative leader sequence and a potential membrane anchor segment, which indicates that this may be a membrane-associated protein in melanocytes. The deduced protein contains five potential N-glycosylation sites and relatively high levels of serine and threonine. Three repeats of a 26-amino acid motif appear in the middle of the molecule. The human Pmel 17 gene, designated D12S53E, maps to chromosome 12, region 12pter-q21; and the mouse homologue, designated D12S53Eh, maps to the distal region of mouse chromosome 10, a region also known to carry the coat color locus si (silver).

  11. Isolation and characterization of two overlapping cosmid clones from the 4q35 region, near the facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy locus

    SciTech Connect

    Deidda, G.; Grisanti, P.; Vigneti, E.

    1994-09-01

    The gene for facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) has been localized by linkage analysis to the 4q35 region. The most telomeric p13E-11 prove has been shown to detect 4q35 DNA rearrangements in both sporadic and familial cases of the disease. With the aim of constructing a detailed physical map of the 4q35 region and searching for the mutant gene, we used p13E-11 probe to isolate cosmid clones from a human genomic library in a pCos-EMBL 2 vector. Two positive clones were isolated, clones 3 and 5, which partially overlap and carry human genomic inserts of 42 and 45 kb, respectively. The cosmids share a common region containing the p13E-11 region and a stretch of KpnI units consisting of 3.2 kb tandemly repeated sequences (about 10). The restriction maps were constructed using the following enzymes: Bam HI, BgIII, Eco RI, EcoRV, KpnI and Sfi I. Clone 3 extends 4 kb upstream of C5 and stops within the Kpn repeats. Clone 5 extends 4 kb downstream from the Kpn repeats and it presents an additional EcoRI site. Clone 5 contains a stretch of Kpn sequences of nearly 32 kb, corresponding to 10 Kpn repeats; clone 3 contains a stretch of 29 kb corresponding to 9 Kpn repeats, as determined by PFGE analysis of partial digestion of the clones. Clone 5 seems to contain the entire Eco RI region prone to rearrangements in FSHD patients. From clone 5 several subclones were obtained, from the Kpn region and from the region spanning from the last Kpn repeat to the cloning site. No single copy sequences were detected. Subclones from the 3{prime} end region contain beta-satellite or Sau3A-like sequences. In situ hybridization with the whole C5 cosmid shows hybridization signals at the tip of chromosome 4 (4q35) and chromosome 10 (10q26), in the pericentromeric region of chromosome 1 (1q12) and in the p12 region of the acrocentric chromosomes (chr. 21, 22, 13, 14, 15).

  12. The Locus Lookup Tool at MaizeGDB: Identification of Genomic Regions in Maize by Integrating Sequence Information with Physical and Genetic Maps

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methods to automatically integrate sequence information with physical and genetic maps are scarce. The Locus Lookup Tool enables researchers to define windows of genomic sequence likely to contain loci of interest where only genetic or physical mapping associations are reported. Using the Locus Look...

  13. FOB1 affects DNA topoisomerase I in vivo cleavages in the enhancer region of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ribosomal DNA locus

    PubMed Central

    Di Felice, Francesca; Cioci, Francesco; Camilloni, Giorgio

    2005-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae the FOB1 gene affects replication fork blocking activity at the replication fork block (RFB) sequences and promotes recombination events within the rDNA cluster. Using in vivo footprinting assays we mapped two in vivo Fob1p-binding sites, RFB1 and RFB3, located in the rDNA enhancer region and coincident with those previously reported to be in vitro binding sites. We previously provided evidences that DNA topoisomerase I is able to cleave two sites within this region. The results reported in this paper, indicate that the DNA topoisomerase I cleavage specific activity at the enhancer region is affected by the presence of Fob1p and independent of replication and transcription activities. We thus hypothesize that the binding to DNA of Fob1p itself may be the cause of the DNA topoisomerase I activity in the rDNA enhancer. PMID:16269824

  14. A high-resolution annotated physical map of the human chromosome 13q12-13 region containing the breast cancer susceptibility locus BRCA2.

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, S G; Cayanis, E; de Fatima Bonaldo, M; Bowcock, A M; Deaven, L L; Edelman, I S; Gallardo, T; Kalachikov, S; Lawton, L; Longmire, J L; Lovett, M; Osborne-Lawrence, S; Rothstein, R; Russo, J J; Soares, M B; Sunjevaric, I; Venkatraj, V S; Warburton, D; Zhang, P; Efstratiadis, A

    1996-01-01

    Various types of physical mapping data were assembled by developing a set of computer programs (Integrated Mapping Package) to derive a detailed, annotated map of a 4-Mb region of human chromosome 13 that includes the BRCA2 locus. The final assembly consists of a yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) contig with 42 members spanning the 13q12-13 region and aligned contigs of 399 cosmids established by cross-hybridization between the cosmids, which were selected from a chromosome 13-specific cosmid library using inter-Alu PCR probes from the YACs. The end sequences of 60 cosmids spaced nearly evenly across the map were used to generate sequence-tagged sites (STSs), which were mapped to the YACs by PCR. A contig framework was generated by STS content mapping, and the map was assembled on this scaffold. Additional annotation was provided by 72 expressed sequences and 10 genetic markers that were positioned on the map by hybridization to cosmids. Images Fig. 3 PMID:8570617

  15. Transcription Factors Oct-1 and GATA-3 Cooperatively Regulate Th2 Cytokine Gene Expression via the RHS5 within the Th2 Locus Control Region

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kiwan; Kim, Najung; Lee, Gap Ryol

    2016-01-01

    The T helper type 2 (Th2) locus control region (LCR) regulates Th2 cell differentiation. Several transcription factors bind to the LCR to modulate the expression of Th2 cytokine genes, but the molecular mechanisms behind Th2 cytokine gene regulation are incompletely understood. Here, we used database analysis and an oligonucleotide competition/electrophoretic mobility shift assays to search for transcription factors binding to RHS5, a DNase I hypersensitive site (DHS) within the Th2 LCR. Consequently, we demonstrated that GATA-binding protein-3 (GATA-3), E26 transformation-specific protein 1 (Ets-1), octamer transcription factor-1 (Oct-1), and Oct-2 selectively associate with RHS5. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation and luciferase reporter assays showed that Oct-1 and Oct-2 bound within the Il4 promoter region and the Th2 LCR, and that Oct-1 and GATA-3 or Oct-2 synergistically triggered the transactivational activity of the Il4 promoter through RHS5. These results suggest that Oct-1 and GATA-3/Oct-2 direct Th2 cytokine gene expression in a cooperative manner. PMID:26840450

  16. Linkage Block and Recombination Suppression at the Pi-ta locus at the Centromere Region of Rice Chromosome 12

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Pi-ta gene, located near the centromeric region of chromosome 12 is an effective resistance gene to Magnaporthe oryzae that causes rice blast disease. Pi-ta has been incorporated into diverse resistant rice cultivars by classical plant breeding in the southern US and worldwide. Previously, la...

  17. Identification and secondary structure analysis of a region affecting electrophoretic mobility of the STR locus SE33.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dennis Y; Green, Robert L; Lagacé, Robert E; Oldroyd, Nicola J; Hennessy, Lori K; Mulero, Julio J

    2012-05-01

    SE33 is one of the most informative markers in forensic use due to its high power of discrimination. During the course of developing the AmpFℓSTR(®) NGM SElect™ PCR Amplification Kit several SE33 primer designs were screened with one primer pair yielding a high frequency of discordant alleles when compared to the AmpFℓSTR(®) SEfiler Plus™ PCR Amplification Kit. This discordance was mostly specific to samples of African descent with an estimated frequency of 5.1% and was a result of a mobility shift of approximately +0.84nt. The sequence analysis of the affected alleles revealed that the only difference from the wild type sequence was a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) outside of the SE33 repeat but within the amplicon of this particular set of experimental primers. In total, we identified three different SNPs all within 9nt of each other, each of which could cause the mobility shift individually. Further characterization of this region via site directed mutagenesis and thermostability measurements strongly suggests that this polymorphic region contains a secondary structure that, when disrupted due to the presence of a variant SNP, results in a mobility shift relative to the wild type sequence. To overcome this problem, the SE33 primers used in the final configuration of the NGM SElect™ Kit avoided the amplification of this polymorphic region yielding in turn results highly concordant with the SEfiler Plus™ Kit. PMID:21757416

  18. X-ray-induced specific-locus mutations in the ad-3 region of two-component heterokaryons of Neurospora crassa. X. Heterozygous effects of multilocus deletion mutations of genotype ad-3A or ad-3B.

    PubMed

    de Serres, F J; Overton, L K; Sadler, B M

    1992-05-01

    Previous studies on X-ray-induced irreparable adenine-3 mutations (designated [ad-3]IR), induced in heterokaryon 12 of Neurospora crassa, demonstrated that they were not recessive and exhibited heterozygous effects in terms of markedly reduced linear growth rates (de Serres, 1965). Complementation tests with a series of tester strains carrying multilocus deletion mutations in the ad-3 and immediately adjacent genetic regions demonstrated that X-ray-induced irreparable mutations map, in the main part, as a series of overlapping multilocus deletion mutations that extend both proximally and distally into the immediately adjacent genetic regions, as well as into the 'X' region (a region of unknown, but essential function) between ad-3A and ad-3B (de Serres, 1968, 1989). Further studies (de Serres and Miller, 1988) have shown that the heterozygous effects of multilocus deletion mutations in the ad-3 region can be modified genetically and biochemically. In the present paper, the heterozygous effects of X-ray-induced multilocus deletion mutations of genotype ad-3A or ad-3B, induced in heterokaryon 12 (Webber and de Serres, 1965; de Serres, 1988, 1989), have been determined. These data show that 57.7% (15/26) of X-ray-induced multilocus deletion mutations covering the ad-3A locus have heterozygous effects, in terms of reduced linear growth rates, in forced dikaryons with a gene/point mutant at the ad-3B locus and 80.0% (20/25) in forced dikaryons with a multilocus deletion mutation covering the ad-3B locus. In addition, 35.1% (20/57) of X-ray-induced multilocus deletion mutations covering the ad-3B locus have heterozygous effects in forced dikaryons with a gene/point mutant at the ad-3A locus, and 100.0% (35/35) in forced dikaryons with a multilocus deletion mutation covering the ad-3A locus. These results demonstrate that the dominant or recessive characteristics of X-ray-induced specific-locus mutations resulting from multilocus deletion mutations are allele specific

  19. Large Deletions at the SHOX Locus in the Pseudoautosomal Region Are Associated with Skeletal Atavism in Shetland Ponies.

    PubMed

    Rafati, Nima; Andersson, Lisa S; Mikko, Sofia; Feng, Chungang; Raudsepp, Terje; Pettersson, Jessica; Janecka, Jan; Wattle, Ove; Ameur, Adam; Thyreen, Gunilla; Eberth, John; Huddleston, John; Malig, Maika; Bailey, Ernest; Eichler, Evan E; Dalin, Göran; Chowdary, Bhanu; Andersson, Leif; Lindgren, Gabriella; Rubin, Carl-Johan

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal atavism in Shetland ponies is a heritable disorder characterized by abnormal growth of the ulna and fibula that extend the carpal and tarsal joints, respectively. This causes abnormal skeletal structure and impaired movements, and affected foals are usually killed. In order to identify the causal mutation we subjected six confirmed Swedish cases and a DNA pool consisting of 21 control individuals to whole genome resequencing. We screened for polymorphisms where the cases and the control pool were fixed for opposite alleles and observed this signature for only 25 SNPs, most of which were scattered on genome assembly unassigned scaffolds. Read depth analysis at these loci revealed homozygosity or compound heterozygosity for two partially overlapping large deletions in the pseudoautosomal region (PAR) of chromosome X/Y in cases but not in the control pool. One of these deletions removes the entire coding region of the SHOX gene and both deletions remove parts of the CRLF2 gene located downstream of SHOX. The horse reference assembly of the PAR is highly fragmented, and in order to characterize this region we sequenced bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones by single-molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing technology. This considerably improved the assembly and enabled size estimations of the two deletions to 160-180 kb and 60-80 kb, respectively. Complete association between the presence of these deletions and disease status was verified in eight other affected horses. The result of the present study is consistent with previous studies in humans showing crucial importance of SHOX for normal skeletal development. PMID:27207956

  20. Large Deletions at the SHOX Locus in the Pseudoautosomal Region Are Associated with Skeletal Atavism in Shetland Ponies

    PubMed Central

    Rafati, Nima; Andersson, Lisa S.; Mikko, Sofia; Feng, Chungang; Raudsepp, Terje; Pettersson, Jessica; Janecka, Jan; Wattle, Ove; Ameur, Adam; Thyreen, Gunilla; Eberth, John; Huddleston, John; Malig, Maika; Bailey, Ernest; Eichler, Evan E.; Dalin, Göran; Chowdary, Bhanu; Andersson, Leif; Lindgren, Gabriella; Rubin, Carl-Johan

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal atavism in Shetland ponies is a heritable disorder characterized by abnormal growth of the ulna and fibula that extend the carpal and tarsal joints, respectively. This causes abnormal skeletal structure and impaired movements, and affected foals are usually killed. In order to identify the causal mutation we subjected six confirmed Swedish cases and a DNA pool consisting of 21 control individuals to whole genome resequencing. We screened for polymorphisms where the cases and the control pool were fixed for opposite alleles and observed this signature for only 25 SNPs, most of which were scattered on genome assembly unassigned scaffolds. Read depth analysis at these loci revealed homozygosity or compound heterozygosity for two partially overlapping large deletions in the pseudoautosomal region (PAR) of chromosome X/Y in cases but not in the control pool. One of these deletions removes the entire coding region of the SHOX gene and both deletions remove parts of the CRLF2 gene located downstream of SHOX. The horse reference assembly of the PAR is highly fragmented, and in order to characterize this region we sequenced bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones by single-molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing technology. This considerably improved the assembly and enabled size estimations of the two deletions to 160−180 kb and 60−80 kb, respectively. Complete association between the presence of these deletions and disease status was verified in eight other affected horses. The result of the present study is consistent with previous studies in humans showing crucial importance of SHOX for normal skeletal development. PMID:27207956

  1. Mapping of retrotransposon sequences in the unstable region surrounding the spinal muscular atrophy locus in 5q13

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, M.J.; Nesbit, M.A.; Theodosiou, A.M.

    1995-05-20

    The mutation that underlies the autosomal recessive disorder spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is located on chromosome 5q13. Recent studies show that SMA patients frequently have deletions and rearrangements in this region compared to normal controls. During the isolation of candidate cDNAs for the disease, the authors identified a sequence that shows high homology to the THE-1 retrotransposon gene family. Using YAC fragmentation techniques, they have refined the localization of this sequence to the domain known to show instability in SMA patients. The implication of these results for the mechanism of the mutation in SMA is discussed. 20 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Localization of a locus (GLC1B) for adult-onset primary open angle glaucoma to the 2cen-q13 region

    SciTech Connect

    Stoilova, D.; Trifan, O.C.; Sarfarazi, M.

    1996-08-15

    Primary open angle glaucoma (GLC1) is a common ocular disorder with a characteristic degeneration of the optic nerve and visual field defects that is often associated with an elevated intraocular pressure. The severe but rare juvenile-onset type has previously been mapped to 1q21-q31, and its genetic heterogeneity has been established. Herein, we present a new locus (GLC1B) for one form of GLC1 on chromosome 2cen-q13 with a clinical presentation of low to moderate intraocular pressure, onset in late 40s, and a good response to medical treatment. Two-point and haplotype analyses of affected and unaffected meioses in six families provided maximum linkage information with D2S417, GATA112EO3, D2S113, D2S373, and D2S274 (lod scores ranging from 3.11 to 6.48) within a region of 8.5 cM that is flanked by D2S2161 and D2S2264. Analysis of affected meioses alone revealed no recombination with an additional two markers (D2S2264 and D2S135) in a region of 11.2 cM that is flanked by D2S2161 and D2S176. Analysis of unaffected meioses identified only one healthy 86-year-old male who has inherited the entire affected haplotype and, hence, is a gene carrier for this condition. Eight additional families with similar and/or different clinical presentation did not show any linkage to this region and, therefore, provided evidence for genetic heterogeneity of adult-onset primary open angle glaucoma. 63 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Electromobility Shift Assay Reveals Evidence in Favor of Allele-Specific Binding of RUNX1 to the 5' Hypersensitive Site 4-Locus Control Region.

    PubMed

    Dehghani, Hossein; Ghobakhloo, Sepideh; Neishabury, Maryam

    2016-08-01

    In our previous studies on the Iranian β-thalassemia (β-thal) patients, we identified an association between the severity of the β-thal phenotype and the polymorphic palindromic site at the 5' hypersensitive site 4-locus control region (5'HS4-LCR) of the β-globin gene cluster. Furthermore, a linkage disequilibrium was observed between this region and XmnI-HBG2 in the patient population. Based on this data, it was suggested that the well-recognized phenotype-ameliorating role assigned to positive XmnI could be associated with its linked elements in the LCR. To investigate the functional significance of polymorphisms at the 5'HS4-LCR, we studied its influence on binding of transcription factors. Web-based predictions of transcription factor binding revealed a binding site for runt-related transcription factor 1 (RUNX1), when the allele at the center of the palindrome (TGGGG(A/G)CCCCA) was A but not when it was G. Furthermore, electromobility shift assay (EMSA) presented evidence in support of allele-specific binding of RUNX1 to 5'HS4. Considering that RUNX1 is a well-known regulator of hematopoiesis, these preliminary data suggest the importance of further studies to confirm this interaction and consequently investigate its functional and phenotypical relevance. These studies could help us to understand the molecular mechanism behind the phenotype modifying role of the 5'HS4-LCR polymorphic palindromic region (rs16912979), which has been observed in previous studies. PMID:27492765

  4. A novel sandwich hybridization method for selecting cDNAs from large genomic regions: Identification of cDNAs from the cloned genomic DNA spanning the XLRP locus

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, D.; McHenry, C.; Fujita, R.

    1994-09-01

    We have developed an efficient hybridization-based cDNA-selection method. A sandwich of three species - single-stranded cDNA, tagged RNA derived from genomic DNA, and biotinylated RNA complementary to the tag - allows specific retention of hybrids on an avidin-matrix. Previously, using model experiments, we demonstrated highly specific and efficient selection of a retinal gene, NRL, from complex mixtures of cDNA clones, using a sub-library from a 5 kb NRL genomic clone. We have now applied this selection strategy to isolate cDNAs from human adult retina and fetal eye libraries, with the {open_quotes}genomic RNA{close_quotes} derived from two YAC clones (OTC-C and 55B) spanning the region of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) locus RP3 at Xp21.1. Effectiveness of the selection-method was monitored by enrichment of TCTEX-1L gene that maps within the 55B YAC. Of the 15 selected cDNA clones that hybridized to the 55B YAC DNA, five appear to the map to specific cosmid clones derived from the 55B YAC. Inserts in these selected cDNA clones range from 0.5 to 2.3 kb in size. Additional clones are now being isolated and characterized. This procedure should be independent of the size or complexity of genomic DNA being used for selection, allow for the isolation of full-length cDNAs, and may have wider application.

  5. Physical and transcript map of the autosomal dominant colobomatous microphthalmia locus on chromosome 15q12-q15 and refinement to a 4.4 Mb region.

    PubMed

    Michon, Laetitia; Morlé, Laurette; Bozon, Muriel; Duret, Laurent; Zech, Jean-Christophe; Godet, Jacqueline; Plauchu, Henry; Edery, Patrick

    2004-07-01

    Congenital microphthalmia is a developmental disorder characterized by shortened axial length of the eye. We have previously mapped the gene responsible for autosomal dominant colobomatous microphthalmia in a 5-generation family to chromosome 15q12-q15. Here, we set up a physical and transcript map of the 13.8 cM critical region, flanked by loci D15S1002 and D15S1040. Physical mapping and genetic linkage analysis using 20 novel polymorphic markers allowed the refinement of the disease locus to two intervals in close vicinity, namely a centromeric interval, bounded by microsatellite DNA markers m3-m17, and a telomeric interval, m76-m24, encompassing respectively 1.9 and 2.5 Mb. Moreover, we excluded three candidate genes, CKTSF1B1, KLF13 and CX36. Finally, although a phenomenon of anticipation was suggested by phenotypic and pedigree data, no abnormal expansion of three trinucleotide repeats mapping to the refine interval was found in affected individuals. PMID:15083168

  6. Genetic mapping of a locus for multiple ephiphyseal dysplasia (EDM2) to a region of chromosome 1 containing a type IX collagen gene

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, M.D.; Choi, HiChang; Warman, M.L.; Loughlin, J.A.; Wordsworth, P.; Sykes, B.C.; Irven, C.M.M.; Smith, M.; Wynne-Davies, R.; Lipson, M.H.

    1994-10-01

    Multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED) is a dominantly inherited chondrodysplasia characterized by mild short stature and early-onset osteoarthrosis. Some forms of MED clinically resemble another chondrodysplasia phenotype, the mild form of pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH). On the basis of their clinical similarities as well as similar ultra-structural and biochemical features in cartilage from some patients, it has been proposed that MED and PSACH belong to a single bone-dysplasia family. Recently, both mild and severe PSACH as well as a form of MED have been linked to the same interval on chromosome 19, suggesting that they may be allelic disorders. Linkage studies with the chromosome 19 markers were carried out in a large family with MED and excluded the previously identified interval. Using this family, we have identified a MED locus on the short arm of chromosome 1, in a region containing the gene (COL9A2) that encodes the {alpha}2 chain of type IX collagen, a structural component of the cartilage extracellular matrix. 39 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Risk of childhood asthma is associated with CpG-site polymorphisms, regional DNA methylation and mRNA levels at the GSDMB/ORMDL3 locus

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo, Nathalie; Reinius, Lovisa E.; Greco, Dario; Gref, Anna; Orsmark-Pietras, Christina; Persson, Helena; Pershagen, Göran; Hedlin, Gunilla; Melén, Erik; Scheynius, Annika; Kere, Juha; Söderhäll, Cilla

    2015-01-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in GSDMB (Gasdermin B) and ORMDL3 (ORMDL sphingolipid biosynthesis regulator 3) are strongly associated with childhood asthma, but the molecular alterations contributing to disease remain unknown. We investigated the effects of asthma-associated SNPs on DNA methylation and mRNA levels of GSDMB and ORMDL3. Genetic association between GSDMB/ORMDL3 and physician-diagnosed childhood asthma was confirmed in the Swedish birth-cohort BAMSE. CpG-site SNPs (rs7216389 and rs4065275) showed differences in DNA methylation depending on carrier status of the risk alleles, and were significantly associated with methylation levels in two CpG sites in the 5′ UTR (untranslated region) of ORMDL3. In the Swedish Search study, we found significant differences in DNA methylation between asthmatics and controls in five CpG sites; after adjusting for lymphocyte and neutrophil cell counts, three remained significant: one in IKZF3 [IKAROS family zinc finger 3 (Aiolos); cg16293631] and two in the CpG island (CGI) of ORMDL3 (cg02305874 and cg16638648). Also, cg16293631 and cg02305874 correlated with mRNA levels of ORMDL3. The association between methylation and asthma was independent of the genotype in rs7216389, rs4065275 and rs12603332. Both SNPs and CpG sites showed significant associations with ORMDL3 mRNA levels. SNPs influenced expression independently of methylation, and the residual association between methylation and expression was not mediated by these SNPs. We found a differentially methylated region in the CGI shore of ORMDL3 with six CpG sites less methylated in CD8+ T-cells. In summary, this study supports that there are differences in DNA methylation at this locus between asthmatics and controls; and both SNPs and CpG sites are independently associated with ORMDL3 expression. PMID:25256354

  8. Fine mapping and targeted SNP survey using rice-wheat gene colinearity in the region of the Bo1 boron toxicity tolerance locus of bread wheat.

    PubMed

    Schnurbusch, Thorsten; Collins, Nicholas C; Eastwood, Russell F; Sutton, Tim; Jefferies, Steven P; Langridge, Peter

    2007-08-01

    Toxicity due to high levels of soil boron (B) represents a significant limitation to cereal production in some regions, and the Bo1 gene provides a major source of B toxicity tolerance in bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). A novel approach was used to develop primers to amplify and sequence gene fragments specifically from the Bo1 region of the hexaploid wheat genome. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified were then used to generate markers close to Bo1 on the distal end of chromosome 7BL. In the 16 gene fragments totaling 19.6 kb, SNPs were observed between the two cultivars Cranbrook and Halberd at a low frequency (one every 613 bp). Furthermore, SNPs were distributed unevenly, being limited to only two genes. In contrast, RFLP provided a much greater number of genetic markers, with every tested gene identifying polymorphism. Bo1 previously known only as a QTL was located as a discrete Mendelian locus. In total, 28 new RFLP, PCR and SSR markers were added to the existing map. The 1.8 cM Bo1 interval of wheat corresponds to a 227 kb section of rice chromosome 6L encoding 21 predicted proteins with no homology to any known B transporters. The co-dominant PCR marker AWW5L7 co-segregated with Bo1 and was highly predictive of B tolerance status within a set of 94 Australian bread wheat cultivars and breeding lines. The markers and rice colinearity described here represent tools that will assist B tolerance breeding and the positional cloning of Bo1. PMID:17571251

  9. A transcription map of the regions surrounding the CSF1R locus on human chromosome 5q31: Candidate genes for diastrophic dysplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Clines, G.; Lovett, M.

    1994-09-01

    Diastrophic dysplasia (DTD) is an autosomal recessive disorder of unknown pathogenesis that is characterized by abnormal skeletal and cartilage growth. Phenotypic characteristics of the disorder include short stature, scoliosis, and deformation of the first metacarpal. The diastrophic dysplasia gene has been localized to chromosome 5q31-33, within {approximately}60 kb of the colony stimulating factor 1 receptor gene (CSF1R). We have used direct cDNA selection to build a transcription map across {approximately}250 kb surrounding and including the CSF1R locus. cDNA pools from human placenta, activated T cells, cerebellum, Hela cells, fetal brain, chondrocytes, chondrosarcomas and osteosarcomas were multiplexed in these selections. After two rounds of selection, an analysis revealed that {approximately}70% of the selected cDNAs were contained within the contig. DNA sequencing and cosmid mapping data from a collection of 310 clones revealed the presence of three new genes in this region that show no appreciable homologies on sequence database searches, as well as cDNA clones from the CSF1R and the PDGFRB loci (another of the known genes in the region). An additional cDNA was found with 100% homology to the gene encoding human ribosomal protein L7 (RPL7). This cDNA comprised {approximately}25% of all selected clones. However, further analysis of the genomic contig revealed the presence of an RPL7 processed pseudogene in very close proximity to the CSF1R and PDGFRB genes. The selection of processed pseudogenes is one previously anticipated artifact of selection metholodolgies, but has not been previously observed. Mutational analysis of the three new genes is underway in diastrophic dysplasia families, as is derivation of full length cDNA clones and the expansion of this detailed transcription map into a larger genomic contig.

  10. Corticosterone administration up-regulated expression of norepinephrine transporter and dopamine β-hydroxylase in rat locus coeruleus and its terminal regions.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yan; Chen, Ping; Li, Ying; Cui, Kui; Noel, Daniel M; Cummins, Elizabeth D; Peterson, Daniel J; Brown, Russell W; Zhu, Meng-Yang

    2014-02-01

    Stress has been reported to activate the locus coeruleus (LC)-noradrenergic system. In this study, corticosterone (CORT) was orally administrated to rats for 21 days to mimic stress status. In situ hybridization measurements showed that CORT ingestion significantly increased mRNA levels of norepinephrine transporter (NET) and dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH) in the LC region. Immunofluorescence staining and western blotting revealed that CORT treatment also increased protein levels of NET and DBH in the LC, as well as NET protein levels in the hippocampus, the frontal cortex and the amygdala. However, CORT-induced increase in DBH protein levels only appeared in the hippocampus and the amygdala. Elevated NET and DBH expression in most of these areas (except for NET protein levels in the LC) was abolished by simultaneous treatment with combination of corticosteroid receptor antagonist mifepristone and spironolactone (s.c. for 21 days). Also, treatment with mifepristone alone prevented CORT-induced increases of NET expression and DBH protein levels in the LC. In addition, behavioral tasks showed that CORT ingestion facilitated escape in avoidance trials using an elevated T-maze, but interestingly, there was no significant effect on the escape trial. Corticosteroid receptor antagonists failed to counteract this response in CORT-treated rats. In the open-field task, CORT treatment resulted in less activity in a defined central zone compared to controls and corticosteroid receptor antagonist treatment alleviated this increase. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that chronic exposure to CORT results in a phenotype that mimics stress-induced alteration of noradrenergic phenotypes, but the effects on behavior are task dependent. As the sucrose consumption test strongly suggests CORT ingestion-induced depression-like behavior, further elucidation of underlying mechanisms may improve our understanding of the correlation between stress and the development of depression. PMID

  11. Genome annotation of a 1.5 Mb region of human chromosome 6q23 encompassing a quantitative trait locus for fetal hemoglobin expression in adults

    PubMed Central

    Close, James; Game, Laurence; Clark, Barnaby; Bergounioux, Jean; Gerovassili, Ageliki; Thein, Swee Lay

    2004-01-01

    Background Heterocellular hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin (HPFH) is a common multifactorial trait characterized by a modest increase of fetal hemoglobin levels in adults. We previously localized a Quantitative Trait Locus for HPFH in an extensive Asian-Indian kindred to chromosome 6q23. As part of the strategy of positional cloning and a means towards identification of the specific genetic alteration in this family, a thorough annotation of the candidate interval based on a strategy of in silico / wet biology approach with comparative genomics was conducted. Results The ~1.5 Mb candidate region was shown to contain five protein-coding genes. We discovered a very large uncharacterized gene containing WD40 and SH3 domains (AHI1), and extended the annotation of four previously characterized genes (MYB, ALDH8A1, HBS1L and PDE7B). We also identified several genes that do not appear to be protein coding, and generated 17 kb of novel transcript sequence data from re-sequencing 97 EST clones. Conclusion Detailed and thorough annotation of this 1.5 Mb interval in 6q confirms a high level of aberrant transcripts in testicular tissue. The candidate interval was shown to exhibit an extraordinary level of alternate splicing – 19 transcripts were identified for the 5 protein coding genes, but it appears that a significant portion (14/19) of these alternate transcripts did not have an open reading frame, hence their functional role is questionable. These transcripts may result from aberrant rather than regulated splicing. PMID:15169551

  12. The Sclerotinia sclerotiorum Mating Type Locus (MAT) Contains a 3.6-kb Region That Is Inverted in Every Meiotic Generation

    PubMed Central

    Maruthachalam, Karunakaran; Wu, Bo-Ming; Subbarao, Krishna V.

    2013-01-01

    Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is a fungal plant pathogen and the causal agent of lettuce drop, an economically important disease of California lettuce. The structure of the S. sclerotiorum mating type locus MAT has previously been reported and consists of two idiomorphs that are fused end-to-end as in other homothallics. We investigated the diversity of S. sclerotiorum MAT using a total of 283 isolates from multiple hosts and locations, and identified a novel MAT allele that differed by a 3.6-kb inversion and was designated Inv+, as opposed to the previously known S. sclerotiorum MAT that lacked the inversion and was Inv-. The inversion affected three of the four MAT genes: MAT1-2-1 and MAT1-2-4 were inverted and MAT1-1-1 was truncated at the 3’-end. Expression of MAT genes differed between Inv+ and Inv- isolates. In Inv+ isolates, only one of the three MAT1-2-1 transcript variants of Inv- isolates was detected, and the alpha1 domain of Inv+ MAT1-1-1 transcripts was truncated. Both Inv- and Inv+ isolates were self-fertile, and the inversion segregated in a 1∶1 ratio regardless of whether the parent was Inv- or Inv+. This suggested the involvement of a highly regulated process in maintaining equal proportions of Inv- and Inv+, likely associated with the sexual state. The MAT inversion region, defined as the 3.6-kb MAT inversion in Inv+ isolates and the homologous region of Inv- isolates, was flanked by a 250-bp inverted repeat on either side. The 250-bp inverted repeat was a partial MAT1-1-1 that through mediation of loop formation and crossing over, may be involved in the inversion process. Inv+ isolates were widespread, and in California and Nebraska constituted half of the isolates examined. We speculate that a similar inversion region may be involved in mating type switching in the filamentous ascomycetes Chromocrea spinulosa, Sclerotinia trifoliorum and in certain Ceratocystis species. PMID:23457637

  13. Microsatellite and single nucleotide polymorphisms in the β-globin locus control region-hypersensitive Site 2: SPECIFICITY of Tunisian βs chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Ben Mustapha, Maha; Moumni, Imen; Zorai, Amine; Douzi, Kaïs; Ghanem, Abderraouf; Abbes, Salem

    2012-01-01

    The diversity of sickle cell disease severity is attributed to several cis acting factors, among them the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and (AT) rich region in the β-locus control region (β-LCR). This contains five DNase I hypersensitive sites (HS) located 6 to 22 kb upstream to the ϵ gene. The most important of these is the HS2 (5' β-LCR-HS2), characterized by the presence of three different SNPs and a microsatellite region known to be in association with β(S) chromosomes in various populations. The aim of this study was to present the molecular investigation of the 5' β-LCR-HS2 site in normal and sickle cell disease individuals in order to determine if there is any correlation or specificity between these molecular markers, the β(S) Tunisian chromosomes and phenotypical expression of sickle cell disease. One hundred and twenty-four chromosomes from Tunisian individuals (49 β(S) carriers and 13 normal individuals) were screened by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing for the polymorphic short tandem microsatellite repeats (AT)(X)N(12)(AT)(Y) and the three SNPs (rs7119428, rs9736333 and rs60240093) of the 5' β-LCR-HS2. Twelve configurations of the microsatellite motif were found with an ancestral configuration elaborated by ClustalW software. Normal and mutated alleles were observed at the homozygous and heterozygous states for the three SNPs. Correlation between microsatellites and SNPs suggests that mutant SNP alleles were mainly associated, in the homozygous sickle cell disease phenotype, with the (AT)(8)N(12)GT(AT)(7) configuration, whereas, normal SNP alleles were associated with the (AT)(X)N(12)(AT)(11) configurations in normal β(A) chromosomes. The correlation of these various configurations with Hb F expression was also investigated. The principal component analysis (PCA) showed the correlation between the homozygous sickle cell disease phenotype, mutated SNP alleles and the Benin microsatellite configuration (AT)(8)N(12)GT

  14. Fine mapping of the pleiotropic locus B for black spine and orange mature fruit color in cucumber identifies a 50 kb region containing a R2R3-MYB transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuhong; Wen, Changlong; Weng, Yiqun

    2013-08-01

    In cucumber, Cucumis sativus L., the spine and skin colors are two important fruit quality traits for variety improvement. In this study, we investigated the inheritance of spine and mature fruit skin colors in F2 and F3 populations derived from a cross between two inbred lines WI7200 (black spine and orange fruit skin colors) and WI7201 (white spine and creamy fruit skin colors). We confirmed that a single, dominant gene, B, controlled both black spine color and orange mature fruit color. Initial framework mapping with microsatellite markers located the B locus in the distal region of the short arm of cucumber chromosome 4. Fine mapping was conducted with draft genome scaffold-assisted chromosome walking and stepwise increase of mapping population sizes, which allowed for the assignment of the B locus to a 50 kb genomic DNA region with two flanking markers that were 0.06 and 0.09 cM, respectively, from the B locus in a mapping population of 2,001 F2 plants. Gene annotation of this 50 kb region identified six genes including one encoding for a R2R3-MYB transcription factor. Sequence alignment of the R2R3-MYB homologs between the two parent inbreds identified a 1 bp deletion in the third intron of this gene in WI 7201. A molecular marker based on this indel was co-segregating with the spine and fruit colors. Quantitative RT-PCR revealed higher level of expression of this R2R3-MYB gene in WI7200 than in WI7201 in both immature and mature fruits. This R2R3-MYB gene seems to be the best candidate gene for the B locus conditioning black spine and orange mature fruit colors of cultivated cucumber. PMID:23689749

  15. 2-Amino-N6-hydroxyadenine induces gene/point mutations and multiple-locus mutations, but not multilocus deletion mutations, in the ad-3 region of a two-component heterokaryon of Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    de Serres, F J; Brockman, H E; Overton, L K

    1991-08-01

    The mutagenicity of 2-amino-N6-hydroxyadenine (AHA) has been studied in Neurospora crassa by treating a two-component heterokaryon (H-12) and recovering specific-locus mutations induced in the ad-3 region. This assay system permits the identification of ad-3A and/or ad-3B mutants resulting from gene/point mutations, multilocus deletion mutations, and multiple-locus mutations of various genotypes, involving one or both loci. Genetic characterization of the ad-3 mutants recovered from experiments with AHA in H-12 shows that 98.9% (270/273) of the ad-3 mutants are gene/point mutations (ad-3R), 1.1% (3/270) are unknowns, and none is a multilocus deletion mutation (ad-3IR). Among the gene/point mutations, 3.3% (9/273) are multiple-locus mutations (gene/point mutations with a closely-linked recessive lethal mutation [ad-3R + RLCL]). Another 25.3% (69/273) are multiple-locus mutations with a recessive lethal mutation located elsewhere in the genome [ad-3R + RL]. Heterokaryon tests for allelic complementation among the ad-3BR mutants showed that 90.8% (139/153) of the mutants were complementing, and 20.3% (31/153) were leaky. In addition, 32.5% (38/117) of the ad-3AR mutants were leaky. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that AHA produces specific-locus mutations in the ad-3 region of N. crassa by base-pair substitution. The data from the present experiments are compared with the data for 2-aminopurine (2AP)-induced ad-3 mutants in H-12 (de Serres and Brockman, 1991). Whereas, 2AP is a weak mutagen in H-12, AHA is extremely potent (Brockman et al., 1987). In contrast with 2AP, AHA induces ad-3 mutants exclusively by gene/point mutation in H-12. We conclude that whereas AHA induces ad-3 mutants predominantly by AT to GC base-pair transitions, 2AP induces ad-3 mutants by a wide variety of mechanisms including: (1) AT to GC and GC to AT base-pair transitions, (2) frameshift mutations, (3) other, as yet unidentified, intragenic alterations, (4) small multilocus

  16. Linkage analysis of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy and microsatellite loci spanning 61 cM of human chromosome 6p in 19 nuclear pedigrees provides no evidence for a susceptibility locus in this region

    SciTech Connect

    Elmslie, F.V.; Williamson, M.P.; Rees, M.

    1996-09-01

    Linkage analysis in separately ascertained families of probands with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) has previously provided evidence both for and against the existence of a locus (designated {open_quotes}EJM1{close_quotes}), on chromosome 6p, predisposing to a trait defined as either clinical JME, its associated electroencephalographic abnormality, or idiopathic generalized epilepsy. Linkage analysis was performed in 19 families in which a proband and at least one first- or two second-degree relatives have clinical JME. Family members were typed for seven highly polymorphic microsatellite markers on chromosome 6p: D6S260, D6S276, D6S291, D6S271, D6S465, D6S257, and D6S254. Pairwise and multipoint linkage analysis was carried out under the assumptions of autosomal dominant inheritance at 70% and 50% penetrance and autosomal recessive inheritance at 70% and 50% penetrance. No significant evidence in favor of linkage to the clinical trait of JME was obtained for any locus. The region formally excluded (LOD score <-2) by using multipoint analysis varies depending on the assumptions made concerning inheritance parameters and the proportion of linked families, {alpha} - that is, the degree of locus heterogeneity. Further analysis either classifying all unaffected individuals as unknown or excluding a subset of four families in which pyknoleptic absence seizures were present in one or more individuals did not alter these conclusions. 24 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Homologous Elements hs3a and hs3b in the 3′ Regulatory Region of the Murine Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain (Igh) Locus Are Both Dispensable for Class-switch Recombination*

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yi; Pieretti, Joyce; Ju, Zhongliang; Wei, Shiniu; Christin, John R.; Bah, Fatmata; Birshtein, Barbara K.; Eckhardt, Laurel A.

    2011-01-01

    Immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) genes are formed, tested, and modified to yield diverse, specific, and high affinity antibody responses to antigen. The processes involved must be regulated, however, to avoid unintended damage to chromosomes. The 3′ regulatory region of the Igh locus plays a major role in regulating class-switch recombination (CSR), the process by which antibody effector functions are modified during an immune response. Loss of all known enhancer-like elements in this region dramatically impairs CSR, but individual element deletions have no effect on this process. In the present study, we explored the hypothesis that an underlying functional redundancy in the homologous elements hs3a and hs3b was masking the importance of either element to CSR. Several transgenic mouse lines were generated, each carrying a bacterial artificial chromosome transgene that mimicked Igh locus structure but in which hs3a was missing and hs3b was flanked by loxP sites. Matings to Cyclization Recombination Enzyme-expressing mice established “pairs” of lines that differed only in the presence or absence of hs3b. Remarkably, CSR remained robust in the absence of both hs3a and hs3b, suggesting that the remaining two elements of the 3′ regulatory region, hs1.2 and hs4, although individually dispensable for CSR, are, together, sufficient to support CSR. PMID:21673112

  18. Identification of a novel susceptibility locus at 13q34 and refinement of the 20p12.2 region as a multi-signal locus associated with bladder cancer risk in individuals of European ancestry.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Jonine D; Middlebrooks, Candace D; Banday, A Rouf; Ye, Yuanqing; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Koutros, Stella; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Rafnar, Thorunn; Bishop, Timothy; Furberg, Helena; Matullo, Giuseppe; Golka, Klaus; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Taylor, Jack A; Fletcher, Tony; Siddiq, Afshan; Cortessis, Victoria K; Kooperberg, Charles; Cussenot, Olivier; Benhamou, Simone; Prescott, Jennifer; Porru, Stefano; Dinney, Colin P; Malats, Núria; Baris, Dalsu; Purdue, Mark P; Jacobs, Eric J; Albanes, Demetrius; Wang, Zhaoming; Chung, Charles C; Vermeulen, Sita H; Aben, Katja K; Galesloot, Tessel E; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Sulem, Patrick; Stefansson, Kari; Kiltie, Anne E; Harland, Mark; Teo, Mark; Offit, Kenneth; Vijai, Joseph; Bajorin, Dean; Kopp, Ryan; Fiorito, Giovanni; Guarrera, Simonetta; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Selinski, Silvia; Hengstler, Jan G; Gerullis, Holger; Ovsiannikov, Daniel; Blaszkewicz, Meinolf; Castelao, Jose Esteban; Calaza, Manuel; Martinez, Maria Elena; Cordeiro, Patricia; Xu, Zongli; Panduri, Vijayalakshmi; Kumar, Rajiv; Gurzau, Eugene; Koppova, Kvetoslava; Bueno-De-Mesquita, H Bas; Ljungberg, Börje; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Krogh, Vittorio; Dorronsoro, Miren; Travis, Ruth C; Tjønneland, Anne; Brennan, Paul; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Riboli, Elio; Conti, David; Stern, Marianna C; Pike, Malcolm C; Van Den Berg, David; Yuan, Jian-Min; Hohensee, Chancellor; Jeppson, Rebecca P; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Roupret, Morgan; Comperat, Eva; Turman, Constance; De Vivo, Immaculata; Giovannucci, Edward; Hunter, David J; Kraft, Peter; Lindstrom, Sara; Carta, Angela; Pavanello, Sofia; Arici, Cecilia; Mastrangelo, Giuseppe; Kamat, Ashish M; Zhang, Liren; Gong, Yilei; Pu, Xia; Hutchinson, Amy; Burdett, Laurie; Wheeler, William A; Karagas, Margaret R; Johnson, Alison; Schned, Alan; Monawar Hosain, G M; Schwenn, Molly; Kogevinas, Manolis; Tardón, Adonina; Serra, Consol; Carrato, Alfredo; García-Closas, Reina; Lloreta, Josep; Andriole, Gerald; Grubb, Robert; Black, Amanda; Diver, W Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M; Weinstein, Stephanie; Virtamo, Jarmo; Haiman, Christopher A; Landi, Maria Teresa; Caporaso, Neil E; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Vineis, Paolo; Wu, Xifeng; Chanock, Stephen J; Silverman, Debra T; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Rothman, Nathaniel

    2016-03-15

    Candidate gene and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 15 independent genomic regions associated with bladder cancer risk. In search for additional susceptibility variants, we followed up on four promising single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that had not achieved genome-wide significance in 6911 cases and 11 814 controls (rs6104690, rs4510656, rs5003154 and rs4907479, P < 1 × 10(-6)), using additional data from existing GWAS datasets and targeted genotyping for studies that did not have GWAS data. In a combined analysis, which included data on up to 15 058 cases and 286 270 controls, two SNPs achieved genome-wide statistical significance: rs6104690 in a gene desert at 20p12.2 (P = 2.19 × 10(-11)) and rs4907479 within the MCF2L gene at 13q34 (P = 3.3 × 10(-10)). Imputation and fine-mapping analyses were performed in these two regions for a subset of 5551 bladder cancer cases and 10 242 controls. Analyses at the 13q34 region suggest a single signal marked by rs4907479. In contrast, we detected two signals in the 20p12.2 region-the first signal is marked by rs6104690, and the second signal is marked by two moderately correlated SNPs (r(2) = 0.53), rs6108803 and the previously reported rs62185668. The second 20p12.2 signal is more strongly associated with the risk of muscle-invasive (T2-T4 stage) compared with non-muscle-invasive (Ta, T1 stage) bladder cancer (case-case P ≤ 0.02 for both rs62185668 and rs6108803). Functional analyses are needed to explore the biological mechanisms underlying these novel genetic associations with risk for bladder cancer. PMID:26732427

  19. Interallelic Complementation at the Suppressor of Forked Locus of Drosophila Reveals Complementation between Suppressor of Forked Proteins Mutated in Different Regions

    PubMed Central

    Simonelig, M.; Elliott, K.; Mitchelson, A.; O'Hare, K.

    1996-01-01

    The Su(f) protein of Drosophila melanogaster shares extensive homologies with proteins from yeast (RNA14) and man (77 kD subunit of cleavage stimulation factor) that are required for 3' end processing of mRNA. These homologies suggest that su(f) is involved in mRNA 3' end formation and that some aspects of this process are conserved throughout eukaryotes. We have investigated the genetic and molecular complexity of the su(f) locus. The su(f) gene is transcribed to produce three RNAs and could encode two proteins. Using constructs that contain different parts of the locus, we show that only the larger predicted gene product of 84 kD is required for the wild-type function of su(f). Some lethal alleles of su(f) complement to produce viable combinations. The structures of complementing and noncomplementing su(f) alleles indicate that 84-kD Su(f) proteins mutated in different domains can act in combination for partial su(f) function. Our results suggest protein-protein interaction between or within wild-type Su(f) molecules. PMID:8846900

  20. Linkage analysis of idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) and marker loci on chromosome 6p in families of patients with juvenile myocloni epilepsy: No evidence for an epilepsy locus in the HLA region

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehouse, W.P.; Rees, M.; Curtis, D.; Sundqvist, A.; Parker, K.; Chung, E.; Baralle, D.; Gardiner, R.M.

    1993-09-01

    Evidence for a locus (EJM1) in the HLA region of chromosome 6p predisposing to idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) in the families of patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) has been obtained in two previous studies of separately ascertained groups of kindreds. Linkage analysis has been undertaken in a third set of 25 families including a patient with JME and at least one first-degree relative with IGE. Family members were typed for eight polymorphic loci on chromosome 6p: F13A, D6889, D6S109, D6S105, D6S10, C4B, DQA1/A2, and TCTE1. Pairwise and multipoint linkage analysis was carried out assuming autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive inheritance and age-dependent high or low penetrance. No significant evidence in favor of linkage was obtained at any locus. Multipoint linkage analysis generated significant exclusion data (lod score < -2.0) at HLA and for a region 10-30 cM telomeric to HLA, the extent of which varied with the level of penetrance assumed. These observations indicate that genetic heterogeneity exists within this epilepsy phenotype. 39 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. The immunoglobulin kappa locus contains a second, stronger B-cell-specific enhancer which is located downstream of the constant region.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, K B; Neuberger, M S

    1989-01-01

    The description of cell lines capable of transcribing immunoglobulin heavy or light chain genes in the apparent absence of an active enhancer has led us to look for novel enhancers in the immunoglobulin gene loci. Here we show that there is a second B-cell-specific enhancer in the mouse kappa locus and that this is located 9 kb downstream of C kappa. This enhancer is some 7-fold stronger than the kappa-intron enhancer and shows striking sequence homologies to the lymphotropic papovavirus, IgH and kappa-intron enhancers. The location of the kappa 3' enhancer between C kappa and the RS element means that it is deleted in some B cells that express lambda light chains. Images PMID:2507312

  2. Essential role of NF-E2 in remodeling of chromatin structure and transcriptional activation of the epsilon-globin gene in vivo by 5' hypersensitive site 2 of the beta-globin locus control region.

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Q H; McDowell, J C; Dean, A

    1996-01-01

    Much of our understanding of the process by which enhancers activate transcription has been gained from transient-transfection studies in which the DNA is not assembled with histones and other chromatin proteins as it is in the cell nucleus. To study the activation of a mammalian gene in a natural chromatin context in vivo, we constructed a minichromosome containing the human epsilon-globin gene and portions of the beta-globin locus control region (LCR). The minichromosomes replicate and are maintained at stable copy number in human erythroid cells. Expression of the minichromosomal epsilon-globin gene requires the presence of beta-globin LCR elements in cis, as is the case for the chromosomal gene. We determined the chromatin structure of the epsilon-globin gene in both the active and inactive states. The transcriptionally inactive locus is covered by an array of positioned nucleosomes extending over 1,400 bp. In minichromosomes with a (mu)LCR or DNase I-hypersensitive site 2 (HS2) which actively transcribe the epsilon-globin gene, the nucleosome at the promoter is altered or disrupted while positioning of nucleosomes in the rest of the locus is retained. All or virtually all minichromosomes are simultaneously hypersensitive to DNase I both at the promoter and at HS2. Transcriptional activation and promoter remodeling, as well as formation of the HS2 structure itself, depended on the presence of the NF-E2 binding motif in HS2. The nucleosome at the promoter which is altered upon activation is positioned over the transcriptional elements of the epsilon-globin gene, i.e., the TATA, CCAAT, and CACCC elements, and the GATA-1 site at -165. The simple availability of erythroid transcription factors that recognize these motifs is insufficient to allow expression. As in the chromosomal globin locus, regulation also occurs at the level of chromatin structure. These observations are consistent with the idea that one role of the beta-globin LCR is to maintain promoters free

  3. Characterization of a human X-linked gene from the DXS732E locus in the candidate region for the anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (EDA) gene (Xq13.1)

    SciTech Connect

    Gault, J.; Zonana, J.; Zeltinger, J.

    1994-09-01

    A conserved mouse genomic clone was used to identify a homologous human genomic clone (the DXS732E locus), which was subsequently employed to isolate cDNAs from a human fetal brain library. Nine unique overlapping cDNAs were isolated, and sequences analysis of 3.9 kb identified a putative 1 kb ORF. GRAIL analysis of the sequence supported the hypothesis that the putative ORF was coding sequence, and Prosite analysis of the putative ORF identified potential glycosylation and phosphorylation sites. The 5{prime} end of the gene maps within a CpG island, and comparison of cDNA sequences indicate the gene is alternatively spliced at its 3{prime} end. Northern analysis and RT-PCR indicate that two different sized messages appear to be expressed with the gene expressed in human fetal kidney, intestine, brain, and muscle. The gene is expressed in 77 day human skin, a time when hair follicle formation occurs. Anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (EDA) results in the abnormal morphogenesis of hair, teeth and eccrine sweat glands. A positional cloning strategy towards cloning the EDA gene had been used, and deletion and X-autosome translocation patients have been useful in further delimiting the EDA region. The present gene at the DXS732E locus is partially deleted in one EDA patient who does not have other apparent abnormalities. No rearrangements of the gene have been detected in two female X-autosome translocation EDA patients, nor in four additional male patients with submicroscopic molecular deletions.

  4. Definition of the locus responsible for systemic carnitine deficiency within a 1.6-cM region of mouse chromosome 11 by detailed linkage analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Okita, Kohei; Tokino, Takashi; Nishimori, Hiroyuki

    1996-04-15

    Carnitine is an essential cofactor for oxidation of mitochondrial fatty acids. Carnitine deficiency results in failure of energy production by mitochondria and leads to metabolic encephalopathy, lipid-storage myopathy, and cardiomyopathy. The juvenile visceral steatosis (JVS) mouse, an animal model of systemic carnitine deficiency, inherits the JVS phenotype in autosomal recessive fashion, through a mutant allele mapped to mouse chromosome 11. As a step toward identifying the gene responsible for JVS by positional cloning, we attempted to refine the jvs locus in the mouse by detailed linkage analysis with 13 microsatellite markers, using 190 backcross progeny. Among the 13 loci tested, 5 (defined by markers D11Mit24, D11Mit111,D11Nds9, D11Mit86, and D11Mit23) showed no recombination, with a maximum lod score of 52.38. Our results implied that the jvs gene can be sought on mouse chromosome 11 within a genetic distance no greater than about 1.6 cM. 21 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Characterization of a kinesin-related gene ATSV, within the tuberous sclerosis locus (TSC1) candidate region on chromosome 9q34

    SciTech Connect

    Furlong, R.A.; Zhou, Chun Yan; Ferguson-Smith, M.A.; Affara, N.A.

    1996-05-01

    In the search for candidate genes for the tuberous sclerosis (TSC1) disease locus on chromosome 9q34, we have isolated an overlapping series of 22 plasmid and phage cDNA clones covering nearly 7 kb and with an open reading frame of 5070 bp encoding a protein of 1690 amino acids. The putative protein product is a member of the kinesin superfamily and is homologous to the mouse KIF1A and the Caenorhabditas elegans unc-104 genes. Both KIF1A and unc-104 function in the anterograde axonal transport of synaptic vesicles. The human homolog is therefore termed H-ATSV (axonal transporter of synaptic vesicles, HGMW-approved nomenclature ATSV). Screening of DNA from 107 tuberous sclerosis patients and 80 unaffected individuals with H-ATSV cDNA probes by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis/Southern blotting following digestion by rare-cutting methylation-sensitive restriction enzymes showed variant banding patterns in three patients with tuberous sclerosis. However, further analysis indicated that these variant fragments represent a rare polymorphism probably associated with methylation of clustered restriction sites. There is no evidence to support H-ATSV as a candidate gene for TSC1. 28 refs., 5 figs.

  6. A new temperature-insensitive allele of the Arabidopsis AXR6/CUL1 locus derived from a missense mutation in the C-terminal RBX1 binding region

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Yukiko; Hayashi, Makoto; Nishimura, Mikio; Yamamoto, Kotaro T

    2015-01-01

    We isolated a new recessive allele at the AUXIN RESISTANT6/CULLIN1 (AXR6/CUL1) locus, axr6–101, from an EMS-mutagenized population of Arabidopsis thaliana, the Landsberg erecta ecotype. axr6–101 is auxin resistant and semi-dwarf similar to the other recessive axr6 mutants. The axr6–101 phenotype is caused by the E716K substitution of the CUL1 protein, which is likely to affect its ability to bind to the C-terminal RING domain of RING-box 1 (RBX1). The previously reported allele of AXR6, cul1–7, is caused by a substitution at T510 that binds to the N-terminal β-strand of RBX1. Although cul1–7 shows temperature-sensitive phenotype, the axr6–101 phenotype is largely unaffected by temperature. axr6–101 may provide an important genetic resource for study of the structure−function relationship of the CUL1 protein. PMID:26339842

  7. Genome-wide association study using a high-density SNP-array and case-control design identifies a novel essential hypertension susceptibility locus in the promoter region of eNOS

    PubMed Central

    Salvi, Erika; Kutalik, Zoltán; Glorioso, Nicola; Benaglio, Paola; Frau, Francesca; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Arima, Hisatomi; Hoggart, Clive; Tichet, Jean; Nikitin, Yury P.; Conti, Costanza; Seidlerova, Jitka; Tikhonoff, Valérie; Stolarz-Skrzypek, Katarzyna; Johnson, Toby; Devos, Nabila; Zagato, Laura; Guarrera, Simonetta; Zaninello, Roberta; Calabria, Andrea; Stancanelli, Benedetta; Troffa, Chiara; Thijs, Lutgarde; Rizzi, Federica; Simonova, Galina; Lupoli, Sara; Argiolas, Giuseppe; Braga, Daniele; D’Alessio, Maria C.; Ortu, Maria F.; Ricceri, Fulvio; Mercurio, Maurizio; Descombes, Patrick; Marconi, Maurizio; Chalmers, John; Harrap, Stephen; Filipovsky, Jan; Bochud, Murielle; Iacoviello, Licia; Ellis, Justine; Stanton, Alice V.; Laan, Maris; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Melander, Olle; Jeunemaitre, Xavier; Manunta, Paolo; Shabo, Amnon; Vineis, Paolo; Cappuccio, Francesco P.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Matullo, Giuseppe; Rivolta, Carlo; Munroe, Patricia B.; Barlassina, Cristina; Staessen, Jan A; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Cusi, Daniele

    2012-01-01

    Essential hypertension is a multi-factorial disorder and is the main risk factor for renal and cardiovascular complications. The research on the genetics of hypertension has been frustrated by the small predictive value of the discovered genetic variants. The HYPERGENES Project investigated associations between genetic variants and essential hypertension pursuing a two-stage study by recruiting cases and controls from extensively characterized cohorts recruited over many years in different European regions. The discovery phase consisted of 1,865 cases and 1,750 controls genotyped with 1M Illumina array. Best hits were followed up in a validation panel of 1,385 cases and 1,246 controls that were genotyped with a custom array of 14,055 markers. We identified a new hypertension susceptibility locus (rs3918226) in the promoter region of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) gene (odds ratio 1.54; 95% CI 1.37-1.73; combined p=2.58·10−13). A meta-analysis, using other in-silico/de novo genotyping data for a total of 21714 subjects, resulted in an overall odds ratio of 1.34 (95% CI 1.25-1.44, p=1.032·10−14). The quantitative analysis on a population-based sample revealed an effect size of 1.91 (95% CI 0.16-3.66) for systolic and 1.40 (95% CI 0.25-2.55) for diastolic blood pressure. We identified in-silico a potential binding site for ETS transcription-factors directly next to rs3918226, suggesting a potential modulation of eNOS expression. Biological evidence links eNOS with hypertension, as it is a critical mediator of cardiovascular homeostasis and blood pressure control via vascular tone regulation. This finding supports the hypothesis that there may be a causal genetic variation at this locus. PMID:22184326

  8. hobo Induced rearrangements in the yellow locus influence the insulation effect of the gypsy su(Hw)-binding region in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Gause, M; Hovhannisyan, H; Kan, T; Kuhfittig, S; Mogila, V; Georgiev, P

    1998-01-01

    The su(Hw) protein is responsible for the insulation mediated by the su(Hw)-binding region present in the gypsy retrotransposon. In the y2 mutant, su(Hw) protein partially inhibits yellow transcription by repressing the function of transcriptional enhancers located distally from the yellow promoter with respect to gypsy. y2 mutation derivatives have been induced by the insertion of two hobo copies on the both sides of gypsy: into the yellow intron and into the 5' regulatory region upstream of the wing and body enhancers. The hobo elements have the same structure and orientation, opposite to the direction of yellow transcription. In the sequence context, where two copies of hobo are separated by the su(Hw)-binding region, hobo-dependent rearrangements are frequently associated with duplications of the region between the hobo elements. Duplication of the su(Hw)-binding region strongly inhibits the insulation of the yellow promoter separated from the body and wing enhancers by gypsy. These results provide a better insight into mechanisms by which the su(Hw)-binding region affects the enhancer function. PMID:9649529

  9. Amh and Dmrta2 genes map to tilapia (Oreochromis spp.) linkage group 23 within quantitative trait locus regions for sex determination.

