Science.gov

Sample records for adherence medication possession

  1. HIV Medication Adherence

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment HIV Medication Adherence (Last updated 3/2/2017; last reviewed 3/2/2017) Key Points Medication adherence means sticking firmly to ... Before and After Starting HIV Medicines . What is medication adherence? Adherence means “to stick firmly.” So for ...

  2. Medication adherence: process for implementation

    PubMed Central

    Mendys, Phil; Zullig, Leah L; Burkholder, Rebecca; Granger, Bradi B; Bosworth, Hayden B

    2014-01-01

    Improving medication adherence is a critically important, but often enigmatic objective of patients, providers, and the overall health care system. Increasing medication adherence has the potential to reduce health care costs while improving care quality, patient satisfaction and health outcomes. While there are a number of papers that describe the benefits of medication adherence in terms of cost, safety, outcomes, or quality of life, there are limited reviews that consider how best to seamlessly integrate tools and processes directed at improving medication adherence. We will address processes for implementing medication adherence interventions with the goal of better informing providers and health care systems regarding the safe and effective use of medications. PMID:25114513

  3. Medication adherence in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Francisco Javier; Hernández, José Luis; Pereira, José; Herrera, Judit; Rodríguez, Carlos J

    2012-10-22

    Non-adherence is a major problem in the treatment of schizophrenia. Its high prevalence, potentially severe consequences and associated costs make the study of this phenomenon a priority issue. In this article, basic non-adherence concepts of prevalence, consequences, evaluation methods, methodological restrictions of available studies, risk factors and intervention strategies, are reviewed. Studying non-adherence risk factors is a necessary step toward designing adequately oriented intervention strategies. An operative definition of adherence and good knowledge of its evaluation methods are essential to study this phenomenon. Unfortunately, most available studies contain methodological restrictions, especially concerning the evaluation methods, and an agreed operative definition of adherence has only very recently been reached. Knowing non-adherence risk factors, intervention strategies and available evidence on their effectiveness is essential in making treatment decisions in daily clinical practice.

  4. [Strategies to improve medication adherence].

    PubMed

    Laufs, U; Böhm, M; Kroemer, H K; Schüssel, K; Griese, N; Schulz, M

    2011-08-01

    Up to 50 % of patients with chronic diseases do not take their medication regularly. Poor adherence to drug therapy is associated with higher morbidity and mortality. A selective literature search using the terms adherence, compliance, concordance, persistence, medication management, and pharmaceutical care was performed. Evidence for improving adherence has been provided for the following principles: individual counselling of patients and care givers, medication management including simplifying dosing and use of combination tablets as well as the use of individual unit doses, e. g. blister cards. The effectiveness has only been shown for the duration of the interventions. The improvement of medication adherence represents an area of research with high impact on outcomes and cost. Measures to improve adherence may be as important as the development of novel therapies. However, prospective clinical evaluations with clinical endpoints are missing especially for the German health care system in order to develop recommendations for clinical practice. Joint efforts of physicians and pharmacists are needed.

  5. Medication Adherence Measures: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Lam, Wai Yin; Fresco, Paula

    2015-01-01

    WHO reported that adherence among patients with chronic diseases averages only 50% in developed countries. This is recognized as a significant public health issue, since medication nonadherence leads to poor health outcomes and increased healthcare costs. Improving medication adherence is, therefore, crucial and revealed on many studies, suggesting interventions can improve medication adherence. One significant aspect of the strategies to improve medication adherence is to understand its magnitude. However, there is a lack of general guidance for researchers and healthcare professionals to choose the appropriate tools that can explore the extent of medication adherence and the reasons behind this problem in order to orchestrate subsequent interventions. This paper reviews both subjective and objective medication adherence measures, including direct measures, those involving secondary database analysis, electronic medication packaging (EMP) devices, pill count, and clinician assessments and self-report. Subjective measures generally provide explanations for patient's nonadherence whereas objective measures contribute to a more precise record of patient's medication-taking behavior. While choosing a suitable approach, researchers and healthcare professionals should balance the reliability and practicality, especially cost effectiveness, for their purpose. Meanwhile, because a perfect measure does not exist, a multimeasure approach seems to be the best solution currently.

  6. Medication Adherence Measures: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Wai Yin; Fresco, Paula

    2015-01-01

    WHO reported that adherence among patients with chronic diseases averages only 50% in developed countries. This is recognized as a significant public health issue, since medication nonadherence leads to poor health outcomes and increased healthcare costs. Improving medication adherence is, therefore, crucial and revealed on many studies, suggesting interventions can improve medication adherence. One significant aspect of the strategies to improve medication adherence is to understand its magnitude. However, there is a lack of general guidance for researchers and healthcare professionals to choose the appropriate tools that can explore the extent of medication adherence and the reasons behind this problem in order to orchestrate subsequent interventions. This paper reviews both subjective and objective medication adherence measures, including direct measures, those involving secondary database analysis, electronic medication packaging (EMP) devices, pill count, and clinician assessments and self-report. Subjective measures generally provide explanations for patient's nonadherence whereas objective measures contribute to a more precise record of patient's medication-taking behavior. While choosing a suitable approach, researchers and healthcare professionals should balance the reliability and practicality, especially cost effectiveness, for their purpose. Meanwhile, because a perfect measure does not exist, a multimeasure approach seems to be the best solution currently. PMID:26539470

  7. Bipolar disorder: medication adherence and life contentment.

    PubMed

    Darling, Carol Anderson; Olmstead, Spencer B; Lund, Victoria E; Fairclough, Jaime F

    2008-06-01

    Using family stress theory, we examined the influence of family and health stress, level of coping, and internal health locus of control upon the life contentment of individuals diagnosed with bipolar disorder (BPD) who were either adherent or nonadherent to their medication regimens. A survey-interview design was used with a sample of 100 individuals diagnosed with BPD; 50 participants were adherent to their medication and 50 were considered nonadherent. The results indicated that the adherent group had fewer health problems and more resources for coping with stress, possessed a stronger belief that their own behaviors controlled their health status, and had higher life contentment compared to nonadherent participants. For the participants in this study, internal health locus of control had the greatest total effect on life contentment followed by family coping. Implications included the need to comprehensively assess each individual regarding the multiple factors in one's life that influence an effective treatment regimen.

  8. Reinforcing adherence to antihypertensive medications.

    PubMed

    Petry, Nancy M; Alessi, Sheila M; Byrne, Shannon; White, William B

    2015-01-01

    This pilot study evaluated a reinforcement intervention to improve adherence to antihypertensive therapy. Twenty-nine participants were randomized to standard care or standard care plus financial reinforcement for 12 weeks. Participants in the reinforcement group received a cell phone to self-record videos of adherence, for which they earned rewards. These participants sent videos demonstrating on-time adherence 97.8% of the time. Pill count adherence differed significantly between the groups during treatment, with 98.8%±1.5% of pills taken during treatment in the reinforcement condition vs 92.6%±9.2% in standard care (P<.002). Benefits persisted throughout a 3-month follow-up, with 93.8%±9.3% vs 78.0%±18.5% of pills taken (P<.001). Pill counts correlated significantly (P<.001) with self-reports of adherence, which also differed between groups over time (P<.01). Systolic blood pressure decreased modestly over time in participants overall (P<.01) but without significant time-by-group effects. These results suggest that reinforcing medication adherence via cellular phone technology and financial reinforcement holds potential to improve adherence.

  9. Medication Adherence: A Call for Action

    PubMed Central

    Bosworth, Hayden B.; Granger, Bradi B.; Mendys, Phil; Brindis, Ralph; Burkholder, Rebecca; Czajkowski, Susan M.; Daniel, Jodi G.; Ekman, Inger; Ho, Michael; Johnson, Mimi; Kimmel, Stephen E.; Liu, Larry Z; Musaus, John; Shrank, William H.; Buono, Elizabeth Whalley; Weiss, Karen; Granger, Christopher B.

    2013-01-01

    Poor adherence to efficacious cardiovascular related medications has led to considerable morbidity, mortality, and avoidable health care costs. This paper provides results of a recent think tank meeting in which various stakeholder groups representing key experts from consumers, community health providers, the academic community, decision-making government officials (FDA, NIH, etc), and industry scientists met to evaluate the current status of medication adherence and provide recommendations for improving outcomes. Below, we review the magnitude of the problem of medication adherence, prevalence, impact, and cost. We then summarize proven effective approaches and conclude with a discussion of recommendations to address this growing and significant public health issue of medication non adherence. PMID:21884856

  10. Current Situation of Medication Adherence in Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Vrijens, Bernard; Antoniou, Sotiris; Burnier, Michel; de la Sierra, Alejandro; Volpe, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Despite increased awareness, poor adherence to treatments for chronic diseases remains a global problem. Adherence issues are common in patients taking antihypertensive therapy and associated with increased risks of coronary and cerebrovascular events. Whilst there has been a gradual trend toward improved control of hypertension, the number of patients with blood pressure values above goal has remained constant. This has both personal and economic consequences. Medication adherence is a multifaceted issue and consists of three components: initiation, implementation, and persistence. A combination of methods is recommended to measure adherence, with electronic monitoring and drug measurement being the most accurate. Pill burden, resulting from free combinations of blood pressure lowering treatments, makes the daily routine of medication taking complex, which can be a barrier to optimal adherence. Single-pill fixed-dose combinations simplify the habit of medication taking and improve medication adherence. Re-packing of medication is also being utilized as a method of improving adherence. This paper presents the outcomes of discussions by a European group of experts on the current situation of medication adherence in hypertension. PMID:28298894

  11. Medication Adherence in the General Population

    PubMed Central

    Glombiewski, Julia A.; Nestoriuc, Yvonne; Rief, Winfried; Glaesmer, Heide; Braehler, Elmar

    2012-01-01

    Background Adherence to medication is low in specific populations who need chronic medication. However, adherence to medication is also of interest in a more general fashion, independent of specific populations or side effects of particular drugs. If clinicians and researchers expect patients to show close to full adherence, it is relevant to know how likely the achievement of this goal is. Population based rates can provide an estimate of efforts needed to achieve near complete adherence in patient populations. The objective of the study was to collect normative data for medication nonadherence in the general population. Methods and Findings We assessed 2,512 persons (a representative sample of German population). Adherence was measured by Rief Adherence Index. We also assessed current medication intake and side effects. We found that at least 33% of Germans repeatedly fail to follow their doctor's recommendations regarding pharmacological treatments and only 25% of Germans describe themselves as fully adherent. Nonadherence to medication occurs more often in younger patients with higher socioeconomic status taking short-term medications than in older patients with chronic conditions. Experience with medication side effects was the most prominent predictor of nonadherence. Conclusions The major strengths of our study are a representative sample and a novel approach to assess adherence. Nonadherece seems to be commonplace in the general population. Therefore adherence cannot be expected per se but needs special efforts on behalf of prescribers and public health initiatives. Nonadherence to medication should not only be considered as a drug-specific behaviour problem, but as a behaviour pattern that is independent of the prescribed medication. PMID:23272064

  12. Medication adherence behaviors of Medicare beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    Carr-Lopez, Sian M; Shek, Allen; Lastimosa, Janine; Patel, Rajul A; Woelfel, Joseph A; Galal, Suzanne M; Gundersen, Berit

    2014-01-01

    Background Medication adherence is crucial for positive outcomes in the management of chronic conditions. Comprehensive medication consultation can improve medication adherence by addressing intentional and unintentional nonadherence. The Medicare Part D prescription drug benefit has eliminated some cost barriers. We sought to examine variables that impact self-reported medication adherence behaviors in an ambulatory Medicare-beneficiary population and to identify the factors that influence what information is provided during a pharmacist consultation. Methods Medicare beneficiaries who attended health fairs in northern California were offered medication therapy management (MTM) services during which demographic, social, and health information, and responses to survey questions regarding adherence were collected. Beneficiaries were also asked which critical elements of a consultation were typically provided by their community pharmacist. Survey responses were examined as a function of demographic, socioeconomic, and health-related factors. Results Of the 586 beneficiaries who were provided MTM services, 575 (98%) completed the adherence questions. Of responders, 406 (70%) reported taking medications “all of the time”. Of the remaining 169 (30%), the following reasons for nonadherence were provided: 123 (73%) forgetfulness; 18 (11%) side effects; and 17 (10%) the medication was not needed. Lower adherence rates were associated with difficulty paying for medication, presence of a medication-related problem, and certain symptomatic chronic conditions. Of the 532 who completed survey questions regarding the content of a typical pharmacist consultation, the topics included: 378 (71%) medication name and indication; 361 (68%) administration instructions; 307 (58%) side effects; 257 (48%) missed-dose instructions; and 245 (46%) interactions. Subsidy recipients and non-English speakers were significantly less likely to be counseled on drug name, indication, and side

  13. Adherence to Antihypertensive Medications in Iranian Patients.

    PubMed

    Behnood-Rod, Azin; Rabbanifar, Omid; Pourzargar, Pirouz; Rai, Alireza; Saadat, Zahra; Saadat, Habibollah; Moharamzad, Yashar; Morisky, Donald E

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Appropriate adherence to medication is still a challenging issue for hypertensive patients. We determined adherence to antihypertensive(s) and its associated factors among 280 Iranian patients. Methods. They were recruited consecutively from private and university health centers and pharmacies in four cities. The validated Persian version of the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) was administered to measure adherence. Results. Mean (±SD) overall MMAS-8 score was 5.75 (±1.88). About half of the sample (139 cases, 49.6%) showed low adherence (MMAS-8 score < 6). There was a negative linear association between the MMAS-8 score and systolic BP (r = -0.231, P < 0.001) as well as diastolic BP (r = -0.280, P < 0.001). In linear regression model, overweight/obesity (B = -0.52, P = 0.02), previous history of admission to emergency services due to hypertensive crisis (B = -0.79, P = 0.001), and getting medication directly from drugstore without refill prescription in hand (B = -0.51, P = 0.04) were factors recognized to have statistically significant association with the MMAS-8 score. Conclusion. Antihypertensive adherence was unsatisfactory. We suggest that health care providers pay special attention and make use of the aforementioned findings in their routine visits of hypertensive patients to recognize those who are vulnerable to poor adherence.

  14. Adherence to Antihypertensive Medications in Iranian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Behnood-Rod, Azin; Rabbanifar, Omid; Pourzargar, Pirouz; Rai, Alireza; Saadat, Zahra; Saadat, Habibollah; Moharamzad, Yashar; Morisky, Donald E.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Appropriate adherence to medication is still a challenging issue for hypertensive patients. We determined adherence to antihypertensive(s) and its associated factors among 280 Iranian patients. Methods. They were recruited consecutively from private and university health centers and pharmacies in four cities. The validated Persian version of the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) was administered to measure adherence. Results. Mean (±SD) overall MMAS-8 score was 5.75 (±1.88). About half of the sample (139 cases, 49.6%) showed low adherence (MMAS-8 score < 6). There was a negative linear association between the MMAS-8 score and systolic BP (r = −0.231, P < 0.001) as well as diastolic BP (r = −0.280, P < 0.001). In linear regression model, overweight/obesity (B = −0.52, P = 0.02), previous history of admission to emergency services due to hypertensive crisis (B = −0.79, P = 0.001), and getting medication directly from drugstore without refill prescription in hand (B = −0.51, P = 0.04) were factors recognized to have statistically significant association with the MMAS-8 score. Conclusion. Antihypertensive adherence was unsatisfactory. We suggest that health care providers pay special attention and make use of the aforementioned findings in their routine visits of hypertensive patients to recognize those who are vulnerable to poor adherence. PMID:27069676

  15. Factors affecting medication adherence in elderly people

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hyekyung; Kim, Yeonhee; Rhie, Sandy Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Background Little is known about the functional health literacy (FHL) associated with medication adherence in elderly patients. The aim of this study was to examine the FHL among older adults and identify influencing factors that can predict medication adherence. Methods This was a cross-sectional survey. Participants (n=160) aged 65 years and older were selected from outpatient clinics of 3 tertiary care hospitals, 6 community pharmacies, and 2 senior centers between November 1 and 30, 2014. The participants’ FHL was measured using the Korean Functional Health Literacy Test, which consists of 15 items including 8 numeracy and 7 reading comprehension items. Medication adherence was measured by the Adherence to Refills and Medication Scale. Descriptive statistics, chi-square or Fisher’s exact test, and multiple regression analyses were used to analyze the data. Results The mean score of the total FHL was 7.72±3.51 (range 0–15). The percentage of the total number of correct answers for the reading comprehension subtest and numeracy subtest were 48.1% and 54.4%, respectively. Among 160 participants, 52.5% showed low adherence to medication. The factors affecting medication adherence included the patient’s degree of satisfaction with the service (β=−0.215, P=0.022), sufficient explanation of medication counseling (β=−0.335, P=0.000), education level (β=−0.153, P=0.045), health-related problems (β=−0.239, P=0.004), and dosing frequency (β=0.189, P=0.018). Conclusion In this study, we found medication adherence of elderly patients was associated with education level, health-related problems, dosing frequency, satisfaction with patient counseling, and explanation of medication, but no association was found with FHL. Pharmacists should consider elderly patients’ individual characteristics such as educational background and specific patient-related health problems, provide sufficient information and explanation of medication, and ensure patient

  16. Race and medication adherence in Medicaid enrollees with type-2 diabetes.

    PubMed Central

    Shenolikar, Rahul A.; Balkrishnan, Rajesh; Camacho, Fabian T.; Whitmire, J. Timothy; Anderson, Roger T.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The association of medication adherence with race has been inadequately studied previously in type-2 diabetes patients. The study objective was to determine the association between race and medication adherence among type-2 diabetes patients. METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study, which compared medication adherence among different races of Medicaid insured patients with type-2 diabetes newly starting oral antidiabetic medication. A total of 1,527 African-American patients newly starting antidiabetic medication between July 2001 and June 2002 were compared with 1,128 white patients and 514 patients of other race. Medication adherence was measured as medication possession ratio using prescription refill patterns. Multivariate regression analyses were used to determine the difference in adherence rates adjusting for other covariates. RESULTS: Medication adherence rate was significantly higher for whites [0.59 (0.31)] as compared to African Americans [0.54 (0.31), (p<0.05)]. In multivariate analyses, the adherence rate of African-American patients was found to be significantly lower by 12% as compared to whites after adjusting for other covariates. Metformin users were associated with a 62% decrease in adherence rate as compared with the sulfonylureas group (p<0.05). CONCLUSION: The antidiabetic medication adherence was associated with race. Future research should investigate patient-related factors affecting medication adherence in type-2 diabetes patients. PMID:16895275

  17. Medication Possession Ratio Predicts Antiretroviral Regimens Persistence in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Westfall, Andrew O.; Paz, Jorge; Moran, Fiorella; Carbajal-Gonzalez, Danny; Callacondo, David; Avalos, Odalie; Rodriguez, Martin; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Echevarria, Juan; Willig, James H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives In developing nations, the use of operational parameters (OPs) in the prediction of clinical care represents a missed opportunity to enhance the care process. We modeled the impact of multiple measurements of antiretroviral treatment (ART) adherence on antiretroviral treatment outcomes in Peru. Design And Methods Retrospective cohort study including ART naïve, non-pregnant, adults initiating therapy at Hospital Nacional Cayetano Heredia, Lima-Peru (2006-2010). Three OPs were defined: 1) Medication possession ratio (MPR): days with antiretrovirals dispensed/days on first-line therapy; 2) Laboratory monitory constancy (LMC): proportion of 6 months intervals with ≥1 viral load or CD4 reported; 3) Clinic visit constancy (CVC): proportion of 6 months intervals with ≥1 clinic visit. Three multi-variable Cox proportional hazard (PH) models (one per OP) were fit for (1) time of first-line ART persistence and (2) time to second-line virologic failure. All models were adjusted for socio-demographic, clinical and laboratory variables. Results 856 patients were included in first-line persistence analyses, median age was 35.6 years [29.4-42.9] and most were male (624; 73%). In multivariable PH models, MPR (per 10% increase HR=0.66; 95%CI=0.61-0.71) and LMC (per 10% increase 0.83; 0.71-0.96) were associated with prolonged time on first-line therapies. Among 79 individuals included in time to second-line virologic failure analyses, MPR was the only OP independently associated with prolonged time to second-line virologic failure (per 10% increase 0.88; 0.77-0.99). Conclusions The capture and utilization of program level parameters such as MPR can provide valuable insight into patient-level treatment outcomes. PMID:24098475

  18. Medication Adherence and Readmission In Medicare Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuting; Kaplan, Cameron M.; Baik, Seo Hyon; Chang, Chung-Chou H.; Lave, Judith R.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine the relationship between 6-month medication adherence and 1-year down-stream heart-disease related readmission among patients who survived a myocardial infarction (MI). Study Design Retrospective, nested case-control analysis of Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries who were discharged alive post-MI in 2008 (n = 168,882). Methods Patients in the case group had their first heart-disease related readmission post-MI discharge during 6-9 months and/or 9-12 months. We then used propensity score matching mechanism to identify patients in the control group who had similar characteristics, but did not have a readmission in the same time window. Adherence was defined as the average 6-month medication possession ratio (MPR) prior to the first date of the time-window of defining readmission. Results After controlling for demographic, insurance coverage and clinical characteristics, patients who had a heart-disease related readmission had worse adherence, with MPR of 0.70 and 0.74 in the case and control groups. Odds ratio of MPR ≥0.75 was 0.79 (95% CI 0.75-0.83) among those with a readmission relative to those without. Conclusion Our study shows that better 6-month medication adherence may reduce heart-disease related readmissions within a year after an MI. PMID:25651604

  19. Medication Adherence among Older Adults with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Leutwyler, Heather C.; Fox, Patrick J.; Wallhagen, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    Older adults with schizophrenia are a growing segment of the population yet their physical and mental health status is extremely poor. The paper presents findings from a qualitative study that explored the understanding older adults with schizophrenia have of their physical health status. The study was conducted among 28 older adults with schizophrenia from a variety of settings using semi-structured interviews and participant observation. Self-management of psychiatric and non-psychiatric medications and its affect on their health status was one of the central themes that emerged from the study. Different styles of medication adherence were identified and factors associated with each style are presented. The findings provide insights into the design of clinical interventions aimed at promoting medication adherence among older adults with schizophrenia. PMID:23327119

  20. Medication Adherence in Psychopharmacologically Treated Adults with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safren, Steven A.; Duran, Petra; Yovel, Iftah; Perlman, Carol A.; Sprich, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Objective: One of the potential causes of residual symptoms of ADHD in adults can be difficulties with consistent adherence to medications. Method: This formative study examined self-reported medication adherence in adults with ADHD with clinically significant symptoms despite medication treatment. Results: Mean adherence for the two-week period…

  1. A Matter of Trust: Patient Barriers to Primary Medication Adherence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polinski, J. M.; Kesselheim, A. S.; Frolkis, J. P.; Wescott, P.; Allen-Coleman, C.; Fischer, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    Primary medication adherence occurs when a patient properly fills the first prescription for a new medication. Primary adherence only occurs about three-quarters of the time for antihypertensive medications. We assessed patients' barriers to primary adherence and attributes of patient-provider discussions that might improve primary adherence…

  2. Adherence to Cardiovascular Medications: Lessons Learned and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Kronish, Ian M; Ye, Siqin

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 50% of patients with cardiovascular disease and/or its major risk factors have poor adherence to their prescribed medications. Finding novel methods to help patients improve their adherence to existing evidence-based cardiovascular drug therapies has enormous potential to improve health outcomes while potentially reducing health care costs. The goal of this report is to provide a review of the current understanding of adherence to cardiovascular medications from the point of view of prescribing clinicians and cardiovascular researchers. Key topics addressed include: 1) definitions of medication adherence; 2) prevalence and impact of non-adherence; 3) methods for assessing medication adherence; 4) reasons for poor adherence; and 5) approaches to improving adherence to cardiovascular medications. For each of these topics, the report seeks to identify important gaps in knowledge and opportunities for advancing the field of cardiovascular adherence research. PMID:23621969

  3. Adherence to antipsychotic medication among homeless adults in Vancouver, Canada: a 15-year retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Moniruzzaman, A.; Fazel, S.; Procyshyn, R.; Somers, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the level of adherence to antipsychotic prescription medication in a well-defined homeless cohort over a 15-year period. We hypothesized that adherence would be well below the recommended threshold for clinical effectiveness (80 %), and that it would be strongly associated with modifiable risk factors in the social environment in which homeless people live. Method Linked baseline data (including comprehensive population-level administrative prescription records) were examined in a subpopulation of participants from two pragmatic-randomized trials that investigated Housing First for homeless and mentally ill adults. Adherence to antipsychotic medication was operationalized using the medication possession ratio. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate effect sizes between socio-demographic, homelessness-related and illness factors, and medication possession ratio. Results Among the 290 participants who met inclusion criteria for the current analysis, adherence to antipsychotic prescription was significantly associated with: history of psychiatric hospitalization; receipt of primary medical services; long-acting injectable antipsychotic formulations; and duration of homelessness. Mean medication possession ratio in the pre-randomization period was 0.41. Socio-demographic characteristics previously correlated with antipsychotic non-adherence were not significantly related to medication possession ratio. Conclusions This is the first study to quantify the very low level of adherence to antipsychotic medication among homeless people over an extended observation period of 15 years. Each of the four factors found to be significantly associated with adherence presents opportunities for intervention. Strategies to end homelessness for this population may represent the greatest opportunity to improve adherence to antipsychotic medication. PMID:27338740

  4. Transient improvement of urticaria induces poor adherence as assessed by Morisky Medication Adherence Scale-8.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Sakae; Masuda, Koji; Hiragun, Takaaki; Inomata, Naoko; Furue, Masutaka; Onozuka, Daisuke; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Murota, Hiroyuki; Sugaya, Makoto; Saeki, Hidehisa; Shintani, Yoichi; Tsunemi, Yuichiro; Abe, Shinya; Kobayashi, Miwa; Kitami, Yuki; Tanioka, Miki; Imafuku, Shinichi; Abe, Masatoshi; Hagihara, Akihito; Morisky, Donald E; Katoh, Norito

    2015-11-01

    Poor adherence to medication is a major public health challenge. Here, we aimed to determine the adherence to oral and topical medications and to analyze underlying associated factors using the translated Japanese version of Morisky Medication Adherence Scale-8 regarding urticaria treatment. Web-based questionnaires were performed for 3096 registered dermatological patients, along with a subanalysis of 751 registered urticaria patients in this study. The adherence to oral medication was significantly associated with the frequency of hospital visits. Variables that affected the adherence to topical medication included age and experience of drug effectiveness. The rate of responses that "It felt like the symptoms had improved" varied significantly among the dermatological diseases treated with oral medications. Dermatologists should be aware that adherence to the treatment of urticaria is quite low. Regular visits and active education for patients with urticaria are mandatory in order to achieve a good therapeutic outcome by increasing the adherence.

  5. An ingestible sensor for measuring medication adherence.

    PubMed

    Hafezi, Hooman; Robertson, Timothy L; Moon, Greg D; Au-Yeung, Kit-Yee; Zdeblick, Mark J; Savage, George M

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the design and performance of the first integrated-circuit microsensor developed for daily ingestion by patients. The ingestible sensor is a device that allows patients, families, and physicians to measure medication ingestion and adherence patterns in real time, relate pharmaceutical compliance to important physiologic metrics, and take appropriate action in response to a patient's adherence pattern and specific health metrics. The design and theory of operation of the device are presented, along with key in-vitro and in-vivo performance results. The chemical, toxicological, mechanical, and electrical safety tests performed to establish the device's safety profile are described in detail. Finally, aggregate results from multiple clinical trials involving 412 patients and 5656 days of system usage are presented to demonstrate the device's reliability and performance as part of an overall digital health feedback system.

  6. Medication Adherence Interventions That Target Subjects with Adherence Problems: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Conn, Vicki S.; Ruppar, Todd M.; Enriquez, Maithe; Cooper, Pam

    2015-01-01

    Background Inadequate medication adherence is a pervasive, under-recognized cause of poor health outcomes. Many intervention trials designed to improve medication adherence have targeted adults with adherence problems. No previous reviews have synthesized the effectiveness of medication adherence interventions focused on subjects with medication adherence difficulties. Objective This systematic review and meta-analysis synthesized findings from medication adherence intervention studies conducted among adults with medication adherence difficulties. Methods Primary research studies were eligible for inclusion if they tested an intervention designed to increase medication adherence among adults with documented adherence difficulties and reported medication adherence behavior outcomes. Comprehensive search strategies of 13 computerized databases, author and ancestry searches, and hand searches of 57 journals were used to locate eligible primary research. Participant demographics, intervention characteristics, and methodological features were reliably coded from reports along with medication adherence outcomes. Effect sizes for outcomes were calculated as standardized mean differences, and random effects models were used to estimate overall mean effects. Exploratory dichotomous and continuous variable moderator analyses were employed to examine potential associations between medication adherence effect size and sample, intervention, and methodological characteristics. Results Data were extracted from 53 reports of studies involving 8,243 individual primary study participants. The overall standardized mean difference effect size for treatment vs. control subjects was 0.301. For treatment pre- vs. post-intervention comparisons, the overall effect size was 0.533. Significantly larger effect sizes were associated with interventions incorporating prompts to take medications than interventions lacking medication prompts (0.497 vs. 0.234). Larger effect sizes were also found

  7. Systematic Review of Educational Interventions to Improve Glaucoma Medication Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Newman-Casey, Paula Anne; Weizer, Jennifer S.; Heisler, Michele; Lee, Paul P.; Stein, Joshua D.

    2014-01-01

    Adherence to prescribed glaucoma medications is often poor, and proper adherence can be challenging for patients. We systematically reviewed the literature and identified eight studies using educational interventions to improve glaucoma medication adherence. Overall, five of the eight studies found that educational interventions lead to a significant improvement in medication adherence, and the remaining studies found a trend towards improvement. Using information from this systematic review and Health Behavior Theory, we constructed a conceptual framework to illustrate how counseling and education can improve glaucoma medication adherence. More rigorous studies grounded in Health Behavior Theory with adequately powered samples and longer follow-up are needed. PMID:23697623

  8. The use of incentives to reinforce medication adherence

    PubMed Central

    DeFulio, Anthony; Silverman, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Objective Poor medication adherence is a longstanding problem, and is especially pertinent for individuals with chronic conditions or diseases. Adherence to medications can improve patient outcomes and greatly reduce the cost of care. The purpose of the present review is to describe the literature on the use of incentives as applied to the problem of medication adherence. Methods We conducted a systematic review of peer-reviewed empirical evaluations of incentives provided to patients contingent upon medication adherence. Results This review suggests that incentive-based medication adherence interventions can be very effective, but there are few controlled studies. The studies on incentive-based medication adherence interventions most commonly feature patients taking medication for drug or alcohol dependence, HIV, or latent tuberculosis. Across studies that reported percent adherence comparisons, incentives increased adherence by a mean of 20 percentage points, but effects varied widely. Cross-study comparisons indicate a positive relationship between the value of the incentive and the impact of the intervention. Post-intervention evaluations were rare, but tended to find that adherence effects diminish after the interventions are discontinued. Conclusions Incentive-based medication adherence interventions are promising but understudied. A significant challenge for research in this area is the development of sustainable and cost-effective long-term interventions. PMID:22580095

  9. 77 FR 20637 - Request for Information on Prescription Medication Adherence

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Request for Information on Prescription Medication Adherence AGENCY: Department of Health... potential solutions associated with the public health problem of prescription medication non-adherence in..., health care providers, and industry and private organizations in efforts to improve medication...

  10. Detection of Low Adherence in Rural Tuberculosis Patients in China: Application of Morisky Medication Adherence Scale

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Minlan; Markström, Urban; Lyu, Juncheng; Xu, Lingzhong

    2017-01-01

    The detection and analysis of cases of low medication adherence is important for helping to control tuberculosis (TB). The purpose of this study was to detect low adherence in rural TB patients by using the eight-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale of Chinese version (C-MMAS-8) and to further analyze the adherence-related variables. A total of 358 rural TB patients recruited through multi-stage randomized sampling participated in the survey. Data were collected by the use of interviewer-led questionnaires. First, the reliability and validity of the C-MMAS-8 were determined. Second, the adherence level was assessed, and factors related to low adherence were analyzed by using Pearson’s chi-square test and then in multiple logistic regression model. Finally, the prediction of the logistic model was assessed with Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves. The C-MMAS-8 could be used to detect low adherence in TB patients with good reliability and validity. By using the referred cutoff points of MMAS-8, it was found that more than one-third of the participants had low medication adherence. Further analysis revealed the variables of being older, a longer treatment time, and being depressive were significantly related to low adherence. The ROC of the model was assessed as good using the cutoff point. We conclude that appropriately tailored strategies are needed for health-care providers to help rural TB patients cope with low medication adherence. PMID:28257075

  11. Adherence to Glaucoma Medications Over 12 Months in Two US Community Pharmacy Chains

    PubMed Central

    Feehan, Michael; Munger, Mark A.; Cooper, Daniel K.; Hess, Kyle T.; Durante, Richard; Jones, Gregory J.; Montuoro, Jaime; Morrison, Margaux A.; Clegg, Daniel; Crandall, Alan S.; DeAngelis, Margaret M.

    2016-01-01

    This study determined the degree of adherence to medications for glaucoma among patients refilling prescriptions in community pharmacies. Methods: Data abstracted from the dispensing records for 3615 adult patients (18 years or older, predominantly over 45) receiving glaucoma medications from two retail pharmacy chains (64 stores in total) were analyzed. From a 24-month historic data capture period, the 12-month levels of adherence were determined using standard metrics, the proportion of days covered (PDC) and the medication possession ratio (MPR). The overall 12-month mean PDC was only 57%, and the mean MPR was 71%. Using a criterion by which 80% coverage was considered satisfactory adherence, only 30% had satisfactory overall 12-month PDC coverage, and only 37% had satisfactory overall 12-month MPR coverage. Refill adherence increased with age and was highest in the 65-and-older age group (p < 0.001). Differential adherence was found across medication classes, with the highest satisfactory coverage seen for those taking alpha2-adrenergic agonists (PDC = 36.0%; MPR = 47.6%) down to those taking direct cholinergic agonists (PDC = 25.0%; MPR = 31.2%) and combination products (PDC = 22.7%; MPR = 31.0%). Adherence to glaucoma medications in the community setting, as measured by pharmacy refill data, is very poor and represents a critical target for intervention. Community pharmacists are well positioned to monitor and reinforce adherence in this population. PMID:27618115

  12. Kitchen table wisdom: a Freirian approach to medication adherence.

    PubMed

    Williams, Ann B; Burgess, Jane D; Danvers, Karina; Malone, Janice; Winfield, Subrena D; Saunders, Lois

    2005-01-01

    Most interventions to promote medication adherence are based on psychological theories of individual behavior. In contrast, this article describes the theory and practice of a socially based adherence intervention that is guided by the educational principles of Paolo Freire. This approach asserts that adherence is influenced by the patient's social context and attempts to improve adherence through identifying social constraints on adherence behavior. The program builds on the traditions of patient education through home nursing visits. Using a dialectic process of dialogue and problem solving and working with a team that includes a nurse and a peer-educator, patients are encouraged to act to change their social environment to support their desire to achieve high levels of medication adherence. This strategy does not replace, but rather supplements, traditional methods of understanding individual patient behavior and allows the patient and the nurse to consider potential solutions to adherence challenges in the larger social context.

  13. Gender differences in Chinese immigrants: predictors for antihypertensive medication adherence.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Wen; Froelicher, Erika S

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe gender differences in predictors for antihypertensive medication adherence in Chinese immigrants. A cross-sectional design was used with recruitment with a convenience sample of 100 men and 100 women with hypertension. Measurements for demographics, cultural factors, clinical factors, and medication adherence were self-administered by the participants. Blood pressure was checked twice. A multivariate logistic regression was used to establish a parsimonious prediction model for medication adherence. It was found that in men, longer length of stay in the United States was a predictor for nonadherence. The predictor of nonadherence in women was lower perceived benefits of antihypertensive medications. To increase adherence in women, the benefits of antihypertensive medications should be emphasized. For men who have lived in the United States for 12 years or more, their adherence should be closely monitored.

  14. [Medication adherence of elderly in Porto Alegre, RS].

    PubMed

    Rocha, Cristiane Hoffmeister; de Oliveira, Ana Paula Sueiro; Ferreira, Caroline; Faggiani, Fabiana Tôrres; Schroeter, Guilherme; de Souza, Antônio Carlos Araújo; DeCarli, Geraldo Attilio; Morrone, Fernanda Bueno; Werlang, Maria Cristina

    2008-04-01

    Polipharmacy and medication non-adherence are problems faced frequently in the treatment of elderly patients. An exploratory cross-sectional study and quantitative approach were conducted to assess the frequency of treatment-adherence in elderly and how polipharmacy can affect adherence. Four hundred and sixty six elderly answered a questionnaire in Porto Alegre, RS in individual interviews. The adherence frequency found was 173 (37.1%) and was higher among those, who use less medication. These results indicate the need for implementing educational programs for the elderly in order to help them to follow their drug therapy.

  15. Medication Adherence in a Comparative Effectiveness Trial for Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Sylvia, Louisa G.; Reilly-Harrington, Noreen A.; Leon, Andrew C.; Kansky, Christine I.; Calabrese, Joseph R.; Bowden, Charles L.; Ketter, Terence A.; Friedman, Edward S.; Iosifescu, Dan V.; Thase, Michael E.; Ostacher, Michael J.; Keyes, Michelle; Rabideau, Dustin; Nierenberg, Andrew A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Psychopharmacology remains the foundation of treatment for bipolar disorder, but medication adherence in this population is low (Range = 20% to 64%). We examined medication adherence in a multi-site, comparative effectiveness study of lithium. Method The Lithium Moderate Dose Use Study (LiTMUS) was a six-month, six-site, randomized effectiveness trial of adjunctive moderate dose lithium therapy compared to optimized treatment in adult outpatients with bipolar I or II disorder (N=283). Medication adherence was measured at each study visit with the Tablet Routine Questionnaire. Results We found that 4.50% of participants reported missing at least 30% of their medications in the past week at baseline and non-adherence remained low throughout the trial (< 7%). Poor medication adherence was associated with more manic symptoms and side effects as well as lower lithium serum levels at mid- and post-treatment, but not with poor quality of life, overall severity of illness, or depressive symptoms. Conclusion Participants in LiTMUS were highly adherent with taking their medications. The lack of association with possible predictors of adherence, such as depression and quality of life, could be explained by the limited variance or other factors as well as by not using an objective measure of adherence. PMID:24117232

  16. Interventional tools to improve medication adherence: review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Elísio; Giardini, Anna; Savin, Magda; Menditto, Enrica; Lehane, Elaine; Laosa, Olga; Pecorelli, Sergio; Monaco, Alessandro; Marengoni, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Medication adherence and persistence is recognized as a worldwide public health problem, particularly important in the management of chronic diseases. Nonadherence to medical plans affects every level of the population, but particularly older adults due to the high number of coexisting diseases they are affected by and the consequent polypharmacy. Chronic disease management requires a continuous psychological adaptation and behavioral reorganization. In literature, many interventions to improve medication adherence have been described for different clinical conditions, however, most interventions seem to fail in their aims. Moreover, most interventions associated with adherence improvements are not associated with improvements in other outcomes. Indeed, in the last decades, the degree of nonadherence remained unchanged. In this work, we review the most frequent interventions employed to increase the degree of medication adherence, the measured outcomes, and the improvements achieved, as well as the main limitations of the available studies on adherence, with a particular focus on older persons. PMID:26396502

  17. What the newspapers say about medication adherence: a content analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study investigates the coverage of adherence to medicine by the UK and US newsprint media. Adherence to medicine is recognised as an important issue facing healthcare professionals and the newsprint media is a key source of health information, however, little is known about newspaper coverage of medication adherence. Methods A search of the newspaper database Nexis®UK from 2004–2011 was performed. Content analysis of newspaper articles which referenced medication adherence from the twelve highest circulating UK and US daily newspapers and their Sunday equivalents was carried out. A second researcher coded a 15% sample of newspaper articles to establish the inter-rater reliability of coding. Results Searches of newspaper coverage of medication adherence in the UK and US yielded 181 relevant articles for each country. There was a large increase in the number of scientific articles on medication adherence in PubMed® over the study period, however, this was not reflected in the frequency of newspaper articles published on medication adherence. UK newspaper articles were significantly more likely to report the benefits of adherence (p = 0.005), whereas US newspaper articles were significantly more likely to report adherence issues in the elderly population (p = 0.004) and adherence associated with diseases of the central nervous system (p = 0.046). The most commonly reported barriers to adherence were patient factors e.g. poor memory, beliefs and age, whereas, the most commonly reported facilitators to adherence were medication factors including simplified regimens, shorter treatment duration and combination tablets. HIV/AIDS was the single most frequently cited disease (reported in 20% of newspaper articles). Poor quality reporting of medication adherence was identified in 62% of newspaper articles. Conclusion Adherence is not well covered in the newspaper media despite a significant presence in the medical literature. The mass media have the

  18. Medication adherence as a learning process: insights from cognitive psychology.

    PubMed

    Rottman, Benjamin Margolin; Marcum, Zachary A; Thorpe, Carolyn T; Gellad, Walid F

    2017-03-01

    Non-adherence to medications is one of the largest contributors to sub-optimal health outcomes. Many theories of adherence include a 'value-expectancy' component in which a patient decides to take a medication partly based on expectations about whether it is effective, necessary, and tolerable. We propose reconceptualising this common theme as a kind of 'causal learning' - the patient learns whether a medication is effective, necessary, and tolerable, from experience with the medication. We apply cognitive psychology theories of how people learn cause-effect relations to elaborate this causal-learning challenge. First, expectations and impressions about a medication and beliefs about how a medication works, such as delay of onset, can shape a patient's perceived experience with the medication. Second, beliefs about medications propagate both 'top-down' and 'bottom-up', from experiences with specific medications to general beliefs about medications and vice versa. Third, non-adherence can interfere with learning about a medication, because beliefs, adherence, and experience with a medication are connected in a cyclic learning problem. We propose that by conceptualising non-adherence as a causal-learning process, clinicians can more effectively address a patient's misconceptions and biases, helping the patient develop more accurate impressions of the medication.

  19. The role of family caregivers in HIV medication adherence.

    PubMed

    Beals, K P; Wight, R G; Aneshensel, C S; Murphy, D A; Miller-Martinez, D

    2006-08-01

    This study examines the role that mid-life and older wives and mothers play in promoting medication adherence among their HIV-infected husbands or adult sons who require daily living assistance. Interviews were conducted with 112 caregiving dyads, with caregivers reporting on their own behaviours and attitudes towards medications, and care-recipients (persons living with HIV [PLH]) providing information about their own adherence practices. By examining how caregiver characteristics, behaviours, and attitudes may influence PLH adherence it is explicitly recognized that caregivers and PLH are linked within a caregiving dyad. Findings indicate that caregivers often remind PLH to take medications, but these reminders are not significantly associated with adherence. Caregivers also report strong attitudes about medication hassles, concerns over treatment failure and general concerns about adherence. Controlling for background characteristics, high perceived adherence hassles on the part of the caregiver were associated with low PLH adherence, providing evidence of shared influence within the caregiving dyad. Adherence interventions may maximize their effectiveness if they consider the role of the family caregiver because these data suggest that caregiver attitudes are linked with PLH adherence behaviours.

  20. Social work and medical care: electronic reminders to address adherence.

    PubMed

    Whisenhunt, Allison

    2014-01-01

    Social workers are often involved with patients and families around adherence, both to clinic appointments as well as to the medication regimen. An evidence-based practice project was created and implemented to determine the efficacy of electronic reminders such as text messaging on adherence. The implications of improving adherence can positively impact the patient on an individual level as well as reduce costs and increase revenue at a systems level.

  1. A new taxonomy for describing and defining adherence to medications

    PubMed Central

    Vrijens, Bernard; De Geest, Sabina; Hughes, Dyfrig A; Przemyslaw, Kardas; Demonceau, Jenny; Ruppar, Todd; Dobbels, Fabienne; Fargher, Emily; Morrison, Valerie; Lewek, Pawel; Matyjaszczyk, Michal; Mshelia, Comfort; Clyne, Wendy; Aronson, Jeffrey K; Urquhart, J

    2012-01-01

    Interest in patient adherence has increased in recent years, with a growing literature that shows the pervasiveness of poor adherence to appropriately prescribed medications. However, four decades of adherence research has not resulted in uniformity in the terminology used to describe deviations from prescribed therapies. The aim of this review was to propose a new taxonomy, in which adherence to medications is conceptualized, based on behavioural and pharmacological science, and which will support quantifiable parameters. A systematic literature review was performed using MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library and PsycINFO from database inception to 1 April 2009. The objective was to identify the different conceptual approaches to adherence research. Definitions were analyzed according to time and methodological perspectives. A taxonomic approach was subsequently derived, evaluated and discussed with international experts. More than 10 different terms describing medication-taking behaviour were identified through the literature review, often with differing meanings. The conceptual foundation for a new, transparent taxonomy relies on three elements, which make a clear distinction between processes that describe actions through established routines (‘Adherence to medications’, ‘Management of adherence’) and the discipline that studies those processes (‘Adherence-related sciences’). ‘Adherence to medications’ is the process by which patients take their medication as prescribed, further divided into three quantifiable phases: ‘Initiation’, ‘Implementation’ and ‘Discontinuation’. In response to the proliferation of ambiguous or unquantifiable terms in the literature on medication adherence, this research has resulted in a new conceptual foundation for a transparent taxonomy. The terms and definitions are focused on promoting consistency and quantification in terminology and methods to aid in the conduct, analysis and interpretation of

  2. Enhancing Commitment Improves Adherence to a Medical Regimen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putnam, Dana E.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Evaluated commitment-based intervention for improvement of adherence to 10-day antibiotic regimen. Subjects were 60 college students. Experimental subjects made verbal and written commitments for adherence and completed tasks designed to increase their investment in medication regimen. Controls performed similarly structured tasks unrelated to…

  3. Medication Adherence in Older Adults: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Elizabeth W.; Rung, Ariane L.; Leon, Kyla A.; Firestein, Catherine; Krousel-Wood, Marie

    2014-01-01

    To effectively address medication adherence and improve cardiovascular health among older adults, a deeper understanding is needed of the barriers that this age group faces and of approaches that would be most effective and feasible for improving adherence. We conducted a focus group study (n = 25) in a diverse population of older adults with…

  4. Teaching Medication Adherence in US Colleges and Schools of Pharmacy

    PubMed Central

    MacLean, Linda Garrelts; Hess, Karl; Farmer, Kevin C.; Yurkon, Afton M.; Ha, Carolyn C.; Schwartzman, Emmanuelle; Law, Anandi V.; Milani, Paul A.; Trotta, Katie; Labella, Sara R.; Designor, Rebecca J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To determine and describe the nature and extent of medication adherence education in US colleges and schools of pharmacy. Methods. A mixed-methods research study was conducted that included a national survey of pharmacy faculty members, a national survey of pharmacy students, and phone interviews of 3 faculty members and 6 preceptors. Results. The majority of faculty members and students agreed that background concepts in medication adherence are well covered in pharmacy curricula. Approximately 40% to 65% of the students sampled were not familiar with several adherence interventions. The 6 preceptors who were interviewed felt they were not well-informed on adherence interventions, unclear on what students knew about adherence, and challenged to provide adherence-related activities for students during practice experiences because of practice time constraints. Conclusions. Intermediate and advanced concepts in medication adherence, such as conducting interventions, are not adequately covered in pharmacy curriculums; therefore stakeholders in pharmacy education must develop national standards and tools to ensure consistent and adequate medication adherence education. PMID:22761520

  5. Concordance of adherence measurement using self-reported adherence questionnaires and medication monitoring devices.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lizheng; Liu, Jinan; Koleva, Yordanka; Fonseca, Vivian; Kalsekar, Anupama; Pawaskar, Manjiri

    2010-01-01

    The primary objective of this review was to identify and examine the literature on the association between medication adherence self-reported questionnaires (SRQs) and medication monitoring devices. The primary literature search was performed for 1980-2009 using PubMed, PubMed In Process and Non-Indexed, Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process, PsycINFO (EBSCO), CINAHL (EBSCO), Ovid HealthStar, EMBASE (Elsevier) and Cochrane Databases and using the following search terms: 'patient compliance', 'medication adherence', 'treatment compliance', 'drug monitoring', 'drug therapy', 'electronic', 'digital', 'computer', 'monitor', 'monitoring', 'drug', 'drugs', 'pharmaceutical preparations', 'compliance' and 'medications'. We identified studies that included SRQs and electronic monitoring devices to measure adherence and focused on the SRQs that were found to be moderately to highly correlated with the monitoring devices. Of the 1679 citations found via the primary search, 41 full-text articles were reviewed for correlation between monitoring devices and SRQs. A majority (68%) of articles reported high (27%), moderate (29%) or significant (12%) correlation between monitoring devices (37 using Medication Event Monitoring System [MEMS®] and four using other devices) and SRQs (11 identified and numerous other unnamed SRQs). The most commonly used SRQs were the Adult/Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trial Group (AACTG/PACTG; 24.4%, 10/41) followed by the 4-item Morisky (9.8%, 4/41), Brief Medication Questionnaire (9.8%, 4/41) and visual analogue scale (VAS; 7.3%, 3/41). Although study designs differed across the articles, SRQs appeared to report a higher rate of medication adherence (+14.9%) than monitoring devices. In conclusion, several medication adherence SRQs were validated using electronic monitoring devices. A majority of them showed high or moderate correlation with medication adherence measured using monitoring devices, and could be considered for measuring patient

  6. Adapting electronic adherence monitors to standard packages of topical medications.

    PubMed

    Tusa, Mark G; Ladd, Mitchell; Kaur, Mandeep; Balkrishnan, Rajesh; Feldman, Steven R

    2006-11-01

    Adherence to topical medications is poorly characterized. Electronic monitors can provide objective adherence data, but these monitors are not designed to work with tubes of medications. We sought to adapt standard electronic monitors to commonly used medication tubes. An adapter was created to fit over standard medication tubes. Screw threads on the adapter were designed to fit standard electronic monitors. Adapters and monitors were tested with tubes of gel, ointment, and cream over an 8-week test period during which the adapters were opened and closed twice daily. The adapters were easily mated to both plastic and aluminum topical medication tubes. The bond between the adapter and the tube was maintained throughout the study. Electronic monitors were 100% accurate at identifying medication events over the study period. We conclude that adapting existing electronic monitors to medication tubes should facilitate a much better understanding of adherence to topical treatment.

  7. Psychological perspective of medication adherence in transplantation

    PubMed Central

    De Pasquale, Concetta; Veroux, Massimiliano; Fornaro, Michele; Sinagra, Nunzia; Basile, Giusi; Gozzo, Cecilia; Santini, Roberta; Costa, Alessandra; Pistorio, Maria Luisa

    2016-01-01

    AIM To identify the risk factors and the post-transplant psychological symptoms that affect adherence to therapy in a population of kidney transplant recipients. METHODS The study examined the psychological variables likely responsible for the non-adherent behavior using a psychological-psychiatric assessment, evaluation of the perception of patients’ health status, and an interview regarding the anti-rejection drug therapy assumption. The study included 74 kidney transplant recipients. RESULTS Individuals with a higher level of education and more years since transplantation showed better mental balance. Regarding gender, women appeared to be less adherent to therapy. Further, the years since transplantation adversely affected the proper pharmacological assumption. Adherence to therapy did not significantly change with the mental health index. CONCLUSION The biopsychosocial illness model provides a conceptual frame of reference in which biological, psychological, and social aspects take on the same importance in the adherence to treatment protocols. For effective management, it is necessary to understand the patients’ personal experiences, their assumptions about the disease, health status perception, and mood, and to identify any “barriers” that could cause them to become noncompliant. PMID:28058225

  8. Pharmacist intervention for blood pressure control: medication intensification and adherence.

    PubMed

    Gums, Tyler H; Uribe, Liz; Vander Weg, Mark W; James, Paul; Coffey, Christopher; Carter, Barry L

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to describe medication adherence and medication intensification in a physician-pharmacist collaborative management (PPCM) model compared with usual care. This study was a prospective, cluster, randomized study in 32 primary care offices from 15 states. The primary outcomes were medication adherence and anti-hypertensive medication changes during the first 9 months of the intervention. The 9-month visit was completed by 539 patients, 345 of which received the intervention. There was no significant difference between intervention and usual care patients in regards to medication adherence at 9 months. Intervention patients received significantly more medication changes (4.9 vs.1.1; P = .0003) and had significantly increased use of diuretics and aldosterone antagonists when compared with usual care (P = .01).The PPCM model increased medication intensification; however, no significant change in medication adherence was detected. PPCM models will need to develop non-adherence identification and intervention methods to further improve the potency of the care team.

  9. Medication Adherence Pattern and Factors affecting Adherence in Helicobacter Pylori Eradication Therapy.

    PubMed

    Shakya Shrestha, S; Bhandari, M; Thapa, S R; Shrestha, R; Poudyal, R; Purbey, B; Gurung, R B

    2016-01-01

    Background Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is the most common chronic bacterial infection worldwide affecting approximately half of the world's population. A number of screening tests as well as complex multi-drug therapies are available for the detection and treatment of H. pylori infection. However, the optimum eradication rates of H. pylori infection can only be achieved if adherence to drug therapy is higher. Therefore, it is of utmost importance to determine the factors leading to poor adherence to obtain successful treatment outcomes. Objective To determine the medication adherence pattern in patients with H. pylori infection and assess the factors associated with non-adherence to the prescribed drug therapy. Method Patients meeting the inclusion criteria who were confirmed as H. pylori positive by rapid urease test (histopathology) and/ or stool antigen test and those under H. pylori eradication therapy were considered. Informed consent was taken from the patients or from the patient party in incapacitated patients. They were then interviewed using structured questionnaire. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS version 20 and a p-value < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Result Among the 70 participants included in this study, 57.10% (n=40) of them were males. The mean (±SD) age of the patients was 42.36 years (±17.93). Higher number (85.70% (n=60)) of the patients were adherent to the recommended medication. Forgetfulness was the reason for missing dose in a majority (80% (n=8)) of the nonadherent patients. A highly significant association (p<0.05) was observed between adherence and absence of symptomatic relief. However, there was no statistically significant association (p>0.05) between patients' adherence to gender, age, literacy, and the prescribed treatment regimen. Conclusion Majority of the patients with H. pylori infection were adherent to medication. Forgetfulness was the major reason for missing dose in the non-adherent

  10. A Synchronized Prescription Refill Program Improved Medication Adherence.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Jalpa A; Lim, Raymond; Li, Pengxiang; Young, Peinie P; Lawnicki, Victor F; State, Joseph J; Troxel, Andrea B; Volpp, Kevin G

    2016-08-01

    Synchronizing medication refills-renewing all medications at the same time from the same pharmacy-is an increasingly popular strategy to improve adherence to medication regimens, but there has been little research regarding its effectiveness. In light of increasing policy interest, we evaluated the impact of a pilot refill synchronization program implemented by a large national insurer. A random sample of Medicare Advantage patients receiving mail-order refills for common maintenance medications (antihypertensive, lipid-lowering, or antidiabetic agents) were invited to join the program and followed for twelve months. On average, the absolute increase in the proportion of patients deemed adherent during follow-up was 3-10 percentage points for the intervention group, compared to 1-5 percentage points for the control group. Patients with poorer baseline adherence showed larger increases in the absolute proportion deemed adherent in intervention (23-26 percentage points) compared to a control group (13-15 percentage points). Synchronizing refills might be a promising intervention to improve adherence to maintenance medications, especially among Medicare patients with low baseline adherence.

  11. Hot Topics in Primary Care: Medication Adherence in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Real-World Strategies for Addressing a Common Problem.

    PubMed

    Brunton, Stephen A; Polonsky, William H

    2017-04-01

    The importance of treatment adherence is well established, as poor adherence contributes to disease progression and increased morbidity and mortality. Analysis of 11,272 veterans with T2DM with a mean follow-up of 5 years showed that for each 10% increase in the medication possession ratio, the mean glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) decreased by 0.24%. Poor adherence also leads to increased health care resource utilization and costs, including more frequent hospitalizations. Conversely, while improved adherence increases medication costs, it can decrease overall health care resource utilization and costs. Improved medication adherence also contributes to improvement in diabetes-related quality of life.

  12. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Illness and Medication Beliefs are Associated with Medication Adherence.

    PubMed

    Krauskopf, Katherine; Federman, Alex D; Kale, Minal S; Sigel, Keith M; Martynenko, Melissa; O'Conor, Rachel; Wolf, Michael S; Leventhal, Howard; Wisnivesky, Juan P

    2015-04-01

    Almost half of patients with COPD do not adhere to their medications. Illness and medication beliefs are important determinants of adherence in other chronic diseases. Using the framework of the Common Sense Model of Self-Regulation (CSM), we determined associations between potentially modifiable beliefs and adherence to COPD medications in a cohort of English- and Spanish-speaking adults with COPD from New York and Chicago. Medication adherence was assessed using the Medication Adherence Report Scale. Illness and medication beliefs along CSM domains were evaluated using the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire (B-IPQ) and the Beliefs about Medications Questionnaire (BMQ). Unadjusted analysis (with Cohen's d effect sizes) and multiple logistic regression were used to assess the relationship between illness and medication beliefs with adherence. The study included 188 participants (47% Black, 13% Hispanics); 109 (58%) were non-adherent. Non-adherent participants were younger (p < 0.001), more likely to be Black or Hispanic (p = 0.001), to have reported low income (p = 0.02), and had fewer years of formal education (p = 0.002). In unadjusted comparisons, non-adherent participants reported being more concerned about their COPD (p = 0.011; Cohen's d = 0.43), more emotionally affected by the disease (p = 0.001; Cohen's d = 0.54), and had greater concerns about COPD medications (p < 0.001, Cohen's d = 0.81). In adjusted analyses, concerns about COPD medications independently predicted non-adherence (odds ratio: 0.52, 95% confidence interval: 0.36-0.75). In this cohort of urban minority adults, concerns about medications were associated with non-adherence. Future work should explore interventions to influence patient adherence by addressing concerns about the safety profile and long-term effects of COPD medications.

  13. Comprehensive medication management services influence medication adherence among Japanese older people

    PubMed Central

    Hirakawa, Yoshihisa; Hilawe, Esayas Haregot; Chiang, Chifa; Kawazoe, Nobuo; Aoyama, Atsuko

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Assistance from health professionals is very important to ensure medication adherence among older people. The present study aimed to assess the relationship between receipt of comprehensive medication management services by primary care physicians and medication adherence among community-dwelling older people in rural Japan. Methods: Data including medication adherence and whether or not a doctor knew all the kinds of medicines being taken were obtained from individuals aged 65 years or older who underwent an annual health checkup between February 2013 and March 2014 at a public clinic in Asakura. The subjects were divided into 2 groups: adherent (always) and non-adherent (not always). A logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the association between the presence of a doctor who was fully responsible for medication adherence and self-reported adherence. Predictors that exhibited significant association (p-value < 0.05) with medication adherence in a univariate analysis were entered in the model as possible confounding factors. The results were presented as odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results: Among four-hundred ninety-seven subjects in total, the adherent group included 430 subjects (86.5%), and its members were older than those of the non-adherent group. Significant predictors of good medication adherence included older age, no discomforting symptoms, eating regularly, diabetes mellitus and having a doctor who knew all the kinds of medicines being taken. After being adjusted for confounding variables, the subjects with a doctor who knew all the kinds of medicines they were taking were three times more likely to be adherent to medication (OR 3.01, 95% CI 1.44-6.99). Conclusion: Receipt of comprehensive medication management services for older people was associated with medication adherence. PMID:26705432

  14. Elder and Caregiver Solutions to Improve Medication Adherence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Quin, K. E.; Semalulu, T.; Orom, H.

    2015-01-01

    Medication mismanagement is a growing public health concern, especially among elders. Annually, it is a major contributor to emergency hospitalization and nursing home placement. Elders and their caregivers, as healthcare consumers and stakeholders in this issue, are uniquely qualified to inform strategies to improve medication adherence. We…

  15. Medication adherence: staying within the boundaries of safety.

    PubMed

    Mickelson, Robin Sue; Holden, Richard J

    2017-04-10

    An important domain of patient safety is the management of medications in home and community settings by patients and their caregiving network. This study applied human factors/ergonomics theories and methods to data about medication adherence collected from 61 patients with heart failure accompanied by 31 informal caregivers living in the US. Seventy non-adherence events were identified, described, and analysed for performance shaping factors. Half were classified as errors and half as violations. Performance shaping factors included elements of the person or team (e.g. patient limitations), task (e.g. complexity), tools and technologies (e.g. tool quality) and organisational, physical, and social context (e.g. resources, support, social influence). Study findings resulted in a dynamic systems model of medication safety applicable to patient medication adherence and the medication management process. Findings and the resulting model offer implications for future research on medication adherence, medication safety interventions, and resilience in home and community settings. Practitioner Summary: We describe situational and habitual errors and violations in medication use among older patients and their family members. Multiple factors pushed performance towards risk and harm. These factors can be the target for redesign or various forms of support, such as education, changes to the plan of care, and technology design.

  16. Association between adherence to medications for COPD and medications for other chronic conditions in COPD patients

    PubMed Central

    Dhamane, Amol D; Schwab, Phil; Hopson, Sari; Moretz, Chad; Annavarapu, Srinivas; Burslem, Kate; Renda, Andrew; Kaila, Shuchita

    2017-01-01

    Background Patients with COPD often have multiple comorbidities requiring use of multiple medications, and adherence rates for maintenance COPD (mCOPD) medications are already known to be suboptimal. Presence of comorbidities in COPD patients, and use of medications used to treat those comorbidities (non-COPD medications), may have an adverse impact on adherence to mCOPD medications. Objective The objective of the study was to evaluate the association between non-adherence to mCOPD medications and non-COPD medications in COPD patients. Methods COPD patients were identified using a large administrative claims database. Selected patients were 40–89 years old and continuously enrolled for 12 months prior to and 24 months after the first identified COPD diagnosis (index date) during January 1, 2009 to December 31, 2010. Patients were required to have ≥1 prescription for a mCOPD medication within 365 days of the index date and ≥1 prescription for one of 12 non-COPD medication classes within ±30 days of the first COPD prescription. Adherence (proportion of days covered [PDC]) was measured during 365 days following the first COPD prescription. The association between non-adherence (PDC <0.8) to mCOPD and non-adherence to non-COPD medications was determined using logistic regression, controlling for baseline patient characteristics. Results A total of 14,117 patients, with a mean age of 69.9 years, met study criteria. Of these, 40.9% were males and 79.2% were non-adherent to mCOPD medications with a mean PDC of 0.47. Non-adherence to mCOPD medications was associated with non-adherence to 10 of 12 non-COPD medication classes (odds ratio 1.38–1.78, all P<0.01). Conclusion Adherence to mCOPD medications is low. Non-adherence (or adherence) to mCOPD medications is positively related to non-adherence (or adherence) to non-COPD medications, implying that the need to take medications prescribed for comorbid conditions does not adversely impact adherence to m

  17. Secondary preventive medication persistence and adherence 1 year after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Olson, D.M.; Zhao, X.; Pan, W.; Zimmer, L.O.; Goldstein, L.B.; Alberts, M.J.; Fagan, S.C.; Fonarow, G.C.; Johnston, S.C.; Kidwell, C.; LaBresh, K.A.; Ovbiagele, B.; Schwamm, L.; Peterson, E.D.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Data on long-term use of secondary prevention medications following stroke are limited. The Adherence eValuation After Ischemic stroke–Longitudinal (AVAIL) Registry assessed patient, provider, and system-level factors influencing continuation of prevention medications for 1 year following stroke hospitalization discharge. Methods: Patients with ischemic stroke or TIA discharged from 106 hospitals participating in the American Heart Association Get With The Guidelines–Stroke program were surveyed to determine their use of warfarin, antiplatelet, antihypertensive, lipid-lowering, and diabetes medications from discharge to 12 months. Reasons for stopping medications were ascertained. Persistence was defined as continuation of all secondary preventive medications prescribed at hospital discharge, and adherence as continuation of prescribed medications except those stopped according to health care provider instructions. Results: Of the 2,880 patients enrolled in AVAIL, 88.4% (2,457 patients) completed 1-year interviews. Of these, 65.9% were regimen persistent and 86.6% were regimen adherent. Independent predictors of 1-year medication persistence included fewer medications prescribed at discharge, having an adequate income, having an appointment with a primary care provider, and greater understanding of why medications were prescribed and their side effects. Independent predictors of adherence were similar to those for persistence. Conclusions: Although up to one-third of stroke patients discontinued one or more secondary prevention medications within 1 year of hospital discharge, self-discontinuation of these medications is uncommon. Several potentially modifiable patient, provider, and system-level factors associated with persistence and adherence may be targets for future interventions. PMID:21900638

  18. Improving outpatient primary medication adherence with physician guided, automated dispensing

    PubMed Central

    Moroshek, Jacob G

    2017-01-01

    Background Physician dispensing, different from pharmacist dispensing, is a way for practitioners to supply their patients with medications, at the point of care. The InstyMeds dispenser and logistics system can automate much of the dispensing, insurance adjudication, inventory management, and regulatory reporting that is required of physician dispensing. Objective To understand the percentage of patients that exhibit primary adherence to medication in the outpatient setting when choosing InstyMeds. Method The InstyMeds dispensing database was de-identified and analyzed for primary adherence. This is the ratio of patients who dispensed their medication to those who received an eligible prescription. Results The average InstyMeds emergency department installation has a primary adherence rate of 91.7%. The maximum rate for an installed device was 98.5%. Conclusion Although national rates of primary adherence have been found to be in the range of 70%, automated physician dispensing vastly improves the rate of adherence. Improved adherence should lead to better patient outcomes, fewer return visits, and lower healthcare costs. PMID:28115860

  19. Glaucoma Medication Adherence among African Americans: Program Development

    PubMed Central

    Dreer, Laura E.; Girkin, Christopher A.; Campbell, Lisa; Wood, Andy; Gao, Liyan; Owsley, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To elucidate barriers and facilitators related to glaucoma medication adherence among African Americans (AA) with glaucoma and to elicit input from a community-based participatory research team in order to guide the development of a culturally informed, health promotion program for improving glaucoma medication adherence among AA’s. Methods The nominal group technique (NGT), a highly structured focus group methodology, was implemented with 12 separate groups of AA’s patients with glaucoma (N = 89) to identify barriers and facilitators related to glaucoma medication usage. Participant rank-ordering votes were summed across groups and categorized into themes. Next, an individually and culturally targeted health promotion program promoting appropriate medication adherence was developed based on focus group results and input from a community-based participatory research team. Results The top five barriers included problems with 1) forgetfulness, 2) side effects, 3) cost/affordability, 4) eye drop administration, and 5) the eye drop schedule. The most salient top five facilitators were 1) fear or thoughts about the consequences of not taking eye drops, 2) use of memory aids, cues, or strategies, 3) maintaining a regular routine or schedule for eye drop administration, 4) ability to afford eye drops, and 5) keeping eye drops in the same area. The resulting health promotion program was based on a multi-component empowerment framework that included glaucoma education, motivational interviewing, and problem-solving training to improve glaucoma medication adherence. Conclusions Barriers and facilitators related to glaucoma medication adherence among AA’s are multifactorial. Based on the NGT themes and input from the community-based participatory research team, a culturally informed, health promotion program was designed and holds great promise for improving medication adherence among this vulnerable population. PMID:23873033

  20. Medication Beliefs Mediate Between Depressive Symptoms and Medication Adherence in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Hilliard, Marisa E.; Eakin, Michelle N.; Borrelli, Belinda; Green, Angela; Riekert, Kristin A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Depression is a known barrier to regimen adherence for chronic conditions. Despite elevated depression rates and complex regimens for people with cystic fibrosis (CF), little is known about associations between depressive symptoms and CF adherence. One possibility is that depressive symptoms distort beliefs about medications, which may influence adherence. Method Adolescents and adults (N = 128; mean age = 29 ± 11 years, range = 16–63, 93% Caucasian) with CF reported on depressive symptoms and medication beliefs (self-efficacy, motivation, perceived importance, and outcome expectancies related to taking medications). Medication adherence was assessed objectively through pharmacy refill data. Cross-sectional structural equation models evaluated medication beliefs as a mediator between depressive symptoms and medication adherence. Results Twenty-three percent of participants exceeded clinical cutoffs for depressive symptoms. Participants took less than half of prescribed pulmonary medications (mean adherence rate = 44.4 ± 26.7%). Depressive symptoms were correlated with adherence (r = −.22, p < .05), and medication beliefs (b = −0.13, 95% CI [−0.24, −0.03]) significantly mediated this relation. Higher depressive symptoms were associated with less positive medication beliefs (b = −0.27, p < .01), which were associated with lower medication adherence (b = 0.49, p < .01). Conclusions Depressive symptoms are related to beliefs about and adherence to CF medications. Monitoring depressive symptoms and medication beliefs in routine CF care may help identify risks for nonadherence and facilitate interventions to reduce depression, adaptive medication beliefs, and ultimately improve adherence and CF management. PMID:25110847

  1. LONGITUDINAL ASSOCIATION BETWEEN MEDICATION ADHERENCE AND LUNG HEALTH IN PEOPLE WITH CYSTIC FIBROSIS

    PubMed Central

    Eakin, Michelle N.; Bilderback, Andrew; Boyle, Michael P.; Mogayzel, Peter J.; Riekert, Kristin A.

