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Sample records for adh1 locus region

  1. The Complete Sequence of 340 kb of DNA around the Rice Adh1–Adh2 Region Reveals Interrupted Colinearity with Maize Chromosome 4

    PubMed Central

    Tarchini, Renato; Biddle, Phyllis; Wineland, Robin; Tingey, Scott; Rafalski, Antoni

    2000-01-01

    A 2.3-centimorgan (cM) segment of rice chromosome 11 consisting of 340 kb of DNA sequence around the alcohol dehydrogenase Adh1 and Adh2 loci was completely sequenced, revealing the presence of 33 putative genes, including several apparently involved in disease resistance. Fourteen of the genes were confirmed by identifying the corresponding transcripts. Five genes, spanning 1.9 cM of the region, cross-hybridized with maize genomic DNA and were genetically mapped in maize, revealing a stretch of colinearity with maize chromosome 4. The Adh1 gene marked one significant interruption. This gene mapped to maize chromosome 1, indicating a possible translocation of Adh1 after the evolutionary divergence leading to maize and sorghum. Several other genes, most notably genes similar to known disease resistance genes, showed no cross-hybridization with maize genomic DNA, suggesting sequence divergence or absence of these sequences in maize, which is in contrast to several other well-conserved genes, including Adh1 and Adh2. These findings indicate that the use of rice as the model system for other cereals may sometimes be complicated by the presence of rapidly evolving gene families and microtranslocations. Seven retrotransposons and eight transposons were identified in this rice segment, including a Tc1/Mariner–like element, which is new to rice. In contrast to maize, retroelements are less frequent in rice. Only 14.4% of this genome segment consist of retroelements. Miniature inverted repeat transposable elements were found to be the most frequently occurring class of repetitive elements, accounting for 18.8% of the total repetitive DNA. PMID:10715324

  2. Replication Study of ESCC Susceptibility Genetic Polymorphisms Locating in the ADH1B-ADH1C-ADH7 Cluster Identified by GWAS

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaoling; Pan, Wenting; Ge, Yunxia; Zhou, Changchun; Liu, Chao; Gao, Jia; Yang, Ming; Mao, Weimin

    2014-01-01

    China was one of the countries with highest esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) incidence and mortality worldwide. Alcohol drinking has been identified as a major environmental risk-factor related to ESCC. The alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) family are major enzymes involved in the alcohol-metabolizing pathways, including alcohol dehydrogenase 1B (ADH1B) and ADH1C. Interestingly, ADH1B and ADH1C genes locate tandemly with ADH7 in a genomic segment as a gene cluster, and are all polymorphic. Several ESCC susceptibility single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the ADH1B-ADH1C-ADH7 cluster have been identified previously through a genome-wide association study (GWAS). In the study, we examined the association between five ADH1B-ADH1C-ADH7 cluster SNPs (rs1042026, rs17033, rs1614972, rs1789903 and rs17028973) and risk of developing ESCC. Genotypes were determined in two independent case-control sets from two regions of China. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated by logistic regression. Our data demonstrated that these ADH1B-ADH1C-ADH7 cluster SNPs confer susceptibility to ESCC in these two case-control sets, which were consistent to results of the previous GWAS. PMID:24722735

  3. Replication study of ESCC susceptibility genetic polymorphisms locating in the ADH1B-ADH1C-ADH7 cluster identified by GWAS.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiwen; Wei, Jinyu; Xu, Xiaoling; Pan, Wenting; Ge, Yunxia; Zhou, Changchun; Liu, Chao; Gao, Jia; Yang, Ming; Mao, Weimin

    2014-01-01

    China was one of the countries with highest esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) incidence and mortality worldwide. Alcohol drinking has been identified as a major environmental risk-factor related to ESCC. The alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) family are major enzymes involved in the alcohol-metabolizing pathways, including alcohol dehydrogenase 1B (ADH1B) and ADH1C. Interestingly, ADH1B and ADH1C genes locate tandemly with ADH7 in a genomic segment as a gene cluster, and are all polymorphic. Several ESCC susceptibility single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the ADH1B-ADH1C-ADH7 cluster have been identified previously through a genome-wide association study (GWAS). In the study, we examined the association between five ADH1B-ADH1C-ADH7 cluster SNPs (rs1042026, rs17033, rs1614972, rs1789903 and rs17028973) and risk of developing ESCC. Genotypes were determined in two independent case-control sets from two regions of China. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated by logistic regression. Our data demonstrated that these ADH1B-ADH1C-ADH7 cluster SNPs confer susceptibility to ESCC in these two case-control sets, which were consistent to results of the previous GWAS.

  4. A genetic analysis of Adh1 regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Freeling, M.

    1992-01-01

    The overall goal of our research proposal is to understand the meaning of the various cis-acting sites responsible for AdH1 expression in the entire maize plant. Progress is reported in the following areas: Studies on the TATA box and analysis of revertants of the Adh1-3F1124 allele; screening for more different mutants that affect Adh1 expression differentially; studies on cis-acting sequences required for root-specific Adh1 expression; refinement of the use of the particle gun; and functional analysis of a non- glycolytic anaerobic protein.

  5. Genetic variants in or near ADH1B and ADH1C affect susceptibility to alcohol dependence in a British and Irish population.

    PubMed

    Way, Michael; McQuillin, Andrew; Saini, Jit; Ruparelia, Kush; Lydall, Gregory J; Guerrini, Irene; Ball, David; Smith, Iain; Quadri, Giorgia; Thomson, Allan D; Kasiakogia-Worlley, Katherine; Cherian, Raquin; Gunwardena, Priyanthi; Rao, Harish; Kottalgi, Girija; Patel, Shamir; Hillman, Audrey; Douglas, Ewen; Qureshi, Sherhzad Y; Reynolds, Gerry; Jauhar, Sameer; O'Kane, Aideen; Dedman, Alex; Sharp, Sally; Kandaswamy, Radhika; Dar, Karim; Curtis, David; Morgan, Marsha Y; Gurling, Hugh M D

    2015-05-01

    Certain single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes encoding alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) enzymes confer a significant protective effect against alcohol dependence syndrome (ADS) in East Asian populations. Recently, attention has focused on the role of these SNPs in determining ADS risk in European populations. To further elucidate these associations, SNPs of interest in ADH1B, ADH1C and the ADH1B/1C intergenic region were genotyped in a British and Irish population (ADS cases n = 1076: controls n = 1027) to assess their relative contribution to ADS risk. A highly significant, protective association was observed between the minor allele of rs1229984 in ADH1B and ADS risk [allelic P = 8.4 × 10(-6) , odds ratio (OR) = 0.26, 95 percent confidence interval, 0.14, 0.49]. Significant associations were also observed between ADS risk and the ADH1B/1C intergenic variant, rs1789891 [allelic P = 7.2 × 10(-5) , OR = 1.4 (1.2, 1.6)] and three non-synonymous SNPs rs698, rs1693482 and rs283413 in ADH1C. However, these associations were not completely independent; thus, while the ADH1B rs1229984 minor allele association was independent of those of the intergenic variant rs1789891 and the three ADH1C variants, the three ADH1C variants were not individually independent. In conclusion, the rare ADH1B rs1229984 mutation provides significant protection against ADS in this British and Irish population; other variants in the ADH gene cluster also alter ADS risk, although the strong linkage disequilibrium between SNPs at this location precluded clear identification of the variant(s) driving the associations.

  6. Adh1 and Adh1/4 knockout mice as possible rodent models for presymptomatic Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Anvret, Anna; Ran, Caroline; Westerlund, Marie; Gellhaar, Sandra; Lindqvist, Eva; Pernold, Karin; Lundströmer, Karin; Duester, Gregg; Felder, Michael R; Galter, Dagmar; Belin, Andrea Carmine

    2012-02-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenases (ADH) catalyze the reversible metabolism of many types of alcohols and aldehydes to prevent the possible toxic accumulation of these compounds. ADHs are of interest in Parkinson's disease (PD) since these compounds can be harmful to dopamine (DA) neurons. Genetic variants in ADH1C and ADH4 have been found to associate with PD and lack of Adh4 gene activity in a mouse model has recently been reported to induce changes in the DA system. Adh1 knockout (Adh1-/-) and Adh1/4 double knockout (Adh1/4-/-) mice were investigated for possible changes in DA system related activity, biochemical parameters and olfactory function compared to wild-type (WT) mice. Locomotor activity was tested at ∼7 (adult) and >15 months of age to mimic the late onset of PD. Adh1-/- and Adh1/4-/- mice displayed a significantly higher spontaneous locomotor activity than WT littermates. Both apomorphine and d-amphetamine increased total distance activity in Adh1-/- mice at both age intervals and in Adh1/4-/- mice at 7 months of age compared to WT mice. No significant changes were found regarding olfactory function, however biochemical data showed decreased 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC)/DA ratios in the olfactory bulb and decreased homovanillic acid (HVA)/DA ratios in the olfactory bulb, frontal cortex and striatum of Adh1/4-/- mice compared to WT mice. Our results suggest that lack of Adh1 alone or Adh1 and Adh4 together lead to changes in DA system related behavior, and that these knockout mice might be possible rodent models to study presymptomatic PD.

  7. Protective effects of the alcohol dehydrogenase-ADH1B*3 allele on attention and behavior problems in adolescents exposed to alcohol during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Dodge, Neil C; Jacobson, Joseph L; Jacobson, Sandra W

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase is a critical enzyme in the metabolism of alcohol. Expression of three alleles at the ADH1B locus results in enzymes that differ in turnover rate and affinity for alcohol. The ADH1B*3 allele, which appears to be unique to individuals of African descent, is associated with more rapid alcohol metabolism than the more prevalent ADH1B*1 allele. It has been previously demonstrated that the presence of at least one maternal ADH1B*3 allele confers a protective effect against alcohol teratogenicity in infants and children. This study was conducted to determine whether the presence of the ADH1B*3 allele in the mother or child continues to be protective in alcohol-exposed individuals during adolescence. 186 adolescents and 167 mothers participating in a 14-year follow-up of the Detroit Longitudinal Cohort were genotyped for ADH1B alleles. Behavioral reports were obtained from classroom teachers. Frequencies of the ADH1B*3 allele were 17.6% in the mothers and 21.0% in the adolescents, which are consistent with the 15-20% expected for African Americans. Prenatal alcohol exposure was associated with increased attention problems and externalizing behaviors in adolescents born to mothers with two ADH1B*1 alleles but not in those whose mothers had at least one ADH1B*3 allele. A similar pattern was seen in relation to the presence or absence of an ADH1B*3 allele in the adolescent, which may have reflected the presence/absence of the maternal variant. This study is the first to demonstrate that the protective effects of the maternal ADH1B*3 allele continue to be evident during adolescence. These persistent individual differences in vulnerability of offspring to the behavioral effects of fetal alcohol exposure are likely attributable to more rapid metabolism of alcohol that the ADH1B*3 variant confers on the mother, leading to a reduction of the peak blood alcohol concentration to which the fetus is exposed during each drinking episode.

  8. High diversity and no significant selection signal of human ADH1B gene in Tibet

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background ADH1B is one of the most studied human genes with many polymorphic sites. One of the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs1229984, coding for the Arg48His substitution, have been associated with many serious diseases including alcoholism and cancers of the digestive system. The derived allele, ADH1B*48His, reaches high frequency only in East Asia and Southwest Asia, and is highly associated with agriculture. Micro-evolutionary study has defined seven haplogroups for ADH1B based on seven SNPs encompassing the gene. Three of those haplogroups, H5, H6, and H7, contain the ADH1B*48His allele. H5 occurs in Southwest Asia and the other two are found in East Asia. H7 is derived from H6 by the derived allele of rs3811801. The H7 haplotype has been shown to have undergone significant positive selection in Han Chinese, Hmong, Koreans, Japanese, Khazak, Mongols, and so on. Methods In the present study, we tested whether Tibetans also showed evidence for selection by typing 23 SNPs in the region covering the ADH1B gene in 1,175 individuals from 12 Tibetan populations representing all districts of the Tibet Autonomous Region. Multiple statistics were estimated to examine the gene diversities and positive selection signals among the Tibetans and other populations in East Asia. Results The larger Tibetan populations (Qamdo, Lhasa, Nagqu, Nyingchi, Shannan, and Shigatse) comprised mostly farmers, have around 12% of H7, and 2% of H6. The smaller populations, living on hunting or recently switched to farming, have lower H7 frequencies (Tingri 9%, Gongbo 8%, Monba and Sherpa 6%). Luoba (2%) and Deng (0%) have even lower frequencies. Long-range haplotype analyses revealed very weak signals of positive selection for H7 among Tibetans. Interestingly, the haplotype diversity of H7 is higher in Tibetans than in any other populations studied, indicating a longer diversification history for that haplogroup in Tibetans. Network analysis on the long-range haplotypes revealed

  9. Genetic polymorphisms of ADH1B, ADH1C and ALDH2 in Turkish alcoholics: lack of association with alcoholism and alcoholic cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Vatansever, Sezgin; Tekin, Fatih; Salman, Esin; Altintoprak, Ender; Coskunol, Hakan; Akarca, Ulus Salih

    2015-05-17

    No data exists regarding the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) gene polymorphisms in Turkish alcoholic cirrhotics. We studied the polymorphisms of ADH1B, ADH1C and ALDH2 genes in alcoholic cirrhotics and compared the results with non-cirrhotic alcoholics and healthy volunteers. Overall, 237 subjects were included for the study: 156 alcoholic patients (78 cirrhotics, 78 non-cirrhotic alcoholics) and 81 healthy volunteers. Three different single-nucleotide-polymorphism genotyping methods were used. ADH1C genotyping was performed using a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. The identified ADH1C genotypes were named according to the presence or absence of the enzyme restriction sites. ADH1B (Arg47Hys) genotyping was performed using the allele specific primer extension method, and ALDH2 (Glu487Lys) genotyping was performed by a multiplex polymerase chain reaction using two allele-specific primer pairs. For ADH1B, the frequency of allele *1 in the cirrhotics, non-cirrhotic alcoholics and healthy volunteers was 97.4%, 94.9% and 99.4%, respectively. For ADH1C, the frequency of allele *1 in the cirrhotics, non-cirrhotic alcoholics and healthy volunteers was 47%, 36.3% and 45%, respectively. There was no statistical difference between the groups for ADH1B and ADH1C (p>0.05). All alcoholic and non-alcoholic subjects (100%) had the allele *1 for ALDH2. The obtained results for ADH1B, ADH1C, and ALDH gene polymorphisms in the present study are similar to the results of Caucasian studies. ADH1B and ADH1C genetic variations are not related to the development of alcoholism or susceptibility to alcoholic cirrhosis. ALDH2 gene has no genetic variation in the Turkish population.

  10. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP839) in the adh1 reference gene affects the quantitation of genetically modified maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Broothaerts, Wim; Corbisier, Philippe; Schimmel, Heinz; Trapmann, Stefanie; Vincent, Sandra; Emons, Hendrik

    2008-10-08

    The real-time PCR methods recommended in the European Union for the quantitation of genetically modified (GM) maize events NK603, GA21, and MON 863 measure the number of copies of the GM event in relation to those of the maize-specific adh1 reference gene. The study reported here revealed that the targeted 70 base pair adh1 region exhibits a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP839) that hampers the binding of the reverse primer used in the adh1 detection method. Partial fragments of the adh1-A and adh1-F allele were cloned. By allele-specific real-time PCR, it was shown that SNP839 corresponds to a common allelic polymorphism in maize. As a result, the quantitation of the GM maize events mentioned is positively or negatively biased, depending on the adh1 genotype of sample and calibrant. Therefore, it is proposed to revise the quantitative detection methods for NK603, GA21, and MON 863 maize.

  11. A genetic analysis of Adh1 regulation. Progress report, June 1991--February 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Freeling, M.

    1992-03-01

    The overall goal of our research proposal is to understand the meaning of the various cis-acting sites responsible for AdH1 expression in the entire maize plant. Progress is reported in the following areas: Studies on the TATA box and analysis of revertants of the Adh1-3F1124 allele; screening for more different mutants that affect Adh1 expression differentially; studies on cis-acting sequences required for root-specific Adh1 expression; refinement of the use of the particle gun; and functional analysis of a non- glycolytic anaerobic protein.

  12. Metabolite Profiling of adh1 Mutant Response to Cold Stress in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yuan; Liu, Lijun; Wei, Yunzhu; Li, Gaopeng; Yue, Xiule; An, Lizhe

    2017-01-01

    As a result of global warming, vegetation suffers from repeated freeze-thaw cycles caused by more frequent short-term low temperatures induced by hail, snow, or night frost. Therefore, short-term freezing stress of plants should be investigated particularly in light of the current climatic conditions. Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) plays a central role in the metabolism of alcohols and aldehydes and it is a key enzyme in anaerobic fermentation. ADH1 responds to plant growth and environmental stress; however, the function of ADH1 in the response to short-term freezing stress remains unknown. Using real-time quantitative fluorescence PCR, the expression level of ADH1 was analyzed at low temperature (4°C). The lethal temperature was calculated based on the electrolyte leakage tests for both ADH1 deletion mutants (adh1) and wild type (WT) plants. To further investigate the relationship between ADH1 and cold tolerance in plants, low-Mr polar metabolite analyses of Arabidopsis adh1 and WT were performed at cold temperatures using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. This investigation focused on freezing treatments (cold acclimation group: −6°C for 2 h with prior 4°C for 7 d, cold shock group: −6°C for 2 h without cold acclimation) and recovery (23°C for 24 h) with respect to seedling growth at optimum temperature. The experimental results revealed a significant increase in ADH1 expression during low temperature treatment (4°C) and at a higher lethal temperature in adh1 compared to that in the WT. Retention time indices and specific mass fragments were used to monitor 263 variables and annotate 78 identified metabolites. From these analyses, differences in the degree of metabolite accumulation between adh1 and WT were detected, including soluble sugars (e.g., sucrose) and amino acids (e.g., asparagine). In addition, the correlation-based network analysis highlighted some metabolites, e.g., melibiose, fumaric acid, succinic acid, glycolic acid, and xylose, which

  13. Metabolite Profiling of adh1 Mutant Response to Cold Stress in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Song, Yuan; Liu, Lijun; Wei, Yunzhu; Li, Gaopeng; Yue, Xiule; An, Lizhe

    2016-01-01

    As a result of global warming, vegetation suffers from repeated freeze-thaw cycles caused by more frequent short-term low temperatures induced by hail, snow, or night frost. Therefore, short-term freezing stress of plants should be investigated particularly in light of the current climatic conditions. Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) plays a central role in the metabolism of alcohols and aldehydes and it is a key enzyme in anaerobic fermentation. ADH1 responds to plant growth and environmental stress; however, the function of ADH1 in the response to short-term freezing stress remains unknown. Using real-time quantitative fluorescence PCR, the expression level of ADH1 was analyzed at low temperature (4°C). The lethal temperature was calculated based on the electrolyte leakage tests for both ADH1 deletion mutants (adh1) and wild type (WT) plants. To further investigate the relationship between ADH1 and cold tolerance in plants, low-Mr polar metabolite analyses of Arabidopsis adh1 and WT were performed at cold temperatures using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. This investigation focused on freezing treatments (cold acclimation group: -6°C for 2 h with prior 4°C for 7 d, cold shock group: -6°C for 2 h without cold acclimation) and recovery (23°C for 24 h) with respect to seedling growth at optimum temperature. The experimental results revealed a significant increase in ADH1 expression during low temperature treatment (4°C) and at a higher lethal temperature in adh1 compared to that in the WT. Retention time indices and specific mass fragments were used to monitor 263 variables and annotate 78 identified metabolites. From these analyses, differences in the degree of metabolite accumulation between adh1 and WT were detected, including soluble sugars (e.g., sucrose) and amino acids (e.g., asparagine). In addition, the correlation-based network analysis highlighted some metabolites, e.g., melibiose, fumaric acid, succinic acid, glycolic acid, and xylose, which

  14. A distinct type of alcohol dehydrogenase, adh4+, complements ethanol fermentation in an adh1-deficient strain of Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Masao; Tohda, Hideki; Kumagai, Hiromichi; Giga-Hama, Yuko

    2004-03-01

    In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, only one alcohol dehydrogenase gene, adh1(+), has been identified. To elucidate the influence of adh1(+) on ethanol fermentation, we constructed the adh1 null strain (delta adh1). The delta adh1 cells still produced ethanol and grew fermentatively as the wild-type cells. Both DNA microarray and RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that this ethanol production is caused by the enhanced expression of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae ADH4-like gene product (SPAC5H10.06C named adh4(+)). Since the strain lacking both adh1 and adh4 genes (delta adh1 delta adh4) showed non-fermentative retarded growth, only these two ADHs produce ethanol for fermentative growth. This is the first observation that a S. cerevisiae ADH4-like alcohol dehydrogenase functions in yeast ethanol fermentation.

  15. Use of a modified alcohol dehydrogenase, ADH1, promoter in construction of diacetyl non-producing brewer's yeast.

    PubMed

    Onnela, M L; Suihko, M L; Penttilä, M; Keränen, S

    1996-08-20

    The bacterial gene, encoding alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase (alpha-ALDC), was expressed in a bottom-fermenting brewer's yeast under the control of a modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH1) promoter which lacks the upstream regions from -800 bp to -1500 bp. In pilot scale brewing conditions, the level of alpha-ALDC produced was high enough to reduce the concentration of diacetyl so that lagering was not required. alpha-ALDC active brewer's yeast strains were also shown to be suitable for high gravity brewing.

  16. ADH1A variation predisposes to personality traits and substance dependence.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Lingjun; Gelernter, Joel; Kranzler, Henry R; Stein, Murray B; Zhang, Huiping; Wei, Feng; Sen, Srijan; Poling, James; Luo, Xingguang

    2010-03-05

    Human personality traits are strong predictors or characteristics of many psychiatric disorders including substance dependence (SD). Recently, significant associations between alcohol dehydrogenase type 1A gene (ADH1A) and SD have been reported, which led us to investigate the impact of ADH1A variation on personality traits and risk of SD. Five hundred fifty-eight subjects with SD [398 European-Americans (EAs) and 160 African-Americans (AAs)], 517 college students (384 EAs and 133 European-origin Hispanics), and 448 healthy subjects (385 EAs, 48 AAs, and 15 European-origin Hispanics) participated. Personality traits were assessed in 247 subjects with SD (179 EAs and 68 AAs), all 517 college students, and 332 healthy subjects (285 EAs, 40 AAs, and 7 European-origin Hispanics). The relationships between ADH1A and personality traits were comprehensively examined using stepwise multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA), and then decomposed by stepwise analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). The relationship between ADH1A and SD was examined using stepwise logistic regression analysis. Admixture effects on analyses were considered. Overall, Agreeableness and Conscientiousness were associated with the diplotypes, haplotypes, genotypes, and/or alleles of ADH1A in three of four phenotype groups including EA SD subjects, healthy subjects, and AA SD subjects (1.7 x 10(-4) ADH1A (0.008 ADH1A variation may contribute to the genetic component of variation in personality traits and SD.

  17. Promoter elements required for developmental expression of the maize Adh1 gene in transgenic rice.

    PubMed Central

    Kyozuka, J; Olive, M; Peacock, W J; Dennis, E S; Shimamoto, K

    1994-01-01

    To define the regions of the maize alcohol dehydrogenase 1 (Adh1) promoter that confer tissue-specific expression, a series of 5' promoter deletions and substitution mutations were linked to the Escherichia coli beta-glucuronidase A (uidA) reporter gene and introduced into rice plants. A region between -140 and -99 not only conferred anaerobically inducible expression in the roots of transgenic plants but was also required for expression in the root cap, embryo, and in endosperm under aerobic conditions. GC-rich (GC-1, GC-2, and GC-3) or GT-rich (GT-1 and GT-2) sequence motifs in this region were necessary for expression in these tissues, as they were in anaerobic expression. Expression in the root cap under aerobic conditions required all the GC- and GT-rich motifs. The GT-1, GC-1, GC-2, and GC-3 motifs, and to a lesser extent the GT-2 motif, were also required for anaerobic responsiveness in rice roots. All elements except the GC-3 motif were needed for endosperm-specific expression. The GC-2 motif and perhaps the GT-1 motif appeared to be the only elements required for high-level expression in the embryos of rice seeds. Promoter regions important for shoot-, embryo-, and pollen-specific expression were proximal to -99, and nucleotides required for shoot-specific expression occurred between positions -72 and -43. Pollen-specific expression required a sequence element outside the promoter region, between +54 and +106 of the untranslated leader, as well as a silencer element in the promoter between -72 and -43. PMID:8061518

  18. Meta-Analyses of ALDH2 and ADH1B with Alcohol Dependence in Asians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luczak, Susan E.; Glatt, Stephen J.; Wall, Tamara J.

    2006-01-01

    Meta-analyses were conducted to determine the magnitude of relationships between polymorphisms in 2 genes, ALDH2 and ADH1B, with alcohol dependence in Asians. For each gene, possession of 1 variant [asterisk]2 allele was protective against alcohol dependence, and possession of a 2nd [asterisk]2 allele did not offer significant additional…

  19. Is ADH1C genotype relevant for the cardioprotective effect of alcohol?

    PubMed

    Høiseth, Gudrun; Magnus, Per; Knudsen, Gun Peggy; Jansen, Mona Dverdal; Næss, Oyvind; Tambs, Kristian; Mørland, Jørg

    2013-03-01

    The cardioprotective effect of ethanol has been suggested to be linked to one of the ethanol metabolizing enzymes (ADH1C), which constitutes a high V(max) and a low V(max) variant. This has been demonstrated in some studies, while others have not been able to replicate the findings. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relation between the different ADH1C genotypes, death from coronary heart disease (CHD) and alcohol in a material larger than the previously published studies. Eight hundred CHD deaths as well as 1303 controls were genotyped for the high V(max) (γ1) and the low V(max) (γ2) ADH1C variant. Information of alcohol use was available for all subjects. Multiple logistic regression analyses was used to study if the decreased risk of death from CHD in alcohol consuming subjects was more pronounced in subjects homozygous for the γ2 allele (γ2γ2 subjects) compared to γ1γ1 and γ1γ2 subjects. The odds ratio (OR) for death from CHD in alcohol consumers compared to abstainers was similar in the genotype groups, i.e., 0.62 (95% CI: 0.43-0.88) in γ1γ1 subjects and 0.62 (95% CI: 0.42-0.91) in γ2γ2 subjects. Also when stratifying the results by gender and when dividing alcohol consumers into different alcohol consumption groups, there was no difference in the OR between the different genotype groups. This study, which included the largest study group published so far, failed to find any link between the ADH1C genotype and the cardioprotective effects of alcohol.

  20. Polymorphisms in Alcohol Metabolism Genes ADH1B and ALDH2, Alcohol Consumption and Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Crous-Bou, Marta; Rennert, Gad; Cuadras, Daniel; Salazar, Ramon; Cordero, David; Saltz Rennert, Hedy; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Kopelovich, Levy; Monroe Lipkin, Steven; Bernard Gruber, Stephen; Moreno, Victor

    2013-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Epidemiological risk factors for CRC included alcohol intake, which is mainly metabolized to acetaldehyde by alcohol dehydrogenase and further oxidized to acetate by aldehyde dehydrogenase; consequently, the role of genes in the alcohol metabolism pathways is of particular interest. The aim of this study is to analyze the association between SNPs in ADH1B and ALDH2 genes and CRC risk, and also the main effect of alcohol consumption on CRC risk in the study population. Methodology/Principal Findings SNPs from ADH1B and ALDH2 genes, included in alcohol metabolism pathway, were genotyped in 1694 CRC cases and 1851 matched controls from the Molecular Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer study. Information on clinicopathological characteristics, lifestyle and dietary habits were also obtained. Logistic regression and association analysis were conducted. A positive association between alcohol consumption and CRC risk was observed in male participants from the Molecular Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer study (MECC) study (OR = 1.47; 95%CI = 1.18-1.81). Moreover, the SNPs rs1229984 in ADH1B gene was found to be associated with CRC risk: under the recessive model, the OR was 1.75 for A/A genotype (95%CI = 1.21-2.52; p-value = 0.0025). A path analysis based on structural equation modeling showed a direct effect of ADH1B gene polymorphisms on colorectal carcinogenesis and also an indirect effect mediated through alcohol consumption. Conclusions/Significance Genetic polymorphisms in the alcohol metabolism pathways have a potential role in colorectal carcinogenesis, probably due to the differences in the ethanol metabolism and acetaldehyde oxidation of these enzyme variants. PMID:24282520

  1. Prospective Multicenter Phase II Trial of Systemic ADH-1 in Combination With Melphalan via Isolated Limb Infusion in Patients With Advanced Extremity Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Beasley, Georgia M.; Riboh, Jonathan C.; Augustine, Christina K.; Zager, Jonathan S.; Hochwald, Steven N.; Grobmyer, Stephen R.; Peterson, Bercedis; Royal, Richard; Ross, Merrick I.; Tyler, Douglas S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Isolated limb infusion (ILI) with melphalan (M-ILI) dosing corrected for ideal body weight (IBW) is a well-tolerated treatment for patients with in-transit melanoma with a 29% complete response rate. ADH-1 is a cyclic pentapeptide that disrupts N-cadherin adhesion complexes. In a preclinical animal model, systemic ADH-1 given with regional melphalan demonstrated synergistic antitumor activity, and in a phase I trial with M-ILI it had minimal toxicity. Patients and Methods Patients with American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage IIIB or IIIC extremity melanoma were treated with 4,000 mg of ADH-1, administered systemically on days 1 and 8, and with M-ILI corrected for IBW on day 1. Drug pharmacokinetics and N-cadherin immunohistochemical staining were performed on pretreatment tumor. The primary end point was response at 12 weeks determined by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) criteria. Results In all, 45 patients were enrolled over 15 months at four institutions. In-field responses included 17 patients with complete responses (CRs; 38%), 10 with partial responses (22%), six with stable disease (13%), eight with progressive disease (18%), and four (9%) who were not evaluable. Median duration of in-field response among the 17 CRs was 5 months, and median time to in-field progression among 41 evaluable patients was 4.6 months (95% CI, 4.0 to 7.1 months). N-cadherin was detected in 20 (69%) of 29 tumor samples. Grade 4 toxicities included creatinine phosphokinase increase (four patients), arterial injury (one), neutropenia (one), and pneumonitis (one). Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, this phase II trial is the first prospective multicenter ILI trial and the first to incorporate a targeted agent in an attempt to augment antitumor responses to regional chemotherapy. Although targeting N-cadherin may improve melanoma sensitivity to chemotherapy, no difference in response to treatment was seen in this study. PMID:21343562

  2. New cis-regulatory elements in the Rht-D1b locus region of wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fifteen gene-containing BACs with accumulated length of 1.82-Mb from the Rht-D1b locus region weresequenced and compared in detail with the orthologous regions of rice, sorghum, and maize. Our results show that Rht-D1b represents a conserved genomic region as implied by high gene sequence identity...

  3. Genetic polymorphisms of ADH1B, ADH1C and ALDH2, alcohol consumption, and the risk of gastric cancer: the Japan Public Health Center-based prospective study.

    PubMed

    Hidaka, Akihisa; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Sawada, Norie; Shimazu, Taichi; Yamaji, Taiki; Iwasaki, Motoki; Inoue, Manami; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2015-02-01

    The association between alcohol consumption, genetic polymorphisms of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) and gastric cancer risk is not completely understood. We investigated the association between ADH1B (rs1229984), ADH1C (rs698) and ALDH2 (rs671) polymorphisms, alcohol consumption and the risk of gastric cancer among Japanese subjects in a population-based, nested, case-control study (1990-2004). Among 36 745 subjects who answered the baseline questionnaire and provided blood samples, 457 new gastric cancer cases matched to 457 controls were used in the analysis. The odds ratios (OR) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using logistic regression models. No association was observed between alcohol consumption, ADH1B (rs1229984), ADH1C (rs698) and ALDH2 (rs671) polymorphisms and gastric cancer risk. However, considering gene-environmental interaction, ADH1C G allele carriers who drink ≥150 g/week of ethanol had a 2.5-fold increased risk of gastric cancer (OR = 2.54, 95% CI = 1.05-6.17) relative to AA genotype carriers who drink 0 to <150 g/week (P for interaction = 0.02). ALDH2 A allele carriers who drink ≥150 g/week also had an increased risk (OR = 2.08, 95% CI = 1.05-4.12) relative to GG genotype carriers who drink 0 to < 150 g/week (P for interaction = 0.08). To find the relation between alcohol consumption and gastric cancer risk, it is important to consider both alcohol consumption level and ADH1C and ALDH2 polymorphisms.

  4. Molecular characterization of a region of DNA associated with mutations at the agouti locus in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Bultman, S J; Russell, L B; Gutierrez-Espeleta, G A; Woychik, R P

    1991-09-15

    Molecular characterization of a radiation-induced agouti (a)-locus mutation has resulted in the isolation of a segment of DNA that maps at or near the a locus on chromosome 2 in the mouse. This region of DNA is deleted in several radiation- or chemical-induced homozygous-lethal a-locus mutations and is associated with specific DNA structural alterations in two viable a-locus mutations. We propose that DNA probes from this region of chromosome 2 will be useful for ultimately characterizing the individual gene or genes associated with a-locus function.

  5. The ADH1B and DRD2 gene polymorphism may modify the protective effect of the ALDH2 gene against heroin dependence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tzu-Yun; Lee, Sheng-Yu; Chen, Shiou-Lan; Chang, Yun-Hsuan; Chen, Shih-Heng; Chu, Chun-Hsien; Huang, San-Yuan; Tzeng, Nian-Sheng; Wang, Chen-Lin; Yeh, Pin-Hsi; Lee, I Hui; Yeh, Tzung Lieh; Yang, Yen Kuang; Lu, Ru-Band

    2013-06-03

    Understanding the influences of genes involved in dopamine and serotonin metabolism, such as the aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) and alcohol dehydrogenase 1B (ADH1B) genes, is critical for understanding addictive behavior. In addition, dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) gene may also interact with the dopamine metabolizing genes and link to addiction. Therefore, we investigated the association between the ALDH2, ADH1B and DRD2 polymorphisms and heroin dependence. Heroin-dependent Han Chinese patients (n=304) and healthy controls (n=335) were recruited. Genotypes of ALDH2, ADH1B and DRD2 polymorphisms were analyzed using a polymerase chain reaction with restriction fragment length polymorphism. The frequency of the ALDH2*1/*1 genotype was significantly lower in heroin-dependent patients than in controls, but the frequency of ADH1B and DRD2 genotypes was not significantly different. Further stratification of the ALDH2 gene with the ADH1B gene showed that the protective effect of ALDH2*1/*1 existed only in patients who also carried the ADH1B*1/*1 and ADH1B*1/*2 genotype. Logistic regression analysis showed a significant interaction between ALDH2 and ADH1B (P=0.022) and DRD2, ALDH2 and ADH1B in patients (P=0.037). The ALDH2*1/*1, ADH1B*1/*1, and ADH1B*1/*2 genotypes may interact and protect their carriers against heroin dependence and the protective effect may be varied by the DRD2 gene polymorphism. We conclude that the protective effect of the ALDH2 polymorphism against heroin dependence may be modified by the ADH1B and DRD2 polymorphism.

  6. Molecular basis of the size polymorphism of the first intron of the Adh-1 gene of the mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata.

    PubMed

    Gomulski, Ludvik M; Brogna, Saverio; Babaratsas, Alekos; Gasperi, Giuliano; Zacharopoulou, Antigoni; Savakis, Charalambos; Bourtzis, Kostas

    2004-06-01

    The first intron of the gene encoding one of the alcohol dehydrogenase isoenzymes (ADH-1) in Ceratitis capitata is highly polymorphic in size. Five size variants of this intron were isolated from different strains and populations and characterized. Restriction map and sequence analysis showed that the intron size polymorphism is due to the presence or absence of (a) a copy of a defective mariner-like element, postdoc; (b) an approximately 550-bp 3' indel which exhibits no similarity to any known sequence; and (c) a central duplication of 704 bp consisting of part of the 3' end of the postdoc element, the region between postdoc and the 3' indel, and the first 20 bp of the 3' indel. The homologous Adh-1 intron was amplified from the congeneric species, Ceratitis rosa, in order to obtain an outgroup for comparative and phylogenetic analyses. The C. rosa introns were polymorphic in size, ranging from about 1100 to 2000 bp, the major difference between them being the presence or absence of a mariner-like element Crmar2, unrelated to the postdoc element. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that the shorter intron variants in C. capitata may represent the ancestral form of the intron, the longest variants apparently being the most recent.

  7. Analysis of the 3' Cmu region of the rabbit Ig heavy chain locus.

    PubMed

    Lanning, Dennis K; Zhai, Shi-Kang; Knight, Katherine L

    2003-05-08

    The immunoglobulin D (IgD) antibody class was, for many years, identified only in primates, rodents and teleost fish. The limited distribution of IgD among vertebrates suggested that IgD is a functionally redundant antibody class that has been lost by many vertebrate species during evolution. The recent identification of IgD in artiodactyls, however, suggests that IgD might be more widely expressed among vertebrates than previously thought, possibly serving a unique role in immunity. IgD expression has been searched for but not detected in rabbits. In order to search directly for a rabbit Cdelta locus encoding the constant region of IgD, we determined the nucleotide sequence of 13.5 kb of genomic DNA downstream of the rabbit Cmu locus. We did not find a rabbit Cdelta locus in this region, but found instead that this region is densely populated by repetitive elements, including a long interspersed DNA element repeat, six C repeats, and two processed pseudogenes. We conclude that the rabbit probably does not express IgD because there is no Cdelta locus immediately downstream of the rabbit Cmu locus.

  8. Hitch-hiking to a locus under balancing selection: high sequence diversity and low population subdivision at the S-locus genomic region in Arabidopsis halleri.

    PubMed

    Ruggiero, Maria Valeria; Jacquemin, Bertrand; Castric, Vincent; Vekemans, Xavier

    2008-02-01

    Hitch-hiking to a site under balancing selection is expected to produce a local increase in nucleotide polymorphism and a decrease in population differentiation compared with the background genomic level, but empirical evidence supporting these predictions is scarce. We surveyed molecular diversity at four genes flanking the region controlling self-incompatibility (the S-locus) in samples from six populations of the herbaceous plant Arabidopsis halleri, and compared their polymorphism with sequences from five control genes unlinked to the S-locus. As a preliminary verification, the S-locus flanking genes were shown to co-segregate with SRK, the gene involved in the self-incompatibility reaction at the pistil level. In agreement with theory, our results demonstrated a significant peak of nucleotide diversity around the S-locus as well as a significant decrease in population genetic structure in the S-locus region compared with both control genes and a set of seven unlinked microsatellite markers. This is consistent with the theoretical expectation that balancing selection is increasing the effective migration rate in subdivided populations. Although only four S-locus flanking genes were investigated, our results suggest that these two signatures of the hitch-hiking effect are localized in a very narrow genomic region.

  9. Interaction of vitamin A supplementation level with ADH1C genotype on intramuscular fat in beef steers.

    PubMed

    Krone, K G; Ward, A K; Madder, K M; Hendrick, S; McKinnon, J J; Buchanan, F C

    2016-03-01

    Previously, the single nucleotide polymorphism in alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH1C c.-64T>C) was shown to have an association with intramuscular fat (IMF) in the longissimus thoracis (LT) muscle when vitamin A was limited in finishing rations of beef steers. The purpose of this study was to determine the optimum vitamin A supplementation level, in combination with ADH1C genotype, to increase IMF of the LT muscle. In total, 45 TT genotype, 45 CT and 27 CC Black Angus crossbred steers were backgrounded on a commercial ration containing 3360 IU vitamin A/kg dry matter (DM). During finishing, the steers were randomly assigned to one of three vitamin A treatments at 25%, 50% and 75% of the National Research Council recommendation of 2200 IU/kg DM. Treatments were administered via an oral bolus. Carcass quality was evaluated and a sample from the LT muscle was collected for analysis of IMF. A treatment×genotype interaction (P=0.04) was observed for IMF; TT steers on the 75% treatment had higher IMF relative to CT and CC steers on the same treatment. Western blot analysis showed that TT steers had higher (P=0.02) ADH1C protein expression in hepatic tissue. Previously, TT steers exhibited increased IMF when fed limited vitamin A. In the current study, the lack of variation in IMF between treatments and genotypes at the lower vitamin A treatment levels was likely due to the majority of the steers grading Canada AAA (USDA Choice). However, the western blot data supports that TT steers are expected to have higher IMF deposition, due to an increased production of ADH1C. The interaction between ADH1C genotype and vitamin A supplementation level has the potential for use in marker-assisted management programs to target niche markets based on increased marbling.

  10. Combination of ADH1B*2/ALDH2*2 polymorphisms alters acetaldehyde-derived DNA damage in the blood of Japanese alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Yukawa, Yoshiyuki; Muto, Manabu; Hori, Kimiko; Nagayoshi, Haruna; Yokoyama, Akira; Chiba, Tsutomu; Matsuda, Tomonari

    2012-09-01

    The acetaldehyde associated with alcoholic beverages is an evident carcinogen for the esophagus. Genetic polymorphisms of the alcohol dehydrogenase 1B (ADH1B) and aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) genes are associated with the risk of esophageal cancer. However, the exact mechanism via which these genetic polymorphisms affect esophageal carcinogenesis has not been elucidated. ADH1B*2 is involved in overproduction of acetaldehyde due to increased ethanol metabolism into acetaldehyde, and ALDH2*2 is involved in accumulation of acetaldehyde due to the deficiency of acetaldehyde metabolism. Acetaldehyde can interact with DNA and form DNA adducts, resulting in DNA damage. N(2)-ethylidene-2'-deoxyguanosine (N(2)-ethylidene-dG) is the most abundant DNA adduct derived from acetaldehyde. Therefore, we quantified N(2)-ethylidene-dG levels in blood samples from 66 Japanese alcoholic patients using liquid chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry, and investigated the relationship between N(2)-ethylidene-dG levels and ADH1B and ALDH2 genotypes. The median N(2)-ethylidene-dG levels (25th percentile, 75th percentile) in patients with ADH1B*1/*1 plus ALDH2*1/*1, ADH1B*2 carrier plus ALDH2*1/*1, ADH1B*1/*1 plus ALDH2*1/*2, and ADH1B*2 carrier plus ALDH2*1/*2 were 2.14 (0.97, 2.37)/10(7) bases, 2.38 (1.18, 2.98)/10(7) bases, 5.38 (3.19, 6.52)/10(7) bases, and 21.04 (12.75, 34.80)/10(7) bases, respectively. In the ALDH2*1/*2 group, N(2)-ethylidene-dG levels were significantly higher in ADH1B*2 carriers than in the ADH1B*1/*1 group (P < 0.01). N(2)-ethylidene-dG levels were significantly higher in the ALDH2*1/*2 group than in the ALDH2*1/*1 group, regardless of ADH1B genotype (ADH1B*1/*1, P < 0.05; ADH1B*2 carriers, P < 0.01) N(2)-ethylidene-dG levels in blood DNA of the alcoholics was remarkably higher in individuals with a combination of the ADH1B*2 and ALDH2*2 alleles. These results provide a new perspective on the carcinogenicity of the acetaldehyde associated with

  11. Further mapping of an ataxia-telangiectasia locus to the chromosome 11q23 region.

    PubMed Central

    Sanal, O; Wei, S; Foroud, T; Malhotra, U; Concannon, P; Charmley, P; Salser, W; Lange, K; Gatti, R A

    1990-01-01

    We recently mapped the gene for ataxia-telangiectasia group A (ATA) to chromosome 11q22-23 by linkage analysis, using the genetic markers THY1 and pYNB3.12 (D11S144). The most likely order was cent-AT-S144-THY1. The present paper describes further mapping of the AT locus by means of a panel of 10 markers that span approximately 60 cM in the 11q22-23 region centered around S144 and THY1. Location scores indicate that three contiguous subsegments within the [S144-THY1] segment, as well as three contiguous segments telomeric to THY1, are each unlikely to contain the AT locus, while the more centromeric [STMY-S144] segment is most likely to contain the AT locus. These data, together with recent refinements in the linkage and physical maps of 11q22-23, place the AT locus at 11q23. PMID:2220826

  12. Evidence for a role for AtMYB2 in the induction of the Arabidopsis alcohol dehydrogenase gene (ADH1) by low oxygen.

    PubMed Central

    Hoeren, F U; Dolferus, R; Wu, Y; Peacock, W J; Dennis, E S

    1998-01-01

    The transcription factor AtMYB2 binds to two sequence motifs in the promoter of the Arabidopsis ADH1 gene. The binding to the GT-motif (5'-TGGTTT-3') is essential for induction of ADH1 by low oxygen, while binding to the second motif, MBS-2, is not essential for induction. We show that AtMYB2 is induced by hypoxia with kinetics compatible with a role in the regulation of ADH1. Like ADH1, AtMYB2 has root-limited expression. When driven by a constitutive promoter, AtMYB2 is able to transactivate ADH1 expression in transient assays in both Arabidopsis and Nicotiana plumbaginifolia protoplasts, and in particle bombardment of Pisum sativum leaves. Mutation of the GT-motif abolished binding of AtMYB2 and caused loss of activity of the ADH1 promoter in both transient assays and transgenic Arabidopsis plants. These results are consistent with AtMYB2 being a key regulatory factor in the induction of the ADH1 promoter by low oxygen. PMID:9611167

  13. ADH1B and CDH1 polymorphisms predict prognosis in male patients with non-metastatic laryngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Tianbo; He, Na; Ren, Le; Zhang, Zhe; Zhang, Qingna; Xu, Ran; Tao, Hong; Zeng, Guang; Gao, Jing

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we assessed the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in candidate genes and the prognosis of laryngeal cancer (LC) patients. Thirty-seven SNPs in 26 genes were genotyped in 170 male Han Chinese patients with LC. The effects of the candidate genes on the prognosis of LC patients were evaluated using Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox proportional hazards regression models. The GA genotype of rs1229984 (hazard ratio [HR], 0.537; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.340–0.848; p = 0.008) in alcohol dehydrogenase 1B (ADH1B), and the AA genotype of rs9929218 (HR, 6.074; 95% CI, 1.426–25.870; p = 0.015) in CDH1 were associated with overall survival. Our data suggest that polymorphisms in ADH1B and CDH1 may be prognostic indicators in LC. PMID:27689323

  14. Confirmation of the SCA-2 locus as an alternative locus for dominantly inherited spinocerebellar ataxias and refinement of the candidate region

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes-Cendes, I.; Rouleau, G.A. ); Andermann, E.; Andermann, F. ); Attig, E. ); Bosch, S.; Wagner, M. )

    1994-05-01

    The autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are a clinically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative diseases. To date, two SCA loci have been identified - one locus (SCA-1) on the short arm of chromosome 6 and the second locus (SCA-2) on the long arm of chromosome 12. The authors have studied two large kindreds from different ethnic backgrounds, segregating an autosomal dominant form of SCA. A total of 207 living individuals, including 50 affected, were examined, and blood was collected. Linkage analysis was performed using anonymous DNA markers which flank the two previously described loci. The results demonstrate that the two kindreds, one Austrian-Canadian and one French-Canadian, are linked to SCA-2 (chromosome 12q). Multipoint linkage analysis places the SCA-2 locus within a region of approximately 16 cM between the microsatellites D12S58 and D12S84/D12S105 (odds ratio 2,371:1 in favor of this position). The authors show that the SCA-2 locus is not a private gene and represents an alternative SCA locus. 51 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Transcription mapping of the region containing the locus for Treacher Collins syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, C.A.; Gallardo, T.D.; Li, X.

    1994-09-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome, an autosomal dominant craniofacial disorder and the most common mandibulofacial dysostosis disorder, has been genetically localized to chromosome 5q32. We have previously constructed a YAC contig of approximately 3 megabases cross the region that includes this locus. A single 1.6 Mb YAC from within this contig contains the genetic markers that flank the disease locus as well as two known genes, osteonectin (SPARC) and annexin VI (ANX6). This was converted to cosmid clones by using inter-Alu PCR products from the YAC to screen the LANL chromosome 5-specific cosmid library. One hundred and seventy five cosmids covering the candidate interval were used in a direct selection strategy to enrich for cDNAs encoded by this region. Over 30 selected cDNAs derived from fetal face, fetal brain, activated T cells, placenta, and fetal cranial tissues have been mapped to the region and DNA sequenced. The majority of these cDNAs show little or no homology to previously described DNA sequences. However, one known gene encoding the G (M2) activator protein was selected as a cDNA and mapped to the region immediately flanking the ANX6 locus. A partial cosmid contig covering the critical interval was built from the cosmids by a combination of end walking and fingerprinting methods. Additional polymorphic markers developed from the contig have allowed the Treacher Collins critical region to be further refined to less than 500 kb. Full length cDNA clones that map to this smaller critical region are currently being derived and evaluated in affected pedigrees.

  16. Opposing--activating or inhibitory--effects of cimetidine and daidzein on human ADH1C activity depending on substrates and solvents.

    PubMed

    Kollock, Ronny; Glatt, Hansruedi

    2012-01-01

    Toxification of benzylic alcohols (e.g. hydroxymethylpyrenes) by sulfotransferases is efficiently competed by alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs). We are interested in drugs and food constituents affecting this detoxification. Daidzein and cimetidine were reported to inhibit ADH1C-mediated ethanol oxidation. Surprisingly, we found that both modulators enhance the oxidation of 4-hydroxymethylpyrene by ADH1C. This activation was seen with either delivering solvents used, dimethylsulfoxide or acetonitrile. Addition of dimethylsulfoxide, but not acetonitrile, converted daidzein and cimetidine from inhibitors to activators of the ADH1C-mediated oxidation of the other substrate studied, ethanol (added in water). Other human ADH forms (ADH2, 3, 4) were inhibited by both agents independently of the substrate and the corresponding solvent used. Kinetic constants for the various reactions are presented. ADH1C was unique in its complex substrate-dependent interaction with daidzein/cimetidine and solvents.

  17. Candidate regions for Waardenburg syndrome type II: Search for a second WS locus

    SciTech Connect

    Nance, W.E.; Pandya, A.; Blanton, S.H.

    1994-09-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by deafness and pigmentary abnormalities such as heterochromia of irides, hypopigmented skin patches, white forlock and premature graying. Clinically the syndrome has been classified into three types. Type II differs from type I in that dystopia canthorum is generally absent, and type III has associated limb anomalies. Recently linkage analysis localized the gene for WSI to chromosome 2q. PAX-3, which is a human analogue of the murine pax-3 locus, maps to this region and mutations in this gene have been found to segregate with WSI. However genetic heterogeneity clearly exists: most if not all WSII families are unlinked to PAX-3 while most if not all WSI cases are linked. We ascertained a four-year-old female child with an interstitial deletion of chromosome 13 who had features of WS including bilateral congenital sensorineural hearing loss, pale blue irides and pinched nostrils as well as hypertelorism microcephaly, bilateral eyelid ptosis, digitalization of thumbs and fifth finger clinodactyly. High resolution chromosomal analysis revealed a de novo interstitial deletion of 13q22-33.2. There was no family history of WS or retardation. A similar deletion in the region of 13q21-32 has been described in a 13-year-old boy with features of WSII. These two cases strongly suggested that this chromosomal region may include a second locus for WS. We have identified eight families with clinical features of WS type I which have been excluded from linkage to the PAX-3 locus. We have typed these families for microsatellite markers spanning chromosome 13. Linkage between WSII and the chromosome 13 markers was excluded in these families. Hirschsprung disease has been associated with WS and it has recently been mapped to chromosome 10q11.2-q21.1. We are currently typing the 8 families for microsatellites in this region.

  18. The human growth hormone gene is regulated by a multicomponent locus control region

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, B.; Cooke, N.E.; Liebhaber, S.A.; Monks, B.R.

    1995-12-01

    This article describes research involving the five-member human growth hormone (hGH)/chorionic somatomammotropin (hCS) gene cluster and its expression in the placenta. The results indicate that interactions among multiple elements are required to restrict hGH transcription to the pituitary and generate appropriate levels of expression in the mouse genome. In addition, the results suggest a role for shared and unique regulatory sequences in locus control region-mediated expression of the hGH/hCS gene cluster in the pituitary and possibly the placenta. 67 refs., 9 figs.

  19. Region-Urbanicity Differences in Locus of Control: Social Disadvantage, Structure, or Cultural Exceptionalism?

    PubMed Central

    Shifrer, Dara; Sutton, April

    2014-01-01

    People with internal rather than external locus of control experience better outcomes in multiple domains. Previous studies on spatial differences in control within America only focused on the South, relied on aggregate level data or historical evidence, or did not account for other confounding regional distinctions (such as variation in urbanicity). Using data from the National Education Longitudinal Study, we find differences in adolescents' loci of control depending on their region and urbanicity are largely attributable to differences in their social background, and only minimally to structural differences (i.e., differences in the qualities of adolescents' schools). Differences that persist net of differences across adolescents and their schools suggest the less internal control of rural Southern adolescents, and the more internal control of rural and urban Northeastern adolescents, may be due to cultural distinctions in those areas. Results indicate region is more closely associated than urbanicity with differences in locus of control, with Western and Northeastern cultures seemingly fostering more internal control than Midwestern and Southern cultures. These findings contribute to research on spatial variation in a variety of psychological traits. PMID:25382875

  20. Functional and structural analyses of mouse genomic regions screened by the morphological specific-locus test.

    PubMed

    Russell, L B

    1989-05-01

    Genetic analyses of certain classes of mutations recovered in the mouse specific-locus test (SLT) have characterized arrays of deletions, overlapping at the marked loci. Complementation maps, generated for several of the regions, have identified a number of functional units surrounding each marked locus and have ordered the mutations into complementation groups. Molecular entry to all but one of the marked regions has been achieved by (1) identifying proviral integrations in, or close to, the specific loci (d, se, a, c); (2) mapping random anonymous clones from appropriately enriched libraries to the longest deleted segments, then submapping to more limited segments on the basis of complementation and deletion-breakpoint maps (c, p); (3) similarly mapping known clones thought to be located in pertinent chromosomal regions (p, c, d); and (4) cloning specific genes that reside in regions corresponding to the deletions (b, c, p). The molecular analyses have confirmed that genetically-inferred deletions are structural deletions of DNA. The emerging physical maps are concordant with the complementation maps, and in several cases have discriminated among members of a complementation group with respect to breakpoint positions. Deletion-breakpoint-fusion fragments have prove to be highly useful for making large chromosomal jumps to facilitate physical mapping. The recent advances toward correlating physical and functional maps of specific regions of the mouse genome owe much to the existence of arrays of mutations involving loci marked in the SLT. In turn, the characterizations of these regions have made it possible to demonstrate qualitative differences among mutations resulting from different treatments. This new capability for qualitative analysis, which will increase as the molecular studies proceed, further enhances the value of the SLT, which has been extensively used for quantitative studies in germ-cell mutagenesis.

  1. The 1.5-Mb region spanning the myotonic dystrophy locus shows uniform recombination frequency.

    PubMed

    Shutler, G G; MacKenzie, A E; Korneluk, R G

    1994-01-01

    The myotonic dystrophy (DM) mutation has been identified as a heritable unstable CTG trinucleotide repeat sequence. The intergenerational amplification of this sequence is an example of a new class of dynamic mutations responsible for human genetic diseases. To ascertain whether recombination activity influences, or is affected by, the presence of this unique sequence, a comprehensive study of the physical and genetic mapping data for the 1.5-Mb region of human chromosome 19q13.3, which contains the DM locus, was conducted. The recombination rate for this region was examined by correlating genetic distance to physical distance for six selected marker loci. The following markers span the DM region: 19qCEN-p alpha 1.4 (D19S37)-APOC2-CKM-pE0.8 (D19S115)-pGB2.6 (DM)-p134c (D19S51)-19qTER. Initial linear regression analysis of these two parameters failed to reveal a significant linear correlation (coefficient of determination, r2 = .19), suggesting nonuniform rates of recombination. However, the presence of a recombination hot spot was believed to be unlikely, as the marker-to-marker pairs that showed the greatest deviation in recombination frequency were not restricted to a specific region of the 1.5 Mb studied and had relatively broad confidence intervals, as reflected by low LOD values. A second linear regression analysis using only marker intervals with high LOD scores (Zmax > 22) showed linear correlation (r2 = .68) for the entire 1.5-Mb region. This analysis indicated a relatively uniform recombination frequency in the 1.5-Mb region spanning the DM locus. Furthermore, the recombinations observed were neither under- nor overrepresented on DM chromosomes. Consequently, recombination activity is unlikely to influence, or be affected by, the presence of the DM mutation.

  2. The human VK locus. Characterization of a duplicated region encoding 28 different immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Straubinger, B; Huber, E; Lorenz, W; Osterholzer, E; Pargent, W; Pech, M; Pohlenz, H D; Zimmer, F J; Zachau, H G

    1988-01-05

    Two large regions of the human multigene family coding for the variable parts of the immunoglobulin light chains of the K type (VK) have been characterized on cosmid clones. The two germline regions, called Aa and Ab, span together 250,000 base-pairs and comprise 28 different VK gene segments, nine of which have been sequenced. There is a preponderance of VKII genes but genes belonging to subgroups I and III, and genes that cannot be easily assigned to one of the known subgroups, are interspersed within the VKII gene clusters. A number of pseudogenes have been identified. Within the Aa and Ab regions, all gene segments are organized in the same transcriptional orientation. The regions Aa and Ab, whose restriction maps are highly homologous, were shown not to be allelic structures; they must have arisen by a duplication event. Taken together with previous results, one can conclude that the major part of the VK locus exists in duplicated form. One individual has been found who has only one copy of some of the duplicated regions. By chromosomal walking, the A regions could be linked to the O regions, an analysis of which has been reported. The A regions contribute about one-third of the VK genes so far identified.

  3. Expression of the (recombinant) endogenous immunoglobulin heavy-chain locus requires the intronic matrix attachment regions.

    PubMed Central

    Oancea, A E; Berru, M; Shulman, M J

    1997-01-01

    The elements which regulate gene expression have traditionally been identified by their effects on reporter genes which have been transfected into cell lines or animals. It is generally assumed that these elements have a comparable role in expression of the corresponding endogenous locus. Nevertheless, several studies of immunoglobulin heavy-chain (IgH) gene expression have reported that the requirements for expressing IgH-derived transgenes differ from the requirements for expression of the endogenous IgH locus. Thus, although expression of transgenes requires multiple elements from the J(H)-C mu intron--the E mu core enhancer, the matrix attachment regions (MARs) which flank E mu, and several switch-associated elements--B-cell lines in which expression of the endogenous heavy-chain gene is maintained at the normal level in the absence of these intronic elements have occasionally been reported. Gene targeting offers an alternative method for assessing regulatory elements, one in which the role of defined segments of endogenous genes can be evaluated in situ. We have applied this approach to the IgH locus of a hybridoma cell line, generating recombinants which bear predetermined modifications in the functional, endogenous mu heavy-chain gene. Our analysis indicates the following. (i) Ninety-eight percent of the expression of the recombinant endogenous mu gene depends on elements in the MAR-E mu-MAR segment. (ii) Expression of the recombinant mu gene depends strongly on the MARs of the J(H)-C mu intron but not on the adjoining E mu core enhancer and switch regions; because our recombinant cell lines bear only a single copy of the mu gene, our results indicate that mu expression is activated by MAR elements lying within that same mu transcription unit. (iii) The MAR segment includes at least one activating element in addition to those defined previously by the binding of presumptive activating proteins in the nuclear matrix. (iv) Close association of the MARs with

  4. The huastec region: a second locus for the production of bronze alloys in ancient mesoamerica.

    PubMed

    Hosler, D; Stresser-Pean, G

    1992-08-28

    Chemical analyses of 51 metal artifacts, one ingot, and two pieces of intermediate processed material from two Late Post Classic archeological sites in the Huastec area of Eastern Mesoamerica point to a second production locus for copper-arsenic-tin alloys, copper-arsenic-tin artifacts, and probably copper-tin and copper-arsenic bronze artifacts. Earlier evidence had indicated that these bronze alloys were produced exclusively in West Mexico. West Mexico was the region where metallurgy first developed in Mesoamerica, although major elements of that technology had been introduced from the metallurgies of Central and South America. The bronze working component of Huastec metallurgy was transmitted from the metalworking regions of West Mexico, most likely through market systems that distributed Aztec goods.

  5. Overexpression of ADH1 and HXT1 genes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae improves the fermentative efficiency during tequila elaboration.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Lomelí, Melesio; Torres-Guzmán, Juan Carlos; González-Hernández, Gloria Angélica; Cira-Chávez, Luis Alberto; Pelayo-Ortiz, Carlos; Ramírez-Córdova, Jose de Jesús

    2008-05-01

    This work assessed the effect of the overexpression of ADH1 and HXT1 genes in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae AR5 strain during fermentation of Agave tequilana Weber blue variety must. Both genes were cloned individually and simultaneously into a yeast centromere plasmid. Two transformant strains overexpressing ADH1 and HXT1 individually and one strain overexpressing both genes were randomly selected and named A1, A3 and A5 respectively. Overexpression effect on growth and ethanol production of the A1, A3 and A5 strains was evaluated in fermentative conditions in A. tequilana Weber blue variety must and YPD medium. During growth in YPD and Agave media, all the recombinant strains showed lower cell mass formation than the wild type AR5 strain. Adh enzymatic activity in the recombinant strains A1 and A5 cultivated in A. tequilana and YPD medium was higher than in the wild type. The overexpression of both genes individually and simultaneously had no significant effect on ethanol formation; however, the fermentative efficiency of the A5 strain increased from 80.33% to 84.57% and 89.40% to 94.29% in YPD and Agave medium respectively.

  6. Regulation of nitrogen metabolism, starch utilisation and the beta-hbd-adh1 gene cluster in Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Woods, D R; Reid, S J

    1995-10-01

    The successful genetic manipulation of Clostridium acetobutylicum for the increased production of solvents will depend on an understanding of gene structure and regulation in the bacterium. The glutamine synthetase (glnA) gene is regulated by antisense RNA, transcribed from a downstream promoter, in the opposite direction to the glnA gene. An open reading frame (ORF) was detected downstream of the glnA gene, which has sequence homology to response regulators with anti-termination activity and may be involved in sensing nitrogen conditions. The expression of the linked beta-hbd, adh1 and fixB genes was investigated throughout the bacterial growth cycle by RNA hybridisation techniques. The adh1 gene was independently expressed as a 2.4-kb transcript which peaked at 12 h, immediately prior to the solventogenic phase. The beta-hbd and fixB genes were transcribed throughout the acidogenic and solventogenic phases. A regulator gene, regA, which complements a Bacillus subtilis ccpA mutant, has been identified and sequenced from C. acetobutylicum P262. The regA gene repressed the degradation of starch by an uncharacterised C. acetobutylicum gene, and may therefore play a role in the utilisation of carbohydrate substrates in this organism.

  7. Comprehensive genetic assessment of the ESR1 locus identifies a risk region for endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    O'Mara, Tracy A; Glubb, Dylan M; Painter, Jodie N; Cheng, Timothy; Dennis, Joe; Attia, John; Holliday, Elizabeth G; McEvoy, Mark; Scott, Rodney J; Ashton, Katie; Proietto, Tony; Otton, Geoffrey; Shah, Mitul; Ahmed, Shahana; Healey, Catherine S; Gorman, Maggie; Martin, Lynn; Hodgson, Shirley; Fasching, Peter A; Hein, Alexander; Beckmann, Matthias W; Ekici, Arif B; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Li, Jingmei; Dürst, Matthias; Runnebaum, Ingo; Hillemanns, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Lambrechts, Diether; Depreeuw, Jeroen; Annibali, Daniela; Amant, Frederic; Zhao, Hui; Goode, Ellen L; Dowdy, Sean C; Fridley, Brooke L; Winham, Stacey J; Salvesen, Helga B; Njølstad, Tormund S; Trovik, Jone; Werner, Henrica M J; Tham, Emma; Liu, Tao; Mints, Miriam; Bolla, Manjeet K; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Wang, Qin; Hopper, John L; Peto, Julian; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Burwinkel, Barbara; Brenner, Hermann; Meindl, Alfons; Brauch, Hiltrud; Lindblom, Annika; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Couch, Fergus J; Giles, Graham G; Kristensen, Vessela N; Cox, Angela; Pharoah, Paul D P; Dunning, Alison M; Tomlinson, Ian; Easton, Douglas F; Thompson, Deborah J; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2015-10-01

    Excessive exposure to estrogen is a well-established risk factor for endometrial cancer (EC), particularly for cancers of endometrioid histology. The physiological function of estrogen is primarily mediated by estrogen receptor alpha, encoded by ESR1. Consequently, several studies have investigated whether variation at the ESR1 locus is associated with risk of EC, with conflicting results. We performed comprehensive fine-mapping analyses of 3633 genotyped and imputed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 6607 EC cases and 37 925 controls. There was evidence of an EC risk signal located at a potential alternative promoter of the ESR1 gene (lead SNP rs79575945, P=1.86×10(-5)), which was stronger for cancers of endometrioid subtype (P=3.76×10(-6)). Bioinformatic analysis suggests that this risk signal is in a functionally important region targeting ESR1, and eQTL analysis found that rs79575945 was associated with expression of SYNE1, a neighbouring gene. In summary, we have identified a single EC risk signal located at ESR1, at study-wide significance. Given SNPs located at this locus have been associated with risk for breast cancer, also a hormonally driven cancer, this study adds weight to the rationale for performing informed candidate fine-scale genetic studies across cancer types.

  8. Comprehensive genetic assessment of the ESR1 locus identifies a risk region for endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    O’Mara, Tracy A; Glubb, Dylan M; Painter, Jodie N; Cheng, Timothy; Dennis, Joe; Attia, John; Holliday, Elizabeth G; McEvoy, Mark; Scott, Rodney J; Ashton, Katie; Proietto, Tony; Otton, Geoffrey; Shah, Mitul; Ahmed, Shahana; Healey, Catherine S; Gorman, Maggie; Martin, Lynn; Hodgson, Shirley; Fasching, Peter A; Hein, Alexander; Beckmann, Matthias W; Ekici, Arif B; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Li, Jingmei; Dürst, Matthias; Runnebaum, Ingo; Hillemanns, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Lambrechts, Diether; Depreeuw, Jeroen; Annibali, Daniela; Amant, Frederic; Zhao, Hui; Goode, Ellen L; Dowdy, Sean C; Fridley, Brooke L; Winham, Stacey J; Salvesen, Helga B; Njølstad, Tormund S; Trovik, Jone; Werner, Henrica MJ; Tham, Emma; Liu, Tao; Mints, Miriam; Bolla, Manjeet K; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Wang, Qin; Hopper, John L; Peto, Julian; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Burwinkel, Barbara; Brenner, Hermann; Meindl, Alfons; Brauch, Hiltrud; Lindblom, Annika; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Couch, Fergus J; Giles, Graham G; Kristensen, Vessela N; Cox, Angela; Pharoah, Paul D P; Dunning, Alison M; Tomlinson, Ian; Easton, Douglas F; Thompson, Deborah J; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2015-01-01

    Excessive exposure to estrogen is a well-established risk factor for endometrial cancer (EC), particularly for cancers of endometrioid histology. The physiological function of estrogen is primarily mediated by estrogen receptor alpha, encoded by ESR1. Consequently, several studies have investigated whether variation at the ESR1 locus is associated with risk of EC, with conflicting results. We performed comprehensive fine-mapping analyses of 3,633 genotyped and imputed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 6,607 EC cases and 37,925 controls. There was evidence of an EC risk signal located at a potential alternative promoter of the ESR1 gene (lead SNP rs79575945, P = 1.86 × 10−5), which was stronger for cancers of endometrioid subtype (P = 3.76 × 10−6). Bioinformatic analysis suggests that this risk signal is in a functionally important region targeting ESR1, and eQTL analysis found that rs79575945 was associated with expression of SYNE1, a neighbouring gene. In summary, we have identified a single EC risk signal located at ESR1, at study-wide significance. Given SNPs located at this locus have been associated with risk for breast cancer, also a hormonally driven cancer, this study adds weight to the rationale for performing informed candidate fine-scale genetic studies across cancer types. PMID:26330482

  9. Adapting in vitro embryonic stem cell differentiation to the study of locus control regions.

    PubMed

    Lahiji, Armin; Kučerová-Levisohn, Martina; Holmes, Roxanne; Zúñiga-Pflücker, Juan Carlos; Ortiz, Benjamin D

    2014-05-01

    Numerous locus control region (LCR) activities have been discovered in gene loci important to immune cell development and function. LCRs are a distinct class of cis-acting gene regulatory elements that appear to contain all the DNA sequence information required to establish an independently and predictably regulated gene expression program at any genomic site in native chromatin of a whole animal. As such, LCR-regulated transgenic reporter systems provide invaluable opportunities to investigate the mechanisms of gene regulatory DNA action during development. Furthermore the qualities of LCR-driven gene expression, including spatiotemporal specificity and "integration site-independence" would be highly desirable to incorporate into vectors used in therapeutic genetic engineering. Thus, advancement in the methods used to investigate LCRs is of considerable basic and translational significance. We study the LCR present in the mouse T cell receptor (TCR)-α gene locus. Until recently, transgenic mice provided the only experimental model capable of supporting the entire spectrum of LCR activities. We have recently reported complete manifestation of TCRα LCR function in T cells derived in vitro from mouse embryonic stem cells (ESC), thus validating a complete cell culture model for the full range of LCR activities seen in transgenic mice. Here we discuss the critical parameters involved in studying LCR-regulated gene expression during in vitro hematopoietic differentiation from ESCs. This advance provides an approach to speed progress in the LCR field, and facilitate the clinical application of its findings, particularly to the genetic engineering of T cells.

  10. Inter-ethnic polymorphism of the beta-globin gene locus control region (LCR) in sickle-cell anemia patients.

    PubMed

    Périchon, B; Ragusa, A; Lapouméroulie, C; Romand, A; Moi, P; Ikuta, T; Labie, D; Elion, J; Krishnamoorthy, R

    1993-06-01

    Sequence polymorphisms within the 5'HS2 segment of human locus control region is described among sickle cell anemia patients. Distinct polymorphic patterns of a simple sequence repeat are observed in strong linkage disequilibrium with each of the five major beta s haplotypes. Potential functional relevance of this polymorphic region in globin gene expression is discussed.

  11. A large section of the gene locus encoding human immunoglobulin variable regions of the kappa type is duplicated.

    PubMed

    Pech, M; Smola, H; Pohlenz, H D; Straubinger, B; Gerl, R; Zachau, H G

    1985-06-05

    The structure of a new segment of the gene locus encoding the variable regions of human immunoglobulins of the Kappa type (VK) has been elucidated. This segment (cluster B) encompasses six VK sequences, which belong to three different subgroups and which are arranged in the same transcriptional orientation. Part of cluster B was found to be very similar to another region of the VK gene locus, which was cloned previously (cluster A). Sequence differences between the homologous region of clusters A and B range from 0.2% to 3.7% depending on the position of the VK sequences. The divergence is in the same range for genes and pseudogenes. Hybridization experiments with DNAs from different individuals clearly demonstrate that the two segments are located at different positions within the VK locus and do not represent allelic variants. The sequence homology between clusters A and B is higher than the homology of both clusters to an allelic variant, which is represented by a DNA segment that had been isolated from another individual. These results, together with a report in the literature of two other homologous regions in the VK locus, make it very likely that a major part of even the whole locus is duplicated. In this case, VK gene numbers would be higher than previously estimated on the basis of hybridization studies. An inverse orientation of VK gene clusters would explain published data on rearrangement products in B-cells if an inversion-deletion mechanism is assumed.

  12. Detailed comparative mapping of cereal chromosome regions corresponding to the Ph1 locus in wheat

    SciTech Connect

    Foote, T.; Roberts, M.; Kurata, N.

    1997-10-01

    Detailed physical mapping of markers from rich chromosome 9, and from syntenous (at the genetic level) regions of other cereal genomes, has resulted in rice yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) contigs spanning parts of rice 9. This physical mapping, together with comparative genetic mapping, has demonstrated that synteny has been largely maintained between the genomes of several cereals at the level of contiged YACs. Markers located in one region of rice chromosome 9 encompassed by the YAC contigs have exhibited restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) using deletion lines for the Ph1 locus. This has allowed demarcation of the region of rice chromosome 9 syntenous with the phlb and phlc deletions in wheat chromosome 5B. A group of probes located in wheat homoeologous group 5 and barley chromosome 5H, however, have synteny with rice chromosomes other than 9. This suggests that the usefulness of comparative trait analysis and of the rice genome as a tool to facilitate gene isolation will differ from one region to the next, and implies that the rice genome is more ancestral in structure than those of the Triticeae. 38 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  13. A novel locus of resistance to severe malaria in a region of ancient balancing selection.

    PubMed

    Band, Gavin; Rockett, Kirk A; Spencer, Chris C A; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P

    2015-10-08

    The high prevalence of sickle haemoglobin in Africa shows that malaria has been a major force for human evolutionary selection, but surprisingly few other polymorphisms have been proven to confer resistance to malaria in large epidemiological studies. To address this problem, we conducted a multi-centre genome-wide association study (GWAS) of life-threatening Plasmodium falciparum infection (severe malaria) in over 11,000 African children, with replication data in a further 14,000 individuals. Here we report a novel malaria resistance locus close to a cluster of genes encoding glycophorins that are receptors for erythrocyte invasion by P. falciparum. We identify a haplotype at this locus that provides 33% protection against severe malaria (odds ratio = 0.67, 95% confidence interval = 0.60-0.76, P value = 9.5 × 10(-11)) and is linked to polymorphisms that have previously been shown to have features of ancient balancing selection, on the basis of haplotype sharing between humans and chimpanzees. Taken together with previous observations on the malaria-protective role of blood group O, these data reveal that two of the strongest GWAS signals for severe malaria lie in or close to genes encoding the glycosylated surface coat of the erythrocyte cell membrane, both within regions of the genome where it appears that evolution has maintained diversity for millions of years. These findings provide new insights into the host-parasite interactions that are critical in determining the outcome of malaria infection.

  14. A phylogenetic analysis of the genus Fragaria (strawberry) using intron-containing sequence from the ADH-1 gene.

    PubMed

    DiMeglio, Laura M; Staudt, Günter; Yu, Hongrun; Davis, Thomas M

    2014-01-01

    The genus Fragaria encompasses species at ploidy levels ranging from diploid to decaploid. The cultivated strawberry, Fragaria×ananassa, and its two immediate progenitors, F. chiloensis and F. virginiana, are octoploids. To elucidate the ancestries of these octoploid species, we performed a phylogenetic analysis using intron-containing sequences of the nuclear ADH-1 gene from 39 germplasm accessions representing nineteen Fragaria species and one outgroup species, Dasiphora fruticosa. All trees from Maximum Parsimony and Maximum Likelihood analyses showed two major clades, Clade A and Clade B. Each of the sampled octoploids contributed alleles to both major clades. All octoploid-derived alleles in Clade A clustered with alleles of diploid F. vesca, with the exception of one octoploid allele that clustered with the alleles of diploid F. mandshurica. All octoploid-derived alleles in clade B clustered with the alleles of only one diploid species, F. iinumae. When gaps encoded as binary characters were included in the Maximum Parsimony analysis, tree resolution was improved with the addition of six nodes, and the bootstrap support was generally higher, rising above the 50% threshold for an additional nine branches. These results, coupled with the congruence of the sequence data and the coded gap data, validate and encourage the employment of sequence sets containing gaps for phylogenetic analysis. Our phylogenetic conclusions, based upon sequence data from the ADH-1 gene located on F. vesca linkage group II, complement and generally agree with those obtained from analyses of protein-encoding genes GBSSI-2 and DHAR located on F. vesca linkage groups V and VII, respectively, but differ from a previous study that utilized rDNA sequences and did not detect the ancestral role of F. iinumae.

