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Sample records for adherence odds ratio

  1. Measuring additive interaction using odds ratios

    PubMed Central

    Kalilani, Linda; Atashili, Julius

    2006-01-01

    Interaction measured on the additive scale has been argued to be better correlated with biologic interaction than when measured on the multiplicative scale. Measures of interaction on the additive scale have been developed using risk ratios. However, in studies that use odds ratios as the sole measure of effect, the calculation of these measures of additive interaction is usually performed by directly substituting odds ratios for risk ratios. Yet assessing additive interaction based on replacing risk ratios by odds ratios in formulas that were derived using the former may be erroneous. In this paper, we evaluate the extent to which three measures of additive interaction – the interaction contrast ratio (ICR), the attributable proportion due to interaction (AP), and the synergy index (S), estimated using odds ratios versus using risk ratios differ as the incidence of the outcome of interest increases in the source population and/or as the magnitude of interaction increases. Our analysis shows that the difference between the two depends on the measure of interaction used, the type of interaction present, and the baseline incidence of the outcome. Substituting odds ratios for risk ratios, when calculating measures of additive interaction, may result in misleading conclusions. Of the three measures, AP appears to be the most robust to this direct substitution. Formulas that use stratum specific odds and odds ratios to accurately calculate measures of additive interaction are presented. PMID:16620385

  2. Computing Power and Sample Size for Informational Odds Ratio

    PubMed Central

    Efird, Jimmy T.

    2013-01-01

    The informational odds ratio (IOR) measures the post-exposure odds divided by the pre-exposure odds (i.e., information gained after knowing exposure status). A desirable property of an adjusted ratio estimate is collapsibility, wherein the combined crude ratio will not change after adjusting for a variable that is not a confounder. Adjusted traditional odds ratios (TORs) are not collapsible. In contrast, Mantel-Haenszel adjusted IORs, analogous to relative risks (RRs) generally are collapsible. IORs are a useful measure of disease association in case-referent studies, especially when the disease is common in the exposed and/or unexposed groups. This paper outlines how to compute power and sample size in the simple case of unadjusted IORs. PMID:24157518

  3. Odds ratios of work related deaths in United States workers.

    PubMed Central

    Leigh, J P

    1988-01-01

    A new data set on job related mortality within 347 3 digit occupations is merged with two national probability samples of United States workers to assess which groups are in hazardous and which in safe jobs. Logistic regressions are fitted to the two samples and the following covariates are assumed to explain employment in a hazardous job: age, race, gender, schooling, region, and marital status. Results from both samples are remarkably similar. Odds ratios for non-whites versus whites are roughly 1.2/1; for high school dropouts versus people with some college education roughly 2.2/1; and for men versus women roughly 5.0/1. PMID:3348992

  4. Odds ratio analysis in women with endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Żak, Ewa; Pięta, Beata

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Despite the progress in diagnosis and treatment of malignant tumours, the effects of treatment are insufficient. Reduction of the risk of cervical, ovarian, and endometrial cancer is possible by introducing preventative actions. Aim of the study The aim of the thesis is the analysis of selected risk factors that may affect the increase or decrease in the odds ratio of developing endometrial cancer. Material and methods The study was conducted among patients of the Gynaecology and Obstetrics Hospital of Poznań University of Medical Sciences in the years 2011-2013. The research included a total of 548 female respondents aged between 40 and 84 years. Women responded to questions assessing elements of lifestyle such as consumption of alcohol, smoking, and eating certain groups of foods. Results The respondents consuming fruits and vegetables several times a week have a reduced risk of odds ratio and the OR is 0.85; 95% CI: 0.18-4.09, compared to the women who rarely consume vegetables and fruits. Consumption of whole-wheat bread several times a week reduces the risk of developing the cancer, OR = 0.59; 95% CI: 0.14-2.47, compared to women not consuming wholegrain bread at all. Respondents who consumed red meat, such as veal, pork, and lamb in the amount of 101-200 g per day have an increased risk of developing the disease: OR = 2.16; 95% CI: 1.09-4.28, compared to women not consuming red meat at all. Conclusions A diet rich in fruit and vegetables, onions, garlic, whole grains, and beans should be introduced in order to reduce the risk of endometrial cancer. The consumption of red meat and white pasta should be reduced or even eliminated. PMID:27095953

  5. [Razón de posibilidades: a proposed translation of the term odds ratio].

    PubMed

    Tapia, J A; Nieto, F J

    1993-01-01

    In English, odds ratio is a basic epidemiological measure approximating the relative risk. Odds ratio has been translated into Spanish in several ways, which has produced great terminological confusion. On the other hand, the English word odds is often used in epidemiology or statistics English textbooks, alone or as part of other expressions, but always keeping a definite mathematical meaning, which calls for a similarly definite term in Spanish. We discuss several translations of odds ratio found in the literature and propose the Spanish word "posibilidades" as a translation of odds and "razón de posibilidades" as a translation of odds ratio. PMID:8342087

  6. Limits on Log Odds Ratios for Unidimensional Item Response Theory Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haberman, Shelby J.; Holland, Paul W.; Sinharay, Sandip

    2007-01-01

    Bounds are established for log odds ratios (log cross-product ratios) involving pairs of items for item response models. First, expressions for bounds on log odds ratios are provided for one-dimensional item response models in general. Then, explicit bounds are obtained for the Rasch model and the two-parameter logistic (2PL) model. Results are…

  7. Informational Odds Ratio: A Useful Measure of Epidemiologic Association in Environment Exposure Studies

    PubMed Central

    Efird, Jimmy T.; Lea, Suzanne; Toland, Amanda; Phillips, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    The informational odds ratio (IOR) measures the post-exposure odds divided by the pre-exposure odds (ie, information gained after knowing exposure status). A desirable property of an adjusted ratio estimate is collapsibility (ie, the combined crude ratio will not change after adjusting for a variable that is not a confounder). Adjusted traditional odds ratios (TORs) are not collapsible. In contrast, Mantel-Haenszel adjusted IORs generally are collapsible. IORs are a useful measure of disease association in environmental case-referent studies, especially when the disease is common in the exposed and/or unexposed groups. PMID:22518087

  8. Isomer residual ratio of odd-odd isotope {sup 180}Ta in supernova nucleosynthsis

    SciTech Connect

    Hayakawa, Takehito; Kajino, Toshitaka; Chiba, Satoshi; Mathews, Grant

    2010-06-01

    The nucleosynthesis of {sup 180}Ta has remained an unsolved problem and as its origin many nucleosynthesis mechanisms have been proposed. This isotope has the unique feature that the naturally occurring abundance of {sup 180}Ta is actually a meta-stable isomer (half-life of >=10{sup 15} yr), while the ground state is a 1{sup +} unstable state which beta-decays with a half-life of only 8.15 hr. We have made a new time-dependent calculation of {sup 180}Ta meta-stable isomer residual ratio after supernova neutrino-induced reactions. This residual isomer ratio is crucial for understanding the production and survival of this naturally occurring rare isotope. We have constructed a new model under temperature evolution after type II supernova explosion. We include the explicit linking between the isomer and all known excited states and found that the residual ratio is insensitive to astrophysical parameters such as neutrino energy spectrum, explosion energy, decay time constant. We find that the explicit time evolution of the synthesis of {sup 180}Ta avoids the overproduction relative to {sup 138}La for a neutrino process neutrino temperature of 4 MeV.

  9. At Odds: Concerns Raised by Using Odds Ratios for Continuous or Common Dichotomous Outcomes in Research on Physical Activity and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Lovasi, Gina S.; Underhill, Lindsay J.; Jack, Darby; Richards, Catherine; Weiss, Christopher; Rundle, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Research on obesity and the built environment has often featured logistic regression and the corresponding parameter, the odds ratio. Use of odds ratios for common outcomes such obesity may unnecessarily hinder the validity, interpretation, and communication of research findings. Methods We identified three key issues raised by the use of odds ratios, illustrating them with data on walkability and body mass index from a study of 13,102 New York City residents. Results First, dichotomization of continuous measures such as body mass index discards theoretically relevant information, reduces statistical power, and amplifies measurement error. Second, odds ratios are systematically higher (further from the null) than prevalence ratios; this inflation is trivial for rare outcomes, but substantial for common outcomes like obesity. Third, odds ratios can lead to incorrect conclusions during tests of interactions. The odds ratio in a particular subgroup might higher simply because the outcome is more common (and the odds ratio inflated) compared with other subgroups. Conclusion Our recommendations are to take full advantage of continuous outcome data when feasible and to use prevalence ratios in place of odds ratios for common dichotomous outcomes. When odds ratios must be used, authors should document outcome prevalence across exposure groups. PMID:23002407

  10. Understanding relative risk, odds ratio, and related terms: as simple as it can get.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2015-07-01

    Risk, and related measures of effect size (for categorical outcomes) such as relative risks and odds ratios, are frequently presented in research articles. Not all readers know how these statistics are derived and interpreted, nor are all readers aware of their strengths and limitations. This article examines several measures, including absolute risk, attributable risk, attributable risk percent, population attributable risk percent, relative risk, odds, odds ratio, and others. The concept and method of calculation are explained for each of these in simple terms and with the help of examples. The interpretation of each is presented in plain English rather than in technical language. Clinically useful notes are provided, wherever necessary. PMID:26231012

  11. Constant Latent Odds-Ratios Models and the Mantel-Haenszel Null Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hessen, David J.

    2005-01-01

    In the present paper, a new family of item response theory (IRT) models for dichotomous item scores is proposed. Two basic assumptions define the most general model of this family. The first assumption is local independence of the item scores given a unidimensional latent trait. The second assumption is that the odds-ratios for all item-pairs are…

  12. An Odds Ratio Approach for Detecting DDF under the Nested Logit Modeling Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terzi, Ragip; Suh, Youngsuk

    2015-01-01

    An odds ratio approach (ORA) under the framework of a nested logit model was proposed for evaluating differential distractor functioning (DDF) in multiple-choice items and was compared with an existing ORA developed under the nominal response model. The performances of the two ORAs for detecting DDF were investigated through an extensive…

  13. Odds Ratio Product of Sleep EEG as a Continuous Measure of Sleep State

    PubMed Central

    Younes, Magdy; Ostrowski, Michele; Soiferman, Marc; Younes, Henry; Younes, Mark; Raneri, Jill; Hanly, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To develop and validate an algorithm that provides a continuous estimate of sleep depth from the electroencephalogram (EEG). Design: Retrospective analysis of polysomnograms. Setting: Research laboratory. Participants: 114 patients who underwent clinical polysomnography in sleep centers at the University of Manitoba (n = 58) and the University of Calgary (n = 56). Interventions: None. Measurements and Results: Power spectrum of EEG was determined in 3-second epochs and divided into delta, theta, alpha-sigma, and beta frequency bands. The range of powers in each band was divided into 10 aliquots. EEG patterns were assigned a 4-digit number that reflects the relative power in the 4 frequency ranges (10,000 possible patterns). Probability of each pattern occurring in 30-s epochs staged awake was determined, resulting in a continuous probability value from 0% to 100%. This was divided by 40 (% of epochs staged awake) producing the odds ratio product (ORP), with a range of 0–2.5. In validation testing, average ORP decreased progressively as EEG progressed from wakefulness (2.19 ± 0.29) to stage N3 (0.13 ± 0.05). ORP < 1.0 predicted sleep and ORP > 2.0 predicted wakefulness in > 95% of 30-s epochs. Epochs with intermediate ORP occurred in unstable sleep with a high arousal index (> 70/h) and were subject to much interrater scoring variability. There was an excellent correlation (r2 = 0.98) between ORP in current 30-s epochs and the likelihood of arousal or awakening occurring in the next 30-s epoch. Conclusions: Our results support the use of the odds ratio product (ORP) as a continuous measure of sleep depth. Citation: Younes M, Ostrowski M, Soiferman M, Younes H, Younes M, Raneri J, Hanly P. Odds ratio product of sleep EEG as a continuous measure of sleep state. SLEEP 2015;38(4):641–654. PMID:25348125

  14. Multiple Imputation for Missing Values Through Conditional Semiparametric Odds Ratio Models

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hua Yun; Xie, Hui; Qian, Yi

    2010-01-01

    Summary Multiple imputation is a practically useful approach to handling incompletely observed data in statistical analysis. Parameter estimation and inference based on imputed full data have been made easy by Rubin's rule for result combination. However, creating proper imputation that accommodates flexible models for statistical analysis in practice can be very challenging. We propose an imputation framework that uses conditional semiparametric odds ratio models to impute the missing values. The proposed imputation framework is more flexible and robust than the imputation approach based on the normal model. It is a compatible framework in comparison to the approach based on fully conditionally specified models. The proposed algorithms for multiple imputation through the Monte Carlo Markov Chain sampling approach can be straightforwardly carried out. Simulation studies demonstrate that the proposed approach performs better than existing, commonly used imputation approaches. The proposed approach is applied to imputing missing values in bone fracture data. PMID:21210771

  15. Interpretation of Genetic Association Studies: Markers with Replicated Highly Significant Odds Ratios May Be Poor Classifiers

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsdottir, Johanna; Gorin, Michael B.; Conley, Yvette P.; Ferrell, Robert E.; Weeks, Daniel E.

    2009-01-01

    Recent successful discoveries of potentially causal single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for complex diseases hold great promise, and commercialization of genomics in personalized medicine has already begun. The hope is that genetic testing will benefit patients and their families, and encourage positive lifestyle changes and guide clinical decisions. However, for many complex diseases, it is arguable whether the era of genomics in personalized medicine is here yet. We focus on the clinical validity of genetic testing with an emphasis on two popular statistical methods for evaluating markers. The two methods, logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, are applied to our age-related macular degeneration dataset. By using an additive model of the CFH, LOC387715, and C2 variants, the odds ratios are 2.9, 3.4, and 0.4, with p-values of 10−13, 10−13, and 10−3, respectively. The area under the ROC curve (AUC) is 0.79, but assuming prevalences of 15%, 5.5%, and 1.5% (which are realistic for age groups 80 y, 65 y, and 40 y and older, respectively), only 30%, 12%, and 3% of the group classified as high risk are cases. Additionally, we present examples for four other diseases for which strongly associated variants have been discovered. In type 2 diabetes, our classification model of 12 SNPs has an AUC of only 0.64, and two SNPs achieve an AUC of only 0.56 for prostate cancer. Nine SNPs were not sufficient to improve the discrimination power over that of nongenetic predictors for risk of cardiovascular events. Finally, in Crohn's disease, a model of five SNPs, one with a quite low odds ratio of 0.26, has an AUC of only 0.66. Our analyses and examples show that strong association, although very valuable for establishing etiological hypotheses, does not guarantee effective discrimination between cases and controls. The scientific community should be cautious to avoid overstating the value of association findings in terms of

  16. Analysis of familial aggregation of atopic eczema and other atopic diseases by ODDS RATIO regression models.

    PubMed

    Diepgen, T L; Blettner, M

    1996-05-01

    In order to determine the relative importance of genetics and the environment on the occurrence of atopic diseases, we investigated the familial aggregation of atopic eczema, allergic rhinitis, and allergic asthma in the relatives of 426 patients with atopic eczema and 628 subjects with no history of eczema (5,136 family members in total). Analyses were performed by regression models for odds ratios (OR) allowing us to estimate OR for the familial aggregation and simultaneously to adjust for other covariates. Three models were analyzed assuming that the OR i) is the same among any two members of a family, ii) depends on different familial constellations, i.e., whether the pairs are siblings, parents, or parent/sibling pairs, and iii) is not the same between the father and the children and between the mother and the children. The OR of familial aggregation for atopic eczema was 2.16 (95% confidence interval (95%-CI) 1.58-2.96) if no distinction was made between the degree of relationship. Further analyses within the members of the family showed a high OR among siblings (OR = 3.86; 95%-CI 2.10-7.09), while the OR between parents and siblings was only 1.90 (95%-CI 1.31-2.97). Only for atopic eczema was the familial aggregation between fathers and siblings (ms: OR = 2.66; fs: OR = 1.29). This can be explained by stronger maternal heritability, shared physical environment of mother and child, or environmental events that affect the fetus in utero. Since for all atopic diseases a stronger correlation was found between siblings than between siblings and parents, our study indicates that environmental factors, especially during childhood, seem to explain the recently observed increased frequencies of atopic diseases. PMID:8618061

  17. The Overall Odds Ratio as an Intuitive Effect Size Index for Multiple Logistic Regression: Examination of Further Refinements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le, Huy; Marcus, Justin

    2012-01-01

    This study used Monte Carlo simulation to examine the properties of the overall odds ratio (OOR), which was recently introduced as an index for overall effect size in multiple logistic regression. It was found that the OOR was relatively independent of study base rate and performed better than most commonly used R-square analogs in indexing model…

  18. Racial Attitudes, Physician-Patient Talk Time Ratio, and Adherence in Racially Discordant Medical Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Hagiwara, Nao; Penner, Louis A.; Gonzalez, Richard; Eggly, Susan; Dovidio, John F.; Gaertner, Samuel L.; West, Tessa; Albrecht, Terrance L.

    2013-01-01

    Physician racial bias and patient perceived discrimination have each been found to influence perceptions of and feelings about racially discordant medical interactions. However, to our knowledge, no studies have examined how they may simultaneously influence the dynamics of these interactions. This study examined how (a) non-Black primary care physicians’ explicit and implicit racial bias and (b) Black patients’ perceived past discrimination affected physician-patient talk time ratio (i.e., the ratio of physician to patient talk time) during medical interactions and the relationship between this ratio and patients’ subsequent adherence. We conducted a secondary analysis of self-report and video-recorded data from a prior study of clinical interactions between 112 low-income, Black patients and their 14 non-Black physicians at a primary care clinic in the Midwestern United States between June, 2006 and February, 2008. Overall, physicians talked more than patients; however, both physician bias and patient perceived past discrimination affected physician-patient talk time ratio. Non-Black physicians with higher levels of implicit, but not explicit, racial bias had larger physician-patient talk time ratios than did physicians with lower levels of implicit bias, indicating that physicians with more negative implicit racial attitudes talked more than physicians with less negative racial attitudes. Additionally, Black patients with higher levels of perceived discrimination had smaller physician-patient talk time ratios, indicating that patients with more negative racial attitudes talked more than patients with less negative racial attitudes. Finally, smaller physician-patient talk time ratios were associated with less patient subsequent adherence, indicating that patients who talked more during the racially discordant medical interactions were less likely to adhere subsequently. Theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed in the context of

  19. Racial attitudes, physician-patient talk time ratio, and adherence in racially discordant medical interactions.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Nao; Penner, Louis A; Gonzalez, Richard; Eggly, Susan; Dovidio, John F; Gaertner, Samuel L; West, Tessa; Albrecht, Terrance L

    2013-06-01

    Physician racial bias and patient perceived discrimination have each been found to influence perceptions of and feelings about racially discordant medical interactions. However, to our knowledge, no studies have examined how they may simultaneously influence the dynamics of these interactions. This study examined how (a) non-Black primary care physicians' explicit and implicit racial bias and (b) Black patients' perceived past discrimination affected physician-patient talk time ratio (i.e., the ratio of physician to patient talk time) during medical interactions and the relationship between this ratio and patients' subsequent adherence. We conducted a secondary analysis of self-report and video-recorded data from a prior study of clinical interactions between 112 low-income, Black patients and their 14 non-Black physicians at a primary care clinic in the Midwestern United States between June, 2006 and February, 2008. Overall, physicians talked more than patients; however, both physician bias and patient perceived past discrimination affected physician-patient talk time ratio. Non-Black physicians with higher levels of implicit, but not explicit, racial bias had larger physician-patient talk time ratios than did physicians with lower levels of implicit bias, indicating that physicians with more negative implicit racial attitudes talked more than physicians with less negative racial attitudes. Additionally, Black patients with higher levels of perceived discrimination had smaller physician-patient talk time ratios, indicating that patients with more negative racial attitudes talked more than patients with less negative racial attitudes. Finally, smaller physician-patient talk time ratios were associated with less patient subsequent adherence, indicating that patients who talked more during the racially discordant medical interactions were less likely to adhere subsequently. Theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed in the context of

  20. Medicine possession ratio as proxy for adherence to antiepileptic drugs: prevalence, associations, and cost implications

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Karen; Julyan, Marlene; Lubbe, Martie S; Burger, Johanita R; Cockeran, Marike

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the adherence status to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) among epilepsy patients; to observe the association between adherence status and age, sex, active ingredient prescribed, treatment period, and number of comorbidities; and to determine the effect of nonadherence on direct medicine treatment cost of AEDs. Methods A retrospective study analyzing medicine claims data obtained from a South African pharmaceutical benefit management company was performed. Patients of all ages (N=19,168), who received more than one prescription for an AED, were observed from 2008 to 2013. The modified medicine possession ratio (MPRm) was used as proxy to determine the adherence status to AED treatment. The MPRm was considered acceptable (adherent) if the calculated value was ≥80%, but ≤110%, whereas an MPRm of <80% (unacceptably low) or >110% (unacceptably high) was considered nonadherent. Direct medicine treatment cost was calculated by summing the medical scheme contribution and patient co-payment associated with each AED prescription. Results Only 55% of AEDs prescribed to 19,168 patients during the study period had an acceptable MPRm. MPRm categories depended on the treatment period (P>0.0001; Cramer’s V=0.208) but were independent of sex (P<0.182; Cramer’s V=0.009). Age group (P<0.0001; Cramer’s V=0.067), active ingredient (P<0.0001; Cramer’s V=0.071), and number of comor-bidities (P<0.0001; Cramer’s V=0.050) were statistically but not practically significantly associated with MPRm categories. AEDs with an unacceptably high MPRm contributed to 3.74% (US$736,376.23) of the total direct cost of all AEDs included in the study, whereas those with an unacceptably low MPRm amounted to US$3,227,894.85 (16.38%). Conclusion Nonadherence to antiepileptic treatment is a major problem, encompassing ~20% of cost in our study. Adherence, however, is likely to improve with the treatment period. Further research is needed to determine the factors influencing

  1. Technical note: The risk ratio, an alternative to the odds ratio for estimating the association between multiple risk factors and a dichotomous outcome.

    PubMed

    Ospina, P A; Nydam, D V; DiCiccio, T J

    2012-05-01

    The objectives were (1) to explain why the risk ratio (RR) is an appropriate measure of association when the outcome of interest is dichotomous (e.g., displaced abomasum or no displaced abomasum) in both cohort studies and randomized trials; and (2) to outline an applied method for estimating the RR using currently available software. Interest in the association between multiple risk factors and a yes or no outcome is very common in the dairy industry; historically, logistic regression, which reports odds ratios (OR), was the method available in common statistical packages to evaluate this kind of association. However, the OR can overestimate the magnitude of the response in cohort studies and randomized trials when the outcome frequency is large. In addition, the interpretation of odds is not intuitive; fortunately, recent advances in statistical software have allowed the estimation of the RR. Because SAS software (SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC) is commonly used to analyze data, this technical note outlines the basic programming code that may be used to estimate the RR from raw data. Example data from a prospective cohort study was used to compare the OR and RR of developing a displaced abomasum or ketosis or metritis based on multiple predictors, their interaction, and a random effect (e.g., herd). PMID:22541486

  2. The association in a two-way contingency table through log odds ratio analysis: the case of Sarno river pollution.

    PubMed

    Camminatiello, Ida; D'Ambra, Antonello; Sarnacchiaro, Pasquale

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we are proposing a general framework for the analysis of the complete set of log Odds Ratios (ORs) generated by a two-way contingency table. Starting from the RC (M) association model and hypothesizing a Poisson distribution for the counts of the two-way contingency table we are obtaining the weighted Log Ratio Analysis that we are extending to the study of log ORs. Particularly we are obtaining an indirect representation of the log ORs and some synthesis measures. Then for studying the matrix of log ORs we are performing a generalized Singular Value Decomposition that allows us to obtain a direct representation of log ORs. We also expect to get summary measures of association too. We have considered the matrix of complete set of ORs, because, it is linked to the two-way contingency table in terms of variance and it allows us to represent all the ORs on a factorial plan. Finally, a two-way contingency table, which crosses pollution of the Sarno river and sampling points, is to be analyzed to illustrate the proposed framework. PMID:25126485

  3. Likelihood ratio and score tests to test the non-inferiority (or equivalence) of the odds ratio in a crossover study with binary outcomes.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaochun; Li, Huilin; Jin, Man; D Goldberg, Judith

    2016-09-10

    We consider the non-inferiority (or equivalence) test of the odds ratio (OR) in a crossover study with binary outcomes to evaluate the treatment effects of two drugs. To solve this problem, Lui and Chang (2011) proposed both an asymptotic method and a conditional method based on a random effects logit model. Kenward and Jones (1987) proposed a likelihood ratio test (LRTM ) based on a log linear model. These existing methods are all subject to model misspecification. In this paper, we propose a likelihood ratio test (LRT) and a score test that are independent of model specification. Monte Carlo simulation studies show that, in scenarios considered in this paper, both the LRT and the score test have higher power than the asymptotic and conditional methods for the non-inferiority test; the LRT, score, and asymptotic methods have similar power, and they all have higher power than the conditional method for the equivalence test. When data can be well described by a log linear model, the LRTM has the highest power among all the five methods (LRTM , LRT, score, asymptotic, and conditional) for both non-inferiority and equivalence tests. However, in scenarios for which a log linear model does not describe the data well, the LRTM has the lowest power for the non-inferiority test and has inflated type I error rates for the equivalence test. We provide an example from a clinical trial that illustrates our methods. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27095359

  4. The Effects of Small Sample Size on Identifying Polytomous DIF Using the Liu-Agresti Estimator of the Cumulative Common Odds Ratio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carvajal, Jorge; Skorupski, William P.

    2010-01-01

    This study is an evaluation of the behavior of the Liu-Agresti estimator of the cumulative common odds ratio when identifying differential item functioning (DIF) with polytomously scored test items using small samples. The Liu-Agresti estimator has been proposed by Penfield and Algina as a promising approach for the study of polytomous DIF but no…

  5. Binary Logistic Regression Analysis for Detecting Differential Item Functioning: Effectiveness of R[superscript 2] and Delta Log Odds Ratio Effect Size Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hidalgo, Mª Dolores; Gómez-Benito, Juana; Zumbo, Bruno D.

    2014-01-01

    The authors analyze the effectiveness of the R[superscript 2] and delta log odds ratio effect size measures when using logistic regression analysis to detect differential item functioning (DIF) in dichotomous items. A simulation study was carried out, and the Type I error rate and power estimates under conditions in which only statistical testing…

  6. A Brief Adherence Intervention that Improved Glycemic Control: Mediation by Patterns of Adherence

    PubMed Central

    de Vries McClintock, Heather F.; Morales, Knashawn H.; Small, Dylan S.; Bogner, Hillary R.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined whether longitudinal adherence profiles mediated the relationship between a brief adherence intervention and glycemic control among patients with Type 2 diabetes. Adherence was assessed using the Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS). Longitudinal analysis via growth curve mixture modeling was carried out to classify patients according to patterns of adherence to oral hypoglycemic agents. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) assays were used to measure glycemic control as the clinical outcome. Across the whole sample, longitudinal adherence profiles mediated 35.2% (13.2%, 81.0%) of the effect of a brief adherence intervention on glycemic control (from odds ratio (OR) = 8.48, 95% CI (3.24, 22.2) to 4.00, 95% CI (1.34, 11.93)). Our results suggest that patients in the intervention had better glycemic control largely due to their greater likelihood of adherence to oral hypoglycemic agents. PMID:24913600

  7. Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy and Virologic Failure

    PubMed Central

    Bezabhe, Woldesellassie M.; Chalmers, Leanne; Bereznicki, Luke R.; Peterson, Gregory M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The often cited need to achieve ≥95% (nearly perfect) adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) for successful virologic outcomes in HIV may present a barrier to initiation of therapy in the early stages of HIV. This meta-analysis synthesized 43 studies (27,905 participants) performed across >26 countries, to determine the relationship between cut-off point for optimal adherence to ART and virologic outcomes. Meta-analysis was performed using a random-effect model to calculate pooled odds ratios with corresponding 95% confidence intervals. The mean rate of patients reporting optimal adherence was 63.4%. Compared with suboptimal adherence, optimal adherence was associated with a lower risk of virologic failure (0.34; 95% CI: 0.26–0.44). There were no significant differences in the pooled odds ratios among different optimal adherence thresholds (≥98–100%, ≥95%, ≥80–90%). Study design (randomized controlled trial vs observational study) (regression coefficient 0.74, 95% CI: 0.04–1.43, P < 0.05) and study region (developing vs developed countries; regression coefficient 0.56, 95% CI: 0.01–1.12, P < 0.05) remained as independent predictors of between-study heterogeneity, with more patients with optimal adherence from developing countries or randomized controlled trials experiencing virologic failure. The threshold for optimal adherence to achieve better virologic outcomes appears to be wider than the commonly used cut-off point (≥95% adherence). The cut-off point for optimal adherence could be redefined to a slightly lower level to encourage the prescribing ART at an early stage of HIV infection. PMID:27082595

  8. A note on the use of the generalized odds ratio in meta-analysis of association studies involving bi- and tri-allelic polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The generalized odds ratio (GOR) was recently suggested as a genetic model-free measure for association studies. However, its properties were not extensively investigated. We used Monte Carlo simulations to investigate type-I error rates, power and bias in both effect size and between-study variance estimates of meta-analyses using the GOR as a summary effect, and compared these results to those obtained by usual approaches of model specification. We further applied the GOR in a real meta-analysis of three genome-wide association studies in Alzheimer's disease. Findings For bi-allelic polymorphisms, the GOR performs virtually identical to a standard multiplicative model of analysis (e.g. per-allele odds ratio) for variants acting multiplicatively, but augments slightly the power to detect variants with a dominant mode of action, while reducing the probability to detect recessive variants. Although there were differences among the GOR and usual approaches in terms of bias and type-I error rates, both simulation- and real data-based results provided little indication that these differences will be substantial in practice for meta-analyses involving bi-allelic polymorphisms. However, the use of the GOR may be slightly more powerful for the synthesis of data from tri-allelic variants, particularly when susceptibility alleles are less common in the populations (≤10%). This gain in power may depend on knowledge of the direction of the effects. Conclusions For the synthesis of data from bi-allelic variants, the GOR may be regarded as a multiplicative-like model of analysis. The use of the GOR may be slightly more powerful in the tri-allelic case, particularly when susceptibility alleles are less common in the populations. PMID:21645382

  9. Adherence to Preventive Medications: Predictors and outcomes in the Diabetes Prevention Program

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Elizabeth A.; Molitch, Mark; Kramer, M. Kaye; Kahn, Steven; Ma, Yong; Edelstein, Sharon; Smith, Kellie; Johnson, Mariana Kiefer; Kitabchi, Abbas; Crandall, Jill

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate barriers to and strategies for medication adherence and predictors of adherence and the primary outcome in the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Within a randomized, controlled primary prevention study for type 2 diabetes, we collected data on study medication adherence, its predictors, and health outcomes in 27 clinical centers across mainland U.S. and Hawaii. Medication arm participants included 2,155 adults with impaired glucose tolerance randomly assigned to either metformin or matched placebo treatment arms. Structured interviews were used to promote medication adherence and to collect data regarding adherence. Adherence was measured by pill count. The primary DPP outcome of type 2 diabetes was assessed by fasting plasma glucose and oral glucose tolerance test. RESULTS Older age-groups were more adherent than the youngest group (P = 0.01) in the metformin group. The most frequently reported barrier to adherence was “forgetting” (22%). Women reported more adverse effects of metformin (15 vs. 10%, P = 0.002) in the metformin group. Odds of nonadherence increased as participants reported more than one barrier (odds ratio 19.1, P < 0.001). Odds of adherence increased as participants reported multiple strategies to take medication (2.69, P < 0.0001). There was a 38.2% risk reduction for developing diabetes for those adherent to metformin compared with those adherent to placebo (P < 0.0003). CONCLUSIONS DPP medication adherence results are unique in primary prevention for a chronic disease in a large multiethnic sample. Our finding that adherence was associated with risk reduction for diabetes supports the development of brief interventions in clinical settings where medication adherence is a challenge. PMID:16936143

  10. Medication possession ratio: implications of using fixed and variable observation periods in assessing adherence with disease-modifying drugs in patients with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Kozma, Chris M; Dickson, Michael; Phillips, Amy L; Meletiche, Dennis M

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to compare two methods of adherence calculation using administrative data for patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) who are prescribed disease-modifying drugs. Methods Pharmacy-billed disease-modifying drug prescription claims were selected from the 2007–2008 LifeLink™ Health Plan Claims Database. The index date was the first disease-modifying drug prescription claim. Two cohorts were created: all patients with a disease-modifying drug claim in 2007 and a subset with continuous eligibility for 12 months post-index. Adherence was calculated across all disease-modifying drugs for 12 months post-index. Medication possession ratios (MPRs) with variable (start to end of therapy) and fixed (365 days) duration denominators were calculated. Variable MPR was calculated by summing days supply from the first to the last prescription (inclusive) divided by time between the last prescription date plus days supply and the first prescription date. Variable MPR was evaluated for all patients and the continuously eligible cohort. Fixed MPR used the same numerator but divided by 365 days of follow-up and evaluated only for the continuously eligible cohort. Results There were 3405 patients with MS and a disease-modifying drug claim in 2007 and 2145 in the continuously eligible cohort. Means for variable MPR ranged from 87.5% ± 16.6% for the continuously eligible cohort to 90.5% ± 16.0% for the 2007 cohort. The comparable value for fixed MPR was 78.0% ± 28.2% for the continuously eligible cohort. Fixed MPR gave a consistently lower rate of adherence than variable MPR at an 80% adherence threshold. Conclusion Different adherence measures can yield different outcomes, especially when using different eligibility criteria. These results demonstrate the importance of full disclosure of methods used for calculations and specification of the study population. PMID:23807840

  11. Assessing adherence in Thai patients taking combination antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Kerr, S J; Avihingsanon, A; Putcharoen, O; Chetchotisakd, P; Layton, M; Ubolyam, S; Ruxrungtham, K; Cooper, D A; Phanuphak, P; Duncombe, C

    2012-03-01

    In settings where medications and viral load (VL) monitoring are limited by cost, clinicians need reliable ways to assess patient adherence to therapy. We assessed sensitivity and specificity of two self-reported adherence tools (a visual analogue scale [VAS] and the CASE [Center for Adherence Support Evaluation] adherence index), against a standard of detectable VL, with 288 patients from three sites in Thailand. We also assessed predictors of non-adherence. The sensitivity and specificity of the VAS <95% and CASE adherence index ≤11 against a VL >50 copies/mL were 26% and 90%, 19% and 95%, respectively. Against a VL ≥1000 copies/mL sensitivities increased to 55% and 36%, respectively, and specificities were unchanged. Attending a clinic not staffed by HIV specialists (odds ratio [OR] 3.14; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.19-8.34) and being educated to primary school level or less (OR 2.24; 95% CI 1.01-4.94) were associated with self-reported adherence <95% on the VAS in multivariate analysis. Adherence assessed by the VAS was a more accurate predictor of detectable VL. Policy-makers in resource-limited settings should ensure that treatment centres are staffed with well-trained personnel aware of the importance of good patient adherence. PMID:22581867

  12. Aberrations Involving Chromosome 1 as a Possible Predictor of Odds Ratio for Colon Cancer - Results from the Krakow Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Galas, Aleksander; Miszczyk, Justyna

    2016-01-01

    Background There is still an open question how to predict colorectal cancer risk before any morphological changes appear in the colon. Objective The purpose was to investigate aberrations in chromosomes 1, 2 and 4 in peripheral blood lymphocytes analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization technique as a tool to assess the likelihood of colorectal cancer. Methods A hospital-based case-control study included 20 colon cancer patients and 18 hospital-based controls. Information about potential covariates was collected by interview. The frequency of stable and unstable chromosome aberrations in chromosome 1, 2 and 4 was assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization technique. Results Colorectal cancer patients, as compared to controls, had a relatively higher frequency of chromosome 1 translocations (median: 3.5 versus 1.0 /1000 cells, p = 0.006), stable aberrations (3.8 versus 1.0 /1000 cells, p = 0.007) and total aberrations (p = 0.009). There were no differences observed for chromosomes 2 and 4. Our results showed an increase in the odds of having colon cancer by about 50–80% associated with an increase by 1/1000 cells in the number of chromosome 1 aberrations. Conclusions The results revealed that the frequency of chromosomal aberrations, especially translocations in chromosome 1, seems to be a promising method to show a colon cancer risk. Additionally, our study suggests the reasonableness of use of biomarkers such as chromosome 1 aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes in screening prevention programs for individuals at higher colon cancer risk to identify those who are at increased risk and require more frequent investigations, e.g. by sigmoidoscopy. PMID:26824604

  13. Non-adherence to topical treatments for actinic keratosis

    PubMed Central

    Shergill, Bav; Zokaie, Simon; Carr, Alison J

    2014-01-01

    Background There is limited information on the patterns of use, adherence rates, and factors that impact adherence with topical treatments for actinic keratosis (AK). Objectives To establish patterns of use and adherence with topical treatments for AK and to identify treatment-related factors that impact on adherence. Methods A community-based, cross-sectional study was performed using a standardized questionnaire completed online or via telephone interview. Patients were stratified according to the presence of AK lesions on the scalp and/or other extremities; and presence of scarring resulting from treatment. Results This study included 305 patients with AK who were currently using a patient-applied topical therapy for AK or had used one within the previous 12 months. In total, 88% (n = 268/305) of patients were either non-adherent, non-persistent or both non-adherent and non-persistent to topical therapy. Duration of treatment was associated with increasing rates of non-adherence (adjusted odds ratio [OR]; for treatment durations greater than 4 weeks, 2.2, P < 0.01): 52% of patients were non-adherent with 3–4 week treatment duration; 69% of patients with 4–8 week treatment duration; and 71% of patients with 6–12 week treatment duration. There were similar increases in non-persistence with increasing treatment duration (adjusted OR; for treatment durations greater than 4 weeks, 2.1, P < 0.05). Conclusion This study found high rates of non-adherence and non-persistence in patients with AK. Duration of treatment was a significant factor contributing to non-adherence and non-persistence to topical treatments. Patient-applied topical therapies that require less frequent application and have shorter treatment duration may be associated with improved adherence rates. PMID:24379656

  14. Medication therapy management and adherence among US renal transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Chisholm-Burns, Marie A; Spivey, Christina A; Tolley, Elizabeth A; Kaplan, Erin K

    2016-01-01

    Background Medication therapy management (MTM) services among patient populations with a range of disease states have improved adherence rates. However, no published studies have examined the impact of Medicare Part D MTM eligibility on renal transplant recipients’ (RTRs) immunosuppressant therapy (IST) adherence. This study’s purpose was therefore, to determine the effects of Medicare Part D MTM on IST adherence among adult RTRs at 12 months posttransplant. Methods Cross-sectional analyses were performed on Medicare Parts A, B, and D claims and transplant follow-up data reported in the United States Renal Data System. The sample included adult RTRs who were transplanted between 2006 and 2011, had graft survival for 12 months, were enrolled in Part D, and were prescribed tacrolimus. IST adherence was measured by medication possession ratio for tacrolimus. MTM eligibility was determined using criteria established by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Descriptive statistics were calculated. Adherence was modeled using multiple logistic regression. Results In all, 17,181 RTRs were included. The majority of the sample were male (59.1%), and 42% were MTM-eligible. Mean medication possession ratio was 0.91±0.17 (mean ± standard deviation), with 16.83% having a medication possession ratio of <0.80. MTM eligibility, sex, age, and number of prescription drugs were significantly associated with adherence in the full model (P<0.05). MTM-eligible RTRs were more likely to be adherent than those who were not MTM-eligible (odds ratio =1.13, 95% confidence interval 1.02–1.26, P=0.02). Conclusion The findings provide evidence that access to MTM services increases IST adherence among RTRs. PMID:27175070

  15. Adherence to Antihypertensive Medication in Older Adults With Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Suzanne H. S.; Chau, Janita P. C.; Woo, Jean; Thompson, David R.; Choi, Kai Chow

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Effective prevention of cardiovascular events in people with hypertension requires optimal control of blood pressure. Despite advances in management, poor adherence to antihypertensive medications is often reported as the major reason attenuating treatment efficacy. Research has provided limited evidence of associations between illness perceptions, satisfaction with consultations, and medication adherence. The aim of this study is to identify factors significantly associated with medication adherence in a group of Chinese older adults with essential hypertension. Design/Setting/Participants: A cross-sectional correlational study was conducted. Data were collected from 195 older adults (mean [SD] age, 76 [6.6] years) recruited from 12 community centers. Measurements: The Illness Perception Questionnaire–Revised was used to measure illness perceptions, and the Medical Interview Satisfaction Scale was used to measure satisfaction with individual consultations. The Morisky Medication Adherence Scale was used to measure the extent of adherence to antihypertensive medications. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to examine factors, including illness perceptions, consultation satisfaction, and demographic and clinical characteristics, that were significantly associated with medication adherence. Results: More than half of the respondents (55.9%) acknowledged some degree of medication nonadherence. Older age, living alone, and perception related to treatment control were independently associated with increased odds of medication adherence, with odds ratios ranging from 1.14 to 1.92 (P < .05). Conclusion: The results highlight the importance of cultivating positive beliefs that hypertension is amenable to control by treatment. Furthermore, the adherence behavior of those of younger individuals and living with family should be closely monitored. PMID:25774846

  16. Realtime adherence monitoring of antiretroviral therapy among HIV-infected adults and children in rural Uganda.

    PubMed

    Haberer, Jessica E; Kiwanuka, Julius; Nansera, Denis; Muzoora, Conrad; Hunt, Peter W; So, Jacquelyn; O'Donnell, Michael; Siedner, Mark; Martin, Jeffrey N; Bangsberg, David R

    2013-08-24

    A real-time wireless electronic adherence monitor (EAM) and weekly self-report of missed doses via interactive voice response (IVR) and short message service (SMS) queries were used to measure antiretroviral therapy adherence in 49 adults and 46 children in rural Uganda. Median adherence was 89.5% among adults and 92.8% among children by EAM, and 99-100% for both adults and children by IVR/SMS self-report. Loss of viral suppression was significantly associated with adherence by EAM (odds ratio 0.58 for each 10% increase), but not IVR/SMS. Wireless EAM creates an exciting opportunity to monitor and potentially intervene with adherence challenges as they are happening. PMID:23751260

  17. Self-Assessment of Adherence to Medication: A Case Study in Campania Region Community-Dwelling Population

    PubMed Central

    Menditto, Enrica; Guerriero, Francesca; Orlando, Valentina; Crola, Catherine; Di Somma, Carolina; Illario, Maddalena; Morisky, Donald E.; Colao, Annamaria

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of the study was to assess self-reported medication adherence measure in patients selected during a health education and health promotion focused event held in the Campania region. The study also assessed sociodemographic determinants of adherence. Methods. An interviewer assisted survey was conducted to assess adherence using the Italian version of the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8). Participants older than 18 years were interviewed by pharmacists while waiting for free-medical checkup. Results. A total of 312 participants were interviewed during the Health Campus event. A total of 187 (59.9%) had low adherence to medications. Pearson's bivariate correlation showed positive association between the MMAS-8 score and gender, educational level and smoking (P < 0.05). A multivariable analysis showed that the level of education and smoking were independent predictors of adherence. Individuals with an average level of education (odds ratio (OR), 2.21, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.08–4.52) and nonsmoker (odds ratio (OR) 1.87, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.04–3.35) were found to be more adherent to medication than those with a lower level of education and smoking. Conclusion. The analysis showed very low prescription adherence levels in the interviewed population. The level of education was a relevant predictor associated with that result. PMID:26346487

  18. Multilevel factors associated with long-term adherence to screening mammography in older women in the U.S.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Rebecca A; O'Meara, Ellen S; Henderson, Louise M; Hill, Deirdre; Braithwaite, Dejana; Haas, Jennifer S; Lee, Christoph I; Sprague, Brian L; Alford-Teaster, Jennifer; Tosteson, Anna N A; Wernli, Karen J; Onega, Tracy

    2016-08-01

    In the U.S., guidelines recommend that women continue mammography screening until at least age 74, but recent evidence suggests declining screening rates in older women. We estimated adherence to screening mammography and multilevel factors associated with adherence in a longitudinal cohort of older women. Women aged 66-75years receiving screening mammography within the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium were linked to Medicare claims (2005-2010). Claims data identified baseline adherence, defined as receiving subsequent mammography within approximately 2years, and length of time adherent to guidelines. Characteristics associated with adherence were investigated using logistic and Cox proportional hazards regression models. Analyses were stratified by age to investigate variation in relationships between patient factors and adherence. Among 49,775 women, 89% were adherent at baseline. Among women 66-70years, those with less than a high school education were more likely to be non-adherent at baseline (odds ratio [OR] 1.96; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.65-2.33) and remain adherent for less time (hazard ratio [HR] 1.41; 95% CI 1.11-1.80) compared to women with a college degree. Women with ≥1 versus no Charlson co-morbidities were more likely to be non-adherent at baseline (OR 1.46; 95% CI 1.31-1.62) and remain adherent for less time (HR 1.44; 95% CI 1.24-1.66). Women aged 71-75 had lower adherence overall, but factors associated with non-adherence were similar. In summary, adherence to guidelines is high among Medicare-enrolled women in the U.S. receiving screening mammography. Efforts are needed to ensure that vulnerable populations attain these same high levels of adherence. PMID:27261409

  19. Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy and Virologic Failure: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Bezabhe, Woldesellassie M; Chalmers, Leanne; Bereznicki, Luke R; Peterson, Gregory M

    2016-04-01

    The often cited need to achieve ≥95% (nearly perfect) adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) for successful virologic outcomes in HIV may present a barrier to initiation of therapy in the early stages of HIV.This meta-analysis synthesized 43 studies (27,905 participants) performed across >26 countries, to determine the relationship between cut-off point for optimal adherence to ART and virologic outcomes.Meta-analysis was performed using a random-effect model to calculate pooled odds ratios with corresponding 95% confidence intervals.The mean rate of patients reporting optimal adherence was 63.4%. Compared with suboptimal adherence, optimal adherence was associated with a lower risk of virologic failure (0.34; 95% CI: 0.26-0.44). There were no significant differences in the pooled odds ratios among different optimal adherence thresholds (≥98-100%, ≥95%, ≥80-90%). Study design (randomized controlled trial vs observational study) (regression coefficient 0.74, 95% CI: 0.04-1.43, P < 0.05) and study region (developing vs developed countries; regression coefficient 0.56, 95% CI: 0.01-1.12, P < 0.05) remained as independent predictors of between-study heterogeneity, with more patients with optimal adherence from developing countries or randomized controlled trials experiencing virologic failure.The threshold for optimal adherence to achieve better virologic outcomes appears to be wider than the commonly used cut-off point (≥95% adherence). The cut-off point for optimal adherence could be redefined to a slightly lower level to encourage the prescribing ART at an early stage of HIV infection. PMID:27082595

  20. Effects of medication adherence on hospitalizations and healthcare costs in patients with schizophrenia in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Dilokthornsakul, Piyameth; Thoopputra, Thitaporn; Patanaprateep, Oraluck; Kongsakon, Ronnachai; Chaiyakunapruk, Nathorn

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study was conducted to determine the impacts of medication adherence on hospitalization and direct healthcare cost in patients with schizophrenia in Thailand. Methods: A retrospective study was undertaken. Patients with schizophrenia aged 18–65 years who visited a University hospital and received antipsychotics from April 2011 to October 2011 were included. Propensity score–adjusted logistic regression was used to determine the impacts of medication adherence on schizophrenia-related and all-cause hospitalizations. Results: A total of 582 patients were included. Three out of 224 patients (1.3%) were hospitalized with schizophrenia in optimal adherence group, while 10 of 140 (7.1%) were hospitalized in under-adherence group, and 7 of 218 (3.2%) were hospitalized in over-adherence group. Based on propensity score–adjusted multivariate logistic regression, the adjusted odds ratio was 5.86 (95% confidence interval = 1.53–22.50) for schizophrenia-related hospitalization and 8.04 (95% confidence interval = 2.20–29.40) for all-cause hospitalization. The average annual direct healthcare costs in patients with optimal adherence, under-adherence, and over-adherence were US$371 ± US$836, US$386 ± US$734, and US$508 ± US$2168, respectively. Conclusion: An initiation of interventions to maintain optimal adherence in patients with schizophrenia would significantly impact the healthcare system. PMID:27026801

  1. Adherence to prescribed medications of Iranian traditional medicine in a group of patients with chronic disease

    PubMed Central

    Dabaghian, Fataneh Hashem; Rassouli, Maryam; Sadighi, Jila; Ghods, Roshanak

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The extent to which a person's health-related behavior corresponds with medical instructions (adherence) is an important modifier of health system effectiveness. This study was designed to determine the patients’ adherence to Iranian traditional medicine in a group of patients with chronic disease. Methods: Convenience sampling was used to enroll 320 patients with chronic diseases from January 2014 to January 2015 in clinics of traditional medicine affiliated with medical universities in Tehran. Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS) was used to measure the adherence. After describing the variables and the frequency of adherence, logistic regression analysis was used to determine the influencing factors. Findings: Mean age was 40.8 (standard deviation [SD] =13) years. The mean of the duration of disease was 54.6 (SD = 56.1) months and mean of the duration of referring to the clinics 6.5 (SD = 6.9) months. Total score of MMAS was zero in 33 (10.3%) of patients (high adherence), one or two in 128 (40%) of patients (moderate adherence), and more than two in 159 (49.7%) of patients (low adherence). Forgetfulness, bad taste, not availability, and the high cost of the drugs were the most commonly reported causes of non-adherence. Adherence was associated with age (odds ratio [OR] =1.05, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1–1.1), marriage (OR = 10.8, 95% CI 2.05–57.6), number of prescribed drugs (OR = 0.05, 95% CI 0.02–0.14), and duration of disease (OR = 1.01, 95% CI 1–1.02). Conclusion: Considering the low adherence in users of medications of Iranian traditional medicine, health care practitioners need to be trained in adherence and the influencing factors and also to use some interventions to increase the adherence. PMID:26985436

  2. Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Nathan A. S.; Pownceby, Mark I.; Madsen, Ian C.; Studer, Andrew J.; Manuel, James R.; Kimpton, Justin A.

    2014-12-01

    Effects of basicity, B (CaO:SiO2 ratio) on the thermal range, concentration, and formation mechanisms of silico-ferrite of calcium and aluminum (SFCA) and SFCA-I iron ore sinter bonding phases have been investigated using an in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction-based methodology with subsequent Rietveld refinement-based quantitative phase analysis. SFCA and SFCA-I phases are the key bonding materials in iron ore sinter, and improved understanding of the effects of processing parameters such as basicity on their formation and decomposition may assist in improving efficiency of industrial iron ore sintering operations. Increasing basicity significantly increased the thermal range of SFCA-I, from 1363 K to 1533 K (1090 °C to 1260 °C) for a mixture with B = 2.48, to ~1339 K to 1535 K (1066 °C to 1262 °C) for a mixture with B = 3.96, and to ~1323 K to 1593 K (1050 °C to 1320 °C) at B = 4.94. Increasing basicity also increased the amount of SFCA-I formed, from 18 wt pct for the mixture with B = 2.48 to 25 wt pct for the B = 4.94 mixture. Higher basicity of the starting sinter mixture will, therefore, increase the amount of SFCA-I, considered to be more desirable of the two phases. Basicity did not appear to significantly influence the formation mechanism of SFCA-I. It did, however, affect the formation mechanism of SFCA, with the decomposition of SFCA-I coinciding with the formation of a significant amount of additional SFCA in the B = 2.48 and 3.96 mixtures but only a minor amount in the highest basicity mixture. In situ neutron diffraction enabled characterization of the behavior of magnetite after melting of SFCA produced a magnetite plus melt phase assemblage.

  3. Rethinking adherence.

    PubMed

    Steiner, John F

    2012-10-16

    In 2012, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) will introduce measures of adherence to oral hypoglycemic, antihypertensive, and cholesterol-lowering drugs into its Medicare Advantage quality program. To meet these quality goals, delivery systems will need to develop and disseminate strategies to improve adherence. The design of adherence interventions has too often been guided by the mistaken assumptions that adherence is a single behavior that can be predicted from readily available patient characteristics and that individual clinicians alone can improve adherence at the population level.Effective interventions require recognition that adherence is a set of interacting behaviors influenced by individual, social, and environmental forces; adherence interventions must be broadly based, rather than targeted to specific population subgroups; and counseling with a trusted clinician needs to be complemented by outreach interventions and removal of structural and organizational barriers. To achieve the adherence goals set by CMS, front-line clinicians, interdisciplinary teams, organizational leaders, and policymakers will need to coordinate efforts in ways that exemplify the underlying principles of health care reform. PMID:23070491

  4. Can adherence to antihypertensive therapy be used to promote adherence to statin therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Richard H; Pelletier, Elise M; Smith, Paula J; Roberts, Craig S

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To compare adherence with statin therapy in patients switching to single-pill amlodipine besylate/atorvastatin calcium with patients adding a separate statin to their amlodipine regimen. Methods: We identified hypertensive patients prescribed amlodipine who switched to amlodipine/atorvastatin (switch) or added a statin to their amlodipine regimen (add-on) from July 2004 to June 2007. Propensity score matching (1 switch:3 add-on) was applied based on ‘nearest neighbor’ approach. The primary adherence measure was patients with proportion of days covered (PDC) ≥0.80 at 180 days; secondary measures included mean PDC and persistence. A sensitivity analysis was performed, accounting for total statin/amlodipine exposure. Results: Among 4556 matched patients (n = 1139 switch; n = 3417 add-on), mean age was 53.9 years and 52.1% were male. After 180 days, adherence with statin therapy was higher for the switch vs add-on cohort (50.8% vs 44.3%; P < 0.001). After adjusting for pre-index amlodipine adherence, the switch cohort was more likely to be adherent than the add-on cohort (odds ratio: 1.64 [95% confidence interval: 1.42 to 1.89]). Persistence was higher in the switch than the add-on cohort (127.6 vs 117 days; P < 0.001). Conclusion: Hypertensive patients taking amlodipine who initiated statin therapy via single-pill amlodipine/atorvastatin were more likely to remain adherent to their statin than patients adding a separate statin to their antihypertensive regimen. PMID:19936170

  5. Accuracy of Measures of Medication Adherence in a Cholesterol-Lowering Regimen

    PubMed Central

    Dunbar-Jacob, Jacqueline; Sereika, Susan M.; Houze, Martin; Luyster, Faith S.; Callan, Judith A.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the concordance between multiple measures of adherence, as well as sensitivity to detection of poor adherers, specificity, and predictive validity using a daily cholesterol-lowering regimen. Participants (N = 180) aged 24 to 60 years participated in an adherence ancillary study in a clinical trial. Males constituted 53.9% of this well-educated, community sample. Data on adherence were collected over a 6-month period, using electronic monitoring, self-report, specific recall, and pill counts. Electronically monitored (odds ratio [OR] = 5.348) and Shea self-report (OR = 2.678) predicted cholesterol lowering. Days (78.9%) and intervals (84.2%) adherent and the Shea (73.7%) were sensitive to the detection of poor adherers. Moderate associations were found between measures of the same type. Low correlations were found otherwise. The electronic monitor was the most accurate and informative measure. The Shea self-report was the most accurate brief, global estimate of adherence. Other measures were not associated with clinical outcome or sensitive to poor adherence. PMID:22438308

  6. The effect of medication adherence on health care utilization in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Lew, Kim H; Chang, Eunice Y; Rajagopalan, Krithika; Knoth, Russell L

    2006-09-01

    A retrospective analysis of electronic prescription and medical claims representing approximately 1.4 million managed care commercial health plan members with mental health benefits was conducted. The effect of patient adherence to traditional mood-stabilizer therapy (lithium, valproate, carbamazepine, lamotrigine, or oxcarbazepine) for bipolar disorder on mental health-related hospitalization was assessed among 1,399 patients (mean age, 42.9 yr; 66.3% female) studied. Reduced adherence to traditional mood-stabilizing therapy (< 80%) in patients with bipolar disorder was associated with significantly greater risk of mental health-related, emergency room visits (odds ratio, 1.98; 95% confidence interval, 1.38-2.84) and inpatient hospitalizations (odds ratio, 1.71; 95% confidence interval, 1.27-2.32), even after adjusting for age, gender, and comorbidity. PMID:17017312

  7. The Association Between Treatment Adherence to Nicotine Patches and Smoking Cessation in Pregnancy: A Secondary Analysis of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Aveyard, Paul; Cooper, Sue; Leonardi-Bee, Jo; Coleman, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: In nonpregnant “quitters,” adherence to nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) increases smoking cessation. We investigated relationships between adherence to placebo or NRT patches and cessation in pregnancy, including an assessment of reverse causation and whether any adherence: cessation relationship is moderated when using nicotine or placebo patches. Methods: Using data from 1050 pregnant trial participants, regression models investigated associations between maternal characteristics, adherence and smoking cessation. Results: Adherence during the first month was associated with lower baseline cotinine concentrations (β −0.08, 95% confidence interval [CI] −0.15 to −0.01) and randomization to NRT (β 2.59, 95% CI 1.50 to 3.68). Adherence during both treatment months was associated with being randomized to NRT (β 0.51, 95% CI 0.29 to 0.72) and inversely associated with higher nicotine dependence. Adherence with either NRT or placebo was associated with cessation at 1 month (odds ratio [OR] 1.11, 95% CI 1.08 to 1.13) and delivery (OR 1.06, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.09), but no such association was observed in the subgroup where reverse causation was not possible. Amongst all women, greater adherence to nicotine patches was associated with increased cessation (OR 2.47, 95% CI 1.32 to 4.63) but greater adherence to placebo was not (OR 0.98, 95% CI: 0.44 to 2.18). Conclusion: Women who were more adherent to NRT were more likely to achieve abstinence; more nicotine dependent women probably showed lower adherence to NRT because they relapsed to smoking more quickly. The interaction between nicotine-containing patches and adherence for cessation suggests that the association between adherence with nicotine patches and cessation may be partly causal. Implications: This study used placebo randomized controlled trial data to investigate both associations between women’s characteristics and adherence to NRT patch treatment, and the relationship between

  8. Associations Between Personality Traits and Adherence to Antidepressants Assessed Through Self-Report, Electronic Monitoring, and Pharmacy Dispensing Data: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Wouters, Hans; Amin, Darya F H; Taxis, Katja; Heerdink, Eibert R; Egberts, Antoine C G; Gardarsdottir, Helga

    2016-10-01

    Treatment with antidepressants is often compromised by substantial nonadherence. To understand nonadherence, specific medication-related behaviors and beliefs have been studied, but less is known about broader and temporally stable personality "traits." Furthermore, adherence has often been assessed by a single method. Hence, we investigated associations between the Big Five personality traits and adherence assessed by self-report, electronic drug use monitoring, and dispensing data. Using the Big Five Inventory, we assessed the personality traits "openness," "conscientiousness," "extraversion," "agreeableness," and "neuroticism" of patients treated with antidepressants who were invited through community pharmacies. Self-reported adherence was assessed with the Medication Adherence Rating Scale (score >24), electronic monitoring with medication event monitoring system (MEMS) devices (therapy days missed ≤ 10% and < 4 consecutive days missed), and dispensing data (medication possession ratio ≥ 80%). One hundred four women and 33 men participated (mean age, 51; standard deviation, 14). Paroxetine was most frequently prescribed (N = 53, 38%). Logistic regression analysis revealed that of the personality traits, the third and fourth quartiles of "conscientiousness" were associated with better self-reported adherence (odds ratio, 3.63; 95% confidence interval, 1.34-9.86 and odds ratio, 2.97; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-8.08; P ≤ 0.05). No relationships were found between personality traits and adherence assessed through electronic drug use monitoring or dispensing data. We therefore conclude that adherence to antidepressant therapy seems to be largely unrelated to personality traits. PMID:27454894

  9. Examining the relationship between psychological distress and adherence to anti-retroviral therapy among Ugandan adolescents living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Mutumba, Massy; Musiime, Victor; Lepkwoski, James M; Harper, Gary W; Snow, Rachel C; Resnicow, Ken; Bauermeister, Jose A

    2016-07-01

    Psychological distress is common among adolescents living with HIV (ALHIV) worldwide, and has been associated with non-adherence to anti-retroviral therapy (ART), leading to poor virologic suppression, drug resistance, and increased risk for AIDS morbidity and mortality. However, only a few studies have explored the relationship between psychological distress and ART adherence among adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa. The paper examines the relationship between psychological distress and ART adherence, and effect of psychosocial resources on ART adherence. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 464 ALHIV (aged 12-19; 53% female) seeking HIV care at a large HIV treatment center in Kampala, Uganda. ALHIV were recruited during routine clinic visits. Three self-reported binary adherence measures were utilized: missed pills in the past three days, non-adherence to the prescribed medical regimen, and self-rated adherence assessed using a visual analog scale. Psychological distress was measured as a continuous variable, and computed as the mean score on a locally developed and validated 25-item symptom checklist for Ugandan ALHIV. Psychosocial resources included spirituality, religiosity, optimism, social support, and coping strategies. After adjusting for respondents' socio-demographic characteristics and psychosocial resources, a unit increase in psychological distress was associated with increased odds of missing pills in past 3 days (Odds Ratio(OR) = 1.75; Confidence Interval (CI): 1.04-2.95), not following the prescribed regimen (OR = 1.63; CI: 1.08-2.46), and lower self-rated adherence (OR = 1.79; CI: 1.19-2.69). Psychosocial resources were associated with lower odds for non-adherence on all three self-report measures. There is a need to strengthen the psychosocial aspects of adolescent HIV care by developing interventions to identify and prevent psychological distress among Ugandan ALHIV. PMID:27294696

  10. Psychiatric symptoms and antiretroviral non-adherence in US youth with perinatal HIV: A longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Kacanek, Deborah; Angelidou, Konstantia; Williams, Paige L.; Chernoff, Miriam; Gadow, Kenneth D.; Nachman, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The relationship of specific psychiatric conditions to adherence has not been examined in longitudinal studies of youth with perinatal HIV infection (PHIV). We examined associations between psychiatric conditions and ARV non-adherence over two years. Design Longitudinal study in 294 PHIV youth, 6–17 years old, in the US and Puerto Rico. Methods We annually assessed three non-adherence outcomes: missed >5% of doses in past 3 days, missed a dose within the past month, and unsuppressed viral load (VL) (>400 copies/mL). We fit multivariable logistic models for non-adherence using Generalized Estimating Equations and evaluated associations of psychiatric conditions (ADHD, disruptive behavior, depression, anxiety) at entry with incident non-adherence using multivariable logistic regression. Results Non-adherence prevalence at study entry was 14% (3-day recall), 32% (past month non-adherence), and 38% (unsuppressed VL), remaining similar over time. At entry, 38% met symptom cutoff criteria for ≥1 psychiatric condition. Greater odds of 3-day recall non-adherence were observed at Week 96 for those with depression (Adjusted Odds Ratio (aOR)=4.14; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.11–15.42) or disruptive behavior (aOR=3.36; 95% CI: 1.02–11.10) but not at entry. Those with vs. without ADHD had elevated odds of unsuppressed VL at Weeks 48 (aOR=2.46; 95% CI: 1.27–4.78) and 96 (aOR=2.35; 95% CI: 1.01–5.45) but not at entry. Among 232 youth adherent at entry, 16% reported incident 3-day recall non-adherence. Disruptive behavior conditions at entry were associated with incident 3-day recall non-adherence (aOR=3.01; 95% CI: 1.24–7.31). Conclusions In PHIV youth, comprehensive adherence interventions that address psychiatric conditions throughout the transition to adult care are needed. PMID:26035322

  11. Adherence to preventive medications in asthmatic children at a tertiary care teaching hospital in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Md Redzuan, Adyani; Lee, Meng Soon; Mohamed Shah, Noraida

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Asthma affects an estimated 300 million people worldwide. Poor adherence to prescribed preventive medications, especially among children with asthma, leads to increased mortality and morbidity. The purpose of this study was to assess the adherence and persistence levels of asthmatic children at the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Center (UKMMC), a tertiary care teaching hospital, and to determine the factors that influence adherence to prescribed preventive medications. Patients and methods Participants were asthmatic patients aged 18 years and younger with at least one prescription for a preventive medication refilled between January and December 2011. Refill records from the pharmacy dispensing database were used to determine the medication possession ratio (MPR) and continuous measure of gaps (CMG), measures of adherence and persistence levels, respectively. Results The sample consisted of 218 children with asthma from the General and Respiratory pediatric clinics at UKMMC. The overall adherence level was 38% (n=83; MPR ≥80%), and the persistence level was 27.5% (n=60; CMG ≤20%). We found a significant association between the adherence and persistence levels (r=0.483, P<0.01). The presence of comorbidities significantly predicted the adherence (odds ratio [OR] =16.21, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 7.76–33.84, P<0.01) and persistence level (OR =2.63, 95% CI: 0.13–52.79, P<0.01). Other factors, including age, sex, ethnicity, duration of asthma diagnosis, and number of prescribed preventive medications did not significantly affect adherence or persistence (P>0.05). Conclusion In conclusion, the adherence level among children with asthma at UKMMC was low. The presence of comorbidities was found to influence adherence towards preventive medications in asthmatic children. PMID:24600208

  12. Patterns of analgesic adherence predict health care utilization among outpatients with cancer pain

    PubMed Central

    Meghani, Salimah H; Knafl, George J

    2016-01-01

    Background Studies in chronic noncancer pain settings have found that opioid use increases health care utilization. Despite the key role of analgesics, specifically opioids, in the setting of cancer pain, there is no literature to our knowledge about the relationship between adherence to prescribed around-the-clock (ATC) analgesics and acute health care utilization (hospitalization) among patients with cancer pain. Purpose To identify adherence patterns over time for cancer patients taking ATC analgesics for pain, cluster these patterns into adherence types, combine the types into an adherence risk factor for hospitalization, identify other risk factors for hospitalization, and identify risk factors for inconsistent analgesic adherence. Materials and methods Data from a 3-month prospective observational study of patients diagnosed with solid tumors or multiple myeloma, having cancer-related pain, and having at least one prescription of oral ATC analgesics were collected. Adherence data were collected electronically using the medication event-monitoring system. Analyses were conducted using adaptive modeling methods based on heuristic search through alternative models controlled by likelihood cross-validation scores. Results Six adherence types were identified and combined into the risk factor for hospitalization of inconsistent versus consistent adherence over time. Twenty other individually significant risk factors for hospitalization were identified, but inconsistent analgesic adherence was the strongest of these predictors (ie, generating the largest likelihood cross-validation score). These risk factors were adaptively combined into a model for hospitalization based on six pairwise interaction risk factors with exceptional discrimination (ie, area under the receiver-operating-characteristic curve of 0.91). Patients had from zero to five of these risk factors, with an odds ratio of 5.44 (95% confidence interval 3.09–9.58) for hospitalization, with a unit

  13. Predictors of decline in medication adherence: Results from CoSMO

    PubMed Central

    Krousel-Wood, Marie; Joyce, Cara; Holt, Elizabeth; Muntner, Paul; Webber, Larry S; Morisky, Donald E; Frohlich, Edward D; Re, Richard N

    2011-01-01

    Few data are available on the predictors of decline in antihypertensive medication adherence and the association of decline in adherence with subsequent blood pressure (BP) control. The current analysis included 1,965 adults from the Cohort Study of Medication Adherence among Older Adults (CoSMO) recruited between August 2006 and September 2007. Decline in antihypertensive medication adherence was defined as a ≥ 2 point decrease on the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale assessed during telephone surveys 1 and 2 years following baseline. Risk factors for decline in adherence were collected using telephone surveys and administrative databases. BP was abstracted from outpatient records. The annual rate for a decline in adherence was 4.3% (159 participants experienced a decline). After multivariable adjustment, a decline in adherence was associated with an odds ratio (OR) for uncontrolled BP (≥140/90 mm Hg) at follow up of 1.68 (95% CI: 1.01, 2.80). Depressive symptoms (OR 1.84, 95%CI 1.20, 2.82) and a high stressful life events score (OR 1.68, 95% CI 1.19, 2.38) were associated with higher ORs for a decline in adherence. Female gender (OR 0.61, 95% CI 0.42, 0.88); being married (OR 0.68, 95% CI 0.47, 0.98); and calcium channel blocker use (OR 0.68, 95% CI 0.48, 0.97) were associated with lower ORs for decline. In summary, a decline in antihypertensive medication adherence was associated with uncontrolled BP. Modifiable factors associated with decline were identified. Further research is warranted to determine if interventions can prevent the decline in antihypertensive medication adherence and improve BP control. PMID:21968751

  14. Food Insufficiency is a Risk Factor for Suboptimal Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence among HIV-Infected Adults in Urban Peru

    PubMed Central

    Franke, Molly F.; Murray, Megan B.; Muñoz, Maribel; Hernández-Díaz, Sonia; Sebastián, José Luís; Atwood, Sidney; Caldas, Adolfo; Bayona, Jaime; Shin, Sonya S.

    2012-01-01

    We examined the relationship between food insufficiency and antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence. A cohort of HIV-infected adults in urban Peru was followed for a two-year period after ART initiation. ART adherence was measured using a 30-day self-report tool and classified as suboptimal if <95% adherence was reported. We conducted a repeated measures cohort analysis to examine whether food insufficiency was more common during months of suboptimal adherence relative to months with optimal adherence. 1,264 adherence interviews were conducted for 134 individuals. Participants who reported food insufficiency in the month prior to interview were more likely to experience suboptimal adherence than those who did not (odds ratio [O.R.]:2.4; 95% confidence interval [C.I.]:1.4, 4.1), even after adjusting for baseline social support score (O.R. per 5 point increase:0.91; C.I.:[0.85, 0.98]) and good baseline adherence self-efficacy (O.R.:0.25; C.I.:[0.09, 0.69]). Interventions that ensure food security for HIV-infected individuals may help sustain high levels of adherence. PMID:20714923

  15. Medication Adherence and Readmission In Medicare Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuting; Kaplan, Cameron M.; Baik, Seo Hyon; Chang, Chung-Chou H.; Lave, Judith R.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine the relationship between 6-month medication adherence and 1-year down-stream heart-disease related readmission among patients who survived a myocardial infarction (MI). Study Design Retrospective, nested case-control analysis of Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries who were discharged alive post-MI in 2008 (n = 168,882). Methods Patients in the case group had their first heart-disease related readmission post-MI discharge during 6-9 months and/or 9-12 months. We then used propensity score matching mechanism to identify patients in the control group who had similar characteristics, but did not have a readmission in the same time window. Adherence was defined as the average 6-month medication possession ratio (MPR) prior to the first date of the time-window of defining readmission. Results After controlling for demographic, insurance coverage and clinical characteristics, patients who had a heart-disease related readmission had worse adherence, with MPR of 0.70 and 0.74 in the case and control groups. Odds ratio of MPR ≥0.75 was 0.79 (95% CI 0.75-0.83) among those with a readmission relative to those without. Conclusion Our study shows that better 6-month medication adherence may reduce heart-disease related readmissions within a year after an MI. PMID:25651604

  16. Procedure volume influences adherence to celiac disease guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Lebwohl, Benjamin; Genta, Robert M.; Kapel, Robert C.; Sheehan, Daniel; Lerner, Nina S.; Green, Peter H.; Neugut, Alfred I.; Rundle, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background Although the prevalence of celiac disease in the USA approaches 1%, most cases are undiagnosed, in part, because of low adherence to the recommendation of submitting at least four specimens during duodenal biopsy. We aimed to determine whether physician and practice characteristics are associated with adherence to this recommendation. Materials and methods We used a large national pathology database to identify all adult patients who underwent duodenal biopsy during 2006–2009. Hierarchical modeling was used to determine whether procedure volume, the number of gastroenterologists per endoscopy suite, and the number of gastroenterologists per capita of the zip code of the practice were associated with adherence. Results We identified 92 580 patients (67% female, mean age 53.5 years) who met our inclusion/exclusion criteria. Specimens were submitted by 669 gastroenterologists from 200 endoscopy suites, located in 191 zip codes, with a mean of 3.4 gastroenterologists per suite. On multivariate analysis, a higher procedure volume was associated with a decreased adherence [odds ratio (OR) for each additional 100 procedures, 0.92; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.88–0.97; P = 0.002]. An increased adherence was reported for gastroenterologists working at suites with higher numbers of gastroenterologists (OR for each additional gastroenterologist, 1.08; 95% CI, 1.04–1.13; P < 0.001) but not for a higher gastroenterologist density in the zip code of the practice (OR for each additional gastroenterologist per capita, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.99–1.03; P = 0.21). Conclusion High-volume physicians exhibit lower rates of adherence to biopsy guidelines, possibly because of the additional time required to submit at least four specimens. In contrast, a greater number of endoscopists working in an endoscopy suite are associated with an increased adherence, possibly because of peer education. PMID:23995767

  17. Adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy impact on clinical and economic outcomes for Medicaid enrollees with HIV and hepatitis C co-infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shun; Rust, George; Cardarelli, Kathryn; Felizzola, Jesus; Fransua, Mesfin; Stringer, Harold G.

