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Sample records for adherens junction proteins

  1. Giardia disrupts the arrangement of tight, adherens and desmosomal junction proteins of intestinal cells.

    PubMed

    Maia-Brigagão, C; Morgado-Díaz, J A; De Souza, W

    2012-06-01

    Giardia duodenalis is a parasitic protozoan that causes diarrhea and other symptoms which together constitute a disease known as giardiasis. Although the disease has been well defined, the mechanisms involving the establishment of the infection have not yet been fully elucidated. In this study, we show that after 24h of interaction between parasites and intestinal Caco-2 cells, there was an alteration of the paracellular permeability, as observed by an approximate 42% of reduction in the transepithelial electrical resistance and permeation to ruthenium red, which was concomitant with ultrastructural changes. Nevertheless, epithelium viability was not affected. We also demonstrate that there was no change in expression of junctional proteins (tight and adherens) but that the distribution of these proteins in Caco-2 cells after parasite adhesion was significantly altered, as observed via laser scanning confocal microscopy 3D reconstruction. The present work shows that adhesion of Giardia duodenalis trophozoites to intestinal cells in vitro induces disturbances of the tight, adherens and desmosomal junctions.

  2. FSGS3/CD2AP is a barbed-end capping protein that stabilizes actin and strengthens adherens junctions.

    PubMed

    Tang, Vivian W; Brieher, William M

    2013-12-09

    By combining in vitro reconstitution biochemistry with a cross-linking approach, we have identified focal segmental glomerulosclerosis 3/CD2-associated protein (FSGS3/CD2AP) as a novel actin barbed-end capping protein responsible for actin stability at the adherens junction. FSGS3/CD2AP colocalizes with E-cadherin and α-actinin-4 at the apical junction in polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. Knockdown of FSGS3/CD2AP compromised actin stability and decreased actin accumulation at the adherens junction. Using a novel apparatus to apply mechanical stress to cell-cell junctions, we showed that knockdown of FSGS3/CD2AP compromised adhesive strength, resulting in tearing between cells and disruption of barrier function. Our results reveal a novel function of FSGS3/CD2AP and a previously unrecognized role of barbed-end capping in junctional actin dynamics. Our study underscores the complexity of actin regulation at cell-cell contacts that involves actin activators, inhibitors, and stabilizers to control adhesive strength, epithelial behavior, and permeability barrier integrity.

  3. The F-BAR protein pacsin2 inhibits asymmetric VE-cadherin internalization from tensile adherens junctions

    PubMed Central

    Dorland, Yvonne L.; Malinova, Tsveta S.; van Stalborch, Anne-Marieke D.; Grieve, Adam G.; van Geemen, Daphne; Jansen, Nicolette S.; de Kreuk, Bart-Jan; Nawaz, Kalim; Kole, Jeroen; Geerts, Dirk; Musters, René J. P.; de Rooij, Johan; Hordijk, Peter L.; Huveneers, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Vascular homoeostasis, development and disease critically depend on the regulation of endothelial cell–cell junctions. Here we uncover a new role for the F-BAR protein pacsin2 in the control of VE-cadherin-based endothelial adhesion. Pacsin2 concentrates at focal adherens junctions (FAJs) that are experiencing unbalanced actomyosin-based pulling. FAJs move in response to differences in local cytoskeletal geometry and pacsin2 is recruited consistently to the trailing end of fast-moving FAJs via a mechanism that requires an intact F-BAR domain. Photoconversion, photobleaching, immunofluorescence and super-resolution microscopy reveal polarized dynamics, and organization of junctional proteins between the front of FAJs and their trailing ends. Interestingly, pacsin2 recruitment inhibits internalization of the VE-cadherin complex from FAJ trailing ends and is important for endothelial monolayer integrity. Together, these findings reveal a novel junction protective mechanism during polarized trafficking of VE-cadherin, which supports barrier maintenance within dynamic endothelial tissue. PMID:27417273

  4. Impaired expression and distribution of adherens and gap junction proteins in the seminiferous tubules of rats undergoing autoimmune orchitis.

    PubMed

    Pérez, C; Sobarzo, C; Jacobo, P; Jarazo Dietrich, S; Theas, M; Denduchis, B; Lustig, L

    2011-12-01

    Experimental autoimmune orchitis (EAO) is characterized by an interstitial lymphomononuclear cell infiltration and a severe lesion of seminiferous tubules (ST) with germ cells that undergo apoptosis and sloughing. The aim of this study was to analyse the expression and localization of adherens junction (AJ) proteins: N-cadherin, α-, β- and p120 catenins and gap junction protein, connexin 43 (Cx43), to explore some aspects of germ-cell sloughing during the development of orchitis. EAO was induced in Sprague-Dawley adult rats by active immunization with testicular homogenate and adjuvants. Control rats (C) were injected with saline solution and adjuvants. Concomitant with early signs of germ-cell sloughing, we observed by immunofluorescence and Western blot, a delocalization and a significant increase in N-cadherin and α-catenin expression in the ST of EAO compared with C rats. In spite of this increased AJ protein expression, a severe germ-cell sloughing occurred. This is probably due to the impairment of the AJ complex function, as shown by the loss of N-cadherin/β-catenin colocalization (confocal microscopy) and increased pY654 β-catenin expression, suggesting lower affinity of these two proteins and increased pERK1/2 expression in the testis of EAO rats. The significant decrease in Cx43 expression detected in EAO rats suggests a gap junction function impairment also contributing to germ-cell sloughing.