  15. A Phylogenetic Analysis of the Genus Fragaria (Strawberry) Using Intron-Containing Sequence from the ADH-1 Gene

    PubMed Central

    DiMeglio, Laura M.; Yu, Hongrun; Davis, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    The genus Fragaria encompasses species at ploidy levels ranging from diploid to decaploid. The cultivated strawberry, Fragaria×ananassa, and its two immediate progenitors, F. chiloensis and F. virginiana, are octoploids. To elucidate the ancestries of these octoploid species, we performed a phylogenetic analysis using intron-containing sequences of the nuclear ADH-1 gene from 39 germplasm accessions representing nineteen Fragaria species and one outgroup species, Dasiphora fruticosa. All trees from Maximum Parsimony and Maximum Likelihood analyses showed two major clades, Clade A and Clade B. Each of the sampled octoploids contributed alleles to both major clades. All octoploid-derived alleles in Clade A clustered with alleles of diploid F. vesca, with the exception of one octoploid allele that clustered with the alleles of diploid F. mandshurica. All octoploid-derived alleles in clade B clustered with the alleles of only one diploid species, F. iinumae. When gaps encoded as binary characters were included in the Maximum Parsimony analysis, tree resolution was improved with the addition of six nodes, and the bootstrap support was generally higher, rising above the 50% threshold for an additional nine branches. These results, coupled with the congruence of the sequence data and the coded gap data, validate and encourage the employment of sequence sets containing gaps for phylogenetic analysis. Our phylogenetic conclusions, based upon sequence data from the ADH-1 gene located on F. vesca linkage group II, complement and generally agree with those obtained from analyses of protein-encoding genes GBSSI-2 and DHAR located on F. vesca linkage groups V and VII, respectively, but differ from a previous study that utilized rDNA sequences and did not detect the ancestral role of F. iinumae. PMID:25078607

  16. The highly recombinogenic bz locus lies in an unusually gene-rich region of the maize genome.

    PubMed

    Fu, H; Park, W; Yan, X; Zheng, Z; Shen, B; Dooner, H K

    2001-07-17

    The bronze (bz) locus exhibits the highest rate of recombination of any gene in higher plants. To investigate the possible basis of this high rate of recombination, we have analyzed the physical organization of the region around the bz locus. Two adjacent bacterial artificial chromosome clones, comprising a 240-kb contig centered around the Bz-McC allele, were isolated, and 60 kb of contiguous DNA spanning the two bacterial artificial chromosome clones was sequenced. We find that the bz locus lies in an unusually gene-rich region of the maize genome. Ten genes, at least eight of which are shown to be transcribed, are contained in a 32-kb stretch of DNA that is uninterrupted by retrotransposons. We have isolated nearly full length cDNAs corresponding to the five proximal genes in the cluster. The average intertranscript distance between them is just 1 kb, revealing a surprisingly compact packaging of adjacent genes in this part of the genome. At least 11 small insertions, including several previously described miniature inverted repeat transposable elements, were detected in the introns and 3' untranslated regions of genes and between genes. The gene-rich region is flanked at the proximal and distal ends by retrotransposon blocks. Thus, the maize genome appears to have scattered regions of high gene density similar to those found in other plants. The unusually high rate of intragenic recombination seen in bz may be related to the very high gene density of the region.

  17. Days to heading 7, a major quantitative locus determining photoperiod sensitivity and regional adaptation in rice.

    PubMed

    Gao, He; Jin, Mingna; Zheng, Xiao-Ming; Chen, Jun; Yuan, Dingyang; Xin, Yeyun; Wang, Maoqing; Huang, Dongyi; Zhang, Zhe; Zhou, Kunneng; Sheng, Peike; Ma, Jin; Ma, Weiwei; Deng, Huafeng; Jiang, Ling; Liu, Shijia; Wang, Haiyang; Wu, Chuanyin; Yuan, Longping; Wan, Jianmin

    2014-11-18

    Success of modern agriculture relies heavily on breeding of crops with maximal regional adaptability and yield potentials. A major limiting factor for crop cultivation is their flowering time, which is strongly regulated by day length (photoperiod) and temperature. Here we report identification and characterization of Days to heading 7 (DTH7), a major genetic locus underlying photoperiod sensitivity and grain yield in rice. Map-based cloning reveals that DTH7 encodes a pseudo-response regulator protein and its expression is regulated by photoperiod. We show that in long days DTH7 acts downstream of the photoreceptor phytochrome B to repress the expression of Ehd1, an up-regulator of the "florigen" genes (Hd3a and RFT1), leading to delayed flowering. Further, we find that haplotype combinations of DTH7 with Grain number, plant height, and heading date 7 (Ghd7) and DTH8 correlate well with the heading date and grain yield of rice under different photoperiod conditions. Our data provide not only a macroscopic view of the genetic control of photoperiod sensitivity in rice but also a foundation for breeding of rice cultivars better adapted to the target environments using rational design.

  18. Functional dissection of the mouse tyrosinase locus control region identifies a new putative boundary activity.

    PubMed

    Giraldo, Patricia; Martínez, Antonio; Regales, Lucía; Lavado, Alfonso; García-Díaz, Angel; Alonso, Angel; Busturia, Ana; Montoliu, Lluís

    2003-11-01

    Locus control regions (LCRs) are complex high-order chromatin structures harbouring several regulatory elements, including enhancers and boundaries. We have analysed the mouse tyrosinase LCR functions, in vitro, in cell lines and, in vivo, in transgenic mice and flies. The LCR-core (2.1 kb), located at -15 kb and carrying a previously described tissue-specific DNase I hypersensitive site, operates as a transcriptional enhancer that efficiently transactivates heterologous promoters in a cell-specific orientation-independent manner. Furthermore, we have investigated the boundary activity of these sequences in transgenic animals and cells. In mice, the LCR fragment (3.7 kb) rescued a weakly expressed reference construct that displays position effects. In Drosophila, the LCR fragment and its core insulated the expression of a white minigene reporter construct from chromosomal position effects. In cells, sequences located 5' from the LCR-core displayed putative boundary activities. We have obtained genomic sequences surrounding the LCR fragment and found a LINE1 repeated element at 5'. In B16 melanoma and L929 fibroblast mouse cells, this element was found heavily methylated, supporting the existence of putative boundary elements that could prevent the spreading of condensed chromatin from the LINE1 sequences into the LCR fragment, experimentally shown to be in an open chromatin structure.

  19. The Impact of ADH1B Alleles and Educational Status on Levels and Modes of Alcohol Consumption in Russian Male Individuals.

    PubMed

    Borinskaya, S A; Kim, A A; Rubanovich, A V; Yankovsky, N K

    2013-07-01

    Alcohol abuse is one of the main reasons behind the low life span in Russia. Both social and genetic factors affect the alcohol consumption level. The genetic factors are alleles of the alcohol dehydrogenase ADH1B and aldehyde dehydrogenaseALDH2 genes. We have typed and found frequencies for the alleles in a cohort of 642 men, ethnic Russians. The individuals of the cohort were asked to complete a questionnaire in the framework of the Izhevsk Family Study (Leon et al., 2007, 2009) regarding the amount of alcohol consumed and on the type of hazardous alcohol consumption (nonbeverage alcohol consumption and the so-called "zapoï" which is a Russian term for a heavy drinking bout lasting for at least 2 days, when an individual is withdrawn from the normal social life). The ADH1B*48His allele was found among heterozygous individuals only (N=68, 10.6% of the cohort). The ALDH2*504Lys allele was also found among heterozygous individuals only (N=2, 0.3%) The effect of ADH1B alleles and the influence of the education level on the amount and type of alcohol consumed had not previously been studied in Russians. We have found that the amount of consumed alcohol is 21.6% lower (1733 g of ethanol per year) for ADH1B*48His allele carriers in the cohort of Russian men. The amount of consumed alcohol was found to be 9.8% lower (793 g of ethanol per year) in the case when individuals had a higher education as compared to those who had a secondary- or elementary school education level in the same cohort. Hence, the protective effect of the genetic factor (ADH1B*48His allele carriage) has proven to be more pronounced than the influence of the social factor (education level) at the individual level in the cohort of Russian men. Both factors have also proven to have a protective effect against hazardous types of alcohol consumption. Zapoï was not scored among individuals of the cohort with ADH1B*48His allele carriage (OR=12.6, P=0.006), as compared to 8.4% of "zapoï" individuals who

  20. A ninth locus (RP18) for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa maps in the pericentromeric region of chromosome 1.

    PubMed

    Xu, S Y; Schwartz, M; Rosenberg, T; Gal, A

    1996-08-01

    We studied a large Danish family of seven generations in which autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP), a heterogeneous genetic form of retinal dystrophy, was segregating. After linkage had been excluded to all known adRP loci on chromosomes 3q, 6p, 7p, 7q, 8q, 17p, 17q and 19q, a genome screening was performed. Positive lod scores suggestive of linkage with values ranging between Z = 1.58-5.36 at theta = 0.04-0.20 were obtained for eight loci on proximal 1p and 1q. Close linkage without recombination and a maximum lod score of 7.22 at theta = 0.00 was found between the adRP locus (RP18) in this family and D1S498 which is on 1q very near the centromere. Analysis of multiply informative meioses suggests that in this family D1S534 and D1S305 flank RP18 in interval 1p13-q23. No linkage has been found to loci from this chromosomal region in six other medium sized adRP families in which the disease locus has been excluded from all known chromosomal regions harbouring an adRP gene or locus suggesting that there is (at least) one further adRP locus to be mapped in the future.

  1. The interplay between alcohol consumption, oral hygiene, ALDH2 and ADH1B in the risk of head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Sen-Tien; Wong, Tung-Yiu; Ou, Chun-Yen; Fang, Sheen-Yie; Chen, Ken-Chung; Hsiao, Jenn-Ren; Huang, Cheng-Chih; Lee, Wei-Ting; Lo, Hung-I; Huang, Jehn-Shyun; Wu, Jiunn-Liang; Yen, Chia-Jui; Hsueh, Wei-Ting; Wu, Yuan-Hua; Yang, Ming-Wei; Lin, Forn-Chia; Chang, Jang-Yang; Chang, Kwang-Yu; Wu, Shang-Yin; Liao, Hsiao-Chen; Lin, Chen-Lin; Wang, Yi-Hui; Weng, Ya-Ling; Yang, Han-Chien; Chang, Jeffrey S

    2014-11-15

    Alcohol consumption is an established risk factor for head and neck cancer (HNC). The major carcinogen from alcohol is acetaldehyde, which may be produced by humans or by oral microorganisms through the metabolism of ethanol. To account for the different sources of acetaldehyde production, the current study examined the interplay between alcohol consumption, oral hygiene (as a proxy measure for the growth of oral microorganisms), and alcohol-metabolizing genes (ADH1B and ALDH2) in the risk of HNC. We found that both the fast (*2/*2) and the slow (*1/*1+ *1/*2) ADH1B genotypes increased the risk of HNC due to alcohol consumption, and this association differed according to the slow/non-functional ALDH2 genotypes (*1/*2+ *2/*2) or poor oral hygiene. In persons with the fast ADH1B genotype, the HNC risk associated with alcohol drinking was increased for those with the slow/non-functional ALDH2 genotypes. For those with the slow ADH1B genotypes, oral hygiene appeared to play an important role; the highest magnitude of an increased HNC risk in alcohol drinkers occurred among those with the worst oral hygiene. This is the first study to show that the association between alcohol drinking and HNC risk may be modified by the interplay between genetic polymorphisms of ADH1B and ALDH2 and oral hygiene. Although it is important to promote abstinence from or reduction of alcohol drinking to decrease the occurrence of HNC, improving oral hygiene practices may provide additional benefit.

  2. Identification and Potential Regulatory Properties of Evolutionary Conserved Regions (ECRs) at the Schizophrenia-Associated MIR137 Locus.

    PubMed

    Gianfrancesco, Olympia; Griffiths, Daniel; Myers, Paul; Collier, David A; Bubb, Vivien J; Quinn, John P

    2016-10-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified a region at chromosome 1p21.3, containing the microRNA MIR137, to be among the most significant associations for schizophrenia. However, the mechanism by which genetic variation at this locus increases risk of schizophrenia is unknown. Identifying key regulatory regions around MIR137 is crucial to understanding the potential role of this gene in the aetiology of psychiatric disorders. Through alignment of vertebrate genomes, we identified seven non-coding regions at the MIR137 locus with conservation comparable to exons (>70 %). Bioinformatic analysis using the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium GWAS dataset for schizophrenia showed five of the ECRs to have genome-wide significant SNPs in or adjacent to their sequence. Analysis of available datasets on chromatin marks and histone modification data showed that three of the ECRs were predicted to be functional in the human brain, and three in development. In vitro analysis of ECR activity using reporter gene assays showed that all seven of the selected ECRs displayed transcriptional regulatory activity in the SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell line. This data suggests a regulatory role in the developing and adult brain for these highly conserved regions at the MIR137 schizophrenia-associated locus and further that these domains could act individually or synergistically to regulate levels of MIR137 expression.

  3. Fast Principal-Component Analysis Reveals Convergent Evolution of ADH1B in Europe and East Asia.

    PubMed

    Galinsky, Kevin J; Bhatia, Gaurav; Loh, Po-Ru; Georgiev, Stoyan; Mukherjee, Sayan; Patterson, Nick J; Price, Alkes L

    2016-03-03

    Searching for genetic variants with unusual differentiation between subpopulations is an established approach for identifying signals of natural selection. However, existing methods generally require discrete subpopulations. We introduce a method that infers selection using principal components (PCs) by identifying variants whose differentiation along top PCs is significantly greater than the null distribution of genetic drift. To enable the application of this method to large datasets, we developed the FastPCA software, which employs recent advances in random matrix theory to accurately approximate top PCs while reducing time and memory cost from quadratic to linear in the number of individuals, a computational improvement of many orders of magnitude. We apply FastPCA to a cohort of 54,734 European Americans, identifying 5 distinct subpopulations spanning the top 4 PCs. Using the PC-based test for natural selection, we replicate previously known selected loci and identify three new genome-wide significant signals of selection, including selection in Europeans at ADH1B. The coding variant rs1229984(∗)T has previously been associated to a decreased risk of alcoholism and shown to be under selection in East Asians; we show that it is a rare example of independent evolution on two continents. We also detect selection signals at IGFBP3 and IGH, which have also previously been associated to human disease.

  4. Fast Principal-Component Analysis Reveals Convergent Evolution of ADH1B in Europe and East Asia

    PubMed Central

    Galinsky, Kevin J.; Bhatia, Gaurav; Loh, Po-Ru; Georgiev, Stoyan; Mukherjee, Sayan; Patterson, Nick J.; Price, Alkes L.

    2016-01-01

    Searching for genetic variants with unusual differentiation between subpopulations is an established approach for identifying signals of natural selection. However, existing methods generally require discrete subpopulations. We introduce a method that infers selection using principal components (PCs) by identifying variants whose differentiation along top PCs is significantly greater than the null distribution of genetic drift. To enable the application of this method to large datasets, we developed the FastPCA software, which employs recent advances in random matrix theory to accurately approximate top PCs while reducing time and memory cost from quadratic to linear in the number of individuals, a computational improvement of many orders of magnitude. We apply FastPCA to a cohort of 54,734 European Americans, identifying 5 distinct subpopulations spanning the top 4 PCs. Using the PC-based test for natural selection, we replicate previously known selected loci and identify three new genome-wide significant signals of selection, including selection in Europeans at ADH1B. The coding variant rs1229984∗T has previously been associated to a decreased risk of alcoholism and shown to be under selection in East Asians; we show that it is a rare example of independent evolution on two continents. We also detect selection signals at IGFBP3 and IGH, which have also previously been associated to human disease. PMID:26924531

  5. Metabolism of trans, trans-muconaldehyde, a cytotoxic metabolite of benzene, in mouse liver by alcohol dehydrogenase Adh1 and aldehyde reductase AKR1A4

    SciTech Connect

    Short, Duncan M.; Lyon, Robert; Watson, David G.; Barski, Oleg A.; McGarvie, Gail; Ellis, Elizabeth M. . E-mail: Elizabeth.ellis@strath.ac.uk

    2006-01-15

    The reductive metabolism of trans, trans-muconaldehyde, a cytotoxic metabolite of benzene, was studied in mouse liver. Using an HPLC-based stopped assay, the primary reduced metabolite was identified as 6-hydroxy-trans, trans-2,4-hexadienal (OH/CHO) and the secondary metabolite as 1,6-dihydroxy-trans, trans-2,4-hexadiene (OH/OH). The main enzymes responsible for the highest levels of reductase activity towards trans, trans-muconaldehyde were purified from mouse liver soluble fraction first by Q-sepharose chromatography followed by either blue or red dye affinity chromatography. In mouse liver, trans, trans-muconaldehyde is predominantly reduced by an NADH-dependent enzyme, which was identified as alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh1). Kinetic constants obtained for trans, trans-muconaldehyde with the native Adh1 enzyme showed a V {sub max} of 2141 {+-} 500 nmol/min/mg and a K {sub m} of 11 {+-} 4 {mu}M. This enzyme was inhibited by pyrazole with a K {sub I} of 3.1 {+-} 0.57 {mu}M. Other fractions were found to contain muconaldehyde reductase activity independent of Adh1, and one enzyme was identified as the NADPH-dependent aldehyde reductase AKR1A4. This showed a V {sub max} of 115 nmol/min/mg and a K {sub m} of 15 {+-} 2 {mu}M and was not inhibited by pyrazole.

  6. Analysis of the albino-locus region of the mouse. IV. Characterization of 34 deficiencies

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, L.B.; Montgomery, C.S.; Raymer, G.D.

    1982-03-01

    Thirty-four independent nonviable c-locus mutations (types c/sup al/, albino lethal and c/sup as/, albino subvital), derived from radiation experiments, were tested for invovlvement of nearby markers tp, Mod-2, sh-1, and Hbb: 10, 22, and 2 involved, respectively, none of these markers, Mod-2 alone, and Mod-2 plus sh-1. When classified on this basis, as well as according to developmental stage at which homozygotes die, and by limited complementation results, the 34 independent mutations fell into 12 groups. From results of a full-scale complementation grid of all 435 possible crosses among 30 of the mutations, we were able to postulate an alignment of eight functional units by which the 12 groups fit a linear pattern. Abnormal phenotypes utilized in the complementation study were deaths at various stages of prenatal or postnatla development, body weight, and reduction or absence of various enzymes. Some of these phenotypes can be separated (e.g., glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency and neonatal death). - We conclude that all of the nonviable albino mutations are deficiencies overalpping at c, and ranging in size from < 2cM to 6 to 11 cM. The characterization of this array of deficiencies should provide useful tools for gene-dosage studies, recombinant-DNA fine-structure analyses, etc. Since many of the combinations of lethals produce viable albino animals that resemble the standard c/c type, we conclude (1) that the c locus contains no sites essential for survival, and (b) that viable nonalbino c-locus mutations (c/sup xv/) are the result of mutations within the c cistron. Viable albinos (c/sup av/, the majority of radiation-induced c-locus mutations) may be intracistronic mutations or very small deficiencies.

  7. Mapping of the chromosome 1p36 region surrounding the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2A locus

    SciTech Connect

    Denton, P.; Gere, S.; Wolpert, C.

    1994-09-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is the most common inherited peripheral neuropathy. Although CMT2 is clinically indistinguishable from CMT1, the two forms can be differentiated by pathological and neurophysiological methods. We have established one locus, CMT2A on chromosome 1p36, and have established genetic heterogeneity. This locus maps to the region of the deletions associated with neuroblastoma. We have now identified an additional 11 CMT2 families. Three families are linked to chromosome 1p36 while six families are excluded from this region. Another six families are currently under analysis and collection. To date the CMT2A families represent one third of those CMT2 families examined. We have established a microdissection library of the 1p36 region which is currently being characterized for microsatellite repeats and STSs using standard hybridization techniques and a modified degenerate primer method. In addition, new markers (D1S253, D1S450, D1S489, D1S503, GATA27E04, and GATA4H04) placed in this region are being mapped using critical recombinants in the CEPH reference pedigrees. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) has been used to confirm mapping. A YAC contig is being assembled from the CEPH megabase library using STSs to isolate key YACs which are extended by vectorette end clone and Alu-PCR. These findings suggest that the CMT2 phenotype is secondary to at least two different genes and demonstrates further heterogeneity in the CMT phenotype.

  8. Molecular genetics of the brown (b)-locus region of mouse chromosome 4. II. Complementation analyses of lethal brown deletions.

    PubMed

    Rinchik, E M

    1994-07-01

    Numerous new mutations at the brown (b) locus in mouse chromosome 4 have been recovered over the years in germ-cell mutagenesis experiments performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A large series of radiation- and chemical-induced b mutations known to be chromosomal deletions, and also known to be prenatally lethal when homozygous, were analyzed by pairwise complementation crosses as well as by pseudodominance tests involving flanking loci defined by externally visible phenotypes. These crosses were designed to determine the extent of each deletion on the genetic and phenotype map of the chromosomal region surrounding the b locus; the crosses also provided basic data that assigned deletions to complementation groups and defined four new loci associated with aberrancies in normal development. Specifically, the pseudodominance tests identified deletions that include the proximally mapping whirler (wi) and the distally mapping depilated (dep) genes, thereby bracketing these loci defined by visible developmental abnormalities with landmarks (deletion breakpoints) that are easily identified on the physical map. Furthermore, the complementation crosses, which were supplemented with additional crosses that allowed determination of the gross time of lethality of selected deletions, defined four new loci required for normal development. Homozygous deletion of one of these loci (b-associated fitness, baf) results in a runting syndrome evident during postnatal development; deletion of one locus [l(4)2Rn] causes death in the late gestation/neonatal period; and deletion of either of two loci [l(4)1Rn or l(4)3Rn] results in embryonic death, most likely in pre-, peri- or postimplantation stages. The placement of these new functionally defined loci on the evolving molecular map of the b region should be useful for continuing the analysis of the roles played in development by genes in this segment of chromosome 4.

  9. Fine Mapping of a Grain-Weight Quantitative Trait Locus in the Pericentromeric Region of Rice Chromosome 3

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiming; Thomson, Michael; McCouch, Susan R.

    2004-01-01

    As the basis for fine mapping of a grain-weight QTL, gw3.1, a set of near isogenic lines (NILs), was developed from an Oryza sativa, cv. Jefferson × O. rufipogon (IRGC105491) population based on five generations of backcrossing and seven generations of selfing. Despite the use of an interspecific cross for mapping and the pericentromeric location of the QTL, we observed no suppression of recombination and have been able to narrow down the location of the gene underlying this QTL to a 93.8-kb region. The locus was associated with transgressive variation for grain size and grain weight in this population and features prominently in many other inter- and intraspecific crosses of rice. The phenotype was difficult to evaluate due to the large amount of variance in size and weight among grains on a panicle and between grains on primary and secondary panicles, underscoring the value of using multiple approaches to phenotyping, including extreme sampling and NIL group-mean comparisons. The fact that a QTL for kernel size has also been identified in a homeologous region of maize chromosome 1 suggests that this locus, in which the dominant O. rufipogon allele confers small seed size, may be associated with domestication in cereals. PMID:15611185

  10. Distal Regions of the Human IFNG Locus Direct Cell Type-Specific Expression

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Patrick L.; Chang, Shaojing; Henderson, Melodie; Soutto, Mohammed; Davis, Georgia M.; McLoed, Allyson G.; Townsend, Michael J.; Glimcher, Laurie H.; Mortlock, Douglas P.; Aune, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01

    Genes, such as IFNG, which are expressed in multiple cell lineages of the immune system, may employ a common set of regulatory elements to direct transcription in multiple cell types or individual regulatory elements to direct expression in individual cell lineages. By employing a bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic system, we demonstrate that IFNG employs unique regulatory elements to achieve lineage-specific transcriptional control. Specifically, a one 1-kb element 30 kb upstream of IFNG activates transcription in T cells and NKT cells but not in NK cells. This distal regulatory element is a Runx3 binding site in Th1 cells and is needed for RNA polymerase II recruitment to IFNG, but it is not absolutely required for histone acetylation of the IFNG locus. These results support a model whereby IFNG utilizes cis-regulatory elements with cell type-restricted function. PMID:20574006

  11. A polymorphic and hypervariable locus in the pseudoautosomal region of the CBA/H mouse sex chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Fennelly, J.; Laval, S.; Wright, E.; Plumb, M.

    1996-04-01

    We have identified a genomic locus (DXYH1) that is polymorphic and hypervariable within the CBA/H colony. Using a panel of C57BL/6 x Mus spretus backcross offspring, it was mapped to the distal end of the X chromosome. Pseudoautosomal inheritance was demonstrated through three generations of CBA/H x CBA/H and CBA/H x C57BL/6 crosses and confirmed through linkage to the Sxr locus in X/Y Sxr x 3H1 crosses. Meiotic recombination frequencies place DXYH1 {approximately}28% into the pseudoautosomal region from the boundary. The de novo generation of CBA/H variant DXYH1 restriction fragment length polymorphisms during spermatogenesis is suggestive of the germline instability associated with hypermutable human minisatellites. The absence of DXY1-related sequences in Mus spretus provides DNA sequence evidence to support the observed failure of X-Y pairing during meiosis and consequent hybrid infertility in C57BL/6 x Mus spretus male F1 offspring. 19 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Comparative Genomic Analyses of the Human NPHP1 Locus Reveal Complex Genomic Architecture and Its Regional Evolution in Primates

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Bo; Liu, Pengfei; Gupta, Aditya; Beck, Christine R.; Tejomurtula, Anusha; Campbell, Ian M.; Gambin, Tomasz; Simmons, Alexandra D.; Withers, Marjorie A.; Harris, R. Alan; Rogers, Jeffrey; Schwartz, David C.; Lupski, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Many loci in the human genome harbor complex genomic structures that can result in susceptibility to genomic rearrangements leading to various genomic disorders. Nephronophthisis 1 (NPHP1, MIM# 256100) is an autosomal recessive disorder that can be caused by defects of NPHP1; the gene maps within the human 2q13 region where low copy repeats (LCRs) are abundant. Loss of function of NPHP1 is responsible for approximately 85% of the NPHP1 cases—about 80% of such individuals carry a large recurrent homozygous NPHP1 deletion that occurs via nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR) between two flanking directly oriented ~45 kb LCRs. Published data revealed a non-pathogenic inversion polymorphism involving the NPHP1 gene flanked by two inverted ~358 kb LCRs. Using optical mapping and array-comparative genomic hybridization, we identified three potential novel structural variant (SV) haplotypes at the NPHP1 locus that may protect a haploid genome from the NPHP1 deletion. Inter-species comparative genomic analyses among primate genomes revealed massive genomic changes during evolution. The aggregated data suggest that dynamic genomic rearrangements occurred historically within the NPHP1 locus and generated SV haplotypes observed in the human population today, which may confer differential susceptibility to genomic instability and the NPHP1 deletion within a personal genome. Our study documents diverse SV haplotypes at a complex LCR-laden human genomic region. Comparative analyses provide a model for how this complex region arose during primate evolution, and studies among humans suggest that intra-species polymorphism may potentially modulate an individual’s susceptibility to acquiring disease-associated alleles. PMID:26641089

  13. Genetic linkage studies in familial partial epilepsy: Exclusion of the human chromosome regions syntenic to the El-1 mouse locus

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes-Cendes, I.; Mulley, J.C.; Andermann, E.

    1994-09-01

    Recently, six families with a familial form of partial epilepsy were described. All pedigrees showed autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance. Affected individuals present with predominantly nocturnal seizures with frontal lobe semiology. In 1959, a genetic mouse model for partial epilepsy, the El mouse, was reported. In the El mouse, a major seizure susceptibility gene, El-1, segregates in an autosomal dominant fashion and has been localized to a region distal to the centromere of mouse chromosome 9. Comparative genetic maps between man and mouse have been used for prediction of localization of several human disease genes. Because the region of mouse chromosome 9 that is the most likely to contain the El-1 locus is syntenic to regions on human chromosomes 3q21-p22, 3q21-q23.3, 6q12 and 15q24, we adopted the candidate gene approach as an initial linkage strategy. Twenty-two polymorphic microsatellite markers covering these regions were used for genotyping individuals in the three larger families ascertained, two of which are Australian and one French-Canadian. Negative two-point lod scores were obtained separately for each family. The analysis of all three families combined significantly excludes the candidate regions on chromosomes 3, 6 and 15.

  14. Autosomal dominant familial spastic paraplegia: Reduction of the FSPI candidate region on chromosome 14q to 7 cM and locus heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Gispert, S.; Santos, N.; Auburger, G.; Damen, R.; Voit, T.; Schulz, J.; Klockgether, T.; Orozco, G.; Kreuz, F.; Weissenbach, J.

    1995-01-01

    Three large pedigrees of Germany descent with autosomal dominant {open_quotes}pure{close_quotes} familial spastic paraplegia (FSP) were characterized clinically and genetically. Haplotype and linkage analyses, with microsatellites covering the FSP region on chromosome 14q (locus FSP1), were performed. In pedigree W, we found a haplotype that cosegregates with the disease and observed three crossing-over events, reducing the FSP1 candidate region to 7 cM; in addition, the observation of apparent anticipation in this family suggests a trinucleotide repeat expansion as the mutation. In pedigree D and S, the gene locus could be excluded from the whole FSP1 region, confirming the locus heterogeneity of autosomal dominant FSP. 11 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. The H19 Differentially Methylated Region Marks the Parental Origin of a Heterologous Locus without Gametic DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kye-Yoon; Sellars, Elizabeth A.; Grinberg, Alexander; Huang, Sing-Ping; Pfeifer, Karl

    2004-01-01

    Igf2 and H19 are coordinately regulated imprinted genes physically linked on the distal end of mouse chromosome 7. Genetic analyses demonstrate that the differentially methylated region (DMR) upstream of the H19 gene is necessary for three distinct functions: transcriptional insulation of the maternal Igf2 allele, transcriptional silencing of paternal H19 allele, and marking of the parental origin of the two chromosomes. To test the sufficiency of the DMR for the third function, we inserted DMR at two heterologous positions in the genome, downstream of H19 and at the alpha-fetoprotein locus on chromosome 5. Our results demonstrate that the DMR alone is sufficient to act as a mark of parental origin. Moreover, this activity is not dependent on germ line differences in DMR methylation. Thus, the DMR can mark its parental origin by a mechanism independent of its own DNA methylation. PMID:15082756

  16. Deletion of the X-linked Opsin Gene Array Locus Control Region (LCR) Results in Disruption of the Cone Mosaic

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Joseph; Rossi, Ethan A.; Porter, Jason; Neitz, Jay; Roorda, Austin; Williams, David; Neitz, Maureen

    2010-01-01

    Blue-cone monochromacy (BCM) is an X-linked condition in which long- (L−) and middle- (M−) wavelength-sensitive cone function is absent. Due to the X-linked nature of the condition, female carriers are spared from a full manifestation of the associated defects but can show visual symptoms, including abnormal cone electroretinograms. Here we imaged the cone mosaic in four females carrying an L/M array with deletion of the locus control region, resulting in an absence of L/M opsin gene expression (effectively acting as a cone opsin knockout). On average, they had cone mosaics with reduced density and disrupted organization compared to normal trichromats. This suggests that the absence of opsin in a subset of cones results in their early degeneration, with X-inactivation the likely mechanism underlying phenotypic variability in BCM carriers. PMID:20638402

  17. NF-E2 disrupts chromatin structure at human beta-globin locus control region hypersensitive site 2 in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, J A; Emerson, B M

    1996-01-01

    The human beta-globin locus control region (LCR) is responsible for forming an active chromatin structure extending over the 100-kb locus, allowing expression of the beta-globin gene family. The LCR consists of four erythroid-cell-specific DNase I hypersensitive sites (HS1 to -4). DNase I hypersensitive sites are thought to represent nucleosome-free regions of DNA which are bound by trans-acting factors. Of the four hypersensitive sites only HS2 acts as a transcriptional enhancer. In this study, we examine the binding of an erythroid protein to its site within HS2 in chromatin in vitro. NF-E2 is a transcriptional activator consisting of two subunits, the hematopoietic cell-specific p45 and the ubiquitous DNA-binding subunit, p18. NF-E2 binds two tandem AP1-like sites in HS2 which form the core of its enhancer activity. In this study, we show that when bound to in vitro-reconstituted chromatin, NF-E2 forms a DNase I hypersensitive site at HS2 similar to the site observed in vivo. Moreover, NF-E2 binding in vitro results in a disruption of nucleosome structure which can be detected 200 bp away. Although NF-E2 can disrupt nucleosomes when added to preformed chromatin, the disruption is more pronounced when NF-E2 is added to DNA prior to chromatin assembly. Interestingly, the hematopoietic cell-specific subunit, p45, is necessary for binding to chromatin but not to naked DNA. Interaction of NF-E2 with its site in chromatin-reconstituted HS2 allows a second erythroid factor, GATA-1, to bind its nearby sites. Lastly, nucleosome disruption by NF-E2 is an ATP-dependent process, suggesting the involvement of energy-dependent nucleosome remodeling factors. PMID:8816476

  18. A distinct regulatory region of the Bmp5 locus activates gene expression following adult bone fracture or soft tissue injury.

    PubMed

    Guenther, Catherine A; Wang, Zhen; Li, Emma; Tran, Misha C; Logan, Catriona Y; Nusse, Roel; Pantalena-Filho, Luiz; Yang, George P; Kingsley, David M

    2015-08-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are key signaling molecules required for normal development of bones and other tissues. Previous studies have shown that null mutations in the mouse Bmp5 gene alter the size, shape and number of multiple bone and cartilage structures during development. Bmp5 mutations also delay healing of rib fractures in adult mutants, suggesting that the same signals used to pattern embryonic bone and cartilage are also reused during skeletal regeneration and repair. Despite intense interest in BMPs as agents for stimulating bone formation in clinical applications, little is known about the regulatory elements that control developmental or injury-induced BMP expression. To compare the DNA sequences that activate gene expression during embryonic bone formation and following acute injuries in adult animals, we assayed regions surrounding the Bmp5 gene for their ability to stimulate lacZ reporter gene expression in transgenic mice. Multiple genomic fragments, distributed across the Bmp5 locus, collectively coordinate expression in discrete anatomic domains during normal development, including in embryonic ribs. In contrast, a distinct regulatory region activated expression following rib fracture in adult animals. The same injury control region triggered gene expression in mesenchymal cells following tibia fracture, in migrating keratinocytes following dorsal skin wounding, and in regenerating epithelial cells following lung injury. The Bmp5 gene thus contains an "injury response" control region that is distinct from embryonic enhancers, and that is activated by multiple types of injury in adult animals.

  19. Fine mapping of the McLeod locus (XK) to a 150-380-kb region in Xp21

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, M.F.; Monaco, A.P. ); Blonden, L.A.J.; Ommen, G.J.B. van ); Affara, N.A.; Ferguson-Smith, M.A. ); Lehrach, H. )

    1992-02-01

    McLeod syndrome characterized by acanthocytosis and the absence of a red-blood-cell Kell antigen (Kx), is a multisystem disorder involving a late-onset myopathy, splenomegaly, and neurological defects. The locus for this syndrome has been mapped, by deletion analysis, to a region between the loci for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). In this study, the authors describe a new marker, 3BH/R 0.3 (DXS 709), isolated by cloning the deletion breakpoint of a DMD patient. A long-range restriction map of Xp21, encompassing the gene loci for McLeod and CGD, was constructed, and multiple CpG islands were found clustered in a 700-kb region. Using the new marker, they have limited the McLeod syndrome critical region to 150-380-kb. Within this interval, two CpG-rich islands which may represent candidate sites for the McLeod gene were identified.

  20. Structural organization of the barley D-hordein locus in comparison with its orthologous regions of wheat genomes.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yong Qiang; Anderson, Olin D; Londeorë, Cynthia F; Kong, Xiuying; Chibbar, Ravindra N; Lazo, Gerard R

    2003-12-01

    D hordein, a prolamin storage protein of barley endosperms, is highly homologous to the high molecular weight (HWM) glutenin subunits, which are the major determinants of bread-making quality in wheat flour. In hexaploid wheat (AABBDD), each genome contains two paralogous copies of HMW-glutenin genes that encode the x- and y-type HMW-glutenin subunits. Previously, we reported the sequence analysis of a 102-kb genomic region that contains the HMW-glutenin locus of the D genome from Aegilops tauschii, the donor of the D genome of hexaploid wheat. Here, we present the sequence analysis of a 120-kb D-hordein region of the barley genome, a more distantly related member of the Triticeae grass tribe. Comparative sequence analysis revealed that gene content and order are generally conserved. Genes included in both of these orthologous regions are arranged in the following order: a Xa21-like receptor kinase, an endosperm globulin, an HMW prolamin, and a serine (threonine) protein kinase. However, in the wheat D genome, a region containing both the globulin and HMW-glutenin gene was duplicated, indicating that this duplication event occurred after the separation of the wheat and barley genomes. The intergenic regions are divergent with regard to the sequence and structural organization. It was found that different types of retroelements are responsible for the intergenic structure divergence in the wheat and barley genomes. In the barley region, we identified 16 long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons in three distinct nested clusters. These retroelements account for 63% of the contig sequence. In addition, barley D hordein was compared with wheat HMW glutenins in terms of cysteine residue conservation and repeat domain organization.

  1. Antibody expression from the core region of the human IgH locus reconstructed in transgenic mice using bacteriophage P1 clones

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, S.D.; Cook, G.P.; Davies, S.L.

    1996-08-01

    Mice carrying transgenic human immunoglobulin gene miniloci can be used for the production of human monoclonal antibodies. The human variable region (V) gene segments in these miniloci undergo productive rearrangement in mouse lymphoid tissue to yield a population of B lymphocytes expressing a repertoire of antibodies. Many of the miniloci studied to date have included only a small number of germline gene segments in an artificially compact configuration. Here we describe the use of the bacteriophage P1 cloning system to create mice carrying the core region of the human immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) locus. Three P1 clones carrying overlapping regions of the human IgH locus (spanning the five J{sub H}-proximal V{sub H} segments, the entire D{sub H} and J{sub H} clusters, and the C{mu} and C{delta} constant regions) were injected into mouse eggs and appear to have reconstituted the core region of the locus (>180 kb) following homologous recombination with each other. While this translocus yielded a titer of serum immunoglobulin similar to that obtained with a smaller plasmid-basid minilocus, the P1-based locus gave rise to substantially greater diversification by somatic hypermutation. Such diversification is important for obtaining high-affinity antibodies. The results show the usefulness of the P1 system in facilitating the manipulation and recreation of large transgenes. 37 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Development of a YAC contig covering the minimal region of a CSNB1 locus in Xp11

    SciTech Connect

    Boycott, K.M.; Gratton, K.J.; Moore, B.J.

    1994-09-01

    X-linked congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB1) is an eye disorder that includes impairment of night vision, reduced visual acuity and, in some cases, myopia and congenital nystagmus. Electroretinography reveals a marked reduction of the b-wave in affected individuals suggesting that X-linked CSNB is due to a molecular defect in the bipolar layer of the retina. Based on our studies of a large four generation family with X-linked CSNB, a CSNB1 locus was mapped to a 4-5 cM region at Xp11.23-Xp11.22 bounded telomerically by DXS426 and centromerically by DXS988. Using a panel of radiation and conventional somatic cell hybrids, a detailed map of new and published STSs has been generated for the minimal region of CSNB1. PCR primer pairs for STSs has been generated for the minimal region of CSNB1. PCR primer pairs for twenty-five STSs, including eleven end-clones, were used to isolate YAC clones from CEPH, mega-CEPH, and X chromosome-specific YAC libraries. In total, fifty-two YACs were characterized for STS overlaps and assembled to provide a minimum of 3 Mb of physical coverage in the region between DXS426 and DXS988. Five gaps proximal to SYP are still to be closed. Our physical map suggests the following gene order: Xpter-OTAL1-GF1-DXS1011E-MG81-HUMCRAS2P-SYP-Xcen. STS analysis of the YACs revealed three subregions of the physical map which appear to be particularly susceptible to internal deletions and end-clone analysis demonstrated chimerism in six of seventeen YACs. A physical map of Xp11.23-Xp11.22 will provide a resource for the isolation of candidate genes for the X-linked CSNB gene which maps to this region.

  3. Exploring the diploid wheat ancestral A genome through sequence comparison at the high-molecular-weight glutenin locus region.

    PubMed

    Dong, Lingli; Huo, Naxin; Wang, Yi; Deal, Karin; Luo, Ming-Cheng; Wang, Daowen; Anderson, Olin D; Gu, Yong Qiang

    2012-12-01

    The polyploid nature of hexaploid wheat (T. aestivum, AABBDD) often represents a great challenge in various aspects of research including genetic mapping, map-based cloning of important genes, and sequencing and accurately assembly of its genome. To explore the utility of ancestral diploid species of polyploid wheat, sequence variation of T. urartu (A(u)A(u)) was analyzed by comparing its 277-kb large genomic region carrying the important Glu-1 locus with the homologous regions from the A genomes of the diploid T. monococcum (A(m)A(m)), tetraploid T. turgidum (AABB), and hexaploid T. aestivum (AABBDD). Our results revealed that in addition to a high degree of the gene collinearity, nested retroelement structures were also considerably conserved among the A(u) genome and the A genomes in polyploid wheats, suggesting that the majority of the repetitive sequences in the A genomes of polyploid wheats originated from the diploid A(u) genome. The difference in the compared region between A(u) and A is mainly caused by four differential TE insertion and two deletion events between these genomes. The estimated divergence time of A genomes calculated on nucleotide substitution rate in both shared TEs and collinear genes further supports the closer evolutionary relationship of A to A(u) than to A(m). The structure conservation in the repetitive regions promoted us to develop repeat junction markers based on the A(u) sequence for mapping the A genome in hexaploid wheat. Eighty percent of these repeat junction markers were successfully mapped to the corresponding region in hexaploid wheat, suggesting that T. urartu could serve as a useful resource for developing molecular markers for genetic and breeding studies in hexaploid wheat.

  4. A novel deletion/insertion caused by a replication error in the β-globin gene locus control region.

    PubMed

    Joly, Philippe; Lacan, Philippe; Garcia, Caroline; Meley, Roland; Pondarré, Corinne; Francina, Alain

    2011-01-01

    Deletions in the β-globin locus control region (β-LCR) lead to (εγδβ)(0)-thalassemia [(εγδβ)(0)-thal]. In patients suffering from these rare deletions, a normal hemoglobin (Hb), phenotype is found, contrasting with a hematological thalassemic phenotype. Multiplex-ligation probe amplification (MLPA) is an efficient tool to detect β-LCR deletions combined with long-range polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing to pinpoint deletion breakpoints. We present here a novel 11,155 bp β-LCR deletion found in a French Caucasian patient which removes DNase I hypersensitive site 2 (HS2) to HS4 of the β-LCR. Interestingly, a 197 bp insertion of two inverted sequences issued from the HS2-HS3 inter-region is present and suggests a complex rearrangement during replication. Carriers of this type of thalassemia can be misdiagnosed as an α-thal trait. Consequently, a complete α- and β-globin gene cluster analysis is required to prevent a potentially damaging misdiagnosis in genetic counselling.

  5. Synthetic human beta-globin 5'HS2 constructs function as locus control regions only in multicopy transgene concatamers.

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, J; Talbot, D; Dillon, N; Grosveld, F

    1993-01-01

    Transgenes linked to the beta-globin locus control region (LCR) are transcribed in a copy-dependent manner that is independent of the integration site. It has previously been shown that the LCR 5'HS2 region does not require its NF-E2 dimer binding site for LCR activity. In this paper we analyse synthetic 5'HS2 core constructs containing point mutations in the other factor binding sites 3' of the NF-E2 dimer site. The results show that 5'HS2 core is a partially active LCR that functions in a concatamer of at least two copies but not when present as a single copy in transgenic mice and that no single binding site within 5'HS2 is required for position-independent expression. In addition, the H-BP factor is identical to upstream stimulatory factor (USF) and full enhancement levels by 5'HS2 core in MEL cells require a combination of all the factor binding sites. We suggest that 5'HS2 cores in a concatamer interact with each other to establish an area of open chromatin and that this process may be the basis of LCR function. Images PMID:8428573

  6. Generation of a transcription map from the 17q21 region containing the BRCA1 locus

    SciTech Connect

    Rommens, J.M.; McArthur, J.; Allen, T.

    1994-09-01

    A limited interval of the chromosome 17q21 has been implicated in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer by linkage analysis. The type I 17{beta}-hydroxysteriod dehydrogenase gene (17{beta}HSD) was used to isolate two YACs. These and additional YACs identified with nearby genetic markers were characterized to obtain a detailed physical map of the BRCA1 region. This map provided the basis for the generation of a transcription map in order to identify candidate genes that could be assessed for involvement in the development of breast cancer in affected families. Direct selection of cDNAs from the genomic clones was carried out by hybridization with primary cDNA pools that had been prepared from RNA of mammary gland, ovary, placenta and the Caco-2 colon carcinoma cell line. The selected material was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction and cloned into plasmid vectors. Individual clones of the libraries of the retrieved fragments were then characterized by physical mapping, by RNA hybridization and by sequence analysis. To date, 36 unique cDNA fragments have been mapped to this region and confirmed to originate from chromosome 17. Longer cDNAs were also isolated by screening libraries derived from human breast and placenta. Based on analyses of these clones we have evidence for at least 12 genes from a 1 Megabase region. These include the type I 17{beta}HSD gene and the human {gamma}-tubulin gene. Sequences of two of the cDNA fragments showed similarity to a human brain cDNA and to a human pancreas cDNA. The predicted coding portion of one cDNA showed similarity with a rat ribosomal protein. Also, one cDNA fragment was found to be part of the recently identified gene corresponding to the CA125 antigen. The sequences of the remaining clones showed no strong similarity to known genes or proteins. These cDNAs are being analyzed by DNA and RNA hybridization for aberrations in breast and ovarian cancers.

  7. Collateral projection from the locus coeruleus to whisker-related sensory and motor brain regions of the rat.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sat-Byol; Beak, Suk K; Park, Seung H; Waterhouse, Barry D; Lee, Hyun S

    2009-06-01

    The primary goal of this study was to examine whether the locus coeruleus (LC) provides collateral projections to whisker-related, sensorimotor brain regions. After injections of retrograde tracers into the primary sensory (S1) barrel field/primary whisker motor (M1) cortices, ventroposteromedial (VPM)/ventrolateral (VL) thalamic nuclei, or principal sensory trigeminal (Pr5)/facial motor (Mo7) nuclei, the distribution of double-labeled neurons within the LC was examined. Our observations indicated that a large number of individual LC cells provided axon collaterals to S1-M1 or VPM-VL regions, whereas only a few projected to Pr5-Mo7 nuclei. The laterality and the distribution of dual-projecting LC neurons were as follows. 1) The neurons projecting to the S1-M1 cortices were predominantly ipsilateral (96% +/- 0.7%). Labeled neurons were located ventrally at the rostral pole but were evenly distributed along the dorsoventral aspect of the principal LC. 2) The cells projecting to the VPM-VL nuclei were bilateral, with ipsilateral (68% +/- 2.3%) dominance. Neurons were observed at the rostrocaudal extent of the LC, where the labeling was most pronounced at the ventral, principal LC. 3) The neurons projecting to the Pr5-Mo7 regions exhibited slightly contralateral (56% +/- 2.9%) dominance, where labeled cells were confined within the ventral margin of the principal subdivision. Taken together, the present observations demonstrate that each subdivision of the LC possesses a differential functional organization with respect to its collateral projection to whisker-related sensorimotor targets, suggesting that the nucleus might play a modulatory role in vibrissal sensorimotor integration that allows the guidance of behavioral action essential for the survival of the animal.

  8. Human dopamine {beta}-hydroxylase locus and the chromosome 9q34 region in alcoholism

    SciTech Connect

    Parsian. A.; Suarez, B.K.; Hampe, C.

    1994-09-01

    Human dopamine {beta}-hydroxylase (DBH) is responsible for conversion of dopamine to norepinephrine in catecholamine neurons. Potential inhibitors of this enzyme do exist, but they are generally not effective in vivo in reducing tissue concentrations of catecholamines. The gene for DBH has been localized to 9q34 by linkage analysis and in situ hybridization. Recently there have been reports indicating a suggestive evidence of linkage between DNA markers in 9q34 region and alcoholism. In order to test for this suggestive linkage, we have genotyped a sample of 134 subjects with alcoholism, 30 alcoholic families (n=302) and 92 normal controls. The alcoholic subjects are probands of multiple incidence families. The normal controls are an epidemiologically ascertained samples of middle-aged, unrelated individuals. The two groups were matched for sex and ethnic background. The markers used in this study were dinucleotide repeats in the DBH gene, and two highly informative (CA) markers (D9S64, D9S66) flanking the DBH gene. A preliminary affected-sib-pair analysis was carried out under two diagnostic schemes. Regardless of whether `probable` alcoholics are classified as unaffected (t=0.63) or affected (t=1.50), these data do not reveal a significant excess in DBH marker sharing among affected-sib-pairs. However, the comparison of the DBH marker allele frequencies between the unrelated alcoholic panel and the unrelated normal control panel was significant at the p=0.04 level.

  9. Cultural meaning of perceived control: a meta-analysis of locus of control and psychological symptoms across 18 cultural regions.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cecilia; Cheung, Shu-Fai; Chio, Jasmine Hin-Man; Chan, Man-Pui Sally

    2013-01-01

    Integrating more than 40 years of studies on locus of control (LOC), this meta-analysis investigated whether (a) the magnitude of the relationship between LOC and psychological symptoms differed among cultures with distinct individualist orientations and (b) depression and anxiety symptoms yielded different patterns of cultural findings with LOC. We included studies that examined global self-ratings of LOC and at least 1 of the criterion variables in nonclinical samples (age range: 18-80 years). Data were analyzed on the basis of 152 independent samples, representing the testing of 33,224 adults across 18 cultural regions. Results revealed moderately strong relationships for external LOC with depression symptoms (k = 123, N = 28,490, r = .30, 95% confidence interval [CI] [.27, .32]) and anxiety symptoms (k = 65, N = 13,208, r = .30, 95% CI [.27, .33]). Individualism explained 20% of unique variance only in the external LOC-anxiety relationship: The link between external LOC and anxiety symptoms was weaker for collectivist societies (k = 8, N = 2,297, r = .20, 95% CI [.13, .28]) compared with individualist societies (k = 54, N = 9,887, r = .32, 95% CI [.29, .34]). Such cultural differences were attributed to the reduced emphasis on agentic goals in more collectivist societies. It is noteworthy that external LOC does not carry the same negative connotations across cultures, and members of collectivist societies may be more ready to endorse such items. Culture has been examined at the country level, and the findings may not be applicable to any particular person in a cultural region. Implications for integrating cultural meaning of perceived control into formulation of theories, research design, and intervention programs are discussed.

  10. A Transcript Map for the 2.8-Mb Region Containing the Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1 Locus

    PubMed Central

    Guru, Siradanahalli C.; Agarwal, Sunita K.; Manickam, Pachiappan; Olufemi, Shodimu-Emmanuel; Crabtree, Judy S.; Weisemann, Jane M.; Kester, Mary Beth; Kim, Young S.; Wang, Yingping; Emmert-Buck, Michael R.; Liotta, Lance A.; Spiegel, Allen M.; Boguski, Mark S.; Roe, Bruce A.; Collins, Francis S.; Marx, Stephen J.; Burns, Lee; Chandrasekharappa, Settara C.

    1997-01-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN 1) is an inherited cancer syndrome in which affected individuals develop multiple parathyroid, enteropancreatic, and pituitary tumors. The locus for MEN1 is tightly linked to the marker PYGM on chromosome 11q13, and linkage analysis places the MEN1 gene within a 2-Mb interval flanked by the markers D11S1883 and D11S449. Loss of heterozygosity studies in MEN 1 and sporadic tumors suggest that the MEN1 gene encodes a tumor suppressor and have helped to narrow the location of the gene to a 600-kb interval between PYGM and D11S449. Focusing on this smaller MEN1 interval, we have identified and mapped 12 transcripts to this 600-kb region. A precise ordered map of 33 transcripts, including 12 genes known to map to this region, was generated for the 2.8-Mb D11S480–D11S913 interval. Fifteen candidate genes (of which 10 were examined exhaustively) were evaluated by Southern blot and/or dideoxy fingerprinting analysis to identify the gene harboring disease-causing mutations. [The sequence data described in this paper have been submitted to GenBank under accession nos. EST06996, U93236, AF001540–AF001547, AF001433–AF001436, AF001891–AF001893, N55476, R19205, and W37647 (see Table 1 for listing of transcripts). The BAC clone sequences have been submitted to GenBank under accession nos. AC000134, AC000159, and AC000353.] PMID:9253601

  11. Locus control region HS2 point mutations are generally not responsible for elevated fetal hemoglobin expression of sickle cell patients

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, J.G.

    1994-09-01

    The locus control region (LCR), composed of four hypersensitive sites (HS1-4) 5{prime} of the {epsilon} globin gene, confers strong, copy-number dependent expression on globin genes in transgenic mice. Several {beta}-globin gene cluster haplotypes carry the sickle cell gene, and show variable levels of fetal hemoglobin (Hb F) expression in association with DNA sequence differences in HS2, {gamma} and {beta} globin promoters, and {gamma}IVSII: The Senegal (SEN or No. 3) haplotype generally has high (>10%) Hb F, Benin (BEN or No. 19) has intermediate Hb F (but some low and some high), and Banu (BAN or No. 20) generally has low Hb F. Huisman and colleagues have proposed that `factors produced under conditions of hematopoietic stress, together with genetic determinants on the haplotype-3 like LCR sequences, allow for high level expression of {gamma} globin genes`. We have now used slot blot to screen high Hb F (>9.5%) and low Hb F cases for two of the three HS2 point mutations described by Oener et al. Comparing eight high Hb F BEN/BEN with two low Hb F BEN/BEN, all ten had the BEN mutations considered by Oener et al. to be associated with low Hb F. Comparing three high Hb F BEN/BAN with two low Hb F BEN/BAN, all five were heterozygous at three positions; this is consistent with BEN having G and T and BAN having A at both positions. DNA sequencing of HS2 for BAN, which is generally associated with low HB F, showed that the point mutations at all three positions were those seen in SEN (generally high Hb F); only the AT repeat region showed major differences, confirming results of Huisman and colleagues. Hence, if there is any effect of HS2 of the Senegal sickle cell haplotype in causing elevated Hb F under hematopoietic stress, it must be due to specific variation in the AT repeat region, which Oener et al. have suggested may bind a silencer.

  12. Characterization of the S-locus region of almond (Prunus dulcis): analysis of a somaclonal mutant and a cosmid contig for an S haplotype.

    PubMed

    Ushijima, K; Sassa, H; Tamura, M; Kusaba, M; Tao, R; Gradziel, T M; Dandekar, A M; Hirano, H

    2001-05-01

    Almond has a self-incompatibility system that is controlled by an S locus consisting of the S-RNase gene and an unidentified "pollen S gene." An almond cultivar "Jeffries," a somaclonal mutant of "Nonpareil" (S(c)S(d)), has a dysfunctional S(c) haplotype both in pistil and pollen. Immunoblot and genomic Southern blot analyses detected no S(c) haplotype-specific signal in Jeffries. Southern blot showed that Jeffries has an extra copy of the S(d) haplotype. These results indicate that at least two mutations had occurred to generate Jeffries: (1) deletion of the S(c) haplotype and (2) duplication of the S(d) haplotype. To analyze the extent of the deletion in Jeffries and gain insight into the physical limit of the S locus region, approximately 200 kbp of a cosmid contig for the S(c) haplotype was constructed. Genomic Southern blot analyses showed that the deletion in Jeffries extends beyond the region covered by the contig. Most cosmid end probes, except those near the S(c)-RNase gene, cross-hybridized with DNA fragments from different S haplotypes. This suggests that regions away from the S(c)-RNase gene can recombine between different S haplotypes, implying that the cosmid contig extends to the borders of the S locus.

  13. Autosomal dominant postaxial polydactyly, nail dystrophy, and dental abnormalities map to chromosome 4p16, in the region containing the Ellis-van Creveld syndrome locus.

    PubMed Central

    Howard, T D; Guttmacher, A E; McKinnon, W; Sharma, M; McKusick, V A; Jabs, E W

    1997-01-01

    We have studied a four-generation family with features of Weyers acrofacial dysostosis, in which the proband has a more severe phenotype, resembling Ellis-van Creveld syndrome. Weyers acrofacial dysostosis is an autosomal dominant condition with dental anomalies, nail dystrophy, postaxial polydactyly, and mild short stature. Ellis-van Creveld syndrome is a similar condition, with autosomal recessive inheritance and the additional features of disproportionate dwarfism, thoracic dysplasia, and congenital heart disease. Linkage and haplotype analysis determined that the disease locus in this pedigree resides on chromosome 4p16, distal to the genetic marker D4S3007 and within a 17-cM region flanking the genetic locus D4S2366. This region includes the Ellis-van Creveld syndrome locus, which previously was reported to map within a 3-cM region between genetic markers D4S2957 and D4S827. Either the genes for the condition in our family and for Ellis-van Creveld syndrome are near one another or these two conditions are allelic with mutations in the same gene. These data also raise the possibility that Weyers acrofacial dysostosis is the heterozygous expression of a mutation that, in homozygous form, causes the autosomal recessive disorder Ellis-van Creveld syndrome. Images Figure 1 PMID:9399901

  14. Cultural Meaning of Perceived Control: A Meta-Analysis of Locus of Control and Psychological Symptoms across 18 Cultural Regions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Cecilia; Cheung, Shu-fai; Chio, Jasmine Hin-man; Chan, Man-pui Sally

    2013-01-01

    Integrating more than 40 years of studies on locus of control (LOC), this meta-analysis investigated whether (a) the magnitude of the relationship between LOC and psychological symptoms differed among cultures with distinct individualist orientations and (b) depression and anxiety symptoms yielded different patterns of cultural findings with LOC.…

  15. Positional cloning of the nude locus: Genetic, physical, and transcription maps of the region and mutations in the mouse and rat

    SciTech Connect

    Segre, J.A.; Lander, E.S. |; Taylor, B.A.

    1995-08-10

    Mutations in the nude locus in mice and rats produce the pleiotropic phenotype of hairlessness and athymia, resulting in severely compromised immune system. To identify the causative gene, we utilized modern tools and techniques of positional cloning. Specifically, spanning the region in which the nude locus resides, we constructed a genetic map of polymorphic markers, a physical map of yeast artificial chromosomes and bacteriophage P1 clones, and a transcription map of genes obtained by direct cDNA selection and exon trapping. We identified seven novel transcripts with similarity to genes from Drosophila, Caenorhabditis elegans, rat or human and three previously identified mouse genes. Based on our transcription mapping results, we present a novel approach to estimate that the nude locus resides in a region approximately threefold enriched for genes. We confirm a recently published report that the nude phenotype is caused by mutations in a gene encoding a novel winged helix or fork head domain transcription factor, whn. We report as well as the mutations in the rat rnu allele and the complete coding sequence of the rat whn mRNA. 42 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Minimal and Contributing Sequence Determinants of the cis-Acting Locus of Transfer (clt) of Streptomycete Plasmid pIJ101 Occur within an Intrinsically Curved Plasmid Region

    PubMed Central

    Ducote, Matthew J.; Prakash, Shubha; Pettis, Gregg S.

    2000-01-01

    Efficient interbacterial transfer of streptomycete plasmid pIJ101 requires the pIJ101 tra gene, as well as a cis-acting plasmid function known as clt. Here we show that the minimal pIJ101 clt locus consists of a sequence no greater than 54 bp in size that includes essential inverted-repeat and direct-repeat sequences and is located in close proximity to the 3′ end of the korB regulatory gene. Evidence that sequences extending beyond the minimal locus and into the korB open reading frame influence clt transfer function and demonstration that clt-korB sequences are intrinsically curved raise the possibility that higher-order structuring of DNA and protein within this plasmid region may be an inherent feature of efficient pIJ101 transfer. PMID:11073933

  17. Minimal and contributing sequence determinants of the cis-acting locus of transfer (clt) of streptomycete plasmid pIJ101 occur within an intrinsically curved plasmid region.

    PubMed

    Ducote, M J; Prakash, S; Pettis, G S

    2000-12-01

    Efficient interbacterial transfer of streptomycete plasmid pIJ101 requires the pIJ101 tra gene, as well as a cis-acting plasmid function known as clt. Here we show that the minimal pIJ101 clt locus consists of a sequence no greater than 54 bp in size that includes essential inverted-repeat and direct-repeat sequences and is located in close proximity to the 3' end of the korB regulatory gene. Evidence that sequences extending beyond the minimal locus and into the korB open reading frame influence clt transfer function and demonstration that clt-korB sequences are intrinsically curved raise the possibility that higher-order structuring of DNA and protein within this plasmid region may be an inherent feature of efficient pIJ101 transfer.

  18. Altered DNA-binding specificity mutants of EKLF and Sp1 show that EKLF is an activator of the β-globin locus control region in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gillemans, Nynke; Tewari, Rita; Lindeboom, Fokke; Rottier, Robbert; de Wit, Ton; Wijgerde, Mark; Grosveld, Frank; Philipsen, Sjaak

    1998-01-01

    The locus control region of the β-globin cluster contains five DNase I hypersensitive sites (5′HS1–5) required for locus activation. 5′HS3 contains six G-rich motifs that are essential for its activity. Members of a protein family, characterized by three zinc fingers highly homologous to those found in transcription factor Sp1, interact with these motifs. Because point mutagenesis cannot distinguish between family members, it is not known which protein activates 5′HS3. We show that the function of such closely related proteins can be distinguished in vivo by matching point mutations in 5′HS3 with amino acid changes in the zinc fingers of Sp1 and EKLF. Testing their activity in transgenic mice shows that EKLF is a direct activator of 5′HS3. PMID:9744863

  19. Molecular genetics of the brown (b)-locus region of mouse chromosome 4. I. Origin and molecular mapping of radiation- and chemical-induced lethal brown deletions.

    PubMed

    Rinchik, E M; Bell, J A; Hunsicker, P R; Friedman, J M; Jackson, I J; Russell, L B

    1994-07-01

    Over a period of many years, germ-cell mutagenesis experiments using the mouse specific-locus test have generated numerous radiation- and chemical-induced alleles of the brown (b; Tyrp 1) locus in mouse chromosome 4. We describe here the origin, maintenance and initial molecular characterization of 28 b mutations that are prenatally lethal when homozygous. Each of these mutations is deleted for Tyrp 1 sequences, and each of 25 mutations tested further is deleted for at least one other locus defined by molecular clones previously found to be closely linked to b by interspecific backcross analysis. A panel of DNAs from mice carrying a lethal b mutation and a Mus spretus chromosome 4 was used in the fine structure mapping of these molecularly defined loci. The deletional nature of each of these prenatally lethal mutations is consistent with the hypothesis that the null phenotype at b has an effect only on the quality (color) of eumelanin produced in melanocytes. The resulting deletion map provides a framework on which to build future molecular-genetic and biological analyses of this region of mouse chromosome 4.

  20. Mapping a blood pressure quantitative trait locus to a 5.7-cM region in Dahl salt-sensitive rats.

    PubMed

    Dutil, J; Deng, A Y

    2001-05-01

    A region on rat Chromosome (Chr) 2 of the Dahl salt-sensitive rat (S) was shown previously to contain a quantitative trait locus (QTL) for blood pressure (BP). This was achieved first by linkage, followed by the use of congenic strains. A congenic strain, designated S.MNS-D2Mit6/Adh, contained a segment of Chr 2 from the Milan Normotensive (MNS) rat in the S genetic background. Since the region containing the QTL was roughly 80 cM in size, a further reduction was needed towards the positional or candidate gene cloning. Currently, two congenic substrains were made from the original strain S.MNS-D2Mit6/Adh. One of these two substrains showed a BP-lowering effect, whereas the other substrain did not. Deducing the segment not shared in the two substrains, the BP QTL has to be present in a chromosome region of roughly 5.7 cM between the marker D2Rat303 and the locus for the neutroendopeptidase gene (Nep). Nep is not included within the segment. This region does not seem to contain any candidate genes well known for the BP control. Thus, the final identification of the QTL will most likely lead to the discovery of a brand new gene for the BP regulation.

  1. The IGF2 Locus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) is a peptide hormone regulating various cellular processes such as proliferation and apoptosis. IGF2 is vital to embryo development. The IGF2 locus covers approximately 150-kb genomic region on human chromosome 11, containing two imprinted genes, IGF2 and H19, sha...

  2. [Studies of the allelic diversity in micro-satellite locus D16S539, F13B, FESFPS, TH01, and TROX in European population of Russia Ural region using capillary electrophoresis].

    PubMed

    Pushkarev, V P; Rakhmanina, L V; Novikov, P I; Ivanov, P L

    2004-01-01

    Allelic frequencies of chromosome micro-satellite locuses D16S539, F13B, FESFPS, TH01 and TPOX were determined, within the case study, in a sampling of Europeoidal individuals residing in Russia's Ural Region. The allelic variants were analyzed by capillary electrophoresis after the enzyme amplification in polymerase chain reaction with fluorescent primers. The genotypic frequencies of the studied locuses were shown not to divert with statistical reliability from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The estimated aggregate discriminative potential for a panel of 5 studied locuses made 0.99995. No nonequilibrium was found by linkage between alleles of all lucuses examined within the present case study or between their alleles and the alleles of previously investigated locuses D7S820 and D13S317. The implemented testing of the population homogeneity of allelic frequencies of investigated locuses for 3 samplings of Europeoids showed a deviation for locus FESFPS versus the Ural and Polish samplings and for locus F13B in the Ural and North America samplings. The distribution of allelic frequencies of other locuses was homogenous in the compared samplings.

  3. Genomic matrix attachment region and chromosome conformation capture quantitative real time PCR assays identify novel putative regulatory elements at the imprinted Dlk1/Gtl2 locus.

    PubMed

    Braem, Caroline; Recolin, Bénédicte; Rancourt, Rebecca C; Angiolini, Christopher; Barthès, Pauline; Branchu, Priscillia; Court, Franck; Cathala, Guy; Ferguson-Smith, Anne C; Forné, Thierry

    2008-07-04

    We previously showed that genomic imprinting regulates matrix attachment region activities at the mouse Igf2 (insulin-like growth factor 2) locus and that these activities are functionally linked to neighboring differentially methylated regions (DMRs). Here, we investigate the similarly structured Dlk1/Gtl2 imprinted domain and show that in the mouse liver, the G/C-rich intergenic germ line-derived DMR, a sequence involved in domain-wide imprinting, is highly retained within the nuclear matrix fraction exclusively on the methylated paternal copy, reflecting its differential function on that chromosome. Therefore, not only "classical" A/T-rich matrix attachment region (MAR) sequences but also other important regulatory DNA elements (such as DMRs) can be recovered from genomic MAR assays following a high salt treatment. Interestingly, the recovery of one A/T-rich sequence (MAR4) from the "nuclear matrix" fraction is strongly correlated with gene expression. We show that this element possesses an intrinsic activity that favors transcription, and using chromosome conformation capture quantitative real time PCR assays, we demonstrate that the MAR4 interacts with the intergenic germ line-derived DMR specifically on the paternal allele but not with the Dlk1/Gtl2 promoters. Altogether, our findings shed a new light on gene regulation at this locus.

  4. Recombination events near the immunoglobulin Cmu gene join variable and constant region genes, switch heavy-chain expression, or inactivate the locus.

    PubMed

    Cory, S; Webb, E; Gough, J; Adams, J M

    1981-04-28

    Immunoglobulin heavy-chain expression is initiated by recombination between a variable region (VH) gene and one of several joining region (JH) genes located near the mu constant region (Cmu) gene, and the active VH gene can subsequently switch to another CH gene. That the general mechanism for CH switching involves recombination between sites within the JH-Cmu intervening sequence and the 5' flanking region of another CH gene is supported here by Southern blot hybridization analysis of eight IgG- and IgA-secreting plasmacytomas. An alternative model requiring successive VH linkage to similar JH clusters near each CH gene is shown to be very unlikely since the mouse genome appears to contain only one complement of the JH locus and no JH gene was detectable within large cloned sequences flanking germline C gamma 3 and C gamma 1 genes. Thus, VH-JH joining and CH switching are mediated by separate regions of "the joining-switch" or J-S element. In each plasmacytoma examined, the J-S element had undergone recombination within both the JH locus and the switch region and was shown to be linked to the functional CH gene in an IgG3, and IgG1, and three IgA secretors. Both JH joining and CH switching occurred by deletion of DNA. Switch recombination occurred at more than one site within the J-S element in different lines, even for recombination with the same CH gene. Significantly, although heavy-chain expression is restricted to one allele ("allelic exclusion"), all rearranged in each plasmacytoma. Some rearrangements were aberrant, involving, for example, deletion of all JH genes from the allele. Hence, an error-prone recombination machinery may account for allelic exclusion in many plasmacytomas.

  5. Mapping of jog locus to the region between D6Mit104 and D6Mit336 on mouse chromosome 6.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiao-yang; Chen, Zi-yan; Kanou, Yasuhiko; Takagishi, Yoshiko; Hayashi, Yoshitaka; Ohno, Tamio; Murata, Yoshiharu; Oda, Sen-ichi

    2007-10-01

    The joggle mouse is a recessive ataxic mutant carrying an unknown mutation in a C3H/He (C3H)-derived chromosomal segment. Taking advantage of the mouse genome database, we selected 127 DNA microsatellite markers showing heterozygosity between C3H and C57BL/6J (B6) and a first round of screening for the joggle mutation was performed on B6-jog/+ partial congenic mice (N4). We identified 4 chromosomal regions in which 13 microsatellite markers show heterozygosity between C3H and B6. Then, we analyzed the genotype of these 4 chromosomal regions in mice that showed the joggle phenotype and mapped the jog locus between markers D6Mit104 (111.4 Mb) and D6Mit336 (125.1 Mb) (an interval of 13.7 Mb) on chromosome 6. By using a partial congenic strain together with the mouse genome database, we successfully mapped the chromosomal localization of the jog locus much more efficiently than by conventional linkage analysis.

  6. Linkage between isozyme markers and a locus affecting seed size in Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    PubMed

    Vallejos, C E; Chase, C D

    1991-03-01

    Backcross and F2 progenies were produced between two bean genotypes, 'XR-235' and 'Calima,' which differ in seed weight by a factor of two. The small-seeded 'XR-235' was used as the pistillate and recurrent parent. These genotypes showed polymorphisms at nine isozyme loci and at the phaseolin locus. Seed size parameters (weight, length, width, and thickness) were determined for each BC1 and F2 individual, i.e., for seeds harvested from 'XR-235' after pollination with F1 and from the F1 after selfing, respectively. A combination of starch gel electrophoresis and enzyme activity staining was used to determine the genotype of each BC1 and F2 individual at the segregating loci. SDS-PAGE and Coomassie blue staining were used to determine geno-type at the phaseolin locus. Tests for independent assortment using two-way contingency and maximum likelihood tables revealed three linkage pairs: Aco-1 - 20 cM - Dia-1; Adh-1 - 2 cM - Got-2; and Est-2 - 11 cM - Pha. Statistical comparisons were made between the means of genotype classes at each segregating locus for all seed size parameters. The results from two independently obtained BC1s and the F2 consistently indicated that the Adh-1-Got-2 segment was linked to a locus that affected seed size and overcame maternal control over seed size. This locus has been designated Ssz-1. This gene exhibited additive gene action and accounted for 30-50% of the seed size difference between the parents.

  7. Localization of the fourth locus (GLC1E) for adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma to the 10p15-p14 region.

    PubMed Central

    Sarfarazi, M; Child, A; Stoilova, D; Brice, G; Desai, T; Trifan, O C; Poinoosawmy, D; Crick, R P

    1998-01-01

    One of the major causes of blindness is primary open-angle glaucoma, which affects millions of elderly people worldwide. Genetic studies have so far mapped three loci for the adult-onset form of this condition to the 2cen-q13, 3q21-q24, and 8q23 regions. Herein, we report the localization of a fourth locus, to the 10p15-p14 region, in one large British family with a classical form of normal-tension open-angle glaucoma. Of the 42 meioses genotyped in this pedigree, 39 subjects (16 affected) inherited a haplotype compatible with their prior clinical designation, whereas the remaining 3 were classified as unknown. Although a maximum LOD score of 10.00 at a recombination fraction of straight theta=.00 was obtained with D10S1216, 21 other markers provided significant values, varying between 3.77 and 9.70. When only the affected meioses of this kindred were analyzed, LOD scores remained statistically significant, ranging from 3.16 (D10S527) to 3.57 (D10S506). Two critical recombinational events in the affected subjects positioned this new locus to a region of approximately 21 cM, flanked by D10S1729 and D10S1664. However, an additional recombination in a 59-year-old unaffected female suggests that this locus resides between D10S585 (or D10S1172) and D10S1664, within a genetic distance of 5-11 cM. However, the latter minimum region must be taken cautiously, because the incomplete penetrance has previously been documented for this group of eye conditions. A partial list of genes that positionally are considered as candidates includes NET1, PRKCT, ITIH2, IL2RA, IL15RA, IT1H2, hGATA3, the mRNA for open reading frame KIAA0019, and the gene for D123 protein. PMID:9497264

  8. Genome-Wide Analysis in Swine Associates Corneal Graft Rejection with Donor-Recipient Mismatches in Three Novel Histocompatibility Regions and One Locus Homologous to the Mouse H-3 Locus.

    PubMed

    Nicholls, Susan; Pong-Wong, Ricardo; Mitchard, Louisa; Harley, Ross; Archibald, Alan; Dick, Andrew; Bailey, Michael

    2016-01-01

    In rodents, immune responses to minor histocompatibility antigens are the most important drivers of corneal graft rejection. However, this has not been confirmed in humans or in a large animal model and the genetic loci are poorly characterised, even in mice. The gene sequence data now available for a range of relevant species permits the use of genome-wide association (GWA) techniques to identify minor antigens associated with transplant rejection. We have used this technique in a pre-clinical model of corneal transplantation in semi-inbred NIH minipigs and Babraham swine to search for novel minor histocompatibility loci and to determine whether rodent findings have wider applicability. DNA from a cohort of MHC-matched and MHC-mismatched donors and recipients was analysed for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The level of SNP homozygosity for each line was assessed. Genome-wide analysis of the association of SNP disparities with rejection was performed using log-likelihood ratios. Four genomic blocks containing four or more SNPs significantly linked to rejection were identified (on chromosomes 1, 4, 6 and 9), none at the location of the MHC. One block of 36 SNPs spanned a region that exhibits conservation of synteny with the mouse H-3 histocompatibility locus and contains the pig homologue of the mouse Zfp106 gene, which encodes peptide epitopes known to mediate corneal graft rejection. The other three regions are novel minor histocompatibility loci. The results suggest that rejection can be predicted from SNP analysis prior to transplant in this model and that a similar GWA analysis is merited in humans.

  9. Germline deletion of Igh 3′ regulatory region elements hs5-7 affects B cell specific regulation, rearrangement and insulation of the Igh locus1

    PubMed Central

    Volpi, Sabrina A.; Verma-Gaur, Jiyoti; Hassan, Rabih; Ju, Zhongliang; Roa, Sergio; Chatterjee, Sanjukta; Werling, Uwe; Hou, Harry; Will, Britta; Steidl, Ulrich; Scharff, Matthew; Edelman, Winfried; Feeney, Ann J.; Birshtein, Barbara K.