    2016-01-01

    We examined the impact of antiretroviral treatment adherence among Hepatitis C co-infected HIV patients on survival and clinical outcomes. We analyzed Medicaid claims data from fourteen southern states from 2005-2007, comparing survival and clinical outcomes and cost of treatment for HIV and hepatitis-C co-infected patients (N=4,115) at different levels of adherence to antiretroviral therapy.More than one in five patients (20.5%) showed less than 50% adherence to antiretroviral treatment, but there were no racial-ethnic or gender disparities. Significant survival benefit was demonstrated at each incremental level of adherence to antiretroviral therapy (one-year mortality ranging from 3.5% in the highest adherence group to 26.0% in the lowest). Low adherence patients also had higher rates of hospitalization and emergency department visits. Relative to patients with high (>95%) ART-adherence, those with less than 25% treatment adherence had four-fold greater risk of death (adjusted odds ratio 4.22 [95% CI, 3.03,5.87]). Non-drug Medicaid expenditures were lower for high adherence patients, but cost of medications drove total Medicaid expenditures higher for high-adherence patients. Cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) saved (relative to the <25% low-adherence group) ranged from $21,874 for increasing adherence to 25-50% to $37,229 for increasing adherence to 75-95%. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy for patients with HIV and hepatitis C co-infection is associated with lower adverse clinical outcomes at a Medicaid cost per QALY commensurate with other well-accepted treatment and prevention strategies. Further research is needed to identify interventions which can best achieve optimal ART adherence at a population scale. PMID:25814041

  18. Understanding Statin Non-Adherence: Knowing Which Perceptions and Experiences Matter to Different Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wouters, Hans; Van Dijk, Liset; Geers, Harm C. J.; Winters, Nina A.; Van Geffen, Erica C. G.; Stiggelbout, Anne M.; Bouvy, Marcel L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Non-adherence to statins is substantial and is associated with numerous perceptions and experiences. However, time limits in clinical practice constrain in depth explorations of these perceptions and experiences. Objectives To propose and examine a strategy aimed at an efficient assessment of a wide array of perceptions and experiences regarding the efficacy, side effects, and practical problems of statins. Furthermore, to assess associations between this wide array of experiences and perceptions and non-adherence and to examine whether patients' 'perceived self-efficacy' moderated these associations. Methods Patients were recruited through community pharmacies. A wide array of specific patient perceptions and experiences was efficiently assessed using the electronic Tailored Medicine Inventory that allows people to skip irrelevant questions. Adherence was measured through self-report and pharmacy refill data. Results Of the two-hundred twenty-nine patients who participated (mean age 63.9, standard deviation 10.2), 40%-70% doubted the necessity of or lacked knowledge about the efficacy of statins, 20%-35% of the patients were worried about joint and muscle side effects or had experienced these, and 23% had encountered practical problems regarding information about statins, intake of tablets, the package, or the blister. Experiencing more practical problems was associated with increased unintentional non-adherence (Odds ratio 1.54, 95%CI:1.13–2.10, P < 0.01), whereas worrying about side effects was associated with increased intentional non-adherence (Odds ratio 1.90, 95%CI:1.17–3.08, P < 0.01). Higher 'perceived self-efficacy' did not moderate these associations. Conclusions Insight into patients' specific barriers with regard to appropriate statin use may reveal personal reasons for being non-adherent. The Tailored Medicine Inventory is a promising tool to devise individualized intervention strategies aimed at improving adherence by the clinician

  19. Patient education improves adherence to peg-interferon and ribavirin in chronic genotype 2 or 3 hepatitis C virus infection: A prospective, real-life, observational study

    PubMed Central

    Cacoub, Patrice; Ouzan, Denis; Melin, Pascal; Lang, Jean-Philippe; Rotily, Michel; Fontanges, Thierry; Varastet, Marina; Chousterman, Michel; Marcellin, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the impact of therapeutic education on adherence to antiviral treatment and sustained virological response (SVR) in a real-life setting in genotype 2/3 hepatitis C, as there are few adherence data in genotype 2/3 infection, even from randomized trials. METHODS: This prospective survey included genotype 2/3 patients who received peg-interferon alfa-2b and ribavirin. There was no intervention. Adherence was self-reported over the past 4 wk (peg-interferon) or 7 d (ribavirin). Adherence to bitherapy was defined as adherence to the two drugs for ≥ 20 wk. SVR was defined as undetectable RNA ≥ 12wk after the end of treatment. RESULTS: 370/674 patients received education during the first 3 mo of treatment. After 6 mo, adherence to bitherapy was higher in educated patients (61% vs 47%, P = 0.01). Adherence to peg-interferon was 78% vs 69% (P = 0.06). Adherence to ribavirin was 70% vs 56% (P = 0.006). The SVR (77% vs 70%, P = 0.05) and relapse (10% vs 16%, P = 0.09) rates tended to be improved. After adjustment for baseline differences, education improved adherence [Odds ratio (OR) 1.58, P = 0.04] but not the SVR (OR 1.54, P = 0.06). CONCLUSION: In genotype 2/3 patients, therapeutic education helped maintain real-life adherence to bitherapy. PMID:18985810

  20. Polysomnographic parameters during non-rapid eye movement sleep predict continuous positive airway pressure adherence.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Tetsurou; Sasanabe, Ryujiro; Murotani, Kenta; Arimoto, Mariko; Inagawa, Shuntaro; Tanigawa, Tohru; Uchida, Yasue; Ogawa, Tetsuya; Ueda, Hiromi; Shiomi, Toshiaki

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the potential polysomnographic predictors of CPAP adherence using polysomnographic parameters at the time of obstructive sleep apnea diagnosis that distinguished between REM and NREM sleep. This was a retrospective cross-sectional study of 173 patients. Patients who used CPAP for more than 4 hours per night for at least 70% of nights over a 6-month period were considered to have good adherence. The poor adherence group included those who had used CPAP for 6 months from initiation, but did not fulfill the definition of good adherence or gave up the treatment within 6 months of treatment initiation. Of the 173 participants, 44 patients had good CPAP adherence and 129 patients had poor adherence. Univariate analysis showed that patients with good adherence had significantly higher apnea-hypopnea index during NREM sleep (p = 0.043), oxygen desaturation index during NREM sleep (p = 0.011), and cumulative percentage of time spent at saturations below 90% (CT90) during NREM sleep (p < .001). In multiple logistic regression analysis including all variables, CT90 during NREM sleep was the only factor independently associated with CPAP adherence (odds ratio, 0.693; 95% confidence interval, 0.582-0.824; p <.0001). The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve of CT90 during NREM sleep was 0.823 (95% confidence interval, 0.745-0.901).Evaluating NREM sleep is important in reliably predicting CPAP adherence using polysomnographic parameters. CT90 during NREM sleep was the best predictor of CPAP adherence. PMID:27303106

  1. Polysomnographic parameters during non-rapid eye movement sleep predict continuous positive airway pressure adherence

    PubMed Central

    Hoshino, Tetsurou; Sasanabe, Ryujiro; Murotani, Kenta; Arimoto, Mariko; Inagawa, Shuntaro; Tanigawa, Tohru; Uchida, Yasue; Ogawa, Tetsuya; Ueda, Hiromi; Shiomi, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to investigate the potential polysomnographic predictors of CPAP adherence using polysomnographic parameters at the time of obstructive sleep apnea diagnosis that distinguished between REM and NREM sleep. This was a retrospective cross-sectional study of 173 patients. Patients who used CPAP for more than 4 hours per night for at least 70% of nights over a 6-month period were considered to have good adherence. The poor adherence group included those who had used CPAP for 6 months from initiation, but did not fulfill the definition of good adherence or gave up the treatment within 6 months of treatment initiation. Of the 173 participants, 44 patients had good CPAP adherence and 129 patients had poor adherence. Univariate analysis showed that patients with good adherence had significantly higher apnea-hypopnea index during NREM sleep (p = 0.043), oxygen desaturation index during NREM sleep (p = 0.011), and cumulative percentage of time spent at saturations below 90% (CT90) during NREM sleep (p < .001). In multiple logistic regression analysis including all variables, CT90 during NREM sleep was the only factor independently associated with CPAP adherence (odds ratio, 0.693; 95% confidence interval, 0.582–0.824; p <.0001). The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve of CT90 during NREM sleep was 0.823 (95% confidence interval, 0.745–0.901).Evaluating NREM sleep is important in reliably predicting CPAP adherence using polysomnographic parameters. CT90 during NREM sleep was the best predictor of CPAP adherence. PMID:27303106

  2. Impact of the Introduction of Generic Latanoprost on Glaucoma Medication Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Joshua D.; Shekhawat, Nakul; Talwar, Nidhi; Balkrishnan, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether enrollees with open-angle glaucoma who switched from brand name to generic prostaglandin analogues (PGAs) exhibited a change in medication adherence compared to those who remained on brand name products when generics became available Design Longitudinal cohort analysis Participants 8427 beneficiaries age >40 years with open-angle glaucoma continuously enrolled in a nationwide managed-care network from 2009–2012 who were taking PGAs prior to generic latanoprost availability Methods We calculated the mean adherence rates for topical PGAs during the 18 months prior to generic latanoprost availability (September 2009–February 2011). We then determined the mean adherence rates during the subsequent 18 months after generic latanoprost first became available (July 2011–December 2012) for those enrollees who were exclusively maintained on brand name PGAs and compared these adherence rates to those who switched exclusively to generic latanoprost. Multivariable logistic regression identified factors affecting adherence rates. Main Outcome Measures Mean medication adherence rates, odds of experiencing ≥25% improvement or worsening of adherence with 95% confidence intervals Results 8427 enrollees met the study eligibility criteria. Compared to enrollees who switched to generic latanoprost once it became available, enrollees remaining on brand name PGAs were 28% less likely to experience an improvement of adherence (odds ratio (OR)=0.72, 95% CI 0.55–0.94) and 39% more likely to experience worsening of adherence (OR=1.39, 95% CI 1.04–1.86). Other factors associated with improved adherence during the post-generic period included higher monthly medication copay during the pre-generic period (p=0.02), lower monthly medication copay during the post-generic period (p<0.0001), and black race (OR=1.25, 95% CI 1.04–1.50). A total of 612 patients (7.3%) completely discontinued all interventions for glaucoma at the time generic latanoprost became

  3. Adherence to Artemisinin-Based Combination Therapy for the Treatment of Uncomplicated Malaria: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yakasai, Ahmad M.; Hamza, Muhammad; Dalhat, Mahmood M.; Bello, Musa; Gadanya, Muktar A.; Yaqub, Zuwaira M.; Ibrahim, Daiyabu A.; Hassan-Hanga, Fatimah

    2015-01-01

    Adherence to artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) is not clearly defined. This meta-analysis determines the prevalence and predictors of adherence to ACT. Twenty-five studies and six substudies met the inclusion criteria. The prevalence of ACT adherence in the public sector was significantly higher compared to retail sector (76% and 45%, resp., P < 0.0001). However, ACT adherence was similar across different ACT dosing regimens and formulations. In metaregression analysis prevalence estimates of adherence significantly decrease with increasing year of study publication (P = 0.046). Factors found to be significant predictors of ACT adherence were years of education ≥ 7 {odds ratio (OR) (95% CI) = 1.63 (1.05–2.53)}, higher income {2.0 (1.35–2.98)}, fatty food {4.6 (2.49–8.50)}, exact number of pills dispensed {4.09 (1.60–10.7)}, and belief in traditional medication for malaria {0.09 (0.01–0.78)}. The accuracy of pooled estimates could be limited by publication bias, and differing methods and thresholds of assessing adherence. To improve ACT adherence, educational programs to increase awareness and understanding of ACT dosing regimen are interventions urgently needed. Patients and caregivers should be provided with an adequate explanation at the time of prescribing and/or dispensing ACT. PMID:26161095

  4. HIV Medication Adherence

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment HIV Medication Adherence (Last updated 3/1/2016; last reviewed 3/1/2016) Key Points Medication adherence means sticking ... exactly as prescribed. Why is adherence to an HIV regimen important? Adherence to an HIV regimen gives ...

  5. The roles of past behavior and health beliefs in predicting medication adherence to a statin regimen

    PubMed Central

    Molfenter, Todd D; Bhattacharya, Abhik; Gustafson, David H

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Current medication-adherence predictive tools are based on patient medication-taking beliefs, but studying past behavior may now be a more explanatory and accessible method. This study will evaluate if past medication-refill behavior for a statin regimen is more predictive of medication adherence than patient medication-taking health beliefs. Patients and methods: This prospective longitudinal study was implemented in a national managed care plan in the United States. A group of 1433 statin patients were identified and followed for 6 months. Medication-taking health beliefs, collected from self-reported mail questionnaires, and past medication-refill behavior, using proportion of days covered (PDC), were collected prior to 6-month follow-up. Outcomes were measured using categorical PDC variable (of adherence, PDC ≥ 85%, versus nonadherence, PDC < 85%), with model fit estimated using receiver operator characteristic analysis. Results: The area under the receiver operator characteristic curve for past behavior (Az = 0.78) was significantly greater (P < 0.05) than for patient health beliefs (Az = 0.69), indicating that past prescription-refill behavior is a better predictor of medication adherence than prospective health beliefs. Among health beliefs, the factor most related to medication adherence was behavioral intent (odds ratio, 5.12; 95% confidence interval, 1.84 to 15.06). The factor most strongly related to behavioral intent was impact of regimen on daily routine (odds ratio, 3.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.41 to 7.74). Conclusion: Electronic medical records and community health-information networks may make past prescription-refill rates more accessible and assist physicians with managing medication-regimen adherence. Health beliefs, however, may still play an important role in influencing medication-taking behaviors. PMID:23055697

  6. Association between antiretroviral therapy adherence and employment status: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Uthman, Olalekan A; Peltzer, Karl; Richardson, Lindsey A; Mills, Edward J; Amekudzi, Kofi; Ouédraogo, Alice

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess the association between the employment status of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals and adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). Methods We searched the Medline, Embase and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases for studies reporting ART adherence and employment status published between January 1980 and September 2014. Information from a wide range of other sources, including the grey literature, was also analysed. Two independent reviewers extracted data on treatment adherence and study characteristics. Study data on the association between being employed and adhering to ART were pooled using a random-effects model. Between-study heterogeneity and sources of bias were evaluated. Findings The meta-analysis included 28 studies published between 1996 and 2014 that together involved 8743 HIV-infected individuals from 14 countries. The overall pooled odds ratio (OR) for the association between being employed and adhering to ART was 1.27 (95% confidence interval, CI: 1.04–1.55). The association was significant for studies from low-income countries (OR: 1.85, 95% CI: 1.58–2.18) and high-income countries (OR: 1.33, 95% CI: 1.02–1.74) but not middle-income countries (OR: 0.94, 95% CI: 0.62–1.42). In addition, studies published after 2011 and larger studies showed less association between employment and adherence than earlier and small studies, respectively. Conclusion Employed HIV-infected individuals, particularly those in low- and high-income countries, were more likely to adhere to ART than unemployed individuals. Further research is needed on the mechanisms by which employment and ART adherence affect each other and on whether employment-creation interventions can positively influence ART adherence, HIV disease progression and quality of life. PMID:25558105

  7. Antidepressant adherence after psychiatric hospitalization

    PubMed Central

    Zivin, Kara; Ganoczy, Dara; Pfeiffer, Paul N.; Miller, Erin M.; Valenstein, Marcia

    2010-01-01

    Objective Depressed patients discharged from psychiatric hospitalizations face increased risks for adverse outcomes including suicide, yet antidepressant adherence rates during this high-risk period are unknown. Using Veterans Affairs (VA) data, we assessed antidepressant adherence and predictors of poor adherence among depressed veterans following psychiatric hospitalization. Method We identified VA patients nationwide with depressive disorders who had a psychiatric hospitalization between April 1, 1999 and September 30, 2003, received antidepressant medication, and had an outpatient appointment following discharge. We calculated medication possession ratios (MPRs), a measure of medication adherence, within three and six months following discharge. We assessed patient factors associated with having lower levels of adherence (MPRs <0.8) after discharge. Results 20,931 and 23,182 patients met criteria for three and six month MPRs. The mean three month MPR was 0.79 (s.d.=0.37). The mean six month MPR was 0.66 (s.d.=0.40). Patients with poorer adherence were male, younger, non-white, and had a substance abuse disorder, but were less likely to have PTSD or other anxiety disorders. Conclusion Poor antidepressant adherence is common among depressed patients after psychiatric hospitalization. Efforts to improve adherence at this time may be critical in improving the outcomes of these high-risk patients. PMID:19609666

  8. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy and acceptability of planned treatment interruptions in HIV-infected children.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Linda; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Hamadache, Djamel; Compagnucci, Alexandra; Penazzato, Martina; Bunupuradah, Torsak; Mazza, Antonio; Ramos, Jose Tomas; Flynn, Jacquie; Rampon, Osvalda; Mellado Pena, Maria Jose; Floret, Daniel; Marczynska, Magdalena; Puga, Ana; Forcat, Silvia; Riault, Yoann; Lallemant, Marc; Castro, Hannah; Gibb, Diana M; Giaquinto, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    There have been no paediatric randomised trials describing the effect of planned treatment interruptions (PTIs) of antiretroviral therapy (ART) on adherence, or evaluating acceptability of such a strategy. In PENTA 11, HIV-infected children were randomised to CD4-guided PTIs (n = 53) or continuous therapy (CT, n = 56). Carers, and children if appropriate, completed questionnaires on adherence to ART and acceptability of PTIs. There was no difference in reported adherence on ART between CT and PTI groups; non-adherence (reporting missed doses over the last 3 days or marking <100 % adherence since the last clinical visit on a visual analogue scale) was 18 % (20/111) and 14 % (12/83) on carer questionnaires in the CT and PTI groups respectively (odds ratios, OR (95 % CI) = 1.04 (0.20, 5.41), χ(2) (1) = 0.003, p = 0.96). Carers in Europe/USA reported non-adherence more often (31/121, 26 %) than in Thailand (1/73, 1 %; OR (95 % CI) = 54.65 (3.68, 810.55), χ(2) (1) = 8.45, p = 0.004). The majority of families indicated they were happy to have further PTIs (carer: 23/36, 64 %; children: 8/13, 62 %), however many reported more clinic visits during PTI were a problem (carer: 15/36, 42 %; children: 6/12, 50 %). PMID:22584916

  9. Reasons for non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy: patients' perspectives provide evidence of multiple causes.

    PubMed

    Walsh, J C; Horne, R; Dalton, M; Burgess, A P; Gazzard, B G

    2001-12-01

    The objective of the study was to define common reasons for non-adherence (NA) to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and the number of reasons reported by non-adherent individuals. A confidential questionnaire was administered to HIV-seropositive patients taking proteinase inhibitor based HAART. Median self-reported adherence was 95% (n = 178, range = 60-100%). The most frequent reasons for at least 'sometimes' missing a dose were eating a meal at the wrong time (38.2%), oversleeping (36.3%), forgetting (35.0%) and being in a social situation (30.5%). The mean number of reasons occurring at least 'sometimes' was 3.2; 20% of patients gave six or more reasons; those reporting the lowest adherence reported a significantly greater numbers of reasons (rho = - 0.59; p < 0.001). Three factors were derived from the data by principal component analysis reflecting 'negative experiences of HAART', 'having a low priority for taking medication' and 'unintentionally missing doses', accounting for 53.8% of the variance. On multivariate analysis only the latter two factors were significantly related to NA (odds ratios 0.845 and 0.849, respectively). There was a wide spectrum of reasons for NA in our population. The number of reasons in an individual increased as adherence became less. A variety of modalities individualized for each patient are required to support patients with the lowest adherence. PMID:11720641

  10. Against the Odds Exhibition Opens

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section Against the Odds Exhibition Opens Past Issues / Spring 2008 ... Research in Bethesda. Photo courtesy of Bill Branson "Against the Odds" is a remarkable story of achievement ...

  11. Can Rapid Diagnostic Testing for Malaria Increase Adherence to Artemether-Lumefantrine?: A Randomized Controlled Trial in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Saran, Indrani; Yavuz, Elif; Kasozi, Howard; Cohen, Jessica

    2016-04-01

    Most patients with suspected malaria do not receive diagnostic confirmation before beginning antimalarial treatment. We investigated the extent to which uncertainty about malaria diagnosis contributes to patient nonadherence to artemether-lumefantrine (AL) treatment through a randomized controlled trial in central Uganda. Among 1,525 patients purchasing a course of AL at private drug shops, we randomly offered 37.6% a free malaria rapid diagnostic test (RDT) and then assessed adherence through home visits 3 days later. Of these subjects, 68.4% tested positive for malaria and 65.8% adhered overall. Patients who tested positive did not have significantly higher odds of adherence than those who were not offered the test (adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 1.07, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.734-1.57,P= 0.719). Patients who received a positive malaria test had 0.488 fewer pills remaining than those not offered the test (95% CI: -1.02 to 0.043,P= 0.072). We found that patients who felt relatively healthy by the second day of treatment had lower odds of completing treatment (adjusted OR: 0.532, 95% CI: 0.394-0.719,P< 0.001). Our results suggest that diagnostic testing may not improve artemisinin-based combination therapy adherence unless efforts are made to persuade patients to continue taking the full course of drugs even if symptoms have resolved. PMID:26928828

  12. Determinants of poor adherence to secondary antibiotic prophylaxis for rheumatic fever recurrence on Lifou, New Caledonia: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Incidence of acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and prevalence of rheumatic heart disease (RHD) in the Pacific region, including New Caledonia, are amongst the highest in the world. The main priority of long-term management of ARF or RHD is to ensure secondary prophylaxis is adhered to. The objectives of this study were to evaluate rates of adherence in people receiving antibiotic prophylaxis by intramuscular injections of penicillin in Lifou and to determine the factors associated with a poor adherence in this population. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study and we included 70 patients receiving injections of antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent ARF recurrence on the island of Lifou. Patients were classified as “good-adherent” when the rate of adherence was ≥80% of the expected injections and as “poor-adherent” when it was <80%. Statistical analysis to identify factors associated with adherence was performed using a multivariate logistic regression model. Results Our study showed that 46% of patients from Lifou receiving antibiotic prophylaxis for ARF or RHD had a rate of adherence <80% and were therefore at high risk of recurrence of ARF. Three independent factors were protective against poor adherence: a household with more than five people (odds ratio, 0.25; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.08 to 0.75), a previous medical history of symptomatic ARF (odds ratio, 0.20; 95% CI, 0.04 to 0.98) and an adequate healthcare coverage (odds ratio, 0.21; 95% CI 0.06 to 0.72). Conclusions To improve adherence to secondary prophylaxis in Lifou, we therefore propose the following recommendations arising from the results of this study: i) identifying patients receiving antibiotic prophylaxis without medical history of ARF to strengthen their therapeutic education and ii) improving the medical coverage in patients with ARF or RHD. We also recommend that the nurse designated for the ARF prevention program in Lifou coordinate an active recall system based

  13. The effect of a locally adapted, secondary stroke risk factor self-management program on medication adherence among veterans with stroke/TIA.

    PubMed

    Damush, Teresa M; Myers, Laura; Anderson, Jane A; Yu, Zhangsheng; Ofner, Susan; Nicholas, Gloria; Kimmel, Barbara; Schmid, Arlene A; Kent, Thomas; Williams, Linda S

    2016-09-01

    We targeted stroke/transient ischemic attack (TIA) survivors to engage in self-management practices to manage secondary stroke risk factors. We conducted a randomized, regional pilot trial of a locally adapted, secondary stroke prevention program. We implemented the program at two Veterans Administration Medical Centers. Program sessions targeted stroke risk factor self-management. Specifically, we evaluated the effect of the program on the reach, implementation, and effectiveness on patient self-efficacy; stroke-specific, health-related quality of life; and medication adherence for the prevalent stroke risk factors: (1) diabetes, (2) hypertension, and (3) hyperlipidemia. Medication possession ratios were calculated to evaluate medication adherence using VA pharmacy benefits data pre (6 months prior) and post (6 months after) the stroke/TIA event. Based upon the literature standard of 80 % compliance rate, we dichotomized compliance and modeled the data using logistical regression. Final sample included 174 veterans with an acute stroke or TIA who were randomized to receive either the intervention (n = 87) or attention control program (n = 87). Patient self-efficacy and stroke-specific, health-related quality of life at 6 months did not significantly differ between groups. We found improvements in medication adherence within the intervention group. In the intervention group, the odds of compliance with diabetes medications post-stroke were significantly larger than the odds of compliance prior to the stroke (odds ratio = 3.45 (95 % CI = 1.08-10.96). For compliance to hypertension medications, the intervention group showed significantly greater odds of compliance post intervention than pre intervention (odds ratio = 3. 68 (95 % CI = 1.81-7.48). The control group showed no difference in compliance rates from baseline to follow-up. For adherence to hypercholesterolemia medications, both the intervention (odds ratio = 5.98 (95 % CI

  14. Obedience and motivation as mechanisms for adherence to medication: a study in obese type 2 diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Reach, Gérard

    2011-01-01

    Objective To clarify the mechanisms of adherence. Methods A cross-sectional, multicenter French study using a self-questionnaire administered by 116 general practitioners to 782 obese type 2 diabetic patients. Results The analysis of 670 completed questionnaires revealed a strong association between the adherence to medication and the behavior of fastening the seatbelt when seated in the rear of a car. Multivariate analysis indicated that this behavior was an independent determinant of adherence to medication (odds ratio [OR] 2.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4–3.6, P < 0.001) with the same OR as the motivation to adhere to medical prescriptions (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.3–3.6, P = 0.003) in a model with good accuracy (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve 0.774). A multiple correspondence analysis suggested that adherence to medication and seatbelt behavior are “homologous” behaviors, with homology between phenomena defined by the fact that they share a common etiology. Conclusion Adherence may have two dimensions: passive (obedience, the main determinant of seatbelt behavior) and active (motivation). This conclusion has theoretical and practical implications. Firstly, empowerment through patient education can be defined as a process that replaces the passive mechanism of adherence in patients’ minds with an active, conscious choice. Secondly, recognizing these two dimensions may help to establish a tailored patient-physician relationship to prevent nonadherence. PMID:22114466

  15. Inhaled corticosteroid adherence and emergency department utilization among Medicaid-enrolled children with asthma

    PubMed Central

    Rust, George; Zhang, Shun; Reynolds, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Asthma is the most prevalent chronic disease among children enrolled in Medicaid. This study measured real-world adherence and outcomes after an initial prescription for inhaled corticosteroid therapy in a multi-state Medicaid population. Methods We conducted a retrospective study among Medicaid-enrolled children aged 5–12 years with asthma in 14 southern states using 2007 Medicaid Analytic eXtract file claims data to assess adherence and outcomes over the 3 months following an initial prescription drug claim for inhaled corticosteroids (ICS-Rx). Adherence was measured by the long-term controller-to-total asthma drug claims ratio. Results Only one-third of children (33.4%) with an initial ICS-Rx achieved a controller-to-total drug ratio >0.5 over the next 90 days. Children for whom long-term control drugs represented less than half of their total asthma drug claims had a 21% higher risk of emergency department (ED) visit (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 1.21 [95% CI 1.14, 1.27]), and a 70% higher risk of hospital admission (AOR 1.70 [95% CI 1.45, 1.98]) than those with a controller-to-total asthma drug ratio >0.5. Conclusion Real-world adherence to long-term controller medications is quite low in this racially diverse, low-income segment of the population, despite Medicaid coverage of medications. Adherence to long-term controller therapy had a measurable impact on real-world outcomes. Medicaid programs are a potential surveillance system for both medication adherence and ED utilization. PMID:23734973

  16. Behavioral Interventions to Enhance Adherence to Hormone Therapy in Breast Cancer Survivors: A Systematic Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Hurtado-de-Mendoza, Alejandra; Cabling, Mark L; Lobo, Tania; Dash, Chiranjeev; Sheppard, Vanessa B

    2016-08-01

    Adjuvant hormone therapy contributes to reductions in recurrence and mortality for women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. However, adherence to hormone therapy is suboptimal. This is the first systematic literature review examining interventions aimed at improving hormone therapy adherence. Researchers followed the PRISMA guidelines. PubMed-Medline, CINAHL, PsychInfo, Ovid-Medline, and EMBASE were searched for behavioral interventions that aimed to enhance adherence to adjuvant hormone therapy in breast cancer survivors. A total of 376 articles were screened for eligibility. Five articles met the study criteria. All interventions presented adherence outcomes after 1-year follow-up. None significantly enhanced adherence compared to the usual care in the primary analysis (odds ratios ranged from 1.03 to 2.06 for adherence and from 1.11 to 1.18 for persistence). All studies targeted patients, and only 3 studies included postmenopausal breast cancer patients. Three tested the same intervention consisting of educational materials. Only one was conducted in the United States. Only one reported participants' ethnicity. Overall, it was unclear whether the studies contained bias. The use of different terminology and operationalization of adherence made comparisons challenging. Interventions to improve adherence to adjuvant hormone therapy in US breast cancer populations that include survivors who are ethnically diverse, premenopausal, and receiving tamoxifen therapy are necessary to inform future interventions. Adoption of consistent adherence definitions/measurements will provide a clearer framework to consolidate aggregate findings. Given the limited efficacy of tested interventions, it is important to engage oncologists and researchers to develop approaches that target different components associated with hormone therapy adherence, such as doctor-patient communication or social support. PMID:27133733

  17. Poor adherence and low persistency rates for hepatocellular carcinoma surveillance in patients with chronic hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Wang, Christina; Chen, Vincent; Vu, Vinh; Le, An; Nguyen, Linda; Zhao, Changqing; Wong, Carrie R; Nguyen, Nghia; Li, Jiayi; Zhang, Jian; Trinh, Huy; Nguyen, Mindie H

    2016-08-01

    Our goal was to examine rates and predictors for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) surveillance adherence and persistency, since studies of such adherence and persistency in patients with chronic hepatitis (CHB) are currently limited.Consecutive CHB patients (N = 1329) monitored for ≥1 year at 4 US clinics from January 1996 to July 2013 were retrospectively studied. Surveillance adherence was evaluated based on the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases guidelines. Kaplan-Meier method was used to analyze surveillance persistency of 510 patients who had initially fair adherence (having at least annual surveillance imaging with further follow-up).Mean age was 48, with the majority being male (58%), Asian (92%), foreign-born (95%), and medically insured (97%). Patients with cirrhosis and those seen at university liver clinics were more likely to have optimal HCC surveillance than those without cirrhosis and those seen at community clinics (38.4% vs 21.6%, P <0.001 and 33.5% vs 14.4%, P < 0.001, respectively). HCC diagnosed in optimally adherent patients trended toward smaller tumor size (P < 0.08). On multivariate analysis also inclusive of age, sex, clinical visits, cirrhosis, clinic setting and antiviral therapy use, strong independent predictors for having at least annual imaging were a history of more frequent clinical visits (odds ratio [OR] = 2.5, P < 0.001) and university-based care (OR = 5.2, P < 0.001). Even for those with initially fair adherence, persistency dropped to 70% at 5 years.Adherence and persistency to HCC surveillance in CHB patients is generally poor. More frequent clinic visits and university-based settings were significant and strong predictors of at least annual HCC surveillance adherence. PMID:27583921

  18. Client Factors Affect Provider Adherence to Clinical Guidelines during First Antenatal Care

    PubMed Central

    Agyepong, Irene Akua; Zuithoff, Nicolaas P. A.; Kayode, Gbenga A; Grobbee, Diederick E; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin; Ansah, Evelyn K

    2016-01-01

    Background The first antenatal clinic (ANC) visit helps to distinguish pregnant women who require standard care, from those with specific problems and so require special attention. There are protocols to guide care providers to provide optimal care to women during ANC. Our objectives were to determine the level of provider adherence to first antenatal visit guidelines in the Safe Motherhood Protocol (SMP), and assess patient factors that determine complete provider adherence. Methods This cross-sectional study is part of a cohort study that recruited women who delivered in eleven health facilities and who had utilized antenatal care services during their pregnancy in the Greater Accra region of Ghana. A record review of the first antenatal visit of participants was carried out to assess the level of adherence to the SMP, using a thirteen-point checklist. Information on their socio-demographic characteristics and previous pregnancy history was collected using a questionnaire. Percentages of adherence levels and baseline characteristics were estimated and cluster-adjusted odds ratios (OR) calculated to identify determinants. Results A total of 948 women who had delivered in eleven public facilities were recruited with a mean age (SD) of 28.2 (5.4) years. Overall, complete adherence to guidelines pertained to only 48.1% of pregnant women. Providers were significantly more likely to completely adhere to guidelines when caring for multiparous women [OR = 5.43 (1.69–17.44), p<0.01] but less likely to do so when attending to women with history of previous pregnancy complications [OR = 0.50 (0.33–0.75), p<0.01]. Conclusion Complete provider adherence to first antenatal visit guidelines is low across different facility types in the Greater Accra region of Ghana and is determined by parity and history of previous pregnancy complication. Providers should be trained and supported to adhere to the guidelines during provision of care to all pregnant women. PMID:27322643

  19. Ophthalmologist-patient communication, self-efficacy, and glaucoma medication adherence

    PubMed Central

    Sleath, Betsy; Blalock, Susan J.; Carpenter, Delesha M.; Sayner, Robyn; Muir, Kelly W.; Slota, Catherine; Lawrence, Scott D.; Giangiacomo, Annette L.; Hartnett, Mary Elizabeth; Tudor, Gail; Goldsmith, Jason A.; Robin, Alan L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of the study was to examine the association between provider-patient communication, glaucoma medication adherence self-efficacy, outcome expectations, and glaucoma medication adherence. Design Prospective observational cohort study. Participants 279 patients with glaucoma who were newly prescribed or on glaucoma medications were recruited at six ophthalmology clinics. Methods Patients’ visits were video-tape recorded and communication variables were coded using a detailed coding tool developed by the authors. Adherence was measured using Medication Event Monitoring Systems for 60 days after their visits. Main outcome measures The following adherence variables were measured for the 60 day period after their visits: whether the patient took 80% or more of the prescribed doses, percent correct number of prescribed doses taken each day, and percent prescribed doses taken on time. Results Higher glaucoma medication adherence self-efficacy was positively associated with better adherence with all three measures. African American race was negatively associated with percent correct number of doses taken each day (beta= −0.16, p<0.05) and whether the patient took 80% or more of the prescribed doses (odds ratio=0.37, 95% confidence interval 0.16, 0.86). Physician education about how to administer drops was positively associated with percent correct number of doses taken each day (beta= 0.18, p<0.01) and percent prescribed doses taken on time (beta=0.15, p<0.05). Conclusions These findings indicate that provider education about how to administer glaucoma drops and patient glaucoma medication adherence self-efficacy are positively associated with adherence. PMID:25542521

  20. Poor adherence and low persistency rates for hepatocellular carcinoma surveillance in patients with chronic hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Christina; Chen, Vincent; Vu, Vinh; Le, An; Nguyen, Linda; Zhao, Changqing; Wong, Carrie R.; Nguyen, Nghia; Li, Jiayi; Zhang, Jian; Trinh, Huy; Nguyen, Mindie H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Our goal was to examine rates and predictors for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) surveillance adherence and persistency, since studies of such adherence and persistency in patients with chronic hepatitis (CHB) are currently limited. Consecutive CHB patients (N = 1329) monitored for ≥1 year at 4 US clinics from January 1996 to July 2013 were retrospectively studied. Surveillance adherence was evaluated based on the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases guidelines. Kaplan–Meier method was used to analyze surveillance persistency of 510 patients who had initially fair adherence (having at least annual surveillance imaging with further follow-up). Mean age was 48, with the majority being male (58%), Asian (92%), foreign-born (95%), and medically insured (97%). Patients with cirrhosis and those seen at university liver clinics were more likely to have optimal HCC surveillance than those without cirrhosis and those seen at community clinics (38.4% vs 21.6%, P <0.001 and 33.5% vs 14.4%, P < 0.001, respectively). HCC diagnosed in optimally adherent patients trended toward smaller tumor size (P < 0.08). On multivariate analysis also inclusive of age, sex, clinical visits, cirrhosis, clinic setting and antiviral therapy use, strong independent predictors for having at least annual imaging were a history of more frequent clinical visits (odds ratio [OR] = 2.5, P < 0.001) and university-based care (OR = 5.2, P < 0.001). Even for those with initially fair adherence, persistency dropped to 70% at 5 years. Adherence and persistency to HCC surveillance in CHB patients is generally poor. More frequent clinic visits and university-based settings were significant and strong predictors of at least annual HCC surveillance adherence. PMID:27583921

  1. Primary adherence to antidepressant prescriptions in primary health care: a population-based study in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Freccero, Carl; Sundquist, Kristina; Sundquist, Jan; Ji, Jianguang

    2016-01-01

    Background Medical adherence is important in the treatment of depression. Primary medical adherence, i.e. patients collecting their newly prescribed medications from pharmacies, is very different depending on the drug prescribed Objective To assess the rate of primary medical adherence in patients prescribed antidepressants and to identify characteristics that make patients less likely to pick up prescriptions. Methods An observational study was performed using primary health care data from Sweden on patients who were prescribed antidepressants. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression was used to determine differences in pick-up rate according to patient characteristics. Main outcome Pick-up rate, defined as collection of a prescription within 30 days. Results A total of 11 624 patients received an antidepressant prescription during the study period, and the overall pick-up rate was 85.1%. The pick-up rate differed according to country of birth: individuals born in the Middle East and other countries outside Europe had lower primary medical adherence than Swedes, with adjusted odds ratios (ORs) of 0.58 and 0.67, respectively. Patients at ages 64–79 years had a higher pick-up rate compared with those aged 25–44 years (OR 1.71). Divorced patients had a lower rate compared with married patients (OR 0.80). Conclusion Immigrants from the Middle East and other countries outside Europe and younger and divorced patients had lower primary medical adherence, which calls for clinical attention and preventive measures. Key pointsPrimary medical adherence is important in the treatment of depression.Are patient characteristics associated with primary medical adherence?The overall primary medical adherence rate was 85%.The rate differed by country of birth, age at diagnosis of depression, and marital status.Clinical attention is needed in patients who do not pick up their antidepressants. PMID:26828942

  2. Complementary and Alternative Medication Use and Adherence to Inhaled Corticosteroid Among Inner-city Asthmatics

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Angkana; Lurslurchachai, Linda; Halm, Ethan A.; Li, Xiu-Min; Wisnivesky, Juan P.

    2009-01-01

    Background Complementary and alternative medicines (CAM) are used widely by patients with chronic diseases such as asthma. However, it is unclear whether use of CAM is associated with decreased adherence to inhaled corticosteroids (ICS), a key component of asthma management. Methods We surveyed 326 adults with persistent asthma receiving care at two inner-city outpatient clinics. Patients were asked about CAM use for treatment of asthma in the prior six months. Medication adherence was assessed using the Medication Adherence Report Scale, a validated self-report measure. Univariate and multiple regression analyses were used to assess the relationship between CAM use, adherence to ICS, and medication and disease beliefs. Results Overall, 25% (95% CI: 20–30%) of patients reported CAM use. Of those who used CAM, 39% (95% CI: 19–59%) discussed it with their physician, and 21% (95% CI: 12–31%) used CAM in place of prescribed asthma therapy. Univariate analyses showed that CAM use was associated with decreased ICS adherence and increased asthma morbidity. In multivariable analysis, CAM use was associated with lower ICS adherence (odds ratio [OR]: 0.5, 95% CI: 0.3–0.9) after adjusting for age, gender, race/ethnicity, education, years since diagnosis, language, and co-morbidities. CAM users were also more likely to worry about side effects of ICS (p=0.01). Conclusion CAM use was associated with decreased ICS adherence among inner-city asthmatics. Medication beliefs such as worry about ICS side effects may in part mediate this relationship. CAM use may be a marker for decreased adherence to ICS, particularly among patients with poor asthma control. PMID:20306816

  3. Relationships among stressful life events and physiological markers, treatment adherence, and psychosocial functioning among youth with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Walders-Abramson, Natalie; Venditti, Elizabeth M.; Ievers-Landis, Carolyn E.; Anderson, Barbara; ghormli, Laure El; Geffner, Mitchell; Kaplan, Joan; Koontz, Michaela B.; Saletsky, Ron; Payan, Marisa; Yasuda, Patrice

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the relationship between stressful life events and physiological measures, medication adherence, depressive symptoms, and impaired quality of life in adolescents with recent onset type 2 diabetes (T2D). Study design Data were collected from 497 ethnically diverse participants (66% female) in the final year of the Treatment Options for type 2 Diabetes in Adolescents and Youth (TODAY) multi-center clinical trial. Exposure to 32 possible events over the prior year and rating of subsequent distress or upset were collected by self-report, and summarized in a major stressors score. The score was analyzed for relationship to glycemic control (HbA1c and treatment failure), BMI, diagnosis of hypertension or triglycerides dyslipidemia, oral medication adherence, presence of depressive symptoms, and impaired quality of life. Results The total number of major stressful life events was calculated, with 33% of the sample reporting none, 67% at least one, 47% at least two, 33% at least three, and 20% reporting four or more. There were no associations between major stressors score and physiological measures or diagnosis of comorbidities. The odds of medication non-adherence increased significantly from those reporting at least one major stressor (odds ratio=1.58, p=0.0265) to those reporting at least 4 (odds ratio=2.70, p=0.0009). Significant odds of elevated depressive symptoms and impaired quality of life were also found with increased reporting of major stressors. Conclusions Exposure to major stressful life events is association with lower adherence and impaired psychosocial functioning among adolescents with T2D. PMID:24948348

  4. Internet Health Information Seeking Behavior and Antiretroviral Adherence in Persons Living with HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Somnath; Chander, Geetanjali; Korthuis, P. Todd; Sharma, Rashmi K.; Sharp, Victoria; Cohn, Jonathan; Moore, Richard D.; Beach, Mary Catherine

    2011-01-01

    Abstract While the Internet has the potential to educate persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA), websites may contain inaccurate information and increase the risk of nonadherence with antiretroviral therapy (ART). The objectives of our study were to determine the extent to which PLWHA engage in Internet health information seeking behavior (IHISB) and to determine whether IHISB is associated with ART adherence. We conducted a survey of adult, English-speaking HIV-infected patients at four HIV outpatient clinic sites in the United States (Baltimore, Maryland; Detroit, Michigan; New York, and Portland, Oregon) between December 2004 and January 2006. We assessed IHISB by asking participants how much information they had received from the Internet since acquiring HIV. The main outcome was patient-reported ART adherence over the past three days. Data were available on IHISB for 433 patients, 334 of whom were on ART therapy. Patients had a mean age of 45 (standard error [SE] 0.45) years and were mostly male (66%), African American (58%), and had attained a high school degree (73%). Most (55%) reported no IHISB, 18% reported some, and 27% reported “a fair amount” or “a great deal.” Patients who reported higher versus lower levels of IHISB were significantly younger, had achieved a higher level of education, and had higher medication self-efficacy. In unadjusted analyses, higher IHISB was associated with ART adherence (odds ratio [OR], 2.96, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.27–6.94). This association persisted after adjustment for age, gender, race, education, clinic site, and medication self-efficacy (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 2.76, 95% CI 1.11–6.87). Our findings indicate that IHISB is positively associated with ART adherence even after controlling for potentially confounding variables. Future studies should investigate the ways in which Internet health information may promote medication adherence among PLWHA. PMID:21682586

  5. "Dealing" with Incidence, Prevalence, and Odds Concepts in Undergraduate Epidemiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senchina, David S.; Laurson, Kelly R.

    2009-01-01

    Concepts and associated statistical formulae of incidence, prevalence, and odds/odds ratios are core knowledge in epidemiology yet can be confusing for students. The purpose of this project was to develop, validate, and share one possible pedagogical technique using playing cards that could be employed to improve undergraduate understanding of…

  6. Tilted axis rotation in odd-odd {sup 164}Tm

    SciTech Connect

    Reviol, W.; Riedinger, L.L.; Wang, X.Z.; Zhang, J.Y.

    1996-12-31

    Ten band structures are observed in {sup 164}Tm, among them sets of parallel and anti-parallel couplings of the proton and neutron spins. The Tilted Axis Cranking scheme is applied for the first time to an odd-odd nucleus in a prominent region of nuclear deformation.

  7. Comparison of adherence and persistence among adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus initiating saxagliptin or linagliptin

    PubMed Central

    Farr, Amanda M; Sheehan, John J; Davis, Brian M; Smith, David M

    2016-01-01

    Background Adherence and persistence to antidiabetes medications are important to control blood glucose levels among individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D). Objectives The objective of this study was to compare adherence and persistence over a 12-month period between patients initiating saxagliptin and patients initiating linagliptin, two dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors. Methods This retrospective cohort study was conducted in MarketScan® Commercial and Medicare Supplemental claims databases. Patients with T2D initiating saxagliptin or linagliptin between January 1, 2009, and June 30, 2013, were selected. Patients were required to be at least 18 years old and have 12 months of continuous enrollment prior to and following initiation. Adherence and persistence to initiated medication were measured over the 12 months after initiation using outpatient pharmacy claims. Patients were considered adherent if the proportion of days covered was ≥0.80. Patients were considered nonpersistent (or to have discontinued) if there was a gap of >60 days without initiated medication on hand. Multivariable logistic regression and multivariable Cox proportional hazard models were fit to compare adherence and persistence, respectively, between the two cohorts. Results There were 21,599 saxagliptin initiators (mean age 55 years; 53% male) and 5,786 linagliptin initiators (mean age 57 years; 54% male) included in the study sample. Over the 12-month follow-up, 46% of saxagliptin initiators and 42% of linagliptin initiators were considered adherent and 47% of saxagliptin initiators and 51% of linagliptin initiators discontinued their initiated medication. After controlling for patient characteristics, saxagliptin initiation was associated with significantly greater odds of being adherent (adjusted odds ratio =1.212, 95% CI 1.140–1.289) and significantly lower hazards of discontinuation (adjusted hazard ratio =0.887, 95% CI 0.850–0.926) compared with linagliptin initiation

  8. Factors linked to transitions in adherence to antiretroviral therapy among HIV-infected illicit drug users in a Canadian setting.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Brenden; Kerr, Thomas; Puskas, Cathy M; Montaner, Julio; Wood, Evan; Milloy, M-J

    2015-01-01

    HIV-positive people who use illicit drugs typically achieve lower levels of adherence to antiretroviral therapy and experience higher rates of sub-optimal HIV/AIDS treatment outcomes. Given the dearth of longitudinal research into ART adherence dynamics, we sought to identify factors associated with transitioning into and out of optimal adherence to ART in a longitudinal study of HIV-infected people who use illicit drugs (PWUD) in a setting of universal no-cost HIV/AIDS treatment. Using data from a prospective cohort of community-recruited HIV-positive illicit drug users confidentially linked to comprehensive HIV/AIDS treatment records, we estimated longitudinal factors associated with losing or gaining ≥95% adherence in the previous six months using two generalized linear mixed-effects models. Among 703 HIV-infected ART-exposed PWUD, becoming non-adherent was associated with periods of homelessness (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.52, 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 1.56-4.07), active injection drug use (AOR = 1.25, 95% CI: 1.01-1.56) and incarceration (AOR = 1.54, 95% CI: 1.10-2.17). Periods of sex work (AOR = 0.51, 95% CI: 0.34-0.75) and injection drug use (AOR = 0.62, 95% CI: 0.50-0.77) were barriers to becoming optimally adherent. Methadone maintenance therapy was associated with becoming optimally adherent (AOR = 1.87, 95% CI: 1.50-2.33) and was protective against becoming non-adherent (AOR = 0.52, 95% CI: 0.41-0.65). In conclusion, we identified several behavioural, social and structural factors that shape adherence patterns among PWUD. Our findings highlight the need to consider these contextual factors in interventions that support the effective delivery of ART to this population. PMID:25915438

  9. Factors linked to transitions in adherence to antiretroviral therapy among HIV-infected illicit drug users in a Canadian setting

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Brenden; Kerr, Thomas; Puskas, Cathy M.; Montaner, Julio; Wood, Evan; Milloy, M-J

    2016-01-01

    HIV-positive people who use illicit drugs typically achieve lower levels of adherence to antiretroviral therapy and experience higher rates of sub-optimal HIV/AIDS treatment outcomes. Given the dearth of longitudinal research into ART adherence dynamics, we sought to identify factors associated with transitioning into and out of optimal adherence to ART in a longitudinal study of HIV-infected people who use illicit drugs (PWUD) in a setting of universal no-cost HIV/AIDS treatment. Using data from a prospective cohort of community-recruited HIV-positive illicit drug users confidentially linked to comprehensive HIV/AIDS treatment records, we estimated longitudinal factors associated with losing or gaining ≥ 95% adherence in the previous six months using two generalized linear mixed-effects models. Among 703 HIV-infected ART-exposed PWUD, becoming non-adherent was associated with periods of homelessness (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR] = 2.52, 95% Confidence Interval [95% CI]: 1.56 - 4.07), active injection drug use (AOR = 1.25, 95% CI: 1.01 - 1.56) and incarceration (AOR = 1.54, 95% CI: 1.10 - 2.17). Periods of sex work (AOR = 0.51, 95% CI: 0.34 - 0.75) and injection drug use (AOR = 0.62, 95% CI: 0.50 - 0.77) were barriers to becoming optimally adherent. Methadone maintenance therapy (MMT) was associated with becoming optimally adherent (AOR = 1.87, 95% CI: 1.50 - 2.33) and was protective against becoming non-adherent (AOR = 0.52, 95% CI: 0.41 - 0.65). In conclusion, we identified several behavioural, social and structural factors that shape adherence patterns among PWUD. Our findings highlight the need to consider these contextual factors in interventions that support the effective delivery of ART to this population. PMID:25915438

  10. Comparative analysis of non-adherence to medication treatment for systemic arterial hypertension in urban and rural populations 1

    PubMed Central

    Magnabosco, Patricia; Teraoka, Eliana Cavalari; de Oliveira, Edward Meirelles; Felipe, Elisangela Aparecida; Freitas, Dayana; Marchi-Alves, Leila Maria

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to evaluate the indexes and the main factors associated with non-adherence to medication treatment for systemic arterial hypertension between urban and rural areas. METHOD: analytical study based on an epidemiological survey with a sample of 247 hypertensive residents of rural and urban areas, with application of a socio-demographic and economic questionnaire, and treatment adherence assessment. The Pearson's Chi-square test was used and the odds ratio (OD) was calculated to analyze the factors related to non-adherence. RESULTS: the prevalence of non-adherence was 61.9% and it was higher in urban areas (63.4%). Factors significantly associated with non-adherence were: male gender (OR=1.95; 95% CI 1.08-3.50), age 20-59 years old (OR=2.51; 95% CI 1.44-4.39), low economic status (OR=1.95; 95% CI 1.09-3.47), alcohol consumption (OR=5.92, 95% CI 1.73-20.21), short time of hypertension diagnosis (OR=3.07; 95% CI 1.35-6.96) and not attending the health service for routine consultations (OR=2.45; 1.35-4.42). CONCLUSION: the socio-demographic/economic characteristics, lifestyle habits and how to relate to health services were the factors that presented association with non-adherence regardless of the place of residence. PMID:25806627

  11. Survey of odd-odd deformed nuclear spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hoff, R.W.

    1993-09-14

    In this paper, we survey the current experimental data that support assignment of rotational bands in odd-odd deformed nuclear in the rare earth and actinide regions. We present the results of a new study of {sup 170}Mt nuclear structure. In a comparing experimental and calculated Gallagher-Moszkowski matrix elements for rare earth-region nuclei, we have developed a new approach to the systematics of these matrix elements.

  12. The effect of knowledge and expectations on adherence to and persistence with antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, Sophie Claire; Bereznicki, Bonnie Jayne; Westbury, Juanita Louise; Bereznicki, Luke Ryan Elliot

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Adherence to and persistence with antidepressants are often suboptimal. However, little is known about how patient knowledge and outcome expectations may influence antidepressant adherence and persistence. Method Individuals who had been prescribed their first antidepressant to treat depression in the preceding 6 months were recruited to an online survey via Facebook. Knowledge, education received, and initial outcome expectations were analyzed for associations with persistence and adherence. Results Two hundred and twenty surveys were analyzed. A total of 117 participants had taken their antidepressant for at least 3 months; another 25 had never started or stopped after <3 months without consulting their doctor. Differences in expectations and various educational messages among persistent and nonpersistent participants were identified. Having received the instruction “don’t stop it without checking with your doctor” was a significant independent predictor of persistence (odds ratio [OR] =5.9, 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.4–24.5). At the time of the survey, 82.7% of participants were taking an antidepressant and 77.9% were adherent. Significant independent predictors of adherence were a greater age (OR =1.1, 95% CI =1.0–1.2), knowledge (OR =1.6, 95% CI =1.1–2.3), being informed of common side effects (OR =5.5, 95% CI =1.1–29.0), and having discussed ways to solve problems (OR =3.9, 95% CI =1.1–14.5). Conclusion Improving outcome expectations and particular educational messages may increase adherence and persistence. Greater knowledge may enhance adherence. Further investigation is warranted to determine whether a focus on these simple educational messages will improve outcomes in patients who commence an antidepressant. PMID:27226710

  13. The Madison Avenue Effect: How drug presentation style influences adherence and outcome in patients with asthma

    PubMed Central

    Clerisme-Beaty, Emmanuelle M; Bartlett, Susan J; Teague, W. Gerald; Lima, John; Irvin, Charles G; Cohen, Rubin; Castro, Mario; Wise, Robert A; Rand, Cynthia S

    2010-01-01

    Background Little is known about how drug presentation influences medication adherence. Objective Examine the effect of an educational program aimed at increasing expectations of treatment benefit on medication adherence. Methods Data are analyzed from 99 participants who underwent electronic drug monitoring during TAPE (Trial of Asthma Patient Education), a randomized placebo-controlled multi-center trial. Participants with suboptimally-controlled asthma were randomized to placebo or montelukast in conjunction with a presentation mode that was either neutral or designed to increase outcome expectancy. Adherence was monitored electronically over 4 weeks, and was defined as ≥ 80% use of prescribed doses. Outcome expectancy, peak expiratory flow, pre-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume, asthma control (ACQ), and asthma-related quality of life were assessed at baseline and at the 4-week follow-up. Results Average electronic medication adherence was 69.9%. There was a significant interaction between presentation mode and drug assignment, with participants in the enhanced/montelukast group having a higher change in outcome expectancy (Δ 2.1 points, p < 0.001) and better medication adherence (odds ratio 4.0, CI 1.1, 14.3) compared to those in the neutral/placebo group. There was no difference in asthma symptoms, quality of life, or clinical outcomes based on presentation mode. Rather, increased outcome expectancy was associated with modest improvements in asthma symptoms after adjusting for presentation mode, drug assignment, and medication adherence. Conclusion The use of an enhanced presentation aimed at increasing outcome expectancy may lead to improved medication adherence. PMID:21281871

  14. Impact of cardiology referral: clinical outcomes and factors associated with physicians' adherence to recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Marques, André C; Calderaro, Daniela; Yu, Pai C; Gualandro, Danielle M; Carmo, Gabriel A L; Azevedo, Fernanda R; Pastana, Adriana F; Lima, Eneas M O; Monachini, Maristela; Caramelli, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Cardiology referral is common for patients admitted for non-cardiac diseases. Recommendations from cardiologists may involve complex and aggressive treatments that could be ignored or denied by other physicians. The purpose of this study was to compare the outcomes of patients who were given recommendations during cardiology referrals and to examine the clinical outcomes of patients who did not follow the recommendations. METHODS: We enrolled 589 consecutive patients who received in-hospital cardiology consultations. Data on recommendations, implementation of suggestions and outcomes were collected. RESULTS: Regarding adherence of the referring service to the recommendations, 77% of patients were classified in the adherence group and 23% were classified in the non-adherence group. Membership in the non-adherence group (p<0.001; odds ratio: 10.25; 95% CI: 4.45-23.62) and advanced age (p = 0.017; OR: 1.04; 95% CI: 1.01-1.07) were associated with unfavorable outcomes. Multivariate analysis identified four independent predictors of adherence to recommendations: follow-up notes in the medical chart (p<0.001; OR: 2.43; 95% CI: 1.48-4.01); verbal reinforcement (p = 0.001; OR: 1.86; 95% CI: 1.23-2.81); a small number of recommendation (p = 0.001; OR: 0.87; 95% CI: 0.80-0.94); and a younger patient age (p = 0.002; OR: 0.98; 95% CI: 0.96-0.99). CONCLUSIONS: Poor adherence to cardiology referral recommendations was associated with unfavorable clinical outcomes. Follow-up notes in the medical chart, verbal reinforcement, a limited number of recommendations and a patient age were associated with greater adherence to recommendations. PMID:25518017

  15. Social factors affecting ART adherence in rural settings in Zambia.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Ikuma; Dube, Christopher; Kakimoto, Kazuhiro; Yamada, Norio; Simpungwe, James B

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the factors that influence ART adherence arising in rural settings in Zambia. A survey was conducted with face-to-face interviews using a semi-structured questionnaire and written informed consent was obtained at ART sites in Mumbwa District in rural Zambia. The questionnaire included items such as the socio-demographic characteristics of respondents, support for adherence, ways to remember when to take ARVs at scheduled times, and the current status of adherence. Valid responses were obtained from 518 research participants. The mean age of the respondents was 38.3 years and the average treatment period was 12.5 months. More than half of the respondents (51%) were farmers, about half (49%) did not own a watch, and 10% of them used the position of the sun to remember when to take ARVs. Sixteen percent of respondents experienced fear of stigma resulting from taking ARVs at work or home, and 10% felt pressured to share ARVs with someone. Eighty-eight percent of the participants reported that they had never missed ARVs in the past four days. Multivariable logistic regression analysis identified age (38 years old or less, odds ratio (OR) = 2.5, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.3-4.8, p=0.005), "remembering when to take ARVs based on the position of the sun" (OR = 3.3, 95% CI: 1.3-8.8, p=0.016), and "feeling pressured to share ARVs with someone" (OR = 4.4, 95% CI: 1.6-12.0, p=0.004) as independent factors for low adherence. As ART services expand to rural areas, program implementers should pay more attention to more specific factors arising in rural settings since they may differ from those in urban settings. PMID:21400314

  16. Social factors affecting ART adherence in rural settings in Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Nozaki, Ikuma; Dube, Christopher; Kakimoto, Kazuhiro; Yamada, Norio; Simpungwe, James B.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the factors that influence ART adherence arising in rural settings in Zambia. A survey was conducted with face-to-face interviews using a semi-structured questionnaire and written informed consent was obtained at ART sites in Mumbwa District in rural Zambia. The questionnaire included items such as the socio-demographic characteristics of respondents, support for adherence, ways to remember when to take ARVs at scheduled times, and the current status of adherence. Valid responses were obtained from 518 research participants. The mean age of the respondents was 38.3 years and the average treatment period was 12.5 months. More than half of the respondents (51%) were farmers, about half (49%) did not own a watch, and 10% of them used the position of the sun to remember when to take ARVs. Sixteen percent of respondents experienced fear of stigma resulting from taking ARVs at work or home, and 10% felt pressured to share ARVs with someone. Eighty-eight percent of the participants reported that they had never missed ARVs in the past four days. Multivariable logistic regression analysis identified age (38 years old or less, odds ratio (OR) = 2.5, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.3–4.8, p = 0.005), “remembering when to take ARVs based on the position of the sun” (OR = 3.3, 95% CI: 1.3–8.8, p = 0.016), and “feeling pressured to share ARVs with someone” (OR = 4.4, 95% CI: 1.6–12.0, p = 0.004) as independent factors for low adherence. As ART services expand to rural areas, program implementers should pay more attention to more specific factors arising in rural settings since they may differ from those in urban settings. PMID:21400314

  17. Factors influencing adherence among older people with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Loew, Laurianne; Brosseau, Lucie; Kenny, Glen P; Durand-Bush, Natalie; Poitras, Stéphane; De Angelis, Gino; Wells, George A

    2016-09-01

    This study aims to identify potential factors that could affect adherence and influence the implementation of an evidence-based structured walking program, among older adults diagnosed with knee osteoarthritis. A total of 69 participants with mild to moderate osteoarthritis of the knee fulfilled an online survey on potential factors that could affect their adherence to an evidence-based structured walking program. Adherence with regard to the influencing factors was explored using a logistic regression model. Results tend to show higher odds of adhering to the evidence-based walking program if the participants were supervised (more than 2.9 times as high), supported by family/friends (more than 3.7 times as high), and not influenced by emotional involvement (more than 11 times as high). The odds of adhering were 3.6 times lower for participants who indicated a change in their medication intake and 3.1 times lower for individuals who considered themselves as less physically active (95 % confidence interval (CI)). Our exploratory findings identified and defined potential adherence factors that could guide health professionals in their practice to better identify positive influences and obstacles to treatment adherence, which would lead to the adoption of a more patient-centered approach. A large-scale study is required to clearly delineate the key factors that would influence adherence. We addressed a new knowledge gap by identifying the main strategies to promote the long-term adherence of community-based walking program. PMID:26646111

  18. Factors Associated with Appointment Non-Adherence among African-Americans with Severe, Poorly Controlled Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Nwabuo, Chike C.; Dy, Sydney Morss; Weeks, Kristina; Young, J. Hunter

    2014-01-01

    Background Missed appointments are associated with an increased risk of hospitalization and mortality. Despite its widespread prevalence, little data exists regarding factors related to appointment non-adherence among hypertensive African-Americans. Objective To investigate factors associated with appointment non-adherence among African-Americans with severe, poorly controlled hypertension. Design and Participants A cross-sectional survey of 185 African-Americans admitted to an urban medical center in Maryland, with severe, poorly controlled hypertension from 1999–2004. Categorical and continuous variables were compared using chi-square and t-tests. Adjusted multivariable logistic regression was used to assess correlates of appointment non-adherence. Main Outcome Measures Appointment non-adherence was the primary outcome and was defined as patient-report of missing greater than 3 appointments out of 10 during their lifetime. Results Twenty percent of participants (n = 37) reported missing more than 30% of their appointments. Patient characteristics independently associated with a higher odds of appointment non-adherence included not finishing high school (Odds ratio [OR] = 3.23 95% confidence interval [CI] (1.33–7.69), hypertension knowledge ([OR] = 1.20 95% CI: 1.01–1.42), lack of insurance ([OR] = 6.02 95% CI: 1.83–19.88), insurance with no medication coverage ([OR] = 5.08 95% CI: 1.05–24.63), cost of discharge medications ([OR] = 1.20 95% CI: 1.01–1.42), belief that anti-hypertensive medications do not work ([OR] = 3.67 95% CI: 1.16–11.7), experience of side effects ([OR] = 3.63 95% CI: 1.24–10.62), medication non-adherence ([OR] = 11.31 95% CI: 3.87–33.10). Substance abuse was not associated with appointment non-adherence ([OR] = 1.05 95% CI: 0.43–2.57). Conclusions Appointment non-adherence among African-Americans with poorly controlled hypertension was associated with many markers of inadequate

  19. Modeling level structures of odd-odd deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Hoff, R.W.; Kern, J.; Piepenbring, R.; Boisson, J.P.

    1985-01-15

    A technique for modeling quasiparticle excitation energies and rotational parameters in odd-odd deformed nuclei has been applied to actinide species where new experimental data have been obtained by use of neutron-capture gamma-ray spectroscopy. The input parameters required for the calculation were derived from empirical data on single-particle excitations in neighboring odd-mass nuclei. Calculated configuration-specific values for the Gallagher-Moszkowski splittings were used. Calculated and experimental level structures for /sup 238/Np, /sup 244/Am, and /sup 250/Bk are compared, as well as those for several nuclei in the rare-earch region. The agreement for the actinide species is excellent, with bandhead energies deviating 22 keV and rotational parameters 5%, on the average. Corresponding average deviations for five rare-earth nuclei are 47 keV and 7%. Several applications of this modeling technique are discussed.

  20. Modeling level structures of odd-odd deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Hoff, R.W.; Kern, J.; Piepenbring, R.; Boisson, J.P.

    1984-09-07

    A technique for modeling quasiparticle excitation energies and rotational parameters in odd-odd deformed nuclei has been applied to actinide species where new experimental data have been obtained by use of neutron-capture gamma-ray spectroscopy. The input parameters required for the calculation were derived from empirical data on single-particle excitations in neighboring odd-mass nuclei. Calculated configuration-specific values for the Gallagher-Moszkowski splittings were used. Calculated and experimental level structures for /sup 238/Np, /sup 244/Am, and /sup 250/Bk are compared, as well as those for several nuclei in the rare-earth region. The agreement for the actinide species is excellent, with bandhead energies deviating 22 keV and rotational parameters 5%, on the average. Corresponding average deviations for five rare-earth nuclei are 47 keV and 7%. Several applications of this modeling technique are discussed. 18 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Nonadiabatic effects in odd-odd deformed proton emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Patial, M.; Jain, A. K.; Arumugam, P.; Maglione, E.; Ferreira, L. S.

    2011-11-30

    We present for the first time, the nonadiabatic quasiparticle approach to study proton emission from odd-odd deformed nuclei. Coriolis effects are incorporated in both the parent and daughter wavefunctions and hence our formalism allows us to study their complete role on the decay widths. First results obtained for the nucleus {sup 112}Cs suggest a weak dependance on Coriolis effect. However, we are able to reproduce the experimental half-lives without assuming the exact Nilsson orbital from which the decay proceeds.

  2. Treatment adherence and other patient-reported outcomes as cost determinants in multiple sclerosis: a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Lizán, Luis; Comellas, Marta; Paz, Silvia; Poveda, José Luis; Meletiche, Dennis M; Polanco, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Background Treatment adherence is one of the key factors for achieving optimal clinical outcomes. In order to assess costs related to adherence to, and persistence and compliance with, disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), a narrative review of the literature was performed. Satisfaction with and preference for DMTs and their delivery devices were also assessed, as both can have an influence on patients’ adherence and persistence. Methods Electronic databases (MEDLINE, PubMed, Google Scholar, congress proceedings) were searched to identify publications analyzing MS costs related to adherence, persistence, satisfaction, and preferences for MS treatments. Bibliographic references were hand searched. English or Spanish studies published between January 2007 and January 2013 were selected. Results A total of 398 titles were identified, of which 12 met the inclusion criteria. Six studies evaluated the impact of adherence, persistence, and compliance on treatment costs; four publications analyzed satisfaction with DMTs; and two assessed treatment preferences based on attributes of the delivery device. Increased adherence and persistence were associated with better clinical outcomes, leading to lower relapse risk (odds ratio [OR]: 0.71; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.59–0.85) and a decrease in health care resource use, such as MS-related hospitalizations (OR: 0.63; 95% CI: 0.47–0.83) and emergency department visits (OR: 0.80; 95% CI: 0.60–1.07). This reduction in resource use led to a patient/year total cost reduction (excluding DMT costs) of up to 22%. Conclusion This review highlights the importance of ensuring adequate adherence in MS patients through treatments and devices better tailored to patients’ needs that could enhance clinical outcomes and reduce MS costs. Understanding the factors underlying satisfaction and compliance with treatment and patients’ preference for certain therapies could help in the development

  3. Medication Adherence in Children and Adolescents with HIV Infection: Associations with Behavioral Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Paige; Montepiedra, Grace; McCabe, Marie; Nichols, Sharon; Sirois, Patricia A.; Storm, Deborah; Farley, John; Kammerer, Betsy

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The impact of behavioral functioning on medication adherence in children with perinatally acquired HIV infection is not well-explored, but has important implications for intervention. This report addresses the relationship between behavioral functioning and child self-report or caregiver report of medication adherence among children and adolescents enrolled in Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group Protocol 219C (conducted 2000–2007). A total of 1134 participants, aged 3–17 years, received a behavioral evaluation and adherence assessment. Complete adherence was defined as taking 100% of prescribed antiretroviral medications during three days preceding the study visit. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to evaluate associations between adherence and behavioral functioning, adjusting for potential confounders, including demographic, psychosocial, and health factors. Children demonstrated higher than expected rates of behavioral impairment (≈7% expected with T > 65) in the areas of conduct problems (14%, z = 7.0, p < 0.001), learning problems (22%, z = 12.2, p < 0.001), somatic complaints (22%, z = 12.6, p < 0.001), impulsivity-hyperactivity (20%, z = 11.1, p < 0.001), and hyperactivity (19%, z = 10.6, p < 0.001). Children with behavioral impairment in one or more areas had significantly increased odds of nonadherence [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 1.49, p = 0.04]. The odds of nonadherence were significantly higher for those with conduct problems and general hyperactivity (aOR = 2.03, p = 0.005 and aOR = 1.68, p = 0.02, respectively). Psychosocial and health factors, such as recent stressful life events and higher HIV RNA levels, were also associated with nonadherence. Knowledge of behavioral, health, and social influences affecting the child and family should guide the development of appropriate, evidence-based interventions for medication adherence. PMID:21323533

  4. Medication adherence in children and adolescents with HIV infection: associations with behavioral impairment.

    PubMed

    Malee, Kathleen; Williams, Paige; Montepiedra, Grace; McCabe, Marie; Nichols, Sharon; Sirois, Patricia A; Storm, Deborah; Farley, John; Kammerer, Betsy

    2011-03-01

    The impact of behavioral functioning on medication adherence in children with perinatally acquired HIV infection is not well-explored, but has important implications for intervention. This report addresses the relationship between behavioral functioning and child self-report or caregiver report of medication adherence among children and adolescents enrolled in Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group Protocol 219C (conducted 2000-2007). A total of 1134 participants, aged 3-17 years, received a behavioral evaluation and adherence assessment. Complete adherence was defined as taking 100% of prescribed antiretroviral medications during three days preceding the study visit. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to evaluate associations between adherence and behavioral functioning, adjusting for potential confounders, including demographic, psychosocial, and health factors. Children demonstrated higher than expected rates of behavioral impairment (≈7% expected with T > 65) in the areas of conduct problems (14%, z = 7.0, p < 0.001), learning problems (22%, z = 12.2, p < 0.001), somatic complaints (22%, z = 12.6, p < 0.001), impulsivity-hyperactivity (20%, z = 11.1, p < 0.001), and hyperactivity (19%, z = 10.6, p < 0.001). Children with behavioral impairment in one or more areas had significantly increased odds of nonadherence [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 1.49, p = 0.04]. The odds of nonadherence were significantly higher for those with conduct problems and general hyperactivity (aOR = 2.03, p = 0.005 and aOR = 1.68, p = 0.02, respectively). Psychosocial and health factors, such as recent stressful life events and higher HIV RNA levels, were also associated with nonadherence. Knowledge of behavioral, health, and social influences affecting the child and family should guide the development of appropriate, evidence-based interventions for medication adherence. PMID:21323533

  5. Household Net Worth, Racial Disparities, and Hormonal Therapy Adherence Among Women With Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hershman, Dawn L.; Tsui, Jennifer; Wright, Jason D.; Coromilas, Ellie J.; Tsai, Wei Yann; Neugut, Alfred I.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Nonadherence to adjuvant hormonal therapy is common and is associated with increased prescription copayment amount and black race. Studies suggest that household wealth may partly explain racial disparities. We investigated the impact of net worth on disparities in adherence and discontinuation. Patients and Methods We used the OptumInsight insurance claims database to identify women older than age 50 years diagnosed with early breast cancer, from January 1, 2007, to December 31, 2011, who were using hormonal therapy. Nonadherence was defined as a medication possession ratio of ≤ 80% of eligible days over a 2-year period. We evaluated the association of demographic and clinical characteristics, annual household income, household net worth (< $250,000, $250,000 to $750,000, or > $750,000), insurance type, and copayments (< $10, $10 to $20, or > $20) with adherence to hormonal therapy. Logistic regression analyses were conducted by sequentially adding sociodemographic and financial variables to race. Results We identified 10,302 patients; 2,473 (24%) were nonadherent. In the unadjusted analyses, adherence was negatively associated with black race (odds ratio [OR], 0.76; P < .001), advanced age, comorbidity, and Medicare insurance. Adherence was positively associated with medium (OR, 1.33; P < .001) and high (OR, 1.66; P < .001) compared with low net worth. The negative association of black race with adherence (OR, 0.76) was reduced by adding net worth to the model (OR, 0.84; P < .05). Correcting for other variables had a minimal impact on the association between race and adherence (OR, 0.87; P = .08). The interaction between net worth and race was significant (P < .01). Conclusion We found that net worth partially explains racial disparities in hormonal therapy adherence. These results suggest that economic factors may contribute to disparities in the quality of care. PMID:25691670

  6. Factors associated with suboptimal adherence to antiretroviral therapy in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Jiamsakul, Awachana; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Ditangco, Rossana; Li, Patrick CK; Phanuphak, Praphan; Sirisanthana, Thira; Sungkanuparph, Somnuek; Kantipong, Pacharee; Lee, Christopher KC; Mustafa, Mahiran; Merati, Tuti; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Singtoroj, Thida; Law, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) plays an important role in treatment outcomes. It is crucial to identify factors influencing adherence in order to optimize treatment responses. The aim of this study was to assess the rates of, and factors associated with, suboptimal adherence (SubAdh) in the first 24 months of ART in an Asian HIV cohort. Methods As part of a prospective resistance monitoring study, the TREAT Asia Studies to Evaluate Resistance Monitoring Study (TASER-M) collected patients’ adherence based on the World Health Organization-validated Adherence Visual Analogue Scale. SubAdh was defined in two ways: (i) <100% and (ii) <95%. Follow-up time started from ART initiation and was censored at 24 months, loss to follow-up, death, treatment switch, or treatment cessation for >14 days. Time was divided into four intervals: 0–6, 6–12, 12–18 and 18–24 months. Factors associated with SubAdh were analysed using generalized estimating equations. Results Out of 1316 patients, 32% ever reported <100% adherence and 17% ever reported <95%. Defining the outcome as SubAdh <100%, the rates of SubAdh for the four time intervals were 26%, 17%, 12% and 10%. Sites with an average of >2 assessments per patient per year had an odds ratio (OR)=0.7 (95% confidence interval (CI) (0.55 to 0.90), p=0.006), compared to sites with ≤2 assessments per patient per year. Compared to heterosexual exposure, SubAdh was higher in injecting drug users (IDUs) (OR=1.92, 95% CI (1.23 to 3.00), p=0.004) and lower in homosexual exposure (OR=0.52, 95% CI (0.38 to 0.71), p<0.001). Patients taking a nucleoside transcriptase inhibitor and protease inhibitor (NRTI+PI) combination were less likely to report adherence <100% (OR=0.36, 95% CI (0.20 to 0.67), p=0.001) compared to patients taking an NRTI and non-nucleoside transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI+NNRTI) combination. SubAdh decreased with increasing time on ART (all p<0.001). Similar associations were found with adherence

  7. Patient Characteristics Associated with Medication Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Rolnick, Sharon J; Pawloski, Pamala A.; Hedblom, Brita D.; Asche, Stephen E.; Bruzek, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Despite evidence indicating therapeutic benefit for adhering to a prescribed regimen, many patients do not take their medications as prescribed. Non-adherence often leads to morbidity and to higher health care costs. The objective of the study was to assess patient characteristics associated with medication adherence across eight diseases. Design Retrospective data from a repository within an integrated health system was used to identify patients ≥18 years of age with ICD-9-CM codes for primary or secondary diagnoses for any of eight conditions (depression, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, multiple sclerosis, cancer, or osteoporosis). Electronic pharmacy data was then obtained for 128 medications used for treatment. Methods Medication possession ratios (MPR) were calculated for those with one condition and one drug (n=15,334) and then for the total population having any of the eight diseases (n=31,636). The proportion of patients adherent (MPR ≥80%) was summarized by patient and living-area (census) characteristics. Bivariate associations between drug adherence and patient characteristics (age, sex, race, education, and comorbidity) were tested using contingency tables and chi-square tests. Logistic regression analysis examined predictors of adherence from patient and living area characteristics. Results Medication adherence for those with one condition was higher in males, Caucasians, older patients, and those living in areas with higher education rates and higher income. In the total population, adherence increased with lower comorbidity and increased number of medications. Substantial variation in adherence was found by condition with the lowest adherence for diabetes (51%) and asthma (33%). Conclusions The expectation of high adherence due to a covered pharmacy benefit, and to enhanced medication access did not hold. Differences in medication adherence were found across condition and by

  8. Factors Associated with Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet among Adolescents Living in Sicily, Southern Italy

    PubMed Central

    Grosso, Giuseppe; Marventano, Stefano; Buscemi, Silvio; Scuderi, Alessandro; Matalone, Margherita; Platania, Alessio; Giorgianni, Gabriele; Rametta, Stefania; Nolfo, Francesca; Galvano, Fabio; Mistretta, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to examine the factors associated with increased Mediterranean diet (MD) adherence among a sample of Italian adolescents. A cross-sectional survey was conducted on 1135 students (13–16 years) attending 13 secondary schools of Sicily, southern Italy. Validated instruments were used for dietary assessment and the KIDMED score to assess adolescents’ adherence to the MD. A higher adherence to the MD was associated with high socioeconomic status (Odds Ratio [OR] 1.53, 95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 1.03–2.26) and high physical activity (OR 1.19, 95% CI: 1.02–1.70), whereas lower adherence was associated with living in an urban environment (OR 0.65, 95% CI: 0.44–0.97) and being obese (OR 0.59, 95% CI: 0.37–0.94). The adolescents’ KIDMED scores were inversely associated with adolescents’ intake of sweets, fast foods, fried foods, and sugary drinks, and directly with fruit, vegetables, pasta, fish, and cheese intakes. Urban-living adolescents were less likely to eat fruit and more prone to consume meat, sugary drinks, and fast food than rural-living adolescents. The latter were more likely to eat sweets and snacks. A general poor quality of food consumption in Italian adolescents away from the MD was reported, especially among those living in urban areas. PMID:24304608

  9. Reflection asymmetry in odd-A and odd-odd actinium nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.

    1993-09-01

    Theoretical calculations and measurements indicate that octupole correlations are at a maximum in the ground states of the odd-proton nuclei Ac and Pa. It has been expected that odd-odd nuclei should have even larger amount of octupole-octupole correlations. We have recently made measurements on the structure of {sup 224}Ac. Although spin and parity assignments could not be made, two bands starting at 354.1 and 360.0 keV have properties characteristic of reflection asymmetric shape. These two bands have very similar rotational constants and also similar alpha decay rates, which suggest similarity between the wavefunctions of these bands. These signatures provide evidence for octupole correlations in these nuclides.

