Science.gov

Sample records for adherens junction aj

  1. Dynamics of adherens junctions in epithelial establishment, maintenance, and remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Baum, Buzz

    2011-01-01

    The epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin)–catenin complex binds to cytoskeletal components and regulatory and signaling molecules to form a mature adherens junction (AJ). This dynamic structure physically connects neighboring epithelial cells, couples intercellular adhesive contacts to the cytoskeleton, and helps define each cell’s apical–basal axis. Together these activities coordinate the form, polarity, and function of all cells in an epithelium. Several molecules regulate AJ formation and integrity, including Rho family GTPases and Par polarity proteins. However, only recently, with the development of live-cell imaging, has the extent to which E-cadherin is actively turned over at junctions begun to be appreciated. This turnover contributes to junction formation and to the maintenance of epithelial integrity during tissue homeostasis and remodeling. PMID:21422226

  2. CCL2 disrupts the adherens junction: implications for neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Toni K; Eugenin, Eliseo A; Lopez, Lillie; Romero, Ignacio A; Weksler, Babette B; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Berman, Joan W

    2012-08-01

    Alterations to blood-brain barrier (BBB) adhesion molecules and junctional integrity during neuroinflammation can promote central nervous system (CNS) pathology. The chemokine CCL2 is elevated during CNS inflammation and is associated with endothelial dysfunction. The effects of CCL2 on endothelial adherens junctions (AJs) have not been defined. We demonstrate that CCL2 transiently induces Src-dependent disruption of human brain microvascular endothelial AJ. β-Catenin is phosphorylated and traffics from the AJ to PECAM-1 (platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1), where it is sequestered at the membrane. PECAM-1 is also tyrosine-phosphorylated, an event associated with recruitment of the phosphatase SHP-2 (Src homology 2 domain-containing protein phosphatase) to PECAM-1, β-catenin release from PECAM-1, and reassociation of β-catenin with the AJ. Surface localization of PECAM-1 is increased in response to CCL2. This may enable the endothelium to sustain CCL2-induced alterations in AJ and facilitate recruitment of leukocytes into the CNS. Our novel findings provide a mechanism for CCL2-mediated disruption of endothelial junctions that may contribute to BBB dysfunction and increased leukocyte recruitment in neuroinflammatory diseases. PMID:22641100

  3. Brain barriers: Crosstalk between complex tight junctions and adherens junctions

    PubMed Central

    Tietz, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Unique intercellular junctional complexes between the central nervous system (CNS) microvascular endothelial cells and the choroid plexus epithelial cells form the endothelial blood–brain barrier (BBB) and the epithelial blood–cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB), respectively. These barriers inhibit paracellular diffusion, thereby protecting the CNS from fluctuations in the blood. Studies of brain barrier integrity during development, normal physiology, and disease have focused on BBB and BCSFB tight junctions but not the corresponding endothelial and epithelial adherens junctions. The crosstalk between adherens junctions and tight junctions in maintaining barrier integrity is an understudied area that may represent a promising target for influencing brain barrier function. PMID:26008742

  4. Microtubules CLASP to Adherens Junctions in epidermal progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Shahbazi, Marta N; Perez-Moreno, Mirna

    2014-01-01

    Cadherin-mediated cell adhesion at Adherens Junctions (AJs) and its dynamic connections with the microtubule (MT) cytoskeleton are important regulators of cellular architecture. However, the functional relevance of these interactions and the molecular players involved in different cellular contexts and cellular compartments are still not completely understood. Here, we comment on our recent findings showing that the MT plus-end binding protein CLASP2 interacts with the AJ component p120-catenin (p120) specifically in progenitor epidermal cells. Absence of either protein leads to alterations in MT dynamics and AJ functionality. These findings represent a novel mechanism of MT targeting to AJs that may be relevant for the maintenance of proper epidermal progenitor cell homeostasis. We also discuss the potential implication of other MT binding proteins previously associated to AJs in the wider context of epithelial tissues. We hypothesize the existence of adaptation mechanisms that regulate the formation and stability of AJs in different cellular contexts to allow the dynamic behavior of these complexes during tissue homeostasis and remodeling. PMID:24522006

  5. Microtubules CLASP to Adherens Junctions in epidermal progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi, Marta N; Perez-Moreno, Mirna

    2014-01-01

    Cadherin-mediated cell adhesion at Adherens Junctions (AJs) and its dynamic connections with the microtubule (MT) cytoskeleton are important regulators of cellular architecture. However, the functional relevance of these interactions and the molecular players involved in different cellular contexts and cellular compartments are still not completely understood. Here, we comment on our recent findings showing that the MT plus-end binding protein CLASP2 interacts with the AJ component p120-catenin (p120) specifically in progenitor epidermal cells. Absence of either protein leads to alterations in MT dynamics and AJ functionality. These findings represent a novel mechanism of MT targeting to AJs that may be relevant for the maintenance of proper epidermal progenitor cell homeostasis. We also discuss the potential implication of other MT binding proteins previously associated to AJs in the wider context of epithelial tissues. We hypothesize the existence of adaptation mechanisms that regulate the formation and stability of AJs in different cellular contexts to allow the dynamic behavior of these complexes during tissue homeostasis and remodeling. PMID:24522006

  6. Neogenin recruitment of the WAVE regulatory complex maintains adherens junction stability and tension

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Natalie K.; Fok, Ka Wai; White, Amanda; Wilson, Nicole H.; O'Leary, Conor J.; Cox, Hayley L.; Michael, Magdalene; Yap, Alpha S.; Cooper, Helen M.

    2016-01-01

    To maintain tissue integrity during epithelial morphogenesis, adherens junctions (AJs) must resist the mechanical stresses exerted by dynamic tissue movements. Junctional stability is dependent on actomyosin contractility within the actin ring. Here we describe a novel function for the axon guidance receptor, Neogenin, as a key component of the actin nucleation machinery governing junctional stability. Loss of Neogenin perturbs AJs and attenuates junctional tension. Neogenin promotes actin nucleation at AJs by recruiting the Wave regulatory complex (WRC) and Arp2/3. A direct interaction between the Neogenin WIRS domain and the WRC is crucial for the spatially restricted recruitment of the WRC to the junction. Thus, we provide the first example of a functional WIRS–WRC interaction in epithelia. We further show that Neogenin regulates cadherin recycling at the AJ. In summary, we identify Neogenin as a pivotal component of the AJ, where it influences both cadherin dynamics and junctional tension. PMID:27029596

  7. Regulation of Endothelial Adherens Junctions by Tyrosine Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Alejandro Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cells form a semipermeable, regulated barrier that limits the passage of fluid, small molecules, and leukocytes between the bloodstream and the surrounding tissues. The adherens junction, a major mechanism of intercellular adhesion, is comprised of transmembrane cadherins forming homotypic interactions between adjacent cells and associated cytoplasmic catenins linking the cadherins to the cytoskeleton. Inflammatory conditions promote the disassembly of the adherens junction and a loss of intercellular adhesion, creating openings or gaps in the endothelium through which small molecules diffuse and leukocytes transmigrate. Tyrosine kinase signaling has emerged as a central regulator of the inflammatory response, partly through direct phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of the adherens junction components. This review discusses the findings that support and those that argue against a direct effect of cadherin and catenin phosphorylation in the disassembly of the adherens junction. Recent findings indicate a complex interaction between kinases, phosphatases, and the adherens junction components that allow a fine regulation of the endothelial permeability to small molecules, leukocyte migration, and barrier resealing. PMID:26556953

  8. Adherens Junction and E-Cadherin complex regulation by epithelial polarity.

    PubMed

    Coopman, Peter; Djiane, Alexandre

    2016-09-01

    E-Cadherin-based Adherens Junctions (AJs) are a defining feature of all epithelial sheets. Through the homophilic association of E-Cadherin molecules expressed on neighboring cells, they ensure intercellular adhesion amongst epithelial cells, and regulate many key aspects of epithelial biology. While their adhesive role requires these structures to remain stable, AJs are also extremely plastic. This plasticity allows for the adaptation of the cell to its changing environment: changes in neighbors after cell division, cell death, or cell movement, and changes in cell shape during differentiation. In this review we focus on the recent advances highlighting the critical role of the apico-basal polarity machinery, and in particular of the Par3/Bazooka scaffold, in the regulation and remodeling of AJs. We propose that by regulating key phosphorylation events on the core E-Cadherin complex components, Par3 and epithelial polarity promote meta-stable protein complexes governing the correct formation, localization, and functioning of AJ. PMID:27151512

  9. Hold on tightly, let go lightly: myosin functions at adherens junctions

    PubMed Central

    Sandquist, Joshua C.; Bement, William M.

    2016-01-01

    Adherens junctions, the sites of cadherin-dependent cell–cell adhesion, are also important for dynamic tension sensing, force transduction and signalling. Different myosin motors contribute to adherens junction assembly and versatility in distinct ways. PMID:20596044

  10. Flow mechanotransduction regulates traction forces, intercellular forces, and adherens junctions

    PubMed Central

    Ting, Lucas H.; Jahn, Jessica R.; Jung, Joon I.; Shuman, Benjamin R.; Feghhi, Shirin; Han, Sangyoon J.; Rodriguez, Marita L.

    2012-01-01

    Endothelial cells respond to fluid shear stress through mechanotransduction responses that affect their cytoskeleton and cell-cell contacts. Here, endothelial cells were grown as monolayers on arrays of microposts and exposed to laminar or disturbed flow to examine the relationship among traction forces, intercellular forces, and cell-cell junctions. Cells under laminar flow had traction forces that were higher than those under static conditions, whereas cells under disturbed flow had lower traction forces. The response in adhesion junction assembly matched closely with changes in traction forces since adherens junctions were larger in size for laminar flow and smaller for disturbed flow. Treating the cells with calyculin-A to increase myosin phosphorylation and traction forces caused an increase in adherens junction size, whereas Y-27362 cause a decrease in their size. Since tugging forces across cell-cell junctions can promote junctional assembly, we developed a novel approach to measure intercellular forces and found that these forces were higher for laminar flow than for static or disturbed flow. The size of adherens junctions and tight junctions matched closely with intercellular forces for these flow conditions. These results indicate that laminar flow can increase cytoskeletal tension while disturbed flow decreases cytoskeletal tension. Consequently, we found that changes in cytoskeletal tension in response to shear flow conditions can affect intercellular tension, which in turn regulates the assembly of cell-cell junctions. PMID:22447948

  11. Adherens junctions determine the apical position of the midbody during follicular epithelial cell division.

    PubMed

    Morais-de-Sá, Eurico; Sunkel, Claudio

    2013-08-01

    Cytokinesis is asymmetric along the apical-basal axis of epithelial cells, positioning the midbody near the apical domain. However, little is known about the mechanism and purpose of this asymmetry. We use live imaging of Drosophila follicle cell division to show that asymmetric cytokinesis does not result from intrinsic polarization of the main contractile ring components. We show that adherens junctions (AJs) maintain close contact with the apical side of the contractile ring during cytokinesis. Asymmetric distribution of AJ components within follicle cells and in the otherwise unpolarized S2 cells is sufficient to recruit the midbody, revealing that asymmetric cytokinesis is determined by apical AJs in the epithelia. We further show that ectopic midbody localization induces epithelial invaginations, shifting the position of the apical interface between daughter cells relative to the AB axis of the tissue. Thus, apical midbody localization is essential to maintain epithelial tissue architecture during proliferation. PMID:23774295

  12. Differential regulation of the Hippo pathway by adherens junctions and apical-basal cell polarity modules.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chih-Chao; Graves, Hillary K; Moya, Ivan M; Tao, Chunyao; Hamaratoglu, Fisun; Gladden, Andrew B; Halder, Georg

    2015-02-10

    Adherens junctions (AJs) and cell polarity complexes are key players in the establishment and maintenance of apical-basal cell polarity. Loss of AJs or basolateral polarity components promotes tumor formation and metastasis. Recent studies in vertebrate models show that loss of AJs or loss of the basolateral component Scribble (Scrib) cause deregulation of the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway and hyperactivation of its downstream effectors Yes-associated protein (YAP) and Transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ). However, whether AJs and Scrib act through the same or independent mechanisms to regulate Hippo pathway activity is not known. Here, we dissect how disruption of AJs or loss of basolateral components affect the activity of the Drosophila YAP homolog Yorkie (Yki) during imaginal disc development. Surprisingly, disruption of AJs and loss of basolateral proteins produced very different effects on Yki activity. Yki activity was cell-autonomously decreased but non-cell-autonomously elevated in tissues where the AJ components E-cadherin (E-cad) or α-catenin (α-cat) were knocked down. In contrast, scrib knockdown caused a predominantly cell-autonomous activation of Yki. Moreover, disruption of AJs or basolateral proteins had different effects on cell polarity and tissue size. Simultaneous knockdown of α-cat and scrib induced both cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous Yki activity. In mammalian cells, knockdown of E-cad or α-cat caused nuclear accumulation and activation of YAP without overt effects on Scrib localization and vice versa. Therefore, our results indicate the existence of multiple, genetically separable inputs from AJs and cell polarity complexes into Yki/YAP regulation. PMID:25624491

  13. The adherens junction is lost during normal pregnancy but not during ovarian hyperstimulated pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Dowland, Samson N; Madawala, Romanthi J; Lindsay, Laura A; Murphy, Christopher R

    2016-03-01

    During early pregnancy in the rat, the luminal uterine epithelial cells (UECs) must transform to a receptive state to permit blastocyst attachment and implantation. The implantation process involves penetration of the epithelial barrier, so it is expected that the transformation of UECs includes alterations in the lateral junctional complex. Previous studies have demonstrated a deepening of the tight junction (zonula occludens) and a reduction in the number of desmosomes (macula adherens) in UECs at the time of implantation. However, the adherens junction (zonula adherens), which is primarily responsible for cell-cell adhesion, has been little studied during early pregnancy. This study investigated the adherens junction in rat UECs during the early stages of normal pregnancy and ovarian hyperstimulated (OH) pregnancy using transmission electron microscopy. The adherens junction is present in UECs at the time of fertilisation, but is lost at the time of blastocyst implantation during normal pregnancy. Interestingly, at the time of implantation after OH, adherens junctions are retained and may impede blastocyst penetration of the epithelium. The adherens junction anchors the actin-based terminal web, which is known to be disrupted in UECs during early pregnancy. However, artificial disruption of the terminal web, using cytochalasin D, did not cause removal of the adherens junction in UECs. This study revealed that adherens junction disassembly occurs during early pregnancy, but that this process does not occur during OH pregnancy. Such disassembly does not appear to depend on the disruption of the terminal web. PMID:26738975

  14. CLASP2 interacts with p120-catenin and governs microtubule dynamics at adherens junctions

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi, Marta N.; Megias, Diego; Epifano, Carolina; Akhmanova, Anna; Gundersen, Gregg G.; Fuchs, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    Classical cadherins and their connections with microtubules (MTs) are emerging as important determinants of cell adhesion. However, the functional relevance of such interactions and the molecular players that contribute to tissue architecture are still emerging. In this paper, we report that the MT plus end–binding protein CLASP2 localizes to adherens junctions (AJs) via direct interaction with p120-catenin (p120) in primary basal mouse keratinocytes. Reductions in the levels of p120 or CLASP2 decreased the localization of the other protein to cell–cell contacts and altered AJ dynamics and stability. These features were accompanied by decreased MT density and altered MT dynamics at intercellular junction sites. Interestingly, CLASP2 was enriched at the cortex of basal progenitor keratinocytes, in close localization to p120. Our findings suggest the existence of a new mechanism of MT targeting to AJs with potential functional implications in the maintenance of proper cell–cell adhesion in epidermal stem cells. PMID:24368809

  15. CLASP2 interacts with p120-catenin and governs microtubule dynamics at adherens junctions.

    PubMed

    Shahbazi, Marta N; Megias, Diego; Epifano, Carolina; Akhmanova, Anna; Gundersen, Gregg G; Fuchs, Elaine; Perez-Moreno, Mirna

    2013-12-23

    Classical cadherins and their connections with microtubules (MTs) are emerging as important determinants of cell adhesion. However, the functional relevance of such interactions and the molecular players that contribute to tissue architecture are still emerging. In this paper, we report that the MT plus end-binding protein CLASP2 localizes to adherens junctions (AJs) via direct interaction with p120-catenin (p120) in primary basal mouse keratinocytes. Reductions in the levels of p120 or CLASP2 decreased the localization of the other protein to cell-cell contacts and altered AJ dynamics and stability. These features were accompanied by decreased MT density and altered MT dynamics at intercellular junction sites. Interestingly, CLASP2 was enriched at the cortex of basal progenitor keratinocytes, in close localization to p120. Our findings suggest the existence of a new mechanism of MT targeting to AJs with potential functional implications in the maintenance of proper cell-cell adhesion in epidermal stem cells. PMID:24368809

  16. Carcinoembryonic antigen promotes colorectal cancer progression by targeting adherens junction complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Bajenova, Olga; Chaika, Nina; Tolkunova, Elena; Davydov-Sinitsyn, Alexander; Gapon, Svetlana; Thomas, Peter; O’Brien, Stephen

    2014-06-10

    Oncomarkers play important roles in the detection and management of human malignancies. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, CEACAM5) and epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin) are considered as independent tumor markers in monitoring metastatic colorectal cancer. They are both expressed by cancer cells and can be detected in the blood serum. We investigated the effect of CEA production by MIP101 colorectal carcinoma cell lines on E-cadherin adherens junction (AJ) protein complexes. No direct interaction between E-cadherin and CEA was detected; however, the functional relationships between E-cadherin and its AJ partners: α-, β- and p120 catenins were impaired. We discovered a novel interaction between CEA and beta-catenin protein in the CEA producing cells. It is shown in the current study that CEA overexpression alters the splicing of p120 catenin and triggers the release of soluble E-cadherin. The influence of CEA production by colorectal cancer cells on the function of E-cadherin junction complexes may explain the link between the elevated levels of CEA and the increase in soluble E-cadherin during the progression of colorectal cancer. - Highlights: • Elevated level of CEA increases the release of soluble E-cadherin during the progression of colorectal cancer. • CEA over-expression alters the binding preferences between E-cadherin and its partners: α-, β- and p120 catenins in adherens junction complexes. • CEA produced by colorectal cancer cells interacts with beta-catenin protein. • CEA over-expression triggers the increase in nuclear beta-catenin. • CEA over-expression alters the splicing of p120 catenin protein.

  17. JNK phosphorylates β-catenin and regulates adherens junctions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Meng-Horng; Koria, Piyush; Qu, Jun; Andreadis, Stelios T.

    2009-01-01

    The c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK) is an important player in inflammation, proliferation, and apoptosis. More recently, JNK was found to regulate cell migration by phosphorylating paxillin. Here, we report a novel role of JNK in cell adhesion. Specifically, we provide evidence that JNK binds to E-cadherin/β-catenin complex and phosphorylates β-catenin at serine 37 and threonine 41, the sites also phosphorylated by GSK-3β. Inhibition of JNK kinase activity using dominant-negative constructs reduces phosphorylation of β-catenin and promotes localization of E-cadherin/β-catenin complex to cell-cell contact sites. Conversely, activation of JNK induces β-catenin phosphorylation and disruption of cell contacts, which are prevented by JNK siRNA. We propose that JNK binds to β-catenin and regulates formation of adherens junctions, ultimately controlling cell-to-cell adhesion.—Lee, M.-H., Koria, P., Qu, J., Andreadis, S. T. JNK phosphorylates β-catenin and regulates adherens junctions. PMID:19667122

  18. SPECC1L deficiency results in increased adherens junction stability and reduced cranial neural crest cell delamination

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Nathan R.; Olm-Shipman, Adam J.; Acevedo, Diana S.; Palaniyandi, Kanagaraj; Hall, Everett G.; Kosa, Edina; Stumpff, Kelly M.; Smith, Guerin J.; Pitstick, Lenore; Liao, Eric C.; Bjork, Bryan C.; Czirok, Andras; Saadi, Irfan

    2016-01-01

    Cranial neural crest cells (CNCCs) delaminate from embryonic neural folds and migrate to pharyngeal arches, which give rise to most mid-facial structures. CNCC dysfunction plays a prominent role in the etiology of orofacial clefts, a frequent birth malformation. Heterozygous mutations in SPECC1L have been identified in patients with atypical and syndromic clefts. Here, we report that in SPECC1L-knockdown cultured cells, staining of canonical adherens junction (AJ) components, β-catenin and E-cadherin, was increased, and electron micrographs revealed an apico-basal diffusion of AJs. To understand the role of SPECC1L in craniofacial morphogenesis, we generated a mouse model of Specc1l deficiency. Homozygous mutants were embryonic lethal and showed impaired neural tube closure and CNCC delamination. Staining of AJ proteins was increased in the mutant neural folds. This AJ defect is consistent with impaired CNCC delamination, which requires AJ dissolution. Further, PI3K-AKT signaling was reduced and apoptosis was increased in Specc1l mutants. In vitro, moderate inhibition of PI3K-AKT signaling in wildtype cells was sufficient to cause AJ alterations. Importantly, AJ changes induced by SPECC1L-knockdown were rescued by activating the PI3K-AKT pathway. Together, these data indicate SPECC1L as a novel modulator of PI3K-AKT signaling and AJ biology, required for neural tube closure and CNCC delamination. PMID:26787558

  19. HIF2α signaling inhibits adherens junctional disruption in acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Haixia; Rehman, Jalees; Tang, Haiyang; Wary, Kishore; Mittal, Manish; Chatturvedi, Pallavi; Zhao, Youyang; Komorova, Yulia A.; Vogel, Stephen M.; Malik, Asrar B.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial barrier dysfunction underlies diseases such as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), characterized by edema and inflammatory cell infiltration. The transcription factor HIF2α is highly expressed in vascular endothelial cells (ECs) and may regulate endothelial barrier function. Here, we analyzed promoter sequences of genes encoding proteins that regulate adherens junction (AJ) integrity and determined that vascular endothelial protein tyrosine phosphatase (VE-PTP) is a HIF2α target. HIF2α-induced VE-PTP expression enhanced dephosphorylation of VE-cadherin, which reduced VE-cadherin endocytosis and thereby augmented AJ integrity and endothelial barrier function. Mice harboring an EC-specific deletion of Hif2a exhibited decreased VE-PTP expression and increased VE-cadherin phosphorylation, resulting in defective AJs. Mice lacking HIF2α in ECs had increased lung vascular permeability and water content, both of which were further exacerbated by endotoxin-mediated injury. Treatment of these mice with Fg4497, a prolyl hydroxylase domain 2 (PHD2) inhibitor, activated HIF2α-mediated transcription in a hypoxia-independent manner. HIF2α activation increased VE-PTP expression, decreased VE-cadherin phosphorylation, promoted AJ integrity, and prevented the loss of endothelial barrier function. These findings demonstrate that HIF2α enhances endothelial barrier integrity, in part through VE-PTP expression and the resultant VE-cadherin dephosphorylation-mediated assembly of AJs. Moreover, activation of HIF2α/VE-PTP signaling via PHD2 inhibition has the potential to prevent the formation of leaky vessels and edema in inflammatory diseases such as ARDS. PMID:25574837

  20. Viscoelastic response of fibroblasts to tension transmitted through adherens junctions.

    PubMed Central

    Ragsdale, G K; Phelps, J; Luby-Phelps, K

    1997-01-01

    Cytoplasmic deformation was monitored by observing the displacements of 200-nm green fluorescent beads microinjected into the cytoplasm of Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts. We noted a novel protrusion of nonruffling cell margins that was accompanied by axial flow of beads and cytoplasmic vesicles as far as 50 microm behind the protruding plasma membrane. Fluorescent analog cytochemistry and immunofluorescence localization of F-actin, alpha-actinin, N-cadherin, and beta-catenin showed that the protruding margins of deforming cells were mechanically coupled to neighboring cells by adherens junctions. Observations suggested that protrusion resulted from passive linear deformation in response to tensile stress exerted by centripetal contraction of the neighboring cell. The time dependence of cytoplasmic strain calculated from the displacements of beads and vesicles was fit quantitatively by a Kelvin-Voight model for a viscoelastic solid with a mean limiting strain of 0.58 and a mean strain rate of 4.3 x 10(-3) s(-1). In rare instances, the deforming cell and its neighbor spontaneously became uncoupled, and recoil of the protruding margin was observed. The time dependence of strain during recoil also fit a Kelvin-Voight model with similar parameters, suggesting that the kinetics of deformation primarily reflect the mechanical properties of the deformed cell rather than the contractile properties of its neighbor. The existence of mechanical coupling between adjacent fibroblasts through adherens junctions and the viscoelastic responses of cells to tension transmitted directly from cell to cell are factors that must be taken into account to fully understand the role of fibroblasts in such biological processes as wound closure and extracellular matrix remodeling during tissue development. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 PMID:9370474

  1. IQGAP1 mediates the disruption of adherens junctions to promote Escherichia coli K1 invasion of brain endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Subramanian; Fernandez, G. Esteban; Sacks, David B.; Prasadarao, Nemani V.

    2012-01-01

    The transcellular entry of E. coli K1 through human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) is responsible for tight junction disruption, leading to brain edema in neonatal meningitis. Previous studies demonstrated that outer membrane protein A (OmpA) of E. coli K1 interacts with its receptor, Ecgp96 to induce PKC-α phosphorylation, adherens junction (AJ) disassembly (by dislodging β-catenin from VE-cadherin), and remodeling of actin in HBMEC. We report here that IQGAP1 mediates β-catenin dissociation from AJs to promote actin polymerization required for E. coli K1 invasion of HBMEC. Overexpression of C-terminal truncated IQGAP1 (IQΔC) that cannot bind β-catenin prevents both AJ disruption and E. coli K1 entry. Of note, phospho-PKC-α interacts with the C-terminal portion of Ecgp96 as well as with VE-cadherin after IQGAP1 mediated AJ disassembly. HBMEC overexpressing either C-terminal truncated Ecgp96 (Ecgp96Δ200) or IQΔC upon infection with E. coli showed no interaction of phospho-PKC-α with Ecgp96. These data indicate that the binding of OmpA to Ecgp96 induces PKC-α phosphorylation and association of phospho-PKC-α with Ecgp96, and then signals IQGAP1 to detach β-catenin from AJs. Subsequently, IQGAP1/β-catenin bound actin translocates to the site of E. coli K1 attachment to promote invasion. PMID:22519731

  2. Rab35 regulates cadherin-mediated adherens junction formation and myoblast fusion

    PubMed Central

    Charrasse, Sophie; Comunale, Franck; De Rossi, Sylvain; Echard, Arnaud; Gauthier-Rouvière, Cécile

    2013-01-01

    Cadherins are homophilic cell–cell adhesion molecules implicated in many fundamental processes, such as morphogenesis, cell growth, and differentiation. They accumulate at cell–cell contact sites and assemble into large macromolecular complexes named adherens junctions (AJs). Cadherin targeting and function are regulated by various cellular processes, many players of which remain to be uncovered. Here we identify the small GTPase Rab35 as a new regulator of cadherin trafficking and stabilization at cell–cell contacts in C2C12 myoblasts and HeLa cells. We find that Rab35 accumulates at cell–cell contacts in a cadherin-dependent manner. Knockdown of Rab35 or expression of a dominant-negative form of Rab35 impaired N- and M-cadherin recruitment to cell–cell contacts, their stabilization at the plasma membrane, and association with p120 catenin and led to their accumulation in transferrin-, clathrin-, and AP-2–positive intracellular vesicles. We also find that Rab35 function is required for PIP5KIγ accumulation at cell–cell contacts and phosphatidyl inositol 4,5-bisphosphate production, which is involved in cadherin stabilization at contact sites. Finally, we show that Rab35 regulates myoblast fusion, a major cellular process under the control of cadherin-dependent signaling. Taken together, these results reveal that Rab35 regulates cadherin-dependent AJ formation and myoblast fusion. PMID:23197472

  3. Drosophila MAGI interacts with RASSF8 to regulate E-Cadherin-based adherens junctions in the developing eye.

    PubMed

    Zaessinger, Sophie; Zhou, Yanxiang; Bray, Sarah J; Tapon, Nicolas; Djiane, Alexandre

    2015-03-15

    Morphogenesis is crucial during development to generate organs and tissues of the correct size and shape. During Drosophila late eye development, interommatidial cells (IOCs) rearrange to generate the highly organized pupal lattice, in which hexagonal ommatidial units pack tightly. This process involves the fine regulation of adherens junctions (AJs) and of adhesive E-Cadherin (E-Cad) complexes. Localized accumulation of Bazooka (Baz), the Drosophila PAR3 homolog, has emerged as a critical step to specify where new E-Cad complexes should be deposited during junction remodeling. However, the mechanisms controlling the correct localization of Baz are still only partly understood. We show here that Drosophila Magi, the sole fly homolog of the mammalian MAGI scaffolds, is an upstream regulator of E-Cad-based AJs during cell rearrangements, and that Magi mutant IOCs fail to reach their correct position. We uncover a direct physical interaction between Magi and the Ras association domain protein RASSF8 through a WW domain-PPxY motif binding, and show that apical Magi recruits the RASSF8-ASPP complex during AJ remodeling in IOCs. We further show that this Magi complex is required for the cortical recruitment of Baz and of the E-Cad-associated proteins α- and β-catenin. We propose that, by controlling the proper localization of Baz to remodeling junctions, Magi and the RASSF8-ASPP complex promote the recruitment or stabilization of E-Cad complexes at junction sites. PMID:25725070

  4. A Novel Role of E-Cadherin-Based Adherens Junctions in Neoplastic Cell Dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Gloushankova, Natalya A.

    2015-01-01

    Using confocal microscopy, we analyzed the behavior of IAR-6-1, IAR1170, and IAR1162 transformed epithelial cells seeded onto the confluent monolayer of normal IAR-2 epithelial cells. Live-cell imaging of neoplastic cells stably expressing EGFP and of normal epithelial cells stably expressing mKate2 showed that transformed cells retaining expression of E-cadherin were able to migrate over the IAR-2 epithelial monolayer and invade the monolayer. Transformed IAR cells invaded the IAR-2 monolayer at the boundaries between normal cells. Studying interactions of IAR-6-1 transformed cells stably expressing GFP-E-cadherin with the IAR-2 epithelial monolayer, we found that IAR-6-1 cells established E-cadherin-based adhesions with normal epithelial cells: dot-like dynamic E-cadherin-based adhesions in protrusions and large adherens junctions at the cell sides and rear. A comparative study of a panel of transformed IAR cells that differ by their ability to form E-cadherin-based AJs, either through loss of E-cadherin expression or through expression of a dominant negative E-cadherin mutant, demonstrated that E-cadherin-based AJs are key mediators of the interactions between neoplastic and normal epithelial cells. IAR-6-1DNE cells expressing a dominant-negative mutant form of E-cadherin with the mutation in the first extracellular domain practically lost the ability to adhere to IAR-2 cells and invade the IAR-2 epithelial monolayer. The ability of cancer cells to form E-cadherin-based AJs with the surrounding normal epithelial cells may play an important role in driving cancer cell dissemination in the body. PMID:26207916

  5. Curcumin prevents cisplatin-induced decrease in the tight and adherens junctions: relation to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Trujillo, Joyce; Molina-Jijón, Eduardo; Medina-Campos, Omar Noel; Rodríguez-Muñoz, Rafael; Reyes, José Luis; Loredo, María L; Barrera-Oviedo, Diana; Pinzón, Enrique; Rodríguez-Rangel, Daniela Saraí; Pedraza-Chaverri, José

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin is a polyphenol and cisplatin is an antineoplastic agent that induces nephrotoxicity associated with oxidative stress, apoptosis, fibrosis and decrease in renal tight junction (TJ) proteins. The potential effect of curcumin against alterations in TJ structure and function has not been evaluated in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. The present study explored whether curcumin is able to prevent the cisplatin-induced fibrosis and decreased expression of the TJ and adherens junction (AJ) proteins occludin, claudin-2 and E-cadherin in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Curcumin (200 mg kg(-1)) was administered in three doses, and rats were sacrificed 72 h after cisplatin administration. Curcumin was able to scavenge, in a concentration-dependent way, superoxide anion, hydroxyl radical, peroxyl radical, singlet oxygen, peroxynitrite anion, hypochlorous acid and hydrogen peroxide. Cisplatin-induced renal damage was associated with alterations in plasma creatinine, expression of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and of kidney injury molecule-1, histological damage, increase in apoptosis, fibrosis (evaluated by transforming growth factor β1, collagen I and IV and α-smooth muscle actin expressions), increase in oxidative/nitrosative stress (evaluated by Hsp70/72 expression, protein tyrosine nitration, superoxide anion production in isolated glomeruli and proximal tubules, and protein levels of NADPH oxidase subunits p47(phox) and gp91(phox), protein kinase C β2, and Nrf2) as well as by decreased expression of occludin, claudin-2, β-catenin and E-cadherin. Curcumin treatment prevented all the above-described alterations. The protective effect of curcumin against cisplatin-induced fibrosis and decreased proteins of the TJ and AJ was associated with the prevention of glomerular and proximal tubular superoxide anion production induced by NADPH oxidase activity. PMID:26467482

  6. Negative pressure induces p120-catenin-dependent adherens junction disassembly in keratinocytes during wound healing.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ching-Hui; Hsu, Chih-Chin; Chen, Carl Pai-Chu; Chow, Shu-Er; Wang, Jong-Shyan; Shyu, Yu-Chiau; Lu, Mu-Jie

    2016-09-01

    A negative-pressure of 125mmHg (NP) has been widely used to treat chronic wounds in modern medicine. Keratinocytes under NP treatment have shown accelerated cell movement and decreased E-cadherin expression. However, the molecular mechanism of E-cadherin regulation under NP remains incompletely understood. Therefore, we investigated the E-cadherin regulation in keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) under NP. HaCaT cells were treated at ambient pressure (AP) and NP for 12h. Cell movement was measured by traditional and electric wound healing assays at the 2 different pressures. Mutants with overexpression of p120-catenin (p120(ctn)) were used to observe the effect of NP on p120(ctn) and E-cadherin expression during wound healing. Cell fractionation and immunoblotting data showed that NP increased Y228-phosphorylated p120(ctn) level and resulted in the translocation of p120(ctn) from the plasma membrane to cytoplasm. Immunofluorescence images revealed that NP decreased the co-localization of p120(ctn) and E-cadherin on the plasma membrane. Knockdown of p120(ctn) reduced E-cadherin expression and accelerated cell movement under AP. Overexpression of the Y228-phosphorylation-mimic p120(ctn) decreased E-cadherin membrane expression under both AP and NP. Phosphorylation-deficient mutants conferred restored adherens junctions (AJs) under NP. The Src inhibitor blocked the phosphorylation of p120(ctn) and impeded cell migration under NP. In conclusion, Src-dependent phosphorylation of p120(ctn) can respond rapidly to NP and contribute to E-cadherin downregulation. The NP-induced disassembly of the AJ further accelerates wound healing. PMID:27220534

  7. The Extracellular Architecture of Adherens Junctions Revealed by Crystal Structures of Type I Cadherins

    SciTech Connect

    O Harrison; X Jin; S Hong; F Bahna; G Ahlsen; J Brasch; Y Wu; J Vendome; K Felsovalyi; et al.

    2011-12-31

    Adherens junctions, which play a central role in intercellular adhesion, comprise clusters of type I classical cadherins that bind via extracellular domains extended from opposing cell surfaces. We show that a molecular layer seen in crystal structures of E- and N-cadherin ectodomains reported here and in a previous C-cadherin structure corresponds to the extracellular architecture of adherens junctions. In all three ectodomain crystals, cadherins dimerize through a trans adhesive interface and are connected by a second, cis, interface. Assemblies formed by E-cadherin ectodomains coated on liposomes also appear to adopt this structure. Fluorescent imaging of junctions formed from wild-type and mutant E-cadherins in cultured cells confirm conclusions derived from structural evidence. Mutations that interfere with the trans interface ablate adhesion, whereas cis interface mutations disrupt stable junction formation. Our observations are consistent with a model for junction assembly involving strong trans and weak cis interactions localized in the ectodomain.

  8. FoxM1 regulates re-annealing of endothelial adherens junctions through transcriptional control of β-catenin expression

    PubMed Central

    Mirza, Muhammad K.; Sun, Ying; Zhao, Yidan D.; S.K. Potula, Hari-Hara; Frey, Randall S.; Vogel, Steven M.; Malik, Asrar B.

    2010-01-01

    Repair of the injured vascular intima requires a series of coordinated events that mediate both endothelial regeneration and reannealing of adherens junctions (AJs) to form a restrictive endothelial barrier. The forkhead transcription factor FoxM1 is essential for endothelial proliferation after vascular injury. However, little is known about mechanisms by which FoxM1 regulates endothelial barrier reannealing. Here, using a mouse model with endothelial cell (EC)-restricted disruption of FoxM1 (FoxM1 CKO) and primary cultures of ECs with small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of FoxM1, we demonstrate a novel requisite role of FoxM1 in mediating endothelial AJ barrier repair through the transcriptional control of β-catenin. In the FoxM1 CKO lung vasculature, we observed persistent microvessel leakage characterized by impaired reannealing of endothelial AJs after endothelial injury. We also showed that FoxM1 directly regulated β-catenin transcription and that reexpression of β-catenin rescued the defective AJ barrier–reannealing phenotype of FoxM1-deficient ECs. Knockdown of β-catenin mimicked the phenotype of defective barrier recovery seen in FoxM1-deficient ECs. These data demonstrate that FoxM1 is required for reannealing of endothelial AJs in order to form a restrictive endothelial barrier through transcriptional control of β-catenin expression. Therefore, means of activating FoxM1-mediated endothelial repair represent a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of inflammatory vascular diseases associated with persistent vascular barrier leakiness such as acute lung injury. PMID:20660612

  9. Adherens and Tight Junctions: Structure, Function and Connections to the Actin Cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Hartsock, Andrea; Nelson, W. James

    2009-01-01

    Summary Adherens juctions and Tight junctions comprise two modes of cell-cell adhesion that provide different functions. Both junctional complexes are proposed to associate with the actin cytoskeleton, and formation and maturation of cell-cell contacts involves reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton. Adherens junctions initiate cell-cell contacts, and mediate the maturation and maintenance of the contact. Adherens junctions consist of the transmembrane protein E-cadherin, and intracellular components, p120-catenin, β-catenin and α-catenin. Tight junctions regulate the paracellular pathway for the movement of ions and solutes in-between cells. Tight junctions consist of the transmembrane proteins occludin and claudin, and the cytoplasmic scaffolding proteins ZO-1,-2, and -3. This review discusses the binding interactions of the most studied proteins that occur within each of these two junctional complexes and possible modes of regulation of these interactions, and the different mechanisms that connect and regulate interactions with the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:17854762

  10. The adherens junctions control susceptibility to Staphylococcus aureus α-toxin

    PubMed Central

    Popov, Lauren M.; Marceau, Caleb D.; Starkl, Philipp M.; Lumb, Jennifer H.; Shah, Jimit; Guerrera, Diego; Cooper, Rachel L.; Merakou, Christina; Bouley, Donna M.; Meng, Wenxiang; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Takeichi, Masatoshi; Galli, Stephen J.; Bagnoli, Fabio; Citi, Sandra; Carette, Jan E.; Amieva, Manuel R.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is both a transient skin colonizer and a formidable human pathogen, ranking among the leading causes of skin and soft tissue infections as well as severe pneumonia. The secreted bacterial α-toxin is essential for S. aureus virulence in these epithelial diseases. To discover host cellular factors required for α-toxin cytotoxicity, we conducted a genetic screen using mutagenized haploid human cells. Our screen identified a cytoplasmic member of the adherens junctions, plekstrin-homology domain containing protein 7 (PLEKHA7), as the second most significantly enriched gene after the known α-toxin receptor, a disintegrin and metalloprotease 10 (ADAM10). Here we report a new, unexpected role for PLEKHA7 and several components of cellular adherens junctions in controlling susceptibility to S. aureus α-toxin. We find that despite being injured by α-toxin pore formation, PLEKHA7 knockout cells recover after intoxication. By infecting PLEKHA7−/− mice with methicillin-resistant S. aureus USA300 LAC strain, we demonstrate that this junctional protein controls disease severity in both skin infection and lethal S. aureus pneumonia. Our results suggest that adherens junctions actively control cellular responses to a potent pore-forming bacterial toxin and identify PLEKHA7 as a potential nonessential host target to reduce S. aureus virulence during epithelial infections. PMID:26489655

  11. The adherens junctions control susceptibility to Staphylococcus aureus α-toxin.

    PubMed

    Popov, Lauren M; Marceau, Caleb D; Starkl, Philipp M; Lumb, Jennifer H; Shah, Jimit; Guerrera, Diego; Cooper, Rachel L; Merakou, Christina; Bouley, Donna M; Meng, Wenxiang; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Takeichi, Masatoshi; Galli, Stephen J; Bagnoli, Fabio; Citi, Sandra; Carette, Jan E; Amieva, Manuel R

    2015-11-17

    Staphylococcus aureus is both a transient skin colonizer and a formidable human pathogen, ranking among the leading causes of skin and soft tissue infections as well as severe pneumonia. The secreted bacterial α-toxin is essential for S. aureus virulence in these epithelial diseases. To discover host cellular factors required for α-toxin cytotoxicity, we conducted a genetic screen using mutagenized haploid human cells. Our screen identified a cytoplasmic member of the adherens junctions, plekstrin-homology domain containing protein 7 (PLEKHA7), as the second most significantly enriched gene after the known α-toxin receptor, a disintegrin and metalloprotease 10 (ADAM10). Here we report a new, unexpected role for PLEKHA7 and several components of cellular adherens junctions in controlling susceptibility to S. aureus α-toxin. We find that despite being injured by α-toxin pore formation, PLEKHA7 knockout cells recover after intoxication. By infecting PLEKHA7(-/-) mice with methicillin-resistant S. aureus USA300 LAC strain, we demonstrate that this junctional protein controls disease severity in both skin infection and lethal S. aureus pneumonia. Our results suggest that adherens junctions actively control cellular responses to a potent pore-forming bacterial toxin and identify PLEKHA7 as a potential nonessential host target to reduce S. aureus virulence during epithelial infections. PMID:26489655

  12. Cadherin controls nectin recruitment into adherens junctions by remodeling the actin cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Troyanovsky, Regina B.; Indra, Indrajyoti; Chen, Chi-Shuo; Hong, Soonjin; Troyanovsky, Sergey M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The mechanism that coordinates activities of different adhesion receptors is poorly understood. We investigated this mechanism by focusing on the nectin-2 and E-cadherin adherens junction receptors. We found that, cadherin was not required for the basic process of nectin junction formation because nectin-2 formed junctions in cadherin-deficient A431D cells. Formation of nectin-2 junctions in these cells, however, became regulated by cadherin as soon as E-cadherin was re-expressed. E-cadherin recruited nectin-2 into adherens junctions, where both proteins formed distinct but tightly associated clusters. Live-cell imaging showed that the appearance of E-cadherin clusters often preceded that of nectin-2 clusters at sites of junction assembly. Inactivation of E-cadherin clustering by different strategies concomitantly suppressed the formation of nectin clusters. Furthermore, cadherin significantly increased the stability of nectin clusters, thereby making them resistant to the BC-12 antibody, which targets the nectin-2 adhesion interface. By testing different E-cadherin–α-catenin chimeras, we showed that the recruitment of nectin into chimera junctions is mediated by the actin-binding domain of α-catenin. Our data suggests that E-cadherin regulates assembly of nectin junctions through α-catenin-induced remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton around the cadherin clusters. PMID:25395582

  13. Evidence of a common mechanism of disassembly of adherens junctions through Gα13 targeting of VE-cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Haixia; Gao, Xiaopei; Feng, Shaoting; Siddiqui, M. Rizwan; Garcia, Alexander; Bonini, Marcelo G.; Komarova, Yulia; Vogel, Stephen M.; Mehta, Dolly

    2014-01-01

    The heterotrimeric G protein Gα13 transduces signals from G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs) to induce cell spreading, differentiation, migration, and cell polarity. Here, we describe a novel GPCR-independent function of Gα13 in regulating the stability of endothelial cell adherens junctions (AJs). We observed that the oxidant H2O2, which is released in response to multiple proinflammatory mediators, induced the interaction of Gα13 with VE-cadherin. Gα13 binding to VE-cadherin in turn induced Src activation and VE-cadherin phosphorylation at Tyr 658, the p120-catenin binding site thought to be responsible for VE-cadherin internalization. Inhibition of Gα13–VE-cadherin interaction using an interfering peptide derived from the Gα13 binding motif on VE-cadherin abrogated the disruption of AJs in response to inflammatory mediators. These studies identify a unique role of Gα13 binding to VE-cadherin in mediating VE-cadherin internalization and endothelial barrier disruption and inflammation. PMID:24590762

  14. Cadherin flexibility provides a key difference between desmosomes and adherens junctions.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Humera; Bella, Jordi; Jowitt, Thomas A; Holmes, David F; Rouhi, Mansour; Nie, Zhuxiang; Baldock, Clair; Garrod, David; Tabernero, Lydia

    2015-04-28

    Desmosomes and adherens junctions are intercellular adhesive structures essential for the development and integrity of vertebrate tissue, including the epidermis and heart. Their cell adhesion molecules are cadherins: type 1 cadherins in adherens junctions and desmosomal cadherins in desmosomes. A fundamental difference is that desmosomes have a highly ordered structure in their extracellular region and exhibit calcium-independent hyperadhesion, whereas adherens junctions appear to lack such ordered arrays, and their adhesion is always calcium-dependent. We present here the structure of the entire ectodomain of desmosomal cadherin desmoglein 2 (Dsg2), using a combination of small-angle X-ray scattering, electron microscopy, and solution-based biophysical techniques. This structure reveals that the ectodomain of Dsg2 is flexible even in the calcium-bound state and, on average, is shorter than the type 1 cadherin crystal structures. The Dsg2 structure has an excellent fit with the electron tomography reconstructions of human desmosomes. This fit suggests an arrangement in which desmosomal cadherins form trans interactions but are too far apart to interact in cis, in agreement with previously reported observations. Cadherin flexibility may be key to explaining the plasticity of desmosomes that maintain tissue integrity in their hyperadhesive form, but can adopt a weaker, calcium-dependent adhesion during wound healing and early development. PMID:25855637

  15. PLEKHA7 Recruits PDZD11 to Adherens Junctions to Stabilize Nectins.

    PubMed

    Guerrera, Diego; Shah, Jimit; Vasileva, Ekaterina; Sluysmans, Sophie; Méan, Isabelle; Jond, Lionel; Poser, Ina; Mann, Matthias; Hyman, Anthony A; Citi, Sandra

    2016-05-20

    PLEKHA7 is a junctional protein implicated in stabilization of the cadherin protein complex, hypertension, cardiac contractility, glaucoma, microRNA processing, and susceptibility to bacterial toxins. To gain insight into the molecular basis for the functions of PLEKHA7, we looked for new PLEKHA7 interactors. Here, we report the identification of PDZ domain-containing protein 11 (PDZD11) as a new interactor of PLEKHA7 by yeast two-hybrid screening and by mass spectrometry analysis of PLEKHA7 immunoprecipitates. We show that PDZD11 (17 kDa) is expressed in epithelial and endothelial cells, where it forms a complex with PLEKHA7, as determined by co-immunoprecipitation analysis. The N-terminal Trp-Trp (WW) domain of PLEKHA7 interacts directly with the N-terminal 44 amino acids of PDZD11, as shown by GST-pulldown assays. Immunofluorescence analysis shows that PDZD11 is localized at adherens junctions in a PLEKHA7-dependent manner, because its junctional localization is abolished by knock-out of PLEKHA7, and is rescued by re-expression of exogenous PLEKHA7. The junctional recruitment of nectin-1 and nectin-3 and their protein levels are decreased via proteasome-mediated degradation in epithelial cells where either PDZD11 or PLEKHA7 have been knocked-out. PDZD11 forms a complex with nectin-1 and nectin-3, and its PDZ domain interacts directly with the PDZ-binding motif of nectin-1. PDZD11 is required for the efficient assembly of apical junctions of epithelial cells at early time points in the calcium-switch model. These results show that the PLEKHA7-PDZD11 complex stabilizes nectins to promote efficient early junction assembly and uncover a new molecular mechanism through which PLEKHA7 recruits PDZ-binding membrane proteins to epithelial adherens junctions. PMID:27044745

  16. Loss of RhoA in neural progenitor cells causes the disruption of adherens junctions and hyperproliferation

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Kei-ichi; Melendez, Jaime; Baumann, Jessica M.; Leslie, Jennifer R.; Chauhan, Bharesh K.; Nemkul, Niza; Lang, Richard A.; Kuan, Chia-Yi; Zheng, Yi; Yoshida, Yutaka

    2011-01-01

    The organization of neural progenitors in the developing mammalian neuroepithelium is marked by cadherin-based adherens junctions. Whereas RhoA, a founding member of the small Rho GTPase family, has been shown to play important roles in epithelial adherens junctions, its physiological roles in neural development remain uncertain due to the lack of specific loss-of-function studies. Here, we show that RhoA protein accumulates at adherens junctions in the developing mouse brain and colocalizes to the cadherin–catenin complex. Conditional deletion of RhoA in midbrain and forebrain neural progenitors using Wnt1-Cre and Foxg1-Cre mice, respectively, disrupts apical adherens junctions and causes massive dysplasia of the brain. Furthermore, RhoA-deficient neural progenitor cells exhibit accelerated proliferation, reduction of cell- cycle exit, and increased expression of downstream target genes of the hedgehog pathway. Consequently, both lines of conditional RhoA-deficient embryos exhibit expansion of neural progenitor cells and exencephaly-like protrusions. These results demonstrate a critical role of RhoA in the maintenance of apical adherens junctions and the regulation of neural progenitor proliferation in the developing mammalian brain. PMID:21502507

  17. Junctional adhesion molecules (JAMs) are differentially expressed in fibroblasts and co-localize with ZO-1 to adherens-like junctions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Junctional Adhesion Molecules (JAMs) are components and regulators of the well-characterized epithelial and endothelial tight junction. Since the molecular components of native fibroblast adherens-like junctions remain poorly described we determined JAM expression profiles in fibroblasts. We found J...

  18. Regulation of Adherens Junctions in Trabecular Meshwork Cells by Rac GTPase and their influence on Intraocular Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Pattabiraman, Padmanabhan P; Epstein, David L; Rao, Ponugoti Vasantha

    2013-01-01

    Intercellular adherens junctions and cell-extracellular matrix interactions are presumed to influence aqueous humor (AH) drainage via the conventional route, however, their direct role in modulation of intraocular pressure (IOP) is not well understood. Here, we investigated the role of Rac GTPase signaling in basal and growth factor-induced formation of adherens junctions in human trabecular meshwork (HTM) cells as compared to human umbilical vascular endothelial cells, and evaluated the effects of inhibition of Rac GTPase activity on IOP in rabbits. Expression of a constitutively active Rac1 GTPase or treatment with platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), a known activator of Rac GTPase, induced formation of β-catenin-based adherens junctions, actin cytoskeletal reorganization and membrane ruffle in HTM cells. In contrast, treatment of HTM cells with inhibitors of Rac GTPase caused cell-cell separation, a decrease in adherens junctions, and reorganization of actin stress fibers to the cell cortical regions and focal adhesion to the cell leading edges. Both, constitutively active Rac1 and PDGF stimulated generation of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) in HTM cells, and ROS were found to increase adherens junction formation and transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) in HTM cells. Topical application of Rac GTPase inhibitors (EHT1864 and NSC23766), however, only marginally influenced IOP in rabbit eyes. Taken together, these data reveal that while Rac GTPase signaling plays a significant role in regulation of adherens junctions, ROS production and TEER in cells of the AH outflow pathway, Rac inhibitors showed only a marginal influence on IOP in live rabbits. PMID:24932460

  19. Regulation of Adherens Junctions in Trabecular Meshwork Cells by Rac GTPase and their influence on Intraocular Pressure.

    PubMed

    Pattabiraman, Padmanabhan P; Epstein, David L; Rao, Ponugoti Vasantha

    2013-06-01

    Intercellular adherens junctions and cell-extracellular matrix interactions are presumed to influence aqueous humor (AH) drainage via the conventional route, however, their direct role in modulation of intraocular pressure (IOP) is not well understood. Here, we investigated the role of Rac GTPase signaling in basal and growth factor-induced formation of adherens junctions in human trabecular meshwork (HTM) cells as compared to human umbilical vascular endothelial cells, and evaluated the effects of inhibition of Rac GTPase activity on IOP in rabbits. Expression of a constitutively active Rac1 GTPase or treatment with platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), a known activator of Rac GTPase, induced formation of β-catenin-based adherens junctions, actin cytoskeletal reorganization and membrane ruffle in HTM cells. In contrast, treatment of HTM cells with inhibitors of Rac GTPase caused cell-cell separation, a decrease in adherens junctions, and reorganization of actin stress fibers to the cell cortical regions and focal adhesion to the cell leading edges. Both, constitutively active Rac1 and PDGF stimulated generation of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) in HTM cells, and ROS were found to increase adherens junction formation and transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) in HTM cells. Topical application of Rac GTPase inhibitors (EHT1864 and NSC23766), however, only marginally influenced IOP in rabbit eyes. Taken together, these data reveal that while Rac GTPase signaling plays a significant role in regulation of adherens junctions, ROS production and TEER in cells of the AH outflow pathway, Rac inhibitors showed only a marginal influence on IOP in live rabbits. PMID:24932460

  20. RhoA mediates cyclooxygenase-2 signaling to disrupt the formation of adherens junctions and increase cell motility.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Wen E; Marlin, Jerry W; Chance, Terry W; Jakobi, Rolf

    2006-12-15

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) represents an important target for treatment and prevention of colorectal cancer. Although COX-2 signaling is implicated in promoting tumor cell growth and invasion, the molecular mechanisms that mediate these processes are largely unknown. In this study, we show that the RhoA pathway mediates COX-2 signaling to disrupt the formation of adherens junctions and increase cell motility. Disruption of adherens junctions promotes tumor cell invasion and metastasis and is often associated with tumor progression. We detected high levels of RhoA activity in HCA-7 colon carcinoma cells that constitutively express COX-2. Inhibition of COX-2 significantly reduced the levels of RhoA activity in HCA-7 cells, suggesting that constitutive expression of COX-2 stimulates RhoA activity. Interestingly, inhibition of COX-2 or silencing of COX-2 expression with small interfering RNA (siRNA) stimulated the formation of adherens junctions, concomitant with increased protein levels of E-cadherin and alpha-catenin. Furthermore, inhibition of RhoA or silencing of RhoA expression with siRNA increased the levels of E-cadherin and alpha-catenin. Inhibition of Rho kinases (ROCK), the RhoA effector proteins, also increased levels of E-cadherin and alpha-catenin and stimulated formation of adherens junctions. The motility of HCA-7 cells was significantly decreased when COX-2 or RhoA was inhibited. Therefore, our data reveal a novel molecular mechanism that links COX-2 signaling to disrupt the formation of adherens junctions; COX-2 stimulates the RhoA/ROCK pathway, which reduces levels of E-cadherin and alpha-catenin leading to disruption of adherens junction formation and increased motility. Understanding of COX-2 downstream signaling pathways that promote tumor progression is crucial for the development of novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:17178865

  1. Pivotal Role of MUC1 Glycosylation by Cigarette Smoke in Modulating Disruption of Airway Adherens Junctions In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lili; Gallup, Marianne; Zlock, Lorna; Chen, Yu Ting Feeling; Finkbeiner, Walter E.; McNamara, Nancy A.

    2014-01-01

    Cigarette smoke increases the risk of lung cancer by 20-fold and accounts for 87% of lung cancer deaths. In the normal airway, heavily O-glycosylated mucin-1 (MUC1) and adherens junctions (AJs) establish a structural barrier that protects the airway from infectious, inflammatory and noxious stimuli. Smoke disrupts cell-cell adhesion via its damaging effects on the AJ protein, epithelial cadherin (E-cad). Loss of E-cad is a major hallmark of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and has been reported in lung cancer where it is associated with invasion, metastasis and poor prognosis. Using organotypic cultures of primary human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells treated with smoke-concentrated medium (Smk), we have demonstrated that E-cad loss is regulated through the aberrant interaction of its AJ binding partner, p120-catenin (p120ctn), and the C-terminus of MUC1 (MUC1-C). Here, we reported that even before MUC1-C became bound to p120ctn, smoke promoted the generation of a novel 400kDa glycoform of MUC1’s N-terminus (MUC1-N) differing from the 230kDa and 150kDa glycoforms in untreated control cells. The subsequent smoke-induced, time-dependent shedding of glycosylated MUC1-N exposed MUC1-C as a putative receptor for interactions with EGFR, Src and p120ctn. Smoke-induced MUC1-C glycosylation modulated MUC1-C tyrosine phosphorylation (TyrP) that was essential for MUC1-C/p120ctn interaction through dose-dependent bridging of Src/MUC1-C/galectin-3/EGFR signalosomes. Chemical deglycosylation of MUC1 using a mixture of N-glycosylation inhibitor tunicamycin and O-glycosylation inhibitor benzyl-α-GalNAc disrupted the Src/MUC1-C/galectin-3/EGFR complexes and thereby abolished smoke-induced MUC1-C-TyrP and MUC1-C/p120ctn interaction. Similarly, inhibition of smoke-induced MUC1-N glycosylation using adenoviral shRNA directed against N-acetyl-galactosaminyl transferase-6 (GALNT6, an enzyme that controls the initiating step of O-glycosylation) successfully suppressed MUC1-C

  2. Interlocked positive and negative feedback network motifs regulate β-catenin activity in the adherens junction pathway

    PubMed Central

    Klinke, David J.; Horvath, Nicholas; Cuppett, Vanessa; Wu, Yueting; Deng, Wentao; Kanj, Rania

    2015-01-01

    The integrity of epithelial tissue architecture is maintained through adherens junctions that are created through extracellular homotypic protein–protein interactions between cadherin molecules. Cadherins also provide an intracellular scaffold for the formation of a multiprotein complex that contains signaling proteins, including β-catenin. Environmental factors and controlled tissue reorganization disrupt adherens junctions by cleaving the extracellular binding domain and initiating a series of transcriptional events that aim to restore tissue homeostasis. However, it remains unclear how alterations in cell adhesion coordinate transcriptional events, including those mediated by β-catenin in this pathway. Here were used quantitative single-cell and population-level in vitro assays to quantify the endogenous pathway dynamics after the proteolytic disruption of the adherens junctions. Using prior knowledge of isolated elements of the overall network, we interpreted these data using in silico model-based inference to identify the topology of the regulatory network. Collectively the data suggest that the regulatory network contains interlocked network motifs consisting of a positive feedback loop, which is used to restore the integrity of adherens junctions, and a negative feedback loop, which is used to limit β-catenin–induced gene expression. PMID:26224311

  3. Disruption of Adherens Junctions Liberates Nectin-1 To Serve as Receptor for Herpes Simplex Virus and Pseudorabies Virus Entry

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Miri; Spear, Patricia G.

    2002-01-01

    Nectin-1, a cell adhesion molecule belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily, can bind to virion glycoprotein D (gD) to mediate entry of herpes simplex viruses (HSV) and pseudorabies virus (PRV). Nectin-1 colocalizes with E-cadherin at adherens junctions in epithelial cells. The disruption of cell junctions can result in the redistribution of nectin-1. To determine whether disruption of junctions by calcium depletion influenced the susceptibility of epithelial cells to viral entry, Madin-Darby canine kidney cells expressing endogenous nectin-1 or transfected human nectin-1 were tested for the ability to bind soluble forms of viral gD and to be infected by HSV and PRV, before and after calcium depletion. Confocal microscopy revealed that binding of HSV and PRV gD was localized to adherens junctions in cells maintained in normal medium but was distributed, along with nectin-1, over the entire cell surface after calcium depletion. Both the binding of gD and the fraction of cells that could be infected by HSV-1 and PRV were enhanced by calcium depletion. Taken together, these results provide evidence that nectin-1 confined to adherens junctions in epithelial cells is not very accessible to virus, whereas dissociation of cell junctions releases nectin-1 to serve more efficiently as an entry receptor. PMID:12072519

  4. Multicomponent Analysis of Junctional Movements Regulated by Myosin II Isoforms at the Epithelial Zonula Adherens

    PubMed Central

    Smutny, Michael; Wu, Selwin K.; Gomez, Guillermo A.; Mangold, Sabine; Yap, Alpha S.; Hamilton, Nicholas A.