  5. Alpha-catenin-Dependent Recruitment of the Centrosomal Protein CAP350 to Adherens Junctions Allows Epithelial Cells to Acquire a Columnar Shape

    PubMed Central

    Zurbano, Angel; Formstecher, Etienne; Martinez-Morales, Juan R.; Bornens, Michel; Rios, Rosa M.

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial morphogenesis involves a dramatic reorganisation of the microtubule cytoskeleton. How this complex process is controlled at the molecular level is still largely unknown. Here, we report that the centrosomal microtubule (MT)-binding protein CAP350 localises at adherens junctions in epithelial cells. By two-hybrid screening, we identified a direct interaction of CAP350 with the adhesion protein α-catenin that was further confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation experiments. Block of epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin)-mediated cell-cell adhesion or α-catenin depletion prevented CAP350 localisation at cell-cell junctions. Knocking down junction-located CAP350 inhibited the establishment of an apico-basal array of microtubules and impaired the acquisition of columnar shape in Madin-Darby canine kidney II (MDCKII) cells grown as polarised epithelia. Furthermore, MDCKII cystogenesis was also defective in junctional CAP350-depleted cells. CAP350-depleted MDCKII cysts were smaller and contained either multiple lumens or no lumen. Membrane polarity was not affected, but cortical microtubule bundles did not properly form. Our results indicate that CAP350 may act as an adaptor between adherens junctions and microtubules, thus regulating epithelial differentiation and contributing to the definition of cell architecture. We also uncover a central role of α-catenin in global cytoskeleton remodelling, in which it acts not only on actin but also on MT reorganisation during epithelial morphogenesis. PMID:25764135

  6. Regulation of Endothelial Adherens Junctions by Tyrosine Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Alejandro Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cells form a semipermeable, regulated barrier that limits the passage of fluid, small molecules, and leukocytes between the bloodstream and the surrounding tissues. The adherens junction, a major mechanism of intercellular adhesion, is comprised of transmembrane cadherins forming homotypic interactions between adjacent cells and associated cytoplasmic catenins linking the cadherins to the cytoskeleton. Inflammatory conditions promote the disassembly of the adherens junction and a loss of intercellular adhesion, creating openings or gaps in the endothelium through which small molecules diffuse and leukocytes transmigrate. Tyrosine kinase signaling has emerged as a central regulator of the inflammatory response, partly through direct phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of the adherens junction components. This review discusses the findings that support and those that argue against a direct effect of cadherin and catenin phosphorylation in the disassembly of the adherens junction. Recent findings indicate a complex interaction between kinases, phosphatases, and the adherens junction components that allow a fine regulation of the endothelial permeability to small molecules, leukocyte migration, and barrier resealing. PMID:26556953

  7. Local BMP receptor activation at adherens junctions in the Drosophila germline stem cell niche.

    PubMed

    Michel, Marcus; Raabe, Isabel; Kupinski, Adam P; Pérez-Palencia, Raquel; Bökel, Christian

    2011-08-02

    According to the stem cell niche synapse hypothesis postulated for the mammalian haematopoietic system, spatial specificity of niche signals is maximized by subcellularly restricting signalling to cadherin-based adherens junctions between individual niche and stem cells. However, such a synapse has never been observed directly, in part, because tools to detect active growth factor receptors with subcellular resolution were not available. Here we describe a novel fluorescence-based reporter that directly visualizes bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) receptor activation and show that in the Drosophila testis a BMP niche signal is transmitted preferentially at adherens junctions between hub and germline stem cells, resembling the proposed synapse organization. Ligand secretion involves the exocyst complex and the Rap activator Gef26, both of which are also required for Cadherin trafficking towards adherens junctions. We, therefore, propose that local generation of the BMP signal is achieved through shared use of the Cadherin transport machinery.

  8. Nectin/PRR: an immunoglobulin-like cell adhesion molecule recruited to cadherin-based adherens junctions through interaction with Afadin, a PDZ domain-containing protein.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, K; Nakanishi, H; Miyahara, M; Mandai, K; Satoh, K; Satoh, A; Nishioka, H; Aoki, J; Nomoto, A; Mizoguchi, A; Takai, Y

    1999-05-03

    We have isolated a novel actin filament-binding protein, named afadin, localized at cadherin-based cell-cell adherens junctions (AJs) in various tissues and cell lines. Afadin has one PDZ domain, three proline-rich regions, and one actin filament-binding domain. We found here that afadin directly interacted with a family of the immunoglobulin superfamily, which was isolated originally as the poliovirus receptor-related protein (PRR) family consisting of PRR1 and -2, and has been identified recently to be the alphaherpes virus receptor. PRR has a COOH-terminal consensus motif to which the PDZ domain of afadin binds. PRR and afadin were colocalized at cadherin-based cell-cell AJs in various tissues and cell lines. In E-cadherin-expressing EL cells, PRR was recruited to cadherin-based cell-cell AJs through interaction with afadin. PRR showed Ca2+-independent cell-cell adhesion activity. These results indicate that PRR is a cell-cell adhesion molecule of the immunoglobulin superfamily which is recruited to cadherin-based cell-cell AJs through interaction with afadin. We rename PRR as nectin (taken from the Latin word "necto" meaning "to connect").