    2012-01-01

    Regulatory elements located within a ~28 kb region 3′ of the Igh gene cluster (3′ regulatory region, 3′ RR) are required for class switch recombination and for high levels of IgH expression in plasma cells. We previously defined novel DNase I hypersensitive (hs) sites, i.e. hs5-7, immediately downstream of this region. Hs5-7 contains a high density of binding sites for CTCF, a zinc finger protein associated with mammalian insulator activity and is an anchor for interactions with CTCF sites flanking the DH region. To test the function of hs5-7, we have generated mice with an 8 kb deletion encompassing all three hs elements. B cells from hs5-7 KO mice showed a modest increase in expression of the nearest downstream gene. In addition, Igh alleles in hs5-7 KO mice were in a less contracted configuration compared to WT Igh alleles and showed a two-fold increase in the usage of proximal VH7183 gene families. Hs5-7 KO mice were essentially indistinguishable from wild type mice in B cell development, allelic regulation, class switch recombination, and chromosomal looping. We conclude that hs5-7--a high-density CTCF binding region at the 3′ end of the Igh locus--impacts usage of VH regions as far as 500 kb away. PMID:22345664

  10. Transcriptomic identification of ADH1B as a novel candidate gene for obesity and insulin resistance in human adipose tissue in Mexican Americans from the Veterans Administration Genetic Epidemiology Study (VAGES).

    PubMed

    Winnier, Deidre A; Fourcaudot, Marcel; Norton, Luke; Abdul-Ghani, Muhammad A; Hu, Shirley L; Farook, Vidya S; Coletta, Dawn K; Kumar, Satish; Puppala, Sobha; Chittoor, Geetha; Dyer, Thomas D; Arya, Rector; Carless, Melanie; Lehman, Donna M; Curran, Joanne E; Cromack, Douglas T; Tripathy, Devjit; Blangero, John; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Göring, Harald H H; DeFronzo, Ralph A; Jenkinson, Christopher P

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a complex metabolic disease that is more prevalent in ethnic groups such as Mexican Americans, and is strongly associated with the risk factors obesity and insulin resistance. The goal of this study was to perform whole genome gene expression profiling in adipose tissue to detect common patterns of gene regulation associated with obesity and insulin resistance. We used phenotypic and genotypic data from 308 Mexican American participants from the Veterans Administration Genetic Epidemiology Study (VAGES). Basal fasting RNA was extracted from adipose tissue biopsies from a subset of 75 unrelated individuals, and gene expression data generated on the Illumina BeadArray platform. The number of gene probes with significant expression above baseline was approximately 31,000. We performed multiple regression analysis of all probes with 15 metabolic traits. Adipose tissue had 3,012 genes significantly associated with the traits of interest (false discovery rate, FDR ≤ 0.05). The significance of gene expression changes was used to select 52 genes with significant (FDR ≤ 10(-4)) gene expression changes across multiple traits. Gene sets/Pathways analysis identified one gene, alcohol dehydrogenase 1B (ADH1B) that was significantly enriched (P < 10(-60)) as a prime candidate for involvement in multiple relevant metabolic pathways. Illumina BeadChip derived ADH1B expression data was consistent with quantitative real time PCR data. We observed significant inverse correlations with waist circumference (2.8 x 10(-9)), BMI (5.4 x 10(-6)), and fasting plasma insulin (P < 0.001). These findings are consistent with a central role for ADH1B in obesity and insulin resistance and provide evidence for a novel genetic regulatory mechanism for human metabolic diseases related to these traits.

  11. Transcriptomic Identification of ADH1B as a Novel Candidate Gene for Obesity and Insulin Resistance in Human Adipose Tissue in Mexican Americans from the Veterans Administration Genetic Epidemiology Study (VAGES)

    PubMed Central

    Winnier, Deidre A.; Fourcaudot, Marcel; Norton, Luke; Abdul-Ghani, Muhammad A.; Hu, Shirley L.; Farook, Vidya S.; Coletta, Dawn K.; Kumar, Satish; Puppala, Sobha; Chittoor, Geetha; Dyer, Thomas D.; Arya, Rector; Carless, Melanie; Lehman, Donna M.; Curran, Joanne E.; Cromack, Douglas T.; Tripathy, Devjit; Blangero, John; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Göring, Harald H. H.; DeFronzo, Ralph A.; Jenkinson, Christopher P.

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a complex metabolic disease that is more prevalent in ethnic groups such as Mexican Americans, and is strongly associated with the risk factors obesity and insulin resistance. The goal of this study was to perform whole genome gene expression profiling in adipose tissue to detect common patterns of gene regulation associated with obesity and insulin resistance. We used phenotypic and genotypic data from 308 Mexican American participants from the Veterans Administration Genetic Epidemiology Study (VAGES). Basal fasting RNA was extracted from adipose tissue biopsies from a subset of 75 unrelated individuals, and gene expression data generated on the Illumina BeadArray platform. The number of gene probes with significant expression above baseline was approximately 31,000. We performed multiple regression analysis of all probes with 15 metabolic traits. Adipose tissue had 3,012 genes significantly associated with the traits of interest (false discovery rate, FDR ≤ 0.05). The significance of gene expression changes was used to select 52 genes with significant (FDR ≤ 10-4) gene expression changes across multiple traits. Gene sets/Pathways analysis identified one gene, alcohol dehydrogenase 1B (ADH1B) that was significantly enriched (P < 10-60) as a prime candidate for involvement in multiple relevant metabolic pathways. Illumina BeadChip derived ADH1B expression data was consistent with quantitative real time PCR data. We observed significant inverse correlations with waist circumference (2.8 x 10-9), BMI (5.4 x 10-6), and fasting plasma insulin (P < 0.001). These findings are consistent with a central role for ADH1B in obesity and insulin resistance and provide evidence for a novel genetic regulatory mechanism for human metabolic diseases related to these traits. PMID:25830378

  12. The mouse atherosclerosis locus at chromosome 10 (Ath11) acts early in lesion formation with subcongenic strains delineating two narrowed regions

    PubMed Central

    Wolfrum, Susanne; Rodríguez, José M.; Tan, Marietta; Chen, Kwan Y.; Teupser, Daniel; Breslow, Jan L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Ath11, an atherosclerosis susceptibility locus on proximal chromosome 10 (0–21cM) revealed in a cross between apolipoprotein E deficient C57BL/6 (B6) and FVB mice, was recently confirmed in congenic mice. The objectives of this study were to assess how Ath11 affects lesion development and morphology, to determine aortic gene expression in congenics, and to narrow the congenic interval. Methods and Results Assessing lesion area over time in congenic mice showed that homozygosity for the FVB allele increased lesion area at 6 weeks persisting through to 24 weeks of age. Staining of aortic root sections at 16 weeks did not reveal obvious differences between congenics. Aortic expression-array analysis at 6 weeks revealed 97 >2 fold regulated genes, including one gene in the QTL interval, Aldh8a1, and two gene clusters regulated by Hnf4α and Esr1. Analysis of lesion area in 11 subcongenic strains revealed two narrowed regions, 10a (21 genes) acting in females and 10b (7 genes) acting in both genders. Conclusions Ath11 appears to act early in lesion formation with significant effects on aortic gene expression. This QTL is genetically complex containing a female specific region 10a from 0 to 7.3 Mb, and a gender independent region 10b from 20.1 to 21.9 Mb. PMID:20466976

  13. Assignment of the disease locus for lethal congenital contracture syndrome to a restricted region of chromosome 9q34, by genome scan using five affected individuals.

    PubMed

    Mäkelä-Bengs, P; Järvinen, N; Vuopala, K; Suomalainen, A; Ignatius, J; Sipilä, M; Herva, R; Palotie, A; Peltonen, L

    1998-08-01

    Lethal congenital contracture syndrome (LCCS) is an autosomal recessive disease leading to death before the 32d gestational week. It is characterized by the fetal akinesia phenotype, with highly focused degeneration of motoneurons in the spinal cord as the main neuropathological finding. We report here the assignment of the LCCS locus to a defined region of chromosome 9q34, between markers D9S1825 and D9S1830. The initial genome scan was performed with the DNA samples of only five affected individuals from two unrelated LCCS families. The conventional linkage analysis performed with 20 affected individuals and their families was focused on those chromosomal regions in which the affected siblings were identical by descent in the initial scan. One core haplotype of 3 cM was observed in LCCS alleles, supporting the assumption of one major mutation underlying LCCS, and linkage disequilibrium analysis restricted the critical chromosomal region to <100 kb in the vicinity of marker D9S61. Two genes, NGAL (neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and NOTCH 1, were excluded as causative genes for LCCS

  14. A melanocyte-specific gene, Pmel 17, maps near the silver coat color locus on mouse chromosome 10 and is in a syntenic region on human chromosome 12

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, B.S.; Chintamaneni, C.; Kobayashi, Y.; Kim, K.K. ); Kozak, C.A. ); Copeland, N.G.; Gilbert, D.J.; Jenkins, N. ); Barton, D.; Francke, U. )

    1991-10-15

    Melanocytes preferentially express an mRNA species, Pmel 17, whose protein product cross-reacts with anti-tyrosinase antibodies and whose expression correlates with the melanin content. The authors have now analyzed the deduced protein structure and mapped its chromosomal location in mouse and human. The amino acid sequence deduced from the nucleotide sequence of the Pmel 17 cDNA showed that the protein is composed of 645 amino acids with a molecular weight of 68,600. The Pmel 17 protein contains a putative leader sequence and a potential membrane anchor segment, which indicates that this may be a membrane-associated protein in melanocytes. The deduced protein contains five potential N-glycosylation sites and relatively high levels of serine and threonine. Three repeats of a 26-amino acid motif appear in the middle of the molecule. The human Pmel 17 gene, designated D12S53E, maps to chromosome 12, region 12pter-q21; and the mouse homologue, designated D12S53Eh, maps to the distal region of mouse chromosome 10, a region also known to carry the coat color locus si (silver).

  15. Isolation and characterization of two overlapping cosmid clones from the 4q35 region, near the facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy locus

    SciTech Connect

    Deidda, G.; Grisanti, P.; Vigneti, E.

    1994-09-01

    The gene for facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) has been localized by linkage analysis to the 4q35 region. The most telomeric p13E-11 prove has been shown to detect 4q35 DNA rearrangements in both sporadic and familial cases of the disease. With the aim of constructing a detailed physical map of the 4q35 region and searching for the mutant gene, we used p13E-11 probe to isolate cosmid clones from a human genomic library in a pCos-EMBL 2 vector. Two positive clones were isolated, clones 3 and 5, which partially overlap and carry human genomic inserts of 42 and 45 kb, respectively. The cosmids share a common region containing the p13E-11 region and a stretch of KpnI units consisting of 3.2 kb tandemly repeated sequences (about 10). The restriction maps were constructed using the following enzymes: Bam HI, BgIII, Eco RI, EcoRV, KpnI and Sfi I. Clone 3 extends 4 kb upstream of C5 and stops within the Kpn repeats. Clone 5 extends 4 kb downstream from the Kpn repeats and it presents an additional EcoRI site. Clone 5 contains a stretch of Kpn sequences of nearly 32 kb, corresponding to 10 Kpn repeats; clone 3 contains a stretch of 29 kb corresponding to 9 Kpn repeats, as determined by PFGE analysis of partial digestion of the clones. Clone 5 seems to contain the entire Eco RI region prone to rearrangements in FSHD patients. From clone 5 several subclones were obtained, from the Kpn region and from the region spanning from the last Kpn repeat to the cloning site. No single copy sequences were detected. Subclones from the 3{prime} end region contain beta-satellite or Sau3A-like sequences. In situ hybridization with the whole C5 cosmid shows hybridization signals at the tip of chromosome 4 (4q35) and chromosome 10 (10q26), in the pericentromeric region of chromosome 1 (1q12) and in the p12 region of the acrocentric chromosomes (chr. 21, 22, 13, 14, 15).

  16. An Intronic Locus Control Region Plays an Essential Role in the Establishment of an Autonomous Hepatic Chromatin Domain for the Human Vitamin D-Binding Protein Gene▿

    PubMed Central

    Hiroki, Tomoko; Liebhaber, Stephen A.; Cooke, Nancy E.

    2007-01-01

    The human vitamin D-binding protein (hDBP) gene exists in a cluster of four liver-expressed genes. A minimal hDBP transgene, containing a defined set of liver-specific DNase I hypersensitive sites (HSs), is robustly expressed in mouse liver in a copy-number-dependent manner. Here we evaluate these HSs for function. Deletion of HSI, located 5′ to the promoter (kb −2.1) had no significant effect on hDBP expression. In contrast, deletion of HSIV and HSV from intron 1 repressed hDBP expression and eliminated copy number dependency without a loss of liver specificity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed peaks of histone H3 and H4 acetylation coincident with HSIV in the intact hDBP locus. This region contains a conserved array of binding sites for the liver-enriched transcription factor C/EBP. In vitro studies revealed selective binding of C/EBPα to HSIV. In vivo occupancy of C/EBPα at HSIV was demonstrated in hepatic chromatin, and depletion of C/EBPα in a hepatic cell line decreased hDBP expression. A nonredundant role for C/EBPα was confirmed in vivo by demonstrating a reduction of hDBP expression in C/EBPα-null mice. Parallel studies revealed in vivo occupancy of the liver-enriched factor HNF1α at HSIII (at kb 0.13) within the hDBP promoter. These data demonstrate a critical role for elements within intron 1 in the establishment of an autonomous and productive hDBP chromatin locus and suggest that this function is dependent upon C/EBPα. Cooperative interactions between these intronic complexes and liver-restricted complexes within the target promoter are likely to underlie the consistency and liver specificity of the hDBP activation. PMID:17785430

  17. The Mating Type Locus (MAT) and Sexual Reproduction of Cryptococcus heveanensis: Insights into the Evolution of Sex and Sex-Determining Chromosomal Regions in Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Metin, Banu; Findley, Keisha; Heitman, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Mating in basidiomycetous fungi is often controlled by two unlinked, multiallelic loci encoding homeodomain transcription factors or pheromones/pheromone receptors. In contrast to this tetrapolar organization, Cryptococcus neoformans/Cryptococcus gattii have a bipolar mating system, and a single biallelic locus governs sexual reproduction. The C. neoformans MAT locus is unusually large (>100 kb), contains >20 genes, and enhances virulence. Previous comparative genomic studies provided insights into how this unusual MAT locus might have evolved involving gene acquisitions into two unlinked loci and fusion into one contiguous locus, converting an ancestral tetrapolar system to a bipolar one. Here we tested this model by studying Cryptococcus heveanensis, a sister species to the pathogenic Cryptococcus species complex. An extant sexual cycle was discovered; co-incubating fertile isolates results in the teleomorph (Kwoniella heveanensis) with dikaryotic hyphae, clamp connections, septate basidia, and basidiospores. To characterize the C. heveanensis MAT locus, a fosmid library was screened with C. neoformans/C. gattii MAT genes. Positive fosmids were sequenced and assembled to generate two large probably unlinked MAT gene clusters: one corresponding to the homeodomain locus and the other to the pheromone/receptor locus. Strikingly, two divergent homeodomain genes (SXI1, SXI2) are present, similar to the bE/bW Ustilago maydis paradigm, suggesting one or the other homeodomain gene was recently lost in C. neoformans/C. gattii. Sequencing MAT genes from other C. heveanensis isolates revealed a multiallelic homeodomain locus and at least a biallelic pheromone/receptor locus, similar to known tetrapolar species. Taken together, these studies reveal an extant C. heveanensis sexual cycle, define the structure of its MAT locus consistent with tetrapolar mating, and support the proposed evolutionary model for the bipolar Cryptococcus MAT locus revealing transitions in sexuality

  18. The Locus Lookup Tool at MaizeGDB: Identification of Genomic Regions in Maize by Integrating Sequence Information with Physical and Genetic Maps

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methods to automatically integrate sequence information with physical and genetic maps are scarce. The Locus Lookup Tool enables researchers to define windows of genomic sequence likely to contain loci of interest where only genetic or physical mapping associations are reported. Using the Locus Look...

  19. Comparative analysis of the locus control region of the rabbit beta-like gene cluster: HS3 increases transient expression of an embryonic epsilon-globin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Hardison, R; Xu, J; Jackson, J; Mansberger, J; Selifonova, O; Grotch, B; Biesecker, J; Petrykowska, H; Miller, W

    1993-01-01

    The rabbit homolog to the locus control region (LCR) of the human beta-like globin gene cluster was isolated, and long segments containing the DNase I hypersensitive sites (HS) were sequenced. The order and spacing of HS4, HS3, HS2 and HS1 are conserved between rabbit and human. Alignment of these sequences with their homologs from human, goat, and mouse shows that very long segments of DNA match between species, for over a thousand base pairs on either side of the previously identified functional cores, indicating that some important functions are found outside the cores. The activity of rabbit HS2 and HS3 was tested by attaching each to a novel reporter gene constructed by inserting the luciferase coding region into the rabbit epsilon-globin gene. In contrast to previous reports showing no effect of human or mouse HS3 on transient expression, both the rabbit HS2 and HS3 DNA fragments separately increased transient expression from the epsilon-luciferase hybrid gene and expression from stably integrated constructs in K562 erythroleukemia cells. PMID:8464710

  20. Genome-Wide Analysis Identifies a Quantitative Trait Locus in the MHC Class II Region Associated with Generalized Vitiligo Age of Onset

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Ying; Birlea, Stanca A.; Fain, Pamela R.; Gowan, Katherine; Riccardi, Sheri L.; Holland, Paulene J.; Bennett, Dorothy C.; Herbstman, Deborah M.; Wallace, Margaret R.; McCormack, Wayne T.; Kemp, E. Helen; Gawkrodger, David J.; Weetman, Anthony P.; Picardo, Mauro; Leone, Giovanni; Taïeb, Alain; Jouary, Thomas; Ezzedine, Khaled; van Geel, Nanny; Lambert, Jo; Overbeck, Andreas; Spritz, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    Generalized vitiligo is a common autoimmune disease in which acquired patchy depigmentation of skin, hair, and mucous membranes results from loss of melanocytes from involved areas. Previous genetic analyses have focused on vitiligo susceptibility, and have identified a number of genes involved in disease risk. Age of onset of generalized vitiligo also involves a substantial genetic component, but has not previously been studied systematically. In this study, we report a genome-wide association study of vitiligo age of onset in 1,339 generalized vitiligo patients, with replication in an independent cohort of 677 cases. We identified a quantitative trait locus for vitiligo age of onset in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II region, located near c6orf10-BTNL2 (rs7758128; P = 8.14×10−11), a region that is also associated with generalized vitiligo susceptibility. In contrast, there was no association of vitiligo age of onset with any other MHC or non-MHC loci that are associated with vitiligo susceptibility. These findings highlight the differing roles played by genes involved in vitiligo susceptibility versus vitiligo age of onset, and illustrate that genome-wide analyses can be used to identify genes involved in quantitative aspects of disease natural history, as well as disease susceptibility per se. PMID:21326295

  1. Specific regions in the Sod1 locus of the ericoid mycorrhizal fungus Oidiodendron maius from metal-enriched soils show a different sequence polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Vallino, Marta; Zampieri, Elisa; Murat, Claude; Girlanda, Mariangela; Picarella, Sandro; Pitet, Marta; Portis, Ezio; Martino, Elena; Perotto, Silvia

    2011-02-01

    The huge diversity of fungi may reflect both the heterogeneity of the niches they occupy and the diverse stresses they must cope with. In order to investigate the genetic and functional diversity in the ericoid mycorrhizal fungus Oidiodendron maius subjected to heavy metal stress, we isolated O. maius strains from a serpentine site naturally enriched by heavy metals. Despite the high Cr and Ni soil concentrations, a high level of diversity was found in the serpentine fungal community. The growth of these isolates in the presence of different metal contaminants identified some tolerant strains, suggesting a site-specific adaptation. To investigate within-species gene divergence in stressful environments, we then compared the sequence polymorphism of a neutral (internal transcribed spacer) and a functional (Cu,ZnSOD) gene in O. maius isolates derived from the serpentine site, from a site heavily polluted with industrial wastes and from unpolluted sites. For all isolates tested, the polymorphism was higher in the nucleotide sequence of the functional gene. However, when compared with isolates from the serpentine area, isolates from industrially polluted sites showed a significantly higher polymorphism in the Cu,ZnSOD promoter region, suggesting that environmental stress may influence the rate of mutations in specific regions of the Sod1 locus.

  2. Large Deletions at the SHOX Locus in the Pseudoautosomal Region Are Associated with Skeletal Atavism in Shetland Ponies

    PubMed Central

    Rafati, Nima; Andersson, Lisa S.; Mikko, Sofia; Feng, Chungang; Raudsepp, Terje; Pettersson, Jessica; Janecka, Jan; Wattle, Ove; Ameur, Adam; Thyreen, Gunilla; Eberth, John; Huddleston, John; Malig, Maika; Bailey, Ernest; Eichler, Evan E.; Dalin, Göran; Chowdary, Bhanu; Andersson, Leif; Lindgren, Gabriella; Rubin, Carl-Johan

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal atavism in Shetland ponies is a heritable disorder characterized by abnormal growth of the ulna and fibula that extend the carpal and tarsal joints, respectively. This causes abnormal skeletal structure and impaired movements, and affected foals are usually killed. In order to identify the causal mutation we subjected six confirmed Swedish cases and a DNA pool consisting of 21 control individuals to whole genome resequencing. We screened for polymorphisms where the cases and the control pool were fixed for opposite alleles and observed this signature for only 25 SNPs, most of which were scattered on genome assembly unassigned scaffolds. Read depth analysis at these loci revealed homozygosity or compound heterozygosity for two partially overlapping large deletions in the pseudoautosomal region (PAR) of chromosome X/Y in cases but not in the control pool. One of these deletions removes the entire coding region of the SHOX gene and both deletions remove parts of the CRLF2 gene located downstream of SHOX. The horse reference assembly of the PAR is highly fragmented, and in order to characterize this region we sequenced bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones by single-molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing technology. This considerably improved the assembly and enabled size estimations of the two deletions to 160−180 kb and 60−80 kb, respectively. Complete association between the presence of these deletions and disease status was verified in eight other affected horses. The result of the present study is consistent with previous studies in humans showing crucial importance of SHOX for normal skeletal development. PMID:27207956

  3. Mapping of retrotransposon sequences in the unstable region surrounding the spinal muscular atrophy locus in 5q13

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, M.J.; Nesbit, M.A.; Theodosiou, A.M.

    1995-05-20

    The mutation that underlies the autosomal recessive disorder spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is located on chromosome 5q13. Recent studies show that SMA patients frequently have deletions and rearrangements in this region compared to normal controls. During the isolation of candidate cDNAs for the disease, the authors identified a sequence that shows high homology to the THE-1 retrotransposon gene family. Using YAC fragmentation techniques, they have refined the localization of this sequence to the domain known to show instability in SMA patients. The implication of these results for the mechanism of the mutation in SMA is discussed. 20 refs., 1 fig.

  4. Genome-wide association study of intraocular pressure identifies the GLCCI1/ICA1 region as a glaucoma susceptibility locus

    PubMed Central

    Strange, Amy; Bellenguez, Céline; Sim, Xueling; Luben, Robert; Hysi, Pirro G.; Ramdas, Wishal D.; van Koolwijk, Leonieke M.E.; Freeman, Colin; Pirinen, Matti; Su, Zhan; Band, Gavin; Pearson, Richard; Vukcevic, Damjan; Langford, Cordelia; Deloukas, Panos; Hunt, Sarah; Gray, Emma; Dronov, Serge; Potter, Simon C.; Tashakkori-Ghanbaria, Avazeh; Edkins, Sarah; Bumpstead, Suzannah J.; Blackwell, Jenefer M.; Bramon, Elvira; Brown, Matthew A.; Casas, Juan P.; Corvin, Aiden; Duncanson, Audrey; Jankowski, Janusz A.Z.; Markus, Hugh S.; Mathew, Christopher G.; Palmer, Colin N.A.; Plomin, Robert; Rautanen, Anna; Sawcer, Stephen J.; Trembath, Richard C.; Wood, Nicholas W.; Barroso, Ines; Peltonen, Leena; Healey, Paul; McGuffin, Peter; Topouzis, Fotis; Klaver, Caroline C.W.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Mackey, David A.; Young, Terri L.; Hammond, Christopher J.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick; Wang, Jie Jin; Wong, Tien Y.; Foster, Paul J.; Mitchell, Paul; Spencer, Chris C.A.; Donnelly, Peter; Viswanathan, Ananth C.

    2013-01-01

    To discover quantitative trait loci for intraocular pressure, a major risk factor for glaucoma and the only modifiable one, we performed a genome-wide association study on a discovery cohort of 2175 individuals from Sydney, Australia. We found a novel association between intraocular pressure and a common variant at 7p21 near to GLCCI1 and ICA1. The findings in this region were confirmed through two UK replication cohorts totalling 4866 individuals (rs59072263, Pcombined = 1.10 × 10−8). A copy of the G allele at this SNP is associated with an increase in mean IOP of 0.45 mmHg (95%CI = 0.30–0.61 mmHg). These results lend support to the implication of vesicle trafficking and glucocorticoid inducibility pathways in the determination of intraocular pressure and in the pathogenesis of primary open-angle glaucoma. PMID:23836780

  5. Variants in the DYX2 locus are associated with altered brain activation in reading-related brain regions in subjects with reading disability.

    PubMed

    Cope, Natalie; Eicher, John D; Meng, Haiying; Gibson, Christopher J; Hager, Karl; Lacadie, Cheryl; Fulbright, Robert K; Constable, R Todd; Page, Grier P; Gruen, Jeffrey R

    2012-10-15

    Reading disability (RD) is a complex genetic disorder with unknown etiology. Genes on chromosome 6p22, including DCDC2, KIAA0319, and TTRAP, have been identified as RD associated genes. Imaging studies have shown both functional and structural differences between brains of individuals with and without RD. There are limited association studies performed between RD genes, specifically genes on 6p22, and regional brain activation during reading tasks. Using fourteen variants in DCDC2, KIAA0319, and TTRAP and exhaustive reading measures, we first tested for association with reading performance in 82 parent-offspring families (326 individuals). Next, we determined the association of these variants with activation of sixteen brain regions of interest during four functional magnetic resonance imaging-reading tasks. We nominally replicated associations between reading performance and variants of DCDC2 and KIAA0319. Furthermore, we observed a number of associations with brain activation patterns during imaging-reading tasks with all three genes. The strongest association occurred between activation of the left anterior inferior parietal lobe and complex tandem repeat BV677278 in DCDC2 (uncorrected p=0.00003, q=0.0442). Our results show that activation patterns across regions of interest in the brain are influenced by variants in the DYX2 locus. The combination of genetic and functional imaging data show a link between genes and brain functioning during reading tasks in subjects with RD. This study highlights the many advantages of imaging data as an endophenotype for discerning genetic risk factors for RD and other communication disorders and underscores the importance of integrating neurocognitive, imaging, and genetic data in future investigations.

  6. Localization of a locus (GLC1B) for adult-onset primary open angle glaucoma to the 2cen-q13 region

    SciTech Connect

    Stoilova, D.; Trifan, O.C.; Sarfarazi, M.

    1996-08-15

    Primary open angle glaucoma (GLC1) is a common ocular disorder with a characteristic degeneration of the optic nerve and visual field defects that is often associated with an elevated intraocular pressure. The severe but rare juvenile-onset type has previously been mapped to 1q21-q31, and its genetic heterogeneity has been established. Herein, we present a new locus (GLC1B) for one form of GLC1 on chromosome 2cen-q13 with a clinical presentation of low to moderate intraocular pressure, onset in late 40s, and a good response to medical treatment. Two-point and haplotype analyses of affected and unaffected meioses in six families provided maximum linkage information with D2S417, GATA112EO3, D2S113, D2S373, and D2S274 (lod scores ranging from 3.11 to 6.48) within a region of 8.5 cM that is flanked by D2S2161 and D2S2264. Analysis of affected meioses alone revealed no recombination with an additional two markers (D2S2264 and D2S135) in a region of 11.2 cM that is flanked by D2S2161 and D2S176. Analysis of unaffected meioses identified only one healthy 86-year-old male who has inherited the entire affected haplotype and, hence, is a gene carrier for this condition. Eight additional families with similar and/or different clinical presentation did not show any linkage to this region and, therefore, provided evidence for genetic heterogeneity of adult-onset primary open angle glaucoma. 63 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Variants in the DYX2 locus are associated with altered brain activation in reading-related brain regions in subjects with reading disability

    PubMed Central

    Cope, Natalie; Eicher, John D.; Meng, Haiying; Gibson, Christopher J.; Hager, Karl; Lacadie, Cheryl; Fulbright, Robert K.; Constable, R. Todd; Page, Grier P.; Gruen, Jeffrey R.

    2012-01-01

    Reading disability (RD) is a complex genetic disorder with unknown etiology. Genes on chromosome 6p22, including DCDC2, KIAA0319, and TTRAP, have been identified as RD associated genes. Imaging studies have shown both functional and structural differences between brains of individuals with and without RD. There are limited association studies performed between RD genes, specifically genes on 6p22, and regional brain activation during reading tasks. Using fourteen variants in DCDC2, KIAA0319, and TTRAP and exhaustive reading measures, we first tested for association with reading performance in 82 parent-offspring families (326 individuals). Next, we determined the association of these variants with activation of sixteen brain regions of interest during four functional magnetic resonance imaging-reading tasks. We nominally replicated associations between reading performance and variants of DCDC2 and KIAA0319. Furthermore, we observed a number of associations with brain activation patterns during imaging-reading tasks with all three genes. The strongest association occurred between activation of the left anterior inferior parietal lobe and complex tandem repeat BV677278 in DCDC2 (uncorrected p=0.00003, q=0.0442). Our results show that activation patterns across regions of interest in the brain are influenced by variants in the DYX2 locus. The combination of genetic and functional imaging data show a link between genes and brain functioning during reading tasks in subjects with RD. This study highlights the many advantages of imaging data as an endophenotype for discerning genetic risk factors for RD and other communication disorders and underscores the importance of integrating neurocognitive, imaging, and genetic data in future investigations. PMID:22750057

  8. Multi-strategy genome-wide association studies identify the DCAF16-NCAPG region as a susceptibility locus for average daily gain in cattle

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wengang; Li, Junya; Guo, Yong; Zhang, Lupei; Xu, Lingyang; Gao, Xue; Zhu, Bo; Gao, Huijiang; Ni, Hemin; Chen, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Average daily gain (ADG) is the most economically important trait in beef cattle industry. Using genome-wide association study (GWAS) approaches, previous studies have identified several causal variants within the PLAG1, NCAPG and LCORL genes for ADG in cattle. Multi-strategy GWASs were implemented in this study to improve detection and to explore the causal genes and regions. In this study, we conducted GWASs based on the genotypes of 1,173 Simmental cattle. In the SNP-based GWAS, the most significant SNPs (rs109303784 and rs110058857, P = 1.78 × 10−7) were identified in the NCAPG intron on BTA6 and explained 4.01% of the phenotypic variance, and the independent and significant SNP (rs110406669, P = 5.18 × 10−6) explained 3.32% of the phenotypic variance. Similarly, in the haplotype-based GWAS, the most significant haplotype block, Hap-6-N1416 (P = 2.56 × 10−8), spanned 12.7 kb on BTA6 and explained 4.85% of the phenotypic variance. Also, in the gene-based GWAS, seven significant genes were obtained which included DCAF16 and NCAPG. Moreover, analysis of the transcript levels confirmed that transcripts abundance of NCAPG (P = 0.046) and DCAF16 (P = 0.046) were significantly correlated with the ADG trait. Overall, our results from the multi-strategy GWASs revealed the DCAF16-NCAPG region to be a susceptibility locus for ADG in cattle. PMID:27892541

  9. Ethylene oxide: induction of specific-locus mutations in the ad-3 region of heterokaryon 12 of Neurospora crassa and implications for genetic risk assessment of human exposure in the workplace.

    PubMed

    de Serres, F J; Brockman, H E

    1995-04-01

    Ethylene oxide (ETO) is an important industrial intermediate used extensively in the production of ethylene glycol, as a fumigant, and as a sterilant of choice for various medical devices. The mutagenicity of ETO was studied for the induction of specific-locus mutations in the adenine-3 (ad-3) region of a two-component heterokaryon (H-12) of Neurospora crassa. The objectives of these studies with ETO were to rank its mutagenic potency and to compare its mutational spectrum for induced specific-locus mutations with other chemical mutagens in this lower eukaryotic organism. Specific-locus mutations in the ad-3 region of heterokaryon H12 result from gene/point mutations at the closely linked ad-3A and ad-3B loci, multilocus deletion mutations and multiple-locus mutations. These major genotypic classes are similar to the types of specific-locus mutations that can be detected in higher organisms. Conidial suspensions of H-12 were treated with five different concentrations of ETO (0.1-0.35%) for 3 h at 25 degrees C. Control and ETO-treated conidial suspensions were used to obtain dose-response curves for inactivation as well as the overall induction of ad-3 forward mutations using a non-selective method based on pigment accumulation rather than a requirement for adenine. The results from these experiments are: (1) the slope of the dose-response curve for ETO-induced specific-locus mutations in the ad-3 region is 1.49 +/- 0.07, and (2) the maximum forward-mutation frequency fell between 10 and 100 ad-3 mutations per 10(6) survivors; therefore, ETO is a moderate mutagen. Classical genetic tests were used to characterize the ETO-induced ad-3 mutations from each of two treatments (0.25 and 0.35%). The overall data base demonstrates that ETO-induced ad-3 mutations result from a high percentage (96.9%) of gene/point mutations at the ad-3A and ad-3B loci, as well as from a low percentage (3.1%) of multilocus deletion mutations. The mutagenic activity of ETO is compared with the

  10. Genome annotation of a 1.5 Mb region of human chromosome 6q23 encompassing a quantitative trait locus for fetal hemoglobin expression in adults

    PubMed Central

    Close, James; Game, Laurence; Clark, Barnaby; Bergounioux, Jean; Gerovassili, Ageliki; Thein, Swee Lay

    2004-01-01

    Background Heterocellular hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin (HPFH) is a common multifactorial trait characterized by a modest increase of fetal hemoglobin levels in adults. We previously localized a Quantitative Trait Locus for HPFH in an extensive Asian-Indian kindred to chromosome 6q23. As part of the strategy of positional cloning and a means towards identification of the specific genetic alteration in this family, a thorough annotation of the candidate interval based on a strategy of in silico / wet biology approach with comparative genomics was conducted. Results The ~1.5 Mb candidate region was shown to contain five protein-coding genes. We discovered a very large uncharacterized gene containing WD40 and SH3 domains (AHI1), and extended the annotation of four previously characterized genes (MYB, ALDH8A1, HBS1L and PDE7B). We also identified several genes that do not appear to be protein coding, and generated 17 kb of novel transcript sequence data from re-sequencing 97 EST clones. Conclusion Detailed and thorough annotation of this 1.5 Mb interval in 6q confirms a high level of aberrant transcripts in testicular tissue. The candidate interval was shown to exhibit an extraordinary level of alternate splicing – 19 transcripts were identified for the 5 protein coding genes, but it appears that a significant portion (14/19) of these alternate transcripts did not have an open reading frame, hence their functional role is questionable. These transcripts may result from aberrant rather than regulated splicing. PMID:15169551

  11. Microsatellite and single nucleotide polymorphisms in the β-globin locus control region-hypersensitive Site 2: SPECIFICITY of Tunisian βs chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Ben Mustapha, Maha; Moumni, Imen; Zorai, Amine; Douzi, Kaïs; Ghanem, Abderraouf; Abbes, Salem

    2012-01-01

    The diversity of sickle cell disease severity is attributed to several cis acting factors, among them the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and (AT) rich region in the β-locus control region (β-LCR). This contains five DNase I hypersensitive sites (HS) located 6 to 22 kb upstream to the ϵ gene. The most important of these is the HS2 (5' β-LCR-HS2), characterized by the presence of three different SNPs and a microsatellite region known to be in association with β(S) chromosomes in various populations. The aim of this study was to present the molecular investigation of the 5' β-LCR-HS2 site in normal and sickle cell disease individuals in order to determine if there is any correlation or specificity between these molecular markers, the β(S) Tunisian chromosomes and phenotypical expression of sickle cell disease. One hundred and twenty-four chromosomes from Tunisian individuals (49 β(S) carriers and 13 normal individuals) were screened by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing for the polymorphic short tandem microsatellite repeats (AT)(X)N(12)(AT)(Y) and the three SNPs (rs7119428, rs9736333 and rs60240093) of the 5' β-LCR-HS2. Twelve configurations of the microsatellite motif were found with an ancestral configuration elaborated by ClustalW software. Normal and mutated alleles were observed at the homozygous and heterozygous states for the three SNPs. Correlation between microsatellites and SNPs suggests that mutant SNP alleles were mainly associated, in the homozygous sickle cell disease phenotype, with the (AT)(8)N(12)GT(AT)(7) configuration, whereas, normal SNP alleles were associated with the (AT)(X)N(12)(AT)(11) configurations in normal β(A) chromosomes. The correlation of these various configurations with Hb F expression was also investigated. The principal component analysis (PCA) showed the correlation between the homozygous sickle cell disease phenotype, mutated SNP alleles and the Benin microsatellite configuration (AT)(8)N(12)GT

  12. Linkage analysis of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy and microsatellite loci spanning 61 cM of human chromosome 6p in 19 nuclear pedigrees provides no evidence for a susceptibility locus in this region

    SciTech Connect

    Elmslie, F.V.; Williamson, M.P.; Rees, M.

    1996-09-01

    Linkage analysis in separately ascertained families of probands with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) has previously provided evidence both for and against the existence of a locus (designated {open_quotes}EJM1{close_quotes}), on chromosome 6p, predisposing to a trait defined as either clinical JME, its associated electroencephalographic abnormality, or idiopathic generalized epilepsy. Linkage analysis was performed in 19 families in which a proband and at least one first- or two second-degree relatives have clinical JME. Family members were typed for seven highly polymorphic microsatellite markers on chromosome 6p: D6S260, D6S276, D6S291, D6S271, D6S465, D6S257, and D6S254. Pairwise and multipoint linkage analysis was carried out under the assumptions of autosomal dominant inheritance at 70% and 50% penetrance and autosomal recessive inheritance at 70% and 50% penetrance. No significant evidence in favor of linkage to the clinical trait of JME was obtained for any locus. The region formally excluded (LOD score <-2) by using multipoint analysis varies depending on the assumptions made concerning inheritance parameters and the proportion of linked families, {alpha} - that is, the degree of locus heterogeneity. Further analysis either classifying all unaffected individuals as unknown or excluding a subset of four families in which pyknoleptic absence seizures were present in one or more individuals did not alter these conclusions. 24 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Refined genetic mapping of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa locus RP18 reduces the critical region to 2 cM between D1S442 and D1S2858 on chromosome 1q.

    PubMed

    Xu, S Y; Rosenberg, T; Gal, A

    1998-04-01

    Linkage analysis was performed on a large Danish family to refine the position of RP18, the locus for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa, mapped previously between D1S534 and D1S305 in chromosome 1p13-q21. We genotyped the family members for five microsatellite-type DNA polymorphisms and mapped RP18 between D1S422 and D1S2858 to a region of less than 2 cM. No obvious candidate gene has yet been assigned to the chromosomal interval defined here.

  14. Homologous Elements hs3a and hs3b in the 3′ Regulatory Region of the Murine Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain (Igh) Locus Are Both Dispensable for Class-switch Recombination*

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yi; Pieretti, Joyce; Ju, Zhongliang; Wei, Shiniu; Christin, John R.; Bah, Fatmata; Birshtein, Barbara K.; Eckhardt, Laurel A.

    2011-01-01

    Immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) genes are formed, tested, and modified to yield diverse, specific, and high affinity antibody responses to antigen. The processes involved must be regulated, however, to avoid unintended damage to chromosomes. The 3′ regulatory region of the Igh locus plays a major role in regulating class-switch recombination (CSR), the process by which antibody effector functions are modified during an immune response. Loss of all known enhancer-like elements in this region dramatically impairs CSR, but individual element deletions have no effect on this process. In the present study, we explored the hypothesis that an underlying functional redundancy in the homologous elements hs3a and hs3b was masking the importance of either element to CSR. Several transgenic mouse lines were generated, each carrying a bacterial artificial chromosome transgene that mimicked Igh locus structure but in which hs3a was missing and hs3b was flanked by loxP sites. Matings to Cyclization Recombination Enzyme-expressing mice established “pairs” of lines that differed only in the presence or absence of hs3b. Remarkably, CSR remained robust in the absence of both hs3a and hs3b, suggesting that the remaining two elements of the 3′ regulatory region, hs1.2 and hs4, although individually dispensable for CSR, are, together, sufficient to support CSR. PMID:21673112

  15. Identification of a novel susceptibility locus at 13q34 and refinement of the 20p12.2 region as a multi-signal locus associated with bladder cancer risk in individuals of European ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Jonine D.; Middlebrooks, Candace D.; Banday, A. Rouf; Ye, Yuanqing; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Koutros, Stella; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Rafnar, Thorunn; Bishop, Timothy; Furberg, Helena; Matullo, Giuseppe; Golka, Klaus; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Taylor, Jack A.; Fletcher, Tony; Siddiq, Afshan; Cortessis, Victoria K.; Kooperberg, Charles; Cussenot, Olivier; Benhamou, Simone; Prescott, Jennifer; Porru, Stefano; Dinney, Colin P.; Malats, Núria; Baris, Dalsu; Purdue, Mark P.; Jacobs, Eric J.; Albanes, Demetrius; Wang, Zhaoming; Chung, Charles C.; Vermeulen, Sita H.; Aben, Katja K.; Galesloot, Tessel E.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Sulem, Patrick; Stefansson, Kari; Kiltie, Anne E.; Harland, Mark; Teo, Mark; Offit, Kenneth; Vijai, Joseph; Bajorin, Dean; Kopp, Ryan; Fiorito, Giovanni; Guarrera, Simonetta; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Selinski, Silvia; Hengstler, Jan G.; Gerullis, Holger; Ovsiannikov, Daniel; Blaszkewicz, Meinolf; Castelao, Jose Esteban; Calaza, Manuel; Martinez, Maria Elena; Cordeiro, Patricia; Xu, Zongli; Panduri, Vijayalakshmi; Kumar, Rajiv; Gurzau, Eugene; Koppova, Kvetoslava; Bueno-De-Mesquita, H. Bas; Ljungberg, Börje; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Krogh, Vittorio; Dorronsoro, Miren; Travis, Ruth C.; Tjønneland, Anne; Brennan, Paul; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Riboli, Elio; Conti, David; Stern, Marianna C.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Van Den Berg, David; Yuan, Jian-Min; Hohensee, Chancellor; Jeppson, Rebecca P.; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Roupret, Morgan; Comperat, Eva; Turman, Constance; De Vivo, Immaculata; Giovannucci, Edward; Hunter, David J.; Kraft, Peter; Lindstrom, Sara; Carta, Angela; Pavanello, Sofia; Arici, Cecilia; Mastrangelo, Giuseppe; Kamat, Ashish M.; Zhang, Liren; Gong, Yilei; Pu, Xia; Hutchinson, Amy; Burdett, Laurie; Wheeler, William A.; Karagas, Margaret R.; Johnson, Alison; Schned, Alan; Monawar Hosain, G. M.; Schwenn, Molly; Kogevinas, Manolis; Tardón, Adonina; Serra, Consol; Carrato, Alfredo; García-Closas, Reina; Lloreta, Josep; Andriole, Gerald; Grubb, Robert; Black, Amanda; Diver, W. Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M.; Weinstein, Stephanie; Virtamo, Jarmo; Haiman, Christopher A.; Landi, Maria Teresa; Caporaso, Neil E.; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Vineis, Paolo; Wu, Xifeng; Chanock, Stephen J.; Silverman, Debra T.; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Rothman, Nathaniel

    2016-01-01

    Candidate gene and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 15 independent genomic regions associated with bladder cancer risk. In search for additional susceptibility variants, we followed up on four promising single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that had not achieved genome-wide significance in 6911 cases and 11 814 controls (rs6104690, rs4510656, rs5003154 and rs4907479, P < 1 × 10−6), using additional data from existing GWAS datasets and targeted genotyping for studies that did not have GWAS data. In a combined analysis, which included data on up to 15 058 cases and 286 270 controls, two SNPs achieved genome-wide statistical significance: rs6104690 in a gene desert at 20p12.2 (P = 2.19 × 10−11) and rs4907479 within the MCF2L gene at 13q34 (P = 3.3 × 10−10). Imputation and fine-mapping analyses were performed in these two regions for a subset of 5551 bladder cancer cases and 10 242 controls. Analyses at the 13q34 region suggest a single signal marked by rs4907479. In contrast, we detected two signals in the 20p12.2 region—the first signal is marked by rs6104690, and the second signal is marked by two moderately correlated SNPs (r2 = 0.53), rs6108803 and the previously reported rs62185668. The second 20p12.2 signal is more strongly associated with the risk of muscle-invasive (T2-T4 stage) compared with non-muscle-invasive (Ta, T1 stage) bladder cancer (case–case P ≤ 0.02 for both rs62185668 and rs6108803). Functional analyses are needed to explore the biological mechanisms underlying these novel genetic associations with risk for bladder cancer. PMID:26732427

  16. Linkage analysis of idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) and marker loci on chromosome 6p in families of patients with juvenile myocloni epilepsy: No evidence for an epilepsy locus in the HLA region

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehouse, W.P.; Rees, M.; Curtis, D.; Sundqvist, A.; Parker, K.; Chung, E.; Baralle, D.; Gardiner, R.M.

    1993-09-01

    Evidence for a locus (EJM1) in the HLA region of chromosome 6p predisposing to idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) in the families of patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) has been obtained in two previous studies of separately ascertained groups of kindreds. Linkage analysis has been undertaken in a third set of 25 families including a patient with JME and at least one first-degree relative with IGE. Family members were typed for eight polymorphic loci on chromosome 6p: F13A, D6889, D6S109, D6S105, D6S10, C4B, DQA1/A2, and TCTE1. Pairwise and multipoint linkage analysis was carried out assuming autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive inheritance and age-dependent high or low penetrance. No significant evidence in favor of linkage was obtained at any locus. Multipoint linkage analysis generated significant exclusion data (lod score < -2.0) at HLA and for a region 10-30 cM telomeric to HLA, the extent of which varied with the level of penetrance assumed. These observations indicate that genetic heterogeneity exists within this epilepsy phenotype. 39 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Which Sry locus is the hypertensive Y chromosome locus?

    PubMed

    Turner, Monte E; Farkas, Joel; Dunmire, Jeff; Ely, Daniel; Milsted, Amy

    2009-02-01

    The Y chromosome of the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) contains a genetic component that raises blood pressure compared with the Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) Y chromosome. This research tests the Sry gene complex as the hypertensive component of the SHR Y chromosome. The Sry loci were sequenced in 1 strain with a hypertensive Y chromosome (SHR/Akr) and 2 strains with a normotensive Y chromosome (SHR/Crl and WKY/Akr). Both SHR strains have 7 Sry loci, whereas the WKY strain has 6. The 6 loci in common between SHR and WKY strains were identical in the sequence compared (coding region, 392-bp 5' prime flanking, 1200-bp 3' flanking). Both SHR strains have a locus (Sry3) not found in WKY rats, but this locus is different between SHR/Akr and SHR/Crl rats. Six mutations have accumulated in Sry3 between the SHR strains, whereas the other 6 Sry loci are identical. This pattern of an SHR-specific locus and mutation in this locus in SHR/Crl coinciding with the loss of Y chromosome hypertension is an expected pattern if Sry3 is the Y chromosome-hypertensive component. The SHR/y strain showed a significant increase in total Sry expression in the kidney between 4 and 15 weeks of age. There are significant differences in Sry expression between adrenal glands and the kidney (15 to 30 times higher in kidneys) but no significant differences between strains. These results, along with previous studies demonstrating an interaction of Sry with the tyrosine hydroxylase promoter and increased blood pressure with exogenous Sry expression, suggest the Sry loci as the hypertensive component of the SHR Y chromosome.

  18. Image simulation using LOCUS

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, J.D.; Roberts, J.A.

    1989-09-01

    The LOCUS data base program has been used to simulate images and to solve simple equations. This has been accomplished by making each record (which normally would represent a data entry)represent sequenced or random number pairs.

  19. Characterization of a human X-linked gene from the DXS732E locus in the candidate region for the anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (EDA) gene (Xq13.1)

    SciTech Connect

    Gault, J.; Zonana, J.; Zeltinger, J.

    1994-09-01

    A conserved mouse genomic clone was used to identify a homologous human genomic clone (the DXS732E locus), which was subsequently employed to isolate cDNAs from a human fetal brain library. Nine unique overlapping cDNAs were isolated, and sequences analysis of 3.9 kb identified a putative 1 kb ORF. GRAIL analysis of the sequence supported the hypothesis that the putative ORF was coding sequence, and Prosite analysis of the putative ORF identified potential glycosylation and phosphorylation sites. The 5{prime} end of the gene maps within a CpG island, and comparison of cDNA sequences indicate the gene is alternatively spliced at its 3{prime} end. Northern analysis and RT-PCR indicate that two different sized messages appear to be expressed with the gene expressed in human fetal kidney, intestine, brain, and muscle. The gene is expressed in 77 day human skin, a time when hair follicle formation occurs. Anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (EDA) results in the abnormal morphogenesis of hair, teeth and eccrine sweat glands. A positional cloning strategy towards cloning the EDA gene had been used, and deletion and X-autosome translocation patients have been useful in further delimiting the EDA region. The present gene at the DXS732E locus is partially deleted in one EDA patient who does not have other apparent abnormalities. No rearrangements of the gene have been detected in two female X-autosome translocation EDA patients, nor in four additional male patients with submicroscopic molecular deletions.

  20. Extension, single-locus conversion and physical mapping of sex chromosome sequences identify the Z microchromosome and pseudo-autosomal region in a dragon lizard, Pogona vitticeps.

    PubMed

    Quinn, A E; Ezaz, T; Sarre, S D; Graves, Ja Marshall; Georges, A

    2010-04-01

    Distribution of temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD) and genotypic sex determination (GSD) across the phylogeny of dragon lizards implies multiple independent origins of at least one, and probably both, modes of sex determination. Female Pogona vitticeps are the heterogametic sex, but ZZ individuals reverse to a female phenotype at high incubation temperatures. We used reiterated genome walking to extend Z and W chromosome-linked amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers, and fluorescence in situ hybridization for physical mapping. One extended fragment hybridized to both W and Z microchromosomes, identifying the Z microchromosome for the first time, and a second hybridized to the centromere of all microchromosomes. W-linked sequences were converted to a single-locus PCR sexing assay. P. vitticeps sex chromosome sequences also shared homology with several other Australian dragons. Further physical mapping and isolation of sex-specific bacterial artificial chromosome clones will provide insight into the evolution of sex determination and sex chromosomes in GSD and TSD dragon lizards.

  1. Definition of the locus responsible for systemic carnitine deficiency within a 1.6-cM region of mouse chromosome 11 by detailed linkage analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Okita, Kohei; Tokino, Takashi; Nishimori, Hiroyuki

    1996-04-15

    Carnitine is an essential cofactor for oxidation of mitochondrial fatty acids. Carnitine deficiency results in failure of energy production by mitochondria and leads to metabolic encephalopathy, lipid-storage myopathy, and cardiomyopathy. The juvenile visceral steatosis (JVS) mouse, an animal model of systemic carnitine deficiency, inherits the JVS phenotype in autosomal recessive fashion, through a mutant allele mapped to mouse chromosome 11. As a step toward identifying the gene responsible for JVS by positional cloning, we attempted to refine the jvs locus in the mouse by detailed linkage analysis with 13 microsatellite markers, using 190 backcross progeny. Among the 13 loci tested, 5 (defined by markers D11Mit24, D11Mit111,D11Nds9, D11Mit86, and D11Mit23) showed no recombination, with a maximum lod score of 52.38. Our results implied that the jvs gene can be sought on mouse chromosome 11 within a genetic distance no greater than about 1.6 cM. 21 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Construction of a transcription map of a 300 kb region around the human G6PD locus by direct cDNA selection.

    PubMed

    Sedlacek, Z; Korn, B; Konecki, D S; Siebenhaar, R; Coy, J F; Kioschis, P; Poustka, A

    1993-11-01

    A transcription map covering a 300 kb region around the G6PD gene in the human Xq28 region was constructed by the direct cDNA selection method and the analysis of the resulting region-specific enriched cDNA sublibrary. Seven new genes and two loci of endogenous retrovirus HERV-K were identified. The distribution of the genes across the region is strongly non-uniform and follows the non-uniform distribution of GpG islands in the area. While one of the novel genes was found to be highly homologous to bovine smg p25A GDP-dissociation inhibitor, the remaining genes did not detect any homology to known genes. The analysis of region-specific cDNA sublibraries represents a simple, rapid and efficient tool for the generation of a regional transcription map.

  3. Erythroid Krüppel-like factor (EKLF) is active in primitive and definitive erythroid cells and is required for the function of 5'HS3 of the beta-globin locus control region.

    PubMed

    Tewari, R; Gillemans, N; Wijgerde, M; Nuez, B; von Lindern, M; Grosveld, F; Philipsen, S

    1998-04-15

    Disruption of the gene for transcription factor EKLF (erythroid Krüppel-like factor) results in fatal anaemia caused by severely reduced expression of the adult beta-globin gene, while other erythroid-specific genes, including the embryonic epsilon- and fetal gamma-globin genes, are expressed normally. Thus, EKLF is thought to be a stage-specific factor acting through the CACC box in the beta-gene promoter, even though it is already present in embryonic red cells. Here, we show that a beta-globin gene linked directly to the locus control region (LCR) is expressed at embryonic stages, and that this is only modestly reduced in EKLF-/- embryos. Thus, embryonic beta-globin expression is not intrinsically dependent on EKLF. To investigate whether EKLF functions in the locus control region, we analysed the expression of LCR-driven lacZ reporters. This shows that EKLF is not required for reporter activation by the complete LCR. However, embryonic expression of reporters driven by 5'HS3 of the LCR requires EKLF. This suggests that EKLF interacts directly with the CACC motifs in 5'HS3 and demonstrates that EKLF is also a transcriptional activator in embryonic erythropoiesis. Finally, we show that overexpression of EKLF results in an earlier switch from gamma- to beta-globin expression. Adult mice with the EKLF transgene have reduced platelet counts, suggesting that EKLF levels affect the balance between the megakaryocytic and erythroid lineages. Interestingly, the EKLF transgene rescues the lethal phenotype of EKLF null mice, setting the stage for future studies aimed at the analysis of the EKLF protein and its role in beta-globin gene activation.

  4. Origin of the CMS gene locus in rapeseed cybrid mitochondria: active and inactive recombination produces the complex CMS gene region in the mitochondrial genomes of Brassicaceae.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Masao; Kikuchi, Rie; Imamura, Jun; Handa, Hirokazu

    2010-01-01

    CMS (cytoplasmic male sterile) rapeseed is produced by asymmetrical somatic cell fusion between the Brassica napus cv. Westar and the Raphanus sativus Kosena CMS line (Kosena radish). The CMS rapeseed contains a CMS gene, orf125, which is derived from Kosena radish. Our sequence analyses revealed that the orf125 region in CMS rapeseed originated from recombination between the orf125/orfB region and the nad1C/ccmFN1 region by way of a 63 bp repeat. A precise sequence comparison among the related sequences in CMS rapeseed, Kosena radish and normal rapeseed showed that the orf125 region in CMS rapeseed consisted of the Kosena orf125/orfB region and the rapeseed nad1C/ccmFN1 region, even though Kosena radish had both the orf125/orfB region and the nad1C/ccmFN1 region in its mitochondrial genome. We also identified three tandem repeat sequences in the regions surrounding orf125, including a 63 bp repeat, which were involved in several recombination events. Interestingly, differences in the recombination activity for each repeat sequence were observed, even though these sequences were located adjacent to each other in the mitochondrial genome. We report results indicating that recombination events within the mitochondrial genomes are regulated at the level of specific repeat sequences depending on the cellular environment.

  5. An autosomal dominant locus, Nka, mapping to the Ly-49 region of a rat natural killer (NK) gene complex, controls NK cell lysis of allogeneic lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells can recognize and kill MHC-incompatible normal bone marrow-derived cells. Presently characterized MHC-binding receptors on NK cells, including the Ly-49 family in the mouse, transmit inhibitory signals upon binding to cognate class I MHC ligands. Here we study in vivo NK-mediated lysis of normal allogeneic lymphocytes in crosses between alloreactivity-competent PVG rats and alloreactivity-deficient DA rats. NK cells from both strains are able to lyse standard tumor targets. We identify an autosomal dominant locus, Nka, that controls NK-mediated alloreactivity. Individuals carrying the dominant PVG allele in single dose were fully competent in eliminating allogeneic target cells, suggesting that Nka encodes or regulates a gene product inducing or activating alloreactivity. By linkage analysis and pulsed field gel electrophoresis, a natural killer gene complex (NKC) on rat chromosome 4 is described that contains the rat NKR-P1 and Ly-49 multigene families plus a rat NKG2D homologue. Nka maps within the NKC, together with the most telomeric Ly-49 family members, but separate from NKG2D and the NKR-P1 family. The Nka-encoded response, moreover, correlates with the expression of transcripts for Ly-49 receptors in NK cell populations, as Northern blot analysis demonstrated low expression of Ly-49 genes in DA NK cells, in contrast to high expression in alloreactivity-competent PVG, (DA X PVG)F1, and PVG.1AVI NK cells. The low Ly-49 expression in DA is not induced by MHC haplotype, as demonstrated by high expression of Ly-49 in the DA MHC- congenic PVG.1AVI strain. Finally, we have cloned and characterized the first four members of the rat Ly-49 gene family. Their cytoplasmic domains demonstrate substantial heterogeneity, consistent with the hypothesis that different Ly-49 family members may subserve different signaling functions. PMID:8642329

  6. Genetic variants of FOXP2 and KIAA0319/TTRAP/THEM2 locus are associated with altered brain activation in distinct language-related regions.

    PubMed

    Pinel, Philippe; Fauchereau, Fabien; Moreno, Antonio; Barbot, Alexis; Lathrop, Mark; Zelenika, Diana; Le Bihan, Denis; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Bourgeron, Thomas; Dehaene, Stanislas

    2012-01-18

    Recent advances have been made in the genetics of two human communication skills: speaking and reading. Mutations of the FOXP2 gene cause a severe form of language impairment and orofacial dyspraxia, while single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located within a KIAA0319/TTRAP/THEM2 gene cluster and affecting the KIAA0319 gene expression are associated with reading disability. Neuroimaging studies of clinical populations point to partially distinct cerebral bases for language and reading impairments. However, alteration of FOXP2 and KIAA0319/TTRAP/THEM2 polymorphisms on typically developed language networks has never been explored. Here, we genotyped and scanned 94 healthy subjects using fMRI during a reading task. We studied the correlation of genetic polymorphisms with interindividual variability in brain activation and functional asymmetry in frontal and temporal cortices. In FOXP2, SNPs rs6980093 and rs7799109 were associated with variations of activation in the left frontal cortex. In the KIAA0319/TTRAP/THEM2 locus, rs17243157 was associated with asymmetry in functional activation of the superior temporal sulcus (STS). Interestingly, healthy subjects bearing the KIAA0319/TTRAP/THEM2 variants previously identified as enhancing the risk of dyslexia showed a reduced left-hemispheric asymmetry of the STS. Our results confirm that both FOXP2 and KIAA0319/TTRAP/THEM2 genes play an important role in human language development, but probably through different cerebral pathways. The observed cortical effects mirror previous fMRI results in developmental language and reading disorders, and suggest that a continuum may exist between these pathologies and normal interindividual variability.

  7. hobo Induced rearrangements in the yellow locus influence the insulation effect of the gypsy su(Hw)-binding region in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Gause, M; Hovhannisyan, H; Kan, T; Kuhfittig, S; Mogila, V; Georgiev, P

    1998-01-01

    The su(Hw) protein is responsible for the insulation mediated by the su(Hw)-binding region present in the gypsy retrotransposon. In the y2 mutant, su(Hw) protein partially inhibits yellow transcription by repressing the function of transcriptional enhancers located distally from the yellow promoter with respect to gypsy. y2 mutation derivatives have been induced by the insertion of two hobo copies on the both sides of gypsy: into the yellow intron and into the 5' regulatory region upstream of the wing and body enhancers. The hobo elements have the same structure and orientation, opposite to the direction of yellow transcription. In the sequence context, where two copies of hobo are separated by the su(Hw)-binding region, hobo-dependent rearrangements are frequently associated with duplications of the region between the hobo elements. Duplication of the su(Hw)-binding region strongly inhibits the insulation of the yellow promoter separated from the body and wing enhancers by gypsy. These results provide a better insight into mechanisms by which the su(Hw)-binding region affects the enhancer function. PMID:9649529

  8. Admixture mapping in two Mexican samples identifies significant associations of locus ancestry with triglyceride levels in the BUD13/ZNF259/APOA5 region and fine mapping points to rs964184 as the main driver of the association signal.

    PubMed

    Parra, Esteban J; Mazurek, Andrew; Gignoux, Christopher R; Sockell, Alexandra; Agostino, Michael; Morris, Andrew P; Petty, Lauren E; Hanis, Craig L; Cox, Nancy J; Valladares-Salgado, Adan; Below, Jennifer E; Cruz, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    We carried out an admixture mapping study of lipid traits in two samples from Mexico City. Native American locus ancestry was significantly associated with triglyceride levels in a broad region of chromosome 11 overlapping the BUD13, ZNF259 and APOA5 genes. In our fine-mapping analysis of this region using dense genome-wide data, rs964184 is the only marker included in the 99% credible set of SNPs, providing strong support for rs964184 as the causal variant within this region. The frequency of the allele associated with increased triglyceride concentrations (rs964184-G) is between 30-40% higher in Native American populations from Mexico than in European populations. The evidence currently available for this variant indicates that it may be exerting its effect through three potential mechanisms: 1) modification of enhancer activity, 2) regulation of the expression of several genes in cis and/or trans, or 3) modification of the methylation patterns of the promoter of the APOA5 gene.

  9. Admixture mapping in two Mexican samples identifies significant associations of locus ancestry with triglyceride levels in the BUD13/ZNF259/APOA5 region and fine mapping points to rs964184 as the main driver of the association signal

    PubMed Central

    Mazurek, Andrew; Sockell, Alexandra; Morris, Andrew P.; Petty, Lauren E.; Hanis, Craig L.; Cox, Nancy J.; Cruz, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    We carried out an admixture mapping study of lipid traits in two samples from Mexico City. Native American locus ancestry was significantly associated with triglyceride levels in a broad region of chromosome 11 overlapping the BUD13, ZNF259 and APOA5 genes. In our fine-mapping analysis of this region using dense genome-wide data, rs964184 is the only marker included in the 99% credible set of SNPs, providing strong support for rs964184 as the causal variant within this region. The frequency of the allele associated with increased triglyceride concentrations (rs964184-G) is between 30–40% higher in Native American populations from Mexico than in European populations. The evidence currently available for this variant indicates that it may be exerting its effect through three potential mechanisms: 1) modification of enhancer activity, 2) regulation of the expression of several genes in cis and/or trans, or 3) modification of the methylation patterns of the promoter of the APOA5 gene. PMID:28245265

  10. Genetic interactions between diverged alleles of Early heading date 1 (Ehd1) and Heading date 3a (Hd3a)/ RICE FLOWERING LOCUS T1 (RFT1) control differential heading and contribute to regional adaptation in rice (Oryza sativa).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Chen, Hongyi; Ren, Ding; Tang, Huiwu; Qiu, Rong; Feng, Jinglei; Long, Yunming; Niu, Baixiao; Chen, Danping; Zhong, Tianyu; Liu, Yao-Guang; Guo, Jingxin

    2015-11-01

    Initiation of flowering, also called heading, in rice (Oryza sativa) is determined by the florigens encoded by Heading date 3a (Hd3a) and RICE FLOWERING LOCUS T1 (RFT1). Early heading date 1 (Ehd1) regulates Hd3a and RFT1. However, different rice varieties have diverged alleles of Ehd1 and Hd3a/RFT1 and their genetic interactions remain largely unclear. Here we generated three segregating populations for different combinations of diverged Ehd1 and Hd3a/RFT1 alleles, and analyzed their genetic interactions between these alleles. We demonstrated that, in an ehd1 mutant background, Hd3a was silenced, but RFT1 was expressed (although at lower levels than in plants with a functional Ehd1) under short-day (SD) and long-day (LD) conditions. We identified a nonfunctional RFT1 allele (rft1); the lines carrying homozygous ehd1 and Hd3a/rft1 failed to induce the floral transition under SD and LD conditions. Like Hd3a, RFT1 also interacted with 14-3-3 proteins, the florigen receptors, but a nonfunctional RFT1 with a crucial E105K mutation failed to interact with 14-3-3 proteins. Furthermore, analyses of sequence variation and geographic distribution suggested that functional RFT1 alleles were selected during rice adaptation to high-latitude regions. Our results demonstrate the important roles of RFT1 in rice flowering and regional adaptation.

  11. A 150-base pair 5' region of the MHC class I HLA-B7 gene is sufficient to direct tissue-specific expression and locus control region activity: the alpha site determines efficient expression and in vivo occupancy at multiple cis-active sites throughout this region.

    PubMed

    Kushida, M M; Dey, A; Zhang, X L; Campbell, J; Heeney, M; Carlyle, J; Ganguly, S; Ozato, K; Vasavada, H; Chamberlain, J W

    1997-11-15

    To characterize cis- and trans-acting mechanisms that regulate MHC class I transcription during development and in adult tissues, we have used transgenic mice to study a series of human MHC (HLA)-B7 class I gene constructs. Previous studies identified the 5' -0.66-kb to -0.075-kb region as sufficient to direct appropriate and efficient tissue-specific levels of HLA-B7 RNA relative to H-2 class I. Results here show that DNA 5' of -0.26 kb is not required for any aspect of expression. As the expression level correlated with the transgene copy number, was comparable to H-2 or a per-gene copy basis and was independent of integration site, the -0.075 to -0.26-kb segment also functions as a locus control region. With this region, sequences 3' of -0.075 kb, possibly at the promoter, appear to direct the appropriate tissue distribution. Of conserved sequences in the -0.075 to -0.26-kb region, enhancer B box is nonessential. In contrast, in vivo "footprinting" implicated region I/ enhancer A/NF-kappaB, IFN consensus/response sequence, and alpha in class I regulation as they are "occupied" in a tissue-specific pattern that correlates with expression. Mutation of alpha leads to decreased expression and loss of occupancy not only at alpha but also at region I/enhancer A/NF-kappaB and IFN consensus/response sequence. Thus, site alpha is an essential class I regulatory element, the dominant function of which is to mediate tissue-specific occupancy at multiple adjacent cis-active sites, possibly by facilitating stable synergistic interactions between factors at these distinct elements.

  12. Human laminin B1 chain. A multidomain protein with gene (LAMB1) locus in the q22 region of chromosome 7.

    PubMed

    Pikkarainen, T; Eddy, R; Fukushima, Y; Byers, M; Shows, T; Pihlajaniemi, T; Saraste, M; Tryggvason, K

    1987-08-05

    We report the isolation and characterization of six overlapping cDNA clones that provide the first and complete amino acid sequence of the human laminin B1 chain. The cDNA clones cover 5613 nucleotides with 5358 nucleotides in an open reading frame encoding 1786 amino acids, including a 21-residue signal peptide-like sequence. Sequence analysis demonstrated the presence of two types of internal homology repeats that were found in clusters within the polypeptide chain. The type A repeats contain about 50 amino acids of which 8 are cysteine. These repeats are present in two clusters toward the NH2-terminal end of the chain and are separated from each other by about 220 amino acids. The two clusters contain five and eight consecutive repeats each. There are two copies of consecutive type B repeats of about 40 amino acids close to the COOH-terminal end. Computer analysis of the amino acid sequence of the B1 chain revealed the presence of structurally distinct domains that contain cysteine-rich repeats, globular regions, and helical structures. Using somatic cell hybrid methodology and in situ hybridization to metaphase chromosomes it was established that the human laminin B1 gene (LAMB1) is located in the q22 region of chromosome 7.

  13. A locus for the nystagmus-associated form of episodic ataxia maps to an 11-cM region on chromosome 19p

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, P.L.; Gancher, S.T.; Nutt, J.G.

    1995-07-01

    Episodic ataxia (EA) is a rare neurological disorder characterized by attacks of generalized ataxia and near-normal neurological function between attacks. Most inherited cases are the result of an autosomal dominant condition with unknown neuropathology. It is heterogeneous and includes at least two distinct forms. In EA-1, attacks last minutes and interictal myokymia may be present. In EA-2, attacks may last hours and interictal nystagmus may occur. We reported linkage in four EA-1 families to chromosome 12p13 and identified mutations in these families in a potassium channel gene, KCNA1. Recently, we reported linkage in two EA-2 families to a 30-cM region on chromosome 19p. This report is based on members of the same two families and one additional kindred. 18 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  14. A brain-specific gene cluster isolated from the region of the mouse obesity locus is expressed in the adult hypothalamus and during mouse development

    SciTech Connect

    Laig-Webster, M.; Lim, M.E.; Chehab, F.F.

    1994-09-01

    The molecular defect underlying an autosomal recessive form of genetic obesity in a classical mouse model C57 BL/6J-ob/ob has not yet been elucidated. Whereas metabolic and physiological disturbances such as diabetes and hypertension are associated with obesity, the site of expression and the nature of the primary lesion responsible for this cascade of events remains elusive. Our efforts aimed at the positional cloning of the ob gene by YAC contig mapping and gene identification have resulted in the cloning of a brain-specific gene cluster from the ob critical region. The expression of this gene cluster is remarkably complex owing to the multitude of brain-specific mRNA transcripts detected on Northern blots. cDNA cloning of these transcripts suggests that they are expressed from different genes as well as by alternate splicing mechanisms. Furthermore, the genomic organization of the cluster appears to consist of at least two identical promoters displaying CpG islands characteristic of housekeeping genes, yet clearly involving tissue-specific expression. Sense and anti-sense synthetic RNA probes were derived from a common DNA sequence on 3 cDNA clones and hybridized to 8-16 days mouse embryonic stages and mouse adult brain sections. Expression in development was noticeable as of the 11th day of gestation and confined to the central nervous system mainly in the telencephalon and spinal cord. Coronal and sagittal sections of the adult mouse brain showed expression only in 3 different regions of the brain stem. In situ hybridization to mouse hypothalamus sections revealed the presence of a localized and specialized group of cells expressing high levels of mRNA, suggesting that this gene cluster may also be involved in the regulation of hypothalamic activities. The hypothalamus has long been hypothesized as a primary candidate tissue for the expression of the obesity gene mainly because of its well-established role in the regulation of energy metabolism and food intake.

  15. The coding region of the UFGT gene is a source of diagnostic SNP markers that allow single-locus DNA genotyping for the assessment of cultivar identity and ancestry in grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Vitis vinifera L. is one of society’s most important agricultural crops with a broad genetic variability. The difficulty in recognizing grapevine genotypes based on ampelographic traits and secondary metabolites prompted the development of molecular markers suitable for achieving variety genetic identification. Findings Here, we propose a comparison between a multi-locus barcoding approach based on six chloroplast markers and a single-copy nuclear gene sequencing method using five coding regions combined with a character-based system with the aim of reconstructing cultivar-specific haplotypes and genotypes to be exploited for the molecular characterization of 157 V. vinifera accessions. The analysis of the chloroplast target regions proved the inadequacy of the DNA barcoding approach at the subspecies level, and hence further DNA genotyping analyses were targeted on the sequences of five nuclear single-copy genes amplified across all of the accessions. The sequencing of the coding region of the UFGT nuclear gene (UDP-glucose: flavonoid 3-0-glucosyltransferase, the key enzyme for the accumulation of anthocyanins in berry skins) enabled the discovery of discriminant SNPs (1/34 bp) and the reconstruction of 130 V. vinifera distinct genotypes. Most of the genotypes proved to be cultivar-specific, and only few genotypes were shared by more, although strictly related, cultivars. Conclusion On the whole, this technique was successful for inferring SNP-based genotypes of grapevine accessions suitable for assessing the genetic identity and ancestry of international cultivars and also useful for corroborating some hypotheses regarding the origin of local varieties, suggesting several issues of misidentification (synonymy/homonymy). PMID:24298902

  16. Exclusion of the locus for autosomal recessive pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1 from the mineralocorticoid receptor gene region on human chromosome 4q by linkage analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, E.; Hanukoglu, A.; Rees, M.; Thompson, R.; Gardiner, R.M.

    1995-10-01

    Pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1 (PHA1) is an uncommon inherited disorder characterized by salt-wasting in infancy arising from target organ unresponsiveness to mineralocorticoids. Clinical expression of the disease varies from severely affected infants who may die to apparently asymptomatic individuals. Inheritance is Mendelian and may be either autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive. A defect in the mineralocortiocoid receptor has been implicated as a likely cause of PHA1. The gene for human mineralocorticoid receptor (MLR) has been cloned and physically mapped to human chromosome 4q31.1-31.2. The etiological role of MLR in autosomal recessive PHA1 was investigated by performing linkage analysis between PHA1 and three simple sequence length polymorphisms (D4S192, D4S1548, and D4S413) on chromosome 4q in 10 consanguineous families. Linkage analysis was carried out assuming autosomal recessive inheritance with full penetrance and zero phenocopy rate using the MLINK program for two-point analysis and the HOMOZ program for multipoint analysis. Lod scores of less than -2 were obtained over the whole region from D4S192 to D4S413 encompassing MLR. This provides evidence against MLR as the site of mutations causing PHA1 in the majority of autosomal recessive families. 34 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Genetic mapping in human and mouse of the locus encoding TRBP, a protein that binds the TAR region of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1)

    SciTech Connect

    Kozak, C.A.; Gatignol, A.; Graham, K.

    1995-01-01

    Productive infection with HIV-1, the virus responsible for AIDS, requires the involvement of host cell factors for completion of the replicative cycle, but the identification of these factors and elucidation of their specific functions has been difficult. A human cDNA, TRBP, was recently cloned and characterized as a positive regulator of gene expression that binds to the TAR region of the HIV-1 genome. Here we demonstrate that this factor is encoded by a gene, TARBP2, that maps to human chromosome 12 and mouse chromosome 15, and we also identify and map one human pseudogene (TARBP2P) and two mouse TRBP-related sequences. The map location of the expressed gene identifies it as a candidate for the previously identified factor encoded on human chromosome 12 that has been shown to be important for expression of HIV-1 genes. Western blotting indicates that despite high sequence conservation in human and mouse, the TARBP2 protein differs in apparent size in primate and rodent cells. 41 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  18. The β-globin locus control region in combination with the EF1α short promoter allows enhanced lentiviral vector-mediated erythroid gene expression with conserved multilineage activity.

    PubMed

    Montiel-Equihua, Claudia A; Zhang, Lin; Knight, Sean; Saadeh, Heba; Scholz, Simone; Carmo, Marlene; Alonso-Ferrero, Maria E; Blundell, Michael P; Monkeviciute, Aiste; Schulz, Reiner; Collins, Mary; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro; Schmidt, Manfred; Fairbanks, Lynette; Antoniou, Michael; Thrasher, Adrian J; Gaspar, H Bobby

    2012-07-01

    Some gene therapy strategies are compromised by the levels of gene expression required for therapeutic benefit, and also by the breadth of cell types that require correction. We designed a lentiviral vector system in which a transgene is under the transcriptional control of the short form of constitutively acting elongation factor 1α promoter (EFS) combined with essential elements of the locus control region of the β-globin gene (β-LCR). We show that the β-LCR can upregulate EFS activity specifically in erythroid cells but does not alter EFS activity in myeloid or lymphoid cells. Experiments using the green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter or the human adenosine deaminase (ADA) gene demonstrate 3-7 times upregulation in vitro but >20 times erythroid-specific upregulation in vivo, the effects of which were sustained for 1 year. The addition of the β-LCR did not alter the mutagenic potential of the vector in in vitro mutagenesis (IM) assays although microarray analysis showed that the β-LCR upregulates ~9% of neighboring genes. This vector design therefore combines the benefits of multilineage gene expression with high-level erythroid expression, and has considerable potential for correction of multisystem diseases including certain lysosomal storage diseases through a hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy approach.

