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Sample records for adh1a adh1b adh1c

  1. Replication Study of ESCC Susceptibility Genetic Polymorphisms Locating in the ADH1B-ADH1C-ADH7 Cluster Identified by GWAS

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaoling; Pan, Wenting; Ge, Yunxia; Zhou, Changchun; Liu, Chao; Gao, Jia; Yang, Ming; Mao, Weimin

    2014-01-01

    China was one of the countries with highest esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) incidence and mortality worldwide. Alcohol drinking has been identified as a major environmental risk-factor related to ESCC. The alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) family are major enzymes involved in the alcohol-metabolizing pathways, including alcohol dehydrogenase 1B (ADH1B) and ADH1C. Interestingly, ADH1B and ADH1C genes locate tandemly with ADH7 in a genomic segment as a gene cluster, and are all polymorphic. Several ESCC susceptibility single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the ADH1B-ADH1C-ADH7 cluster have been identified previously through a genome-wide association study (GWAS). In the study, we examined the association between five ADH1B-ADH1C-ADH7 cluster SNPs (rs1042026, rs17033, rs1614972, rs1789903 and rs17028973) and risk of developing ESCC. Genotypes were determined in two independent case-control sets from two regions of China. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated by logistic regression. Our data demonstrated that these ADH1B-ADH1C-ADH7 cluster SNPs confer susceptibility to ESCC in these two case-control sets, which were consistent to results of the previous GWAS. PMID:24722735

  2. Replication study of ESCC susceptibility genetic polymorphisms locating in the ADH1B-ADH1C-ADH7 cluster identified by GWAS.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiwen; Wei, Jinyu; Xu, Xiaoling; Pan, Wenting; Ge, Yunxia; Zhou, Changchun; Liu, Chao; Gao, Jia; Yang, Ming; Mao, Weimin

    2014-01-01

    China was one of the countries with highest esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) incidence and mortality worldwide. Alcohol drinking has been identified as a major environmental risk-factor related to ESCC. The alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) family are major enzymes involved in the alcohol-metabolizing pathways, including alcohol dehydrogenase 1B (ADH1B) and ADH1C. Interestingly, ADH1B and ADH1C genes locate tandemly with ADH7 in a genomic segment as a gene cluster, and are all polymorphic. Several ESCC susceptibility single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the ADH1B-ADH1C-ADH7 cluster have been identified previously through a genome-wide association study (GWAS). In the study, we examined the association between five ADH1B-ADH1C-ADH7 cluster SNPs (rs1042026, rs17033, rs1614972, rs1789903 and rs17028973) and risk of developing ESCC. Genotypes were determined in two independent case-control sets from two regions of China. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated by logistic regression. Our data demonstrated that these ADH1B-ADH1C-ADH7 cluster SNPs confer susceptibility to ESCC in these two case-control sets, which were consistent to results of the previous GWAS.

  3. Genetic polymorphisms of ADH1B, ADH1C and ALDH2 in Turkish alcoholics: lack of association with alcoholism and alcoholic cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Vatansever, Sezgin; Tekin, Fatih; Salman, Esin; Altintoprak, Ender; Coskunol, Hakan; Akarca, Ulus Salih

    2015-05-17

    No data exists regarding the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) gene polymorphisms in Turkish alcoholic cirrhotics. We studied the polymorphisms of ADH1B, ADH1C and ALDH2 genes in alcoholic cirrhotics and compared the results with non-cirrhotic alcoholics and healthy volunteers. Overall, 237 subjects were included for the study: 156 alcoholic patients (78 cirrhotics, 78 non-cirrhotic alcoholics) and 81 healthy volunteers. Three different single-nucleotide-polymorphism genotyping methods were used. ADH1C genotyping was performed using a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. The identified ADH1C genotypes were named according to the presence or absence of the enzyme restriction sites. ADH1B (Arg47Hys) genotyping was performed using the allele specific primer extension method, and ALDH2 (Glu487Lys) genotyping was performed by a multiplex polymerase chain reaction using two allele-specific primer pairs. For ADH1B, the frequency of allele *1 in the cirrhotics, non-cirrhotic alcoholics and healthy volunteers was 97.4%, 94.9% and 99.4%, respectively. For ADH1C, the frequency of allele *1 in the cirrhotics, non-cirrhotic alcoholics and healthy volunteers was 47%, 36.3% and 45%, respectively. There was no statistical difference between the groups for ADH1B and ADH1C (p>0.05). All alcoholic and non-alcoholic subjects (100%) had the allele *1 for ALDH2. The obtained results for ADH1B, ADH1C, and ALDH gene polymorphisms in the present study are similar to the results of Caucasian studies. ADH1B and ADH1C genetic variations are not related to the development of alcoholism or susceptibility to alcoholic cirrhosis. ALDH2 gene has no genetic variation in the Turkish population.

  4. Genetic variants in or near ADH1B and ADH1C affect susceptibility to alcohol dependence in a British and Irish population.

    PubMed

    Way, Michael; McQuillin, Andrew; Saini, Jit; Ruparelia, Kush; Lydall, Gregory J; Guerrini, Irene; Ball, David; Smith, Iain; Quadri, Giorgia; Thomson, Allan D; Kasiakogia-Worlley, Katherine; Cherian, Raquin; Gunwardena, Priyanthi; Rao, Harish; Kottalgi, Girija; Patel, Shamir; Hillman, Audrey; Douglas, Ewen; Qureshi, Sherhzad Y; Reynolds, Gerry; Jauhar, Sameer; O'Kane, Aideen; Dedman, Alex; Sharp, Sally; Kandaswamy, Radhika; Dar, Karim; Curtis, David; Morgan, Marsha Y; Gurling, Hugh M D

    2015-05-01

    Certain single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes encoding alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) enzymes confer a significant protective effect against alcohol dependence syndrome (ADS) in East Asian populations. Recently, attention has focused on the role of these SNPs in determining ADS risk in European populations. To further elucidate these associations, SNPs of interest in ADH1B, ADH1C and the ADH1B/1C intergenic region were genotyped in a British and Irish population (ADS cases n = 1076: controls n = 1027) to assess their relative contribution to ADS risk. A highly significant, protective association was observed between the minor allele of rs1229984 in ADH1B and ADS risk [allelic P = 8.4 × 10(-6) , odds ratio (OR) = 0.26, 95 percent confidence interval, 0.14, 0.49]. Significant associations were also observed between ADS risk and the ADH1B/1C intergenic variant, rs1789891 [allelic P = 7.2 × 10(-5) , OR = 1.4 (1.2, 1.6)] and three non-synonymous SNPs rs698, rs1693482 and rs283413 in ADH1C. However, these associations were not completely independent; thus, while the ADH1B rs1229984 minor allele association was independent of those of the intergenic variant rs1789891 and the three ADH1C variants, the three ADH1C variants were not individually independent. In conclusion, the rare ADH1B rs1229984 mutation provides significant protection against ADS in this British and Irish population; other variants in the ADH gene cluster also alter ADS risk, although the strong linkage disequilibrium between SNPs at this location precluded clear identification of the variant(s) driving the associations.

  5. Genetic polymorphisms of ADH1B, ADH1C and ALDH2, alcohol consumption, and the risk of gastric cancer: the Japan Public Health Center-based prospective study.

    PubMed

    Hidaka, Akihisa; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Sawada, Norie; Shimazu, Taichi; Yamaji, Taiki; Iwasaki, Motoki; Inoue, Manami; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2015-02-01

    The association between alcohol consumption, genetic polymorphisms of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) and gastric cancer risk is not completely understood. We investigated the association between ADH1B (rs1229984), ADH1C (rs698) and ALDH2 (rs671) polymorphisms, alcohol consumption and the risk of gastric cancer among Japanese subjects in a population-based, nested, case-control study (1990-2004). Among 36 745 subjects who answered the baseline questionnaire and provided blood samples, 457 new gastric cancer cases matched to 457 controls were used in the analysis. The odds ratios (OR) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using logistic regression models. No association was observed between alcohol consumption, ADH1B (rs1229984), ADH1C (rs698) and ALDH2 (rs671) polymorphisms and gastric cancer risk. However, considering gene-environmental interaction, ADH1C G allele carriers who drink ≥150 g/week of ethanol had a 2.5-fold increased risk of gastric cancer (OR = 2.54, 95% CI = 1.05-6.17) relative to AA genotype carriers who drink 0 to <150 g/week (P for interaction = 0.02). ALDH2 A allele carriers who drink ≥150 g/week also had an increased risk (OR = 2.08, 95% CI = 1.05-4.12) relative to GG genotype carriers who drink 0 to < 150 g/week (P for interaction = 0.08). To find the relation between alcohol consumption and gastric cancer risk, it is important to consider both alcohol consumption level and ADH1C and ALDH2 polymorphisms.

  6. Meta-Analyses of ALDH2 and ADH1B with Alcohol Dependence in Asians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luczak, Susan E.; Glatt, Stephen J.; Wall, Tamara J.

    2006-01-01

    Meta-analyses were conducted to determine the magnitude of relationships between polymorphisms in 2 genes, ALDH2 and ADH1B, with alcohol dependence in Asians. For each gene, possession of 1 variant [asterisk]2 allele was protective against alcohol dependence, and possession of a 2nd [asterisk]2 allele did not offer significant additional…

  7. High diversity and no significant selection signal of human ADH1B gene in Tibet

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background ADH1B is one of the most studied human genes with many polymorphic sites. One of the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs1229984, coding for the Arg48His substitution, have been associated with many serious diseases including alcoholism and cancers of the digestive system. The derived allele, ADH1B*48His, reaches high frequency only in East Asia and Southwest Asia, and is highly associated with agriculture. Micro-evolutionary study has defined seven haplogroups for ADH1B based on seven SNPs encompassing the gene. Three of those haplogroups, H5, H6, and H7, contain the ADH1B*48His allele. H5 occurs in Southwest Asia and the other two are found in East Asia. H7 is derived from H6 by the derived allele of rs3811801. The H7 haplotype has been shown to have undergone significant positive selection in Han Chinese, Hmong, Koreans, Japanese, Khazak, Mongols, and so on. Methods In the present study, we tested whether Tibetans also showed evidence for selection by typing 23 SNPs in the region covering the ADH1B gene in 1,175 individuals from 12 Tibetan populations representing all districts of the Tibet Autonomous Region. Multiple statistics were estimated to examine the gene diversities and positive selection signals among the Tibetans and other populations in East Asia. Results The larger Tibetan populations (Qamdo, Lhasa, Nagqu, Nyingchi, Shannan, and Shigatse) comprised mostly farmers, have around 12% of H7, and 2% of H6. The smaller populations, living on hunting or recently switched to farming, have lower H7 frequencies (Tingri 9%, Gongbo 8%, Monba and Sherpa 6%). Luoba (2%) and Deng (0%) have even lower frequencies. Long-range haplotype analyses revealed very weak signals of positive selection for H7 among Tibetans. Interestingly, the haplotype diversity of H7 is higher in Tibetans than in any other populations studied, indicating a longer diversification history for that haplogroup in Tibetans. Network analysis on the long-range haplotypes revealed

  8. Polymorphisms in Alcohol Metabolism Genes ADH1B and ALDH2, Alcohol Consumption and Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Crous-Bou, Marta; Rennert, Gad; Cuadras, Daniel; Salazar, Ramon; Cordero, David; Saltz Rennert, Hedy; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Kopelovich, Levy; Monroe Lipkin, Steven; Bernard Gruber, Stephen; Moreno, Victor

    2013-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Epidemiological risk factors for CRC included alcohol intake, which is mainly metabolized to acetaldehyde by alcohol dehydrogenase and further oxidized to acetate by aldehyde dehydrogenase; consequently, the role of genes in the alcohol metabolism pathways is of particular interest. The aim of this study is to analyze the association between SNPs in ADH1B and ALDH2 genes and CRC risk, and also the main effect of alcohol consumption on CRC risk in the study population. Methodology/Principal Findings SNPs from ADH1B and ALDH2 genes, included in alcohol metabolism pathway, were genotyped in 1694 CRC cases and 1851 matched controls from the Molecular Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer study. Information on clinicopathological characteristics, lifestyle and dietary habits were also obtained. Logistic regression and association analysis were conducted. A positive association between alcohol consumption and CRC risk was observed in male participants from the Molecular Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer study (MECC) study (OR = 1.47; 95%CI = 1.18-1.81). Moreover, the SNPs rs1229984 in ADH1B gene was found to be associated with CRC risk: under the recessive model, the OR was 1.75 for A/A genotype (95%CI = 1.21-2.52; p-value = 0.0025). A path analysis based on structural equation modeling showed a direct effect of ADH1B gene polymorphisms on colorectal carcinogenesis and also an indirect effect mediated through alcohol consumption. Conclusions/Significance Genetic polymorphisms in the alcohol metabolism pathways have a potential role in colorectal carcinogenesis, probably due to the differences in the ethanol metabolism and acetaldehyde oxidation of these enzyme variants. PMID:24282520

  9. Is ADH1C genotype relevant for the cardioprotective effect of alcohol?

    PubMed

    Høiseth, Gudrun; Magnus, Per; Knudsen, Gun Peggy; Jansen, Mona Dverdal; Næss, Oyvind; Tambs, Kristian; Mørland, Jørg

    2013-03-01

    The cardioprotective effect of ethanol has been suggested to be linked to one of the ethanol metabolizing enzymes (ADH1C), which constitutes a high V(max) and a low V(max) variant. This has been demonstrated in some studies, while others have not been able to replicate the findings. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relation between the different ADH1C genotypes, death from coronary heart disease (CHD) and alcohol in a material larger than the previously published studies. Eight hundred CHD deaths as well as 1303 controls were genotyped for the high V(max) (γ1) and the low V(max) (γ2) ADH1C variant. Information of alcohol use was available for all subjects. Multiple logistic regression analyses was used to study if the decreased risk of death from CHD in alcohol consuming subjects was more pronounced in subjects homozygous for the γ2 allele (γ2γ2 subjects) compared to γ1γ1 and γ1γ2 subjects. The odds ratio (OR) for death from CHD in alcohol consumers compared to abstainers was similar in the genotype groups, i.e., 0.62 (95% CI: 0.43-0.88) in γ1γ1 subjects and 0.62 (95% CI: 0.42-0.91) in γ2γ2 subjects. Also when stratifying the results by gender and when dividing alcohol consumers into different alcohol consumption groups, there was no difference in the OR between the different genotype groups. This study, which included the largest study group published so far, failed to find any link between the ADH1C genotype and the cardioprotective effects of alcohol.

  10. The ADH1B and DRD2 gene polymorphism may modify the protective effect of the ALDH2 gene against heroin dependence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tzu-Yun; Lee, Sheng-Yu; Chen, Shiou-Lan; Chang, Yun-Hsuan; Chen, Shih-Heng; Chu, Chun-Hsien; Huang, San-Yuan; Tzeng, Nian-Sheng; Wang, Chen-Lin; Yeh, Pin-Hsi; Lee, I Hui; Yeh, Tzung Lieh; Yang, Yen Kuang; Lu, Ru-Band

    2013-06-03

    Understanding the influences of genes involved in dopamine and serotonin metabolism, such as the aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) and alcohol dehydrogenase 1B (ADH1B) genes, is critical for understanding addictive behavior. In addition, dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) gene may also interact with the dopamine metabolizing genes and link to addiction. Therefore, we investigated the association between the ALDH2, ADH1B and DRD2 polymorphisms and heroin dependence. Heroin-dependent Han Chinese patients (n=304) and healthy controls (n=335) were recruited. Genotypes of ALDH2, ADH1B and DRD2 polymorphisms were analyzed using a polymerase chain reaction with restriction fragment length polymorphism. The frequency of the ALDH2*1/*1 genotype was significantly lower in heroin-dependent patients than in controls, but the frequency of ADH1B and DRD2 genotypes was not significantly different. Further stratification of the ALDH2 gene with the ADH1B gene showed that the protective effect of ALDH2*1/*1 existed only in patients who also carried the ADH1B*1/*1 and ADH1B*1/*2 genotype. Logistic regression analysis showed a significant interaction between ALDH2 and ADH1B (P=0.022) and DRD2, ALDH2 and ADH1B in patients (P=0.037). The ALDH2*1/*1, ADH1B*1/*1, and ADH1B*1/*2 genotypes may interact and protect their carriers against heroin dependence and the protective effect may be varied by the DRD2 gene polymorphism. We conclude that the protective effect of the ALDH2 polymorphism against heroin dependence may be modified by the ADH1B and DRD2 polymorphism.