  9. Structure of artificial and natural VE-cadherin-based adherens junctions.

    PubMed

    Taveau, Jean-Christophe; Dubois, Mathilde; Le Bihan, Olivier; Trépout, Sylvain; Almagro, Sébastien; Hewat, Elizabeth; Durmort, Claire; Heyraud, Stéphanie; Gulino-Debrac, Danielle; Lambert, Olivier

    2008-04-01

    In vascular endothelium, adherens junctions between endothelial cells are composed of VE-cadherin (vascular endothelial cadherin), an adhesive receptor that is crucial for the proper assembly of vascular structures and the maintenance of vascular integrity. As a classical cadherin, VE-cadherin links endothelial cells together by homophilic interactions mediated by its extracellular part and associates intracellularly with the actin cytoskeleton via catenins. Although, from structural crystallographic data, a dimeric structure arranged in a trans orientation has emerged as a potential mechanism of cell-cell adhesion, the cadherin organization within adherens junctions remains controversial. Concerning VE-cadherin, its extracellular part possesses the capacity to self-associate in solution as hexamers consisting of three antiparallel cadherin dimers. VE-cadherin-based adherens junctions were reconstituted in vitro by assembly of a VE-cadherin EC (extracellular repeat) 1-EC4 hexamer at the surfaces of liposomes. The artificial adherens junctions revealed by cryoelectron microscopy appear as a two-dimensional self-assembly of hexameric structures. This cadherin organization is reminiscent of that found in native desmosomal junctions. Further structural studies performed on native VE-cadherin junctions would provide a better understanding of the cadherin organization within adherens junctions. Homophilic interactions between cadherins are strengthened intracellularly by connection to the actin cytoskeleton. Recently, we have discovered that annexin 2, an actin-binding protein connects the VE-cadherin-catenin complex to the actin cytoskeleton. This novel link is labile and promotes the endothelial cell switch from a quiescent to an angiogenic state.

  10. The organization of adherens junctions and desmosomes at the cardiac intercalated disc is independent of gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Gutstein, David E; Liu, Fang-Yu; Meyers, Marian B; Choo, Andrew; Fishman, Glenn I

    2003-03-01

    Adherens junctions and desmosomes are responsible for mechanically coupling myocytes in the heart and are found closely apposed to gap junction plaques at the intercalated discs of cardiomyocytes. It is not known whether loss of cardiac gap junctions, such as described in cardiac disease states, may influence the expression patterns of other intercalated disc-associated proteins. We investigated whether the major cardiac gap junction protein connexin43 (Cx43) may be responsible for regulating adherens junctions, desmosomes and their associated catenins, in terms of abundance and localization at the intercalated discs of cardiomyocytes. In order to study the effect of loss of cardiac gap junctions on the intercalated disc-associated proteins, we used a combination of immunoblotting, immunofluorescence with confocal microscopy and electron microscopy to evaluate heart tissue from mice with cardiac-specific conditional knockout of Cx43. We found that the cardiac adherens junctions, desmosomes and their associated catenins, as well as vinculin and ZO-1, maintain their normal abundance, structural appearance and localization in the absence of Cx43. We conclude from these data that Cx43 is not required for the organization of the cell adhesion junctions and their associated catenins at the intercalated disc in the adult cardiac myocyte.

  11. ZO-1 controls endothelial adherens junctions, cell-cell tension, angiogenesis, and barrier formation.

    PubMed

    Tornavaca, Olga; Chia, Minghao; Dufton, Neil; Almagro, Lourdes Osuna; Conway, Daniel E; Randi, Anna M; Schwartz, Martin A; Matter, Karl; Balda, Maria S

    2015-03-16

    Intercellular junctions are crucial for mechanotransduction, but whether tight junctions contribute to the regulation of cell-cell tension and adherens junctions is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the tight junction protein ZO-1 regulates tension acting on VE-cadherin-based adherens junctions, cell migration, and barrier formation of primary endothelial cells, as well as angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. ZO-1 depletion led to tight junction disruption, redistribution of active myosin II from junctions to stress fibers, reduced tension on VE-cadherin and loss of junctional mechanotransducers such as vinculin and PAK2, and induced vinculin dissociation from the α-catenin-VE-cadherin complex. Claudin-5 depletion only mimicked ZO-1 effects on barrier formation, whereas the effects on mechanotransducers were rescued by inhibition of ROCK and phenocopied by JAM-A, JACOP, or p114RhoGEF down-regulation. ZO-1 was required for junctional recruitment of JACOP, which, in turn, recruited p114RhoGEF. ZO-1 is thus a central regulator of VE-cadherin-dependent endothelial junctions that orchestrates the spatial actomyosin organization, tuning cell-cell tension, migration, angiogenesis, and barrier formation.