    PubMed

    Shirak, Andrey; Seroussi, Eyal; Cnaani, Avner; Howe, Aimee E; Domokhovsky, Raisa; Zilberman, Noam; Kocher, Thomas D; Hulata, Gideon; Ron, Micha

    2006-11-01

    Recent studies have revealed that the major genes of the mammalian sex determination pathway are also involved in sex determination of fish. Several studies have reported QTL in various species and strains of tilapia, regions contributing to sex determination have been identified on linkage groups 1, 3, and 23. Genes contributing to sex-specific mortality have been detected on linkage groups 2, 6, and 23. To test whether the same genes might control sex determination in mammals and fishes, we mapped 11 genes that are considered putative master key regulators of sex determination: Amh, Cyp19, Dax1, Dmrt2, Dmrta2, Fhl3l, Foxl2, Ixl, Lhx9, Sf1, and Sox8. We identified polymorphisms in noncoding regions of these genes and genotyped these sites for 90 individuals of an F2 mapping family. Mapping of Dax1 joined LG16 and LG21 into a single linkage group. The Amh and Dmrta2 genes were mapped to two distinct regions of LG23. The Amh gene was mapped 5 cM from UNH879 within a QTL region for sex determination and 2 cM from UNH216 within a QTL region for sex-specific mortality. Dmrta2 was mapped 4 cM from UNH848 within another QTL region for sex determination. Cyp19 was mapped to LG1 far from a previously reported QTL region for sex determination on this chromosome. Seven other candidate genes mapped to LG4, -11, -12, -14, and -17. PMID:16951079

  10. Sequence Analysis of a 282-Kilobase Region Surrounding the Citrus Tristeza Virus Resistance Gene (Ctv) Locus in Poncirus trifoliata L. Raf.1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhong-Nan; Ye, Xin-Rong; Molina, Joe; Roose, Mikeal L.; Mirkov, T. Erik

    2003-01-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is the major virus pathogen causing significant economic damage to citrus worldwide, and a single dominant gene, Ctv, provides broad spectrum resistance to CTV in Poncirus trifoliata L. Raf. Ctv was physically mapped to a 282-kb region using a P. trifoliata bacterial artificial chromosome library. This region was completely sequenced to about 8× coverage using a shotgun sequencing strategy and primer walking for gap closure. Sequence analysis predicts 22 putative genes, two mutator-like transposons and eight retrotransposons. This sequence analysis also revealed some interesting features of this region of the P. trifoliata genome: a disease resistance gene cluster with seven members and eight retrotransposons clustered in a 125-kb gene-poor region. Comparative sequence analysis suggests that six genes in the Ctv region have significant sequence similarity with their orthologs in bacterial artificial chromosome clones F7H2 and F21T11 from Arabidopsis chromosome I. However, the analysis of gene colinearity between P. trifoliata and Arabidopsis indicates that Arabidopsis genome sequence information may be of limited use for positional gene cloning in P. trifoliata and citrus. Analysis of candidate genes for Ctv is also discussed. PMID:12586873

  11. Sequence analysis of a 282-kilobase region surrounding the citrus Tristeza virus resistance gene (Ctv) locus in Poncirus trifoliata L. Raf.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhong-Nan; Ye, Xin-Rong; Molina, Joe; Roose, Mikeal L; Mirkov, T Erik

    2003-02-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is the major virus pathogen causing significant economic damage to citrus worldwide, and a single dominant gene, Ctv, provides broad spectrum resistance to CTV in Poncirus trifoliata L. Raf. Ctv was physically mapped to a 282-kb region using a P. trifoliata bacterial artificial chromosome library. This region was completely sequenced to about 8x coverage using a shotgun sequencing strategy and primer walking for gap closure. Sequence analysis predicts 22 putative genes, two mutator-like transposons and eight retrotransposons. This sequence analysis also revealed some interesting features of this region of the P. trifoliata genome: a disease resistance gene cluster with seven members and eight retrotransposons clustered in a 125-kb gene-poor region. Comparative sequence analysis suggests that six genes in the Ctv region have significant sequence similarity with their orthologs in bacterial artificial chromosome clones F7H2 and F21T11 from Arabidopsis chromosome I. However, the analysis of gene colinearity between P. trifoliata and Arabidopsis indicates that Arabidopsis genome sequence information may be of limited use for positional gene cloning in P. trifoliata and citrus. Analysis of candidate genes for Ctv is also discussed. PMID:12586873

  12. A low-Ca2+ response (LCR) secretion (ysc) locus lies within the lcrB region of the LCR plasmid in Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed Central

    Fields, K A; Plano, G V; Straley, S C

    1994-01-01

    The causative agent of plague, Yersinia pestis, contains a 75-kb plasmid, pCD1, which carries a virulence-related stimulon called the low-Ca2+ response stimulon (LCRS). LCRS operons are regulated by the environmental signals of temperature and Ca2+. This study characterized a portion of the lcrB region of pCD1, known to contain at least one gene necessary for the regulation of LCRS operons by Ca2+. The sequence of a 2-kb region revealed three open reading frames, designated yscQ, yscR, and yscS, predicted to encode acidic proteins of 34.4, 24.4, and 8.5 kDa. All three proteins were homologous to proteins involved in flagellar function or virulence. An antipeptide antibody specific for YscR was used to localize YscR to the inner membrane of Y. pestis. Analysis of yscR-phoA fusions supported a model for yscR which predicts four transmembrane regions and a large, central hydrophilic domain. In-frame deletion mutations of yscQ and yscR were constructed and moved into Y. pestis. Both mutants failed to show the restriction of growth that normally accompanies maximal LCRS induction. Unlike the parent Y. pestis, the yscR mutant did not respond to the absence of Ca2+ by increasing the net transcription or translation of the LCRS-encoded V antigen, YopM, or LcrG. The yscR mutant also was defective for secretion of V antigen, YopM, and LcrG. These findings implicate a dual role for YscR in regulation of LCRS operons and secretion of LCRS proteins and add to the developing picture of how secretion of virulence proteins may be coupled to transcriptional regulation in yersiniae. Images PMID:8300512

  13. Nucleotide sequence of the McrB region of Escherichia coli K-12 and evidence for two independent translational initiation sites at the mcrB locus.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, T K; Achberger, E C; Braymer, H D

    1989-01-01

    The McrB restriction system of Escherichia coli K-12 is responsible for the biological inactivation of foreign DNA that contains 5-methylcytosine residues (E. A. Raleigh and G. Wilson, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 83:9070-9074, 1986). Within the McrB region of the chromosome is the mcrB gene, which encodes a protein of 51 kilodaltons (kDa) (T. K. Ross, E. C. Achberger, and H. D. Braymer, Gene 61:277-289, 1987), and the mcrC gene, the product of which is 39 kDa (T. K. Ross, E. C. Achberger, and H. D. Braymer, Mol. Gen. Genet., in press). The nucleotide sequence of a 2,695-base-pair segment encompassing the McrB region was determined. The deduced amino acid sequence was used to identify two open reading frames specifying peptides of 455 and 348 amino acids, corresponding to the products of the mcrB and mcrC genes, respectively. A single-nucleotide overlap was found to exist between the termination codon of the mcrB gene and the proposed initiation codon of the mcrC gene. The presence of an additional peptide of 33 kDa in strains containing various recombinant plasmids with portions of the McrB region has been reported by Ross et al. (Gene 61:277-289, 1987). The analysis of frameshift and deletion mutants of one such hybrid plasmid, pRAB-13, provided evidence for a second translational initiation site within the McrB open reading frame. The proposed start codon for translation of the 33-kDa peptide lies 481 nucleotides downstream from the initiation codon for the 51-kDa mcrB gene product. The 33-kDa peptide may play a regulatory role in the McrB restriction of DNA containing 5-methylcytosine. Images PMID:2649480

  14. IlvHI locus of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Squires, C H; De Felice, M; Lago, C T; Calvo, J M

    1983-06-01

    In Escherichia coli K-12, the ilvHI locus codes for one of two acetohydroxy acid synthase isoenzymes. A region of the Salmonella typhimurium genome adjacent to the leucine operon was cloned on plasmid pBR322, yielding plasmids pCV47 and pCV49 (a shortened version of pCV47). This region contains DNA homologous to the E. coli ilvHI locus, as judged by hybridization experiments. Plasmid pCV47 did not confer isoleucine-valine prototrophy upon either E. coli or S. typhimurium strains lacking acetohydroxy acid synthase activity, suggesting that S. typhimurium lacks a functional ilvHI locus. However, isoleucine-valine prototrophs were readily isolated from such strains after mutagenesis with nitrosoguanidine. In one case we found that the Ilv+ phenotype resulted from an alteration in bacterial DNA on the plasmid (new plasmid designated pCV50). Furthermore, a new acetohydroxy acid synthase activity was observed in Ilv+ revertants; this enzyme was similar to E. coli acetohydroxy acid synthase III in its lack of activity at low pH. This new activity was correlated with the appearance in minicells of a new polypeptide having an approximate molecular weight of 61,000. Strains carrying either pCV49 or pCV50 produced a substantial amount of ilvHI-specific mRNA. These results, together with results from other laboratories, suggest that S. typhimurium has functional ilvB and ilvG genes and a cryptic ilvHI locus. E. coli K-12, on the other hand, has functional ilvB and ilvHI genes and a cryptic ilvG locus. PMID:6189818

  15. Hairpin-duplex equilibrium reflected in the A-->B transition in an undecamer quasi-palindrome present in the locus control region of the human beta-globin gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Mahima; Kukreti, Ritushree; Grover, Deepak; Brahmachari, Samir K; Kukreti, Shrikant

    2003-12-01

    Our recent work on an A-->G single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at the quasi-palindromic sequence d(TGGGG[A/G]CCCCA) of HS4 of the human beta-globin locus control region in an Indian population showed a significant association between the G allele and the occurrence of beta-thalassemia. Using UV-thermal denaturation, gel assay, circular dichroism (CD) and nuclease digestion experiments we have demonstrated that the undecamer quasi- palindromic sequence d(TGGGGACCCCA) (HPA11) and its reported polymorphic (SNP) version d(TGG GGGCCCCA) (HPG11) exist in hairpin-duplex equilibria. The biphasic nature of the melting profiles for both the oligonucleotides persisted at low as well as high salt concentrations. The HPG11 hairpin showed a higher T(m) than HPA11. The presence of unimolecular and bimolecular species was also shown by non-denaturating gel electrophoresis experiments. The CD spectra of both oligonucleotides showed features of the A- as well as B-type conformations and, moreover, exhibited a concentration dependence. The disappearance of the 265 nm positive CD signal in an oligomer concentration-dependent manner is indicative of an A-->B transition. The results give unprecedented insight into the in vitro structure of the quasi-palindromic sequence and provide the first report in which a hairpin-duplex equilibrium has been correlated with an A-->B interconversion of DNA. The nuclease-dependent degradation suggests that HPG11 is more resistant to nuclease than HPA11. Multiple sequence alignment of the HS4 region of the beta-globin gene cluster from different organisms revealed that this quasi-palindromic stretch is unique to Homo sapiens. We propose that quasi-palindromic sequences may form stable mini- hairpins or cruciforms in the HS4 region and might play a role in regulating beta-globin gene expression by affecting the binding of transcription factors. PMID:14627823

  16. The coding region of the UFGT gene is a source of diagnostic SNP markers that allow single-locus DNA genotyping for the assessment of cultivar identity and ancestry in grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Vitis vinifera L. is one of society’s most important agricultural crops with a broad genetic variability. The difficulty in recognizing grapevine genotypes based on ampelographic traits and secondary metabolites prompted the development of molecular markers suitable for achieving variety genetic identification. Findings Here, we propose a comparison between a multi-locus barcoding approach based on six chloroplast markers and a single-copy nuclear gene sequencing method using five coding regions combined with a character-based system with the aim of reconstructing cultivar-specific haplotypes and genotypes to be exploited for the molecular characterization of 157 V. vinifera accessions. The analysis of the chloroplast target regions proved the inadequacy of the DNA barcoding approach at the subspecies level, and hence further DNA genotyping analyses were targeted on the sequences of five nuclear single-copy genes amplified across all of the accessions. The sequencing of the coding region of the UFGT nuclear gene (UDP-glucose: flavonoid 3-0-glucosyltransferase, the key enzyme for the accumulation of anthocyanins in berry skins) enabled the discovery of discriminant SNPs (1/34 bp) and the reconstruction of 130 V. vinifera distinct genotypes. Most of the genotypes proved to be cultivar-specific, and only few genotypes were shared by more, although strictly related, cultivars. Conclusion On the whole, this technique was successful for inferring SNP-based genotypes of grapevine accessions suitable for assessing the genetic identity and ancestry of international cultivars and also useful for corroborating some hypotheses regarding the origin of local varieties, suggesting several issues of misidentification (synonymy/homonymy). PMID:24298902

  17. A physical and expression map of the D17S1810-D17S1353 region spanning the central areolar choroidal dystrophy locus.

    PubMed

    Lichanska, A M; McGibbon, D; Silvestri, G; Hughes, A E

    2001-01-01

    Central areolar choroidal dystrophy (CACD) causes bilateral irreversible central visual loss in the 5th to 7th decades. The authors previously described a large pedigree with the disorder, which showed linkage to chromosome 17p13.2-->p13.1 between microsatellite markers D17S1353 and D17S1810. 17p13 is very rich in genes that cause retinal diseases. We have now constructed a detailed and ordered physical map of the critical CACD region which spans up to 2.4 Mb. The new transcript map contains thirteen genes and seven expressed sequence tags (ESTs) that are eye-expressed, and therefore are positional candidates. Several of these have been screened, but no disease-causing mutations were found in CACD patients. PMID:11474177

  18. A brain-specific gene cluster isolated from the region of the mouse obesity locus is expressed in the adult hypothalamus and during mouse development

    SciTech Connect

    Laig-Webster, M.; Lim, M.E.; Chehab, F.F.

    1994-09-01

    The molecular defect underlying an autosomal recessive form of genetic obesity in a classical mouse model C57 BL/6J-ob/ob has not yet been elucidated. Whereas metabolic and physiological disturbances such as diabetes and hypertension are associated with obesity, the site of expression and the nature of the primary lesion responsible for this cascade of events remains elusive. Our efforts aimed at the positional cloning of the ob gene by YAC contig mapping and gene identification have resulted in the cloning of a brain-specific gene cluster from the ob critical region. The expression of this gene cluster is remarkably complex owing to the multitude of brain-specific mRNA transcripts detected on Northern blots. cDNA cloning of these transcripts suggests that they are expressed from different genes as well as by alternate splicing mechanisms. Furthermore, the genomic organization of the cluster appears to consist of at least two identical promoters displaying CpG islands characteristic of housekeeping genes, yet clearly involving tissue-specific expression. Sense and anti-sense synthetic RNA probes were derived from a common DNA sequence on 3 cDNA clones and hybridized to 8-16 days mouse embryonic stages and mouse adult brain sections. Expression in development was noticeable as of the 11th day of gestation and confined to the central nervous system mainly in the telencephalon and spinal cord. Coronal and sagittal sections of the adult mouse brain showed expression only in 3 different regions of the brain stem. In situ hybridization to mouse hypothalamus sections revealed the presence of a localized and specialized group of cells expressing high levels of mRNA, suggesting that this gene cluster may also be involved in the regulation of hypothalamic activities. The hypothalamus has long been hypothesized as a primary candidate tissue for the expression of the obesity gene mainly because of its well-established role in the regulation of energy metabolism and food intake.

  19. Exclusion of the locus for autosomal recessive pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1 from the mineralocorticoid receptor gene region on human chromosome 4q by linkage analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, E.; Hanukoglu, A.; Rees, M.; Thompson, R.; Gardiner, R.M.

    1995-10-01

    Pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1 (PHA1) is an uncommon inherited disorder characterized by salt-wasting in infancy arising from target organ unresponsiveness to mineralocorticoids. Clinical expression of the disease varies from severely affected infants who may die to apparently asymptomatic individuals. Inheritance is Mendelian and may be either autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive. A defect in the mineralocortiocoid receptor has been implicated as a likely cause of PHA1. The gene for human mineralocorticoid receptor (MLR) has been cloned and physically mapped to human chromosome 4q31.1-31.2. The etiological role of MLR in autosomal recessive PHA1 was investigated by performing linkage analysis between PHA1 and three simple sequence length polymorphisms (D4S192, D4S1548, and D4S413) on chromosome 4q in 10 consanguineous families. Linkage analysis was carried out assuming autosomal recessive inheritance with full penetrance and zero phenocopy rate using the MLINK program for two-point analysis and the HOMOZ program for multipoint analysis. Lod scores of less than -2 were obtained over the whole region from D4S192 to D4S413 encompassing MLR. This provides evidence against MLR as the site of mutations causing PHA1 in the majority of autosomal recessive families. 34 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. High-resolution mapping of a novel rat blood pressure locus on chromosome 9 to a region containing the Spp2 gene and colocalization of a QTL for bone mass.

    PubMed

    Nie, Ying; Kumarasamy, Sivarajan; Waghulde, Harshal; Cheng, Xi; Mell, Blair; Czernik, Piotr J; Lecka-Czernik, Beata; Joe, Bina

    2016-06-01

    Through linkage analysis of the Dahl salt-sensitive (S) rat and the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR), a blood pressure (BP) quantitative trait locus (QTL) was previously located on rat chromosome 9. Subsequent substitution mapping studies of this QTL revealed multiple BP QTLs within the originally identified logarithm of odds plot by linkage analysis. The focus of this study was on a 14.39 Mb region, the distal portion of which remained unmapped in our previous studies. High-resolution substitution mapping for a BP QTL in the setting of a high-salt diet indicated that an SHR-derived congenic segment of 787.9 kb containing the gene secreted phosphoprotein-2 (Spp2) lowered BP and urinary protein excretion. A nonsynonymous G/T polymorphism in the Spp2 gene was detected between the S and S.SHR congenic rats. A survey of 45 strains showed that the T allele was rare, being detected only in some substrains of SHR and WKY. Protein modeling prediction through SWISSPROT indicated that the predicted protein product of this variant was significantly altered. Importantly, in addition to improved cardiovascular and renal function, high salt-fed congenic animals carrying the SHR T variant of Spp2 had significantly lower bone mass and altered bone microarchitecture. Total bone volume and volume of trabecular bone, cortical thickness, and degree of mineralization of cortical bone were all significantly reduced in congenic rats. Our study points to opposing effects of a congenic segment containing the prioritized candidate gene Spp2 on BP and bone mass. PMID:27113531

  1. Bipartite Structure of the ade3 Locus of SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Elizabeth W.

    1977-01-01

    Forty ade3 mutants were examined with respect to their growth requirements, levels of the tetrahydrofolate interconversion enzymes, and/or map positions. Four deletions were detected. Mutations that result in a requirement for adenine and histidine map in one region of the locus; those which result in a requirement for adenine only map in a quite separate region of the locus, a region not disclosed in previous studies. No correlation was observed between growth properties of the strains and enzyme levels. PMID:324867

  2. Confirmation of the 2p locus for the mild autosomal recessive lim-girdle muscular dystrophy gene (LGMD2B) in three families allows refinement of the candidate region

    SciTech Connect

    Bashir, R.; Iughetti, P.; Strachan, T.

    1995-05-01

    The mild autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD) are a heterogeneous group of muscle diseases. The first gene to be mapped and associated with this phenotype was a locus on 15q geographic isolate. These results have been confirmed in other populations, but it was shown that there is genetic heterogeneity for this form of LGMD. Recently, a second locus has been mapped to chromosome 2p. The confirmation of the mapping of this second locus in LGMD families from different populations is of utmost importance for the positional cloning of this gene (HGMW-approved symbol LGMD2B). In this publication, haplotypes generated from five chromosome 2 markers from all of the known large families linked to chromosome 2p are reported together with the recombinants that show the current most likely location of the LGMD 2B gene. 9 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. High-resolution mapping of the X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (EDA) locus

    PubMed Central

    Zonana, J.; Jones, M.; Browne, D.; Litt, M.; Kramer, P.; Becker, H. W.; Brockdorff, N.; Rastan, S.; Davies, K. P.; Clarke, A.; Thomas, N. S. T.

    1992-01-01

    The X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (EDA) locus has been previously localized to the subchromosomal region Xq11-q21.1. We have extended our previous linkage studies and analyzed linkage between the EDA locus and 10 marker loci, including five new loci, in 41 families. Four of the marker loci showed no recombination with the EDA locus, and six other loci were also linked to the EDA locus with recombination fractions of .009–.075. Multipoint analyses gave support to the placement of the PGK1P1 locus proximal to the EDA locus and the DXS453 and PGK1 loci distal to EDA. Further ordering of the loci could be inferred from a human/rodent somatic cell hybrid derived from an affected female with EDA and an X;9 translocation and from studies of an affected male with EDA and a submicroscopic deletion. Three of the proximal marker loci, which showed no recombination with the EDA locus, when used in combination, were informative in 92% of females. The closely linked flanking polymorphic loci DXS339 and DXS453 had heterozygosities of 72% and 76%, respectively, and when used jointly, they were doubly informative in 52% of females. The human DXS732 locus was defined by a conserved mouse probe pcos169E/4 (DXCrc169 locus) that cosegregates with the mouse tabby (Ta) locus, a potential homologue to the EDA locus. The absence of recombination between EDA and the DXS732 locus lends support to the hypothesis that the DXCrc169 locus in the mouse and the DXS732 locus in humans may contain candidate sequences for the Ta and EDA genes, respectively. PMID:1357963

  4. The putative imprinted locus D15S9 within the common deletion region for the Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes encodes two overlapping mRNAs transcribed from opposite strands

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn, C.C.; Driscoll, D.J.; Saitoh, S.

    1994-09-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome is typically caused by a deletion of paternal 15q11-q13, or maternal uniparental disomy (UPD) of chromosome 15, while Angelman syndrome is caused by a maternal deletion or paternal UPD of the same region. Therefore, these two clinically distinct neurobehavioral syndromes result from differential expression of imprinted genes within 15q11-q13. A 3.1 kb cDNA, DN34, from the D15S9 locus within 15q11-q13 was isolated from a human fetal brain library. We showed previously that DN34 probe detects a DNA methylation imprint and therefore may represent a candidate imprinted gene. Isolation of genomic clones and DNA sequencing demonstrated that the gene segment encoding the partial cDNA DN34 was split by a 2 kb intron, but did not encode a substantial open reading frame (ORF). Preliminary analysis of expression by RT-PCR suggests that this gene is expressed in fetal but not in tested tissue types from the adult, and thus its imprinting status has not been possible to assess at present. Surprisingly, we found an ORF on the antisense strand of the DN34 cDNA. This ORF encodes a putative polypeptide of 505 amino acid residues containing a RING C{sub 3}HC{sub 4} zinc-finger motif and other features of nuclear proteins. Subsequent characterization of this gene, ZNF127, and a mouse homolog, demonstrated expression of 3.2 kb transcript from all tested fetal and adult tissues. Transcripts initiate from within a CpG-island, shown to be differentially methylated on parental alleles in the human. Interestingly, functional imprinting of the mouse homolog was subsequently demonstrated in an F{sub 1} cross by analyzing a VNTR polymorphism in the mRNA. The ZNF127 gene is intronless, has significant overlap with the DN34 gene on the antisense strand, and a 1 kb 3{prime} end within the 2 kb DN34 intron.

  5. Association study between the TNXB locus and schizophrenia in a Japanese population.

    PubMed

    Tochigi, Mamoru; Zhang, Xuan; Ohashi, Jun; Hibino, Hiroyuki; Otowa, Takeshi; Rogers, Mark; Kato, Tadafumi; Okazaki, Yuji; Kato, Nobumasa; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Sasaki, Tsukasa

    2007-04-01

    The chromosome 6p21-24 region, which contains the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region, has been suggested as an important locus for a susceptibility gene for schizophrenia. Recently, a significant association between schizophrenia and the TNXB locus, located immediately telomeric of the NOTCH4 locus in the HLA region, was observed. Few studies have further investigated the region in schizophrenia. In the present study, we investigated the region in a Japanese population. Subjects included 241 patients with schizophrenia and 290 controls. Twenty-six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and the corresponding haplotypes were analyzed. As a result, exactly the same SNPs in the TNXB locus (rs1009382 and rs204887) as in the previous study were associated with schizophrenia (P = 0.034 and 0.034, respectively, uncorrected). A SNP (rs2071287) in the NOTCH4 locus and haplotype around it were also suggested to associate with the disease, consistent with another previous study (P = 0.041 and permutation P = 0.024, respectively, uncorrected). Although these associations became insignificant after Bonferroni correction, the findings might provide support for the association of the TNXB locus or its adjacent region of the NOTCH4 locus with schizophrenia. PMID:17192952

  6. Biochemical Analysis of Genome Functions Using Locus-Specific Chromatin Immunoprecipitation Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Toshitsugu; Fujii, Hodaka

    2016-01-01

    To isolate specific genomic regions that retain their molecular interactions, allowing direct identification of chromatin-bound molecules, we developed two locus-specific chromatin immunoprecipitation (locus-specific ChIP) technologies, insertional ChIP (iChIP) and engineered DNA-binding molecule-mediated ChIP (enChIP) using the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system or transcription activator-like (TAL) proteins. Essentially, a locus-specific ChIP consists of locus-tagging and affinity purification and can be combined with downstream analyses to identify molecules associated with the target genomic regions. In this review, we discuss the applications of locus-specific ChIP to analyze the genome functions, including transcription and epigenetic regulation. PMID:26819551

  7. Locus of Control and Interpersonal Attraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fagan, M. Michael

    1980-01-01

    The role of locus of control in interpersonal attraction was examined by administering 1) the Nowicki-Strickland Locus of Control Scale and 2) a sociometric test of friendship to 200 eighth graders. (CM)

  8. Transcriptional Analysis of the Streptococcus pyogenes Salivaricin Locus

    PubMed Central

    Namprachan-Frantz, Phanramphoei; Rowe, Hannah M.; Runft, Donna L.

    2014-01-01

    The sal lantibiotic locus plays an important role in the virulence of Streptococcus pyogenes. Our transcriptional analysis of the sal locus provides new information on the complex regulation of this operon. Transcription of the operon is regulated by a promoter upstream of the operon and by a second internal promoter upstream of the salKRZ genes. Here we identify the location of the internal promoter and provide information on how this promoter is autoregulated by proteins within the locus. We determined by primer extension that the salKR promoter is located within the salY gene and identified several regulatory regions important for expression. The higher activity of the promoter in a salKR deletion strain indicates a role in repression by the SalR response regulator. Further, this promoter had higher activity in a salA deletion strain, implicating corepression or a signaling role for the SalA peptide. Finally, we demonstrate that this promoter can be controlled by host factors. Analysis of transcriptional regulation of this locus provides a better understanding of the function of the sal locus in S. pyogenes pathogenesis. PMID:24244008

  9. Locus of Control and Status Attainment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bensman, Miriam Roza; Haller, Archibald O.

    Utilizing data derived from 277 rural, male respondents initially enrolled in Lenawee County, Michigan high schools, the Rotter's Internal-External Locus of Control Scale was employed to test the hypothesis that locus of control will have interactive rather than additive effects on the process of status attainment. Locus of control was defined as…

  10. TYPES AND RATES OF SEQUENCE EVOLUTION AT HMW-GLUTENIN LOCUS IN HEXAPLOID WHEAT AND ITS ANCESTRAL GENOMES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Glu-1 locus, encoding the High Molecular Weight-glutenin protein subunits, controls bread-making quality in hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum) and represents a recently evolved region unique to Triticeae genomes. To understand the molecular evolution of this locus region, three orthologous Glu...

  11. Genomic characterization of the Atlantic cod sex-locus.

    PubMed

    Star, Bastiaan; Tørresen, Ole K; Nederbragt, Alexander J; Jakobsen, Kjetill S; Pampoulie, Christophe; Jentoft, Sissel

    2016-01-01

    A variety of sex determination mechanisms can be observed in evolutionary divergent teleosts. Sex determination is genetic in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), however the genomic location or size of its sex-locus is unknown. Here, we characterize the sex-locus of Atlantic cod using whole genome sequence (WGS) data of 227 wild-caught specimens. Analyzing more than 55 million polymorphic loci, we identify 166 loci that are associated with sex. These loci are located in six distinct regions on five different linkage groups (LG) in the genome. The largest of these regions, an approximately 55 Kb region on LG11, contains the majority of genotypes that segregate closely according to a XX-XY system. Genotypes in this region can be used genetically determine sex, whereas those in the other regions are inconsistently sex-linked. The identified region on LG11 and its surrounding genes have no clear sequence homology with genes or regulatory elements associated with sex-determination or differentiation in other species. The functionality of this sex-locus therefore remains unknown. The WGS strategy used here proved adequate for detecting the small regions associated with sex in this species. Our results highlight the evolutionary flexibility in genomic architecture underlying teleost sex-determination and allow practical applications to genetically sex Atlantic cod. PMID:27499266

  12. Genomic characterization of the Atlantic cod sex-locus

    PubMed Central

    Star, Bastiaan; Tørresen, Ole K.; Nederbragt, Alexander J.; Jakobsen, Kjetill S.; Pampoulie, Christophe; Jentoft, Sissel

    2016-01-01

    A variety of sex determination mechanisms can be observed in evolutionary divergent teleosts. Sex determination is genetic in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), however the genomic location or size of its sex-locus is unknown. Here, we characterize the sex-locus of Atlantic cod using whole genome sequence (WGS) data of 227 wild-caught specimens. Analyzing more than 55 million polymorphic loci, we identify 166 loci that are associated with sex. These loci are located in six distinct regions on five different linkage groups (LG) in the genome. The largest of these regions, an approximately 55 Kb region on LG11, contains the majority of genotypes that segregate closely according to a XX-XY system. Genotypes in this region can be used genetically determine sex, whereas those in the other regions are inconsistently sex-linked. The identified region on LG11 and its surrounding genes have no clear sequence homology with genes or regulatory elements associated with sex-determination or differentiation in other species. The functionality of this sex-locus therefore remains unknown. The WGS strategy used here proved adequate for detecting the small regions associated with sex in this species. Our results highlight the evolutionary flexibility in genomic architecture underlying teleost sex-determination and allow practical applications to genetically sex Atlantic cod. PMID:27499266

  13. Excess polymorphism at the Adh locus in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Kreitman, M E; Aguadé, M

    1986-09-01

    The evolutionary history of a region of DNA encompassing the Adh locus is studied by comparing patterns of variation in Drosophila melanogaster and its sibling species, D. simulans. An unexpectedly high level of silent polymorphism in the Adh coding region relative to the 5' and 3' flanking regions in D. melanogaster is revealed by a populational survey of restriction polymorphism using a four-cutter filter hybridization technique as well as by direct sequence comparisons. In both of these studies, a region of the Adh gene encompassing the three coding exons exhibits a frequency of polymorphism equal to that of a 4-kb 5' flanking region. In contrast, an interspecific sequence comparison shows a two-fold higher level of divergence in the 5' flanking sequence compared to the structural locus. Analysis of the patterns of variation suggest an excess of polymorphism within the D. melanogaster Adh locus, rather than lack of polymorphism in the 5' flanking region. An approach is outlined for testing neutral theory predictions about patterns of variation within and between species. This approach indicates that the observed patterns of variation are incompatible with an infinite site neutral model. PMID:3021568

  14. Two forms of loops generate the chromatin conformation of the immunoglobulin heavy chain gene locus

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Changying; Gerasimova, Tatiana; Hao, Haiping; Ivanova, Irina; Chakraborty, Tirtha; Selimyan, Roza; Oltz, Eugene M.; Sen, Ranjan

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) gene locus undergoes radial re-positioning within the nucleus and locus contraction in preparation for gene recombination. We demonstrate that IgH locus conformation involves two levels of chromosomal compaction. At the first level the locus folds into several multi-looped domains. One such domain at the 3′ end of the locus requires an enhancer, Eμ; two other domains at the 5′ end are Eμ-independent. At the second level, these domains are brought into spatial proximity by Eμ-dependent interactions with specific sites within the VH region. Eμ is also required for radial re-positioning of IgH alleles indicating its essential role in large scale chromosomal movements in developing lymphocytes. Our observations provide a comprehensive view of the conformation of IgH alleles in pro-B cells and the mechanisms by which it is established. PMID:21982154

  15. Identifying a novel locus for psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Budu-Aggrey, Ashley; Bowes, John; Barton, Anne

    2016-01-01

    A number of studies have identified genetic risk loci for PsA, the majority of which also confer risk for psoriasis. The stronger heritability of PsA in comparison with psoriasis suggests that there should be risk loci that are specific for PsA. Identifying such loci could potentially inform therapy development to provide more effective treatments for PsA patients, especially with a considerable proportion being non-responsive to current therapies. Evidence of a PsA-specific locus has been previously found at HLA-B27 within the MHC region. A recent study has provided evidence of non-HLA risk loci that are specific for PsA at IL23R, PTPN22 and on chromosome 5q31. Functional characterization of these loci will provide further understanding of the pathways underlying PsA, and enable us to apply genetic findings for patient benefit. PMID:26255310

  16. Identifying a novel locus for psoriatic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Budu-Aggrey, Ashley; Bowes, John

    2016-01-01

    A number of studies have identified genetic risk loci for PsA, the majority of which also confer risk for psoriasis. The stronger heritability of PsA in comparison with psoriasis suggests that there should be risk loci that are specific for PsA. Identifying such loci could potentially inform therapy development to provide more effective treatments for PsA patients, especially with a considerable proportion being non-responsive to current therapies. Evidence of a PsA-specific locus has been previously found at HLA-B27 within the MHC region. A recent study has provided evidence of non-HLA risk loci that are specific for PsA at IL23R, PTPN22 and on chromosome 5q31. Functional characterization of these loci will provide further understanding of the pathways underlying PsA, and enable us to apply genetic findings for patient benefit. PMID:26255310

  17. Allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR at the p16INK4a locus

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Toshitsugu; Yuno, Miyuki; Fujii, Hodaka

    2016-01-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system has been adopted for a wide range of biological applications including genome editing. In some cases, dissection of genome functions requires allele-specific genome editing, but the use of CRISPR for this purpose has not been studied in detail. In this study, using the p16INK4a gene in HCT116 as a model locus, we investigated whether chromatin states, such as CpG methylation, or a single-nucleotide gap form in a target site can be exploited for allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR in vivo. First, we showed that allele-specific locus binding and genome editing could be achieved by targeting allele-specific CpG-methylated regions, which was successful for one, but not all guide RNAs. In this regard, molecular basis underlying the success remains elusive at this stage. Next, we demonstrated that an allele-specific single-nucleotide gap form could be employed for allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR, although it was important to avoid CRISPR tolerance of a single nucleotide mismatch brought about by mismatched base skipping. Our results provide information that might be useful for applications of CRISPR in studies of allele-specific functions in the genomes. PMID:27465215

  18. Hysteresis zone or locus - Aerodynamic of bulbous based bodies at low speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Covert, E. E.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental data are presented which seem to suggest that a well-defined hysteresis locus on bulbous based bodies at low speeds does not exist. Instead, if the experiment is repeated several times, the entire hysteresis region seems to fill with data rather than trace out a specific hysteresis locus. Data obtained on an oscillating model even at low reduced frequencies may be well defined but when applied to arbitrary motion lead to less accurate results than desired.

  19. Isolation of Alcohol Dehydrogenase cDNA and Basal Regulatory Region from Metroxylon sagu

    PubMed Central

    Wee, Ching Ching; Roslan, Hairul Azman

    2012-01-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) is a versatile enzyme involved in many biochemical pathways in plants such as in germination and stress tolerance. Sago palm is plant with much importance to the state of Sarawak as one of the most important crops that bring revenue with the advantage of being able to withstand various biotic and abiotic stresses such as heat, pathogens, and water logging. Here we report the isolation of sago palm Adh cDNA and its putative promoter region via the use of rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) and genomic walking. The isolated cDNA was characterized and determined to be 1464 bp long encoding for 380 amino acids. BLAST analysis showed that the Adh is similar to the Adh1 group with 91% and 85% homology with Elaeis guineensis and Washingtonia robusta, respectively. The putative basal msAdh1 regulatory region was further determined to contain promoter signals of TATA and AGGA boxes and predicted amino acids analyses showed several Adh-specific motifs such as the two zinc-binding domains that bind to the adenosine ribose of the coenzyme and binding to alcohol substrate. A phylogenetic tree was also constructed using the predicted amino acid showed clear separation of Adh from bacteria and clustered within the plant Adh group.

  20. Isolation of Alcohol Dehydrogenase cDNA and Basal Regulatory Region from Metroxylon sagu.

    PubMed

    Wee, Ching Ching; Roslan, Hairul Azman

    2012-01-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) is a versatile enzyme involved in many biochemical pathways in plants such as in germination and stress tolerance. Sago palm is plant with much importance to the state of Sarawak as one of the most important crops that bring revenue with the advantage of being able to withstand various biotic and abiotic stresses such as heat, pathogens, and water logging. Here we report the isolation of sago palm Adh cDNA and its putative promoter region via the use of rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) and genomic walking. The isolated cDNA was characterized and determined to be 1464 bp long encoding for 380 amino acids. BLAST analysis showed that the Adh is similar to the Adh1 group with 91% and 85% homology with Elaeis guineensis and Washingtonia robusta, respectively. The putative basal msAdh1 regulatory region was further determined to contain promoter signals of TATA and AGGA boxes and predicted amino acids analyses showed several Adh-specific motifs such as the two zinc-binding domains that bind to the adenosine ribose of the coenzyme and binding to alcohol substrate. A phylogenetic tree was also constructed using the predicted amino acid showed clear separation of Adh from bacteria and clustered within the plant Adh group. PMID:27335670

  1. Factors Determining Adolescent Locus of Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopera-Frye, Karen F.; And Others

    Previous research has demonstrated an association between locus of control in adolescence and a successful transition to adulthood. Having an external locus of control has been implicated as an important factor in adolescent behaviors such as teenage pregnancy and delinquency, and has been found to be negatively related to school achievement. This…

  2. The X-linked F cell production locus: Genetic mapping and role in fetal hemoglobin production

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.C.; Smith, K.D.; Moore, R.D.

    1994-09-01

    Postnatal fetal hemoglobin (Hb F) production is confined to a subset of erythocytes termed F-cells. There is a 10-20 fold variation in F-cell production in sickle cell disease (SCD) and normal individuals. Most of the variation in F-cell production has been attributed to a diallelic (High, Low) X-linked gene, the F-cell production (FCP) locus that we recently mapped to Xp22.2-22.3 (LOD=4.56, theta=0.04). Using multiple regression analysis in 262 Jamaican SCD patients we determined the relative contribution of the FCP locus and other variables previously associated with variation in Hb F level (gender, age, beta-globin haplotypes, number of alpha-globin genes and the FCP locus phenotypes). When the FCP locus is in the regression model, the FCP locus alone accounts for approximately 40% of the variation in Hb F level while the contribution of age, alpha-globin gene number, and beta-globin haplotypes was insignificant. When individuals with High FCP allele are removed from the analysis, the beta globin haplotype now contribute to >10% of the Hb F variation. We conclude that the X-linked FCP locus is the major determinant of all known variables in Hb F production. Using 4 highly polymorphic dinucleotide repeat markers that we identified from cosmids in Xp22.2-22.3, have localized the FCP locus to a 1 Mb minimal candidate region between DXS143 and DXS410.

  3. Combinatorial H3K9acS10ph histone modification in IgH locus S regions targets 14-3-3 adaptors and AID to specify antibody class-switch DNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Li, Guideng; White, Clayton A; Lam, Tonika; Pone, Egest J; Tran, Daniel C; Hayama, Ken L; Zan, Hong; Xu, Zhenming; Casali, Paolo

    2013-11-14

    Class-switch DNA recombination (CSR) is central to the antibody response, in that it changes the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) constant region, thereby diversifying biological effector functions of antibodies. The activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID)-centered CSR machinery excises and rejoins DNA between an upstream (donor) and a downstream (acceptor) S region, which precede the respective constant region DNA. AID is stabilized on S regions by 14-3-3 adaptors. These adaptors display a high affinity for 5'-AGCT-3' repeats, which recur in all S regions. However, how 14-3-3, AID, and the CSR machinery target exclusively the donor and acceptor S regions is poorly understood. Here, we show that histone methyltransferases and acetyltransferases are induced by CD40 or Toll-like receptor signaling and catalyze H3K4me3 and H3K9ac/K14ac histone modifications, which are enriched in S regions but do not specify the S region targets of CSR. By contrast, the combinatorial H3K9acS10ph modification specifically marks the S regions set to recombine and directly recruits 14-3-3 adaptors for AID stabilization there. Inhibition of the enzymatic activity of GCN5 and PCAF histone acetyltransferases reduces H3K9acS10ph in S regions, 14-3-3 and AID stabilization, and CSR. Thus, H3K9acS10ph is a histone code that is "written" specifically in S regions and is "read" by 14-3-3 adaptors to target AID for CSR as an important biological outcome. PMID:24209747

  4. Low Cost Upper Atmosphere Sounder (LOCUS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerber, Daniel; Swinyard, Bruce M.; Ellison, Brian N.; Aylward, Alan D.; Aruliah, Anasuya; Plane, John M. C.; Feng, Wuhu; Saunders, Christopher; Friend, Jonathan; Bird, Rachel; Linfield, Edmund H.; Davies, A. Giles; Parkes, Steve

    2014-05-01

    The Mesosphere - Lower Thermosphere region (MLT) is often quoted as being the least well known region of the atmosphere, meaning that measurements of this altitude range are sparser than for the neighbouring layers. The reason for this apparent lack of observations can be traced back to a combination of two facts - A) the MLT is ill suited for in-situ sampling on a global scale because the residual air drag is prohibitive for suborbital vehicles (rockets are traditionally used to sample the MLT region, but they only provide snapshot measurements both geographically, as well as temporally), and B) Some of the most important trace gases in the MLT have spectral emission lines in the THz range, a frequency band which has only just become accessible to conventional remote sensing technologies (i.e. passive heterodyne detection) thanks to ongoing technology development, but which still poses massive - often prohibitive - demands on the complexity, weight and power consumption of satellite borne remote sensing detectors. To mitigate the substantial power requirements of a Local Oscillator (LO) able to pump a heterodyne receiver at THZ frequencies, we are suggesting the use of Quantum Cascade Laser diodes (QCL). Combining a QCL LO with a sub-harmonic Schottky mixer in an integrated receiver system would allow us to build a THz passive heterodyne detector for atmospheric remote sensing that is both very compact and power efficient, and could therefore be built and launched much more cheaply than competitive systems. Many of the technologies required for such an instrument already exist at technology readiness levels (TRL) of 3-5. A consortium of RAL Space, University College London (UCL), University of Leeds, Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd (SSTL) and STAR-Dundee have been awarded a grant through the ESA In Orbit Demonstration Programme (IOD) to start developing an integrated, sub-harmonic heterodyne receiver with a QCL LO up to a TRL that would allow IOD hopefully in the

  5. A genetic locus of enterocyte effacement conserved among diverse enterobacterial pathogens.

    PubMed Central

    McDaniel, T K; Jarvis, K G; Donnenberg, M S; Kaper, J B

    1995-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) and enterohemorrhagic E. coli O157:H7 are intestinal pathogens that profoundly damage the microvilli and subapical cytoskeleton of epithelial cells. Here we report finding in EPEC a 35-kbp locus containing several regions implicated in formation of these lesions. DNA probes throughout this locus hybridize to E. coli O157:H7 and other pathogens of three genera that cause similar lesions but do not hybridize to avirulent members of the same species. The EPEC locus and a different virulence locus of uropathogenic E. coli insert into the E. coli chromosome at the identical site and share highly similar sequences near the point of insertion. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:7878036

  6. Molecular characterization of the S locus in two self-incompatible Brassica napus lines.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, K; Schafer, U; Glavin, T L; Goring, D R; Rothstein, S J

    1996-01-01

    In Brassica species, self-incompatibility has been mapped genetically to a single chromosomal location. In this region, there are two closely linked genes coding for the S locus glycoprotein (SLG) and S locus receptor kinase (SRK). They appear to comprise the pistil component of the self-incompatibility reaction. SLG and SRK are thought to recognize an unknown pollen component on the incompatible pollen, and the gene encoding this pollen component must also be linked to the SLG and SRK genes. To further our understanding of self-incompatibility, the chromosomal region carrying the SLG and SRK genes has been studied. The physical region between the SLG-910 and the SRK-910 genes in the Brassica napus W1 line was cloned, and a search for genes expressed in the anther revealed two additional S locus genes located downstream of the SLG-910 gene. Because these two genes are novel and are conserved at other S alleles, we designated them as SLL1 and SLL2 (for S locus-linked genes 1 and 2, respectively). The SLL1 gene is S locus specific, whereas the SLL2 gene is not only present at the S locus but is also present in other parts of the genomes in both self-incompatible and self-compatible Brassica ssp lines. Expression of the SLL1 gene is only detectable in anthers of self-incompatible plants and is developmentally regulated during anther development, whereas the SLL2 gene is expressed in anthers and stigmas in both self-incompatible and self-compatible plants, with the highest levels of expression occurring in the stigmas. Although SLL1 and SLL2 are linked to the S locus region, it is not clear whether these genes function in self-incompatibility or serve some other cellular roles in pollen-pistil functions. PMID:8989888

  7. Loss of heterozygosity and transcriptome analyses of a 1.2 Mb candidate ovarian cancer tumor suppressor locus region at 17q25.1-q25.2.

    PubMed

    Presneau, Nadège; Dewar, Ken; Forgetta, Vince; Provencher, Diane; Mes-Masson, Anne-Marie; Tonin, Patricia N

    2005-07-01

    Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) analysis was performed in epithelial ovarian cancers (EOC) to further characterize a previously identified candidate tumor suppressor gene (TSG) region encompassing D17S801 at chromosomal region 17q25.1. LOH of at least one informative marker was observed for 100 (71%) of 140 malignant EOC samples in an analysis of 6 polymorphic markers (cen-D17S1839-D17S785-D17S1817-D17S801-D17S751-D17S722-tel). The combined LOH analysis revealed a 453 kilobase (Kb) minimal region of deletion (MRD) bounded by D17S1817 and D17S751. Human and mouse genome assemblies were used to resolve marker inconsistencies in the D17S1839-D17S722 interval and identify candidates. The region contains 32 known and strongly predicted genes, 9 of which overlap the MRD. The reference genomic sequences share nearly identical gene structures and the organization of the region is highly collinear. Although, the region does not show any large internal duplications, a 1.5 Kb inverted duplicated sequence of 87% nucleotide identity was observed in a 13 Kb region surrounding D17S801. Transcriptome analysis by Affymetrix GeneChip and reverse transcription (RT)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods of 3 well characterized EOC cell lines and primary cultures of normal ovarian surface epithelial (NOSE) cells was performed with 32 candidates spanning D17S1839-D17S722 interval. RT-PCR analysis of 8 known or strongly predicted genes residing in the MRD in 10 EOC samples, that exhibited LOH of the MRD, identified FLJ22341 as a strong candidate TSG. The proximal repeat sequence of D17S801 occurs 8 Kb upstream of the putative promoter region of FLJ22341. RT-PCR analysis of the EOC samples and cell lines identified DKFZP434P0316 that maps proximal to the MRD, as a candidate. While Affymetrix technology was useful for initially eliminating less promising candidates, subsequent RT-PCR analysis of well-characterized EOC samples was essential to prioritize TSG candidates for further study

  8. Comparative mapping of the Grpr locus on the X chromosomes of man and mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Maslen, G.Ll.; Boyd, Y. )

    1993-07-01

    The gastrin-releasing peptide receptor has been previously cloned from both humans and mice. The authors have mapped the mouse gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (Grpr) locus using a polymorphic CA[sub n] repeat located in the 5[prime] untranslated region of the gene and a Mus spretus/Mus musculus interspecific backcross. The Grpr locus mapped between the Pdha-1 and Amg loci on the mouse X chromosome. Studies in man indicate that GRPR maps to the Xp21.2-p22.3 region of the human X chromosome and not to the Xp11-q11 interval as previously reported. The assignment of the GRPR locus to the distal Xp region is supported by the comparative map position in the mouse. 25 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Increased cerebral blood flow during hypercapnia is not affected by lesion of the nucleus locus ceruleus

    SciTech Connect

    Harik, S.I.; Prado, R.; Busto, R.; Ginsberg, M.D.

    1986-11-01

    To test the hypothesis that the putative noradrenergic innervation of intraparenchymal cerebral blood vessels from the nucleus locus ceruleus mediates the vasodilatory response to hypercapnia, regional cerebral blood flow was measured by iodo-(/sup 14/C)antipyrine autoradiography in awake and restrained rats with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion of the nucleus locus ceruleus and in unlesioned control rats. Hypercapnia, induced by the inhalation of 5% or 8% CO/sub 2/ in air for 8 minutes caused a 2 to 5-fold increase in regional cerebral blood flow. However, despite a marked reduction of about 90% in cortical norepinephrine levels ipsilateral to the lesion, blood flow to the frontal and parietal cortex, hippocampus, striatum and cerebellum increased to the same extent in ipsilateral and contralateral regions. Thus, lesion of the locus ceruleus and the resultant depletion of endogenous cortical and hippocampal norepinephrine, does not influence the cerebrovascular response to hypercapnia.

  10. The immunoglobulin heavy chain locus in the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus).

    PubMed

    Gambón-Deza, F; Sánchez-Espinel, C; Magadán-Mompó, S

    2009-08-01

    Immunoglobulins loci in mammals are well known to be organized within a translocon, however their origin remains unresolved. Four of the five classes of immunoglobulins described in humans and rodents (immunoglobulins M, G, E and A-IgM, IgG, IgE and IgA) were found in marsupials and monotremes (immunoglobulin D-IgD was not found) thus showing that the genomic structure of antibodies in mammals has remained constant since its origin. We have recently described the genomic organization of the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus in reptiles (IGHM, IGHD and IGHY). These data and the characterization of the IGH locus in platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus), allow us to elucidate the changes that took place in this genomic region during evolution from reptile to mammal. Thus, by using available genome data, we were able to detect that platypus IGH locus contains reptilian and mammalian genes. Besides having an IGHD that is very similar to the one in reptiles and an IGHY, they also present the mammal specific antibody genes IGHG and IGHE, in addition to IGHA. We also detected a pseudogene that originated by recombination between the IGHD and the IGHM (similar to the IGHD2 found in Eublepharis macularius). The analysis of the IGH locus in platypus shows that IGHY was duplicated, firstly by evolving into IGHE and then into IGHG. The IGHA of the platypus has a complex origin, and probably arose by a process of recombination between the IGHM and the IGHY. We detected about 44 VH genes (25 were already described), most of which comprise a single group. When we compared these VH genes with those described in Anolis carolinensis, we find that there is an evolutionary relationship between the VH genes of platypus and the reptilian Group III genes. These results suggest that a fast VH turnover took place in platypus and this gave rise to a family with a high VH gene number and the disappearance of the earlier VH families. PMID:19505725

  11. Characterization of a Multipeptide Lantibiotic Locus in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Maricic, Natalie; Anderson, Erica S.; Opipari, AnneMarie E.; Yu, Emily A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial communities are established through a combination of cooperative and antagonistic interactions between the inhabitants. Competitive interactions often involve the production of antimicrobial substances, including bacteriocins, which are small antimicrobial peptides that target other community members. Despite the nearly ubiquitous presence of bacteriocin-encoding loci, inhibitory activity has been attributed to only a small fraction of gene clusters. In this study, we characterized a novel locus (the pld locus) in the pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae that drives the production of a bacteriocin called pneumolancidin, which has broad antimicrobial activity. The locus encodes an unusual tandem array of four inhibitory peptides, three of which are absolutely required for antibacterial activity. The three peptide sequences are similar but appear to play distinct roles in regulation and inhibition. A modification enzyme typically found in loci encoding a class of highly modified bacteriocins called lantibiotics was required for inhibitory activity. The production of pneumolancidin is controlled by a two-component regulatory system that is activated by the accumulation of modified peptides. The locus is located on a mobile element that has been found in many pneumococcal lineages, although not all elements carry the pld genes. Intriguingly, a minimal region containing only the genes required for pneumolancidin immunity was found in several Streptococcus mitis strains. The pneumolancidin-producing strain can inhibit nearly all pneumococci tested to date and provided a competitive advantage in vivo. These peptides not only represent a unique strategy for bacterial competition but also are an important resource to guide the development of new antimicrobials. PMID:26814178

  12. A novel locus for split-hand/foot malformation associated with tibial hemimelia (SHFLD syndrome) maps to chromosome region 17p13.1-17p13.3.

    PubMed

    Lezirovitz, Karina; Maestrelli, Sylvia Regina Pedrosa; Cotrim, Nelson Henderson; Otto, Paulo A; Pearson, Peter L; Mingroni-Netto, Regina Celia

    2008-07-01

    Split-hand/foot malformation (SHFM) associated with aplasia of long bones, SHFLD syndrome or Tibial hemimelia-ectrodactyly syndrome is a rare condition with autosomal dominant inheritance, reduced penetrance and an incidence estimated to be about 1 in 1,000,000 liveborns. To date, three chromosomal regions have been reported as strong candidates for harboring SHFLD syndrome genes: 1q42.2-q43, 6q14.1 and 2q14.2. We characterized the phenotype of nine affected individuals from a large family with the aim of mapping the causative gene. Among the nine affected patients, four had only SHFM of the hands and no tibial defects, three had both defects and two had only unilateral tibial hemimelia. In keeping with previous publications of this and other families, there was clear evidence of both variable expression and incomplete penetrance, the latter bearing hallmarks of anticipation. Segregation analysis and multipoint Lod scores calculations (maximum Lod score of 5.03 using the LINKMAP software) using all potentially informative family members, both affected and unaffected, identified the chromosomal region 17p13.1-17p13.3 as the best and only candidate for harboring a novel mutated gene responsible for the syndrome in this family. The candidate gene CRK located within this region was sequenced but no pathogenic mutation was detected. PMID:18493797

  13. Asynchronous DNA replication within the human. beta. -globin gene locus

    SciTech Connect

    Epner, E.; Forrester, W.C.; Groudine, M. )

    1988-11-01

    The timing of DNA replication of the human {beta}-globin gene locus has been studied by blot hybridization of newly synthesized BrdUrd-substituted DNA from cells in different stages of the S phase. Using probes that span >120 kilobases across the human {beta}-globin gene locus, the authors show that the majority of this domain replicates in early S phase in the human erythroleukemia cell line K562 and in middle-to-late S phase in the lymphoid cell line Manca. However, in K562 cells three small regions display a strikingly different replication pattern than adjacent sequences. These islands, located in the inter-{gamma}-globin gene region and approximately 20 kilobases 5' to the {epsilon}-globin gene and 20 kilobases 3' to the {beta}-globin gene, replicate later and throughout S phase. A similar area is also present in the {alpha}-globin gene region in K562 cells. They suggest that these regions may represent sites of termination of replication forks.

  14. Mining locus tags in PubMed Central to improve microbial gene annotation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The scientific literature contains millions of microbial gene identifiers within the full text and tables, but these annotations rarely get incorporated into public sequence databases. We propose to utilize the Open Access (OA) subset of PubMed Central (PMC) as a gene annotation database and have developed an R package called pmcXML to automatically mine and extract locus tags from full text, tables and supplements. Results We mined locus tags from 1835 OA publications in ten microbial genomes and extracted tags mentioned in 30,891 sentences in main text and 20,489 rows in tables. We identified locus tag pairs marking the start and end of a region such as an operon or genomic island and expanded these ranges to add another 13,043 tags. We also searched for locus tags in supplementary tables and publications outside the OA subset in Burkholderia pseudomallei K96243 for comparison. There were 168 publications containing 48,470 locus tags and 83% of mentions were from supplementary materials and 9% from publications outside the OA subset. Conclusions B. pseudomallei locus tags within the full text and tables of OA publications represent only a small fraction of the total mentions in the literature. For microbial genomes with very few functionally characterized proteins, the locus tags mentioned in supplementary tables and within ranges like genomic islands contain the majority of locus tags. Significantly, the functions in the R package provide access to additional resources in the OA subset that are not currently indexed or returned by searching PMC. PMID:24499370

  15. Tissue specificity of methylation of cytosines in regulatory regions of four genes located in the locus FXYD5-COX7A1 of human chromosome 19: correlation with their expression level.