  11. Combination of ADH1B*2/ALDH2*2 polymorphisms alters acetaldehyde-derived DNA damage in the blood of Japanese alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Yukawa, Yoshiyuki; Muto, Manabu; Hori, Kimiko; Nagayoshi, Haruna; Yokoyama, Akira; Chiba, Tsutomu; Matsuda, Tomonari

    2012-09-01

    The acetaldehyde associated with alcoholic beverages is an evident carcinogen for the esophagus. Genetic polymorphisms of the alcohol dehydrogenase 1B (ADH1B) and aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) genes are associated with the risk of esophageal cancer. However, the exact mechanism via which these genetic polymorphisms affect esophageal carcinogenesis has not been elucidated. ADH1B*2 is involved in overproduction of acetaldehyde due to increased ethanol metabolism into acetaldehyde, and ALDH2*2 is involved in accumulation of acetaldehyde due to the deficiency of acetaldehyde metabolism. Acetaldehyde can interact with DNA and form DNA adducts, resulting in DNA damage. N(2)-ethylidene-2'-deoxyguanosine (N(2)-ethylidene-dG) is the most abundant DNA adduct derived from acetaldehyde. Therefore, we quantified N(2)-ethylidene-dG levels in blood samples from 66 Japanese alcoholic patients using liquid chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry, and investigated the relationship between N(2)-ethylidene-dG levels and ADH1B and ALDH2 genotypes. The median N(2)-ethylidene-dG levels (25th percentile, 75th percentile) in patients with ADH1B*1/*1 plus ALDH2*1/*1, ADH1B*2 carrier plus ALDH2*1/*1, ADH1B*1/*1 plus ALDH2*1/*2, and ADH1B*2 carrier plus ALDH2*1/*2 were 2.14 (0.97, 2.37)/10(7) bases, 2.38 (1.18, 2.98)/10(7) bases, 5.38 (3.19, 6.52)/10(7) bases, and 21.04 (12.75, 34.80)/10(7) bases, respectively. In the ALDH2*1/*2 group, N(2)-ethylidene-dG levels were significantly higher in ADH1B*2 carriers than in the ADH1B*1/*1 group (P < 0.01). N(2)-ethylidene-dG levels were significantly higher in the ALDH2*1/*2 group than in the ALDH2*1/*1 group, regardless of ADH1B genotype (ADH1B*1/*1, P < 0.05; ADH1B*2 carriers, P < 0.01) N(2)-ethylidene-dG levels in blood DNA of the alcoholics was remarkably higher in individuals with a combination of the ADH1B*2 and ALDH2*2 alleles. These results provide a new perspective on the carcinogenicity of the acetaldehyde associated with

  12. ADH1B and CDH1 polymorphisms predict prognosis in male patients with non-metastatic laryngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Tianbo; He, Na; Ren, Le; Zhang, Zhe; Zhang, Qingna; Xu, Ran; Tao, Hong; Zeng, Guang; Gao, Jing

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we assessed the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in candidate genes and the prognosis of laryngeal cancer (LC) patients. Thirty-seven SNPs in 26 genes were genotyped in 170 male Han Chinese patients with LC. The effects of the candidate genes on the prognosis of LC patients were evaluated using Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox proportional hazards regression models. The GA genotype of rs1229984 (hazard ratio [HR], 0.537; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.340–0.848; p = 0.008) in alcohol dehydrogenase 1B (ADH1B), and the AA genotype of rs9929218 (HR, 6.074; 95% CI, 1.426–25.870; p = 0.015) in CDH1 were associated with overall survival. Our data suggest that polymorphisms in ADH1B and CDH1 may be prognostic indicators in LC. PMID:27689323

  13. Protective effects of the alcohol dehydrogenase-ADH1B*3 allele on attention and behavior problems in adolescents exposed to alcohol during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Dodge, Neil C; Jacobson, Joseph L; Jacobson, Sandra W

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase is a critical enzyme in the metabolism of alcohol. Expression of three alleles at the ADH1B locus results in enzymes that differ in turnover rate and affinity for alcohol. The ADH1B*3 allele, which appears to be unique to individuals of African descent, is associated with more rapid alcohol metabolism than the more prevalent ADH1B*1 allele. It has been previously demonstrated that the presence of at least one maternal ADH1B*3 allele confers a protective effect against alcohol teratogenicity in infants and children. This study was conducted to determine whether the presence of the ADH1B*3 allele in the mother or child continues to be protective in alcohol-exposed individuals during adolescence. 186 adolescents and 167 mothers participating in a 14-year follow-up of the Detroit Longitudinal Cohort were genotyped for ADH1B alleles. Behavioral reports were obtained from classroom teachers. Frequencies of the ADH1B*3 allele were 17.6% in the mothers and 21.0% in the adolescents, which are consistent with the 15-20% expected for African Americans. Prenatal alcohol exposure was associated with increased attention problems and externalizing behaviors in adolescents born to mothers with two ADH1B*1 alleles but not in those whose mothers had at least one ADH1B*3 allele. A similar pattern was seen in relation to the presence or absence of an ADH1B*3 allele in the adolescent, which may have reflected the presence/absence of the maternal variant. This study is the first to demonstrate that the protective effects of the maternal ADH1B*3 allele continue to be evident during adolescence. These persistent individual differences in vulnerability of offspring to the behavioral effects of fetal alcohol exposure are likely attributable to more rapid metabolism of alcohol that the ADH1B*3 variant confers on the mother, leading to a reduction of the peak blood alcohol concentration to which the fetus is exposed during each drinking episode.

  14. Interaction of vitamin A supplementation level with ADH1C genotype on intramuscular fat in beef steers.

    PubMed

    Krone, K G; Ward, A K; Madder, K M; Hendrick, S; McKinnon, J J; Buchanan, F C

    2016-03-01

    Previously, the single nucleotide polymorphism in alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH1C c.-64T>C) was shown to have an association with intramuscular fat (IMF) in the longissimus thoracis (LT) muscle when vitamin A was limited in finishing rations of beef steers. The purpose of this study was to determine the optimum vitamin A supplementation level, in combination with ADH1C genotype, to increase IMF of the LT muscle. In total, 45 TT genotype, 45 CT and 27 CC Black Angus crossbred steers were backgrounded on a commercial ration containing 3360 IU vitamin A/kg dry matter (DM). During finishing, the steers were randomly assigned to one of three vitamin A treatments at 25%, 50% and 75% of the National Research Council recommendation of 2200 IU/kg DM. Treatments were administered via an oral bolus. Carcass quality was evaluated and a sample from the LT muscle was collected for analysis of IMF. A treatment×genotype interaction (P=0.04) was observed for IMF; TT steers on the 75% treatment had higher IMF relative to CT and CC steers on the same treatment. Western blot analysis showed that TT steers had higher (P=0.02) ADH1C protein expression in hepatic tissue. Previously, TT steers exhibited increased IMF when fed limited vitamin A. In the current study, the lack of variation in IMF between treatments and genotypes at the lower vitamin A treatment levels was likely due to the majority of the steers grading Canada AAA (USDA Choice). However, the western blot data supports that TT steers are expected to have higher IMF deposition, due to an increased production of ADH1C. The interaction between ADH1C genotype and vitamin A supplementation level has the potential for use in marker-assisted management programs to target niche markets based on increased marbling.

  15. Opposing--activating or inhibitory--effects of cimetidine and daidzein on human ADH1C activity depending on substrates and solvents.

    PubMed

    Kollock, Ronny; Glatt, Hansruedi

    2012-01-01

    Toxification of benzylic alcohols (e.g. hydroxymethylpyrenes) by sulfotransferases is efficiently competed by alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs). We are interested in drugs and food constituents affecting this detoxification. Daidzein and cimetidine were reported to inhibit ADH1C-mediated ethanol oxidation. Surprisingly, we found that both modulators enhance the oxidation of 4-hydroxymethylpyrene by ADH1C. This activation was seen with either delivering solvents used, dimethylsulfoxide or acetonitrile. Addition of dimethylsulfoxide, but not acetonitrile, converted daidzein and cimetidine from inhibitors to activators of the ADH1C-mediated oxidation of the other substrate studied, ethanol (added in water). Other human ADH forms (ADH2, 3, 4) were inhibited by both agents independently of the substrate and the corresponding solvent used. Kinetic constants for the various reactions are presented. ADH1C was unique in its complex substrate-dependent interaction with daidzein/cimetidine and solvents.

  16. The Impact of ADH1B Alleles and Educational Status on Levels and Modes of Alcohol Consumption in Russian Male Individuals.

    PubMed

    Borinskaya, S A; Kim, A A; Rubanovich, A V; Yankovsky, N K

    2013-07-01

    Alcohol abuse is one of the main reasons behind the low life span in Russia. Both social and genetic factors affect the alcohol consumption level. The genetic factors are alleles of the alcohol dehydrogenase ADH1B and aldehyde dehydrogenaseALDH2 genes. We have typed and found frequencies for the alleles in a cohort of 642 men, ethnic Russians. The individuals of the cohort were asked to complete a questionnaire in the framework of the Izhevsk Family Study (Leon et al., 2007, 2009) regarding the amount of alcohol consumed and on the type of hazardous alcohol consumption (nonbeverage alcohol consumption and the so-called "zapoï" which is a Russian term for a heavy drinking bout lasting for at least 2 days, when an individual is withdrawn from the normal social life). The ADH1B*48His allele was found among heterozygous individuals only (N=68, 10.6% of the cohort). The ALDH2*504Lys allele was also found among heterozygous individuals only (N=2, 0.3%) The effect of ADH1B alleles and the influence of the education level on the amount and type of alcohol consumed had not previously been studied in Russians. We have found that the amount of consumed alcohol is 21.6% lower (1733 g of ethanol per year) for ADH1B*48His allele carriers in the cohort of Russian men. The amount of consumed alcohol was found to be 9.8% lower (793 g of ethanol per year) in the case when individuals had a higher education as compared to those who had a secondary- or elementary school education level in the same cohort. Hence, the protective effect of the genetic factor (ADH1B*48His allele carriage) has proven to be more pronounced than the influence of the social factor (education level) at the individual level in the cohort of Russian men. Both factors have also proven to have a protective effect against hazardous types of alcohol consumption. Zapoï was not scored among individuals of the cohort with ADH1B*48His allele carriage (OR=12.6, P=0.006), as compared to 8.4% of "zapoï" individuals who

  17. The interplay between alcohol consumption, oral hygiene, ALDH2 and ADH1B in the risk of head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Sen-Tien; Wong, Tung-Yiu; Ou, Chun-Yen; Fang, Sheen-Yie; Chen, Ken-Chung; Hsiao, Jenn-Ren; Huang, Cheng-Chih; Lee, Wei-Ting; Lo, Hung-I; Huang, Jehn-Shyun; Wu, Jiunn-Liang; Yen, Chia-Jui; Hsueh, Wei-Ting; Wu, Yuan-Hua; Yang, Ming-Wei; Lin, Forn-Chia; Chang, Jang-Yang; Chang, Kwang-Yu; Wu, Shang-Yin; Liao, Hsiao-Chen; Lin, Chen-Lin; Wang, Yi-Hui; Weng, Ya-Ling; Yang, Han-Chien; Chang, Jeffrey S

    2014-11-15

    Alcohol consumption is an established risk factor for head and neck cancer (HNC). The major carcinogen from alcohol is acetaldehyde, which may be produced by humans or by oral microorganisms through the metabolism of ethanol. To account for the different sources of acetaldehyde production, the current study examined the interplay between alcohol consumption, oral hygiene (as a proxy measure for the growth of oral microorganisms), and alcohol-metabolizing genes (ADH1B and ALDH2) in the risk of HNC. We found that both the fast (*2/*2) and the slow (*1/*1+ *1/*2) ADH1B genotypes increased the risk of HNC due to alcohol consumption, and this association differed according to the slow/non-functional ALDH2 genotypes (*1/*2+ *2/*2) or poor oral hygiene. In persons with the fast ADH1B genotype, the HNC risk associated with alcohol drinking was increased for those with the slow/non-functional ALDH2 genotypes. For those with the slow ADH1B genotypes, oral hygiene appeared to play an important role; the highest magnitude of an increased HNC risk in alcohol drinkers occurred among those with the worst oral hygiene. This is the first study to show that the association between alcohol drinking and HNC risk may be modified by the interplay between genetic polymorphisms of ADH1B and ALDH2 and oral hygiene. Although it is important to promote abstinence from or reduction of alcohol drinking to decrease the occurrence of HNC, improving oral hygiene practices may provide additional benefit.

  18. Fast Principal-Component Analysis Reveals Convergent Evolution of ADH1B in Europe and East Asia.

    PubMed

    Galinsky, Kevin J; Bhatia, Gaurav; Loh, Po-Ru; Georgiev, Stoyan; Mukherjee, Sayan; Patterson, Nick J; Price, Alkes L

    2016-03-03

    Searching for genetic variants with unusual differentiation between subpopulations is an established approach for identifying signals of natural selection. However, existing methods generally require discrete subpopulations. We introduce a method that infers selection using principal components (PCs) by identifying variants whose differentiation along top PCs is significantly greater than the null distribution of genetic drift. To enable the application of this method to large datasets, we developed the FastPCA software, which employs recent advances in random matrix theory to accurately approximate top PCs while reducing time and memory cost from quadratic to linear in the number of individuals, a computational improvement of many orders of magnitude. We apply FastPCA to a cohort of 54,734 European Americans, identifying 5 distinct subpopulations spanning the top 4 PCs. Using the PC-based test for natural selection, we replicate previously known selected loci and identify three new genome-wide significant signals of selection, including selection in Europeans at ADH1B. The coding variant rs1229984(∗)T has previously been associated to a decreased risk of alcoholism and shown to be under selection in East Asians; we show that it is a rare example of independent evolution on two continents. We also detect selection signals at IGFBP3 and IGH, which have also previously been associated to human disease.

  19. Fast Principal-Component Analysis Reveals Convergent Evolution of ADH1B in Europe and East Asia

    PubMed Central

    Galinsky, Kevin J.; Bhatia, Gaurav; Loh, Po-Ru; Georgiev, Stoyan; Mukherjee, Sayan; Patterson, Nick J.; Price, Alkes L.

    2016-01-01

    Searching for genetic variants with unusual differentiation between subpopulations is an established approach for identifying signals of natural selection. However, existing methods generally require discrete subpopulations. We introduce a method that infers selection using principal components (PCs) by identifying variants whose differentiation along top PCs is significantly greater than the null distribution of genetic drift. To enable the application of this method to large datasets, we developed the FastPCA software, which employs recent advances in random matrix theory to accurately approximate top PCs while reducing time and memory cost from quadratic to linear in the number of individuals, a computational improvement of many orders of magnitude. We apply FastPCA to a cohort of 54,734 European Americans, identifying 5 distinct subpopulations spanning the top 4 PCs. Using the PC-based test for natural selection, we replicate previously known selected loci and identify three new genome-wide significant signals of selection, including selection in Europeans at ADH1B. The coding variant rs1229984∗T has previously been associated to a decreased risk of alcoholism and shown to be under selection in East Asians; we show that it is a rare example of independent evolution on two continents. We also detect selection signals at IGFBP3 and IGH, which have also previously been associated to human disease. PMID:26924531

  20. ADH1A variation predisposes to personality traits and substance dependence.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Lingjun; Gelernter, Joel; Kranzler, Henry R; Stein, Murray B; Zhang, Huiping; Wei, Feng; Sen, Srijan; Poling, James; Luo, Xingguang

    2010-03-05

    Human personality traits are strong predictors or characteristics of many psychiatric disorders including substance dependence (SD). Recently, significant associations between alcohol dehydrogenase type 1A gene (ADH1A) and SD have been reported, which led us to investigate the impact of ADH1A variation on personality traits and risk of SD. Five hundred fifty-eight subjects with SD [398 European-Americans (EAs) and 160 African-Americans (AAs)], 517 college students (384 EAs and 133 European-origin Hispanics), and 448 healthy subjects (385 EAs, 48 AAs, and 15 European-origin Hispanics) participated. Personality traits were assessed in 247 subjects with SD (179 EAs and 68 AAs), all 517 college students, and 332 healthy subjects (285 EAs, 40 AAs, and 7 European-origin Hispanics). The relationships between ADH1A and personality traits were comprehensively examined using stepwise multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA), and then decomposed by stepwise analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). The relationship between ADH1A and SD was examined using stepwise logistic regression analysis. Admixture effects on analyses were considered. Overall, Agreeableness and Conscientiousness were associated with the diplotypes, haplotypes, genotypes, and/or alleles of ADH1A in three of four phenotype groups including EA SD subjects, healthy subjects, and AA SD subjects (1.7 x 10(-4) ADH1A (0.008 ADH1A variation may contribute to the genetic component of variation in personality traits and SD.

  1. Inhibition of human alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases by cimetidine and assessment of its effects on ethanol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lai, Ching-Long; Li, Yeung-Pin; Liu, Chiu-Ming; Hsieh, Hsiu-Shan; Yin, Shih-Jiun

    2013-02-25

    Previous studies have reported that cimetidine, an H2-receptor antagonist used to treat gastric and duodenal ulcers, can inhibit alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs) and ethanol metabolism. Human alcohol dehydrogenases and aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs), the principal enzymes responsible for metabolism of ethanol, are complex enzyme families that exhibit functional polymorphisms among ethnic groups and distinct tissue distributions. We investigated the inhibition by cimetidine of alcohol oxidation by recombinant human ADH1A, ADH1B1, ADH1B2, ADH1B3, ADH1C1, ADH1C2, ADH2, and ADH4, and aldehyde oxidation by ALDH1A1 and ALDH2 at pH 7.5 and a cytosolic NAD(+) concentration. Cimetidine acted as competitive or noncompetitive inhibitors for the ADH and ALDH isozymes/allozymes with near mM inhibition constants. The metabolic interactions between cimetidine and ethanol/acetaldehyde were assessed by computer simulation using the inhibition equations and the determined kinetic constants. At therapeutic drug levels (0.015 mM) and physiologically relevant concentrations of ethanol (10 mM) and acetaldehyde (10 μM) in target tissues, cimetidine could weakly inhibit (<5%) the activities of ADH1B2 and ADH1B3 in liver, ADH2 in liver and small intestine, ADH4 in stomach, and ALDH1A1 in the three tissues, but not significantly affect ADH1A, ADH1B1, ADH1C1/2, or ALDH2. At higher drug levels, which may accumulate in cells (0.2 mM), the activities of the weakly-inhibited enzymes may be decreased more significantly. The quantitative effects of cimetidine on metabolism of ethanol and other physiological substrates of ADHs need further investigation.

  2. Inhibition of human alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases by aspirin and salicylate: assessment of the effects on first-pass metabolism of ethanol.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shou-Lun; Lee, Yung-Pin; Wu, Min-Li; Chi, Yu-Chou; Liu, Chiu-Ming; Lai, Ching-Long; Yin, Shih-Jiun

    2015-05-01

    Previous studies have reported that aspirin significantly reduced the first-pass metabolism (FPM) of ethanol in humans thereby increasing adverse effects of alcohol. The underlying causes, however, remain poorly understood. Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), principal enzymes responsible for metabolism of ethanol, are complex enzyme families that exhibit functional polymorphisms among ethnic groups and distinct tissue distributions. We investigated the inhibition profiles by aspirin and its major metabolite salicylate of ethanol oxidation by recombinant human ADH1A, ADH1B1, ADH1B2, ADH1B3, ADH1C1, ADH1C2, ADH2, and ADH4, and acetaldehyde oxidation by ALDH1A1 and ALDH2, at pH 7.5 and 0.5 mM NAD(+). Competitive inhibition pattern was found to be a predominant type among the ADHs and ALDHs studied, although noncompetitive and uncompetitive inhibitions were also detected in a few cases. The inhibition constants of salicylate for the ADHs and ALDHs were considerably lower than that of aspirin with the exception of ADH1A that can be ascribed to a substitution of Ala-93 at the bottom of substrate pocket as revealed by molecular docking experiments. Kinetic inhibition equation-based simulations show at higher therapeutic levels of blood plasma salicylate (1.5 mM) that the decrease of activities at 2-10 mM ethanol for ADH1A/ADH2 and ADH1B2/ADH1B3 are predicted to be 75-86% and 31-52%, respectively, and that the activity decline for ALDH1A1 and ALDH2 at 10-50 μM acetaldehyde to be 62-73%. Our findings suggest that salicylate may substantially inhibit hepatic FPM of alcohol at both the ADH and ALDH steps when concurrent intaking aspirin.

  3. Oxidation of methanol, ethylene glycol, and isopropanol with human alcohol dehydrogenases and the inhibition by ethanol and 4-methylpyrazole.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shou-Lun; Shih, Hsuan-Ting; Chi, Yu-Chou; Li, Yeung-Pin; Yin, Shih-Jiun

    2011-05-30

    Human alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs) include multiple isozymes with broad substrate specificity and ethnic distinct allozymes. ADH catalyzes the rate-limiting step in metabolism of various primary and secondary aliphatic alcohols. The oxidation of common toxic alcohols, that is, methanol, ethylene glycol, and isopropanol by the human ADHs remains poorly understood. Kinetic studies were performed in 0.1M sodium phosphate buffer, at pH 7.5 and 25°C, containing 0.5 mM NAD(+) and varied concentrations of substrate. K(M) values for ethanol with recombinant human class I ADH1A, ADH1B1, ADH1B2, ADH1B3, ADH1C1, and ADH1C2, and class II ADH2 and class IV ADH4 were determined to be in the range of 0.12-57 mM, for methanol to be 2.0-3500 mM, for ethylene glycol to be 4.3-2600mM, and for isopropanol to be 0.73-3400 mM. ADH1B3 appeared to be inactive toward ethylene glycol, and ADH2 and ADH4, inactive with methanol. The variations for V(max) for the toxic alcohols were much less than that of the K(M) across the ADH family. 4-Methylpyrazole (4MP) was a competitive inhibitor with respect to ethanol for ADH1A, ADH1B1, ADH1B2, ADH1C1 and ADH1C2, and a noncompetitive inhibitor for ADH1B3, ADH2 and ADH4, with the slope inhibition constants (K(is)) for the whole family being 0.062-960 μM and the intercept inhibition constants (K(ii)), 33-3000 μM. Computer simulation studies using inhibition equations in the presence of alternate substrate ethanol and of dead-end inhibitor 4MP with the determined corresponding kinetic parameters for ADH family, indicate that the oxidation of the toxic alcohols up to 50mM are largely inhibited by 20 mM ethanol or by 50 μM 4MP with some exceptions. The above findings provide an enzymological basis for clinical treatment of methanol and ethylene glycol poisoning by 4MP or ethanol with pharmacogenetic perspectives.