  19. Generation of antibody- and B cell-deficient pigs by targeted disruption of the J-region gene segment of the heavy chain locus.

    PubMed

    Mendicino, M; Ramsoondar, J; Phelps, C; Vaught, T; Ball, S; LeRoith, T; Monahan, J; Chen, S; Dandro, A; Boone, J; Jobst, P; Vance, A; Wertz, N; Bergman, Z; Sun, X-Z; Polejaeva, I; Butler, J; Dai, Y; Ayares, D; Wells, K

    2011-06-01

    A poly(A)-trap gene targeting strategy was used to disrupt the single functional heavy chain (HC) joining region (J(H)) of swine in primary fibroblasts. Genetically modified piglets were then generated via somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) and bred to yield litters comprising J(H) wild-type littermate (+/+), J(H) heterozygous knockout (±) and J(H) homozygous knockout (-/-) piglets in the expected Mendelian ratio of 1:2:1. There are only two other targeted loci previously published in swine, and this is the first successful poly(A)-trap strategy ever published in a livestock species. In either blood or secondary lymphoid tissues, flow cytometry, RT-PCR and ELISA detected no circulating IgM(+) B cells, and no transcription or secretion of immunoglobulin (Ig) isotypes, respectively in J(H) -/- pigs. Histochemical and immunohistochemical (IHC) studies failed to detect lymph node (LN) follicles or CD79α(+) B cells, respectively in J(H) -/- pigs. T cell receptor (TCR)(β) transcription and T cells were detected in J(H) -/- pigs. When reared conventionally, J(H) -/- pigs succumbed to bacterial infections after weaning. These antibody (Ab)- and B cell-deficient pigs have significant value as models for both veterinary and human research to discriminate cellular and humoral protective immunity to infectious agents. Thus, these pigs may aid in vaccine development for infectious agents such as the pandemic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) and H1N1 swine flu. These pigs are also a first significant step towards generating a pig that expresses fully human, antigen-specific polyclonal Ab to target numerous incurable infectious diseases with high unmet clinical need.

  20. Retroviral transfer of a human beta-globin/delta-globin hybrid gene linked to beta locus control region hypersensitive site 2 aimed at the gene therapy of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed Central

    Takekoshi, K J; Oh, Y H; Westerman, K W; London, I M; Leboulch, P

    1995-01-01

    Human gamma-globin and delta-globin chains have been previously identified as strong inhibitors of the polymerization of hemoglobin S, in contrast to the beta-globin chain, which exerts only a moderate antisickling effect. However, gamma-globin and delta-globin are normally expressed at very low levels in adult erythroid cells, in contrast to beta-globin. We report the design of a beta-globin/delta-globin hybrid gene, beta/delta-sickle cell inhibitor 1 (beta/delta-SCI1) and its transduction by retrovirus-mediated gene transfer. The beta/delta-SCI1-encoding gene retains the overall structure of the human beta-globin gene, while incorporating specific amino acid residues from the delta chain previously found responsible for its enhanced antisickling properties. To achieve high expression levels of beta/delta-SCI1 in adult erythrocytes, the hybrid gene was placed under the transcriptional control of the human beta-globin promoter and the DNase I hypersensitive site 2 of the human beta locus control region. High-titer retroviruses were generated, and stable proviral transmission was achieved in infected cells. The mRNA expression levels of the beta/delta-SCI1 gene in infected, dimethyl sulfoxide-induced murine erythroleukemia cells approached 85% of the endogenous murine beta maj-globin mRNA, on a per gene basis, evidence that high gene expression levels were achieved in adult erythroid cells. Further evaluation of this strategy in transgenic animal models of sickle cell disease should assess its efficacy for the gene therapy of human patients. Images Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7708766

  1. Confirmation of the 2p locus for the mild autosomal recessive lim-girdle muscular dystrophy gene (LGMD2B) in three families allows refinement of the candidate region

    SciTech Connect

    Bashir, R.; Iughetti, P.; Strachan, T.

    1995-05-01

    The mild autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD) are a heterogeneous group of muscle diseases. The first gene to be mapped and associated with this phenotype was a locus on 15q geographic isolate. These results have been confirmed in other populations, but it was shown that there is genetic heterogeneity for this form of LGMD. Recently, a second locus has been mapped to chromosome 2p. The confirmation of the mapping of this second locus in LGMD families from different populations is of utmost importance for the positional cloning of this gene (HGMW-approved symbol LGMD2B). In this publication, haplotypes generated from five chromosome 2 markers from all of the known large families linked to chromosome 2p are reported together with the recombinants that show the current most likely location of the LGMD 2B gene. 9 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. A 1.1Mb deletion in distal 13q deletion syndrome region with congenital heart defect and postaxial polydactyly: additional support for a CHD locus at distal 13q34 region.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi-Feng; Ai, Qi; Huang, Can; Chen, Jin-Lan; Wang, Jian; Xie, Li; Zhang, Wei-Zhi; Yang, Jin-Fu; Tan, Zhi-Ping

    2013-10-01

    13q deletion syndrome is a rare genetic disorder, especially for group 3 deletion (13q33-q34 deletion). Previously we described a patient with congenital heart defect and mental retardation and proposed that a distal 6Mb region might contain the causative gene of congenital heart defect. Here we present a new patient with congenital heart defects (CHD), hand and foot anomalies and mild mental retardation. We identified a 1.1Mb deletion at chromosome 13q34 with high resolution SNP-array BeadChips (HumanOmni1-Quad, Illumina, USA). This chromosome region contains ten annotated genes, including GRK1, TFDP1, RASA3 and GAS6. To our knowledge, this represents the smallest 13q34 deletion identified to date. Our study provides additional support that distal 13q34 deletion region might contain key gene(s) responsible for cardiac development.

  3. Strategies for conditional two-locus nonparametric linkage analysis.

    PubMed

    Angquist, Lars; Hössjer, Ola; Groop, Leif

    2008-01-01

    In this article we deal with two-locus nonparametric linkage (NPL) analysis, mainly in the context of conditional analysis. This means that one incorporates single-locus analysis information through conditioning when performing a two-locus analysis. Here we describe different strategies for using this approach. Cox et al. [Nat Genet 1999;21:213-215] implemented this as follows: (i) Calculate the one-locus NPL process over the included genome region(s). (ii) Weight the individual pedigree NPL scores using a weighting function depending on the NPL scores for the corresponding pedigrees at speci fi c conditioning loci. We generalize this by conditioning with respect to the inheritance vector rather than the NPL score and by separating between the case of known (prede fi ned) and unknown (estimated) conditioning loci. In the latter case we choose conditioning locus, or loci, according to prede fi ned criteria. The most general approach results in a random number of selected loci, depending on the results from the previous one-locus analysis. Major topics in this article include discussions on optimal score functions with respect to the noncentrality parameter (NCP), and how to calculate adequate p values and perform power calculations. We also discuss issues related to multiple tests which arise from the two-step procedure with several conditioning loci as well as from the genome-wide tests.

  4. The putative imprinted locus D15S9 within the common deletion region for the Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes encodes two overlapping mRNAs transcribed from opposite strands

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn, C.C.; Driscoll, D.J.; Saitoh, S.

    1994-09-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome is typically caused by a deletion of paternal 15q11-q13, or maternal uniparental disomy (UPD) of chromosome 15, while Angelman syndrome is caused by a maternal deletion or paternal UPD of the same region. Therefore, these two clinically distinct neurobehavioral syndromes result from differential expression of imprinted genes within 15q11-q13. A 3.1 kb cDNA, DN34, from the D15S9 locus within 15q11-q13 was isolated from a human fetal brain library. We showed previously that DN34 probe detects a DNA methylation imprint and therefore may represent a candidate imprinted gene. Isolation of genomic clones and DNA sequencing demonstrated that the gene segment encoding the partial cDNA DN34 was split by a 2 kb intron, but did not encode a substantial open reading frame (ORF). Preliminary analysis of expression by RT-PCR suggests that this gene is expressed in fetal but not in tested tissue types from the adult, and thus its imprinting status has not been possible to assess at present. Surprisingly, we found an ORF on the antisense strand of the DN34 cDNA. This ORF encodes a putative polypeptide of 505 amino acid residues containing a RING C{sub 3}HC{sub 4} zinc-finger motif and other features of nuclear proteins. Subsequent characterization of this gene, ZNF127, and a mouse homolog, demonstrated expression of 3.2 kb transcript from all tested fetal and adult tissues. Transcripts initiate from within a CpG-island, shown to be differentially methylated on parental alleles in the human. Interestingly, functional imprinting of the mouse homolog was subsequently demonstrated in an F{sub 1} cross by analyzing a VNTR polymorphism in the mRNA. The ZNF127 gene is intronless, has significant overlap with the DN34 gene on the antisense strand, and a 1 kb 3{prime} end within the 2 kb DN34 intron.

  5. High-resolution mapping of the x-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (EDA) locus

    SciTech Connect

    Zonana, J.; Jones, M.; Litt, M.; Kramer, P.; Browne, D.; Becker, H.W. ); Brockdorff, N.; Rastan, S. ); Davies, K.P.; Clarke, A. )

    1992-11-01

    The X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (EDA) locus has been previously localized to the subchromosomal region Xq11-q21.1. The authors have extended previous linkage studies and analyzed linkage between the EDA locus and 10 marker loci, including five new loci, in 41 families. Four of the marker loci showed no recombination with the EDA locus, and six other loci were also linked to the EDA locus with recombination fractions of .009-.075. Multipoint analysis gave support to the placement of the PGK1P1 locus proximal to the EDA locus and the DXS453 and PGK1 loci distal to EDA. Further ordering of the loci could be inferred from a human-rodent somatic cell hybrid derived from an affected female with EDA and an X;9 translocation and from studies of an affected male with EDA and a submicroscopic deletion. Three of the proximal marker loci, which showed no recombination with the EDA locus, when used in combination, were informative in 92% of females. The closely linked flanking polymorphic loci DXS339 and DXS453 had heterozygosites of 72% and 76%, respectively, and when used jointly, they were doubly informative in 52% of females. The human DXS732 locus was defined by a conserved mouse probe pcos169E/4 (DXCrc169 locus) that consegregates with the mouse tabby (Ta) locus, a potential homologue to the EDA locus. The absence of recombination between EDA and the DXSA732 locus lends support to the hypothesis that the DXCrc169 locus in the mouse and the DXS732 locus in humans may contain candidate sequences for the Ta and EDA genes, respectively. 36 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  6. [Study on preferred retinal locus].

    PubMed

    Dai, Bing-Fa; Hu, Jian-Min; Xu, Duan-Lian

    2012-03-01

    Preferred retinal locus (PRL) is always found in the age-related macular degeneration and other macular damages in patients with low vision, and it is a very important anatomic position in patients with central vision impairment to achieve the rehabilitation. In recent years, the training of preferred retinal locus (PRL) has become a research hotspot of low vision rehabilitation, it can clearly improve functional vision and quality of life. The authors reviewed relevant literatures, and summarized the definition, position, characteristics, training and clinical implications of the PRL.

  7. Locus of Control and Delinquency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrott, C. A.; Strongman, K. T.

    1984-01-01

    Assessed delinquent and nondelinquent male adolescents (N=43) on locus of control and intellectual achievement responsibilty. Results supported a multidimensional model. There was no difference in expectancy of control for negative academic events between delinquents and nondelinquents. Birth order and delinquency were the most important…

  8. Locus of Control and Socialization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raine, Adrian; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Predicted that an external locus of control would characterize undersocialization. Tested this hypothesis on a random sample of secondary school children (N=97). Scores from the Child Nowicki-Strickland Internal-External Scale were found to predict undersocialization in the expected direction. Suggested several possible interpretations of this…

  9. Biochemical Analysis of Genome Functions Using Locus-Specific Chromatin Immunoprecipitation Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Toshitsugu; Fujii, Hodaka

    2016-01-01

    To isolate specific genomic regions that retain their molecular interactions, allowing direct identification of chromatin-bound molecules, we developed two locus-specific chromatin immunoprecipitation (locus-specific ChIP) technologies, insertional ChIP (iChIP) and engineered DNA-binding molecule-mediated ChIP (enChIP) using the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system or transcription activator-like (TAL) proteins. Essentially, a locus-specific ChIP consists of locus-tagging and affinity purification and can be combined with downstream analyses to identify molecules associated with the target genomic regions. In this review, we discuss the applications of locus-specific ChIP to analyze the genome functions, including transcription and epigenetic regulation. PMID:26819551

  10. Locus of Control and Status Attainment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bensman, Miriam Roza; Haller, Archibald O.

    Utilizing data derived from 277 rural, male respondents initially enrolled in Lenawee County, Michigan high schools, the Rotter's Internal-External Locus of Control Scale was employed to test the hypothesis that locus of control will have interactive rather than additive effects on the process of status attainment. Locus of control was defined as…

  11. Genomic characterization of the Atlantic cod sex-locus

    PubMed Central

    Star, Bastiaan; Tørresen, Ole K.; Nederbragt, Alexander J.; Jakobsen, Kjetill S.; Pampoulie, Christophe; Jentoft, Sissel

    2016-01-01

    A variety of sex determination mechanisms can be observed in evolutionary divergent teleosts. Sex determination is genetic in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), however the genomic location or size of its sex-locus is unknown. Here, we characterize the sex-locus of Atlantic cod using whole genome sequence (WGS) data of 227 wild-caught specimens. Analyzing more than 55 million polymorphic loci, we identify 166 loci that are associated with sex. These loci are located in six distinct regions on five different linkage groups (LG) in the genome. The largest of these regions, an approximately 55 Kb region on LG11, contains the majority of genotypes that segregate closely according to a XX-XY system. Genotypes in this region can be used genetically determine sex, whereas those in the other regions are inconsistently sex-linked. The identified region on LG11 and its surrounding genes have no clear sequence homology with genes or regulatory elements associated with sex-determination or differentiation in other species. The functionality of this sex-locus therefore remains unknown. The WGS strategy used here proved adequate for detecting the small regions associated with sex in this species. Our results highlight the evolutionary flexibility in genomic architecture underlying teleost sex-determination and allow practical applications to genetically sex Atlantic cod. PMID:27499266

  12. Speaking rate effects on locus equation slope.

    PubMed

    Berry, Jeff; Weismer, Gary

    2013-11-01

    A locus equation describes a 1st order regression fit to a scatter of vowel steady-state frequency values predicting vowel onset frequency values. Locus equation coefficients are often interpreted as indices of coarticulation. Speaking rate variations with a constant consonant-vowel form are thought to induce changes in the degree of coarticulation. In the current work, the hypothesis that locus slope is a transparent index of coarticulation is examined through the analysis of acoustic samples of large-scale, nearly continuous variations in speaking rate. Following the methodological conventions for locus equation derivation, data pooled across ten vowels yield locus equation slopes that are mostly consistent with the hypothesis that locus equations vary systematically with coarticulation. Comparable analyses between different four-vowel pools reveal variations in the locus slope range and changes in locus slope sensitivity to rate change. Analyses across rate but within vowels are substantially less consistent with the locus hypothesis. Taken together, these findings suggest that the practice of vowel pooling exerts a non-negligible influence on locus outcomes. Results are discussed within the context of articulatory accounts of locus equations and the effects of speaking rate change.

  13. Identifying a novel locus for psoriatic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Budu-Aggrey, Ashley; Bowes, John

    2016-01-01

    A number of studies have identified genetic risk loci for PsA, the majority of which also confer risk for psoriasis. The stronger heritability of PsA in comparison with psoriasis suggests that there should be risk loci that are specific for PsA. Identifying such loci could potentially inform therapy development to provide more effective treatments for PsA patients, especially with a considerable proportion being non-responsive to current therapies. Evidence of a PsA-specific locus has been previously found at HLA-B27 within the MHC region. A recent study has provided evidence of non-HLA risk loci that are specific for PsA at IL23R, PTPN22 and on chromosome 5q31. Functional characterization of these loci will provide further understanding of the pathways underlying PsA, and enable us to apply genetic findings for patient benefit. PMID:26255310

  14. Locus ceruleus neurons in people with autism contain no histochemically-detectable mercury.

    PubMed

    Pamphlett, Roger; Kum Jew, Stephen

    2016-02-01

    Exposure to environmental mercury has been proposed to play a part in autism. Mercury is selectively taken up by the human locus ceruleus, a region of the brain that has been implicated in autism. We therefore looked for the presence of mercury in the locus ceruleus of people who had autism, using the histochemical technique of autometallography which can detect nanogram amounts of mercury in tissues. In addition, we sought evidence of damage to locus ceruleus neurons in autism by immunostaining for hyperphosphorylated tau. No mercury was found in any neurons of the locus ceruleus of 6 individuals with autism (5 male, 1 female, age range 16-48 years). Mercury was present in locus ceruleus neurons in 7 of 11 (64%) age-matched control individuals who did not have autism, which is significantly more than in individuals with autism. No increase in numbers of locus ceruleus neurons containing hyperphosphorylated tau was detected in people with autism. In conclusion, most people with autism have not been exposed early in life to quantities of mercury large enough to be found later in adult locus ceruleus neurons. Human locus ceruleus neurons are sensitive indicators of mercury exposure, and mercury appears to remain in these neurons indefinitely, so these findings do not support the hypothesis that mercury neurotoxicity plays a role in autism.

  15. Allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR at the p16INK4a locus.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Toshitsugu; Yuno, Miyuki; Fujii, Hodaka

    2016-07-28

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system has been adopted for a wide range of biological applications including genome editing. In some cases, dissection of genome functions requires allele-specific genome editing, but the use of CRISPR for this purpose has not been studied in detail. In this study, using the p16INK4a gene in HCT116 as a model locus, we investigated whether chromatin states, such as CpG methylation, or a single-nucleotide gap form in a target site can be exploited for allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR in vivo. First, we showed that allele-specific locus binding and genome editing could be achieved by targeting allele-specific CpG-methylated regions, which was successful for one, but not all guide RNAs. In this regard, molecular basis underlying the success remains elusive at this stage. Next, we demonstrated that an allele-specific single-nucleotide gap form could be employed for allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR, although it was important to avoid CRISPR tolerance of a single nucleotide mismatch brought about by mismatched base skipping. Our results provide information that might be useful for applications of CRISPR in studies of allele-specific functions in the genomes.

  16. Allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR at the p16INK4a locus

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Toshitsugu; Yuno, Miyuki; Fujii, Hodaka

    2016-01-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system has been adopted for a wide range of biological applications including genome editing. In some cases, dissection of genome functions requires allele-specific genome editing, but the use of CRISPR for this purpose has not been studied in detail. In this study, using the p16INK4a gene in HCT116 as a model locus, we investigated whether chromatin states, such as CpG methylation, or a single-nucleotide gap form in a target site can be exploited for allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR in vivo. First, we showed that allele-specific locus binding and genome editing could be achieved by targeting allele-specific CpG-methylated regions, which was successful for one, but not all guide RNAs. In this regard, molecular basis underlying the success remains elusive at this stage. Next, we demonstrated that an allele-specific single-nucleotide gap form could be employed for allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR, although it was important to avoid CRISPR tolerance of a single nucleotide mismatch brought about by mismatched base skipping. Our results provide information that might be useful for applications of CRISPR in studies of allele-specific functions in the genomes. PMID:27465215

  17. Construction of recombinant industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain with bglS gene insertion into PEP4 locus by homologous recombination*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiang; Chen, Qi-he; Fu, Ming-liang; Wang, Jin-ling; Zhang, Hong-bo; He, Guo-qing

    2008-01-01

    The bglS gene encoding endo-l,3-1,4-β-glucanase from Bacillus subtilis was cloned and sequenced in this study. The bglS expression cassette, including PGK1 promoter, bglS gene fused to the signal sequence of the yeast mating pheromone α-factor (MFα1S), and ADH1 terminator with G418-resistance as the selected marker, was constructed. Then one of the PEP4 allele of Saccharomyces cerevisiae WZ65 strain was replaced by bglS expression cassette using chromosomal integration of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-mediated homologous recombination, and the bglS gene was expressed simultaneously. The recombinant strain S. cerevisiae (SC-βG) was preliminarily screened by the clearing hydrolysis zone formed after the barley β-glucan was hydrolyzed in the plate and no proteinase A (PrA) activity was measured in fermenting liquor. The results of PCR analysis of genome DNA showed that one of the PEP4 allele had been replaced and bglS gene had been inserted into the locus of PEP4 gene in recombinant strains. Different endo-l,3-1,4-β-glucanase assay methods showed that the recombinant strain SC-βG had high endo-l,3-1,4-β-glucanase expression level with the maximum of 69.3 U/(h·ml) after 60 h of incubation. Meanwhile, the Congo Red method was suitable for the determination of endo-l,3-1,4-β-glucanase activity during the actual brewing process. The current research implies that the constructed yeast strain could be utilized to improve the industrial brewing property of beer. PMID:18600782

  18. Congenic mapping and sequence analysis of the Renin locus

    PubMed Central

    Flister, Michael J.; Hoffman, Matthew J.; Reddy, Prajwal; Jacob, Howard J.; Moreno, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Renin was the first blood pressure (BP) quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapped by linkage analysis in the rat. Subsequent BP linkage and congenic studies capturing different portions of the renin region have returned conflicting results, suggesting that multiple interdependent BP loci may be residing in the chromosome 13 BP QTL that includes Renin. We used SS-13BN congenic strains to map 2 BP loci in the Renin region (chr13:45.2–49.0 Mb). We identified a 1.1 Mb protective Brown Norway (BN) region around Renin (chr13:46.1–47.2 Mb) that significantly decreased BP by 32 mmHg. The Renin protective BP locus was offset by an adjacent hypertensive locus (chr13:47.2–49.0 Mb) that significantly increased BP by 29 mmHg. Sequence analysis of the protective and hypertensive BP loci revealed 1,433 and 2,063 variants between Dahl salt-sensitive/Mcwi (SS) and BN rats, respectively. To further reduce the list of candidate variants, we re-genotyped an overlapping SS-13SR congenic strain (S/renrr) with a previously reported BP phenotype. Sequence comparison between SS, Dahl R (SR), and BN reduced the number of candidate variants in the 2 BP loci by 42% for further study. Combined with previous studies, these data suggest that at least 4 BP loci reside within the 30 cM chromosome 13 BP QTL that includes Renin. PMID:23460292

  19. Transvection at the vestigial locus of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Coulthard, Alistair B; Nolan, Nadia; Bell, John B; Hilliker, Arthur J

    2005-08-01

    Transvection is a phenomenon wherein gene expression is effected by the interaction of alleles in trans and often results in partial complementation between mutant alleles. Transvection is dependent upon somatic pairing between homologous chromosome regions and is a form of interallelic complementation that does not occur at the polypeptide level. In this study we demonstrated that transvection could occur at the vestigial (vg) locus by revealing that partial complementation between two vg mutant alleles could be disrupted by changing the genomic location of the alleles through chromosome rearrangement. If chromosome rearrangements affect transvection by disrupting somatic pairing, then combining chromosome rearrangements that restore somatic pairing should restore transvection. We were able to restore partial complementation in numerous rearrangement trans-heterozygotes, thus providing substantial evidence that the observed complementation at vg results from a transvection effect. Cytological analyses revealed this transvection effect to have a large proximal critical region, a feature common to other transvection effects. In the Drosophila interphase nucleus, paired chromosome arms are separated into distinct, nonoverlapping domains. We propose that if the relative position of each arm in the nucleus is determined by the centromere as a relic of chromosome positions after the last mitotic division, then a locus will be displaced to a different territory of the interphase nucleus relative to its nonrearranged homolog by any rearrangement that links that locus to a different centromere. This physical displacement in the nucleus hinders transvection by disrupting the somatic pairing of homologous chromosomes and gives rise to proximal critical regions.

  20. Mapping genetic determinants of viral traits with FST and quantitative trait locus (QTL) approaches.

    PubMed

    Doumayrou, Juliette; Thébaud, Gaël; Vuillaume, Florence; Peterschmitt, Michel; Urbino, Cica

    2015-10-01

    The genetic determinism of viral traits can generally be dissected using either forward or reverse genetics because the clonal reproduction of viruses does not require the use of approaches based on laboratory crosses. Nevertheless, we hypothesized that recombinant viruses could be analyzed as sexually reproducing organisms, using either a quantitative trait loci (QTL) approach or a locus-by-locus fixation index (FST). Locus-by-locus FST analysis, and four different regressions and interval mapping algorithms of QTL analysis were applied to a phenotypic and genotypic dataset previously obtained from 47 artificial recombinant genomes generated between two begomovirus species. Both approaches assigned the determinant of within-host accumulation-previously identified using standard virology approaches-to a region including the 5׳ end of the replication-associated protein (Rep) gene and the upstream intergenic region. This study provides a proof of principle that QTL and population genetics tools can be extended to characterize the genetic determinants of viral traits.

  1. Factors Determining Adolescent Locus of Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopera-Frye, Karen F.; And Others

    Previous research has demonstrated an association between locus of control in adolescence and a successful transition to adulthood. Having an external locus of control has been implicated as an important factor in adolescent behaviors such as teenage pregnancy and delinquency, and has been found to be negatively related to school achievement. This…

  2. THE LOCUS COERULEUS AND CENTRAL CHEMOSENSITIVITY

    PubMed Central

    Gargaglioni, Luciane H.; Hartzler, Lynn K.; Putnam, Robert W.

    2010-01-01

    The locus coeruleus (LC) lies in the dorsal pons and supplies noradrenergic (NA) input to many regions of the brain, including respiratory control areas. The LC may provide tonic input for basal respiratory drive and is involved in central chemosensitivity since focal acidosis of the region stimulates ventilation and ablation reduces CO2-induced increased ventilation. The output of LC is modulated by both serotonergic and glutamatergic inputs. A large percentage of LC neurons are intrinsically activated by hypercapnia. This percentage and the magnitude of their response are highest in young neonates and decrease dramatically after postnatal day P10. The cellular bases for intrinsic chemosensitivity of LC neurons are comprised of multiple factors, primary among them being reduced extracellular and intracellular pH, which inhibit inwardly rectifying and voltage-gated K+ channels, and activate L-type Ca2+ channels. Activation of KCa channels in LC neurons may limit their ultimate response to hypercapnia. Finally, the LC mediates central chemosensitivity and contains pH-sensitive neurons in amphibians, suggesting that the LC has a long-standing phylogenetic role in respiratory control. PMID:20435170

  3. Hysteresis zone or locus - Aerodynamic of bulbous based bodies at low speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Covert, E. E.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental data are presented which seem to suggest that a well-defined hysteresis locus on bulbous based bodies at low speeds does not exist. Instead, if the experiment is repeated several times, the entire hysteresis region seems to fill with data rather than trace out a specific hysteresis locus. Data obtained on an oscillating model even at low reduced frequencies may be well defined but when applied to arbitrary motion lead to less accurate results than desired.

  4. Low Cost Upper Atmosphere Sounder (LOCUS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerber, Daniel; Swinyard, Bruce M.; Ellison, Brian N.; Aylward, Alan D.; Aruliah, Anasuya; Plane, John M. C.; Feng, Wuhu; Saunders, Christopher; Friend, Jonathan; Bird, Rachel; Linfield, Edmund H.; Davies, A. Giles; Parkes, Steve

    2014-05-01

    The Mesosphere - Lower Thermosphere region (MLT) is often quoted as being the least well known region of the atmosphere, meaning that measurements of this altitude range are sparser than for the neighbouring layers. The reason for this apparent lack of observations can be traced back to a combination of two facts - A) the MLT is ill suited for in-situ sampling on a global scale because the residual air drag is prohibitive for suborbital vehicles (rockets are traditionally used to sample the MLT region, but they only provide snapshot measurements both geographically, as well as temporally), and B) Some of the most important trace gases in the MLT have spectral emission lines in the THz range, a frequency band which has only just become accessible to conventional remote sensing technologies (i.e. passive heterodyne detection) thanks to ongoing technology development, but which still poses massive - often prohibitive - demands on the complexity, weight and power consumption of satellite borne remote sensing detectors. To mitigate the substantial power requirements of a Local Oscillator (LO) able to pump a heterodyne receiver at THZ frequencies, we are suggesting the use of Quantum Cascade Laser diodes (QCL). Combining a QCL LO with a sub-harmonic Schottky mixer in an integrated receiver system would allow us to build a THz passive heterodyne detector for atmospheric remote sensing that is both very compact and power efficient, and could therefore be built and launched much more cheaply than competitive systems. Many of the technologies required for such an instrument already exist at technology readiness levels (TRL) of 3-5. A consortium of RAL Space, University College London (UCL), University of Leeds, Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd (SSTL) and STAR-Dundee have been awarded a grant through the ESA In Orbit Demonstration Programme (IOD) to start developing an integrated, sub-harmonic heterodyne receiver with a QCL LO up to a TRL that would allow IOD hopefully in the

  5. Fine structure of the FMR-1 locus

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, D.L.; Eichler, E.E.; Richards, S.; Gibbs, R.A.

    1994-07-15

    The fragile X syndrome is due to a CGG triplet expansion in the first exon of FMR-1, resulting in hypermethylation and extinction of gene expression. To further understanding of the gene`s involvement in the syndrome, we have determined the physical structure of this locus. A high resolution restriction map of cosmids from the region has been prepared encompassing approximately 50 kb. Using exon-exon PCR and restriction analysis, the FMR-1 gene has been determined to consist of 17 exons spanning 38 kb of Xq27.3. Each intron-exon boundary has been sequenced. In general, the splice donors and acceptors located in the 5{prime} portion of the gene demonstrate greater adherence to consensus than those in the 3{prime} end, providing a possible explanation for the finding of alternative splicing in FMR-1. Sequence analysis of the region immediately flanking the CGG triplet repeat demonstrated both tetranucleotide and dinucleotide repeats. Additional sequence is being obtained from the overlapping cosmids spanning the gene, and extending 20 kb proximal and approximately 30 kb distal as part of a larger project to determine sequence on the megabase scale in the Xq27.3-q28 region. These sequences are being characterized from normal and affected individuals to assess polymorphisms and the role (if any) of peculiar sequences in the generation of fragile X CGG instability. The elucidation of the structure and composition of the FMR-1 gene as well as its flanking region will enhance detection of other mutations possible in fragile X phenocopy individuals.

  6. Integration of genetic and physical maps of the Primula vulgaris S locus and localization by chromosome in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinhong; Webster, Margaret A; Wright, Jonathan; Cocker, Jonathan M; Smith, Matthew C; Badakshi, Farah; Heslop-Harrison, Pat; Gilmartin, Philip M

    2015-10-01

    Heteromorphic flower development in Primula is controlled by the S locus. The S locus genes, which control anther position, pistil length and pollen size in pin and thrum flowers, have not yet been characterized. We have integrated S-linked genes, marker sequences and mutant phenotypes to create a map of the P. vulgaris S locus region that will facilitate the identification of key S locus genes. We have generated, sequenced and annotated BAC sequences spanning the S locus, and identified its chromosomal location. We have employed a combination of classical genetics and three-point crosses with molecular genetic analysis of recombinants to generate the map. We have characterized this region by Illumina sequencing and bioinformatic analysis, together with chromosome in situ hybridization. We present an integrated genetic and physical map across the P. vulgaris S locus flanked by phenotypic and DNA sequence markers. BAC contigs encompass a 1.5-Mb genomic region with 1 Mb of sequence containing 82 S-linked genes anchored to overlapping BACs. The S locus is located close to the centromere of the largest metacentric chromosome pair. These data will facilitate the identification of the genes that orchestrate heterostyly in Primula and enable evolutionary analyses of the S locus.

  7. The X-linked F cell production locus: Genetic mapping and role in fetal hemoglobin production

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.C.; Smith, K.D.; Moore, R.D.

    1994-09-01

    Postnatal fetal hemoglobin (Hb F) production is confined to a subset of erythocytes termed F-cells. There is a 10-20 fold variation in F-cell production in sickle cell disease (SCD) and normal individuals. Most of the variation in F-cell production has been attributed to a diallelic (High, Low) X-linked gene, the F-cell production (FCP) locus that we recently mapped to Xp22.2-22.3 (LOD=4.56, theta=0.04). Using multiple regression analysis in 262 Jamaican SCD patients we determined the relative contribution of the FCP locus and other variables previously associated with variation in Hb F level (gender, age, beta-globin haplotypes, number of alpha-globin genes and the FCP locus phenotypes). When the FCP locus is in the regression model, the FCP locus alone accounts for approximately 40% of the variation in Hb F level while the contribution of age, alpha-globin gene number, and beta-globin haplotypes was insignificant. When individuals with High FCP allele are removed from the analysis, the beta globin haplotype now contribute to >10% of the Hb F variation. We conclude that the X-linked FCP locus is the major determinant of all known variables in Hb F production. Using 4 highly polymorphic dinucleotide repeat markers that we identified from cosmids in Xp22.2-22.3, have localized the FCP locus to a 1 Mb minimal candidate region between DXS143 and DXS410.

  8. Comparative mapping reveals partial conservation of synteny at the apomixis locus in Paspalum spp.

    PubMed

    Pupilli, F; Martinez, E J; Busti, A; Calderini, O; Quarin, C L; Arcioni, S

    2004-01-01

    In plants, gametophytic apomixis is a form of asexual reproduction that leads to the formation of seed-derived offspring that are genetically identical to the mother plant. A common set of RFLP markers, including five rice anchor markers previously shown to be linked to apomixis in Paspalum simplex, were used to detect linkage with apomixis in P. notatum and P. malacophyllum. A comparative map of the region around the apomixis locus was constructed for the three Paspalum species, and compared to the rice map. The locus that controls apomixis in P. simplex was almost completely conserved in the closely related species P. malacophyllum, whereas it was only partially represented in the distantly related species P. notatum. Although strong synteny of markers was noted between this locus and a portion of rice chromosome 12 in both P. simplex and P. malacophyllum, the same locus in P. notatum was localized to a hybrid chromosome which carries markers that map to rice chromosomes 2 and 12. All three Paspalum species showed recombination suppression at the apomixis locus; in the case of P. notatum, this might be due to a heterozygosity for a translocation that most probably negatively interferes with chromosomal pairing near the locus. A common set of markers that show linkage with apomixis in all three Paspalum species define a portion of the apomixis-controlling locus that is likely to contain genes critical for apomictic reproduction.

  9. Characterization of frequently deleted 6q locus in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mei; Srikantan, Vasantha; Ma, Lanfeng; Li, Jia; Zhang, Wei; Petrovics, Gyorgy; Makarem, Mazen; Strovel, Jeffrey W; Horrigan, Stephen G; Augustus, Meena; Sesterhenn, Isabell A; Moul, Judd W; Chandrasekharappa, Settara; Zou, Zhiqiang; Srivastava, Shiv

    2006-11-01

    The long arm of chromosome 6 is frequently deleted in diverse human neoplasms. Our previous study showed a minimum deletion region between markers D6S1056 and D6S300 on chromosome 6q in primary prostate cancer (CaP). In this study, we further refined a 200-kb minimal region of deletion (6qTSG1) centered around D6S1013 marker. The 6qTSG1 transcripts contained complex multiple splicing variants with low or absent expression in CaP cells. None of the transcripts identified contained open reading frames that code for a protein in the NCBI database. The expression of 6qTSG transcripts revealed interesting hormonal regulation relevant to CaP biology. Expression of 6q TSG transcript was induced in LNCaP cells that were cultured in charcoal-stripped serum medium suggesting an upregulation of 6qTSG transcript by androgen ablation and cell growth inhibition/apoptosis. Induction of 6qTSG1 expression in response to androgen ablation was abrogated in androgen-independent derivatives of LNCaP cells. In summary, we have defined a candidate CaP suppressor locus on chromosome 6q16.1, and deletions of this locus are frequently associated with prostate tumorigenesis. In the light of emerging role of noncoding RNAs in cancer biology including CaP, future investigations of 6qTSG11 locus is warranted.

  10. The immunoglobulin heavy chain locus in the reptile Anolis carolinensis.

    PubMed

    Gambón Deza, Francisco; Sánchez Espinel, Christian; Magadán Mompó, Susana

    2009-05-01

    We describe the entire immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) locus from the reptile Anolis carolinensis. The heavy chain constant (C(H)) region includes C mu, C delta and C upsilon genes. This is the first description of a C upsilon gene in the reptilian class. Variable (V(H)), diversity (D(H)) and joining (J(H)) genes are located 5' from the constant (C(H)) chain complex locus. The C mu and C upsilon genes encode antibodies with four immunoglobulin domains. The C delta gene encoded an 11 domain delta heavy chain as in Eublepharis macularius. Seventy V(H) genes, belonging to 28 families, were identified, and they can be sorted into five broader groups. The similarity of the organization of the reptilian genes with those of amphibians and mammals suggests the existence of a process of heavy chain genomic reorganization before the radiation of tetrapod vertebrates.

  11. A locus affecting nucleoid segregation in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, M B

    1990-01-01

    Thirteen temperature-sensitive lethal mutations of Salmonella typhimurium map near metC at 65 min and form the clmF (conditional lethal mutation) locus. The mutations in this region were ordered by three-point transduction crosses. After a shift to the nonpermissive temperature, many of these clmF mutants failed to complete the segregation of nucleoids into daughter cells; daughter nucleoids appeared incompletely separated and asymmetrically positioned within cells. Some clmF mutants showed instability of F' episomes at permissive growth temperatures yet showed no detectable defect with smaller multicopy plasmids such as pSC101 or pBR322. In addition, many of the clmF mutants rapidly lost viability yet continued DNA replication at the nonpermissive temperature. These results suggest that the clmF locus encodes at least one indispensable gene product that is required for faithful partitioning of the bacterial nucleoid and F-plasmid replicons. Images PMID:2203751

  12. Homozygosity mapping of the locus responsible for renal tubular dysplasia of cattle on bovine chromosome 1.

    PubMed

    Ohba, Y; Kitagawa, H; Kitoh, K; Asahina, S; Nishimori, K; Yoneda, K; Kunieda, T; Sasaki, Y

    2000-04-01

    Renal tubular dysplasia is a hereditary disease of Japanese black cattle showing renal failure and growth retardation with an autosomal recessive trait. In the present study, we mapped the locus responsible for the disease (RTD) by linkage analysis with an inbred paternal half-sib pedigree obtained from commercial herds. By analyzing segregation of microsatellite markers in the half-sibs, significant linkage was observed between the RTD locus and markers on bovine Chromosome (Chr) 1 with the highest lod score of 11.4. Homozygosity mapping with the inbred pedigree further defined the localization of the RTD locus in a 4-cM region between microsatellite markers BMS4003 and INRA119. Mapping of the RTD locus on bovine Chr 1 will facilitate cloning and characterization of the gene responsible for this disease.

  13. A novel locus for split-hand/foot malformation associated with tibial hemimelia (SHFLD syndrome) maps to chromosome region 17p13.1-17p13.3.

    PubMed

    Lezirovitz, Karina; Maestrelli, Sylvia Regina Pedrosa; Cotrim, Nelson Henderson; Otto, Paulo A; Pearson, Peter L; Mingroni-Netto, Regina Celia

    2008-07-01

    Split-hand/foot malformation (SHFM) associated with aplasia of long bones, SHFLD syndrome or Tibial hemimelia-ectrodactyly syndrome is a rare condition with autosomal dominant inheritance, reduced penetrance and an incidence estimated to be about 1 in 1,000,000 liveborns. To date, three chromosomal regions have been reported as strong candidates for harboring SHFLD syndrome genes: 1q42.2-q43, 6q14.1 and 2q14.2. We characterized the phenotype of nine affected individuals from a large family with the aim of mapping the causative gene. Among the nine affected patients, four had only SHFM of the hands and no tibial defects, three had both defects and two had only unilateral tibial hemimelia. In keeping with previous publications of this and other families, there was clear evidence of both variable expression and incomplete penetrance, the latter bearing hallmarks of anticipation. Segregation analysis and multipoint Lod scores calculations (maximum Lod score of 5.03 using the LINKMAP software) using all potentially informative family members, both affected and unaffected, identified the chromosomal region 17p13.1-17p13.3 as the best and only candidate for harboring a novel mutated gene responsible for the syndrome in this family. The candidate gene CRK located within this region was sequenced but no pathogenic mutation was detected.

  14. Isolation of Alcohol Dehydrogenase cDNA and Basal Regulatory Region from Metroxylon sagu

    PubMed Central

    Wee, Ching Ching; Roslan, Hairul Azman

    2012-01-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) is a versatile enzyme involved in many biochemical pathways in plants such as in germination and stress tolerance. Sago palm is plant with much importance to the state of Sarawak as one of the most important crops that bring revenue with the advantage of being able to withstand various biotic and abiotic stresses such as heat, pathogens, and water logging. Here we report the isolation of sago palm Adh cDNA and its putative promoter region via the use of rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) and genomic walking. The isolated cDNA was characterized and determined to be 1464 bp long encoding for 380 amino acids. BLAST analysis showed that the Adh is similar to the Adh1 group with 91% and 85% homology with Elaeis guineensis and Washingtonia robusta, respectively. The putative basal msAdh1 regulatory region was further determined to contain promoter signals of TATA and AGGA boxes and predicted amino acids analyses showed several Adh-specific motifs such as the two zinc-binding domains that bind to the adenosine ribose of the coenzyme and binding to alcohol substrate. A phylogenetic tree was also constructed using the predicted amino acid showed clear separation of Adh from bacteria and clustered within the plant Adh group. PMID:27335670

  15. Complex evolution of a highly conserved microsatellite locus in several fish species.

    PubMed

    Liu, J-X; Ely, B

    2009-08-01

    The evolutionary dynamics of a highly conserved microsatellite locus (Dla 11) were studied in several fish species. The data indicated that multiple types of compound microsatellites arose through point mutations that were sometimes followed by expansion of the derived motif. Furthermore, extensive length variation was detected among species in the regions immediately flanking the repeat region.

  16. Molecular characterization of the S locus in two self-incompatible Brassica napus lines.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, K; Schafer, U; Glavin, T L; Goring, D R; Rothstein, S J

    1996-01-01

    In Brassica species, self-incompatibility has been mapped genetically to a single chromosomal location. In this region, there are two closely linked genes coding for the S locus glycoprotein (SLG) and S locus receptor kinase (SRK). They appear to comprise the pistil component of the self-incompatibility reaction. SLG and SRK are thought to recognize an unknown pollen component on the incompatible pollen, and the gene encoding this pollen component must also be linked to the SLG and SRK genes. To further our understanding of self-incompatibility, the chromosomal region carrying the SLG and SRK genes has been studied. The physical region between the SLG-910 and the SRK-910 genes in the Brassica napus W1 line was cloned, and a search for genes expressed in the anther revealed two additional S locus genes located downstream of the SLG-910 gene. Because these two genes are novel and are conserved at other S alleles, we designated them as SLL1 and SLL2 (for S locus-linked genes 1 and 2, respectively). The SLL1 gene is S locus specific, whereas the SLL2 gene is not only present at the S locus but is also present in other parts of the genomes in both self-incompatible and self-compatible Brassica ssp lines. Expression of the SLL1 gene is only detectable in anthers of self-incompatible plants and is developmentally regulated during anther development, whereas the SLL2 gene is expressed in anthers and stigmas in both self-incompatible and self-compatible plants, with the highest levels of expression occurring in the stigmas. Although SLL1 and SLL2 are linked to the S locus region, it is not clear whether these genes function in self-incompatibility or serve some other cellular roles in pollen-pistil functions. PMID:8989888

  17. Molecular Identification of the Schwannomatosis Locus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    AD Award Number: DAMD17-03-1-0445 TITLE: Molecular Identification of the Schwannomatosis Locus PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Mia M. MacCollin, M.D...NUMBER Molecular Identification of the Schwannomatosis Locus 5b. GRANT NUMBER DAMD17-03-1-0445 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER...can be found on next page. 15. SUBJECT TERMS schwannomatosis, tumor suppressor gene, NF2, molecular genetics 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17

  18. The SCL gene is formed from a transcriptionally complex locus.

    PubMed Central

    Aplan, P D; Begley, C G; Bertness, V; Nussmeier, M; Ezquerra, A; Coligan, J; Kirsch, I R

    1990-01-01

    We describe the structural organization of the human SCL gene, a helix-loop-helix family member which we believe plays a fundamental role in hematopoietic differentiation. The SCL locus is composed of eight exons distributed over 16 kb. SCL shows a pattern of expression quite restricted to early hematopoietic tissues, although in malignant states expression of the gene may be somewhat extended into later developmental stages. A detailed analysis of the transcript(s) arising from the SCL locus revealed that (i) the 5' noncoding portion of the SCL transcript, which resides within a CpG island, has a complex pattern of alternative exon utilization as well as two distinct transcription initiation sites; (ii) the 5' portions of the SCL transcript contain features that suggest a possible regulatory role for these segments; (iii) the pattern of utilization of the 5' exons is cell lineage dependent; and (iv) all of the currently studied chromosomal aberrations that affect the SCL locus either structurally or functionally eliminate the normal 5' transcription initiation sites. These data suggest that the SCL gene, and specifically its 5' region, may be a target for regulatory interactions during early hematopoietic development. Images PMID:2247063

  19. Increased cerebral blood flow during hypercapnia is not affected by lesion of the nucleus locus ceruleus

    SciTech Connect

    Harik, S.I.; Prado, R.; Busto, R.; Ginsberg, M.D.

    1986-11-01

    To test the hypothesis that the putative noradrenergic innervation of intraparenchymal cerebral blood vessels from the nucleus locus ceruleus mediates the vasodilatory response to hypercapnia, regional cerebral blood flow was measured by iodo-(/sup 14/C)antipyrine autoradiography in awake and restrained rats with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion of the nucleus locus ceruleus and in unlesioned control rats. Hypercapnia, induced by the inhalation of 5% or 8% CO/sub 2/ in air for 8 minutes caused a 2 to 5-fold increase in regional cerebral blood flow. However, despite a marked reduction of about 90% in cortical norepinephrine levels ipsilateral to the lesion, blood flow to the frontal and parietal cortex, hippocampus, striatum and cerebellum increased to the same extent in ipsilateral and contralateral regions. Thus, lesion of the locus ceruleus and the resultant depletion of endogenous cortical and hippocampal norepinephrine, does not influence the cerebrovascular response to hypercapnia.

  20. Comparative mapping of the Grpr locus on the X chromosomes of man and mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Maslen, G.Ll.; Boyd, Y. )

    1993-07-01

    The gastrin-releasing peptide receptor has been previously cloned from both humans and mice. The authors have mapped the mouse gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (Grpr) locus using a polymorphic CA[sub n] repeat located in the 5[prime] untranslated region of the gene and a Mus spretus/Mus musculus interspecific backcross. The Grpr locus mapped between the Pdha-1 and Amg loci on the mouse X chromosome. Studies in man indicate that GRPR maps to the Xp21.2-p22.3 region of the human X chromosome and not to the Xp11-q11 interval as previously reported. The assignment of the GRPR locus to the distal Xp region is supported by the comparative map position in the mouse. 25 refs., 3 figs.

  1. The immunoglobulin heavy chain locus in the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus).

    PubMed

    Gambón-Deza, F; Sánchez-Espinel, C; Magadán-Mompó, S

    2009-08-01

    Immunoglobulins loci in mammals are well known to be organized within a translocon, however their origin remains unresolved. Four of the five classes of immunoglobulins described in humans and rodents (immunoglobulins M, G, E and A-IgM, IgG, IgE and IgA) were found in marsupials and monotremes (immunoglobulin D-IgD was not found) thus showing that the genomic structure of antibodies in mammals has remained constant since its origin. We have recently described the genomic organization of the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus in reptiles (IGHM, IGHD and IGHY). These data and the characterization of the IGH locus in platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus), allow us to elucidate the changes that took place in this genomic region during evolution from reptile to mammal. Thus, by using available genome data, we were able to detect that platypus IGH locus contains reptilian and mammalian genes. Besides having an IGHD that is very similar to the one in reptiles and an IGHY, they also present the mammal specific antibody genes IGHG and IGHE, in addition to IGHA. We also detected a pseudogene that originated by recombination between the IGHD and the IGHM (similar to the IGHD2 found in Eublepharis macularius). The analysis of the IGH locus in platypus shows that IGHY was duplicated, firstly by evolving into IGHE and then into IGHG. The IGHA of the platypus has a complex origin, and probably arose by a process of recombination between the IGHM and the IGHY. We detected about 44 VH genes (25 were already described), most of which comprise a single group. When we compared these VH genes with those described in Anolis carolinensis, we find that there is an evolutionary relationship between the VH genes of platypus and the reptilian Group III genes. These results suggest that a fast VH turnover took place in platypus and this gave rise to a family with a high VH gene number and the disappearance of the earlier VH families.

  2. Genome-wide association study and mouse expression data identify a highly conserved 32 kb intergenic region between WNT3 and WNT9b as possible susceptibility locus for isolated classic exstrophy of the bladder.

    PubMed

    Reutter, Heiko; Draaken, Markus; Pennimpede, Tracie; Wittler, Lars; Brockschmidt, Felix F; Ebert, Anne-Karolin; Bartels, Enrika; Rösch, Wolfgang; Boemers, Thomas M; Hirsch, Karin; Schmiedeke, Eberhard; Meesters, Christian; Becker, Tim; Stein, Raimund; Utsch, Boris; Mangold, Elisabeth; Nordenskjöld, Agneta; Barker, Gillian; Kockum, Christina Clementsson; Zwink, Nadine; Holmdahl, Gundula; Läckgren, Göran; Jenetzky, Ekkehart; Feitz, Wouter F J; Marcelis, Carlo; Wijers, Charlotte H W; Van Rooij, Iris A L M; Gearhart, John P; Herrmann, Bernhard G; Ludwig, Michael; Boyadjiev, Simeon A; Nöthen, Markus M; Mattheisen, Manuel

    2014-10-15

    Bladder exstrophy-epispadias complex (BEEC), the severe end of the urorectal malformation spectrum, has a profound impact on continence as well as sexual and renal functions. It is widely accepted that for the majority of cases the genetic basis appears to be multifactorial. Here, we report the first study which utilizes genome-wide association methods to analyze a cohort comprising patients presenting the most common BEEC form, classic bladder exstrophy (CBE), to identify common variation associated with risk for isolated CBE. We employed discovery and follow-up samples comprising 218 cases/865 controls and 78 trios in total, all of European descent. Our discovery sample identified a marker near SALL1, showing genome-wide significant association with CBE. However, analyses performed on follow-up samples did not add further support to these findings. We were also able to identify an association with CBE across our study samples (discovery: P = 8.88 × 10(-5); follow-up: P = 0.0025; combined: 1.09 × 10(-6)) in a highly conserved 32 kb intergenic region containing regulatory elements between WNT3 and WNT9B. Subsequent analyses in mice revealed expression for both genes in the genital region during stages relevant to the development of CBE in humans. Unfortunately, we were not able to replicate the suggestive signal for WNT3 and WNT9B in a sample that was enriched for non-CBE BEEC cases (P = 0.51). Our suggestive findings support the hypothesis that larger samples are warranted to identify association of common variation with CBE.

  3. Adaptation of maize to temperate climates: mid-density genome-wide association genetics and diversity patterns reveal key genomic regions, with a major contribution of the Vgt2 (ZCN8) locus.

    PubMed

    Bouchet, Sophie; Servin, Bertrand; Bertin, Pascal; Madur, Delphine; Combes, Valérie; Dumas, Fabrice; Brunel, Dominique; Laborde, Jacques; Charcosset, Alain; Nicolas, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    The migration of maize from tropical to temperate climates was accompanied by a dramatic evolution in flowering time. To gain insight into the genetic architecture of this adaptive trait, we conducted a 50K SNP-based genome-wide association and diversity investigation on a panel of tropical and temperate American and European representatives. Eighteen genomic regions were associated with flowering time. The number of early alleles cumulated along these regions was highly correlated with flowering time. Polymorphism in the vicinity of the ZCN8 gene, which is the closest maize homologue to Arabidopsis major flowering time (FT) gene, had the strongest effect. This polymorphism is in the vicinity of the causal factor of Vgt2 QTL. Diversity was lower, whereas differentiation and LD were higher for associated loci compared to the rest of the genome, which is consistent with selection acting on flowering time during maize migration. Selection tests also revealed supplementary loci that were highly differentiated among groups and not associated with flowering time in our panel, whereas they were in other linkage-based studies. This suggests that allele fixation led to a lack of statistical power when structure and relatedness were taken into account in a linear mixed model. Complementary designs and analysis methods are necessary to unravel the architecture of complex traits. Based on linkage disequilibrium (LD) estimates corrected for population structure, we concluded that the number of SNPs genotyped should be at least doubled to capture all QTLs contributing to the genetic architecture of polygenic traits in this panel. These results show that maize flowering time is controlled by numerous QTLs of small additive effect and that strong polygenic selection occurred under cool climatic conditions. They should contribute to more efficient genomic predictions of flowering time and facilitate the dissemination of diverse maize genetic resources under a wide range of

  4. Adaptation of Maize to Temperate Climates: Mid-Density Genome-Wide Association Genetics and Diversity Patterns Reveal Key Genomic Regions, with a Major Contribution of the Vgt2 (ZCN8) Locus

    PubMed Central

    Bouchet, Sophie; Servin, Bertrand; Bertin, Pascal; Madur, Delphine; Combes, Valérie; Dumas, Fabrice; Brunel, Dominique; Laborde, Jacques; Charcosset, Alain; Nicolas, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    The migration of maize from tropical to temperate climates was accompanied by a dramatic evolution in flowering time. To gain insight into the genetic architecture of this adaptive trait, we conducted a 50K SNP-based genome-wide association and diversity investigation on a panel of tropical and temperate American and European representatives. Eighteen genomic regions were associated with flowering time. The number of early alleles cumulated along these regions was highly correlated with flowering time. Polymorphism in the vicinity of the ZCN8 gene, which is the closest maize homologue to Arabidopsis major flowering time (FT) gene, had the strongest effect. This polymorphism is in the vicinity of the causal factor of Vgt2 QTL. Diversity was lower, whereas differentiation and LD were higher for associated loci compared to the rest of the genome, which is consistent with selection acting on flowering time during maize migration. Selection tests also revealed supplementary loci that were highly differentiated among groups and not associated with flowering time in our panel, whereas they were in other linkage-based studies. This suggests that allele fixation led to a lack of statistical power when structure and relatedness were taken into account in a linear mixed model. Complementary designs and analysis methods are necessary to unravel the architecture of complex traits. Based on linkage disequilibrium (LD) estimates corrected for population structure, we concluded that the number of SNPs genotyped should be at least doubled to capture all QTLs contributing to the genetic architecture of polygenic traits in this panel. These results show that maize flowering time is controlled by numerous QTLs of small additive effect and that strong polygenic selection occurred under cool climatic conditions. They should contribute to more efficient genomic predictions of flowering time and facilitate the dissemination of diverse maize genetic resources under a wide range of

  5. Isolation of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), a NF-E2-like basic leucine zipper transcriptional activator that binds to the tandem NF-E2/AP1 repeat of the beta-globin locus control region.

    PubMed Central

    Moi, P; Chan, K; Asunis, I; Cao, A; Kan, Y W

    1994-01-01

    Hypersensitive site 2 located in the beta-globin locus control region confers high levels of expression to the genes of the beta-globin cluster. A tandem repeat of the consensus sequence for the transcription factors AP1 and NF-E2 (activating protein 1 and nuclear factor erythroid 2, respectively) is present within hypersensitive site 2 and is absolutely required for strong enhancer activity. This sequence binds, in vitro and in vivo, to ubiquitous proteins of the AP1 family and to the recently cloned erythroid-specific transcription factor NF-E2. Using the tandem repeat as a recognition site probe to screen a lambda gt11 cDNA expression library from K562 cells, we isolated several DNA binding proteins. Here, we report the characterization of one of the clones isolated. The gene, which we named Nrf2 (NF-E2-related factor 2), is encoded within a 2.2-kb transcript and predicts a 66-kDa protein with a basic leucine zipper DNA binding domain highly homologous to that of NF-E2. Although Nrf2 is expressed ubiquitously, a role of this protein in mediating enhancer activity of hypersensitive site 2 in erythroid cells cannot be excluded. In this respect, Nrf2 contains a powerful acidic activation domain that may participate in the transcriptional stimulation of beta-globin genes. Images PMID:7937919

  6. Content and organization of the human Ig VH locus: definition of three new VH families and linkage to the Ig CH locus.

    PubMed Central

    Berman, J E; Mellis, S J; Pollock, R; Smith, C L; Suh, H; Heinke, B; Kowal, C; Surti, U; Chess, L; Cantor, C R

    1988-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the content and organization of the human immunoglobulin VH locus. Human VH genes representing five distinct families were isolated, including novel members belonging to two out of three of the known VH gene families (VH1 and VH3) as well as members of three new families (VH4, VH5, and VH6). We report the nucleotide sequence of 21 novel human VH genes, many of which belong to the three new VH gene families. In addition, we provide a preliminary analysis of the organization of these gene segments over the full extent of the locus. We find that the five multi-segment families (VH1-5) have members interspersed over nearly the full 1500-2000 kb of the VH locus, and estimate that the entire heavy chain locus covers 2500 kb or less. Finally, we provide the first report of the physical linkage of the variable and constant loci of a human Ig gene family by demonstrating that the most proximal known human VH segments lie within 100 kb of the constant region locus. Images PMID:3396540

  7. Forum domain in Drosophila melanogaster cut locus possesses looped domains inside.

    PubMed

    Tchurikov, N A; Krasnov, A N; Ponomarenko, N A; Golova, Y B; Chernov, B K

    1998-07-01

    We have studied the relationship between chromosomal forum domains and looped domains in the cut locus of Drosophila melanogaster . Forum domains were earlier detected by separation in pulsed-field gels of 50-150 kb chromosomal DNA fragments obtained after spontaneous non-random degradation of chromosomes. We have localized the boundary region where cleavage sites are scattered between two forum domains in the regulatory region of the cut locus. We have sequenced a 13 kb region spanning few kilobases from distal domain, the boundary region and part of the proximal forum domain where several scaffold associated regions (SARs) were observed. We conclude that forum domains and looped domains are physically different types of domains and belong to different levels of organization in eukaryotic chromosomes. The boundary region between the neighboring forum domains in the cut locus possesses the Doc element insertion and a micro-satellite stretch and thus might remind a small island of heterochromatin and correspond to so-called intercalary heterochromatin that is known to be located in the 7B1-2 band where the major part of the cut locus is reside.

  8. The locus for bovine dilated cardiomyopathy maps to chromosome 18.

    PubMed

    Guziewicz, K E; Owczarek-Lipska, M; Küffer, J; Schelling, C; Tontis, A; Denis, C; Eggen, A; Leeb, T; Dolf, G; Braunschweig, M H

    2007-06-01

    Bovine dilated cardiomyopathy (BDCMP) is a severe and terminal disease of the heart muscle observed in Holstein-Friesian cattle over the last 30 years. There is strong evidence for an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance for BDCMP. The objective of this study was to genetically map BDCMP, with the ultimate goal of identifying the causative mutation. A whole-genome scan using 199 microsatellite markers and one SNP revealed an assignment of BDCMP to BTA18. Fine-mapping on BTA18 refined the candidate region to the MSBDCMP06-BMS2785 interval. The interval containing the BDCMP locus was confirmed by multipoint linkage analysis using the software loki. The interval is about 6.7 Mb on the bovine genome sequence (Btau 3.1). The corresponding region of HSA19 is very gene-rich and contains roughly 200 genes. Although telomeric of the marker interval, TNNI3 is a possible positional and a functional candidate for BDCMP given its involvement in a human form of dilated cardiomyopathy. Sequence analysis of TNNI3 in cattle revealed no mutation in the coding sequence, but there was a G-to-A transition in intron 6 (AJ842179:c.378+315G>A). The analysis of this SNP using the study's BDCMP pedigree did not conclusively exclude TNNI3 as a candidate gene for BDCMP. Considering the high density of genes on the homologous region of HSA19, further refinement of the interval on BTA18 containing the BDCMP locus is needed.

  9. The Locus Coeruleus: Essential for Maintaining Cognitive Function and the Aging Brain

    PubMed Central

    Mather, Mara; Harley, Carolyn W.

    2016-01-01

    Research on cognitive aging has focused on how decline in various cortical and hippocampal regions influence cognition. However, brainstem regions play essential modulatory roles, and new evidence suggests that among these, the integrity of the locus coeruleus-norepinephrine system plays a key role in determining late life cognitive abilities. The locus coeruleus is especially vulnerable to toxins and infection and is often the first place Alzheimer’s related pathology appears, with most people showing at least some tau pathology by their mid-twenties. On the other hand, norepinephrine released from the locus coeruleus during arousing, mentally challenging or novel situations helps protect neurons from damage, which may help explain how education and engaging careers prevent cognitive decline in later years. PMID:26895736

  10. Haplotype mapping of the bronchiolitis susceptibility locus near IL8.

    PubMed

    Hull, Jeremy; Rowlands, Kate; Lockhart, Elizabeth; Sharland, Mike; Moore, Catrin; Hanchard, Neil; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P

    2004-02-01

    Susceptibility to viral bronchiolitis, the commonest cause of infant admissions to hospital in the industrialised world, is associated with polymorphism at the IL8 locus. Here we map the genomic boundaries of the disease association by case-control analysis and TDT in 580 affected UK infants. Markers for association mapping were chosen after determining patterns of linkage disequilibrium across the surrounding region of chromosome 4q, a 550-kb segment containing nine genes, extending from AFP to PPBP. The region has three major clusters of high linkage disequilibrium and is notable for its low haplotypic diversity. We exclude adjacent chemokine genes as the cause of the association, and identify a disease-associated haplotype that spans a 250-kb region from AFM to IL8. In between these two genes there is only one structural feature of interest, a novel gene RASSF6, which is predicted to encode a Ras effector protein.

  11. Molecular characterization of the mouse agouti locus.

    PubMed

    Bultman, S J; Michaud, E J; Woychik, R P

    1992-12-24

    The agouti (a) locus acts within the microenvironment of the hair follicle to regulate coat color pigmentation in the mouse. We have characterized a gene encoding a novel 131 amino acid protein that we propose is the one gene associated with the agouti locus. This gene is normally expressed in a manner consistent with a locus function, and, more importantly, its structure and expression are affected by a number of representative alleles in the agouti dominance hierarchy. In addition, we found that the pleiotropic effects associated with the lethal yellow (Ay) mutation, which include pronounced obesity, diabetes, and the development of neoplasms, are accompanied by deregulated overexpression of the agouti gene in numerous tissues of the adult animal.

  12. Autosomal dominant ataxia: Genetic evidence for locus heterogeneity from a cuban founder-effect population

    PubMed Central

    Auburger, Georg; Diaz, Guillermo Orozco; Capote, Raul Ferreira; Sanchez, Suzana Gispert; Perez, Marta Paradoa; del Cueto, Marianela Estrada; Meneses, Mirna Garcia; Farrall, Martin; Williamson, Robert; Chamberlain, Susan; Baute, Luis Heredero

    1990-01-01

    The locus for autosomal dominant ataxia with a diagnosis of olivo-ponto-cerebellar atrophy at autopsy has been previously assigned to chromosome 6p. However, evidence for two alternative locations has been reported. We have recently described a large potential founder-effect population of such patients in the Holguin province of Cuba. With an estimated 1,000 patients available for analysis, this extensive cluster of families provides a unique opportunity for the definitive localization of the genetic mutation. Linkage analysis between the disease locus in this population and markers within and flanking the HLA region on chromosome 6 were undertaken in 12 families comprising over 100 affected individuals. Despite similarity in the clinical phenotype between those families where the disease locus has been reported to be linked to the HLA locus and the Cuban patients, no evidence of linkage to this region could be demonstrated in the latter. The disease locus was excluded from a 96-cM genetic interval of the short arm of chromosome 6, encompassing the F13A1–HLA–GLO1–MUT/D6S4 loci. These data strongly support the existence of genetic heterogeneity for the disease. PMID:1971152

  13. Efferent projections of nucleus locus coeruleus: topographic organization of cells of origin demonstrated by three-dimensional reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Loughlin, S E; Foote, S L; Bloom, F E

    1986-06-01

    The present study examines the spatial distribution within rat locus coeruleus of neurons projecting to particular brain regions. In order to accurately recreate, in digital and pictorial formats, the spatial distribution of neurons for the entire nucleus locus coeruleus, three-dimensional reconstructions were created which specified the location of each individual Nissl-stained locus coeruleus cell in each of five nuclei. Dynamic computerized displays were visually analyzed and statistically compared. The nuclei from different brains were found to be strikingly similar in density and distribution of cells. In order to determine whether the cells of origin for particular locus coeruleus projections were clustered within the nucleus, reconstructions were created of the distributions of cells labeled by injections of a retrograde tracer, horseradish peroxidase, into particular terminal regions. Groups consisting of animals with injections into the same target areas were visually and statistically compared. The cells of origin of most efferent projections were found to be spatially organized within locus coeruleus. Specifically, projections to both the dorsal and ventral hippocampus originated solely from the dorsal segment of the nucleus, while spinal cord projections originated from ventral-posterior locus coeruleus. Cells of origin of cerebral and cerebellar cortical efferents, as well as hypothalamic efferents, exhibited less clustering, although reliable differences in distribution were observed. The most striking example of clustered cells of origin was exhibited by the large norepinephrine-containing cells constituting the anterior pole of locus coeruleus which were labeled only by hypothalamic injections. This analysis of spatial organization within locus coeruleus is unique in its utilization of a defined control group, experimental groups consisting of strictly defined replications, accurate three-dimensional reconstruction, and statistical comparisons. The

  14. Dental Outpatients: Health Locus of Control Correlates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludenia, Krista; Donham, Greg W.

    1983-01-01

    Examined relationships among specific personality variables, the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scales, and criterion-based ratings by staff dentists with dental outpatients (N=101). Found a consistent relationship between the perception that health is maintained by engaging in health-related behaviors and individual difference measures…

  15. A suppressor locus for MODY3-diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Gonzalez, Miguel A.; Carette, Claire; Bagattin, Alessia; Chiral, Magali; Makinistoglu, Munevver Parla; Garbay, Serge; Prévost, Géraldine; Madaras, Cécile; Hérault, Yann; Leibovici, Michel; Pontoglio, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Maturity Onset Diabetes of the Young type 3 (MODY3), linked to mutations in the transcription factor HNF1A, is the most prevalent form of monogenic diabetes mellitus. HNF1alpha-deficiency leads to defective insulin secretion via a molecular mechanism that is still not completely understood. Moreover, in MODY3 patients the severity of insulin secretion can be extremely variable even in the same kindred, indicating that modifier genes may control the onset of the disease. With the use of a mouse model for HNF1alpha-deficiency, we show here that specific genetic backgrounds (C3H and CBA) carry a powerful genetic suppressor of diabetes. A genome scan analysis led to the identification of a major suppressor locus on chromosome 3 (Moda1). Moda1 locus contains 11 genes with non-synonymous SNPs that significantly interacts with other loci on chromosomes 4, 11 and 18. Mechanistically, the absence of HNF1alpha in diabetic-prone (sensitive) strains leads to postnatal defective islets growth that is remarkably restored in resistant strains. Our findings are relevant to human genetics since Moda1 is syntenic with a human locus identified by genome wide association studies of fasting glycemia in patients. Most importantly, our results show that a single genetic locus can completely suppress diabetes in Hnf1a-deficiency. PMID:27667715

  16. The Preconscious: Locus for Significant Written Compositions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alley, Alvin D.

    1979-01-01

    The author suggests that the preconscious is the true locus of significant prose because of its greater amount of freedom to gather, compare, and rearrange ideas, and that the ultimate challenge to teachers of composition is to give freedom to their students' preconscious processes. (KC)

  17. Exercise Adherence and Locus of Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geshuri, Yosef; Glahn, Ronald

    In 1990, a study was conducted to investigate the relationship between students' locus of control and the extent to which they participated in a voluntary exercise program. First-time participants in the "Shape Up" program offered at the Porterville College Fitness Center during the summer and fall semesters of 1990 were identified through the…

  18. Intrahaplotype polymorphism at the Brassica S locus.

    PubMed Central

    Miege, C; Ruffio-Châble, V; Schierup, M H; Cabrillac, D; Dumas, C; Gaude, T; Cock, J M

    2001-01-01

    The S locus receptor kinase and the S locus glycoproteins are encoded by genes located at the S locus, which controls the self-incompatibility response in Brassica. In class II self-incompatibility haplotypes, S locus glycoproteins can be encoded by two different genes, SLGA and SLGB. In this study, we analyzed the sequences of these genes in several independently isolated plants, all of which carry the same S haplotype (S(2)). Two groups of S(2) haplotypes could be distinguished depending on whether SRK was associated with SLGA or SLGB. Surprisingly, SRK alleles from the two groups could be distinguished at the sequence level, suggesting that recombination rarely occurs between haplotypes of the two groups. An analysis of the distribution of polymorphisms along the S domain of SRK showed that hypervariable domains I and II tend to be conserved within haplotypes but to be highly variable between haplotypes. This is consistent with these domains playing a role in the determination of haplotype specificity. PMID:11606555

  19. Locus of Control, Social Class, and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasquez, James A.

    The relationship between locus of control, social class, and learning processes were reviewed by analyzing: (1) externality as a function of socioeconomic status, i.e., the lower the status, the greater the degree of externality; (2) the impact of the early home environment on the child's learning and development; (3) classroom and teacher…

  20. Linkage disequilibrium at the APA insecticidal seed protein locus of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background An interesting seed protein family with a role in preventing insect herbivory is the multi-gene, APA family encoding the α-amylase inhibitor, phytohemagglutinin and arcelin proteins of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). Variability for this gene family exists and has been exploited to breed for insect resistance. For example, the arcelin locus has been successfully transferred from wild to cultivated common bean genotypes to provide resistance against the bruchid species Zabrotes subfasciatus although the process has been hampered by a lack of genetic tools for and understanding about the locus. In this study, we analyzed linkage disequilibrium (LD) between microsatellite markers at the APA locus and bruchid resistance in a germplasm survey of 105 resistant and susceptible genotypes and compared this with LD in other parts of the genome. Results Microsatellite allele diversity was found to vary with each of the eight APA-linked markers analyzed, and two markers within the APA locus were found to be diagnostic for bruchid resistance or susceptibility and for the different arcelin alleles inherited from the wild accessions. Arc1 was found to provide higher levels of resistance than Arc5 and the markers in the APA locus were highly associated with resistance showing that introgression of this gene-family from wild beans provides resistance in cultivated beans. LD around the APA locus was found to be intermediate compared to other regions of the genome and the highest LD was found within the APA locus itself for example between the markers PV-atct001 and PV-ag004. Conclusions We found the APA locus to be an important genetic determinant of bruchid resistance and also found that LD existed mostly within the APA locus but not beyond it. Moderate LD was also found for some other regions of the genome perhaps related to domestication genes. The LD pattern may reflect the introgression of arcelin from the wild into the cultivated background through breeding. LD

  1. Nonlinkage of D6S260, a putative schizophrenia locus, to bipolar affective disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, L.J.; Mitchell, P.B.; Salmon, J.

    1996-09-20

    To examine whether genes that predispose to schizophrenia also confer a predisposition to other psychiatric disorders such as bipolar affective disorder (BAD), we tested for linkage between the recently identified schizophrenia susceptibility locus D6S260 and the inheritance of BAD in 12 large Australian pedigrees. We found no evidence for linkage over a region of 12-27 cM from the D6S260 locus, depending on the model used. Our results therefore do not provide support for the continuum theory of psychosis. 13 refs., 2 tabs.

  2. High-density genetic maps for loci involved in nuclear male sterility (NMS1) and sporophytic self-incompatibility (S-locus) in chicory (Cichorium intybus L., Asteraceae).

    PubMed

    Gonthier, Lucy; Blassiau, Christelle; Mörchen, Monika; Cadalen, Thierry; Poiret, Matthieu; Hendriks, Theo; Quillet, Marie-Christine

    2013-08-01

    High-density genetic maps were constructed for loci involved in nuclear male sterility (NMS1-locus) and sporophytic self-incompatibility (S-locus) in chicory (Cichorium intybus L.). The mapping population consisted of 389 F1' individuals derived from a cross between two plants, K28 (male-sterile) and K59 (pollen-fertile), both heterozygous at the S-locus. This F1' mapping population segregated for both male sterility (MS) and strong self-incompatibility (SI) phenotypes. Phenotyping F1' individuals for MS allowed us to map the NMS1-locus to linkage group (LG) 5, while controlled diallel and factorial crosses to identify compatible/incompatible phenotypes mapped the S-locus to LG2. To increase the density of markers around these loci, bulked segregant analysis was used. Bulks and parental plants K28 and K59 were screened using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis, with a complete set of 256 primer combinations of EcoRI-ANN and MseI-CNN. A total of 31,000 fragments were generated, of which 2,350 showed polymorphism between K59 and K28. Thirteen AFLP markers were identified close to the NMS1-locus and six in the vicinity of the S-locus. From these AFLP markers, eight were transformed into sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers and of these five showed co-dominant polymorphism. The chromosomal regions containing the NMS1-locus and the S-locus were each confined to a region of 0.8 cM. In addition, we mapped genes encoding proteins similar to S-receptor kinase, the female determinant of sporophytic SI in the Brasicaceae, and also markers in the vicinity of the putative S-locus of sunflower, but none of these genes or markers mapped close to the chicory S-locus.

  3. Organization of the murine Cd22 locus

    SciTech Connect

    Law, Che-Leung; Torres, R.M.; Sundeberg, H.A.; Clark, E.A ); Parkhouse, R.M.E. ); Brannan, C.I.; Copeland, N.G.; Jenkins, N.A. )

    1993-07-01

    Murine CD22 (mCD22) is a B cell-associated adhesion protein with seven extracellular Ig-like domains that has 62% amino acid identify to its human homologue. Southern analysis on genomic DNA isolated from tissues and cell lines from several mouse strains using mCD22 cDNA demonstrated that the Cd22 locus encoding mCD22 is a single copy gene of [le]30 kb. Digestion of genomic DNA preparations with four restriction endonucleases revealed the presence of restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) in BALB/c, C57BL/6, and C3H strains vs DBA/2j, NZB, and NZC strains, suggesting the presence of two or more Cd22 alleles. Using a mCD22 cDNA clone derived from the BALB/c strain, the authors isolated genomic clones from a DBA/2 genomic library that contained all the exons necessary to encode the full length mCD22 cDNA. Fifteen exons, including exon 3 that encodes the translation start codon, were identified. Each extracellular Ig-like domain of mCD22 is encoded by a single exon. A comparison between the nucleotide sequences of the BALB/c CD22 cDNA and the exons of the DBA/2j CD22 genomic clones revealed an 18-nucleotide deletion in exon 4 (encoding the most distal Ig-like domain 1 of mCD22) of the DBA/2j genomic sequence in addition to a number of substitutions, insertions, and deletions in other exons. These nucleotide differences were also present in a cDNA clone isolated from total RNA of LPS-activated DBA/2j splenocytes mosome 7, a region sytenic to human chromosome 19q, close to the previously reported loci, Lyb-8 and Mag (a homologue of Cd22). An antibody (CY34) against the Lyb-8.2 B cell marker reacted with a BHK transfectant expressing the full length mCd22 cDNA, thus demonstrating that Lyb-8 and Cd22 loci are identical. Furthermore, a rat anti-mCD22 mAb, NIM-R6, bound to slgM[sup +] DBA/2j B cells, confirming the expression of a CD22 protein by the Cd22[sup a]/lyb-8[sup a] allele. 63 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Organization and Evolutionary Trajectory of the Mating Type (MAT) Locus in Dermatophyte and Dimorphic Fungal Pathogens▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenjun; Metin, Banu; White, Theodore C.; Heitman, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Sexual reproduction in fungi is governed by a specialized genomic region, the mating type (MAT) locus, whose gene identity, organization, and complexity are diverse. We identified the MAT locus of five dermatophyte fungal pathogens (Microsporum gypseum, Microsporum canis, Trichophyton equinum, Trichophyton rubrum, and Trichophyton tonsurans) and a dimorphic fungus, Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, and performed phylogenetic analyses. The identified MAT locus idiomorphs of M. gypseum control cell type identity in mating assays, and recombinant progeny were produced. Virulence tests in Galleria mellonella larvae suggest the two mating types of M. gypseum may have equivalent virulence. Synteny analysis revealed common features of the MAT locus shared among these five dermatophytes: namely, a small size (∼3 kb) and a novel gene arrangement. The SLA2, COX13, and APN2 genes, which flank the MAT locus in other Ascomycota are instead linked on one side of the dermatophyte MAT locus. In addition, the transcriptional orientations of the APN2 and COX13 genes are reversed compared to the dimorphic fungi Histoplasma capsulatum, Coccidioides immitis, and Coccidioides posadasii. A putative transposable element, pogo, was found to have inserted in the MAT1-2 idiomorph of one P. brasiliensis strain but not others. In conclusion, the evolution of the MAT locus of the dermatophytes and dimorphic fungi from the last common ancestor has been punctuated by both gene acquisition and expansion, and asymmetric gene loss. These studies further support a foundation to develop molecular and genetic tools for dermatophyte and dimorphic human fungal pathogens. PMID:19880755

  5. High-resolution analysis of cis-acting regulatory networks at the α-globin locus.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Jim R; Lower, Karen M; Dunham, Ian; Taylor, Stephen; De Gobbi, Marco; Sloane-Stanley, Jacqueline A; McGowan, Simon; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Vernimmen, Douglas; Gibbons, Richard J; Higgs, Douglas R

    2013-01-01

    We have combined the circular chromosome conformation capture protocol with high-throughput, genome-wide sequence analysis to characterize the cis-acting regulatory network at a single locus. In contrast to methods which identify large interacting regions (10-1000 kb), the 4C approach provides a comprehensive, high-resolution analysis of a specific locus with the aim of defining, in detail, the cis-regulatory elements controlling a single gene or gene cluster. Using the human α-globin locus as a model, we detected all known local and long-range interactions with this gene cluster. In addition, we identified two interactions with genes located 300 kb (NME4) and 625 kb (FAM173a) from the α-globin cluster.