  12. The adherens junction is lost during normal pregnancy but not during ovarian hyperstimulated pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Dowland, Samson N; Madawala, Romanthi J; Lindsay, Laura A; Murphy, Christopher R

    2016-03-01

    During early pregnancy in the rat, the luminal uterine epithelial cells (UECs) must transform to a receptive state to permit blastocyst attachment and implantation. The implantation process involves penetration of the epithelial barrier, so it is expected that the transformation of UECs includes alterations in the lateral junctional complex. Previous studies have demonstrated a deepening of the tight junction (zonula occludens) and a reduction in the number of desmosomes (macula adherens) in UECs at the time of implantation. However, the adherens junction (zonula adherens), which is primarily responsible for cell-cell adhesion, has been little studied during early pregnancy. This study investigated the adherens junction in rat UECs during the early stages of normal pregnancy and ovarian hyperstimulated (OH) pregnancy using transmission electron microscopy. The adherens junction is present in UECs at the time of fertilisation, but is lost at the time of blastocyst implantation during normal pregnancy. Interestingly, at the time of implantation after OH, adherens junctions are retained and may impede blastocyst penetration of the epithelium. The adherens junction anchors the actin-based terminal web, which is known to be disrupted in UECs during early pregnancy. However, artificial disruption of the terminal web, using cytochalasin D, did not cause removal of the adherens junction in UECs. This study revealed that adherens junction disassembly occurs during early pregnancy, but that this process does not occur during OH pregnancy. Such disassembly does not appear to depend on the disruption of the terminal web.

  13. The adherens junctions control susceptibility to Staphylococcus aureus α-toxin.

    PubMed

    Popov, Lauren M; Marceau, Caleb D; Starkl, Philipp M; Lumb, Jennifer H; Shah, Jimit; Guerrera, Diego; Cooper, Rachel L; Merakou, Christina; Bouley, Donna M; Meng, Wenxiang; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Takeichi, Masatoshi; Galli, Stephen J; Bagnoli, Fabio; Citi, Sandra; Carette, Jan E; Amieva, Manuel R

    2015-11-17

    Staphylococcus aureus is both a transient skin colonizer and a formidable human pathogen, ranking among the leading causes of skin and soft tissue infections as well as severe pneumonia. The secreted bacterial α-toxin is essential for S. aureus virulence in these epithelial diseases. To discover host cellular factors required for α-toxin cytotoxicity, we conducted a genetic screen using mutagenized haploid human cells. Our screen identified a cytoplasmic member of the adherens junctions, plekstrin-homology domain containing protein 7 (PLEKHA7), as the second most significantly enriched gene after the known α-toxin receptor, a disintegrin and metalloprotease 10 (ADAM10). Here we report a new, unexpected role for PLEKHA7 and several components of cellular adherens junctions in controlling susceptibility to S. aureus α-toxin. We find that despite being injured by α-toxin pore formation, PLEKHA7 knockout cells recover after intoxication. By infecting PLEKHA7(-/-) mice with methicillin-resistant S. aureus USA300 LAC strain, we demonstrate that this junctional protein controls disease severity in both skin infection and lethal S. aureus pneumonia. Our results suggest that adherens junctions actively control cellular responses to a potent pore-forming bacterial toxin and identify PLEKHA7 as a potential nonessential host target to reduce S. aureus virulence during epithelial infections.

  14. The adherens junctions control susceptibility to Staphylococcus aureus α-toxin

    PubMed Central

    Popov, Lauren M.; Marceau, Caleb D.; Starkl, Philipp M.; Lumb, Jennifer H.; Shah, Jimit; Guerrera, Diego; Cooper, Rachel L.; Merakou, Christina; Bouley, Donna M.; Meng, Wenxiang; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Takeichi, Masatoshi; Galli, Stephen J.; Bagnoli, Fabio; Citi, Sandra; Carette, Jan E.; Amieva, Manuel R.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is both a transient skin colonizer and a formidable human pathogen, ranking among the leading causes of skin and soft tissue infections as well as severe pneumonia. The secreted bacterial α-toxin is essential for S. aureus virulence in these epithelial diseases. To discover host cellular factors required for α-toxin cytotoxicity, we conducted a genetic screen using mutagenized haploid human cells. Our screen identified a cytoplasmic member of the adherens junctions, plekstrin-homology domain containing protein 7 (PLEKHA7), as the second most significantly enriched gene after the known α-toxin receptor, a disintegrin and metalloprotease 10 (ADAM10). Here we report a new, unexpected role for PLEKHA7 and several components of cellular adherens junctions in controlling susceptibility to S. aureus α-toxin. We find that despite being injured by α-toxin pore formation, PLEKHA7 knockout cells recover after intoxication. By infecting PLEKHA7−/− mice with methicillin-resistant S. aureus USA300 LAC strain, we demonstrate that this junctional protein controls disease severity in both skin infection and lethal S. aureus pneumonia. Our results suggest that adherens junctions actively control cellular responses to a potent pore-forming bacterial toxin and identify PLEKHA7 as a potential nonessential host target to reduce S. aureus virulence during epithelial infections. PMID:26489655

  15. Plakophilin 3 mediates Rap1-dependent desmosome assembly and adherens junction maturation

    PubMed Central

    Todorovic´, Viktor; Koetsier, Jennifer L.; Godsel, Lisa M.; Green, Kathleen J.