  4. Transcriptomic identification of ADH1B as a novel candidate gene for obesity and insulin resistance in human adipose tissue in Mexican Americans from the Veterans Administration Genetic Epidemiology Study (VAGES).

    PubMed

    Winnier, Deidre A; Fourcaudot, Marcel; Norton, Luke; Abdul-Ghani, Muhammad A; Hu, Shirley L; Farook, Vidya S; Coletta, Dawn K; Kumar, Satish; Puppala, Sobha; Chittoor, Geetha; Dyer, Thomas D; Arya, Rector; Carless, Melanie; Lehman, Donna M; Curran, Joanne E; Cromack, Douglas T; Tripathy, Devjit; Blangero, John; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Göring, Harald H H; DeFronzo, Ralph A; Jenkinson, Christopher P

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a complex metabolic disease that is more prevalent in ethnic groups such as Mexican Americans, and is strongly associated with the risk factors obesity and insulin resistance. The goal of this study was to perform whole genome gene expression profiling in adipose tissue to detect common patterns of gene regulation associated with obesity and insulin resistance. We used phenotypic and genotypic data from 308 Mexican American participants from the Veterans Administration Genetic Epidemiology Study (VAGES). Basal fasting RNA was extracted from adipose tissue biopsies from a subset of 75 unrelated individuals, and gene expression data generated on the Illumina BeadArray platform. The number of gene probes with significant expression above baseline was approximately 31,000. We performed multiple regression analysis of all probes with 15 metabolic traits. Adipose tissue had 3,012 genes significantly associated with the traits of interest (false discovery rate, FDR ≤ 0.05). The significance of gene expression changes was used to select 52 genes with significant (FDR ≤ 10(-4)) gene expression changes across multiple traits. Gene sets/Pathways analysis identified one gene, alcohol dehydrogenase 1B (ADH1B) that was significantly enriched (P < 10(-60)) as a prime candidate for involvement in multiple relevant metabolic pathways. Illumina BeadChip derived ADH1B expression data was consistent with quantitative real time PCR data. We observed significant inverse correlations with waist circumference (2.8 x 10(-9)), BMI (5.4 x 10(-6)), and fasting plasma insulin (P < 0.001). These findings are consistent with a central role for ADH1B in obesity and insulin resistance and provide evidence for a novel genetic regulatory mechanism for human metabolic diseases related to these traits.

  5. Transcriptomic Identification of ADH1B as a Novel Candidate Gene for Obesity and Insulin Resistance in Human Adipose Tissue in Mexican Americans from the Veterans Administration Genetic Epidemiology Study (VAGES)

    PubMed Central

    Winnier, Deidre A.; Fourcaudot, Marcel; Norton, Luke; Abdul-Ghani, Muhammad A.; Hu, Shirley L.; Farook, Vidya S.; Coletta, Dawn K.; Kumar, Satish; Puppala, Sobha; Chittoor, Geetha; Dyer, Thomas D.; Arya, Rector; Carless, Melanie; Lehman, Donna M.; Curran, Joanne E.; Cromack, Douglas T.; Tripathy, Devjit; Blangero, John; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Göring, Harald H. H.; DeFronzo, Ralph A.; Jenkinson, Christopher P.

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a complex metabolic disease that is more prevalent in ethnic groups such as Mexican Americans, and is strongly associated with the risk factors obesity and insulin resistance. The goal of this study was to perform whole genome gene expression profiling in adipose tissue to detect common patterns of gene regulation associated with obesity and insulin resistance. We used phenotypic and genotypic data from 308 Mexican American participants from the Veterans Administration Genetic Epidemiology Study (VAGES). Basal fasting RNA was extracted from adipose tissue biopsies from a subset of 75 unrelated individuals, and gene expression data generated on the Illumina BeadArray platform. The number of gene probes with significant expression above baseline was approximately 31,000. We performed multiple regression analysis of all probes with 15 metabolic traits. Adipose tissue had 3,012 genes significantly associated with the traits of interest (false discovery rate, FDR ≤ 0.05). The significance of gene expression changes was used to select 52 genes with significant (FDR ≤ 10-4) gene expression changes across multiple traits. Gene sets/Pathways analysis identified one gene, alcohol dehydrogenase 1B (ADH1B) that was significantly enriched (P < 10-60) as a prime candidate for involvement in multiple relevant metabolic pathways. Illumina BeadChip derived ADH1B expression data was consistent with quantitative real time PCR data. We observed significant inverse correlations with waist circumference (2.8 x 10-9), BMI (5.4 x 10-6), and fasting plasma insulin (P < 0.001). These findings are consistent with a central role for ADH1B in obesity and insulin resistance and provide evidence for a novel genetic regulatory mechanism for human metabolic diseases related to these traits. PMID:25830378

  6. Inhibition of human alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases by acetaminophen: Assessment of the effects on first-pass metabolism of ethanol.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yung-Pin; Liao, Jian-Tong; Cheng, Ya-Wen; Wu, Ting-Lun; Lee, Shou-Lun; Liu, Jong-Kang; Yin, Shih-Jiun

    2013-11-01

    Acetaminophen is one of the most widely used over-the-counter analgesic, antipyretic medications. Use of acetaminophen and alcohol are commonly associated. Previous studies showed that acetaminophen might affect bioavailability of ethanol by inhibiting gastric alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). However, potential inhibitions by acetaminophen of first-pass metabolism (FPM) of ethanol, catalyzed by the human ADH family and by relevant aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) isozymes, remain undefined. ADH and ALDH both exhibit racially distinct allozymes and tissue-specific distribution of isozymes, and are principal enzymes responsible for ethanol metabolism in humans. In this study, we investigated acetaminophen inhibition of ethanol oxidation with recombinant human ADH1A, ADH1B1, ADH1B2, ADH1B3, ADH1C1, ADH1C2, ADH2, and ADH4, and inhibition of acetaldehyde oxidation with recombinant human ALDH1A1 and ALDH2. The investigations were done at near physiological pH 7.5 and with a cytoplasmic coenzyme concentration of 0.5 mM NAD(+). Acetaminophen acted as a noncompetitive inhibitor for ADH enzymes, with the slope inhibition constants (Kis) ranging from 0.90 mM (ADH2) to 20 mM (ADH1A), and the intercept inhibition constants (Kii) ranging from 1.4 mM (ADH1C allozymes) to 19 mM (ADH1A). Acetaminophen exhibited noncompetitive inhibition for ALDH2 (Kis = 3.0 mM and Kii = 2.2 mM), but competitive inhibition for ALDH1A1 (Kis = 0.96 mM). The metabolic interactions between acetaminophen and ethanol/acetaldehyde were assessed by computer simulation using inhibition equations and the determined kinetic constants. At therapeutic to subtoxic plasma levels of acetaminophen (i.e., 0.2-0.5 mM) and physiologically relevant concentrations of ethanol (10 mM) and acetaldehyde (10 μm) in target tissues, acetaminophen could inhibit ADH1C allozymes (12-26%) and ADH2 (14-28%) in the liver and small intestine, ADH4 (15-31%) in the stomach, and ALDH1A1 (16-33%) and ALDH2 (8.3-19%) in all 3 tissues. The

  7. ADH single nucleotide polymorphism associations with alcohol metabolism in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Birley, Andrew J.; James, Michael R.; Dickson, Peter A.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Heath, Andrew C.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Whitfield, John B.

    2009-01-01

    We have previously found that variation in alcohol metabolism in Europeans is linked to the chromosome 4q region containing the ADH gene family. We have now typed 103 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across this region to test for allelic associations with variation in blood and breath alcohol concentrations after an alcohol challenge. In vivo alcohol metabolism was modelled with three parameters that identified the absorption and rise of alcohol concentration following ingestion, and the rate of elimination. Alleles of ADH7 SNPs were associated with the early stages of alcohol metabolism, with additional effects in the ADH1A, ADH1B and ADH4 regions. Rate of elimination was associated with SNPs in the intragenic region between ADH7 and ADH1C, and across ADH1C and ADH1B. SNPs affecting alcohol metabolism did not correspond to those reported to affect alcohol dependence or alcohol-related disease. The combined SNP associations with early- and late-stage metabolism only account for approximately 20% of the total genetic variance linked to the ADH region, and most of the variance for in vivo alcohol metabolism linked to this region is yet to be explained. PMID:19193628

  8. Alcohol metabolizing genes and alcohol phenotypes in an Israeli household sample

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, Jacquelyn L.; Shmulewitz, Dvora; Aharonovich, Efrat; Waxman, Rachel; Frisch, Amos; Weizman, Abraham; Spivak, Baruch; Edenberg, Howard J.; Gelernter, Joel; Hasin, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Background ADH1B and ADH1C variants have been robustly associated with alcohol phenotypes in East Asian populations but less so in non-Asian populations where prevalence of the most protective ADH1B allele is low (generally <5%). Further, the joint effects of ADH1B and ADH1C on alcohol phenotypes have been unclear. Therefore, we tested the independent and joint effects of ADH1B and ADH1C on alcohol phenotypes in an Israeli sample, with higher prevalence of the most protective ADH1B allele than other non-Asian populations. Methods A structured interview assessed lifetime drinking and alcohol use disorders (AUDs) in adult Israeli household residents. Four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped: ADH1B (rs1229984, rs1229982, rs1159918) and ADH1C (rs698). Regression analysis examined the association between alcohol phenotypes and each SNP (absence vs. presence of the protective allele) as well as rs698/rs1229984 diplotypes (also indicating absence or presence of protective alleles) in lifetime drinkers (N=1,129). Results Lack of the ADH1B rs1229984 protective allele was significantly associated with consumption- and AUD-related phenotypes (OR=1.77 for AUD; OR=1.83 for risk drinking), while lack of the ADH1C rs698 protective allele was significantly associated with AUD-related phenotypes (OR=2.32 for AUD). Diplotype analysis indicated that jointly, ADH1B and ADH1C significantly influenced AUD-related phenotypes. For example, among those without protective alleles for ADH1B or ADH1C, OR for AUD was 1.87 as compared to those without the protective allele for ADH1B only and 3.16 as compared to those with protective alleles at both ADH1B and ADH1C. Conclusions This study adds support for the relationship of ADH1B and ADH1C to alcohol phenotypes in non-Asians. Further, these findings help clarify the mixed results from previous studies by showing that ADH1B and ADH1C jointly effect AUDs, but not consumption. Studies of the association of alcohol phenotypes and

  9. A candidate gene association study of alcohol consumption in young women

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Arpana; Lynskey, Michael T.; Todorov, Alexandre A.; Schrage, Andrew J.; Littlefield, Andrew K.; Grant, Julia D.; Zhu, Qin; Nelson, Elliot C.; Madden, Pamela A.F.; Bucholz, Kathleen K.; Sher, Kenneth J.; Heath, Andrew C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Excessive alcohol consumption contributes to significant morbidity and mortality. Heritable influences contribute to 50% of the variation in alcohol consumption, suggesting the important role of genes. We used data on a previously defined alcohol consumption factor score in a sample of 827 young women to investigate association with 1014 single nucleotide polymorphisms in genes related to addiction. Methods Data were drawn from the Missouri Adolescent Female Twin Study (MOAFTS) with replication in the College Drinking Sample (CDS). Genotypic and phenotypic data were available on 827 MOAFTS and 100 CDS women of European- American ancestry. Data on 1014 SNPs across 130 genes related to addiction were utilized. Association was conducted in QTDT, which allows for identity-by-descent information to account accurately for twin status in the analysis. The total association variance components model was used, with specification of variance components for relatedness in MOAFTS. Results The top signals included clusters of SNPs in TPH2 (e.g. rs1386496, p=0.0003) and DDC (e.g. rs3779084, p=0.0008), genes that encode proteins responsible for serotonin synthesis. Additional polymorphisms in ADH1B, ADH1C, ADH7 and ADH1A1 were also associated at p < 0.05. The FDR for the top signal (p=0.0003) was 0.15 suggesting nominal significance only. Replication was limited and noted for 2 SNPs in ADH1C. Conclusions While no results survive the burden of multiple testing, nominal findings in TPH2 and DDC suggest the potential role of the serotonin synthesis pathway in alcohol consumption. PMID:21143251

  10. Alcoholism and alcohol drinking habits predicted from alcohol dehydrogenase genes.

    PubMed

    Tolstrup, Janne Schurmann; Nordestgaard, Børge Grønne; Rasmussen, Søren; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Grønbaek, Morten

    2008-06-01

    Alcohol drinking habits and alcoholism are partly genetically determined. Alcohol is degraded primarily by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) wherein genetic variation that affects the rate of alcohol degradation is found in ADH1B and ADH1C. It is biologically plausible that these variations may be associated with alcohol drinking habits and alcoholism. By genotyping 9080 white men and women from the general population, we found that men and women with ADH1B slow vs fast alcohol degradation drank more alcohol and had a higher risk of everyday drinking, heavy drinking, excessive drinking and of alcoholism. For example, the weekly alcohol intake was 9.8 drinks (95% confidence interval (CI): 9.1-11) among men with the ADH1B.1/1 genotype compared to 7.5 drinks (95% CI: 6.4-8.7) among men with the ADH1B.1/2 genotype, and the odds ratio (OR) for heavy drinking was 3.1 (95% CI: 1.7-5.7) among men with the ADH1B.1/1 genotype compared to men with the ADH1B.1/2 genotype. Furthermore, individuals with ADH1C slow vs fast alcohol degradation had a higher risk of heavy and excessive drinking. For example, the OR for heavy drinking was 1.4 (95% CI: 1.1-1.8) among men with the ADH1C.1/2 genotype and 1.4 (95% CI: 1.0-1.9) among men with the ADH1B.2/2 genotype, compared with men with the ADH1C.1/1 genotype. Results for ADH1B and ADH1C genotypes among men and women were similar. Finally, because slow ADH1B alcohol degradation is found in more than 90% of the white population compared to less than 10% of East Asians, the population attributable risk of heavy drinking and alcoholism by ADH1B.1/1 genotype was 67 and 62% among the white population compared with 9 and 24% among the East Asian population.

  11. Biology, Genetics, and Environment

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Tamara L.; Luczak, Susan E.; Hiller-Sturmhöfel, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Gene variants encoding several of the alcohol-metabolizing enzymes, alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), are among the largest genetic associations with risk for alcohol dependence. Certain genetic variants (i.e., alleles)—particularly the ADH1B*2, ADH1B*3, ADH1C*1, and ALDH2*2 alleles—have been associated with lower rates of alcohol dependence. These alleles may lead to an accumulation of acetaldehyde during alcohol metabolism, which can result in heightened subjective and objective effects. The prevalence of these alleles differs among ethnic groups; ADH1B*2 is found frequently in northeast Asians and occasionally Caucasians, ADH1B*3 is found predominantly in people of African ancestry, ADH1C*1 varies substantially across populations, and ALDH2*2 is found almost exclusively in northeast Asians. Differences in the prevalence of these alleles may account at least in part for ethnic differences in alcohol consumption and alcohol use disorder (AUD). However, these alleles do not act in isolation to influence the risk of AUD. For example, the gene effects of ALDH2*2 and ADH1B*2 seem to interact. Moreover, other factors have been found to influence the extent to which these alleles affect a person’s alcohol involvement, including developmental stage, individual characteristics (e.g., ethnicity, antisocial behavior, and behavioral undercontrol), and environmental factors (e.g., culture, religion, family environment, and childhood adversity). PMID:27163368

  12. Expression pattern, ethanol-metabolizing activities, and cellular localization of alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases in human large bowel: association of the functional polymorphisms of ADH and ALDH genes with hemorrhoids and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Chien-Ping; Jao, Shu-Wen; Lee, Shiao-Pieng; Chen, Pei-Chi; Chung, Chia-Chi; Lee, Shou-Lun; Nieh, Shin; Yin, Shih-Jiun

    2012-02-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) are principal enzymes responsible for metabolism of ethanol. Functional polymorphisms of ADH1B, ADH1C, and ALDH2 genes occur among racial populations. The goal of this study was to systematically determine the functional expressions and cellular localization of ADHs and ALDHs in human rectal mucosa, the lesions of adenocarcinoma and hemorrhoid, and the genetic association of allelic variations of ADH and ALDH with large bowel disorders. Twenty-one surgical specimens of rectal adenocarcinoma and the adjacent normal mucosa, including 16 paired tissues of rectal tumor, normal mucosae of rectum and sigmoid colon from the same individuals, and 18 surgical mixed hemorrhoid specimens and leukocyte DNA samples from 103 colorectal cancer patients, 67 hemorrhoid patients, and 545 control subjects recruited in previous study, were investigated. The isozyme/allozyme expression patterns of ADH and ALDH were identified by isoelectric focusing and the activities were assayed spectrophotometrically. The protein contents of ADH/ALDH isozymes were determined by immunoblotting using the corresponding purified class-specific antibodies; the cellular activity and protein localizations were detected by immunohistochemistry and histochemistry, respectively. Genotypes of ADH1B, ADH1C, and ALDH2 were determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphisms. At 33mM ethanol, pH 7.5, the activity of ADH1C*1/1 phenotypes exhibited 87% higher than that of the ADH1C*1/*2 phenotypes in normal rectal mucosa. The activity of ALDH2-active phenotypes of rectal mucosa was 33% greater than ALDH2-inactive phenotypes at 200μM acetaldehyde. The protein contents in normal rectal mucosa were in the following order: ADH1>ALDH2>ADH3≈ALDH1A1, whereas those of ADH2, ADH4, and ALDH3A1 were fairly low. Both activity and content of ADH1 were significantly decreased in rectal tumors, whereas the ALDH activity remained

  13. Alcohol drinking, mean corpuscular volume of erythrocytes, and alcohol metabolic genotypes in drunk drivers.

    PubMed

    Pavanello, Sofia; Snenghi, Rossella; Nalesso, Alessandro; Sartore, Daniela; Ferrara, Santo Davide; Montisci, Massimo