  6. Confirmation of locus heterogeneity in the pure form of familial spastic paraplegia

    SciTech Connect

    Speer, M.C.; Gaskell, P.C.; Robinson, L.C.

    1995-08-14

    Familial spastic paraplegia (FSP), characterized by progressive spasticity of the lower extremities, is in its {open_quotes}pure{close_quotes} form generally of autosomal dominant inheritance pattern. Hazen et al. reported tight linkage of a large FSP family to the highly polymorphic microsatellite marker D14S269 with z ({sub {theta}}) = 8.49 at {sub {theta}} = 0.00. They further demonstrated evidence for locus heterogeneity when they showed that 2 FSP families were unlinked to this region. We have subsequently studied 4 FSP families (3 American, one British) and excluded the disease locus in these families for approximately 30 cM on either side of D14S269, thereby confirming evidence for locus heterogeneity within the spastic paraplegia diagnostic classification. 28 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Molecular genetic diversity and evolution at the MHC DQB locus in four species of pinnipeds.

    PubMed

    Hoelzel, A R; Stephens, J C; O'Brien, S J

    1999-05-01

    Variation was investigated at exon 2 (including part of the putative peptide-binding region) of the class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) DQB locus for two congeneric phocid seal species and two congeneric otariid seal species. Polymorphism in one phocid species, the southern elephant seal (Mirounga leonina), was comparable to that seen in human populations, while the other phocid, the northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris), has been through a severe population bottleneck and exhibited much less variation at this locus. A phylogenetic comparison of the four species was consistent with the trans-specific pattern of evolution described for other taxa at this locus, and relative nonsynonymous and synonymous substitution rates suggest the maintenance of polymorphisms by natural selection. A comparison of sequence patterns also suggested that some variation could have been generated through recombinational events, primarily within genera. These results suggest a pattern of evolution of the immune response in pinnipeds similar to that in terrestrial mammal species.

  8. Integrity of the thyroglobulin locus in tricho-rhino-phalangeal syndrome II.

    PubMed

    Brocas, H; Bühler, E M; Simon, P; Malik, N J; Vassart, G

    1986-10-01

    The thyroglobulin gene has been mapped to chromosome band 8q24 by several investigators. This is the band implicated in the causation of Langer-Giedion syndrome (tricho-rhino-phalangeal syndrome II). We have examined a restriction fragment length polymorphism at the thyroglobulin locus in a patient with Langer-Giedion syndrome and 8q deletion in order to: (1) localize the Langer-Giedion deletion more precisely, (2) define the relative map positions of the thyroglobulin gene and the Langer-Giedion locus. The results indicate that the locus of the thyroglobulin gene is intact in the patient with an interstitial deletion of proximal band 8q24.1 which confirms its more distal localization reported earlier by Bergé-Lefranc et al. (1985). It also assigns the critical region for the causation of Langer-Giedion syndrome to the proximal part of band 8q24, viz. 8q24.11----q24.13.

  9. Genetic and Physical Variability at the Mating Type Locus of the Oomycete, Phytophthora Infestans

    PubMed Central

    Judelson, H. S.

    1996-01-01

    Mating type in the oomyceteous fungus, Phytophthora infestans, is determined by a single locus. In a previous study of a few isolates, the locus segregated in a manner genetically consistent with its linkage to a system of balanced lethal loci. To determine the prevalence of this phenomenon within P. infestans, genetic analyses were performed using isolates representative of the diversity within the species that had been selected by DNA fingerprinting using probes linked to mating type. Non-Mendelian segregation of the mating type locus was observed in crosses performed with each isolate. An unusual group of isolates was identified in which the mating type determinants had been rearranged within the genome; these strains also produced an aberrantly large number of self-fertile progeny. Curiously, in all isolates, markers linked to the mating type locus appeared prone to duplication, transposition, deletion, or other rearrangement. This was not observed for loci unlinked to mating type. Data from the crosses and analyses of marker variation were used to erect models to explain the bases of mating type determination and of the unusual segregation of the chromosomal region containing the mating type locus. PMID:8913745

  10. Unconventional Recombination in the Mating Type Locus of Heterothallic Apple Canker Pathogen Valsa mali

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Zhiyuan; Ke, Xiwang; Li, Zhengpeng; Chen, Jiliang; Gao, Xiaoning; Huang, Lili

    2017-01-01

    Sexual reproduction in filamentous ascomycetes is controlled by the mating type (MAT) locus, including two idiomorphs MAT1-1 and MAT1-2. Understanding the MAT locus can provide clues for unveiling the sexual development and virulence factors for fungal pathogens. The genus Valsa (Sordariomycetes, Diaporthales) contains many tree pathogens responsible for destructive canker diseases. The sexual stage of these ascomycetes is occasionally observed in nature, and no MAT locus has been reported to date. Here, we identified the MAT locus of the apple canker pathogen Valsa mali, which causes extensive damage, and even death, to trees. V. mali is heterothallic in that each isolate carries either the MAT1-1 or MAT1-2 idiomorph. However, the MAT structure is distinct from that of many other heterothallic fungi in the Sordariomycetes. Two flanking genes, COX13 and APN2, were coopted into the MAT locus, possibly by intrachromosomal rearrangement. After the acquisition of foreign genes, unequal recombination occurred between MAT1-1/2 idiomorphs, resulting in a reverse insertion in the MAT1-2 idiomorph. Evolutionary analysis showed that the three complete MAT1-1-2, COX13, and APN2 genes in this region diverged independently due to different selection pressure. Null hypothesis tests of a 1:1 MAT ratio of 86 V. mali isolates from four different provinces showed a relatively balanced distribution of the two idiomorphs in the fields. These results provide insights into the evolution of the mating systems in Sordariomycetes. PMID:28228472

  11. Physical mapping of a pollen modifier locus controlling self-incompatibility in apricot and synteny analysis within the Rosaceae.

    PubMed

    Zuriaga, Elena; Molina, Laura; Badenes, María Luisa; Romero, Carlos

    2012-06-01

    S-locus products (S-RNase and F-box proteins) are essential for the gametophytic self-incompatibility (GSI) specific recognition in Prunus. However, accumulated genetic evidence suggests that other S-locus unlinked factors are also required for GSI. For instance, GSI breakdown was associated with a pollen-part mutation unlinked to the S-locus in the apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.) cv. 'Canino'. Fine-mapping of this mutated modifier gene (M-locus) and the synteny analysis of the M-locus within the Rosaceae are here reported. A segregation distortion loci mapping strategy, based on a selectively genotyped population, was used to map the M-locus. In addition, a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) contig was constructed for this region using overlapping oligonucleotides probes, and BAC-end sequences (BES) were blasted against Rosaceae genomes to perform micro-synteny analysis. The M-locus was mapped to the distal part of chr.3 flanked by two SSR markers within an interval of 1.8 cM corresponding to ~364 Kb in the peach (Prunus persica L. Batsch) genome. In the integrated genetic-physical map of this region, BES were mapped against the peach scaffold_3 and BACs were anchored to the apricot map. Micro-syntenic blocks were detected in apple (Malus × domestica Borkh.) LG17/9 and strawberry (Fragaria vesca L.) FG6 chromosomes. The M-locus fine-scale mapping provides a solid basis for self-compatibility marker-assisted selection and for positional cloning of the underlying gene, a necessary goal to elucidate the pollen rejection mechanism in Prunus. In a wider context, the syntenic regions identified in peach, apple and strawberry might be useful to interpret GSI evolution in Rosaceae.

  12. Locus of control and the fundamental dimensions of moods.

    PubMed

    Henson, H N; Chang, E C

    1998-06-01

    The present study examined the association between locus of control and positive and negative moods in 253 college students. Using the PANAS-X, designed by Watson and Clark, individuals scoring high on internal locus of control also scored higher across different dimensions of positive mood. Conversely, individuals scoring high on external locus of control had higher scores across different dimensions of negative mood.

  13. Self-Esteem, Locus of Control, and Student Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sterbin, Allan; Rakow, Ernest

    The direct effects of locus of control and self-esteem on standardized test scores were studied. The relationships among the standardized test scores and measures of locus of control and self-esteem for 12,260 students from the National Education Longitudinal Study 1994 database were examined, using the same definition of locus of control and…

  14. Cognitive Evaluation Theory, Locus of Control and Positive Verbal Feedback.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lonky, Edward; Reihman, Jacqueline

    This study tests the hypothesis that individual differences in locus of control orientation may mediate elementary school students' responses to positive verbal feedback. A total of 30 kindergarten through fourth grade subjects were assessed for locus of control orientation using the Bialer Children's Locus of Control Questionnaire. To establish a…

  15. The Impact of Locus of Control on Language Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nodoushan, Mohammad Ali Salmani

    2012-01-01

    This study hypothesized that students' loci of control affected their language achievement. 198 (N = 198) EFL students took the Rotter's (1966) locus of control test and were classified as locus-internal (ni = 78), and locus-external (ne = 120). They then took their ordinary courses and at the end of the semester, they were given their exams.…

  16. Characterization of histone H3K27 modifications in the {beta}-globin locus

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yea Woon; Kim, AeRi

    2011-02-11

    Research highlights: {yields} The {beta}-globin locus control region is hyperacetylated and monomethylated at histone H3K27. {yields} Highly transcribed globin genes are marked by H3K27ac, but H3K27me2 is remarkable at silent globin genes in erythroid K562 cells. {yields} Association of PRC2 subunits is comparable with H3K27me3 pattern. {yields} Modifications of histone H3K27 are established in an enhancer-dependent manner. -- Abstract: Histone H3K27 is acetylated or methylated in the environment of nuclear chromatin. Here, to characterize the modification pattern of H3K27 in locus control region (LCR) and to understand the correlation of various H3K27 modifications with transcriptional activity of genes, we analyzed the human {beta}-globin locus using the ChIP assay. The LCR of the human {beta}-globin locus was enriched by H3K27ac and H3K27me1 in erythroid K562 cells. The highly transcribed globin genes were hyperacetylated at H3K27, but the repressed globin genes were highly dimethylated at this lysine in these cells. However, in non-erythroid 293FT cells, the {beta}-globin locus was marked by a high level of H3K27me3. EZH2 and SUZ12, subunits of polycomb repressive complex 2, were comparably detected with the H3K27me3 pattern in K562 and 293FT cells. In addition, H3K27ac, H3K27me1 and H3K27me3 were established in an enhancer-dependent manner in a model minichromosomal locus containing an enhancer and its target gene. Taken together, these results show that H3K27 modifications have distinctive correlations with the chromatin state or transcription level of genes and are influenced by an enhancer.

  17. Molecular analysis of 36 mutations at the mouse pink-eyed dilution (p) locus.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D K; Stubbs, L J; Culiat, C T; Montgomery, C S; Russell, L B; Rinchik, E M

    1995-12-01

    Thirty-six radiation- or chemically induced homozygous-lethal mutations at the p locus in mouse chromosome 7 have been analyzed at 17 loci defined by molecular probes to determine the types of lesions, numbers of p-region markers deleted or rearranged, regions of overlap of deletion mutations, and genetic distances between loci. A linear deletion map of the [Myod1, Ldh3]-[Snrpn, Znf127] region has been constructed from the molecular analyses of the p-locus deletions. The utility of these deletions as tools for the isolation and characterization of the genes specifying the neurological, reproductive, and developmental phenotypes genetically mapped to this region will grow as more detailed molecular analyses continue.

  18. Mox: a novel modifier of the tomato Xa locus.

    PubMed

    Peterson, P W; Yoder, J I

    1995-01-01

    We have isolated a novel mutation that caused variegated leaf color in a tomato plant which had multiple maize Ac transposable elements and the tomato Xa allele. Xa is a previously characterized semi-dominant mutation that causes tomato leaves to be bright yellow when heterozygous (Xa/xa+). The mutation responsible for the new phenotype was named Mox (Modifier of Xa). The Mox mutation modified the Xa/xa+ yellow leaf phenotype in two ways: it compensated for the Xa allele resulting in a plant with a wildtype green color, and it caused somatic variegation which appeared as white and yellow sectors on the green background. Somatic variegation was visible only if the plant contained both the Mox and Xa loci. Genetic studies indicated that the Mox locus was linked in repulsion to Xa and that the Mox locus was genetically transmitted at a reduced frequency through the male gamete. Molecular characterization of the Ac elements in lines segregating for Mox identified an Ac insertion that appeared to cosegregate with Mox variegation. We propose a model in which the Mox mutation consists of a duplication of the xa+ allele and subsequent Ac-induced breakage of the duplicated region causes variegation.

  19. Affected-sib-pair analyses reveal support of prior evidence for a susceptibility locus for bipolar disorder, on 21q

    SciTech Connect

    Detera-Wadleigh, S.D.; Badner, J.A.; Goldin, L.R.

    1996-06-01

    In 22 multiplex pedigrees screened for linkage to bipolar disorder, by use of 18 markers on chromosome 21q, single-locus affected-sib-pair (ASP) analysis detected a high proportion (57%-62%) of alleles shared identical by descent (IBD), with P values of .049-.0008 on nine marker loci. Multilocus ASP analyses revealed locus trios in the distal region between D21S270 and D21S171, with excess allele sharing (nominal P values <.01) under two affection-status models, ASM I (bipolars and schizoaffectives) and ASM II (ASM I plus recurrent unipolars). In addition, under ASM I, the proximal interval spanned by D21S1436 and D21S65 showed locus trios with excess allele sharing (nominal P values of .03-.0003). These findings support prior evidence that a susceptibility locus for bipolar disorder is on 21q. 38 refs., 4 tabs.

  20. Role of CTCF Protein in Regulating FMR1 Locus Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Lanni, Stella; Goracci, Martina; Borrelli, Loredana; Mancano, Giorgia; Chiurazzi, Pietro; Moscato, Umberto; Ferrè, Fabrizio; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela; Tabolacci, Elisabetta; Neri, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the leading cause of inherited intellectual disability, is caused by epigenetic silencing of the FMR1 gene, through expansion and methylation of a CGG triplet repeat (methylated full mutation). An antisense transcript (FMR1-AS1), starting from both promoter and intron 2 of the FMR1 gene, was demonstrated in transcriptionally active alleles, but not in silent FXS alleles. Moreover, a DNA methylation boundary, which is lost in FXS, was recently identified upstream of the FMR1 gene. Several nuclear proteins bind to this region, like the insulator protein CTCF. Here we demonstrate for the first time that rare unmethylated full mutation (UFM) alleles present the same boundary described in wild type (WT) alleles and that CTCF binds to this region, as well as to the FMR1 gene promoter, exon 1 and intron 2 binding sites. Contrariwise, DNA methylation prevents CTCF binding to FXS alleles. Drug-induced CpGs demethylation does not restore this binding. CTCF knock-down experiments clearly established that CTCF does not act as insulator at the active FMR1 locus, despite the presence of a CGG expansion. CTCF depletion induces heterochromatinic histone configuration of the FMR1 locus and results in reduction of FMR1 transcription, which however is not accompanied by spreading of DNA methylation towards the FMR1 promoter. CTCF depletion is also associated with FMR1-AS1 mRNA reduction. Antisense RNA, like sense transcript, is upregulated in UFM and absent in FXS cells and its splicing is correlated to that of the FMR1-mRNA. We conclude that CTCF has a complex role in regulating FMR1 expression, probably through the organization of chromatin loops between sense/antisense transcriptional regulatory regions, as suggested by bioinformatics analysis. PMID:23874213

  1. Role of CTCF protein in regulating FMR1 locus transcription.

    PubMed

    Lanni, Stella; Goracci, Martina; Borrelli, Loredana; Mancano, Giorgia; Chiurazzi, Pietro; Moscato, Umberto; Ferrè, Fabrizio; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela; Tabolacci, Elisabetta; Neri, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the leading cause of inherited intellectual disability, is caused by epigenetic silencing of the FMR1 gene, through expansion and methylation of a CGG triplet repeat (methylated full mutation). An antisense transcript (FMR1-AS1), starting from both promoter and intron 2 of the FMR1 gene, was demonstrated in transcriptionally active alleles, but not in silent FXS alleles. Moreover, a DNA methylation boundary, which is lost in FXS, was recently identified upstream of the FMR1 gene. Several nuclear proteins bind to this region, like the insulator protein CTCF. Here we demonstrate for the first time that rare unmethylated full mutation (UFM) alleles present the same boundary described in wild type (WT) alleles and that CTCF binds to this region, as well as to the FMR1 gene promoter, exon 1 and intron 2 binding sites. Contrariwise, DNA methylation prevents CTCF binding to FXS alleles. Drug-induced CpGs demethylation does not restore this binding. CTCF knock-down experiments clearly established that CTCF does not act as insulator at the active FMR1 locus, despite the presence of a CGG expansion. CTCF depletion induces heterochromatinic histone configuration of the FMR1 locus and results in reduction of FMR1 transcription, which however is not accompanied by spreading of DNA methylation towards the FMR1 promoter. CTCF depletion is also associated with FMR1-AS1 mRNA reduction. Antisense RNA, like sense transcript, is upregulated in UFM and absent in FXS cells and its splicing is correlated to that of the FMR1-mRNA. We conclude that CTCF has a complex role in regulating FMR1 expression, probably through the organization of chromatin loops between sense/antisense transcriptional regulatory regions, as suggested by bioinformatics analysis.

  2. Scrutinizing the FTO locus: compelling evidence for a complex, long-range regulatory context.

    PubMed

    Rask-Andersen, Mathias; Almén, Markus Sällman; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2015-11-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within a genetic region including the first two introns of the gene encoding FTO have consistently been shown to be the strongest genetic factors influencing body mass index (BMI). However, this same also contains several regulatory DNA elements that affect the expression of IRX3 and IRX5, which respectively, are located approximately 500 kb and 1.2 Mbp downstream from the BMI-associated FTO locus. Through these affected regulatory elements, genetic variation at the FTO locus influences adipocyte development leading to decreased thermogenesis and increased lipid storage. These findings provide a genomic model for the functional implications of genetic variations at this locus, and also demonstrate the importance of accounting for chromatin-chromatin interactions when constructing hypotheses for the mechanisms of trait and disease-associated common genetic variants. Several consortia have generated genome-wide datasets describing different aspects of chromatin biology which can be utilized to predict functionality and propose biologically relevant descriptions of specific DNA regions. Here, we review some of the publically available data resources on genome function and organization that can be used to gain an overview of genetic regions of interest and to generate testable hypotheses for future studies. We use the BMI- and obesity-associated FTO locus as a subject as it poses an illustrative example on the value of these resources. We find that public databases strongly support long-range interactions between regulatory elements in the FTO locus with the IRXB cluster genes IRX3 and IRX5. Chromatin configuration capture data also support interactions across a large region stretching across from the RPGRIP1L gene, FTO and the IRXB gene cluster.

  3. Molecular Identification of the Schwannomatosis Locus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-07-01

    AD Award Number: DAMD17-03-1-0445 TITLE: Molecular Identification of the Schwannomatosis Locus PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Mia M. MacCollin, M.D...COVERED (Leave blank) July 2004 Annual (1 Jul 2003 - 30 Jun 2004) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Molecular Identification of the Schwannomatosis...linkage and loss of heterozygosity analyses. 3. To determine the molecular mechanism of tumor formation in these patients using complementary molecular

  4. Bipolar disorder: Evidence for a major locus

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, M.A.; Flodman, P.L.; Sadovnick, A.D.; Ameli, H.

    1995-10-09

    Complex segregation analyses were conducted on families of bipolar I and bipolar II probands to delineate the mode of inheritance. The probands were ascertained from consecutive referrals to the Mood Disorder Service, University Hospital, University of British Columbia and diagnosed by DSM-III-R and Research Diagnostic Criteria. Data were available on over 1,500 first-degree relatives of the 186 Caucasian probands. The purpose of the analyses was to determine if, after correcting for age and birth cohort, there was evidence for a single major locus. Five models were fit to the data using the statistical package SAGE: (1) dominant, (2) recessive, (3) arbitrary mendelian inheritance, (4) environmental, and (5) no major effects. A single dominant, mendelian major locus was the best fitting of these models for the sample of bipolar I and II probands when only bipolar relatives were defined as affected (polygenic inheritance could not be tested). Adding recurrent major depression to the diagnosis {open_quotes}affected{close_quotes} for relatives reduced the evidence for a major locus effect. Our findings support the undertaking of linkage studies and are consistent with the analyses of the National Institutes of Mental Health (NIMH) Collaborative Study data by Rice et al. and Blangero and Elston. 39 refs., 4 tabs.

  5. Structure of the MHC A and B locus promoters in hominoids

    SciTech Connect

    Vallejo, A.N.; Pease, L.R.

    1995-04-15

    The expansion and contraction of mammalian class I multigene families raises the issue as to what determines the loss or retention of family members. We propose that accumulating changes in regulatory regions result in the loss of expression of the gene products during times critical to selection, leading to the extinction of misregulated genes. The structures of promoter regions of MHC class I genes in nonhuman primates support this view. The B promoters are more homogeneous and contain regulatory elements also found in the promoters of the homologous class I genes of more distant mammals, whereas the A locus promoters were significantly more heterogeneous, have fewer sequence motifs related to known transcription factor-binding sites and have accumulated nucleotide substitutions within one of the widely conserved class I promoter elements. These findings are consistent with the view that the more polymorphic B locus is the principal MHC locus encoding functional class I Ag-presenting molecules whereas the less polymorphic A locus is assuming a secondary role as a consequence of promoter defects. 50 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Fine mapping of the chicken congenital loco locus on chromosome 12.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Y; Ohtake, T; Uemoto, Y; Sato, S; Sato, S; Kobayashi, E

    2013-12-01

    Congenital loco in chicks is characterized by an apparent lack of control of the muscles of the neck. This disorder is inherited as a simple Mendelian recessive disease, caused by an autosomal recessive gene, lo. To date, there are no reports on the localization of this gene. The objective of this study was therefore to identify the genomic region of the lo locus. The experimental congenital loco population used here were selected from a Rhode Island Red (RIR) line and consisted of six generations, resulting in 124 chickens. A total of 113 DNA samples from offspring of four generations (G3, G4, G5, and G6) were used for genotyping. At first, genome-wide linkage mapping was performed using 122 microsatellite markers on 22 autosomal chromosomes, and the lo locus was mapped to chromosome 12. We then performed fine mapping in two steps on chromosome 12. First, the lo locus was mapped to the interval between GGA12_5 and GGA12_11 using 13 new polymorphic markers. In the second step, fine mapping was performed by adding new families and 11 additional new polymorphic markers. Linkage mapping and haplotype information enabled the localization of the lo locus to a 1.1-Mb region between GGA12_28 and GGA12_30. Genetic markers between GGA12_28 and GGA12_30 may be used to remove the carriers of congenital loco through this RIR line.

  7. Studies on the Mechanism of Heterochromatic Position Effect at the Rosy Locus of DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER

    PubMed Central

    Rushlow, C. A.; Bender, W.; Chovnick, A.

    1984-01-01

    Experiments are described that extend the characterization of position effect variants of the rosy locus and test possible mechanisms of heterochromatic position effect.—Rosy position effect variants exhibit a variegated phenotype with respect to xanthine dehydrogenase activity in malpighian tubules.—The breakpoints of the position effect mutations are located on the DNA map of the rosy region outside of the rosy locus DNA; ryps1136 is located in the DNA of the l(3)S12 gene immediately proximal to rosy, whereas ryps1149 is located some 15 kb distal to rosy in the pic locus.—Southern blot experiments are described that test and reject the notion that heterochromatic position effect results from underreplication of the position-affected gene. Rather, the results of Northern blots serve to direct attention to position effect as a defect in transcription.—Histone region deletion heterozygosity and butyrate-feeding experiments failed to exhibit specific suppression of position effect at the rosy locus. PMID:6149972

  8. Search for a schizophrenia susceptibility locus of human chromosome 22

    SciTech Connect

    Coon, H.; Hoff, M.; Holik, J.

    1994-06-15

    We used 10 highly informative DNA polymorphic markers and genetic linkage analysis to examine whether a gene locus predisposing to schizophrenia is located on chromosome 22, in 105 families with schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder. The LOD score method, including analysis for heterogeneity, provided no conclusive evidence of linkage under a dominant, recessive, or penetrance free model of inheritance. Affected sib-pair analysis was inconclusive. Affected Pedigree Member (APM) analysis gave only suggestive evidence for linkage. Multipoint APM analysis, using 4 adjacent loci including D22S281 and IL2RB, a region of interest from the APM analysis, gave non-significant results for the three different weighting functions. 18 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  9. The tyrosinase-positive oculocutaneous albinism locus maps to chromosome 15q11. 2-q12

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsay, M.; Colman, M.A.; Stevens, G.; Zwane, E.; Kromberg, J.; Jenkins, T. ); Garral, M.

    1992-10-01

    Tyrosinase-positive oculocutaneous albinism (ty-pos OCA), an autosomal recessive disorder of the melanin biosynthetic pathway, is the most common type of albinism occurring worldwide. In southern African Bantu-speaking negroids it has an overall prevalence of about 1/3,900. Since the basic biochemical defect is unknown, a linkage study with candidate loci, candidate chromosomal regions, and random loci was undertaken. The ty-pos OCA locus was found to be linked to two arbitrary loci, D15S10 and D15S13, in the Prader-Willi/Angelman chromosomal region on chromosome 15q11.2-q12. The pink-eyed dilute locus, p, on mouse chromosome 7, maps close to a region of homology on human chromosome 15q, and we postulate that the ty-pos OCA and p loci are homologous. 43 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Genome-wide association filtering using a highly locus-specific transmission/disequilibrium test.

    PubMed

    Abad-Grau, María M; Medina-Medina, Nuria; Montes-Soldado, Rosana; Moreno-Ortega, José; Matesanz, Fuencisla

    2010-09-01

    Multimarker transmission/disequilibrium tests (TDTs) are powerful association and linkage tests used to perform genome-wide filtering in the search for disease susceptibility loci. In contrast to case/control studies, they have a low rate of false positives for population stratification and admixture. However, the length of a region found in association with a disease is usually very large because of linkage disequilibrium (LD). Here, we define a multimarker proportional TDT (mTDT ( P )) designed to improve locus specificity in complex diseases that has good power compared to the most powerful multimarker TDTs. The test is a simple generalization of a multimarker TDT in which haplotype frequencies are used to weight the effect that each haplotype has on the whole measure. Two concepts underlie the features of the metric: the 'common disease, common variant' hypothesis and the decrease in LD with chromosomal distance. Because of this decrease, the frequency of haplotypes in strong LD with common disease variants decreases with increasing distance from the disease susceptibility locus. Thus, our haplotype proportional test has higher locus specificity than common multimarker TDTs that assume a uniform distribution of haplotype probabilities. Because of the common variant hypothesis, risk haplotypes at a given locus are relatively frequent and a metric that weights partial results for each haplotype by its frequency will be as powerful as the most powerful multimarker TDTs. Simulations and real data sets demonstrate that the test has good power compared with the best tests but has remarkably higher locus specificity, so that the association rate decreases at a higher rate with distance from a disease susceptibility or disease protective locus.

  11. Genome-wide association filtering using a highly locus-specific transmission/disequilibrium test

    PubMed Central

    Medina-Medina, Nuria; Montes-Soldado, Rosana; Moreno-Ortega, José; Matesanz, Fuencisla

    2010-01-01

    Multimarker transmission/disequilibrium tests (TDTs) are powerful association and linkage tests used to perform genome-wide filtering in the search for disease susceptibility loci. In contrast to case/control studies, they have a low rate of false positives for population stratification and admixture. However, the length of a region found in association with a disease is usually very large because of linkage disequilibrium (LD). Here, we define a multimarker proportional TDT (mTDTP) designed to improve locus specificity in complex diseases that has good power compared to the most powerful multimarker TDTs. The test is a simple generalization of a multimarker TDT in which haplotype frequencies are used to weight the effect that each haplotype has on the whole measure. Two concepts underlie the features of the metric: the ‘common disease, common variant’ hypothesis and the decrease in LD with chromosomal distance. Because of this decrease, the frequency of haplotypes in strong LD with common disease variants decreases with increasing distance from the disease susceptibility locus. Thus, our haplotype proportional test has higher locus specificity than common multimarker TDTs that assume a uniform distribution of haplotype probabilities. Because of the common variant hypothesis, risk haplotypes at a given locus are relatively frequent and a metric that weights partial results for each haplotype by its frequency will be as powerful as the most powerful multimarker TDTs. Simulations and real data sets demonstrate that the test has good power compared with the best tests but has remarkably higher locus specificity, so that the association rate decreases at a higher rate with distance from a disease susceptibility or disease protective locus. PMID:20603721

  12. Molecular and recombinational mapping of mutations in the Ace locus of Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Nagoshi, R.N.; Gelbart, W.M.

    1987-11-01

    The Ace locus in Drosophila melanogaster is known to be the structural gene for acetylcholinesterase. Ace is located in a region of chromosome arm 3R which has been subjected to intensive genetic and molecular analysis. Previous deletion mapping studies have identified a 40-kb region with which the Ace gene resides. This report focuses on the further localization of Ace within this 40-kb interval. Within this region, selective fine structure recombinational analysis was employed to localize three recessive Ace lethals relative to unselected restriction site variations. These three mutations fall into a segment of 7 kb within the Ace interval. Fine structure recombinational analysis was also used to confirm that the Ace/sup -/ phenotype of one deletion, Df(3R)Ace/sup HD1/, co-segregated with the molecular deletion. This deletion does not fully remove Ace activity, but it behaves as a recessive Ace lethal. Df(3R)Ace/sup HD1/ is the most distal Ace lesion identified and indicates that the Ace locus must extend at least 16 kb. Several poly(A)transcripts are detectable in the region defined by the Ace lesions. The position and extent of the Ace locus, as well as the types of transcripts found, is consistent with the recent findings which identified Torpedo-AChE homologous cDNA sequences in this region.

  13. Molecular and Recombinational Mapping of Mutations in the Ace Locus of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Nagoshi, Rodney N.; Gelbart, William M.

    1987-01-01

    The Ace locus in Drosophila melanogaster is known to be the structural gene for acetylcholinesterase. Ace is located in a region of chromosome arm 3R which has been subjected to intensive genetic and molecular analysis. Previous deletion mapping studies have identified a 40-kb region within which the Ace gene resides. This report focuses on the further localization of Ace within this 40-kb interval. Within this region, selective fine structure recombinational analysis was employed to localize three recessive Ace lethals relative to unselected restriction site variations. These three mutations fall into a segment of 7 kb within the Ace interval. Fine structure recombinational analysis was also used to confirm that the Ace- phenotype of one deletion, Df(3R)AceHD1, co-segregated with the molecular deletion. This deletion does not fully remove Ace activity, but it behaves as a recessive Ace lethal. Df(3R)AceHD1 is the most distal Ace lesion identified and indicates that the Ace locus must extend at least 16 kb. Several poly(A)transcripts are detectable in the region defined by the Ace lesions. The position and extent of the Ace locus, as well as the types of transcripts found, is consistent with the recent findings which identified Torpedo-AChE homologous cDNA sequences in this region. PMID:2826288

  14. Recombination Can Initiate and Terminate at a Large Number of Sites within the Rosy Locus of Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Clark, S. H.; Hilliker, A. J.; Chovnick, A.

    1988-01-01

    This report presents the results of a recombination experiment designed to question the existence of special sites for the initiation or termination of a recombination heteroduplex within the region of the rosy locus. Intragenic recombination events were monitored between two physically separated rosy mutant alleles ry(301) and ry(2) utilizing DNA restriction site polymorphisms as genetic markers. Both ry(301) and ry(2) are known from previous studies to be associated with gene conversion frequencies an order of magnitude lower than single site mutations. The mutations are associated with large, well defined insertions located as internal sites within the locus in prior intragenic mapping studies. On the molecular map, they represent large insertions approximately 2.7 kb apart in the second and third exons, respectively, of the XDH coding region. The present study monitors intragenic recombination in a mutant heterozygous genotype in which DNA homology is disrupted by these large discontinuities, greater than the region of DNA homology and flanking both sides of the locus. If initiation/or termination requires separate sites at either end of the locus, then intragenic recombination within the rosy locus of the heterozygote should be eliminated. Contrary to expectation, significant recombination between these sites is seen. PMID:2834266

  15. Conservation of the S10-spc-α Locus within Otherwise Highly Plastic Genomes Provides Phylogenetic Insight into the Genus Leptospira

    PubMed Central

    Zuerner, Richard L.; Ahmed, Niyaz; Bulach, Dieter M.; Quinteiro, Javier; Hartskeerl, Rudy A.

    2008-01-01

    S10-spc-α is a 17.5 kb cluster of 32 genes encoding ribosomal proteins. This locus has an unusual composition and organization in Leptospira interrogans. We demonstrate the highly conserved nature of this region among diverse Leptospira and show its utility as a phylogenetically informative region. Comparative analyses were performed by PCR using primer sets covering the whole locus. Correctly sized fragments were obtained by PCR from all L. interrogans strains tested for each primer set indicating that this locus is well conserved in this species. Few differences were detected in amplification profiles between different pathogenic species, indicating that the S10-spc-α locus is conserved among pathogenic Leptospira. In contrast, PCR analysis of this locus using DNA from saprophytic Leptospira species and species with an intermediate pathogenic capacity generated varied results. Sequence alignment of the S10-spc-α locus from two pathogenic species, L. interrogans and L. borgpetersenii, with the corresponding locus from the saprophyte L. biflexa serovar Patoc showed that genetic organization of this locus is well conserved within Leptospira. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) of four conserved regions resulted in the construction of well-defined phylogenetic trees that help resolve questions about the interrelationships of pathogenic Leptospira. Based on the results of secY sequence analysis, we found that reliable species identification of pathogenic Leptospira is possible by comparative analysis of a 245 bp region commonly used as a target for diagnostic PCR for leptospirosis. Comparative analysis of Leptospira strains revealed that strain H6 previously classified as L. inadai actually belongs to the pathogenic species L. interrogans and that L. meyeri strain ICF phylogenetically co-localized with the pathogenic clusters. These findings demonstrate that the S10-spc-α locus is highly conserved throughout the genus and may be more useful in comparing evolution of

  16. Regulatory organization of the staphylococcal sae locus.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Rajan P; Novick, Richard P

    2008-03-01

    This paper describes an investigation of the complex internal regulatory circuitry of the staphylococcal sae locus and the impact of modifying this circuitry on the expression of external genes in the sae regulon. The sae locus contains four genes, the saeR and S two-component signalling module (TCS), and saeP and Q, two upstream genes of hitherto unknown function. It is expressed from two promoters, P(A)sae, which transcribes only the TCS, and P(C)sae, which transcribes the entire locus. A bursa aurealis (bursa) transposon insertion in saeP in a derivative of Staphylococcus aureus NCTC 8325 has a profound effect on sae function. It modifies the activity of the TCS, changing the expression of many genes in the sae regulon, even though transcription of the TCS (from P(A)sae) is not interrupted. Moreover, these effects are not due to disruption of saeP since an in-frame deletion in saeP has essentially no phenotype. The phenotype of S. aureus strain Newman is remarkably similar to that of the saeP : : bursa and this similarity is explained by an amino acid substitution in the Newman saeS gene that is predicted to modify profoundly the signalling function of the protein. This concurrence suggests that the saeP : : bursa insertion affects the signalling function of saeS, a suggestion that is supported by the ability of an saeQR clone, but not an saeR clone, to complement the effects of the saeP : : bursa insertion.

  17. A root locus based flutter synthesis procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajela, P.

    1983-01-01

    An efficient generalized constraint is proposed in the context of a nonlinear mathematical programming approach for the minimum weight design of wing structures for flutter considerations. The approach is based on a root locus analysis procedure that is better suited for flutter redesign than the conventionally used V-g method. The proposed flutter constraint does not require an actual computation of the flutter speed, allows prescription of meaningful margins of safety in the optimized design and lends itself to elegant computation of sensitivity information. The approach is implemented and results presented for representative structural models.

  18. Root Locus Algorithms for Programmable Pocket Calculators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wechsler, E. R.

    1983-01-01

    Two algorithms are described which allow the plotting of individual points on a root locus diagram with or without time delay. The development was performed during the design of a continuous phase shifter used in the Baseband Antenna Combiner for the Deep Space Network (DSN). The algorithms, which are expected to be useful in similar DSN efforts, are simple enough to be implemented on a programmable pocket calculator. The coordinates of the open-loop zeros and poles, the gain constant K, and the time delay T are the data inputs.

  19. Cytogenetic Analysis of Segregation Distortion in Drosophila Melanogaster: The Cytological Organization of the Responder (Rsp) Locus

    PubMed Central

    Pimpinelli, S.; Dimitri, P.

    1989-01-01

    The segregation distortion phenomenon occurs in Drosophila melanogaster males carrying an SD second chromosome and an SD(+) homolog. In such males the SD chromosome is transmitted to the progeny more frequently than the expected 50% because of an abnormal differentiation of the SD(+)-bearing sperms. Three major loci are involved in this phenomenon: SD and Rsp, associated with the SD and SD(+) chromosome, respectively, and E(SD). In the present work we performed a cytogenetic analysis of the Rsp locus which was known to map to the centromeric heterochromatin of the second chromosome. Hoechst- and N-banding techniques were used to characterize chromosomes carrying Responder insensitive (Rsp(i)), Responder sensitive (Rsp(s)) and Responder supersensitive (Rsp(ss)) alleles. Our results locate the Rsp locus to the h39 region of 2R heterochromatin. This region is a Hoechstbright, N-banding negative heterochromatic block adjacent to the centromere. Quantitative variations of the h39 region were observed. The degree of sensitivity to Sd was found to be directly correlated with the physical size of that region, demonstrating that the Rsp locus is composed of repeated DNA. PMID:2470640

  20. Evidence for locus heterogeneity in human autosomal dominant split hand/split foot malformation

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, S.E.; Wijsman, E.M.; Stephens, K.; Evans, J.P. ); Scherer, S.W.; Tsui, L.C. ); Kukolich, M. )

    1994-07-01

    Split hand/split foot (SHSF; also known as ectrodactyly) is a human developmental disorder characterized by missing central digits and other distal limb malformations. An association between SHSF and cytogenetically visible rearrangements of chromosome 7 at bands q21-q22 provides compelling evidence for the location of a causative gene at this location, and the locus has been designated SHFD1. In the present study, marker loci were localized to the SHFD1 critical region through the analysis of somatic cell hybrids derived from individuals with SHSF and cytogenetic abnormalities involving the 7q21-q22 region. Combined genetic and physical data suggest that the order of markers in the SHFD1 critical region is cen-D7S492-D7S527-(D7S479-D7S491)-SHFD1-D7S553-D7S518-qter. Dinucleotide repeat polymorphisms at three of these loci were used to test for linkage of SHSF to this region in a large pedigree that demonstrates autosomal dominant SHSF. Evidence against linkage of the SHSF gene to 7q21-q22 was obtained in this pedigree. Therefore, combined molecular and genetic data provide evidence for locus heterogeneity in autosomal dominant SHSF. The authors propose the name SHSF2 for this second locus. 34 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Homozygosity mapping to the USH2A locus in two isolated populations.

    PubMed

    Fagerheim, T; Raeymaekers, P; Merren, J; Mani, K; Jha, G K; Baumbach, L; Brox, V; Breines, E; Holdø, B E; Holdø, A; Tranebjaerg, L

    1999-02-01

    Usher syndrome is a group of autosomal recessive disorders characterised by progressive visual loss from retinitis pigmentosa and moderate to severe sensorineural hearing loss. Usher syndrome is estimated to account for 6-10% of all congenital sensorineural hearing loss. A gene locus in Usher type II (USH2) families has been assigned to a small region on chromosome 1q41 called the UHS2A locus. We have investigated two families with Usher syndrome from different isolated populations. One family is a Norwegian Saami family and the second family is from the Cayman Islands. They both come from relatively isolated populations and are inbred families suitable for linkage analysis. A lod score of 3.09 and 7.65 at zero recombination was reached respectively in the two families with two point linkage analysis to the USH2A locus on 1q41. Additional homozygosity mapping of the affected subjects concluded with a candidate region of 6.1 Mb. This region spans the previously published candidate region in USH2A. Our study emphasises that the mapped gene for USH2 is also involved in patients from other populations and will have implications for future mutation analysis once the USH2A gene is cloned.

  2. Acquisition of the capsule locus by horizontal gene transfer in Neisseria meningitidis is often accompanied by the loss of UDP-GalNAc synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Bartley, Stephanie N.; Mowlaboccus, Shakeel; Mullally, Christopher A.; Stubbs, Keith A.; Vrielink, Alice; Maiden, Martin C. J.; Harrison, Odile B.; Perkins, Timothy T.; Kahler, Charlene M.

    2017-01-01

    Pathogenic meningococci have acquired a 24 kb capsule synthesis island (cps) by horizontal gene transfer which consists of a synthetic locus and associated capsule transport genes flanked by repetitive Regions D and D’. Regions D and D’ contain an intact gene encoding a UDP-galactose epimerase (galE1) and a truncated remnant (galE2), respectively. In this study, GalE protein alleles were shown to be either mono-functional, synthesising UDP-galactose (UDP-Gal), or bi-functional, synthesising UDP-Gal and UDP-galactosamine (UDP-GalNAc). Meningococci possessing a capsule null locus (cnl) typically possessed a single bi-functional galE. Separation of functionality between galE1 and galE2 alleles in meningococcal isolates was retained for all serogroups except serogroup E which has a synthetic requirement for UDP-GalNAc. The truncated galE2 remnant in Region D’ was also phylogenetically related to the bi-functional galE of the cnl locus suggesting common ancestry. A model is proposed in which the illegitimate recombination of the cps island into the galE allele of the cnl locus results in the formation of Region D’ containing the truncated galE2 locus and the capture of the cps island en bloc. The retention of the duplicated Regions D and D’ enables inversion of the synthetic locus within the cps island during bacterial growth. PMID:28290510

  3. Evaluation of the plastic yield locus for embossed sheet using biaxial tensile tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young-Suk; Oh, Seok-Hwan; Do, Van-Cuong; Lee, Bong-Hyun

    2016-11-01

    3D-structured (embossed) aluminium sheets have been used as heat insulation materials in automotive exhaust parts because the embossments on the sheets increase the surface area and reinforce the stiffness of exhaust components. Unlike the press-forming process for flat (non-embossed) sheets, however, that for embossed aluminium sheets is constrained by many restrictions given the distinct mechanical properties and geometric 3D shape of the latter. In designing sheet-stamping tools, manufacturers have recently used CAE technologies based on finite element analysis. Guaranteeing the effectiveness of CAE technologies necessitates information about the plastic yield criterion, which is determined primarily by performing a biaxial tensile test on cruciform-shaped specimens. We measured the yield locus of an embossed aluminium 3004-P sheet by using the camera vision method instead of strain gauge measurement because of the difficulty in attaching a strain gauge to the central region of the aluminium body. The measured yield locus of the studied sheet shows that its yield stress in equi-biaxial stress is smaller than the flat sheet yield locus measured by the strain gauge method. The shape of the yield locus of the embossed aluminium sheet also adequately corresponds with Logan-Hosford anisotropic yield function.

  4. Tissue specific CTCF occupancy and boundary function at the human growth hormone locus.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yu-Cheng; Cooke, Nancy E; Liebhaber, Stephen A

    2014-04-01

    The robust and tissue-specific activation of the human growth hormone (hGH) gene cluster in the pituitary and placenta constitutes an informative model for analysis of gene regulation. The five-gene hGH cluster is regulated by two partially overlapping sets of DNase I hypersensitive sites (HSs) that constitute the pituitary (HSI, II, III and V) and placental (HSIII, IV, and V) locus control regions (LCRs). The single placenta-specific LCR component, HSIV, is located at -30 kb to the cluster. Here we generate a series of hGH/BAC transgenes specifically modified to identify structural features of the hGH locus required for its appropriate placental expression. We find that placental specificity is dependent on the overall multigene configuration of the cluster whereas the distance between the cluster and its LCR impacts the level of placental expression. We further observe that a major function of the placental hGH LCR is to insulate the transgene locus from site-of-integration effects. This insulation activity is linked to placenta-specific occupancy of the chromatin architectural protein, CTCF, at HSIV. These data reveal a remarkable combination of structural configurations and regulatory determinants that must work in concert to insure robust and tightly controlled expression from a complex multigene locus.

  5. Determining the bistability parameter ranges of artificially induced lac operon using the root locus method.

    PubMed

    Avcu, N; Alyürük, H; Demir, G K; Pekergin, F; Cavas, L; Güzeliş, C

    2015-06-01

    This paper employs the root locus method to conduct a detailed investigation of the parameter regions that ensure bistability in a well-studied gene regulatory network namely, lac operon of Escherichia coli (E. coli). In contrast to previous works, the parametric bistability conditions observed in this study constitute a complete set of necessary and sufficient conditions. These conditions were derived by applying the root locus method to the polynomial equilibrium equation of the lac operon model to determine the parameter values yielding the multiple real roots necessary for bistability. The lac operon model used was defined as an ordinary differential equation system in a state equation form with a rational right hand side, and it was compatible with the Hill and Michaelis-Menten approaches of enzyme kinetics used to describe biochemical reactions that govern lactose metabolism. The developed root locus method can be used to study the steady-state behavior of any type of convergent biological system model based on mass action kinetics. This method provides a solution to the problem of analyzing gene regulatory networks under parameter uncertainties because the root locus method considers the model parameters as variable, rather than fixed. The obtained bistability ranges for the lac operon model parameters have the potential to elucidate the appearance of bistability for E. coli cells in in vivo experiments, and they could also be used to design robust hysteretic switches in synthetic biology.

  6. Relationships between locus of control and paranormal beliefs.

    PubMed

    Newby, Robert W; Davis, Jessica Boyette

    2004-06-01

    The present study investigated the associations between scores on paranormal beliefs, locus of control, and certain psychological processes such as affect and cognitions as measured by the Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count. Analysis yielded significant correlations between scores on Locus of Control and two subscales of Tobacyk's (1988) Revised Paranormal Beliefs Scale, New Age Philosophy and Traditional Paranormal Beliefs. A step-wise multiple regression analysis indicated that Locus of Control was significantly related to New Age Philosophy. Other correlations were found between Tobacyk's subscales, Locus of Control, and three processes measured by the Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count.

  7. Impact of locus of control on health message effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Kong, Ying; Shen, Fuyuan

    2011-10-01

    This article examined how individuals' locus of control might moderate the effect of health message frames. An experiment was conducted whereby participants read either individual- or social-responsibility message frames after their locus of control was primed. Results indicated that messages presented in individual-responsibility frames were more persuasive when people were primed with internal locus of control, whereas social-responsibility framed appeals were more persuasive when people were primed with external locus of control. These results were found for individuals in both high and low cognitive load conditions. Theoretical and practical implications of the findings are discussed.

  8. Fine Mapping a Locus Controlling Leg Morphology in the Domestic Dog

    PubMed Central

    Quignon, P.; Schoenebeck, J.J.; Chase, K.; Parker, H.G.; Mosher, D.S.; Johnson, G.S.; Lark, K.G.; Ostrander, E.A.

    2012-01-01

    The domestic dog offers a remarkable opportunity to disentangle the genetics of complex phenotypes. Here, we explore a locus, previously identified in the Portuguese water dog (PWD), associated with PC2, a morphological principal component characterized as leg width versus leg length. The locus was initially mapped to a region of 26 Mb on canine chromosome 12 (CFA12) following a genome-wide scan. Subsequent and extensive genotyping of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and haplotype analysis in both the PWD and selected breeds representing phenotypic extremes of PC2 reduced the region from 26 Mb to 500 kb. The proximity of the critical interval to two collagen genes suggests that the phenotype may be controlled by cis-acting mechanisms. PMID:19717540

  9. Consensus multi-locus sequence typing scheme for Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Wieland; Aanensen, David M.; Boekhout, Teun; Cogliati, Massimo; Diaz, Mara R.; Esposto, Maria Carmela; Fisher, Matthew; Gilgado, Felix; Hagen, Ferry; Kaocharoen, Sirada; Litvintseva, Anastasia P.; Mitchell, Thomas G.; Simwami, Sitali P.; Trilles, Luciana; Viviani, Maria Anna; Kwon-Chung, June

    2010-01-01

    This communication describes the consensus multi-locus typing scheme established by the Cryptococcal Working Group I (Genotyping of Cryptococcus neoformans and C. gattii) of the International Society for Human and Animal Mycology (ISHAM) using seven unlinked genetic loci for global strain genotyping. These genetic loci include the housekeeping genes CAP59, GPD1, LAC1, PLB1, SOD1, URA5 and the IGS1 region. Allele and sequence type information are accessible at http://www.mlst.net/. PMID:19462334

  10. Sexual dimorphism of the dopamine-beta-hydroxylase-immunoreactive neurons in the rat locus ceruleus.

    PubMed

    Luque, J M; de Blas, M R; Segovia, S; Guillamón, A

    1992-06-19

    Sex differences in the noradrenaline synthesizing neurons of the locus ceruleus (LC) in rat brain were investigated immunocytochemically using an antibody to dopamine-beta-hydroxylase. Female adult rats contained a greater structural volume and average somatic area in the anterior intermediate region of the nucleus compared with males. Whether this difference is related to the endocrine status of the animals, and consequently a functionally distinct population of neurons, is yet to be determined.

  11. A Functional and Structural Analysis of the Sex Combs Reduced Locus of Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Pattatucci, A. M.; Otteson, D. C.; Kaufman, T. C.

    1991-01-01

    We have undertaken a developmental genetic analysis of the homeotic gene Sex combs reduced (Scr) of Drosophila melanogaster by examining embryonic and adult phenotypes of mutations affecting Scr gene function. Molecular mapping of Scr breakpoint lesions has defined a segment of >70 kb of DNA necessary for proper Scr gene function. This region is split by the fushi tarazu (ftz) gene, with lesions affecting embryonic Scr function molecularly mapping to the region proximal (5') to ftz and those exhibiting polyphasic semilethality predominantly mapping distal (3') to ftz. Gain-of-function mutations are associated with genomic rearrangements and map throughout the Scr locus. Our analysis has revealed that the Scr locus encompasses genetic elements that are responsible for functions in both the embryonic and larval to adult periods of development. From these studies, we conclude that Scr is a complex genetic locus with an extensive regulatory region that directs functions required for normal head and thoracic development in both the embryo and the adult and that the regulation of Scr during these two periods is distinct. PMID:1743486

  12. Fine mapping of E(kp)-1, a locus associated with silkworm (Bombyx mori) proleg development.

    PubMed

    Xiang, H; Li, M; Yang, F; Guo, Q; Zhan, S; Lin, H; Miao, X; Huang, Y

    2008-05-01

    The silkworm homeotic mutant E(kp) has a pair of rudimentary abdominal legs, called prolegs, in its A2 segment. This phenotype is caused by a single dominant mutation at the E(kp)-1 locus, which was previously mapped to chromosome 6. To explore the possible association of Hox genes with proleg development in the silkworm, a map-based cloning strategy was used to isolate the E(kp)-1 locus. Five E(kp)-1-linked simple sequence repeat markers on chromosome 6 were used to generate a low-resolution map with a total genetic distance of 39.5 cM. Four additional cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence markers were developed based on the initial map. The closest marker to E(kp)-1 was at a genetic distance of 2.7 cM. A high-resolution genetic map was constructed using nine BC1 segregating populations consisting of 2396 individuals. Recombination suppression was observed in the vicinity of E(kp)-1. Four molecular markers were tightly linked to E(kp)-1, and three were clustered with it. These markers were used to screen a BAC library. A single bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone spanning the E(kp)-1 locus was identified, and E(kp)-1 was delimited to a region less than 220 kb long that included the Hox gene abdominal-A and a non-coding locus, iab-4. These results provide essential information for the isolation of this locus, which may shed light on the mechanism of proleg development in the silkworm and possibly in Lepidoptera.

  13. Patterns of polymorphism at the self-incompatibility locus in 1,083 Arabidopsis thaliana genomes.

    PubMed

    Tsuchimatsu, Takashi; Goubet, Pauline M; Gallina, Sophie; Holl, Anne-Catherine; Fobis-Loisy, Isabelle; Bergès, Hélène; Marande, William; Prat, Elisa; Meng, Dazhe; Long, Quan; Platzer, Alexander; Nordborg, Magnus; Vekemans, Xavier; Castric, Vincent

    2017-04-04

    Although the transition to selfing in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana involved the loss of the self-incompatibility (SI) system, it clearly did not occur due to the fixation of a single inactivating mutation at the locus determining the specificities of SI (the S-locus). At least three groups of divergent haplotypes (haplogroups), corresponding to ancient functional S-alleles, have been maintained at this locus, and extensive functional studies have shown that all three carry distinct inactivating mutations. However, the historical process of loss of SI is not well understood, in particular its relation with the last glaciation. Here, we took advantage of recently published genomic re-sequencing data in 1,083 Arabidopsis thaliana accessions that we combined with BAC sequencing to obtain polymorphism information for the whole S-locus region at a species-wide scale. The accessions differed by several major rearrangements including large deletions and inter-haplogroup recombinations, forming a set of haplogroups that are widely distributed throughout the native range and largely overlap geographically. 'Relict' A. thaliana accessions that directly derive from glacial refugia are polymorphic at the S-locus, suggesting that the three haplogroups were already present when glacial refugia from the last Ice Age became isolated. Inter-haplogroup recombinant haplotypes were highly frequent, and detailed analysis of recombination breakpoints suggested multiple independent origins. These findings suggest that the complete loss of SI in A. thaliana involved independent self-compatible mutants that arose prior to the last Ice Age, and experienced further rearrangements during post-glacial colonization.

  14. The Cajal Body and Histone Locus Body

    PubMed Central

    Nizami, Zehra; Deryusheva, Svetlana; Gall, Joseph G.

    2010-01-01

    The Cajal body (CB) is a nuclear organelle present in all eukaryotes that have been carefully studied. It is identified by the signature protein coilin and by CB-specific RNAs (scaRNAs). CBs contain high concentrations of splicing small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) and other RNA processing factors, suggesting that they are sites for assembly and/or posttranscriptional modification of the splicing machinery of the nucleus. The histone locus body (HLB) contains factors required for processing histone pre-mRNAs. As its name implies, the HLB is associated with the genes that code for histones, suggesting that it may function to concentrate processing factors at their site of action. CBs and HLBs are present throughout the interphase of the cell cycle, but disappear during mitosis. The biogenesis of CBs shows the features of a self-organizing structure. PMID:20504965

  15. Acculturation and Health Locus of Control among Mexican American Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guinn, Bobby

    1998-01-01

    Health locus of control was investigated across culture of origin (Mexicanism), mainstream culture (Americanism), and bicultural linguistic-acculturation domains among 424 Mexican-American adolescents. Belief in powerful others' external control was the strongest explanation of locus of control in the culture-of-origin domain; internal control was…

  16. Anxiety, locus of control and appraisal of air pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Navarro, P.L.; Simpson-Housley, P.; de Man, A.F.

    1987-06-01

    100 residents of Santiago de Chile took part in a study of the relationship among locus of control, trait-anxiety, and perception of air pollution. Concern over the problem of atmospheric pollution and number of antipollution measures taken was related to trait-anxiety. Locus of control was associated with variation in awareness of pollution hazard.

  17. Personality and Locus of Control among School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pandya, Archana A.; Jogsan, Yogesh A.

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this investigation is to find out the sex differences in personality traits and locus of control among school children. A total 60 children (30 boys and 30 girls) were taken as a sample. The research tool for personality, children personality questionnaire was used, which was made by Cattell and Porter. Locus of control was…

  18. Metacognition: As a Predictor of One's Academic Locus of Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arslan, Serhat; Akin, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of metacognition on one's academic locus of control. The study's sample group consists of 451 university students enrolled in various programs at Sakarya University, Turkey. In this study, the Metacognitive Awareness Inventory and the Academic Locus of Control Scale were used. The correlations and…

  19. Externality and Locus of Control in Obese Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isbitsky, Joyce Renee; White, Donna Romano

    1981-01-01

    Significant sex differences indicated that boys generally ate more than girls and held more internal locus of control expectancies. However, obese and normal-weighted children were not differentiated by their performance on either food-related measures nor by their locus of control expectancies. (Author/MP)

  20. Mutations Affecting Expression of the rosy Locus in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chong Sung; Curtis, Daniel; McCarron, Margaret; Love, Carol; Gray, Mark; Bender, Welcome; Chovnick, Arthur

    1987-01-01

    The rosy locus in Drosophila melanogaster codes for the enzyme xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH). Previous studies defined a "control element" near the 5' end of the gene, where variant sites affected the amount of rosy mRNA and protein produced. We have determined the DNA sequence of this region from both genomic and cDNA clones, and from the ry+10 underproducer strain. This variant strain had many sequence differences, so that the site of the regulatory change could not be fixed. A mutagenesis was also undertaken to isolate new regulatory mutations. We induced 376 new mutations with 1-ethyl-1-nitrosourea (ENU) and screened them to isolate those that reduced the amount of XDH protein produced, but did not change the properties of the enzyme. Genetic mapping was used to find mutations located near the 5' end of the gene. DNA from each of seven mutants was cloned and sequenced through the 5' region. Mutant base changes were identified in all seven; they appear to affect splicing and translation of the rosy mRNA. In a related study (T. P. Keith et al. 1987), the genomic and cDNA sequences are extended through the 3' end of the gene; the combined sequences define the processing pattern of the rosy transcript and predict the amino acid sequence of XDH. PMID:3036645

  1. A Quantitative Trait Locus on chr.4 Regulates Thymic Involution

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ritu; Avagyan, Serine

    2010-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying age-associated thymic involution are unknown. In mice, thymic involution shows mouse strain–dependent genetic variation. Identification of the underlying genes would provide mechanistic insight into this elusive process. We previously showed that responsiveness of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) to transforming growth factor-beta 2, a positive regulator of HSPC proliferation, is regulated by a quantitative trait locus (QTL) on chr. 4, Tb2r1. Interestingly, Tgfb2+/− mice have delayed thymic involution. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that a QTL on chr. 4 might regulate thymic involution. Aged, but not young, B6.D2-chr.4 congenic mice, where the telomeric region of chr. 4 was introgressed from DBA/2 to C57BL/6 mice, had larger thymi, and better maintenance of early thymic precursors than C57BL/6 control mice. These observations unequivocally demonstrate that the telomeric region of chr. 4 contains a QTL, Ti1 (thymic involution 1) that regulates thymic involution, and suggest the possibility that Ti1 may be identical to Tb2r1. PMID:20371546

  2. A locus regulating bronchial hyperresponsiveness maps to chromosome 5q

    SciTech Connect

    Levitt, R.C.; Meyers, D.A.; Bleecker, E.R.

    1994-09-01

    Bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) is one of the hallmarks of asthma. BHR correlates well with asthmatic symptoms and the response to treatment. Moreover, BHR appears to be closely related to airways inflammation. Numerous studies have demonstrated a familial aggregation; however, this phenotype is not likely inherited as a simple Mendelian trait. BHR is also closely associated with total serum IgE levels, as are allergy and asthma. We studied 92 families from Northern Holland ascertained through a parent with asthma who were originally studied between 1962-1970. Since there are a number of candidate genes on chromosome 5q potentially important in producing BHR, families were genotyped for markers in this region. These genes regulate IgE production and the cellular elements that are likely involved in inflammation associated with BHR, allergy and asthma. They include IL-4, IL-3, IL-5, IL-9, IL-12, IL-13 and GM-CSF. Linkage of BHR with markers on 5q was tested using a model free sib-pair method. The data suggest a locus for BHR maps near the cytokine gene cluster on 5q. This region appears critical in producing susceptibility to BHR and possibly to asthma.

  3. Mutations affecting expression of the rosy locus in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.S.; Curtis, D.; McCarron, M.; Love, C.; Gray, M.; Bender, W.; Chovnick, A.

    1987-05-01

    The rosy locus in Drosophila melanogaster codes for the enzyme xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH). Previous studies defined a control element near the 5' end of the gene, where variant sites affected the amount of rosy mRNA and protein produced. The authors have determined the DNA sequence of this region from both genomic and cDNA clones, and from the ry/sup +10/ underproducer strain. This variant strain had many sequence differences, so that the site of the regulatory change could not be fixed. A mutagenesis was also undertaken to isolate new regulatory mutations. They induced 376 new mutations with 1-ethyl-1-nitrosourea (ENU) and screened them to isolate those that reduced the amount of XDH protein produced, but did not change the properties of the enzyme. Genetic mapping was used to find mutations located near the 5' end of the gene. DNA from each of seven mutants was cloned and sequenced through the 5' region. Mutant base changes were identified in all seven; they appear to affect splicing and translation of the rosy mRNA. In a related study, the genomic and cDNA sequences are extended through the 3' end of the gene; the combined sequences define the processing pattern of the rosy transcript and predict the amino acid sequence of XDH.

  4. Exonic Re-Sequencing of the Chromosome 2q24.3 Parkinson's Disease Locus.

    PubMed

    Labbé, Catherine; Ogaki, Kotaro; Lorenzo-Betancor, Oswaldo; Carrasquillo, Minerva M; Heckman, Michael G; McCarthy, Allan; Soto-Ortolaza, Alexandra I; Walton, Ronald L; Lynch, Timothy; Siuda, Joanna; Opala, Grzegorz; Krygowska-Wajs, Anna; Barcikowska, Maria; Czyzewski, Krzysztof; Dickson, Dennis W; Uitti, Ryan J; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Ross, Owen A

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in Parkinson's disease (PD) have identified over 20 genomic regions associated with disease risk. Many of these loci include several candidate genes making it difficult to pinpoint the causal gene. The locus on chromosome 2q24.3 encompasses three genes: B3GALT1, STK39, and CERS6. In order to identify if the causal variants are simple missense changes, we sequenced all 31 exons of these three genes in 187 patients with PD. We identified 13 exonic variants including four non-synonymous and three insertion/deletion variants (indels). These non-synonymous variants and rs2102808, the GWAS tag SNP, were genotyped in three independent series consisting of a total of 1976 patients and 1596 controls. Our results show that the seven identified 2q24.3 coding variants are not independently responsible for the GWAS association signal at the locus; however, there is a haplotype, which contains both rs2102808 and a STK39 exon 1 6bp indel variant, that is significantly associated with PD risk (Odds Ratio [OR] = 1.35, 95% CI: 1.11-1.64, P = 0.003). This haplotype is more associated than each of the two variants independently (OR = 1.23, P = 0.005 and 1.10, P = 0.10, respectively). Our findings suggest that the risk variant is likely located in a non-coding region. Additional sequencing of the locus including promoter and regulatory regions will be needed to pinpoint the association at this locus that leads to an increased risk to PD.

  5. High-density SNP genotyping to define beta-globin locus haplotypes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Muralidhar, Shalini; Singh, Manisha; Sylvan, Caprice; Kalra, Inderdeep S; Quinn, Charles T; Onyekwere, Onyinye C; Pace, Betty S

    2009-01-01

    Five major beta-globin locus haplotypes have been established in individuals with sickle cell disease (SCD) from the Benin, Bantu, Senegal, Cameroon, and Arab-Indian populations. Historically, beta-haplotypes were established using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis across the beta-locus, which consists of five functional beta-like globin genes located on chromosome 11. Previous attempts to correlate these haplotypes as robust predictors of clinical phenotypes observed in SCD have not been successful. We speculate that the coverage and distribution of the RFLP sites located proximal to or within the globin genes are not sufficiently dense to accurately reflect the complexity of this region. To test our hypothesis, we performed RFLP analysis and high-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping across the beta-locus using DNA samples from healthy African Americans with either normal hemoglobin A (HbAA) or individuals with homozygous SS (HbSS) disease. Using the genotyping data from 88 SNPs and Haploview analysis, we generated a greater number of haplotypes than that observed with RFLP analysis alone. Furthermore, a unique pattern of long-range linkage disequilibrium between the locus control region and the beta-like globin genes was observed in the HbSS group. Interestingly, we observed multiple SNPs within the HindIII restriction site located in the Ggamma-globin intervening sequence II which produced the same RFLP pattern. These findings illustrated the inability of RFLP analysis to decipher the complexity of sequence variations that impacts genomic structure in this region. Our data suggest that high-density SNP mapping may be required to accurately define beta-haplotypes that correlate with the different clinical phenotypes observed in SCD.

  6. Effects of preferred retinal locus placement on text navigation and development of advantageous trained retinal locus.

    PubMed

    Watson, Gale R; Schuchard, Ronald A; De l'Aune, William R; Watkins, Erica

    2006-01-01

    Sixty readers were evaluated for visual function and text-navigation ability. The visual field and preferred retinal locus (PRL) were measured with a scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO). We found significant differences in text-navigation ability based on scotoma and PRL placement. Readers with a PRL to the left of or above a scotoma had significantly less text-navigation abilities. Readers with a PRL to the left of a scotoma tended to misread words with similar beginnings and omit the last word on a line. Readers with a PRL above a scotoma tended to skip a line or reread the same line twice. In a follow-up study, seven subjects with a nonadvantageous PRL quickly developed a trained retinal locus (TRL) during instruction with an SLO. Although the readers developed the TRL in about 15 minutes, they read slower with the TRL than the PRL. This TRL research provides promising pilot data.

  7. A soybean quantitative trait locus that promotes flowering under long days is identified as FT5a, a FLOWERING LOCUS T ortholog

    PubMed Central

    Takeshima, Ryoma; Hayashi, Takafumi; Zhu, Jianghui; Zhao, Chen; Xu, Meilan; Yamaguchi, Naoya; Sayama, Takashi; Ishimoto, Masao; Kong, Lingping; Shi, Xinyi; Liu, Baohui; Tian, Zhixi; Yamada, Tetsuya; Kong, Fanjiang; Abe, Jun

    2016-01-01

    FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) is an important floral integrator whose functions are conserved across plant species. In soybean, two orthologs, FT2a and FT5a, play a major role in initiating flowering. Their expression in response to different photoperiods is controlled by allelic combinations at the maturity loci E1 to E4, generating variation in flowering time among cultivars. We determined the molecular basis of a quantitative trait locus (QTL) for flowering time in linkage group J (Chromosome 16). Fine-mapping delimited the QTL to a genomic region of 107kb that harbors FT5a. We detected 15 DNA polymorphisms between parents with the early-flowering (ef) and late-flowering (lf) alleles in the promoter region, an intron, and the 3′ untranslated region of FT5a, although the FT5a coding regions were identical. Transcript abundance of FT5a was higher in near-isogenic lines for ef than in those for lf, suggesting that different transcriptional activities or mRNA stability caused the flowering time difference. Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) calling from re-sequencing data for 439 cultivated and wild soybean accessions indicated that ef is a rare haplotype that is distinct from common haplotypes including lf. The ef allele at FT5a may play an adaptive role at latitudes where early flowering is desirable. PMID:27422993

  8. A Two-locus DNA Sequence Database for Typing Plant and Human Pathogens Within the Fusarium oxysporum Species Complex

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We constructed a two-locus database, comprising partial translation elongation factor (EF-1alpha) gene sequences and nearly full-length sequences of the nuclear ribosomal intergenic spacer region (IGS rDNA) for 850 isolates spanning the phylogenetic breadth of the Fusarium oxysporum species complex ...

  9. Refinement of the spinal muscular atrophy locus to the interval between D5S435 and MAP1B

    SciTech Connect

    Soares, V.M.; Brzustowicz, L.M.; Kleyn, P.W.; Knowles, J.A.; Palmer, D.A.; Asokan, S.; Penchaszadeh, G.K.; Gilliam, T.C. ); Munsat, T.L. )

    1993-02-01

    The childhood-onset SMA locus has been mapped to chromosome 5q13, in a region bounded by the proximal locus, D5S6, and the closely linked distal loci, D5S112 and MAP1B. We now describe a highly polymorphic, tightly linked microsatellite marker (D5S435) that is very likely the closet proximal marker to the SMA locus. Multipoint linkage analysis firmly establishes the following order of markers at 5q13; centromere-D5S76-D5S6-D5S435-MAP1B/D5S112-D5S39-telomere. The data indicate that SMA resides in an approximately 0.7-cM (range 01.-2.1) region between D5S435 and MAP1B. This finding reduces by approximately fourfold the genetic region that most likely harbors the SMA locus and will facilitate the physical mapping and cloning of the disease gene region. 24 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Locus of Control Orientation: Parents, Peers, and Place.

    PubMed

    Ahlin, Eileen M; Lobo Antunes, Maria João

    2015-09-01

    An internal locus of control contributes to positive youth outcomes such as a general well-being and academic success, while also serving as a protective factor against exposure to community violence and reducing negative behaviors like violence. Despite these benefits, very little is known about antecedents of an internal locus of control orientation. Without an understanding of what factors contribute to the development of an internal locus of control, it is not clear how to best encourage its formation. This study uses data from the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods to examine whether various mesosystem variables (family management strategies, peer interactions, neighborhood context, and individual-level characteristics) are associated with an internal locus of control orientation among 1,076 youth ages 9-19 living in 78 Chicago neighborhoods. Study participants were Hispanic (46 %), African American (34 %), and White (15 %), and 50 % were female. The findings suggest that, while most levels of the mesosystem influence locus of control orientation, family management strategies are more prominent determinants of an internal locus of control than peers, neighborhood context, or individual characteristics. Parental supervision over the time a youth spends at home and family socioeconomic status are consistent predictors of an internal locus of control, while harsh discipline is associated with an external locus of control. The discussion examines the import of various parenting techniques in shaping an internal locus of control and considers future avenues for research to further unpack how antecedents of locus of control can vary across youth.

  11. Chromosomal orientation of the lambda light chain locus: V lambda is proximal to C lambda in 22q11.

    PubMed Central

    Emanuel, B S; Cannizzaro, L A; Magrath, I; Tsujimoto, Y; Nowell, P C; Croce, C M

    1985-01-01

    We have demonstrated that the chromosomal breakpoint at 22q11 of a Burkitt lymphoma cell line (PA682) with an 8;22 translocation interrupts the variable region of the lambda light chain locus. In these cells, all of the C lambda and some V lambda sequences translocate to the 8q+ chromosome whereas some V lambda sequences remain on the 22q-. These results indicate that the lambda light chain locus on the long arm of chromosome 22 is oriented such that V lambda is proximal to C lambda. Images PMID:3923432

  12. Genetic and molecular characterization of the maize rp3 rust resistance locus.

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Craig A; Richter, Todd E; Collins, Nicholas C; Nicolas, Marie; Trick, Harold N; Pryor, Tony; Hulbert, Scot H

    2002-01-01

    In maize, the Rp3 gene confers resistance to common rust caused by Puccinia sorghi. Flanking marker analysis of rust-susceptible rp3 variants suggested that most of them arose via unequal crossing over, indicating that rp3 is a complex locus like rp1. The PIC13 probe identifies a nucleotide binding site-leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) gene family that maps to the complex. Rp3 variants show losses of PIC13 family members relative to the resistant parents when probed with PIC13, indicating that the Rp3 gene is a member of this family. Gel blots and sequence analysis suggest that at least 9 family members are at the locus in most Rp3-carrying lines and that at least 5 of these are transcribed in the Rp3-A haplotype. The coding regions of 14 family members, isolated from three different Rp3-carrying haplotypes, had DNA sequence identities from 93 to 99%. Partial sequencing of clones of a BAC contig spanning the rp3 locus in the maize inbred line B73 identified five different PIC13 paralogues in a region of approximately 140 kb. PMID:12242248

  13. Locus- and cell type-specific epigenetic switching during cellular differentiation in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ying-Tao; Fasolino, Maria; Zhou, Zhaolan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Epigenomic reconfiguration, including changes in DNA methylation and histone modifications, is crucial for the differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) into somatic cells. However, the extent to which the epigenome is reconfigured and the interplay between components of the epigenome during cellular differentiation remain poorly defined. METHODS We systematically analyzed and compared DNA methylation, various histone modification, and transcriptome profiles in ESCs with those of two distinct types of somatic cells from human and mouse. RESULTS We found that global DNA methylation levels are lower in somatic cells compared to ESCs in both species. We also found that 80% of regions with histone modification occupancy differ between human ESCs and the two human somatic cell types. Approximately 70% of the reconfigurations in DNA methylation and histone modifications are locus- and cell type-specific. Intriguingly, the loss of DNA methylation is accompanied by the gain of different histone modifications in a locus- and cell type-specific manner. Further examination of transcriptional changes associated with epigenetic reconfiguration at promoter regions revealed an epigenetic switching for gene regulation—a transition from stable gene silencing mediated by DNA methylation in ESCs to flexible gene repression facilitated by repressive histone modifications in somatic cells. CONCLUSIONS Our findings demonstrate that the epigenome is reconfigured in a locus- and cell type-specific manner and epigenetic switching is common during cellular differentiation in both human and mouse. PMID:28261266

  14. Bivariate genomic analysis identifies a hidden locus associated with bacteria hypersensitive response in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Biao; Li, Zhuocheng; Xu, Weilin; Feng, Xiao; Wan, Qianhui; Zan, Yanjun; Sheng, Sitong; Shen, Xia

    2017-01-01

    Multi-phenotype analysis has drawn increasing attention to high-throughput genomic studies, whereas only a few applications have justified the use of multivariate techniques. We applied a recently developed multi-trait analysis method on a small set of bacteria hypersensitive response phenotypes and identified a single novel locus missed by conventional single-trait genome-wide association studies. The detected locus harbors a minor allele that elevates the risk of leaf collapse response to the injection of avrRpm1-modified Pseudomonas syringae (P = 1.66e-08). Candidate gene AT3G32930 with in the detected region and its co-expressed genes showed significantly reduced expression after P. syringae interference. Our results again emphasize that multi-trait analysis should not be neglected in association studies, as the power of specific multi-trait genotype-phenotype maps might only be tractable when jointly considering multiple phenotypes. PMID:28338080

  15. Causes and Consequences of Multi-Locus Imprinting Disturbances in Humans.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Delgado, Marta; Riccio, Andrea; Eggermann, Thomas; Maher, Eamonn R; Lapunzina, Pablo; Mackay, Deborah; Monk, David

    2016-07-01

    Eight syndromes are associated with the loss of methylation at specific imprinted loci. There has been increasing evidence that these methylation defects in patients are not isolated events occurring at a given disease-associated locus but that some of these patients may have multi-locus imprinting disturbances (MLID) affecting additional imprinted regions. With the recent advances in technology, methylation profiling has revealed that imprinted loci represent only a small fraction of the methylation differences observed between the gametes. To figure out how imprinting anomalies occur at multiple imprinted domains, we have to understand the interplay between DNA methylation and histone modifications in the process of selective imprint protection during pre-implantation reprogramming, which, if disrupted, leads to these complex imprinting disorders (IDs).