    2011-01-01

    Background This study examined the relationship of medication adherence to frequency of pulmonary exacerbation and rate of decline in FEV1% predicted (FEV1). Methods 95 CF patients ages 6 years or older and prescribed a pulmonary medication, enrolled in a longitudinal retrospective review of medication adherence and health outcomes (the occurrence and frequency of intravenous (IV) antibiotic treatments and FEV1) over 12-months. Pharmacy refill records were used to calculate a medication possession ratio (MPR). Results Composite MPR predicted the occurrence of at least one pulmonary exacerbation requiring a course of IV antibiotics (IRR=2.34, p=0.05), but not the frequency of exacerbations, after controlling for gender, baseline FEV1, and regimen complexity. Composite MPR predicted baseline FEV1 (estimate=29.81, p=.007), but not decline in FEV1. Conclusions These results demonstrate a significant relation between medication adherence and IV antibiotics in CF patients, highlighting the importance of addressing adherence during clinic visits to improve health outcomes. PMID:21458391

  2. Adherence to medication in the community: audit cycle of interventions to improve the assessment of adherence

    PubMed Central

    Farooq, Saeed; Choudry, Abid

    2017-01-01

    Aims and method To investigate whether medication adherence is monitored during follow-up in out-patient reviews. A retrospective audit was carried out with a sample of 50 follow-up patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. Following this, interventions were made prior to the re-audit (including text messaging clinicians and prompt sheets in the out-patient department to encourage adherence discussions). Results There was an improvement on all the standards set for this audit following the interventions. More doctors had discussed medication adherence (62% second cycle v. 50% first cycle) with their patient and there was increased discussion and documentation regarding medication side-effects (60% second cycle v. 30% first cycle). More clinicians discussed the response to medication (60% second cycle v. 46% first cycle). Clinical implications Treatment adherence is not regularly monitored or recorded in clinical notes in routine psychiatric out-patient appointments. This highlights the need for regular training to improve practice. PMID:28184317

  3. The association of smoking with medical treatment adherence in the workforce of a large employer

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Bruce W; Lynch, Wendy D

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Prior descriptive epidemiology studies have shown that smokers have lower compliance rates with preventive care services and lower chronic medication adherence rates for preventive care services in separate studies. The goal of this study was to perform a more detailed analysis to validate both of these findings for current smokers versus nonsmokers within the benefit-covered population of a large US employer. Patients and methods This study involved the analysis of incurred medical and pharmacy claims for employee and spouse health plan enrollees of a single US-based employer during 2010. Multivariate regression models were used to compare data by active or never-smoker status for preventive care services and medication adherence for chronic conditions. Analysis controlled for demographic variables, chronic condition prevalence, and depression. Results Controlling for demographic variables and comorbid conditions, smokers had significantly lower cancer screening rates, with absolute reductions of 6%–13%. Adherence to chronic medication use for hypertension was also significantly lower among smokers, with nearly 7% fewer smokers having a medication possession ratio of ≥80%. Smokers were less adherent to depression medications (relative risk =0.79) than nonsmokers (P=0.10). While not statistically significant, smokers were consistently less adherent to all other medications than nonsmokers. Conclusion Current smokers are less compliant with recommended preventive care and medication use than nonsmokers, likely contributing to smoking-related employer costs. Awareness of these care gaps among smokers and direct management should be considered as part of a comprehensive population health-management strategy. PMID:24790415

  4. Multifaceted Prospective Memory Intervention to Improve Medication Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Insel, Kathie C.; Einstein, Gilles O.; Morrow, Daniel G.; Koerner, Kari M.; Hepworth, Joseph T.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives Older adults do not take medication as prescribed, diminishing the benefits of treatment and increasing costs to individuals and society. A multifaceted prospective memory intervention for improving adherence to antihypertensive medication was tested and assessed if executive function/working memory processes moderated intervention effects. Design A two group longitudinal randomized control trial was used. Setting and Participants and Measurements The sample consisted of community-based older adults (≥ 65 years of age) without signs of dementia or symptoms of severe depression who were self-managing prescribed medication. Following four weeks of initial adherence monitoring using a medication event monitoring system (MEMS®), individuals with 90% or less adherence were randomly assigned to groups. Intervention The prospective memory intervention was designed to provide strategies that switch older adults from relying on executive function/working memory processes (that show effects of cognitive aging) to mostly automatic associative processes (that are relatively spared with normal aging) for remembering to take one’s medications. Strategies included establishing a routine, establishing cues strongly associated with medication taking actions, performing the action immediately upon thinking about it, using a medication organizer, and imagining medication taking to enhance encoding and improve cuing. Results There was significant improvement in adherence for the intervention group (57% at baseline to 78% post intervention), but most of these gains were lost after 5 months. The control condition started at 68%, was stable during the intervention, but dropped to 62%. Executive function/working memory moderated the intervention effect, with the intervention producing greater benefit for those with lower executive function/working memory. Conclusion The intervention improved adherence, but the benefits were not sustained. Further research is

  5. Medication adherence and older renal transplant patients' perceptions of electronic medication monitoring.

    PubMed

    Russell, Cynthia L; Owens, Sarah; Hamburger, Karen Q; Thompson, Denise A; Leach, Rebecca R; Cetingok, Muammer; Hathaway, Donna; Conn, Vicki S; Ashbaugh, Catherine; Peace, Leanne; Madsen, Richard; Winsett, Rebecca P; Wakefield, Mark R

    2009-10-01

    This study evaluated older renal transplant recipients' perceptions of electronic medication monitoring and the influence of these perceptions on medication adherence. A sample of 73 older adult renal transplant recipients who used the Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS(®)) TrackCaps for 12 months provided their perceptions of device use. Participants perceived that the MEMS had a neutral effect on their medication-taking routine (65%), believed the MEMS was practical (56%), and could not describe any instances in which using the MEMS was difficult (56%). No significant difference in medication adherence was found between those who perceived the MEMS's influence negatively/neutrally and those who perceived the MEMS positively (p = 0.22). Medication adherence data from older adult renal transplant recipients can be used regardless of their perceptions of the MEMS's influence on their medication taking without biasing medication adherence data.

  6. 76 FR 12969 - Campaign To Improve Poor Medication Adherence (U18)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Campaign To Improve Poor Medication Adherence (U18) AGENCY... ] importance of good medication adherence, a vital first step toward improved adherence behavior and better...' awareness of the importance of good medication adherence and provide tools to prescribers to help...

  7. Improving Patient's Primary Medication Adherence: The Value of Pharmaceutical Counseling.

    PubMed

    Leguelinel-Blache, Géraldine; Dubois, Florent; Bouvet, Sophie; Roux-Marson, Clarisse; Arnaud, Fabrice; Castelli, Christel; Ray, Valérie; Kinowski, Jean-Marie; Sotto, Albert

    2015-10-01

    Quality of transitions of care is one of the first concerns in patient safety. Redesigning the discharge process to incorporate clinical pharmacy activities could reduce the incidence of postdischarge adverse events by improving medication adherence. The present study investigated the value of pharmacist counseling sessions on primary medication adherence after hospital discharge.This study was conducted in a 1844-bed hospital in France. It was divided in an observational period and an interventional period of 3 months each. In both periods, ward-based clinical pharmacists performed medication reconciliation and inpatient follow-up. In interventional period, initial counseling and discharge counseling sessions were added to pharmaceutical care. The primary medication adherence was assessed by calling community pharmacists 7 days after patient discharge.We compared the measure of adherence between the patients from the observational period (n = 201) and the interventional period (n = 193). The rate of patients who were adherent increased from 51.0% to 66.7% between both periods (P < 0.01). When discharge counseling was performed (n = 78), this rate rose to 79.7% (P < 0.001). The multivariate regression performed on data from both periods showed that age of at least 78 years old, and 3 or less new medications on discharge order were predictive factors of adherence. New medications ordered at discharge represented 42.0% (n = 1018/2426) of all medications on discharge order. The rate of unfilled new medications decreased from 50.2% in the observational period to 32.5% in the interventional period (P < 10). However, patients included in the observational period were not significantly more often readmitted or visited the emergency department than the patients who experienced discharge counseling during the interventional period (45.3% vs. 46.2%; P = 0.89).This study highlights that discharge counseling sessions are essential to improve

  8. Decisional capacity and medication adherence among youth with HIV.

    PubMed

    Chenneville, Tiffany; Clutter, Michiko Otsuki; Hintz, Stephanie; Walsh, Audra; Emmanuel, Patricia; Lujan-Zilberman, Jorge; Rodriguez, Carina

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory study examined the degree to which decisional capacity (DC) is associated with measures of self-reported medication adherence. We hypothesized that youth with higher levels of DC would report greater levels of antiretroviral medication adherence. Seventy-two (72) youth with HIV aged 13-24 participated in this study. Data collection included administration of the MacArthur Competence Tool for Treatment and measures of adherence (i.e., seven-day self-report interview, visual analog scale, and biological indicators). Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, intercorrelations, and multiple and Poisson regression analyses. Youth with HIV who exhibited greater understanding of their disease were more likely to report fewer missed doses in the last seven days. Findings build upon literature in the areas of DC and health literacy and highlight the potential utility of enhancing HIV disease understanding among youth with HIV.

  9. Metacognition and medication adherence: how do older adults remember?

    PubMed

    Gould, O N; McDonald-Miszczak, L; King, B

    1997-01-01

    Fifty-one older adults (M age = 75.9 years, SD = 6.9) reported their use of memory strategies for taking of medication using the Prospective Memory for Medication Questionnaire. Older adults used internal strategies more often when the domain was restricted to medication taking but used external strategies more often when queried across a variety of everyday situations. Surprisingly, the hypothesis that medical factors would be the primary determinants of older adults' reports of memory strategy use and perceived adherence was not supported. Metamemorial variables of non-domain-specific memory self-efficacy and memory anxiety in everyday life were significant predictors of strategy use and perceived adherence over and above variables related to the domain of health.

  10. Mental Health, Binge Drinking, and Antihypertension Medication Adherence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banta, Jim E.; Haskard, Kelly B.; Haviland, Mark G.; Williams, Summer L.; Werner, Leonard S.; Anderson, Donald L.; DiMatteo, M. Robin

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the relationship between self-reported mental health and binge drinking, as well as health status, sociodemographic, social support, economic resource, and health care access indicators to antihypertension medication adherence. Method: Analysis of 2003 California Health Interview Survey data. Results: Having poor mental…

  11. Families and medication use and adherence among Latinos with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Mercedes; Barrio, Concepción

    2017-01-01

    Background Medication nonadherence among Latinos with schizophrenia represents a significant treatment obstacle. Although some studies have examined patient and family perceptions of adherence, few have examined these perceptions together. However, such knowledge can provide a deeper understanding of how family processes may contribute to or impede adherence among underserved groups such as Latinos. Aims This study explored perceptions of medication and adherence among Latinos with schizophrenia and key family members. Method Purposive sampling was used to collect data from 34 participants: 14 patients with schizophrenia receiving community-based mental health services in an urban public setting and 20 key family members. Informed by grounded theory, semistructured interviews were analyzed by bilingual–bicultural team members. Results Salient themes emerged indicating facilitators of and obstacles to medication use. Specifically, challenges centered on medication side effects, autonomy and choice, and illness insight, whereas facilitators focused on family support and holistic views of treatment and empowerment. Conclusions Because the majority of Spanish-speaking Latinos with schizophrenia live with family, it is important to examine family factors that may influence medication use. Findings suggest that patient and family perceptions of medication should be examined as part of the treatment process, particularly regarding issues of autonomy and choice. PMID:27690706

  12. Factors of interpersonal communication and behavioral health on medication self-efficacy and medication adherence.

    PubMed

    Archiopoli, Ashley; Ginossar, Tamar; Wilcox, Bryan; Avila, Magdalena; Hill, Ricky; Oetzel, John

    2016-12-01

    Despite devastating effects on health outcomes and disease progression, many people living with HIV (PLWH) are non-adherent to their medications. Medication self-efficacy is a pivotal factor in medication adherence, yet its formation and relationship with other factors are understudied. This study examines a model that considers the role of three communicative factors (patient-provider communication, social support, and social undermining) and two behavioral health factors (depression and alcohol abuse) and medication self-efficacy impacting medication adherence. Methods included a cross-sectional design using a survey questionnaire of 344 PLWH. Findings indicated that 25% of variance in medication adherence can be explained by a mediation model where depression (B = -.18) and provider-patient communication (B = .21) affect medication self-efficacy, which in turn impacts medication adherence (B = .64). Other variables, including demographics, did not add any explanatory power. These findings demonstrate the complex nature of medication adherence and the formation of medication self-efficacy.

  13. Interleukin-8 secretion by epithelial cells infected with diffusely adherent Escherichia coli possessing Afa adhesin-coding genes.

    PubMed

    Arikawa, Kentaro; Meraz, Ismail Mustafa; Nishikawa, Yoshikazu; Ogasawara, Jun; Hase, Atsushi

    2005-01-01

    Escherichia coli that adhere sparsely to human epithelial (HEp-2) cells are known as diffusely adherent E. coli(DAEC) and considered potentially diarrheagenic. The role of the afimbrial adhesive sheath (Afa)-identified originally as a uropathogenic factor-in diffuse adhesion is now understood. However, the role of DAEC in diarrheal disease remains controversial. Recently, ability to induce interleukin-8 (IL-8) secretion from intestinal epithelial cells has been suggested as one of the properties of enterovirulent bacteria. In this study, we examined whether DAEC strains possessing Afa genes induced IL-8 in cultures of human carcinoma epithelial cells (e.g., HEp-2, Caco-2, and T84). Nineteen afa-positive DAEC strains were examined for their ability to induce IL-8 secretion, and only 7 strains (37%; 7/19) induced IL-8 as much as enteroaggregative E. coli did. No marked differences in adhesion were observed between high and low inducers. Diffusive adhesiveness itself is unlikely to be sufficient to induce IL-8. All high inducers were motile and others were nonmotile. Additional stimulation by flagella may be required to cause high levels of chemokine induction. Motility or presence of flagella can be an important criterion to predict DAEC diarrheagenicity at clinical laboratories.

  14. Executive function and medical non-adherence: a different perspective.

    PubMed

    Brock, Laura L; Brock, Clive D; Thiedke, C Carolyn

    2011-01-01

    Medical non-adherence is multifactorial: cost, convenience, side effect profile, and cognitive impairment are all implicated in medical nonadherence. We explore impaired executive function (EF) as a cause for medical non-adherence when other causes can be ruled out. EF describes the coordination and manipulation of higher-order cognitive processes involved in problem-solving, planning, and decision-making. EF has three components: working memory, mental flexibility, and inhibitory control. The latter, inhibitory control, when impaired will affect an individual's ability to make choices to produce long-term benefits, in favor of short-term gratification. When applied to adults with chronic diseases, like diabetes, that require lifestyle modification and, at times, complicated medical regimens to forestall long term complications, an intact EF has a role in adherence. EF development is protracted with behavioral corollaries observable from early childhood. Thus, teachers, family physicians, and pediatricians will be the professionals to first encounter and manage such individuals. We suggest screening tests for children in the doctor's office to detect impaired EF, and postulate a cognitive behavioral therapeutic approach for adults with uncontrolled DM and impaired EF.

  15. Youth Views on Communication About ADHD and Medication Adherence.

    PubMed

    Sleath, Betsy; Carpenter, Delesha M; Sayner, Robyn; Thomas, Kathleen; Mann, Larry; Sage, Adam; Sulzer, Sandra H; Sandler, Adrian D

    2017-01-10

    The purpose of this study was to examine youth perceptions of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) communication with their pediatric providers, their reported adherence to their ADHD medications, and their desired location for an ADHD educational program. Youth ages 7 through 17 with an ADHD diagnosis were recruited. A research associate interviewed the youth. Parents completed demographic questionnaires. Seventy families participated. One-third of the youth wanted more discussion about ADHD with their providers during visits. The average youth had over eight questions about ADHD and its treatment. Most youth wanted to learn about ADHD at their provider's office. Non-white and older youth were significantly more likely to be less adherent to their ADHD medications. Youth want their providers to engage them more during visits. Providers should take advantage of this interest to engage youth more in discussions regarding ADHD and its treatment during pediatric ADHD visits.

  16. A systematic review of medication non-adherence in persons with dementia or cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Weller, Carolina; Kennedy, Briohny; Winbolt, Margaret; Young, Carmel

    2017-01-01

    Background Adherence to medication is vital for disease management while simultaneously reducing healthcare expenditure. Older persons with cognitive impairment (CI) are at risk for non-adherence as cognitive processes are needed to manage medications. This systematic review focuses on the relationship between medication non-adherence and specific cognitive domains in persons with CI, and explores determinants of medication non-adherence. When available, relationships and factors are compared with cognitively intact populations. Methods A seven database systematic search of studies published between 1 January 1949–31 December 2015 examining medication non-adherence in community dwelling persons with CI or dementia was conducted. Articles reporting medication non-adherence in people with CI or dementia in the community, with or without caregiver supports were eligible for inclusion. Papers reporting adherence to treatments in cognitively intact populations, populations from hospital or institutional settings, for non-prescribed medication or those describing dementia as a factor predicting medication non-adherence were excluded. Data on study and population characteristics, research design, data sources and analysis, specific cognitive domains, non-adherence prevalence, measurement of adherence, salient findings, factors associated with adherence and strategies to improve medication adherence were extracted. Study limitations included inconsistencies between data sources and definitions, resulting in a loss of fidelity in the value and comprehensiveness of data, as well as exclusion of non-pharmacological treatments and regimens. Findings Fifteen studies met inclusion criteria. Adherence among CI subjects ranged from 10.7%-38% with better rates of adherence in non-CI individuals. Medication non-adherence definitions varied considerably. New-learning, memory and executive functioning were associated with improved adherence and formed the focus of most studies

  17. Medical student-led patient education prior to hospital discharge improves 1-month adherence rates.

    PubMed

    Leung, Chun H S; Chong, Carol; Lim, Wen K

    2017-03-01

    Approximately 40% of patients are non-adherent to their medications. A prospective study of 80 patients evaluated the effectiveness of medical student-led pre-discharge medication education sessions. A significantly greater proportion of patients in the intervention group were adherent to their regular medications at 1 month compared with the control group (76.3% compared to 60.3%, P = 0.037). Medical student-led patient education significantly improved medication adherence rates.

  18. Adherence, persistence, and medication discontinuation in patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder – a systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    Gajria, Kavita; Lu, Mei; Sikirica, Vanja; Greven, Peter; Zhong, Yichen; Qin, Paige; Xie, Jipan

    2014-01-01

    Untreated attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) can lead to substantial adverse social, economic, and emotional outcomes for patients. The effectiveness of current pharmacologic treatments is often reduced, due to low treatment adherence and medication discontinuation. This current systematic literature review analyzes the current state of knowledge surrounding ADHD medication discontinuation, focusing on: 1) the extent of patient persistence; 2) adherence; and 3) the underlying reasons for patients’ treatment discontinuation and how discontinuation rates and reasons vary across patient subgroups. We selected 91 original studies (67 with persistence/discontinuation results, 26 with adherence results, and 41 with reasons for discontinuation, switching, or nonadherence) and 36 expert opinion reviews on ADHD medication discontinuation, published from 1990 to 2013. Treatment persistence on stimulants, measured by treatment duration during the 12-month follow-up periods, averaged 136 days for children and adolescents and 230 days for adults. Owing to substantial study heterogeneity, comparisons across age or medication type subgroups were generally inconclusive; however, long-acting formulations and amphetamines were associated with longer treatment duration than short-acting formulations and methylphenidates. The medication possession ratio, used to measure adherence, was <0.7 for all age groups and medication classes during a 12-month period. Adverse effects were the most commonly cited reason for discontinuation in all studies. Original research studies reported the lack of symptom control as a common discontinuation reason, followed by dosing inconvenience, social stigma associated with ADHD medication, and the patient’s attitude. In summary, although there was a lack of consistency in the measurement of adherence and persistence, these findings indicate that drug adherence and persistence are generally poor among patients with ADHD. Clinicians may be

  19. Adherence, persistence, and medication discontinuation in patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder - a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Gajria, Kavita; Lu, Mei; Sikirica, Vanja; Greven, Peter; Zhong, Yichen; Qin, Paige; Xie, Jipan

    2014-01-01

    Untreated attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) can lead to substantial adverse social, economic, and emotional outcomes for patients. The effectiveness of current pharmacologic treatments is often reduced, due to low treatment adherence and medication discontinuation. This current systematic literature review analyzes the current state of knowledge surrounding ADHD medication discontinuation, focusing on: 1) the extent of patient persistence; 2) adherence; and 3) the underlying reasons for patients' treatment discontinuation and how discontinuation rates and reasons vary across patient subgroups. We selected 91 original studies (67 with persistence/discontinuation results, 26 with adherence results, and 41 with reasons for discontinuation, switching, or nonadherence) and 36 expert opinion reviews on ADHD medication discontinuation, published from 1990 to 2013. Treatment persistence on stimulants, measured by treatment duration during the 12-month follow-up periods, averaged 136 days for children and adolescents and 230 days for adults. Owing to substantial study heterogeneity, comparisons across age or medication type subgroups were generally inconclusive; however, long-acting formulations and amphetamines were associated with longer treatment duration than short-acting formulations and methylphenidates. The medication possession ratio, used to measure adherence, was <0.7 for all age groups and medication classes during a 12-month period. Adverse effects were the most commonly cited reason for discontinuation in all studies. Original research studies reported the lack of symptom control as a common discontinuation reason, followed by dosing inconvenience, social stigma associated with ADHD medication, and the patient's attitude. In summary, although there was a lack of consistency in the measurement of adherence and persistence, these findings indicate that drug adherence and persistence are generally poor among patients with ADHD. Clinicians may be able

  20. Utility of the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale in gout: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Tan, CSL; Teng, GG; Chong, KJ; Cheung, PP; Lim, AYN; Wee, HL; Santosa, A

    2016-01-01

    Background The outcomes of any chronic illness often depend on patients’ adherence with their treatment. A tool is lacking to assess adherence in gout that is standardized, allows real-time feedback, and is easy to understand. Objective We set out to evaluate the utility of the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) in monitoring medication adherence in a multiethnic Asian gout cohort on urate-lowering therapy (ULT). Methods This cohort study recruited patients with gout where baseline and 6-monthly clinical data, self-report of adherence, and health status by Gout Impact Scale (GIS) and EuroQoL-5 dimension 3 levels were collected. Those who received at least 9 months of ULT were analyzed. Convergent and construct validities of MMAS-8 were evaluated against medication possession ratio (MPR) and known groups, clinical outcomes, and patient-reported outcomes. Internal consistency and test–retest reliability were assessed using Cronbach’s alpha and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), respectively. Results Of 91 patients, 92.3% were male, 72.5% Chinese with mean age 53.5 years. MMAS-8 (mean 6.17) and MPR (mean 96.3%) were poorly correlated (r=0.069, P=0.521). MMAS-8 did not differ between those who did or did not achieve target serum urate (SU) <360 µmol/L (P=0.852); or among those whose SU improved, stagnated, or worsened during follow-up (P=0.777). Adherence was associated with age (β=0.256, P=0.015) and education level (P=0.011) but not comorbidities, polypharmacy, or flare frequency. Concerns for medication side effects and anxiety or depression were associated with lower MMAS-8 (P<0.005). Internal consistency was acceptable (α=0.725) and test–retest reliability was satisfactory (ICC =0.70, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.36–0.88). Conclusion MMAS-8 had limited construct validity in assessing medication adherence to ULT in our gout patients. Nevertheless, it identified patients bothered or worried about ULT side effects, and those with

  1. Drug Attitude and Adherence to Anti-Glaucoma Medication

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Samin; Kang, Sung Yong; Yoon, Jong Uk; Kang, Uicheon; Seong, Gong Je

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to assess patient attitudes towards anti-glaucoma medication and their association with adherence, visual quality of life, and personality traits. Materials and Methods One hundred and forty-seven glaucoma patients were enrolled this study. The participants were divided into 'pharmacophobic' and 'pharmacophilic' groups according to their scores on the Modified Glaucoma Drug Attitude Inventory (MG-DAI). To establish a correlation with patient drug attitude, each group had their subjective drug adherence, visual quality of life, and personality traits examined. For personality traits, the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) was used to sub-classify each group. Results Among the patients analyzed, 91 (72.80%) patients showed a 'pharmacophobic' attitude and 34 (27.20%) patients showed a 'pharmacophilic' attitude. The pharmacophobic group tended to have worse adherence than the pharmacophilic group. Personality dichotomies from the MBTI also showed different patterns for each group. Conclusion In glaucoma patients, pharmacological adherence was influenced by their attitude towards drugs; an association might exist between drug attitude and underlying personality traits. PMID:20191020

  2. Developing a generic, individualised adherence programme for chronic medication users

    PubMed Central

    Herborg, Hanne; Haugbølle, Lotte S.; Sørensen, Lene; Rossing, Charlotte; Dam, Pernille

    2008-01-01

    Objective The scope of this article is to describe the background for and content of an adherence counselling programme with a specific focus on an individualised, multi-dimensional adherence model for patients with a potential adherence problem (a so-called ‘individualised systems model’). Methods An intervention programme based on WHO’s systems model for adherence was developed for implementation in primary health care and tested in a development project in Danish pharmacies in 2004-2005 in three pharmacies and 4 GP practices by 27 patients. Data were collected from the participants by registration forms, questionnaires, and focus groups. Since the programme was to support patients in the self-management process regarding choice and implementation of medication treatment, various strategies were used and different theoretical assumptions and choices made prior to setting up the study. These strategies include distinguishing between different types of non-adherence, a model for stages of change, self-efficacy, narratives, motivating interviewing strategies and coaching techniques. These strategic and theoretical choices are described in the article. Results The strategies and theoretical reflections formed the platform for the creation of a counselling programme, which was tested in two forms, a basic and an extended version - provided by either a pharmaconomist or a pharmacist. The result section also describes a toolbox of instruments to enable pharmacy staff and GPs to tailor a counselling programme for patients individually called ‘Safe and effective use of medicines’. Besides, the results include a description of how the WHO-model is transformed into an individualised counselling model. PMID:25177406

  3. Medication Adherence and Growth in Children with CKD

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Michael F.; Mulqueen, Lucy; Brooks, Ellen R.; Langman, Craig B.; Greenbaum, Larry A.; Furth, Susan L.; Moxey-Mims, Marva; Warady, Bradley A.; Kaskel, Frederick J.; Skversky, Amy L.

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives Poor growth is a consequence of CKD, but can often be partially or fully prevented or corrected with the use of a number of medications. The extent of nonadherence with medications used to treat or mitigate growth failure in CKD has not been examined prospectively in children with CKD. Design, setting, participants, & measurements The prevalence of both prescription of and nonadherence to recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH), phosphate binders, alkali, active vitamin D, nutritional vitamin D, iron, and erythrocyte-stimulating agents was summarized over the first seven visits of the Chronic Kidney Disease in Children cohort study. The association between self-reported nonadherence to each medication group and the mean annual change in age- and sex-specific height z score was quantified using seven separate linear regression models with generalized estimating equations. Results Of 834 participants, 597 reported use of at least one of these medication groups and had adherence data available. Nonadherence ranged from 4% over all visits for erythrocyte-stimulating agents to 22% over all visits for nutritional vitamin D. Of the study participants, 451 contributed data to at least one of the analyses of adherence and changes in height z score. Children nonadherent to rhGH had no change in height z score, whereas those adherent to rhGH had a significant improvement of 0.16 SDs (95% confidence interval, 0.05 to 0.27); the effect size was slightly larger and remained significant after adjustment. Among participants with height≤3rd percentile and after adjustment, adherence to rhGH was associated with a 0.33 SD (95% confidence interval, 0.10 to 0.56) greater change in height z score. Nonadherence with other medication groups was not significantly associated with a change in height z score. Conclusions Self-reported nonadherence to rhGH was associated with poorer growth velocity in children with CKD, suggesting an opportunity for intervention and

  4. Rates and Predictors of Adherence to Psychotropic Medications in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, Sarah L.; Carpenter, Laura; Leslie, R. Scott; Hunt, Kelly S.; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Charles, Jane; Nicholas, Joyce S.

    2014-01-01

    Medication adherence in children is poor, particularly among those with chronic or mental health disorders. However, adherence has not been fully assessed in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). The validated proportion of days covered method was used to quantify adherence to psychotropic medication in Medicaid-eligible children who met diagnostic…

  5. Medication adherence skills training for African-American breast cancer survivors: the effects on health literacy, medication adherence, and self-efficacy.

    PubMed

    Rust, Connie F; Davis, Cindy; Moore, Matthew R

    2015-01-01

    There are gaps in research regarding medication adherence, self-efficacy in proper medication adherence, and health literacy among breast cancer survivors. This pilot randomized controlled study was conducted to provide information addressing health literacy with respect to medication adherence and self-efficacy in African American breast cancer survivors. The study sample consisted of an intervention group (n = 24) of medication adherence skills training (MST) and a control group (n = 24), with a total sample population of 48 participants. The MST workshop was a collaborative intervention between pharmacy and social work and was designed to address issues that may be encountered while taking multiple medications for various acute and chronic conditions, increase participant confidence in accessing necessary resources for improved medication usage, and enhance personal self-efficacy regarding health care. A statistically significant relationship was detected between initial health literacy and medication adherence, as well as initial health literacy and self-efficacy. These findings indicated that individuals with higher health literacy were more likely to have higher levels of self-efficacy and were more likely to adhere to medication instructions. Analysis of the intervention and treatment groups did not show a statistically significant effect on health literacy, medication adherence, or self-efficacy from pre-test to post-test.

  6. How payment scheme affects patients’ adherence to medications? A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Hamiza; Hatah, Ernieda; Makmor Bakry, Mohd; Islahudin, Farida

    2016-01-01

    Background A previous systematic review reported that increase in patients’ medication cost-sharing reduced patients’ adherence to medication. However, a study among patients with medication subsidies who received medication at no cost found that medication nonadherence was also high. To our knowledge, no study has evaluated the influence of different medication payment schemes on patients’ medication adherence. Objective This study aims to review research reporting the influence of payment schemes and their association with patients’ medication adherence behavior. Methods This study was conducted using systematic review of published articles. Relevant published articles were located through three electronic databases Medline, ProQuest Medical Library, and ScienceDirect since inception to February 2015. Included articles were then reviewed and summarized narratively. Results Of the total of 2,683 articles located, 21 were included in the final analysis. There were four types of medication payment schemes reported in the included studies: 1) out-of-pocket expenditure or copayments; 2) drug coverage or insurance benefit; 3) prescription cap; and 4) medication subsidies. Our review found that patients with “lower self-paying constraint” were more likely to adhere to their medication (adherence rate ranged between 28.5% and 94.3%). Surprisingly, the adherence rate among patients who received medication as fully subsidized was similar (rate between 34% and 84.6%) as that of other payment schemes. The studies that evaluated patients with fully subsidized payment scheme found that the medication adherence was poor among patients with nonsevere illness. Conclusion Although medication adherence was improved with the reduction of cost-sharing such as lower copayment, higher drug coverage, and prescription cap, patients with full-medication subsidies payment scheme (received medication at no cost) were also found to have poor adherence to their medication. Future

  7. Patient-related Factors Predicting HIV Medication Adherence among Men and Women with Alcohol Problems

    PubMed Central

    PARSONS, JEFFREY T.; ROSOF, ELANA; MUSTANSKI, BRIAN

    2007-01-01

    The study explored the relationship between HIV medication adherence and alcohol, cognitive, social and affective factors in 272 persons with alcohol problems. Alcohol and cognitive factors significantly differentiated those who did and did not adhere. Specifically, adherence confidence and number of drinks emerged as subfactors driving the associations to adherence. Among those who were less than perfectly adherent (n = 154), only alcohol factors predicted levels of nonadherence. Cognitive factors play a role in understanding some of the differences between those who do and do not adhere to their HIV medications, but they do not differentiate among levels of nonadherence. PMID:17284499

  8. Offering Financial Incentives to Increase Adherence to Antipsychotic Medication

    PubMed Central

    Highton-Williamson, Elizabeth; Barnicot, Kirsten; Kareem, Tarrannum; Priebe, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Financial incentives for medication adherence in patients with psychotic disorders are controversial. It is not yet known whether fears expressed by clinicians are borne out in reality. We aimed to explore community mental health clinicians’ experiences of the consequences of giving patients with psychotic disorders a financial incentive to take their depot medication. We implemented descriptive and thematic analyses of semistructured interviews with the clinicians of patients assigned to receive incentives within a randomized controlled trial. Fifty-nine clinicians were interviewed with regard to the effect of the incentives on 73 of the 78 patients allocated to receive incentives in the trial. Most commonly, the clinicians reported benefits for clinical management including improved adherence, contact, patient monitoring, communication, and trust (n = 52). Positive effects on symptoms, insight, or social functioning were reported for some (n = 33). Less commonly, problems for patient management were reported (n = 19) such as monetarization of the therapeutic relationship or negative consequences for the patient (n = 15) such as increased drug and alcohol use. Where requests for increased money occurred, they were rapidly resolved. It seems that, in most cases, the clinicians found that using incentives led to benefits for patient management and for patient health. However, in 33% of cases, some adverse effects were reported. It remains unclear whether certain clinical characteristics are associated with increased risk for adverse effects of financial incentives. The likelihood of benefit versus the smaller risk for adverse effects should be weighed up when deciding whether to offer incentives to individual patients. PMID:25692797

  9. RMAIS: RFID-based medication Adherence Intelligence System.

    PubMed

    McCall, Corey; Maynes, Branden; Zou, Cliff C; Zhang, Ning J

    2010-01-01

    There has been compelling evidence that outpatients, especially those who are elderly or taking multiple complexly scheduled drugs, are not taking their medicines as directed, leading to unnecessary disease progression, complications, functional disabilities, lower quality of life, and even mortality. Existing technologies for monitoring and improving drug adherence are either costly or too complicated for general patients to use. In this paper, we introduce the detailed design and the complete prototype of a marketable Radio-Frequency Identification (RFID)-based Medication Adherence Intelligence System (RMAIS) that can be conveniently used at a residential home by ordinary patients. RMAIS is designed to maintain patients' independence and enable them to take multiple daily medicine dosages of the right amount at the right time. The system is patient-centered and user-friendly by reminding a patient of the prescribed time for medication and dispensing it in a fully automatic and fool-proof way. This is achieved mainly due to its novel design of a motorized rotation platform and the smooth integration of a scale, an RFID reader, and the rotation platform. In addition, this system has an Internet-based notification function that is used to alert the patient when it is time to take medicine as well as report deviations from the prescribed schedule to the primary care physicians or pharmacists.

  10. Medication Adherence and the Risk of Cardiovascular Mortality and Hospitalization Among Patients With Newly Prescribed Antihypertensive Medications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soyeun; Shin, Dong Wook; Yun, Jae Moon; Hwang, Yunji; Park, Sue K; Ko, Young-Jin; Cho, BeLong

    2016-03-01

    The importance of adherence to antihypertensive treatments for the prevention of cardiovascular disease has not been well elucidated. This study evaluated the effect of antihypertensive medication adherence on specific cardiovascular disease mortality (ischemic heart disease [IHD], cerebral hemorrhage, and cerebral infarction). Our study used data from a 3% sample cohort that was randomly extracted from enrollees of Korean National Health Insurance. Study subjects were aged ≥20 years, were diagnosed with hypertension, and started newly prescribed antihypertensive medication in 2003 to 2004. Adherence to antihypertensive medication was estimated as the cumulative medication adherence. Subjects were divided into good (cumulative medication adherence, ≥80%), intermediate (cumulative medication adherence, 50%-80%), and poor (cumulative medication adherence, <50%) adherence groups. We used time-dependent Cox proportional hazards models to evaluate the association between medication adherence and health outcomes. Among 33 728 eligible subjects, 670 (1.99%) died of coronary heart disease or stroke during follow-up. Patients with poor medication adherence had worse mortality from IHD (hazard ratio, 1.64; 95% confidence interval, 1.16-2.31; P for trend=0.005), cerebral hemorrhage (hazard ratio, 2.19; 95% confidence interval, 1.28-3.77; P for trend=0.004), and cerebral infarction (hazard ratio, 1.92; 95% confidence interval, 1.25-2.96; P for trend=0.003) than those with good adherence. The estimated hazard ratios of hospitalization for cardiovascular disease were consistent with the mortality end point. Poor medication adherence was associated with higher mortality and a greater risk of hospitalization for specific cardiovascular diseases, emphasizing the importance of a monitoring system and strategies to improve medication adherence in clinical practice.

  11. Intentional and Unintentional Medication Non-Adherence in Hypertension: The Role of Health Literacy, Empowerment and Medication Beliefs

    PubMed Central

    Náfrádi, Lilla; Galimberti, Elisa; Nakamoto, Kent; Schulz, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Medication non-adherence is a major public health issue, creating obstacles to effective treatment of hypertension. Examining the underlying factors of deliberate and non-deliberate non-adherence is crucial to address this problem. Thus, the goal of the present study is to assess the socio-demographic, clinical and psychological determinants of intentional and unintentional non-adherence. Design and methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted between March, 2015 and April, 2016. The sample consisted of hypertension patients holding at least one medical prescription (N=109). Measurements assessed patients’ medication adherence, health literacy, empowerment, self-efficacy, medication beliefs, and patients’ acceptance of their doctor’s advice, socio-demographic and clinical characteristics. Results Patients who occasionally engaged in either intentional or unintentional non-adherence reported to have lower adherence selfefficacy, higher medication concern beliefs, lower meaningfulness scores and were less likely to accept the doctor’s treatment recommendations. Patients who occasionally engaged in unintentional nonadherence were younger and had experienced more side effects compared to completely adherent patients. Adherence self-efficacy was a mediator of the effect of health literacy on patients’ medication adherence and acceptance of the doctor’s advice was a covariate. Conclusions Regarding the research implications, health literacy and adherence self-efficacy should be assessed simultaneously when investigating the factors of non-adherence. Regarding the practical implications, adherence could be increased if physicians i) doublecheck whether their patients accept the treatment advice given and ii) if they address patients’ concerns about medications. These steps could be especially important for patients characterized with lower self-efficacy, as they are more likely to engage in occasional nonadherence. Significance for public health

  12. Psychotropic Medication Adherence among Community-Based Individuals with Developmental Disabilities and Mental Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Xi; Marshall, Vincent D.; Balkrishnan, Rajesh; Patel, Isha; Chang, Jongwha; Erickson, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    Psychotropic medications are a common treatment for mental illness in people with developmental disabilities. Medication adherence is a critical determinant of the effectiveness of psychotropic drugs, but psychotropic medication adherence research specific to this population remains limited. This retrospective study analyzed Marketscan®…

  13. Adherence to Antipsychotic Medication in Bipolar Disorder and Schizophrenic Patients

    PubMed Central

    García, Saínza; Martínez-Cengotitabengoa, Mónica; López-Zurbano, Saioa; Zorrilla, Iñaki; López, Purificación; Vieta, Eduard; González-Pinto, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Antipsychotics are the drugs prescribed to treat psychotic disorders; however, patients often fail to adhere to their treatment, and this has a severe negative effect on prognosis in these kinds of illnesses. Among the wide range of risk factors for treatment nonadherence, this systematic review covers those that are most important from the point of view of clinicians and patients and proposes guidelines for addressing them. Analyzing 38 studies conducted in a total of 51,796 patients, including patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders and bipolar disorder, we found that younger age, substance abuse, poor insight, cognitive impairments, low level of education, minority ethnicity, poor therapeutic alliance, experience of barriers to care, high intensity of delusional symptoms and suspiciousness, and low socioeconomic status are the main risk factors for medication nonadherence in both types of disorder. In the future, prospective studies should be conducted on the use of personalized patient-tailored treatments, taking into account risk factors that may affect each individual, to assess the ability of such approaches to improve adherence and hence prognosis in these patients. PMID:27307187

  14. Medication adherence in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: why do patients not take what we prescribe?

    PubMed

    Wong, Peter K K

    2016-11-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune inflammatory disease which results in extensive articular and extra-articular morbidity and increased mortality from cardiovascular disease. Despite an increasing range of non-biological and biological disease-modifying agents, poor patient adherence with medication is a significant barrier to effective control of the inflammation associated with RA. This review seeks to identify factors that affect patient adherence with medication, examine the effectiveness of interventions to address this issue and offer practical suggestions to improve medication adherence. The impact of health literacy on medication adherence and the novel role of musculoskeletal ultrasound as an educational intervention will also be discussed.

  15. Suboptimal inhaler medication adherence and incorrect technique are common among chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Krishna B; Percival, Matthew

    2016-02-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are routinely prescribed one or more inhaled medications. Adherence to inhaler medications and correct inhaler device technique are crucial to successful COPD management. The goals of this study were to estimate adherence and inhaler technique in a cohort of COPD patients. This was an observational study conducted on a sample of 150 COPD patients. Medication adherence was assessed using the Medication Adherence Report Scale (MARS). Inhaler technique was assessed using standardized checklists. Clinical data were collected using a proforma. Of the 150 patients (mean age 70.3 years, 52% male), 58% reported suboptimal adherence (MARS ≤ 24). High adherence to therapy (MARS = 25) was associated with older age (p = 0.001), but not any of the other studied variables. Medication non-adherence was not associated with COPD exacerbations. Errors (≥ 1) in inhaler technique were common across all of the types of inhaler devices reportedly used by patients, with the highest proportion of errors among Turbuhaler users (83%) and the least proportion of errors among Handihaler users (50%). No clinical variables were associated with errors in inhaler technique. Suboptimal adherence and errors in inhaler technique are common among COPD patients. No clinical variables to assist in the prediction of medication non-adherence and poor inhaler technique were identifiable. Consequently, regular assessment of medication adherence and inhaler technique should be incorporated into routine clinical practice to facilitate improved health outcomes among patients with COPD.

  16. Drug delivery systems improve pharmaceutical profile and facilitate medication adherence.

    PubMed

    Wertheimer, Albert I; Santella, Thomas M; Finestone, Albert J; Levy, Richard A

    2005-01-01

    Innovations in dosage forms and dose delivery systems across a wide range of medications offer substantial clinical advantages, including reduced dosing frequency and improved patient adherence; minimized fluctuation of drug concentrations and maintenance of blood levels within a desired range; localized drug delivery; and the potential for reduced adverse effects and increased safety. The advent of new large-molecule drugs for previously untreatable or only partially treatable diseases is stimulating the development of suitable delivery systems for these agents. Although advanced formulations may be more expensive than conventional dosage forms, they often have a more favorable pharmacologic profile and can be cost-effective. Inclusion of these dosage forms on drug formulary lists may help patients remain on therapy and reduce the economic and social burden of care.

  17. Decision support for evidence-based pharmacotherapy detects adherence problems but does not impact medication use.

    PubMed

    Willis, Janese M; Edwards, Rex; Anstrom, Kevin J; Johnson, Fred S; Del Fiol, Guilherme; Kawamoto, Kensaku; Lapointe, Nancy M Allen; Eisenstein, Eric L; Lobach, David F

    2013-01-01

    Although evidence-based pharmacotherapies are a principal component of patient care, 30-50% of patients do not take their medications as prescribed. We conducted a randomized trial of two clinical decision support (CDS) interventions in 2219 patients: patient adherence reports to providers (n=744), patient adherence reports to providers + email notices to care managers (n=736), and controls (739). At 18-month follow-up, there were no treatment-related differences in patient medication adherence (overall, by medication class, and by medical condition). There also were no treatment-related differences in patient clinical and economic outcomes. Thus, while this study's CDS information interventions were successfully delivered to providers and care managers, and were effective in identifying medication adherence deficits and in increasing care manager responses to medication adherences issues, these interventions were not able to alter patient medication behavior.

  18. A performance improvement plan to increase nurse adherence to use of medication safety software.

    PubMed

    Gavriloff, Carrie

    2012-08-01

    Nurses can protect patients receiving intravenous (IV) medication by using medication safety software to program "smart" pumps to administer IV medications. After a patient safety event identified inconsistent use of medication safety software by nurses, a performance improvement team implemented the Deming Cycle performance improvement methodology. The combined use of improved direct care nurse communication, programming strategies, staff education, medication safety champions, adherence monitoring, and technology acquisition resulted in a statistically significant (p < .001) increase in nurse adherence to using medication safety software from 28% to above 85%, exceeding national benchmark adherence rates (Cohen, Cooke, Husch & Woodley, 2007; Carefusion, 2011).

  19. Medication adherence: a review of pharmacy education, research, practice and policy in Finland

    PubMed Central

    Bell, J. Simon; Enlund, Hannes; Vainio, Kirsti

    2010-01-01

    Aims To describe pharmacy education, research, practice and policy related to medication adherence in Finland since the year 2000. Methods The three universities that provide pharmacy education (Åbo Akademi, University of Eastern Finland, and University of Helsinki) completed a structured pro-forma questionnaire regarding education related to medication adherence. A MEDLINE and EMBASE literature search was performed to identify English language peer-reviewed research that reported medication compliance, adherence or persistence. The Ministry of Social Affairs and Health was invited to nominate policies and documents related to medication adherence. A narrative review of medication counselling practices and professional service delivery through Finnish community pharmacies was undertaken. Results Medication adherence was a theme integrated into obligatory and elective courses for bachelors and masters degree students. The literature search identified 33 English language peer-reviewed research articles reporting medication compliance, adherence or persistence published since the year 2000. Policy documents of the Ministry of Social Affairs and Health recognise that poor medication adherence may lead to suboptimal treatment outcomes, and encourage patient participation in treatment decision making. Adherence practice in Finnish pharmacies has been strongly linked to the development of medication counselling services. Conclusions Adherence research and education has focused on understanding and addressing the contextual factors that contribute to medication nonadherence. Adherence practice in community pharmacies has tended to focus on medication counselling and programs specific to particular disease states. Medication adherence is a topic that is integrated into courses for bachelor’s and master’s level pharmacy students in Finland. PMID:25126134

  20. Oral Medication Adherence and Disease Severity in Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hommel, Kevin A.; Denson, Lee A.; Baldassano, Robert N.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of oral medication adherence and perceived adherence barriers with disease severity in a sample of adolescents with IBD. Methods Participants included 62 adolescents, aged 13–17 years, diagnosed with IBD and their parents. Measures of parent- and patient-rated oral medication adherence and related barriers, behavioral and emotional functioning per parent- and self-report, and disease severity per physician reported medical chart data were obtained. Results Fifteen percent of the sample reported clinically elevated depressive symptoms and 24% reported clinically elevated internalizing behavioral problems. Number of reported adherence barriers was 2.6 ± 1.5, and no participants reported zero barriers. Parental ratings of medication adherence (t = −2.11, p < .05) and perceived barriers to adherence (t = 2.05, p < .05) significantly predicted disease severity after statistically controlling for the contributions of behavioral and disease parameters to disease severity. Conclusions Results suggest that oral medication adherence and perceived adherence barriers are significantly related to disease severity in adolescents with IBD. These patients also may be at risk for increased behavioral and emotional problems which may impact health outcomes as well. Clinicians should make particular efforts to attend to medication adherence issues with their patients. Working with patients and families to develop solutions for eliminating adherence barriers might result in better disease outcomes. PMID:21304318

  1. Acculturation, Medication Adherence, Lifestyle Behaviors, and Blood Pressure Control Among Arab Americans

    PubMed Central

    Tailakh, Ayman K.; Evangelista, Lorraine S.; Morisky, Donald E.; Mentes, Janet C.; Pike, Nancy A.; Phillips, Linda R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between acculturation, medication adherence, lifestyle behaviors (e.g., physical activity, nutrition, weight control), and blood pressure control among hypertensive Arab Americans. Design The study utilized a cross-sectional descriptive design. A convenience sample of 126 participants completed questionnaires and had measures of blood pressure, weight, and height. Forty-six participants were hypertensive and were included in the analysis. Results Only 29.2% of participants reported high medication adherence. High medication adherence was associated with lower diastolic blood pressure, eating a healthy diet, and following lifestyle modifications. Acculturation was significantly associated with physical activity and body mass index. Conclusion Our study found that acculturated participants were more adherent to medications and physical activity and had better blood pressure control. Further studies are needed to explore how acculturation improves adherence and what factors contribute to better adherence in order to design culturally sensitive interventions. PMID:24848347

  2. Monitoring medication adherence in multiple sclerosis using a novel web-based tool: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Settle, Jill R; Maloni, Heidi W; Bedra, McKenzie; Finkelstein, Joseph; Zhan, Min; Wallin, Mitchell T

    2016-06-01

    Monitoring medication adherence in multiple sclerosis (MS) can be time consuming and expensive; however, non-adherence is common and is very costly in terms of lost therapeutic benefit and unused medications. To address this problem, we employed a web-based system to monitor and potentially modify medication adherence. Participants (n = 30) were randomized either to routine care or to the MS Home Automated Telehealth (MS HAT) system. Weekly interferon beta-1a intramuscular (INFbeta-1a IM) injections and daily vitamin D adherence were tracked over a six-month period using multiple modalities: self-reported adherence, calendar diaries, pharmacy refill rates, blood serum levels, and MS HAT alerts. Weekly INFbeta-1a IM adherence was highly correlated across measures; however, vitamin D adherence was not as consistent. Healthcare providers were able to efficiently monitor adherence in a patient-centered way by using the MS HAT system to monitor adherence rather than employing chart reviews and phone calls. In addition, patients with more preserved cognitive function appeared to benefit more from use of the MS HAT system than those with cognitive impairment. While further research is needed to understand the differential effects of MS HAT on specific medications and for different individuals, it is a promising tool for monitoring medication adherence in patients with MS.

  3. Perspectives of patients on factors relating to adherence to post-acute coronary syndrome medical regimens

    PubMed Central

    Lambert-Kerzner, Anne; Havranek, Edward P; Plomondon, Mary E; Fagan, Katherine M; McCreight, Marina S; Fehling, Kelty B; Williams, David J; Hamilton, Alison B; Albright, Karen; Blatchford, Patrick J; Mihalko-Corbitt, Renee; Bryson, Chris L; Bosworth, Hayden B; Kirshner, Miriam A; Giacco, Eric J Del; Ho, P Michael

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Poor adherence to cardioprotective medications after acute coronary syndrome (ACS) hospitalization is associated with increased risk of rehospitalization and mortality. Clinical trials of multifaceted interventions have improved medication adherence with varying results. Patients’ perspectives on interventions could help researchers interpret inconsistent outcomes. Identifying factors that patients believe would improve adherence might inform the design of future interventions and make them more parsimonious and sustainable. The objective of this study was to obtain patients’ perspectives on adherence to medical regimens after experiencing an ACS event and their participation in a medication adherence randomized control trial following their hospitalization. Patients and methods Sixty-four in-depth interviews were conducted with ACS patients who participated in an efficacious, multifaceted, medication adherence randomized control trial. Interview transcripts were analyzed using the constant comparative approach. Results Participants described their post-ACS event experiences and how they affected their adherence behaviors. Patients reported that adherence decisions were facilitated by mutually respectful and collaborative provider–patient treatment planning. Frequent interactions with providers and medication refill reminder calls supported improved adherence. Additional facilitators included having social support, adherence routines, and positive attitudes toward an ACS event. The majority of patients expressed that being active participants in health care decision-making contributed to their health. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate that respectful collaborative communication can contribute to medication adherence after ACS hospitalization. These results suggest a potential role for training health-care providers, including pharmacists, social workers, registered nurses, etc, to elicit and acknowledge the patients’ views regarding medication

  4. Adherence to Medication Regimens among Low-Income Patients with Multiple Comorbid Chronic Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishra, Shiraz I.; Gioia, Deborah; Childress, Saltanat; Barnet, Beth; Webster, Ramothea L.

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative study sought to explore facilitators and barriers to adherence to multiple medications among low-income patients with comorbid chronic physical and mental health conditions. The 50 focus group participants identified personal/contextual and health system factors as major impediments to adherence to multiple medications. These…

  5. Medication Adherence among Adolescents in a School-Based Health Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mears, Cynthia J.; Charlebois, Nicole M.; Holl, Jane L.

    2006-01-01

    School-based health centers are an integral part of the health care delivery system for low-income children. Medication adherence for these patients may be challenging because the student is often responsible for bringing home the prescription and receiving the instructions. This study assesses medication fill, initiation, and adherence rates…

  6. The Nursing Assessment of Medication Acceptance: the reliability and validity of a schizophrenia medication adherence scale

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Hikaru; Ueda, Nobuhisa; Shiozuka, Hideki; Igata, Ryohei; Miki, Tazuko; Atake, Kiyokazu; Takeuchi, Yuji; Shirozu, Hiroaki; Ohara, Naotoshi; Konishi, Yuki; Nagai, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Noriaki; Kubota, Takanori; Yoshimura, Reiji

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many patients with schizophrenia have low medication adherence. There is, however, no objective assessment scale that can be used by nurses or caregiver specialists. The Nursing Assessment of Medication Acceptance (NAMA) was developed to assess patients’ medication adherence. The aim of this study was to examine the validity and reliability of the NAMA in patients with schizophrenia. Methods: A total of 121 Japanese patients with schizophrenia were enrolled. All patients underwent evaluation using the NAMA and the Drug Attitude Inventory (DAI-10). Reliability was investigated using a test-retest method and a parallel-test method. To determine the test-retest reliability of the NAMA, we tested 101 schizophrenia patients twice, with the second assessment 2–4 weeks after the date of the first assessment. For validity verification, standard-related validity and the degree of concordance with the DAI-10 scores were measured. Results: The Cronbach’s alpha value of the NAMA in schizophrenia was 0.88. The test-retest correlation coefficients were all between 0.53–0.74. The total scores and all subscores for the NAMA were significantly correlated, and the NAMA total scores were significantly correlated with the DAI-10 total scores. Conclusions: The NAMA shows good reliability and validity in measuring medication adherence in schizophrenia. PMID:28101319

  7. From Morisky to Hill-bone; self-reports scales for measuring adherence to medication.

    PubMed

    Culig, Josip; Leppée, Marcel

    2014-03-01

    There are a number of approaches to studying medication-taking behavior. Self-report measures have the benefits of being cheap, easy to administer, non-intrusive, and able to provide information on attitudes and beliefs about medication. Potential limitations to self-report are that the ability to understand the items, and willingness to disclose information, can affect response accuracy and, thus, questionnaire validity. A computerized systematic search of the PubMed databases identified articles on scales for medication adherence measuring using the MeSH terms medication adherence, compliance, and persistence combined with the terms questionnaire self-report. Adherence scales have identified mostly in the last few years (2005-2012). One of the main sources has been article (Lavsa et. al) which evaluated literature describing medication adherence surveys/scales to gauge patient behaviors at the point of care. Articles were included if they evaluated or reviewed self-reported adherence medication scale applicable to chronic diseases and with a good coefficient of internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's alpha (alpha)). Articles that contained data about self-report medication adherence scales use were included. A total of about one hundred articles were identified. Of those articles, 20% (20 of 100) were included in the review because of their relevance to the article topic. This article describes various self-report scales by which to monitor medication adherence, their advantages and disadvantages, and discusses the effectiveness of their application at different chronic diseases. There are many self-report scales for measuring medication adherence and their derivatives (or subscales). Due to the different nature of the diseases, there is no gold-standard scale for measuring medication adherence. It can be nevertheless concluded that the nearest to gold-standard is the Medication Adherence Questionnaire (MAQ) scale by Morisky et.al. but we found better

  8. The relationship between clinical outcomes and medication adherence in difficult-to-control asthma.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Anna C; Proeschal, Amandine; Brightling, Christopher E; Wardlaw, Andrew J; Pavord, Ian; Bradding, Peter; Green, Ruth H

    2012-08-01

    Medication non-adherence and the clinical implications in difficult-to-control asthma were audited. Prescription issue data from 115 patients identified sub-optimal adherence (<80%) in 65% of patients on inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) or combined ICS/long-acting β2 agonist (LABA). In those using separate ICS and LABA, adherence to LABA (50%) was significantly better than to ICS (14.3%). Patients with sub-optimal ICS adherence had reduced FEV(1) and higher sputum eosinophil counts. Adherence ratio was an independent predictor of previous ventilation for acute severe asthma (p=0.008). The majority of patients with difficult-to-control asthma are non-adherent with their asthma medication. Non-adherence is correlated with poor clinical outcomes.

  9. Stressors May Compromise Medication Adherence among Adults with Diabetes and Low Socioeconomic Status

    PubMed Central

    Osborn, Chandra Y.; Mayberry, Lindsay S.; Wagner, Julie A.; Welch, Garry W.

    2014-01-01

    Studies examining the impact of stressors on diabetes self-care have been limited by focusing on a single stressor or have been largely qualitative. Therefore, we assessed the stressors experienced by a high-risk population with type 2 diabetes, and tested whether having more stressors was associated with less adherence to multiple self-care behaviors. Participants were recruited from a Federally Qualified Health Center and 192 completed a stressors checklist. Experiencing more stressors was associated with less adherence to diet recommendations and medications among participants who were trying to be adherent, but was not associated with adherence to other self-care behaviors. Because having more stressors was also associated with more depressive symptoms, we further adjusted for depressive symptoms; stressors remained associated with less adherence to medications, but not to diet recommendations. For adults engaged in adherence, experiencing numerous chronic stressors presents barriers to adherence that are distinct from associated depressive symptoms. PMID:24569697

  10. Systematic Review of Educational Interventions to Improve Glaucoma Medication Adherence: an update in 2015

    PubMed Central

    Newman-Casey, Paula Anne; Dayno, Megan; Robin, Alan L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the current state of the research on educational interventions whose aim is to improve glaucoma medication adherence. Methods A systematic review of Pubmed, Embase and CINAHL was conducted to identify research studies evaluating educational interventions to improve glaucoma medication adherence. Studies were included if the intervention was described, the outcomes assessed glaucoma medication adherence, and the focus of the research was on adults with glaucoma. The search was conducted on June 2, 2015. Results Seventeen studies were identified that met the inclusion criteria. These included nine randomized controlled trials and eight observational studies. Eight of the studies demonstrated an impact on glaucoma medication adherence, though their outcome measures were too heterogeneous to estimate a pooled effect size.. Conclusion The interventions that successfully improved glaucoma medication adherence used an adequate dose of face-to-face counseling to overcome barriers to health behavior change alongside education about glaucoma. PMID:27134639

  11. Prevalence, predictors, and clinical consequences of medical adherence in IBD: how to improve it?

    PubMed

    Lakatos, Peter Laszlo

    2009-09-14

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are chronic diseases with a relapsing-remitting disease course necessitating lifelong treatment. However, non-adherence has been reported in over 40% of patients, especially those in remission taking maintenance therapies for IBD. The economical impact of non-adherence to medical therapy including absenteeism, hospitalization risk, and the health care costs in chronic conditions, is enormous. The causes of medication non-adherence are complex, where the patient-doctor relationship, treatment regimen, and other disease-related factors play key roles. Moreover, subjective assessment might underestimate adherence. Poor adherence may result in more frequent relapses, a disabling disease course, in ulcerative colitis, and an increased risk for colorectal cancer. Improving medication adherence in patients is an important challenge for physicians. Understanding the different patient types, the reasons given by patients for non-adherence, simpler and more convenient dosage regimens, dynamic communication within the health care team, a self-management package incorporating enhanced patient education and physician-patient interaction, and identifying the predictors of non-adherence will help devise suitable plans to optimize patient adherence. This editorial summarizes the available literature on frequency, predictors, clinical consequences, and strategies for improving medical adherence in patients with IBD.