    2012-02-01

    Regular and irregular abuse of alcohol are global health priorities associated with diseases at multiple sites, including cancer. Mechanisms of diseases induced by alcohol are closely related to its metabolism. Among conventional markers of alcohol abuse, the mean corpuscular volume (MCV) of erythrocytes is prognostic of alcohol-related cancer and its predictivity increases when combined with functional polymorphisms of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH1B [rs1229984] and ADH1C [rs698]) and the mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2 [rs671]). Whether these genetic variants can influence abuse in alcohol drinking and MCV has never been examined in drunk-driving traffic offenders. We examined 149 drunk drivers, diagnosed as alcohol abusers according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth edition Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR) and enrolled in a probation program, and 257 social drinkers (controls), all Caucasian males. Alcohol intake was assessed according to self-reported drink-units/d and MCV unadjusted and adjusted for age, smoking, and body mass index. Multivariable models were used to compute MCV adjusted means. Genotype analyses were performed by PCR on DNA from blood. The adjusted MCV mean was higher in drunk-driving abusers than in controls (92 vs. 91fL; P<.0001) and increased with the number of drink-units/d in both abusers and controls (P-trend=.0316 and .0089) already at intermediate quantities (0-1 vs. 2-4 drink-units/d: P=.054 and .024). Carriers of the common ADH1B*1/*1 (rs1229984) genotype were more likely to be drunk-driving abusers (P=.008), reported higher drink-units/d (P=.0126), and had larger MCV (P=.035). The rs698 ADH1C and rs671 ALDH2 polymorphisms were not associated with MCV. ADH1B*1/*1 polymorphism is significantly associated with being a drunk-driving abuser, higher alcohol drinking, and MCV enlargement. This suggests that drunk drivers with augmented MCV modulated by the alcohol metabolic ADH1B*1/*1 genotype may be at

  14. PubMed Central

    CADONI, G.; BOCCIA, S.; PETRELLI, L.; DI GIANNANTONIO, P.; ARZANI, D.; GIORGIO, A.; DE FEO, E.; PANDOLFINI, M.; GALLÌ, P.; PALUDETTI, G.; RICCIARDI, G.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The purpose of this report is to review the relationship between genetic polymorphisms involved in carcinogen metabolism, alcohol metabolism and cell-cycle control with the risk of head and neck cancer. The review was performed on available studies on genetic polymorphisms and head and neck cancer (HNC) published in PubMed up to September 2011. 246 primary articles and 7 meta-analyses were published. Among these, a statistically significant association was reported for glutathione S-transferases (GSTM1), glutathione S-transferases (GSTT1) and human microsomal epoxide hydrolase (EPHX1) genes. An increased risk for HNC was also associated reported for P53 codon 72 Pro/Pro, ALDH2 and three variants of the ADH gene: ADH1B (rs1229984), ADH7 (rs1573496) and ADH1C (rs698). PMID:22500060

  15. Rare ADH Variant Constellations are Specific for Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Lingjun; Zhang, Heping; Malison, Robert T.; Li, Chiang-Shan R.; Zhang, Xiang-Yang; Wang, Fei; Lu, Lingeng; Lu, Lin; Wang, Xiaoping; Krystal, John H.; Zhang, Fengyu; Deng, Hong-Wen; Luo, Xingguang

    2013-01-01

    Aims: Some of the well-known functional alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) gene variants (e.g. ADH1B*2, ADH1B*3 and ADH1C*2) that significantly affect the risk of alcohol dependence are rare variants in most populations. In the present study, we comprehensively examined the associations between rare ADH variants [minor allele frequency (MAF) <0.05] and alcohol dependence, with several other neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders as reference. Methods: A total of 49,358 subjects in 22 independent cohorts with 11 different neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders were analyzed, including 3 cohorts with alcohol dependence. The entire ADH gene cluster (ADH7–ADH1C–ADH1B–ADH1A–ADH6–ADH4–ADH5 at Chr4) was imputed in all samples using the same reference panels that included whole-genome sequencing data. We stringently cleaned the phenotype and genotype data to obtain a total of 870 single nucleotide polymorphisms with 0< MAF <0.05 for association analysis. Results: We found that a rare variant constellation across the entire ADH gene cluster was significantly associated with alcohol dependence in European-Americans (Fp1: simulated global P = 0.045), European-Australians (Fp5: global P = 0.027; collapsing: P = 0.038) and African-Americans (Fp5: global P = 0.050; collapsing: P = 0.038), but not with any other neuropsychiatric disease. Association signals in this region came principally from ADH6, ADH7, ADH1B and ADH1C. In particular, a rare ADH6 variant constellation showed a replicable association with alcohol dependence across these three independent cohorts. No individual rare variants were statistically significantly associated with any disease examined after group- and region-wide correction for multiple comparisons. Conclusion: We conclude that rare ADH variants are specific for alcohol dependence. The ADH gene cluster may harbor a causal variant(s) for alcohol dependence. PMID:23019235

  16. Ethanol oxidation and the inhibition by drugs in human liver, stomach and small intestine: Quantitative assessment with numerical organ modeling of alcohol dehydrogenase isozymes.

    PubMed

    Chi, Yu-Chou; Lee, Shou-Lun; Lai, Ching-Long; Lee, Yung-Pin; Lee, Shiao-Pieng; Chiang, Chien-Ping; Yin, Shih-Jiun

    2016-10-25

    Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) is the principal enzyme responsible for metabolism of ethanol. Human ADH constitutes a complex isozyme family with striking variations in kinetic function and tissue distribution. Liver and gastrointestinal tract are the major sites for first-pass metabolism (FPM). Their relative contributions to alcohol FPM and degrees of the inhibitions by aspirin and its metabolite salicylate, acetaminophen and cimetidine remain controversial. To address this issue, mathematical organ modeling of ethanol-oxidizing activities in target tissues and that of the ethanol-drug interactions were constructed by linear combination of the corresponding numerical rate equations of tissue constituent ADH isozymes with the documented isozyme protein contents, kinetic parameters for ethanol oxidation and the drug inhibitions of ADH isozymes/allozymes that were determined in 0.1 M sodium phosphate at pH 7.5 and 25 °C containing 0.5 mM NAD(+). The organ simulations reveal that the ADH activities in mucosae of the stomach, duodenum and jejunum with ADH1C*1/*1 genotype are less than 1%, respectively, that of the ADH1B*1/*1-ADH1C*1/*1 liver at 1-200 mM ethanol, indicating that liver is major site of the FPM. The apparent hepatic KM and Vmax for ethanol oxidation are simulated to be 0.093 ± 0.019 mM and 4.0 ± 0.1 mmol/min, respectively. At 95% clearance in liver, the logarithmic average sinusoidal ethanol concentration is determined to be 0.80 mM in accordance with the flow-limited gradient perfusion model. The organ simulations indicate that higher therapeutic acetaminophen (0.5 mM) inhibits 16% of ADH1B*1/*1 hepatic ADH activity at 2-20 mM ethanol and that therapeutic salicylate (1.5 mM) inhibits 30-31% of the ADH1B*2/*2 activity, suggesting potential significant inhibitions of ethanol FPM in these allelotypes. The result provides systematic evaluations and predictions by computer simulation on potential ethanol FPM in target tissues and hepatic

  17. Genes Encoding Enzymes Involved in Ethanol Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, Thomas D.; Edenberg, Howard J.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of beverage alcohol (ethanol) on the body are determined largely by the rate at which it and its main breakdown product, acetaldehyde, are metabolized after consumption. The main metabolic pathway for ethanol involves the enzymes alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). Seven different ADHs and three different ALDHs that metabolize ethanol have been identified. The genes encoding these enzymes exist in different variants (i.e., alleles), many of which differ by a single DNA building block (i.e., single nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs]). Some of these SNPs result in enzymes with altered kinetic properties. For example, certain ADH1B and ADH1C variants that are commonly found in East Asian populations lead to more rapid ethanol breakdown and acetaldehyde accumulation in the body. Because acetaldehyde has harmful effects on the body, people carrying these alleles are less likely to drink and have a lower risk of alcohol dependence. Likewise, an ALDH2 variant with reduced activity results in acetaldehyde buildup and also has a protective effect against alcoholism. In addition to affecting drinking behaviors and risk for alcoholism, ADH and ALDH alleles impact the risk for esophageal cancer. PMID:23134050

  18. Asian flushing: genetic and sociocultural factors of alcoholism among East asians.

    PubMed

    Lee, Haeok; Kim, Sun S; You, Kwang Soo; Park, Wanju; Yang, Jin Hyang; Kim, Minjin; Hayman, Laura L

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol use can lead to a cascade of problems such as increased chances of risky behavior and negative health consequences, including alcoholic liver disease and upper gastric and liver cancer. Ethanol is metabolized mainly by 2 major enzymes: alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). Genetic variations of genes encoding the 2 enzymes are very common among East Asians but relatively rare for most other populations. Facial flushing and other physical discomforts after alcohol drinking triggered by accumulation of acetaldehyde through defective genes for ADH and ALDH have been reported. Approximately 40% of East Asians (Chinese, Japanese, and Korean) show facial flushing after drinking alcohol, known as "Asian flush," which is characterized by adverse reactions on alcohol drinking in individuals possessing the fasting metabolizing alleles for ADH, ADH1B*2, and ADH1C*1, and the null allele for ALDH and ALDH2*2. Alcoholism is determined not only by the genetic deficiency but also by behaviors that involve complex interactions between genetic and sociocultural factors. The purpose of this article was to provide nurses with the most current information about genetic and sociocultural influences on alcoholism and alcohol-related health problems specifically for East Asians and implications of this knowledge to nursing practice. The physiological phenomenon of genes and genetics in relation to alcohol metabolism in this special population is emphasized.

  19. Natural formulas and the nature of formulas: Exploring potential therapeutic targets based on traditional Chinese herbal formulas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qianru; Yu, Hua; Qi, Jin; Tang, Daisheng; Chen, Xiaojia; Wan, Jian-Bo; Li, Peng; Hu, Hao; Wang, Yi-Tao; Hu, Yuanjia

    2017-01-01

    By comparing the target proteins (TPs) of classic traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) herbal formulas and modern drugs used for treating coronary artery disease (CAD), this study aimed to identify potential therapeutic TPs for treating CAD. Based on the theory of TCM, the Xuefu-Zhuyu decoction (XZD) and Gualou-Xiebai-Banxia decoction (GXBD), both of which are classic herbal formulas, were selected for treating CAD. Data on the chemical ingredients and corresponding TPs of the herbs in these two formulas and data on modern drugs approved for treating CAD and related TPs were retrieved from professional TCM and bioinformatics databases. Based on the associations between the drugs or ingredients and their TPs, the TP networks of XZD, GXBD, and modern drugs approved for treating CAD were constructed separately and then integrated to create a complex master network in which the vertices represent the TPs and the edges, the ingredients or drugs that are linked to the TPs. The reliability of this master network was validated through statistical tests. The common TPs of the two herbal formulas have a higher possibility of being targeted by modern drugs in comparison with the formula-specific TPs. A total of 114 common XZD and GXBD TPs that are not yet the target of modern drugs used for treating CAD should be experimentally investigated as potential therapeutic targets for treating CAD. Among these TPs, the top 10 are NOS3, PTPN1, GABRA1, PRKACA, CDK2, MAOB, ESR1, ADH1C, ADH1B, and AKR1B1. The results of this study provide a valuable reference for further experimental investigations of therapeutic targets for CAD. The established method shows promise for searching for potential therapeutic TPs based on herbal formulas. It is crucial for this work to select beneficial therapeutic targets of TCM, typical TCM syndromes, and corresponding classic formulas.

  20. Genome-wide association study of alcohol dependence: significant findings in African- and European-Americans including novel risk loci

    PubMed Central

    Gelernter, J; Kranzler, HR; Sherva, R; Almasy, L; Koesterer, R; Smith, AH; Anton, R; Preuss, UW; Ridinger, M; Rujescu, D; Wodarz, N; Zill, P; Zhao, H; Farrer, LA

    2014-01-01

    We report a GWAS of alcohol dependence (AD) in European-American (EA) and African-American (AA) populations, with replication in independent samples of EAs, AAs and Germans. Our sample for discovery and replication was 16 087 subjects, the largest sample for AD GWAS to date. Numerous genome-wide significant (GWS) associations were identified, many novel. Most associations were population specific, but in several cases were GWS in EAs and AAs for different SNPs at the same locus, showing biological convergence across populations. We confirmed well-known risk loci mapped to alcohol-metabolizing enzyme genes, notably ADH1B (EAs: Arg48His, P = 1.17 × 10−31; AAs: Arg369Cys, P = 6.33 × 10−17) and ADH1C in AAs (Thr151Thr, P = 4.94 × 10−10), and identified novel risk loci mapping to the ADH gene cluster on chromosome 4 and extending centromerically beyond it to include GWS associations at LOC100507053 in AAs (P = 2.63 × 10−11), PDLIM5 in EAs (P = 2.01 × 10−8), and METAP in AAs (P = 3.35 × 10−8). We also identified a novel GWS association (1.17 × 10−10) mapped to chromosome 2 at rs1437396, between MTIF2 and CCDC88A, across all of the EA and AA cohorts, with supportive gene expression evidence, and population-specific GWS for markers on chromosomes 5, 9 and 19. Several of the novel associations implicate direct involvement of, or interaction with, genes previously identified as schizophrenia risk loci. Confirmation of known AD risk loci supports the overall validity of the study; the novel loci are worthy of genetic and biological follow-up. The findings support a convergence of risk genes (but not necessarily risk alleles) between populations, and, to a lesser extent, between psychiatric traits. PMID:24166409

  1. Natural formulas and the nature of formulas: Exploring potential therapeutic targets based on traditional Chinese herbal formulas

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Jin; Tang, Daisheng; Chen, Xiaojia; Wan, Jian-bo; Li, Peng; Hu, Hao; Wang, Yi-tao; Hu, Yuanjia

    2017-01-01

    By comparing the target proteins (TPs) of classic traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) herbal formulas and modern drugs used for treating coronary artery disease (CAD), this study aimed to identify potential therapeutic TPs for treating CAD. Based on the theory of TCM, the Xuefu-Zhuyu decoction (XZD) and Gualou-Xiebai-Banxia decoction (GXBD), both of which are classic herbal formulas, were selected for treating CAD. Data on the chemical ingredients and corresponding TPs of the herbs in these two formulas and data on modern drugs approved for treating CAD and related TPs were retrieved from professional TCM and bioinformatics databases. Based on the associations between the drugs or ingredients and their TPs, the TP networks of XZD, GXBD, and modern drugs approved for treating CAD were constructed separately and then integrated to create a complex master network in which the vertices represent the TPs and the edges, the ingredients or drugs that are linked to the TPs. The reliability of this master network was validated through statistical tests. The common TPs of the two herbal formulas have a higher possibility of being targeted by modern drugs in comparison with the formula-specific TPs. A total of 114 common XZD and GXBD TPs that are not yet the target of modern drugs used for treating CAD should be experimentally investigated as potential therapeutic targets for treating CAD. Among these TPs, the top 10 are NOS3, PTPN1, GABRA1, PRKACA, CDK2, MAOB, ESR1, ADH1C, ADH1B, and AKR1B1. The results of this study provide a valuable reference for further experimental investigations of therapeutic targets for CAD. The established method shows promise for searching for potential therapeutic TPs based on herbal formulas. It is crucial for this work to select beneficial therapeutic targets of TCM, typical TCM syndromes, and corresponding classic formulas. PMID:28182702

  2. A genome-wide association study of upper aerodigestive tract cancers conducted within the INHANCE consortium.

    PubMed

    McKay, James D; Truong, Therese; Gaborieau, Valerie; Chabrier, Amelie; Chuang, Shu-Chun; Byrnes, Graham; Zaridze, David; Shangina, Oxana; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Lissowska, Jolanta; Rudnai, Peter; Fabianova, Eleonora; Bucur, Alexandru; Bencko, Vladimir; Holcatova, Ivana; Janout, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Lagiou, Pagona; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Benhamou, Simone; Bouchardy, Christine; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Merletti, Franco; Richiardi, Lorenzo; Talamini, Renato; Barzan, Luigi; Kjaerheim, Kristina; Macfarlane, Gary J; Macfarlane, Tatiana V; Simonato, Lorenzo; Canova, Cristina; Agudo, Antonio; Castellsagué, Xavier; Lowry, Ray; Conway, David I; McKinney, Patricia A; Healy, Claire M; Toner, Mary E; Znaor, Ariana; Curado, Maria Paula; Koifman, Sergio; Menezes, Ana; Wünsch-Filho, Victor; Neto, José Eluf; Garrote, Leticia Fernández; Boccia, Stefania; Cadoni, Gabriella; Arzani, Dario; Olshan, Andrew F; Weissler, Mark C; Funkhouser, William K; Luo, Jingchun; Lubiński, Jan; Trubicka, Joanna; Lener, Marcin; Oszutowska, Dorota; Schwartz, Stephen M; Chen, Chu; Fish, Sherianne; Doody, David R; Muscat, Joshua E; Lazarus, Philip; Gallagher, Carla J; Chang, Shen-Chih; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Wei, Qingyi; Sturgis, Erich M; Wang, Li-E; Franceschi, Silvia; Herrero, Rolando; Kelsey, Karl T; McClean, Michael D; Marsit, Carmen J; Nelson, Heather H; Romkes, Marjorie; Buch, Shama; Nukui, Tomoko; Zhong, Shilong; Lacko, Martin; Manni, Johannes J; Peters, Wilbert H M; Hung, Rayjean J; McLaughlin, John; Vatten, Lars; Njølstad, Inger; Goodman, Gary E; Field, John K; Liloglou, Triantafillos; Vineis, Paolo; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Palli, Domenico; Tumino, Rosario; Krogh, Vittorio; Panico, Salvatore; González, Carlos A; Quirós, J Ramón; Martínez, Carmen; Navarro, Carmen; Ardanaz, Eva; Larrañaga, Nerea; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Key, Timothy; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Peeters, Petra H M; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Linseisen, Jakob; Boeing, Heiner; Hallmans, Göran; Overvad, Kim; Tjønneland, Anne; Kumle, Merethe; Riboli, Elio; Välk, Kristjan; Vooder, Tõnu; Voodern, Tõnu; Metspalu, Andres; Zelenika, Diana; Boland, Anne; Delepine, Marc; Foglio, Mario; Lechner, Doris; Blanché, Hélène; Gut, Ivo G; Galan, Pilar; Heath, Simon; Hashibe, Mia; Hayes, Richard B; Boffetta, Paolo; Lathrop, Mark; Brennan, Paul

    2011-03-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been successful in identifying common genetic variation involved in susceptibility to etiologically complex disease. We conducted a GWAS to identify common genetic variation involved in susceptibility to upper aero-digestive tract (UADT) cancers. Genome-wide genotyping was carried out using the Illumina HumanHap300 beadchips in 2,091 UADT cancer cases and 3,513 controls from two large European multi-centre UADT cancer studies, as well as 4,821 generic controls. The 19 top-ranked variants were investigated further in an additional 6,514 UADT cancer cases and 7,892 controls of European descent from an additional 13 UADT cancer studies participating in the INHANCE consortium. Five common variants presented evidence for significant association in the combined analysis (p ≤ 5 × 10⁻⁷). Two novel variants were identified, a 4q21 variant (rs1494961, p = 1×10⁻⁸) located near DNA repair related genes HEL308 and FAM175A (or Abraxas) and a 12q24 variant (rs4767364, p =2 × 10⁻⁸) located in an extended linkage disequilibrium region that contains multiple genes including the aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) gene. Three remaining variants are located in the ADH gene cluster and were identified previously in a candidate gene study involving some of these samples. The association between these three variants and UADT cancers was independently replicated in 5,092 UADT cancer cases and 6,794 controls non-overlapping samples presented here (rs1573496-ADH7, p = 5 × 10⁻⁸); rs1229984-ADH1B, p = 7 × 10⁻⁹; and rs698-ADH1C, p = 0.02). These results implicate two variants at 4q21 and 12q24 and further highlight three ADH variants in UADT cancer susceptibility.