  16. New polymorphic markers in the vicinity of the pearl locus on mouse chromosome 13.

    PubMed

    Xu, H P; Yanak, B L; Wigler, M H; Gorin, M B

    1996-01-01

    We have used a Mus domesticus/-Mus spretus congenic animal that was selected for retention of Mus spretus DNA around the pearl locus to create a highly polymorphic region suitable for screening new markers. Representation difference analysis (RDA) was performed with either DNA from the congenic animal or C57BL/6J as the driver for subtraction. Four clones were identified, characterized, and converted to PCR-based polymorphic markers. Three of the four markers equally subdivide a 10-cM interval containing the pearl locus, with the fourth located centromeric to it. These markers have been placed on the mouse genetic map by use of an interspecific backcross panel between Mus domesticus (C57BL/6J) and Mus spretus generated by The Jackson Laboratory.

  17. Exploiting synteny in Cucumis for mapping of Psm: a unique locus controlling paternal mitochondrial sorting.

    PubMed

    Al-Faifi, Sulieman; Meyer, Jenelle D F; Garcia-Mas, Jordi; Monforte, Antonio J; Havey, Michael J

    2008-08-01

    The three genomes of cucumber show different modes of transmission, nuclear DNA bi-parentally, plastid DNA maternally, and mitochondrial DNA paternally. The mosaic (MSC) phenotype of cucumber is associated with mitochondrial DNA rearrangements and is a valuable tool for studying mitochondrial transmission. A nuclear locus (Psm) has been identified in cucumber that controls sorting of paternally transmitted mitochondrial DNA. Comparative sequencing and mapping of cucumber and melon revealed extensive synteny on the recombinational and sequence levels near Psm and placed this locus on linkage group R of cucumber and G10 of melon. However, the cucumber genomic region near Psm was surprisingly monomorphic with an average of one SNP every 25 kb, requiring that a family from a more diverse cross is produced for fine mapping and eventual cloning of Psm. The cucumber ortholog of Arabidopsis mismatch repair (MSH1) was cloned and it segregated independently of Psm, revealing that this candidate gene is not Psm.

  18. Suppression of a Lethal Trisomic Phenotype in Drosophila Melanogaster by Increased Dosage of an Unlinked Locus

    PubMed Central

    Dorer, D. R.; Cadden, M. A.; Gordesky-Gold, B.; Harries, G.; Christensen, A. C.

    1993-01-01

    One of the most extreme examples of gene dosage sensitivity is the Triplo-lethal locus (Tpl) on the third chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster, which is lethal when present in either one or three copies. Increased dosage of an unlinked locus, Isis, suppresses the triplo-lethal phenotype of Tpl, but not the haplo-lethal phenotype. We have mapped Isis to the X chromosome region 7E3-8A5, and shown that the suppression is a gene dosage effect. Altered dosage of Isis in the presence of two copies of Tpl has no obvious effects. By examining the interactions between Isis dosage and Tpl we suggest that Isis does not directly repress Tpl expression, but acts downstream on the triplo-lethal phenotype of Tpl. PMID:8514133

  19. Polymer models of the hierarchical folding of the Hox-B chromosomal locus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annunziatella, Carlo; Chiariello, Andrea M.; Bianco, Simona; Nicodemi, Mario

    2016-10-01

    As revealed by novel technologies, chromosomes in the nucleus of mammalian cells have a complex spatial organization that serves vital functional purposes. Here we use models from polymer physics to identify the mechanisms that control their three-dimensional spatial organization. In particular, we investigate a model of the Hox-B locus, an important genomic region involved in embryo development, to expose the principles regulating chromatin folding and its complex behaviors in mouse embryonic stem cells. We reconstruct with high accuracy the pairwise contact matrix of the Hox-B locus as derived by Hi-C experiments and investigate its hierarchical folding dynamics. We trace back the observed behaviors to general scaling properties of polymer physics.

  20. Genetic and physical maps around the sex-determining M-locus of the dioecious plant asparagus.

    PubMed

    Telgmann-Rauber, Alexa; Jamsari, Ari; Kinney, Michael S; Pires, J Chris; Jung, Christian

    2007-09-01

    Asparagus officinalis L. is a dioecious plant. A region called the M-locus located on a pair of homomorphic sex chromosomes controls the sexual dimorphism in asparagus. The aim of this work was to clone the region determining sex in asparagus from its position in the genome. The structure of the region encompassing M should be investigated and compared to the sex-determining regions in other dioecious model species. To establish an improved basis for physical mapping, a high-resolution genetic map was enriched with AFLP markers closely linked to the target locus by carrying out a bulked segregant analysis. By screening a BAC library with AFLP- and STS-markers followed by chromosome walking, a physical map with eight contigs could be established. However, the gaps between the contigs could not be closed due to a plethora of repetitive elements. Surprisingly, two of the contigs on one side of the M-locus did not overlap although they have been established with two markers, which mapped in a distance as low as 0.25 cM flanking the sex locus. Thus, the clustering of the markers indicates a reduced recombination frequency within the M-region. On the opposite side of the M-locus, a contig was mapped in a distance of 0.38 cM. Four closely linked BAC clones were partially sequenced and 64 putative ORFs were identified. Interestingly, only 25% of the ORFs showed sequence similarity to known proteins and ESTs. In addition, an accumulation of repetitive sequences and a low gene density was revealed in the sex-determining region of asparagus. Molecular cytogenetic and sequence analysis of BACs flanking the M-locus indicate that the BACs contain highly repetitive sequences that localize to centromeric and pericentromeric locations on all asparagus chromosomes, which hindered the localization of the M-locus to the single pair of sex chromosomes. We speculate that dioecious Silene, papaya and Asparagus species may represent three stages in the evolution of XX, XY sex

  1. AKT as locus of fragility in robust cancer system.

    PubMed

    Radisavljevic, Ziv

    2008-08-15

    Metastatic cancer is a complex positive feedback loop system. Such as system has a tendency to acquire extreme robustness. Signaling pathways controlling that robustness can fail completely if an essential element from the signaling is removed. That element is a locus of fragility. Targeting that locus represents the best way to target the cancer robustness. This prospect presents another locus of fragility in signaling complex system network, controlling the cell cycle progression through the PI3K/AKT/mTOR/RAN pathway and cell migration and angiogenesis through the VEGF/PI3K/AKT/NO/ICAM-1 pathway. The locus of fragility of these pathways is AKT, which is regulated by a balance of catalase/H2O2 or by AKT inhibitor. Tiny and trivial perturbations such as change in redox state in the cells by antioxidant enzyme catalase, scavenging H2O2 signaling molecule, regulates robust signaling molecule AKT, abolishing its phosporilation and inducing cascading failure of robust signaling pathways for cell growth, proliferation, migration, and angiogenesis. An anticancer effect of the antioxidant is achieved through the AKT locus, by abolishing signals from growth factors VEGF, HGF, HIF-1alpha and H2O2. Previously reported locus of fragility nitric oxide (NO) and locus AKT are close in the complex signaling interactome network, but they regulate distinct signaling modules. Simultaneously targeted loci represents new principles in cancer robustness chemotherapy by blocking cell proliferation, migration, angiogenesis and inducing rather slow then fast apoptosis leading to slow eradication of cancer.

  2. Characterization of a hypoxia-response element in the Epo locus of the pufferfish, Takifugu rubripes.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Rashmi P; Tohari, Sumanty; Ho, Adrian; Brenner, Sydney; Venkatesh, Byrappa

    2010-06-01

    Animals respond to hypoxia by increasing synthesis of the glycoprotein hormone erythropoietin (Epo) which in turn stimulates the production of red blood cells. The gene encoding Epo has been recently cloned in teleost fishes such as the pufferfish Takifugu rubripes (fugu) and zebrafish (Danio rerio). It has been shown that the transcription levels of Epo in teleost fishes increase in response to anemia or hypoxia in a manner similar to its human ortholog. However, the cis-regulatory element(s) mediating the hypoxia response of Epo gene in fishes has not been identified. In the present study, using the human hepatoma cell line (Hep3B), we have identified and characterized a hypoxia response element (HRE) in the fugu Epo locus. The sequence of the fugu HRE (ACGTGCTG) is identical to that of the HRE in the human EPO locus. However, unlike the HRE in the mammalian Epo locus, which is located in the 3' region of the gene, the fugu HRE is located in the 5' flanking region and on the opposite strand of DNA. This HRE is conserved in other teleosts such as Tetraodon and zebrafish in a similar location. A 365-bp fragment containing the fugu HRE was able to drive GFP expression in the liver of transgenic zebrafish. However, we could not ascertain if the expression of transgene is induced by hypoxia in vivo due to the low and variable levels of GFP expression in transgenic zebrafish. Our investigations also revealed that the Epo locus has experienced extensive rearrangements during vertebrate evolution.

  3. Asexual cephalosporin C producer Acremonium chrysogenum carries a functional mating type locus.

    PubMed

    Pöggeler, Stefanie; Hoff, Birgit; Kück, Ulrich

    2008-10-01

    Acremonium chrysogenum, the fungal producer of the pharmaceutically relevant beta-lactam antibiotic cephalosporin C, is classified as asexual because no direct observation of mating or meiosis has yet been reported. To assess the potential of A. chrysogenum for sexual reproduction, we screened an expressed sequence tag library from A. chrysogenum for the expression of mating type (MAT) genes, which are the key regulators of sexual reproduction. We identified two putative mating type genes that are homologues of the alpha-box domain gene, MAT1-1-1 and MAT1-1-2, encoding an HPG domain protein defined by the presence of the three invariant amino acids histidine, proline, and glycine. In addition, cDNAs encoding a putative pheromone receptor and pheromone-processing enzymes, as well as components of a pheromone response pathway, were found. Moreover, the entire A. chrysogenum MAT1-1 (AcMAT1-1) gene and regions flanking the MAT region were obtained from a genomic cosmid library, and sequence analysis revealed that in addition to AcMAT1-1-1 and AcMAT1-1-2, the AcMAT1-1 locus comprises a third mating type gene, AcMAT1-1-3, encoding a high-mobility-group domain protein. The alpha-box domain sequence of AcMAT1-1-1 was used to determine the phylogenetic relationships of A. chrysogenum to other ascomycetes. To determine the functionality of the AcMAT1-1 locus, the entire MAT locus was transferred into a MAT deletion strain of the heterothallic ascomycete Podospora anserina (the PaDeltaMAT strain). After fertilization with a P. anserina MAT1-2 (MAT(+)) strain, the corresponding transformants developed fruiting bodies with mature ascospores. Thus, the results of our functional analysis of the AcMAT1-1 locus provide strong evidence to hypothesize a sexual cycle in A. chrysogenum.

  4. Coat colour in dogs: identification of the Merle locus in the Australian shepherd breed

    PubMed Central

    Hédan, Benoit; Corre, Sébastien; Hitte, Christophe; Dréano, Stéphane; Vilboux, Thierry; Derrien, Thomas; Denis, Bernard; Galibert, Francis; Galibert, Marie-Dominique; André, Catherine

    2006-01-01

    Background Coat colours in canines have many natural phenotypic variants. Some of the genes and alleles involved also cause genetic developmental defects, which are also observed in humans and mice. We studied the genetic bases of the merle phenotype in dogs to shed light on the pigmentation mechanisms and to identify genes involved in these complex pathways. The merle phenotype includes a lack of eumelanic pigmentation and developmental defects, hearing impairments and microphthalmia. It is similar to that observed in microphthalmia mouse mutants. Results Taking advantage of the dog as a powerful genetic model and using recently available genomic resources, we investigated the segregation of the merle phenotype in a five-generation pedigree, comprising 96 sampled Australian shepherd dogs. Genetic linkage analysis allowed us to identify a locus for the merle phenotype, spanning 5.5 megabases, at the centromeric tip of canine chromosome 10 (CFA10). This locus was supported by a Lod score of 15.65 at a recombination fraction θ = 0. Linkage analysis in three other breeds revealed that the same region is linked to the merle phenotype. This region, which is orthologous to human chromosome 12 (HSA12 q13-q14), belongs to a conserved ordered segment in the human and mouse genome and comprises several genes potentially involved in pigmentation and development. Conclusion This study has identified the locus for the merle coat colour in dogs to be at the centromeric end of CFA10. Genetic studies on other breeds segregating the merle phenotype should allow the locus to be defined more accurately with the aim of identifying the gene. This work shows the power of the canine system to search for the genetic bases of mammalian pigmentation and developmental pathways. PMID:16504149

  5. Sequence Evolution of the Drosophila Heat Shock Locus Hsrω. I. the Nonrepeated Portion of the Gene

    PubMed Central

    Garbe, J. C.; Bendena, W. G.; Pardue, M. L.

    1989-01-01

    The locus which we now call hsrω was originally identified as a large heat shock puff in polytene region 93D of Drosophila melanogaster. This puff was subsequently found to have several phenotypic characteristics that distinguished it from other heat shock puffs. These characteristics include induction by a number of agents that do not induce other puffs and the presence of large ribonucleotide particles that are not found elsewhere. Each Drosophila species has one heat shock puff with these phenotypes. In contrast to the strong sequence conservation seen in puffs coding for heat shock proteins, very little cross-hybridization is detected between hsrω loci in different species, suggesting that the hsrω loci are diverging rapidly. Comparative analyses of the hsrω locus from D. melanogaster, D. pseudoobscura, and D. hydei show that, despite the sequence change, the structure of the locus and its transcripts has been conserved, along with a number of short regions of the sequence. The short regions of conservation offer some clues to the function of this unusual locus. In addition, these comparisons offer a view of the evolution of a gene whose primary function does not appear to be protein coding. PMID:2475389

  6. Mediator facilitates transcriptional activation and dynamic long-range contacts at the IgH locus during class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Thomas-Claudepierre, Anne-Sophie; Robert, Isabelle; Rocha, Pedro P; Raviram, Ramya; Schiavo, Ebe; Heyer, Vincent; Bonneau, Richard; Luo, Vincent M; Reddy, Janardan K; Borggrefe, Tilman; Skok, Jane A; Reina-San-Martin, Bernardo

    2016-03-07

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) class switch recombination (CSR) is initiated by the transcription-coupled recruitment of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) to Ig switch regions (S regions). During CSR, the IgH locus undergoes dynamic three-dimensional structural changes in which promoters, enhancers, and S regions are brought to close proximity. Nevertheless, little is known about the underlying mechanisms. In this study, we show that Med1 and Med12, two subunits of the mediator complex implicated in transcription initiation and long-range enhancer/promoter loop formation, are dynamically recruited to the IgH locus enhancers and the acceptor regions during CSR and that their knockdown in CH12 cells results in impaired CSR. Furthermore, we show that conditional inactivation of Med1 in B cells results in defective CSR and reduced acceptor S region transcription. Finally, we show that in B cells undergoing CSR, the dynamic long-range contacts between the IgH enhancers and the acceptor regions correlate with Med1 and Med12 binding and that they happen at a reduced frequency in Med1-deficient B cells. Our results implicate the mediator complex in the mechanism of CSR and are consistent with a model in which mediator facilitates the long-range contacts between S regions and the IgH locus enhancers during CSR and their transcriptional activation.

  7. Variants observed for STR locus SE33: a concordance study.

    PubMed

    Davis, Carey; Ge, Jianye; King, Jonathan; Malik, Naseem; Weirich, Volker; Eisenberg, Arthur J; Budowle, Bruce

    2012-07-01

    Discordance of STR typing results can be expected between kits that employ different primers for amplification. The complex motif of the SE33 locus and its flanking regions can contribute to the degree of discordant results. Sequence-dependent conformational changes can manifest as length differences under certain electrophoretic conditions and/or use of different primers. The AmpFlSTR® NGM SElect™ PCR Amplification Kit (Life Technologies, Carlsbad, CA), PowerPlex® ESX 17 system (Promega Corporation, Madison, WI), and PowerPlex® ESI 17 system (Promega Corporation) were compared for concordance of allele calls for the SE33 marker in selected samples. A total of 16 samples were identified that were discordant at one of the SE33 alleles by an apparent one nucleotide in size. While the ESX 17 and NGM SElect™ kits yielded concordant results for these 16 samples, the ESI 17 kit generated alleles that differed. The discordant alleles were observed in individuals of African and European descent. Sequence analysis revealed that the one-base difference in size is not due to an indel but is instead the result of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the flanking region of the SE33 repeat region. Three different SNPs were observed, one of which is novel. Although these migration anomalies were observed only with the ESI 17 kit, one cannot preclude that a similar phenomenon may occur with the other kits as data sets increase. The type and degree of discordance of STR allele calls among STR kits is an important issue when comparing STR profiles among laboratories and when determining search parameters for identifying candidate associations in national databases.

  8. Relation of organizational citizenship behavior and locus of control.

    PubMed

    Turnipseed, David L; Bacon, Calvin M

    2009-12-01

    The relation of organizational citizenship behavior and locus of control was assessed in a sample of 286 college students (52% men; M age = 24 yr.) who worked an average of 26 hr. per week. Measures were Spector's Work Locus of Control Scale and Podsakoff, et al.'s Organization Citizenship Behavior scale. Hierarchical multiple regressions indicated positive association of scores on work locus of control with scores on each of the four tested dimensions of organizational citizenship, as well as total organizational citizenship behavior.

  9. The functional organization of the vestigial locus in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Williams, J A; Atkin, A L; Bell, J B

    1990-03-01

    Vestigial mutants are associated with imaginal disc cell death which results in the deletion of adult wing and haltere structures. The vestigial locus has previously been cloned, and mutational lesions associated with a number of vg alleles were mapped within a 19 kb DNA region defined as essential for vg function. Herein we report the identification and characterization of a developmentally regulated 3.8 kb vg transcript which is spliced from exons distributed throughout the essential interval defined above. All the characterized classical alleles have predictable effects on this transcription unit, and the severity of this effect is directly proportional to the severity of the wing phenotype. A repetitive domain within this transcription unit was identified and may serve as a tag to isolate other genes with functions related to vg. We also report an exceptional vg allele (vg83b27) that produces an extreme wing and haltere phenotype, but which defines a second vg complementation unit. This allele is associated with a 4 kb deletion entirely within a 4.5 kb vg intron as defined by the 3.8 kb transcription unit. Molecular and genetic evidence indicates that the vg83b27 mutation has a functional 3.8 kb transcription unit, thus accounting for its ability to complement classical alleles. The results indicate that sequences within a vg intron are essential for normal wing and haltere development.

  10. Conserved Arrangement of Nested Genes at the Drosophila Gart Locus

    PubMed Central

    Henikoff, Steven; Eghtedarzadeh, Mohammad K.

    1987-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster Gart gene encodes three enzymatic activities in the pathway for purine de novo synthesis. Alternative processing of the primary transcript leads to the synthesis of two overlapping polypeptides. The coding sequence for both polypeptides is interrupted by an intron that contains a functional cuticle protein gene encoded on the opposite DNA strand. Here we show that this nested organization also exists at the homologous locus of a distantly related species, Drosophila pseudoobscura. In both species, the intronic cuticle gene is expressed in wandering larvae and in prepupae. Remarkably, there are 24 different highly conserved noncoding segments within the intron containing the cuticle gene. These are found upstream of the transcriptional start, at the 3' end, and even within the single intronic gene intron. Other introns in the purine gene, including the intron at which alternative processing occurs, show no such homologies. It seems likely that at least some of the conserved noncoding regions are involved in specifying the high level developmental expression of the cuticle gene. We discuss the possibility that shared cis-acting regulatory sites might enhance transcription of both genes and help explain their nested arrangement. PMID:3123310

  11. Autism, fever, epigenetics and the locus coeruleus.

    PubMed

    Mehler, Mark F; Purpura, Dominick P

    2009-03-01

    Some children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) exhibit improved behaviors and enhanced communication during febrile episodes. We hypothesize that febrigenesis and the behavioral-state changes associated with fever in autism depend upon selective normalization of key components of a functionally impaired locus coeruleus-noradrenergic (LC-NA) system. We posit that autistic behaviors result from developmental dysregulation of LC-NA system specification and neural network deployment and modulation linked to the core behavioral features of autism. Fever transiently restores the modulatory functions of the LC-NA system and ameliorates autistic behaviors. Fever-induced reversibility of autism suggests preserved functional integrity of widespread neural networks subserving the LC-NA system and specifically the subsystems involved in mediating the cognitive and behavioral repertoires compromised in ASD. Alterations of complex gene-environmental interactions and associated epigenetic mechanisms during seminal developmental critical periods are viewed as instrumental in LC-NA dysregulation as emphasized by the timing and severity of prenatal maternal stressors on autism prevalence. Our hypothesis has implications for a rational approach to further interrogate the interdisciplinary etiology of ASD and for designing novel biological detection systems and therapeutic agents that target the LC-NA system's diverse network of pre- and postsynaptic receptors, intracellular signaling pathways and dynamic epigenetic remodeling processes involved in their regulation and functional plasticity.

  12. Locus of control and cerebral asymmetry.

    PubMed

    De Brabander, B; Boone, C; Gerits, P

    1992-08-01

    Data about the lack of synchronism of flexor carpi ulnaris peak EMG values of bimanual reactions during a semantic and during a visuospatial discrimination reaction time task are reported. The effects of type of task as well as the presence or absence of an unexpected stimulus preceding the reaction stimulus on lack of synchronism clearly depend upon the locus of control of the subjects, as measured on Rotter's I-E scale. On the basis of several arguments it is proposed that the measure of lack of synchronism reflects in an opposite sense the amount of dopaminergic activation or motor readiness in the sense in which Pribram and McGuinness in 1975 and Tucker and Williamson in 1984 have defined these concepts. The results for 15 women and 18 men show that more internally oriented subjects are more activated by a semantic task and by an unexpected preparatory stimulus in this type of task than more externally oriented subjects. The opposite appears to hold on the visuospatial task and unexpected preparatory stimuli therein. Together with earlier findings about reaction times and a number of relevant findings in the literature, the results are interpreted as indicative of basic differences in asymmetric tonic activation of the cerebral hemispheres between more internally and more externally oriented subjects. A model is proposed to explain phasic activating effects which ensue when tonically more left- or right-activated subjects perform left- or right-hemisphere tasks and when supplementary irrelevant stimuli are received.

  13. Refined Mapping of the Renal Failure Rf-3 Quantitative Trait Locus

    PubMed Central

    O'Meara, Caitlin C.; Lazar, Jozef; Hoffman, Matthew; Moreno, Carol

    2011-01-01

    Rf-3, a quantitative trait locus (QTL) on rat chromosome 3, affects the development of CKD in Fawn-Hooded Hypertensive (FHH) rats. This QTL spans 110 Mb and approximately 1400 genes; therefore, narrowing the position of this locus is necessary to elucidate potential candidate genes. Here, we used congenic models and comparative genomics to refine the Rf-3 candidate region. We generated congenic lines carrying smaller intervals (subcongenics) of the Rf-3 region and used these lines to reduce the Rf-3 candidate region by 94% (to 7.1 Mb). We used comparative genomics to identify QTL for both nephropathy and albuminuria in the syntenic region of this interval for both human and mouse. We also used the overlapping homologous regions to reduce the number of likely positional candidate genes to 13 known or predicted genes. By combining congenic models and cross-species studies, we narrowed the list of candidate genes to a level that we could sequence the whole interval to further identify the causative gene in future studies. PMID:21127141

  14. Is Racial Attitude Change a Function of Locus of Control?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Vijay

    1977-01-01

    This study explores the relationship between counselors' locus of control and the degree of change on racial attitudes followed by a structured awareness program and counseling experience on racial and multi-ethnic cultures. (Author)

  15. Multidimensional profiles of health locus of control in Hispanic Americans.

    PubMed

    Champagne, Brian R; Fox, Rina S; Mills, Sarah D; Sadler, Georgia Robins; Malcarne, Vanessa L

    2016-10-01

    Latent profile analysis identified health locus of control profiles among 436 Hispanic Americans who completed the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control scales. Results revealed four profiles: Internally Oriented-Weak, -Moderate, -Strong, and Externally Oriented. The profile groups were compared on sociocultural and demographic characteristics, health beliefs and behaviors, and physical and mental health outcomes. The Internally Oriented-Strong group had less cancer fatalism, religiosity, and equity health attributions, and more alcohol consumption than the other three groups; the Externally Oriented group had stronger equity health attributions and less alcohol consumption. Deriving multidimensional health locus of control profiles through latent profile analysis allows examination of the relationships of health locus of control subtypes to health variables.

  16. The internet and locus of control in older adults.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Robert J.; Harris, Kimberly D.; Wabby, James

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate how training older adults to find medical information using the Internet affects their locus of control. METHODS: Quantitative methods were utilized. Specifically, the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control survey was distributed at the onset of each seminar and again at the conclusion. RESULTS: Paired t-tests revealed that the subjects did not change their locus of control regarding their health beliefs over the period of the seminar. However, there was statistical significance with regard to eight specific questions. CONCLUSION: Subjects scored high on their level of internal locus of control coming into the study. The majority of subjects had already learned to use the computer, owned a home computer, and had access to the Internet, but had not used the Internet to search for healthcare information. The challenge continues to be reaching those older adults who have not encountered the computer and the Internet. PMID:12463794

  17. Analysis of positional candidate genes in the AAA1 susceptibility locus for abdominal aortic aneurysms on chromosome 19

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a complex disorder with multiple genetic risk factors. Using affected relative pair linkage analysis, we previously identified an AAA susceptibility locus on chromosome 19q13. This locus has been designated as the AAA1 susceptibility locus in the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database. Methods Nine candidate genes were selected from the AAA1 locus based on their function, as well as mRNA expression levels in the aorta. A sample of 394 cases and 419 controls was genotyped for 41 SNPs located in or around the selected nine candidate genes using the Illumina GoldenGate platform. Single marker and haplotype analyses were performed. Three genes (CEBPG, PEPD and CD22) were selected for DNA sequencing based on the association study results, and exonic regions were analyzed. Immunohistochemical staining of aortic tissue sections from AAA and control individuals was carried out for the CD22 and PEPD proteins with specific antibodies. Results Several SNPs were nominally associated with AAA (p < 0.05). The SNPs with most significant p-values were located near the CCAAT enhancer binding protein (CEBPG), peptidase D (PEPD), and CD22. Haplotype analysis found a nominally associated 5-SNP haplotype in the CEBPG/PEPD locus, as well as a nominally associated 2-SNP haplotype in the CD22 locus. DNA sequencing of the coding regions revealed no variation in CEBPG. Seven sequence variants were identified in PEPD, including three not present in the NCBI SNP (dbSNP) database. Sequencing of all 14 exons of CD22 identified 20 sequence variants, five of which were in the coding region and six were in the 3'-untranslated region. Five variants were not present in dbSNP. Immunohistochemical staining for CD22 revealed protein expression in lymphocytes present in the aneurysmal aortic wall only and no detectable expression in control aorta. PEPD protein was expressed in fibroblasts and myofibroblasts in the media-adventitia border in both

  18. A gene locus for targeted ectopic gene integration in Zymoseptoria tritici☆

    PubMed Central

    Kilaru, S.; Schuster, M.; Latz, M.; Das Gupta, S.; Steinberg, N.; Fones, H.; Gurr, S.J.; Talbot, N.J.; Steinberg, G.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the cellular organization and biology of fungal pathogens requires accurate methods for genomic integration of mutant alleles or fluorescent fusion-protein constructs. In Zymoseptoria tritici, this can be achieved by integrating of plasmid DNA randomly into the genome of this wheat pathogen. However, untargeted ectopic integration carries the risk of unwanted side effects, such as altered gene expression, due to targeting regulatory elements, or gene disruption following integration into protein-coding regions of the genome. Here, we establish the succinate dehydrogenase (sdi1) locus as a single “soft-landing” site for targeted ectopic integration of genetic constructs by using a carboxin-resistant sdi1R allele, carrying the point-mutation H267L. We use various green and red fluorescent fusion constructs and show that 97% of all transformants integrate correctly into the sdi1 locus as single copies. We also demonstrate that such integration does not affect the pathogenicity of Z. tritici, and thus the sdi1 locus is a useful tool for virulence analysis in genetically modified Z. tritici strains. Furthermore, we have developed a vector which facilitates yeast recombination cloning and thus allows assembly of multiple overlapping DNA fragments in a single cloning step for high throughput vector and strain generation. PMID:26092798

  19. Mapping of the X-linked agammaglobulinemia locus by use of restriction fragment-length polymorphism.

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, S P; Kunkel, L; Bruns, G; Wedgwood, R J; Latt, S; Rosen, F S

    1986-01-01

    A molecular linkage analysis in 11 families with X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) localized the XLA gene to the proximal part of the long arm of the human X chromosome. Significant linkage was detected between XLA and loci defined by two polymorphic DNA probes called 19-2 for the DXS3 locus and S21 for the DXS17 locus. Both localize to the region Xq21.3-Xq22. Most likely recombination distances (theta) and associated logarithm of the odds (lod) scores for the XLA-DXS3 and XLA-DXS17 pairs were theta = 0.04 morgans (lod, 3.65) and theta = 0 (lod, 2.17), respectively. Tight linkage between XLA and the locus DXS43 defined by the X short arm probe D2 (localized to Xp22-Xp21) was strongly excluded and we obtained no evidence for significant linkage between XLA and any other X short arm probe. The probe pair 19-2 and S21 should be informative for molecular linkage-based analysis of XLA segregation in the majority of families afflicted with this disorder. Images PMID:3003164

  20. Evolution and selection of Rhg1, a copy-number variant nematode-resistance locus

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tong Geon; Kumar, Indrajit; Diers, Brian W; Hudson, Matthew E

    2015-01-01

    The soybean cyst nematode (SCN) resistance locus Rhg1 is a tandem repeat of a 31.2 kb unit of the soybean genome. Each 31.2-kb unit contains four genes. One allele of Rhg1, Rhg1-b, is responsible for protecting most US soybean production from SCN. Whole-genome sequencing was performed, and PCR assays were developed to investigate allelic variation in sequence and copy number of the Rhg1 locus across a population of soybean germplasm accessions. Four distinct sequences of the 31.2-kb repeat unit were identified, and some Rhg1 alleles carry up to three different types of repeat unit. The total number of copies of the repeat varies from 1 to 10 per haploid genome. Both copy number and sequence of the repeat correlate with the resistance phenotype, and the Rhg1 locus shows strong signatures of selection. Significant linkage disequilibrium in the genome outside the boundaries of the repeat allowed the Rhg1 genotype to be inferred using high-density single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping of 15 996 accessions. Over 860 germplasm accessions were found likely to possess Rhg1 alleles. The regions surrounding the repeat show indications of non-neutral evolution and high genetic variability in populations from different geographic locations, but without evidence of fixation of the resistant genotype. A compelling explanation of these results is that balancing selection is in operation at Rhg1. PMID:25735447

  1. Molecular and genetic analyses of the putative Proteus O antigen gene locus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quan; Torzewska, Agnieszka; Ruan, Xiaojuan; Wang, Xiaoting; Rozalski, Antoni; Shao, Zhujun; Guo, Xi; Zhou, Haijian; Feng, Lu; Wang, Lei

    2010-08-01

    Proteus species are well-characterized opportunistic pathogens primarily associated with urinary tract infections (UTI) of humans. The Proteus O antigen is one of the most variable constituents of the cell surface, and O antigen heterogeneity is used for serological classification of Proteus isolates. Even though most Proteus O antigen structures have been identified, the O antigen locus has not been well characterized. In this study, we identified the putative Proteus O antigen locus and demonstrated this region's high degree of heterogeneity by comparing sequences of 40 Proteus isolates using PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). This analysis identified five putative Proteus O antigen gene clusters, and the probable functions of these O antigen-related genes were proposed, based on their similarity to genes in the available databases. Finally, Proteus-specific genes from these five serogroups were identified by screening 79 strains belonging to the 68 Proteus O antigen serogroups. To our knowledge, this is the first molecular characterization of the putative Proteus O antigen locus, and we describe a novel molecular classification method for the identification of different Proteus serogroups.

  2. Genetic variation of polymorphic NOS STR locus in ten Indian population groups.

    PubMed

    Shazia, A; Nithya, P; Seshadri, M

    2009-02-01

    The genotyping of 313 random individuals belonging to ten different population groups from three different states of India was performed for polymorphic pentanucleotide repeat present in the 5'-flanking region of nitric oxide synthase gene (NOS2A) to study the effect of geographical and linguistic affiliations on the genetic affinities among these groups. Likelihood ratio tests showed that all the ten populations for this locus were in Hardy Weinberg equilibrium. Eleven different alleles ranging from 7 repeat to 17 repeats and 46 different genotypes were observed. The observed and the expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.72-0.94 and 0.84-0.89, respectively. The discriminating power of this locus is > or = 0.86 and the polymorphism information content of this locus in ten population groups ranged from 0.80 to 0.85. High PIC, PD and PE value of this STR showed this marker to be informative and can be used for DNA typing and population studies. The eight populations from Kerala showed a lower GST value of 0.016 compared to the GST of ten populations (G(ST) = 0.019), thereby showing that the populations from the same state showed higher genetic proximity probably due to linguistic and geographical proximity between them.

  3. Localization of a locus responsible for the bovine chondrodysplastic dwarfism (bcd) on chromosome 6.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, K; Moritomo, Y; Takami, M; Hirata, S; Kikukawa, Y; Kunieda, T

    1999-06-01

    A hereditary chondrodysplastic dwarfism caused by an autosomal recessive gene has been reported in a population of Japanese Brown cattle. Affected calves show an insufficiency of endochondral ossification at the long bones of the limbs. In the present study, we mapped the locus responsible for the disease (bcd) by linkage analysis, using microsatellite markers and a single paternal half-sib pedigree obtained from commercial herds. Linkage analysis revealed a significant linkage between the bcd locus and marker loci on the distal region of bovine Chromosome (Chr) 6. The bcd locus was mapped in the interval between microsatellite markers BM9257 and BP7 or BMS511 with a recombination fraction of 0.05 and 0.06, and a lod score of 8.6 and 10.1, respectively. A comparison of genetic maps between bovine Chr 6 and human Chr 4 or mouse Chr 5 indicates possible candidate genes including FGFR3 and BMP3 genes, which are responsible for human chondrodysplasias and associated with bone morphogenesis, respectively.

  4. Induced DNA demethylation can reshape chromatin topology at the IGF2-H19 locus

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Yoko; Nativio, Raffaella; Murrell, Adele

    2013-01-01

    Choriocarcinomas are embryonal tumours with loss of imprinting and hypermethylation at the insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2)-H19 locus. The DNA methyltransferase inhibitor, 5-Aza-2′deoxycytidine (5-AzaCdR) is an approved epigenetic cancer therapy. However, it is not known to what extent 5-AzaCdR influences other epigenetic marks. In this study, we set out to determine whether 5-AzaCdR treatment can reprogram the epigenomic organization of the IGF2-H19 locus in a choriocarcinoma cancer cell line (JEG3). We found that localized DNA demethylation at the H19 imprinting control region (ICR) induced by 5-AzaCdR, reduced IGF2, increased H19 expression, increased CTCF and cohesin recruitment and changed histone modifications. Furthermore chromatin accessibility was increased locus-wide and chromatin looping topography was altered such that a CTCF site downstream of the H19 enhancers switched its association with the CTCF site upstream of the IGF2 promoters to associate with the ICR. We identified a stable chromatin looping domain, which forms independently of DNA methylation. This domain contains the IGF2 gene and is marked by a histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation block between CTCF site upstream of the IGF2 promoters and the Centrally Conserved Domain upstream of the ICR. Together, these data provide new insights into the responsiveness of chromatin topography to DNA methylation changes. PMID:23585276

  5. Novel Locus for Paroxysmal Kinesigenic Dyskinesia Mapped to Chromosome 3q28-29.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ding; Zhang, Yumiao; Wang, Yu; Chen, Chanjuan; Li, Xin; Zhou, Jinxia; Song, Zhi; Xiao, Bo; Rasco, Kevin; Zhang, Feng; Wen, Shu; Li, Guoliang

    2016-05-13

    Paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD) is characterized by recurrent and brief attacks of dystonia or chorea precipitated by sudden movements. It can be sporadic or familial. Proline-Rich Transmembrane Protein 2 (PRRT2) has been shown to be a common causative gene of PKD. However, less than 50% of patients with primary PKD harbor mutations in PRRT2. The aim of this study is to use eight families with PKD to identify the pathogenic PRRT2 mutations, or possible novel genetic cause of PKD phenotypes. After extensive clinical investigation, direct sequencing and mutation analysis of PRRT2 were performed on patients from eight PKD families. A genome-wide STR and SNP based linkage analysis was performed in one large family that is negative for pathogenic PRRT2 mutations. Using additional polymorphic markers, we identified a novel gene locus on chromosome 3q in this PRRT2-mutation-negative PKD family. The LOD score for the region between markers D3S1314 and D3S1256 is 3.02 and we proposed to designate this locus as Episodic Kinesigenic Dyskinesia (EKD3). Further studies are needed to identify the causative gene within this locus.

  6. Novel Locus for Paroxysmal Kinesigenic Dyskinesia Mapped to Chromosome 3q28-29

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ding; Zhang, Yumiao; Wang, Yu; Chen, Chanjuan; Li, Xin; Zhou, Jinxia; Song, Zhi; Xiao, Bo; Rasco, Kevin; Zhang, Feng; Wen, Shu; Li, Guoliang

    2016-01-01

    Paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD) is characterized by recurrent and brief attacks of dystonia or chorea precipitated by sudden movements. It can be sporadic or familial. Proline-Rich Transmembrane Protein 2 (PRRT2) has been shown to be a common causative gene of PKD. However, less than 50% of patients with primary PKD harbor mutations in PRRT2. The aim of this study is to use eight families with PKD to identify the pathogenic PRRT2 mutations, or possible novel genetic cause of PKD phenotypes. After extensive clinical investigation, direct sequencing and mutation analysis of PRRT2 were performed on patients from eight PKD families. A genome-wide STR and SNP based linkage analysis was performed in one large family that is negative for pathogenic PRRT2 mutations. Using additional polymorphic markers, we identified a novel gene locus on chromosome 3q in this PRRT2-mutation-negative PKD family. The LOD score for the region between markers D3S1314 and D3S1256 is 3.02 and we proposed to designate this locus as Episodic Kinesigenic Dyskinesia (EKD3). Further studies are needed to identify the causative gene within this locus. PMID:27173777

  7. An autosomal locus predisposing to multiple deletions of mtDNA on chromosome 3p

    SciTech Connect

    Kaukonen, J.A.; Suomalainen, A.; Peltonen, L.; Amati, P.; Zeviani, M.

    1996-04-01

    Autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia (adPEO) is a disorder characterized by ptosis, progressive weakness of the external eye muscles, and general muscle weakness. The patients have multiple deletions of mtDNA on Southern blots or in PCR analysis of muscle DNA and a mild deficiency of one or more respiratory-chain enzymes carrying mtDNA-encoded subunits. The pattern of inheritance indicates a nuclear gene defect predisposing to secondary mtDNA deletions. Recently, in one Finnish family, we assigned an adPEO locus to chromosome 10q23.3-24.3 but also excluded linkage to this same locus in two Italian adPEO families with a phenotype closely resembling the Finnish one. We applied a random mapping approach to informative non-10q-linked Italian families to assign the second locus for adPEO and found strong evidence for linkage on chromosome 3p14.1-21.2 in three Italian families, with a maximum two-point lod score of 4.62 at a recombination fraction of .0. However, in three additional families, linkage to the same chromosomal region was clearly absent, indicating further genetic complexity of the adPEO trait. 19 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Genomic organization and characterization of the white locus of the Mediterranean fruitfly, Ceratitis capitata.

    PubMed Central

    Gomulski, L M; Pitts, R J; Costa, S; Saccone, G; Torti, C; Polito, L C; Gasperi, G; Malacrida, A R; Kafatos, F C; Zwiebel, L J

    2001-01-01

    An approximately 14-kb region of genomic DNA encoding the wild-type white eye (w+) color gene from the medfly, Ceratitis capitata has been cloned and characterized at the molecular level. Comparison of the intron-exon organization of this locus among several dipteran insects reveals distinct organizational patterns that are consistent with the phylogenetic relationships of these flies and the dendrogram of the predicted primary amino acid sequence of the white loci. An examination of w+ expression during medfly development has been carried out, displaying overall similarity to corresponding studies for white gene homologues in Drosophila melanogaster and other insects. Interestingly, we have detected two phenotypically neutral allelic forms of the locus that have arisen as the result of an apparently novel insertion or deletion event located in the large first intron of the medfly white locus. Cloning and sequencing of two mutant white alleles, w1 and w2, from the we,wp and M245 strains, respectively, indicate that the mutant conditions in these strains are the result of independent events--a frameshift mutation in exon 6 for w1 and a deletion including a large part of exon 2 in the case of w2. PMID:11238408

  9. Familial migraine: Exclusion of the susceptibility gene from the reported locus of familial hemiplegic migraine on 19p

    SciTech Connect

    Hovatta, I.; Peltonen, L.; Kallela, M.; Faerkkilae, M.

    1994-10-01

    Genetic isolates are highly useful in analyses of the molecular background of complex diseases since the enrichment of a limited number of predisposing genes can be predicted in representative families or in specific geographical regions. It has been suggested that the pathophysiology and etiology of familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) and typical migraine with aura are most probably the same. Recent assignment of FHM locus to chromosome 19p in two French families makes it now possible to test this hypothesis. We report here linkage data on four families with multiple cases of migraine disorder originating from the genetically isolated population of Finland. We were interested to discover whether the migraine in these families would also show linkage to the markers on 19p. We could exclude a region of 50 cM, flanking the reported FHM locus, as a site of migraine locus in our four families. It seems evident that locus heterogeneity exists between different diagnostic classes of migraine spectrum of diseases and also between different ethnic groups. 10 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Imprinting defects at human 14q32 locus alters gene expression and is associated with the pathobiology of osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Jingmin; Li, Lihua; Sarver, Anne E.; Pope, Emily A.; Varshney, Jyotika; Thayanithy, Venugopal; Spector, Logan; Largaespada, David A.; Steer, Clifford J.; Subramanian, Subbaya

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone malignancy affecting children and adolescents. Although several genetic predisposing conditions have been associated with osteosarcoma, our understanding of its pathobiology is rather limited. Here we show that, first, an imprinting defect at human 14q32-locus is highly prevalent (87%) and specifically associated with osteosarcoma patients < 30 years of age. Second, the average demethylation at differentially methylated regions (DMRs) in the 14q32-locus varied significantly compared to genome-wide demethylation. Third, the 14q32-locus was enriched in both H3K4-me3 and H3K27-me3 histone modifications that affected expression of all imprinted genes and miRNAs in this region. Fourth, imprinting defects at 14q32 - DMRs are present in triad DNA samples from affected children and their biological parents. Finally, imprinting defects at 14q32-DMRs were also observed at higher frequencies in an Rb1/Trp53 mutation-induced osteosarcoma mouse model. Further analysis of normal and tumor tissues from a Sleeping Beauty mouse model of spontaneous osteosarcoma supported the notion that these imprinting defects may be a key factor in osteosarcoma pathobiology. In conclusion, we demonstrate that imprinting defects at the 14q32 locus significantly alter gene expression, may contribute to the pathogenesis of osteosarcoma, and could be predictive of survival outcomes. PMID:26802029

  11. Genome scan in familial late-onset Alzheimer's disease: a locus on chromosome 6 contributes to age-at-onset.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Marchani, Elizabeth E; Cheung, Charles Y K; Steinbart, Ellen J; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Bird, Thomas D; Wijsman, Ellen M

    2013-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a common, genetically complex, fatal neurodegenerative disorder of late life. Although several genes are known to play a role in early-onset AD, identification of the genetic basis of late onset AD (LOAD) has been challenging, with only the APOE gene known to have a high contribution to both AD risk and age-at-onset. Here, we present the first genome-scan analysis of the complete, well-characterized University of Washington LOAD sample of 119 pedigrees, using age-at-onset as the trait of interest. The analysis approach used allows for a multilocus trait model while at the same time accommodating age censoring, effects of APOE as a known genetic covariate, and full pedigree and marker information. The results provide strong evidence for linkage of loci contributing to age-at-onset to genomic regions on chromosome 6q16.3, and to 19q13.42 in the region of the APOE locus. There was evidence for interaction between APOE and the locus on chromosome 6q and suggestive evidence for linkage to chromosomes 11p13, 15q12-14, and 19p13.12. These results provide the first independent confirmation of an AD age-at-onset locus on chromosome 6 and suggest that further efforts towards identifying the underlying causal locus or loci are warranted.

  12. Two-locus linkage analysis in multiple sclerosis (MS)

    SciTech Connect

    Tienari, P.J. Univ. of Helsinki ); Terwilliger, J.D.; Ott, J. ); Palo, J. ); Peltonen, L. )

    1994-01-15

    One of the major challenges in genetic linkage analyses is the study of complex diseases. The authors demonstrate here the use of two-locus linkage analysis in multiple sclerosis (MS), a multifactorial disease with a complex mode of inheritance. In a set of Finnish multiplex families, they have previously found evidence for linkage between MS susceptibility and two independent loci, the myelin basic protein gene (MBP) on chromosome 18 and the HLA complex on chromosome 6. This set of families provides a unique opportunity to perform linkage analysis conditional on two loci contributing to the disease. In the two-trait-locus/two-marker-locus analysis, the presence of another disease locus is parametrized and the analysis more appropriately treats information from the unaffected family member than single-disease-locus analysis. As exemplified here in MS, the two-locus analysis can be a powerful method for investigating susceptibility loci in complex traits, best suited for analysis of specific candidate genes, or for situations in which preliminary evidence for linkage already exists or is suggested. 41 refs., 6 tabs.

  13. Fixation probability in a two-locus intersexual selection model.

    PubMed

    Durand, Guillermo; Lessard, Sabin

    2016-06-01

    We study a two-locus model of intersexual selection in a finite haploid population reproducing according to a discrete-time Moran model with a trait locus expressed in males and a preference locus expressed in females. We show that the probability of ultimate fixation of a single mutant allele for a male ornament introduced at random at the trait locus given any initial frequency state at the preference locus is increased by weak intersexual selection and recombination, weak or strong. Moreover, this probability exceeds the initial frequency of the mutant allele even in the case of a costly male ornament if intersexual selection is not too weak. On the other hand, the probability of ultimate fixation of a single mutant allele for a female preference towards a male ornament introduced at random at the preference locus is increased by weak intersexual selection and weak recombination if the female preference is not costly, and is strong enough in the case of a costly male ornament. The analysis relies on an extension of the ancestral recombination-selection graph for samples of haplotypes to take into account events of intersexual selection, while the symbolic calculation of the fixation probabilities is made possible in a reasonable time by an optimizing algorithm.

  14. [Health locus of control of patients in disease management programmes].

    PubMed

    Schnee, M; Grikscheit, F

    2013-06-01

    Health locus of control beliefs plays a major role in improving self-management skills of the chronically ill - a main goal in disease management programmes (DMP). This study aims at characterising participants in disease management regarding their health locus of control. Data are based on 4 cross-sectional postal surveys between spring and autumn of 2006 and 2007 within the Health Care Monitor of the Bertelsmann Foundation. Among the 6 285 respondents, 1 266 are chronically ill and not enrolled in a DMP and 327 are participating in a DMP. A high internal locus of control (HLC) occurs significantly less often in DMP patients than in normal chronically ill patients (and healthy people) controlling for age, gender and social class. With increasing age, a high internal locus of control is also significantly less likely. When comparing healthy people, the chronically ill and the DMP participants a social gradient of a high internal locus of control belief can be observed. The weaker internal and higher doctor-related external locus of control of DMP participants should be carefully observed by the physician when trying to strengthen the patients' self-management skills. Evaluators of DMP should take into account the different baselines of DMP patients and relevant control groups and incorporate these differences into the evaluation.

  15. Analysis of human chromosome 21 for a locus conferring susceptibility to Hirschsprung Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bolk, S.; Duggan, D.J.; Chakravarti, A.

    1994-09-01

    It has been estimated that approximately 5% of patients diagnosed with Hirschsprung disease (HSCR), or aganglionic megacolon, have trisomy 21. Since the incidence of Hirschsprung disease is 1/5000 live births and the incidence of trisomy 21 is approximately 1/1000 live births, the observed occurrence of HSCR in trisomy 21 is fifty times higher than expected. We propose that at least one locus on chromosome 21 predisposes to HSCR. Although at fifty times elevated risk, only 1% of Down Syndrome cases have HSCR. Thus additional genes or genetic events are necessary for HSCR to manifest in patients with trisomy 21. Based on segregation analysis, Badner et al. postulated that recessive genes may be responsible for up to 80% of HSCR. We postulate that at least one such gene is on chromosome 21 and increased homozygosity for common recessive HSCR mutations may be one cause for the elevated risk of HSCR in cases of trisomy 21. To map such a chromosome 21 locus, we are searching for segments of human chromosome 21 which are identical by descent from the parent in whom non-disjunction occurred. These segments will arise either from meiosis I (followed by a crossover between the centromere and the locus) or from meiosis II (followed by no crossovers). Nine nuclear families with a proband diagnosed with HSCR and Down Syndrome have been genotyped for 18 microsatellite markers spanning human chromosome 21q. In all nine cases analyzed thus far, trisomy 21 resulted from maternal non-disjunction at meiosis I. At this point no single IBD region is apparent. Therefore, additional families are being ascertained and additional markers at high density are being genotyped to map the HSCR locus.

  16. Transcriptome and allele specificity associated with a 3BL locus for Fusarium crown rot resistance in bread wheat.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jian; Stiller, Jiri; Zhao, Qiang; Feng, Qi; Cavanagh, Colin; Wang, Penghao; Gardiner, Donald; Choulet, Frédéric; Feuillet, Catherine; Zheng, You-Liang; Wei, Yuming; Yan, Guijun; Han, Bin; Manners, John M; Liu, Chunji

    2014-01-01

    Fusarium pathogens cause two major diseases in cereals, Fusarium crown rot (FCR) and head blight (FHB). A large-effect locus conferring resistance to FCR disease was previously located to chromosome arm 3BL (designated as Qcrs-3B) and several independent sets of near isogenic lines (NILs) have been developed for this locus. In this study, five sets of the NILs were used to examine transcriptional changes associated with the Qcrs-3B locus and to identify genes linked to the resistance locus as a step towards the isolation of the causative gene(s). Of the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) detected between the NILs, 12.7% was located on the single chromosome 3B. Of the expressed genes containing SNP (SNP-EGs) detected, 23.5% was mapped to this chromosome. Several of the DEGs and SNP-EGs are known to be involved in host-pathogen interactions, and a large number of the DEGs were among those detected for FHB in previous studies. Of the DEGs detected, 22 were mapped in the Qcrs-3B interval and they included eight which were detected in the resistant isolines only. The enrichment of DEG, and not necessarily those containing SNPs between the resistant and susceptible isolines, around the Qcrs-3B locus is suggestive of local regulation of this region by the resistance allele. Functions for 13 of these DEGs are known. Of the SNP-EGs, 28 were mapped in the Qcrs-3B interval and biological functions for 16 of them are known. These results provide insights into responses regulated by the 3BL locus and identify a tractable number of target genes for fine mapping and functional testing to identify the causative gene(s) at this QTL.

  17. Positional cloning of the chromosome 14 Alzheimer`s disease locus

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R.F.; Korenblat, K.M.; Goate, A.M.

    1994-09-01

    Genetic linkage analysis had indicated a locus for familial early-onset Alzheimer`s disease (FAD) on chromosome 14 at q24.3. The FAD locus has been shown previously to lie between the dinucleotide markers D14S61 and D14S63, a genetic distance of approximately 13 cM. We are currently attempting to identify the gene using a positional cloning strategy. The first step towards the isolation and characterization of this locus was the construction of an overlapping YAC contig covering the entire region. Over forty YACs which map to this region have been isolated from the St. Louis and CEPH libraries by a combination of YAC end sequence walking and sequence tagged site mapping. Our contig fully spans the complete domain, encompassing all genetic markers non-recombinant with FAD (i.e. D14S76, D14S43, D14S71, D14S77) and the two nearest flanking FAD-recombinant markers. With restriction mapping of the domain, we can determine the exact size of the region. As a second step, the YACs in this contig are currently being inspected for expressed sequences by exon trapping, initially on those YACs known to be nonchimeric. We have currently made exon-trapped libraries from YACs that have the markers D14S76 and D14S43. Sequence analysis of these libraries indicates that a trapped exon is identified on average for each 30 kb of YAC DNA. The trapped exons are being screened to identify likely candidate genes, which will be examined for mutations in FAD families.

  18. Detection of the signature of natural selection in humans: evidence from the Duffy blood group locus.

    PubMed Central

    Hamblin, M T; Di Rienzo, A

    2000-01-01

    The Duffy blood group locus, which encodes a chemokine receptor, is characterized by three alleles-FY*A, FY*B, and FY*O. The frequency of the FY*O allele, which corresponds to the absence of Fy antigen on red blood cells, is at or near fixation in most sub-Saharan African populations but is very rare outside Africa. The FST value for the FY*O allele is the highest observed for any allele in humans, providing strong evidence for the action of natural selection at this locus. Homozygosity for the FY*O allele confers complete resistance to vivax malaria, suggesting that this allele has been the target of selection by Plasmodium vivax or some other infectious agent. To characterize the signature of directional selection at this locus, we surveyed DNA sequence variation, both in a 1.9-kb region centered on the FY*O mutation site and in a 1-kb region 5-6 kb away from it, in 17 Italians and in a total of 24 individuals from five sub-Saharan African populations. The level of variation across both regions is two- to threefold lower in the Africans than in the Italians. As a result, the pooled African sample shows a significant departure from the neutral expectation for the number of segregating sites, whereas the Italian sample does not. The FY*O allele occurs on two major haplotypes in three of the five African populations. This finding could be due to recombination, recurrent mutation, population structure, and/or mutation accumulation and drift. Although we are unable to distinguish among these alternative hypotheses, it is likely that the two major haplotypes originated prior to selection on the FY*O mutation. PMID:10762551

  19. Dysgenesis-Induced Instability of Rosy Locus Transformation in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER: Analysis of Excision Events and the Selective Recovery of Control Element Deletions

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Stephen B.; McCarron, Margaret; Love, Carol; Chovnick, Arthur

    1985-01-01

    Utilizing the method of P-M hybrid dysgenesis-mediated gene transfer to insert rosy locus DNA into various chromosomal locations, we recovered a transformed strain that carries an ry+ transposon inserted in or near the scalloped locus in polytene section 13F on the X chromosome. The resultant product, when stabilized, behaves as a homozygous and hemizygous viable and fertile extreme scalloped allele associated with wild-type expression of the rosy locus. We have labeled this allele, sdryry+. This allele has been destabilized by subsequent P-M hybrid dysgenesis, and mutations were recovered that exhibit alterations in the rosy and/or scalloped phenotypes. Representative samples of all phenotypic classes have been characterized by Southern blot analyses of restricted DNA. The most common events are excisions of DNA wholly internal to the transposon and representing sections of rosy DNA. In addition to loss of rosy locus function, such excisions affect the scalloped locus expression.—A second dysgenesis experiment was carried out involving an ry+ transposon inserted in polytene section 16D on the X chromosome. A minimal estimate of the relative frequency of imprecise excisions, determined in this experiment is 75%.—A successful pilot experiment is described that utilizes dysgenic perturbation of the sdryry+ allele to select for small deletions of the 5' noncoding region of the rosy locus. PMID:2981758

  20. Sequential design of linear quadratic state regulators via the optimal root-locus techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shieh, L. S.; Dib, H. M.; Yates, R. E.

    1988-01-01

    The use of well-known root-locus techniques for sequentially finding the weighting matrices and the linear quadratic state regulators of multivariable control systems in the frequency domain is considered. This sequential design method permits the retention of some stable open-loop poles and the associated eigenvectors in the closed-loop system; it also allows some optimal closed-loop poles to be placed in a specific region of the complex plane. In addition, it provides a design procedure for determining the weighting matrices and linear quadratic state regulators for the optimal control of multivariable systems in the frequency domain.

  1. Elucidation of Molecular Identity of the W3 Locus and Its Implication in Determination of Flower Colors in Soybean.

    PubMed

    Park, Gyu Tae; Sundaramoorthy, Jagadeesh; Lee, Jeong-Dong; Kim, Jeong Hoe; Seo, Hak Soo; Song, Jong Tae

    2015-01-01

    The wide range of flower colors in soybean is controlled by six independent loci (W1, W2, W3, W4, Wm, and Wp). Among these loci, mutations in the W3 locus under the w4 allelic background (i.e., w3w4) produce near-white flowers, while the W3w4 genotype produces purple throat flowers. Although a gene encoding dihydroflavonol 4-reductase, DFR1, has been known to be closely associated with the W3 locus, its molecular identity has not yet been characterized. In the present study, we aimed to determine whether DFR1 is responsible for allelic variations in the W3 locus. On the basis of the sequence of a DFR probe, Glyma.14G072700 was identified as a candidate gene for DFR1, and nucleotide sequences of Glyma.14G072700 from cultivars with previously validated genotypes for the W3 locus were determined. As a result, a number of nucleotide polymorphisms, mainly single-base substitutions, between both coding and 5'-upstream region sequences of the W3 and w3 alleles were identified. Among them, an indel of 311-bp in the 5'-upstream region was noteworthy, since the Glyma.14G072700 in all the w3 alleles examined contained the indel, whereas that in all the W3 alleles did not; the former was barely expressed, but the latter was well expressed. These results suggest that Glyma.14G072700 is likely to correspond to DFR1 for the W3 locus and that its expression patterns may lead to allelic color phenotypes of W3 and w3 alleles under the w4 allelic background.

  2. Elucidation of Molecular Identity of the W3 Locus and Its Implication in Determination of Flower Colors in Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Park, Gyu Tae; Sundaramoorthy, Jagadeesh; Lee, Jeong-Dong; Kim, Jeong Hoe; Seo, Hak Soo; Song, Jong Tae

    2015-01-01

    The wide range of flower colors in soybean is controlled by six independent loci (W1, W2, W3, W4, Wm, and Wp). Among these loci, mutations in the W3 locus under the w4 allelic background (i.e., w3w4) produce near-white flowers, while the W3w4 genotype produces purple throat flowers. Although a gene encoding dihydroflavonol 4-reductase, DFR1, has been known to be closely associated with the W3 locus, its molecular identity has not yet been characterized. In the present study, we aimed to determine whether DFR1 is responsible for allelic variations in the W3 locus. On the basis of the sequence of a DFR probe, Glyma.14G072700 was identified as a candidate gene for DFR1, and nucleotide sequences of Glyma.14G072700 from cultivars with previously validated genotypes for the W3 locus were determined. As a result, a number of nucleotide polymorphisms, mainly single-base substitutions, between both coding and 5′-upstream region sequences of the W3 and w3 alleles were identified. Among them, an indel of 311-bp in the 5′-upstream region was noteworthy, since the Glyma.14G072700 in all the w3 alleles examined contained the indel, whereas that in all the W3 alleles did not; the former was barely expressed, but the latter was well expressed. These results suggest that Glyma.14G072700 is likely to correspond to DFR1 for the W3 locus and that its expression patterns may lead to allelic color phenotypes of W3 and w3 alleles under the w4 allelic background. PMID:26555888

  3. Molecular analysis of radiation-induced albino (c)-locus mutations that cause death at preimplantation stages of development

    SciTech Connect

    Rinchik, E.M. ); Toenjes, R.R.; Paul, D. ); Potter, M.D. )

    1993-12-01

    Deletion mutations at the albino (c) locus have been useful for continuing the development of fine-structure physical and functional maps of the Fes-Hbb region of mouse chromosome 7. This report describes the molecular analysis of a number of radiation-induced c deletions that, when homozygous, cause death of the embryo during preimplantation stages. The distal extent of these deletions defines a locus, pid, (preimplantation development) genetically associated with this phenotype. The proximal breakpoints of eight of these deletions were mapped with respect to the Tyr (tyrosinase; albino) gene as well as to anonymous loci within the Fah-Tyr region that are defined by the Pmv-31 viral integration site and by chromosome-microdissection clones. Rearrangements corresponding to the proximal breakpoints of two of these deletions were detected by Southern blot analysis, and a size-altered restriction fragment carrying the breakpoint of one of them was cloned. A probe derived from this deletion fusion fragment defines a locus, D7Rn6, which maps within (or distal to) the pid region, and which discriminates among the distal extents of deletions eliciting the pid phenotype. Extension of physical maps from D7Rn6 should provide access both to the pid region and to loci mapping distal to pid that are defined by N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced lethal mutations. 36 refs., 10 figs.

  4. Role of the ACL2 locus in flower stalk elongation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hiroaki; Komeda, Yoshibumi; Saito, Tamao; Ito, Hidetaka; Kato, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    The acaulis2 (acl2) mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana shows a defect in flower stalk elongation. We identified the mutation point of acl2 by map-based cloning. The ACL2 locus is located within an approximately 320-kb region at around 100 map units on chromosome 1. One nucleotide substitution was detected in this region in the acl2 mutant, but no significant open reading frames were found around this mutation point. When wild-type DNA fragments containing the mutation point were introduced into acl2 mutant plants, some transgenic plants partially or almost completely recovered from the defect in flower stalk elongation. 3'-RACE experiments showed that bidirectional transcripts containing the acl2 mutation point were expressed, and the Plant MPSS database revealed that several small RNAs were produced from this region. Microarray analysis showed that transcription of many genes is activated in flower stalks of acl2 mutant plants. Overexpression of some of these genes caused a dwarf phenotype in wild-type plants. These results suggest the following novel mechanism for control of the elongation of flower stalks. Bidirectional non-coding RNAs are transcribed from the ACL2 locus, and small RNAs are generated from them in flower stalks. These small RNAs repress the transcription of a set of genes whose expression represses flower stalk elongation, and flower stalks are therefore fully elongated.

  5. Refinement of the Spinal Muscular Atrophy Locus by Genetic and Physical Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Wang, C. H.; Kleyn, P. W.; Vitale, E.; Ross, B. M.; Lien, L.; Xu, J.; Carter, T. A.; Brzustowicz, L. M.; Obici, S.; Selig, S.; Pavone, L.; Parano, E.; Penchaszadeh, G. K.; Munsat, T.; Kunkel, L. M.; Gilliam, T. C.

    1995-01-01

    We report the mapping and characterization of 12 microsatellite markers including 11 novel markers. All markers were generated from overlapping YAC clones that span the spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) locus. PCR amplification of 32 overlapping YAC clones shows that 9 of the new markers (those set in italics) map to the interval between the two previous closest flanking markers (D5S629 and D5S557): cen - D5S6 - D5S125 - D5S435 - D5S1407-D5S629-D5S1410-D5S1411/D5S1412-D5S1413-D5S1414-D5Z8-D5Z9-CATT1-D5Z10/D5Z6-D5S557-D5S1408-D5S1409-D5S637-D5S351-MAP1B-tel. Four of these new markers detect multiple loci in and out of the SMA gene region. Genetic analysis of recombinant SMA families indicates that D5S1413 is a new proximal flanking locus for the SMA gene. Interestingly, among the 40 physically mapped loci, the 14 multilocus markers map contiguously to a genomic region that overlaps, and perhaps helps define, the minimum genetic region encompassing the SMA gene(s). ImagesFigure 2Figure 5 PMID:7825579

  6. Genomic organization of the human T-cell antigen-receptor alpha/delta locus.

    PubMed

    Satyanarayana, K; Hata, S; Devlin, P; Roncarolo, M G; De Vries, J E; Spits, H; Strominger, J L; Krangel, M S

    1988-11-01

    Two clusters of overlapping cosmid clones comprising about 100 kilobases (kb) at the human T-cell antigen-receptor alpha/delta locus were isolated from a genomic library. The structure of the germ-line V delta 1 variable gene segment was determined. V delta 1 is located 8.5 kb downstream of the V alpha 13.1 gene segment, and both V segments are arranged in the same transcriptional orientation. The V alpha 17.1 segment is located between V delta 1 and the D delta, J delta, C delta region (containing the diversity, joining, and constant gene segments). Thus, V delta and V alpha segments are interspersed along the chromosome. The germ-line organization of the D delta 2, J delta 1, and J delta 2 segments was determined. Linkage of C delta to the J alpha region was established by identification of J alpha segments within 20 kb downstream of C delta. The organization of the locus was also analyzed by field-inversion gel electrophoresis. The unrearranged V delta 1 and D delta, J delta, C delta regions are quite distant from each other, apparently separated by a minimum of 175-180 kb.

  7. Evidence for meiotic drive at the myotonic dystrophy locus

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, A.M.; Barnetson, R.A.; Phillips, M.F.

    1994-09-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM), an autosomal dominant disorder, is the most common form of adult muscular dystrophy, affecting at least 1 in 8000 of the population. It is a multisystemic disorder, primarily characterized by myotonia, muscle wasting and cataract. The molecular basis of DM is an expanded CTG repeat located within the 3{prime} untranslated region of a putative serine-threonine protein kinase on chromosome 19q13.3. DM exhibits anticipation, that is, with successive generations there is increasing disease severity and earlier age of onset. This mechanism and the fact that the origin of the disease has been attributed to one or a small number of founder chromosomes suggests that, in time, DM should die out. Meiotic drive has been described as a way in which certain alleles are transmitted to succeeding generations in preference to others: preferential transmission of large CTG alleles may account for their continued existence in the gene pool. There is evidence that a CTG allele with > 19 repeats may gradually increase in repeat number over many generations until it is sufficiently large to give a DM phenotype. We report a study of 495 transmissions from individuals heterozygous for the CTG repeat and with repeat numbers within the normal range (5-30). Alleles were simply classified as large or small relative to the other allele in an individual. Of 242 male meioses, 126 transmissions from parent to child were of the larger allele to their offspring (57.7%, p=0.014). This shows that there is strong evidence for meiotic drive favoring the transmission of the larger DM allele in unaffected individuals. Contrary to a previous report of meiotic drive in the male, we have shown that females preferentially transmit the larger DM allele. Taken together, the data suggest the occurrence of meiotic drive in both males and females in this locus.

  8. Evidence for locus heterogeneity in human autosomal dominant split hand/split foot malformation

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.P.; Palmer, S.E.; Wijsman, E.M.

    1994-09-01

    Split hand/split foot (SHSF, also known as ectrodactyly) is a human developmental disorder characterized by absent central rays and other distal limb malformations. Physical mapping of SHSF-associated chromosomal rearrangements has provided compelling evidence for the location of a causative gene locus (designated SHFD1) on chromosome 7 within q21.3-q22.1. In the present study, marker loci were localized to the SHFD1 critical region through the analysis of somatic cell hybrids derived from individuals with SHSF and cytogenetic abnormalities involving the 7q21.3q22.1 region. Combined genetic and physical data suggest that the order of markers in the SHFD1 critical region is cen - D7S492 - COL1A2 - D7S527 - D7S479 - D7S491 - SHFD1 - D7S554 - ASNS - D7S518 -qter. Dinucleotide repeat polymorphisms at several of these loci were used to test for linkage of SHSF to this region in a large pedigree that demonstrated autosomal dominant inheritance of this disorder. Strong evidence against linkage of SHSF to the SHFD1 critical region was obtained, and the gene responsible for the SHSF phenotype in this pedigree was excluded from a 10 cM interval spanning the entire SHFD1 critical region. Evidence of exclusion to the SHFD1 critical region was also observed in five additional families. Thus, combined molecular and genetic data provide evidence for locus heterogeneity in autosomal dominant SHSF, implying that mutations in at least two separate autosomal genes can result in this distinctive human developmental disorder.

  9. Investigation of Homologous Crossing over and Sister Chromatid Exchange in the Wheat Nor-B2 Locus Coding for Rrna and Gli-B2 Locus Coding for Gliadins

    PubMed Central

    Dvořák, J.; Appels, R.

    1986-01-01

    Recombination was investigated within the Nor-B2 locus of wheat chromosome 6B that contains several thousand of the 18S-5.8S-26S rRNA (rDNA) repeated units. Additionally, recombination was assessed for several chromosome regions, in arm 6Bq between the centromere and the B2 locus (awn suppressor) and in arm 6Bp between the centromere and Nor-B2, between Nor-B2 and a distal C-band and between Nor-B2 and Gli-B2 coding for gliadins. The experimental design permitted the distinction between crossing over between homologous chromosomes and exchange between sister chromatids. No homologous crossing over within the Nor-B2 locus was found in a sample of 446 chromosomes, but one exchange with the attributes of unequal sister chromatid exchange was identified. The molecular characteristics of this presumed sister chromatid exchange indicate that the spacer variants present in the Nor-B2 locus are clustered. No homologous recombination was detected within the distal Gli-B2 locus containing repeated genes coding for gliadin seed-storage proteins. Both arms of chromosome 6B showed low crossing-over frequency in the proximal regions. The distance from the centromere to Nor-B2 was only from 0.3 to 2.2 cM although it accounts for about two-thirds of the metaphase chromosome arm, which shows a great distortion of the metaphase map of the arm. The level of homologous recombination within the Nor-B2 locus is lower than in the chromosome region immediately distal to it. Whether it is comparable to that in the chromosome region proximal to it could not be determined. Recombination frequencies of different pairs of chromosome 6B in all but one interval paralleled the frequencies of their metaphase I pairing: Lower pairing at metaphase I was paralleled by lower crossing-over frequency. This relationship indicated that reduced metaphase I pairing between 6B chromosomes from different populations is due to impaired crossing-over and not due to precocious chiasma terminalization. PMID

  10. Bardet-Biedl syndrome: Mapping of a new locus to chromosome 3 and fine-mapping of the chromosome 16 linked locus

    SciTech Connect

    Kwitek-Black, A.E.; Rokhlina, T.; Nishimura, D.Y.

    1994-09-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorder characterized by mental retardation, post-axial polydactyly, obesity, retinitis pigmentosa, and hypogonadism. Other features of this disease include renal and cardiovascular abnormalities and an increased incidence of hypertension and diabetes mellitus. The molecular etiology for BBS is not known. We previously linked BBS to chromosome 16q13 in a large inbred Bedouin family, and excluded this locus in a second large inbred Bedouin family. We now report linkage of this second family to markers on chromosome 3q, proving non-allelic, genetic heterogeneity in the Bedouin population. A third large inbred Bedouin family was excluded from the 3q and 16q BBS loci. In addition to the identification of a new BBS locus on chromosome 3, we have identified and utilized additional short tandem repeat polymorphisms (STRPs) in the 16q BBS region to narrow the candidate interval to 3 cM. Additional recombinant individuals will allow further refinement of the interval. Identification of genes causing BBS has the potential to provide insight into diverse genetic traits and disease processes including obesity, hypertension, diabetes, retinal degeneration, and abnormal limb, renal and cardiac development.

  11. Targeted Droplet-Digital PCR as a Tool for Novel Deletion Discovery at the DFNB1 Locus.

    PubMed

    Tayoun, Ahmad N Abou; Mason-Suares, Heather; Frisella, Ashley L; Bowser, Mark; Duffy, Elizabeth; Mahanta, Lisa; Funke, Birgit; Rehm, Heidi L; Amr, Sami S

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic variants at the DFNB1 locus encompassing the GJB2 and GJB6 genes account for 50% of autosomal-recessive, congenital nonsyndromic hearing loss in the United States. Most cases are caused by sequence variants within the GJB2 gene, but a significant number of DFNB1 patients carry a large deletion (GJB6-D13S1830) in trans with a GJB2 variant. This deletion lies upstream of GJB2 and was shown to reduce GJB2 expression by disrupting unidentified regulatory elements. First-tier genetic testing for hearing loss includes GJB2 sequence and GJB6-D13S1830 deletion analysis; however, several other deletions in this locus, each with distinct breakpoints, have been reported in DFNB1 patients and are missed by current panels. Here, we report the development of a targeted droplet digital polymerase chain reaction-based assay for comprehensive copy-number analysis at the DFNB1 locus that detects all deletions reported to date. This assay increased detection rates in a multiethnic cohort of 87 hearing loss patients with only one identified pathogenic GJB2 variant. We identify two deletions, one of which is novel, in two patients (2/87 or 2.3%), suggesting that other pathogenic deletions at the DFNB1 locus may be missed. Mapping the assayed DFNB1 deletions also revealed a ∼ 95 kb critical region, which may harbor the GJB2 regulatory element(s).

  12. Rapid asymmetric evolution of a dual-coding tumor suppressor INK4a/ARF locus contradicts its function

    PubMed Central

    Szklarczyk, Radek; Heringa, Jaap; Pond, Sergei Kosakovsky; Nekrutenko, Anton

    2007-01-01

    INK4a/ARF tumor suppressor locus encodes two protein products, INK4a and ARF, essential for controlling tumorigenesis and mutated in more than half of human cancers. There is no resemblance between the two proteins: their coding regions are assembled by alternative splicing of two mutually exclusive 5′ exons into a constitutive one containing overlapping out-of-phase reading frames. We show that the dual-coding arrangement conflicts with the high cost of mutations within INK4a/ARF. Unexpectedly, the locus evolves rapidly and asymmetrically, with ARF accumulating the majority of amino acid replacements. Rapid evolution drives both INK4a and ARF proteins out of sync with other members of the RB and p53 tumor suppressor pathways, both of which are controlled by the locus. Yet, the asymmetric behavior may be an intrinsic property of dual-coding exons: INK4a/ARF closely mimics the evolution of 90 newly identified genes with similar dual-coding structure. Thus, the strong link between mutations in INK4a/ARF and cancer may be a direct consequence of the architecture of the locus. PMID:17652172

  13. The Superantigen Gene ypm Is Located in an Unstable Chromosomal Locus of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Carnoy, Christophe; Floquet, Stephanie; Marceau, Michael; Sebbane, Florent; Haentjens-Herwegh, Stephanie; Devalckenaere, Annie; Simonet, Michel

    2002-01-01

    Yersinia pseudotuberculosis produces YPM (Y. pseudotuberculosis-derived mitogen), a superantigenic toxin that exacerbates the virulence of the bacterium in vivo. To date, three alleles of the superantigen gene (ypmA, ypmB, and ypmC) have been described. These genes are not found in all Y. pseudotuberculosis strains and have a low GC content, suggesting their location on mobile genetic elements. To elucidate this question, the genetic environment of the superantigen-encoding genes was characterized and 11 open reading frames (ORFs) were defined. Sequence analysis revealed that the ypm genes were not associated with plasmids, phages, transposons, or pathogenicity islands and that the superantigen genes were always located in the chromosome between ORF3 and ORF4. Nonsuperantigenic strains exhibited the same genetic organization of the locus but lacked the ypm gene between ORF3 and ORF4. A new insertion sequence, designated IS1398, which displays features of the Tn3 family, was characterized downstream of the ypmA and ypmC genes. A 13.3-kb region containing the ypm genes was not found in the genome of Y. pestis (CO92 and KIM 5 strains). We experimentally induced deletion of the ypm gene from a superantigen-expressing Y. pseudotuberculosis: using the association of aph(3′)-IIIa and sacB genes, we demonstrated that when these reporter genes were present in the ypm locus, deletion of these genes was about 250 times more frequent than when they were located in another region of the Y. pseudotuberculosis chromosome. These results indicate that unlike other superantigenic toxin genes, the Yersinia ypm genes are not associated with mobile genetic elements but are inserted in an unstable locus of the genome. PMID:12142419

  14. Fine-mapping the POLL locus in Brahman cattle yields the diagnostic marker CSAFG29.

    PubMed

    Mariasegaram, Maxy; Harrison, Blair E; Bolton, Jennifer A; Tier, Bruce; Henshall, John M; Barendse, William; Prayaga, Kishore C

    2012-12-01

    The POLL locus has been mapped to the centromeric region of bovine chromosome 1 (BTA1) in both taurine breeds and taurine-indicine crosses in an interval of approximately 1 Mb. It has not yet been mapped in pure-bred zebu cattle. Despite several efforts, neither causative mutations in candidate genes nor a singular diagnostic DNA marker has been identified. In this study, we genotyped a total of 68 Brahman cattle and 20 Hereford cattle informative for the POLL locus for 33 DNA microsatellites, 16 of which we identified de novo from the bovine genome sequence, mapping the POLL locus to the region of the genes IFNAR2 and SYNJ1. The 303-bp allele of the new microsatellite, CSAFG29, showed strong association with the POLL allele. We then genotyped 855 Brahman cattle for CSAFG29 and confirmed the association between the 303-bp allele and POLL. To determine whether the same association was found in taurine breeds, we genotyped 334 animals of the Angus, Hereford and Limousin breeds and 376 animals of the Brangus, Droughtmaster and Santa Gertrudis composite taurine-zebu breeds. The association between the 303-bp allele and POLL was confirmed in these breeds; however, an additional allele (305 bp) was also associated but not fully predictive of POLL. Across the data, CSAFG29 was in sufficient linkage disequilibrium to the POLL allele in Australian Brahman cattle that it could potentially be used as a diagnostic marker in that breed, but this may not be the case in other breeds. Further, we provide confirmatory evidence that the scur phenotype generally occurs in animals that are heterozygous for the POLL allele.