    2011-01-01

    The zonula adherens (ZA) of epithelial cells is a site of cell-cell adhesion where cellular forces are exerted and resisted. Increasing evidence indicates that E-cadherin adhesion molecules at the ZA serve to sense force applied on the junctions and coordinate cytoskeletal responses to those forces. Efforts to understand the role that cadherins play in mechanotransduction have been limited by the lack of assays to measure the impact of forces on the ZA. In this study we used 4D imaging of GFP-tagged E-cadherin to analyse the movement of the ZA. Junctions in confluent epithelial monolayers displayed prominent movements oriented orthogonal (perpendicular) to the ZA itself. Two components were identified in these movements: a relatively slow unidirectional (translational) component that could be readily fitted by least-squares regression analysis, upon which were superimposed more rapid oscillatory movements. Myosin IIB was a dominant factor responsible for driving the unilateral translational movements. In contrast, frequency spectrum analysis revealed that depletion of Myosin IIA increased the power of the oscillatory movements. This implies that Myosin IIA may serve to dampen oscillatory movements of the ZA. This extends our recent analysis of Myosin II at the ZA to demonstrate that Myosin IIA and Myosin IIB make distinct contributions to junctional movement at the ZA. PMID:21799860

  5. Photoperiod-Dependent Effects of 4-tert-Octylphenol on Adherens and Gap Junction Proteins in Bank Vole Seminiferous Tubules

    PubMed Central

    Kuras, Paulina; Lydka-Zarzycka, Marta; Bilinska, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    In the present study we evaluated in vivo and in vitro effects of 4-tert-octylphenol (OP) on the expression and distribution of adherens and gap junction proteins, N-cadherin, β-catenin, and connexin 43 (Cx43), in testes of seasonally breeding rodents, bank voles. We found that in bank vole testes expression and distribution of N-cadherin, β-catenin, and Cx43 were photoperiod dependent. Long-term treatment with OP (200 mg/kg b.w.) resulted in the reduction of junction proteins expressions (P < 0.05, P < 0.01) and their delocalization in the testes of males kept in long photoperiod, whereas in short-day animals slight increase of Cx43 (P < 0.05), N-cadherin, and β-catenin (statistically nonsignificant) levels was observed. Effects of OP appeared to be independent of FSH and were maintained during in vitro organ culture, indicating that OP acts directly on adherens and gap junction proteins in the testes. An experiment performed using an antiestrogen ICI 182,780 demonstrated that the biological effects of OP on β-catenin and Cx43 involve an estrogen receptor-mediated response. Taken together, in bank vole organization of adherens and gap junctions and their susceptibility to OP are related to the length of photoperiod. Alterations in cadherin/catenin and Cx43-based junction may partially result from activation of estrogen receptor α and/or β signaling pathway. PMID:23737770

  6. VEGFR2 pY949 signalling regulates adherens junction integrity and metastatic spread

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiujuan; Padhan, Narendra; Sjöström, Elisabet O.; Roche, Francis P.; Testini, Chiara; Honkura, Naoki; Sáinz-Jaspeado, Miguel; Gordon, Emma; Bentley, Katie; Philippides, Andrew; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Dejana, Elisabetta; Stan, Radu V.; Vestweber, Dietmar; Ballmer-Hofer, Kurt; Betsholtz, Christer; Pietras, Kristian; Jansson, Leif; Claesson-Welsh, Lena

    2016-01-01

    The specific role of VEGFA-induced permeability and vascular leakage in physiology and pathology has remained unclear. Here we show that VEGFA-induced vascular leakage depends on signalling initiated via the VEGFR2 phosphosite Y949, regulating dynamic c-Src and VE-cadherin phosphorylation. Abolished Y949 signalling in the mouse mutant Vegfr2Y949F/Y949F leads to VEGFA-resistant endothelial adherens junctions and a block in molecular extravasation. Vessels in Vegfr2Y949F/Y949F mice remain sensitive to inflammatory cytokines, and vascular morphology, blood pressure and flow parameters are normal. Tumour-bearing Vegfr2Y949F/Y949F mice display reduced vascular leakage and oedema, improved response to chemotherapy and, importantly, reduced metastatic spread. The inflammatory infiltration in the tumour micro-environment is unaffected. Blocking VEGFA-induced disassembly of endothelial junctions, thereby suppressing tumour oedema and metastatic spread, may be preferable to full vascular suppression in the treatment of certain cancer forms. PMID:27005951

  7. Striatins as plaque molecules of zonulae adhaerentes in simple epithelia, of tessellate junctions in stratified epithelia, of cardiac composite junctions and of various size classes of lateral adherens junctions in cultures of epithelia- and carcinoma-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Franke, Werner W; Rickelt, Steffen; Zimbelmann, Ralf; Dörflinger, Yvette; Kuhn, Caecilia; Frey, Norbert; Heid, Hans; Rosin-Arbesfeld, Rina

    2015-03-01

    Proteins of the striatin family (striatins 1-4; sizes ranging from 90 to 110 kDa on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis) are highly homologous in their amino acid sequences but can differ in their cell-type-specific gene expression patterns and biological functions. In various cell types, we have found one, two or three polypeptides of this evolutionarily old and nearly ubiquitous family of proteins known to serve as scaffold proteins for diverse protein complexes. Light and electron microscopic immunolocalization methods have revealed striatins in mammalian cell-cell adherens junctions (AJs). In simple epithelia, we have localized striatins as constitutive components of the plaques of the subapical zonulae adhaerentes of cells, including intestinal, glandular, ductal and urothelial cells and hepatocytes. Striatins colocalize with E-cadherin or E-N-cadherin heterodimers and with the plaque proteins α- and β-catenin, p120 and p0071. In some epithelia and carcinomas and in cultured cells derived therefrom, striatins are also seen in lateral AJs. In stratified epithelia and in corresponding squamous cell carcinomas, striatins can be found in plaques of some forms of tessellate junctions. Moreover, striatins are major plaque proteins of composite junctions (CJs; areae compositae) in the intercalated disks connecting cardiomyocytes, colocalizing with other CJ molecules, including plectin and ankyrin-G. We discuss the "multimodulator" scaffold roles of striatins in the initiation and regulation of the formation of various complex particles and structures. We propose that striatins are included in the diagnostic candidate list of proteins that, in the CJs of human hearts, can occur in mutated forms in the pathogeneses of hereditary cardiomyopathies, as seen in some types of genetically determined heart damage in boxer dogs. PMID:25501894

  8. Planar cell polarity protein Celsr1 regulates endothelial adherens junctions and directed cell rearrangements during valve morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tatin, Florence; Taddei, Andrea; Weston, Anne; Fuchs, Elaine; Devenport, Danelle; Tissir, Fadel; Makinen, Taija

    2013-07-15

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling controls tissue morphogenesis by coordinating collective cell behaviors. We show a critical role for the core PCP proteins Celsr1 and Vangl2 in the complex morphogenetic process of intraluminal valve formation in lymphatic vessels. We found that valve-forming endothelial cells undergo elongation, reorientation, and collective migration into the vessel lumen as they initiate valve leaflet formation. During this process, Celsr1 and Vangl2 are recruited from endothelial filopodia to discrete membrane domains at cell-cell contacts. Celsr1- or Vangl2-deficient mice show valve aplasia due to failure of endothelial cells to undergo rearrangements and adopt perpendicular orientation at valve initiation sites. Mechanistically, we show that Celsr1 regulates dynamic cell movements by inhibiting stabilization of VE-cadherin and maturation of adherens junctions. These findings reveal a role for PCP signaling in regulating adherens junctions and directed cell rearrangements during vascular development. PMID:23792146

  9. Mammary epithelial cell phagocytosis downstream of TGF-β3 is characterized by adherens junction reorganization

    PubMed Central

    Fornetti, J; Flanders, K C; Henson, P M; Tan, A-C; Borges, V F; Schedin, P

    2016-01-01

    After weaning, during mammary gland involution, milk-producing mammary epithelial cells undergo apoptosis. Effective clearance of these dying cells is essential, as persistent apoptotic cells have a negative impact on gland homeostasis, future lactation and cancer susceptibility. In mice, apoptotic cells are cleared by the neighboring epithelium, yet little is known about how mammary epithelial cells become phagocytic or whether this function is conserved between species. Here we use a rat model of weaning-induced involution and involuting breast tissue from women, to demonstrate apoptotic cells within luminal epithelial cells and epithelial expression of the scavenger mannose receptor, suggesting conservation of phagocytosis by epithelial cells. In the rat, epithelial transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling is increased during involution, a pathway known to promote phagocytic capability. To test whether TGF-β enhances the phagocytic ability of mammary epithelial cells, non-transformed murine mammary epithelial EpH4 cells were cultured to achieve tight junction impermeability, such as occurs during lactation. TGF-β3 treatment promoted loss of tight junction impermeability, reorganization and cleavage of the adherens junction protein E-cadherin (E-cad), and phagocytosis. Phagocytosis correlated with junction disruption, suggesting junction reorganization is necessary for phagocytosis by epithelial cells. Supporting this hypothesis, epithelial cell E-cad reorganization and cleavage were observed in rat and human involuting mammary glands. Further, in the rat, E-cad cleavage correlated with increased γ-secretase activity and β-catenin nuclear localization. In vitro, pharmacologic inhibitors of γ-secretase or β-catenin reduced the effect of TGF-β3 on phagocytosis to near baseline levels. However, β-catenin signaling through LiCl treatment did not enhance phagocytic capacity, suggesting a model in which both reorganization of cell junctions and

  10. Mammary epithelial cell phagocytosis downstream of TGF-β3 is characterized by adherens junction reorganization.

    PubMed

    Fornetti, J; Flanders, K C; Henson, P M; Tan, A-C; Borges, V F; Schedin, P

    2016-02-01

    After weaning, during mammary gland involution, milk-producing mammary epithelial cells undergo apoptosis. Effective clearance of these dying cells is essential, as persistent apoptotic cells have a negative impact on gland homeostasis, future lactation and cancer susceptibility. In mice, apoptotic cells are cleared by the neighboring epithelium, yet little is known about how mammary epithelial cells become phagocytic or whether this function is conserved between species. Here we use a rat model of weaning-induced involution and involuting breast tissue from women, to demonstrate apoptotic cells within luminal epithelial cells and epithelial expression of the scavenger mannose receptor, suggesting conservation of phagocytosis by epithelial cells. In the rat, epithelial transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling is increased during involution, a pathway known to promote phagocytic capability. To test whether TGF-β enhances the phagocytic ability of mammary epithelial cells, non-transformed murine mammary epithelial EpH4 cells were cultured to achieve tight junction impermeability, such as occurs during lactation. TGF-β3 treatment promoted loss of tight junction impermeability, reorganization and cleavage of the adherens junction protein E-cadherin (E-cad), and phagocytosis. Phagocytosis correlated with junction disruption, suggesting junction reorganization is necessary for phagocytosis by epithelial cells. Supporting this hypothesis, epithelial cell E-cad reorganization and cleavage were observed in rat and human involuting mammary glands. Further, in the rat, E-cad cleavage correlated with increased γ-secretase activity and β-catenin nuclear localization. In vitro, pharmacologic inhibitors of γ-secretase or β-catenin reduced the effect of TGF-β3 on phagocytosis to near baseline levels. However, β-catenin signaling through LiCl treatment did not enhance phagocytic capacity, suggesting a model in which both reorganization of cell junctions and

  11. HIV-associated disruption of tight and adherens junctions of oral epithelial cells facilitates HSV-1 infection and spread.

    PubMed

    Sufiawati, Irna; Tugizov, Sharof M

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) types 1 and 2 are the most common opportunistic infections in HIV/AIDS. In these immunocompromised individuals, HSV-1 reactivates and replicates in oral epithelium, leading to oral disorders such as ulcers, gingivitis, and necrotic lesions. Although the increased risk of HSV infection may be mediated in part by HIV-induced immune dysfunction, direct or indirect interactions of HIV and HSV at the molecular level may also play a role. In this report we show that prolonged interaction of the HIV proteins tat and gp120 and cell-free HIV virions with polarized oral epithelial cells leads to disruption of tight and adherens junctions of epithelial cells through the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway. HIV-induced disruption of oral epithelial junctions facilitates HSV-1 paracellular spread between the epithelial cells. Furthermore, HIV-associated disruption of adherens junctions exposes sequestered nectin-1, an adhesion protein and critical receptor for HSV envelope glycoprotein D (gD). Exposure of nectin-1 facilitates binding of HSV-1 gD, which substantially increases HSV-1 infection of epithelial cells with disrupted junctions over that of cells with intact junctions. Exposed nectin-1 from disrupted adherens junctions also increases the cell-to-cell spread of HSV-1 from infected to uninfected oral epithelial cells. Antibodies to nectin-1 and HSV-1 gD substantially reduce HSV-1 infection and cell-to-cell spread, indicating that HIV-promoted HSV infection and spread are mediated by the interaction of HSV gD with HIV-exposed nectin-1. Our data suggest that HIV-associated disruption of oral epithelial junctions may potentiate HSV-1 infection and its paracellular and cell-to-cell spread within the oral mucosal epithelium. This could be one of the possible mechanisms of rapid development of HSV-associated oral lesions in HIV-infected individuals. PMID:24586397

  12. HIV-Associated Disruption of Tight and Adherens Junctions of Oral Epithelial Cells Facilitates HSV-1 Infection and Spread

    PubMed Central

    Sufiawati, Irna; Tugizov, Sharof M.

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) types 1 and 2 are the most common opportunistic infections in HIV/AIDS. In these immunocompromised individuals, HSV-1 reactivates and replicates in oral epithelium, leading to oral disorders such as ulcers, gingivitis, and necrotic lesions. Although the increased risk of HSV infection may be mediated in part by HIV-induced immune dysfunction, direct or indirect interactions of HIV and HSV at the molecular level may also play a role. In this report we show that prolonged interaction of the HIV proteins tat and gp120 and cell-free HIV virions with polarized oral epithelial cells leads to disruption of tight and adherens junctions of epithelial cells through the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway. HIV-induced disruption of oral epithelial junctions facilitates HSV-1 paracellular spread between the epithelial cells. Furthermore, HIV-associated disruption of adherens junctions exposes sequestered nectin-1, an adhesion protein and critical receptor for HSV envelope glycoprotein D (gD). Exposure of nectin-1 facilitates binding of HSV-1 gD, which substantially increases HSV-1 infection of epithelial cells with disrupted junctions over that of cells with intact junctions. Exposed nectin-1 from disrupted adherens junctions also increases the cell-to-cell spread of HSV-1 from infected to uninfected oral epithelial cells. Antibodies to nectin-1 and HSV-1 gD substantially reduce HSV-1 infection and cell-to-cell spread, indicating that HIV-promoted HSV infection and spread are mediated by the interaction of HSV gD with HIV-exposed nectin-1. Our data suggest that HIV-associated disruption of oral epithelial junctions may potentiate HSV-1 infection and its paracellular and cell-to-cell spread within the oral mucosal epithelium. This could be one of the possible mechanisms of rapid development of HSV-associated oral lesions in HIV-infected individuals. PMID:24586397

  13. Targeting of Transmembrane Protein Shrew-1 to Adherens Junctions Is Controlled by Cytoplasmic Sorting Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Jakob, Viktor; Schreiner, Alexander; Tikkanen, Ritva

    2006-01-01

    We recently identified transmembrane protein shrew-1 and showed that it is able to target to adherens junctions in polarized epithelial cells. This suggested shrew-1 possesses specific basolateral sorting motifs, which we analyzed by mutational analysis. Systematic mutation of amino acids in putative sorting signals in the cytoplasmic domain of shrew-1 revealed three tyrosines and a dileucine motif necessary for basolateral sorting. Substitution of these amino acids leads to apical localization of shrew-1. By applying tannic acid to either the apical or basolateral part of polarized epithelial cells, thereby blocking vesicle fusion with the plasma membrane, we obtained evidence that the apically localized mutants were primarily targeted to the basolateral membrane and were then redistributed to the apical domain. Further support for a postendocytic sorting mechanism of shrew-1 was obtained by demonstrating that μ1B, a subunit of the epithelial cell-specific adaptor complex AP-1B, interacts with shrew-1. In conclusion, our data provide evidence for a scenario where shrew-1 is primarily delivered to the basolateral membrane by a so far unknown mechanism. Once there, adaptor protein complex AP-1B is involved in retaining shrew-1 at the basolateral membrane by postendocytic sorting mechanisms. PMID:16707570

  14. Segmentation and Tracking of Adherens Junctions in 3D for the Analysis of Epithelial Tissue Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Cilla, Rodrigo; Mechery, Vinodh; Hernandez de Madrid, Beatriz; Del Signore, Steven; Dotu, Ivan; Hatini, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial morphogenesis generates the shape of tissues, organs and embryos and is fundamental for their proper function. It is a dynamic process that occurs at multiple spatial scales from macromolecular dynamics, to cell deformations, mitosis and apoptosis, to coordinated cell rearrangements that lead to global changes of tissue shape. Using time lapse imaging, it is possible to observe these events at a system level. However, to investigate morphogenetic events it is necessary to develop computational tools to extract quantitative information from the time lapse data. Toward this goal, we developed an image-based computational pipeline to preprocess, segment and track epithelial cells in 4D confocal microscopy data. The computational pipeline we developed, for the first time, detects the adherens junctions of epithelial cells in 3D, without the need to first detect cell nuclei. We accentuate and detect cell outlines in a series of steps, symbolically describe the cells and their connectivity, and employ this information to track the cells. We validated the performance of the pipeline for its ability to detect vertices and cell-cell contacts, track cells, and identify mitosis and apoptosis in surface epithelia of Drosophila imaginal discs. We demonstrate the utility of the pipeline to extract key quantitative features of cell behavior with which to elucidate the dynamics and biomechanical control of epithelial tissue morphogenesis. We have made our methods and data available as an open-source multiplatform software tool called TTT (http://github.com/morganrcu/TTT) PMID:25884654

  15. Targeted Recycling of the Lateral Border Recycling Compartment Precedes Adherens Junction Dissociation during Transendothelial Migration.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Annette M; Cyrus, Bita F; Muller, William A

    2016-05-01

    Leukocyte transendothelial migration (TEM) requires two major events: local dissociation of adherens junctions manifested as gaps in vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin staining at the site of TEM and targeted trafficking of the lateral border recycling compartment (LBRC) to the site of TEM. However, the association between LBRC recycling and VE-cadherin gaps remains unknown. We found that when targeting of the LBRC is selectively inhibited using established methods, such as a function blocking anti-platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 antibody, depolymerizing microtubules, or microinjection of an antibody that inhibits kinesin, VE-cadherin gaps do not form around the blocked leukocyte. This is the first time that the LBRC has been implicated in this process. We obtained similar results for neutrophils and monocytes and in studies using live cell imaging microscopy conducted under fluid shear conditions. Depolymerizing microtubules did not affect the ability of leukocytes to induce tyrosine phosphorylation of VE-cadherin. A VE-cadherin double mutant (Y658F, Y731F) expressed in endothelial cells acted as a dominant negative and inhibited VE-cadherin gap formation and TEM, yet targeting of the LBRC still occurred. These data suggest that targeting of the LBRC to the site of TEM precedes VE-cadherin clearance. Recruitment of the LBRC may play a role in clearing VE-cadherin from the site of TEM. PMID:26968345

  16. RPTPα controls epithelial adherens junctions, linking E-cadherin engagement to c-Src-mediated phosphorylation of cortactin.

    PubMed

    Truffi, Marta; Dubreuil, Véronique; Liang, Xuan; Vacaresse, Nathalie; Nigon, Fabienne; Han, Siew Ping; Yap, Alpha S; Gomez, Guillermo A; Sap, Jan

    2014-06-01

    Epithelial junctions are fundamental determinants of tissue organization, subject to regulation by tyrosine phosphorylation. Homophilic binding of E-cadherin activates tyrosine kinases, such as Src, that control junctional integrity. Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) also contribute to cadherin-based adhesion and signaling, but little is known about their specific identity or functions at epithelial junctions. Here, we report that the receptor PTP RPTPα (human gene name PTPRA) is recruited to epithelial adherens junctions at the time of cell-cell contact, where it is in molecular proximity to E-cadherin. RPTPα is required for appropriate cadherin-dependent adhesion and for cyst architecture in three-dimensional culture. Loss of RPTPα impairs adherens junction integrity, as manifested by defective E-cadherin accumulation and peri-junctional F-actin density. These effects correlate with a role for RPTPα in cellular (c)-Src activation at sites of E-cadherin engagement. Mechanistically, RPTPα is required for appropriate tyrosine phosphorylation of cortactin, a major Src substrate and a cytoskeletal actin organizer. Expression of a phosphomimetic cortactin mutant in RPTPα-depleted cells partially rescues F-actin and E-cadherin accumulation at intercellular contacts. These findings indicate that RPTPα controls cadherin-mediated signaling by linking homophilic E-cadherin engagement to cortactin tyrosine phosphorylation through c-Src. PMID:24652832

  17. FSGS3/CD2AP is a barbed-end capping protein that stabilizes actin and strengthens adherens junctions

    PubMed Central

    Brieher, William M.

    2013-01-01

    By combining in vitro reconstitution biochemistry with a cross-linking approach, we have identified focal segmental glomerulosclerosis 3/CD2-associated protein (FSGS3/CD2AP) as a novel actin barbed-end capping protein responsible for actin stability at the adherens junction. FSGS3/CD2AP colocalizes with E-cadherin and α-actinin-4 at the apical junction in polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. Knockdown of FSGS3/CD2AP compromised actin stability and decreased actin accumulation at the adherens junction. Using a novel apparatus to apply mechanical stress to cell–cell junctions, we showed that knockdown of FSGS3/CD2AP compromised adhesive strength, resulting in tearing between cells and disruption of barrier function. Our results reveal a novel function of FSGS3/CD2AP and a previously unrecognized role of barbed-end capping in junctional actin dynamics. Our study underscores the complexity of actin regulation at cell–cell contacts that involves actin activators, inhibitors, and stabilizers to control adhesive strength, epithelial behavior, and permeability barrier integrity. PMID:24322428

  18. Protein tyrosine phosphatase κ and SHP-1 are involved in the regulation of cell-cell contacts at adherens junctions in the exocrine pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Schnekenburger, J; Mayerle, J; Krüger, B; Buchwalow, I; Weiss, F U; Albrecht, E; Samoilova, V E; Domschke, W; Lerch, M M

    2005-01-01

    Background: We have previously shown that cell contacts between pancreatic acinar cells dissociate early in pancreatitis and that this is a prerequisite for the development of pancreatic oedema. Here we studied the underlying mechanism. Methods: Employing experimental caerulein induced pancreatitis in vivo and isolated pancreatic acini ex vivo, in conjunction with protein chemistry, morphology, and electron microscopy, we determined whether cell contact regulation in the pancreas requires or involves: (1) changes in cadherin-catenin protein expression, (2) tyrosine phosphorylation of adhesion proteins, or (3) alterations in the actin cytoskeleton. Results: During initial cell-cell contact dissociation at adherens junctions, expression of adhesion proteins remained stable. At time points of dissociated adherens junctions, the cadherin-catenin complex was found to be tyrosine phosphorylated and internalised. The receptor type protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP)κ was constitutively associated with the cadherin-catenin complex at intact cell contacts whereas following the dissociation of adherens junctions, the internalised components of the cadherin-catenin complex were tyrosine phosphorylated and associated with the cytosolic PTP SHP-1. In isolated acini, inhibition of endogenous protein tyrosine phosphatases alone was sufficient to induce dissociation of adherens junctions analogous to that found with supramaximal caerulein stimulation. Dissociation of actin microfilaments had no effect on adherens junction integrity. Conclusions: These data identify tyrosine phosphorylation as the key regulator for cell contacts at adherens junctions and suggest a definitive role for the protein tyrosine phosphatases PTPκ and SHP-1 in the regulation, maintenance, and restitution of cell adhesions in a complex epithelial organ such as the pancreas. PMID:15987791

  19. A novel amphioxus cadherin that localizes to epithelial adherens junctions has an unusual domain organization with implications for chordate phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Oda, Hiroki; Wada, Hiroshi; Tagawa, Kunifumi; Akiyama-Oda, Yasuko; Satoh, Nori; Humphreys, Tom; Zhang, Shicui; Tsukita, Shoichiro

    2002-01-01

    Although data are available from only vertebrates, urochordates, and three nonchordate animals, there are definite differences in the structures of classic cadherins between vertebrates plus urochordates and nonchordates. In this study we examined structural diversity of classic cadherins among bilaterian animals by obtaining new data from an amphioxus (Cephalochordata, Chordata), an acorn worm (Hemichordata), a sea star (Echinodermata), and an oyster (Mollusca). The structures of newly identified nonchordate cadherins are grouped together with those of the known sea urchin and Drosophila cadherins, whereas the structure of an amphioxus (Branchiostoma belcheri) cadherin, designated BbC, is differently categorized from those of other known chordate cadherins. BbC is identified as a cadherin by its cytoplasmic domain whose sequence is highly related to the cytoplasmic sequences of all known classic cadherins, but it lacks all of the five repeats constituting the extracellular homophilic-binding domain of other chordate cadherins. The ectodomains of BbC match the ectodomains found in nonchordate cadherins but not present in other chordate cadherins. We show that the BbC functions as a cell-cell adhesion molecule when expressed in Drosophila S2 cells and localizes to adherens junctions in the ectodermal epithelia in amphioxus embryos. We argue that BbC is the amphioxus homologue of the classic cadherins involved in the formation of epithelial adherens junctions. The structural relationships of the cadherin molecules allow us to propose a possibility that cephalochordates might be basal to the sister-groups vertebrates and urochordates. PMID:12492143

  20. The F-BAR protein pacsin2 inhibits asymmetric VE-cadherin internalization from tensile adherens junctions

    PubMed Central

    Dorland, Yvonne L.; Malinova, Tsveta S.; van Stalborch, Anne-Marieke D.; Grieve, Adam G.; van Geemen, Daphne; Jansen, Nicolette S.; de Kreuk, Bart-Jan; Nawaz, Kalim; Kole, Jeroen; Geerts, Dirk; Musters, René J. P.; de Rooij, Johan; Hordijk, Peter L.; Huveneers, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Vascular homoeostasis, development and disease critically depend on the regulation of endothelial cell–cell junctions. Here we uncover a new role for the F-BAR protein pacsin2 in the control of VE-cadherin-based endothelial adhesion. Pacsin2 concentrates at focal adherens junctions (FAJs) that are experiencing unbalanced actomyosin-based pulling. FAJs move in response to differences in local cytoskeletal geometry and pacsin2 is recruited consistently to the trailing end of fast-moving FAJs via a mechanism that requires an intact F-BAR domain. Photoconversion, photobleaching, immunofluorescence and super-resolution microscopy reveal polarized dynamics, and organization of junctional proteins between the front of FAJs and their trailing ends. Interestingly, pacsin2 recruitment inhibits internalization of the VE-cadherin complex from FAJ trailing ends and is important for endothelial monolayer integrity. Together, these findings reveal a novel junction protective mechanism during polarized trafficking of VE-cadherin, which supports barrier maintenance within dynamic endothelial tissue. PMID:27417273

  1. The F-BAR protein pacsin2 inhibits asymmetric VE-cadherin internalization from tensile adherens junctions.

    PubMed

    Dorland, Yvonne L; Malinova, Tsveta S; van Stalborch, Anne-Marieke D; Grieve, Adam G; van Geemen, Daphne; Jansen, Nicolette S; de Kreuk, Bart-Jan; Nawaz, Kalim; Kole, Jeroen; Geerts, Dirk; Musters, René J P; de Rooij, Johan; Hordijk, Peter L; Huveneers, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Vascular homoeostasis, development and disease critically depend on the regulation of endothelial cell-cell junctions. Here we uncover a new role for the F-BAR protein pacsin2 in the control of VE-cadherin-based endothelial adhesion. Pacsin2 concentrates at focal adherens junctions (FAJs) that are experiencing unbalanced actomyosin-based pulling. FAJs move in response to differences in local cytoskeletal geometry and pacsin2 is recruited consistently to the trailing end of fast-moving FAJs via a mechanism that requires an intact F-BAR domain. Photoconversion, photobleaching, immunofluorescence and super-resolution microscopy reveal polarized dynamics, and organization of junctional proteins between the front of FAJs and their trailing ends. Interestingly, pacsin2 recruitment inhibits internalization of the VE-cadherin complex from FAJ trailing ends and is important for endothelial monolayer integrity. Together, these findings reveal a novel junction protective mechanism during polarized trafficking of VE-cadherin, which supports barrier maintenance within dynamic endothelial tissue. PMID:27417273

  2. The tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 regulates recovery of endothelial adherens junctions through control of β-catenin phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Timmerman, Ilse; Hoogenboezem, Mark; Bennett, Anton M.; Geerts, Dirk; Hordijk, Peter L.; van Buul, Jaap D.

    2012-01-01

    Impaired endothelial barrier function results in a persistent increase in endothelial permeability and vascular leakage. Repair of a dysfunctional endothelial barrier requires controlled restoration of adherens junctions, comprising vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin and associated β-, γ-, α-, and p120-catenins. Little is known about the mechanisms by which recovery of VE-cadherin–mediated cell–cell junctions is regulated. Using the inflammatory mediator thrombin, we demonstrate an important role for the Src homology 2-domain containing tyrosine phosphatase (SHP2) in mediating recovery of the VE-cadherin–controlled endothelial barrier. Using SHP2 substrate-trapping mutants and an in vitro phosphatase activity assay, we validate β-catenin as a bona fide SHP2 substrate. SHP2 silencing and SHP2 inhibition both result in delayed recovery of endothelial barrier function after thrombin stimulation. Moreover, on thrombin challenge, we find prolonged elevation in tyrosine phosphorylation levels of VE-cadherin–associated β-catenin in SHP2-depleted cells. No disassembly of the VE-cadherin complex is observed throughout the thrombin response. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, we show that loss of SHP2 reduces the mobility of VE-cadherin at recovered cell–cell junctions. In conclusion, our data show that the SHP2 phosphatase plays an important role in the recovery of disrupted endothelial cell–cell junctions by dephosphorylating VE-cadherin–associated β-catenin and promoting the mobility of VE-cadherin at the plasma membrane. PMID:22956765

  3. E-cadherin Surface Levels in Epithelial Growth Factor-stimulated Cells Depend on Adherens Junction Protein Shrew-1

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Julia Christina; Schreiner, Alexander; Engels, Knut

    2009-01-01

    Gain- and loss-of-function studies indicate that the adherens junction protein shrew-1 acts as a novel modulator of E-cadherin internalization induced by epithelial growth factor (EGF) or E-cadherin function-blocking antibody during epithelial cell dynamics. Knocking down shrew-1 in MCF-7 carcinoma cells preserves E-cadherin surface levels upon EGF stimulation. Overexpression of shrew-1 leads to preformation of an E-cadherin/EGF receptor (EGFR) HER2/src-kinase/shrew-1 signaling complex and accelerated E-cadherin internalization. Shrew-1 is not sufficient to stimulate E-cadherin internalization, but facilitates the actions of EGFR and thus may promote malignant progression in breast cancer cells with constitutive EGFR stimulation by reducing surface E-cadherin expression. PMID:19515834

  4. Microtubule plus-end and minus-end capture at adherens junctions is involved in the assembly of apico-basal arrays in polarised epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bellett, Gemma; Carter, Jane M; Keynton, Jennifer; Goldspink, Deborah; James, Colin; Moss, David K; Mogensen, Mette M

    2009-10-01

    Apico-basal polarisation of epithelial cells involves a dramatic reorganisation of the microtubule cytoskeleton. The classic radial array of microtubules focused on a centrally located centrosome typical of many animal cells is lost or greatly reduced and a non-centrosomal apico-basal array develops. The molecules and mechanisms responsible for the assembly and positioning of these non-centrosomal microtubules have not been fully elucidated. Using a Nocodazole induced regrowth assay in invitro culture (MDCK) and in situ epithelial (cochlear Kolliker's) cell models we establish that the apico-basal array originates from the centrosome and that the non-centrosomal microtubule minus-end anchoring sites do not contribute significantly to their nucleation. Confocal and electron microscopy revealed that an extended radial array assembles with microtubule plus-ends targeting cadheren sites at adherens junctions and EB1 and CLIP-170 co-localising with beta-catenin and dynein clusters at the junction sites. The extended radial array is likely to be a vital intermediate step in the assembly process with cortical anchored dynein providing the mechanical force required for microtubule release, translocation and capture. Ultrastructural analyses of the apico-basal arrays in fully polarised MDCK and Kolliker's cells revealed microtubule minus-end association with the most apical adherens junction (Zonula adherens). We propose that a release and capture model involving both microtubule plus- and minus-end capture at adherens junctions is responsible for the generation of non-centrosomal apico-basal arrays in most centrosome containing polarised epithelial cells. PMID:19479825

  5. Negatively charged silver nanoparticles cause retinal vascular permeability by activating plasma contact system and disrupting adherens junction.

    PubMed

    Long, Yan-Min; Zhao, Xing-Chen; Clermont, Allen C; Zhou, Qun-Fang; Liu, Qian; Feener, Edward P; Yan, Bing; Jiang, Gui-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been extensively used as antibacterial component in numerous healthcare, biomedical and consumer products. Therefore, their adverse effects to biological systems have become a major concern. AgNPs have been shown to be absorbed into circulation and redistributed into various organs. It is thus of great importance to understand how these nanoparticles affect vascular permeability and uncover the underlying molecular mechanisms. A negatively charged mecaptoundeonic acid-capped silver nanoparticle (MUA@AgNP) was investigated in this work. Ex vivo experiments in mouse plasma revealed that MUA@AgNPs caused plasma prekallikrein cleavage, while positively charged or neutral AgNPs, as well as Ag ions had no effect. In vitro tests revealed that MUA@AgNPs activated the plasma kallikrein-kinin system (KKS) by triggering Hageman factor autoactivation. By using specific inhibitors aprotinin and HOE 140, we demonstrated that KKS activation caused the release of bradykinin, which activated B2 receptors and induced the shedding of adherens junction protein, VE-cadherin. These biological perturbations eventually resulted in endothelial paracellular permeability in mouse retina after intravitreal injection of MUA@AgNPs. The findings from this work provided key insights for toxicity modulation and biomedical applications of AgNPs. PMID:26399585

  6. Lateral assembly of N-cadherin drives tissue integrity by stabilizing adherens junctions

    PubMed Central

    Garg, S.; Fischer, S. C.; Schuman, E. M.; Stelzer, E. H. K.

    2015-01-01

    Cadherin interactions ensure the correct registry and anchorage of cells during tissue formation. Along the plasma membrane, cadherins form inter-junctional lattices via cis- and trans-dimerization. While structural studies have provided models for cadherin interactions, the molecular nature of cadherin binding in vivo remains unexplored. We undertook a multi-disciplinary approach combining live cell imaging of three-dimensional cell assemblies (spheroids) with a computational model to study the dynamics of N-cadherin interactions. Using a loss-of-function strategy, we demonstrate that each N-cadherin interface plays a distinct role in spheroid formation. We found that cis-dimerization is not a prerequisite for trans-interactions, but rather modulates trans-interfaces to ensure tissue stability. Using a model of N-cadherin junction dynamics, we show that the absence of cis-interactions results in low junction stability and loss of tissue integrity. By quantifying the binding and unbinding dynamics of the N-cadherin binding interfaces, we determined that mutating either interface results in a 10-fold increase in the dissociation constant. These findings provide new quantitative information on the steps driving cadherin intercellular adhesion and demonstrate the role of cis-interactions in junction stability. PMID:25589573

  7. Crucial Role of Rapgef2 and Rapgef6, a Family of Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors for Rap1 Small GTPase, in Formation of Apical Surface Adherens Junctions and Neural Progenitor Development in the Mouse Cerebral Cortex123

    PubMed Central

    Maeta, Kazuhiro; Edamatsu, Hironori; Nishihara, Kaori; Ikutomo, Junji; Bilasy, Shymaa E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cerebral neocortex development in mammals requires highly orchestrated events involving proliferation, differentiation, and migration of neural progenitors and neurons. Rapgef2 and Rapgef6 constitute a unique family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors for Rap1 small GTPase, which is known to play crucial roles in migration of postmitotic neurons. We previously reported that conditional knockout of Rapgef2 in dorsal telencephalon (Rapgef2-cKO) resulted in the formation of an ectopic cortical mass (ECM) resembling that of subcortical band heterotopia. Here we show that double knockout of Rapgef6 in Rapgef2-cKO mice (Rapgef2/6-dKO) results in marked enlargement of the ECM. While Rapgef2-cKO affects late-born neurons only, Rapgef2/6-dKO affects both early-born and late-born neurons. The Rapgef2-cKO cortex at embryonic day (E) 15.5, and the Rapgef2/6-dKO cortex at E13.5 and E15.5 show disruption of the adherens junctions (AJs) on the apical surface, detachment of radial glial cells (RGCs) from the apical surface and disorganization of the radial glial fiber system, which are accompanied by aberrant distribution of RGCs and intermediate progenitors, normally located in the ventricular zone and the subventricular zone, respectively, over the entire cerebral cortex. Moreover, intrauterine transduction of Cre recombinase into the Rapgef2flox/flox brains also results in the apical surface AJ disruption and the RGC detachment from the apical surface, both of which are effectively suppressed by cotransduction of the constitutively active Rap1 mutant Rap1G12V. These results demonstrate a cell-autonomous role of the Rapgef2/6-Rap1 pathway in maintaining the apical surface AJ structures, which is necessary for the proper development of neural progenitor cells. PMID:27390776

  8. Protein 4.1R links E-cadherin/beta-catenin complex to the cytoskeleton through its direct interaction with beta-catenin and modulates adherens junction integrity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shaomin; Guo, Xinhua; Debnath, Gargi; Mohandas, Narla; An, Xiuli

    2009-07-01

    Protein 4.1R (4.1R) is the prototypical member of the protein 4.1 superfamily comprising of the protein 4.1 family (4.1R, 4.1B, 4.1G and 4.1N) and ERM family (ezrin, radixin and meosin). These proteins in general serve as adaptors between the membrane and the cytoskeleton. Here we show that 4.1R expressed in the gastric epithelial cells associates with adherens junction protein beta-catenin. Biochemical examination of 4.1R-deficient stomach epithelia revealed a selective reduction of beta-catenin which is accompanied by a weaker linkage of E-cadherin to the cytoskeleton. In addition, organization of actin cytoskeleton was altered in 4.1R-deficient cells. Moreover, histological examination revealed that cell-cell contacts are impaired and gastric glands are disorganized in 4.1R null stomach epithelia. These results demonstrate an important and previously unidentified role of 4.1R in linking the cadherin/catenin complex to the cytoskeleton through its direct interaction with beta-catenin and in regulating the integrity of adherens junction. PMID:19376086

  9. VASP, zyxin and TES are tension-dependent members of Focal Adherens Junctions independent of the α-catenin-vinculin module

    PubMed Central

    Oldenburg, Joppe; van der Krogt, Gerard; Twiss, Floor; Bongaarts, Annika; Habani, Yasmin; Slotman, Johan A.; Houtsmuller, Adriaan; Huveneers, Stephan; de Rooij, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical forces are integrated at cadherin-based adhesion complexes to regulate morphology and strength of cell-cell junctions and organization of associated F-actin. A central mechanosensor at the cadherin complex is α-catenin, whose stretching recruits vinculin to regulate adhesion strength. The identity of the F-actin regulating signals that are also activated by mechanical forces at cadherin-based junctions has remained elusive. Here we identify the actin-regulators VASP, zyxin and TES as members of punctate, tensile cadherin-based junctions called Focal Adherens Junctions (FAJ) and show that they display mechanosensitive recruitment similar to that of vinculin. However, this recruitment is not altered by destroying or over-activating the α-catenin/vinculin module. Structured Illumination Microscopy (SIM) indicates that these tension sensitive proteins concentrate at locations within FAJs that are distinct from the core cadherin complex proteins. Furthermore, localization studies using mutated versions of VASP and zyxin indicate that these two proteins require binding to each other in order to localize to the FAJs. We conclude that there are multiple force sensitive modules present at the FAJ that are activated at distinct locations along the cadherin-F-actin axis and regulate specific aspects of junction dynamics. PMID:26611125

  10. Folliculin, the product of the Birt-Hogg-Dube tumor suppressor gene, interacts with the adherens junction protein p0071 to regulate cell-cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Medvetz, Doug A; Khabibullin, Damir; Hariharan, Venkatesh; Ongusaha, Pat P; Goncharova, Elena A; Schlechter, Tanja; Darling, Thomas N; Hofmann, Ilse; Krymskaya, Vera P; Liao, James K; Huang, Hayden; Henske, Elizabeth P

    2012-01-01

    Birt-Hogg-Dube (BHD) is a tumor suppressor gene syndrome associated with fibrofolliculomas, cystic lung disease, and chromophobe renal cell carcinoma. In seeking to elucidate the pathogenesis of BHD, we discovered a physical interaction between folliculin (FLCN), the protein product of the BHD gene, and p0071, an armadillo repeat containing protein that localizes to the cytoplasm and to adherens junctions. Adherens junctions are one of the three cell-cell junctions that are essential to the establishment and maintenance of the cellular architecture of all epithelial tissues. Surprisingly, we found that downregulation of FLCN leads to increased cell-cell adhesion in functional cell-based assays and disruption of cell polarity in a three-dimensional lumen-forming assay, both of which are phenocopied by downregulation of p0071. These data indicate that the FLCN-p0071 protein complex is a negative regulator of cell-cell adhesion. We also found that FLCN positively regulates RhoA activity and Rho-associated kinase activity, consistent with the only known function of p0071. Finally, to examine the role of Flcn loss on cell-cell adhesion in vivo, we utilized keratin-14 cre-recombinase (K14-cre) to inactivate Flcn in the mouse epidermis. The K14-Cre-Bhd(flox/flox) mice have striking delays in eyelid opening, wavy fur, hair loss, and epidermal hyperplasia with increased levels of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) activity. These data support a model in which dysregulation of the FLCN-p0071 interaction leads to alterations in cell adhesion, cell polarity, and RhoA signaling, with broad implications for the role of cell-cell adhesion molecules in the pathogenesis of human disease, including emphysema and renal cell carcinoma. PMID:23139756

  11. The Wnt pathway destabilizes adherens junctions and promotes cell migration via β-catenin and its target gene cyclin D1.

    PubMed

    Vlad-Fiegen, Annica; Langerak, Anette; Eberth, Sonja; Müller, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    The Wnt pathway regulates cell proliferation, mobility and differentiation. Among the many Wnt target genes is CCND1 which codes for cyclin D1. Cyclin D1, in complex with cdk4 and cdk6, regulates G1/S phase transition during cell cycle. Independently of CDK, cyclin D1 also regulates the migration of macrophages. Here we analyzed the effects of cyclin D1 on the migration of cancer cell lines using the transwell migration and scratch assays. We also tested the effect of cyclin D1 and β-catenin on E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell contacts. Our results show that the Wnt pathway promotes cellular migration via its target gene cyclin D1. Moreover we show that cyclin D1 influences the actin cytoskeleton and destabilizes adherens junctions. PMID:23650577

  12. The Wnt pathway destabilizes adherens junctions and promotes cell migration via β-catenin and its target gene cyclin D1

    PubMed Central

    Vlad-Fiegen, Annica; Langerak, Anette; Eberth, Sonja; Müller, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    The Wnt pathway regulates cell proliferation, mobility and differentiation. Among the many Wnt target genes is CCND1 which codes for cyclin D1. Cyclin D1, in complex with cdk4 and cdk6, regulates G1/S phase transition during cell cycle. Independently of CDK, cyclin D1 also regulates the migration of macrophages. Here we analyzed the effects of cyclin D1 on the migration of cancer cell lines using the transwell migration and scratch assays. We also tested the effect of cyclin D1 and β-catenin on E-cadherin-mediated cell–cell contacts. Our results show that the Wnt pathway promotes cellular migration via its target gene cyclin D1. Moreover we show that cyclin D1 influences the actin cytoskeleton and destabilizes adherens junctions. PMID:23650577

  13. Pak4 Is Required during Epithelial Polarity Remodeling through Regulating AJ Stability and Bazooka Retention at the ZA

    PubMed Central

    Walther, Rhian F.; Nunes de Almeida, Francisca; Vlassaks, Evi; Burden, Jemima J.; Pichaud, Franck

    2016-01-01

    Summary The ability of epithelial cells to assemble into sheets relies on their zonula adherens (ZA), a circumferential belt of adherens junction (AJ) material, which can be remodeled during development to shape organs. Here, we show that during ZA remodeling in a model neuroepithelial cell, the Cdc42 effector P21-activated kinase 4 (Pak4/Mbt) regulates AJ morphogenesis and stability through β-catenin (β-cat/Arm) phosphorylation. We find that β-catenin phosphorylation by Mbt, and associated AJ morphogenesis, is needed for the retention of the apical determinant Par3/Bazooka at the remodeling ZA. Importantly, this retention mechanism functions together with Par1-dependent lateral exclusion of Par3/Bazooka to regulate apical membrane differentiation. Our results reveal an important functional link between Pak4, AJ material morphogenesis, and polarity remodeling during organogenesis downstream of Par3. PMID:27052178

  14. Id-1 promotes TGF-{beta}1-induced cell motility through HSP27 activation and disassembly of adherens junction in prostate epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Di Kaijun; Wong, Y.C. Wang Xianghong

    2007-11-15

    Id-1 (inhibitor of differentiation or DNA binding-1) has been positively associated with cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, and invasiveness during tumorigenesis. In addition, Id-1 has been shown to modulate cellular sensitivity to TGF-{beta}1 (transforming growth factor {beta}1). Here we demonstrate a novel role of Id-1 in promoting TGF-{beta}1-induced cell motility in a non-malignant prostate epithelial cell line, NPTX. We found that Id-1 promoted F-actin stress fiber formation in response to TGF-{beta}1, which was associated with increased cell-substrate adhesion and cell migration in NPTX cells. In addition, this positive effect of Id-1 on TGF-{beta}1-induced cell motility was mediated through activation of MEK-ERK signaling pathway and subsequent phosphorylation of HSP27 (heat shock protein 27). Furthermore, Id-1 disrupted the adherens junction complex in TGF-{beta}1-treated cells through down-regulation of E-cadherin, redistribution of {beta}-catenin, along with up-regulation of N-cadherin. These lines of evidence reveal a novel tumorigenic role of Id-1 through reorganization of actin cytoskeleton and disassembly of cell-cell adhesion in response to TGF-{beta}1 in human prostate epithelial cells, and suggest that intracellular Id-1 levels might be a determining factor for switching TGF-{beta}1 from a growth inhibitor to a tumor promoter during prostate carcinogenesis.

  15. Rab14 and Its Exchange Factor FAM116 Link Endocytic Recycling and Adherens Junction Stability in Migrating Cells

    PubMed Central

    Linford, Andrea; Yoshimura, Shin-ichiro; Bastos, Ricardo Nunes; Langemeyer, Lars; Gerondopoulos, Andreas; Rigden, Daniel J.; Barr, Francis A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Rab GTPases define the vesicle trafficking pathways underpinning cell polarization and migration. Here, we find that Rab4, Rab11, and Rab14 and the candidate Rab GDP-GTP exchange factors (GEFs) FAM116A and AVL9 are required for cell migration. Rab14 and its GEF FAM116A localize to and act on an intermediate compartment of the transferrin-recycling pathway prior to Rab11 and after Rab5 and Rab4. This Rab14 intermediate recycling compartment has specific functions in migrating cells discrete from early and recycling endosomes. Rab14-depleted cells show increased N-cadherin levels at junctional complexes and cannot resolve cell-cell junctions. This is due to decreased shedding of cell-surface N-cadherin by the ADAM family protease ADAM10/Kuzbanian. In FAM116A- and Rab14-depleted cells, ADAM10 accumulates in a transferrin-positive endocytic compartment, and the cell-surface level of ADAM10 is correspondingly reduced. FAM116 and Rab14 therefore define an endocytic recycling pathway needed for ADAM protease trafficking and regulation of cell-cell junctions. PMID:22595670

  16. Oxygen deprivation inhibits basal keratinocyte proliferation in a model of human skin and induces regio-specific changes in the distribution of epidermal adherens junction proteins, aquaporin-3, and glycogen

    PubMed Central

    Straseski, Joely A.; Gibson, Angela L.; Thomas-Virnig, Christina L.; Allen-Hoffmann, B. Lynn

    2009-01-01

    It is generally accepted that hypoxia and recovery from oxygen deprivation contribute to the breakdown and ulceration of human skin. The effects of these stresses on proliferation, differentiation and expression of cell-cell adhesion molecules were investigated for the first time in an organotypic model of human skin. Fully stratified tissues were exposed to a time course of oxygen deprivation and subsequent reoxygenation. Regional changes in keratinocyte morphology, glycogen stores and cellular junctions were observed, with more differentiated layers of the epidermis exhibiting the first evidence of oxygen deprivation. Cellular swelling within the granular layer was concurrent with aquaporin-3 depletion. The keratinocyte adherens junction proteins E-cadherin and β-catenin were dramatically decreased in a regio-specific manner throughout the epidermis following oxygen deprivation. In contrast, P-cadherin and the desmosomal proteins desmoplakin and desmoglein-1 were refractory to oxygen deprivation. Relative to normoxic controls, hypoxic tissues exhibited increased mRNA levels of the transcriptional repressor Slug however mRNA levels of the related transcriptional factor Snail were unaffected. All cellular and molecular changes were reversible upon reoxygenation. These results demonstrate that oxygen deprivation and reoxygenation exert differential effects on epidermal adhesion proteins and suggest a novel role for cadherins, β-catenin, and Slug in hypoxia-induced junctional changes occurring in stratified squamous epithelium. PMID:19614926

  17. Vinculin potentiates E-cadherin mechanosensing and is recruited to actin-anchored sites within adherens junctions in a myosin II–dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    le Duc, Quint; Shi, Quanming; Blonk, Iris; Sonnenberg, Arnoud

    2010-01-01

    Cell surface receptors integrate chemical and mechanical cues to regulate a wide range of biological processes. Integrin complexes are the mechanotransducers between the extracellular matrix and the actomyosin cytoskeleton. By analogy, cadherin complexes may function as mechanosensors at cell–cell junctions, but this capacity of cadherins has not been directly demonstrated. Furthermore, the molecular composition of the link between E-cadherin and actin, which is needed to sustain such a function, is unresolved. In this study, we describe nanomechanical measurements demonstrating that E-cadherin complexes are functional mechanosensors that transmit force between F-actin and E-cadherin. Imaging experiments reveal that intercellular forces coincide with vinculin accumulation at actin-anchored cadherin adhesions, and nanomechanical measurements show that vinculin potentiates the E-cadherin mechanosensory response. These investigations directly demonstrate the mechanosensory capacity of the E-cadherin complex and identify a novel function for vinculin at cell–cell junctions. These findings have implications for barrier function, morphogenesis, cell migration, and invasion and may extend to all soft tissues in which classical cadherins regulate cell–cell adhesion. PMID:20584916

  18. The cell-cell junctions of mammalian testes: I. The adhering junctions of the seminiferous epithelium represent special differentiation structures.

    PubMed

    Domke, Lisa M; Rickelt, Steffen; Dörflinger, Yvette; Kuhn, Caecilia; Winter-Simanowski, Stefanie; Zimbelmann, Ralf; Rosin-Arbesfeld, Rina; Heid, Hans; Franke, Werner W

    2014-09-01

    The seminiferous tubules and the excurrent ducts of the mammalian testis are physiologically separated from the mesenchymal tissues and the blood and lymph system by a special structural barrier to paracellular translocations of molecules and particles: the "blood-testis barrier", formed by junctions connecting Sertoli cells with each other and with spermatogonial cells. In combined biochemical as well as light and electron microscopical studies we systematically determine the molecules located in the adhering junctions of adult mammalian (human, bovine, porcine, murine, i.e., rat and mouse) testis. We show that the seminiferous epithelium does not contain desmosomes, or "desmosome-like" junctions, nor any of the desmosome-specific marker molecules and that the adhering junctions of tubules and ductules are fundamentally different. While the ductules contain classical epithelial cell layers with E-cadherin-based adherens junctions (AJs) and typical desmosomes, the Sertoli cells of the tubules lack desmosomes and "desmosome-like" junctions but are connected by morphologically different forms of AJs. These junctions are based on N-cadherin anchored in cytoplasmic plaques, which in some subforms appear thick and dense but in other subforms contain only scarce and loosely arranged plaque structures formed by α- and β-catenin, proteins p120, p0071 and plakoglobin, together with a member of the striatin family and also, in rodents, the proteins ZO-1 and myozap. These N-cadherin-based AJs also include two novel types of junctions: the "areae adhaerentes", i.e., variously-sized, often very large cell-cell contacts and small sieve-plate-like AJs perforated by cytoplasm-to-cytoplasm channels of 5-7 nm internal diameter ("cribelliform junctions"). We emphasize the unique character of this epithelium that totally lacks major epithelial marker molecules and structures such as keratin filaments and desmosomal elements as well as EpCAM- and PERP-containing junctions. We also

  19. N-glycosylation status of E-cadherin controls cytoskeletal dynamics through the organization of distinct β-catenin- and γ-catenin-containing AJs

    PubMed Central

    Jamal, Basem T; Nita-Lazar, Mihai; Gao, Zhennan; Amin, Bakr; Walker, Janice; Kukuruzinska, Maria A

    2010-01-01

    N-glycosylation of E-cadherin has been shown to inhibit cell–cell adhesion. Specifically, our recent studies have provided evidence that the reduction of E-cadherin N-glycosylation promoted the recruitment of stabilizing components, vinculin and serine/threonine protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), to adherens junctions (AJs) and enhanced the association of AJs with the actin cytoskeleton. Here, we examined the details of how N-glycosylation of E-cadherin affected the molecular organization of AJs and their cytoskeletal interactions. Using the hypoglycosylated E-cadherin variant, V13, we show that V13/β-catenin complexes preferentially interacted with PP2A and with the microtubule motor protein dynein. This correlated with dephosphorylation of the microtubule-associated protein tau, suggesting that increased association of PP2A with V13-containing AJs promoted their tethering to microtubules. On the other hand V13/γ-catenin complexes associated more with vinculin, suggesting that they mediated the interaction of AJs with the actin cytoskeleton. N-glycosylation driven changes in the molecular organization of AJs were physiologically significant because transfection of V13 into A253 cancer cells, lacking both mature AJs and tight junctions (TJs), promoted the formation of stable AJs and enhanced the function of TJs to a greater extent than wild-type E-cadherin. These studies provide the first mechanistic insights into how N-glycosylation of E-cadherin drives changes in AJ composition through the assembly of distinct β-catenin- and γ-catenin-containing scaffolds that impact the interaction with different cytoskeletal components. PMID:20502620

  20. Actin-interacting protein 1 controls assembly and permeability of intestinal epithelial apical junctions

    PubMed Central

    Baranwal, Somesh

    2015-01-01

    Adherens junctions (AJs) and tight junctions (TJs) are crucial regulators of the integrity and restitution of the intestinal epithelial barrier. The structure and function of epithelial junctions depend on their association with the cortical actin cytoskeleton that, in polarized epithelial cells, is represented by a prominent perijunctional actomyosin belt. The assembly and stability of the perijunctional cytoskeleton is controlled by constant turnover (disassembly and reassembly) of actin filaments. Actin-interacting protein (Aip) 1 is an emerging regulator of the actin cytoskeleton, playing a critical role in filament disassembly. In this study, we examined the roles of Aip1 in regulating the structure and remodeling of AJs and TJs in human intestinal epithelium. Aip1 was enriched at apical junctions in polarized human intestinal epithelial cells and normal mouse colonic mucosa. Knockdown of Aip1 by RNA interference increased the paracellular permeability of epithelial cell monolayers, decreased recruitment of AJ/TJ proteins to steady-state intercellular contacts, and attenuated junctional reassembly in a calcium-switch model. The observed defects of AJ/TJ structure and functions were accompanied by abnormal organization and dynamics of the perijunctional F-actin cytoskeleton. Moreover, loss of Aip1 impaired the apico-basal polarity of intestinal epithelial cell monolayers and inhibited formation of polarized epithelial cysts in 3-D Matrigel. Our findings demonstrate a previously unanticipated role of Aip1 in regulating the structure and remodeling of intestinal epithelial junctions and early steps of epithelial morphogenesis. PMID:25792565

  1. PLEKHA7: Cytoskeletal adaptor protein at center stage in junctional organization and signaling.

    PubMed

    Shah, Jimit; Guerrera, Diego; Vasileva, Ekaterina; Sluysmans, Sophie; Bertels, Eva; Citi, Sandra

    2016-06-01

    PLEKHA7 is a recently characterized component of the cytoplasmic region of epithelial adherens junctions (AJ). It comprises two WW domains, a pleckstrin-homology domain, and proline-rich and coiled-coil domains. PLEKHA7 interacts with cytoplasmic components of the AJ (p120-catenin, paracingulin, afadin), stabilizes the E-cadherin complex by linking it to the minus ends of noncentrosomal microtubules, and stabilizes junctional nectins through the newly identified interactor PDZD11. Similarly to afadin, and unlike E-cadherin and p120-catenin, the localization of PLEKHA7 at AJ is strictly zonular (in the zonula adhaerens subdomain of AJ), and does not extend along the basolateral contacts. Genome-wide association studies and experiments on animal and cellular models show that although PLEKHA7 is not required for organism viability, it is implicated in cardiovascular physiology, hypertension, primary angle closure glaucoma, susceptibility to staphylococcal α-toxin, and epithelial morphogenesis and growth. Thus, PLEKHA7 is a cytoskeletal adaptor protein important for AJ organization, and at the center of junction-associated signaling pathways which fine-tune important pathophysiological processes. PMID:27072621

  2. Depletion of E-Cadherin Disrupts Establishment but Not Maintenance of Cell Junctions in Madin-Darby Canine Kidney Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Capaldo, Christopher T.

    2007-01-01

    E-cadherin forms calcium-dependent homophilic intercellular adhesions between epithelial cells. These contacts regulate multiple aspects of cell behavior, including the organization of intercellular tight junctions (TJs). To distinguish between the roles of E-cadherin in formation versus maintenance of junctions, Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells were depleted of E-cadherin by RNA interference. Surprisingly, reducing E-cadherin expression had little effect on the protein levels or localization of adherens junction (AJ) or TJ markers. The cells underwent morphological changes, as the normally flat apical surface swelled into a dome. However, apical–basal polarity was not compromised, transmembrane resistance was normal, and zonula occludin protein 1 dynamics at the TJs were unchanged. Additionally, an E-cadherin/Cadherin-6 double knockdown also failed to disrupt established TJs, although β-catenin was lost from the cell cortex. Nevertheless, cells depleted of E-cadherin failed to properly reestablish cell polarity after junction disassembly. Recovery of cell–cell adhesion, transepithelial resistance, and the localization of TJ and AJ markers were all delayed. In contrast, depletion of α-catenin caused long-term disruption of junctions. These results indicate that E-cadherin and Cadherin-6 function as a scaffold for the construction of polarized structures, and they become largely dispensable in mature junctions, whereas α-catenin is essential for the maintenance of functional junctions. PMID:17093058

  3. Junctional actin assembly is mediated by Formin-like 2 downstream of Rac1

    PubMed Central

    Grikscheit, Katharina; Frank, Tanja; Wang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial integrity is vitally important, and its deregulation causes early stage cancer. De novo formation of an adherens junction (AJ) between single epithelial cells requires coordinated, spatial actin dynamics, but the mechanisms steering nascent actin polymerization for cell–cell adhesion initiation are not well understood. Here we investigated real-time actin assembly during daughter cell–cell adhesion formation in human breast epithelial cells in 3D environments. We identify formin-like 2 (FMNL2) as being specifically required for actin assembly and turnover at newly formed cell–cell contacts as well as for human epithelial lumen formation. FMNL2 associates with components of the AJ complex involving Rac1 activity and the FMNL2 C terminus. Optogenetic control of Rac1 in living cells rapidly drove FMNL2 to epithelial cell–cell contact zones. Furthermore, Rac1-induced actin assembly and subsequent AJ formation critically depends on FMNL2. These data uncover FMNL2 as a driver for human epithelial AJ formation downstream of Rac1. PMID:25963818

  4. Junctional actin assembly is mediated by Formin-like 2 downstream of Rac1.

    PubMed

    Grikscheit, Katharina; Frank, Tanja; Wang, Ying; Grosse, Robert

    2015-05-11

    Epithelial integrity is vitally important, and its deregulation causes early stage cancer. De novo formation of an adherens junction (AJ) between single epithelial cells requires coordinated, spatial actin dynamics, but the mechanisms steering nascent actin polymerization for cell-cell adhesion initiation are not well understood. Here we investigated real-time actin assembly during daughter cell-cell adhesion formation in human breast epithelial cells in 3D environments. We identify formin-like 2 (FMNL2) as being specifically required for actin assembly and turnover at newly formed cell-cell contacts as well as for human epithelial lumen formation. FMNL2 associates with components of the AJ complex involving Rac1 activity and the FMNL2 C terminus. Optogenetic control of Rac1 in living cells rapidly drove FMNL2 to epithelial cell-cell contact zones. Furthermore, Rac1-induced actin assembly and subsequent AJ formation critically depends on FMNL2. These data uncover FMNL2 as a driver for human epithelial AJ formation downstream of Rac1. PMID:25963818

  5. Contribution of Annexin 2 to the Architecture of Mature Endothelial Adherens Junctions▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Heyraud, Stéphanie; Jaquinod, Michel; Durmort, Claire; Dambroise, Emilie; Concord, Evelyne; Schaal, Jean Patrick; Huber, Philippe; Gulino-Debrac, Danielle

    2008-01-01

    The vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cad)-based complex is involved in the maintenance of vascular endothelium integrity. Using immunoprecipitation experiments, we have demonstrated that, in confluent human umbilical vein endothelial cells, the VE-cad-based complex interacts with annexin 2 and that annexin 2 translocates from the cytoplasm to the cell-cell contact sites as cell confluence is established. Annexin 2, located in cholesterol rafts, binds to both the actin cytoskeleton and the VE-cad-based complex so the complex is docked to cholesterol rafts. These multiple connections prevent the lateral diffusion of the VE-cad-based complex, thus strengthening adherens junctions in the ultimate steps of maturation. Moreover, we observed that the down-regulation of annexin 2 by small interfering RNA induces a delocalization of VE-cad from adherens junctions and consequently a destabilization of these junctions. Furthermore, our data indicate that the decoupling of the annexin 2/p11 complex from the VE-cad-based junction, triggered by vascular endothelial growth factor treatment, facilitates the switch from a quiescent to an immature state. PMID:18160703

  6. Protein kinase C activation disrupts epithelial apical junctions via ROCK-II dependent stimulation of actomyosin contractility

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Andrei I; Samarin, Stanislav N; Bachar, Moshe; Parkos, Charles A; Nusrat, Asma

    2009-01-01

    Background Disruption of epithelial cell-cell adhesions represents an early and important stage in tumor metastasis. This process can be modeled in vitro by exposing cells to chemical tumor promoters, phorbol esters and octylindolactam-V (OI-V), known to activate protein kinase C (PKC). However, molecular events mediating PKC-dependent disruption of epithelial cell-cell contact remain poorly understood. In the present study we investigate mechanisms by which PKC activation induces disassembly of tight junctions (TJs) and adherens junctions (AJs) in a model pancreatic epithelium. Results Exposure of HPAF-II human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell monolayers to either OI-V or 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate caused rapid disruption and internalization of AJs and TJs. Activity of classical PKC isoenzymes was responsible for the loss of cell-cell contacts which was accompanied by cell rounding, phosphorylation and relocalization of the F-actin motor nonmuscle myosin (NM) II. The OI-V-induced disruption of AJs and TJs was prevented by either pharmacological inhibition of NM II with blebbistatin or by siRNA-mediated downregulation of NM IIA. Furthermore, AJ/TJ disassembly was attenuated by inhibition of Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) II, but was insensitive to blockage of MLCK, calmodulin, ERK1/2, caspases and RhoA GTPase. Conclusion Our data suggest that stimulation of PKC disrupts epithelial apical junctions via ROCK-II dependent activation of NM II, which increases contractility of perijunctional actin filaments. This mechanism is likely to be important for cancer cell dissociation and tumor metastasis. PMID:19422706

  7. Caveolin-1 regulates expression of junction-associated proteins in brain microvascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Song, Li; Ge, Shujun; Pachter, Joel S.

    2007-01-01

    Recent evidence from this laboratory indicated that reduced expression of caveolin-1 accompanied the diminished expression of tight junction (TJ)–associated proteins occludin and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) following stimulation of brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs) with the chemokine CCL2 (formerly called MCP-1). Because attenuated caveolin-1 levels have also been correlated with heightened permeability of other endothelia, the objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that reduced caveolin-1 expression is causally linked to the action of CCL2 on BMEC junctional protein expression and barrier integrity. This was achieved using adenovirus to nondestructively deliver caveolin-1 siRNA (Ad-siCav-1) to BMEC monolayers, which model the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Treatment with siRNA reduced the caveolin-1 protein level as well as occludin and ZO-1. Additionally, occludin exhibited dissociation from the cytoskeletal framework. These changes were attended by comparable alterations in adherens junction (AJ)–associated proteins, VE-cadherin and β-catenin, increased BMEC paracellular permeability, and facilitated the ability of CCL2 to stimulate monocytic transendothelial migration. Furthermore, treating BMECs with cavtratin, a synthetic cell-permeable peptide encoding the caveolin-1 scaffolding domain, antagonized effects of both Ad-siCav-1 and CCL2. These results collectively highlight caveolin-1 loss as a critical step in CCL2-induced modulation of BMEC junctional protein expression and integrity, and possibly serve a crucial role in regulating inflammation at the BBB. PMID:17023578

  8. Rapid disruption of intestinal epithelial tight junction and barrier dysfunction by ionizing radiation in mouse colon in vivo: protection by N-acetyl-l-cysteine.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Pradeep K; Gangwar, Ruchika; Manda, Bhargavi; Meena, Avtar S; Yadav, Nikki; Szabo, Erzsebet; Balogh, Andrea; Lee, Sue Chin; Tigyi, Gabor; Rao, RadhaKrishna

    2016-05-01

    The goals of this study were to evaluate the effects of ionizing radiation on apical junctions in colonic epithelium and mucosal barrier function in mice in vivo. Adult mice were subjected to total body irradiation (4 Gy) with or without N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) feeding for 5 days before irradiation. At 2-24 h postirradiation, the integrity of colonic epithelial tight junctions (TJ), adherens junctions (AJ), and the actin cytoskeleton was assessed by immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoblot analysis of detergent-insoluble fractions for TJ and AJ proteins. The barrier function was evaluated by measuring vascular-to-luminal flux of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-inulin in vivo and luminal-to-mucosal flux in vitro. Oxidative stress was evaluated by measuring protein thiol oxidation. Confocal microscopy showed that radiation caused redistribution of occludin, zona occludens-1, claudin-3, E-cadherin, and β-catenin, as well as the actin cytoskeleton as early as 2 h postirradiation, and this effect was sustained for at least 24 h. Feeding NAC before irradiation blocked radiation-induced disruption of TJ, AJ, and the actin cytoskeleton. Radiation increased mucosal permeability to inulin in colon, which was blocked by NAC feeding. The level of reduced-protein thiols in colon was depleted by radiation with a concomitant increase in the level of oxidized-protein thiol. NAC feeding blocked the radiation-induced protein thiol oxidation. These data demonstrate that radiation rapidly disrupts TJ, AJ, and the actin cytoskeleton by an oxidative stress-dependent mechanism that can be prevented by NAC feeding. PMID:26822914

  9. Chronic hypoxia down‐regulates tight junction protein ZO‐2 expression in children with cyanotic congenital heart defect

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Emma L.; Caputo, Massimo; Angelini, Gianni D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims Tight junction protein zonula occludens protein 2 (ZO‐2) is a member of the membrane‐associated guanylate kinases protein family known to be expressed at tight junctions of epithelial and endothelial cells and at adherens junctions (AJs) in cardiomyocytes. Little is known about ZO‐2 expression and function in the human heart. Here, we examined the hypothesis that chronic hypoxia down‐regulates ZO‐2 expression in human myocardium and cultured rat cardiomyocytes. Methods and results Patients with a diagnosis of cyanotic (n = 10) or acyanotic (n = 10) Tetralogy of Fallot undergoing surgical repair were used to examine ZO‐2 messenger RNA and protein expression by real time‐PCR, immunohistochemistry, and western blotting. A model of cultured rat cardiomyocytes was used to measure ZO‐2 and AJ proteins levels in response to hypoxia and to investigate ZO‐2 cellular localization. We showed that ZO‐2 is expressed in myocardial tissue in acyanotic and cyanotic children with congenital heart defects. ZO‐2 was specifically down‐regulated in cyanotic myocardium at both the messenger RNA and protein levels when compared with acyanotic patients. This specific down‐regulation can be mimicked in cultured rat cardiomyocytes by treating them with hypoxic conditions confirming that ZO‐2 gene down‐regulation is specifically due to cyanosis. Furthermore, in addition to its cytoplasmic expression, ZO‐2 showed nuclear expression in cultured rat cardiomyocytes suggesting potential role in transcription regulation. Conclusions Hypoxia down‐regulates ZO‐2 expression in both cyanotic patient's myocardium and cultured rat cardiomyocytes. This down‐regulation suggest an involvement of ZO‐2 in cardiac remodelling of AJs in cyanotic children and may explain the greater susceptibility of cyanotic patients to corrective heart surgery.

  10. Remodeling the zonula adherens in response to tension and the role of afadin in this response.

    PubMed

    Choi, Wangsun; Acharya, Bipul R; Peyret, Grégoire; Fardin, Marc-Antoine; Mège, René-Marc; Ladoux, Benoit; Yap, Alpha S; Fanning, Alan S; Peifer, Mark

    2016-04-25

    Morphogenesis requires dynamic coordination between cell-cell adhesion and the cytoskeleton to allow cells to change shape and move without losing tissue integrity. We used genetic tools and superresolution microscopy in a simple model epithelial cell line to define how the molecular architecture of cell-cell zonula adherens (ZA) is modified in response to elevated contractility, and how these cells maintain tissue integrity. We previously found that depleting zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1) family proteins in MDCK cells induces a highly organized contractile actomyosin array at the ZA. We find that ZO knockdown elevates contractility via a Shroom3/Rho-associated, coiled-coil containing protein kinase (ROCK) pathway. Our data suggest that each bicellular border is an independent contractile unit, with actin cables anchored end-on to cadherin complexes at tricellular junctions. Cells respond to elevated contractility by increasing junctional afadin. Although ZO/afadin knockdown did not prevent contractile array assembly, it dramatically altered cell shape and barrier function in response to elevated contractility. We propose that afadin acts as a robust protein scaffold that maintains ZA architecture at tricellular junctions. PMID:27114502

  11. aPKC Inhibition by Par3 CR3 Flanking Regions Controls Substrate Access and Underpins Apical-Junctional Polarization.