  3. A Genome-Wide Association Study of Upper Aerodigestive Tract Cancers Conducted within the INHANCE Consortium

    PubMed Central

    McKay, James D.; Truong, Therese; Gaborieau, Valerie; Chabrier, Amelie; Chuang, Shu-Chun; Byrnes, Graham; Zaridze, David; Shangina, Oxana; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Lissowska, Jolanta; Rudnai, Peter; Fabianova, Eleonora; Bucur, Alexandru; Bencko, Vladimir; Holcatova, Ivana; Janout, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Lagiou, Pagona; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Benhamou, Simone; Bouchardy, Christine; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Merletti, Franco; Richiardi, Lorenzo; Talamini, Renato; Barzan, Luigi; Kjaerheim, Kristina; Macfarlane, Gary J.; Macfarlane, Tatiana V.; Simonato, Lorenzo; Canova, Cristina; Agudo, Antonio; Castellsagué, Xavier; Lowry, Ray; Conway, David I.; McKinney, Patricia A.; Healy, Claire M.; Toner, Mary E.; Znaor, Ariana; Curado, Maria Paula; Koifman, Sergio; Menezes, Ana; Wünsch-Filho, Victor; Neto, José Eluf; Garrote, Leticia Fernández; Boccia, Stefania; Cadoni, Gabriella; Arzani, Dario; Olshan, Andrew F.; Weissler, Mark C.; Funkhouser, William K.; Luo, Jingchun; Lubiński, Jan; Trubicka, Joanna; Lener, Marcin; Oszutowska, Dorota; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Chen, Chu; Fish, Sherianne; Doody, David R.; Muscat, Joshua E.; Lazarus, Philip; Gallagher, Carla J.; Chang, Shen-Chih; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Wei, Qingyi; Sturgis, Erich M.; Wang, Li-E; Franceschi, Silvia; Herrero, Rolando; Kelsey, Karl T.; McClean, Michael D.; Marsit, Carmen J.; Nelson, Heather H.; Romkes, Marjorie; Buch, Shama; Nukui, Tomoko; Zhong, Shilong; Lacko, Martin; Manni, Johannes J.; Peters, Wilbert H. M.; Hung, Rayjean J.; McLaughlin, John; Vatten, Lars; Njølstad, Inger; Goodman, Gary E.; Field, John K.; Liloglou, Triantafillos; Vineis, Paolo; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Palli, Domenico; Tumino, Rosario; Krogh, Vittorio; Panico, Salvatore; González, Carlos A.; Quirós, J. Ramón; Martínez, Carmen; Navarro, Carmen; Ardanaz, Eva; Larrañaga, Nerea; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Key, Timothy; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Peeters, Petra H. M.; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Linseisen, Jakob; Boeing, Heiner; Hallmans, Göran; Overvad, Kim; Tjønneland, Anne; Kumle, Merethe; Riboli, Elio; Välk, Kristjan; Voodern, Tõnu; Metspalu, Andres; Zelenika, Diana; Boland, Anne; Delepine, Marc; Foglio, Mario; Lechner, Doris; Blanché, Hélène; Gut, Ivo G.; Galan, Pilar; Heath, Simon; Hashibe, Mia; Hayes, Richard B.; Boffetta, Paolo; Lathrop, Mark; Brennan, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been successful in identifying common genetic variation involved in susceptibility to etiologically complex disease. We conducted a GWAS to identify common genetic variation involved in susceptibility to upper aero-digestive tract (UADT) cancers. Genome-wide genotyping was carried out using the Illumina HumanHap300 beadchips in 2,091 UADT cancer cases and 3,513 controls from two large European multi-centre UADT cancer studies, as well as 4,821 generic controls. The 19 top-ranked variants were investigated further in an additional 6,514 UADT cancer cases and 7,892 controls of European descent from an additional 13 UADT cancer studies participating in the INHANCE consortium. Five common variants presented evidence for significant association in the combined analysis (p≤5×10−7). Two novel variants were identified, a 4q21 variant (rs1494961, p = 1×10−8) located near DNA repair related genes HEL308 and FAM175A (or Abraxas) and a 12q24 variant (rs4767364, p = 2×10−8) located in an extended linkage disequilibrium region that contains multiple genes including the aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) gene. Three remaining variants are located in the ADH gene cluster and were identified previously in a candidate gene study involving some of these samples. The association between these three variants and UADT cancers was independently replicated in 5,092 UADT cancer cases and 6,794 controls non-overlapping samples presented here (rs1573496-ADH7, p = 5×10−8; rs1229984-ADH1B, p = 7×10−9; and rs698-ADH1C, p = 0.02). These results implicate two variants at 4q21 and 12q24 and further highlight three ADH variants in UADT cancer susceptibility. PMID:21437268

  4. Effects of polymorphisms in alcohol metabolism and oxidative stress genes on survival from head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hakenewerth, Anne M.; Millikan, Robert C.; Rusyn, Ivan; Herring, Amy H.; Weissler, Mark C.; Funkhouser, William K.; North, Kari E.; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.; Olshan, Andrew F.

    2013-01-01

    Background Heavy alcohol consumption increases risk of developing squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Alcohol metabolism to cytotoxic and mutagenic intermediates acetaldehyde and reactive oxygen species is critical for alcohol-drinking-associated carcinogenesis. We hypothesized that polymorphisms in alcohol metabolism-related and antioxidant genes influence SCCHN survival. Methods Interview and genotyping data (64 polymorphisms in 12 genes) were obtained from 1227 white and African-American cases from the Carolina Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology study, a population-based case–control study of SCCHN conducted in North Carolina from 2002 to 2006. Vital status, date and cause of death through 2009 were obtained from the National Death Index. Kaplan–Meier log-rank tests and adjusted hazard ratios were calculated to identify alleles associated with survival. Results Most tested SNPs were not associated with survival, with the exception of the minor alleles of rs3813865 and rs8192772 in CYP2E1. These were associated with poorer cancer-specific survival (HRrs3813865, 95%CI = 2.00, 1.33–3.01; HRrs8192772, 95%CI = 1.62, 1.17–2.23). Hazard ratios for 8 additional SNPs in CYP2E1, GPx2, SOD1, and SOD2, though not statistically significant, were suggestive of differences in allele hazards for all-cause and/or cancer death. No consistent associations with survival were found for SNPs in ADH1B, ADH1C, ADH4, ADH7, ALDH2, GPx2, GPx4, and CAT. Conclusions We identified some polymorphisms in alcohol and oxidative stress metabolism genes that influence survival in subjects with SCCHN. Previously unreported associations of SNPs in CYP2E1 warrant further investigation. PMID:23632049

  5. Genetic Variants in Nicotine Addiction and Alcohol Metabolism Genes, Oral Cancer Risk and the Propensity to Smoke and Drink Alcohol: A Replication Study in India

    PubMed Central

    Anantharaman, Devasena; Chabrier, Amélie; Gaborieau, Valérie; Franceschi, Silvia; Herrero, Rolando; Rajkumar, Thangarajan; Samant, Tanuja; Mahimkar, Manoj B.; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Genetic variants in nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and alcohol metabolism genes have been associated with propensity to smoke tobacco and drink alcohol, respectively, and also implicated in genetic susceptibility to head and neck cancer. In addition to smoking and alcohol, tobacco chewing is an important oral cancer risk factor in India. It is not known if these genetic variants influence propensity or oral cancer susceptibility in the context of this distinct etiology. Methods We examined 639 oral and pharyngeal cancer cases and 791 controls from two case-control studies conducted in India. We investigated six variants known to influence nicotine addiction or alcohol metabolism, including rs16969968 (CHRNA5), rs578776 (CHRNA3), rs1229984 (ADH1B), rs698 (ADH1C), rs1573496 (ADH7), and rs4767364 (ALDH2). Results The CHRN variants were associated with the number of chewing events per day, including in those who chewed tobacco but never smoked (P =  0.003, P =  0.01 for rs16969968 and rs578776 respectively). Presence of the variant allele contributed to approximately 13% difference in chewing frequency compared to non-carriers. While no association was observed between rs16969968 and oral cancer risk (OR =  1.01, 95% CI =  0.83– 1.22), rs578776 was modestly associated with a 16% decreased risk of oral cancer (OR =  0.84, 95% CI =  0.72– 0.98). There was little evidence for association between polymorphisms in genes encoding alcohol metabolism and oral cancer in this population. Conclusion The association between rs16969968 and number of chewing events implies that the effect on smoking propensity conferred by this gene variant extends to the use of smokeless tobacco. PMID:24505444

  6. Synergistic Association between Two Alcohol Metabolism Relevant Genes and Coronary Artery Disease among Chinese Hypertensive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hongye; Yu, Xiaohong; Liu, Jun; Xiao, Yu; Lu, Changzhu; Li, Xue; Wang, Yanli; Wang, Bin; Niu, Wenquan

    2014-01-01

    Objective Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a multifactorial and polygenic disease. The aim of this study was to examine the association between six polymorphisms of four alcohol metabolism relevant genes (ADH1B, ADH1C, ALDH1b1, ALDH2) and the risk of CAD in Han Chinese. Methods and Results This was a hospital-based case-control study involving 1365 hypertensive patients. All study subjects were angiographically confirmed. Genotypes were determined with ligase detection reaction method. There was no observable deviation from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium for six examined polymorphisms in controls. The genotype and allele distributions of ALDH1b1 rs2073478 and ALDH2 rs671 polymorphisms differed significantly between the two groups (P≤0.005), even after the Bonferroni correction. The most common allele combination was A-C-C-G-C-G (alleles in order of rs1229984, rs1693482, rs2228093, rs2073478, rs886205, rs671) and its frequency was slightly higher in controls than in CAD patients (P = 0.067). After assigning the most common allele combination as a reference, allele combination A-C-C-T-C-A, which simultaneously possessed the risk alleles of rs2073478 and rs671 polymorphisms, was associated with a 1.80-fold greater risk of CAD. Further, a two-locus model including rs2073478 and rs671 that had a maximal testing accuracy of 0.598 and a cross-validation consistency of 10 (P = 0.008) was deemed as the overall best MDR model, which was further validated by classical Logistic regression model. Conclusion Our findings provide clear evidence for both individual and interactive associations of ALDH1b1 and ALDH2 genes with the development of CAD in Han Chinese. PMID:25047496

  7. Alcohol dehydrogenase 1B genotype and fetal alcohol syndrome: a HuGE minireview.

    PubMed

    Green, Ridgely Fisk; Stoler, Joan Marilyn

    2007-07-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS), 1 of the most common developmental disabilities in the United States, occurs at a rate of 0.5-2.0:1000 live births. Animal model, family, and twin studies suggest a genetic component to FAS susceptibility. Alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs) catalyze the rate-limiting step in alcohol metabolism. Studies of genetic associations with FAS have focused on the alcohol dehydrogenase 1B (ADH1B) gene, comparing mothers and children with the alleles ADH1B*2 or ADH1B*3, associated with faster ethanol metabolism, with those homozygous for ADH1B*1. While most studies have found a protective effect for genotypes containing ADH1B*2 or ADH1B*3, results have been conflicting, and further investigation into the association between the ADH1B genotype and FAS is needed. Whether increased alcohol intake accounts for the elevated risk reported for the ADH1B*1/ADH1B*1 genotype should be addressed, and future studies would benefit from consistent case definitions, enhanced exposure measurements, larger sample sizes, and careful study design.

  8. Causal Role of Alcohol Consumption in an Improved Lipid Profile: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Khanh N.; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Hoogeveen, Ron C.; Nambi, Vijay; Volcik, Kelly A.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Morrison, Alanna C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Health benefits of low-to-moderate alcohol consumption may operate through an improved lipid profile. A Mendelian randomization (MR) approach was used to examine whether alcohol consumption causally affects lipid levels. Methods This analysis involved 10,893 European Americans (EA) from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study. Common and rare variants in alcohol dehydrogenase and acetaldehyde dehydrogenase genes were evaluated for MR assumptions. Five variants, residing in the ADH1B, ADH1C, and ADH4 genes, were selected as genetic instruments and were combined into an unweighted genetic score. Triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) and its subfractions (HDL2-c and HDL3-c), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c), small dense LDL-c (sdLDL-c), apolipoprotein B (apoB), and lipoprotein (a) (Lp(a)) levels were analyzed. Results Alcohol consumption significantly increased HDL2-c and reduced TG, total cholesterol, LDL-c, sdLDL-c, and apoB levels. For each of these lipids a non-linear trend was observed. Compared to the first quartile of alcohol consumption, the third quartile had a 12.3% lower level of TG (p < 0.001), a 7.71 mg/dL lower level of total cholesterol (p = 0.007), a 10.3% higher level of HDL2-c (p = 0.007), a 6.87 mg/dL lower level of LDL-c (p = 0.012), a 7.4% lower level of sdLDL-c (p = 0.037), and a 3.5% lower level of apoB (p = 0.058, poverall = 0.022). Conclusions This study supports the causal role of regular low-to-moderate alcohol consumption in increasing HDL2-c, reducing TG, total cholesterol, and LDL-c, and provides evidence for the novel finding that low-to-moderate consumption of alcohol reduces apoB and sdLDL-c levels among EA. However, given the nonlinearity of the effect of alcohol consumption, even within the range of low-to-moderate drinking, increased consumption does not always result in a larger benefit. PMID:26849558

  9. Alcohol Dehydrogenase-1B (rs1229984) and Aldehyde Dehydrogenase-2 (rs671) Genotypes Are Strong Determinants of the Serum Triglyceride and Cholesterol Levels of Japanese Alcoholic Men

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Akira; Yokoyama, Tetsuji; Matsui, Toshifumi; Mizukami, Takeshi; Kimura, Mitsuru; Matsushita, Sachio; Higuchi, Susumu; Maruyama, Katsuya

    2015-01-01

    Background Elevated serum triglyceride (TG) and high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels are common in drinkers. The fast-metabolizing alcohol dehydrogenase-1B encoded by the ADH1B*2 allele (vs. ADH1B*1/*1 genotype) and inactive aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 encoded by the ALDH2*2 allele (vs. ALDH2*1/*1 genotype) modify ethanol metabolism and are prevalent (≈90% and ≈40%, respectively) in East Asians. We attempted to evaluate the associations between the ADH1B and ALDH2 genotypes and lipid levels in alcoholics. Methods The population consisted of 1806 Japanese alcoholic men (≥40 years) who had undergone ADH1B and ALDH2 genotyping and whose serum TG, total cholesterol, and HDL-C levels in the fasting state had been measured within 3 days after admission. Results High serum levels of TG (≥150 mg/dl), HDL-C (>80 mg/dl), and low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C calculated by the Friedewald formula ≥140 mg/dl) were observed in 24.3%, 16.8%, and 15.6%, respectively, of the subjects. Diabetes, cirrhosis, smoking, and body mass index (BMI) affected the serum lipid levels. Multivariate analysis revealed that the presence of the ADH1B*2 allele and the active ALDH2*1/*1 genotype increased the odds ratio (OR; 95% confidence interval) for a high TG level (2.22 [1.67–2.94] and 1.39 [0.99–1.96], respectively), and decreased the OR for a high HDL-C level (0.37 [0.28–0.49] and 0.51 [0.37–0.69], respectively). The presence of the ADH1B*2 allele decreased the OR for a high LDL-C level (0.60 [0.45–0.80]). The ADH1B*2 plus ALDH2*1/*1 combination yielded the highest ORs for high TG levels and lowest OR for a high HDL-C level. The genotype effects were more prominent in relation to the higher levels of TG (≥220 mg/dl) and HDL-C (≥100 mg/dl). Conclusions The fast-metabolizing ADH1B and active ALDH2, and especially a combination of the two were strongly associated with higher serum TG levels and lower serum HDL-C levels of alcoholics. The fast

  10. Genetic polymorphisms: impact on the risk of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Warren, Kenneth R; Li, Ting-Kai

    2005-04-01

    Clinical reports on monozygotic and dizygotic twins provided the initial evidence for the involvement of genetic factors in risk vulnerability for fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) including fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS). Research with selectively bred and inbred rodents, genetic crosses of these lines and strains, and embryo culture studies have further clarified the role of both maternal and fetal genetics in the development of FASD. Research to identify specific polymorphisms contributing to FASD is still at an early stage. To date, polymorphisms of only one of the genes for the alcohol dehydrogenase enzyme family, the ADH1B, have been demonstrated to contribute to FASD vulnerability. In comparison with ADH1B*1, both maternal and fetal ADH1B*2 have been shown to reduce risk for FAS in a mixed ancestry South African population. ADH1B*3 appears to afford protection for FASD outcomes in African-American populations. Other candidate genes should be examined with respect to FASD risk, including those for the enzymes of serotonin metabolism, in particular the serotonin transporter. By its very nature, alcohol teratogenesis is the expression of the interaction of genes with environment. The study of genetic factors in FASD falls within the new field of ecogenetics. Understanding of the array of genetic factors in FASD will be enhanced by future genetic investigations, including case-control, family association, and linkage studies.

  11. Polymorphism of ethanol-metabolism genes and alcoholism: correlation of allelic variations with the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic consequences.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Chyan; Peng, Giia-Sheun; Wang, Ming-Fang; Tsao, Tien-Ping; Yin, Shih-Jiun

    2009-03-16

    Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) are the principal enzymes responsible for metabolism of ethanol. Both ADH and ALDH exhibit genetic polymorphisms among racial populations. Functional variant alleles ADH1B*2 and ALDH2*2 have been consistently replicated to show protection against developing alcohol dependence. Multiple logistic regression analyses suggest that ADH1B*2 and ALDH2*2 may independently influence the risk for alcoholism. It has been well documented that homozygosity of ALDH2*2 almost fully protects against developing alcoholism and that the heterozygosity only affords a partial protection to varying degrees. Correlations of blood ethanol and acetaldehyde concentrations, cardiovascular hemodynamic responses, and subjective perceptions have been investigated in men with different combinatorial ADH1B and ALDH2 genotypes following challenge with ethanol for a period of 130 min. The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic consequences indicate that acetaldehyde, rather than ethanol, is primarily responsible for the observed alcohol sensitivity reactions, suggesting that the full protection by ALDH2*2/*2 can be ascribed to the intense unpleasant physiological and psychological reactions caused by persistently elevated blood acetaldehyde after ingesting a small amount of alcohol and that the partial protection by ALDH2*1/*2 can be attributed to a faster elimination of acetaldehyde and the lower accumulation in circulation. ADH1B polymorphism does not significantly contribute to buildup of the blood acetaldehyde. Physiological tolerance or innate insensitivity to acetaldehyde may be crucial for development of alcohol dependence in alcoholics carrying ALDH2*2.