  12. Predictors of psychotropic medication adherence among HIV+ individuals living with bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Casaletto, Kaitlin B.; Kwan, Sara; Montoya, Jessica L.; Obermeit, Lisa C.; Gouaux, Ben; Poquette, Amelia; Heaton, Robert K.; Atkinson, J.H.; Moore, D.J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective HIV infection and bipolar disorder (HIV/BD) are highly comorbid and associated with frontostriatal disruption, emotional dysregulation and neurocognitive impairment. Psychiatric and cognitive factors have been linked to antiretroviral nonadherence; however, predictors of psychotropic adherence among HIV+ individuals with psychiatric comorbidities have not been explored. We evaluated predictors of psychotropic adherence among HIV/BD individuals. Method Psychiatric medication adherence of 50 HIV/BD participants was tracked for 30-days using Medication Event Monitoring Systems (MEMS). Participants completed neurocognitive, neuromedical, and psychiatric batteries. Results Mean psychotropic adherence rate was 78%; 56% of participants achieved ≥90% adherence. Younger age and onset of depressive symptoms, more severe current depressive symptoms, number of previous psychiatric hospitalizations and suicide attempts, poorer neurocognition, and more negative attitudes and self-beliefs toward medications univariably predicted worse psychotropic adherence (ps<.10). A multivariable model demonstrated a combination of current depressive symptoms and more negative attitudes toward medications significantly predicting poorer adherence (R2=0.27, p<0.003). Secondary analyses revealed an interaction between neurocognition and mood, such that HIV/BD with greater executive dysfunction and depressive symptoms evidenced the poorest psychotropic adherence (p<0.001). Conclusions Both psychiatric and neurocognitive factors contribute to poorer psychotropic adherence among HIV+ individuals with serious mental illness. Adherence interventions aimed at remediating these factors may be especially fruitful. PMID:26681237

  13. Geriatric syndromes are potential determinants of the medication adherence status in prevalent dialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Chia-Ter

    2016-01-01

    Background. Geriatric syndromes (GS) exhibit high prevalence in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) under chronic dialysis irrespective of age. We sought to determine whether GS influences medication adherence in ESRD patients. Methods. A prospective cohort of chronic dialysis patients was assembled. The presence of GS components, including frailty/prefrailty, polypharmacy, and malnutrition, were ascertained through a validated questionnaire, electronic records and chart abstraction, and laboratory tests. The severity of medication non-adherence was defined using the eight-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS). Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed targeting MMAS results and incorporating relevant clinical features and GS. Results. The prevalence of frailty/pre-frailty, polypharmacy, and hypoalbuminemia/ malnutrition among the enrolled participants was 66.7%, 94%, and 14%, respectively. The average MMAS scores in these dialysis patients were 2 ± 1.7 (range, 0–6), with only 15.7% exhibiting high medication adherence. Multiple regression analyses showed that the absence of frailty/pre-frailty (P = 0.01) were significantly associated with poorer medication adherence, while the presence of polypharmacy (P = 0.02) and lower serum albumin, a potential sign of malnutrition (P = 0.03), were associated with poor adherence in another model. Conclusion. This study is among the very few reports addressing GS and medication adherence, especially in ESRD patients. Interventions targeting frailty, polypharmacy, and malnutrition might potentially improve the medication non-adherence and symptom control in these pill-burdened patients. PMID:27326380

  14. Interventions to Improve Medication Adherence among Older Adults: Meta-Analysis of Adherence Outcomes among Randomized Controlled Trials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conn, Vicki S.; Hafdahl, Adam R.; Cooper, Pamela S.; Ruppar, Todd M.; Mehr, David R.; Russell, Cynthia L.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the effectiveness of interventions to improve medication adherence (MA) in older adults. Design and Methods: Meta-analysis was used to synthesize results of 33 published and unpublished randomized controlled trials. Random-effects models were used to estimate overall mean effect sizes (ESs) for MA, knowledge,…

  15. Intentional Medication Non-Adherence Due to Interactive Toxicity Beliefs among HIV Positive Active Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Kalichman, Seth C.; Kalichman, Moira O.; Cherry, Charsey; Hoyt, Ginger; Washington, Christopher; Grebler, Tamar; Merely, Cindy; Welles, Brandi

    2015-01-01

    Drug use poses significant challenges to medical management of HIV infection. While most research has focused on the influence of intoxication on unintentional adherence to HIV treatment, drug use may also lead to intentional non-adherence, particularly when individuals believe that mixing medications with drugs is harmful. This study examined whether interactive toxicity beliefs predict non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) over a prospective period of adherence monitoring. Men and women living with HIV who screened positive for drug use and were being treated with ART (N=530) completed computerized self-interviews, three prospective unannounced pill counts to measure ART adherence, provided urine specimens for drug screening, and HIV viral load results from medical records. Results showed that 189 (35%) participants indicated that they intentionally miss their ART when they are using drugs. These participants also reported common beliefs regarding the perceived hazards of mixing HIV medications with alcohol and other drugs. Multivariable models that controlled for demographic and health characteristics, as well as frequency of alcohol use, showed that intentional non-adherence predicted poorer ART adherence over the prospective month and also predicted poorer treatment outcomes as indexed by unsuppressed HIV viral load. These findings extend previous research to show that interactive toxicity beliefs and intentional non-adherence play a significant role in medication non-adherence for a substantial number of people living with HIV and should be actively addressed in HIV clinical care. PMID:26226250

  16. Sex Differences in Barriers to Antihypertensive Medication Adherence: Findings From the Cohort Study of Medication Adherence Among Older Adults (CoSMO)

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Elizabeth; Joyce, Cara; Dornelles, Adriana; Morisky, Donald; Webber, Larry S.; Muntner, Paul; Krousel-Wood, Marie

    2013-01-01

    Objectives We assessed whether socio-demographic, clinical, health care system, psychosocial, and behavioral factors are differentially associated with low antihypertensive medication adherence scores among older men and women. Design / Setting A cross-sectional analysis using baseline data from the Cohort Study of Medication Adherence in Older Adults (CoSMO, n=2,194). Measurements Low antihypertensive medication adherence was defined as a score <6 on the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale. Risk factors for low adherence were collected using telephone surveys and administrative databases. Results The prevalence of low medication adherence scores did not differ according to sex (15.0% in women and 13.1% in men p=0.208). In sex-specific multivariable models, having issues with medication cost and practicing fewer lifestyle modifications for blood pressure control were associated with low adherence scores among both men and women. Factors associated with low adherence scores in men but not women included reduced sexual functioning (OR = 2.03; 95% CI: 1.31, 3.16 for men and OR = 1.28; 95% CI: 0.90, 1.82 for women), and BMI ≥25 (OR = 3.23; 95% CI: 1.59, 6.59 for men and 1.23; 95% CI: 0.82, 1.85 for women). Factors associated with low adherence scores in women but not men included dissatisfaction with communication with their healthcare provider (OR = 1.75; 95% CI: 1.16, 2.65 for women and OR =1.16 95% CI: 0.57, 2.34 for men) and depressive symptoms (OR = 2.29; 95% CI: 1.55, 3.38 for women and OR = 0.93; 95% CI: 0.48, 1.80 for men). Conclusion Factors associated with low antihypertensive medication adherence scores differed according to sex. Interventions designed to improve adherence in older adults should be tailored to account for the sex of the target population. PMID:23528003

  17. Medication Adherence: Tailoring the Analysis to the Data

    PubMed Central

    Saberi, Parya; Johnson, Mallory O.; McCulloch, Charles E.; Vittinghoff, Eric; Neilands, Torsten B.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore more comprehensive methods to analyze antiretroviral non-adherence data. Using illustrative data and simulations, we investigated the value of using binary logistic regression (LR; dichotomized at 0% non-adherence) versus a hurdle model (combination of LR plus generalized linear model for >0% non-adherence) versus a zero-inflated negative binomial (ZINB) model (simultaneously modeling 0% non-adherence and >0% non-adherence). In simulation studies, the hurdle and ZINB models had similar power but both had higher power in comparison to LR alone. The hurdle model had higher power than ZINB in settings where covariate effects were restricted to one or the other part of the model (0% non-adherence or degree of non-adherence). Use of the hurdle and ZINB models are powerful and valuable approaches in analyzing adherence data which yield a more complete picture than LR alone. We recommend adoption of this methodology for future antiretroviral adherence research. PMID:21833689

  18. Adherence to Pharmacotherapy and Medication-Related Beliefs in Patients with Hypertension in Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, J. Jaime; Diez-Canseco, Francisco; Malaga, German

    2014-01-01

    Objective To characterize adherence to pharmacological medication and beliefs towards medication in a group of patients with hypertension in a large national hospital. Materials and Methods Cross-sectional survey among patients with hypertension attending the outpatient clinic of a large national hospital. Exposure of interest was the patient's beliefs towards general medication and antihypertensive drugs, i.e. beliefs of harm, overuse, necessity and concern, measured using the Beliefs about Medication questionnaire. Main outcome was adherence measured using the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale-8. Multivariate analysis was conducted using Poisson distribution logistic regression, prevalence ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Results Data from 115 participants, 67% females and mean age 62.7 years were analyzed. Low adherence was found in 57.4%. Highest scores were on the ideas of necessity and one of the most rated statements was “physicians would prescribe less medication if they spent more time with patients”. Beliefs of harm about medications and concerns about antihypertensive drugs were higher in the low adherence group (p<0.01). Those who scored higher on ideas of harm were 52% less likely of being high adherents (PR 0.48; 95% CI 0.25–0.93) and those with higher scores on concerns were 41% less likely of being high adherents (PR 0.59; 95% CI 0.39–0.91). Patients whose ideas of necessity outweighed their concerns were more likely to be adherent (PR 2.65; 95% CI 1.21–5.81). Conclusions Low adherence to antihypertensive medication is common. High scores on ideas of harm, concern and a high necessity-concern differential were predictors of medication adherence. PMID:25470372

  19. Exploring predictors of medication adherence among HIV positive women in North America

    PubMed Central

    Tyer-Viola, LA; Corless, IB; Webel, A; Reid, P; Sullivan, KM; Nichols, P

    2015-01-01

    Objective Women infected with HIV live with many factors that affect antiretroviral (ARV) medication adherence. Social Action Theory (SAT) explains how context, environment, and psychological factors influence behavior. How these factors are related to HIV adherence in women is unique. The purpose of this analysis was to explore the relationships among contextual, environmental, and regulatory factors with ARV medication adherence in order to assist care providers in improving care for women living with HIV. Design Convenience descriptive multicenter Setting Sixteen HIV clinics and service organizations in North America Participants This sample was drawn from a larger study of 2,182 persons living with HIV recruited from clinics and service from September 2009 to January, 2011. Our study included 383 North American women living with HIV who were taking ARV medications. Methods We assessed the relationship of contextual, environmental, and psychological factors specific to women living with HIV with adherence to ARV medication. Descriptive and multivariate statistics were used to examine the effects of these factors on self-reported ARV adherence. Results Age, depression symptoms, stigma, and engagement with health care provider, and four psychological factors were correlated with self-reported ARV medication adherence (p = .01). Regression analysis indicated that adherence self-efficacy and depression symptoms accounted for 19% for 3-day and 22% for 30-day self-reported medication adherence. Conclusions Adherence self-efficacy and depression symptoms predict ARV medication adherence in women and should be evaluated by nurses. Future research is needed to identify antecedents to and interventions that support adherence self-efficacy and decrease depression symptoms. PMID:24502460

  20. Depression and medication adherence among older Korean patients with hypertension: Mediating role of self-efficacy.

    PubMed

    Son, Youn-Jung; Won, Mi Hwa

    2017-02-13

    Many studies have reported the negative effects of depression on adherence to antihypertensive medication. However, little is known about the mechanism underlying this relationship in elderly patients with hypertension. The aim of this cross-sectional study is to examine the mediating role of self-efficacy in the relationship between depression and medication adherence among older patients with hypertension. The data were collected from October to December 2014. A total of 255 older patients with hypertension were assessed using the Geriatric Depression Scale, the Self-efficacy for Appropriate Medication Use Scale, and the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale. Hierarchical linear regression analysis and the Sobel test were used to examine the mediating role of self-efficacy in the relationship between depression and medication adherence. Depression and self-efficacy were statistically significant predictors of medication adherence in older patients with hypertension. Self-efficacy partially mediated the relationship between depression and medication adherence. Interventions targeting self-efficacy could increase the confidence of patients in their ability to actively take their medicines. Moreover, health care providers should be aware of the importance of early detection of depression in older patients with hypertension. Future studies with longitudinal data are warranted to clarify the multidirectional relationships between depression, self-efficacy, and medication adherence.

  1. TIME PERSPECTIVE AND MEDICATION ADHERENCE AMONG INDIVIDUALS WITH HYPERTENSION OR DIABETES MELLITUS

    PubMed Central

    Sansbury, Brittany; Dasgupta, Abhijit; Guthrie, Lori; Ward, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The study determined if time perspective was associated with medication adherence among people with hypertension and diabetes. Methods Using the Health Beliefs Model, we used path analysis to test direct and indirect effects of time perspective and health beliefs on adherence among 178 people who participated in a community-based survey near Washington, D. C. We measured three time perspectives (future, present fatalistic, and present hedonistic) with the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory and medication adherence by self-report. Results The total model demonstrated a good fit (RMSEA = 0.17, 90% CI [0.10, 0.28], p = 0.003; comparative fit index = 0.91). Future time perspective and age showed direct effects on increased medication adherence; an increase by a single unit in future time perspective was associated with a 0.32 standard deviation increase in reported adherence. There were no significant indirect effects of time perspective with reported medication adherence through health beliefs. Conclusion The findings provide the first evidence that time perspective plays an under-recognized role as a psychological motivator in medication adherence. Practice Implications Patient counseling for medication adherence may be enhanced if clinicians incorporate consideration of the patient’s time perspective. PMID:24480361

  2. MEDICATION ADHERENCE IN ELDERLY WITH POLYPHARMACY LIVING AT HOME: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW OF EXISTING STUDIES

    PubMed Central

    Zelko, Erika; Klemenc-Ketis, Zalika; Tusek-Bunc, Ksenija

    2016-01-01

    Background: We wanted to systematically review the available evidence to evaluate the drug adherence in elderly with polypharmacy living at home. Methods: We performed a literature search using MEDLINE, ISI Web of Science, ProQuest, EMBASE, SCOPUS, Springer Link, Sage Journals and CINAHL. We used the following terms: Medication Adherence, Medication Compliance, Polypharmacy, and Elderly. The search was limited to English-language articles. We included only clinical trials, systematic reviews, meta-analysis and cross-sectional studies. Results: A total of seven articles were included in this systematic review after applying the search strategy. Six studies dealt with the prevalence of medication adherence and its correlates in patients aged 65 years or more with polypharmacy. Two studies dealt with the effect of various interventions on medication adherence in patients aged 65 years or more with polypharmacy. Conclusion: The available literature on the polypharmacy and drug adherence in elderly living at home is scarce and further studies are needed. PMID:27147920

  3. A cost analysis of an internet based medication adherence intervention for people living with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Page, Timothy F.; Horvath, Keith J.; Danilenko, Gene P.; Williams, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to document development costs and estimate implementation costs of an internet based medication adherence intervention for people living with HIV in the US. Participants (n=61) were enrolled in the 8 week study in 2011 and entered the intervention website remotely in the setting of their choice. Development costs were obtained from a feasibility and acceptability study of an internet based medication adherence intervention. Implementation costs were estimated based on an 8 week trial period during the feasibility and acceptability study. Results indicated that although developing an internet based medication adherence intervention is expensive, the monthly cost of implementing and delivering the intervention is low. If the efficacy of similar interventions can be established, these results suggest the internet could be an effective method for delivering medication adherence interventions to persons residing in areas with limited access to in-person adherence services. PMID:22362156

  4. Strategies to improve medication adherence in patients with schizophrenia: the role of support services

    PubMed Central

    El-Mallakh, Peggy; Findlay, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to describe research over the past 10 years on the role of support services in promoting medication adherence in mental health consumers diagnosed with schizophrenia. A literature search was conducted using the terms “medication adherence,” “schizophrenia,” and “support services,” using Medline, PubMed, and CINAHL. Reference lists from published studies were also reviewed to identify additional research studies. Twenty-two articles focused on support-service intervention studies, and these were selected for review. Available support-service interventions include adherence therapy, electronic reminders via text messages and telephones, cognitive–behavioral and motivational strategies, and financial incentives. Support-service intervention strategies need to be tailored to the specific needs of mental health consumers with schizophrenia. More research is needed to investigate effective support services to enhance long-term adherence and adherence to medications for medical illnesses in this population. PMID:25931823

  5. Pilot study examining the efficacy of an electronic intervention to promote HIV medication adherence.

    PubMed

    Claborn, Kasey R; Leffingwell, Thad R; Miller, Mary Beth; Meier, Ellen; Stephens, Johnny R

    2014-01-01

    Widespread dissemination of current interventions designed to improve HIV medication adherence is limited by several barriers, including additional time and expense burdens on the health care systems. Electronic interventions could aid in dissemination of interventions in the clinic setting. This study developed and tested the feasibility and acceptability of a computer-based adaption of an empirically supported face-to-face adherence promotion intervention. HIV-positive individuals (N = 92) on antiretroviral therapy with self-reported adherence <95% were randomized to the electronic intervention + treatment as usual (TAU) or TAU only. Study outcome variables which included treatment self-efficacy and self-reported medication adherence were assessed at baseline and follow-up. Time × condition interaction effects in mixed model analysis of variance (ANOVAs) examined the differences in patterns of change in the outcome variables over time between the two groups. Participants in the electronic intervention condition reported higher levels of self-efficacy to adhere to their medication at follow-up compared to the control condition. Although nonsignificant, levels of adherence tended to improve over time in the intervention condition, while TAU adherence remained constant. This was the first study to investigate a single-session, computer-based adherence intervention. Results suggest that electronic interventions are feasible and this method may be effective at increasing self-efficacy and adherence among patients reporting suboptimal adherence levels.

  6. A Social Problem-Solving Model of Adherence to HIV Medications.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Mallory O; Elliott, Timothy R; Neilands, Torsten B; Morin, Stephen F; Chesney, Margaret A

    2006-05-01

    HIV medication adherence remains a challenge and limits the degree to which treatment benefit can be maximized. This study tested an explanatory model of HIV medication adherence using a social problem-solving (SPS) framework. Associations of SPS with adherence are hypothesized to be direct and/or indirect via psychological health. HIV+ adults were interviewed using validated measures of SPS, psychological health, and antiretroviral therapy (ART) medication adherence. Structural equation modeling (SEM) techniques were used to test hypothesized relationships and to evaluate overall fit of the model to the data. SEM supported an indirect association (but not direct) of SPS on adherence via psychological health among the 545 HIV+ adults included in the analyses. Overall, the findings resulted in a model of adherence that offered very good fit to the data and correctly classified 97% of the cases as adherent versus nonadherent. Results support the use of SPS as a conceptual framework for understanding adherence to ART. Findings offer rationale and direction for SPS interventions to enhance adherence by improving psychological health. Such approaches, if effective, have the potential to positively impact psychological well being and adherence, thereby maximizing clinical benefit from treatment, which is linked to lower mortality from AIDS.

  7. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for HIV Medication Adherence and Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safren, Steven A.; Hendriksen, Ellen S.; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Mimiaga, Matthew J.; Pickard, Robert; Otto, Michael W.

    2004-01-01

    For patients with HIV, depression is a common, distressing condition that can interfere with a critical self-care behavior--adherence to antiretroviral therapy. The present study describes a cognitive-behavioral treatment designed to integrate cognitive-behavioral therapy for depression with our previously tested approach to improving adherence to…

  8. Association between addressing antiseizure drug side effects and patient-reported medication adherence in epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Lidia M V R; Carneiro, Thiago S; Cole, Andrew J; Hsu, John; Vickrey, Barbara G; Hoch, Daniel B

    2016-01-01

    Background and aim Adherence to treatment is a critical component of epilepsy management. This study examines whether addressing antiepileptic drug (AED) side effects at every visit is associated with increased patient-reported medication adherence. Patients and methods This study identified 243 adults with epilepsy who were seen at two academic outpatient neurology settings and had at least two visits over a 3-year period. Demographic and clinical characteristics were abstracted. Evidence that AED side effects were addressed was measured through 1) phone interview (patient-reported) and 2) medical records abstraction (physician-documented). Medication adherence was assessed using the validated Morisky Medication Adherence Scale-4. Complete adherence was determined as answering “no” to all questions. Results Sixty-two (25%) patients completed the interviews. Participants and nonparticipants were comparable with respect to demographic and clinical characteristics; however, a smaller proportion of participants had a history of drug-resistant epilepsy than nonparticipants (17.7% vs 30.9%, P=0.04). Among the participants, evidence that AED side effects were addressed was present in 48 (77%) medical records and reported by 51 (82%) patients. Twenty-eight (45%) patients reported complete medication adherence. The most common reason for incomplete adherence was missed medication due to forgetfulness (n=31, 91%). There was no association between addressing AED side effects (neither physician-documented nor patient-reported) and complete medication adherence (P=0.22 and 0.20). Discussion and conclusion Among patients with epilepsy, addressing medication side effects at every visit does not appear to increase patient-reported medication adherence. PMID:27826186

  9. Patient knowledge and pulmonary medication adherence in adult patients with cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ann Hsu-An; Kendrick, Jennifer G; Wilcox, Pearce G; Quon, Bradley S

    2017-01-01

    Background and objectives Patient knowledge of lung function (ie, forced expiratory volume in 1 s [FEV1]% predicted) and the intended benefits of their prescribed pulmonary medications might play an important role in medication adherence, but this relationship has not been examined previously in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Methods All patients diagnosed with CF and without prior lung transplantation were invited to complete knowledge and self-reported medication adherence questionnaires during routine outpatient visits to the Adult CF Clinic, St Paul’s Hospital, Vancouver, Canada from June 2013 to August 2014. Results A total of 142 out of 167 (85%) consecutive adults attending CF clinic completed patient knowledge and medication adherence survey questionnaires. Sixty-four percent of the patients recalled their last FEV1% predicted value within 5%, and 70% knew the intended benefits of all their prescribed medications. Self-reported adherence rates were highest for inhaled antibiotics (81%), azithromycin (87%), and dornase alpha (76%) and lowest for hypertonic saline (47%). Individuals who knew their FEV1% predicted value within 5% were more likely to self-report adherence to dornase alpha (84% vs 62%, P=0.06) and inhaled antibiotics (88% vs 64%, P=0.06) compared to those who did not, but these associations were not statistically significant. There were no significant associations observed between patient knowledge of intended medication benefits and self-reported medication adherence. Conclusion Contrary to our hypothesis, disease- and treatment-related knowledge was not associated with self-reported medication adherence. This suggests other barriers to medication adherence should be targeted in future studies aiming to improve medication adherence in adults with CF.

  10. Medication adherence and patient outcomes: part 2: interventions and resources to overcome low health literacy.

    PubMed

    Petty, Janet L

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the influence of health literacy on medication adherence. With health literacy skills nearly flat for over a decade and an aging population receiving multiple and complex medication regimens, literacy is becoming a more important factor in nursing assessment and intervention. Concrete tools are provided to help the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) assess literacy and evaluate written resources for patient education and to improve medication adherence.

  11. A proposal for quality standards for measuring medication adherence in research.

    PubMed

    Williams, Ann Bartley; Amico, K Rivet; Bova, Carol; Womack, Julie A

    2013-01-01

    A decade after widespread recognition that adherence to medication regimens is key to antiretroviral effectiveness, considerable controversy remains regarding a "gold standard" for adherence measurement. Each adherence measurement approach has strengths and weaknesses and each rests on specific assumptions. The range of assumptions regarding adherence measurement and the diversity with which each approach is implemented strongly suggest that the evaluation of a particular measure outside of the context in which it was used (e.g. the study's operational protocol) may result in undeserved confidence or lack of confidence in study results. The purpose of this paper is to propose a set of best practices across commonly used measurement methods. Recommendations regarding what information should be included in published reports regarding how adherence was measured are provided to promote improvement in the quality of measurement of medication adherence in research.

  12. An observational study of health literacy and medication adherence in adult kidney transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Demian, Maryam N.; Shapiro, R. Jean

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a high prevalence of non-adherence to immunosuppressants in kidney transplant recipients. Although limited health literacy is common in kidney recipients and is linked to adverse outcomes in other medical populations, its effect on medication adherence in kidney transplant recipients remains poorly understood. The objective was to investigate the effect of lower health literacy on immunosuppressant adherence. Methods Kidney recipients who were at least 6 months post-transplant and outpatients of Vancouver General Hospital in B.C., Canada were recruited through invitation letters. A total of 96 recipients completed the Health Literacy Questionnaire, which provides a multifactorial profile of self-reported health literacy and the Transplant Effects Questionnaire-Adherence subscale measuring self-reported immunosuppressant adherence. Hierarchical linear regression was used to analyze the association between health literacy and adherence after controlling for identified risk factors of non-adherence. Results Our sample was on average 53 years old, 56% male and 9 years post-transplant. Kidney recipients reported low levels of health literacy on scales measuring active health management and critical appraisal of information and 75% reported non-perfect adherence. Worse adherence was associated with poorer overall health literacy (ΔR2 = 0.08, P = 0.004) and lower scores on six of nine of the health literacy factors. Conclusions Poorer health literacy is associated with lower immunosuppressant adherence in adult kidney transplant recipients suggesting the importance of considering a recipient's level of health literacy in research and clinical contexts. Medication adherence interventions can target the six factors of health literacy identified as being risk factors for lower medication adherence. PMID:27994867

  13. The Impact of Caregiving on Caregivers' Medication Adherence and Appointment Keeping.

    PubMed

    Wang, XiaoRong; Robinson, Karen M; Hardin, Heather K

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between care demands and caregivers' medication adherence and health appointment keeping. A cross-sectional correlational design was used to survey a convenience sample of 45 informal caregivers of persons with dementia. Pearson product-moment correlations and hierarchical multiple regressions were used to examine the relationships among study variables. Nearly one third of caregivers reported frequently or occasionally missing medication doses and nearly a half reported not being able to fully keep appointments with health care providers. Female gender, care duration, and care-recipient activities of daily living were significant predictors for medication adherence and appointment keeping. Caregivers' education and weekly caregiving hours contributed significantly to their medication adherence. Interventions are needed to help caregivers keep health appointments and adhere to their medications.

  14. Financial incentives to improve adherence to antipsychotic maintenance medication in non-adherent patients: a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed Central

    Priebe, Stefan; Bremner, Stephen A; Lauber, Christoph; Henderson, Catherine; Burns, Tom

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Poor adherence to long-term antipsychotic injectable (LAI) medication in patients with psychotic disorders is associated with a range of negative outcomes. No psychosocial intervention has been found to be consistently effective in improving adherence. OBJECTIVES: To test whether or not offering financial incentives is effective and cost-effective in improving adherence and to explore patient and clinician experiences with such incentives. DESIGN: A cluster randomised controlled trial with economic and nested qualitative evaluation. The intervention period lasted for 12 months with 24 months' follow-up. The unit of randomisation was mental health teams in the community. SETTING: Community teams in secondary mental health care. PARTICIPANTS: Patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia, schizoaffective psychosis or bipolar illness, receiving ≤ 75% of their prescribed LAI medication. In total, 73 teams with 141 patients (intervention n = 78 and control n = 63) were included. INTERVENTIONS: Participants in the intervention group received £15 for each LAI medication. Patients in the control group received treatment as usual. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: PRIMARY OUTCOME: adherence to LAI medication (the percentage of received out of those prescribed). SECONDARY OUTCOMES: percentage of patients with at least 95% adherence; clinical global improvement; subjective quality of life; satisfaction with medication; hospitalisation; adverse events; and costs. Qualitative evaluation: semistructured interviews with patients in the intervention group and their clinicians. RESULTS: PRIMARY OUTCOME: outcome data were available for 131 patients. Baseline adherence was 69% in the intervention group and 67% in the control group. During the intervention period, adherence was significantly higher in the intervention group than in the control group (85% vs. 71%) [adjusted mean difference 11.5%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.9% to 19.0%; p = 0.003]. Secondary outcome

  15. Medication Adherence Following Acute Coronary Syndrome: Does One Size Fit All?

    PubMed

    Bernal, Daniel D L; Bereznicki, Luke R E; Chalmers, Leanne; Castelino, Ronald L; Thompson, Angus; Davidson, Patricia M; Peterson, Gregory M

    2016-02-01

    Guideline-based management of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is well established, yet some may challenge that strict implementation of guideline recommendations can limit the individualization of therapy. The use of all recommended medications following ACS places a high burden of responsibility and cost on patients, particularly when these medications have not been previously prescribed. Without close attention to avoiding non-adherence to these medications, the full benefits of the guideline recommendations will not be realized in many patients. Using a case example, we discuss how the recognition of adherence barriers can be an effective and efficient process for identifying patients at risk of non-adherence following ACS. For those identified as at risk, the World Health Organization's model of adherence barriers is explored as a potentially useful tool to assist with individualization of therapy and promotion of adherence.

  16. 78 FR 34109 - ``Script Your Future'' Medication Adherence Campaign

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-06

    ... adherence, and tailoring messaging to subpopulations of consumers who may need adaptations or special... enhance it; (5) to tailor campaign messaging to subpopulations of consumers who may need adaptations...

  17. Adherence to hypertension medication: Quantitative and qualitative investigations in a rural Northern Vietnamese community

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thi-Phuong-Lan; Schuiling-Veninga, Catharina C. M.; Nguyen, Thi Bach Yen; Vu, Thu-Hang; Wright, E. Pamela; Postma, Maarten J.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The purposes of this study were to assess the adherence to medication of hypertensive patients visiting community health stations in a rural area in Vietnam, to examine the relationship between levels of adherence and cardiovascular risk among hypertensive patients and to further understand factors influencing adherence. Methods This study is part of a prospective one-year study conducted on hypertension management in a population aged 35 to 64 years. Data on age, sex, blood pressure and blood test results were collected at baseline. Cardiovascular risk was based on the Cardiovascular Risk Prediction Model for populations in Asia. To calculate medication adherence, the number of days the drug was taken was divided by the number of days since the first day of the prescription. A threshold of 80% was applied to differentiate between adherence and non-adherence. In-depth interviews were conducted among 18 subjects, including subjects classified as adherent and as non-adherent. Results Among 315 patients analyzed, 49.8% of the patients were adherent. Qualitative investigation revealed discrepancies in classification of adherence and non-adherence based on quantitative analysis and interviews. No significant difference in medication compliance between two cardiovascular disease risk groups (<10% vs. >10% risk) was found, also not after controlling for age, sex, and ethnicity (adjusted odds ratio at 1.068; 95% CI: 0.614 to 1.857). The odds of medication adherence in females was 1.531 times higher than in males but the difference was not statistically significant (95% CI: 0.957 to 2.448). Each one-year increase in age resulted in patients being 1.036 times more likely to be compliant (95% CI: 1.002 to 1.072). Awareness of complications related to hypertension was given as the main reason for adherence to therapy. Conclusions Medication adherence rate was relatively low among hypertensive subjects. The data suggest that rather than risk profile, the factor of

  18. Medication Adherence Behavior and Priorities Among Older Adults With CKD: A Semistructured Interview Study

    PubMed Central

    Rifkin, Dena E.; Laws, M. Barton; Rao, Madhumathi; Balakrishnan, V. S.; Sarnak, Mark J.; Wilson, Ira B.

    2010-01-01

    Background Older adults with chronic kidney disease (CKD) typically take more than five medications and have multiple prescribing physicians. Little however is known about how they prioritize their medical conditions or decide which medications to take. Methods Semistructured interviews (average length 40 minutes) with twenty community-dwelling adults with CKD stages 3-5D, receiving nephrology care at a tertiary referral center. Respondents were asked about medications, prescribing physicians, and medication-taking behaviors. We performed thematic analysis to explain patients’ decisions regarding medication prioritization, understanding, and adherence decisions. Results Participants (age range, 55–84 years; mean, 72) took 5–14 prescribed medications, had 2–9 physicians, and 5–11 comorbid conditions. All had assigned implicit priorities to their medications. While the majority expressed the intention to be adherent, many regularly skipped medications they considered less important. Most identified the prescribing physician and indication for each medication, but there was often substantial discordance between beliefs about medications and conventional medical opinion. Respondents prioritized medications based on the salience of the particular condition, perceived effects of the treatment, and on the barriers (physical, logistic, or financial) to taking the prescribed drug. Side effects of medications were common and anxiety-provoking, but discussions with the prescribing physician were often delayed or unfulfilling for the patient. Conclusions Polypharmacy in CKD patients leads to complex medication choices and adherence behaviors in this population. Most of the patients we interviewed had beliefs or priorities that were non-concordant with conventional medical opinion, but patients rarely discussed these beliefs and priorities, or the resultant poor medication adherence, with their physicians. Further study is needed to provide quantitative data on the

  19. Association between Medication Adherence and Duration of Outpatient Treatment in Patients with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Kikuyama, Hiroki; Ohta, Munehiro; Kanazawa, Tetsufumi; Okamura, Takehiko; Yoneda, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Objective Medication adherence is important in the treatment of schizophrenia, and critical periods during treatment may be associated with relapse. However, the relationship between adherence and duration of outpatient treatment (DOT) remains unclear. The authors aimed to clarify the relationship between adherence and DOT at a psychiatric hospital in Japan. Methods For outpatients with schizophrenia who regularly visit Shin-Abuyama hospital, the authors conducted a single questionnaire survey (five questions covering gender, age, DOT, medication shortages, and residual medication) over one month period. Participants were divided into two groups whether DOT were from more than one year to within five years or not. Mantel-Haenszel analysis and logistic regression analysis were performed on the data regarding the medication adherence. Results Effective answers were received for 328 patients. The residual medication rate was significantly higher among those receiving outpatient treatment from more than one year to within five years than five years than those receiving outpatient treatment for more than five years or less than one year (p=0.016). Conclusion This survey suggests that there are critical periods during which patients are most prone to poor adherence. Because poor adherence increases the risk of relapse, specific measures must be taken to improve adherence during these periods. PMID:27482242

  20. Factors influencing adherence to psychopharmacological medications in psychiatric patients: a structural equation modeling approach

    PubMed Central

    De las Cuevas, Carlos; de Leon, Jose; Peñate, Wenceslao; Betancort, Moisés

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate pathways through which sociodemographic, clinical, attitudinal, and perceived health control variables impact psychiatric patients’ adherence to psychopharmacological medications. Method A sample of 966 consecutive psychiatric outpatients was studied. The variables were sociodemographic (age, gender, and education), clinical (diagnoses, drug treatment, and treatment duration), attitudinal (attitudes toward psychopharmacological medication and preferences regarding participation in decision-making), perception of control over health (health locus of control, self-efficacy, and psychological reactance), and level of adherence to psychopharmacological medications. Structural equation modeling was applied to examine the nonstraightforward relationships and the interactive effects among the analyzed variables. Results Structural equation modeling demonstrated that psychiatric patients’ treatment adherence was associated: 1) negatively with cognitive psychological reactance (adherence decreased as cognitive psychological reactance increased), 2) positively with patients’ trust in their psychiatrists (doctors’ subscale), 3) negatively with patients’ belief that they are in control of their mental health and that their mental health depends on their own actions (internal subscale), and 4) positively (although weakly) with age. Self-efficacy indirectly influenced treatment adherence through internal health locus of control. Conclusion This study provides support for the hypothesis that perceived health control variables play a relevant role in psychiatric patients’ adherence to psychopharmacological medications. The findings highlight the importance of considering prospective studies of patients’ psychological reactance and health locus of control as they may be clinically relevant factors contributing to adherence to psychopharmacological medications.

  1. Validated adherence scales used in a measurement-guided medication management approach to target and tailor a medication adherence intervention: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thi-My-Uyen; La Caze, Adam; Cottrell, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine if a targeted and tailored intervention based on a discussion informed by validated adherence scales will improve medication adherence. Design Prospective randomised trial. Setting 2 community pharmacies in Brisbane, Australia. Methods Patients recently initiated on a cardiovascular or oral hypoglycaemic medication within the past 4–12 weeks were recruited from two community pharmacies. Participants identified as non-adherent using the Medication Adherence Questionnaire (MAQ) were randomised into the intervention or control group. The intervention group received a tailored intervention based on a discussion informed by responses to the MAQ, Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire-Specific and Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire. Adherence was measured using the MAQ at 3 and 6 months following the intervention. Results A total of 408 patients were assessed for eligibility, from which 152 participants were enrolled into the study. 120 participants were identified as non-adherent using the MAQ and randomised to the ‘intervention’ or ‘control’ group. The mean MAQ score at baseline in the intervention and control were similar (1.58: 95% CI (1.38 to 1.78) and 1.60: 95% CI (1.43 to 1.77), respectively). There was a statistically significant improvement in adherence in the intervention group compared to control at 3 months (mean MAQ score 0.42: 95% CI (0.27 to 0.57) vs 1.58: 95% CI (1.42 to 1.75); p<0.001). The significant improvement in MAQ score in the intervention group compared to control was sustained at 6 months (0.48: 95% CI (0.31 to 0.65) vs 1.48: 95% CI (1.27 to 1.69); p<0.001). Conclusions An intervention that targeted non-adherent participants and tailored to participant-specific reasons for non-adherence was successful at improving medication adherence. Trial registration number ACTRN12613000162718; Results. PMID:27903564

  2. An Analysis of Medication Adherence of Sooner Health Access Network SoonerCare Choice Patients

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Nicholas A.; Kendrick, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Medication adherence is a desirable but rarely available metric in patient care, providing key insights into patient behavior that has a direct effect on a patient’s health. In this research, we determine the medication adherence characteristics of over 46,000 patients enrolled in the Sooner Health Access Network (HAN), based on Medicaid claims data from the Oklahoma Health Care Authority. We introduce a new measure called Specific Medication PDC (smPDC), based on the popular Proportion of Days Covered (PDC) method, using the last fill date for the end date of the measurement duration. The smPDC method is demonstrated by calculating medication adherence across the eligible patient population, for relevant subpopulations over a two-year period spanning 2012 – 2013. We leverage a clinical analytics platform to disseminate adherence measurements to providers. Aggregate results demonstrate that the smPDC method is relevant and indicates potential opportunities for health improvement for certain population segments. PMID:25954350

  3. Methods for measuring, enhancing, and accounting for medication adherence in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Vrijens, B; Urquhart, J

    2014-06-01

    Adherence to rationally prescribed medications is essential for effective pharmacotherapy. However, widely variable adherence to protocol-specified dosing regimens is prevalent among participants in ambulatory drug trials, mostly manifested in the form of underdosing. Drug actions are inherently dose and time dependent, and as a result, variable underdosing diminishes the actions of trial medications by various degrees. The ensuing combination of increased variability and decreased magnitude of trial drug actions reduces statistical power to discern between-group differences in drug actions. Variable underdosing has many adverse consequences, some of which can be mitigated by the combination of reliable measurements of ambulatory patients' adherence to trial and nontrial medications, measurement-guided management of adherence, statistically and pharmacometrically sound analyses, and modifications in trial design. Although nonadherence is prevalent across all therapeutic areas in which the patients are responsible for treatment administration, the significance of the adverse consequences depends on the characteristics of both the disease and the medications.

  4. Systematic review of adherence rates by medication class in type 2 diabetes: a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    McGovern, Andrew; Tippu, Zayd; Hinton, William; Munro, Neil; Whyte, Martin; de Lusignan, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Treatment options for type 2 diabetes are becoming increasingly complex with people often prescribed multiple medications, and may include both oral and injectable therapies. There is ongoing debate about which drug classes provide the optimum second-line and third-line treatment options. In the real world, patient adherence and persistence determines medication effectiveness. A better understanding of adherence may help inform the choice of second-line and third-line drug classes. Methods and analysis This systematic review will compare adherence and persistence rates across the different classes of medication available to people with type 2 diabetes. It will include all identified studies comparing medication adherence or persistence between two or more glucose-lowering medications in people with type 2 diabetes. Research databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, The Cochrane Library, The Register of Controlled Trials, PsychINFO and CINAHL) will be searched for relevant articles, using a comprehensive search strategy. All identified medication trials and observational studies will be included which compare adherence or persistence across classes of diabetes medication. The characteristics and outcomes of all the included studies will be reported along with a study quality grade, assessed using the Cochrane Risk Assessment Tool. The quality of adjustment for confounders of adherence or persistence will be reported for each study. Where multiple (n ≥3) studies provide compare adherence or persistence across the same 2 medication classes, a meta-analysis will be performed. Ethics and dissemination No ethics approval is required. This review and meta-analysis (where possible) will provide important information on the relative patient adherence and persistence, with the different classes of diabetes therapies. Once complete, the results will be made available by peer-reviewed publication. Trial registration number CRD42015027865. PMID:26928029

  5. Supportive relationships and medication adherence in HIV-infected, low-income Latinos.

    PubMed

    van Servellen, Gwen; Lombardi, Emilia

    2005-12-01

    Inadequate social support and poor communications with health care providers can affect adherence to antiretroviral therapy. The magnitude of independent effects of these factors on adherence is not fully known. This study examined the relationship of perceived emotional or informational social support from family and friends, quality of physician-patient communications and relationships, and medication adherence in a sample of low-income, Spanish-speaking, HIV-positive Latino men and women receiving treatment in community-based clinics (n = 85). Results of the study indicated that, whereas emotional or informational support was significantly associated with level of dose adherence (OR, 1.04, 95% CI, 1.01-1.08; p = .03), quality of physician-patient communications or relationships was significantly associated with adherence to medication schedule,t(6, 71) = 4.45,p < .001. Quality of patient-physician relationship accounted for 22% of the variance in adherence to medication schedule. Both kinds of support were associated with better adherence in this population but may affect adherence behaviors in different ways.

  6. Evidence-based Assessment of Adherence to Medical Treatments in Pediatric Psychology

    PubMed Central

    Modi, Avani C.; Lemanek, Kathleen L.; Ievers-Landis, Carolyn E.; Rapoff, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives Adherence to medical regimens for children and adolescents with chronic conditions is generally below 50% and is considered the single, greatest cause of treatment failure. As the prevalence of chronic illnesses in pediatric populations increases and awareness of the negative consequences of poor adherence become clearer, the need for reliable and valid measures of adherence has grown. Methods This review evaluated empirical evidence for 18 measures utilizing three assessment methods: (a) self-report or structured interviews, (b) daily diary methods, and (c) electronic monitors. Results Ten measures met the “well-established” evidence-based (EBA) criteria. Conclusions Several recommendations for improving adherence assessment were made. In particular, consideration should be given to the use of innovative technologies that provide a window into the “real time” behaviors of patients and families. Providing written treatment plans, identifying barriers to good adherence, and examining racial and ethnic differences in attitudes, beliefs and behaviors affecting adherence were strongly recommended. PMID:17846042

  7. The importance of the patient-clinician relationship in adherence to antiretroviral medication.

    PubMed

    Molassiotis, Alex; Morris, Kate; Trueman, Ian

    2007-12-01

    The aim of the study was to assess dimensions of the patient-clinician relationship in relation to adherence with antiretroviral medication in a sample of HIV patients. This was a correlational evaluation, using a cross-sectional design. Thirty-eight HIV patients in two UK HIV units provided complete data. Analysis suggested that the elements of the patient-clinician relationship contributing to adherence with medication were the patient perception of being valued and respected by the clinician, the patients' ability to initiate discussions about the treatment, empowerment and level of trust placed in the nurse. The latter, and the time since starting antiretroviral treatment, were the only two variables that could predict adherence in a regression model, explaining 41% of the variance in adherence. Building trusted relationships with the patients and investing in educational and communication techniques to improve the therapeutic relationship could strongly contribute to HIV patients to maintaining high adherence rates.

  8. Electronic Monitoring of Medication Adherence in Early Maintenance Phase Treatment for Pediatric Leukemia and Lymphoma: Identifying Patterns of Nonadherence

    PubMed Central

    Drotar, Dennis; Alderfer, Melissa; Donewar, Crista Wetherington; Ewing, Linda; Katz, Ernest R.; Muriel, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe patterns of treatment adherence to early maintenance phase therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and lymphoblastic lymphoma (LBL). Methods Using an objective observational method (electronic monitoring), adherence was examined for 139 patients aged 7–19 years diagnosed with ALL or LBL across 6 centers. Results The mean adherence percentage was 86.2%. Adherence rates declined over the 1-month of follow-up to 83%. 3 linear trajectories of 6-mercaptopurine adherence were identified: (1) exemplary adherence (n = 99): Averaging nearly 100%; (2) deteriorating (n = 23): Adherence decreased from 100 to 60%; and (3) chronically poor adherence (n = 9): Averaging 40%. Conclusions Adherence promotion interventions might be tailored to subgroups of patients who demonstrated problematic patterns of treatment adherence that could place them at risk for relapse. This research demonstrates the importance of using objective real-time measures of medication adherence for measuring and documenting adherence patterns. PMID:24365698

  9. Poor medication adherence in clinical trials: consequences and solutions.

    PubMed

    Breckenridge, Alasdair; Aronson, Jeffrey K; Blaschke, Terrence F; Hartman, Dan; Peck, Carl C; Vrijens, Bernard

    2017-03-01

    Poor adherence to medicines in clinical trials can undermine the value of the trials; for example, by compromising estimates of the benefits and risks of a medicine. In this article, we highlight such consequences and also discuss approaches to tackle this problem.

  10. Revisiting the internal consistency and factorial validity of the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale

    PubMed Central

    Zongo, Arsène; Guénette, Line; Moisan, Jocelyne; Guillaumie, Laurence; Lauzier, Sophie; Grégoire, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the internal consistency and factorial validity of the adapted French 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale in assessing adherence to noninsulin antidiabetic drug treatment. Study Design and Setting: In a cross-sectional web survey of individuals with type 2 diabetes of the Canadian province of Quebec, self-reported adherence to the antidiabetes drug treatment was measured using the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale-8. We assessed the internal consistency of the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale-8 with Cronbach’s alpha, and factorial validity was assessed by identifying the underlying factors using exploratory factor analyses. Results: A total of 901 individuals completed the survey. Cronbach’s alpha was 0.60. Two factors were identified. One factor comprised five items: stopping medication when diabetes is under control, stopping when feeling worse, feeling hassled about sticking to the prescription, reasons other than forgetting and a cross-loading item (i.e. taking drugs the day before). The second factor comprised three other items that were all related to forgetfulness in addition to the cross-loading item. Conclusion: Cronbach’s alpha of the adapted French Morisky Medication Adherence Scale-8 was below the acceptable value of 0.70. This observed low internal consistency of the scale is probably related to the causal nature of the items of the scale but not necessarily a lack of reliability. The results suggest that the adapted French Morisky Medication Adherence Scale-8 is a two-factor scale assessing intentional (first factor) and unintentional (second factor) non-adherence to the noninsulin antidiabetes drug treatment. The scale could be used to separately identify these outcomes using scores obtained on each of the sub-scales. PMID:27895914

  11. Cultural Rationales Guiding Medication Adherence Among African American with HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Neufeld, Stewart; Berry, Rico; Luborsky, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Abstract To date, only modest gains have been achieved in explaining adherence to medical regimens, limiting effective interventions. This is a particularly important issue for African Americans who are disproportionately affected by the HIV epidemic. Few studies have focused on intragroup variation among African Americans in adherence to ART. The aim of this study was to identify and describe the cultural rationales guiding African American patients' formulation and evaluation of adherence. Rationales are key features of purposeful human action. In-depth interviews with 80 seropositive African Americans were tape recorded, transcribed, and analyzed. Participant CD4, viral load and medical histories were collected at each data point. Analysis of four waves of panel data identified three types of adherence rationales: Authoritative Knowledge Rationale (AKR; n=29, 36.3%), Following Doctors' Orders Rationale (DOR; n=24, 30.0%) and Individualized Adherence Rationale (IAR; n=27, 33.8%). Differences in mean reported adherence between the rationale groups did not achieve statistical significance. However, the fraction reporting low adherence (<70%), although not different by rationale group at the first interview (T1), was significantly higher for the IAR group by the fourth interview (T4). Objective clinical markers (CD4 and viral load) improved over time (from T1 to T4) for AKR and DOR groups, but remained unchanged for the IAR group, yet self-reported adherence declined for all groups over the course of the four interviews. PMID:21777141

  12. A multifaceted prospective memory intervention to improve medication adherence: design of a randomized control trial.

    PubMed

    Insel, Kathleen C; Einstein, Gilles O; Morrow, Daniel G; Hepworth, Joseph T

    2013-01-01

    Adherence to prescribed antihypertensive agents is critical because control of elevated blood pressure is the single most important way to prevent stroke and other end organ damage. Unfortunately, nonadherence remains a significant problem. Previous interventions designed to improve adherence have demonstrated only small benefits of strategies that target single facets such as understanding medication directions. The intervention described here is informed by prospective memory theory and performance of older adults in laboratory-based paradigms and uses a comprehensive, multifaceted approach to improve adherence. It incorporates multiple strategies designed to support key components of prospective remembering involved in taking medication. The intervention is delivered by nurses in the home with an education control group for comparison. Differences between groups in overall adherence following the intervention and 6 months later will be tested. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels also will be examined between groups and as they relate to adherence. Intra-individual regression is planned to examine change in adherence over time and its predictors. Finally, we will examine the association between executive function/working memory and adherence, predicting that adherence will be related to executive/working memory in the control group but not in the intervention group.

  13. The influence of frailty syndrome on medication adherence among elderly patients with hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Jankowska-Polańska, Beata; Dudek, Krzysztof; Szymanska-Chabowska, Anna; Uchmanowicz, Izabella

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypertension affects about 80% of people older than 80 years; however, diagnosis and treatment are difficult because about 55% of them do not adhere to treatment recommendations due to low socioeconomic status, comorbidities, age, physical limitations, and frailty syndrome. Aims The purposes of this study were to evaluate the influence of frailty on medication adherence among elderly hypertensive patients and to assess whether other factors influence adherence in this group of patients. Methods and results The study included 296 patients (mean age 68.8±8.0) divided into frail (n=198) and non-frail (n=98) groups. The Polish versions of the Tilburg Frailty Indicator (TFI) for frailty assessment and 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale for adherence assessment were used. The frail patients had lower medication adherence in comparison to the non-frail subjects (6.60±1.89 vs 7.11±1.42; P=0.028). Spearman’s rank correlation coefficients showed that significant determinants with negative influence on the level of adherence were physical (rho =−0.117), psychological (rho =−0.183), and social domain (rho =−0.163) of TFI as well as the total score of the questionnaire (rho =−0.183). However, multiple regression analysis revealed that only knowledge about complications of untreated hypertension (β=0.395) and satisfaction with the home environment (β=0.897) were found to be independent stimulants of adherence level. Conclusion Frailty is highly prevalent among elderly hypertensive patients. Higher level of frailty among elderly patients can be considered as a determinant of lower adherence. However, social support and knowledge about complications of untreated hypertension are the most important independent determinants of adherence to pharmacological treatment. PMID:27994444

  14. INCREASED ADHERENCE TO CFF PRACTICE GUIDELINES FOR PULMONARY MEDICATIONS CORRELATES WITH IMPROVED FEV1

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Brooke M.; Laguna, Theresa A.; Liu, Meixia; McNamara, John J.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND CFF practice guidelines recommend patients ≥ age 6 use dornasealfa and hypertonic saline daily, and those ≥ age 6 colonized with P. aeruginosa use inhaled tobramycin and oral azithromycin to improve lung function and reduce pulmonary exacerbations. A decline in FEV1 was noted in our 2008 CF Center Report. We hypothesized that increasing adherence to prescribing guidelines for these pulmonary medications would improve mean FEV1. METHODS This was a quality improvement project completed at a US CF center. CFF practice guidelines were reviewed with the center physicians. Patients were identified that were eligible to receive recommended therapies and it was determined whether they were prescribed the therapies. Baseline FEV1 data was collected. Adherence rates and FEV1 were followed quarterly for 1 year. Providers received a quarterly report card with adherence rates, mean FEV1 compared to colleagues, and a list of eligible patients that were not prescribed recommended therapies. RESULTS 92 patients were included. At baseline, the overall adherence rate was 59%. Overall adherence increased quarterly (p=<0.001). Each quarter there was improvement in adherence to prescribing for each medication (p<0.001). Except in quarter 1, FEV1 increased quarterly (p=0.092). There was moderate correlation (r=0.533) between improved adherence and improved FEV1. CONCLUSIONS Educating clinicians about guidelines, providing feedback on adherence to guidelines, and monitoring prescribing patterns improves prescribing adherence. FEV1 showed improvement after months of sustained adherence, trending towards significance. Longer follow-up is necessary to determine if improved prescribing adherence translates into improved FEV1 or slows rate of decline in FEV1. PMID:22997186

  15. Psychometric properties of three medication adherence scales in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Salt, Elizabeth; Hall, Lynne; Peden, Ann R; Home, Rob

    2012-01-01

    Patient adherence to their health care protocols is important to encourage the best health outcomes in rheumatoid arthritis (RA); however, little attention has been given to assessing the psychometric properties of adherence measures in this patient population. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of three existing self-report measures of medication adherence in a sample of patients with RA--the compliance-questionnaire-rheumatology (CQR), the Medication Adherence Report Scale (MARS), and the medication adherence scale (MAS). A cross-sectional study of 108 clinic patients with rheumatoid arthritis was conducted to evaluate the reliability and validity of the measures. Cronbach's alpha was .77 for both the CQR and a modified version of the MARS. For the MAS, the Kuder-Richardson 20 reliability was .25. Although not strong, test-retest reliability was adequate for all measures. Factor analysis indicated that both the MARS and the CQR measure two factors. All three instruments were moderately correlated with each other, with correlations ranging between .48 and .56. Although these scales were significantly correlated, moderate correlations among the scales indicate that they may not measure the same aspects of adherence. Among the three adherence measures, the modified MARS demonstrated the best evidence of reliability and validity and ease of administration in this sample of persons with RA.

  16. Medication adherence challenges among HIV positive substance abusers: the role of food and housing insecurity.

    PubMed

    Surratt, Hilary L; O'Grady, Catherine L; Levi-Minzi, Maria A; Kurtz, Steven P

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the prevalence of food/housing insecurity and its association with psychological, behavioral, and environmental factors impacting antiretroviral (ARV) medication adherence and diversion among substance using HIV+ patients in South Florida. Five hundred and three HIV+ substance abusers were recruited through targeted sampling. Participants completed a standardized instrument assessing demographics, mental health status, sex risk behaviors, HIV diagnosis, treatment history and access, ARV adherence and diversion, and attitudes toward health-care providers. Chi-square and t-tests were used to examine differences by food/housing status and a multivariate linear regression model examined food/housing insecurity and its associations to ARV adherence. Food/housing insecurity was reported by 43.3% of the sample and was associated with higher likelihood of severe psychological distress and substance dependence. Nearly 60% reported recent ARV diversion; only 47.2% achieved 95% medication adherence over one week. Food/housing insecure participants had deficits in their HIV care, including less time in consistent care, lower access to medical care, and less favorable attitudes toward care providers. Multivariate linear regression showed food/housing insecurity demonstrated significant main effects on adherence, including lower past week adherence. Medication diversion was also associated with reduced adherence. Our findings suggest that food/housing insecurity operates as a significant driver of ARV non-adherence and diversion in this population. In the pursuit of better long-term health outcomes for vulnerable HIV+ individuals, it is essential for providers to understand the role of food and housing insecurity as a stressor that negatively impacts ARV adherence and treatment access, while also significantly contributing to higher levels of distress and substance dependence.

  17. Medication Adherence Challenges among HIV Positive Substance Abusers: The Role of Food and Housing Insecurity

    PubMed Central

    Surratt, Hilary L.; O’Grady, Catherine L.; Levi-Minzi, Maria A.; Kurtz, Steven P.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the prevalence of food/housing insecurity and its association with psychological, behavioral and environmental factors impacting ARV medication adherence and diversion among substance using HIV+ patients in South Florida. 503 HIV+ substance abusers were recruited through targeted sampling. Participants completed a standardized instrument assessing demographics, mental health status, sex risk behaviors, HIV diagnosis, treatment history and access, ARV adherence and diversion, and attitudes toward health care providers. Chi-square and t-tests were used to examine differences by food/housing status and a multivariate linear regression model examined food/housing insecurity and its associations to ARV adherence. Food/housing insecurity was reported by 43.3% of the sample and was associated with higher likelihood of severe psychological distress and substance dependence. Nearly 60% reported recent ARV diversion; only 47.2% achieved 95% medication adherence over one week. Food/housing insecure participants had deficits in their HIV care, including less time in consistent care, lower access to medical care, and less favorable attitudes toward care providers. Multivariate linear regression showed food/housing insecurity demonstrated significant main effects on adherence, including lower past week adherence. Medication diversion was also associated with reduced adherence. Our findings suggest that food/housing insecurity operates as a significant driver of ARV non-adherence and diversion in this population. In the pursuit of better long term health outcomes for vulnerable HIV+ individuals, it is essential for providers to understand the role of food and housing insecurity as a stressor that negatively impacts ARV adherence and treatment access, while also significantly contributing to higher levels distress and substance dependence. PMID:25314042

  18. Integrative health coaching: a behavior skills approach that improves HbA1c and pharmacy claims-derived medication adherence

    PubMed Central

    Wolever, Ruth Q; Dreusicke, Mark H

    2016-01-01

    Objective Medication adherence requires underlying behavior skills and a supporting mindset that may not be addressed with education or reminders. Founded in the study of internal motivation and health psychology, integrative health coaching (IHC) helps patients gain insight into their behaviors and make long-term, sustainable lifestyle changes. The purpose of the study is to determine whether IHC improves oral medication adherence, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and psychosocial measures, and to assess whether adherence changes are sustained after the intervention. Methods Using a prospective observational design, participants (n=56) received 14 coaching calls by telephone over 6 months. Medication possession ratio (MPR) was calculated for time intervals before, during, and after the intervention. HbA1c and patient-reported psychosocial outcomes were obtained to test interactions with MPR. Results Medication adherence (MPR) increased from 0.74±0.197 to 0.85±0.155 during coaching, and was sustained at 0.82±0.175 during a 6-month period after the study. Better adherence correlated with a greater decrease in HbA1c. HbA1c decreased from 8.0±1.92% to 7.7±1.70% over the 6-month intervention. All psychosocial measures showed significant improvement. In addition to discussing medication adherence strategies with their coach, patients discussed nutrition and exercise (86.9% of calls), stress management (39.8%), and social support and relationships (15.4%). Conclusions IHC targets internal motivation and supports behavior change by facilitating patients’ insight into their own behaviors, and it uses this insight to foster self-efficacy. This approach may yield sustainable results for medication adherence and warrants further exploration for health-related behavior change. PMID:27239318

  19. Packaging interventions to increase medication adherence: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Conn, Vicki S.; Ruppar, Todd M.; Chan, Keith C.; Dunbar-Jacob, Jacqueline; Pepper, Ginette A.; De Geest, Sabina

    2015-01-01

    Objective Inadequate medication adherence is a widespread problem that contributes to increase chronic disease complications and health care expenditures. Packaging interventions using pill boxes and blister packs have been widely recommended to address the medication adherence issue. This meta-analysis review determined the overall effect of packaging interventions on medication adherence and health outcomes. In addition, we tested whether effects vary depending on intervention, sample, and design characteristics. Research design and methods Extensive literature search strategies included examination of 13 computerized databases and 19 research registries, hand searches of 57 journal, and author and ancestry searches. Eligible studies included either pill-boxes or blister packaging interventions to increase medication adherence. Primary study characteristics and outcomes were reliably coded. Random-effects analyses were used to calculate overall effect sizes and conduct moderator analyses. Results Data were synthesized across 22,858 subjects from 52 reports. The overall mean weighted standardized difference effect size for two-group comparisons was 0.593 (favoring treatment over control), which is consistent with the mean of 71% adherence for treatment subjects compared to 63% among control subjects. We found using moderator analyses that interventions were most effective when they used blister packs and were delivered in pharmacies, while interventions were less effective when studies included older subjects and those with cognitive impairment. Methodological moderator analyses revealed significantly larger effect sizes in studies reporting continuous data outcomes instead of dichotomous results and in studies using pharmacy refill medication adherence measures as compared to studies with self-report measures. Conclusions Overall, meta-analysis findings support the use of packaging interventions to effectively increase medication adherence. Limitations of the

  20. Medication Adherence Among Elderly Patients with High Blood Pressure in Gweru, Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Wariva, Elizabeth; Maradzika, Julita

    2014-01-01

    High blood pressure is a global health concern which is mainly managed by taking anti-hypertensive medications. Although medication is available to control high blood pressure, adhering to treatment is a major problem among hypertensive patients. The purpose of the study was to assess the predisposing, enabling and reinforcing factors to medication adherence among hypertensive patients in Gweru urban aged 40-70 years. A descriptive cross sectional study was used with a sample size of 110 conveniently sampled hypertensive patients. We used an interviewer administered questionnaire designed using phase 4 of the PRECEDE model. The modal age was 70 years and mean age was 58 years (SD=10.29). There were 61.8% females and 38.2% males. Variables associated with medication adherence were: age (P=0.0059), marital status (P=0.015), average monthly income (P=0.0002), support group (P=0.027) and knowledge (P=0.0058). Providing information to patients with high blood pressure and having a good patient-provider relationship improves medication adherence. There is need to focus on the predisposing, enabling and reinforcing factors of medication adherence since demographic and socio-economic factors may be more difficult to change.

  1. Utilizing an Ingestible Biosensor to Assess Real-Time Medication Adherence.

    PubMed

    Chai, Peter R; Castillo-Mancilla, Jose; Buffkin, Eric; Darling, Chad; Rosen, Rochelle K; Horvath, Keith J; Boudreaux, Edwin D; Robbins, Gregory K; Hibberd, Patricia L; Boyer, Edward W

    2015-12-01

    Medication adherence monitoring has relied largely on indirect measures of pill ingestion including patient self-report, pharmacy refills, electronically triggered pill bottles, and pill counts. Our objective is to describe an ingestible biosensor system comprising a radio-frequency identification (RFID)-tagged gelatin capsule. Once the capsule dissolves in the stomach, the RFID tag activates to transmit a unique signal to a relay device which transmits a time-stamped message to a cloud-based server that functions as a direct measure of medication adherence. We describe a constellation of mobile technologies that provide real-time direct measures of medication adherence. Optimizing connectivity, relay design, and interactivity with users are important in obtaining maximal acceptability. Potential concerns including gut retention of metallic components of the ingestible biosensor and drug dissolution within a gelatin capsule should be considered. An ingestible biosensor incorporated into a medication management system has the potential to improve medication compliance with real-time monitoring of ingestion and prompt early behavioral intervention. Integration of ingestible biosensors for multiple disease states may provide toxicologists with salient data early in the care of poisoned patients in the future. Further research on device design and interventions to improve adherence is needed and will shape the evolving world of medication adherence.

  2. A framework for assessing adherence and persistence to long-term medication.

    PubMed

    Mabotuwana, Thusitha; Warren, Jim

    2009-01-01

    Poor adherence and persistence to long-term medication is a growing concern worldwide. Despite their importance, tools that facilitate the identification of patients who show poor adherence and persistence rates are limited. Herein we present a framework we have developed to assist in assessing adherence and persistence rates. We demonstrate the framework's features using production electronic medical record data from a general medical practice in the context of analysis of antihypertensive and antidepressant prescribing. The framework is flexible and extensible and has the potential to be used as a tool to improve the management of patients on long-term medication either to benchmark quality over a specified evaluation period or for the direct identification of specific patients that would benefit from immediate follow-up.

  3. Factor structure and validity of the Medication Adherence Questionnaire (MAQ) with cigarette smokers trying to quit.

    PubMed

    Toll, Benjamin A; McKee, Sherry A; Martin, Daniel J; Jatlow, Peter; O'Malley, Stephanie S

    2007-05-01

    The Medication Adherence Questionnaire (MAQ) is a scale used to evaluate adherence to medications. The present study assessed the factor structure and validity of the MAQ with cigarette smokers. A principal components analysis was conducted on MAQ scores from a sample of smokers presenting for treatment in a clinical trial of naltrexone and nicotine patch for smoking cessation (N = 385). Indices of convergent and predictive validity were tested using electronic medication caps for naltrexone, nicotine patch counts, plasma drug levels of naltrexone, and treatment outcomes. The principal components analysis revealed two factors. Factor 1, labeled "unintentional nonadherence," measured the extent to which individuals were nonadherent because they were careless or forgot to take their medications. Factor 2, labeled "purposeful nonadherence," assessed nonadherence related to purposefully stopping medication use after feeling better or worse. Only the second factor was shown to have good convergent and predictive validity. Specifically, this factor was related to pill-taking behavior measured with electronic medication caps and drug plasma levels and nicotine patch use based on nicotine patch count data, and it was associated with smoking cessation outcome. Thus the purposeful nonadherence factor of the MAQ may be used as a brief screening tool for medication adherence with cigarette smokers seeking treatment. Information obtained with this questionnaire could be used to counsel patients regarding the importance of medication adherence.

  4. Factor structure and validity of the Medication Adherence Questionnaire (MAQ) with cigarette smokers trying to quit

    PubMed Central

    Toll, Benjamin A.; McKee, Sherry A.; Martin, Daniel J.; Jatlow, Peter; O’Malley, Stephanie S.

    2008-01-01

    The Medication Adherence Questionnaire (MAQ) is a scale used to evaluate adherence to medications. The present study assessed the factor structure and validity of the MAQ with cigarette smokers. A principal components analysis was conducted on MAQ scores from a sample of smokers presenting for treatment in a clinical trial of naltrexone and nicotine patch for smoking cessation (N=385). Indices of convergent and predictive validity were tested using electronic medication caps for naltrexone, nicotine patch counts, plasma drug levels of naltrexone, and treatment outcomes. The principal components analysis revealed two factors. Factor 1, labeled “unintentional nonadherence,” measured the extent to which individuals were nonadherent because they were careless or forgot to take their medications. Factor 2, labeled “purposeful nonadherence,” assessed nonadherence related to purposefully stopping medication use after feeling better or worse. Only the second factor was shown to have good convergent and predictive validity. Specifically, this factor was related to pill-taking behavior measured with electronic medication caps and drug plasma levels and nicotine patch use based on nicotine patch count data, and it was associated with smoking cessation outcome. Thus the purposeful nonadherence factor of the MAQ may be used as a brief screening tool for medication adherence with cigarette smokers seeking treatment. Information obtained with this questionnaire could be used to counsel patients regarding the importance of medication adherence. PMID:17454716

  5. Development and Implementation of a Medication Adherence Training Instrument for Persons Living With HIV: The MATI

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPherson-Baker, Shvawn; Jones, Deborah; Duran, Ron E.; Klimas, Nancy; Schneiderman, Neil

    2005-01-01

    Recent advances in the medical management of HIV offer the potential for increased longevity, improved quality of life, and the treatment of HIV as a chronic, rather than terminal, illness. The advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has required the necessity of strict adherence to complex medication regimens. As a vital factor in…

  6. Connection between self-stigma, adherence to treatment, and discontinuation of medication

    PubMed Central

    Kamaradova, Dana; Latalova, Klara; Prasko, Jan; Kubinek, Radim; Vrbova, Kristyna; Mainerova, Barbora; Cinculova, Andrea; Ociskova, Marie; Holubova, Michaela; Smoldasova, Jarmila; Tichackova, Anezka

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Self-stigma plays a role in many areas of the patient’s life. Furthermore, it also discourages therapy. The aim of our study was to examine associations between self-stigma and adherence to treatment and discontinuation of medication in patients from various diagnostic groups. Methods This cross-sectional study involved outpatients attending the Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital Olomouc, Czech Republic. The level of self-stigma was measured with the Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness and adherence with the Drug Attitude Inventory. The patients also anonymously filled out a demographic questionnaire which included a question asking whether they had discontinued their medication in the past. Results We examined data from 332 patients from six basic diagnostic categories (substance abuse disorders, schizophrenia, bipolar disorders, depressive disorders, anxiety disorders, and personality disorders). The study showed a statistically significant negative correlation between self-stigma and adherence to treatment in all diagnostic groups. Self-stigma correlated positively and adherence negatively with the severity of disorders. Another important factor affecting both variables was partnership. Self-stigma positively correlated with doses of antidepressants and adherence with doses of anxiolytics. Self-stigma also negatively correlated with education, and positively with a number of hospitalizations and number of psychiatrists visited. Adherence was further positively correlated with age and age of onset of disorders. Regression analysis showed that self-stigma was an important factor negatively influencing adherence to treatment and significantly contributing to voluntary discontinuation of drugs. The level of self-stigma did not differ between diagnostic categories. Patients suffering from schizophrenia had the lowest adherence to treatment. Conclusion The study showed a significant correlation between self-stigma and adherence to treatment

  7. Factors influencing medication knowledge and beliefs on warfarin adherence among patients with atrial fibrillation in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shujuan; Zhao, Hongwei; Wang, Xianpei; Gao, Chuanyu; Qin, Yuhua; Cai, Haixia; Chen, Boya; Cao, Jingjing

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Warfarin is often used for ischemic stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), but the factors affecting patient adherence to warfarin therapy have not been fully understood. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted in AF patients undergoing warfarin therapy at least 6 months prior to the study. The clinical data collected using questionnaires by phone interviews included the following: 1) self-reported adherence measured by the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale-8©; 2) beliefs about medicines surveyed by Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire (BMQ); and 3) drug knowledge as measured by the Warfarin Related Knowledge Test (WRKT). Demographic and clinical factors associated with warfarin adherence were identified using a logistic regression model. Results Two hundred eighty-eight patients completed the survey and 93 (32.3%) of them were classified as nonadherent (Morisky Medication Adherence Scale-8 score <6). Major factors predicting warfarin adherence included age, cardiovascular disorders, WRKT, and BMQ; WRKT and BMQ were independently correlated with adherence to warfarin therapy by multivariate logistic regression analysis. Adherents were more likely to have greater knowledge scores and stronger beliefs in the necessity of their specific medications ([odds ratio {OR} =1.81, 95% confidence interval {CI} =1.51–2.15] and [OR =1.17, 95% CI =1.06–1.29], respectively). Patients with greater concerns about adverse reactions and more negative views of general harm were more likely to be nonadherent ([OR =0.76, 95% CI =0.69–0.84] and [OR =0.82, 95% CI =0.73–0.92], respectively). Conclusion BMK and WRKT are related with patient behavior toward warfarin adherence. BMQ can be applied to identify patients at increased risk of nonadherence. PMID:28223782

  8. Feasibility of mHealth and Near Field Communication technology based medication adherence monitoring.

    PubMed

    Morak, Juergen; Schwarz, Mark; Hayn, Dieter; Schreier, Guenter

    2012-01-01

    Poor patients' adherence to intake of prescribed medication has been identified as a serious problem in the treatment of chronically ill patients. Technical solutions are needed to measure and - if necessary - to increase the patients' adherence. A telemonitoring solution was developed to record a patient's medication intake based on smart blisters and mobile phones with NFC functionality. The components allowed recording of drug type, timestamp, and dosage of pills taken. The system's usability and technical feasibility was evaluated in the course of an application study. Over a period of 13 months 59 patients suffering from diabetes were monitored. 1,760 blisters were handed out to these patients and 14,843 takeout events were recorded and transmitted via mobile phone. Results indicate the feasibility of this concept to monitor adherence. Although the system still needs to be optimized for routine use it shows the potential for targeting the problem of poor patient adherence by NFC enabled devices.