  10. On Quantizable Odd Lie Bialgebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoroshkin, Anton; Merkulov, Sergei; Willwacher, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Motivated by the obstruction to the deformation quantization of Poisson structures in infinite dimensions, we introduce the notion of a quantizable odd Lie bialgebra. The main result of the paper is a construction of the highly non-trivial minimal resolution of the properad governing such Lie bialgebras, and its link with the theory of so-called quantizable Poisson structures.

  11. Adherence and persistence to urate-lowering therapies in the Irish setting.

    PubMed

    McGowan, Bernie; Bennett, Kath; Silke, Carmel; Whelan, Bryan

    2016-03-01

    To identify adherence and persistence levels with urate-lowering therapies using the national administrative pharmacy claim database. This was a retrospective, pharmacy claims-based analysis of dispensed anti-gout medications on the Irish national HSE-PCRS scheme database between January 2008 and December 2012. Adherence is defined by the medication possession ratio (MPR), and patients were considered to be adherent if the MPR ≥80 % (good adherers) in any given time period. Persistence was defined as continued use of therapy with no periods exceeding a refill gap of >63 days (9 weeks). Logistic regression analysis was used to predict odd ratios (OR) and 95 % confidence interval (CI) for persistence and adherence in relation to age, gender and level of comorbidity. There was a 53 % increase in the number of patients prescribed anti-gout medications between 2008 and 2012 with an increase of 27 % in the associated ingredient cost of these medications. Allopurinol accounted for 87 % of the prescribing and febuxostat accounted for a further 9 %. In patients who started on 100 mg allopurinol, only 14.6 % were titrated to the 300 mg dose. For all those initiating urate-lowering therapies, 45.8 % of patients were persistent with treatment at 6 months decreasing to 22.6 % at 12 months. In multivariate analysis, females had poorer adherence (OR = 0.83 (0.77-0.90)), and increasing age was associated with increased adherence (OR = 4.19 (2.53-6.15)) Increasing comorbidity score was associated with increased adherence and persistence at 6 months (OR = 0.68 (0.59-0.79)). Adherence with anti-gout medications in this study cohort was relatively low. Sustained treatment for gouty arthritis is essential in the prevention of serious adverse outcomes.Significance and Innovations-Poor adherence to medications prescribed to patients for the management of chronic diseases such as gout is an ongoing problem which urgently needs to be addressed.-Some of the

  12. Excited states of the odd-odd nucleus 230Pa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotthaus, T.; Reiter, P.; Hess, H.; Kalkühler, M.; Wendt, A.; Wiens, A.; Hertenberger, R.; Morgan, T.; Thirolf, P. G.; Wirth, H.-F.; Faestermann, T.

    2013-04-01

    The completely unknown spectrum of excited states of the odd-odd nucleus 230Pa was studied employing the one-neutron transfer reaction 231Pa(d,t)230Pa at a beam energy of 22 MeV. The excitation energy and the cross section were measured for, in total, 81 states below 1.4 MeV. Level assignments of these states are based on a semiempirical model and comparison with theoretical predictions, based on distorted-wave Born approximation (DWBA) calculations for the cross sections. For 12 rotational bands the band-head energy and the rotational parameter are determined. The K quantum numbers and the Nilsson configurations are established. Empirical values for the Gallagher-Moszkowski splittings and for Newby shifts are obtained.

  13. Development of a new diabetes medication self-efficacy scale and its association with both reported problems in using diabetes medications and self-reported adherence

    PubMed Central

    Sleath, Betsy; Carpenter, Delesha M; Blalock, Susan J; Davis, Scott A; Hickson, Ryan P; Lee, Charles; Ferreri, Stefanie P; Scott, Jennifer E; Rodebaugh, Lisa B; Cummings, Doyle M

    2016-01-01

    Background Although there are several different general diabetes self-efficacy scales, there is a need to develop a self-efficacy scale that providers can use to assess patient’s self-efficacy regarding medication use. The purpose of this study was to: 1) develop a new diabetes medication self-efficacy scale and 2) examine how diabetes medication self-efficacy is associated with patient-reported problems in using diabetes medications and self-reported adherence. Patients and methods Adult English-speaking patients with type 2 diabetes were recruited from a family medicine clinic and a pharmacy in Eastern North Carolina, USA. The patients were eligible if they reported being nonadherent to their diabetes medicines on a visual analog scale. Multivariable regression was used to examine the relationship between self-efficacy and the number of reported diabetes medication problems and adherence. Results The diabetes medication self-efficacy scale had strong reliability (Cronbach’s alpha =0.86). Among a sample (N=51) of mostly African-American female patients, diabetes medication problems were common (6.1±3.1) and a greater number of diabetes medications were associated with lower medication adherence (odds ratio: 0.35; 95% confidence interval: 0.13, 0.89). Higher medication self-efficacy was significantly related to medication adherence (odds ratio: 1.17; 95% confidence interval: 1.05, 1.30) and inversely related to the number of self-reported medication problems (β=−0.13; P=0.006). Conclusion Higher diabetes medication self-efficacy was associated with fewer patient-reported medication problems and better medication adherence. Assessing medication-specific self-efficacy may help to identify medication-related problems that providers can help the patients address, potentially improving adherence and patient outcomes. PMID:27354769

  14. Depression and adherence to antiretroviral therapy in low-, middle- and high-income countries: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Uthman, Olalekan A.; Magidson, Jessica F.; Safren, Steven A.; Nachega, Jean B.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the associations between depressive symptoms and adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) among people living with HIV (PLHIV). We searched the PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane CENTRAL databases for studies that studies that reported an association between depression and adherence to ART as a primary or secondary outcome. We used a random-effect model to pool the risk estimates from the individual studies. The odds ratio (OR) with their 95% CIs were used as summary estimates. Of 2,861 citations, 111 studies that recruited 42,366 PLHIV met our inclusion criteria. When reported, the rate of PLHIV with depressive symptoms ranged from 12.8% to 78% and the proportion of PLHIV who achieved good adherence (≥ 80%) ranged from 20% to 98%. There were no significant differences in rate of depressive symptoms in PLHIV by country income group; however, the proportion of PLHIV who achieved good adherence was significantly higher in lower-income countries (as defined in the 2012 World Bank Country Income Groups) (pooled rate = 86%) compared to higher-income countries (pooled rate = 67.5%; p<.05). We found that the likelihood of achieving good ART adherence was 42% lower among those with depressive symptoms compared to those without (pooled OR = 0.58, 95% CI 0.55 to 0.62). The relationship between depressive symptoms and adherence to ART was consistent across the country’s income group, study design, and adherence rates. We found that the magnitude of the association significantly decreases with more recent publications and increasing study sample size. The higher the prevalence of depressive symptoms of PLHIV recruited in the studies, the lower the likelihood of achieving good adherence to ART. In conclusion, the likelihood of achieving good adherence was lower among those with depressive symptoms compared to those without. PMID:25038748

  15. Relationship between viral load and behavioral measures of adherence to antiretroviral therapy in children living with HIV in Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Horacio A.; Harris, D. Robert; Tassiopoulos, Katherine; Leister, Erin; Negrini, Silvia Fabiana Biason de Moura; Ferreira, Flavia Faleiro; Cruz, Maria Leticia Santos; Pinto, Jorge; Allison, Susannah; Hazra, Rohan

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have examined antiretroviral therapy adherence in Latin American children. Standardized behavioral measures were applied to a large cohort of HIV-infected children in Brazil, Mexico, and Peru to assess adherence to prescribed antiretroviral therapy doses during the three days prior to study visits, assess timing of last missed dose, and evaluate the ability of the adherence measures to predict viral suppression. Time trends in adherence were modeled using a generalized estimating equations approach to account for possible correlations in outcomes measured repeatedly in the same participants. Associations of adherence with HIV viral load were examined using linear regression. Mean enrollment age of the 380 participants was 5 years; 57.6% had undetectable' viral load (<400 copies/mL). At enrollment, 90.8% of participants were perfectly (100%) adherent, compared to 87.6% at the 6-month and 92.0% at the 12-month visit; the proportion with perfect adherence did not differ over time (p=0.1). Perfect adherence was associated with a higher probability of undetectable viral load at the 12-month visit (odds ratio=4.1, 95% confidence interval: 1.8–9.1; p<0.001), but not at enrollment or the 6-month visit (p>0.3). Last time missed any antiretroviral therapy dose was reported as "never" for 52.0% at enrollment, increasing to 60.7% and 65.9% at the 6- and 12-month visits, respectively (p<0.001 for test of trend). The proportion with undetectable viral load was higher among those who never missed a dose at enrollment and the 12-month visit (p≤0.005), but not at the 6-month visit (p=0.2). While antiretroviral therapy adherence measures utilized in this study showed some association with viral load for these Latin American children, they may not be adequate for reliably identifying non-adherence and consequently children at risk for viral resistance. Other strategies are needed to improve the evaluation of adherence in this population. PMID:25743569

  16. Impact of reducing dosing frequency on adherence to oral therapies: a literature review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Kunal; Arora, Anamika; Kataria, Aditi; Cappelleri, Joseph C; Sadosky, Alesia; Peterson, Andrew M

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To assess the impact of reduced frequency of oral therapies from multiple-dosing schedules to a once-daily (OD) dosing schedule on adherence, compliance, persistence, and associated economic impact. Methods A meta-analysis was performed based on relevant articles identified from a comprehensive literature review using MEDLINE® and Embase®. The review included studies assessing adherence with OD, twice-daily (BID), thrice-daily (TID), and four-times daily (QID) dosing schedules and costs associated with optimal/suboptimal adherence among patients with acute and chronic diseases. Effect estimates across studies were pooled and analyzed using the DerSimonian and Laird random-effect model. Results Forty-three studies met inclusion criteria, and meta-analyzable data were available from 13 studies. The overall results indicated that OD schedules were associated with higher adherence rates (odds ratio [OR] 3.07, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.80–5.23; P < 0.001 for OD versus > OD dosing) and compliance rates (OR 3.50, 95% CI 1.73–7.08; P < 0.001 for OD versus > OD dosing); persistence rates showed the same direction but were not statistically significant (OR 1.43, 95% CI 0.62–3.29; P = 0.405 for OD versus BID dosing). Results for each of the conditions were consistent with those observed overall with respect to showing the benefits of less frequent dosing. From a health economic perspective, higher adherence rates with OD relative to multiple dosing in a number of conditions were consistently associated with corresponding lower costs of health care resources utilization. Conclusion Current meta-analyses suggested that across acute and chronic disease states, reducing dosage frequency from multiple dosing to OD dosing may improve adherence to therapies among patients. Improving adherence may result in subsequent decreases in health care costs. PMID:23737662

  17. The effect of strict adherence to a high-fiber, high-fruit and -vegetable, and low-fat eating pattern on adenoma recurrence.

    PubMed

    Sansbury, Leah B; Wanke, Kay; Albert, Paul S; Kahle, Lisa; Schatzkin, Arthur; Lanza, Elaine

    2009-09-01

    Individual differences in dietary intake are thought to account for substantial variation in cancer incidence. However, there has been a consistent lack of effect for low-fat, high-fiber dietary interventions and risk of colorectal cancer. These inconsistencies may reflect the multistage process of cancer as well as the range and timing of dietary change. Another potential reason for the lack of effect is poor dietary adherence among participants in these trials. The authors examined the effect of strict adherence to a low-fat, high-fiber, high-fruit and -vegetable intervention over 4 years among participants (n = 1,905) in the US Polyp Prevention Trial (1991-1998) on colorectal adenoma recurrence. There was a wide range of individual variation in the level of compliance among intervention participants. The most adherent participants, defined as "super compliers" (n = 210), consistently reported that they met or exceeded each of the 3 dietary goals at all 4 annual visits. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to estimate the association between dietary adherence and adenoma recurrence. The authors observed a 35% reduced odds of adenoma recurrence among super compliers compared with controls (odds ratio = 0.65, 95% confidence interval: 0.47, 0.92). Findings suggest that high compliance with a low-fat, high-fiber diet is associated with reduced risk of adenoma recurrence. PMID:19643809

  18. Use of medicines and adherence to standard treatment guidelines in rural community health centers, Timor-Leste.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Michiyo; Okumura, Junko; Aoyama, Atsuko; Suryawati, Sri; Porter, John

    2015-03-01

    The use of medicines and nurses'/midwives' adherence to standard treatment guidelines (STGs) were examined in Timor-Leste during the early stage of the nation's new health system development. A cross-sectional study was conducted as the quantitative element of mixed methods research. Retrospective samples from patient registration books and prospective observations were obtained in 20 randomly selected rural community health centers. The medicines use indicators, in particular the level of injection use, in Timor-Leste did not suggest overprescription. Prescribers with clinical nurse training prescribed significantly fewer antibiotics than those without such training (P < .01). The adjusted odds ratio of prescribing adherence for clinical nurse training, after accounting for confounders and prescriber clustering, was 6.6 (P < .01). STGs for nonphysician health professionals at the primary health care level have potential value in basic health care delivery, including appropriate use of medicines, in resource-limited communities when strategically developed and introduced. PMID:22548774

  19. Level structures in odd-odd deformed nucleus 184Ta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gowrishankar, R.; Sood, P. C.

    2016-02-01

    A detailed low-energy level scheme of the odd-odd n-rich nucleus 184 73Ta111 is constructed using the well tested Two-Quasiparticle Rotor Model (TQRM) for calculating the bandhead energies of physically admissible 2qp configurations with the inclusion of residual n-p interaction contribution. The presently available data on this level scheme from 184Hf decay are shown to be in agreement with these calculations. Our analysis concludes that 184Hf ( Q_{β}=1340(30) keV) decay admits of 7 additional (to the 3 presently reported) β-branches to 184Ta with J = 0 or 1 and 8 more physically admissible weak ( 1fu β-branches populating J^{π}=2- levels in 184Ta. Further, a close examination of our level scheme clearly indicates the existence of a low-lying ( Ex = 260(40) keV) high-spin ( J^{π}=10-) long-lived isomer in this nucleus.

  20. Dietary guideline adherence for gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is the most common gastrointestinal disease, and the cost of health care and lost productivity due to GERD is extremely high. Recently described side effects of long-term acid suppression have increased the interest in nonpharmacologic methods for alleviating GERD symptoms. We aimed to examine whether GERD patients follow recommended dietary guidelines, and if adherence is associated with the severity and frequency of reflux symptoms. Methods We conducted a population-based cross-sectional study within the Kaiser Permanente Northern California population, comparing 317 GERD patients to 182 asymptomatic population controls. All analyses adjusted for smoking and education. Results GERD patients, even those with moderate to severe symptoms or frequent symptoms, were as likely to consume tomato products and large portion meals as GERD-free controls and were even more likely to consume soft drinks and tea [odds ratio (OR) = 2.01 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.12-3.61; OR = 2.63 95% CI 1.24-5.59, respectively] and eat fried foods and high fat diet. The only reflux-triggering foods GERD patients were less likely to consume were citrus and alcohol [OR = 0.59; 95% CI: 0.35-0.97 for citrus; OR = 0.41 95% CI 0.19-0.87 for 1 + drink/day of alcohol]. The associations were similar when we excluded users of proton pump inhibitors. Conclusions GERD patients consume many putative GERD causing foods as frequently or even more frequently than asymptomatic patients despite reporting symptoms. These findings suggest that, if dietary modification is effective in reducing GERD, substantial opportunities for nonpharmacologic interventions exist for many GERD patients. PMID:25125219

  1. Socioeconomic and familial characteristics influence caretakers' adherence to the periodic vitamin A capsule supplementation program in Central Java, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Pangaribuan, Rosnani; Scherbaum, Veronika; Erhardt, Jürgen G; Sastroamidjojo, Soemilah; Biesalski, Hans K

    2004-06-01

    The adherence of program participants to periodic vitamin A capsule (VAC) supplementation among children aged 1-5 years (n = 677) in Central Java, Indonesia was assessed. Fourteen villages from five sub-districts and one ward from one sub-district in Central Java were included in the study to represent rural and suburban areas. All questions about demographic factors, socioeconomic conditions, current dietary practice and healthcare-seeking attitudes for common childhood illnesses, previous breastfeeding experience, their knowledge about vitamin A and adherence to the VAC program after capsule distribution (two periods in 2000) were asked. Caretakers with limited knowledge about the health benefits of vitamin A, households with more than one preschool child, and households with older children (> 36 months) were associated with a decreased likelihood of regular participation in the program with odds ratios of 0.38, 0.55, and 0.26, respectively (p < 0.01). The percentage of caretakers who utilized community health centers, village health posts or midwives' practices in rural areas, was significantly higher (86.6 per cent, p < 0.001) than in suburban areas (62.8 per cent). Living in a rural location was associated with an increased adherence to participate in the program regularly with an odds ratio of 2.02 (p < 0.01). In conclusion, nutritional education and periodic social marketing should be re-emphasized and other potential delivery channels, such as private healthcare practices, could also contribute to an increase adherence of supplementation program. PMID:15233189

  2. Quality of life and adherence to inhaled corticosteroids and tiotropium in COPD are related

    PubMed Central

    Koehorst-ter Huurne, Kirsten; Kort, Sharina; van der Palen, Job; van Beurden, Wendy JC; Movig, Kris LL; van der Valk, Paul; Brusse-Keizer, Marjolein

    2016-01-01

    Background Poor adherence to inhaled medications in COPD patients seems to be associated with an increased risk of death and hospitalization. Knowing the determinants of nonadherence to inhaled medications is important for creating interventions to improve adherence. Objectives To identify disease-specific and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) factors, associated with adherence to inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) and tiotropium in COPD patients. Methods Adherence of 795 patients was recorded over 3 years and was deemed optimal at >75%–≤125%, suboptimal at ≥50%–<75%, and poor at <50% (underuse) or >125% (overuse). Health-related quality of life was measured with the Clinical COPD Questionnaire and the EuroQol-5D questionnaire. Results Patients with a higher forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1)/vital capacity (VC) (odds ratio [OR] =1.03) and ≥1 hospitalizations in the year prior to inclusion in this study (OR =2.67) had an increased risk of suboptimal adherence to ICS instead of optimal adherence. An increased risk of underuse was predicted by a higher FEV1/VC (OR =1.05). Predictors for the risk of overuse were a lower FEV1 (OR =0.49), higher scores on Clinical COPD Questionnaire-question 3 (anxiety for dyspnea) (OR =1.26), and current smoking (OR =1.73). Regarding tiotropium, predictors for suboptimal use were a higher FEV1/VC (OR =1.03) and the inability to perform usual activities as asked by the EuroQol-5D questionnaire (OR =3.09). A higher FEV1/VC also was a predictor for the risk of underuse compared to optimal adherence (OR =1.03). The risk of overuse increased again with higher scores on Clinical COPD Questionnaire-question 3 (OR =1.46). Conclusion Several disease-specific and quality of life factors are related to ICS and tiotropium adherence, but a clear profile of a nonadherent patient cannot yet be outlined. Overusers of ICS and tiotropium experience more anxiety. PMID:27555758

  3. Factors influencing adherence to anti-craving medications and drinking outcomes in patients with alcohol dependence: A hospital-based study

    PubMed Central

    Lohit, K.; Kulkarni, Chanda; Galgali, R. B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To examine the factors influencing the pattern and extent of anti-craving medication adherence and drinking outcomes in alcohol-dependent patients. Materials and Methods: Demographic data from 102 inpatients were collected at discharge from hospital. The pattern of anti-craving medication, extent of adherence, and drinking outcome was collected at 1st, 3rd, 8th, and 12th week follow-up. Patients’ self-reported adherence, medication diary, and simplified medication adherence questionnaire were used and data were analyzed using SPSS. Results: Majority (99%) were male patients with a mean age of 41.17 ± 9.86 years and 70% belonged to middle socioeconomic status. There was a decrease in the number of patients coming for follow-up over time from 99.01% to 77.45% on day 90. Acamprosate was used in 74% and naltrexone and disulfiram in 7% of patients each. A significant reduction in adherence to acamprosate and naltrexone (P < 0.001) was associated with simultaneous decrease in days to alcohol abstinence and increase in relapse rate compared to adherent group (P < 0.001). Main barriers to adherence included younger age (odds ratio = 1.05 95% [1.01-1.09]; P < 0.01), self-decision, emotional factors, and adverse effects. Conclusions: The study demonstrated the need for safer therapeutic options along with suitable intervention at grass root level for sustenance of adherence to anti-craving medication among young adults to prevent relapse and achieve near-complete abstinence from alcohol dependence. PMID:27440951

  4. The Change From Brand-Name to Generic Aromatase Inhibitors and Hormone Therapy Adherence for Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tsui, Jennifer; Meyer, Jay; Glied, Sherry; Hillyer, Grace Clarke; Wright, Jason D.; Neugut, Alfred I.

    2014-01-01

    Background Nonadherence to hormonal therapy is common and is associated with increased copayment amount. We investigated the change in adherence after the introduction of generic aromatase inhibitors (AIs) in 2010. Methods Using deidentified pharmacy and claims data from OptumInsight, we identified women older than 50 years on brand-name AIs (BAIs) and/or generic AIs (GAIs) for early breast cancer between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2012. Clinical, demographic, and financial variables were evaluated. Adherence was defined as a medication possession ratio (MPR) 80% or greater. Results We identified 5511 women, 2815 (51.1%) on BAI, 1411 (25.6%) on GAI, and 1285 (23.3%) who switched from BAI to GAI. The median 30-day copayment was higher for BAI ($33.3) than for GAI ($9.04). In a multivariable Cox-proportional hazard analysis, women who took GAI were less likely to discontinue therapy (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.69, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.57 to 0.84) compared with BAI. Discontinuation was positively associated with a higher monthly copayment of $15 to $30 (HR = 1.21, 95% CI = 1.01 to 1.44) and more than $30 (HR = 1.49, 95% CI = 1.23 to 1.80) compared with less than $15. In a multivariable logistic regression analysis, adherence (medication possession ratio ≥ 80%) was positively associated with GAI use (odds ratio = 1.53, 95% CI = 1.22 to 1.91) compared with BAI and inversely associated with increased monthly copayment. In addition, adherence was associated with a high annual income of more than $100k/year (odds ratio = 1.58, 95% CI = 1.17 to 2.11). Conclusions Higher prescription copayment amount was associated with nonadherence and discontinuation of AIs. After controlling for copayment, discontinuation was higher and adherence was lower with Brand AIs. Because nonadherence is associated with worse survival, efforts should be directed towards reducing out-of-pocket costs for these life-saving medications. PMID:25349080

  5. Weight loss intervention adherence and factors promoting adherence: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lemstra, Mark; Bird, Yelena; Nwankwo, Chijioke; Rogers, Marla; Moraros, John

    2016-01-01

    Background Adhering to weight loss interventions is difficult for many people. The majority of those who are overweight or obese and attempt to lose weight are simply not successful. The objectives of this study were 1) to quantify overall adherence rates for various weight loss interventions and 2) to provide pooled estimates for factors associated with improved adherence to weight loss interventions. Methods We performed a systematic literature review and meta-analysis of all studies published between January 2004 and August 2015 that reviewed weight loss intervention adherence. Results After applying inclusion and exclusion criteria and checking the methodological quality, 27 studies were included in the meta-analysis. The overall adherence rate was 60.5% (95% confidence interval [CI] 53.6–67.2). The following three main variables were found to impact adherence: 1) supervised attendance programs had higher adherence rates than those with no supervision (rate ratio [RR] 1.65; 95% CI 1.54–1.77); 2) interventions that offered social support had higher adherence than those without social support (RR 1.29; 95% CI 1.24–1.34); and 3) dietary intervention alone had higher adherence than exercise programs alone (RR 1.27; 95% CI 1.19–1.35). Conclusion A substantial proportion of people do not adhere to weight loss interventions. Programs supervising attendance, offering social support, and focusing on dietary modification have better adherence than interventions not supervising attendance, not offering social support, and focusing exclusively on exercise. PMID:27574404

  6. Use of prior odds for missing persons identifications

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Identification of missing persons from mass disasters is based on evaluation of a number of variables and observations regarding the combination of features derived from these variables. DNA typing now is playing a more prominent role in the identification of human remains, and particularly so for highly decomposed and fragmented remains. The strength of genetic associations, by either direct or kinship analyses, is often quantified by calculating a likelihood ratio. The likelihood ratio can be multiplied by prior odds based on nongenetic evidence to calculate the posterior odds, that is, by applying Bayes' Theorem, to arrive at a probability of identity. For the identification of human remains, the path creating the set and intersection of variables that contribute to the prior odds needs to be appreciated and well defined. Other than considering the total number of missing persons, the forensic DNA community has been silent on specifying the elements of prior odds computations. The variables include the number of missing individuals, eyewitness accounts, anthropological features, demographics and other identifying characteristics. The assumptions, supporting data and reasoning that are used to establish a prior probability that will be combined with the genetic data need to be considered and justified. Otherwise, data may be unintentionally or intentionally manipulated to achieve a probability of identity that cannot be supported and can thus misrepresent the uncertainty with associations. The forensic DNA community needs to develop guidelines for objectively computing prior odds. PMID:21707977

  7. Maternal perceptions of social context and adherence to maternal and child health (MCH) clinic recommendations among marginalized Bedouin mothers.

    PubMed

    Daoud, Nihaya; Shoham-Vardi, Ilana

    2015-03-01

    National maternal and child health (MCH) care systems often deliver universal health care recommendations that do not take into consideration the social context of infant care (IC) for marginalized groups. We examined associations between maternal perceptions of social context (MPSC) and adherence by minority Bedouin mothers in Israel to three commonly recommended IC practices. We conducted personal interviews with 464 mothers visiting 14 MCH clinics using a structured questionnaire based on findings from a previous focus-group study, and guided by constructs of the Health Beliefs Model. Items were tested for validity and reliability. We used multivariate analysis to identify MPSC constructs associated with adherence to MCH clinic recommendations (timely postnatal first visit, sustaining breastfeeding, and use of infant car seat). Social context, when perceived as a barrier to IC, was negatively associated with adherence to timely first postnatal MCH clinic visit (odds ratio, 95 %, confidence intervals (OR 1.45, 95 % CI 1.24, 1.70) and use of infant car seat (OR 1.43, 95 % CI 1.21, 1.69). However, social context was positively associated with sustained breastfeeding (OR 0.54, 95 % CI 0.37, 0.79). Perceptions of the severity of infant health problems, and family financial and relationship problems had less significant associations with adherence to MCH clinic recommendations. Adherence by marginalized mothers to MCH clinic recommendations is related to their perceptions of social context. When there are higher financial and other living conditions barriers mothers tend toward lower adherence to these recommendations. MCH policy makers and service providers must consider MPSC in planning and delivery of MCH recommendations. PMID:24927786

  8. High-intensity cannabis use and adherence to antiretroviral therapy among people who use illicit drugs in a Canadian setting

    PubMed Central

    Slawson, Gregory; Milloy, M-J; Balneaves, Lynda; Simo, Annick; Guillemi, Silvia; Hogg, Robert; Montaner, Julio; Wood, Evan; Kerr, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Background Cannabis is increasingly prescribed clinically and utilized by people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) to address symptoms of HIV disease and to manage side effects of antiretroviral therapy (ART). In light of concerns about the possibly deleterious effect of psychoactive drug use on adherence to ART, we sought to determine the relationship between high-intensity cannabis use and adherence to ART among a community-recruited cohort of HIV-positive illicit drug users. Methods We used data from the ACCESS study, an ongoing prospective cohort study of HIV-seropositive illicit drug users linked to comprehensive ART dispensation records in a setting of universal no-cost HIV care. We estimated the relationship between at least daily cannabis use in the last six months, measured longitudinally, and the likelihood of optimal adherence to ART during the same period, using a multivariate linear mixed-effects model accounting for relevant socio-demographic, behavioral, clinical and structural factors. Results From May 2005 to May 2012, 523 HIV-positive illicit drug users were recruited and contributed 2430 interviews. At baseline, 121 (23.1%) participants reported at least daily cannabis use. In bivariate and multivariate analyses we did not observe an association between using cannabis at least daily and optimal adherence to prescribed HAART (Adjusted Odds Ratio = 1.12, 95% Confidence Interval [95% CI]: 0.76 – 1.64, p-value = 0.555.) Conclusions High-intensity cannabis use was not associated with adherence to ART. These findings suggest cannabis may be utilized by PLWHA for medicinal and recreational purposes without compromising effective adherence to ART. PMID:25012624

  9. Food Labels Use Is Associated with Higher Adherence to Mediterranean Diet: Results from the Moli-Sani Study

    PubMed Central

    Bonanni, Americo E.; Bonaccio, Marialaura; di Castelnuovo, Augusto; de Lucia, Francesca; Costanzo, Simona; Persichillo, Mariarosaria; Zito, Francesco; Donati, Maria Benedetta; de Gaetano, Giovanni; Iacoviello, Licia

    2013-01-01

    Mediterranean diet (MD) has been associated with lower risk of ischemic cerebro- and cardio-vascular disease, neurological degenerative disease, and breast and colonrectal cancers. Nevertheless, adherence to this pattern has decreased. Food labels are a potentially valid means to encourage towards healthier dietary behavior. This study, conducted on a subsample of 883 subjects enrolled in the Moli-sani Project, evaluated whether food labels reading (LR) is associated with MD adherence. Participants completed a questionnaire on nutrition knowledge, information, and attitudes, with a specific question on food labels reading. Biometric measurements, socio-economic status, education, physical activity, and smoking habits were collected. The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) food frequency questionnaire was used to collect dietary habits, and subsequently evaluated by both the Mediterranean diet score (MDS) and Italian Mediterranean index (IMI), a priori dietary patterns. Food consumption patterns were generated by Principal Components Analysis (PCA), an a posteriori approach. Multivariable odds ratios were calculated to quantify the association of LR categories with dietary habits. LR was significantly associated with greater adherence to both MDS (p = 0.0004) and IMI (p = 0.0019) in a multivariable model. LR participants had 74% (MDS) or 68% (IMI) higher probability to be in the highest level of adherence to Mediterranean diet-like patterns. Moreover, they showed greater adherence to Mediterranean-like food consumption patterns (0.1 vs. −0.2, p < 0.0001) and lower adherence to two Western-like patterns (0.01 vs. 0.2, p = 0.009 and 0.1 vs. 0.2, p = 0.02). These findings support an association between food label use and consuming a Mediterranean-type diet. PMID:24192994

  10. Adherence to GLP-1 receptor agonist therapy administered by once-daily or once-weekly injection in patients with type 2 diabetes in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Qing; Ouwens, Mario JNM; Grandy, Susan; Johnsson, Kristina; Kostev, Karel

    2016-01-01

    Aim This study aimed to compare 6-month adherence to therapy with exenatide once weekly (Bydureon®) vs liraglutide once daily (Victoza®) in patients with type 2 diabetes under primary care in Germany. Methods A nationwide longitudinal prescription database (LRx), (between January 2011 and September 2014) was used to analyze adherence to therapy. The proportion of days covered (PDC) by prescription was used as a measure of adherence in the 6-month postindex period. Logistic regression analyses were performed to investigate the associations between glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist therapy adjusting for age, sex, and cotherapy. Results Therapy was initiated in 5,449 patients with exenatide once weekly (age: 59.7±11.8 years; 51.4% were male) and in 24,648 patients with liraglutide once daily (age: 59.4±11.4 years; 49.7% were male). The median PDC was 0.88 for exenatide once weekly and 0.77 for liraglutide once daily (P<0.05). Once-weekly exenatide was associated with significantly higher adherence. Odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for having a PDC of ≥0.80 was 1.78 (1.62–1.96) for exenatide once weekly compared with liraglutide once daily after adjusting for age, sex, and cotherapy. Conclusion Adherence to treatment with exenatide once weekly was significantly increased compared to that with liraglutide once daily over 6 months in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:27418849

  11. Enhancing adherence through education.

    PubMed

    Smrtka, Jennifer; Caon, Christina; Saunders, Carol; Becker, Brenda L; Baxter, Nancy

    2010-10-01

    The treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) has advanced greatly since the introduction of disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) in the early 1990s. Although the DMTs have exhibited significant efficacy in relapsing-remitting MS and other forms of the disease, the degree of benefit depends heavily on patient adherence to recommended regimens. This article addresses some of the most pressing areas of unmet need in educating advanced-practice nurses, neurologists, patients, and support care partners regarding strategies that can overcome obstacles to adherence. The observations presented here are based on clinical experience with real-life cognitive, psychosocial, and cultural impediments to adherence. The article also explores the ways in which adherence may be affected by emerging therapies for MS (such as oral agents) as well as the educational needs that will arise with the further evolution of MS care. PMID:21049830

  12. Adherence to Insulin Therapy.

    PubMed

    Sarbacker, G Blair; Urteaga, Elizabeth M

    2016-08-01

    IN BRIEF Six million people with diabetes use insulin either alone or in combination with an oral medication. Many barriers exist that lead to poor adherence with insulin. However, there is an underwhelming amount of data on interventions to address these barriers and improve insulin adherence. Until pharmacological advancements create easier, more acceptable insulin regimens, it is imperative to involve patients in shared decision-making. PMID:27574371

  13. General parity-odd CMB bispectrum estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, Maresuke; Liguori, Michele; Fergusson, James R. E-mail: michele.liguori@pd.infn.it

    2014-05-01

    We develop a methodology for estimating parity-odd bispectra in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). This is achieved through the extension of the original separable modal methodology to parity-odd bispectrum domains (ℓ{sub 1}+ℓ{sub 2}+ℓ{sub 3} = odd). Through numerical tests of the parity-odd modal decomposition with some theoretical bispectrum templates, we verify that the parity-odd modal methodology can successfully reproduce the CMB bispectrum, without numerical instabilities. We also present simulated non-Gaussian maps produced by modal-decomposed parity-odd bispectra, and show the consistency with the exact results. Our new methodology is applicable to all types of parity-odd temperature and polarization bispectra.

  14. The influence of cultural and religious orientations on social support and its potential impact on medication adherence

    PubMed Central

    Hatah, Ernieda; Lim, Kien Ping; Ali, Adliah Mohd; Mohamed Shah, Noraida; Islahudin, Farida

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Social support can positively influence patients’ health outcomes through a number of mechanisms, such as increases in patients’ adherence to medication. Although there have been studies on the influence of social support on medication adherence, these studies were conducted in Western settings, not in Asian settings where cultural and religious orientations may be different. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of cultural orientation and religiosity on social support and its relation to patients’ medication adherence. Methods This was a cross-sectional study of patients with chronic diseases in two tertiary hospitals in Selangor, Malaysia. Patients who agreed to participate in the study were asked to answer questions in the following areas: 1) perceived group and higher authority cultural orientations; 2) religiosity: organizational and non-organizational religious activities, and intrinsic religiosity; 3) perceived social support; and 4) self-reported medication adherence. Patients’ medication adherence was modeled using multiple logistic regressions, and only variables with a P-value of <0.25 were included in the analysis. Results A total of 300 patients completed the questionnaire, with the exception of 40 participants who did not complete the cultural orientation question. The mean age of the patients was 57.6±13.5. Group cultural orientation, organizational religious activity, non-organizational religious activity, and intrinsic religiosity demonstrated significant associations with patients’ perceived social support (r=0.181, P=0.003; r=0.230, P<0.001; r=0.135, P=0.019; and r=0.156, P=0.007, respectively). In the medication adherence model, only age, duration of treatment, organizational religious activity, and disease type (human immunodeficiency virus) were found to significantly influence patients’ adherence to medications (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.05, P=0.002; OR 0.99, P=0.025; OR 1.19, P=0.038; and OR 9.08, P<0

  15. Odds of observing the multiverse

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlen, A.

    2010-03-15

    Eternal inflation predicts that our observable universe lies within a bubble (or pocket universe) embedded in a volume of inflating space. The interior of the bubble undergoes inflation and standard cosmology, while the bubble walls expand outward and collide with other neighboring bubbles. The collisions provide either an opportunity to make a direct observation of the multiverse or, if they produce unacceptable anisotropy, a threat to inflationary theory. The probability of an observer in our bubble detecting the effects of collisions has an absolute upper bound set by the odds of being in the part of our bubble that lies in the forward light cone of a collision; in the case of collisions with bubbles of identical vacua, this bound is given by the bubble nucleation rate times (H{sub O}/H{sub I}){sup 2}, where H{sub O} is the Hubble scale outside the bubbles and H{sub I} is the scale of the second round of inflation that occurs inside our bubble. Similar results were obtained by Freigovel et al. using a different method for the case of collisions with bubbles of much larger cosmological constant; here, it is shown to hold in the case of collisions with identical bubbles as well.

  16. Sexual relationships outside primary partnerships and abstinence are associated with lower adherence and adherence gaps: data from the Partners PrEP Ancillary Adherence Study

    PubMed Central

    Kintu, Alexander; Hankinson, Susan E.; Balasubramanian, Raji; Ertel, Karen; Tumwesigye, Elioda; Bangsberg, David R.; Haberer, Jessica E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the role of sexual relationships on levels and patterns of adherence to medication for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) against HIV. Methods We enrolled 1,147 HIV-negative individuals in long-term serodiscordant relationships at three sites in Uganda from the Partners PrEP Study- a randomized placebo-controlled trial of daily oral tenofovir and emtricitabine/tenofovir. We used generalized estimation equations to assess the effects of sexual relationships on low adherence (<80%) and on gaps in adherence. Results Fifty-three percent were male, 51% were 18-34 years and 24% were polygamous. Participants who reported sex in the past month with someone other than their primary partner and with <100% condom use were more than twice as likely to have low adherence (aOR 2.48, 95% CI: 1.70-3.62) compared to those who had sex with only their primary partners and 100% condom use. Using the same reference group, those who abstained from sex in the previous month had 30% increased odds of low adherence (aOR 1.30, 95% CI: 1.05-1.62), and participants in non-polygamous marriages who reported sex with both their primary and other partners and <100% condom use were almost twice as likely to be low adherers (aOR 1.76, 95% CI: 1.01-3.08). At least one 72-hour gap in adherence was seen in 598 participants (54.7%); 23.2% had at least one one-week gap. Conclusions Risk of low overall adherence was higher in participants who reported sex outside primary partnerships and suboptimal condom use, as well as in those who abstained from sex. Adherence gaps were common, potentially creating risk for HIV acquisition. PMID:25942457

  17. Associations of adherence to the New Nordic Diet with risk of preeclampsia and preterm delivery in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa).

    PubMed

    Hillesund, Elisabet Rudjord; Øverby, Nina C; Engel, Stephanie M; Klungsøyr, Kari; Harmon, Quaker E; Haugen, Margaretha; Bere, Elling

    2014-10-01

    Preeclampsia and preterm delivery are serious complications of pregnancy and leading causes of perinatal mortality and morbidity worldwide. Dietary factors might be associated with these adverse outcomes. We investigated whether adherence to the New Nordic Diet (NND) was associated with preeclampsia and preterm delivery risks in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa). Participants were recruited from all over Norway during the period 1999-2008. A previously constructed diet score assessing meal frequency, and the consumption of Nordic fruits, root vegetables, cabbages, potatoes, oatmeal porridge, whole grains, wild fish, game, berries, milk and water, was used to assess NND adherence. Associations between NND adherence and the outcomes were estimated in adjusted multivariate logistic regression models. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. A total of 72,072 women was included in the study. High versus low NND adherence was associated with lower risk of total preeclampsia (OR 0.86; 95 % CI 0.78-0.95) and early preeclampsia (OR 0.71; 95 % CI 0.52-0.96). High compared with low NND adherence was associated with a lower risk of spontaneous preterm delivery among nulliparous women (OR 0.77; 95 % CI 0.66-0.89), whereas multiparous women with high NND adherence had a marginally significant higher risk of preterm delivery (OR 1.24; 95 % CI 1.00-1.53). High NND adherence was associated with a lower relative risk of preeclampsia and of spontaneous preterm delivery among nulliparous women; however, among multiparous women there was a higher relative risk of preterm delivery. PMID:25193741

  18. Prevalence and predictors of sub-optimal medication adherence among patients with severe mental illnesses in a tertiary psychiatric facility in Maiduguri, North-eastern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Abdu Wakawa; Yahya, Shuaibu; Pindar, Sadique Kwajafa; Wakil, Musa Abba; Garkuwa, Adamu; Sale, Shehu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Sub-optimal adherence constitutes a significant impediment to the management of severe mental illnesses (SMIs) as it negatively impacts on the course of the illness and the treatment outcome. In this study, the levels of adherence, prevalence and the predictors of sub-optimal adherence were assessed in a sub-Saharan African setting. Methods Three hundred and seventy (370) respondents with diagnoses of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder or severe depression were randomly enrolled and interviewed at the out-patient department of the Federal Neuropsychiatric Hospital, Maiduguri in northeastern Nigeria. An anonymous sociodemographic questionnaire and a clinical proforma designed by the authors, Oslo social support scale and the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) were used for data collection. Results The prevalence of sub-optimal adherence was 55.7%. The independent predictors of sub-optimal adherence were; seeking for traditional/ spiritual treatment (Odds Ratio (O.R.) = 6.523, 95% C.I. = 3.773 - 11.279, P = < 0.001), male gender (O.R. = 3.307, 95% C.I. = 1.907 - 5.737, P = < 0.001), low levels of insight (O.R. = 1.753, 95 C.I. = 1.220 - 2.519, P = 0.002), and low social support levels (O.R. = 1.528, 95% C.I. = 1.097 - 2.129, P = 0.012). Conclusion Based on the outcome of the study, we recommend the development of psycho-educational programmes on adherence and the active involvement of the relations and significant others in the management of patients with SMIs in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:26405475

  19. Adherence to Sublingual Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Incorvaia, Cristoforo; Mauro, Marina; Leo, Gualtiero; Ridolo, Erminia

    2016-02-01

    Adherence is a major issue in any medical treatment. Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is particularly affected by a poor adherence because a flawed application prevents the immunological effects that underlie the clinical outcome of the treatment. Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) was introduced in the 1990s, and the early studies suggested that adherence and compliance to such a route of administration was better than the traditional subcutaneous route. However, the recent data from manufacturers revealed that only 13% of patients treated with SLIT reach the recommended 3-year duration. Therefore, improved adherence to SLIT is an unmet need that may be achieved by various approaches. The utility of patient education and accurate monitoring during the treatment was demonstrated by specific studies, while the success of technology-based tools, including online platforms, social media, e-mail, and a short message service by phone, is currently considered to improve the adherence. This goal is of pivotal importance to fulfill the object of SLIT that is to modify the natural history of allergy, ensuring a long-lasting clinical benefit, and a consequent pharmaco-economic advantage, when patients complete at least a 3-year course of treatment. PMID:26758865

  20. Observed parity-odd CMB temperature bispectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, Maresuke; Liguori, Michele; Fergusson, James R. E-mail: michele.liguori@pd.infn.it

    2015-01-01

    Parity-odd non-Gaussianities create a variety of temperature bispectra in the cosmic microwave background (CMB), defined in the domain: ℓ{sub 1} + ℓ{sub 2} + ℓ{sub 3} = odd. These models are yet unconstrained in the literature, that so far focused exclusively on the more common parity-even scenarios. In this work, we provide the first experimental constraints on parity-odd bispectrum signals in WMAP 9-year temperature data, using a separable modal parity-odd estimator. Comparing theoretical bispectrum templates to the observed bispectrum, we place constraints on the so-called nonlineality parameters of parity-odd tensor non-Gaussianities predicted by several Early Universe models. Our technique also generates a model-independent, smoothed reconstruction of the bispectrum of the data for parity-odd configurations.

  1. Reduced adherence to antiretroviral therapy among HIV-infected Tanzanians seeking cure from the Loliondo healer.

    PubMed

    Thielman, Nathan M; Ostermann, Jan; Whetten, Kathryn; Whetten, Rachel; Itemba, Dafrosa; Maro, Venance; Pence, Brian; Reddy, Elizabeth

    2014-03-01

    : The predictors for seeking alternative therapies for HIV-infection in sub-Saharan Africa are unknown. Among a prospective cohort of 442 HIV-infected patients in Moshi, Tanzania, 249 (56%) sought cure from a newly popularized religious healer in Loliondo (450 km away), and their adherence to antiretrovirals (ARVs) dropped precipitously (odds ratio = 0.20, 95% confidence interval: 0.09 to 0.44, P < 0.001) after the visit. Compared with those not attending Loliondo, attendees were more likely to have been diagnosed with HIV more remotely (3.8 vs. 3.0 years before, P < 0.001), have taken ARVs longer (3.4 vs. 2.5 years, P < 0.001), have higher median CD4 lymphocyte counts (429 vs. 354 cells/mm, P < 0.001), be wealthier (wealth index: 10.9 vs. 8.8, P = 0.034), and receive care at the private versus the public hospital (P = 0.012). In multivariable logistic regression, only years since the start of ARVs remained significant (odds ratio = 1.49, 95% confidence interval: 1.23 to 1.80). Treatment fatigue may play a role in the lure of alternative healers. PMID:24525471

  2. Adherence to treatment in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Taddeo, Danielle; Egedy, Maud; Frappier, Jean-Yves

    2008-01-01

    Health care professionals must be alert to the high prevalence of low adherence to treatment during adolescence. Low adherence increases morbidity and medical complications, contributes to poorer quality of life and an overuse of the health care system. Many different factors have an impact on adherence. However, critical factors to consider in teens are their developmental stage and challenges, emotional issues and family dysfunction. Direct and indirect methods have been described to assess adherence. Eliciting an adherence history is the most useful way for clinicians to evaluate adherence, and could be the beginning of a constructive dialogue with the adolescent. Interventions to improve adherence are multiple – managing mental health issues appropriately, building a strong relationship, customizing the treatment regimen if possible, empowering the adolescent to deal with adherence issues, providing information, ensuring family and peer support, and motivational enhancement therapy. Evaluation of adherence at regular intervals should be an important aspect of health care for adolescents. PMID:19119348

  3. BOOK REVIEW: The Odd Quantum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Helen

    2000-03-01

    The Odd Quantum is aiming to be odd. Falling between being a quantum mechanics textbook and a `popular' science book, it aims to convey something of the substance of quantum mechanics without being overly technical or professional. It does not shy away from the mathematics of the subject or resort solely to analogy and metaphor, as so often is the case. Books aimed at the lay reader tend to take on a particular aspect of quantum mechanics, for example, wave-particle duality, and can do little more than hint at the complexity of the subject. This book is more than a textbook on quantum mechanics; it gives the reader a comprehensive account of history and an appreciation of the nature of quantum mechanics. The introductory chapters deal with the earlier part of the century and the thinking of that time. The approach is familiar, as are the stories that Treiman tells, but he also manages to convey the speed with which ideas changed and the excitement this brought to the physics community. Classical ideas of force and energy are dealt with succinctly but with sufficient depth to set up the reader for what is to come; Maxwell's equations and a brief glimpse at relativity are included. This is followed by a brief description of what the author terms the `old' quantum mechanics, in effect a highly readable tour around black body radiation and spectroscopy and the models of the atom that emerged from them. The `new' quantum mechanics begins about a third of the way through the book, and in a chapter entitled `Foundations' starts gently but rapidly moves into a detailed mathematical treatment. This section, of necessity, relapses into the style of a textbook and covers a lot of ground quickly. It is at this point that the non-specialist popular science readers for whom Treiman has written this book may become a little bemused. Concepts such as non-degeneracy and operators come thick and fast. It is difficult to imagine an educated non-physicist with little mathematical

  4. Positronium Decay and C-Odd Bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skalsey, M.; Conti, R. S.

    1996-05-01

    Triplet-state orthopositronium (o-Ps) decay rate measurements are in marked disagreement by 0.17% with QED theoretical calculations done up to, but not including order α ^2 radiative and relativistic corrections. The existence of a rare exotic decay branch o-Ps arrow 2γ + X^0 (where X^0 is a neutral, massive C-odd boson) could resolve the discrepancy. We have searched for, but have not found evidence of the X^0 in two recent experiments.(M. Skalsey and R.S. Conti, Phys. Rev. D51), 6292 (1995) and submitted to Phys. Rev. Lett. Stringent limits are placed on the exotic decay branching ratio e^+ +e^- arrow X^0 +γ as a function of the X^0 mass and lifetime. The results are interpreted for two distinct models of X^0 interactions and related to o-Ps decay as well as other experiments, including singlet-state parapositronium decay rate measurements. *Supported by NSF grant PHY-9417854 and the University of Michigan.

  5. The Competition Between Collective and Single - Effects in the Odd-Odd Nuclei LANTHANUM-128,130.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godfrey, Mark Jonathan

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Excited states in the odd-odd nuclei ^{128,130}La have been investigated to high-spin using gamma-ray spectroscopy. The nucleus ^{128}La was identified using the Daresbury Recoil Separator, and gamma -gamma coincidence data were taken on both nuclei with the TESSA3 array. Angular distributions were also measured for ^{128} La. Seven distinct bands have been observed, three in ^{128}La and four in ^{130}La, with four of these structures being seen for the first time. Two of the bands in each nucleus correspond to near-prolate nuclear shapes, one based on a pih _{11/2} otimes nuh _{11/2} structure and the other on a pih_{11/2 } otimes nug_{7/2 } configuration. A further band in each nucleus has similar properties to what would be expected for a collective oblate structure. In addition the first odd -proton system superdeformed band has been found in ^{130}La. The experimental evidence for these structures will be discussed in terms of the variation in energy level signature splitting, B(M1)/B(E2) ratios and mixing ratios as a function of rotational frequency and single particle configuration. The nature of the particles responsible for backbends in the near-prolate bands will be conclusively proved. The results will be interpreted in terms of the cranked shell model, an odd-odd particle-rotor model and deformation self-consistent cranking calculations. They will be compared to other odd and odd-odd systems in the A = 130 region. Long-range p-n and n-n interactions are investigated through the measurement of residual interactions. Theoretical interactions are obtained from deformation self-consistent cranking calculations, which contain no long-range interactions, to estimate the nuclear mean field. The results are discussed in terms of the variation in the spatial overlap of the various wavefunctions and changes in the mean field, as a function of particle number, configuration and rotational frequency.

  6. Improving the Odds of Surviving Sepsis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Improving the Odds of Surviving Sepsis Inside Life Science View All Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Improving the Odds of Surviving Sepsis ... Threatening Bacterial Infection Remains Mysterious This Inside Life Science article also appears on LiveScience . Learn about related ...

  7. Statin adherence and the risk of major coronary events in patients with diabetes: a nested case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Ruokoniemi, Päivi; Korhonen, Maarit J; Helin-Salmivaara, Arja; Lavikainen, Piia; Jula, Antti; Junnila, Seppo Y T; Kettunen, Raimo; Huupponen, Risto

    2011-01-01

    AIMS To evaluate whether good statin adherence is associated with a reduced incidence of major coronary events (MCEs) among diabetic patients with and without coronary heart disease (CHD). METHODS Using data derived by linkage of nationwide health databases in Finland, we conducted a nested case–control analysis of 3513 cases with an MCE, a composite of acute myocardial infarction and/or coronary revascularization, and 20 090 matched controls identified from a cohort of 60 677 statin initiators with diabetes. Cases and controls were matched according to gender, time of cohort entry and duration of follow-up and further classified to two risk groups according to the presence of CHD at statin initiation. The incidence of MCEs was compared between patients with good statin adherence (the proportion of days covered ≥80%) and patients with poor statin adherence (<80%). Odds ratios (OR) for MCEs were estimated by conditional logistic regression adjusting for several covariables. RESULTS Good statin adherence was associated with a reduced incidence of MCEs in those with prior CHD [OR 0.84 (95% CI 0.74–0.95)] and in those without it [OR 0.86 (95% CI 0.78–0.95)]. The association persisted among those followed up for 5 years or longer [OR 0.77 (95% CI 0.58–1.02) and OR 0.79 (95% CI 0.66–0.94) respectively]. In sensitivity analyses, a reduced MCE incidence was observed also in those without any documented cardiovascular disease (CVD) at statin initiation [OR 0.87 (95% CI 0.78–0.96) overall and OR 0.80 (95% CI 0.66–0.97) for those followed up 5 years or longer]. CONCLUSIONS In patients with diabetes, good adherence to statins predicts reduced incidence of MCEs irrespective of the presence of CHD at statin initiation. PMID:21204911

  8. Assessment of adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy and associated factors among people living with HIV at Debrebrihan Referral Hospital and Health Center, Northeast Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Ketema, Abush Kebede; Shewangizaw Weret, Zewdu

    2015-01-01

    Patient adherence to antiretroviral combination therapy is a critical component to successful treatment outcome. Nonadherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is a major challenge to AIDS care, and the risks associated with it are extensive. The intention of this study was to determine prevalence and associated factors with adherence to highly active ART among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) at the Debrebrihan Referral Hospital and Health Center, Northeast Ethiopia. A cross-sectional study design with systematic random sampling conducted by the use of a structured, pretested self-rating adherence questionnaire was used to conduct the study among 422 respondents from the Debrebrihan Referral Hospital and Health Center. A single population proportion formula at 95% CI with 5% of marginal error at 50% of prevalence of occurrence was used to determine sample size. Adherence was defined as not missing a single ART dose during the 30-day period prior to filling out the self-report. Adherence was measured by self-reports by the patients. These results were then used in binary logistic regression analysis. Covariates were analyzed by bivariate and multivariate logistic regression with SPSS statistical software. The total number of respondents in this study was 422; their median age was 35 years. Among the participants, 95.5% were taking their medication without missing a dose. Factors such as having emotional or practical support positively encouraged ART adherence (adjusted odds ratio 0.16 [95% CI 0.05–0.49]). However, users of traditional, complementary, and alternative medicine (TCAM) (adjusted odds ratio 4.7 [95% CI 1.06–21.22]) had nearly a five times higher risk for ART nonadherence (P<0.05) than those not using TCAM. Adherence to ART among PLWA is imperative and standard. But, there is still a need to boost psychological support and practical support for the clients, and there is also a need to create a more integrative approach with TCAM in order to increase

  9. The nuclear structure of deformed odd-odd nuclei: Experimental and theoretical investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Hoff, R.W.; Jain, A.K.; Sood, P.C.; Sheline, R.K.

    1988-06-06

    Previous surveys of experimental level structure in deformed odd-odd nuclei have been updated with recent results for the lanthanide and actinide regions. The relative strengths of the effective neutron-proton interaction derived from these data are compared. The predictive power of a semi-empirical model for level structure in deformed odd-odd nuclei is demonstrated. Comparison is made with recent Hartree-Fock calculations of selected nuclei.

  10. Social Adjustment among Taiwanese Children with Symptoms of ADHD, ODD, and ADHD Comorbid with ODD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tseng, Wan-Ling; Kawabata, Yoshito; Gau, Susan Shur-Fen

    2011-01-01

    This study examined social problems at school and relationships with peers, siblings, mothers, and fathers among children with ADHD only (n = 41), ODD only (n = 14), ADHD + ODD (n = 47), and normal controls (n = 204) from a school-based sample of 2,463 first to ninth graders in Taiwan. ADHD and ODD symptoms were determined by teacher and mother…

  11. A MULTI-CENTER CLUSTER-RANDOMIZED TRIAL OF A MULTI-FACTORIAL INTERVENTION TO IMPROVE ANTIHYPERTENSIVE MEDICATION ADHERENCE AND BLOOD PRESSURE CONTROL AMONG PATIENTS AT HIGH CARDIOVASCULAR RISK (The COM99 study)*

    PubMed Central

    Pladevall, Manel; Brotons, Carlos; Gabriel, Rafael; Arnau, Anna; Suarez, Carmen; de la Figuera, Mariano; Marquez, Emilio; Coca, Antonio; Sobrino, Javier; Divine, George; Heisler, Michele; Williams, L Keoki

    2010-01-01

    Background Medication non-adherence is common and results in preventable disease complications. This study assesses the effectiveness of a multifactorial intervention to improve both medication adherence and blood pressure control and to reduce cardiovascular events. Methods and Results In this multi-center, cluster-randomized trial, physicians from hospital-based hypertension clinics and primary care centers across Spain were randomized to receive and provide the intervention to their high-risk patients. Eligible patients were ≥50 years of age, had uncontrolled hypertension, and had an estimated 10-year cardiovascular risk greater than 30%. Physicians randomized to the intervention group counted patients’ pills, designated a family member to support adherence behavior, and provided educational information to patients. The primary outcome was blood pressure control at 6 months. Secondary outcomes included both medication adherence and a composite end-point of all cause mortality and cardiovascular-related hospitalizations. Seventy-nine physicians and 877 patients participated in the trial. The mean duration of follow-up was 39 months. Intervention patients were less likely to have an uncontrolled systolic blood pressure (odds ratio 0.62; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.50–0.78) and were more likely to be adherent (OR 1.91; 95% CI 1.19–3.05) when compared with control group patients at 6 months. After five years 16% of the patients in the intervention group and 19% in the control group met the composite end-point (hazard ratio 0.97; 95% CI 0.67–1.39). Conclusions A multifactorial intervention to improve adherence to antihypertensive medication was effective in improving both adherence and blood pressure control, but it did not appear to improve long-term cardiovascular events. PMID:20823391

  12. Lifestyles and Risk Factors Associated with Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet: A Baseline Assessment of the PREDIMED Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Emily A.; Toledo, Estefania; Diez-Espino, Javier; Estruch, Ramon; Corella, Dolores; Salas-Salvado, Jordi; Vinyoles, Ernest; Gomez-Gracia, Enrique; Aros, Fernando; Fiol, Miquel; Lapetra, Jose; Serra-Majem, Lluis; Pintó, Xavier; Portillo, Maria Puy; Lamuela-Raventos, Rosa M.; Ros, Emilio; Sorli, Jose V.; Martinez-Gonzalez, Miguel A.

    2013-01-01

    Background The traditional Mediterranean dietary pattern (MedDiet) is associated with longevity and low rates of cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, there is little information on who is more likely to follow this food pattern. Aim To evaluate how different factors are associated with lower MedDiet adherence in older Spanish subjects. Methods We included 7305 participants (men aged 55–80 y, women 60–80 y) at high-risk of CVD recruited into the PREDIMED trial (ISRCTN35739639). Socioeconomic, anthropometric, lifestyle characteristics and CVD risk factors were recorded. A validated 14-item questionnaire was used to evaluate MedDiet adherence at baseline. Multivariate models were used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals for lower adherence to the MedDiet (<9 points out of 14) and ascertain factors independently associated with it. Results Former smoking (OR = 0.87; 95% CI, 0.78–0.98), physical activity (OR for the 3rd vs. the 1sttertile: 0.69; 0.62–0.78), and higher educational level (OR for university vs. less than primary school: 0.54; 0.38–0.77) were associated with higher MedDiet adherence. Conversely, having a larger waist-to-height ratio (OR for 0.1 units, 1.35; 1.22–1.49), being diabetic (OR = 1.13; 1.03–1.24), being single (OR = 1.27; 1.01–1.61) or divorced or separated (OR = 1.44; 1.09–1.89), and current smoking (OR = 1.28; 1.11–1.47) were associated with lower adherence. Conclusions Participants with little education, a larger waist-to-height ratio, or diabetes and those who were less physically active, single, divorced or separated, or smokers were less likely to adhere to the MedDiet, an ideal model for food choices. Stronger efforts of health promotion are needed in these groups to foster adoption of the MedDiet. PMID:23637743

  13. Alignments, additivity, and signature inversion in odd-odd {sup 170}Ta : a comprehensive high-spin study.

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar, A.; Hartley, D. J.; Riley, M. A.; Teal, C.; Carpenter, M. P.; Chowdhury, P.; Danchev, M.; Djongolov, M. K.; Hagemann, G. B.; Hecht, A. A.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Kondev, F. G.; Lauritsen, T.; Ma, W. C.; Mohr, W. H.; Moore, E. F.; Odegard, S. W.; Riedinger, L. L.; Sletten, G.; Tandel, S. K.; Vanhoy, J. R.; Wang, X.; Zhu, S.; Florida State Univ.; U.S. Naval Academy; Univ. of Massachusetts; Univ. of Tennessee; Niels Bohr Inst.; Mississippi State Univ.; Univ. of Oslo

    2010-01-01

    High-spin states (I?50?) of the odd-odd nucleus 170Ta have been investigated with the 124Sn(51V,5n) reaction. The resolving power of Gammasphere has allowed for the observation of eleven rotational bands (eight of which are new) and over 430 transitions ( 350 of which are new) in this nucleus. Many interband transitions have been observed such that the relative spins and excitation energies of the 11 bands have been established. This is an unusual circumstance in an odd-odd study. Configurations have been assigned to most of these bands based upon features such as alignment properties, band crossings, B(M1)/B(E2) ratios, and the additivity of Routhians. A systematic study of the frequency at which normal signature ordering occurs in the ?h9/2?i13/2 band has been performed and it is found that its trend is opposite to that observed in the ?h11/2?i13/2 bands. A possible interpretation of these trends is discussed based on a proton-neutron interaction.

  14. Topology Explains Why Automobile Sunshades Fold Oddly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feist, Curtis; Naimi, Ramin

    2009-01-01

    Automobile sunshades always fold into an "odd" number of loops. The explanation why involves elementary topology (braid theory and linking number, both explained in detail here with definitions and examples), and an elementary fact from algebra about symmetric group.

  15. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) during the early months of treatment in rural Zambia: influence of demographic characteristics and social surroundings of patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Around 70% of those living with HIV in need of treatment accessed antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Zambia by 2009. However, sustaining high levels of adherence to ART is a challenge. This study aimed to identify the predictive factors associated with ART adherence during the early months of treatment in rural Zambia. Methods This is a field based observational longitudinal study in Mumbwa district, which is located 150 km west of Lusaka, the capital of Zambia. Treatment naive patients aged over 15 years, who initiated treatment during September-November 2010, were enrolled. Patients were interviewed at the initiation and six weeks later. The treatment adherence was measured according to self-reporting by the patients. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to identify the predictive factors associated with the adherence. Results Of 157 patients, 59.9% were fully adherent to the treatment six weeks after starting ART. According to the multivariable analysis, full adherence was associated with being female [Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR), 3.3; 95% Confidence interval (CI), 1.2-8.9], having a spouse who were also on ART (AOR, 4.4; 95% CI, 1.5-13.1), and experience of food insufficiency in the previous 30 days (AOR, 5.0; 95% CI, 1.8-13.8). Some of the most common reasons for missed doses were long distance to health facilities (n = 21, 53.8%), food insufficiency (n = 20, 51.3%), and being busy with other activities such as work (n = 15, 38.5%). Conclusions The treatment adherence continues to be a significant challenge in rural Zambia. Social supports from spouses and people on ART could facilitate their treatment adherence. This is likely to require attention by ART services in the future, focusing on different social influences on male and female in rural Zambia. In addition, poverty reduction strategies may help to reinforce adherence to ART and could mitigate the influence of HIV infection for poor patients and those who fall into poverty after

  16. Reconceptualizing medication adherence: six phases of dynamic adherence.

    PubMed

    Gearing, Robin E; Townsend, Lisa; MacKenzie, Michael; Charach, Alice

    2011-01-01

    Nonadherence is the Achilles' heel of effective psychiatric treatment. It affects the resolution of mental health symptoms and interferes with the assessment of treatment response. The meaning of the term adherence has evolved over time and is now associated with a variety of definitions and measurement methods. The result has been a poorly operationalized and nonstandardized term that is often interpreted differently by providers and patients. Drawing extensively from the literature, this article aims to (1) describe changes in the concept of adherence, drawing from the mental health treatment literature, (2) present a more comprehensive definition of adherence that recognizes the role of patient-provider transactions, (3) introduce dynamic adherence, a six-phase model, which incorporates the role of transactional processes and other factors that influence patients' adherence decisions, and (4) provide recommendations for providers to improve adherence as well as their relationships with patients. PMID:21790266

  17. Effects of Telephone Counseling Intervention by Pharmacists (TelCIP) on Medication Adherence; Results of a Cluster Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kooij, Marcel J.; Heerdink, Eibert R.; van Dijk, Liset; van Geffen, Erica C. G.; Belitser, Svetlana V.; Bouvy, Marcel L.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the effect of a pharmacist telephone counseling intervention on patients' medication adherence. Design: Pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial. Setting: 53 Community pharmacies in The Netherlands. Participants: Patients ≥18 years initiating treatment with antidepressants, bisphosphonates, Renin-Angiotensin System (RAS)-inhibitors, or statins (lipid lowering drugs). Pharmacies in arm A provided the intervention for antidepressants and bisphosphonates and usual care for RAS-inhibitors and statins. Pharmacies in arm B provided the intervention for RAS-inhibitors and statins and usual care for antidepressants and bisphosphonates. Intervention: Intervention consisted of a telephone counseling intervention 7–21 days after the start of therapy. Counseling included assessment of practical and perceptual barriers and provision of information and motivation. Main outcome measure: Primary outcome was refill adherence measured over 1 year expressed as continuous outcome and dichotomous (refill rate≥80%). Secondary outcome was discontinuation within 1 year. Results: In the control arms 3627 patients were eligible and in the intervention arms 3094 patients. Of the latter, 1054 patients (34%) received the intervention. Intention to treat analysis showed no difference in adherence rates between the intervention and the usual care arm (74.7%, SD 37.5 respectively 74.5%, 37.9). More patients starting with RAS-inhibitors had a refill ratio ≥80% in the intervention arm compared to usual care (81.4 vs. 74.9% with odds ratio (OR) 1.43, 95%CI 1.11–1.99). Comparing patients with counseling to patients with usual care (per protocol analysis), adherence was statistically significant higher for patients starting with RAS-inhibitors, statins and bisphosphonates. Patients initiating antidepressants did not benefit from the intervention. Conclusions: Telephone counseling at start of therapy improved adherence in patients initiating RAS-inhibitors. The per

  18. Materials Adherence Experiment: Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, P.P.; Landis, G.A.; Oberle, L.G.

    1997-12-31

    NASA`s Mars Pathfinder mission, launched December 4, 1996, reflects a new philosophy of exploiting new technologies to reduce mission cost and accelerate the pace of space exploration. Pathfinder will demonstrate a variety of new technologies aimed at reducing the cost of Mars exploration. Chief among these will be the demonstration of a solar-powered spacecraft on the surface of Mars. The Materials Adherence Experiment on Pathfinder was designed to measure the degradation of solar arrays due to dust settling out of the atmosphere and blocking light to the solar array, lowering the array power output.

  19. Depression in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes: associations with hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, and poor treatment adherence

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuying; Ting, Rose ZW; Yang, Wenying; Jia, Weiping; Li, Wenhui; Ji, Linong; Guo, Xiaohui; Kong, Alice PS; Wing, Yun‐Kwok; Luk, Andrea OY; Sartorius, Norman; Morisky, Donald E; Oldenburg, Brian; Weng, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background We hypothesize that depression in type 2 diabetes might be associated with poor glycemic control, in part due to suboptimal self‐care. We tested this hypothesis by examining the associations of depression with clinical and laboratory findings in a multicenter survey of Chinese type 2 diabetic patients. Method 2538 patients aged 18–75 years attending hospital‐based clinics in four cities in China underwent detailed clinical‐psychological‐behavioral assessment during a 12‐month period between 2011 and 2012. Depression was diagnosed if Patient Health Questionnaire‐9 (PHQ‐9) score ≥10. Diabetes self‐care and medication adherence were assessed using the Summary of Diabetes Self‐care Activities and the 4‐item Morisky medication adherence scale respectively. Results In this cross‐sectional study (mean age: 56.4 ± 10.5[SD] years, 53% men), 6.1% (n = 155) had depression. After controlling for study sites, patients with depression had higher HbA 1c (7.9 ± 2.0 vs. 7.7 ± 2.0%, P = 0.008) and were less likely to achieve HbA 1c goal of <7.0% (36.2% vs 45.6%, P = 0.004) than those without depression. They were more likely to report hypoglycemia and to have fewer days of being adherent to their recommended diet, exercise, foot care and medication. In logistic regression, apart from young age, poor education, long disease duration, tobacco use, high body mass index, use of insulin, depression was independently associated with failure to attain HbA 1c target (Odds Ratio [OR] = 1.56, 95%CI:1.05–2.32, P = 0.028). The association between depression and glycemic control became non‐significant after inclusion of adherence to diet, exercise and medication (OR = 1.48, 95% CI 0.99–2.21, P = 0.058). Conclusion Depression in type 2 diabetes was closely associated with hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia, which might be partly mediated through poor treatment adherence. PMID:25349949

  20. Even-odd staggering of the spectroscopic factor as new evidence for α clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delion, D. S.; Dumitrescu, A.; Baran, V. V.

    2016-04-01

    We evidence a staggering effect of the experimental spectroscopic factors corresponding to even-even and odd-mass (odd-mass and odd-odd) α emitters. The comparison to the theoretical estimate within the standard Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) approach reveals a similar staggering, but with a different behavior. It turns out that the ratio between corresponding experimental and theoretical spectroscopic factors is proportional to the experimental reduced decay width. A similar dependence was found in a previous work between the strength of the quadrupole-quadrupole α -core interaction, describing the α -decay fine structure and the reduced width. Thus, the even-odd staggering effect in the spectroscopic factor is a new evidence of the α -clustering phenomenon in medium and heavy nuclei.

  1. Mental health in hypertension: assessing symptoms of anxiety, depression and stress on anti-hypertensive medication adherence

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with chronic conditions like hypertension may experience many negative emotions which increase their risk for the development of mental health disorders particularly anxiety and depression. For Ghanaian patients with hypertension, the interaction between hypertension and symptoms of anxiety, depression and stress remains largely unexplored. To fill this knowledge gap, the study sought to ascertain the prevalence and role of these negative emotions on anti-hypertensive medication adherence while taking into account patients’ belief systems. Methods The hospital-based cross-sectional study involving 400 hypertensive patients was conducted in two tertiary hospitals in Ghana. Data were gathered on patient’s socio-demographic characteristics, anxiety, depression and stress symptoms, spiritual beliefs, and medication adherence. Results Hypertensive patients experienced symptoms of anxiety (56%), stress (20%) and depression (4%). As a coping mechanism, a significant relation was observed between spiritual beliefs and anxiety (x2 = 13.352, p = 0.010), depression (x2 = 6.205, p = 0.045) and stress (x2 = 14.833, p = 0.001). Stress among patients increased their likelihood of medication non-adherence [odds ratio (OR) = 2.42 (95% CI 1.06 – 5.5), p = 0.035]. Conclusion The study has demonstrated the need for clinicians to pay attention to negative emotions and their role in medication non-adherence. The recommendation is that attention should be directed toward the use of spirituality as a possible mechanism by which negative emotions could be managed among hypertensive patients. PMID:24987456

  2. A Longitudinal Study of Adherence to the Mediterranean Dietary Pattern and Metabolic Syndrome in a Non-Mediterranean Population

    PubMed Central

    Mirmiran, Parvin; Moslehi, Nazanin; Mahmoudof, Hessameddin; Sadeghi, Mahbubeh; Azizi, Fereidoun

    2015-01-01

    Background: Adherence to the Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) has been proposed to reduce the risk of metabolic syndrome (MetS), but the association of the diet on MetS in non-Mediterranean populations remains unclear. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate whether adherence to the MedDiet is related to the incident MetS and its components during a 3-year follow-up among Iranian adults. Patients and Methods: Longitudinal associations between the MedDiet and MetS components were investigated on 2241 adults, aged 18 - 74 years, without type 2 diabetes selected from participants of the Tehran lipid and glucose study (TLGS). The association between the MedDiet and MetS incidence was also examined in 1661 participants, free of Mets at baseline. Adherence to the MedDiet was assessed using the traditional Mediterranean diet score (MDS) and a recently posteriori adaptation of the MDS of Sofi et al. (Sofi-MDS). MetS was defined according to the recent interim consensus. Results: After adjusting for potential confounders, neither higher MDS nor higher Sofi-MDS were significantly associated with the mean values of MetS components and the risk of metabolic abnormalities incidence after 3 years follow-up. During the 3 years of follow-up, 246 developed MetS were identified. In multivariable model, the adjusted odds ratio (OR) of developing MetS did not differ significantly in participants with the highest tertile of the MDS (OR (95% CI): 0.88 (0.62 - 1.23)) or sofi-MDS (OR (95% CI):1.12 (0.77 - 1.62)) compared to those in the lowest tertiles. Conclusions: Adherence to the MedDiet, according to MDS and Sofi-MDS, may not predict MetS components and MetS incidence after 3 years of follow-up in Iranian adult populations. PMID:26425127

  3. Aggregate versus day level association between methamphetamine use and HIV medication non-adherence among gay and bisexual men

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Jeffrey T.; Kowalczyk, William; Botsko, Michael; Tomassilli, Julia; Golub, Sarit A.