  12. Ethanol Metabolism by HeLa Cells Transduced with Human Alcohol Dehydrogenase Isoenzymes: Control of the Pathway by Acetaldehyde Concentration†

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Michinaga; Cyganek, Izabela; Sanghani, Paresh C.; Cho, Won Kyoo; Liangpunsakul, Suthat; Crabb, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Background Human class I alcohol dehydrogenase 2 isoenzymes (encoded by the ADH1B locus) have large differences in kinetic properties; however, individuals inheriting the alleles for the different isoenzymes exhibit only small differences in alcohol elimination rates. This suggests that other cellular factors must regulate the activity of the isoenzymes. Methods The activity of the isoenzymes expressed from ADH1B*1, ADH1B*2, and ADH1B*3 cDNAs was examined in stably transduced HeLa cell lines, including lines which expressed human low Km aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2). The ability of the cells to metabolize ethanol was compared with that of HeLa cells expressing rat class I ADH (HeLa-rat ADH cells), rat hepatoma (H4IIEC3) cells, and rat hepatocytes. Results The isoenzymes had similar protein half-lives in the HeLa cells. Rat hepatocytes, H4IIEC3 cells, and HeLa-rat ADH cells oxidized ethanol much faster than the cells expressing the ADH1B isoenzymes. This was not explained by high cellular NADH levels or endogenous inhibitors; but rather because the activity of the β1 and β2 ADHs were constrained by the accumulation of acetaldehyde, as shown by the increased rate of ethanol oxidation by cell lines expressing β2 ADH plus ALDH2. Conclusion The activity of the human β2 ADH isoenzyme is sensitive to inhibition by acetaldehyde, which likely limits its activity in vivo. This study emphasizes the importance of maintaining a low steady–state acetaldehyde concentration in hepatocytes during ethanol metabolism. PMID:21166830

  13. Maternal Alcohol Consumption, Alcohol Metabolism Genes, and the Risk of Oral Clefts: A Population-based Case-Control Study in Norway, 1996–2001

    PubMed Central

    Boyles, Abee L.; DeRoo, Lisa A.; Lie, Rolv T.; Taylor, Jack A.; Jugessur, Astanand; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Wilcox, Allen J.

    2010-01-01

    Heavy maternal alcohol consumption during early pregnancy increases the risk of oral clefts, but little is known about how genetic variation in alcohol metabolism affects this association. Variants in the alcohol dehydrogenase 1C (ADH1C) gene may modify the association between alcohol and clefts. In a population-based case-control study carried out in Norway (1996–2001), the authors examined the association between maternal alcohol consumption and risk of oral clefts according to mother and infant ADH1C haplotypes encoding fast or slow alcohol-metabolizing phenotypes. Subjects were 483 infants with oral cleft malformations and 503 control infants and their mothers, randomly selected from all other livebirths taking place during the same period. Mothers who consumed 5 or more alcoholic drinks per sitting during the first trimester of pregnancy had an elevated risk of oral cleft in their offspring (odds ratio (OR) = 2.6, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.4, 4.7). This increased risk was evident only in mothers or children who carried the ADH1C haplotype associated with reduced alcohol metabolism (OR= 3.0, 95% CI: 1.4, 6.8). There was no evidence of alcohol-related risk when both mother and infant carried only the rapid-metabolism ADH1C variant (OR = 0.9, 95% CI: 0.2, 4.1). The teratogenic effect of alcohol may depend on the genetic capacity of the mother and fetus to metabolize alcohol. PMID:20810466

  14. Association Between Six Genetic Polymorphisms and Colorectal Cancer: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cheng; Wang, Lingyan; Liao, Qi; Xu, Leiting; Huang, Yi; Zhang, Cheng; Ye, Huadan; Xu, Xuting

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine whether six genetic polymorphisms confer susceptibility to colorectal cancer (CRC). Methods: A systematic search for candidate genes of CRC was performed among several online databases, including PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library, CNKI, and Wanfang online libraries. After a comprehensive filtering procedure, we harvested five genes, including MGMT (rs12917 and rs2308321), ADH1B (rs1229984), SOD2 (rs4880), XPC (rs2228001), and PPARG (rs1801282). Using the REVMAN and Stata software, six meta-analyses were conducted for associations between CRC and the just-mentioned genetic variants. Results: A total of 34 comparative studies among 17,289 cases and 54,927 controls were involved in our meta-analyses. Significant association was found between ADH1B rs1229984 polymorphism and CRC (p=0.03, odds ratio [OR]=1.18, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.01–1.36). We also found significant association between PPARG rs1801282 polymorphism and CRC (p=0.004, OR=1.498, 95% CI=1.139–1.970), and this significant association is specific in Caucasians (p=0.004, OR=1.603, 95% CI=1.165–2.205). Conclusions: The current meta-analysis has established that ADH1B (rs1229984) and PPARG (rs1801282) are two risk variants of CRC. PMID:24552298

  15. ALDH2 polymorphism is associated with fasting blood glucose through alcohol consumption in Japanese men

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Guang; Naito, Mariko; Wakai, Kenji; Morita, Emi; Kawai, Sayo; Hamajima, Nobuyuki; Suzuki, Sadao; Kita, Yoshikuni; Takezaki, Toshiro; Tanaka, Keitaro; Morita, Makiko; Uemura, Hirokazu; Ozaki, Etsuko; Hosono, Satoyo; Mikami, Haruo; Kubo, Michiaki; Tanaka, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Associations between alcohol consumption and type 2 diabetes risk are inconsistent in epidemiologic studies. This study investigated the associations of ADH1B and ALDH2 polymorphisms with fasting blood glucose levels, and the impact of the associations of alcohol consumption with fasting blood glucose levels in Japanese individuals. This cross-sectional study included 907 men and 912 women, aged 35–69 years. The subjects were selected from among the Japan Multi-institutional Collaborative Cohort study across six areas of Japan. The ADH1B and ALDH2 polymorphisms were genotyped by Invader Assays. The ALDH2 Glu504Lys genotypes were associated with different levels of fasting blood glucose in men (P = 0.04). Mean fasting glucose level was positively associated with alcohol consumption in men with the ALDH2 504 Lys allele (Ptrend = 0.02), but not in men with the ALDH2 504Glu/Glu genotype (Ptrend = 0.45), resulting in no statistically significant interaction (P = 0.38). Alcohol consumption was associated with elevated fasting blood glucose levels compared with non-consumers in men (Ptrend = 0.002). The ADH1B Arg48His polymorphism was not associated with FBG levels overall or after stratification for alcohol consumption. These findings suggest that the ALDH2 polymorphism is associated with different levels of fasting blood glucose through alcohol consumption in Japanese men. The interaction of ALDH2 polymorphisms in the association between alcohol consumption and fasting blood glucose warrants further investigation. PMID:27303105

  16. The effect of consuming small volumes of beer on gastric motility and the involvement of gene polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Tomoyuki; Yamashita, Hiromi; Kawamura, Tomohiko; Jodai, Yasutaka; Omori, Takafumi; Sumi, Kazuya; Ichikawa, Yuichiro; Okubo, Masaaki; Ishizuka, Takamitsu; Tahara, Tomomitsu; Nagasaka, Mitsuo; Nakagawa, Yoshihito; Hirata, Ichiro; Ohmiya, Naoki; Nakao, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of consuming small amounts of beer or a nonalcoholic beer taste beverage (non-beer) on gastric emptying and the polymorphisms in alcohol metabolism-related enzyme-encoding genes. Twenty male healthy volunteers were questioned regarding their alcohol consumption status, and body measurement was performed. The genetic polymorphisms in ADH1B (rs1229984, Arg47His) and ALDH2 (rs671 Glu487Lys) were analyzed. The subjects consumed 150 mL of beer or non-beer once per week, followed by the ingestion of 200 kcal of the test nutrient containing (13)C-acetate 15 min later, after which the subjects' exhalations were collected up to 120 min. The concentration peak of (13)C was measured as Tmax. Diamine oxidase (DAO) activity for the marker of small intestinal function activity was also measured the day after the test. Gastric emptying was significantly slower in the group that consumed a small amount of beer, and in daily beer consumption group, and also in the ADH1B *2/*2, ALDH2 *1/*2 genotypes compared to non-beer drinking group. DAO values were not significantly changed between beer and non-beer group. The consumption of even a small amount of beer and the polymorphisms in ADH1B / ALDH2 affects gastric motility.

  17. Association between alcohol and cardiovascular disease: Mendelian randomisation analysis based on individual participant data

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Michael V; Dale, Caroline E; Zuccolo, Luisa; Silverwood, Richard J; Guo, Yiran; Ye, Zheng; Prieto-Merino, David; Dehghan, Abbas; Trompet, Stella; Wong, Andrew; Cavadino, Alana; Drogan, Dagmar; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Yesupriya, Ajay; Leusink, Maarten; Sundstrom, Johan; Hubacek, Jaroslav A; Pikhart, Hynek; Swerdlow, Daniel I; Panayiotou, Andrie G; Borinskaya, Svetlana A; Finan, Chris; Shah, Sonia; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Shah, Tina; Engmann, Jorgen; Folkersen, Lasse; Eriksson, Per; Ricceri, Fulvio; Melander, Olle; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Gamble, Dale M; Rayaprolu, Sruti; Ross, Owen A; McLachlan, Stela; Vikhireva, Olga; Sluijs, Ivonne; Scott, Robert A; Adamkova, Vera; Flicker, Leon; van Bockxmeer, Frank M; Power, Christine; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Meade, Tom; Marmot, Michael G; Ferro, Jose M; Paulos-Pinheiro, Sofia; Humphries, Steve E; Talmud, Philippa J; Leach, Irene Mateo; Verweij, Niek; Linneberg, Allan; Skaaby, Tea; Doevendans, Pieter A; Cramer, Maarten J; van der Harst, Pim; Klungel, Olaf H; Dowling, Nicole F; Dominiczak, Anna F; Kumari, Meena; Nicolaides, Andrew N; Weikert, Cornelia; Boeing, Heiner; Ebrahim, Shah; Gaunt, Tom R; Price, Jackie F; Lannfelt, Lars; Peasey, Anne; Kubinova, Ruzena; Pajak, Andrzej; Malyutina, Sofia; Voevoda, Mikhail I; Tamosiunas, Abdonas; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke H; Norman, Paul E; Hankey, Graeme J; Bergmann, Manuela M; Hofman, Albert; Franco, Oscar H; Cooper, Jackie; Palmen, Jutta; Spiering, Wilko; de Jong, Pim A; Kuh, Diana; Hardy, Rebecca; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Ikram, M Arfan; Ford, Ian; Hyppönen, Elina; Almeida, Osvaldo P; Wareham, Nicholas J; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Hamsten, Anders; Husemoen, Lise Lotte N; Tjønneland, Anne; Tolstrup, Janne S; Rimm, Eric; Beulens, Joline W J; Verschuren, W M Monique; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Hofker, Marten H; Wannamethee, S Goya; Whincup, Peter H; Morris, Richard; Vicente, Astrid M; Watkins, Hugh; Farrall, Martin; Jukema, J Wouter; Meschia, James; Cupples, L Adrienne; Sharp, Stephen J; Fornage, Myriam; Kooperberg, Charles; LaCroix, Andrea Z; Dai, James Y; Lanktree, Matthew B; Siscovick, David S; Jorgenson, Eric; Spring, Bonnie; Coresh, Josef; Buxbaum, Sarah G; Schreiner, Pamela J; Ellison, R Curtis; Tsai, Michael Y; Patel, Sanjay R; Redline, Susan; Johnson, Andrew D; Hoogeveen, Ron C; Hakonarson, Hakon; Rotter, Jerome I; Boerwinkle, Eric; de Bakker, Paul I W; Kivimaki, Mika; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Sattar, Naveed; Lawlor, Debbie A; Whittaker, John; Davey Smith, George; Mukamal, Kenneth; Psaty, Bruce M; Wilson, James G; Lange, Leslie A; Hamidovic, Ajna; Hingorani, Aroon D; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Bobak, Martin; Leon, David A; Langenberg, Claudia; Palmer, Tom M; Reiner, Alex P; Keating, Brendan J; Dudbridge, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Objective To use the rs1229984 variant in the alcohol dehydrogenase 1B gene (ADH1B) as an instrument to investigate the causal role of alcohol in cardiovascular disease. Design Mendelian randomisation meta-analysis of 56 epidemiological studies. Participants 261 991 individuals of European descent, including 20 259 coronary heart disease cases and 10 164 stroke events. Data were available on ADH1B rs1229984 variant, alcohol phenotypes, and cardiovascular biomarkers. Main outcome measures Odds ratio for coronary heart disease and stroke associated with the ADH1B variant in all individuals and by categories of alcohol consumption. Results Carriers of the A-allele of ADH1B rs1229984 consumed 17.2% fewer units of alcohol per week (95% confidence interval 15.6% to 18.9%), had a lower prevalence of binge drinking (odds ratio 0.78 (95% CI 0.73 to 0.84)), and had higher abstention (odds ratio 1.27 (1.21 to 1.34)) than non-carriers. Rs1229984 A-allele carriers had lower systolic blood pressure (−0.88 (−1.19 to −0.56) mm Hg), interleukin-6 levels (−5.2% (−7.8 to −2.4%)), waist circumference (−0.3 (−0.6 to −0.1) cm), and body mass index (−0.17 (−0.24 to −0.10) kg/m2). Rs1229984 A-allele carriers had lower odds of coronary heart disease (odds ratio 0.90 (0.84 to 0.96)). The protective association of the ADH1B rs1229984 A-allele variant remained the same across all categories of alcohol consumption (P=0.83 for heterogeneity). Although no association of rs1229984 was identified with the combined subtypes of stroke, carriers of the A-allele had lower odds of ischaemic stroke (odds ratio 0.83 (0.72 to 0.95)). Conclusions Individuals with a genetic variant associated with non-drinking and lower alcohol consumption had a more favourable cardiovascular profile and a reduced risk of coronary heart disease than those without the genetic variant. This suggests that reduction of alcohol consumption, even for light to moderate drinkers, is beneficial for

  18. Alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase polymorphisms and a new strategy for prevention and screening for cancer in the upper aerodigestive tract in East Asians.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Akira; Omori, Tai; Yokoyama, Tetsuji

    2010-01-01

    The ethanol in alcoholic beverages and the acetaldehyde associated with alcohol consumption are Group 1 human carcinogens (WHO, International Agency for Research on Cancer). The combination of alcohol consumption, tobacco smoking, the inactive heterozygous aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 genotype (ALDH2*1/*2) and the less-active homozygous alcohol dehydrogenase-1B genotype (ADH1B*1/*1) increases the risk of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in the upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) in a multiplicative fashion in East Asians. In addition to being exposed to locally high levels of ethanol, the UADT is exposed to a very high concentration of acetaldehyde from a variety of sources, including that as an ingredient of alcoholic beverages per se and that found in tobacco smoke; acetaldehyde is also produced by salivary microorganisms and mucosal enzymes and is present as blood acetaldehyde. The inefficient degradation of acetaldehyde by weakly expressed ALDH2 in the UADT may be cri! tical to the local accumulation of acetaldehyde, especially in ALDH2*1/*2 carriers. ADH1B*1/*1 carriers tend to experience less intense alcohol flushing and are highly susceptible to heavy drinking and alcoholism. Heavy drinking by persons with the less-active ADH1B*1/*1 leads to longer exposure of the UADT to salivary ethanol and acetaldehyde. The ALDH2*1/*2 genotype is a very strong predictor of synchronous and metachronous multiple SCCs in the UADT. High red cell mean corpuscular volume (MCV), esophageal dysplasia, and melanosis in the UADT, all of which are frequently found in ALDH2*1/*2 drinkers, are useful for identifying high-risk individuals. We invented a simple flushing questionnaire that enables prediction of the ALDH2 phenotype. New health appraisal models that include ALDH2 genotype, the simple flushing questionnaire, or MCV are powerful tools for devising a new strategy for prevention and screening for UADT cancer in East Asians.

  19. Acetaldehyde as an underestimated risk factor for cancer development: role of genetics in ethanol metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Stickel, Felix

    2009-01-01

    Chronic ethanol consumption is a strong risk factor for the development of certain types of cancer including those of the upper aerodigestive tract, the liver, the large intestine and the female breast. Multiple mechanisms are involved in alcohol-mediated carcinogenesis. Among those the action of acetaldehyde (AA), the first metabolite of ethanol oxidation is of particular interest. AA is toxic, mutagenic and carcinogenic in animal experiments. AA binds to DNA and forms carcinogenic adducts. Direct evidence of the role of AA in alcohol-associated carcinogenesis derived from genetic linkage studies in alcoholics. Polymorphisms or mutations of genes coding for AA generation or detoxifying enzymes resulting in elevated AA concentrations are associated with increased cancer risk. Approximately 40% of Japanese, Koreans or Chinese carry the AA dehydrogenase 2*2 (ALDH2*2) allele in its heterozygous form. This allele codes for an ALDH2 enzyme with little activity leading to high AA concentrations after the consumption of even small amounts of alcohol. When individuals with this allele consume ethanol chronically, a significant increased risk for upper alimentary tract and colorectal cancer is noted. In Caucasians, alcohol dehydrogenase 1C*1 (ADH1C*1) allele encodes for an ADH isoenzyme which produces 2.5 times more AA than the corresponding allele ADH1C*2. In studies with moderate to high alcohol intake, ADH1C*1 allele frequency and rate of homozygosity was found to be significantly associated with an increased risk for cancer of the upper aerodigestive tract, the liver, the colon and the female breast. These studies underline the important role of acetaldehyde in ethanol-mediated carcinogenesis. PMID:19847467

  20. Identification of SNPs associated with response of breast cancer patients to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in the EORTC-10994 randomized phase III trial.

    PubMed

    Le Morvan, V; Litière, S; Laroche-Clary, A; Ait-Ouferoukh, S; Bellott, R; Messina, C; Cameron, D; Bonnefoi, H; Robert, J

    2015-02-01

    Using cell line panels we identified associations between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and chemosensitivity. To validate these findings in clinics, we genotyped a subset of patients included in a neoadjuvant breast cancer trial to explore the relationship between genotypes and clinical outcome according to treatment received and p53 status. We genotyped 384 selected SNPs in the germline DNA extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded non-invaded lymph nodes of 243 patients. The polymorphisms of five selected genes were first studied, and then all 384 SNPs were considered. Correction for multiple testing was applied. CYP1B1 polymorphism was significantly associated with pathological complete response (pCR) in patients who had received DNA-damaging agents. MDM2, MDM4 and TP53BP1 polymorphisms were significantly associated with pCR in patients harboring a p53-positive tumor. In the complete SNP panel, there was a significant association between overall survival (OS) and a SNP of ADH1C, R272Q (P=0.0023). By multivariate analysis, only ADH1C genotype and p53 status were significantly associated with OS.