  9. Validity and Reliability of a Self-Reported Measure of Antihypertensive Medication Adherence in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Nasasira, Benson; Muiru, Anthony Ndichu Wa; Muyingo, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Background The Morisky Medication Adherence scale (MMAS-8) is a widely used self-reported measure of adherence to antihypertensive medications that has not been validated in hypertensive patients in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods We carried out a cross-sectional study to examine psychometric properties of a translated MMAS-8 (MMAS-U) in a tertiary care hypertension clinic in Uganda. We administered the MMAS-U to consecutively selected hypertensive adults and used principal factor analysis and Cronbach’s alpha to determine its validity and internal consistency respectively. Then we randomly selected one-sixth of participants for a 2-week test-retest telephone interview. Lastly, we used ordinal logistic regression modeling to explore factors associated with levels of medication adherence. Results Of the 329 participants, 228 (69%) were females, median age of 55 years [Interquartile range (IQR) (46–66)], and median duration of hypertension of 4 years [IQR (2–8)]. The adherence levels were low (MMAS-U score ≤ 5) in 85%, moderate (MMAS-U score 6–7) in 12% and high (MMAS-U score ≥8) in 3%. The factor analysis of construct validity was good (overall Kaiser’s measure of sampling adequacy for residuals of 0.72) and identified unidimensionality of MMAS-U. The internal consistency of MMAS-U was moderate (Cronbach α = 0.65), and test-retest reliability was low (weighted kappa = 0.36; 95% CI -0.01, 0.73). Age of 40 years or greater was associated with low medication adherence (p = 0.02) whereas a family member buying medication for participants (p = 0.02) and purchasing medication from a private clinic (p = 0.02) were associated with high adherence. Conclusion The Ugandan version of the MMAS-8 (MMAS-U) is a valid and reliable measure of adherence to antihypertensive medication among Ugandan outpatients receiving care at a public tertiary facility. Though the limited supply of medication affected adherence, this easy to use tool can be adapted to assess medication

  10. Sustainability of professionals’ adherence to clinical practice guidelines in medical care: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Ament, Stephanie M C; de Groot, Jeanny J A; Maessen, José M C; Dirksen, Carmen D; van der Weijden, Trudy; Kleijnen, Jos

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate (1) the state of the art in sustainability research and (2) the outcomes of professionals’ adherence to guideline recommendations in medical practice. Design Systematic review. Data sources Searches were conducted until August 2015 in MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) and the Guidelines International Network (GIN) library. A snowball strategy, in which reference sections of other reviews and of included papers were searched, was used to identify additional papers. Eligibility criteria Studies needed to be focused on sustainability and on professionals’ adherence to clinical practice guidelines in medical care. Studies had to include at least 2 measurements: 1 before (PRE) or immediately after implementation (EARLY POST) and 1 measurement longer than 1 year after active implementation (LATE POST). Results The search retrieved 4219 items, of which 14 studies met the inclusion criteria, involving 18 sustainability evaluations. The mean timeframe between the end of active implementation and the sustainability evaluation was 2.6 years (minimum 1.5–maximum 7.0). The studies were heterogeneous with respect to their methodology. Sustainability was considered to be successful if performance in terms of professionals’ adherence was fully maintained in the late postimplementation phase. Long-term sustainability of professionals’ adherence was reported in 7 out of 18 evaluations, adherence was not sustained in 6 evaluations, 4 evaluations showed mixed sustainability results and in 1 evaluation it was unclear whether the professional adherence was sustained. Conclusions (2) Professionals’ adherence to a clinical practice guideline in medical care decreased after more than 1 year after implementation in about half of the cases. (1) Owing to the limited number of studies, the absence of a uniform definition, the high risk of bias, and the mixed results of studies, no firm conclusion about the

  11. Strategies to improve adherence to medications for cardiovascular diseases in socioeconomically disadvantaged populations: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Laba, Tracey-Lea; Bleasel, Jonathan; Brien, Jo-Anne; Cass, Alan; Howard, Kirsten; Peiris, David; Redfern, Julie; Salam, Abdul; Usherwood, Tim; Jan, Stephen

    2013-09-10

    Medication non-adherence poses a major barrier to reducing cardiovascular disease (CVD) burden globally, and is increasingly recognised as a socioeconomically determined problem. Strategies promoting CVD medication adherence appear of moderate effectiveness and cost-effectiveness. Potentially, 'one-size-fits-all' measures are ill-equipped to address heterogeneous adherence behaviour between social groups. This review aims to determine the effects of strategies to improve adherence to CVD-related medications in socioeconomically disadvantaged groups. Randomised/quasi-randomised controlled trials (1996-June 2012, English), testing strategies to increase adherence to CVD-related medications prescribed to adult patients who may experience health inequity (place of residence, occupation, education, or socioeconomic position) were reviewed. 772 abstracts were screened, 111 full-text articles retrieved, and 16 full-text articles reporting on 14 studies, involving 7739 patients (age range 41-66 years), were included. Methodological and clinical heterogeneity precluded quantitative data synthesis. Studies were thematically grouped by targeted outcomes; underlying interventions and policies were classified using Michie et al.'s Behaviour Change Wheel. Contrasting with patient or physician/practice strategies, those simultaneously directed at patients and physicians/practices resulted in statistically significant improvements in relative adherence (16-169%). Comparative cost and cost-effectiveness analyses from three studies did not find cost-saving or cost-effective strategies. Unlike much current evidence in general populations, promising evidence exists about what strategies improve adherence in disadvantaged groups. These strategies were generally complex: simultaneously targeting patients and physicians; addressing social, financial, and treatment-related adherence barriers; and supported by broader guidelines, regulatory and communication-based policies. Given their

  12. Cognitive functioning, depression, and HIV medication adherence in India: a randomized pilot trial

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Ryan; Waldrop-Valverde, Drenna; Sharma, Aman; Vamos, Szonja; Mahajan, Biraaj; Weiss, Stephen M.; Kumar, Mahendra; Nehra, Ritu; Jones, Deborah L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: India is home to the third-largest number of people living with HIV in the world, and no-cost antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been available across the country since 2004. However, rates of adherence to ART are often subpar in India, and interventions to increase adherence are warranted. Cognitive impairment and depression have been associated with ART non-adherence, and may also limit the impact of behavioral interventions designed to improve adherence. Studies have not evaluated the impact of cognitive impairment and depression on response to adherence interventions in India. Methods: Individuals new to ART (≤12 months prescribed) were recruited from a public hospital in Chandigarh, India. Participants (N = 80) were randomized to either a group medication adherence intervention (MAI) or an enhanced standard of care (ESOC) condition. The MAI consisted of three monthly gender-concordant group cognitive-behavioral sessions addressing HIV and ART, adherence, and HIV-related coping and social support. Participants were assessed at baseline for depression and cognitive functioning, and assessed monthly for adherence by pill count. Results: Adherence among participants receiving the MAI improved by about one day's dose over the course of the study, and no improvement was noted among those in the ESOC. Additionally, high rates of cognitive impairment (57%) and depression (25%) were identified among participants. There was no evidence that cognitive impairment moderated response to the intervention. However, while non-depressed participants benefitted from the intervention, depressed participants failed to show the same improvement. Conclusions: Results of this pilot study suggest that group behavioral interventions can be an effective strategy to promote ART adherence in this population, even among those demonstrating cognitive impairment. However, because of the negative impact of depression on adherence, future studies should continue to develop

  13. Voucher reinforcement improves medication adherence in HIV-positive methadone patients: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Sorensen, James L; Haug, Nancy A; Delucchi, Kevin L; Gruber, Valerie; Kletter, Evan; Batki, Steven L; Tulsky, Jacqueline P; Barnett, Paul; Hall, Sharon

    2007-04-17

    This clinical trial evaluated a contingency management intervention designed to improve medication adherence among HIV-positive methadone maintenance patients. After a 4-week baseline observation phase, eligible participants (N=66) were randomly assigned to: (a) medication coaching sessions every other week to assist with adherence strategies (comparison group) or (b) medication coaching plus voucher reinforcement for opening electronic medication caps on time (voucher group). Baseline adherence (percent doses taken/percent total possible doses) was 51% using electronic measurement, 75% using self-report and 75% using pill count. The intervention was provided for 12 weeks, with a 4-week follow-up. The primary outcome results of the clinical trial indicated effectiveness during the intervention, with significant mean adherence differences between voucher and comparison groups using electronic measurement (78% versus 56%), pill count (86% versus 75%), and self-report (87% versus 69%). Differences between groups faded after vouchers were discontinued. Contingency management shows promise as a strategy to promote antiretroviral medication adherence in this population.

  14. Evaluating the Potential Impact of Pharmacist Counseling on Medication Adherence Using a Simulation Activity

    PubMed Central

    Das, Rolee Pathak; Mansukhani, Rupal Patel; Cosler, Leon E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the impact of counseling in a simulated medication adherence activity. Design. Students were randomized into 2 groups: patient medication monograph only (PMMO) and patient medication monograph with counseling (PMMC). Both groups received a fictitious medication and monograph. Additionally, the PMMC group received brief counseling. A multiple-choice, paper-based survey instrument was used to evaluate simulated food-drug interactions, adherence, and perceptions regarding the activity’s value and impact on understanding adherence challenges. Assessment. Ninety-two students participated (PMMC, n=45; and PMMO, n=47). Overall, a significantly higher incidence of simulated food-drug interactions occurred in the PMMO group (30%) vs the PMMC group (22%) (p=0.02). Doses taken without simulated food-drug interactions were comparable: 46.2% (PMCC) vs 41.9% (PMMO) (p=0.19). The average number of missed doses were 3.2 (PMMC) vs 2.8 (PMMO) (p=0.55). Approximately 70% of the students found the activity to be valuable and 89% believed it helped them better understand adherence challenges. Conclusion. This activity demonstrated the challenges and important role of counseling in medication adherence. PMID:26056407

  15. HIV-infected individuals with co-occurring bipolar disorder evidence poor antiretroviral and psychiatric medication adherence.

    PubMed

    Moore, David J; Posada, Carolina; Parikh, Mili; Arce, Miguel; Vaida, Florin; Riggs, Patricia K; Gouaux, Ben; Ellis, Ronald J; Letendre, Scott L; Grant, Igor; Atkinson, J Hampton

    2012-11-01

    The contribution of bipolar disorder (BD), a prevalent serious mental illness characterized by impulsivity and mood instability, to antiretroviral (ART) and psychiatric medication adherence among HIV-infected (HIV+) individuals is unknown. We examined medication adherence among 44 HIV+/BD+ persons as compared to 33 demographically- and medically-comparable HIV+/BD- persons. Classification of adherent (≥ 90%) or non-adherent (<90%) based on proportion of correctly taken doses over 30 days was determined using electronic medication monitoring devices. HIV+/BD+ persons were significantly less likely to be ART adherent (47.7%) as compared to HIV+/BD- (90.9%) persons. Within the HIV+/BD+ group, mean psychiatric medication adherence was significantly worse than ART medication adherence, although there was a significant correlation between ART and psychiatric adherence levels. Importantly, 30-day ART adherence was associated with plasma virologic response among HIV+/BD+ individuals. Given the high overlap of HIV and BD, and the observed medication adherence difficulties for these persons, specialized adherence improvement interventions are needed.

  16. HIV-infected individuals with co-occurring bipolar disorder evidence poor antiretroviral and psychiatric medication adherence

    PubMed Central

    Moore, David J.; Posada, Carolina; Parikh, Mili; Arce, Miguel; Vaida, Florin; Riggs, Patricia K.; Gouaux, Ben; Ellis, Ronald J.; Letendre, Scott L.; Grant, Igor; Atkinson, J. Hampton

    2012-01-01

    The contribution of bipolar disorder (BD), a prevalent serious mental illness characterized by impulsivity and mood instability, to antiretroviral (ART) and psychiatric medication adherence among HIV-infected (HIV+) individuals is unknown. We examined medication adherence among 44 HIV+/BD+ persons as compared to 33 demographically- and medically-comparable HIV+/BD− persons. Classification of adherent (≥90%) or non-adherent (<90%) based on proportion of correctly taken doses over 30 days was determined using electronic medication monitoring devices. HIV+/BD+ persons were significantly less likely to be ART adherent (47.7%) as compared to HIV+/BD− (90.9%) persons. Within the HIV+/BD+ group, mean psychiatric medication adherence was significantly worse than ART medication adherence, although there was a significant correlation between ART and psychiatric adherence levels. Importantly, 30-day ART adherence was associated with plasma virologic response among HIV+/BD+ individuals. Given the high overlap of HIV and BD, and the observed medication adherence difficulties for these persons, specialized adherence improvement interventions are needed. PMID:22041931

  17. A Structural Equation Model of HIV-related Symptoms, Depressive Symptoms, and Medication Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Yoo-Jeong, Moka; Waldrop-Valverde, Drenna; McCoy, Katryna; Ownby, Raymond L

    2016-01-01

    Adherence to combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) remains critical in management of HIV infection. This study evaluated depression as a potential mechanism by which HIV-related symptoms affect medication adherence and explored if particular clusters of HIV symptoms are susceptible to this mechanism. Baseline data from a multi-visit intervention study were analyzed among 124 persons living with HIV (PLWH). A bifactor model showed two clusters of HIV-related symptom distress: general HIV-related symptoms and gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms. Structural equation modeling showed that both general HIV-related symptoms and GI symptoms were related to higher levels of depressive symptoms, and higher levels of depressive symptoms were related to lower levels of medication adherence. Although general HIV-related symptoms and GI symptoms were not directly related to adherence, they were indirectly associated with adherence via depression. The findings highlight the importance of early recognition and evaluation of symptoms of depression, as well as the underlying physical symptoms that might cause depression, to improve medication adherence. PMID:27695710

  18. The Role of Cognitive Functioning in Medication Adherence of Children and Adolescents with HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Paige L.; Montepiedra, Grace; Nichols, Sharon; Sirois, Patricia A.; Storm, Deborah; Farley, John; Kammerer, Betsy

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the relationship between cognitive functioning and medication adherence in children and adolescents with perinatally acquired HIV infection. Methods Children and adolescents, ages 3–18 (N = 1,429), received a cognitive evaluation and adherence assessment. Multiple logistic regression models were used to identify associations between adherence and cognitive status, adjusting for potential confounding factors. Results Children's average cognitive performance was within the low-average range; 16% of children were cognitively impaired (MDI/FSIQ <70). Cognitive status was not associated with adherence to full medication regimens; however, children with borderline/low average cognitive functioning (IQ 70–84) had increased odds of nonadherence to the protease inhibitor class of antiretroviral therapy. Recent stressful life events and child health characteristics, such as HIV RNA detectability, were significantly associated with nonadherence. Conclusion Cognitive status plays a limited role in medication adherence. Child and caregiver psychosocial and health characteristics should inform interventions to support adherence. PMID:18647794

  19. Systemic Arterial Hypertension in the Emergency Service: medication adherence and understanding of this disease

    PubMed Central

    Vancini-Campanharo, Cássia Regina; Oliveira, Gabriella Novelli; Andrade, Thaisa Fernanda Landim; Okuno, Meiry Fernanda Pinto; Lopes, Maria Carolina Barbosa Teixeira; Batista, Ruth Ester Assayag

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to identify the epidemiological profile of hypertension patients, how much they understand about the disease and the rate of adherence to treatment by these patients who had been hospitalized in the Brazilian emergency service. Methods: this cross-sectional study was performed with 116 patients, both male and female and aged over 18 years, who had been hospitalized in the Emergency Service of a University Hospital between March and June, 2013. The studied variables were data referring to socio-demographics, comorbidities, physical activity and knowledge regarding the disease. Patient adherence to treatment and the identification of the barriers were respectively evaluated using the Morisky test and the Brief Medication Questionnaire. Results: most of the patients involved in this study were women (55%), with white skin color (55%), married (51%), retirees or pensioners (64%) and with a low educational level (58%). Adherence to treatment, in most cases (55%), was moderate and the most prevalent adherence barrier was recall (67%). When medication was acquired at no cost to the patient, there was greater adherence to treatment. Conclusion: this study's patients had a moderate understanding about the disease. The high correlation between the number of drugs used and the recall barrier suggests that monotherapy is an option that can facilitate treatment adherence and reduce how often the patients forget to take their medication. PMID:26626007

  20. Factors affecting adherence to antihypertensive medication in Greece: results from a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Tsiantou, Vassiliki; Pantzou, Polina; Pavi, Elpida; Koulierakis, George; Kyriopoulos, John

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Although hypertension constitutes a major risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, research on adherence to antihypertensive treatment has shown that at least 75% of patients are not adherent because of the combined demographic, organizational, psychological, and disease- and medication-related factors. This study aimed to elicit hypertensive patients’ beliefs on hypertension and antihypertensive treatment, and their role to adherence. Methods: Transcripts from semistructured interviews and focus groups were content analyzed to extract participants’ beliefs about hypertension and antihypertensive treatment, and attitudes toward patient–physician and patient–pharmacist relationships. Results: Hypertension was considered a very serious disease, responsible for stroke and myocardial infarction. Participants expressed concerns regarding the use of medicines and the adverse drug reactions. Previous experience with hypertension, fear of complications, systematic disease management, acceptance of hypertension as a chronic disease, incorporation of the role of the patient and a more personal relationship with the doctor facilitated adherence to the treatment. On the other hand, some patients discontinued treatment when they believed that they had controlled their blood pressure. Conclusion: Cognitive and communication factors affect medication adherence. Results could be used to develop intervention techniques to improve medication adherence. PMID:20859460

  1. Study the Impact of Diabetes Camps on Adherence to Medication and Glycaemic Control in Uttarakhand

    PubMed Central

    Dutt, Hemant Kumar; Gogoi, Javin Bisnu; Rathaur, Vyas; Singh, Ganesh; Singh, Parul

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Diabetes is a major public health problem which needs to be addressed with outmost planning in resource poor settings. Good glycaemic control and medication adherence patterns can play an important role in reducing disease related complications thereby reducing morbidity and mortality among diabetics. Disease specific camps can act as a stepping stone in providing limited care to the patients. Aim The study was planned to study the impact of diabetes camp on glycaemic control and adherence to antidiabetic medication among diabetic patients at a Government Teaching Hospital, Srinagar, Garhwal, Uttarakhand, India. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study using a medication adherence questionnaire collected from the patients participating in diabetic camps and measuring their HbA1C levels before and after the camps along with spreading awareness about the disease. Two diabetes awareness camps were organized, three month apart and the participants were imparted knowledge about the disease. A total of 50 patients with type 2 DM who had self reported history of diabetes and were on some form of oral anti diabetics confirmed by their prescriptions. The patients were called for monthly follow up in outpatient department. A six question preformed questionnaire – the Girerd’s instrument was used to assess the level of adherence to the prescribed anti-diabetic drugs in 50 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, their HbA1C levels were estimated and the results were analysed using standard statistical methods. Results A total of 50 type 2 diabetic, 48 were studied comprising 23 (47.9%) women and 25 (52.1%) men with a mean age of 57.43 years. The average duration of diabetes among participants was 7.02 years. Poor medication adherence score was recorded in 27 participants and only 7 participants had good adherence to medication before the camp. After the camp, 19 participants had good adherence and 7 had poor medication adherence scores. As a result of

  2. Race-based medical mistrust, medication beliefs and HIV treatment adherence: test of a mediation model in people living with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Kalichman, Seth C; Eaton, Lisa; Kalichman, Moira O; Grebler, Tama; Merely, Cynthia; Welles, Brandi

    2016-12-01

    Race-based medical mistrust significantly predicts non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) in people living with HIV. The current study builds on previous research that shows beliefs about medication necessity (i.e., "My medicines protect me from becoming worse") and concerns (i.e., "Having to take my medicines worries me") mediate the association between race-based medical mistrust and medication adherence. Racial and ethnic minority men and women living with HIV and receiving ART (N = 178) in a southern US city completed computerized measures of demographic and health characteristics, telephone interviews of race-based medical mistrust and medication beliefs, and unannounced phone-based pill counts for ART adherence. Multiple mediation modeling showed that medical mistrust is related to medication necessity and concerns beliefs and ART adherence. Furthermore, medication necessity beliefs predicted ART adherence. The indirect effect of medical mistrust on adherence through medication necessity beliefs was also significant. Results confirm that medication necessity beliefs, although not concerns beliefs, mediate the association between medical mistrust and ART adherence. Medication necessity beliefs offer a viable target for interventions to improve ART adherence in the context of mistrust that patients may have for medical providers and health care systems.

  3. Design and Evaluation of a Medication Adherence Application with Communication for Seniors in Independent Living Communities

    PubMed Central

    Dasgupta, Dipanwita; Johnson, Reid A.; Chaudhry, Beenish; Reeves, Kimberly G.; Willaert, Patty; Chawla, Nitesh V.

    2016-01-01

    Medication non-adherence is a pressing concern among seniors, leading to a lower quality of life and higher healthcare costs. While mobile applications provide a viable medium for medication management, their utility can be limited without tackling the specific needs of seniors and facilitating the active involvement of care providers. To address these limitations, we are developing a tablet-based application designed specifically for seniors to track their medications and a web portal for their care providers to track medication adherence. In collaboration with a local Aging in Place program, we conducted a three-month study with sixteen participants from an independent living facility. Our study found that the application helped participants to effectively track their medications and improved their sense of wellbeing. Our findings highlight the importance of catering to the needs of seniors and of involving care providers in this process, with specific recommendations for the development of future medication management applications. PMID:28269843

  4. Improving medication adherence with a targeted, technology-driven disease management intervention.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, David B; Allison, Wanda; Chen, Joyce C; Demand, Michael

    2008-06-01

    Treatment adherence is critical in managing chronic disease, but achieving it remains an elusive goal across many prevalent conditions. As part of its care management strategy, BlueCross BlueShield of South Carolina (BCBSSC) implemented the Longitudinal Adherence Treatment Evaluation program, a behavioral intervention to improve medication adherence among members with cardiovascular disease and/or diabetes. The objectives of this study were to 1) assess the effectiveness of telephonic intervention in influencing reinitiation of medication therapy, and 2) evaluate the rate and timing of medication reinitiation. BCBSSC applied algorithms against pharmacy claims data to identify patients prescribed targeted medications who were 60 or more days overdue for refills. This information was provided to care managers to address during their next patient contact. Care managers received focused training on techniques for medication behavior change, readiness to change, motivational interviewing, and active listening. Training also addressed common barriers to adherence and available resources, including side effect management, mail order benefits, drug assistance programs, medication organizers, and reminder systems. Overdue refills were tracked for 12 months, with medication reinitiation followed for an additional 3 months. In the intervention group, 94 patients were identified with 123 instances of late medication refills. In the age- and gender-matched comparison group, 61 patients were identified with 76 late refills. The intervention group had a significantly higher rate of medication reinitiation (59.3%) than the control group (42.1%; P < 0.05). Time to reinitiation was significantly shorter in the intervention group, 59.5 (+/- 69.0) days vs. 107.4 (+/- 109) days for the control group (P < 0.05). This initiative demonstrated that a targeted disease management intervention promoting patient behavior change increased the number of patients who reinitiated therapy after a

  5. Medication adherence to oral iron therapy in patients with iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Gereklioglu, Cigdem; Asma, Suheyl; Korur, Asli; Erdogan, Ferit; Kut, Altug

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed at investigating the factors affecting medication adherence in patients who use oral iron therapy due to iron deficiency anemia. Methods: A total of 96 female patients in fertile age with mean age of 30±10.1 years (range 18-53) who were admitted to Family Medicine Clinic between 01 January and 31 March 2015 and who had received iron therapy within the recent three years were enrolled in the study. Data were collected through a questionnaire form. Results: Of the patients, 39 (40,6%) were detected not to use the medication regularly or during the recommended period. A statistically significant relationship was found between non-adherence to therapy and gastrointestinal side effects and weight gain (p<0.05). Conclusion: Medication adherence is deficient in patients with iron deficiency anemia. The most important reason for this seems gastrointestinal side effects, in addition to weight gain under treatment. PMID:27375698

  6. Interdisciplinary Medication Adherence Program: The Example of a University Community Pharmacy in Switzerland

    PubMed Central

    Lelubre, Mélanie; Kamal, Susan; Genre, Noëllie; Celio, Jennifer; Gorgerat, Séverine; Hugentobler Hampai, Denise; Bourdin, Aline; Berger, Jerôme; Bugnon, Olivier; Schneider, Marie

    2015-01-01

    The Community Pharmacy of the Department of Ambulatory Care and Community Medicine (Policlinique Médicale Universitaire, PMU), University of Lausanne, developed and implemented an interdisciplinary medication adherence program. The program aims to support and reinforce medication adherence through a multifactorial and interdisciplinary intervention. Motivational interviewing is combined with medication adherence electronic monitors (MEMS, Aardex MWV) and a report to patient, physician, nurse, and other pharmacists. This program has become a routine activity and was extended for use with all chronic diseases. From 2004 to 2014, there were 819 patient inclusions, and 268 patients were in follow-up in 2014. This paper aims to present the organization and program's context, statistical data, published research, and future perspectives. PMID:26839879

  7. Interdisciplinary Medication Adherence Program: The Example of a University Community Pharmacy in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Lelubre, Mélanie; Kamal, Susan; Genre, Noëllie; Celio, Jennifer; Gorgerat, Séverine; Hugentobler Hampai, Denise; Bourdin, Aline; Berger, Jerôme; Bugnon, Olivier; Schneider, Marie

    2015-01-01

    The Community Pharmacy of the Department of Ambulatory Care and Community Medicine (Policlinique Médicale Universitaire, PMU), University of Lausanne, developed and implemented an interdisciplinary medication adherence program. The program aims to support and reinforce medication adherence through a multifactorial and interdisciplinary intervention. Motivational interviewing is combined with medication adherence electronic monitors (MEMS, Aardex MWV) and a report to patient, physician, nurse, and other pharmacists. This program has become a routine activity and was extended for use with all chronic diseases. From 2004 to 2014, there were 819 patient inclusions, and 268 patients were in follow-up in 2014. This paper aims to present the organization and program's context, statistical data, published research, and future perspectives.

  8. A review of behavioral tailoring strategies for improving medication adherence in serious mental illness.

    PubMed

    Kreyenbuhl, Julie; Record, Elizabeth J; Palmer-Bacon, Jessica

    2016-06-01

    Nonadherence to psychopharmacological treatments poses a significant challenge to treatment success in individuals with serious mental illness, with upwards of 60% of people not taking their psychiatric medications as prescribed. Nonadherence is associated with adverse outcomes, including exacerbation of psychiatric symptoms, impaired functioning, increased hospitalizations and emergency room use, and increased health care costs. Whereas interventions using psychoeducation or cognitive approaches, such as motivational interviewing, have largely proven ineffective in improving adherence, approaches employing behavioral tailoring that incorporate medication taking into the daily routine and/or use environmental supports have shown promise. Recently, adherence-enhancing behavioral tailoring interventions that utilize novel technologies, such as electronic monitors and mobile phones, have been developed. Although interventions utilizing these platforms have the potential for widespread dissemination to a broad range of individuals, most require further empirical testing. This paper reviews selected behavioral tailoring strategies that aim to improve medication adherence and other functional outcomes among individuals with serious mental illness.

  9. Patient centered primary care is associated with patient hypertension medication adherence.

    PubMed

    Roumie, Christianne L; Greevy, Robert; Wallston, Kenneth A; Elasy, Tom A; Kaltenbach, Lisa; Kotter, Kristen; Dittus, Robert S; Speroff, Theodore

    2011-08-01

    There is increasing evidence that patient centered care, including communication skills, is an essential component to chronic illness care. Our aim was to evaluate patient centered primary care as a determinant of medication adherence. We mailed 1,341 veterans with hypertension the Short Form Primary Care Assessment Survey (PCAS) which measures elements of patient centered primary care. We prospectively collected each patient's antihypertensive medication adherence for 6 months. Patients were characterized as adherent if they had medication for >80%. 654 surveys were returned (50.7%); and 499 patients with complete data were analyzed. Antihypertensive adherence increased as scores in patient centered care increased [RR 3.18 (95% CI 1.44, 16.23) bootstrap 5000 resamples] for PCAS score of 4.5 (highest quartile) versus 1.5 (lowest quartile). Future research is needed to determine if improving patient centered care, particularly communication skills, could lead to improvements in health related behaviors such as medication adherence and health outcomes.

  10. Concordance of direct and indirect measures of medication adherence in a treatment trial for cannabis dependence

    PubMed Central

    McRae-Clark, Aimee L.; Baker, Nathaniel L.; Sonne, Susan C.; DeVane, C. Lindsay; Wagner, Amanda; Norton, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    The current study compared adherence rates as measured by two indirect measurement methods (pill count and daily medication diary) to two direct measurement methods (urine riboflavin and serum 6-OH-buspirone level measurement) among participants (n=109) in a medication treatment trial for cannabis dependence. Pill count and diary data showed high levels of percent agreement and strong kappa coefficients throughout the study. Riboflavin levels indicated lower level of percent in adherence during the study as compared to both pill count and self-report. In the subset of participants with 6-OH-buspirone levels (n=58), the kappa coefficient also showed low to moderate agreement between the pill count and medication diaries with 6-OH-buspirone levels. In contrast to pill count and medication diaries, adherence as measured by riboflavin and 6-OH-buspirone significantly decreased over time. The findings from this study support previous work demonstrating that pill count and patient self-report of medication taking likely overestimate rates of medication adherence, and may become less reliable as the duration of a clinical trial increases. PMID:26028133

  11. Medication practice and feminist thought: a theoretical and ethical response to adherence in HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Broyles, Lauren M; Colbert, Alison M; Erlen, Judith A

    2005-08-01

    Accurate self-administration of antiretroviral medication therapy for HIV/AIDS is a significant clinical and ethical concern because of its implications for individual morbidity and mortality, the health of the public, and escalating healthcare costs. However, the traditional construction of patient medication adherence is oversimplified, myopic, and ethically problematic. Adherence relies on existing social power structures and western normative assumptions about the proper roles of patients and providers, and principally focuses on patient variables, obscuring the powerful socioeconomic and institutional influences on behaviour. Some professionals advocate for alternate approaches to adherence, but many of the available alternatives remain conceptually underdeveloped. Using HIV/AIDS as an exemplar, this paper presents medication practice as a theoretical reconstruction and explicates its conceptual and ethical evolution. We first propose that one of these alternatives, medication practice, broadens the understanding of individuals' medication-taking behaviour, speaks to the inherent power inequities in the patient-provider interaction, and addresses the ethical shortcomings in the traditional construal. We then integrate medication practice with feminist thought, further validating individuals' situated knowledge, choices, and multiple roles; more fully recognizing the individual as a multidiminsional, autonomous human being; and reducing notions of obedience and deference to authority. Blame is thus extricated from the healthcare relationship, reshaping the traditionally adversarial components of the interaction, and eliminating the view of adherence as a patient problem in need of patient-centred interventions.

  12. Adherence to cardiovascular medications in the South Asian population: A systematic review of current evidence and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Akeroyd, Julia M; Chan, Winston J; Kamal, Ayeesha K; Palaniappan, Latha; Virani, Salim S

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To review methods of assessing adherence and strategies to improve adherence to cardiovascular disease (CVD) medications, among South Asian CVD patients. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review of English language studies that examined CVD medication adherence in South Asian populations from 1966 to April 1, 2015 in SCOPUS and PubMed. Working in duplicate, we identified 61 studies. After exclusions, 26 studies were selected for full text review. Of these, 17 studies were included in the final review. We abstracted data on several factors including study design, study population, method of assessing adherence and adherence rate. RESULTS: These studies were conducted in India (n = 11), Pakistan (n = 3), Bangladesh (n = 1), Nepal (n = 1) and Sri Lanka (n = 1). Adherence rates ranged from 32%-95% across studies. Of the 17 total publications included, 10 focused on assessing adherence to CVD medications and 7 focused on assessing the impact of interventions on medication adherence. The validated Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS) was used as the primary method of assessing adherence in five studies. Three studies used validated questionnaires similar to the MMAS, and one study utilized Medication Event Monitoring System caps, with the remainder of the studies utilizing pill count and self-report measures. As expected, studies using non-validated self-report measures described higher rates of adherence than studies using validated scale measurements and pill count. The included intervention studies examined the use of polypill therapy, provider education and patient counseling to improve medication adherence. CONCLUSION: The overall medication adherence rates were low in the region, which suggest a growing need for future interventions to improve adherence. PMID:26730300

  13. HIV medication adherence and HIV symptom severity: the roles of sleep quality and memory.

    PubMed

    Babson, Kimberly A; Heinz, Adrienne J; Bonn-Miller, Marcel O

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine the extent to which self-reported sleep quality, a clinically malleable factor, is associated with both HIV medication adherence and self-reported HIV symptom severity. In addition, we sought to examine whether sleep quality may explain the association between HIV medication adherence and symptom severity, as well as the role of self-reported memory functioning in terms of the above relations. This study took place from April 2010 to March 2012. Participants were 129 HIV-positive individuals who completed an ART pill count and series of structured clinical interviews and self-report questionnaires on sleep, memory, and HIV symptom severity. A series of regressions were conducted to test study hypotheses. After accounting for covariates (i.e., problematic alcohol, nicotine, and cannabis use, and mood disorder diagnosis), results indicated that self-reported sleep quality was associated with HIV medication adherence and self-reported HIV symptom severity, and that sleep quality partially mediated the relation between medication adherence and self-reported HIV symptom severity. In addition, memory functioning moderated the relation between self-reported sleep quality and HIV symptom severity, such that the interaction of poor sleep quality and relatively good memory functioning was associated with heightened self-reported HIV symptom severity. This study highlights the importance of assessing sleep and memory among HIV-infected individuals as they may represent treatment targets for those experiencing poor medication adherence or particularly severe HIV symptoms. Such information could lead to the inclusion of adjunct brief interventions to target sleep and memory functioning in order to reduce symptom severity among HIV-positive individuals with poor medication adherence.

  14. Social network approaches to recruitment, HIV prevention, medical care, and medication adherence

    PubMed Central

    Latkin, Carl A.; Davey-Rothwell, Melissa A.; Knowlton, Amy R.; Alexander, Kamila A.; Williams, Chyvette T.; Boodram, Basmattee

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews current issues and advancements in social network approaches to HIV prevention and care. Social network analysis can provide a method to understand health disparities in HIV rates and treatment access and outcomes. Social network analysis is a value tool to link social structural factors to individual behaviors. Social networks provide an avenue for low cost and sustainable HIV prevention interventions that can be adapted and translated into diverse populations. Social networks can be utilized as a viable approach to recruitment for HIV testing and counseling, HIV prevention interventions, and optimizing HIV medical care and medication adherence. Social network interventions may be face-to-face or through social media. Key issues in designing social network interventions are contamination due to social diffusion, network stability, density, and the choice and training of network members. There are also ethical issues involved in the development and implementation of social network interventions. Social network analyses can also be used to understand HIV transmission dynamics. PMID:23673888

  15. Complex antithrombotic therapy: determinants of patient preference and impact on medication adherence

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Neena S; Naik, Aanand D; Street, Richard L; Castillo, Diana L; Deswal, Anita; Richardson, Peter A; Hartman, Christine M; Shelton, George; Fraenkel, Liana

    2015-01-01

    Purpose For years, older patients have been prescribed multiple blood-thinning medications (complex antithrombotic therapy [CAT]) to decrease their risk of cardiovascular events. These therapies, however, increase risk of adverse bleeding events. We assessed patient-reported trade-offs between cardioprotective benefit, gastrointestinal bleeding risk, and burden of self-management using adaptive conjoint analysis (ACA). As ACA could be a clinically useful tool to obtain patient preferences and guide future patient-centered care, we examined the clinical application of ACA to obtain patient preferences and the impact of ACA on medication adherence. Patients and methods An electronic ACA survey led 201 respondents through medication risk–benefit trade-offs, revealing patients’ preferences for the CAT risk/benefit profile they valued most. The post-ACA prescription regimen was categorized as concordant or discordant with elicited preferences. Adherence was measured using VA pharmacy refill data to measure persistence of use prior to and 1 year following preference-elicitation. Additionally, we analyzed qualitative interviews of 56 respondents regarding their perception of the ACA and the preference elicitation experience. Results Participants prioritized 5-year cardiovascular benefit over preventing adverse events. Medication side effects, medication-associated activity restrictions, and regimen complexity were less important than bleeding risk and cardioprotective benefit. One year after the ACA survey, a 15% increase in adherence was observed in patients prescribed a preference-concordant CAT strategy. An increase of only 6% was noted in patients prescribed a preference-discordant strategy. Qualitative interviews showed that the ACA exercise contributed to increase inpatient activation, patient awareness of preferences, and patient engagement with clinicians about treatment decisions. Conclusion By working through trade-offs, patients actively clarified their

  16. Type 2 diabetes: cost-effectiveness of medication adherence and lifestyle interventions

    PubMed Central

    Nerat, Tomaž; Locatelli, Igor; Kos, Mitja

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Type 2 diabetes is a major burden for the payer, however, with proper medication adherence, diet and exercise regime, complication occurrence rates, and consequently costs can be altered. Aims The aim of this study was to conduct a cost-effectiveness analysis on real patient data and evaluate which medication adherence or lifestyle intervention is less cost demanding for the payer. Methods Medline was searched systematically for published type 2 diabetes interventions regarding medication adherence and lifestyle in order to determine their efficacies, that were then used in the cost-effectiveness analysis. For cost-effectiveness analysis-required disease progression simulation, United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study Outcomes model 2.0 and Slovenian type 2 diabetes patient cohort were used. The intervention duration was set to 1, 2, 5, and 10 years. Complications and drug costs in euro (EUR) were based on previously published type 2 diabetes costs from the Health Care payer perspective in Slovenia. Results Literature search proved the following interventions to be effective in type 2 diabetes patients: medication adherence, the Mediterranean diet, aerobic, resistance, and combined exercise. The long-term simulation resulted in no payer net savings. The model predicted following quality-adjusted life-years (QALY) gained and incremental costs for QALY gained (EUR/QALYg) after 10 years of intervention: high-efficacy medication adherence (0.245 QALY; 9,984 EUR/QALYg), combined exercise (0.119 QALY; 46,411 EUR/QALYg), low-efficacy medication adherence (0.075 QALY; 30,967 EUR/QALYg), aerobic exercise (0.069 QALY; 80,798 EUR/QALYg), the Mediterranean diet (0.057 QALY; 27,246 EUR/QALYg), and resistance exercise (0.050 QALY; 111,847 EUR/QALYg). Conclusion The results suggest that medication adherence intervention is, regarding cost-effectiveness, superior to diet and exercise interventions from the payer perspective. However, the latter could also be utilized

  17. "You must take the medications for you and for me": family caregivers promoting HIV medication adherence in China.

    PubMed

    Fredriksen-Goldsen, Karen I; Shiu, Cheng-Shi; Starks, Helene; Chen, Wei-Ti; Simoni, Jane; Kim, Hyun-Jun; Pearson, Cynthia; Zhao, Hongxin; Zhang, Fujie

    2011-12-01

    China is experiencing a rapid increase in the incidence of HIV infections, which it is addressing proactively with broad implementation of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Within a cultural context extolling familial responsibility, family caregiving may be an important component to promote medication adherence for persons living with HIV in China. Based on 20 qualitative interviews with persons living with HIV and their family caregivers and a cross-sectional survey with 113 adults receiving HIV care at Beijing's Ditan outpatient clinic, this mixed-methods study examines family caregivers' role in promoting adherence to ART. Building upon a conceptual model of adherence, this article explores the role of family members in supporting four key components enhancing adherence (i.e., access, knowledge, motivation, and proximal cue to action). Patients with family caregiving support report superior ART adherence. Also, gender (being female) and less time since ART initiation are significantly related to superior adherence. Since Chinese cultural values emphasize family care, future work on adherence promotion in China will want to consider the systematic incorporation of family members.

  18. Text Messaging to Improve Hypertension Medication Adherence in African Americans: BPMED Intervention Development and Study Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Artinian, Nancy T; Schwiebert, Loren; Yarandi, Hossein; Levy, Phillip D

    2015-01-01

    Background Hypertension (HTN) is a major public health concern in the United States, with almost 78 million Americans age 20 years and over suffering from the condition. Moreover, HTN is a key risk factor for health disease and stroke. African Americans disproportionately shoulder the burdens of HTN, with greater prevalence, disease severity, earlier onset, and more HTN-related complications than age-matched whites. Medication adherence for the treatment of HTN is poor, with estimates indicating that only about half of hypertensive patients are adherent to prescribed medication regimens. Although no single intervention for improving medication adherence has emerged as superior to others, text message medication reminders have the potential to help improve medication adherence in African Americans with uncontrolled HTN as mobile phone adoption is very high in this population. Objective The purpose of this two-phased study was to develop (Phase I) and test in a randomized controlled trial (RCT) (Phase II) a text message system, BPMED, to improve the quality of medication management through increasing medication adherence in African Americans with uncontrolled HTN. Methods In Phase I, we recruited 16 target end-users from a primary care clinic, to assist in the development of BPMED through participating in one of three focus groups. Focus groups sought to gain patient perspectives on HTN, medication adherence, mobile phone use, and the use of text messaging to support medication adherence. Potential intervention designs were presented to participants, and feedback on the designs was solicited. In Phase II, we conducted two pilot RCTs to determine the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of BPMED in primary care and emergency department settings. Both pilot studies recruited approximately 60 participants, who were randomized equally between usual care and the BPMED intervention. Results Although data collection is now complete, data analysis from the

  19. Refining a Personalized mHealth Intervention to Promote Medication Adherence among HIV+ Methamphetamine Users

    PubMed Central

    Montoya, Jessica L.; Georges, Shereen; Poquette, Amelia; Depp, Colin A.; Atkinson, J. Hampton; Moore, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Mobile health (mHealth) interventions to promote antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence have shown promise; however, among persons living with HIV who abuse methamphetamine (MA) effective tailoring of content to match the expressed needs of this patient population may be necessary. This study aimed: 1) to understand patient perspectives of barriers and facilitators of ART adherence among people with HIV who use MA, and 2) to obtain feedback on the thematic content of an mHealth intervention in order to tailor the intervention to this subgroup. Two separate focus groups, each with ten HIV+/MA+ individuals, were conducted. Transcribed audio recordings were qualitatively analyzed to identify emergent themes. Interrater reliability of themes was high (mean Kappa=.97). Adherence barriers included MA use, misguided beliefs about ART adherence, memory and planning difficulties, social barriers and perceived stigma, and mental heath issues. Facilitators of effective ART adherence were cognitive compensatory strategies, promotion of well being, health care supports, adherence education, and social support. Additionally, the focus groups generated content for reminder text messages to be used in the medication adherence intervention. This qualitative study demonstrates feasibility of using focus groups to derive patient-centered intervention content to address the health challenge at hand in targeted populations. Clinical Trial # NCT01317277 PMID:24911433

  20. Antidepressant treatment and adherence to antiretroviral medications among privately insured persons with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Akincigil, Ayse; Wilson, Ira B; Walkup, James T; Siegel, Michele J; Huang, Cecilia; Crystal, Stephen

    2011-11-01

    In order to examine relationships between depression treatments (antidepressant and/or psychotherapy utilization) and adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART), we conducted a retrospective analysis of medical and pharmacy insurance claims for privately insured persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) diagnosed with depression (n = 1,150). Participants were enrolled in 80 insurance plans from all 50 states. Adherence was suboptimal. Depression treatment initiators were significantly more likely to be adherent to ART than the untreated. We did not observe an association between psychotherapy utilization and ART adherence, yet given the limitations of the data (e.g., there is no information on types of psychological treatment and its targets), the lack of association should not be interpreted as lack of efficacy.

  1. Patient-centered Outcomes of Medication Adherence Interventions: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Conn, Vicki S.; Ruppar, Todd M.; Enriquez, Maithe; Cooper, Pamela S.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This systematic review used meta-analytic procedures to synthesize changes in patient-centered outcomes following medication adherence interventions. Methods Strategies to locate studies included online searches of 13 databases and 19 research registries, hand searches of 57 journals, and author and ancestry searches of all eligible studies. Search terms included patient compliance, medication adherence, and related terms. Searches were conducted for all studies published since 1960. Eligible published or unpublished primary studies tested medication adherence interventions and reported medication knowledge, quality of life, physical function, and symptom outcomes. Primary study attributes and outcome data were reliably coded. Overall standardized mean differences (SMDs) were analyzed using random-effects models. Dichotomous and continuous moderator analyses and funnel plots were used to explore risks of bias. Results Thorough searching located eligible 141 reports. The reports included 176 eligible comparisons between treatment and control subjects across 23,318 subjects. Synthesis across all comparisons yielded statistically significant SMDs for medication knowledge (d = 0.449), quality of life (d = 0.127), physical function (d = 0.142), and symptoms (d = 0.182). The overall SMDs for studies focusing on subsamples of patients with specific illnesses were more modest but also statistically significant. Of specific symptoms analyzed (depression, anxiety, pain, energy/vitality, cardiovascular, and respiratory), only anxiety failed to show a significant improvement following medication adherence interventions. Most SMDs were significantly heterogeneous, and risk of bias analyses suggested links between study quality and SMDs. Conclusions Modest but significant improvements in patient-centered outcomes followed medication adherence interventions. PMID:27021763

  2. Neurocognitive impairment and medication adherence in HIV patients with and without cocaine dependence

    PubMed Central

    Meade, Christina S.; Conn, Nina A.; Skalski, Linda M.; Safren, Steven A.

    2010-01-01

    Cocaine abuse among HIV patients is associated with faster disease progression and mortality. This study examined the relationship between neurocognitive functioning and medication adherence in HIV patients with (n= 25) and without (n= 39) current cocaine dependence. Active users had greater neurocognitive impairment (mean T-score= 35.16 vs. 40.97, p < .05) and worse medication adherence (mean z-score= −0.44 vs. 0.27, p < .001). In a multiple regression model, neurocognitive functioning (β= .33, p < .01) and cocaine dependence (β= −.36, p < .01) were predictive of poorer adherence. There was a significant indirect effect of cocaine dependence on medication adherence through neurocognitive impairment (estimate= −0.15, p < .05), suggesting that neurocognitive impairment partially mediated the relationship between cocaine dependence and poorer adherence. These results confirm that cocaine users are at high risk for poor HIV outcomes and underscore the importance of treating both neurocognitive impairment and cocaine dependence among HIV patients. PMID:20857187

  3. African Americans’ Perceptions of Adherence to Medications and Lifestyle Changes Prescribed to Treat Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Pettey, Christina M.; McSweeney, Jean C.; Stewart, Katharine E.; Cleves, Mario A.; Price, Elvin T.; Heo, Seongkum; Souder, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    More than 80 million Americans have hypertension (HTN), and African Americans (AAs) are disproportionately affected. AAs also have lower rates of adherence to HTN treatment. It is important to understand AAs’ perceptions of adherence to develop effective interventions. The aim of this study is to examine AAs’ perceptions of adherence to medications and lifestyle changes prescribed to treat HTN. In this qualitative study, we used purposive sampling to recruit Southern AAs with HTN aged 21 and older from a free, faith-based clinic. We recorded individual, in-person interviews about perceptions related to adherence to treatment of HTN and analyzed verbatim transcripts using content analysis and constant comparison. We also conducted medical record audits. Twenty-nine AAs participated (52% female, 38% were <50 years of age, 52% had taken anti-HTN medications for ≥5 years). Audits indicated that 65% had uncontrolled HTN during the previous year. Two main themes included causes of HTN and ways to improve blood pressure. Perceived causes of HTN included diet, stress, unhealthy actions, genes, and obesity. Ways to improve HTN included using cultural treatments “passed down,” increasing exercise, reducing stress, and losing weight. Many reported using home remedies to control HTN, including drinking pickle juice. More than half of this sample had uncontrolled HTN. They identified influences of culture on perceptions of adherence including causes and treatment of HTN, and possibly detrimental home remedies. It is imperative that clinicians identify culturally appropriate interventions for this high-risk group. PMID:27148469

  4. A systematic review of service-user reasons for adherence and nonadherence to neuroleptic medication in psychosis.

    PubMed

    Wade, Miriam; Tai, Sara; Awenat, Yvonne; Haddock, Gillian

    2017-02-01

    People diagnosed with psychosis, such as those with schizophrenia-related disorders, are routinely prescribed neuroleptic medication as a primary treatment. Despite reported benefits of neuroleptic treatment for symptom remission and relapse prevention, discontinuation rates are high. Research examining factors associated with neuroleptic non-adherence report inconsistent findings. Reasons for adherence to neuroleptic medication are under-researched. The current review aimed to synthesise evidence exploring service-user self-reported reasons for adherence and non-adherence to neuroleptic medication. A systematic literature search of databases and reference list searching identified 21 studies investigating service-user accounts of reasons for adherence and/or non-adherence to neuroleptic medication. Qualitative, quantitative and mixed-method studies were included in the review. Several themes of reasons were identified. Reasons for both adherence and non-adherence were largely similar; medication efficacy, compatibility with personal medication or religious beliefs, side-effects and the influence of relationships with other people. Experiences of stigma and economic difficulties were generally identified as reasons for non-adherence only while experiences of fear and coercion were identified as reasons for adherence only. The review identified crucial factors which may aid service providers in bettering treatment for people with psychosis and will provide evidence which could contribute to future prescribing guidelines.

  5. Adherence to medication: A nation-wide study from the Children’s Cancer Hospital, Egypt

    PubMed Central

    El Malla, Hanan; Ylitalo Helm, Nathalie; Wilderäng, Ulrica; El Sayed Elborai, Yasser; Steineck, Gunnar; Kreicbergs, Ulrika

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate adherence to medical regimen and predictors for non-adherence among children with cancer in Egypt. METHODS: We administered two study specific questionnaires to 304 parents of children diagnosed with cancer at the Children’s Cancer Hospital in Cairo, Egypt, one before the first chemotherapy treatment and the other before the third. The questionnaires were translated to colloquial Egyptian Arabic, and due, to the high illiteracy level in Egypt an interviewer read the questions in Arabic to each parent and registered the answers. Both questionnaires consisted of almost 90 questions each. In addition, a Case Report Form was filled in from the child’s medical journal. The study period consisted of 7 mo (February until September 2008) and we had a participation rate of 97%. Descriptive statistics are presented and Fisher’s exact test was used to check for possible differences between the adherent and non-adherent groups. A P-value below 0.05 was considered significant. Software used was SAS version 9.3 for Windows (SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC, United States). RESULTS: Two hundred and eighty-one (90%) parents answered the second questionnaire, regarding their child’s adherence behaviour. Approximately two thirds of the children admitted to their third chemotherapy treatment had received medical recommendations upon discharge from the first or second chemotherapy treatment (181/281, 64%). Sixty-eight percent (123/181) of the parents who were given medical recommendations reported that their child did not follow the recommendations. Two main predictors were found for non-adherence: child resistance (111/123, 90%) and inadequate information (100/123, 81%). In the adherent group, 20% of the parents (n = 12/58) reported trust in their child’s doctor while 14 percent 8/58 reported trust in the other health-care professionals. Corresponding numbers for the non-adherent group are 8/123 (7%) for both their child’s doctor and other health

  6. Development of a Patient-Centered Antipsychotic Medication Adherence Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pyne, Jeffrey M.; Fischer, Ellen P.; Gilmore, LaNissa; McSweeney, Jean C.; Stewart, Katharine E.; Mittal, Dinesh; Bost, James E.; Valenstein, Marcia

    2014-01-01

    Objective: A substantial gap exists between patients and their mental health providers about patient's perceived barriers, facilitators, and motivators (BFMs) for taking antipsychotic medications. This article describes how we used an intervention mapping (IM) framework coupled with qualitative and quantitative item-selection methods to…

  7. Psychosocial predictors of non-adherence to chronic medication: systematic review of longitudinal studies

    PubMed Central

    Zwikker, Hanneke E; van den Bemt, Bart J; Vriezekolk, Johanna E; van den Ende, Cornelia H; van Dulmen, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Several cross-sectional studies suggest that psychosocial factors are associated with non-adherence to chronic preventive maintenance medication (CPMM); however, results from longitudinal associations have not yet been systematically summarized. Therefore, the objective of this study was to systematically synthesize evidence of longitudinal associations between psychosocial predictors and CPMM non-adherence. Materials and methods PUBMED, EMBASE, CINAHL, and PsychINFO databases were searched for studies meeting our inclusion criteria. The reference lists and the ISI Web of Knowledge of the included studies were checked. Studies were included if they had an English abstract, involved adult populations using CPMM living in Western countries, and if they investigated associations between psychosocial predictors and medication non-adherence using longitudinal designs. Data were extracted according to a literature-based extraction form. Study quality was independently judged by two researchers using a framework comprising six bias domains. Studies were considered to be of high quality if ≥four domains were free of bias. Psychosocial predictors for non-adherence were categorized into five pre-defined categories: beliefs/cognitions; coping styles; social influences and social support; personality traits; and psychosocial well-being. A qualitative best evidence synthesis was performed to synthesize evidence of longitudinal associations between psychosocial predictors and CPMM non-adherence. Results Of 4,732 initially-identified studies, 30 (low-quality) studies were included in the systematic review. The qualitative best evidence synthesis demonstrated limited evidence for absence of a longitudinal association between CPMM non-adherence and the psychosocial categories. The strength of evidence for the review’s findings is limited by the low quality of included studies. Conclusion The results do not provide psychosocial targets for the development of new

  8. Examination of the Role of Religious and Psychosocial Factors in HIV Medication Adherence Rates.

    PubMed

    Dalmida, Safiya George; McCoy, Katryna; Koenig, Harold G; Miller, Aretha; Holstad, Marcia McDonnell; Thomas, Tami; Clayton-Jones, Dora; Grant, Mary; Fleming, Terri; Wirani, Menka Munira; Mugoya, George

    2017-03-11

    Optimal adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is associated with favorable HIV outcomes, including higher CD4 cell counts, HIV virus suppression and a lower risk of HIV transmission. However, only 25% of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWH) in the USA are virally suppressed. Sub-optimal adherence (<90-95%) contributes to antiretroviral resistance and worse medical outcomes, including more rapid progression to AIDS and death. Psychosocial factors and religion/spirituality (R/S) have a significant impact on ART adherence, but the findings are mixed. The purpose of this study was to examine religious and psychosocial correlates and predictors of ≥90% ART adherence in PLWH. A cross-sectional study was conducted with a sample of 292 outpatient PLWH in the Southeastern USA. Participants completed computerized surveys. The mean ART adherence percentage was 80.9% and only about half reported ≥90% adherence. There were statistically significant differences in ART adherence rates based on age, depressive symptom status and frequency of religious attendance and prayer. Praying at least once a day was significantly associated with ≥90% ART adherence (OR = 2.26, 95% CI [1.06-4.79], p < 0.05). Social support satisfaction was also significantly associated with ART adherence (OR = 1.52, 95% CI [1.11-2.08], p < 0.05) and energy/fatigue/vitality (OR = 1.03, 95% CI [1.00-1.05], p < 0.05).

  9. Oral targeted therapies: managing drug interactions, enhancing adherence and optimizing medication safety in lymphoma patients.

    PubMed

    Liewer, Susanne; Huddleston, Ashley N

    2015-04-01

    The advent of newer, targeted oral chemotherapy medications such as small molecule kinase inhibitors, ibrutinib and idelalisib, has created additional options for the treatment of lymphoma. The targeted nature of these agents offers many patient-identified advantages over older, intravenously administered chemotherapy regimens such as ease of self-administration and an increased sense of independence. However, newer oral agents also present unique challenges not previously experienced with older therapies that may affect safety, efficacy and patient adherence. In this article, we review oral agents for the treatment of lymphoma, how to evaluate and manage drug-drug and drug-food interactions with concomitant oral medications, and issues with patient adherence as well as methods to determine adherence for oral chemotherapy.

  10. Explaining attitudes and adherence to antipsychotic medication: the development of a process model.

    PubMed

    Wiesjahn, Martin; Jung, Esther; Lamster, Fabian; Rief, Winfried; Lincoln, Tania M

    2014-01-01

    Although nonadherence to antipsychotic medication poses a threat to outcome of medical treatment, the processes preceding the intake behavior have not been investigated sufficiently. This study tests a process model of medication adherence derived from the Health Belief Model which is based on cost-benefit considerations. The model includes an extensive set of potential predictors for medication attitudes and uses these attitudes as a predictor for medication adherence. We conducted an online study of 84 participants with a self-reported psychotic disorder and performed a path analysis. More insight into the need for treatment, a higher attribution of the symptoms to a mental disorder, experience of less negative side effects, presence of biological causal beliefs, and less endorsement of psychological causal beliefs were significant predictors of more positive attitudes towards medication. The results largely supported the postulated process model. Mental health professionals should consider attitudes towards medication and the identified predictors when they address adherence problems with the patient in a shared and informed decision process.

  11. Explaining Attitudes and Adherence to Antipsychotic Medication: The Development of a Process Model

    PubMed Central

    Rief, Winfried; Lincoln, Tania M.

    2014-01-01

    Although nonadherence to antipsychotic medication poses a threat to outcome of medical treatment, the processes preceding the intake behavior have not been investigated sufficiently. This study tests a process model of medication adherence derived from the Health Belief Model which is based on cost-benefit considerations. The model includes an extensive set of potential predictors for medication attitudes and uses these attitudes as a predictor for medication adherence. We conducted an online study of 84 participants with a self-reported psychotic disorder and performed a path analysis. More insight into the need for treatment, a higher attribution of the symptoms to a mental disorder, experience of less negative side effects, presence of biological causal beliefs, and less endorsement of psychological causal beliefs were significant predictors of more positive attitudes towards medication. The results largely supported the postulated process model. Mental health professionals should consider attitudes towards medication and the identified predictors when they address adherence problems with the patient in a shared and informed decision process. PMID:24693426

  12. Examining whether the information-motivation-behavioral skills model predicts medication adherence for patients with a rare disease.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Dayna S; Hogan, Susan L; Jordan, Joanne M; DeVellis, Robert F; Carpenter, Delesha M

    2017-01-01

    The information-motivation-behavioral skills (IMB) model has been used to explain and promote medication adherence among patients with diabetes and HIV. The objective of this study was to examine whether the IMB model predicted medication adherence among vasculitis patients. Adult vasculitis patients (n=228) completed online questionnaires at baseline and 3-month follow-up. Linear regressions were calculated to determine the direct effects of information and motivation on medication adherence (P<0.05). A mediation analysis using a bootstrapping approach was used to test whether behavioral skills significantly mediated the effect of information and motivation on medication adherence. Participants reported high levels of information (M=4.0; standard deviation [SD]=0.68), moderate levels of motivation (M=2.7; SD=1.00), and high levels of behavioral skills (M=4.1; SD=0.74). In the regression model, only behavioral skills (B=0.38; P<0.001) were significantly associated with medication adherence; however, mediation analysis revealed that behavioral skills significantly mediated the effects of information and motivation on medication adherence. The results support the IMB-hypothesized relationships between information, motivation, behavioral skills, and medication adherence in our sample. Findings suggest that providers should work with vasculitis patients to increase their medication-related skills to improve medication adherence.

  13. Examining whether the information–motivation–behavioral skills model predicts medication adherence for patients with a rare disease

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Dayna S; Hogan, Susan L; Jordan, Joanne M; DeVellis, Robert F; Carpenter, Delesha M

    2017-01-01

    The information–motivation–behavioral skills (IMB) model has been used to explain and promote medication adherence among patients with diabetes and HIV. The objective of this study was to examine whether the IMB model predicted medication adherence among vasculitis patients. Adult vasculitis patients (n=228) completed online questionnaires at baseline and 3-month follow-up. Linear regressions were calculated to determine the direct effects of information and motivation on medication adherence (P<0.05). A mediation analysis using a bootstrapping approach was used to test whether behavioral skills significantly mediated the effect of information and motivation on medication adherence. Participants reported high levels of information (M=4.0; standard deviation [SD]=0.68), moderate levels of motivation (M=2.7; SD=1.00), and high levels of behavioral skills (M=4.1; SD=0.74). In the regression model, only behavioral skills (B=0.38; P<0.001) were significantly associated with medication adherence; however, mediation analysis revealed that behavioral skills significantly mediated the effects of information and motivation on medication adherence. The results support the IMB-hypothesized relationships between information, motivation, behavioral skills, and medication adherence in our sample. Findings suggest that providers should work with vasculitis patients to increase their medication-related skills to improve medication adherence. PMID:28138225

  14. Medication Adherence Is a Mediator of the Relationship between Ethnicity and Event-Free Survival in Patients with Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jia-Rong; Lennie, Terry A.; De Jong, Marla J.; Frazier, Susan K.; Heo, Seongkum; Chung, Misook L.; Moser, Debra K.

    2009-01-01

    Background Rehospitalization rates are higher in African-American than Caucasian patients with heart failure (HF). The reasons for the disparity in outcomes between African-Americans and Caucasians may relate to differences in medication adherence. Objective To determine whether medication adherence is a mediator of the relationship between ethnicity and event-free survival in patients with HF. Methods Medication adherence was monitored longitudinally in 135 HF patients using the Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS). Events (ED visits for HF exacerbation, HF and cardiac rehospitalization, and all cause mortality) were obtained by interview and hospital data base review. A series of regression models and survival analyses were conducted to determine whether medication adherence mediated the relationship between ethnicity and event-free survival. Results Event-free survival was significantly worse in African-Americans than Caucasians. Ethnicity was a predictor of medication adherence (p = .011). African-Americans were 2.57 times more likely to experience an event than Caucasians (p = .026). Ethnicity was not a predictor of event-free survival after entering medication adherence in the model (p = .06). Conclusion Medication adherence was a mediator of the relationship between ethnicity and event-free survival in this sample. Interventions designed to reduce barriers to medication adherence may decrease the disparity in outcomes. PMID:20142026

  15. Medication adherence in patients with myotonic dystrophy and facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Bryan P; Conn, Kelly M; Smith, Joanne; Walker, Andrew; Parkhill, Amy L; Hilbert, James E; Luebbe, Elizabeth A; Moxley III, Richard T

    2016-12-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) and facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) are the two most common adult muscular dystrophies and have progressive and often disabling manifestations. Higher levels of medication adherence lead to better health outcomes, especially important to patients with DM and FSHD because of their multisystem manifestations and complexity of care. However, medication adherence has not previously been studied in a large cohort of DM type 1 (DM1), DM type 2 (DM2), and FSHD patients. The purpose of our study was to survey medication adherence and disease manifestations in patients enrolled in the NIH-supported National DM and FSHD Registry. The study was completed by 110 DM1, 49 DM2, and 193 FSHD patients. Notable comorbidities were hypertension in FSHD (44 %) and DM2 (37 %), gastroesophageal reflux disease in DM1 (24 %) and DM2 (31 %) and arrhythmias (29 %) and thyroid disease (20 %) in DM1. Each group reported high levels of adherence based on regimen complexity, medication costs, health literacy, side effect profile, and their beliefs about treatment. Only dysphagia in DM1 was reported to significantly impact medication adherence. Approximately 35 % of study patients reported polypharmacy (taking 6 or more medications). Of the patients with polypharmacy, the DM1 cohort was significantly younger (mean 55.0 years) compared to DM2 (59.0 years) and FSHD (63.2 years), and had shorter disease duration (mean 26 years) compared to FSHD (26.8 years) and DM2 (34.8 years). Future research is needed to assess techniques to ease pill swallowing in DM1 and to monitor polypharmacy and potential drug interactions in DM and FSHD.

  16. Does Assertive Community Treatment Increase Medication Adherence for People With Co-occurring Psychotic and Substance Use Disorders?