    PubMed

    Chalaya, T V; Akopov, S B; Nikolaev, L G; Sverdlov, E D

    2006-03-01

    In this study, we compared degree of methylation of selected CpG sites in CCGG sequences located in promoter regions of four human genes with expression level of these genes in several human cell lines and tissues. These genes were subdivided into two groups according to the dependence of their expression on CpG methylation in the 5 -regions. The first group, characterized by clear correlation of methylation with the transcription level, includes housekeeping gene COX6B (the absence of methylation unambiguously correlates with expression) and urothelium-specific uroplakin gene (the methylation coincides with absence of expression). The second group includes genes that are expressed in many, but not all tissues and cells. For these genes (LEAP-1 and ATP4A), there was no correlation between methylation and expression. It is possible that methylation provides some basal level of gene repression, which is overcome by binding of tissue-specific transcription factors, whereas lack of methylation gives the opportunity for gene expression in various cells and tissues. PMID:16545066

  16. Adaptation of Maize to Temperate Climates: Mid-Density Genome-Wide Association Genetics and Diversity Patterns Reveal Key Genomic Regions, with a Major Contribution of the Vgt2 (ZCN8) Locus

    PubMed Central

    Bouchet, Sophie; Servin, Bertrand; Bertin, Pascal; Madur, Delphine; Combes, Valérie; Dumas, Fabrice; Brunel, Dominique; Laborde, Jacques; Charcosset, Alain; Nicolas, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    The migration of maize from tropical to temperate climates was accompanied by a dramatic evolution in flowering time. To gain insight into the genetic architecture of this adaptive trait, we conducted a 50K SNP-based genome-wide association and diversity investigation on a panel of tropical and temperate American and European representatives. Eighteen genomic regions were associated with flowering time. The number of early alleles cumulated along these regions was highly correlated with flowering time. Polymorphism in the vicinity of the ZCN8 gene, which is the closest maize homologue to Arabidopsis major flowering time (FT) gene, had the strongest effect. This polymorphism is in the vicinity of the causal factor of Vgt2 QTL. Diversity was lower, whereas differentiation and LD were higher for associated loci compared to the rest of the genome, which is consistent with selection acting on flowering time during maize migration. Selection tests also revealed supplementary loci that were highly differentiated among groups and not associated with flowering time in our panel, whereas they were in other linkage-based studies. This suggests that allele fixation led to a lack of statistical power when structure and relatedness were taken into account in a linear mixed model. Complementary designs and analysis methods are necessary to unravel the architecture of complex traits. Based on linkage disequilibrium (LD) estimates corrected for population structure, we concluded that the number of SNPs genotyped should be at least doubled to capture all QTLs contributing to the genetic architecture of polygenic traits in this panel. These results show that maize flowering time is controlled by numerous QTLs of small additive effect and that strong polygenic selection occurred under cool climatic conditions. They should contribute to more efficient genomic predictions of flowering time and facilitate the dissemination of diverse maize genetic resources under a wide range of

  17. Positional cloning of the major quantitative trait locus underlying lung tumor susceptibility in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhongqiu; Futamura, Manabu; Vikis, Haris G.; Wang, Min; Li, Jie; Wang, Yian; Guan, Kun-Liang; You, Ming

    2003-01-01

    Pulmonary adenoma susceptibility 1 (Pas1), located on chromosome 6, is the major locus affecting inherited predisposition to lung tumor development in mice. We have fine mapped the Pas1 locus to a region of ≈0.5 megabases by using congenic strains of mice, constructed by placing the Pas1 region of chromosome 6 from A/J mice onto the genetic background of C57BL/6J mice. Systematic characterization of Pas1 candidates establishes the Las1 (lung adenoma susceptibility 1) and Kras2 (Kirsten rat sarcoma oncogene 2) genes as primary candidates for the Pas1 locus. Clearly, Kras2 affects lung tumor progression only, and Las1 is likely to affect lung tumor multiplicity. PMID:14583591

  18. The Rhizobium meliloti rhizopine mos locus is a mosaic structure facilitating its symbiotic regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, P J; Trenz, S P; Grzemski, W; De Bruijn, F J; Schell, J

    1993-01-01

    The Rhizobium meliloti L5-30 mos locus, encoding biosynthesis of the rhizopine 3-O-methyl-scyllo-inosamine, is shown to be a mosaic structure. The mos locus consists of four open reading frames (ORFs) (ORF1 and mosABC) arranged in an operon structure. Within this locus, several domains of homology with other prokaryotic symbiotic genes (nifH, fixA, fixU, and nifT) are present, suggesting that this locus may represent a hot spot for rearrangement of symbiotic genes. Unusually, these domains are present in the coding as well as noncoding regions of the mos locus. Proteins corresponding to those encoded by mosABC, but not ORF1, have been detected in nodule extracts by using antibodies. As ORF1 shows extensive homology with the 5' region of the nifH gene (P.J. Murphy, N. Heycke, S.P. Trenz, P. Ratet, F.J. de Bruijn, and J. Schell, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 85:9133-9137, 1988) and a frameshift mutation indicates that expression of this ORF is not required for mos activity, we propose that the mos locus has acquired a duplicated copy of nifH, including the promoter region, in order to become symbiotically regulated. Surprisingly, since the functions are likely different, MosA has an amino acid sequence similar to that of the DapA protein of Escherichia coli. The central domain of MosB has extensive homology with a range of diverse proteins involved with carbohydrate metabolism in either antibiotic or outer-cell-wall biosynthesis. This region is also common to the regulatory proteins DegT and DnrJ, suggesting a regulatory role for MosB. The structure of MosC is consistent with its being a membrane transport protein. Images PMID:8349559

  19. Different Foreign Genes Incidentally Integrated into the Same Locus of the Streptococcus suis Genome

    PubMed Central

    Sekizaki, Tsutomu; Takamatsu, Daisuke; Osaki, Makoto; Shimoji, Yoshihiro

    2005-01-01

    Some strains of Streptococcus suis possess a type II restriction-modification (RM) system, whose genes are thought to be inserted into the genome between purH and purD from a foreign source by illegitimate recombination. In this study, we characterized the purHD locus of the S. suis genomes of 28 serotype reference strains by DNA sequencing. Four strains contained the RM genes in the locus, as described before, whereas 11 strains possessed other genetic regions of seven classes. The genetic regions contained a single gene or multiple genes that were either unknown or similar to hypothetical genes of other bacteria. The mutually exclusive localization of the genetic regions with the atypical G+C contents indicated that these regions were also acquired from foreign sources. No transposable element or long-repeat sequence was found in the neighboring regions. An alignment of the nucleotide sequences, including the RM gene regions, suggested that the foreign regions were integrated by illegitimate recombination via short stretches of nucleotide identity. By using a thermosensitive suicide plasmid, the RM genes were experimentally introduced into an S. suis strain that did not contain any foreign genes in that locus. Integration of the plasmid into the S. suis genome did not occur in the purHD locus but occurred at various chromosomal loci, where there were 2 to 10 bp of nucleotide identity between the chromosome and the plasmid. These results suggest that various foreign genes described here were incidentally integrated into the same locus of the S. suis genome. PMID:15659665

  20. High-density genetic maps for loci involved in nuclear male sterility (NMS1) and sporophytic self-incompatibility (S-locus) in chicory (Cichorium intybus L., Asteraceae).

    PubMed

    Gonthier, Lucy; Blassiau, Christelle; Mörchen, Monika; Cadalen, Thierry; Poiret, Matthieu; Hendriks, Theo; Quillet, Marie-Christine

    2013-08-01

    High-density genetic maps were constructed for loci involved in nuclear male sterility (NMS1-locus) and sporophytic self-incompatibility (S-locus) in chicory (Cichorium intybus L.). The mapping population consisted of 389 F1' individuals derived from a cross between two plants, K28 (male-sterile) and K59 (pollen-fertile), both heterozygous at the S-locus. This F1' mapping population segregated for both male sterility (MS) and strong self-incompatibility (SI) phenotypes. Phenotyping F1' individuals for MS allowed us to map the NMS1-locus to linkage group (LG) 5, while controlled diallel and factorial crosses to identify compatible/incompatible phenotypes mapped the S-locus to LG2. To increase the density of markers around these loci, bulked segregant analysis was used. Bulks and parental plants K28 and K59 were screened using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis, with a complete set of 256 primer combinations of EcoRI-ANN and MseI-CNN. A total of 31,000 fragments were generated, of which 2,350 showed polymorphism between K59 and K28. Thirteen AFLP markers were identified close to the NMS1-locus and six in the vicinity of the S-locus. From these AFLP markers, eight were transformed into sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers and of these five showed co-dominant polymorphism. The chromosomal regions containing the NMS1-locus and the S-locus were each confined to a region of 0.8 cM. In addition, we mapped genes encoding proteins similar to S-receptor kinase, the female determinant of sporophytic SI in the Brasicaceae, and also markers in the vicinity of the putative S-locus of sunflower, but none of these genes or markers mapped close to the chicory S-locus. PMID:23689744

  1. Specificity of prenatal cocaine on inhibition of locus coeruleus neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Dey, S; Mactutus, C F; Booze, R M; Snow, D M

    2006-01-01

    Prenatal cocaine exposure induces alterations in attentional function that presumably involve locus coeruleus noradrenergic neurons and their projections. Previous reports indicate that embryonic rat locus coeruleus neurons exposed to cocaine, both in vitro and in vivo, showed in decreased cell survival and inhibition of neurite outgrowth, and that the effects were most deleterious during early gestation. The present study performed in vitro addressed the specificity of the inhibitory effects of cocaine by comparing locus coeruleus neurite formation and extension to that of dopaminergic substantia nigra neurons following exposure to a physiologically-relevant dose of cocaine (500 ng/ml, two times a day, for four days) during peak neuritogenesis. Following cocaine treatment, immunocytochemistry (anti-norepinephrine antibody to locus coeruleus; anti-tyrosine hydroxylase antibody to substantia nigra) and image analysis were performed to measure a variety of neurite outgrowth parameters. For locus coeruleus neurons, cocaine treatment decreased the 1) number of cells initiating neurites [P<0.001], 2) mean number [P<0.05] and length of neurites [P<0.0001], 3) mean number [P<0.0016] and length of branched neurites [P<0.0006], and 4) mean length of the longest neurites [P<0.0001]. In comparison, substantia nigra neurons were not significantly affected by cocaine for any of the parameters examined. More importantly, a significant interaction between cocaine treatment and brain region was observed [P<0.0002] indicating greater vulnerability of locus coeruleus, relative to substantia nigra neurons, to cocaine exposure. These data support our hypothesis that cocaine targets the noradrenergic system by negatively regulating locus coeruleus neuronal outgrowth, which likely affects pathfinding, synaptic connectivity, and ultimately attentional behavior in cocaine-exposed offspring. PMID:16483722

  2. Linkage disequilibrium at the APA insecticidal seed protein locus of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background An interesting seed protein family with a role in preventing insect herbivory is the multi-gene, APA family encoding the α-amylase inhibitor, phytohemagglutinin and arcelin proteins of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). Variability for this gene family exists and has been exploited to breed for insect resistance. For example, the arcelin locus has been successfully transferred from wild to cultivated common bean genotypes to provide resistance against the bruchid species Zabrotes subfasciatus although the process has been hampered by a lack of genetic tools for and understanding about the locus. In this study, we analyzed linkage disequilibrium (LD) between microsatellite markers at the APA locus and bruchid resistance in a germplasm survey of 105 resistant and susceptible genotypes and compared this with LD in other parts of the genome. Results Microsatellite allele diversity was found to vary with each of the eight APA-linked markers analyzed, and two markers within the APA locus were found to be diagnostic for bruchid resistance or susceptibility and for the different arcelin alleles inherited from the wild accessions. Arc1 was found to provide higher levels of resistance than Arc5 and the markers in the APA locus were highly associated with resistance showing that introgression of this gene-family from wild beans provides resistance in cultivated beans. LD around the APA locus was found to be intermediate compared to other regions of the genome and the highest LD was found within the APA locus itself for example between the markers PV-atct001 and PV-ag004. Conclusions We found the APA locus to be an important genetic determinant of bruchid resistance and also found that LD existed mostly within the APA locus but not beyond it. Moderate LD was also found for some other regions of the genome perhaps related to domestication genes. The LD pattern may reflect the introgression of arcelin from the wild into the cultivated background through breeding. LD

  3. Structure and genotypic plasticity of the Campylobacter fetus sap locus.

    PubMed

    Tu, Zheng-Chao; Wassenaar, Trudy M; Thompson, Stuart A; Blaser, Martin J

    2003-05-01

    The Campylobacter fetus surface layer proteins (SLPs), encoded by five to nine sapA homologues, are major virulence factors. To characterize the sapA homologues further, a 65.9 kb C. fetus genomic region encompassing the sap locus from wild-type strain 23D was completely sequenced and analysed; 44 predicted open reading frames (ORFs) were recognized. The 53.8 kb sap locus contained eight complete and one partial sapA homologues, varying from 2769 to 3879 bp, sharing conserved 553-2622 bp 5' regions, with partial sharing of 5' and 3' non-coding regions. All eight sapA homologues were expressed in Escherichia coli as antigenic proteins and reattached to the surface of SLP- strain 23B, indicating their conserved function. Analysis of the sap homologues indicated three phylogenetic groups. Promoter-specific polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) and sapA homologue-specific reverse transcription (RT)-PCRs showed that the unique sapA promoter can potentially express all eight sapA homologues. Reciprocal DNA recombination based on the 5' conserved regions can involve each of the eight sapA homologues, with frequencies from 10(-1) to 10(-3). Intragenic recombination between sapA7 and sapAp8, mediated by their conserved regions with a 10(-1)-10(-2) frequency, allows the formation of new sap homologues. As divergent SLP C-termini possess multiple antigenic sites, their reciprocal recombination behind the unique sap promoter leads to continuing antigenic variation. PMID:12694614

  4. Organization and Evolutionary Trajectory of the Mating Type (MAT) Locus in Dermatophyte and Dimorphic Fungal Pathogens▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenjun; Metin, Banu; White, Theodore C.; Heitman, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Sexual reproduction in fungi is governed by a specialized genomic region, the mating type (MAT) locus, whose gene identity, organization, and complexity are diverse. We identified the MAT locus of five dermatophyte fungal pathogens (Microsporum gypseum, Microsporum canis, Trichophyton equinum, Trichophyton rubrum, and Trichophyton tonsurans) and a dimorphic fungus, Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, and performed phylogenetic analyses. The identified MAT locus idiomorphs of M. gypseum control cell type identity in mating assays, and recombinant progeny were produced. Virulence tests in Galleria mellonella larvae suggest the two mating types of M. gypseum may have equivalent virulence. Synteny analysis revealed common features of the MAT locus shared among these five dermatophytes: namely, a small size (∼3 kb) and a novel gene arrangement. The SLA2, COX13, and APN2 genes, which flank the MAT locus in other Ascomycota are instead linked on one side of the dermatophyte MAT locus. In addition, the transcriptional orientations of the APN2 and COX13 genes are reversed compared to the dimorphic fungi Histoplasma capsulatum, Coccidioides immitis, and Coccidioides posadasii. A putative transposable element, pogo, was found to have inserted in the MAT1-2 idiomorph of one P. brasiliensis strain but not others. In conclusion, the evolution of the MAT locus of the dermatophytes and dimorphic fungi from the last common ancestor has been punctuated by both gene acquisition and expansion, and asymmetric gene loss. These studies further support a foundation to develop molecular and genetic tools for dermatophyte and dimorphic human fungal pathogens. PMID:19880755

  5. Immotile cilia syndrome: A recombinant family at HLA-linked gene locus

    SciTech Connect

    Gasparini, P.; Grifa, A.; Oggiano, N.; Fabbrizzi, E.; Giorgi, P.L.

    1994-02-15

    The immotile-cilia syndrome (ICS) is an autosomal recessive trait of congenital dismobility or even complete immobility of cilia in the ciliated epithelia (MIM 244400). Recurrent upper respiratory infections in early childhood are the most common clinical findings. Recently a disease locus was mapped by sib pair analysis in two unrelated families on 6p tightly linked to HLA class II loci, such as DR and DQ. In order to confirm this assignment and to test the presence of possible heterogeneity, the authors analyzed several ICS families utilizing DNA makers of HLA class II region. Here they report the identification of a recombinant family at this locus. 3 refs., 1 fig.

  6. Nonlinkage of D6S260, a putative schizophrenia locus, to bipolar affective disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, L.J.; Mitchell, P.B.; Salmon, J.

    1996-09-20

    To examine whether genes that predispose to schizophrenia also confer a predisposition to other psychiatric disorders such as bipolar affective disorder (BAD), we tested for linkage between the recently identified schizophrenia susceptibility locus D6S260 and the inheritance of BAD in 12 large Australian pedigrees. We found no evidence for linkage over a region of 12-27 cM from the D6S260 locus, depending on the model used. Our results therefore do not provide support for the continuum theory of psychosis. 13 refs., 2 tabs.

  7. The barley Frost resistance-H2 locus.

    PubMed

    Pasquariello, Marianna; Barabaschi, Delfina; Himmelbach, Axel; Steuernagel, Burkhard; Ariyadasa, Ruvini; Stein, Nils; Gandolfi, Francesco; Tenedini, Elena; Bernardis, Isabella; Tagliafico, Enrico; Pecchioni, Nicola; Francia, Enrico

    2014-03-01

    Frost resistance-H2 (Fr-H2) is a major QTL affecting freezing tolerance in barley, yet its molecular basis is still not clearly understood. To gain a better insight into the structural characterization of the locus, a high-resolution linkage map developed from the Nure × Tremois cross was initially implemented to map 13 loci which divided the 0.602 cM total genetic distance into ten recombination segments. A PCR-based screening was then applied to identify positive bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones from two genomic libraries of the reference genotype Morex. Twenty-six overlapping BACs from the integrated physical-genetic map were 454 sequenced. Reads assembled in contigs were subsequently ordered, aligned and manually curated in 42 scaffolds. In a total of 1.47 Mbp, 58 protein-coding sequences were identified, 33 of which classified according to similarity with sequences in public databases. As three complete barley C-repeat Binding Factors (HvCBF) genes were newly identified, the locus contained13 full-length HvCBFs, four Related to AP2 Triticeae (RAPT) genes, and at least five CBF pseudogenes. The final overall assembly of Fr-H2 includes more than 90 % of target region: all genes were identified along the locus, and a general survey of Repetitive Elements obtained. We believe that this gold-standard sequence for the Morex Fr-H2 will be a useful genomic tool for structural and evolutionary comparisons with Fr-H2 in winter-hardy cultivars along with Fr-2 of other Triticeae crops. PMID:24442711

  8. Developmental expression of the white locus of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Fjose, A.; Polito, L. C.; Weber, U.; Gehring, W. J.

    1984-01-01

    We have isolated several cDNA clones of the white locus which are derived from embryonic and pupal transcripts of Drosophila melanogaster. The cDNA sequences map within ˜7.5 kb (coordinates −3.0 to +4.6) of the genomic DNA and correspond mainly to sequences within the distal region of the gene (coordinates −0.2 to −3.0). A major RNA species of 2.6 kb was detected on Northerns of poly(A)+ RNA isolated from all developmental stages. The total accumulation of this transcript peaks in the mature third instar larva to a level of 0.003% which is about ten times higher than that observed in embryos. The spatial distribution of white locus transcripts was determined by in situ hybridization to tissue sections. In embryos, hybridization signals are restricted to the cells of the developing Malpighian tubules and the signal strength corresponds with ˜50 transcripts per cell. Before the termination of the third instar stage, hybridization signals are also detected at a comparable level in the eye antennal disks. At the same stage, a third site of labeling is observed over a small cluster of cells which seems to be associated with the larval photoreceptor organs. Thus, white locus expression is largely restricted to tissues which are known to be involved in the biosynthesis of eye pigments and these different cell types act in a temporally autonomous manner with respect to the induction of the white gene during development. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4.Fig. 5. PMID:16453550

  9. Exercise Adherence and Locus of Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geshuri, Yosef; Glahn, Ronald

    In 1990, a study was conducted to investigate the relationship between students' locus of control and the extent to which they participated in a voluntary exercise program. First-time participants in the "Shape Up" program offered at the Porterville College Fitness Center during the summer and fall semesters of 1990 were identified through the…

  10. Locus of Control Differences and Marital Dissatisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doherty, William J.

    1981-01-01

    Studied the relationship between spouses' individual expectancies for internal versus external control of reinforcements (locus of control), and their level of marital dissatisfaction. Results indicated that only a marital pattern in which the wife was more external and the husband more internal was associated with marital dissatisfaction. (Author)

  11. The Measurement of Parenting Locus of Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kralj, M. M.; And Others

    The present study describes the construction of a scale for reliably measuring the extent to which parents form generalized expectancies of the degree to which their children's behaviors are contingent on their own actions as parents. The original 72 statements included in the Parenting Locus of Control (PLOC) scale ascribed cause to one of four…

  12. KLF1 stabilizes GATA-1 and TAL1 occupancy in the human β-globin locus.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yujin; Kim, Yea Woon; Yun, Jangmi; Shin, Jongo; Kim, AeRi

    2015-03-01

    KLF1 is an erythroid specific transcription factor that binds to regulatory regions of erythroid genes. Binding sites of KLF1 are often found near binding sites of GATA-1 and TAL1. In the β-globin locus, KLF1 is required for forming active chromatin structure, although its role is unclear. To explore the role of KLF1 in transcribing the human γ-globin genes, we stably reduced the expression of KLF1 in erythroid K562 cells, compromising its association in the β-globin locus. The γ-globin transcription was reduced with disappearance of active chromatin structure of the locus in the KLF1 knockdown cells. Interestingly, GATA-1 and TAL1 binding was reduced in the β-globin locus, even though their expressions were not affected by KLF1 knockdown. The KLF1-dependent GATA-1 and TAL1 binding was observed in the adult locus transcribing the β-globin gene and in several erythroid genes, where GATA-1 occupancy is independent from TAL1. These results indicate that KLF1 plays a role in facilitating and/or stabilizing GATA-1 and TAL1 occupancy in the erythroid genes, contributing to the generation of active chromatin structure such as histone acetylation and chromatin looping. PMID:25528728

  13. A locus on chromosome 7 determines myocardial cell necrosis and calcification (dystrophic cardiac calcinosis) in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Ivandic, B T; Qiao, J H; Machleder, D; Liao, F; Drake, T A; Lusis, A J

    1996-01-01

    Dystrophic cardiac calcinosis, an age-related cardiomyopathy that occurs among certain inbred strains of mice, involves myocardial injury, necrosis, and calcification. Using a complete linkage map approach and quantitative trait locus analysis, we sought to identify genetic loci determining dystrophic cardiac calcinosis in an F2 intercross of resistant C57BL/6J and susceptible C3H/HeJ inbred strains. We identified a single major locus, designated Dyscalc, located on proximal chromosome 7 in a region syntenic with human chromosomes 19q13 and 11p15. The statistical significance of Dyscalc (logarithm of odds score 14.6) was tested by analysis of permuted trait data. Analysis of BxH recombinant inbred strains confirmed the mapping position. The inheritance pattern indicated that this locus influences susceptibility of cells both to enter necrosis and to subsequently undergo calcification. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:8643601

  14. The Effect of Locus of Control and Locus of Reinforcement on Academic Task Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Susan; Messer, Stanley B.

    1978-01-01

    Examines the differential effectiveness of using external reinforcement versus self reinforcement to increase the task persistence of children characterized by internal or external locus of control. Subjects were 153 fourth and fifth grade boys. (BD)

  15. A 12 megabase restriction map at the cystic fibrosis locus.

    PubMed Central

    Fulton, T R; Bowcock, A M; Smith, D R; Daneshvar, L; Green, P; Cavalli-Sforza, L L; Donis-Keller, H

    1989-01-01

    We have constructed a physical map of the chromosomal region containing the cystic fibrosis locus using seven DNA markers and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis methods. The map includes cleavage sites for 8 rare-cutting restriction enzymes and spans over 12 megabases (Mb) of DNA, with one unlinked probe covering an additional 5 Mb. To our knowledge, this is the largest segment of human DNA which has been restriction-mapped to date. We can identify thirteen putative HTF islands spaced at intervals of 0.3-3.2 Mb. The region between loci D7S8 and MET, where the CF gene lies, includes 1.4-1.9 Mb of DNA. Images PMID:2911467

  16. Quantitative trait locus for reading disability on chromosome 6

    SciTech Connect

    Cardon, L.R. |; Smith, S.D.; Kimberling, W.J.; Fulker, D.W.; DeFries, J.C.; Pennington, B.F.

    1994-10-14

    Interval mapping of data from two independent samples of sib pairs, at least one member of whom was reading disabled, revealed evidence for a quantitative trait locus (QTL) on chromosome 6. Results obtained from analyses of reading performance from 114 sib pairs genotyped for DNA markers localized the QTL to 6p21.3. Analyses of corresponding data from an independent sample of 50 dizygotic twin pairs provided evidence for linkage to the same region. In combination, the replicate samples yielded a x{sup 2} value of 16.73 (P = 0.0002). Examination of twin and kindred siblings with more extreme deficits in reading performance yielded even stronger evidence for a QTL (x{sup 2} = 27.35, P < 0.00001). The position of the QTL was narrowly defined with a 100:1 confidence interval to a 2-centimorgan region within the human leukocyte antigen complex. 23 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Locus of Control: The Effect on Reading and Instructional Preference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Richard I; Dyer, Barbara

    1978-01-01

    One hundred seventy-five college students were tested to determine the relationship among locus of control, student preference, and teaching procedures. Results showed that external locus of control students preferred hardware as instructional devices and that such devices improved their reading rates, while internal locus of control students…

  18. Self-Esteem, Locus of Control, and Student Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sterbin, Allan; Rakow, Ernest

    The direct effects of locus of control and self-esteem on standardized test scores were studied. The relationships among the standardized test scores and measures of locus of control and self-esteem for 12,260 students from the National Education Longitudinal Study 1994 database were examined, using the same definition of locus of control and…

  19. Locus of Control and Psychological Distress among the Aged.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, W. Daniel; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Examined relationship between locus of control and self-reported psychopathology in 139 residents of retirement complex. Correlation coefficients computed for locus of control and each of nine symptom dimensions of the Brief Symptom Inventory indicated that locus of control was correlated with self-reported psychopatholgoy for older women but not…

  20. The Impact of Locus of Control on Language Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nodoushan, Mohammad Ali Salmani

    2012-01-01

    This study hypothesized that students' loci of control affected their language achievement. 198 (N = 198) EFL students took the Rotter's (1966) locus of control test and were classified as locus-internal (ni = 78), and locus-external (ne = 120). They then took their ordinary courses and at the end of the semester, they were given their exams.…

  1. Toward an Abbreviated Internal-External Locus of Control Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Robert M., Jr.; Salomone, Paul R.

    1981-01-01

    Integrates a review of Rotter's theory with an analysis of the design and development of locus of control scales, and tests the reliability and validity of an abbreviated version of Rotter's Locus of Control Scale which provides practitioners with an instrument less confusing than other locus of control scales. (Author)

  2. Characterization of histone H3K27 modifications in the {beta}-globin locus

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yea Woon; Kim, AeRi

    2011-02-11

    Research highlights: {yields} The {beta}-globin locus control region is hyperacetylated and monomethylated at histone H3K27. {yields} Highly transcribed globin genes are marked by H3K27ac, but H3K27me2 is remarkable at silent globin genes in erythroid K562 cells. {yields} Association of PRC2 subunits is comparable with H3K27me3 pattern. {yields} Modifications of histone H3K27 are established in an enhancer-dependent manner. -- Abstract: Histone H3K27 is acetylated or methylated in the environment of nuclear chromatin. Here, to characterize the modification pattern of H3K27 in locus control region (LCR) and to understand the correlation of various H3K27 modifications with transcriptional activity of genes, we analyzed the human {beta}-globin locus using the ChIP assay. The LCR of the human {beta}-globin locus was enriched by H3K27ac and H3K27me1 in erythroid K562 cells. The highly transcribed globin genes were hyperacetylated at H3K27, but the repressed globin genes were highly dimethylated at this lysine in these cells. However, in non-erythroid 293FT cells, the {beta}-globin locus was marked by a high level of H3K27me3. EZH2 and SUZ12, subunits of polycomb repressive complex 2, were comparably detected with the H3K27me3 pattern in K562 and 293FT cells. In addition, H3K27ac, H3K27me1 and H3K27me3 were established in an enhancer-dependent manner in a model minichromosomal locus containing an enhancer and its target gene. Taken together, these results show that H3K27 modifications have distinctive correlations with the chromatin state or transcription level of genes and are influenced by an enhancer.

  3. Thorough investigation of a canine autoinflammatory disease (AID) confirms one main risk locus and suggests a modifier locus for amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Mia; Tintle, Linda; Kierczak, Marcin; Perloski, Michele; Tonomura, Noriko; Lundquist, Andrew; Murén, Eva; Fels, Max; Tengvall, Katarina; Pielberg, Gerli; Dufaure de Citres, Caroline; Dorso, Laetitia; Abadie, Jérôme; Hanson, Jeanette; Thomas, Anne; Leegwater, Peter; Hedhammar, Åke; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Meadows, Jennifer R S

    2013-01-01

    Autoinflammatory disease (AID) manifests from the dysregulation of the innate immune system and is characterised by systemic and persistent inflammation. Clinical heterogeneity leads to patients presenting with one or a spectrum of phenotypic signs, leading to difficult diagnoses in the absence of a clear genetic cause. We used separate genome-wide SNP analyses to investigate five signs of AID (recurrent fever, arthritis, breed specific secondary dermatitis, otitis and systemic reactive amyloidosis) in a canine comparative model, the pure bred Chinese Shar-Pei. Analysis of 255 DNA samples revealed a shared locus on chromosome 13 spanning two peaks of association. A three-marker haplotype based on the most significant SNP (p<2.6×10(-8)) from each analysis showed that one haplotypic pair (H13-11) was present in the majority of AID individuals, implicating this as a shared risk factor for all phenotypes. We also noted that a genetic signature (F ST) distinguishing the phenotypic extremes of the breed specific Chinese Shar-Pei thick and wrinkled skin, flanked the chromosome 13 AID locus; suggesting that breed development and differentiation has played a parallel role in the genetics of breed fitness. Intriguingly, a potential modifier locus for amyloidosis was revealed on chromosome 14, and an investigation of candidate genes from both this and the chromosome 13 regions revealed significant (p<0.05) renal differential expression in four genes previously implicated in kidney or immune health (AOAH, ELMO1, HAS2 and IL6). These results illustrate that phenotypic heterogeneity need not be a reflection of genetic heterogeneity, and that genetic modifiers of disease could be masked if syndromes were not first considered as individual clinical signs and then as a sum of their component parts. PMID:24130694

  4. Affected-sib-pair analyses reveal support of prior evidence for a susceptibility locus for bipolar disorder, on 21q

    SciTech Connect

    Detera-Wadleigh, S.D.; Badner, J.A.; Goldin, L.R.

    1996-06-01

    In 22 multiplex pedigrees screened for linkage to bipolar disorder, by use of 18 markers on chromosome 21q, single-locus affected-sib-pair (ASP) analysis detected a high proportion (57%-62%) of alleles shared identical by descent (IBD), with P values of .049-.0008 on nine marker loci. Multilocus ASP analyses revealed locus trios in the distal region between D21S270 and D21S171, with excess allele sharing (nominal P values <.01) under two affection-status models, ASM I (bipolars and schizoaffectives) and ASM II (ASM I plus recurrent unipolars). In addition, under ASM I, the proximal interval spanned by D21S1436 and D21S65 showed locus trios with excess allele sharing (nominal P values of .03-.0003). These findings support prior evidence that a susceptibility locus for bipolar disorder is on 21q. 38 refs., 4 tabs.

  5. Positional cloning of the mouse saccharin preference (Sac) locus

    PubMed Central

    Bachmanov, Alexander A.; Li, Xia; Reed, Danielle R.; Ohmen, Jeffery D.; Li, Shanru; Chen, Zhenyu; Tordoff, Michael G.; de Jong, Pieter J.; Wu, Chenyan; West, David B.; Chatterjee, Alu; Ross, David A.; Beauchamp, Gary K.

    2013-01-01

    Differences in sweetener intake among inbred strains of mice are partially determined by allelic variation of the saccharin preference (Sac) locus. Genetic and physical mapping limited a critical genomic interval containing Sac to a 194-kb DNA fragment. Sequencing and annotation of this region identified a gene (Tas1r3) encoding the third member of the T1R family of putative taste receptors, T1R3. Introgression by serial backcrossing of the 194-kb chromosomal fragment containing the Tas1r3 allele from the high-sweetener preferring C57BL/6ByJ strain onto the genetic background of the low-sweetener preferring 129P3/J strain rescued its low sweetener preference phenotype. Polymorphisms of Tas1r3 that are likely to have functional significance were identified using analysis of genomic sequences and sweetener preference phenotypes of genealogically distant mouse strains. Tas1r3 has two common haplotypes, consisting of six single nucleotide polymorphisms: one haplotype was found in mouse strains with elevated sweetener preference and the other in strains relatively indifferent to sweeteners. This study provides compelling evidence that Tas1r3 is equivalent to the Sac locus and that the T1R3 receptor responds to sweeteners. PMID:11555487

  6. Recombination at the Rp1 locus of maize.

    PubMed

    Hulbert, S H; Bennetzen, J L

    1991-05-01

    The Rp1 locus of maize determines resistance to races of the maize rust fungus (Puccinia sorghi). Restriction fragment length polymorphism markers that closely flank Rp1 were mapped and used to study the genetic fine structure and role of recombination in the instability of this locus. Susceptible progeny, lacking the resistance of either parent, were obtained from test cross progeny of several Rp1 heterozygotes. These susceptible progeny usually had non-parental genotypes at flanking marker loci, thereby verifying their recombinational origin. Seven of eight Rp1 alleles (or genes) studied were clustered within about 0.2 map units of each other. Rp1G, however, mapped from 1-3 map units distal to other Rp1 alleles. Rp5 also mapped distally to most Rp1 alleles. Other aspects of recombination at Rp1 suggested that some alleles carry duplicated sequences, that mispairing can occur, and that unequal crossing-over may be a common phenomenon in this region; susceptible progeny from an Rp1A homozygote had recombinant flanking marker genotypes, and susceptible progeny from an Rp1D/Rp1F heterozygote showed both possible nonparental flanking marker genotypes. PMID:1674815

  7. Scrutinizing the FTO locus: compelling evidence for a complex, long-range regulatory context.

    PubMed

    Rask-Andersen, Mathias; Almén, Markus Sällman; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2015-11-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within a genetic region including the first two introns of the gene encoding FTO have consistently been shown to be the strongest genetic factors influencing body mass index (BMI). However, this same also contains several regulatory DNA elements that affect the expression of IRX3 and IRX5, which respectively, are located approximately 500 kb and 1.2 Mbp downstream from the BMI-associated FTO locus. Through these affected regulatory elements, genetic variation at the FTO locus influences adipocyte development leading to decreased thermogenesis and increased lipid storage. These findings provide a genomic model for the functional implications of genetic variations at this locus, and also demonstrate the importance of accounting for chromatin-chromatin interactions when constructing hypotheses for the mechanisms of trait and disease-associated common genetic variants. Several consortia have generated genome-wide datasets describing different aspects of chromatin biology which can be utilized to predict functionality and propose biologically relevant descriptions of specific DNA regions. Here, we review some of the publically available data resources on genome function and organization that can be used to gain an overview of genetic regions of interest and to generate testable hypotheses for future studies. We use the BMI- and obesity-associated FTO locus as a subject as it poses an illustrative example on the value of these resources. We find that public databases strongly support long-range interactions between regulatory elements in the FTO locus with the IRXB cluster genes IRX3 and IRX5. Chromatin configuration capture data also support interactions across a large region stretching across from the RPGRIP1L gene, FTO and the IRXB gene cluster. PMID:26340902

  8. On the Components of Segregation Distortion in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER. II. Deletion Mapping and Dosage Analysis of the SD Locus

    PubMed Central

    Brittnacher, John G.; Ganetzky, Barry

    1983-01-01

    Segregation distorter (SD) chromosomes are preferentially transmitted to offspring from heterozygous SD/SD+ males owing to the induced dysfunction of the SD+-bearing sperm. This phenomenon involves at least two major loci: the Sd locus whose presence is necessary for distortion to occur and the Rsp locus which acts as the site of Sd action. Several additional loci on SD chromosomes enhance distortion.—In a previous study deletions were used to map the Sd locus and to determine some of its properties. We have extended this analysis with the isolation and characterization of 14 new deletions in the Sd region. From our results we conclude (1) SD chromosomes contain a single Sd locus located in region 37D2-6 of the salivary gland chromosome map. Deletion of this locus in any of three SD chromosomes now studied results in complete loss of ability to distort a sensitive chromosome; (2) the reduced male fecundity observed in many homozygous SD or SDi/SDj combinations is due at least in part to the action of the Sd locus. The fecundity of these males can be substantially increased by deletion of one Sd locus. Thus, it is the presence of two doses of Sd rather than the absence of Sd+ that produces the lowered male fecundity in SD homozygotes; (3) Sd behaves as a neomorph, whereas Sd+, if it exists at all, is amorphic with respect to segregation distortion; (4) these results support a model in which the Sd product is made in limiting amounts and the interaction of this product with the Rsp locus causes sperm dysfunction. The Sd product appears to act preferentially at Rsps (sensitive-Responder) but may also act at Rspi (insensitive-Responder). PMID:17246120

  9. CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) and cohesin influence the genomic architecture of the Igh locus and antisense transcription in pro-B cells.

    PubMed

    Degner, Stephanie C; Verma-Gaur, Jiyoti; Wong, Timothy P; Bossen, Claudia; Iverson, G Michael; Torkamani, Ali; Vettermann, Christian; Lin, Yin C; Ju, Zhongliang; Schulz, Danae; Murre, Caroline S; Birshtein, Barbara K; Schork, Nicholas J; Schlissel, Mark S; Riblet, Roy; Murre, Cornelis; Feeney, Ann J

    2011-06-01

    Compaction and looping of the ~2.5-Mb Igh locus during V(D)J rearrangement is essential to allow all V(H) genes to be brought in proximity with D(H)-J(H) segments to create a diverse antibody repertoire, but the proteins directly responsible for this are unknown. Because CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) has been demonstrated to be involved in long-range chromosomal interactions, we hypothesized that CTCF may promote the contraction of the Igh locus. ChIP sequencing was performed on pro-B cells, revealing colocalization of CTCF and Rad21 binding at ~60 sites throughout the V(H) region and 2 other sites within the Igh locus. These numerous CTCF/cohesin sites potentially form the bases of the multiloop rosette structures at the Igh locus that compact during Ig heavy chain rearrangement. To test whether CTCF was involved in locus compaction, we used 3D-FISH to measure compaction in pro-B cells transduced with CTCF shRNA retroviruses. Reduction of CTCF binding resulted in a decrease in Igh locus compaction. Long-range interactions within the Igh locus were measured with the chromosomal conformation capture assay, revealing direct interactions between CTCF sites 5' of DFL16 and the 3' regulatory region, and also the intronic enhancer (Eμ), creating a D(H)-J(H)-Eμ-C(H) domain. Knockdown of CTCF also resulted in the increase of antisense transcription throughout the D(H) region and parts of the V(H) locus, suggesting a widespread regulatory role for CTCF. Together, our findings demonstrate that CTCF plays an important role in the 3D structure of the Igh locus and in the regulation of antisense germline transcription and that it contributes to the compaction of the Igh locus. PMID:21606361

  10. Role of CTCF protein in regulating FMR1 locus transcription.

    PubMed

    Lanni, Stella; Goracci, Martina; Borrelli, Loredana; Mancano, Giorgia; Chiurazzi, Pietro; Moscato, Umberto; Ferrè, Fabrizio; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela; Tabolacci, Elisabetta; Neri, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the leading cause of inherited intellectual disability, is caused by epigenetic silencing of the FMR1 gene, through expansion and methylation of a CGG triplet repeat (methylated full mutation). An antisense transcript (FMR1-AS1), starting from both promoter and intron 2 of the FMR1 gene, was demonstrated in transcriptionally active alleles, but not in silent FXS alleles. Moreover, a DNA methylation boundary, which is lost in FXS, was recently identified upstream of the FMR1 gene. Several nuclear proteins bind to this region, like the insulator protein CTCF. Here we demonstrate for the first time that rare unmethylated full mutation (UFM) alleles present the same boundary described in wild type (WT) alleles and that CTCF binds to this region, as well as to the FMR1 gene promoter, exon 1 and intron 2 binding sites. Contrariwise, DNA methylation prevents CTCF binding to FXS alleles. Drug-induced CpGs demethylation does not restore this binding. CTCF knock-down experiments clearly established that CTCF does not act as insulator at the active FMR1 locus, despite the presence of a CGG expansion. CTCF depletion induces heterochromatinic histone configuration of the FMR1 locus and results in reduction of FMR1 transcription, which however is not accompanied by spreading of DNA methylation towards the FMR1 promoter. CTCF depletion is also associated with FMR1-AS1 mRNA reduction. Antisense RNA, like sense transcript, is upregulated in UFM and absent in FXS cells and its splicing is correlated to that of the FMR1-mRNA. We conclude that CTCF has a complex role in regulating FMR1 expression, probably through the organization of chromatin loops between sense/antisense transcriptional regulatory regions, as suggested by bioinformatics analysis. PMID:23874213

  11. Structure of the MHC A and B locus promoters in hominoids

    SciTech Connect

    Vallejo, A.N.; Pease, L.R.

    1995-04-15

    The expansion and contraction of mammalian class I multigene families raises the issue as to what determines the loss or retention of family members. We propose that accumulating changes in regulatory regions result in the loss of expression of the gene products during times critical to selection, leading to the extinction of misregulated genes. The structures of promoter regions of MHC class I genes in nonhuman primates support this view. The B promoters are more homogeneous and contain regulatory elements also found in the promoters of the homologous class I genes of more distant mammals, whereas the A locus promoters were significantly more heterogeneous, have fewer sequence motifs related to known transcription factor-binding sites and have accumulated nucleotide substitutions within one of the widely conserved class I promoter elements. These findings are consistent with the view that the more polymorphic B locus is the principal MHC locus encoding functional class I Ag-presenting molecules whereas the less polymorphic A locus is assuming a secondary role as a consequence of promoter defects. 50 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Association of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder With Reduced In Vivo Norepinephrine Availability in the Locus Coeruleus

    PubMed Central

    Pietrzak, Robert H.; Gallezot, Jean-Dominique; Ding, Yu-Shin; Henry, Shannan; Potenza, Marc N.; Southwick, Steven M.; Krystal, John H.; Carson, Richard E.; Neumeister, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Animal data suggest that chronic stress is associated with a reduction in norepinephrine transporter (NET) availability in the locus coeruleus. However, it is unclear whether such models are relevant to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), which has been linked to noradrenergic dysfunction in humans. OBJECTIVES To use positron emission tomography and the radioligand [11C]methylreboxetine to examine in vivo NET availability in the locus coeruleus in the following 3 groups of individuals: healthy adults (HC group), adults exposed to trauma who did not develop PTSD (TC group), and adults exposed to trauma who developed PTSD (PTSD group) and to evaluate the relationship between NET availability in the locus coeruleus and a contemporary phenotypic model of PTSD symptoms. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Cross-sectional positron emission tomography study under resting conditions at academic and Veterans Affairs medical centers among 56 individuals in the following 3 study groups: HC (n = 18), TC (n = 16), and PTSD (n = 22). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The [11C]methylreboxetine-binding potential of NET availability in the locus coeruleus and the severity of PTSD symptoms assessed using the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale. RESULTS The PTSD group had significantly lower NET availability than the HC group (41% lower, Cohen d = 1.07). NET availability did not differ significantly between the TC and HC groups (31% difference, Cohen d = 0.79) or between the TC and PTSD groups (15% difference, Cohen d = 0.28). In the PTSD group, NET availability in the locus coeruleus was independently positively associated with the severity of anxious arousal (ie, hypervigilance) symptoms (r = 0.52) but not with any of the other PTSD symptom clusters. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE These results suggest that PTSD is associated with significantly reduced NET availability in the locus coeruleus and that greater NET availability in this brain region is associated with increased severity

  13. Bipolar disorder: Evidence for a major locus

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, M.A.; Flodman, P.L.; Sadovnick, A.D.; Ameli, H.

    1995-10-09

    Complex segregation analyses were conducted on families of bipolar I and bipolar II probands to delineate the mode of inheritance. The probands were ascertained from consecutive referrals to the Mood Disorder Service, University Hospital, University of British Columbia and diagnosed by DSM-III-R and Research Diagnostic Criteria. Data were available on over 1,500 first-degree relatives of the 186 Caucasian probands. The purpose of the analyses was to determine if, after correcting for age and birth cohort, there was evidence for a single major locus. Five models were fit to the data using the statistical package SAGE: (1) dominant, (2) recessive, (3) arbitrary mendelian inheritance, (4) environmental, and (5) no major effects. A single dominant, mendelian major locus was the best fitting of these models for the sample of bipolar I and II probands when only bipolar relatives were defined as affected (polygenic inheritance could not be tested). Adding recurrent major depression to the diagnosis {open_quotes}affected{close_quotes} for relatives reduced the evidence for a major locus effect. Our findings support the undertaking of linkage studies and are consistent with the analyses of the National Institutes of Mental Health (NIMH) Collaborative Study data by Rice et al. and Blangero and Elston. 39 refs., 4 tabs.

  14. Affective state and locus of control modulate the neural response to threat.

    PubMed

    Harnett, Nathaniel G; Wheelock, Muriah D; Wood, Kimberly H; Ladnier, Jordan C; Mrug, Sylvie; Knight, David C

    2015-11-01

    The ability to regulate the emotional response to threat is critical to healthy emotional function. However, the response to threat varies considerably from person-to-person. This variability may be partially explained by differences in emotional processes, such as locus of control and affective state, which vary across individuals. Although the basic neural circuitry that mediates the response to threat has been described, the impact individual differences in affective state and locus of control have on that response is not well characterized. Understanding how these factors influence the neural response to threat would provide new insight into processes that mediate emotional function. Therefore, the present study used a Pavlovian conditioning procedure to investigate the influence individual differences in locus of control, positive affect, and negative affect have on the brain and behavioral responses to predictable and unpredictable threats. Thirty-two healthy volunteers participated in a fear conditioning study in which predictable and unpredictable threats (i.e., unconditioned stimulus) were presented during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Locus of control showed a linear relationship with learning-related ventromedial prefrontal cortex (PFC) activity such that the more external an individual's locus of control, the greater their differential response to predictable versus unpredictable threat. In addition, positive and negative affectivity showed a curvilinear relationship with dorsolateral PFC, dorsomedial PFC, and insula activity, such that those with high or low affectivity showed reduced regional activity compared to those with an intermediate level of affectivity. Further, activity within the PFC, as well as other regions including the amygdala, were linked with the peripheral emotional response as indexed by skin conductance and electromyography. The current findings demonstrate that the neural response to threat within brain regions

  15. The tyrosinase-positive oculocutaneous albinism locus maps to chromosome 15q11. 2-q12

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsay, M.; Colman, M.A.; Stevens, G.; Zwane, E.; Kromberg, J.; Jenkins, T. ); Garral, M.

    1992-10-01

    Tyrosinase-positive oculocutaneous albinism (ty-pos OCA), an autosomal recessive disorder of the melanin biosynthetic pathway, is the most common type of albinism occurring worldwide. In southern African Bantu-speaking negroids it has an overall prevalence of about 1/3,900. Since the basic biochemical defect is unknown, a linkage study with candidate loci, candidate chromosomal regions, and random loci was undertaken. The ty-pos OCA locus was found to be linked to two arbitrary loci, D15S10 and D15S13, in the Prader-Willi/Angelman chromosomal region on chromosome 15q11.2-q12. The pink-eyed dilute locus, p, on mouse chromosome 7, maps close to a region of homology on human chromosome 15q, and we postulate that the ty-pos OCA and p loci are homologous. 43 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Search for a schizophrenia susceptibility locus of human chromosome 22

    SciTech Connect

    Coon, H.; Hoff, M.; Holik, J.

    1994-06-15

    We used 10 highly informative DNA polymorphic markers and genetic linkage analysis to examine whether a gene locus predisposing to schizophrenia is located on chromosome 22, in 105 families with schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder. The LOD score method, including analysis for heterogeneity, provided no conclusive evidence of linkage under a dominant, recessive, or penetrance free model of inheritance. Affected sib-pair analysis was inconclusive. Affected Pedigree Member (APM) analysis gave only suggestive evidence for linkage. Multipoint APM analysis, using 4 adjacent loci including D22S281 and IL2RB, a region of interest from the APM analysis, gave non-significant results for the three different weighting functions. 18 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  17. A comprehensive analysis of the chorion locus in silkmoth

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhiwei; Nohata, Junko; Guo, Huizhen; Li, Shenglong; Liu, Jianqiu; Guo, Youbing; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Kadono-Okuda, Keiko; Liu, Chun; Arunkumar, Kallare P.; Nagaraju, Javaregowda; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Shiping; Labropoulou, Vassiliki; Swevers, Luc; Tsitoura, Panagiota; Iatrou, Kostas; Gopinathan, Karumathil P.; Goldsmith, Marian R.; Xia, Qingyou; Mita, Kazuei

    2015-01-01

    Despite more than 40 years of intense study, essential features of the silkmoth chorion (eggshell) are still not fully understood. To determine the precise structure of the chorion locus, we performed extensive EST analysis, constructed a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) contig, and obtained a continuous genomic sequence of 871,711 base pairs. We annotated 127 chorion genes in two segments interrupted by a 164 kb region with 5 non-chorion genes, orthologs of which were on chorion bearing scaffolds in 4 ditrysian families. Detailed transcriptome analysis revealed expression throughout choriogenesis of most chorion genes originally categorized as “middle”, and evidence for diverse regulatory mechanisms including cis-elements, alternative splicing and promoter utilization, and antisense RNA. Phylogenetic analysis revealed multigene family associations and faster evolution of early chorion genes and transcriptionally active pseudogenes. Proteomics analysis identified 99 chorion proteins in the eggshell and micropyle localization of 1 early and 6 Hc chorion proteins. PMID:26553298

  18. A comprehensive analysis of the chorion locus in silkmoth.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiwei; Nohata, Junko; Guo, Huizhen; Li, Shenglong; Liu, Jianqiu; Guo, Youbing; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Kadono-Okuda, Keiko; Liu, Chun; Arunkumar, Kallare P; Nagaraju, Javaregowda; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Shiping; Labropoulou, Vassiliki; Swevers, Luc; Tsitoura, Panagiota; Iatrou, Kostas; Gopinathan, Karumathil P; Goldsmith, Marian R; Xia, Qingyou; Mita, Kazuei

    2015-01-01

    Despite more than 40 years of intense study, essential features of the silkmoth chorion (eggshell) are still not fully understood. To determine the precise structure of the chorion locus, we performed extensive EST analysis, constructed a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) contig, and obtained a continuous genomic sequence of 871,711 base pairs. We annotated 127 chorion genes in two segments interrupted by a 164 kb region with 5 non-chorion genes, orthologs of which were on chorion bearing scaffolds in 4 ditrysian families. Detailed transcriptome analysis revealed expression throughout choriogenesis of most chorion genes originally categorized as "middle", and evidence for diverse regulatory mechanisms including cis-elements, alternative splicing and promoter utilization, and antisense RNA. Phylogenetic analysis revealed multigene family associations and faster evolution of early chorion genes and transcriptionally active pseudogenes. Proteomics analysis identified 99 chorion proteins in the eggshell and micropyle localization of 1 early and 6 Hc chorion proteins. PMID:26553298

  19. The A alpha mating locus of Schizophyllum commune encodes two dissimilar multiallelic homeodomain proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Stankis, M M; Specht, C A; Yang, H; Giasson, L; Ullrich, R C; Novotny, C P

    1992-01-01

    The A alpha mating locus is one of four multiallelic loci that govern sexual development in the basidiomycete fungus Schizophyllum commune. We have determined the nucleotide sequence encoding three A alpha mating types, A alpha 1, A alpha 3, and A alpha 4. We have found that the locus for A alpha 3 and A alpha 4 consists of two genes: Y and Z. The locus for A alpha 1 encodes only one gene, Y. The Z polypeptides encoded by different alleles exhibit 42% identity. The Y polypeptides exhibit 49-54% identity. The finding that the deduced Z and Y polypeptides have homeodomain motifs suggests that these polypeptides may be DNA-binding regulatory proteins that control the expression of developmental genes. The deduced Z polypeptide also has acidic regions that might be functionally analogous to the acidic regions in yeast GAL4 and GCN4 that activate transcription. The Y polypeptide has a serine-rich region and a basic region that shows some identity to the lysine-rich region of H1 histones. PMID:1353886

  20. Variant forms of the binary toxin CDT locus and tcdC gene in Clostridium difficile strains.

    PubMed

    Stare, Barbara Geric; Delmée, Michel; Rupnik, Maja

    2007-03-01

    Variability in the genes for toxin A, toxin B and other pathogenicity locus regions is well known and is the basis for the distribution of Clostridium difficile strains into variant toxinotypes. Previous data have indicated that some C. difficile strains have a non-functional truncated form of the binary toxin (CDT) locus. This study analysed variability in the CDT locus and the presence of deleted tcdC genes in C. difficile strains. A total of 146 strains were screened, including known variant toxinotypes and non-variant A+B+ (toxinotype 0) and A-B- C. difficile strains. In all of the strains studied, only two forms of the CDT locus were found: a full-length 4.3 kb fragment encoding the functional binary toxin or a truncated 2.3 kb fragment. Whilst the full-length CDT locus was found almost exclusively in variant toxinotypes, the truncated form was detected in 79% of toxinotype 0 strains. Non-toxinogenic A-B- strains with a truncated version were not found and only rarely possessed the full-length CDT locus (A-B-CDT+ strains). Four different forms of the tcdC gene were found; three represented deleted versions and typically were found in toxinotypes III-VII, XI, XIV-XVI and XXIV. PMID:17314362

  1. TNXB locus may be a candidate gene predisposing to schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Wei, J; Hemmings, G P

    2004-02-15

    We report here on the detection of nine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) near to the NOTCH4 locus in the search for schizophrenia susceptibility genes in the class III region of the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC). We totally analyzed 122 family trios recruited in the UK. The TDT analysis demonstrated that of the nine SNPs, three were associated with schizophrenia, including rs1009382 (P = 0.00047), rs204887 (P = 0.007), and rs8283 (P = 0.015). Both rs1009382 and rs204887 are present in the TNXB locus. The rs1009382 is a non-synonymous SNP located in exon 23 of the gene and its A to G base change causes a Glu2578Gly substitution. The goodness-of-fit test showed that genotypic distribution of rs1009382 was deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium due to homozygote excess in the patient group (P = 0.01), suggesting that a double dose of a genetic risk may be involved. Possibly, rs1009382 is a candidate SNP predisposing to a schizophrenic illness. Moreover, the test for linkage disequilibrium (LD) between paired SNPs showed that the nine SNPs studied may be in the same LD block with an unexpected pattern as the strength of LD was not correlated with the distance between paired SNPs. The haplotype analysis suggested that there might be more than one disease-related allele located in the class III region of the MHC, and that these alleles possibly confer either susceptibility or resistance to schizophrenia. PMID:14755442

  2. Recombination Can Initiate and Terminate at a Large Number of Sites within the Rosy Locus of Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Clark, S. H.; Hilliker, A. J.; Chovnick, A.

    1988-01-01

    This report presents the results of a recombination experiment designed to question the existence of special sites for the initiation or termination of a recombination heteroduplex within the region of the rosy locus. Intragenic recombination events were monitored between two physically separated rosy mutant alleles ry(301) and ry(2) utilizing DNA restriction site polymorphisms as genetic markers. Both ry(301) and ry(2) are known from previous studies to be associated with gene conversion frequencies an order of magnitude lower than single site mutations. The mutations are associated with large, well defined insertions located as internal sites within the locus in prior intragenic mapping studies. On the molecular map, they represent large insertions approximately 2.7 kb apart in the second and third exons, respectively, of the XDH coding region. The present study monitors intragenic recombination in a mutant heterozygous genotype in which DNA homology is disrupted by these large discontinuities, greater than the region of DNA homology and flanking both sides of the locus. If initiation/or termination requires separate sites at either end of the locus, then intragenic recombination within the rosy locus of the heterozygote should be eliminated. Contrary to expectation, significant recombination between these sites is seen. PMID:2834266

  3. Localization of a bidirectional DNA replication origin in the native locus and in episomally amplified murine adenosine deaminase loci.

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, S M; DeRose, M L; Kolman, J L; Nonet, G H; Kelly, R E; Wahl, G M

    1993-01-01

    Gene amplification is frequently mediated by the initial production of acentric, autonomously replicating extrachromosomal elements. The 4,000 extrachromosomal copies of the mouse adenosine deaminase (ADA) amplicon in B-1/50 cells initiate their replication remarkably synchronously in early S phase and at approximately the same time as the single-copy chromosomal locus from which they were derived. The abundance of ADA sequences and favorable replication timing characteristics in this system led us to determine whether DNA replication initiates in ADA episomes within a preferred region and whether this region is the same as that used at the corresponding chromosomal locus prior to amplification. This study reports the detection and localization of a discrete set of DNA fragments in the ADA amplicon which label soon after release of synchronized B-1/50 cells into S phase. A switch in template strand complementarity of Okazaki fragments, indicative of the initiation of bidirectional DNA replication, was found to lie within the same region. This putative replication origin is located approximately 28.5 kbp upstream of the 5' end of the ADA gene. The same region initiated DNA replication in the single-copy ADA locus of the parental cells. These analyses provide the first evidence that the replication of episomal intermediates involved in gene amplification initiates within a preferred region and that the same region is used to initiate DNA synthesis within the native locus. Images PMID:8474455

  4. Cdkn2a is an atherosclerosis modifier locus that regulates monocyte/macrophage proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Chao-Ling; Murphy, Andrew J.; Sayers, Scott; Li, Rong; Yvan-Charvet, Laurent; Davis, Jaeger Z.; Krishnamurthy, Janakiraman; Liu, Yan; Puig, Oscar; Sharpless, Norman E.; Tall, Alan R.; Welch, Carrie L.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Common genetic variants in a 58-kilobase region of chr 9p21, near the CDKN2A/CDKN2B tumor suppressor locus, are strongly associated with coronary artery disease. However, the underlying mechanism of action remains unknown. Methods and Results We previously reported a congenic mouse model harboring an atherosclerosis susceptibility locus and the region of homology with the human 9p21 locus. Microarray and transcript-specific expression analyses showed markedly decreased Cdkn2a expression, including both p16INK4a and p19ARF, but not Cdkn2b (p15INK4b), in macrophages derived from congenic mice compared to controls. Atherosclerosis studies in subcongenic strains revealed genetic complexity and narrowed one locus to a small interval including Cdkn2a/b. Bone marrow (BM) transplantation studies implicated myeloid lineage cells as the culprit cell type rather than resident vascular cells. To directly test the role of BM-derived Cdkn2a transcripts in atherogenesis and inflammatory cell proliferation, we performed a transplantation study utilizing Cdkn2a+/− cells in the Ldlr−/− mouse model. Cdkn2a-deficient BM recipients exhibited accelerated atherosclerosis, increased Ly6Chi pro-inflammatory monocytes and increased monocyte/macrophage proliferation compared to controls. Conclusions These data provide a plausible mechanism for accelerated atherogenesis in susceptible congenic mice, involving decreased expression of Cdkn2a and increased proliferation of monocyte/macrophages, with possible relevance to the 9p21 human locus. PMID:21868699

  5. Interaction of the Stubble-Stubbloid Locus and the Broad-Complex of Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Beaton, A. H.; Kiss, I.; Fristrom, D.; Fristrom, J. W.

    1988-01-01

    The 2B5 region on the X chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster forms an early ecdysone puff at the end of the third instar. The region is coextensive with a complex genetic locus, the Broad-Complex (BR-C). The BR-C is a regulatory gene that contains two major functional domains, the br domain and the l(1)2Bc domain. BR-C mutants prevent metamorphosis, including morphogenesis of imaginal discs; br mutants prevent elongation and eversion of appendages and l(1)2Bc mutants prevent fusion of the discs. The Stubble-stubbloid (Sb-sbd) locus at 89B9-10 is best known for the effects of its mutants on bristle structure. Mutants of the BR-C and the Sb-sbd locus interact to produce severe malformation of appendages. Viable heteroallelic and homoallelic combinations of Sb-sbd mutants, including loss-of-function mutants, affect the elongation of imaginal disc appendages. Thus, the Sb-sbd(+) product is essential for normal appendage elongation. Sb-sbd mutants, however, do not affect eversion or fusion of discs. Correspondingly, only BR-C mutants deficient in br function interact with Sb-sbd mutants. The interaction occurs in deficiency heterozygotes using single, wild-type doses of the BR-C, of the Sb-sbd locus, or of both loci. These last results are formally consistent with the possibility that the BR-C acts as a positive regulator of the Sb-sbd locus. The data do not exclude other possible nonregulatory interactions between the two loci, e.g., interactions between the products of both genes. PMID:3143619

  6. The mouse lysosomal membrane protein 1 gene as a candidate for the motorneuron degeneration (mnd) locus

    SciTech Connect

    Bermingham, N.A.; Martin, J.E.; Fisher, E.M.C.