    2014-01-01

    The pathways driving desmosome and adherens junction assembly are temporally and spatially coordinated, but how they are functionally coupled is poorly understood. Here we show that the Armadillo protein plakophilin 3 (Pkp3) mediates both desmosome assembly and E-cadherin maturation through Rap1 GTPase, thus functioning in a manner distinct from the closely related plakophilin 2 (Pkp2). Whereas Pkp2 and Pkp3 share the ability to mediate the initial phase of desmoplakin (DP) accumulation at sites of cell–cell contact, they play distinct roles in later steps: Pkp3 is required for assembly of a cytoplasmic population of DP-enriched junction precursors, whereas Pkp2 is required for transfer of the precursors to the membrane. Moreover, Pkp3 forms a complex with Rap1 GTPase, promoting its activation and facilitating desmosome assembly. We show further that Pkp3 deficiency causes disruption of an E-cadherin/Rap1 complex required for adherens junction sealing. These findings reveal Pkp3 as a coordinator of desmosome and adherens junction assembly and maturation through its functional association with Rap1. PMID:25208567

  16. Interlocked positive and negative feedback network motifs regulate β-catenin activity in the adherens junction pathway

    PubMed Central

    Klinke, David J.; Horvath, Nicholas; Cuppett, Vanessa; Wu, Yueting; Deng, Wentao; Kanj, Rania

    2015-01-01

    The integrity of epithelial tissue architecture is maintained through adherens junctions that are created through extracellular homotypic protein–protein interactions between cadherin molecules. Cadherins also provide an intracellular scaffold for the formation of a multiprotein complex that contains signaling proteins, including β-catenin. Environmental factors and controlled tissue reorganization disrupt adherens junctions by cleaving the extracellular binding domain and initiating a series of transcriptional events that aim to restore tissue homeostasis. However, it remains unclear how alterations in cell adhesion coordinate transcriptional events, including those mediated by β-catenin in this pathway. Here were used quantitative single-cell and population-level in vitro assays to quantify the endogenous pathway dynamics after the proteolytic disruption of the adherens junctions. Using prior knowledge of isolated elements of the overall network, we interpreted these data using in silico model-based inference to identify the topology of the regulatory network. Collectively the data suggest that the regulatory network contains interlocked network motifs consisting of a positive feedback loop, which is used to restore the integrity of adherens junctions, and a negative feedback loop, which is used to limit β-catenin–induced gene expression. PMID:26224311

  17. Oxygen deprivation inhibits basal keratinocyte proliferation in a model of human skin and induces regio-specific changes in the distribution of epidermal adherens junction proteins, aquaporin-3, and glycogen.

    PubMed

    Straseski, Joely A; Gibson, Angela L; Thomas-Virnig, Christina L; Allen-Hoffmann, B Lynn

    2009-01-01

    It is generally accepted that hypoxia and recovery from oxygen deprivation contribute to the breakdown and ulceration of human skin. The effects of these stresses on proliferation, differentiation and expression of cell-cell adhesion molecules were investigated for the first time in an organotypic model of human skin. Fully stratified tissues were exposed to a time course of oxygen deprivation and subsequent reoxygenation. Regional changes in keratinocyte morphology, glycogen stores and cellular junctions were observed, with more differentiated layers of the epidermis exhibiting the first evidence of oxygen deprivation. Cellular swelling within the granular layer was concurrent with aquaporin-3 depletion. The keratinocyte adherens junction proteins E-cadherin and beta-catenin were dramatically decreased in a regio-specific manner throughout the epidermis following oxygen deprivation. In contrast, P-cadherin and the desmosomal proteins desmoplakin and desmoglein-1 were refractory to oxygen deprivation. Relative to normoxic controls, hypoxic tissues exhibited increased mRNA levels of the transcriptional repressor Slug; however, mRNA levels of the related transcriptional factor Snail were unaffected. All cellular and molecular changes were reversible upon reoxygenation. These results show that oxygen deprivation and reoxygenation exert differential effects on epidermal adhesion proteins and suggest a novel role for cadherins, beta-catenin, and Slug in hypoxia-induced junctional changes occurring in stratified squamous epithelium.