  1. Joint Effects of Alcohol Consumption and Polymorphisms in Alcohol and Oxidative Stress Metabolism Genes on Risk of Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hakenewerth, Anne M.; Millikan, Robert C.; Rusyn, Ivan; Herring, Amy H.; North, Kari E.; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.; Funkhouser, William F.; Weissler, Mark C.; Olshan, Andrew F.

    2011-01-01

    Background Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in alcohol metabolism genes are associated with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN), and may influence cancer risk in conjunction with alcohol. Genetic variation in the oxidative stress pathway may impact the carcinogenic effect of reactive oxygen species produced by ethanol metabolism. We hypothesized that alcohol interacts with these pathways to affect SCCHN incidence. Methods Interview and genotyping data for 64 SNPs were obtained from 2552 European- and African-American subjects (1227 cases, 1325 controls) from the Carolina Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology study, a population-based case-control study of SCCHN conducted in North Carolina from 2002–2006. We estimated odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for SNPs and haplotypes, adjusting for age, sex, race, and duration of cigarette smoking. P-values were adjusted for multiple testing using Bonferroni correction. Results Two SNPs were associated with SCCHN risk: ADH1B rs1229984 A allele (OR=0.7, 95%CI=0.6–0.9) and ALDH2 rs2238151 C allele (OR=1.2, 95%CI=1.1–1.4). Three were associated with sub-site tumors: ADH1B rs17028834 C allele (larynx, OR=1.5, 95%CI=1.1–2.0), SOD2 rs4342445 A allele (oral cavity, OR=1.3, 95%CI=1.1–1.6), and SOD2 rs5746134 T allele (hypopharynx, OR=2.1, 95%CI=1.2–3.7). Four SNPs in alcohol metabolism genes interacted additively with alcohol consumption: ALDH2 rs2238151, ADH1B rs1159918, ADH7 rs1154460, and CYP2E1 rs2249695. No alcohol interactions were found for oxidative stress SNPs. Conclusions and Impact Previously unreported associations of SNPs in ALDH2, CYP2E1, GPX2, SOD1, and SOD2 with SCCHN and sub-site tumors provide evidence that alterations in alcohol and oxidative stress pathways influence SCCHN carcinogenesis, and warrant further investigation. PMID:21940907

  2. Genetic polymorphisms of alcohol dehydrogense-1B and aldehyde dehydrogenase-2, alcohol flushing, mean corpuscular volume, and aerodigestive tract neoplasia in Japanese drinkers.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Akira; Mizukami, Takeshi; Yokoyama, Tetsuji

    2015-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms of alcohol dehydrogenase-1B (ADH1B) and aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2) modulate exposure levels to ethanol/acetaldehyde. Endoscopic screening of 6,014 Japanese alcoholics yielded high detection rates of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC; 4.1%) and head and neck SCC (1.0%). The risks of upper aerodigestive tract SCC/dysplasia, especially of multiple SCC/dysplasia, were increased in a multiplicative fashion by the presence of a combination of slow-metabolizing ADH1B*1/*1 and inactive heterozygous ALDH2*1/*2 because of prolonged exposure to higher concentrations of ethanol/acetaldehyde. A questionnaire asking about current and past facial flushing after drinking a glass (≈180 mL) of beer is a reliable tool for detecting the presence of inactive ALDH2. We invented a health-risk appraisal (HRA) model including the flushing questionnaire and drinking, smoking, and dietary habits. Esophageal SCC was detected at a high rate by endoscopic mass-screening in high HRA score persons. A total of 5.0% of 4,879 alcoholics had a history of (4.0%) or newly diagnosed (1.0%) gastric cancer. Their high frequency of a history of gastric cancer is partly explained by gastrectomy being a risk factor for alcoholism because of altered ethanol metabolism, e.g., by blood ethanol level overshooting. The combination of H. pylori-associated atrophic gastritis and ALDH2*1/*2 showed the greatest risk of gastric cancer in alcoholics. High detection rates of advanced colorectal adenoma/carcinoma were found in alcoholics, 15.7% of 744 immunochemical fecal occult blood test (IFOBT)-negative alcoholics and 31.5% of the 393 IFOBT-positive alcoholics. Macrocytosis with an MCV≥106 fl increased the risk of neoplasia in the entire aerodigestive tract of alcoholics, suggesting that poor nutrition as well as ethanol/acetaldehyde exposure plays an important role in neoplasia.

  3. The genetic basis of addictive disorders.

    PubMed

    Ducci, Francesca; Goldman, David

    2012-06-01

    Addictions are common, chronic, and relapsing diseases that develop through a multistep process. The impact of addictions on morbidity and mortality is high worldwide. Twin studies have shown that the heritability of addictions ranges from 0.39 (hallucinogens) to 0.72 (cocaine). Twin studies indicate that genes influence each stage from initiation to addiction, although the genetic determinants may differ. Addictions are by definition the result of gene × environment interaction. These disorders, which are in part volitional, in part inborn, and in part determined by environmental experience, pose the full range of medical, genetic, policy, and moral challenges. Gene discovery is being facilitated by a variety of powerful approaches, but is in its infancy. It is not surprising that the genes discovered so far act in a variety of ways: via altered metabolism of drug (the alcohol and nicotine metabolic gene variants), via altered function of a drug receptor (the nicotinic receptor, which may alter affinity for nicotine but as discussed may also alter circuitry of reward), and via general mechanisms of addiction (genes such as monoamine oxidase A and the serotonin transporter that modulate stress response, emotion, and behavioral control). Addiction medicine today benefits from genetic studies that buttress the case for a neurobiologic origin of addictive behavior, and some general information on familially transmitted propensity that can be used to guide prevention. A few well-validated, specific predictors such as OPRM1, ADH1B, ALDH2, CHRNA5, and CYP26 have been identified and can provide some specific guidance, for example, to understand alcohol-related flushing and upper GI cancer risk (ADH1B and AKLDH2), variation in nicotine metabolism (CYP26), and, potentially, naltrexone treatment response (OPRM1). However, the genetic predictors available are few in number and account for only a small portion of the genetic variance in liability, and have not been integrated

  4. Alcohol metabolism in human cells causes DNA damage and activates the Fanconi anemia – breast cancer susceptibility (FA-BRCA) DNA damage response network

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Jessy; Balbo, Silvia; Crabb, David; Brooks, P.J.

    2011-01-01

    Background We recently reported that exposure of human cells in vitro to acetaldehyde resulted in activation of the Fanconi anemia-breast cancer associated (FA-BRCA) DNA damage response network. Methods To determine whether intracellular generation of acetaldehyde from ethanol metabolism can cause DNA damage and activate the FA-BRCA network, we engineered HeLa cells to metabolize alcohol by expression of human alcohol dehydrogenase 1B. Results Incubation of HeLa-ADH1B cells with ethanol (20 mM) resulted in acetaldehyde accumulation in the media which was prevented by co-incubation with 4-methyl pyrazole (4-MP), a specific inhibitor of ADH. Ethanol treatment of HeLa-ADH1B cells produced a 4-fold increase in the acetaldehyde-DNA adduct, N2-ethylidene-dGuo, and also resulted in activation of the Fanconi anemia -breast cancer susceptibility (FA-BRCA) DNA damage response network, as indicated by a monoubiquitination of FANCD2, and phosphorylation of BRCA1. Ser 1524 was identified as one site of BRCA1 phosphorylation. The increased levels of DNA adducts, FANCD2 monoubiquitination, and BRCA1 phosphorylation were all blocked by 4-MP, indicating that acetaldehyde, rather than ethanol itself, was responsible for all three responses. Importantly, the ethanol concentration we used is within the range that can be attained in the human body during social drinking. Conclusions Our results indicate that intracellular metabolism of ethanol to acetaldehyde results in DNA damage which activates the FA-BRCA DNA damage response network. PMID:21919919

  5. Mechanism of protection against alcoholism by an alcohol dehydrogenase polymorphism: development of an animal model.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Meza, Mario; Quintanilla, María Elena; Tampier, Lutske; Mura, Casilda V; Sapag, Amalia; Israel, Yedy

    2010-01-01

    Humans who carry a point mutation in the gene coding for alcohol dehydrogenase-1B (ADH1B*2; Arg47His) are markedly protected against alcoholism. Although this mutation results in a 100-fold increase in enzyme activity, it has not been reported to cause higher levels of acetaldehyde, a metabolite of ethanol known to deter alcohol intake. Hence, the mechanism by which this mutation confers protection against alcoholism is unknown. To study this protective effect, the wild-type rat cDNA encoding rADH-47Arg was mutated to encode rADH-47His, mimicking the human mutation. The mutated cDNA was incorporated into an adenoviral vector and administered to genetically selected alcohol-preferring rats. The V(max) of rADH-47His was 6-fold higher (P<0.001) than that of the wild-type rADH-47Arg. Animals transduced with rAdh-47His showed a 90% (P<0.01) increase in liver ADH activity and a 50% reduction (P<0.001) in voluntary ethanol intake. In animals transduced with rAdh-47His, administration of ethanol (1g/kg) produced a short-lived increase of arterial blood acetaldehyde concentration to levels that were 3.5- to 5-fold greater than those in animals transduced with the wild-type rAdh-47Arg vector or with a noncoding vector. This brief increase (burst) in arterial acetaldehyde concentration after ethanol ingestion may constitute the mechanism by which humans carrying the ADH1B*2 allele are protected against alcoholism.

  6. Case-control study for colorectal cancer genetic susceptibility in EPICOLON: previously identified variants and mucins

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer death in developed countries. Familial aggregation in CRC is also important outside syndromic forms and, in this case, a polygenic model with several common low-penetrance alleles contributing to CRC genetic predisposition could be hypothesized. Mucins and GALNTs (N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase) are interesting candidates for CRC genetic susceptibility and have not been previously evaluated. We present results for ten genetic variants linked to CRC risk in previous studies (previously identified category) and 18 selected variants from the mucin gene family in a case-control association study from the Spanish EPICOLON consortium. Methods CRC cases and matched controls were from EPICOLON, a prospective, multicenter, nationwide Spanish initiative, comprised of two independent stages. Stage 1 corresponded to 515 CRC cases and 515 controls, whereas stage 2 consisted of 901 CRC cases and 909 controls. Also, an independent cohort of 549 CRC cases and 599 controls outside EPICOLON was available for additional replication. Genotyping was performed for ten previously identified SNPs in ADH1C, APC, CCDN1, IL6, IL8, IRS1, MTHFR, PPARG, VDR and ARL11, and 18 selected variants in the mucin gene family. Results None of the 28 SNPs analyzed in our study was found to be associated with CRC risk. Although four SNPs were significant with a P-value < 0.05 in EPICOLON stage 1 [rs698 in ADH1C (OR = 1.63, 95% CI = 1.06-2.50, P-value = 0.02, recessive), rs1800795 in IL6 (OR = 1.62, 95% CI = 1.10-2.37, P-value = 0.01, recessive), rs3803185 in ARL11 (OR = 1.58, 95% CI = 1.17-2.15, P-value = 0.007, codominant), and rs2102302 in GALNTL2 (OR = 1.20, 95% CI = 1.00-1.44, P-value = 0.04, log-additive 0, 1, 2 alleles], only rs3803185 achieved statistical significance in EPICOLON stage 2 (OR = 1.34, 95% CI = 1.06-1.69, P-value = 0.01, recessive). In the joint analysis for both stages, results were only significant for rs

  7. Genetics and alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Edenberg, Howard J; Foroud, Tatiana

    2013-08-01

    Alcohol is widely consumed; however, excessive use creates serious physical, psychological and social problems and contributes to the pathogenesis of many diseases. Alcohol use disorders (that is, alcohol dependence and alcohol abuse) are maladaptive patterns of excessive drinking that lead to serious problems. Abundant evidence indicates that alcohol dependence (alcoholism) is a complex genetic disease, with variations in a large number of genes affecting a person's risk of alcoholism. Some of these genes have been identified, including two genes involved in the metabolism of alcohol (ADH1B and ALDH2) that have the strongest known affects on the risk of alcoholism. Studies continue to reveal other genes in which variants affect the risk of alcoholism or related traits, including GABRA2, CHRM2, KCNJ6 and AUTS2. As more variants are analysed and studies are combined for meta-analysis to achieve increased sample sizes, an improved picture of the many genes and pathways that affect the risk of alcoholism will be possible.

  8. Genetic polymorphisms of pharmacogenomic VIP variants in the Kyrgyz population from northwest China.

    PubMed

    Yunus, Zulfiya; Liu, Lijun; Wang, Hong; Zhang, Le; Li, Xiaolan; Geng, Tingting; Kang, Longli; Jin, Tianbo; Chen, Chao

    2013-10-15

    Pharmacogenomic variant information is well known for major human populations; however, this information is less commonly studied in minorities. In the present study, we genotyped 85 very important pharmacogenetic (VIP) variants (selected from the PharmGKB database) in the Kyrgyz population and compared our data with other four major human populations including Han Chinese in Beijing, China (CHB), the Japanese in Tokyo, Japan (JPT), a northern and western Europe population (CEU), and the Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigeria (YRI). There were 13, 12 and 16 of the selected VIP variant genotype frequencies in the Kyrgyz which differed from those of the CHB, JPT and CEU, respectively (p<0.005). In the YRI, there were 32 different variants, compared to the Kyrgyz (p<0.005). Genotype frequencies of ADH1B, AHR, CYP3A5, PTGS2, VDR, and VKORC1 in the Kyrgyz differed widely from those in the four populations. Haplotype analyses also showed differences among the Kyrgyz and the other four populations. Our results complement the information provided by the database of pharmacogenomics on Kyrgyz. We provide a theoretical basis for safer drug administration and individualized treatment plans for the Kyrgyz. We also provide a template for the study of pharmacogenomics in various ethnic minority groups in China.

  9. Comparative Proteomics Analysis Reveals L-Arginine Activates Ethanol Degradation Pathways in HepG2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Guokai; Lestari, Retno; Long, Baisheng; Fan, Qiwen; Wang, Zhichang; Guo, Xiaozhen; Yu, Jie; Hu, Jun; Yang, Xingya; Chen, Changqing; Liu, Lu; Li, Xiuzhi; Purnomoadi, Agung; Achmadi, Joelal; Yan, Xianghua

    2016-01-01

    L-Arginine (Arg) is a versatile amino acid that plays crucial roles in a wide range of physiological and pathological processes. In this study, to investigate the alteration induced by Arg supplementation in proteome scale, isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) based proteomic approach was employed to comparatively characterize the differentially expressed proteins between Arg deprivation (Ctrl) and Arg supplementation (+Arg) treated human liver hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells. A total of 21 proteins were identified as differentially expressed proteins and these 21 proteins were all up-regulated by Arg supplementation. Six amino acid metabolism-related proteins, mostly metabolic enzymes, showed differential expressions. Intriguingly, Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) based pathway analysis suggested that the three ethanol degradation pathways were significantly altered between Ctrl and +Arg. Western blotting and enzymatic activity assays validated that the key enzymes ADH1C, ALDH1A1, and ALDH2, which are mainly involved in ethanol degradation pathways, were highly differentially expressed, and activated between Ctrl and +Arg in HepG2 cells. Furthermore, 10 mM Arg significantly attenuated the cytotoxicity induced by 100 mM ethanol treatment (P < 0.0001). This study is the first time to reveal that Arg activates ethanol degradation pathways in HepG2 cells. PMID:26983598

  10. Induction of CYP2E1 in non-alcoholic fatty liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Aljomah, Ghanim; Baker, Susan S.; Liu, Wensheng; Kozielski, Rafal; Oluwole, Janet; Lupu, Benita; Baker, Robert D.; Zhu, Lixin

    2015-01-01

    Mounting evidence supports a contribution of endogenous alcohol metabolism in the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). However, it is not known whether the expression of alcohol metabolism genes is altered in the livers of simple steatosis. There is also a current debate on whether fatty acids induce CYP2E1 in fatty livers. In this study, expression of alcohol metabolizing genes in the liver biopsies of simple steatosis patients was examined by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), in comparison to biopsies of NASH livers and normal controls. Induction of alcohol metabolizing genes was also examined in cultured HepG2 cells treated with ethanol or oleic acid, by qRT-PCR and Western blots. We found that the mRNA expression of alcohol metabolizing genes including ADH1C, ADH4, ADH6, catalase and CYP2E1 were elevated in the livers of simple steatosis, to similar levels found in NASH livers. In cultured HepG2 cells, ethanol induced the expression of CYP2E1 mRNA and protein, but not ADH4 or ADH6; oleic acid did not induce any of these genes. These results suggest that elevated alcohol metabolism may contribute to the pathogenesis of NAFLD at the stage of simple steatosis as well as more severe stages. Our in vitro data support that CYP2E1 is induced by endogenous alcohol but not by fatty acids. PMID:26551085

  11. Detecting recent positive selection with high accuracy and reliability by conditional coalescent tree.

    PubMed

    Wang, Minxian; Huang, Xin; Li, Ran; Xu, Hongyang; Jin, Li; He, Yungang

    2014-11-01

    Studies of natural selection, followed by functional validation, are shedding light on understanding of genetic mechanisms underlying human evolution and adaptation. Classic methods for detecting selection, such as the integrated haplotype score (iHS) and Fay and Wu's H statistic, are useful for candidate gene searching underlying positive selection. These methods, however, have limited capability to localize causal variants in selection target regions. In this study, we developed a novel method based on conditional coalescent tree to detect recent positive selection by counting unbalanced mutations on coalescent gene genealogies. Extensive simulation studies revealed that our method is more robust than many other approaches against biases due to various demographic effects, including population bottleneck, expansion, or stratification, while not sacrificing its power. Furthermore, our method demonstrated its superiority in localizing causal variants from massive linked genetic variants. The rate of successful localization was about 20-40% higher than that of other state-of-the-art methods on simulated data sets. On empirical data, validated functional causal variants of four well-known positive selected genes were all successfully localized by our method, such as ADH1B, MCM6, APOL1, and HBB. Finally, the computational efficiency of this new method was much higher than that of iHS implementations, that is, 24-66 times faster than the REHH package, and more than 10,000 times faster than the original iHS implementation. These magnitudes make our method suitable for applying on large sequencing data sets. Software can be downloaded from https://github.com/wavefancy/scct.