    PubMed Central

    Manuel, Jennifer I.; Covell, Nancy H.; Jackson, Carlos T.; Essock, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study analyzed data from a randomized trial to examine the impact on medication adherence of integrated treatment delivered via assertive community treatment (ACT) versus standard clinical case management (SCCM). METHOD Data from the original study included 198 study participants with co-occurring psychotic and substance use disorders who were randomly assigned to receive integrated treatment via ACT or SCCM and were followed for 3 years. We applied mixed-effects logistic regression to estimate group (ACT vs. SCCM) by time effects on a self-report measure of medication adherence. Adherence was dichotomized as 20% or more missed medication days (“poor adherence”) versus less than 20% missed medication days (“adequate adherence”). RESULTS Participants who were assigned to ACT reported significant improvement in medication adherence compared with those assigned to SCCM. CONCLUSIONS Integrated treatment delivered via ACT may benefit persons with co-occurring psychotic and substance use disorders who are poorly adherent to medications. PMID:21659294

  17. THE ASSOCIATION OF DEPRESSION WITH ADHERENCE TO ANTIHYPERTENSIVE MEDICATIONS: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    Eze-Nliam, Chete M.; Thombs, Brett D.; Lima, Bruno B.; Smith, Cheri G.; Ziegelstein, Roy C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine the strength and consistency of the evidence on the relationship between depression and adherence to antihypertensive medications. Methods The MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Embase, SCOPUS, and ISI databases were searched from inception until December 11, 2009 for published studies of original research that assessed adherence to antihypertensive medications and used a standardized interview, validated questionnaire or International Classification of Diseases Ninth Revision (ICD-9) code to assess depression or symptoms of depression in patients with hypertension. Manual searching was conducted on 22 selected journals. Citations of included articles were tracked using Web of Science and Google Scholar. Two investigators independently extracted data from the selected articles and discrepancies were resolved by consensus. Results Eight studies were identified that included a total of 42,790 patients. 95% of these patients were from one study. Only 4 of the studies had the assessment of this relationship as a primary objective. Adherence rates varied from 29% to 91%. There were widely varying results within and across studies. All 8 studies reported at least one significant bivariate or multivariate negative relationship between depression and adherence to antihypertensive medications. Insignificant findings in bivariate or multivariate analyses were reported in 6 of 8 studies. Conclusions All studies reported statistically significant relationships between depression and poor adherence to antihypertensive medications, but definitive conclusions cannot be drawn because of substantial heterogeneity between studies with respect to the assessment of depression and adherence, as well as inconsistencies in results both within and between studies. Additional studies would help clarify this relationship. PMID:20531223

  18. Increased neurocognitive intra-individual variability is associated with declines in medication adherence in HIV-infected adults

    PubMed Central

    Thaler, Nicholas S.; Sayegh, Philip; Arentoft, Alyssa; Thames, April D.; Castellon, Steven A.; Hinkin, Charlie H.

    2015-01-01

    There is cross-sectional evidence that neurocognitive intra-individual variability (IIV), or dispersion, is elevated in HIV disease and is associated with declines in activities of daily living, including medication adherence. This longitudinal study extends this literature by examining whether increased neurocognitive IIV in HIV+ persons over time predicts declines in medication adherence above and beyond changes in mean level of performance over a six-month observation. After controlling for drug use, declines in mean performance, and changes in depressive symptoms, results confirmed that increases in IIV were associated with overall poorer antiretroviral medication adherence. HIV+ individuals with the greatest increases in dispersion demonstrated marked reductions in adherence by the third month that exceed that observed in less variable individuals. Our results indicate that increases in dispersion are associated with poorer declines in medication adherence in HIV disease, which may have implications for the early detection and remediation of suboptimal antiretroviral adherence. PMID:25730729

  19. Rethinking Adherence: A Health Literacy–Informed Model of Medication Self-Management

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Stacy C.; Oramasionwu, Christine U.; Wolf, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Medication adherence has received a great deal of attention over the past several decades; however, its definition and measurement remain elusive. The authors propose a new definition of medication self-management that is guided by evidence from the field of health literacy. Specifically, a new conceptual model is introduced that deconstructs the tasks associated with taking prescription drugs; including the knowledge, skills and behaviors necessary for patients to correctly take medications and sustain use over time in ambulatory care. This model is then used to review and criticize current adherence measures as well as to offer guidance to future interventions promoting medication self-management, especially among patients with low literacy skills. PMID:24093342

  20. Improving medication adherence in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Jamie; McDonald, Vanessa M; Boyes, Allison; Sanson-Fisher, Rob; Paul, Christine; Melville, Jessica

    2013-10-20

    Adherence to medication among individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is suboptimal and has negative impacts on survival and health care costs. No systematic review has examined the effectiveness of interventions designed to improve medication adherence. Electronic databases Medline and Cochrane were searched using a combination of MeSH and keywords. Eligible studies were interventions with a primary or secondary aim to improve medication adherence among individuals with COPD published in English. Included studies were assessed for methodological quality using the Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) criteria. Of the 1,186 papers identified, seven studies met inclusion criteria. Methodological quality of the studies was variable. Five studies identified effective interventions. Strategies included: brief counselling; monitoring and feedback about inhaler use through electronic medication delivery devices; and multi-component interventions consisting of self-management and care co-ordination delivered by pharmacists and primary care teams. Further research is needed to establish the most effective and cost effective interventions. Special attention should be given to increasing patient sample size and using a common measure of adherence to overcome methodological limitations. Interventions that involve caregivers and target the healthcare provider as well as the patient should be further explored.

  1. Meta-analyses of Theory use in Medication Adherence Intervention Research

    PubMed Central

    Conn, Vicki S.; Enriquez, Maithe; Ruppar, Todd M.; Chan, Keith C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective This systematic review applied meta-analytic procedures to integrate primary research that examined theory- or model-linked medication adherence interventions. Methods Extensive literature searching strategies were used to locate trials testing interventions with medication adherence behavior outcomes measured by electronic event monitoring, pharmacy refills, pill counts, and self-reports. Random-effects model analysis was used to calculate standardized mean difference effect sizes for medication adherence outcomes. Results Codable data were extracted from 146 comparisons with 19,348 participants. The most common theories and models were social cognitive theory and motivational interviewing. The overall weighted effect size for all interventions comparing treatment and control participants was 0.294. The effect size for interventions based on single-theories was 0.323 and for multiple-theory interventions was 0.214. Effect sizes for individual theories and models ranged from 0.041 to 0.447. The largest effect sizes were for interventions based on the health belief model (0.477) and adult learning theory (0.443). The smallest effect sizes were for interventions based on PRECEDE (0.041) and self-regulation (0.118). Conclusion These findings suggest that theory- and model-linked interventions have a significant but modest effect on medication adherence outcomes. PMID:26931748

  2. Predictors of Medication Adherence in an AIDS Clinical Trial: Patient and Clinician Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Lisa E.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents data from an AIDS clinical trial that evaluated 238 (60 percent nonwhite) patients infected with HIV and their clinician's perceptions of medication adherence and visit attendance in relationship to lifestyle, psychosocial, and health belief model (HBM) variables. Twelve sites collected data via a prospective, multisite…

  3. Self-Efficacy Mediates the Relationship between Depressive Symptoms and Medication Adherence among Hypertensive African Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenthaler, Antoinette; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Allegrante, John P.

    2009-01-01

    Many studies have documented the negative effects of depression on adherence to recommended treatment; however, little is known about the mechanism underlying this relationship. Using the Kenny and Baron analytic framework of mediation, the authors assessed whether self-efficacy mediated the relationship between depression and medication adherence…

  4. A Mobile Phone HIV Medication Adherence Intervention: Care4Today™ Mobile Health Manager

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, C. Andrew

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of a qualitative study designed to describe the experience of HIV medication adherence using a mobile phone application. For the purpose of this qualitative study, nine semi-structured focus group discussions were conducted over a three-month period at an AIDS service organization in Central Texas. The data were…

  5. Mediating role of illness representation among social support, therapeutic alliance, experience of medication side effects, and medication adherence in persons with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Rungruangsiripan, Malatee; Sitthimongkol, Yajai; Maneesriwongul, Wantana; Talley, Sandra; Vorapongsathorn, Thavatchai

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this cross-sectional research study was to examine factors affecting medication adherence in Thai individuals with schizophrenia. The Common-Sense Model of Illness Representation was used to guide the study. Two hundred twenty-five subjects met the inclusion criteria and were interviewed. Variables of interest focused on experience of medication side effects, therapeutic alliance, social support, illness representation, and behavior change with medication adherence. Results indicated that therapeutic alliance and the experience of medication side effects enhanced illness representation, which in turn led to an intention to change adherence behavior. Social support did not alter illness representation or adherence behavior. Because illness representation positively influenced patients' intention to change adherence behavior, mental health nurses should promote patients' perception about their illness to enhance medication adherence.

  6. Rethinking agency and medical adherence technology: applying Actor Network Theory to the case study of Digital Pills.

    PubMed

    Hurtado-de-Mendoza, Alejandra; Cabling, Mark L; Sheppard, Vanessa B

    2015-12-01

    Much literature surrounding medical technology and adherence posits that technology is a mechanism for social control. This assumes that the medical establishment can take away patients' agency. Although power relationships and social control can play a key role, medical technology can also serve as an agentive tool to be utilized. We (1) offer the alternative framework of Actor Network Theory to view medical technology, (2) discuss the literature on medication adherence and technology, (3) delve into the ramifications of looking at adherence as a network and (4) use Digital Pills as a case study of dispersed agency.

  7. The Telehealth Enhancement of Adherence to Medication in Pediatric IBD (TEAM) Trial: Design and Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Hommel, Kevin A.; Gray, Wendy N.; Hente, Elizabeth; Loreaux, Katherine; Ittenbach, Richard F.; Maddux, Michele; Baldassano, Robert; Sylvester, Francisco; Crandall, Wallace; Doarn, Charles; Heyman, Melvin B.; Keljo, David; Denson, Lee A.

    2015-01-01

    Medication nonadherence is a significant health care issue requiring regular behavioral treatment. Lack of sufficient health care resources and patient/family time commitment for weekly treatment are primary barriers to receiving appropriate self-management support. We describe the methodology of the Telehealth Enhancement of Adherence to Medication (TEAM) trial for medication nonadherence in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). For this trial, participants 11–18 years of age will be recruited from seven pediatric hospitals and will complete an initial 4-week run in to assess adherence to a daily medication. Those who take less than 90% of their prescribed medication will be randomized. A total of 194 patients with IBD will be randomized to either a telehealth behavioral treatment (TBT) arm or education only (EO) arm. All treatment will be delivered via telehealth video conferencing. Patients will be assessed at baseline, post-treatment, 3-, 6-, and 12-months. We anticipate that participants in the TBT arm will demonstrate a statistically significant improvement at post-treatment and 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-up compared to participants in the EO arm for both medication adherence and secondary outcomes (i.e., disease severity, patient quality of life, and health care utilization). If efficacious, the TEAM intervention could be disseminated broadly and reduce health care access barriers so that patients could receive much needed self-management intervention. PMID:26003436

  8. Retention in care and medication adherence: current challenges to antiretroviral therapy success.

    PubMed

    Holtzman, Carol W; Brady, Kathleen A; Yehia, Baligh R

    2015-04-01

    Health behaviors such as retention in HIV medical care and adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) pose major challenges to reducing new HIV infections, addressing health disparities, and improving health outcomes. Andersen's Behavioral Model of Health Service Use provides a conceptual framework for understanding how patient and environmental factors affect health behaviors and outcomes, which can inform the design of intervention strategies. Factors affecting retention and adherence among persons with HIV include patient predisposing factors (e.g., mental illness, substance abuse), patient-enabling factors (e.g., social support, reminder strategies, medication characteristics, transportation, housing, insurance), and healthcare environment factors (e.g., pharmacy services, clinic experiences, provider characteristics). Evidence-based recommendations for improving retention and adherence include (1) systematic monitoring of clinic attendance and ART adherence; (2) use of peer or paraprofessional navigators to re-engage patients in care and help them remain in care; (3) optimization of ART regimens and pharmaceutical supply chain management systems; (4) provision of reminder devices and tools; (5) general education and counseling; (6) engagement of peer, family, and community support groups; (7) case management; and (8) targeting patients with substance abuse and mental illness. Further research is needed on effective monitoring strategies and interventions that focus on improving retention and adherence, with specific attention to the healthcare environment.

  9. Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence and Use of an Electronic Shared Medical Record Among People Living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Saberi, Parya; Catz, Sheryl L; Leyden, Wendy A; Stewart, Christine; Ralston, James D; Horberg, Michael A; Grothaus, Louis; Silverberg, Michael J

    2015-06-01

    Electronic shared medical records (SMR) are emerging healthcare technologies that allow patients to engage in their healthcare by communicating with providers, refilling prescriptions, scheduling appointments, and viewing portions of medical records. We conducted a pre-post cohort study of HIV-positive adults who used and did not use SMR in two integrated healthcare systems. We compared the difference in antiretroviral refill adherence between SMR users and age- and sex-frequency matched non-users from the 12-month period prior to SMR useto the 12-month period starting 6 months after initiation of SMR use. High adherence was maintained among SMR users (change = -0.11 %) but declined among non-users (change = -2.05 %; p = 0.003). Among SMR users, there was a steady improvement in adherence as monthly frequency of SMR use increased (p = 0.009). SMR use, particularly more frequent use, is associated with maintaining high adherence and non-use is associated with declines in adherence over time among patients with access to these online services.

  10. Intervention to Promote Patients' Adherence to Antimalarial Medication: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Fuangchan, Anjana; Dhippayom, Teerapon; Kongkaew, Chuenjid

    2014-01-01

    Non-adherence as a major contributor to poor treatment outcomes. This study aimed to explore the effectiveness of existing interventions promoting adherence to antimalarial drugs by systematic review. The following databases were used to identify potential articles: MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane CENTRAL, and CINAHL (through March 2013). From 1,813 potential papers identified, 16 studies met the selection criteria comprising 9,247 patients. Interventions were classified as packaging aids, visual media, combined visual media and verbal information, community education, medication supervision, and convenient regimen. These interventions were shown to increase adherence to antimalarial drugs (median relative risk = 1.4, interquartile range 1.2–2.0). Although a most effective intervention did not emerge, community education and visual media/verbal information combinations may well have most potential to improve adherence to antimalarial medication. These interventions should be implemented in combination to optimize their beneficial effects. The current understanding on improved adherence would facilitate to contain outbreaks of malaria cost effectively. PMID:24166045

  11. Dosing patterns and medication adherence in bipolar disorder patients treated with lurasidone: a US retrospective claims database analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sajatovic, Martha; Ng-Mak, Daisy; Solem, Caitlyn T.; Lin, Fang-Ju; Rajagopalan, Krithika; Loebel, Antony

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to describe dosing patterns and medication adherence among bipolar patients who initiated lurasidone in a real-world setting. Methods: Adult bipolar patients who initiated lurasidone between 1 November 2010 and 31 December 2012 (index period) with 6-month pre- and post-index continuous enrollment were identified from the IMS RWD Adjudicated Claims US database. Patients were grouped by starting lurasidone daily dose: 20 mg (7.1%), 40 mg (62.2%), 60–80 mg (28.7%), and 120–160 mg (2.1%). Patient characteristics were compared across doses using Cochran–Armitage trend tests. Multivariable ordinal logistic regression assessed the association between initial lurasidone dose and patient characteristics. Medication adherence was measured using medication possession ratio (MPR). Results: Of 1114 adult bipolar patients (mean age 40.6 years, 70.6% female), 90% initiated lurasidone at 40 mg or 80 mg/day (mean 51.9 mg/day). Of these, 16.2% initiated lurasidone as monotherapy. Mean lurasidone maintenance dose was 55.2 mg/day and mean MPR was 0.53 [standard deviation (SD) = 0.34] over the 6-month follow up. Substance use, hyperglycemia, obesity, and prior antipsychotic use were associated with higher initial lurasidone doses (p < 0.05). Odds of a 20 mg/day increase in initial lurasidone dose was 1.6-times higher for patients with substance use [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.16−2.24], 2.6-times higher with hyperglycemia problems (95% CI: 1.15−5.83), 1.7-times higher with obesity (95% CI: 1.05−2.60), and 1.3 (95% CI: 1.01−1.78) and 1.8-times higher (95% CI: 1.17−2.86) with prior use of second- and first-generation antipsychotics, respectively. Conclusions: This real-world analysis of bipolar patients indicated that 40 mg or 80 mg/day were the most common starting doses of lurasidone. A majority of patients used concomitant psychiatric medications (polypharmacy). Higher doses of lurasidone were prescribed to patients with

  12. A Metaanalysis of Interventions to Improve Adherence to Lipid-Lowering Medication

    PubMed Central

    Deichmann, Richard E.; Morledge, Michael D.; Ulep, Robin; Shaffer, Johnathon P.; Davies, Philippa; van Driel, Mieke L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Inadequate patient adherence to a medication regimen is a major factor in the lack of success in treating hyperlipidemia. Improved adherence rates may result in significantly improved cardiovascular outcomes in populations treated with lipid-lowering therapy. The purpose of this metaanalysis was to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions aimed at improving adherence to lipid-lowering drugs, focusing on measures of adherence and clinical outcomes. Methods: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature databases through January 14, 2015, and also used the results from previous Cochrane reviews of this title. Randomized controlled trials of adherence-enhancing interventions for lipid-lowering medication in adults in an ambulatory setting with measurable outcomes were evaluated with criteria outlined by the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. Results: Twenty-seven studies randomly assigning 899,068 participants to a variety of interventions were analyzed. One group of interventions categorized as intensified patient care showed significant improvement in adherence rates when compared to usual care (odds ratio 1.93; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.29-2.88). Additionally, after <6 months of follow-up, total cholesterol decreased by a mean of 17.15 mg/dL (95% CI 1.17-33.14), while after >6 months total cholesterol decreased by a mean of 17.57 mg/dL (95% CI 14.95-20.19). Conclusion: Healthcare systems that can implement team-based intensified patient care interventions, such as electronic reminders, pharmacist-led interventions, and healthcare professional education of patients, may be successful in improving adherence rates to lipid-lowering medicines. PMID:27660570

  13. Effectiveness of Electronic Reminders to Improve Medication Adherence in Tuberculosis Patients: A Cluster-Randomised Trial

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoqiu; Lewis, James J.; Zhang, Hui; Lu, Wei; Zhang, Shun; Zheng, Guilan; Bai, Liqiong; Li, Jun; Li, Xue; Chen, Hongguang; Liu, Mingming; Chen, Rong; Chi, Junying; Lu, Jian; Huan, Shitong; Cheng, Shiming; Wang, Lixia; Jiang, Shiwen; Chin, Daniel P.; Fielding, Katherine L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Mobile text messaging and medication monitors (medication monitor boxes) have the potential to improve adherence to tuberculosis (TB) treatment and reduce the need for directly observed treatment (DOT), but to our knowledge they have not been properly evaluated in TB patients. We assessed the effectiveness of text messaging and medication monitors to improve medication adherence in TB patients. Methods and Findings In a pragmatic cluster-randomised trial, 36 districts/counties (each with at least 300 active pulmonary TB patients registered in 2009) within the provinces of Heilongjiang, Jiangsu, Hunan, and Chongqing, China, were randomised using stratification and restriction to one of four case-management approaches in which patients received reminders via text messages, a medication monitor, combined, or neither (control). Patients in the intervention arms received reminders to take their drugs and reminders for monthly follow-up visits, and the managing doctor was recommended to switch patients with adherence problems to more intensive management or DOT. In all arms, patients took medications out of a medication monitor box, which recorded when the box was opened, but the box gave reminders only in the medication monitor and combined arms. Patients were followed up for 6 mo. The primary endpoint was the percentage of patient-months on TB treatment where at least 20% of doses were missed as measured by pill count and failure to open the medication monitor box. Secondary endpoints included additional adherence and standard treatment outcome measures. Interventions were not masked to study staff and patients. From 1 June 2011 to 7 March 2012, 4,292 new pulmonary TB patients were enrolled across the 36 clusters. A total of 119 patients (by arm: 33 control, 33 text messaging, 23 medication monitor, 30 combined) withdrew from the study in the first month because they were reassessed as not having TB by their managing doctor (61 patients) or were switched to

  14. Relationship of emotional intelligence and adherence to combination antiretroviral medications by individuals living with HIV disease.

    PubMed

    Willard, Suzanne

    2006-01-01

    Medications are an intentional and purposeful means to the successful management of many chronic diseases. In the treatment of disease caused by HIV, adherence to medication is of particular concern because any level of nonadherence, often a few missed doses, will lead eventually to the development of drug resistance. Many predictors of poor adherence to HIV medications have been identified as significant factors in adherence. Among these is the emotional aspect. The purpose of this study was to examine emotional intelligence (EI) and adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy in individuals who are infected with HIV. EI is defined as the ability to perceive and express emotions, facilitate emotions, understand and reason with emotion, and manage emotions. EI has been correlated with various aspects of success in life. In this study, EI was measured by the Mayer, Salovey, Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test. Adherence to medications was measured by self-report and defined as less than 10% missed doses of medications. Eighty-two participants were recruited from an urban hospital-based HIV clinic. Pearson's r was used to analyze the data for significance, and no correlation was reported. This data set was not large enough to prove significance, statistically, of the research question. However, an unexpected result of this study was that the overall EI scores for this particular population were markedly lower than the test norms. Further study would be warranted and recommended to explore El measurement in people at risk for HIV disease or in those who have the disease to further understand the impact of emotions and EI in this specific population.

  15. Nurses’ perceptions of medication adherence in schizophrenia: results of the ADHES cross-sectional questionnaire survey

    PubMed Central

    Emsley, Robin; Alptekin, Koksal; Azorin, Jean-Michel; Cañas, Fernando; Dubois, Vincent; Gorwood, Philip; Haddad, Peter M.; Naber, Dieter; Olivares, José Manuel; Papageorgiou, Georgios; Roca, Miguel; Thomas, Pierre; Hargarter, Ludger; Schreiner, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Poor adherence to antipsychotic treatment is a widespread problem within schizophrenia therapy with serious consequences including increased risks of relapse and rehospitalization. Mounting evidence supports the key roles that nurses play in monitoring patient progress and facilitating long-term treatment adherence. The Adherencia Terapéutica en la Esquizofrenia (ADHES) nurses’ survey was designed to assess the opinions of nurses on the causes and management of partial/nonadherence to antipsychotic medication. Methods: A questionnaire-based cross-sectional survey of 4120 nurses from Europe, the Middle East and Africa. Interpretation of results was based on a descriptive comparison of responses. Results: Nurses perceived 54% of patients seen in the preceding month to be partially/nonadherent to treatment. Most nurses (90%) reported some level of experience with administration of long-acting injectable (LAI) antipsychotics, with 24% of nurses administering >10 injections per month. The majority (85%) of nurses surveyed believed that improving adherence would improve patient outcomes. Nearly half (49%) reported that most of their patients depend on a family member or other nonprofessional carer to remind them to take their medication as prescribed. A similar proportion of nurses (43%) reported that most of their patients relied on a professional to remind them to take medication. Most nurses (92%) felt that ensuring continuous medication with LAI antipsychotics would yield long-term benefits for patients, but their opinion was that over a third of patients were unaware of LAI antipsychotic treatments. In a series of forced options, the strategy used most often by respondents (89%) to promote medication adherence was to build trusting relationships with patients while listening to and interpreting their needs and concerns. Respondents also rated this as the most effective strategy that they used (48%). Conclusion: Nurses are highly aware of adherence

  16. A mixed-methods study of the implementation of medication adherence policy solutions: how do European countries compare?

    PubMed Central

    Clyne, Wendy; McLachlan, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We describe a key informant study that invited national medicines policy leads for the European Union member states to self-assess the level of implementation of medicines adherence initiatives in their country and the adequacy of that implementation. Interviews with medicines policy leads enabled in-depth understanding of the variation in adherence support across nations and the ways in which different nations prioritize, plan, and implement medicines adherence systems and services. Methods Ten national policy leads (Bulgaria, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Germany, Ireland, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, and the Netherlands) completed a self-assessment survey, and seven (Estonia, Finland, Germany, Ireland, Lithuania, Malta, and the Netherlands) engaged in a follow-up interview. Key findings Policy leads varied in the level of implementation of medication adherence solutions that they reported in their nations; most initiatives were aimed directly at patients with few initiatives at government or health care commissioner levels of action. Policy leads reported insufficient implementation of medication adherence initiatives across all potential domains. Barriers to implementation included lack of resources, strategic planning, evidence to support action, the “hidden” nature of medication adherence within policy work, and dispersed responsibility for medication adherence as a policy and practice theme. Conclusion This study has international significance and summarizes the emergent characteristics of nations with and without coordinated medication adherence activity. We highlight the importance of sharing good practice in policy formulation and implementation for medication adherence. PMID:26604703

  17. Tailored Information and Automated Reminding to Improve Medication Adherence in Spanish- and English-Speaking Elders Treated for Memory Impairment.

    PubMed

    Ownby, Raymond L; Hertzog, Christopher; Czaja, Sara J

    2012-05-01

    Medication adherence is recognized as an issue of critical importance within health care, as many patients do not take their medications as prescribed. This study evaluated two interventions targeted at improving adherence in elderly patients being treated for memory impairments. Twenty-seven participants were randomly assigned to control (n = 11), automated reminding (n = 8), or tailored information conditions (n = 8). Medication adherence was evaluated with an electronic pill bottle. Generalized estimating equation (GEE) models assessed the effects of the interventions on electronically monitored medication adherence after controlling for covariates. Results showed that individuals in both intervention groups had higher levels of medication adherence than those in the control group. The presence of a caregiver was associated with substantially higher levels of adherence. Verbal memory, but not general cognitive status, predicted better adherence. Mood, health literacy, and executive functions were not associated with adherence. Results thus suggest that both automated reminding and tailored information interventions may improve medication adherence in elders, even among those with memory impairments.

  18. Video chat technology to remotely quantify dietary, supplement, and medication adherence in clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Courtney M.; Apolzan, John W.; Wright, Courtney; Martin, Corby K.

    2017-01-01

    We conducted a pair of studies to test the validity, reliability, feasibility, and acceptability of using video chat technology as a novel method to quantify dietary and pill-taking (i.e., supplement and medication) adherence. In the first study, we investigated whether video chat technology can accurately quantify adherence to dietary and pill-taking interventions. Mock study participants ate food items and swallowed pills while performing randomized scripted “cheating” behaviors design to mimic non-adherence. Monitoring was conducted in a crossover design, with two monitors watching in-person and two watching remotely by Skype on a smartphone. For the second study, a 22-question online survey was sent to an email listserv with more than 20,000 unique email addresses of past and present study participants to assess the feasibility and acceptability of the technology. For the dietary adherence tests, monitors detected 86% of non-adherent events (sensitivity) in-person versus 78% of events via video chat monitoring (p=0.12), with comparable inter-rater agreement (0.88 vs. 0.85; p=0.62). However, for pill-taking, non-adherence trended towards being more easily detected in-person than by video chat (77% vs. 60%; p=0.08), with non-significantly higher inter-rater agreement (0.85 vs. 0.69; p=0.21). Survey results from the second study (N=1,076 respondents; at least a 5% response rate) indicated that 86.4% of study participants had video chatting hardware, 73.3% were comfortable using the technology; and 79.8% were willing to use it for clinical research. Given the capability of video chat technology to reduce participant burden and to outperform other adherence monitoring methods such as dietary self-report and pill counts, video chatting is a novel and highly promising platform to quantify dietary and pill-taking adherence. PMID:27753427

  19. Video chat technology to remotely quantify dietary, supplement and medication adherence in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Courtney M; Apolzan, John W; Wright, Courtney; Martin, Corby K

    2016-11-01

    We conducted two studies to test the validity, reliability, feasibility and acceptability of using video chat technology to quantify dietary and pill-taking (i.e. supplement and medication) adherence. In study 1, we investigated whether video chat technology can accurately quantify adherence to dietary and pill-taking interventions. Mock study participants ate food items and swallowed pills, while performing randomised scripted 'cheating' behaviours to mimic non-adherence. Monitoring was conducted in a cross-over design, with two monitors watching in-person and two watching remotely by Skype on a smartphone. For study 2, a twenty-two-item online survey was sent to a listserv with more than 20 000 unique email addresses of past and present study participants to assess the feasibility and acceptability of the technology. For the dietary adherence tests, monitors detected 86 % of non-adherent events (sensitivity) in-person v. 78 % of events via video chat monitoring (P=0·12), with comparable inter-rater agreement (0·88 v. 0·85; P=0·62). However, for pill-taking, non-adherence trended towards being more easily detected in-person than by video chat (77 v. 60 %; P=0·08), with non-significantly higher inter-rater agreement (0·85 v. 0·69; P=0·21). Survey results from study 2 (n 1076 respondents; ≥5 % response rate) indicated that 86·4 % of study participants had video chatting hardware, 73·3 % were comfortable using the technology and 79·8 % were willing to use it for clinical research. Given the capability of video chat technology to reduce participant burden and outperform other adherence monitoring methods such as dietary self-report and pill counts, video chatting is a novel and promising platform to quantify dietary and pill-taking adherence.

  20. Variation in medication adherence across patient behavioral segments: a multi-country study in hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Sandy, Robert; Connor, Ulla

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study determines the following for a hypertensive patient population: 1) the prevalence of patient worldview clusters; 2) differences in medication adherence across these clusters; and 3) the adherence predictive power of the clusters relative to measures of patients’ concerns over their medication’s cost, side effects, and efficacy. Methods Members from patient panels in the UK, Germany, Italy, and Spain were invited to participate in an online survey that included the Medication Adherence Report Scale-5 (MARS-5) adherence instrument and a patient segmentation instrument developed by CoMac Analytics, Inc, based on a linguistic analysis of patient talk. Subjects were screened to have a diagnosis of hypertension and treatment with at least one antihypertensive agent. Results A total of 353 patients completed the online survey in August/September 2011 and were categorized against three different behavioral domains: 1) control orientation (n=176 respondents [50%] for I, internal; n=177 respondents [50%] for E, external); 2) emotion (n=100 respondents [28%] for P, positive; n=253 respondents [72%] for N, negative); and 3) agency or ability to act on choices (n=227 respondents [64%] for H, high agency; n=126 [36%] for L, low agency). Domains were grouped into eight different clusters with EPH and IPH being the most prevalent (88 respondents [25%] in each cluster). The prevalence of other behavior clusters ranged from 6% (22 respondents, INH) to 12% (41 respondents, IPL). The proportion of patients defined as perfectly adherent (scored 25 on MARS-5) varied sharply across the segments: 51% adherent (45 of 88 respondents) for the IPH vs 8% adherent (2 of 25 respondents) classified as INL. Side effects, being employed, and stopping medicine because the patient got better were all significant determinants of adherence in a probit regression model. Conclusion By categorizing patients into worldview clusters, we identified wide differences in adherence that

  1. Adherence to Follow-Up Recommendations by Triathlon Competitors Receiving Event Medical Care

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Jarem B.; Copeli, Nikoli

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. We sought to investigate triathlete adherence to recommendations for follow-up for participants who received event medical care. Methods. Participants of the 2011 Ironman Syracuse 70.3 (Syracuse, NY) who sought evaluation and care at the designated finish line medical tent were contacted by telephone approximately 3 months after the initial encounter to measure adherence with the recommendation to seek follow-up care after event. Results. Out of 750 race participants, 35 (4.6%) athletes received event medical care. Of these 35, twenty-eight (28/35; 80%) consented to participate in the study and 17 (61%) were available on telephone follow-up. Of these 17 athletes, 11 (11/17; 65%) of participants reported that they had not followed up with a medical professional since the race. Only 5 (5/17; 29%) confirmed that they had seen a medical provider in some fashion since the race; of these, only 2 (2/17; 12%) sought formal medical follow-up resulting from the recommendation whereas the remaining athletes merely saw their medical providers coincidentally or as part of routine care. Conclusion. Only 2 (2/17; 12%) of athletes who received event medical care obtained postrace follow-up within a one-month time period following the race. Event medical care providers must be aware of potential nonadherence to follow-up recommendations. PMID:28203462

  2. Attributes Associated with Adherence to Glaucoma Medical Therapy and its Effects on Glaucoma Outcomes: An Evidence-Based Review and Potential Strategies to Improve Adherence.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Arun; Pasquale, Louis R

    2017-01-01

    The treatment paradigm in glaucoma classically starts with exhausting all medical therapy prior to proceeding with laser or incisional surgery, although laser-first and surgery-first strategies have been explored in randomized clinical trials. Although glaucoma drops are proven to work well to lower intraocular pressure, slow the conversion from ocular hypertension, and slow the progression of disease in early open angle glaucoma, adherence to treatment is likely optimum in the randomized clinical trials that support these claims. In real-world scenarios, medical therapy often fails and practitioners are forced to proceed with more invasive treatment modalities to slow the progression of this blinding disease. This review aims to take an evidence-based approach to study the risk factors for poor adherence in glaucoma patients, to determine whether poor adherence is, in fact, associated with worse outcomes, and to seek potential strategies to improve adherence in these patients.

  3. Episodic medication adherence in adolescents and young adults with perinatally acquired HIV: a within-participants approach

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Amy; Evangeli, Michael; Sturgeon, Kate; Le Prevost, Marthe; Judd, Ali

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Due to the success of antiretroviral (ART) medications, young people living with perinatally acquired HIV (PHIV+) are now surviving into adolescence and young adulthood. Understanding factors influencing ART non-adherence in this group is important in developing effective adherence interventions. Most studies of ART adherence in HIV-positive populations assess differences in adherence levels and adherence predictors between participants, over a period of time (global adherence). Many individuals living with HIV, however, including PHIV+ young people, take medication inconsistently. To investigate this pattern of adherence, a within-participants design, focussing on specific episodes of adherence and non-adherence, is suitable (episodic adherence). A within-participants design was used with 29 PHIV+ young people (17 female, median age 17 years, range 14–22 years), enrolled in the UK Adolescents and Adults Living with Perinatal HIV cohort study. Participants were eligible if they could identify one dose of medication taken and one dose they had missed in the previous two months. For each of the two episodes (one adherent, one non-adherent), behavioural factors (whom they were with, location, routine, day, reminders) and psychological factors at the time of the episode (information about medication, adherence motivation, perceived behavioural skills to adhere to medication – derived from the Information-Motivation-Behavioural Skills (IMB) Model – and affect) were assessed in a questionnaire. Non-adherence was significantly associated with weekend days (Friday to Sunday versus Monday to Thursday, p = .001), lack of routine (p = .004), and being out of the home (p = .003), but not with whom the young person was with or whether they were reminded to take medication. Non-adherence was associated with lower levels of behavioural skills (p < .001), and lower positive affect (p = .005). Non-adherence was not significantly associated with

  4. Explanatory Models and Medication Adherence in Patients with Depression in South India

    PubMed Central

    Siddappa, Adarsh Lakkur; Raman, Rajesh; Hattur, Basavana Gowdappa

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Conceptualization of depression may have bearing on treatment seeking. It may affect adherence behaviour of the patients. Aim To find out the explanatory models and their relationship with socio-demographic variables and medication adherence in patients with depression. Materials and Methods Fifty-eight consecutive patients with depression in remission were recruited as per selection criteria. Socio-demographic details were collected. Patients were assessed using Mental Distress Explanatory Model Questionnaire (MDEMQ) and Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS). Results Significant scores were observed in all dimensions of explanatory models. In the Mann-Whitney U test the patient’s marital status (MU=113.500, p=0.05, sig≤0.05, 2-tailed), and family history of mental illness (MU=165.5, p=0.03, sig≤0.05, 2-tailed) had a statistically significant group difference in the score of MDEMQ. In linear regression analysis, four predictors (MDEMQ subscales Stress, Western physiology, Non-Western physiology and Supernatural) had significantly predicted the value of MMAS (R2=0.937, f=153.558, p<0.001). Conclusion Findings of this study suggested that patients with depression harbor multidimensional explanatory model. The levels of explanatory models are inversely associated with levels of medication adherence. PMID:28274025

  5. Medication adherence and quality of life among the elderly with diabetic retinopathy 1

    PubMed Central

    Jannuzzi, Fernanda Freire; Cintra, Fernanda Aparecida; Rodrigues, Roberta Cunha Matheus; São-João, Thaís Moreira; Gallani, Maria Cecília Bueno Jayme

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to investigate the factors related to medication adherence and its relation to Health- Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) in elderly people with diabetic retinopathy. METHOD: one hundred (n=100) elderly outpatients with diabetic retinopathy taking antihypertensives and/or oral antidiabetics/insulin were interviewed. Adherence was evaluated by the adherence proportion and its association with the care taken in administrating medications and by the Morisky Scale. The National Eye Institute Visual Functioning Questionnaire (NEI VFQ-25) was used to evaluate HRQoL. RESULTS: most (58%) reported the use of 80% or more of the prescribed dose and care in utilizing the medication. The item "stopping the drug when experiencing an adverse event", from the Morisky Scale, explained 12.8% and 13.5% of the variability of adherence proportion to antihypertensives and oral antidiabetics/insulin, respectively. CONCLUSION: there was better HRQoL in the Color Vision, Driving and Social Functioning domains of the NEI VFQ-25. Individuals with lower scores on the NEI VFQ-25 and higher scores on the Morisky Scale presented greater chance to be nonadherent to the pharmacological treatment of diabetes and hypertension. PMID:25591084

  6. A Mobile Phone HIV Medication Adherence Intervention: Acceptability and Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Martin, C Andrew; Upvall, Michele J

    We present the findings of a qualitative pilot study designed to describe the experience of HIV medication adherence using a mobile phone application. Nine semi-structured focus group discussions were conducted over a 3-month period at an AIDS Services Organization in Central Texas. The data were analyzed following the principles of thematic analysis. During analysis, four themes were identified, and relations between these themes were delineated to reflect the experiences of the 23 participants. The mobile phone application, Care4Today™ Mobile Health Manager, was the intervention tool. Collection of focus group discussion outcomes over a 3-month period with baseline versus end-of-study data determined the feasibility and acceptability of this medication adherence intervention. The findings suggest that when individuals are offered the necessary resources, such as a mobile phone medication reminder application, they may have greater success in performing the behavior.

  7. Locus of pain control associated with medication adherence behaviors among patients after an orthopedic procedure

    PubMed Central

    Porto, Thaisy Mendes; Machado, Daniele Caferatti; Martins, Rafael Olívio; Galato, Dayani; Piovezan, Anna Paula

    2014-01-01

    Background Locus of pain control (LPC) is characterized by the behavior of people coping with their health problems, as a result of their own actions (internal control) or external factors or other people (external control). This parameter can be associated with medication adherence, in addition to other psychosocial factors that may also influence this behavior. This study was performed to investigate the influence of the LPC on medication adherence in patients undergoing an orthopedic procedure. Subjects and methods We conducted a prospective cohort study on patients who attended an orthopedic clinic for arthroscopy treatment. The patients’ LPC and pain intensity data were obtained on the day of admission through the use of the LPC scale and the visual analog scale (VAS), respectively, both being validated tools. After arthroscopic surgery, the patients received drug prescriptions and were reassessed after 15 days regarding treatment adherence, using the Morisky test. A P-value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results We assessed 79 individuals from both the internal LPC group (n=35) and external LPC group (n=44) and found that there were no group differences in sex, affected limb, cause of injury, repetitive strain injury, duration of pain, or pain intensity. However, there was a higher proportion of patients in the external LPC group that adhered to the prescribed medication compared with the internal LPC group (P<0.01). Conclusion The results showed that among patients who underwent an orthopedic procedure, there was a higher adherence rate to prescribed medication in the external LPC group compared with the internal LPC group. PMID:25075178

  8. ESPACOMP Medication Adherence Reporting Guidelines (EMERGE): a reactive-Delphi study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Helmy, R; Zullig, L L; Dunbar-Jacob, J; Hughes, D A; Vrijens, B; Wilson, I B; De Geest, S

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Medication adherence is fundamental to achieving optimal patient outcomes. Reporting research on medication adherence suffers from some issues—including conceptualisation, measurement and data analysis—that thwart its advancement. Using the ABC taxonomy for medication adherence as the conceptual basis, a steering committee of members of the European Society for Patient Adherence, COMpliance, and Persistence (ESPACOMP) launched an initiative to develop ESPACOMP Medication Adherence Reporting Guidelines (EMERGE). This paper is a protocol for a Delphi study that aims to build consensus among a group of topic experts regarding an item list that will support developing EMERGE. Methods and analysis This study uses a reactive-Delphi design where a group of topic experts will be asked to rate the relevance and clarity of an initial list of items, in addition to suggesting further items and/or modifications of the initial items. The initial item list, generated by the EMERGE steering committee through a structured process, consists of 26 items distributed in 2 sections: 4 items representing the taxonomy-based minimum reporting criteria, and 22 items organised according to the common reporting sections. A purposive sample of experts will be selected from relevant disciplines and diverse geographical locations. Consensus will be achieved through predefined decision rules to keep, delete or modify the items. An iterative process of online survey rounds will be carried out until consensus is reached. Ethics and dissemination An ethics approval was not required for the study according to the Swiss federal act on research involving human beings. The participating experts will be asked to give an informed consent. The results of this Delphi study will feed into EMERGE, which will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications and presentations at conferences. Additionally, the steering committee will encourage their endorsement by registering the guidelines at

  9. Medication adherence and the use of new pharmaceutical formulations: the case of levothyroxine.

    PubMed

    Scavone, Cristina; Sportiello, Liberata; Cimmaruta, Daniela; Sullo, Maria G; Vitelli, Bonaventura; Rafaniello, Concetta; Fossati, Tiziano; Rossi, Francesco

    2016-06-01

    According to World Health Organization, medication adherence refers not only to pharmacological treatment, but also extends to all behaviors which guarantee patient's health. Poor medication adherence is the main cause of low efficacy of pharmacological therapy and it is more common in chronic diseases. For example, among hypothyroid patients, it was estimated that after 5 years of levothyroxine therapy 21.5% of patients still have a TSH level >5.0 mU/L due to poor medication adherence. Moreover, it was found that almost 40% of pediatric patients had at least one episode of non-compliance following thyroidectomia. Several strategies can be adopted in order to improve medication adherence. These include self-monitoring drug therapy and self-management programs, simplified dosing regimens, directly involving pharmacists in drug therapy management, use of pharmaceutical formulations more attractive to the patient and through the therapeutic drug monitoring. The effects mediated by the thyroid gland, the clinical symptoms of hypothyroidism and the main characteristics of levothyroxine therapy have been discussed. In order to give an overview of interactions with food and drinks, pharmacokinetic characteristics, efficacy/safety profile, as well as the impact on medication adherence of levothyroxine in oral solution and soft gel capsule formulations, a literature search was performed. The results of 21 clinical studies were reviewed. Levothyroxine oral solution and soft gel capsule formulations showed irrelevant interactions with food and drinks, with a dissolution profile minimally influenced by pH variations. According to pharmacokinetic study results, bioequivalence between these formulations and levothyroxine tablets was confirmed. Regarding the efficacy/safety profile, while some studies did not detect any difference between levothyroxine formulations, other studies suggested that oral solution and soft gel capsule were associated to a higher efficacy compared to

  10. Mobilizing Your Medications: An Automated Medication Reminder Application for Mobile Phones and Hypertension Medication Adherence in a High-Risk Urban Population

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Samir; Jacobus-Kantor, Laura; Marshall, Lorraine; Ritchie, Clark; Kaplinski, Michelle; Khurana, Parvinder S.; Katz, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Hypertension frequently accompanies diabetes mellitus, worsening prognosis and complicating medical care for patients. Low medication adherence with multiple medications is a major factor in the inadequate achievement of blood pressure treatment goals. Widespread access to mobile phones offers a new opportunity to communicate with patients and enhance disease self-management. Methods We recruited 50 high-risk urban patients with hypertension, who are using at least two prescription medications for hypertension, into an open-label trial using medication reminder software on a mobile phone. Medication adherence was assessed by review of pharmacy refill rates before, during, and after availability of the medication reminder software (pre-activation, activation, and post-activation phase, respectively). Results Forty-eight patients completed the study. All subjects were insured by Medicaid, 96% were African-American, and the majority had diabetes mellitus. The proportion of days covered for each study phase was as follows: pre-activation phase = 0.54, activation phase = 0.58, and post-activation phase = 0.46. A significant difference was found between the activation and post-activation phases (p = .001). The increase in measured adherence between the pre-activation and activation phases approached significance (p =.057). Forty-six patients completed the pre- and post-Morisky medication adherence survey. The median score rose from 2.0 at baseline to 3.0 at study completion (p <.001). Average blood pressure and level of control during study period improved significantly after initiation of the study and remained improved from baseline through the course of the study. The 48 subjects who completed the study reported a high level of satisfaction with the medication reminder application at the final study visit. Conclusions A mobile-phone-based automated medication reminder system shows promise in improving medication adherence and blood pressure in high

  11. Antiretroviral drug diversion links social vulnerability to poor medication adherence in substance abusing populations.

    PubMed

    Tsuyuki, Kiyomi; Surratt, Hilary L

    2015-05-01

    Antiretroviral (ARV) medication diversion to the illicit market has been documented in South Florida, and linked to sub-optimal adherence in people living with HIV. ARV diversion reflects an unmet need for care in vulnerable populations that have difficulty engaging in consistent HIV care due to competing needs and co-morbidities. This study applies the Gelberg-Andersen behavioral model of health care utilization for vulnerable populations to understand how social vulnerability is linked to ARV diversion and adherence. Cross-sectional data were collected from a targeted sample of vulnerable people living with HIV in South Florida between 2010 and 2012 (n = 503). Structured interviews collected quantitative data on ARV diversion, access and utilization of care, and ARV adherence. Logistic regression was used to estimate the goodness-of-fit of additive models that test domain fit. Linear regression was used to estimate the effects of social vulnerability and ARV diversion on ARV adherence. The best fitting model to predict ARV diversion identifies having a low monthly income and unstable HIV care as salient enabling factors that promote ARV diversion. Importantly, health care need factors did not protect against ARV diversion, evidence that immediate competing needs are prioritized even in the face of poor health for this sample. We also find that ARV diversion provides a link between social vulnerability and sub-optimal ARV adherence, with ARV diversion and domains from the Behavioral Model explaining 25 % of the variation in ARV adherence. Our analyses reveal great need to improve engagement in HIV care for vulnerable populations by strengthening enabling factors (e.g. patient-provider relationship) to improve retention in HIV care and ARV adherence for vulnerable populations.

  12. Antiretroviral Drug Diversion Links Social Vulnerability to Poor Medication Adherence in Substance Abusing Populations

    PubMed Central

    Tsuyuki, Kiyomi; Surratt, Hilary L.

    2015-01-01

    Antiretroviral (ARV) medication diversion to the illicit market has been documented in South Florida, and linked to sub-optimal adherence in people living with HIV. ARV diversion reflects an unmet need for care in vulnerable populations that have difficulty engaging in consistent HIV care due to competing needs and co-morbidities. This study applies the Gelberg-Andersen Behavioral Model of Health Care Utilization for Vulnerable Populations to understand how social vulnerability is linked to ARV diversion and adherence. Cross-sectional data were collected from a targeted sample of vulnerable people living with HIV in South Florida between 2010 and 2012 (n=503). Structured interviews collected quantitative data on ARV diversion, access and utilization of care, and ARV adherence. Logistic regression was used to estimate the goodness-of-fit of additive models that test domain fit. Linear regression was used to estimate the effects of social vulnerability and ARV diversion on ARV adherence. The best fitting model to predict ARV diversion identifies having a low monthly income and unstable HIV care as salient enabling factors that promote ARV diversion. Importantly, health care need factors did not protect against ARV diversion, evidence that immediate competing needs are prioritized even in the face of poor health for this sample. We also find that ARV diversion provides a link between social vulnerability and sub-optimal ARV adherence, with ARV diversion and domains from the Behavioral Model explaining 25% of the variation in ARV adherence. Our analyses reveal great need to improve engagement in HIV care for vulnerable populations by strengthening enabling factors (e.g. patient-provider relationship) to improve retention in HIV care and ARV adherence for vulnerable populations. PMID:25893656

  13. The Effect of Group Psychoeducation Program on Medication Adherence in Patients with Bipolar Mood Disorders: a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Rahmani, Farnaz; Ebrahimi, Hossein; Ranjbar, Fatemeh; Razavi, Seyed Sajjad; Asghari, Elnaz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Medication nonadherence is highly prevalent in patients with bipolar disorders and often results in worsening disease prognosis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of group psychoeducation on medication adherence in female patients with bipolar mood disorder type I. Methods: This randomized controlled trial was conducted on 76 patients with bipolar mood disorder admitted in female psychiatric wards of Razi teaching hospital, Tabriz, Iran. The participants were selected by convenience sampling method and were randomly assigned to experimental and control groups. Patients in experimental group received 10 continuous 90 minutes sessions of psychoeducation, two times a week. Medication adherence was measured using the medicine check list and medication adherence rating scale (MARS) before and after intervention. Data analysis was performed with SPSS ver.13. Results: There was no significant difference between two groups regarding medication adherence before the intervention. After the study intervention, the mean scores of medication adherence check list and medication adherence rating scale in the experimental group were significantly higher than the control group. Conclusion: Since group psychoeducation was effective in improving patients' medication adherence, it could be recommended for psychiatric nurses to apply this intervention in the clinical setting. PMID:28032073

  14. Health care providers' support of patients' autonomy, phosphate medication adherence, race and gender in end stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Umeukeje, Ebele M; Merighi, Joseph R; Browne, Teri; Wild, Marcus; Alsmaan, Hafez; Umanath, Kausik; Lewis, Julia B; Wallston, Kenneth A; Cavanaugh, Kerri L

    2016-12-01

    This study was designed to assess dialysis subjects' perceived autonomy support association with phosphate binder medication adherence, race and gender. A multi-site cross-sectional study was conducted among 377 dialysis subjects. The Health Care Climate (HCC) Questionnaire assessed subjects' perception of their providers' autonomy support for phosphate binder use, and adherence was assessed by the self-reported Morisky Medication Adherence Scale. Serum phosphorus was obtained from the medical record. Regression models were used to examine independent factors of medication adherence, serum phosphorus, and differences by race and gender. Non-white HCC scores were consistently lower compared with white subjects' scores. No differences were observed by gender. Reported phosphate binder adherence was associated with HCC score, and also with phosphorus control. No significant association was found between HCC score and serum phosphorus. Autonomy support, especially in non-white end stage renal disease subjects, may be an appropriate target for culturally informed strategies to optimize mineral bone health.

  15. [Medical books in the possession of Canadian health professionals in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries].

    PubMed

    Lessard, R

    1995-01-01

    This study, based on the data found in notarized inventories of the deceased, ex-libris or bookplates, and listings of books in institutional libraries, shows clearly that circulation of medical books, generally imported from Europe, was next to non-existent in the general public but growing steadily in the Canadian medical corps during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. This growth is proof of the increasing professionalization of the medical corps and institutionalization of medical know-how and expertise during that period.

  16. Relationship between depression and medication adherence in cardiovascular disease: the perfect challenge for the integrated care team

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Carly M; Gathright, Emily C; Garcia, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Many individuals with cardiovascular disease (CVD) experience depression that is associated with poor health outcomes, which may be because of medication nonadherence. Several factors influence medication adherence and likely influence the relationship between depression and medication adherence in CVD patients. This comprehensive study reviews the existing literature on depression and medication adherence in CVD patients, addresses the methods of and problems with measuring medication adherence, and explains why the integrated care team is uniquely situated to improve the outcomes in depressed CVD patients. This paper also explores how the team can collaboratively target depressive symptoms and medication-taking behavior in routine clinical care. Finally, it suggests the limitations to the integrated care approach, identifies targets for future research, and discusses the implications for CVD patients and their families. PMID:28352161

  17. Relationship between depression and medication adherence in cardiovascular disease: the perfect challenge for the integrated care team.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Carly M; Gathright, Emily C; Garcia, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Many individuals with cardiovascular disease (CVD) experience depression that is associated with poor health outcomes, which may be because of medication nonadherence. Several factors influence medication adherence and likely influence the relationship between depression and medication adherence in CVD patients. This comprehensive study reviews the existing literature on depression and medication adherence in CVD patients, addresses the methods of and problems with measuring medication adherence, and explains why the integrated care team is uniquely situated to improve the outcomes in depressed CVD patients. This paper also explores how the team can collaboratively target depressive symptoms and medication-taking behavior in routine clinical care. Finally, it suggests the limitations to the integrated care approach, identifies targets for future research, and discusses the implications for CVD patients and their families.

  18. Improving Medication Adherence and Health Care Outcomes in a Commercial Population through a Community Pharmacy

    PubMed Central

    Akinbosoye, Osayi E.; Grana, James; Hill, Jerrold; Wade, Rolin L

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim was to evaluate the impact of a multifaceted set of medication management interventions offered by a community pharmacy on adherence, health care utilization, and costs within a commercial population. Patients initiating therapy within 16 drug classes from February 7, 2013, to October 6, 2013, were offered various adherence interventions by Walgreens pharmacy. Patients were linked deterministically to IMS medical and prescription databases for 6-month pre- and post-index data analysis. Walgreens patients (intervention) were matched to patients using other pharmacies (control) on drug class, index date, baseline demographics, clinical factors, utilization, and costs. Outcomes were evaluated at the intent-to-treat level using post-index differences and generalized estimating equations (GEE) regression model. Paired t tests (continuous variables) and McNemar's test (dichotomous variables) were used to determine the significance of estimated model coefficients at α = 0.05. The groups (n = 72,410 each) had similar age (47.1 vs. 45.7 years), sex (41.2% vs. 40.2% male), and disease burden (0.52 vs. 0.40 mean Charlson comorbidity index). In the 6-month post-index period, the intervention group had 3.0% greater medication adherence, 1.8% fewer hospital admissions, 2.7% fewer emergency room (ER) visits, and 0.53 fewer mean outpatient visits compared to the control group (all P < 0.0001). The intervention group incurred significantly lower GEE-adjusted pharmacy costs (−$92), outpatient costs (−$120), ER costs (−$38), and total health care costs (−$226.07) (all P < 0.0001), and higher inpatient costs ($86, P < 0.004) per patient. A multifaceted set of medication management interventions offered by a community pharmacy were associated with patients in a commercial population having significantly higher medication adherence and lower health care utilization and costs. PMID:27035728

  19. Interplay between Oral Hypoglycemic Medication Adherence and Quality of Life among Elderly Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients

    PubMed Central

    Manan, Mohamed Mansor; Husin, Akhma Radzuanna; Alkhoshaiban, Ali Saleh; Al-Worafi, Yaser Mohammed Ali

    2014-01-01

    Background: Adherence to medications is an important factor that contributes to therapeutic success. With the current increase in the elderly population, information relating to adherence to treatment and quality of life (QoL) of diabetic elderly patients will help the healthcare provider to improve their treatment. Thus, this study aims to determine the factors affecting adherence to medications and the consequence of non adherence to QoL. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study using validated Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS) Questionnaire. This study was conducted to assess the level of adherence on oral hypoglycemic medications (OHM) and quality of life of the Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) elderly patients in an urban health centre in Malaysia. A retrospective medication record review was also conducted to collect and confirm data on patients’ demographics, diagnosis, treatments, and outcomes. Results: One hundred and seventy nine patients were recruited in this study. Median adherence score was 7.75 (IQR 6.50- 8.00). Good adherer was observed in 48.00% of the participants. A Chi-square test indicated significant correlation between adherence and HbA1c (p= 0.010). The mean elderly diabetes mellitus Problem Areas in Diabetes (PAID) score was 6.30 ±SD 8.50. A significant inversed association was observed between PAID score and the level of adherence (r = - 0.175, p< 0.05). A highly significant difference in the low adherence group (p = 0.002). PAID score significantly correlated with age (years), female gender and HbA1c (p <0.05). A negative association between HbA1c levels and adherence was identified where a 1% increase in HbA1c was associated with a 30% decrease in the likelihood of being adherent. Conclusion: A medication adherence rate of 48% was obtained among elderly T2DM patients treated in the primary care clinic. This study showed that HbA1c is a relevant tool to assess patient glycemic control and adherence

  20. Difference in Effectiveness of Medication Adherence Intervention by Health Literacy Level

    PubMed Central

    Owen-Smith, Ashli A; Smith, David H; Rand, Cynthia S; Tom, Jeffrey O; Laws, Reesa; Waterbury, Amy; Williams, Andrew; Vollmer, William M

    2016-01-01

    Context: There is little research investigating whether health information technologies, such as interactive voice recognition, are effective ways to deliver information to individuals with lower health literacy. Objective: Determine the extent to which the impact of an interactive voice recognition-based intervention to improve medication adherence appeared to vary by participants’ health literacy level. Design: Promoting Adherence to Improve Effectiveness of Cardiovascular Disease Therapies (PATIENT) was a randomized clinical trial designed to test the impact, compared with usual care, of 2 technology-based interventions that leveraged interactive voice recognition to promote medication adherence. A 14% subset of participants was sent a survey that included questions on health literacy. This exploratory analysis was limited to the 833 individuals who responded to the survey and provided data on health literacy. Main Outcome Measures: Adherence to statins and/or angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and/or angiotensin II receptor blockers. Results: Although intervention effects did not differ significantly by level of health literacy, the data were suggestive of differential intervention effects by health literacy level. Conclusions: The differences in intervention effects for high vs low health literacy in this exploratory analysis are consistent with the hypothesis that individuals with lower health literacy may derive greater benefit from this type of intervention compared with individuals with higher health literacy. Additional studies are needed to further explore this finding. PMID:27352409

  1. Synergistic Effects of Food Insecurity and Drug Use on Medication Adherence among People Living with HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yiyun; Kalichman, Seth C.

    2014-01-01

    Food insecurity and drug use are closely connected in the context of poverty, and both have been suggested to interfere with HIV medication adherence among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWH). Yet the potential interaction between the two factors on adherence has not been examined. For this study we collected longitudinal data on HIV medication adherence among PLWH in Atlanta, GA, to assess a possible synergistic effect between the two factors on HIV medication adherence. People informed about the study came to the research site and completed an audio computer-assisted self-interview and instructions for pill counting. Over the next five weeks participants received three unscheduled follow-up phone assessments conducted two weeks apart to collect pill counts of their HIV medication. The prevalence of food insecurity was 60% (488) and that of drug use was 33% (274) in the sample of 809 participants. Among 770 participants who completed follow-up phone assessments, both food insecurity and drug use were associated with HIV medication adherence after adjusting for socio-demographic characteristics. The negative association between drug use and adherence persisted after further adjusting for health-related characteristics. Moreover, drug use appeared to moderate the effect of food insufficiency on adherence, with drug users who were food insufficient being the least likely to achieve 85% adherence. Results from the current study demonstrate a synergism between food insecurity and drug use that may impede adherence among PLWH. The findings imply that the disruptive effects of food insecurity and drug use on adherence are likely to be intensified with the presence of each other, and encourage interventions to address the problem of HIV medication adherence from a multi-faceted perspective that takes into account detrimental combination of problem factors. PMID:25533641

  2. Modeling Determinants of Medication Attitudes and Poor Adherence in Early Nonaffective Psychosis: Implications for Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Richard J.; Nordentoft, Merete; Haddock, Gillian; Arango, Celso; Fleischhacker, W. Wolfgang; Glenthøj, Birte; Leboyer, Marion; Leucht, Stefan; Leweke, Markus; McGuire, Phillip; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Rujescu, Dan; Sommer, Iris E.; Kahn, René S.; Lewis, Shon W.

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to design a multimodal intervention to improve adherence following first episode psychosis, consistent with current evidence. Existing literature identified medication attitudes, insight, and characteristics of support as important determinants of adherence to medication: we examined medication attitudes, self-esteem, and insight in an early psychosis cohort better to understand their relationships. Existing longitudinal data from 309 patients with early Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, nonaffective psychosis (83% first episode) were analyzed to test the hypothesis that medication attitudes, while meaningfully different from “insight,” correlated with insight and self-esteem, and change in each influenced the others. Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, Birchwood Insight Scale, and Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale insight were assessed at presentation, after 6 weeks and 3 and 18 months. Drug Attitudes Inventory (DAI) and treatment satisfaction were rated from 6 weeks onward. Structural equation models of their relationships were compared. Insight measures’ and DAI’s predictive validity were compared against relapse, readmission, and remission. Analysis found five latent constructs best fitted the data: medication attitudes, self-esteem, accepting need for treatment, self-rated insight, and objective insight. All were related and each affected the others as it changed, except self-esteem and medication attitudes. Low self-reported insight at presentation predicted readmission. Good 6-week insight (unlike drug attitudes) predicted remission. Literature review and data modeling indicated that a multimodal intervention using motivational interviewing, online psychoeducation, and SMS text medication reminders to enhance adherence without damaging self-concept was feasible and appropriate. PMID:25750247

  3. Self-Assessment of Adherence to Medication: A Case Study in Campania Region Community-Dwelling Population

    PubMed Central

    Menditto, Enrica; Guerriero, Francesca; Orlando, Valentina; Crola, Catherine; Di Somma, Carolina; Illario, Maddalena; Morisky, Donald E.; Colao, Annamaria

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of the study was to assess self-reported medication adherence measure in patients selected during a health education and health promotion focused event held in the Campania region. The study also assessed sociodemographic determinants of adherence. Methods. An interviewer assisted survey was conducted to assess adherence using the Italian version of the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8). Participants older than 18 years were interviewed by pharmacists while waiting for free-medical checkup. Results. A total of 312 participants were interviewed during the Health Campus event. A total of 187 (59.9%) had low adherence to medications. Pearson's bivariate correlation showed positive association between the MMAS-8 score and gender, educational level and smoking (P < 0.05). A multivariable analysis showed that the level of education and smoking were independent predictors of adherence. Individuals with an average level of education (odds ratio (OR), 2.21, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.08–4.52) and nonsmoker (odds ratio (OR) 1.87, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.04–3.35) were found to be more adherent to medication than those with a lower level of education and smoking. Conclusion. The analysis showed very low prescription adherence levels in the interviewed population. The level of education was a relevant predictor associated with that result. PMID:26346487

  4. Curing the disobedient patient: medication adherence programs as pharmaceutical marketing tools.

    PubMed

    Lamkin, Matt; Elliott, Carl

    2014-01-01

    Pharmaceutical companies have long focused their marketing strategies on getting doctors to write more prescriptions. But they lose billions in potential sales when patients do not take their prescribed drugs. Getting patients to "adhere" to drug therapies that have unpleasant side effects and questionable efficacy requires more than mere ad campaigns urging patients to talk to their doctors. It requires changing patients' beliefs and attitudes about their medications through repeated contact from people patients trust. Since patients do not trust drug companies, these companies are delivering their marketing messages through nurses, pharmacists, and even other patients--leveraging patients' trust in these intermediaries to persuade them to consume more brand name drugs. Armed with the premise that better adherence improves patients' health, drug companies justify manipulating patients by reframing reasonable decisions to decline therapy as pathological, and promote brand loyalty in the guise of offering medical care.

  5. Temporal patterns of adherence to medications and behavioral treatment and their relationship to patient characteristics and treatment response

    PubMed Central

    Gueorguieva, Ralitza; Wu, Ran; Krystal, John H.; Donovan, Dennis; O’Malley, Stephanie S.