  18. Oxygen deprivation inhibits basal keratinocyte proliferation in a model of human skin and induces regio-specific changes in the distribution of epidermal adherens junction proteins, aquaporin-3, and glycogen

    PubMed Central

    Straseski, Joely A.; Gibson, Angela L.; Thomas-Virnig, Christina L.; Allen-Hoffmann, B. Lynn

    2009-01-01

    It is generally accepted that hypoxia and recovery from oxygen deprivation contribute to the breakdown and ulceration of human skin. The effects of these stresses on proliferation, differentiation and expression of cell-cell adhesion molecules were investigated for the first time in an organotypic model of human skin. Fully stratified tissues were exposed to a time course of oxygen deprivation and subsequent reoxygenation. Regional changes in keratinocyte morphology, glycogen stores and cellular junctions were observed, with more differentiated layers of the epidermis exhibiting the first evidence of oxygen deprivation. Cellular swelling within the granular layer was concurrent with aquaporin-3 depletion. The keratinocyte adherens junction proteins E-cadherin and β-catenin were dramatically decreased in a regio-specific manner throughout the epidermis following oxygen deprivation. In contrast, P-cadherin and the desmosomal proteins desmoplakin and desmoglein-1 were refractory to oxygen deprivation. Relative to normoxic controls, hypoxic tissues exhibited increased mRNA levels of the transcriptional repressor Slug however mRNA levels of the related transcriptional factor Snail were unaffected. All cellular and molecular changes were reversible upon reoxygenation. These results demonstrate that oxygen deprivation and reoxygenation exert differential effects on epidermal adhesion proteins and suggest a novel role for cadherins, β-catenin, and Slug in hypoxia-induced junctional changes occurring in stratified squamous epithelium. PMID:19614926

  19. Myosin-dependent remodeling of adherens junctions protects junctions from Snail-dependent disassembly

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Mo

    2016-01-01

    Although Snail is essential for disassembly of adherens junctions during epithelial–mesenchymal transitions (EMTs), loss of adherens junctions in Drosophila melanogaster gastrula is delayed until mesoderm is internalized, despite the early expression of Snail in that primordium. By combining live imaging and quantitative image analysis, we track the behavior of E-cadherin–rich junction clusters, demonstrating that in the early stages of gastrulation most subapical clusters in mesoderm not only persist, but move apically and enhance in density and total intensity. All three phenomena depend on myosin II and are temporally correlated with the pulses of actomyosin accumulation that drive initial cell shape changes during gastrulation. When contractile myosin is absent, the normal Snail expression in mesoderm, or ectopic Snail expression in ectoderm, is sufficient to drive early disassembly of junctions. In both cases, junctional disassembly can be blocked by simultaneous induction of myosin contractility. Our findings provide in vivo evidence for mechanosensitivity of cell–cell junctions and imply that myosin-mediated tension can prevent Snail-driven EMT. PMID:26754645

  20. Carcinoembryonic antigen promotes colorectal cancer progression by targeting adherens junction complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Bajenova, Olga; Chaika, Nina; Tolkunova, Elena; Davydov-Sinitsyn, Alexander; Gapon, Svetlana; Thomas, Peter; O’Brien, Stephen

    2014-06-10

    Oncomarkers play important roles in the detection and management of human malignancies. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, CEACAM5) and epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin) are considered as independent tumor markers in monitoring metastatic colorectal cancer. They are both expressed by cancer cells and can be detected in the blood serum. We investigated the effect of CEA production by MIP101 colorectal carcinoma cell lines on E-cadherin adherens junction (AJ) protein complexes. No direct interaction between E-cadherin and CEA was detected; however, the functional relationships between E-cadherin and its AJ partners: α-, β- and p120 catenins were impaired. We discovered a novel interaction between CEA and beta-catenin protein in the CEA producing cells. It is shown in the current study that CEA overexpression alters the splicing of p120 catenin and triggers the release of soluble E-cadherin. The influence of CEA production by colorectal cancer cells on the function of E-cadherin junction complexes may explain the link between the elevated levels of CEA and the increase in soluble E-cadherin during the progression of colorectal cancer. - Highlights: • Elevated level of CEA increases the release of soluble E-cadherin during the progression of colorectal cancer. • CEA over-expression alters the binding preferences between E-cadherin and its partners: α-, β- and p120 catenins in adherens junction complexes. • CEA produced by colorectal cancer cells interacts with beta-catenin protein. • CEA over-expression triggers the increase in nuclear beta-catenin. • CEA over-expression alters the splicing of p120 catenin protein.

  1. HIV-associated disruption of tight and adherens junctions of oral epithelial cells facilitates HSV-1 infection and spread.

    PubMed

    Sufiawati, Irna; Tugizov, Sharof M

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) types 1 and 2 are the most common opportunistic infections in HIV/AIDS. In these immunocompromised individuals, HSV-1 reactivates and replicates in oral epithelium, leading to oral disorders such as ulcers, gingivitis, and necrotic lesions. Although the increased risk of HSV infection may be mediated in part by HIV-induced immune dysfunction, direct or indirect interactions of HIV and HSV at the molecular level may also play a role. In this report we show that prolonged interaction of the HIV proteins tat and gp120 and cell-free HIV virions with polarized oral epithelial cells leads to disruption of tight and adherens junctions of epithelial cells through the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway. HIV-induced disruption of oral epithelial junctions facilitates HSV-1 paracellular spread between the epithelial cells. Furthermore, HIV-associated disruption of adherens junctions exposes sequestered nectin-1, an adhesion protein and critical receptor for HSV envelope glycoprotein D (gD). Exposure of nectin-1 facilitates binding of HSV-1 gD, which substantially increases HSV-1 infection of epithelial cells with disrupted junctions over that of cells with intact junctions. Exposed nectin-1 from disrupted adherens junctions also increases the cell-to-cell spread of HSV-1 from infected to uninfected oral epithelial cells. Antibodies to nectin-1 and HSV-1 gD substantially reduce HSV-1 infection and cell-to-cell spread, indicating that HIV-promoted HSV infection and spread are mediated by the interaction of HSV gD with HIV-exposed nectin-1. Our data suggest that HIV-associated disruption of oral epithelial junctions may potentiate HSV-1 infection and its paracellular and cell-to-cell spread within the oral mucosal epithelium. This could be one of the possible mechanisms of rapid development of HSV-associated oral lesions in HIV-infected individuals.