    2013-01-01

    Methamphetamine use is associated with HIV infection, especially among gay and bisexual men. Methamphetamine use contributes to disease progression both directly, by increasing viral load and damaging the immune system, and indirectly, by decreasing medication adherence. Research examining the association of methamphetamine use and non-adherence has traditionally compared groups of users and nonusers on adherence, compared methamphetamine use between participants above or below some threshold level of adherence (e.g. >90% dose adherence), or examined aggregate relationships. Using Timeline Follow-back procedures, the present study examined aggregate, threshold, and day-level associations of methamphetamine use with non-adherence in 210 HIV-positive gay and bisexual methamphetamine-using men. Methamphetamine use was not associated with adherence behavior at the aggregate-level, but methamphetamine use on a given day was associated with 2.3 times the odds of non-adherence on that day. Threshold results were equivocal. These data suggest that the methamphetamine and non-adherence relationship is complicated: non-adherence is more likely to occur on days in which methamphetamine is used, but participants reported more non-adherence days in which methamphetamine was not used. This seeming paradox generates questions about the selection of analytical techniques and has important implications for behavioral interventions targeting substance use and adherence among HIV-positive individuals. PMID:23553345

  4. Odd-frequency Superconductivity in Driven Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triola, Christopher; Balatsky, Alexander

    We show that Berezinskii's classification of the symmetries of Cooper pair amplitudes in terms of parity under transformations that invert spin, space, time, and orbital degrees of freedom holds for driven systems even in the absence of translation invariance. We then discuss the conditions under which pair amplitudes which are odd in frequency can emerge in driven systems. Considering a model Hamiltonian for a superconductor coupled to an external driving potential, we investigate the influence of the drive on the anomalous Green's function, density of states, and spectral function. We find that the anomalous Green's function develops odd in frequency component in the presence of an external drive. Furthermore we investigate how these odd-frequency terms are related to satellite features in the density of states and spectral function. Supported by US DOE BES E 304.

  5. Association between adherence, treatment satisfaction and illness perception in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Saarti, S; Hajj, A; Karam, L; Jabbour, H; Sarkis, A; El Osta, N; Rabbaa Khabbaz, L

    2016-05-01

    The relationship between adherence to antihypertension medications, treatment satisfaction and illness perception has not been studied so far. The primary objective of this study was to examine the association between adherence to medication, treatment satisfaction and illness perception in Lebanese hypertensive patients. The relation between medication adherence and blood pressure (BP) control was also assessed. In this cross-sectional study, patients were recruited from the physician's practice offices and community pharmacies in Beirut. Patients who had been treated for hypertension for at least 3 months were invited to participate in the study; they completed three questionnaires: the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8), the Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire for Medication (TSQM-4) and the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire (BIPQ). BP was also measured and recorded. A total of 117 subjects were included, of whom 29.1% had poor adherence to their antihypertension treatment (MMAS-8 scores<6). The odds of having well-controlled hypertension was 3.5 times higher in patients with high adherence compared with patients with poor adherence (P=0.010). Treatment satisfaction was significantly greater in patients with good adherence (P<0.001). Neither socio-demographic, disease- nor drug-related characteristics of the participants were significantly associated with medication adherence. As for illness perception, even though the mean BIPQ score of adherent participants was lower than the mean score of non-adherent participants, this difference did not reach statistical significance. In conclusion, treatment satisfaction was found to be a predictor of adherence. Studies are needed to determine whether interventions to increase satisfaction can improve adherence and BP control. PMID:26310182

  6. Determinants of medication adherence among adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus in three Malaysian public health clinics: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Chew, Boon-How; Hassan, Noor-Hasliza; Sherina, Mohd-Sidik

    2015-01-01

    Medication adherence (MA) in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) is associated with improved disease control (glycated hemoglobin, blood pressure, and lipid profile), lower rates of death and diabetes-related complications, increased quality of life, and decreased health care resource utilization. However, there is a paucity of data on the effect of diabetes-related distress, depression, and health-related quality of life on MA. This study examined factors associated with MA in adults with T2D at the primary care level. This was a cross-sectional study conducted in three Malaysian public health clinics, where adults with T2D were recruited consecutively in 2013. We used the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) to assess MA as the main dependent variable. In addition to sociodemographic data, we included diabetes-related distress, depressive symptoms, and health-related quality of life as independent variables. Independent association between the MMAS-8 score and its determinants was done using generalized linear models with a gamma distribution and log link function. The participant response rate was 93.1% (700/752). The majority were female (52.8%), Malay (52.9%), and married (79.1%). About 43% of patients were classified as showing low MA (MMAS-8 score <6). Higher income (adjusted odds ratio 0.90) and depressive symptoms (adjusted odds ratio 0.99) were significant independent determinants of medication non-adherence in young adults with T2D. Low MA in adults with T2D is a prevalent problem. Thus, primary health care providers in public health clinics should focus on MA counselling for adult T2D patients who are younger, have a higher income, and symptoms of depression. PMID:25999699

  7. Tilted excitation implies odd periodic resonances.

    PubMed

    Depetri, G I; Sartorelli, J C; Marin, B; Baptista, M S

    2016-07-01

    Our aim is to unveil how resonances of parametric systems are affected when symmetry is broken. We showed numerically and experimentally that odd resonances indeed come about when the pendulum is excited along a tilted direction. Applying the Melnikov subharmonic function, we not only determined analytically the loci of saddle-node bifurcations delimiting resonance regions in parameter space but also explained these observations by demonstrating that, under the Melnikov method point of view, odd resonances arise due to an extra torque that appears in the asymmetric case. PMID:27575118

  8. Tilted excitation implies odd periodic resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depetri, G. I.; Sartorelli, J. C.; Marin, B.; Baptista, M. S.

    2016-07-01

    Our aim is to unveil how resonances of parametric systems are affected when symmetry is broken. We showed numerically and experimentally that odd resonances indeed come about when the pendulum is excited along a tilted direction. Applying the Melnikov subharmonic function, we not only determined analytically the loci of saddle-node bifurcations delimiting resonance regions in parameter space but also explained these observations by demonstrating that, under the Melnikov method point of view, odd resonances arise due to an extra torque that appears in the asymmetric case.

  9. [Adherence to psychopharmacological treatment: Psychotherapeutic strategies to enhance adherence].

    PubMed

    Lencer, R; Korn, D

    2015-05-01

    Effective psychopharmacological medication with good tolerability represents the cornerstone of treatment for severe mental illness; however, the 1-year adherence rates are only approximately 50%. The term adherence emphasizes the collaborative responsibility of the clinician and the patient for a positive treatment outcome. Reasons for non-adherence are manifold and include patient-specific factors, such as self-stigmatization, lack of social and familial support, cognitive impairment and substance use besides insufficient effectiveness and the occurrence of side effects of the psychotropic drugs. To enhance adherence, both clinician and patient have to fully understand all the reasons for and against adherence to medication before a collaborative decision is made on future long-term treatment. A positive attitude towards medication critically depends on whether patients feel that the medication supports the attainment of the individual goals. PMID:25903501

  10. Experimental level-structure determination in odd-odd actinide nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Hoff, R.W.

    1985-04-04

    The status of experimental determination of level structure in odd-odd actinide nuclei is reviewed. A technique for modeling quasiparticle excitation energies and rotational parameters in odd-odd deformed nuclei is applied to actinide species where new experimental data have been obtained by use of neutron-capture gamma-ray spectroscopy. The input parameters required for the calculation are derived from empirical data on single-particle excitations in neighboring odd-mass nuclei. Calculated configuration-specific values for the Gallagher-Moszkowski splittings are used. Calculated and experimental level structures for /sup 238/Np, /sup 244/Am, and /sup 250/Bk are compared, as well as those for several nuclei in the rare-earth region. The agreement for the actinide species is excellent, with bandhead energies deviating 22 keV and rotational parameters 5%, on the average. Applications of this modeling technique are discussed.

  11. Adherence Barriers to Chronic Dialysis in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Thadhani, Ravi I.; Maddux, Franklin W.

    2014-01-01

    Hemodialysis patients often do not attend their scheduled treatment session. We investigated factors associated with missed appointments and whether such nonadherence poses significant harm to patients and increases overall health care utilization in an observational analysis of 44 million hemodialysis treatments for 182,536 patients with ESRD in the United States. We assessed the risk of hospitalization, emergency room visit, or intensive-coronary care unit (ICU-CCU) admission in the 2 days after a missed treatment relative to the risk for patients who received hemodialysis. Over the 5-year study period, the average missed treatment rate was 7.1 days per patient-year. In covariate adjusted logistic regression, the risk of hospitalization (odds ratio [OR], 3.98; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 3.93 to 4.04), emergency room visit (OR, 2.00; 95% CI, 1.87 to 2.14), or ICU-CCU admission (OR, 3.89; 95% CI, 3.81 to 3.96) increased significantly after a missed treatment. Overall, 0.9 missed treatment days per year associated with suboptimal transportation to dialysis, inclement weather, holidays, psychiatric illness, pain, and gastrointestinal upset. These barriers also associated with excess hospitalization (5.6 more events per patient-year), emergency room visits (1.1 more visits), and ICU-CCU admissions (0.8 more admissions). In conclusion, poor adherence to hemodialysis treatments may be a substantial roadblock to achieving better patient outcomes. Addressing systemic and patient barriers that impede access to hemodialysis care may decrease missed appointments and reduce patient morbidity. PMID:24762400

  12. The Alleged Oddness of Ethical Egoism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marietta, Don E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    There are some critics of ethical egoism who treat it seriously as an ethical doctrine, but consider it an odd approach. Examines this doctrine and suggests that if we are to have the benefit of egoism as a sound ethical approach, or rightly assess its inadequacies, we must first see it fairly. (Author/RK)

  13. Odd numbers of photons and teleportation

    SciTech Connect

    Enk, S.J. van

    2003-02-01

    Several teleportation protocols, namely those using entangled coherent states, entangled squeezed states, and the single-photon Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen state, are all shown to be particular instances of a more general scheme that relies on the detection of an odd number of photons.

  14. Odd-Man-Out and Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diascro, Matthew N.; Brody, Nathan

    1994-01-01

    The relationship between odd-man-out reaction time tasks and intelligence was examined in 2 experiments involving 79 college students. The two experiments indicate that tasks that assess the ability to perceive relationships among stimuli rapidly are good measures of general intelligence. (SLD)

  15. Confusion between Odds and Probability, a Pandemic?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulton, Lawrence V.; Mendez, Francis A.; Bastian, Nathaniel D.; Musal, R. Muzaffer

    2012-01-01

    This manuscript discusses the common confusion between the terms probability and odds. To emphasize the importance and responsibility of being meticulous in the dissemination of information and knowledge, this manuscript reveals five cases of sources of inaccurate statistical language imbedded in the dissemination of information to the general…

  16. Improved adherence with contingency management.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Marc I; Dieckhaus, Kevin; McMahon, Thomas J; Valdes, Barbara; Petry, Nancy M; Cramer, Joyce; Rounsaville, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    Contingency management (CM) based interventions that reinforce adherence to prescribed medications have shown promise in a variety of disadvantaged populations. Fifty-six participants with histories of illicit substance use who were prescribed antiretroviral medication but evidenced suboptimal adherence during a baseline assessment were randomly assigned to 16 weeks of weekly CM-based counseling or supportive counseling, followed by 16 additional weeks of data collection and adherence feedback to providers. The CM intervention involved review of data generated by electronic pill-bottle caps that record bottle opening (MEMS) and brief substance abuse counseling. CM participants were reinforced for MEMS-measured adherence with drawings from a bowl for prizes and bonus drawings for consecutive weeks of perfect adherence. Potential total earnings averaged $800. Mean MEMS-measured adherence to the reinforced medication increased from 61% at baseline to 76% during the 16-week treatment phase and was significantly increased relative to the supportive counseling group (p = 0.01). Furthermore, mean log-transformed viral load was significantly lower in the CM group. However, by the end of the 16-week follow-up phase, differences between groups in adherence and viral load were no longer significantly different. Proportions of positive urine toxicology tests did not differ significantly between the two groups at any phase. A brief CM-based intervention was associated with significantly higher adherence and lower viral loads. Future studies should evaluate methods to extend effects for longer term benefits. PMID:17263651

  17. Optimizing adherence to antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sahay, Seema; Reddy, K. Srikanth; Dhayarkar, Sampada

    2011-01-01

    HIV has now become a manageable chronic disease. However, the treatment outcomes may get hampered by suboptimal adherence to ART. Adherence optimization is a concrete reality in the wake of ‘universal access’ and it is imperative to learn lessons from various studies and programmes. This review examines current literature on ART scale up, treatment outcomes of the large scale programmes and the role of adherence therein. Social, behavioural, biological and programme related factors arise in the context of ART adherence optimization. While emphasis is laid on adherence, retention of patients under the care umbrella emerges as a major challenge. An in-depth understanding of patients’ health seeking behaviour and health care delivery system may be useful in improving adherence and retention of patients in care continuum and programme. A theoretical framework to address the barriers and facilitators has been articulated to identify problematic areas in order to intervene with specific strategies. Empirically tested objective adherence measurement tools and approaches to assess adherence in clinical/ programme settings are required. Strengthening of ART programmes would include appropriate policies for manpower and task sharing, integrating traditional health sector, innovations in counselling and community support. Implications for the use of theoretical model to guide research, clinical practice, community involvement and policy as part of a human rights approach to HIV disease is suggested. PMID:22310817

  18. [Treatment adherence: a key element].

    PubMed

    Bastida, Guillermo; Sánchez Montes, Cristina; Aguas, Mariam

    2011-12-01

    A substantial percentage of patients fail to follow health professionals' recommendations, which affects the management of chronic diseases, reducing the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions and increasing the costs of the disease. Lack of adherence is a multidimensional phenomenon and is influenced by numerous factors that should be identified. A multiplicity of measures is available to improve adherence, such as simplifying treatment administration, but none of these measures is effective when used alone. One way of tackling lack of adherence is by identifying patients' barriers to medication and involving them in decision making. Ulcerative colitis (UC) poses a risk for lack of treatment adherence. In this disease, poor adherence correlates with poor disease control (drug effectiveness) and with higher costs. As in other chronic diseases, the causes associated with poor adherence are multiple, including psychosocial factors, the physician-patient relationship and patients' prejudices toward medication. A single dose of aminosalycylates (5-ASA) should be recommended, as this dose is as safe and effective as other regimens. However, by itself, this recommendation does not seem to improve adherence. Identifying the scale of the problem and developing strategies to involve the patient in decision making is crucial to improve treatment adherence. PMID:25443221

  19. Biologic Influences on Exercise Adherence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dishman, Rod K.

    1981-01-01

    Diagnostic profiles of 362 male participants in an exercise program were analyzed to determine the biological variables between exercise adherence and symptoms of coronary disease. Findings indicated that individuals with lower metabolic capacity tended to adhere longer, to be less fit, were leaner, and began with more symptoms related to coronary…

  20. Adherence to a Mediterranean diet in Morocco and its correlates: cross-sectional analysis of a sample of the adult Moroccan population

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Dietary habits in Morocco are changing and the causes are not well understood. This study aimed to analyse socio-demographic factors associated with adherence to the Mediterranean diet (MeDi) in a national random sample of the adult Moroccan population. Methods The data collected in this cross-sectional survey included socio-demographic factors and a food frequency questionnaire. MeDi adherence was assessed in 2214 individuals with complete dietary data. MeDi adherence was measured according to a simplified MeDi score based on the weekly frequency of intake of eight food groups (vegetables, legumes, fruits, cereal or potatoes, fish, red meat, dairy products and olive oil) with the use of the sex specific medians of the sample as cut-offs. A value of 0 or 1 was assigned to consumption of each component according to its presumed detrimental or beneficial effect on health. Logistic regression was used to estimate the association between MeDi adherence (low score 1-4 vs. high 5-8) and other factors. Results Mean age of the sample was 41.4 (standard deviation 15.3) years, 45.4% were men and 29.9% had a low MeDi adherence. Married subjects (adjusted odds ratio ORa=0.68, 95% CI 0.55-0.84) were less likely to have a low MeDi adherence compared to single, divorced or widowed persons. Persons from rural areas (ORa=1.46, 95% CI: 1.02-2.08), were more often low MeDi adherents compared to those from urban areas. Obese persons (ORa=1.56, 95% CI: 1.16-2.11) were more prone to low MeDi adherence than normal weight individuals. Conclusion MeDi is far from being a universal pattern in the Moroccan population. Intervention strategies should be implemented in target groups to maintain the traditional MeDi pattern considered as the original diet in Morocco. PMID:22578133

  1. Medication Adherence and Blood Pressure Control Among Hypertensive Patients With Coexisting Long-Term Conditions in Primary Care Settings

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu Ting; Wang, Harry H.X.; Liu, Kirin Q.L.; Lee, Gabrielle K.Y.; Chan, Wai Man; Griffiths, Sian M.; Chen, Ruo Ling

    2016-01-01

    (adjusted odds ratio 2.07, 95% CI 1.70–2.53, P < 0.001). Diabetes was the most prevalent concomitant long-term condition among hypertensive patients with poor BP control (38.6%, 95% CI 35.8–41.4 vs 19.7%, 95% CI 17.5–21.9 for patients with good BP control, P < 0.001). Multimorbidity was common among hypertensive patients, and was associated with poor BP control. Subjects with coexisting diabetes, heart disease, or chronic kidney disorder should receive more clinical attention to achieve better clinical outcomes. PMID:27196458

  2. Comparison of Adherence to Guideline-Based Cholesterol Treatment Goals in Men Versus Women.

    PubMed

    Schoen, Martin W; Tabak, Rachel G; Salas, Joanne; Scherrer, Jeffrey F; Buckhold, Fred R

    2016-01-01

    Studies show women do not receive aggressive cardiovascular interventions and may not be given guideline-based treatment to reduce cardiac events. We describe cholesterol treatment in an academic practice of family and internal medicine physicians to understand factors associated with achievement of guideline-based treatment goals in women compared with men. Primary care patients aged 40 to 75 years were included if they were prescribed a statin, had a Framingham risk score of ≥ 10%, had diabetes, or had atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Patients were classified into Adult Treatment Panel III categories and assessed to whether they were in compliance with Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines. Odds ratios of goal adherence between women and men were calculated, and a multivariate model for goal achievement was created. In 2,747 patients, women were less likely to achieve cholesterol goals (odds ratio [OR] 0.82; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.70 to 0.95) despite having more prescriptions for statins (48% vs 39%, p <0.001). More women than men failed to reach low-density lipoprotein goals because they were not prescribed a statin (OR 0.69; 95% CI 0.56 to 0.85) and women on high-intensity statins were less likely than men to achieve goals (OR 0.51; 95% CI 0.27 to 0.96). In all patients, diabetes was associated with nonattainment of cholesterol goals, but in high-risk women, the presence of diabetes improved goal achievement. In conclusion, women achieved guideline-based cholesterol recommendations at a lower rate than men, even when individual goals are considered. PMID:26589821

  3. Clustering based on adherence data

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Adherence to a medical treatment means the extent to which a patient follows the instructions or recommendations by health professionals. There are direct and indirect ways to measure adherence which have been used for clinical management and research. Typically adherence measures are monitored over a long follow-up or treatment period, and some measurements may be missing due to death or other reasons. A natural question then is how to describe adherence behavior over the whole period in a simple way. In the literature, measurements over a period are usually combined just by using averages like percentages of compliant days or percentages of doses taken. In the paper we adapt an approach where patient adherence measures are seen as a stochastic process. Repeated measures are then analyzed as a Markov chain with finite number of states rather than as independent and identically distributed observations, and the transition probabilities between the states are assumed to fully describe the behavior of a patient. The patients can then be clustered or classified using their estimated transition probabilities. These natural clusters can be used to describe the adherence of the patients, to find predictors for adherence, and to predict the future events. The new approach is illustrated and shown to be useful with a simple analysis of a data set from the DART (Development of AntiRetroviral Therapy in Africa) trial in Uganda and Zimbabwe. PMID:21385451

  4. Latino High School Graduation. Defying the Odds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romo, Harriett D.; Falbo, Toni

    This book describes how "at-risk" Hispanic youth defy the odds and stay in school to earn a high school diploma. Information about success is needed because Hispanic youth drop out at about twice the rate of non-Hispanic Whites. The discussion is based on the results of a 4-year longitudinal study of 100 Hispanic youth labeled at-risk by their…

  5. Stratospheric distributions of odd nitrogen and odd hydrogen in a two-dimensional model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinn, R. G.; Alyea, F. N.; Cunnold, D. M.

    1975-01-01

    A two-dimensional pole-to-pole chemical model of the stratosphere is developed which extends from 8 to 38 km in altitude. Atmospheric motions are simulated by mean vertical and meridional winds and eddy diffusion coefficients. Seasonally averaged distributions of important odd nitrogen (NO, NO2, and HNO3) and odd hydrogen (H, OH, HO2, H2O2) compounds are computed. Photodissociation of N2O leads to production of odd nitrogen in the stratosphere, and the odd nitrogen is ultimately removed by downward transport into the troposphere and by rain-out (modeled by a rain-out lifetime of 30 days below 8-km altitude). Results are presented for a quasi-steady state in which seasonal cycles repeat themselves. These results show significant latitudinal as well as vertical variations in the predicted species which emphasize the need for at least two dimensions in accurate stratospheric modeling. Computed concentrations are compared with observations when they exist.

  6. Adherence and rehospitalizations in patients with schizophrenia: evidence from Japanese claims data

    PubMed Central

    Kuwabara, Hiroyo; Saito, Yoshimichi; Mahlich, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to analyze if there is a relationship between adherence to antipsychotic medication and rehospitalization for patients diagnosed with schizophrenia in Japan. Methods Based on Japanese claims data, we constructed three patient groups based on their medication possession ratio (MPR). Controlling for potential confounders, a Cox proportional hazard model was employed to assess if medication adherence affects the risk of rehospitalization. Results Patients with good adherence (MPRs from 0.8–1.1) had the lowest rates of admission. Both poor adherence (MPRs <0.8) and overadherence (MPRs >1.1) were associated with a significant higher risk of rehospitalization with hazard ratios of 4.7 and 2.0, respectively. Conclusion The results of this study support the notion that good adherence to antipsychotic medication reduces the risk of rehospitalization of schizophrenia patients. Appropriate measures should be taken to improve adherence of schizophrenia patients. PMID:25897229

  7. Odd top partners at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anandakrishnan, Archana; Collins, Jack H.; Farina, Marco; Kuflik, Eric; Perelstein, Maxim

    2016-04-01

    LHC searches for fermionic top partners T focus on three decay topologies: T →b W , T →t Z , and T →t h . However, top partners may carry new conserved quantum numbers that forbid these decays. The simplest possibility is a conserved parity, under which the top partner is odd and all SM states are even. In this case, decays of top partners may involve new particle-odd scalars, leading to signal topologies more commonly associated with supersymmetry, either with or without R -parity conservation. We study a simplified model in which this possibility is realized, and estimate the bounds on the top partner mass in this model implied by LHC searches for supersymmetry. We find that the bounds can be significantly weaker than in the conventional top partner decay scenario. For example, if the new parity is exact, a 500 GeV top partner is allowed as long as the lightest parity-odd scalar mass is between 325 and 500 GeV. The lower allowed top partner mass reduces the need for fine-tuning in the Higgs mass parameter, compared to the conventional decay scenario. We also present an explicit model, the oddest little Higgs, which exhibits this phenomenology.

  8. Study of Even-Even/Odd-Even/Odd-Odd Nuclei in Zn-Ga-Ge Region in the Proton-Neutron IBM/IBFM/IBFFM

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, N.; Brant, S.; Zuffi, L.

    2009-08-26

    We study the even-even, odd-even and odd-odd nuclei in the region including Zn-Ga-Ge in the proton-neutron IBM and the models derived from it: IBM2, IBFM2, IBFFM2. We describe {sup 67}Ga, {sup 65}Zn, and {sup 68}Ga by coupling odd particles to a boson core {sup 66}Zn. We also calculate the beta{sup +}-decay rates among {sup 68}Ge, {sup 68}Ga and {sup 68}Zn.

  9. Is Inconsistent Pre-treatment Bedtime Related to CPAP Non-Adherence?

    PubMed Central

    Sawyer, Amy M.; King, Tonya S.; Sawyer, Douglas A.; Rizzo, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Lack of adherence to continuous positive airway pressure therapy (CPAP) limits the effectiveness of treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We hypothesized that an irregular bedtime would be negatively related to regular use of CPAP treatment. If so, modifying bedtime schedule may address the persistent problem of inconsistent CPAP use in adults with OSA. In a prospective longitudinal study, we examined whether inconsistent self-reported bedtime before initiation of CPAP treatment, operationalized as bedtime variability, was (1) different among those adherent (≥ 4 hours per night) and non-adherent to CPAP treatment at one week and one month; and/or (2) was related to one-week and one-month CPAP use when other variables were accounted for. Consecutively-recruited newly-diagnosed OSA adults (N=79) completed sleep diaries prior to CPAP treatment. One-week and one-month objective CPAP use data were collected. Pre-treatment bedtime variability was different among CPAP non-adherers and adherers at one month and was a significant predictor of non-adherence at one month in multivariate analyses. The odds of one-month CPAP non-adherence were 3.5 times greater in those whose pre-treatment bedtimes varied by >75 minutes. Addressing sleep schedule prior to CPAP initiation may be an opportunity to improve CPAP adherence. PMID:25353159

  10. Adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy in Hyderabad, India: barriers, facilitators and identification of target groups.

    PubMed

    Dworkin, Mark S; Douglas, G W; Sabitha Rani, G P; Chakraborty, Apurba

    2016-03-01

    We assessed the barriers and facilitators to highly active antiretroviral therapy adherence and determined their prevalence among HIV/AIDS patients in Hyderabad, India. We conducted a cross-sectional study among HIV-infected adults prescribed highly active antiretroviral therapy and receiving care from nine clinics. Depression was screened using Patient Health Questionnaire 9 and facilitators of HIV medication adherence were assessed using an 11-item scale which yielded a total positive attitude to disease score. Prevalence ratios of non-adherence between different categories of potential risk factors were calculated. We compared mean 'facilitators to adherence' scores between the adherent and non-adherent population. Multivariable Poisson regression with robust variance was used to identify independent risk factors. Among the 211 respondents, nearly 20% were non-adherent, approximately 8% had either moderately severe or severe depression and mean score for combined facilitators to medication adherence was 33.35 (±7.88) out of a possible 44 points. Factors significantly associated with non-adherence included older age, female sex worker, moderate-to-severe depression and the combined facilitators to medication adherence score. These data from a broad range of clinical settings in Hyderabad reveal that key groups to focus on for adherence intervention are female sex workers, older persons and those with depression. PMID:25801316

  11. Adherence in outpatients taking warfarin and its effect on anticoagulation control in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Ababneh, Mera A; Al-Azzam, Sayer I; Alzoubi, Karem H; Rababa'h, Abeer M

    2016-08-01

    Background Medication adherence is an important element for the success of any therapeutic plan. The picture is more complicated with warfarin, due to its small therapeutic window and patients' needs to have effective anticoagulation control. Objective To measure warfarin-adherence, warfarin-knowledge and to assess the relationship between adherence and anticoagulation control. Setting Adult outpatients (≥18 years) taking warfarin at two medical sites in north of Jordan were invited to participate. Method This was a cross sectional study in which survey questionnaire that included demographic, clinical, warfarin related questions and Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) was administered to patients in Arabic language. International normalization ratio (INR) readings were retrieved from patients' medical records. Main outcome measure MMAS-8 adherence scores and time within therapeutic range were calculated. Results More than half of study participants (54 %) were adherent (MMAS-8 = 8). The MMAS-8 adherence scores were significantly associated with warfarin-knowledge scores (Spearman's ρ = 0.291, p = 0.000). Adherent patients were more likely to have good anticoagulation control compared to non-adherent patients (MMAS-8 ≤ 7). Conclusion Adherence to warfarin therapy can have a substantial effect on anticoagulation control. Thus, healthcare practitioners should consider strategies to improve patient adherence to warfarin. PMID:27015937

  12. Medication Adherence Measures: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Wai Yin; Fresco, Paula

    2015-01-01

    WHO reported that adherence among patients with chronic diseases averages only 50% in developed countries. This is recognized as a significant public health issue, since medication nonadherence leads to poor health outcomes and increased healthcare costs. Improving medication adherence is, therefore, crucial and revealed on many studies, suggesting interventions can improve medication adherence. One significant aspect of the strategies to improve medication adherence is to understand its magnitude. However, there is a lack of general guidance for researchers and healthcare professionals to choose the appropriate tools that can explore the extent of medication adherence and the reasons behind this problem in order to orchestrate subsequent interventions. This paper reviews both subjective and objective medication adherence measures, including direct measures, those involving secondary database analysis, electronic medication packaging (EMP) devices, pill count, and clinician assessments and self-report. Subjective measures generally provide explanations for patient's nonadherence whereas objective measures contribute to a more precise record of patient's medication-taking behavior. While choosing a suitable approach, researchers and healthcare professionals should balance the reliability and practicality, especially cost effectiveness, for their purpose. Meanwhile, because a perfect measure does not exist, a multimeasure approach seems to be the best solution currently. PMID:26539470

  13. Medication Adherence Measures: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Lam, Wai Yin; Fresco, Paula

    2015-01-01

    WHO reported that adherence among patients with chronic diseases averages only 50% in developed countries. This is recognized as a significant public health issue, since medication nonadherence leads to poor health outcomes and increased healthcare costs. Improving medication adherence is, therefore, crucial and revealed on many studies, suggesting interventions can improve medication adherence. One significant aspect of the strategies to improve medication adherence is to understand its magnitude. However, there is a lack of general guidance for researchers and healthcare professionals to choose the appropriate tools that can explore the extent of medication adherence and the reasons behind this problem in order to orchestrate subsequent interventions. This paper reviews both subjective and objective medication adherence measures, including direct measures, those involving secondary database analysis, electronic medication packaging (EMP) devices, pill count, and clinician assessments and self-report. Subjective measures generally provide explanations for patient's nonadherence whereas objective measures contribute to a more precise record of patient's medication-taking behavior. While choosing a suitable approach, researchers and healthcare professionals should balance the reliability and practicality, especially cost effectiveness, for their purpose. Meanwhile, because a perfect measure does not exist, a multimeasure approach seems to be the best solution currently. PMID:26539470

  14. Adherence of Helicobacter pylori to primary human gastrointestinal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Clyne, M; Drumm, B

    1993-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori adheres only to gastric cells in vivo. However, the organism adheres to a wide variety of nongastric cells in vitro. In this study, we have used flow cytometry to assess the adherence of H. pylori to primary epithelial cells isolated from gastric, duodenal, and colonic biopsy specimens by collagenase digestion. After incubation of bacteria and cells together and subsequent staining with a two-stage fluorescein isothiocyanate-labelled H. pylori antibody method, cells with adherent bacteria could be easily distinguished from cells without bacteria. Binding to Kato III cells (a gastric adenocarcinoma cell line) was saturable when bacteria and cells were mixed at a ratio of 250:1. Adherence to cells isolated from gastric biopsy specimens was significantly better than adherence to cells isolated from duodenal or colonic biopsy specimens. Almost 70% of gastric cells had bacteria bound, in contrast to 30% of duodenal cells and 32% of colonic cells (P < 0.0001). There was no correlation between expression of hemagglutinins by the bacteria and ability to bind to either Kato III cells or primary epithelial cells isolated from gastric biopsy specimens. In view of the strict tropism that the organism exhibits in vivo for gastric cells, the results of this study indicate that primary cells are ideal for assessing the factors that might play a role in the pathogenesis of disease caused by the organism. Images PMID:8406792

  15. Comparative study of Gamow-Teller strength distributions in the odd-odd nucleus {sup 50}V and its impact on electron capture rates in astrophysical environments

    SciTech Connect

    Nabi, Jameel-Un; Sajjad, Muhammad

    2007-11-15

    Gamow-Teller (GT) strength transitions are an ideal probe for testing nuclear structure models. In addition to nuclear structure, GT transitions in nuclei directly affect the early phases of Type Ia and Type-II supernovae core collapse since the electron capture rates are partly determined by these GT transitions. In astrophysics, GT transitions provide an important input for model calculations and element formation during the explosive phase of a massive star at the end of its life-time. Recent nucleosynthesis calculations show that odd-odd and odd-A nuclei cause the largest contribution in the rate of change of lepton-to-baryon ratio. In the present manuscript, we have calculated the GT strength distributions and electron capture rates for odd-odd nucleus {sup 50}V by using the pn-QRPA theory. At present {sup 50}V is the first experimentally available odd-odd nucleus in fp-shell nuclei. We also compare our GT strength distribution with the recently measured results of a {sup 50}V(d, {sup 2}He){sup 50}Ti experiment, with the earlier work of Fuller, Fowler, and Newman (referred to as FFN) and subsequently with the large-scale shell model calculations. One curious finding of the paper is that the Brink's hypothesis, usually employed in large-scale shell model calculations, is not a good approximation to use at least in the case of {sup 50}V. SNe Ia model calculations performed using FFN rates result in overproduction of {sup 50}Ti, and were brought to a much acceptable value by employing shell model results. It might be interesting to study how the composition of the ejecta using presently reported QRPA rates compare with the observed abundances.

  16. Odd-parity D states in He.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, A. K.

    1972-01-01

    The states considered lie below the n = 2 threshold of He(+) and decay radiatively to the lower states. The most general D-state wave function of odd parity of two electrons is examined. The results presented are optimized with respect to four nonlinear parameters for 112 terms. A mass-polarization correction is given for all the states listed. The positions of the D states, including the reduced mass and the mass-polarization corrections, with respect to the ground state of He are reported.

  17. Empirical residual neutron-proton interaction in odd-odd nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zheying; Changizi, S. A.; Qi, Chong

    2016-03-01

    Two types of average neutron-proton interaction formulas are compared: In the first type, neutron-proton interactions for even-even and odd-A nuclei extracted from experimental binding energies show a smooth behavior as a function of mass number A and are dominated by the contribution from the symmetry energy. Whereas in the second type large systematic staggering is seen between even-A and odd-A nuclei. This deviation is understood in terms of the additional neutron-proton interaction in odd-odd nuclei relative to the neighboring even-even and odd-A systems. We explore three possible ways to extract this additional interaction from the binding energy difference of neighboring nuclei. The extracted interactions are positive in nearly all cases and show weak dependence on the mass number. The empirical interactions are also compared with theoretical values extracted from recent nuclear mass models where large unexpected fluctuations are seen in certain nuclei. The reproduction of the residual neutron-proton interaction and the correction of those irregular fluctuations can be a good criterion for the refinement of those mass models.

  18. Enhanced T-odd, P-odd electromagnetic moments in reflection asymmetric nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Spevak, V.; Auerbach, N.; Flambaum, V.V.

    1997-09-01

    Collective P- and T-odd moments produced by parity and time invariance violating forces in reflection asymmetric nuclei are considered. The enhanced collective Schiff, electric dipole, and octupole moments appear due to the mixing of rotational levels of opposite parity. These moments can exceed single-particle moments by more than 2 orders of magnitude. The enhancement is due to the collective nature of the intrinsic moments and the small energy separation between members of parity doublets. In turn these nuclear moments induce enhanced T- and P-odd effects in atoms and molecules. A simple estimate is given and a detailed theoretical treatment of the collective T-, P-odd electric moments in reflection asymmetric, odd-mass nuclei is presented. In the present work we improve on the simple liquid drop model by evaluating the Strutinsky shell correction and include corrections due to pairing. Calculations are performed for octupole deformed long-lived odd-mass isotopes of Rn, Fr, Ra, Ac, and Pa and the corresponding atoms. Experiments with such atoms may improve substantially the limits on time reversal violation. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  19. Allopurinol use in a New Zealand population: prevalence and adherence.

    PubMed

    Horsburgh, Simon; Norris, Pauline; Becket, Gordon; Arroll, Bruce; Crampton, Peter; Cumming, Jacqueline; Keown, Shirley; Herbison, Peter

    2014-07-01

    Allopurinol is effective for the control of gout and its long-term complications when taken consistently. There is evidence that adherence to allopurinol therapy varies across population groups. This may exacerbate differences in the burden of gout on population groups and needs to be accurately assessed. The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of allopurinol use in a region of New Zealand using community pharmacy dispensing data and to examine the levels of suboptimal adherence in various population groups. Data from all community pharmacy dispensing databases in a New Zealand region were collected for a year covering 2005/2006 giving a near complete picture of dispensings to area residents. Prevalence of allopurinol use in the region by age, sex, ethnicity and socioeconomic position was calculated. Adherence was assessed using the medication possession ratio (MPR), with a MPR of 0.80 indicative of suboptimal adherence. Multiple logistic regression was used to explore variations in suboptimal adherence across population groups. A total of 953 people received allopurinol in the study year (prevalence 3%). Prevalence was higher in males (6%) than in females (1%) and Māori (5%) than non-Māori (3%). The overall MPR during the study was 0.88, with 161 (22%) of patients using allopurinol having suboptimal adherence. Non-Māori were 54% less likely to have suboptimal allopurinol adherence compared to Māori (95% CI 0.30-0.72, p = 0.001). These findings are consistent with those from other studies nationally and internationally and point to the important role for health professionals in improving patient adherence to an effective gout treatment. PMID:24390636

  20. Equity in adherence to antiretroviral therapy among economically vulnerable adolescents living with HIV in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Bermudez, Laura Gauer; Jennings, Larissa; Ssewamala, Fred M; Nabunya, Proscovia; Mellins, Claude; McKay, Mary

    2016-03-01

    Studies from sub-Saharan Africa indicate that children made vulnerable by poverty have been disproportionately affected by HIV with many exposed via mother-to-child transmission. For youth living with HIV, adherence to life-saving treatment regimens are likely to be affected by the complex set of economic and social circumstances that challenge their families and also exacerbate health problems. Using baseline data from the National Institute of Child and Human Development (NICHD) funded Suubi+Adherence study, we examined the extent to which individual and composite measures of equity predict self-reported adherence among Ugandan adolescents aged 10-16 (n = 702) living with HIV. Results showed that greater asset ownership, specifically familial possession of seven or more tangible assets, was associated with greater odds of self-reported adherence (OR 1.69, 95% CI: 1.00-2.85). Our analyses also indicated that distance to the nearest health clinic impacts youth's adherence to an ARV regimen. Youth who reported living nearest to a clinic were significantly more likely to report optimal adherence (OR 1.49, 95% CI: 0.92-2.40). Moreover, applying the composite equity scores, we found that adolescents with greater economic advantage in ownership of household assets, financial savings, and caregiver employment had higher odds of adherence by a factor of 1.70 (95% CI: 1.07-2.70). These findings suggest that interventions addressing economic and social inequities may be beneficial to increase antiretroviral therapy (ART) uptake among economically vulnerable youth, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. This is one of the first studies to address the question of equity in adherence to ART among economically vulnerable youth with HIV. PMID:27392003

  1. Equity in adherence to antiretroviral therapy among economically vulnerable adolescents living with HIV in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Bermudez, Laura Gauer; Jennings, Larissa; Ssewamala, Fred M.; Nabunya, Proscovia; Mellins, Claude; McKay, Mary

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Studies from sub-Saharan Africa indicate that children made vulnerable by poverty have been disproportionately affected by HIV with many exposed via mother-to-child transmission. For youth living with HIV, adherence to life-saving treatment regimens are likely to be affected by the complex set of economic and social circumstances that challenge their families and also exacerbate health problems. Using baseline data from the National Institute of Child and Human Development (NICHD) funded Suubi+Adherence study, we examined the extent to which individual and composite measures of equity predict self-reported adherence among Ugandan adolescents aged 10–16 (n = 702) living with HIV. Results showed that greater asset ownership, specifically familial possession of seven or more tangible assets, was associated with greater odds of self-reported adherence (OR 1.69, 95% CI: 1.00–2.85). Our analyses also indicated that distance to the nearest health clinic impacts youth’s adherence to an ARV regimen. Youth who reported living nearest to a clinic were significantly more likely to report optimal adherence (OR 1.49, 95% CI: 0.92–2.40). Moreover, applying the composite equity scores, we found that adolescents with greater economic advantage in ownership of household assets, financial savings, and caregiver employment had higher odds of adherence by a factor of 1.70 (95% CI: 1.07–2.70). These findings suggest that interventions addressing economic and social inequities may be beneficial to increase antiretroviral therapy (ART) uptake among economically vulnerable youth, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. This is one of the first studies to address the question of equity in adherence to ART among economically vulnerable youth with HIV. PMID:27392003

  2. Fever and Pain Management in Childhood: Healthcare Providers' and Parents' Adherence to Current Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Raffaeli, Genny; Orenti, Annalisa; Gambino, Monia; Peves Rios, Walter; Bosis, Samantha; Bianchini, Sonia; Tagliabue, Claudia; Esposito, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    In order to evaluate the adherence of healthcare providers and parents to the current recommendations concerning fever and pain management, randomized samples of 500 healthcare providers caring for children and 500 families were asked to complete an anonymous questionnaire. The 378 health care providers (HCPs) responding to the survey (75.6%) included 144 primary care pediatricians (38.1%), 98 hospital pediatricians (25.9%), 62 pediatric residents (16.4%), and 71 pediatric nurses (19.6%); the 464 responding parents (92.8%) included 175 whose youngest (or only) child was ≤5 years old (37.7%), 175 whose youngest (or only) child was aged 6-10 years (37.7%), and 114 whose youngest (or only) child was aged 11-14 years (24.6%). There were gaps in the knowledge of both healthcare providers and parents. Global adherence to the guidelines was lower among the pediatric nurses than the other healthcare providers (odds ratio 0.875; 95% confidence interval 0.795-0.964). Among the parents, those of children aged 6-10 and 11-14 years old, those who were older, and those without a degree answered the questions correctly significantly less frequently than the others. These findings suggest that there is an urgent need to improve the dissemination of the current recommendations concerning fever and pain management among healthcare providers and parents in order to avoid mistaken and sometimes risky attitudes, common therapeutic errors, and the unnecessary overloading of emergency department resources. Pediatric nurses and parents with older children, those who are older, and those with a lower educational level should be the priority targets of educational programmes. PMID:27187436

  3. Fever and Pain Management in Childhood: Healthcare Providers’ and Parents’ Adherence to Current Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Raffaeli, Genny; Orenti, Annalisa; Gambino, Monia; Peves Rios, Walter; Bosis, Samantha; Bianchini, Sonia; Tagliabue, Claudia; Esposito, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    In order to evaluate the adherence of healthcare providers and parents to the current recommendations concerning fever and pain management, randomized samples of 500 healthcare providers caring for children and 500 families were asked to complete an anonymous questionnaire. The 378 health care providers (HCPs) responding to the survey (75.6%) included 144 primary care pediatricians (38.1%), 98 hospital pediatricians (25.9%), 62 pediatric residents (16.4%), and 71 pediatric nurses (19.6%); the 464 responding parents (92.8%) included 175 whose youngest (or only) child was ≤5 years old (37.7%), 175 whose youngest (or only) child was aged 6–10 years (37.7%), and 114 whose youngest (or only) child was aged 11–14 years (24.6%). There were gaps in the knowledge of both healthcare providers and parents. Global adherence to the guidelines was lower among the pediatric nurses than the other healthcare providers (odds ratio 0.875; 95% confidence interval 0.795–0.964). Among the parents, those of children aged 6–10 and 11–14 years old, those who were older, and those without a degree answered the questions correctly significantly less frequently than the others. These findings suggest that there is an urgent need to improve the dissemination of the current recommendations concerning fever and pain management among healthcare providers and parents in order to avoid mistaken and sometimes risky attitudes, common therapeutic errors, and the unnecessary overloading of emergency department resources. Pediatric nurses and parents with older children, those who are older, and those with a lower educational level should be the priority targets of educational programmes. PMID:27187436

  4. Soil clay content underlies prion infection odds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    David, Walter W.; Walsh, D.P.; Farnsworth, Matthew L.; Winkelman, D.L.; Miller, M.W.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental factors-especially soil properties-have been suggested as potentially important in the transmission of infectious prion diseases. Because binding to montmorillonite (an aluminosilicate clay mineral) or clay-enriched soils had been shown to enhance experimental prion transmissibility, we hypothesized that prion transmission among mule deer might also be enhanced in ranges with relatively high soil clay content. In this study, we report apparent influences of soil clay content on the odds of prion infection in free-ranging deer. Analysis of data from prion-infected deer herds in northern Colorado, USA, revealed that a 1% increase in the clay-sized particle content in soils within the approximate home range of an individual deer increased its odds of infection by up to 8.9%. Our findings suggest that soil clay content and related environmental properties deserve greater attention in assessing risks of prion disease outbreaks and prospects for their control in both natural and production settings. ?? 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  5. Sigma decomposition: the CP-odd Lagrangian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hierro, I. M.; Merlo, L.; Rigolin, S.

    2016-04-01

    In Alonso et al., JHEP 12 (2014) 034, the CP-even sector of the effective chiral Lagrangian for a generic composite Higgs model with a symmetric coset has been constructed, up to four momenta. In this paper, the CP-odd couplings are studied within the same context. If only the Standard Model bosonic sources of custodial symmetry breaking are considered, then at most six independent operators form a basis. One of them is the weak- θ term linked to non-perturbative sources of CP violation, while the others describe CP-odd perturbative couplings between the Standard Model gauge bosons and an Higgs-like scalar belonging to the Goldstone boson sector. The procedure is then applied to three distinct exemplifying frameworks: the original SU(5)/SO(5) Georgi-Kaplan model, the minimal custodial-preserving SO(5)/SO(4) model and the minimal SU(3)/(SU(2) × U(1)) model, which intrinsically breaks custodial symmetry. Moreover, the projection of the high-energy electroweak effective theory to the low-energy chiral effective Lagrangian for a dynamical Higgs is performed, uncovering strong relations between the operator coefficients and pinpointing the differences with the elementary Higgs scenario.

  6. Meissner effect of odd-frequency superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Katsufumi

    2001-10-01

    We present theoretical results on the Meissner effect of odd-frequency superconductors with the order parameter of the form, sgn(ωn)φ(k,iωn), where φ(k,iωn) is even in the Matsubara frequency ωn as in the conventional case. It is shown that the spectral function of the anomalous Green's function is given in the form of the Hilbert transformation of the one for the even-frequency part, and the anomalous contribution to the paramagnetic kernel consists of the conventional term but with the opposite sign and a term expressed by the digamma function. In the static limit the latter term reduces to twice the former one with the opposite sign so that the net contribution becomes the same as the conventional one. This indicates the presence of the Meissner effect for this class of the odd-frequency superconductors. A model interaction is discussed that leads to the order parameter mentioned above.

  7. Effect of odd hydrogen on ozone depletion by chlorine reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donahue, T. M.; Cicerone, R. J.; Liu, S. C.; Chameides, W. L.

    1976-01-01

    The present paper discusses how the shape of the ozone layer changes under the influence of injected ClX for several choices of two key HOx reaction rates. The two HOx reactions are: OH + HO2 yields H2O + O2 and O + HO2 yields OH + O2. Results of calculations are presented which show that the two reaction rates determine the stratospheric concentrations of OH and HO2, and that these concentrations regulate the amount by which the stratospheric ozone column can be reduced due to injections of odd chlorine. It is concluded that the amount of ozone reduction by a given mixing ratio of ClX will remain very uncertain until the significance of several possible feedback effects involving HOx in a chlorine-polluted atmosphere are determined and measurements of the reaction rates and HOx concentrations are made at the relevant temperatures.

  8. Comparison of model results transporting the odd nitrogen family with results transporting separate odd nitrogen species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglass, Anne R.; Jackman, Charles H.; Stolarski, Richard S.

    1989-01-01

    A fast two-dimensional residual circulation stratospheric family transport model, designed to minimize computer requirements, is developed. The model was used to calculate the ambient and perturbed atmospheres in which odd nitrogen species are transported as a family, and the results were compared with calculations in which HNO3, N2O5, ClONO2, and HO2NO2 are transported separately. It was found that ozone distributions computed by the two models for a present-day atmosphere are nearly identical. Good agreement was also found between calculated species concentrations and the ozone response, indicating the general applicability of the odd-nitrogen family approximations.

  9. Shell Model Description of the Odd-Odd Co and Cu Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Medina, N. H.; Allegro, P. R. P.; Oliveira, J. R. B. de; Ribas, R. V.; Seale, W. A.; Toufen, D. L.; Silveira, M. A. G.

    2007-10-26

    The known excited states of the odd-odd nuclei {sup 54,56,58,60}Co and 60,62,64,66Cu were interpreted in the framework of the large scale shell model (LSSM), using several effective interactions and configuration spaces. For the description of the negative parity states, we have allowed one particle excitation to the g{sub 9/2} orbital. The LSSM using the GXPF1 effective interaction reproduces well the first excited states in all of these nuclei.

  10. Proton emission from the deformed odd-odd nuclei near drip line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patial, M.; Arumugam, P.; Jain, A. K.; Maglione, E.; Ferreira, L. S.

    2016-01-01

    Proton emission from odd-odd nuclei is studied within the two quasiparticle plus rotor model which includes the non-adiabatic effects and the residual interaction between valence proton and neutron. Justification of the formalism is discussed through corroboration of our results with the experimental spectrum of 180Ta. Exact calculations are performed to get the proton emission halflives. Our results for the proton emitter 130Eu leads to the assignment of spin and parity Jπ = 1+ for the ground state. The role of Coriolis and residual neutron-proton interactions on the proton emission halflives and their interplay are also discussed.

  11. The challenge of patient adherence.

    PubMed

    Martin, Leslie R; Williams, Summer L; Haskard, Kelly B; Dimatteo, M Robin

    2005-09-01

    Quality healthcare outcomes depend upon patients' adherence to recommended treatment regimens. Patient nonadherence can be a pervasive threat to health and wellbeing and carry an appreciable economic burden as well. In some disease conditions, more than 40% of patients sustain significant risks by misunderstanding, forgetting, or ignoring healthcare advice. While no single intervention strategy can improve the adherence of all patients, decades of research studies agree that successful attempts to improve patient adherence depend upon a set of key factors. These include realistic assessment of patients' knowledge and understanding of the regimen, clear and effective communication between health professionals and their patients, and the nurturance of trust in the therapeutic relationship. Patients must be given the opportunity to tell the story of their unique illness experiences. Knowing the patient as a person allows the health professional to understand elements that are crucial to the patient's adherence: beliefs, attitudes, subjective norms, cultural context, social supports, and emotional health challenges, particularly depression. Physician-patient partnerships are essential when choosing amongst various therapeutic options to maximize adherence. Mutual collaboration fosters greater patient satisfaction, reduces the risks of nonadherence, and improves patients' healthcare outcomes. PMID:18360559

  12. Odd perfect numbers have at least nine distinct prime factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Pace P.

    2007-12-01

    An odd perfect number, N , is shown to have at least nine distinct prime factors. If 3nmid N then N must have at least twelve distinct prime divisors. The proof ultimately avoids previous computational results for odd perfect numbers.

  13. Intervention Strategies for Improving Patient Adherence to Follow-Up in the Era of Mobile Information Technology: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Patient adherence to follow-up plays a key role in the medical surveillance of chronic diseases and affects the implementation of clinical research by influencing cost and validity. We previously reported a randomized controlled trial (RCT) on short message service (SMS) reminders, which significantly improved follow-up adherence in pediatric cataract treatment. Methods RCTs published in English that reported the impact of SMS or telephone reminders on increasing or decreasing the follow-up rate (FUR) were selected from Medline, EMBASE, PubMed, and the Cochrane Library through February 2014. The impacts of SMS and telephone reminders on the FUR of patients were systematically evaluated by meta-analysis and bias was assessed. Results We identified 13 RCTs reporting on 3276 patients with and 3402 patients without SMS reminders and 8 RCTs reporting on 2666 patients with and 3439 patients without telephone reminders. For the SMS reminders, the majority of the studies (>50%) were at low risk of bias, considering adequate sequence generation, allocation concealment, blinding, evaluation of incomplete outcome data, and lack of selective reporting. For the studies on the telephone reminders, only the evaluation of incomplete outcome data accounted for more than 50% of studies being at low risk of bias. The pooled odds ratio (OR) for the improvement of follow-up adherence in the SMS group compared with the control group was 1.76 (95% CI [1.37, 2.26]; P<0.01), and the pooled OR for the improvement of follow-up adherence in the telephone group compared with the control group was 2.09 (95% CI [1.85, 2.36]; P<0.01); both sets showed no evidence of publication bias. Conclusions SMS and telephone reminders could both significantly improve the FUR. Telephone reminders were more effective but had a higher risk of bias than SMS reminders. PMID:25100267

  14. A validated measure of adherence to antibiotic prophylaxis in children with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Natalie A; Kronenberger, William G; Hampton, Kisha C; Bloom, Ellen M; Rampersad, Angeli G; Roberson, Christopher P; Shapiro, Amy D

    2016-01-01

    Background Antibiotic prophylaxis is a mainstay in sickle cell disease management. However, adherence is estimated at only 66%. This study aimed to develop and validate a Sickle Cell Antibiotic Adherence Level Evaluation (SCAALE) to promote systematic and detailed adherence evaluation. Methods A 28-item questionnaire was created, covering seven adherence areas. General Adherence Ratings from the parent and one health care provider and medication possession ratios were obtained as validation measures. Results Internal consistency was very good to excellent for the total SCAALE (α=0.89) and four of the seven subscales. Correlations between SCAALE scores and validation measures were strong for the total SCAALE and five of the seven subscales. Conclusion The SCAALE provides a detailed, quantitative, multidimensional, and global measurement of adherence and can promote clinical care and research. PMID:27354768

  15. W${'}$ signatures with odd Higgs particles

    SciTech Connect

    Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; Peterson, Andrea D.

    2014-08-13

    We point out that W' bosons may decay predominantly into Higgs particles associated with their broken gauge symmetry. We demonstrate this in a renormalizable model where the W' and W couplings to fermions differ only by an overall normalization. This "meta-sequential" W' boson decays into a scalar pair, with the charged one subsequently decaying into a W boson and a neutral scalar. These scalars are odd under a parity of the Higgs sector, which consists of a complex bidoublet and a doublet. Finally, the W' and Z' bosons have the same mass and branching fractions into scalars, and may show up at the LHC in final states involving one or two electroweak bosons and missing transverse energy.

  16. W$${'}$$ signatures with odd Higgs particles

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; Peterson, Andrea D.

    2014-08-13

    We point out that W' bosons may decay predominantly into Higgs particles associated with their broken gauge symmetry. We demonstrate this in a renormalizable model where the W' and W couplings to fermions differ only by an overall normalization. This "meta-sequential" W' boson decays into a scalar pair, with the charged one subsequently decaying into a W boson and a neutral scalar. These scalars are odd under a parity of the Higgs sector, which consists of a complex bidoublet and a doublet. Finally, the W' and Z' bosons have the same mass and branching fractions into scalars, and may showmore » up at the LHC in final states involving one or two electroweak bosons and missing transverse energy.« less

  17. Adherence of sputtered titanium carbides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Wheeler, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    Sputtered coatings of the refractory metal carbides are of great interest for applications where hard wear-resistant materials are desired. The usefulness of sputtered refractory carbides is often limited, in practice, by spalling or interfacial separation. In this work improvements in the adherence of refractory carbides on iron, nickel and titanium based alloys were obtained by using oxidation, reactive sputtering or sputtered interlayers to alter the coating-substrate interfacial region. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and argon ion etching were used to characterize the interfacial regions, and an attempt was made to correlate adherence as measured in wear tests with the chemical nature of the interface.

  18. Even-odd effects in Z and N distributions of fragments emitted at intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardo, I.; Lanzalone, G.; Agodi, C.; Amorini, F.; Anzalone, A.; Han, J.; Maiolino, C.; Auditore, L.; Loria, D.; Trifiro, A.; Trimarchi, M.; Berceanu, I.; Cardella, G.; De Filippo, E.; Pagano, A.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S.; Cavallaro, S.; Porto, F.; Rizzo, F.

    2011-08-15

    Even-odd effects in Z and N distributions of light fragments emitted at forward angles in nuclear collisions {sup 40}Ca + {sup 40}Ca, {sup 40}Ca + {sup 48}Ca, and {sup 48}Ca + {sup 48}Ca at 25 MeV/nucleon and identified in charge and mass with the Chimera multidetector have been analyzed. The amplitude of even-odd staggering effects seems to be related to the neutron to proton ratio N/Z of the entrance channels. A qualitative explanation of this effect, taking into account the deexcitation phase of primary excited fragments, is discussed.

  19. Impact of an exercise program on adherence and fitness indicators.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Roger; Gilleland, Diana

    2016-05-01

    Adherence to exercise is one of the most problematic health behaviors. This pilot study describes the impact of an exercise program on adherence to exercise and fitness indicators for overweight and obese adults enrolled in an insurance reimbursed exercise plan. Chart reviews were conducted retrospectively in a convenience sample of 77 subjects from a human performance lab (HPL) at a large southern university. Charts from 2004 to 2009 were reviewed for health history, fitness indicators (fitness level, weight, BMI, hip/waist ratio, % body fat, BP, HR, cholesterol), and adherence (number of exercise sessions/month). Exercise supervision was operationalized in two phases over 12months: Phase I (3months supervised exercise) and Phase II (9months unsupervised exercise). Fifty-eight participants completed Phase I, and 8 completed Phase II. Six-nine percent of those completing Phase I visited the gym at least 8 times/month with significant (α=.05) improvement in all fitness indicators. Those visiting <8 times/month had improvement in fitness level, weight, BMI, and % body fat. Twenty-four subjects continued into Phase II, with only eight completing Phase II. Of those eight, only one subject visited the HPL at least 8 times/month. Health history data including co-morbidities, symptoms, habits, perceived tension, job stress, and fitness level were not associated with adherence. Symptoms of swollen, stiff, painful joints, and swollen ankles and legs were associated with decreased adherence to exercise. Supervised exercise was positively related to adherence and improved fitness indicators. Adults with joint symptoms may require more support. Based on these pilot data, designing a study with a larger sample and the inclusion of barriers and facilitators for adherence to self-directed exercise would allow additional analysis. Innovative interventions are needed that mimic the supervised environment, shifting responsibility for the exercise plan from the supervisor to those

  20. The ODD protocol: A review and first update

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grimm, Volker; Berger, Uta; DeAngelis, Donald L.; Polhill, J. Gary; Giske, Jarl; Railsback, Steve F.

    2010-01-01

    The 'ODD' (Overview, Design concepts, and Details) protocol was published in 2006 to standardize the published descriptions of individual-based and agent-based models (ABMs). The primary objectives of ODD are to make model descriptions more understandable and complete, thereby making ABMs less subject to criticism for being irreproducible. We have systematically evaluated existing uses of the ODD protocol and identified, as expected, parts of ODD needing improvement and clarification. Accordingly, we revise the definition of ODD to clarify aspects of the original version and thereby facilitate future standardization of ABM descriptions. We discuss frequently raised critiques in ODD but also two emerging, and unanticipated, benefits: ODD improves the rigorous formulation of models and helps make the theoretical foundations of large models more visible. Although the protocol was designed for ABMs, it can help with documenting any large, complex model, alleviating some general objections against such models.

  1. Improving Patient's Primary Medication Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Leguelinel-Blache, Géraldine; Dubois, Florent; Bouvet, Sophie; Roux-Marson, Clarisse; Arnaud, Fabrice; Castelli, Christel; Ray, Valérie; Kinowski, Jean-Marie; Sotto, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Quality of transitions of care is one of the first concerns in patient safety. Redesigning the discharge process to incorporate clinical pharmacy activities could reduce the incidence of postdischarge adverse events by improving medication adherence. The present study investigated the value of pharmacist counseling sessions on primary medication adherence after hospital discharge. This study was conducted in a 1844-bed hospital in France. It was divided in an observational period and an interventional period of 3 months each. In both periods, ward-based clinical pharmacists performed medication reconciliation and inpatient follow-up. In interventional period, initial counseling and discharge counseling sessions were added to pharmaceutical care. The primary medication adherence was assessed by calling community pharmacists 7 days after patient discharge. We compared the measure of adherence between the patients from the observational period (n = 201) and the interventional period (n = 193). The rate of patients who were adherent increased from 51.0% to 66.7% between both periods (P < 0.01). When discharge counseling was performed (n = 78), this rate rose to 79.7% (P < 0.001). The multivariate regression performed on data from both periods showed that age of at least 78 years old, and 3 or less new medications on discharge order were predictive factors of adherence. New medications ordered at discharge represented 42.0% (n = 1018/2426) of all medications on discharge order. The rate of unfilled new medications decreased from 50.2% in the observational period to 32.5% in the interventional period (P < 10−7). However, patients included in the observational period were not significantly more often readmitted or visited the emergency department than the patients who experienced discharge counseling during the interventional period (45.3% vs. 46.2%; P = 0.89). This study highlights that discharge counseling sessions are

  2. Factors associated with low adherence to medication in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Noemia Urruth Leão; Bertoldi, Andréa Dâmaso; Thumé, Elaine; Facchini, Luiz Augusto; de França, Giovanny Vinícius Araújo; Mengue, Sotero Serrate

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess factors associated with low adherence to pharmacotherapy in older adults. METHODS Cross-sectional population-based study, with a representative sample of 1,593 individuals aged 60 or older, living in the urban area of Bagé, RS, Southern Brazil, in 2008. A multiple stage sampling model was used. The data were collected through individual household interviews. The analyses of the association between low adherence regarding pharmacotherapy, measured using the Brief Medication Questionnaire (BMQ), and demographic, socioeconomic, behavioral, health, assistance and prescription factors were carried out applying Poisson regression model to assess crude and adjusted prevalence ratios, their respective 95% confidence intervals and p-value (Wald test). RESULTS Around 78.0% of individuals reported have taken at least one medication in the seven days prior to the interview. Of these, approximately one third (28.7%) were considered to have low adherence to the treatment. The factors significantly associated to low adherence to treatment were: age (65 to 74 years old), not having health insurance, having to purchase (totally or partially) their own medicines, having three or more morbidities, having functional disabilities and using three or more medicines. CONCLUSIONS The increased use of medicines by older adults, because of the high prevalence of non-communicable diseases in this group, and the access to the treatment need to be considered by health care professionals regarding fostering adherence to treatment, which increases therapeutic solutions and quality of life among older people. PMID:24626547

  3. Selective imaging of adherent targeted ultrasound contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, S; Kruse, D E; Ferrara, K W; Dayton, P A

    2007-01-01

    The goal of ultrasonic molecular imaging is the detection of targeted contrast agents bound to receptors on endothelial cells. We propose imaging methods that can distinguish adherent microbubbles from tissue and from freely circulating microbubbles, each of which would otherwise obscure signal from molecularly targeted adherent agents. The methods are based on a harmonic signal model of the returned echoes over a train of pulses. The first method utilizes an ‘image–push–image’ pulse sequence where adhesion of contrast agents is rapidly promoted by acoustic radiation force and the presence of adherent agents is detected by the signal change due to targeted microbubble adhesion. The second method rejects tissue echoes using a spectral high-pass filter. Free agent signal is suppressed by a pulse-to-pulse low-pass filter in both methods. An overlay of the adherent and/or flowing contrast agents on B-mode images can be readily created for anatomical reference. Contrast-to-tissue ratios from adherent microbubbles exceeding 30 dB and 20 dB were achieved for the two methods proposed, respectively. The performance of these algorithms is compared, emphasizing the significance and potential applications in ultrasonic molecular imaging. PMID:17404455

  4. Medication Adherence and the Risk of Cardiovascular Mortality and Hospitalization Among Patients With Newly Prescribed Antihypertensive Medications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soyeun; Shin, Dong Wook; Yun, Jae Moon; Hwang, Yunji; Park, Sue K; Ko, Young-Jin; Cho, BeLong

    2016-03-01

    The importance of adherence to antihypertensive treatments for the prevention of cardiovascular disease has not been well elucidated. This study evaluated the effect of antihypertensive medication adherence on specific cardiovascular disease mortality (ischemic heart disease [IHD], cerebral hemorrhage, and cerebral infarction). Our study used data from a 3% sample cohort that was randomly extracted from enrollees of Korean National Health Insurance. Study subjects were aged ≥20 years, were diagnosed with hypertension, and started newly prescribed antihypertensive medication in 2003 to 2004. Adherence to antihypertensive medication was estimated as the cumulative medication adherence. Subjects were divided into good (cumulative medication adherence, ≥80%), intermediate (cumulative medication adherence, 50%-80%), and poor (cumulative medication adherence, <50%) adherence groups. We used time-dependent Cox proportional hazards models to evaluate the association between medication adherence and health outcomes. Among 33 728 eligible subjects, 670 (1.99%) died of coronary heart disease or stroke during follow-up. Patients with poor medication adherence had worse mortality from IHD (hazard ratio, 1.64; 95% confidence interval, 1.16-2.31; P for trend=0.005), cerebral hemorrhage (hazard ratio, 2.19; 95% confidence interval, 1.28-3.77; P for trend=0.004), and cerebral infarction (hazard ratio, 1.92; 95% confidence interval, 1.25-2.96; P for trend=0.003) than those with good adherence. The estimated hazard ratios of hospitalization for cardiovascular disease were consistent with the mortality end point. Poor medication adherence was associated with higher mortality and a greater risk of hospitalization for specific cardiovascular diseases, emphasizing the importance of a monitoring system and strategies to improve medication adherence in clinical practice. PMID:26865198

  5. Medication Adherence and Blood Pressure Control Among Hypertensive Patients With Coexisting Long-Term Conditions in Primary Care Settings: A Cross-Sectional Analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu Ting; Wang, Harry H X; Liu, Kirin Q L; Lee, Gabrielle K Y; Chan, Wai Man; Griffiths, Sian M; Chen, Ruo Ling

    2016-05-01

    odds ratio 2.07, 95% CI 1.70-2.53, P < 0.001). Diabetes was the most prevalent concomitant long-term condition among hypertensive patients with poor BP control (38.6%, 95% CI 35.8-41.4 vs 19.7%, 95% CI 17.5-21.9 for patients with good BP control, P < 0.001).Multimorbidity was common among hypertensive patients, and was associated with poor BP control. Subjects with coexisting diabetes, heart disease, or chronic kidney disorder should receive more clinical attention to achieve better clinical outcomes. PMID:27196458

  6. Redistribution of reactive odd nitrogen in the lower arctic stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huebler, G.; Fahey, D. W.; Kelly, K. K.; Montzka, D. D.; Carroll, M. A.; Tuck, A. F.; Heidt, L. E.; Pollock, W. H.; Gregory, G. L.; Vedder, J. F.

    1990-01-01

    In-situ measurements of total reactive odd nitrogen NO(y), were made from the NASA DC-8 aircraft in the lower arctic stratosphere during the 1989 Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition. Throughout January and February, NO(y) mixing ratios were typically between 0.5 and 3 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) at altitudes between 10 and 12.5 km. During several flights late in the mission, events of unusually light NO(y) occurred with mixing ratios up to 12 ppbv at these altitudes. Simultaneous measurements of N2O, O3, and H2O during these events suggest that large changes in NO(y) are not expected. The elevated NO(y) values are interpreted as a vertical redistribution of NO(y) in the lower stratosphere resulting from gravitational sedimentation of aerosol particles containing HNO3. No evidence of the redistribution of H2O is noted, consistent with observations of denitrification without dehydration higher in the stratosphere.

  7. Isospin and deformation studies in the odd-odd N=Z nucleus {sup 54}Co

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolph, D.; Andersson, L.-L.; Ekman, J.; Erten, O.; Fahlander, C.; Johansson, E. K.; Andreoiu, C.; Bengtsson, R.; Ragnarsson, I.; Bentley, M. A.; Williams, S. J.; Carpenter, M. P.; Seweryniak, D.; Charity, R. J.; Reviol, W.; Sarantites, D. G.; Clark, R. M.; Fallon, P.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Svensson, C. E.

    2010-11-15

    High-spin states in the odd-odd N=Z nucleus {sup 54}Co have been investigated by the fusion-evaporation reaction {sup 28}Si({sup 32}S,1{alpha}1p1n){sup 54}Co. Gamma-ray information gathered with the Ge detector array Gammasphere was correlated with evaporated particles detected in the charged particle detector system Microball and a 1{pi} neutron detector array. A significantly extended excitation scheme of {sup 54}Co is presented, which includes a candidate for the isospin T=1, 6{sup +} state of the 1f{sub 7/2}{sup -2} multiplet. The results are compared to large-scale shell-model calculations in the fp shell. Effective interactions with and without isospin-breaking terms have been used to probe isospin symmetry and isospin mixing. A quest for deformed high-spin rotational cascades proved negative. This feature is discussed by means of cranking calculations.

  8. Influence of Traxiality on the Signature Inversion in Odd Odd Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Ren-Rong; Zhu, Shun-Quan; Luo, Xiang-Dong; Janos, Timár; Andree, Gizon; Jean, Gizon; Sohler, D.; Nyakó M., B.; Zolnai, L.; Paul S., E.

    2004-08-01

    The nature of signature inversion in the pig9/2nuh11/2 bands of odd-odd 98,102Rh nuclei is studied. Calculations are performed by using a triaxial rotor plus two-quasiparticle model and are compared with the experimentally observed signature inversions. The calculations reproduce well the observations and suggest that, in these bands, the signature inversion can be interpreted mainly as a competition between the Coriolis and the proton-neutron residual interactions in low K space. The triaxiality applied in the Hamiltonian enlarges the amplitudes of high spin signature zigzags at small triaxial deformation and might push the signature inversion point to higher spin at large triaxial deformation.

  9. Meeting report for "OddPols" 2014: the odds invite an even.

    PubMed

    Roy-Engel, Astrid M

    2015-02-01

    The Ninth International Biennial Conference on RNA Polymerases I and III (the "OddPols") was held on June 19-21, 2014 at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA. Sponsored by New England Biolabs, the Cayman Chemical Company, the Rackham Graduate School and the University of Michigan Health System, and organized by David Engelke, Craig Pikaard, Lawrence Rothblum, Andrzej Wierzbicki and Astrid Engel. This year at the conference, the "odds" were increased by expanding the usual topics on the advances in RNA polymerases I and III research to include presentations on RNA polymerase IV and V. The keynote speaker, Craig Pikaard, opened the meeting with his presentation entitled "Five nuclear multisubunit RNA polymerases". The meeting drew attendees from fourteen countries that shared their research discoveries through oral and poster presentations. The talks were organized into 11 sessions covering seven distinct topics. Here we present some of the highlights from the meeting using summaries provided by the participants. PMID:25445280

  10. Chiral Symmetry and Signature Splitting in Odd-Odd Neutron deficient Pr Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetea, Mirela; Nikolova, Veronika; Crider, Benjamin

    2004-10-01

    Over the past few years, sufficient data have been accumulated to enable a meaningful study of the systematic trends in nuclei far from stability. While general characteristics seen in experiments are understood by various mean-field nuclear models, there are key features that are not fully explained. Of particular interest are the chiral symmetry (chiral bands) and signature splitting/inversion phenomena. We report on our investigation on the association of signature inversion in an odd-odd band of two quasiparticles pointed along different axes with the formation of chiral twin bands, and understanding systematic chiral symmetry and signature splitting/inversion features within the framework of particle rotor model for neutron deficient Pr nuclei. This work was supported by the NSF Grant No. PHY 0204811 and U.S. Research Corporation Grant No. CC5494.

  11. Structure of the yrast band in the odd-odd deformed nucleus {sup 156}Pm

    SciTech Connect

    Sood, P. C.; Sai, K. Vijay; Gowrishankar, R.; Sainath, M.

    2011-05-15

    The six-level sequence deduced for the odd-odd nucleus {sup 156}Pm in the high-spin studies following spontaneous fission of {sup 252}Cf is shown to constitute the K{sup {pi}=}4{sup +} yrast band having the two-quasiparticle configuration {l_brace}p:5/2[532]+ n:3/2[521]{r_brace}. Spin parities I{sup {pi}=}4{sup +} through 9{sup +} are assigned to the earlier suggested six levels. The location and the decay {gamma}'s of the 10{sup +} level of this band are indicated. It is also pointed out that there are no {gamma} rays common to these postfission high-spin spectra and those seen in the {sup 156}Nd {beta}-decay studies.