    PubMed

    Soriano, Erika V; Ivanova, Marina E; Fletcher, Georgina; Riou, Philippe; Knowles, Philip P; Barnouin, Karin; Purkiss, Andrew; Kostelecky, Brenda; Saiu, Peter; Linch, Mark; Elbediwy, Ahmed; Kjær, Svend; O'Reilly, Nicola; Snijders, Ambrosius P; Parker, Peter J; Thompson, Barry J; McDonald, Neil Q

    2016-08-22

    Atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) is a key apical-basal polarity determinant and Par complex component. It is recruited by Par3/Baz (Bazooka in Drosophila) into epithelial apical domains through high-affinity interaction. Paradoxically, aPKC also phosphorylates Par3/Baz, provoking its relocalization to adherens junctions (AJs). We show that Par3 conserved region 3 (CR3) forms a tight inhibitory complex with a primed aPKC kinase domain, blocking substrate access. A CR3 motif flanking its PKC consensus site disrupts the aPKC kinase N lobe, separating P-loop/αB/αC contacts. A second CR3 motif provides a high-affinity anchor. Mutation of either motif switches CR3 to an efficient in vitro substrate by exposing its phospho-acceptor site. In vivo, mutation of either CR3 motif alters Par3/Baz localization from apical to AJs. Our results reveal how Par3/Baz CR3 can antagonize aPKC in stable apical Par complexes and suggests that modulation of CR3 inhibitory arms or opposing aPKC pockets would perturb the interaction, promoting Par3/Baz phosphorylation. PMID:27554858

  12. ROCK activity regulates functional tight junction assembly during blastocyst formation in porcine parthenogenetic embryos

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Jeongwoo

    2016-01-01

    The Rho-associated coiled-coil-containing protein serine/threonine kinases 1 and 2 (ROCK1 and ROCK2) are Rho subfamily GTPase downstream effectors that regulate cell migration, intercellular adhesion, cell polarity, and cell proliferation by stimulating actin cytoskeleton reorganization. Inhibition of ROCK proteins affects specification of the trophectoderm (TE) and inner cell mass (ICM) lineages, compaction, and blastocyst cavitation. However, the molecules involved in blastocyst formation are not known. Here, we examined developmental competence and levels of adherens/tight junction (AJ/TJ) constituent proteins, such as CXADR, OCLN, TJP1, and CDH1, as well as expression of their respective mRNAs, after treating porcine parthenogenetic four-cell embryos with Y-27632, a specific inhibitor of ROCK, at concentrations of 0, 10, 20, 100 µM for 24 h. Following this treatment, the blastocyst development rates were 39.1, 20.7, 10.0, and 0% respectively. In embryos treated with 20 µM treatment, expression levels of CXADR, OCLN, TJP1, and CDH1 mRNA and protein molecules were significantly reduced (P < 0.05). FITC-dextran uptake assay revealed that the treatment caused an increase in TE TJ permeability. Interestingly, the majority of the four-cell and morula embryos treated with 20 µM Y-27643 for 24 h showed defective compaction and cavitation. Taken together, our results indicate that ROCK activity may differentially affect assembly of AJ/TJs as well as regulate expression of genes encoding junctional proteins. PMID:27077008

  13. ADAM10 Is Involved in Cell Junction Assembly in Early Porcine Embryo Development

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Jeongwoo; Jeong, Sung-min; Choi, Inchul; Kim, Nam-Hyung

    2016-01-01

    ADAM10 (A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease domain-containing protein 10) is a cell surface protein with a unique structure possessing both potential adhesion and protease domains. However, the role of ADAM10 in preimplantation stage embryos is not clear. In this study, we examined the expression patterns and functional roles of ADAM10 in porcine parthenotes during preimplantation development. The transcription level of ADAM10 dramatically increased from the morula stage onward. Immunostaining revealed that ADAM10 was present in both the nucleus and cytoplasm in early cleavage stage embryos, and localized to the apical region of the outer cells in morula and blastocyst embryos. Knockdown (KD) of ADAM10 using double strand RNA did not alter preimplantation embryo development until morula stage, but resulted in significantly reduced development to blastocyst stage. Moreover, the KD blastocyst showed a decrease in gene expression of adherens and tight junction (AJ/TJ), and an increase in trophectoderm TJ permeability by disrupting TJ assembly. Treatment with an ADAM10 specific chemical inhibitor, GI254023X, at the morula stage also inhibited blastocyst development and led to disruption of TJ assembly. An in situ proximity ligation assay demonstrated direct interaction of ADAM10 with coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor (CXADR), supporting the involvement of ADAM10 in TJ assembly. In conclusion, our findings strongly suggest that ADADM10 is important for blastocyst formation rather than compaction, particularly for TJ assembly and stabilization in preimplantation porcine parthenogenetic development. PMID:27043020

  14. ADAM10 Is Involved in Cell Junction Assembly in Early Porcine Embryo Development.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jeongwoo; Jeong, Sung-min; Choi, Inchul; Kim, Nam-Hyung

    2016-01-01

    ADAM10 (A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease domain-containing protein 10) is a cell surface protein with a unique structure possessing both potential adhesion and protease domains. However, the role of ADAM10 in preimplantation stage embryos is not clear. In this study, we examined the expression patterns and functional roles of ADAM10 in porcine parthenotes during preimplantation development. The transcription level of ADAM10 dramatically increased from the morula stage onward. Immunostaining revealed that ADAM10 was present in both the nucleus and cytoplasm in early cleavage stage embryos, and localized to the apical region of the outer cells in morula and blastocyst embryos. Knockdown (KD) of ADAM10 using double strand RNA did not alter preimplantation embryo development until morula stage, but resulted in significantly reduced development to blastocyst stage. Moreover, the KD blastocyst showed a decrease in gene expression of adherens and tight junction (AJ/TJ), and an increase in trophectoderm TJ permeability by disrupting TJ assembly. Treatment with an ADAM10 specific chemical inhibitor, GI254023X, at the morula stage also inhibited blastocyst development and led to disruption of TJ assembly. An in situ proximity ligation assay demonstrated direct interaction of ADAM10 with coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor (CXADR), supporting the involvement of ADAM10 in TJ assembly. In conclusion, our findings strongly suggest that ADADM10 is important for blastocyst formation rather than compaction, particularly for TJ assembly and stabilization in preimplantation porcine parthenogenetic development. PMID:27043020

  15. AJ26 Rocket Engine Test

    NASA Video Gallery

    Engineers at NASA’s John C. Stennis Space Center conducts the second in a series of verification tests on an Aerojet AJ26 engine that will power the first stage of the Orbital Sciences Corporatio...

  16. Expression of Tight Junction Proteins and Cadherin 17 in the Small Intestine of Young Goats Offered a Reduced N and/or Ca Diet.

    PubMed

    Elfers, Kristin; Marr, Isabell; Wilkens, Mirja R; Breves, Gerhard; Langeheine, Marion; Brehm, Ralph; Muscher-Banse, Alexandra S

    2016-01-01

    Diets fed to ruminants should contain nitrogen (N) as low as possible to reduce feed costs and environmental pollution. Though possessing effective N-recycling mechanisms to maintain the N supply for rumen microbial protein synthesis and hence protein supply for the host, an N reduction caused substantial changes in calcium (Ca) and phosphate homeostasis in young goats including decreased intestinal transepithelial Ca absorption as reported for monogastric species. In contrast to the transcellular component of transepithelial Ca transport, the paracellular route has not been investigated in young goats. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to characterise the effects of dietary N and/or Ca reduction on paracellular transport mechanisms in young goats. Electrophysiological properties of intestinal epithelia were investigated by Ussing chamber experiments. The expression of tight junction (TJ) and adherens junction (AJ) proteins in intestinal epithelia were examined on mRNA level by qPCR and on protein level by western blot analysis. Dietary N reduction led to a segment specific increase in tissue conductances in the proximal jejunum which might be linked to concomitantly decreased expression of cadherin 17 mRNA. Expression of occludin (OCLN) and zonula occludens protein 1 was increased in mid jejunal epithelia of N reduced fed goats on mRNA and partly on protein level. Reduced dietary Ca supply resulted in a segment specific increase in claudin 2 and claudin 12 expression and decreased the expression of OCLN which might have been mediated at least in part by calcitriol. These data show that dietary N as well as Ca reduction affected expression of TJ and AJ proteins in a segment specific manner in young goats and may thus be involved in modulation of paracellular Ca permeability. PMID:27120348

  17. Expression of Tight Junction Proteins and Cadherin 17 in the Small Intestine of Young Goats Offered a Reduced N and/or Ca Diet

    PubMed Central

    Wilkens, Mirja R.; Breves, Gerhard; Langeheine, Marion; Brehm, Ralph; Muscher-Banse, Alexandra S.

    2016-01-01

    Diets fed to ruminants should contain nitrogen (N) as low as possible to reduce feed costs and environmental pollution. Though possessing effective N-recycling mechanisms to maintain the N supply for rumen microbial protein synthesis and hence protein supply for the host, an N reduction caused substantial changes in calcium (Ca) and phosphate homeostasis in young goats including decreased intestinal transepithelial Ca absorption as reported for monogastric species. In contrast to the transcellular component of transepithelial Ca transport, the paracellular route has not been investigated in young goats. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to characterise the effects of dietary N and/or Ca reduction on paracellular transport mechanisms in young goats. Electrophysiological properties of intestinal epithelia were investigated by Ussing chamber experiments. The expression of tight junction (TJ) and adherens junction (AJ) proteins in intestinal epithelia were examined on mRNA level by qPCR and on protein level by western blot analysis. Dietary N reduction led to a segment specific increase in tissue conductances in the proximal jejunum which might be linked to concomitantly decreased expression of cadherin 17 mRNA. Expression of occludin (OCLN) and zonula occludens protein 1 was increased in mid jejunal epithelia of N reduced fed goats on mRNA and partly on protein level. Reduced dietary Ca supply resulted in a segment specific increase in claudin 2 and claudin 12 expression and decreased the expression of OCLN which might have been mediated at least in part by calcitriol. These data show that dietary N as well as Ca reduction affected expression of TJ and AJ proteins in a segment specific manner in young goats and may thus be involved in modulation of paracellular Ca permeability. PMID:27120348

  18. Connexins, E-cadherin, Claudin-7 and β-catenin transiently form junctional nexuses during the post-natal mammary gland development.

    PubMed

    Dianati, Elham; Poiraud, Jérémy; Weber-Ouellette, Anne; Plante, Isabelle

    2016-08-01

    Gap junctions are intercellular channels made of connexins (Cxs) that allow direct communication between adjacent cells. Modulation of Cxs has been associated with abnormal development and function of the mammary gland and breast cancer. However, the mechanisms underlying their expression during normal mammary gland are not yet known. Cxs interact with components of tight and adherens junctions. Thus, we hypothesized that the expression levels of Cxs vary during mammary gland development and are regulated through stage-dependent interactions with members of the tight and adherens junctions. Our specific objectives were to: 1) determine the expression of Cxs and tight and adherens junction proteins throughout development and 2) characterize Cxs interactions with components of tight and adherens junctions. Murine mammary glands were sampled at various developmental stages (pre-pubescent to post-weaning). RT-qPCR and western-blot analyses demonstrated differential expression patterns for all gap (Cx43, Cx32, Cx26, Cx30), tight (Claudin-1, -3, -4, -7) and adherens (β-catenin, E- and P-cadherins) junctions throughout development. Interestingly, co-immunoprecipitation demonstrated interactions between these different types of junctions. Cx30 interacted with Cx26 just at the late pregnancy stage. While Cx43 showed a persistent interaction with β-catenin from virginity to post-weaning, its interactions with E-cadherin and Claudin-7 were transient. Cx32 interacted with Cx26, E-cadherin and β-catenin during lactation. Immunofluorescence results confirmed the existence of a junctional nexus that remodeled during mammary gland development. Together, our results confirm that the expression levels of Cxs vary concomitantly and that Cxs form junctional nexuses with tight and adherens junctions, suggesting the existence of common regulatory pathways. PMID:27291930

  19. Three mechanisms control E-cadherin localization to the zonula adherens.

    PubMed

    Woichansky, Innokenty; Beretta, Carlo Antonio; Berns, Nicola; Riechmann, Veit

    2016-01-01

    E-cadherin localization to the zonula adherens is fundamental for epithelial differentiation but the mechanisms controlling localization are unclear. Using the Drosophila follicular epithelium we genetically dissect E-cadherin transport in an in vivo model. We distinguish three mechanisms mediating E-cadherin accumulation at the zonula adherens. Two membrane trafficking pathways deliver newly synthesized E-cadherin to the plasma membrane. One is Rab11 dependent and targets E-cadherin directly to the zonula adherens, while the other transports E-cadherin to the lateral membrane. Lateral E-cadherin reaches the zonula adherens by endocytosis and targeted recycling. We show that this pathway is dependent on RabX1, which provides a functional link between early and recycling endosomes. Moreover, we show that lateral E-cadherin is transported to the zonula adherens by an apically directed flow within the plasma membrane. Differential activation of these pathways could facilitate cell shape changes during morphogenesis, while their misregulation compromises cell adhesion and tissue architecture in differentiated epithelia. PMID:26960923

  20. Three mechanisms control E-cadherin localization to the zonula adherens

    PubMed Central

    Woichansky, Innokenty; Beretta, Carlo Antonio; Berns, Nicola; Riechmann, Veit

    2016-01-01

    E-cadherin localization to the zonula adherens is fundamental for epithelial differentiation but the mechanisms controlling localization are unclear. Using the Drosophila follicular epithelium we genetically dissect E-cadherin transport in an in vivo model. We distinguish three mechanisms mediating E-cadherin accumulation at the zonula adherens. Two membrane trafficking pathways deliver newly synthesized E-cadherin to the plasma membrane. One is Rab11 dependent and targets E-cadherin directly to the zonula adherens, while the other transports E-cadherin to the lateral membrane. Lateral E-cadherin reaches the zonula adherens by endocytosis and targeted recycling. We show that this pathway is dependent on RabX1, which provides a functional link between early and recycling endosomes. Moreover, we show that lateral E-cadherin is transported to the zonula adherens by an apically directed flow within the plasma membrane. Differential activation of these pathways could facilitate cell shape changes during morphogenesis, while their misregulation compromises cell adhesion and tissue architecture in differentiated epithelia. PMID:26960923

  1. Ultrastructural studies of the junctional complex in the musculature of the arrow-worm (Sagitta setosa) (Chaetognatha).

    PubMed

    Duvert, M; Gros, D; Salat, C

    1980-01-01

    In the A fibres of the primary musculature of Sagitta, the junctional complex is made up of three kinds of junctions. From the apex to the base they occur in the following order: an apical zonula adherens, a columnar zonula then columnar maculae intermingled with gap junction. Each columnar junction joins two intracellular filament networks in adjacent cells; this cytoskeleton is largely developed around the nucleus of the A fibres and in close relation with the contractile apparatus, especially at the I band level. The B fibres, which never reach the general cavity, lack zonula adherens and columnar zonula. The columnar junction constitutes a new type of junction which seems to belong to the adherens kind. At their level fibrous columns cross the extracellular space, joining the membranes. Each column faces two cytoplasmic densities localized against the cytoplasmic leaflets of the membranes. A cytoskeleton composed of bunldes of cytoplasmic filaments is in close contact with these cytoplasmic densities. The great number of columnar junctions and associated cytoskeleton assure the cohesion of the tissue and the distribution of contractile forces in the absence of connective tissue. The abundance of gap junctions can account for the metabolic and ionic coupling of the fibres. PMID:7189067

  2. The cytoskeletal mechanisms of cell–cell junction formation in endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Hoelzle, Matthew K.; Svitkina, Tatyana

    2012-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton and associated proteins play a vital role in cell–cell adhesion. However, the procedure by which cells establish adherens junctions remains unclear. We investigated the dynamics of cell–cell junction formation and the corresponding architecture of the underlying cytoskeleton in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells. We show that the initial interaction between cells is mediated by protruding lamellipodia. On their retraction, cells maintain contact through thin bridges formed by filopodia-like protrusions connected by VE-cadherin–rich junctions. Bridges share multiple features with conventional filopodia, such as an internal actin bundle associated with fascin along the length and vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein at the tip. It is striking that, unlike conventional filopodia, transformation of actin organization from the lamellipodial network to filopodial bundle during bridge formation occurs in a proximal-to-distal direction and is accompanied by recruitment of fascin in the same direction. Subsequently, bridge bundles recruit nonmuscle myosin II and mature into stress fibers. Myosin II activity is important for bridge formation and accumulation of VE-cadherin in nascent adherens junctions. Our data reveal a mechanism of cell–cell junction formation in endothelial cells using lamellipodia as the initial protrusive contact, subsequently transforming into filopodia-like bridges connected through adherens junctions. Moreover, a novel lamellipodia-to-filopodia transition is used in this context. PMID:22090347

  3. The tight junction: a multifunctional complex.

    PubMed

    Schneeberger, Eveline E; Lynch, Robert D

    2004-06-01

    Multicellular organisms are separated from the external environment by a layer of epithelial cells whose integrity is maintained by intercellular junctional complexes composed of tight junctions, adherens junctions, and desmosomes, whereas gap junctions provide for intercellular communication. The aim of this review is to present an updated overview of recent developments in the area of tight junction biology. In a relatively short time, our knowledge of the tight junction has evolved from a relatively simple view of it being a permeability barrier in the paracellular space and a fence in the plane of the plasma membrane to one of it acting as a multicomponent, multifunctional complex that is involved in regulating numerous and diverse cell functions. A group of integral membrane proteins-occludin, claudins, and junction adhesion molecules-interact with an increasingly complex array of tight junction plaque proteins not only to regulate paracellular solute and water flux but also to integrate such diverse processes as gene transcription, tumor suppression, cell proliferation, and cell polarity. PMID:15151915

  4. Cyclic stretch disrupts apical junctional complexes in Caco-2 cell monolayers by a JNK-2-, c-Src-, and MLCK-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Samak, Geetha; Gangwar, Ruchika; Crosby, Lynn M.; Desai, Leena P.; Wilhelm, Kristina; Waters, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium is subjected to various types of mechanical stress. In this study, we investigated the impact of cyclic stretch on tight junction and adherens junction integrity in Caco-2 cell monolayers. Stretch for 2 h resulted in a dramatic modulation of tight junction protein distribution from a linear organization into wavy structure. Continuation of cyclic stretch for 6 h led to redistribution of tight junction proteins from the intercellular junctions into the intracellular compartment. Disruption of tight junctions was associated with redistribution of adherens junction proteins, E-cadherin and β-catenin, and dissociation of the actin cytoskeleton at the actomyosin belt. Stretch activates JNK2, c-Src, and myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK). Inhibition of JNK, Src kinase or MLCK activity and knockdown of JNK2 or c-Src attenuated stretch-induced disruption of tight junctions, adherens junctions, and actin cytoskeleton. Paracellular permeability measured by a novel method demonstrated that cyclic stretch increases paracellular permeability by a JNK, Src kinase, and MLCK-dependent mechanism. Stretch increased tyrosine phosphorylation of occludin, ZO-1, E-cadherin, and β-catenin. Inhibition of JNK or Src kinase attenuated stretch-induced occludin phosphorylation. Immunofluorescence localization indicated that phospho-MLC colocalizes with the vesicle-like actin structure at the actomyosin belt in stretched cells. On the other hand, phospho-c-Src colocalizes with the actin at the apical region of cells. This study demonstrates that cyclic stretch disrupts tight junctions and adherens junctions by a JNK2, c-Src, and MLCK-dependent mechanism. PMID:24722904

  5. Tight Junction Proteins in Human Schwann Cell Autotypic Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Alanne, Maria H.; Pummi, Kati; Heape, Anthony M.; Grènman, Reidar; Peltonen, Juha; Peltonen, Sirkku

    2009-01-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) form physical barriers in various tissues and regulate paracellular transport of ions, water, and molecules. Myelinating Schwann cells form highly organized structures, including compact myelin, nodes of Ranvier, paranodal regions, Schmidt-Lanterman incisures, periaxonal cytoplasmic collars, and mesaxons. Autotypic TJs are formed in non-compacted myelin compartments between adjacent membrane lamellae of the same Schwann cell. Using indirect immunofluorescence and RT-PCR, we analyzed the expression of adherens junction (E-cadherin) and TJ [claudins, zonula occludens (ZO)-1, occludin] components in human peripheral nerve endoneurium, showing clear differences with published rodent profiles. Adult nerve paranodal regions contained E-cadherin, claudin-1, claudin-2, and ZO-1. Schmidt-Lanterman incisures contained E-cadherin, claudin-1, claudin-2, claudin-3, claudin-5, ZO-1, and occludin. Mesaxons contained E-cadherin, claudin-1, claudin-2, claudin-3, ZO-1, and occludin. None of the proteins studied were associated with nodal inter-Schwann cell junctions. Fetal nerve expression of claudin-1, claudin-3, ZO-1, and occludin was predominantly punctate, with a mesaxonal labeling pattern, but paranodal (ZO-1, claudin-3) and Schmidt-Lanterman incisure (claudins-1 and -3) expression profiles typical of compact myelin were visible by gestational week 37. The clear differences observed between human and published rodent nerve profiles emphasize the importance of human studies when translating the results of animal models to human diseases. (J Histochem Cytochem 57:523–529, 2009) PMID:19153196

  6. Minireview: Steroid/Nuclear Receptor-Regulated Dynamics of Occluding and Anchoring Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Kapadia, Bhumika J.

    2014-01-01

    A diverse set of physiological signals control intercellular interactions by regulating the structure and function of occluding junctions (tight junctions) and anchoring junctions (adherens junctions and desmosomes). These plasma membrane junctions are comprised of multiprotein complexes of transmembrane and cytoplasmic peripheral plasma membrane proteins. Evidence from many hormone-responsive tissues has shown that expression, modification, molecular interactions, stability, and localization of junctional complex-associated proteins can be targeted by nuclear hormone receptors and their ligands through transcriptional and nontranscriptional mechanisms. The focus of this minireview is to discuss molecular, cellular, and physiological studies that directly link nuclear receptor- and ligand-triggered signaling pathways to the regulation of occluding and anchoring junction dynamics. PMID:25203673

  7. Differences in expression of junctional adhesion molecule-A and beta-catenin in multiple sclerosis brain tissue: increasing evidence for the role of tight junction pathology.

    PubMed

    Padden, Maureen; Leech, Susie; Craig, Beverly; Kirk, John; Brankin, Brenda; McQuaid, Stephen

    2007-02-01

    Previously we have employed antibodies to the tight junction (TJ)-associated proteins ZO-1 and occludin to describe endothelial tight junction abnormalities, in lesional and normal appearing white matter, in primary and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (MS). This work is extended here by use of antibodies to the independent TJ-specific proteins and junctional adhesion molecule A & B (JAM-A, JAM-B). We have also assessed the expression in MS of beta-catenin, a protein specific to the TJ-associated adherens junction. Immunocytochemistry and semiquantitative confocal microscopy for JAM-A and beta-catenin was performed on snap-frozen sections from MS cases (n=11) and controls (n=6). Data on 1,443 blood vessels was acquired from active lesions (n=13), inactive lesions (n=13), NAWM (n=20) and control white matter (n=13). In MS abnormal JAM-A expression was found in active (46%) and inactive lesions (21%), comparable to previous data using ZO-1. However, a lower level of TJ abnormality was found in MS NAWM using JAM-A (3%) compared to ZO-1 (13%). JAM-B was strongly expressed on a small number of large blood vessels in control and MS tissues but at too low a level for quantitative analysis. By comparison with the high levels of abnormality observed with the TJ proteins, the adherens junction protein beta-catenin was normally expressed in all MS and control tissue categories. These results confirm, by use of the independent marker JAM-A, that TJ abnormalities are most frequent in active white matter lesions. Altered expression of JAM-A, in addition to affecting junctional tightness may also both reflect and affect leukocyte trafficking, with implications for immune status within the diseased CNS. Conversely, the adherens junction component of the TJ, as indicated by beta-catenin expression is normally expressed in all MS and control tissue categories. PMID:17024496

  8. AJ26 rocket engine testing news briefing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Operators at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center are completing modifications to the E-1 Test Stand to begin testing Aerojet AJ26 rocket engines in early summer of 2010. Modifications include construction of a 27-foot-deep flame deflector trench. The AJ26 rocket engines will be used to power Orbital Sciences Corp.'s Taurus II space vehicles to provide commercial cargo transportation missions to the International Space Station for NASA. Stennis has partnered with Orbital to test all engines for the transport missions.

  9. Transmissible gastroenteritis virus and porcine epidemic diarrhoea virus infection induces dramatic changes in the tight junctions and microfilaments of polarized IPEC-J2 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shanshan; Gao, Junkai; Zhu, Liqi; Yang, Qian

    2014-11-01

    Viral infection converts the normal constitution of a cell to optimise viral entry, replication, and virion production. These conversions contain alterations or disruptions of the tight and adherens junctions between cells as part of their pathogenesis, and reorganise cellular microfilaments that initiate, sustain and spread the viral infections and so on. Using porcine epidemic diarrhoea virus (PEDV), transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) and a model of normal intestinal epithelial cells (IPEC-J2), we researched the interaction between tight and adherens junctions and microfilaments of IPEC-J2 cells with these viruses. In our work, the results showed that IPEC-J2 cells were susceptible to TGEV and PEDV infection. And TGEV could impair the barrier integrity of IPEC-J2 cells at early stages of infection through down-regulating some proteins of tight and adherens junctions, while PEDV cloud cause a slight of damage in the integrity of epithelial barrier. In addition, they also could affect the microfilaments remodelling of IPEC-J2 cells, and the drug-interfered microfilaments could inhibit viral replication and release. Furthermore, PEDV+TGEV co-infection was more aggravating to damage of tight junctions and remodelling of microfilaments than their single infection. Finally, the PEDV and TGEV infection affected the MAPK pathway, and inhibition of MAPK pathway regulated the changes of tight junctions and microfilaments of cells. These studies provide a new insight from the perspective of the epithelial barrier and microfilaments into the pathogenesis of PEDV and TGEV. PMID:25173696

  10. Nanotube junctions

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, Vincent Henry; Cohen, Marvin Lou; Louie, Steven Gwon; Zettl, Alexander Karlwalte

    2004-12-28

    The present invention comprises a new nanoscale metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, or metal-metal junction, designed by introducing topological or chemical defects in the atomic structure of the nanotube. Nanotubes comprising adjacent sections having differing electrical properties are described. These nanotubes can be constructed from combinations of carbon, boron, nitrogen and other elements. The nanotube can be designed having different indices on either side of a junction point in a continuous tube so that the electrical properties on either side of the junction vary in a useful fashion. For example, the inventive nanotube may be electrically conducting on one side of a junction and semiconducting on the other side. An example of a semiconductor-metal junction is a Schottky barrier. Alternatively, the nanotube may exhibit different semiconductor properties on either side of the junction. Nanotubes containing heterojunctions, Schottky barriers, and metal-metal junctions are useful for microcircuitry.

  11. Nanotube junctions

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, Vincent Henry; Cohen, Marvin Lou; Louie, Steven Gwon Sheng; Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter

    2003-01-01

    The present invention comprises a new nanoscale metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, or metal-metal junction, designed by introducing topological or chemical defects in the atomic structure of the nanotube. Nanotubes comprising adjacent sections having differing electrical properties are described. These nanotubes can be constructed from combinations of carbon, boron, nitrogen and other elements. The nanotube can be designed having different indices on either side of a junction point in a continuous tube so that the electrical properties on either side of the junction vary in a useful fashion. For example, the inventive nanotube may be electrically conducting on one side of a junction and semiconducting on the other side. An example of a semiconductor-metal junction is a Schottky barrier. Alternatively, the nanotube may exhibit different semiconductor properties on either side of the junction. Nanotubes containing heterojunctions, Schottky barriers, and metal-metal junctions are useful for microcircuitry.

  12. Ultrafast endocytosis at Caenorhabditis elegans neuromuscular junctions

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Shigeki; Liu, Qiang; Davis, M Wayne; Hollopeter, Gunther; Thomas, Nikita; Jorgensen, Nels B; Jorgensen, Erik M

    2013-01-01

    Synaptic vesicles can be released at extremely high rates, which places an extraordinary demand on the recycling machinery. Previous ultrastructural studies of vesicle recycling were conducted in dissected preparations using an intense stimulation to maximize the probability of release. Here, a single light stimulus was applied to motor neurons in intact Caenorhabditis elegans nematodes expressing channelrhodopsin, and the animals rapidly frozen. We found that docked vesicles fuse along a broad active zone in response to a single stimulus, and are replenished with a time constant of about 2 s. Endocytosis occurs within 50 ms adjacent to the dense projection and after 1 s adjacent to adherens junctions. These studies suggest that synaptic vesicle endocytosis may occur on a millisecond time scale following a single physiological stimulus in the intact nervous system and is unlikely to conform to current models of endocytosis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00723.001 PMID:24015355

  13. Rhabdomyosarcomas in Aging A/J Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sher, Roger B.; Cox, Gregory A.; Mills, Kevin D.; Sundberg, John P.

    2011-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcomas (RSCs) are skeletal muscle neoplasms found in humans and domestic mammals. The A/J inbred strain developed a high frequency (between 70–80%) of adult pleomorphic type (APT) RSC at >20 months of age while BALB/cByJ also develop RSC but less frequently. These neoplasms invaded skeletal muscle surrounding either the axial or proximal appendicular skeleton and were characterized by pleomorphic cells with abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm, multiple nuclei, and cross striations. The diagnosis was confirmed by detection of alpha-sarcomeric actin and myogenin in the neoplastic cells using immunocytochemistry. The A/J strain, but not the related BALB/c substrains, is also characterised by a progressive muscular dystrophy homologous to limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B. The association between the development of RSC in similar muscle groups to those most severely affected by the progressive muscular dystrophy suggested that these neoplasms developed from abnormal regeneration of the skeletal muscle exacerbated by the dysferlin mutation. Transcriptome analyses of RSCs revealed marked downregulation of genes in muscular development and function signaling networks. Non-synonymous coding SNPs were found in Myl1, Abra, Sgca, Ttn, and Kcnj12 suggesting these may be important in the pathogenesis of RSC. These studies suggest that A strains of mice can be useful models for dissecting the molecular genetic basis for development, progression, and ultimately for testing novel anticancer therapeutic agents dealing with rhabdomyosarcoma. PMID:21853140

  14. Intraepithelial lymphocytes express junctional molecules in murine small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Inagaki-Ohara, Kyoko . E-mail: INAGAKI@med.miyazaki-u.ac.jp; Sawaguchi, Akira; Suganuma, Tatsuo; Matsuzaki, Goro; Nawa, Yukifumi

    2005-06-17

    Intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL) that reside at basolateral site regulate the proliferation and differentiation of epithelial cells (EC) for providing a first line of host defense in intestine. However, it remains unknown how IEL interact and communicate with EC. Here, we show that IEL express junctional molecules like EC. We identified mRNA expression of the junctional molecules in IEL such as zonula occludens (ZO)-1, occludin and junctional adhesion molecule (JAM) (tight junction), {beta}-catenin and E-cadherin (adherens junction), and connexin26 (gap junction). IEL constitutively expressed occludin and E-cadherin at protein level, while other T cells in the thymus, spleen, liver, mesenteric lymph node, and Peyer's patches did not. {gamma}{delta} IEL showed higher level of these expressions than {alpha}{beta} IEL. The expression of occludin was augmented by anti-CD3 Ab stimulation. These results suggest the possibility of a novel role of IEL concerning epithelial barrier and communication between IEL and EC.

  15. Josephson junction

    DOEpatents

    Wendt, Joel R.; Plut, Thomas A.; Martens, Jon S.

    1995-01-01

    A novel method for fabricating nanometer geometry electronic devices is described. Such Josephson junctions can be accurately and reproducibly manufactured employing photolithographic and direct write electron beam lithography techniques in combination with aqueous etchants. In particular, a method is described for manufacturing planar Josephson junctions from high temperature superconducting material.

  16. Josephson junction

    DOEpatents

    Wendt, J.R.; Plut, T.A.; Martens, J.S.

    1995-05-02

    A novel method for fabricating nanometer geometry electronic devices is described. Such Josephson junctions can be accurately and reproducibly manufactured employing photolithographic and direct write electron beam lithography techniques in combination with aqueous etchants. In particular, a method is described for manufacturing planar Josephson junctions from high temperature superconducting material. 10 figs.

  17. Bimetallic junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arcella, F. G.; Lessmann, G. G.; Lindberg, R. A. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    The formation of voids through interdiffusion in bimetallic welded structures exposed to high operating temperatures is inhibited by utilizing an alloy of the parent materials in the junction of the parent materials or by preannealing the junction at an ultrahigh temperature. These methods are also used to reduce the concentration gradient of a hardening agent.

  18. Glutamine supplementation attenuates ethanol-induced disruption of apical junctional complexes in colonic epithelium and ameliorates gut barrier dysfunction and fatty liver in mice.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Kamaljit K; Shukla, Pradeep K; Mir, Hina; Manda, Bhargavi; Gangwar, Ruchika; Yadav, Nikki; McMullen, Megan; Nagy, Laura E; Rao, RadhaKrishna

    2016-01-01

    Previous in vitro studies showed that glutamine (Gln) prevents acetaldehyde-induced disruption of tight junctions and adherens junctions in Caco-2 cell monolayers and human colonic mucosa. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of Gln supplementation on ethanol-induced gut barrier dysfunction and liver injury in mice in vivo. Ethanol feeding caused a significant increase in inulin permeability in distal colon. Elevated permeability was associated with a redistribution of tight junction and adherens junction proteins and depletion of detergent-insoluble fractions of these proteins, suggesting that ethanol disrupts apical junctional complexes in colonic epithelium and increases paracellular permeability. Ethanol-induced increase in colonic mucosal permeability and disruption of junctional complexes were most severe in mice fed Gln-free diet. Gln supplementation attenuated ethanol-induced mucosal permeability and disruption of tight junctions and adherens junctions in a dose-dependent manner, indicating the potential role of Gln in nutritional intervention to alcoholic tissue injury. Gln supplementation dose-dependently elevated reduced-protein thiols in colon without affecting the level of oxidized-protein thiols. Ethanol feeding depleted reduced protein thiols and elevated oxidized protein thiols. Ethanol-induced protein thiol oxidation was most severe in mice fed with Gln-free diet and absent in mice fed with Gln-supplemented diet, suggesting that antioxidant effect is one of the likely mechanisms involved in Gln-mediated amelioration of ethanol-induced gut barrier dysfunction. Ethanol feeding elevated plasma transaminase and liver triglyceride, which was accompanied by histopathologic lesions in the liver; ethanol-induced liver damage was attenuated by Gln supplementation. These results indicate that Gln supplementation ameliorates alcohol-induced gut and liver injury. PMID:26365579

  19. Gap Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Morten Schak; Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Sorgen, Paul L.; Verma, Vandana; Delmar, Mario; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Gap junctions are essential to the function of multicellular animals, which require a high degree of coordination between cells. In vertebrates, gap junctions comprise connexins and currently 21 connexins are known in humans. The functions of gap junctions are highly diverse and include exchange of metabolites and electrical signals between cells, as well as functions, which are apparently unrelated to intercellular communication. Given the diversity of gap junction physiology, regulation of gap junction activity is complex. The structure of the various connexins is known to some extent; and structural rearrangements and intramolecular interactions are important for regulation of channel function. Intercellular coupling is further regulated by the number and activity of channels present in gap junctional plaques. The number of connexins in cell-cell channels is regulated by controlling transcription, translation, trafficking, and degradation; and all of these processes are under strict control. Once in the membrane, channel activity is determined by the conductive properties of the connexin involved, which can be regulated by voltage and chemical gating, as well as a large number of posttranslational modifications. The aim of the present article is to review our current knowledge on the structure, regulation, function, and pharmacology of gap junctions. This will be supported by examples of how different connexins and their regulation act in concert to achieve appropriate physiological control, and how disturbances of connexin function can lead to disease. © 2012 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 2:1981-2035, 2012. PMID:23723031

  20. AJ26 rocket engine testing news briefing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center Director Gene Goldman (center) stands in front of a 'pathfinder' rocket engine with Orbital Sciences Corp. President and Chief Operating Officer J.R. Thompson (left) and Aerojet President Scott Seymour during a Feb. 24 news briefing at the south Mississippi facility. The leaders appeared together to announce a partnership for testing Aerojet AJ26 rocket engines at Stennis. The engines will be used to power Orbital's Taurus II space vehicles to provide commercial cargo transportation missions to the International Space Station for NASA. During the event, the Stennis partnership with Orbital was cited as an example of the new direction of NASA to work with commercial interests for space travel and transport.

  1. Calcium-Ask1-MKK7-JNK2-c-Src Signaling Cascade Mediates Disruption of Intestinal Epithelial Tight Junctions by Dextran Sulfate Sodium

    PubMed Central

    Samak, Geetha; Chaudhry, Kamaljit K.; Gangwar, Ruchika; Narayanan, Damodaran; Jaggar, Jonathan H.; Rao, RadhaKrishna

    2015-01-01

    Disruption of intestinal epithelial tight junctions is an important event in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis. Dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) induces colitis in mice with the symptoms similar to ulcerative colitis. However, the mechanism of DSS-induced colitis is unknown. We investigated the mechanism of DSS-induced disruption of intestinal epithelial tight junctions and barrier dysfunction in Caco-2 cell monolayers in vitro and mouse colon in vivo. DSS treatment resulted in disruption of tight junctions, adherens junctions and actin cytoskeleton leading to barrier dysfunction in Caco-2 cell monolayers. DSS induced a rapid activation of c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and the inhibition or knockdown of JNK2 attenuated DSS-induced tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction. In mice, DSS administration for 4 days caused redistribution of tight junction and adherens junction proteins from the epithelial junctions, which was blocked by JNK inhibitor. In Caco-2 cell monolayers, DSS increased intracellular Ca2+ concentration, and depletion of intracellular Ca2+ by BAPTA or thapsigargin attenuated DSS-induced JNK activation, tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction. Knockdown of Ask1 or MKK7 blocked DSS-induced tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction. DSS activated c-Src by a Ca2+ and JNK-dependent mechanism. Inhibition of Src kinase activity or knockdown of c-Src blocked DSS-induced tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction. DSS increased Tyr-phosphorylation of occludin, ZO-1, E-cadherin and β-catenin. SP600125 abrogated DSS-induced Tyr-phosphorylation of junctional proteins. Recombinant JNK2 induced threonine phosphorylation and auto phosphorylation of c-Src. This study demonstrates that Ca2+-Ask1-MKK7-JNK2-cSrc signaling cascade mediates DSS-induced tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction. PMID:25377781

  2. Testicular Cell Junction: A Novel Target for Male Contraception

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Nikki P.Y.; Wong, Elissa W.P.; Mruk, Dolores D.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2009-01-01

    Even though various contraceptive methods are widely available, the number of unwanted pregnancies is still on the rise in developing countries, pressurizing the already resource limited nations. One of the major underlying reasons is the lack of effective, low cost, and safe contraceptives for couples. During the past decade, some studies were performed using animal models to decipher if the Sertoli-germ cell junction in the testis is a target for male fertility regulation. Some of these study models were based on the use of hormones and/or chemicals to disrupt the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis (e.g., androgen-based implants or pills) and others utilized a panel of chemical entities or synthetic peptides to perturb spermatogenesis either reversibly or non-reversibly. Among them, adjudin, a potential male contraceptive, is one of the compounds exerting its action on the unique adherens junctions, known as ectoplasmic specializations, in the testis. Since the testis is equipped with inter-connected cell junctions, an initial targeting of one junction type may affect the others and these accumulative effects could lead to spermatogenic arrest. This review attempts to cover an innovative theme on how male infertility can be achieved by inducing junction instability and defects in the testis, opening a new window of research for male contraceptive development. While it will still take much time and effort of intensive investigation before a product can reach the consumable market, these findings have provided hope for better family planning involving men. PMID:19275601

  3. The expression of gingival epithelial junctions in response to subgingival biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Belibasakis, Georgios N; Kast, Jeannette I; Thurnheer, Thomas; Akdis, Cezmi A; Bostanci, Nagihan

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is an infectious inflammatory disease that destroys the tooth-supporting tissues. It is caused by the formation of subgingival biofilms on the surface of the tooth. Characteristic bacteria associated with subgingival biofilms are the Gram-negative anaerobes Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia and Treponema denticola, collectively known as the “red complex” species. Inter-epithelial junctions ensure the barrier integrity of the gingival epithelium. This may however be disrupted by the biofilm challenge. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the effect of subgingival biofilms on the expression of inter-epithelial junctions by gingival epithelia, and evaluate the relative role of the red complex. Multi-layered human gingival epithelial cultures were challenged with a 10-species in vitro subgingival biofilm model, or its variant without the red complex, for 3 h and 24 h. A low-density array microfluidic card platform was then used for analyzing the expression of 62 genes encoding for tight junctions, gap junctions, adherens junctions, and desmosomes. Although there was a limited effect of the biofilms on the expression of tight, adherens and gap junctions, the expression of a number of desmosomal components was affected. In particular, Desmoglein-1 displayed a limited and transient up-regulation in response to the biofilm. In contrast, Desmocollin-2, Desmoplakin and Plakoglobin were down-regulated equally by both biofilm variants, after 24 h. In conclusion, this subgingival biofilm model may down-regulate selected desmosomal junctions in the gingival epithelium, irrespective of the presence of the “red complex.” In turn, this could compromise the structural integrity of the gingival tissue, favoring bacterial invasion and chronic infection. PMID:26305580

  4. Tight junctions in Hailey-Hailey and Darier's diseases

    PubMed Central

    Raiko, Laura; Leinonen, Pekka; Hägg, Päivi M.; Peltonen, Juha; Oikarinen, Aarne; Peltonen, Sirkku

    2009-01-01

    Hailey-Hailey disease (HHD) and Darier's disease (DD) are caused by mutations in Ca2+-ATPases with the end result of desmosomal disruption and suprabasal acantholysis. Tight junctions (TJ) are located in the granular cell layer in normal skin and contribute to the epidermal barrier. Aberrations in the epidermal differentiation, such as in psoriasis, have been shown to lead to changes in the expression of TJ components. Our aim was to elucidate the expression and dynamics of the TJ proteins during the disruption of desmosomes in HHD and DD lesions. Indirect immunofluorescence and avidin-biotin labeling for TJ, desmosomal and adherens junction proteins, and subsequent analyses with the confocal laser scanning microscope were carried out on 14 HHD and 14 DD skin samples. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) was measured in normal and lesional epidermis of nine HHD and eight DD patients to evaluate the function of the epidermal barrier in HHD and DD skin. The localization of TJ proteins claudin-1, claudin-4, ZO-1, and occludin in perilesional HHD and DD epidermis was similar to that previously described in normal skin. In HHD lesions the tissue distribution of ZO-1 expanded to the acantholytic spinous cells. In agreement with previous findings, desmoplakin was localized intracellularly. In contrast claudin-1 and ZO-1 persisted in the cell-cell contact sites of acantholytic cells. TEWL was increased in the lesional skin. The current results suggest that TJ components follow different dynamics in acantholysis of HHD and DD compared to desmosomal and adherens junction proteins. PMID:25386233

  5. The inner CSF–brain barrier: developmentally controlled access to the brain via intercellular junctions

    PubMed Central

    Whish, Sophie; Dziegielewska, Katarzyna M.; Møllgård, Kjeld; Noor, Natassya M.; Liddelow, Shane A.; Habgood, Mark D.; Richardson, Samantha J.; Saunders, Norman R.

    2015-01-01

    In the adult the interface between the cerebrospinal fluid and the brain is lined by the ependymal cells, which are joined by gap junctions. These intercellular connections do not provide a diffusional restrain between the two compartments. However, during development this interface, initially consisting of neuroepithelial cells and later radial glial cells, is characterized by “strap” junctions, which limit the exchange of different sized molecules between cerebrospinal fluid and the brain parenchyma. Here we provide a systematic study of permeability properties of this inner cerebrospinal fluid-brain barrier during mouse development from embryonic day, E17 until adult. Results show that at fetal stages exchange across this barrier is restricted to the smallest molecules (286Da) and the diffusional restraint is progressively removed as the brain develops. By postnatal day P20, molecules the size of plasma proteins (70 kDa) diffuse freely. Transcriptomic analysis of junctional proteins present in the cerebrospinal fluid-brain interface showed expression of adherens junctional proteins, actins, cadherins and catenins changing in a development manner consistent with the observed changes in the permeability studies. Gap junction proteins were only identified in the adult as was claudin-11. Immunohistochemistry was used to localize at the cellular level some of the adherens junctional proteins of genes identified from transcriptomic analysis. N-cadherin, β - and α-catenin immunoreactivity was detected outlining the inner CSF-brain interface from E16; most of these markers were not present in the adult ependyma. Claudin-5 was present in the apical-most part of radial glial cells and in endothelial cells in embryos, but only in endothelial cells including plexus endothelial cells in adults. Claudin-11 was only immunopositive in the adult, consistent with results obtained from transcriptomic analysis. These results provide information about physiological, molecular

  6. Aj-rel and Aj-p105, two evolutionary conserved NF-κB homologues in sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus) and their involvement in LPS induced immunity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tingting; Sun, Yongxin; Jin, Liji; Thacker, Philip; Li, Shuying; Xu, Yongping

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) has been evolutionary conserved from insects to mammals and plays a major regulatory role in the initiation of physiological responses. In this study, we identified and characterized a primitive and functional NF-κB pathway active in the immune defence of the sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus). The ancient NF-κB homologues, Aj-rel and Aj-p105, share numerous signature motifs with their vertebrate orthologues, notably the Rel Homology Domain, Rel Protein Signature DNA Binding Motif, Nuclear Localization Signal and the Ankyrin Repeats for Aj-p105. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that these homologues belong to class I and II of NF-κB respectively. We examined the dimerization of Aj-rel and Aj-p105 and our results demonstrated that Aj-rel forms heterdimers with Aj-p105 and the degradation product of Aj-p105, namely Aj-p50. We further observed that LPS stimulation led to the degradation of Aj-p105 and the nuclear translocation of Aj-rel and Aj-p50. Taken together, our data indicate that the NF-κB signaling cascade is active in sea cucumber and plays a crucial role in regulating their immune defence. Our results increase the available information on sea cucumber immunity and provide new information for use in the study of the comparative and evolutionary aspects of immunity. PMID:23022054

  7. p120-catenin-dependent junctional recruitment of Shroom3 is required for apical constriction during lens pit morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Richard A.; Herman, Ken; Reynolds, Albert B.; Hildebrand, Jeffrey D.; Plageman, Timothy F.

    2014-01-01

    Apical constriction (AC) is a widely utilized mechanism of cell shape change whereby epithelial cells transform from a cylindrical to conical shape, which can facilitate morphogenetic movements during embryonic development. Invertebrate epithelial cells undergoing AC depend on the contraction of apical cortex-spanning actomyosin filaments that generate force on the apical junctions and pull them toward the middle of the cell, effectively reducing the apical circumference. A current challenge is to determine whether these mechanisms are conserved in vertebrates and to identify the molecules responsible for linking apical junctions with the AC machinery. Utilizing the developing mouse eye as a model, we have uncovered evidence that lens placode AC may be partially dependent on apically positioned myosin-containing filaments associated with the zonula adherens. In addition we found that, among several junctional components, p120-catenin genetically interacts with Shroom3, a protein required for AC during embryonic morphogenesis. Further analysis revealed that, similar to Shroom3, p120-catenin is required for AC of lens cells. Finally, we determined that p120-catenin functions by recruiting Shroom3 to adherens junctions. Together, these data identify a novel role for p120-catenin during AC and further define the mechanisms required for vertebrate AC. PMID:25038041

  8. MgcRacGAP restricts active RhoA at the cytokinetic furrow and both RhoA and Rac1 at cell–cell junctions in epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Breznau, Elaina B.; Semack, Ansley C.; Higashi, Tomohito; Miller, Ann L.

    2015-01-01

    Localized activation of Rho GTPases is essential for multiple cellular functions, including cytokinesis and formation and maintenance of cell–cell junctions. Although MgcRacGAP (Mgc) is required for spatially confined RhoA-GTP at the equatorial cortex of dividing cells, both the target specificity of Mgc's GAP activity and the involvement of phosphorylation of Mgc at Ser-386 are controversial. In addition, Mgc's function at cell–cell junctions remains unclear. Here, using gastrula-stage Xenopus laevis embryos as a model system, we examine Mgc's role in regulating localized RhoA-GTP and Rac1-GTP in the intact vertebrate epithelium. We show that Mgc's GAP activity spatially restricts accumulation of both RhoA-GTP and Rac1-GTP in epithelial cells—RhoA at the cleavage furrow and RhoA and Rac1 at cell–cell junctions. Phosphorylation at Ser-386 does not switch the specificity of Mgc's GAP activity and is not required for successful cytokinesis. Furthermore, Mgc regulates adherens junction but not tight junction structure, and the ability to regulate adherens junctions is dependent on GAP activity and signaling via the RhoA pathway. Together these results indicate that Mgc's GAP activity down-regulates the active populations of RhoA and Rac1 at localized regions of epithelial cells and is necessary for successful cytokinesis and cell–cell junction structure. PMID:25947135

  9. Neisseria gonorrhoeae induced disruption of cell junction complexes in epithelial cells of the human genital tract.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Tirado, Carolina; Maisey, Kevin; Rodríguez, Felipe E; Reyes-Cerpa, Sebastián; Reyes-López, Felipe E; Imarai, Mónica

    2012-03-01

    Pathogenic microorganisms, such as Neisseria gonorrhoeae, have developed mechanisms to alter epithelial barriers in order to reach subepithelial tissues for host colonization. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of gonococci on cell junction complexes of genital epithelial cells of women. Polarized Ishikawa cells, a cell line derived from endometrial epithelium, were used for experimental infection. Infected cells displayed a spindle-like shape with an irregular distribution, indicating potential alteration of cell-cell contacts. Accordingly, analysis by confocal microscopy and cellular fractionation revealed that gonococci induced redistribution of the adherens junction proteins E-cadherin and its adapter protein β-catenin from the membrane to a cytoplasmic pool, with no significant differences in protein levels. In contrast, gonococcal infection did not induce modification of either expression or distribution of the tight junction proteins Occludin and ZO-1. Similar results were observed for Fallopian tube epithelia. Interestingly, infected Ishikawa cells also showed an altered pattern of actin cytoskeleton, observed in the form of stress fibers across the cytoplasm, which in turn matched a strong alteration on the expression of fibronectin, an adhesive glycoprotein component of extracellular matrix. Interestingly, using western blotting, activation of the ERK pathway was detected after gonococcal infection while p38 pathway was not activated. All effects were pili and Opa independent. Altogether, results indicated that gonococcus, as a mechanism of pathogenesis, induced disruption of junction complexes with early detaching of E-cadherin and β-catenin from the adherens junction complex, followed by a redistribution and reorganization of actin cytoskeleton and fibronectin within the extracellular matrix. PMID:22146107

  10. Polarity Proteins as Regulators of Cell Junction Complexes: Implications for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bazzoun, Dana; Lelièvre, Sophie; Talhouk, Rabih

    2013-01-01

    The epithelium of multicellular organisms possesses a well-defined architecture, referred to as polarity that coordinates the regulation of essential cell features. Polarity proteins are intimately linked to the protein complexes that make the tight, adherens and gap junctions; they contribute to the proper localization and assembly of these cell-cell junctions within cells and consequently to functional tissue organization. The establishment of cell-cell junctions and polarity are both implicated in the regulation of epithelial modifications in normal and cancer situations. Uncovering the mechanisms through which cell-cell junctions and epithelial polarization are established and how their interaction with the microenvironment direct cell and tissue organization has opened new venues for the development of cancer therapies. In this review, we focus on the breast epithelium to highlight how polarity and cell-cell junction proteins interact together in normal and cancerous contexts to regulate major cellular mechanisms such as migration. The impact of these proteins on epigenetic mechanisms responsible for resetting cells towards oncogenesis is discussed in light of increasing evidence that tissue polarity modulates chromatin function. Finally, we give an overview of recent breast cancer therapies that target proteins involved in cell-cell junctions. PMID:23458609

  11. Bibliography of Writings by A.J. Meadows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Line, Maurice B.

    2000-01-01

    This chronological bibliography of writings (1967-1999) by A.J. Meadows, astronomer, historian of science, and information scientist, is restricted to papers and book reviews on library and information science, publishing and scientific communication. It excludes works on the history of science and astronomy. It aims at completeness, though some…

  12. 17 CFR 240.15Aj-1 - Amendments and supplements to registration statements of securities associations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... consolidated supplement as of such date on Form X-15AJ-2 (§ 249.803) except that: (i) If the securities... Form X-15AJ-2 on an annual or more frequent basis, in lieu of filing such an item the securities... three years thereafter each association shall file complete Exhibit A to Form X-15AJ-2. The...

  13. 17 CFR 240.15Aj-1 - Amendments and supplements to registration statements of securities associations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... consolidated supplement as of such date on Form X-15AJ-2 (§ 249.803) except that: (i) If the securities... Form X-15AJ-2 on an annual or more frequent basis, in lieu of filing such an item the securities... three years thereafter each association shall file complete Exhibit A to Form X-15AJ-2. The...

  14. 17 CFR 240.15Aj-1 - Amendments and supplements to registration statements of securities associations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... consolidated supplement as of such date on Form X-15AJ-2 (§ 249.803) except that: (i) If the securities... Form X-15AJ-2 on an annual or more frequent basis, in lieu of filing such an item the securities... three years thereafter each association shall file complete Exhibit A to Form X-15AJ-2. The...

  15. 17 CFR 240.15Aj-1 - Amendments and supplements to registration statements of securities associations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... consolidated supplement as of such date on Form X-15AJ-2 (§ 249.803) except that: (i) If the securities... Form X-15AJ-2 on an annual or more frequent basis, in lieu of filing such an item the securities... three years thereafter each association shall file complete Exhibit A to Form X-15AJ-2. The...

  16. Abnormal Junctions and Permeability of Myelin in PMP22-Deficient Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jiasong; Wang, Leiming; Zhang, Yang; Wu, Jiawen; Arpag, Sezgi; Hu, Bo; Imhof, Beat A.; Tian, Xinxia; Carter, Bruce D.; Suter, Ueli; Li, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Objective The peripheral myelin protein-22 (PMP22) gene is associated with the most common types of inherited neuropathies, including hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) caused by PMP22 deficiency. However, the function of PMP22 has yet to be defined. Our previous study has shown that PMP22 deficiency causes an impaired propagation of nerve action potentials in the absence of demyelination. In the present study, we tested an alternative mechanism relating to myelin permeability. Methods Utilizing Pmp22+/− mice as a model of HNPP, we evaluated myelin junctions and their permeability using morphological, electrophysiological, and biochemical approaches. Results We show disruption of multiple types of cell junction complexes in peripheral nerve, resulting in increased permeability of myelin and impaired action potential propagation. We further demonstrate that PMP22 interacts with immunoglobulin domain–containing proteins known to regulate tight/adherens junctions and/or transmembrane adhesions, including junctional adhesion molecule-C (JAM-C) and myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG). Deletion of Jam-c or Mag in mice recapitulates pathology in HNPP. Interpretation Our study reveals a novel mechanism by which PMP22 deficiency affects nerve conduction not through removal of myelin, but through disruption of myelin junctions. PMID:24339129

  17. Reduced expression of adherens and gap junction proteins can have a fundamental role in the development of heart failure following cardiac hypertrophy in rats.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Daniele O; Blefari, Valdecir; Prado, Fernanda P; Silva, Carlos A; Fazan, Rubens; Salgado, Helio C; Ramos, Simone G; Prado, Cibele M

    2016-02-01

    Hypertension causes cardiac hypertrophy, cardiac dysfunction and heart failure (HF). The mechanisms implicated in the transition from compensated to decompensated cardiac hypertrophy are not fully understood. This study was aimed to investigate whether alterations in the expression of intercalated disk proteins could contribute to the transition of compensated cardiac hypertrophy to dilated heart development that culminates in HF. Male rats were submitted to abdominal aortic constriction and at 90 days post surgery (dps), three groups were observed: sham-operated animals (controls), animals with hypertrophic hearts (HH) and animals with hypertrophic + dilated hearts (HD). Blood pressure was evaluated. The hearts were collected and Western blot and immunofluorescence were performed to desmoglein-2, desmocollin-2, N-cadherin, plakoglobin, Bcatenin, and connexin-43. Cardiac systolic function was evaluated using the Vevo 2100 ultrasound system. Data were considered significant when p b 0.05. Seventy percent of the animals presented with HH and 30% were HD at 90 dps. The blood pressure increased in both groups. The amount of desmoglein-2 and desmocollin-2 expression was increased in both groups and no difference was observed in either group. The expression of N-cadherin, plakoglobin and B-catenin increased in the HHgroup and decreased in the HDgroup; and connexin-43 decreased only in theHDgroup. Therewas no difference between the ejection fraction and fractional shortening at 30 and 60 dps; however, they were decreased in the HD group at 90 dps. We found that while some proteins have increased expression accompanied by the increase in the cell volume associated with preserved systolic cardiac function in theHHgroup, these same proteins had decreased expression evenwithout significant reduction in the cell volume associated with decreased systolic cardiac function in HD group. The increased expression of desmoglein-2 and desmocollin-2 in both the HH and HD groups could work as a protective compensatory mechanism, helping tomaintain the dilated heart.We can hypothesize that inappropriate intercellular mechanical and electrical coupling associated with necrosis and/or apoptosis are important factors contributing to the transition to HF. PMID:26708424

  18. Differential roles of inflammation and apoptosis in initiation of mid-gestational abortion in malaria-infected C57BL/6 and A/J mice

    PubMed Central

    Sarr, Demba; Bracken, Tara C.; Owino, Simon O.; Cooper, Caitlin A.; Smith, Geoffrey M.; Nagy, Tamas; Moore, Julie M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Plasmodium chabaudi AS-infection in pregnant A/J and C57BL/6J mice results in mid-gestational pregnancy loss. Although associated with increased systemic and placental pro-inflammatory responses and coagulopathy, the molecular mechanisms that underlie poor pregnancy outcomes in these mice are not yet fully understood. This study investigates the relationships between inflammation, apoptosis and malaria-induced pregnancy loss. Methods Infection with Plasmodium chabaudi AS in early murine pregnancy and term human placental tissues from an endemic setting were assessed by histology, immunohistochemistry, TUNEL staining, real-time PCR, flow cytometry, western blot, and ELISA. Results Quantitative PCR reveals accumulation of lymphocytes and monocytes and upregulation of chemokines that attract these cell types in malaria-exposed mid-gestational A/J conceptuses. Monocyte accumulation is confirmed by flow cytometry and placental immunohistochemistry. Concurrent with initiation of malaria-induced abortion, markers of apoptosis are evident in the junctional zone, but not the labyrinth, of A/J placentae. In contrast, mid-gestation conceptuses in infected C57BL/6J lack evidence for monocyte accumulation, exhibiting low or no in situ placental staining despite trophoblast immunoreactivity for the monokine, CCL2. Additionally, placental apoptosis is not consistently observed, and when evident, appears after malaria-induced abortion typically initiates. Similarly, trophoblast apoptosis in term human placental malaria is not observed. Of those studied, a sole common feature of malaria-induced abortion in A/J and C57BL/6J mice is elevation of plasma tumor necrosis factor. Discussion Consistent with our previous observations, tumor necrosis factor is likely to be a central driver of malaria-induced pregnancy loss in both strains, but likely operates through mechanisms distinct from placental apoptosis in C57BL/6J mice. PMID:25956987

  19. Solitons in Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustinov, A. V.

    1998-11-01

    Magnetic flux quanta in Josephson junctions, often called fluxons, in many cases behave as solitons. A review of recent experiments and modelling of fluxon dynamics in Josephson circuits is presented. Classic quasi-one-dimensional junctions, stacked junctions (Josephson superlattices), and discrete Josephson transmission lines (JTLs) are discussed. Applications of fluxon devices as high-frequency oscillators and digital circuits are also addressed.

  20. Mutant B-Raf(V600E) Promotes Melanoma Paracellular Transmigration by Inducing Thrombin-mediated Endothelial Junction Breakdown.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pu; Feng, Shan; Liu, Gentao; Wang, Heyong; Zhu, Huifeng; Ren, Qiao; Bai, Huiyuan; Fu, Changliang; Dong, Cheng

    2016-01-29

    Tumor invasiveness depends on the ability of tumor cells to breach endothelial barriers. In this study, we investigated the mechanism by which the adhesion of melanoma cells to endothelium regulates adherens junction integrity and modulates tumor transendothelial migration (TEM) by initiating thrombin generation. We found that the B-Raf(V600E) mutation in metastatic melanoma cells up-regulated tissue factor (TF) expression on cell membranes and promoted thrombin production. Co-culture of endothelial monolayers with metastatic melanoma cells mediated the opening of inter-endothelial spaces near melanoma cell contact sites in the presence of platelet-free plasma (PFP). By using small interfering RNA (siRNA), we demonstrated that B-Raf(V600E) and TF silencing attenuated the focal disassembly of adherens junction induced by tumor contact. Vascular endothelial-cadherin (VE-cadherin) disassembly was dependent on phosphorylation of p120-catenin on Ser-879 and VE-cadherin on Tyr-658, Tyr-685, and Tyr-731, which can be prevented by treatment with the thrombin inhibitor, hirudin, or by silencing the thrombin receptor, protease-activated receptor-1, in endothelial cells. We also provided strong evidence that tumor-derived thrombin enhanced melanoma TEM by inducing ubiquitination-coupled VE-cadherin internalization, focal adhesion formation, and actin assembly in endothelium. Confocal microscopic analysis of tumor TEM revealed that junctions transiently opened and resealed as tumor cells accomplished TEM. In addition, in the presence of PFP, tumor cells preferentially transmigrated via paracellular routes. PFP supported melanoma transmigration under shear conditions via a B-Raf(V600E)-thrombin-dependent mechanism. We concluded that the activation of thrombin generation by cancer cells in plasma is an important process regulating melanoma extravasation by disrupting endothelial junction integrity. PMID:26504080

  1. Reinforcing endothelial junctions prevents microvessel permeability increase and tumor cell adhesion in microvessels in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Bingmei M.; Yang, Jinlin; Cai, Bin; Fan, Jie; Zhang, Lin; Zeng, Min

    2015-10-01

    Tumor cell adhesion to the microvessel wall is a critical step during tumor metastasis. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a secretion of tumor cells, can increase microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion in the microvessel. To test the hypothesis that inhibiting permeability increase can reduce tumor cell adhesion, we used in vivo fluorescence microscopy to measure both microvessel permeability and adhesion rates of human mammary carcinoma MDA-MB-231 cells in post-capillary venules of rat mesentery under the treatment of VEGF and a cAMP analog, 8-bromo-cAMP, which can decrease microvessel permeability. By immunostaining adherens junction proteins between endothelial cells forming the microvessel wall, we further investigated the structural mechanism by which cAMP abolishes VEGF-induced increase in microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion. Our results demonstrate that 1) Pretreatment of microvessels with cAMP can abolish VEGF-enhanced microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion; 2) Tumor cells prefer to adhere to the endothelial cell junctions instead of cell bodies; 3) VEGF increases microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion by compromising endothelial junctions while cAMP abolishes these effects of VEGF by reinforcing the junctions. These results suggest that strengthening the microvessel wall integrity can be a potential approach to inhibiting hematogenous tumor metastasis.