  2. An introduction to adherens junctions: from molecular mechanisms to tissue development and disease.

    PubMed

    Harris, Tony J C

    2012-01-01

    Adherens junctions (AJs) are fundamental for the development of animal tissues and organs. The core complex is formed from transmembrane cell-cell adhesion molecules, cadherins, and adaptor molecules, the catenins, that link to cytoskeletal and regulatory networks within the cell. This complex can be considered over a wide range of biological organization, from atoms to molecules, protein complexes, molecular networks, cells, tissues, and overall animal development. AJs have also been an integral part of animal evolution, and play central roles in cancer development and pathogen infection. This book addresses major questions encompassing these aspects of AJ biology. How did AJs evolve? How do the cadherins and catenins interact to assemble AJs and mediate adhesion? How do AJs interface with other cellular machinery to couple adhesion with the whole cell? How do AJs affect cell behaviour and multicellular development? How can abnormal AJ activity lead to disease?

  3. The Extracellular Architecture of Adherens Junctions Revealed by Crystal Structures of Type I Cadherins

    SciTech Connect

    O Harrison; X Jin; S Hong; F Bahna; G Ahlsen; J Brasch; Y Wu; J Vendome; K Felsovalyi; et al.

    2011-12-31

    Adherens junctions, which play a central role in intercellular adhesion, comprise clusters of type I classical cadherins that bind via extracellular domains extended from opposing cell surfaces. We show that a molecular layer seen in crystal structures of E- and N-cadherin ectodomains reported here and in a previous C-cadherin structure corresponds to the extracellular architecture of adherens junctions. In all three ectodomain crystals, cadherins dimerize through a trans adhesive interface and are connected by a second, cis, interface. Assemblies formed by E-cadherin ectodomains coated on liposomes also appear to adopt this structure. Fluorescent imaging of junctions formed from wild-type and mutant E-cadherins in cultured cells confirm conclusions derived from structural evidence. Mutations that interfere with the trans interface ablate adhesion, whereas cis interface mutations disrupt stable junction formation. Our observations are consistent with a model for junction assembly involving strong trans and weak cis interactions localized in the ectodomain.

  4. Defects in the adherens junction complex (E-cadherin/ β-catenin) in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Shameer; Nijhuis, Anke; Kumagai, Tomoko; Lindsay, James; Silver, Andrew

    2015-06-01

    The epithelial monolayer of the intestine is a selective barrier permitting nutrient and electrolyte absorption yet acting to protect the underlying tissue compartments and cellular components from attack and infiltration by antigens, bacteria and bacterial products present in the lumen. Disruption of this barrier has been associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The adherens junction (AJ), together with tight junctions (TJ) and desmosomes, form an apical junction complex that controls epithelial cell-to-cell adherence and barrier function as well as regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, intracellular signalling pathways and transcriptional regulation. Numerous studies and reviews highlight the responses of TJs to physiological and pathological stimuli. By comparison, the response of AJ proteins, and the subsequent consequences for barrier function, when exposed to the IBD inflammatory milieu, is less well studied. In this review, we will highlight the roles and responses of the AJ proteins in IBD and provide suggestions for future studies. We will also consider recently proposed therapeutic strategies to preserve or restore epithelial barrier functions to prevent and treat IBD.

  5. CLASP2 interacts with p120-catenin and governs microtubule dynamics at adherens junctions

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi, Marta N.; Megias, Diego; Epifano, Carolina; Akhmanova, Anna; Gundersen, Gregg G.; Fuchs, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    Classical cadherins and their connections with microtubules (MTs) are emerging as important determinants of cell adhesion. However, the functional relevance of such interactions and the molecular players that contribute to tissue architecture are still emerging. In this paper, we report that the MT plus end–binding protein CLASP2 localizes to adherens junctions (AJs) via direct interaction with p120-catenin (p120) in primary basal mouse keratinocytes. Reductions in the levels of p120 or CLASP2 decreased the localization of the other protein to cell–cell contacts and altered AJ dynamics and stability. These features were accompanied by decreased MT density and altered MT dynamics at intercellular junction sites. Interestingly, CLASP2 was enriched at the cortex of basal progenitor keratinocytes, in close localization to p120. Our findings suggest the existence of a new mechanism of MT targeting to AJs with potential functional implications in the maintenance of proper cell–cell adhesion in epidermal stem cells. PMID:24368809