  12. Odd frequency pairing of interacting Majorana fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhoushen; Woelfle, Peter; Balatsky, Alexandar

    Majorana fermions are rising as a promising key component in quantum computation. While the prevalent approach is to use a quadratic (i.e. non-interacting) Majorana Hamiltonian, when expressed in terms of Dirac fermions, generically the Hamiltonian involves interaction terms. Here we focus on the possible pair correlations in a simple model system. We study a model of Majorana fermions coupled to a boson mode and show that the anomalous correlator between different Majorana fermions, located at opposite ends of a topological wire, exhibits odd frequency behavior. It is stabilized when the coupling strength g is above a critical value gc. We use both, conventional diagrammatic theory and a functional integral approach, to derive the gap equation, the critical temperature, the gap function, the critical coupling, and a Ginzburg-Landau theory allowing to discuss a possible subleading admixture of even-frequency pairing. Work supported by USDOE DE-AC52-06NA25396 E304, Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, and ERC DM-321031.

  13. Large odd{endash}even effect in RbC{sup {minus}}{sub {ital n}} cluster size distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Vandenbosch, R.; Will, D.I.

    1996-04-01

    RbC{sub {ital n}} cluster anions have been produced by Rb sputtering of graphite. The intensity ratio of clusters with an even number of carbon atoms to those with an odd number of carbons is much larger for RbC{sup {minus}}{sub {ital n}} clusters than for C{sup {minus}}{sub {ital n}} clusters. {ital Ab} {ital initio} quantum mechanical calculations suggest that this arises from RbC{sub {ital n}} electron affinities that are close to zero or negative for odd {ital n}, rather than from an enhanced odd{endash}even alternation in the affinities. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Reasons Low-Income Parents Offer Snacks to Children: How Feeding Rationale Influences Snack Frequency and Adherence to Dietary Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Blaine, Rachel E; Fisher, Jennifer Orlet; Taveras, Elsie M; Geller, Alan C; Rimm, Eric B; Land, Thomas; Perkins, Meghan; Davison, Kirsten K

    2015-07-01

    Although American children snack more than ever before, the parental role in promoting snacking is not well understood. In 2012-2013 at baseline in an intervention study to prevent childhood obesity in low-income Massachusetts communities, n = 271 parents of children aged 2-12 years completed surveys regarding nutritive and non-nutritive reasons they offered children snacks, demographics, and dietary factors. An analysis of variance demonstrated that parents reported offering snacks (mean/week; standard deviation (SD)) for nutritive reasons like promoting growth (x̄ = 2.5; SD 2.2) or satisfying hunger (x̄ = 2.4; SD 2.1) almost twice as often as non-nutritive reasons like keeping a child quiet (x̄ = 0.7; SD 1.5) or celebrating events/holidays (x̄ = 0.8; SD 1.1). Parents reported giving young children (2-5 years) more snacks to reward behavior (1.9 vs. 1.1, p < 0.001), keep quiet (1.0 vs. 0.5, p < 0.001), and celebrate achievements (1.7 vs. 1.0, p < 0.001) than parents of older children (6-12 years). Multivariable logistic regression models were used to obtain adjusted odds ratios, which indicated reduced child adherence to dietary recommendations when parents offered snacks to reward behavior (Odds Ratio (OR) = 0.83; 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 0.70-0.99), celebrate events/holidays (OR = 0.72; 95% CI 0.52-0.99), or achievements (OR = 0.82; 95% CI 0.68-0.98). Parental intentions around child snacking are likely important targets for obesity prevention efforts. PMID:26197335

  15. Reasons Low-Income Parents Offer Snacks to Children: How Feeding Rationale Influences Snack Frequency and Adherence to Dietary Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Blaine, Rachel E.; Fisher, Jennifer Orlet; Taveras, Elsie M.; Geller, Alan C.; Rimm, Eric B.; Land, Thomas; Perkins, Meghan; Davison, Kirsten K.

    2015-01-01

    Although American children snack more than ever before, the parental role in promoting snacking is not well understood. In 2012–2013 at baseline in an intervention study to prevent childhood obesity in low-income Massachusetts communities, n = 271 parents of children aged 2–12 years completed surveys regarding nutritive and non-nutritive reasons they offered children snacks, demographics, and dietary factors. An analysis of variance demonstrated that parents reported offering snacks (mean/week; standard deviation (SD)) for nutritive reasons like promoting growth (x̄ = 2.5; SD 2.2) or satisfying hunger (x̄ = 2.4; SD 2.1) almost twice as often as non-nutritive reasons like keeping a child quiet (x̄ = 0.7; SD 1.5) or celebrating events/holidays (x̄ = 0.8; SD 1.1). Parents reported giving young children (2–5 years) more snacks to reward behavior (1.9 vs. 1.1, p < 0.001), keep quiet (1.0 vs. 0.5, p < 0.001), and celebrate achievements (1.7 vs. 1.0, p < 0.001) than parents of older children (6–12 years). Multivariable logistic regression models were used to obtain adjusted odds ratios, which indicated reduced child adherence to dietary recommendations when parents offered snacks to reward behavior (Odds Ratio (OR) = 0.83; 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 0.70–0.99), celebrate events/holidays (OR = 0.72; 95% CI 0.52–0.99), or achievements (OR = 0.82; 95% CI 0.68–0.98). Parental intentions around child snacking are likely important targets for obesity prevention efforts. PMID:26197335

  16. Improving medication adherence in migraine treatment.

    PubMed

    Seng, Elizabeth K; Rains, Jeanetta A; Nicholson, Robert A; Lipton, Richard B

    2015-06-01

    Medication adherence is integral to successful treatment of migraine and other headache. The existing literature examining medication adherence in migraine is small, and the methodologies used to assess adherence are limited. However, these studies broadly suggest poor adherence to both acute and preventive migraine medications, with studies using more objective monitoring reporting lower adherence rates. Methods for improving medication adherence are described, including organizational strategies, provider-monitoring and self-monitoring of adherence, regimen strategies, patient education, self-management skills training (e.g., stimulus control, behavioral contracts), and cognitive-behavioral therapy techniques. The article concludes by discussing the future of research regarding adherence to medications for migraine and other headaches. PMID:26040703

  17. Factors influencing human leukocyte adherence in vitro.

    PubMed

    Stepniewicz, W; Tchórzewski, H; Luciak, M

    1983-01-01

    Studies were performed on factors influencing leucocyte adherence in vitro. Blood condensation was found to increase leukocyte adherence. Addition of heparin, dextran or ethanol caused a significant reduction of white blood cell count in blood samples in comparison with blood mixed with sodium EDTA or ACD solution. This suggests the existence of two granulocyte subpopulations; viz, rapidly adhering and slowly adhering. Heparin enhanced granulocyte adherence, while dextran and ethanol decreased it. Five-day storage of ACD blood led to a decrease in granulocyte adherence, while addition of heparin or histamine to ACD blood prevented this change to occur. The glucose concentration of 1,000 mg/dl augmented granulocyte adherence, while higher glucose concentrations induced its progressive fall below the control values. There was no significant change of lymphocyte adherence during the experiments. PMID:6194070

  18. Comparison of prospective daily diaries and retrospective recall to measure oral contraceptive adherence

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Larissa R. Brunner; Broel, Elizabeth C.; Mitchelides, Ashley N.; Dmochowski, Jacek; Dulin, Michael; Scholes, Delia

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND The purpose of this study was to determine if retrospective recall of oral contraceptive (OC) adherence provides data that are similar to data collected via daily diaries over the same time period. Factors associated with inconsistent agreement between prospective and retrospective measurements of adherence also were explored. STUDY DESIGN A total of 185 women participated in a longitudinal, prospective cohort of OC users and 113 of these women provided complete information on OC adherence during follow-ups. Concordance beyond chance was assessed using weighted kappa statistics and logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with inconsistent reporting of adherence. RESULTS There was substantial agreement between prospective and retrospective adherence information (weighted kappa=0.64; 95% CI: 0.52, 0.77). Participants with a high school education or less and those who had problems with feeling sad while using OCs had increased odds of inconsistent reporting of adherence (OR=4.38, 95% CI: 1.41, 13.61 and OR=3.52, 95% CI: 1.25, 9.94; respectively). CONCLUSION While prospective data collection via diaries may improve accuracy, the added expense and burden on study participants may not be necessary. However, the use of retrospective recall may not be appropriate for all study populations. PMID:23582236

  19. Enhancing Adherence in Clinical Exercise Trials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neal, Heather A.; Blair, Steven N.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses exercise adherence from the perspective of adhering to an exercise treatment in a controlled trial, focusing on: adherence (to intervention and measurement); the development of randomized clinical trials; exemplary randomized clinical trials in exercise science (exercise training studies and physical activity interventions); and study…

  20. Medication Adherence and the Use of Generic Drug Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Briesacher, Becky A.; Andrade, Susan E.; Fouayzi, Hassan; Chan, K. Arnold

    2010-01-01

    Objective to assess if the lower copayments often charged for generic drugs explains the improved drug adherence associated with use of generic drugs. Methods We analyzed 2001–2004 healthcare claims data from 45 large employers. Study subjects were aged 18 years +, had 1 or more of 5 study conditions (hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, hypothyroidism, seizure disorders, and type 2 diabetes), and new use of generic-only or brand-only drug therapy for that condition. We measured adherence as the medication possession ratio (MPR), and adequate adherence as MPR >= 80%. Logistic regressions were conducted to assess adequate adherence adjusting for copayments. Results We identified 327,629 new users of drug therapy for the study conditions. Proportion of individuals starting generic therapies ranged from 9% in hypothyroidism to 45% in hypertension. After 1 year of therapy, 66.2% of individuals with hypothyroidism achieved MPR >= 80% compared to 53.4% with hypertension, 53.2% with hypercholesterolemia, 52.0% with diabetes, and 42.2% with seizure disorders. Logistic regressions of adequate adherence showed generics were associated with higher adherence relative to brands in 2 conditions (hypercholesterolemia AOR 1.52, 95% CI: 1.44–1.60; diabetes AOR 1.06, 95% CI: 1.01–1.12, p<.05), with lower adherence in 2 conditions (hypertension AOR 0.75, 95% CI:.73-.77; hypothyroidism AOR 0.86, 95% CI:.78-.94, p<.05), and no difference in seizure disorders. In comparison, the likelihood of achieving MPR >= 80% with $0 copayments relative to $1-$9 ranged from AOR 1.32 for seizure disorders (95% CI: 1.41–1.43) to AOR 1.45 for hypothyroidism (95% CI: 1.43–1.48). Conclusion Generic prescribing was associated with improved medication adherence in 2 of 5 study conditions, and the effect was modest. Copayments of $0 were associated with improved adherence across all study conditions. PMID:19589012

  1. GT Strength in Odd-A Nuclei^*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, J. W.; Du, Q. Q.

    1998-04-01

    We measured the complete set of polarization-transfer observables (D_ij) for the ^13C(p,n)^13N and ^15N(p,n)^15O reactions at 135 MeV. From the D_ijs we constructed the spin-independent, spin-longitudinal, and spin-transverse responses [1] D_0, D_q, Dn and D_p. From these responses we extracted, in a model-independent way, the Δ J=0 and Δ J=1 (``F'' and ``GT'') fractions of the J^π=1/2^-arrow1/2^- g.s. to g.s. transitions for these reactions. The ``F'' fraction, f_F=D_0(0^circ); the ``GT'' fraction, f_GT=D_q(0^circ)+D_n(0^circ)+D_p(0^circ)= 1- D_0(0^circ). The extracted GT fractions, f_GT, are substantially larger than one would predict from β-decay matrix elements and the systematics of the (p,n) reaction on even-A nuclei. These results confirm earlier, model-dependent determinations of f_GT obtained from the (p,n) reaction on ^13C, ^15N and ^39K at other energies [2], [3], [4], indicating that considerable caution must be used when extracting B(GT) matrix elements from odd-A (p,n) data. * Research supported in part by the U.S. NSF. [1] M. Ichimura, K. Kawahigashi, Phys. Rev. C 45 1822 (1992). [2] T. N. Taddeucci, C. A. Goulding, T. A. Carey, R. C. Byrd, C. D. Goodman, C. Gaarde, J. Larsen, D. Horen, J. Rapaport, and E. Sugarbaker, Nucl. Phys. A469 125 (1987). [3] H. Sakai, H. Okamura, N. Matsuoka, A. Shimizu, T. Suda, M. Ieiri and H. M. Shimizu, Nuclear Physics A579 45-61 (1994). [4] W. Huang, Ph.D. dissertation, Indiana U., 1991, (unpublished).

  2. How can we improve adherence?

    PubMed

    Price, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Many patients with wound healing difficulties are also coping with the management of a chronic disease or chronic condition that requires them to make lifestyle behaviour changes, for example, managing glucose levels through diet and exercise and regular foot inspection. Many find it difficult to make such changes and often experience feelings of powerlessness when faced with a lifetime of behavioural and psychological change. This article will explore the importance of understanding the patient difficulties associated with adherence to a regime and how life changes can be difficult to maintain over sustained periods of time. However, the article will also discuss the importance of this topic in trying to understand the clinical evidence base for treatment--as many clinical trials investigating treatments for the diabetic foot do not include information on the extent to which patients in the trial conformed to the trial protocol. The article gives an overview of recent developments--including lessons we can learn from other chronic conditions where permanent life changes are required--in particular the need to keep health messages simple, tailored to the individual and repeated frequently. The evidence to date suggests that no one single form of adherence intervention will work with all patients; this is not surprising given complex and multifactorial nature of adherence and the myriad of barriers that exist that patients and health care professionals need to overcome. PMID:26453542

  3. Asthma prevalence, cost, and adherence with expert guidelines on the utilization of health care services and costs in a state Medicaid population.

    PubMed Central

    Piecoro, L T; Potoski, M; Talbert, J C; Doherty, D E

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide a descriptive analysis of asthma prevalence and costs in a Medicaid population and gauge the degree of adherence with expert guidelines for asthma medication management from the National Asthma Education and Prevention Program. DATA SOURCES: Kentucky Medicaid administrative data for 1996. STUDY DESIGN: A cross-sectional retrospective analysis was used to determine adherence with asthma medication guidelines and utilization of asthma-related health care services and costs. Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine the relationship between nonadherence with the guidelines and utilization of health care services. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Of the 530,000 Medicaid recipients, 24,365 (4.6 percent) were identified as having asthma. Average annual asthma-related costs ($616) accounted for less than 20 percent of total health care costs ($3,645). Nonadherence to the guidelines was prevalent. Less than 40 percent of the patients received a prescription for a rescue medication, and fewer than 10 percent of the patients who received daily inhaled short-acting beta-2 agonists were regular users of inhaled steroids. Nonadherence to the guidelines was associated with an increased risk of an asthma-related hospitalization (odds ratio = 1.5, p < .05). CONCLUSIONS: Guideline nonadherence was widespread and associated with an increase in exacerbations of asthma that resulted in hospitalizations. Asthma prevalence and utilization of health care services in a Medicaid population were similar to previous estimates reported nationally and in health maintenance organizations. PMID:11409817

  4. Association of Continuity of Primary Care and Statin Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Warren, James R.; Falster, Michael O.; Tran, Bich; Jorm, Louisa

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Deficiencies in medication adherence are a major barrier to effectiveness of chronic condition management. Continuity of primary care may promote adherence. We assessed the association of continuity of primary care with adherence to long-term medication as exemplified by statins. Research Design We linked data from a prospective study of 267,091 Australians aged 45 years and over to national data sets on prescription reimbursements, general practice claims, hospitalisations and deaths. For participants having a statin dispense within 90 days of study entry, we computed medication possession ratio (MPR) and usual provider continuity index (UPI) for the subsequent two years. We used multivariate Poisson regression to calculate the relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for the association between tertiles of UPI and MPR adjusted for socio-demographic and health-related patient factors, including age, gender, remoteness of residence, smoking, alcohol intake, fruit and vegetable intake, physical activity, prior heart disease and speaking a language other than English at home. We performed a comparison approach using propensity score matching on a subset of the sample. Results 36,144 participants were eligible and included in the analysis among whom 58% had UPI greater than 75%. UPI was significantly associated with 5% increased MPR for statin adherence (95% CI 1.04–1.06) for highest versus lowest tertile. Dichotomised analysis using a cut-off of UPI at 75% showed a similar effect size. The association between UPI and statin adherence was independent of socio-demographic and health-related factors. Stratification analyses further showed a stronger association among those who were new to statins (RR 1.33, 95% CI 1.15–1.54). Conclusions Greater continuity of care has a positive association with medication adherence for statins which is independent of socio-demographic and health-related factors. PMID:26448561

  5. [Long term adherence to HAART in Senegal].

    PubMed

    Bastard, M; Fall, M Basty Koita

    2014-10-01

    Adherence is one of the main predictors of antiretroviral treatment success. A governmental initiative was launched in 1998 for HIV-infected patients in Senegal to provide access to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Adherence measurements, defined as pills taken/pills prescribed, were assessed between November 1999 and June 2010 using a pill count along with a questionnaire for 330 patients. Predictors of adherence and identification of adherence trajectories were explored through latent class mixed model. We also performed a survival analysis using Cox proportional hazard model. Three adherence behaviours were revealed as well as a better adherence for women. A third of patients had a high adherence trajectory over time and a third had an intermediate one. Male gender and low adherence behaviour over time were independently associated with a higher mortality rate. This study shows that an overall good adherence can be obtained in the long term in Senegal, suggests a better adherence for women and points out a large subsample of patients with intermediate level of adherence behaviour who are at risk for developing resistance to antiretroviral drugs. PMID:24615434

  6. Bisphosphonates adherence for treatment of osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Osteoporosis is a disease of bone metabolism in which bisphosphonates (BPS) are the most common medications used in its treatment, whose main objective is to reduce the risk of fractures. The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review on BPs adherence for treatment of osteoporosis. Methods Systematic review of articles on BPs adherence for treatment of osteoporosis, indexed on MEDLINE (via PubMed) databases, from inception of databases until January 2013. Search terms were “Adherence, Medication” (MeSH term), “Bisphosphonates” (MeSH term), and “Osteoporosis” (MeSH term). Results Of the 78 identified studies, 27 met the eligibility criteria. Identified studies covered a wide range of aspects regarding adherence and associated factors, adherence and fracture, adherence and BPs dosage. The studies are mostly observational, conducted with women over 45 years old, showing low rates of adherence to treatment. Several factors may influence adherence: socio-economic and cultural, participation of physicians when guidance is given to the patient, the use of bone turnover markers, and use of generic drugs. The monthly dosage is associated with greater adherence compared to weekly dosage. Conclusions Considering the methodological differences between the studies, the results converge to show that adherence to treatment of osteoporosis with BPs is still inadequate. Further experimental studies are needed to evaluate the adherence and suggest new treatment options. PMID:23705998

  7. Antiretroviral regimen and suboptimal medication adherence are associated with low-level human immunodeficiency virus viremia.

    PubMed

    Konstantopoulos, Christina; Ribaudo, Heather; Ragland, Kathleen; Bangsberg, David R; Li, Jonathan Z

    2015-01-01

    Episodes of human immunodeficiency virus low-level viremia (LLV) are common in the clinical setting, but its association with antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimen and adherence remains unclear. Antiretroviral therapy adherence was evaluated in participants of the Research on Access to Care in the Homeless cohort by unannounced pill counts. Factors associated with increased risk of LLV include treatment with a protease inhibitor (PI)-based regimen (ritonavir-boosted PI vs nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor: adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 3.1; P = .01) and lower ART adherence over the past 3 months (HR, 1.1 per 5% decreased adherence, adjusted; P = .050). Patients with LLV may benefit from ART adherence counseling and potentially regimen modification. PMID:25884007

  8. Antiretroviral Non-Adherence is Associated With a Retrieval Profile of Deficits in Verbal Episodic Memory.

    PubMed

    Obermeit, Lisa C; Morgan, Erin E; Casaletto, Kaitlin B; Grant, Igor; Woods, Steven Paul

    2015-01-01

    HIV-associated deficits in verbal episodic memory are commonly associated with antiretroviral non-adherence; however, the specific aspects of memory functioning (e.g., encoding, consolidation, or retrieval) that underlie this established relationship are not well understood. This study evaluated verbal memory profiles of 202 HIV+ participants who underwent a 30-day electronic monitoring of antiretroviral adherence. At the group level, non-adherence was significantly associated with lower scores on immediate and delayed passage recall and word list learning. Retention and recognition of passages and word lists were not related to adherence. Participants were then classified as having either a normal verbal memory profile, a "subcortical" retrieval profile (i.e., impaired free recall with relatively spared recognition), or a "cortical" encoding profile (e.g., cued recall intrusions) based on the Massman et al. ( 1990 ) algorithm for the California Verbal Learning Test. HIV+ participants with a classic retrieval deficit had significantly greater odds of being non-adherent than participants with a normal or encoding profile. These findings suggest that adherence to prescribed antiretroviral regimens may be particularly vulnerable to disruption in HIV+ individuals due to deficits in the complex process of efficiently accessing verbal episodic information with minimal cues. A stronger relationship between non-adherence and passage (vs. word list) recall was also found and may reflect the importance of contextual features in remembering to take medications. Targeted interventions for enhancing and supporting episodic memory retrieval processes may improve antiretroviral adherence and overall health outcomes among persons living with HIV. PMID:25781903

  9. Antiretroviral Non-Adherence is Associated with a Retrieval Profile of Deficits in Verbal Episodic Memory

    PubMed Central

    Obermeit, Lisa C.; Morgan, Erin E.; Casaletto, Kaitlin B.; Grant, Igor; Woods, Steven Paul

    2015-01-01

    Objective HIV-associated deficits in verbal episodic memory are commonly associated with antiretroviral non-adherence; however, the specific aspects of memory functioning (e.g., encoding, consolidation, or retrieval) that underlie this established relationship are not well understood. Method This study evaluated verbal memory profiles of 202 HIV+ participants who underwent a 30-day electronic monitoring of antiretroviral adherence. Results At the group level, non-adherence was significantly associated with lower scores on immediate and delayed passage recall and word list learning. Retention and recognition of passages and word lists were not related to adherence. Participants were then classified as having either a normal verbal memory profile, a “subcortical” retrieval profile (i.e., impaired free recall with relatively spared recognition), or a “cortical” encoding profile (e.g., cued recall intrusions) based on the Massman et al. (1990) algorithm for the California Verbal Learning Test. HIV+ participants with a classic retrieval deficit had significantly greater odds of being non-adherent than participants with a normal or encoding profile. Conclusions These findings suggest that adherence to prescribed antiretroviral regimens may be particularly vulnerable to disruption in HIV+ individuals due to deficits in the complex process of efficiently accessing verbal episodic information with minimal cues. A stronger relationship between non-adherence and passage (vs. word list) recall was also found and may reflect the importance of contextual features in remembering to take medications. Targeted interventions for enhancing and supporting episodic memory retrieval processes may improve antiretroviral adherence and overall health outcomes among persons living with HIV. PMID:25781903

  10. Adherence to Methotrexate therapy in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Arshad, Nasim; Ahmad, Nighat Mir; Saeed, Muhammad Ahmed; Khan, Saira; Batool, Shabnam; Farman, Sumaira

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine adherence to methotrexate (MTX) therapy in patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) and to identify factors that promote either adherence or non adherence. Methods: One hundred Rheumatoid Arthritis patients on MTX for at least two months were enrolled. Questionnaire was completed by direct interview. Details recorded were, demographics (age, sex, education, monthly income), disease duration, duration on MTX and current dose. Disease Activity Score on 28 joint counts (DAS 28) at the current visit, concomitant drugs taken and number of doses of MTX missed in the previous 8 weeks were noted. Non adherence was defined as omission of any three or more prescribed doses of MTX in previous 8 week. Patients were asked for the factors that motivated their adherence to MTX as well as factors for non adherence. Presence of side effects due to MTX was also recorded. Result: Non adherence was found among 23% of cases. Patients of low socioeconomic group (p <0.0001) and on MTX for longer duration (p <0.001) had higher non adherence. Non adherent patients had significantly higher disease activity as measured by DAS 28 (p<0.001). Good counseling and education by the doctor was a strong predictor of adherence (p <0.001). Lack of affordability (p <0.001); lack of availability at local pharmacy (p <0.001); lack of family support (p <0.001) and lack of awareness regarding need and importance of MTX (p < 0.001were found as significant factors for non adherence. Conclusion: MTX non adherence in RA is noted in about one fourth of study group. Various economical and social issues lead to non adherence but good patient education and counseling by doctor could promote adherence in this study group. PMID:27182251

  11. The Scale of Self-Efficacy Expectations of Adherence to Antiretroviral Treatment: A Tool for Identifying Risk for Non-Adherence to Treatment for HIV

    PubMed Central

    Drachler, Maria de Lourdes; Drachler, Carlos Wietzke; Teixeira, Luciana Barcellos; de Carvalho Leite, José Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Background Identification of risk for non-adherence to treatment is a challenge for personalized care for people living with HIV. Standardized questionnaires of patients’ expectations of their capability to overcome obstacles for treatment adherence may be used as a pre-screening for risk identification. A scale of self-efficacy expectations of adherence to antiretroviral treatment (SEA-ART scale) was previously developed. This study assesses the scale validity in predicting non-adherence to ART in adults living with HIV. Methods and Findings A prospective cohort study applied a 21-item SEA-ART scale to 275 adults in ART treatment at an outpatient public service for HIV in Southern Brazil. ART medications taken were assessed at one-month follow-up; ART adherence was devised as an intake of 95% and more of the prescribed medication. A SEA-ART score was calculated by adding up the scores of all items. Multivariable logistic regression and the Area Under the Receiver-Operating-Characteristic Curve (AUROC) were applied to examine the ability of the SEA-ART score to predict non-adherence at follow-up. The SEA-ART score varied from 21 to 105; mean 93.9; median 103.0. Non-adherence was 30.3% (n = 81/267). The odds of non-adherence was 8% lower for each unit increase of the SEA-ART score; after adjustment for age, sex, formal education and time in treatment (OR = 0.92; 95%CI 0.90–0.95; LRT for linear trend, p = 0.002). The AUROC was 0.80 (95%CI 0.73–0.87; p<0.001). The SEA-ART optimal cut-off value was 101, providing a sensitivity of 76.5%, a specificity of 73.1%, a positive predictive value of 55.4% and a negative predictive value of 87.7%. There was no evidence of difference in sensitivity, and specificity among groups organized by age, gender, formal education and time in treatment. Conclusions The SEA-ART scale appears to have a good capacity to discriminate between adherents and non-adherents at one-month follow-up. Further studies should confirm these results

  12. Diabatic crossing of chiral "twins" in the odd-odd 106Ag nucleus: A theoretical perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Sham S.

    2016-07-01

    A systematic study of both the observed positive-parity magnetic rotation band and the negative-parity Δ I =1 doublet bands in an odd-odd 106Ag nucleus is carried out. The negative-parity doublet bands depict some unusual features that have not been observed in any isotope in the mass A =100 region. For instance, (i) the moment of inertia of the partner band is quite different from that of the yrast band, and (ii) these bands cross each other at an angular momentum of I =14 ℏ . Also, the observed significantly large but constant B (M 1 ) transitions confirm that the strong M 1 transitions are being reinforced by the contributions from collective rotation. To explain these features, a collective model has been developed whose kinetic and potential energies are extracted from the tilted-axis cranking model. Instead of the triaxial parameter γ , a second-order phase transition is found to be responsible for the spontaneous breakdown of chiral symmetry. Analytical solution of the Schrödinger equation has generated a doublet nondegenerate eigenvalue spectrum. The ensuing model results based on the two-quasiparticle configuration π g9/2⊗ν h11/2 exhibit similarities with many observed features of the negative-parity doublet bands and hence confirm their chiral character. The cranking mass parameter in kinetic energy plays an important role in diabatic crossing between these emerged chiral twin bands.

  13. Neutron-proton multiplets in the odd-odd nucleus 53 37 90Rb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czerwiński, M.; RzÄ ca-Urban, T.; Urban, W.; BÄ czyk, P.; Sieja, K.; Timár, J.; Nyakó, B. M.; Kuti, I.; Tornyi, T. G.; Atanasova, L.; Blanc, A.; Jentschel, M.; Mutti, P.; Köster, U.; Soldner, T.; de France, G.; Simpson, G. S.; Ur, C. A.

    2016-03-01

    Medium-spin excited levels in 90Rb, populated in the fission of 235U induced by neutrons, have been observed for the first time. γ radiation from fission has been measured by using the EXILL array of Ge detectors at the cold-neutron-beam facility PF1B of the Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble. Low-energy levels are interpreted as members of the π p3/2 -1ν (d5/2) 3 , π f5/2 -1ν (d5/2) 3 , and π g9 /2ν (d5/2) 3 multiplets with the 0- ground state due to the seniority-3 coupling in the ν d5 /2 shell. Analogous anomalous coupling within the π g9 /2ν (d5/2) 3 configuration explains the 5+, 6+, and 7+ triplet of states, observed at medium spins, similar to the triplet seen in the N =53 isotone, 88Br. Shell-model calculations reproduce well the proposed structures in Rb,9088 and support the seniority-3 coupling in N =53 isotones and its absence in N =51 isotones. The structure of the odd-odd 88Rb and 90Rb nuclei provides an argument in favor of the collectivity building up at the neutron number N =53 .

  14. An Analytical Evaluation of Two Common-Odds Ratios as Population Indicators of DIF.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pommerich, Mary; And Others

    The Mantel-Haenszel (MH) statistic for identifying differential item functioning (DIF) commonly conditions on the observed test score as a surrogate for conditioning on latent ability. When the comparison group distributions are not completely overlapping (i.e., are incongruent), the observed score represents different levels of latent ability…

  15. Asymptotically Unbiased Estimation of Exposure Odds Ratios in Complete Records Logistic Regression

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, Jonathan W.; Harel, Ofer; Carpenter, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Missing data are a commonly occurring threat to the validity and efficiency of epidemiologic studies. Perhaps the most common approach to handling missing data is to simply drop those records with 1 or more missing values, in so-called “complete records” or “complete case” analysis. In this paper, we bring together earlier-derived yet perhaps now somewhat neglected results which show that a logistic regression complete records analysis can provide asymptotically unbiased estimates of the association of an exposure of interest with an outcome, adjusted for a number of confounders, under a surprisingly wide range of missing-data assumptions. We give detailed guidance describing how the observed data can be used to judge the plausibility of these assumptions. The results mean that in large epidemiologic studies which are affected by missing data and analyzed by logistic regression, exposure associations may be estimated without bias in a number of settings where researchers might otherwise assume that bias would occur. PMID:26429998

  16. Odds Ratio, Delta, ETS Classification, and Standardization Measures of DIF Magnitude for Binary Logistic Regression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monahan, Patrick O.; McHorney, Colleen A.; Stump, Timothy E.; Perkins, Anthony J.

    2007-01-01

    Previous methodological and applied studies that used binary logistic regression (LR) for detection of differential item functioning (DIF) in dichotomously scored items either did not report an effect size or did not employ several useful measures of DIF magnitude derived from the LR model. Equations are provided for these effect size indices.…

  17. Could Weight-Loss Surgery Boost Odds of Preemie Birth?

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160596.html Could Weight-Loss Surgery Boost Odds of Preemie Birth? Monitoring is ... HealthDay News) -- Mothers-to-be who've had weight-loss surgery may have increased odds for premature delivery, ...

  18. On the largest prime divisor of an odd harmonic number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chishiki, Yusuke; Goto, Takeshi; Ohno, Yasuo

    2007-09-01

    A positive integer is called a (Ore's) harmonic number if its positive divisors have integral harmonic mean. Ore conjectured that every harmonic number greater than 1 is even. If Ore's conjecture is true, there exist no odd perfect numbers. In this paper, we prove that every odd harmonic number greater than 1 must be divisible by a prime greater than 10^5 .

  19. Checking the odd Goldbach conjecture up to 10(20)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saouter, Y.

    1998-04-01

    Vinogradov's theorem states that any sufficiently large odd integer is the sum of three prime numbers. This theorem allows us to suppose the conjecture that this is true for all odd integers. In this paper, we describe the implementation of an algorithm which allowed us to-check this conjecture up to 10(20).

  20. Relationship between buprenorphine adherence and health service utilization and costs among opioid dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Tkacz, Joseph; Volpicelli, Joseph; Un, Hyong; Ruetsch, Charles

    2014-04-01

    Buprenorphine-medication assisted therapy (B-MAT) is an effective treatment for opioid dependence, but may be considered cost-prohibitive based on ingredient cost alone. The purpose of this study was to use medical and pharmacy claims data to estimate the healthcare service utilization and costs associated with B-MAT adherence among a sample of opioid dependent members. Members were placed into two adherence groups based on 1-year medication possession ratio (≥ 0.80 vs. <0.80). The B-MAT adherent group incurred significantly higher pharmacy charges (adjusted means; $6,156 vs. $3,581), but lower outpatient ($9,288 vs. $14,570), inpatient ($10,982 vs. $26,470), ER ($1,891 vs. $4,439), and total healthcare charges ($28,458 vs. $49,051; p<0.01) compared to non-adherent members. Adherence effects were confirmed in general linear models. Though B-MAT adherence requires increased pharmacy utilization, adherent individuals were shown to use fewer expensive health care services, resulting in overall reduced healthcare expenditure compared to non-adherent patients. PMID:24332511

  1. Medication Adherence in People With Parkinson Disease.

    PubMed

    Shin, Ju Young; Habermann, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder in the United States. Because there is no cure for PD currently, pharmacological therapy is the mainstay of PD symptom management. Despite the importance of medication adherence in PD, several studies have reported medication nonadherence and/or suboptimal adherence. This literature review provides an overview of medication adherence issues in people with PD. Articles were identified for this study using computerized database searches and journal hand searches. Of the 72 medication adherence articles reviewed, the following articles were eligible for this review: (a) 10 articles measuring medication adherence in people with PD, (b) four medication adherence intervention articles, and (c) six studies of medication adherence in hospitalized settings. The importance of adherence assessment and strategies in improving medication adherence are discussed with the goal of improving symptom management and clinical outcomes in people with PD. Because medication taking is a complex and multifaceted phenomena, patient-centered, theory-driven interventions are needed to improve medication adherence and quality of care and life in people with PD. PMID:27224682

  2. Interventions to improve adherence to treatment for paediatric tuberculosis in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Meaghann S; Lönnroth, Knut; Howard, Scott C; Roter, Debra L

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess the design, delivery and outcomes of interventions to improve adherence to treatment for paediatric tuberculosis in low- and middle-income countries and develop a contextual framework for such interventions. Methods We searched PubMed and Cochrane databases for reports published between 1 January 2003 and 1 December 2013 on interventions to improve adherence to treatment for tuberculosis that included patients younger than 20 years who lived in a low- or middle-income country. For potentially relevant articles that lacked paediatric outcomes, we contacted the authors of the studies. We assessed heterogeneity and risk of bias. To evaluate treatment success – i.e. the combination of treatment completion and cure – we performed random-effects meta-analysis. We identified areas of need for improved intervention practices. Findings We included 15 studies in 11 countries for the qualitative analysis and of these studies, 11 qualified for the meta-analysis – representing 1279 children. Of the interventions described in the 15 studies, two focused on education, one on psychosocial support, seven on care delivery, four on health systems and one on financial provisions. The children in intervention arms had higher rates of treatment success, compared with those in control groups (odds ratio: 3.02; 95% confidence interval: 2.19–4.15). Using the results of our analyses, we developed a framework around factors that promoted or threatened treatment completion. Conclusion Various interventions to improve adherence to treatment for paediatric tuberculosis appear both feasible and effective in low- and middle-income countries. PMID:26600612

  3. Individual factors and school-based policies related to adherence to physical activity recommendations in Spanish adolescents.

    PubMed

    Galán, I; Boix, R; Medrano, M J; Ramos, P; Rivera, F; Moreno, C

    2014-08-01

    Our objective was to identify individual- and school-level contextual factors related to adherence to the recommendations for physical activity in adolescents. The study used a representative sample of 15,902 students from 328 schools aged 11-18 years participating in the Spanish Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) survey 2006. In addition to the student questionnaire, the school management board completed a questionnaire about school-based policies related to physical activity. Adherence to the recommendations was defined as "having carried out moderate and/or vigorous physical activity for at least 60 min a day on five or more days during the last week". Analysis was undertaken using multilevel logistic regression models. Individual factors associated in a statistically significant way with a higher non-compliance were: being female; being older; immigrants; tobacco smoking; being overweight or obese; low consumption of fruit and vegetables; low level of satisfaction with life; not having a high level of academic achievement; and spending a lot of time studying. The family variables were: not undertaking sports activities with the family; low socioeconomic status; and a low level of satisfaction with family relationships. Compared with schools that have a low level of policies to promote physical activities, those with a high level of promotion had an odds ratio of 0.76 (CI 95 %, 0.61-0.94). In summary, irrespective of personal and family factors, students from schools with better policies of promotion of physical activity showed a higher compliance with the recommendations. PMID:23728581

  4. Soil adherence to human skin

    SciTech Connect

    Driver, J.H.; Konz, J.J.; Whitmyre, G.K. )

    1989-12-01

    Dermal exposure to soils contaminated with toxic chemicals represents a potential public health hazard. These soils, contaminated with chemicals such as PCBs and dioxins, may be found at various locations throughout the US. Furthermore, dermal contact with pesticide-containing particles and contaminated soil particles is of importance for exposures to agricultural workers who reenter fields after pesticide application. With respect to dermal exposure to pesticide-contaminated particulate matter, several occurrences of human toxicity to ethyl parathion in citrus groves have been reported. These exposures resulted from dermal contact with high concentrations of the toxic transformation product paraoxon in soil dust contaminated as a result of application of pesticide to the overhead foliage of trees. To assess dermal exposure to chemically-contaminated soil at sites of concern, dermal adherence of soil must be determined prior to the assessment of dermal absorption. The purpose of the experiment reported herein was to determine the amount of soil (mg/cm{sup 2}) that adheres to adult hands under various soil conditions. These conditions include the type of soil, the organic content of the soil, and the particle size of the soil.

  5. The causal effect of opioid substitution treatment on HAART medication refill adherence

    PubMed Central

    Nosyk, Bohdan; Min, Jeong E.; Colley, Guillaume; Lima, Viviane D.; Yip, Benita; Milloy, M.-J.S.; Wood, Evan; Montaner, Julio S.G.

    2015-01-01

    Background People who inject drugs (PWID) account for roughly 13% of the prevalent HIV/AIDS population outside of sub-Saharan Africa, and access to opioid substitution treatment (OST) is limited in many settings globally. OST likely facilitates access to HAART, yet sparse evidence is available to support this hypothesis. Our objective was to determine the causal impact of OST exposure on HAART adherence among HIV-positive PWID in a Canadian setting. Methods We executed a retrospective cohort study using linked population-level data for British Columbia, Canada (January 1996–March 2010). We considered HIV-positive PWID after meeting HAART initiation criteria. A marginal structural model was estimated on a monthly timescale using inverse probability of treatment weights. The primary outcome was 95% HAART adherence, according to pharmacy refill compliance. Exposure to OST was defined as 95% of OST receipt, and we controlled for a range of fixed and time-varying covariates. Results Our study included 1852 (63.3%) HIV-positive PWID with a median follow-up of 5.5 years; 34% were female and 39% had previously accessed OST. The baseline covariate-adjusted odds of HAART adherence following OST exposure was 1.96 (95% confidence interval: 1.72–2.24), although the adjusted odds estimated within the marginal structural model was 1.68 (1.48–1.92). Findings were robust to sensitivity analyses on model specification. Conclusion In a setting characterized by universal healthcare and widespread access to both office-based OST and HAART, OST substantially increased the odds of HAART adherence. This underlines the need to address barriers to OST globally to reduce the disease burden of both opioid dependence and HIV/AIDS. PMID:25915170

  6. Properties of the {pi}i{sub 13/2}x{nu}i{sub 13/2} band in odd-odd {sup 184}Au

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.H.; Fang, Y.D.; Wang, H.L.; Zhou, X.H.; Guo, W.T.; Liu, M.L.; Guo, Y.X.; Lei, X.G.; De Angelis, G.; Marginean, N.; Gadea, A.; Napoli, D.R.; Axiotis, M.; Rusu, C.; Martinez, T.; Oshima, M.; Toh, Y.

    2004-11-01

    High-spin level structure in {sup 184}Au has been reinvestigated using the multidetector array of GASP via the {sup 159}Tb({sup 29}Si,4n{gamma}){sup 184}Au reaction at a beam energy of 140 MeV. The ground-state band and the excited {pi}i{sub 13/2}x{nu}i{sub 13/2} 2-qp band have been extended up to lower and higher spin states. An upbend has been observed in the excited band at ({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){omega}{approx}0.25 MeV and is interpreted as resulting from a pair of {pi}h{sub 9/2} alignment. This low-frequency ({pi}h{sub 9/2}){sup 2} alignment is supported by the measured B(M1)/B(E2) ratios and alignment properties in neighboring odd-A nuclei. The linking transitions between the two bands and to the ground state have been established leading to a firm spin-and-parity assignment for the {pi}i{sub 13/2}x{nu}i{sub 13/2} band in {sup 184}Au. This result provides strong evidence for the low-spin signature inversion in the {pi}i{sub 13/2}x{nu}i{sub 13/2} bands of odd-odd nuclei in the A{approx}180 mass region.

  7. Nuclear spin of odd-odd α emitters based on the behavior of α -particle preformation probability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, M.; Adel, A.; Botros, M. M.

    2016-05-01

    The preformation probabilities of an α cluster inside radioactive parent nuclei for both odd-even and odd-odd nuclei are investigated. The calculations cover the isotopic chains from Ir to Ac in the mass regions 166 ≤A ≤215 and 77 ≤Z ≤89 . The calculations are employed in the framework of the density-dependent cluster model. A realistic density-dependent nucleon-nucleon (N N ) interaction with a finite-range exchange part is used to calculate the microscopic α -nucleus potential in the well-established double-folding model. The main effect of antisymmetrization under exchange of nucleons between the α and daughter nuclei has been included in the folding model through the finite-range exchange part of the N N interaction. The calculated potential is then implemented to find both the assault frequency and the penetration probability of the α particle by means of the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation in combination with the Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization condition. The correlation of the α -particle preformation probability and the neutron and proton level sequences of the parent nucleus as obtained in our previous work is extended to odd-even and odd-odd nuclei to determine the nuclear spin and parities. Two spin coupling rules are used, namely, strong and weak rules to determine the nuclear spin for odd-odd isotopes. This work can be a useful reference for theoretical calculation of undetermined nuclear spin of odd-odd nuclei in the future.

  8. Improving hand hygiene adherence among nursing staff.

    PubMed

    Harne-Britner, Sarah; Allen, Marianne; Fowler, Kimberly A

    2011-01-01

    This quasi-experimental study explored initial and sustained effects of educational and behavioral interventions on hand hygiene adherence and the relationships between hand hygiene adherence and health care-associated infections. Education paired with positive reinforcement behavioral interventions significantly improved hand hygiene adherence after the first month (χ² = 4.27; P = .039); however, the improvement was not sustained over 6 months. There were no significant differences in infection rates between the treatment and control groups. PMID:20407392

  9. Medication Adherence: A Call for Action

    PubMed Central

    Bosworth, Hayden B.; Granger, Bradi B.; Mendys, Phil; Brindis, Ralph; Burkholder, Rebecca; Czajkowski, Susan M.; Daniel, Jodi G.; Ekman, Inger; Ho, Michael; Johnson, Mimi; Kimmel, Stephen E.; Liu, Larry Z; Musaus, John; Shrank, William H.; Buono, Elizabeth Whalley; Weiss, Karen; Granger, Christopher B.

    2013-01-01

    Poor adherence to efficacious cardiovascular related medications has led to considerable morbidity, mortality, and avoidable health care costs. This paper provides results of a recent think tank meeting in which various stakeholder groups representing key experts from consumers, community health providers, the academic community, decision-making government officials (FDA, NIH, etc), and industry scientists met to evaluate the current status of medication adherence and provide recommendations for improving outcomes. Below, we review the magnitude of the problem of medication adherence, prevalence, impact, and cost. We then summarize proven effective approaches and conclude with a discussion of recommendations to address this growing and significant public health issue of medication non adherence. PMID:21884856

  10. Medication adherence among adult patients on hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Alkatheri, Abdulmalik M; Alyousif, Sarah M; Alshabanah, Najla; Albekairy, Abdulkareem M; Alharbi, Shemylan; Alhejaili, Fayze F; Alsayyari, Abdullah A; Qandil, Abeer Ma; Qandil, Amjad M

    2014-07-01

    Medication adherence was assessed in 89 patients on hemodialysis (HD) at the King Abdul Aziz Medical City using an Arabic version of the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MASS-8). The results of the study revealed that 31.46% and 40.45% of the participants showed low and medium adherence, respectively, while 28.09% showed high medication adherence. Accordingly, 71.91% of the patients visiting the dialysis unit were considered medication non-adherent. While being of older age (P = 0.012), being married (P = 0.012) increased the level of adherence, being of medium level of education (P = 0.024) decreased adherence levels. On the other hand, gender, presence of a care-giver, number of members in the household and employment status seems to have no effect on the level of medication adherence. These results call upon the practitioners in HD units to develop intervention programs that can increase the level of medication adherence. PMID:24969185

  11. Family interaction and treatment adherence after stroke.

    PubMed

    Evans, R L; Bishop, D S; Matlock, A L; Stranahan, S; Smith, G G; Halar, E M

    1987-08-01

    Caregivers of 60 stroke patients were assessed five months after patient discharge from a stroke care unit to determine the relationship between family function and poststroke treatment adherence. Areas of family interaction which were significantly related to ratings of treatment adherence included problem solving, communication, and affective involvement. Better functioning families were consistently high on signs of treatment adherence. Findings suggest that families with specific dysfunction may not be as capable of helping patients comply with rehabilitation efforts as families who function more effectively. Thorough family assessment to identify which areas of family interaction are most problematic in relation to adherence issues is recommended. PMID:3619615

  12. Observation of odd toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes.

    PubMed

    Kramer, G J; Sharapov, S E; Nazikian, R; Gorelenkov, N N; Budny, R V

    2004-01-01

    Experimental evidence is presented for the existence of the theoretically predicted odd toroidicity induced Alfvén eigenmode (TAE) from the simultaneous appearance of odd and even TAEs in a normal shear discharge of the joint European torus. The modes are observed in low central magnetic shear plasmas created by injecting lower hybrid current drive. A fast ion population was created by applying ion cyclotron heating at the high-field side to excite the TAEs. The odd TAEs were identified from their frequency, mode number, and timing relative to the even TAEs. PMID:14753994

  13. Adherence to cancer prevention guidelines and risk of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Catsburg, Chelsea; Miller, Anthony B; Rohan, Thomas E

    2014-11-15

    Healthy eating patterns and keeping physically active are potentially more important for chronic disease prevention than intake or exclusion of specific food items or nutrients. To this end, many health organizations routinely publish dietary and lifestyle recommendations aimed at preventing chronic disease. Using data from the Canadian National Breast Screening Study, we investigated the association between breast cancer risk and adherence to two sets of guidelines specific for cancer prevention, namely the American Cancer Society (ACS) Guidelines and the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) Recommendations. At baseline, 49,613 women completed dietary and lifestyle questionnaires and height and weight measurements were taken. During a mean follow-up of 16.6 years, 2,503 incident cases of breast cancer were ascertained. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association of meeting each guideline, and number of guidelines met, with breast cancer risk. The two sets of guidelines yielded similar results. Specifically, adherence to all six ACS guidelines was associated with a 31% reduction in breast cancer risk when compared to subjects adhering to at most one guideline (HR=0.69; 95% CI=0.49-0.97); similarly, adherence to six or seven of the WCRF/AICR guidelines was also associated with a 31% reduction in breast cancer risk (HR=0.69; 95% CI=0.47-1.00). Under either classification, meeting each additional guideline was associated with a 4-6% reduction in breast cancer risk. These results suggest that adherence to cancer prevention guidelines is associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer. PMID:24723234

  14. The competition between alpha decay and spontaneous fission in odd-even and odd-odd nuclei in the range 99 ≤ Z ≤ 129

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santhosh, K. P.; Priyanka, B.

    2015-08-01

    The predictions on the mode of decay of the odd-even and odd-odd isotopes of heavy and superheavy nuclei with Z = 99- 129, in the range 228 ≤ A ≤ 336, have been done within the Coulomb and proximity potential model for deformed nuclei (CPPMDN). A comparison of our calculated alpha half lives with the values computed using other theoretical models shows good agreement with each other. An extensive study on the spontaneous fission half lives of all the isotopes under study has been performed to identify the long-lived isotopes in the mass region. The study reveals that the alpha decay half lives and the mode of decay of the isotopes with Z = 109, 111, 113, 115 and 117, evaluated using our formalisms, agree well with the experimental observations. As our study on the odd-even and odd-odd isotopes of Z = 99- 129 predicts that, the isotopes 238,240-25499, 244,246-258101, 248,250,252-260,262103, 254,256,258-262,264105, 258,260,262-264,266107, 262,264,266-274109, 266,268-279111, 270-284,286113, 272-289,291115, 274-299117, 276-307119, 281-314121, 287-320,322123, 295-325125, 302-327127 and 309-329129 survive fission and have alpha decay channel as the prominent mode of decay, these nuclei could possibly be synthesized in the laboratory and this could be of great interest to the experimentalists. The behavior of these nuclei against the proton decay has also been studied to identify the probable proton emitters in this region of nuclei.

  15. Potential Savings From Increasing Adherence to Inhaled Corticosteroid Therapy in Medicaid-Enrolled Children

    PubMed Central

    Rust, George; Zhang, Shun; McRoy, Luceta; Pisu, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background Many asthma-related exacerbations could be prevented by consistent use of daily inhaled corticosteroid therapy (ICS-Rx). Objectives We sought to measure the potential cost savings that could accrue from increasing ICS-Rx adherence in children. Study Design We measured observed costs for a cohort of 43,156 Medicaid-enrolled children in 14 southern states whose initial ICS-Rx was prescribed in 2007. Methods Adherence rates and associated costs were calculated from Medicaid claims. Children were categorized as high or low adherence based on the ratio of ICS-Rx claims filled to total asthma drug claims. Branching tree simulation was used to project the potential cost savings achieved by increasing the proportion of children with ICS-Rx to total asthma Rx ratios greater than 0.5 to 20%, 40%, 60%, 80%, and 100%. Results Increasing the proportion of children who maintain higher adherence after initial ICS-Rx to 40% would generate savings of $95 per child per year. An intervention costing $10 per member per month that resulted in even half of the children maintaining high adherence would generate a 98% return on investment for managed care plans or state Medicaid programs. Net costs decreased incrementally at each level of increase in ICS-Rx adherence. The projected Medicaid cost savings for these 14 states in 2007 ranged from $8.2 million if 40% of the children achieved high adherence, to $57.5 million if 80% achieved high adherence. Conclusions If effective large-scale interventions can be found, there are substantial cost savings to be gained from even modest increases in real-world adherence to ICS-Rx among Medicaid-enrolled children with asthma. PMID:25880622

  16. Non-adherence to inhaled corticosteroids and the risk of asthma exacerbations in children

    PubMed Central

    Vasbinder, Erwin C; Belitser, Svetlana V; Souverein, Patrick C; van Dijk, Liset; Vulto, Arnold G; van den Bemt, Patricia MLA

    2016-01-01

    Background Non-adherence to inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) is a major risk factor for poor asthma control in children. However, little is known about the effect of adherence to ICS on the incidence of asthma exacerbations. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of poor adherence to ICS on the risk of exacerbations in children with asthma. Methods In this nested case–control study using data from the Dutch PHARMO Record Linkage System, children aged 5–12 years who had an asthma exacerbation needing oral corticosteroids or hospital admission were matched to patients without exacerbations. Refill adherence was calculated as medication possession ratio from ICS-dispensing records. Data were analyzed using a multivariable multiplicative intensity regression model. Results A total of 646 children were included, of whom 36 had one or more asthma exacerbations. The medication possession ratio was 67.9% (standard deviation [SD] 30.2%) in children with an exacerbation versus 54.2% (SD 35.6%) in the control group. In children using long-acting beta-agonist, good adherence to ICS was associated with a higher risk of asthma exacerbations: relative risk 4.34 (95% confidence interval: 1.20–15.64). Conclusion In children with persistent asthma needing long-acting beta-agonist, good adherence to ICS was associated with an increased risk of asthma exacerbations. Possible explanations include better motivation for adherence to ICS in children with more severe asthma, and reduced susceptibility to the consequences of non-adherence to ICS due to overprescription of ICS to children who are in clinical remission. Further study into the background of the complex interaction between asthma and medication adherence is needed. PMID:27110103

  17. Predictors of adherence to safe handling practices for antineoplastic drugs: A survey of hospital nurses.

    PubMed

    Silver, Sharon R; Steege, Andrea L; Boiano, James M

    2016-01-01

    Despite growing awareness of the hazards of exposure to antineoplastic drugs (ADs), surveys continue to find incomplete adherence to recommended safe handling guidelines. A 2011 survey of healthcare workers presents an opportunity to examine factors associated with adherence among 1094 hospital nurses who administered ADs. Data for these hypothesis-generating analyses were taken from an anonymous, web-based survey of healthcare workers. Regression modeling was used to examine associations between a number of predictors (engineering controls, work practices, nurse perceptions, and nurse and hospital characteristics) and three outcomes reported by nurses: use of personal protective equipment (PPE); activities performed with gloves previously worn to administer ADs; and spills of ADs. Adherence to safe handling guidelines was not universal, and AD spills were reported by 9.5% of nurses during the week prior to the survey. Familiarity with safe handling guidelines and training in safe handling were associated with more reported PPE use. Nurse-perceived availability of PPE was associated with more reported PPE use and lower odds of reported spills. Use of closed system drug-transfer devices and luer-lock fittings also decreased the odds of self-reported AD spills, while more frequent AD administration increased the risk. AD administration frequency was also associated with performing more activities with gloves previously worn to administer ADs, and nurse perception of having adequate time for taking safety precautions with fewer such activities. The results suggest that training and familiarity with guidelines for safe handling of ADs, adequate time to adhere to guidelines, and availability of PPE and certain engineering controls are key to ensuring adherence to safe handling practices. Further assessment of training components and engineering controls would be useful for tailoring interventions targeting these areas. PMID:26556549

  18. Adherence to Pharmacotherapy and Medication-Related Beliefs in Patients with Hypertension in Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, J. Jaime; Diez-Canseco, Francisco; Malaga, German

    2014-01-01

    Objective To characterize adherence to pharmacological medication and beliefs towards medication in a group of patients with hypertension in a large national hospital. Materials and Methods Cross-sectional survey among patients with hypertension attending the outpatient clinic of a large national hospital. Exposure of interest was the patient's beliefs towards general medication and antihypertensive drugs, i.e. beliefs of harm, overuse, necessity and concern, measured using the Beliefs about Medication questionnaire. Main outcome was adherence measured using the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale-8. Multivariate analysis was conducted using Poisson distribution logistic regression, prevalence ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Results Data from 115 participants, 67% females and mean age 62.7 years were analyzed. Low adherence was found in 57.4%. Highest scores were on the ideas of necessity and one of the most rated statements was “physicians would prescribe less medication if they spent more time with patients”. Beliefs of harm about medications and concerns about antihypertensive drugs were higher in the low adherence group (p<0.01). Those who scored higher on ideas of harm were 52% less likely of being high adherents (PR 0.48; 95% CI 0.25–0.93) and those with higher scores on concerns were 41% less likely of being high adherents (PR 0.59; 95% CI 0.39–0.91). Patients whose ideas of necessity outweighed their concerns were more likely to be adherent (PR 2.65; 95% CI 1.21–5.81). Conclusions Low adherence to antihypertensive medication is common. High scores on ideas of harm, concern and a high necessity-concern differential were predictors of medication adherence. PMID:25470372

  19. Superdeformation studies in the odd-odd nucleus {sup 192}Tl

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, S.; Carpenter, M.P.; Janssens, R.V.F.

    1995-08-01

    The study of yrast and near-yrast structures of odd-odd nuclei to high spins is somewhat limited due to the complexity of the spectra resulting from the many proton-neutron couplings near the Fermi surface. In superdeformed nuclei, the number of available protons and neutrons near the Fermi surface is somewhat limited due to the presence of large-shell gaps which stabilize the nuclear shape. A relatively small number of available neutron and proton configurations can lead to fragmentation of the SD intensity into a number of different bands. Two good examples of this phenomenon were found in {sup 192}Tl and {sup 194}Tl where the presence of six superdeformed bands were reported in both nuclei. We reexamined {sup 192}Tl at Gammasphere using the {sup 160}Gd({sup 37}Cl,5n) reaction at 178 MeV to populate states in the superdeformed well of this nucleus. While our previous study on {sup 192}Tl at ATLAS was very successful, a number of questions remained which formed the basis of our objectives in this experiment: obtain better {gamma}-ray energies for the known transitions and identify higher spin members in each band; determine how the bands feed the known yrast states in {sup 192}Tl as well as determine the complete spectrum in coincidence with the SD bands; look for M1 transitions connecting proposed signature partners; and attempt to identify other excitations in the superdeformed well. Analysis is underway and four of the six bands were confirmed. The reasons that two of the reported bands were not observed in this latest work is still under investigation. As of this time, no other superdeformed bands were identified in the data. Two of the confirmed SD bands have a constant moment of inertia and show indications of cross-talk between each other. This observation is not unexpected since the calculated M1 rates for the proposed configuration of the band, {pi}{sub 13/2} x {upsilon}j{sub 15/2}, indicate that M1 transitions linking the two SD bands should be observed.

  20. Adherence of sputtered titanium carbides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Wheeler, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    The study searches for interface treatment that would increase the adhesion of TiC coating to nickel- and titanium-base alloys. Rene 41 (19 wt percent Cr, 11 wt percent Mo, 3 wt percent Ti, balance Ni) and Ti-6Al-4V (6 wt percent Al, 4 wt percent V, balance Ti) are considered. Adhesion of the coatings is evaluated in pin-and disk friction tests. The coatings and interface regions are examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Results suggest that sputtered refractory compound coatings adhere best when a mixed compound of coating and substrate metals is formed in the interfacial region. The most effective type of refractory compound interface appears to depend on both substrate and coating material. A combination of metallic interlayer deposition and mixed compound interface formation may be more effective for some substrate coating combinations than either alone.

  1. New description of the doublet bands in doubly odd nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ganev, H. G.; Georgieva, A. I.; Brant, S.; Ventura, A.

    2009-04-15

    The experimentally observed {delta}I=1 doublet bands in some odd-odd nuclei are analyzed within the orthosymplectic extension of the interacting vector boson model (IVBM). A new, purely collective interpretation of these bands is given on the basis of the obtained boson-fermion dynamical symmetry of the model. It is illustrated by its application to three odd-odd nuclei from the A{approx}130 region, namely {sup 126}Pr, {sup 134}Pr, and {sup 132}La. The theoretical predictions for the energy levels of the doublet bands as well as E2 and M1 transition probabilities between the states of the yrast band in the last two nuclei are compared with experiment and the results of other theoretical approaches. The obtained results reveal the applicability of the orthosymplectic extension of the IVBM.

  2. Two Genes May Raise Odds for Fraternal Twin Pregnancies

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_158554.html Two Genes May Raise Odds for Fraternal Twin Pregnancies Variants ... families, researchers say they've just pinpointed two genes that seem to be associated with having such ...

  3. Two Genes May Raise Odds for Fraternal Twin Pregnancies

    MedlinePlus

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158554.html Two Genes May Raise Odds for Fraternal Twin Pregnancies Variants ... families, researchers say they've just pinpointed two genes that seem to be associated with having such ...

  4. Veterans' Painkiller Abuse Can Raise Odds for Heroin Use

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Veterans' Painkiller Abuse Can Raise Odds for Heroin Use 3 of 4 who tried the illicit ... narcotic painkillers may be at high risk for heroin use, a new study cautions. The research included ...

  5. The importance of inhaler devices: the choice of inhaler device may lead to suboptimal adherence in COPD patients

    PubMed Central

    Darbà, Josep; Ramírez, Gabriela; Sicras, Antoni; Francoli, Pablo; Torvinen, Saku; Sánchez-de la Rosa, Rainel

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aims to identify factors associated with poor adherence to COPD treatment in patients receiving a fixed-dose combination (FDC) of inhaled corticosteroids and long-acting β2-agonist (ICS/LABA), focusing on the importance of inhaler devices. Methods We conducted a retrospective and multicenter study based on a review of medical registries between 2007 and 2012 of COPD patients (n=1,263) treated with ICS/LABA FDC, whose medical devices were either dry powder inhalers (DPIs) or pressurized metered-dose inhalers (pMDI). Medication adherence included persistence outcomes through 18 months and medication possession ratios. Data on exacerbations, comorbidities, demographic characteristics, and health care resource utilization were also included as confounders of adherence. Results The analyses revealed that COPD patients whose medication was delivered through a DPI were less likely to have medication adherence compared to patients with pMDI, after adjusting for confounding factors, especially active ingredients. Younger groups of patients were less likely to be adherent compared to the oldest group. Smoker men were less likely to be adherent compared to women and non-smokers. Comorbidities decreased the probability of treatment adherence. Those patients that visited their doctor once a month were more likely to adhere to their medication regimen; however, suboptimal adherence was more likely to occur among those patients who visited more than three times per month their doctor. We also found that worsening of COPD is negatively associated with adherence. Conclusion According to this study, inhaler devices influence patients’ adherence to long-term COPD medication. We also found that DPIs delivering ICS/LABA FDC had a negative impact on adherence. Patients’ clinic and socioeconomic characteristics were associated with adherence. PMID:26604733

  6. The odd-number sequence: squares and sums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leyendekkers, J. V.; Shannon, A. G.

    2015-11-01

    Direct study of various characteristics of integers and their interactions is readily accessible to undergraduate students. Integers obviously fall in different classes of modular rings and thus have features unique to that class which can result in a variety of formations, particularly with sums of squares. The sum of the first n odd numbers is itself the square of n within the odd number sequence, from which testing for primality within the Fibonacci sequence is investigated in this note.

  7. Characterization of isomers in the neutron-rich odd-odd nucleus {sup 156}Pm

    SciTech Connect

    Sood, P. C.; Gowrishankar, R; Sai, K. Vijay; Sainath, M.

    2011-02-15

    Critical examination of the experimental data from {sup 156}Nd and {sup 156}Pm {beta} decays and the observed location of relevant neutron and proton orbitals in the neighboring odd-A isotones and isotopes, taken together with the low-lying two-quasiparticle (2qp) structures expected in {sup 156}Pm from the rotor-particle model, lead to the conclusion that a consistent description of all the available data is achieved with the I{sup {pi}}=4{sup +} spin-parity assignment to the 26.7s {sup 156}Pm ground state (g.s.) and assignment of I{sup {pi}}=1{sup +} to its 150.3-keV isomer with the 2qp configuration 4{sub g.s.}{sup +}{l_brace}p{sub o}:5/2[532{up_arrow}]{+-}n{sub o}:3/2[521{up_arrow}]{r_brace}1{sub 150}{sup +}. In the process, a two-neutron configuration is also suggested for the 1509-keV 4{sup +} level in the daughter nucleus {sup 156}Sm. The present analysis reiterates the important question of whether the {beta}-decay log ft value, by itself, can be employed to deduce the relative parity of the {beta}-connected states.

  8. Psychological Determinants of Adolescent Exercise Adherence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douthitt, Vicki L.

    1994-01-01

    High school physical education students completed questionnaires which represented four psychological variables, and one physical activity variable (exercise adherence) in classroom setting (n=132) and in summer setting (n=110). Found Perceived Romantic Appeal predictive of male exercise adherence and Perceived Athletic Competency, Perceived…

  9. Predicting asthma exacerbations employing remotely monitored adherence.

    PubMed

    Killane, Isabelle; Sulaiman, Imran; MacHale, Elaine; Breathnach, Aoife; Taylor, Terence E; Holmes, Martin S; Reilly, Richard B; Costello, Richard W

    2016-03-01

    This Letter investigated the efficacy of a decision-support system, designed for respiratory medicine, at predicting asthma exacerbations in a multi-site longitudinal randomised control trial. Adherence to inhaler medication was acquired over 3 months from patients with asthma employing a dose counter and a remote monitoring adherence device which recorded participant's inhaler use: n = 184 (23,656 audio files), 61% women, age (mean ± sd) 49.3 ± 16.4. Data on occurrence of exacerbations was collected at three clinical visits, 1 month apart. The relative risk of an asthma exacerbation for those with good and poor adherence was examined employing a univariate and multivariate modified Poisson regression approach; adjusting for age, gender and body mass index. For all months dose counter adherence was significantly (p < 0.01) higher than remote monitoring adherence. Overall, those with poor adherence had a 1.38 ± 0.34 and 1.42 ± 0.39 (remotely monitored) and 1.25 ± 0.32 and 1.18 ± 0.31 (dose counter) higher relative risk of an exacerbation in model 1 and model 2, respectively. However, this was not found to be statistically significantly different. Remotely monitored adherence holds important clinical information and future research should focus on refining adherence and exacerbation measures. Decision-support systems based on remote monitoring may enhance patient-physician communication, possibly reducing preventable adverse events. PMID:27222733

  10. A Review of Treatment Adherence Measurement Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenwald, Sonja K.; Garland, Ann F.

    2013-01-01

    Fidelity measurement is critical for testing the effectiveness and implementation in practice of psychosocial interventions. Adherence is a critical component of fidelity. The purposes of this review were to catalogue adherence measurement methods and assess existing evidence for the valid and reliable use of the scores that they generate and the…

  11. Double Brillouin frequency shift through circulation of odd-order Stokes signal.

    PubMed

    Shee, Yu Gang; Al-Mansoori, Mohammed Hayder; Ismail, Alyani; Hitam, Salasiah; Mahdi, Mohd Adzir

    2010-07-10

    We demonstrate a simple configuration for generating a double Brillouin frequency shift through the circulation of an odd-order Brillouin Stokes signal. It is operated based on cascaded Brillouin scattering in single-mode optical fibers that behave as the Brillouin gain media. A four-port circulator is incorporated into the setup to circulate the odd-order Brillouin Stokes signal in the fiber. It thus initiates a higher order Brillouin Stokes signal, which is double Brillouin frequency downshifted from the input signal. For the 5 km long fiber, the Brillouin pump power at 23 mW gives a clean output spectrum with 30 dB sideband suppression ratio. The output signal is 0.174 nm or approximately 21.7 GHz downshifted from the input signal. PMID:20648173

  12. Sexual risk behaviors among HIV-patients receiving antiretroviral therapy in Southern Thailand: roles of antiretroviral adherence and serostatus disclosure.

    PubMed

    Thanawuth, Nattasiri; Rojpibulstit, Malee

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the extent of unprotected sex among patients already established in HIV-medical care and their associated factors. Sexually active patients who were receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) from five public hospitals in Trang province, Southern Thailand, were interviewed. Of 279 studied patients, 37.3% had unprotected sex in the prior 3 months and 27.2% did not disclose their serostatus to sexual partners. The median duration interquartile range (IQR) of using ART was 47 (27-60) months and 26.7% were non-adherent to ART (i.e., taking less than 95% of the prescribed doses). More than one-third had the perception that ART use would protect against HIV transmission even with unprotected sex. About 36.6% reported that they were unaware of their current CD4 counts and nearly one-third did not receive any safe sex counseling at each medical follow-up. After adjustment for potential confounders, non-adherence to ART and HIV-nondisclosure were strongly associated with an increase in the risk of unprotected sex with the adjusted odds ratio (aOR) of 5.03 (95% CI 2.68-9.44) and 3.89 (95% CI 1.57-9.61), respectively. In contrast, the risk for engaging in unprotected sex was less likely among patients having a negative-serostatus partner (aOR = 0.30; 95% CI 0.12-0.75), a longer duration of the use of ART (aOR = 0.98; 95%CI 0.97-0.99) and an unawareness of their current CD4 levels (aOR = 0.54; 95% CI 0.30-0.99). To maximize the benefits from ART, there should be a bigger emphasis on the "positive prevention" program and more efforts are needed to target the population at risk for unprotected sex. Strategies to encourage adherence to ART and for disclosure of serostatus are also required. PMID:26666292

  13. Excited states of deformable odd {sup 157,159}Tb nuclei: Nonconservation of the angular momentum of external nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Sharipov, Sh.; Ermamatov, M. J.

    2009-01-15

    The previously developed rotationally single-particle and vibrational model of the triaxial deformable odd nuclei is extended to the case where the total angular momentum of an external nucleon is not conserved. The calculated ratios of the excitation energies of the {sup 157,159}Tb nuclei are compared with the existing experimental data. The ratios of E2-transition probabilities and those of quadrupole moments of the above nuclei are calculated using parameters determined from the spectra of these nuclei.

  14. Parent-adolescent conflict in teenagers with ADHD and ODD.

    PubMed

    Edwards, G; Barkley, R A; Laneri, M; Fletcher, K; Metevia, L

    2001-12-01

    Eighty-seven male teens (ages 12-18 years) with ADHD/ODD and their parents were compared to 32 male teens and their parents in a community control (CC) group on mother, father, and teen ratings of parent-teen conflict and communication quality, parental self-reports of psychological adjustment, and direct observations of parent-teen problem-solving interactions during a neutral and conflict discussion. Parents and teens in the ADHD/ODD group rated themselves as having significantly more issues involving parent-teen conflict, more anger during these conflict discussions, and more negative communication generally, and used more aggressive conflict tactics with each other than did parents and teens in the CC group. During a neutral discussion, only the ADHD/ODD teens demonstrated more negative behavior. During the conflict discussion, however, the mothers, fathers, and teens in the ADHD/ODD group displayed more negative behavior, and the mothers and teens showed less positive behavior than did participants in the CC group. Differences in conflicts related to sex of parent were evident on only a few measures. Both mother and father self-rated hostility contributed to the level of mother-teen conflict whereas father self-rated hostility and anxiety contributed to father-teen conflict beyond the contribution made by level of teen ODD and ADHD symptoms. Results replicated past studies of mother-child interactions in ADHD/ODD children, extended these results to teens with these disorders, showed that greater conflict also occurs in father-teen interactions, and found that degree of parental hostility, but not ADHD symptoms, further contributed to levels of parent-teen conflict beyond the contribution made by severity of teen ADHD and ODD symptoms. PMID:11761288

  15. Dipole strength distributions of the stable odd-mass N=82 isotones {sup 139}La and {sup 141}Pr

    SciTech Connect

    Scheck, M.; Brentano, P. von; Fransen, C.; Linnemann, A.; Muecher, D.; Pietralla, N.; Scholl, C.; Werner, V.; Kneissl, U.; Kohstall, C.; Pitz, H. H.; Stedile, F.; Walter, S.; Yates, S. W.

    2007-04-15

    The low-lying dipole strength distributions of the odd-mass isotopes {sup 139}La and {sup 141}Pr were studied in nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments using bremsstrahlung beams. Excited states were observed at excitation energies up to 4 MeV. Spectroscopic information was obtained on excitation energies, decay widths, decay branching ratios, and transition probabilities. The states belonging to the [[2{sup +}(multiply-in-circle sign)3{sup -}](multiply-in-circle sign)particle/hole] coupling were a special focus, and the results are compared with other stable odd-mass nuclei at or near the N=82 shell closure.

  16. Adherence to antihypertensive medications and health outcomes among newly treated hypertensive patients

    PubMed Central

    Esposti, Luca Degli; Saragoni, Stefania; Benemei, Silvia; Batacchi, Paolo; Geppetti, Pierangelo; Di Bari, Mauro; Marchionni, Niccolò; Sturani, Alessandra; Buda, Stefano; Esposti, Ezio Degli

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate adherence to antihypertensive therapy (AHT) and the association between adherence to AHT, all-cause mortality, and cardiovascular (CV) morbidity in a large cohort of patients newly treated with antihypertensives in a clinical practice setting. Methods: An administrative database kept by the Local Health Unit of Florence (Italy) listing patient baseline characteristics, drug prescription, and hospital admission information was used to perform a population-based retrospective study including patients newly treated with antihypertensives, ≥18 years of age, with a first prescription between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2006. Patients using antihypertensives for secondary prevention of CV disease, occasional spot users, and patients with early CV events, were excluded from the study cohort. Adherence to AHT was calculated and classified as poor, moderate, good, and excellent. A Cox regression model was conducted to determine the association among adherence to AHT and risk of all-cause mortality, stroke, or acute myocardial infarction. Results: A total of 31,306 patients, 15,031 men (48.0%), and 16,275 women (52.0%), with a mean age of 60.2 ± 14.5 years was included in the study. Adherence to AHT was poor in 8038 patients (25.7% of included patients), moderate in 4640 (14.8%), good in 5651 (18.1%), and excellent in 12,977 (41.5%). Compared with patients with poor adherence (hazard ratio [HR] = 1), the risk of all-cause death, stroke, or acute myocardial infarction was significantly lower in patients with good (HR = 0.69, P < 0.001) and excellent adherence (HR = 0.53, P < 0.001). Conclusions: These findings indicate that suboptimal adherence to AHT occurs in a substantial proportion of patients and is associated with poor health outcomes already in primary prevention of CV diseases. For health authorities, this preliminary evidence underlines the need for monitoring and improving medication adherence in clinical practice. PMID:21935332

  17. The Introduction of Generic Aromatase Inhibitors and Treatment Adherence Among Medicare D Enrollees

    PubMed Central

    Kamaraju, Sailaja; Charlson, John A.; Wozniak, Erica M.; Smith, Elizabeth C.; Biggers, Alana; Smallwood, Alicia J.; Laud, Purushottam W.; Pezzin, Liliana E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) substantially reduce breast cancer mortality in clinical trials, but high rates of nonadherence to these long-term oral therapies have reduced their impact outside of trials. We examined the association of generic AI availability with AI adherence among a large national breast cancer cohort. Methods: Using a quasi-experimental prepost design, we examined the effect of generic AI introductions (7/2010 and 4/2011) on adherence among a national cohort of women with incident breast cancer in 2006 and 2007 who were enrolled in the Medicare D pharmaceutical coverage program. Medicare D claims were used to calculate AI adherence, defined as a medication possession ratio of 80% or more of eligible days, over 36 months. Multivariable logistic regression models estimated with generalized estimating equations were applied to longitudinal adherence data to control for possible confounders, including receipt of a Medicare D low-income subsidy, and to account for repeated measures. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: Sixteen thousand four hundred sixty-two Medicare D enrollees were eligible. Adherence declined throughout the study. However, among women without a subsidy, the median quarterly out-of-pocket cost of anastrozole fell from $183 in the fourth quarter of 2009 to $15 in 2011, and declines in adherence were attenuated with generic AI introductions. Regression-adjusted adherence probabilities were estimated to be 5.4% higher after generic anastrozole was introduced in 2010 and 11% higher after generic letrozole/exemestane was introduced in 2011. Subsidy recipients had higher adherence rates throughout the study. Conclusions: The introduction of generic medications attenuated the decline in adherence to AIs over three years of treatment among breast cancer survivors not receiving low-income subsidies for Medicare D coverage. PMID:25971298

  18. Portrait of Candida albicans Adherence Regulators

    PubMed Central

    Finkel, Jonathan S.; Xu, Wenjie; Huang, David; Hill, Elizabeth M.; Desai, Jigar V.; Woolford, Carol A.; Nett, Jeniel E.; Taff, Heather; Norice, Carmelle T.; Andes, David R.; Lanni, Frederick; Mitchell, Aaron P.