    1996-03-01

    The motorneuron degeneration (mnd) mutation causes one of the few late-onset progressive neurodegenerations in mice; therefore, the mnd mouse is a valuable paradigm for studying neurodegenerative biology. The mnd mutation may also model human neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL) or Batten disease. Mnd maps to the centromeric region of mouse chromosome 8, which likely corresponds to portions of human chromosomes 13,8, or 19; we note that the chromosome 13 portion maps close to a region thought to contain the human Type V NCL locus. We have identified candidate genes for the mnd locus from human chromosomes 13, 8, and 19, and we are mapping these genes in the mouse to determine their proximity to the mutated locus and to refine the comparative human-mouse map in this area. A candidate gene from human chromosome 13 is LAMP1, which encodes lysosomal membrane protein 1. We found that Lamp1 in the mouse lies within the region of the mnd mutation. Therefore, we sequenced Lamp1 cDNAs from homozygous mnd mice and unrelated wildtype C57BL/6 mice. We find no differences between the two cDNA species in the regions examined, and expression analysis shows a similar LAMP1 protein distribution in wildtype and mutant mice, suggesting that an abnormal accumulation of material within normal lysosome structures is unlikely to be the pathogenetic mechanism in the mnd mouse. 19 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Evidence for locus heterogeneity in human autosomal dominant split hand/split foot malformation

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, S.E.; Wijsman, E.M.; Stephens, K.; Evans, J.P. ); Scherer, S.W.; Tsui, L.C. ); Kukolich, M. )

    1994-07-01

    Split hand/split foot (SHSF; also known as ectrodactyly) is a human developmental disorder characterized by missing central digits and other distal limb malformations. An association between SHSF and cytogenetically visible rearrangements of chromosome 7 at bands q21-q22 provides compelling evidence for the location of a causative gene at this location, and the locus has been designated SHFD1. In the present study, marker loci were localized to the SHFD1 critical region through the analysis of somatic cell hybrids derived from individuals with SHSF and cytogenetic abnormalities involving the 7q21-q22 region. Combined genetic and physical data suggest that the order of markers in the SHFD1 critical region is cen-D7S492-D7S527-(D7S479-D7S491)-SHFD1-D7S553-D7S518-qter. Dinucleotide repeat polymorphisms at three of these loci were used to test for linkage of SHSF to this region in a large pedigree that demonstrates autosomal dominant SHSF. Evidence against linkage of the SHSF gene to 7q21-q22 was obtained in this pedigree. Therefore, combined molecular and genetic data provide evidence for locus heterogeneity in autosomal dominant SHSF. The authors propose the name SHSF2 for this second locus. 34 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Determining the bistability parameter ranges of artificially induced lac operon using the root locus method.

    PubMed

    Avcu, N; Alyürük, H; Demir, G K; Pekergin, F; Cavas, L; Güzeliş, C

    2015-06-01

    This paper employs the root locus method to conduct a detailed investigation of the parameter regions that ensure bistability in a well-studied gene regulatory network namely, lac operon of Escherichia coli (E. coli). In contrast to previous works, the parametric bistability conditions observed in this study constitute a complete set of necessary and sufficient conditions. These conditions were derived by applying the root locus method to the polynomial equilibrium equation of the lac operon model to determine the parameter values yielding the multiple real roots necessary for bistability. The lac operon model used was defined as an ordinary differential equation system in a state equation form with a rational right hand side, and it was compatible with the Hill and Michaelis-Menten approaches of enzyme kinetics used to describe biochemical reactions that govern lactose metabolism. The developed root locus method can be used to study the steady-state behavior of any type of convergent biological system model based on mass action kinetics. This method provides a solution to the problem of analyzing gene regulatory networks under parameter uncertainties because the root locus method considers the model parameters as variable, rather than fixed. The obtained bistability ranges for the lac operon model parameters have the potential to elucidate the appearance of bistability for E. coli cells in in vivo experiments, and they could also be used to design robust hysteretic switches in synthetic biology. PMID:25864166

  9. Direct visualization of the highly polymorphic RNU2 locus in proximity to the BRCA1 gene.

    PubMed

    Tessereau, Chloé; Buisson, Monique; Monnet, Nastasia; Imbert, Marine; Barjhoux, Laure; Schluth-Bolard, Caroline; Sanlaville, Damien; Conseiller, Emmanuel; Ceppi, Maurizio; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Mazoyer, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    Although the breast cancer susceptibility gene BRCA1 is one of the most extensively characterized genetic loci, much less is known about its upstream variable number tandem repeat element, the RNU2 locus. RNU2 encodes the U2 small nuclear RNA, an essential splicing element, but this locus is missing from the human genome assembly due to the inherent difficulty in the assembly of repetitive sequences. To fill the gap between RNU2 and BRCA1, we have reconstructed the physical map of this region by re-examining genomic clone sequences of public databases, which allowed us to precisely localize the RNU2 array 124 kb telomeric to BRCA1. We measured by performing FISH analyses on combed DNA for the first time the exact number of repeats carried by each of the two alleles in 41 individuals and found a range of 6-82 copies and a level of heterozygosity of 98%. The precise localisation of the RNU2 locus in the genome reference assembly and the implementation of a new technical tool to study it will make the detailed exploration of this locus possible. This recently neglected macrosatellite could be valuable for evaluating the potential role of structural variations in disease due to its location next to a major cancer susceptibility gene. PMID:24146815

  10. Evidence that the Saethre-Chotzen syndrome locus lies between D7S664 and D7S507, by genetic analysis and detection of a microdeletion in a patient

    SciTech Connect

    Lewanda, A.F.; Jerald, H.; Taylor, E.; Jabs, E.W.; Green, E.D.; Weissenbach, J.; Summar, M.L.; Phillips, J.A. III; Cohen, M.; Feingold, M.

    1994-12-01

    The locus for Saethre-Chotzen syndrome, a common autosomal dominant disorder of craniosynostosis and digital anomalies, was previously mapped to chromosome 7p between D7S513 and D7S516. We used linkage and haplotype analyses to narrow the disease locus to an 8-cM region between D7S664 and D7S507. The tightest linkage was to locus D7S664 (Z = 7.16, {theta} = .00). chromosomes from a Saethre-Chotzen syndrome patient with t(2;7) (p23;p22) were used for in situ hybridization with YAC clones containing D7S664 and D7S507. The D7S664 locus was found to lie distal to the 7p22 breakpoint, and the D7S507 locus was deleted from the translocation chromosomes. These genetic and physical mapping data independently show that the disease locus resides in this interval.

  11. Root Locus Algorithms for Programmable Pocket Calculators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wechsler, E. R.

    1983-01-01

    Two algorithms are described which allow the plotting of individual points on a root locus diagram with or without time delay. The development was performed during the design of a continuous phase shifter used in the Baseband Antenna Combiner for the Deep Space Network (DSN). The algorithms, which are expected to be useful in similar DSN efforts, are simple enough to be implemented on a programmable pocket calculator. The coordinates of the open-loop zeros and poles, the gain constant K, and the time delay T are the data inputs.

  12. A YAC contig spanning the dominant retinitis pigmentosa locus (RP9) on chromosome 7p

    SciTech Connect

    Keen, T.J.; Inglehearn, C.F.; Patel, R.J.; Peacock, R.E.

    1995-08-10

    The dominant retinitis pigmentosa locus RP9 has previously been localized to 7p13-p15, in the interval D7S526-D7S484. We now report refinement of the locus to the interval D7S795-D7S484 and YAC contig of approximately 4.8 Mb spanning this region and extending both distally and proximally from it. The contig was constructed by STS content mapping and physically orders 29 STSs in 28 YAC clones. The order of polymorphic markers in the contig is consistent with a genetic map that has been assembled using haplotype data from the CEPH pedigrees. This contig will provide a primary resource for the construction of a transcriptional map of this region and for the identification of the defective gene causing this form of adRP. 27 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Direct and indirect relationship between locus of control and depression.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaobo; Fan, Guanhua

    2016-07-01

    This study examined the mediating effect of self-esteem on the relationship between locus of control and depression among Chinese university students. In all, 457 students (232 men and 225 women) completed measures of locus of control, self-esteem, and depression. Correlational analyses indicated that external locus of control was related to self-esteem and depression, and self-esteem was related to depression. Structural equation modeling analysis showed that self-esteem partially mediated the influence of locus of control on depression. The significance of the results is discussed. PMID:25305190

  14. Clutter locus equation for more general linear array orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bickel, Douglas L.

    2011-06-01

    The clutter locus is an important concept in space-time adaptive processing (STAP) for ground moving target indicator (GMTI) radar systems. The clutter locus defines the expected ground clutter location in the angle-Doppler domain. Typically in literature, the clutter locus is presented as a line, or even a set of ellipsoids, under certain assumptions about the geometry of the array. Most often, the array is assumed to be in the horizontal plane containing the velocity vector. This paper will give a more general 3-dimensional interpretation of the clutter locus for a general linear array orientation.

  15. Molecular cloning of the c locus of Zea mays: a locus regulating the anthocyanin pathway.

    PubMed

    Paz-Ares, J; Wienand, U; Peterson, P A; Saedler, H

    1986-05-01

    The c locus of Zea mays, involved in the regulation of anthocyanin biosynthesis, has been cloned by transposon tagging. A clone (# 18En) containing a full size En1 element was initially isolated from the En element-induced mutable allele c-m668655. Sequences of clone # 18En flanking the En1 element were used to clone other c mutants, whose structure was predicted genetically. Clone #23En (isolated from c-m668613) contained a full size En1 element, clone #3Ds (isolated from c-m2) a Ds element and clone # 5 (isolated from c+) had no element on the cloned fragment. From these data we conclude that the clones obtained contain at least part of the c locus. Preliminary data on transcript analysis using a 1-kb DNA fragment from wild-type clone # 5 showed that at least three transcripts are encoded by that part of the locus, indicating that c is a complex locus. PMID:15957214

  16. Characterization of the bovine type I IFN locus: rearrangements, expansions, and novel subfamilies

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Angela M; Roberts, R Michael

    2009-01-01

    Background The Type I interferons (IFN) have major roles in the innate immune response to viruses, a function that is believed to have led to expansion in the number and complexity of their genes, although these genes have remained confined to single chromosomal region in all mammals so far examined. IFNB and IFNE define the limits of the locus, with all other Type I IFN genes except IFNK distributed between these boundaries, strongly suggesting that the locus has broadened as IFN genes duplicated and then evolved into a series of distinct families. Results The Type I IFN locus in Bos taurus has undergone significant rearrangement and expansion compared to mouse and human, however, with the constituent genes separated into two sub-loci separated by >700 kb. The IFNW family is greatly expanded, comprising 24 potentially functional genes and at least 8 pseudogenes. The IFNB (n = 6), represented in human and mouse by one copy, are also present as multiple copies in Bos taurus. The IFNT, which encode a non-virally inducible, ruminant-specific IFN secreted by the pre-implantation conceptus, are represented by three genes and two pseudogenes. The latter have sequences intermediate between IFNT and IFNW. A new Type I IFN family (IFNX) of four members, one of which is a pseudogene, appears to have diverged from the IFNA lineage at least 83 million years ago, but is absent in all other sequenced genomes with the possible exception of the horse, a non-ruminant herbivore. Conclusion In summary, we have provided the first comprehensive annotation of the Type I IFN locus in Bos taurus, thereby providing an insight into the functional evolution of the Type I IFN in ruminants. The diversity and global spread of the ruminant species may have required an expansion of the Type I IFN locus and its constituent genes to provide broad anti-viral protection required for foraging and foregut fermentation. PMID:19393062

  17. A Two-locus DNA Sequence Database for Typing Plant and Human Pathogens Within the Fusarium oxysporum Species Complex

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We constructed a two-locus database, comprising partial translation elongation factor (EF-1alpha) gene sequences and nearly full-length sequences of the nuclear ribosomal intergenic spacer region (IGS rDNA) for 850 isolates spanning the phylogenetic breadth of the Fusarium oxysporum species complex ...

  18. Refinement of the spinal muscular atrophy locus to the interval between D5S435 and MAP1B

    SciTech Connect

    Soares, V.M.; Brzustowicz, L.M.; Kleyn, P.W.; Knowles, J.A.; Palmer, D.A.; Asokan, S.; Penchaszadeh, G.K.; Gilliam, T.C. ); Munsat, T.L. )

    1993-02-01

    The childhood-onset SMA locus has been mapped to chromosome 5q13, in a region bounded by the proximal locus, D5S6, and the closely linked distal loci, D5S112 and MAP1B. We now describe a highly polymorphic, tightly linked microsatellite marker (D5S435) that is very likely the closet proximal marker to the SMA locus. Multipoint linkage analysis firmly establishes the following order of markers at 5q13; centromere-D5S76-D5S6-D5S435-MAP1B/D5S112-D5S39-telomere. The data indicate that SMA resides in an approximately 0.7-cM (range 01.-2.1) region between D5S435 and MAP1B. This finding reduces by approximately fourfold the genetic region that most likely harbors the SMA locus and will facilitate the physical mapping and cloning of the disease gene region. 24 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Rpv10: a new locus from the Asian Vitis gene pool for pyramiding downy mildew resistance loci in grapevine.

    PubMed

    Schwander, Florian; Eibach, Rudolf; Fechter, Iris; Hausmann, Ludger; Zyprian, Eva; Töpfer, Reinhard

    2012-01-01

    A population derived from a cross between grapevine breeding strain Gf.Ga-52-42 and cultivar 'Solaris' consisting of 265 F1-individuals was genetically mapped using SSR markers and screened for downy mildew resistance. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis revealed two strong QTLs on linkage groups (LGs) 18 and 09. The locus on LG 18 was found to be identical with the previously described locus Rpv3 and is transmitted by Gf.Ga-52-42. 'Solaris' transmitted the resistance-related locus on LG 09 explaining up to 50% of the phenotypic variation in the population. This downy mildew resistance locus is named Rpv10 for resistance to Plasmopara viticola. Rpv10 was initially introgressed from Vitis amurensis, a wild species of the Asian Vitis gene pool. The one-LOD supported confidence interval of the QTL spans a section of 2.1 centi Morgan (cM) corresponding to 314 kb in the reference genome PN40024 (12x). Eight resistance gene analogues (RGAs) of the NBS-LRR type and additional resistance-linked genes are located in this region of PN40024. The F1 sub-population which contains the Rpv3 as well as the Rpv10 locus showed a significantly higher degree of resistance, indicating additive effects by pyramiding of resistance loci. Possibilities for using the resistance locus Rpv10 in a grapevine breeding programme are discussed. Furthermore, the marker data revealed 'Severnyi' × 'Muscat Ottonel' as the true parentage for the male parent of 'Solaris'. PMID:21935694

  20. A Cis-Acting Locus That Promotes Crossing over between X Chromosomes in Caenorhabditis Elegans

    PubMed Central

    Villeneuve, A. M.

    1994-01-01

    This study reports the characterization of a cis-acting locus on the Caenorhabditis elegans X chromosome that is crucial for promoting normal levels of crossing over specifically between the X homologs and for ensuring their proper disjunction at meiosis I. The function of this locus is disrupted by the mutation me8, which maps to the extreme left end of the X chromosome within the region previously implicated by studies of X;A translocations and X duplications to contain a meiotic pairing site. Hermaphrodites homozygous for a deletion of the locus (Df/Df) or heterozygous for a deletion and the me8 mutation (me8/Df) exhibit extremely high levels of X chromosome nondisjunction at the reductional division; this is correlated with a sharp decrease in crossing over between the X homologs as evidenced both by reductions in genetic map distances and by the presence of achiasmate chromosomes in cytological preparations of oocyte nuclei. Duplications of the wild-type region that are unlinked to the X chromosome cannot complement the recombination and disjunction defects in trans, indicating that this region must be present in cis to the X chromosome to ensure normal levels of crossing over and proper homolog disjunction. me8 homozygotes exhibit an altered distribution of crossovers along the X chromosome that suggests a defect in processivity along the X chromosome of an event that initiates at the chromosome end. Models are discussed in which the cis-acting locus deleted by the Dfs functions as a meiotic pairing center that recruits trans-acting factors onto the chromosomes to nucleate assembly of a crossover-competent complex between the X homologs. This pairing center might function in the process of homolog recognition, or in the initiation of homologous synapsis. PMID:8005443

  1. Changing Locus of Control: Steelworkers Adjusting to Forced Unemployment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legerski, Elizabeth Miklya; Cornwall, Marie; O'Neil, Brock

    2006-01-01

    Using an abbreviated version of Levenson's (1981) locus of control scale, we examine change over time in the locus of control of displaced steelworkers. The first data collection occurred approximately six months after plant shutdown, the second occurred a year later. Utilizing a multidimensional measurement model, we test the major assumption…

  2. Itpr3 Is responsible for the mouse tufted (tf) locus.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Hillary T; Tordoff, Michael G; Parker, M Rockwell

    2013-03-01

    The tf (tufted) locus is responsible for a classic phenotype of hair loss and regrowth in mice. It is a characteristic of the BTBR strain. Here, we use a combination of positional cloning methods and complementation mapping to identify Itpr3, the inositol triphosphate receptor type 3, as the gene responsible for the tf locus. PMID:23100490

  3. Locus of Control, and Expectational Set, on Two Aptitude Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildstein, Arlene B.; And Others

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether there are differences between males and females on locus of control, if experimental instructions differentially affect the performance of internals as opposed to externals, and if locus of control differentially influences performance on distinct types of aptitude tests. The Children's…

  4. Anxiety, locus of control and appraisal of air pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Navarro, P.L.; Simpson-Housley, P.; de Man, A.F.

    1987-06-01

    100 residents of Santiago de Chile took part in a study of the relationship among locus of control, trait-anxiety, and perception of air pollution. Concern over the problem of atmospheric pollution and number of antipollution measures taken was related to trait-anxiety. Locus of control was associated with variation in awareness of pollution hazard.

  5. Physical structure of an endopolygalacturonase locus in peach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The melting flesh trait and the freestone trait are genetically linked to the same single locus in peach. Several studies have associated an endopolygalacturonase gene with this locus, either a deletion of endopolygalacturonase associated with the non-melting/clingstone phenotype or changes in the ...

  6. Personality and Locus of Control among School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pandya, Archana A.; Jogsan, Yogesh A.

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this investigation is to find out the sex differences in personality traits and locus of control among school children. A total 60 children (30 boys and 30 girls) were taken as a sample. The research tool for personality, children personality questionnaire was used, which was made by Cattell and Porter. Locus of control was…

  7. Locus of Control and the Effectiveness of Social Reinforcers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pawlicki, Robert E.

    1974-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that the developmental change in the effectiveness of social reinforcement was related to changes in locus of control. A total of 145 subjects in grades 3, 4, 6, and 7 responded to the Children's Locus of Control Scale and to a simple game of measuring the effectiveness of either praise connoting or information…

  8. Physical linkage of a GABAA receptor subunit gene to the DXS374 locus in human Xq28.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, M V; Bloomfield, J; McKinley, M; Patterson, M N; Darlison, M G; Barnard, E A; Davies, K E

    1989-01-01

    We report the physical linkage of the gene encoding one of the subunits of the GABAA receptor (GABRA3) to the polymorphic locus DXS374 on the human X chromosome at Xq28. X-linked manic depression and other psychiatric disorders have been mapped to this region, and thus GABRA3 is a potential candidate gene for these disorders. DXS374--and therefore GABRA3--lies distal to the fragile X locus at a recombination fraction of approximately .15. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2574000

  9. A soybean quantitative trait locus that promotes flowering under long days is identified as FT5a, a FLOWERING LOCUS T ortholog

    PubMed Central

    Takeshima, Ryoma; Hayashi, Takafumi; Zhu, Jianghui; Zhao, Chen; Xu, Meilan; Yamaguchi, Naoya; Sayama, Takashi; Ishimoto, Masao; Kong, Lingping; Shi, Xinyi; Liu, Baohui; Tian, Zhixi; Yamada, Tetsuya; Kong, Fanjiang; Abe, Jun

    2016-01-01

    FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) is an important floral integrator whose functions are conserved across plant species. In soybean, two orthologs, FT2a and FT5a, play a major role in initiating flowering. Their expression in response to different photoperiods is controlled by allelic combinations at the maturity loci E1 to E4, generating variation in flowering time among cultivars. We determined the molecular basis of a quantitative trait locus (QTL) for flowering time in linkage group J (Chromosome 16). Fine-mapping delimited the QTL to a genomic region of 107kb that harbors FT5a. We detected 15 DNA polymorphisms between parents with the early-flowering (ef) and late-flowering (lf) alleles in the promoter region, an intron, and the 3′ untranslated region of FT5a, although the FT5a coding regions were identical. Transcript abundance of FT5a was higher in near-isogenic lines for ef than in those for lf, suggesting that different transcriptional activities or mRNA stability caused the flowering time difference. Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) calling from re-sequencing data for 439 cultivated and wild soybean accessions indicated that ef is a rare haplotype that is distinct from common haplotypes including lf. The ef allele at FT5a may play an adaptive role at latitudes where early flowering is desirable. PMID:27422993

  10. A locus regulating bronchial hyperresponsiveness maps to chromosome 5q

    SciTech Connect

    Levitt, R.C.; Meyers, D.A.; Bleecker, E.R.

    1994-09-01

    Bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) is one of the hallmarks of asthma. BHR correlates well with asthmatic symptoms and the response to treatment. Moreover, BHR appears to be closely related to airways inflammation. Numerous studies have demonstrated a familial aggregation; however, this phenotype is not likely inherited as a simple Mendelian trait. BHR is also closely associated with total serum IgE levels, as are allergy and asthma. We studied 92 families from Northern Holland ascertained through a parent with asthma who were originally studied between 1962-1970. Since there are a number of candidate genes on chromosome 5q potentially important in producing BHR, families were genotyped for markers in this region. These genes regulate IgE production and the cellular elements that are likely involved in inflammation associated with BHR, allergy and asthma. They include IL-4, IL-3, IL-5, IL-9, IL-12, IL-13 and GM-CSF. Linkage of BHR with markers on 5q was tested using a model free sib-pair method. The data suggest a locus for BHR maps near the cytokine gene cluster on 5q. This region appears critical in producing susceptibility to BHR and possibly to asthma.

  11. Dental outpatients: health locus of control correlates.

    PubMed

    Ludenia, K; Donham, G W

    1983-11-01

    Examined relationships between the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control (MHLC) Scales, Beck Depression Inventory, Trait subscales of the State-Trait Personality Inventory, and dental ratings of oral hygiene and presence of periodontal disease with dental outpatients (N = 101) at a Veterans Administration Medical Center Dental Clinic. Results indicated that this sample of outpatients scored comparably on MHLC Health Internality and Health Externality to a sample reported by Wallston and Wallston. Older dental patients, in the present sample, scored significantly higher on Powerful Others Externality in contrast to younger Ss, which suggests greater reliance on health professionals for dental health. Confirmatory evidence is presented on the negative correlations of depression, anger, and anxiety with Health Internality. Differential approaches to dental treatment are discussed. PMID:6662936

  12. The Cajal Body and Histone Locus Body

    PubMed Central

    Nizami, Zehra; Deryusheva, Svetlana; Gall, Joseph G.

    2010-01-01

    The Cajal body (CB) is a nuclear organelle present in all eukaryotes that have been carefully studied. It is identified by the signature protein coilin and by CB-specific RNAs (scaRNAs). CBs contain high concentrations of splicing small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) and other RNA processing factors, suggesting that they are sites for assembly and/or posttranscriptional modification of the splicing machinery of the nucleus. The histone locus body (HLB) contains factors required for processing histone pre-mRNAs. As its name implies, the HLB is associated with the genes that code for histones, suggesting that it may function to concentrate processing factors at their site of action. CBs and HLBs are present throughout the interphase of the cell cycle, but disappear during mitosis. The biogenesis of CBs shows the features of a self-organizing structure. PMID:20504965

  13. Locus of Control Orientation: Parents, Peers, and Place.

    PubMed

    Ahlin, Eileen M; Lobo Antunes, Maria João

    2015-09-01

    An internal locus of control contributes to positive youth outcomes such as a general well-being and academic success, while also serving as a protective factor against exposure to community violence and reducing negative behaviors like violence. Despite these benefits, very little is known about antecedents of an internal locus of control orientation. Without an understanding of what factors contribute to the development of an internal locus of control, it is not clear how to best encourage its formation. This study uses data from the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods to examine whether various mesosystem variables (family management strategies, peer interactions, neighborhood context, and individual-level characteristics) are associated with an internal locus of control orientation among 1,076 youth ages 9-19 living in 78 Chicago neighborhoods. Study participants were Hispanic (46 %), African American (34 %), and White (15 %), and 50 % were female. The findings suggest that, while most levels of the mesosystem influence locus of control orientation, family management strategies are more prominent determinants of an internal locus of control than peers, neighborhood context, or individual characteristics. Parental supervision over the time a youth spends at home and family socioeconomic status are consistent predictors of an internal locus of control, while harsh discipline is associated with an external locus of control. The discussion examines the import of various parenting techniques in shaping an internal locus of control and considers future avenues for research to further unpack how antecedents of locus of control can vary across youth. PMID:25617000

  14. A trans-acting locus regulates an anti-viral expression network and type 1 diabetes risk

    PubMed Central

    Heinig, Matthias; Petretto, Enrico; Wallace, Chris; Bottolo, Leonardo; Rotival, Maxime; Lu, Han; Li, Yoyo; Sarwar, Rizwan; Langley, Sarah R.; Bauerfeind, Anja; Hummel, Oliver; Lee, Young-Ae; Paskas, Svetlana; Rintisch, Carola; Saar, Kathrin; Cooper, Jason; Buchan, Rachel; Gray, Elizabeth E.; Cyster, Jason G.; Erdmann, Jeanette; Hengstenberg, Christian; Maouche, Seraya; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Rice, Catherine M.; Samani, Nilesh J; Schunkert, Heribert; Goodall, Alison H; Schulz, Herbert; Roider, Helge; Vingron, Martin; Blankenberg, Stefan; Münzel, Thomas; Zeller, Tanja; Szymczak, Silke; Ziegler, Andreas; Tiret, Laurence; Smyth, Deborah J.; Pravenec, Michal; Aitman, Timothy J.; Cambien, Francois; Clayton, David; Todd, John A.; Hubner, Norbert; Cook, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    Combined analyses of gene networks and DNA sequence variation can provide new insights into the aetiology of common diseases. Here, we used integrated genome-wide approaches across seven rat tissues to identify gene networks and the loci underlying their regulation. We defined an interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF7)1-driven inflammatory network (iDIN) enriched for viral response genes, which represents a molecular biomarker for macrophages and was regulated in multiple tissues by a locus on rat chromosome 15q25. At this locus, Epstein-Barr virus induced gene 2 (Ebi2 or Gpr183), which we localised to macrophages and is known to control B lymphocyte migration2,3, regulated the iDIN. The human chromosome 13q32 locus, orthologous to rat 15q25, controlled the human equivalent of iDIN, which was conserved in monocytes. For the macrophage-associated autoimmune disease type 1 diabetes (T1D) iDIN genes were more likely to associate with T1D susceptibility than randomly selected immune response genes (P = 8.85 × 10−6). The human locus controlling the iDIN, was associated with the risk of T1D at SNP rs9585056 (P = 7.0 × 10−10, odds ratio = 1.15), which was one of five SNPs in this region associated with EBI2 expression. These data implicate IRF7 network genes and their regulatory locus in the pathogenesis of T1D. PMID:20827270

  15. Neuroanatomical correlates of the sense of control: Gray and white matter volumes associated with an internal locus of control.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Teruo; Takeuchi, Hikaru; Taki, Yasuyuki; Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Nouchi, Rui; Kotozaki, Yuka; Nakagawa, Seishu; Miyauchi, Carlos Makoto; Iizuka, Kunio; Yokoyama, Ryoichi; Shinada, Takamitsu; Yamamoto, Yuki; Hanawa, Sugiko; Araki, Tsuyoshi; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Kunitoki, Keiko; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2015-10-01

    A belief that effort is rewarded can develop incentive, achievement motivation, and self-efficacy. Individuals with such a belief attribute causes of events to themselves, not to external, uncontrollable factors, and are thus said to have an internal locus of control. An internal locus of control is a positive personality trait and has been thoroughly studied in applied psychology, but has not been widely examined in neuroscience. In the present study, correlations between locus of control assessment scores and brain volumes were examined in 777 healthy young adults using magnetic resonance imaging. A whole-brain multiple regression analysis with corrections for the effects of age, gender, and intelligence was conducted. Voxel-based morphometry analyses revealed that gray matter volumes in the anterior cingulate cortex, striatum, and anterior insula positively correlated with higher scores, which indicate an internal LOC. In addition, white matter volumes in the striatum showed significant correlations with an internal locus of control. These results suggest that cognitive, socioemotional, self-regulatory, and reward systems might be associated with internal control orientation. The finding of greater volumes in several brain regions in individuals with a stronger internal locus of control indicates that there is a neuroanatomical basis for the belief that one's efforts are rewarded. PMID:26123375

  16. A novel susceptibility locus at 2p24 for generalised epilepsy with febrile seizures plus.

    PubMed

    Audenaert, D; Claes, L; Claeys, K G; Deprez, L; Van Dyck, T; Goossens, D; Del-Favero, J; Van Paesschen, W; Van Broeckhoven, C; De Jonghe, P

    2005-12-01

    Generalised epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous epilepsy syndrome. Using positional cloning strategies, mutations in SCN1B, SCN1A, and GABRG2 have been identified as genetic causes of GEFS+. In the present study, we describe a large four generation family with GEFS+ in which we performed a 10 cM density genome-wide scan. We obtained conclusive evidence for a novel GEFS+ locus on chromosome 2p24 with a maximum two point logarithm of the odds (LOD) score of 4.22 for marker D2S305 at zero recombination. Fine mapping and haplotype segregation analysis in this family delineated a candidate region of 3.24 cM, corresponding to a physical distance of 4.2 Mb. Linkage to 2p24 was confirmed (p = 0.007) in a collection of 50 nuclear and multiplex families with febrile seizures and epilepsy. Transmission disequilibrium testing and association studies provided further evidence (p < 0.05) that 2p24 is a susceptibility locus for febrile seizures and epilepsy. Furthermore, we could reduce the candidate region to a 2.14 cM interval, localised between D2S1360 and D2S2342, based upon an ancestral haplotype. Identification of the disease gene at this locus will contribute to a better understanding of the complex genetic aetiology of febrile seizures and epilepsy. PMID:15827091

  17. Intragenic pausing and anti-sense transcription within the murine c-myc locus.

    PubMed Central

    Nepveu, A; Marcu, K B

    1986-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of strand-specific transcription in different regions of the murine c-myc locus. In normal and transformed cell lines, RNA polymerase II directed transcription occurs in the sense and anti-sense direction. Three noncontiguous regions show a high level of transcription in the anti-sense orientation: upstream of the first exon, within the first intron and in the 3' part of the gene (intron 2 and exon 3). In a cell line carrying a c-myc amplification (54c12), anti-sense transcription is not uniformly increased throughout the locus and is differentially affected by inhibition of protein synthesis. These results suggest that anti-sense transcription in various parts of the locus is independently regulated. In the sense orientation, transcriptional activity is higher in the first exon than in the rest of the gene indicating that transcription pauses near the 3' end of the first exon. The extent of this intragenic pausing varies among different cell lines and is most severe in cells with a c-myc amplification. Transcription initiation and pausing are both negatively regulated by labile proteins. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:3024965

  18. Genetic and molecular characterization of the maize rp3 rust resistance locus.

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Craig A; Richter, Todd E; Collins, Nicholas C; Nicolas, Marie; Trick, Harold N; Pryor, Tony; Hulbert, Scot H

    2002-01-01

    In maize, the Rp3 gene confers resistance to common rust caused by Puccinia sorghi. Flanking marker analysis of rust-susceptible rp3 variants suggested that most of them arose via unequal crossing over, indicating that rp3 is a complex locus like rp1. The PIC13 probe identifies a nucleotide binding site-leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) gene family that maps to the complex. Rp3 variants show losses of PIC13 family members relative to the resistant parents when probed with PIC13, indicating that the Rp3 gene is a member of this family. Gel blots and sequence analysis suggest that at least 9 family members are at the locus in most Rp3-carrying lines and that at least 5 of these are transcribed in the Rp3-A haplotype. The coding regions of 14 family members, isolated from three different Rp3-carrying haplotypes, had DNA sequence identities from 93 to 99%. Partial sequencing of clones of a BAC contig spanning the rp3 locus in the maize inbred line B73 identified five different PIC13 paralogues in a region of approximately 140 kb. PMID:12242248

  19. Genetic and molecular characterization of the maize rp3 rust resistance locus.

    PubMed

    Webb, Craig A; Richter, Todd E; Collins, Nicholas C; Nicolas, Marie; Trick, Harold N; Pryor, Tony; Hulbert, Scot H

    2002-09-01

    In maize, the Rp3 gene confers resistance to common rust caused by Puccinia sorghi. Flanking marker analysis of rust-susceptible rp3 variants suggested that most of them arose via unequal crossing over, indicating that rp3 is a complex locus like rp1. The PIC13 probe identifies a nucleotide binding site-leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) gene family that maps to the complex. Rp3 variants show losses of PIC13 family members relative to the resistant parents when probed with PIC13, indicating that the Rp3 gene is a member of this family. Gel blots and sequence analysis suggest that at least 9 family members are at the locus in most Rp3-carrying lines and that at least 5 of these are transcribed in the Rp3-A haplotype. The coding regions of 14 family members, isolated from three different Rp3-carrying haplotypes, had DNA sequence identities from 93 to 99%. Partial sequencing of clones of a BAC contig spanning the rp3 locus in the maize inbred line B73 identified five different PIC13 paralogues in a region of approximately 140 kb. PMID:12242248

  20. The CLDN5 locus may be involved in the vulnerability to schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Sun, Z-Y; Wei, J; Xie, L; Shen, Y; Liu, S-Z; Ju, G-Z; Shi, J-P; Yu, Y-Q; Zhang, X; Xu, Q; Hemmings, G P

    2004-09-01

    The present study was designed to detect three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located on 22q11 that was thought as being of particularly importance for genetic research into schizophrenia. We recruited a total of 176 Chinese family trios of Han descent, consisting of mothers, fathers and affected offspring with schizophrenia for the genetic analysis. The transmission disequilibrium test (TDT) showed that of three SNPs, rs10314 in the 3'-untranslated region of the CLDN5 locus was associated with schizophrenia (chi(2) = 4.75, P = 0.029). The other two SNPs, rs1548359 present in the CDC45L locus centromeric of rs10314 and rs739371 in the 5'-flanking region of the CLDN5 locus, did not show such an association. The global chi-square (chi(2)) test showed that the 3-SNP haplotype system was not associated with schizophrenia although the 1-df test for individual haplotypes showed that the rs1548359(C)-rs10314(G)-rs739371(C) haplotype was excessively non-transmitted (chi(2) = 5.32, P = 0.02). Because the claudin proteins are a major component for barrier-forming tight junctions that could play a crucial role in response to changing natural, physiological and pathological conditions, the CLDN5 association with schizophrenia may be an important clue leading to look into a meeting point of genetic and environmental factors. PMID:15363474

  1. Genetic and physical maps around the sex-determining M-locus of the dioecious plant asparagus.

    PubMed

    Telgmann-Rauber, Alexa; Jamsari, Ari; Kinney, Michael S; Pires, J Chris; Jung, Christian

    2007-09-01

    Asparagus officinalis L. is a dioecious plant. A region called the M-locus located on a pair of homomorphic sex chromosomes controls the sexual dimorphism in asparagus. The aim of this work was to clone the region determining sex in asparagus from its position in the genome. The structure of the region encompassing M should be investigated and compared to the sex-determining regions in other dioecious model species. To establish an improved basis for physical mapping, a high-resolution genetic map was enriched with AFLP markers closely linked to the target locus by carrying out a bulked segregant analysis. By screening a BAC library with AFLP- and STS-markers followed by chromosome walking, a physical map with eight contigs could be established. However, the gaps between the contigs could not be closed due to a plethora of repetitive elements. Surprisingly, two of the contigs on one side of the M-locus did not overlap although they have been established with two markers, which mapped in a distance as low as 0.25 cM flanking the sex locus. Thus, the clustering of the markers indicates a reduced recombination frequency within the M-region. On the opposite side of the M-locus, a contig was mapped in a distance of 0.38 cM. Four closely linked BAC clones were partially sequenced and 64 putative ORFs were identified. Interestingly, only 25% of the ORFs showed sequence similarity to known proteins and ESTs. In addition, an accumulation of repetitive sequences and a low gene density was revealed in the sex-determining region of asparagus. Molecular cytogenetic and sequence analysis of BACs flanking the M-locus indicate that the BACs contain highly repetitive sequences that localize to centromeric and pericentromeric locations on all asparagus chromosomes, which hindered the localization of the M-locus to the single pair of sex chromosomes. We speculate that dioecious Silene, papaya and Asparagus species may represent three stages in the evolution of XX, XY sex

  2. Causes and Consequences of Multi-Locus Imprinting Disturbances in Humans.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Delgado, Marta; Riccio, Andrea; Eggermann, Thomas; Maher, Eamonn R; Lapunzina, Pablo; Mackay, Deborah; Monk, David

    2016-07-01

    Eight syndromes are associated with the loss of methylation at specific imprinted loci. There has been increasing evidence that these methylation defects in patients are not isolated events occurring at a given disease-associated locus but that some of these patients may have multi-locus imprinting disturbances (MLID) affecting additional imprinted regions. With the recent advances in technology, methylation profiling has revealed that imprinted loci represent only a small fraction of the methylation differences observed between the gametes. To figure out how imprinting anomalies occur at multiple imprinted domains, we have to understand the interplay between DNA methylation and histone modifications in the process of selective imprint protection during pre-implantation reprogramming, which, if disrupted, leads to these complex imprinting disorders (IDs). PMID:27235113

  3. Sequence of a probable potassium channel component encoded at shaker locus of drosophila

    SciTech Connect

    Tempel, B.L.; Papazian, D.M.; Schwarz, T.L.; Jan, Y.N.; Jan, L.Y.

    1987-08-24

    Potassium currents are crucial for the repolarization of electrically excitable membranes, a role that makes potassium channels a target for physiological modifications that alter synaptic efficacy. The Shaker locus of Drosophila is thought to encode a K/sup +/ channel. The sequence of two complementary DNA clones from the Shaker locus is reported here. The sequence predicts an integral membrane protein of 70,200 daltons containing seven potential membrane-spanning sequences. In addition, the predicted protein is homologous to the vertebrate sodium channel in a region previously proposed to be involved in the voltage-dependent activation of the Na/sup +/ channel. These results support the hypothesis that Shaker encodes a structural component of a voltage-dependent K/sup +/ channel and suggest a conserved mechanism for voltage activation.

  4. Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies a Novel Canine Glaucoma Locus

    PubMed Central

    Ahonen, Saija J.; Pietilä, Elina; Mellersh, Cathryn S.; Tiira, Katriina; Hansen, Liz; Johnson, Gary S.; Lohi, Hannes

    2013-01-01

    Glaucoma is an optic neuropathy and one of the leading causes of blindness. Its hereditary forms are classified into primary closed-angle (PCAG), primary open-angle (POAG) and primary congenital glaucoma (PCG). Although many loci have been mapped in human, only a few genes have been identified that are associated with the development of glaucoma and the genetic basis of the disease remains poorly understood. Glaucoma has also been described in many dog breeds, including Dandie Dinmont Terriers (DDT) in which it is a late-onset (>7 years) disease. We designed clinical and genetic studies to better define the clinical features of glaucoma in the DDT and to identify the genetic cause. Clinical diagnosis was based on ophthalmic examinations of the affected dogs and 18 additionally investigated unaffected DDTs. We collected DNA from over 400 DTTs and a genome wide association study was performed in a cohort of 23 affected and 23 controls, followed by a fine mapping, a replication study and candidate gene sequencing. The clinical study suggested that ocular abnormalities including abnormal iridocorneal angles and pectinate ligament dysplasia are common (50% and 72%, respectively) in the breed and the disease resembles human PCAG. The genetic study identified a novel 9.5 Mb locus on canine chromosome 8 including the 1.6 Mb best associated region (p = 1.63×10−10, OR = 32 for homozygosity). Mutation screening in five candidate genes did not reveal any causative variants. This study indicates that although ocular abnormalities are common in DDTs, the genetic risk for glaucoma is conferred by a novel locus on CFA8. The canine locus shares synteny to a region in human chromosome 14q, which harbors several loci associated with POAG and PCG. Our study reveals a new locus for canine glaucoma and ongoing molecular studies will likely help to understand the genetic etiology of the disease. PMID:23951034

  5. Coat colour in dogs: identification of the Merle locus in the Australian shepherd breed

    PubMed Central

    Hédan, Benoit; Corre, Sébastien; Hitte, Christophe; Dréano, Stéphane; Vilboux, Thierry; Derrien, Thomas; Denis, Bernard; Galibert, Francis; Galibert, Marie-Dominique; André, Catherine

    2006-01-01

    Background Coat colours in canines have many natural phenotypic variants. Some of the genes and alleles involved also cause genetic developmental defects, which are also observed in humans and mice. We studied the genetic bases of the merle phenotype in dogs to shed light on the pigmentation mechanisms and to identify genes involved in these complex pathways. The merle phenotype includes a lack of eumelanic pigmentation and developmental defects, hearing impairments and microphthalmia. It is similar to that observed in microphthalmia mouse mutants. Results Taking advantage of the dog as a powerful genetic model and using recently available genomic resources, we investigated the segregation of the merle phenotype in a five-generation pedigree, comprising 96 sampled Australian shepherd dogs. Genetic linkage analysis allowed us to identify a locus for the merle phenotype, spanning 5.5 megabases, at the centromeric tip of canine chromosome 10 (CFA10). This locus was supported by a Lod score of 15.65 at a recombination fraction θ = 0. Linkage analysis in three other breeds revealed that the same region is linked to the merle phenotype. This region, which is orthologous to human chromosome 12 (HSA12 q13-q14), belongs to a conserved ordered segment in the human and mouse genome and comprises several genes potentially involved in pigmentation and development. Conclusion This study has identified the locus for the merle coat colour in dogs to be at the centromeric end of CFA10. Genetic studies on other breeds segregating the merle phenotype should allow the locus to be defined more accurately with the aim of identifying the gene. This work shows the power of the canine system to search for the genetic bases of mammalian pigmentation and developmental pathways. PMID:16504149

  6. Novel Susceptibility Locus at 22q11 for Diabetic Nephropathy in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Wessman, Maija; Forsblom, Carol; Kaunisto, Mari A.; Söderlund, Jenny; Ilonen, Jorma; Sallinen, Riitta; Hiekkalinna, Tero; Parkkonen, Maija; Maxwell, Alexander P.; Tarnow, Lise; Parving, Hans-Henrik; Hadjadj, Samy; Marre, Michel; Groop, Per-Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Background Diabetic nephropathy (DN) affects about 30% of patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and contributes to serious morbidity and mortality. So far only the 3q21–q25 region has repeatedly been indicated as a susceptibility region for DN. The aim of this study was to search for new DN susceptibility loci in Finnish, Danish and French T1D families. Methods and Results We performed a genome-wide linkage study using 384 microsatellite markers. A total of 175 T1D families were studied, of which 94 originated from Finland, 46 from Denmark and 35 from France. The whole sample set consisted of 556 individuals including 42 sib-pairs concordant and 84 sib-pairs discordant for DN. Two-point and multi-point non-parametric linkage analyses were performed using the Analyze package and the MERLIN software. A novel DN locus on 22q11 was identified in the joint analysis of the Finnish, Danish and French families by genome-wide multipoint non-parametric linkage analysis using the Kong and Cox linear model (NPLpairs LOD score 3.58). Nominal or suggestive evidence of linkage to this locus was also detected when the three populations were analyzed separately. Suggestive evidence of linkage was found to six additional loci in the Finnish and French sample sets. Conclusions This study identified a novel DN locus at chromosome 22q11 with significant evidence of linkage to DN. Our results suggest that this locus may be of importance in European populations. In addition, this study supports previously indicated DN loci on 3q21–q25 and 19q13. PMID:21909410

  7. Mediator facilitates transcriptional activation and dynamic long-range contacts at the IgH locus during class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Thomas-Claudepierre, Anne-Sophie; Robert, Isabelle; Rocha, Pedro P; Raviram, Ramya; Schiavo, Ebe; Heyer, Vincent; Bonneau, Richard; Luo, Vincent M; Reddy, Janardan K; Borggrefe, Tilman; Skok, Jane A; Reina-San-Martin, Bernardo

    2016-03-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) class switch recombination (CSR) is initiated by the transcription-coupled recruitment of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) to Ig switch regions (S regions). During CSR, the IgH locus undergoes dynamic three-dimensional structural changes in which promoters, enhancers, and S regions are brought to close proximity. Nevertheless, little is known about the underlying mechanisms. In this study, we show that Med1 and Med12, two subunits of the mediator complex implicated in transcription initiation and long-range enhancer/promoter loop formation, are dynamically recruited to the IgH locus enhancers and the acceptor regions during CSR and that their knockdown in CH12 cells results in impaired CSR. Furthermore, we show that conditional inactivation of Med1 in B cells results in defective CSR and reduced acceptor S region transcription. Finally, we show that in B cells undergoing CSR, the dynamic long-range contacts between the IgH enhancers and the acceptor regions correlate with Med1 and Med12 binding and that they happen at a reduced frequency in Med1-deficient B cells. Our results implicate the mediator complex in the mechanism of CSR and are consistent with a model in which mediator facilitates the long-range contacts between S regions and the IgH locus enhancers during CSR and their transcriptional activation. PMID:26903242

  8. Detection of a molecular deletion at the DXS732 locus in a patient with X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (EDA), with the identification of a unique junctional fragment.

    PubMed Central

    Zonana, J; Gault, J; Davies, K J; Jones, M; Browne, D; Litt, M; Brockdorff, N; Rastan, S; Clarke, A; Thomas, N S

    1993-01-01

    X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (EDA) has been localized to the Xq12-q13.1 region. A panel of genomic DNA samples from 80 unrelated males with EDA has been screened for deletions at seven genetic loci within the Xq12-13 region. A single individual was identified with a deletion at the DXS732 locus by hybridization with the mouse genomic probe pcos169E/4. This highly conserved DNA probe is from locus DXCrc169, which is tightly linked to the Ta locus, the putative mouse homologue of EDA. The proband had the classical phenotype of EDA, with no other phenotypic abnormalities, and a normal cytogenetic analysis. A human genomic DNA clone, homologous to pcos169E/4, was isolated from a human X-chromosome cosmid library. On hybridization with the cosmid, the proband was found to be only partially deleted at the DXS732 locus, with a unique junctional fragment identified in the proband and in three of his maternal relatives. This is the first determination of carrier status for EDA in females, by direct mutation analysis. Failure to detect deletion of the other loci tested in the proband suggests that the DXS732 locus is the closest known locus to the EDA gene. Since the DXS732 locus contains a highly conserved sequence, it must be considered to be a candidate locus for the EDA gene itself. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8434608

  9. Detecting purely epistatic multi-locus interactions by an omnibus permutation test on ensembles of two-locus analyses

    PubMed Central

    Wongseree, Waranyu; Assawamakin, Anunchai; Piroonratana, Theera; Sinsomros, Saravudh; Limwongse, Chanin; Chaiyaratana, Nachol

    2009-01-01

    Background Purely epistatic multi-locus interactions cannot generally be detected via single-locus analysis in case-control studies of complex diseases. Recently, many two-locus and multi-locus analysis techniques have been shown to be promising for the epistasis detection. However, exhaustive multi-locus analysis requires prohibitively large computational efforts when problems involve large-scale or genome-wide data. Furthermore, there is no explicit proof that a combination of multiple two-locus analyses can lead to the correct identification of multi-locus interactions. Results The proposed 2LOmb algorithm performs an omnibus permutation test on ensembles of two-locus analyses. The algorithm consists of four main steps: two-locus analysis, a permutation test, global p-value determination and a progressive search for the best ensemble. 2LOmb is benchmarked against an exhaustive two-locus analysis technique, a set association approach, a correlation-based feature selection (CFS) technique and a tuned ReliefF (TuRF) technique. The simulation results indicate that 2LOmb produces a low false-positive error. Moreover, 2LOmb has the best performance in terms of an ability to identify all causative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and a low number of output SNPs in purely epistatic two-, three- and four-locus interaction problems. The interaction models constructed from the 2LOmb outputs via a multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) method are also included for the confirmation of epistasis detection. 2LOmb is subsequently applied to a type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) data set, which is obtained as a part of the UK genome-wide genetic epidemiology study by the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC). After primarily screening for SNPs that locate within or near 372 candidate genes and exhibit no marginal single-locus effects, the T2D data set is reduced to 7,065 SNPs from 370 genes. The 2LOmb search in the reduced T2D data reveals that four intronic SNPs

  10. Relation of organizational citizenship behavior and locus of control.

    PubMed

    Turnipseed, David L; Bacon, Calvin M

    2009-12-01

    The relation of organizational citizenship behavior and locus of control was assessed in a sample of 286 college students (52% men; M age = 24 yr.) who worked an average of 26 hr. per week. Measures were Spector's Work Locus of Control Scale and Podsakoff, et al.'s Organization Citizenship Behavior scale. Hierarchical multiple regressions indicated positive association of scores on work locus of control with scores on each of the four tested dimensions of organizational citizenship, as well as total organizational citizenship behavior. PMID:20099548

  11. Mapping a disease locus by allelic association

    PubMed Central

    Collins, A.; Morton, N. E.

    1998-01-01

    Allelic association provides a means to map disease genes that, in a dense map of polymorphic markers, has considerably higher resolution than linkage methods. We describe here a composite likelihood estimate of location for a disease gene against a high-resolution marker map by using allele frequencies at linked loci. Data may be family-based, as in the transmission disequilibrium test, or from a case-control study. χ2 tests, logarithm of odds, standard errors, and information weights are provided. The method is illustrated by analysis of published cystic fibrosis haplotypes, in which ΔF508 is more accurately localized than by other association studies. This differs from current approaches by adopting a more general Malecot model for isolation by distance, where distance here is between marker and disease locus, allowance for errors in the map and model, and freedom from assumptions about demography, systematic pressures, and the ratio of physical to genetic distance. When these assumptions are introduced the number of generations since the original mutation may be estimated, but this is not required to determine location and its standard error, so that evidence from allelic association may be efficiently combined with linkage evidence to identify a region for positional cloning of a disease gene. PMID:9465087

  12. Paramutation alters regulatory control of the maize pl locus.

    PubMed Central

    Hollick, J B; Patterson, G I; Asmundsson, I M; Chandler, V L

    2000-01-01

    The maize purple plant (pl) locus encodes a transcription factor required for anthocyanin pigment synthesis in vegetative and floral tissues. The strongly expressed Pl-Rhoades (Pl-Rh) allele is unstable, spontaneously changing to weaker expression states (Pl') at low frequencies and exclusively changing to Pl' in Pl'/Pl-Rh heterozygotes. The weakly expressed Pl' state is mitotically and meiotically stable, yet reversible. This type of allele-dependent, heritable alteration of gene control is called paramutation. Expression studies herein demonstrate that visible differences in anthocyanin pigment levels mirror pl RNA abundance and that pl paramutation is associated with reduced transcription of the pl gene. This transcriptional alteration is accompanied by acquisition of light-dependent regulation. Restriction endonuclease mapping indicates that these changes in pl gene regulation are not associated with detectable DNA alterations or with extensive changes in cytosine methylation patterns. Genetic tests show that Pl-Blotched (Pl-Bh), a structurally similar pl allele encoding an identical pl RNA and PL protein, does not participate in pl paramutation. This result suggests that if cis-acting sequences are required for pl paramutation they are distinct from the protein coding and immediately adjacent regions. A model is discussed in which pl paramutation results in heritable changes of chromatin structure that fundamentally alter regulatory interactions occurring during plant development. PMID:10747073

  13. Polymorphic DNA haplotypes at the LDL receptor locus.

    PubMed Central

    Leitersdorf, E; Chakravarti, A; Hobbs, H H

    1989-01-01

    Mutations in the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor gene result in the autosomal dominant disorder familial hypercholesterolemia (FH). Many different LDL receptor mutations have been identified and characterized, demonstrating a high degree of allelic heterogeneity at this locus. The ability to identify mutant LDL receptor genes for prenatal diagnosis of homozygous FH or to study the role of the LDL receptor gene in polygenic hypercholesterolemia requires the use of closely linked RFLPs. In the present study we used 10 different RFLPs, including three newly described polymorphisms, to construct 123 independent haplotypes from 20 Caucasian American pedigrees. Our sample contained 31 different haplotypes varying in frequency from 0.8% to 29.3%; the five most common haplotypes account for 67.5% of the sample. The heterozygosity and PIC of each site were determined, and these values disclosed that eight of the RFLPs were substantially polymorphic. Linkage-disequilibrium analysis of the haplotype data revealed strong nonrandom associations among all 10 RFLPs, especially among those sites clustered in the 3' region of the gene. Evolutionary analysis suggests the occurrence of both mutational and recombinational events in the generation of the observed haplotypes. A strategy for haplotype analysis of the LDL receptor gene in individuals of Caucasian American descent is presented. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:2563635

  14. High Genetic Variability of the agr Locus in Staphylococcus Species

    PubMed Central

    Dufour, Philippe; Jarraud, Sophie; Vandenesch, Francois; Greenland, Timothy; Novick, Richard P.; Bes, Michele; Etienne, Jerome; Lina, Gerard

    2002-01-01

    The agr quorum-sensing and signal transduction system was initially described in Staphylococcus aureus, where four distinct allelic variants have been sequenced. Western blotting suggests the presence of homologous loci in many other staphylococci, and this has been confirmed for S. epidermidis and S. lugdunensis. In this study we isolated agr-like loci from a range of staphylococci by using PCR amplification from primers common to the six published agr sequences and bracketing the most variable region, associated with quorum-sensing specificity. Positive amplifications were obtained from 14 of 34 staphylococcal species or subspecies tested. Sequences of the amplicons identified 24 distinct variants which exhibited extensive sequence divergence with only 10% of the nucleotides absolutely conserved on multiple alignment. This variability involved all three open reading frames involved in quorum sensing and signal transduction. However, these variants retained several protein signatures, including the conserved cysteine residue of the autoinducing peptide, with the exception of S. intermedius of pigeon origin, which contained a serine in place of cysteine at this position. We discuss hypotheses on the mode of action and the molecular evolution of the agr locus based on comparisons between the newly determined sequences. PMID:11807079

  15. Control of arousal through neuropeptide afferents of the locus coeruleus.

    PubMed

    Zitnik, Gerard A

    2016-06-15

    The locus coeruleus-norepinephine (LC-NE) system is implicated in mediating several aspects of arousal. Alterations in LC neuronal discharge is associated with distinct changes in behavior, cognition, sensory processing and regulation of the sleep-wake cycle. Changes in LC output and subsequent release of NE in target brain regions help adjust arousal state to respond appropriately to environmental conditions and behavioral circumstances. One way in which LC activity is controlled is through release of endogenous neuropeptides. Based on the sleep-wake cycle and environmental cues specific neuropeptide afferent systems are activated, innervating the LC. These neuropeptides include: corticotropin releasing factor (CRF), orexin (ORX), endogenous opioids, substance P (SP), melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH), neuropeptide Y (NPY) and somatostatin (SS). This review summarizes studies examining the neuroanatomical projections of these neuropeptides, their receptors in the LC, the actions on LC neurons and downstream NE release, as well as the behavioral and cognitive effects associated individual neuropeptide-mediated innervation of the LC. Finally, the relationship between individual neuropeptides, the LC-NE system and various clinical disorders is discussed, providing evidence for possible therapeutic targets for treatment of several arousal- and stress-related disorders. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Noradrenergic System. PMID:26688115

  16. Guidelines for establishing locus specific databases.

    PubMed

    Vihinen, Mauno; den Dunnen, Johan T; Dalgleish, Raymond; Cotton, Richard G H

    2012-02-01

    Information about genetic variation has been collected for some 20 years into registries, known as locus specific databases (LSDBs), which nowadays often contain information in addition to the actual genetic variation. Several issues have to be taken into account when considering establishing and maintaining LSDBs and these have been discussed previously in a number of articles describing guidelines and recommendations. This information is widely scattered and, for a newcomer, it would be difficult to obtain the latest information and guidance. Here, a sequence of steps essential for establishing an LSDB is discussed together with guidelines for each step. Curators need to collect information from various sources, code it in systematic way, and distribute to the research and clinical communities. In doing this, ethical issues have to be taken into account. To facilitate integration of information to, for example, analyze genotype-phenotype correlations, systematic data representation using established nomenclatures, data models, and ontologies is essential. LSDB curation and maintenance comprises a number of tasks that can be managed by following logical steps. These resources are becoming ever more important and new curators are essential to ensure that we will have expertly curated databases for all disease-related genes in the near future. PMID:22052659

  17. Chromosomal locus for staphylococcal enterotoxin B.

    PubMed Central

    Shafer, W M; Iandolo, J J

    1978-01-01

    The genetic locus of staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) was investigated in the Staphylococcus aureus food-poisoning isolates, strains S6 and 277. Direct neutral sucrose gradient centrifugation analysis of sodium dodecyl sulfate-sodium chloride-mediated cleared lysates demonstrated that strain S6 contained a single 37S plasmid. Transductional analysis revealed that the 37S plasmid in S6 encoded for cadmium resistance (Cad) but not SEB. Additionally, elimination of cadmium resistance in S6 provided a plasmid-negative derivative that produced SEB at the same level as the parent. Examination of strain 277 showed two plasmids, a 37S species encoding for penicillin resistance (Penr) and a 21S species containing the gene(s) responsible for tetracycline resistance (Tetr). Elimination of the 37S, penr plasmid in 277 had no effect on SEB production, whereas introduction of the 21S tetr plasmid via transformation into strain 8325 (SEB--) did not confer enterotoxigenesis upon the transformants. The data obtained in this investigation suggest that the SEB gene(s) in these food-poisoning isolates of S. aureus is chromosomal. Images PMID:669796

  18. Linkage of Thomsen disease to the T-cell-receptor beta (TCRB) locus on chromosome 7q35

    SciTech Connect

    Abdalla, J.A.; Casley, W.L.; Cousin, H.K.; Hudson, A.J.; Hashimoto, L.; Ebers, G.C. ); Murphy, E.G. ); Cornelis, F.C. )

    1992-09-01

    The chromosomal localization of the gene for Thomsen disease, an autosomal dominant form of myotonia congenita, is unknown. Electrophysiologic data in Thomsen disease point to defects in muscle-membrane ion-channel function. A mouse model of myotonia congenita appears to result from transposon inactivation of a muscle chloride-channel gene which maps to a region of mouse chromosome 6. The linkage group containing this gene includes several loci which have human homologues on human chromosome 7q31-35 (synteny), and this is a candidate region for the Thomsen disease locus. Linkage analysis of Thomsen disease to the T-cell-receptor beta (TCRB) locus at 7q35 was carried out in four pedigrees (25 affected and 23 unaffected individuals) by using a PCR-based dinucleotide repeat polymorphism in the TCRB gene. Two-point linkage analysis between Thomsen disease and TCRB showed a maximum cumulative lod score of 3.963 at a recombination fraction of .10 (1-lod support interval .048-.275). The authors conclude that the Thomsen disease locus is linked to the TCRB locus in these families. 30 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Imprinting defects at human 14q32 locus alters gene expression and is associated with the pathobiology of osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Shu, Jingmin; Li, Lihua; Sarver, Anne E; Pope, Emily A; Varshney, Jyotika; Thayanithy, Venugopal; Spector, Logan; Largaespada, David A; Steer, Clifford J; Subramanian, Subbaya

    2016-04-19

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone malignancy affecting children and adolescents. Although several genetic predisposing conditions have been associated with osteosarcoma, our understanding of its pathobiology is rather limited. Here we show that, first, an imprinting defect at human 14q32-locus is highly prevalent (87%) and specifically associated with osteosarcoma patients < 30 years of age. Second, the average demethylation at differentially methylated regions (DMRs) in the 14q32-locus varied significantly compared to genome-wide demethylation. Third, the 14q32-locus was enriched in both H3K4-me3 and H3K27-me3 histone modifications that affected expression of all imprinted genes and miRNAs in this region. Fourth, imprinting defects at 14q32 - DMRs are present in triad DNA samples from affected children and their biological parents. Finally, imprinting defects at 14q32-DMRs were also observed at higher frequencies in an Rb1/Trp53 mutation-induced osteosarcoma mouse model. Further analysis of normal and tumor tissues from a Sleeping Beauty mouse model of spontaneous osteosarcoma supported the notion that these imprinting defects may be a key factor in osteosarcoma pathobiology. In conclusion, we demonstrate that imprinting defects at the 14q32 locus significantly alter gene expression, may contribute to the pathogenesis of osteosarcoma, and could be predictive of survival outcomes. PMID:26802029

  20. Imprinting defects at human 14q32 locus alters gene expression and is associated with the pathobiology of osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Jingmin; Li, Lihua; Sarver, Anne E.; Pope, Emily A.; Varshney, Jyotika; Thayanithy, Venugopal; Spector, Logan; Largaespada, David A.; Steer, Clifford J.; Subramanian, Subbaya

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone malignancy affecting children and adolescents. Although several genetic predisposing conditions have been associated with osteosarcoma, our understanding of its pathobiology is rather limited. Here we show that, first, an imprinting defect at human 14q32-locus is highly prevalent (87%) and specifically associated with osteosarcoma patients < 30 years of age. Second, the average demethylation at differentially methylated regions (DMRs) in the 14q32-locus varied significantly compared to genome-wide demethylation. Third, the 14q32-locus was enriched in both H3K4-me3 and H3K27-me3 histone modifications that affected expression of all imprinted genes and miRNAs in this region. Fourth, imprinting defects at 14q32 - DMRs are present in triad DNA samples from affected children and their biological parents. Finally, imprinting defects at 14q32-DMRs were also observed at higher frequencies in an Rb1/Trp53 mutation-induced osteosarcoma mouse model. Further analysis of normal and tumor tissues from a Sleeping Beauty mouse model of spontaneous osteosarcoma supported the notion that these imprinting defects may be a key factor in osteosarcoma pathobiology. In conclusion, we demonstrate that imprinting defects at the 14q32 locus significantly alter gene expression, may contribute to the pathogenesis of osteosarcoma, and could be predictive of survival outcomes. PMID:26802029

  1. Familial migraine: Exclusion of the susceptibility gene from the reported locus of familial hemiplegic migraine on 19p

    SciTech Connect

    Hovatta, I.; Peltonen, L.; Kallela, M.; Faerkkilae, M.