    2013-01-01

    Background The primary analyses of the COMBINE study revealed significant naltrexone and Combined Behavioral Intervention (CBI) main effects on drinking outcomes but failed to find additional benefits of the combination of treatments. Investigating differences in patterns of adherence over time may shed light on the treatment effects in COMBINE. The goals of the study were to identify trajectories of medication adherence and participation in CBI, to estimate predictive and moderating effects of adherence trajectories on drinking outcomes and to characterize subjects in adherence trajectories. The results of these analyses may suggest approaches to improving adherence in order to ultimately improve treatment outcome. Methods We used a trajectory-based approach to identify patterns of treatment adherence separately for naltrexone, acamprosate and CBI adherence. Logistic regression and general linear models assessed associations among adherence trajectories, drinking outcomes and patient characteristics. Results Three trajectories of adherence were identified for each treatment: “excellent adherers”, “late non-adherers” and “early non-adherers” and there was good agreement among adherence trajectories with different treatments. “Excellent adherers” had significantly higher percent days abstinent (PDA) and lower percent heavy drinking days (PHDD). CBI significantly decreased PHDD for subjects on acamprosate in the “early non-adherers with medication” trajectory (p=0.01). Either naltrexone or acamprosate was associated with lower PHDD than placebo for “early non-adherers with CBI” (p<0.01). Receiving active medication decreased the likelihood to be in the excellent medication adherence trajectory. Younger age, greater drinking severity, dissatisfaction with the medicine and session frequency, adverse events and lack of benefit were related to less favorable medication adherence trajectories. “Excellent adherers with CBI” were significantly

  6. Effect of drug reminder packaging on medication adherence: a systematic review revealing research gaps

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This was a systematic review of the literature in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement. Evidence mapping was used to reveal the effect of drug reminder packaging on medication adherence, to identify research gaps and to make suggestions for future research. Methods PubMed, Embase, CINAHL and PsycINFO were searched with an end date of September 2013 using the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) term ‘medication adherence’ and 20 different search terms for ‘drug reminder packaging’, limited to the English and German languages. Additional references were identified through cross-referencing. All prospective controlled trials with an intervention using drug reminder packaging for patients taking at least one medication without the assistance of a health-care professional were included in the evidence mapping of the effect of drug reminder packaging on adherence and outcomes according to the Economic, Clinical and Humanistic Outcomes (ECHO) model. Results A total of 30 studies met the inclusion criteria: 10 randomized controlled trials, 19 controlled clinical trials and 1 cohort study. Drug reminder packaging had a significant effect on at least one adherence parameter in 17 studies (57%). The methodological quality was strong in five studies. Two studies provided complete information. Clear research gaps emerged. Conclusions Overall, the studies showed a positive effect of drug reminder packaging on adherence and clinical outcomes. However, poor reporting and important gaps like missing humanistic and economic outcomes and neglected safety issues limit the drawing of firm conclusions. Suggestions are made for future research. PMID:24661495

  7. Test of a Web-Based Program to Improve Adherence to HIV Medications

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Royer F.; Billings, Douglas W.; Kaplan, Seth; Murray, David; Safren, Steven; Goforth, Justin; Spencer, Joy

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of a web-based version of the Life-Steps intervention combined with modules for stress reduction and mood management, designed to improve medication adherence among HIV infected individuals. 168 HIV+ adults were randomized into either the Life-Steps program or a waitlist control condition. All participants completed a baseline assessment and provided a 2-week electronic pill (MEMS) cap baseline reading. Follow up data collection was conducted at 3, 6 and 9 months. Patients in the web-based Life-Steps condition had significantly higher antiretroviral medication adherence rates than patients in the control group over the nine-month period as measured by the MEMS cap. In addition, analysis of viral load data indicated that the program also resulted in a significant decrease in viral load. These findings indicate that a web-based Life-Steps program can be a useful and implementable tool for helping patients living with HIV maintain medication adherence. PMID:23760634

  8. Factors that Affect the Adherence to ADHD Medications during a Treatment Continuation Period in Children and Adolescents: A Nationwide Retrospective Cohort Study Using Korean Health Insurance Data from 2007 to 2011

    PubMed Central

    Bhang, Soo-Young; Kwack, Young Sook; Joung, Yoo-Sook; Lee, Soyoung Irene; Kim, Bongseog; Sohn, Seok Han; Chung, Un-Sun; Yang, Jaewon; Hong, Minha; Bahn, Geon Ho; Choi, Hyung-yun; Oh, In Hwan; Lee, Yeon Jung

    2017-01-01

    Objective Several factors, such as male gender, older age, type of insurance, comorbid conditions, and medication type, have been associated with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) medication adherence rates, but the results have been inconsistent. We analyzed data to answer several questions: 1) How old were patients who first refilled their treatment medications used primarily for ADHD, regardless of the medication type? 2) What socio-demographic factors are associated with medication adherence? 3) What medical conditions, such as medication type and comorbid diagnosis, influence adherence? Methods We analyzed National Health Insurance data, which comprised continuously enrolled Korean National Medical Insurance children (6–18 years) with at least 2 ADHD prescription claims (January 2008–December 2011). The persistence of use regarding the days of continuous therapy without a 30-day gap were measured continuously and dichotomously. Adherence, using a medication possession ratio (MPR), was measured dichotomously (80% cut-off). Results The cumulative incidence of index cases that initiated medication refills for ADHD treatment during the 4 year period was 0.85%. The patients who exhibited a MPR greater than 80 comprised approximately 66%. The medication type, high school age groups, physician speciality, treatment at a private clinic, and comorbid conditions were associated with medication adherence during continuous treatment using a multivariate analysis. Conclusion A better understanding of ADHD treatment patterns may lead to initiatives targeted at the improvement of treatment adherence and persistence. Other factors, including the severity, family history, costs, type of comorbidities, and switching patterns, will be analyzed in future studies. PMID:28326113

  9. A counselor in your pocket: feasibility of mobile health tailored messages to support HIV medication adherence

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Paul F; Carrington, Jane M; Schmiege, Sarah J; Starr, Whitney; Reeder, Blaine

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Medication adherence is a major challenge in HIV treatment. New mobile technologies such as smartphones facilitate the delivery of brief tailored messages to promote adherence. However, the best approach for tailoring messages is unknown. Persons living with HIV (PLWH) might be more receptive to some messages than others based on their current psychological state. Methods We recruited 37 PLWH from a parent study of motivational states and adherence. Participants completed smartphone-based surveys at a random time every day for 2 weeks, then immediately received intervention or control tailored messages, depending on random assignment. After 2 weeks in the initial condition, participants received the other condition in a crossover design. Intervention messages were tailored to match PLWH’s current psychological state based on five variables – control beliefs, mood, stress, coping, and social support. Control messages were tailored to create a mismatch between message framing and participants’ current psychological state. We evaluated intervention feasibility based on acceptance, ease of use, and usefulness measures. We also used pilot randomized controlled trial methods to test the intervention’s effect on adherence, which was measured using electronic caps that recorded pill-bottle openings. Results Acceptance was high based on 76% enrollment and 85% satisfaction. Participants found the hardware and software easy to use. However, attrition was high at 59%, and usefulness ratings were slightly lower. The most common complaint was boredom. Unexpectedly, there was no difference between mismatched and matched messages’ effects, but each group showed a 10%–15% improvement in adherence after crossing to the opposite study condition. Conclusion Although smartphone-based tailored messaging was feasible and participants had clinically meaningful improvements in adherence, the mechanisms of change require further study. Possible explanations might include

  10. Relationship between patients’ knowledge and medication adherence among patients with hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Jankowska-Polańska, Beata; Uchmanowicz, Izabella; Dudek, Krzysztof; Mazur, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between knowledge on arterial hypertension (AH) and its management, and adherence to pharmaceutical treatment. Methods The study included 233 patients diagnosed with AH and treated with hypotensive drugs for at least 1 year. The 8-item © Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) and the Hypertension Knowledge-Level Scale (HK-LS) were used. Results Sixty-three percent of the patients had a low level of knowledge on AH, with the smallest proportion of correct answers provided for items related to non-pharmaceutical treatment, diet, hypertension definition, and drug adherence. When compared to patients with a high level of knowledge, those with a low knowledge had lower scores in the MMAS (6.45±1.45 vs 7.08±1.04; P=0.038). Multiple-factor analysis showed that statistically significant independent determinants of good adherence included a high level of knowledge (β=0.208; P=0.001), non-pharmaceutical treatment (β=0.182; P=0.006), and frequent blood pressure measurements (β=0.183; P=0.004). The most significant factor in MMAS was knowledge in the “drug adherence” domain (ρ=0.303; P<0.001). Conclusion Patients’ knowledge on hypertension is a significant independent determinant of good adherence. Other independent determinants include non-pharmaceutical treatment and regular blood pressure measurements. Implication for practice The identification of knowledge deficits as a factor contributing to lack of adherence and poor hypertension control remains a key challenge for multidisciplinary team caring for patients with hypertension. PMID:27994443

  11. Medication Adherence in Children and Adolescents with HIV Infection: Associations with Behavioral Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Paige; Montepiedra, Grace; McCabe, Marie; Nichols, Sharon; Sirois, Patricia A.; Storm, Deborah; Farley, John; Kammerer, Betsy

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The impact of behavioral functioning on medication adherence in children with perinatally acquired HIV infection is not well-explored, but has important implications for intervention. This report addresses the relationship between behavioral functioning and child self-report or caregiver report of medication adherence among children and adolescents enrolled in Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group Protocol 219C (conducted 2000–2007). A total of 1134 participants, aged 3–17 years, received a behavioral evaluation and adherence assessment. Complete adherence was defined as taking 100% of prescribed antiretroviral medications during three days preceding the study visit. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to evaluate associations between adherence and behavioral functioning, adjusting for potential confounders, including demographic, psychosocial, and health factors. Children demonstrated higher than expected rates of behavioral impairment (≈7% expected with T > 65) in the areas of conduct problems (14%, z = 7.0, p < 0.001), learning problems (22%, z = 12.2, p < 0.001), somatic complaints (22%, z = 12.6, p < 0.001), impulsivity-hyperactivity (20%, z = 11.1, p < 0.001), and hyperactivity (19%, z = 10.6, p < 0.001). Children with behavioral impairment in one or more areas had significantly increased odds of nonadherence [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 1.49, p = 0.04]. The odds of nonadherence were significantly higher for those with conduct problems and general hyperactivity (aOR = 2.03, p = 0.005 and aOR = 1.68, p = 0.02, respectively). Psychosocial and health factors, such as recent stressful life events and higher HIV RNA levels, were also associated with nonadherence. Knowledge of behavioral, health, and social influences affecting the child and family should guide the development of appropriate, evidence-based interventions for medication adherence. PMID:21323533

  12. Medication adherence in children and adolescents with HIV infection: associations with behavioral impairment.

    PubMed

    Malee, Kathleen; Williams, Paige; Montepiedra, Grace; McCabe, Marie; Nichols, Sharon; Sirois, Patricia A; Storm, Deborah; Farley, John; Kammerer, Betsy

    2011-03-01

    The impact of behavioral functioning on medication adherence in children with perinatally acquired HIV infection is not well-explored, but has important implications for intervention. This report addresses the relationship between behavioral functioning and child self-report or caregiver report of medication adherence among children and adolescents enrolled in Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group Protocol 219C (conducted 2000-2007). A total of 1134 participants, aged 3-17 years, received a behavioral evaluation and adherence assessment. Complete adherence was defined as taking 100% of prescribed antiretroviral medications during three days preceding the study visit. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to evaluate associations between adherence and behavioral functioning, adjusting for potential confounders, including demographic, psychosocial, and health factors. Children demonstrated higher than expected rates of behavioral impairment (≈7% expected with T > 65) in the areas of conduct problems (14%, z = 7.0, p < 0.001), learning problems (22%, z = 12.2, p < 0.001), somatic complaints (22%, z = 12.6, p < 0.001), impulsivity-hyperactivity (20%, z = 11.1, p < 0.001), and hyperactivity (19%, z = 10.6, p < 0.001). Children with behavioral impairment in one or more areas had significantly increased odds of nonadherence [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 1.49, p = 0.04]. The odds of nonadherence were significantly higher for those with conduct problems and general hyperactivity (aOR = 2.03, p = 0.005 and aOR = 1.68, p = 0.02, respectively). Psychosocial and health factors, such as recent stressful life events and higher HIV RNA levels, were also associated with nonadherence. Knowledge of behavioral, health, and social influences affecting the child and family should guide the development of appropriate, evidence-based interventions for medication adherence.

  13. Improving Medication Adherence and Health Outcomes in Older Adults: An Evidence-Based Review of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Marcum, Zachary A.; Murray, Michael D.

    2017-01-01

    Background Poor medication adherence is a major public health problem in older adults often resulting in negative health outcomes. Objective The objective of this review was to provide an updated summary of evidence from randomized controlled studies to determine whether interventions aimed at improving medication adherence also improve the health outcomes of older adults residing in community-based settings. Methods Articles that assessed medication adherence interventions and related health outcomes in elderly individuals were identified through searches of MEDLINE (1970–June 2016), the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (through to June 2016), and Google Scholar. Across the 12 included studies, interventions were grouped into three main categories: behavioral/educational (n = 3), pharmacist-led (n = 7), and reminder/simplification (n = 2). Results Among the behavioral/educational intervention studies, two showed improvements in both adherence and related health outcomes, whereas one found no changes in adherence or health outcomes. Among the pharmacist-led studies, three showed improvements in both adherence and related health outcomes, while three reported no changes in adherence or health outcomes. One found an improvement in adherence but not health outcomes. Among the reminder/simplification studies, both studies reported improvements in adherence without a significant impact on related health outcomes. Conclusion This evidence-based review of medication adherence interventions in older adults revealed promising strategies in the larger context of a largely mixed body of literature. Future patient-centered and multidisciplinary interventions should be developed and tested using evidence-based principles to improve medication adherence and health outcomes in older adults. PMID:28074410

  14. The association between Self-Reported Medication Adherence scores and systolic blood pressure control: a SPRINT baseline data study.

    PubMed

    Haley, William E; Gilbert, Olivia N; Riley, Robert F; Newman, Jill C; Roumie, Christianne L; Whittle, Jeffrey; Kronish, Ian M; Tamariz, Leonardo; Wiggers, Alan; Morisky, Donald E; Conroy, Molly B; Kovalik, Eugene; Kressin, Nancy R; Muntner, Paul; Goff, David C

    2016-11-01

    We examined baseline data from the Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT) to investigate whether medication adherence, measured by the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8), was associated with systolic blood pressure (SBP) and whether MMAS-8 score and number of antihypertensive medications interacted in influencing SBP. A total of 8435 SPRINT participants were included: 21.2% had low adherence (MMAS-8: <6); 40.0% had medium adherence (6 to <8); and 38.8% had high adherence (8). SBP was <140 mm Hg in 54.6%; 140-160 mm Hg in 36.6%; and >160 mm Hg in 8.8%. In multivariable regression, medium vs. low adherence weakly associated with lower SBP (odds ratio: 1.17; confidence interval: 1.04, 1.31). SPRINT eligibility criteria should be considered when interpreting results. Efforts to understand and enhance adherence are crucial to improve population health, and using self-report instruments might be considered for predicting treatment adherence and response in future efficacy trials and for identifying patients for adherence support in clinical practice.

  15. The Effectiveness of Mobile Phone Text Messaging in Improving Medication Adherence for Patients with Chronic Diseases: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ershad Sarabi, Roghayeh; Sadoughi, Farahnaz; Jamshidi Orak, Roohangiz; Bahaadinbeigy, Kambiz

    2016-01-01

    Context Medication non-adherence is a commonly observed problem in the self-administration of treatment, regardless of the disease type. Text messaging reminders, as electronic reminders, provide an opportunity to improve medication adherence. In this study, we aimed to provide evidence addressing the question of whether text message reminders were effective in improving patients’ adherence to medication. Evidence Acquisition We carried out a systematic literature search, using the five electronic bibliographic databases: PubMed, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and the Cochrane central register of controlled trials. Studies were included on the basis of whether they examined the benefits and effects of short-message service (SMS) interventions on medication adherence. Results The results of this systematic review indicated that text messaging interventions have improved patients’ medication adherence rate (85%, 29.34). Included in the review, those who had problems with adherence, or those whom text messaging was most helpful had HIV, asthma, diabetes, schizophrenia and heart disease (73.5%). The period of intervention varied from 1 week to 14 months. The most common study design was randomized controlled trials (RCTs) (66%) carried out in the developed countries. Conclusions This study demonstrated the potential of mobile phone text messaging for medication non-adherence problem solving. PMID:27437126

  16. Situational Temptation for HIV Medication Adherence in High-Risk Youth

    PubMed Central

    Naar-King, Sylvie; Murphy, Debra A.; Parsons, Jeffrey T.; Huszti, Heather

    2011-01-01

    Abstract This study explored the role of situational temptation, a component of self-efficacy, in adolescent and young adult (ages 16–24) HIV medication adherence by assessing participants' perceptions of their temptation to miss medications in various situations (e.g., when medication causes physical side effects, when there is fear of disclosure of HIV status). Youth (n = 186; 83% African American) were participants in a multisite clinical trial examining the efficacy of a motivational intervention. Data were collected using computer-assisted personal interviewing. Youth believed the most tempting reasons or situations that might lead them to miss their HIV medications to be symptoms (if the medicine caused you to have other physical symptoms) and sick (if the medicine made you sick to your stomach or made you throw up or if it tasted bad), but these were not significantly associated with nonadherence. This suggests disconnection between youths' expectations of temptation and actual tempting situations associated with nonadherence. Situational temptations associated with nonadherence included lack of social support, needing a break from medications, and not seeing a need for medications. Interventions to improve adherence should consider perceptions of HIV medications, particularly the benefits of taking medications and expectations of physical symptoms. Interventionists and clinicians should consider situations that may tempt youth to miss doses of medication and help youth gain insight into these temptations. Emerging methods, such as Ecological Momentary Assessment (e.g., daily diaries, cell phone text messaging), may be useful in gaining insight into the day-to-day experience of youth living with HIV. PMID:21162691

  17. The Chinese Life-Steps Program: A Cultural Adaptation of a Cognitive-Behavioral Intervention to Enhance HIV Medication Adherence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiu, Cheng-Shi; Chen, Wei-Ti; Simoni, Jane; Fredriksen-Goldsen, Karen; Zhang, Fujie; Zhou, Hongxin

    2013-01-01

    China is considered to be the new frontier of the global AIDS pandemic. Although effective treatment for HIV is becoming widely available in China, adherence to treatment remains a challenge. This study aimed to adapt an intervention promoting HIV-medication adherence--favorably evaluated in the West--for Chinese HIV-positive patients. The…

  18. Mediators and Moderators of Improvements in Medication Adherence: Secondary Analysis of a Community Health Worker-Led Diabetes Medication Self-Management Support Program.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Rebecca; Choi, Hwajung; Mase, Rebecca; Fagerlin, Angela; Spencer, Michael; Heisler, Michele

    2016-07-14

    Objective In a randomized controlled trial we compared two models of community health worker-led diabetes medication decision support for low-income Latino and African American adults with diabetes. Most outcomes were improved when community health workers used either an interactive e-Health tool or print materials. This article investigates mediators and moderators of improved medication adherence in these two models. Method Because both programs significantly improved satisfaction with medication information, medication knowledge, and decisional conflict, we examined whether improvements in each of these outcomes in turn were associated with improvements in self-reported medication adherence, and if so, whether these improvements were mediated by improvements in diabetes self-efficacy or diabetes distress. Potential moderators of improvement included gender, race/ethnicity, age, education, insulin use, health literacy, and baseline self-efficacy, diabetes distress, and A1c. Results A total of 176 participants (94%) completed all assessments. After adjusting for potential confounders, only increased satisfaction with medication information was correlated with improved medication adherence (p = .024). Improved self-efficacy, but not diabetes distress, was associated with improvements in both satisfaction with medication information and medication adherence. However, the Sobel-Goodman Mediation test did not support improvements in self-efficacy as a mechanism by which improved satisfaction led to better adherence. None of the examined variables achieved statistical significance as moderators. Conclusions Improvements in satisfaction with medication information but not in medication knowledge or decision conflict were associated with improvements in medication adherence. Interventions that target low-income ethnic and racial minorities may need to focus on increasing participants' satisfaction with information provided on diabetes medications and not just improving

  19. Adherence to antiepilepsy drug therapy.

    PubMed

    Faught, Edward

    2012-11-01

    Adherence to antiepilepsy drug (AED) therapy is critical for effective disease management, yet adherence and persistence rates are low due to several barriers. The definitions of adherence (80% rate of total pills taken, medication possession ratio, and days covered by prescriptions filled) and methods of measurement (patient self-reports, serum drug levels, pill counts, electronic bottle tops, and reviews of pharmacy records) are not without limitations, and their applicability to epilepsy is not clear. The use of simple adherence scales during office visits can provide an overall impression of a patient's adherence and can serve as a basis for practitioner-patient dialog. Efforts to improve adherence should focus on provider and healthcare system determinants versus those focused only on the patient. These interventions include non-judgmental communication, patient education, simplification of the dosage regimen with once-daily therapies, and the use of patient reminders.

  20. Expanding patient access to quality medication-related information: the potential of medication hotlines to improve patient adherence in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Pettit, Amy R; Marcus, Steven C

    2015-05-01

    Medication nonadherence is a widespread problem that compromises treatment outcomes, particularly in schizophrenia. Weersink et al. (Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol, 2015) describe telephone calls to a national medicines information line, with a focus on queries related to antipsychotic medications. Their analysis of callers' questions and concerns offers a valuable window into patient and caregiver perspectives. Given that many callers reported that they had not shared these concerns with a health care provider, this study also highlights the capacity of medication hotlines to address unmet needs. Establishing and maintaining long-term treatment regimens is a complex task, and truly patient-centered care requires a variety of creative and accessible support resources. Medication lines have the potential to serve as a resource and to provide proactive and timely adherence support.

  1. Evaluation of self-reported medication adherence and its associated factors among epilepsy patients in Hospital Kuala Lumpur

    PubMed Central

    Molugulu, Nagashekhara; Gubbiyappa, Kumar Shiva; Vasudeva Murthy, C. R.; Lumae, Lim; Mruthyunjaya, Anil Tumkur

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Reports on medication adherence and its associated factors in patients with epilepsy in South East Asian countries are lacking. The primary purpose of this study was to assess the degree of medication adherence and its relationship with patient's satisfaction, psychosocial factors, quality of life and mental health in a sample of Malaysian epilepsy patients. Methodology: It is a cross-sectional study and was carried out in the outpatient Neurology Department of Hospital Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (n=272). Data was collected by administering the structured questionnaire. Results and Discussion: Results showed that 49.3% of the epilepsy patients were non-adherent to their prescribed regimen. Univariate analysis showed significant associations between medication adherence and the following factors: race, seizure frequency, overall patient satisfaction, medication taste and smell, medication cost and physical appearance, medication effectiveness, complexity of medication regimen, patient barrier, patient understanding, patient role functioning, patient positivity, vitality and general interest. Multiple regression analysis indicated that factors that are influencing medication adherence are seizure frequency (P = 0.048), overall patient satisfaction (P = 0.043) and patient understanding about their illness (P = 0.001). The model chosen for testing the relationship between medication adherence and its associated factors give an R2 value of 25.2% with an adjusted R2 of 21.4%. The F value was also significant (P = 0.000). Based on the research findings, the researchers recommends that clinicians need to play a vital role in educating the patients on their disease conditions. By educating the patients on nature of epilepsy, different modalities of treatment and benefits of adherence to treatment will help in the better adherence and management. PMID:27999469

  2. Conceptualisations of masculinity and self-reported medication adherence among HIV-positive Latino men in Los Angeles, California, USA.

    PubMed

    Galvan, Frank H; Bogart, Laura M; Wagner, Glenn J; Klein, David J; Chen, Ying-Tung

    2014-06-01

    HIV-positive Latino men have been found to have poorer medication adherence compared to Whites. This study sought to identify how cultural conceptualisations of masculinity are associated with self-reported medication adherence among Latino men. A total of 208 HIV-positive men reported the number of doses of antiretroviral medication missed in the previous seven days (dichotomised at 100% adherence versus less). Conceptualisations of masculinity consisted of traditional machismo (e.g., power and aggressive attitudes, which are normally associated with negative stereotypes of machismo) and caballerismo (e.g., fairness, respect for elders and the importance of family). Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with adherence. The mean adherence was 97% (SD = 6.5%; range = 57-100%). In all, 77% of the participants reported 100% adherence in the previous seven days. Caballerismo was associated with a greater likelihood (OR = 1.77; 95% CI: 1.08-2.92; p = 0.03) and machismo with a lower likelihood (OR = 0.60; 95% CI: 0.38-0.95; p = 0.03) of medication adherence. In addition, higher medication side-effects were found to be associated with a lower likelihood (OR = 0.59; 95% CI: 0.43-0.81; p = 0.001) of medication adherence. These findings reinforce the importance of identifying cultural factors that may affect medication adherence among HIV-positive Latino men resident in the USA.

  3. Relationship of treatment satisfaction to medication adherence: findings from a cross-sectional survey among hypertensive patients in Palestine

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The concepts of medication adherence and Treatment satisfactions are commonly used in clinical research for assessing pharmaceutical care and improving treatment outcomes. Generally, one would expect a positive relationship between the two concepts. The objectives of this study were to investigate the factors associated with adherence to antihypertensive therapy among hypertensive patients and to assess the relationship between antihypertensive medication adherence and treatment satisfaction. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted, adopting the Morisky eight-item Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS) for the assessment of medication adherence and using the Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire for Medication (TSQM 1.4) for the assessment of treatment satisfaction. Descriptive and comparative statistics were used to describe socio-demographic and disease-related characteristics of the patients. All analyses were performed using SPSS v 15.0. Results Four hundred and ten hypertensive patients were enrolled in the study. The mean age of participants was 58.38 ± 10.65 years; 52% were female and 36.8% had low antihypertensive medication adherence. There was a significant difference in the mean scores in the Effectiveness (p < 0.001), Convenience (p < 0.001), and Global Satisfaction (p < 0.001) domains, but not in the Side Effects (p = 0.466) domain among patients with different levels of adherence. After adjustment for covariates using multiple linear regression, global treatment satisfaction was still statistically significantly (p = 0.001) associated with medication adherence. Conclusions Low treatment satisfaction may be an important barrier for achieving high rates of adherence to treatment. These study findings could be helpful in clinical practice, mainly in the early treatment of hypertensive patients, at a point where improving treatment satisfaction is still possible. PMID:24195638

  4. Development of a new diabetes medication self-efficacy scale and its association with both reported problems in using diabetes medications and self-reported adherence

    PubMed Central

    Sleath, Betsy; Carpenter, Delesha M; Blalock, Susan J; Davis, Scott A; Hickson, Ryan P; Lee, Charles; Ferreri, Stefanie P; Scott, Jennifer E; Rodebaugh, Lisa B; Cummings, Doyle M

    2016-01-01

    Background Although there are several different general diabetes self-efficacy scales, there is a need to develop a self-efficacy scale that providers can use to assess patient’s self-efficacy regarding medication use. The purpose of this study was to: 1) develop a new diabetes medication self-efficacy scale and 2) examine how diabetes medication self-efficacy is associated with patient-reported problems in using diabetes medications and self-reported adherence. Patients and methods Adult English-speaking patients with type 2 diabetes were recruited from a family medicine clinic and a pharmacy in Eastern North Carolina, USA. The patients were eligible if they reported being nonadherent to their diabetes medicines on a visual analog scale. Multivariable regression was used to examine the relationship between self-efficacy and the number of reported diabetes medication problems and adherence. Results The diabetes medication self-efficacy scale had strong reliability (Cronbach’s alpha =0.86). Among a sample (N=51) of mostly African-American female patients, diabetes medication problems were common (6.1±3.1) and a greater number of diabetes medications were associated with lower medication adherence (odds ratio: 0.35; 95% confidence interval: 0.13, 0.89). Higher medication self-efficacy was significantly related to medication adherence (odds ratio: 1.17; 95% confidence interval: 1.05, 1.30) and inversely related to the number of self-reported medication problems (β=−0.13; P=0.006). Conclusion Higher diabetes medication self-efficacy was associated with fewer patient-reported medication problems and better medication adherence. Assessing medication-specific self-efficacy may help to identify medication-related problems that providers can help the patients address, potentially improving adherence and patient outcomes. PMID:27354769

  5. Food insecurity and medication adherence in low-income older Medicare beneficiaries with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sattler, Elisabeth Lilian Pia; Lee, Jung Sun; Bhargava, Vibha

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about diabetes management among low-income older Americans. This study used statewide self-administered survey and Medicare claims data to examine the relationships of food insecurity and medication (re)fill adherence in a sample of Medicare Part D beneficiaries with type 2 diabetes in need of food assistance in Georgia in 2008 (n = 243, mean age 74.2 ± 7.8 years, 27.2% African American, 77.4% female). (Re)fill adherence to oral hypoglycemics was measured as Proportion of Days Covered. Food insecurity was assessed using a six-item validated standard measure. About 54% of the sample were food insecure. About 28% of the diabetic sample did not (re)fill any diabetes medication and over 80% had at least one diabetes complication. Food insecure participants showed comparable (re)fill adherence to food secure participants. However, 57% of food insecure participants were nonadherent to oral hypoglycemics. Underlying basic needs must be addressed to improve diabetes management in this population.

  6. Medication Adherence in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis: The Effect of Patient Education, Health Literacy, and Musculoskeletal Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Joplin, Samantha; van der Zwan, Rick; Joshua, Fredrick; Wong, Peter K. K.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease affecting <1% of the population. Incompletely controlled RA results in fatigue, joint and soft tissue pain, progressive joint damage, reduced quality of life, and increased cardiovascular mortality. Despite an increasing range of disease modifying agents which halt disease progression, poor patient adherence with medication is a significant barrier to management. Objective. The goal of this review was to examine the effectiveness of measures to improve patient medication adherence. Methods. Studies addressing treatment adherence in patients with RA were identified by trawling PsycINFO, Medline, Cochrane, Pubmed, and ProQuest for studies published between January 2000 and October 2014. Articles were independently reviewed to identify relevant studies. Results. Current strategies were of limited efficacy in improving patient adherence with medications used to treat RA. Conclusion. Poor medication adherence is a complex issue. Low educational levels and limited health literacy are contributory factors. Psychological models may assist in explaining medication nonadherence. Increasing patient knowledge of their disease seems sensible. Existing educational interventions appear ineffective at improving medication adherence, probably due to an overemphasis on provision of biomedical information. A novel approach to patient education using musculoskeletal ultrasound is proposed. PMID:26060812

  7. Reported Racial Discrimination, Trust in Physicians, and Medication Adherence Among Inner-City African Americans With Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hargraves, J. Lee; Rosal, Milagros; Briesacher, Becky A.; Schoenthaler, Antoinette; Person, Sharina; Hullett, Sandral; Allison, Jeroan

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We sought to determine if reported racial discrimination was associated with medication nonadherence among African Americans with hypertension and if distrust of physicians was a contributing factor. Methods. Data were obtained from the TRUST project conducted in Birmingham, Alabama, 2006 to 2008. All participants were African Americans diagnosed with hypertension and receiving care at an inner city, safety net setting. Three categories of increasing adherence were defined based on the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale. Trust in physicians was measured with the Hall General Trust Scale, and discrimination was measured with the Experiences of Discrimination Scale. Associations were quantified by ordinal logistic regression, adjusting for gender, age, education, and income. Results. The analytic sample consisted of 227 African American men and 553 African American women, with a mean age of 53.7 ±9.9 years. Mean discrimination scores decreased monotonically across increasing category of medication adherence (4.1, 3.6, 2.9; P = .025), though the opposite was found for trust scores (36.5, 38.5, 40.8; P < .001). Trust mediated 39% (95% confidence interval = 17%, 100%) of the association between discrimination and medication adherence. Conclusions. Within our sample of inner city African Americans with hypertension, racial discrimination was associated with lower medication adherence, and this association was partially mediated by trust in physicians. Patient, physician and system approaches to increase “earned” trust may enhance existing interventions for promoting medication adherence. PMID:24028222

  8. Impact of a Brief Patient and Provider Intervention to Improve the Quality of Communication about Medication Adherence among HIV Patients

    PubMed Central

    Beach, Mary Catherine; Roter, Debra L.; Saha, Somnath; Korthuis, P. Todd; Eggly, Susan; Cohn, Jonathan; Sharp, Victoria; Moore, Richard D.; Wilson, Ira B.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Medication adherence is essential in HIV care, yet provider communication about adherence is often suboptimal. We designed this study to improve patient-provider communication about HIV medication adherence. Methods We randomized 26 providers at three HIV care sites to receive or not receive a one-hour communication skills training based on motivational interviewing principles applied to medication adherence. Prior to routine office visits, non-adherent patients of providers who received the training were coached to discuss adherence with their providers. Patients of providers who did not receive the training providers were not coached. We audio-recorded and coded patient-provider interactions using the Roter Interaction Analysis System (RIAS). Results There was more dialogue about therapeutic regimen in visits with intervention patients and providers (167 vs 128, respectively, p=.004), with the majority of statements coming from providers. These visits also included more brainstorming solutions to nonadherence (41% vs. 22%, p=0.026). Intervention compared with control visit providers engaged in more positive talk (44 vs. 38 statements, p=0.039), emotional talk (26 vs. 18 statements, p<0.001), and probing of patient opinion (3 vs. 2 statements, p=0.009). Conclusion A brief provider training combined with patient coaching sessions, improved provider communication behaviors and increased dialogue regarding medication adherence. PMID:26021185

  9. Barriers to medication adherence for the secondary prevention of stroke: a qualitative interview study in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Jamison, James; Graffy, Jonathan; Mullis, Ricky; Mant, Jonathan; Sutton, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Background Medications are highly effective at reducing risk of recurrent stroke, but success is influenced by adherence to treatment. Among survivors of stroke and transient ischaemic attack (TIA), adherence to medication is known to be suboptimal. Aim To identify and report barriers to medication adherence for the secondary prevention of stroke/TIA. Design and setting A qualitative interview study was conducted within general practice surgeries in the East of England, UK. Method Patients were approached by letter and invited to take part in a qualitative research study. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with survivors of stroke, caregivers, and GPs to explore their perspectives and views around secondary prevention and perceived barriers to medication adherence. Key themes were identified using a grounded theory approach. Verbatim quotes describing the themes are presented here. Results In total, 28 survivors of stroke, including 14 accompanying caregivers and five GPs, were interviewed. Two key themes were identified. Patient level barriers included ability to self-care, the importance people attach to a stroke event, and knowledge of stroke and medication. Medication level barriers included beliefs about medication and beliefs about how pills work, medication routines, changing medications, and regimen complexity and burden of treatment. Conclusion Patients who have had a stroke are faced with multiple barriers to taking secondary prevention medications in UK general practice. This research suggests that a collaborative approach between caregivers, survivors, and healthcare professionals is needed to address these barriers and facilitate medication-taking behaviour. PMID:27215572

  10. Attitudes and experience of youth and their parents with psychiatric medication and relationship to self-reported adherence.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Megan; Crickard, Elizabeth; Lee, Jaehoon; Holmes, Cheryl

    2013-10-01

    Few studies have directly examined the interrelationship of teen and parent attitudes toward psychiatric medication and how this relates to medication adherence. In the current study, survey data from 19 parent-child dyads were analyzed to investigate the relationship of parent and teen attitudes toward medication, decision self-efficacy, and current involvement in decisions about psychiatric medication with self-reported adherence. Structural equation modeling techniques were used to fit actor-partner interdependence models to examine bidirectional effects of the dyadic relationships. Teens and parents had similarly positive attitudes toward medication, high levels of self-efficacy and self-reported adherence. Current involvement in decisions about medications was significantly lower for teens compared to their parents. The actor-partner interdependence models revealed that parent levels of decision self-efficacy were related to youth self-reported adherence (partner effect). Youth attitudes toward medications were related to youth self-reported adherence (actor effect). Parent and teen actor effects of decisional self-efficacy were significantly associated with current involvement. Providers need to be aware of the importance of engaging both teens and parents in decisions about psychiatric medication and recognize the need to explicitly elicit questions and concerns from young patients.

  11. Quality of life of coronary artery disease patients after the implementation of planning strategies for medication adherence 1

    PubMed Central

    Lourenço, Laura Bacelar de Araujo; Rodrigues, Roberta Cunha Matheus; São-João, Thaís Moreira; Gallani, Maria Cecilia; Cornélio, Marilia Estevam

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to compare the general and specific health-related quality of life (HRQoL) between the Intervention (IG) and Control (CG) groups of coronary artery disease patients after the implementation of Action Planning and Coping Planning strategies for medication adherence and to verify the relationship between adherence and HRQoL. METHOD: this was a controlled and randomized study. RESULTS: the sample (n=115) was randomized into two groups, IG (n=59) and CG (n=56). Measures of medication adherence and general and specific HRQoL were obtained in the baseline and after two months of monitoring. CONCLUSION: the findings showed that the combination of intervention strategies - Action Planning and Coping Planning for medication adherence did not affect the HRQoL of coronary artery disease patients in outpatient monitoring. PMID:25806626

  12. Comparative Cost-Effectiveness of Interventions to Improve Medication Adherence after Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Kouta; Shrank, William H; Avorn, Jerry; Patrick, Amanda R; Brennan, Troyen A; Antman, Elliot M; Choudhry, Niteesh K

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the comparative cost-effectiveness of interventions to improve adherence to evidence-based medications among postmyocardial infarction (MI) patients. Data Sources/Study Setting Cost-effectiveness analysis. Study Design We developed a Markov model simulating a hypothetical cohort of 65-year-old post-MI patients who were prescribed secondary prevention medications. We evaluated mailed education, disease management, polypill use, and combinations of these interventions. The analysis was performed from a societal perspective over a lifetime horizon. The main outcome was an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) as measured by cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained. Data Collection/Extraction Methods Model inputs were extracted from published literature. Principal Findings Compared with usual care, only mailed education had both improved health outcomes and reduced spending. Mailed education plus disease management, disease management, polypill use, polypill use plus mailed education, and polypill use plus disease management cost were $74,600, $69,200, $133,000, $113,000, and $142,900 per QALY gained, respectively. In an incremental analysis, only mailed education had an ICER of less than $100,000 per QALY and was therefore the optimal strategy. Polypill use, particularly when combined with mailed education, could be cost effective, and potentially cost saving if its price decreased to less than $100 per month. Conclusions Mailed education and a polypill, once available, may be the cost-saving strategies for improving post-MI medication adherence. PMID:22998129

  13. Medication Adherence, Work Performance and Self-Esteem among Psychiatric Patients Attending Psychosocial Rehabilitation Services at Bangalore, India

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Sailaxmi; Pavalur, Rajitha; Thanapal, Sivakumar; Parathasarathy, Nirmala B.; Desai, Geetha; Bhola, Poornima; Philip, Mariamma; Chaturvedi, Santosh K.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Work benefits mental health in innumerable ways. Vocational rehabilitation can enhance self-esteem. Medication adherence can improve work performance and thereby the individuals’ self-esteem. Aim: To test the hypothesis that there would be a significant correlation between medication adherence, work performance and self-esteem. Setting and Design: A quantitative, descriptive correlational research design was adopted to invite patients attending psychiatric rehabilitation services to participate in the research. Material and Methods: Data was collected from a convenience sample of 60 subjects using the ‘Medication Adherence Rating scale’, ‘Griffiths work behaviour scale’ and the ‘Rosenberg's Self-esteem scale’. Statistical analysis used: Analysis was done using spss18 with descriptive statistics, Pearsons correlation coefficient and multiple regression analysis. Results: There were 36 males and 24 females who participated in this study. The subjects had good mean medication adherence of 8.4 ± 1.5 with median of 9.00, high mean self-esteem of 17.65 ± 2.97 with median of 18.0 and good mean work performance of 88.62 ± 22.56 with median of 93.0. Although weak and not significant, there was a positive correlation (r = 0.22, P = 0.103) between medication adherence and work performance; positive correlation between (r = 0.25, P = 0.067) medication adherence and self–esteem; positive correlation between (r = 0.136, P = 0.299) work performance and self-esteem. Multiple regression analysis showed no significant predictors for medication adherence, work performance and self-esteem among patients with psychiatric illness. Conclusions: Medication monitoring and strengthening of work habit can improve self-esteem thereby, strengthening hope of recovery from illness. PMID:25336771

  14. Out-of-pocket spending and medication adherence among dialysis patients in twelve countries.

    PubMed

    Hirth, Richard A; Greer, Scott L; Albert, Justin M; Young, Eric W; Piette, John D

    2008-01-01

    Few studies have examined drug costs and adherence in similar patient cohorts across countries. Using representative samples of hemodialysis patients from twelve countries, we examined out-of-pocket medication spending and cost-related nonadherence. Mean monthly spending ranged from $8 in the United Kingdom to $114 in the United States. The proportion of patients reporting nonadherence because of cost ranged from 3 percent in Japan to 29 percent in the United States. Out-of-pocket spending was related to national pharmaceutical financing policies and predicted national nonadherence rates. However, inconsistencies in the relationship between patient costs and nonadherence suggested that other social or policy factors also matter.

  15. ASH position paper: Adherence and persistence with taking medication to control high blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Hill, Martha N; Miller, Nancy H; DeGeest, Sabina

    2010-10-01

    Nonadherence and poor or no persistence in taking antihypertensive medications results in uncontrolled high blood pressure, poor clinical outcomes, and preventable health care costs. Factors associated with nonadherence are multilevel and relate not only to the patient, but also to the provider, health care system, health care organization, and community. National guideline committees have called for more aggressive approaches to implement strategies known to improve adherence and technologies known to enable changes at the systems level, including improved communication among providers and patients. Improvements in adherence and persistence are likely to be achieved by supporting patient self-management, a team approach to patient care, technology-supported office practice systems, better methods to measure adherence, and less clinical inertia. Integrating high blood pressure control into health care policies that emphasize and improve prevention and management of chronic illness remains a challenge. Four strategies are proposed: focusing on clinical outcomes; empowering informed, activated patients; developing prepared proactive practice teams; and advocating for health care policy reform. With hypertension remaining the most common reason for office visits, the time is now.

  16. Antidepressant adherence after psychiatric hospitalization

    PubMed Central

    Zivin, Kara; Ganoczy, Dara; Pfeiffer, Paul N.; Miller, Erin M.; Valenstein, Marcia

    2010-01-01

    Objective Depressed patients discharged from psychiatric hospitalizations face increased risks for adverse outcomes including suicide, yet antidepressant adherence rates during this high-risk period are unknown. Using Veterans Affairs (VA) data, we assessed antidepressant adherence and predictors of poor adherence among depressed veterans following psychiatric hospitalization. Method We identified VA patients nationwide with depressive disorders who had a psychiatric hospitalization between April 1, 1999 and September 30, 2003, received antidepressant medication, and had an outpatient appointment following discharge. We calculated medication possession ratios (MPRs), a measure of medication adherence, within three and six months following discharge. We assessed patient factors associated with having lower levels of adherence (MPRs <0.8) after discharge. Results 20,931 and 23,182 patients met criteria for three and six month MPRs. The mean three month MPR was 0.79 (s.d.=0.37). The mean six month MPR was 0.66 (s.d.=0.40). Patients with poorer adherence were male, younger, non-white, and had a substance abuse disorder, but were less likely to have PTSD or other anxiety disorders. Conclusion Poor antidepressant adherence is common among depressed patients after psychiatric hospitalization. Efforts to improve adherence at this time may be critical in improving the outcomes of these high-risk patients. PMID:19609666

  17. Medical librarians supporting information systems project lifecycles toward improved patient safety. Medical librarians possess expertise to navigate various search resources and can investigate inquiries during IS project lifecycles.

    PubMed

    Saimbert, Marie K; Zhang, Yingting; Pierce, Jenny; Moncrief, Erica S; O'Hagan, Keydi Boss; Cole, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Health information systems (HIS) have progressed from being used to manage billing to impacting patient safety and health professionals' job satisfaction. Many decisions are made during project management and the information system lifecycle of a HIS. Medical librarians are underutilized in HIS lifecycles; it may not be clear to stakeholders what they can provide and where their services fit. Medical librarians possess expertise to navigate various search resources and can investigate inquiries during information systems project lifecycles. Librarians can market specific skills to project lifecycle teams such as those involved in computerized provider order entry (CPOE), electronic medication administration record (eMAR) and root cause analysis (RCA). HIS project personnel, including patient safety team members, should make use of medical librarians in phases of health information systems project management. This will help them meet institutional and global objectives for evidence-based use of technology towards improved patient safety.

  18. GADL1 variant and medication adherence in predicting response to lithium maintenance treatment in bipolar I disorder

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chih-Ken; Lee, Chau-Shoun; Chen, Hsuan-Yu; Wu, Lawrence Shih-Hsin; Chang, Jung-Chen; Liu, Chia-Yih

    2016-01-01

    Background Genetic variants and medication adherence have been identified to be the main factors contributing to lithium treatment response in bipolar disorders. Aims To simultaneously examine effects of variant glutamate decarboxylase-like protein 1 (GADL1) and medication adherence on response to lithium maintenance treatment in Han Chinese patients with bipolar I (BPI) disorder. Method Frequencies of manic and depressive episodes between carriers and non-carriers of the effective GADL1 rs17026688 T allele during the cumulative periods of off-lithium, poor adherence to lithium treatment and good adherence to lithium treatment were compared in Han Chinese patients with BPI disorder (n=215). Results GADL1 rs17026688 T carriers had significantly lower frequencies of recurrent affective episodes than non-T carriers during the cumulative period of good adherence, but not during those of poor adherence. Conclusions GADL1 rs17026688 and medication adherence jointly predict response to lithium maintenance treatment in Han Chinese BPI patients. Declaration of interest None. Copyright and usage © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) license. PMID:27703793

  19. Improving medication adherence for severely mentally ill adults by decreasing coercion and increasing cooperation.

    PubMed

    Danzer, Graham; Rieger, Sarah M

    2016-01-01

    Severe mental illnesses, mainly schizophrenia and bipolar disorders, often go untreated until the afflicted persons become dangerous to themselves or others. In such states, they must be hospitalized and medicated, often involuntarily due to the stigma and low insight into need for treatment that can be considered characteristic of severe illnesses. Hospitalization and medications can help the mentally ill stabilize. But these options also can have a demoralizing effect on future engagement with providers. Accordingly, the process of involuntary hospitalization and medication treatment must be maximally dignified and respectful of patient autonomy, within the limits of manifest illnesses. Literature that was reviewed and synthesized suggests best practice strategies for helping involuntary mentally ill patients grow into voluntary consumers of medication. In turn, risk of relapse is lowered and quality of life is enhanced. Best practice strategies included decreasing usage of coercive tactics, helping patients cope with medication side effects, and emphasizing the necessity of family involvement. The authors conclude with a review of the limitations of arguing for involuntary hospitalization and treatment as restoring patient autonomy, along with implications for future practice focusing on increasing the medication adherence of severely mentally ill populations.

  20. Perception of hypertensive patients about their non-adherence to the use of medication.

    PubMed

    Marin, Nadia Sanches; Santos, Mariana Fonseca Dos; Moro, André Dos Santos

    2016-06-01

    This qualitative study aims to analyze the perception of patients with hypertension on their non-adherence to medication. 13 participants were interviewed, classified as non-adherent.The analysis was performed using the technique of thematic content analysis. Data points to contradictions in the approach of what is being adherent or not, the difficulty of adhering to the use of medication due to lifestyle habits, that forgetting is understood as a justification for non-compliance, and reinforces factors that hinder such practice, such as the use of many drugs, the presence of signs and symptoms and changes in daily routine. With complex conditions that involve non-adherence to treatment and the current context of the predominance of chronic diseases, it is essential to invest in innovative strategies of care for such people. Estudo qualitativo que se propõe a analisar a percepção do portador de hipertensão arterial sobre a sua não adesão ao tratamento medicamentoso. Foram entrevistados treze participantes classificados como não aderente. A analise foi realizada pela técnica de analise de conteúdo modalidade temática. Os dados apontam para contradições na abordagem sobre o que é ser ou não aderente, a dificuldade de aderir ao uso dos medicamentos devido ao hábito de vida, que o esquecimento é compreendido como uma justificativa para a não adesão, além de reforçarem fatores que dificultam tal prática, como o uso de muitos medicamentos, presença de sinais e sintomas e mudanças na rotina diária. As complexas condições que envolvem a não adesão ao tratamento e ao o atual contexto de predomínio de doenças crônicas, é primordial que se invista em estratégias inovadoras de cuidado a tais pessoas.

  1. Non-adherence in children with asthma reviewed: The need for improvement of asthma care and medical education.

    PubMed

    Klok, Ted; Kaptein, Adrian A; Brand, Paul L P

    2015-05-01

    Adherence to daily inhaled corticosteroid therapy is a key determinant of asthma control. Therefore, improving adherence to inhaled corticosteroids is the most effective method through which healthcare providers can help children with uncontrolled asthma. However, identifying non-adherent patients is difficult, and electronic monitoring is the only reliable method to assess adherence. (Non-)adherence is a complex behavioural process influenced by many interacting factors. Intentional barriers to adherence are common; driven by illness perceptions and medication beliefs, patients and parents deliberately choose not to follow the doctor's recommendations. Common non-intentional barriers are related to family routines, child-raising issues, and to social issues such as poverty. Effective interventions improving adherence are complex, because they take intentional and non-intentional barriers to adherence into account. There is evidence that comprehensive, guideline-based asthma self-management programmes can be successful, with excellent adherence and good asthma control. Patient-centred care focused on healthcare provider-patient/parent collaboration is the key factor determining the success of guided self-management programmes. Such care should focus on shared decision-making as this has been shown to improve adherence and healthcare outcomes. Current asthma care falls short because many physicians fail to adhere to asthma guidelines in their diagnostic approach and therapeutic prescriptions, and because of the lack of application of patient-centred health care. Increased awareness of the importance of patient-centred communication and increased training in patient-centred communication skills of undergraduates and experienced attending physicians are needed to improve adherence to daily controller therapy and asthma control in children with asthma.

  2. Missing signposts on the roadmap to quality: a call to improve medication adherence indicators in data collection for population research

    PubMed Central

    Granger, Bradi B.; Rusincovitch, Shelley A.; Avery, Suzanne; Batch, Bryan C.; Dunham, Ashley A.; Feinglos, Mark N.; Kelly, Katherine; Pierre-Louis, Marjorie; Spratt, Susan E.; Califf, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Poor adherence to prescribed medicines is associated with increased rates of poor outcomes, including hospitalization, serious adverse events, and death, and is also associated with increased healthcare costs. However, current approaches to evaluation of medication adherence using real-world electronic health records (EHRs) or claims data may miss critical opportunities for data capture and fall short in modeling and representing the full complexity of the healthcare environment. We sought to explore a framework for understanding and improving data capture for medication adherence in a population-based intervention in four U.S. counties. Approach: We posited that application of a data model and a process matrix when designing data collection for medication adherence would improve identification of variables and data accessibility, and could support future research on medication-taking behaviors. We then constructed a use case in which data related to medication adherence would be leveraged to support improved healthcare quality, clinical outcomes, and efficiency of healthcare delivery in a population-based intervention for persons with diabetes. Because EHRs in use at participating sites were deemed incapable of supplying the needed data, we applied a taxonomic approach to identify and define variables of interest. We then applied a process matrix methodology, in which we identified key research goals and chose optimal data domains and their respective data elements, to instantiate the resulting data model. Conclusions: Combining a taxonomic approach with a process matrix methodology may afford significant benefits when designing data collection for clinical and population-based research in the arena of medication adherence. Such an approach can effectively depict complex real-world concepts and domains by “mapping” the relationships between disparate contributors to medication adherence and describing their relative contributions to the shared goals

  3. Improving medication adherence among kidney transplant recipients: Findings from other industries, patient engagement, and behavioral economics—A scoping review

    PubMed Central

    Oberlin, Shelley R; Parente, Stephen T; Pruett, Timothy L

    2016-01-01

    The immune system is a powerful barrier to successful organ transplantation, but one that has been routinely thwarted through modern pharmacotherapeutics. Despite the benefits of immunosuppressive therapy, medication non-adherence leads to an increased risk of graft rejection, higher hospital utilization and costs, and poor outcomes. We conduct a scoping review following Arksey and O’Malley’s five-stage framework methodology to identify established or novel interventions that could be applied to kidney transplant recipients to improve medication adherence. As the desired outcome is a behavior (taking a pill), we assess three areas: behavioral-focused interventions in other industries, patient engagement theories, and behavioral economic principles. Search strategies included mining business, social sciences, and medical literature with additional guidance from six consultative interviews. Our review suggests that no intervention stands out as superior or likely to be more effective than any other intervention; yet promising strategies and interventions were identified across all three areas examined. Based on our findings, we believe there are five strategies that transplant centers and other organizations can implement to improve medication adherence: (1) Build a foundation of trust; (2) Employ multiple interventions; (3) Stratify the population; (4) Develop collaborative partnerships; and (5) Embed medication adherence into the organization’s culture. The effectiveness of these interventions will need to be investigated further, but we believe they are a step in the right direction for organizations to consider in their efforts to improve medication adherence. PMID:26835016

  4. Antiretroviral Therapy Use, Medication Adherence, and Viral Suppression among PLWHA with Panic Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Sam, Tanyka S; Hutton, Heidi E; Lau, Bryan; McCaul, Mary E; Keruly, Jeanne; Moore, Richard; Chander, Geetanjali

    2015-01-01

    Panic symptoms are prevalent among PLWHAs, yet few studies have examined their relationship with HIV outcomes. Using data from an observational cohort study in Baltimore, MD, we examined the association between panic symptoms and ART use, medication adherence, and viral suppression. Data were analyzed using GEE and adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, cocaine and/or heroin use, clinic enrollment time, alcohol use, and depressive symptoms. Between June 2010 and September 2012, 1195 individuals participated in 2080 audio computer assisted interviews; 9.9% (n=118) of individuals endorsed current panic symptoms. In multivariate analysis, panic symptoms were associated with decreased ART use (IRR 0.94; p = 0.05). Panic symptoms were neither associated with medication adherence nor viral suppression. These findings were independent of depressive symptoms and substance use. Panic symptoms are under-recognized in primary care settings and present an important barrier to ART use. Further studies investigating the reasons for this association are needed. PMID:25903506

  5. Effect of Expectation of Care on Adherence to Antihypertensive Medications Among Hypertensive Blacks: Analysis of the Counseling African Americans to Control Hypertension (CAATCH) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Andrea Barnes; Seixas, Azizi; Frederickson, Keville; Butler, Mark; Tobin, Jonathan N.; Jean-Louis, Girardin; Ogedegbe, Gbenga

    2017-01-01

    Novel ideas are needed to increase adherence to antihypertensive medication. The current study used data from the Counseling African Americans to Control Hypertension (CAATCH) study, a sample of 442 hypertensive African Americans, to investigate the mediating effects of expectation of hypertension care, social support, hypertension knowledge, and medication adherence, adjusting for age, sex, number of medications, diabetes, education, income, employment, insurance status, and intervention. Sixty-six percent of patients had an income of $20,000 or less and 56% had a high school education or less, with a mean age of 57 years. Greater expectation of care was associated with greater medication adherence (P=.007), and greater social support was also associated with greater medication adherence (P=.046). Analysis also showed that expectation of care mediated the relationship between hypertension knowledge and medication adherence (P<.05). Expectation of care and social support are important factors for developing interventions to increase medication adherence among blacks. PMID:26593105

  6. Effect of Expectation of Care on Adherence to Antihypertensive Medications Among Hypertensive Blacks: Analysis of the Counseling African Americans to Control Hypertension (CAATCH) Trial.

    PubMed

    Grant, Andrea Barnes; Seixas, Azizi; Frederickson, Keville; Butler, Mark; Tobin, Jonathan N; Jean-Louis, Girardin; Ogedegbe, Gbenga

    2016-07-01

    Novel ideas are needed to increase adherence to antihypertensive medication. The current study used data from the Counseling African Americans to Control Hypertension (CAATCH) study, a sample of 442 hypertensive African Americans, to investigate the mediating effects of expectation of hypertension care, social support, hypertension knowledge, and medication adherence, adjusting for age, sex, number of medications, diabetes, education, income, employment, insurance status, and intervention. Sixty-six percent of patients had an income of $20,000 or less and 56% had a high school education or less, with a mean age of 57 years. Greater expectation of care was associated with greater medication adherence (P=.007), and greater social support was also associated with greater medication adherence (P=.046). Analysis also showed that expectation of care mediated the relationship between hypertension knowledge and medication adherence (P<.05). Expectation of care and social support are important factors for developing interventions to increase medication adherence among blacks.

  7. Efficacy of a group medication adherence intervention among HIV positive women: the SMART/EST Women's Project.

    PubMed

    Jones, Deborah L; McPherson-Baker, Shvawn; Lydston, David; Camille, Joanne; Brondolo, Elizabeth; Tobin, Jonathan N; Weiss, Stephen M

    2007-01-01

    This intervention sought to improve overall quality of life and health behavior in women living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We contrasted the effect of a group cognitive behavioral stress management expressive supportive therapy (CBSM+) intervention plus a healthier lifestyles (HL) component with an individual educational/informational format plus HL on HIV-medication adherence. Women, n = 237, predominantly African-American and Latina, living with HIV were recruited from Miami, New York and New Jersey and randomized to group or individual conditions (ten weekly sessions) plus group or individual HL, i.e., four conditions. Women reported relatively high levels of adherence at baseline. Participants in any of the group conditions increased self-reported adherence and emotion-focused coping skills in comparison with individual participation. This study suggests that group interventions may be an important adjunct in increasing medication adherence for HIV positive women.

  8. [Risk factors associated with non-adherence to anti-hypertensive medication among patients treated in family health care facilities].

    PubMed

    Santa-Helena, Ernani Tiaraju de; Nemes, Maria Ines Battistella; Eluf Neto, José

    2010-12-01

    In order to estimate the prevalence of treatment non-adherence and associated factors among individuals with systemic arterial hypertension treated at family health care facilities, a cross-sectional study was performed with 595 patients. The dependent variable non-adherence was measured with a Medication Adherence Questionnaire (MAQ). A hierarchical logistic regression model was used to analyze socioeconomic, health care-related, personal, and treatment-related variables. Prevalence of non-adherence was 53%. Variables associated with non-adherence were: (1) socioeconomic--belonging to economic classes C, D, or E; work market participation in unskilled labor; (2) health care--out-of-pocket payment for medication; more than six months since last physician consultation; and (3) personal and treatment characteristics--previous interruption of treatment; being on treatment for less than three years; and presence of a common mental disorder. The study of determinants of non-adherence articulated in a hierarchical model suggests that social inequalities are either directly associated with non-adherence or mediated by personal and health services factors.

  9. A longitudinal analysis of medication adherence among young Black men who have sex with men: A latent class analysis

    PubMed Central

    Voisin, Dexter R.; Quinn, Katherine; Kim, Dong Ha; Schneider, John

    2017-01-01

    HIV-positive young Black MSM (YBMSM) experience poor antiretroviral (ART) medication adherence relative to their white counterparts. However, few studies have longitudinally examined factors that may correlate with various classifications of ART adherence among this population, which was the primary aim of this study. Project nGage was a randomized controlled trial conducted across five Chicago clinics from 2012–2015. Survey and medical records data were collected at baseline, 3-, and 12-month periods to assess psychological distress, HIV stigma, substance use, family acceptance, social support and self efficacy predicted ART medication adherence among 92 YBMSM ages 16 to 29 years old. Major results controlling for the potential effects of age, education level, employment, and intervention condition, indicated that participants with high versus low medication adherence were less likely to report daily/weekly alcohol or marijuana use, have higher family acceptance, and greater self efficacy. These findings identity important constructs that can be targeted in clinical and program interventions which correlate with improved ART medication adherence for YBMSM. PMID:28043754

  10. Applying the resources and supports in self-management framework to examine ophthalmologist-patient communication and glaucoma medication adherence.

    PubMed

    Sleath, B; Carpenter, D M; Blalock, S J; Sayner, R; Muir, K W; Slota, C; Giangiacomo, A L; Hartnett, M E; Tudor, G; Robin, A L

    2015-10-01

    Little is known about how ophthalmologist-patient communication over time is associated with glaucoma patient long-term adherence. The purpose of our study was to examine the association between provider use of components of the resources and supports in self-management model when communicating with patients and adherence to glaucoma medications measured electronically over an 8-month period. In this longitudinal prospective cohort study, the main variables studied were ophthalmologist communication-individualized assessment, collaborative goal setting and skills enhancement. Patients with glaucoma who were newly prescribed or on glaucoma medications were recruited from six ophthalmology clinics. Patients' baseline and next follow-up visits were videotape-recorded. Patients were interviewed after their visits. Patients used medication event monitoring systems (MEMS) for 8 months after enrollment into the study, and adherence was measured electronically using MEMS for 240 days after their visits. Two hundred and seventy-nine patients participated. Patient race and regimen complexity were negatively associated with glaucoma medication adherence over an 8-month period. Provider communication behaviors, including providing education and positive reinforcement, can improve patient adherence to glaucoma medications over an 8-month period.

  11. Improving Medication Adherence in a Regional Healthcare Information Exchange using a Scalable, Claims-Driven, and Service-Oriented Approach

    PubMed Central

    Del Fiol, Guilherme; Kawamoto, Kensaku; LaPointe, Nancy M Allen; Eisenstein, Eric L; Anstrom, Kevin J; Wood, Laura L; Lobach, David F

    2010-01-01

    Evidence-based pharmacotherapy is a central aspect of optimal patient care for many chronic conditions. However, medication non-adherence frequently inhibits the attainment of optimal pharmacotherapy regimens. In this study, we designed, developed, and implemented a multifaceted clinical decision support (CDS) intervention that supports evidence-based pharmacotherapy and enhanced medication adherence through the use of a scalable, claims-driven, and service-oriented approach. The intervention includes a medication management report and a low adherence alert based on thirteen evidence-based pharmacotherapy rules for seven chronic conditions. Reports and alerts are delivered to primary care clinics and care managers that participate in a healthcare information exchange in North Carolina. The resulting system architecture may enable this CDS intervention to be widely disseminated to healthcare networks through an open-source model. PMID:21346956

  12. Improving Medication Adherence in a Regional Healthcare Information Exchange using a Scalable, Claims-Driven, and Service-Oriented Approach.

    PubMed

    Del Fiol, Guilherme; Kawamoto, Kensaku; Lapointe, Nancy M Allen; Eisenstein, Eric L; Anstrom, Kevin J; Wood, Laura L; Lobach, David F

    2010-11-13

    Evidence-based pharmacotherapy is a central aspect of optimal patient care for many chronic conditions. However, medication non-adherence frequently inhibits the attainment of optimal pharmacotherapy regimens. In this study, we designed, developed, and implemented a multifaceted clinical decision support (CDS) intervention that supports evidence-based pharmacotherapy and enhanced medication adherence through the use of a scalable, claims-driven, and service-oriented approach. The intervention includes a medication management report and a low adherence alert based on thirteen evidence-based pharmacotherapy rules for seven chronic conditions. Reports and alerts are delivered to primary care clinics and care managers that participate in a healthcare information exchange in North Carolina. The resulting system architecture may enable this CDS intervention to be widely disseminated to healthcare networks through an open-source model.

  13. Health system barriers and facilitators to medication adherence for the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Amitava; Khandelwal, Shweta; Nambiar, Lavanya; Saxena, Malvika; Peck, Victoria; Moniruzzaman, Mohammed; Faria Neto, Jose Rocha; Quinto, Katherine Curi; Smyth, Andrew; Leong, Darryl; Werba, José Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Background Secondary prevention is cost-effective for cardiovascular disease (CVD), but uptake is suboptimal. Understanding barriers and facilitators to adherence to secondary prevention for CVD at multiple health system levels may inform policy. Objectives To conduct a systematic review of barriers and facilitators to adherence/persistence to secondary CVD prevention medications at health system level. Methods Included studies reported effects of health system level factors on adherence/persistence to secondary prevention medications for CVD (coronary artery or cerebrovascular disease). Studies considered at least one of β blockers, statins, angiotensin–renin system blockers and aspirin. Relevant databases were searched from 1 January 1966 until 1 October 2015. Full texts were screened for inclusion by 2 independent reviewers. Results Of 2246 screened articles, 25 studies were included (12 trials, 11 cohort studies, 1 cross-sectional study and 1 case–control study) with 132 140 individuals overall (smallest n=30, largest n=63 301). 3 studies included upper middle-income countries, 1 included a low middle-income country and 21 (84%) included high-income countries (9 in the USA). Studies concerned established CVD (n=4), cerebrovascular disease (n=7) and coronary heart disease (n=14). Three studies considered persistence and adherence. Quantity and quality of evidence was limited for adherence, persistence and across drug classes. Studies were concerned with governance and delivery (n=19, including 4 trials of fixed-dose combination therapy, FDC), intellectual resources (n=1), human resources (n=1) and health system financing (n=4). Full prescription coverage, reduced copayments, FDC and counselling were facilitators associated with higher adherence. Conclusions High-quality evidence on health system barriers and facilitators to adherence to secondary prevention medications for CVD is lacking, especially for low-income settings. Full prescription coverage

  14. Risk factor control, adherence to medication and follow up visit, five years after coronary artery bypass graft surgery

    PubMed Central

    Salari, Arsalan; Hasandokht, Tolou; Mahdavi-Roshan, Marjan; Kheirkhah, Jalal; Gholipour, Mahboueh; Pouradollah Tootkaoni, Mahsa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Inadequate adherence to medication and follow up visits were proposed correlated with cardiovascular mortality and complications. This study was planned to evaluate medication and follow up adherence and risk factor control in patients with coronary artery disease 5 years after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Methods: In this retrospective cohort study, adult patients who underwent CABG in 2010 were enrolled. Conventional and probable risk factor control and adherence to medication and follow up visits were assessed. Results: 196 patients were recruited to the study. Uncontrolled blood pressure, blood glucose and low-density lipoprotein (LDL)were reported in 48%, 61% and 32% of patients, respectively. More than 63% of former smokers restarted smoking during 6-12 months after bypass. Poor medication adherence was present in 10.7% in the study population. The last follow up visit time for 30% of patients was later than 12 months after CABG. Conclusion: Poor risk factors control and adherence to follow up visits was common among patients undergoing CABG. PMID:28210470

  15. Adaptation of an HIV Medication Adherence Intervention for Adolescents and Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Thurston, Idia B.; Bogart, Laura M.; Wachman, Madeline; Closson, Elizabeth F.; Skeer, Margie R.; Mimiaga, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Rising rates of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection among adolescents and young adults underscore the importance of interventions for this population. While the morbidity and mortality of HIV has greatly decreased over the years, maintaining high rates of adherence is necessary to receive optimal medication effects. Few studies have developed interventions for adolescents and young adults and none have specifically been developed for sexual minority (lesbian, gay, and bisexual; LGB) youth. Guided by an evidence-based adult intervention and adolescent qualitative interviews, we developed a multicomponent, technology-enhanced, customizable adherence intervention for adolescents and young adults for use in a clinical setting. The two cases presented in this paper illustrate the use of the five-session positive strategies to enhance problem solving (Positive STEPS) intervention, based on cognitive-behavioral techniques and motivational interviewing. We present a perinatally infected heterosexual woman and a behaviorally infected gay man to demonstrate the unique challenges faced by these youth and showcase how the intervention can be customized. Future directions include varying the number of intervention sessions based on mode of HIV infection and incorporating booster sessions. PMID:25452680

  16. The Usability of Diabetes MAP: A Web-delivered Intervention for Improving Medication Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Lyndsay A; Bethune, Magaela C; Lagotte, Andrea E

    2016-01-01

    Background Web-delivered interventions are a feasible approach to health promotion. However, if a website is poorly designed, difficult to navigate, and has technical bugs, it will not be used as intended. Usability testing prior to evaluating a website’s benefits can identify barriers to user engagement and maximize future use. Objective We developed a Web-delivered intervention called Diabetes Medication Adherence Promotion (Diabetes MAP) and used a mixed-methods approach to test its usability prior to evaluating its efficacy on medication adherence and glycemic control in a randomized controlled trial. Methods We recruited English-speaking adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) from an academic medical center who were prescribed diabetes medications. A trained research assistant administered a baseline survey, collected medical record information, and instructed participants on how to access Diabetes MAP. Participants were asked to use the site independently for 2 weeks and to provide survey and/or focus group feedback on their experience. We analyzed survey data descriptively and qualitative data thematically to identify participants’ favorable and unfavorable experiences, characterize usability concerns, and solicit recommendations for improving Diabetes MAP. Results Enrolled participants (N=32) were an average of 51.7 ± 11.8 years old, 66% (21/32) female, 60% (19/32) non-Hispanic White, 88% (28/32) had more than 12 years of education, half had household incomes over $50,000, and 78% (25/32) were privately insured. Average duration of diagnosed diabetes was 7.8 ± 6.3 years, average A1c was 7.4 ± 2.0, and 38% (12/32) were prescribed insulin. Of enrolled participants, 91% (29/32) provided survey and/or focus group feedback about Diabetes MAP. On the survey, participants agreed website information was clear and easy to understand, but in focus groups they reported navigational challenges and difficulty overcoming user errors (eg, entering data in an

  17. Memory-based Strategies for Antiretroviral Medication Management: An Evaluation of Clinical Predictors, Adherence Behavior Awareness, and Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Blackstone, K.; Woods, S. P.; Weber, E.; Grant, I.; Moore, D. J.