    2012-01-01

    Cell-substrate adherence is a fundamental property of microorganisms that enables them to exist in biofilms. Our study focuses on adherence of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans to one substrate, silicone, that is relevant to device-associated infection. We conducted a mutant screen with a quantitative flow-cell assay to identify thirty transcription factors that are required for adherence. We then combined nanoString gene expression profiling with functional analysis to elucidate relationships among these transcription factors, with two major goals: to extend our understanding of transcription factors previously known to govern adherence or biofilm formation, and to gain insight into the many transcription factors we identified that were relatively uncharacterized, particularly in the context of adherence or cell surface biogenesis. With regard to the first goal, we have discovered a role for biofilm regulator Bcr1 in adherence, and found that biofilm regulator Ace2 is a major functional target of chromatin remodeling factor Snf5. In addition, Bcr1 and Ace2 share several target genes, pointing to a new connection between them. With regard to the second goal, our findings reveal existence of a large regulatory network that connects eleven adherence regulators, the zinc-response regulator Zap1, and approximately one quarter of the predicted cell surface protein genes in this organism. This limited yet sensitive glimpse of mutant gene expression changes had thus defined one of the broadest cell surface regulatory networks in C. albicans. PMID:22359502

  19. Adherence to Antihypertensive Medications in Iranian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Behnood-Rod, Azin; Rabbanifar, Omid; Pourzargar, Pirouz; Rai, Alireza; Saadat, Zahra; Saadat, Habibollah; Moharamzad, Yashar; Morisky, Donald E.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Appropriate adherence to medication is still a challenging issue for hypertensive patients. We determined adherence to antihypertensive(s) and its associated factors among 280 Iranian patients. Methods. They were recruited consecutively from private and university health centers and pharmacies in four cities. The validated Persian version of the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) was administered to measure adherence. Results. Mean (±SD) overall MMAS-8 score was 5.75 (±1.88). About half of the sample (139 cases, 49.6%) showed low adherence (MMAS-8 score < 6). There was a negative linear association between the MMAS-8 score and systolic BP (r = −0.231, P < 0.001) as well as diastolic BP (r = −0.280, P < 0.001). In linear regression model, overweight/obesity (B = −0.52, P = 0.02), previous history of admission to emergency services due to hypertensive crisis (B = −0.79, P = 0.001), and getting medication directly from drugstore without refill prescription in hand (B = −0.51, P = 0.04) were factors recognized to have statistically significant association with the MMAS-8 score. Conclusion. Antihypertensive adherence was unsatisfactory. We suggest that health care providers pay special attention and make use of the aforementioned findings in their routine visits of hypertensive patients to recognize those who are vulnerable to poor adherence. PMID:27069676

  20. Adherence to Antihypertensive Medications in Iranian Patients.

    PubMed

    Behnood-Rod, Azin; Rabbanifar, Omid; Pourzargar, Pirouz; Rai, Alireza; Saadat, Zahra; Saadat, Habibollah; Moharamzad, Yashar; Morisky, Donald E

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Appropriate adherence to medication is still a challenging issue for hypertensive patients. We determined adherence to antihypertensive(s) and its associated factors among 280 Iranian patients. Methods. They were recruited consecutively from private and university health centers and pharmacies in four cities. The validated Persian version of the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) was administered to measure adherence. Results. Mean (±SD) overall MMAS-8 score was 5.75 (±1.88). About half of the sample (139 cases, 49.6%) showed low adherence (MMAS-8 score < 6). There was a negative linear association between the MMAS-8 score and systolic BP (r = -0.231, P < 0.001) as well as diastolic BP (r = -0.280, P < 0.001). In linear regression model, overweight/obesity (B = -0.52, P = 0.02), previous history of admission to emergency services due to hypertensive crisis (B = -0.79, P = 0.001), and getting medication directly from drugstore without refill prescription in hand (B = -0.51, P = 0.04) were factors recognized to have statistically significant association with the MMAS-8 score. Conclusion. Antihypertensive adherence was unsatisfactory. We suggest that health care providers pay special attention and make use of the aforementioned findings in their routine visits of hypertensive patients to recognize those who are vulnerable to poor adherence. PMID:27069676

  1. Risk management in HIV/AIDS: ethical and economic issues associated with restricting HAART access only to adherent patients.

    PubMed

    Chawana, Richard; van Bogaert, Donna Knapp

    2011-01-01

    Like many other developing nations, South Africa faces the challenge of mobilising resources in response to the HIV pandemic. There is a large budget gap between the ideal and the actual amount of funding needed to achieve universal access to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). In addition to financial demands, new burdens are being placed on HAART programmes with the emergence of HIV drug resistance (HIVDR). Thus, a major threat to successful HAART rollout is HIVDR due to non-adherence to HAART. The use of HAART as a primary and secondary HIV-prevention strategy could be ineffective in situations characterised by high rates of non-adherence. In this context, the research looked at issues related to adherence and non-adherence to HAART from the perspective of the provider. Using the software TreeAge Pro 2009, we developed a Markov model to project economic outcomes for a hypothetical cohort of HIV/AIDS patients on HAART. The model compared two scenarios: adherence and non-adherence to HAART. Input data for the model was obtained from existing literature on HAART uptake in South Africa. Moral arguments were analysed and managed through moral reasoning and critical thinking. Discounted lifetime costs for adherent and non-adherent HAART patients in South Africa were estimated at US$9 771 and US$14 762, respectively. The model showed the loss of 4.55 quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) for non-adherent patients, which could be otherwise gained through improved adherence. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) indicated that restricting HAART access only to adherent patients was the dominant strategy. We suggest that, although not a panacea, the withholding or withdrawal of treatment from non-adherent individuals as a precautionary intervention has economic and moral merit. PMID:25865513

  2. Multicomponent fluids of hard hyperspheres in odd dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohrmann, René D.; Santos, Andrés

    2011-01-01

    Mixtures of hard hyperspheres in odd-space dimensionalities are studied with an analytical approximation method. This technique is based on the so-called rational function approximation and provides a procedure for evaluating equations of state, structure factors, radial distribution functions, and direct correlation functions of additive mixtures of hard hyperspheres with any number of components and in arbitrary odd-dimension space. The method gives the exact solution of the Ornstein-Zernike equation coupled with the Percus-Yevick closure, thus, extending the solution for hard-sphere mixtures [J. L. Lebowitz, Phys. Rev.PHRVAO0031-899X10.1103/PhysRev.133.A895 133, A895 (1964)] to arbitrary odd dimensions. Explicit evaluations for binary mixtures in five dimensions are performed. The results are compared with computer simulations, and a good agreement is found.

  3. Evening chronotypes have the increased odds for bronchial asthma and nocturnal asthma.

    PubMed

    Merikanto, Ilona; Englund, Ani; Kronholm, Erkki; Laatikainen, Tiina; Peltonen, Markku; Vartiainen, Erkki; Partonen, Timo

    2014-02-01

    Earlier studies have found associations of chronotypes with a range of health-related factors. In the light of these findings, the behavioral trait of eveningness in particular associates with determinants that might have a negative impact on health. In this study, based on a random sample of population aged 25-74 years living in five large geographical areas in Finland (N = 6089), we tested whether the evening chronotypes have the increased odds for respiratory symptoms and diseases. As a result, after controlling for socio-demographic and lifestyle factors, evening-types had wheezy breathing without respiratory infection, a diagnosed or treated bronchial asthma, awoken in shortness of breath, awoken in heavy to breath, wheezy breathing with dyspnea, wheezy breathing as such and medication for asthma more often than morning-types (odds ratios (ORs) of 1.5-1.9) and intermediate-types (ORs of 1.3-1.6). In addition, evening-types had current medication for asthma, and awoken in coughing more often (OR = 1.5 and OR = 1.4, respectively) than morning-types. Evening-types did not have a diagnosed or treated chronic bronchitis more frequently than others. Our results suggest that the behavioral trait of eveningness associates with the increased odds for the bronchial asthma and nocturnal asthma in particular. PMID:24131153

  4. Effect of time-odd fields on odd-even mass differences of semi-magic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Kun; Zhou, XianRong; Cui, JiWei; Sagawa, H.

    2016-05-01

    The effect of time-odd fields of Skyrme interaction on neutron odd-even mass differences is studied in the framework of axially deformed Skyrme Hartree-Fock (DSHF)+BCS model. To this end, we take into account both the time-even and time-odd fields to calculate the one-neutron and two-neutron separation energies and pairing gaps of semi-magic Ca, Ni, and Sn isotopic chains. In the calculations, a surface-type pairing interaction (IS pairing) and an isospin dependent contact pairing interaction (IS+IV pairing) are adopted on top of Skyrme interactions SLy4, SLy6 and SkM*, respectively. We find that the time-odd fields have in general small effects on pairing gaps, but achieve better agreement with experimental data using SLy4 and Sly6 interactions, respectively. It is also shown that the calculations with IS+IV pairing reproduce the one-neutron separation energies of Sn isotopes better than those with the IS pairing interaction when the contributions of the time-odd fields are included.

  5. Extremal charged rotating dilaton black holes in odd dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allahverdizadeh, Masoud; Kunz, Jutta; Navarro-Lérida, Francisco

    2010-09-01

    Employing higher-order perturbation theory, we find a new class of charged rotating black hole solutions of Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory with general dilaton coupling constant. Starting from the Myers-Perry solutions, we use the electric charge as the perturbative parameter, and focus on extremal black holes with equal-magnitude angular momenta in odd dimensions. We perform the perturbations up to 4th order for black holes in 5 dimensions and up to 3rd order in higher odd dimensions. We calculate the physical properties of these black holes and study their dependence on the charge and the dilaton coupling constant.

  6. Adherence to Mammography Screening Guidelines Among Transgender Persons and Sexual Minority Women.

    PubMed

    Bazzi, Angela Robertson; Whorms, Debra S; King, Dana S; Potter, Jennifer

    2015-11-01

    We used retrospective (2012-2013) chart review to examine breast cancer screening among transgender persons and sexual minority women (n = 1263) attending an urban community health center in Massachusetts. Transgender were less likely than cisgender patients and bisexuals were less likely than heterosexuals and lesbians to adhere to mammography screening guidelines (respectively, adjusted odds ratios = 0.53 and 0.56; 95% confidence intervals = 0.31, 0.91 and 0.34, 0.92) after adjustment for sociodemographics. Enhanced cancer prevention outreach is needed among gender and sexual minorities. PMID:26378843

  7. Search for a very light CP-odd neutral Higgs boson of the MSSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskulic, D.; Decamp, D.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Minard, M.-N.; Mours, B.; Alemany, R.; Ariztizabal, F.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Gaitan, V.; Garrido, Ll.; Pacheco, A.; Pascual, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Farilla, A.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Quattromini, M.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Romano, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Gao, Y.; Hu, H.; Huang, D.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Lou, J.; Qiao, C.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, D.; Xu, R.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, W.; Atwood, W. B.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Blucher, E.; Bonvicini, G.; Bossi, F.; Boudreau, J.; Burnett, T. H.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Haywood, S.; Hilgart, J.; Jacobsen, R.; Jost, B.; Knobloch, J.; Lançon, E.; Lehraus, I.; Lohse, T.; Lusiani, A.; Martinez, M.; Mato, P.; Mattison, T.; Meinhard, H.; Menary, S.; Meyer, T.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Moser, H.-G.; Nash, J.; Palazzi, P.; Perlas, J. A.; Ranjard, F.; Redlinger, G.; Rolandi, L.; Roth, A.; Rothberg, J.; Ruan, T.; Saich, M.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Sefkow, F.; Tejessy, W.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wildish, T.; Witzeling, W.; Wotschack, J.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Badaud, F.; Bardadin-Otwinowska, M.; Bencheikh, A. M.; El Fellous, R.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Proriol, J.; Prulhière, F.; Stimpfl, G.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Møllerud, R.; Nilsson, B. S.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Kyriakis, A.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Badier, J.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Fouque, G.; Gamess, A.; Orteu, S.; Rosowsky, A.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Tanaka, R.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Veitch, E.; Moneta, L.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Ikeda, M.; Lannutti, J.; Levinthal, D.; Mermikides, M.; Sawyer, L.; Wasserbaech, S.; Antonelli, A.; Baldini, R.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; D'Ettorre-Piazzoli, B.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Picchi, P.; Altoon, B.; Boyle, O.; Colrain, P.; Ten Have, I.; Lynch, J. G.; Maitland, W.; Morton, W. T.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Thompson, A. S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Brandl, B.; Braun, O.; Geiges, R.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Maumary, Y.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Stahl, A.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Belk, A. T.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Cattaneo, M.; Colling, D. J.; Dornan, P. J.; Dugeay, S.; Greene, A. M.; Hassard, J. F.; Lieske, N. M.; Patton, S. J.; Payne, D. G.; Phillips, M. J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Tomalin, I. R.; Wright, A. G.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bowdery, C. K.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jackson, D.; Keemer, N. R.; Nuttall, M.; Patel, A.; Sloan, T.; Snow, S. W.; Whelan, E. P.; Barczewski, T.; Kleinknecht, K.; Raab, J.; Renk, B.; Roehn, S.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmidt, H.; Steeg, F.; Walther, S. M.; Wolf, B.; Aubert, J.-J.; Benchouk, C.; Bernard, V.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Drinkard, J.; Etienne, F.; Papalexiou, S.; Payre, P.; Qian, Z.; Rousseau, D.; Schwemling, P.; Talby, M.; Adlung, S.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Brown, D.; Cowan, G.; Dehning, B.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Frank, M.; Halley, A. W.; Lauber, J.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Richter, R.; Schröder, J.; Schwarz, A. S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stierlin, U.; Stiegler, U.; St. Denis, R.; Takashima, M.; Thomas, J.; Wolf, G.; Bertin, V.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, X.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Janot, P.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Schune, M.-H.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zhang, Z.; Zomer, F.; Abbaneo, D.; Amendolia, S. R.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bosisio, L.; Bottigli, U.; Bradaschia, C.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Foà, L.; Focardi, E.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Ligabue, F.; Mannelli, E. B.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Triggiani, G.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Carter, J. M.; Green, M. G.; March, P. V.; Mir, Ll. M.; Medcalf, T.; Quazi, I. S.; Strong, J. A.; West, L. R.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Edwards, M.; Fisher, S. M.; Jones, T. J.; Norton, P. R.; Salmon, D. P.; Thompson, J. C.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Kozanecki, W.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Loucatos, S.; Monnier, E.; Perez, P.; Perrier, F.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Si Mohand, D.; Vallage, B.; Johnson, R. P.; Litke, A. M.; Taylor, G.; Wear, J.; Ashman, J. G.; Babbage, W.; Booth, C. N.; Buttar, C.; Carney, R. E.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Hatfield, F.; Reeves, P.; Thompson, L. F.; Barberio, E.; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Mirabito, L.; Schäfer, U.; Ganis, G.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Ragusa, F.; Bellantoni, L.; Cinabro, D.; Conway, J. S.; Cowen, D. F.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; Grahl, J.; Harton, J. L.; Jared, R. C.; Leclaire, B. W.; Lishka, C.; Pan, Y. B.; Pater, J. R.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Saadi, Y.; Sharma, V.; Schmitt, M.; Shi, Z. H.; Walsh, A. M.; Weber, F. V.; Whitney, M. H.; Sau Lan Wu; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1992-07-01

    The reactions e+e- → hZ∗ande+e- → hA have been used to search for the neutral Higgs bosons h and A of the MSSM in the case where the CP-odd A is lighter than 2 mμ, taking into account the large h → AA decay branching ratio. No signal was found in the data sample collected until the end of 1991 by the ALEPH experiment at LEP. For tan β ⩾, mA < 2 mμ is excluded at 95% CL for any mh.

  8. The association between combination antiretroviral adherence and AIDS-defining conditions at HIV diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Abara, Winston E; Xu, Junjun; Adekeye, Oluwatoyosi A; Rust, George

    2016-08-01

    Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) has changed the clinical course of HIV. AIDS-defining conditions (ADC) are suggestive of severe or advanced disease and are a leading cause of HIV-related hospitalizations and death among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in the USA. Optimal adherence to cART can mitigate the impact of ADC and disease severity on the health and survivability of PLWHA. The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between ADC at HIV diagnosis and optimal adherence among PLWHA. Using data from the 2008 and 2009 Medicaid data from 29 states, we identified individuals, between 18 and 49 years, recently infected with HIV and with a cART prescription. Frequencies and descriptive statistics were conducted to characterize sample. Univariate and multivariable Poisson regression analyses were employed to evaluate the association optimal cART adherence (defined as ≥ 95% study days covered by cART) and ADC at HIV diagnosis (≥1 ADC) were assessed. Approximately 17% of respondents with ADC at HIV diagnosis reported optimal cART adherence. After adjusting for covariates, respondents with an ADC at HIV diagnosis were less likely to report optimal cART adherence (adjusted prevalence ratio (APR) = 0.64, 95% confidence intervals (CI), 0.54-0.75). Among the covariates, males (APR=1.10, 95% CI, 1.02-1.19) compared to females were significantly more likely to report optimal adherence while younger respondents, 18-29 years (APR=0.67, 95% CI, 0.57-0.77), 30-39 years (APR=0.86, 95% CI, 0.79-0.95) compared to older respondents were significantly less likely to report optimal adherence. PLWHA with ADC at HIV diagnosis are at risk of suboptimal cART adherence. Multiple adherence strategies that include healthcare providers, case managers, and peer navigators should be utilized to improve cART adherence and optimize health outcomes among PLWHA with ADC at HIV diagnosis. Targeted adherence programs and services are required to address

  9. Entrance-channel effects in odd-Z tranactinide compound nucleus reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, S.L.; Gregorich, K.E.; Dragojevic, I.; Dullmann, Ch.E.; Eichler, R.; Folden III, C.M.; Garcia, M.A.; Gates, J.M.; Stavsetra, L.; Sudowe, R.; Nitsche, H.

    2007-09-01

    Swiatecki, Siwek-Wilczynska, and Wilczynski's 'Fusion By Diffusion' description [1] of transactinide (TAN) compound nucleus (CN) formation utilizes a three-step model. The first step is the 'sticking', or capture, which can be calculated relatively accurately. The second step is the probability for the formation of a CN by 'diffusion' analogous to that of Brownian motion. Lastly, there exists the probability of the CN 'surviving' deexcitation by neutron emission, which competes with fission and other de-excitation modes. This model predicts and reproduces cross sections typically within a factor of two. Producing the same CN with different projectile-target pairs is a very sensitive way to test entrance channel effects on heavy element production cross sections. If the same CN is produced at or near the same excitation energy the survival portion of the theory is nearly identical for the two reactions. This method can be used as a critical test of the novel 'diffusion' portion of the model. The reactions producing odd-Z TAN CN such as Db, Bh, Mt, and Rg (Z = 105, 107, 109, and 111, respectively) were first studied using even-Z projectiles on {sup 209}Bi targets (as opposed to odd-Z projectiles on {sup 208}Pb targets) because lower effective fissility [2] was expected to lead to larger cross sections. Many odd-Z projectile reactions producing odd-Z CN had not been studied in-depth until very recently. We have completed studies of these reaction pairs with the 88-Inch Cyclotron and the Berkeley Gas-Filled Separator (BGS) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), see Figure 1. Cross section ratios for several pairs of reactions will be presented and compared with theory.

  10. Variability of erythrocyte and serum lithium levels correlates with therapist treatment adherence efforts and maintenance treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    Taylor, R; Mallinger, A G; Frank, E; Rucci, P; Thase, M E; Kupfer, D J

    2001-02-01

    This study investigated the relationship between psychotherapeutic interventions and pharmacologic measures of pharmacotherapy treatment adherence in patients with bipolar I disorder, as well as the relationship between these measures and treatment outcome. Subjects were participating in an ongoing maintenance treatment study. Audiotaped therapy sessions were rated for frequency of psychotherapeutic interventions related to pharmacotherapy treatment adherence. Pharmacologic measures of medication adherence were compared to the tape ratings as well as to treatment outcome. Variability in log erythrocyte (RBC) lithium-a marker of probable nonadherence to the pharmacotherapy regimen-for individual patients correlated significantly with treatment adherence interventions scale ratings. This marker of nonadherence was significantly related to maintenance treatment outcome, as was variability of the serum lithium level/dose (L/D) ratio; however, no relationship was found between treatment adherence interventions scale ratings and outcome. PMID:11120401

  11. Oral anticancer agent medication adherence by outpatients.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Michio; Usami, Eiseki; Iwai, Mina; Nakao, Toshiya; Yoshimura, Tomoaki; Mori, Hiromi; Sugiyama, Tadashi; Teramachi, Hitomi

    2014-11-01

    In the present study, medication adherence and factors affecting adherence were examined in patients taking oral anticancer agents. In June 2013, 172 outpatients who had been prescribed oral anticancer agents by Ogaki Municipal Hospital (Ogaki, Gifu, Japan) completed a questionnaire survey, with answers rated on a five-point Likert scale. The factors that affect medication adherence were evaluated using a customer satisfaction (CS) analysis. For patients with good and insufficient adherence to medication, the median ages were 66 years (range, 21-85 years) and 73 years (range, 30-90 years), respectively (P=0.0004), while the median dosing time was 131 days (range, 3-3,585 days) and 219 days (24-3,465 days), respectively (P=0.0447). In 36.0% (62 out of 172) of the cases, there was insufficient medication adherence; 64.5% of those cases (40 out of 62) showed good medication compliance (4-5 point rating score). However, these patients did not fully understand the effects or side-effects of the drugs, giving a score of three points or less. The percentage of patients with good medication compliance was 87.2% (150 out of 172). Through the CS analysis, three items, the interest in the drug, the desire to consult about the drug and the condition of the patient, were extracted as items for improvement. Overall, the medication compliance of the patients taking the oral anticancer agents was good, but the medication adherence was insufficient. To improve medication adherence, a better understanding of the effectiveness and necessity of drugs and their side-effects is required. In addition, the interest of patients in their medication should be encouraged and intervention should be tailored to the condition of the patient. These steps should lead to improved medication adherence. PMID:25295117

  12. Oral anticancer agent medication adherence by outpatients

    PubMed Central

    KIMURA, MICHIO; USAMI, EISEKI; IWAI, MINA; NAKAO, TOSHIYA; YOSHIMURA, TOMOAKI; MORI, HIROMI; SUGIYAMA, TADASHI; TERAMACHI, HITOMI

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, medication adherence and factors affecting adherence were examined in patients taking oral anticancer agents. In June 2013, 172 outpatients who had been prescribed oral anticancer agents by Ogaki Municipal Hospital (Ogaki, Gifu, Japan) completed a questionnaire survey, with answers rated on a five-point Likert scale. The factors that affect medication adherence were evaluated using a customer satisfaction (CS) analysis. For patients with good and insufficient adherence to medication, the median ages were 66 years (range, 21–85 years) and 73 years (range, 30–90 years), respectively (P=0.0004), while the median dosing time was 131 days (range, 3–3,585 days) and 219 days (24–3,465 days), respectively (P=0.0447). In 36.0% (62 out of 172) of the cases, there was insufficient medication adherence; 64.5% of those cases (40 out of 62) showed good medication compliance (4–5 point rating score). However, these patients did not fully understand the effects or side-effects of the drugs, giving a score of three points or less. The percentage of patients with good medication compliance was 87.2% (150 out of 172). Through the CS analysis, three items, the interest in the drug, the desire to consult about the drug and the condition of the patient, were extracted as items for improvement. Overall, the medication compliance of the patients taking the oral anticancer agents was good, but the medication adherence was insufficient. To improve medication adherence, a better understanding of the effectiveness and necessity of drugs and their side-effects is required. In addition, the interest of patients in their medication should be encouraged and intervention should be tailored to the condition of the patient. These steps should lead to improved medication adherence. PMID:25295117

  13. Bayesian population modeling of drug dosing adherence.

    PubMed

    Fellows, Kelly; Stoneking, Colin J; Ramanathan, Murali

    2015-10-01

    Adherence is a frequent contributing factor to variations in drug concentrations and efficacy. The purpose of this work was to develop an integrated population model to describe variation in adherence, dose-timing deviations, overdosing and persistence to dosing regimens. The hybrid Markov chain-von Mises method for modeling adherence in individual subjects was extended to the population setting using a Bayesian approach. Four integrated population models for overall adherence, the two-state Markov chain transition parameters, dose-timing deviations, overdosing and persistence were formulated and critically compared. The Markov chain-Monte Carlo algorithm was used for identifying distribution parameters and for simulations. The model was challenged with medication event monitoring system data for 207 hypertension patients. The four Bayesian models demonstrated good mixing and convergence characteristics. The distributions of adherence, dose-timing deviations, overdosing and persistence were markedly non-normal and diverse. The models varied in complexity and the method used to incorporate inter-dependence with the preceding dose in the two-state Markov chain. The model that incorporated a cooperativity term for inter-dependence and a hyperbolic parameterization of the transition matrix probabilities was identified as the preferred model over the alternatives. The simulated probability densities from the model satisfactorily fit the observed probability distributions of adherence, dose-timing deviations, overdosing and persistence parameters in the sample patients. The model also adequately described the median and observed quartiles for these parameters. The Bayesian model for adherence provides a parsimonious, yet integrated, description of adherence in populations. It may find potential applications in clinical trial simulations and pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling. PMID:26319548

  14. The Malaysian Medication Adherence Scale (MALMAS): Concurrent Validity Using a Clinical Measure among People with Type 2 Diabetes in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Pauline Siew Mei; Morisky, Donald E.

    2015-01-01

    Medication non-adherence is a prevalent problem worldwide but up to today, no gold standard is available to assess such behavior. This study was to evaluate the psychometric properties, particularly the concurrent validity of the English version of the Malaysian Medication Adherence Scale (MALMAS) among people with type 2 diabetes in Malaysia. Individuals with type 2 diabetes, aged 21 years and above, using at least one anti-diabetes agent and could communicate in English were recruited. The MALMAS was compared with the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) to assess its convergent validity while concurrent validity was evaluated based on the levels of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C). Participants answered the MALMAS twice: at baseline and 4 weeks later. The study involved 136 participants. The MALMAS achieved acceptable internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha=0.565) and stable reliability as the test-retest scores showed fair correlation (Spearman’s rho=0.412). The MALMAS has good correlation with the MMAS-8 (Spearman’s rho=0.715). Participants who were adherent to their anti-diabetes medications had significantly lower median HbA1C values than those who were non-adherence (7.90 versus 8.55%, p=0.032). The odds of participants who were adherent to their medications achieving good glycemic control was 3.36 times (95% confidence interval: 1.09-10.37) of those who were non-adherence. This confirms the concurrent validity of the MALMAS. The sensitivity of the MALMAS was 88.9% while its specificity was 29.6%. The findings of this study further substantiates the reliability and validity of the MALMAS, in particular its concurrent validity and sensitivity for assessing medication adherence of people with type 2 diabetes in Malaysia. PMID:25909363

  15. New spin assignments in the odd-odd N=Z nucleus Sc42 and the breaking of the Ca40 core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholl, C.; Petkov, P.; Werner, V.; Linnemann, A.; Adachi, T.; Dewald, A.; Fitzler, A.; Fransen, C.; Fujita, Y.; Jolie, J.; Langanke, K.; Lisetskiy, A. F.; Martinez-Pinedo, G.; Mücher, D.; Orce, J. N.; Pietralla, N.; Warr, N.; Zell, K. O.; Brentano, P. Von

    2007-06-01

    Using the Ca40(He3,p) reaction at E3He=9 MeV and the multidetector array HORUS, angular correlations of coincident pairs of γ transitions in the odd-odd N=Z nucleus Sc42 have been measured at the FN tandem Van de Graaff accelerator of the University of Cologne. The analysis of the data allowed nine new spin assignments and the determination of a series of new multipole mixing ratios. In particular, the spin and parity of the 5+ and 7+ levels belonging to the lowest T=0πf7/2νf7/2 multiplet have been determined and the (6+) level from the T=1 multiplet has been tentatively assigned. In this way, all T=1 states up to an excitation energy of 3.2 MeV now have known spins as well as the lowest T=0 quadruplet (Jπ=1+,3+,5+,7+) and many other T=0 states of unknown structure. The comparison with shell-model calculations reveals that a breaking of the Ca40 core has to be invoked to describe the level structure of Sc42.

  16. New spin assignments in the odd-odd N=Z nucleus {sup 42}Sc and the breaking of the {sup 40}Ca core

    SciTech Connect

    Scholl, C.; Linnemann, A.; Dewald, A.; Fitzler, A.; Fransen, C.; Jolie, J.; Muecher, D.; Warr, N.; Zell, K. O.; Brentano, P. von; Petkov, P.; Werner, V.; Adachi, T.; Fujita, Y.; Langanke, K.; Martinez-Pinedo, G.; Lisetskiy, A. F.; Orce, J. N.; Pietralla, N.

    2007-06-15

    Using the {sup 40}Ca({sup 3}He,p) reaction at E{sub {sup 3}He}=9 MeV and the multidetector array HORUS, angular correlations of coincident pairs of {gamma} transitions in the odd-odd N=Z nucleus {sup 42}Sc have been measured at the FN tandem Van de Graaff accelerator of the University of Cologne. The analysis of the data allowed nine new spin assignments and the determination of a series of new multipole mixing ratios. In particular, the spin and parity of the 5{sup +} and 7{sup +} levels belonging to the lowest T=0{pi}f{sub 7/2}{nu}f{sub 7/2} multiplet have been determined and the (6{sup +}) level from the T=1 multiplet has been tentatively assigned. In this way, all T=1 states up to an excitation energy of 3.2 MeV now have known spins as well as the lowest T=0 quadruplet (J{sup {pi}}=1{sup +},3{sup +},5{sup +},7{sup +}) and many other T=0 states of unknown structure. The comparison with shell-model calculations reveals that a breaking of the {sup 40}Ca core has to be invoked to describe the level structure of {sup 42}Sc.

  17. Microbicide clinical trial adherence: insights for introduction.

    PubMed

    Woodsong, Cynthia; MacQueen, Kathleen; Amico, K Rivet; Friedland, Barbara; Gafos, Mitzy; Mansoor, Leila; Tolley, Elizabether; McCormack, Sheena

    2013-01-01

    After two decades of microbicide clinical trials it remains uncertain if vaginally- delivered products will be clearly shown to reduce the risk of HIV infection in women and girls. Furthermore, a microbicide product with demonstrated clinical efficacy must be used correctly and consistently if it is to prevent infection. Information on adherence that can be gleaned from microbicide trials is relevant for future microbicide safety and efficacy trials, pre-licensure implementation trials, Phase IV post-marketing research, and microbicide introduction and delivery. Drawing primarily from data and experience that has emerged from the large-scale microbicide efficacy trials completed to-date, the paper identifies six broad areas of adherence lessons learned: (1) Adherence measurement in clinical trials, (2) Comprehension of use instructions/Instructions for use, (3) Unknown efficacy and its effect on adherence/Messages regarding effectiveness, (4) Partner influence on use, (5) Retention and continuation and (6) Generalizability of trial participants' adherence behavior. Each is discussed, with examples provided from microbicide trials. For each of these adherence topics, recommendations are provided for using trial findings to prepare for future microbicide safety and efficacy trials, Phase IV post-marketing research, and microbicide introduction and delivery programs. PMID:23561044

  18. Patient Education and Adherence to Aerosol Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ari, Arzu

    2015-06-01

    Nonadherence to prescribed medications results in disease instability and poor clinical control, with increases in hospital admissions, emergency room visits, school/work absenteeism, morbidity, and mortality. Poor patient adherence to therapy can be due to lack of cognition, competence, or contrivance. Patients who have not been trained or fail to understand use of drug and device combinations (cognition) often do not have the ability to use an aerosol device correctly (competence). Many patients have the competence to use the device correctly and know why they should use the device in the way they were taught; however, they still contrive to use it in an ineffective and suboptimal manner that reduces its efficiency and effectiveness. Ensuring effective aerosol therapy and optimizing its role in disease management involve not only delivery of aerosolized medications to the lungs, but also understanding why, when, and how to use the medications, competence to use the device, motivation to adhere to therapy, and not contriving to use the device in a way that will prevent effective drug delivery. This paper explains some of the problems with patient education and adherence to aerosol therapy and suggests strategies to evaluate, monitor, and improve patient adherence effectively in primary care. Factors affecting patient adherence to prescribed medications, effective educational interventions, and strategies to promote patient adherence to aerosol therapy are also discussed. PMID:26070585

  19. The Antarctic ozone minimum - Relationship to odd nitrogen, odd chlorine, the final warming, and the 11-year solar cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callis, L. B.; Natarajan, M.

    1986-01-01

    Photochemical calculations along 'diabatic trajectories' in the meridional phase are used to search for the cause of the dramatic springtime minimum in Antarctic column ozone. The results indicate that the minimum is principally due to catalytic destruction of ozone by high levels of total odd nitrogen. Calculations suggest that these levels of odd nitrogen are transported within the polar vortex and during the polar night from the middle to upper stratosphere and lower mesosphere to the lower stratosphere. The possibility that these levels are related to the 11-year solar cycle and are increased by enhanced formation in the thermosphere and mesosphere during solar maximum conditions is discussed.

  20. CP-odd phase correlations and electric dipole moments

    SciTech Connect

    Olive, Keith A.; Pospelov, Maxim; Ritz, Adam; Santoso, Yudi

    2005-10-01

    We revisit the constraints imposed by electric dipole moments (EDMs) of nucleons and heavy atoms on new CP-violating sources within supersymmetric theories. We point out that certain two-loop renormalization group corrections induce significant mixing between the basis-invariant CP-odd phases. In the framework of the constrained minimal supersymmetric standard model, the CP-odd invariant related to the soft trilinear A-phase at the grand unified theory (GUT) scale, {theta}{sub A}, induces nontrivial and distinct CP-odd phases for the three gaugino masses at the weak scale. The latter give one-loop contributions to EDMs enhanced by tan{beta}, and can provide the dominant contribution to the electron EDM induced by {theta}{sub A}. We perform a detailed analysis of the EDM constraints within the constrained minimal supersymmetric standard model, exhibiting the reach, in terms of sparticle spectra, which may be obtained assuming generic phases, as well as the limits on the CP-odd phases for some specific parameter points where detailed phenomenological studies are available. We also illustrate how this reach will expand with results from the next generation of experiments which are currently in development.

  1. Are the Odds Against the Origin of Life Too Great?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrier, Richard

    2000-01-01

    Statistics are offered to "prove" odds against the origin of life. Presents a summary analysis of all known examples to be used to check these claims whenever they are brought up in conversations, debates, books, or articles. Addresses scientific work misused by anti-evolutionists and the pseudoscientific assertions of the anti-evolutionists…

  2. Band structure of doubly-odd nuclei around mass 130

    SciTech Connect

    Higashiyama, Koji; Yoshinaga, Naotaka

    2011-05-06

    Nuclear structure of the doublet bands in the doubly-odd nuclei with mass A{approx}130 is studied in terms of a pair-truncated shell model. The model reproduces quite well the energy levels of the doublet bands and the electromagnetic transitions. The analysis of the electromagnetic transitions reveals new band structure of the doublet bands.

  3. Against the Odds: Disadvantaged Students Who Succeed in School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing (NJ1), 2011

    2011-01-01

    This report explores the factors and conditions that could help more students succeed at school despite challenging socio-economic backgrounds. It does this by studying resilient students and what sets them apart from their less successful peers. Understanding how educational systems can support disadvantaged students and help them "beat the odds"…

  4. Despite the Odds: The Contentious Politics of Education Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grindle, Merilee S.

    2004-01-01

    "Despite the Odds" poses an important question: How can we account for successful policy reform initiatives when the political cards are stacked against change? Theories of politics usually predict that reform initiatives will be unsuccessful when powerful groups are opposed to change and institutions are biased against it. This book, however,…

  5. The Differential Graded Odd NilHecke Algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Alexander P.; Qi, You

    2016-05-01

    We equip the odd nilHecke algebra and its associated thick calculus category with diagrammatically local differentials. The resulting differential graded Grothendieck groups are isomorphic to two different forms of the positive part of quantum {{{sl}_2}} at a fourth root of unity.

  6. Quantum description of T-odd correlations in ternary fission

    SciTech Connect

    Bunakov, V. E.; Kadmensky, S. G.

    2008-07-15

    A quantum version of a unified description of two T-odd effects recently observed in the ternary fission of nuclei that is induced by polarized neutrons is considered. These effects are explained by the effect of the Coriolis interaction of the rotating fissile system on the angular distributions of light charged particles in the interior and exterior regions of the nucleus.

  7. A Study of Odd- and Even-Number Cultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nishiyama, Yutaka

    2006-01-01

    Japanese prefer odd numbers, whereas Westerners emphasize even numbers, an observation that is clear from the distribution of number-related words in Japanese and English dictionaries. In this article, the author explains why these two cultures differ by surveying the history of numbers, including yin-yang thought from ancient China, ancient Greek…

  8. Adherence to abiraterone among the first 86 recipients after release in Saskatchewan

    PubMed Central

    Smith, A.D.; Olson, C.; Lyons, B.; Tran, D.; Blackburn, D.F.

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer is now commonly treated with abiraterone, an orally administered chronic medication. Although abiraterone has certain advantages over docetaxel-based therapy, patients are now responsible for ensuring optimal adherence to their medication. To our knowledge, adherence to abiraterone in a real-world setting has never been described. The objective of the present study was to measure adherence to abiraterone among the first patients to receive the drug in Saskatchewan. Electronic pharmacy claims were obtained from the Saskatchewan Cancer Agency after removal of patient names and identifiers. All patients with at least 1 dispensation for abiraterone between August 2011 and October 2013 were eligible. The primary endpoint was the percentage of patients achieving optimal adherence at 6 months, defined as a medication possession ratio (mpr) of 80% or better. During the study period, 141 patients received abiraterone, among whom 86 could be followed for at least 6 months. Optimal adherence was achieved in 82.6% of patients (71 of 86) at 6 months, with 79.1% achieving a mpr of at least 90%. Of patients with available follow-up to 1 year, 81.6% (31 of 38) maintained optimal adherence during the entire period. PMID:25684990

  9. Antiferromagnetic molecular nanomagnets with odd-numbered coupled spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owerre, S. A.; Nsofini, J.

    2015-05-01

    In recent years, studies on cyclic molecular nanomagnets have captivated the attention of researchers. These magnets are finite in size and contain very large spins. They are interesting because they possess macroscopic quantum tunneling of Néel vectors. For antiferromagnetic molecular nanomagnets with finite number of even-numbered coupled spins, tunneling involves two classical localized Néel ground states separated by a magnetic energy barrier. The question is: can such phenomena be observed in nanomagnets with odd number of magnetic ions? The answer is not directly obvious because cyclic chains with odd-numbered coupled spins are frustrated as one cannot obtain a perfect Néel order. These frustrated spins can indeed be observed experimentally, so they are of interest. In this letter, we theoretically investigate macroscopic quantum tunneling in this odd spin system with arbitrary spins s, in the presence of a magnetic field applied along the plane of the magnet. In contrast to systems with an even-numbered coupled spins, the ground state of the cyclic odd-spin system contains a topological soliton due to spin frustration. Thus, the classical ground state is 2N-fold degenerate as the soliton can be placed anywhere along the ring with total S_z=+/- s . Small quantum fluctuations delocalize the soliton with a formation of an energy band. We obtain this energy band using degenerate perturbation theory at order 2s. We show that the soliton ground state is chiral for half-odd integer spins and non-chiral for integer spins. From the structure of the energy band we infer that as the value of the spin increases the inelastic polarized neutron-scattering intensity may increase or decrease depending on the strengths of the parameters of the Hamiltonian.

  10. Biosynthesis of odd-chain fatty alcohols in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ying-Xiu; Xiao, Wen-Hai; Liu, Duo; Zhang, Jin-Lai; Ding, Ming-Zhu; Yuan, Ying-Jin

    2015-05-01

    Engineered microbes offer the opportunity to design and implement artificial molecular pathways for renewable production of tailored chemical commodities. Targeted biosynthesis of odd-chain fatty alcohols is very challenging in microbe, due to the specificity of fatty acids synthase for two-carbon unit elongation. Here, we developed a novel strategy to directly tailor carbon number in fatty aldehydes formation step by incorporating α-dioxygenase (αDOX) from Oryza sativa (rice) into Escherichia coli αDOX oxidizes Cn fatty acids (even-chain) to form Cn-1 fatty aldehydes (odd-chain). Through combining αDOX with fatty acyl-acyl carrier protein (-ACP) thioesterase (TE) and aldehyde reductase (AHR), the medium odd-chain fatty alcohols profile (C11, C13, C15) was firstly established in E. coli. Also, medium even-chain alkanes (C12, C14) were obtained by substitution of AHR to aldehyde decarbonylase (AD). The titer of odd-chain fatty alcohols was improved from 7.4mg/L to 101.5mg/L in tube cultivation by means of fine-tuning endogenous fatty acyl-ACP TE (TesA'), αDOX, AHRs and the genes involved in fatty acids metabolism pathway. Through high cell density fed-batch fermentation, a titer of 1.95g/L odd-chain fatty alcohols was achieved, which was the highest reported titer in E. coli. Our system has greatly expanded the current microbial fatty alcohols profile that provides a new brand solution for producing complex and desired molecules in microbes. PMID:25773521

  11. One-year adherence to oral antihyperglycemic medication and risk prediction of patient outcomes for adults with diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Carola A.; Rapold, Roland; Brüngger, Beat; Reich, Oliver; Rosemann, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Medication adherence is essential in preventing adverse intermediate outcomes, but little is known on hard outcomes. The aims of this study were to determine the 1-year adherence to oral antihyperglycemic drugs (OADs) and to predict the risk of subsequent health outcomes among (non)adherent patients with diabetes. Using a large Swiss healthcare claims database from 2011 to 2014, we identified all patients aged ≥18 years with diabetes and treated with at least 1 OAD prescription. Adherence to OADs was measured as the proportion of days covered (PDC) over 1 year and subdivided into 2 categories: adherent (PDC ≥ 80%), nonadherent (PDC < 80%). We estimated the relative risk of hospitalization and mortality at follow-up using multivariate Cox proportional hazard models. Based on a sample of 26,713 patients, adherence to OADs was quite low: 42% of the patients achieved a PDC of ≥80% during the 1-year observation period. A 7% reduction in the hospitalization risk and a 10% reduction in the risk of mortality could be observed in adherent patients compared to nonadherent patients (hazard ratio [HR], 0.93 [95% CI, 0.89–0.97]; HR, 0.90 [95% CI, 0.82–0.99]). Subgroup analysis showed that an intensified diabetes therapy had no significant influence on the risk of both outcomes in adherent patients. Poor medication adherence increases the risk of subsequent hospitalizations and premature mortality in patient with diabetes, regardless of disease severity and comorbidities. This emphasizes the need for an earlier identification of patients with poor medication adherence. The awareness of physicians and patients regarding the importance of adherence in diabetes treatment should be increased. PMID:27368004

  12. Adherence to Alternative Healthy Eating Index in relation to depression and anxiety in Iranian adults.

    PubMed

    Saneei, Parvane; Hajishafiee, Maryam; Keshteli, Ammar Hassanzadeh; Afshar, Hamid; Esmaillzadeh, Ahmad; Adibi, Peyman

    2016-07-01

    Earlier studies have shown a protective association between adherence to healthy eating guidelines and mental disorders in Western nations; however, data in this regard are limited from the understudied region of Middle East. We examined the association between adherence to healthy eating guidelines, as measured by Alternative Healthy Eating Index (AHEI)-2010, and prevalence of anxiety and depression in a large sample of Iranian adults. In this cross-sectional study, data on dietary intakes of 3363 adult participants were collected using a validated dish-based 106-item semi-quantitative FFQ. Adherence to healthy eating was quantified using AHEI-2010, as suggested by earlier publications. The Iranian validated version of Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale was used to assess anxiety and depression in study participants. Data on other covariates were gathered using a pre-tested questionnaire. Overall, the prevalence of anxiety and depression was 15·2 % (males 10·8 % and females 18·3 %) and 30·0 % (males 22·9 % and females 35·1 %), respectively. After controlling for potential confounders, those in the top quartile of AHEI-2010 had a 49 % lower chance of anxiety (OR 0·51; 95 % CI 0·35, 0·72) and a 45 % lower odds of depression (OR 0·55; 95 % CI 0·42, 0·72), compared with those in the bottom quartile. Stratified analysis by sex revealed that women in the highest categories of AHEI-2010 had a 49 % lower odds of having anxiety and depression, after adjustment for confounders, but no significant association was found in men. In addition, among individuals who were 40 years old or younger, those with high adherence to AHEI-2010 were 58 and 51 % less likely to have anxiety and depression, compared with those with less adherence. Adherence to healthy eating was inversely associated with a lower chance of anxiety and depression in Iranian adults. Prospective studies are required to confirm these associations in Middle-Eastern populations. PMID:27188471

  13. Dynamic mechanical measurement of the viscoelasticity of single adherent cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbin, Elise A.; Adeniba, Olaoluwa O.; Ewoldt, Randy H.; Bashir, Rashid

    2016-02-01

    Many recent studies on the viscoelasticity of individual cells link mechanics with cellular function and health. Here, we introduce a measurement of the viscoelastic properties of individual human colon cancer cells (HT-29) using silicon pedestal microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) resonant sensors. We demonstrate that the viscoelastic properties of single adherent cells can be extracted by measuring a difference in vibrational amplitude of our resonant sensor platform. The magnitude of vibration of the pedestal sensor is measured using a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV). A change in amplitude of the sensor, compared with the driving amplitude (amplitude ratio), is influenced by the mechanical properties of the adhered cells. The amplitude ratio of the fixed cells was greater than the live cells, with a p-value <0.0001. By combining the amplitude shift with the resonant frequency shift measure, we determined the elastic modulus and viscosity values of 100 Pa and 0.0031 Pa s, respectively. Our method using the change in amplitude of resonant MEMS devices can enable the determination of a refined solution space and could improve measuring the stiffness of cells.

  14. Adherence to hydroxyurea medication by children with sickle cell disease (SCD) using an electronic device: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Susumu; Kodjebacheva, Gergana; Scherrer, Tammy; Rice, Gary; Grigorian, Matthew; Blankenship, Jeremy; Onwuzurike, Nkechi

    2016-08-01

    Adherence to hydroxyurea (HU) is a significant modifying factor in sickle cell vaso-occlusive pain. We conducted a study using an electronic medication container-monitor-reminder device (GlowCap™) to track adherence and determine whether use of this device affected rates of HU adherence. Subjects were regular attendees to our clinic. They were given a 37-item questionnaire and were asked to use a GlowCap containing HU. When the device cap is opened, it makes a remote "medication taken" record. The device also provides usage reminder in the form of lights and alarm sounds if the cap opening is delayed. Nineteen subjects participated in the survey, and 17 in the intervention phase. Of the 17, 12 had reliable adherence data. Seventeen caregivers of patients and two patients completed the survey. Two most common barriers to adherence identified were lack of reminders and absence of medicine home delivery. The intervention component of this study, which used both the electronic (GlowCap) method and medication possession ratio showed that the median adherence rate for the 12 patients evaluated was 85 %. The GlowCap device accurately kept a record of adherence rates. This device may be an effective tool for increasing HU medication adherence. PMID:27225236

  15. Executive Functioning in Children: A Comparison of Hospitalised ODD and ODD/ADHD Children and Normal Controls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Goozen, Stephanie H. M.; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T.; Snoek, Heddeke; Matthys, Walter; Swaab-Barneveld, Hanna; Van Engeland, Herman

    2004-01-01

    Background: Deficits in executive functioning are supposed to have a predisposing influence on impulsive or aggressive behaviour. We tested the hypothesis that oppositional-defiant disorder (ODD) children with or without attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have problems in executive functioning. Method: Seventy-seven 7- to 12-year-old…

  16. Psychometric Properties of a Short Self-Reported Measure of Medication Adherence Among Patients With Hypertension Treated in a Busy Clinical Setting in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeung-Hee; Lee, Weon-Young; Hong, Yeon-Pyo; Ryu, Wang-Seong; Lee, Kwang Je; Lee, Wang-Soo; Morisky, Donald E.

    2014-01-01

    Background We examined the psychometric properties of the Korean version of the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) among adults with hypertension. Methods A total of 373 adults with hypertension were given face-to-face interviews in 2 cardiology clinics at 2 large teaching hospitals in Seoul, South Korea. Blood pressure was measured twice, and medical records were reviewed. About one-third of the participants (n = 109) were randomly selected for a 2-week test-retest evaluation of reliability via telephone interview. Results Internal consistency reliability was moderate (Cronbach α = 0.56), and test-retest reliability was excellent (intraclass correlation = 0.91; P < 0.001), although a ceiling effect was detected. The correlation of MMAS-8 scores with scores for the original 4-item scale indicated that convergent validity was good (r = 0.92; P < 0.01). A low MMAS-8 score was significantly associated with poor blood pressure control (χ2 = 29.86; P < 0.001; adjusted odds ratio = 5.08; 95% CI, 2.56–10.08). Using a cut-off point of 6, sensitivity and specificity were 64.3% and 72.9%, respectively. Exploratory factor analysis identified 3 dimensions of the scale, with poor fit for the 1-dimensional construct using confirmatory factory analysis. Conclusions The MMAS-8 had satisfactory reliability and validity and thus might be suitable for assessment and counseling regarding medication adherence among adults with hypertension in a busy clinical setting in Korea. PMID:24463958

  17. Regional and neighborhood disparities in the odds of type 2 diabetes: results from 5 population-based studies in Germany (DIAB-CORE consortium).

    PubMed

    Müller, Grit; Kluttig, Alexander; Greiser, Karin Halina; Moebus, Susanne; Slomiany, Uta; Schipf, Sabine; Völzke, Henry; Maier, Werner; Meisinger, Christa; Tamayo, Teresa; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Berger, Klaus

    2013-07-15

    The objective of this study was to investigate the association between residential environment and type 2 diabetes. We pooled cross-sectional data from 5 population-based German studies (1997-2006): the Cardiovascular Disease, Living and Ageing in Halle Study, the Dortmund Health Study, the Heinz Nixdorf Recall Study, the Cooperative Health Research in the Region of Augsburg Study, and the Study of Health in Pomerania. The outcome of interest was the presence of self-reported type 2 diabetes. We conducted mixed logistic regression models in a hierarchical data set with 8,879 individuals aged 45-74 years on level 1; 226 neighborhoods on level 2; and 5 study regions on level 3. The analyses were adjusted for age, sex, social class, and employment status. The odds ratio for type 2 diabetes was highest in eastern Germany (odds ratio = 1.98, 95% confidence interval: 1.81, 2.14) and northeastern Germany (odds ratio = 1.58, 95% confidence interval: 1.40, 1.77) and lowest in southern Germany (reference) after adjustment for individual variables. Neighborhood unemployment rates explained a large proportion of regional differences. Individuals residing in neighborhoods with high unemployment rates had elevated odds of type 2 diabetes (odds ratio = 1.62, 95% confidence interval: 1.25, 2.09). The diverging levels of unemployment in neighborhoods and regions are an independent source of disparities in type 2 diabetes. PMID:23648804

  18. Adherence to Glycemic Monitoring in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Patton, Susana R.

    2015-01-01

    Glucose monitoring either by self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) or continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) plays an important role in diabetes management and in reducing risk for diabetes-related complications. However, despite evidence supporting the role of glucose monitoring in better patient health outcomes, studies also reveal relatively poor adherence rates to SMBG and CGM use and numerous patient-reported barriers. Fortunately, some promising intervention strategies have been identified that promote at least short-term improvements in patients’ adherence to SMBG. These include education, problem solving, contingency management, goal setting, cognitive behavioral therapy, and motivational interviewing. Specific to CGM, interventions to promote greater use among patients are currently under way, yet one pilot study provides data suggesting better maintenance of CGM use in patients showing greater readiness for behavior change. The purpose of this review is to summarize the literature specific to glucose monitoring in patients with diabetes focusing specifically on current adherence rates, barriers to monitoring, and promising intervention strategies that may be ready to deploy now in the clinic setting to promote greater patient adherence to glucose monitoring. Yet, to continue to help patients with diabetes adhere to glucose monitoring, future research is needed to identify the treatment strategies and the intervention schedules that most likely lead to long-term maintenance of optimal glycemic monitoring levels. PMID:25591853

  19. Precision spectroscopy of the {sup 207}Pb{sup 19}F molecule: Implications for measurement of P-odd and T-odd effects

    SciTech Connect

    Alphei, Lukas D.; Grabow, Jens-Uwe; Petrov, A. N.; Mawhorter, Richard; Murphy, Benjamin; Baum, Alexander; Sears, Trevor J.; Yang, T. Zh.; Rupasinghe, P. M.; McRaven, C. P.; Shafer-Ray, N. E.

    2011-04-15

    Here we report precision microwave spectroscopy of pure rotational transitions of the {sup 207}Pb{sup 19}F isotopologue. We use these data to make predictions of the sensitivity of the molecule to P-odd, T-even and P-odd, T-odd effects.

  20. An Index of Multiple Psychosocial, Syndemic Conditions Is Associated with Antiretroviral Medication Adherence Among HIV-Positive Youth.

    PubMed

    Kuhns, Lisa M; Hotton, Anna L; Garofalo, Rob; Muldoon, Abigail L; Jaffe, Kaitlyn; Bouris, Alida; Voisin, Dexter; Schneider, John

    2016-04-01

    Medication adherence among HIV-infected individuals is critical to limit disease progression and onward transmission. Evidence indicates that among youth living with HIV (YLH), adherence is suboptimal and related to co-morbid psychosocial conditions. Cross-sectional data from 212 YLH, ages 16-29, collected between 2011-2014 in Chicago were analyzed to assess the relationship of multiple psychosocial conditions (e.g., depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms, moderate/heavy marijuana use, moderate/heavy alcohol use, HIV-related stigma) to ART adherence (i.e., a "syndemic.") Adherence was regressed on an index of increasing numbers of psychosocial conditions, controlling for demographic and treatment factors as well as enrollment site. The mean age of participants was 24, 89% were male, 87% black, and 91% behaviorally infected. Psychosocial conditions were prevalent, including 38% and 34% with high depressive and anxiety symptoms, respectively, 54% and 25% with a moderate/high level of marijuana and alcohol use, respectively, and 46% reporting high HIV-related stigma. In regression analysis, the likelihood of ART adherence decreased with the number of syndemic conditions (linear dose response, p = 0.02) as did the odds of viral load suppression (p = 0.008). Interventions to address these conditions in concert with biomedical treatment as prevention for YLH are needed. PMID:27028184

  1. Does the Prevalence of CD and ODD Vary across Cultures?

    PubMed Central

    Canino, Glorisa; Polanczyk, Guilherme; Bauermeister, Jose J.; Rohde, Luis A.; Frick, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    The worldwide prevalence of conduct disorder (CD) and oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) is presented in order to examine the first of four criteria used in other studies to determine the validity of psychiatric disorders across cultures. The authors searched Medline and PsycINFO from 1987 to 2008. Studies were included if they were representative of specific communities or countries and reported point prevalence of CD or ODD according to DSM-III-R or DSM-IV criteria for children 18 years or younger. Only methodological and not geographic factors were associated with variability of the prevalence estimates. The results are discussed in terms of their significance for the classification of disorders and the need for further research to establish the validity of these two disorders across cultures. PMID:20532864

  2. Mesospheric Odd Nitrogen Enhancements During Relativistic Electron Precipitation Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, A. C.; Smith, H. J. P.

    1999-01-01

    The behavior of mesospheric odd nitrogen species during and following relativistic and diffuse auroral precipitation events is simulated, Below 75 km nitric oxide is enhanced in proportion to the ion pair production function associated with the electron precipitation and the length of the event. Nitrogen dioxide and nitric acid are also enhanced. At 65 km the percentage of odd nitrogen for N is 0.1%, HNO3 is 1.6%, NO2 is 15%, and NO is 83.3%. Between 75 and 85 km NO is depleted during particle events due to the faster destruction of NO by N relative to the production of NO by N reacting with O2. Recovery of NO depends on transport from the lower thermosphere, where NO is produced in abundant amounts during particle events.

  3. Beating the regulatory odds with new simulation models

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, M.B.

    1994-06-20

    Complying with environmental regulations is like a horse race. When it comes to selecting pollution control technologies, the odds against picking a winner are high. A system that`s supposedly an odds-on favorite can come up short if the track conditions are wrong. The penalty for picking a loser is steep and even the best manufacturers can be put out to pasture for poor performance. Certainly, the stakes are high: the federal government projects that environmental rules will cost industry $184 billion annually by 2000. Others say it could be four times that. {open_quotes}But unless you have a crystal ball no one knows what it will cost{close_quotes}, says Robert Sackellares, head of the Atlanta office of SBE Environmental Company, New York City. {open_quotes}The final price tag will depend on the technologies that companies choose, and how effective they are.{close_quotes}.

  4. Predator fitness increases with selectivity for odd prey.

    PubMed

    Rutz, Christian

    2012-05-01

    The fundamental currency of normative models of animal decision making is Darwinian fitness. In foraging ecology, empirical studies typically assess foraging strategies by recording energy intake rates rather than realized reproductive performance. This study provides a rare empirical link, in a vertebrate predator-prey system, between a predator's foraging behavior and direct measures of its reproductive fitness. Goshawks Accipiter gentilis selectively kill rare color variants of their principal prey, the feral pigeon Columba livia, presumably because targeting odd-looking birds in large uniform flocks helps them overcome confusion effects and enhances attack success. Reproductive performance of individual hawks increases significantly with their selectivity for odd-colored pigeons, even after controlling for confounding age effects. Older hawks exhibit more pronounced dietary preferences, suggesting that hunting performance improves with experience. Intriguingly, although negative frequency-dependent predation by hawks exerts strong selection against rare pigeon phenotypes, pigeon color polymorphism is maintained through negative assortative mating. PMID:22503502

  5. Investigation of odd-order nonlinear susceptibilities in atomic vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Yaqi; Wu, Zhenkun; Si, Jinhai; Yan, Lihe; Zhang, Yiqi; Yuan, Chenzhi; Sun, Jia; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2013-06-15

    We theoretically deduce the macroscopic symmetry constraints for arbitrary odd-order nonlinear susceptibilities in homogeneous media including atomic vapors for the first time. After theoretically calculating the expressions using a semiclassical method, we demonstrate that the expressions for third- and fifth-order nonlinear susceptibilities for undressed and dressed four- and six-wave mixing (FWM and SWM) in atomic vapors satisfy the macroscopic symmetry constraints. We experimentally demonstrate consistence between the macroscopic symmetry constraints and the semiclassical expressions for atomic vapors by observing polarization control of FWM and SWM processes. The experimental results are in reasonable agreement with our theoretical calculations. -- Highlights: •The macroscopic symmetry constraints are deduced for homogeneous media including atomic vapors. •We demonstrate that odd-order nonlinear susceptibilities satisfy the constraints. •We experimentally demonstrate the deduction in part.

  6. Shape phase transitions in odd-A nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, C. E.; Arias, J. M.; Fortunato, L.; Vitturi, A.

    2008-11-11

    We investigate shape phase transitions in odd nuclei within the Interacting Boson Fermion Model. Special attention is given to the case of the transition from the vibrational behaviour to the stable axial deformation. The odd particle is assumed to be moving in the three single particle orbitals j = 1/2,3/2,5/2 with a boson-fermion Hamiltonian that leads to the occurrence of the SU{sup BF}(3) boson-fermion symmetry when the boson part approaches the SU(3) condition. Both energy spectra and electromagnetic transitions show characteristic patterns similar to those displayed by the even nuclei at the corresponding critical point. The role of the additional particle in characterizing the properties of the critical points in finite quantal systems is investigated by resorting to the formalism based on the intrinsic frame.

  7. Abuse and Resilience in Relation to HAART Medication Adherence and HIV Viral Load Among Women with HIV in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Mardge; Weber, Kathleen; Cruise, Ruth; Kelso, Gwendolyn

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Abuse is highly prevalent among HIV+ women, leading to behaviors, including lower adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) that result in poor health outcomes. Resilience (functioning competently despite adversity) may buffer the negative effects of abuse. This study investigated how resilience interacted with abuse history in relation to HAART adherence, HIV viral load (VL), and CD4+ cell count among a convenience sample of 138 HIV+ women from the Ruth M. Rothstein CORE Center/Cook County Health and Hospital Systems site of the Women's Interagency HIV Study (WIHS). Resilience was measured by the 10-item Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC). HAART adherence (≥95% vs. <95% self reported usage of prescribed medication) and current or prior sexual, physical, or emotional/domestic abuse, were reported during structured interviews. HIV viral load (≥20 vs. <20 copies/mL) and CD4+ count (200 vs. <200 cells/mm) were measured with blood specimens. Multiple logistic regressions, controlling for age, race, income, enrollment wave, substance use, and depressive symptoms, indicated that each unit increase in resilience was significantly associated with an increase in the odds of having ≥95% HAART adherence and a decrease in the odds of having a detectable viral load. Resilience-Abuse interactions showed that only among HIV+ women with sexual abuse or multiple abuses did resilience significantly relate to an increase in the odds of ≥95% HAART adherence. Interventions to improve coping strategies that promote resilience among HIV+ women may be beneficial for achieving higher HAART adherence and viral suppression. PMID:24568654

  8. Alternating parity structure in doubly odd /sup 218/Ac

    SciTech Connect

    Debray, M.E.; Davidson, M.; Kreiner, A.J.; Davidson, J.; Falcone, G.; Hojman, D.; Santos, D.

    1989-03-01

    States in doubly odd /sup 218/Ac have been studied using in-beam ..cap alpha..-, ..gamma..-, and e/sup -/-spectroscopy techniques mainly through the /sup 209/Bi(/sup 12/C,3n)= fusion-evaporation reaction. /sup 218/Ac shows a band structure, with interleaved states of alternating parities connected by enhanced B(E1) transitions, which is strikingly similar to the one in its isotone /sup 217/Ra.

  9. Improved techniques for lower bounds for odd perfect numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brent, R. P.; Cohen, G. L.; Riele, H. J. J. Te

    1991-10-01

    If N is an odd perfect number, and {q^k}\\vert\\vert N , q prime, k even, then it is almost immediate that N > {q^{2k}} . We prove here that, subject to certain conditions verifiable in polynomial time, in fact N > {q^{5k/2}} . Using this and related results, we are able to extend the computations in an earlier paper to show that N > {10^{300}} .

  10. Even-odd effect in short antiferromagnetic Heisenberg chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machens, A.; Konstantinidis, N. P.; Waldmann, O.; Schneider, I.; Eggert, S.

    2013-04-01

    Motivated by recent experiments on chemically synthesized magnetic molecular chains, we investigate the lowest-lying energy band of short spin-s antiferromagnetic Heisenberg chains focusing on effects of open boundaries. By numerical diagonalization we find that the Landé pattern in the energy levels, i.e., E(S)∝S(S+1) for total spin S, known from, e.g., ring-shaped nanomagnets, can be recovered in odd-membered chains, while strong deviations are found for the lowest excitations in chains with an even number of sites. This particular even-odd effect in the short Heisenberg chains cannot be explained by simple effective Hamiltonians and symmetry arguments. We go beyond these approaches, taking into account quantum fluctuations by means of a path-integral description and the valence bond basis, but the resulting quantum edge-spin picture which is known to work well for long chains does not agree with the numerical results for short chains and cannot explain the even-odd effect. Instead, by analyzing also the classical chain model, we show that spatial fluctuations dominate the physical behavior in short chains, with length N≲eπs, for any spin s. Such short chains are found to display a unique behavior, which is not related to the thermodynamic limit and cannot be described well by theories developed for this regime.

  11. Wind-induced odd gravitational harmonics of Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Dali; Zhang, Keke; Schubert, Gerald

    2015-06-01

    While the rotational distortion of Jupiter makes a major contribution to its lowermost order even zonal gravitational coefficients Jn with n ≥ 2, the component of the zonal winds with equatorial antisymmetry, if sufficiently deep, produces a gravitational signature contained in the odd zonal gravitational coefficients Jn with n ≥ 3. Based on a non-spherical model of a polytropic Jupiter with index unity, we compute Jupiter's odd gravitational coefficients J3, J5, J7, …, J11 induced by the equatorially antisymmetric zonal winds that are assumed to be deep. It is found that the lowermost odd gravitational coefficients J3, J5 and J7 are of the same order of magnitude with J3 = -1.6562 × 10-6, J5 = 1.5778 × 10-6 and J7 = -0.7432 × 10-6, and are within the accuracy of high-precision gravitational measurements to be carried out by the Juno spacecraft.

  12. Fluctuation theorems and entropy production with odd-parity variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyunggyu; Lee, Hyun Keun; Kwon, Chulan

    2013-03-01

    We show that the total entropy production in stochastic processes with odd-parity variables (under time reversal) is separated into three parts, only two of which satisfy the integral fluctuation theorems in general. One is the usual excess contribution, which can appear only transiently and is called non-adiabatic. Another one is attributed solely to the breakage of detailed balance. The last part not satisfying the fluctuation theorem comes from the steady-state distribution asymmetry for odd-parity variables, which is activated in a non-transient manner. The latter two parts combine together as the house-keeping (adiabatic) contribution, whose positivity is not guaranteed except when the excess contribution completely vanishes. Our finding reveals that the equilibrium requires the steady-state distribution symmetry for odd-parity variables independently, in addition to the usual detailed balance. This work was supported by Mid-career Researcher Program through NRF grant (No. 2010-0026627) funded by the MEST.

  13. Decline in Cardiorespiratory Fitness and Odds of Incident Sleep Complaints

    PubMed Central

    Dishman, Rodney K.; Sui, Xuemei; Church, Timothy S.; Kline, Christopher E.; Youngstedt, Shawn D.; Blair, Steven N.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To examine longitudinal change in cardiorespiratory fitness and odds of incident sleep problems. Methods A cohort of 7368 men and 1155 women, aged 20–85 years, from the Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study. The cohort did not complain of sleep problems, depression, or anxiety at their first clinic visit. Cardiorespiratory fitness assessed at 4 clinic visits between 1971–2006, each separated by an average of 2–3 years, was used as a proxy measure of cumulative physical activity exposure. Sleep complaints were made to a physician during follow-up. Results Across visits, there were 784 incident cases of sleep complaints in men and 207 cases in women. After adjustment for age, time between visits, body mass index, smoking, alcohol use, chronic medical conditions, complaints of depression or anxiety at each visit, and fitness at Visit 1, each minute decline in treadmill endurance (i.e., a decline in cardiorespiratory fitness of approximately one-half MET) between ages 51 to 56 increased the odds of incident sleep complaints by 1.7% (1.0–2.4%) in men and 1.3% (0.0–2.8%) in women. Odds were ~8% higher per minute decline in people with sleep complaints at 2 or 3 visits. Conclusion The results indicate that maintenance of cardiorespiratory fitness during middle-age, when decline in fitness typically accelerates and risk of sleep problems is elevated, helps protect against the onset of sleep complaints made to a physician. PMID:25207930

  14. A loop group extension of the odd Chern character

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Scott O.

    2016-04-01

    We show that the universal odd Chern form, defined on the stable unitary group U, extends to the loop group LU as an equivariantly closed differential form. This provides an odd analogue to the Bismut-Chern form that appears in supersymmetric field theories. We also describe the associated transgression form, the so-called Bismut-Chern-Simons form, and explicate some properties it inherits as a differential form on the space of maps of a cylinder into the stable unitary group. As one corollary, we show that in a precise sense the spectral flow of a loop of self adjoint Fredholm operators equals the lowest degree component of the Bismut-Chern-Simons form, and the latter, when restricted to cylinders which are tori, is an equivariantly closed extension of spectral flow. As another corollary, we construct the Chern character homomorphism from odd K-theory to the periodic cohomology of the free loop space, represented geometrically on the level of differential forms.

  15. Strategies to Increase Adherence through Diabetes Technology

    PubMed Central

    Gabbay, Robert A.; Durdock, Kendra

    2010-01-01

    A variety of new technologies have been developed to assist patients with self-managing their diabetes and yet hemoglobin A1c has not changed dramatically over the last decade. Although more data available from these new diabetes technologies can be helpful, it is clear that an informed, motivated, and adherent patient is the key to success. This article focuses on increasing patient adherence through the use of motivational interviewing, an evidence-based behavior change counseling technique. Specific skills of motivational interviewing may help the provider assess what the patient already knows about the technology, explore the patient's motivation for using the technology, and, finally, assess the patient's barriers, importance, and confidence in using the technology, leading to better adherence. PMID:20513334

  16. Strategies to increase adherence through diabetes technology.

    PubMed

    Gabbay, Robert A; Durdock, Kendra

    2010-05-01

    A variety of new technologies have been developed to assist patients with self-managing their diabetes and yet hemoglobin A1c has not changed dramatically over the last decade. Although more data available from these new diabetes technologies can be helpful, it is clear that an informed, motivated, and adherent patient is the key to success. This article focuses on increasing patient adherence through the use of motivational interviewing, an evidence-based behavior change counseling technique. Specific skills of motivational interviewing may help the provider assess what the patient already knows about the technology, explore the patient's motivation for using the technology, and, finally, assess the patient's barriers, importance, and confidence in using the technology, leading to better adherence. PMID:20513334

  17. The Impact of Text Message Reminders on Adherence to Antimalarial Treatment in Northern Ghana: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Raifman, Julia R. G.; Lanthorn, Heather E.; Rokicki, Slawa; Fink, Günther

    2014-01-01

    Background Low rates of adherence to artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) regimens increase the risk of treatment failure and may lead to drug resistance, threatening the sustainability of current anti-malarial efforts. We assessed the impact of text message reminders on adherence to ACT regimens. Methods Health workers at hospitals, clinics, pharmacies, and other stationary ACT distributors in Tamale, Ghana provided flyers advertising free mobile health information to individuals receiving malaria treatment. The messaging system automatically randomized self-enrolled individuals to the control group or the treatment group with equal probability; those in the treatment group were further randomly assigned to receive a simple text message reminder or the simple reminder plus an additional statement about adherence in 12-hour intervals. The main outcome was self-reported adherence based on follow-up interviews occurring three days after treatment initiation. We estimated the impact of the messages on treatment completion using logistic regression. Results 1140 individuals enrolled in both the study and the text reminder system. Among individuals in the control group, 61.5% took the full course of treatment. The simple text message reminders increased the odds of adherence (adjusted OR 1.45, 95% CI [1.03 to 2.04], p-value 0.028). Receiving an additional message did not result in a significant change in adherence (adjusted OR 0.77, 95% CI [0.50 to 1.20], p-value 0.252). Conclusion The results of this study suggest that a simple text message reminder can increase adherence to antimalarial treatment and that additional information included in messages does not have a significant impact on completion of ACT treatment. Further research is needed to develop the most effective text message content and frequency. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01722734 PMID:25350546

  18. Adherence of Clostridium thermocellum to cellulose.

    PubMed Central

    Bayer, E A; Kenig, R; Lamed, R

    1983-01-01

    The adherence of Clostridium thermocellum, a cellulolytic, thermophilic anaerobe, to its insoluble substrate (cellulose) was studied. The adherence phenomenon was determined to be selective for cellulose. The observed adherence was not significantly affected by various parameters, including salts, pH, temperature, detergents, or soluble sugars. A spontaneous adherence-defective mutant strain (AD2) was isolated from the wild-type strain YS. Antibodies were prepared against the bacterial cell surface and rendered specific to the cellulose-binding factor (CBF) by adsorption to mutant AD2 cells. By using these CBF-specific antibodies, crossed immunoelectrophoresis of cell extracts revealed a single discrete precipitation peak in the parent strain which was absent in the mutant. This difference was accompanied by an alteration in the polypeptide profile whereby sonicates of strain YS contained a 210,000-molecular-weight band which was missing in strain AD2. The CBF antigen could be removed from cell extracts by adsorption to cellulose. A combined gel-overlay--immunoelectrophoretic technique demonstrated that the cellulose-binding properties of the CBF were accompanied by carboxymethylcellulase activity. During the exponential phase of growth, a large part of the CBF antigen and related carboxymethylcellulase activity was associated with the cells of wild-type strain YS. However, the amounts decreased in stationary-phase cells. Cellobiose-grown mutant AD2 cells lacked the cell-associated CBF, but the latter was detected in the extracellular fluid. Increased levels of CBF were observed when cells were grown on cellulose. In addition, mutant AD2 regained cell-associated CBF together with the property of cellulose adherence. The presence of the CBF antigen and related adherence characteristics appeared to be a phenomenon common to other naturally occurring strains of this species. Images PMID:6630152

  19. A Review of Treatment Adherence Measurement Methods

    PubMed Central

    Schoenwald, Sonja K.; Garland, Ann F.