    1994-10-01

    Genetic isolates are highly useful in analyses of the molecular background of complex diseases since the enrichment of a limited number of predisposing genes can be predicted in representative families or in specific geographical regions. It has been suggested that the pathophysiology and etiology of familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) and typical migraine with aura are most probably the same. Recent assignment of FHM locus to chromosome 19p in two French families makes it now possible to test this hypothesis. We report here linkage data on four families with multiple cases of migraine disorder originating from the genetically isolated population of Finland. We were interested to discover whether the migraine in these families would also show linkage to the markers on 19p. We could exclude a region of 50 cM, flanking the reported FHM locus, as a site of migraine locus in our four families. It seems evident that locus heterogeneity exists between different diagnostic classes of migraine spectrum of diseases and also between different ethnic groups. 10 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Eight closely linked loci place the Wilson disease locus within 13q14-q21

    PubMed Central

    Bowcock, A. M.; Farrer, L. A.; Hebert, J. M.; Agger, M.; Sternlieb, I.; Scheinberg, I. H.; Buys, C. H. C. M.; Scheffer, H.; Frydman, M.; Chajek-Saul, T.; Bonne-Tamir, B.; Cavalli-Sforza, L. L.

    1988-01-01

    Wilson disease (WD) is an autosomal recessive disorder resulting in an accumulation of copper in the liver, brain, and other organs. The WD locus (WND) has previously been linked to esterase D (ESD) and localized to 13q14–22. With the large Centre d'Etude Polymorphisme Humain cohort, a refined map of DNA markers from this region was constructed, with the following locus order: D13S1-D13S21-D13S22-D13S10-ESD-RB-WND-D13S26-D13S12-D13S2. A significant excess of male recombination was observed between D13S21 and D13S22. Intervals distal to D13S22 showed an excess of female recombination. When these markers were tested on 19 WD families from a variety of ethnic backgrounds, the two closest loci were shown to be RB and D13S26. The retinoblastoma gene locus (RB) was shown to be proximal to WND at a distance of 4.4 centimorgans (cM), and D13S26 was placed distal to WND at a distance of 4.0 cM. ESD was assigned proximally at a distance of 9.4 cM. In all families studied WND was linked to one or more of the loci ESD, RB, or D13S26. PMID:3189332

  3. An autosomal locus predisposing to multiple deletions of mtDNA on chromosome 3p

    SciTech Connect

    Kaukonen, J.A.; Suomalainen, A.; Peltonen, L.; Amati, P.; Zeviani, M.

    1996-04-01

    Autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia (adPEO) is a disorder characterized by ptosis, progressive weakness of the external eye muscles, and general muscle weakness. The patients have multiple deletions of mtDNA on Southern blots or in PCR analysis of muscle DNA and a mild deficiency of one or more respiratory-chain enzymes carrying mtDNA-encoded subunits. The pattern of inheritance indicates a nuclear gene defect predisposing to secondary mtDNA deletions. Recently, in one Finnish family, we assigned an adPEO locus to chromosome 10q23.3-24.3 but also excluded linkage to this same locus in two Italian adPEO families with a phenotype closely resembling the Finnish one. We applied a random mapping approach to informative non-10q-linked Italian families to assign the second locus for adPEO and found strong evidence for linkage on chromosome 3p14.1-21.2 in three Italian families, with a maximum two-point lod score of 4.62 at a recombination fraction of .0. However, in three additional families, linkage to the same chromosomal region was clearly absent, indicating further genetic complexity of the adPEO trait. 19 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. A gene locus for targeted ectopic gene integration in Zymoseptoria tritici.

    PubMed

    Kilaru, S; Schuster, M; Latz, M; Das Gupta, S; Steinberg, N; Fones, H; Gurr, S J; Talbot, N J; Steinberg, G

    2015-06-01

    Understanding the cellular organization and biology of fungal pathogens requires accurate methods for genomic integration of mutant alleles or fluorescent fusion-protein constructs. In Zymoseptoria tritici, this can be achieved by integrating of plasmid DNA randomly into the genome of this wheat pathogen. However, untargeted ectopic integration carries the risk of unwanted side effects, such as altered gene expression, due to targeting regulatory elements, or gene disruption following integration into protein-coding regions of the genome. Here, we establish the succinate dehydrogenase (sdi1) locus as a single "soft-landing" site for targeted ectopic integration of genetic constructs by using a carboxin-resistant sdi1(R) allele, carrying the point-mutation H267L. We use various green and red fluorescent fusion constructs and show that 97% of all transformants integrate correctly into the sdi1 locus as single copies. We also demonstrate that such integration does not affect the pathogenicity of Z. tritici, and thus the sdi1 locus is a useful tool for virulence analysis in genetically modified Z. tritici strains. Furthermore, we have developed a vector which facilitates yeast recombination cloning and thus allows assembly of multiple overlapping DNA fragments in a single cloning step for high throughput vector and strain generation. PMID:26092798

  5. Characterization of "Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus" populations by double-locus analyses.

    PubMed

    Deng, X; Lopes, S; Wang, X; Sun, X; Jones, D; Irey, M; Civerolo, E; Chen, J

    2014-10-01

    "Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus" (CaLas) is associated with citrus Huanglongbing (HLB, yellow shoot disease), which is highly destructive to world citrus production. Understanding the relationships of CaLas isolates from different geographical regions is important for HLB research and development of disease management strategies. In this study, 301 CaLas isolates [85 Brazil, 132 China, and 84 U.S. (83 Florida and 1 California)] were collected, and genomic variations among them were evaluated based on the analyses of two genomic loci: trn1, characteristic of variable tandem repeat numbers (TRNs), and snp1, characteristic of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Locus trn1 revealed the homogeneity of all Brazilian isolates, and locus snp1 revealed the homogeneity of most Florida isolates. When the two loci were analyzed simultaneously, i.e., double-locus (DL) analyses, CaLas isolates were clustered mostly according to geographical origins. DL genotype 1 included 97 % of the Chinese isolates, DL genotype 2 included all Brazilian isolates, and DL genotype 3 included 93 % of the U.S. isolates. DL analyses successfully revealed inter-continental overlapping or movement pattern of CaLas isolates. The isolate recently found in California belonged to Asiatic DL genotype 1. PMID:24912994

  6. Insertional inactivation of an intrageneric coaggregation-relevant adhesin locus from Streptococcus gordonii DL1 (Challis).

    PubMed Central

    Whittaker, C J; Clemans, D L; Kolenbrander, P E

    1996-01-01

    Transposon Tn916 was used to insertionally inactivate a coaggregation-relevant locus of Streptococcus gordonii DL1 (Challis). One mutant (F11) was isolated that lost the ability to coaggregate with the streptococcal partners of DL1 but retained the ability to coaggregate with partners belonging to other genera. A probe specific for the region flanking the Tn916 insertion was used to isolate a locus-specific fragment from a chromosomal lambda library. Southern analysis of the resulting phagemids revealed that a 0.5-kb EcoRI fragment hybridized with the F11 probe. Cloning of the 0.5-kb EcoRI fragment into the E. coli-streptococcal insertion vector p(omega) yielded pCW4, which was used to insertionally inactivate the putative coaggregation-relevant gene in DL1. Insertion mutants showed altered coaggregation with streptococci but retained wild-type coaggregation properties with other genera of bacteria. Comparison of immunoblots of cell surface proteins showed a 100-kDa protein in DL1 which was not detected in the Tn916 and pCW4 insertion mutants. These results indicate that the 0.5-kb EcoRI fragment is part of an adhesin-relevant locus that is involved in the production of a 100-kDa protein at the cell surface. PMID:8926080

  7. Classification of mutations at the HLA-A locus by use of the polymerase chain reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, G.; Grist, S.; Firgaira, F.; Turner, D.; Morley, A. )

    1993-01-01

    The authors investigated whether the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) could be used to determine the mechanism of mutation in lymphocyte clones mutated at the HLA-A locus. Three polymorphisms, at Factor XIIIA, D6S109, and intron 3 of the HLA-A gene, were used to study a series of clones previously characterized by Southern blotting (SB) at multiple loci on chromosome 6. For detection of loss of heterozygosity, the results of PCR and SB were concordant in 140 of 141 clones when polymorphism in the Factor XIIIA region was studied and in 144 of 145 clones when polymorphism in the HLA-A gene was studied. For classification of the mechanism of mutation, PCR and SB gave the same result in 88 of 92 clones (96%) when a combination of the HLA-A and Factor XIIIA polymorphisms was used and in 46 of 47 clones (98%) when a combination of the HLA-A and D6S109 polymorphisms was used. The results indicate that PCR provides a simple and reliable method for categorizing mutations at the HLA-A locus as arising from mitotic recombination, deletion, or from presumptive minor changes within the gene. Rare events such as gene conversion, nondisjunction, or large deletions extending to the telomere will be misclassified. However, such events are rare for mutations at this locus. 9 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Intrachromosomal telomere-related sequences and gpt locus sensitivity to ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Oroskar, A.A.; Sedita, B.A; Schwartz, J.L.

    1994-12-31

    The Chinese hamster ovary cell line CHO-T510 contains a single copy of a stably integrated retroviral vector with a selectable marker, the E. coli xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (gpt) gene. Previous studies on the CHO-T510 line showed that, in comparison with other genetic loci, the gpt locus was hypersensitive to mutation induction by ionizing radiation. Southern blot analyses of a set of 20-26 gpt{sup -} mutant lines, isolated as either spontaneous, gamma-induced, or alpha-radiation-induced mutants, indicated that 86-95% of these were complete vector deletions. The integrated gpt vector was localized by in situ hybridization to the q arm of chromosome 5 in close proximity to the interstitial ttelomeresequences near the pericentric region of this chromosome. One to three kilobases of sequences adjacent to the gpt integration site were clones and analyzed. Both the right and left integration sites contain sequences that hybridize to a pantelomere probe, suggesting that the vector has acquired telomeric repeats at its ends. The radio-sensitivity of the gpt locus may be due to these telomere repeats, as interstitial telomeres have been reported to be radiation-sensitive fragile sites. The gpt locus in the T510 line affords a unique resource to test this hypothesis.

  9. Genomic organization and characterization of the white locus of the Mediterranean fruitfly, Ceratitis capitata.

    PubMed

    Gomulski, L M; Pitts, R J; Costa, S; Saccone, G; Torti, C; Polito, L C; Gasperi, G; Malacrida, A R; Kafatos, F C; Zwiebel, L J

    2001-03-01

    An approximately 14-kb region of genomic DNA encoding the wild-type white eye (w+) color gene from the medfly, Ceratitis capitata has been cloned and characterized at the molecular level. Comparison of the intron-exon organization of this locus among several dipteran insects reveals distinct organizational patterns that are consistent with the phylogenetic relationships of these flies and the dendrogram of the predicted primary amino acid sequence of the white loci. An examination of w+ expression during medfly development has been carried out, displaying overall similarity to corresponding studies for white gene homologues in Drosophila melanogaster and other insects. Interestingly, we have detected two phenotypically neutral allelic forms of the locus that have arisen as the result of an apparently novel insertion or deletion event located in the large first intron of the medfly white locus. Cloning and sequencing of two mutant white alleles, w1 and w2, from the we,wp and M245 strains, respectively, indicate that the mutant conditions in these strains are the result of independent events--a frameshift mutation in exon 6 for w1 and a deletion including a large part of exon 2 in the case of w2. PMID:11238408

  10. Novel Locus for Paroxysmal Kinesigenic Dyskinesia Mapped to Chromosome 3q28-29

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ding; Zhang, Yumiao; Wang, Yu; Chen, Chanjuan; Li, Xin; Zhou, Jinxia; Song, Zhi; Xiao, Bo; Rasco, Kevin; Zhang, Feng; Wen, Shu; Li, Guoliang

    2016-01-01

    Paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD) is characterized by recurrent and brief attacks of dystonia or chorea precipitated by sudden movements. It can be sporadic or familial. Proline-Rich Transmembrane Protein 2 (PRRT2) has been shown to be a common causative gene of PKD. However, less than 50% of patients with primary PKD harbor mutations in PRRT2. The aim of this study is to use eight families with PKD to identify the pathogenic PRRT2 mutations, or possible novel genetic cause of PKD phenotypes. After extensive clinical investigation, direct sequencing and mutation analysis of PRRT2 were performed on patients from eight PKD families. A genome-wide STR and SNP based linkage analysis was performed in one large family that is negative for pathogenic PRRT2 mutations. Using additional polymorphic markers, we identified a novel gene locus on chromosome 3q in this PRRT2-mutation-negative PKD family. The LOD score for the region between markers D3S1314 and D3S1256 is 3.02 and we proposed to designate this locus as Episodic Kinesigenic Dyskinesia (EKD3). Further studies are needed to identify the causative gene within this locus. PMID:27173777

  11. Novel Locus for Paroxysmal Kinesigenic Dyskinesia Mapped to Chromosome 3q28-29.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ding; Zhang, Yumiao; Wang, Yu; Chen, Chanjuan; Li, Xin; Zhou, Jinxia; Song, Zhi; Xiao, Bo; Rasco, Kevin; Zhang, Feng; Wen, Shu; Li, Guoliang

    2016-01-01

    Paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD) is characterized by recurrent and brief attacks of dystonia or chorea precipitated by sudden movements. It can be sporadic or familial. Proline-Rich Transmembrane Protein 2 (PRRT2) has been shown to be a common causative gene of PKD. However, less than 50% of patients with primary PKD harbor mutations in PRRT2. The aim of this study is to use eight families with PKD to identify the pathogenic PRRT2 mutations, or possible novel genetic cause of PKD phenotypes. After extensive clinical investigation, direct sequencing and mutation analysis of PRRT2 were performed on patients from eight PKD families. A genome-wide STR and SNP based linkage analysis was performed in one large family that is negative for pathogenic PRRT2 mutations. Using additional polymorphic markers, we identified a novel gene locus on chromosome 3q in this PRRT2-mutation-negative PKD family. The LOD score for the region between markers D3S1314 and D3S1256 is 3.02 and we proposed to designate this locus as Episodic Kinesigenic Dyskinesia (EKD3). Further studies are needed to identify the causative gene within this locus. PMID:27173777

  12. Locus of information in words and the right visual field effect.

    PubMed

    Bryden, M P; Mondor, T A; Loken, M; Ingleton, M A; Bergstrom, K

    1990-09-01

    The right visual field (RVF) advantage found for the identification or classification of words has usually been interpreted as evidence for left hemisphere language functions. It has more recently been explained as the result of the fact that the most informative part of the word, presumably the beginning, is in a region of better visual acuity. It is not clear from existing evidence that the beginnings of words are in fact more informative. The present study assessed the locus of information in words by deleting either the initial or terminal one or two letters. Subjects were required to generate a completion. Regardless of whether subjects were scored as correct for generating the original target word (as would be appropriate in a naming study) or for producing any legitimate word (as would be appropriate for a lexical decision study), the results indicated that most words have more information in the initial letters. Nevertheless, there are exceptions to this rule, and some words have more terminal information. Equal numbers of words with more initial information and with more terminal information were selected for two visual field studies in order to assess the effect of the locus of information on visual laterality. In neither a lexical decision study nor a naming study did locus of information affect the commonly observed right visual field superiority. Thus the distribution of information is not likely to be a major confounding variable in laterality studies employing horizontally presented words. PMID:2223044

  13. Preferential Deletion Events in the Direct Repeat Locus of Mycobacterium tuberculosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Schürch, Anita C.; Kremer, Kristin; Kiers, Albert; Boeree, Martin J.; Siezen, Roland J.; van Soolingen, Dick

    2011-01-01

    The “Harlingen” IS6110 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) cluster has linked over 100 tuberculosis cases in The Netherlands since 1993. Four Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates that were epidemiologically linked to this cluster had different spoligotype patterns, as well as slightly divergent IS6110 profiles, compared to the majority of the isolates. Sequencing of the direct repeat (DR) locus revealed sequence polymorphisms at the putative deletion sites. These deletion footprints provided evidence for independent deletions of the central region of the DR locus in three isolates, while the different genotype of the fourth isolate was explained by transmission. Our finding suggests that convergent deletions in the DR locus occur frequently. However, deletion footprints are not suitable to detect convergent deletions in the DR because they seem to be exceptional. Deletion footprints in the DR were not described previously, and we did not observe them in any public M. tuberculosis complex sequences. We conclude that preferential deletions in the DR loci of closely related strains are usually an unnoted event that interferes with clustering of closely related strains. PMID:21325559

  14. Preferential deletion events in the direct repeat locus of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Schürch, Anita C; Kremer, Kristin; Kiers, Albert; Boeree, Martin J; Siezen, Roland J; van Soolingen, Dick

    2011-04-01

    The "Harlingen" IS6110 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) cluster has linked over 100 tuberculosis cases in The Netherlands since 1993. Four Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates that were epidemiologically linked to this cluster had different spoligotype patterns, as well as slightly divergent IS6110 profiles, compared to the majority of the isolates. Sequencing of the direct repeat (DR) locus revealed sequence polymorphisms at the putative deletion sites. These deletion footprints provided evidence for independent deletions of the central region of the DR locus in three isolates, while the different genotype of the fourth isolate was explained by transmission. Our finding suggests that convergent deletions in the DR locus occur frequently. However, deletion footprints are not suitable to detect convergent deletions in the DR because they seem to be exceptional. Deletion footprints in the DR were not described previously, and we did not observe them in any public M. tuberculosis complex sequences. We conclude that preferential deletions in the DR loci of closely related strains are usually an unnoted event that interferes with clustering of closely related strains. PMID:21325559

  15. Evolution and selection of Rhg1, a copy-number variant nematode-resistance locus

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tong Geon; Kumar, Indrajit; Diers, Brian W; Hudson, Matthew E

    2015-01-01

    The soybean cyst nematode (SCN) resistance locus Rhg1 is a tandem repeat of a 31.2 kb unit of the soybean genome. Each 31.2-kb unit contains four genes. One allele of Rhg1, Rhg1-b, is responsible for protecting most US soybean production from SCN. Whole-genome sequencing was performed, and PCR assays were developed to investigate allelic variation in sequence and copy number of the Rhg1 locus across a population of soybean germplasm accessions. Four distinct sequences of the 31.2-kb repeat unit were identified, and some Rhg1 alleles carry up to three different types of repeat unit. The total number of copies of the repeat varies from 1 to 10 per haploid genome. Both copy number and sequence of the repeat correlate with the resistance phenotype, and the Rhg1 locus shows strong signatures of selection. Significant linkage disequilibrium in the genome outside the boundaries of the repeat allowed the Rhg1 genotype to be inferred using high-density single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping of 15 996 accessions. Over 860 germplasm accessions were found likely to possess Rhg1 alleles. The regions surrounding the repeat show indications of non-neutral evolution and high genetic variability in populations from different geographic locations, but without evidence of fixation of the resistant genotype. A compelling explanation of these results is that balancing selection is in operation at Rhg1. PMID:25735447

  16. Changing Expectancies: A Counseling Model Based on Locus of Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connolly, Sean G.

    1980-01-01

    Presents counseling and communication techniques for giving external expectancies the internal direction necessary to facilitate behavior change. Locus of control expectancies provide a useful concept for assessing and influencing the behavior of unmotivated clients. (Author)

  17. Transcriptome and Allele Specificity Associated with a 3BL Locus for Fusarium Crown Rot Resistance in Bread Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jian; Stiller, Jiri; Zhao, Qiang; Feng, Qi; Cavanagh, Colin; Wang, Penghao; Gardiner, Donald; Choulet, Frédéric; Feuillet, Catherine; Zheng, You-Liang; Wei, Yuming; Yan, Guijun; Han, Bin; Manners, John M.; Liu, Chunji

    2014-01-01

    Fusarium pathogens cause two major diseases in cereals, Fusarium crown rot (FCR) and head blight (FHB). A large-effect locus conferring resistance to FCR disease was previously located to chromosome arm 3BL (designated as Qcrs-3B) and several independent sets of near isogenic lines (NILs) have been developed for this locus. In this study, five sets of the NILs were used to examine transcriptional changes associated with the Qcrs-3B locus and to identify genes linked to the resistance locus as a step towards the isolation of the causative gene(s). Of the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) detected between the NILs, 12.7% was located on the single chromosome 3B. Of the expressed genes containing SNP (SNP-EGs) detected, 23.5% was mapped to this chromosome. Several of the DEGs and SNP-EGs are known to be involved in host-pathogen interactions, and a large number of the DEGs were among those detected for FHB in previous studies. Of the DEGs detected, 22 were mapped in the Qcrs-3B interval and they included eight which were detected in the resistant isolines only. The enrichment of DEG, and not necessarily those containing SNPs between the resistant and susceptible isolines, around the Qcrs-3B locus is suggestive of local regulation of this region by the resistance allele. Functions for 13 of these DEGs are known. Of the SNP-EGs, 28 were mapped in the Qcrs-3B interval and biological functions for 16 of them are known. These results provide insights into responses regulated by the 3BL locus and identify a tractable number of target genes for fine mapping and functional testing to identify the causative gene(s) at this QTL. PMID:25405461

  18. Transcriptome and allele specificity associated with a 3BL locus for Fusarium crown rot resistance in bread wheat.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jian; Stiller, Jiri; Zhao, Qiang; Feng, Qi; Cavanagh, Colin; Wang, Penghao; Gardiner, Donald; Choulet, Frédéric; Feuillet, Catherine; Zheng, You-Liang; Wei, Yuming; Yan, Guijun; Han, Bin; Manners, John M; Liu, Chunji

    2014-01-01

    Fusarium pathogens cause two major diseases in cereals, Fusarium crown rot (FCR) and head blight (FHB). A large-effect locus conferring resistance to FCR disease was previously located to chromosome arm 3BL (designated as Qcrs-3B) and several independent sets of near isogenic lines (NILs) have been developed for this locus. In this study, five sets of the NILs were used to examine transcriptional changes associated with the Qcrs-3B locus and to identify genes linked to the resistance locus as a step towards the isolation of the causative gene(s). Of the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) detected between the NILs, 12.7% was located on the single chromosome 3B. Of the expressed genes containing SNP (SNP-EGs) detected, 23.5% was mapped to this chromosome. Several of the DEGs and SNP-EGs are known to be involved in host-pathogen interactions, and a large number of the DEGs were among those detected for FHB in previous studies. Of the DEGs detected, 22 were mapped in the Qcrs-3B interval and they included eight which were detected in the resistant isolines only. The enrichment of DEG, and not necessarily those containing SNPs between the resistant and susceptible isolines, around the Qcrs-3B locus is suggestive of local regulation of this region by the resistance allele. Functions for 13 of these DEGs are known. Of the SNP-EGs, 28 were mapped in the Qcrs-3B interval and biological functions for 16 of them are known. These results provide insights into responses regulated by the 3BL locus and identify a tractable number of target genes for fine mapping and functional testing to identify the causative gene(s) at this QTL. PMID:25405461

  19. Evaluation of High-Throughput Genomic Assays for the Fc Gamma Receptor Locus.

    PubMed

    Hargreaves, Chantal E; Iriyama, Chisako; Rose-Zerilli, Matthew J J; Nagelkerke, Sietse Q; Hussain, Khiyam; Ganderton, Rosalind; Lee, Charlotte; Machado, Lee R; Hollox, Edward J; Parker, Helen; Latham, Kate V; Kuijpers, Taco W; Potter, Kathleen N; Coupland, Sarah E; Davies, Andrew; Stackpole, Michael; Oates, Melanie; Pettitt, Andrew R; Glennie, Martin J; Cragg, Mark S; Strefford, Jonathan C

    2015-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy has been revolutionised by the use monoclonal antibodies (mAb) that function through their interaction with Fc gamma receptors (FcγRs). The low-affinity FcγR genes are highly homologous, map to a complex locus at 1p23 and harbour single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and copy number variation (CNV) that can impact on receptor function and response to therapeutic mAbs. This complexity can hinder accurate characterisation of the locus. We therefore evaluated and optimised a suite of assays for the genomic analysis of the FcγR locus amenable to peripheral blood mononuclear cells and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) material that can be employed in a high-throughput manner. Assessment of TaqMan genotyping for FCGR2A-131H/R, FCGR3A-158F/V and FCGR2B-232I/T SNPs demonstrated the need for additional methods to discriminate genotypes for the FCGR3A-158F/V and FCGR2B-232I/T SNPs due to sequence homology and CNV in the region. A multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification assay provided high quality SNP and CNV data in PBMC cases, but there was greater data variability in FFPE material in a manner that was predicted by the BIOMED-2 multiplex PCR protocol. In conclusion, we have evaluated a suite of assays for the genomic analysis of the FcγR locus that are scalable for application in large clinical trials of mAb therapy. These assays will ultimately help establish the importance of FcγR genetics in predicting response to antibody therapeutics. PMID:26545243

  20. Analysis of human chromosome 21 for a locus conferring susceptibility to Hirschsprung Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bolk, S.; Duggan, D.J.; Chakravarti, A.

    1994-09-01

    It has been estimated that approximately 5% of patients diagnosed with Hirschsprung disease (HSCR), or aganglionic megacolon, have trisomy 21. Since the incidence of Hirschsprung disease is 1/5000 live births and the incidence of trisomy 21 is approximately 1/1000 live births, the observed occurrence of HSCR in trisomy 21 is fifty times higher than expected. We propose that at least one locus on chromosome 21 predisposes to HSCR. Although at fifty times elevated risk, only 1% of Down Syndrome cases have HSCR. Thus additional genes or genetic events are necessary for HSCR to manifest in patients with trisomy 21. Based on segregation analysis, Badner et al. postulated that recessive genes may be responsible for up to 80% of HSCR. We postulate that at least one such gene is on chromosome 21 and increased homozygosity for common recessive HSCR mutations may be one cause for the elevated risk of HSCR in cases of trisomy 21. To map such a chromosome 21 locus, we are searching for segments of human chromosome 21 which are identical by descent from the parent in whom non-disjunction occurred. These segments will arise either from meiosis I (followed by a crossover between the centromere and the locus) or from meiosis II (followed by no crossovers). Nine nuclear families with a proband diagnosed with HSCR and Down Syndrome have been genotyped for 18 microsatellite markers spanning human chromosome 21q. In all nine cases analyzed thus far, trisomy 21 resulted from maternal non-disjunction at meiosis I. At this point no single IBD region is apparent. Therefore, additional families are being ascertained and additional markers at high density are being genotyped to map the HSCR locus.

  1. Evaluation of High-Throughput Genomic Assays for the Fc Gamma Receptor Locus

    PubMed Central

    Hargreaves, Chantal E.; Iriyama, Chisako; Rose-Zerilli, Matthew J. J.; Nagelkerke, Sietse Q.; Hussain, Khiyam; Ganderton, Rosalind; Lee, Charlotte; Machado, Lee R.; Hollox, Edward J.; Parker, Helen; Latham, Kate V.; Kuijpers, Taco W.; Potter, Kathleen N.; Coupland, Sarah E.; Davies, Andrew; Stackpole, Michael; Oates, Melanie; Pettitt, Andrew R.; Glennie, Martin J.; Cragg, Mark S.; Strefford, Jonathan C.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy has been revolutionised by the use monoclonal antibodies (mAb) that function through their interaction with Fc gamma receptors (FcγRs). The low-affinity FcγR genes are highly homologous, map to a complex locus at 1p23 and harbour single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and copy number variation (CNV) that can impact on receptor function and response to therapeutic mAbs. This complexity can hinder accurate characterisation of the locus. We therefore evaluated and optimised a suite of assays for the genomic analysis of the FcγR locus amenable to peripheral blood mononuclear cells and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) material that can be employed in a high-throughput manner. Assessment of TaqMan genotyping for FCGR2A-131H/R, FCGR3A-158F/V and FCGR2B-232I/T SNPs demonstrated the need for additional methods to discriminate genotypes for the FCGR3A-158F/V and FCGR2B-232I/T SNPs due to sequence homology and CNV in the region. A multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification assay provided high quality SNP and CNV data in PBMC cases, but there was greater data variability in FFPE material in a manner that was predicted by the BIOMED-2 multiplex PCR protocol. In conclusion, we have evaluated a suite of assays for the genomic analysis of the FcγR locus that are scalable for application in large clinical trials of mAb therapy. These assays will ultimately help establish the importance of FcγR genetics in predicting response to antibody therapeutics. PMID:26545243

  2. Genetic organization of the agouti region of the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Siracusa, L.D.; Russell, L.B.; Eicher, E.M.; Corrow, D.J.; Copeland, N.G.; Jenkins, N.A.

    1987-09-01

    The agouti locus on mouse chromosome 2 acts via the hair follicle to control the melanic type and distribution of hair pigments. The diverse phenotypes associated with various agouti mutations have led to speculation about the organization of the agouti locus. Earlier studies indicated that two presumed agouti alleles, lethal yellow (A/sup y/) and lethal light-bellied nonagouti (a/sup x/), are pseudoallelic. The authors present genetic data showing probable recombination between A/sup y/ and three agouti mutations (a/sup t/, a, and a/sup x/), which suggest that A/sup y/ is a pseudoallele of the agouti locus. The close linkage of an endogenous ecotropic murine leukemia provirus, Emv-15, to A/sup y/ provides a molecular access to genes at or near the agouti locus. However, previous studies suggested that the Emv-15 locus can recombine with some agouti alleles and therefore they analyzed mice from recombinant inbred strains and backcrosses to measure the genetic distance between various agouti alleles and the Emv-15 locus. The data indicate that the Emv-15 locus is less the 0.3 cM from the agouti locus. These experiments provide a conceptual framework for initiating chromosome walking experiments designed to retrieve sequences from the agouti locus and give new insight into the genetic organization of the agouti region.

  3. Two-locus linkage analysis in multiple sclerosis (MS)

    SciTech Connect

    Tienari, P.J. Univ. of Helsinki ); Terwilliger, J.D.; Ott, J. ); Palo, J. ); Peltonen, L. )

    1994-01-15

    One of the major challenges in genetic linkage analyses is the study of complex diseases. The authors demonstrate here the use of two-locus linkage analysis in multiple sclerosis (MS), a multifactorial disease with a complex mode of inheritance. In a set of Finnish multiplex families, they have previously found evidence for linkage between MS susceptibility and two independent loci, the myelin basic protein gene (MBP) on chromosome 18 and the HLA complex on chromosome 6. This set of families provides a unique opportunity to perform linkage analysis conditional on two loci contributing to the disease. In the two-trait-locus/two-marker-locus analysis, the presence of another disease locus is parametrized and the analysis more appropriately treats information from the unaffected family member than single-disease-locus analysis. As exemplified here in MS, the two-locus analysis can be a powerful method for investigating susceptibility loci in complex traits, best suited for analysis of specific candidate genes, or for situations in which preliminary evidence for linkage already exists or is suggested. 41 refs., 6 tabs.

  4. Fixation probability in a two-locus intersexual selection model.

    PubMed

    Durand, Guillermo; Lessard, Sabin

    2016-06-01

    We study a two-locus model of intersexual selection in a finite haploid population reproducing according to a discrete-time Moran model with a trait locus expressed in males and a preference locus expressed in females. We show that the probability of ultimate fixation of a single mutant allele for a male ornament introduced at random at the trait locus given any initial frequency state at the preference locus is increased by weak intersexual selection and recombination, weak or strong. Moreover, this probability exceeds the initial frequency of the mutant allele even in the case of a costly male ornament if intersexual selection is not too weak. On the other hand, the probability of ultimate fixation of a single mutant allele for a female preference towards a male ornament introduced at random at the preference locus is increased by weak intersexual selection and weak recombination if the female preference is not costly, and is strong enough in the case of a costly male ornament. The analysis relies on an extension of the ancestral recombination-selection graph for samples of haplotypes to take into account events of intersexual selection, while the symbolic calculation of the fixation probabilities is made possible in a reasonable time by an optimizing algorithm. PMID:27059474

  5. [Health locus of control of patients in disease management programmes].

    PubMed

    Schnee, M; Grikscheit, F

    2013-06-01

    Health locus of control beliefs plays a major role in improving self-management skills of the chronically ill - a main goal in disease management programmes (DMP). This study aims at characterising participants in disease management regarding their health locus of control. Data are based on 4 cross-sectional postal surveys between spring and autumn of 2006 and 2007 within the Health Care Monitor of the Bertelsmann Foundation. Among the 6 285 respondents, 1 266 are chronically ill and not enrolled in a DMP and 327 are participating in a DMP. A high internal locus of control (HLC) occurs significantly less often in DMP patients than in normal chronically ill patients (and healthy people) controlling for age, gender and social class. With increasing age, a high internal locus of control is also significantly less likely. When comparing healthy people, the chronically ill and the DMP participants a social gradient of a high internal locus of control belief can be observed. The weaker internal and higher doctor-related external locus of control of DMP participants should be carefully observed by the physician when trying to strengthen the patients' self-management skills. Evaluators of DMP should take into account the different baselines of DMP patients and relevant control groups and incorporate these differences into the evaluation. PMID:22864845

  6. Neurolinguistic programming training, trait anxiety, and locus of control.

    PubMed

    Konefal, J; Duncan, R C; Reese, M A

    1992-06-01

    Training in the neurolinguistic programming techniques of shifting perceptual position, visual-kinesthetic dissociation, timelines, and change-history, all based on experiential cognitive processing of remembered events, leads to an increased awareness of behavioral contingencies and a more sensitive recognition of environmental cues which could serve to lower trait anxiety and increase the sense of internal control. This study reports on within-person and between-group changes in trait anxiety and locus of control as measured on the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and Wallston, Wallston, and DeVallis' Multiple Health Locus of Control immediately following a 21-day residential training in neurolinguistic programming. Significant with-in-person decreases in trait-anxiety scores and increases in internal locus of control scores were observed as predicted. Chance and powerful other locus of control scores were unchanged. Significant differences were noted on trait anxiety and locus of control scores between European and U.S. participants, although change scores were similar for the two groups. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that this training may lower trait-anxiety scores and increase internal locus of control scores. A matched control group was not available, and follow-up was unfortunately not possible. PMID:1620774

  7. Complex patterns of intragenic polymorphism at the PDGFA locus.

    PubMed

    Bonthron, D T; Smith, S J; Campbell, R

    1999-11-01

    The human platelet-derived growth factor A chain gene (PDGFA) on chromosome 7p22 encodes an important mitogen. Within PDGFA lies a complex minisatellite structure that results in partial duplications of exon 4 and the IVS4 splice donor site. Here, we show that the PDGFA genes of four ape species and an Old-World monkey all have similar complex minisatellites at this position. Comparison of their structures suggests evolutionary constraints resulting from the protein-coding function of the minisatellite. Nonetheless, the IVS4 minisatellite seems to have undergone independent expansion events in different primate lineages. Within the human IVS4 minisatellite, an embedded pentanucleotide repeat, based on the sequence (CCTCC)n, shows frequent subunit sequence variation but only rare length polymorphism. In contrast, within IVS3 of human PDGFA, we have discovered a second minisatellite which, unlike the IVS4 minisatellite, is highly polymorphic. The subunit sequences of these two minisatellites, which lie less than 0.5 kb apart, are non-identical, but share a CnT-rich core. Two new single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), in exon 3 and IVS4, are in linkage disequilibrium, despite flanking the two minisatellite regions. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis of the exon 3 SNP in human foetal tissues demonstrated biallelic expression of PDGFA in all tissues examined. The unusual location of PDGFA exon 4 between two minisatellite sequences, together with its partial duplication, may have functional implications, particularly for the splicing of the gene. The high level of polymorphism demonstrated in this region will also be valuable for disease-association and linkage studies of the PDGFA locus. PMID:10598812

  8. Searching for a major locus for male pattern baldness (MPB)

    SciTech Connect

    Anker, R.; Eisen, A.Z.; Donis-Keller, H.

    1994-09-01

    Male pattern baldness (MPB) is a common trait in post-pubertal males. Approximately 50% of adult males present some degree of MPB by age 50. According to the classification provided by Hamilton in 1951 and modified by Norwood in 1975, the trait itself is a continuum that ranges from mild (Type I) to severe (Type VII) cases. In addition, there is extensive variability for the age of onset. The role of androgens in allowing the expression of this trait in males has been well established. This phenotype is uncommonly expressed in females. The high prevalence of the trait, the distribution of MPB as a continuous trait, and several non-allelic mutations identified in the mouse capable of affecting hair pattern, suggest that MPB is genetically heterogeneous. In order to reduce the probability of multiple non-allelic MPB genes within a pedigree, we selected 9 families in which MPB appears to segregate exclusively through the paternal lineage as compared to bilineal pedigrees. There are 32 males expressing this phenotype and females are treated as phenotype unknown. In general, affected individuals expressed the trait before 30 years of age with a severity of at least Type III or IV. We assumed an autosomal dominant model, with a gene frequency of 1/20 for the affected allele, and 90% penetrance. Simulation studies using the SLINK program with these pedigrees showed that these families would be sufficient to detect linkage under the assumption of a single major locus. If heterogeneity is present, the current resource does not have sufficient power to detect linkage at a statistically significant level, although candidate regions of the genome could be identified for further studies with additional pedigrees. Using 53 highly informative microsatellite markers, and a subset of 7 families, we have screened 30% of the genome. This search included several regions where candidate genes for MPB are located.

  9. Adenovirus cyt+ locus, which controls cell transformation and tumorigenicity, is an allele of lp+ locus, which codes for a 19-kilodalton tumor antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, T; Kuppuswamy, M; Mak, S; Chinnadurai, G

    1984-01-01

    The early region E1b of adenovirus type 2 (Ad2) codes for two major tumor antigens of 53 and 19 kilodaltons (kd). The adenovirus lp+ locus maps within the 19-kd tumor antigen-coding region (G. Chinnadurai, Cell 33:759-766, 1983). We have now constructed a large-plaque deletion mutant (dl250) of Ad2 that has a specific lesion in the 19-kd tumor antigen-coding region. In contrast to most other Ad2 lp mutants (G. Chinnadurai, Cell 33:759-766, 1983), mutant dl250 is cytocidal (cyt) on infected KB cells, causing extensive cellular destruction. Cells infected with Ad2 wt or most of these other Ad2 lp mutants are rounded and aggregated without cell lysis (cyt+). The cyt phenotype of dl250 resembles the cyt mutants of highly oncogenic Ad12, isolated by Takemori et al. (Virology 36:575-586, 1968). By intertypic complementation analysis, we showed that the Ad12 cyt mutants indeed map within the 19-kd tumor antigen-coding region. The transforming potential of dl250 was assayed on an established rat embryo fibroblast cell line, CREF, and on primary rat embryo fibroblasts and baby rat kidney cells. On all these cells, dl250 induced transformation at greatly reduced frequency compared with wt. The cells transformed by this mutant are defective in anchorage-independent growth on soft agar. Our results suggest that the 19-kd tumor antigen (in conjunction with E1a tumor antigens) may play an important role in the maintenance of cell transformation. Since we have mapped the low-oncogenic or nononcogenic Ad12 cyt mutants within the 19-kd tumor antigen-coding region, our results further indicate that the 19-kd tumor antigen also directly or indirectly plays an important role in tumorigenesis of Ad12. Our results show that the cyt+ locus is an allele of the lp+ locus and that the cyt phenotype may be the result of mutations in specific domains of the 19-kd tumor antigen. Images PMID:6492253

  10. Differential regulation of non-protein coding RNAs from Prader-Willi Syndrome locus

    PubMed Central

    Galiveti, Chenna R.; Raabe, Carsten A.; Konthur, Zoltán; Rozhdestvensky, Timofey S.

    2014-01-01

    Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS) is a neurogenetic disorder caused by the deletion of imprinted genes on the paternally inherited human chromosome 15q11-q13. This locus harbours a long non-protein-coding RNA (U-UBE3A-ATS) that contains six intron-encoded snoRNAs, including the SNORD116 and SNORD115 repetitive clusters. The 3′-region of U-UBE3A-ATS is transcribed in the cis-antisense direction to the ubiquitin-protein ligase E3A (UBE3A) gene. Deletion of the SNORD116 region causes key characteristics of PWS. There are few indications that SNORD115 might regulate serotonin receptor (5HT2C) pre-mRNA processing. Here we performed quantitative real-time expression analyses of RNAs from the PWS locus across 20 human tissues and combined it with deep-sequencing data derived from Cap Analysis of Gene Expression (CAGE-seq) libraries. We found that the expression profiles of SNORD64, SNORD107, SNORD108 and SNORD116 are similar across analyzed tissues and correlate well with SNORD116 embedded U-UBE3A-ATS exons (IPW116). Notable differences in expressions between the aforementioned RNAs and SNORD115 together with the host IPW115 and UBE3A cis-antisense exons were observed. CAGE-seq analysis revealed the presence of potential transcriptional start sites originated from the U-UBE3A-ATS spanning region. Our findings indicate novel aspects for the expression regulation in the PWS locus. PMID:25246219

  11. Fine mapping of the celiac disease-associated LPP locus reveals a potential functional variant

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Rodrigo; Ricaño-Ponce, Isis; Kumar, Vinod; Deelen, Patrick; Szperl, Agata; Trynka, Gosia; Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; Kanterakis, Alexandros; Westra, Harm-Jan; Franke, Lude; Swertz, Morris A.; Platteel, Mathieu; Bilbao, Jose Ramon; Barisani, Donatella; Greco, Luigi; Mearin, Luisa; Wolters, Victorien M.; Mulder, Chris; Mazzilli, Maria Cristina; Sood, Ajit; Cukrowska, Bozena; Núñez, Concepción; Pratesi, Riccardo; Withoff, Sebo; Wijmenga, Cisca

    2014-01-01

    Using the Immunochip for genotyping, we identified 39 non-human leukocyte antigen (non-HLA) loci associated to celiac disease (CeD), an immune-mediated disease with a worldwide frequency of ∼1%. The most significant non-HLA signal mapped to the intronic region of 70 kb in the LPP gene. Our aim was to fine map and identify possible functional variants in the LPP locus. We performed a meta-analysis in a cohort of 25 169 individuals from six different populations previously genotyped using Immunochip. Imputation using data from the Genome of the Netherlands and 1000 Genomes projects, followed by meta-analysis, confirmed the strong association signal on the LPP locus (rs2030519, P = 1.79 × 10−49), without any novel associations. The conditional analysis on this top SNP-indicated association to a single common haplotype. By performing haplotype analyses in each population separately, as well as in a combined group of the four populations that reach the significant threshold after correction (P < 0.008), we narrowed down the CeD-associated region from 70 to 2.8 kb (P = 1.35 × 10−44). By intersecting regulatory data from the ENCODE project, we found a functional SNP, rs4686484 (P = 3.12 × 10−49), that maps to several B-cell enhancer elements and a highly conserved region. This SNP was also predicted to change the binding motif of the transcription factors IRF4, IRF11, Nkx2.7 and Nkx2.9, suggesting its role in transcriptional regulation. We later found significantly low levels of LPP mRNA in CeD biopsies compared with controls, thus our results suggest that rs4686484 is the functional variant in this locus, while LPP expression is decreased in CeD. PMID:24334606

  12. Chromosome walking on the TCL1 locus involved in T-cell neoplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Virgilio, L.; Narducci, M.G.; Carotenuto, P.; Camerini, B.; Russo, G. ); Isobe, Masaharu; Kurosawa, Nobuyuki ); Rushdi, A.A.; Croce, C.M. )

    1993-10-15

    The TCL1 locus on chromosome 14 band q32.1 is frequently involved in the chromosomal translocations and inversions with the T-cell receptor genes observed in several T-cell tumors, including T-prolymphocytic leukemias, acute and chronic leukemias associated with the immunodeficiency syndrome ataxia-telangiectasia, and adult T-cell leukemia. All breakpoints cloned in this area have been mapped to 14q32.1, an area distant [approximately]10,000 kb from the immunoglobulin heavy-chain gene locus on chromosome 14q band 32.3. Except for two cases of inversion, no physical linkage of the cloned breakpoints has been reported, nor has a gene been identified in this region. Taking advantage of chromosome-walking techniques and of the P1 phage, the authors cloned and characterized 450 kb of the germ-line TCL1 locus, starting from the breakpoints of two independent T-cell leukemias. The authors show that all molecular rearrangements characterized so far map to these clones, indicating not only that this region is the target of chromosomal rearrangements occurring in this area but also that both inversion and translocations occur within a 300-kb region in the T-cell leukemias. In the attempt to identify a candidate oncogene responsible for the malignant transformation, a CpG island centromeric to the inversions and to the translocations has been identified. Two probes near the CpG island have detected sequences conserved among species, as well as two transcripts in the K562 human erythroleukemia cell line. On the basis of these data, a model of activation of the putative TCL1 oncogene is suggested. 30 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Chromosome walking on the TCL1 locus involved in T-cell neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Virgilio, L; Isobe, M; Narducci, M G; Carotenuto, P; Camerini, B; Kurosawa, N; Abbas-ar-Rushdi; Croce, C M; Russo, G

    1993-01-01

    The TCL1 locus on chromosome 14 band q32.1 is frequently involved in the chromosomal translocations and inversions with the T-cell receptor genes observed in several T-cell tumors, including T-prolymphocytic leukemias, acute and chronic leukemias associated with the immunodeficiency syndrome ataxia-telangiectasia, and adult T-cell leukemia. All breakpoints cloned in this area have been mapped to 14q32.1, an area distant approximately 10,000 kb from the immunoglobulin heavy-chain gene locus on chromosome 14q band 32.3. Except for two cases of inversion, no physical linkage of the cloned breakpoints has been reported, nor has a gene been identified in this region. Taking advantage of chromosome-walking techniques and of the P1 phage, we cloned and characterized 450 kb of the germ-line TCL1 locus, starting from the breakpoints of two independent T-cell leukemias. We show that all molecular rearrangements characterized so far map to these clones, indicating not only that this region is the target of chromosomal rearrangements occurring in this area but also that both inversion and translocations occur within a 300-kb region in the T-cell leukemias. In the attempt to identify a candidate oncogene responsible for the malignant transformation, a CpG island centromeric to the inversions and to the translocations has been identified. Two probes near the CpG island have detected sequences conserved among species, as well as two transcripts in the K562 human erythroleukemia cell line. On the basis of these data, a model of activation of the putative TCL1 oncogene is suggested. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8415691

  14. Positional cloning of the chromosome 14 Alzheimer`s disease locus

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R.F.; Korenblat, K.M.; Goate, A.M.

    1994-09-01

    Genetic linkage analysis had indicated a locus for familial early-onset Alzheimer`s disease (FAD) on chromosome 14 at q24.3. The FAD locus has been shown previously to lie between the dinucleotide markers D14S61 and D14S63, a genetic distance of approximately 13 cM. We are currently attempting to identify the gene using a positional cloning strategy. The first step towards the isolation and characterization of this locus was the construction of an overlapping YAC contig covering the entire region. Over forty YACs which map to this region have been isolated from the St. Louis and CEPH libraries by a combination of YAC end sequence walking and sequence tagged site mapping. Our contig fully spans the complete domain, encompassing all genetic markers non-recombinant with FAD (i.e. D14S76, D14S43, D14S71, D14S77) and the two nearest flanking FAD-recombinant markers. With restriction mapping of the domain, we can determine the exact size of the region. As a second step, the YACs in this contig are currently being inspected for expressed sequences by exon trapping, initially on those YACs known to be nonchimeric. We have currently made exon-trapped libraries from YACs that have the markers D14S76 and D14S43. Sequence analysis of these libraries indicates that a trapped exon is identified on average for each 30 kb of YAC DNA. The trapped exons are being screened to identify likely candidate genes, which will be examined for mutations in FAD families.

  15. Identification of Potentially Pathogenic Variants in the Posterior Polymorphous Corneal Dystrophy 1 Locus

    PubMed Central

    Le, Derek J.; Chung, Duk-Won D.; Frausto, Ricardo F.; Kim, Michelle J.; Aldave, Anthony J.

    2016-01-01

    Posterior polymorphous corneal dystrophy 1 (PPCD1) is a genetic disorder that affects corneal endothelial cell function and leads to loss of visual acuity. PPCD1 has been linked to a locus on chromosome 20 in multiple families; however, Sanger sequencing of protein-coding genes in the consensus region failed to identify any causative missense mutations. In this study, custom capture probes were utilized for targeted next-generation sequencing of the linked region in a previously reported family with PPCD1. Variants were detected through two bioinformatics pipelines and filtered according to multiple criteria. Additionally, a high-resolution microarray was used to detect copy number variations. No non-synonymous variants in the protein-coding region of annotated genes were identified. However, 12 single nucleotide variants in 10 genes, and 9 indels in 7 genes met the filtering criteria and were considered candidate variants for PPCD1. Eleven single nucleotide variants were confirmed by Sanger sequencing, including 2 synonymous variants and 9 non-coding variants, in 9 genes. One microdeletion was detected in an intron of OVOL2 by microarray but was subsequently not identified by PCR. Using a comprehensive next-generation sequencing approach, a total of 16 genes containing single nucleotide variants or indels that segregated with the affected phenotype in an affected family previously mapped to the PPCD1 locus were identified. Screening of these candidate genes in other families previously mapped to the PPCD1 locus will likely result in the identification of the genetic basis of PPCD1. PMID:27355326

  16. Elucidation of Molecular Identity of the W3 Locus and Its Implication in Determination of Flower Colors in Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Park, Gyu Tae; Sundaramoorthy, Jagadeesh; Lee, Jeong-Dong; Kim, Jeong Hoe; Seo, Hak Soo; Song, Jong Tae

    2015-01-01

    The wide range of flower colors in soybean is controlled by six independent loci (W1, W2, W3, W4, Wm, and Wp). Among these loci, mutations in the W3 locus under the w4 allelic background (i.e., w3w4) produce near-white flowers, while the W3w4 genotype produces purple throat flowers. Although a gene encoding dihydroflavonol 4-reductase, DFR1, has been known to be closely associated with the W3 locus, its molecular identity has not yet been characterized. In the present study, we aimed to determine whether DFR1 is responsible for allelic variations in the W3 locus. On the basis of the sequence of a DFR probe, Glyma.14G072700 was identified as a candidate gene for DFR1, and nucleotide sequences of Glyma.14G072700 from cultivars with previously validated genotypes for the W3 locus were determined. As a result, a number of nucleotide polymorphisms, mainly single-base substitutions, between both coding and 5′-upstream region sequences of the W3 and w3 alleles were identified. Among them, an indel of 311-bp in the 5′-upstream region was noteworthy, since the Glyma.14G072700 in all the w3 alleles examined contained the indel, whereas that in all the W3 alleles did not; the former was barely expressed, but the latter was well expressed. These results suggest that Glyma.14G072700 is likely to correspond to DFR1 for the W3 locus and that its expression patterns may lead to allelic color phenotypes of W3 and w3 alleles under the w4 allelic background. PMID:26555888

  17. Vapor-liquid equilibrium, coexistence curve, and critical locus for difluoromethane + pentafluoroethane (R-32 + R-125)

    SciTech Connect

    Higashi, Yukihiro

    1997-11-01

    The vapor-liquid equilibrium for difluoromethane + pentafluoroethane (R-32 + R-125) was measured by the static method in the temperature range between 283 K and 313 K. The vapor-liquid coexistence curve near the critical point was measured by the observation of the meniscus disappearance. The critical temperatures and critical densities of a 30 mass % R-32 and a 60 mass % R-32 mixture were determined on the basis of the saturation densities along the coexistence curve in the critical region. In addition, the critical locus for the R-32 + R-125 mixture is correlated as the function of composition.

  18. Molecular analysis of radiation-induced albino (c)-locus mutations that cause death at preimplantation stages of development

    SciTech Connect

    Rinchik, E.M. ); Toenjes, R.R.; Paul, D. ); Potter, M.D. )

    1993-12-01

    Deletion mutations at the albino (c) locus have been useful for continuing the development of fine-structure physical and functional maps of the Fes-Hbb region of mouse chromosome 7. This report describes the molecular analysis of a number of radiation-induced c deletions that, when homozygous, cause death of the embryo during preimplantation stages. The distal extent of these deletions defines a locus, pid, (preimplantation development) genetically associated with this phenotype. The proximal breakpoints of eight of these deletions were mapped with respect to the Tyr (tyrosinase; albino) gene as well as to anonymous loci within the Fah-Tyr region that are defined by the Pmv-31 viral integration site and by chromosome-microdissection clones. Rearrangements corresponding to the proximal breakpoints of two of these deletions were detected by Southern blot analysis, and a size-altered restriction fragment carrying the breakpoint of one of them was cloned. A probe derived from this deletion fusion fragment defines a locus, D7Rn6, which maps within (or distal to) the pid region, and which discriminates among the distal extents of deletions eliciting the pid phenotype. Extension of physical maps from D7Rn6 should provide access both to the pid region and to loci mapping distal to pid that are defined by N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced lethal mutations. 36 refs., 10 figs.

  19. Fine mapping and resequencing of the PARK16 locus in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Pihlstrøm, Lasse; Rengmark, Aina; Bjørnarå, Kari Anne; Dizdar, Nil; Fardell, Camilla; Forsgren, Lars; Holmberg, Björn; Larsen, Jan Petter; Linder, Jan; Nissbrandt, Hans; Tysnes, Ole-Bjørn; Dietrichs, Espen; Toft, Mathias

    2015-07-01

    The PARK16 locus, spanning five genes on chromosome 1, was among the first genetic regions to show genome-wide association in Parkinson's disease (PD). Subsequent investigations have found variability in PARK16 top-hits and association patterns across populations, and the implicated genes and mechanisms are currently unclear. In the present study, we aimed to explore the contribution of PARK16 variability to PD risk in a Scandinavian population. We genotyped 17 single-nucleotide polymorphisms in a case-control sample set of 2570 individuals from Norway and Sweden to fine map the locus. Targeted resequencing of the full coding regions of SLC45A3, NUCKS1, RAB7L1, SLC41A1 and PM20D1 was performed in DNA pools from a subset of 387 patient samples. We find evidence for an association with PD for rs1775143 as well as a haplotype located around the 5' region of RAB7L1, implicating variants which are not in high linkage disequilibrium with the strongest signal from a recent large meta-analysis in Caucasians. We also provide suggestive support for epistasis between RAB7L1 and LRRK2 as previously hypothesized by others. Comparing our results with previous work, allelic heterogeneity at PARK16 appears likely, and further studies are warranted to disentangle the complex patterns of association and pinpoint the functionally relevant variants. PMID:25855069

  20. Refinement of the spinal muscular atrophy locus by genetic and physical mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.H.; Kleyn, P.W.; Vitale, E.; Ross, B.M.; Xu, J.; Carter, T.A.; Brzustowicz, L.M.; Obici, S.; Lien, L.; Selig, S.

    1995-01-01

    We report the mapping and characterization of 12 microsatellite markers including 11 novel markers. All markers were generated from overlapping YAC clones that span the spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) locus. PCR amplification of 32 overlapping YAC clones show that 9 of the new markers (those set in italics) map to the interval between the two previous closest flanking markers (D5S629 and D5S557):cen - D5S6 - D5S125 - D5S435 - D5S1407 - D5S629 - D5S1410 - D5S1411/D5S1412 - D5S1413 - D5S1414 - D5Z8 - D5Z9 - CATT1 - D5Z10/D5Z6 - D5S557 - D5S1408 - D5S1409 - D5S637 - D5S351 - MAP1B - tel. Four of these new markers detect multiple loci in and out of the SMA gene region. Genetic analysis of recombinant SMA families indicates that D5S1413 is a new proximal flanking locus for the SMA gene. Interestingly, among the 40 physically mapped loci, the 14 multilocus markers map contiguously to a genomic region that overlaps, and perhaps helps define, the minimum genetic region encompassing the SMA gene(s). 24 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Three-dimensional parameterization of the stellar locus with application to QSO color selection

    SciTech Connect

    Newberg, H.J.; Yanny, B.