    2012-01-01

    “Forgetting” is the most commonly endorsed reason for missing an antiretroviral therapy (ART) dose, yet little is known about the prevalence, predictors, and effectiveness of the mnemonic strategies to support ART adherence. The current study assessed 28 self-reported memory-based medication strategies in 233 HIV-infected individuals with 30-day ART adherence measured via the Medication Event Monitoring System. Participants endorsed using multiple (8.7 5.6) strategies with the most common being internally-driven. More frequent strategy use was uniquely associated with affective distress, dependent daily functioning, higher non-ART pill burden, and poorer ART adherence. Individuals who used strategies frequently, but perceived them as minimally effective, had more affective, physical, and functional distress. More frequent strategy use was associated with worse ART adherence and was unrelated to perceived effectiveness. Primary reliance on internally-based mnemonic strategies may reflect a lack of awareness of adherence behaviors and may be insufficient to support optimal ART adherence in vulnerable populations. PMID:22968399

  18. Verifying quantitative stigma and medication adherence scales using qualitative methods among Thai youth living with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Fongkaew, Warunee; Viseskul, Nongkran; Suksatit, Benjamas; Settheekul, Saowaluck; Chontawan, Ratanawadee; Grimes, Richard M; Grimes, Deanna E

    2014-01-01

    HIV/AIDS-related stigma has been linked to poor adherence resulting in drug resistance and the failure to control HIV. This study used both quantitative and qualitative methods to examine stigma and its relationship to adherence in 30 HIV-infected Thai youth aged 14 to 21 years. Stigma was measured using the HIV stigma scale and its 4 subscales, and adherence was measured using a visual analog scale. Stigma and adherence were also examined by in-depth interviews. The interviews were to determine whether verbal responses would match the scale's results. The mean score of stigma perception from the overall scale and its 4 subscales ranged from 2.14 to 2.45 on a scale of 1 to 4, indicating moderate levels of stigma. The mean adherence score was .74. The stigma scale and its subscales did not correlate with the adherence. Totally, 17 of the respondents were interviewed. Contrary to the quantitative results, the interviewees reported that the stigma led to poor adherence because the fear of disclosure often caused them to miss medication doses. The differences between the quantitative and the qualitative results highlight the importance of validating psychometric scales when they are translated and used in other cultures.

  19. Let Visuals Tell the Story: Medication Adherence in Patients with Type II Diabetes Captured by a Novel Ingestion Sensor Platform

    PubMed Central

    Behzadi, Yashar; Littlewort, Gwen

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic diseases such as diabetes require high levels of medication adherence and patient self-management for optimal health outcomes. A novel sensing platform, Digital Health Feedback System (Proteus Digital Health, Redwood City, CA), can for the first time detect medication ingestion events and physiological measures simultaneously, using an edible sensor, personal monitor patch, and paired mobile device. The Digital Health Feedback System (DHFS) generates a large amount of data. Visual analytics of this rich dataset may provide insights into longitudinal patterns of medication adherence in the natural setting and potential relationships between medication adherence and physiological measures that were previously unknown. Objective Our aim was to use modern methods of visual analytics to represent continuous and discrete data from the DHFS, plotting multiple different data types simultaneously to evaluate the potential of the DHFS to capture longitudinal patterns of medication-taking behavior and self-management in individual patients with type II diabetes. Methods Visualizations were generated using time domain methods of oral metformin medication adherence and physiological data obtained by the DHFS use in 5 patients with type II diabetes over 37-42 days. The DHFS captured at-home metformin adherence, heart rate, activity, and sleep/rest. A mobile glucose monitor captured glucose testing and level (mg/dl). Algorithms were developed to analyze data over varying time periods: across the entire study, daily, and weekly. Following visualization analysis, correlations between sleep/rest and medication ingestion were calculated across all subjects. Results A total of 197 subject days, encompassing 141,840 data events were analyzed. Individual continuous patch use varied between 87-98%. On average, the cohort took 78% (SD 12) of prescribed medication and took 77% (SD 26) within the prescribed ±2-hour time window. Average activity levels per subjects ranged

  20. Comparison of Methods to Assess Psychiatric Medication Adherence in Methadone-maintained Patients with Co-occurring Psychiatric Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Kelly E.; King, Van L.; Brooner, Robert K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Adherence with psychiatric medication is a critical issue that has serious individual and public health implications. This is a secondary analysis of a large-scale clinical treatment trial of co-occurring substance use and psychiatric disorder. Method Participants (n=153) who received a clinically-indicated psychiatric medication >30 days during the 12-month study and provided corresponding data from Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS) and Morisky Medication Taking Adherence Scale (MMAS) self-report adherence ratings were included in the analyses. Accuracy in MEMS caps openings was customized to each participant’s unique required dosing schedule. Results Consistent with expectations, MEMS-based adherence declined slowly over time, though MMAS scores of forgetting medication remained high and did not change over the 12-month study. MEMS caps openings were not significantly impacted by any baseline or treatment level variables, whereas MMAS scores were significantly associated with younger age and presence of an Axis I disorder and antisocial personality disorder, or any cluster B diagnoses. Conclusions Results suggest that MEMS caps may be a more objective method for monitoring adherence in patients with co-occurring substance use and psychiatric disorder relative to the MMAS self-report. Participants in this study were able to successfully use the MEMS caps for a 12-month period with <1% lost or broken caps, suggesting this comorbid population is able to use the MEMS successfully. Ultimately, these data suggest that an objective method for monitoring adherence in this treatment population yield more accurate outcomes relative to self-report. PMID:26851987

  1. Predictors of Medication Adherence and Blood Pressure Control among Saudi Hypertensive Patients Attending Primary Care Clinics: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Khayyat, Sarah M.; Khayyat, Salwa M. Saeed; Hyat Alhazmi, Raghda S.; Mohamed, Mahmoud M. A.; Abdul Hadi, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To assess the level of medication adherence and to investigate predictors of medication adherence and blood pressure control among hypertensive patients attending primary healthcare clinics in Makkah, Saudi Arabia. Patients and methods Hypertensive patients meeting the eligibility criteria were recruited from eight primary care clinics between January and May 2016 for this study. The patients completed Arabic version of Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8), an eight-item validated, self-reported measure to assess medication adherence. A structured data collection form was used to record patients’ sociodemographic, medical and medication data. Results Two hundred and four patients, of which 71.6% were females, participated in the study. Patients’ mean age was 59.1 (SD 12.2). The mean number of medication used by patients was 4.4 (SD 1.89). More than half (110; 54%) of the patients were non-adherent to their medications (MMAS score < 6). Binary regression analysis showed that highly adherent patients (MMAS score = 8) were about five times (OR 4.91 [95%CI: 1.85–12.93; P = 0.01]) more likely to have controlled blood pressure compared to low adherent patients. Female gender (OR 0.40 [95% CI: 0.20–0.80; P = 0.01]), Age > 65 years (OR 2.0 [95% CI: 1.0–4.2; P = 0.04]), and being diabetic (OR 0.25 [95% CI: 0.1–0.6; P = 0.04]) were found to be independent predictors of medication adherence. Conclusion Medication adherence is alarmingly low among hypertensive patients attending primary care clinics in Saudi Arabia which may partly explain observed poor blood pressure control. There is a clear need to educate patients about the importance of medication adherence and its impact on improving clinical outcomes. Future research should identify barriers to medication adherence among Saudi hypertensive patients. PMID:28135324

  2. Medication Adherence and HIV Symptom Distress in Relation to Panic Disorder Among HIV-Positive Adults Managing Opioid Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Kosiba, Jesse D.; Gonzalez, Adam; O'Cleirigh, Conall

    2015-01-01

    Panic disorder (PD) occurs at greater rates among those with HIV compared to those without HIV. Rates of PD may be elevated among those with opioid dependence (persons who inject drugs, PWID). Persons with HIV experience common bodily symptoms as a result of the disease and these symptoms overlap with those of PD which may contribute to a “fear of fear” cycle present in PD. HIV-positive, PWID represent an at-risk population in terms of poor medication adherence. HIV symptoms and HIV medication side-effects commonly overlap with panic symptoms and may affect HIV medication adherence. The aim of this investigation was to examine the impact of PD on HIV-related symptom distress and HIV medication adherence in HIV-positive adults (N = 131) in treatment for opioid use. Those with a diagnosis of PD evidenced greater levels of HIV symptom distress and lower levels of medication adherence than those without current PD. Results highlight the clinical importance of assessing for and treating PD among individuals with HIV that are prescribed antiretroviral therapy. Future work would benefit from examining observed associations longitudinally and identifying potential mechanisms involved. PMID:26146476

  3. Value-Based Insurance Design Benefit Offsets Reductions In Medication Adherence Associated With Switch To Deductible Plan.

    PubMed

    Reed, Mary E; Warton, E Margaret; Kim, Eileen; Solomon, Matthew D; Karter, Andrew J

    2017-03-01

    Enrollment in high-deductible health plans is increasing out-of-pocket spending. But innovative plans that pair deductibles with value-based insurance designs can help preserve low-cost access to high-value treatments for patients by aligning coverage with clinical value. Among adults in high-deductible health plans who were prescribed medications for chronic conditions, we examined what impact a value-based pharmacy benefit that offered free chronic disease medications had on medication adherence. Overall, we found that the value-based plan offset reductions in medication adherence associated with switching to a deductible plan. The value-based plan appeared particularly beneficial for patients who started with low levels of medication adherence. Patients with additional clinical complexity or vulnerable populations living in neighborhoods with lower socioeconomic status, however, did not show adherence improvements and might not be taking advantage of value-based insurance design provisions. Additional efforts may be needed to educate patients about their nuanced benefit plans to help overcome initial confusion about these complex plans.

  4. The Effect of Motivational Interviewing on Medication Adherence and Hospitalization Rates in Nonadherent Patients with Multi-Episode Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Barkhof, Emile

    2013-01-01

    Background: Medication nonadherence in patients with schizophrenia presents a serious clinical problem. Research on interventions incorporating motivational interviewing (MI) to improve adherence have shown mixed results. Aims: Primary aim is to determine the effectiveness of a MI intervention on adherence and hospitalization rates in patients, with multi-episode schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder, who have experienced a psychotic relapse following medication nonadherence. Secondary aim is to evaluate whether MI is more effective in specific subgroups. Methods: We performed a randomized controlled study including 114 patients who experienced a psychotic relapse due to medication nonadherence in the past year. Participants received an adapted form of MI or an active control intervention, health education (HE). Both interventions consisted of 5–8 sessions, which patients received in adjunction to the care as usual. Patients were assessed at baseline and at 6 and 12 months follow-up. Results: Our results show that MI did not improve medication adherence in previously nonadherent patients who experienced a psychotic relapse. Neither were there significant differences in hospitalization rates at follow-up between MI and HE (27% vs 40%, P = .187). However, MI resulted in reduced hospitalization rates for female patients (9% vs 63%, P = .041), non-cannabis users (20% vs 53%, P = .041), younger patients (14% vs 50%, P = .012), and patients with shorter illness duration (14% vs 42%, P = .040). Conclusions: Targeted use of MI may be of benefit for improving medication adherence in certain groups of patients, although this needs further examination. PMID:24072808

  5. Assessment of impact of pharmacophilia and pharmacophobia on medication adherence in patients with psychiatric disorders: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Christudas, Mini Johnson; Gupta, Balaji Sathyanarayana; Undela, Krishna; Isaac, Noel M.; Ram, Dushad; Ramesh, Madhan

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To investigate the impact of pharmacophilia and pharmacophobia on medication adherence among patients with psychiatric disorders. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional, observational study was conducted in the Department of Psychiatry over a period of 2 months. Patients above 18 years of age with a psychiatric diagnosis as per the International Classification of Diseases 10 and receiving at least one psychotropic medication (any medication capable of affecting the mind, emotions, and behavior) for >1 month were enrolled in the study. Patients who were critically ill, on magico-religious treatment (beliefs prevalent in a particular culture concerning various supernatural influences operating in the environment), diagnosis of dementia, or mental retardation and patients from whom reliable history of illness cannot be obtained were excluded from the study. Drug attitude inventory scale was used to classify patients into pharmacophilic and pharmacophobic groups. Medication adherence rating scale was used to identify the extent of medication adherence. Results: Among 176 patients included, 110 were found to be pharmacophilic and 54 were pharmacophobic. The number of hospitalizations (P < 0.03) and adverse drug reactions (P < 0.001) were found to be higher in pharmacophobic group as compared to pharmacophilic group. Antipsychotics were found to be most commonly prescribed medications among pharmacophobic group (P < 0.001). In this study, patients who had pharmacophilia were found to be have higher adherence score (mean score: 6.98) than patients with pharmacophobia (mean score: 2.9), with P< 0.001. Conclusions: This study concluded that pharmacophobia toward psychopharmacological agents can significantly reduce the medication adherence among patients with psychiatric disorders. PMID:28066110

  6. Acceptability of Mobile Phone Technology for Medication Adherence Interventions among HIV-Positive Patients at an Urban Clinic.

    PubMed

    Miller, Christopher W T; Himelhoch, Seth

    2013-01-01

    Mobile phone technology is increasingly used to overcome traditional barriers limiting access to care. The goal of this study was to evaluate access and willingness to use smart and mobile phone technology for promoting adherence among people attending an urban HIV clinic. One hundred consecutive HIV-positive patients attending an urban HIV outpatient clinic were surveyed. The questionnaire evaluated access to and utilization of mobile phones and willingness to use them to enhance adherence to HIV medication. The survey also included the CASE adherence index as a measure of adherence. The average age was 46.4 (SD = 9.2). The majority of participants were males (63%), black (93%), and Hispanic (11.4%) and reported earning less than $10,000 per year (67.3%). Most identified themselves as being current smokers (57%). The vast majority reported currently taking HAART (83.5%). Approximately half of the participants reported some difficulty with adherence (CASE < 10). Ninety-six percent reported owning a mobile phone. Among owners of mobile phones 47.4% reported currently owning more than one device. Over a quarter reported owning a smartphone. About 60% used their phones for texting and 1/3 used their phone to search the Internet. Nearly 70% reported that they would use a mobile device to help with HIV adherence. Those who reported being very likely or likely to use a mobile device to improve adherence were significantly more likely to use their phone daily (P = 0.03) and use their phone for text messages (P = 0.002). The vast majority of patients in an urban HIV clinic own mobile phones and would use them to enhance adherence interventions to HIV medication.

  7. Strategies to Improve Medication Adherence in Older Persons: Consensus Statement from the Senior Italia Federanziani Advisory Board.

    PubMed

    Marengoni, Alessandra; Monaco, Alessandro; Costa, Elisio; Cherubini, Antonio; Prados-Torres, Alexandra; Muth, Christiane; Melis, Renè J F; Pasina, Luca; van der Cammen, Tischa J M; Palmer, Katie; Pecorelli, Sergio; Onder, Graziano

    2016-09-01

    Poor adherence to treatment regimens has long been recognized as a substantial roadblock to achieving better outcomes for patients. Non-adherence to medications affects the quality and length of life and has been associated with negative health outcomes and increasing healthcare costs. The problem of non-adherence is particularly troublesome in older patients who are affected by multiple chronic diseases and for this reason receive multiple treatments. To date, no single intervention strategy has been shown to be effective in improving adherence across all patients, conditions, and settings. Between September and October 2014, a group of experts in geriatrics, pharmacology, epidemiology, and public health applied a modified RAND appropriateness method to reach a consensus on the possible best interventions to improve adherence in older individuals. Seven interventions were identified, classified based on their target (patient, therapy, and public health/society): (1) Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment, (2) patient (and caregiver) education to improve patient empowerment, (3) optimization of treatment, (4) use of adherence aids, (5) physician and other healthcare professionals' education, (6) adherence assessment, (7) facilitating access to medicine by service integration. For each intervention, experts assessed (a) target population, (b) health professionals potentially involved in the intervention, (c) strategies/instruments needed for implementation, and (d) time of the intervention. Interventions that target adherence must combine different approaches targeting the complex aspects of older adults in a holistic approach. Tackling non-adherence, with its complexity, requires a multi-stakeholder patient-centred approach acting in a defined framework of interactions in which the different players may provide different services but are integrated with one another.

  8. Oral Medications Enhance Adherence to Surveillance for Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Survival in Chronic Hepatitis B Patients

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Joon Yeul; Kim, Hwi Young; Kim, Jieun E.; Lee, Dong Hyeon; Chang, Young; Cho, Hyeki; Yoo, Jeong-Ju; Lee, Minjong; Cho, Young Youn; Cho, Yuri; Cho, EunJu; Yu, Su Jong; Kim, Yoon Jun; Yoon, Jung-Hwan

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Regular surveillance for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients is essential to detect HCC earlier and to improve prognosis. This study investigated whether prescription of oral medication contributes to adherence to surveillance, early tumor detection, and overall survival (OS). Methods A total of 401 CHB patients who were newly diagnosed with HCC were included: 134 patients received no medication (group 1), 151 received hepatoprotective agents such as ursodeoxycholic acid and silymarin (group 2), and 116 received antiviral agents (group 3) at two years before HCC diagnosis. The primary endpoint was OS, and secondary endpoints were compliance to regular surveillance and HCC status at diagnosis. Results Compared to group 1, both group 2 and 3 had higher rates of good compliance to regular surveillance (defined as participation in >80% of imaging intervals being ≤6 months) (58.2%, 90.1%, and 97.4%, respectively; P<0.001), more HCC diagnosed at a very early stage (20.9%, 32.5%, and 36.2%; P = 0.019) and smaller tumor size (2.8±2.4cm, 1.9±1.1cm, and 1.8±0.9cm; P<0.001). Finally, compared to group 1, both group 2 (hazard ratio, 0.63; 95% confidence interval, 0.41–0.97; P = 0.035) and group 3 (hazard ratio, 0.40; 95% confidence interval, 0.22–0.71; P = 0.002) had significantly longer OS. In mediation analysis, prolonged OS is resulted considerably from indirect effect mediated by shorter imaging interval (>100% in group 2 and 14.5% in group 3) rather than direct effect of medication itself. Conclusions Prescription of oral medication improves compliance to surveillance and enables early detection of HCC, which is associated with enhanced survival. PMID:28099520

  9. Psychosocial factors affecting medication adherence among HIV-1 infected adults receiving combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in Botswana.

    PubMed

    Do, Natalie T; Phiri, Kelesitse; Bussmann, Hermann; Gaolathe, Tendani; Marlink, Richard G; Wester, C William

    2010-06-01

    As increasing numbers of persons are placed on potentially life-saving combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in sub-Saharan Africa, it is imperative to identify the psychosocial and social factors that may influence antiretroviral (ARV) medication adherence. Using an 87 question survey, the following data were collected from patients on cART in Botswana: demographics, performance (Karnofsky) score, perceived stigma and level of HIV disclosure, attitudes and beliefs concerning HIV/AIDS, substance and/or drug use, depression, and pharmacy and healthcare provider-related factors. Overall adherence rates were determined by patient self-report, institutional adherence, and a culturally modified Morisky scale. Three hundred adult patients were recruited between April and May 2005. The overall cART adherence rate was 81.3% based on 4 day and 1 month patient recall and on clinic attendance for ARV medication refills during the previous 3 months. Adults receiving cART for 1-6 months were the least adherent (77%) followed by those receiving cART for greater than 12 months (79%). Alcohol use, depression, and nondisclosure of positive HIV status to their partner were predictive of poor adherence rates (p value <0.02). A significant proportion (81.3%) of cART-treated adults were adherent to their prescribed treatment, with rates superior to those reported in resource-rich settings. Adherence rates were poorest among those just starting cART, most likely due to the presence of ARV-related toxicity. Adherence was lower among those who have been treated for longer periods of time (greater than 1 year), suggesting complacency, which may become a significant problem, especially among these long-term cART-treated patients who return to improved physical and mental functioning and may be less motivated to adhere to their ARV medications. Healthcare providers should encourage HIV disclosure to "at-risk" partners and provide ongoing counseling and education to help patients

  10. Patient-Physician Racial/Ethnic Concordance and Blood Pressure Control: The Role of Trust and Medication Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Montague, Enid; Manwell, Linda Baier; Brown, Roger; Schwartz, Mark D.; Linzer, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine associations between racial/ethnic concordance and BP control, and determine if patient trust and medication adherence mediate these associations. Design Cross-sectional study of 723 hypertensive African American and White patients receiving care from 205 White and African American providers at 119 primary care clinics, from 2001–2005. Racial/ethnic concordance was characterized as dyads where both the patient and physician were of the same race/ethnicity; discordance occurred in dyads where the patient was African American and the physician was White. Patient perceptions of trust and medication adherence were assessed with self-report measures. Blood pressure readings were abstracted from patients’ medical charts using standardized procedures. Results Six hundred thirty seven patients were in race/ethnic-concordant relationships; 86 were in race/ethnic-discordant relationships. Concordance had no association with blood pressure control. White patients in race/ethnic-concordant relationships were more likely to report better adherence than African American patients in race/ethnic-discordant relationships (OR: 1.27 95% CI: 1.01, 1.61 p = 0.04). Little difference in adherence was found for African American patients in race/ethnic-concordant vs. discordant relationships. Increasing trust was associated with significantly better adherence (OR: 1.17 95% CI: 1.04, 1.31, p < 0.01) and a trend toward better BP control among all patients (OR: 1.26, 95% CI: 0.97, 1.63, p=0.07). Conclusions Patient trust may influence medication adherence and BP control regardless of patient-physician racial/ethnic composition. PMID:24266617

  11. Implementing Behavioral Activation and Life-Steps for Depression and HIV Medication Adherence in a Community Health Center

    PubMed Central

    Magidson, Jessica F.; Seitz-Brown, C. J.; Safren, Steven A.; Daughters, Stacey B.

    2014-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy to treat HIV/AIDS has substantially improved clinical outcomes among patients living with HIV/AIDS, but only in the presence of very consistent adherence. One of the most prevalent and impactful individual-level predictors of poor adherence is depressive symptoms, even at subthreshold levels. Evidence-based cognitive behavioral interventions exist to address improvements in depressive symptoms and adherence in this population, yet these techniques have largely been designed and tested as individual treatments for delivery in mental health settings. This presents a significant challenge when transporting these techniques to medical settings where other formats for delivery may be more appropriate (i.e., groups, less frequent visits) and few hands-on resources exist to guide this process. As such, primary aims of this study were to adapt and implement evidence-based cognitive behavioral techniques for depression (behavioral activation; BA) and HIV medication adherence (Life-Steps) that have potential for dissemination in an outpatient community health center. The intervention incorporated feedback from health center staff and utilized a modular, group format that did not rely on sequential session attendance. Feasibility was examined over 8 weeks (n = 13). Preliminary effects on depression, health-related quality of life, and medication adherence were examined and exit interviews were conducted with a subset of participants (n = 4) to inform future modifications. Treatment descriptions and recommendations for effective clinical implementation based on patient and clinician feedback are provided along with case material of two individual patients and an example group session. Current efforts are an important next step for disseminating evidence-based techniques for depression and HIV medication adherence to community health center or AIDS service organization settings. PMID:25419102

  12. Blister Packaging Medication to Increase Treatment Adherence and Clinical Response: Impact on Suicide-related Morbidity and Mortality

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    AD _ Award Number: W81XWH-09-1-0723 TITLE: Blister Packaging Medication to Increase Treatment Adherence and Clinical Response: Impact on Suicide...YYYY) , 2. REPORT TYPE December 2014 Final Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 29Sept2009 - 28 Sept2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Blister Packaging

  13. Diet and Exercise Adherence and Practices among Medically Underserved Patients with Chronic Disease: Variation across Four Ethnic Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orzech, Kathryn M.; Vivian, James; Huebner Torres, Cristina; Armin, Julie; Shaw, Susan J.

    2013-01-01

    Many factors interact to create barriers to dietary and exercise plan adherence among medically underserved patients with chronic disease, but aspects related to culture and ethnicity are underexamined in the literature. Using both qualitative ("n" = 71) and quantitative ("n" = 297) data collected in a 4-year, multimethod study…

  14. HEALTH LITERACY, MEDICATION ADHERENCE, AND BLOOD PRESSURE LEVEL AMONG HYPERTENSIVE OLDER ADULTS TREATED AT PRIMARY HEALTH CARE CENTERS.

    PubMed

    Wannasirikul, Phitchayaphat; Termsirikulchai, Lakkhana; Sujirarat, Dusit; Benjakul, Sarunya; Tanasugarn, Chanuantong

    2016-01-01

    We conducted this study to explore the causal relationships between health literacy, individual characteristics, literacy, culture and society, cognitive ability, medication adherence, and the blood pressure levels of hypertensive older adults receiving health care services at Primary Health Care Centers in Sa Kaeo Province, Thailand. Six hundred hypertensive older adults had their blood pressure level recorded and were interviewed using questionnaires. Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) was used to determine the effect size, both direct and indirect, among factors. Almost half (48.7%) of studied subjects had inadequate health literacy, 98.3% had good medication adherence, and 80% had good blood pressure levels. The highest effect size on health literacy was literacy, followed by cognitive ability, and culture and society. Medication adherence was affected directly and indirectly by cognitive ability, literacy, and culture and society. Health literacy had not only a direct effect on medication adherence but was also the mediator. Finally, the highest effect size on blood pressure level was critical and communicative health literacy. These findings suggest that health literacy should be considered in the Health Literacy Program of the National Public Health Policy and Plan, Ministry of Public Health.

  15. Type D Personality Predicts Poor Medication Adherence in Chinese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Six-Month Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuemei; Zhang, Shengfa; Xu, Huiwen; Tang, Xinfeng; Zhou, Huixuan; Yuan, Jiaqi; Wang, Xiaohua; Qu, Zhiyong; Wang, Fugang; Zhu, He; Guo, Shuai

    2016-01-01

    Background Type D personality and medication nonadherence have been shown to be associated with poor health outcomes. Type D personality is associated with poor medication adherence in patients with coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, and heart failure. However, the relationship between type D personality and medication adherence in patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) remains unknown. This study aims to examine whether type D personality was associated with medication adherence in patients with T2DM. Design and Settings A follow-up study was conducted in general hospital of the People's Liberation Army in Beijing. Methods 412 T2DM patients (205 females), who were recruited by circular systematic random sampling, provided demographic and baseline data about medical information and completed measures of Type D personality. Then, 330 patients went on to complete a self-report measure of medication adherence at the sixth month after baseline data collection. Chi-square test, t tests, and hierarchical multiple regression analyses were conducted, as needed. Results Patients with type D personality were significantly more likely to have poor medication adherence (p<0.001). Type D personality predicts poor medication adherence before and after controlling for covariates when it was analyzed as a categorical variable. However, the dimensional construct of type D personality was not associated with medication adherence when analyzed as a continuous variable. Conclusion Although, as a dimensional construct, type D personality may not reflect the components of the personality associated with poor medication adherence in patients with T2DM, screening for type D personality may help to identify those who are at higher risk of poor medication adherence. Interventions, aiming to improve medication adherence, should be launched for these high-risk patients. PMID:26894925

  16. Factors associated with medication adherence in school-aged children with asthma.

    PubMed

    Chan, Amy H Y; Stewart, Alistair W; Foster, Juliet M; Mitchell, Edwin A; Camargo, Carlos A; Harrison, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Adherence to preventive asthma treatment is poor, particularly in children, yet the factors associated with adherence in this age group are not well understood. Adherence was monitored electronically over 6 months in school-aged children who attended a regional emergency department in New Zealand for an asthma exacerbation and were prescribed twice-daily inhaled corticosteroids. Participants completed questionnaires including assessment of family demographics, asthma responsibility and learning style. Multivariable analysis of factors associated with adherence was conducted. 101 children (mean (range) age 8.9 (6-15) years, 51% male) participated. Median (interquartile range) preventer adherence was 30% (17-48%) of prescribed. Four explanatory factors were identified: female sex (+12% adherence), Asian ethnicity (+19% adherence), living in a smaller household (-3.0% adherence per person in the household), and younger age at diagnosis (+2.7% for every younger year of diagnosis) (all p<0.02). In school-aged children attending the emergency department for asthma, males and non-Asian ethnic groups were at high risk for poor inhaled corticosteroid adherence and may benefit most from intervention. Four factors explained a small proportion of adherence behaviour indicating the difficulty in identifying adherence barriers. Further research is recommended in other similar populations.

  17. Factors associated with medication adherence in school-aged children with asthma

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Alistair W.; Foster, Juliet M.; Mitchell, Edwin A.; Camargo, Carlos A.; Harrison, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Adherence to preventive asthma treatment is poor, particularly in children, yet the factors associated with adherence in this age group are not well understood. Adherence was monitored electronically over 6 months in school-aged children who attended a regional emergency department in New Zealand for an asthma exacerbation and were prescribed twice-daily inhaled corticosteroids. Participants completed questionnaires including assessment of family demographics, asthma responsibility and learning style. Multivariable analysis of factors associated with adherence was conducted. 101 children (mean (range) age 8.9 (6–15) years, 51% male) participated. Median (interquartile range) preventer adherence was 30% (17–48%) of prescribed. Four explanatory factors were identified: female sex (+12% adherence), Asian ethnicity (+19% adherence), living in a smaller household (−3.0% adherence per person in the household), and younger age at diagnosis (+2.7% for every younger year of diagnosis) (all p<0.02). In school-aged children attending the emergency department for asthma, males and non-Asian ethnic groups were at high risk for poor inhaled corticosteroid adherence and may benefit most from intervention. Four factors explained a small proportion of adherence behaviour indicating the difficulty in identifying adherence barriers. Further research is recommended in other similar populations. PMID:27730181

  18. Comparative analysis of non-adherence to medication treatment for systemic arterial hypertension in urban and rural populations 1

    PubMed Central

    Magnabosco, Patricia; Teraoka, Eliana Cavalari; de Oliveira, Edward Meirelles; Felipe, Elisangela Aparecida; Freitas, Dayana; Marchi-Alves, Leila Maria

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to evaluate the indexes and the main factors associated with non-adherence to medication treatment for systemic arterial hypertension between urban and rural areas. METHOD: analytical study based on an epidemiological survey with a sample of 247 hypertensive residents of rural and urban areas, with application of a socio-demographic and economic questionnaire, and treatment adherence assessment. The Pearson's Chi-square test was used and the odds ratio (OD) was calculated to analyze the factors related to non-adherence. RESULTS: the prevalence of non-adherence was 61.9% and it was higher in urban areas (63.4%). Factors significantly associated with non-adherence were: male gender (OR=1.95; 95% CI 1.08-3.50), age 20-59 years old (OR=2.51; 95% CI 1.44-4.39), low economic status (OR=1.95; 95% CI 1.09-3.47), alcohol consumption (OR=5.92, 95% CI 1.73-20.21), short time of hypertension diagnosis (OR=3.07; 95% CI 1.35-6.96) and not attending the health service for routine consultations (OR=2.45; 1.35-4.42). CONCLUSION: the socio-demographic/economic characteristics, lifestyle habits and how to relate to health services were the factors that presented association with non-adherence regardless of the place of residence. PMID:25806627

  19. Discontinuing financial incentives for adherence to antipsychotic depot medication: long-term outcomes of a cluster randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Priebe, Stefan; Bremner, Stephen A; Pavlickova, Hana

    2016-01-01

    Objectives In a cluster randomised controlled trial, offering financial incentives improved adherence to antipsychotic depot medication over a 1-year period. Yet, it is unknown whether this positive effect is sustained once the incentives stop. Methods and analyses Patients in the intervention and control group were followed up for 2 years after the intervention. Primary and secondary outcomes were assessed at 6 months and 24 months post intervention. Assessments were conducted between September 2011 and November 2014. Results After the intervention period, intervention and control groups did not show any statistically significant differences in adherence, neither in the first 6 months (71% and 77%, respectively) nor in the following 18 months (68%, 74%). There were no statistically significant differences in secondary outcomes, that is, adherence ≥95% and untoward incidents either. Conclusions It may be concluded that incentives to improve adherence to antipsychotic maintenance medication are effective only for as long as they are provided. Once they are stopped, adherence returns to approximately baseline level with no sustained benefit. Trial registration number ISRCTN77769281; Results. PMID:27655261

  20. HAART Adherence Strategies for Methadone Clients Who Are HIV-Positive: A Treatment Manual for Implementing Contingency Management and Medication Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haug, Nancy A.; Sorensen, James L.; Gruber, Valerie A.; Lollo, Nicole; Roth, Gregory

    2006-01-01

    Research demonstrates that injection drug users with HIV and/or AIDS have difficulty adhering to complex regimens of HIV medications. Because of the risk of increased viral resistance associated with irregular medication adherence, there is considerable clinical need to assist clients who abuse substances in taking their antiretroviral medications…

  1. Patient and primary care provider attitudes and adherence towards lung cancer screening at an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Duong, Duy K; Shariff-Marco, Salma; Cheng, Iona; Naemi, Harris; Moy, Lisa M; Haile, Robert; Singh, Baldeep; Leung, Ann; Hsing, Ann; Nair, Viswam S

    2017-06-01

    Low dose CT (LDCT) for lung cancer screening is an evidence-based, guideline recommended, and Medicare approved test but uptake requires further study. We therefore conducted patient and provider surveys to elucidate factors associated with utilization. Patients referred for LDCT at an academic medical center were questioned about their attitudes, knowledge, and beliefs on lung cancer screening. Adherent patients were defined as those who met screening eligibility criteria and completed a LDCT. Referring primary care providers within this same medical system were surveyed in parallel about their practice patterns, attitudes, knowledge and beliefs about screening. Eighty patients responded (36%), 48 of whom were adherent. Among responders, non-Hispanic patients (p = 0.04) were more adherent. Adherent respondents believed that CT technology is accurate and early detection is useful, and they trusted their providers. A majority of non-adherent patients (79%) self-reported an intention to obtain a LDCT in the future. Of 36 of 87 (41%) responding providers, only 31% knew the correct lung cancer screening eligibility criteria, which led to a 37% inappropriate referral rate from 2013 to 2015. Yet, 75% had initiated lung cancer screening discussions, 64% thought screening was at least moderately effective, and 82% were interested in learning more of the 33 providers responding to these questions. Overall, patients were motivated and providers engaged to screen for lung cancer by LDCT. Non-adherent patient "procrastinators" were motivated to undergo screening in the future. Additional follow through on non-adherence may enhance screening uptake, and raising awareness for screening eligibility through provider education may reduce inappropriate referrals.

  2. “My patients are better than yours”: optimistic bias about patients’ medication adherence by European health care professionals

    PubMed Central

    Clyne, Wendy; McLachlan, Sarah; Mshelia, Comfort; Jones, Peter; De Geest, Sabina; Ruppar, Todd; Siebens, Kaat; Dobbels, Fabienne; Kardas, Przemyslaw

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The objectives of this study were to determine the perceptions of European physicians, nurses, and pharmacists about the extent of nonadherence by patients in their country relative to their perception of nonadherence by their own patients, and to investigate the occurrence of optimistic bias about medication adherence. The study explored a key cognitive bias for prevalence and likelihood estimates in the context of health care professionals’ beliefs about patients’ use of medicines. Methods A cross-sectional online survey of 3,196 physicians (855), nurses (1,294), and pharmacists (1,047) in ten European countries (Austria, Belgium, England, France, Germany, Hungary, the Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, and Switzerland) was used. Results Participants differed in their perceptions of the prevalence of medication adherence initiation, implementation, and persistence present in their own patients with a chronic illness in comparison to patients with a chronic illness in general. Health care professionals demonstrated optimistic bias for initiation and persistence with medicine taking, perceiving their own patients to be more likely to initiate and persist with treatment than other patients, but reported significantly lower prevalence of medication adherence levels for their own patients than for patients in general. This finding is discussed in terms of motivational and cognitive factors that may foster optimistic bias by health care professionals about their patients, including heightened knowledge of, and positive beliefs about, their own professional competence and service delivery relative to care and treatment provided elsewhere. Conclusion Health care professionals in Europe demonstrated significant differences in their perceptions of medication adherence prevalence by their own patients in comparison to patients in general. Some evidence of optimistic bias by health care professionals about their patients’ behavior is observed. Further social

  3. Patterns of Substance Use among HIV-Positive Adults Over 50: Implications for Treatment and Medication Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Jeffrey T.; Starks, Tyrel J.; Millar, Brett M.; Boonrai, Kailip; Marcotte, David

    2014-01-01

    Background The population of older adults living with HIV is increasing in the United States. Despite an increased focus on the health of HIV-positive older adults, knowledge about their substance use, a primary risk factor for HIV medication non-adherence, and the association between use, problems associated with use, and adherence behavior, is limited. Methods Data were collected from 557 HIV-positive adults aged 50 and older in the New York City area via telephone interview. Participants reported the number of days in the past month on which they missed any doses of HIV medication as well as the number of days they used alcohol, marijuana, cocaine/crack, opiates, amyl nitrite (poppers), and other drugs. The severity of substance use associated problems was assessed using the DAST-10 and AUDIT-C. Results The sample included gay/bisexual (40.4%) and heterosexual (28.1%) men as well as lesbian/bisexual (4.9%) and heterosexual (26.7%) women. Latent class analyses identified four distinct patterns of substance use: Exclusive Alcohol Use; Alcohol and Marijuana; Alcohol and Cocaine/Crack; and Multiple-Substance Use. Variability in the number of missed HIV medication days and perceptions of substance use associated problems were observed across classes, with poorest adherence reported in the Alcohol and Cocaine/Crack class, followed by the Multiple-Substance Use class. These two classes also reported the greatest perceived impairment from substance use. Conclusions Patterns of recent substance use were associated with varying levels of HIV medication adherence and perceived substance use impairment, indicating that substance type matters when considering the health of older adults living with HIV, and that multiple-substance use needs to be addressed by interventions aimed at improving medication adherence. PMID:24745475

  4. Effectiveness of a focused, brief psychoeducation program for parents of ADHD children: improvement of medication adherence and symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Guan-nan; Wang, Yu-feng; Yang, Li; Niu, Wen-yi

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy of a psychoeducation program for parents of children with ADHD in enhancing adherence to pharmacological treatment and improving clinical symptoms. Methods We developed a psychoeducation program based on the theory of planned behavior (TPB). Eighty-nine children with ADHD were cluster randomly assigned for their families to receive 3 months of well-structured psychoeducation (intervention group, n=44) or only general clinical counseling (control group, n=45). Parents in the intervention group were given an expert lecture (with slides and a parent manual), attended two expert-guided parent group sessions, and were invited to join a professional-guided online community. Measurement of parents’ knowledge about ADHD, components of the TPB model, and child ADHD symptoms were taken before and after intervention. Medication adherence was assessed thoroughly at the end of the first and third months. Satisfaction with the psychoeducation program was assessed only in the intervention group. Two-independent-samples t-test, ANOVA, and chi-square test were employed to compare differences between groups. Results Compared to the control group, medication adherence in the intervention group was significantly higher after 1 and 3 months (97.7% intervention vs 75.6% control, P=0.002, and 86.4% intervention vs 53.3% control, P=0.001, respectively). Accordingly, the ADHD rating scale scores were lower in the intervention group than the control group after intervention (33.7±5.4 vs 45.1±7.9, P=0.008). Greater improvements in parents’ knowledge about ADHD and many components of the TPB model were observed in the intervention group, especially increased intention to adhere to medication, compared to the control group (P<0.001). Conclusion This psychoeducation program had a positive impact on both medication adherence and clinical symptoms of ADHD children. It could be considered as a potential beneficial supplement to clinical practice. PMID

  5. A Web-Based and Mobile Health Social Support Intervention to Promote Adherence to Inhaled Asthma Medications: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Koufopoulos, Justin T; Conner, Mark T; Gardner, Peter H

    2016-01-01

    Background Online communities hold great potential as interventions for health, particularly for the management of chronic illness. The social support that online communities can provide has been associated with positive treatment outcomes, including medication adherence. There are few studies that have attempted to assess whether membership of an online community improves health outcomes using rigorous designs. Objective Our objective was to conduct a rigorous proof-of-concept randomized controlled trial of an online community intervention for improving adherence to asthma medicine. Methods This 9-week intervention included a sample of asthmatic adults from the United Kingdom who were prescribed an inhaled corticosteroid preventer. Participants were recruited via email and randomized to either an “online community” or “no online community” (diary) condition. After each instance of preventer use, participants (N=216) were required to report the number of doses of medication taken in a short post. Those randomized to the online community condition (n=99) could read the posts of other community members, reply, and create their own posts. Participants randomized to the no online community condition (n=117) also posted their medication use, but could not read others’ posts. The main outcome measures were self-reported medication adherence at baseline and follow-up (9 weeks postbaseline) and an objective measure of adherence to the intervention (visits to site). Results In all, 103 participants completed the study (intervention: 37.8%, 39/99; control: 62.2%, 64/117). MANCOVA of self-reported adherence to asthma preventer medicine at follow-up was not significantly different between conditions in either intention-to-treat (P=.92) or per-protocol (P=.68) analysis. Site use was generally higher in the control compared to intervention conditions. Conclusions Joining an online community did not improve adherence to preventer medication for asthma patients. Without

  6. The influence of health literacy level on an educational intervention to improve glaucoma medication adherence

    PubMed Central

    Muir, Kelly W.; Ventura, Alice; Stinnett, Sandra S.; Enfiedjian, Abraham; Allingham, R. Rand; Lee, Paul P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To test an educational intervention targeted to health literacy level with the goal of improving glaucoma medication adherence. Methods One hundred and twenty-seven veterans with glaucoma were randomized to glaucoma education or standard care. The intervention included a video scripted at a 4th, 7th, or 10th grade level, depending on the subject’s literacy level. After six months, the number of days without glaucoma medicine (DWM) according to pharmacy records for the intervention and control groups was compared. Results The number of DWM in the six months following enrollment was similar for control and intervention groups (intervention, n = 67, DWM = 63 ± 198; standard care, n = 60, DWM = 65 ± 198; p = 0.708). For each subgroup of literacy (adequate, marginal, inadequate), subjects in the intervention group experienced less mean DWM than subjects in the control group and the effect size (ES) increased as literacy decreased: adequate literacy, ES 0.069; marginal, ES 0.183, inadequate, ES 0.363. Decreasing health literacy skills were associated with decreasing self-reported satisfaction with care (slope = 0.017, SE = 0.005, p = 0.002). Conclusions Patients with decreased health literacy skills may benefit from educational efforts tailored to address their health literacy level and learning style. Practice implications Providers should consider health literacy skills when engaging in glaucoma education. PMID:22000272

  7. HIGHLIGHTING DIFFERENCES BETWEEN CONDITIONAL AND UNCONDITIONAL QUANTILE REGRESSION APPROACHES THROUGH AN APPLICATION TO ASSESS MEDICATION ADHERENCE

    PubMed Central

    BORAH, BIJAN J.; BASU, ANIRBAN

    2014-01-01

    The quantile regression (QR) framework provides a pragmatic approach in understanding the differential impacts of covariates along the distribution of an outcome. However, the QR framework that has pervaded the applied economics literature is based on the conditional quantile regression method. It is used to assess the impact of a covariate on a quantile of the outcome conditional on specific values of other covariates. In most cases, conditional quantile regression may generate results that are often not generalizable or interpretable in a policy or population context. In contrast, the unconditional quantile regression method provides more interpretable results as it marginalizes the effect over the distributions of other covariates in the model. In this paper, the differences between these two regression frameworks are highlighted, both conceptually and econometrically. Additionally, using real-world claims data from a large US health insurer, alternative QR frameworks are implemented to assess the differential impacts of covariates along the distribution of medication adherence among elderly patients with Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:23616446

  8. Simultaneous analysis of multiple serum proteins adhering to the surface of medical grade polydimethylsiloxane elastomers.

    PubMed

    Backovic, Aleksandar; Wolfram, Dolores; Del-Frari, Barbara; Piza, Hildegunde; Huber, Lukas A; Wick, Georg

    2007-12-01

    Although polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS, silicone) elastomers are presumed to be chemically inert and of negligible toxicity, they induce a prompt acute inflammatory response with subsequent fibrotic reactions. Since local inflammatory and fibrotic side effects are associated with the proteinaceous film on the surface of silicone implants, the process of protein adherence to silicone is of practical medical relevance, and interesting from theoretical, clinical and biotechnological perspectives. It is hypothesized that the systemic side effects resembling rheumatoid and other connective tissue diseases may be triggered by local immunological changes, but this functional relationship has yet to be defined. Because the proteinaceous film on the surface of silicone has been identified as a key player in the activation of host defense mechanisms, we propose a test system based on a proteomics screen to simultaneously identify proteins adsorbed from serum to the surface of silicone. Herein, we describe protein adsorption kinetics on the surface of silicone implants, correlate the adhesion properties of serum proteins with the occurrence of adverse reactions to silicone, and successfully discriminate their signature on the silicone surface in a blinded study of patients suffering from fibrotic reactions (as determined by Baker scale) to silicone implants.

  9. Psychometric properties of the Polish version of the eight-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale in hypertensive adults.

    PubMed

    Jankowska-Polanska, Beata; Uchmanowicz, Izabella; Chudiak, Anna; Dudek, Krzysztof; Morisky, Donald E; Szymanska-Chabowska, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Low adherence to pharmacological treatment is often associated with poor blood pressure control, but identification of nonadherent patients in outpatient settings is difficult. The aim of the study was to translate and evaluate the psychometric properties of the Polish version of the structured self-report eight-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) among patients with hypertension. The study was conducted in a family doctor practice between January and July 2015. After a standard "forward-backward" procedure to translate MMAS-8 into Polish, the questionnaire was administered to 160 patients with hypertension. Reliability was tested using a measure of internal consistency (Cronbach's α) and test-retest reliability. Validity was confirmed using known group validity. Three levels of adherence were considered based on the following scores: 0 to <6 (low); 6 to <8 (medium); and 8 (high). Complete questionnaires were returned by 110 respondents (mean age: 60.7 years ±12.6; 54.6% were female). The mean number of pills taken daily was 3.61±4.31. The mean adherence score was 6.42± 2.0. Moderate internal consistency was found (Cronbach's α=0.81), and test-retest reliability was satisfactory (r=0.461-0.905; P<0.001). Reproducibility expressed by Cohen's κ coefficient =0.61 was good. In high-adherent patients, the percentage of well-controlled blood pressure was higher than in low-adherent patients (33.3% vs 19.1%, χ (2)=0.87, P=0.648). Psychometric evaluation of the Polish version of the MMAS-8 indicates that it is a reliable and valid measure tool to detect nonadherent patients. The MMAS-8 may be routinely used to support communication about the medication-taking behavior in hypertensive patients.

  10. The effectiveness of interventions using electronic reminders to improve adherence to chronic medication: a systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Linn, Annemiek J; van Weert, Julia C M; de Bakker, Dinny H; Bouvy, Marcel L; van Dijk, Liset

    2012-01-01

    Background Many patients experience difficulties in adhering to long-term treatment. Although patients' reasons for not being adherent are diverse, one of the most commonly reported barriers is forgetfulness. Reminding patients to take their medication may provide a solution. Electronic reminders (automatically sent reminders without personal contact between the healthcare provider and patient) are now increasingly being used in the effort to improve adherence. Objective To examine the effectiveness of interventions using electronic reminders in improving patients' adherence to chronic medication. Methods A comprehensive literature search was conducted in PubMed, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Electronic searches were supplemented by manual searching of reference lists and reviews. Two reviewers independently screened all citations. Full text was obtained from selected citations and screened for final inclusion. The methodological quality of studies was assessed. Results Thirteen studies met the inclusion criteria. Four studies evaluated short message service (SMS) reminders, seven audiovisual reminders from electronic reminder devices (ERD), and two pager messages. Best evidence synthesis revealed evidence for the effectiveness of electronic reminders, provided by eight (four high, four low quality) studies showing significant effects on patients' adherence, seven of which measured short-term effects (follow-up period <6 months). Improved adherence was found in all but one study using SMS reminders, four studies using ERD and one pager intervention. In addition, one high quality study using an ERD found subgroup effects. Conclusion This review provides evidence for the short-term effectiveness of electronic reminders, especially SMS reminders. However, long-term effects remain unclear. PMID:22534082

  11. Psychometric properties of the Polish version of the eight-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale in hypertensive adults

    PubMed Central

    Jankowska-Polanska, Beata; Uchmanowicz, Izabella; Chudiak, Anna; Dudek, Krzysztof; Morisky, Donald E; Szymanska-Chabowska, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Low adherence to pharmacological treatment is often associated with poor blood pressure control, but identification of nonadherent patients in outpatient settings is difficult. The aim of the study was to translate and evaluate the psychometric properties of the Polish version of the structured self-report eight-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) among patients with hypertension. The study was conducted in a family doctor practice between January and July 2015. After a standard “forward–backward” procedure to translate MMAS-8 into Polish, the questionnaire was administered to 160 patients with hypertension. Reliability was tested using a measure of internal consistency (Cronbach’s α) and test–retest reliability. Validity was confirmed using known group validity. Three levels of adherence were considered based on the following scores: 0 to <6 (low); 6 to <8 (medium); and 8 (high). Complete questionnaires were returned by 110 respondents (mean age: 60.7 years ±12.6; 54.6% were female). The mean number of pills taken daily was 3.61±4.31. The mean adherence score was 6.42± 2.0. Moderate internal consistency was found (Cronbach’s α=0.81), and test–retest reliability was satisfactory (r=0.461–0.905; P<0.001). Reproducibility expressed by Cohen’s κ coefficient =0.61 was good. In high-adherent patients, the percentage of well-controlled blood pressure was higher than in low-adherent patients (33.3% vs 19.1%, χ2=0.87, P=0.648). Psychometric evaluation of the Polish version of the MMAS-8 indicates that it is a reliable and valid measure tool to detect nonadherent patients. The MMAS-8 may be routinely used to support communication about the medication-taking behavior in hypertensive patients. PMID:27672314

  12. Adherence to HIV medications in a cohort of men who have sex with men: impact of September 11th.

    PubMed

    Halkitis, Perry N; Kutnick, Alexandra H; Rosof, Elana; Slater, Simon; Parsons, Jeffrey T

    2003-03-01

    Adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) regimens remains a challenge for people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Severe traumas like that of September 11, 2001, can exacerbate the difficulties already associated with adherence. A community-based sample of 68 HIV-seropositive men who have sex with men (MSM) living in New York City who were on protease inhibitor HAART regimens completed quantitative assessments to examine adherence in the aftermath of September 11th. Data were drawn from a larger study of drug use and HIV medication adherence. Assessments conducted from September 24, 2001 to October 24, 2001 were compared to assessments taken 2-4 months prior to September 11th. Repeated measures analyses of variance were used to analyze the number of missed and suboptimal doses (doses taken outside the prescribed time by +/-4 hours) reported in the 2 weeks prior to each respective assessment. The results indicated a significant increase in the number of missed doses and the number of suboptimal doses immediately after the events of September 11th. Differences in adherence were not influenced, however, by sociodemographic characteristics. These results suggest that the events of September 11th had an impact on adherence to HIV medications among MSM in New York City and provide further support for the notion that the events of September 11th may have adversely impacted the lives of seropositive individuals. Attention should be paid by clinicians working with HIV-positive individuals on how this event has been incorporated into lives of individuals already burdened by a chronic and demanding disease.

  13. Medication adherence and visit-to-visit variability of systolic blood pressure in African Americans with chronic kidney disease in the AASK trial.

    PubMed

    Hong, K; Muntner, P; Kronish, I; Shilane, D; Chang, T I

    2016-01-01

    Lower adherence to antihypertensive medications may increase visit-to-visit variability of blood pressure (VVV of BP), a risk factor for cardiovascular events and death. We used data from the African American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension (AASK) trial to examine whether lower medication adherence is associated with higher systolic VVV of BP in African Americans with hypertensive chronic kidney disease (CKD). Determinants of VVV of BP were also explored. AASK participants (n=988) were categorized by self-report or pill count as having perfect (100%), moderately high (75-99%), moderately low (50-74%) or low (<50%) proportion of study visits with high medication adherence over a 1-year follow-up period. We used multinomial logistic regression to examine determinants of medication adherence, and multivariable-adjusted linear regression to examine the association between medication adherence and systolic VVV of BP, defined as the coefficient of variation or the average real variability (ARV). Participants with lower self-reported adherence were generally younger and had a higher prevalence of comorbid conditions. Compared with perfect adherence, moderately high, moderately low and low adherence was associated with 0.65% (±0.31%), 0.99% (±0.31%) and 1.29% (±0.32%) higher systolic VVV of BP (defined as the coefficient of variation) in fully adjusted models. Results were qualitatively similar when using ARV or when using pill counts as the measure of adherence. Lower medication adherence is associated with higher systolic VVV of BP in African Americans with hypertensive CKD; efforts to improve medication adherence in this population may reduce systolic VVV of BP.

  14. Impact of Randomization, Clinic Visits, and Medical and Psychiatric Cormorbidities on Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Adherence in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Budhiraja, Rohit; Kushida, Clete A.; Nichols, Deborah A.; Walsh, James K.; Simon, Richard D.; Gottlieb, Daniel J.; Quan, Stuart F.

    2016-01-01

    visits approach. Citation: Budhiraja R, Kushida CA, Nichols DA, Walsh JK, Simon RD, Gottlieb DJ, Quan SF. Impact of randomization, clinic visits, and medical and psychiatric cormorbidities on continuous positive airway pressure adherence in obstructive sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(3):333–341. PMID:26518698

  15. Medication Adherence and Blood Pressure Control Among Hypertensive Patients With Coexisting Long-Term Conditions in Primary Care Settings

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu Ting; Wang, Harry H.X.; Liu, Kirin Q.L.; Lee, Gabrielle K.Y.; Chan, Wai Man; Griffiths, Sian M.; Chen, Ruo Ling

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hypertension is a typical example of long-term disease posing formidable challenges to health care. One goal of antihypertensive therapy is to achieve optimal blood pressure (BP) control and reduce co-occurring chronic conditions (multimorbidity). This study aimed to assess the influence of multimorbidity on medication adherence, and to explore the association between poor BP control and multimorbidity, with implications for hypertension management. A cross-sectional design with multistage sampling was adopted to recruit Chinese hypertensive patients attending general out-patient clinics from 3 geographic regions in Hong Kong. A modified systemic sampling methodology with 1 patient as a sampling unit was used to recruit consecutive samples in each general out-patient clinic. Data were collected by face-to-face interviews using a standardized protocol. Poor BP control was defined as having systolic BP/diastolic BP ≥130/80 mm Hg for those with diabetes or chronic kidney disease; and ≥140/90 mm Hg for others. Medication adherence was assessed by a validated Chinese version of the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale. A simple unweighted enumeration was adopted to measure the combinations of coexisting long-term conditions. Binary logistic regression analysis was conducted with medication adherence and multimorbidity as outcome variables, respectively, after controlling for effects of patient-level covariates. The prevalence of multimorbidity was 47.4% (95% confidence interval [CI] 45.4%–49.4%) among a total of 2445 hypertensive patients. The proportion of subjects having 0, 1, and ≥2 additional long-term conditions was 52.6%, 29.1%, and 18.3%, respectively. The overall rate of poor adherence to medication was 46.6%, whereas the rate of suboptimal BP control was 48.7%. Albeit the influence of multimorbidity on medication adherence was not found to be statistically significant, patients with poorly controlled BP were more likely to have multimorbidity

  16. Adherence to Behavioral and Medical Treatment Recommendations by Parents of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Timothy R.; Symons, Frank J.

    2009-01-01

    The extent to which parents of children with intellectual or developmental disabilities are adherent to prescribed treatments has not been investigated. In this treatment adherence study, parents (n = 220) of children with autism spectrum disorders were surveyed regarding implementation of recommended treatments to manage problem behavior of their…

  17. Medication adherence in patients with diabetes mellitus: does physician drug dispensing enhance quality of care? Evidence from a large health claims database in Switzerland

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Carola A; Reich, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Background The drug-dispensing channel is a scarcely explored determinant of medication adherence, which is considered as a key indicator for the quality of care among patients with diabetes mellitus. In this study, we investigated the difference in adherence between diabetes patients who obtained their medication directly from a prescribing physician (physician dispensing [PD]) or via a pharmacy. Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted using a large health care claims database from 2011 to 2014. Patients with diabetes of all ages and receiving at least one oral antidiabetic drug (OAD) prescription were included. We calculated patients’ individual adherence to OADs defined as the proportion of days covered (PDC), which was measured over 1 year after patient identification. Good adherence was defined as PDC ≥80%. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the relationship between the PDC and the dispensing channel (PD, pharmacy). Results We identified a total of 10,430 patients prescribed drugs by a dispensing physician and 16,292 patients receiving drugs from a pharmacy. Medication adherence was poor in both patient groups: ~40% of the study population attained good adherence to OADs. We found no significant impact of PD on the adherence level in diabetes patients. Covariates associated significantly with good adherence were older age groups, male sex, occurrence of comorbidity and combined diabetes drug therapy. Conclusion In conclusion, adherence to antihyperglycemic medication is suboptimal among patients with diabetes. The results of this study provide evidence that the dispensing channel does not have an impact on adherence in Switzerland. Certainly, medication adherence needs to be improved in both supply settings. Physicians as well as pharmacists are encouraged to develop and implement useful tools to increase patients’ adherence behavior. PMID:27695299

  18. African-Americans' perceptions of health care provider cultural competence that promote HIV medical self-care and antiretroviral medication adherence.

    PubMed

    Gaston, Gina B

    2013-01-01

    Most studies of cultural competence in healthcare examine healthcare providers' definitions of cultural competence practices. This study is unique in that it examines the relationship between African-American patients' perceptions of the cultural competence of their HIV healthcare providers and the adherence of these patients to medical self-care and antiretroviral therapy (ART). This cross-sectional, exploratory, descriptive study was conducted at the Ruth Rothstein CORE Center in Chicago, Illinois. The sample consisted of 202 HIV-positive African-Americans who completed surveys during clinic visits. Multiple measures were used, including the Patient Assessments of Cultural Competency survey instrument developed by the Department of Health and Human Services Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Medical self-care was measured using the advice and instructions scale and the self-care symptom management for people living with HIV/AIDS categorical scale. ART adherence was measured using the Adherence Behaviors Self-Report and Adherence Self-Report scales. The data revealed many significant correlations between variables. The more patients believed that providers should integrate culture in HIV treatment; the better their reported health (F1,138=0.151, P=0.05) and the more they followed their provider's advice and instructions (medical self-care; F1,138=0.029, P=0.05). Participants who trusted their providers engaged in more medical self-care (F1,138=0.280, P=0.01). More shared treatment decisions were reported among participants who had higher levels of education (F1,127=0.337, P=0.05). Findings of this study indicate the need for increased attention to the role of cultural competence in HIV/AIDS care. Understanding patient perceptions of provider cultural competence has the potential to improve HIV treatment adherence and health outcomes.

  19. HIV-Related Stress and Life Chaos Mediate the Association Between Poverty and Medication Adherence Among People Living with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Kalichman, Seth C; Kalichman, Moira O

    2016-12-01

    HIV treatment depends on high-levels of antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence, which is severely impeded by poverty. Men and women living with HIV infection (N = 92) completed computerized interviews of demographic and health characteristics, poverty markers, stressful life events, and life chaos, as well as unannounced pill counts to determine prospective medication adherence and medical record chart abstractions for HIV viral load. Poverty markers were associated with both stressors and chaos, and the direct effects of all three factors predicted ART non-adherence. The multiple mediation model showed that accounting for stressors and chaos resulted in a non-significant association between poverty markers and ART adherence. The indirect effect of poverty markers on adherence through life chaos was significant, whereas the indirect effect of poverty markers on adherence through stressors was not significant. Factors that render HIV-related stress and create chaos offer intervention targets that are more amenable to change than poverty itself.

  20. Five features of value-based insurance design plans were associated with higher rates of medication adherence.

    PubMed

    Choudhry, Niteesh K; Fischer, Michael A; Smith, Benjamin F; Brill, Gregory; Girdish, Charmaine; Matlin, Olga S; Brennan, Troyen A; Avorn, Jerry; Shrank, William H

    2014-03-01

    Value-based insurance design (VBID) plans selectively lower cost sharing to increase medication adherence. Existing plans have been structured in a variety of ways, and these variations could influence the effectiveness of VBID plans. We evaluated seventy-six plans introduced by a large pharmacy benefit manager during 2007-10. We found that after we adjusted for the other features and baseline trends, VBID plans that were more generous, targeted high-risk patients, offered wellness programs, did not offer disease management programs, and made the benefit available only for medication ordered by mail had a significantly greater impact on adherence than plans without these features. The effects were as large as 4-5 percentage points. These findings can provide guidance for the structure of future VBID plans.

  1. Baseline Substance Use Interferes with Maintenance of HIV Medication Adherence Skills.

    PubMed

    Dale, Sannisha K; Traeger, Lara; O'Cleirigh, Conall; Bedoya, C Andres; Pinkston, Megan; Wilner, Julianne G; Stein, Michael; Safren, Steven A

    2016-05-01

    Cognitive behavioral therapy for adherence and depression (CBT-AD) in HIV improves both adherence and depression outcomes relative to enhanced treatment as usual (ETAU). However, in persons with injection drug use (PWIDU) histories, adherence gains seen during treatment have not been maintained postintervention. Therefore, we examined whether heroin or cocaine use at study entry moderated acquisition or maintenance of adherence gains after CBT-AD. HIV-positive adults in treatment for opioid dependence (n = 89) were randomly assigned to CBT-AD or ETAU and completed 3-, 6-, and 12-month assessments. Participants were majority male (61%), white (48%), and heterosexual (79%). Hierarchical linear modeling was used to evaluate whether heroin or cocaine use at baseline interacted with intervention assignment to predict change in adherence during active treatment and follow-up. CBT-AD-related improvement in adherence during the active intervention period did not vary by baseline substance use. However, cocaine use (but not heroin use) at baseline interacted with intervention assignment to predict a significant decline in follow-up adherence (cocaine use × group condition coefficient = -0.77, t = -2.44, p = 0.02) such that by 12 months, adherence among CBT participants was significantly lower among those who used cocaine (45.0%) compared to those who did not (72.3%; t = 2.50, p = 0.018). HIV-positive PWIDU who use heroin or cocaine at baseline can benefit from the CBT-AD intervention to improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy; therefore, providers should not withhold an active psychosocial treatment for HIV-positive PWIDU who are using. Cocaine use at baseline may limit the degree to which gains are maintained postintervention, and therefore, booster sessions may be needed.

  2. Community Health Workers as Allies in Hypertension Self-Management and Medication Adherence in the United States, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Brownstein, J. Nell; Satsangi, Anamika; Escoffery, Cam

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Rates of hypertension control remain low among underserved populations in the United States; moreover, disparities in hypertension-related cardiovascular disease death are increasing. Community health workers (CHWs) can address barriers to hypertension control among underrepresented and diverse populations. We identify unique roles CHWs play in hypertension self-management and medication adherence. Methods In 2014, we conducted a mixed methods study with an online survey of 265 CHWs and 23 telephone interviews. The survey and interview guide contained questions about CHWs’ roles in hypertension self-management and hypertension medication adherence. We used descriptive statistics to analyze survey data and used inductive thematic analysis for the qualitative data. Results CHWs described working in partnership with patients and various health care providers to assist people in hypertension self-management. Roles were flexible and multifaceted but patient-driven. CHWs used various delivery methods to assist patients in overcoming barriers to medication adherence. CHWs interacted with patients primarily through individual clinical sessions or home visits. On average, they visit about 8 times per month, about 40 minutes per visit, over 7 months. CHWs often addressed barriers related to medicine-taking and refills and support patient–provider communications. Conclusion Results from this study will help health care professionals, policy makers, and academics better understand the work of CHWs. CHWs are important provider allies for improving hypertension prevention and self-management, especially among underserved and diverse populations in the United States. PMID:28033090

  3. Health Literacy, Cognitive Function, Proper Use, and Adherence to Inhaled Asthma Controller Medications Among Older Adults With Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Michael S.; Smith, Samuel G.; Martynenko, Melissa; Vicencio, Daniel P.; Sano, Mary; Wisnivesky, Juan P.; Federman, Alex D.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We sought to investigate the degree to which cognitive skills explain associations between health literacy and asthma-related medication use among older adults with asthma. METHODS: Patients aged ≥ 60 years receiving care at eight outpatient clinics (primary care, geriatrics, pulmonology, allergy, and immunology) in New York, New York, and Chicago, Illinois, were recruited to participate in structured, in-person interviews as part of the Asthma Beliefs and Literacy in the Elderly (ABLE) study (n = 425). Behaviors related to medication use were investigated, including adherence to prescribed regimens, metered-dose inhaler (MDI) technique, and dry powder inhaler (DPI) technique. Health literacy was measured using the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults. Cognitive function was assessed in terms of fluid (working memory, processing speed, executive function) and crystallized (verbal) ability. RESULTS: The mean age of participants was 68 years; 40% were Hispanic and 30% non-Hispanic black. More than one-third (38%) were adherent to their controller medication, 53% demonstrated proper DPI technique, and 38% demonstrated correct MDI technique. In multivariable analyses, limited literacy was associated with poorer adherence to controller medication (OR, 2.3; 95% CI, 1.29-4.08) and incorrect DPI (OR, 3.51; 95% CI, 1.81-6.83) and MDI (OR, 1.64; 95% CI, 1.01-2.65) techniques. Fluid and crystallized abilities were independently associated with medication behaviors. However, when fluid abilities were added to the model, literacy associations were reduced. CONCLUSIONS: Among older patients with asthma, interventions to promote proper medication use should simplify tasks and patient roles to overcome cognitive load and suboptimal performance in self-care. PMID:25275432

  4. The impact of non-adherence to medication in patients with schizophrenia on health, social care and societal costs. Analysis of the QUATRO study.

    PubMed

    King, D; Knapp, M; Patel, A; Amaddeo, F; Tansella, M; Schene, A; Koeter, M; Angermeyer, M; Becker, T

    2014-03-01

    Aims. For people with schizophrenia, non-adherence to antipsychotic medications may result in high use of health and other services. The objective of our research was to examine the economic consequences of non-adherence in patients with schizophrenia taking antipsychotic medication. Methods. Data were taken from QUATRO, a randomized controlled trial that drew a sample of adults with schizophrenia receiving psychiatric services in four European cities: Amsterdam, Leipzig, London and Verona. Trial inclusion criteria were a clinical diagnosis of schizophrenia, requiring on-going antipsychotic medication for at least 1-year following baseline assessment, and exhibiting evidence of clinical instability in the year prior to baseline. The patient-completed Medication Adherence Questionnaire (MAQ) was used to calculate the 5-point Morisky index of adherence. Generalized linear models (GLM) were developed to determine the effect of adherence on (i) health and social care and (ii) societal costs before and after treatment, taking into account other potential cost-influencing factors. Results. The effect of non-adherence on costs was mixed. For different groups of services, and according to treatment group assignment, non-adherence was both negatively and positively associated with costs. Conclusions. The impact of non-adherence on costs varies across the types of services used by individuals with schizophrenia.