  15. Genome Wide Single Locus Single Trait, Multi-Locus and Multi-Trait Association Mapping for Some Important Agronomic Traits in Common Wheat (T. aestivum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Vandana; Gahlaut, Vijay; Meher, Prabina Kumar; Mir, Reyazul Rouf; Jaiswal, Jai Prakash; Rao, Atmakuri Ramakrishna; Balyan, Harindra Singh; Gupta, Pushpendra Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Genome wide association study (GWAS) was conducted for 14 agronomic traits in wheat following widely used single locus single trait (SLST) approach, and two recent approaches viz. multi locus mixed model (MLMM), and multi-trait mixed model (MTMM). Association panel consisted of 230 diverse Indian bread wheat cultivars (released during 1910–2006 for commercial cultivation in different agro-climatic regions in India). Three years phenotypic data for 14 traits and genotyping data for 250 SSR markers (distributed across all the 21 wheat chromosomes) was utilized for GWAS. Using SLST, as many as 213 MTAs (p ≤ 0.05, 129 SSRs) were identified for 14 traits, however, only 10 MTAs (~9%; 10 out of 123 MTAs) qualified FDR criteria; these MTAs did not show any linkage drag. Interestingly, these genomic regions were coincident with the genomic regions that were already known to harbor QTLs for same or related agronomic traits. Using MLMM and MTMM, many more QTLs and markers were identified; 22 MTAs (19 QTLs, 21 markers) using MLMM, and 58 MTAs (29 QTLs, 40 markers) using MTMM were identified. In addition, 63 epistatic QTLs were also identified for 13 of the 14 traits, flag leaf length (FLL) being the only exception. Clearly, the power of association mapping improved due to MLMM and MTMM analyses. The epistatic interactions detected during the present study also provided better insight into genetic architecture of the 14 traits that were examined during the present study. Following eight wheat genotypes carried desirable alleles of QTLs for one or more traits, WH542, NI345, NI170, Sharbati Sonora, A90, HW1085, HYB11, and DWR39 (Pragati). These genotypes and the markers associated with important QTLs for major traits can be used in wheat improvement programs either using marker-assisted recurrent selection (MARS) or pseudo-backcrossing method. PMID:27441835

  16. Organization of the locus coeruleus-norepinephrine system.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Lindsay A; Luo, Liqun

    2015-11-02

    The release of the neurotransmitter norepinephrine throughout the mammalian brain is important for modulating attention, arousal, and cognition during many behaviors. Furthermore, disruption of norepinephrine-mediated signaling is strongly associated with several psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders in humans, emphasizing the clinical importance of this system. Most of the norepinephrine released in the brain is supplied by a very small, bilateral nucleus in the brainstem called the locus coeruleus. The goal of this minireview is to emphasize the complexity of the locus coeruleus beyond its primary definition as a norepinephrine-producing nucleus. Several recent studies utilizing innovative technologies highlight how the locus coeruleus-norepinephrine system can now be targeted with increased accuracy and resolution, in order to better understand its role in modulating diverse behaviors.

  17. Tension versus ecological zones in a two-locus system.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xin-Sheng

    2005-08-01

    Previous theories show that tension and ecological zones are indistinguishable in terms of gene frequency clines. Here I analytically show that these two types of zones can be distinguished in terms of genetic statistics other than gene frequency. A two-locus cline model is examined with the assumptions of random mating, weak selection, no drift, no mutation, and multiplicative viabilities. The genetic statistics for distinguishing the two types of zones are the deviations of one- or two-locus genotypic frequencies from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) or from random association of gametes (RAG), and the deviations of additive and dominance variances from the values at HWE. These deviations have a discontinuous distribution in space and different extents of interruptions in the ecological zone with a sharp boundary, but exhibit a continuous distribution in the tension zone. Linkage disequilibrium enhances the difference between the deviations from HWE and from RAG for any two-locus genotypic frequency.

  18. The capsule biosynthesis locus of Haemophilus influenzae shows conspicuous similarity to the corresponding locus in Haemophilus sputorum and may have been recruited from this species by horizontal gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Signe M; de Gier, Camilla; Dimopoulou, Chrysoula; Gupta, Vikas; Hansen, Lars H; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Niels

    2015-06-01

    The newly described species Haemophilus sputorum has been cultured from the upper respiratory tract of humans and appears to have little pathogenic potential. The species encodes a capsular biosynthesis locus of approximately 12  kb composed of three distinct regions. Region I and III genes, involved in export and processing of the capsular material, show high similarity to the corresponding genes in capsulate lineages of the pathogenic species Haemophilus influenzae; indeed, standard bexA and bexB PCRs for detection of capsulated strains of H. influenzae give positive results with strains of H. sputorum. Three ORFs are present in region II of the sequenced strain of H. sputorum, of which a putative phosphotransferase showed homology with corresponding genes from H. influenzae serotype c and f. Phylogenetic analysis of housekeeping genes from 24 Pasteurellaceae species showed that H. sputorum was only distantly related to H. influenzae. In contrast to H. influenzae, the capsule locus in H. sputorum is not associated with transposases or other transposable elements. Our data suggest that the capsule locus of capsulate lineages of H. influenzae may have been recruited relatively recently from the commensal species H. sputorum by horizontal gene transfer.

  19. Molecular Identification of the Schwannomatosis Locus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-01

    loss of heterozygosity of the region and potential identity by descent when identical changes were found in two or more families. A SALSA multiplex...concentration of genomic samples was measured using a Nanodrop ND-1000 spectro- photometer. Twenty to 500 ng were used for each assay. A SALSA

  20. Prostate cancer risk locus at 8q24 as a regulatory hub by physical interactions with multiple genomic loci across the genome.

    PubMed

    Du, Meijun; Yuan, Tiezheng; Schilter, Kala F; Dittmar, Rachel L; Mackinnon, Alexander; Huang, Xiaoyi; Tschannen, Michael; Worthey, Elizabeth; Jacob, Howard; Xia, Shu; Gao, Jianzhong; Tillmans, Lori; Lu, Yan; Liu, Pengyuan; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Wang, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome 8q24 locus contains regulatory variants that modulate genetic risk to various cancers including prostate cancer (PC). However, the biological mechanism underlying this regulation is not well understood. Here, we developed a chromosome conformation capture (3C)-based multi-target sequencing technology and systematically examined three PC risk regions at the 8q24 locus and their potential regulatory targets across human genome in six cell lines. We observed frequent physical contacts of this risk locus with multiple genomic regions, in particular, inter-chromosomal interaction with CD96 at 3q13 and intra-chromosomal interaction with MYC at 8q24. We identified at least five interaction hot spots within the predicted functional regulatory elements at the 8q24 risk locus. We also found intra-chromosomal interaction genes PVT1, FAM84B and GSDMC and inter-chromosomal interaction gene CXorf36 in most of the six cell lines. Other gene regions appeared to be cell line-specific, such as RRP12 in LNCaP, USP14 in DU-145 and SMIN3 in lymphoblastoid cell line. We further found that the 8q24 functional domains more likely interacted with genomic regions containing genes enriched in critical pathways such as Wnt signaling and promoter motifs such as E2F1 and TCF3. This result suggests that the risk locus may function as a regulatory hub by physical interactions with multiple genes important for prostate carcinogenesis. Further understanding genetic effect and biological mechanism of these chromatin interactions will shed light on the newly discovered regulatory role of the risk locus in PC etiology and progression.

  1. Linkage analysis of X-linked cone-rod dystrophy: localization to Xp11.4 and definition of a locus distinct from RP2 and RP3.

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, A B; Dash-Modi, A; O'Connell, J R; Shaffer-Gordon, M; Mah, T S; Stefko, S T; Nagaraja, R; Brown, J; Kimura, A E; Ferrell, R E; Gorin, M B

    1998-01-01

    Progressive X-linked cone-rod dystrophy (COD1) is a retinal disease affecting primarily the cone photoreceptors. The COD1 locus originally was localized, by the study of three independent families, to a region between Xp11.3 and Xp21.1, encompassing the retinitis pigmentosa (RP) 3 locus. We have refined the COD1 locus to a limited region of Xp11.4, using two families reported elsewhere and a new extended family. Genotype analysis was performed by use of eight microsatellite markers (tel-M6CA, DXS1068, DXS1058, DXS993, DXS228, DXS1201, DXS1003, and DXS1055-cent), spanning a distance of 20 cM. Nine-point linkage analysis, by use of the VITESSE program for X-linked disorders, established a maximum LOD score (17.5) between markers DXS1058 and DXS993, spanning 4.0 cM. Two additional markers, DXS977 and DXS556, which map between DXS1058 and DXS993, were used to further narrow the critical region. The RP3 gene, RPGR, was excluded on the basis of two obligate recombinants, observed in two independent families. In a third family, linkage analysis did not exclude the RPGR locus. The entire coding region of the RPGR gene from two affected males from family 2 was sequenced and was found to be normal. Haplotype analysis of two family branches, containing three obligate recombinants, two affected and one unaffected, defined the COD1 locus as distal to DXS993 and proximal to DXS556, a distance of approximately 1.0 Mb. This study excludes COD1 as an allelic variant of RP3 and establishes a novel locus that is sufficiently defined for positional cloning. PMID:9443860

  2. A conserved interaction that is essential for the biogenesis of histone locus bodies.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-cui; Sabath, Ivan; Kunduru, Lalitha; van Wijnen, Andre J; Marzluff, William F; Dominski, Zbigniew

    2014-12-05

    Nuclear protein, ataxia-telangiectasia locus (NPAT) and FLICE-associated huge protein (FLASH) are two major components of discrete nuclear structures called histone locus bodies (HLBs). NPAT is a key co-activator of histone gene transcription, whereas FLASH through its N-terminal region functions in 3' end processing of histone primary transcripts. The C-terminal region of FLASH contains a highly conserved domain that is also present at the end of Yin Yang 1-associated protein-related protein (YARP) and its Drosophila homologue, Mute, previously shown to localize to HLBs in Drosophila cells. Here, we show that the C-terminal domain of human FLASH and YARP interacts with the C-terminal region of NPAT and that this interaction is essential and sufficient to drive FLASH and YARP to HLBs in HeLa cells. Strikingly, only the last 16 amino acids of NPAT are sufficient for the interaction. We also show that the C-terminal domain of Mute interacts with a short region at the end of the Drosophila NPAT orthologue, multi sex combs (Mxc). Altogether, our data indicate that the conserved C-terminal domain shared by FLASH, YARP, and Mute recognizes the C-terminal sequence of NPAT orthologues, thus acting as a signal targeting proteins to HLBs. Finally, we demonstrate that the C-terminal domain of human FLASH can be directly joined with its N-terminal region through alternative splicing. The resulting 190-amino acid MiniFLASH, despite lacking 90% of full-length FLASH, contains all regions necessary for 3' end processing of histone pre-mRNA in vitro and accumulates in HLBs.

  3. Locus-specific view of flax domestication history

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yong-Bi; Diederichsen, Axel; Allaby, Robin G

    2012-01-01

    Crop domestication has been inferred genetically from neutral markers and increasingly from specific domestication-associated loci. However, some crops are utilized for multiple purposes that may or may not be reflected in a single domestication-associated locus. One such example is cultivated flax (Linum usitatissimum L.), the earliest oil and fiber crop, for which domestication history remains poorly understood. Oil composition of cultivated flax and pale flax (L. bienne Mill.) indicates that the sad2 locus is a candidate domestication locus associated with increased unsaturated fatty acid production in cultivated flax. A phylogenetic analysis of the sad2 locus in 43 pale and 70 cultivated flax accessions established a complex domestication history for flax that has not been observed previously. The analysis supports an early, independent domestication of a primitive flax lineage, in which the loss of seed dispersal through capsular indehiscence was not established, but increased oil content was likely occurred. A subsequent flax domestication process occurred that probably involved multiple domestications and includes lineages that contain oil, fiber, and winter varieties. In agreement with previous studies, oil rather than fiber varieties occupy basal phylogenetic positions. The data support multiple paths of flax domestication for oil-associated traits before selection of the other domestication-associated traits of seed dispersal loss and fiber production. The sad2 locus is less revealing about the origin of winter tolerance. In this case, a single domestication-associated locus is informative about the history of domesticated forms with the associated trait while partially informative on forms less associated with the trait. PMID:22408732

  4. Evidence that the penetrance of mutations at the RP11 locus causing dominant retinitis pigmentosa is influenced by a gene linked to the homologous RP11 allele.

    PubMed Central

    McGee, T L; Devoto, M; Ott, J; Berson, E L; Dryja, T P

    1997-01-01

    A subset of families with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (RP) display reduced penetrance with some asymptomatic gene carriers showing no retinal abnormalities by ophthalmic examination or by electroretinography. Here we describe a study of three families with reduced-penetrance RP. In all three families the disease gene appears to be linked to chromosome 19q13.4, the region containing the RP11 locus, as defined by previously reported linkage studies based on five other reduced-penetrance families. Meiotic recombinants in one of the newly identified RP11 families and in two of the previously reported families serve to restrict the disease locus to a 6-cM region bounded by markers D19S572 and D19S926. We also compared the disease status of RP11 carriers with the segregation of microsatellite alleles within 19q13.4 from the noncarrier parents in the newly reported and the previously reported families. The results support the hypothesis that wild-type alleles at the RP11 locus or at a closely linked locus inherited from the noncarrier parents are a major factor influencing the penetrance of pathogenic alleles at this locus. PMID:9345108

  5. Controlling-Element Events at the Shrunken Locus in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Burr, B.; Burr, F. A.

    1981-01-01

    We have examined insertions of the controlling element Ds at the Shrunken locus of maize. A cDNA probe complementary to a portion of the Shrunken locus mRNA was prepared. This probe recognizes a unique sequence in maize DNA. Using lines carrying derivatives of the same short arm of chromosome 9, we have detected modifications at the nucleic acid level caused by Ds. The changes appear to be large insertions, one of which may be more than 20 kilobase pairs in length. These observations provide a basis for the isolation and molecular characterization of one of the maize controlling elements. PMID:17249083

  6. Neighborhood Vigilance, Health Locus of Control, and Smoking Abstinence

    PubMed Central

    Reitzel, Lorraine R.; Lahoti, Sejal; Li, Yisheng; Cao, Yumei; Wetter, David W.; Waters, Andrew J.; Vidrine, Jennifer Irvin

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To examine whether health locus of control mediated relations of self-reported neighborhood vigilance and biochemically verified, continuous short-term smoking abstinence among 200 smokers enrolled in a cohort study. Methods A nonparametric bootstrapping procedure was used to assess mediation. Results Health locus of control-chance mediated relations between neighborhood vigilance and smoking abstinence in analyses adjusted for sociodemographics and tobacco dependence (p < .05). Greater vigilance was associated with greater attributions that health was affected by chance, which was associated with a lower likelihood of smoking abstinence. Conclusions Results suggest that neighborhood perceptions influence residents’ attributions for health outcomes, which can affect smoking abstinence. PMID:23985180

  7. Assignment of the locus for PLO-SL, a frontal-lobe dementia with bone cysts, to 19q13.

    PubMed Central

    Pekkarinen, P; Hovatta, I; Hakola, P; Järvi, O; Kestilä, M; Lenkkeri, U; Adolfsson, R; Holmgren, G; Nylander, P O; Tranebjaerg, L; Terwilliger, J D; Lönnqvist, J; Peltonen, L

    1998-01-01

    PLO-SL (polycystic lipomembranous osteodysplasia with sclerosing leukoencephalopathy) is a recessively inherited disorder characterized by systemic bone cysts and progressive presenile frontal-lobe dementia, resulting in death at <50 years of age. Since the 1960s, approximately 160 cases have been reported, mainly in Japan and Finland. The pathogenesis of the disease is unknown. In this article, we report the assignment of the locus for PLO-SL, by random genome screening using a modification of the haplotype-sharing method, in patients from a genetically isolated population. By screening five patient samples from 2 Finnish families, followed by linkage analysis of 12 Finnish families, 3 Swedish families, and 1 Norwegian family, we were able to assign the PLO-SL locus to a 9-cM interval between markers D19S191 and D19S420 on chromosome 19q13. The critical region was further restricted, to approximately 1.8 Mb, by linkage-disequilibrium analysis of the Finnish families. According to the haplotype analysis, one Swedish and one Norwegian PLO-SL family are not linked to the chromosome 19 locus, suggesting that PLO-SL is a heterogeneous disease. In this chromosomal region, one potential candidate gene for PLO-SL, the gene encoding amyloid precursor-like protein 1, was analyzed, but no mutations were detected in the coding region. PMID:9463329

  8. History of the discovery of a master locus producing piRNAs: the flamenco/COM locus in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Goriaux, Coline; Théron, Emmanuelle; Brasset, Emilie; Vaury, Chantal

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of transposable elements (TEs) in the 1950s by B. McClintock implied the existence of cellular regulatory systems controlling TE activity. The discovery of flamenco (flam) an heterochromatic locus from Drosophila melanogaster and its ability to survey several TEs such as gypsy, ZAM, and Idefix contributed to peer deeply into the mechanisms of the genetic and epigenetic regulation of TEs. flam was the first cluster producing small RNAs to be discovered long before RNAi pathways were identified in 1998. As a result of the detailed genetic analyses performed by certain laboratories and of the sophisticated genetic tools they developed, this locus has played a major role in our understanding of piRNA mediated TE repression in animals. Here we review the first discovery of this locus and retrace decades of studies that led to our current understanding of the relationship between genomes and their TE targets.

  9. History of the discovery of a master locus producing piRNAs: the flamenco/COM locus in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Coline, Goriaux; Théron, Emmanuelle; Brasset, Emilie; Vaury, Chantal

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of transposable elements (TEs) in the 1950s by B. McClintock implied the existence of cellular regulatory systems controlling TE activity. The discovery of flamenco (flam) an heterochromatic locus from Drosophila melanogaster and its ability to survey several TEs such as gypsy, ZAM, and Idefix contributed to peer deeply into the mechanisms of the genetic and epigenetic regulation of TEs. flam was the first cluster producing small RNAs to be discovered long before RNAi pathways were identified in 1998. As a result of the detailed genetic analyses performed by certain laboratories and of the sophisticated genetic tools they developed, this locus has played a major role in our understanding of piRNA mediated TE repression in animals. Here we review the first discovery of this locus and retrace decades of studies that led to our current understanding of the relationship between genomes and their TE targets. PMID:25136352

  10. Heterochromatic Position Effect at the Rosy Locus of DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER: Cytological, Genetic and Biochemical Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Rushlow, C. A.; Chovnick, A.

    1984-01-01

    This report describes cytological, genetic and biochemical studies designed to characterize two γ-radiation induced, apparent "underproducer" variants of the rosy locus (ry:3-52.0), ryps1149 and ryps11136. The following observations provide a compelling basis for their diagnosis as heterochromatic position effect variants. (1) They are associated with rearrangements that place heterochromatin adjacent to the rosy region of chromosome 3 (87D). (2) The effect of these mutations on rosy locus expression is subject to modification by abnormal Y chromosome content. (3) The rearrangement alters only the expression of the rosy allele on the same chromosome (cis-acting). (4) The Y chromosome modification is only on the position-affected allele's expression. (5) The recessive lethality associated with the rearrangements relate to specific rosy region vital loci, and for ryps 11136, the lethality is not Y chromosome modified. (6) The peptide product of the position-affected allele is qualitatively normal by several criteria. (7) Heterozygous deletion of 87E2-F2 is a suppressor of the rosy position effect. (8) The rosy position effect on XDH production may be assayed in whole larvae and larval fat body tissue as well as in adults. PMID:6437902

  11. Deletion mapping of the DFN3 locus at Xq21.1

    SciTech Connect

    Dahl, N. |; Biancalana, V.; Hanauer, A.

    1994-09-01

    A gene responsible for progressive mixed deafness with stapes fixation and perilymphatic gusher (DFN3) has previously been mapped to Xq132-q21. Molecular characterization of a family with X-linked sensorineural deafness revealed a deletion of locus DXS169 whereas the more telomeric locus DXS26 was intact. Patients affected by DFN3 have previously been reported to be deleted for DXS26 but not for DXS169, and we assumed that a common deletion overlap between the two markers should involve a gene for DFN3. Both loci DXS169 and DXS26 were sequenced and used for PCR-based screening of a mega YAC library (CEPH). One YAC of 1.1 Mb that bridges both loci was isolated. A pulsed-field map was constructed; Alu-PCR clones were generated from the YAC, and their relative positions were determined. Selected Alu clones were sequenced, converted into STSs and used to map the deletion breakpoints. Cosmids, homologous to the YAC, were isolated and mapped to the region corresponding to the deletion overlap. The region should contain at least part of the DFN3 gene and selected cosmids are being used in the search for transcribed sequences.

  12. Global Genetic Architecture of an Erythroid Quantitative Trait Locus, HMIP-2

    PubMed Central

    Menzel, Stephan; Rooks, Helen; Zelenika, Diana; Mtatiro, Siana N; Gnanakulasekaran, Akshala; Drasar, Emma; Cox, Sharon; Liu, Li; Masood, Mariam; Silver, Nicholas; Garner, Chad; Vasavda, Nisha; Howard, Jo; Makani, Julie; Adekile, Adekunle; Pace, Betty; Spector, Tim; Farrall, Martin; Lathrop, Mark; Thein, Swee Lay

    2014-01-01

    HMIP-2 is a human quantitative trait locus affecting peripheral numbers, size and hemoglobin composition of red blood cells, with a marked effect on the persistence of the fetal form of hemoglobin, HbF, in adults. The locus consists of multiple common variants in an enhancer region for MYB (chr 6q23.3), which encodes the hematopoietic transcription factor cMYB. Studying a European population cohort and four African-descended groups of patients with sickle cell anemia, we found that all share a set of two spatially separate HbF-promoting alleles at HMIP-2, termed “A” and “B.” These typically occurred together (“A–B”) on European chromosomes, but existed on separate homologous chromosomes in Africans. Using haplotype signatures for “A” and “B,” we interrogated public population datasets. Haplotypes carrying only “A” or “B” were typical for populations in Sub-Saharan Africa. The “A–B” combination was frequent in European, Asian, and Amerindian populations. Both alleles were infrequent in tropical regions, possibly undergoing negative selection by geographical factors, as has been reported for malaria with other hematological traits. We propose that the ascertainment of worldwide distribution patterns for common, HbF-promoting alleles can aid their further genetic characterization, including the investigation of gene–environment interaction during human migration and adaptation. PMID:25069958

  13. Transcription-dependent generation of a specialized chromatin structure at the TCRβ locus.

    PubMed

    Zacarías-Cabeza, Joaquin; Belhocine, Mohamed; Vanhille, Laurent; Cauchy, Pierre; Koch, Frederic; Pekowska, Aleksandra; Fenouil, Romain; Bergon, Aurélie; Gut, Marta; Gut, Ivo; Eick, Dirk; Imbert, Jean; Ferrier, Pierre; Andrau, Jean-Christophe; Spicuglia, Salvatore

    2015-04-01

    V(D)J recombination assembles Ag receptor genes during lymphocyte development. Enhancers at AR loci are known to control V(D)J recombination at associated alleles, in part by increasing chromatin accessibility of the locus, to allow the recombination machinery to gain access to its chromosomal substrates. However, whether there is a specific mechanism to induce chromatin accessibility at AR loci is still unclear. In this article, we highlight a specialized epigenetic marking characterized by high and extended H3K4me3 levels throughout the Dβ-Jβ-Cβ gene segments. We show that extended H3K4 trimethylation at the Tcrb locus depends on RNA polymerase II (Pol II)-mediated transcription. Furthermore, we found that the genomic regions encompassing the two DJCβ clusters are highly enriched for Ser(5)-phosphorylated Pol II and short-RNA transcripts, two hallmarks of transcription initiation and early transcription. Of interest, these features are shared with few other tissue-specific genes. We propose that the entire DJCβ regions behave as transcription "initiation" platforms, therefore linking a specialized mechanism of Pol II transcription with extended H3K4 trimethylation and highly accessible Dβ and Jβ gene segments.

  14. Structural forms of the human amylase locus and their relationships to SNPs, haplotypes, and obesity

    PubMed Central

    Usher, Christina L; Handsaker, Robert E; Esko, Tõnu; Tuke, Marcus A; Weedon, Michael N; Hastie, Alex R; Cao, Han; Moon, Jennifer E; Kashin, Seva; Fuchsberger, Christian; Metspalu, Andres; Pato, Carlos N; Pato, Michele T; McCarthy, Mark I; Boehnke, Michael; Altshuler, David M; Frayling, Timothy M; Hirschhorn, Joel N; McCarroll, Steven A

    2016-01-01

    Hundreds of genes reside in structurally complex, poorly understood regions of the human genome1-3. One such region contains the three amylase genes (AMY2B, AMY2A, and AMY1) responsible for digesting starch into sugar. The copy number of AMY1 is reported to be the genome’s largest influence on obesity4, though genome-wide association studies for obesity have found this locus unremarkable. Using whole genome sequence analysis3,5, droplet digital PCR6, and genome mapping7, we identified eight common structural haplotypes of the amylase locus that suggest its mutational history. We found that AMY1 copy number in individuals’ genomes is generally even (rather than odd) and partially correlates to nearby SNPs, which do not associate with BMI. We measured amylase gene copy number in 1,000 obese or lean Estonians and in two other cohorts totaling ~3,500 individuals. We had 99% power to detect the lower bound of the reported effects on BMI4, yet found no association. PMID:26098870

  15. Heterotic trait locus (HTL) mapping identifies intra-locus interactions that underlie reproductive hybrid vigor in Sorghum bicolor.

    PubMed

    Ben-Israel, Imri; Kilian, Benjamin; Nida, Habte; Fridman, Eyal

    2012-01-01

    Identifying intra-locus interactions underlying heterotic variation among whole-genome hybrids is a key to understanding mechanisms of heterosis and exploiting it for crop and livestock improvement. In this study, we present the development and first use of the heterotic trait locus (HTL) mapping approach to associate specific intra-locus interactions with an overdominant heterotic mode of inheritance in a diallel population using Sorghum bicolor as the model. This method combines the advantages of ample genetic diversity and the possibility of studying non-additive inheritance. Furthermore, this design enables dissecting the latter to identify specific intra-locus interactions. We identified three HTLs (3.5% of loci tested) with synergistic intra-locus effects on overdominant grain yield heterosis in 2 years of field trials. These loci account for 19.0% of the heterotic variation, including a significant interaction found between two of them. Moreover, analysis of one of these loci (hDPW4.1) in a consecutive F2 population confirmed a significant 21% increase in grain yield of heterozygous vs. homozygous plants in this locus. Notably, two of the three HTLs for grain yield are in synteny with previously reported overdominant quantitative trait loci for grain yield in maize. A mechanism for the reproductive heterosis found in this study is suggested, in which grain yield increase is achieved by releasing the compensatory tradeoffs between biomass and reproductive output, and between seed number and weight. These results highlight the power of analyzing a diverse set of inbreds and their hybrids for unraveling hitherto unknown allelic interactions mediating heterosis.

  16. A Novel Quantitative Trait Locus on Mouse Chromosome 18, “era1,” Modifies the Entrainment of Circadian Rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Wisor, Jonathan P.; Striz, Martin; DeVoss, Jason; Murphy, Greer M.; Edgar, Dale M.; O'Hara, Bruce F.

    2007-01-01

    Study Objectives: The mammalian circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of the hypothalamus conveys 24-h rhythmicity to sleep-wake cycles, locomotor activity, and other behavioral and physiological processes. The timing of rhythms relative to the light/dark (LD12:12) cycle is influenced in part by the endogenous circadian period and the time of day specific sensitivity of the clock to light. We now describe a novel circadian rhythm phenotype, and a locus influencing that phenotype, in a segregating population of mice. Methods: By crossbreeding 2 genetically distinct nocturnal strains of mice (Cast/Ei and C57BL/6J) and backcrossing the resulting progeny to Cast/Ei, we have produced a novel circadian phenotype, called early runner mice. Results: Early runner mice entrain to a light/dark cycle at an advanced phase, up to 9 hours before dark onset. This phenotype is not significantly correlated with circadian period in constant darkness and is not associated with disruption of molecular circadian rhythms in the SCN, as assessed by analysis of period gene expression. We have identified a genomic region that regulates this phenotype—a major quantitative trait locus on chromosome 18 (near D18Mit184) that we have named era1 for Early Runner Activity locus one. Phase delays caused by light exposure early in the subjective night were of smaller magnitude in backcross offspring that were homozygous Cast/Ei at D18Mit184 than in those that were heterozygous at this locus. Conclusion: Genetic variability in the circadian response to light may, in part, explain the variance in phase angle of entrainment in this segregating mouse population. Citation: Wisor JP; Striz M; DeVoss J; Murphy GM; Edgar DM; O'Hara BF. A novel quantitative trait locus on mouse chromosome 18, “era1,” modifies the entrainment of circadian rhythms. SLEEP 2007;30(10):1255-1263. PMID:17969459

  17. Two pedigrees segregating Duane’s retraction syndrome as a dominant trait map to the DURS2 genetic locus

    PubMed Central

    Engle, Elizabeth C.; Andrews, Caroline; Law, Krystal; Demer, Joseph L.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE To determine the molecular etiologies of Duane’s retraction syndrome (DRS), we are investigating its genetic bases. We have previously identified the transcription factors SALL4 and HOXA1 as the genes mutated in DRS with radial anomalies, and in DRS with deafness, vascular anomalies, and cognitive deficits, respectively. We know less, however, about the genetic etiology of DRS when it occurs in isolation, and only one genetic locus for isolated DRS, the DURS2 locus on chromosome 2, has been mapped to date. Toward the goal of identifying the DURS2 gene, we have ascertained and studied two pedigrees that segregate DRS as a dominant trait. METHODS We enrolled members of two large dominant DRS pedigrees into our ongoing study of the genetic basis of the congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders, and conducted linkage analysis to determine if their DRS phenotype maps to the DURS2 locus. RESULTS By haplotype analysis, the DRS phenotype in each family co-segregates with markers spanning the DURS2 region, and linkage analysis reveals maximum lod scores of >2, establishing that the DRS phenotype in these two pedigrees maps to the DURS2 locus. CONCLUSIONS These two pedigrees double the published pedigrees known to map to the DURS2 locus, and can thus contribute toward the search for the DURS2 gene. The affected members represent a genetically defined population of DURS2-linked DRS individuals, and hence studies of their clinical and structural features can enhance our understanding of the DURS2 phenotype, as described in the companion paper. PMID:17197532

  18. On the Components of Segregation Distortion in Drosophila Melanogaster. IV. Construction and Analysis of Free Duplications for the Responder Locus

    PubMed Central

    Brittnacher, J. G.; Ganetzky, B.

    1989-01-01

    Male Drosophila heterozygous for an SD-bearing second chromosome and a normal homolog preferentially transmit the SD chromosome to their offspring. The distorted transmission involves the induced dysfunction of the sperm that receive the SD(+) chromosome. The loci on the SD chromosome responsible for causing distortion are the Sd locus the the E(SD) locus. Their target of action on the SD(+) chromosome is the Rsp(s) locus. Previous studies of Rsp(s) indicated that deletion of this locus rendered a chromosome insensitive to the action of SD and mapped Rsp(s) physically within the centric heterochromatin of 2R. In this study we have constructed a collection of marked free duplications for the centromeric region of a second chromosome that carried Rsp(s). The heterochromatic extent of each duplication as well as its sensitivity to distortion was determined. We found that Rsp(s) is the most proximal known locus within the 2R heterochromatin. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that the presence of Rsp(s) is not only necessary but sufficient to confer sensitivity to distortion irrespective of its association with an intact second chromosome or one that pairs meiotically with an SD chromosome. By use of these duplications we increased the usual dosage of Rsp(s) relative to SD to determine whether there was any competition for limited amounts of SD [and/or E(SD)] product. When two Rsp(s)-bearing chromosomes are present within the same spermatocyte nucleus an SD chromosome is capable of causing efficient distortion of both. However, at least in some cases the degree of distortion against a given Rsp(s) was reduced by the presence of an extra dose of Rsp(s) indicating that there was some competition between them. The bearing of these results on present models of segregation distortion are discussed. PMID:2498160

  19. Fine-Mapping of the 1p11.2 Breast Cancer Susceptibility Locus.

    PubMed

    Horne, Hisani N; Chung, Charles C; Zhang, Han; Yu, Kai; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Fasching, Peter A; Beckmann, Matthias W; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Sawyer, Elinor J; Tomlinson, Ian; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Bojesen, Stig E; Flyger, Henrik; Benitez, Javier; González-Neira, Anna; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L; Brenner, Hermann; Arndt, Volker; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Nevanlinna, Heli; Khan, Sofia; Matsuo, Keitaro; Iwata, Hiroji; Dörk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Wu, Anna H; Ven den Berg, David; Smeets, Ann; Zhao, Hui; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Radice, Paolo; Barile, Monica; Couch, Fergus J; Vachon, Celine; Giles, Graham G; Milne, Roger L; Haiman, Christopher A; Marchand, Loic Le; Goldberg, Mark S; Teo, Soo H; Taib, Nur A M; Kristensen, Vessela; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Zheng, Wei; Shrubsole, Martha; Winqvist, Robert; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Devilee, Peter; Seynaeve, Caroline; García-Closas, Montserrat; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Martens, John W M; Li, Jingmei; Lu, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Blot, William; Cai, Qiuyin; Shah, Mitul; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Harrington, Patricia; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Hartman, Mikael; Chia, Kee Seng; Kabisch, Maria; Torres, Diana; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Brennan, Paul; Slager, Susan; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hou, Ming-Feng; Swerdlow, Anthony; Orr, Nick; Simard, Jacques; Hall, Per; Pharoah, Paul D P; Easton, Douglas F; Chanock, Stephen J; Dunning, Alison M; Figueroa, Jonine D

    2016-01-01

    The Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility genome-wide association study (GWAS) originally identified a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs11249433 at 1p11.2 associated with breast cancer risk. To fine-map this locus, we genotyped 92 SNPs in a 900kb region (120,505,799-121,481,132) flanking rs11249433 in 45,276 breast cancer cases and 48,998 controls of European, Asian and African ancestry from 50 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. Genotyping was done using iCOGS, a custom-built array. Due to the complicated nature of the region on chr1p11.2: 120,300,000-120,505,798, that lies near the centromere and contains seven duplicated genomic segments, we restricted analyses to 429 SNPs excluding the duplicated regions (42 genotyped and 387 imputed). Per-allelic associations with breast cancer risk were estimated using logistic regression models adjusting for study and ancestry-specific principal components. The strongest association observed was with the original identified index SNP rs11249433 (minor allele frequency (MAF) 0.402; per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.10, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.08-1.13, P = 1.49 x 10-21). The association for rs11249433 was limited to ER-positive breast cancers (test for heterogeneity P≤8.41 x 10-5). Additional analyses by other tumor characteristics showed stronger associations with moderately/well differentiated tumors and tumors of lobular histology. Although no significant eQTL associations were observed, in silico analyses showed that rs11249433 was located in a region that is likely a weak enhancer/promoter. Fine-mapping analysis of the 1p11.2 breast cancer susceptibility locus confirms this region to be limited to risk to cancers that are ER-positive.

  20. Fine-Mapping of the 1p11.2 Breast Cancer Susceptibility Locus

    PubMed Central

    Horne, Hisani N.; Chung, Charles C.; Zhang, Han; Yu, Kai; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Bojesen, Stig E.; Flyger, Henrik; Benitez, Javier; González-Neira, Anna; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Brenner, Hermann; Arndt, Volker; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Nevanlinna, Heli; Khan, Sofia; Matsuo, Keitaro; Iwata, Hiroji; Dörk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Wu, Anna H.; ven den Berg, David; Smeets, Ann; Zhao, Hui; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Radice, Paolo; Barile, Monica; Couch, Fergus J.; Vachon, Celine; Giles, Graham G.; Milne, Roger L.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Marchand, Loic Le; Goldberg, Mark S.; Teo, Soo H.; Taib, Nur A. M.; Kristensen, Vessela; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Zheng, Wei; Shrubsole, Martha; Winqvist, Robert; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Devilee, Peter; Seynaeve, Caroline; García-Closas, Montserrat; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Martens, John W. M.; Li, Jingmei; Lu, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Blot, William; Cai, Qiuyin; Shah, Mitul; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Harrington, Patricia; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Hartman, Mikael; Chia, Kee Seng; Kabisch, Maria; Torres, Diana; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Brennan, Paul; Slager, Susan; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hou, Ming-Feng; Swerdlow, Anthony; Orr, Nick; Simard, Jacques; Hall, Per; Pharoah, Paul D. P.

    2016-01-01

    The Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility genome-wide association study (GWAS) originally identified a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs11249433 at 1p11.2 associated with breast cancer risk. To fine-map this locus, we genotyped 92 SNPs in a 900kb region (120,505,799–121,481,132) flanking rs11249433 in 45,276 breast cancer cases and 48,998 controls of European, Asian and African ancestry from 50 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. Genotyping was done using iCOGS, a custom-built array. Due to the complicated nature of the region on chr1p11.2: 120,300,000–120,505,798, that lies near the centromere and contains seven duplicated genomic segments, we restricted analyses to 429 SNPs excluding the duplicated regions (42 genotyped and 387 imputed). Per-allelic associations with breast cancer risk were estimated using logistic regression models adjusting for study and ancestry-specific principal components. The strongest association observed was with the original identified index SNP rs11249433 (minor allele frequency (MAF) 0.402; per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.10, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.08–1.13, P = 1.49 x 10-21). The association for rs11249433 was limited to ER-positive breast cancers (test for heterogeneity P≤8.41 x 10-5). Additional analyses by other tumor characteristics showed stronger associations with moderately/well differentiated tumors and tumors of lobular histology. Although no significant eQTL associations were observed, in silico analyses showed that rs11249433 was located in a region that is likely a weak enhancer/promoter. Fine-mapping analysis of the 1p11.2 breast cancer susceptibility locus confirms this region to be limited to risk to cancers that are ER-positive. PMID:27556229

  1. Two-trait-locus linkage analysis: A powerful strategy for mapping complex genetic traits

    SciTech Connect

    Schork, N.J.; Boehnke, M. ); Terwilliger, J.D.; Ott, J. )

    1993-11-01

    Nearly all diseases mapped to date follow clear Mendelian, single-locus segregation patterns. In contrast, many common familial diseases such as diabetes, psoriasis, several forms of cancer, and schizophrenia are familial and appear to have a genetic component but do not exhibit simple Mendelian transmission. More complex models are required to explain the genetics of these important diseases. In this paper, the authors explore two-trait-locus, two-marker-locus linkage analysis in which two trait loci are mapped simultaneously to separate genetic markers. The authors compare the utility of this approach to standard one-trait-locus, one-marker-locus linkage analysis with and without allowance for heterogeneity. The authors also compare the utility of the two-trait-locus, two-marker-locus analysis to two-trait-locus, one-marker-locus linkage analysis. For common diseases, pedigrees are often bilineal, with disease genes entering via two or more unrelated pedigree members. Since such pedigrees often are avoided in linkage studies, the authors also investigate the relative information content of unilineal and bilineal pedigrees. For the dominant-or-recessive and threshold models that the authors consider, the authors find that two-trait-locus, two-marker-locus linkage analysis can provide substantially more linkage information, as measured by expected maximum lod score, than standard one-trait-locus, one-marker-locus methods, even allowing for heterogeneity, while, for a dominant-or-dominant generating model, one-locus models that allow for heterogeneity extract essentially as much information as the two-trait-locus methods. For these three models, the authors also find that bilineal pedigrees provide sufficient linkage information to warrant their inclusion in such studies. The authors discuss strategies for assessing the significance of the two linkages assumed in two-trait-locus, two-marker-locus models. 37 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  2. Exonic Re-Sequencing of the Chromosome 2q24.3 Parkinson’s Disease Locus

    PubMed Central

    Labbé, Catherine; Ogaki, Kotaro; Lorenzo-Betancor, Oswaldo; Carrasquillo, Minerva M.; Heckman, Michael G.; McCarthy, Allan; Soto-Ortolaza, Alexandra I.; Walton, Ronald L.; Lynch, Timothy; Siuda, Joanna; Opala, Grzegorz; Krygowska-Wajs, Anna; Barcikowska, Maria; Czyzewski, Krzysztof; Dickson, Dennis W.; Uitti, Ryan J.; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Ross, Owen A.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in Parkinson’s disease (PD) have identified over 20 genomic regions associated with disease risk. Many of these loci include several candidate genes making it difficult to pinpoint the causal gene. The locus on chromosome 2q24.3 encompasses three genes: B3GALT1, STK39, and CERS6. In order to identify if the causal variants are simple missense changes, we sequenced all 31 exons of these three genes in 187 patients with PD. We identified 13 exonic variants including four non-synonymous and three insertion/deletion variants (indels). These non-synonymous variants and rs2102808, the GWAS tag SNP, were genotyped in three independent series consisting of a total of 1976 patients and 1596 controls. Our results show that the seven identified 2q24.3 coding variants are not independently responsible for the GWAS association signal at the locus; however, there is a haplotype, which contains both rs2102808 and a STK39 exon 1 6bp indel variant, that is significantly associated with PD risk (Odds Ratio [OR] = 1.35, 95% CI: 1.11–1.64, P = 0.003). This haplotype is more associated than each of the two variants independently (OR = 1.23, P = 0.005 and 1.10, P = 0.10, respectively). Our findings suggest that the risk variant is likely located in a non-coding region. Additional sequencing of the locus including promoter and regulatory regions will be needed to pinpoint the association at this locus that leads to an increased risk to PD. PMID:26090850

  3. A copy number variant at the KITLG locus likely confers risk for canine squamous cell carcinoma of the digit.

    PubMed

    Karyadi, Danielle M; Karlins, Eric; Decker, Brennan; vonHoldt, Bridgett M; Carpintero-Ramirez, Gretchen; Parker, Heidi G; Wayne, Robert K; Ostrander, Elaine A

    2013-03-01

    The domestic dog is a robust model for studying the genetics of complex disease susceptibility. The strategies used to develop and propagate modern breeds have resulted in an elevated risk for specific diseases in particular breeds. One example is that of Standard Poodles (STPOs), who have increased risk for squamous cell carcinoma of the digit (SCCD), a locally aggressive cancer that causes lytic bone lesions, sometimes with multiple toe recurrence. However, only STPOs of dark coat color are at high risk; light colored STPOs are almost entirely unaffected, suggesting that interactions between multiple pathways are necessary for oncogenesis. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) on STPOs, comparing 31 SCCD cases to 34 unrelated black STPO controls. The peak SNP on canine chromosome 15 was statistically significant at the genome-wide level (P(raw) = 1.60 × 10(-7); P(genome) = 0.0066). Additional mapping resolved the region to the KIT Ligand (KITLG) locus. Comparison of STPO cases to other at-risk breeds narrowed the locus to a 144.9-Kb region. Haplotype mapping among 84 STPO cases identified a minimal region of 28.3 Kb. A copy number variant (CNV) containing predicted enhancer elements was found to be strongly associated with SCCD in STPOs (P = 1.72 × 10(-8)). Light colored STPOs carry the CNV risk alleles at the same frequency as black STPOs, but are not susceptible to SCCD. A GWAS comparing 24 black and 24 light colored STPOs highlighted only the MC1R locus as significantly different between the two datasets, suggesting that a compensatory mutation within the MC1R locus likely protects light colored STPOs from disease. Our findings highlight a role for KITLG in SCCD susceptibility, as well as demonstrate that interactions between the KITLG and MC1R loci are potentially required for SCCD oncogenesis. These findings highlight how studies of breed-limited diseases are useful for disentangling multigene disorders.

  4. Strong conservation of rhoptry-associated-protein-1 (RAP-1) locus organization and sequence among Babesia isolates infecting sheep from China (Babesia motasi-like phylogenetic group).

    PubMed

    Niu, Qingli; Valentin, Charlotte; Bonsergent, Claire; Malandrin, Laurence

    2014-12-01

    Rhoptry-associated-protein 1 (RAP-1) is considered as a potential vaccine candidate due to its involvement in red blood cell invasion by parasites in the genus Babesia. We examined its value as a vaccine candidate by studying RAP-1 conservation in isolates of Babesia sp. BQ1 Ningxian, Babesia sp. Tianzhu and Babesia sp. Hebei, responsible for ovine babesiosis in different regions of China. The rap-1 locus in these isolates has very similar features to those described for Babesia sp. BQ1 Lintan, another Chinese isolate also in the B. motasi-like phylogenetic group, namely the presence of three types of rap-1 genes (rap-1a, rap-1b and rap-1c), multiple conserved rap-1b copies (5) interspaced with more or less variable rap-1a copies (6), and the 3' localization of one rap-1c. The isolates Babesia sp. Tianzhu, Babesia sp. BQ1 Lintan and Ningxian were almost identical (average nucleotide identity of 99.9%) over a putative locus of about 31 Kb, including the intergenic regions. Babesia sp. Hebei showed a similar locus organization but differed in the rap-1 locus sequence, for each gene and intergenic region, with an average nucleotide identity of 78%. Our results are in agreement with 18S rDNA phylogenetic studies performed on these isolates. However, in extremely closely related isolates the rap-1 locus seems more conserved (99.9%) than the 18S rDNA (98.7%), whereas in still closely related isolates the identities are much lower (78%) compared with the 18S rDNA (97.7%). The particularities of the rap-1 locus in terms of evolution, phylogeny, diagnosis and vaccine development are discussed.

  5. A two-locus DNA sequence database for identifying host-specific pathogens and phylogenetic diversity within the Fusarium oxysporum species complex

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An electronically portable two-locus DNA sequence database, comprising partial sequences of the translation elongation factor gene (EF-1a, 634 bp alignment) and nearly complete sequences of the nuclear ribosomal intergenic spacer region (IGS rDNA, 2220 bp alignment) for 850 isolates spanning the phy...

  6. Structural organization of the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus in the channel catfish: the IgH locus represents a composite of two gene clusters.

    PubMed

    Ventura-Holman, Tereza; Lobb, Craig J

    2002-01-01

    Two structurally-related genomic clusters of catfish immunoglobulin heavy chain gene segments are known. The first gene cluster contains DH and JH segments, as well as the C region exons encoding the functional Cmu. The second gene cluster contains multiple VH gene segments representing different VH families, a germline-joined VDJ, a single JH segment, and at least two pseudogene Cmu exons. It was not known whether these gene clusters were linked, nor was the organization or the location of VH segments associated within the first gene cluster known. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis studies have been used to determine the structural organization of these gene clusters. Restriction mapping studies show that the two gene clusters are closely linked; the second gene cluster is located upstream from the first with the Cmu regions within the clusters separated by about 725kb. The clusters are in the same relative transcriptional orientation, and the results indicate that the complete IgH locus spans no more than 1000kb and may be as small as 750-800kb. VH gene segments are located both upstream and downstream of the pseudo-Cmu exons; however, no VH gene segments that hybridized with the VH specific probes were detected downstream of the functional Cmu. These studies coupled with earlier sequence analyses indicate that the catfish IgH locus arose from a massive internal duplication event. Subsequent gene rearrangement within the duplicated cluster likely resulted in the presence of the germline VDJ and the deletion of intervening V, D and J segments. Transposition by a member of the Tc1/mariner family of transposable elements appears to have led to the disruption of the duplicated Cmu.

  7. Relationships among Impulsiveness, Locus of Control, Sex, and Music Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miksza, Peter

    2006-01-01

    This study is an investigation of relationships among impulsiveness, locus of control, sex, observed practice behaviors, practice effectiveness, and self-reported practice habits in a sample of 40 college brass players. Practice effectiveness was defined by the amount of change in pretest and posttest performance achievement scores over one…

  8. Reminiscences of a mouse specific-locus test addict.

    PubMed

    Russell, W L

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes some of the historical events surrounding the development of and achievements with the mouse specific-locus test in radiation and chemical mutagenesis. Some ongoing and future contributions of the test to research in molecular genetics are also mentioned.

  9. Molecular Epidemiology of sil Locus in Clinical Streptococcus pyogenes Strains

    PubMed Central

    Plainvert, Céline; Dinis, Márcia; Ravins, Miriam; Hanski, Emanuel; Touak, Gérald; Dmytruk, Nicolas; Fouet, Agnès

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus [GAS]) causes a wide variety of diseases, ranging from mild noninvasive to severe invasive infections. Mutations in regulatory components have been implicated in the switch from colonization to invasive phenotypes. The inactivation of the sil locus, composed of six genes encoding a quorum-sensing complex, gives rise to a highly invasive strain. However, studies conducted on limited collections of GAS strains suggested that sil prevalence is around 15%; furthermore, whereas a correlation between the presence of sil and the genetic background was suggested, no link between the presence of a functional sil locus and the invasive status was assessed. We established a collection of 637 nonredundant strains covering all emm genotypes present in France and of known clinical history; 68%, 22%, and 10% were from invasive infections, noninvasive infections, and asymptomatic carriage, respectively. Among the 637 strains, 206 were sil positive. The prevalence of the sil locus varied according to the emm genotype, being present in >85% of the emm4, emm18, emm32, emm60, emm87, and emm90 strains and absent from all emm1, emm28, and emm89 strains. A random selection based on 2009 French epidemiological data indicated that 16% of GAS strains are sil positive. Moreover, due to mutations leading to truncated proteins, only 9% of GAS strains harbor a predicted functional sil system. No correlation was observed between the presence or absence of a functional sil locus and the strain invasiveness status. PMID:24671796

  10. Relationship between Locus of Control and Health-Related Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graffeo, Lisa Cotlar; Silvestri, Lynette

    2006-01-01

    Locus of Control (LOC) deals with an individual's personal attribution of successful or failure. Those with internal LOC believe that events in their lives are under their personal control while individuals with external LOC feel that their lives are dominated by the environment. The theory has been applied to achievement and health-related issues…

  11. Dealing with Malfunction: Locus of Control in Web-Conferencing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klebl, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers how students deal with malfunctions that occur during the use of web conferencing systems in learning arrangements. In a survey among participants in online courses that make use of a web-conferencing system (N = 129), the relationship between a preference for internal or external locus of control and the perception of…

  12. Molecular genetic analysis of the Phaseolus vulgaris P locus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Common bean market classes are distinguished by their many seed colors, patterns, and size. At least 23 genes, acting independently or in an epistatic manner, affect the seed coat color and pattern. The P locus which is described as the “ground factor” by Emerson, has multiple alleles and controls a...

  13. The Locus of the Focus of a Rolling Parabola

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agarwal, Anurag; Marengo, James

    2010-01-01

    The catenary is usually introduced as the shape assumed by a hanging flexible cable. This is a "physical" description of a catenary. In this article we give a "geometrical" description of a catenary. Specifically we show that the catenary is the locus of the focus of a certain parabola as it rolls on the x-axis.

  14. Job Satisfaction and Locus of Control in an Academic Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stachowiak, Bonni J.

    2010-01-01

    This study explored any relationships that existed between faculty members' locus of control and job satisfaction at a small, private, faith-based university. Two demographic variables were also analyzed in the findings: number of years teaching in higher education and tenure status. The job satisfaction instrument used was the Job in General…

  15. Relationships Among Locus of Control, Grades, and Student Ratings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, Steven V.; Froman, Robin D.

    This research examines the interaction between college students' control orientation and a discrepancy score of GPA minus expected grade in course, on the dependent measure of 13 student rating items. It was hypothesized that students with an external locus of control who also showed a discrepancy between expected and actual grades would distort…

  16. Motive to Avoid Success, Locus of Control, and Reinforcement Avoidance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katovsky, Walter

    Subjects were four groups of 12 college women, high or low in motive to avoid success (MAS) and locus of control (LC), were reinforced for response A on a fixed partial reinforcement schedule on three concept learning tasks, one task consisting of combined reward and punishment, another of reward only, and one of punishment only. Response B was…

  17. Locus of Control Correlates in an Alcoholic Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowicki, Stephen, Jr.; Hopper, Allen E.

    1974-01-01

    Assesses the locus of control orientation within an alcoholic population and relates this orientation to the degree of cognitive dysfunction. Results suggest that female alcoholics, specifically those who need inpatient treatment, may be a relatively more disturbed group compared to alcoholic male inpatients. (Author/PC)

  18. Attitudes toward Nutrition, Locus of Control and Smoking Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corfield, V. Kilian; And Others

    Research has shown that many behaviors previously thought to be purely psychological in origin do, in fact, have a physiological basis. To examine the relationship of smoking behavior to locus of control, and to attitudes toward, knowledge about, and behavior with respect to nutrition, 116 Canadian undergraduate students completed the Nutrition…

  19. Fetal Health Locus of Control Scale: Development and Validation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labs, Sharon M.; Wurtele, Sandy K.

    1986-01-01

    Describes development of the Fetal Health Locus of Control scale, the scale's utility in predicting maternal health-related behavior during pregnancy, normative data, and information on factor structure and internal consistency. Reports that cigarette and caffeine consumption during pregnancy, and women's intentions to participate in prepared…

  20. Locus of Control and Completion in an Adult Retraining Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Maurice C.

    Since attrition is often a problem in adult training programs, a study was conducted to investigate the relationship between locus of control and course completion of adults enrolled in a retraining program. Rotter's Social Learning Theory of Personality was used as a starting point for the study. The study population was a sample of 108…

  1. Marathon Group: Changes in Perceived Locus of Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foulds, Melvin L.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Fifteen college students participated in a 24-hour marathon group and responded to the Internal-External Scale immediately before and after the experience. The results disclosed significant positive change at the .001 level in perceived locus of internal-external control of reinforcement expectancies in the direction of increased internality.…

  2. Exploring Learner Autonomy: Language Learning Locus of Control in Multilinguals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peek, Ron

    2016-01-01

    By using data from an online language learning beliefs survey (n?=?841), defining language learning experience in terms of participants' multilingualism, and using a domain-specific language learning locus of control (LLLOC) instrument, this article examines whether more experienced language learners can also be seen as more autonomous language…

  3. Inferring relationships between pairs of individuals from locus heterozygosities

    PubMed Central

    Presciuttini, Silvano; Toni, Chiara; Tempestini, Elena; Verdiani, Simonetta; Casarino, Lucia; Spinetti, Isabella; Stefano, Francesco De; Domenici, Ranieri; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E

    2002-01-01

    Background The traditional exact method for inferring relationships between individuals from genetic data is not easily applicable in all situations that may be encountered in several fields of applied genetics. This study describes an approach that gives affordable results and is easily applicable; it is based on the probabilities that two individuals share 0, 1 or both alleles at a locus identical by state. Results We show that these probabilities (zi) depend on locus heterozygosity (H), and are scarcely affected by variation of the distribution of allele frequencies. This allows us to obtain empirical curves relating zi's to H for a series of common relationships, so that the likelihood ratio of a pair of relationships between any two individuals, given their genotypes at a locus, is a function of a single parameter, H. Application to large samples of mother-child and full-sib pairs shows that the statistical power of this method to infer the correct relationship is not much lower than the exact method. Analysis of a large database of STR data proves that locus heterozygosity does not vary significantly among Caucasian populations, apart from special cases, so that the likelihood ratio of the more common relationships between pairs of individuals may be obtained by looking at tabulated zi values. Conclusions A simple method is provided, which may be used by any scientist with the help of a calculator or a spreadsheet to compute the likelihood ratios of common alternative relationships between pairs of individuals. PMID:12441003

  4. Should Farmers' Locus of Control Be Used in Extension?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuthall, Peter L.

    2010-01-01

    To explore whether Farmers' Locus of Control (LOC) could be useful in agricultural extension programmes to improve managerial ability. This test records a farmer's belief in her/his control over production outcomes. A mail survey of 2300 New Zealand farmers was used to obtain a range of variables, and to measure their LOC using a question set…

  5. The Influence of Locus of Control on Student Financial Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Britt, Sonya; Cumbie, Julie A.; Bell, Mary M.

    2013-01-01

    Data on psychological influences of financial behaviors has not been well addressed in student populations, which is concerning given the high levels of general and financial stress experienced by college students. The findings of this study indicate that college students with an external locus of control exhibit the worst financial behaviors.…

  6. Validation of a Five-Level Locus of Control Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fournier, Genevieve; Jeanrie, Chantale

    1999-01-01

    Interviews with 1,011 students and employed adults explored seven work-related themes: decision making, self-knowledge, meaning of work, career planning, social/work environment, educational institutions, and job market. Results supported the validity of the Vocational Locus of Control Scale. (SK)

  7. [Drug compliance and health locus of control in schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Combes, C; Feral, F

    2011-05-01

    Schizophrenia is a frequent disorder since it affects about 1% of the general population. Drug compliance, that is to say patients' adherence to their treatment, remains rather poor concerning this disease with, on an average, one patient out of two not complying with his/her medication. Among the factors influencing drug compliance, we focused on patients' beliefs in terms of health control, a concept known as health locus of control. This is a concept that originated from social psychology and derived from the Rotters' original concept of locus of control: it corresponds to the type of connexion established by an individual between subsequent events in the history of his/her disease and internal (personal abilities) or external factors (chance, powerful others). Nowadays, the tridimensional structure of this concept is commonly admitted as being in three dimensions: internality, chance externality and powerful others externality, the latter group being divided between doctors and others. We have assumed that there is a correlation between the degree of drug compliance and the internal and/or doctors' external health locus of control. For this purpose, we have determined the quality of drug compliance by using the Medical Adherence Rating Scale (MARS) and the type of health locus of control by using the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control (MHLC) scale among 65 schizophrenic patients. We have also considered it was important to evaluate patients' insight by using the Amador's scale (Scale of Unawareness of Mental Disorder) because many researchers have established a strong correlation between insight and drug compliance in schizophrenia. Associations between the four dimensions of health locus of control ("internal", "chance external", "others external" and "doctors' external") and drug compliance were assessed by estimating Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (r) and its degree of significance (p). These associations were judged significant at an alpha

  8. The handedness-associated PCSK6 locus spans an intronic promoter regulating novel transcripts.

    PubMed

    Shore, Robert; Covill, Laura; Pettigrew, Kerry A; Brandler, William M; Diaz, Rebeca; Xu, Yiwang; Tello, Javier A; Talcott, Joel B; Newbury, Dianne F; Stein, John; Monaco, Anthony P; Paracchini, Silvia

    2016-05-01

    We recently reported the association of the PCSK6 gene with handedness through a quantitative genome-wide association study (GWAS; P < 0.5 × 10(-8)) for a relative hand skill measure in individuals with dyslexia. PCSK6 activates Nodal, a morphogen involved in regulating left-right body axis determination. Therefore, the GWAS data suggest that the biology underlying the patterning of structural asymmetries may also contribute to behavioural laterality, e.g. handedness. The association is further supported by an independent study reporting a variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) within the same PCSK6 locus to be associated with degree of handedness in a general population cohort. Here, we have conducted a functional analysis of the PCSK6 locus combining further genetic analysis, in silico predictions and molecular assays. We have shown that the previous GWAS signal was not tagging a VNTR effect, suggesting that the two markers have independent effects. We demonstrated experimentally that one of the top GWAS-associated markers, rs11855145, directly alters the binding site for a nuclear factor. Furthermore, we have shown that the predicted regulatory region adjacent to rs11855415 acts as a bidirectional promoter controlling the expression of novel RNA transcripts. These include both an antisense long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) and a short PCSK6 isoform predicted to be coding. This is the first molecular characterization of a handedness-associated locus that supports the role of common variants in non-coding sequences in influencing complex phenotypes through gene expression regulation.

  9. Modifier locus of the skeletal muscle involvement in Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Granger, B; Gueneau, L; Drouin-Garraud, V; Pedergnana, V; Gagnon, F; Ben Yaou, R; Tezenas du Montcel, S; Bonne, G

    2011-02-01

    Autosomal dominant Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy is caused by mutations in LMNA gene encoding lamins A and C. The disease is characterized by early onset joint contractures during childhood associated with humero-peroneal muscular wasting and weakness, and by the development of a cardiac disease in adulthood. Important intra-familial variability characterized by a wide range of age at onset of myopathic symptoms (AOMS) has been recurrently reported, suggesting the contribution of a modifier gene. Our objective was to identify a modifier locus of AOMS in relation with the LMNA mutation. To map the modifier locus, we genotyped 291 microsatellite markers in 59 individuals of a large French family, where 19 patients carrying the same LMNA mutation, exhibited wide range of AOMS. We performed Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo-based joint segregation and linkage methods implemented in the Loki software, and detected a strong linkage signal on chromosome 2 between markers D2S143 and D2S2244 (211 cM) with a Bayes factor of 28.7 (empirical p value = 0.0032). The linked region harbours two main candidate genes, DES and MYL1 encoding desmin and light chain of myosin. Importantly, the impact of the genotype on the phenotype for this locus showed an overdominant effect with AOMS 2 years earlier for the homozygotes of the rare allele and 37 years earlier for the heterozygotes than the homozygotes for the common allele. These results provide important highlights for the natural history and for the physiopathology of Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy.

  10. The handedness-associated PCSK6 locus spans an intronic promoter regulating novel transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Shore, Robert; Covill, Laura; Pettigrew, Kerry A.; Brandler, William M.; Diaz, Rebeca; Xu, Yiwang; Tello, Javier A.; Talcott, Joel B.; Newbury, Dianne F.; Stein, John; Monaco, Anthony P.; Paracchini, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    We recently reported the association of the PCSK6 gene with handedness through a quantitative genome-wide association study (GWAS; P < 0.5 × 10−8) for a relative hand skill measure in individuals with dyslexia. PCSK6 activates Nodal, a morphogen involved in regulating left–right body axis determination. Therefore, the GWAS data suggest that the biology underlying the patterning of structural asymmetries may also contribute to behavioural laterality, e.g. handedness. The association is further supported by an independent study reporting a variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) within the same PCSK6 locus to be associated with degree of handedness in a general population cohort. Here, we have conducted a functional analysis of the PCSK6 locus combining further genetic analysis, in silico predictions and molecular assays. We have shown that the previous GWAS signal was not tagging a VNTR effect, suggesting that the two markers have independent effects. We demonstrated experimentally that one of the top GWAS-associated markers, rs11855145, directly alters the binding site for a nuclear factor. Furthermore, we have shown that the predicted regulatory region adjacent to rs11855415 acts as a bidirectional promoter controlling the expression of novel RNA transcripts. These include both an antisense long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) and a short PCSK6 isoform predicted to be coding. This is the first molecular characterization of a handedness-associated locus that supports the role of common variants in non-coding sequences in influencing complex phenotypes through gene expression regulation. PMID:26908617

  11. Coordinated forms of noradrenergic plasticity in the locus coeruleus and primary auditory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Ana Raquel O.; Froemke, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    The cerebral cortex is plastic and represents the world according to the significance of sensory stimuli. However, cortical networks are embodied within complex circuits including neuromodulatory systems such as the noradrenergic locus coeruleus, providing information about internal state and behavioral relevance. While norepinephrine is important for cortical plasticity, it is unknown how modulatory neurons themselves respond to changes of sensory input. Here we examine how locus coeruleus neurons are modified by experience, and the consequences of locus coeruleus plasticity on cortical representations and sensory perception. We made whole-cell recordings from rat locus coeruleus and primary auditory cortex (AI), pairing sounds with locus coeruleus activation. Although initially unresponsive, locus coeruleus neurons developed and maintained auditory responses afterwards. Locus coeruleus plasticity induced changes in AI responses lasting at least hours and improved auditory perception for days to weeks. Our results demonstrate that locus coeruleus is highly plastic, leading to substantial changes in regulation of brain state by norepinephrine. PMID:26301326

  12. Receptor protein kinase gene encoded at the self-incompatibility locus

    DOEpatents

    Nasrallah, June B.; Nasrallah, Mikhail E.; Stein, Joshua

    1996-01-01

    Described herein is a S receptor kinase gene (SRK), derived from the S locus in Brassica oleracea, having a extracellular domain highly similar to the secreted product of the S-locus glycoprotein gene.

  13. Familial vestibulocerebellar disorder maps to chromosome 13q31-q33: a new nystagmus locus

    PubMed Central

    Ragge, N; Hartley, C; Dearlove, A; Walker, J; Russell-Eggitt, I; Harris, C

    2003-01-01

    Design: Observational and experimental study. Methods: We carried out a phenotypic study of a unique four generation family with nystagmus. We performed genetic linkage studies including a genome wide search. Results: Affected family members developed vestibulocerebellar type nystagmus in the first two years of life. A higher incidence of strabismus was noted in affected members. Haplotype construction and analysis of recombination events linked the disorder to a locus (NYS4) on chromosome 13q31-q33 with a lod score of 6.322 at θ=0 for D13S159 and narrowed the region to a 13.8 cM region between markers D13S1300 and D13S158. Conclusions: This study suggests that the early onset acquired nystagmus seen in this family is caused by a single gene defect. Identification of the gene may hold the key to understanding pathways for early eye stabilisation and strabismus. PMID:12525540

  14. Identification of a locus (LCA9) for Leber's congenital amaurosis on chromosome 1p36.

    PubMed

    Keen, T Jeffrey; Mohamed, Moin D; McKibbin, Martin; Rashid, Yasmin; Jafri, Hussain; Maumenee, Irene H; Inglehearn, Chris F

    2003-05-01

    Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA) is the most common cause of inherited childhood blindness and is characterised by severe retinal degeneration at or shortly after birth. We have identified a new locus, LCA9, on chromosome 1p36, at which the disease segregates in a single consanguineous Pakistani family. Following a whole genome linkage search, an autozygous region of 10 cM was identified between the markers D1S1612 and D1S228. Multipoint linkage analysis generated a lod score of 4.4, strongly supporting linkage to this region. The critical disease interval contains at least 5.7 Mb of DNA and around 50 distinct genes. One of these, retinoid binding protein 7 (RBP7), was screened for mutations in the family, but none was found.

  15. Evidence for locus heterogeneity in autosomal dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Speer, M.C.; Stajich, J.M.; Gaskell, P.C.

    1995-12-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) is a diagnostic classification encompassing a broad group of proximal myopathies. A gene for the dominant form of LGMD (LGMD1A) has recently been localized to a 7-cM region of chromosome 5q between D5S178 and IL9. We studied three additional dominant LGMD families for linkage to these two markers and excluded all from localization to this region, providing evidence for locus heterogeneity within the dominant form of LGMD. Although the patterns of muscle weakness were similar in all families studied, the majority of affected family members in the chromosome 5-linked pedigree have a dysarthric speech pattern, which is not present in any of the five unlinked families. The demonstration of heterogeneity within autosomal dominant LGMD is the first step in attempting to subclassify these families with similar clinical phenotypes on a molecular level. 33 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  16. Fine-structure genetic map of the cysB locus in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Cheney, R W; Kredich, N M

    1975-01-01

    A genetic map of the cysB region of the Salmonella typhimurium chromosome was constructed using bacteriophage P22-mediated transduction. Strains bearing delta (supX cysB) mutations were employed to divide this regulatory locus into 12 segments containing a total of 39 single-site mutations. Twenty-five of these single-site mutations were further ordered by reciprocal three-point crosses. The results do not support the concept of multiple cistrons at cysB and suggest that the abortive transductants previously observed in crosses between certain cysB mutants were due to intracistronic complementation. The prototrophic cys-1352 mutation, which causes the constitutive expression of the cysteine biosynthetic enzymes, was found to lie within the cysB region itself. It is bracketed by mutations, which lead to an inability to derepress for these enzymes and result in auxotrophy for cysteine. PMID:1104581

  17. Molecular mapping of the putative gonadoblastoma locus on the Y chromosome.

    PubMed

    Salo, P; Kääriäinen, H; Petrovic, V; Peltomäki, P; Page, D C; de la Chapelle, A

    1995-11-01

    Based on the high incidence of gonadoblastoma in females with XY gonadal dysgenesis or 45,X/46,XY mosaicism, the existence of a susceptibility locus on the Y chromosome (GBY) has been postulated. We attempted to map GBY by making use of a recently developed dense map of Y-chromosomal sequence-tagged sites (STSs). In two female patients with gonadoblastoma, small marker chromosomes contained portions of the Y chromosome, and a single region of overlap could be defined extending from probe pDP97 in interval 4B, which contains the centromere, to marker sY182 in interval 5E of the proximal long arm. This interval is contained in a YAC contig that comprises approximately 4 Mb of DNA. Our findings confirm the previous localization of GBY and greatly refine it. The localization of GBY overlaps with the region to which a putative growth determinant, GCY, was recently assigned.

  18. Locus-specific epigenetic remodeling controls addiction- and depression-related behaviors.

    PubMed

    Heller, Elizabeth A; Cates, Hannah M; Peña, Catherine J; Sun, Haosheng; Shao, Ningyi; Feng, Jian; Golden, Sam A; Herman, James P; Walsh, Jessica J; Mazei-Robison, Michelle; Ferguson, Deveroux; Knight, Scott; Gerber, Mark A; Nievera, Christian; Han, Ming-Hu; Russo, Scott J; Tamminga, Carol S; Neve, Rachael L; Shen, Li; Zhang, H Steve; Zhang, Feng; Nestler, Eric J

    2014-12-01

    Chronic exposure to drugs of abuse or stress regulates transcription factors, chromatin-modifying enzymes and histone post-translational modifications in discrete brain regions. Given the promiscuity of the enzymes involved, it has not yet been possible to obtain direct causal evidence to implicate the regulation of transcription and consequent behavioral plasticity by chromatin remodeling that occurs at a single gene. We investigated the mechanism linking chromatin dynamics to neurobiological phenomena by applying engineered transcription factors to selectively modify chromatin at a specific mouse gene in vivo. We found that histone methylation or acetylation at the Fosb locus in nucleus accumbens, a brain reward region, was sufficient to control drug- and stress-evoked transcriptional and behavioral responses via interactions with the endogenous transcriptional machinery. This approach allowed us to relate the epigenetic landscape at a given gene directly to regulation of its expression and to its subsequent effects on reward behavior.

  19. Fine mapping and identification of a candidate gene for a major locus controlling maturity date in peach

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Maturity date (MD) is a crucial factor for marketing of fresh fruit, especially those with limited shelf-life such as peach (Prunus persica L. Batsch): selection of several cultivars with differing MD would be advantageous to cover and extend the marketing season. Aims of this work were the fine mapping and identification of candidate genes for the major maturity date locus previously identified on peach linkage group 4. To improve genetic resolution of the target locus two F2 populations derived from the crosses Contender x Ambra (CxA, 306 individuals) and PI91459 (NJ Weeping) x Bounty (WxBy, 103 individuals) were genotyped with the Sequenom and 9K Illumina Peach Chip SNP platforms, respectively. Results Recombinant individuals from the WxBy F2 population allowed the localisation of maturity date locus to a 220 kb region of the peach genome. Among the 25 annotated genes within this interval, functional classification identified ppa007577m and ppa008301m as the most likely candidates, both encoding transcription factors of the NAC (NAM/ATAF1, 2/CUC2) family. Re-sequencing of the four parents and comparison with the reference genome sequence uncovered a deletion of 232 bp in the upstream region of ppa007577m that is homozygous in NJ Weeping and heterozygous in Ambra, Bounty and the WxBy F1 parent. However, this variation did not segregate in the CxA F2 population being the CxA F1 parent homozygous for the reference allele. The second gene was thus examined as a candidate for maturity date. Re-sequencing of ppa008301m, showed an in-frame insertion of 9 bp in the last exon that co-segregated with the maturity date locus in both CxA and WxBy F2 populations. Conclusions Using two different segregating populations, the map position of the maturity date locus was refined from 3.56 Mb to 220 kb. A sequence variant in the NAC gene ppa008301m was shown to co-segregate with the maturity date locus, suggesting this gene as a candidate controlling ripening time in

  20. Mapping of the Domestic Cat “SILVER” Coat Color Locus Identifies a Unique Genomic Location for Silver in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    David, Victor A.; Eizirik, Eduardo; Roelke, Melody E.; Ghaffari, Helya; O'Brien, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    The SILVER locus has been mapped in the domestic cat, identifying a unique genomic location distinct from that of any known reported gene associated with silver or hypopigmentation in mammals. A demonstrated lack of linkage to SILV, the strong candidate gene for silver, led to the initiation of a genome scan utilizing 2 pedigrees segregating for silver coat color. Linkage mapping defined a genomic region for SILVER as a 3.3-Mb region, (95.87–99.21 Mb) on chromosome D2, (peak logarithm of the odds = 10.5, θ = 0), which displays conserved synteny to a genomic interval between 118.58 and 121.85 Mb on chromosome 10 in the human genome. In the domestic cat, mutations at the SILVER locus suppress the development of pigment in the hair, but in contrast to other mammalian silver variants, there is an apparently greater influence on the production of pheomelanin than eumelanin pigment. The mapping of a novel locus for SILVER offers much promise in identifying a gene that may help elucidate aspects of pheomelanogenesis, a pathway that has been very elusive, and illustrates the promise of the cat genome project in increasing our understanding of basic biological processes of general relevance for mammals. PMID:19398491

  1. High-resolution genetic mapping of the sucrose octaacetate taste aversion (Soa) locus on mouse Chromosome 6.

    PubMed

    Bachmanov, A A; Li, X; Li, S; Neira, M; Beauchamp, G K; Azen, E A

    2001-09-01

    An acetylated sugar, sucrose octaacetate (SOA), tastes bitter to humans and has an aversive taste to at least some mice and other animals. In mice, taste aversion to SOA depends on allelic variation of a single locus, Soa. Three Soa alleles determine 'taster' (Soa(a)), 'nontaster' (Soa(b)), and 'demitaster' (Soa(c)) phenotypes of taste sensitivity to SOA. Although Soa has been mapped to distal Chromosome (Chr) 6, the limits of the Soa region have not been defined. In this study, mice from congenic strains SW.B6-Soa(b), B6.SW-Soa(a), and C3.SW-Soa(a/c) and from an outbred CFW strain were genotyped with polymorphic markers on Chr 6. In the congenic strains, the limits of introgressed donor fragments were determined. In the outbred mice, linkage disequilibrium and haplotype analyses were conducted. Positions of the markers were further resolved by using radiation hybrid mapping. The results show that the Soa locus is contained in an approximately 1-cM (3.3-4.9 Mb) region including the Prp locus.