    1997-11-01

    A straightforward method for parameterizing and visualizing a locus of points in n-space is presented. The algorithm applies directly to the problem of distinguishing QSOs from Galactic stars in multicolor space. When applied to an existing four-filter data set (photometric errors of {sigma}{approximately}0.1mag and B{sub J}{approx_lt}21.5), it recovers 95{percent} of the known QSOs, with 76{percent} of the candidate sources yielding QSOs. If only the non{endash}ultraviolet excess candidates are considered, it recovers 69{percent} of the 13 known QSOs, with 47{percent} of the candidate sources yielding QSOs. The completeness and efficiency will differ depending on the depth and accuracy of the photometric data. The algorithm scales well to large data sets and allows astrophysical information about the location of QSOs in color space to be easily added to improve efficiency. Three-dimensional visualization of the high-accuracy photometry ({sigma}{lt}0.01mag) of the Catalogue of {ital WBVR} Magnitudes of Northern Sky Bright Stars (V{lt}7.2) yields the first look at the intrinsic width in the Galactic star color distribution. The stellar locus is found to populate a ribbon-like subset of color-color-color space. In the G to early-K star region, the cross section of the stellar locus has a FWHM of 0.07 mag in the wide direction. We attribute the majority of the width to metallicity differences between the stars, although there may be some contribution from other sources such as differential reddening. The FWHM in the thin direction is 0.03 mag or less. The locus is parameterized from late-B stars through M stars. We reproduce the metallicities of 64 F and G dwarfs with an rms error of 0.13. The distribution of bright stars along the locus is also presented. The algorithm can be applied to parameterize any one-dimensional set of data that is distributed in n-dimensional space. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Astronomical Society}

  2. Evidence for meiotic drive at the myotonic dystrophy locus

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, A.M.; Barnetson, R.A.; Phillips, M.F.

    1994-09-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM), an autosomal dominant disorder, is the most common form of adult muscular dystrophy, affecting at least 1 in 8000 of the population. It is a multisystemic disorder, primarily characterized by myotonia, muscle wasting and cataract. The molecular basis of DM is an expanded CTG repeat located within the 3{prime} untranslated region of a putative serine-threonine protein kinase on chromosome 19q13.3. DM exhibits anticipation, that is, with successive generations there is increasing disease severity and earlier age of onset. This mechanism and the fact that the origin of the disease has been attributed to one or a small number of founder chromosomes suggests that, in time, DM should die out. Meiotic drive has been described as a way in which certain alleles are transmitted to succeeding generations in preference to others: preferential transmission of large CTG alleles may account for their continued existence in the gene pool. There is evidence that a CTG allele with > 19 repeats may gradually increase in repeat number over many generations until it is sufficiently large to give a DM phenotype. We report a study of 495 transmissions from individuals heterozygous for the CTG repeat and with repeat numbers within the normal range (5-30). Alleles were simply classified as large or small relative to the other allele in an individual. Of 242 male meioses, 126 transmissions from parent to child were of the larger allele to their offspring (57.7%, p=0.014). This shows that there is strong evidence for meiotic drive favoring the transmission of the larger DM allele in unaffected individuals. Contrary to a previous report of meiotic drive in the male, we have shown that females preferentially transmit the larger DM allele. Taken together, the data suggest the occurrence of meiotic drive in both males and females in this locus.

  3. Bardet-Biedl syndrome: Mapping of a new locus to chromosome 3 and fine-mapping of the chromosome 16 linked locus

    SciTech Connect

    Kwitek-Black, A.E.; Rokhlina, T.; Nishimura, D.Y.

    1994-09-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorder characterized by mental retardation, post-axial polydactyly, obesity, retinitis pigmentosa, and hypogonadism. Other features of this disease include renal and cardiovascular abnormalities and an increased incidence of hypertension and diabetes mellitus. The molecular etiology for BBS is not known. We previously linked BBS to chromosome 16q13 in a large inbred Bedouin family, and excluded this locus in a second large inbred Bedouin family. We now report linkage of this second family to markers on chromosome 3q, proving non-allelic, genetic heterogeneity in the Bedouin population. A third large inbred Bedouin family was excluded from the 3q and 16q BBS loci. In addition to the identification of a new BBS locus on chromosome 3, we have identified and utilized additional short tandem repeat polymorphisms (STRPs) in the 16q BBS region to narrow the candidate interval to 3 cM. Additional recombinant individuals will allow further refinement of the interval. Identification of genes causing BBS has the potential to provide insight into diverse genetic traits and disease processes including obesity, hypertension, diabetes, retinal degeneration, and abnormal limb, renal and cardiac development.

  4. Locus equations are an acoustic expression of articulator synergy

    PubMed Central

    Iskarous, Khalil; Fowler, Carol A.; Whalen, D. H.

    2010-01-01

    The study investigated the articulatory basis of locus equations, regression lines relating F2 at the start of a Consonant-Vowel (CV) transition to F2 at the middle of the vowel, with C fixed and V varying. Several studies have shown that consonants of different places of articulation have locus equation slopes that descend from labial to velar to alveolar, and intercept magnitudes that increase in the opposite order. Using formulas from the theory of bivariate regression that express regression slopes and intercepts in terms of standard deviations and averages of the variables, it is shown that the slope directly encodes a well-established measure of coarticulation resistance. It is also shown that intercepts are directly related to the degree to which the tongue body assists the formation of the constriction for the consonant. Moreover, it is shown that the linearity of locus equations and the linear relation between locus equation slopes and intercepts originates in linearity in articulation between the horizontal position of the tongue dorsum in the consonant and to that in the vowel. It is concluded that slopes and intercepts of acoustic locus equations are measures of articulator synergy. PMID:20968373

  5. Prostate cancer risk locus at 8q24 as a regulatory hub by physical interactions with multiple genomic loci across the genome

    PubMed Central

    Du, Meijun; Yuan, Tiezheng; Schilter, Kala F.; Dittmar, Rachel L.; Mackinnon, Alexander; Huang, Xiaoyi; Tschannen, Michael; Worthey, Elizabeth; Jacob, Howard; Xia, Shu; Gao, Jianzhong; Tillmans, Lori; Lu, Yan; Liu, Pengyuan; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Wang, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome 8q24 locus contains regulatory variants that modulate genetic risk to various cancers including prostate cancer (PC). However, the biological mechanism underlying this regulation is not well understood. Here, we developed a chromosome conformation capture (3C)-based multi-target sequencing technology and systematically examined three PC risk regions at the 8q24 locus and their potential regulatory targets across human genome in six cell lines. We observed frequent physical contacts of this risk locus with multiple genomic regions, in particular, inter-chromosomal interaction with CD96 at 3q13 and intra-chromosomal interaction with MYC at 8q24. We identified at least five interaction hot spots within the predicted functional regulatory elements at the 8q24 risk locus. We also found intra-chromosomal interaction genes PVT1, FAM84B and GSDMC and inter-chromosomal interaction gene CXorf36 in most of the six cell lines. Other gene regions appeared to be cell line-specific, such as RRP12 in LNCaP, USP14 in DU-145 and SMIN3 in lymphoblastoid cell line. We further found that the 8q24 functional domains more likely interacted with genomic regions containing genes enriched in critical pathways such as Wnt signaling and promoter motifs such as E2F1 and TCF3. This result suggests that the risk locus may function as a regulatory hub by physical interactions with multiple genes important for prostate carcinogenesis. Further understanding genetic effect and biological mechanism of these chromatin interactions will shed light on the newly discovered regulatory role of the risk locus in PC etiology and progression. PMID:25149474

  6. Evidence that the penetrance of mutations at the RP11 locus causing dominant retinitis pigmentosa is influenced by a gene linked to the homologous RP11 allele.

    PubMed Central

    McGee, T L; Devoto, M; Ott, J; Berson, E L; Dryja, T P

    1997-01-01

    A subset of families with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (RP) display reduced penetrance with some asymptomatic gene carriers showing no retinal abnormalities by ophthalmic examination or by electroretinography. Here we describe a study of three families with reduced-penetrance RP. In all three families the disease gene appears to be linked to chromosome 19q13.4, the region containing the RP11 locus, as defined by previously reported linkage studies based on five other reduced-penetrance families. Meiotic recombinants in one of the newly identified RP11 families and in two of the previously reported families serve to restrict the disease locus to a 6-cM region bounded by markers D19S572 and D19S926. We also compared the disease status of RP11 carriers with the segregation of microsatellite alleles within 19q13.4 from the noncarrier parents in the newly reported and the previously reported families. The results support the hypothesis that wild-type alleles at the RP11 locus or at a closely linked locus inherited from the noncarrier parents are a major factor influencing the penetrance of pathogenic alleles at this locus. PMID:9345108

  7. DNA Loss at the Ceratocystis fimbriata Mating Locus Results in Self-Sterility

    PubMed Central

    Wilken, P. Markus; Steenkamp, Emma T.; Wingfield, Michael J.; de Beer, Z. Wilhelm; Wingfield, Brenda D.

    2014-01-01

    Fungi have evolved a remarkable diversity of reproductive strategies. Some of these, most notably those of the model fungi, have been well studied but others are poorly understood. The latter is also true for uni-directional mating type switching, which has been reported in only five fungal genera, including Ceratocystis. Mating type switching allows a self-fertile fungal isolate to produce both self-fertile and self-sterile offspring. This study considered the molecular nature of uni-directional mating type switching in the type species of Ceratocystis, C. fimbriata. To do this, the genome of C. fimbriata was first examined for the presence of mating type genes. Three mating genes (MAT1-1-1, MAT1-2-1 and MAT1-1-2) were found in an atypical organisation of the mating type locus. To study the effect that uni-directional switching has on this locus, several self-sterile offspring were analysed. Using a combination of next generation and conventional Sanger sequencing, it was shown that a 3581 base pair (bp) region had been completely deleted from the MAT locus. This deletion, which includes the entire MAT1-2-1 gene, results in the permanent loss of self-fertility, rendering these isolates exclusively self-sterile. Our data also suggest that the deletion mechanism is tightly controlled and that it always occurs at the same genomic position. Two 260 bp direct repeats flanking the deleted region are strongly implicated in the process, although the exact mechanism behind the switching remains unclear. PMID:24651494

  8. Functional Analysis of the Quorum-Sensing Streptococcal Invasion Locus (sil)

    PubMed Central

    Belotserkovsky, Ilia; Baruch, Moshe; Peer, Asaf; Dov, Eran; Ravins, Miriam; Mishalian, Inbal; Persky, Merav; Smith, Yoav; Hanski, Emanuel

    2009-01-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) causes a wide variety of human diseases, and at the same time, GAS can also circulate without producing symptoms, similar to its close commensal relative, group G streptococcus (GGS). We previously identified, by transposon-tagged mutagenesis, the streptococcal invasion locus (sil). sil is a quorum-sensing regulated locus which is activated by the autoinducer peptide SilCR through the two-component system SilA-SilB. Here we characterize the DNA promoter region necessary for SilA-mediated activation. This site is composed of two direct repeats of 10 bp, separated by a spacer of 11 bp. Fusion of this site to gfp allowed us to systematically introduce single-base substitutions in the repeats region and to assess the relative contribution of various positions to promoter strength. We then developed an algorithm giving different weights to these positions, and performed a chromosome-wide bioinformatics search which was validated by transcriptome analysis. We identified 13 genes, mostly bacteriocin related, that are directly under the control of SilA. Having developed the ability to quantify SilCR signaling via GFP accumulation prompted us to search for GAS and GGS strains that sense and produce SilCR. While the majority of GAS strains lost sil, all GGS strains examined still possess the locus and ∼63% are able to respond to exogenously added SilCR. By triggering the autoinduction circle using a minute concentration of synthetic SilCR, we identified GAS and GGS strains that are capable of sensing and naturally producing SilCR, and showed that SilCR can be sensed across these streptococci species. These findings suggest that sil may be involved in colonization and establishment of commensal host-bacterial relationships. PMID:19893632

  9. Pseudohypoparathyroidism Type Ib Associated with Novel Duplications in the GNAS Locus

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Nanclares, Gustavo; Velayos, Teresa; Vela, Amaya; Muñoz-Torres, Manuel; Castaño, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Context Pseudohypoparathyroidism type 1b (PHP-Ib) is characterized by renal resistance to PTH (and, sometimes, a mild resistance to TSH) and absence of any features of Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy. Patients with PHP-Ib suffer of defects in the methylation pattern of the complex GNAS locus. PHP-Ib can be either sporadic or inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern. Whereas familial PHP-Ib is well characterized at the molecular level, the genetic cause of sporadic PHP-Ib cases remains elusive, although some molecular mechanisms have been associated with this subtype. Objective The aim of the study was to investigate the molecular and imprinting defects in the GNAS locus in two unrelated patients with PHP-Ib. Design We have analyzed the GNAS locus by direct sequencing, Methylation-Specific Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification, microsatellites, Quantitative Multiplex PCR of Short Fluorescent fragments and array-Comparative Genomic Hybridization studies in order to characterize two unrelated families with clinical features of PHP-Ib. Results We identified two duplications in the GNAS region in two patients with PHP-Ib: one of them, comprising ∼320 kb, occurred ‘de novo’ in the patient, whereas the other one, of ∼179 kb in length, was inherited from the maternal allele. In both cases, no other known genetic cause was observed. Conclusion In this article, we describe the to-our-knowledge biggest duplications reported so far in the GNAS region. Both are associated to PHP-Ib, one of them occurring ‘de novo’ and the other one being maternally inherited. PMID:25710380

  10. Fine-mapping the POLL locus in Brahman cattle yields the diagnostic marker CSAFG29.

    PubMed

    Mariasegaram, Maxy; Harrison, Blair E; Bolton, Jennifer A; Tier, Bruce; Henshall, John M; Barendse, William; Prayaga, Kishore C

    2012-12-01

    The POLL locus has been mapped to the centromeric region of bovine chromosome 1 (BTA1) in both taurine breeds and taurine-indicine crosses in an interval of approximately 1 Mb. It has not yet been mapped in pure-bred zebu cattle. Despite several efforts, neither causative mutations in candidate genes nor a singular diagnostic DNA marker has been identified. In this study, we genotyped a total of 68 Brahman cattle and 20 Hereford cattle informative for the POLL locus for 33 DNA microsatellites, 16 of which we identified de novo from the bovine genome sequence, mapping the POLL locus to the region of the genes IFNAR2 and SYNJ1. The 303-bp allele of the new microsatellite, CSAFG29, showed strong association with the POLL allele. We then genotyped 855 Brahman cattle for CSAFG29 and confirmed the association between the 303-bp allele and POLL. To determine whether the same association was found in taurine breeds, we genotyped 334 animals of the Angus, Hereford and Limousin breeds and 376 animals of the Brangus, Droughtmaster and Santa Gertrudis composite taurine-zebu breeds. The association between the 303-bp allele and POLL was confirmed in these breeds; however, an additional allele (305 bp) was also associated but not fully predictive of POLL. Across the data, CSAFG29 was in sufficient linkage disequilibrium to the POLL allele in Australian Brahman cattle that it could potentially be used as a diagnostic marker in that breed, but this may not be the case in other breeds. Further, we provide confirmatory evidence that the scur phenotype generally occurs in animals that are heterozygous for the POLL allele. PMID:22497221

  11. Genetic homogeneity of Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease: Tight linkage to the proteolipoprotein locus in 16 affected families

    SciTech Connect

    Boespflug-Tanguy, O.; Mimault, C.; Cavagna, A.; Giraud, G.; Dastugue, B.; Melki, J.; Dinh, D.P.; Dautigny, A.

    1994-09-01

    Among the numerous leukodystrophies that have an early onset and no biochemical markers, Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) is one that can be identified using strict clinical criteria and demonstrating an abnormal formation of myelin that is restricted to the CNS in electrophysiological studies and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In PMD, 12 different base substitutions and one total deletion of the genomic region containing the PLP gene have been reported, but, despite extensive analysis, PLP exon mutations have been found in only 10%-25% of the families analyzed. To test the genetic homogeneity of this disease, the authors have carried out linkage analysis with polymorphic markers of the PLP genomic region in 16 families selected on strict diagnostic criteria of PMD. They observed a tight linkage of the PMD locus with markers of the PLP gene (cDNA PLP, exon IV polymorphism) and of the Xq22 region (DXS17, DXS94, and DXS287), whereas the markers located more proximally (DXYS1X and DXS3) or distally (DXS11) were not linked to the PMD locus. Multipoint analysis gave a maximal location score for the PMD locus (13.98) and the PLP gene (8.32) in the same interval between DXS94 and DXS287, suggesting that in all families PMD is linked to the PLP locus. Mutations of the extraexonic PLP gene sequences or of another unknown close gene could be involved in PMD. In an attempt to identify molecular defects of this genomic region that are responsible for PMD, these results meant that RFLP analysis could be used to improve genetic counseling for the numerous affected families in which a PLP exon mutation could not be demonstrated. 39 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Genome Wide Single Locus Single Trait, Multi-Locus and Multi-Trait Association Mapping for Some Important Agronomic Traits in Common Wheat (T. aestivum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Vandana; Gahlaut, Vijay; Meher, Prabina Kumar; Mir, Reyazul Rouf; Jaiswal, Jai Prakash; Rao, Atmakuri Ramakrishna; Balyan, Harindra Singh; Gupta, Pushpendra Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Genome wide association study (GWAS) was conducted for 14 agronomic traits in wheat following widely used single locus single trait (SLST) approach, and two recent approaches viz. multi locus mixed model (MLMM), and multi-trait mixed model (MTMM). Association panel consisted of 230 diverse Indian bread wheat cultivars (released during 1910–2006 for commercial cultivation in different agro-climatic regions in India). Three years phenotypic data for 14 traits and genotyping data for 250 SSR markers (distributed across all the 21 wheat chromosomes) was utilized for GWAS. Using SLST, as many as 213 MTAs (p ≤ 0.05, 129 SSRs) were identified for 14 traits, however, only 10 MTAs (~9%; 10 out of 123 MTAs) qualified FDR criteria; these MTAs did not show any linkage drag. Interestingly, these genomic regions were coincident with the genomic regions that were already known to harbor QTLs for same or related agronomic traits. Using MLMM and MTMM, many more QTLs and markers were identified; 22 MTAs (19 QTLs, 21 markers) using MLMM, and 58 MTAs (29 QTLs, 40 markers) using MTMM were identified. In addition, 63 epistatic QTLs were also identified for 13 of the 14 traits, flag leaf length (FLL) being the only exception. Clearly, the power of association mapping improved due to MLMM and MTMM analyses. The epistatic interactions detected during the present study also provided better insight into genetic architecture of the 14 traits that were examined during the present study. Following eight wheat genotypes carried desirable alleles of QTLs for one or more traits, WH542, NI345, NI170, Sharbati Sonora, A90, HW1085, HYB11, and DWR39 (Pragati). These genotypes and the markers associated with important QTLs for major traits can be used in wheat improvement programs either using marker-assisted recurrent selection (MARS) or pseudo-backcrossing method. PMID:27441835

  13. Genome Wide Single Locus Single Trait, Multi-Locus and Multi-Trait Association Mapping for Some Important Agronomic Traits in Common Wheat (T. aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Vandana; Gahlaut, Vijay; Meher, Prabina Kumar; Mir, Reyazul Rouf; Jaiswal, Jai Prakash; Rao, Atmakuri Ramakrishna; Balyan, Harindra Singh; Gupta, Pushpendra Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Genome wide association study (GWAS) was conducted for 14 agronomic traits in wheat following widely used single locus single trait (SLST) approach, and two recent approaches viz. multi locus mixed model (MLMM), and multi-trait mixed model (MTMM). Association panel consisted of 230 diverse Indian bread wheat cultivars (released during 1910-2006 for commercial cultivation in different agro-climatic regions in India). Three years phenotypic data for 14 traits and genotyping data for 250 SSR markers (distributed across all the 21 wheat chromosomes) was utilized for GWAS. Using SLST, as many as 213 MTAs (p ≤ 0.05, 129 SSRs) were identified for 14 traits, however, only 10 MTAs (~9%; 10 out of 123 MTAs) qualified FDR criteria; these MTAs did not show any linkage drag. Interestingly, these genomic regions were coincident with the genomic regions that were already known to harbor QTLs for same or related agronomic traits. Using MLMM and MTMM, many more QTLs and markers were identified; 22 MTAs (19 QTLs, 21 markers) using MLMM, and 58 MTAs (29 QTLs, 40 markers) using MTMM were identified. In addition, 63 epistatic QTLs were also identified for 13 of the 14 traits, flag leaf length (FLL) being the only exception. Clearly, the power of association mapping improved due to MLMM and MTMM analyses. The epistatic interactions detected during the present study also provided better insight into genetic architecture of the 14 traits that were examined during the present study. Following eight wheat genotypes carried desirable alleles of QTLs for one or more traits, WH542, NI345, NI170, Sharbati Sonora, A90, HW1085, HYB11, and DWR39 (Pragati). These genotypes and the markers associated with important QTLs for major traits can be used in wheat improvement programs either using marker-assisted recurrent selection (MARS) or pseudo-backcrossing method. PMID:27441835

  14. Function and evolution of local repeats in the Firre locus

    PubMed Central

    Hacisuleyman, Ezgi; Shukla, Chinmay J.; Weiner, Catherine L.; Rinn, John L.

    2016-01-01

    More than half the human and mouse genomes are comprised of repetitive sequences, such as transposable elements (TEs), which have been implicated in many biological processes. In contrast, much less is known about other repeats, such as local repeats that occur in multiple instances within a given locus in the genome but not elsewhere. Here, we systematically characterize local repeats in the genomic locus of the Firre long noncoding RNA (lncRNA). We find a conserved function for the RRD repeat as a ribonucleic nuclear retention signal that is sufficient to retain an otherwise cytoplasmic mRNA in the nucleus. We also identified a repeat, termed R0, that can function as a DNA enhancer element within the intronic sequences of Firre. Collectively, our data suggest that local repeats can have diverse functionalities and molecular modalities in the Firre locus and perhaps more globally in other lncRNAs. PMID:27009974

  15. Locus coeruleus syndrome as a complication of tectal surgery.

    PubMed

    Kronenburg, Annick; Spliet, Wim G; Broekman, Marike; Robe, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of a 48-year-old woman who underwent a resection of a tectal pilocytic astrocytoma complicated by a sequence of fluctuating consciousness, psychosis with complex hallucinations and lasting sleeping disturbances in which she vividly acts out her dreams. Based on the clinical and anatomical evidence of this case, we propose the term locus coeruleus syndrome to describe this association of iatrogenic symptoms. Along with those of the locus coeruleus, lesions of the dorsal raphe nucleus, ventral tegmentum, substantia nigra pars compacta, the superior colliculus and other peduncular lesions (such as peduncular hallucinosis) are involved in the regulation of sleep-wake/arousal, behaviour, sleeping disorders and rapid eye movement atonia. However, iatrogenic lesion of the locus coeruleus could explain the complications on all levels in our patient. PMID:25903199

  16. Identification of the minus-dominance gene ortholog in the mating-type locus of Gonium pectorale.

    PubMed

    Hamaji, Takashi; Ferris, Patrick J; Coleman, Annette W; Waffenschmidt, Sabine; Takahashi, Fumio; Nishii, Ichiro; Nozaki, Hisayoshi

    2008-01-01

    The evolution of anisogamy/oogamy in the colonial Volvocales might have occurred in an ancestral isogamous colonial organism like Gonium pectorale. The unicellular, close relative Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has a mating-type (MT) locus harboring several mating-type-specific genes, including one involved in mating-type determination and another involved in the function of the tubular mating structure in only one of the two isogametes. In this study, as the first step in identifying the G. pectorale MT locus, we isolated from G. pectorale the ortholog of the C. reinhardtii mating-type-determining minus-dominance (CrMID) gene, which is localized only in the MT- locus. 3'- and 5'-RACE RT-PCR using degenerate primers identified a CrMID-orthologous 164-amino-acid coding gene (GpMID) containing a leucine-zipper RWP-RK domain near the C-terminal, as is the case with CrMID. Genomic Southern blot analysis showed that GpMID was coded only in the minus strain of G. pectorale. RT-PCR revealed that GpMID expression increased during nitrogen starvation. Analysis of F1 progeny suggested that GpMID and isopropylmalate dehydratase LEU1S are tightly linked, suggesting that they are harbored in a chromosomal region under recombinational suppression that is comparable to the C. reinhardtii MT locus. However, two other genes present in the C. reinhardtii MT locus are not linked to the G. pectorale LEU1S/MID, suggesting that the gene content of the volvocalean MT loci is not static over time. Inheritance of chloroplast and mitochondria genomes in G. pectorale is uniparental from the plus and minus parents, respectively, as is also the case in C. reinhardtii. PMID:18202374

  17. A Novel Quantitative Trait Locus on Mouse Chromosome 18, “era1,” Modifies the Entrainment of Circadian Rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Wisor, Jonathan P.; Striz, Martin; DeVoss, Jason; Murphy, Greer M.; Edgar, Dale M.; O'Hara, Bruce F.

    2007-01-01

    Study Objectives: The mammalian circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of the hypothalamus conveys 24-h rhythmicity to sleep-wake cycles, locomotor activity, and other behavioral and physiological processes. The timing of rhythms relative to the light/dark (LD12:12) cycle is influenced in part by the endogenous circadian period and the time of day specific sensitivity of the clock to light. We now describe a novel circadian rhythm phenotype, and a locus influencing that phenotype, in a segregating population of mice. Methods: By crossbreeding 2 genetically distinct nocturnal strains of mice (Cast/Ei and C57BL/6J) and backcrossing the resulting progeny to Cast/Ei, we have produced a novel circadian phenotype, called early runner mice. Results: Early runner mice entrain to a light/dark cycle at an advanced phase, up to 9 hours before dark onset. This phenotype is not significantly correlated with circadian period in constant darkness and is not associated with disruption of molecular circadian rhythms in the SCN, as assessed by analysis of period gene expression. We have identified a genomic region that regulates this phenotype—a major quantitative trait locus on chromosome 18 (near D18Mit184) that we have named era1 for Early Runner Activity locus one. Phase delays caused by light exposure early in the subjective night were of smaller magnitude in backcross offspring that were homozygous Cast/Ei at D18Mit184 than in those that were heterozygous at this locus. Conclusion: Genetic variability in the circadian response to light may, in part, explain the variance in phase angle of entrainment in this segregating mouse population. Citation: Wisor JP; Striz M; DeVoss J; Murphy GM; Edgar DM; O'Hara BF. A novel quantitative trait locus on mouse chromosome 18, “era1,” modifies the entrainment of circadian rhythms. SLEEP 2007;30(10):1255-1263. PMID:17969459

  18. Neighborhood Vigilance, Health Locus of Control, and Smoking Abstinence

    PubMed Central

    Reitzel, Lorraine R.; Lahoti, Sejal; Li, Yisheng; Cao, Yumei; Wetter, David W.; Waters, Andrew J.; Vidrine, Jennifer Irvin

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To examine whether health locus of control mediated relations of self-reported neighborhood vigilance and biochemically verified, continuous short-term smoking abstinence among 200 smokers enrolled in a cohort study. Methods A nonparametric bootstrapping procedure was used to assess mediation. Results Health locus of control-chance mediated relations between neighborhood vigilance and smoking abstinence in analyses adjusted for sociodemographics and tobacco dependence (p < .05). Greater vigilance was associated with greater attributions that health was affected by chance, which was associated with a lower likelihood of smoking abstinence. Conclusions Results suggest that neighborhood perceptions influence residents’ attributions for health outcomes, which can affect smoking abstinence. PMID:23985180

  19. Structural forms of the human amylase locus and their relationships to SNPs, haplotypes, and obesity

    PubMed Central

    Usher, Christina L; Handsaker, Robert E; Esko, Tõnu; Tuke, Marcus A; Weedon, Michael N; Hastie, Alex R; Cao, Han; Moon, Jennifer E; Kashin, Seva; Fuchsberger, Christian; Metspalu, Andres; Pato, Carlos N; Pato, Michele T; McCarthy, Mark I; Boehnke, Michael; Altshuler, David M; Frayling, Timothy M; Hirschhorn, Joel N; McCarroll, Steven A

    2016-01-01

    Hundreds of genes reside in structurally complex, poorly understood regions of the human genome1-3. One such region contains the three amylase genes (AMY2B, AMY2A, and AMY1) responsible for digesting starch into sugar. The copy number of AMY1 is reported to be the genome’s largest influence on obesity4, though genome-wide association studies for obesity have found this locus unremarkable. Using whole genome sequence analysis3,5, droplet digital PCR6, and genome mapping7, we identified eight common structural haplotypes of the amylase locus that suggest its mutational history. We found that AMY1 copy number in individuals’ genomes is generally even (rather than odd) and partially correlates to nearby SNPs, which do not associate with BMI. We measured amylase gene copy number in 1,000 obese or lean Estonians and in two other cohorts totaling ~3,500 individuals. We had 99% power to detect the lower bound of the reported effects on BMI4, yet found no association. PMID:26098870

  20. Phenotypic subregions within the split-hand/foot malformation 1 locus.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Malene B; Kreiborg, Sven; Jensen, Per; Bak, Mads; Mang, Yuan; Lodahl, Marianne; Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben; Tommerup, Niels; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth; Rendtorff, Nanna D

    2016-03-01

    Split-hand/foot malformation 1 (SHFM1) is caused by chromosomal aberrations involving the region 7q21.3, DLX5 mutation, and dysregulation of DLX5/DLX6 expression by long-range position effects. SHFM1 can be isolated or syndromic with incomplete penetrance and a highly variable clinical expression, possibly influenced by sex and imprinting. We report on a new family with five affected individuals with syndromic SHFM1 that includes split-hand/foot malformations, hearing loss, and craniofacial anomalies, and an inv(7)(q21.3q35) present both in the proband and her affected son. The proximal inversion breakpoint, identified by next generation mate-pair sequencing, truncates the SHFM1 locus within the regulatory region of DLX5/6 expression. Through genotype-phenotype correlations of 100 patients with molecularly characterized chromosomal aberrations from 32 SHFM1 families, our findings suggest three phenotypic subregions within the SHFM1 locus associated with (1) isolated SHFM, (2) SHFM and hearing loss, and (3) SHFM, hearing loss, and craniofacial anomalies, respectively (ranked for increasing proximity to DLX5/6), and encompassing previously reported tissue-specific enhancers for DLX5/6. This uniquely well-characterized cohort of SHFM1 patients allowed us to systematically analyze the recently suggested hypothesis of skewed transmission and to confirm a higher penetrance in males vs. females in a subgroup of patients with isolated SHFM. PMID:26839112

  1. Genetic analysis of a Treponema phagedenis locus encoding antigenic lipoproteins with potential for antigenic variation.

    PubMed

    Mushtaq, Mamoona; Bongcam-Rudloff, Erik; Loftsdottir, Heidur; Pringle, Märit; Segerman, Bo; Zuerner, Richard; Rosander, Anna

    2016-06-30

    Digital dermatitis (DD) is a painful and debilitating claw disease in cattle. Spirochetes of the genus Treponema are found in high numbers in the lesions and are likely to be involved in the pathogenesis. The occurrence of Treponema phagedenis in DD lesions, especially near the interface of healthy and diseased tissue, suggests that this species contributes to the development and/or progression of the lesions. In this study we characterized a genetic locus in T. phagedenis that contains coding regions for three antigenic proteins, PrrA, VpsA, and VpsB. Comparative analysis of homologous loci from fifteen strains suggests that prrA may be transposed into or out of this locus. Alterations in the copy number of TA repeats within the putative promoter region may regulate VpsA/B expression. The vpsA and prrA genes occur in allelic variants in different T. phagedenis isolates and may provide one explanation for the antigenic variation observed in T. phagedenis DD isolates. PMID:27259832

  2. Global Genetic Architecture of an Erythroid Quantitative Trait Locus, HMIP-2

    PubMed Central

    Menzel, Stephan; Rooks, Helen; Zelenika, Diana; Mtatiro, Siana N; Gnanakulasekaran, Akshala; Drasar, Emma; Cox, Sharon; Liu, Li; Masood, Mariam; Silver, Nicholas; Garner, Chad; Vasavda, Nisha; Howard, Jo; Makani, Julie; Adekile, Adekunle; Pace, Betty; Spector, Tim; Farrall, Martin; Lathrop, Mark; Thein, Swee Lay

    2014-01-01

    HMIP-2 is a human quantitative trait locus affecting peripheral numbers, size and hemoglobin composition of red blood cells, with a marked effect on the persistence of the fetal form of hemoglobin, HbF, in adults. The locus consists of multiple common variants in an enhancer region for MYB (chr 6q23.3), which encodes the hematopoietic transcription factor cMYB. Studying a European population cohort and four African-descended groups of patients with sickle cell anemia, we found that all share a set of two spatially separate HbF-promoting alleles at HMIP-2, termed “A” and “B.” These typically occurred together (“A–B”) on European chromosomes, but existed on separate homologous chromosomes in Africans. Using haplotype signatures for “A” and “B,” we interrogated public population datasets. Haplotypes carrying only “A” or “B” were typical for populations in Sub-Saharan Africa. The “A–B” combination was frequent in European, Asian, and Amerindian populations. Both alleles were infrequent in tropical regions, possibly undergoing negative selection by geographical factors, as has been reported for malaria with other hematological traits. We propose that the ascertainment of worldwide distribution patterns for common, HbF-promoting alleles can aid their further genetic characterization, including the investigation of gene–environment interaction during human migration and adaptation. PMID:25069958

  3. Global genetic architecture of an erythroid quantitative trait locus, HMIP-2.

    PubMed

    Menzel, Stephan; Rooks, Helen; Zelenika, Diana; Mtatiro, Siana N; Gnanakulasekaran, Akshala; Drasar, Emma; Cox, Sharon; Liu, Li; Masood, Mariam; Silver, Nicholas; Garner, Chad; Vasavda, Nisha; Howard, Jo; Makani, Julie; Adekile, Adekunle; Pace, Betty; Spector, Tim; Farrall, Martin; Lathrop, Mark; Thein, Swee Lay

    2014-11-01

    HMIP-2 is a human quantitative trait locus affecting peripheral numbers, size and hemoglobin composition of red blood cells, with a marked effect on the persistence of the fetal form of hemoglobin, HbF, in adults. The locus consists of multiple common variants in an enhancer region for MYB (chr 6q23.3), which encodes the hematopoietic transcription factor cMYB. Studying a European population cohort and four African-descended groups of patients with sickle cell anemia, we found that all share a set of two spatially separate HbF-promoting alleles at HMIP-2, termed "A" and "B." These typically occurred together ("A-B") on European chromosomes, but existed on separate homologous chromosomes in Africans. Using haplotype signatures for "A" and "B," we interrogated public population datasets. Haplotypes carrying only "A" or "B" were typical for populations in Sub-Saharan Africa. The "A-B" combination was frequent in European, Asian, and Amerindian populations. Both alleles were infrequent in tropical regions, possibly undergoing negative selection by geographical factors, as has been reported for malaria with other hematological traits. We propose that the ascertainment of worldwide distribution patterns for common, HbF-promoting alleles can aid their further genetic characterization, including the investigation of gene-environment interaction during human migration and adaptation. PMID:25069958

  4. Loss of locus coeruleus neurons and reduced startle in parkin null mice

    PubMed Central

    von Coelln, Rainer; Thomas, Bobby; Savitt, Joseph M.; Lim, Kah Leong; Sasaki, Masayuki; Hess, Ellen J.; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2004-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the most common neurodegenerative movement disorder and is characterized pathologically by degeneration of catecholaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta and locus coeruleus, among other regions. Autosomal-recessive juvenile Parkinsonism (ARJP) is caused by mutations in the PARK2 gene coding for parkin and constitutes the most common familial form of PD. The majority of ARJP-associated parkin mutations are thought to be loss of function-mutations; however, the pathogenesis of ARJP remains poorly understood. Here, we report the generation of parkin null mice by targeted deletion of parkin exon 7. These mice show a loss of catecholaminergic neurons in the locus coeruleus and an accompanying loss of norepinephrine in discrete regions of the central nervous system. Moreover, there is a dramatic reduction of the norepinephrine-dependent startle response. The nigrostriatal dopaminergic system does not show any impairment. This mouse model will help gain a better understanding of parkin function and the mechanisms underlying parkin-associated PD. PMID:15249681

  5. A Susceptibility Locus for Migraine with Aura, on Chromosome 4q24

    PubMed Central

    Wessman, Maija; Kallela, Mikko; Kaunisto, Mari A.; Marttila, Pia; Sobel, Eric; Hartiala, Jaana; Oswell, Greg; Leal, Suzanne M.; Papp, Jeanette C.; Hämäläinen, Eija; Broas, Petra; Joslyn, Geoffrey; Hovatta, Iiris; Hiekkalinna, Tero; Kaprio, Jaakko; Ott, Jürg; Cantor, Rita M.; Zwart, John-Anker; Ilmavirta, Matti; Havanka, Hannele; Färkkilä, Markus; Peltonen, Leena; Palotie, Aarno

    2002-01-01

    Migraine is a complex neurovascular disorder with substantial evidence supporting a genetic contribution. Prior attempts to localize susceptibility loci for common forms of migraine have not produced conclusive evidence of linkage or association. To date, no genomewide screen for migraine has been published. We report results from a genomewide screen of 50 multigenerational, clinically well-defined Finnish families showing intergenerational transmission of migraine with aura (MA). The families were screened using 350 polymorphic microsatellite markers, with an average intermarker distance of 11 cM. Significant evidence of linkage was found between the MA phenotype and marker D4S1647 on 4q24. Using parametric two-point linkage analysis and assuming a dominant mode of inheritance, we found for this marker a maximum LOD score of 4.20 under locus homogeneity (P=.000006) or locus heterogeneity (P=.000011). Multipoint parametric (HLOD = 4.45; P=.0000058) and nonparametric (NPLall = 3.43; P=.0007) analyses support linkage in this region. Statistically significant linkage was not observed in any other chromosomal region. PMID:11836652

  6. Strong conservation of rhoptry-associated-protein-1 (RAP-1) locus organization and sequence among Babesia isolates infecting sheep from China (Babesia motasi-like phylogenetic group).

    PubMed

    Niu, Qingli; Valentin, Charlotte; Bonsergent, Claire; Malandrin, Laurence

    2014-12-01

    Rhoptry-associated-protein 1 (RAP-1) is considered as a potential vaccine candidate due to its involvement in red blood cell invasion by parasites in the genus Babesia. We examined its value as a vaccine candidate by studying RAP-1 conservation in isolates of Babesia sp. BQ1 Ningxian, Babesia sp. Tianzhu and Babesia sp. Hebei, responsible for ovine babesiosis in different regions of China. The rap-1 locus in these isolates has very similar features to those described for Babesia sp. BQ1 Lintan, another Chinese isolate also in the B. motasi-like phylogenetic group, namely the presence of three types of rap-1 genes (rap-1a, rap-1b and rap-1c), multiple conserved rap-1b copies (5) interspaced with more or less variable rap-1a copies (6), and the 3' localization of one rap-1c. The isolates Babesia sp. Tianzhu, Babesia sp. BQ1 Lintan and Ningxian were almost identical (average nucleotide identity of 99.9%) over a putative locus of about 31 Kb, including the intergenic regions. Babesia sp. Hebei showed a similar locus organization but differed in the rap-1 locus sequence, for each gene and intergenic region, with an average nucleotide identity of 78%. Our results are in agreement with 18S rDNA phylogenetic studies performed on these isolates. However, in extremely closely related isolates the rap-1 locus seems more conserved (99.9%) than the 18S rDNA (98.7%), whereas in still closely related isolates the identities are much lower (78%) compared with the 18S rDNA (97.7%). The particularities of the rap-1 locus in terms of evolution, phylogeny, diagnosis and vaccine development are discussed. PMID:25200723

  7. History of the discovery of a master locus producing piRNAs: the flamenco/COM locus in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Coline, Goriaux; Théron, Emmanuelle; Brasset, Emilie; Vaury, Chantal

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of transposable elements (TEs) in the 1950s by B. McClintock implied the existence of cellular regulatory systems controlling TE activity. The discovery of flamenco (flam) an heterochromatic locus from Drosophila melanogaster and its ability to survey several TEs such as gypsy, ZAM, and Idefix contributed to peer deeply into the mechanisms of the genetic and epigenetic regulation of TEs. flam was the first cluster producing small RNAs to be discovered long before RNAi pathways were identified in 1998. As a result of the detailed genetic analyses performed by certain laboratories and of the sophisticated genetic tools they developed, this locus has played a major role in our understanding of piRNA mediated TE repression in animals. Here we review the first discovery of this locus and retrace decades of studies that led to our current understanding of the relationship between genomes and their TE targets. PMID:25136352

  8. History of the discovery of a master locus producing piRNAs: the flamenco/COM locus in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Goriaux, Coline; Théron, Emmanuelle; Brasset, Emilie; Vaury, Chantal

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of transposable elements (TEs) in the 1950s by B. McClintock implied the existence of cellular regulatory systems controlling TE activity. The discovery of flamenco (flam) an heterochromatic locus from Drosophila melanogaster and its ability to survey several TEs such as gypsy, ZAM, and Idefix contributed to peer deeply into the mechanisms of the genetic and epigenetic regulation of TEs. flam was the first cluster producing small RNAs to be discovered long before RNAi pathways were identified in 1998. As a result of the detailed genetic analyses performed by certain laboratories and of the sophisticated genetic tools they developed, this locus has played a major role in our understanding of piRNA mediated TE repression in animals. Here we review the first discovery of this locus and retrace decades of studies that led to our current understanding of the relationship between genomes and their TE targets. PMID:25136352

  9. Two-trait-locus linkage analysis: A powerful strategy for mapping complex genetic traits

    SciTech Connect

    Schork, N.J.; Boehnke, M. ); Terwilliger, J.D.; Ott, J. )

    1993-11-01

    Nearly all diseases mapped to date follow clear Mendelian, single-locus segregation patterns. In contrast, many common familial diseases such as diabetes, psoriasis, several forms of cancer, and schizophrenia are familial and appear to have a genetic component but do not exhibit simple Mendelian transmission. More complex models are required to explain the genetics of these important diseases. In this paper, the authors explore two-trait-locus, two-marker-locus linkage analysis in which two trait loci are mapped simultaneously to separate genetic markers. The authors compare the utility of this approach to standard one-trait-locus, one-marker-locus linkage analysis with and without allowance for heterogeneity. The authors also compare the utility of the two-trait-locus, two-marker-locus analysis to two-trait-locus, one-marker-locus linkage analysis. For common diseases, pedigrees are often bilineal, with disease genes entering via two or more unrelated pedigree members. Since such pedigrees often are avoided in linkage studies, the authors also investigate the relative information content of unilineal and bilineal pedigrees. For the dominant-or-recessive and threshold models that the authors consider, the authors find that two-trait-locus, two-marker-locus linkage analysis can provide substantially more linkage information, as measured by expected maximum lod score, than standard one-trait-locus, one-marker-locus methods, even allowing for heterogeneity, while, for a dominant-or-dominant generating model, one-locus models that allow for heterogeneity extract essentially as much information as the two-trait-locus methods. For these three models, the authors also find that bilineal pedigrees provide sufficient linkage information to warrant their inclusion in such studies. The authors discuss strategies for assessing the significance of the two linkages assumed in two-trait-locus, two-marker-locus models. 37 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  10. A two-locus DNA sequence database for identifying host-specific pathogens and phylogenetic diversity within the Fusarium oxysporum species complex

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An electronically portable two-locus DNA sequence database, comprising partial sequences of the translation elongation factor gene (EF-1a, 634 bp alignment) and nearly complete sequences of the nuclear ribosomal intergenic spacer region (IGS rDNA, 2220 bp alignment) for 850 isolates spanning the phy...

  11. Exonic Re-Sequencing of the Chromosome 2q24.3 Parkinson’s Disease Locus

    PubMed Central

    Labbé, Catherine; Ogaki, Kotaro; Lorenzo-Betancor, Oswaldo; Carrasquillo, Minerva M.; Heckman, Michael G.; McCarthy, Allan; Soto-Ortolaza, Alexandra I.; Walton, Ronald L.; Lynch, Timothy; Siuda, Joanna; Opala, Grzegorz; Krygowska-Wajs, Anna; Barcikowska, Maria; Czyzewski, Krzysztof; Dickson, Dennis W.; Uitti, Ryan J.; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Ross, Owen A.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in Parkinson’s disease (PD) have identified over 20 genomic regions associated with disease risk. Many of these loci include several candidate genes making it difficult to pinpoint the causal gene. The locus on chromosome 2q24.3 encompasses three genes: B3GALT1, STK39, and CERS6. In order to identify if the causal variants are simple missense changes, we sequenced all 31 exons of these three genes in 187 patients with PD. We identified 13 exonic variants including four non-synonymous and three insertion/deletion variants (indels). These non-synonymous variants and rs2102808, the GWAS tag SNP, were genotyped in three independent series consisting of a total of 1976 patients and 1596 controls. Our results show that the seven identified 2q24.3 coding variants are not independently responsible for the GWAS association signal at the locus; however, there is a haplotype, which contains both rs2102808 and a STK39 exon 1 6bp indel variant, that is significantly associated with PD risk (Odds Ratio [OR] = 1.35, 95% CI: 1.11–1.64, P = 0.003). This haplotype is more associated than each of the two variants independently (OR = 1.23, P = 0.005 and 1.10, P = 0.10, respectively). Our findings suggest that the risk variant is likely located in a non-coding region. Additional sequencing of the locus including promoter and regulatory regions will be needed to pinpoint the association at this locus that leads to an increased risk to PD. PMID:26090850

  12. Heterotic Trait Locus (HTL) Mapping Identifies Intra-Locus Interactions That Underlie Reproductive Hybrid Vigor in Sorghum bicolor

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Israel, Imri; Kilian, Benjamin; Nida, Habte; Fridman, Eyal

    2012-01-01

    Identifying intra-locus interactions underlying heterotic variation among whole-genome hybrids is a key to understanding mechanisms of heterosis and exploiting it for crop and livestock improvement. In this study, we present the development and first use of the heterotic trait locus (HTL) mapping approach to associate specific intra-locus interactions with an overdominant heterotic mode of inheritance in a diallel population using Sorghum bicolor as the model. This method combines the advantages of ample genetic diversity and the possibility of studying non-additive inheritance. Furthermore, this design enables dissecting the latter to identify specific intra-locus interactions. We identified three HTLs (3.5% of loci tested) with synergistic intra-locus effects on overdominant grain yield heterosis in 2 years of field trials. These loci account for 19.0% of the heterotic variation, including a significant interaction found between two of them. Moreover, analysis of one of these loci (hDPW4.1) in a consecutive F2 population confirmed a significant 21% increase in grain yield of heterozygous vs. homozygous plants in this locus. Notably, two of the three HTLs for grain yield are in synteny with previously reported overdominant quantitative trait loci for grain yield in maize. A mechanism for the reproductive heterosis found in this study is suggested, in which grain yield increase is achieved by releasing the compensatory tradeoffs between biomass and reproductive output, and between seed number and weight. These results highlight the power of analyzing a diverse set of inbreds and their hybrids for unraveling hitherto unknown allelic interactions mediating heterosis. PMID:22761720

  13. Fine-Mapping of the 1p11.2 Breast Cancer Susceptibility Locus.

    PubMed

    Horne, Hisani N; Chung, Charles C; Zhang, Han; Yu, Kai; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Fasching, Peter A; Beckmann, Matthias W; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Sawyer, Elinor J; Tomlinson, Ian; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Bojesen, Stig E; Flyger, Henrik; Benitez, Javier; González-Neira, Anna; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L; Brenner, Hermann; Arndt, Volker; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Nevanlinna, Heli; Khan, Sofia; Matsuo, Keitaro; Iwata, Hiroji; Dörk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Wu, Anna H; Ven den Berg, David; Smeets, Ann; Zhao, Hui; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Radice, Paolo; Barile, Monica; Couch, Fergus J; Vachon, Celine; Giles, Graham G; Milne, Roger L; Haiman, Christopher A; Marchand, Loic Le; Goldberg, Mark S; Teo, Soo H; Taib, Nur A M; Kristensen, Vessela; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Zheng, Wei; Shrubsole, Martha; Winqvist, Robert; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Devilee, Peter; Seynaeve, Caroline; García-Closas, Montserrat; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Martens, John W M; Li, Jingmei; Lu, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Blot, William; Cai, Qiuyin; Shah, Mitul; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Harrington, Patricia; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Hartman, Mikael; Chia, Kee Seng; Kabisch, Maria; Torres, Diana; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Brennan, Paul; Slager, Susan; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hou, Ming-Feng; Swerdlow, Anthony; Orr, Nick; Simard, Jacques; Hall, Per; Pharoah, Paul D P; Easton, Douglas F; Chanock, Stephen J; Dunning, Alison M; Figueroa, Jonine D

    2016-01-01

    The Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility genome-wide association study (GWAS) originally identified a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs11249433 at 1p11.2 associated with breast cancer risk. To fine-map this locus, we genotyped 92 SNPs in a 900kb region (120,505,799-121,481,132) flanking rs11249433 in 45,276 breast cancer cases and 48,998 controls of European, Asian and African ancestry from 50 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. Genotyping was done using iCOGS, a custom-built array. Due to the complicated nature of the region on chr1p11.2: 120,300,000-120,505,798, that lies near the centromere and contains seven duplicated genomic segments, we restricted analyses to 429 SNPs excluding the duplicated regions (42 genotyped and 387 imputed). Per-allelic associations with breast cancer risk were estimated using logistic regression models adjusting for study and ancestry-specific principal components. The strongest association observed was with the original identified index SNP rs11249433 (minor allele frequency (MAF) 0.402; per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.10, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.08-1.13, P = 1.49 x 10-21). The association for rs11249433 was limited to ER-positive breast cancers (test for heterogeneity P≤8.41 x 10-5). Additional analyses by other tumor characteristics showed stronger associations with moderately/well differentiated tumors and tumors of lobular histology. Although no significant eQTL associations were observed, in silico analyses showed that rs11249433 was located in a region that is likely a weak enhancer/promoter. Fine-mapping analysis of the 1p11.2 breast cancer susceptibility locus confirms this region to be limited to risk to cancers that are ER-positive. PMID:27556229

  14. Evaluating the Results of Genomewide Linkage Scans of Complex Traits by Locus Counting

    PubMed Central

    Wiltshire, Steven; Cardon, Lon R.; McCarthy, Mark I.

    2002-01-01

    The evaluation of results from primary genomewide linkage scans of complex human traits remains an area of importance and considerable debate. Apart from the usual assessment of statistical significance by use of asymptotic and empirical calculations, an additional means of evaluation—based on counting the number of distinct regions showing evidence of linkage—is possible. We have explored the characteristics of such a locus-counting method over a range of experimental conditions typically encountered during genomewide scans for complex trait loci. Under the null hypothesis, factors that have an impact on the informativeness of the data—such as map density, availability of parental data, and completeness of genotyping—are seen to markedly influence the number of regions of excess allele sharing and the empirically derived genomewide significance of the associated LOD score thresholds. In some circumstances, the expected number of regions is less than one-quarter of that predicted under the assumption of a dense map and complete extraction of inheritance information. We have applied this method to a previously analyzed data set—the Warren 2 genome scan for type 2–diabetes susceptibility—and demonstrate that more regions showing evidence for linkage were observed in the primary genome scan than would be expected by chance, across the whole range of LOD scores, even though no single linkage result achieved empirical genomewide statistical significance. Locus counting may be useful in assessing the results from genome scans for complex traits in general, especially because relatively few scans generate evidence for linkage reaching genomewide significance by dense-map criteria. By taking account of the effects of reduced data informativeness on the expected number of regions showing evidence for linkage, a more meaningful, and less conservative, evaluation of the results from such linkage studies is possible. PMID:12355401

  15. Fine-Mapping of the 1p11.2 Breast Cancer Susceptibility Locus

    PubMed Central

    Horne, Hisani N.; Chung, Charles C.; Zhang, Han; Yu, Kai; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Bojesen, Stig E.; Flyger, Henrik; Benitez, Javier; González-Neira, Anna; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Brenner, Hermann; Arndt, Volker; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Nevanlinna, Heli; Khan, Sofia; Matsuo, Keitaro; Iwata, Hiroji; Dörk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Wu, Anna H.; ven den Berg, David; Smeets, Ann; Zhao, Hui; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Radice, Paolo; Barile, Monica; Couch, Fergus J.; Vachon, Celine; Giles, Graham G.; Milne, Roger L.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Marchand, Loic Le; Goldberg, Mark S.; Teo, Soo H.; Taib, Nur A. M.; Kristensen, Vessela; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Zheng, Wei; Shrubsole, Martha; Winqvist, Robert; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Devilee, Peter; Seynaeve, Caroline; García-Closas, Montserrat; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Martens, John W. M.; Li, Jingmei; Lu, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Blot, William; Cai, Qiuyin; Shah, Mitul; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Harrington, Patricia; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Hartman, Mikael; Chia, Kee Seng; Kabisch, Maria; Torres, Diana; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Brennan, Paul; Slager, Susan; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hou, Ming-Feng; Swerdlow, Anthony; Orr, Nick; Simard, Jacques; Hall, Per; Pharoah, Paul D. P.

    2016-01-01

    The Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility genome-wide association study (GWAS) originally identified a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs11249433 at 1p11.2 associated with breast cancer risk. To fine-map this locus, we genotyped 92 SNPs in a 900kb region (120,505,799–121,481,132) flanking rs11249433 in 45,276 breast cancer cases and 48,998 controls of European, Asian and African ancestry from 50 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. Genotyping was done using iCOGS, a custom-built array. Due to the complicated nature of the region on chr1p11.2: 120,300,000–120,505,798, that lies near the centromere and contains seven duplicated genomic segments, we restricted analyses to 429 SNPs excluding the duplicated regions (42 genotyped and 387 imputed). Per-allelic associations with breast cancer risk were estimated using logistic regression models adjusting for study and ancestry-specific principal components. The strongest association observed was with the original identified index SNP rs11249433 (minor allele frequency (MAF) 0.402; per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.10, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.08–1.13, P = 1.49 x 10-21). The association for rs11249433 was limited to ER-positive breast cancers (test for heterogeneity P≤8.41 x 10-5). Additional analyses by other tumor characteristics showed stronger associations with moderately/well differentiated tumors and tumors of lobular histology. Although no significant eQTL associations were observed, in silico analyses showed that rs11249433 was located in a region that is likely a weak enhancer/promoter. Fine-mapping analysis of the 1p11.2 breast cancer susceptibility locus confirms this region to be limited to risk to cancers that are ER-positive. PMID:27556229

  16. Receptor protein kinase gene encoded at the self-incompatibility locus

    DOEpatents

    Nasrallah, June B.; Nasrallah, Mikhail E.; Stein, Joshua

    1996-01-01

    Described herein is a S receptor kinase gene (SRK), derived from the S locus in Brassica oleracea, having a extracellular domain highly similar to the secreted product of the S-locus glycoprotein gene.

  17. Coordinated forms of noradrenergic plasticity in the locus coeruleus and primary auditory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Ana Raquel O.; Froemke, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    The cerebral cortex is plastic and represents the world according to the significance of sensory stimuli. However, cortical networks are embodied within complex circuits including neuromodulatory systems such as the noradrenergic locus coeruleus, providing information about internal state and behavioral relevance. While norepinephrine is important for cortical plasticity, it is unknown how modulatory neurons themselves respond to changes of sensory input. Here we examine how locus coeruleus neurons are modified by experience, and the consequences of locus coeruleus plasticity on cortical representations and sensory perception. We made whole-cell recordings from rat locus coeruleus and primary auditory cortex (AI), pairing sounds with locus coeruleus activation. Although initially unresponsive, locus coeruleus neurons developed and maintained auditory responses afterwards. Locus coeruleus plasticity induced changes in AI responses lasting at least hours and improved auditory perception for days to weeks. Our results demonstrate that locus coeruleus is highly plastic, leading to substantial changes in regulation of brain state by norepinephrine. PMID:26301326

  18. Mapping a quantitative trait locus via the EM algorithm and Bayesian classification.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, S; Majumder, P P

    2000-09-01

    Mapping a locus controlling a quantitative genetic trait (e.g., blood pressure) to a specific genomic region is of considerable interest. Data on the quantitative trait under consideration and several codominant genetic markers with known genomic locations are collected from members of families and statistically analyzed to draw inferences on the genomic position of the trait locus. The vector of parameters of interest comprises the pairwise recombination fractions, theta, between the putative quantitative trait locus and the marker loci. One of the major complications in estimating theta for a quantitative trait in humans is the lack of haplotype information on members of families. The purpose of this study was to devise a computationally simple and efficient method of estimation of theta in the absence of haplotype information. We have proposed a two-stage estimation procedure using the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm. In the first stage, parameters of the QTL are estimated based on data of a sample of unrelated individuals. From estimates thus obtained, we have used a Bayes' rule to infer QTL genotypes of parents in families. Finally, in the second stage of the procedure, we have proposed an EM algorithm for obtaining the maximum likelihood estimate of theta based on data of informative families (which are identified upon inferring parental QTL genotypes performed in the first stage). We have shown, using simulated data, that the proposed procedure is cost-effective, computationally simple, and statistically efficient. As expected, analysis of data on multiple markers jointly is more efficient than the analysis based on single markers. PMID:10962473

  19. A genomewide screen for chronic rhinosinusitis genes identifies a locus on chromosome 7q

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Jayant M.; Hayes, M. Geoffrey; Schneider, Daniel; Naclerio, Robert M.; Ober, Carole

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic rhinosinusitis is an important public health problem with substantial impact on patient quality of life and health care costs. We hypothesized that genetic variation may be one factor that affects this disease. Objective To identify genetic variation underlying susceptibility to chronic rhinosinusitis using a genome-wide approach. Methods We studied a religious isolate that practices a communal lifestyle and shares common environmental exposures. Using physical examination, medical interviews, and a review of medical records, we identified 8 individuals with chronic rhinosinusitis out of 291 screened. These 8 individuals were related to each other in a single 60 member, 9 generation pedigree. A genome-wide screen for loci influencing susceptibility to chronic rhinosinusitis using 1123 genome-wide markers was conducted. Results The largest linkage peak (P = 0.0023; 127.15 cM, equivalent to LOD=2.01) was on chromosome 7q31.1-7q32.1, 7q31 (127.15 cM; 1-LOD support region: 115cM to 135cM) and included the CFTR locus. Genotyping of 38 mutations in the CFTR gene did not reveal variation accounting for this linkage signal. Conclusion Understanding the genes involved in chronic rhinosinusitis may lead to improvements in its diagnosis and treatment. Our results represent the first genome-wide screen for chronic rhinosinusitis and suggest that a locus on 7q31.1-7q32.1 influences disease susceptibility. This may be the CFTR gene or another nearby locus. PMID:18622306

  20. The handedness-associated PCSK6 locus spans an intronic promoter regulating novel transcripts.

    PubMed

    Shore, Robert; Covill, Laura; Pettigrew, Kerry A; Brandler, William M; Diaz, Rebeca; Xu, Yiwang; Tello, Javier A; Talcott, Joel B; Newbury, Dianne F; Stein, John; Monaco, Anthony P; Paracchini, Silvia

    2016-05-01

    We recently reported the association of the PCSK6 gene with handedness through a quantitative genome-wide association study (GWAS; P < 0.5 × 10(-8)) for a relative hand skill measure in individuals with dyslexia. PCSK6 activates Nodal, a morphogen involved in regulating left-right body axis determination. Therefore, the GWAS data suggest that the biology underlying the patterning of structural asymmetries may also contribute to behavioural laterality, e.g. handedness. The association is further supported by an independent study reporting a variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) within the same PCSK6 locus to be associated with degree of handedness in a general population cohort. Here, we have conducted a functional analysis of the PCSK6 locus combining further genetic analysis, in silico predictions and molecular assays. We have shown that the previous GWAS signal was not tagging a VNTR effect, suggesting that the two markers have independent effects. We demonstrated experimentally that one of the top GWAS-associated markers, rs11855145, directly alters the binding site for a nuclear factor. Furthermore, we have shown that the predicted regulatory region adjacent to rs11855415 acts as a bidirectional promoter controlling the expression of novel RNA transcripts. These include both an antisense long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) and a short PCSK6 isoform predicted to be coding. This is the first molecular characterization of a handedness-associated locus that supports the role of common variants in non-coding sequences in influencing complex phenotypes through gene expression regulation. PMID:26908617

  1. Ink4-Arf locus in cancer and aging.

    PubMed

    Sherr, Charles J

    2012-01-01

    Three tumor suppressor genes at the small (<50 kb) INK4-ARF (CDKN2A/B) locus on human chromosome 9p21 coordinate a signaling network that depends on the activities of the retinoblastoma (RB) protein and the p53 transcription factor. Disruption of this circuitry, frequently by codeletion of INK4-ARF, is a hallmark of cancer, begging the question of why the intimate genetic linkage of these tumor suppressor genes has been maintained in mammals despite the risk of their coinactivation. The INK4-ARF locus is not highly expressed under normal physiologic conditions in young mammals, but its induction becomes more pronounced as animals age. Notably, INK4-ARF is actively silenced en bloc in embryonic, fetal, and adult stem cells but becomes poised to respond to oncogenic stress signals as stem cells lose their self-renewal capacity and differentiate, thereby providing a potent barrier to tumor formation. Epigenetic remodeling of the locus as a whole provides a mechanism for coordinating the activities of RB and p53. A hypothesis is that the INK4-ARF locus may have evolved to physiologically restrict the self-renewal capacities and numbers of stem and progenitor cells with the attendant consequence of limiting tissue regenerative capacity, particularly as animals age. Deletion of INK4-ARF contributes to the aberrant self-renewal capacity of tumor cells and occurs frequently in many forms of human cancer. PMID:22960768

  2. Locus of Control and Human Capital Investment Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cebi, Merve

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the effect of teenagers' outlooks--specified as their locus of control--on educational attainment and labor market outcomes. I replicate the study of Coleman and DeLeire (2003) and test the predictions of their theoretical model using a different data set--National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY). The findings fail to…

  3. Relationship between Locus of Control and Health-Related Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graffeo, Lisa Cotlar; Silvestri, Lynette

    2006-01-01

    Locus of Control (LOC) deals with an individual's personal attribution of successful or failure. Those with internal LOC believe that events in their lives are under their personal control while individuals with external LOC feel that their lives are dominated by the environment. The theory has been applied to achievement and health-related issues…

  4. Should Farmers' Locus of Control Be Used in Extension?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuthall, Peter L.