  2. A complex of ZO-1 and the BAR-domain protein TOCA-1 regulates actin assembly at the tight junction

    PubMed Central

    Van Itallie, Christina M.; Tietgens, Amber Jean; Krystofiak, Evan; Kachar, Bechara; Anderson, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Assembly and sealing of the tight junction barrier are critically dependent on the perijunctional actin cytoskeleton, yet little is known about physical and functional links between barrier-forming proteins and actin. Here we identify a novel functional complex of the junction scaffolding protein ZO-1 and the F-BAR–domain protein TOCA-1. Using MDCK epithelial cells, we show that an alternative splice of TOCA-1 adds a PDZ-binding motif, which binds ZO-1, targeting TOCA-1 to barrier contacts. This isoform of TOCA-1 recruits the actin nucleation–promoting factor N-WASP to tight junctions. CRISPR-Cas9–mediated knockout of TOCA-1 results in increased paracellular flux and delayed recovery in a calcium switch assay. Knockout of TOCA-1 does not alter FRAP kinetics of GFP ZO-1 or occludin, but longer term (12 h) time-lapse microscopy reveals strikingly decreased tight junction membrane contact dynamics in knockout cells compared with controls. Reexpression of TOCA-1 with, but not without, the PDZ-binding motif rescues both altered flux and membrane contact dynamics. Ultrastructural analysis shows actin accumulation at the adherens junction in TOCA-1–knockout cells but unaltered freeze-fracture fibril morphology. Identification of the ZO-1/TOCA-1 complex provides novel insights into the underappreciated dependence of the barrier on the dynamic nature of cell-to-cell contacts and perijunctional actin. PMID:26063734

  3. Analysis of cell-cell junctions in human amnion and chorionic plate affected by chorioamnionitis.

    PubMed

    Licini, Caterina; Tossetta, Giovanni; Avellini, Chiara; Ciarmela, Pasquapina; Lorenzi, Teresa; Toti, Paolo; Gesuita, Rosaria; Voltolini, Chiara; Petraglia, Felice; Castellucci, Mario; Marzioni, Daniela

    2016-07-01

    Chorioamnionitis is an acute inflammatory reaction associated with the premature rupture of the fetal membranes. It is caused mainly by invasion of bacteria from the vaginal tract that can penetrate the intact membranes and invade the amnion cavity and the decidua. Tight junctions (TJs) and adherent junctions (AJs) are intercellular junctions crucial for epithelia adhesion and permeability regulation in a wide variety of tissues and organs. Our aim is to investigate if TJ and AJ molecules are involved in human chorioamnionitis. We studied the protein expression (by immunohistochemistry and western blotting) and the mRNA levels (by RT-PCR) of some junction proteins such as Zonula Occludens-1 (ZO-1), occludin, VE-cadherin and β-catenin in fetal membranes from women with chorioamnionitis compared to those membranes derived from idiopathic pregnancies. Western blotting and immunohistochemical data established that occludin expression was decreased in amnion with chorioamnionitis compared to amnion from idiopathic pregnancies. Samples tested for ZO-1, VE-cadherin and β-catenin (proteins and mRNAs) showed no differences between idiopathic and pathological membranes. One of the most relevant results is the decrease of occludin in membranes with chorioamnionitis. Since we have previously demonstrated that some cytokines, particularly elevated in the chorioamnionitis, cause the disruption of TJs in placental villi, we suggest that the decrease of occludin in amnion may be the first change that leads to the rupture of the amniotic membrane in this pathology. PMID:26739007

  4. Junctional Adhesion Molecule-A Is Required for Hematogenous Dissemination of Reovirus

    PubMed Central

    Antar, Annukka A. R.; Konopka, Jennifer L.; Campbell, Jacquelyn A.; Henry, Rachel A.; Perdigoto, Ana L.; Carter, Bruce D.; Pozzi, Ambra; Abel, Ty W.; Dermody, Terence S.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Diverse families of viruses bind immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) proteins located in tight junctions (TJs) and adherens junctions of epithelium and endothelium. However, little is known about the roles of these receptors in the pathogenesis of viral disease. Junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) is an IgSF protein that localizes to TJs and serves as a receptor for mammalian reovirus. We inoculated wild-type (wt) and isogenic JAM-A−/− mice perorally with reovirus and found that JAM-A is dispensable for viral replication in the intestine but required for systemic dissemination. Reovirus replication in the brain and tropism for discrete neural regions are equivalent in wt and JAM-A−/− mice following intracranial inoculation, suggesting a function for JAM-A in reovirus spread to extra-intestinal sites. JAM-A promotes reovirus infection of endothelial cells, providing a conduit for the virus into the bloodstream. These findings indicate that a broadly expressed IgSF viral receptor specifically mediates hematogenous dissemination in the host. PMID:19154988

  5. IQGAP1 controls tight junction formation through differential regulation of claudin recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Tanos, Barbara E.; Perez Bay, Andres E.; Salvarezza, Susana; Vivanco, Igor; Mellinghoff, Ingo; Osman, Mahasin; Sacks, David B.; Rodriguez-Boulan, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT IQGAP1 is a scaffolding protein previously implicated in adherens junction formation. However, its role in the establishment or maintenance of tight junctions (TJs) has not been explored. We hypothesized that IQGAP1 could regulate TJ formation by modulating the expression and/or localization of junctional proteins, and we systematically tested this hypothesis in the model Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell line. We find that IQGAP1 silencing enhances a transient increase in transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) observed during the early stages of TJ formation (Cereijido et al., 1978). Quantitative microscopy and biochemical experiments suggest that this effect of IQGAP1 on TJ assembly is accounted for by reduced expression and TJ recruitment of claudin 2, and increased TJ recruitment of claudin 4. Furthermore, we show that IQGAP1 also regulates TJ formation through its interactor CDC42, because IQGAP1 knockdown increases the activity of the CDC42 effector JNK and dominant-negative CDC42 prevents the increase in TER caused by IQGAP1 silencing. Hence, we provide evidence that IQGAP1 modulates TJ formation by a twofold mechanism: (1) controlling the expression and recruitment of claudin 2 and recruitment of claudin 4 to the TJ, and (2) transient inhibition of the CDC42–JNK pathway. PMID:25588839

  6. Self-Organizing Actomyosin Patterns on the Cell Cortex at Epithelial Cell-Cell Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Thomas; Wu, Selwin K.; Michael, Magdalene; Yap, Alpha S.; Gomez, Guillermo A.; Neufeld, Zoltan

    2014-01-01

    The behavior of actomyosin critically determines morphologically distinct patterns of contractility found at the interface between adherent cells. One such pattern is found at the apical region (zonula adherens) of cell-cell junctions in epithelia, where clusters of the adhesion molecule E-cadherin concentrate in a static pattern. Meanwhile, E-cadherin clusters throughout lateral cell-cell contacts display dynamic movements in the plane of the junctions. To gain insight into the principles that determine the nature and organization of these dynamic structures, we analyze this behavior by modeling the 2D actomyosin cell cortex as an active fluid medium. The numerical simulations show that the stability of the actin filaments influences the spatial structure and dynamics of the system. We find that in addition to static Turing-type patterns, persistent dynamic behavior occurs in a wide range of parameters. In the 2D model, mechanical stress-dependent actin breakdown is shown to produce a continuously changing network of actin bridges, whereas with a constant breakdown rate, more isolated clusters of actomyosin tend to form. The model qualitatively reproduces the dynamic and stable patterns experimentally observed at the junctions between epithelial cells. PMID:25468344

  7. Self-organizing actomyosin patterns on the cell cortex at epithelial cell-cell junctions.

    PubMed

    Moore, Thomas; Wu, Selwin K; Michael, Magdalene; Yap, Alpha S; Gomez, Guillermo A; Neufeld, Zoltan

    2014-12-01

    The behavior of actomyosin critically determines morphologically distinct patterns of contractility found at the interface between adherent cells. One such pattern is found at the apical region (zonula adherens) of cell-cell junctions in epithelia, where clusters of the adhesion molecule E-cadherin concentrate in a static pattern. Meanwhile, E-cadherin clusters throughout lateral cell-cell contacts display dynamic movements in the plane of the junctions. To gain insight into the principles that determine the nature and organization of these dynamic structures, we analyze this behavior by modeling the 2D actomyosin cell cortex as an active fluid medium. The numerical simulations show that the stability of the actin filaments influences the spatial structure and dynamics of the system. We find that in addition to static Turing-type patterns, persistent dynamic behavior occurs in a wide range of parameters. In the 2D model, mechanical stress-dependent actin breakdown is shown to produce a continuously changing network of actin bridges, whereas with a constant breakdown rate, more isolated clusters of actomyosin tend to form. The model qualitatively reproduces the dynamic and stable patterns experimentally observed at the junctions between epithelial cells. PMID:25468344

  8. ROCK2 primes the endothelium for vascular hyperpermeability responses by raising baseline junctional tension.

    PubMed

    Beckers, Cora M L; Knezevic, Nebojsa; Valent, Erik T; Tauseef, Mohammad; Krishnan, Ramaswamy; Rajendran, Kavitha; Hardin, C Corey; Aman, Jurjan; van Bezu, Jan; Sweetnam, Paul; van Hinsbergh, Victor W M; Mehta, Dolly; van Nieuw Amerongen, Geerten P

    2015-07-01

    Rho kinase mediates the effects of inflammatory permeability factors by increasing actomyosin-generated traction forces on endothelial adherens junctions, resulting in disassembly of intercellular junctions and increased vascular leakage. In vitro, this is accompanied by the Rho kinase-driven formation of prominent radial F-actin fibers, but the in vivo relevance of those F-actin fibers has been debated, suggesting other Rho kinase-mediated events to occur in vascular leak. Here, we delineated the contributions of the highly homologous isoforms of Rho kinase (ROCK1 and ROCK2) to vascular hyperpermeability responses. We show that ROCK2, rather than ROCK1 is the critical Rho kinase for regulation of thrombin receptor-mediated vascular permeability. Novel traction force mapping in endothelial monolayers, however, shows that ROCK2 is not required for the thrombin-induced force enhancements. Rather, ROCK2 is pivotal to baseline junctional tension as a novel mechanism by which Rho kinase primes the endothelium for hyperpermeability responses, independent from subsequent ROCK1-mediated contractile stress-fiber formation during the late phase of the permeability response. PMID:25869521

  9. Three-junction solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Ludowise, Michael J.

    1986-01-01

    A photovoltaic solar cell is formed in a monolithic semiconductor. The cell contains three junctions. In sequence from the light-entering face, the junctions have a high, a medium, and a low energy gap. The lower junctions are connected in series by one or more metallic members connecting the top of the lower junction through apertures to the bottom of the middle junction. The upper junction is connected in voltage opposition to the lower and middle junctions by second metallic electrodes deposited in holes 60 through the upper junction. The second electrodes are connected to an external terminal.

  10. Evidence for differential changes of junctional complex proteins in murine neurocysticerosis dependent upon CNS vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Jorge I.; Teale, Judy M.

    2009-01-01

    The delicate balance required to maintain homeostasis of the central nervous system (CNS) is controlled by the blood brain barrier (BBB). Upon injury, the BBB is disrupted compromising the CNS. BBB disruption has been represented as a uniform event. However, our group has shown in a murine model of neurocysticercosis (NCC) that BBB disruption varies depending upon the anatomical site/vascular bed analyzed. In this study further understanding of the mechanisms of BBB disruption were explored in blood vessels located in leptomeninges (pial vessels) and brain parenchyma (parenchymal vessels) by examining the expression of junctional complex proteins in murine brain infected with Mesocestoides corti. Both pial and parenchymal vessels from mock infected animals showed significant colocalization of junctional proteins and displayed an organized architecture. Upon infection, the patterned organization was disrupted and in some cases, particular tight junction and adherens junction proteins were undetectable or appeared to be undergoing proteolysis. The extent and timing of these changes differed between both types of vessels (pial vessel disruption within days versus weeks for parenchymal vessels). To approach potential mechanisms, the expression and activity of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) was evaluated by in situ zymography. The results indicated an increase in MMP-9 activity at sites of BBB disruption exhibiting leukocyte infiltration. Moreover, the timing of MMP activity in pial and parenchymal vessels correlated with the timing of permeability disruption. Thus, breakdown of the BBB is a mutable process despite the similar structure of the junctional complex between pial and parenchymal vessels and involvement of MMP activity. PMID:17686468

  11. Vestibular dysfunction, altered macular structure and trait localization in A/J inbred mice.

    PubMed

    Vijayakumar, Sarath; Lever, Teresa E; Pierce, Jessica; Zhao, Xing; Bergstrom, David; Lundberg, Yunxia Wang; Jones, Timothy A; Jones, Sherri M

    2015-04-01

    A/J mice develop progressive hearing loss that begins before 1 month of age and is attributed to cochlear hair cell degeneration. Screening tests indicated that this strain also develops early onset vestibular dysfunction and has otoconial deficits. The purpose of this study was to characterize the vestibular dysfunction and macular structural pathology over the lifespan of A/J mice. Vestibular function was measured using linear vestibular evoked potentials (VsEPs). Macular structural pathology was evaluated using light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, confocal microscopy and Western blotting. Individually, vestibular functional deficits in mice ranged from mild to profound. On average, A/J mice had significantly reduced vestibular sensitivity (elevated VsEP response thresholds and smaller amplitudes), whereas VsEP onset latency was prolonged compared to age-matched controls (C57BL/6). A limited age-related vestibular functional loss was also present. Structural analysis identified marked age-independent otoconial abnormalities in concert with some stereociliary bundle defects. Macular epithelia were incompletely covered by otoconial membranes with significantly reduced opacity and often contained abnormally large or giant otoconia as well as normal-appearing otoconia. Elevated expression of key otoconins (i.e., otoconin 90, otolin and keratin sulfate proteoglycan) ruled out the possibility of reduced levels contributing to otoconial dysgenesis. The phenotype of A/J was partially replicated in a consomic mouse strain (C57BL/6J-Chr 17(A/J)/NaJ), thus indicating that Chr 17(A/J) contained a trait locus for a new gene variant responsible to some extent for the A/J vestibular phenotype. Quantitative trait locus analysis identified additional epistatic influences associated with chromosomes 1, 4, 9 and X. Results indicate that the A/J phenotype represents a complex trait, and the A/J mouse strain presents a new model for the

  12. Doped semiconductor nanocrystal junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borowik, Ł.; Nguyen-Tran, T.; Roca i Cabarrocas, P.; Mélin, T.

    2013-11-01

    Semiconductor junctions are the basis of electronic and photovoltaic devices. Here, we investigate junctions formed from highly doped (ND≈1020-1021cm-3) silicon nanocrystals (NCs) in the 2-50 nm size range, using Kelvin probe force microscopy experiments with single charge sensitivity. We show that the charge transfer from doped NCs towards a two-dimensional layer experimentally follows a simple phenomenological law, corresponding to formation of an interface dipole linearly increasing with the NC diameter. This feature leads to analytically predictable junction properties down to quantum size regimes: NC depletion width independent of the NC size and varying as ND-1/3, and depleted charge linearly increasing with the NC diameter and varying as ND1/3. We thus establish a "nanocrystal counterpart" of conventional semiconductor planar junctions, here however valid in regimes of strong electrostatic and quantum confinements.

  13. A survey of classical and quantum interpretations of experiments on Josephson junctions at very low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackburn, James A.; Cirillo, Matteo; Grønbech-Jensen, Niels

    2016-02-01

    For decades following its introduction in 1968, the resistively and capacitively shunted junction (RCSJ) model, sometimes referred to as the Stewart-McCumber model, was successfully applied to study the dynamics of Josephson junctions embedded in a variety of superconducting circuits. In 1980 a theoretical conjecture by A.J. Leggett suggested a possible new and quite different behavior for Josephson junctions at very low temperatures. A number of experiments seemed to confirm this prediction and soon it was taken as given that junctions at tens of millikelvins should be regarded as macroscopic quantum entities. As such, they would possess discrete levels in their effective potential wells, and would escape from those wells (with the appearance of a finite junction voltage) via a macroscopic quantum tunneling process. A zeal to pursue this new physics led to a virtual abandonment of the RCSJ model in this low temperature regime. In this paper we consider a selection of essentially prototypical experiments that were carried out with the intention of confirming aspects of anticipated macroscopic quantum behavior in Josephson junctions. We address two questions: (1) How successful is the non-quantum theory (RCSJ model) in replicating those experiments? (2) How strong is the evidence that data from these same experiments does indeed reflect macroscopic quantum behavior?

  14. Quantum junction solar cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jiang; Liu, Huan; Zhitomirsky, David; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Wang, Xihua; Furukawa, Melissa; Levina, Larissa; Sargent, Edward H

    2012-09-12

    Colloidal quantum dot solids combine convenient solution-processing with quantum size effect tuning, offering avenues to high-efficiency multijunction cells based on a single materials synthesis and processing platform. The highest-performing colloidal quantum dot rectifying devices reported to date have relied on a junction between a quantum-tuned absorber and a bulk material (e.g., TiO(2)); however, quantum tuning of the absorber then requires complete redesign of the bulk acceptor, compromising the benefits of facile quantum tuning. Here we report rectifying junctions constructed entirely using inherently band-aligned quantum-tuned materials. Realizing these quantum junction diodes relied upon the creation of an n-type quantum dot solid having a clean bandgap. We combine stable, chemically compatible, high-performance n-type and p-type materials to create the first quantum junction solar cells. We present a family of photovoltaic devices having widely tuned bandgaps of 0.6-1.6 eV that excel where conventional quantum-to-bulk devices fail to perform. Devices having optimal single-junction bandgaps exhibit certified AM1.5 solar power conversion efficiencies of 5.4%. Control over doping in quantum solids, and the successful integration of these materials to form stable quantum junctions, offers a powerful new degree of freedom to colloidal quantum dot optoelectronics. PMID:22881834

  15. Ezrin: a regulator of actin microfilaments in cell junctions of the rat testis.

    PubMed

    Gungor-Ordueri, N Ece; Celik-Ozenci, Ciler; Cheng, C Yan

    2015-01-01

    Ezrin, radixin, moesin and merlin (ERM) proteins are highly homologous actin-binding proteins that share extensive sequence similarity with each other. These proteins tether integral membrane proteins and their cytoplasmic peripheral proteins (e.g., adaptors, nonreceptor protein kinases and phosphatases) to the microfilaments of actin-based cytoskeleton. Thus, these proteins are crucial to confer integrity of the apical membrane domain and its associated junctional complex, namely the tight junction and the adherens junction. Since ectoplasmic specialization (ES) is an F-actin-rich testis-specific anchoring junction-a highly dynamic ultrastructure in the seminiferous epithelium due to continuous transport of germ cells, in particular spermatids, across the epithelium during the epithelial cycle-it is conceivable that ERM proteins are playing an active role in these events. Although these proteins were first reported almost 25 years and have since been extensively studied in multiple epithelia/endothelia, few reports are found in the literature to examine their role in the actin filament bundles at the ES. Studies have shown that ezrin is also a constituent protein of the actin-based tunneling nanotubes (TNT) also known as intercellular bridges, which are transient cytoplasmic tubular ultrastructures that transport signals, molecules and even organelles between adjacent and distant cells in an epithelium to coordinate cell events that occur across an epithelium. Herein, we critically evaluate recent data on ERM in light of recent findings in the field in particular ezrin regarding its role in actin dynamics at the ES in the testis, illustrating additional studies are warranted to examine its physiological significance in spermatogenesis. PMID:25652626

  16. Carbon nanotube intramolecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Zhen; Postma, Henk W. Ch.; Balents, Leon; Dekker, Cees

    1999-11-01

    The ultimate device miniaturization would be to use individual molecules as functional devices. Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are promising candidates for achieving this: depending on their diameter and chirality, they are either one-dimensional metals or semiconductors. Single-electron transistors employing metallic nanotubes and field-effect transistors employing semiconducting nanotubes have been demonstrated. Intramolecular devices have also been proposed which should display a range of other device functions. For example, by introducing a pentagon and a heptagon into the hexagonal carbon lattice, two tube segments with different atomic and electronic structures can be seamlessly fused together to create intramolecular metal-metal, metal-semiconductor, or semiconductor-semiconductor junctions. Here we report electrical transport measurements on SWNTs with intramolecular junctions. We find that a metal-semiconductor junction behaves like a rectifying diode with nonlinear transport characteristics that are strongly asymmetric with respect to bias polarity. In the case of a metal-metal junction, the conductance appears to be strongly suppressed and it displays a power-law dependence on temperatures and applied voltage, consistent with tunnelling between the ends of two Luttinger liquids. Our results emphasize the need to consider screening and electron interactions when designing and modelling molecular devices. Realization of carbon-based molecular electronics will require future efforts in the controlled production of these intramolecular nanotube junctions.

  17. N-glycosylation controls the function of junctional adhesion molecule-A

    PubMed Central

    Scott, David W.; Tolbert, Caitlin E.; Graham, David M.; Wittchen, Erika; Bear, James E.; Burridge, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) is an adherens and tight junction protein expressed by endothelial and epithelial cells. JAM-A serves many roles and contributes to barrier function and cell migration and motility, and it also acts as a ligand for the leukocyte receptor LFA-1. JAM-A is reported to contain N-glycans, but the extent of this modification and its contribution to the protein’s functions are unknown. We show that human JAM-A contains a single N-glycan at N185 and that this residue is conserved across multiple mammalian species. A glycomutant lacking all N-glycans, N185Q, is able to reach the cell surface but exhibits decreased protein half-life compared with the wild- type protein. N-glycosylation of JAM-A is required for the protein’s ability to reinforce barrier function and contributes to Rap1 activity. We further show that glycosylation of N185 is required for JAM-A–mediated reduction of cell migration. Finally, we show that N-glycosylation of JAM-A regulates leukocyte adhesion and LFA-1 binding. These findings identify N-glycosylation as critical for JAM-A’s many functions. PMID:26224316

  18. Meprin A impairs epithelial barrier function, enhances monocyte migration, and cleaves the tight junction protein occludin

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Jialing; Yura, Renee E.; Matters, Gail L.; Bradley, S. Gaylen; Shi, Pan; Tian, Fang

    2013-01-01

    Meprin metalloproteases are highly expressed at the luminal interface of the intestine and kidney and in certain leukocytes. Meprins cleave a variety of substrates in vitro, including extracellular matrix proteins, adherens junction proteins, and cytokines, and have been implicated in a number of inflammatory diseases. The linkage between results in vitro and pathogenesis, however, has not been elucidated. The present study aimed to determine whether meprins are determinative factors in disrupting the barrier function of the epithelium. Active meprin A or meprin B applied to Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell monolayers increased permeability to fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran and disrupted immunostaining of the tight junction protein occludin but not claudin-4. Meprin A, but not meprin B, cleaved occludin in MDCK monolayers. Experiments with recombinant occludin demonstrated that meprin A cleaves the protein between Gly100 and Ser101 on the first extracellular loop. In vivo experiments demonstrated that meprin A infused into the mouse bladder increased the epithelium permeability to sodium fluorescein. Furthermore, monocytes from meprin knockout mice on a C57BL/6 background were less able to migrate through an MDCK monolayer than monocytes from their wild-type counterparts. These results demonstrate the capability of meprin A to disrupt epithelial barriers and implicate occludin as one of the important targets of meprin A that may modulate inflammation. PMID:23804454

  19. Four-junction superconducting circuit.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yueyin; Xiong, Wei; He, Xiao-Ling; Li, Tie-Fu; You, J Q

    2016-01-01

    We develop a theory for the quantum circuit consisting of a superconducting loop interrupted by four Josephson junctions and pierced by a magnetic flux (either static or time-dependent). In addition to the similarity with the typical three-junction flux qubit in the double-well regime, we demonstrate the difference of the four-junction circuit from its three-junction analogue, including its advantages over the latter. Moreover, the four-junction circuit in the single-well regime is also investigated. Our theory provides a tool to explore the physical properties of this four-junction superconducting circuit. PMID:27356619

  20. Four-junction superconducting circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Yueyin; Xiong, Wei; He, Xiao-Ling; Li, Tie-Fu; You, J. Q.

    2016-06-01

    We develop a theory for the quantum circuit consisting of a superconducting loop interrupted by four Josephson junctions and pierced by a magnetic flux (either static or time-dependent). In addition to the similarity with the typical three-junction flux qubit in the double-well regime, we demonstrate the difference of the four-junction circuit from its three-junction analogue, including its advantages over the latter. Moreover, the four-junction circuit in the single-well regime is also investigated. Our theory provides a tool to explore the physical properties of this four-junction superconducting circuit.

  1. Four-junction superconducting circuit

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yueyin; Xiong, Wei; He, Xiao-Ling; Li, Tie-Fu; You, J. Q.

    2016-01-01

    We develop a theory for the quantum circuit consisting of a superconducting loop interrupted by four Josephson junctions and pierced by a magnetic flux (either static or time-dependent). In addition to the similarity with the typical three-junction flux qubit in the double-well regime, we demonstrate the difference of the four-junction circuit from its three-junction analogue, including its advantages over the latter. Moreover, the four-junction circuit in the single-well regime is also investigated. Our theory provides a tool to explore the physical properties of this four-junction superconducting circuit. PMID:27356619

  2. Structural characteristics and elevated temperature mechanical properties of AJ62 Mg alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Kubásek, J. Vojtěch, D.; Martínek, M.

    2013-12-15

    Structure and mechanical properties of the novel casting AJ62 (Mg–6Al–2Sr) alloy developed for elevated temperature applications were studied. The AJ62 alloy was compared to commercial casting AZ91 (Mg–9Al–1Zn) and WE43 (Mg–4Y–3RE) alloys. The structure was examined by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction and energy dispersive spectrometry. Mechanical properties were characterized by Viskers hardness measurements in the as-cast state and after a long-term heat treatment at 250 °C/150 hours. Compressive mechanical tests were also carried out both at room and elevated temperatures. Compressive creep tests were conducted at a temperature of 250 °C and compressive stresses of 60, 100 and 140 MPa. The structure of the AJ62 alloy consisted of primary α-Mg dendrites and interdendritic nework of the Al{sub 4}Sr and massive Al{sub 3}Mg{sub 13}Sr phases. By increasing the cooling rate during solidification from 10 and 120 K/s the average dendrite arm thickness decreased from 18 to 5 μm and the total volume fraction of the interdendritic phases from 20% to 30%. Both factors slightly increased hardness and compressive strength. The room temperature compressive strength and hardness of the alloy solidified at 30 K/s were 298 MPa and 50 HV 5, i.e. similar to those of the as-cast WE43 alloy and lower than those of the AZ91 alloy. At 250 °C the compressive strength of the AJ62 alloy decreased by 50 MPa, whereas those of the AZ91 and WE43 alloys by 100 and 20 MPa, respectively. The creep rate of the AJ62 alloy was higher than that of the WE43 alloy, but significantly lower in comparison with the AZ91 alloy. Different thermal stabilities of the alloys were discussed and related to structural changes during elevated temperature expositions. - Highlights: • Small effect of cooling rate on the compressive strength and hardness of AJ 62 • A bit lower compressive strength of AJ 62 compared to AZ91 at room temperature • Higher resistance of the AJ 62

  3. T-Junction Benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    Part 1: Two different volume renderings of fluid temperatures in a turbulent T-junction mixing problem at Reynolds number Re=40,000. Part 2: Volume rendering of fluid temperatures in a turbulent T-junction mixing problem at Reynolds number Re=40,000, simulated using Nek5000 at three different resolutions. Part 3: Temperature distribution for a turbulent T-junction mixing problem at Reynolds number Re=40,000, simulated using Nek5000 with 89056 spectral elements of order N=9 (65 million grid points). Credits: Science: Aleks Obabko and Paul Fisher, Argonne National Laboratory
 Visualization: Hank Childs, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

 This research used resources of the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility at Argonne National Laboratory, which is supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357

  4. Oncostatin M induces upregulation of claudin-2 in rodent hepatocytes coinciding with changes in morphology and function of tight junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Imamura, Masafumi; Kojima, Takashi . E-mail: ktakashi@sapmed.ac.jp; Lan, Mengdong; Son, Seiichi; Murata, Masaki; Osanai, Makoto; Chiba, Hideki; Hirata, Koichi; Sawada, Norimasa

    2007-05-15

    In rodent livers, integral tight junction (TJ) proteins claudin-1, -2, -3, -5 and -14 are detected and play crucial roles in the barrier to keep bile in bile canaculi away from the blood circulation. Claudin-2 shows a lobular gradient increasing from periportal to pericentral hepatocytes, whereas claudin-1 and -3 are expressed in the whole liver lobule. Although claudin-2 expression induces cation-selective channels in tight junctions of epithelial cells, the physiological functions and regulation of claudin-2 in hepatocytes remain unclear. Oncostatin M (OSM) is a multifunctional cytokine implicated in the differentiation of hepatocytes that induces formation of E-cadherin-based adherens junctions in fetal hepatocytes. In this study, we examined whether OSM could induce expression and function of claudin-2 in rodent hepatocytes, immortalized mouse and primary cultured proliferative rat hepatocytes. In the immortalized mouse and primary cultured proliferative rat hepatocytes, treatment with OSM markedly increased mRNA and protein of claudin-2 together with formation of developed networks of TJ strands. The increase of claudin-2 enhanced the paracellular barrier function which depended on molecular size. The increase of claudin-2 expression induced by OSM in rodent hepatocytes was regulated through distinct signaling pathways including PKC. These results suggest that expression of claudin-2 in rodent hepatocytes may play a specific role as controlling the size of paracellular permeability in the barrier to keep bile in bile canaculi.

  5. Victory Junction Gang Camp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shell, Ryan

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the Victory Junction Gang Camp, a not-for-profit, NASCAR-themed camp for children with chronic medical conditions that serves 24 different disease groups. The mission of the camp is to give children life-changing camping experiences that are exciting, fun, and empowering in a safe and medically sound environment. While doing…

  6. Josephson junction mixing.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, E. D.

    1973-01-01

    A theory is presented which, though too simple to explain quantitative details in the Josephson junction mixing response, is sufficient for explaining qualitatively the results observed. Crucial to the theory presented, and that which differentiates it from earlier ones, is the inclusion of harmonic voltages across the ideal Josephson element.

  7. Squeezable electron tunneling junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreland, J.; Alexander, S.; Cox, M.; Sonnenfeld, R.; Hansma, P. K.

    1983-09-01

    We report a versatile new technique for constructing electron tunneling junctions with mechanically-adjusted artificial barriers. I-V curves are presented for tunneling between Ag electrodes with vacuum, gas, liquid or solid in the barrier. An energy gap is apparent in the measured I-V curve when tunneling occurs between superconducting Pb electrodes.

  8. Doped semiconductor nanocrystal junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Borowik, Ł.; Mélin, T.; Nguyen-Tran, T.; Roca i Cabarrocas, P.

    2013-11-28

    Semiconductor junctions are the basis of electronic and photovoltaic devices. Here, we investigate junctions formed from highly doped (N{sub D}≈10{sup 20}−10{sup 21}cm{sup −3}) silicon nanocrystals (NCs) in the 2–50 nm size range, using Kelvin probe force microscopy experiments with single charge sensitivity. We show that the charge transfer from doped NCs towards a two-dimensional layer experimentally follows a simple phenomenological law, corresponding to formation of an interface dipole linearly increasing with the NC diameter. This feature leads to analytically predictable junction properties down to quantum size regimes: NC depletion width independent of the NC size and varying as N{sub D}{sup −1/3}, and depleted charge linearly increasing with the NC diameter and varying as N{sub D}{sup 1/3}. We thus establish a “nanocrystal counterpart” of conventional semiconductor planar junctions, here however valid in regimes of strong electrostatic and quantum confinements.

  9. Erratum: ``Double-peaked Low-Ionization Emission Lines in Active Galactic Nuclei'' (AJ, 126, 1720 [2003])

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strateva, Iskra V.; Strauss, Michael A.; Hao, Lei; Schlegel, David J.; Hall, Pat B.; Gunn, James E.; Li, Li-Xin; Ivezić, Željko; Richards, Gordon T.; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Voges, Wolfgang; Anderson, Scott F.; Lupton, Robert H.; Schneider, Donald P.; Brinkmann, Jon; Nichol, Robert C.

    2005-10-01

    The model magnitudes of extended objects (e.g., galaxies) processed with the photometric pipeline PHOTO, version 5.3 (SDSS Data Release 1 [DR1] and earlier), were systematically too faint by about 0.2 mag (K. Abazajian et al. [AJ, 126, 1720 [2003]; AJ, 126, 1720 [2003

  10. Wireless Josephson Junction Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Laura

    2015-03-01

    We report low temperature, microwave transmission measurements on a wireless two- dimensional network of Josephson junction arrays composed of superconductor-insulator -superconductor tunnel junctions. Unlike their biased counterparts, by removing all electrical contacts to the arrays and superfluous microwave components and interconnects in the transmission line, we observe new collective behavior in the transmission spectra. In particular we will show emergent behavior that systematically responds to changes in microwave power at fixed temperature. Likewise we will show the dynamic and collective response of the arrays while tuning the temperature at fixed microwave power. We discuss these spectra in terms of the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition and Shapiro steps. We gratefully acknowledge the support Prof. Steven Anlage at the University of Maryland and Prof. Allen Goldman at the University of Minnesota. Physics and School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

  11. Holliday Junction Resolvases

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, Haley D.M.; West, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    Four-way DNA intermediates, called Holliday junctions (HJs), can form during meiotic and mitotic recombination, and their removal is crucial for chromosome segregation. A group of ubiquitous and highly specialized structure-selective endonucleases catalyze the cleavage of HJs into two disconnected DNA duplexes in a reaction called HJ resolution. These enzymes, called HJ resolvases, have been identified in bacteria and their bacteriophages, archaea, and eukaryotes. In this review, we discuss fundamental aspects of the HJ structure and their interaction with junction-resolving enzymes. This is followed by a brief discussion of the eubacterial RuvABC enzymes, which provide the paradigm for HJ resolvases in other organisms. Finally, we review the biochemical and structural properties of some well-characterized resolvases from archaea, bacteriophage, and eukaryotes. PMID:25183833

  12. 17 CFR 240.15Aj-1 - Amendments and supplements to registration statements of securities associations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... three years thereafter each association shall file complete Exhibit A to Form X-15AJ-2. The information... registration statement or in any amendment or supplement thereto the association shall file with the Commission... any amendment or supplement thereto the association shall file with the Commission a...

  13. A.J. STEVENS MEMORIAL, “ERECTED TO A FRIEND OF LABOR BY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A.J. STEVENS MEMORIAL, “ERECTED TO A FRIEND OF LABOR BY HIS COWORKERS, NOV. 28, 1889.” CESAR CHAVEZ PLAZA, SACRAMENTO, CA. STEVENS WAS MASTER MECHANIC AT SACRAMENTO SHOPS FROM 1870-1888. - Southern Pacific, Sacramento Shops, 111 I Street, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  14. 17 CFR 249.802 - Form X-15AJ-1, for amendatory and/or supplementary statements to registration statement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... association. Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting Form X-15AJ-1, see the List of CFR... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Form X-15AJ-1, for amendatory... Affiliated Securities Associations § 249.802 Form X-15AJ-1, for amendatory and/or supplementary statements...

  15. 17 CFR 249.803 - Form X-15AJ-2, for annual consolidated supplement of a national securities association or an...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Form X-15AJ-2, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Form X-15AJ-2, for annual....803 Form X-15AJ-2, for annual consolidated supplement of a national securities association or...

  16. 17 CFR 249.802 - Form X-15AJ-1, for amendatory and/or supplementary statements to registration statement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... association. Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting Form X-15AJ-1, see the List of CFR... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Form X-15AJ-1, for amendatory... Affiliated Securities Associations § 249.802 Form X-15AJ-1, for amendatory and/or supplementary statements...

  17. 17 CFR 249.803 - Form X-15AJ-2, for annual consolidated supplement of a national securities association or an...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Form X-15AJ-2, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Form X-15AJ-2, for annual....803 Form X-15AJ-2, for annual consolidated supplement of a national securities association or...

  18. 17 CFR 249.802 - Form X-15AJ-1, for amendatory and/or supplementary statements to registration statement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... association. Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting Form X-15AJ-1, see the List of CFR... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Form X-15AJ-1, for amendatory... Affiliated Securities Associations § 249.802 Form X-15AJ-1, for amendatory and/or supplementary statements...

  19. 17 CFR 249.803 - Form X-15AJ-2, for annual consolidated supplement of a national securities association or an...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Form X-15AJ-2, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Form X-15AJ-2, for annual....803 Form X-15AJ-2, for annual consolidated supplement of a national securities association or...

  20. 17 CFR 249.802 - Form X-15AJ-1, for amendatory and/or supplementary statements to registration statement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... association. Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting Form X-15AJ-1, see the List of CFR... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Form X-15AJ-1, for amendatory... Affiliated Securities Associations § 249.802 Form X-15AJ-1, for amendatory and/or supplementary statements...

  1. 17 CFR 249.803 - Form X-15AJ-2, for annual consolidated supplement of a national securities association or an...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Form X-15AJ-2, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Form X-15AJ-2, for annual....803 Form X-15AJ-2, for annual consolidated supplement of a national securities association or...

  2. 17 CFR 249.803 - Form X-15AJ-2, for annual consolidated supplement of a national securities association or an...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Form X-15AJ-2, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Form X-15AJ-2, for annual....803 Form X-15AJ-2, for annual consolidated supplement of a national securities association or...

  3. 17 CFR 249.802 - Form X-15AJ-1, for amendatory and/or supplementary statements to registration statement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... association. Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting Form X-15AJ-1, see the List of CFR... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Form X-15AJ-1, for amendatory... Affiliated Securities Associations § 249.802 Form X-15AJ-1, for amendatory and/or supplementary statements...

  4. Fractional order junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, J. Tenreiro

    2015-01-01

    Gottfried Leibniz generalized the derivation and integration, extending the operators from integer up to real, or even complex, orders. It is presently recognized that the resulting models capture long term memory effects difficult to describe by classical tools. Leon Chua generalized the set of lumped electrical elements that provide the building blocks in mathematical models. His proposal of the memristor and of higher order elements broadened the scope of variables and relationships embedded in the development of models. This paper follows the two directions and proposes a new logical step, by generalizing the concept of junction. Classical junctions interconnect system elements using simple algebraic restrictions. Nevertheless, this simplistic approach may be misleading in the presence of unexpected dynamical phenomena and requires including additional "parasitic" elements. The novel γ -junction includes, as special cases, the standard series and parallel connections and allows a new degree of freedom when building models. The proposal motivates the search for experimental and real world manifestations of the abstract conjectures.

  5. Thermoelectricity in molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Pramod; Jang, Sung-Yeon; Segalman, Rachel A; Majumdar, Arun

    2007-03-16

    By trapping molecules between two gold electrodes with a temperature difference across them, the junction Seebeck coefficients of 1,4-benzenedithiol (BDT), 4,4'-dibenzenedithiol, and 4,4''-tribenzenedithiol in contact with gold were measured at room temperature to be +8.7 +/- 2.1 microvolts per kelvin (muV/K), +12.9 +/- 2.2 muV/K, and +14.2 +/- 3.2 muV/K, respectively (where the error is the full width half maximum of the statistical distributions). The positive sign unambiguously indicates p-type (hole) conduction in these heterojunctions, whereas the Au Fermi level position for Au-BDT-Au junctions was identified to be 1.2 eV above the highest occupied molecular orbital level of BDT. The ability to study thermoelectricity in molecular junctions provides the opportunity to address these fundamental unanswered questions about their electronic structure and to begin exploring molecular thermoelectric energy conversion. PMID:17303718

  6. Spontaneous initiation, promotion and progression of colorectal cancer in the novel A/J Min/+ mouse.

    PubMed

    Sødring, Marianne; Gunnes, Gjermund; Paulsen, Jan Erik

    2016-04-15

    The C57BL/6J multiple intestinal neoplasia (Min/+) mouse is a widely used murine model for familial adenomatous polyposis, a hereditary form of human colorectal cancer. However, it is a questionable model partly because the vast majority of tumors arise in the small intestine, and partly because the fraction of tumors that progress to invasive carcinomas is minuscule. A/J mice are typically more susceptible to carcinogen-induced colorectal cancer than C57BL/6J mice. To investigate whether the novel Min/+ mouse on the A/J genetic background could be a better model for colorectal cancer, we examined the spontaneous intestinal tumorigenesis in 81 A/J Min/+ mice ranging in age from 4 to 60 weeks. The A/J Min/+ mouse exhibited a dramatic increase in number of colonic lesions when compared to what has been reported for the conventional Min/+ mouse; however, an increase in small intestinal lesions did not occur. In addition, this novel mouse model displayed a continual development of colonic lesions highlighted by the transition from early lesions (flat ACF) to tumors over time. In mice older than 40 weeks, 13 colonic (95% CI: 8.7-16.3) and 21 small intestinal (95% CI: 18.6-24.3) tumors were recorded. Notably, a considerable proportion of those lesions progressed to carcinomas in both the colon (21%) and small intestine (51%). These findings more closely reflect aspects of human colorectal carcinogenesis. In conclusion, the novel A/J Min/+ mouse may be a relevant model for initiation, promotion and progression of colorectal cancer. PMID:26566853

  7. Signatures of topological Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yang; Pientka, Falko; Berg, Erez; Oreg, Yuval; von Oppen, Felix

    2016-08-01

    Quasiparticle poisoning and diabatic transitions may significantly narrow the window for the experimental observation of the 4 π -periodic dc Josephson effect predicted for topological Josephson junctions. Here, we show that switching-current measurements provide accessible and robust signatures for topological superconductivity which persist in the presence of quasiparticle poisoning processes. Such measurements provide access to the phase-dependent subgap spectrum and Josephson currents of the topological junction when incorporating it into an asymmetric SQUID together with a conventional Josephson junction with large critical current. We also argue that pump-probe experiments with multiple current pulses can be used to measure the quasiparticle poisoning rates of the topological junction. The proposed signatures are particularly robust, even in the presence of Zeeman fields and spin-orbit coupling, when focusing on short Josephson junctions. Finally, we also consider microwave excitations of short topological Josephson junctions which may complement switching-current measurements.

  8. [Gap junction and diabetic foot].

    PubMed

    Zou, Xiao-rong; Tao, Jian; Wang, Yun-kai

    2015-11-01

    Gap junctions play a critical role in electrical synchronization and exchange of small molecules between neighboring cells; connexins are a family of structurally related transmembrane proteins that assemble to form vertebrate gap junctions. Hyperglycemia changes the structure gap junction proteins and their expression, resulting in obstruction of neural regeneration, vascular function and wound healing, and also promoting vascular atherosclerosis. These pathogenic factors would cause diabetic foot ulcers. This article reviews the involvement of connexins in pathogenesis of diabetic foot. PMID:26822053

  9. An induced junction photovoltaic cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Call, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Silicon solar cells operating with induced junctions rather than diffused junctions have been fabricated and tested. Induced junctions were created by forming an inversion layer near the surface of the silicon by supplying a sheet of positive charge above the surface. Measurements of the response of the inversion layer cell to light of different wavelengths indicated it to be more sensitive to the shorter wavelengths of the sun's spectrum than conventional cells. The greater sensitivity occurs because of the shallow junction and the strong electric field at the surface.

  10. Josephson junction simulation of neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crotty, Patrick; Schult, Dan; Segall, Ken

    2010-07-01

    With the goal of understanding the intricate behavior and dynamics of collections of neurons, we present superconducting circuits containing Josephson junctions that model biologically realistic neurons. These “Josephson junction neurons” reproduce many characteristic behaviors of biological neurons such as action potentials, refractory periods, and firing thresholds. They can be coupled together in ways that mimic electrical and chemical synapses. Using existing fabrication technologies, large interconnected networks of Josephson junction neurons would operate fully in parallel. They would be orders of magnitude faster than both traditional computer simulations and biological neural networks. Josephson junction neurons provide a new tool for exploring long-term large-scale dynamics for networks of neurons.

  11. Evolution and cell physiology. 4. Why invent yet another protein complex to build junctions in epithelial cells?

    PubMed

    Le Bivic, André

    2013-12-15

    The formation of the first epithelium was an essential step for animal evolution, since it has allowed coordination of the behavior of a cell layer and creation of a selective barrier between the internal medium and the outside world. The possibility of coupling the cells in a single layer has allowed morphogenetic events, such as tube formation, or gastrulation, to form more complex animal morphologies. The invention of sealed junctions between cells has allowed, on the other hand, creation of an asymmetry of nutrients or salts between the apical and the basal side of the epithelial layer. Creation of an internal medium has led to homeostasis, allowing the evolution of more complex physiological functions and the emergence of sophisticated animal shapes. During evolution, the origins of the first animals coincided with the invention of several protein complexes, including true cadherins and the polarity protein complexes. How these complexes regulate formation of the apicolateral border and the adherens junctions is still not fully understood. This review focuses on the role of these apical polarity complexes and, in particular, the Crumbs complex, which is essential for proper organization of epithelial layers from Drosophila to humans. PMID:24025867

  12. Endothelial Alpha-Parvin Controls Integrity of Developing Vasculature and Is Required for Maintenance of Cell–Cell Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Fraccaroli, Alessia; Pitter, Bettina; Taha, Abdallah Abu; Seebach, Jochen; Huveneers, Stephan; Kirsch, Julian; Casaroli-Marano, Ricardo P.; Zahler, Stefan; Pohl, Ulrich; Gerhardt, Holger; Schnittler, Hans-J.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Angiogenesis and vessel integrity depend on the adhesion of endothelial cells (ECs) to the extracellular matrix and to adjacent ECs. The focal adhesion protein α-parvin (α-pv) is essential for vascular development. However, the role of α-pv in ECs in vivo is not known. Objective: To determine the function of α-pv in ECs during vascular development in vivo and the underlying mechanisms. Methods and Results: We deleted the α-pv gene specifically in ECs of mice to study its role in angiogenesis and vascular development. Here, we show that endothelial-specific deletion of α-pv in mice results in late embryonic lethality associated with hemorrhages and reduced vascular density. Postnatal-induced EC-specific deletion of α-pv leads to retinal hypovascularization because of reduced vessel sprouting and excessive vessel regression. In the absence of α-pv, blood vessels display impaired VE-cadherin junction morphology. In vitro, α-pv–deficient ECs show reduced stable adherens junctions, decreased monolayer formation, and impaired motility, associated with reduced formation of integrin-mediated cell–extracellular matrix adhesion structures and an altered actin cytoskeleton. Conclusions: Endothelial α-pv is essential for vessel sprouting and for vessel stability. PMID:25925587

  13. GUARD RING SEMICONDUCTOR JUNCTION

    DOEpatents

    Goulding, F.S.; Hansen, W.L.

    1963-12-01

    A semiconductor diode having a very low noise characteristic when used under reverse bias is described. Surface leakage currents, which in conventional diodes greatly contribute to noise, are prevented from mixing with the desired signal currents. A p-n junction is formed with a thin layer of heavily doped semiconductor material disposed on a lightly doped, physically thick base material. An annular groove cuts through the thin layer and into the base for a short distance, dividing the thin layer into a peripheral guard ring that encircles the central region. Noise signal currents are shunted through the guard ring, leaving the central region free from such currents. (AEC)

  14. Neuromuscular junction disorders.

    PubMed

    Verschuuren, Jan; Strijbos, Ellen; Vincent, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Diseases of the neuromuscular junction comprise a wide range of disorders. Antibodies, genetic mutations, specific drugs or toxins interfere with the number or function of one of the essential proteins that control signaling between the presynaptic nerve ending and the postsynaptic muscle membrane. Acquired autoimmune disorders of the neuromuscular junction are the most common and are described here. In myasthenia gravis, antibodies to acetylcholine receptors or to proteins involved in receptor clustering, particularly muscle-specific kinase, cause direct loss of acetylcholine receptors or interfere with the agrin-induced acetylcholine receptor clustering necessary for efficient neurotransmission. In the Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS), loss of the presynaptic voltage-gated calcium channels results in reduced release of the acetylcholine transmitter. The conditions are generally recognizable clinically and the diagnosis confirmed by serologic testing and electromyography. Screening for thymomas in myasthenia or small cell cancer in LEMS is important. Fortunately, a wide range of symptomatic treatments, immunosuppressive drugs, or other immunomodulating therapies is available. Future research is directed to understanding the pathogenesis, discovering new antigens, and trying to develop disease-specific treatments. PMID:27112691

  15. Tight Junctions Go Viral!

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Flores, Jesús M.; Arias, Carlos F.

    2015-01-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) are highly specialized membrane domains involved in many important cellular processes such as the regulation of the passage of ions and macromolecules across the paracellular space and the establishment of cell polarity in epithelial cells. Over the past few years there has been increasing evidence that different components of the TJs can be hijacked by viruses in order to complete their infectious cycle. Viruses from at least nine different families of DNA and RNA viruses have been reported to use TJ proteins in their benefit. For example, TJ proteins such as JAM-A or some members of the claudin family of proteins are used by members of the Reoviridae family and hepatitis C virus as receptors or co-receptors during their entry into their host cells. Reovirus, in addition, takes advantage of the TJ protein Junction Adhesion Molecule-A (JAM-A) to achieve its hematogenous dissemination. Some other viruses are capable of regulating the expression or the localization of TJ proteins to induce cell transformation or to improve the efficiency of their exit process. This review encompasses the importance of TJs for viral entry, replication, dissemination, and egress, and makes a clear statement of the importance of studying these proteins to gain a better understanding of the replication strategies used by viruses that infect epithelial and/or endothelial cells. PMID:26404354

  16. Durability testing of the AJ10-221 490 N high performance (321 sec Isp) engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jassowski, D. M.; Rosenberg, S. D.; Schoenman, L.

    1993-01-01

    The durability of the 490 N AJ10-221 engine is characterized on the basis of data from 93 tests and a total firing life of 6.3 hr. For the three Ir/Re chambers tested, no limiting conditions were encountered in the 43,379 sec and 229 test thermal cycles. A wide range of off nominal operating conditions was successfully demonstrated.

  17. Inhibition of inflammation with celastrol fails to improve muscle function in dysferlin-deficient A/J mice.

    PubMed

    Dillingham, Blythe C; Benny Klimek, Margaret E; Gernapudi, Ramkishore; Rayavarapu, Sree; Gallardo, Eduard; Van der Meulen, Jack H; Jordan, Sarah; Ampong, Beryl; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Spurney, Christopher F; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2015-09-15

    The dysferlin-deficient A/J mouse strain represents a homologous model for limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2B. We evaluated the disease phenotype in 10 month old A/J mice compared to two dysferlin-sufficient, C57BL/6 and A/JOlaHsd, mouse lines to determine which functional end-points are sufficiently sensitive to define the disease phenotype for use in preclinical studies in the A/J strain. A/J mice had significantly lower open field behavioral activity (horizontal activity, total distance, movement time and vertical activity) when compared to C57BL/6 and A/JoIaHsd mice. Both A/J and A/JOIaHsd mice showed decreases in latency to fall with rotarod compared to C57BL/6. No changes were detected in grip strength, force measurements or motor coordination between these three groups. Furthermore, we have found that A/J muscle shows significantly increased levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α when compared to C57BL/6 mice, indicating an activation of NF-κB signaling as part of the inflammatory response in dysferlin-deficient muscle. Therefore, we assessed the effect of celastrol (a potent NF-κB inhibitor) on the disease phenotype in female A/J mice. Celastrol treatment for four months significantly reduced the inflammation in A/J muscle; however, it had no beneficial effect in improving muscle function, as assessed by grip strength, open field activity, and in vitro force contraction. In fact, celastrol treated mice showed a decrease in body mass, hindlimb grip strength and maximal EDL force. These findings suggest that inhibition of inflammation alone may not be sufficient to improve the muscle disease phenotype in dysferlin-deficient mice and may require combination therapies that target membrane stability to achieve a functional improvement in skeletal muscle. PMID:26119397

  18. Haloalkaliphilic Streptomyces spp. AJ8 isolated from solar salt works and its' pharmacological potential.

    PubMed

    Jenifer, John Selesteen Charles Adlin; Donio, Mariathason Birdilla Selva; Michaelbabu, Mariavincent; Vincent, Samuel Gnana Prakash; Citarasu, Thavasimuthu

    2015-12-01

    Antagonistic Streptomyces spp. AJ8 was isolated and identified from the Kovalam solar salt works in India. The antimicrobial NRPS cluster gene was characterized by PCR, sequencing and predict the secondary structure analysis. The secondary metabolites will be extracted from different organic solvent extraction and studied the antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral and anticancer activities. In vitro antagonistic activity results revealed that, Streptomyces spp. AJ8 was highly antagonistic against Staphylococcus aureus, Aeromonas hydrophila WPD1 and Candida albicans. The genomic level identification revealed that, the strain was confirmed as Streptomyces spp. AJ8 and submitted the NCBI database (KC603899). The NRPS gene was generated a single gene fragment of 781 bp length (KR491940) and the database analysis revealed that, the closely related to Streptomyces spp. SAUK6068 and S. coeruleoprunus NBRC15400. The secondary metabolites extracted with ethyl acetate was effectively inhibited the bacterial and fungal growth at the ranged between 7 and 19.2 mm of zone of inhibition. The antiviral activity results revealed that, the metabolite was significantly (P < 0.001) controlled the killer shrimp virus white spot syndrome virus at the level of 85 %. The metabolite also suppressed the L929 fibroblast cancer cells at 35.7 % viability in 1000 µg treatment. PMID:26307214

  19. Herlitz junctional epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Laimer, Martin; Lanschuetzer, Christoph M; Diem, Anja; Bauer, Johann W

    2010-01-01

    Junctional epidermolysis bullosa type Herlitz (JEB-H) is the autosomal recessively inherited, more severe variant of "lucidolytic" JEB. Characterized by generalized, extensive mucocutaneous blistering at birth and early lethality, this devastating condition is most often caused by homozygous null mutations in the genes LAMA3, LAMB3, or LAMC2, each encoding for 1 of the 3 chains of the heterotrimer laminin-332. The JEB-H subtype usually presents as a severe and clinically diverse variant of the EB group of mechanobullous genodermatoses. This article outlines the epidemiology, presentation, and diagnosis of JEB-H. Morbidity and mortality are high, necessitating optimized protocols for early (including prenatal) diagnosis and palliative care. Gene therapy remains the most promising perspective. PMID:19945616

  20. Ion bipolar junction transistors.

    PubMed

    Tybrandt, Klas; Larsson, Karin C; Richter-Dahlfors, Agneta; Berggren, Magnus

    2010-06-01

    Dynamic control of chemical microenvironments is essential for continued development in numerous fields of life sciences. Such control could be achieved with active chemical circuits for delivery of ions and biomolecules. As the basis for such circuitry, we report a solid-state ion bipolar junction transistor (IBJT) based on conducting polymers and thin films of anion- and cation-selective membranes. The IBJT is the ionic analogue to the conventional semiconductor BJT and is manufactured using standard microfabrication techniques. Transistor characteristics along with a model describing the principle of operation, in which an anionic base current amplifies a cationic collector current, are presented. By employing the IBJT as a bioelectronic circuit element for delivery of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, its efficacy in modulating neuronal cell signaling is demonstrated. PMID:20479274

  1. Ion bipolar junction transistors

    PubMed Central

    Tybrandt, Klas; Larsson, Karin C.; Richter-Dahlfors, Agneta; Berggren, Magnus

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic control of chemical microenvironments is essential for continued development in numerous fields of life sciences. Such control could be achieved with active chemical circuits for delivery of ions and biomolecules. As the basis for such circuitry, we report a solid-state ion bipolar junction transistor (IBJT) based on conducting polymers and thin films of anion- and cation-selective membranes. The IBJT is the ionic analogue to the conventional semiconductor BJT and is manufactured using standard microfabrication techniques. Transistor characteristics along with a model describing the principle of operation, in which an anionic base current amplifies a cationic collector current, are presented. By employing the IBJT as a bioelectronic circuit element for delivery of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, its efficacy in modulating neuronal cell signaling is demonstrated. PMID:20479274

  2. Disordered graphene Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, W. A.; Covaci, L.; Peeters, F. M.

    2015-02-01

    A tight-binding approach based on the Chebyshev-Bogoliubov-de Gennes method is used to describe disordered single-layer graphene Josephson junctions. Scattering by vacancies, ripples, or charged impurities is included. We compute the Josephson current and investigate the nature of multiple Andreev reflections, which induce bound states appearing as peaks in the density of states for energies below the superconducting gap. In the presence of single-atom vacancies, we observe a strong suppression of the supercurrent, which is a consequence of strong intervalley scattering. Although lattice deformations should not induce intervalley scattering, we find that the supercurrent is still suppressed, which is due to the presence of pseudomagnetic barriers. For charged impurities, we consider two cases depending on whether the average doping is zero, i.e., existence of electron-hole puddles, or finite. In both cases, short-range impurities strongly affect the supercurrent, similar to the vacancies scenario.

  3. Thermopower measurements in molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Rincón-García, Laura; Evangeli, Charalambos; Rubio-Bollinger, Gabino; Agraït, Nicolás

    2016-08-01

    The measurement of thermopower in molecular junctions offers complementary information to conductance measurements and is becoming essential for the understanding of transport processes at the nanoscale. In this review, we discuss the recent advances in the study of the thermoelectric properties of molecular junctions. After presenting the theoretical background for thermoelectricity at the nanoscale, we review the experimental techniques for measuring the thermopower in these systems and discuss the main results. Finally, we consider the challenges in the application of molecular junctions in viable thermoelectric devices. PMID:27277330

  4. Electronic properties of nanotube junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambin, Ph.; Meunier, V.

    1998-08-01

    The possibility of realizing junctions between two different nanotubes has recently attracted a great interest, even though much remains to be done for putting this idea in concrete form. Pentagon-heptagon pair defects in the otherwise perfect graphitic network make such connections possible, with virtually infinite varieties. In this paper, the literature devoted to nanotube junctions is briefly reviewed. A special emphasize is put on the electronic properties of C nanotube junctions, together with an indication on how their current-voltage characteristics may look like.

  5. Tight Junction Disruption Induced by Type 3 Secretion System Effectors Injected by Enteropathogenic and Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Ugalde-Silva, Paul; Gonzalez-Lugo, Octavio; Navarro-Garcia, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium consists of a single cell layer, which is a critical selectively permeable barrier to both absorb nutrients and avoid the entry of potentially harmful entities, including microorganisms. Epithelial cells are held together by the apical junctional complexes, consisting of adherens junctions, and tight junctions (TJs), and by underlying desmosomes. TJs lay in the apical domain of epithelial cells and are mainly composed by transmembrane proteins such as occludin, claudins, JAMs, and tricellulin, that are associated with the cytoplasmic plaque formed by proteins from the MAGUK family, such as ZO-1/2/3, connecting TJ to the actin cytoskeleton, and cingulin and paracingulin connecting TJ to the microtubule network. Extracellular bacteria such as EPEC and EHEC living in the intestinal lumen inject effectors proteins directly from the bacterial cytoplasm to the host cell cytoplasm, where they play a relevant role in the manipulation of the eukaryotic cell functions by modifying or blocking cell signaling pathways. TJ integrity depends on various cell functions such as actin cytoskeleton, microtubule network for vesicular trafficking, membrane integrity, inflammation, and cell survival. EPEC and EHEC effectors target most of these functions. Effectors encoded inside or outside of locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) disrupt the TJ strands. EPEC and EHEC exploit the TJ dynamics to open this structure, for causing diarrhea. EPEC and EHEC secrete effectors that mimic host proteins to manipulate the signaling pathways, including those related to TJ dynamics. In this review, we focus on the known mechanisms exploited by EPEC and EHEC effectors for causing TJ disruption. PMID:27606286

  6. Tight Junction Disruption Induced by Type 3 Secretion System Effectors Injected by Enteropathogenic and Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ugalde-Silva, Paul; Gonzalez-Lugo, Octavio; Navarro-Garcia, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium consists of a single cell layer, which is a critical selectively permeable barrier to both absorb nutrients and avoid the entry of potentially harmful entities, including microorganisms. Epithelial cells are held together by the apical junctional complexes, consisting of adherens junctions, and tight junctions (TJs), and by underlying desmosomes. TJs lay in the apical domain of epithelial cells and are mainly composed by transmembrane proteins such as occludin, claudins, JAMs, and tricellulin, that are associated with the cytoplasmic plaque formed by proteins from the MAGUK family, such as ZO-1/2/3, connecting TJ to the actin cytoskeleton, and cingulin and paracingulin connecting TJ to the microtubule network. Extracellular bacteria such as EPEC and EHEC living in the intestinal lumen inject effectors proteins directly from the bacterial cytoplasm to the host cell cytoplasm, where they play a relevant role in the manipulation of the eukaryotic cell functions by modifying or blocking cell signaling pathways. TJ integrity depends on various cell functions such as actin cytoskeleton, microtubule network for vesicular trafficking, membrane integrity, inflammation, and cell survival. EPEC and EHEC effectors target most of these functions. Effectors encoded inside or outside of locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) disrupt the TJ strands. EPEC and EHEC exploit the TJ dynamics to open this structure, for causing diarrhea. EPEC and EHEC secrete effectors that mimic host proteins to manipulate the signaling pathways, including those related to TJ dynamics. In this review, we focus on the known mechanisms exploited by EPEC and EHEC effectors for causing TJ disruption. PMID:27606286

  7. Josephson junction Q-spoiler

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, J.; Hilbert, C.; Hahn, E.L.; Sleator, T.

    1986-03-25

    An automatic Q-spoiler comprising at least one Josephson tunnel junction connected in an LC circuit for flow of resonant current therethrough. When in use in a system for detecting the magnetic resonance of a gyromagnetic particle system, a high energy pulse of high frequency energy irradiating the particle system will cause the critical current through the Josephson tunnel junctions to be exceeded, causing the tunnel junctions to act as resistors and thereby damp the ringing of the high-Q detection circuit after the pulse. When the current has damped to below the critical current, the Josephson tunnel junctions revert to their zero-resistance state, restoring the Q of the detection circuit and enabling the low energy magnetic resonance signals to be detected.

  8. Josephson junction Q-spoiler

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John; Hilbert, Claude; Hahn, Erwin L.; Sleator, Tycho

    1988-01-01

    An automatic Q-spoiler comprising at least one Josephson tunnel junction connected in an LC circuit for flow of resonant current therethrough. When in use in a system for detecting the magnetic resonance of a gyromagnetic particle system, a high energy pulse of high frequency energy irradiating the particle system will cause the critical current through the Josephson tunnel junctions to be exceeded, causing the tunnel junctions to act as resistors and thereby damp the ringing of the high-Q detection circuit after the pulse. When the current has damped to below the critical current, the Josephson tunnel junctions revert to their zero-resistance state, restoring the Q of the detection circuit and enabling the low energy magnetic resonance signals to be detected.

  9. Thermal conductance of superlattice junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Simon; McGaughey, Alan J. H.

    2015-05-15

    We use molecular dynamics simulations and the lattice-based scattering boundary method to compute the thermal conductance of finite-length Lennard-Jones superlattice junctions confined by bulk crystalline leads. The superlattice junction thermal conductance depends on the properties of the leads. For junctions with a superlattice period of four atomic monolayers at temperatures between 5 and 20 K, those with mass-mismatched leads have a greater thermal conductance than those with mass-matched leads. We attribute this lead effect to interference between and the ballistic transport of emergent junction vibrational modes. The lead effect diminishes when the temperature is increased, when the superlattice period is increased, and when interfacial disorder is introduced, but is reversed in the harmonic limit.

  10. Electronic thermometry in tunable tunnel junction

    DOEpatents

    Maksymovych, Petro

    2016-03-15

    A tunable tunnel junction thermometry circuit includes a variable width tunnel junction between a test object and a probe. The junction width is varied and a change in thermovoltage across the junction with respect to the change in distance across the junction is determined. Also, a change in biased current with respect to a change in distance across the junction is determined. A temperature gradient across the junction is determined based on a mathematical relationship between the temperature gradient, the change in thermovoltage with respect to distance and the change in biased current with respect to distance. Thermovoltage may be measured by nullifying a thermoelectric tunneling current with an applied voltage supply level. A piezoelectric actuator may modulate the probe, and thus the junction width, to vary thermovoltage and biased current across the junction. Lock-in amplifiers measure the derivatives of the thermovoltage and biased current modulated by varying junction width.

  11. Neuromuscular junctional disorders.

    PubMed

    Girija, A S; Ashraf, V V

    2008-07-01

    Neuromuscular junctional disorders (NMJ) in children are distinct entity. They may be acquired or hereditary. They pose problem in diagnosis because of the higher occurrence of sero negative Myasthenia Gravis (MG) cases in children. The identity of MusK antibody positivity in a good percentage of sero negative cases further adds to problems in diagnosis. The Congenital Myasthenic Syndrome (CMS) which are rare disorders of hereditary neuromuscular transmission (NMT) has to be differentiated because immunotherapy has no benefit in this group. Molecular genetic studies of these diseases helps to identify specific type of CMS which is important as other drugs like Fluoxetine, Quinidine are found to be effective in some. In infancy, all can manifest as floppy infant syndrome. The important key to diagnosis is by detailed electrophysiological studies including repetitive nerve stimulation at slow and high rates and its response to anticholinesterases and estimation of Acetyl choline receptor antibodies. Other causes of neuromuscular transmission defects viz. snake venom poisoning and that due to drugs are discussed. PMID:18716738

  12. Confocal Annular Josephson Tunnel Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaco, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    The physics of Josephson tunnel junctions drastically depends on their geometrical configurations and here we show that also tiny geometrical details play a determinant role. More specifically, we develop the theory of short and long annular Josephson tunnel junctions delimited by two confocal ellipses. The behavior of a circular annular Josephson tunnel junction is then seen to be simply a special case of the above result. For junctions having a normalized perimeter less than one, the threshold curves in the presence of an in-plane magnetic field of arbitrary orientations are derived and computed even in the case with trapped Josephson vortices. For longer junctions, a numerical analysis is carried out after the derivation of the appropriate motion equation for the Josephson phase. We found that the system is modeled by a modified and perturbed sine-Gordon equation with a space-dependent effective Josephson penetration length inversely proportional to the local junction width. Both the fluxon statics and dynamics are deeply affected by the non-uniform annulus width. Static zero-field multiple-fluxon solutions exist even in the presence of a large bias current. The tangential velocity of a traveling fluxon is not determined by the balance between the driving and drag forces due to the dissipative losses. Furthermore, the fluxon motion is characterized by a strong radial inward acceleration which causes electromagnetic radiation concentrated at the ellipse equatorial points.

  13. Confocal Annular Josephson Tunnel Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaco, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    The physics of Josephson tunnel junctions drastically depends on their geometrical configurations and here we show that also tiny geometrical details play a determinant role. More specifically, we develop the theory of short and long annular Josephson tunnel junctions delimited by two confocal ellipses. The behavior of a circular annular Josephson tunnel junction is then seen to be simply a special case of the above result. For junctions having a normalized perimeter less than one, the threshold curves in the presence of an in-plane magnetic field of arbitrary orientations are derived and computed even in the case with trapped Josephson vortices. For longer junctions, a numerical analysis is carried out after the derivation of the appropriate motion equation for the Josephson phase. We found that the system is modeled by a modified and perturbed sine-Gordon equation with a space-dependent effective Josephson penetration length inversely proportional to the local junction width. Both the fluxon statics and dynamics are deeply affected by the non-uniform annulus width. Static zero-field multiple-fluxon solutions exist even in the presence of a large bias current. The tangential velocity of a traveling fluxon is not determined by the balance between the driving and drag forces due to the dissipative losses. Furthermore, the fluxon motion is characterized by a strong radial inward acceleration which causes electromagnetic radiation concentrated at the ellipse equatorial points.