    2013-01-01

    Fidelity measurement is critical for testing the effectiveness and implementation in practice of psychosocial interventions. Adherence is a critical component of fidelity. The purposes of this review were to catalogue adherence measurement methods and assess existing evidence for the valid and reliable use of scores they generate and feasibility of use in routine care settings. Method A systematic literature search identified articles published between 1980–2008 reporting studies of evidence-based psychosocial treatments for child or adult mental health problems, and including mention of adherence or fidelity assessment. Coders abstracted data on the measurement methods and clinical contexts of their use. Results 341 articles were reviewed in which 249 unique adherence measurement methods were identified. These methods assessed many treatment models, although more than half (59%) assessed Cognitive Behavioral Treatments. The measurement methods were used in studies with diverse clientele and clinicians. The majority (71.5%) of methods were observational. Information about psychometric properties was reported for 35% of the measurement methods, but adherence-outcomes relationships were reported for only ten percent. Approximately one third of the measures were used in community- based settings. Conclusions Many adherence measurement methods have been used in treatment research; however, little reliability and validity evidence exists for the use of these methods. That some methods were used in routine care settings suggests the feasibility of their use in practice; however, information about the operational details of measurement, scoring, and reporting is sorely needed to inform and evaluate strategies to embed fidelity measurement in implementation support and monitoring systems. PMID:22888981

  20. [Challenges of adolescents' adherence to therapy].

    PubMed

    Brand, P L P; Kaptein, A A; Janssens, L P F; Klok, T

    2016-01-01

    Non-adherence occurs at any age, in all chronic diseases, and has a major impact on clinical outcomes. Non-adherence is primarily determined by perceptions of illness and medication beliefs. During puberty, adolescents attain independence from their parents and attach to their peers. This complicates successful self-management of chronic illness, because the adolescents avoid standing out from their peers. Discussion of barriers hindering successful self-management in adolescents can be promoted by seeing the patient alone, without the parents being present, and by acknowledging the patient's independence and responsibilities. PMID:27581866

  1. [Adherence to statins: updates and practical proposals].

    PubMed

    Bauwens, Marine; Schneider, Marie-paule; Nanchen, David

    2016-03-01

    Statins are an established treatment for dyslipidemia, because they were shown to decrease the cardiovascular risk by 25%. However, one third of patients using statins don't take them regularly. Statin intolerance is an important risk factor for nonadherence, but health literacy and lack of education regarding the cardiovascular benefits are also important triggers for poor adherence to statins. A better communication between the caregiver and his patient, by taking patient's perspectives into account could help find effective solutions. This article reviews the issue of statins adherence and suggests solutions to improve it. PMID:27089601

  2. Isomer ratio calculations using modeled discrete levels

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, M.A.; Gardner, D.G.; Hoff, R.W.

    1984-10-16

    Isomer ratio calculations were made for the reactions: /sup 175/Lu(n,..gamma..)/sup 176m,g/Lu, /sup 175/Lu(n,2n)/sup 174m,g/Lu, /sup 237/Np(n,2n)/sup 236m,g/Np, /sup 241/Am(n,..gamma..)/sup 242m,g/Am, and /sup 243/Am(n,..gamma..)/sup 244m,g/Am using modeled level structures in the deformed, odd-odd product nuclei. The hundreds of discrete levels and their gamma-ray branching ratios provided by the modeling are necessary to achieve agreement with experiment. Many rotational bands must be included in order to obtain a sufficiently representative selection of K quantum numbers. The levels of each band must be extended to appropriately high values of angular momentum.

  3. Adherence to Cardiovascular Medications: Lessons Learned and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Kronish, Ian M; Ye, Siqin

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 50% of patients with cardiovascular disease and/or its major risk factors have poor adherence to their prescribed medications. Finding novel methods to help patients improve their adherence to existing evidence-based cardiovascular drug therapies has enormous potential to improve health outcomes while potentially reducing health care costs. The goal of this report is to provide a review of the current understanding of adherence to cardiovascular medications from the point of view of prescribing clinicians and cardiovascular researchers. Key topics addressed include: 1) definitions of medication adherence; 2) prevalence and impact of non-adherence; 3) methods for assessing medication adherence; 4) reasons for poor adherence; and 5) approaches to improving adherence to cardiovascular medications. For each of these topics, the report seeks to identify important gaps in knowledge and opportunities for advancing the field of cardiovascular adherence research. PMID:23621969

  4. Medication adherence to oral anticancer drugs: systematic review.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Chuan; Chen, Chung-Yu; Lin, Shun-Jin; Chang, Chao-Sung

    2016-04-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that non-adherence to oral anticancer drugs (OACDs) has challenged treatment efficacy. Otherwise, few validated tools exist to measure patients' adherence to medication regimen in clinical practice. To synthesize previous studies on adherence by cancer patients taking OACDs, especially in targeted therapy, a systematic search of several electronic databases was conducted. We analyzed existing scales' contents for various cancer patients and outcomes of studies assessing adherence. However, a well-validated scale designed particularly for OACD adherence is still lacking. Most adherence scales used in the studies reviewed contain items focused on measuring patients' medication-taking behavior more than their barriers to medication compliance and beliefs. However, non-adherence to OACDs is a complex phenomenon, and drug-taking barriers and patient beliefs significantly affect patients' non-adherence. To understand the key drivers and predisposing factors for non-adherence, we need to develop a well-validated, multidimensional scale. PMID:26935964

  5. Correlates of Adherence to Varenicline Among HIV+ Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Tuo-Yen; Gonzalez, Mirelis; Krebs, Paul; Wong, Selena; Furberg, Robert; Sherman, Scott; Schoenthaler, Antoinette; Urbina, Anthony; Cleland, Charles M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Low rates of adherence to smoking cessation pharmacotherapy may limit the effectiveness of treatment. However, few studies have examined adherence in smoking cessation trials thus, there is a limited understanding of factors that influence adherence behaviors. This brief report analyzes correlates of adherence to varenicline among people living with HIV/AIDS. Methods: Study participants were recruited from three HIV care centers in New York City and enrolled in a three-arm randomized controlled pilot study in which all subjects received varenicline. At the 1-month study visit, there were no significant differences in adherence by study condition, therefore we combined treatment arms to examine correlates of adherence (n = 127). We used pill counts to assess varenicline adherence, defined as taking at least 80% of the prescribed dose. We conducted a multivariate path analysis to assess factors proposed by the information-motivation-behavioral skills model to predict adherence. Results: Only 56% of smokers were at least 80% adherent to varenicline at 1 month. Adherence-related information, self-efficacy, a college degree, and non-Hispanic white race/ethnicity were associated with increased varenicline adherence. In path analysis, information and motivation were associated with increased adherence self-efficacy, and adherence self-efficacy was associated with increased adherence, but with marginal significance. These associations with adherence were no longer significant after controlling for race/ethnicity and education. Conclusions: Further exploration of the role of a modifiable correlates of adherence, such as adherence-related information, motivation and self-efficacy is warranted. Interventions are needed that can address disparities in these and other psychosocial factors that may mediate poor medication adherence. PMID:26180221

  6. Childhood Adversity as a Predictor of Non-Adherence to Statin Therapy in Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Korhonen, Maarit Jaana; Halonen, Jaana I.; Brookhart, M. Alan; Kawachi, Ichiro; Pentti, Jaana; Karlsson, Hasse; Kivimäki, Mika; Vahtera, Jussi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate whether adverse experiences in childhood predict non-adherence to statin therapy in adulthood. Methods A cohort of 1378 women and 538 men who initiated statin therapy during 2008–2010 after responding to a survey on childhood adversities, was followed for non-adherence during the first treatment year. Log-binomial regression was used to estimate predictors of non-adherence, defined as the proportion of days covered by dispensed statin tablets <80%. In fully adjusted models including age, education, marital status, current smoking, heavy alcohol use, physical inactivity, obesity, presence of depression and cardiovascular comorbidity, the number of women ranged from 1172 to 1299 and that of men from 473 to 516, because of missing data on specific adversities and covariates. Results Two in three respondents reported at least one of the following six adversities in the family: divorce/separation of the parents, long-term financial difficulties, severe conflicts, frequent fear, severe illness, or alcohol problem of a family member. 51% of women and 44% of men were non-adherent. In men, the number of childhood adversities predicted an increased risk of non-adherence (risk ratio [RR] per adversity 1.11, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01–1.21], P for linear trend 0.013). Compared with those reporting no adversities, men reporting 3–6 adversities had a 1.44-fold risk of non-adherence (95% CI 1.12–1.85). Experiencing severe conflicts in the family (RR 1.27, 95% CI 1.03–1.57]) and frequent fear of a family member (RR 1.27, 95% CI 1.00–1.62]) in particular, predicted an increased risk of non-adherence. In women, neither the number of adversities nor any specific type of adversity predicted non-adherence. Conclusions Exposure to childhood adversity may predict non-adherence to preventive cardiovascular medication in men. Usefulness of information on childhood adversities in identification of adults at high risk of non-adherence deserves

  7. Incomplete adherence among treatment-experienced adults on antiretroviral therapy in Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Denison, Julie A.; Koole, Olivier; Tsui, Sharon; Menten, Joris; Torpey, Kwasi; van Praag, Eric; Mukadi, Ya Diul; Colebunders, Robert; Auld, Andrew F.; Agolory, Simon; Kaplan, Jonathan E.; Mulenga, Modest; Kwesigabo, Gideon P.; Wabwire-Mangen, Fred; Bangsberg, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To characterize antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence across different programmes and examine the relationship between individual and programme characteristics and incomplete adherence among ART clients in sub-Saharan Africa. Design A cross-sectional study. Methods Systematically selected ART clients (≥18 years; on ART ≥6 months) attending 18 facilities in three countries (250 clients/facility) were interviewed. Client self-reports (3-day, 30-day, Case Index ≥48 consecutive hours of missed ART), healthcare provider estimates and the pharmacy medication possession ratio (MPR) were used to estimate ART adherence. Participants from two facilities per country underwent HIV RNA testing. Optimal adherence measures were selected on the basis of degree of association with concurrent HIV RNA dichotomized at less than or greater/equal to 1000 copies/ml. Multivariate regression analysis, adjusted for site-level clustering, assessed associations between incomplete adherence and individual and programme factors. Results A total of 4489 participants were included, of whom 1498 underwent HIV RNA testing. Nonadherence ranged from 3.2% missing at least 48 consecutive hours to 40.1% having an MPR of less than 90%. The percentage with HIV RNA at least 1000 copies/ml ranged from 7.2 to 17.2% across study sites (mean = 9.9%). Having at least 48 consecutive hours of missed ART was the adherence measure most strongly related to virologic failure. Factors significantly related to incomplete adherence included visiting a traditional healer, screening positive for alcohol abuse, experiencing more HIV symptoms, having an ART regimen without nevirapine and greater levels of internalized stigma. Conclusion Results support more in-depth investigations of the role of traditional healers, and the development of interventions to address alcohol abuse and internalized stigma among treatment-experienced adult ART patients. PMID:25686684

  8. Closely Spaced Pregnancies Are Associated With Increased Odds of Autism in California Sibling Births

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kayuet; Bearman, Peter S.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the interpregnancy interval (IPI) is associated with the risk of autism in subsequent births. METHODS: Pairs of first- and second-born singleton full siblings were identified from all California births that occurred from 1992 to 2002 using birth records, and autism diagnoses were identified by using linked records of the California Department of Developmental Services. IPI was calculated as the time interval between birth dates minus the gestational age of the second sibling. In the primary analysis, logistic regression models were used to determine whether odds of autism in second-born children varied according to IPI. To address potential confounding by unmeasured family-level factors, a case-sibling control analysis determined whether affected sibling (first versus second) varied with IPI. RESULTS: An inverse association between IPI and odds of autism among 662 730 second-born children was observed. In particular, IPIs of <12, 12 to 23, and 24 to 35 months were associated with odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) for autism of 3.39 (3.00–3.82), 1.86 (1.65–2.10), and 1.26 (1.10–1.45) relative to IPIs of ≥36 months. The association was not mediated by preterm birth or low birth weight and persisted across categories of sociodemographic characteristics, with some attenuation in the oldest and youngest parents. Second-born children were at increased risk of autism relative to their firstborn siblings only in pairs with short IPIs. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that children born after shorter intervals between pregnancies are at increased risk of developing autism; the highest risk was associated with pregnancies spaced <1 year apart. PMID:21220394

  9. Type of Diabetes Mellitus and the Odds of Gleason Score 8 to 10 Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Josephine; Chen Minghui; Zhang Yuanye; Moran, Brian J.; Dosoretz, Daniel E.; Katin, Michael J.; Braccioforte, Michelle H.; Salenius, Sharon A.; D'Amico, Anthony V.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: It has been recently shown that diabetes mellitus (DM) is significantly associated with the likelihood of presenting with high-grade prostate cancer (PCa) or Gleason score (GS) 8 to 10; however, whether this association holds for both Type 1 and 2 DM is unknown. In this study we evaluated whether DM Type 1, 2, or both are associated with high-grade PCa after adjusting for known predictors of high-grade disease. Methods and Materials: Between 1991 and 2010, a total of 15,330 men diagnosed with PCa and treated with radiation therapy were analyzed. A polychotomous logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate whether Type 1 or 2 DM was associated with odds of GS 7 or GS 8 to 10 compared with 6 or lower PCa, adjusting for African American race, age, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, and digital rectal examination findings. Results: Men with Type 1 DM (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 2.05; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.28-3.27; p = 0.003) or Type 2 DM (AOR, 1.58; 95% CI, 1.26-1.99; p < 0.001) were significantly more likely to be diagnosed with GS 8 to 10 PCa compared with nondiabetic men. However this was not true for GS 7, for which these respective results were AOR, 1.30; 95% CI, 0.93-1.82; p = 0.12 and AOR, 1.13; 95% CI, 0.98-1.32; p = 0.10. Conclusion: Type 1 and 2 DM were associated with a higher odds of being diagnosed with Gleason score 8 to 10 but not 7 PCa. Pending validation, men who are diagnosed with Type I DM with GS 7 or lower should be considered for additional workup to rule out occult high-grade disease.

  10. E-health strategies to support adherence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adherence to healthy behaviors and self-care strategies is a concern among clinicians. E-health applications, such as the internet, personal communication devices, electronic health records and web portals, and electronic games, may be a way to provide health information in a way that is reliable, c...

  11. Adherence to Exercise and Physical Activity: Preface.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, William P.; Dishman, Rod K.

    2001-01-01

    Introduces a collection of papers on adherence to exercise programs and physical activity from the 2000 American Academy of Kinesiology and Physical Education conference, which included research on middle school boys and girls, college men and women, and men and women in the later years, as well as on the more traditional subject of middle aged…

  12. The Economics of Improving Medication Adherence in Osteoporosis: Validation and Application of a Simulation Model

    PubMed Central

    Schousboe, John T.; Losina, Elena; Solomon, Daniel H.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Adherence to osteoporosis treatment is low. Although new therapies and behavioral interventions may improve medication adherence, questions are likely to arise regarding their cost-effectiveness. Objective: Our objectives were to develop and validate a model to simulate the clinical outcomes and costs arising from various osteoporosis medication adherence patterns among women initiating bisphosphonate treatment and to estimate the cost-effectiveness of a hypothetical intervention to improve medication adherence. Design: We constructed a computer simulation using estimates of fracture rates, bisphosphonate treatment effects, costs, and utilities for health states drawn from the published literature. Probabilities of transitioning on and off treatment were estimated from administrative claims data. Setting and Patients: Patients were women initiating bisphosphonate therapy from the general community. Intervention: We evaluated a hypothetical behavioral intervention to improve medication adherence. Main Outcome Measures: Changes in 10-yr fracture rates and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were evaluated. Results: A hypothetical intervention with a one-time cost of $250 and reducing bisphosphonate discontinuation by 30% had an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of $29,571 per quality-adjusted life year in 65-yr-old women initiating bisphosphonates. Although the ICER depended on patient age, intervention effectiveness, and intervention cost, the ICERs were less than $50,000 per quality-adjusted life year for the majority of intervention cost and effectiveness scenarios evaluated. Results were sensitive to bisphosphonate cost and effectiveness and assumptions about the rate at which intervention and treatment effects decline over time. Conclusions: Our results suggests that behavioral interventions to improve osteoporosis medication adherence will likely have favorable ICERs if their efficacy can be sustained. PMID:21733991

  13. Adherence to Mediterranean diet and risk of developing diabetes: prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Objective To assess the relation between adherence to a Mediterranean diet and the incidence of diabetes among initially healthy participants. Design Prospective cohort study with estimates of relative risk adjusted for sex, age, years of university education, total energy intake, body mass index, physical activity, sedentary habits, smoking, family history of diabetes, and personal history of hypertension. Setting Spanish university department. Participants 13 380 Spanish university graduates without diabetes at baseline followed up for a median of 4.4 years. Main outcome measures Dietary habits assessed at baseline with a validated 136 item food frequency questionnaire and scored on a nine point index. New cases of diabetes confirmed through medical reports and an additional detailed questionnaire posted to those who self reported a new diagnosis of diabetes by a doctor during follow-up. Confirmed cases of type 2 diabetes. Results Participants who adhered closely to a Mediterranean diet had a lower risk of diabetes. The incidence rate ratios adjusted for sex and age were 0.41 (95% confidence interval 0.19 to 0.87) for those with moderate adherence (score 3-6) and 0.17 (0.04 to 0.75) for those with the highest adherence (score 7-9) compared with those with low adherence (score <3). In the fully adjusted analyses the results were similar. A two point increase in the score was associated with a 35% relative reduction in the risk of diabetes (incidence rate ratio 0.65, 0.44 to 0.95), with a significant inverse linear trend (P=0.04) in the multivariate analysis. Conclusion Adherence to a Mediterranean diet is associated with a reduced risk of diabetes. PMID:18511765

  14. Enhancing Respiratory Medication Adherence: The Role of Health Care Professionals and Cost-Effectiveness Considerations.

    PubMed

    van Boven, Job F M; Ryan, Dermot; Eakin, Michelle N; Canonica, Giorgio W; Barot, Aji; Foster, Juliet M

    2016-01-01

    Adherence to medication comprises a multiphased temporal process involving (1) initiation of prescribed therapy, (2) implementation as prescribed, and (3) subsequent persistence. Medication adherence remains suboptimal in most patients with long-term respiratory conditions such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Interventions have been shown to effectively improve treatment initiation, implementation, and persistence when delivered at the health care professional level or the system level, but demonstration of the cost-effectiveness of these interventions is necessary to ensure their widespread use. This review summarizes how health care professionals can intervene to improve medication adherence in patients with asthma and COPD, provides some examples of effective primary care interventions, and illustrates some of the challenges to optimal implementation arising from cost-effectiveness modeling. Improving adherence is shown to be an economically viable treatment option for patients with asthma and COPD, but there are differences in the health economics pertaining to each condition and setting that can affect whether an intervention is considered cost-effective. Targeting adherence interventions at patients with the greatest to gain, and tailoring them to individual patient needs, may help to optimize cost-effectiveness ratios and improve the probability of positive reimbursement decisions, systemwide implementation, and resultant health benefits. PMID:27587317

  15. Patient Adherence and Persistence with Imatinib, Nilotinib, Dasatinib in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Santoleri, Fiorenzo; Sorice, Paola; Lasala, Ruggero; Rizzo, Rosa Carmela; Costantini, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study is to evaluate adherence and persistence of patients treated with Imatinib, Nilotinib or Dasatinib, also giving economic evaluations on therapy costs for Received Daily Dose (RDD). Materials and Methods In this retrospective study, we took into account 3 years from 1st Jan. 2009 to 31st March.2012. Treatment adherence was quantified utilizing ratio between RDD and PDD (Prescribed Daily Dose). Persistence is reckoned taking into account the actual therapy days, comparing posology with supplied dose, drawing the graph using Kaplan-Meir method. Results Adherence results in values between 0.8 and 1.0 for Nilotinib (Adh  = 0.93), Imatinib (Adh  = 0.83) and Dasatinib (0.85). Imatinib has better persistence, 90% of patients in treatment exceed one year of treatment versus 83.3% for Nilotinib and 80% for Dasatinib. The cost per single day of treatment (cost per RDD) was € 39.41 for Imatinib, € 113.60 for Nilotinib and € 94.84 for Dasatinib. Conclusion Patients with CML have a loose of adherence both in first line with Imatinib and in second line of therapy with Dasatinib and Nilotinib. Loss of adherence remains a big problem and could be minimized by a patient-oriented project invlolving physicians, nurses, pharmacists and caregiver. PMID:23437249

  16. GENERAL: Decoy State Quantum Key Distribution with Odd Coherent State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shi-Hai; Gao, Ming; Dai, Hong-Yi; Chen, Ping-Xing; Li, Cheng-Zu

    2008-07-01

    We propose a decoy state quantum key distribution scheme with odd coherent state which follows sub-Poissonian distributed photon count and has low probability of the multi-photon event and vacuum event in each pulse. The numerical calculations show that our scheme can improve efficiently the key generation rate and secure communication distance. Furthermore, only one decoy state is necessary to approach to the perfect asymptotic limit with infinite decoy states in our scheme, but at least two decoy states are needed in other scheme.

  17. Dimension-5 C P -odd operators: QCD mixing and renormalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Cirigliano, Vincenzo; Gupta, Rajan; Mereghetti, Emanuele; Yoon, Boram

    2015-12-01

    We study the off-shell mixing and renormalization of flavor-diagonal dimension-five T - and P -odd operators involving quarks, gluons, and photons, including quark electric dipole and chromoelectric dipole operators. We present the renormalization matrix to one loop in the MS ¯ scheme. We also provide a definition of the quark chromoelectric dipole operator in a regularization-independent momentum-subtraction scheme suitable for nonperturbative lattice calculations and present the matching coefficients with the MS ¯ scheme to one loop in perturbation theory, using both the naïve dimensional regularization and 't Hooft-Veltman prescriptions for γ5.

  18. Neutron-proton pairing correlations in odd mass systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fellah, M. Allal, N. H.; Oudih, M. R.

    2015-03-30

    An expression of the ground-state which describes odd mass systems within the BCS approach in the isovector neutron-proton pairing case is proposed using the blocked level technique. The gap equations as well as the energy expression are then derived. It is shown that they exactly generalize the expressions obtained in the pairing between like-particles case. The various gap parameters and the energy are then numerically studied as a function of the pairing-strength within the schematic one-level model.

  19. The odds of wrong-way crashes and resulting fatalities: A comprehensive analysis.

    PubMed

    Ponnaluri, Raj V

    2016-03-01

    The United States of America and other nations are grappling with the incidence of wrong-way driving (WWD). The issue is as important today (NTSB, 2012) as it was a half-century ago (Hulbert and Beers, 1966). In the absence of a comprehensive analysis, any effort to implement WWD countermeasures can be counterproductive. Hence, this effort began with the express intent to identify the factors that cause WWD crashes and fatalities. This work is sizeable in that it evaluated one million complete crash records from Florida. The methodology comprised (a) administering a survey on the perceptions about WWD; (b) developing binomial logistic models for computing the odds of WWD crashes, and of fatal crashes within the WWD space; (c) analyzing the contributing variables; and (d) comparing perceptions with crash analysis results. The study parameters included driver's age, gender, licensing state, physical defect, blood alcohol concentration, vehicle use, seatbelt compliance, day and time of crash, roadway lighting, facility type, weather conditions, road geometrics, and traffic volumes. Individual variable analysis of 23 parameters and the model development process included the determination of odds ratios and statistical tests for the predictive power and goodness-of-fit. The results of this work are generally consistent with expectation, yet surprising at times. This work concludes with decision-making inputs to the scientist, policy-maker and practitioner on the need for effectively engineering the roads, actively educating people about wrong-way driving, and strictly enforcing traffic laws, rules and regulations. PMID:26745273

  20. Clinical Supervision in Treatment Transport: Effects on Adherence and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Schoenwald, Sonja K.; Sheidow, Ashli J.; Chapman, Jason E.

    2009-01-01

    This non-experimental study used Mixed-Effects Regression Models (MRMs) to examine relations among supervisor adherence to a clinical supervision protocol, therapist adherence, and changes in the behavior and functioning of youth with serious antisocial behavior treated with an empirically supported treatment (i.e., Multisystemic Therapy), one-year post treatment. Participants were 1979 youth and families treated by 429 clinicians across 45 provider organizations in North America. Four dimensions of clinical supervision were examined. MRM results showed one dimension, supervisor focus on adherence to treatment principles, predicted greater therapist adherence. Two supervision dimensions, adherence to the structure and process of supervision, and focus on clinician development, predicted changes in youth behavior. Conditions required to test hypothesized mediation by therapist adherence of supervisor adherence effects on youth outcomes were not met, and direct effects of each were observed in models including both supervisor and therapist adherence. PMID:19485583

  1. Medication Adherence in Patients with Bipolar Disorder: A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Levin, Jennifer B; Krivenko, Anna; Howland, Molly; Schlachet, Rebecca; Sajatovic, Martha

    2016-09-01

    Poor medication adherence is a pervasive problem that causes disability and suffering as well as extensive financial costs among individuals with bipolar disorder (BD). Barriers to adherence are numerous and cross multiple levels, including factors related to bipolar pathology and those unique to an individual's circumstances. External factors, including treatment setting, healthcare system, and broader health policies, can also affect medication adherence in people with BD. Fortunately, advances in research have suggested avenues for improving adherence. A comprehensive review of adherence-enhancement interventions for the years 2005-2015 is included. Specific bipolar adherence-enhancement approaches that target knowledge gaps, cognitive patterns, specific barriers, and motivation may be helpful, as may approaches that capitalize on technology or novel drug-delivery systems. However, much work remains to optimally facilitate long-term medication adherence in people with BD. For adherence-enhancement approaches to be widely adapted, they need to be easily accessible, affordable, and practical. PMID:27435356

  2. An Odd Parity Checker Prototype Using DNAzyme Finite State Machine.

    PubMed

    Eshra, Abeer; El-Sayed, Ayman

    2014-01-01

    A finite-state machine (FSM) is an abstract mathematical model of computation used to design both computer programs and sequential logic circuits. Considered as an abstract model of computation, FSM is weak; it has less computational power than some other models of computation such as the Turing machine. This paper discusses the finite-state automata based on Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA) and different implementations of DNA FSMs. Moreover, a comparison was made to clarify the advantages and disadvantages of each kind of presented DNA FSMS. Since it is a major goal for nanoscince, nanotechnology and super molecular chemistry is to design synthetic molecular devices that are programmable and run autonomously. Programmable means that the behavior of the device can be modified without redesigning the whole structure. Autonomous means that it runs without externally mediated change to the work cycle. In this paper we present an odd Parity Checker Prototype Using DNAzyme FSM. Our paper makes use of a known design for a DNA nanorobotic device due to Reif and Sahu for executing FSM computations using DNAzymes. The main contribution of our paper is a description of how to program that device to do a FSM computation known as odd parity checking. We describe in detail finite state automaton built on 10-23 DNAzyme, and give its procedure of design and computation. The design procedure has two major phases: designing the language potential alphabet DNA strands, and depending on the first phase to design the DNAzyme possible transitions. PMID:26355779

  3. Odd-even staggering in neutron drip line nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Changizi, S. A.; Qi, Chong

    2016-07-01

    We have done systematic Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov calculations in coordinate space on the one-quasi-particle energies and binding energy odd-even staggering (OES) in semi-magic nuclei with the zero-range volume, mixed and surface pairing forces in order to explore the influence of their density dependence. The odd-N isotopes are calculated within the blocking scheme. The strengths for the pairing forces are determined in two schemes by fitting locally to reproduce pairing gap in 120Sn and globally to all available data on the OES of semi-magic nuclei with Z ≥ 8. In the former calculations, there is a noticeable difference between the neutron mean gaps in neutron-rich O, Ca, Ni and Sn isotopes calculated with the surface pairing and those with the mixed and volume pairing. The difference gets much smaller if the globally optimized pairing strengths are employed. The heavier Pb isotopes show the opposite trend. Moreover, large differences between the mean gap and the OES may be expected in both calculations when one goes towards the neutron drip line.

  4. Beyond mean-field calculations for odd-mass nuclei.

    PubMed

    Bally, B; Avez, B; Bender, M; Heenen, P-H

    2014-10-17

    Beyond mean-field methods are very successful tools for the description of large-amplitude collective motion for even-even atomic nuclei. The state-of-the-art framework of these methods consists in a generator coordinate method based on angular-momentum and particle-number projected triaxially deformed Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) states. The extension of this scheme to odd-mass nuclei is a long-standing challenge. We present for the first time such an extension, where the generator coordinate space is built from self-consistently blocked one-quasiparticle HFB states. One of the key points for this success is that the same Skyrme interaction is used for the mean-field and the pairing channels, thus avoiding problems related to the violation of the Pauli principle. An application to ^{25}Mg illustrates the power of our method, as agreement with experiment is obtained for the spectrum, electromagnetic moments, and transition strengths, for both positive and negative parity states and without the necessity for effective charges or effective moments. Although the effective interaction still requires improvement, our study opens the way to systematically describe odd-A nuclei throughout the nuclear chart. PMID:25361253

  5. Structure of hard-hypersphere fluids in odd dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohrmann, René D.; Santos, Andrés

    2007-11-01

    The structural properties of single component fluids of hard hyperspheres in odd space dimensionalities d are studied with an analytical approximation method that generalizes the rational function approximation earlier introduced in the study of hard-sphere fluids [S. B. Yuste and A. Santos, Phys. Rev. A 43, 5418 (1991)]. The theory makes use of the exact form of the radial distribution function to first order in density and extends it to finite density by assuming a rational form for a function defined in Laplace space, the coefficients being determined by simple physical requirements. Fourier transform in terms of reverse Bessel polynomials constitute the mathematical framework of this approximation, from which an analytical expression for the static structure factor is obtained. In its most elementary form, the method recovers the solution of the Percus-Yevick closure to the Ornstein-Zernike equation for hyperspheres at odd dimensions. The present formalism allows one to go beyond by yielding solutions with thermodynamic consistency between the virial and compressibility routes to any desired equation of state. Excellent agreement with available computer simulation data at d=5 and d=7 is obtained.

  6. Beyond Mean-Field Calculations for Odd-Mass Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bally, B.; Avez, B.; Bender, M.; Heenen, P.-H.

    2014-10-01

    Beyond mean-field methods are very successful tools for the description of large-amplitude collective motion for even-even atomic nuclei. The state-of-the-art framework of these methods consists in a generator coordinate method based on angular-momentum and particle-number projected triaxially deformed Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) states. The extension of this scheme to odd-mass nuclei is a long-standing challenge. We present for the first time such an extension, where the generator coordinate space is built from self-consistently blocked one-quasiparticle HFB states. One of the key points for this success is that the same Skyrme interaction is used for the mean-field and the pairing channels, thus avoiding problems related to the violation of the Pauli principle. An application to Mg25 illustrates the power of our method, as agreement with experiment is obtained for the spectrum, electromagnetic moments, and transition strengths, for both positive and negative parity states and without the necessity for effective charges or effective moments. Although the effective interaction still requires improvement, our study opens the way to systematically describe odd-A nuclei throughout the nuclear chart.

  7. Treatment Adherence in Adolescents With Inflammatory Bowel Disease: The Collective Impact of Barriers to Adherence and Anxiety/Depressive Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Wendy N.; Denson, Lee A.; Baldassano, Robert N.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Knowledge of factors impacting adolescents’ ability to adhere to their inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) regimen is limited. The current study examines the collective impact of barriers to adherence and anxiety/depressive symptoms on adolescent adherence to the IBD regimen. Methods Adolescents (n = 79) completed measures of barriers to adherence, adherence, and anxiety/depressive symptoms at one of two specialty pediatric IBD clinics. Results Most adolescents reported barriers to adherence and 1 in 8 reported borderline or clinically elevated levels of anxiety/depressive symptoms. Anxiety/depressive symptoms moderated the relationship between barriers to adherence and adherence. Post hoc probing revealed a significant, additive effect of higher anxiety/depressive symptoms in the barriers–adherence relationship, with adherence significantly lower among adolescents with higher barriers and higher anxiety/depressive symptoms. Conclusions In order to optimize adherence in adolescents, interventions should target not only barriers to adherence but also any anxiety/depressive symptoms that may negatively impact efforts to adhere to recommended treatment. PMID:22080456

  8. Micronutrient supplementation adherence and influence on the prevalences of anemia and iron, zinc and vitamin A deficiencies in preemies with a corrected age of six months

    PubMed Central

    de Freitas, Brunnella Alcantara Chagas; Lima, Luciana Moreira; Moreira, Maria Elisabeth Lopes; Priore, Silvia Eloiza; Henriques, Bruno David; Carlos, Carla Fernanda Lisboa Valente; Sabino, Jusceli Souza Nogueira; do Carmo Castro Franceschini, Sylvia

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze adherence to the recommended iron, zinc and multivitamin supplementation guidelines for preemies, the factors associated with this adherence, and the influence of adherence on the occurrence of anemia and iron, zinc and vitamin A deficiencies. METHODS: This prospective cohort study followed 58 preemies born in 2014 until they reached six months corrected age. The preemies were followed at a referral secondary health service and represented 63.7% of the preterm infants born that year. Outcomes of interest included high or low adherence to iron, zinc and multivitamin supplementation guidelines; prevalence of anemia; and prevalences of iron, zinc, and vitamin A deficiencies. The prevalence ratios were calculated by Poisson regression. RESULTS: Thirty-eight (65.5%) preemies presented high adherence to micronutrient supplementation guidelines. At six months of corrected age, no preemie had vitamin A deficiency. The prevalences of anemia, iron deficiency and zinc deficiency were higher in the low-adherence group but also concerning in the high-adherence group. Preemies with low adherence to micronutrient supplementation guidelines were 2.5 times more likely to develop anemia and 3.1 times more likely to develop zinc deficiency. Low maternal education level increased the likelihood of nonadherence to all three supplements by 2.2 times. CONCLUSIONS: Low maternal education level was independently associated with low adherence to iron, zinc and vitamin A supplementation guidelines in preemies, which impacted the prevalences of anemia and iron and zinc deficiencies at six months of corrected age. PMID:27626474

  9. Comparison in Adherence to Osteoporosis Guidelines according to Bone Health Status in Korean Adult

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hee-Sook; Kim, Soon-Kyung; Lee, Hae-Hyeog; Byun, Dong Won; Kim, Tae-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Background Osteoporosis one of the most serious disease to decrease the quality of life and cause economic loss. Thus, prevention of osteoporosis has become an important health concern. The study examined in adherence to osteoporosis guidelines and compared the levels of adherence to osteoporosis guidelines between bone health status in Korean adult. Methods This study used data from a nationally represented sample of Koreans (n=3,419) from 2008 to 2011 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. We were divided into three groups by T-score: normal, osteopenia and osteoporosis. Assessment of adherence level was based on 5 components of osteoporosis guidelines, considering intake of sodium, calcium and protein, smoking and regular exercise. Results The sex, body mass index, income and educational level did not significantly differ between three groups. Deficient intake of calcium was significantly associated with a threefold greater odds in osteoporosis group (OR 3.6; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.52-5.22). Excessive protein intake was significantly increased the risk only in osteoporosis group compared to the normal group (OR 1.71; 95% CI 1.15-2.62). Smoking increased the risk in osteoporosis group compared to the normal group (OR 2.88; 95% CI 1.75-4.76), osteoporosis group compared to the osteopenia group (OR 2.69; 95% CI 1.61-4.55). Conclusions Nutritional factor (intake of calcium and protein) and lifestyle-related factor (smoking and exercise) must be accompanied the management for bone health. An adherence of guidelines is considered very important for the prevention of osteoporosis. PMID:27622178

  10. B meson dileptonic decays in the next-to-minimal supersymmetric model with a light CP-odd Higgs boson

    SciTech Connect

    Heng Zhaoxia; Oakes, Robert J.; Wang Wenyu; Yang Jinmin; Xiong Zhaohua

    2008-05-01

    In the next-to-minimal supersymmetric model (NMSSM) a light CP-odd Higgs boson is so far allowed by current experiments, which, together with a large tan{beta}, may greatly enhance the rare dileptonic decays B{yields}X{sub s}l{sup +}l{sup -} and B{sub s}{yields}l{sup +}l{sup -}{gamma}. We examine these decays paying special attention to the new operator allowed by the light CP-odd Higgs boson. We find that in the parameter space allowed by current experiments like CERN LEP II and b{yields}s{gamma}, the branching ratios of these rare decays can be greatly enhanced, and thus the existing experimental data on B{yields}X{sub s}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} can further stringently constrain the parameter space (especially the region with a superlight CP-odd Higgs boson and large tan{beta}). In the surviving parameter space we give the predictions for other dileptonic decay branching ratios and also show the results for the forward-backward asymmetry.

  11. Overactive bladder: strategies to ensure treatment compliance and adherence

    PubMed Central

    Dhaliwal, Prabhpreet; Wagg, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Overactive bladder is a common, debilitating condition for many patients who may benefit from pharmacological management of their condition. However, adherence to medication in this condition is markedly worse than other chronic medical conditions. This review explores what is known about persistence and the factors which influence medication adherence for overactive bladder, those factors that might be modifiable to improve adherence, and the measures the health care provider can take to optimize adherence to therapy and thereby improve treatment outcomes. PMID:27350744

  12. Improved assay for quantitating adherence of ruminal bacteria to cellulose.

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, M A; White, B A; Hespell, R B

    1989-01-01

    A quantitative technique suitable for the determination of adherence of ruminal bacteria to cellulose was developed. This technique employs adherence of cells to cellulose disks and alleviates the problem of nonspecific cell entrapment within cellulose particles. By using this technique, it was demonstrated that the adherence of Ruminococcus flavefaciens FD1 to cellulose was inhibited by formaldehyde, methylcellulose, and carboxymethyl cellulose. Adherence was unaffected by acid hydrolysates of methylcellulose, glucose, and cellobiose. PMID:2782879

  13. Mixed symmetry states and {beta} decays of odd-A Xe to I isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Khudair, Falih H.

    2009-07-15

    The energy spectra of the parent and daughter nuclei in the {beta} decays ({sup 121-127}Xe,{beta}{sup +121-127}I) are considered in the interacting boson fermion model (IBFM-2) with the g{sub 7/2},d{sub 5/2},d{sub 3/2},s{sub 1/2}, and h{sub 11/2} single-particle orbitals. Electromagnetic transition probabilities and branching ratios in odd {sup 121-127}I isotopes are investigated. Special attention is given to the occurrence of mixed symmetry states, and the F-spin structures of the wave functions are analyzed. The log{sub 10}ft values of the allowed {beta} decay transitions are calculated. It is found that the IBFM-2 results agree with the experimental data quite well.

  14. On strontium isotopic anomalies and odd-A p-process abundances. [in solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, D. D.

    1978-01-01

    Several aspects of the nucleosynthesis of Sr isotopes are considered in an attempt to shed light on the problem of the Sr isotopic anomalies discovered in an inclusion of the Allende meteorite. Decomposition of the Sr isotopes into average r-, s-, and p-process nucleosynthetic classes is performed. It is suggested that the Allende inclusion most likely has an excess of s-process Sr and that the initial Sr-87/Sr-86 isotopic ratio is probably slightly more primitive than basaltic achondrites. The results also show that Sn-115 is mostly due to the r-process and that odd-A yields are very small. It is concluded that if the Sr anomaly in the inclusion is an average s enhancement, it argues somewhat in favor of a model of gas/dust fractionation of s and r isotopes during accumulation of the inclusion parent in the protosolar cloud.

  15. Sensitivity of calculated odd nitrogen distributions to the diabatic wind fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boughner, R. E.; Callis, L. B., Jr.; Natarajan, M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper compares atmospheric total odd nitrogen and ozone computed with two different advective wind fields, one using climatological averages of ozone and temperature to obtain monthly averaged horizontal and vertical winds and the other using measurements from the LIMS instrument. Calculations using the former data show stronger poleward and downward motion in the winter season compared to those using the LIMS data. This leads to NO(y) mixing ratios in the lower stratosphere that are about 20 percent larger in the polar regions of both hemispheres and about 40 percent higher in the equatorial region for climatological transport fields compared to those derived from LIMS data. Consequently, the NO(y) distributions calculated with the LIMS advective field show worse agreement with the NO(y) values inferred from the LIMS measurements than similar results obtained with the climatological wind field.

  16. Adherence to Concurrent Tuberculosis Treatment and Antiretroviral Treatment among Co-Infected Persons in South Africa, 2008–2010

    PubMed Central

    Webb Mazinyo, Ernesha; Kim, Lindsay; Masuku, Sikhethiwe; Lancaster, Joey L.; Odendaal, Ronel; Uys, Margot; Podewils, Laura Jean; Van der Walt, Martie L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Adherence to tuberculosis (TB) treatment and antiretroviral therapy (ART) reduces morbidity and mortality among persons co-infected with TB/HIV. We measured adherence and determined factors associated with non-adherence to concurrent TB treatment and ART among co-infected persons in two provinces in South Africa. Methods A convenience sample of 35 clinics providing integrated TB/HIV care was included due to financial and logistic considerations. Retrospective chart reviews were conducted among persons who received concurrent TB treatment and ART and who had a TB treatment outcome recorded during 1 January 2008–31 December 2010. Adherence to concurrent TB and HIV treatment was defined as: (1) taking ≥80% of TB prescribed doses by directly observed therapy (DOT) as noted in the patient card; and (2) taking >90% ART doses as documented in the ART medical record during the concurrent treatment period (period of time when the patient was prescribed both TB treatment and ART). Risk ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to identify factors associated with non-adherence. Results Of the 1,252 persons receiving concurrent treatment, 138 (11.0%) were not adherent. Non-adherent persons were more likely to have extrapulmonary TB (RR: 1.71, 95% CI: 1.12 to 2.60) and had not disclosed their HIV status (RR: 1.96, 95% CI: 1.96 to 3.76). Conclusions The majority of persons with TB/HIV were adherent to concurrent treatment. Close monitoring and support of persons with extrapulmonary TB and for persons who have not disclosed their HIV status may further improve adherence to concurrent TB and antiretroviral treatment. PMID:27442440

  17. WCRF/AICR recommendation adherence and breast cancer incidence among postmenopausal women with and without non-modifiable risk factors.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Sarah J O; Inoue-Choi, Maki; Lazovich, DeAnn; Robien, Kim

    2016-06-01

    Taller height, family history of breast cancer, greater number of years of potential fertility and nulliparity are established non-modifiable risk factors for postmenopausal breast cancer. Greater adherence to the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) diet, physical activity and body weight recommendations has previously been shown to be associated with lower breast cancer risk. However, no prior studies have evaluated whether women with non-modifiable risk factors receive similar benefits from recommendation adherence compared to women without these risk factors. In the Iowa Women's Health Study prospective cohort, we investigated whether associations of WCRF/AICR recommendation adherence differed by the presence/absence of non-modifiable breast cancer risk factors. Baseline (1986) questionnaire data from 36,626 postmenopausal women were used to create adherence scores for the WCRF/AICR recommendations (maximum score = 8.0). Overall and single recommendation adherence in relation to breast cancer risk (n = 3,189 cases) across levels of non-modifiable risk factors were evaluated using proportional hazards regression. Mean adherence score was 5.0 points (range: 0.5-8.0). Higher adherence scores (score ≥ 6.0 vs. ≤ 3.5, HR = 0.76, 95% CI = 0.67-0.87), and adherence to the individual recommendations for body weight and alcohol intake were associated with a lower breast cancer incidence. While not statistically significant among women with more non-modifiable risk factors (score ≥ 6.0 vs. ≤ 3.5, HR = 0.76, 95% CI = 0.36-1.63), hazard ratios were comparable to women with the no non-modifiable risk factors (score ≥ 6.0 vs. ≤ 3.5, HR = 0.74, 95% CI = 0.49-0.93) (p-interaction = 0.57). WCRF/AICR recommendation adherence is associated with lower breast cancer risk, regardless of non-modifiable risk factor status. PMID:26756307

  18. Prescription Factors Associated with Medication Non-adherence in Japan Assessed from Leftover Drugs in the SETSUYAKU-BAG Campaign: Focus on Oral Antidiabetic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Koyanagi, Kaori; Kubota, Toshio; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Kihara, Taro; Yoshida, Takeo; Miisho, Takamasa; Miura, Tomoko; Sakamoto, Yoshiko; Takaki, Junichi; Seo, Takashi; Shimazoe, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Background: Medication adherence has an important influence on health outcomes in patients with chronic diseases. However, few studies have been performed in Japan to determine factors related to medication non-adherence. Objective: The aim of this study was to identify prescription factors related to medication non-adherence by investigating patient characteristics, all prescriptions, and prescriptions for oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs). Methods: A retrospective cross-sectional survey of prescription data about implementation of dosing regimen was performed at community pharmacies engaged in appropriate use of leftover drugs. We evaluated the amount of drugs originally prescribed and the reduced amount after use of leftover drugs, and then calculated prescription reduction ratio (PRR). We analyzed prescription factors contributing to non-adherence based on the PRR. Results: Prescription information for 1207 patients was reviewed, revealing that patients were non-adherent to 58% of prescriptions. Lack of a drug copayment, fewer concurrent drugs, and drugs not in single-dose packaging were associated with non-adherence. Among the 1207 patients, 234 prescriptions for diabetes and 452 OAD formulations were included. Forty-seven percent of prescriptions and 29% of the formulations were non-adherent. A higher dosing frequency and preprandial administration were associated with non-adherence. Among the OADs, adherence was lower for α-glucosidase inhibitors and biguanides than for sulfonylureas. Conclusions: Several factors related to patient characteristics, general drug prescriptions, and OAD prescriptions were associated with non-adherence. Further consideration will be needed to improve adherence to medication in Japan. Health care providers should perform more careful monitoring of adherence in patients with the factors identified by this study. PMID:27489544

  19. Adherence to the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension-style diet in relation to glioma: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Benisi-Kohansal, Sanaz; Shayanfar, Mehdi; Mohammad-Shirazi, Minoo; Tabibi, Hadi; Sharifi, Giuve; Saneei, Parvane; Esmaillzadeh, Ahmad

    2016-03-28

    Data on the association of adherence to the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH)-style and glioma are scarce. We aimed to examine the association between adherence to the DASH-style diet and glioma in Iranian adults. In this study, 128 pathologically confirmed cases of glioma were recruited from hospitals and 256 age- and sex-matched controls were enrolled from other wards of the hospital. Dietary intakes were assessed using a 126-item validated FFQ. Adherence to the DASH-style diet was followed considering the healthy and non-healthy foods emphasised in the DASH dietary pattern. After controlling for potential confounders, individuals with the greatest adherence to the DASH diet were 72 % less likely to have glioma compared with those with the lowest adherence (OR 0·28; 95 % CI 0·13, 0·57). Individuals with the highest consumption of fruits had lower odds for having glioma compared with those with the lowest intake (OR 0·31; 95 % CI 0·14, 0·68). A protective association was also observed between consumption of legumes and nuts and risk of glioma (OR 0·23; 95 % CI 0·10, 0·53). We found a significant positive association between red and processed meat (OR 2·60; 95 % CI 1·16, 5·81) and salt intakes (OR 2·87; 95 % CI 1·30, 6·34) and risk of glioma, after taking all potential confounders into account. Adherence to the DASH-style dietary pattern was inversely associated with glioma. In addition, some components of the DASH diet, including red meats and salt intakes, were positively associated with glioma. Consumption of nuts and legumes as well as fruits was inversely associated with glioma. Prospective cohort studies are required to confirm our findings. PMID:26856761

  20. Exposure to childhood traumas ups the odds of giving birth to daughters.

    PubMed

    Kaitz, Marsha; Rokem, Ann Marie; Mankuta, David; Davidov, Maayan; Faraone, Stephen V

    2014-04-01

    This study examined the likelihood of giving birth to a daughter as a function of women's exposure to four categories of stressors: childhood trauma, adult trauma, chronic stressors, and recent (adverse) life events. Hypothesis 1 stated that exposure to recent life events (near conception) and to childhood traumas would increase women's chances of having a girl baby. Hypothesis 2 stated that the relationship between stress and gender outcome is mediated by persistent posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. The final sample was comprised of 225 women. The design was prospective observational. At first contact, women were retained if they were <27 weeks pregnant and met initial inclusion criteria. In interview 2, at 27-30 weeks, women were excluded for positive diagnoses of anxiety disorders besides PTSD with or without depression (Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Disorders). In interview 3 (30-34 weeks), reports on stress categories (Social Stress Indicator Questionnaire) and PTSD symptoms (Post-Traumatic Checklist) were obtained. Infant gender was obtained from medical records. The relationship between stress categories and the distribution of girl/boy infants was examined with Chi Squares and logistic regression analyses. Mediation was tested with the macro PROCESS (Hayes 2012). Childhood trauma was the only stress category that increased the odds of having a girl, with an odds ratio of >3.0 for women who had been exposed to more than two such events. PTSD symptoms (partially) mediated the relationship between childhood trauma and infant gender. Findings suggest that women's exposure to childhood trauma contributes to the determination of the sex ratio at birth and that PTSD symptoms are part of the cause. PMID:24221408

  1. Medication Adherence in Psychopharmacologically Treated Adults with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safren, Steven A.; Duran, Petra; Yovel, Iftah; Perlman, Carol A.; Sprich, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Objective: One of the potential causes of residual symptoms of ADHD in adults can be difficulties with consistent adherence to medications. Method: This formative study examined self-reported medication adherence in adults with ADHD with clinically significant symptoms despite medication treatment. Results: Mean adherence for the two-week period…

  2. A Matter of Trust: Patient Barriers to Primary Medication Adherence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polinski, J. M.; Kesselheim, A. S.; Frolkis, J. P.; Wescott, P.; Allen-Coleman, C.; Fischer, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    Primary medication adherence occurs when a patient properly fills the first prescription for a new medication. Primary adherence only occurs about three-quarters of the time for antihypertensive medications. We assessed patients' barriers to primary adherence and attributes of patient-provider discussions that might improve primary adherence…

  3. Evaluation of medication adherence in Lebanese hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Yassine, Mohammad; Al-Hajje, Amal; Awada, Sanaa; Rachidi, Samar; Zein, Salam; Bawab, Wafa; Bou Zeid, Mayssam; El Hajj, Maya; Salameh, Pascale

    2016-09-01

    Controlling hypertension is essential in cardiovascular diseases. Poor medication adherence is associated with poor disease outcomes, waste of healthcare resources, and contributes to reduced blood pressure control. This study evaluates treatment adherence to antihypertensive therapy in Lebanese hypertensive patients by estimating the proportion of adherent hypertensive patients using a validated tool and investigates what factors predict this behavior. A questionnaire-based cross-sectional study was conducted on a random sample of 210 hypertensive outpatients selected from clinics located in tertiary-care hospitals and from private cardiology clinics located in Beirut. Adherence level was measured using a validated 8-item Modified Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMMAS). Among 210 patients, 50.5% showed high adherence, 27.1% medium adherence, and 22.4% low adherence to medication. Mean MMMAS score was 6.59±2.0. In bivariate analyses, having controlled blood pressure (p=0.003) and taking a combination drug (p=0.023) were predictors of high adherence. Forgetfulness (p<0.01), complicated drug regimen (p=0.001), and side effects (p=0.006) were predictors of low adherence after multiple liner regression. Logistic regression results showed that calcium channel blockers (p=0.030) were associated with increased adherence levels. In conclusion, developing multidisciplinary intervention programs to address the factors identified, in addition to educational strategies targeting healthcare providers, are necessary to enhance patient adherence. PMID:26232704

  4. Adherence indicators predict changes in health outcomes: HUB City Steps

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Participant adherence is a major threat to intervention effectiveness. Most researchers have reported effects of a single adherence measure on health outcomes. The objective of this analysis was to evaluate two adherence measures, separately and in combination, for predicting changes in health out...

  5. Analyzing Adherence to Prenatal Supplement: Does Pill Count Measure Up?

    PubMed Central

    Appelgren, Kristie E.; Nietert, Paul J.; Hulsey, Thomas C.; Hollis, Bruce W.; Wagner, Carol L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective. To determine if adherence as measured by pill count would show a significant association with serum-based measures of adherence. Methods. Data were obtained from a prenatal vitamin D supplementation trial where subjects were stratified by race and randomized into three dosing groups: 400 (control), 2000, or 4000 IU vitamin D3/day. One measurement of adherence was obtained via pill counts remaining compared to a novel definition for adherence using serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D (25-OH-D) levels (absolute change in 25(OH)D over the study period and the subject's steady-state variation in their 25(OH)D levels). A multivariate logistic regression model examined whether mean percent adherence by pill count was significantly associated with the adherence measure by serum metabolite levels. Results. Subjects' mean percentage of adherence by pill count was not a significant predictor of adherence by serum metabolite levels. This finding was robust across a series of sensitivity analyses. Conclusions. Based on our novel definition of adherence, pill count was not a reliable predictor of adherence to protocol, and calls into question how adherence is measured in clinical research. Our findings have implications regarding the determination of efficacy of medications under study and offer an alternative approach to measuring adherence of long half-life supplements/medications. PMID:20169132

  6. Novel Adherence Measures for Infusible Therapeutic Agents Indicated for Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Tkacz, Joseph; Ingham, Michael P.; Brady, Brenna L.; Meyer, Roxanne; Ruetsch, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Background Published studies on adherence to biologic medications show that many types of calculation methods are used. However, infused biologics are not well-suited to typical measures of adherence, such as proportion of days covered. Objective To construct and assess 7 novel adherence measures potentially applicable to infusible biologic agents and compare outcomes for 2 infusible biologics used for the treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods Adults (aged ≥18 years) diagnosed with RA (ie, 2 or more 714.x claims) who received ≥24 months of continuous medical and pharmacy eligibility and who started taking abatacept or infliximab therapy were selected from a large commercial insurer database of medical and pharmacy claims. The 7 new adherence measures included cumulative amount of time with a refill gap ≥20% (CG20) beyond the expected infusion interval, cumulative time off treatment, days of uninterrupted use (DoUU), observed versus expected refill ratio (OvERR), repeated observations of underuse (RoUU), variance in time between infusions, and time to discontinuation (TTD). Mean observed infusion intervals were calculated and served as a reference measure of adherence. Results The mean maintenance intervals approximated recommended guidelines. The mean observed infusion interval for abatacept recipients was 33 days (recommended, 28 days); it was 53 days (recommended, 56 days) for patients receiving infliximab. Three measures demonstrated a significant positive relationship to the mean observed infusion interval—CG20 (r = .258), DoUU (r = .212), and TTD (r = .081; P <.05). OvERR (r = −.072) and RoUU (r = −.189; P <.05) showed significant negative correlations. Real-world comparisons showed that adherence was significantly (P <.001) greater for the infliximab group according to most measures. Conclusion New measures of adherence correlate significantly with mean maintenance intervals. Future studies should examine relationships

  7. Understanding how adherence goals promote adherence behaviours: a repeated measure observational study with HIV seropositive patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The extent to which patients follow treatments as prescribed is pivotal to treatment success. An exceptionally high level (> 95%) of HIV medication adherence is required to suppress viral replication and protect the immune system and a similarly high level (> 80%) of adherence has also been suggested in order to benefit from prescribed exercise programmes. However, in clinical practice, adherence to both often falls below the desirable level. This project aims to investigate a wide range of psychological and personality factors that may lead to adherence/non-adherence to medical treatment and exercise programmes. Methods HIV positive patients who are referred to the physiotherapist-led 10-week exercise programme as part of the standard care are continuously recruited. Data on social cognitive variables (attitude, intention, subjective norms, self-efficacy, and outcome beliefs) about the goal and specific behaviours, selected personality factors, perceived quality of life, physical activity, self-reported adherence and physical assessment are collected at baseline, at the end of the exercise programme and again 3 months later. The project incorporates objective measures of both exercise (attendance log and improvement in physical measures such as improved fitness level, weight loss, improved circumferential anthropometric measures) and medication adherence (verified by non-invasive hair analysis). Discussion The novelty of this project comes from two key aspects, complemented with objective information on exercise and medication adherence. The project assesses beliefs about both the underlying goal such as following prescribed treatment; and about the specific behaviours such as undertaking the exercise or taking the medication, using both implicit and explicit assessments of patients’ beliefs and attitudes. We predict that i) the way people think about the underlying goal of their treatments explains medication and exercise behaviours over and above

  8. Ethical Questions in Medical Electronic Adherence Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Jeffrey I; Eyal, Nir; Musiimenta, Angella; Haberer, Jessica E

    2016-03-01

    Electronic adherence monitors (EAMs) record and report an array of health behaviors, ranging from taking daily medications to wearing medical devices. EAMs are utilized in research worldwide and are being investigated for clinical use. However, there is also growing popular concern about the extent to which electronic devices may be used to monitor individuals, including allegations in the media that EAMs represent a move towards "Big Brother" in medicine. Here, we highlight the unique benefits as well as the potential ethical challenges that electronic adherence monitoring generates. These challenges surround autonomy, privacy and confidentiality, trust, and ancillary care obligations. We describe key questions within each of these domains that warrant further investigation, and present potential solutions to many of the concerns raised. PMID:26358284

  9. Subpopulations in purified platelets adhering on glass.

    PubMed

    Donati, Alessia; Gupta, Swati; Reviakine, Ilya

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how platelet activation is regulated is important in the context of cardiovascular disorders and their management with antiplatelet therapy. Recent evidence points to different platelet subpopulations performing different functions. In particular, procoagulant and aggregating subpopulations have been reported in the literature in platelets treated with the GPVI agonists. How the formation of platelet subpopulations upon activation is regulated remains unclear. Here, it is shown that procoagulant and aggregating platelet subpopulations arise spontaneously upon adhesion of purified platelets on clean glass surfaces. Calcium ionophore treatment of the adhering platelets resulted in one platelet population expressing both the procoagulant and the adherent population markers phosphatidylserine and the activated form of GPIIb/IIIa, while all of the platelets expressed CD62P independently of the ionophore treatment. Therefore, all platelets have the capacity to express all three activation markers. It is concluded that platelet subpopulations observed in various studies reflect the dynamics of the platelet activation process. PMID:27338300

  10. Medication adherence in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Phan, Stephanie V

    2016-01-01

    Medication nonadherence is common among patients with schizophrenia and due to a variety of factors including lack of insight, psychopathology, substance use disorder, issues associated with treatment, stigma, fragmentation of care, cultural influences, and socioeconomic status. Among this population, nonadherence is problematic because it can lead to decompensation or exacerbation of symptoms, relapse, rehospitalization or greater use of emergency psychiatric services, functional decline, and increased risk of death. Psychoeducational approaches alone are ineffective, but in combination with behavioral interventions, appear to be effective. Involving the patient's support system, in addition to other interventions, can improve treatment adherence. Many medication-related factors, such as effectiveness and tolerability of antipsychotics, regimen complexity, and past medication trials impact appropriate medication use. Therefore, optimizing the patient's pharmacotherapeutic regimens can improve adherence. Additional factors favorably influencing adherence include involving the patient in their treatment, fostering a therapeutic alliance, implementing/using reminder systems, and addressing substance use disorder. Medication nonadherence arises from multiple reasons that vary between patients. Thus, the most effective strategies to improve adherence are multifactorial and may involve both psychoeducational and behavioral techniques, as well as previously listed approaches. Strategies should be targeted toward the patient and their support system, whenever possible, to further improve the chances of appropriate medication use. Recognizing that all patients with schizophrenia are at risk for medication nonadherence is important. No one technique has been shown to be most effective; therefore, the risk for nonadherence should continually be assessed and multiple strategies should be targeted to the patient (and caregiver) and repeatedly implemented throughout the course

  11. Adherence with drug therapy in the rheumatic diseases Part one: a review of adherence rates.

    PubMed

    Hill, Jackie

    2005-01-01

    Drug therapy plays a major role in the management of many rheumatic diseases and is particularly important in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) because of the significant rates of morbidity and mortality (Pincus, 1995). Understanding of the pathogenesis of RA has led to the development of new and more effective drugs (Emery et al., 1999), but the ultimate efficacy of any drug therapy depends upon the patient's decision to take it. There is widespread agreement that many people with rheumatic disease do not adhere to their medication regimens (Deyo et al., 1981; Belcon et al., 1984; Pullar et al., 1988; Hill et al., 2001). Research has demonstrated that 50% of women taking hormone replacement therapy for the prevention of osteoporosis discontinue treatment after a year (Fordham, 2000) and similar rates of discontinuation are found in other chronic diseases (Haynes et al., 1996, 2000). This is bewildering as, in asymptomatic illnesses such as hypertension and diabetes, the expectation is that levels of adherence would be lower than in diseases where pain and stiffness are present. The picture becomes even more confusing when we consider the findings from a recent multi-country study of RA, which found no association between adherence and disease severity, nor with the treatment prescribed (Viller et al., 1999). In chronic disease poor adherence is commonplace. The World Health Organization (WHO) recognizes this and has recently stated that 'poor adherence to treatment of chronic diseases is a worldwide problem of striking magnitude' and cites adherence to long-term therapy for chronic illnesses in developed countries averaging just 50% (WHO, 2003). The first part of this two part review focuses on adherence with drug therapy, and the second part discusses different methods of measuring it. PMID:17041995

  12. Adherent Raindrop Modeling, Detectionand Removal in Video.

    PubMed

    You, Shaodi; Tan, Robby T; Kawakami, Rei; Mukaigawa, Yasuhiro; Ikeuchi, Katsushi

    2016-09-01

    Raindrops adhered to a windscreen or window glass can significantly degrade the visibility of a scene. Modeling, detecting and removing raindrops will, therefore, benefit many computer vision applications, particularly outdoor surveillance systems and intelligent vehicle systems. In this paper, a method that automatically detects and removes adherent raindrops is introduced. The core idea is to exploit the local spatio-temporal derivatives of raindrops. To accomplish the idea, we first model adherent raindrops using law of physics, and detect raindrops based on these models in combination with motion and intensity temporal derivatives of the input video. Having detected the raindrops, we remove them and restore the images based on an analysis that some areas of raindrops completely occludes the scene, and some other areas occlude only partially. For partially occluding areas, we restore them by retrieving as much as possible information of the scene, namely, by solving a blending function on the detected partially occluding areas using the temporal intensity derivative. For completely occluding areas, we recover them by using a video completion technique. Experimental results using various real videos show the effectiveness of our method. PMID:26485475

  13. Motivational factors of adherence to cardiac rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Shahsavari, Hooman; Shahriari, Mohsen; Alimohammadi, Nasrollah

    2012-01-01

    Background: Main suggested theories about patients’ adherence to treatment regimens recognize the importance of motivation in positive changes in behaviors. Since cardiac diseases are chronic and common, cardiac rehabilitation as an effective prevention program is crucial in management of these diseases. There is always concern about the patients’ adherence to cardiac rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to describe the motivational factors affecting the patients’ participation and compliance to cardiac rehabilitation by recognizing and understanding the nature of patients’ experiences. Materials and Methods: The participants were selected among the patients with cardiac diseases who were referred to cardiac rehabilitation in Isfahan Cardiovascular Research Center, Iran. The purposive sampling method was used and data saturation achieved after 8 semi-structured interviews. Findings: The three main concepts obtained from this study are “beliefs”, “supporters” and “group cohesion”. Conclusions: In cardiac rehabilitation programs, emphasis on motivational factors affects the patient’s adherence. It is suggested that in cardiac rehabilitation programs more attention should be paid to patients’ beliefs, the role of patients’ supporters and the role of group-based rehabilitation. PMID:23833634

  14. Four therapeutic diets: adherence and acceptability.

    PubMed

    Berkow, Susan E; Barnard, Neal; Eckart, Jill; Katcher, Heather

    2010-01-01

    Many health conditions are treated, at least in part, by therapeutic diets. Although the success of any intervention depends on its acceptability to the patient, the acceptability of therapeutic diets and factors that influence it have been largely neglected in nutrition research. A working definition of acceptability is proposed and an examination and summary are provided of available data on the acceptability of common diet regimens used for medical conditions. The goal is to suggest ways to improve the success of therapeutic diets. The proposed working definition of "acceptability" refers to the user's judgment of the advantages and disadvantages of a therapeutic diet-in relation to palatability, costs, and effects on eating behaviour and health-that influence the likelihood of adherence. Very low-calorie, reduced-fat omnivorous, vegetarian and vegan, and low-carbohydrate diets all achieve acceptability among the majority of users in studies of up to one year, in terms of attrition and adherence rates and results of questionnaires assessing eating behaviours. Longer studies are fewer, but they suggest that vegetarian, vegan, and reduced-fat diets are acceptable, as indicated by sustained changes in nutrient intake. Few studies of this length have been published for very low-calorie or low-carbohydrate diets. Long-term studies of adherence and acceptability of these and other therapeutic diets are warranted. PMID:21144137

  15. [Adherence to chronic medication: also a frequent problem in Belgium!].

    PubMed

    Liekens, S; Hulshagen, L; Dethier, M; Laekeman, G; Foulon, V

    2013-12-01

    Medication adherence in chronic conditions such as asthma, type 2 diabetes, heart failure, HIV and cancer appears to be a frequent problem. However, the literature on adherence in patients who use inhaled corticosteroids (ICS), oral hypoglycemic agents, drugs for heart failure, antiretrovirals or oral chemotherapy, contains little or no relevant data for Belgium. In the context of a Master thesis in Pharmaceutical care at KU Leuven, a quantitative study was performed to determine the prevalence of adherence to chronic medication in Belgium. This retrospective, cross-sectional study used a database containing refill data of a regional pharmacists' association (KLAV). Out of the 603 pharmacies affiliated with this association, all 50 pharmacies where HIV medication was delivered, were selected. Dispensing data from the selected pharmacies were collected from 01/07/2008 to 31/12/2009 for five pathologies, i.e.; asthma, type 2 diabetes, heart failure, HIV and cancer. Adherence (TT) was calculated with the Medication Refill Adherence (MRA) method. In order to determine whether there were associations between age, gender, drug class and adherence, Chi-square tests were used. Compared with the other patients, cancer patients were the most adherent in taking their drugs (median adherence rate = 88%). In addition, this was the only group in which the median adherence rate was above the set limit of 80%. The patients who were prescribed inhaled corticosteroids were the least adherent (median adherence rate = 38%). More than 50% of patients with asthma/COPD, heart failure and diabetes were classified as "under-users". Furthermore, the results showed a significant association within asthma patients between gender and adherence. In asthma, type 2 diabetes, heart failure and HIV patients there was a significant relationship between age and adherence and drug class and adherence. As the current study has some limitations, the results should be handled with caution. Nevertheless

  16. Odd-frequency superconducting states with different types of Meissner response: Problem of coexistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fominov, Ya. V.; Tanaka, Y.; Asano, Y.; Eschrig, M.

    2015-04-01

    We consider physical properties of a superconductor with a recently proposed type of odd-frequency pairing that exhibits diamagnetic Meissner response ("odd-dia state"). Such a state was suggested in order to address stability issues arising in an odd-frequency superconducting state with paramagnetic Meissner response ("odd-para state"). Assuming the existence of an odd-dia state (due to a proper retarded interaction), we study its coexistence with an odd-para state. The latter is known to be generated as an induced superconducting component in, e.g., singlet superconductor/ferromagnet proximity structures or triplet superconductor/normal metal systems. Calculating the superfluid density of the mixed odd-para/odd-dia state and the Josephson current between the odd-para and odd-dia states, we find that the expressions for the currents in both cases have nonvanishing imaginary contributions and are therefore unphysical. We show that a realization of the odd-dia state implies the absence of a Hamiltonian description of the system, and suggest that there exists no physically realizable perturbation that could give rise to the spontaneous symmetry breaking necessary for an actual realization of the odd-dia superconducting state.

  17. Isotopic Ratio, Isotonic Ratio, Isobaric Ratio and Shannon Information Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chun-Wang; Wei, Hui-Ling

    2014-11-01

    The isoscaling and the isobaric yield ratio difference (IBD) probes, both of which are constructed by yield ratio of fragment, provide cancelation of parameters. The information entropy theory is introduced to explain the physical meaning of the isoscaling and IBD probes. The similarity between the isoscaling and IBD results is found, i.e., the information uncertainty determined by the IBD method equals to β - α determined by the isoscaling (α (β) is the parameter fitted from the isotopic (isotonic) yield ratio).

  18. Preconception maternal polychlorinated biphenyl concentrations and the secondary sex ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Kira C.; Jackson, Leila W.; Lynch, Courtney D.; Kostyniak, Paul J.; Buck Louis, Germaine M. . E-mail: louisg@mail.nih.gov

    2007-01-15

    The secondary sex ratio is the ratio of male to female live births and historically has ranged from 102 to 106 males to 100 females. Temporal declines have been reported in many countries prompting authors to hypothesize an environmental etiology. Blood specimens were obtained from 99 women aged 24-34 prior to attempting pregnancy and quantified for 76 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners using dual column gas chromatography with electron capture detection. Women were prospectively followed until pregnancy or 12 cycles of trying. The odds of a male birth for three PCB groupings (total, estrogenic, anti-estrogenic) controlling for maternal characteristics were estimated using logistic regression. Among the 50 women with live births and PCB data, 26 female and 24 male infants were born (ratio 0.92). After adjusting for age and body mass index, odds of a male birth were elevated among women in the second (OR=1.29) and third (OR=1.48) tertiles of estrogenic PCBs; odds (OR=0.70) were reduced among women in the highest tertile of anti-estrogenic PCBs. All confidence intervals included one. The direction of the odds ratios in this preliminary study varied by PCB groupings, supporting the need to study specific PCB patterns when assessing environmental influences on the secondary sex ratio.

  19. The Euler current and relativistic parity odd transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golkar, Siavash; Roberts, Matthew M.; Son, Dam T.

    2015-04-01

    For a spacetime of odd dimensions endowed with a unit vector field, we introduce a new topological current that is identically conserved and whose charge is equal to the Euler character of the even dimensional spacelike foliations. The existence of this current allows us to introduce new Chern-Simons-type terms in the effective field theories describing relativistic quantum Hall states and (2 + 1) dimensional superfluids. Using effective field theory, we calculate various correlation functions and identify transport coefficients. In the quantum Hall case, this current provides the natural relativistic generalization of the Wen-Zee term, required to characterize the shift and Hall viscosity in quantum Hall systems. For the superfluid case this term is required to have nonzero Hall viscosity and to describe superfluids with non s-wave pairing.

  20. Phase transition in odd-N Pd-isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hou-Bing; Dong, Guo-Xiang; Sun, Xiao-Jun; Xu, Fu-Rong

    2015-11-01

    Phase transition in odd-N isotopes 99,101,103Pd are investigated via the E-GOS (E-Gamma Over Spin) curves, which strongly suggest a structure evolution from vibration to rotation along the yrast lines with increasing spin. Theoretical calculations have been performed for the ground state bands of 99,101,103Pd in the framework of the cranked shell model (CSM) and the alignment properties observed experimentally are analyzed employing this model. The results show that the phase transition in the ground state bands of 99,101,103Pd can be interpreted as the valence nucleons start to occupy the g9/2 proton orbitals with increasing spin which would polarize the core to a small, but rigid quadrupole deformation. Supported by Natural Science Foundation of Guangxi (2014jjBA10016, 2014jjDA10012) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (11465005)

  1. Topological Blount's theorem of odd-parity superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayshi, Shingo; Shiozaki, Ken; Sato, Masatoshi; Tanaka, Yukio

    2014-03-01

    Nontrivial nodal structures are one of the most salient features of gap functions of the unconventional superconductors. In a system with spin-orbit coupling and crystal field, the group theory plays a key role to determine the node of the gap function. From the group theoretical ground, Blount proved that the line node is ``vanishingly improbable'' in spin-triplet superconductors. Namely, it is impossible to create a stable line node in odd-parity superconductors. Our motivation is to compare the group theoretical result with topological stability of nodes by K-theory As a result, we found that K-theory not only rebuilds the original Blount's argument but also exhibits counterexamples with the stable line node. In this talk, we will show the physical interpretation of them.

  2. Near yrast states in doubly odd [sup 214]Fr

    SciTech Connect

    Debray, M.E.; Kreiner, A.J.; Kesque, J.M.; Ozafran, M.; Romo, A.; Somacal, H.; Vazquez, M.E. ); Davidson, J.; Davidson, M. ); Ahn, K.; Fossan, D.B.; Liang, Y.; Ma, R.; Paul, E.S.; Piel, W.F. Jr.; Xu, N. )

    1993-11-01

    High spin states of doubly odd [sup 214]Fr[sub 127] have been investigated using in-beam [gamma]-ray and conversion electron spectroscopy techniques through the [sup 206]Pb([sup 11]B, 3[ital n]) and [sup 208]Pb([sup 11]B, 5[ital n]) fusion-evaporation reactions. Completely new spectrocopic information has been obtained. The yrast level structure is established up to spin (19[sup +]) and some information on [gamma] transitions from higher-lying levels is also obtained. Two new isomers [ital T][sub 1/2]=174(20) ns and [ital T][sub 1/2]=11(2) ns were found. Configuration assignments for the low-lying levels are discussed. Information on residual proton-neutron interactions is extracted.

  3. Cotunneling into a Kondo lattice with odd hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baruselli, Pier Paolo; Vojta, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    Cotunneling into Kondo systems, where an electron enters an f -electron material via a cotunneling process through the local-moment orbital, has been proposed to explain the characteristic line shapes observed in scanning-tunneling-spectroscopy (STS) experiments. Here we extend the theory of electron cotunneling to Kondo-lattice systems in which the bulk hybridization between conduction and f electrons is odd under inversion, being particularly relevant to Kondo insulators. Compared to the case of even hybridization, we show that the interference between normal tunneling and cotunneling processes is fundamentally altered: it is entirely absent for layered, i.e., quasi-two-dimensional materials, while its energy dependence is strongly modified for three-dimensional materials. We discuss implications for STS experiments.

  4. Summertime distribution and relations of reactive odd nitrogen species and NO(y) in the troposphere over Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talbot, R. W.; Bradshaw, J. D.; Sandholm, S. T.; Singh, H. B.; Sachse, G. W.; Collins, J.; Gregory, G. L.; Anderson, B.; Blake, D.; Barrick, J.