    2010-01-01

    To explore whether Farmers' Locus of Control (LOC) could be useful in agricultural extension programmes to improve managerial ability. This test records a farmer's belief in her/his control over production outcomes. A mail survey of 2300 New Zealand farmers was used to obtain a range of variables, and to measure their LOC using a question set…

  5. Changes in Perceived Locus of Control during Basic Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vickers, Ross R., Jr.; Conway, Terry L.

    Basic Training (BT) is designed to prepare recruits for their new role as members of the military. The psychological effects of this experience can have important implications for recruits' later effectiveness in the military. Locus of control is one psychological construct which can be important for overall psychological and behavioral adaptation…

  6. Attitudes toward Nutrition, Locus of Control and Smoking Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corfield, V. Kilian; And Others

    Research has shown that many behaviors previously thought to be purely psychological in origin do, in fact, have a physiological basis. To examine the relationship of smoking behavior to locus of control, and to attitudes toward, knowledge about, and behavior with respect to nutrition, 116 Canadian undergraduate students completed the Nutrition…

  7. Fetal Health Locus of Control Scale: Development and Validation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labs, Sharon M.; Wurtele, Sandy K.

    1986-01-01

    Describes development of the Fetal Health Locus of Control scale, the scale's utility in predicting maternal health-related behavior during pregnancy, normative data, and information on factor structure and internal consistency. Reports that cigarette and caffeine consumption during pregnancy, and women's intentions to participate in prepared…

  8. Comparison of Locus of Control with Levels of Creativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kneipp, Karen B.; Gadzella, Bernadette M.

    This study was undertaken to determine whether external locus of control orientation was significantly negatively correlated with levels of creativity. Subjects were 13 male and 13 female undergraduate students enrolled in psychology classes at a southwestern university. Mean age of the subjects was 28.6. Instruments used were Levenson's (1972) I…

  9. Locus of Control of Reinforcement and Responsiveness to Social Influence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doctor, Ronald M.; Marziani, A. William

    Rotter's (1966) "control of reinforcement" construct is a dimension of belief or expectancy about the locus of reinforcing consequences for behavior. A generalized disposition is represented which ascribes reinforcement contingencies to either "external" (and, hence, uncontrollable) factors or to "internal" sources in which case the individual…

  10. Dimensions of Locus of Control: Impact of Early Educational Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Mark W.

    A study was conducted to: (1) assess the equivalence of the Nowicki Strickland Locus of Control Scale for Children, the Stephens-Delys Reinforcement Contingency Interview, and the Gruen-Korte-Stephens test and the construct validity of each; and (2) investigate the impact on IE of the open classroom Follow Through program sponsored by the…

  11. Locus of Control and Helplessness: Gender Differences among Bereaved Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubinstein, Gidi

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated locus of control (LC) and hopelessness (H) among 25 pairs of bereaved parents, who lost their children in the Arab--Israeli conflict, and 25 pairs of demographically matched non-bereaved parents (mean age 53). Four of the 5 hypotheses were supported by results. LC was significantly more external and H was significantly…

  12. Children's Locus of Control and Intrinsically Motivated Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitney, Patricia

    A study investigated the relationship between locus of control and intrinsically motivated reading for children. The entire sixth grade, totalling 53 students, of a parochial school in San Francisco was administered the Children's Nowicki-Strickland Internal-External Control Scale. A free-choice paperback reading rack provided the measure for…

  13. Inferring relationships between pairs of individuals from locus heterozygosities

    PubMed Central

    Presciuttini, Silvano; Toni, Chiara; Tempestini, Elena; Verdiani, Simonetta; Casarino, Lucia; Spinetti, Isabella; Stefano, Francesco De; Domenici, Ranieri; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E

    2002-01-01

    Background The traditional exact method for inferring relationships between individuals from genetic data is not easily applicable in all situations that may be encountered in several fields of applied genetics. This study describes an approach that gives affordable results and is easily applicable; it is based on the probabilities that two individuals share 0, 1 or both alleles at a locus identical by state. Results We show that these probabilities (zi) depend on locus heterozygosity (H), and are scarcely affected by variation of the distribution of allele frequencies. This allows us to obtain empirical curves relating zi's to H for a series of common relationships, so that the likelihood ratio of a pair of relationships between any two individuals, given their genotypes at a locus, is a function of a single parameter, H. Application to large samples of mother-child and full-sib pairs shows that the statistical power of this method to infer the correct relationship is not much lower than the exact method. Analysis of a large database of STR data proves that locus heterozygosity does not vary significantly among Caucasian populations, apart from special cases, so that the likelihood ratio of the more common relationships between pairs of individuals may be obtained by looking at tabulated zi values. Conclusions A simple method is provided, which may be used by any scientist with the help of a calculator or a spreadsheet to compute the likelihood ratios of common alternative relationships between pairs of individuals. PMID:12441003

  14. The Locus of the Focus of a Rolling Parabola

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agarwal, Anurag; Marengo, James

    2010-01-01

    The catenary is usually introduced as the shape assumed by a hanging flexible cable. This is a "physical" description of a catenary. In this article we give a "geometrical" description of a catenary. Specifically we show that the catenary is the locus of the focus of a certain parabola as it rolls on the x-axis.

  15. The Influence of Locus of Control on Student Financial Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Britt, Sonya; Cumbie, Julie A.; Bell, Mary M.

    2013-01-01

    Data on psychological influences of financial behaviors has not been well addressed in student populations, which is concerning given the high levels of general and financial stress experienced by college students. The findings of this study indicate that college students with an external locus of control exhibit the worst financial behaviors.…

  16. Relationship Among Locus of Control, Self-concept, and Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donovan, Dennis M.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of the present research was to replicate O'Leary, et al.'s previous findings (EJ 100 528) and to test the hypothesis that the correlation between Rotter's Locus of Control scale and the Taylor Manifest Anxiety scale was moderated by neuroticism and negativism toward self. (Author/RK)

  17. Dealing with Malfunction: Locus of Control in Web-Conferencing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klebl, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers how students deal with malfunctions that occur during the use of web conferencing systems in learning arrangements. In a survey among participants in online courses that make use of a web-conferencing system (N = 129), the relationship between a preference for internal or external locus of control and the perception of…

  18. Relationships among Impulsiveness, Locus of Control, Sex, and Music Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miksza, Peter

    2006-01-01

    This study is an investigation of relationships among impulsiveness, locus of control, sex, observed practice behaviors, practice effectiveness, and self-reported practice habits in a sample of 40 college brass players. Practice effectiveness was defined by the amount of change in pretest and posttest performance achievement scores over one…

  19. Molecular genetic analysis of the Phaseolus vulgaris P locus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Common bean market classes are distinguished by their many seed colors, patterns, and size. At least 23 genes, acting independently or in an epistatic manner, affect the seed coat color and pattern. The P locus which is described as the “ground factor” by Emerson, has multiple alleles and controls a...

  20. Marathon Group: Changes in Perceived Locus of Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foulds, Melvin L.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Fifteen college students participated in a 24-hour marathon group and responded to the Internal-External Scale immediately before and after the experience. The results disclosed significant positive change at the .001 level in perceived locus of internal-external control of reinforcement expectancies in the direction of increased internality.…

  1. Exploring Learner Autonomy: Language Learning Locus of Control in Multilinguals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peek, Ron

    2016-01-01

    By using data from an online language learning beliefs survey (n?=?841), defining language learning experience in terms of participants' multilingualism, and using a domain-specific language learning locus of control (LLLOC) instrument, this article examines whether more experienced language learners can also be seen as more autonomous language…

  2. Effect of Color-coding on Locus of Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, David M.; Dwyer, Francis M.

    This study examined the effects of color on information processing strategies of internal and external locus of control learners. Specific objectives were to: (1) examine the instructional effectiveness of two types of visualized instruction in facilitating achievement for students with different learning styles; (2) determine whether an…

  3. Job Satisfaction and Locus of Control in an Academic Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stachowiak, Bonni J.

    2010-01-01

    This study explored any relationships that existed between faculty members' locus of control and job satisfaction at a small, private, faith-based university. Two demographic variables were also analyzed in the findings: number of years teaching in higher education and tenure status. The job satisfaction instrument used was the Job in General…

  4. Affective Relationship, Locus of Control, and Imitative Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finch, A. J., Jr.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    The effects of the affective relationship between a model and observer and locus of control on imitative behavior were investigated using a simple imitative task with 28 boys as subjects. Results indicated the need to control the affective relationship between model and observer and support Bandura's position that imitative behavior is primarily…

  5. Erythroid activator NF-E2, TAL1 and KLF1 play roles in forming the LCR HSs in the human adult β-globin locus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yea Woon; Yun, Won Ju; Kim, AeRi

    2016-06-01

    The β-like globin genes are developmental stage specifically transcribed in erythroid cells. The transcription of the β-like globin genes requires erythroid specific activators such as GATA-1, NF-E2, TAL1 and KLF1. However, the roles of these activators have not fully elucidated in transcription of the human adult β-globin gene. Here we employed hybrid MEL cells (MEL/ch11) where a human chromosome containing the β-globin locus is present and the adult β-globin gene is highly transcribed by induction. The roles of erythroid specific activators were analyzed by inhibiting the expression of NF-E2, TAL1 or KLF1 in MEL/ch11 cells. The loss of each activator decreased the transcription of human β-globin gene, locus wide histone hyperacetylation and the binding of other erythroid specific activators including GATA-1, even though not affecting the expression of other activators. Notably, sensitivity to DNase I was reduced in the locus control region (LCR) hypersensitive sites (HSs) with the depletion of activators. These results indicate that NF-E2, TAL1 and KLF1, all activators play a primary role in HSs formation in the LCR. It might contribute to the transcription of human adult β-globin gene by allowing the access of activators and cofactors. The roles of activators in the adult β-globin locus appear to be different from the roles in the early fetal locus. PMID:27026582

  6. Fine mapping and identification of a candidate gene for a major locus controlling maturity date in peach

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Maturity date (MD) is a crucial factor for marketing of fresh fruit, especially those with limited shelf-life such as peach (Prunus persica L. Batsch): selection of several cultivars with differing MD would be advantageous to cover and extend the marketing season. Aims of this work were the fine mapping and identification of candidate genes for the major maturity date locus previously identified on peach linkage group 4. To improve genetic resolution of the target locus two F2 populations derived from the crosses Contender x Ambra (CxA, 306 individuals) and PI91459 (NJ Weeping) x Bounty (WxBy, 103 individuals) were genotyped with the Sequenom and 9K Illumina Peach Chip SNP platforms, respectively. Results Recombinant individuals from the WxBy F2 population allowed the localisation of maturity date locus to a 220 kb region of the peach genome. Among the 25 annotated genes within this interval, functional classification identified ppa007577m and ppa008301m as the most likely candidates, both encoding transcription factors of the NAC (NAM/ATAF1, 2/CUC2) family. Re-sequencing of the four parents and comparison with the reference genome sequence uncovered a deletion of 232 bp in the upstream region of ppa007577m that is homozygous in NJ Weeping and heterozygous in Ambra, Bounty and the WxBy F1 parent. However, this variation did not segregate in the CxA F2 population being the CxA F1 parent homozygous for the reference allele. The second gene was thus examined as a candidate for maturity date. Re-sequencing of ppa008301m, showed an in-frame insertion of 9 bp in the last exon that co-segregated with the maturity date locus in both CxA and WxBy F2 populations. Conclusions Using two different segregating populations, the map position of the maturity date locus was refined from 3.56 Mb to 220 kb. A sequence variant in the NAC gene ppa008301m was shown to co-segregate with the maturity date locus, suggesting this gene as a candidate controlling ripening time in

  7. High-resolution genetic mapping of the sucrose octaacetate taste aversion (Soa) locus on mouse Chromosome 6

    PubMed Central

    Bachmanov, Alexander A.; Li, Xia; Li, Shanru; Neira, Mauricio; Beauchamp, Gary K.; Azen, Edwin A.

    2013-01-01

    An acetylated sugar, sucrose octaacetate (SOA), tastes bitter to humans and has an aversive taste to at least some mice and other animals. In mice, taste aversion to SOA depends on allelic variation of a single locus, Soa. Three Soa alleles determine ‘taster’ (Soaa), ‘nontaster’ (Soab), and ‘demitaster’ (Soac) phenotypes of taste sensitivity to SOA. Although Soa has been mapped to distal Chromosome (Chr) 6, the limits of the Soa region have not been defined. In this study, mice from congenic strains SW.B6-Soab, B6.SW-Soaa, and C3.SW-Soaa/c and from an outbred CFW strain were genotyped with polymorphic markers on Chr 6. In the congenic strains, the limits of introgressed donor fragments were determined. In the outbred mice, linkage disequilibrium and haplotype analyses were conducted. Positions of the markers were further resolved by using radiation hybrid mapping. The results show that the Soa locus is contained in a ~1-cM (3.3–4.9 Mb) region including the Prp locus. PMID:11641717

  8. A third major locus for autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia maps to 1p34.1-p32.

    PubMed Central

    Varret, M; Rabès, J P; Saint-Jore, B; Cenarro, A; Marinoni, J C; Civeira, F; Devillers, M; Krempf, M; Coulon, M; Thiart, R; Kotze, M J; Schmidt, H; Buzzi, J C; Kostner, G M; Bertolini, S; Pocovi, M; Rosa, A; Farnier, M; Martinez, M; Junien, C; Boileau, C

    1999-01-01

    Autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia (ADH), one of the most frequent hereditary disorders, is characterized by an isolated elevation of LDL particles that leads to premature mortality from cardiovascular complications. It is generally assumed that mutations in the LDLR and APOB genes account for ADH. We identified one large French pedigree (HC2) and 12 additional white families with ADH in which we excluded linkage to the LDLR and APOB, implicating a new locus we named "FH3." A LOD score of 3.13 at a recombination fraction of 0 was obtained at markers D1S2892 and D1S2722. We localized the FH3 locus to a 9-cM interval at 1p34.1-p32. We tested four regional markers in another set of 12 ADH families. Positive LOD scores were obtained in three pedigrees, whereas linkage was excluded in the others. Heterogeneity tests indicated linkage to FH3 in approximately 27% of these non-LDLR/non-APOB ADH families and implied a fourth locus. Radiation hybrid mapping located four candidate genes at 1p34.1-p32, outside the critical region, showing no identity with FH3. Our results show that ADH is genetically more heterogeneous than conventionally accepted. PMID:10205269

  9. An embryonic stage–specific enhancer within the murine β-globin locus mediates domain-wide histone hyperacetylation

    PubMed Central

    Fromm, George; Cadiz-Rivera, Brenda; de Vries, Christina; Getman, Michael; McGrath, Kathleen E.; Kingsley, Paul D.; Fields, Jennifer; Fiering, Steven

    2011-01-01

    In mammalian nuclei, a select number of tissue-specific gene loci exhibit broadly distributed patterns of histone modifications, such as histone hyperacetylation, that are normally associated with active gene promoters. Previously, we characterized such hyperacetylated domains within mammalian β-globin gene loci, and determined that within the murine locus, neither the β-globin locus control region nor the gene promoters were required for domain formation. Here, we identify a developmentally specific erythroid enhancer, hypersensitive site-embryonic 1 (HS-E1), located within the embryonic β-globin domain in mouse, which is homologous to a region located downstream of the human embryonic ϵ-globin gene. This sequence exhibits nuclease hypersensitivity in primitive erythroid cells and acts as an enhancer in gain-of-function assays. Deletion of HS-E1 from the endogenous murine β-globin locus results in significant decrease in the expression of the embryonic β-globin genes and loss of the domain-wide pattern of histone hyperacetylation. The data suggest that HS-E1 is an enhancer that is uniquely required for β-like globin expression in primitive erythroid cells, and that it defines a novel class of enhancer that works in part by domain-wide modulation of chromatin structure. PMID:21321362

  10. A third major locus for autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia maps to 1p34.1-p32.

    PubMed

    Varret, M; Rabès, J P; Saint-Jore, B; Cenarro, A; Marinoni, J C; Civeira, F; Devillers, M; Krempf, M; Coulon, M; Thiart, R; Kotze, M J; Schmidt, H; Buzzi, J C; Kostner, G M; Bertolini, S; Pocovi, M; Rosa, A; Farnier, M; Martinez, M; Junien, C; Boileau, C

    1999-05-01

    Autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia (ADH), one of the most frequent hereditary disorders, is characterized by an isolated elevation of LDL particles that leads to premature mortality from cardiovascular complications. It is generally assumed that mutations in the LDLR and APOB genes account for ADH. We identified one large French pedigree (HC2) and 12 additional white families with ADH in which we excluded linkage to the LDLR and APOB, implicating a new locus we named "FH3." A LOD score of 3.13 at a recombination fraction of 0 was obtained at markers D1S2892 and D1S2722. We localized the FH3 locus to a 9-cM interval at 1p34.1-p32. We tested four regional markers in another set of 12 ADH families. Positive LOD scores were obtained in three pedigrees, whereas linkage was excluded in the others. Heterogeneity tests indicated linkage to FH3 in approximately 27% of these non-LDLR/non-APOB ADH families and implied a fourth locus. Radiation hybrid mapping located four candidate genes at 1p34.1-p32, outside the critical region, showing no identity with FH3. Our results show that ADH is genetically more heterogeneous than conventionally accepted. PMID:10205269

  11. Recombinations in Individuals Homozygous by Descent Localize the Friedreich Ataxia Locus in a Cloned 450-kb Interval

    PubMed Central

    Rodius, François; Duclos, Franck; Wrogemann, Klaus; Le Paslier, Denis; Ougen, Pierre; Billault, Alain; Belal, Samir; Musenger, Christine; Brice, Alexis; Dürr, Alexandra; Mignard, Claude; Sirugo, Giorgio; Weissenbach, Jean; Cohen, Daniel; Hentati, Fayçal; Hamida, Mongi Ben; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Koenig, Michel

    1994-01-01

    The locus for Friedreich ataxia (FRDA), a severe neurodegenerative disease, is tightly linked to markers D9S5 and D9S15, and analysis of rare recombination events has suggested the order cen–FRDA–D9S5–D9S15–qter. We report here the construction of a YAC contig extending 800 kb centromeric to D9S5 and the isolation of five new microsatellite markers from this region. In order to map these markers with respect to the FRDA locus, all within a 1-cM confidence interval, we sought to increase the genetic information of available FRDA families by considering homozygosity by descent and association with founder haplotypes in isolated populations. This approach allowed us to identify one phase-known recombination and one probable historic recombination on haplotypes from Réunion Island patients, both of which place three of the five markers proximal to FRDA. This represents the first identification of close FRDA flanking markers on the centromeric side. The two other markers allowed us to narrow the breakpoint of a previously identified distal recombination that is >180 kb from D9S5 (26P). Taken together, the results place the FRDA locus in a 450-kb interval, which is small enough for direct search of candidate genes. A detailed rare cutter restriction map and a cosmid contig covering this interval were constructed and should facilitate the search of genes in this region. ImagesFigure 3 PMID:8198128

  12. Evidence for Locus Heterogeneity in Autosomal Dominant Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Speer, Marcy C.; Gilchrist, James M.; Chutkow, Jerry G.; McMichael, Robert; Westbrook, Carol A.; Stajich, Jeffrey M.; Jorgenson, Eric M.; Gaskell, P. Craig; Rosi, Barbara L.; Ramesar, Raj; Vance, Jeffery M.; Yamaoka, Larry H.; Roses, Allen D.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.

    1995-01-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) is a diagnostic classification encompassing a broad group of proximal myopathies. A gene for the dominant form of LGMD (LGMD1A) has recently been localized to a 7-cM region of chromosome 5q between D5S178 and IL9. We studied three additional dominant LGMD families for linkage to these two markers and excluded all from localization to this region, providing evidence for locus heterogeneity within the dominant form of LGMD. Although the patterns of muscle weakness were similar in all families studied, the majority of affected family members in the chromosome 5–linked pedigree have a dysarthric speech pattern, which is not present in any of the five unlinked families. The demonstration of heterogeneity within autosomal dominant LGMD is the first step in attempting to subclassify these families with similar clinical phenotypes on a molecular level. PMID:8533766

  13. Genetic overlap between Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease at the MAPT locus

    PubMed Central

    Desikan, Rahul S.; Schork, Andrew J.; Wang, Yunpeng; Witoelar, Aree; Sharma, Manu; McEvoy, Linda K.; Holland, Dominic; Brewer, James B.; Chen, Chi-Hua; Thompson, Wesley K.; Harold, Denise; Williams, Julie; Owen, Michael J.; O’Donovan, Michael C.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Mayeux, Richard; Haines, Jonathan L.; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Heutink, Peter; Singleton, Andrew B.; Brice, Alexis; Wood, Nicolas W.; Hardy, John; Martinez, Maria; Choi, Seung Hoi; DeStefano, Anita; Ikram, M. Arfan; Bis, Joshua C.; Smith, Albert; Fitzpatrick, Annette L.; Launer, Lenore; van Duijn, Cornelia; Seshadri, Sudha; Ulstein, Ingun Dina; Aarsland, Dag; Fladby, Tormod; Djurovic, Srdjan; Hyman, Bradley T.; Snaedal, Jon; Stefansson, Hreinn; Stefansson, Kari; Gasser, Thomas; Andreassen, Ole A.; Dale, Anders M.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated genetic overlap between Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Parkinson’s disease (PD). Using summary statistics (p-values) from large recent genomewide association studies (GWAS) (total n = 89,904 individuals), we sought to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associating with both AD and PD. We found and replicated association of both AD and PD with the A allele of rs393152 within the extended MAPT region on chromosome 17 (meta analysis p-value across 5 independent AD cohorts = 1.65 × 10−7). In independent datasets, we found a dose-dependent effect of the A allele of rs393152 on intra-cerebral MAPT transcript levels and volume loss within the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus. Our findings identify the tau-associated MAPT locus as a site of genetic overlap between AD and PD and extending prior work, we show that the MAPT region increases risk of Alzheimer’s neurodegeneration. PMID:25687773

  14. Evidence for locus heterogeneity in autosomal dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Speer, M.C.; Stajich, J.M.; Gaskell, P.C.

    1995-12-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) is a diagnostic classification encompassing a broad group of proximal myopathies. A gene for the dominant form of LGMD (LGMD1A) has recently been localized to a 7-cM region of chromosome 5q between D5S178 and IL9. We studied three additional dominant LGMD families for linkage to these two markers and excluded all from localization to this region, providing evidence for locus heterogeneity within the dominant form of LGMD. Although the patterns of muscle weakness were similar in all families studied, the majority of affected family members in the chromosome 5-linked pedigree have a dysarthric speech pattern, which is not present in any of the five unlinked families. The demonstration of heterogeneity within autosomal dominant LGMD is the first step in attempting to subclassify these families with similar clinical phenotypes on a molecular level. 33 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  15. The Locus Coeruleus: Essential for Maintaining Cognitive Function and the Aging Brain.

    PubMed

    Mather, Mara; Harley, Carolyn W

    2016-03-01

    Research on cognitive aging has focused on how decline in various cortical and hippocampal regions influence cognition. However, brainstem regions play essential modulatory roles, and new evidence suggests that, among these, the integrity of the locus coeruleus (LC)-norepinephrine (NE) system plays a key role in determining late-life cognitive abilities. The LC is especially vulnerable to toxins and infection and is often the first place Alzheimer's-related pathology appears, with most people showing at least some tau pathology by their mid-20s. On the other hand, NE released from the LC during arousing, mentally challenging, or novel situations helps to protect neurons from damage, which may help to explain how education and engaging careers prevent cognitive decline in later years. PMID:26895736

  16. Genetic overlap between Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease at the MAPT locus.

    PubMed

    Desikan, R S; Schork, A J; Wang, Y; Witoelar, A; Sharma, M; McEvoy, L K; Holland, D; Brewer, J B; Chen, C-H; Thompson, W K; Harold, D; Williams, J; Owen, M J; O'Donovan, M C; Pericak-Vance, M A; Mayeux, R; Haines, J L; Farrer, L A; Schellenberg, G D; Heutink, P; Singleton, A B; Brice, A; Wood, N W; Hardy, J; Martinez, M; Choi, S H; DeStefano, A; Ikram, M A; Bis, J C; Smith, A; Fitzpatrick, A L; Launer, L; van Duijn, C; Seshadri, S; Ulstein, I D; Aarsland, D; Fladby, T; Djurovic, S; Hyman, B T; Snaedal, J; Stefansson, H; Stefansson, K; Gasser, T; Andreassen, O A; Dale, A M

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the genetic overlap between Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). Using summary statistics (P-values) from large recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) (total n=89 904 individuals), we sought to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associating with both AD and PD. We found and replicated association of both AD and PD with the A allele of rs393152 within the extended MAPT region on chromosome 17 (meta analysis P-value across five independent AD cohorts=1.65 × 10(-7)). In independent datasets, we found a dose-dependent effect of the A allele of rs393152 on intra-cerebral MAPT transcript levels and volume loss within the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus. Our findings identify the tau-associated MAPT locus as a site of genetic overlap between AD and PD, and extending prior work, we show that the MAPT region increases risk of Alzheimer's neurodegeneration. PMID:25687773

  17. Locus of Control, Field Dependence, and Stress Reactivity in Young Adult Males.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schweibinz, Janet S.

    This study examined the potential relationships between locus of control, field dependence, and stress reactivity in a sample of young adult males (N=40). Locus of control, field dependence, and stress reactivity were measured by the Rotter Locus of Control Scale, the Embedded Figures Test, and the Life Events Survey, respectively. State stress…

  18. On the Locus Formed by the Maximum Heights of Projectile Motion with Air Resistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez-Saldana, H.

    2010-01-01

    We present an analysis on the locus formed by the set of maxima of the trajectories of a projectile launched in a medium with linear drag. Such a place, the locus of apexes, is written in terms of the Lambert "W" function in polar coordinates, confirming the special role played by this function in the problem. To characterize the locus, a study of…

  19. Locus of Control, Television Viewing, and Eating Disorder Symptomatology in Young Females.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fouts, Gregory; Vaughan, Kimberley

    2002-01-01

    Assesses the effects of locus of control and television watching on eating disorder symptomatology in girls between the ages 10-17 years. Girls with an external locus of control had significantly greater eating disorder symptomatology. Girls who watched higher amounts of television and had an external locus of control had significantly greater…

  20. Reframing Student Affairs Leadership: An Analysis of Organizational Frames of Reference and Locus of Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tull, Ashley; Freeman, Jerrid P.

    2011-01-01

    Examined in this study were the identified frames of reference and locus of control used by 478 student affairs administrators. Administrator responses were examined to identify frames of reference most commonly used and their preference order. Locus of control most commonly used and the relationship between frames of reference and locus of…

  1. Development and Validation of the Health Locus of Control (HLC) Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallston, Barbara Strudler; And Others

    1976-01-01

    The Health Locus of Control (HLC) Scale is an area-specific measure of expectancies regarding locus of control developed for prediction of health-related behavior. Two experiments show discriminant validity of the HLC in contrast with Rotter's Internal-External Locus of Control Scale. Normative data on the HLC are provided. (Author)

  2. Locus of Control and Attitude toward Eating in a Female College Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groth-Marnat, Gary; Scumaker, Jack F.

    1988-01-01

    Investigated relationship between locus of control and attitude to food intake in 101 female college students. Results indicated that locus of control was unable to predict attitudes toward eating and fear of becoming overweight. Thesis that locus of control would be related to attitude toward food intake was not supported. (Author/NB)

  3. Antecedents and Correlates of Locus of Control in High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masi, Wendy Segal

    This study dealt with the perceived parental attitudes of affection, physical contact, consistency-trust, security and perceived parental locus of control orientation as possible determinants of locus of control orientation in high school seniors. A second phase was concerned with the relationship of perceived parental locus of control orientation…

  4. Rasch Analysis of the Locus-of-Hope Scale. Brief Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gadiana, Leny G.; David, Adonis P.

    2015-01-01

    The Locus-of-Hope Scale (LHS) was developed as a measure of the locus-of-hope dimensions (Bernardo, 2010). The present study adds to the emerging literature on locus-of-hope by assessing the psychometric properties of the LHS using Rasch analysis. The results from the Rasch analyses of the four subscales of LHS provided evidence on the…

  5. A Study of Reward Preference in Taiwanese Gifted and Nongifted Students with Differential Locus of Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Su Chen; Elliott, Robert T.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate whether gifted and nongifted students' preferences for different types of reward were affected by differential locus of control. In total, 181 gifted and 107 nongifted junior high school students in Taiwan participated. The Nowicki-Strickland Locus of Control Scale was used as a measure of locus of…

  6. Locus of Control in Offenders and Alleged Offenders with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Wendy; Leggett, Janice; Garrett, Tanya

    2007-01-01

    Locus of control can be a useful measure of treatment outcome in offenders from the general population. However, there is little information regarding locus of control and offenders with learning disabilities. Existing measures of locus of control use complex language and abstract ideas that may not be accessible to individuals in this group. A…

  7. On the Relation of Locus of Control and L2 Reading and Writing Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghonsooly, Behzad; Shirvan, Majid Elahi

    2011-01-01

    Locus of control, a psychological construct, has been the focus of attention in recent decades. Psychologists have discussed the effect of locus of control on achieving life goals in social/psychological interactions. While learning a foreign language involves both social interactions and psychological processes, the role and relation of locus of…

  8. A YAC contig encompassing the chromosome 7p locus for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Inglehearn, C.F.; Keen, T.J.; Ratel, R.

    1994-09-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited retinal degeneration characterized by night blindness and loss of peripheral vision, often leading to complete blindness. The autosomal dominant form (adRP) maps to at least six different loci, including the rhodopsin and peripherin/Rds genes and four loci identified only by linkage analysis on chromosomes 7p, 7q, 8cen and 19q. The 7p locus was reported by this laboratory in a large English family, with a lod score of 16.5. Several new genetic markers have been tested in the family and this locus has now been refined to an interval of approximately 1 cM between markers D7S795 and D7S484 in the 7p13-15 region. In order to clone the gene for adRP, we have used microsatellites and STSs from the region to identify over 80 YACs, from four different libraries, which map to this interval. End clones from key YACs were isolated for the generation of additional STSs. Eleven microsatellite markers between D7S435 (distal) and D7S484 (proximal) have been ordered by a combination of both physical and genetic mapping. In this way we have now obtained a YAC contig spanning approximately 3 megabases of chromosome 7p within which the adRP gene must lie. One gene (aquaporin) and one chromosome 7 brain EST have been placed on the contig but both map distal to the region of interest. Sixteen other ESTs and three further known 7p genes mapping in the region have been excluded. We are now attempting to build a cosmid contig in the defined interval and identify further expressed sequences from both YACs and cosmids to test as candidates for the adRP gene.

  9. Evidence for a susceptibility locus for manic-depressive disorder in Xq26

    SciTech Connect

    Pekkarinen, P.; Bredbacka, P.E.; Terwilliger, J.

    1994-09-01

    Manic-depression (MD) is a severe psychiatric disorder affecting 1% of the population. Several linkage studies have provided evidence for a susceptibility locus for MD in chromosome Xq27-28. However, validity of these findings have remained unclear for several reasons: linkage has been suggested to two distinct chromosomal regions (F9 and CB-G6PD) separated by 30 cM, linkage has been found in only few of the pedigrees analyzed and ascertainment bias have probably been introduced when using classical markers like CB. The aim of our study was to analyze several markers expanding both of these regions in one extended Finnish pedigree with 13 affected individuals (bipolar or schizoaffective disorder) and without male-to-male transmission. Together 27 polymorphic X chromosomal markers were studied, 22 of them in Xq25-q28. Linkage analyses were carried out using a dominant model, 0.005 disease gene frequency, age-dependent penetrance with a maximum penetrance of 0.80 and low phenocopy rate. Two-point linkage analyses resulted in clearly negative lod scores (<-2) to almost all markers outside the chromosomal region of Xq26. Three markers DXS458, GABRA3 and G6PD, gave uninformative lod scores but respective chromosomal areas could be excluded by other markers in the vicinity. Opposite to this, several markers on Xq26 resulted in positive lod scores. A maximum lod score of 3.4 was obtained with the marker AFM205wd2 at {theta}=0.0. This marker is located about 7 cM centromeric to F9. When all published linkage data on Xq26-q28 was reanalyzed no evidence for locus heterogeneity emerged suggesting a more general significance of this DNA region in the predisposition to manic-depressive disorder.

  10. PARK10 is a major locus for sporadic neuropathologically confirmed Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Beecham, Gary W.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Scott, William K.; Martin, Eden R.; Schellenberg, Gerard; Nuytemans, Karen; Larson, Eric B.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M.; Hurtig, Howard I.; Mash, Deborah C.; Beach, Thomas G.; Troncoso, Juan C.; Pletnikova, Olga; Frosch, Matthew P.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Honig, Lawrence S.; Marder, Karen; Vonsattel, Jean Paul; Goldman, Samuel M.; Vinters, Harry V.; Ross, Owen A.; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Wang, Liyong; Dykxhoorn, Derek M.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Montine, Thomas J.; Leverenz, James B.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To minimize pathologic heterogeneity in genetic studies of Parkinson disease (PD), the Autopsy-Confirmed Parkinson Disease Genetics Consortium conducted a genome-wide association study using both patients with neuropathologically confirmed PD and controls. Methods: Four hundred eighty-four cases and 1,145 controls met neuropathologic diagnostic criteria, were genotyped, and then imputed to 3,922,209 variants for genome-wide association study analysis. Results: A small region on chromosome 1 was strongly associated with PD (rs10788972; p = 6.2 × 10−8). The association peak lies within and very close to the maximum linkage peaks of 2 prior positive linkage studies defining the PARK10 locus. We demonstrate that rs10788972 is in strong linkage disequilibrium with rs914722, the single nucleotide polymorphism defining the PARK10 haplotype previously shown to be significantly associated with age at onset in PD. The region containing the PARK10 locus was significantly reduced from 10.6 megabases to 100 kilobases and contains 4 known genes: TCEANC2, TMEM59, miR-4781, and LDLRAD1. Conclusions: We confirm the association of a PARK10 haplotype with the risk of developing idiopathic PD. Furthermore, we significantly reduce the size of the PARK10 region. None of the candidate genes in the new PARK10 region have been previously implicated in the biology of PD, suggesting new areas of potential research. This study strongly suggests that reducing pathologic heterogeneity may enhance the application of genetic association studies to PD. PMID:25663231

  11. Linkage mapping of a polymorphic plumage locus associated with intermorph incompatibility in the Gouldian finch (Erythrura gouldiae).

    PubMed

    Kim, K-W; Griffith, S C; Burke, T

    2016-04-01

    Colour polymorphism is known to facilitate speciation but the genetic basis of animal pigmentation and how colour polymorphisms contribute to speciation is poorly understood. Restricted recombination may promote linkage disequilibrium between the colour locus and incompatibility genes. Genomic rearrangement and the position of relevant loci within a chromosome are important factors that influence the frequency of recombination. Therefore, it is important to know the position of the colour locus, gene order and recombination landscape of the chromosome to understand the mechanism that generates incompatibilities between morphs. Recent studies showed remarkable pre- and postzygotic incompatibilities between sympatric colour morphs of the Gouldian finch (Erythrura gouldiae), in which head feather colour is genetically determined by a single sex-linked locus, Red. We constructed a genetic map for the Z chromosome of the Gouldian finch (male-specific map distance=131 cM), using 618 captive-bred birds and 34 microsatellite markers, to investigate the extent of inter- and intraspecific genomic rearrangements and variation in recombination rate within the Z chromosome. We refined the location of the Red locus to a ~7.2-cM interval in a region with a moderate recombination rate but outside the least-recombining, putative centromeric region. There was no evidence of chromosome-wide genomic rearrangements between the chromosomes carrying the red or black alleles with the current marker resolution. This work will contribute to identifying the causal gene, which will in turn enable alternative explanations for the association between incompatibility and colouration, such as fine-scale linkage disequilibrium, genomic rearrangements and pleiotropy, to be tested. PMID:26786066

  12. Association between prostate cancer in black Americans and an allele of the PADPRP pseudogene locus on chromosome 13

    SciTech Connect

    Doll, J.A.; Suarez, B.K.; Donis-Keller, H.

    1996-02-01

    Black American men have a higher incidence of cancer of the prostate (CAP), multiple myeloma, and lung cancer than do white American men. The basis for these differences no doubt includes environmental influences, because American blacks have also been found to have a higher incidence of CAP than do African blacks. However, genetic factors may play a role as well. For example, Lyn et al. reported an increase in the frequency of an allele of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PADPRP) pseudogene locus on chromosome 13 in black Americans with CAP, suggesting the presence of a disease-susceptibility locus. Since only nine CAP patients were studied, proof of the significance of the finding for the general population of black Americans will rely on independent replication of the result and studies with larger sample sizes. We have doubled the number of black American CAP patients studied at the PADPRP pseudogene locus on chromosome 13 and compared them with white Americans with CAP, along with reference samples. In addition, we have determined allele frequencies by using a larger number of white individuals, from the CEPH reference pedigree resource, and a larger number of black Americans than previously reported, which may reflect more accurately the allele frequencies in these populations. We also find a statistically significant association between an allele at the PADPRP pseudogene locus and CAP in black Americans; however, it is not the same allele reported by Lyn et al. Furthermore, we tested CAP tumor DNA for chromosome 13 PADPRP pseudogene region deletions. In contrast to the report of Bhatia et al., we found no evidence for deletions that would suggest the presence of a tumor-suppressor gene in this region of chromosome 13. 16 refs., 2 tabs.

  13. HMGB1 binds to the rs7903146 locus in TCF7L2 in human pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuedan; Oskolkov, Nikolay; Shcherbina, Liliya; Ratti, Joyce; Kock, Kian-Hong; Su, Jing; Martin, Brian; Oskolkova, Malin Zackrisson; Göransson, Olga; Bacon, Julie; Li, Weimin; Bucciarelli, Saskia; Cilio, Corrado; Brazma, Alvis; Thatcher, Bradley; Rung, Johan; Wierup, Nils; Renström, Erik; Groop, Leif; Hansson, Ola

    2016-07-15

    The intronic SNP rs7903146 in the T-cell factor 7-like 2 gene (TCF7L2) is the common genetic variant most highly associated with Type 2 diabetes known to date. The risk T-allele is located in an open chromatin region specific to human pancreatic islets of Langerhans, thereby accessible for binding of regulatory proteins. The risk T-allele locus exhibits stronger enhancer activity compared to the non-risk C-allele. The aim of this study was to identify transcriptional regulators that bind the open chromatin region in the rs7903146 locus and thereby potentially regulate TCF7L2 expression and activity. Using affinity chromatography followed by Edman sequencing, we identified one candidate regulatory protein, i.e. high-mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1). The binding of HMGB1 to the rs7903146 locus was confirmed in pancreatic islets from human deceased donors, in HCT116 and in HEK293 cell lines using: (i) protein purification on affinity columns followed by Western blot, (ii) chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by qPCR and (iii) electrophoretic mobility shift assay. The results also suggested that HMGB1 might have higher binding affinity to the C-allele of rs7903146 compared to the T-allele, which was supported in vitro using Dynamic Light Scattering, possibly in a tissue-specific manner. The functional consequence of HMGB1 depletion in HCT116 and INS1 cells was reduced insulin and TCF7L2 mRNA expression, TCF7L2 transcriptional activity and glucose stimulated insulin secretion. These findings suggest that the rs7903146 locus might exert its enhancer function by interacting with HMGB1 in an allele dependent manner. PMID:26845344

  14. Fine-mapping of the HNF1B multicancer locus identifies candidate variants that mediate endometrial cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Painter, Jodie N.; O'Mara, Tracy A.; Batra, Jyotsna; Cheng, Timothy; Lose, Felicity A.; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Ahmed, Shahana; Ferguson, Kaltin; Healey, Catherine S.; Kaufmann, Susanne; Hillman, Kristine M.; Walpole, Carina; Moya, Leire; Pollock, Pamela; Jones, Angela; Howarth, Kimberley; Martin, Lynn; Gorman, Maggie; Hodgson, Shirley; De Polanco, Ma. Magdalena Echeverry; Sans, Monica; Carracedo, Angel; Castellvi-Bel, Sergi; Rojas-Martinez, Augusto; Santos, Erika; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Carvajal-Carmona, Luis; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Long, Jirong; Zheng, Wei; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Montgomery, Grant W.; Webb, Penelope M.; Scott, Rodney J.; McEvoy, Mark; Attia, John; Holliday, Elizabeth; Martin, Nicholas G.; Nyholt, Dale R.; Henders, Anjali K.; Fasching, Peter A.; Hein, Alexander; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Renner, Stefan P.; Dörk, Thilo; Hillemanns, Peter; Dürst, Matthias; Runnebaum, Ingo; Lambrechts, Diether; Coenegrachts, Lieve; Schrauwen, Stefanie; Amant, Frederic; Winterhoff, Boris; Dowdy, Sean C.; Goode, Ellen L.; Teoman, Attila; Salvesen, Helga B.; Trovik, Jone; Njolstad, Tormund S.; Werner, Henrica M.J.; Ashton, Katie; Proietto, Tony; Otton, Geoffrey; Tzortzatos, Gerasimos; Mints, Miriam; Tham, Emma; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Liu, Jianjun; Li, Jingmei; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Ekici, Arif B.; Ruebner, Matthias; Johnson, Nicola; Peto, Julian; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida K.; Meindl, Alfons; Brauch, Hiltrud; Lindblom, Annika; Depreeuw, Jeroen; Moisse, Matthieu; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Giles, Graham G.; Bruinsma, Fiona; Cunningham, Julie M.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Kristensen, Vessela N.; Cox, Angela; Swerdlow, Anthony J.; Orr, Nicholas; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Chen, Zhihua; Shah, Mitul; French, Juliet D.; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Dunning, Alison M.; Tomlinson, Ian; Easton, Douglas F.; Edwards, Stacey L.; Thompson, Deborah J.; Spurdle, Amanda B.

    2015-01-01

    Common variants in the hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 homeobox B (HNF1B) gene are associated with the risk of Type II diabetes and multiple cancers. Evidence to date indicates that cancer risk may be mediated via genetic or epigenetic effects on HNF1B gene expression. We previously found single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at the HNF1B locus to be associated with endometrial cancer, and now report extensive fine-mapping and in silico and laboratory analyses of this locus. Analysis of 1184 genotyped and imputed SNPs in 6608 Caucasian cases and 37 925 controls, and 895 Asian cases and 1968 controls, revealed the best signal of association for SNP rs11263763 (P = 8.4 × 10−14, odds ratio = 0.86, 95% confidence interval = 0.82–0.89), located within HNF1B intron 1. Haplotype analysis and conditional analyses provide no evidence of further independent endometrial cancer risk variants at this locus. SNP rs11263763 genotype was associated with HNF1B mRNA expression but not with HNF1B methylation in endometrial tumor samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas. Genetic analyses prioritized rs11263763 and four other SNPs in high-to-moderate linkage disequilibrium as the most likely causal SNPs. Three of these SNPs map to the extended HNF1B promoter based on chromatin marks extending from the minimal promoter region. Reporter assays demonstrated that this extended region reduces activity in combination with the minimal HNF1B promoter, and that the minor alleles of rs11263763 or rs8064454 are associated with decreased HNF1B promoter activity. Our findings provide evidence for a single signal associated with endometrial cancer risk at the HNF1B locus, and that risk is likely mediated via altered HNF1B gene expression. PMID:25378557

  15. DSP4, a selective neurotoxin for the locus coeruleus noradrenergic system. A review of its mode of action.

    PubMed

    Ross, Svante B; Stenfors, Carina

    2015-01-01

    DSP4 (N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine hydrochloride) is a selective neurotoxin for the locus coeruleus noradrenergic system in the rodent and bird brain. It readily passes the blood-brain barrier and cyclizes to a reactive aziridinium derivative that is accumulated into the noradrenergic nerve terminals via the noradrenaline transporter. DSP4 is also an irreversible inhibitor of this transporter. Within the nerve terminals the aziridinium derivative reacts with unknown vital cellular components, destroying the terminals. At the dose 50 mg/kg i.p. this is characterized by a rapid and long-lasting loss of noradrenaline and a slower decrease in the dopamine-β-hydroxylase enzyme activity and immunoreactivity in the regions innervated from locus coeruleus. The tissue level of noradrenaline is reduced to 10-30% of the normal value. The extraneuronal concentration is, on the other hand, increased due to inflow from non-lesioned regions. Like the peripheral sympathetic nerves the non-locus coeruleus noradrenergic systems in the rodent brain is resistant to the neurotoxic action of DSP4. Serotoninergic and dopaminergic nerves are only slightly or not at all affected by DSP4. The neurotoxic effect is counteracted by pretreatment with noradrenaline uptake inhibitors (e.g., desipramine). MAO-B inhibitors of the N-propargylamine type (e.g., selegiline) also counteract the DSP4-induced neurotoxicity with another, yet unknown mechanism. Because of its selectivity for the locus coeruleus system DSP4 is a useful tool in studies of the functional role of this noradrenergic system in the brain. PMID:24964753

  16. Fine-mapping of the HNF1B multicancer locus identifies candidate variants that mediate endometrial cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Painter, Jodie N; O'Mara, Tracy A; Batra, Jyotsna; Cheng, Timothy; Lose, Felicity A; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Ahmed, Shahana; Ferguson, Kaltin; Healey, Catherine S; Kaufmann, Susanne; Hillman, Kristine M; Walpole, Carina; Moya, Leire; Pollock, Pamela; Jones, Angela; Howarth, Kimberley; Martin, Lynn; Gorman, Maggie; Hodgson, Shirley; De Polanco, Ma Magdalena Echeverry; Sans, Monica; Carracedo, Angel; Castellvi-Bel, Sergi; Rojas-Martinez, Augusto; Santos, Erika; Teixeira, Manuel R; Carvajal-Carmona, Luis; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Long, Jirong; Zheng, Wei; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Montgomery, Grant W; Webb, Penelope M; Scott, Rodney J; McEvoy, Mark; Attia, John; Holliday, Elizabeth; Martin, Nicholas G; Nyholt, Dale R; Henders, Anjali K; Fasching, Peter A; Hein, Alexander; Beckmann, Matthias W; Renner, Stefan P; Dörk, Thilo; Hillemanns, Peter; Dürst, Matthias; Runnebaum, Ingo; Lambrechts, Diether; Coenegrachts, Lieve; Schrauwen, Stefanie; Amant, Frederic; Winterhoff, Boris; Dowdy, Sean C; Goode, Ellen L; Teoman, Attila; Salvesen, Helga B; Trovik, Jone; Njolstad, Tormund S; Werner, Henrica M J; Ashton, Katie; Proietto, Tony; Otton, Geoffrey; Tzortzatos, Gerasimos; Mints, Miriam; Tham, Emma; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Liu, Jianjun; Li, Jingmei; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Ekici, Arif B; Ruebner, Matthias; Johnson, Nicola; Peto, Julian; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida K; Meindl, Alfons; Brauch, Hiltrud; Lindblom, Annika; Depreeuw, Jeroen; Moisse, Matthieu; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Couch, Fergus J; Olson, Janet E; Giles, Graham G; Bruinsma, Fiona; Cunningham, Julie M; Fridley, Brooke L; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Kristensen, Vessela N; Cox, Angela; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Orr, Nicholas; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Chen, Zhihua; Shah, Mitul; French, Juliet D; Pharoah, Paul D P; Dunning, Alison M; Tomlinson, Ian; Easton, Douglas F; Edwards, Stacey L; Thompson, Deborah J; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2015-03-01

    Common variants in the hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 homeobox B (HNF1B) gene are associated with the risk of Type II diabetes and multiple cancers. Evidence to date indicates that cancer risk may be mediated via genetic or epigenetic effects on HNF1B gene expression. We previously found single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at the HNF1B locus to be associated with endometrial cancer, and now report extensive fine-mapping and in silico and laboratory analyses of this locus. Analysis of 1184 genotyped and imputed SNPs in 6608 Caucasian cases and 37 925 controls, and 895 Asian cases and 1968 controls, revealed the best signal of association for SNP rs11263763 (P = 8.4 × 10(-14), odds ratio = 0.86, 95% confidence interval = 0.82-0.89), located within HNF1B intron 1. Haplotype analysis and conditional analyses provide no evidence of further independent endometrial cancer risk variants at this locus. SNP rs11263763 genotype was associated with HNF1B mRNA expression but not with HNF1B methylation in endometrial tumor samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas. Genetic analyses prioritized rs11263763 and four other SNPs in high-to-moderate linkage disequilibrium as the most likely causal SNPs. Three of these SNPs map to the extended HNF1B promoter based on chromatin marks extending from the minimal promoter region. Reporter assays demonstrated that this extended region reduces activity in combination with the minimal HNF1B promoter, and that the minor alleles of rs11263763 or rs8064454 are associated with decreased HNF1B promoter activity. Our findings provide evidence for a single signal associated with endometrial cancer risk at the HNF1B locus, and that risk is likely mediated via altered HNF1B gene expression. PMID:25378557

  17. An S-Locus Independent Pollen Factor Confers Self-Compatibility in ‘Katy’ Apricot

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Laura; Gisbert, Ana D.; Badenes, María L.; Romero, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Loss of pollen-S function in Prunus self-compatible cultivars has been mostly associated with deletions or insertions in the S-haplotype-specific F-box (SFB) genes. However, self-compatible pollen-part mutants defective for non-S-locus factors have also been found, for instance, in the apricot (Prunus armeniaca) cv. ‘Canino’. In the present study, we report the genetic and molecular analysis of another self-compatible apricot cv. termed ‘Katy’. S-genotype of ‘Katy’ was determined as S1S2 and S-RNase PCR-typing of selfing and outcrossing populations from ‘Katy’ showed that pollen gametes bearing either the S1- or the S2-haplotype were able to overcome self-incompatibility (SI) barriers. Sequence analyses showed no SNP or indel affecting the SFB1 and SFB2 alleles from ‘Katy’ and, moreover, no evidence of pollen-S duplication was found. As a whole, the obtained results are compatible with the hypothesis that the loss-of-function of a S-locus unlinked factor gametophytically expressed in pollen (M’-locus) leads to SI breakdown in ‘Katy’. A mapping strategy based on segregation distortion loci mapped the M’-locus within an interval of 9.4 cM at the distal end of chr.3 corresponding to ∼1.29 Mb in the peach (Prunus persica) genome. Interestingly, pollen-part mutations (PPMs) causing self-compatibility (SC) in the apricot cvs. ‘Canino’ and ‘Katy’ are located within an overlapping region of ∼273 Kb in chr.3. No evidence is yet available to discern if they affect the same gene or not, but molecular markers seem to indicate that both cultivars are genetically unrelated suggesting that every PPM may have arisen independently. Further research will be necessary to reveal the precise nature of ‘Katy’ PPM, but fine-mapping already enables SC marker-assisted selection and paves the way for future positional cloning of the underlying gene. PMID:23342044

  18. A 6.4MB duplication of the alpha-synuclein locus causing fronto-temporal dementia and parkinsonism - phenotype-genotype correlations

    PubMed Central

    Kara, Eleanna; Kiely, Aoife P; Proukakis, Christos; Giffin, Nicola; Love, Seth; Hehir, Jason; Rantell, Khadija; Pandraud, Amelie; Hernandez, Dena G; Nacheva, Elizabeth; Pittman, Alan M; Nalls, Mike A; Singleton, Andrew B; Revesz, Tamas; Bhatia, Kailash P; Quinn, Niall; Hardy, John; Holton, Janice L; Houlden, Henry

    2015-01-01

    . Conclusions and relevance These findings further expand the phenotypic spectrum of SNCA locus duplications. Increased dosage of genes located within the duplicated region probably cannot increase disease risk and disease severity without the contribution of additional risk factors. Identification of disease modifiers accounting for the substantial phenotypic heterogeneity of patients with SNCA locus duplications could provide insight into molecular events involved in α-synuclein aggregation. PMID:25003242

  19. Reassessment of the type I diabetes association of the OAS1 locus.

    PubMed

    Qu, H-Q; Polychronakos, C

    2009-12-01

    To reassess the type I diabetes (T1D) association of the OAS1 locus, the Type I Diabetes Genetics Consortium (T1DGC) genotyped 11 tag single-nucleotide polymorphisms spanning approximately 41 kb from the 5' to 3' flanking region. For each sample obtained from over 2000 affected sib-pair families from nine cohorts, the genotyping was performed on both the Illumina Golden Gate and Sequenom iPlex platforms. The data suggest that there may be a weak association with T1D for two OAS1 polymorphisms, rs3741981 and rs10774671, in populations of European descent. The OAS1 locus is close to a recently identified T1D-associated linkage disequilibrium (LD) block in human chromosome 12q24. Extended LD in populations earlier examined may account for the prior observation of an association of T1D with OAS1 variants. This possibility needs to be addressed further by fine mapping of the T1D association represented in 12q24. PMID:19956105

  20. The qSD12 Locus Controls Offspring Tissue-Imposed Seed Dormancy in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Xing-You; Turnipseed, E. Brent; Foley, Michael E.

    2008-01-01

    Seed component structures were grouped into maternal and offspring (embryo and endosperm) tissues to characterize a dormancy quantitative trait locus (QTL) for tissue-specific function using a marker-assisted genetic approach. The approach was devised to test if genotypic/allelic frequencies of a marker tightly linked to the QTL deviate from Mendelian expectations in germinated and nongerminated subpopulations derived from a segregation population of partially after-ripened seeds and was applied to the dormancy QTL qSD12 and qSD7-1 in a nearly isogenic background of rice. Experimental results unambiguously demonstrated that qSD12 functions in the offspring tissue(s) and suggested that qSD7-1 may control dormancy through the maternal tissues. These experiments also provide the first solid evidence that an offspring tissue-imposed dormancy gene contributes to the segregation distortion in a mapping population developed from partially after-ripened seeds and, in part, to the germination heterogeneity of seeds from hybrid plants. Offspring and maternal tissue-imposed dormancy genes express in very early and late stages of the life cycle, respectively, and interact to provide the species with complementary adaptation strategies. The qSD12 locus was narrowed to the region of ∼600 kbp on a high-resolution map to facilitate cloning and marker-assisted selection of the major dormancy gene. PMID:18711220

  1. Multi-ethnic genome-wide association study identifies novel locus for type 2 diabetes susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Cook, James P; Morris, Andrew P

    2016-08-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have traditionally been undertaken in homogeneous populations from the same ancestry group. However, with the increasing availability of GWAS in large-scale multi-ethnic cohorts, we have evaluated a framework for detecting association of genetic variants with complex traits, allowing for population structure, and developed a powerful test of heterogeneity in allelic effects between ancestry groups. We have applied the methodology to identify and characterise loci associated with susceptibility to type 2 diabetes (T2D) using GWAS data from the Resource for Genetic Epidemiology on Adult Health and Aging, a large multi-ethnic population-based cohort, created for investigating the genetic and environmental basis of age-related diseases. We identified a novel locus for T2D susceptibility at genome-wide significance (P<5 × 10(-8)) that maps to TOMM40-APOE, a region previously implicated in lipid metabolism and Alzheimer's disease. We have also confirmed previous reports that single-nucleotide polymorphisms at the TCF7L2 locus demonstrate the greatest extent of heterogeneity in allelic effects between ethnic groups, with the lowest risk observed in populations of East Asian ancestry. PMID:27189021

  2. Polymorphism and Locus-Specific Effects on Polymorphism at Microsatellite Loci in Natural Drosophila Melanogaster Populations

    PubMed Central

    Schlotterer, C.; Vogl, C.; Tautz, D.