  14. Octagonal Defects at Carbon Nanotube Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Jaskólski, W.; Pelc, M.; Chico, Leonor; Ayuela, A.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate knee-shaped junctions of semiconductor zigzag carbon nanotubes. Two dissimilar octagons appear at such junctions; one of them can reconstruct into a pair of pentagons. The junction with two octagons presents two degenerate localized states at Fermi energy (EF). The reconstructed junction has only one state near EF, indicating that these localized states are related to the octagonal defects. The inclusion of Coulomb interaction splits the localized states in the junction with two octagons, yielding an antiferromagnetic system. PMID:24089604

  15. Protein phosphatase 2A activity is required for functional adherent junctions in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kása, Anita; Czikora, István; Verin, Alexander D; Gergely, Pál; Csortos, Csilla

    2013-09-01

    Reversible Ser/Thr phosphorylation of cytoskeletal and adherent junction (AJ) proteins has a critical role in the regulation of endothelial cell (EC) barrier function. We have demonstrated earlier that protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity is important in EC barrier integrity. In the present work, macro- and microvascular EC were examined and we provided further evidence on the significance of PP2A in the maintenance of EC cytoskeleton and barrier function with special focus on the Bα (regulatory) subunit of PP2A. Immunofluorescent staining revealed that the inhibition of PP2A results in changes in the organization of EC cytoskeleton as microtubule dissolution and actin re-arrangement were detected. Depletion of Bα regulatory subunit of PP2A had similar effect on the cytoskeleton structure of the cells. Furthermore, transendothelial electric resistance measurements demonstrated significantly slower barrier recovery of Bα depleted EC after thrombin treatment. AJ proteins, VE-cadherin and β-catenin, were detected along with Bα in pull-down assay. Also, the inhibition of PP2A (by okadaic acid or fostriecin) or depletion of Bα caused β-catenin translocation from the membrane to the cytoplasm in parallel with its phosphorylation on Ser552. In conclusion, our data suggest that the A/Bα/C holoenzyme form of PP2A is essential in EC barrier integrity both in micro- and macrovascular EC. PMID:23721711

  16. Blumeaenes A-J, sesquiterpenoid esters from Blumea balsamifera with NO inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming; Qin, Jiang-Jiang; Fu, Jian-Jun; Hu, Xiao-Jia; Liu, Xiao-Hua; Zhang, Wei-Dong; Jin, Hui-Zi

    2010-06-01

    Chemical examination of the ethanol extract of the aerial parts of Blumea balsamifera led to the isolation of ten new sesquiterpenoid esters, blumeaenes A-J (1- 10), with 13 known flavonoids. Their structures were determined mainly by use of 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic techniques. All sesquiterpenoid esters were tested for their inhibitory activity against LPS-induced NO production in RAW264.7 macrophages. Compounds 1, 4 and 5 showed slight inhibitory effect on the production of NO with IC(50) values of 40.06, 46.35 and 57.80 microg/mL, respectively. PMID:20101563

  17. Erratum: ``Stellar Chemical Signatures and Hierarchical Galaxy Formation'' (AJ, 128, 1177 [2004])

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venn, Kim A.; Irwin, Mike; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Tout, Christopher A.; Hill, Vanessa; Tolstoy, Eline

    2006-10-01

    Due to a program error, the published version of Table 2 included inaccurate entries for the calcium, titanium, and mean α-element abundance ratios for the stars in the dwarf spheroidal galaxies from Shetrone et al. (2003). A corrected version is given below. We are grateful to Bruno Letarte for detecting this error. We have also updated the information for additional stars in the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy from D. Geisler et al. (AJ, 128, 1177 [2004]) following the final publication of that paper.

  18. Effects of Hemin and Nitrite on Intestinal Tumorigenesis in the A/J Min/+ Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Sødring, Marianne; Oostindjer, Marije; Egelandsdal, Bjørg; Paulsen, Jan Erik

    2015-01-01

    Red and processed meats are considered risk factors for colorectal cancer (CRC); however, the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. One cause for the potential link between CRC and meat is the heme iron in red meat. Two pathways by which heme and CRC promotion may be linked have been suggested: fat peroxidation and N-nitrosation. In the present work we have used the novel A/J Min/+ mouse model to test the effects of dietary hemin (a model of red meat), and hemin in combination with nitrite (a model of processed meat) on intestinal tumorigenesis. Mice were fed a low Ca2+ and vitamin D semi-synthetic diet with added hemin and/or nitrite for 8 weeks post weaning, before termination followed by excision and examination of the intestinal tract. Our results indicate that dietary hemin decreased the number of colonic lesions in the A/J Min/+ mouse. However, our results also showed that the opposite occurred in the small intestine, where dietary hemin appeared to stimulate tumor growth. Furthermore, we find that nitrite, which did not have an effect in the colon, appeared to have a suppressive effect on tumor growth in the small intestine. PMID:25836260

  19. A neutron-star-driven X-ray flash associated with supernova SN 2006aj.

    PubMed

    Mazzali, Paolo A; Deng, Jinsong; Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Sauer, Daniel N; Pian, Elena; Tominaga, Nozomu; Tanaka, Masaomi; Maeda, Keiichi; Filippenko, Alexei V

    2006-08-31

    Supernovae connected with long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are hyper-energetic explosions resulting from the collapse of very massive stars ( approximately 40 M\\circ, where M\\circ is the mass of the Sun) stripped of their outer hydrogen and helium envelopes. A very massive progenitor, collapsing to a black hole, was thought to be a requirement for the launch of a GRB. Here we report the results of modelling the spectra and light curve of SN 2006aj (ref. 9), which demonstrate that the supernova had a much smaller explosion energy and ejected much less mass than the other GRB-supernovae, suggesting that it was produced by a star whose initial mass was only approximately 20 M\\circ. A star of this mass is expected to form a neutron star rather than a black hole when its core collapses. The smaller explosion energy of SN 2006aj is matched by the weakness and softness of GRB 060218 (an X-ray flash), and the weakness of the radio flux of the supernova. Our results indicate that the supernova-GRB connection extends to a much broader range of stellar masses than previously thought, possibly involving different physical mechanisms: a 'collapsar' (ref. 8) for the more massive stars collapsing to a black hole, and magnetic activity of the nascent neutron star for the less massive stars. PMID:16943833

  20. Effect of bronchoconstrictive aerosols on pulmonary gas trapping in the A/J mouse.

    PubMed

    Yiamouyiannis, C A; Stengel, P W; Cockerham, S L; Silbaugh, S A

    1995-10-01

    We exposed A/J mice to several challenge aerosols and measured gas trapped within excised lungs by quantitating their buoyancy in saline (Archimedes' principle). The temporal stability of the excised lung gas volume (ELGV) measurement was also examined. ELGV increased in a dose proportional manner with increasing concentrations of methacholine and reached a maximum of 338 +/- 33% above vehicle-exposed controls. The A/J mice were 100 times more responsive to aerosol methacholine compared to hyporesponsive C3H/HeJ mice. Aerosol challenges of U-46619, a thromboxane A2 mimetic, and serotonin resulted in a 40% and 135% increase in ELGV's versus their controls, respectively. ELGV's were not increased after aerosols of leukotriene C4, histamine, substance P, N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenyl-alanine and platelet activating factor. Both normal (filtered air-exposed) and hyperinflated (methacholine-exposed) excised lungs lost about 10% of their initial volume by 30 min and 40-65% of initial volume by 4 h. Occlusion of the trachea in either group did not affect the total gas lost, suggesting that majority of the gas loss was via transpleural diffusion. We conclude that determination of ELGV in mice, when performed soon after challenge testing, is a simple, rapid and reliable estimate of airway obstruction. PMID:8610213

  1. Inhibitory effect of 5F on development of lung cancer in A/J mice

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hua; Yang, Xiaoqing; Wu, Kefeng; Li, Li; Lv, Yingnian; Liu, Yi; Zheng, Xuebao

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to investigate the effect of ent-11α-hydroxy-15-oxo-kaur-16-en-19-oic-acid (5F) on the model of induced A/J mice lung cancer in A/J mice. The expressions of tumor-related molecules including P65 and Bcl-2 at protein level were examined using the immunohistochemical method (IHC). Side effects of 5F were also monitored. The results indicated that 5F significantly suppressed the development of B[a]P and NNK-induced lung cancer in vivo by facilitating cell apoptosis with minimal side effects. Compared to the expressions of P65 and Bcl-2 in model group, the levels were strongly attenuated both in blank and 5F injection groups. Moreover, P65 and Bcl-2 levels varied among different groups receiving 5F treatment. The expressions of P65 and Bcl-2 were much lower in groups receiving high-concentration 5F treatment than those with low-concentration 5F injection. Findings revealed that 5F inhibited the pathogenesis of lung cancer through accelerating apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:26097604

  2. Surface water and groundwater characteristics in the wetlands of the Ajó River (Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carol, E. S.; Dragani, W. C.; Kruse, E. E.; Pousa, J. L.

    2012-10-01

    Intertidal wetlands are complex hydrological environments in which surface water and groundwater interact periodically with tidal flows. This work analyzes how the tidal flow determines the hydrodynamics and salinity of surface water and groundwater at different depths in the intertidal wetland located in the marsh of the Ajó River. Water level and salinity measurements were obtained from the Ajó River, the channels discharging into the river and the phreatic aquifer. The results in the natural marsh indicate the presence of saline stratification and that the surface water-groundwater relationship varies with the tide. At low tide, the water table discharges into the surface watercourses, and when the high tide rises above the regional groundwater discharge level, the tidal flow contributes to the water table, which causes an increase in salinity in surface water and groundwater. When the high tide does not rise above the discharge level, the tidal flow only enters the groundwater at the mouth section and the salinity of the surface water and groundwater decreases from low tide to high tide. In the marsh areas excluded from the tidal cycle due to the presence of floodgates, the water table always discharges into the canals, and in the surface water and groundwater there is no presence of saline stratification. The results obtained make it possible to generate a conceptual model of hydrological behaviour which shows the hydrodynamic and hydrochemical complexity of intertidal wetlands.

  3. Caspase-Mediated Apoptosis in the Cochleae Contributes to the Early Onset of Hearing Loss in A/J Mice

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xu; Ge, Ruli; Xie, Gang; Li, Ping; Zhao, Xin; Gao, Lixiang; Zhang, Heng; Wang, Oumei; Huang, Fei; Han, Fengchan

    2015-01-01

    A/J and C57BL/6 J (B6) mice share a mutation in Cdh23 (ahl allele) and are characterized by age-related hearing loss. However, hearing loss occurs much earlier in A/J mice at about four weeks of age. Recent study has revealed that a mutation in citrate synthase (Cs) is one of the main contributors, but the mechanism is largely unknown. In the present study, we showed that A/J mice displayed more severe degeneration of hair cells, spiral ganglion neurons, and stria vascularis in the cochleae compared with B6 mice. Moreover, messenger RNA accumulation levels of caspase-3 and caspase-9 in the inner ears of A/J mice were significantly higher than those in B6 mice at 2 and 8 weeks of age. Immunohistochemistry localized caspase-3 expression mainly to the hair cells, spiral ganglion neurons, and stria vascularis in cochleae. In vitro transfection with Cs short hairpin RNA (shRNA) alone or cotransfection with Cs shRNA and Cdh23 shRNA significantly increased the levels of caspase-3 in an inner ear cell line (HEI-OC1). Finally, a pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK could preserve the hearing of A/J mice by lowering about 15 decibels of the sound pressure level for the auditory-evoked brainstem response thresholds. In conclusion, our results suggest that caspase-mediated apoptosis in the cochleae, which may be related to a Cs mutation, contributes to the early onset of hearing loss in A/J mice. PMID:25732708

  4. Transport in Carbon Nanotube Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoo, K. H.; Chelikowsky, James R.

    2008-03-01

    There is growing interest in the use of carbon nanotube thin films as transparent electrical conductors and thin-film transistors owing to their high optical transmittance, low sheet resistivity, and ease of fabrication. [1,2] A major contribution to the sheet resistivity originates at nanotube junctions, as electrical contact is typically poor between adjacent nanotubes. It is thus important to characterize carbon nanotube junctions in order to understand the conduction properties of nanotube thin films. To this end, we have performed ab initio density functional theory calculations to investigate the structural, electronic and transport properties of carbon nanotube junctions as a function of nanotube chirality and contact geometry [1] Z. Wu et al., Science 305, 1273 (2004) [2] E. S. Snow, J. P. Novak, P. M. Campbell, and D. Park, Appl. Phys. Lett. 82, 2145 (2003).

  5. Ephrin-Bs Drive Junctional Downregulation and Actin Stress Fiber Disassembly to Enable Wound Re-epithelialization

    PubMed Central

    Nunan, Robert; Campbell, Jessica; Mori, Ryoichi; Pitulescu, Mara E.; Jiang, Wen G.; Harding, Keith G.; Adams, Ralf H.; Nobes, Catherine D.; Martin, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Summary For a skin wound to successfully heal, the cut epidermal-edge cells have to migrate forward at the interface between scab and healthy granulation tissue. Much is known about how lead-edge cells migrate, but very little is known about the mechanisms that enable active participation by cells further back. Here we show that ephrin-B1 and its receptor EphB2 are both upregulated in vivo, just for the duration of repair, in the first 70 or so rows of epidermal cells, and this signal leads to downregulation of the molecular components of adherens and tight (but not desmosomal) junctions, leading to loosening between neighbors and enabling shuffle room among epidermal cells. Additionally, this signaling leads to the shutdown of actomyosin stress fibers in these same epidermal cells, which may act to release tension within the wound monolayer. If this signaling axis is perturbed, then disrupted healing is a consequence in mouse and man. PMID:26549443

  6. Ephrin-Bs Drive Junctional Downregulation and Actin Stress Fiber Disassembly to Enable Wound Re-epithelialization.

    PubMed

    Nunan, Robert; Campbell, Jessica; Mori, Ryoichi; Pitulescu, Mara E; Jiang, Wen G; Harding, Keith G; Adams, Ralf H; Nobes, Catherine D; Martin, Paul

    2015-11-17

    For a skin wound to successfully heal, the cut epidermal-edge cells have to migrate forward at the interface between scab and healthy granulation tissue. Much is known about how lead-edge cells migrate, but very little is known about the mechanisms that enable active participation by cells further back. Here we show that ephrin-B1 and its receptor EphB2 are both upregulated in vivo, just for the duration of repair, in the first 70 or so rows of epidermal cells, and this signal leads to downregulation of the molecular components of adherens and tight (but not desmosomal) junctions, leading to loosening between neighbors and enabling shuffle room among epidermal cells. Additionally, this signaling leads to the shutdown of actomyosin stress fibers in these same epidermal cells, which may act to release tension within the wound monolayer. If this signaling axis is perturbed, then disrupted healing is a consequence in mouse and man. PMID:26549443

  7. Conducting polyaniline nanowire electrode junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaikwad, Sumedh; Bodkhe, Gajanan; Deshmukh, Megha; Patil, Harshada; Rushi, Arti; Shirsat, Mahendra D.; Koinkar, Pankaj; Kim, Yun-Hae; Mulchandani, Ashok

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, a synthesis of conducting polyaniline nanowires electrode junction (CPNEJ) has been reported. Conducting polyaniline nanowires electrode junction on Si/SiO2 substrate (having 3 μm gap between two gold microelectrodes) is prepared. Polyaniline nanowires with diameter (ca. 140 nm to 160 nm) were synthesized by one step electrochemical polymerization using galvanostatic (constant current) technique to bridge this gap. The surface morphology of CPNEJ was studied by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The synthesized CPNEJ is an excellent platform for biosensor applications.

  8. Planar cell polarity links axes of spatial dynamics in neural-tube closure.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Tamako; Honda, Hisao; Takeichi, Masatoshi

    2012-05-25

    Neural-tube closure is a critical step of embryogenesis, and its failure causes serious birth defects. Coordination of two morphogenetic processes--convergent extension and neural-plate apical constriction--ensures the complete closure of the neural tube. We now provide evidence that planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling directly links these two processes. In the bending neural plates, we find that a PCP-regulating cadherin, Celsr1, is concentrated in adherens junctions (AJs) oriented toward the mediolateral axes of the plates. At these AJs, Celsr1 cooperates with Dishevelled, DAAM1, and the PDZ-RhoGEF to upregulate Rho kinase, causing their actomyosin-dependent contraction in a planar-polarized manner. This planar-polarized contraction promotes simultaneous apical constriction and midline convergence of neuroepithelial cells. Together our findings demonstrate that PCP signals confer anisotropic contractility on the AJs, producing cellular forces that promote the polarized bending of the neural plate. PMID:22632972

  9. GLIAL ANKYRINS FACILITATE PARANODAL AXOGLIAL JUNCTION ASSEMBLY

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Kae-Jiun; Zollinger, Daniel R.; Susuki, Keiichiro; Sherman, Diane L.; Makara, Michael A.; Brophy, Peter J.; Cooper, Edward C.; Bennett, Vann; Mohler, Peter J.; Rasband, Matthew N.

    2014-01-01

    Neuron-glia interactions establish functional membrane domains along myelinated axons. These include nodes of Ranvier, paranodal axoglial junctions, and juxtaparanodes. Paranodal junctions are the largest vertebrate junctional adhesion complex, are essential for rapid saltatory conduction, and contribute to assembly and maintenance of nodes. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying paranodal junction assembly are poorly understood. Ankyrins are cytoskeletal scaffolds traditionally associated with Na+ channel clustering in neurons and important for membrane domain establishment and maintenance in many cell types. Here, we show that ankyrinB, expressed by Schwann cells, and ankyrinG, expressed by oligodendrocytes, are highly enriched at the glial side of paranodal junctions where they interact with the essential glial junctional component neurofascin 155. Conditional knockout of ankyrins in oligodendrocytes disrupts paranodal junction assembly and delays nerve conduction during early development in mice. Thus, glial ankyrins function as major scaffolds that facilitate early and efficient paranodal junction assembly in the developing central nervous system. PMID:25362471

  10. Simple Electronic Analog of a Josephson Junction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, R. W.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Demonstrates that an electronic Josephson junction analog constructed from three integrated circuits plus an external reference oscillator can exhibit many of the circuit phenomena of a real Josephson junction. Includes computer and other applications of the analog. (Author/SK)

  11. Glial ankyrins facilitate paranodal axoglial junction assembly.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kae-Jiun; Zollinger, Daniel R; Susuki, Keiichiro; Sherman, Diane L; Makara, Michael A; Brophy, Peter J; Cooper, Edward C; Bennett, Vann; Mohler, Peter J; Rasband, Matthew N

    2014-12-01

    Neuron-glia interactions establish functional membrane domains along myelinated axons. These include nodes of Ranvier, paranodal axoglial junctions and juxtaparanodes. Paranodal junctions are the largest vertebrate junctional adhesion complex, and they are essential for rapid saltatory conduction and contribute to assembly and maintenance of nodes. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying paranodal junction assembly are poorly understood. Ankyrins are cytoskeletal scaffolds traditionally associated with Na(+) channel clustering in neurons and are important for membrane domain establishment and maintenance in many cell types. Here we show that ankyrin-B, expressed by Schwann cells, and ankyrin-G, expressed by oligodendrocytes, are highly enriched at the glial side of paranodal junctions where they interact with the essential glial junctional component neurofascin 155. Conditional knockout of ankyrins in oligodendrocytes disrupts paranodal junction assembly and delays nerve conduction during early development in mice. Thus, glial ankyrins function as major scaffolds that facilitate early and efficient paranodal junction assembly in the developing CNS. PMID:25362471

  12. Layer Engineering of 2D Semiconductor Junctions.

    PubMed

    He, Yongmin; Sobhani, Ali; Lei, Sidong; Zhang, Zhuhua; Gong, Yongji; Jin, Zehua; Zhou, Wu; Yang, Yingchao; Zhang, Yuan; Wang, Xifan; Yakobson, Boris; Vajtai, Robert; Halas, Naomi J; Li, Bo; Xie, Erqing; Ajayan, Pulickel

    2016-07-01

    A new concept for junction fabrication by connecting multiple regions with varying layer thicknesses, based on the thickness dependence, is demonstrated. This type of junction is only possible in super-thin-layered 2D materials, and exhibits similar characteristics as p-n junctions. Rectification and photovoltaic effects are observed in chemically homogeneous MoSe2 junctions between domains of different thicknesses. PMID:27136275

  13. Measurement of tunnel junction resistance during formation

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, W.C.; Johnson, R.T.; Lee, J.S.; Laws, K.E.; Bland, R.W. )

    1993-11-01

    The authors have measured the characteristics of aluminum tunnel junctions during and immediately after the formation of the junction. This has permitted us to observe changes in the oxide barrier, in vacuum and in air. By observing the barrier resistance during sputtering, they were able to diagnose and correct problems due to plasma discharges which were damaging the junctions. They report preliminary results from junctions passivated with a silicon nitride cap layer.

  14. GAP JUNCTION FUNCTION AND CANCER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gap Junctions (GJs) provide cell-to-cell communication (GJIC) of essential metabolites and ions. Js allow tissues to average responses, clear waste products, and minimize the effects of xenobiotics by dilution and allowing steady-state catabolism. any chemicals can adversely affe...

  15. The Yolla Bolly junction revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, M.C.; Jayko, A.S. ); Jones, D.L. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics); Engebretson, D.C. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    West of Red Bluff, California, rocks of the northern Coast Ranges, Klamath-Sierra Nevada, and Great Valley provinces come together at what has been called the Yolla Bolly junction. Mapping of the Red Bluff and Willows 1:100,000 quadrangles has greatly clarified the enigmatic features of this complex area. Terranes of the Klamath Mountains and their Cretaceous sedimentary cover have been thrust northwestward over the Elder Creek terrane and Franciscan rocks, north of the left-lateral Cold Fork fault zone. The Condrey Mountain window (Franciscan Pickett Peak terrane) provides a measure of the magnitude of this thrusting (ca 90 km). South of the Cold Fork fault zone, the Franciscan and Elder Creek terranes were driven southeastward as tectonic wedges onto Sierran-Klamath basement. Timing of this scissor-tectonics is not constrained near the junction, but further north in southwest Oregon, Lower Eocene strata were deformed by overthrusting of the Klamath block whereas Upper Eocene strata overlap the thrust, indicating that thrusting occurred between about 52 and 60 Ma. Plate reconstructions for this time interval indicate the close proximity of the Kula-Farallon-North America triple junction and that old (ca 100 m.y.) Farallon lithosphere was being subducted north of the junction whereas to the south, very young (ca 10 m.y.) Kula plate was presumably obducted onto North America.

  16. Improved Solar-Cell Tunnel Junction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daud, T.; Kachare, A.

    1986-01-01

    Efficiency of multiple-junction silicon solar cells increased by inclusion of p+/n+ tunnel junctions of highly doped GaP between component cells. Relatively low recombination velocity at GaP junction principal reason for recommending this material. Relatively wide band gap also helps increase efficiency by reducing optical losses.

  17. 27 CFR 9.164 - River Junction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false River Junction. 9.164... River Junction. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “River Junction.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the River...

  18. 27 CFR 9.164 - River Junction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false River Junction. 9.164... River Junction. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “River Junction.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the River...

  19. Defensin Susceptibility and Colonization in the Mouse Model of AJ100, a Polymyxin B Resistant, Brucella abortus RB51 Isolate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial facultative intracellular pathogens selected for sensitivity to polymyxin B have been shown to be attenuated. However, the effect on pathogenicity of increased resistance to polymyxin B has not been studied. A polymyxin resistant mutant, Brucella abortus AJ100, was characterized by comp...

  20. DIBENZO[A,L]PYRENE INDUCTION OF ERYTHROCYTE MICRONUCLEI IN A/J AND P53-DEFICIENT MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    DIBENZO[a,l]PYRENE INDUCTION OF ERYTHROCYTE MICRONUCLEI IN AlJ AND P53-DEFICIENT MICE

    Male A/J and C57Bl/6 background p53+/+, p53+/- and p53-/- mice were treated with dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (DB[a,l]P), and micronucleus (MN) frequencies were measured in erythrocytes from bone ...

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of the Polyextremophilic Halorubrum sp. Strain AJ67, Isolated from Hyperarsenic Lakes in the Argentinian Puna

    PubMed Central

    Burguener, Germán F.; Maldonado, Marcos J.; Revale, Santiago; Fernández Do Porto, Darío; Rascován, Nicolás; Vázquez, Martín; Farías, María Eugenia; Marti, Marcelo A.

    2014-01-01

    Halorubrum sp. strain AJ67, an extreme halophilic UV-resistant archaeon, was isolated from Laguna Antofalla in the Argentinian Puna. The draft genome sequence suggests the presence of potent enzyme candidates that are essential for survival under multiple environmental extreme conditions, such as high UV radiation, elevated salinity, and the presence of critical arsenic concentrations. PMID:24503991

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of the Polyextremophilic Halorubrum sp. Strain AJ67, Isolated from Hyperarsenic Lakes in the Argentinian Puna.

    PubMed

    Burguener, Germán F; Maldonado, Marcos J; Revale, Santiago; Fernández Do Porto, Darío; Rascován, Nicolás; Vázquez, Martín; Farías, María Eugenia; Marti, Marcelo A; Turjanski, Adrián Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    Halorubrum sp. strain AJ67, an extreme halophilic UV-resistant archaeon, was isolated from Laguna Antofalla in the Argentinian Puna. The draft genome sequence suggests the presence of potent enzyme candidates that are essential for survival under multiple environmental extreme conditions, such as high UV radiation, elevated salinity, and the presence of critical arsenic concentrations. PMID:24503991

  3. COMPARISON OF THE LUNG ADENOMA RESPONSE IN STRAIN A/J MICE AFTER INTRAPERITONEAL AND ORAL ADMINISTRATION OF CARCINOGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was undertaken to compare the ability of a series of compounds from different chemical classes to induce lung tumors in strain A/J mice after either ip or po administration. 3-Methylcholanthrene, benzo(a)pyrene, urethan, diethylnitrosamine, ethylnitrosourea, and dimeth...

  4. CYCLOPENTA-FUSED POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN STRAIN A/J MOUSE LUNG: DNA ADDUCTS, ONCOGENE MUTATIONS, & TUMORIGENESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cyclopenta-fused Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Strain AJJ Mouse Lung: DNA Adducts, Oncogene Mutations, and Tumorigenesis.

    We have examined the relationships between DNA adducts, Ki-ras oncogene mutations, DNA adducts, and adenoma induction in the lungs of strain A/J...

  5. Involvement of YAP, TAZ and HSP90 in Contact Guidance and Intercellular Junction Formation in Corneal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Joshua T.; Tuyen, Binh C.; Rose, Brad W.; Reilly, Christopher M.; Russell, Paul; Murphy, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    The extracellular environment possesses a rich milieu of biophysical and biochemical signaling cues that are simultaneously integrated by cells and influence cellular phenotype. Yes-associated protein (YAP) and transcriptional co-activator with PDZ-binding motif (WWTR1; TAZ), two important signaling molecules of the Hippo pathway, have been recently implicated as nuclear relays of cytoskeletal changes mediated by substratum rigidity and topography. These proteins intersect with other important intracellular signaling pathways (e.g. Wnt and TGFβ). In the cornea, epithelial cells adhere to the stroma through a 3-dimensional topography-rich basement membrane, with features in the nano-submicron size-scale that are capable of profoundly modulating a wide range of fundamental cell behaviors. The influences of substratum-topography, YAP/TAZ knockdown, and HSP90 inhibition on cell morphology, YAP/TAZ localization, and the expression of TGFβ2 and CTGF, were investigated. The results demonstrate (a) that knockdown of TAZ enhances contact guidance in a YAP dependent manner, (b) that CTGF is predominantly regulated by YAP and not TAZ, and (c) that TGFβ2 is regulated by both YAP and TAZ in these cells. Additionally, inhibition of HSP90 resulted in nuclear localization and subsequent transcriptional-activation of YAP, formation of cell-cell junctions and co-localization of E-cadherin and β-catenin at adherens junctions. Results presented in this study reflect the complexities underlying the molecular relationships between the cytoskeleton, growth factors, heat shock proteins, and co-activators of transcription that impact mechanotransduction. The data reveal the importance of YAP/TAZ on the cell behaviors, and gene and protein expression. PMID:25290150

  6. Notolutesins A-J, dolabrane-type diterpenoids from the Chinese liverwort Notoscyphus lutescens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Song; Li, Rui-Juan; Zhu, Rong-Xiu; Hu, Xiao-Yan; Guo, Yan-Xia; Zhou, Jin-Chuan; Lin, Zhao-Min; Zhang, Jiao-Zhen; Wu, Jing-Yi; Kang, Ya-Qi; Morris-Natschke, Susan L; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Yuan, Hui-Qing; Lou, Hong-Xiang

    2014-09-26

    Ten new dolabrane-type diterpenoids, notolutesins A-J (1-10), were isolated from the Chinese liverwort Notoscyphus lutescens, along with four known compounds. The structures of the new compounds were established on the basis of extensive spectroscopic data, and that of 1 was confirmed by single-crystal X-ray crystallography. The absolute configuration of 1 was determined by comparing its experimental and calculated electronic circular dichroism spectra. All of the isolates were evaluated for their cytotoxicity against a small panel of human cancer cell lines, and compound 1 exhibited an IC50 value of 6.2 μM against the PC3 human prostate cancer cell line. PMID:25226363

  7. Hypermongones A-J, Rare Methylated Polycyclic Polyprenylated Acylphloroglucinols from the Flowers of Hypericum monogynum.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen-Jun; Zhu, Meng-Di; Wang, Xiao-Bing; Yang, Ming-Hua; Luo, Jun; Kong, Ling-Yi

    2015-05-22

    Hypermongones A-J (1-10), rare methylated polycyclic polyprenylated acylphloroglucinol derivatives, together with three known simple acylphloroglucinols (11-13) as their plausible biogenetic precursors, were identified from the flowers of Hypericum monogynum. The structures of 1-10 were elucidated by analysis of their 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic data; the absolute configuration of their polycyclic skeleton was determined by the electronic circular dichroism exciton chirality method and was subsequently confirmed by an X-ray diffraction study of 1. The evaluation of their inhibitory effects on nitric oxide (NO) production in lipopolysaccharide-induced RAW264.7 cells revealed that compound 7 exhibited significant NO inhibition activity, with an IC50 value of 9.5 μM. PMID:25924023

  8. The role of P-cadherin in skin biology and skin pathology: lessons from the hair follicle.

    PubMed

    Samuelov, Liat; Sprecher, Eli; Paus, Ralf

    2015-06-01

    Adherens junctions (AJs) are one of the major intercellular junctions in various epithelia including the epidermis and the follicular epithelium. AJs connect the cell surface to the actin cytoskeleton and comprise classic transmembrane cadherins, such as P-cadherin, armadillo family proteins, and actin microfilaments. Loss-of-function mutations in CDH3, which encodes P-cadherin, result in two allelic autosomal recessive disorders: hypotrichosis with juvenile macular dystrophy (HJMD) and ectodermal dysplasia, ectrodactyly, and macular dystrophy (EEM) syndromes. Both syndromes feature sparse hair heralding progressive macular dystrophy. EEM syndrome is characterized in addition by ectodermal and limb defects. Recent studies have demonstrated that, together with its involvement in cell-cell adhesion, P-cadherin plays a crucial role in regulating cell signaling, malignant transformation, and other major intercellular processes. Here, we review the roles of P-cadherin in skin and hair biology, with emphasize on human hair growth, cycling and pigmentation. PMID:25707507

  9. Molecular series-tunneling junctions.

    PubMed

    Liao, Kung-Ching; Hsu, Liang-Yan; Bowers, Carleen M; Rabitz, Herschel; Whitesides, George M

    2015-05-13

    Charge transport through junctions consisting of insulating molecular units is a quantum phenomenon that cannot be described adequately by classical circuit laws. This paper explores tunneling current densities in self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-based junctions with the structure Ag(TS)/O2C-R1-R2-H//Ga2O3/EGaIn, where Ag(TS) is template-stripped silver and EGaIn is the eutectic alloy of gallium and indium; R1 and R2 refer to two classes of insulating molecular units-(CH2)n and (C6H4)m-that are connected in series and have different tunneling decay constants in the Simmons equation. These junctions can be analyzed as a form of series-tunneling junctions based on the observation that permuting the order of R1 and R2 in the junction does not alter the overall rate of charge transport. By using the Ag/O2C interface, this system decouples the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO, which is localized on the carboxylate group) from strong interactions with the R1 and R2 units. The differences in rates of tunneling are thus determined by the electronic structure of the groups R1 and R2; these differences are not influenced by the order of R1 and R2 in the SAM. In an electrical potential model that rationalizes this observation, R1 and R2 contribute independently to the height of the barrier. This model explicitly assumes that contributions to rates of tunneling from the Ag(TS)/O2C and H//Ga2O3 interfaces are constant across the series examined. The current density of these series-tunneling junctions can be described by J(V) = J0(V) exp(-β1d1 - β2d2), where J(V) is the current density (A/cm(2)) at applied voltage V and βi and di are the parameters describing the attenuation of the tunneling current through a rectangular tunneling barrier, with width d and a height related to the attenuation factor β. PMID:25871745

  10. The effect of hyperglycaemia on permeability and the expression of junctional complex molecules in human retinal and choroidal endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Saker, S; Stewart, E A; Browning, A C; Allen, C L; Amoaku, W M

    2014-04-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of preventable blindness in the working population and its prevalence continues to increase as the worldwide prevalence of diabetes grows. Diabetic choroidopathy is less well studied and occurs in the late stages of diabetic eye disease. The main cause of visual loss in diabetic eye disease is diabetic macular oedema caused by an increase in microvascular endothelial permeability. Endothelial cell permeability is influenced by multiple factors which have not been fully elucidated, particularly in human models. In addition, the gene and protein expression between retinal and choroidal endothelial cells, even in humans, has been shown to be heterogeneous. The aim of this project was to determine, in vitro, the effect of high glucose (25 mM) on human paracellular permeability in retinal and choroidal endothelial cells. The expression of selected tight junction molecules (Occludin, Claudin-5, JAM-A and JAM-C) and adheren junction (VE-Cadherin) molecules was also compared between retinal and choroidal endothelial cells and with high glucose. High glucose conditions significantly increased the permeability in both retinal and choroidal endothelial cells monolayers although the increase was higher in retinal endothelial cells. Under normal glucose culture conditions microarray analysis determined that occludin and claudin-5 gene expression was higher in retinal endothelial cells than choroidal endothelial cells, and western blotting indicated that claudin-5 protein expression was also higher in retinal endothelial cells whilst JAM-A, and C and VE-Cadherin levels were similar. In retinal endothelial cells exposed to high glucose claudin-5, occludin and JAM-A was found to be reduced, whereas the expression of VE-Cadherin and JAM-C was unchanged when evaluated with western blotting, immunofluorescence and qPCR. None of the proteins were significantly decreased by high glucose in choroidal endothelial cells. The increase in retinal

  11. Identification, expression pattern and potential role of variable lymphocyte receptor Aj-VLRA from Apostichopus japonicus in response to bacterial challenge.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Yao, Feng; Ba, Huazhong; Qin, Tong; Luan, Hong; Li, Zhengmin; Hou, Lin; Zou, Xiangyang

    2015-08-01

    The variable lymphocyte receptors (VLRs) are found in jawless vertebrates (agnathans), and specifically recognize bacteria and viruses via their leucine-rich repeats (LRRs). VLRs are believed to be adaptive immune response molecules. Echinoderms do not have adaptive immune systems; however, in the present study, a VLR cDNA named Aj-VLRA was cloned and characterized from sea cucumber, Apostichopus japonicus. The complete cDNA of Aj-VLRA was 3072 bp, including a 1995 bp open reading frame encoding 664 amino acids comprising LRR domains, a predicted transmembrane helix and an N-terminal signal peptide. As determined by quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, Aj-VLRA transcripts are ubiquitously expressed in the body wall, longitudinal muscles, intestine and respiratory tree of A. japonicus. The expression level of Aj-VLRA was upregulated after challenge with four common marine bacteria. In situ hybridization showed that the expression of Aj-VLRA was widely distributed in the four tissues, particularly in the cytoplasm of epidermal cells. Recombinantly expressed Aj-VLRA (including the LRR domains) could bind to bacteria including Micrococcus lysodeikticus (Gram+) and Vibrio anguillarum (Gram-). Collectively, the results suggested that Aj-VLRA is related to an innate immune response of A. japonicus. PMID:25896798

  12. Direct Exposure to Ethanol Disrupts Junctional Cell-Cell Contact and Hippo-YAP Signaling in HL-1 Murine Atrial Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Noritake, Kanako; Aki, Toshihiko; Funakoshi, Takeshi; Unuma, Kana; Uemura, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Direct exposure of cardiomyocytes to ethanol causes cardiac damage such as cardiac arrythmias and apoptotic cell death. Cardiomyocytes are connected to each other through intercalated disks (ID), which are composed of a gap junction (GJ), adherens junction, and desmosome. Changes in the content as well as the subcellular localization of connexin43 (Cx43), the main component of the cardiac GJ, are reportedly involved in cardiac arrythmias and subsequent damage. Recently, the hippo-YAP signaling pathway, which links cellular physical status to cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis, has been implicated in cardiac homeostasis under physiological as well as pathological conditions. This study was conducted to explore the possible involvement of junctional intercellular communication, mechanotransduction through cytoskeletal organization, and the hippo-YAP pathway in cardiac damage caused by direct exposure to ethanol. HL-1 murine atrial cardiac cells were used since these cells retain cardiac phenotypes through ID formation and subsequent synchronous contraction. Cells were exposed to 0.5–2% ethanol; significant apoptotic cell death was observed after exposure to 2% ethanol for 48 hours. A decrease in Cx43 levels was already observed after 3 hours exposure to 2% ethanol, suggesting a rapid degradation of this protein. Upon exposure to ethanol, Cx43 translocated into lysosomes. Cellular cytoskeletal organization was also dysregulated by ethanol, as demonstrated by the disruption of myofibrils and intermediate filaments. Coinciding with the loss of cell-cell adherence, decreased phosphorylation of YAP, a hippo pathway effector, was also observed in ethanol-treated cells. Taken together, the results provide evidence that cells exposed directly to ethanol show 1) impaired cell-cell adherence/communication, 2) decreased cellular mechanotransduction by the cytoskeleton, and 3) a suppressed hippo-YAP pathway. Suppression of hippo-YAP pathway signaling should be

  13. Ureteropelvic junction disease: diagnostic imaging.

    PubMed

    Maresca, Giulia; Maggi, Fabio; Valentini, Viola

    2002-01-01

    Ureteropelvic junction disease is very frequent in pediatric age. Diagnosis is usually established on sonography; in most cases it is prenatal and confirmed at birth. On sonography, hydronephrosis and the site of obstruction is identified with morphofunctional information on renal parenchyma. In the past, urography was the reference examination for ureteropelvic junction disease, but its use is limited in pediatrics especially in prenatal study for radioprotection as well as for the limited glomerular filtration of neonatal kidney. CT and MRI as second level examinations do not find many indications, while angioscintigraphy is largely used to acquire functional data and, in combination with sonography, is basic for diagnosis as well as in follow-up of operated patients. PMID:12696256

  14. Gap junctions as electrical synapses.

    PubMed

    Bennett, M V

    1997-06-01

    Gap junctions are the morphological substrate of one class of electrical synapse. The history of the debate on electrical vs. chemical transmission is instructive. One lesson is that Occam's razor sometimes cuts too deep; the nervous system does its operations in a number of different ways and a unitarian approach can lead one astray. Electrical synapses can do many things that chemical synapses can do, and do them just as slowly. More intriguing are the modulatory actions that chemical synapses can have on electrical synapses. Voltage dependence provides an important window on structure function relations of the connexins, even where the dependence may have no physiological role. The new molecular approaches will greatly advance our knowledge of where gap junctions occur and permit experimental manipulation with high specificity. PMID:9278865

  15. Josephson junctions and dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jetzer, Philippe; Straumann, Norbert

    2006-08-01

    In a recent paper Beck and Mackey [C. Beck, M.C. Mackey, astro-ph/0603397] argue that the argument we gave in our paper [Ph. Jetzer, N. Straumann, Phys. Lett. B 606 (2005) 77, astro-ph/0411034] to disprove their claim that dark energy can be discovered in the Lab through noise measurements of Josephson junctions is incorrect. In particular, they emphasize that the measured noise spectrum in Josephson junctions is a consequence of the fluctuation dissipation theorem, while our argument was based on equilibrium statistical mechanics. In this note we show that the fluctuation dissipation relation does not depend upon any shift of vacuum (zero-point) energies, and therefore, as already concluded in our previous paper, dark energy has nothing to do with the proposed measurements.

  16. Seebeck effect in molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Zimbovskaya, Natalya A

    2016-05-11

    Advances in the fabrication and characterization of nanoscale systems presently allow for a better understanding of their thermoelectric properties. As is known, the building blocks of thermoelectricity are the Peltier and Seebeck effects. In the present work we review results of theoretical studies of the Seebeck effect in single-molecule junctions and similar systems. The behavior of thermovoltage and thermopower in these systems is controlled by several factors including the geometry of molecular bridges, the characteristics of contacts between the bridge and the electrodes, the strength of the Coulomb interactions between electrons on the bridge, and of electron-phonon interactions. We describe the impact of these factors on the thermopower. Also, we discuss a nonlinear Seebeck effect in molecular junctions. PMID:27073108

  17. Seebeck effect in molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimbovskaya, Natalya A.

    2016-05-01

    Advances in the fabrication and characterization of nanoscale systems presently allow for a better understanding of their thermoelectric properties. As is known, the building blocks of thermoelectricity are the Peltier and Seebeck effects. In the present work we review results of theoretical studies of the Seebeck effect in single-molecule junctions and similar systems. The behavior of thermovoltage and thermopower in these systems is controlled by several factors including the geometry of molecular bridges, the characteristics of contacts between the bridge and the electrodes, the strength of the Coulomb interactions between electrons on the bridge, and of electron–phonon interactions. We describe the impact of these factors on the thermopower. Also, we discuss a nonlinear Seebeck effect in molecular junctions.

  18. Junctionally restricted RhoA activity is necessary for apical constriction during phase 2 inner ear placode invagination.

    PubMed

    Sai, Xiaorei; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Ladher, Raj K

    2014-10-15

    After induction, the inner ear is transformed from a superficially located otic placode into an epithelial vesicle embedded in the mesenchyme of the head. Invagination of this epithelium is biphasic: phase 1 involves the expansion of the basal aspect of the otic cells, and phase 2, the constriction of their apices. Apical constriction is important not only for otic invagination, but also the invagination of many other epithelia; however, its molecular basis is still poorly understood. Here we show that phase 2 otic morphogenesis, like phase 1 morphogenesis, results from the activation of myosin-II. However unlike the actin depolymerising activity observed basally, active myosin-II results in actomyosin contractility. Myosin-II activation is triggered by the accumulation of the planar cell polarity (PCP) core protein, Celsr1 in apical junctions (AJ). Apically polarized Celsr1 orients and recruits the Rho Guanine exchange factor (GEF) ArhGEF11 to apical junctions, thus restricting RhoA activity to the junctional membrane where it activates the Rho kinase ROCK. We suggest that myosin-II and RhoA activation results in actomyosin dependent constriction in an apically polarised manner driving otic epithelium invagination. PMID:25173873

  19. Thermoelectric efficiency of molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perroni, C. A.; Ninno, D.; Cataudella, V.

    2016-09-01

    Focus of the review is on experimental set-ups and theoretical proposals aimed to enhance thermoelectric performances of molecular junctions. In addition to charge conductance, the thermoelectric parameter commonly measured in these systems is the thermopower, which is typically rather low. We review recent experimental outcomes relative to several junction configurations used to optimize the thermopower. On the other hand, theoretical calculations provide estimations of all the thermoelectric parameters in the linear and non-linear regime, in particular of the thermoelectric figure of merit and efficiency, completing our knowledge of molecular thermoelectricity. For this reason, the review will mainly focus on theoretical studies analyzing the role of not only electronic, but also of the vibrational degrees of freedom. Theoretical results about thermoelectric phenomena in the coherent regime are reviewed focusing on interference effects which play a significant role in enhancing the figure of merit. Moreover, we review theoretical studies including the effects of molecular many-body interactions, such as electron–vibration couplings, which typically tend to reduce the efficiency. Since a fine tuning of many parameters and coupling strengths is required to optimize the thermoelectric conversion in molecular junctions, new theoretically proposed set-ups are discussed in the conclusions.

  20. Thermoelectric efficiency of molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Perroni, C A; Ninno, D; Cataudella, V

    2016-09-21

    Focus of the review is on experimental set-ups and theoretical proposals aimed to enhance thermoelectric performances of molecular junctions. In addition to charge conductance, the thermoelectric parameter commonly measured in these systems is the thermopower, which is typically rather low. We review recent experimental outcomes relative to several junction configurations used to optimize the thermopower. On the other hand, theoretical calculations provide estimations of all the thermoelectric parameters in the linear and non-linear regime, in particular of the thermoelectric figure of merit and efficiency, completing our knowledge of molecular thermoelectricity. For this reason, the review will mainly focus on theoretical studies analyzing the role of not only electronic, but also of the vibrational degrees of freedom. Theoretical results about thermoelectric phenomena in the coherent regime are reviewed focusing on interference effects which play a significant role in enhancing the figure of merit. Moreover, we review theoretical studies including the effects of molecular many-body interactions, such as electron-vibration couplings, which typically tend to reduce the efficiency. Since a fine tuning of many parameters and coupling strengths is required to optimize the thermoelectric conversion in molecular junctions, new theoretically proposed set-ups are discussed in the conclusions. PMID:27420149

  1. Lung tumorigenic interactions in strain A/J mice of five environmental polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed Central

    Nesnow, S; Mass, M J; Ross, J A; Galati, A J; Lambert, G R; Gennings, C; Carter, W H; Stoner, G D

    1998-01-01

    The binary, ternary, quaternary, and quintary interactions of a five-component mixture of carcinogenic environmental polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) using response surface analyses are described. Initially, lung tumor dose-response curves in strain A/J mice for each of the individual PAHs benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), benzo[b]fluoranthene (B[b]F), dibenz[a,h]anthracene (DBA), 5-methylchrysene (5MC), and cyclopenta[cd]pyrene (CPP) were obtained. From these data, doses were selected for the quintary mixture study based on toxicity, survival, range of response, and predicted tumor yields. The ratios of doses among PAHs were designed to simulate PAH ratios found in environmental air and combustion samples. Quintary mixtures of B[a]P, B[b]F, DBA, 5MC, and CPP were administered to male strain A/J mice in a 2(5) factorial 32-dose group dosing scheme (combinations of five PAHs each at either high or low doses) and lung adenomas were scored. Comparison of observed lung adenoma formation with that expected from additivity identified both greater than additive and less than additive interactions that were dose related i.e., greater than additive at lower doses and less than additive at higher doses. To identify specific interactions, a response surface analysis using response addition was applied to the tumor data. This response surface model contained five dose, ten binary, ten ternary, five quaternary, and one quintary parameter. This analysis produced statistically significant values of 16 parameters. The model and model parameters were evaluated by estimating the dose-response relationships for each of the five PAHs. The predicted dose-response curves for all five PAHs indicated a good estimation. The binary interaction functions were dominated for the most part by DBA and were inhibitory. The response surface model predicted, to a significant degree, the observed lung tumorigenic responses of the quintary mixtures. These data suggest that although interactions between

  2. Idiotypic manipulation in mice: BALB/c mice can express the crossreactive idiotype of A/J mice.

    PubMed Central

    Moser, M; Leo, O; Hiernaux, J; Urbain, J

    1983-01-01

    The response of A/J mice to arsonate-coupled keyhole limpet hemocyanin is characterized by a crossreactive idiotype (CRIA). CRIA+ antibodies are restricted to the Igh-Ic haplotype and are never expressed in BALB/c mice after immunization with antigen. Studies at the DNA level suggest that the gene encoding the CRIA heavy chain in A/J mice is probably absent in the genome of BALB/c mice. Despite this, using the immunization cascade tool, we have been able to induce the expression of CRIA+ antibodies in BALB/c mice. These studies led to an apparent paradox, whose understanding will provide new insights into the regulatory mechanisms of the immune system. We suggest that clones secreting CRIA-like Igs in BALB/c mice are "somatic variants" that could arise from gene conversion events. PMID:6576348

  3. String junction as a baryonic constituent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalashnikova, Yu. S.; Nefediev, A. V.

    1996-02-01

    We extend the model for QCD string with quarks to consider the Mercedes Benz string configuration describing the three-quark baryon. Under the assumption of adiabatic separation of quark and string junction motion we formulate and solve the classical equation of motion for the junction. We dare to quantize the motion of the junction, and discuss the impact of these modes on the baryon spectra.

  4. A/J and C57BL/6J mice differ in chorda tympani responses to NaCl

    PubMed Central

    Cherukuri, Chandra M.; Bachmanov, Alexander A.; McCaughey, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms of sodium taste transduction are not completely understood, especially those responsible for the portion of NaCl’s taste in rodents that is not blocked by amiloride. As a prelude to conducting genetic analyses of peripheral NaCl taste responsiveness, we performed multiunit electrophysiological recordings from the chorda tympani (CT) nerve in C57BL/6J (B6) and A/J mice. Mice were anesthetized, the CT was accessed, and taste solutions were flowed over the tongue in order to measure the integrated whole-nerve response. NaCl was delivered before and during application of 100 μM amiloride. Pre-amiloride responses were significantly larger in A/J than B6 mice for 1–8 mM NaCl. Responses to NaCl were suppressed significantly by amiloride in both strains and to similar degrees. However, the size of the amiloride-insensitive NaCl response component was significantly larger in A/J mice than in B6 mice for NaCl at 2–16 mM. These data help to explain the prior observation that the strains differ in behavioral taste thresholds for NaCl. Specifically, the results suggest that perception of sodium-specific taste by mice depends on the ratio of amiloride-sensitive and -insensitive responses in the CT, rather than on the absolute level of the whole-nerve response to NaCl or on the size of the amiloride-sensitive component alone. Because the B6 and A/J mice differed in the size of their amiloride-insensitive components, they may prove useful in future genetic work designed to characterize the underlying transduction mechanisms. PMID:23458904

  5. PATJ, a Tight Junction-Associated PDZ Protein, Is a Novel Degradation Target of High-Risk Human Papillomavirus E6 and the Alternatively Spliced Isoform 18 E6*▿

    PubMed Central

    Storrs, Carina H.; Silverstein, Saul J.

    2007-01-01

    The E6 protein from high-risk human papillomavirus types interacts with and degrades several PDZ domain-containing proteins that localize to adherens junctions or tight junctions in polarized epithelial cells. We have identified the tight junction-associated multi-PDZ protein PATJ (PALS1-associated TJ protein) as a novel binding partner and degradation target of high-risk types 16 and 18 E6. PATJ functions in the assembly of the evolutionarily conserved CRB-PALS1-PATJ and Par6-aPKC-Par3 complexes and is critical for the formation of tight junctions in polarized cells. The ability of type 18 E6 full-length to bind to, and the subsequent degradation of, PATJ is dependent on its C-terminal PDZ binding motif. We demonstrate that the spliced 18 E6* protein, which lacks a C-terminal PDZ binding motif, associates with and degrades PATJ independently of full-length 18 E6. Thus, PATJ is the first binding partner that is degraded in response to both isoforms of 18 E6. The ability of E6 to utilize a non-E6AP ubiquitin ligase for the degradation of several PDZ binding partners has been suggested. We also demonstrate that 18 E6-mediated degradation of PATJ is not inhibited in cells where E6AP is silenced by shRNA. This suggests that the E6-E6AP complex is not required for the degradation of this protein target. PMID:17287269

  6. String junctions and holographic interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Chiodaroli, Marco; Gutperle, Michael; Hung, Ling-Yan; Krym, Darya

    2011-01-15

    In this paper we study half-BPS type IIB supergravity solutions with multiple AdS{sub 3}xS{sup 3}xM{sub 4} asymptotic regions, where M{sub 4} is either T{sup 4} or K{sub 3}. These solutions were first constructed in [M. Chiodaroli, M. Gutperle, and D. Krym, J. High Energy Phys. 02 (2010) 066.] and have geometries given by the warped product of AdS{sub 2}xS{sup 2}xM{sub 4} over {Sigma}, where {Sigma} is a Riemann surface. We show that the holographic boundary has the structure of a star graph, i.e. n half-lines joined at a point. The attractor mechanism and the relation of the solutions to junctions of self-dual strings in six-dimensional supergravity are discussed. The solutions of [M. Chiodaroli, M. Gutperle, and D. Krym, J. High Energy Phys. 02 (2010) 066.] are constructed introducing two meromorphic and two harmonic functions defined on {Sigma}. We focus our analysis on solutions corresponding to junctions of three different conformal field theories and show that the conditions for having a solution charged only under Ramond-Ramond three-form fields reduce to relations involving the positions of the poles and the residues of the relevant harmonic and meromorphic functions. The degeneration limit in which some of the poles collide is analyzed in detail. Finally, we calculate the holographic boundary entropy for a junction of three CFTs and obtain a simple expression in terms of poles and residues.

  7. Thermoelectric effects in nanoscale junctions.

    PubMed

    Dubi, Yonatan; Di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2009-01-01

    Despite its intrinsic nonequilibrium origin, thermoelectricity in nanoscale systems is usually described within a static scattering approach which disregards the dynamical interaction with the thermal baths that maintain energy flow. Using the theory of open quantum systems, we show instead that unexpected properties, such as a resonant structure and large sign sensitivity, emerge if the nonequilibrium nature of this problem is considered. Our approach also allows us to define and study a local temperature, which shows hot spots and oscillations along the system according to the coupling of the latter to the electrodes. This demonstrates that Fourier's lawa paradigm of statistical mechanicsis generally violated in nanoscale junctions. PMID:19072125

  8. Method for shallow junction formation

    DOEpatents

    Weiner, Kurt H.

    1996-01-01

    A doping sequence that reduces the cost and complexity of forming source/drain regions in complementary metal oxide silicon (CMOS) integrated circuit technologies. The process combines the use of patterned excimer laser annealing, dopant-saturated spin-on glass, silicide contact structures and interference effects creates by thin dielectric layers to produce source and drain junctions that are ultrashallow in depth but exhibit low sheet and contact resistance. The process utilizes no photolithography and can be achieved without the use of expensive vacuum equipment. The process margins are wide, and yield loss due to contact of the ultrashallow dopants is eliminated.

  9. Method for shallow junction formation

    DOEpatents

    Weiner, K.H.

    1996-10-29

    A doping sequence is disclosed that reduces the cost and complexity of forming source/drain regions in complementary metal oxide silicon (CMOS) integrated circuit technologies. The process combines the use of patterned excimer laser annealing, dopant-saturated spin-on glass, silicide contact structures and interference effects creates by thin dielectric layers to produce source and drain junctions that are ultrashallow in depth but exhibit low sheet and contact resistance. The process utilizes no photolithography and can be achieved without the use of expensive vacuum equipment. The process margins are wide, and yield loss due to contact of the ultrashallow dopants is eliminated. 8 figs.

  10. An improved junction capacitance model for junction field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Hao; Liou, Juin J.; Cirba, Claude R.; Green, Keith

    2006-07-01

    A new junction capacitance model for the four-terminal junction field-effect transistor (JFET) is presented. With a single expression, the model, which is valid for different temperatures and a wide range of bias conditions, describes correctly the JFET junction capacitance behavior and capacitance drop-off phenomenon. The model has been verified using experimental data measured at Texas Instruments.

  11. The Sinai triple junction revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtillot, Vincent; Armijo, Rolando; Tapponnier, Paul

    1987-09-01

    This paper is a summary of a more detailed analysis of the kinematics of the Sinai triple junction (Courtillot et al., 1987). Accurate kinematic data are lacking along the Red Sea and they can be supplemented by bathymetric, topographic and geological data pertaining to the three arms of the entirely continental Sinai triple junction. Motions across the northern Red Sea and along the Gulf of Elat are an order of magnitude larger than across the Gulf of Suez. The direction of motion there remains a major uncertainty. A possible kinematic model is highlighted, in which right-lateral strike-slip motion and small pull-apart basins occur along the Gulf of Suez, in agreement with recent field observations in Egypt. Early Miocene is marked by major geodynamical changes all along the northern boundaries of the African and Indian plates. We suggest that rifting in the Arabian Sea, Gulf of Aden, Red Sea and Gulf of Suez was initiated at the end of the first phase of continental extrusion of Indochina, when the Tibetan plateau began to rise and spreading in the South China Sea came to a halt.

  12. Electron transport through molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimbovskaya, Natalya A.; Pederson, Mark R.

    2011-12-01

    At present, metal-molecular tunnel junctions are recognized as important active elements in molecular electronics. This gives a strong motivation to explore physical mechanisms controlling electron transport through molecules. In the last two decades, an unceasing progress in both experimental and theoretical studies of molecular conductance has been demonstrated. In the present work we give an overview of theoretical methods used to analyze the transport properties of metal-molecular junctions as well as some relevant experiments and applications. After a brief general description of the electron transport through molecules we introduce a Hamiltonian which can be used to analyze electron-electron, electron-phonon and spin-orbit interactions. Then we turn to description of the commonly used transport theory formalisms including the nonequilibrium Green’s functions based approach and the approach based on the “master” equations. We discuss the most important effects which could be manifested through molecules in electron transport phenomena such as Coulomb, spin and Frank-Condon blockades, Kondo peak in the molecular conductance, negative differential resistance and some others. Bearing in mind that first principles electronic structure calculations are recognized as the indispensable basis of the theory of electron transport through molecules, we briefly discuss the main equations and some relevant applications of the density functional theory which presently is often used to analyze important characteristics of molecules and molecular clusters. Finally, we discuss some kinds of nanoelectronic devices built using molecules and similar systems such as carbon nanotubes, various nanowires and quantum dots.

  13. Magnetoresistance in Boron Carbide junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Ellen; Sokolov, A.; Baruth, A.; Robertson, B. W.; Adenwalla, S.

    2007-03-01

    The properties of thin insulator layers are crucial to the performance of magnetic tunnel junctions. Commercial requirements are a device with a high tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) with low cost and high stability. At present the vast majority of barriers are made from amorphous Al2O3 and crystalline MgO. The TMR value depends not only on the spin-dependent electronic structure of the electrodes, but on the metal-insulator interface. Oxide-type barriers may suffer from local vacancies and other type of defects, resulting in oxygen diffusion, making the TMR value unstable with time. We present TMR results obtained on a non-oxide barrier, boron carbide (B10C2) for applications in magnetic tunnel junctions. This low Z inorganic material can be grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) without pinholes in the ultra thin film regime. PECVD grown boron carbide is an excellent dielectric with resistivities in the range of 10^7 ohm-cm, with a band gap that can be adjusted from 0.7 eV to 1.9 eV by altering the boron to carbon ratio and to band gap values well above 2.7 eV by adding phosphorus. This creates a unique opportunity for experimental study of a broad spectrum of phenomena, related to the dielectric properties of the barrier.

  14. Solar Cells With Multiple Small Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daud, T.; Koliwad, K. M.

    1985-01-01

    Concept for improving efficiency of photovoltaic solar cells based on decreasing p/n junction area in relation to total surface area of cell. Because of reduced junction area, surface leakage drops and saturation current density decreases. Surface passivation helps to ensure short-circuit current remains at high value and response of cells to blue light increases.

  15. Zipper and freeway shear zone junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passchier, Cees; Platt, John

    2016-04-01

    Ductile shear zones are usually presented as isolated planar high-strain domains in a less deformed wall rock, characterised by shear sense indicators such as characteristic deflected foliation traces. Many shear zones, however, form branched systems and if movement on such branches is contemporaneous, the resulting geometry can be complicated and lead to unusual fabric geometries in the wall rock. For Y-shaped shear zone junctions with three simultaneously operating branches, and with slip directions at a high angle to the branch line, eight basic types of shear zone triple junctions are possible, divided into three groups. The simplest type, called freeway junctions, have similar shear sense on all three branches. If shear sense is different on the three branches, this can lead to space problems. Some of these junctions have shear zone branches that join to form a single branch, named zipper junctions, or a single shear zone which splits to form two, known as wedge junctions. Closing zipper junctions are most unusual, since they form a non-active high-strain zone with opposite deflection of foliations. Shear zipper and shear wedge junctions have two shear zones with similar shear sense, and one with the opposite sense. All categories of shear zone junctions show characteristic flow patterns in the shear zone and its wall rock. Shear zone junctions with slip directions normal to the branch line can easily be studied, since ideal sections of shear sense indicators lie in the plane normal to the shear zone branches and the branch line. Expanding the model to allow slip oblique and parallel to the branch line in a full 3D setting gives rise to a large number of geometries in three main groups. Slip directions can be parallel on all branches but oblique to the branch line: two slip directions can be parallel and a third oblique, or all three branches can have slip in different directions. Such more complex shear zone junctions cannot be studied to advantage in a

  16. Design of immobile nucleic acid junctions.

    PubMed Central

    Seeman, N C; Kallenbach, N R

    1983-01-01

    Nucleic acids that interact to generate structures in which three or more double helices emanate from a single point are said to form a junction. Such structures arise naturally as intermediates in DNA replication and recombination. It has been proposed that stable junctions can be created by synthesizing sets of oligonucleotides of defined sequence that can associate by maximizing Watson-Crick complementarity (Seeman N. C., 1981, Biomolecular Stereodynamics. Adenine Press, New York. 1: 269-278; Seeman, N. C., 1982, J. Theor. Biol. 99:237-247.) To make it possible to design molecules that will form junctions of specific architecture, we present here an efficient algorithm for generating nucleic acid sequences that optimize two fundamental properties: fidelity and stability. Fidelity refers to the relative probability of forming the junction complex relative to all alternative paired structures. Calculations are described that permit approximate prediction of the melting curves for junction complexes. PMID:6197102

  17. Macroscopic quantum tunneling in Josephson tunnel junctions and Coulomb blockade in single small tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Cleland, A.N.

    1991-04-01

    Experiments investigating the process of macroscopic quantum tunneling in a moderately-damped, resistively shunted, Josephson junction are described, followed by a discussion of experiments performed on very small capacitance normal-metal tunnel junctions. The experiments on the resistively-shunted Josephson junction were designed to investigate a quantum process, that of the tunneling of the Josephson phase variable under a potential barrier, in a system in which dissipation plays a major role in the dynamics of motion. All the parameters of the junction were measured using the classical phenomena of thermal activation and resonant activation. Theoretical predictions are compared with the experimental results, showing good agreement with no adjustable parameters; the tunneling rate in the moderately damped (Q {approx} 1) junction is seen to be reduced by a factor of 300 from that predicted for an undamped junction. The phase is seen to be a good quantum-mechanical variable. The experiments on small capacitance tunnel junctions extend the measurements on the larger-area Josephson junctions from the region in which the phase variable has a fairly well-defined value, i.e. its wavefunction has a narrow width, to the region where its value is almost completely unknown. The charge on the junction becomes well-defined and is predicted to quantize the current through the junction, giving rise to the Coulomb blockade at low bias. I present the first clear observation of the Coulomb blockade in single junctions. The electrical environment of the tunnel junction, however, strongly affects the behavior of the junction: higher resistance leads are observed to greatly sharpen the Coulomb blockade over that seen with lower resistance leads. I present theoretical descriptions of how the environment influences the junctions; comparisons with the experimental results are in reasonable agreement.

  18. Magnetic Fabrics and their Application to Basal Crevasse Fills, Flàajökull, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, W. R., Jr.; Hooyer, T.

    2014-12-01

    Long, linear features consisting of sediment and ice, approximately 100 m long and 20 cm wide, run transverse to the margin of Flàajökull, an outlet glacier of Vatnajökull Ice Cap. These features, interpreted as basal crevasse fills, are thought to have formed by debris and water injected into a void under pure tension or a combination of tension and shear in response to an ice pressure drop at the bed. The debris content of these basal crevasse fills are between 5 to 10% by volume. The formation of these basal crevasse fills is uncertain, because direct observation is difficult. To study these basal crevasse fills, we used the orientation of magnetic grains using anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) to guide us in understanding their kinematics. The AMS technique is superior over other fabric methods because a three-dimensional susceptibility ellipsoid is used to determine strain. We sampled two basal crevasse fills and obtained 86 ice core samples for AMS analyses. We also cut nine blocks of ice to determine the magnetic mineralogy, grain size of the magnetic carrier and c-axis orientation of the ice. The AMS results demonstrate that at one fill, the fabric was most likely formed by a combination of pure shear and simple shear. At the second site the AMS results were not well clustered possibly due to insufficient strain. Hysteresis and high temperature susceptibility tests indicate a magnetite carrier that was silt-sized or smaller. Thin sections used to evaluate c-axis fabrics display several multi-maximums that suggested that the fabric developed through recrystallization during deformation. It is inferred that grain scale processes reveal deformation by grain-boundary migration and grain nucleation. Magnetic particles appear to have behaved as passive markers following the March model (1932). Given this data set, we argue that the crevasse fills were formed by multiple processes including injection of turbid waters followed by in situ-freezing and

  19. G alpha12 interaction with alphaSNAP induces VE-cadherin localization at endothelial junctions and regulates barrier function.