  5. Validation of the Persian Version of the 8-Item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) in Iranian Hypertensive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Moharamzad, Yashar; Saadat, Habibollah; Shahraki, Babak Nakhjavan; Rai, Alireza; Saadat, Zahra; Aerab-Sheibani, Hossein; Naghizadeh, Mohammad Mehdi; Morisky, Donald E.

    2015-01-01

    The reliability and validity of the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) was assessed in a sample of Iranian hypertensive patients. In this multi-center study which lasted from August to October 2014, a total of 200 patients who were suffering from hypertension (HTN) and were taking anti-hypertensive medication(s) were included. The cases were accessed through private and university health centers in the cities of Tehran, Karaj, Kermanshah, and Bafgh in Iran and were interviewed face-to-face by the research team. The validated Persian translation of the MMAS-8 was provided by the owner of this scale. This scale contains 7 questions with “Yes” or “No” response choices and an additional Likert-type question (totally 8 questions). The total score ranges from 0 to 8 with higher scores reflecting better medication adherence. Mean (±SD) overall MMAS-8 score was 5.57 (±1.86). There were 108 (54%), 62 (31%), and 30 (15%) patients in the low, moderate, and high adherence groups. Internal consistency was acceptable with an overall Cronbach’s α coefficient of 0.697 and test–retest reliability showed good reproducibility (r= 0.940); P< 0.001. Overall score of the MMAS-8 was significantly correlated with systolic BP (r= - 0.306) and diastolic BP (r= - 0.279) with P< 0.001 for both BP measurements. The Chi-square test showed a significant relationship between adherence level and BP control (P= 0.016). The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) of the scale were 92.8%, 22.3%, 52.9%, and 76.7%, respectively. The Persian version of the MMAS had acceptable reliability and validity in Iranian hypertensive patients. This scale can be used as a standard and reliable tool in future studies to determine medication adherence of Persian-speaking patients with chronic conditions. PMID:25946926

  6. Does Health Information in Mass Media Help or Hurt Patients? Investigation of Potential Negative Influence of Mass Media Health Information on Patients' Beliefs and Medication Regimen Adherence.

    PubMed

    Im, Heewon; Huh, Jisu

    2017-03-01

    As an important public health issue, patient medication non-adherence has drawn much attention, but research on the impact of mass media as an information source on patient medication adherence has been scant. Given that mass media often provide confusing and contradicting information regarding health/medical issues, this study examined the potential negative influence of exposure to health information in mass media on patients' beliefs about their illnesses and medications, and medication adherence, in comparison with the effects of exposure to another primary medication information source, physicians. Survey data obtained from patients on blood thinner regimens revealed that the frequency of exposure to health information in mass media was negatively related to accuracy of patients' beliefs about their medication benefits and patient medication adherence. On the other hand, frequency of visits with physicians was positively associated with patients' beliefs about their medication benefits but had no significant relation to medication regimen adherence. The implications of the study findings are discussed, and methodological limitations and suggestion for future research are presented.

  7. Barriers to HIV Medication Adherence: Examining Distinct Anxiety and Depression Symptoms among Women Living with HIV Who Experienced Childhood Sexual Abuse.

    PubMed

    Willie, Tiara C; Overstreet, Nicole M; Sullivan, Tami P; Sikkema, Kathleen J; Hansen, Nathan B

    2016-01-01

    Experiencing sexual violence in childhood or adolescence is highly prevalent among some women living with HIV, often resulting in anxiety and depression symptoms in adulthood. Anxiety and depression have been associated with HIV medication nonadherence, yet little research has assessed distinct components of anxiety and depression as risk factors of HIV medication nonadherence. The current study examined distinct symptom components of anxiety and depression as predictors of HIV medication non-adherence among women living with HIV and childhood sexual abuse enrolled in a coping intervention. This secondary analysis included a sample of 85 women living with HIV and childhood sexual abuse and being prescribed antiretroviral medication who completed measures on anxiety, depression, and medication adherence. Results from a logistic regression analysis suggest that distinct components of anxiety may be related to medication nonadherence among this population. Targeted mental health interventions for this population may increase adherence to antiretroviral medication.

  8. Medication adherence may be more important than other behaviours for optimizing glycaemic control among low-income adults

    PubMed Central

    Osborn, C. Y.; Mayberry, L. S.; Kim, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY What is known Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are required to perform multiple self-care behaviours to achieve and maintain optimal glycaemic control (HbA1c), which prevents complications and premature mortality. Patients with T2DM and low socioeconomic status (SES) are more likely to have suboptimal HbA1c, often due to being less adherent to recommended self-care activities than their higher-SES counterparts. Objective Although studies support performing certain diabetes self-care behaviours for optimizing glycaemic control, there is limited research on the relative importance of each behaviour for this purpose. Identifying what behaviours are most important for HbA1c among low-SES patients with T2DM would be particularly useful for informing policy and intervention efforts for this high-risk group. Methods In a cross-sectional study of 314 adults with T2DM and low SES, we used the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities to assess self-care behaviours and multivariate models to test which behaviours were associated with lower HbA1c. Results and discussion Only medication adherence was significantly associated with lower HbA1c after adjusting for the other self-care behaviours (β = −0 14, P = 0 028) and further adjusting for demographic and diabetes characteristics (β = −0 16, P = 0 024). What is new Medication adherence may be the most important self-care behaviour for glycaemic control among adults with T2DM and low SES. Conclusion Focused efforts to improve medication adherence among low-SES patient populations may improve glycaemic control. PMID:26939721

  9. Diet and exercise adherence and practices among medically underserved patients with chronic disease: variation across four ethnic groups.

    PubMed

    Orzech, Kathryn M; Vivian, James; Huebner Torres, Cristina; Armin, Julie; Shaw, Susan J

    2013-02-01

    Many factors interact to create barriers to dietary and exercise plan adherence among medically underserved patients with chronic disease, but aspects related to culture and ethnicity are underexamined in the literature. Using both qualitative (n = 71) and quantitative (n = 297) data collected in a 4-year, multimethod study among patients with hypertension and/or diabetes, the authors explored differences in self-reported adherence to diet and exercise plans and self-reported daily diet and exercise practices across four ethnic groups-Whites, Blacks, Vietnamese, and Latinos-at a primary health care center in Massachusetts. Adherence to diet and exercise plans differed across ethnic groups even after controlling for key sociodemographic variables, with Vietnamese participants reporting the highest adherence. Food and exercise options were shaped by economic constraints as well as ethnic and cultural familiarity with certain foods and types of activity. These findings indicate that health care providers should consider ethnicity and economic status together to increase effectiveness in encouraging diverse populations with chronic disease to make healthy lifestyle changes.

  10. Current practice and clinicians’ perception of medication non-adherence in patients with inflammatory bowel disease: A survey of 98 clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Soobraty, Anisah; Boughdady, Sarah; Selinger, Christian P

    2017-01-01

    AIM The survey ascertains perceptions and describes current practice of clinicians regarding medication non-adherence in patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease. METHODS Gastroenterologists, trainees and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) specialist nurses from the United Kingdom were invited to a web based survey collecting data on clinician demographics, patient volume and level of interest in IBD. Respondents were asked to estimate non-adherence levels and report use of screening tools and interventions to improve adherence. RESULTS Non-adherence was seen as an infrequent problem by 57% of 98 respondents. Levels of non-adherence were estimated lower than evidence suggests by 29% for mesalazine (5ASA), 26% for immunomodulators (IMM) and 21% for biologics (BIOL). Respondents reporting non-adherence as a frequent problem were more likely to report adherence levels in line with evidence (5ASA P < 0.001; IMM P = 0.012; BIOL P = 0.015). While 80% regarded screening as important only 25% screen regularly (40% of these with validated assessment tools). Respondents stated forgetfulness, beliefs about necessity of medication and not immediately apparent benefits as the main reasons for non-adherence. Patient counselling on benefits and risks of medication was a commonly used intervention. CONCLUSION Clinicians treating IBD patients frequently underestimate non-adherence and use of validated screening tools is infrequent. Most respondents identified the main factors associated with non-adherence in line with evidence and often counselled patients accordingly. Professional education should focus more on non-adherence practice to avoid adverse treatment outcomes associated with non-adherence. PMID:28217376

  11. Does Spanish instruction for emergency medicine resident physicians improve patient satisfaction in the emergency department and adherence to medical recommendations?

    PubMed Central

    Stoneking, LR; Waterbrook, AL; Garst Orozco, J; Johnston, D; Bellafiore, A; Davies, C; Nuño, T; Fatás-Cabeza, J; Beita, O; Ng, V; Grall, KH; Adamas-Rappaport, W

    2016-01-01

    Background After emergency department (ED) discharge, Spanish-speaking patients with limited English proficiency are less likely than English-proficient patients to be adherent to medical recommendations and are more likely to be dissatisfied with their visit. Objectives To determine if integrating a longitudinal medical Spanish and cultural competency curriculum into emergency medicine residency didactics improves patient satisfaction and adherence to medical recommendations in Spanish-speaking patients with limited English proficiency. Methods Our ED has two Emergency Medicine Residency Programs, University Campus (UC) and South Campus (SC). SC program incorporates a medical Spanish and cultural competency curriculum into their didactics. Real-time Spanish surveys were collected at SC ED on patients who self-identified as primarily Spanish-speaking during registration and who were treated by resident physicians from both residency programs. Surveys assessed whether the treating resident physician communicated in the patient’s native Spanish language. Follow-up phone calls assessed patient satisfaction and adherence to discharge instructions. Results Sixty-three patients self-identified as primarily Spanish-speaking from August 2014 to July 2015 and were initially included in this pilot study. Complete outcome data were available for 55 patients. Overall, resident physicians spoke Spanish 58% of the time. SC resident physicians spoke Spanish with 66% of the patients versus 45% for UC resident physicians. Patients rated resident physician Spanish ability as very good in 13% of encounters – 17% for SC versus 5% for UC. Patient satisfaction with their ED visit was rated as very good in 35% of encounters – 40% for SC resident physicians versus 25% for UC resident physicians. Of the 13 patients for whom Spanish was the language used during the medical encounter who followed medical recommendations, ten (77%) of these encounters were with SC resident physicians

  12. Targeting Medication Non-Adherence Behavior in Selected Autoimmune Diseases: A Systematic Approach to Digital Health Program Development

    PubMed Central

    van Mierlo, Trevor; Fournier, Rachel; Ingham, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background 29 autoimmune diseases, including Rheumatoid Arthritis, gout, Crohn’s Disease, and Systematic Lupus Erythematosus affect 7.6-9.4% of the population. While effective therapy is available, many patients do not follow treatment or use medications as directed. Digital health and Web 2.0 interventions have demonstrated much promise in increasing medication and treatment adherence, but to date many Internet tools have proven disappointing. In fact, most digital interventions continue to suffer from high attrition in patient populations, are burdensome for healthcare professionals, and have relatively short life spans. Objective Digital health tools have traditionally centered on the transformation of existing interventions (such as diaries, trackers, stage-based or cognitive behavioral therapy programs, coupons, or symptom checklists) to electronic format. Advanced digital interventions have also incorporated attributes of Web 2.0 such as social networking, text messaging, and the use of video. Despite these efforts, there has not been little measurable impact in non-adherence for illnesses that require medical interventions, and research must look to other strategies or development methodologies. As a first step in investigating the feasibility of developing such a tool, the objective of the current study is to systematically rate factors of non-adherence that have been reported in past research studies. Methods Grounded Theory, recognized as a rigorous method that facilitates the emergence of new themes through systematic analysis, data collection and coding, was used to analyze quantitative, qualitative and mixed method studies addressing the following autoimmune diseases: Rheumatoid Arthritis, gout, Crohn’s Disease, Systematic Lupus Erythematosus, and inflammatory bowel disease. Studies were only included if they contained primary data addressing the relationship with non-adherence. Results Out of the 27 studies, four non-modifiable and 11 modifiable

  13. Pharmacy adherence measures to assess adherence to antiretroviral therapy: review of the literature and implications for treatment monitoring.

    PubMed

    McMahon, James H; Jordan, Michael R; Kelley, Karen; Bertagnolio, Silvia; Hong, Steven Y; Wanke, Christine A; Lewin, Sharon R; Elliott, Julian H

    2011-02-15

    Prescription or pill-based methods for estimating adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART), pharmacy adherence measures (PAMs), are objective estimates calculated from routinely collected pharmacy data. We conducted a literature review to evaluate PAMs, including their association with virological and other clinical outcomes, their efficacy compared with other adherence measures, and factors to consider when selecting a PAM to monitor adherence. PAMs were classified into 3 categories: medication possession ratio (MPR), pill count (PC), and pill pick-up (PPU). Data exist to recommend PAMs over self-reported adherence. PAMs consistently predicted patient outcomes, but additional studies are needed to determine the most predictive PAM parameters. Current evidence suggests that shorter duration of adherence assessment (≤ 6 months) and use of PAMs to predict future outcomes may be less accurate. PAMs which incorporate the number of days for which ART was prescribed without the counting of remnant pills, are reasonable minimum-resource methods to assess adherence to ART.

  14. Effects of a health promotion program on medication adherence to antiplatelet therapy among ischemic stroke patients in Hainan Province, China.

    PubMed

    Su, Qingjie; Li, Chaoyun; Long, Faqing; Chen, Bin; Wan, Zhongqin; Wu, Yingman; Dai, Mingming; Wang, Desheng; Zhang, Yuhui; Wang, Bufei

    2016-01-01

    Survivors of ischemic stroke are still at a significant risk for recurrence. Antiplatelet agents are the treatment of first choice for long-term secondary prevention of vascular events. This study aims to assess a health promotion program on medication adherence to antiplatelet therapy among ischemic stroke patients in Hainan province, China. In five hospitals from the intervention group, four highly experienced physicians trained 62 neurologists, who in turn trained 613 stroke patients to improve their awareness and adherence to antiplatelet therapy. Physicians and patients of the control group received usual stroke management programs. After one-year follow-up, the proportion of patients who took the antiplatelet therapy increased significantly in the intervention group, reaching 73.2%, with a pre-post difference between two arms of 22.9% ( P < 0.01). There was also a significant net increase in the proportion of patients with awareness of antiplatelet therapy (24.4%, P < 0.01). Multivariate analysis illustrated health promotion program, higher education, annual household income, insurance, and medical status affected antiplatelet drug use in stroke patients. In conclusion, the health promotion program, based on a train-the-trainer approach, showed positive effects on awareness of and adherence to antiplatelet therapy, which has the potential to be scaled up to other resource-limited areas.

  15. Validation of the Medication Adherence Rating Scale in homeless patients with schizophrenia: Results from the French Housing First experience

    PubMed Central

    Zemmour, K.; Tinland, A.; Boucekine, M.; Girard, V.; Loubière, S.; Resseguier, N.; Fond, G.; Auquier, P.; Boyer, L.; Apostolidis, T.; Birmes, P.; Bossetti, T.; Bouloudnine, R.; Combes, B.; Debieve, J.; Falissard, B.; Greacen, T.; Laval, C.; Lancon, C.; Le Cardinal, P.; Mantovani, J.; Moreau, D.; Naudin, J.; Rhunter, P.; Videau, B.

    2016-01-01

    The Medication Adherence Rating Scale (MARS) is one of the most widely used measurements of adherence in schizophrenia (SZ), but there is no available data regarding its psychometric properties in homeless SZ patients (HSZ). The aim of this study was therefore to assess the psychometric properties of the MARS in a large multicenter sample of HSZ subjects. This multi-centre prospective study was conducted in the following 4 French cities: Lille, Marseille, Paris and Toulouse. Three hundred and fifty-three patients were included. The 3-factor structure of the MARS was confirmed using confirmatory factor analysis: RMSEA = 0.045, CFI = 0.98, TLI = 0.97 and WRMR = 0.76. The unidimensionality of each factor was supported by the satisfactory INFIT statistics. Item internal consistencies were all higher than 0.20 and the Kuder–Richardson were higher than to 0.6, except for factor 2, which was closed to 0.5. Significant associations with symptoms, functioning and quality of life showed satisfactory external validity. The acceptability was satisfactory with missing data lower than 5% for each dimension. The MARS is a short self-administered instrument with acceptable psychometric properties in homeless SZ patients that yields interesting information about medication adherence. PMID:27534796

  16. Refill Adherence in Relation to Substitution and the Use of Multiple Medications: A Nationwide Population Based Study on New ACE-Inhibitor Users

    PubMed Central

    Jönsson, Anna K.; Lesén, Eva; Mårdby, Ann-Charlotte; Sundell, Karolina Andersson

    2016-01-01

    Objective Generic substitution has contributed to economic savings but switching products may affect patient adherence, particularly among those using multiple medications. The aim was to analyse if use of multiple medications influenced the association between switching products and refill adherence to angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitors in Sweden. Study Design and Setting New users of ACE-inhibitors, starting between 1 July 2006 and 30 June 2007, were identified in the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register. Refill adherence was assessed using the continuous measure of medication acquisition (CMA) and analysed with linear regression and analysis of covariance. Results The study population included 42735 individuals whereof 51.2% were exposed to switching ACE-inhibitor and 39.6% used multiple medications. Refill adherence was higher among those exposed to switching products than those not, but did not vary depending on the use of multiple medications or among those not. Refill adherence varied with age, educational level, household income, country of birth, previous hospitalisation and previous cardiovascular diagnosis. Conclusion The results indicate a positive association between refill adherence and switching products, mainly due to generic substitution, among new users of ACE-inhibitors in Sweden. This association was independent of use of multiple medications. PMID:27192203

  17. Medical screening reference manual for security force personnel at fuel cycle facilities possessing formula quantities of special nuclear materials

    SciTech Connect

    Arzino, P.A.; Brown, C.H. . Foundation)

    1991-09-01

    The recommendations contained throughout this NUREG were provided to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) as medical screening information that could be used by physicians who are evaluating the parameters of the safe participation of guards, Tactical Response Team members (TRTs), and all other armed response personnel in physical fitness training and in physical performance standards testing. The information provided in this NUREG will help licensees to determine if guards, TRTs, and other armed response personnel can effectively perform their normal and emergency duties without undue hazard to themselves, to fellow employees, to the plant site, and to the general public. The medical recommendations in this NUREG are similar in content to the medical standards contained in 10 CFR Part 1046 which, in part, specifies medical standards for the protective force personnel regulated by the Department of Energy. The guidelines contained in this NUREG are not requirements, and compliance is not required. 3 refs.

  18. Adaptation and evaluation of the measurement properties of the Brazilian version of the Self-efficacy for Appropriate Medication Adherence Scale1

    PubMed Central

    Pedrosa, Rafaela Batista dos Santos; Rodrigues, Roberta Cunha Matheus

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: to undertake the cultural adaptation of, and to evaluate the measurement properties of, the Brazilian version of the Self-efficacy for Appropriate Medication Adherence Scale in coronary heart disease (CHD) patients, with outpatient monitoring at a teaching hospital. Method: the process of cultural adaptation was undertaken in accordance with the international literature. The data were obtained from 147 CHD patients, through the application of the sociodemographic/clinical characterization instrument, and of the Brazilian versions of the Morisky Self-Reported Measure of Medication Adherence Scale, the General Perceived Self-Efficacy Scale, and the Self-efficacy for Appropriate Medication Adherence Scale. Results: the Brazilian version of the Self-efficacy for Appropriate Medication Adherence Scale presented evidence of semantic-idiomatic, conceptual and cultural equivalencies, with high acceptability and practicality. The floor effect was evidenced for the total score and for the domains of the scale studied. The findings evidenced the measure's reliability. The domains of the Brazilian version of the Self-efficacy for Appropriate Medication Adherence Scale presented significant inverse correlations of moderate to strong magnitude between the scores of the Morisky scale, indicating convergent validity, although correlations with the measure of general self-efficacy were not evidenced. The validity of known groups was supported, as the scale discriminated between "adherents" and "non-adherents" to the medications, as well as to "sufficient dose" and "insufficient dose". Conclusion: the Brazilian version of the Self-efficacy for Appropriate Medication Adherence Scale presented evidence of reliability and validity in coronary heart disease outpatients. PMID:27192417

  19. Medication adherence in patients with psychotic disorders: an observational survey involving patients before they switch to long-acting injectable risperidone

    PubMed Central

    Baylé, Franck Jean; Tessier, Arnaud; Bouju, Sophie; Misdrahi, David

    2015-01-01

    Background Maintaining antipsychotic therapy in psychosis is important in preventing relapse. Long-acting depot preparations can prevent covert non-adherence and thus potentially contribute to better patient outcomes. In this observational survey the main objective is to evaluate medication adherence and its determinants for oral treatment in a large sample of patients with psychosis. Methods In this cross-sectional survey medication adherence for oral treatment was assessed by patients using the patient-rated Medication Adherence Questionnaire (MAQ). Data were collected by physicians on patients with a recent acute psychotic episode before switching to long-acting injectable risperidone. Other evaluations included disease severity (Clinical Global Impression – Severity), patients’ insight (Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale item G12), treatment acceptance (clinician-rated Compliance Rating Scale), and therapeutic alliance (patient-rated 4-Point ordinal Alliance Scale). Results A total of 399 psychiatrists enrolled 1,887 patients (mean age 36.8±11.9 years; 61.6% had schizophrenia). Adherence to oral medication was “low” in 53.2% of patients, “medium” in 29.5%, and “high” in 17.3%. Of patients with psychiatrist-rated active acceptance of treatment, 70% had “medium” or “high” MAQ scores (P<0.0001). Medication adherence was significantly associated with therapeutic alliance (4-Point ordinal Alliance Scale score; P<0.0001). Patient age was significantly associated with adherence: mean age increased with greater adherence (35.6, 36.7, and 38.6 years for patients with “low”, “medium”, and “high” levels of adherence, respectively; P=0.0007), while age <40 years was associated with “low” MAQ classification (P=0.0003). Poor adherence was also associated with a diagnosis of schizophrenia (P=0.0083), more severe disease (Clinical Global Impression – Severity ≥4; P<0.0001), and lower insight (Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale

  20. Cost-Effectiveness of Financial Incentives to Promote Adherence to Depot Antipsychotic Medication: Economic Evaluation of a Cluster-Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Catherine; Knapp, Martin; Yeeles, Ksenija; Bremner, Stephen; Eldridge, Sandra; David, Anthony S.; O’Connell, Nicola; Burns, Tom; Priebe, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Background Offering a modest financial incentive to people with psychosis can promote adherence to depot antipsychotic medication, but the cost-effectiveness of this approach has not been examined. Methods Economic evaluation within a pragmatic cluster-randomised controlled trial. 141 patients under the care of 73 teams (clusters) were randomised to intervention or control; 138 patients with diagnoses of schizophrenia, schizo-affective disorder or bipolar disorder participated. Intervention participants received £15 per depot injection over 12 months, additional to usual acute, mental and community primary health services. The control group received usual health services. Main outcome measures: incremental cost per 20% increase in adherence to depot antipsychotic medication; incremental cost of ‘good’ adherence (defined as taking at least 95% of the prescribed number of depot medications over the intervention period). Findings Economic and outcome data for baseline and 12-month follow-up were available for 117 participants. The adjusted difference in adherence between groups was 12.2% (73.4% control vs. 85.6% intervention); the adjusted costs difference was £598 (95% CI -£4 533, £5 730). The extra cost per patient to increase adherence to depot medications by 20% was £982 (95% CI -£8 020, £14 000). The extra cost per patient of achieving 'good' adherence was £2 950 (CI -£19 400, £27 800). Probability of cost-effectiveness exceeded 97.5% at willingness-to-pay values of £14 000 for a 20% increase in adherence and £27 800 for good adherence. Interpretation Offering a modest financial incentive to people with psychosis is cost-effective in promoting adherence to depot antipsychotic medication. Direct healthcare costs (including costs of the financial incentive) are unlikely to be increased by this intervention. Trial Registration ISRCTN.com 77769281 PMID:26448540

  1. Barriers to Antiretroviral Medication Adherence in Young HIV-Infected Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Kathleen Johnston

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this exploratory study was to examine, from the perspectives of both HIV-infected children and such children's primary guardians, the barriers children face in adhering to combination antiretroviral therapies. Nine HIV-infected young children and 14 guardians of HIV-positive children were interviewed about what the children's lives…

  2. Effects of and satisfaction with short message service reminders for patient medication adherence: a randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Medication adherence is critical for patient treatment. This study involved evaluating how implementing Short Message Service (SMS) reminders affected patient medication adherence and related factors. Methods We used a structured questionnaire to survey outpatients at three medical centers. Patients aged 20 years and older who were prescribed more than 7 days of a prescription medication were randomized into SMS intervention or control groups. The intervention group received daily messages reminding them of aspects regarding taking their medication; the control group received no messages. A phone follow-up was performed to assess outcomes after 8 days. Data were collected from 763 participants in the intervention group and 435 participants in the control group. Results After participants in the intervention group received SMS reminders to take medication or those in the control group received no messages, incidences of delayed doses were decreased by 46.4 and 78.8% for those in the control and intervention groups, respectively. The rate of missed doses was decreased by 90.1% for participants in the intervention group and 61.1% for those in the control group. We applied logistic regression analysis and determined that participants in the intervention group had a 3.2-fold higher probability of having a decrease in delayed doses compared with participants in the control group. Participants in the intervention group also showed a 2.2-fold higher probability of having a decrease in missed doses compared with participants in the control group. Conclusions Use of SMS significantly affected the rates of taking medicine on schedule. Therefore, daily SMS could be useful for reminding patients to take their medicine on schedule. PMID:24238397

  3. ADHERENCE TO INFLUENZA VACCINATION AMONG MEDICAL STUDENTS DURING AND AFTER INFLUENZA A (H1N1) PANDEMIC

    PubMed Central

    de PAULA, Stéfano Ivani; de PAULA, Gustavo Ivani; CUNEGUNDES, Kelly Simone Almeida; de MORAES-PINTO, Maria Isabel

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY This study evaluated the adherence to influenza vaccination among medical students in 2010 and 2011. From August to December 2011, a questionnaire was used to record the influenza vaccination in 2010 and 2011, reasons for acceptance of the influenza vaccine and knowledge of healthcare workers about the influenza vaccine recommendation. One hundred and forty-four students from the 2ndto the 6th years of the medical school were interviewed. A great adherence to pandemic influenza vaccine was noted in 2010, (91% of the students), with "self-protection" being the most common reason cited for vaccination. Other determinants for the vaccination during pandemic were "convenient access to vaccine" and "encouragement by peers and teachers in workplaces and at the university". However, there was a great decay in the acceptance to vaccine in the next influenza season (2011). Only 42% of the students received the vaccine. They claimed "lack of time" and "have forgotten to take the vaccine" as the main reasons. The "knowledge on the recommendation of influenza vaccine to healthcare workers" increased when the students come to attend the last year of the medical school, but that was an insufficient motivator for vaccination. Strategies to increase vaccination should be based on the abovementioned aspects for the adoption of effective measures in both, pandemic and seasonal periods. PMID:27828623

  4. ADHERENCE TO INFLUENZA VACCINATION AMONG MEDICAL STUDENTS DURING AND AFTER INFLUENZA A (H1N1) PANDEMIC.

    PubMed

    Paula, Stéfano Ivani de; Paula, Gustavo Ivani de; Cunegundes, Kelly Simone Almeida; Moraes-Pinto, Maria Isabel de

    2016-11-03

    This study evaluated the adherence to influenza vaccination among medical students in 2010 and 2011. From August to December 2011, a questionnaire was used to record the influenza vaccination in 2010 and 2011, reasons for acceptance of the influenza vaccine and knowledge of healthcare workers about the influenza vaccine recommendation. One hundred and forty-four students from the 2ndto the 6th years of the medical school were interviewed. A great adherence to pandemic influenza vaccine was noted in 2010, (91% of the students), with "self-protection" being the most common reason cited for vaccination. Other determinants for the vaccination during pandemic were "convenient access to vaccine" and "encouragement by peers and teachers in workplaces and at the university". However, there was a great decay in the acceptance to vaccine in the next influenza season (2011). Only 42% of the students received the vaccine. They claimed "lack of time" and "have forgotten to take the vaccine" as the main reasons. The "knowledge on the recommendation of influenza vaccine to healthcare workers" increased when the students come to attend the last year of the medical school, but that was an insufficient motivator for vaccination. Strategies to increase vaccination should be based on the abovementioned aspects for the adoption of effective measures in both, pandemic and seasonal periods.

  5. Differential Predictors of Medication Adherence in HIV: Findings from a Sample of African American and Caucasian HIV-Positive Drug-Using Adults

    PubMed Central

    Moizel, Jennifer; Panos, Stella E.; Patel, Sapna M.; Byrd, Desiree A.; Myers, Hector F.; Wyatt, Gail E.; Hinkin, Charles H.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Modest or even occasional nonadherence to combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) can result in adverse clinical outcomes. African Americans demonstrate lower rates of adherence than Caucasians or Latinos. Identifying factors that influence medication adherence among African Americans is a critical step toward reducing HIV/AIDS disease progression and mortality. In a sample of 181 African American (n=144) and Caucasian (n=37) HIV-positive drug-using individuals [age (M=42.31; SD=6.6) education (M=13.41; SD=2.1)], we examined the influence of baseline drug use, literacy, neurocognition, depression, treatment-specific social support, and patient satisfaction with health care provider on medication adherence averaged over the course of 6 months (study dates 2002–2006). Our findings suggest differential baseline predictors of medication adherence for African Americans and Caucasians, such that patient satisfaction with provider was the strongest predictor of follow-up medication adherence for African Americans whereas for Caucasians depressive symptoms and treatment-specific social support were predictive of medication adherence (after controlling for duration of drug use). PMID:22889235

  6. Psychiatrists’ awareness of adherence to antipsychotic medication in patients with schizophrenia: results from a survey conducted across Europe, the Middle East, and Africa

    PubMed Central

    Olivares, José Manuel; Alptekin, Köksal; Azorin, Jean-Michel; Cañas, Fernando; Dubois, Vincent; Emsley, Robin; Gorwood, Philip; Haddad, Peter M; Naber, Dieter; Papageorgiou, George; Roca, Miquel; Thomas, Pierre; Martinez, Guadalupe; Schreiner, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Background Nonadherence is common among patients with schizophrenia, although the rates vary according to means of assessment and patient population. Failure to adhere to medication can have a major impact on the course of illness and treatment outcomes, including increasing the risk of relapse and rehospitalization. Understanding psychiatrists’ perception of the causes and consequences of nonadherence is crucial to addressing adherence problems effectively. Methods The Europe, the Middle East, and Africa (EMEA) Spanish Adherencia Terapéutica en la Esquizofrenia (ADHES) survey was conducted by questionnaire during January–March 2010 among psychiatrists treating patients with schizophrenia in 36 countries. The survey comprised 20 questions. In addition to recording the demographic details of the 4722 respondents (~12% response rate), it canvassed their preferred methods of assessing adherence, their perceptions of adherence rates, reasons for nonadherence, and strategies to improve adherence. Results Psychiatrists estimated that 53% of their patients with schizophrenia were partially/nonadherent during the previous month. They estimated only one-third of patients who deteriorated after stopping medication were able to attribute this to nonadherence. Psychiatrists assessed adherence most often by patient interview. Lack of insight was viewed as the most important cause of medication discontinuation, followed by patients feeling better and thinking their medication unnecessary, and experiencing undesirable side effects. Considerably fewer psychiatrists viewed insufficient efficacy, cognitive impairment, or drug/alcohol abuse as the most important reasons for their patients stopping medication. Conclusion Psychiatrists throughout EMEA recognize the impact of partial/nonadherence to medication, with patient enquiry being the most commonly used means of assessment. There remains a need for more proactive management of patients with schizophrenia, particularly in

  7. The attitudes of pharmacists, students and the general public on mHealth applications for medication adherence

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Michael J.; Kotadia, Alysha; Mughal, Hassan; Hannan, Ashraf; Alqarni, Hamdan

    2015-01-01

    Background: During recent years mobile technology has developed tremendously and has infiltrated the healthcare field. Mobile healthcare (mHealth) applications, or apps, may be used to support patient adherence to medication thus promoting optimal treatment outcomes and reducing medication wastage. Objective: This study shall consider the opinions of United Kingdom (UK) based pharmacists, pharmacy undergraduates and members of the general public towards the use of mHealth apps to promote adherence to prescribed medication regimens. Methods: On Liverpool John Moores University (LJMU) ethical approval, the 25 item questionnaire was distributed to UK registered pharmacists within inner city Liverpool and Manchester (n=500), pharmacy undergraduates studying at LJMU (n=420) and members of the general public within Liverpool City Centre (n=400). The questions were formatted as multiple choice, Likert scales or the open answer type. The data were analysed using simple frequencies, cross tabulations and non-parametric techniques in the SPSS v22 program. Results: The number of completed questionnaires from the pharmacist, student and general public cohorts were 245, 333 and 400; respectively. The data indicated that the general public rely heavily upon daily routine to take medication as prescribed (54.1%) with mHealth app use being extremely low (1.5%); a similar trend was noted for the pharmacist / student cohorts. The age of the individual is an important consideration, with the younger generation likely to engage with mHealth apps and the older generation less so. Here, education and training are important. Pharmacists (82.3%) would be happy to deliver training packages to the public who would in turn happily receive such training (84%). Key barriers precluding mHealth app use include data reliability, security and technical difficulties. Conclusion: Adherence apps hold great promise to support the patient and their healthcare needs. In order to increase acceptance and

  8. A review of health behaviour theories: how useful are these for developing interventions to promote long-term medication adherence for TB and HIV/AIDS?

    PubMed Central

    Munro, Salla; Lewin, Simon; Swart, Tanya; Volmink, Jimmy

    2007-01-01

    Background Suboptimal treatment adherence remains a barrier to the control of many infectious diseases, including tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS, which contribute significantly to the global disease burden. However, few of the many interventions developed to address this issue explicitly draw on theories of health behaviour. Such theories could contribute to the design of more effective interventions to promote treatment adherence and to improving assessments of the transferability of these interventions across different health issues and settings. Methods This paper reviews behaviour change theories applicable to long-term treatment adherence; assesses the evidence for their effectiveness in predicting behaviour change; and examines the implications of these findings for developing strategies to improve TB and HIV/AIDS medication adherence. We searched a number of electronic databases for theories of behaviour change. Eleven theories were examined. Results Little empirical evidence was located on the effectiveness of these theories in promoting adherence. However, several models have the potential to both improve understanding of adherence behaviours and contribute to the design of more effective interventions to promote adherence to TB and HIV/AIDS medication. Conclusion Further research and analysis is needed urgently to determine which models might best improve adherence to long-term treatment regimens. PMID:17561997

  9. Medication Adherence Patterns after Hospitalization for Coronary Heart Disease. A Population-Based Study Using Electronic Records and Group-Based Trajectory Models

    PubMed Central

    Librero, Julián; Sanfélix-Gimeno, Gabriel; Peiró, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify adherence patterns over time and their predictors for evidence-based medications used after hospitalization for coronary heart disease (CHD). Patients and Methods We built a population-based retrospective cohort of all patients discharged after hospitalization for CHD from public hospitals in the Valencia region (Spain) during 2008 (n = 7462). From this initial cohort, we created 4 subcohorts with at least one prescription (filled or not) from each therapeutic group (antiplatelet, beta-blockers, ACEI/ARB, statins) within the first 3 months after discharge. Monthly adherence was defined as having ≥24 days covered out of 30, leading to a repeated binary outcome measure. We assessed the membership to trajectory groups of adherence using group-based trajectory models. We also analyzed predictors of the different adherence patterns using multinomial logistic regression. Results We identified a maximum of 5 different adherence patterns: 1) Nearly-always adherent patients; 2) An early gap in adherence with a later recovery; 3) Brief gaps in medication use or occasional users; 4) A slow decline in adherence; and 5) A fast decline. These patterns represented variable proportions of patients, the descending trajectories being more frequent for the beta-blocker and ACEI/ARB cohorts (16% and 17%, respectively) than the antiplatelet and statin cohorts (10% and 8%, respectively). Predictors of poor or intermediate adherence patterns were having a main diagnosis of unstable angina or other forms of CHD vs. AMI in the index hospitalization, being born outside Spain, requiring copayment or being older. Conclusion Distinct adherence patterns over time and their predictors were identified. This may be a useful approach for targeting improvement interventions in patients with poor adherence patterns. PMID:27551748

  10. Effects of Telephone Counseling Intervention by Pharmacists (TelCIP) on Medication Adherence; Results of a Cluster Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kooij, Marcel J.; Heerdink, Eibert R.; van Dijk, Liset; van Geffen, Erica C. G.; Belitser, Svetlana V.; Bouvy, Marcel L.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the effect of a pharmacist telephone counseling intervention on patients' medication adherence. Design: Pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial. Setting: 53 Community pharmacies in The Netherlands. Participants: Patients ≥18 years initiating treatment with antidepressants, bisphosphonates, Renin-Angiotensin System (RAS)-inhibitors, or statins (lipid lowering drugs). Pharmacies in arm A provided the intervention for antidepressants and bisphosphonates and usual care for RAS-inhibitors and statins. Pharmacies in arm B provided the intervention for RAS-inhibitors and statins and usual care for antidepressants and bisphosphonates. Intervention: Intervention consisted of a telephone counseling intervention 7–21 days after the start of therapy. Counseling included assessment of practical and perceptual barriers and provision of information and motivation. Main outcome measure: Primary outcome was refill adherence measured over 1 year expressed as continuous outcome and dichotomous (refill rate≥80%). Secondary outcome was discontinuation within 1 year. Results: In the control arms 3627 patients were eligible and in the intervention arms 3094 patients. Of the latter, 1054 patients (34%) received the intervention. Intention to treat analysis showed no difference in adherence rates between the intervention and the usual care arm (74.7%, SD 37.5 respectively 74.5%, 37.9). More patients starting with RAS-inhibitors had a refill ratio ≥80% in the intervention arm compared to usual care (81.4 vs. 74.9% with odds ratio (OR) 1.43, 95%CI 1.11–1.99). Comparing patients with counseling to patients with usual care (per protocol analysis), adherence was statistically significant higher for patients starting with RAS-inhibitors, statins and bisphosphonates. Patients initiating antidepressants did not benefit from the intervention. Conclusions: Telephone counseling at start of therapy improved adherence in patients initiating RAS-inhibitors. The per

  11. Reliability and validity of Arabic translation of Medication Adherence Report Scale (MARS) and Beliefs about Medication Questionnaire (BMQ)–specific for use in children and their parents

    PubMed Central

    Alsous, Mervat; Alhalaiqa, Fadwa; Abu Farha, Rana; Abdel Jalil, Mariam; McElnay, James; Horne, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Objectives to evaluate the reliability and discriminant validity of Arabic translation of the Medication Adherence Report Scale (MARS) and the Beliefs about Medication Questionnaire-specific (BMQ-specific). Methods Having developed Arabic translations of the study instruments, a cross-sectional study was carried out between March and October 2015 in two multidisciplinary governmental hospitals in Jordan. An expert panel monitored the forward and backward translation of the MARS and BMQ. Standard Arabic was used (with no specific dialect inclusion) to allow greater generalisability across Arabic speaking countries. Once the Arabic translations of the questionnaires were developed they were tested for consistency, validity and reliability on a group of children with chronic diseases and their parents. Results A total of 258 parents and 208 children were included in the study. The median age of participated children and parents was 15 years and 42 years respectively. Principle component analysis of all questionnaires indicated that all had good construct validity as they clearly measured one construct. The questionnaires were deemed reliable based on the results of Cronbach alpha coefficient. Furthermore, reliability of the questionnaires was demonstrated by test-retest intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) which ranged from good to excellent for all scales (ICC>0.706). The Pearson correlation coefficient ranged from 0.546–0.805 for the entire sample which indicated a significant moderate to strong positive correlation between MARS and BMQ items at time 1 and 2. Reported adherence was greater than 59% using MARS-children and MARS-parents scales, and was correlated with beliefs in necessity and independent of the concerns regarding medications. Conclusion The Arabic translations of both BMQ and MARS for use in children and their parents have good internal consistency and proved to be valid and reliable tools that can be used by researchers in clinical practice to

  12. Empowerment, motivation, and medical adherence (EMMA): the feasibility of a program for patient-centered consultations to support medication adherence and blood glucose control in adults with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Varming, Annemarie Reinhardt; Hansen, Ulla Møller; Andrésdóttir, Gudbjörg; Husted, Gitte Reventlov; Willaing, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To explore the feasibility of a research-based program for patient-centered consultations to improve medical adherence and blood glucose control in patients with type 2 diabetes. Patients and methods The patient-centered empowerment, motivation, and medical adherence (EMMA) consultation program consisted of three individual consultations and one phone call with a single health care professional (HCP). Nineteen patients with type 2 diabetes completed the feasibility study. Feasibility was assessed by a questionnaire-based interview with patients 2 months after the final consultation and interviews with HCPs. Patient participation was measured by 10-second event coding based on digital recordings and observations of the consultations. Results HCPs reported that EMMA supported patient-centered consultations by facilitating dialogue, reflection, and patient activity. Patients reported that they experienced valuable learning during the consultations, felt understood, and listened to and felt a trusting relationship with HCPs. Consultations became more person-specific, which helped patients and HCPs to discover inadequate diabetes self-management through shared decision-making. Compared with routine consultations, HCPs talked less and patients talked more. Seven of ten dialogue tools were used by all patients. It was difficult to complete the EMMA consultations within the scheduled time. Conclusion The EMMA program was feasible, usable, and acceptable to patients and HCPs. The use of tools elicited patients’ perspectives and facilitated patient participation and shared decision-making. PMID:26366060

  13. Feasibility of a novel mHealth management system to capture and improve medication adherence among adolescents with asthma

    PubMed Central

    Cushing, Anna; Manice, Melissa P; Ting, Andrew; Parides, Michael K

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Currently, 7.1 million children in the United States have asthma. Nonadherence to daily controller asthma medication is common, leading to more severe symptoms, overuse of rescue medication, and increased hospitalizations. The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of a novel mHealth management system composed of a sensored device, which is connected to mobile phone app that is designed to monitor and improve asthma medication adherence. Patients and methods The asthma management system was designed using well-established behavioral theory. Seven adolescents aged 11–18 years were enrolled and given an adherence sensor, and four of those also received a mobile phone app with game features and reminders. Five patients completed the study, and one was lost to follow-up in each group. Mobile app users and their parents participated in focus groups to assess patient preferences. Feasibility was assessed by the ability of sensors to capture real-time medication data. Acceptability was assessed by patient questionnaire and focus group analysis. Results Successful upload of real-time data from six of seven inhaler sensors to the HIPAA-compliant server demonstrates the feasibility of at-home patient monitoring using the sensor device. All three mobile app users who completed the study reported interest in continued use of the management system and would recommend the app to friends. Unstructured interviews and focus groups revealed that patients felt that the intervention helped their sense of asthma control. Conclusion This study demonstrates the feasibility of using the sensor device to remotely monitor real-time medication usage, and user feedback demonstrates the acceptability of the intervention for patient use. The findings provide guidance for the improvement of study design and technology development. Further research is needed to assess the efficacy of the intervention. PMID:27853357

  14. Adherence and rehospitalizations in patients with schizophrenia: evidence from Japanese claims data

    PubMed Central

    Kuwabara, Hiroyo; Saito, Yoshimichi; Mahlich, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to analyze if there is a relationship between adherence to antipsychotic medication and rehospitalization for patients diagnosed with schizophrenia in Japan. Methods Based on Japanese claims data, we constructed three patient groups based on their medication possession ratio (MPR). Controlling for potential confounders, a Cox proportional hazard model was employed to assess if medication adherence affects the risk of rehospitalization. Results Patients with good adherence (MPRs from 0.8–1.1) had the lowest rates of admission. Both poor adherence (MPRs <0.8) and overadherence (MPRs >1.1) were associated with a significant higher risk of rehospitalization with hazard ratios of 4.7 and 2.0, respectively. Conclusion The results of this study support the notion that good adherence to antipsychotic medication reduces the risk of rehospitalization of schizophrenia patients. Appropriate measures should be taken to improve adherence of schizophrenia patients. PMID:25897229

  15. Factors associated with poor adherence to antiviral treatment for hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Allard, N; Dev, A; Dwyer, J; Srivatsa, G; Thompson, A; Cowie, B

    2017-01-01

    Antiviral therapy for hepatitis B is effective and reduces the risk of progression to cirrhosis and liver cancer but is often required for an indefinite duration. Treatment adherence is important to prevent the development of resistance and optimize outcomes. Pharmacy adherence measures can be used to assess treatment adherence, with the medication possession ratio being less susceptible to bias than physician- or self-reported adherence. The aim of this study was to measure adherence in public hospital outpatients over a 3-year period and to examine factors associated with nonadherence. A retrospective study of pharmacy records of patients dispensed antiviral therapy for hepatitis B from four major hospitals in Melbourne between 2010 and 2013. Hospital record numbers were linked with and de-identified demographic information including age, sex, Indigenous status, country of birth, interpreter requirement, spoken language and postcode of residence. The medication possession ratio was the outcome measure with poor adherence defined <.90. Univariate logistic regression and multivariate logistic regression were performed to examine associations with nonadherence. Records of 1026 patients were included in the analysis. Twenty per cent of all participants met the definition of poor adherence. Significant factors affecting adherence included age <35 years (P=.002), hospital site and treatment by multiple doctors within shorter time periods. This is the largest study examining detailed factors associated with adherence to hepatitis B treatment. Understanding poor adherence in clinical settings, and the factors associated with lower adherence, is important to inform efforts towards promoting treatment adherence for hepatitis B.

  16. Why don't patients take their analgesics? A meta-ethnography assessing the perceptions of medication adherence in patients with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Dockerty, T; Latham, S K; Smith, T O

    2016-05-01

    Whilst analgesics and medications have demonstrated efficacy for people with osteoarthritis, their effectiveness is dependent on adherence. This has previously been reported as particularly low in this population. The purpose of this meta-ethnography was to explore possible perceptions for this. A systematic review of published and unpublished literature was undertaken. All qualitative studies assessing the attitudes or perceptions of people with osteoarthritis towards medication adherence were eligible. Study quality was assessed using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme qualitative tool. Analysis was undertaken using a meta-ethnography approach, distilling to a third-order construct and developing a line of argument. From 881 citations, five studies met the eligibility criteria. The meta-ethnography generated a model where medication adherence for people with osteoarthritis is perceived as a balance between the willingness and preference to take medications with the alterative being toleration of symptoms. Motivators to influence this 'balance' may fluctuate and change over time but include: severity of symptoms, education and understanding of osteoarthritis and current medications, or general health which may raise issues for poly-pharmacy as other medications are added or substituted into the patient's formulary. Medicine adherence in people with osteoarthritis is complex, involving motivators which will fluctuate in impact on individuals at different points along the disease progression. Awareness of each motivator may better inform clinicians as to what education, support or change in prescription practice should be adopted to ensure that medicine adherence is individualised to better promote long-term behaviour change.

  17. Medication adherence and utilization in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder receiving aripiprazole, quetiapine, or ziprasidone at hospital discharge: A retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are chronic debilitating disorders that are often treated with second-generation antipsychotic agents, such as aripiprazole, quetiapine, and ziprasidone. While patients who are hospitalized for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder often receive these agents at discharge, comparatively little information exists on subsequent patterns of pharmacotherapy. Methods Using a database linking hospital admission records to health insurance claims, we identified all patients hospitalized for schizophrenia (ICD-9-CM diagnosis code 295.XX) or bipolar disorder (296.0, 296.1, 296.4-296.89) between January 1, 2001 and September 30, 2008 who received aripiprazole, quetiapine, or ziprasidone at discharge. Patients not continuously enrolled for 6 months before and after hospitalization (“pre-admission” and “follow-up”, respectively) were excluded. We examined patterns of use of these agents during follow-up, including adherence with treatment (using medication possession ratios [MPRs] and cumulative medication gaps [CMGs]) and therapy switching. Analyses were undertaken separately for patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, respectively. Results We identified a total of 43 patients with schizophrenia, and 84 patients with bipolar disorder. During the 6-month period following hospitalization, patients with schizophrenia received an average of 101 therapy-days with the second-generation antipsychotic agent prescribed at discharge; for patients with bipolar disorder, the corresponding value was 68 therapy-days. Mean MPR at 6 months was 55.1% for schizophrenia patients, and 37.3% for those with bipolar disorder; approximately one-quarter of patients switched to another agent over this period. Conclusions Medication compliance is poor in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder who initiate treatment with aripiprazole, quetiapine, or ziprasidone at hospital discharge. PMID:22856540

  18. Cost-effectiveness of raloxifene in the treatment of osteoporosis in Chinese postmenopausal women: impact of medication persistence and adherence

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mingsheng; Si, Lei; Winzenberg, Tania M; Gu, Jieruo; Jiang, Qicheng; Palmer, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Aims Raloxifene treatment of osteoporotic fractures is clinically effective, but economic evidence in support of raloxifene reimbursement is lacking in the People’s Republic of China. We aimed at evaluating the cost-effectiveness of raloxifene in the treatment of osteoporotic fractures using an osteoporosis health economic model. We also assessed the impact of medication persistence and adherence on clinical outcomes and cost-effectiveness of raloxifene. Methods We used a previously developed and validated osteoporosis state-transition microsimulation model to compare treatment with raloxifene with current practices of osteoporotic fracture treatment (conventional treatment) from the health care payer’s perspective. A Monte Carlo probabilistic sensitivity analysis with microsimulations was conducted. The impact of medication persistence and adherence on clinical outcomes and the cost-effectiveness of raloxifene was addressed in sensitivity analyses. The simulated patients used in the model’s initial state were 65-year-old postmenopausal Chinese women with osteoporosis (but without previous fractures), simulated using a 1-year cycle length until all patients had died. Costs were presented in 2015 US dollars (USD), and costs and effectiveness were discounted at 3% annually. The willingness-to-pay threshold was set at USD 20,000 per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained. Results Treatment with raloxifene improved clinical effectiveness by 0.006 QALY, with additional costs of USD 221 compared with conventional treatment. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was USD 36,891 per QALY gained. The cost-effectiveness decision did not change in most of the one-way sensitivity analyses. With full raloxifene persistence and adherence, average effectiveness improved compared with the real-world scenario, and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was USD 40,948 per QALY gained compared with conventional treatment. Conclusion Given the willingness-to-pay threshold

  19. Barriers to HIV Medication Adherence: Examining Distinct Anxiety and Depression Symptoms among Women Living with HIV Who Experienced Childhood Sexual Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Willie, Tiara C.; Overstreet, Nicole M.; Sullivan, Tami P.; Sikkema, Kathleen J.

    2016-01-01

    Experiencing sexual violence in childhood or adolescence is highly prevalent among some women living with HIV, often resulting in anxiety and depression symptoms in adulthood. Anxiety and depression have been associated with HIV medication nonadherence, yet little research has assessed distinct components of anxiety and depression as risk factors of HIV medication nonadherence. The current study examined distinct symptom components of anxiety and depression as predictors of HIV medication nonadherence among women living with HIV and childhood sexual abuse enrolled in a coping intervention. This secondary analysis included a sample of 85 women living with HIV and childhood sexual abuse and being prescribed antiretroviral medication who completed measures on anxiety, depression, and medication adherence. Results from a logistic regression analysis suggest that distinct components of anxiety may be related to medication nonadherence among this population. Targeted mental health interventions for this population may increase adherence to antiretroviral medication. PMID:26010763

  20. Identification of Evidence-Based Interventions for Promoting HIV Medication Adherence: Findings from a Systematic Review of U.S.-Based Studies, 1996–2011

    PubMed Central

    Charania, Mahnaz R.; Marshall, Khiya J.; Crepaz, Nicole; Kay, Linda S.; Koenig, Linda J.; Weidle, Paul J.; Purcell, David W.

    2015-01-01

    A systematic review was conducted to identify evidence-based interventions (EBIs) for increasing HIV medication adherence behavior or decreasing HIV viral load among persons living with HIV (PLWH). We conducted automated searches of electronic databases (i.e., MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL) and manual searches of journals, reference lists, and listservs. Interventions were eligible for the review if they were U.S.-based, published between 1996 and 2011, intended to improve HIV medication adherence behaviors of PLWH, evaluated the intervention using a comparison group, and reported outcome data on adherence behaviors or HIV viral load. Each intervention was evaluated on the quality of study design, implementation, analysis, and strength of findings. Of the 65 eligible interventions, 10 are EBIs. The remaining 55 interventions failed to meet the efficacy criteria primarily due to null findings, small sample sizes, or low retention rates. Research gaps and future directions for development of adherence EBIs are discussed. PMID:24043269

  1. The Nurse-Led Telephone Follow-Up on Medication and Dietary Adherence among Patients after Myocardial Infarction: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, Seyed Saeed; Shaabani, Maryam; Momennassab, Marzieh; Aghasadeghi, Kamran

    2016-01-01

    Background: Adherence to dietary and medication regimen plays an important role in successful treatment and reduces the negative complications and severity of the disease. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the effect of nurse-led telephone follow-up on the level of adherence to dietary and medication regimen among patients after Myocardial Infarction (MI). Methods: This non-blinded randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted on 100 elderly patients with MI who had referred to the cardiovascular clinics in Shiraz. Participants were selected and randomly assigned to intervention and control groups using balanced block randomization method. The intervention group received a nurse-led telephone follow-up. The data were collected using a demographic questionnaire, Morisky’s 8-item medication adherence questionnaire, and dietary adherence questionnaire before and three months after the intervention. Data analysis was done by the SPSS statistical software (version 21), using paired t-test for intra-group and Chi-square and t-test for between groups comparisons. Significance level was set at<0.05. Results: The results of Chi-square test showed no statistically significant difference between the intervention and control groups with respect to their adherence to dietary and medication regimen before the intervention (P>0.05). However, a statistically significant difference was found between the two groups in this regard after the intervention (P<0.05). The mean differences of dietary and medication adherence scores between pre- and post-tests were significantly different between the two groups. Independent t-test showed these differences (P=0.001). Conclusion: The results of the present study confirmed the positive effects of nurse-led telephone follow-up as a method of tele-nursing on improvement of adherence to dietary and medication regimen in the patients with MI. Trial Registration Number: IRCT201409148505N8 PMID:27382586

  2. Can purchasing information be used to predict adherence to cardiovascular medications? An analysis of linked retail pharmacy and insurance claims data

    PubMed Central

    Krumme, Alexis A; Sanfélix-Gimeno, Gabriel; Franklin, Jessica M; Isaman, Danielle L; Mahesri, Mufaddal; Matlin, Olga S; Shrank, William H; Brennan, Troyen A; Brill, Gregory; Choudhry, Niteesh K

    2016-01-01

    Objective The use of retail purchasing data may improve adherence prediction over approaches using healthcare insurance claims alone. Design Retrospective. Setting and participants A cohort of patients who received prescription medication benefits through CVS Caremark, used a CVS Pharmacy ExtraCare Health Care (ECHC) loyalty card, and initiated a statin medication in 2011. Outcome We evaluated associations between retail purchasing patterns and optimal adherence to statins in the 12 subsequent months. Results Among 11 010 statin initiators, 43% were optimally adherent at 12 months of follow-up. Greater numbers of store visits per month and dollar amount per visit were positively associated with optimal adherence, as was making a purchase on the same day as filling a prescription (p<0.0001 for all). Models to predict adherence using retail purchase variables had low discriminative ability (C-statistic: 0.563), while models with both clinical and retail purchase variables achieved a C-statistic of 0.617. Conclusions While the use of retail purchases may improve the discriminative ability of claims-based approaches, these data alone appear inadequate for adherence prediction, even with the addition of more complex analytical approaches. Nevertheless, associations between retail purchasing behaviours and adherence could inform the development of quality improvement interventions. PMID:28186924

  3. Characterizing HIV medication adherence for virologic success among individuals living with HIV/AIDS: Experience with the CNS HIV Antiretroviral Therapy Effects Research (CHARTER) cohort

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, B.; Spitznagel, E.; Collier, A.C.; Gelman, B.B.; McArthur, J.C.; Morgello, S.; McCutchan, J. A.; Clifford, D.B.

    2014-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has changed HIV related illness from terminal to chronic by suppressing viral load which results in immunologic and clinical improvement. Success with ART is dependent on optimal adherence, commonly categorized as >95%. As medication type, class and frequency of use continue to evolve, we assessed adherence levels related to viral suppression. Using a cross-sectional analysis with secondary data (n = 381) from an ongoing multi-site study on impact of ART on the Central Nervous System (CNS), we compared self-reported adherence rates with biological outcomes of HIV-RNA copies/ml, and CD4 cell/mm3. Adherence to ART measures included taking all prescribed medication as directed on schedule and following dietary restrictions. While depression was a barrier to adherence, undetectable viral suppression was achieved at pill adherence percentages lower than 95%. Practice, research and policy implications are discussed in the context of patient-, provider-, and system-level factors influencing adherence to ART. PMID:24678283

  4. Duke Ferdinand: patient or possessed? The reflection of contemporary medical discourse in John Webster's The Duchess of Malfi.

    PubMed

    Tullo, Ellen

    2010-06-01

    The Duchess of Malfi, a tragedy written by John Webster, makes frequent reference to contemporary Jacobean concerns about health and disease for dramatic effect. Most notably Webster chooses to highlight lycanthropy through the evolution of the condition in the character of Duke Ferdinand. This paper examines Webster's knowledge of contemporary medical, religious and political texts and explores the reflection of both a natural humoral understanding of lycanthropy as a disease, and the concurrent importance of supernatural concerns prevalent at the time. Although Webster's choice to associate Duke Ferdinand with lycanthropy primarily serves a dramatic purpose, it is proposed that fictional works such as The Duchess of Malfi can be considered as important sources for the history of medicine since authors often reflect the contemporary understanding of health and disease from the world around them.

  5. A Systematic Review of Interventions Addressing Adherence to Anti-Diabetic Medications in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes—Components of Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Sapkota, Sujata; Brien, Jo-anne E.; Greenfield, Jerry R.; Aslani, Parisa

    2015-01-01

    Background Poor adherence to anti-diabetic medications contributes to suboptimal glycaemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). A range of interventions have been developed to promote anti-diabetic medication adherence. However, there has been very little focus on the characteristics of these interventions and how effectively they address factors that predict non-adherence. In this systematic review we assessed the characteristics of interventions that aimed to promote adherence to anti-diabetic medications. Method Using appropriate search terms in Medline, Embase, CINAHL, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (IPA), PUBmed, and PsychINFO (years 2000–2013), we identified 52 studies which met the inclusion criteria. Results Forty-nine studies consisted of patient-level interventions, two provider-level interventions, and one consisted of both. Interventions were classified as educational (n = 7), behavioural (n = 3), affective, economic (n = 3) or multifaceted (a combination of the above; n = 40). One study consisted of two interventions. The review found that multifaceted interventions, addressing several non-adherence factors, were comparatively more effective in improving medication adherence and glycaemic target in patients with T2D than single strategies. However, interventions with similar components and those addressing similar non-adherence factors demonstrated mixed results, making it difficult to conclude on effective intervention strategies to promote adherence. Educational strategies have remained the most popular intervention strategy, followed by behavioural, with affective components becoming more common in recent years. Most of the interventions addressed patient-related (n = 35), condition-related (n = 31), and therapy-related (n = 20) factors as defined by the World Health Organization, while fewer addressed health care system (n = 5) and socio-economic-related factors (n = 13). Conclusion There is a noticeable shift in the literature

  6. Protocol Adherence in Prehospital Medical Care Provided for Patients with Chest Pain and Loss of Consciousness; a Brief Report

    PubMed Central

    Mehrara, Mostafa; Tavakoli, Nader; Fathi, Marzieh; Mahshidfar, Babak; Zare, Mohammad Amin; Asadi, Azita; Hosseinzadeh, Saeedeh; Safdarian, Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Although many protocols are available in the field of the prehospital medical care (PMC), there is still a notable gap between protocol based directions and applied clinical practice. This study measures the rate of protocol adherence in PMC provided for patients with chest pain and loss of consciousness (LOC). Method: In this cross-sectional study, 10 educated research assistants audited the situation of provided PMC for non-traumatic chest pain and LOC patients, presenting to the emergency department of a tertiary level teaching hospital, compare to national recommendations in these regards. Results: 101 cases with the mean age of 56.7 ± 12.3 years (30-78) were audited (55.4% male). 61 (60.3%) patients had chest pain and 40 (39.7%) cases had LOC. Protocol adherence rates for cardiac monitoring (62.3%), O2 therapy (32.8%), nitroglycerin administration (60.7%), and aspirin administration (52.5%) in prehospital care of patients with chest pain were fair to poor. Protocol adherence rates for correct patient positioning (25%), O2 therapy (75%), cardiac monitoring (25%), pupils examination (25%), bedside glucometery (50%), and assessing for naloxone administration (55%) in prehospital care of patients with LOC were fair to poor. Conclusion: There were more than 20% protocol violation regarding prehospital care of chest pain patients regarding cardiac monitoring, O2 therapy, and nitroglycerin and aspirin administration. There were same situation regarding O2 therapy, positioning, cardiac monitoring, pupils examination, bedside glucometery, and assessing for naloxone administration of LOC patients in prehospital setting. PMID:28286847

  7. Mobile Phone Apps to Improve Medication Adherence: A Systematic Stepwise Process to Identify High-Quality Apps

    PubMed Central

    Richtering, Sarah S; Chalmers, John; Thiagalingam, Aravinda; Chow, Clara K; Redfern, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Background There are a growing number of mobile phone apps available to support people in taking their medications and to improve medication adherence. However, little is known about how these apps differ in terms of features, quality, and effectiveness. Objective We aimed to systematically review the medication reminder apps available in the Australian iTunes store and Google Play to assess their features and their quality in order to identify high-quality apps. Methods This review was conducted in a similar manner to a systematic review by using a stepwise approach that included (1) a search strategy; (2) eligibility assessment; (3) app selection process through an initial screening of all retrieved apps and full app review of the included apps; (4) data extraction using a predefined set of features considered important or desirable in medication reminder apps; (5) analysis by classifying the apps as basic and advanced medication reminder apps and scoring and ranking them; and (6) a quality assessment by using the Mobile App Rating Scale (MARS), a reliable tool to assess mobile health apps. Results We identified 272 medication reminder apps, of which 152 were found only in Google Play, 87 only in iTunes, and 33 in both app stores. Apps found in Google Play had more customer reviews, higher star ratings, and lower cost compared with apps in iTunes. Only 109 apps were available for free and 124 were recently updated in 2015 or 2016. Overall, the median number of features per app was 3.0 (interquartile range 4.0) and only 18 apps had ≥9 of the 17 desirable features. The most common features were flexible scheduling that was present in 56.3% (153/272) of the included apps, medication tracking history in 54.8% (149/272), snooze option in 34.9% (95/272), and visual aids in 32.4% (88/272). We classified 54.8% (149/272) of the included apps as advanced medication reminder apps and 45.2% (123/272) as basic medication reminder apps. The advanced apps had a higher number

  8. Adherence to local guidelines for venous thromboprophylaxis: a cross-sectional study of medical inpatients in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Venous thromboembolism prophylaxis has been shown to safely and cost-effectively reduce the incidence of thromboembolic events in medical inpatients. However, there is a gap between evidence and medical practice. The aim of this study was evaluate the appropriateness of prescribing venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in accordance with local recommendations for medical inpatients. Methods This cross-sectional study included 310 prescriptions of medical general-ward admitted patients of two university hospitals of Buenos Aires, Argentina. Data was collected using filled-out prescriptions, medical records and interviews with the head attending physician. Information was gathered at different times during 16 days randomly selected over September 2007 and January 2008. Results One hundred eighty eight patients' prescriptions (60.6%) were appropriate according to the institutional guidelines. Inappropriateness was due to excessive (14.2%), insufficient (15.8%) and absent (9.4%) prescribing. According to the recommendations of the American College of Chest Physicians, 256 (82.6%) patients received appropriate prophylaxis. Twenty-nine patients (9.4%) were considered at low risk for thromboembolism and did not need pharmacologic or mechanical prophylaxis. One hundred three patients (33.2%) had at least one major risk factor for venous thromboembolism. Compliance with the institutional guidelines was more frequently in the case of high risk patients. Complex preventive measures and low risk patients were related to lower adherence to recommendations. In the multivariate analysis, predictors of inappropriateness were the requirement of a surgical procedure and absence of prophylaxis prescribing at admission. In contrast, patients with a diagnosis of gastrointestinal disorders had lower odds of inappropriateness than those with an infectious disease. Conclusions Most medical inpatients received some thromboprophylaxis measure, but the compliance with recommendations

  9. How to Evaluate Health-Related Quality of Life and Its Association with Medication Adherence in Pulmonary Tuberculosis – Designing a Prospective Observational Study in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Kastien-Hilka, Tanja; Rosenkranz, Bernd; Bennett, Bryan; Sinanovic, Edina; Schwenkglenks, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) has become an important measure to identify and shape effective and patient-relevant healthcare interventions innovations through outcomes. Adherence to tuberculosis (TB) treatment is a public health concern. The main objective of this research is to develop a study design for evaluation of HRQOL and its association with medication adherence in TB in South Africa. Methodology: A conceptual framework for HRQOL in TB has been developed to identify Patient-Reported Outcomes and Quality of Life Database (PROQOLID), (n.d.) measures for HRQOL and adherence and to generate an endpoint model. Two generic (SF-12 and EQ-5D-5L), one disease-specific (St. George’s Respiratory Questionnaire) and one condition-specific (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) measure for HRQOL and Morisky Medication Adherence Scale for adherence assessment were identified. All measures are applied in a longitudinal multi-center study at five data collection time points during standard TB treatment. Statistical analysis includes multivariable analysis. Change over time in the physical component score of SF-12 is defined as primary endpoint. Sample size estimation based thereupon has led to a recruitment target of 96 patients. This study is on-going. Discussion: This is the first longitudinal study in South Africa which evaluates HRQOL and its association with medication adherence in TB in a comprehensive manner. Results will help to improve current treatment programs and medication adherence and will support the identification of sustainable health innovations in TB, determining the value of new products, and supporting decision making with regard to health policy and pricing. PMID:27303294

  10. "You're in a world of chaos": experiences accessing HIV care and adhering to medications after incarceration.