  2. Recombinations in individuals homozygous by descent localize the Friedreich ataxia locus in a cloned 450-kb interval

    SciTech Connect

    Rodius, F.; Duclos, F.; Wrogemann, K.; Sirugo, G.; Mandel, J.L.; Koenig, M. ); Le Paslier, D.; Ougen, P.; Billault, A.; Cohen, D. )

    1994-06-01

    The locus for Friedreich ataxia (FRDA), a severe neurodegenerative disease, is tightly linked to markers D9S5 and D9S15, and analysis of rare recombination events has suggested the order cen-FRDA-D9S5-D9S15-qter. The authors report here the construction of a YAC contig extending 800 kb centromeric to D9S5t and the isolation of five new microsatellite markers from this region. In order to map these markers with respect to the FRDA locus, all within a 1-cM confidence interval, they sought to increase the genetic information of available FRDA families by considering homozygosity by descent and association with founder haplotypes in isolated populations. This approach allowed identification of one phase-known recombination and one probable historic recombination on haplotypes from Reunion Island patients, both of which place three of the five markers proximal to FRDA. This represents the first identification of close FRDA flanking markers on the centromeric side. The two other markers allowed narrowing of the breakpoint of a previously identified distal recombination that is >180 kb from D9S5 (26P). Taken together, the results place the FRDA locus in a 450-kb interval, which is small enough for direct search of candidate genes. A detailed rare cutter restriction map and a cosmid contig covering this interval were constructed and should facilitate the search of genes in this region. 26 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. The locus of evolution: evo devo and the genetics of adaptation.

    PubMed

    Hoekstra, Hopi E; Coyne, Jerry A

    2007-05-01

    An important tenet of evolutionary developmental biology ("evo devo") is that adaptive mutations affecting morphology are more likely to occur in the cis-regulatory regions than in the protein-coding regions of genes. This argument rests on two claims: (1) the modular nature of cis-regulatory elements largely frees them from deleterious pleiotropic effects, and (2) a growing body of empirical evidence appears to support the predominant role of gene regulatory change in adaptation, especially morphological adaptation. Here we discuss and critique these assertions. We first show that there is no theoretical or empirical basis for the evo devo contention that adaptations involving morphology evolve by genetic mechanisms different from those involving physiology and other traits. In addition, some forms of protein evolution can avoid the negative consequences of pleiotropy, most notably via gene duplication. In light of evo devo claims, we then examine the substantial data on the genetic basis of adaptation from both genome-wide surveys and single-locus studies. Genomic studies lend little support to the cis-regulatory theory: many of these have detected adaptation in protein-coding regions, including transcription factors, whereas few have examined regulatory regions. Turning to single-locus studies, we note that the most widely cited examples of adaptive cis-regulatory mutations focus on trait loss rather than gain, and none have yet pinpointed an evolved regulatory site. In contrast, there are many studies that have both identified structural mutations and functionally verified their contribution to adaptation and speciation. Neither the theoretical arguments nor the data from nature, then, support the claim for a predominance of cis-regulatory mutations in evolution. Although this claim may be true, it is at best premature. Adaptation and speciation probably proceed through a combination of cis-regulatory and structural mutations, with a substantial contribution of

  4. Evidence for a susceptibility locus for manic-depressive disorder in Xq26

    SciTech Connect

    Pekkarinen, P.; Bredbacka, P.E.; Terwilliger, J.

    1994-09-01

    Manic-depression (MD) is a severe psychiatric disorder affecting 1% of the population. Several linkage studies have provided evidence for a susceptibility locus for MD in chromosome Xq27-28. However, validity of these findings have remained unclear for several reasons: linkage has been suggested to two distinct chromosomal regions (F9 and CB-G6PD) separated by 30 cM, linkage has been found in only few of the pedigrees analyzed and ascertainment bias have probably been introduced when using classical markers like CB. The aim of our study was to analyze several markers expanding both of these regions in one extended Finnish pedigree with 13 affected individuals (bipolar or schizoaffective disorder) and without male-to-male transmission. Together 27 polymorphic X chromosomal markers were studied, 22 of them in Xq25-q28. Linkage analyses were carried out using a dominant model, 0.005 disease gene frequency, age-dependent penetrance with a maximum penetrance of 0.80 and low phenocopy rate. Two-point linkage analyses resulted in clearly negative lod scores (<-2) to almost all markers outside the chromosomal region of Xq26. Three markers DXS458, GABRA3 and G6PD, gave uninformative lod scores but respective chromosomal areas could be excluded by other markers in the vicinity. Opposite to this, several markers on Xq26 resulted in positive lod scores. A maximum lod score of 3.4 was obtained with the marker AFM205wd2 at {theta}=0.0. This marker is located about 7 cM centromeric to F9. When all published linkage data on Xq26-q28 was reanalyzed no evidence for locus heterogeneity emerged suggesting a more general significance of this DNA region in the predisposition to manic-depressive disorder.

  5. A candidate syntenic genetic locus is associated with voluntary exercise levels in mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Kostrzewa, E; Brandys, M K; van Lith, H A; Kas, M J H

    2015-01-01

    Individual levels of physical activity, and especially of voluntary physical exercise, highly contribute to the susceptibility for developing metabolic, cardiovascular diseases, and potentially to psychiatric disorders. Here, we applied a cross-species approach to explore a candidate genetic region for voluntary exercise levels. First, a panel of mouse chromosome substitution strains was used to map a genomic region on mouse chromosome 2 that contributes to voluntary wheel running levels - a behavioral readout considered a model of voluntary exercise in humans. Subsequently, we tested the syntenic region (HSA20: 51,212,545-55,212,986) in a human sample (Saint Thomas Twin Register; n=3038) and found a significant association between voluntary exercise levels (categorized into excessive and non-excessive exercise) and an intergenic SNP rs459465 (adjusted P-value of 0.001). Taking under consideration the methodological challenges embedded in this translational approach in the research of complex phenotypes, we wanted to further test the validity of this finding. Therefore, we repeated the analysis in an independent human population (ALSPAC data set; n=2557). We found a significant association of excessive exercise with two SNPs in the same genomic region (rs6022999, adjusted P-value of P=0.011 and rs6092090, adjusted P-value of 0.012). We explored the locus for possible candidate genes by means of literature search and bioinformatics analysis of gene function and of trans-regulatory elements. We propose three potential human candidate genes for voluntary physical exercise levels (MC3R, CYP24A1, and GRM8). To conclude, the identified genetic variance in the human locus 20q13.2 may affect voluntary exercise levels.

  6. PARK10 is a major locus for sporadic neuropathologically confirmed Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Beecham, Gary W.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Scott, William K.; Martin, Eden R.; Schellenberg, Gerard; Nuytemans, Karen; Larson, Eric B.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M.; Hurtig, Howard I.; Mash, Deborah C.; Beach, Thomas G.; Troncoso, Juan C.; Pletnikova, Olga; Frosch, Matthew P.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Honig, Lawrence S.; Marder, Karen; Vonsattel, Jean Paul; Goldman, Samuel M.; Vinters, Harry V.; Ross, Owen A.; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Wang, Liyong; Dykxhoorn, Derek M.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Montine, Thomas J.; Leverenz, James B.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To minimize pathologic heterogeneity in genetic studies of Parkinson disease (PD), the Autopsy-Confirmed Parkinson Disease Genetics Consortium conducted a genome-wide association study using both patients with neuropathologically confirmed PD and controls. Methods: Four hundred eighty-four cases and 1,145 controls met neuropathologic diagnostic criteria, were genotyped, and then imputed to 3,922,209 variants for genome-wide association study analysis. Results: A small region on chromosome 1 was strongly associated with PD (rs10788972; p = 6.2 × 10−8). The association peak lies within and very close to the maximum linkage peaks of 2 prior positive linkage studies defining the PARK10 locus. We demonstrate that rs10788972 is in strong linkage disequilibrium with rs914722, the single nucleotide polymorphism defining the PARK10 haplotype previously shown to be significantly associated with age at onset in PD. The region containing the PARK10 locus was significantly reduced from 10.6 megabases to 100 kilobases and contains 4 known genes: TCEANC2, TMEM59, miR-4781, and LDLRAD1. Conclusions: We confirm the association of a PARK10 haplotype with the risk of developing idiopathic PD. Furthermore, we significantly reduce the size of the PARK10 region. None of the candidate genes in the new PARK10 region have been previously implicated in the biology of PD, suggesting new areas of potential research. This study strongly suggests that reducing pathologic heterogeneity may enhance the application of genetic association studies to PD. PMID:25663231

  7. eQTL analysis links inflammatory bowel disease associated 1q21 locus to ECM1 gene.

    PubMed

    Repnik, Katja; Potočnik, Uroš

    2016-08-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been highly successful in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) with 163 confirmed associations so far. We used expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) mapping to analyze IBD associated regions for which causative gene from the region is still unknown. First, we performed an extensive literature search and in silico analysis of published GWAS in IBD and eQTL studies and extracted 402 IBD associated SNPs assigned to 208 candidate loci, and 9562 eQTL correlations. When crossing GWA and eQTL data we found that for 50 % of loci there is no eQTL gene, while for 31.2 % we can determine one gene, for 11.1 % two genes and for the remaining 7.7 % three or more genes. Based on that we selected loci with one, two, and three or more eQTL genes and analyzed them in peripheral blood lymphocytes and intestine tissue samples of 606 Slovene patients with IBD and in 449 controls. Association analysis of selected SNPs showed statistical significance for three (rs2631372 and rs1050152 on 5q locus and rs13294 on 1q locus) out of six selected SNPs with at least one phenotype. Furthermore, with eQTL analysis of selected chromosomal regions, we confirmed a link between SNP and gene for four (SLC22A5 on 5q, ECM1 on 1q, ORMDL3 on 17q, and PUS10 on 2p locus) out of five selected regions. For 1q21 loci, we confirmed gene ECM1 as the most plausible gene from this region to be involved in pathogenesis of IBD and thereby contributed new eQTL correlation from this genomic region.

  8. Complex rearrangements within the human J delta-C delta/J alpha-C alpha locus and aberrant recombination between J alpha segments.

    PubMed Central

    Baer, R; Boehm, T; Yssel, H; Spits, H; Rabbitts, T H

    1988-01-01

    We have examined DNA rearrangements within a 120 kb cloned region of the human T cell receptor J delta-C delta/J alpha-C alpha locus. Three types of pattern emerge from an analysis of T cell lines and clones. Firstly, cells with two rearrangements within J delta-C delta; secondly, cells with one rearrangement within J delta-C delta and one or more J alpha rearrangements, and finally, cells with rearrangements within J alpha and consequential deletion of the delta locus. Further analysis by cloning of rearrangements within the J alpha locus show that, in addition to V alpha-J alpha joins, J alpha-J alpha aberrant recombinations occur and rearrangement data indicate that such events are frequent. A model is presented to account for such recombinations. Images PMID:2971534

  9. PRC2 Is Required to Maintain Expression of the Maternal Gtl2-Rian-Mirg Locus by Preventing De Novo DNA Methylation in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Das, Partha Pratim; Hendrix, David A; Apostolou, Effie; Buchner, Alice H; Canver, Matthew C; Beyaz, Semir; Ljuboja, Damir; Kuintzle, Rachael; Kim, Woojin; Karnik, Rahul; Shao, Zhen; Xie, Huafeng; Xu, Jian; De Los Angeles, Alejandro; Zhang, Yingying; Choe, Junho; Jun, Don Leong Jia; Shen, Xiaohua; Gregory, Richard I; Daley, George Q; Meissner, Alexander; Kellis, Manolis; Hochedlinger, Konrad; Kim, Jonghwan; Orkin, Stuart H

    2015-09-01

    Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) function and DNA methylation (DNAme) are typically correlated with gene repression. Here, we show that PRC2 is required to maintain expression of maternal microRNAs (miRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) from the Gtl2-Rian-Mirg locus, which is essential for full pluripotency of iPSCs. In the absence of PRC2, the entire locus becomes transcriptionally repressed due to gain of DNAme at the intergenic differentially methylated regions (IG-DMRs). Furthermore, we demonstrate that the IG-DMR serves as an enhancer of the maternal Gtl2-Rian-Mirg locus. Further analysis reveals that PRC2 interacts physically with Dnmt3 methyltransferases and reduces recruitment to and subsequent DNAme at the IG-DMR, thereby allowing for proper expression of the maternal Gtl2-Rian-Mirg locus. Our observations are consistent with a mechanism through which PRC2 counteracts the action of Dnmt3 methyltransferases at an imprinted locus required for full pluripotency.

  10. N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced prenatally lethal mutations define at least two complementation groups within the embryonic ectoderm development (eed) locus in mouse chromosome 7.

    PubMed

    Rinchik, E M; Carpenter, D A

    1993-01-01

    Two loci [l(7)5Rn and l(7)6Rn] defined by N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-induced, prenatally lethal mutations were mapped by means of trans complementation crosses to mice carrying lethal deletions of the albino (c) locus in Chromosome (Chr) 7. Both loci were found to map to the subregion of the Mod-2-sh-1 interval that contains the eed (embryonic ectoderm development) locus, eed has been defined by the inability of embryos homozygous for certain c deletions to develop beyond the early stages of gastrulation. Evidence for at least two loci necessary for normal prenatal development, rather than one locus, that map within the eed interval came from the observation that two prenatally lethal mutations, 3354SB [l(7)5Rn3354SB] and 4234SB [l(7)6Rn4234SB], could complement each other in trans, but could not each be complemented individually by c deletions known to include the eed locus. A somewhat leaky allele of l(7)5Rn [l(7)5Rn1989SB] was also recovered, in which hemizygotes are often stillborn and homozygotes exhibit variable fitness and survival. The mapping of the loci defined by these mutations is likely to be useful for genetic, molecular, and phenotypic characterization of the eed region, and mutations at either locus (or both loci) may contribute to the eed phenotype.

  11. Genomic organization of the DCTN1-SLC4A5 locus encoding both NBC4 and p150(Glued).

    PubMed

    Pushkin, A; Abuladze, N; Newman, D; Tatishchev, S; Kurtz, I

    2001-01-01

    In eukaryotes, it is rare for a single gene to encode two functionally unrelated proteins. p150(Glued) is a component of the dynactin heteromultimeric complex of proteins which is required for dynein-mediated vesicle and organelle transport by microtubules. NBC4 is an electrogenic sodium bicarbonate cotransporter, which regulates intracellular pH. Here we report that NBC4 and p150(Glued) are encoded by the same locus, DCTN1-SLC4A5. We have characterized the genomic organization of the human DCTN1-SLC4A5 locus which spans approximately 230 kilobases on chromosome 2p13 and contains 66 exons. This information should allow the study of potential genomic alterations of DCTN1-SLC4A5 in patients with diseases mapping to this genomic region.

  12. On the Relation of Locus of Control and L2 Reading and Writing Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghonsooly, Behzad; Shirvan, Majid Elahi

    2011-01-01

    Locus of control, a psychological construct, has been the focus of attention in recent decades. Psychologists have discussed the effect of locus of control on achieving life goals in social/psychological interactions. While learning a foreign language involves both social interactions and psychological processes, the role and relation of locus of…

  13. Adolescent Values Clarification: A Positive Influence on Perceived Locus of Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Mark R.

    1990-01-01

    Used locus of control assessments to monitor specific aspect of adolescent chemical dependency treatment program. Used song lyric analysis activities to note short-term modifications in experimental group's (N=10) perceived locus of control. No improvements were noted in matched control group's locus of control. Findings suggest that addictions…

  14. Rasch Analysis of the Locus-of-Hope Scale. Brief Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gadiana, Leny G.; David, Adonis P.

    2015-01-01

    The Locus-of-Hope Scale (LHS) was developed as a measure of the locus-of-hope dimensions (Bernardo, 2010). The present study adds to the emerging literature on locus-of-hope by assessing the psychometric properties of the LHS using Rasch analysis. The results from the Rasch analyses of the four subscales of LHS provided evidence on the…

  15. On the Locus Formed by the Maximum Heights of Projectile Motion with Air Resistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez-Saldana, H.

    2010-01-01

    We present an analysis on the locus formed by the set of maxima of the trajectories of a projectile launched in a medium with linear drag. Such a place, the locus of apexes, is written in terms of the Lambert "W" function in polar coordinates, confirming the special role played by this function in the problem. To characterize the locus, a study of…

  16. The transcriptional control of the perforin locus

    PubMed Central

    Pipkin, Matthew E.; Rao, Anjana; Lichtenheld, Mathias G.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Natural killer (NK) cells and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) use cytotoxic granules containing perforin and granzymes to lyse infected or malignant host cells and provide immunity to intracellular microbes and tumors. Perforin is essential for cytotoxic granule-mediated killing. Perforin expression is regulated transcriptionally and correlates tightly with the development of cells that can exhibit cytotoxic activity. Although a number of genes transcribed by T cells and NK cells have been studied, the cell-specificity of perforin gene expression makes it an ideal model system in which to clarify the transcriptional mechanisms that guide the development and activation of cytotoxic lymphocytes. In this review, we discuss what is known about perforin expression and its regulation, then elaborate on recent studies that utilized chromosome transfer and bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenics to define a comprehensive set of cis-regulatory regions that control transcription of the human PRF1 gene in a near-physiological context. In addition, we compare the human and murine Prf1 loci and discuss how transcription factors known to be important for driving CTL differentiation might also directly regulate the cis-acting domains that control Prf1. Our review emphasizes how studies of PRF1/Prf1 gene transcription can illuminate not only the mechanisms of cytotoxic lymphocyte differentiation but also some basic principles of transcriptional regulation. PMID:20536555

  17. PREFERRED RETINAL LOCUS IN MACULAR DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    GREENSTEIN, VIVIENNE C.; SANTOS, RODRIGO A. V.; TSANG, STEPHEN H.; SMITH, R. THEODORE; BARILE, GAETANO R.; SEIPLE, WILLIAM

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the location and fixation stability of preferred retinal locations (PRLs) in patients with macular disease, and the relationship among areas of abnormal fundus autofluorescence, the PRL and visual sensitivity. Methods Fifteen patients (15 eyes) were studied. Seven had Stargardt disease, 1 bull’s eye maculopathy, 5 age-related macular degeneration, 1 Best disease, and 1 pattern dystrophy. All tested eyes had areas of abnormal fundus autofluorescence. The PRL was evaluated with fundus photography and the Nidek microperimeter. Visual field sensitivity was measured with the Nidek microperimeter. Results Of the 15 eyes, 4 had foveal and 11 had eccentric fixation. Eccentric PRLs were above the atrophic lesion and their stability did not depend on the degree of eccentricity from the fovea. Visual sensitivity was markedly decreased in locations corresponding to hypofluorescent areas. Sensitivity was not decreased in hyperfluorescent areas corresponding to flecks but was decreased if hyperfluorescence was in the form of dense annuli. Conclusion Eccentric PRLs were in the superior retina in regions of normal fundus autofluorescence. Fixation stability was not correlated with the degree of eccentricity from the fovea. To assess the outcomes of treatment trials it is important to use methods that relate retinal morphology to visual function. PMID:18628727

  18. COMT gene locus: new functional variants

    PubMed Central

    Meloto, Carolina B.; Segall, Samantha K.; Smith, Shad; Parisien, Marc; Shabalina, Svetlana A.; Rizzatti-Barbosa, Célia M.; Gauthier, Josée; Tsao, Douglas; Convertino, Marino; Piltonen, Marjo H.; Slade, Gary Dmitri; Fillingim, Roger B.; Greenspan, Joel D.; Ohrbach, Richard; Knott, Charles; Maixner, William; Zaykin, Dmitri; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.; Reenilä, Ilkka; Männistö, Pekka T.; Diatchenko, Luda

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) metabolizes catecholaminergic neurotransmitters. Numerous studies have linked COMT to pivotal brain functions such as mood, cognition, response to stress, and pain. Both nociception and risk of clinical pain have been associated with COMT genetic variants, and this association was shown to be mediated through adrenergic pathways. Here, we show that association studies between COMT polymorphic markers and pain phenotypes in 2 independent cohorts identified a functional marker, rs165774, situated in the 3′ untranslated region of a newfound splice variant, (a)-COMT. Sequence comparisons showed that the (a)-COMT transcript is highly conserved in primates, and deep sequencing data demonstrated that (a)-COMT is expressed across several human tissues, including the brain. In silico analyses showed that the (a)-COMT enzyme features a distinct C-terminus structure, capable of stabilizing substrates in its active site. In vitro experiments demonstrated not only that (a)-COMT is catalytically active but also that it displays unique substrate specificity, exhibiting enzymatic activity with dopamine but not epinephrine. They also established that the pain-protective A allele of rs165774 coincides with lower COMT activity, suggesting contribution to decreased pain sensitivity through increased dopaminergic rather than decreased adrenergic tone, characteristic of reference isoforms. Our results provide evidence for an essential role of the (a)-COMT isoform in nociceptive signaling and suggest that genetic variations in (a)-COMT isoforms may contribute to individual variability in pain phenotypes. PMID:26207649

  19. COMT gene locus: new functional variants.

    PubMed

    Meloto, Carolina B; Segall, Samantha K; Smith, Shad; Parisien, Marc; Shabalina, Svetlana A; Rizzatti-Barbosa, Célia M; Gauthier, Josée; Tsao, Douglas; Convertino, Marino; Piltonen, Marjo H; Slade, Gary Dmitri; Fillingim, Roger B; Greenspan, Joel D; Ohrbach, Richard; Knott, Charles; Maixner, William; Zaykin, Dmitri; Dokholyan, Nikolay V; Reenilä, Ilkka; Männistö, Pekka T; Diatchenko, Luda

    2015-10-01

    Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) metabolizes catecholaminergic neurotransmitters. Numerous studies have linked COMT to pivotal brain functions such as mood, cognition, response to stress, and pain. Both nociception and risk of clinical pain have been associated with COMT genetic variants, and this association was shown to be mediated through adrenergic pathways. Here, we show that association studies between COMT polymorphic markers and pain phenotypes in 2 independent cohorts identified a functional marker, rs165774, situated in the 3' untranslated region of a newfound splice variant, (a)-COMT. Sequence comparisons showed that the (a)-COMT transcript is highly conserved in primates, and deep sequencing data demonstrated that (a)-COMT is expressed across several human tissues, including the brain. In silico analyses showed that the (a)-COMT enzyme features a distinct C-terminus structure, capable of stabilizing substrates in its active site. In vitro experiments demonstrated not only that (a)-COMT is catalytically active but also that it displays unique substrate specificity, exhibiting enzymatic activity with dopamine but not epinephrine. They also established that the pain-protective A allele of rs165774 coincides with lower COMT activity, suggesting contribution to decreased pain sensitivity through increased dopaminergic rather than decreased adrenergic tone, characteristic of reference isoforms. Our results provide evidence for an essential role of the (a)-COMT isoform in nociceptive signaling and suggest that genetic variations in (a)-COMT isoforms may contribute to individual variability in pain phenotypes.

  20. An S-locus independent pollen factor confers self-compatibility in 'Katy' apricot.

    PubMed

    Zuriaga, Elena; Muñoz-Sanz, Juan V; Molina, Laura; Gisbert, Ana D; Badenes, María L; Romero, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Loss of pollen-S function in Prunus self-compatible cultivars has been mostly associated with deletions or insertions in the S-haplotype-specific F-box (SFB) genes. However, self-compatible pollen-part mutants defective for non-S-locus factors have also been found, for instance, in the apricot (Prunus armeniaca) cv. 'Canino'. In the present study, we report the genetic and molecular analysis of another self-compatible apricot cv. termed 'Katy'. S-genotype of 'Katy' was determined as S(1)S(2) and S-RNase PCR-typing of selfing and outcrossing populations from 'Katy' showed that pollen gametes bearing either the S(1)- or the S(2)-haplotype were able to overcome self-incompatibility (SI) barriers. Sequence analyses showed no SNP or indel affecting the SFB(1) and SFB(2) alleles from 'Katy' and, moreover, no evidence of pollen-S duplication was found. As a whole, the obtained results are compatible with the hypothesis that the loss-of-function of a S-locus unlinked factor gametophytically expressed in pollen (M'-locus) leads to SI breakdown in 'Katy'. A mapping strategy based on segregation distortion loci mapped the M'-locus within an interval of 9.4 cM at the distal end of chr.3 corresponding to ∼1.29 Mb in the peach (Prunus persica) genome. Interestingly, pollen-part mutations (PPMs) causing self-compatibility (SC) in the apricot cvs. 'Canino' and 'Katy' are located within an overlapping region of ∼273 Kb in chr.3. No evidence is yet available to discern if they affect the same gene or not, but molecular markers seem to indicate that both cultivars are genetically unrelated suggesting that every PPM may have arisen independently. Further research will be necessary to reveal the precise nature of 'Katy' PPM, but fine-mapping already enables SC marker-assisted selection and paves the way for future positional cloning of the underlying gene.

  1. Fine-mapping of the HNF1B multicancer locus identifies candidate variants that mediate endometrial cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Painter, Jodie N.; O'Mara, Tracy A.; Batra, Jyotsna; Cheng, Timothy; Lose, Felicity A.; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Ahmed, Shahana; Ferguson, Kaltin; Healey, Catherine S.; Kaufmann, Susanne; Hillman, Kristine M.; Walpole, Carina; Moya, Leire; Pollock, Pamela; Jones, Angela; Howarth, Kimberley; Martin, Lynn; Gorman, Maggie; Hodgson, Shirley; De Polanco, Ma. Magdalena Echeverry; Sans, Monica; Carracedo, Angel; Castellvi-Bel, Sergi; Rojas-Martinez, Augusto; Santos, Erika; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Carvajal-Carmona, Luis; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Long, Jirong; Zheng, Wei; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Montgomery, Grant W.; Webb, Penelope M.; Scott, Rodney J.; McEvoy, Mark; Attia, John; Holliday, Elizabeth; Martin, Nicholas G.; Nyholt, Dale R.; Henders, Anjali K.; Fasching, Peter A.; Hein, Alexander; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Renner, Stefan P.; Dörk, Thilo; Hillemanns, Peter; Dürst, Matthias; Runnebaum, Ingo; Lambrechts, Diether; Coenegrachts, Lieve; Schrauwen, Stefanie; Amant, Frederic; Winterhoff, Boris; Dowdy, Sean C.; Goode, Ellen L.; Teoman, Attila; Salvesen, Helga B.; Trovik, Jone; Njolstad, Tormund S.; Werner, Henrica M.J.; Ashton, Katie; Proietto, Tony; Otton, Geoffrey; Tzortzatos, Gerasimos; Mints, Miriam; Tham, Emma; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Liu, Jianjun; Li, Jingmei; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Ekici, Arif B.; Ruebner, Matthias; Johnson, Nicola; Peto, Julian; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida K.; Meindl, Alfons; Brauch, Hiltrud; Lindblom, Annika; Depreeuw, Jeroen; Moisse, Matthieu; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Giles, Graham G.; Bruinsma, Fiona; Cunningham, Julie M.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Kristensen, Vessela N.; Cox, Angela; Swerdlow, Anthony J.; Orr, Nicholas; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Chen, Zhihua; Shah, Mitul; French, Juliet D.; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Dunning, Alison M.; Tomlinson, Ian; Easton, Douglas F.; Edwards, Stacey L.; Thompson, Deborah J.; Spurdle, Amanda B.

    2015-01-01

    Common variants in the hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 homeobox B (HNF1B) gene are associated with the risk of Type II diabetes and multiple cancers. Evidence to date indicates that cancer risk may be mediated via genetic or epigenetic effects on HNF1B gene expression. We previously found single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at the HNF1B locus to be associated with endometrial cancer, and now report extensive fine-mapping and in silico and laboratory analyses of this locus. Analysis of 1184 genotyped and imputed SNPs in 6608 Caucasian cases and 37 925 controls, and 895 Asian cases and 1968 controls, revealed the best signal of association for SNP rs11263763 (P = 8.4 × 10−14, odds ratio = 0.86, 95% confidence interval = 0.82–0.89), located within HNF1B intron 1. Haplotype analysis and conditional analyses provide no evidence of further independent endometrial cancer risk variants at this locus. SNP rs11263763 genotype was associated with HNF1B mRNA expression but not with HNF1B methylation in endometrial tumor samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas. Genetic analyses prioritized rs11263763 and four other SNPs in high-to-moderate linkage disequilibrium as the most likely causal SNPs. Three of these SNPs map to the extended HNF1B promoter based on chromatin marks extending from the minimal promoter region. Reporter assays demonstrated that this extended region reduces activity in combination with the minimal HNF1B promoter, and that the minor alleles of rs11263763 or rs8064454 are associated with decreased HNF1B promoter activity. Our findings provide evidence for a single signal associated with endometrial cancer risk at the HNF1B locus, and that risk is likely mediated via altered HNF1B gene expression. PMID:25378557

  2. Fine-mapping of the HNF1B multicancer locus identifies candidate variants that mediate endometrial cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Painter, Jodie N; O'Mara, Tracy A; Batra, Jyotsna; Cheng, Timothy; Lose, Felicity A; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Ahmed, Shahana; Ferguson, Kaltin; Healey, Catherine S; Kaufmann, Susanne; Hillman, Kristine M; Walpole, Carina; Moya, Leire; Pollock, Pamela; Jones, Angela; Howarth, Kimberley; Martin, Lynn; Gorman, Maggie; Hodgson, Shirley; De Polanco, Ma Magdalena Echeverry; Sans, Monica; Carracedo, Angel; Castellvi-Bel, Sergi; Rojas-Martinez, Augusto; Santos, Erika; Teixeira, Manuel R; Carvajal-Carmona, Luis; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Long, Jirong; Zheng, Wei; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Montgomery, Grant W; Webb, Penelope M; Scott, Rodney J; McEvoy, Mark; Attia, John; Holliday, Elizabeth; Martin, Nicholas G; Nyholt, Dale R; Henders, Anjali K; Fasching, Peter A; Hein, Alexander; Beckmann, Matthias W; Renner, Stefan P; Dörk, Thilo; Hillemanns, Peter; Dürst, Matthias; Runnebaum, Ingo; Lambrechts, Diether; Coenegrachts, Lieve; Schrauwen, Stefanie; Amant, Frederic; Winterhoff, Boris; Dowdy, Sean C; Goode, Ellen L; Teoman, Attila; Salvesen, Helga B; Trovik, Jone; Njolstad, Tormund S; Werner, Henrica M J; Ashton, Katie; Proietto, Tony; Otton, Geoffrey; Tzortzatos, Gerasimos; Mints, Miriam; Tham, Emma; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Liu, Jianjun; Li, Jingmei; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Ekici, Arif B; Ruebner, Matthias; Johnson, Nicola; Peto, Julian; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida K; Meindl, Alfons; Brauch, Hiltrud; Lindblom, Annika; Depreeuw, Jeroen; Moisse, Matthieu; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Couch, Fergus J; Olson, Janet E; Giles, Graham G; Bruinsma, Fiona; Cunningham, Julie M; Fridley, Brooke L; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Kristensen, Vessela N; Cox, Angela; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Orr, Nicholas; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Chen, Zhihua; Shah, Mitul; French, Juliet D; Pharoah, Paul D P; Dunning, Alison M; Tomlinson, Ian; Easton, Douglas F; Edwards, Stacey L; Thompson, Deborah J; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2015-03-01

    Common variants in the hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 homeobox B (HNF1B) gene are associated with the risk of Type II diabetes and multiple cancers. Evidence to date indicates that cancer risk may be mediated via genetic or epigenetic effects on HNF1B gene expression. We previously found single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at the HNF1B locus to be associated with endometrial cancer, and now report extensive fine-mapping and in silico and laboratory analyses of this locus. Analysis of 1184 genotyped and imputed SNPs in 6608 Caucasian cases and 37 925 controls, and 895 Asian cases and 1968 controls, revealed the best signal of association for SNP rs11263763 (P = 8.4 × 10(-14), odds ratio = 0.86, 95% confidence interval = 0.82-0.89), located within HNF1B intron 1. Haplotype analysis and conditional analyses provide no evidence of further independent endometrial cancer risk variants at this locus. SNP rs11263763 genotype was associated with HNF1B mRNA expression but not with HNF1B methylation in endometrial tumor samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas. Genetic analyses prioritized rs11263763 and four other SNPs in high-to-moderate linkage disequilibrium as the most likely causal SNPs. Three of these SNPs map to the extended HNF1B promoter based on chromatin marks extending from the minimal promoter region. Reporter assays demonstrated that this extended region reduces activity in combination with the minimal HNF1B promoter, and that the minor alleles of rs11263763 or rs8064454 are associated with decreased HNF1B promoter activity. Our findings provide evidence for a single signal associated with endometrial cancer risk at the HNF1B locus, and that risk is likely mediated via altered HNF1B gene expression.

  3. Association between prostate cancer in black Americans and an allele of the PADPRP pseudogene locus on chromosome 13

    SciTech Connect

    Doll, J.A.; Suarez, B.K.; Donis-Keller, H.

    1996-02-01

    Black American men have a higher incidence of cancer of the prostate (CAP), multiple myeloma, and lung cancer than do white American men. The basis for these differences no doubt includes environmental influences, because American blacks have also been found to have a higher incidence of CAP than do African blacks. However, genetic factors may play a role as well. For example, Lyn et al. reported an increase in the frequency of an allele of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PADPRP) pseudogene locus on chromosome 13 in black Americans with CAP, suggesting the presence of a disease-susceptibility locus. Since only nine CAP patients were studied, proof of the significance of the finding for the general population of black Americans will rely on independent replication of the result and studies with larger sample sizes. We have doubled the number of black American CAP patients studied at the PADPRP pseudogene locus on chromosome 13 and compared them with white Americans with CAP, along with reference samples. In addition, we have determined allele frequencies by using a larger number of white individuals, from the CEPH reference pedigree resource, and a larger number of black Americans than previously reported, which may reflect more accurately the allele frequencies in these populations. We also find a statistically significant association between an allele at the PADPRP pseudogene locus and CAP in black Americans; however, it is not the same allele reported by Lyn et al. Furthermore, we tested CAP tumor DNA for chromosome 13 PADPRP pseudogene region deletions. In contrast to the report of Bhatia et al., we found no evidence for deletions that would suggest the presence of a tumor-suppressor gene in this region of chromosome 13. 16 refs., 2 tabs.

  4. cap alpha. -chain locus of the T-cell antigen receptor is involved in the t(10; 14) chromosome translocation of T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Kagan, J.; Finan, J.; Letofsky, J.; Besa, E.C.; Nowell, P.C.; Croce, C.M.

    1987-07-01

    Human leukemic T cells carrying a t(10;14)(q24;q11) chromosome translocation were fused with mouse leukemic T cells, and the hybrids were examined for genetic markers of human chromosomes 10 and 14. Hybrids containing the human 10q+ chromosome had the human genes for terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase that has been mapped at 10q23-q25 and for C/sub ..cap alpha../ (the constant region of TCRA (the ..cap alpha..-chain locus of the T-cell antigen receptor gene)), but not for V/sub ..cap alpha../ (the variable region of TCRA). Hybrids containing the human 14q- chromosome retained the V/sub ..cap alpha../genes. Thus the 14q11 breakpoint in the t(10;14) chromosome translocation directly involves TCRA, splitting the locus in a region between the V/sub ..cap alpha../ and the C/sub ..cap alpha../ genes. These results suggest that the translocation of the C/sub ..cap alpha../ locus to a putative cellular protooncogene located proximal to the breakpoint at 10q24, for which the authors propose the name TCL3, results in its deregulation, leading to T-cell leukemia. Since hybrids with the 10q+ chromosome also retained the human terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase gene, it is further concluded that the terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase locus is proximal to the TCL3 gene, at band 10q23-q24.

  5. Haplotype frequencies at the DRD2 locus in populations of the East European Plain

    PubMed Central

    Flegontova, Olga V; Khrunin, Andrey V; Lylova, Olga I; Tarskaia, Larisa A; Spitsyn, Victor A; Mikulich, Alexey I; Limborska, Svetlana A

    2009-01-01

    Background It was demonstrated previously that the three-locus RFLP haplotype, TaqI B-TaqI D-TaqI A (B-D-A), at the DRD2 locus constitutes a powerful genetic marker and probably reflects the most ancient dispersal of anatomically modern humans. Results We investigated TaqI B, BclI, MboI, TaqI D, and TaqI A RFLPs in 17 contemporary populations of the East European Plain and Siberia. Most of these populations belong to the Indo-European or Uralic language families. We identified three common haplotypes, which occurred in more than 90% of chromosomes investigated. The frequencies of the haplotypes differed according to linguistic and geographical affiliation. Conclusion Populations in the northwestern (Byelorussians from Mjadel'), northern (Russians from Mezen' and Oshevensk), and eastern (Russians from Puchezh) parts of the East European Plain had relatively high frequencies of haplotype B2-D2-A2, which may reflect admixture with Uralic-speaking populations that inhabited all of these regions in the Early Middle Ages. PMID:19793394

  6. Imprinting on chromosome 20: tissue-specific imprinting and imprinting mutations in the GNAS locus.

    PubMed

    Kelsey, Gavin

    2010-08-15

    The GNAS locus on chromosome 20q13.11 is the archetypal complex imprinted locus. It comprises a bewildering array of alternative transcripts determined by differentially imprinted promoters which encode distinct proteins. It also provides the classic example of tissue-specific imprinted gene expression, in which the canonical GNAS transcript coding for Gsalpha is expressed predominantly from the maternal allele in a set of seemingly unrelated tissues. Functionally, this rather obscure imprinting is nevertheless of considerable clinical significance, as it dictates the nature of the disease caused by inactivating mutations in Gsalpha, with end organ hormone resistance specifically on maternal transmission (pseudohypoparathyroidism type 1a, PHP1a). In addition, there is a bona fide imprinting disorder, PHP1b, which is caused specifically by DNA methylation defects in the differentially methylated regions (DMRs) that determine tissue-specific monoallelic expression of GNAS. Although the genetic defect in PHP1a and the disrupted imprinting in PHP1b both essentially result in profound reduction of Gsalpha activity in tissues with monoallelic GNAS expression, and despite a growing awareness of the overlap in these two conditions, there are important pathophysiological differences between the two whose basis is not fully understood. PHP1b is one of the only imprinted gene syndromes in which cis-acting mutations have been discovered that disrupt methylation of germline-derived imprint marks; such imprinting mutations in GNAS are helping to provide important new insights into the mechanisms of imprinting establishment generally.

  7. Variants at chromosome 10q26 locus and the expression of HTRA1 in the retina.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gaofeng; Dubovy, Sander R; Kovach, Jaclyn L; Schwartz, Stephen G; Agarwal, Anita; Scott, William K; Haines, Jonathan L; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A

    2013-07-01

    Variations in a locus at chromosome 10q26 are strongly associated with the risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The most significantly associated haplotype includes a nonsynonymous SNP rs10490924 in the exon 1 of ARMS2 and rs11200638 in the promoter region of HTRA1. It is under debate which gene(s), ARMS2, HTRA1 or some other genes are functionally responsible for the genetic association. To verify whether the associated variants correlate with a higher HTRA1 expression level as previously reported, HTRA1 mRNA and protein were measured in a larger human retina-RPE-choroid samples (n = 82). Results show there is no significant change of HTRA1 mRNA level among genotypes at rs11200638, rs10490924 or an indel variant of ARMS2. Furthermore, two AMD-associated synonymous SNPs rs1049331 and rs2293870 in HTRA1 exon 1 do not change its protein level either. These results suggest that the AMD-associated variants in the chromosome 10q26 locus do not significantly affect the expression of HTRA1.

  8. Development of a multi-locus sequence typing scheme for avian isolates of Pasteurella multocida.

    PubMed

    Subaaharan, S; Blackall, L L; Blackall, P J

    2010-03-24

    A total of 63 isolates of Pasteurella multocida from Australian poultry, all associated with fowl cholera outbreaks, and three international reference strains, representing the three subspecies within P. multocida were used to develop a multi-locus sequence typing scheme. Primers were designed for conserved regions of seven house-keeping enzymes -adk, est, gdh, mdh, pgi, pmi and zwf - and internal fragments of 570-784 bp were sequenced for all isolates and strains. The number of alleles at the different loci ranged from 11 to 20 and a total of 29 allelic profiles or sequence types were recognised amongst the 66 strains. There was a strong concordance between the MLST data and the existing multi-locus enzyme electrophoresis and ribotyping data. When used to study a sub-set of isolates with a known detailed epidemiological history, the MLST data matched the results given by restriction endonuclease analysis, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, ribotyping and REP-PCR. The MLST scheme provides a high level of resolution and is an excellent tool for studying the population structure and epidemiology of P. multocida.

  9. [Identification of fish species based on ribosomal DNA ITS2 locus].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Wan-An

    2010-04-01

    To prevent illegal fishing and sale, the most difficult problem is identification of marketed fish species, especially the parts that are difficult to be differentiated with morphological method (e.g., larval, eggs, scales, meat, products etc. To assist conservation and management of fishery resources, this paper reported a molecular genetic approach based on ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 2 locus. The method includes two steps: (1) the order general primers were designed according to the conservative nature of 5.8SrRAN and 28SrRNA genes within an order, and the DNA ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 2 locus fragment were then amplified and sequenced. (2) The species-specific ladders and the species-specific primers for each species were designed according to the sequencing results. The map of molecular taxonomy was constructed. This approach employs multiplex PCR that is formatted for fish species identification. We tested 210 single-species samples and 40 mix-species samples from different regions of China. The approach distinguished accurately and sensitively samples from each of the five species. This genetic and molecular approach will be useful for fish conservation, assessment, management and exploitation, strengthen in law enforcement of fishery manager, combat rare and endangered fish smuggling, and prevent commercial fraud and biological invasion by harmful nonnative species.

  10. The Psm locus controls paternal sorting of the cucumber mitochondrial genome.

    PubMed

    Havey, M J; Park, Y H; Bartoszewski, G

    2004-01-01

    The mitochondrial genome of cucumber shows paternal transmission and there are no reports of variation for mitochondrial transmission in cucumber. We used a mitochondrially encoded mosaic (MSC) phenotype to reveal phenotypic variation for mitochondrial-genome transmission in cucumber. At least 10 random plants from each of 71 cucumber plant introductions (PIs) were crossed as the female with an inbred line (MSC16) possessing the MSC phenotype. Nonmosaic F1 progenies were observed at high frequencies (greater than 50%) in F1 families from 10 PIs, with the greatest proportions being from PI 401734. Polymorphisms near the mitochondrial cox1 gene and JLV5 region revealed that nonmosaic hybrid progenies from crosses of PI 401734 with MSC16 as the male possessed the nonmosaic-inducing mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from the paternal parent. F2) F3, and backcross progenies from nonmosaic F1 plants from PI 401734 x MSC16 were testcrossed with MSC16 as the male parent to reveal segregation of a nuclear locus (Psm for Paternal sorting of mitochondria) controlling sorting of mtDNA from the paternal parent. Psm is a unique locus at which the maternal genotype affects sorting of paternally transmitted mtDNA.

  11. A new locus for autosomal dominant amelogenesis imperfecta on chromosome 8q24.3.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Gustavo; Pemberton, Trevor J; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Scarel-Caminaga, Raquel; Mehrian-Shai, Ruty; Gonzalez-Quevedo, Catalina; Ninis, Vasiliki; Hartiala, Jaana; Allayee, Hooman; Snead, Malcolm L; Leal, Suzanne M; Line, Sergio R P; Patel, Pragna I

    2007-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a collective term used to describe phenotypically diverse forms of defective tooth enamel development. AI has been reported to exhibit a variety of inheritance patterns, and several loci have been identified that are associated with AI. We have performed a genome-wide scan in a large Brazilian family segregating an autosomal dominant form of AI and mapped a novel locus to 8q24.3. A maximum multipoint LOD score of 7.5 was obtained at marker D8S2334 (146,101,309 bp). The disease locus lies in a 1.9 cM (2.1 Mb) region according to the Rutgers Combined Linkage-Physical map, between a VNTR marker (at 143,988,705 bp) and the telomere (146,274,826 bp). Ten candidate genes were identified based on gene ontology and microarray-facilitated gene selection using the expression of murine orthologues in dental tissue, and examined for the presence of a mutation. However, no causative mutation was identified.

  12. [A search for null alleles at the microsatellite locus of chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta Walbaum)].

    PubMed

    Kordicheva, S Iu; Rubtsova, G A; Shitova, M V; Shaĭkhaev, G O; Afanas'ev, K I; Zhivotovskiĭ, L A

    2010-08-01

    Population studies with the use of microsatellite markers face a problem of null alleles, i.e., the absence of a PCR product, caused by the mutations in the microsatellite flanking regions, which serve as the sites of primer hybridization. In this case, the microsatellite primer associated with such mutation is not amplified, leading to false homozygosity in heterozygous individuals. This, in turn, results in biased population genetic estimates, including the excess of homozygotes at microsatellite loci. Analysis of the population structure of a Pacific salmon species, chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta Walbaum), revealed the presence of null alleles at the Oke3 microsatellite locus in the population samples, in which an excess of homozygotes was observed. The analysis was performed using different combinations of modified primers chosen to match the Oke3 locus. The use of these primers enabled identification of true heterozygotes among those individuals, which were previously diagnosed as homozygotes with the use of standard primers. Removal of null alleles eliminated the excess homozygotes in the chum salmon samples described. In addition to the exclusion of false homozygosity, the use of modified primers makes it possible to introduce polymorphic primer variants associated with certain microsatellite alleles into population studies.

  13. Identification of a novel percent mammographic density locus at 12q24.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Kristen N; Lindstrom, Sara; Scott, Christopher G; Thompson, Deborah; Sellers, Thomas A; Wang, Xianshu; Wang, Alice; Atkinson, Elizabeth; Rider, David N; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E; Varghese, Jajini S; Audley, Tina; Brown, Judith; Leyland, Jean; Luben, Robert N; Warren, Ruth M L; Loos, Ruth J F; Wareham, Nicholas J; Li, Jingmei; Hall, Per; Liu, Jianjun; Eriksson, Louise; Czene, Kamila; Olson, Janet E; Pankratz, V Shane; Fredericksen, Zachary; Diasio, Robert B; Lee, Adam M; Heit, John A; DeAndrade, Mariza; Goode, Ellen L; Vierkant, Robert A; Cunningham, Julie M; Armasu, Sebastian M; Weinshilboum, Richard; Fridley, Brooke L; Batzler, Anthony; Ingle, James N; Boyd, Norman F; Paterson, Andrew D; Rommens, Johanna; Martin, Lisa J; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Stone, Jennifer; Apicella, Carmel; Kraft, Peter; Hankinson, Susan E; Hazra, Aditi; Hunter, David J; Easton, Douglas F; Couch, Fergus J; Tamimi, Rulla M; Vachon, Celine M

    2012-07-15

    Percent mammographic density adjusted for age and body mass index (BMI) is one of the strongest risk factors for breast cancer and has a heritable component that remains largely unidentified. We performed a three-stage genome-wide association study (GWAS) of percent mammographic density to identify novel genetic loci associated with this trait. In stage 1, we combined three GWASs of percent density comprised of 1241 women from studies at the Mayo Clinic and identified the top 48 loci (99 single nucleotide polymorphisms). We attempted replication of these loci in 7018 women from seven additional studies (stage 2). The meta-analysis of stage 1 and 2 data identified a novel locus, rs1265507 on 12q24, associated with percent density, adjusting for age and BMI (P = 4.43 × 10(-8)). We refined the 12q24 locus with 459 additional variants (stage 3) in a combined analysis of all three stages (n = 10 377) and confirmed that rs1265507 has the strongest association in the 12q24 region (P = 1.03 × 10(-8)). Rs1265507 is located between the genes TBX5 and TBX3, which are members of the phylogenetically conserved T-box gene family and encode transcription factors involved in developmental regulation. Understanding the mechanism underlying this association will provide insight into the genetics of breast tissue composition.

  14. A Locus in Drosophila sechellia Affecting Tolerance of a Host Plant Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Hungate, Eric A.; Earley, Eric J.; Boussy, Ian A.; Turissini, David A.; Ting, Chau-Ti; Moran, Jennifer R.; Wu, Mao-Lien; Wu, Chung-I; Jones, Corbin D.

    2013-01-01

    Many insects feed on only one or a few types of host. These host specialists often evolve a preference for chemical cues emanating from their host and develop mechanisms for circumventing their host’s defenses. Adaptations like these are central to evolutionary biology, yet our understanding of their genetics remains incomplete. Drosophila sechellia, an emerging model for the genetics of host specialization, is an island endemic that has adapted to chemical toxins present in the fruit of its host plant, Morinda citrifolia. Its sibling species, D. simulans, and many other Drosophila species do not tolerate these toxins and avoid the fruit. Earlier work found a region with a strong effect on tolerance to the major toxin, octanoic acid, on chromosome arm 3R. Using a novel assay, we narrowed this region to a small span near the centromere containing 18 genes, including three odorant binding proteins. It has been hypothesized that the evolution of host specialization is facilitated by genetic linkage between alleles contributing to host preference and alleles contributing to host usage, such as tolerance to secondary compounds. We tested this hypothesis by measuring the effect of this tolerance locus on host preference behavior. Our data were inconsistent with the linkage hypothesis, as flies bearing this tolerance region showed no increase in preference for media containing M. citrifolia toxins, which D. sechellia prefers. Thus, in contrast to some models for host preference, preference and tolerance are not tightly linked at this locus nor is increased tolerance per se sufficient to change preference. Our data are consistent with the previously proposed model that the evolution of D. sechellia as a M. citrifolia specialist occurred through a stepwise loss of aversion and gain of tolerance to M. citrifolia’s toxins. PMID:24037270

  15. Fine mapping of locus Xq25.1-27-2 for a low caries experience phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Küchler, Erika C.; Feng, Ping; Deeley, Kathleen; Fitzgerald, Carly A.; Meyer, Chelsea; Gorbunov, Anastasia; Bezamat, Mariana; Reis, Maria Fernanda; Noel, Jacqueline; Kouzbari, M. Zahir; Granjeiro, José M.; Antunes, Leonardo S.; Antunes, Livia A.; de Abreu, Fernanda Volpe; Costa, Marcelo C.; Tannure, Patricia N.; Seymen, Figen; Koruyucu, Mine; Patir, Asli; Vieira, Alexandre R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to fine map the locus Xq25.1-27-2 in order to identify genetic contributors involved in low caries experience. Design Seventy-two families from the Philippines were studied. Caries experience was recorded and genomic DNA extracted from peripheral blood was obtained from all subjects. One hundred and twenty-eight polymorphisms in the locus Xq25.1-27-2, a region that contains 24 genes, were genotyped. Association between caries experience and alleles was tested using the transmission disequilibrium test (TDT). This initial analysis was followed by experiments with DNA samples from 1,481 subjects from Pittsburgh, 918 children from Brazil, and 275 children from Turkey in order to follow up the results found in the Filipino families. Chi-square or Fisher’s exact tests were used. Sequencing of the coding regions and exon-intron boundaries of MST4 and FGF13 were also performed on 91 women from Pittsburgh. Results Statistically significant association with low caries experience was found for 11 markers in Xq25.1-27-2 in the Filipino families. One marker was in MST4, another marker was in FGF13, and the remaining markers were in intergenic regions. Haplotype analysis also confirmed these results, but the follow up studies with DNA samples from Pittsburgh, Brazil, and Turkey showed associations for a subset of the 11 markers. No coding mutations were identified by sequencing. Conclusions Our study failed to conclusively demonstrate that genetic factors in Xq25.1-27-2 contribute to caries experience in multiple populations. PMID:24632093

  16. SIRPB1 copy-number polymorphism as candidate quantitative trait locus for impulsive-disinhibited personality.

    PubMed

    Laplana, M; Royo, J L; García, L F; Aluja, A; Gomez-Skarmeta, J L; Fibla, J

    2014-09-01

    Impulsive-disinhibited personality (IDP) is a behavioral trait mainly characterized by seeking immediate gratification at the expense of more enduring or long-term gains. This trait has a major role in the development of several disinhibitory behaviors and syndromes, including psychopathy, attention-deficit and hyperactivity disorder, cluster-B personality disorders, criminality and alcoholism. Available data consistently support a strong heritable component, accounting for 30-60% of the observed variance in personality traits. A genome-wide analysis of copy-number variants was designed to identify novel genetic pathways associated with the IDP trait, using a series of 261 male participants with maximized opposite IDP scores. Quantitative trait locus analysis of candidate copy-number variants (CNVs) was conducted across the entire IDP continuum. Functional effects of associated variants were evaluated in zebrafish embryos. A common CNV mapping to the immune-related gene SIRPB1 was significantly associated with IDP scores in a dose-dependent manner (β=-0.172, P<0.017). Expression quantitative trait locus analysis of the critical region revealed higher SIRPB1 mRNA levels associated with the haplotype containing the deleted allele (P<0.0007). Epigenetic marks highlighted the presence of two potential insulators within the deleted region, confirmed by functional assays in zebrafish embryos, which suggests that SIRPB1 expression rates are affected by the presence/absence of the insulator regions. Upregulation of SIRPB1 has been described in prefrontal cortex of patients with schizophrenia, providing a link between SIRPB1 and diseases involving disinhibition and failure to control impulsivity. We propose SIRPB1 as a novel candidate gene to account for phenotypic differences observed in the IDP trait.

  17. A 6.4MB duplication of the alpha-synuclein locus causing fronto-temporal dementia and parkinsonism - phenotype-genotype correlations

    PubMed Central

    Kara, Eleanna; Kiely, Aoife P; Proukakis, Christos; Giffin, Nicola; Love, Seth; Hehir, Jason; Rantell, Khadija; Pandraud, Amelie; Hernandez, Dena G; Nacheva, Elizabeth; Pittman, Alan M; Nalls, Mike A; Singleton, Andrew B; Revesz, Tamas; Bhatia, Kailash P; Quinn, Niall; Hardy, John; Holton, Janice L; Houlden, Henry

    2015-01-01

    . Conclusions and relevance These findings further expand the phenotypic spectrum of SNCA locus duplications. Increased dosage of genes located within the duplicated region probably cannot increase disease risk and disease severity without the contribution of additional risk factors. Identification of disease modifiers accounting for the substantial phenotypic heterogeneity of patients with SNCA locus duplications could provide insight into molecular events involved in α-synuclein aggregation. PMID:25003242

  18. An investigation on the mediating role of coping strategies on locus of control-- wellbeing relationship.

    PubMed

    Thiruchelvi, Arunachalam; Supriya, Mangatvadakkeveetil V

    2012-03-01

    The relationship among coping strategies, locus of control, and workplace wellbeing is examined. The model hypothesizes that coping strategies mediate the relationship between locus of control and work place well being. To test the model, data was collected from 154 software professionals using separate tools to assess coping strategies, locus of control and work place wellbeing. Model fit for the collected data was examined using structural equation modeling technique with the help of AMOS. Results support the view that coping strategies mediate the relationship between locus of control and work place wellbeing. While the path between locus of control and wellbeing is significant, the path between coping distraction and wellbeing is not significant.

  19. Evidence for the murine IgH mu locus acting as a hot spot for intrachromosomal homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Raynard, Steven J; Read, Leah R; Baker, Mark D

    2002-03-01

    Homologous recombination accomplishes the exchange of genetic information between two similar or identical DNA duplexes. It can occur either by gene conversion, a process of unidirectional genetic exchange, or by reciprocal crossing over. Homologous recombination is well known for its role in generating genetic diversity in meiosis and, in mitosis, as a DNA repair mechanism. In the immune system, the evidence suggests a role for homologous recombination in Ig gene evolution and in the diversification of Ab function. Previously, we reported the occurrence of homologous recombination between repeated, donor and recipient alleles of the Ig H chain mu gene C (Cmu) region residing at the Ig mu locus in mouse hybridoma cells. In this study, we constructed mouse hybridoma cell lines bearing Cmu region heteroalleles to learn more about the intrachromosomal homologous recombination process. A high frequency of homologous recombination (gene conversion) was observed for markers spanning the entire recipient Cmu region, suggesting that recombination might initiate at random sites within the Cmu region. The Cmu region heteroalleles were equally proficient as either conversion donors or recipients. Remarkably, when the same Cmu heteroalleles were tested for recombination in ectopic genomic positions, the mean frequency of gene conversion was reduced by at least 65-fold. These results are consistent with the murine IgH mu locus behaving as a hot spot for intrachromosomal homologous recombination.

  20. Teacher psychological needs, locus of control and engagement.

    PubMed

    Betoret, Fernando Doménech

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the relationships among psychological needs, locus of control and engagement in a sample of 282 Spanish secondary school teachers. Nine teacher needs were identified based on the study of Bess (1977) and on the Self-Determination Theory (Deci & Ryan, 1985, 2000, 2002). Self-report questionnaires were used to measure the construct selected for this study and their interrelationships were examined by conducting hierarchical regression analyses. An analysis of teacher responses using hierarchical regression reveals that psychological needs have significant positive effects on the three engagement dimensions (vigor, dedication and absorption). Furthermore, the results show the moderator role played by locus of control in the relationship between teacher psychological needs and the so-called core of engagement (vigor and dedication). Finally, practical implications are discussed.

  1. The locus of microRNA-10b

    PubMed Central

    Biagioni, Francesca; Bossel Ben-Moshe, Noa; Fontemaggi, Giulia; Yarden, Yosef; Domany, Eytan; Blandino, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Contemporary microRNA research has led to significant advances in our understanding of the process of tumorigenesis. MicroRNAs participate in different events of a cancer cell’s life, through their ability to target hundreds of putative transcripts involved in almost every cellular function, including cell cycle, apoptosis, and differentiation. The relevance of these small molecules is even more evident in light of the emerging linkage between their expression and both prognosis and clinical outcome of many types of human cancers. This identifies microRNAs as potential therapeutic modifiers of cancer phenotypes. From this perspective, we overview here the miR-10b locus and its involvement in cancer, focusing on its role in the establishment (miR-10b*) and spreading (miR-10b) of breast cancer. We conclude that targeting the locus of microRNA 10b holds great potential for cancer treatment. PMID:23839045

  2. Refined localization of the Prieto-syndrome locus

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, F.; Prieto, F.; Gal, A.

    1996-07-12

    PRS designates the locus for a syndromal form of X-linked mental retardation (Prieto syndrome) characterized by minor facial anomalies, ear malformation, abnormal growth of teeth, clinodactyly, sacral dimple, patellar luxation, malformation of lower limbs, abnormalities of the fundus of the eye, and subcortical cerebral atrophy. Linkage analysis localized the disease locus between DXS84 (Xp21.1) and DXS255. Here we present additional linkage data that provide further support and refinement of this localization. Individual III-18 gave birth to a male, currently aged 2 7/12 years, who clearly shows delayed psychomotor development. He began to walk at 23 months and his speech is delayed. In addition, he shows the characteristic facial anomalies, {open_quotes}dysplastic{close_quotes} ears, sacral dimple, and clinodactyly, as do all other affected males in this family. 7 refs., 1 tab.

  3. Locus-specific gene repositioning in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Leshner, Marc; Devine, Michelle; Roloff, Gregory W.; True, Lawrence D.; Misteli, Tom; Meaburn, Karen J.

    2016-01-01

    Genes occupy preferred spatial positions within interphase cell nuclei. However, positioning patterns are not an innate feature of a locus, and genes can alter their localization in response to physiological and pathological changes. Here we screen the radial positioning patterns of 40 genes in normal, hyperplasic, and malignant human prostate tissues. We find that the overall spatial organization of the genome in prostate tissue is largely conserved among individuals. We identify three genes whose nuclear positions are robustly altered in neoplastic prostate tissues. FLI1 and MMP9 position differently in prostate cancer than in normal tissue and prostate hyperplasia, whereas MMP2 is repositioned in both prostate cancer and hyperplasia. Our data point to locus-specific reorganization of the genome during prostate disease. PMID:26564800

  4. Mechanisms Underlying the Breast Cancer Susceptibility Locus Mcs5a

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    Mcs5a2) down regulates the expression of the Fbxo10 gene in the T cells and that this reduced expression is associated with reduced mammary tumor...in primary T cells is conserved between rat and human. We demonstrate that the function of the non-coding Mcs5a locus likely is repressive gene ...regulation. We present a model that begins to explain how the Fbxo10 gene could be regulated in T cells. 15. SUBJECT TERMS mammary carcinogenesis

  5. Genetic analysis of the claret locus of Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Sequeira, W.; Nelson, C.R.; Szauter, P. )

    1989-11-01

    The claret (ca) locus of Drosophila melanogaster comprises two separately mutable domains, one responsible for eye color and one responsible for proper disjunction of chromosomes in meiosis and early cleavage divisions. Previously isolated alleles are of three types: (1) alleles of the claret (ca) type that affect eye color only, (2) alleles of the claret-nondisjunctional (ca{sup nd}) type that affect eye color and chromosome behavior, and (3) a meiotic mutation, non-claret disjunctional (ncd), that affects chromosome behavior only. In order to investigate the genetic structure of the claret locus, the authors have isolated 19 radiation-induced alleles of claret on the basis of the eye color phenotype. Two of these 19 new alleles are of the ca{sup nd} type, while 17 are of the ca type, demonstrating that the two domains do not often act as a single target for mutagenesis. This suggests that the two separately mutable functions are likely to be encoded by separate or overlapping genes rather than by a single gene. One of the new alleles of the ca{sup nd} type is a chromosome rearrangement with a breakpoint at the position of the claret locus. If this breakpoint is the cause of the mutant phenotype and there are no other mutations associated with the rearrangement, the two functions must be encoded by overlapping genes.

  6. Measurement methodology in children's health locus of control.

    PubMed

    Bases, Hugh; Schonfeld, David J

    2002-06-01

    Health locus of control scales for children are often constructed in an agree/disagree format. It was hypothesized that the structure of the instrument may be in part responsible for the finding that young children (7-8 yr) have an external health locus of control relevant to children several years older. The original version and a revised version, using a choice of attribution format, were both administered to 444 students (98% of eligible students) attending 10 second-grade classes. Although the mean scores for the two formats were the same, 32.0 (SD = 3.3), item level analyses showed poor agreement (kappa, -.005-.41) and significant bias in disagreements on 15 of the 20 items. Changes in the wording of the questions led to different results, indicating possible limitations in either format. The observation that young children likely have a mixed health locus of control indicates that health educators may benefit from employing both internal and external sources of reinforcement to promote healthy behaviors in young children.

  7. Interarticulator phasing, locus equations, and degree of coarticulation.

    PubMed

    Löfqvist, A

    1999-10-01

    A locus equation plots the frequency of the second formant at vowel onset against the target frequency of the same formant for the vowel in a consonant-vowel sequence, across different vowel contexts. It has generally been assumed that the slope of the locus equation reflects the degree of coarticulation between the consonant and the vowel, with a steeper slope showing more coarticulation. This study examined the articulatory basis for this assumption. Four subjects participated and produced VCV sequences of the consonants /b, d, g/ and the vowels /i, a, u/. The movements of the tongue and the lips were recorded using a magnetometer system. One articulatory measure was the temporal phasing between the onset of the lip closing movement for the bilabial consonant and the onset of the tongue movement from the first to the second vowel in a VCV sequence. A second measure was the magnitude of the tongue movement during the oral stop closure, averaged across four receivers on the tongue. A third measure was the magnitude of the tongue movement from the onset of the second vowel to the tongue position for that vowel. When compared with the corresponding locus equations, no measure showed any support for the assumption that the slope serves as an index of the degree of coarticulation between the consonant and the vowel.

  8. The Effects of Locus of Control and Task Difficulty on Procrastination.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Tracy; Carton, John S

    1999-12-01

    The authors investigated the effects of locus of control expectancies and task difficulty on procrastination. Forty-two college students were administered an academic locus of control scale and a task that was similar to a typical college homework assignment. The students were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 task difficulty levels. Although none of the results involving task difficulty was significant, several results involving locus of control were significant. Specifically, analyses revealed that students with internal locus of control expectancies tended to begin working on the assignment sooner than students with external locus of control expectancies. In addition, students with internal locus of control completed and returned the assignment sooner than students with external locus of control. The results are discussed within the context of J. B. Rotter's (1966, 1975, 1982) social learning theory.

  9. Loss of heterozygosity at the SS receptor type 5 locus in human GH- and TSH-secreting pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Filopanti, M; Ballarè, E; Lania, A G; Bondioni, S; Verga, U; Locatelli, M; Zavanone, L M; Losa, M; Gelmini, S; Peri, A; Orlando, C; Beck-Peccoz, P; Spada, A

    2004-11-01

    SS receptor types 2 and 5 (sst2 and sst5) are involved in the control of secretion and proliferation of normal and tumoral somatotrophs and thyrotrophs. The mechanisms leading to reduced responsiveness to SS analogues in patients with pituitary tumors are poorly understood. The aim of the study was to verify the possible loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at the sst5 gene locus in somatotroph and thyrotroph adenomas by screening leukocyte and tumor DNA for two single nucleotide polymorphisms, i.e. C1004T leading to P335L change and T-461C in the 5'-upstream region. Among the 13 informative samples, 1 GH- and 1 TSH-secreting adenoma showed LOH at sst5 gene locus with the retention of Leu335 variant. By analyzing other polymorphic markers spanning from telomere to 16p13.3-13.2 boundaries, DNA deletion of at least 1 megabase was found in both tumors. LOH in thyrotroph adenoma was associated with unusual tumor aggressiveness that required a second surgery and resistance to SS analogs, while no obvious phenotype was identified in the case of the somatotroph adenoma. In conclusions, LOH at the sst5 gene locus is a rare phenomenon, occurring in about 10% of pituitary tumors, that seems to be associated with an aggressive phenotype, at least in thyrotroph adenomas. Further studies are required to confirm this association and to identify the genes, in addition to sst5, lost in these tumors.

  10. The dyslexia candidate locus on 2p12 is associated with general cognitive ability and white matter structure.

    PubMed

    Scerri, Thomas S; Darki, Fahimeh; Newbury, Dianne F; Whitehouse, Andrew J O; Peyrard-Janvid, Myriam; Matsson, Hans; Ang, Qi W; Pennell, Craig E; Ring, Susan; Stein, John; Morris, Andrew P; Monaco, Anthony P; Kere, Juha; Talcott, Joel B; Klingberg, Torkel; Paracchini, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    Independent studies have shown that candidate genes for dyslexia and specific language impairment (SLI) impact upon reading/language-specific traits in the general population. To further explore the effect of disorder-associated genes on cognitive functions, we investigated whether they play a role in broader cognitive traits. We tested a panel of dyslexia and SLI genetic risk factors for association with two measures of general cognitive abilities, or IQ, (verbal and non-verbal) in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) cohort (N>5,000). Only the MRPL19/C2ORF3 locus showed statistically significant association (minimum P = 0.00009) which was further supported by independent replications following analysis in four other cohorts. In addition, a fifth independent sample showed association between the MRPL19/C2ORF3 locus and white matter structure in the posterior part of the corpus callosum and cingulum, connecting large parts of the cortex in the parietal, occipital and temporal lobes. These findings suggest that this locus, originally identified as being associated with dyslexia, is likely to harbour genetic variants associated with general cognitive abilities by influencing white matter structure in localised neuronal regions.

  11. The Dyslexia Candidate Locus on 2p12 Is Associated with General Cognitive Ability and White Matter Structure

    PubMed Central

    Scerri, Thomas S.; Darki, Fahimeh; Newbury, Dianne F.; Whitehouse, Andrew J. O.; Peyrard-Janvid, Myriam; Matsson, Hans; Ang, Qi W.; Pennell, Craig E.; Ring, Susan; Stein, John; Morris, Andrew P.; Monaco, Anthony P.; Kere, Juha; Talcott, Joel B.; Klingberg, Torkel; Paracchini, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    Independent studies have shown that candidate genes for dyslexia and specific language impairment (SLI) impact upon reading/language-specific traits in the general population. To further explore the effect of disorder-associated genes on cognitive functions, we investigated whether they play a role in broader cognitive traits. We tested a panel of dyslexia and SLI genetic risk factors for association with two measures of general cognitive abilities, or IQ, (verbal and non-verbal) in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) cohort (N>5,000). Only the MRPL19/C2ORF3 locus showed statistically significant association (minimum P = 0.00009) which was further supported by independent replications following analysis in four other cohorts. In addition, a fifth independent sample showed association between the MRPL19/C2ORF3 locus and white matter structure in the posterior part of the corpus callosum and cingulum, connecting large parts of the cortex in the parietal, occipital and temporal lobes. These findings suggest that this locus, originally identified as being associated with dyslexia, is likely to harbour genetic variants associated with general cognitive abilities by influencing white matter structure in localised neuronal regions. PMID:23209710

  12. Evidence of genotypic adaptation to the exposure to volcanic risk at the dopamine receptor DRD4 locus

    PubMed Central

    Faurie, Charlotte; Mettling, Clement; Ali Bchir, Mohamed; Hadmoko, Danang Sri; Heitz, Carine; Lestari, Evi Dwi; Raymond, Michel; Willinger, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Humans have colonized and adapted to extremely diverse environments, and the genetic basis of some such adaptations, for example to high altitude, is understood. In some cases, local or regional variation in selection pressure could also cause behavioural adaptations. Numerous genes influence behaviour, such as alleles at the dopamine receptor locus D4 (DRD4), which are associated with attitude toward risk in experimental settings. We demonstrate genetic differentiation for this gene, but not for five unlinked microsatellite loci, between high- and low risk environments around Mount Merapi, an active volcano in Java, Indonesia. Using a behavioural experiment, we further show that people inhabiting the high risk environment are significantly more risk averse. We provide evidence of a genetic basis for this difference, showing that heterozygotes at the DRD4 locus are more risk averse than either homozygotes. In the high risk environment, allele frequencies are equilibrated, generating a high frequency of heterozygotes. Thus it appears that overdominance (i.e. selective advantage of heterozygotes) generates negative frequency dependent selection, favouring the rarer allele at this locus. Our results therefore provide evidence for adaptation to a marginal habitat through the selection of a neurocognitive trait with a genetic basis. PMID:27905471

  13. Evidence of genotypic adaptation to the exposure to volcanic risk at the dopamine receptor DRD4 locus.

    PubMed

    Faurie, Charlotte; Mettling, Clement; Ali Bchir, Mohamed; Hadmoko, Danang Sri; Heitz, Carine; Lestari, Evi Dwi; Raymond, Michel; Willinger, Marc

    2016-12-01

    Humans have colonized and adapted to extremely diverse environments, and the genetic basis of some such adaptations, for example to high altitude, is understood. In some cases, local or regional variation in selection pressure could also cause behavioural adaptations. Numerous genes influence behaviour, such as alleles at the dopamine receptor locus D4 (DRD4), which are associated with attitude toward risk in experimental settings. We demonstrate genetic differentiation for this gene, but not for five unlinked microsatellite loci, between high- and low risk environments around Mount Merapi, an active volcano in Java, Indonesia. Using a behavioural experiment, we further show that people inhabiting the high risk environment are significantly more risk averse. We provide evidence of a genetic basis for this difference, showing that heterozygotes at the DRD4 locus are more risk averse than either homozygotes. In the high risk environment, allele frequencies are equilibrated, generating a high frequency of heterozygotes. Thus it appears that overdominance (i.e. selective advantage of heterozygotes) generates negative frequency dependent selection, favouring the rarer allele at this locus. Our results therefore provide evidence for adaptation to a marginal habitat through the selection of a neurocognitive trait with a genetic basis.

  14. An extremely polymorphic locus on the short arm of the human X chromosome with homology to the long arm of the Y chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Knowlton, R G; Nelson, C A; Brown, V A; Page, D C; Donis-Keller, H

    1989-01-01

    A genomic DNA clone named CRI-S232 reveals an array of highly polymorphic restriction fragments on the X chromosome as well as a set of non-polymorphic fragments on the Y chromosome. Every individual has multiple bands, highly variable in length, in every restriction enzyme digest tested. One set of bands is found in all males, and co-segregates with the Y chromosome in families. These sequences have been regionally localized by deletion mapping to the long arm of the Y chromosome. Segregation analysis in families shows that all of the remaining fragments co-segregate as a single locus on the X chromosome, each haplotype consisting of three or more polymorphic fragments. This locus (designated DXS278) is linked to several markers on Xp, the closest being dic56 (DXS143) at a distance of 2 cM. Although it is outside the pseudoautosomal region, the S232 X chromosome locus shows linkage to pseudoautosomal markers in female meiosis. In determining the X chromosome S232 haplotypes of 138 offspring among 19 families, we observed three non-parental haplotypes. Two were recombinant haplotypes, consistent with a cross-over among the S232-hybridizing fragments in maternal meiosis. The third was a mutant haplotype arising on a paternal X chromosome. The locus identified by CRI-S232 may therefore be a recombination and mutation hotspot. Images PMID:2911472

  15. Association analysis using refined microsatellite markers localizes a susceptibility locus for psoriasis vulgaris within a 111 kb segment telomeric to the HLA-C gene.

    PubMed

    Oka, A; Tamiya, G; Tomizawa, M; Ota, M; Katsuyama, Y; Makino, S; Shiina, T; Yoshitome, M; Iizuka, M; Sasao, Y; Iwashita, K; Kawakubo, Y; Sugai, J; Ozawa, A; Ohkido, M; Kimura, M; Bahram, S; Inoko, H

    1999-11-01

    The HLA-Cw6 antigen has been associated with psoriasis vulgaris despite racial and ethnic differences. However, it remains unclear whether it is the HLA-Cw6 antigen itself or a closely linked, hitherto unidentified, locus that predisposes to the disease. Here, in order to map the susceptibility locus for psoriasis vulgaris precisely within the HLA class I region, 11 polymorphic microsatellite markers distributed throughout a 1060 kb segment surrounding the HLA-C locus were subjected to association analysis in Japanese psoriasis vulgaris patients. Statistical analyses of the distribution and deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium of the allelic frequency at each micro-satellite locus revealed that the pathogenic gene for psoriasis vulgaris is located within a reduced interval of 111 kb spanning 89-200 kb telomeric of the HLA-C gene. In addition to three known genes, POU5F1, TCF19 and S, this 111 kb fragment contains four new, expressed genes identified in the course of our genomic sequencing of the entire HLA class I region. Therefore, these seven genes are the potential candidates for susceptibility to psoriasis vulgaris.

  16. Evidence against an X-linked visual loss susceptibility locus in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Chalmers, R.M.; Davis, M.B.; Sweeney, M.G.; Wood, N.W.; Harding, A.E.

    1996-07-01

    Pedigree analysis of British families with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) closely fits a model in which a pathogenic mtDNA mutation interacts with an X-linked visual loss susceptibility locus (VLSL). This model predicts that 60% of affected females will show marked skewing of X inactivation. Linkage analysis in British and Italian families with genetically proven LHON has excluded the presence of such a VLSL over 169 cM of the X chromosome both when all families were analyzed together and when only families with the bp 11778 mutation were studied. Further, there was no excess skewing of X inactivation in affected females. There was no evidence for close linkage to three markers in the pseudoautosomal region of the sex chromosomes. The mechanism of incomplete penetrance and male predominance in LHON remains unclear. 27 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  17. A locus for bilateral occipital polymicrogyria maps to chromosome 6q16-q22.

    PubMed

    Ben Cheikh, Bouchra Ouled Amar; Baulac, Stéphanie; Lahjouji, Fatiha; Bouhouche, Ahmed; Couarch, Philippe; Khalili, Naima; Regragui, Wafae; Lehericy, Stéphane; Ruberg, Merle; Benomar, Ali; Heath, Simon; Chkili, Taib; Yahyaoui, Mohamed; Jiddane, Mohamed; Ouazzani, Reda; LeGuern, Eric

    2009-02-01

    We describe the clinical, radiographic, and genetic features of a large consanguineous Moroccan family in which bilateral occipital polymicrogyria segregated as an autosomal recessive trait. Six affected members of the family had partial complex seizures often associated with behavioral abnormalities. On MRI, three patients had a thickened irregular cortex in the lateral occipital lobes with small gyri. A high-density genome-wide scan with 10,000 SNPs established linkage by homozygosity mapping to a 14-Mb region on chromosome 6q16-q22. Candidate genes by function (TUBE1, GRIK2, GPRC6A, GPR6, NR2E1, MICAL1, and MARCKS) in this locus we