    PubMed

    Andreeva, Alexandra V; Kutuzov, Mikhail A; Vaiskunaite, Rita; Profirovic, Jasmina; Meigs, Thomas E; Predescu, Sanda; Malik, Asrar B; Voyno-Yasenetskaya, Tatyana

    2005-08-26

    The involvement of heterotrimeric G proteins in the regulation of adherens junction function is unclear. We identified alphaSNAP as an interactive partner of G alpha12 using yeast two-hybrid screening. Glutathione S-transferase pull-down assays showed the selective interaction of alphaSNAP with G alpha12 in COS-7 as well as in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Using domain swapping experiments, we demonstrated that the N-terminal region of G alpha12 (1-37 amino acids) was necessary and sufficient for its interaction with alphaSNAP. G alpha13 with its N-terminal extension replaced by that of G alpha12 acquired the ability to bind to alphaSNAP, whereas G alpha12 with its N terminus replaced by that of G alpha13 lost this ability. Using four point mutants of alphaSNAP, which alter its ability to bind to the SNARE complex, we determined that the convex rather than the concave surface of alphaSNAP was involved in its interaction with G alpha12. Co-transfection of human umbilical vein endothelial cells with G alpha12 and alphaSNAP stabilized VE-cadherin at the plasma membrane, whereas down-regulation of alphaSNAP with siRNA resulted in the loss of VE-cadherin from the cell surface and, when used in conjunction with G alpha12 overexpression, decreased endothelial barrier function. Our results demonstrate a direct link between the alpha subunit of G12 and alphaSNAP, an essential component of the membrane fusion machinery, and implicate a role for this interaction in regulating the membrane localization of VE-cadherin and endothelial barrier function. PMID:15980433

  20. Electric field breakdown in single molecule junctions.

    PubMed

    Li, Haixing; Su, Timothy A; Zhang, Vivian; Steigerwald, Michael L; Nuckolls, Colin; Venkataraman, Latha

    2015-04-22

    Here we study the stability and rupture of molecular junctions under high voltage bias at the single molecule/single bond level using the scanning tunneling microscope-based break-junction technique. We synthesize carbon-, silicon-, and germanium-based molecular wires terminated by aurophilic linker groups and study how the molecular backbone and linker group affect the probability of voltage-induced junction rupture. First, we find that junctions formed with covalent S-Au bonds are robust under high voltage and their rupture does not demonstrate bias dependence within our bias range. In contrast, junctions formed through donor-acceptor bonds rupture more frequently, and their rupture probability demonstrates a strong bias dependence. Moreover, we find that the junction rupture probability increases significantly above ∼1 V in junctions formed from methylthiol-terminated disilanes and digermanes, indicating a voltage-induced rupture of individual Si-Si and Ge-Ge bonds. Finally, we compare the rupture probabilities of the thiol-terminated silane derivatives containing Si-Si, Si-C, and Si-O bonds and find that Si-C backbones have higher probabilities of sustaining the highest voltage. These results establish a new method for studying electric field breakdown phenomena at the single molecule level. PMID:25675085

  1. Electrostatic control of thermoelectricity in molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngsang; Jeong, Wonho; Kim, Kyeongtae; Lee, Woochul; Reddy, Pramod

    2014-11-01

    Molecular junctions hold significant promise for efficient and high-power-output thermoelectric energy conversion. Recent experiments have probed the thermoelectric properties of molecular junctions. However, electrostatic control of thermoelectric properties via a gate electrode has not been possible due to technical challenges in creating temperature differentials in three-terminal devices. Here, we show that extremely large temperature gradients (exceeding 1 × 10(9) K m(-1)) can be established in nanoscale gaps bridged by molecules, while simultaneously controlling their electronic structure via a gate electrode. Using this platform, we study prototypical Au-biphenyl-4,4'-dithiol-Au and Au-fullerene-Au junctions to demonstrate that the Seebeck coefficient and the electrical conductance of molecular junctions can be simultaneously increased by electrostatic control. Moreover, from our studies of fullerene junctions, we show that thermoelectric properties can be significantly enhanced when the dominant transport orbital is located close to the chemical potential (Fermi level) of the electrodes. These results illustrate the intimate relationship between the thermoelectric properties and charge transmission characteristics of molecular junctions and should enable systematic exploration of the recent computational predictions that promise extremely efficient thermoelectric energy conversion in molecular junctions. PMID:25282046

  2. Constraints on string networks with junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copeland, E. J.; Kibble, T. W. B.; Steer, D. A.

    2007-03-01

    We consider the constraints on string networks with junctions in which the strings may all be different, as may be found, for example, in a network of (p,q) cosmic superstrings. We concentrate on three aspects of junction dynamics. First we consider the propagation of small-amplitude waves across a static three-string junction. Then, generalizing our earlier work, we determine the kinematic constraints on two colliding strings with different tensions. As before, the important conclusion is that strings do not always reconnect with a third string; they can pass straight through one another (or in the case of non-Abelian strings become stuck in an X configuration), the constraint depending on the angle at which the strings meet, on their relative velocity, and on the ratios of the string tensions. For example, if the two colliding strings have equal tensions, then for ultrarelativistic initial velocities they pass through one another. However, if their tensions are sufficiently different they can reconnect. Finally, we consider the global properties of junctions and strings in a network. Assuming that, in a network, the incoming waves at a junction are independently randomly distributed, we determine the root-mean-square (r.m.s.) velocities of strings and calculate the average speed at which a junction moves along each of the three strings from which it is formed. Our findings suggest that junction dynamics may be such as to preferentially remove the heavy strings from the network leaving a network of predominantly light strings. Furthermore the r.m.s. velocity of strings in a network with junctions is smaller than 1/2, the result for conventional Nambu-Goto strings without junctions in Minkowski space-time.

  3. Constraints on string networks with junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, E. J.; Kibble, T. W. B.; Steer, D. A.

    2007-03-15

    We consider the constraints on string networks with junctions in which the strings may all be different, as may be found, for example, in a network of (p,q) cosmic superstrings. We concentrate on three aspects of junction dynamics. First we consider the propagation of small-amplitude waves across a static three-string junction. Then, generalizing our earlier work, we determine the kinematic constraints on two colliding strings with different tensions. As before, the important conclusion is that strings do not always reconnect with a third string; they can pass straight through one another (or in the case of non-Abelian strings become stuck in an X configuration), the constraint depending on the angle at which the strings meet, on their relative velocity, and on the ratios of the string tensions. For example, if the two colliding strings have equal tensions, then for ultrarelativistic initial velocities they pass through one another. However, if their tensions are sufficiently different they can reconnect. Finally, we consider the global properties of junctions and strings in a network. Assuming that, in a network, the incoming waves at a junction are independently randomly distributed, we determine the root-mean-square (r.m.s.) velocities of strings and calculate the average speed at which a junction moves along each of the three strings from which it is formed. Our findings suggest that junction dynamics may be such as to preferentially remove the heavy strings from the network leaving a network of predominantly light strings. Furthermore the r.m.s. velocity of strings in a network with junctions is smaller than 1/{radical}(2), the result for conventional Nambu-Goto strings without junctions in Minkowski space-time.

  4. Graded junction termination extensions for electronic devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrett, J. Neil (Inventor); Isaacs-Smith, Tamara (Inventor); Sheridan, David C. (Inventor); Williams, John R. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A graded junction termination extension in a silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor device and method of its fabrication using ion implementation techniques is provided for high power devices. The properties of silicon carbide (SiC) make this wide band gap semiconductor a promising material for high power devices. This potential is demonstrated in various devices such as p-n diodes, Schottky diodes, bipolar junction transistors, thyristors, etc. These devices require adequate and affordable termination techniques to reduce leakage current and increase breakdown voltage in order to maximize power handling capabilities. The graded junction termination extension disclosed is effective, self-aligned, and simplifies the implementation process.

  5. The myoendothelial junction: breaking through the matrix?

    PubMed Central

    Heberlein, Katherine; Straub, Adam; Isakson, Brant E

    2009-01-01

    Within the vasculature, specialized cellular extensions from endothelium (and sometimes smooth muscle) protrude through the extracellular matrix where they interact with the opposing cell type. These structures, termed myoendothelial junctions, have been cited as a possible key element in the control of several vascular physiologies and pathologies. This review will discuss observations that have led to a focus on the myoendothelial junction as a cellular integration point in the vasculature for both homeostatic and pathological conditions and as a possible independent signaling entity. We will also highlight the need for novel approaches to studying the myoendothelial junction in order to comprehend the cellular biology associated with this structure. PMID:19330678

  6. Temperature dependence of thermopower in molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youngsang; Lenert, Andrej; Meyhofer, Edgar; Reddy, Pramod

    2016-07-01

    The thermoelectric properties of molecular junctions are of considerable interest due to their promise for efficient energy conversion. While the dependence of thermoelectric properties of junctions on molecular structure has been recently studied, their temperature dependence remains unexplored. Using a custom built variable temperature scanning tunneling microscope, we measured the thermopower and electrical conductance of individual benzenedithiol junctions over a range of temperatures (100 K-300 K). We find that while the electrical conductance is independent of temperature, the thermopower increases linearly with temperature, confirming the predictions of the Landauer theory.

  7. Palladium electrodes for molecular tunnel junctions.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shuai; Sen, Suman; Zhang, Peiming; Gyarfas, Brett; Ashcroft, Brian; Lefkowitz, Steven; Peng, Hongbo; Lindsay, Stuart

    2012-10-26

    Gold has been the metal of choice for research on molecular tunneling junctions, but it is incompatible with complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor fabrication because it forms deep level traps in silicon. Palladium electrodes do not contaminate silicon, and also give higher tunnel current signals in the molecular tunnel junctions that we have studied. The result is cleaner signals in a recognition-tunneling junction that recognizes the four natural DNA bases as well as 5-methyl cytosine, with no spurious background signals. More than 75% of all the recorded signal peaks indicate the base correctly. PMID:23037952

  8. New Phenomena in Josephson SINIS Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, A. F.

    1995-06-01

    We analyze the dc and ac Josephson effects in SaINISb junctions in which an additional bias current flows in the N layer. The case of low temperatures and voltages \\(eV, T<<Δ\\) is considered in the dirty limit. We show that the critical Josephson current may change sign, and the considered SINIS junction may become a π junction if the voltage drop across the N/Sa interface exceeds a certain value \\(eVN>Δ/2\\). The ac Josephson effect may arise even if the current flows only through the N/Sa interface, whereas the current through the Sb/N interface is absent.

  9. Plasticity of single-atom Pb junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, M.; Salgado, C.; Néel, N.; Palacios, J. J.; Kröger, J.

    2016-06-01

    A low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope was used to fabricate atomic contacts on Pb(111). Conductance characteristics of the junctions were simultaneously recorded with forming and subsequent breaking of the contacts. A pronounced hysteresis effect in conductance traces was observed from junctions comprising the clean Pb(111) surface. The hysteretic behavior was less profound in contacts to single Pb atoms adsorbed to Pb(111). Density-functional calculations reproduced the experimental results by performing a full ab initio modeling of plastic junction deformations. A comprehensive description of the experimental findings was achieved by considering different atomic tip apex geometries.

  10. Graded junction termination extensions for electronic devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrett, J. Neil (Inventor); Isaacs-Smith, Tamara (Inventor); Sheridan, David C. (Inventor); Williams, John R. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A graded junction termination extension in a silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor device and method of its fabrication using ion implementation techniques is provided for high power devices. The properties of silicon carbide (SiC) make this wide band gap semiconductor a promising material for high power devices. This potential is demonstrated in various devices such as p-n diodes, Schottky diodes, bipolar junction transistors, thyristors, etc. These devices require adequate and affordable termination techniques to reduce leakage current and increase breakdown voltage in order to maximize power handling capabilities. The graded junction termination extension disclosed is effective, self-aligned, and simplifies the implementation process.

  11. C57BL/6 and A/J Mice Have Different Inflammatory Response and Liver Lipid Profile in Experimental Alcoholic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bavia, Lorena; de Castro, Íris Arantes; Isaac, Lourdes

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is an important worldwide public health issue characterized by liver steatosis, inflammation, necrosis, and apoptosis of hepatocytes with eventual development of fibrosis and cirrhosis. Comparison of murine models with different inflammatory responses for ALD is important for an evaluation of the importance of genetic background in the interpretation of ethanol-induced phenotypes. Here, we investigated the role of inflammation and genetic background for the establishment of ALD using two different mouse strains: C57BL/6 (B6) and A/J. B6 and A/J mice were treated with a high fat diet containing ethanol (HFDE) and compared to the controls for 10 weeks. Hepatomegaly and steatohepatitis were similar in B6 and A/J mice, but only A/J mice were resistant to weight gain. On the other hand, HFDE-fed B6 accumulated more triglycerides (TG) and cholesterol and presented more intense cellular infiltrate in the liver when compared to HFDM-fed mice. Liver inflammatory environment was distinct in these two mouse strains. While HFDE-fed B6 produced more liver IL-12, A/J mice increased the TNF-α production. We concluded that mouse genetic background could dictate the intensity of the HFDE-induced liver injury. PMID:26448681

  12. Comparative pulmonary carcinogenicity of inhaled beryllium A/J and C3H/HeJ mice

    SciTech Connect

    Nikula, K.J.; Belinsky, S.A.; Hoover, M.D.; Finch, G.L.

    1994-11-01

    The purpose of these investigations was to compare the pulomonary carcinogenicity of beryllium (Be) metal in A/J and C3H/HeJ mice, strains which are sensitive and resistant, respectively, to pulmonary neoplasia. Lesions in these mice will be used to study the molecular mechanisms of Be-induced carcinogenesis. Be, a metal that is generally negative in short-term genotoxicity assays, is a potent pulmonary carcinogen in F344/N rats. Although the epidemiological evidence is weak, Be is classified as a suspect human carcinogen.

  13. Wear Protection of AJ62 Mg Engine Blocks using Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng

    2011-12-01

    In order to reduce the fuel consumption and pollution, automotive companies are developing magnesium-intensive components. However, due to the low wear resistance of the magnesium (Mg) alloys, Mg cylinder bores are vulnerable to the sliding wear attack. In this thesis, two approaches were used to protect the cylinder bores, made of a new developed Mg engine alloy AJ62 (MgA16Mn0.34Sr2). The first one was to use a Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation (PEO) process to produce oxide coatings on the Mg bores. The wear properties of the PEO coatings were evaluated by sliding wear tests under the boundary lubrication condition at the room and elevated temperatures. It was found that due to the substrate softening and the vaporization loss of the lubricant, the tribological properties of the PEO coatings were deteriorated at the elevated temperature. In order to optimize the PEO process, a statistical method (Response surface method) was used to analyze the effects of the 4 main PEO process parameters with 2 levels for each and their interactions on the tribological properties of the PEO coatings at the room and elevated temperatures, individually. A cylinder liner made of an economical metal-matrix composite (MMC) was another approach to improve the wear resistance of the Mg cylinder bore. In this thesis, an A1383/SiO2 MMC was designed to replace the expensive Alusil alloy used in the BMW Mg/Al composite engine to build the cylinder liner. To further increase the wear resistance of the MMC, PEO process was also used to form an oxide coating on the MMC. The effects of the SiO 2 content and coating thickness on the tribological properties of the MMC were studied. To evaluate the wear properties of the optimal PEO coated Mg coupons and the MMC with the oxide coatings, Alusil and cast iron, currently used on the cylinder bores of the commercial aluminum engines, were used as reference materials. The optimal PEO coated Mg coupons and the oxidized MMC showed their advantages over the

  14. Tunnel junction multiple wavelength light-emitting diodes

    DOEpatents

    Olson, J.M.; Kurtz, S.R.

    1992-11-24

    A multiple wavelength LED having a monolithic cascade cell structure comprising at least two p-n junctions, wherein each of said at least two p-n junctions have substantially different band gaps, and electrical connector means by which said at least two p-n junctions may be collectively energized; and wherein said diode comprises a tunnel junction or interconnect. 5 figs.

  15. Tunnel junction multiple wavelength light-emitting diodes

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Jerry M.; Kurtz, Sarah R.

    1992-01-01

    A multiple wavelength LED having a monolithic cascade cell structure comprising at least two p-n junctions, wherein each of said at least two p-n junctions have substantially different band gaps, and electrical connector means by which said at least two p-n junctions may be collectively energized; and wherein said diode comprises a tunnel junction or interconnect.

  16. Ferromagnetic planar Josephson junction with transparent interfaces: a φ junction proposal.

    PubMed

    Heim, D M; Pugach, N G; Kupriyanov, M Yu; Goldobin, E; Koelle, D; Kleiner, R

    2013-05-29

    We calculate the current-phase relation of a planar Josephson junction with a ferromagnetic weak link located on top of a thin normal metal film. Following experimental observations we assume transparent superconductor-ferromagnet interfaces. This provides the best interlayer coupling and a low suppression of the superconducting correlations penetrating from the superconducting electrodes into the ferromagnetic layer. We show that this Josephson junction is a promising candidate for experimental φ junction realization. PMID:23636963

  17. Gravitational wave bursts from cosmic superstrings with Y-junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Binetruy, P.; Bohe, A.; Hertog, T.; Steer, D. A.

    2009-12-15

    Cosmic superstring loops generically contain strings of different tensions that meet at Y-junctions. These loops evolve nonperiodically in time, and have cusps and kinks that interact with the junctions. We study the effect of junctions on the gravitational wave signal emanating from cosmic string cusps and kinks. We find that earlier results on the strength of individual bursts from cusps and kinks on strings without junctions remain largely unchanged, but junctions give rise to additional contributions to the gravitational wave signal coming from strings expanding at the speed of light at a junction and kinks passing through a junction.

  18. Molecular junctions: Single-molecule contacts exposed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, Richard J.; Higgins, Simon J.

    2015-05-01

    Using a scanning tunnelling microscopy-based method it is now possible to get an atomistic-level description of the most probable binding and contact configuration for single-molecule electrical junctions.

  19. Computing Scattering Characteristics Of Waveguide Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppe, Daniel J.; Manshadi, Farzin

    1994-01-01

    Rectangular WaveGuide Junction SCATtering RWGSCAT computer program solves scattering properties of waveguide device. Modeled as assembly of rectangular waveguides of different cross sections. RWGSCAT written in FORTRAN 77.

  20. Chirality effect in disordered graphene ribbon junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Wen

    2012-05-01

    We investigate the influence of edge chirality on the electronic transport in clean or disordered graphene ribbon junctions. By using the tight-binding model and the Landauer-Büttiker formalism, the junction conductance is obtained. In the clean sample, the zero-magnetic-field junction conductance is strongly chirality-dependent in both unipolar and bipolar ribbons, whereas the high-magnetic-field conductance is either chirality-independent in the unipolar or chirality-dependent in the bipolar ribbon. Furthermore, we study the disordered sample in the presence of magnetic field and find that the junction conductance is always chirality-insensitive for both unipolar and bipolar ribbons with adequate disorders. In addition, the disorder-induced conductance plateaus can exist in all chiral bipolar ribbons provided the disorder strength is moderate. These results suggest that we can neglect the effect of edge chirality in fabricating electronic devices based on the magnetotransport in a disordered graphene ribbon.

  1. Adrenocortical Gap Junctions and Their Functions

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Cheryl L.; Murray, Sandra A.

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal cortical steroidogenesis and proliferation are thought to be modulated by gap junction-mediated direct cell–cell communication of regulatory molecules between cells. Such communication is regulated by the number of gap junction channels between contacting cells, the rate at which information flows between these channels, and the rate of channel turnover. Knowledge of the factors regulating gap junction-mediated communication and the turnover process are critical to an understanding of adrenal cortical cell functions, including development, hormonal response to adrenocorticotropin, and neoplastic dedifferentiation. Here, we review what is known about gap junctions in the adrenal gland, with particular attention to their role in adrenocortical cell steroidogenesis and proliferation. Information and insight gained from electrophysiological, molecular biological, and imaging (immunocytochemical, freeze fracture, transmission electron microscopic, and live cell) techniques will be provided. PMID:27445985

  2. Current trends in salivary gland tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Baker, Olga J

    2016-01-01

    Tight junctions form a continuous intercellular barrier between epithelial cells that is required to separate tissue spaces and regulate selective movement of solutes across the epithelium. They are composed of strands containing integral membrane proteins (e.g., claudins, occludin and tricellulin, junctional adhesion molecules and the coxsackie adenovirus receptor). These proteins are anchored to the cytoskeleton via scaffolding proteins such as ZO-1 and ZO-2. In salivary glands, tight junctions are involved in polarized saliva secretion and barrier maintenance between the extracellular environment and the glandular lumen. This review seeks to provide an overview of what is currently known, as well as the major questions and future research directions, regarding tight junction expression, organization and function within salivary glands. PMID:27583188

  3. Local Frame Junction Trees in SLAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehnel, Frank O.

    2005-11-01

    Junction trees (JT) is a general purpose tool for exact inference on graphical models. Many of the existing algorithms for building junction trees require a fixed static graphical model. The construction process is not unique, finding the one with the best computational structure (smallest clique size) is also a hard problem. For large scale inference problems, such as Geo-referencing using triangular geodetic networks or equivalent, the simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) problem in robotics pose some challenges to junction tree applications. Incremental junction tree techniques for dynamic graphical models prescribe heuristic methods for growing the tree structure, and are applicable to large scale graphical models. Of concern are the proliferative widening of the tree, which makes message passing expensive. In the context of SLAM we present a new apporach that exploits the local frame dependence of novel observation variables.

  4. Superconducting switch made of graphene nanoribbon junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Qifeng; Dong, Jinming

    2008-09-01

    The transmission of superconductor-graphene nanoribbon-superconductor junctions (SGS) has been studied by the non-equilibrium Green's function method. It is found that the on-site potential U in the center zigzag graphene nanoribbon (ZGNR) of the SGS junction plays an important role in the magnitude of the supercurrent Ic. As the effective Fermi energy μeff (μeff = μF-U) goes from negative to positive, the SGS junction would suddenly transform from an 'OFF' state to an 'ON' state. And, as μeff increases further, the Ic will continue to increase. This switching behavior of the SGS junction shares the same origin with the zigzag GNR valley-isospin valve (Rycerz et al 2007 Nat. Phys. 3 172). Besides the valley-isospin, the density of states will also have an effect on the suppression of Ic.

  5. Electrochemical control of a DNA Holliday Junction nanoswitch by Mg2+ ions.

    PubMed

    Ferapontova, E E; Mountford, C P; Crain, J; Buck, A H; Dickinson, P; Beattie, J S; Ghazal, P; Terry, J G; Walton, A J; Mount, A R

    2008-11-15

    The molecular conformation of a synthetic branched, 4-way DNA Holliday junction (HJ) was electrochemically switched between the open and closed (stacked) conformers. Switching was achieved by electrochemically induced quantitative release of Mg(2+) ions from the oxidised poly(N-methylpyrrole) film (PPy), which contained polyacrylate as an immobile counter anion and Mg(2+) ions as charge compensating mobile cations. This increase in the Mg(2+) concentration screened the electrostatic repulsion between the widely separated arms in the open HJ configuration, inducing switching to the closed conformation. Upon electrochemical reduction of PPy, entrapment of Mg(2+) ions back into the PPy film induced the reverse HJ switching from the closed to open state. The conformational transition was monitored using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between donor and acceptor dyes each located at the terminus of one of the arms. The demonstrated electrochemical control of the conformation of the used probe-target HJ complex, previously reported as a highly sequence specific nanodevice for detecting of unlabelled target [Buck, A.H., Campbell, C.J., Dickinson, P., Mountford, C.P., Stoquert, H.C., Terry, J.G., Evans, S.A.G., Keane, L., Su, T.J., Mount, A.R., Walton, A.J., Beattie, J.S., Crain, J., Ghazal, P., 2007. Anal. Chem., 79, 4724-4728], allows the development of electronically addressable DNA nanodevices and label-free gene detection assays. PMID:18541422

  6. Junction Plasmon-Induced Molecular Reorientation

    SciTech Connect

    El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Hu, Dehong; Hess, Wayne P.

    2013-10-17

    Time and frequency dependent intensity variations in sequences of Raman spectra recorded at plasmonic junctions can be assigned to molecular reorientation. This is revealed through Raman trajectories recorded at a nanojunction formed between a silver AFM tip and a corrugated silver surface coated with biphenyl-4,4’-dithiol. Molecular motion is not observed when the tip is retracted and only surface enhancement is operative. In effect, junction plasmon induced molecular reorientation is tracked.

  7. Spectroscopy Measurements of Magnesium Diboride Josephson Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlack, J. T.; Lambert, J. G.; Carabello, S. A.; Thrailkill, Z. E.; Galwaduge, P. T.; Ramos, R. C.

    2010-03-01

    MgB2 has the highest Tc of the conventional superconductors at 39K and exhibits two superconducting energy bands. This material is also inexpensive to produce and has been utilized in new designs for MRI, RF cavities, and Josephson junctions. We report results of recent spectroscopy and transport measurements of Josephson junctions made of MgB2 obtained from our collaborators. We investigate its transport characteristics at sub-kelvin temperatures as well as its responses to resonant microwave activation.

  8. Semiconductor tunnel junction with enhancement layer

    DOEpatents

    Klem, J.F.; Zolper, J.C.

    1997-10-21

    The incorporation of a pseudomorphic GaAsSb layer in a runnel diode structure affords a new degree of freedom in designing runnel junctions for p-n junction device interconnects. Previously only doping levels could be varied to control the tunneling properties. This invention uses the valence band alignment band of the GaAsSb with respect to the surrounding materials to greatly relax the doping requirements for tunneling. 5 figs.

  9. Quantum Coherence in a Superfluid Josephson Junction

    SciTech Connect

    Narayana, Supradeep; Sato, Yuki

    2011-02-04

    We report a new kind of experiment in which we take an array of nanoscale apertures that form a superfluid {sup 4}He Josephson junction and apply quantum phase gradients directly along the array. We observe collective coherent behaviors from aperture elements, leading to quantum interference. Connections to superconducting and Bose-Einstein condensate Josephson junctions as well as phase coherence among the superfluid aperture array are discussed.

  10. Semiconductor tunnel junction with enhancement layer

    DOEpatents

    Klem, John F.; Zolper, John C.

    1997-01-01

    The incorporation of a pseudomorphic GaAsSb layer in a runnel diode structure affords a new degree of freedom in designing runnel junctions for p-n junction device interconnects. Previously only doping levels could be varied to control the tunneling properties. This invention uses the valence band alignment band of the GaAsSb with respect to the surrounding materials to greatly relax the doping requirements for tunneling.

  11. Supercurrent switch in graphene pi junctions.

    PubMed

    Linder, Jacob; Yokoyama, Takehito; Huertas-Hernando, Daniel; Sudbø, Asle

    2008-05-01

    We study the supercurrent in a superconductor/ferromagnet/superconductor graphene junction. In contrast to its metallic counterpart, the oscillating critical current in our setup decays only weakly upon increasing the exchange field and junction width. We find an unusually large residual value of the supercurrent at the oscillatory cusps due to a strong deviation from a sinusoidal current-phase relationship. Our findings suggest a very efficient device for dissipationless supercurrent switching. PMID:18518411

  12. Supercurrent Switch in Graphene π Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linder, Jacob; Yokoyama, Takehito; Huertas-Hernando, Daniel; Sudbø, Asle

    2008-05-01

    We study the supercurrent in a superconductor/ferromagnet/superconductor graphene junction. In contrast to its metallic counterpart, the oscillating critical current in our setup decays only weakly upon increasing the exchange field and junction width. We find an unusually large residual value of the supercurrent at the oscillatory cusps due to a strong deviation from a sinusoidal current-phase relationship. Our findings suggest a very efficient device for dissipationless supercurrent switching.

  13. Shalbatana/Simud Vallis Junction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The sinuous channels and streamlined islands at the junction of Shalbatana and Simud Vallis present an erosional history of the catastrophic floods that scoured the Martian surface hundreds of millions of years ago.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 16, Longitude 317.4 East (42.6 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

  14. Black diamonds at brane junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamblin, Andrew; Csáki, Csaba; Erlich, Joshua; Hollowood, Timothy J.

    2000-08-01

    We discuss the properties of black holes in brane-world scenarios where our Universe is viewed as a four-dimensional sub-manifold of some higher-dimensional spacetime. We consider in detail such a model where four-dimensional spacetime lies at the junction of several domain walls in a higher dimensional anti-de Sitter spacetime. In this model there may be any number p of infinitely large extra dimensions transverse to the brane-world. We present an exact solution describing a black p-brane which will induce on the brane-world the Schwarzschild solution. This exact solution is unstable to the Gregory-Laflamme instability, whereby long-wavelength perturbations cause the extended horizon to fragment. We therefore argue that at late times a non-rotating uncharged black hole in the brane-world is described by a deformed event horizon in p+4 dimensions which will induce, to good approximation, the Schwarzschild solution in the four-dimensional brane world. When p=2, this deformed horizon resembles a black diamond and more generally for p>2, a polyhedron.

  15. Black diamonds at brane junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Chamblin, Andrew; Csaki, Csaba; Erlich, Joshua; Hollowood, Timothy J.; Department of Physics, University of Wales Swansea, Swansea, SA2 8PP,

    2000-08-15

    We discuss the properties of black holes in brane-world scenarios where our Universe is viewed as a four-dimensional sub-manifold of some higher-dimensional spacetime. We consider in detail such a model where four-dimensional spacetime lies at the junction of several domain walls in a higher dimensional anti-de Sitter spacetime. In this model there may be any number p of infinitely large extra dimensions transverse to the brane-world. We present an exact solution describing a black p-brane which will induce on the brane-world the Schwarzschild solution. This exact solution is unstable to the Gregory-Laflamme instability, whereby long-wavelength perturbations cause the extended horizon to fragment. We therefore argue that at late times a non-rotating uncharged black hole in the brane-world is described by a deformed event horizon in p+4 dimensions which will induce, to good approximation, the Schwarzschild solution in the four-dimensional brane world. When p=2, this deformed horizon resembles a black diamond and more generally for p>2, a polyhedron. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  16. Hydrogen peroxide-mediated dealkylation of 7-ethoxycoumarin by cytochrome P450 (CYP107AJ1) from Streptomyces peucetius ATCC27952.

    PubMed

    Niraula, Narayan Prasad; Kanth, Bashistha Kumar; Sohng, Jae Kyung; Oh, Tae-Jin

    2011-02-01

    Cytochrome P450 CYP107AJ1, which was isolated from Streptomyces peucetius and showed high homology with peroxygenases, catalyzed a dealkylation reaction with hydrogen peroxide to provide electrons, protons and oxygen, evading the requirement for a supporting redox protein. Preliminary investigation of its transcriptional level in S. peucetius showed significant expression. Homology modeling and subsequent docking with 7-ethoxycoumarin yielded a reasonable docked structure. cyp107AJ1 cloned into pET28a(+) was expressed in Escherichia coli, and soluble protein was subjected to column-chromatographic purification in order to carry out enzyme assays with 7-ethoxycoumarin. HPLC analysis of the extracted product, corresponding to its LC/MS analysis, showed the dealkylated 7-ethoxycoumarin, which was further established by subsequent GC/MS spectral analysis. We suggest that CYP107AJ1 bypassed the requirement for NAD(P)H and redox partners for generating novel analogues. PMID:22112829

  17. Long Josepshon Junction in a Resonant Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tornes, Ivan

    2005-03-01

    We present a model for an underdamped long Josephson junction coupled to a single-mode electromagnetic cavity, and carry out numerical calculations using this model in various regimes. The coupling may occur through either the electric or the magnetic field of the cavity mode. When a current is injected into the junction, we find that the time-averaged voltage exhibits self-induced resonant steps due to coupling between the current in the junction and the electric field of the cavity mode. These steps are similar to those observed and calculated in small Josephson junctions. When a soliton is present in the junction (corresponding to a quantum of magnetic flux parallel to the junction plates), the SIRS's disappear if the electric field in the cavity is spatially uniform. If the cavity mode has a spatially varying electric field, there is a strong coupling between the soliton and the cavity mode. This coupling causes the soliton to become phase-locked to the cavity mode, and produces step-like anomalies on the soliton branch of the IV characteristics. If the coupling is strong enough, the frequency of the cavity mode is greatly red-shifted from its uncoupled value. We present simple geometrical arguments and a simple analytical model which account for this behavior. This work was supported by NSF grant DMR04-13395.

  18. Exercise regulation of intestinal tight junction proteins.

    PubMed

    Zuhl, Micah; Schneider, Suzanne; Lanphere, Katherine; Conn, Carole; Dokladny, Karol; Moseley, Pope

    2014-06-01

    Gastrointestinal distress, such as diarrhoea, cramping, vomiting, nausea and gastric pain are common among athletes during training and competition. The mechanisms that cause these symptoms are not fully understood. The stress of heat and oxidative damage during exercise causes disruption to intestinal epithelial cell tight junction proteins resulting in increased permeability to luminal endotoxins. The endotoxin moves into the blood stream leading to a systemic immune response. Tight junction integrity is altered by the phosphoylation state of the proteins occludin and claudins, and may be regulated by the type of exercise performed. Prolonged exercise and high-intensity exercise lead to an increase in key phosphorylation enzymes that ultimately cause tight junction dysfunction, but the mechanisms are different. The purpose of this review is to (1) explain the function and physiology of tight junction regulation, (2) discuss the effects of prolonged and high-intensity exercise on tight junction permeability leading to gastrointestinal distress and (3) review agents that may increase or decrease tight junction integrity during exercise. PMID:23134759

  19. Multi-junction solar cell device

    DOEpatents

    Friedman, Daniel J.; Geisz, John F.

    2007-12-18

    A multi-junction solar cell device (10) is provided. The multi-junction solar cell device (10) comprises either two or three active solar cells connected in series in a monolithic structure. The multi-junction device (10) comprises a bottom active cell (20) having a single-crystal silicon substrate base and an emitter layer (23). The multi-junction device (10) further comprises one or two subsequent active cells each having a base layer (32) and an emitter layer (23) with interconnecting tunnel junctions between each active cell. At least one layer that forms each of the top and middle active cells is composed of a single-crystal III-V semiconductor alloy that is substantially lattice-matched to the silicon substrate (22). The polarity of the active p-n junction cells is either p-on-n or n-on-p. The present invention further includes a method for substantially lattice matching single-crystal III-V semiconductor layers with the silicon substrate (22) by including boron and/or nitrogen in the chemical structure of these layers.

  20. A Par-1-Par-3-Centrosome Cell Polarity Pathway and Its Tuning for Isotropic Cell Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tao; McKinley, R F Andrew; McGill, Melanie A; Angers, Stephane; Harris, Tony J C

    2015-10-19

    To form regulated barriers between body compartments, epithelial cells polarize into apical and basolateral domains and assemble adherens junctions (AJs). Despite close links with polarity networks that generate single polarized domains, AJs distribute isotropically around the cell circumference for adhesion with all neighboring cells [1-3]. How AJs avoid the influence of polarity networks to maintain their isotropy has been unclear. In established epithelia, trans cadherin interactions could maintain AJ isotropy [4], but AJs are dynamic during epithelial development and remodeling [5, 6], and thus specific mechanisms may control their isotropy. In Drosophila, aPKC prevents hyper-polarization of junctions as epithelia develop from cellularization to gastrulation [7]. Here, we show that aPKC does so by inhibiting a positive feedback loop between Bazooka (Baz)/Par-3, a junctional organizer [5, 8-10], and centrosomes. Without aPKC, Baz and centrosomes lose their isotropic distributions and recruit each other to single plasma membrane (PM) domains. Surprisingly, our loss- and gain-of-function analyses show that the Baz-centrosome positive feedback loop is driven by Par-1, a kinase known to phosphorylate Baz and inhibit its basolateral localization [8, 11, 12]. We find that Par-1 promotes the positive feedback loop through both centrosome microtubule effects and Baz phosphorylation. Normally, aPKC attenuates the circuit by expelling Par-1 from the apical domain at gastrulation. The combination of local activation and global inhibition is a common polarization strategy [13-16]. Par-1 seems to couple both effects for a potent Baz polarization mechanism that is regulated for the isotropy of Baz and AJs around the cell circumference. PMID:26455305

  1. The Rexinoids LG100268 and LG101506 Inhibit Inflammation and Suppress Lung Carcinogenesis in A/J Mice.

    PubMed

    Cao, Martine; Royce, Darlene B; Risingsong, Renee; Williams, Charlotte R; Sporn, Michael B; Liby, Karen T

    2016-01-01

    LG101506 was originally synthesized to overcome some of the undesirable side effects of rexinoids. We compared the anticarcinogenic action of LG101506 and LG100268 and for the first time showed that both drugs are useful for prevention of lung cancer in A/J mice. These molecules markedly reduced tumor number, tumor size, and total tumor burden, when chronically administered to A/J mice that had been initiated with the mutagenic carcinogen, vinyl carbamate. Moreover, LG100268 synergized with the histone deacetylase inhibitor, vorinostat, for prevention of experimental lung cancer and enhanced the effect of carboplatin/paclitaxel for treatment of experimental lung cancer. Both rexinoids diminished the percentage of high-grade, highly malignant adenocarcinomas found at autopsy. In cell culture studies, the rexinoids exhibited potent anti-inflammatory properties at nanoMolar concentrations. These drugs suppressed the ability of lipopolysaccharide to stimulate the synthesis and secretion of nitric oxide and inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, such as IL6, IL1β, CXCL2, and CSF3, in macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells. The present results suggest that LG100268, LG101506, or a related rexinoid may have useful clinical applications in the field of oncology. PMID:26554632

  2. Fentanyl effects on breath generation in C57BL/6J and A/J mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Fechtner, Linnea; El Ali, Mazen; Sattar, Abdus; Moore, Michael; Strohl, Kingman P

    2015-08-15

    We examined the effect of fentanyl on chemoresponsiveness in mouse strains divergent in the expression of spontaneous and post-hypoxic pauses. Frequency and tidal volume were recorded with plethysmography in A/J and C57BL/6J (B6) male mice. Mice selected at random received an intraperitoneal (IP) injection of either saline, low dose fentanyl (LDF = 0.04 mg/kg), or high dose fentanyl (HDF = 0.4 mg/kg) under hypoxia (8% O2) or hyperoxia (100%O2). LDF produced a decrease in frequency during hypoxia in B6, but not A/J, mice. HDF significantly decreased frequency and tidal volume in both strains under hypoxia and hyperoxia (p<0.01); naloxone, an opioid antagonist, reversed this response. The acute administration of fentanyl at any dose did not promote apneas in strains of mice exhibiting regular or irregular respiratory patterns. However, higher doses depressed respiratory frequency in both strains. The B6 mice responded with a depressive response to hypoxia that did not recover with reoxygenation, but did recover with time or naloxone. PMID:25936679

  3. Systems toxicology approaches enable mechanistic comparison of spontaneous and cigarette smoke-related lung tumor development in the A/J mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Yang; Iskandar, Anita; Sewer, Alain; Martin, Florian; Talikka, Marja; Vanscheeuwijck, Patrick; Berges, An; Veljkovic, Emilija; Gonzalez-Suarez, Ignacio; Schlage, Walter; Hoeng, Julia; Peitsch, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    The A/J mouse is highly susceptible to lung tumor induction and has been widely used as a screening model in carcinogenicity testing and chemoprevention studies. However, the A/J mouse model has several disadvantages. Most notably, it develops lung tumors spontaneously. Moreover, there is a considerable gap in our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of pulmonary chemical carcinogenesis in the A/J mouse. Therefore, we examined the differences between spontaneous and cigarette smoke-related lung tumors in the A/J mouse model using mRNA and microRNA (miRNA) profiling. Male A/J mice were exposed whole-body to mainstream cigarette smoke (MS) for 18 months. Gene expression interaction term analysis of lung tumors and surrounding non-tumorous parenchyma samples from animals that were exposed to either 300 mg/m3 MS or sham-exposed to fresh air indicated significant differential expression of 296 genes. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis® (IPA®) indicated an overall suppression of the humoral immune response, which was accompanied by a disruption of sphingolipid and glycosaminoglycan metabolism and a deregulation of potentially oncogenic miRNA in tumors of MS-exposed A/J mice. Thus, we propose that MS exposure leads to severe perturbations in pathways essential for tumor recognition by the immune system, thereby potentiating the ability of tumor cells to escape from immune surveillance. Further, exposure to MS appeared to affect expression of miRNA, which have previously been implicated in carcinogenesis and are thought to contribute to tumor progression. Finally, we identified a 50-gene expression signature and show its utility in distinguishing between cigarette smoke-related and spontaneous lung tumors. PMID:26109882

  4. Plectin reinforces vascular integrity by mediating crosstalk between the vimentin and the actin networks

    PubMed Central

    Osmanagic-Myers, Selma; Rus, Stefanie; Wolfram, Michael; Brunner, Daniela; Goldmann, Wolfgang H.; Bonakdar, Navid; Fischer, Irmgard; Reipert, Siegfried; Zuzuarregui, Aurora; Walko, Gernot; Wiche, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mutations in the cytoskeletal linker protein plectin result in multisystemic diseases affecting skin and muscle with indications of additional vascular system involvement. To study the mechanisms underlying vascular disorders, we established plectin-deficient endothelial cell and mouse models. We show that apart from perturbing the vimentin cytoskeleton of endothelial cells, plectin deficiency leads to severe distortions of adherens junctions (AJs), as well as tight junctions, accompanied by an upregulation of actin stress fibres and increased cellular contractility. Plectin-deficient endothelial cell layers were more leaky and showed reduced mechanical resilience in fluid-shear stress and mechanical stretch experiments. We suggest that the distorted AJs and upregulated actin stress fibres in plectin-deficient cells are rooted in perturbations of the vimentin cytoskeleton, as similar phenotypes could be mimicked in wild-type cells by disruption of vimentin filaments. In vivo studies in endothelium-restricted conditional plectin-knockout mice revealed significant distortions of AJs in stress-prone aortic arch regions and increased pulmonary vascular leakage. Our study opens a new perspective on cytoskeleton-controlled vascular permeability, where a plectin-organized vimentin scaffold keeps actomyosin contractility ‘in-check’ and maintains AJ homeostasis. PMID:26519478

  5. Plectin reinforces vascular integrity by mediating crosstalk between the vimentin and the actin networks.

    PubMed

    Osmanagic-Myers, Selma; Rus, Stefanie; Wolfram, Michael; Brunner, Daniela; Goldmann, Wolfgang H; Bonakdar, Navid; Fischer, Irmgard; Reipert, Siegfried; Zuzuarregui, Aurora; Walko, Gernot; Wiche, Gerhard

    2015-11-15

    Mutations in the cytoskeletal linker protein plectin result in multisystemic diseases affecting skin and muscle with indications of additional vascular system involvement. To study the mechanisms underlying vascular disorders, we established plectin-deficient endothelial cell and mouse models. We show that apart from perturbing the vimentin cytoskeleton of endothelial cells, plectin deficiency leads to severe distortions of adherens junctions (AJs), as well as tight junctions, accompanied by an upregulation of actin stress fibres and increased cellular contractility. Plectin-deficient endothelial cell layers were more leaky and showed reduced mechanical resilience in fluid-shear stress and mechanical stretch experiments. We suggest that the distorted AJs and upregulated actin stress fibres in plectin-deficient cells are rooted in perturbations of the vimentin cytoskeleton, as similar phenotypes could be mimicked in wild-type cells by disruption of vimentin filaments. In vivo studies in endothelium-restricted conditional plectin-knockout mice revealed significant distortions of AJs in stress-prone aortic arch regions and increased pulmonary vascular leakage. Our study opens a new perspective on cytoskeleton-controlled vascular permeability, where a plectin-organized vimentin scaffold keeps actomyosin contractility 'in-check' and maintains AJ homeostasis. PMID:26519478

  6. The junctional complex in the intestine of Sagitta setosa (Chaetognatha): the paired septate junction.

    PubMed

    Duvert, M; Gros, D; Salat, C

    1980-04-01

    The junctional complex of the intestine of Sagitta setosa has been studied in tissues stained with uranyl acetate or after lanthanum impregnation, and by freeze-cleavage. All types of junctions have been characterized in both perpendicular and tangential planes. From the apex to the base of the cell the following junctions occur in this order: a zonula adhaerens; a septate junction where the septa occur in pairs; a pleated sheet septate junction; and numerous gap junctions of the A-type. From the upper part of the cells inwards to the septate junction, the membranes follow a relatively straight path. In the lower part of the cells the membranes are deeply interdigitating. At the intersection between 3 cells a very different junction is to be observed where small units, periodically disposed, bind the membranes of the 3 adjoining cells. Each unit is composed of 3 short segments which bind the cell membranes to a central ring 16.6 +/- 2.3 nm in outer diameter. The paired septate junction constitutes a new type. Its main features are that the septa are paired and occur in 2 formations, one the 'loose formation', with elements between the septa of each pair, and the other, a 'tight formation'. After lanthanum impregnation, the thickness of each septum is seen to be about 3 nm and the undulation period 12.6 +/- 1.6 nm. On freeze-fractures 10-nm particles are found on crests on the PF face and in furrows on the EF face. The possible significance of this type of junction is discussed. The junctional complex described is analogous to those found in various invertebrate epithelia. PMID:6105159

  7. Rac1 functions as a reversible tension modulator to stabilize VE-cadherin trans-interaction.

    PubMed

    Daneshjou, Nazila; Sieracki, Nathan; van Nieuw Amerongen, Geerten P; Schwartz, Martin A; Komarova, Yulia A; Malik, Asrar B; Conway, Daniel E

    2015-01-01

    The role of the RhoGTPase Rac1 in stabilizing mature endothelial adherens junctions (AJs) is not well understood. In this paper, using a photoactivatable probe to control Rac1 activity at AJs, we addressed the relationship between Rac1 and the dynamics of vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin). We demonstrated that Rac1 activation reduced the rate of VE-cadherin dissociation, leading to increased density of VE-cadherin at AJs. This response was coupled to a reduction in actomyosin-dependent tension across VE-cadherin adhesion sites. We observed that inhibiting myosin II directly or through photo-release of the caged Rho kinase inhibitor also reduced the rate of VE-cadherin dissociation. Thus, Rac1 functions by stabilizing VE-cadherin trans-dimers in mature AJs by counteracting the actomyosin tension. The results suggest a new model of VE-cadherin adhesive interaction mediated by Rac1-induced reduction of mechanical tension at AJs, resulting in the stabilization of VE-cadherin adhesions. PMID:25559184

  8. Charge transport in nanoscale junctions.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Tim; Kornyshev, Alexei; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2008-09-01

    many particle excitations, new surface states in semiconductor electrodes, various mechanisms for single molecule rectification of the current, inelastic electron spectra and SERS spectroscopy. Three terminal architectures allowing (electrochemical) gating and transistor effects. Electrochemical nanojunctions and gating: intermolecular electron transfer in multi-redox metalloproteins, contact force modulation, characteristic current-noise patterns due to conformational fluctuations, resonance effects and electrocatalysis. Novel architectures: linear coupled quantum-dot-bridged junctions, electrochemical redox mediated transfer in two center systems leading to double maxima current-voltage plots and negative differential resistance, molecular-nanoparticle hybrid junctions and unexpected mesoscopic effects in polymeric wires. Device integration: techniques for creating stable metal/molecule/metal junctions using 'nano-alligator clips' and integration with 'traditional' silicon-based technology. The Guest Editors would like to thank all of the authors and referees of this special issue for their meticulous work in making each paper a valuable contribution to this research area, the early-bird authors for their patience, and Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter editorial staff in Bristol for their continuous support. PMID:21694407

  9. Model Building to Facilitate Understanding of Holliday Junction and Heteroduplex Formation, and Holliday Junction Resolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selvarajah, Geeta; Selvarajah, Susila

    2016-01-01

    Students frequently expressed difficulty in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in chromosomal recombination. Therefore, we explored alternative methods for presenting the two concepts of the double-strand break model: Holliday junction and heteroduplex formation, and Holliday junction resolution. In addition to a lecture and…

  10. Junctional Adhesion Molecule A Promotes Epithelial Tight Junction Assembly to Augment Lung Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Leslie A.; Ward, Christina; Kwon, Mike; Mitchell, Patrick O.; Quintero, David A.; Nusrat, Asma; Parkos, Charles A.; Koval, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial barrier function is maintained by tight junction proteins that control paracellular fluid flux. Among these proteins is junctional adhesion molecule A (JAM-A), an Ig fold transmembrane protein. To assess JAM-A function in the lung, we depleted JAM-A in primary alveolar epithelial cells using shRNA. In cultured cells, loss of JAM-A caused an approximately 30% decrease in transepithelial resistance, decreased expression of the tight junction scaffold protein zonula occludens 1, and disrupted junctional localization of the structural transmembrane protein claudin-18. Consistent with findings in other organs, loss of JAM-A decreased β1 integrin expression and impaired filamentous actin formation. Using a model of mild systemic endoxotemia induced by i.p. injection of lipopolysaccharide, we report that JAM-A−/− mice showed increased susceptibility to pulmonary edema. On injury, the enhanced susceptibility of JAM-A−/− mice to edema correlated with increased, transient disruption of claudin-18, zonula occludens 1, and zonula occludens 2 localization to lung tight junctions in situ along with a delay in up-regulation of claudin-4. In contrast, wild-type mice showed no change in lung tight junction morphologic features in response to mild systemic endotoxemia. These findings support a key role of JAM-A in promoting tight junction homeostasis and lung barrier function by coordinating interactions among claudins, the tight junction scaffold, and the cytoskeleton. PMID:25438062

  11. Esophagogastric junction distensibility in hiatus hernia.

    PubMed

    Lottrup, C; McMahon, B P; Ejstrud, P; Ostapiuk, M A; Funch-Jensen, P; Drewes, A M

    2016-07-01

    Hiatus hernia is known to be an important risk factor for developing gastroesophageal reflux disease. We aimed to use the endoscopic functional lumen imaging probe (EndoFLIP) to evaluate the functional properties of the esophagogastric junction. EndoFLIP assessments were made in 30 patients with hiatus hernia and Barrett's esophagus, and in 14 healthy controls. The EndoFLIP was placed straddling the esophagogastric junction and the bag distended stepwise to 50 mL. Cross-sectional areas of the bag and intra-bag pressures were recorded continuously. Measurements were made in the separate sphincter components and hiatus hernia cavity. EndoFLIP measured functional aspects such as sphincter distensibility and pressure of all esophagogastric junction components and visualized all hiatus hernia present at endoscopy. The lower esophageal sphincter in hiatus hernia patients had a lower pressure (e.g. 47.7 ± 13.0 vs. 61.4 ± 19.2 mm Hg at 50-mL distension volume) and was more distensible (all P < 0.001) than the common esophagogastric junction in controls. In hiatus hernia patients, the crural diaphragm had a lower pressure (e.g. 29.6 ± 10.1 vs. 47.7 ± 13.0 mm Hg at 50-mL distension volume) and was more distensible (all P < 0.001) than the lower esophageal sphincter. There was a significant association between symptom scores in patients and EndoFLIP assessment. Conclusively, EndoFLIP was a useful tool. To evaluate the presence of a hiatus hernia and to measure the functional properties of the esophagogastric junction. Furthermore, EndoFLIP distinguished the separate esophagogastric junction components in hiatus hernia patients, and may help us understand the biomechanics of the esophagogastric junction and the mechanisms behind hiatal herniation. PMID:25789842

  12. Clathrin and Cx43 gap junction plaque endoexocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Nickel, Beth M.; DeFranco, B. Hewa; Gay, Vernon L.; Murray, Sandra A.

    2008-10-03

    In earlier transmission electron microscopic studies, we have described pentilaminar gap junctional membrane invaginations and annular gap junction vesicles coated with short, electron-dense bristles. The similarity between these electron-dense bristles and the material surrounding clathrin-coated pits led us to suggest that the dense bristles associated with gap junction structures might be clathrin. To confirm that clathrin is indeed associated with annular gap junction vesicles and gap junction plaques, quantum dot immuno-electron microscopic techniques were used. We report here that clathrin associates with both connexin 43 (Cx43) gap junction plaques and pentilaminar gap junction vesicles. An important finding was the preferential localization of clathrin to the cytoplasmic surface of the annular or of the gap junction plaque membrane of one of the two contacting cells. This is consistent with the possibility that the direction of gap junction plaque internalization into one of two contacting cells is regulated by clathrin.

  13. A single-gradient junction technique to replace multiple-junction shifts for craniospinal irradiation treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, Austin; Ding, George X.

    2014-01-01

    Craniospinal irradiation (CSI) requires abutting fields at the cervical spine. Junction shifts are conventionally used to prevent setup error–induced overdosage/underdosage from occurring at the same location. This study compared the dosimetric differences at the cranial-spinal junction between a single-gradient junction technique and conventional multiple-junction shifts and evaluated the effect of setup errors on the dose distributions between both techniques for a treatment course and single fraction. Conventionally, 2 lateral brain fields and a posterior spine field(s) are used for CSI with weekly 1-cm junction shifts. We retrospectively replanned 4 CSI patients using a single-gradient junction between the lateral brain fields and the posterior spine field. The fields were extended to allow a minimum 3-cm field overlap. The dose gradient at the junction was achieved using dose painting and intensity-modulated radiation therapy planning. The effect of positioning setup errors on the dose distributions for both techniques was simulated by applying shifts of ± 3 and 5 mm. The resulting cervical spine doses across the field junction for both techniques were calculated and compared. Dose profiles were obtained for both a single fraction and entire treatment course to include the effects of the conventional weekly junction shifts. Compared with the conventional technique, the gradient-dose technique resulted in higher dose uniformity and conformity to the target volumes, lower organ at risk (OAR) mean and maximum doses, and diminished hot spots from systematic positioning errors over the course of treatment. Single-fraction hot and cold spots were improved for the gradient-dose technique. The single-gradient junction technique provides improved conformity, dose uniformity, diminished hot spots, lower OAR mean and maximum dose, and one plan for the entire treatment course, which reduces the potential human error associated with conventional 4-shifted plans.

  14. Proximal Junctional Kyphosis: Diagnosis, Pathogenesis, and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jaewon

    2016-01-01

    Proximal junctional kyphosis (PJK) is a common radiographic finding after long spinal fusion. A number of studies on the causes, risk factors, prevention, and treatment of PJK have been conducted. However, no clear definition of PJK has been established. In this paper, we aimed to clarify the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of PJK by reviewing relevant papers that have been published to date. A literature search was conducted on PubMed using "proximal junctional", "proximal junctional kyphosis", and "proximal junctional failure" as search keywords. Only studies that were published in English were included in this study. The incidence of PJK ranges from 5% to 46%, and it has been reported that 66% of cases occur 3 months after surgery and approximately 80% occur within 18 months. A number of studies have reported that there is no significantly different clinical outcome between PJK patients and non-PJK patients. One study showed that PJK patients expressed more pain than non-PJK patients. However, recent studies focused on proximal junctional failure (PJF), which is accepted as a severe form of PJK. PJF showed significant adverse impact in clinical aspect such as pain, neurologic deficit, ambulatory difficulties, and social isolation. Numerous previous studies have identified various risk factors and reported on the treatment and prevention of PJK. Based on these studies, we determined the clinical significance and impact of PJK. In addition, it is important to find a strategic approach to the proper treatment of PJK. PMID:27340542

  15. Dislocation Multi-junctions and Strain Hardening

    SciTech Connect

    Bulatov, V; Hsiung, L; Tang, M; Arsenlis, A; Bartelt, M; Cai, W; Florando, J; Hiratani, M; Rhee, M; Hommes, G; Pierce, T; Diaz de la Rubia, T

    2006-06-20

    At the microscopic scale, the strength of a crystal derives from the motion, multiplication and interaction of distinctive line defects--dislocations. First theorized in 1934 to explain low magnitudes of crystal strength observed experimentally, the existence of dislocations was confirmed only two decades later. Much of the research in dislocation physics has since focused on dislocation interactions and their role in strain hardening: a common phenomenon in which continued deformation increases a crystal's strength. The existing theory relates strain hardening to pair-wise dislocation reactions in which two intersecting dislocations form junctions tying dislocations together. Here we report that interactions among three dislocations result in the formation of unusual elements of dislocation network topology, termed hereafter multi-junctions. The existence of multi-junctions is first predicted by Dislocation Dynamics (DD) and atomistic simulations and then confirmed by the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) experiments in single crystal molybdenum. In large-scale Dislocation Dynamics simulations, multi-junctions present very strong, nearly indestructible, obstacles to dislocation motion and furnish new sources for dislocation multiplication thereby playing an essential role in the evolution of dislocation microstructure and strength of deforming crystals. Simulation analyses conclude that multi-junctions are responsible for the strong orientation dependence of strain hardening in BCC crystals.

  16. Semiconductor Lasers Containing Quantum Wells in Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Rui Q.; Qiu, Yueming

    2004-01-01

    In a recent improvement upon In(x)Ga(1-x)As/InP semiconductor lasers of the bipolar cascade type, quantum wells are added to Esaki tunnel junctions, which are standard parts of such lasers. The energy depths and the geometric locations and thicknesses of the wells are tailored to exploit quantum tunneling such that, as described below, electrical resistances of junctions and concentrations of dopants can be reduced while laser performances can be improved. In(x)Ga(1-x)As/InP bipolar cascade lasers have been investigated as sources of near-infrared radiation (specifically, at wavelengths of about 980 and 1,550 nm) for photonic communication systems. The Esaki tunnel junctions in these lasers have been used to connect adjacent cascade stages and to enable transport of charge carriers between them. Typically, large concentrations of both n (electron-donor) and p (electron-acceptor) dopants have been necessary to impart low electrical resistances to Esaki tunnel junctions. Unfortunately, high doping contributes free-carrier absorption, thereby contributing to optical loss and thereby, further, degrading laser performance. In accordance with the present innovation, quantum wells are incorporated into the Esaki tunnel junctions so that the effective heights of barriers to quantum tunneling are reduced (see figure).

  17. Methods for the fabrication of thermally stable magnetic tunnel junctions

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Y. Austin; Yang, Jianhua J.; Ladwig, Peter F.

    2009-08-25

    Magnetic tunnel junctions and method for making the magnetic tunnel junctions are provided. The magnetic tunnel junctions are characterized by a tunnel barrier oxide layer sandwiched between two ferromagnetic layers. The methods used to fabricate the magnetic tunnel junctions are capable of completely and selectively oxidizing a tunnel junction precursor material using an oxidizing gas containing a mixture of gases to provide a tunnel junction oxide without oxidizing the adjacent ferromagnetic materials. In some embodiments the gas mixture is a mixture of CO and CO.sub.2 or a mixture of H.sub.2 and H.sub.2O.

  18. K-RAS MUTATIONS AND ADDUCTS FORMED BY BENZ(J)ACEANTHRYLENE AND BENZO(A)PYRENE IN THE LUNGS OF STRAIN A/J MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Strain A/J mice received l.p. injections of benz[j]aceanthrylene (B[j]A) or benzo(a)pyrene (BP) and lung tissues were removed for analysis of BP- or B [j] A-derived DNA adducts during the first three days of exposure. roup of animals exposed to these hydrocarbons was held for eig...

  19. Holographic Josephson junction from massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ya-Peng; Li, Huai-Fan; Zeng, Hua-Bi; Zhang, Hai-Qing

    2016-05-01

    We study the holographic superconductor-normal metal-superconductor (SNS) Josephson junction in de Rham-Gabadadze-Tolley massive gravity. If the boundary theory is independent of spatial directions, i.e., if the chemical potential is homogeneous in spatial directions, we find that the graviton mass parameter will make it more difficult for the normal metal-superconductor phase transition to take place. In the holographic model of the Josephson junction, it is found that the maximal tunneling current will decrease according to the graviton mass parameter. Besides, the coherence length of the junction decreases as well with respect to the graviton mass parameter. If one interprets the graviton mass parameter as the effect of momentum dissipation in the boundary field theory, this indicates that the stronger the momentum dissipation is, the smaller the coherence length is.

  20. Silicon fiber with p-n junction

    SciTech Connect

    Homa, D.; Cito, A.; Pickrell, G.; Hill, C.; Scott, B.

    2014-09-22

    In this study, we fabricated a p-n junction in a fiber with a phosphorous doped silicon core and fused silica cladding. The fibers were fabricated via a hybrid process of the core-suction and melt-draw techniques and maintained overall diameters ranging from 200 to 900 μm and core diameters of 20–800 μm. The p-n junction was formed by doping the fiber with boron and confirmed via the current-voltage characteristic. The demonstration of a p-n junction in a melt-drawn silicon core fiber paves the way for the seamless integration of optical and electronic devices in fibers.

  1. Studies of silicon PN junction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindholm, F. A.

    1975-01-01

    Silicon pn junction solar cells made with low-resistivity substrates show poorer performance than traditional theory predicts. The purpose of this research was to identify and characterize the physical mechanisms responsible for the discrepancy. Attention was concentrated on the open circuit voltage in shallow junction cells of 0.1 ohm-cm substrate resistivity. A number of possible mechanisms that can occur in silicon devices were considered. Two mechanisms which are likely to be of main importance in explaining the observed low values of open-circuit voltage were found: (1) recombination losses associated with defects introduced during junction formation, and (2) inhomogeneity of defects and impurities across the area of the cell. To explore these theoretical anticipations, various diode test structures were designed and fabricated and measurement configurations for characterizing the defect properties and the areal inhomogeneity were constructed.

  2. Electronic Veselago lensing in graphene PN junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, Cory

    Ballistic electrons in a uniform 2D electron gas (2DEG) behave in close analogy to light propagating through an optical medium. In the absence of impurity scattering, electrons follow straight-line trajectories, while the associated de Broglie wavelength can give rise to interference and diffraction. Here we present measurements of ballistic graphene devices in which a graphite gate is used to realize an atomically-smooth junction. We demonstrate unambiguous signatures of negative refraction across a PN junction, paving the way for electron optics inspired by Veselago lensing. Comparison with theoretical simulations reveals the importance of the junction profile towards this effort. Opportunities for future device designs that may take advantage of these effects will be discussed.

  3. Tunnel junction based memristors as artificial synapses

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Andy; Niehörster, Stefan; Fabretti, Savio; Shepheard, Norman; Kuschel, Olga; Küpper, Karsten; Wollschläger, Joachim; Krzysteczko, Patryk; Chicca, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    We prepared magnesia, tantalum oxide, and barium titanate based tunnel junction structures and investigated their memristive properties. The low amplitudes of the resistance change in these types of junctions are the major obstacle for their use. Here, we increased the amplitude of the resistance change from 10% up to 100%. Utilizing the memristive properties, we looked into the use of the junction structures as artificial synapses. We observed analogs of long-term potentiation, long-term depression and spike-time dependent plasticity in these simple two terminal devices. Finally, we suggest a possible pathway of these devices toward their integration in neuromorphic systems for storing analog synaptic weights and supporting the implementation of biologically plausible learning mechanisms. PMID:26217173

  4. Molecular organization of tricellular tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Furuse, Mikio; Izumi, Yasushi; Oda, Yukako; Higashi, Tomohito; Iwamoto, Noriko

    2014-01-01

    When the apicolateral border of epithelial cells is compared with a polygon, its sides correspond to the apical junctional complex, where cell adhesion molecules assemble from the plasma membranes of two adjacent cells. On the other hand, its vertices correspond to tricellular contacts, where the corners of three cells meet. Vertebrate tricellular contacts have specialized structures of tight junctions, termed tricellular tight junctions (tTJs). tTJs were identified by electron microscopic observations more than 40 years ago, but have been largely forgotten in epithelial cell biology since then. The identification of tricellulin and angulin family proteins as tTJ-associated membrane proteins has enabled us to study tTJs in terms of not only the paracellular barrier function but also unknown characteristics of epithelial cell corners via molecular biological approaches. PMID:25097825

  5. Synchronized Switching in a Josephson Junction Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leib, Martin; Hartmann, Michael J.

    2014-06-01

    We consider a superconducting coplanar waveguide resonator where the central conductor is interrupted by a series of uniformly spaced Josephson junctions. The device forms an extended medium that is optically nonlinear on the single photon level with normal modes that inherit the full nonlinearity of the junctions but are nonetheless accessible via the resonator ports. For specific plasma frequencies of the junctions, a set of normal modes clusters in a narrow band and eventually becomes entirely degenerate. Upon increasing the intensity of a red detuned drive on these modes, we observe a sharp and synchronized switching from low-occupation quantum states to high-occupation classical fields, accompanied by a pronounced jump from low to high output intensity.

  6. Tunneling Magnetothermopower in Magnetic Tunnel Junction Nanopillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebing, N.; Serrano-Guisan, S.; Rott, K.; Reiss, G.; Langer, J.; Ocker, B.; Schumacher, H. W.

    2011-10-01

    We study tunneling magnetothermopower (TMTP) in CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB magnetic tunnel junction nanopillars. Thermal gradients across the junctions are generated by an electric heater line. Thermopower voltages up to a few tens of μV between the top and bottom contact of the nanopillars are measured which scale linearly with the applied heating power and hence the thermal gradient. The thermopower signal varies by up to 10μV upon reversal of the relative magnetic configuration of the two CoFeB layers from parallel to antiparallel. This signal change corresponds to a large spin-dependent Seebeck coefficient of the order of 100μV/K and a large TMTP change of the tunnel junction of up to 90%.