    1994-01-01

    We report here large-scale features of the distribution of NO(x), HNO3, PAN, particle NO3, and NO(y) in the troposphere from 0.15 to 6 km altitude over central Canada. These measurements were conducted in July - August 1990 from the NASA Wallops Electra aircraft as part of the joint United States-Canadian Arctic Boundary Layer Expedition (ABLE) 3B-Northern Wetlands Study. Our findings show that this region is generally NO(x) limited, with NO(x) mixing ratios typically 20-30 parts per trillion by volume (pptv). We found little direct evidence for anthropogenic enhancement of mixing ratios of reactive odd nitrogen species and NO(y) above those in 'background' air. Instead, it appears that enhancements in the mixing ratios of these species were primarily due to emissions from several day old or CO-rich-NO(x)-poor smoldering local biomass-burning fires. NO(x) mixing ratios in biomass-burning impacted air masses were usually less than 50 pptv, but those of HNO3 and PAN were typically 100-300 pptv representing a twofold-threefold enhancement over 'background' air. During our study period, inputs of what appeared to be aged tropical air were a major factor influencing the distribution of reactive odd nitrogen in the midtroposphere over northeastern North America. These air masses were quite depleted in NO(y) (generally less than 150 pptv), and a frequent summertime occurrence of such air masses over this region would imply a significant influence on the reactive odd nitrogen budget. Our findings show that the chemical composition of aged air masses over subarctic Canada and those documented in the Arctic during ABLE 3A have strikingly similar chemistries, suggesting large-scale connection between the air masses influencing these regions.

  5. Multiply enhanced odd-order wave-mixing spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Nathan A; Block, Stephen B; Yurs, Lena A; Kornau, Kathryn M; Pakoulev, Andrei V; Wright, John C

    2009-12-01

    Extending current coherent multidimensional spectroscopy (CMDS) methods to higher order multiwave mixing requires excitation intensities where dynamic Stark effects become important. This paper examines the dynamic Stark effects that occur in mixed frequency/time domain CMDS methods at high excitation intensities in a model system with an isolated vibrational state. The phase-matching restrictions in CMDS define the excitation beams that interact by nonlinear mixing while the dynamic Stark effects create vibrational ladders of increasingly more energetic overtone and combination band states. The excited quantum states form coherences that reemit the output beams. This paper uses the phase-matching conditions k(out) = k(1) - k(2) + k(2') and k(out) =- k(1) + k(2) + k(2'), where the subscripts denote the excitation frequencies of each excitation pulse and the output pulse. The phase-matching condition constrains each pulse to have an odd number of interactions so the overall mixing process that creates the output coherence must also involve an odd number of interactions. Tuning the excitation frequencies and spectrally resolving the output intensity creates three-dimensional spectra that resolve the individual overtone states. Changing the excitation pulse time delays measures the dynamics of the coherences and populations created by the multiple excitations. The multidimensional spectra probe the highly excited states of a molecular potential energy surface. This paper uses tungsten hexacarbonyl (W(CO)(6)) as a model for observing how dynamic Stark effects change the multidimensional spectra of a simple system. The simplicity of the W(CO)(6) system provides the experimental data required to develop the nonperturbative theoretical methods that will be necessary to model this new approach to CMDS. PMID:19860444

  6. An Overview of Modeling Middle Atmospheric Odd Nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackman, Charles H.; Kawa, S. Randolph; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Odd nitrogen (N, NO, NO2, NO3, N2O5, HNO3, HO2NO2, ClONO2, and BrONO2) constituents are important components in the control of middle atmospheric ozone. Several processes lead to the production of odd nitrogen (NO(sub y)) in the middle atmosphere (stratosphere and mesosphere) including the oxidation of nitrous oxide (N2O), lightning, downflux from the thermosphere, and energetic charged particles (e.g., galactic cosmic rays, solar proton events, and energetic electron precipitation). The dominant production mechanism of NO(sub y) in the stratosphere is N2O oxidation, although other processes contribute. Mesospheric NO(sub y) is influenced by N2O oxidation, downflux from the thermosphere, and energetic charged particles. NO(sub y) is destroyed in the middle atmosphere primarily via two processes: 1) dissociation of NO to form N and O followed by N + NO yielding N2 + O to reform even nitrogen; and 2) transport to the troposphere where HNO3 can be rapidly scavenged in water droplets and rained out of the atmosphere. There are fairly significant differences among global models that predict NO(sub y). NO(sub y) has a fairly long lifetime in the stratosphere (months to years), thus disparate transport in the models probably contributes to many of these differences. Satellite and aircraft measurement provide modeling tests of the various components of NO(sub y). Although some recent reaction rate measurements have led to improvements in model/measurement agreement, significant differences do remain. This presentation will provide an overview of several proposed sources and sinks of NO(sub y) and their regions of importance. Multi-dimensional modeling results for NO(sub y) and its components with comparisons to observations will also be presented.

  7. Promoting adherence to nebulized therapy in cystic fibrosis: poster development and a qualitative exploration of adherence

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Stephen; Babiker, Nathan; Gardner, Emma; Royle, Jane; Curley, Rachael; Hoo, Zhe Hui; Wildman, Martin J

    2015-01-01

    Background Cystic fibrosis (CF) health care professionals recognize the need to motivate people with CF to adhere to nebulizer treatments, yet little is known about how best to achieve this. We aimed to produce motivational posters to support nebulizer adherence by using social marketing involving people with CF in the development of those posters. Methods The Sheffield CF multidisciplinary team produced preliminary ideas that were elaborated upon with semi-structured interviews among people with CF to explore barriers and facilitators to the use of nebulized therapy. Initial themes and poster designs were refined using an online focus group to finalize the poster designs. Results People with CF preferred aspirational posters describing what could be achieved through adherence in contrast to posters that highlighted the adverse consequences of nonadherence. A total of 14 posters were produced through this process. Conclusion People with CF can be engaged to develop promotional material to support adherence, providing a unique perspective differing from that of the CF multidisciplinary team. Further research is needed to evaluate the effectiveness of these posters to support nebulizer adherence. PMID:26346635

  8. The old problem of adherence: research on treatment adherence and its relevance for HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Wright, M T

    2000-12-01

    The international published research on patient adherence was selectively reviewed with the goal of determining its relevance for the treatment of HIV/AIDS. Results show that not adhering to treatment regimes is so widespread that no combination of sociodemographic variables is reliably predictive of patients' not following doctors' orders. Achieving 100% adherence for any treatment or patient group does not appear to be realistic. Characteristics of the patient's situation, of the given therapy, and of the disease itself affect adherence. In addition, the patient-doctor relationship and the context of the treatment are important. Often overlooked are the existential dimensions of meaning, self-determination and quality of life which are particularly important for the chronically ill. Treatment needs to be negotiated individually with each patient on the basis of an open therapeutic relationship and with the help of multidimensional interventions. Lessons from the discourse on safer sex can steer adherence research and practice away from a behavioural and reductionist approach toward the context and meaning of treatment. PMID:11177448

  9. Evaluating an Adaptive and Interactive mHealth Smoking Cessation and Medication Adherence Program: A Randomized Pilot Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Melissa L; Bradley, Katharine; An, Lawrence C; Catz, Sheryl L

    2016-01-01

    /22, 97%) and would recommend the program to others (20/23, 87%). They also rated the program as convenient, responsive to their needs, and easy to use. Abstinence rates at 5-month follow-up were 36% in the experimental arm versus 24% among controls (odds ratio 1.79 [0.61-5.19], P=.42). Experimental participants used their varenicline an average of 46 days versus 39 among controls (P=.49). More than two-thirds (22/33, 67%) of experimental participants and three-quarters (25/33, 76%) of controls prematurely discontinued their varenicline use (P=.29). Conclusions The MyMAP intervention was found to be feasible and acceptable. Since the study was not powered for statistical significance, no conclusions can be drawn about the program’s effects on smoking abstinence or medication adherence, but the overall study results suggest further evaluation in a larger randomized trial is warranted. ClinicalTrial ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02136498; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02136498 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6jT3UMFLj) PMID:27489247

  10. Adherence to HIV antiretrovirals among persons with serious mental illness.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Glenn J; Kanouse, David E; Koegel, Paul; Sullivan, Greer

    2003-04-01

    Despite the absence of empirical evidence, serious mental illness is assumed to be a high risk factor for nonadherence to HIV antiretroviral regimens. To assess antiretroviral adherence among persons with serious mental illness, we conducted a study in which adherence was observed over a 2-week period with electronic monitoring bottle caps and self-report. Forty-seven participants enrolled, with all but two (96%) completing the study. Psychiatric diagnoses included bipolar depression (n = 24), schizophrenia (n = 12), schizoaffective disorder (n = 5), and major depression with psychotic features (n = 6). Mean adherence (proportion of prescribed doses taken) was 66% (standard deviation [SD] = 34), as measured by electronic monitoring; 40% demonstrated at least 90% adherence, but 31% had less than 50% adherence. Self-reported adherence to psychotropics was moderately correlated with self-reported (r = 0.45, p < 0.05) and electronically monitored (r = 0.39, p < 0.05) antiretroviral adherence. Viral load (log(10)) was negatively correlated with electronically monitored (r = -0.28, p < 0.10) and self-reported (r = -0.39, p < 0.05) antiretroviral adherence, after controlling for the length of time on treatment. These findings suggest that many patients with serious mental illness are able to adhere very well to antiretroviral regimens, yet a substantial proportion of our sample displayed poor adherence, indicating the need for research to further assess the factors that influence adherence to antiretrovirals in this population. PMID:12737641

  11. Iron Chelation Adherence to Deferoxamine and Deferasirox in Thalassemia

    PubMed Central

    Trachtenberg, Felicia; Vichinsky, Elliott; Haines, Dru; Pakbaz, Zahra; Mednick, Lauren; Sobota, Amy; Kwiatkowski, Janet; Thompson, Alexis A.; Porter, John; Coates, Thomas; Giardina, Patricia J.; Olivieri, Nancy; Yamashita, Robert; Neufeld, Ellis J.

    2015-01-01

    The Thalassemia Clinical Research Network collected adherence information from 79 patients on deferoxamine and 186 on deferasirox from 2007 to 2009. Chelation adherence was defined as percent of doses administered in the last 4 weeks (patient report) out of those prescribed (chart review). Chelation history since 2002 was available for 97 patients currently on deferoxamine and 217 on deferasirox, with crude estimates of adherence from chart review. Self-reported adherence to both deferoxamine and deferasirox were quite high, with slightly higher adherence to the oral chelator (97 vs. 92%). Ninety percent of patients on deferasirox reported at least 90% adherence, compared with 75% of patients on deferoxamine. Adherence to both chelators was highest in children, followed by adolescents and older adults. Predictors of lower deferoxamine adherence were smoking in the past year, problems sticking themselves (adults only), problems wearing their pump, and fewer transfusions in the past year. Predictors of lower deferasirox adherence were bodily pain and depression. Switching chelators resulted in increased adherence, regardless of the direction of the switch, although switching from deferoxamine to deferasirox was far more common. As adherence to deferoxamine is higher than previously reported, it appears beneficial for patients to have a choice in chelators. PMID:21523808

  12. Association of Ongoing Drug and Alcohol Use with Non-Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy and Higher Risk of AIDS and Death: Results from ACTG 362

    PubMed Central

    COHN, Susan E.; JIANG, Hongyu; MCCUTCHAN, J. Allen; KOLETAR, Susan L.; MURPHY, Robert L.; ROBERTSON, Kevin R.; DESTMAURICE, Annabelle; CURRIER, Judith S.; WILLIAMS, Paige L.

    2011-01-01

    Drug and alcohol use have been associated with a worse prognosis in short-term and cross-sectional analyses of HIV-infected populations, but longitudinal effects on adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) and clinical outcomes in advanced AIDS are less well characterized. We assessed self-reported drug and alcohol use in AIDS patients, and examined their association with non-adherence and death or disease progression in a multicenter observational study. We defined non-adherence as reporting missed ART doses in the 48 hours before study visits. The association between drug use and ART non-adherence was evaluated using repeated measures generalized estimating equation (GEE) models. The association between drug and alcohol use and time to new AIDS diagnosis or death was evaluated via Cox regression models, controlling for covariates including ART adherence. Of 643 participants enrolled between 1997–1999 and followed through 2007, at entry 39% reported ever using cocaine, 24% amphetamines, and 10% heroin. Ongoing drug use during study follow-up was reported by 9% using cocaine, 4% amphetamines, and 1% heroin. Hard drug (cocaine, amphetamines, or heroin) users had 2.1 times higher odds (p=0.001) of ART non-adherence in GEE models and 2.5 times higher risk (p=0.04) of AIDS progression or death in Cox models. Use of hard drugs was attenuated as a risk factor for AIDS progression or death after controlling for non-adherence during follow-up (HR=2.11, p=0.08), but was still suggestive of a possible adherence-independent mechanism of harm. This study highlights the need to continuously screen and treat patients for drug use as a part of ongoing HIV care. PMID:21293986

  13. Workplace Social Capital and Adherence to Antihypertensive Medication: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Oksanen, Tuula; Kawachi, Ichiro; Kouvonen, Anne; Suzuki, Etsuji; Takao, Soshi; Sjösten, Noora; Virtanen, Marianna; Pentti, Jaana

    2011-01-01

    Background While hypertension is a common and treatable health problem, adherence to antihypertensive medication remains a challenge. This study examines the hypothesis that workplace social capital may influence adherence to antihypertensive medication among hypertensive employees. Methodology/Principal Findings We linked survey responses to nationwide pharmacy records for a cohort of 3515 hypertensive employees (mean age 53.9 years, 76% women) who required continuous antihypertensive drug therapy (the Finnish Public Sector study). A standard scale was used to measure workplace social capital from co-workers' assessments and self-reports in 2000–2004. Non-adherence to antihypertensive medication was determined based on the number of days-not-treated at the year following the survey using comprehensive prescription records. Negative binomial regression models were conducted adjusting for socio-demographic characteristics, duration of hypertension, behaviour-related risk factors, and co-morbid conditions. The overall rate of days-not-treated was 20.7 per person-year (78% had no days-not-treated). Higher age, obesity, and presence of somatic co-morbidities were all associated with better adherence, but this was not the case for co-worker-assessed or self-reported workplace social capital. The rate of days-not-treated was 19.7 per person-year in the bottom fourth of co-worker-assessed workplace social capital, compared to 20.4 in the top fourth. The corresponding rate ratio from the fully-adjusted model was 0.95 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.58–1.56). In a subgroup of 907 new users of antihypertensive medication this rate ratio was 0.98 (95% CI 0.42–2.29). Conclusions/Significance We found no consistent evidence to support the hypothesized effect of workplace social capital on adherence to drug therapy among employees with chronic hypertension. PMID:21931836

  14. The importance of community consultation and social support in adhering to an obesity reduction program: results from the Healthy Weights Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Lemstra, Mark; Rogers, Marla R

    2015-01-01

    having a family member or friend sign a social support contract (odds ratio 2.91, 95% confidence interval 1.01–8.34, P=0.047) and lower education (odds ratio 2.90, 95% confidence interval 1.20–7.03, P=0.018). Conclusion Comprehensive obesity reduction programs can be effective when there is extensive consultation at the community level and social support at the individual level. PMID:26508843

  15. Graphical Representations and Odds Ratios in a Distance-Association Model for the Analysis of Cross-Classified Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Rooij, Mark; Heiser, Willem J.

    2005-01-01

    Although RC(M)-association models have become a generally useful tool for the analysis of cross-classified data, the graphical representation resulting from such an analysis can at times be misleading. The relationships present between row category points and column category points cannot be interpreted by inter point distances but only through…

  16. The Interplay Among Preschool Child and Family Factors and the Development of ODD Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Elizabeth A.; Metcalfe, Lindsay A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The present study examined (a) the interactions between early behavior, early parenting, and early family adversity in predicting later ODD symptoms, and (b) the reciprocal relations between parent functioning and ODD symptoms across the preschool years. Method Participants were 258 3-year-old children (138 boys and 120 girls) and their parents from diverse backgrounds who participated in a 4-year longitudinal study. Results Early child behavior, parenting, and family adversity did not significantly interact in the predicted direction. Reciprocal relations between ODD symptoms and parent functioning were observed for maternal and paternal depression, and maternal warmth. Paternal laxness at age 4 predicted ODD symptoms at age 5 and paternal laxness at age 5 predicted ODD symptoms at age 6, but child ODD did not significantly predict paternal laxness. Conclusion Results suggest that ODD symptoms may develop through a transactional process between parent and child functioning across the preschool years. PMID:22530755

  17. Computational Tension Mapping of Adherent Cells Based on Actin Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Manifacier, Ian; Milan, Jean-Louis; Jeanneau, Charlotte; Chmilewsky, Fanny; Chabrand, Patrick; About, Imad

    2016-01-01

    Forces transiting through the cytoskeleton are known to play a role in adherent cell activity. Up to now few approaches haves been able to determine theses intracellular forces. We thus developed a computational mechanical model based on a reconstruction of the cytoskeleton of an adherent cell from fluorescence staining of the actin network and focal adhesions (FA). Our custom made algorithm converted the 2D image of an actin network into a map of contractile interactions inside a 2D node grid, each node representing a group of pixels. We assumed that actin filaments observed under fluorescence microscopy, appear brighter when thicker, we thus presumed that nodes corresponding to pixels with higher actin density were linked by stiffer interactions. This enabled us to create a system of heterogeneous interactions which represent the spatial organization of the contractile actin network. The contractility of this interaction system was then adapted to match the level of force the cell truly exerted on focal adhesions; forces on focal adhesions were estimated from their vinculin expressed size. This enabled the model to compute consistent mechanical forces transiting throughout the cell. After computation, we applied a graphical approach on the original actin image, which enabled us to calculate tension forces throughout the cell, or in a particular region or even in single stress fibers. It also enabled us to study different scenarios which may indicate the mechanical role of other cytoskeletal components such as microtubules. For instance, our results stated that the ratio between intra and extra cellular compression is inversely proportional to intracellular tension. PMID:26812601

  18. Computational Tension Mapping of Adherent Cells Based on Actin Imaging.

    PubMed

    Manifacier, Ian; Milan, Jean-Louis; Jeanneau, Charlotte; Chmilewsky, Fanny; Chabrand, Patrick; About, Imad

    2016-01-01

    Forces transiting through the cytoskeleton are known to play a role in adherent cell activity. Up to now few approaches haves been able to determine theses intracellular forces. We thus developed a computational mechanical model based on a reconstruction of the cytoskeleton of an adherent cell from fluorescence staining of the actin network and focal adhesions (FA). Our custom made algorithm converted the 2D image of an actin network into a map of contractile interactions inside a 2D node grid, each node representing a group of pixels. We assumed that actin filaments observed under fluorescence microscopy, appear brighter when thicker, we thus presumed that nodes corresponding to pixels with higher actin density were linked by stiffer interactions. This enabled us to create a system of heterogeneous interactions which represent the spatial organization of the contractile actin network. The contractility of this interaction system was then adapted to match the level of force the cell truly exerted on focal adhesions; forces on focal adhesions were estimated from their vinculin expressed size. This enabled the model to compute consistent mechanical forces transiting throughout the cell. After computation, we applied a graphical approach on the original actin image, which enabled us to calculate tension forces throughout the cell, or in a particular region or even in single stress fibers. It also enabled us to study different scenarios which may indicate the mechanical role of other cytoskeletal components such as microtubules. For instance, our results stated that the ratio between intra and extra cellular compression is inversely proportional to intracellular tension. PMID:26812601

  19. Facilitators and barriers to adherence to urate-lowering therapy in African-Americans with gout: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Limited literature exists for qualitative studies of medication adherence in gout, especially in African-Americans. The aim of this study was to examine the facilitators and barriers to adherence to urate-lowering therapy (ULT) in African-Americans with gout. Methods In this study, nine nominal groups lasting 1 to 1.5 hours each were conducted in African-Americans with gout, six with low ULT and three with high ULT adherence (medication possession ratios of <0.80 or ≥0.80, respectively). Patients presented, discussed, combined and rank ordered their concerns. A qualitative analysis was performed. Results This study included 43 patients with mean age 63.9 years (standard deviation, 9.9), 67% men, who participated in nine nominal groups (seven in men, two in women): African-American men (n = 30); African-American women (n = 13). The main facilitators to ULT adherence (three groups) were the recognition of the need to take ULT regularly to prevent gout flares, prevent pain from becoming chronic/severe and to have less dietary restriction; the lack of side effects from ULT; trust in physicians; and avoiding the need to seek emergent/urgent care for flares. Patients achieved high ULT adherence by organizing their pills using the pillbox and the incorporation of ULT intake into their routine to prevent forgetting. The main barriers to optimal ULT adherence were (six groups): doubts about effectiveness of ULT, concerns about cost and side effects, concomitant medications, forgetfulness, refilling the prescriptions on time, pill size and difficulty in swallowing, competing priorities, patient preference for alternative medicines (that is, cherry juice) and frequent travel. Conclusions Identification of facilitators and barriers to high ULT adherence in African-Americans with gout in this study lays the foundation for designing interventions to improve ULT adherence in racial minorities. PMID:24678765

  20. On World Religion Adherence Distribution Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ausloos, Marcel; Petroni, Filippo

    Religious adherence can be considered as a degree of freedom, in a statistical physics sense, for a human agent belonging to a population. The distribution, performance and life time of religions can thus be studied having in mind heterogeneous interacting agent modeling. We present a comprehensive analysis of 58 so-called religions (to be better defined in the main text) as measured through their number of adherents evolutions, between 1900 and 2000, - data taken from the World Christian Trends (Barrett and Johnson, "World Christian Trends AD 30 - AD 2200: Interpreting the Annual Christian Megacensus", William Carey Library, 2001): 40 are considered to be "presently growing" cases, including 11 turn overs in the twentieth century; 18 are "presently decaying", among which 12 are found to have had a recent maximum, in the nineteenth or the twentieth century. The Avrami-Kolmogorov differential equation which usually describes solid state transformations, like crystal growth, is used in each case in order to obtain the preferential attachment parameter introduced previously (Europhys Lett 77:38002, 2007). It is not often found close to unity, though often corresponding to a smooth evolution. However large values suggest the occurrence of extreme cases which we conjecture are controlled by so-called external fields. A few cases indicate the likeliness of a detachment process. We discuss a few growing and decaying religions, and illustrate various fits. Some cases seem to indicate the lack of reliability of the data, but others some marked departure from Avrami law. Whence the Avrami evolution equation might be surely improved, in particular, and somewhat obviously, for the decaying religion cases. We point out two major difficulties in such an analysis: (1) the "precise" original time of apparition of a religion, (2) the time at which there is a maximum number of adherents, both information being necessary for integrating reliably any evolution equation.

  1. Topography Influences Adherent Cell Regulation of Osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, M; Cooper, L F; Ogino, Y; Mendonca, D; Liang, R; Yang, S; Mendonca, G; Uoshima, K

    2016-03-01

    The importance of osteoclast-mediated bone resorption in the process of osseointegration has not been widely considered. In this study, cell culture was used to investigate the hypothesis that the function of implant-adherent bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in osteoclastogenesis is influenced by surface topography. BMSCs isolated from femur and tibia of Sprague-Dawley rats were seeded onto 3 types of titanium surfaces (smooth, micro, and nano) and a control surface (tissue culture plastic) with or without osteogenic supplements. After 3 to 14 d, conditioned medium (CM) was collected. Subsequently, rat bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) were cultured in media supplemented with soluble receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) as well as BMSC CM from each of the 4 surfaces. Gene expression levels of soluble RANKL, osteoprotegerin, tumor necrosis factor α, and M-CSF in cultured BMSCs at different time points were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The number of differentiated osteoclastic cells was determined after tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining. Analysis of variance and t test were used for statistical analysis. The expression of prominent osteoclast-promoting factors tumor necrosis factor α and M-CSF was increased by BMSCs cultured on both micro- and nanoscale titanium topographies (P < 0.01). BMSC CM contained a heat-labile factor that increased BMMs osteoclastogenesis. CM from both micro- and nanoscale surface-adherent BMSCs increased the osteoclast number (P < 0.01). Difference in surface topography altered BMSC phenotype and influenced BMM osteoclastogenesis. Local signaling by implant-adherent cells at the implant-bone interface may indirectly control osteoclastogenesis and bone accrual around endosseous implants. PMID:26553885

  2. Persisting with prevention: The importance of adherence for HIV prevention

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Helen A; Wasserheit, Judith N; Barnabas, Ruanne V; Hayes, Richard J; Abu-Raddad, Laith J

    2008-01-01

    Background Only four out of 31 completed randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of HIV prevention strategies against sexual transmission have shown significant efficacy. Poor adherence may have contributed to the lack of effect in some of these trials. In this paper we explore the impact of various levels of adherence on measured efficacy within an RCT. Analysis We used simple quantitative methods to illustrate the impact of various levels of adherence on measured efficacy by assuming a uniform population in terms of sexual behavior and the binomial model for the transmission probability per partnership. At 100% adherence the measured efficacy within an RCT is a reasonable approximation of the true biological efficacy. However, as adherence levels fall, the efficacy measured within a trial substantially under-estimates the true biological efficacy. For example, at 60% adherence, the measured efficacy can be less than half of the true biological efficacy. Conclusion Poor adherence during a trial can substantially reduce the power to detect an effect, and improved methods of achieving and maintaining high adherence within trials are needed. There are currently 12 ongoing HIV prevention trials, all but one of which require ongoing user-adherence. Attention must be given to methods of maximizing adherence when piloting and designing RCTs and HIV prevention programmes. PMID:18620578

  3. Adherence and receptor relationships of Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Calderone, R A; Braun, P C

    1991-01-01

    The cell surface of Candida albicans is composed of a variety of polysaccharides such as glucan, chitin, and mannan. The first two components primarily provide structure, while the mannan, often covalently linked to protein, constitutes the major antigen of the organism. Mannoproteins also have enzymatic activity (acid protease) and ligand-receptor functions. The complement receptors of C. albicans appear to be mannoproteins that are required for the adherence of the organism to endothelial cells. This is certainly true of the CR3-like protein of C. albicans. Proof that the CR3 is the Candida receptor for endothelial cells is derived from two observations. First, mutants lacking CR3 activity are less adherent in vitro and, in fact, less virulent. Second, the ligand recognized by the CR3 receptor (C3bi) as well as anti-CR3 antibodies blocks adherence of the organism to endothelial cells. The CR2 of C. albicans appears to promote the adherence of the organism to plastic substrates. Unlike the CR2 of mammalian cells, the Candida CR2 recognizes ligands containing the RGD sequence of amino acids in addition to the C3d ligand, which does not contain the RGD sequence. There is uncertainty as to whether the Candida CR2 and CR3 are, in fact, different proteins. A mannoprotein has also been described as the adhesin for epithelial cells. In this case, the receptor has a lectinlike activity and recognizes fucose- or glucosamine-containing glycoproteins of epithelial cells, depending on the strain of C. albicans. The oligosaccharide component of the receptor is probably not involved in ligand recognition and may serve to stabilize the receptor. However, the oligosaccharide factor 6 epitope of mannan may also provide adhesin activity in the recognition of epithelial cells. Mannoproteins can be extracted from cells by a number of reagents. Zymolyase, for instance, tends to remove structural mannoproteins, which contain relatively little protein and are linked to glucan. Reagents

  4. Medication adherence among transgender women living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Baguso, Glenda N; Gay, Caryl L; Lee, Kathryn A

    2016-08-01

    Medication adherence is linked to health outcomes among adults with HIV infection. Transgender women living with HIV (TWLWH) in the US report suboptimal adherence to medications and are found to have difficulty integrating HIV medication into their daily routine, but few studies explore the factors associated with medication adherence among transgender women. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to examine demographic and clinical factors related to self-reported medication adherence among transgender women. This secondary analysis is based on data collected from the Symptom and Genetic Study that included a convenience sample of 22 self-identified transgender women, 201 non-transgender men, and 72 non-transgender women recruited in northern California. Self-reported medication adherence was assessed using the AIDS Clinical Trials Group Adherence Questionnaire. Gender differences in demographic and clinical variables were assessed, as were differences between transgender women reporting high and low adherence. Transgender women had lower adherence to medications compared to non-transgender males and non-transgender females (p = .028) and were less likely to achieve viral suppression (p = .039). Within the transgender group, Black/African-Americans reported better adherence than participants who were Whites/Caucasian or other races (p = .009). Adherence among transgender women was unrelated to medication count and estrogen therapy, but consistent with other reports on the HIV population as a whole; transgender women with high adherence were more likely to achieve viral suppression compared to the transgender women with low adherence. Despite the high incidence of HIV infection in the transgender population, few studies focus on TWLWH, either in regard to their adherence to antiretroviral therapies or to their healthcare in general. To address ongoing health disparities, more studies are needed focusing on the transgender population's continuum of care in

  5. The Complex Relation between Bisphosphonate Adherence and Fracture Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Patrick, Amanda R.; Brookhart, M. Alan; Losina, Elena; Schousboe, John T.; Cadarette, Suzanne M.; Mogun, Helen; Solomon, Daniel H.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Real-world adherence to bisphosphonate therapy is poor. Consistent data support a relation between medication adherence and fracture reduction, but relatively little attention has been paid to the effect of the method used to measure adherence on this relation or on the relation between adherence and specific fracture types. Objective: Our objective was to assess the relation between bisphosphonate adherence and the risk of hip, vertebral, distal forearm, and any fracture using different measures of adherence. Design: We conducted a cohort study using administrative claims data. Adherence was assessed in sequential 60-d periods. In models incorporating time-varying measures of adherence, the adjusted relation between adherence and fracture was examined using several methods for calculating the proportion of days covered (PDC). Patients: Patients included community-dwelling elderly enrolled in a Pennsylvania pharmaceutical assistance program and Medicare initiating an oral bisphosphonate for osteoporosis. Main Outcome Measures: Risk of hip, vertebral, distal forearm, and any osteoporotic fracture was assessed. Results: Fractures occurred at a rate of 43 per 1000 person-years among the 19,987 patients meeting study eligibility criteria. There was an inverse relation between adherence and fracture rate for all adherence measures and fracture types, excluding distal forearm fractures. High (80–100%) cumulative PDC was associated with a 22% reduction in overall fracture rate, a 23% reduction in hip fracture rate, and 26% reduction in vertebral fracture rate. Conclusions: We found a consistent relation between adherence with osteoporosis treatment and fracture reduction, regardless of method for measuring PDC. The similarity in results across adherence measures is likely due to the high correlation between them. PMID:20444916

  6. Determinants of methotrexate adherence in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    De Cuyper, Ellen; De Gucht, Veronique; Maes, Stan; Van Camp, Yoleen; De Clerck, Luc S

    2016-05-01

    In rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, weekly intake of methotrexate (MTX) is the basic drug treatment. This observational study aims to investigate how many RA patients are adherent in terms of MTX intake and to identify determinants of non-adherence. Intake of MTX (orally or via injection) was recorded in 129 RA patients with an electronic monitoring system (MEMS(®)) during 16 weeks. In addition, two adherence questionnaires, the Medication Adherence Report Scale (MARS-5) and the Compliance-Questionnaire-Rheumatology (CQR) as well as a visual analogue scale (VAS) measuring MTX adherence, were administered to these patients. As possible determinants of adherence, data on demographics, disease and treatment characteristics, depression, illness cognitions, motivation, and social support were collected. Of all participants, 58 % were fully adherent and 75 % skipped at most one dose during 16 weeks. A better mental health status and suffering from comorbidities had a positive effect on adherence, while living alone had a negative effect. These three predictors explained 30 % of the variance in MTX adherence. Of the three self-report medication adherence measures, the VAS correlated the highest with the results of the electronic monitoring system (r = 0.552, p = 0.01). A relatively high adherence rate was observed in RA patients treated with MTX. The determinants identified by this study could be used to screen patients at risk for non-adherence. A simple VAS scale seems to be an acceptable way for a preliminary screening of MTX adherence. PMID:26781783

  7. Fission barriers for the emission of odd-numbered fragments from multicharged C{sub 60} prepared in Ar{sup 8+}-C{sub 60} collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, S.; Chen, L.; Bernard, J.; Buchet-Poulizac, M. C.; Wei, B.; Bredy, R.

    2006-01-15

    We report on measurements of the branching ratios of emission of small C{sub n}{sup +} fragments in asymmetrical fission of highly charged C{sub 60}{sup r+} ions (r=4-6). For the channels corresponding to the emission of one fragment, only small fragments with an even number of carbon atoms are observed. For the channels with the emission of two fragments, successive emission of small fragments with an odd number of carbon atoms has been observed with a surprisingly high branching ratio (30%). In order to reproduce the experimental branching ratios in the framework of a statistical evaporation model, the height of fission barriers for the emission of one odd numbered fragment has to be reduced at higher temperature in order to allow the opening of these channels that are forbidden at lower temperature.

  8. Odd-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in thraustochytrids.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kim Jye Lee; Mansour, Maged P; Dunstan, Graeme A; Blackburn, Susan I; Koutoulis, Anthony; Nichols, Peter D

    2011-08-01

    A series of unusual odd-chain fatty acids (OC-FA) were identified in two thraustochytrid strains, TC 01 and TC 04, isolated from waters off the south east coast of Tasmania, Australia. FA compositions were determined by capillary GC and GC-MS, with confirmation of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) structure performed by analysis of 4,4-dimethyloxazoline derivatives. PUFA constituted 68-74% of the total FA, with the essential PUFA; eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5ω3, EPA), arachidonic acid (20:4ω6, AA) and docosahexaenoic acid (22:6ω3, DHA), accounting for 42-44% of the total FA. High proportions of the saturated OC-FA 15:0 (7.1% in TC 01) and 17:0 (6.2% in TC 04) were detected. The OC-FA 17:1ω8 was present at 2.8% in TC 01. Of particular interest, the C₂₁ PUFA 21:5ω5 and 21:4ω7 were detected at 3.5% and 4.1%, respectively, in TC 04. A proposed biosynthesis pathway for these OC-PUFA is presented. It is possible that the unsaturated OC-PUFA found previously in a number of marine animals were derived from dietary thraustochytrids and they could be useful biomarkers in environmental and food web studies. PMID:21546043

  9. Decay Properties of N = 77 odd-Z Isotones

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelder, J. C.; Tantawy, M. N.; Danchev, M.; Hartley, D. J.; Mazzocchi, C.; Bingham, C. R.; Grzywacz, R.; Rykaczewski, K. P.; Gross, C. J.; Shapira, D.; Yu, C.-H.; Krolas, W.; Fong, D.; Hamilton, J. H.; Li, K.; Ramayya, A. V.; Ginter, T. N.; Stolz, A.; Hagino, K.; Karny, M.

    2007-11-30

    The systematics of the {pi}h{sub 11/2} x {nu}h{sub 11/2} and {pi}h{sub 11/2} x {nu}s{sub 1/2} isomeric configurations were studied for the odd-Z N = 77 isotones near the proton dripline. The spin and parity of I{sup {pi}} = 8{sup +} and 5{sup -} were deduced for the isomers in {sup 140}Eu and {sup 142}Tb. No evidence for the expected 1{sup +} ground-state was found in the {sup 144}Ho decay data. The proton emission from {sup 146}Tm was restudied and the spin and parity values of I{sup {pi}} = 10{sup +} and 5{sup -} were established for {sup 146m}Tm and {sup 146gs}Tm, respectively. The interpretation of the observed decay properties and structure of the proton-emitting states was made by accounting for deformation and proton and neutron coupling to the core excitations.

  10. Massive and massless higher spinning particles in odd dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastianelli, Fiorenzo; Bonezzi, Roberto; Corradini, Olindo; Latini, Emanuele

    2014-09-01

    We study actions for massive bosonic particles of higher spins by dimensionally reducing an action for massless particles. For the latter we take a model with a SO( N) extended local supersymmetry on the worldline, that is known to describe massless (conformal) particles of higher spins in flat spacetimes of even dimensions. Dimensional reduction produces an action for massive spinning particles in odd dimensions. The field equations that emerge in a quantization à la Dirac are shown to be equivalent to the Fierz-Pauli ones. The massless limit generates a multiplet of massless states with higher spins, whose first quantized field equations have a geometric form with fields belonging to various types of Young tableaux. These geometric equations can be partially integrated to show their equivalence with the standard Fronsdal-Labastida equations. We covariantize our model to check whether an extension to curved spacetimes can be achieved. Restricting to (A)dS spaces, we find that the worldline gauge algebra becomes nonlinear, but remains first class. This guarantees consistency on such backgrounds. A light cone analysis confirms the presence of the expected propagating degrees of freedom. A covariant analysis is worked out explicitly for the massive case, which is seen to give rise to the Fierz-Pauli equations extended to (A)dS spaces. It is worth noting that in D = 3 the massless limit of our model with N → ∞ has the same field content of the Vasiliev's theory that accommodates each spin exactly once.

  11. Explicit energy expansion for general odd-degree polynomial potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanayakkara, Asiri; Mathanaranjan, Thilagarajah

    2013-11-01

    In this paper we derive an almost explicit analytic formula for asymptotic eigenenergy expansion of arbitrary odd-degree polynomial potentials of the form V (x) = (ix)2N+1 + β1x2N + β2x2N-1 + ··· + β2Nx, where β‧k are real or complex for 1 ⩽ k ⩽ 2N. The formula can be used to find semiclassical analytic expressions for eigenenergies up to any order, very efficiently. Each term of the expansion is given explicitly as a multinomial of the parameters β1,β2… and β2N of the potential. Unlike in the even-degree polynomial case, the highest-order term in the potential is pure imaginary and hence the system is non-Hermitian. Therefore all the integrations have been carried out along a contour enclosing two complex branch points, which lies within a wedge in the complex plane. With the help of some examples we demonstrate the accuracy of the method for both real and complex eigenspectra.

  12. Strain-induced time-reversal odd superconductivity in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juricic, Vladimir; Roy, Bitan

    2014-03-01

    I will discuss the possibility of realizing a time-reversal-symmetry breaking superconducting state that exhibits an f + is pairing symmetry in strained graphene. Although the underlying attractive interactions need to be sufficiently strong and comparable in pristine graphene to support such pairing state, I will argue that strain can be conducive for its formation even for weak interactions. I will show that quantum-critical behavior near the transition is controlled by a fermionic multicritical point, characterized by various critical exponents computed in the framework of an ɛ-expansion near four spacetime dimensions. I will then discuss the scaling of the superconducting gap with the strain-induced axial pseudo-magnetic field. Furthermore, a vortex in this mixed superconducting state hosts a pair of Majorana fermions supporting a quartet of insulating and superconducting orders, among which quantum spin Hall topological insulator. Finally, I will mention some experimental signatures of this f + is time-reversal odd superconductor. These findings suggest that strained graphene could provide a platform for the realization of exotic superconducting states of Dirac fermions. VJ is supported by the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO).

  13. Succinate esters: odd-even effects in melting points.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Sumy; Sathishkumar, Ranganathan

    2014-10-01

    Dialkyl succinates show a pattern of alternating behavior in their melting points, as the number of C atoms in the alkane side chain increases, unlike in the dialkyl oxalates [Joseph et al. (2011). Acta Cryst. B67, 525-534]. Dialkyl succinates with odd numbers of C atoms in the alkyl side chain show higher melting points than the immediately adjacent analogues with even numbers. The crystal structures and their molecular packing have been analyzed for a series of dialkyl succinates with 1-4 C atoms in the alkyl side chain. The energy difference (ΔE) between the optimized and observed molecular conformations, density, Kitaigorodskii packing index (KPI) and C-H...O interactions are considered to rationalize this behavior. In contrast to the dialkyl oxalates where a larger number of moderately strong C-H...O interactions were characteristic of oxalates with elevated melting points, here the molecular packing and the density play a major role in raising the melting point. On moving from oxalate to succinate esters the introduction of the C2 spacer adds two activated H atoms to the asymmetric unit, resulting in the formation of stronger C-H...O hydrogen bonds in all succinates. As a result the crystallinity of long-chain alkyl substituted esters improves enormously in the presence of hydrogen bonds from activated donors. PMID:25274517

  14. Impact of a Prescription Copayment Increase on Lipid Lowering Medication Adherence in Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Doshi, Jalpa A.; Zhu, Jingsan; Lee, Bruce; Kimmel, Stephen; Volpp, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    Background In February 2002, the VA increased copayments from $2 to $7 per 30-day drug supply of each medication for many veterans. We examined the impact of the copayment increase on lipid lowering medication adherence. Methods and Results Quasi-experimental study using electronic records of 5,604 veterans receiving care at the Philadelphia VA Medical Center from November, 1999 to April, 2004. The “All Copayment” group included veterans subject to copayments for all drugs with no annual cap. Veterans subject to copayments for drugs only if indicated for a non-service connected condition with an annual cap of $840 for out-of-pocket costs comprised the “Some Copayment” group. Veterans who remained copayment exempt formed a natural control group (“No copayment” group). Patients were identified as “adherent” if the proportion of days covered (PDC) with lipid-lowering medications was >= 80%. Patients were identified as having a “continuous gap” if they had at least one continuous episode with no lipid lowering medications for >= 90 days. A difference-indifference approach comparing changes in lipid lowering medication adherence during the 24 months pre- and post- copayment increase among veterans subject to the copayment change versus those who were not. Adherence declined in all three groups after the copayment increase. However, the percent of patients who were adherent (PDC>=80%) declined significantly more in the all copayment (-19.2%) and some copayment (-19.3%) groups relative to the exempt group (-11.9%). The incidence of a continuous gap increased significantly at twice the rate in both copayment groups (+24.6% all copayment group and 24.1% some copayment group) than the exempt group (+11.7%). Compared to the exempt group, the odds of having a continuous gap in the post- relative to the pre-period were significantly higher in both the all copayment group (OR 3.04 95% CI 2.29-4.03) and the some copayment group (OR 1.85 95% CI 1

  15. Determinants of Medication Adherence to Topical Glaucoma Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dreer, Laura E.; Girkin, Christopher; Mansberger, Steven L.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction/Purpose To determine the associations between medical, demographic, socioeconomic, and ocular factors and adherence to topical glaucoma ocular hypotensive therapy. Methods One-hundred and sixteen patients with ocular hypertension or open angle glaucoma from two tertiary glaucoma services participated in this prospective study. Adherence to ocular hypotensive therapy was measured using an electronic dose monitor (Travatan Dosing Aid, Alcon Laboratories Inc., Fort Worth, TX) and collected data at 3-months after enrollment. We used 3 different definitions of adherence: 1) Definition 1: the proportion of days taking the prescribed number of drops within 3 hours of the prescribed dosing time; 2) Definition 2: the proportion of days taking any drops within 3 hours of the prescribed dosing time; and 3) Definition 3: the proportion of days taking any drops within 6 hours of the prescribed dosing time. Univariate and multivariate models were used to determine the association between the three adherence definitions, medical, demographic, socioeconomic, and ocular factors at 3-month follow-up. The main outcome measures for this study were risk factors for poor objective medication adherence. Results Adherence, using Definition 1, Definition 2, and Definition 3, was 64%, 75%, and 80%, respectively. Age, total number of other eye diseases, and race were significantly associated with full treatment adherence (Definition 1), with race alone significantly predicting 11% of full treatment adherence. For Definition 2, age, income, level of education, and total number of eye diseases were significantly associated with partial adherence (3 hours), again race alone significantly predicted 15% of partial adherence (any drops within 3 hours). For Definition 3, race, income, level of education, and total number of other eye diseases significantly predicted partial adherence (any drops within 6 hours), both race and income predicted 19% of partial treatment adherence

  16. Side effects, adherence self-efficacy, and adherence to antiretroviral treatment: a mediation analysis in a Chinese sample.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liying; Li, Xiaoming; Lin, Zhenping; Jacques-Tiura, Angela J; Xu, Jinping; Zhou, Yuejiao; Qiao, Shan; Shen, Zhiyong; Stanton, Bonita

    2016-07-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is a lifelong treatment. To date, ART adherence is suboptimal for most patients in resource-poor settings. Previous research indicates that medication side effects are perceived to be a significant barrier of high ART adherence. Data regarding the role of adherence self-efficacy in mediating the relationship between side effects from ART and adherence to ART are limited; thus, this study examines this potential mediational role of self-efficacy. A cross-sectional survey of 2987 people living with HIV aged ≥18 years was conducted in 2012-2013 in Guangxi Autonomous Region (Guangxi) which has one of the fastest-growing HIV rates in China. Of the total sample, 2146 (72.1%) participants had initiated ART. Participants reported the number of days of completing the daily dose of ART in the past month; adherence was defined as completing the daily dose at least 28 days in the last month (≥90%). Side effects were significantly negatively related to adherence to ART. Mediation analyses indicated that adherence self-efficacy significantly mediated the side effects-adherence relationship. Future interventions to increase adherence self-efficacy and effective coping with side effects among HIV patients are needed in order to improve their ART adherence. PMID:27010870

  17. Adherence of oral streptococci to salivary glycoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, P A; Prakobphol, A; Lee, T; Hoover, C I; Fisher, S J

    1992-01-01

    We used an overlay method to study the ability of human salivary glycoproteins to serve as receptors for several strains of streptococci that colonize the oral cavity. Parotid and submandibular-sublingual salivas were collected as ductal secretions, separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and transferred to nitrocellulose membranes. The resulting blots were overlaid with [35S]methionine-labeled bacteria, and salivary components to which the bacteria bound were detected by autoradiography. Potential glycoprotein receptors were identified for 8 of the 16 strains tested. In three cases (Streptococcus sanguis 72-40 and 804 and Streptococcus sobrinus OMZ176), highly specific interactions with a single salivary component were detected. Removal of sialic acid residues from the low-molecular-weight salivary mucin prevented adherence of one of these strains (S. sanguis 72-40), suggesting that this saccharide either mediates binding or is a critical component of the receptor site. In the remaining five strains (Streptococcus gordonii G9B and 10558, S. sanguis 10556, and Streptococcus oralis 10557 and 72-41), interactions with multiple salivary components, including the low-molecular-weight salivary mucin, highly glycosylated proline-rich glycoproteins, and alpha-amylase, were detected. These results suggest that some oral streptococci can bind specifically to certain of the salivary glycoproteins. The interactions identified may play an important role in governing bacterial adherence and clearance within the oral cavity. Images PMID:1729194

  18. First Evidence for the Existence of Odd Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes (TAEs) from the Simultaneous Observation of Even and Odd TAEs on the Joint European Torus

    SciTech Connect

    G.J. Kramer; S.E. Sharapov; R. Nazikian; N.N. Gorelenkov; R. Budny; JET-EFDA contributors

    2003-01-15

    Experimental evidence is presented for the existence of the theoretically predicted odd Torodicity-induced Alfven Eigenmode (TAEs) from the simultaneous appearance of odd and even TAEs in a normal shear discharge. The modes are observed in low central magnetic shear plasmas created by injecting lower hybrid current drive. A fast ion population was created by applying ion cyclotron heating at the high field side to excite the TAEs in the weak magnetic shear region. The odd TAEs were identified from their frequency, mode number, and timing relative to the even TAEs.

  19. [Strategies for measuring medication adherence in patients with schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunfang; Huang, Zhiping; Xu, Dong; Gong, Wenjie; Tang, Yuan; Xiao, Shuiyuan

    2016-02-01

    Long-term therapy should be administrated for patients with schizophrenia and the medication adherence is very important for the prognosis and outcome in these patients. In this study, we screened the literatures from various databases in accordance with our search criteria. A total of 11 literatures with the results of reliability and validity regarding the measurement of schizophrenia medication adherence were enrolled in our analysis. Based on the measurements, they were classified into subjective methods and objective ones. The objective methods include blood plasma and urine concentrations, pharmacy records, pill counts and Medication Event Monitoring System. The subjective methods include Drug Attitude Inventory, Rating of Medication Influences Scale, Brief Evaluation of Medication Influences and Beliefs, the Brief Adherence Rating Scale, Medication Adherence Rating Scale, and Morisky scales. In general, single method for measuring medication adherence in patients with schizophrenia is limited. We recommend researchers to use 2 or more methods when measuring the medication adherence in patients with schizophrenia. PMID:26932222

  20. Nuclear Shell Structure and Beta Decay I. Odd A Nuclei II. Even A Nuclei

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Mayer, M.G.; Moszkowski, S.A.; Nordheim, L.W.

    1951-05-01

    In Part I a systematics is given of all transitions for odd A nuclei for which sufficiently reliable data are available. The allowed or forbidden characters of the transitions are correlated with the positions of the initial and final odd nucleon groups in the nuclear shell scheme. The nuclear shells show definite characteristics with respect to parity of the ground states. The latter is the same as the one obtained from known spins and magnetic moments in a one-particle interpretation. In Part II a systematics of the beta transitions of even-A nuclei is given. An interpretation of the character of the transitions in terms of nuclear shell structure is achieved on the hypothesis that the odd nucleon groups have the same structure as in odd-A nuclei, together with a simple coupling rule between the neutron and proton groups in odd-odd nuclei.

  1. Heart failure patient adherence: epidemiology, cause, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Corotto, Paul S; McCarey, Melissa M; Adams, Suzanne; Khazanie, Prateeti; Whellan, David J

    2013-01-01

    Poor adherence to therapeutic regimens is a significant impediment to improving clinical outcomes in the HF population. Typical rates of adherence to prescribed medications, low-sodium diets, and aerobic exercise programs remain lower than that needed to decrease morbidity and mortality associated with HF. Factors contributing to poor adherence include multiple comorbidities, clinical depression, and decreased cognitive functioning. HF education and programs to enhance self-management skills have improved patient quality of life but have yet to decrease mortality or rehospitalization rates significantly. Telemonitoring to improve adherence behaviors and self-management interventions within broader HF management programs have demonstrated significant clinical improvements in this population. PMID:23168317

  2. Adherence in the CAPRISA 004 Tenofovir Gel Microbicide Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mansoor, Leila E

    2014-01-01

    High adherence is key to microbicide effectiveness. Here we provide a description of adherence interventions and the adherence rates achieved in the CAPRISA 004 Tenofovir Gel Trial. Adherence support for the before-and-after dosing strategy (BAT 24) was provided at enrolment and at each monthly study visit. This initially comprised individual counselling and was replaced midway by a structured theory-based adherence support program (ASP) based on motivational interviewing. The 889 women were followed for an average of 18 months and attended a total of 17031 monthly visits. On average women reported 5 sex acts and returned 5.9 empty applicators per month. The adherence rate based on applicator count in relation to all reported sex acts was 72.2% compared to the 82.0% self-reported adherence during the last sex act. Adherence support activities, which achieve levels of adherence similar to or better than those achieved by the CAPRISA 004 ASP, will be critical to the success of future microbicide trials. PMID:24643315

  3. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy: are we doing enough?

    PubMed

    Read, T; Mijch, A; Fairley, C K

    2003-01-01

    Adherence to antiretroviral therapy is a powerful predictor of response to therapy. For optimal antiretroviral therapy response, individuals need to take more than 95% of their prescribed medication. The most widely used method for measuring adherence is self-report of the number of missed doses and this should be done at every clinic visit. There are several well-recognized predictors of poor adherence, such as illicit drug use, depression, limited knowledge or ambivalence about starting treatment. Adherence can be improved by addressing these issues or through other means such as pill boxes or electronic reminders. PMID:12752896

  4. Comparative adherence of granulocytes to endothelial monolayers and nylon fiber.

    PubMed

    MacGregor, R R; Macarak, E J; Kefalides, N A

    1978-03-01

    Adherence of granulocytes to tissue culture monolayers of endothelium averaged 26.2 +/- 1.3% SEM, which was similar to their adherence on 50-mg nylon fiber columns (27.7 +/- 3.6%). In contrast, adherence to epithelial cells, fibroblasts, kidney cells, and plastic Petri dishes without monolayers was only 12.4, 9.9, 11.1, and 4.3%, respectively. Cyclic nucleotides and adherence-modifying plasma factors induced changes of adherence to endothelium similar to those in nylon fiber columns. Adherence of granulocytes in whole blood was the same as for purified granulocytes in Hank's balanced salt solution. Exposure of endothelial monolayers to 0.18% trypsin for 10 min reduced subsequent granulocyte adherence to 25.2% of control values. Incubation of trypsin-treated monolayers with nutrient medium for 4 h did not improve adherence, but values returned to normal or above by 24 h, with or without serum proteins present in the nutrient medium. The similarity of granulocyte adherence to nylon fiber and to endothelial monolayers in vitro suggests that results with the nylon fiber assay reflect in vivo granulocyte-endothelium interaction. Furthermore, the endothelial monolayer offers a new model for studying this cell-cell relationship in vitro. PMID:641148

  5. Understanding patient management: the need for medication adherence and persistence.

    PubMed

    Chia, Yc

    2008-01-01

    Poor patient adherence to medication is one of the major factors contributing to poor disease control, in particular in asymptomatic chronic diseases like hypertension and dyslipidaemia. The physical and economic burden on patients and the health care system as a result of non-adherence is great. It is estimated that poor adherence to hypertension medication accounts for as many as 7.1 million preventable deaths annually. Hence recognising and identifying non-adherence is the first step to addressing this problem. Medication adherence can be measured in various ways including self-report to electronic monitoring. In order to be more successful in managing non-adherence, attention must be paid to barriers to adherence, namely the interplay of patient factors, the health care providers themselves and the health care system itself. Taking these into account will probably have the greatest impact on improving medication adherence. Consequently strategies to help overcome these barriers are of paramount importance. Some of these strategies will include education of patients, improving communication between patients and health care providers, improving dose scheduling, providing drugs with less adverse effects, and improving accessibility to health care. Poor mediation adherence continues to be a huge challenge. While the patient is ultimately responsible for the taking of medication, good communication, involving the patient in decision making about their care and simplifying drug regimens go a long way in improving it. PMID:25606104

  6. Pharmacists' perspectives on monitoring adherence to treatment in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Karen; Ryan, Cristín; Downey, Damian G

    2016-04-01

    Background Cystic Fibrosis (CF) management requires complex treatment regimens but adherence to treatment is poor and has negative health implications. There are various methods of measuring adherence, but little is known regarding the extent of adherence measurement in CF centres throughout the UK and Ireland. Objective To determine the adherence monitoring practices in CF centres throughout the UK and Ireland, and to establish CF pharmacists' views on these practices. Setting UK and Ireland Cystic Fibrosis Pharmacists' Group's annual meeting (2014). Methods A questionnaire was designed, piloted and distributed to pharmacists attending the UK and Ireland Cystic Fibrosis Pharmacists' Group's annual meeting (2014). The main outcome measures were the methods of inhaled/nebulised antibiotic supply and the methods used to measure treatment adherence in CF centres. The questionnaire also ascertained the demographic information of participating pharmacists. Closed question responses were analysed using descriptive statistics. Open questions were analysed using content analysis. Results Twenty-one respondents (84 % response) were included in the analysis and were mostly from English centres (66.7 %). Detailed records of patients receiving their inhaled/nebulised antibiotics were lacking. Adherence was most commonly described to be measured at 'every clinic visit' (28.6 %) and 'occasionally' (28.6 %). Patient self-reported adherence was the most commonly used method of measuring adherence in practice (90.5 %). The availability of electronic adherence monitoring in CF centres did not guarantee its use. Pharmacists attributed an equal professional responsibility for adherence monitoring in CF to Consultants, Nurses and Pharmacists. Seventy-six percent of pharmacists felt that the current adherence monitoring practices within their own unit were inadequate and associated with the absence of sufficient specialist CF pharmacist involvement. Many suggested that greater

  7. A Higher Adherence to a Mediterranean-Style Diet Is Inversely Associated with the Development of Frailty in Community-Dwelling Elderly Men and Women12

    PubMed Central

    Talegawkar, Sameera A.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Bandeen-Roche, Karen; Chen, Ping; Milaneschi, Yuri; Tanaka, Toshiko; Semba, Richard D.; Guralnik, Jack M.; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2012-01-01

    Adherence to a Mediterranean-style diet is associated with a lower risk for mortality, cognitive decline, and dementia. Whether adherence to a Mediterranean-style diet protects against age-related frailty is unclear. Therefore, our objective was to examine the association between a Mediterranean-style diet with the risk of frailty in community-dwelling older persons. We conducted longitudinal analyses using data from 690 community-living persons (≥65 y) who were randomly selected from a population registry in Tuscany, Italy. Participants of the Invecchiare in Chianti study of aging completed the baseline examination in 1998–2000 and were re-examined at least once over 6 y. Adherence to a Mediterranean-style diet (scored 0–9, modeled categorically as ≤3, 4–5, and ≥6) was computed from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and nutrition FFQ previously validated in this cohort. Frailty was defined as having at least 2 of the following criteria: poor muscle strength, feeling of exhaustion, low walking speed, and low physical activity. After a 6-y follow-up, higher adherence (score ≥6) to a Mediterranean-style diet was associated with lower odds of developing frailty [OR = 0.30 (95% CI: 0.14, 0.66)] compared with those with lower adherence (score ≤3). A higher adherence to a Mediterranean-style diet at baseline was also associated with a lower risk of low physical activity (OR = 0.62; 95% CI: 0.40, 0.96) and low walking speed [OR = 0.48 (95% CI: 0.27, 0.86)] but not with feelings of exhaustion and poor muscle strength. In community-dwelling older adults, higher adherence to a Mediterranean-style diet was inversely associated with the development of frailty. PMID:23096005

  8. Medical costs and adherence in patients receiving aqueous versus pressurized aerosol formulations of intranasal corticosteroids.

    PubMed

    Hankin, Cheryl S; Cox, Linda; Lang, David; Bronstone, Amy; Wang, Zhaohui; Lepore, Mark S; Buck, Philip O

    2012-01-01

    Intranasal corticosteroid (INS) formulations have different sensory attributes that influence patient preferences, and thereby possibly adherence and health outcomes. This study compares health care use and costs and medication adherence in matched cohorts of patients with allergic rhinitis (AR) using a chlorofluorocarbon-propelled pressurized metered-dose inhaler (pMDI) or aqueous intranasal corticosteroid (A-INS). Florida Medicaid retrospective claims analysis was performed of enrollees aged ≥12 years with at least 1 year of continuous enrollment before their initial AR diagnosis, 1 year for continuous enrollment before their index INS claim, and 18 months of continuous enrollment after their index INS claim during which they received either pMDI or A-INS. pMDI and A-INS patients were matched 1:2 using propensity scores. Nonparametric analyses compared outcomes between matched cohorts at 6, 12, and 18 months of follow-up. A total of 585 patients were matched (pMDI = 195, A-INS = 390). pMDI patients were more adherent to INS, as reflected in their higher median medication possession ratio (53.2% versus 32.7%; p < 0.0001) and fewer median days between fills (73 days versus 111 days; p = 0.0003). Significantly lower median per patient pharmacy fills (34.0 versus 50.5; p < 0.05) and costs ($1282 versus $2178; p < 0.01) were observed among pMDI patients versus A-INS patients 18 months after INS initiation and were maintained when analyses excluded INS fills. Adherence to INS and health care utilization and costs following INS initiation for AR differed by type of formulation received. Our findings suggest patient preferences for INS sensory attributes can drive adherence and affect disease control, and ultimately impact health care costs. PMID:22737709

  9. Adherence of Streptococcus salivarius HB and HB-7 to oral surfaces and saliva-coated hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed Central

    Weerkamp, A H; McBride, B C

    1980-01-01

    We compared the binding of Streptococcus salivarius HB and the mutant HB-7 to oral surfaces in vivo. Mutant HB-7 does not aggregate with saliva nor does it bind to buccal epithelium, but it does retain its ability to coaggregate with Veillonella and Fusobacterium. At 1 h after inoculation into the oral cavity of six volunteers, significantly more S. salivarius HB than HB-7 cells were found adhering to the buccal mucosa (P < 0.05) and to a cleaned tooth surface (P < 0.01); there was no significant difference in the numbers adhering to the tongue. The ratio of HB to HB-7 on the tongue increased in samples taken 1, 3, and 9 days after inoculation. The average time required to clear the mutant HB-7 from the oral cavity was 7 days, whereas that for the parent HB was greater than 20 days, and in some cases strain HB was still present 3 months after its inoculation. A representative S. salivarius serotype II strain, designated T3, behaved similarly to mutant HB-7 with respect to its adherence to the buccal mucosa. Strain HB adhered better to hydroxyapatite treated with human saliva than mutant HB-7; both strains adhered in similar numbers to untreated hydroxyapatite. Hydroxyapatite treated with rat saliva bound less HB than hydroxyapatite treated with human saliva, corresponding to the lower aggregating activity of rat saliva. Extraction of saliva with aggregating strains of S. salivarius reduced the ability of saliva to mediate attachment of strain HB to hydroxyapatite. PMID:7439971

  10. Experimental Identification of Intruder Bandheads in Odd-Mass {sup 187-193}Pb

    SciTech Connect

    A.N. Andreyev; J.F.C. Cocks; O. Dorvaux; K. Eskola; P. Greenlees; P. Jones; R. Julin; S. Juutinen; K. Helariutta; M. Huyse; H. Kettunen; P. Kuusiniemi; M. Leino; M. Muikku; W.H. Trzaska; K. Van de Vel; P. Van Duppen; R. Wyss

    1999-12-31

    Fine-structure {alpha}-decays of the odd mass {sup 191-197}Po identifying proton based intruder states in the daughter lead nuclei have been observed, leading to a systematics of intruder states in odd mass lead isotopes from {sup 197}Pb down to {sup 187}Pb. The interpretation of these states involves the coupling of the i{sub 13/2} or p{sub 3/2} odd neutron to the oblate deformed even lead core.

  11. Experimental identification of intruder bandheads in odd-mass {sup 187-193}Pb

    SciTech Connect

    Andreyev, A. N.; Huyse, M.; Van de Vel, K.; Van Duppen, P.; Cocks, J. F. C.; Dorvaux, O.; Greenlees, P.; Jones, P.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Helariutta, K.; Kettunen, H.; Kuusiniemi, P.; Leino, M.; Muikku, M.; Trzaska, W. H.; Eskola, K.; Wyss, R.

    1999-11-16

    Fine-structure {alpha}-decays of the odd mass {sup 191-197}Po identifying proton based intruder states in the daughter lead nuclei have been observed, leading to a systematics of intruder states in odd mass lead isotopes from {sup 197}Pb down to {sup 187}Pb. The interpretation of these states involves the coupling of the i{sub 13/2} or p{sub 3/2} odd neutron to the oblate deformed even lead core.

  12. Improving adherence to antiretroviral therapy in sub-Saharan African HIV-positive populations: an enhanced adherence package.

    PubMed

    Kunutsor, S; Walley, J; Muchuro, S; Katabira, E; Balidawa, H; Namagala, E; Ikoona, E

    2012-01-01

    With the increasing access to antiretroviral therapy in sub-Saharan African HIV-positive populations, it is important to find additional simple, effective, and feasible methods of improving and maintaining adequately high levels of adherence. In this study, we undertook the development, testing, implementation, and evaluation of various adherence support interventions at four sites in Uganda. A one-group pre- and post-intervention design was employed under routine operational conditions. Various adherence support strategies were identified, adapted, and developed. These strategies which included a combination of elements such as counseling, group education, leaflets, late attendee tracing, and adherence diaries was implemented for an antiretroviral treatment cohort which had baseline levels of adherence measured preintervention. Follow-up was from August 2009 through August 2010. Mean adherence and proportions of clients achieving adherence levels of 95% and above were determined at end of follow-up. Of the 967 participants enrolled, 856 (88.5%) completed follow-up. A before-and-after comparison of outcomes demonstrated that mean adherence (95% confidence interval [CI]) improved statistically significant from baseline following implementation of the interventions (97.4% [96.9-97.9%] to 99.1% [99.0-99.3%], P=0.001). There was also a significant difference between proportions with optimal (≥ 95%) and suboptimal adherence (<95%) pre- and post-intervention (7.0% difference, 95% CI: 4.6-9.4%, P<0.001). We conclude that additional adherence strategies (including counseling, group education, leaflets, late attendee tracing, and adherence diaries) can substantially improve and maintain high levels of treatment adherence in the long term. Health systems in sub-Saharan African countries should consider integrating these elements into their treatment programs for HIV/AIDS. PMID:22621288

  13. Provider-Focused Intervention Increases Adherence-Related Dialogue, But Does Not Improve Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence in Persons with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Ira B.; Laws, M. Barton; Safren, Steven A.; Lee, Yoojin; Lu, Minyi; Coady, William; Skolnik, Paul R.; Rogers, William H.

    2010-01-01

    Background Physicians' limited knowledge of patients' antiretroviral adherence may reduce their ability to perform effective adherence counseling. Methods We conducted a randomized, cross-over study of an intervention to improve physicians' knowledge of patients' antiretroviral adherence. The intervention was a report given to the physician prior to a routine office visit that included data on: MEMS and self-reported data on antiretroviral adherence, patients' beliefs about antiretroviral therapy, reasons for missed doses, alcohol and drug use, and depression. We audio-recorded one intervention and one control visit for each patient to analyze differences in adherence related dialogue. Results 156 patients were randomized, and 106 completed all 5 study visits. Paired audio-recorded visits were available for 58 patients. Using a linear regression model that adjusted for site and baseline MEMS adherence, adherence following intervention visits did not differ significantly from control visits (2.0% higher, p=0.31, 95% CI -1.95% – 5.9%). There was a trend toward more total adherence-related utterances (median of 76 vs. 49.5, p=0.07) and a significant increase in utterances about the current regimen (median of 51.5 vs. 32.5, p=0.0002) in intervention compared with control visits. However less than 10% of adherence-related utterances were classified as “problem solving” in content, and one third of physicians' problem solving utterances were directive in nature. Conclusions Receipt of a detailed report prior to clinic visits containing data about adherence and other factors did not improve patients' antiretroviral adherence. Analyses of patient-provide dialogue suggests that providers who care for persons with HIV may benefit from training in adherence counseling techniques. PMID:20048680

  14. Prognostic Significance of Neutrophil-to-Lymphocyte Ratio in Colorectal Liver Metastasis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Aiqun; Lu, Wenping; Xiang, Canhong; Dong, Jiahong

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Inflammation is deemed to play critical roles in tumor progression and metastasis, and an increased neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) has been reported to correlate with poor survivals in various malignancies. However, association between NLR elevation and survival outcome in patients with colorectal liver metastasis (CRLM) remains controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic significance of elevated NLR in CRLM. Methods The meta-analysis was conducted in adherence to the MOOSE guidelines. PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, Web of Science and the Chinese SinoMed were systematically searched to identify eligible studies from the initiation of the databases to May, 2016. Overall survival (OS) and recurrence free survival (RFS) were pooled by using hazard ratio (HR) with corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI). Correlation between NLR values and clinicopathological features was synthesized by using odds ratio (OR) with corresponding 95% CI. Results A total of 1685 patients from 8 studies (9 cohorts) were analyzed, consisting 347 (20.59%) in high pretreatment NLR value group and 1338 (79.41%) in low pretreatment NLR value one. The results demonstrated that elevated pretreatment NLR was significantly related to poor OS (HR 2.17, 95% CI 1.82–2.58) and RFS (HR 1.96, 95% CI 1.64–2.35) in patients with CRLM. Conclusion The result of this systematic review and meta-analysis indicated that an elevated pretreatment NLR was closely correlated with poor long-term survival (OS and RFS) in CRLM patients. NLR can be routinely monitored and serve as a useful and cost-effective marker with strong prognostic significance in patients with CRLM. PMID:27427969

  15. Optical painting and fluorescence activated sorting of single adherent cells labelled with photoswitchable Pdots.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chun-Ting; Thompson, Alison M; Gallina, Maria Elena; Ye, Fangmao; Johnson, Eleanor S; Sun, Wei; Zhao, Mengxia; Yu, Jiangbo; Wu, I-Che; Fujimoto, Bryant; DuFort, Christopher C; Carlson, Markus A; Hingorani, Sunil R; Paguirigan, Amy L; Radich, Jerald P; Chiu, Daniel T

    2016-01-01

    The efficient selection and isolation of individual cells of interest from a mixed population is desired in many biomedical and clinical applications. Here we show the concept of using photoswitchable semiconducting polymer dots (Pdots) as an optical 'painting' tool, which enables the selection of certain adherent cells based on their fluorescence, and their spatial and morphological features, under a microscope. We first develop a Pdot that can switch between the bright (ON) and dark (OFF) states reversibly with a 150-fold contrast ratio on irradiation with ultraviolet or red light. With a focused 633-nm laser beam that acts as a 'paintbrush' and the photoswitchable Pdots as the 'paint', we select and 'paint' individual Pdot-labelled adherent cells by turning on their fluorescence, then proceed to sort and recover the optically marked cells (with 90% recovery and near 100% purity), followed by genetic analysis. PMID:27118210

  16. Optical painting and fluorescence activated sorting of single adherent cells labelled with photoswitchable Pdots

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Chun-Ting; Thompson, Alison M.; Gallina, Maria Elena; Ye, Fangmao; Johnson, Eleanor S.; Sun, Wei; Zhao, Mengxia; Yu, Jiangbo; Wu, I-Che; Fujimoto, Bryant; DuFort, Christopher C.; Carlson, Markus A.; Hingorani, Sunil R.; Paguirigan, Amy L.; Radich, Jerald P.; Chiu, Daniel T.

    2016-01-01

    The efficient selection and isolation of individual cells of interest from a mixed population is desired in many biomedical and clinical applications. Here we show the concept of using photoswitchable semiconducting polymer dots (Pdots) as an optical ‘painting' tool, which enables the selection of certain adherent cells based on their fluorescence, and their spatial and morphological features, under a microscope. We first develop a Pdot that can switch between the bright (ON) and dark (OFF) states reversibly with a 150-fold contrast ratio on irradiation with ultraviolet or red light. With a focused 633-nm laser beam that acts as a ‘paintbrush' and the photoswitchable Pdots as the ‘paint', we select and ‘paint' individual Pdot-labelled adherent cells by turning on their fluorescence, then proceed to sort and recover the optically marked cells (with 90% recovery and near 100% purity), followed by genetic analysis. PMID:27118210

  17. Elastohydrodynamics of contact in adherent sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Andreas; Mandre, Shreyas; Mahadevan, L.

    2015-11-01

    The dynamics of contact between a thin elastic film and a solid arises in many scientific and engineering applications, from the simple saran-wrap to cellular adhesion to grounding lines in ice sheets. Here, we use a mathematical description of the multi-scale processes associated with microscopic adhesion, fluid flow and elastic thin film deformation to deduce the dynamics of the onset of adhesion, as well as the speed and the shape of the adhesion zone. Our analysis is consistent with prior experimental observations, provides new testable predictions for the shape, size and dynamics of adherent contact in thin sheets and in addition provides a broadly applicable prescription for the boundary conditions at elastic contact lines.

  18. Pure odd-order oscillators with constant excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cveticanin, L.

    2011-02-01

    In this paper the excited vibrations of a truly nonlinear oscillator are analyzed. The excitation is assumed to be constant and the nonlinearity is pure (without a linear term). The mathematical model is a second-order nonhomogeneous differential equation with strong nonlinear term. Using the first integral, the exact value of period of vibration i.e., angular frequency of oscillator described with a pure nonlinear differential equation with constant excitation is analytically obtained. The closed form solution has the form of gamma function. The period of vibration depends on the value of excitation and of the order and coefficient of the nonlinear term. For the case of pure odd-order-oscillators the approximate solution of differential equation is obtained in the form of trigonometric function. The solution is based on the exact value of period of vibration. For the case when additional small perturbation of the pure oscillator acts, the so called 'Cveticanin's averaging method' for a truly nonlinear oscillator is applied. Two special cases are considered: one, when the additional term is a function of distance, and the second, when damping acts. To prove the correctness of the method the obtained results are compared with those for the linear oscillator. Example of pure cubic oscillator with constant excitation and linear damping is widely discussed. Comparing the analytically obtained results with exact numerical ones it is concluded that they are in a good agreement. The investigations reported in the paper are of special interest for those who are dealing with the problem of vibration reduction in the oscillator with constant excitation and pure nonlinear restoring force the examples of which can be found in various scientific and engineering systems. For example, such mechanical systems are seats in vehicles, supports for machines, cutting machines with periodical motion of the cutting tools, presses, etc. The examples can be find in electronics

  19. Adherence to immunosuppression: a prospective diary study.

    PubMed

    Gordon, E J; Prohaska, T R; Gallant, M P; Siminoff, L A

    2007-12-01

    Immunosuppression adherence among kidney transplant recipients is essential for graft survival. However, nonadherence is common, jeopardizing graft survival. Besides skipping dosages, little is known about other forms of medication nonadherence and their underlying reasons. This study sought to examine patients' extent of medication adherence over time and reasons for nonadherence. Thirty-nine new kidney transplant recipients were asked to complete a month-long medication-taking diary that included reporting medication nonadherence such as skipped medications, medications taken early or late, taking dosages greater or less than prescribed, and the reason for each occurrence of nonadherence. Of the 20 (51%) patients who completed the diary, 11 (55%) reported at least 1 form of nonadherence. Eleven patients reported taking their immunosuppression at least 1 hour later than the prescribed time, 1 patient reported skipping medication, but no patients reported changing the dosage on their own. Immunosuppression was taken on average 1.5 hours after the prescribed time. Of those patients who took their medications late, there were on average 3.1 occasions of taking it late. The most common reasons for this behavior included health care-related issues, followed by oversleeping, being away from home, work-related barriers, and forgetting. The majority of kidney transplant recipients took medications later than prescribed during 1 month. Future research should determine the clinical impact on graft function of late administration of immunosuppression. Interventions should be designed to better assist kidney recipients with taking medications on time, especially when they are away from home. PMID:18089327

  20. Sharing Physician Notes Through an Electronic Portal is Associated With Improved Medication Adherence: Quasi-Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Darer, Jonathan; Tang, Xiaoqin; Thompson, Jason; Tusing, Lorraine; Fossa, Alan; Delbanco, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Background In surveys, interviews, and focus groups, patients taking medications and offered Web portal access to their primary care physicians’ (PCPs) notes report improved adherence to their regimens. However, objective confirmation has yet to be reported. Objective To evaluate the association between patient Internet portal access to primary care physician visit notes and medication adherence. Methods This study is a retrospective comparative analysis at one site of the OpenNotes quasi-experimental trial. The setting includes primary care practices at the Geisinger Health System (GHS) in Danville, Pennsylvania. Participants include patients 18 years of age or older with electronic portal access, GHS primary care physicians, and Geisinger health plan insurance, and taking at least one antihypertensive or antihyperlipidemic agent from March 2009 to June 2011. Starting in March 2010, intervention patients were invited and reminded to read their PCPs' notes. Control patients also had Web portal access throughout, but their PCPs' notes were not available. From prescription claims, adherence was assessed by using the proportion of days covered (PDC). Patients with a PDC ≥.80