  12. Alcohol, genetics and risk of breast cancer in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Catherine A; Reding, Douglas J; Commins, John; Williams, Craig; Yeager, Meredith; Burmester, James K; Schairer, Catherine; Ziegler, Regina G

    2012-06-01

    We tested the hypothesis that genes involved in the alcohol oxidation pathway modify the association between alcohol intake and breast cancer. Subjects were women aged 55-74 at baseline from the screening arm of the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial. Incident breast cancers were identified through annual health surveys. Controls were frequency matched to cases by age and year of entry into the trial. A self-administered food frequency questionnaire queried frequency and usual serving size of beer, wine or wine coolers, and liquor. Three SNPs in genes in the alcohol metabolism pathway were genotyped: alcohol dehydrogenase 2, alcohol dehydrogenase 3, and CYP2E1. The study included 1,041 incident breast cancer cases and 1,070 controls. In comparison to non-drinkers, the intake of any alcohol significantly increased the risk of breast cancer, and this risk increased with each category of daily alcohol intake (OR 2.01, 95% CI 1.14, 3.53) for women who drank three or more standard drinks per day. Stratification by genotype revealed significant gene/environment interactions. For the ADH1B gene, there were statistically significant associations between all levels of alcohol intake and risk of breast cancer (all OR > 1.34 and all lower CI > 1.01), while for women with the GA or AA genotype, there were no significant associations between alcohol intake and risk of breast cancer. Alcohol intake, genes involved in alcohol metabolism and their interaction increase the risk of breast cancer in post-menopausal women. This information could be useful for primary care providers to personalize information about breast cancer risk reduction.

  13. Alcohol, Genetics and Risk of Breast Cancer in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer (PLCO) Screening Trial

    PubMed Central

    McCarty, Catherine A.; Reding, Douglas J.; Commins, John; Williams, Craig; Yeager, Meredith; Burmester, James K.; Schairer, Catherine; Ziegler, Regina G.

    2012-01-01

    Background We tested the hypothesis that genes involved in the alcohol oxidation pathway modify the association between alcohol intake and breast cancer. Methods Subjects were women aged 55–74 at baseline from the screening arm of the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial. Incident breast cancers were identified through annual health surveys. Controls were frequency matched to cases by age and year of entry into the trial. A self-administered food frequency questionnaire queried frequency and usual serving size of beer, wine or wine coolers and liquor. Three SNPs in genes in the alcohol metabolism pathway were genotyped: alcohol dehydrogenase 2, alcohol dehydrogenase 3 and CYP2E1. Results The study included 1041 incident breast cancer cases and 1070 controls. In comparison to non-drinkers, the intake of any alcohol significantly increased the risk of breast cancer, and this risk increased with each category of daily alcohol intake, (OR=2.01, 95% CL=1.14, 3.53) for women who drank three or more standard drinks per day. Stratification by genotype revealed significant gene/environment interactions. For the ADH1B gene, there were statistically significant associations between all levels of alcohol intake and risk of breast cancer (all OR>1.34 and all lower CL >1.01), while for women with the GA or AA genotype, there were no significant associations between alcohol intake and risk of breast cancer. Conclusion Alcohol intake, genes involved in alcohol metabolism and their interaction increase the risk of breast cancer in post-menopausal women. Impact This information could be useful for primary care providers to personalize information about breast cancer risk reduction. PMID:22331481

  14. Adh1 and Adh1/4 knockout mice as possible rodent models for presymptomatic Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Anvret, Anna; Ran, Caroline; Westerlund, Marie; Gellhaar, Sandra; Lindqvist, Eva; Pernold, Karin; Lundströmer, Karin; Duester, Gregg; Felder, Michael R; Galter, Dagmar; Belin, Andrea Carmine

    2012-02-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenases (ADH) catalyze the reversible metabolism of many types of alcohols and aldehydes to prevent the possible toxic accumulation of these compounds. ADHs are of interest in Parkinson's disease (PD) since these compounds can be harmful to dopamine (DA) neurons. Genetic variants in ADH1C and ADH4 have been found to associate with PD and lack of Adh4 gene activity in a mouse model has recently been reported to induce changes in the DA system. Adh1 knockout (Adh1-/-) and Adh1/4 double knockout (Adh1/4-/-) mice were investigated for possible changes in DA system related activity, biochemical parameters and olfactory function compared to wild-type (WT) mice. Locomotor activity was tested at ∼7 (adult) and >15 months of age to mimic the late onset of PD. Adh1-/- and Adh1/4-/- mice displayed a significantly higher spontaneous locomotor activity than WT littermates. Both apomorphine and d-amphetamine increased total distance activity in Adh1-/- mice at both age intervals and in Adh1/4-/- mice at 7 months of age compared to WT mice. No significant changes were found regarding olfactory function, however biochemical data showed decreased 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC)/DA ratios in the olfactory bulb and decreased homovanillic acid (HVA)/DA ratios in the olfactory bulb, frontal cortex and striatum of Adh1/4-/- mice compared to WT mice. Our results suggest that lack of Adh1 alone or Adh1 and Adh4 together lead to changes in DA system related behavior, and that these knockout mice might be possible rodent models to study presymptomatic PD.

  15. Interactions of alcohol and tobacco in gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Salaspuro, Mikko; Mikko, Salaspuro

    2012-03-01

    Cancer prevention is based on the identification of specific etiologic factors. Acetaldehyde derived from the alcoholic beverage itself and formed from ethanol endogenously has recently been classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer/World Health Organization as a group 1 carcinogen to humans. This is based on the uniform epidemiological and biochemical evidence derived from individuals carrying alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase gene mutations. After drinking alcohol, these mutations are associated with increased exposure of the upper digestive tract to acetaldehyde and as well with a remarkably increased risk for upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract cancers. Acetaldehyde is the key intermediate in alcoholic fermentation and ethanol oxidation. Therefore, it is widely present in our environment. Furthermore, it is the most abundant carcinogenic compound of tobacco smoke. Most of the known risk factors for upper digestive tract cancer appear to be associated with an enhanced exposure of GI mucosa to locally formed acetaldehyde. In these process microbes, salivary glands and even mucosal cells appear to play an essential role. Consequently, in the presence of ethanol mutagenic acetaldehyde concentrations are found in the saliva, achlorhydric stomach and colon. Equal acetaldehyde concentrations are seen in saliva also during active smoking. ALDH2-deficiency and high active ADH1C result in two- to threefold salivary acetaldehyde concentrations after a dose of alcohol and this prevails for as long as ethanol is present in the blood and saliva. Regarding cancer prevention, the good news is that acetaldehyde exposure can be markedly reduced. This can be achieved by giving high priority for regulatory measures and consumer guidance.

  16. Transient and Prolonged Response of Chicken Cecum Mucosa to Colonization with Different Gut Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Volf, Jiri; Polansky, Ondrej; Varmuzova, Karolina; Gerzova, Lenka; Sekelova, Zuzana; Faldynova, Marcela; Babak, Vladimir; Medvecky, Matej; Smith, Adrian L.; Kaspers, Bernd; Velge, Philippe; Rychlik, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    In this study we determined protein and gene expression in the caeca of newly hatched chickens inoculated with cecal contents sourced from hens of different ages. Over 250 proteins exhibited modified expression levels in response to microbiota inoculation. The most significant inductions were observed for ISG12-2, OASL, ES1, LYG2, DMBT1-L, CDD, ANGPTL6, B2M, CUZD1, IgM and Ig lambda chain. Of these, ISG12-2, ES1 and both immunoglobulins were expressed at lower levels in germ-free chickens compared to conventional chickens. In contrast, CELA2A, BRT-2, ALDH1A1, ADH1C, AKR1B1L, HEXB, ALDH2, ALDOB, CALB1 and TTR were expressed at lower levels following inoculation of microbiota. When chicks were given microbiota preparations from different age donors, the recipients mounted differential responses to the inoculation which also differed from the response profile in naturally colonised birds. For example, B2M, CUZD1 and CELA2A responded differently to the inoculation with microbiota of 4- or 40-week-old hens. The increased or decreased gene expression could be recorded 6 weeks after the inoculation of newly hatched chickens. To characterise the proteins that may directly interact with the microbiota we characterised chicken proteins that co-purified with the microbiota and identified a range of host proteins including CDD, ANGPTL6, DMBT1-L, MEP1A and Ig lambda. We propose that induction of ISG12-2 results in reduced apoptosis of host cells exposed to the colonizing commensal microbiota and that CDD, ANGPTL6, DMBT1-L, MEP1A and Ig lambda reduce contact of luminal microbiota with the gut epithelium thereby reducing the inflammatory response. PMID:27685470

  17. Epigenetic effects of prenatal estradiol-17β exposure on the reproductive system of pigs.

    PubMed

    Kradolfer, David; Flöter, Veronika L; Bick, Jochen T; Fürst, Rainer W; Rode, Kristina; Brehm, Ralph; Henning, Heiko; Waberski, Dagmar; Bauersachs, Stefan; Ulbrich, Susanne E

    2016-07-15

    There is growing evidence that early life exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals might increase the risk for certain adult onset diseases, in particular reproductive health problems and hormone dependent cancers. Studies in rodents suggest that perinatal exposure to even low doses of estrogenic substances can cause adverse effects, including epigenetic reprogramming of the prostate and increased formation of precancerous lesions. We analyzed the effects of an in utero exposure to the strongest natural estrogen, estradiol-17β, in a pig model. Two different low and one high dose of estradiol-17β (0.05, 10 and 1000 μg/kg body weight/day) were orally applied to gilts during pregnancy and potential effects on the reproductive system of the offspring were analyzed. No significant effects on sperm vitality parameters and testes size were observed in adult boars. However, prenatal exposure to the high dose decreased absolute, but not relative weight of the testes in prepubertal piglets. RNA sequencing revealed significantly regulated genes of the prepubertal prostate, while testes and uteri were not affected. Notably, we found an increased prostate expression of CCDC80 and a decreased ADH1C expression in the low dose treatment groups. BGN and SPARC, two genes associated with prostate tumor progression, were as well more abundant in exposed animals. Strikingly, the gene body DNA methylation level of BGN was accordingly increased in the high dose group. Thus, while only prenatal exposure to a high dose of estrogen altered testes development and local DNA methylation of the prostate, even low dose exposure had significant effects on gene expression in the prostate of prepubertal piglet offspring. The relevance of these distinct, but subtle transcriptional changes following low dose treatment lacking a clear phenotype calls for further long-term investigations. An epigenetic reprogramming of the pig prostate due to prenatal estrogen cannot be neglected.

  18. Transcriptome-Wide Expression Profiling in Skin Fibroblasts of Patients with Joint Hypermobility Syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility Type

    PubMed Central

    Chiarelli, Nicola; Carini, Giulia; Zoppi, Nicoletta; Dordoni, Chiara; Ritelli, Marco; Venturini, Marina; Castori, Marco; Colombi, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers–Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT), is likely the most common systemic heritable connective tissue disorder, and is mostly recognized by generalized joint hypermobility, joint instability complications, minor skin changes and a wide range of satellite features. JHS/EDS-HT is considered an autosomal dominant trait but is still without a defined molecular basis. The absence of (a) causative gene(s) for JHS/EDS-HT is likely attributable to marked genetic heterogeneity and/or interaction of multiple loci. In order to help in deciphering such a complex molecular background, we carried out a comprehensive immunofluorescence analysis and gene expression profiling in cultured skin fibroblasts from five women affected with JHS/EDS-HT. Protein study revealed disarray of several matrix structural components such as fibrillins, tenascins, elastin, collagens, fibronectin, and their integrin receptors. Transcriptome analysis indicated perturbation of different signaling cascades that are required for homeostatic regulation either during development or in adult tissues as well as altered expression of several genes involved in maintenance of extracellular matrix architecture and homeostasis (e.g., SPON2, TGM2, MMP16, GPC4, SULF1), cell-cell adhesion (e.g., CDH2, CHD10, PCDH9, CLDN11, FLG, DSP), immune/inflammatory/pain responses (e.g., CFD, AQP9, COLEC12, KCNQ5, PRLR), and essential for redox balance (e.g., ADH1C, AKR1C2, AKR1C3, MAOB, GSTM5). Our findings provide a picture of the gene expression profile and dysregulated pathways in JHS/EDS-HT skin fibroblasts that correlate well with the systemic phenotype of the patients. PMID:27518164

  19. Liver proteomics in progressive alcoholic steatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Fernando, Harshica; Wiktorowicz, John E.; Soman, Kizhake V.; Kaphalia, Bhupendra S.; Khan, M. Firoze; Shakeel Ansari, G.A.

    2013-02-01

    ) and 3 (4–6) months. C and E represent pair-fed control and ethanol-fed rats, respectively. Highlights: ► Proteins related to ethanol-induced steatosis and mild steatohepatitis are identified. ► ADH1C and ALDH2 involved in alcohol metabolism are differentially expressed at 1 and 3 months. ► Discovery proteomics identified a group of proteins to serve as potential biomarkers. ► Using nonparametric analysis DDT is identified as a possible marker for liver damage.

  20. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP839) in the adh1 reference gene affects the quantitation of genetically modified maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Broothaerts, Wim; Corbisier, Philippe; Schimmel, Heinz; Trapmann, Stefanie; Vincent, Sandra; Emons, Hendrik

    2008-10-08

    The real-time PCR methods recommended in the European Union for the quantitation of genetically modified (GM) maize events NK603, GA21, and MON 863 measure the number of copies of the GM event in relation to those of the maize-specific adh1 reference gene. The study reported here revealed that the targeted 70 base pair adh1 region exhibits a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP839) that hampers the binding of the reverse primer used in the adh1 detection method. Partial fragments of the adh1-A and adh1-F allele were cloned. By allele-specific real-time PCR, it was shown that SNP839 corresponds to a common allelic polymorphism in maize. As a result, the quantitation of the GM maize events mentioned is positively or negatively biased, depending on the adh1 genotype of sample and calibrant. Therefore, it is proposed to revise the quantitative detection methods for NK603, GA21, and MON 863 maize.

  1. Under-Researched Demographics: Heavy Episodic Drinking and Alcohol-Related Problems Among Asian Americans.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Derek Kenji; Kaya, Aylin; Grivel, Margaux; Clinton, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    Asian Americans represent the fastest- growing population in the United States (Le 2010). At the same time, there is evidence that problematic drinking rates are increasing among young-adult Asian Americans (Grant et al. 2004). Accordingly, it is essential to understand the etiological determinants and mechanisms of risk that may help explain this growth in problematic alcohol use among this group. The high prevalence of the ALDH2*2 and ADH1B*2 alleles in a large percentage of Asian subgroups has been studied as a potential protective factors against alcohol abuse, yet some individuals who possess these genes still engage in problematic alcohol use (Wall et al. 2001). Other social and psychological factors may account for this discrepancy. Thus, some factors, such as negative physiological alcohol expectancies, are protective against alcohol abuse in this population (Hendershot et al. 2009). Sociocultural factors such as acculturation and nativity also may help explain drinking patterns among this group. The literature suggests that vast and significant within-group differences exist among Asian Americans, such that individuals who were born in the United States and/or are more acculturated are at elevated risk for alcohol abuse and related problems (Hahm et al. 2003). Differences also have been observed among Asian-American ethnic subgroups, with some groups (e.g., Japanese, Korean, and multi-Asian Americans) reporting higher rates of drinking compared with others (e.g., Chinese and Vietnamese Americans) (Iwamoto et al. 2012). Furthermore, Asian Americans who report higher levels of depressive symptoms, psychological distress, and perceived discrimination seem to be at a heightened risk for abusing alcohol (Iwamoto et al. 2011a; Nishimura et al. 2005; Yoo et al. 2010). Finally, an emerging body of research examining gender-relevant factors, including feminine and masculine norms, may help explain within-group differences among Asian-American women and men. Thus

  2. Exploring the Distribution of Genetic Markers of Pharmacogenomics Relevance in Brazilian and Mexican Populations

    PubMed Central

    Bonifaz-Peña, Vania; Contreras, Alejandra V.; Struchiner, Claudio Jose; Roela, Rosimeire A.; Furuya-Mazzotti, Tatiane K.; Chammas, Roger; Rangel-Escareño, Claudia; Uribe-Figueroa, Laura; Gómez-Vázquez, María José; McLeod, Howard L.; Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Studies of pharmacogenomics-related traits are increasingly being performed to identify loci that affect either drug response or susceptibility to adverse drug reactions. However, the effect of the polymorphisms can differ in magnitude or be absent depending on the population being assessed. We used the Affymetrix Drug Metabolizing Enzymes and Transporters (DMET) Plus array to characterize the distribution of polymorphisms of pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics (PGx) relevance in two samples from the most populous Latin American countries, Brazil and Mexico. The sample from Brazil included 268 individuals from the southeastern state of Rio de Janeiro, and was stratified into census categories. The sample from Mexico comprised 45 Native American Zapotecas and 224 self-identified Mestizo individuals from 5 states located in geographically distant regions in Mexico. We evaluated the admixture proportions in the Brazilian and Mexican samples using a panel of Ancestry Informative Markers extracted from the DMET array, which was validated with genome-wide data. A substantial variation in ancestral proportions across census categories in Brazil, and geographic regions in Mexico was identified. We evaluated the extent of genetic differentiation (measured as FST values) of the genetic markers of the DMET Plus array between the relevant parental populations. Although the average levels of genetic differentiation are low, there is a long tail of markers showing large frequency differences, including markers located in genes belonging to the Cytochrome P450, Solute Carrier (SLC) and UDP-glucuronyltransferase (UGT) families as well as other genes of PGx relevance such as ABCC8, ADH1A, CHST3, PON1, PPARD, PPARG, and VKORC1. We show how differences in admixture history may have an important impact in the distribution of allele and genotype frequencies at the population level. PMID:25419701

  3. A New View of Alcohol Metabolism and Alcoholism—Role of the High-Km Class III Alcohol Dehydrogenase (ADH3)

    PubMed Central

    Haseba, Takeshi; Ohno, Youkichi

    2010-01-01

    The conventional view is that alcohol metabolism is carried out by ADH1 (Class I) in the liver. However, it has been suggested that another pathway plays an important role in alcohol metabolism, especially when the level of blood ethanol is high or when drinking is chronic. Over the past three decades, vigorous attempts to identify the enzyme responsible for the non-ADH1 pathway have focused on the microsomal ethanol oxidizing system (MEOS) and catalase, but have failed to clarify their roles in systemic alcohol metabolism. Recently, using ADH3-null mutant mice, we demonstrated that ADH3 (Class III), which has a high Km and is a ubiquitous enzyme of ancient origin, contributes to systemic alcohol metabolism in a dose-dependent manner, thereby diminishing acute alcohol intoxication. Although the activity of ADH3 toward ethanol is usually low in vitro due to its very high Km, the catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) is markedly enhanced when the solution hydrophobicity of the reaction medium increases. Activation of ADH3 by increasing hydrophobicity should also occur in liver cells; a cytoplasmic solution of mouse liver cells was shown to be much more hydrophobic than a buffer solution when using Nile red as a hydrophobicity probe. When various doses of ethanol are administered to mice, liver ADH3 activity is dynamically regulated through induction or kinetic activation, while ADH1 activity is markedly lower at high doses (3–5 g/kg). These data suggest that ADH3 plays a dynamic role in alcohol metabolism, either collaborating with ADH1 or compensating for the reduced role of ADH1. A complex two-ADH model that ascribes total liver ADH activity to both ADH1 and ADH3 explains the dose-dependent changes in the pharmacokinetic parameters (β, CLT, AUC) of blood ethanol very well, suggesting that alcohol metabolism in mice is primarily governed by these two ADHs. In patients with alcoholic liver disease, liver ADH3 activity increases, while ADH1 activity decreases, as alcohol