  7. Tunneling magnetothermopower in magnetic tunnel junction nanopillars.

    PubMed

    Liebing, N; Serrano-Guisan, S; Rott, K; Reiss, G; Langer, J; Ocker, B; Schumacher, H W

    2011-10-21

    We study tunneling magnetothermopower (TMTP) in CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB magnetic tunnel junction nanopillars. Thermal gradients across the junctions are generated by an electric heater line. Thermopower voltages up to a few tens of μV between the top and bottom contact of the nanopillars are measured which scale linearly with the applied heating power and hence the thermal gradient. The thermopower signal varies by up to 10  μV upon reversal of the relative magnetic configuration of the two CoFeB layers from parallel to antiparallel. This signal change corresponds to a large spin-dependent Seebeck coefficient of the order of 100  μV/K and a large TMTP change of the tunnel junction of up to 90%. PMID:22107572

  8. Synchronized switching in a josephson junction crystal.

    PubMed

    Leib, Martin; Hartmann, Michael J

    2014-06-01

    We consider a superconducting coplanar waveguide resonator where the central conductor is interrupted by a series of uniformly spaced Josephson junctions. The device forms an extended medium that is optically nonlinear on the single photon level with normal modes that inherit the full nonlinearity of the junctions but are nonetheless accessible via the resonator ports. For specific plasma frequencies of the junctions, a set of normal modes clusters in a narrow band and eventually becomes entirely degenerate. Upon increasing the intensity of a red detuned drive on these modes, we observe a sharp and synchronized switching from low-occupation quantum states to high-occupation classical fields, accompanied by a pronounced jump from low to high output intensity. PMID:24949766

  9. Junction-side illuminated silicon detector arrays

    DOEpatents

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Patt, Bradley E.; Tull, Carolyn

    2004-03-30

    A junction-side illuminated detector array of pixelated detectors is constructed on a silicon wafer. A junction contact on the front-side may cover the whole detector array, and may be used as an entrance window for light, x-ray, gamma ray and/or other particles. The back-side has an array of individual ohmic contact pixels. Each of the ohmic contact pixels on the back-side may be surrounded by a grid or a ring of junction separation implants. Effective pixel size may be changed by separately biasing different sections of the grid. A scintillator may be coupled directly to the entrance window while readout electronics may be coupled directly to the ohmic contact pixels. The detector array may be used as a radiation hardened detector for high-energy physics research or as avalanche imaging arrays.

  10. Oxidative Stress, Lens Gap Junctions, and Cataracts

    PubMed Central

    Beyer, Eric C.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The eye lens is constantly subjected to oxidative stress from radiation and other sources. The lens has several mechanisms to protect its components from oxidative stress and to maintain its redox state, including enzymatic pathways and high concentrations of ascorbate and reduced glutathione. With aging, accumulation of oxidized lens components and decreased efficiency of repair mechanisms can contribute to the development of lens opacities or cataracts. Maintenance of transparency and homeostasis of the avascular lens depend on an extensive network of gap junctions. Communication through gap junction channels allows intercellular passage of molecules (up to 1 kDa) including antioxidants. Lens gap junctions and their constituent proteins, connexins (Cx43, Cx46, and Cx50), are also subject to the effects of oxidative stress. These observations suggest that oxidative stress-induced damage to connexins (and consequent altered intercellular communication) may contribute to cataract formation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 11, 339–353. PMID:18831679

  11. Phonon Josephson junction with nanomechanical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzanjeh, Shabir; Vitali, David

    2016-03-01

    We study coherent phonon oscillations and tunneling between two coupled nonlinear nanomechanical resonators. We show that the coupling between two nanomechanical resonators creates an effective phonon Josephson junction, which exhibits two different dynamical behaviors: Josephson oscillation (phonon-Rabi oscillation) and macroscopic self-trapping (phonon blockade). Self-trapping originates from mechanical nonlinearities, meaning that when the nonlinearity exceeds its critical value, the energy exchange between the two resonators is suppressed, and phonon Josephson oscillations between them are completely blocked. An effective classical Hamiltonian for the phonon Josephson junction is derived and its mean-field dynamics is studied in phase space. Finally, we study the phonon-phonon coherence quantified by the mean fringe visibility, and show that the interaction between the two resonators may lead to the loss of coherence in the phononic junction.

  12. Defect junctions and domain wall dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Avelino, P.P.; Oliveira, J.C.R.E.; Martins, C.J.A.P.; Menezes, J.; Menezes, R.

    2006-06-15

    We study a number of domain wall forming models where various types of defect junctions can exist. These illustrate some of the mechanisms that will determine the evolution of defect networks with junctions. Understanding these mechanisms is vital for a proper assessment of a number of cosmological scenarios: we will focus on the issue of whether or not cosmological frustrated domain wall networks can exist at all, but our results are also relevant for the dynamics of cosmic (super)strings, where junctions are expected to be ubiquitous. We also define and discuss the properties that would make up the ideal model in terms of hypothetical frustrated wall networks, and provide an explicit construction for such a model. We carry out a number of numerical simulations of the evolution of these networks, analyze and contrast their results, and discuss their implications for our no-frustration conjecture.

  13. Fimbriatols A-J, Highly Oxidized ent-Kaurane Diterpenoids from Traditional Chinese Plant Flickingeria fimbriata (B1.) Hawkes.

    PubMed

    Ding, Gang; Fei, Jiaodong; Wang, Jing; Xie, Yong; Li, Rongtao; Gong, Ningbo; Lv, Yang; Yu, Changyuan; Zou, Zhongmei

    2016-01-01

    Fimbriatols A-J (1-10), ten new ent-kaurane diterpenoids possessing differently highly oxidized sites, were isolated from Flickingeria fimbriata (B1.) Hawkes. The structures of these new compounds were determined by HRESI-MS, NMR, CD spectra and X-ray diffraction analysis. Compound 1 displayed moderately inhibitory ratio (48.5%) compared with the positive compound NSC-87877 (81.6%) at the concentration of 0.022 μg/mL. Compounds 7-10 possess 3, 4-seco-ent-kaurane skeleton containing a disaccharide moiety with an unusual linkage at C-2' to C-1'' instead of the common linkage at C-6' to C-1'', and this is the first report in 600 more ent-kauranes found in nature, which might be originated from ent-kaurane diterpenoids through post-modified reactions of Baeyer-Villiger oxygenation and glycosylation. PMID:27484744

  14. AJ Cronin and The Citadel: did a work of fiction contribute to the foundation of the NHS?

    PubMed

    O'Mahony, S

    2012-06-01

    AJ Cronin (1896-1981) was a Scottish-born doctor-turned-novelist whose most famous novel is The Citadel, published in 1937. The book describes the struggles of an idealistic young doctor working in Wales and London in the 1920s and 30s. The novel was a global bestseller and its portrayal of a largely ineffective, corruption-ridden system of healthcare is thought to have directly influenced the foundation of the National Health Service in 1948. The Citadel anticipates such phenomena as evidence-based medicine and continuing medical education. This paper argues that the novel was never intended as propaganda for a state-controlled national health service. On the contrary, Cronin was against state control. Analysis of the novel is informed by recent biographical revelations about Cronin and the blurring of the margin between fact and fiction in Cronin's life and work is examined. PMID:22693705

  15. Magnesium gating of cardiac gap junction channels.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Hiroyuki; Kurata, Yasutaka; Oka, Chiaki; Matsuoka, Satoshi; Noma, Akinori

    2010-09-01

    We aimed to study kinetics of modulation by intracellular Mg(2+) of cardiac gap junction (Mg(2+) gate). Paired myocytes of guinea-pig ventricle were superfused with solutions containing various concentrations of Mg(2+). In order to rapidly apply Mg(2+) to one aspect of the gap junction, the non-junctional membrane of one of the pair was perforated at nearly the connecting site by pulses of nitrogen laser beam. The gap junction conductance (G(j)) was measured by clamping the membrane potential of the other cell using two-electrode voltage clamp method. The laser perforation immediately increased G(j), followed by slow G(j) change with time constant of 3.5 s at 10 mM Mg(2+). Mg(2+) more than 1.0 mM attenuated dose-dependently the gap junction conductance and lower Mg(2+) (0.6 mM) increased G(j) with a Hill coefficient of 3.4 and a half-maximum effective concentration of 0.6 mM. The time course of G(j) changes was fitted by single exponential function, and the relationship between the reciprocal of time constant and Mg(2+) concentration was almost linear. Based on the experimental data, a mathematical model of Mg(2+) gate with one open state and three closed states well reproduced experimental results. One-dimensional cable model of thirty ventricular myocytes connected to the Mg(2+) gate model suggested a pivotal role of the Mg(2+) gate of gap junction under pathological conditions. PMID:20553744

  16. Electronic Properties of Carbon Nanotubes and Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anantram, M. P.; Han, Jie; Yang, Liu; Govindan, T. R.; Jaffe, R.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Metallic and semiconducting Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes (CNT) have recently been characterized using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and the manipulation of individual CNT has been demonstrated. These developments make the prospect of using CNT as molecular wires and possibly as electronic devices an even more interesting one. We have been modeling various electronic properties such as the density of states and the transmission coefficient of CNT wires and junctions. These studies involve first calculating the stability of junctions using molecular dynamics simulations and then calculating the electronic properties using a pi-electron tight binding Hamiltonian. We have developed the expertise to calculate the electronic properties of both finite-sized CNT and CNT systems with semi-infinite boundary conditions. In this poster, we will present an overview of some of our results. The electronic application of CNT that is most promising at this time is their use as molecular wires. The conductance can however be greatly reduced because of reflection due to defects and contacts. We have modeled the transmission through CNT in the presence of two types of defects: weak uniform disorder and strong isolated scatterers. We find that the conductance is affected in significantly different manners due to these defects Junctions of CNT have also been imaged using STM. This makes it essential to derive rules for the formation of junctions between tubes of different chirality, study their relative energies and electronic properties. We have generalized the rules for connecting two different CNT and have calculated the transmission and density of states through CNT junctions. Metallic and semiconducting CNT can be joined to form a stable junction and their current versus voltage characteristics are asymmetric. CNT are deformed by the application of external forces including interactions with a substrate or other CNT. In many experiments, these deformation are expected to

  17. Morphometric differences between central vs. surface acini in A/J mice using high-resolution micro-computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Kizhakke Puliyakote, Abhilash S; Vasilescu, Dragoş M; Newell, John D; Wang, Ge; Weibel, Ewald R; Hoffman, Eric A

    2016-07-01

    Through interior tomography, high-resolution microcomputed tomography (μCT) systems provide the ability to nondestructively assess the pulmonary acinus at micron and submicron resolutions. With the application of systematic uniform random sampling (SURS) principles applied to in situ fixed, intact, ex vivo lungs, we have sought to characterize morphometric differences in central vs. surface acini to better understand how well surface acini reflect global acinar geometry. Lungs from six mice (A/J strain, 15-20 wk of age) were perfusion fixed in situ and imaged using a multiresolution μCT system (Micro XCT 400, Zeiss). With the use of lower-resolution whole lung images, SURS methods were used for identification of central and surface foci for high-resolution imaging. Acinar morphometric metrics included diameters, lengths, and branching angles for each alveolar duct and total path lengths from entrance of the acinus to the terminal alveolar sacs. In addition, acinar volume, alveolar surface area, and surface area/volume ratios were assessed. A generation-based analysis demonstrated that central acini have significantly smaller branch diameters at each generation with no significant increase in branch lengths. In addition to larger-diameter alveolar ducts, surface acini had significantly increased numbers of branches and terminal alveolar sacs. The total path lengths from the acinar entrance to the terminal nodes were found to be higher in the case of surface acini. Volumes and surface areas of surface acini are greater than central acini, but there were no differences in surface/volume ratios. In conclusion, there are significant structural differences between surface and central acini in the A/J mouse. PMID:27174924

  18. Fluctuation of heat current in Josephson junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Virtanen, P.; Giazotto, F.

    2015-02-15

    We discuss the statistics of heat current between two superconductors at different temperatures connected by a generic weak link. As the electronic heat in superconductors is carried by Bogoliubov quasiparticles, the heat transport fluctuations follow the Levitov–Lesovik relation. We identify the energy-dependent quasiparticle transmission probabilities and discuss the resulting probability density and fluctuation relations of the heat current. We consider multichannel junctions, and find that heat transport in diffusive junctions is unique in that its statistics is independent of the phase difference between the superconductors.

  19. Bursting behaviour in coupled Josephson junctions.

    PubMed

    Hongray, Thotreithem; Balakrishnan, J; Dana, Syamal K

    2015-12-01

    We report an interesting bow-tie shaped bursting behaviour in a certain parameter regime of two resistive-capacitative shunted Josephson junctions, one in the oscillatory and the other in the excitable mode and coupled together resistively. The burst emerges in both the junctions and they show near-complete synchronization for strong enough couplings. We discuss a possible bifurcation scenario to explain the origin of the burst. An exhaustive study on the parameter space of the system is performed, demarcating the regions of bursting from other solutions. PMID:26723143

  20. Josephson junctions with alternating critical current density

    SciTech Connect

    Mints, R.G.; Kogan, V.G.

    1997-04-01

    The magnetic-field dependence of the critical current I{sub c}(H) is considered for a short Josephson junction with the critical current density j{sub c} alternating along the tunnel contact. Two model cases, periodic and randomly alternating j{sub c}, are treated in detail. Recent experimental data on I{sub c}(H) for grain-boundary Josephson junctions in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  1. Electronic properties of electrodeposited semiconductor junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatman, Shawn Michael Edward

    This thesis describes the synthesis, structural properties, optical properties, and electronic properties of semiconductor junctions based on electrochemically deposited ZnO and CU2O thin films. The first focus is characterizing the effect of deposition conditions (including applied potential and electrolyte composition) on the fundamental properties of these materials (including carrier concentration, band gap, and microstructure). Subsequent discussion addresses electrical conduction to and through ZnO/substrate junctions as a function of these deposition conditions. Finally, three device applications for these ZnO-based junction are explored: Schottky rectifiers, humidity sensors, and photovoltaic cells. Since electrical conduction to and through heterojunction interfaces is very important for maximizing the functionality of semiconductor devices, this thesis work is an essential step towards increasing the functionality of multi-layer ZnO-based heterojunction devices prepared by electrodeposition. Capacitive Mott-Schottky analyses showed that the carrier concentrations of our ZnO electrodeposits are dependent upon deposition potential, with higher net carrier concentration at more positive potentials. UV/Visible diffuse reflectance data indicates that band gap increases with more positive deposition potentials. Together, these results suggest that hydrogen is the dominant, yet unintentional, Moss-Burstein like dopant in our n-type ZnO. Furthermore, the range of carrier concentrations we can achieve (10 18 -- 1021 cm-3) is comparable to that obtained with intentional doping. This is significant because using deposition potential to change growth rate or morphology will simultaneously change electronic properties. The deposition potential studies evolved into a procedure for selective, one-step production of either ohmic or rectifying (Schottky) ZnO/metal junctions (Chatman et al., Appi.Phys.Lett., 2008, 92, 012103/1-3). Rectifying ratio and soft

  2. Electrostatic model of radial pn junction nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chia, A. C. E.; LaPierre, R. R.

    2013-08-01

    Poisson's equation is solved for a radial pn junction nanowire (NW) with surface depletion. This resulted in a model capable of giving radial energy band and electric field profiles for any arbitrary core/shell doping density, core/shell dimensions, and surface state density. Specific cases were analyzed to extract pertinent underlying physics, while the relationship between NW specifications and the depletion of the NW were examined to optimize the built-in potential across the junction. Additionally, the model results were compared with experimental results in literature to good agreement. Finally, an optimum device design is proposed to satisfy material, optical, and electrostatic constraints in high efficiency NW solar cells.

  3. Complementary junction heterostructure field-effect transistor

    DOEpatents

    Baca, Albert G.; Drummond, Timothy J.; Robertson, Perry J.; Zipperian, Thomas E.

    1995-01-01

    A complimentary pair of compound semiconductor junction heterostructure field-effect transistors and a method for their manufacture are disclosed. The p-channel junction heterostructure field-effect transistor uses a strained layer to split the degeneracy of the valence band for a greatly improved hole mobility and speed. The n-channel device is formed by a compatible process after removing the strained layer. In this manner, both types of transistors may be independently optimized. Ion implantation is used to form the transistor active and isolation regions for both types of complimentary devices. The invention has uses for the development of low power, high-speed digital integrated circuits.

  4. Complementary junction heterostructure field-effect transistor

    DOEpatents

    Baca, A.G.; Drummond, T.J.; Robertson, P.J.; Zipperian, T.E.

    1995-12-26

    A complimentary pair of compound semiconductor junction heterostructure field-effect transistors and a method for their manufacture are disclosed. The p-channel junction heterostructure field-effect transistor uses a strained layer to split the degeneracy of the valence band for a greatly improved hole mobility and speed. The n-channel device is formed by a compatible process after removing the strained layer. In this manner, both types of transistors may be independently optimized. Ion implantation is used to form the transistor active and isolation regions for both types of complimentary devices. The invention has uses for the development of low power, high-speed digital integrated circuits. 10 figs.

  5. Alternating current driven instability in magnetic junctions.

    PubMed

    Epshtein, E M; Zilberman, P E

    2009-04-01

    An effect is considered of alternating (high-frequency) current on the spin-valve-type magnetic junction configuration. The stability with respect to small fluctuations is investigated in the macrospin approximation. When the current frequency is close to the eigenfrequency (precession frequency) of the free layer, parametric resonance occurs. Both collinear configurations, antiparallel and parallel, can become unstable under resonance conditions. The antiparallel configuration can also become unstable under non-resonant conditions. The threshold current density amplitude is of the order of the dc current density for switching of the magnetic junction. PMID:21825350

  6. Bursting behaviour in coupled Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongray, Thotreithem; Balakrishnan, J.; Dana, Syamal K.

    2015-12-01

    We report an interesting bow-tie shaped bursting behaviour in a certain parameter regime of two resistive-capacitative shunted Josephson junctions, one in the oscillatory and the other in the excitable mode and coupled together resistively. The burst emerges in both the junctions and they show near-complete synchronization for strong enough couplings. We discuss a possible bifurcation scenario to explain the origin of the burst. An exhaustive study on the parameter space of the system is performed, demarcating the regions of bursting from other solutions.

  7. Atomic-scaled characterization of graphene PN junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaodong; Wang, Dennis; Dadgar, Ali; Agnihotri, Pratik; Lee, Ji Ung; Reuter, Mark C.; Ross, Frances M.; Pasupathy, Abhay N.

    Graphene p-n junctions are essential devices for studying relativistic Klein tunneling and the Veselago lensing effect in graphene. We have successfully fabricated graphene p-n junctions using both lithographically pre-patterned substrates and the stacking of vertical heterostructures. We then use our 4-probe STM system to characterize the junctions. The ability to carry out scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in our STM instrument is essential for us to locate and measure the junction interface. We obtain both the topography and dI/dV spectra at the junction area, from which we track the shift of the graphene chemical potential with position across the junction interface. This allows us to directly measure the spatial width and roughness of the junction and its potential barrier height. We will compare the junction properties of devices fabricated by the aforementioned two methods and discuss their effects on the performance as a Veselago lens.

  8. Ballistic bipolar junctions in chemically gated graphene ribbons

    PubMed Central

    Baringhaus, Jens; Stöhr, Alexander; Forti, Stiven; Starke, Ulrich; Tegenkamp, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    The realization of ballistic graphene pn-junctions is an essential task in order to study Klein tunneling phenomena. Here we show that intercalation of Ge under the buffer layer of pre-structured SiC-samples succeeds to make truly nano-scaled pn-junctions. By means of local tunneling spectroscopy the junction width is found to be as narrow as 5 nm which is a hundred times smaller compared to electrically gated structures. The ballistic transmission across the junction is directly proven by systematic transport measurements with a 4-tip STM. Various npn- and pnp-junctions are studied with respect to the barrier length. The pn-junctions are shown to act as polarizer and analyzer with the second junction becoming transparent in case of a fully ballistic barrier. This can be attributed to the almost full suppression of electron transmission through the junction away from normal incidence. PMID:25898259

  9. High voltage series connected tandem junction solar battery

    DOEpatents

    Hanak, Joseph J.

    1982-01-01

    A high voltage series connected tandem junction solar battery which comprises a plurality of strips of tandem junction solar cells of hydrogenated amorphous silicon having one optical path and electrically interconnected by a tunnel junction. The layers of hydrogenated amorphous silicon, arranged in a tandem configuration, can have the same bandgap or differing bandgaps. The tandem junction strip solar cells are series connected to produce a solar battery of any desired voltage.

  10. Ballistic transport in InSb Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damasco, John Jeffrey; Gill, Stephen; Car, Diana; Bakkers, Erik; Mason, Nadya

    We present transport measurements on Josephson junctions consisting of InSb nanowires contacted by Al at various junction lengths. Junction behavior as a function of gate voltage, electric field, and magnetic field is discussed. We show that short junctions behave as 1D quantum wires, exhibiting quantized conductance steps. In addition, we show how Josephson behavior changes as transport evolves from ballistic to diffusive as a function of contact spacing.

  11. Tandem junction amorphous silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Hanak, Joseph J.

    1981-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell has an active body with two or a series of layers of hydrogenated amorphous silicon arranged in a tandem stacked configuration with one optical path and electrically interconnected by a tunnel junction. The layers of hydrogenated amorphous silicon arranged in tandem configuration can have the same bandgap or differing bandgaps.

  12. Radiation comb generation with extended Josephson junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Solinas, P.; Bosisio, R.; Giazotto, F.

    2015-09-21

    We propose the implementation of a Josephson radiation comb generator based on an extended Josephson junction subject to a time dependent magnetic field. The junction critical current shows known diffraction patterns and determines the position of the critical nodes when it vanishes. When the magnetic flux passes through one of such critical nodes, the superconducting phase must undergo a π-jump to minimize the Josephson energy. Correspondingly, a voltage pulse is generated at the extremes of the junction. Under periodic driving, this allows us to produce a comb-like voltage pulses sequence. In the frequency domain, it is possible to generate up to hundreds of harmonics of the fundamental driving frequency, thus mimicking the frequency comb used in optics and metrology. We discuss several implementations through a rectangular, cylindrical, and annular junction geometries, allowing us to generate different radiation spectra and to produce an output power up to 10 pW at 50 GHz for a driving frequency of 100 MHz.

  13. Semiconductor liquid-junction solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Parkinson, B.A.

    1982-10-29

    A semiconductor liquid junction photocell in which the photocell is in the configuration of a light concentrator and in which the electrolytic solution both conducts current and facilitates the concentration of incident solar radiation onto the semiconductor. The photocell may be in the configuration of a non-imaging concentrator such as a compound parabolic concentrator, or an imaging concentrator such as a lens.

  14. Supercurrent in van der Waals Josephson junction

    PubMed Central

    Yabuki, Naoto; Moriya, Rai; Arai, Miho; Sata, Yohta; Morikawa, Sei; Masubuchi, Satoru; Machida, Tomoki

    2016-01-01

    Supercurrent flow between two superconductors with different order parameters, a phenomenon known as the Josephson effect, can be achieved by inserting a non-superconducting material between two superconductors to decouple their wavefunctions. These Josephson junctions have been employed in fields ranging from digital to quantum electronics, yet their functionality is limited by the interface quality and use of non-superconducting material. Here we show that by exfoliating a layered dichalcogenide (NbSe2) superconductor, the van der Waals (vdW) contact between the cleaved surfaces can instead be used to construct a Josephson junction. This is made possible by recent advances in vdW heterostructure technology, with an atomically flat vdW interface free of oxidation and inter-diffusion achieved by eliminating all heat treatment during junction preparation. Here we demonstrate that this artificially created vdW interface provides sufficient decoupling of the wavefunctions of the two NbSe2 crystals, with the vdW Josephson junction exhibiting a high supercurrent transparency. PMID:26830754

  15. PECAM-1: regulator of endothelial junctional integrity.

    PubMed

    Privratsky, Jamie R; Newman, Peter J

    2014-03-01

    PECAM-1 (also known as CD31) is a cellular adhesion and signaling receptor comprising six extracellular immunoglobulin (Ig)-like homology domains, a short transmembrane domain and a 118 amino acid cytoplasmic domain that becomes serine and tyrosine phosphorylated upon cellular activation. PECAM-1 expression is restricted to blood and vascular cells. In circulating platelets and leukocytes, PECAM-1 functions largely as an inhibitory receptor that, via regulated sequential phosphorylation of its cytoplasmic domain, limits cellular activation responses. PECAM-1 is also highly expressed at endothelial cell intercellular junctions, where it functions as a mechanosensor, as a regulator of leukocyte trafficking and in the maintenance of endothelial cell junctional integrity. In this review, we will describe (1) the functional domains of PECAM-1 and how they contribute to its barrier-enhancing properties, (2) how the physical properties of PECAM-1 influence its subcellular localization and its ability to influence endothelial cell barrier function, (3) various stimuli that initiate PECAM-1 signaling and/or function at the endothelial junction and (4) cross-talk of PECAM-1 with other junctional molecules, which can influence endothelial cell function. PMID:24435645

  16. Superfluid density through 2D superconductor junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Hyoungdo; Shih, Chih-Kang

    As S. Qin et al. reported, two monolayer (2 ML) lead film on a silicon (111) substrate has one of two different atomic structures on the silicon substrate: the unstrained 1x1 and the psedumorphically strained √3x √3 (i.e. the same lattice constant as the Si √3x √3 lattice). Most interestingly, although these two different regions show the same quantum well state features, they have different Tc's (5 K and 4 K). These two different regions of 2 ML film naturally form superconductor-superconductor (SS or SS') junctions along silicon step edges. Physical connection of the junction is only 1 ML thickness because of the step height difference of substrate. We will present this study of SS (or SS') junction system using scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy and in-situ double-coil mutual inductance measurement. The transition of superconducting gaps across either SS or SS' junctions should show how to locally affect each other. Double coil measurement show a global Tc close to the lower Tc region with sizable superfluid density. We will discuss the phase rigidity and its relationship to the superfluid density in this ultra-thin Pb film that is only 2 ML thick.

  17. Axion mass estimates from resonant Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Christian

    2015-03-01

    Recently it has been proposed that dark matter axions from the galactic halo can produce a small Shapiro step-like signal in Josephson junctions whose Josephson frequency resonates with the axion mass (Beck, 2013). Here we show that the axion field equations in a voltage-driven Josephson junction environment allow for a nontrivial solution where the axion-induced electrical current manifests itself as an oscillating supercurrent. The linear change of phase associated with this nontrivial solution implies the formal existence of a large magnetic field in a tiny surface area of the weak link region of the junction which makes incoming axions decay into microwave photons. We derive a condition for the design of Josephson junction experiments so that they can act as optimum axion detectors. Four independent recent experiments are discussed in this context. The observed Shapiro step anomalies of all four experiments consistently point towards an axion mass of (110±2) μeV. This mass value is compatible with the recent BICEP2 results and implies that Peccei-Quinn symmetry breaking was taking place after inflation.

  18. Costochondral junction osteomyelitis in 3 septic foals

    PubMed Central

    Cesarini, Carla; Macieira, Susana; Girard, Christiane; Drolet, Richard; d’Anjou, Marc-André; Jean, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The costochondral junction constitutes a potential site of infection in septic foals and it could be favored by thoracic trauma. Standard radiographs and ultrasonography are useful tools for diagnosis of this condition and ultrasound-guided needle aspiration could permit the definitive confirmation of infection. PMID:22210943

  19. Axial p-n-junctions in nanowires.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, C; Shik, A; Byrne, K; Lynall, D; Blumin, M; Saveliev, I; Ruda, H E

    2015-02-27

    The charge distribution and potential profile of p-n-junctions in thin semiconductor nanowires (NWs) were analyzed. The characteristics of screening in one-dimensional systems result in a specific profile with large electric field at the boundary between the n- and p- regions, and long tails with a logarithmic drop in the potential and charge density. As a result of these tails, the junction properties depend sensitively on the geometry of external contacts and its capacity has an anomalously large value and frequency dispersion. In the presence of an external voltage, electrons and holes in the NWs can not be described by constant quasi-Fermi levels, due to small values of the average electric field, mobility, and lifetime of carriers. Thus, instead of the classical Sah-Noice-Shockley theory, the junction current-voltage characteristic was described by an alternative theory suitable for fast generation-recombination and slow diffusion-drift processes. For the non-uniform electric field in the junction, this theory predicts the forward branch of the characteristic to have a non-ideality factor η several times larger than the values 1 < η < 2 from classical theory. Such values of η have been experimentally observed by a number of researchers, as well as in the present work. PMID:25656461

  20. Polyphosphonium-based ion bipolar junction transistors

    PubMed Central

    Gabrielsson, Erik O.; Berggren, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Advancements in the field of electronics during the past few decades have inspired the use of transistors in a diversity of research fields, including biology and medicine. However, signals in living organisms are not only carried by electrons but also through fluxes of ions and biomolecules. Thus, in order to implement the transistor functionality to control biological signals, devices that can modulate currents of ions and biomolecules, i.e., ionic transistors and diodes, are needed. One successful approach for modulation of ionic currents is to use oppositely charged ion-selective membranes to form so called ion bipolar junction transistors (IBJTs). Unfortunately, overall IBJT device performance has been hindered due to the typical low mobility of ions, large geometries of the ion bipolar junction materials, and the possibility of electric field enhanced (EFE) water dissociation in the junction. Here, we introduce a novel polyphosphonium-based anion-selective material into npn-type IBJTs. The new material does not show EFE water dissociation and therefore allows for a reduction of junction length down to 2 μm, which significantly improves the switching performance of the ion transistor to 2 s. The presented improvement in speed as well the simplified design will be useful for future development of advanced iontronic circuits employing IBJTs, for example, addressable drug-delivery devices. PMID:25553192

  1. Graphene-based magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobas, Enrique

    2013-03-01

    Graphene's in-plane transport has been widely researched and has yielded extraordinary carrier mobilities of 105 cm2/Vs and spin diffusion lengths of exceeding 100 μm. These properties bode well for graphene in future electronics and spintronics technologies. Its out-of-plane transport has been far less studied, although its parent material, graphite, shows a large conductance anisotropy. Recent calculations show graphene's interaction with close-packed ferromagnetic metal surfaces should produce highly spin-polarized transport out-of-plane, an enabling breakthrough for spintronics technology. In this work, we fabricate and measure FM/graphene/FM magnetic tunnel junctions using CVD-grown single-layer graphene. The resulting juctions show non-linear current-voltage characteristics and a very weak temperature dependence consistent with charge tunneling transport. Furthermore, we study spin transport across the junction as a function of bias voltage and temperature. The tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) peaks at two percent for single-layer graphene junctions and exhibits the expected bias asymmetry and a temperature dependence that fits well with established spin-polarized tunneling models. Results of mutli-layer graphene tunnel junctions will also be discussed.

  2. Miniaturized symmetrization optics for junction laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammer, Jacob M. (Inventor); Kaiser, Charlie J. (Inventor); Neil, Clyde C. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    Miniaturized optics comprising transverse and lateral cylindrical lenses composed of millimeter-sized rods with diameters, indices-of-refraction and spacing such that substantially all the light emitted as an asymmetrical beam from the emitting junction of the laser is collected and translated to a symmetrical beam.

  3. Supercurrent in van der Waals Josephson junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabuki, Naoto; Moriya, Rai; Arai, Miho; Sata, Yohta; Morikawa, Sei; Masubuchi, Satoru; Machida, Tomoki

    2016-02-01

    Supercurrent flow between two superconductors with different order parameters, a phenomenon known as the Josephson effect, can be achieved by inserting a non-superconducting material between two superconductors to decouple their wavefunctions. These Josephson junctions have been employed in fields ranging from digital to quantum electronics, yet their functionality is limited by the interface quality and use of non-superconducting material. Here we show that by exfoliating a layered dichalcogenide (NbSe2) superconductor, the van der Waals (vdW) contact between the cleaved surfaces can instead be used to construct a Josephson junction. This is made possible by recent advances in vdW heterostructure technology, with an atomically flat vdW interface free of oxidation and inter-diffusion achieved by eliminating all heat treatment during junction preparation. Here we demonstrate that this artificially created vdW interface provides sufficient decoupling of the wavefunctions of the two NbSe2 crystals, with the vdW Josephson junction exhibiting a high supercurrent transparency.

  4. Gallium nitride junction field-effect transistor

    DOEpatents

    Zolper, J.C.; Shul, R.J.

    1999-02-02

    An ion implanted gallium-nitride (GaN) junction field-effect transistor (JFET) and method of making the same are disclosed. Also disclosed are various ion implants, both n- and p-type, together with or without phosphorus co-implantation, in selected III-V semiconductor materials. 19 figs.

  5. Gallium nitride junction field-effect transistor

    DOEpatents

    Zolper, John C.; Shul, Randy J.

    1999-01-01

    An all-ion implanted gallium-nitride (GaN) junction field-effect transistor (JFET) and method of making the same. Also disclosed are various ion implants, both n- and p-type, together with or without phosphorous co-implantation, in selected III-V semiconductor materials.

  6. Overdamped Josephson junctions for digital applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Febvre, P.; De Leo, N.; Fretto, M.; Sosso, A.; Belogolovskii, M.; Collot, R.; Lacquaniti, V.

    2013-01-01

    An interesting feature of Superconductor-Normal metal-Superconductor Josephson junctions for digital applications is due to their non-hysteretic current-voltage characteristics in a broad temperature range below Tc. This allows to design Single-Flux-Quantum (SFQ) cells without the need of external shunts. Two advantages can be drawn from this property: first the SFQ cells can be more compact which leads to a more integrated solution towards nano-devices and more complex circuits; second the absence of electrical parasitic elements associated with the wiring of resistors external to the Josephson junctions increases the performance of SFQ circuits, in particular regarding the ultimate speed of operation. For this purpose Superconductor-Normal metal-Insulator-Superconductor Nb/Al-AlOx/Nb Josephson junctions have been recently developed at INRiM with aluminum layer thicknesses between 30 and 100 nm. They exhibit non-hysteretic current-voltage characteristics with IcRn values higher than 0.5 mV in a broad temperature range and optimal Stewart McCumber parameters at 4.2 K for RSFQ applications. The main features of obtained SNIS junctions regarding digital applications are presented.

  7. Supercurrent in van der Waals Josephson junction.

    PubMed

    Yabuki, Naoto; Moriya, Rai; Arai, Miho; Sata, Yohta; Morikawa, Sei; Masubuchi, Satoru; Machida, Tomoki

    2016-01-01

    Supercurrent flow between two superconductors with different order parameters, a phenomenon known as the Josephson effect, can be achieved by inserting a non-superconducting material between two superconductors to decouple their wavefunctions. These Josephson junctions have been employed in fields ranging from digital to quantum electronics, yet their functionality is limited by the interface quality and use of non-superconducting material. Here we show that by exfoliating a layered dichalcogenide (NbSe2) superconductor, the van der Waals (vdW) contact between the cleaved surfaces can instead be used to construct a Josephson junction. This is made possible by recent advances in vdW heterostructure technology, with an atomically flat vdW interface free of oxidation and inter-diffusion achieved by eliminating all heat treatment during junction preparation. Here we demonstrate that this artificially created vdW interface provides sufficient decoupling of the wavefunctions of the two NbSe2 crystals, with the vdW Josephson junction exhibiting a high supercurrent transparency. PMID:26830754

  8. Tight junction, selective permeability, and related diseases.

    PubMed

    Krug, Susanne M; Schulzke, Jörg D; Fromm, Michael

    2014-12-01

    The tight junction forms a barrier against unlimited paracellular passage but some of the tight junction proteins just do the opposite, they form extracellular channels zigzagging between lateral membranes of neighboring cells. All of these channel-forming proteins and even some of the barrier formers exhibit selectivity, which means that they prefer certain substances over others. All channel formers exhibit at least one of the three types of selectivity: for cations (claudin-2, -10b, -15), for anions (claudin-10a, -17) or for water (claudin-2). Also some, but not all, barrier-forming claudins are charge-selective (claudin-4, -8, -14). Moreover, occludin and tricellulin turned out to be relevant for barrier formation against macromolecule passage. Tight junction proteins are dysregulated or can be genetically defective in numerous diseases, which may lead to three effects: (i) impaired paracellular transport e.g. causing magnesium loss in the kidney, (ii) increased paracellular transport of solutes and water e.g. causing leak-flux diarrhea in the intestine, and (iii) increased permeability to large molecules e.g. unwanted intestinal pathogen uptake fueling inflammatory processes. This review gives an overview on the properties of tight junction proteins featuring selective permeability, and in this context explains how these proteins induce or aggravate diseases. PMID:25220018

  9. Electric Field Effect in Intrinsic Josephson Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, T.

    The electric field effect in intrinsic Josephson junction stacks (IJJ's) is investigated on the basis of the capacitively-coupled IJJ model. We clarify the current-voltage characteristics of the IJJ's in the presence of an external electric field. It is predicted that the IJJ's show a dynamical transition to the voltage state as the external electric field is increased.

  10. TOPICAL REVIEW: Intrinsic Josephson junctions: recent developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurgens, A. A.

    2000-08-01

    Some recent developments in the fabrication of intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJ) and their application for studying high-temperature superconductors are discussed. The major advantages of IJJ and unsolved problems are outlined. The feasibility of three-terminal devices based on the stacked IJJ is briefly evaluated.

  11. 27 CFR 9.164 - River Junction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Junction AVA is located in southern San Joaquin County, California. The boundaries are as follows: (1... the San Joaquin River levee, near Benchmark 35 in T3S/R6E; (2) Then in a southeasterly direction, follow the levee along the San Joaquin River onto the Ripon, CA quadrangle map; (3) Then in a...

  12. 27 CFR 9.164 - River Junction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Junction AVA is located in southern San Joaquin County, California. The boundaries are as follows: (1... the San Joaquin River levee, near Benchmark 35 in T3S/R6E; (2) Then in a southeasterly direction, follow the levee along the San Joaquin River onto the Ripon, CA quadrangle map; (3) Then in a...

  13. 27 CFR 9.164 - River Junction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Junction AVA is located in southern San Joaquin County, California. The boundaries are as follows: (1... the San Joaquin River levee, near Benchmark 35 in T3S/R6E; (2) Then in a southeasterly direction, follow the levee along the San Joaquin River onto the Ripon, CA quadrangle map; (3) Then in a...

  14. 30 CFR 57.12007 - Junction box connection procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Junction box connection procedures. 57.12007... Electricity Surface and Underground § 57.12007 Junction box connection procedures. Trailing cable and power-cable connections to junction boxes shall not be made or broken under load....

  15. 30 CFR 57.12007 - Junction box connection procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Junction box connection procedures. 57.12007... Electricity Surface and Underground § 57.12007 Junction box connection procedures. Trailing cable and power-cable connections to junction boxes shall not be made or broken under load....

  16. 30 CFR 57.12007 - Junction box connection procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Junction box connection procedures. 57.12007... Electricity Surface and Underground § 57.12007 Junction box connection procedures. Trailing cable and power-cable connections to junction boxes shall not be made or broken under load....

  17. 30 CFR 75.602 - Trailing cable junctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Trailing cable junctions. 75.602 Section 75.602... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 75.602 Trailing cable junctions. When two or more trailing cables junction to the same distribution center, means shall be provided...

  18. 30 CFR 57.12007 - Junction box connection procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Junction box connection procedures. 57.12007... Electricity Surface and Underground § 57.12007 Junction box connection procedures. Trailing cable and power-cable connections to junction boxes shall not be made or broken under load....

  19. 30 CFR 75.602 - Trailing cable junctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Trailing cable junctions. 75.602 Section 75.602... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 75.602 Trailing cable junctions. When two or more trailing cables junction to the same distribution center, means shall be provided...

  20. 30 CFR 75.602 - Trailing cable junctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Trailing cable junctions. 75.602 Section 75.602... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 75.602 Trailing cable junctions. When two or more trailing cables junction to the same distribution center, means shall be provided...

  1. 30 CFR 75.602 - Trailing cable junctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Trailing cable junctions. 75.602 Section 75.602... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 75.602 Trailing cable junctions. When two or more trailing cables junction to the same distribution center, means shall be provided...

  2. 30 CFR 57.12007 - Junction box connection procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Junction box connection procedures. 57.12007... Electricity Surface and Underground § 57.12007 Junction box connection procedures. Trailing cable and power-cable connections to junction boxes shall not be made or broken under load....

  3. 30 CFR 75.602 - Trailing cable junctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Trailing cable junctions. 75.602 Section 75.602... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 75.602 Trailing cable junctions. When two or more trailing cables junction to the same distribution center, means shall be provided...

  4. A power balance model for converging and diverging flow junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Guffey, S.E. ); Fraser, D.A. )

    1989-01-01

    The authors propose that pressures across a junction of flows are best described by potential, kinetic, and dissipated (lost) power. It is demonstrated that differences in Bernoulli constants up- and downstream of junctions are not proportional to energy losses even in the trivial case of zero junction losses.

  5. Overview of the Grand Junction Office from Bluff east of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Overview of the Grand Junction Office from Bluff east of facility. Note Buildings #35. #33 and #31A in lower left of photograph. VIEW WEST - Department of Energy, Grand Junction Office, 2597 B3/4 Road, Grand Junction, Mesa County, CO

  6. Dependence of proximity-induced supercurrent on junction length in multilayer-graphene Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanda, A.; Sato, T.; Goto, H.; Tomori, H.; Takana, S.; Ootuka, Y.; Tsukagoshi, K.

    2010-11-01

    We report experimental observation of the proximity-induced supercurrent in superconductor-multilayer graphene-superconductor junctions. We find that the supercurrent is a linearly decreasing function of the junction length (separation of the superconducting electrodes), which is quite different from the usual behavior of exponential dependence. We suggest that this behavior originates from the intrinsic large contact resistance between the multilayer and the superconducting electrodes.

  7. 75 FR 6094 - Modification of Class E Airspace; Grand Junction, CO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-08

    ... Federal Register a notice of proposed rulemaking to amend Class E airspace at Grand Junction, CO (74 FR... Junction, CO Grand Junction Regional, Grand Junction, CO (Lat. 39 07'21'' N., long. 108 31'36'' W.) Grand Junction VORTAC (Lat. 39 03'34'' N., long. 108 47'33'' W.) Grand Junction Localizer (Lat. 39 07'04''...

  8. Inverted Three-Junction Tandem Thermophotovoltaic Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojtczuk, Steven

    2012-01-01

    An InGaAs-based three-junction (3J) tandem thermophotovoltaic (TPV) cell has been investigated to utilize more of the blackbody spectrum (from a 1,100 C general purpose heat source GPHS) efficiently. The tandem consists of three vertically stacked subcells, a 0.74-eV InGaAs cell, a 0.6- eV InGaAs cell, and a 0.55-eV InGaAs cell, as well as two interconnecting tunnel junctions. A greater than 20% TPV system efficiency was achieved by another group with a 1,040 C blackbody using a single-bandgap 0.6- eV InGaAs cell MIM (monolithic interconnected module) (30 lateral junctions) that delivered about 12 V/30 or 0.4 V/junction. It is expected that a three-bandgap tandem MIM will eventually have about 3 this voltage (1.15 V) and about half the current. A 4 A/cm2 would be generated by a single-bandgap 0.6-V InGaAs MIM, as opposed to the 2 A/cm2 available from the same spectrum when split among the three series-connected junctions in the tandem stack. This would then be about a 50% increase (3xVoc, 0.5xIsc) in output power if the proposed tandem replaced the single- bandgap MIM. The advantage of the innovation, if successful, would be a 50% increase in power conversion efficiency from radioisotope heat sources using existing thermophotovoltaics. Up to 50% more power would be generated for radioisotope GPHS deep space missions. This type of InGaAs multijunction stack could be used with terrestrial concentrator solar cells to increase efficiency from 41 to 45% or more.

  9. Hormonal regulation of hepatocyte tight junctional permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, P.J.; Miyai, K.; Steinbach, J.H.; Hardison, W.G.M. Univ. of California, San Diego )

    1988-10-01

    The authors have investigated the effects of hormones on the permeability of the hepatocyte tight junction to two probes, ({sup 14}C)sucrose and horseradish peroxidase, using one-pass perfused rat livers. Using a single injection of horseradish peroxidase the authors have demonstrated that this probe can enter bile by two pathways that are kinetically distinct, a fast pathway, which corresponds to the passage of the probe through the hepatocyte tight junctions, and a slow pathway, which corresponds to the transcytotic entry into bile. The passage of horseradish peroxidase through the hepatocyte tight junctions was confirmed by electron microscopic histochemistry. Vasopressin, epinephrine, and angiotensin II, hormones that act in the hepatocyte through the intracellular mediators calcium, the inositol polyphosphates, and diacylglycerol, increased the bile-to-perfusion fluid ratio of ({sup 14}C)sucrose and the rapid entry of horseradish peroxidase into bile, indicating that the permeability of the tight junctions to these probes was increased. The effect of these hormones was dose dependent and in the cases of angiotensin II and epinephrine was inhibited by the specific inhibitors (Sar{sup 1},Thr{sup 8})angiotensin II and prazosin, respectively. Dibutyryl adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate did not affect the ({sup 14}C)sucrose bile-to-perfusion fluid ratio or the fast entry of horseradish peroxidase into bile. These results suggest that the hepatocyte tight junction can no longer be considered a static system of pores separating blood from bile. It is rather a dynamic barrier potentially capable of influencing the composition of the bile.

  10. The effects of junction depth and impurity concentration on ion-implanted, junction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Neville, R.C.

    1980-12-01

    This paper presents data resulting from tests on the experimental optimization of the ion-implanted region of horizontal junction, silicon, ion-implanted P+N and N+P solar cells. The experimental data are compared to theoretical predictions based on a simple model and to data obtained with diffused junction solar cells (1). Optimum junction depth and average ion-implanted layer concentration for ion-implanted, silicon, PN junction solar cells under non-concentrated sunlight (approximately AMI conditions) appear to be 0.5..mu..m and 5X10/sup 18/ atoms/cm/sup 3/, respectively. Variation in solar cell efficiency with junction depth is rapid between 0.1 and 0.5..mu..m. Variations of efficiency in response to changes in concentration are minimal over the range tested. Experiments under various illumination conditions indicate increasing efficiency as insolation increases from 83mw/cm/sup 2/ to 100 mw/cm/sup 2/. Comparison with diffused junction, silicon solar cells indicates a potentially greater efficiency for ion-implanted solar cells. However, variation in efficiency between individual solar cells is sufficiently great to warrant further experimentation before reaching any final conclusions.

  11. Thermopower measurements of atomic and molecular junctions using microheater-embedded mechanically-controllable break junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsui, Makusu; Morikawa, Takanori; Arima, Akihide; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2015-03-01

    There has been growing interest in developing high-performance thermoelectric materials for realizing thermoelectric power generation. Quantum confinement effects in low-dimensional structures are expected to provide high electronic density of states for enhanced thermopower, and thus considered as a promising approach for achieving a high figure of merit (M. S. Dresselhaus et al., Adv. Mat. 19 (2007) 1043-1053). From this respect, it is interesting to study thermoelectric properties of atomic and molecular junctions and evaluate their potential as a thermoelectric material. Recently, we have developed a heater-embedded micro-fabricated mechanically-controllable break junction (MCBJ) for investigating the thermoelectric transport in single-atom and -molecule junctions. Using the MCBJ devices, we could repeatedly form stable junctions at room temperatures via a self-breaking mechanism with one side being heated by the adjacent microheater. In my presentation, I will show the results of simultaneous measurements of the thermoelectric voltage and the electrical conductance of atom-sized Au junctions and Au-benzenedithiol-Au junctions and discuss on the geometrical dependence of thermoelectric transport.

  12. Model building to facilitate understanding of holliday junction and heteroduplex formation, and holliday junction resolution.

    PubMed

    Selvarajah, Geeta; Selvarajah, Susila

    2016-07-01

    Students frequently expressed difficulty in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in chromosomal recombination. Therefore, we explored alternative methods for presenting the two concepts of the double-strand break model: Holliday junction and heteroduplex formation, and Holliday junction resolution. In addition to a lecture and computer-animated video, we included a model building activity using pipe cleaners. Biotechnology undergraduates (n = 108) used the model to simulate Holliday junction and heteroduplex formation, and Holliday junction resolution. Based on student perception, an average of 12.85 and 78.35% students claimed that they completely and partially understood the two concepts, respectively. A test conducted to ascertain their understanding about the two concepts showed that 66.1% of the students provided the correct response to the three multiple choice questions. A majority of the 108 students attributed the inclusion of model building to their better understanding of Holliday junction and heteroduplex formation, and Holliday junction resolution. This underlines the importance of incorporating model building, particularly in concepts that require spatial visualization. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44(4):381-390, 2016. PMID:26899144

  13. Carotenoid composition and vitamin A value in ají (Capsicum baccatum L.) and rocoto (C. pubescens R. & P.), 2 pepper species from the Andean region.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Burruezo, Adrián; González-Mas, Maria del Carmen; Nuez, Fernando

    2010-10-01

    The carotenoid patterns of fully ripe fruits from 12 Bolivian accessions of the Andean peppers Capsicum baccatum (ají) and C. pubescens (rocoto) were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-photodiode array detector (PDA)-mass spectrometry (MS). We include 2 California Wonder cultivars as C. annuum controls. A total of 16 carotenoids were identified and differences among species were mostly found at the quantitative level. Among red-fruited genotypes, capsanthin was the main carotenoid in the 3 species (25% to 50% contribution to carotenoid fraction), although ajíes contained the lowest contribution of this carotenoid. In addition, the contribution of capsanthin 5,6-epoxide to total carotenoids in this species was high (11% to 27%) in comparison to rocotos and red C. annuum. Antheraxanthin and violaxanthin were, in general, the next most relevant carotenoids in the red Andean peppers (6.1% to 10.6%). Violaxanthin was the major carotenoid in yellow-/orange-fruited genotypes of the 3 species (37% to 68% total carotenoids), although yellow rocotos were characterized by lower levels (<45%). Cis-violaxanthin, antheraxanthin, and lutein were the next most relevant carotenoids in the yellow/orange Andean peppers (5% to 14%). As a whole, rocotos showed the highest contributions of provitamin A carotenoids to the carotenoid fraction. In terms of nutritional contribution, both ajíes and rocotos provide a remarkable provitamin A activity, with several accessions showing a content in retinol equivalents higher than California Wonder controls. Furthermore, levels of lutein in yellow/orange ajíes and rocotos were clearly higher than California Wonder pepper (≥1000 μg·100/g). Finally, the Andean peppers, particularly red ajíes, can be also considered as a noticeable source of capsanthin, the most powerful antioxidant compound among pepper carotenoids. Practical Application: Capsicum peppers are known for their content in carotenoids, although there is

  14. The critical current of point symmetric Josephson tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaco, Roberto

    2016-06-01

    The physics of Josephson tunnel junctions drastically depends on their geometrical configurations. The shape of the junction determines the specific form of the magnetic-field dependence of its Josephson current. Here we address the magnetic diffraction patterns of specially shaped planar Josephson tunnel junctions in the presence of an in-plane magnetic field of arbitrary orientations. We focus on a wide ensemble of junctions whose shape is invariant under point reflection. We analyze the implications of this type of isometry and derive the threshold curves of junctions whose shape is the union or the relative complement of two point symmetric plane figures.

  15. Indentation Tests Reveal Geometry-Regulated Stiffening of Nanotube Junctions.

    PubMed

    Ozden, Sehmus; Yang, Yang; Tiwary, Chandra Sekhar; Bhowmick, Sanjit; Asif, Syed; Penev, Evgeni S; Yakobson, Boris I; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2016-01-13

    Here we report a unique method to locally determine the mechanical response of individual covalent junctions between carbon nanotubes (CNTs), in various configurations such as "X", "Y", and "Λ"-like. The setup is based on in situ indentation using a picoindenter integrated within a scanning electron microscope. This allows for precise mapping between junction geometry and mechanical behavior and uncovers geometry-regulated junction stiffening. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that the dominant contribution to the nanoindentation response is due to the CNT walls stretching at the junction. Targeted synthesis of desired junction geometries can therefore provide a "structural alphabet" for construction of macroscopic CNT networks with tunable mechanical response. PMID:26618517

  16. Dlg5 maintains apical polarity by promoting membrane localization of Crumbs during Drosophila oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jun; Wang, Heng; Kang, Di; Guo, Xuan; Wan, Ping; Wang, Dou; Chen, Jiong

    2016-01-01

    Apical-basal polarity plays critical roles in the functions of epithelial tissues. However, the mechanisms of epithelial polarity establishment and maintenance remain to be fully elucidated. Here we show that the membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) family protein Dlg5 is required for the maintenance of apical polarity of follicle epithelium during Drosophila oogenesis. Dlg5 localizes at the apical membrane and adherens junction (AJ) of follicle epithelium in early stage egg chambers. Specifically, we demonstrate that the major function of Dlg5 is to promote apical membrane localization of Crumbs, since overexpression of Crumbs but not other major apical or AJ components could rescue epithelial polarity defects resulted from loss of Dlg5. Furthermore, we performed a structure-function analysis of Dlg5 and found that the C-terminal PDZ3 and PDZ4 domains are required for all Dlg5’s functions as well as its ability to localize to apical membrane. The N-terminal coiled-coil motif could be individually targeted to the apical membrane, while the central linker region could be targeted to AJ. Lastly, the MAGUK core domains of PDZ4-SH3-GUK could be individually targeted to apical, AJ and basolateral membranes. PMID:27211898

  17. Dlg5 maintains apical polarity by promoting membrane localization of Crumbs during Drosophila oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jun; Wang, Heng; Kang, Di; Guo, Xuan; Wan, Ping; Wang, Dou; Chen, Jiong

    2016-01-01

    Apical-basal polarity plays critical roles in the functions of epithelial tissues. However, the mechanisms of epithelial polarity establishment and maintenance remain to be fully elucidated. Here we show that the membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) family protein Dlg5 is required for the maintenance of apical polarity of follicle epithelium during Drosophila oogenesis. Dlg5 localizes at the apical membrane and adherens junction (AJ) of follicle epithelium in early stage egg chambers. Specifically, we demonstrate that the major function of Dlg5 is to promote apical membrane localization of Crumbs, since overexpression of Crumbs but not other major apical or AJ components could rescue epithelial polarity defects resulted from loss of Dlg5. Furthermore, we performed a structure-function analysis of Dlg5 and found that the C-terminal PDZ3 and PDZ4 domains are required for all Dlg5's functions as well as its ability to localize to apical membrane. The N-terminal coiled-coil motif could be individually targeted to the apical membrane, while the central linker region could be targeted to AJ. Lastly, the MAGUK core domains of PDZ4-SH3-GUK could be individually targeted to apical, AJ and basolateral membranes. PMID:27211898

  18. Sphingomyelin metabolism is involved in the differentiation of MDCK cells induced by environmental hypertonicity

    PubMed Central

    Favale, Nicolás Octavio; Santacreu, Bruno Jaime; Pescio, Lucila Gisele; Marquez, Maria Gabriela; Sterin-Speziale, Norma Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids (SLs) are relevant lipid components of eukaryotic cells. Besides regulating various cellular processes, SLs provide the structural framework for plasma membrane organization. Particularly, SM is associated with detergent-resistant microdomains. We have previously shown that the adherens junction (AJ) complex, the relevant cell-cell adhesion structure involved in cell differentiation and tissue organization, is located in an SM-rich membrane lipid domain. We have also demonstrated that under hypertonic conditions, Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells acquire a differentiated phenotype with changes in SL metabolism. For these reasons, we decided to evaluate whether SM metabolism is involved in the acquisition of the differentiated phenotype of MDCK cells. We found that SM synthesis mediated by SM synthase 1 is involved in hypertonicity-induced formation of mature AJs, necessary for correct epithelial cell differentiation. Inhibition of SM synthesis impaired the acquisition of mature AJs, evoking a disintegration-like process reflected by the dissipation of E-cadherin and β- and α-catenins from the AJ complex. As a consequence, MDCK cells did not develop the hypertonicity-induced differentiated epithelial cell phenotype. PMID:25670801

  19. Stereoelectronic switching in single-molecule junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Timothy A.; Li, Haixing; Steigerwald, Michael L.; Venkataraman, Latha; Nuckolls, Colin

    2015-03-01

    A new intersection between reaction chemistry and electronic circuitry is emerging from the ultraminiaturization of electronic devices. Over decades chemists have developed a nuanced understanding of stereoelectronics to establish how the electronic properties of molecules relate to their conformation; the recent advent of single-molecule break-junction techniques provides the means to alter this conformation with a level of control previously unimagined. Here we unite these ideas by demonstrating the first single-molecule switch that operates through a stereoelectronic effect. We demonstrate this behaviour in permethyloligosilanes with methylthiomethyl electrode linkers. The strong σ conjugation in the oligosilane backbone couples the stereoelectronic properties of the sulfur-methylene σ bonds that terminate the molecule. Theoretical calculations support the existence of three distinct dihedral conformations that differ drastically in their electronic character. We can shift between these three species by simply lengthening or compressing the molecular junction, and, in doing so, we can switch conductance digitally between two states.

  20. Fabrication and characterization of graphene PN junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dennis; Zhou, Xiaodong; Dadgar, Ali; Agnihotri, Pratik; Lee, Ji Ung; Reuter, Mark; Ross, Frances; Pasupathy, Abhay

    Theoretical predictions of relativistic Klein tunneling and Veselago lensing in graphene have inspired efforts to fabricate graphene p-n junctions where such phenomena could be realized and studied via electronic transport or scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Here we will discuss the interplay between device geometry and our measurements in a 4-probe STM, which allows for simultaneous back gating, biasing, and scanning of a micromechanically exfoliated graphene sample. A sharp p-n junction is essential to the manifestation of these aforementioned effects, and we examine the benefits and drawbacks of several routes toward this goal from a fabrication standpoint. These methods include lithographically pre-patterned substrates and the stacking of vertical heterostructures. Finally, we will describe our subsequent characterization results for each, including information about topography and spatial mapping of the density of states. This work is supported by NSF IGERT (DGE-1069240).

  1. Junction conditions in extended Teleparallel gravities

    SciTech Connect

    De la Cruz-Dombriz, Álvaro; Dunsby, Peter K.S.; Sáez-Gómez, Diego E-mail: peter.dunsby@uct.ac.za

    2014-12-01

    In the context of extended Teleparallel gravity theories, we address the issue of junction conditions required to guarantee the correct matching of different regions of spacetime. In the absence of shells/branes, these conditions turn out to be more restrictive than their counterparts in General Relativity as in other extended theories of gravity. In fact, the general junction conditions on the matching hypersurfaces depend on the underlying theory and a new condition on the induced tetrads in order to avoid delta-like distributions in the field equations. This result imposes strict consequences on the viability of standard solutions such as the Einstein-Straus-like construction. We find that the continuity of the scalar torsion is required in order to recover the usual General Relativity results.

  2. Vibrational Heat Transport in Molecular Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segal, Dvira; Agarwalla, Bijay Kumar

    2016-05-01

    We review studies of vibrational energy transfer in a molecular junction geometry, consisting of a molecule bridging two heat reservoirs, solids or large chemical compounds. This setup is of interest for applications in molecular electronics, thermoelectrics, and nanophononics, and for addressing basic questions in the theory of classical and quantum transport. Calculations show that system size, disorder, structure, dimensionality, internal anharmonicities, contact interaction, and quantum coherent effects are factors that combine to determine the predominant mechanism (ballistic/diffusive), effectiveness (poor/good), and functionality (linear/nonlinear) of thermal conduction at the nanoscale. We review recent experiments and relevant calculations of quantum heat transfer in molecular junctions. We recount the Landauer approach, appropriate for the study of elastic (harmonic) phononic transport, and outline techniques that incorporate molecular anharmonicities. Theoretical methods are described along with examples illustrating the challenge of reaching control over vibrational heat conduction in molecules.

  3. Magnetoamplification in a Bipolar Magnetic Junction Transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangaraju, N.; Peters, J. A.; Wessels, B. W.

    2010-09-01

    We have demonstrated the first bipolar magnetic junction transistor using a dilute magnetic semiconductor. For an InMnAs p-n-p transistor magnetoamplification is observed at room temperature. The observed magnetoamplification is attributed to the magnetoresistance of the magnetic semiconductor InMnAs heterojunction. The magnetic field dependence of the transistor characteristics confirm that the magnetoamplification results from the junction magnetoresistance. To describe the experimentally observed transistor characteristics, we propose a modified Ebers-Moll model that includes a series magnetoresistance attributed to spin-selective conduction. The capability of magnetic field control of the amplification in an all-semiconductor transistor at room temperature potentially enables the creation of new computer logic architecture where the spin of the carriers is utilized.

  4. Laminin 332 in junctional epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Kiritsi, Dimitra; Has, Cristina; Bruckner-Tuderman, Leena

    2013-01-01

    Laminin 332 is an essential component of the dermal-epidermal junction, a highly specialized basement membrane zone that attaches the epidermis to the dermis and thereby provides skin integrity and resistance to external mechanical forces. Mutations in the LAMA3, LAMB3 and LAMC2 genes that encode the three constituent polypeptide chains, α3, β3 and γ2, abrogate or perturb the functions of laminin 332. The phenotypic consequences are diminished dermal-epidermal adhesion and, as clinical symptoms, skin fragility and mechanically induced blistering. The disorder is designated as junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB). This article delineates the signs and symptoms of the different forms of JEB, the mutational spectrum, genotype-phenotype correlations as well as perspectives for future molecular therapies. PMID:23076207

  5. Dissipation and traversal time in Josephson junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Cacciari, Ilaria; Ranfagni, Anedio; Moretti, Paolo

    2010-05-01

    The various ways of evaluating dissipative effects in macroscopic quantum tunneling are re-examined. The results obtained by using functional integration, while confirming those of previously given treatments, enable a comparison with available experimental results relative to Josephson junctions. A criterion based on the shortening of the semiclassical traversal time tau of the barrier with regard to dissipation can be established, according to which DELTAtau/tau > or approx. N/Q, where Q is the quality factor of the junction and N is a numerical constant of order unity. The best agreement with the experiments is obtained for N=1.11, as it results from a semiempirical analysis based on an increase in the potential barrier caused by dissipative effects.

  6. Vibrational Heat Transport in Molecular Junctions.

    PubMed

    Segal, Dvira; Agarwalla, Bijay Kumar

    2016-05-27

    We review studies of vibrational energy transfer in a molecular junction geometry, consisting of a molecule bridging two heat reservoirs, solids or large chemical compounds. This setup is of interest for applications in molecular electronics, thermoelectrics, and nanophononics, and for addressing basic questions in the theory of classical and quantum transport. Calculations show that system size, disorder, structure, dimensionality, internal anharmonicities, contact interaction, and quantum coherent effects are factors that combine to determine the predominant mechanism (ballistic/diffusive), effectiveness (poor/good), and functionality (linear/nonlinear) of thermal conduction at the nanoscale. We review recent experiments and relevant calculations of quantum heat transfer in molecular junctions. We recount the Landauer approach, appropriate for the study of elastic (harmonic) phononic transport, and outline techniques that incorporate molecular anharmonicities. Theoretical methods are described along with examples illustrating the challenge of reaching control over vibrational heat conduction in molecules. PMID:27215814

  7. Cusps on cosmic superstrings with junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Anne-Christine; Rajamanoharan, Senthooran; Nelson, William; Sakellariadou, Mairi E-mail: william.nelson@kcl.ac.uk E-mail: mairi.sakellariadou@kcl.ac.uk

    2008-11-15

    The existence of cusps on non-periodic strings ending on D-branes is demonstrated and the conditions for which such cusps are generic are derived. The dynamics of F-strings, D-strings and FD-string junctions are investigated. It is shown that pairs of FD-string junctions, such as would form after intercommutations of F-strings and D-strings, generically contain cusps. This new feature of cosmic superstrings opens up the possibility of extra channels of energy loss from a string network. The phenomenology of cusps on such cosmic superstring networks is compared to that of cusps formed on networks of their field theory analogues, the standard cosmic strings.

  8. Boson Josephson Junction with Trapped Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghavan, S.; Smerzi, A.; Fantoni, S.; Shenoy, S. R.

    We consider coherent atomic tunneling between two weakly coupled Bose-Einstein condensates at T=0 in a double-well trap. The condensate dynamics of the macroscopic amplitudes in the two wells is modeled by two Gross-Pitaevskii equations (GPE) coupled by a tunneling matrix element. Analytic elliptic function solutions are obtained for the time evolution of the inter-well fractional population imbalance z(t) (related to the condensate phase difference) of the Boson Josephson junction (BJJ). Surprisingly, the neutral-atom BJJ shows (non-sinusoidal generalizations of) effects seen in charged-electron superconductor Josephson junctions (SJJ). The BJJ elliptic-function behavior has a singular dependence on a GPE parameter ratio Λ at a critical ratio Λ=Λc, beyond which a novel 'macroscopic quantum self-trapping' effect sets in with a non-zero time-averaged imbalance ≠0.