    1997-01-01

    We have studied the natural variation at microsatellite loci in two African and five non-African populations of Drosophila melanogaster. Ten dinucleotide simple sequence loci were cloned from chromosomally mapped P1 clones and typed for single individuals from isofemale lines of the respective populations. We find that the African populations harbor the largest degree of diversity, while the non-African populations show a lower diversity. This supports previous results that D. melanogaster originated in Africa and spread across the rest of the world in historic times. Using genetic distance measures, we find also a distinct population subdivision between the non-African populations. Most interestingly, we find for some loci in some populations a strongly reduced variability, which cannot be explained by bottleneck effects. Employing a conservative test based on the variance in repeat number, we find that at least one locus in one population deviates significantly from the expectations of mutation-drift equilibrium. We suggest that this may be due to a recent selective sweep in this chromosomal region that may have been caused by a linked locus that was involved in local adaptation of the population. PMID:9136020

  3. Haplotype frequencies at the DRD2 locus in populations of the East European Plain

    PubMed Central

    Flegontova, Olga V; Khrunin, Andrey V; Lylova, Olga I; Tarskaia, Larisa A; Spitsyn, Victor A; Mikulich, Alexey I; Limborska, Svetlana A

    2009-01-01

    Background It was demonstrated previously that the three-locus RFLP haplotype, TaqI B-TaqI D-TaqI A (B-D-A), at the DRD2 locus constitutes a powerful genetic marker and probably reflects the most ancient dispersal of anatomically modern humans. Results We investigated TaqI B, BclI, MboI, TaqI D, and TaqI A RFLPs in 17 contemporary populations of the East European Plain and Siberia. Most of these populations belong to the Indo-European or Uralic language families. We identified three common haplotypes, which occurred in more than 90% of chromosomes investigated. The frequencies of the haplotypes differed according to linguistic and geographical affiliation. Conclusion Populations in the northwestern (Byelorussians from Mjadel'), northern (Russians from Mezen' and Oshevensk), and eastern (Russians from Puchezh) parts of the East European Plain had relatively high frequencies of haplotype B2-D2-A2, which may reflect admixture with Uralic-speaking populations that inhabited all of these regions in the Early Middle Ages. PMID:19793394

  4. Loss of heterozygosity at the BRCA1 locus in Tunisian women with sporadic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Charef-Hamza, Sameh; Trimeche, Mounir; Ziadi, Sonia; Amara, Khaled; Gaddas, Naim; Mokni, Moncef; Sriha, Badreddine; Yacoubi, Tahar; Korbi, Sadok

    2005-06-28

    Breast cancer in Tunisia is characterized by a much higher incidence of aggressiveness compared with Western countries. The pattern of allelic loss at the BRCA1 locus in Tunisian women with breast carcinoma has not been studied. Therefore, the aim of this present preliminary study was mainly focused on loss of heterozygosity (LOH) analysis of the BRCA1 gene to determine if this tumor suppressor gene is involved in sporadic breast carcinoma among Tunisian women. We investigate allelic losses by analyzing three microsatellite markers in the BRCA1 region, in a panel of 21 human breast tumors. D17S1322 marker had the highest frequency of LOH (59%), followed by the D17S1323 (35%), and EDH-17B (20%). Collectively out of 21 informative cases 13 (62%) showed LOH at at least one BRCA1 locus. This data provides evidence that allelic loss at BRCA1 is a frequent event in sporadic breast tumorigenesis among Tunisian women, and suggests that the BRCA1 gene might play an important role as a tumor suppressor gene. PMID:15914269

  5. Deconvoluting complex tissues for expression quantitative trait locus-based analyses

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Ji-Heui; Li, Qiyuan; Fatima, Aquila; Eklund, Aron; Szallasi, Zoltan; Polyak, Kornelia; Richardson, Andrea L.; Freedman, Matthew L.

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer genome-wide association studies have pinpointed dozens of variants associated with breast cancer pathogenesis. The majority of risk variants, however, are located outside of known protein-coding regions. Therefore, identifying which genes the risk variants are acting through presents an important challenge. Variants that are associated with mRNA transcript levels are referred to as expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs). Many studies have demonstrated that eQTL-based strategies provide a direct way to connect a trait-associated locus with its candidate target gene. Performing eQTL-based analyses in human samples is complicated because of the heterogeneous nature of human tissue. We addressed this issue by devising a method to computationally infer the fraction of cell types in normal human breast tissues. We then applied this method to 13 known breast cancer risk loci, which we hypothesized were eQTLs. For each risk locus, we took all known transcripts within a 2 Mb interval and performed an eQTL analysis in 100 reduction mammoplasty cases. A total of 18 significant associations were discovered (eight in the epithelial compartment and 10 in the stromal compartment). This study highlights the ability to perform large-scale eQTL studies in heterogeneous tissues. PMID:23650637

  6. New assignment of the adenosine deaminase gene locus to chromosome 20q13 X 11 by study of a patient with interstitial deletion 20q.

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, M B; Tranebjaerg, L; Tommerup, N; Nygaard, P; Edwards, H

    1987-01-01

    A karyotype 46,XY,del(20)(q11 X 23q13 X 11) was found in a three year old boy with mental and growth retardation, low set ears, broad nasal bridge, and macrostomia. Adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity was reduced by about 50%, assigning the gene locus to the deleted segment. A review of the previously reported regional assignments suggests that the ADA gene is in the region of band 20q13 X 11. Images PMID:3560174

  7. A meta-analytic examination of work and general locus of control.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Bowling, Nathan A; Eschleman, Kevin J

    2010-07-01

    The current meta-analysis examined the hypothesized consequences of work and general locus of control. As expected, work locus of control generally yielded stronger relationships with work-related criteria (e.g., job satisfaction, affective commitment, and burnout) than general locus of control. We also found some evidence that general locus of control yielded relatively stronger relationships with general criteria (e.g., life satisfaction, affective commitment, and burnout). Regression analysis found several unique effects for both work and general locus of control. PMID:20604595

  8. A Locus in Drosophila sechellia Affecting Tolerance of a Host Plant Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Hungate, Eric A.; Earley, Eric J.; Boussy, Ian A.; Turissini, David A.; Ting, Chau-Ti; Moran, Jennifer R.; Wu, Mao-Lien; Wu, Chung-I; Jones, Corbin D.

    2013-01-01

    Many insects feed on only one or a few types of host. These host specialists often evolve a preference for chemical cues emanating from their host and develop mechanisms for circumventing their host’s defenses. Adaptations like these are central to evolutionary biology, yet our understanding of their genetics remains incomplete. Drosophila sechellia, an emerging model for the genetics of host specialization, is an island endemic that has adapted to chemical toxins present in the fruit of its host plant, Morinda citrifolia. Its sibling species, D. simulans, and many other Drosophila species do not tolerate these toxins and avoid the fruit. Earlier work found a region with a strong effect on tolerance to the major toxin, octanoic acid, on chromosome arm 3R. Using a novel assay, we narrowed this region to a small span near the centromere containing 18 genes, including three odorant binding proteins. It has been hypothesized that the evolution of host specialization is facilitated by genetic linkage between alleles contributing to host preference and alleles contributing to host usage, such as tolerance to secondary compounds. We tested this hypothesis by measuring the effect of this tolerance locus on host preference behavior. Our data were inconsistent with the linkage hypothesis, as flies bearing this tolerance region showed no increase in preference for media containing M. citrifolia toxins, which D. sechellia prefers. Thus, in contrast to some models for host preference, preference and tolerance are not tightly linked at this locus nor is increased tolerance per se sufficient to change preference. Our data are consistent with the previously proposed model that the evolution of D. sechellia as a M. citrifolia specialist occurred through a stepwise loss of aversion and gain of tolerance to M. citrifolia’s toxins. PMID:24037270

  9. A locus in Drosophila sechellia affecting tolerance of a host plant toxin.

    PubMed

    Hungate, Eric A; Earley, Eric J; Boussy, Ian A; Turissini, David A; Ting, Chau-Ti; Moran, Jennifer R; Wu, Mao-Lien; Wu, Chung-I; Jones, Corbin D

    2013-11-01

    Many insects feed on only one or a few types of host. These host specialists often evolve a preference for chemical cues emanating from their host and develop mechanisms for circumventing their host's defenses. Adaptations like these are central to evolutionary biology, yet our understanding of their genetics remains incomplete. Drosophila sechellia, an emerging model for the genetics of host specialization, is an island endemic that has adapted to chemical toxins present in the fruit of its host plant, Morinda citrifolia. Its sibling species, D. simulans, and many other Drosophila species do not tolerate these toxins and avoid the fruit. Earlier work found a region with a strong effect on tolerance to the major toxin, octanoic acid, on chromosome arm 3R. Using a novel assay, we narrowed this region to a small span near the centromere containing 18 genes, including three odorant binding proteins. It has been hypothesized that the evolution of host specialization is facilitated by genetic linkage between alleles contributing to host preference and alleles contributing to host usage, such as tolerance to secondary compounds. We tested this hypothesis by measuring the effect of this tolerance locus on host preference behavior. Our data were inconsistent with the linkage hypothesis, as flies bearing this tolerance region showed no increase in preference for media containing M. citrifolia toxins, which D. sechellia prefers. Thus, in contrast to some models for host preference, preference and tolerance are not tightly linked at this locus nor is increased tolerance per se sufficient to change preference. Our data are consistent with the previously proposed model that the evolution of D. sechellia as a M. citrifolia specialist occurred through a stepwise loss of aversion and gain of tolerance to M. citrifolia's toxins. PMID:24037270

  10. COMT gene locus: new functional variants.

    PubMed

    Meloto, Carolina B; Segall, Samantha K; Smith, Shad; Parisien, Marc; Shabalina, Svetlana A; Rizzatti-Barbosa, Célia M; Gauthier, Josée; Tsao, Douglas; Convertino, Marino; Piltonen, Marjo H; Slade, Gary Dmitri; Fillingim, Roger B; Greenspan, Joel D; Ohrbach, Richard; Knott, Charles; Maixner, William; Zaykin, Dmitri; Dokholyan, Nikolay V; Reenilä, Ilkka; Männistö, Pekka T; Diatchenko, Luda

    2015-10-01

    Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) metabolizes catecholaminergic neurotransmitters. Numerous studies have linked COMT to pivotal brain functions such as mood, cognition, response to stress, and pain. Both nociception and risk of clinical pain have been associated with COMT genetic variants, and this association was shown to be mediated through adrenergic pathways. Here, we show that association studies between COMT polymorphic markers and pain phenotypes in 2 independent cohorts identified a functional marker, rs165774, situated in the 3' untranslated region of a newfound splice variant, (a)-COMT. Sequence comparisons showed that the (a)-COMT transcript is highly conserved in primates, and deep sequencing data demonstrated that (a)-COMT is expressed across several human tissues, including the brain. In silico analyses showed that the (a)-COMT enzyme features a distinct C-terminus structure, capable of stabilizing substrates in its active site. In vitro experiments demonstrated not only that (a)-COMT is catalytically active but also that it displays unique substrate specificity, exhibiting enzymatic activity with dopamine but not epinephrine. They also established that the pain-protective A allele of rs165774 coincides with lower COMT activity, suggesting contribution to decreased pain sensitivity through increased dopaminergic rather than decreased adrenergic tone, characteristic of reference isoforms. Our results provide evidence for an essential role of the (a)-COMT isoform in nociceptive signaling and suggest that genetic variations in (a)-COMT isoforms may contribute to individual variability in pain phenotypes. PMID:26207649

  11. Refined localization of the Prieto-syndrome locus

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, F.; Prieto, F.; Gal, A.

    1996-07-12

    PRS designates the locus for a syndromal form of X-linked mental retardation (Prieto syndrome) characterized by minor facial anomalies, ear malformation, abnormal growth of teeth, clinodactyly, sacral dimple, patellar luxation, malformation of lower limbs, abnormalities of the fundus of the eye, and subcortical cerebral atrophy. Linkage analysis localized the disease locus between DXS84 (Xp21.1) and DXS255. Here we present additional linkage data that provide further support and refinement of this localization. Individual III-18 gave birth to a male, currently aged 2 7/12 years, who clearly shows delayed psychomotor development. He began to walk at 23 months and his speech is delayed. In addition, he shows the characteristic facial anomalies, {open_quotes}dysplastic{close_quotes} ears, sacral dimple, and clinodactyly, as do all other affected males in this family. 7 refs., 1 tab.

  12. Cross-species identification of Mendel's I locus.

    PubMed

    Armstead, Ian; Donnison, Iain; Aubry, Sylvain; Harper, John; Hörtensteiner, Stefan; James, Caron; Mani, Jan; Moffet, Matt; Ougham, Helen; Roberts, Luned; Thomas, Ann; Weeden, Norman; Thomas, Howard; King, Ian

    2007-01-01

    A key gene involved in plant senescence, mutations of which partially disable chlorophyll catabolism and confer stay-green leaf and cotyledon phenotypes, has been identified in Pisum sativum, Arabidopsis thaliana, and Festuca pratensis by using classical and molecular genetics and comparative genomics. A stay-green locus in F. pratensis is syntenically equivalent to a similar stay-green locus on rice chromosome 9. Functional testing in Arabidopsis of a homolog of the rice candidate gene revealed (i) senescence-associated gene expression and (ii) a stay-green phenotype after RNA interference silencing. Genetic mapping in pea demonstrated cosegregation with the yellow/green cotyledon polymorphism (I/i) first reported by Gregor Mendel in 1866. PMID:17204643

  13. Teacher psychological needs, locus of control and engagement.

    PubMed

    Betoret, Fernando Doménech

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the relationships among psychological needs, locus of control and engagement in a sample of 282 Spanish secondary school teachers. Nine teacher needs were identified based on the study of Bess (1977) and on the Self-Determination Theory (Deci & Ryan, 1985, 2000, 2002). Self-report questionnaires were used to measure the construct selected for this study and their interrelationships were examined by conducting hierarchical regression analyses. An analysis of teacher responses using hierarchical regression reveals that psychological needs have significant positive effects on the three engagement dimensions (vigor, dedication and absorption). Furthermore, the results show the moderator role played by locus of control in the relationship between teacher psychological needs and the so-called core of engagement (vigor and dedication). Finally, practical implications are discussed. PMID:23866223

  14. The locus of microRNA-10b

    PubMed Central

    Biagioni, Francesca; Bossel Ben-Moshe, Noa; Fontemaggi, Giulia; Yarden, Yosef; Domany, Eytan; Blandino, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Contemporary microRNA research has led to significant advances in our understanding of the process of tumorigenesis. MicroRNAs participate in different events of a cancer cell’s life, through their ability to target hundreds of putative transcripts involved in almost every cellular function, including cell cycle, apoptosis, and differentiation. The relevance of these small molecules is even more evident in light of the emerging linkage between their expression and both prognosis and clinical outcome of many types of human cancers. This identifies microRNAs as potential therapeutic modifiers of cancer phenotypes. From this perspective, we overview here the miR-10b locus and its involvement in cancer, focusing on its role in the establishment (miR-10b*) and spreading (miR-10b) of breast cancer. We conclude that targeting the locus of microRNA 10b holds great potential for cancer treatment. PMID:23839045

  15. Recovery of probes linked to the jcpk locus on mouse chromosome 10 by the use of an improved representational difference analysis technique

    SciTech Connect

    Baldocchi, R.A.; Tartaglia, K.E.; Bryda, E.C.; Flaherty, L.

    1996-04-15

    Representational difference analysis (RDA) is a subtractive hybridization technique by which the differences two complex genomes can be isolated. An improved version of this technique was used to isolate DNA segments that map to a narrow genetic region adjacent to the jcpk locus on Chromosome 10 of the mouse. A mutation at this locus acts recessively and causes an early onset polycystic kidney disease. Genomic subtractions involving DNA from C57BL/6 (B6) and its partially congenic partner, B6-jcpk/jcpk, produced 39 restriction fragments (difference products), 25 of which were unique and represented differences in BglII sites between these two strains. Although none identified the jcpk locus itself, 7 of these were mapped to an interval between 3.4 and 6.5 cM distal to the jcpk locus. Five of these 7 difference products were developed by subtracting B6-jcpk/jcpk from B6 DNA, but only 1 of the 5 was isolated using the an improved technique. The other 4 were obtained by an improved technique that included size selection of difference products after the third round of subtractive hybridization and amplification. The remaining 2 of the mapped products resulted from the reciprocal subtraction experiment using the improvements. Thus, by this improved technique and two-way subtraction, we were able to add seven new markers to a relatively small genetic region on Chromosome 10. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  16. The LOSS OF APOMEIOSIS (LOA) locus in Hieracium praealtum can function independently of the associated large-scale repetitive chromosomal structure.

    PubMed

    Kotani, Yoshiko; Henderson, Steven T; Suzuki, Go; Johnson, Susan D; Okada, Takashi; Siddons, Hayley; Mukai, Yasuhiko; Koltunow, Anna M G

    2014-02-01

    Apomixis or asexual seed formation in Hieracium praealtum (Asteraceae) is controlled by two independent dominant loci. One of these, the LOSS OF APOMEIOSIS (LOA) locus, controls apomixis initiation, mitotic embryo sac formation (apospory) and suppression of the sexual pathway. The LOA locus is found near the end of a hemizygous chromosome surrounded by extensive repeats extending along the chromosome arm. Similar apomixis-carrying chromosome structures have been found in some apomictic grasses, suggesting that the extensive repetitive sequences may be functionally relevant to apomixis. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to examine chromosomes of apomeiosis deletion mutants and rare recombinants in the critical LOA region arising from a cross between sexual Hieracium pilosella and apomictic H. praealtum. The combined analyses of aposporous and nonaposporous recombinant progeny and chromosomal karyotypes were used to determine that the functional LOA locus can be genetically separated from the very extensive repeat regions found on the LOA-carrying chromosome. The large-scale repetitive sequences associated with the LOA locus in H. praealtum are not essential for apospory or suppression of sexual megasporogenesis (female meiosis). PMID:24400904

  17. Analysis of the ABCA4 genomic locus in Stargardt disease.

    PubMed

    Zernant, Jana; Xie, Yajing Angela; Ayuso, Carmen; Riveiro-Alvarez, Rosa; Lopez-Martinez, Miguel-Angel; Simonelli, Francesca; Testa, Francesco; Gorin, Michael B; Strom, Samuel P; Bertelsen, Mette; Rosenberg, Thomas; Boone, Philip M; Yuan, Bo; Ayyagari, Radha; Nagy, Peter L; Tsang, Stephen H; Gouras, Peter; Collison, Frederick T; Lupski, James R; Fishman, Gerald A; Allikmets, Rando

    2014-12-20

    Autosomal recessive Stargardt disease (STGD1, MIM 248200) is caused by mutations in the ABCA4 gene. Complete sequencing of ABCA4 in STGD patients identifies compound heterozygous or homozygous disease-associated alleles in 65-70% of patients and only one mutation in 15-20% of patients. This study was designed to find the missing disease-causing ABCA4 variation by a combination of next-generation sequencing (NGS), array-Comparative Genome Hybridization (aCGH) screening, familial segregation and in silico analyses. The entire 140 kb ABCA4 genomic locus was sequenced in 114 STGD patients with one known ABCA4 exonic mutation revealing, on average, 200 intronic variants per sample. Filtering of these data resulted in 141 candidates for new mutations. Two variants were detected in four samples, two in three samples, and 20 variants in two samples, the remaining 117 new variants were detected only once. Multimodal analysis suggested 12 new likely pathogenic intronic ABCA4 variants, some of which were specific to (isolated) ethnic groups. No copy number variation (large deletions and insertions) was detected in any patient suggesting that it is a very rare event in the ABCA4 locus. Many variants were excluded since they were not conserved in non-human primates, were frequent in African populations and, therefore, represented ancestral, and not disease-associated, variants. The sequence variability in the ABCA4 locus is extensive and the non-coding sequences do not harbor frequent mutations in STGD patients of European-American descent. Defining disease-associated alleles in the ABCA4 locus requires exceptionally well characterized large cohorts and extensive analyses by a combination of various approaches. PMID:25082829

  18. A large duplication involving the IHH locus mimics acrocallosal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yuksel-Apak, Memnune; Bögershausen, Nina; Pawlik, Barbara; Li, Yun; Apak, Selcuk; Uyguner, Oya; Milz, Esther; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Karaman, Birsen; Gülgören, Ayan; Grzeschik, Karl-Heinz; Nürnberg, Peter; Kayserili, Hülya; Wollnik, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    Indian hedgehog (Ihh) signaling is a major determinant of various processes during embryonic development and has a pivotal role in embryonic skeletal development. A specific spatial and temporal expression of Ihh within the developing limb buds is essential for accurate digit outgrowth and correct digit number. Although missense mutations in IHH cause brachydactyly type A1, small tandem duplications involving the IHH locus have recently been described in patients with mild syndactyly and craniosynostosis. In contrast, a ∼600-kb deletion 5′ of IHH in the doublefoot mouse mutant (Dbf) leads to severe polydactyly without craniosynostosis, but with craniofacial dysmorphism. We now present a patient resembling acrocallosal syndrome (ACS) with extensive polysyndactyly of the hands and feet, craniofacial abnormalities including macrocephaly, agenesis of the corpus callosum, dysplastic and low-set ears, severe hypertelorism and profound psychomotor delay. Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array copy number analysis identified a ∼900-kb duplication of the IHH locus, which was confirmed by an independent quantitative method. A fetus from a second pregnancy of the mother by a different spouse showed similar craniofacial and limb malformations and the same duplication of the IHH-locus. We defined the exact breakpoints and showed that the duplications are identical tandem duplications in both sibs. No copy number changes were observed in the healthy mother. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a human phenotype similar to the Dbf mutant and strikingly overlapping with ACS that is caused by a copy number variation involving the IHH locus on chromosome 2q35. PMID:22234151

  19. The Relationship between the Functional Complexity and the Molecular Organization of the ANTENNAPEDIA Locus of DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Michael K.; Kaufman, Thomas C.

    1986-01-01

    The Antp locus is involved in the development of the thorax of the larval and adult Drosophila. The absence of Antp + function during embryogenesis results in the larval mesothorax exhibiting characteristics of the prothorax and an ensuing lethality; the loss of Antp+ function in the development of the adult thorax causes specific portions of the leg, wing and humeral imaginal discs to develop abnormally. Every Antp mutation, however, does not cause all of these developmental defects. Certain mutant alleles disrupt humeral and wing disc development without affecting leg development, and they are not deficient for the wild-type function required during embryogenesis. Other Antp mutations result in abnormal legs, but do not alter dorsal thoracic development. Mutations of each type can complement to produce a normal adult fly, which suggests that there are at least two discrete functional units within the locus. This hypothesis is supported by the fact that each of the developmental defects arises from the alteration of a different physical region within the Antp DNA. These observations indicate that the complete developmental role of the Antp locus is defined by the spatial and temporal regulation of the expression of several individual functional units. PMID:3098627

  20. Sequence variations in the Boophilus microplus Bm86 locus and implications for immunoprotection in cattle vaccinated with this antigen.

    PubMed

    García-García, J C; Gonzalez, I L; González, D M; Valdés, M; Méndez, L; Lamberti, J; D'Agostino, B; Citroni, D; Fragoso, H; Ortiz, M; Rodríguez, M; de la Fuente, J

    1999-11-01

    Cattle tick infestations constitute a major problem for the cattle industry in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Traditional control methods have been only partially successful, hampered by the selection of chemical-resistant tick populations. The Boophilus microplus Bm86 protein was isolated from tick gut epithelial cells and shown to induce a protective response against tick infestations in vaccinated cattle. Vaccine preparations including the recombinant Bm86 are used to control cattle tick infestations in the field as an alternative measure to reduce the losses produced by this ectoparasite. The principle for the immunological control of tick infestations relies on a polyclonal antibody response against the target antigen and, therefore, should be difficult to select for tick-resistant populations. However, sequence variations in the Bm86 locus, among other factors, could affect the effectiveness of Bm86-containing vaccines. In the present study we have addressed this issue, employing data obtained with B. microplus strains from Australia, Mexico, Cuba, Argentina and Venezuela. The results showed a tendency in the inverse correlation between the efficacy of the vaccination with Bm86 and the sequence variations in the Bm86 locus (R2 = 0.7). The mutation fixation index in the Bm86 locus was calculated and shown to be between 0.02 and 0.1 amino acids per year. Possible implications of these findings for the immunoprotection of cattle against tick infestations employing the Bm86 antigen are discussed. PMID:10668863

  1. Domestication-related genetic effects on social behavior in chickens - effects of genotype at a major growth quantitative trait locus.

    PubMed

    Wirén, A; Gunnarsson, U; Andersson, L; Jensen, P

    2009-06-01

    Domestication is an evolutionary process in which animals become adapted to a life in close proximity to humans. There are typically specific selection pressures associated with this, including living in larger social groups than their wild ancestors. We hypothesized that the genotype at a major growth QTL could affect aspects of social behavior in chickens as well. We performed social behavior tests in red junglefowl (RJF) and White Leghorn (WL) chickens and in chickens from a selected advanced intercross line (SAIL) between RJF and WL, selected for different genotypes at a microsatellite marker locus within the QTL region. Four-week-old pure WL inspected strangers significantly more than pure RJF. Male 4-wk-old SAIL birds, homozygous for the WL allele at the marker locus, differed from those with RJF alleles in a similar way as the pure WL differed from RJF. Furthermore, 155- to 170-d-old male SAIL birds homozygous for the WL allele at the marker locus were less aggressive to unfamiliar conspecifics in a dominance test. The results suggest that domestication has caused changes in social behavior, which, in males, may partly depend on variations in the genotype at the growth QTL where the avian homolog of the arginine vasopressin receptor 1a (AVPR1a) is located. This gene is therefore one of several putative candidate genes for future research. PMID:19439625

  2. The Clr1 Locus Regulates the Expression of the Cryptic Mating-Type Loci of Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Thon, G.; Klar, AJS.

    1992-01-01

    The mat2-P and mat3-M loci of fission yeast contain respectively the plus (P) and minus (M) mating-type information in a transcriptionally silent state. That information is transposed from the mat2 or mat3 donor locus via recombination into the expressed mating-type locus (mat1) resulting in switching of the cellular mating type. We have identified a gene, named clr1 (for cryptic loci regulator), whose mutations allow expression of the mat2 and mat3 loci. clr1 mutants undergo aberrant haploid meiosis, indicative of transcription of the silent genes. Production of mRNA from mat3 is detectable in clr1 mutants. Furthermore, the ura4 gene inserted near mat3, weakly expressed in wild-type cells, is derepressed in clr1 mutants. The clr1 mutations also permit meiotic recombination in the 15-kb mat2-mat3 interval, where recombination is normally inhibited. The clr1 locus is in the right arm of chromosome II. We suggest that clr1 regulates silencing of the mat2 and mat3 loci, and participates in establishing the ``cold spot'' for recombination by organizing the chromatin structure of the mating-type region. PMID:1644273

  3. Genome-Wide Association Study for Type 2 Diabetes in Indians Identifies a New Susceptibility Locus at 2q21

    PubMed Central

    Tabassum, Rubina; Chauhan, Ganesh; Dwivedi, Om Prakash; Mahajan, Anubha; Jaiswal, Alok; Kaur, Ismeet; Bandesh, Khushdeep; Singh, Tejbir; Mathai, Benan John; Pandey, Yogesh; Chidambaram, Manickam; Sharma, Amitabh; Chavali, Sreenivas; Sengupta, Shantanu; Ramakrishnan, Lakshmi; Venkatesh, Pradeep; Aggarwal, Sanjay K.; Ghosh, Saurabh; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Srinath, Reddy K.; Saxena, Madhukar; Banerjee, Monisha; Mathur, Sandeep; Bhansali, Anil; Shah, Viral N.; Madhu, Sri Venkata; Marwaha, Raman K.; Basu, Analabha; Scaria, Vinod; McCarthy, Mark I.; Venkatesan, Radha; Mohan, Viswanathan; Tandon, Nikhil; Bharadwaj, Dwaipayan

    2013-01-01

    Indians undergoing socioeconomic and lifestyle transitions will be maximally affected by epidemic of type 2 diabetes (T2D). We conducted a two-stage genome-wide association study of T2D in 12,535 Indians, a less explored but high-risk group. We identified a new type 2 diabetes–associated locus at 2q21, with the lead signal being rs6723108 (odds ratio 1.31; P = 3.32 × 10−9). Imputation analysis refined the signal to rs998451 (odds ratio 1.56; P = 6.3 × 10−12) within TMEM163 that encodes a probable vesicular transporter in nerve terminals. TMEM163 variants also showed association with decreased fasting plasma insulin and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance, indicating a plausible effect through impaired insulin secretion. The 2q21 region also harbors RAB3GAP1 and ACMSD; those are involved in neurologic disorders. Forty-nine of 56 previously reported signals showed consistency in direction with similar effect sizes in Indians and previous studies, and 25 of them were also associated (P < 0.05). Known loci and the newly identified 2q21 locus altogether explained 7.65% variance in the risk of T2D in Indians. Our study suggests that common susceptibility variants for T2D are largely the same across populations, but also reveals a population-specific locus and provides further insights into genetic architecture and etiology of T2D. PMID:23209189

  4. Analysis of intragenic recombination at wx in rice: correlation between the molecular and genetic maps within the locus.

    PubMed

    Inukai, T; Sako, A; Hirano, H Y; Sano, Y

    2000-08-01

    In plant genomes as well as other eukaryotic genomes, meiotic recombination does not occur uniformly. At the level of the gene, high recombination frequencies are often observed within genetic loci in maize, but this feature of intragenic recombination is not seen at the csr1 locus in Arabidopsis. These observations suggest that meiotic recombination in plant genomes varies considerably among species. In the present study we investigated meiotic recombination at the wx locus in rice. The mutation sites of wx mutants induced by ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) treatment or gamma-ray irradiation and a spontaneous wx mutant were physically characterized, and the genetic distances between those wx mutation sites were estimated by pollen analysis. Based on these results, the recombination frequency at the wx locus in rice was estimated as 27.3 kb/cM, which was about 10 times higher than the average for the genome, suggesting that there was a radically different rate of meiotic recombination for intra- and intergenic regions in the rice genome. PMID:10984169

  5. Genome dynamics and evolution of the Mla (powdery mildew) resistance locus in barley.

    PubMed

    Wei, Fusheng; Wing, Rod A; Wise, Roger P

    2002-08-01

    Genes that confer defense against pathogens often are clustered in the genome and evolve via diverse mechanisms. To evaluate the organization and content of a major defense gene complex in cereals, we determined the complete sequence of a 261-kb BAC contig from barley cv Morex that spans the Mla (powdery mildew) resistance locus. Among the 32 predicted genes on this contig, 15 are associated with plant defense responses; 6 of these are associated with defense responses to powdery mildew disease but function in different signaling pathways. The Mla region is organized as three gene-rich islands separated by two nested complexes of transposable elements and a 45-kb gene-poor region. A heterochromatic-like region is positioned directly proximal to Mla and is composed of a gene-poor core with 17 families of diverse tandem repeats that overlap a hypermethylated, but transcriptionally active, gene-dense island. Paleontology analysis of long terminal repeat retrotransposons indicates that the present Mla region evolved over a period of >7 million years through a variety of duplication, inversion, and transposon-insertion events. Sequence-based recombination estimates indicate that R genes positioned adjacent to nested long terminal repeat retrotransposons, such as Mla, do not favor recombination as a means of diversification. We present a model for the evolution of the Mla region that encompasses several emerging features of large cereal genomes. PMID:12172030

  6. Fine mapping the TAGAP risk locus in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chen, R; Stahl, E A; Kurreeman, F A S; Gregersen, P K; Siminovitch, K A; Worthington, J; Padyukov, L; Raychaudhuri, S; Plenge, R M

    2011-06-01

    A common allele at the TAGAP gene locus demonstrates a suggestive, but not conclusive association with risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). To fine map the locus, we conducted comprehensive imputation of CEU HapMap single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 5,500 RA cases and 22,621 controls (all of European ancestry). After controlling for population stratification with principal components analysis, the strongest signal of association was to an imputed SNP, rs212389 (P=3.9 × 10(-8), odds ratio=0.87). This SNP remained highly significant upon conditioning on the previous RA risk variant (rs394581, P=2.2 × 10(-5)) or on a SNP previously associated with celiac disease and type I diabetes (rs1738074, P=1.7 × 10(-4)). Our study has refined the TAGAP signal of association to a single haplotype in RA, and in doing so provides conclusive statistical evidence that the TAGAP locus is associated with RA risk. Our study also underscores the utility of comprehensive imputation in large GWAS data sets to fine map disease risk alleles. PMID:21390051

  7. Culture, serotonin receptor polymorphism and locus of attention

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, David K.; Taylor, Shelley E.; Sasaki, Joni Y.; Chu, Thai Q.; Ryu, Chorong; Suh, Eunkook M.; Xu, Jun

    2010-01-01

    The present research examined the interaction between genes and culture as potential determinants of individuals’ locus of attention. As the serotonin (5-HT) system has been associated with attentional focus and the ability to adapt to changes in reinforcement, we examined the serotonin 1A receptor polymorphism (5-HTR1A). Koreans and European Americans were genotyped and reported their chronic locus of attention. There was a significant interaction between 5-HTR1A genotype and culture in the locus of attention. Koreans reported attending to the field more than European Americans, and this cultural difference was moderated by 5-HTR1A. There was a linear pattern such that those homozygous for the G allele, which is associated with reduced ability to adapt to changes in reinforcement, more strongly endorsed the culturally reinforced mode of thinking than those homozygous for the C allele, with those heterozygous in the middle. Our findings suggest that the same genetic predisposition can result in divergent psychological outcomes, depending on an individual’s cultural context. PMID:19736291

  8. Genetic analysis of the claret locus of Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Sequeira, W.; Nelson, C.R.; Szauter, P. )

    1989-11-01

    The claret (ca) locus of Drosophila melanogaster comprises two separately mutable domains, one responsible for eye color and one responsible for proper disjunction of chromosomes in meiosis and early cleavage divisions. Previously isolated alleles are of three types: (1) alleles of the claret (ca) type that affect eye color only, (2) alleles of the claret-nondisjunctional (ca{sup nd}) type that affect eye color and chromosome behavior, and (3) a meiotic mutation, non-claret disjunctional (ncd), that affects chromosome behavior only. In order to investigate the genetic structure of the claret locus, the authors have isolated 19 radiation-induced alleles of claret on the basis of the eye color phenotype. Two of these 19 new alleles are of the ca{sup nd} type, while 17 are of the ca type, demonstrating that the two domains do not often act as a single target for mutagenesis. This suggests that the two separately mutable functions are likely to be encoded by separate or overlapping genes rather than by a single gene. One of the new alleles of the ca{sup nd} type is a chromosome rearrangement with a breakpoint at the position of the claret locus. If this breakpoint is the cause of the mutant phenotype and there are no other mutations associated with the rearrangement, the two functions must be encoded by overlapping genes.

  9. Mating-type switching by chromosomal inversion in methylotrophic yeasts suggests an origin for the three-locus Saccharomyces cerevisiae system.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Sara J; Byrne, Kevin P; Wolfe, Kenneth H

    2014-11-11

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has a complex system for switching the mating type of haploid cells, requiring the genome to have three mating-type (MAT)-like loci and a mechanism for silencing two of them. How this system originated is unknown, because the three-locus system is present throughout the family Saccharomycetaceae, whereas species in the sister Candida clade have only one locus and do not switch. Here we show that yeasts in a third clade, the methylotrophs, have a simpler two-locus switching system based on reversible inversion of a section of chromosome with MATa genes at one end and MATalpha genes at the other end. In Hansenula polymorpha the 19-kb invertible region lies beside a centromere so that, depending on the orientation, either MATa or MATalpha is silenced by centromeric chromatin. In Pichia pastoris, the orientation of a 138-kb invertible region puts either MATa or MATalpha beside a telomere and represses transcription of MATa2 or MATalpha2. Both species are homothallic, and inversion of their MAT regions can be induced by crossing two strains of the same mating type. The three-locus system of S. cerevisiae, which uses a nonconservative mechanism to replace DNA at MAT, likely evolved from a conservative two-locus system that swapped genes between expression and nonexpression sites by inversion. The increasing complexity of the switching apparatus, with three loci, donor bias, and cell lineage tracking, can be explained by continuous selection to increase sporulation ability in young colonies. Our results provide an evolutionary context for the diversity of switching and silencing mechanisms. PMID:25349420

  10. Mating-type switching by chromosomal inversion in methylotrophic yeasts suggests an origin for the three-locus Saccharomyces cerevisiae system

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Sara J.; Byrne, Kevin P.; Wolfe, Kenneth H.

    2014-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has a complex system for switching the mating type of haploid cells, requiring the genome to have three mating-type (MAT)–like loci and a mechanism for silencing two of them. How this system originated is unknown, because the three-locus system is present throughout the family Saccharomycetaceae, whereas species in the sister Candida clade have only one locus and do not switch. Here we show that yeasts in a third clade, the methylotrophs, have a simpler two-locus switching system based on reversible inversion of a section of chromosome with MATa genes at one end and MATalpha genes at the other end. In Hansenula polymorpha the 19-kb invertible region lies beside a centromere so that, depending on the orientation, either MATa or MATalpha is silenced by centromeric chromatin. In Pichia pastoris, the orientation of a 138-kb invertible region puts either MATa or MATalpha beside a telomere and represses transcription of MATa2 or MATalpha2. Both species are homothallic, and inversion of their MAT regions can be induced by crossing two strains of the same mating type. The three-locus system of S. cerevisiae, which uses a nonconservative mechanism to replace DNA at MAT, likely evolved from a conservative two-locus system that swapped genes between expression and nonexpression sites by inversion. The increasing complexity of the switching apparatus, with three loci, donor bias, and cell lineage tracking, can be explained by continuous selection to increase sporulation ability in young colonies. Our results provide an evolutionary context for the diversity of switching and silencing mechanisms. PMID:25349420

  11. A genetic analysis of Adhl regulation. Progress report, June 1991--May 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Freeling, M.

    1992-12-01

    Several separate but related studies are reported on the mechanism of alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh-1) are reported. A study of a deletion mutation in the TATA box region which resulted in an increase from 6--60% of wildtype Adh-1 expression in the revertant has led to a focus on trans-acting protein factors that bind the TATA box. Analysis of another revertant has led to study of cis-acting sequences in Adh-1 expression. Screening efforts aimed at defining different mutants affecting Adh-1 expression are reported.

  12. A genetic analysis of Adhl regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Freeling, M.

    1992-01-01

    Several separate but related studies are reported on the mechanism of alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh-1) are reported. A study of a deletion mutation in the TATA box region which resulted in an increase from 6--60% of wildtype Adh-1 expression in the revertant has led to a focus on trans-acting protein factors that bind the TATA box. Analysis of another revertant has led to study of cis-acting sequences in Adh-1 expression. Screening efforts aimed at defining different mutants affecting Adh-1 expression are reported.

  13. Three novel polymorphic microsatellite markers for the glaucoma locus GLC1B by datamining tetranucleotide repeats on chromosome 2p12-q12

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    In order to identify new markers around the glaucoma locus GLC1B as a tool to refine its critical region at 2p11.2-2q11.2, we searched the critical region sequence obtained from the UCSC database for tetranucleotide (GATA)n and (GTCT)n repeats of at least 10 units in length. Three out of four potential microsatellite loci were found to be polymorphic, heterozygosity ranging from 64.56% to 79.59%. The identified markers are useful not only for GLC1B locus but also for the study of other disease loci at 2p11.2-2q11.2, a region with scarcity of microsatellite markers. PMID:21637444

  14. Three novel polymorphic microsatellite markers for the glaucoma locus GLC1B by datamining tetranucleotide repeats on chromosome 2p12-q12.

    PubMed

    Murga-Zamalloa, Carlos; Guevara-Fujita, Maria Luisa; Estrada-Cuzcano, Alejandro; Fujita, Ricardo

    2009-10-01

    In order to identify new markers around the glaucoma locus GLC1B as a tool to refine its critical region at 2p11.2-2q11.2, we searched the critical region sequence obtained from the UCSC database for tetranucleotide (GATA)n and (GTCT)n repeats of at least 10 units in length. Three out of four potential microsatellite loci were found to be polymorphic, heterozygosity ranging from 64.56% to 79.59%. The identified markers are useful not only for GLC1B locus but also for the study of other disease loci at 2p11.2-2q11.2, a region with scarcity of microsatellite markers. PMID:21637444

  15. Analytical Framework for Identifying and Differentiating Recent Hitchhiking and Severe Bottleneck Effects from Multi-Locus DNA Sequence Data

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sargsyan, Ori

    2012-05-25

    Hitchhiking and severe bottleneck effects have impact on the dynamics of genetic diversity of a population by inducing homogenization at a single locus and at the genome-wide scale, respectively. As a result, identification and differentiation of the signatures of such events from DNA sequence data at a single locus is challenging. This study develops an analytical framework for identifying and differentiating recent homogenization events at multiple neutral loci in low recombination regions. The dynamics of genetic diversity at a locus after a recent homogenization event is modeled according to the infinite-sites mutation model and the Wright-Fisher model of reproduction withmore » constant population size. In this setting, I derive analytical expressions for the distribution, mean, and variance of the number of polymorphic sites in a random sample of DNA sequences from a locus affected by a recent homogenization event. Based on this framework, three likelihood-ratio based tests are presented for identifying and differentiating recent homogenization events at multiple loci. Lastly, I apply the framework to two data sets. First, I consider human DNA sequences from four non-coding loci on different chromosomes for inferring evolutionary history of modern human populations. The results suggest, in particular, that recent homogenization events at the loci are identifiable when the effective human population size is 50000 or greater in contrast to 10000, and the estimates of the recent homogenization events are agree with the “Out of Africa” hypothesis. Second, I use HIV DNA sequences from HIV-1-infected patients to infer the times of HIV seroconversions. The estimates are contrasted with other estimates derived as the mid-time point between the last HIV-negative and first HIV-positive screening tests. Finally, the results show that significant discrepancies can exist between the estimates.« less

  16. Analytical Framework for Identifying and Differentiating Recent Hitchhiking and Severe Bottleneck Effects from Multi-Locus DNA Sequence Data

    SciTech Connect

    Sargsyan, Ori

    2012-05-25

    Hitchhiking and severe bottleneck effects have impact on the dynamics of genetic diversity of a population by inducing homogenization at a single locus and at the genome-wide scale, respectively. As a result, identification and differentiation of the signatures of such events from DNA sequence data at a single locus is challenging. This study develops an analytical framework for identifying and differentiating recent homogenization events at multiple neutral loci in low recombination regions. The dynamics of genetic diversity at a locus after a recent homogenization event is modeled according to the infinite-sites mutation model and the Wright-Fisher model of reproduction with constant population size. In this setting, I derive analytical expressions for the distribution, mean, and variance of the number of polymorphic sites in a random sample of DNA sequences from a locus affected by a recent homogenization event. Based on this framework, three likelihood-ratio based tests are presented for identifying and differentiating recent homogenization events at multiple loci. Lastly, I apply the framework to two data sets. First, I consider human DNA sequences from four non-coding loci on different chromosomes for inferring evolutionary history of modern human populations. The results suggest, in particular, that recent homogenization events at the loci are identifiable when the effective human population size is 50000 or greater in contrast to 10000, and the estimates of the recent homogenization events are agree with the “Out of Africa” hypothesis. Second, I use HIV DNA sequences from HIV-1-infected patients to infer the times of HIV seroconversions. The estimates are contrasted with other estimates derived as the mid-time point between the last HIV-negative and first HIV-positive screening tests. Finally, the results show that significant discrepancies can exist between the estimates.

  17. Identification and Functional Analysis of Pheromone and Receptor Genes in the B3 Mating Locus of Pleurotus eryngii

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung-Hee; Kang, Young Min; Im, Chak Han; Ali, Asjad; Kim, Sun Young; Je, Hee-Jeong; Kim, Min-Keun; Rho, Hyun Su; Lee, Hyun Sook; Kong, Won-Sik; Ryu, Jae-San

    2014-01-01

    Pleurotus eryngii has recently become a major cultivated mushroom; it uses tetrapolar heterothallism as a part of its reproductive process. Sexual development progresses only when the A and B mating types are compatible. Such mating incompatibility occasionally limits the efficiency of breeding programs in which crossing within loci-shared strains or backcrossing strategies are employed. Therefore, understanding the mating system in edible mushroom fungi will help provide a short cut in the development of new strains. We isolated and identified pheromone and receptor genes in the B3 locus of P. eryngii and performed a functional analysis of the genes in the mating process by transformation. A genomic DNA library was constructed to map the entire mating-type locus. The B3 locus was found to contain four pheromone precursor genes and four receptor genes. Remarkably, receptor PESTE3.3.1 has just 34 amino acid residues in its C-terminal cytoplasmic region; therefore, it seems likely to be a receptor-like gene. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR (real-time qRT-PCR) revealed that most pheromone and receptor genes showed significantly higher expression in monokaryotic cells than dikaryotic cells. The pheromone genes PEphb3.1 and PEphb3.3 and the receptor gene PESTE3.3.1 were transformed into P5 (A3B4). The transformants were mated with a tester strain (A4B4), and the progeny showed clamp connections and a normal fruiting body, which indicates the proposed role of these genes in mating and fruiting processes. This result also confirms that PESTE3.3.1 is a receptor gene. In this study, we identified pheromone and receptor genes in the B3 locus of P. eryngii and found that some of those genes appear to play a role in the mating and fruiting processes. These results might help elucidate the mechanism of fruiting differentiation and improve breeding efficiency. PMID:25133513

  18. Cloning and characterization of XiR1, a locus responsible for dagger nematode resistance in grape

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Chin-Feng; Xu, Kenong; Hu, Rong; Zhou, Rita; Riaz, Summaira

    2010-01-01

    The dagger nematode, Xiphinemaindex, feeds aggressively on grape roots and in the process, vectors grapevine fanleaf virus (GFLV) leading to the severe viral disease known as fanleaf degeneration. Resistance to X. index and GFLV has been the key objective of grape rootstock breeding programs. A previous study found that resistance to X. index derived from Vitis arizonica was largely controlled by a major quantitative trait locus, XiR1 (X. index Resistance 1), located on chromosome 19. The study presented here develops high-resolution genetic and physical maps in an effort to identify the XiR1 gene(s). The mapping was carried out with 1,375 genotypes in three populations derived from D8909-15, a resistant selection from a cross of V. rupestris A. de Serres (susceptible) × V. arizonica b42-26 (resistant). Resistance to X. index was evaluated on 99 informative recombinants that were identified by screening the three populations with two markers flanking the XiR1 locus. The high-resolution genetic map of XiR1 was primarily constructed with seven DNA markers developed in this study. Physical mapping of XiR1 was accomplished by screening three bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries constructed from D8909-15, V. vinifera Cabernet Sauvignon and V. arizonica b42-26. A total of 32 BAC clones were identified and the XiR1 locus was delineated within a 115 kb region. Sequence analysis of three BAC clones identified putative nucleotide binding/leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) genes. This is the first report of a closely linked major gene locus responsible for ectoparasitic nematode resistance. The markers developed from this study are being used to expedite the breeding of resistant grape rootstocks. PMID:20490447

  19. A beak size locus in Darwin's finches facilitated character displacement during a drought.

    PubMed

    Lamichhaney, Sangeet; Han, Fan; Berglund, Jonas; Wang, Chao; Almén, Markus Sällman; Webster, Matthew T; Grant, B Rosemary; Grant, Peter R; Andersson, Leif

    2016-04-22

    Ecological character displacement is a process of morphological divergence that reduces competition for limited resources. We used genomic analysis to investigate the genetic basis of a documented character displacement event in Darwin's finches on Daphne Major in the Galápagos Islands: The medium ground finch diverged from its competitor, the large ground finch, during a severe drought. We discovered a genomic region containing the HMGA2 gene that varies systematically among Darwin's finch species with different beak sizes. Two haplotypes that diverged early in the radiation were involved in the character displacement event: Genotypes associated with large beak size were at a strong selective disadvantage in medium ground finches (selection coefficient s = 0.59). Thus, a major locus has apparently facilitated a rapid ecological diversification in the adaptive radiation of Darwin's finches. PMID:27102486

  20. Single-locus enrichment without amplification for sequencing and direct detection of epigenetic modifications.

    PubMed

    Pham, Thang T; Yin, Jun; Eid, John S; Adams, Evan; Lam, Regina; Turner, Stephen W; Loomis, Erick W; Wang, Jun Yi; Hagerman, Paul J; Hanes, Jeremiah W

    2016-06-01

    A gene-level targeted enrichment method for direct detection of epigenetic modifications is described. The approach is demonstrated on the CGG-repeat region of the FMR1 gene, for which large repeat expansions, hitherto refractory to sequencing, are known to cause fragile X syndrome. In addition to achieving a single-locus enrichment of nearly 700,000-fold, the elimination of all amplification steps removes PCR-induced bias in the repeat count and preserves the native epigenetic modifications of the DNA. In conjunction with the single-molecule real-time sequencing approach, this enrichment method enables direct readout of the methylation status and the CGG repeat number of the FMR1 allele(s) for a clonally derived cell line. The current method avoids potential biases introduced through chemical modification and/or amplification methods for indirect detection of CpG methylation events. PMID:26825750

  1. Progressive myoclonus epilepsy EPM1 locus maps to a 175-kb interval in distal 21q

    SciTech Connect

    Virtaneva, K.; Miao, J.; Traeskelin, A.L.; Chapelle, A. de la; Lehesjoki, A.E.

    1996-06-01

    The EPM1 locus responsible for progressive myoclonus epilepsy of Unverricht-Lundborg type (MIM 254800) maps to a region in distal chromosome 21q where positional cloning has been hampered by the lack of physical and genetic mapping resolution. We here report the use of a recently constituted contig of cosmid, BAC, and P1 clones that allowed new polymorphic markers to be positioned. These were typed in 53 unrelated disease families from an isolated Finnish population in which a putative single ancestral EPM1 mutation has segregated for an estimated 100 generations. By thus exploiting historical recombinations in haplotype analysis, EPM1 could be assigned to the {approximately}175-kb interval between the markers D21S2040 and D21S1259. 26 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. R-loop stabilization represses antisense transcription at the Arabidopsis FLC locus.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qianwen; Csorba, Tibor; Skourti-Stathaki, Konstantina; Proudfoot, Nicholas J; Dean, Caroline

    2013-05-01

    Roles for long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in gene expression are emerging, but regulation of the lncRNA itself is poorly understood. We have identified a homeodomain protein, AtNDX, that regulates COOLAIR, a set of antisense transcripts originating from the 3' end of Arabidopsis FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). AtNDX associates with single-stranded DNA rather than double-stranded DNA non-sequence-specifically in vitro, and localizes to a heterochromatic region in the COOLAIR promoter in vivo. Single-stranded DNA was detected in vivo as part of an RNA-DNA hybrid, or R-loop, that covers the COOLAIR promoter. R-loop stabilization mediated by AtNDX inhibits COOLAIR transcription, which in turn modifies FLC expression. Differential stabilization of R-loops could be a general mechanism influencing gene expression in many organisms. PMID:23641115

  3. Short tandem repeat (STR) locus HUMD8S306 in a large population sample from Germany.

    PubMed

    Benecke, M; Knopf, M; Voll, W; Oesterreich, W; Jacobi, Y; Edelmann, J

    1998-10-01

    Applied DNA typing in medico-legal investigations, in criminalistic practice, and in paternity cases often relies on high inclusion and exclusion probabilities. For that reason, the short autosomal tandem repeat locus D8D306 was validated for forensic use and incorporated into a nonoverlapping multiplex reaction with HUMDHFRP2 and HUMCD4: The allele frequencies of D8S306 in four different regions of Germany (n = 1220 alleles) were determined for use in a population database; the allele distributions did not significantly deviate from each other. The hererozygosity of D8S306 is 83%, expected exclusion chance in stain cases is 96% (paternity cases: 69%), the lowest amount of successfully amplified DNA was 30 pg. The alleles are in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. PMID:9820956

  4. Evidence against an X-linked visual loss susceptibility locus in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Chalmers, R.M.; Davis, M.B.; Sweeney, M.G.; Wood, N.W.; Harding, A.E.

    1996-07-01

    Pedigree analysis of British families with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) closely fits a model in which a pathogenic mtDNA mutation interacts with an X-linked visual loss susceptibility locus (VLSL). This model predicts that 60% of affected females will show marked skewing of X inactivation. Linkage analysis in British and Italian families with genetically proven LHON has excluded the presence of such a VLSL over 169 cM of the X chromosome both when all families were analyzed together and when only families with the bp 11778 mutation were studied. Further, there was no excess skewing of X inactivation in affected females. There was no evidence for close linkage to three markers in the pseudoautosomal region of the sex chromosomes. The mechanism of incomplete penetrance and male predominance in LHON remains unclear. 27 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  5. New Amino Acid Regulatory Locus Having Unusual Properties in Heterozygous Merodiploids

    PubMed Central

    Kline, Ellis L.

    1972-01-01

    Spontaneous mutants of Escherichia coli B/r resistant to 5′,5′,5′,-trifluoro-dl-leucine contain defects in a gene which maps to the left of the threonine region. Low-level constitutive expression of the isoleucine-valine and leucine operons is caused by this mutation in haploid strains. This is in contrast to extremely high levels of gene expression in the heterozygous merodiploids (F' wild type/mutant allele). The properties of these mutants define a new locus and suggest that it encodes a subunit protein which is involved in the repression of the structural genes for the branched-chain amino acid pathways. Images PMID:4555405

  6. On the significance of germline cytogenetic rearrangements at MYCN locus in neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background MYCN oncogene amplification is the most important prognostic factor in neuroblastoma. 25% neuroblastoma tumors have somatic amplifications at this locus but little is known about its constitutional aberrations and their potential role in carcinogenesis. Here, we have performed an array-CGH and qPCR characterization of two patients with constitutional partial 2p trisomy including MYCN genomic region. Results One of the patients had congenital neuroblastoma and showed presence of minute areas of gains and losses within the common fragile site FRA2C at 2p24 encompassing MYCN. The link between 2p24 germline rearrangements and neuroblastoma development was reassessed by reviewing similar cases in the literature. Conclusions It appears that constitutional rearrangements involving chromosome 2p24 may play role in NB development. PMID:24131700

  7. Nucleotide sequence of the regulatory locus controlling expression of bacterial genes for bioluminescence.

    PubMed Central

    Engebrecht, J; Silverman, M

    1987-01-01

    Production of light by the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri and by recombinant hosts containing cloned lux genes is controlled by the density of the culture. Density-dependent regulation of lux gene expression has been shown to require a locus consisting of the luxR and luxI genes and two closely linked divergent promoters. As part of a genetic analysis to understand the regulation of bioluminescence, we have sequenced the region of DNA containing this control circuit. Open reading frames corresponding to luxR and luxI were identified; transcription start sites were defined by S1 nuclease mapping and sequences resembling promoter elements were located. Images PMID:3697093

  8. Genotyping in the MHC locus: potential for defining predictive markers in sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Seitzer, Ulrike; Gerdes, Johannes; Müller-Quernheim, Joachim

    2002-01-01

    In sarcoidosis, host genetic factors are discussed as contributing to disease susceptibility and course. Since tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α is a central mediator of granuloma formation and since elevated TNF-α levels are found during active phases of sarcoidosis, genetic polymorphisms correlating with influences on TNF-α levels are of special interest. The complete sequencing of the MHC region and the increase in the number of identified gene polymorphisms in this locus associated with TNF-α production offer the opportunity of detecting new genes associated with sarcoidosis and perhaps of defining disease-associated haplotypes that bear the potential of serving as predictive markers for this disease. PMID:11806841

  9. The Salmonella typhimurium mar locus: molecular and genetic analyses and assessment of its role in virulence.

    PubMed Central

    Sulavik, M C; Dazer, M; Miller, P F

    1997-01-01

    The marRAB operon is a regulatory locus that controls multiple drug resistance in Escherichia coli. marA encodes a positive regulator of the antibiotic resistance response, acting by altering the expression of unlinked genes. marR encodes a repressor of marRAB transcription and controls the production of MarA in response to environmental signals. A molecular and genetic study of the homologous operon in Salmonella typhimurium was undertaken, and the role of marA in virulence in a murine model was assessed. Expression of E. coli marA (marAEC) present on a multicopy plasmid in S. typhimurium resulted in a multiple antibiotic resistance (Mar) phenotype, suggesting that a similar regulon exists in this organism. A genomic plasmid library containing S. typhimurium chromosomal sequences was introduced into an E. coli strain that was deleted for the mar locus and contained a single-copy marR'-'lacZ translational fusion. Plasmid clones that contained both S. typhimurium marR (marRSt) and marA (marASt) genes were identified as those that were capable of repressing expression of the fusion and which resulted in a Mar phenotype. The predicted amino acid sequences of MarRSt, MarASt, and MarBSt were 91, 86, and 42% identical, respectively, to the same genes from E. coli, while the operator/promoter region of the operon was 86% identical to the same 98-nucleotide-upstream region in E. coli. The marRAB transcriptional start sites for both organisms were determined by primer extension, and a marRABSt transcript of approximately 1.1 kb was identified by Northern blot analysis. Its accumulation was shown to be inducible by sodium salicylate. Open reading frames flanking the marRAB operon were also conserved. An S. typhimurium marA disruption strain was constructed by an allelic exchange method and compared to the wild-type strain for virulence in a murine BALB/c infection model. No effect on virulence was noted. The endogenous S. typhimurium plasmid that is associated with virulence

  10. Mapping of DNA markers linked to the cystic fibrosis locus on the long arm of chromosome 7.

    PubMed Central

    Zengerling, S; Tsui, L C; Grzeschik, K H; Olek, K; Riordan, J R; Buchwald, M

    1987-01-01

    We have used a panel of eight human/mouse somatic-cell hybrids, each containing various portions of human chromosome 7, and three patient cell lines with interstitial deletions on chromosome 7 for localization of six DNA markers linked to the cystic fibrosis locus. Our data suggest that D7S15 is located in the region 7 cen----q22, that MET is located in 7q22----31, and that D7S8 and 7C22 are located in q22----q32. The hybridization results for COL1A2 and TCRB are consistent with their previous assignment to 7q21----q22 and 7q32, respectively. Given the location of these six markers and their linkage relationships, it is probable that the cystic fibrosis locus is in either the distal region of band q22 or the proximal region of q31. Using the same set of cell lines, we have also examined the location of another chromosome 7 marker PGY1. The data show that PGY1 is located in the region 7cen----q22, a position very different from its previous assignment. Images Fig. 1 PMID:3472464

  11. Fine Mapping of the Barley Chromosome 6H Net Form Net Blotch Susceptibility Locus

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Jonathan; Chao, Shiaoman; Friesen, Timothy; Brueggeman, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Net form net blotch, caused by the necrotrophic fungal pathogen Pyrenophora teres f. teres, is a destructive foliar disease of barley with the potential to cause significant yield loss in major production regions throughout the world. The complexity of the host–parasite genetic interactions in this pathosystem hinders the deployment of effective resistance in barley cultivars, warranting a deeper understanding of the interactions. Here, we report on the high-resolut