  9. Laminin 332 in junctional epidermolysis bullosa

    PubMed Central

    Kiritsi, Dimitra; Has, Cristina; Bruckner-Tuderman, Leena

    2013-01-01

    Laminin 332 is an essential component of the dermal-epidermal junction, a highly specialized basement membrane zone that attaches the epidermis to the dermis and thereby provides skin integrity and resistance to external mechanical forces. Mutations in the LAMA3, LAMB3 and LAMC2 genes that encode the three constituent polypeptide chains, α3, β3 and γ2, abrogate or perturb the functions of laminin 332. The phenotypic consequences are diminished dermal-epidermal adhesion and, as clinical symptoms, skin fragility and mechanically induced blistering. The disorder is designated as junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB). This article delineates the signs and symptoms of the different forms of JEB, the mutational spectrum, genotype-phenotype correlations as well as perspectives for future molecular therapies. PMID:23076207

  10. Lycopene oxidation product enhances gap junctional communication.

    PubMed

    Aust, O; Ale-Agha, N; Zhang, L; Wollersen, H; Sies, H; Stahl, W

    2003-10-01

    Carotenoids as well as their metabolites and oxidation products stimulate gap junctional communication (GJC) between cells, which is thought to be one of the protective mechanisms related to cancer-preventive activities of these compounds. Increased intake of lycopene by consumption of tomatoes or tomato products has been epidemiologically associated with a diminished risk of prostate cancer. Here, we report a stimulatory effect of a lycopene oxidation product on GJC in rat liver epithelial WB-F344 cells. The active compound was obtained by complete in vitro oxidation of lycopene with hydrogen peroxide/osmium tetroxide. For structural analysis high performance liquid chromatography, gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry, ultraviolet/visible-, and infrared spectrophotometry were applied. The biologically active oxidation product was identified as 2,7,11-trimethyl-tetradecahexaene-1,14-dial. The present data indicate a potential role of lycopene degradation products in cell signaling enhancing cell-to-cell communication via gap junctions. PMID:12909274

  11. K-Ras mutant fraction in A/J mouse lung increases as a function of benzo[a]pyrene dose

    EPA Science Inventory

    K-Ras mutant fraction (MF) was measured to examine the default assumption of low dose linearity in the benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) mutational response. Groups of ten male A/J mice (7-9 weeks-old) received a single i.p. injection of 0, 0.05, 0.5, 5, or 50 mg/kg B[a]P, and were sacrifi...

  12. Josephson Junctions Help Measure Resonance And Dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Javadi, Hamid H. S.; Mcgrath, William R.; Bumble, Bruce; Leduc, Henry G.

    1994-01-01

    Electrical characteristics of superconducting microstrip transmission lines measured at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths. Submicron Josephson (super-conductor/insulator/superconductor) junctions used as both voltage-controlled oscillators and detectors to measure frequencies (in range of hundreds of gigahertz) of high-order resonant electromagnetic modes of superconducting microstrip transmission-line resonators. This oscillator/detector approach similar to vacuum-tube grid dip meters and transistor dip meters used to probe resonances at much lower frequencies.

  13. Electron irradiation of tandem junction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anspaugh, B. E.; Miyahira, T. F.; Scott-Monck, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    The electrical behavior of 100 micron thick tandem junction solar cells manufactured by Texas Instruments was studied as a function of 1 MeV electron fluence, photon irradiation, and 60 C annealing. These cells are found to degrade rapidly with radiation, the most serious loss occurring in the blue end of the cell's spectral response. No photon degradation was found to occur, but the cells did anneal a small amount at 60 C.

  14. Peltier Junction heats and cools car seat

    SciTech Connect

    Gottschalk, M.A.

    1994-10-10

    Electrically heated seats may soon become heated and cooled seats. The design called the CCS module exploits the heat-pump capability of a class of semiconductor thermoelectric devices (TEDs) known as Peltier Junction. Every CCS module contain two TEDs. Heating and cooling occurs through convection and conduction. The heart of the system is the thermoelectric heat pump. This is originally conceived as the sole heating/cooling options for a prototype electric vehicle.

  15. Semiconductor junction formation by directed heat

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Robert B.

    1988-03-24

    The process of the invention includes applying precursors 6 with N- and P-type dopants therein to a silicon web 2, with the web 2 then being baked in an oven 10 to drive off excessive solvents, and the web 2 is then heated using a pulsed high intensity light in a mechanism 12 at 1100.degree.-1150.degree. C. for about 10 seconds to simultaneously form semiconductor junctions in both faces of the web.

  16. Electronic and optical spectroscopy of molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preiner, Michael J.

    Electronic transport through molecules has been intensively studied in recent years, due to scientific interest in fundamental questions about charge transport and the technological promise of nanoscale circuitry. A wide range of range of experimental platforms have been developed to electronically probe both single molecules and molecular monolayers. However, it remains challenging to fabricate reliable electronic contacts to molecules, and the vast majority of molecular electronic architectures are not amenable to standard characterization techniques, such as optical spectroscopy. Thus the field of molecular electronics has been hampered with problems of reproducibility, and many fundamental questions about electronic transport remain unanswered. This thesis describes four significant contributions towards the fabrication and characterization of molecular electronic devices: (1) The development of a new method for creating robust, large area junctions where the electronic transport is through a single monolayer of molecules. This method utilizes atomic layer deposition (ALD) to grow an ultrathin oxide layer on top of a molecular monolayer, which protects the molecules against subsequent processing. (2) A new method for rapid imaging and analysis of single defects in molecular monolayers. This method also electrically passivates defects as it labels them. (3) Hot carrier spectroscopy of molecular junctions. Using optically excited hot carriers, we demonstrate the ability to probe the energy level lineup inside buried molecular junctions. (4) Efficient coupling of optical fields to metal-insulator-metal (MIM) surface plasmon modes. We show both theoretical and experimental work illustrating the ability to create very intense optical fields inside MIM systems. The intense fields generated in this manner have natural extensions to a variety of applications, such as photon assisted tunneling in molecular junctions, optical modulators, and ultrafast optoelectronic

  17. An epitaxial ferroelectric tunnel junction on silicon.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhipeng; Guo, Xiao; Lu, Hui-Bin; Zhang, Zaoli; Song, Dongsheng; Cheng, Shaobo; Bosman, Michel; Zhu, Jing; Dong, Zhili; Zhu, Weiguang

    2014-11-12

    Epitaxially grown functional perovskites on silicon (001) and the ferroelectricity of a 3.2 nm thick BaTiO3 barrier layer are demonstrated. The polarization-switching-induced change in tunneling resistance is measured to be two orders of magnitude. The obtained results suggest the possibility of integrating ferroelectric tunnel junctions as binary data storage media in non-volatile memory cells on a silicon platform. PMID:25200550

  18. Quantum dynamics in the bosonic Josephson junction

    SciTech Connect

    Chuchem, Maya; Cohen, Doron; Smith-Mannschott, Katrina; Hiller, Moritz; Kottos, Tsampikos; Vardi, Amichay

    2010-11-15

    We employ a semiclassical picture to study dynamics in a bosonic Josephson junction with various initial conditions. Phase diffusion of coherent preparations in the Josephson regime is shown to depend on the initial relative phase between the two condensates. For initially incoherent condensates, we find a universal value for the buildup of coherence in the Josephson regime. In addition, we contrast two seemingly similar on-separatrix coherent preparations, finding striking differences in their convergence to classicality as the number of particles increases.

  19. Inhibition of Lung Carcinogenesis by 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 and 9-cis Retinoic Acid in the A/J Mouse Model: Evidence of Retinoid Mitigation of Vitamin D Toxicity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    9-cis-retinoic acid (9cRA) and 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D) show promise as potential chemopreventive agents. We examined 9cRA and 1,25D, alone and in combination, for their potential to inhibit carcinogen (NNK)-induced lung carcinogenesis in A/J mice. A/J mice (n=14/group) were treated wit...

  20. IDENTIFICATION OF STEREOCHEMICAL CONFIGURATIONS OF CYCLOPENTA[CD]PYRENE-DNA ADDUCTS IN STRAIN A/J MOUSE LUNG AND C3H10T1/2CL8 CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identification of Sterochemical Configurations of Cyclopent A[cd]Pyrene DNA Adducts in Strain A/J Mouse Lung and C3H10T1/2CL8 Cells.

    Four major and several minor DNA adducts were resolved by 32P-postlabeling analysis of DNA from strain A/J mouse lung and C3H10T1/2CL8 (C3H...

  1. Single-molecule junctions beyond electronic transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aradhya, Sriharsha V.; Venkataraman, Latha

    2013-06-01

    The idea of using individual molecules as active electronic components provided the impetus to develop a variety of experimental platforms to probe their electronic transport properties. Among these, single-molecule junctions in a metal-molecule-metal motif have contributed significantly to our fundamental understanding of the principles required to realize molecular-scale electronic components from resistive wires to reversible switches. The success of these techniques and the growing interest of other disciplines in single-molecule-level characterization are prompting new approaches to investigate metal-molecule-metal junctions with multiple probes. Going beyond electronic transport characterization, these new studies are highlighting both the fundamental and applied aspects of mechanical, optical and thermoelectric properties at the atomic and molecular scales. Furthermore, experimental demonstrations of quantum interference and manipulation of electronic and nuclear spins in single-molecule circuits are heralding new device concepts with no classical analogues. In this Review, we present the emerging methods being used to interrogate multiple properties in single molecule-based devices, detail how these measurements have advanced our understanding of the structure-function relationships in molecular junctions, and discuss the potential for future research and applications.

  2. Josephson junction in a thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Kogan, V. G.; Dobrovitski, V. V.; Clem, J. R.; Mawatari, Yasunori; Mints, R. G.

    2001-04-01

    The phase difference {phi}(y) for a vortex at a line Josephson junction in a thin film attenuates at large distances as a power law, unlike the case of a bulk junction where it approaches exponentially the constant values at infinities. The field of a Josephson vortex is a superposition of fields of standard Pearl vortices distributed along the junction with the line density {phi}'(y)/2{pi}. We study the integral equation for {phi}(y) and show that the phase is sensitive to the ratio l/{Lambda}, where l={lambda}{sub J}{sup 2}/{lambda}{sub L}, {Lambda}=2{lambda}{sub L}{sup 2}/d, {lambda}{sub L}, and {lambda}{sub J} are the London and Josephson penetration depths, and d is the film thickness. For l<<{Lambda}, the vortex ''core'' of the size l is nearly temperature independent, while the phase ''tail'' scales as l{Lambda}/y{sup 2}={lambda}{sub J}2{lambda}{sub L}/d/y{sup 2}; i.e., it diverges as T{yields}T{sub c}. For l>>{Lambda}, both the core and the tail have nearly the same characteristic length l{Lambda}.

  3. Radial pn Junction, Wire Array Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayes, Brendan Melville

    Radial pn junctions are potentially of interest in photovoltaics as a way to decouple light absorption from minority carrier collection. In a traditional planar design these occur in the same dimension, and this sets a lower limit on absorber material quality, as cells must both be thick enough to effectively absorb the solar spectrum while also having minority-carrier diffusion lengths long enough to allow for efficient collection of the photo-generated carriers. Therefore, highly efficient photovoltaic devices currently require highly pure materials and expensive processing techniques, while low cost devices generally operate at relatively low efficiency. The radial pn junction design sets the direction of light absorption perpendicular to the direction of minority-carrier transport, allowing the cell to be thick enough for effective light absorption, while also providing a short pathway for carrier collection. This is achieved by increasing the junction area, in order to decrease the path length any photogenerated minority carrier must travel, to be less than its minority carrier diffusion length. Realizing this geometry in an array of semiconducting wires, by for example depositing a single-crystalline inorganic semiconducting absorber layer at high deposition rates from the gas phase by the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism, allows for a "bottom up" approach to device fabrication, which can in principle dramatically reduce the materials costs associated with a cell.

  4. Functional analysis of tight junction organization.

    PubMed

    DiBona, D R

    1985-01-01

    The functional basis of tight junction design has been examined from the point of view that this rate-limiting barrier to paracellular transport is a multicompartment system. Review of the osmotic sensitivity of these structures points to the need for this sort of analysis for meaningful correlation of structure and function under a range of conditions. A similar conclusion is drawn with respect to results from voltage-clamping protocols where reversal of spontaneous transmural potential difference elicits parallel changes in both structure and function in much the same way as does reversal of naturally occurring osmotic gradients. In each case, it becomes necessary to regard the junction as a functionally polarized structure to account for observations of its rectifying properties. Lastly, the details of experimentally-induced junction deformation are examined in light of current theories of its organization; arguments are presented in favor of the view that the primary components of intramembranous organization (as viewed with freeze-fracture techniques) are lipidic rather than proteinaceous. PMID:4088839

  5. Very large thermophase in ferromagnetic Josephson junctions.

    PubMed

    Giazotto, F; Heikkilä, T T; Bergeret, F S

    2015-02-13

    The concept of thermophase refers to the appearance of a phase gradient inside a superconductor originating from the presence of an applied temperature bias across it. The resulting supercurrent flow may, in suitable conditions, fully counterbalance the temperature-bias-induced quasiparticle current therefore preventing the formation of any voltage drop, i.e., a thermovoltage, across the superconductor. Yet, the appearance of a thermophase is expected to occur in Josephson-coupled superconductors as well. Here, we theoretically investigate the thermoelectric response of a thermally biased Josephson junction based on a ferromagnetic insulator. In particular, we predict the occurrence of a very large thermophase that can reach π/2 across the contact for suitable temperatures and structure parameters; i.e., the quasiparticle thermal current can reach the critical current. Such a thermophase can be several orders of magnitude larger than that predicted to occur in conventional Josephson tunnel junctions. In order to assess experimentally the predicted very large thermophase, we propose a realistic setup realizable with state-of-the-art nanofabrication techniques and well-established materials, based on a superconducting quantum interference device. This effect could be of strong relevance in several low-temperature applications, for example, for revealing tiny temperature differences generated by coupling the electromagnetic radiation to one of the superconductors forming the junction. PMID:25723238

  6. Josephson Effect in SFNS Josephson Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karminskaya, T. Yu.; Kupriyanov, M. Yu.; Golubov, A. A.; Sidorenko, A. S.

    The critical current, I C, of Josephson junctions both in ramp-type (S-FN-S) and in overlap (SNF-FN-FNS, SN-FN-NS, SNF-N-FNS) geometries has been calculated in the frame of linearized Usadel equations (S-superconductor, F-ferromagnetic, N-normal metal). For the ramp-type structures, in which S electrodes contact directly the end walls of FN bilayer, it is shown that I C may exhibit damping oscillations as a function of both the distance L between superconductors and thicknesses d F,N of ferromagnetic and normal layers. The conditions have been determined under which the decay length and period of oscillation of I C(L) at fixed d F are of the order of decay length of superconducting correlations in the N metal, ξN, that is much larger than in F film. In overlap configurations, in which S films are placed on the top of NF bilayer, the studied junctions have complex SNF or SN electrodes (N or NF bilayer are situated under a superconductor). We demonstrate that in these geometries the critical current can exceed that in ramp-type junctions. Based on these results, the choice of the most practically applicable geometry is discussed.

  7. Primary thermometry with nanoscale tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Hirvi, K.P.; Kauppinen, J.P.; Paalanen, M.A.; Pekola, J.P.

    1995-10-01

    We have found current-voltage (I-V) and conductance (dI/dV) characteristics of arrays of nanoscale tunnel junctions between normal metal electrodes to exhibit suitable features for primary thermometry. The current through a uniform array depends on the ratio of the thermal energy k{sub B}T and the electrostatic charging energy E{sub c} of the islands between the junctions and is completely blocked by Coulomb repulsion at T=0 and at small voltages eV/2 {<=} Ec. In the opposite limit, k{sub B}T {much_gt} E{sub c}, the width of the conductance minimum scales linearly and universally with T and N, the number of tunnel junctions, and qualifies as a primary thermometer. The zero bias drop in the conductance is proportional to T{sup -1} and can be used as a secondary thermometer. We will show with Monte Carlo simulations how background charge and nonuniformities of the array will affect the thermometer.

  8. Fermi edge singularity in a tunnel junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jin; Sherkunov, Yury; D'Ambrumenil, Nicholas; Muzykantskii, Boris

    2010-03-01

    We present results on the non-equilibrium Fermi edge singularity (FES) problem in tunnel junctions. The FES, which is present in a Fermi gas subject to any sudden change of potential, manifests itself in the final state many body interaction between the electrons in the leads [1]. We establish a connection between the FES problem in a tunnel junction and the Full Counting Statistics (FCS) for the device [2]. We find that the exact profile of the changing potential (or the profile for the barrier opening and closing in the tunnel junction case) strongly affects the overlap between the initial and final state of the Fermi gas. We factorize the contribution to the FES into two approximately independent terms: one is connected with the short time opening process while the other is concerned with the long time asymptotic effect, namely the Anderson orthogonality catastrophe. We consider applications to a localized level coupled through a tunnel barrier to a 1D lead driven out of equilibrium [3]. References: [1] G. Mahan, Phys. Rev. 163, 1612 (1967); P. Nozieres and C. T. De Dominicis, Phys. Rev. 178, 1079 (1969); P. Anderson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 18, 1049 (1967) [2] J. Zhang, Y. Sherkunov, N. d'Ambrumenil, and B. Muzykantskii, ArXiv:0909.3427 [3] D. Abanin and L. Levitov, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 186803 (2005)

  9. Effects of cyclophosphamide and irradiation singly and in combination upon SaI growth in A/J mice

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.E.; Williams, W.L.; Tokuda, S.

    1987-05-01

    The effects of various doses of cyclophosphamide and low-dose (15 rads) radiation upon the size of tumors caused by 10(4) Sarcoma I (SaI) cells was determined. In intact A/Jax (A/J) recipients, the effect of the two agents singly and in combination was found to be dependent especially upon the dosage of cyclophosphamide and the time of its administration in relation to tumor inoculation. In cell transfer experiments to adult thymectomized, lethally irradiated, bone-marrow-restored (ATxXBM) mice, the effects of cyclophosphamide and irradiation appeared to be either overlapping (low dosages of cyclophosphamide) or additive (dosages of cyclophosphamide greater than or equal to 50 mg/kg), suggesting that the two agents exert their influence in dissimilar fashion, perhaps by injuring different cell types with the same basic function. The most pronounced conjoint effects are seen when low dosages of cyclophosphamide are given 3 days after the adoptive transfer of spleen cells from mice pretreated with low-dose irradiation. The implications of this observation with respect to immunotherapy are discussed.

  10. Early activation of natural killer and B cells in response to primary dengue virus infection in A/J mice.

    PubMed

    Shresta, Sujan; Kyle, Jennifer L; Robert Beatty, P; Harris, Eva

    2004-02-20

    Dengue virus (DEN) causes the most prevalent arthropod-borne viral illness in humans worldwide. Immune mechanisms that are involved in protection and pathogenesis of DEN infection have not been fully elucidated due largely to the lack of an adequate animal model. Therefore, as a first step, we characterized the primary immune response in immunocompetent inbred A/J mice that were infected intravenously with a non-mouse-adapted DEN type 2 (DEN2) strain. A subset (55%) of infected mice developed paralysis by 14 days post-infection (p.i.), harbored infectious DEN in the central nervous system (CNS), and had an elevated hematocrit and a decreased white blood cell (WBC) count. Immunologic studies detected (i). increased numbers of CD69(+) splenic natural killer (NK) and B cells at day 3 p.i., (ii). DEN-specific IgM and IgG responses by days 3 and 7 p.i., respectively, and (iii). splenocyte production of IFNgamma at day 14 p.i. We conclude that the early activities of NK cells, B cells and IgM, and later actions of IFNgamma and IgG likely play a role in the defense against DEN infection. PMID:14980486

  11. SN 2006aj Associated with XRF 060218 at Late Phases: Nucleosynthesis Signature of a Neutron Star-driven Explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, K.; Kawabata, K.; Tanaka, M.; Nomoto, K.; Tominaga, N.; Hattori, T.; Minezaki, T.; Kuroda, T.; Suzuki, T.; Deng, J.; Mazzali, P. A.; Pian, E.

    2007-03-01

    Optical spectroscopy and photometry of SN 2006aj have been performed with the Subaru telescope at t>200 days after GRB 060218, the X-ray flash with which it was associated. Strong nebular emission lines with an expansion velocity of v~7300 km s-1 were detected. The peaked but relatively broad [O I] λλ6300, 6363 suggests the existence of ~2 Msolar of materials in which ~1.3 Msolar is oxygen. The core might be produced by a mildly asymmetric explosion. The spectra are unique among SNe Ic in (1) the absence of [Ca II] λλ7291, 7324 emission and (2) a strong emission feature at ~7400 Å, which requires ~0.05 Msolar of newly synthesized 58Ni. Such a large amount of stable neutron-rich Ni strongly indicates the formation of a neutron star. The progenitor and the explosion energy are constrained to 18 Msolar<~Mms<~22 Msolar and E~(1-3)×1051 ergs, respectively. Based on data collected at Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan.

  12. Natural History of Helicobacter hepaticus Infection in Conventional A/J Mice, with Special Reference to Liver Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Avenaud, Philippe; Le Bail, Brigitte; Mayo, Kathryn; Marais, Armelle; Fawaz, Rabia; Bioulac-Sage, Paulette; Megraud, Francis

    2003-01-01

    It has been reported that Helicobacter hepaticus infection of mice leads to chronic hepatitis and hepatocarcinoma. Our aim was to monitor a cohort of 80 conventional A/J mice in which half of the mice were infected by H. hepaticus in order to study the evolution of the infection and the pathological changes in comparison to uninfected mice. H. hepaticus was detected by culture only in some colon and cecum specimens after 17 months of age, while PCR detected H. hepaticus in the intestines of all inoculated mice after only 5 months of infection. The percentage of mice in which H. hepaticus was detected in the gallbladder, bile ducts, and liver by PCR, as well as the number of bacteria present in the liver, tended to increase with increasing age and longer infection time. Anti-H. hepaticus immunoglobulin G antibodies were positive by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay only in inoculated mice. Pathological findings were also more frequent as the mice grew older: fibrosis was present (especially in the peripheral part of the liver), and significant portal inflammation including lymphoid nodules was present in almost all infected animals. Biliary lesions of neutrophilic acute cholangitis or lymphocytic cholangitis were noted. However, lesions were also observed in uninfected animals, although at a significantly lower level, and the only hepatocellular carcinoma occurred in an uninfected mouse. The evolution towards hepatocarcinoma is not always the endpoint and may depend on the bacterial strain and on the environmental conditions. PMID:12761159

  13. HER2 activation results in β-catenin-dependent changes in pulmonary epithelial permeability.

    PubMed

    Finigan, James H; Vasu, Vihas T; Thaikoottathil, Jyoti V; Mishra, Rangnath; Shatat, Mohammad A; Mason, Robert J; Kern, Jeffrey A

    2015-01-15

    The receptor tyrosine kinase human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) is known to regulate pulmonary epithelial barrier function; however, the mechanisms behind this effect remain unidentified. We hypothesized that HER2 signaling alters the epithelial barrier through an interaction with the adherens junction (AJ) protein β-catenin, leading to dissolution of the AJ. In quiescent pulmonary epithelial cells, HER2 and β-catenin colocalized along the lateral intercellular junction. HER2 activation by the ligand neuregulin-1 was associated with tyrosine phosphorylation of β-catenin, dissociation of β-catenin from E-cadherin, and decreased E-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion. All effects were blocked with the HER2 inhibitor lapatinib. β-Catenin knockdown using shRNA significantly attenuated neuregulin-1-induced decreases in pulmonary epithelial resistance in vitro. Our data indicate that HER2 interacts with β-catenin, leading to dissolution of the AJ, decreased cell-cell adhesion, and disruption of the pulmonary epithelial barrier. PMID:25326580

  14. Bioactivity and Bioavailability of Ginsenosides Are Dependent on the Glycosidase Activities of the A/J Mouse Intestinal Microbiome Defined by Pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Tao; Smith, Diane; Yang, Zhen; Gao, Song; Yin, Taijun; Jiang, Zhi-Hong; You, Ming; Gibbs, Richard A.; Petrosino, Joseph F.; Hu, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The ability of bacteria in the intestinal microbiome to convert naturally occurring primary ginsenosides in red ginseng extract or RGE to active secondary ginsenosides was investigated. Methods The anti-proliferative activity of ginsenosides was tested using the mouse lung cancer LM1 cells. Their permeabilities were evaluated in Caco-2 cell monolayers. Systemic exposure of secondary ginsenosides was determined in A/J mice. 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing was used to determine membership and abundance of bacteria in the intestinal microbiome. Results Secondary ginsenoside C-K exhibited higher anti-proliferative activity and permeability than primary ginsenosides, and significant amounts of secondary ginsenosides (F2 and C-K) were found in the blood of A/J mice following oral administration of the primary ginsenoside Rb1. Because mammalian cells did not hydrolyze ginsenoside, we determined the ability of bacteria to hydrolyze ginsenosides and found that the primary ginsenoside Rb1 underwent stepwise hydrolysis to Rd, F2, and then C-K. Formation of F2 from Rd was the rate-limiting step in the biotransformation of Rb1 to C-K. Conclusion This is the first study to characterize the A/J mouse intestinal microbiome and reveal the presence of certain bacterial families capable of efficiently converting inactive primary ginsenosides to active secondary ginsenosides in vivo. PMID:23254888

  15. Ingestion of Bt corn pollen containing Cry1Ab/2Aj or Cry1Ac does not harm Propylea japonica larvae

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yanmin; Liu, Qingsong; Wang, Yanan; Chen, Xiuping; Song, Xinyuan; Romeis, Jörg; Li, Yunhe; Peng, Yufa

    2016-01-01

    Propylea japonica (Thunberg) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) is a prevalent pollen consumer in corn fields and is therefore exposed to insecticidal proteins contained in the pollen of insect-resistant transgenic corn cultivars expressing Cry proteins derived from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). In the present study, the potential effect of Cry1Ab/2Aj- or Cry1Ac-containing transgenic Bt corn pollen on the fitness of P. japonica larvae was evaluated. The results show that the larval developmental time was significantly shorter when P. japonica larvae were fed pollen from Bt corn cultivars rather than control pollen but that pupation rate, eclosion rate, and adult fresh weight were not significantly affected. In the feeding experiments, the stability of the Cry proteins in the food sources was confirmed. When Bt corn pollen passed through the gut of P. japonica, 23% of Cry1Ab/2Aj was digested. The results demonstrate that consumption of Bt corn pollen containing Cry1Ab/2Aj or Cry1Ac has no detrimental effect on P. japonica larvae; the shortened developmental time of larvae that consumed these proteins was likely attributable to unknown differences in the nutritional composition between the Bt-transgenic and control corn pollen. PMID:27005950

  16. Ingestion of Bt corn pollen containing Cry1Ab/2Aj or Cry1Ac does not harm Propylea japonica larvae.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanmin; Liu, Qingsong; Wang, Yanan; Chen, Xiuping; Song, Xinyuan; Romeis, Jörg; Li, Yunhe; Peng, Yufa

    2016-01-01

    Propylea japonica (Thunberg) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) is a prevalent pollen consumer in corn fields and is therefore exposed to insecticidal proteins contained in the pollen of insect-resistant transgenic corn cultivars expressing Cry proteins derived from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). In the present study, the potential effect of Cry1Ab/2Aj- or Cry1Ac-containing transgenic Bt corn pollen on the fitness of P. japonica larvae was evaluated. The results show that the larval developmental time was significantly shorter when P. japonica larvae were fed pollen from Bt corn cultivars rather than control pollen but that pupation rate, eclosion rate, and adult fresh weight were not significantly affected. In the feeding experiments, the stability of the Cry proteins in the food sources was confirmed. When Bt corn pollen passed through the gut of P. japonica, 23% of Cry1Ab/2Aj was digested. The results demonstrate that consumption of Bt corn pollen containing Cry1Ab/2Aj or Cry1Ac has no detrimental effect on P. japonica larvae; the shortened developmental time of larvae that consumed these proteins was likely attributable to unknown differences in the nutritional composition between the Bt-transgenic and control corn pollen. PMID:27005950

  17. Single P-N junction tandem photovoltaic device

    SciTech Connect

    Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw; Ager, III, Joel W.; Yu, Kin Man

    2011-10-18

    A single P-N junction solar cell is provided having two depletion regions for charge separation while allowing the electrons and holes to recombine such that the voltages associated with both depletion regions of the solar cell will add together. The single p-n junction solar cell includes an alloy of either InGaN or InAlN formed on one side of the P-N junction with Si formed on the other side in order to produce characteristics of a two junction (2J) tandem solar cell through only a single P-N junction. A single P-N junction solar cell having tandem solar cell characteristics will achieve power conversion efficiencies exceeding 30%.

  18. Scanning SQUID microscopy of SFS π-Josephson junction arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoutimore, M. J. A.; Oboznov, V. A.

    2005-03-01

    We use a Scanning SQUID Microscope to image the magnetic flux distribution in arrays of SFS (superconductor-ferromagnet-superconductor) Josephson junctions. The junctions are fabricated with barrier thickness such that they undergo a transition to a π-junction state at a temperature Tπ 2-4 K. In arrays with cells that have an odd number of π-junctions, we observe spontaneously generated magnetic flux in zero applied magnetic field. We image both fully-frustrated arrays and arrays with non-uniform frustration created by varying the number of π-junctions in the cells. By monitoring the onset of spontaneous flux as a function of temperature near Tπ,^ we estimate the uniformity of the junction critical currents.

  19. Single P-N junction tandem photovoltaic device

    SciTech Connect

    Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw; Ager, III, Joel W.; Yu, Kin Man

    2012-03-06

    A single P-N junction solar cell is provided having two depletion regions for charge separation while allowing the electrons and holes to recombine such that the voltages associated with both depletion regions of the solar cell will add together. The single p-n junction solar cell includes an alloy of either InGaN or InAlN formed on one side of the P-N junction with Si formed on the other side in order to produce characteristics of a two junction (2J) tandem solar cell through only a single P-N junction. A single P-N junction solar cell having tandem solar cell characteristics will achieve power conversion efficiencies exceeding 30%.

  20. Gap distance and interactions in a molecular tunnel junction.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shuai; He, Jin; Zhang, Peiming; Gyarfas, Brett; Lindsay, Stuart

    2011-09-14

    The distance between electrodes in a tunnel junction cannot be determined from the external movement applied to the electrodes because of interfacial forces that distort the electrode geometry at the nanoscale. These distortions become particularly complex when molecules are present in the junction, as demonstrated here by measurements of the AC response of a molecular junction over a range of conductivities from microsiemens to picosiemens. Specific chemical interactions within the junction lead to distinct features in break-junction data, and these have been used to determine the electrode separation in a junction functionalized with 4(5)-(2-mercaptoethyl)-1H-imidazole-2-carboxamide, a reagent developed for reading DNA sequences. PMID:21838292

  1. The critical power to maintain thermally stable molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanlei; Xu, Zhiping

    2014-07-01

    With the rise of atomic-scale devices such as molecular electronics and scanning probe microscopies, energy transport processes through molecular junctions have attracted notable research interest recently. In this work, heat dissipation and transport across diamond/benzene/diamond molecular junctions are explored by performing atomistic simulations. We identify the critical power Pcr to maintain thermal stability of the junction through efficient dissipation of local heat. We also find that the molecule-probe contact features a power-dependent interfacial thermal resistance RK in the order of 109 kW-1. Moreover, both Pcr and RK display explicit dependence on atomic structures of the junction, force and temperature. For instance, Pcr can be elevated in multiple-molecule junctions, and streching the junction enhances RK by a factor of 2. The applications of these findings in molecular electronics and scanning probing measurements are discussed, providing practical guidelines in their rational design.

  2. The critical power to maintain thermally stable molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanlei; Xu, Zhiping

    2014-01-01

    With the rise of atomic-scale devices such as molecular electronics and scanning probe microscopies, energy transport processes through molecular junctions have attracted notable research interest recently. In this work, heat dissipation and transport across diamond/benzene/diamond molecular junctions are explored by performing atomistic simulations. We identify the critical power Pcr to maintain thermal stability of the junction through efficient dissipation of local heat. We also find that the molecule-probe contact features a power-dependent interfacial thermal resistance RK in the order of 10(9) kW(-1). Moreover, both Pcr and RK display explicit dependence on atomic structures of the junction, force and temperature. For instance, Pcr can be elevated in multiple-molecule junctions, and streching the junction enhances RK by a factor of 2. The applications of these findings in molecular electronics and scanning probing measurements are discussed, providing practical guidelines in their rational design. PMID:25005801

  3. Selective plating for junction delineation in silicon nanowires.

    PubMed

    Eichfeld, Chad M; Wood, Carolyn; Liu, Bangzhi; Eichfeld, Sarah M; Redwing, Joan M; Mohney, Suzanne E

    2007-09-01

    The in situ growth of p-n junctions in silicon nanowires enables the fabrication of a variety of nanoscale electronic devices. We have developed a method for selective coating of Au onto n-type segments of silicon nanowire p-n junctions. Selective plating allows for quick verification of the position of p-n junctions along the nanowire using electron microscopy and allows for measurement of segment length. PMID:17696558

  4. The SNS Josephson junction with a third terminal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prans, G. P.; Meissner, H.

    1974-01-01

    Discussion of the operating characteristics of a three-terminal thin-film SNS Josephson junction whose diameter is much greater than the electron pair coherence length in the N metal. It is shown that a junction of this type is essentially a two-terminal device even though the third terminal of the junction supplies the control current. The mechanism underlying this finding is discussed.

  5. Definitive evidence for the existence of tight junctions in invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Lane, N J; Chandler, H J

    1980-09-01

    Extensive and unequivocal tight junctions are here reported between the lateral borders of the cellular layer that circumscribes the arachnid (spider) central nervous system. This account details the features of these structures, which form a beltlike reticulum that is more complex than the simple linear tight junctions hitherto found in invertebrate tissues and which bear many of the characteristics of vertebrate zonulae occludentes. We also provide evidence that these junctions form the basis of a permeability barrier to exogenous compounds. In thin sections, the tight junctions are identifiable as punctate points of membrane apposition; they are seen to exclude the stain and appear as election- lucent moniliform strands along the lines of membrane fusion in en face views of uranyl-calcium-treated tissues. In freeze-fracture replicas, the regions of close membrane apposition exhibit P-face (PF) ridges and complementary E-face (EF) furrows that are coincident across face transitions, although slightly offset with respect to one another. The free inward diffusion of both ionic and colloidal lanthanum is inhibited by these punctate tight junctions so that they appear to form the basis of a circumferential blood-brain barrier. These results support the contention that tight junctions exist in the tissues of the invertebrata in spite of earlier suggestions that (a) they are unique to vertebrates and (b) septate junctions are the equivalent invertebrate occluding structure. The component tight junctional 8- to 10-nm-particulate PF ridges are intimately intercalated with, but clearly distinct from, inverted gap junctions possessing the 13-nm EF particles typical of arthropods. Hence, no confusion can occur as to which particles belong to each of the two junctional types, as commonly happens with vertebrate tissues, especially in the analysis of developing junctions. Indeed, their coexistance in this way supports the idea, over which there has been some controversy, that

  6. Topological phase transition of a Josephson junction and its dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutasoit, Jimmy; Marciani, Marco; Tarasinski, Brian; Beenakker, Carlo

    A Josephson junction formed by a superconducting ring interrupted by a semiconductor nanowire can realize a zero-dimensional class D topological superconductor. By coupling the Josephson junction to a ballistic wire and altering the strength of the coupling, one can drive this topological superconductor through a topological phase transition. We study the compressibility of the junction as a probe of the topological phase transition. We also study the dynamics of the phase transition by studying the current pulse injected into the wire.

  7. Macroscopic quantum effects in intrinsic Josephson junction stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, T.; Machida, M.

    2008-09-01

    A macroscopic quantum theory for the capacitively-coupled intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJ’s) is constructed. We clarify the multi-junction effect for the macroscopic quantum tunneling (MQT) to the first resistive branch. It is shown that the escape rate is greatly enhanced by the capacitive coupling between junctions. We also discuss the origin of the N2-enhancement in the escape rate observed in the uniformly switching in Bi-2212 IJJ’s.

  8. Polarity-dependent distribution of angiomotin localizes Hippo signaling in preimplantation embryos

    PubMed Central

    Hirate, Yoshikazu; Hirahara, Shino; Inoue, Ken-ichi; Suzuki, Atsushi; Alarcon, Vernadeth B.; Akimoto, Kazunori; Hirai, Takaaki; Hara, Takeshi; Adachi, Makoto; Chida, Kazuhiro; Ohno, Shigeo; Marikawa, Yusuke; Nakao, Kazuki; Shimono, Akihiko; Sasaki, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background In preimplantation mouse embryos, the first cell fate specification to the trophectoderm or inner cell mass occurs by the early blastocyst stage. The cell fate is controlled by cell position-dependent Hippo signaling, although the mechanisms underlying position-dependent Hippo signaling are unknown. Results We showed that a combination of cell polarity and cell–cell adhesion establishes position-dependent Hippo signaling, where the outer and inner cells are polar and nonpolar, respectively. The junction-associated proteins angiomotin (Amot) and Amotl2 are essential for Hippo pathway activation and appropriate cell fate specification. In the nonpolar inner cells, Amot localizes to adherens junctions (AJs) and cell–cell adhesion activates the Hippo pathway. In the outer cells, the cell polarity sequesters Amot from basolateral AJs to apical domains, thereby suppressing Hippo signaling. The N-terminal domain of Amot is required for actin binding, Nf2/Merlin-mediated association with the E-cadherin complex, and interaction with Lats protein kinase. In AJs, Ser176 in the N-terminal domain of Amot is phosphorylated by Lats, which inhibits the actin-binding activity, thereby stabilizing the Amot–Lats interaction to activate the Hippo pathway. Conclusion We propose that the phosphorylation of S176 in Amot is a critical step for activation of the Hippo pathway in AJs and that cell polarity disconnects the Hippo pathway from cell–cell adhesion by sequestering Amot from AJ. This mechanism converts positional information into differential Hippo signaling, thereby leading to differential cell fates. PMID:23791731

  9. Fabrication of magnetic tunnel junctions with epitaxial and textured ferromagnetic layers

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Y. Austin; Yang, Jianhua Joshua

    2008-11-11

    This invention relates to magnetic tunnel junctions and methods for making the magnetic tunnel junctions. The magnetic tunnel junctions include a tunnel barrier oxide layer sandwiched between two ferromagnetic layers both of which are epitaxial or textured with respect to the underlying substrate upon which the magnetic tunnel junctions are grown. The magnetic tunnel junctions provide improved magnetic properties, sharper interfaces and few defects.

  10. The 'depletion layer' of amorphous p-n junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Roos, O.

    1981-01-01

    It is shown that within reasonable approximations for the density of state distribution within the mobility gap of a:Si, a one-to-one correspondence exists between the electric field distribution in the transition region of an amorphous p-n junction and that in the depletion layer of a crystalline p-n junction. Thus it is inferred that the depletion layer approximation which leads to a parabolic potential distribution within the depletion layer of crystalline junctions also constitutes a fair approximation in the case of amorphous junctions. This fact greatly simplifies an analysis of solid-state electronic devices based on amorphous material (i.e., solar cells).

  11. Direct experimental determination of voltage across high-low junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daud, T.; Lindholm, F. A.

    1986-01-01

    High-low (HL) junctions form a part of many semiconductor devices, including back surface field solar cells. A first experimental determination and interpretation of the voltage across the HL junction under low- and high-injection conditions is presented as a function of the voltage across a nearby p/n junction. Theoretical analysis from first principles is shown to bear well on the experimental results. In addition, a test structure is proposed for measurement of the effective surface recombination velocity at the HL junctions.

  12. Naturally formed graded junction for organic light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Yan; Yang, Yang

    2003-09-01

    In this letter, we report naturally-formed graded junctions (NFGJ) for organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). These junctions are fabricated using single thermal evaporation boat loaded with uniformly mixed charge transport and light-emitting materials. Upon heating, materials sublimate sequentially according to their vaporizing temperatures forming the graded junction. Two kinds of graded structures, sharp and shallow graded junctions, can be formed based on the thermal properties of the selected materials. The NFGJ OLEDs have shown excellent performance in both brightness and lifetime compared with heterojunction devices.

  13. Josephson junction through a disordered topological insulator with helical magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyuzin, Alexander; Alidoust, Mohammad; Loss, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    We study supercurrent and proximity vortices in a Josephson junction made of disordered surface states of a three-dimensional topological insulator with a proximity induced in-plane helical magnetization. In a regime where the rotation period of helical magnetization is larger than the junction width, we find supercurrent 0 -π crossovers as a function of junction thickness, magnetization strength, and parameters inherent to the helical modulation and surface states. The supercurrent reversals are associated with proximity induced vortices, nucleated along the junction width, where the number of vortices and their locations can be manipulated by means of the superconducting phase difference and the parameters mentioned above.

  14. Craniovertebral Junction Instability: A Review of Facts about Facets

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Craniovertebral junction surgery involves an appropriate philosophical, biomechanical and anatomical understanding apart from high degree of technical skill and ability of controlling venous and arterial bleeding. The author presents his 30-year experience with treating complex craniovertebral junction instability related surgical issues. The facets of atlas and axis form the primary site of movements at the craniovertebral junction. All craniovertebral junction instability is essentially localized to the atlantoaxial facet joint. Direct manipulation and fixation of the facets forms the basis of treatment for instability. PMID:26240728

  15. Josephson Current and Multiple Andreev Reflections in Graphene SNS Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skachko, Ivan; Du, Xu; Andrei, Eva Y.

    2008-03-01

    The Josephson Effect and Superconducting Proximity Effect were observed in Superconductor-Graphene-Superconductor (SGS) Josephson junctions with coherence lengths comparable to the distance between the superconducting leads. By comparing the measured temperature and gate dependence of the supercurrent and the proximity induced sub-gap features (multiple Andreev reflections) to theoretical predictions, we find that the diffusive junction model yields close quantitative agreement with the results. This is consistent with the fact that the measured mean free paths in these junctions, 10 ˜ 30 nm, are significantly shorter than the lead separation. We show that all SGS devices reported so far fall in the diffusive junction category.

  16. Electrical and Spectroscopic Characterization of Metal-Molecule-Metal Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Theresa

    2005-03-01

    Considerable attention has been devoted to developing an understanding of the mechanisms that dominate electrical transport in metal- molecule-metal junctions comprised of single and small ensembles of molecules. In this talk, we will present an overview of recent research on the electrical and spectroscopic characterization of molecular junctions inserted along the length of sub-40-nm diameter Au and Pd metal nanowires (i.e., in-wire junctions) fabricated by template-directed synthesis. In particular, we will show results that investigate the relationship between the temperature dependent (10 -- 300 K) current-voltage (I-V) characteristics and the vibrational spectra measured by inelastic electron tunneling (IET) spectroscopy for candidate molecular wires and bistable switching molecules. The two types of molecular wire junctions that were studied incorporate a self assembled monolayer of dithiolated oligo(phenylene- ethynylene) (OPE) molecules or their -NO2 derivatives. The I-V of these junctions are stable and reproducible between +/-1V. Temperature independent I-V are measured for both types of junctions, which is indicative of coherent tunneling transport. Moreover, strong vibrations associated with υ(18b) and υ(19a) ring modes were observed in both junctions. In contrast, measurements of molecular junctions that incorporate SAMs based on aniline derivatives show reproducible bistable switching with an on-off ratio of >10:1 at 1V. Differences are observed in the vibrational spectra that depend on the state of the junction.

  17. Magic-T Junction using Microstrip/Slotline Transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    U-yen, Kongpop; Wollack, Edward J.; Doiron, Terence

    2008-01-01

    An improved broadband planar magic-T junction that incorporates microstrip/slotline transitions has been developed. In comparison with a prior broadband magic-T junction incorporating microstrip/slotline transitions, this junction offers superior broadband performance. In addition, because this junction is geometrically simpler and its performance is less affected by fabrication tolerances, the benefits of the improved design can be realized at lower fabrication cost. There are potential uses for junctions like this one in commercial microwave communication receivers, radar and polarimeter systems, and industrial microwave instrumentation. A magic-T junction is a four-port waveguide junction consisting of a combination of an H-type and an E-type junction. An E-type junction is so named because it includes a junction arm that extends from a main waveguide in the same direction as that of the electric (E) field in the waveguide. An H-type junction is so named because it includes a junction arm parallel to the magnetic (H) field in a main waveguide. A magic-T junction includes two input ports (here labeled 1 and 2, respectively) and two output ports (here labeled E and H, respectively). In an ideal case, (1) a magic-T junction is lossless, (2) the input signals add (that is, they combine in phase with each other) at port H, and (3) the input signals subtract (that is, they combine in opposite phase) at port E. The prior junction over which the present junction is an improvement affords in-phase-combining characterized by a broadband frequency response, and features a small slotline area to minimize in-band loss. However, with respect to isolation between ports 1 and 2 and return loss at port E, it exhibits narrowband frequency responses. In addition, its performance is sensitive to misalignment of microstrip and slotline components: this sensitivity is attributable to a limited number of quarter-wavelength (lambda/4) transmission-line sections for matching impedances

  18. Differences between liver gap junction protein and lens MIP 26 from rat: implications for tissue specificity of gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, B J; Takemoto, L J; Hunkapiller, M W; Hood, L E; Revel, J P

    1983-03-01

    Liver gap junctions and gap-junction-like structures from eye lenses are each comprised of a single major protein (Mr 28,000 and 26,000, respectively). These proteins display different two-dimensional peptide fingerprints, distinct amino acid compositions, nonhomologous N-terminal amino acid sequences and different sensitivities to proteases when part of the intact junction. However, the junctional protein of each tissue is well conserved between species, as demonstrated previously for lens and now for liver in several mammalian species. The possiblity of tissue-specific gap junction proteins is discussed in the light of data suggesting that rat heart gap junctions are comprised of yet a third protein. PMID:6299583

  19. Epithelial tight junctions in intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Schulzke, Joerg D; Ploeger, Svenja; Amasheh, Maren; Fromm, Anja; Zeissig, Sebastian; Troeger, Hanno; Richter, Jan; Bojarski, Christian; Schumann, Michael; Fromm, Michael

    2009-05-01

    The epithelium in inflamed intestinal segments of patients with Crohn's disease is characterized by a reduction of tight junction strands, strand breaks, and alterations of tight junction protein content and composition. In ulcerative colitis, epithelial leaks appear early due to micro-erosions resulting from upregulated epithelial apoptosis and in addition to a prominent increase of claudin-2. Th1-cytokine effects by interferon-gamma in combination with TNFalpha are important for epithelial damage in Crohn's disease, while interleukin-13 (IL-13) is the key effector cytokine in ulcerative colitis stimulating apoptosis and upregulation of claudin-2 expression. Focal lesions caused by apoptotic epithelial cells contribute to barrier disturbance in IBD by their own conductivity and by confluence toward apoptotic foci or erosions. Another type of intestinal barrier defect can arise from alpha-hemolysin harboring E. coli strains among the physiological flora, which can gain pathologic relevance in combination with proinflammatory cytokines under inflammatory conditions. On the other hand, intestinal barrier impairment can also result from transcellular antigen translocation via an initial endocytotic uptake into early endosomes, and this is intensified by proinflammatory cytokines as interferon-gamma and may thus play a relevant role in the onset of IBD. Taken together, barrier defects contribute to diarrhea by a leak flux mechanism (e.g., in IBD) and can cause mucosal inflammation by luminal antigen uptake. Immune regulation of epithelial functions by cytokines may cause barrier dysfunction not only by tight junction impairments but also by apoptotic leaks, transcytotic mechanisms, and mucosal gross lesions. PMID:19538319

  20. Effect of Dietary Fibers on Cecal Microbiota and Intestinal Tumorigenesis in Azoxymethane Treated A/J Min/+ Mice.

    PubMed

    Moen, Birgitte; Henjum, Kristi; Måge, Ingrid; Knutsen, Svein Halvor; Rud, Ida; Hetland, Ragna Bogen; Paulsen, Jan Erik

    2016-01-01

    Foods naturally high in dietary fiber are generally considered to protect against development of colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the intrinsic effect of dietary fiber on intestinal carcinogenesis is unclear. We used azoxymethane (AOM) treated A/J Min/+ mice, which developed a significantly higher tumor load in the colon than in the small intestine, to compare the effects of dietary inulin (IN), cellulose (CE) or brewers spent grain (BSG) on intestinal tumorigenesis and cecal microbiota. Each fiber was tested at two dose levels, 5% and 15% (w/w) content of the AIN-93M diet. The microbiota was investigated by next-generation sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene (V4). We found that mice fed IN had approximately 50% lower colonic tumor load than mice fed CE or BSG (p<0.001). Surprisingly, all three types of fiber caused a dose dependent increase of colonic tumor load (p<0.001). The small intestinal tumor load was not affected by the dietary fiber interventions. Mice fed IN had a lower bacterial diversity than mice fed CE or BSG. The Bacteroidetes/Firmicutes ratio was significantly (p = 0.003) different between the three fiber diets with a higher mean value in IN fed mice compared with BSG and CE. We also found a relation between microbiota and the colonic tumor load, where many of the operational taxonomic units (OTUs) related to low tumor load were significantly enriched in mice fed IN. Among the OTUs related to low tumor load were bacteria affiliated with the Bacteroides genus. These results suggest that type of dietary fiber may play a role in the development of CRC, and that the suppressive effect of IN on colonic tumorigenesis is associated with profound changes in the cecal microbiota profile. PMID:27196124

  1. Effect of Dietary Fibers on Cecal Microbiota and Intestinal Tumorigenesis in Azoxymethane Treated A/J Min/+ Mice

    PubMed Central

    Måge, Ingrid; Knutsen, Svein Halvor; Rud, Ida; Hetland, Ragna Bogen; Paulsen, Jan Erik

    2016-01-01

    Foods naturally high in dietary fiber are generally considered to protect against development of colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the intrinsic effect of dietary fiber on intestinal carcinogenesis is unclear. We used azoxymethane (AOM) treated A/J Min/+ mice, which developed a significantly higher tumor load in the colon than in the small intestine, to compare the effects of dietary inulin (IN), cellulose (CE) or brewers spent grain (BSG) on intestinal tumorigenesis and cecal microbiota. Each fiber was tested at two dose levels, 5% and 15% (w/w) content of the AIN-93M diet. The microbiota was investigated by next-generation sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene (V4). We found that mice fed IN had approximately 50% lower colonic tumor load than mice fed CE or BSG (p<0.001). Surprisingly, all three types of fiber caused a dose dependent increase of colonic tumor load (p<0.001). The small intestinal tumor load was not affected by the dietary fiber interventions. Mice fed IN had a lower bacterial diversity than mice fed CE or BSG. The Bacteroidetes/Firmicutes ratio was significantly (p = 0.003) different between the three fiber diets with a higher mean value in IN fed mice compared with BSG and CE. We also found a relation between microbiota and the colonic tumor load, where many of the operational taxonomic units (OTUs) related to low tumor load were significantly enriched in mice fed IN. Among the OTUs related to low tumor load were bacteria affiliated with the Bacteroides genus. These results suggest that type of dietary fiber may play a role in the development of CRC, and that the suppressive effect of IN on colonic tumorigenesis is associated with profound changes in the cecal microbiota profile. PMID:27196124

  2. Plasmon Enhanced Hetero-Junction Solar Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Gen; Ching, Levine; Sadoqi, Mostafa; Xu, Huizhong

    2015-03-01

    Here we report a systematic study of plasmon-enhanced hetero-junction solar cells made of colloidal quantum dots (PbS) and nanowires (ZnO), with/without metal nanoparticles (Au). The structure of solar cell devices was characterized by AFM, SEM and profilometer, etc. The power conversion efficiencies of solar cell devices were characterized by solar simulator (OAI TriSOL, AM1.5G Class AAA). The enhancement in the photocurrent due to introduction of metal nanoparticles was obvious. We believe this is due to the plasmonic effect from the metal nanoparticles. The correlation between surface roughness, film uniformity and device performance was also studied.

  3. Creating Spin Switches and Junctions on Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Eric; Stamp, Philip

    2010-03-01

    Inspired by the work of Hirjibehedin et al, (Science 317 1199) creating Heisenberg spin chains on an insulating surface, we examine geometries in which excitations down a spin chain are either blocked or transmitted depending on the state of a central junction, made from a spin dimer. The dimer state can be controlled by excitations down an additional chain, creating a spin switch. In addition to the technological applications of such a switch, the theoretical language developed has application to certain quantum computation schemes.

  4. On Chip Josephson Junction Microwave Switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naaman, Ofer; Abutaleb, Mohamed; Kirby, Chris; Rennie, Michael

    We report on the design and measurement of a reflective single-pole single-throw microwave switch based on a superconducting circuit containing a single Josephson junction. The device has no internal power dissipation, minimal insertion loss, and is controlled by Φ0-level base-band signals. The data demonstrates the device operation with 2 GHz instantaneous bandwidth centered at 10 GHz and better than 20 dB on/off ratio for input powers up to -100 dBm.

  5. On-chip Josephson junction microwave switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naaman, O.; Abutaleb, M. O.; Kirby, C.; Rennie, M.

    2016-03-01

    The authors report on the design and measurement of a reflective single-pole single-throw microwave switch with no internal power dissipation, based on a superconducting circuit containing a single Josephson junction. The data demonstrate the switch operation with 2 GHz instantaneous bandwidth centered at 10 GHz, low insertion loss, and better than 20 dB on/off ratio. The switch's measured performance agrees well with simulations for input powers up to -100 dBm. An extension of the demonstrated circuit to implement a single-pole double-throw switch is shown in simulation.

  6. Phonon interference effects in molecular junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Markussen, Troels

    2013-12-28

    We study coherent phonon transport through organic, π-conjugated molecules. Using first principles calculations and Green's function methods, we find that the phonon transmission function in cross-conjugated molecules, like meta-connected benzene, exhibits destructive quantum interference features very analogous to those observed theoretically and experimentally for electron transport in similar molecules. The destructive interference features observed in four different cross-conjugated molecules significantly reduce the thermal conductance with respect to linear conjugated analogues. Such control of the thermal conductance by chemical modifications could be important for thermoelectric applications of molecular junctions.

  7. Junctional angle of a bihanded helix.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Wolgemuth, Charles W; Huber, Greg

    2014-10-01

    Helical filaments having sections of reversed chirality are common phenomena in the biological realm. The apparent angle between the two sections of opposite handedness provides information about the geometry and elasticity of the junctional region. In this paper, the governing differential equations for the local helical axis are developed, and asymptotic solutions of the governing equations are solved by perturbation theory. The asymptotic solutions are compared with the corresponding numerical solutions, and the relative error at second order is found to be less than 1.5% over a range of biologically relevant curvature and torsion values from 0 to 1/2 in dimensionless units. PMID:25375538

  8. Atrioventricular Junction Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Patel, Dilesh; Daoud, Emile G

    2016-04-01

    Atrioventricular junction (AVJ) ablation is an effective therapy in patients with symptomatic atrial fibrillation who are intolerant to or unsuccessfully managed with rhythm control or medical rate control strategies. A drawback is that the procedure mandates a pacing system. Overall, the safety and efficacy of AVJ ablation is high with a majority of the patients reporting significant improvement in symptoms and quality-of-life measures. Risk of sudden cardiac death after device implantation is low, especially with an appropriate postprocedure pacing rate. Mortality benefit with AVJ ablation has been shown in patients with heart failure and cardiac resynchronization therapy devices. PMID:26968669

  9. Atrioventricular junction ablation for atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Patel, Dilesh; Daoud, Emile G

    2014-11-01

    Atrioventricular junction (AVJ) ablation is an effective therapy in patients with symptomatic atrial fibrillation who are intolerant to or unsuccessfully managed with rhythm control or medical rate control strategies. A drawback is that the procedure mandates a pacing system. Overall, the safety and efficacy of AVJ ablation is high with a majority of the patients reporting significant improvement in symptoms and quality-of-life measures. Risk of sudden cardiac death after device implantation is low, especially with an appropriate postprocedure pacing rate. Mortality benefit with AVJ ablation has been shown in patients with heart failure and cardiac resynchronization therapy devices. PMID:25443238

  10. Elasticity of a soap film junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, F.; Janiaud, E.; Bacri, J.-C.; Andreotti, B.

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the elasticity of an isolated, threefold junction of soap films (Plateau border), which displays static undulations when liquid rapidly flows into it. By analyzing the shape of the Plateau border (thickness R and transverse displacement) as a function of the liquid flow rate Q, we show experimentally and theoretically that the elasticity of the Plateau border is dominated by the bending of the soap films pulling on the Plateau border. In this asymptotic regime, the undulation wavelength obeys the scaling law ˜Q2 R-2 and the decay length ˜Q2 R-4.

  11. Collisions of strings with Y junctions.

    PubMed

    Copeland, E J; Kibble, T W B; Steer, D A

    2006-07-14

    We study the dynamics of Nambu-Goto strings with junctions at which three strings meet. In particular, we exhibit one simple exact solution and examine the process of intercommuting of two straight strings in which they exchange partners but become joined by a third string. We show that there are important kinematical constraints on this process. The exchange cannot occur if the strings meet with very large relative velocity. This may have important implications for the evolution of cosmic superstring networks and non-Abelian string networks. PMID:16907431

  12. Spin blockade qubit in a superconducting junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padurariu, C.; Nazarov, Yu. V.

    2012-12-01

    We interpret a recent pioneering experiment (Zgirski M. et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 106 (2011) 257003) on quasiparticle manipulation in a superconducting break junction in terms of spin blockade drawing analogy with spin qubits. We propose a novel qubit design that exploits the spin state of two trapped quasiparticles. We detail the coherent control of all four spin states by resonant quantum manipulation and compute the corresponding Rabi frequencies. The read-out technique is based on the spin blockade that inhibits quasiparticle recombination in triplet states. We provide extensive microscopic estimations of the parameters of our model.

  13. Photoresponse in arrays of thermoelectric nanowire junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, T. E.; Scott, R.; Johnson, S.; Brower, T.; Belk, J. H.; Hunt, J. H.

    2013-07-01

    We report the first demonstration of optical detection by thermoelectric nanowire junctions. We employed devices composed of bismuth nanowire arrays which are capped with a transparent indium tin oxide electrode. The incident surface features very low optical reflectivity and enhanced light trapping. The unique attributes of the thermoelectric arrays are the combination of strong temporal and optical wavelength dependences of the photocurrent. Under infrared illumination, the signal can be completely described by thermoelectric effects considering cooling rates given by heat diffusion through the array. In addition, under visible illumination, we observe a photovoltaic response.

  14. Nonintrusive Measurement Of Temperature Of LED Junction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leidecker, Henning; Powers, Charles

    1991-01-01

    Temperature inferred from spectrum of emitted light. Method of determining temperature of junction based on two relevant characteristics of LED. Gap between valence and conduction electron-energy bands in LED material decreases with increasing temperature, causing wavelength of emitted photon to increase with temperature. Other, as temperature increases, non-radiative processes dissipate more of input electrical energy as heat and less as photons in band-gap wavelenth region; optical and quantum efficiencies decrease with increasing temperature. In principal, either characteristic alone used to determine temperature. However, desirable to use both to obtain indication of uncertainty.

  15. Full potential of radial junction Si thin film solar cells with advanced junction materials and design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Shengyi; Misra, Soumyadeep; Lu, Jiawen; Yu, Zhongwei; Yu, Linwei; Xu, Jun; Wang, Junzhuan; Xu, Ling; Shi, Yi; Chen, Kunji; Roca i Cabarrocas, Pere

    2015-07-01

    Combining advanced materials and junction design in nanowire-based thin film solar cells requires a different thinking of the optimization strategy, which is critical to fulfill the potential of nano-structured photovoltaics. Based on a comprehensive knowledge of the junction materials involved in the multilayer stack, we demonstrate here, in both experimental and theoretical manners, the potential of hydrogenated amorphous Si (a-Si:H) thin film solar cells in a radial junction (RJ) configuration. Resting upon a solid experimental basis, we also assess a more advanced tandem RJ structure with radially stacking a-Si:H/nanocrystalline Si (nc-Si:H) PIN junctions, and show that a balanced photo-current generation with a short circuit current density of Jsc = 14.2 mA/cm2 can be achieved in a tandem RJ cell, while reducing the expensive nc-Si:H absorber thickness from 1-3 μ m (in planar tandem cells) to only 120 nm. These results provide a clearly charted route towards a high performance Si thin film photovoltaics.

  16. Molecular force spectroscopy of homophilic nectin-1 interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Vedula, Sri Ram Krishna; Lim, T.S.; Hui Shi; Kausalya, P. Jaya; Lane, E. Birgitte; Rajagopal, Gunaretnam; Hunziker, Walter; Lim, C.T.

    2007-11-03

    Nectins are Ca{sup 2+} independent cell adhesion molecules localizing at the cadherin based adherens junctions. In this study, we have used atomic force microscopy to study interaction of a chimera of extra cellular fragment of nectin-1 and Fc of human IgG (nef-1) with wild type L-fibroblasts that express endogenous nectin-1 to elucidate the biophysical characteristics of homophilic nectin-1 trans-interactions at the level of single molecule. Bond strength distribution revealed three distinct bound states (or configurations) of trans-interactions between paired nectins, where each bound state has a unique unstressed off-rate and reactive compliance. Kinetic analysis of force-dependent off-rate of the bound state involving trans-interacting V-V domains between paired nectin-1 (unstressed off-rate {approx}1.465 {+-} 0.779 s{sup -1}, reactive compliance {approx}0.143 {+-} 0.072 nm) was found to be closest to E-cadherin, indicating that V-V domain trans-interactions are probably necessary to initiate and promote adhesions of E-cadherin at adherens junctions (AJs)

  17. Switching and Rectification in Carbon-Nanotube Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Andriotis, Antonis N.; Menon, Madhu; Chernozatonskii, Leonid

    2003-01-01

    Multi-terminal carbon-nanotube junctions are under investigation as candidate components of nanoscale electronic devices and circuits. Three-terminal "Y" junctions of carbon nanotubes (see Figure 1) have proven to be especially interesting because (1) it is now possible to synthesize them in high yield in a controlled manner and (2) results of preliminary experimental and theoretical studies suggest that such junctions could exhibit switching and rectification properties. Following the preliminary studies, current-versus-voltage characteristics of a number of different "Y" junctions of single-wall carbon nanotubes connected to metal wires were computed. Both semiconducting and metallic nanotubes of various chiralities were considered. Most of the junctions considered were symmetric. These computations involved modeling of the quantum electrical conductivity of the carbon nanotubes and junctions, taking account of such complicating factors as the topological defects (pentagons, heptagons, and octagons) present in the hexagonal molecular structures at the junctions, and the effects of the nanotube/wire interfaces. A major component of the computational approach was the use of an efficient Green s function embedding scheme. The results of these computations showed that symmetric junctions could be expected to support both rectification and switching. The results also showed that rectification and switching properties of a junction could be expected to depend strongly on its symmetry and, to a lesser degree, on the chirality of the nanotubes. In particular, it was found that a zigzag nanotube branching at a symmetric "Y" junction could exhibit either perfect rectification or partial rectification (asymmetric current-versus-voltage characteristic, as in the example of Figure 2). It was also found that an asymmetric "Y" junction would not exhibit rectification.

  18. Metallic Electrode: Semiconducting Nanotube Junction Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamada, Toshishige; Biegel, Bryon (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A model is proposed for two observed current-voltage (I-V) patterns in an experiment with a scanning tunneling microscope tip and a carbon nanotube [Collins et al., Science 278, 100 ('97)]. We claim that there are two contact modes for a tip (metal) -nanotube semi conductor) junction depending whether the alignment of the metal and semiconductor band structure is (1) variable (vacuum-gap) or (2) fixed (touching) with V. With the tip grounded, the tunneling case in (1) would produce large dI/dV with V > 0, small dI/dV with V < 0, and I = 0 near V = 0 for an either n- or p-nanotube. However, the Schottky mechanism in (2) would result in forward current with V < 0 for an n-nanotube, while with V > 0 for an p-nanotube. The two observed I-V patterns are thus entirely explained by a tip-nanotube contact of the two types, where the nanotube must be n-type. We apply this picture to the source-drain I-V characteristics in a long nanotube-channel field-effect-transistor (Zhou et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 76, 1597 ('00)], and show that two independent metal-semiconductor junctions connected in series are responsible for the observed behavior.

  19. Fractional Solitons in Excitonic Josephson Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Ya-Fen; Su, Jung-Jung

    2015-01-01

    The Josephson effect is especially appealing to physicists because it reveals macroscopically the quantum order and phase. In excitonic bilayers the effect is even subtler due to the counterflow of supercurrent as well as the tunneling between layers (interlayer tunneling). Here we study, in a quantum Hall bilayer, the excitonic Josephson junction: a conjunct of two exciton condensates with a relative phase ϕ0 applied. The system is mapped into a pseudospin ferromagnet then described numerically by the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. In the presence of interlayer tunneling, we identify a family of fractional sine-Gordon solitons which resemble the static fractional Josephson vortices in the extended superconducting Josephson junctions. Each fractional soliton carries a topological charge Q that is not necessarily a half/full integer but can vary continuously. The calculated current-phase relation (CPR) shows that solitons with Q = ϕ0/2π is the lowest energy state starting from zero ϕ0 – until ϕ0 > π – then the alternative group of solitons with Q = ϕ0/2π − 1 takes place and switches the polarity of CPR. PMID:26511770

  20. Electrophysiological study in neuromuscular junction disorders.

    PubMed

    Cherian, Ajith; Baheti, Neeraj N; Iype, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    This review is on ultrastructure and subcellular physiology at normal and abnormal neuromuscular junctions. The clinical and electrophysiological findings in myasthenia gravis, Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS), congenital myasthenic syndromes, and botulinum intoxication are discussed. Single fiber electromyography (SFEMG) helps to explain the basis of testing neuromuscular junction function by repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS). SFEMG requires skill and patience and its availability is limited to a few centers. For RNS supramaximal stimulation is essential and so is display of the whole waveform of each muscle response at maximum amplitude. The amplitudes of the negative phase of the first and fourth responses are measured from baseline to negative peak, and the percent change of the fourth response compared with the first represents the decrement or increment. A decrement greater than 10% is accepted as abnormal and smooth progression of response amplitude train and reproducibility form the crux. In suspected LEMS the effect of fast rates of stimulation should be determined after RNS response to slow rates of stimulation. Caution is required to avoid misinterpretation of potentiation and pseudofacilitation. PMID:23661960