  6. Curcumin prevents cisplatin-induced decrease in the tight and adherens junctions: relation to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Trujillo, Joyce; Molina-Jijón, Eduardo; Medina-Campos, Omar Noel; Rodríguez-Muñoz, Rafael; Reyes, José Luis; Loredo, María L; Barrera-Oviedo, Diana; Pinzón, Enrique; Rodríguez-Rangel, Daniela Saraí; Pedraza-Chaverri, José

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin is a polyphenol and cisplatin is an antineoplastic agent that induces nephrotoxicity associated with oxidative stress, apoptosis, fibrosis and decrease in renal tight junction (TJ) proteins. The potential effect of curcumin against alterations in TJ structure and function has not been evaluated in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. The present study explored whether curcumin is able to prevent the cisplatin-induced fibrosis and decreased expression of the TJ and adherens junction (AJ) proteins occludin, claudin-2 and E-cadherin in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Curcumin (200 mg kg(-1)) was administered in three doses, and rats were sacrificed 72 h after cisplatin administration. Curcumin was able to scavenge, in a concentration-dependent way, superoxide anion, hydroxyl radical, peroxyl radical, singlet oxygen, peroxynitrite anion, hypochlorous acid and hydrogen peroxide. Cisplatin-induced renal damage was associated with alterations in plasma creatinine, expression of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and of kidney injury molecule-1, histological damage, increase in apoptosis, fibrosis (evaluated by transforming growth factor β1, collagen I and IV and α-smooth muscle actin expressions), increase in oxidative/nitrosative stress (evaluated by Hsp70/72 expression, protein tyrosine nitration, superoxide anion production in isolated glomeruli and proximal tubules, and protein levels of NADPH oxidase subunits p47(phox) and gp91(phox), protein kinase C β2, and Nrf2) as well as by decreased expression of occludin, claudin-2, β-catenin and E-cadherin. Curcumin treatment prevented all the above-described alterations. The protective effect of curcumin against cisplatin-induced fibrosis and decreased proteins of the TJ and AJ was associated with the prevention of glomerular and proximal tubular superoxide anion production induced by NADPH oxidase activity.

  7. Overexpression of CD97 in Intestinal Epithelial Cells of Transgenic Mice Attenuates Colitis by Strengthening Adherens Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Wobus, Manja; Schneider, Rick; Amasheh, Salah; Sittig, Doreen; Kerner, Christiane; Naumann, Ronald; Hamann, Joerg; Aust, Gabriela

    2010-01-01

    The adhesion G-protein-coupled receptor CD97 is present in normal colonic enterocytes but overexpressed in colorectal carcinoma. To investigate the function of CD97 in colorectal carcinogenesis, transgenic Tg(villin-CD97) mice overexpressing CD97 in enterocytes were generated and subjected to azoxymethane (AOM)/dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis-associated tumorigenesis. Unexpectedly, we found a CD97 cDNA copy number-dependent reduction of DSS-induced colitis in Tg compared to wild-type (WT) mice that was confirmed by applying a simple DSS protocol. Ultrastructural analysis revealed that overexpression of CD97 strengthened lateral cell-cell contacts between enterocytes, which, in contrast, were weakened in CD97 knockout (Ko) mice. Transepithelial resistance was not altered in Tg and Ko mice, indicating that tight junctions were not affected. In Tg murine and normal human colonic enterocytes as well as in colorectal cell lines CD97 was localized preferentially in E-cadherin-based adherens junctions. CD97 overexpression upregulated membrane-bound but not cytoplasmic or nuclear β-catenin and reduced phospho-β-catenin, labeled for degradation. This was associated with inactivation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) and activation of Akt. In summary, CD97 increases the structural integrity of enterocytic adherens junctions by increasing and stabilizing junctional β-catenin, thereby regulating intestinal epithelial strength and attenuating experimental colitis. PMID:20084281

  8. Neogenin recruitment of the WAVE regulatory complex maintains adherens junction stability and tension

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Natalie K.; Fok, Ka Wai; White, Amanda; Wilson, Nicole H.; O'Leary, Conor J.; Cox, Hayley L.; Michael, Magdalene; Yap, Alpha S.; Cooper, Helen M.

    2016-01-01

    To maintain tissue integrity during epithelial morphogenesis, adherens junctions (AJs) must resist the mechanical stresses exerted by dynamic tissue movements. Junctional stability is dependent on actomyosin contractility within the actin ring. Here we describe a novel function for the axon guidance receptor, Neogenin, as a key component of the actin nucleation machinery governing junctional stability. Loss of Neogenin perturbs AJs and attenuates junctional tension. Neogenin promotes actin nucleation at AJs by recruiting the Wave regulatory complex (WRC) and Arp2/3. A direct interaction between the Neogenin WIRS domain and the WRC is crucial for the spatially restricted recruitment of the WRC to the junction. Thus, we provide the first example of a functional WIRS–WRC interaction in epithelia. We further show that Neogenin regulates cadherin recycling at the AJ. In summary, we identify Neogenin as a pivotal component of the AJ, where it influences both cadherin dynamics and junctional tension. PMID:27029596

  9. Reduced expression of adherens and gap junction proteins can have a fundamental role in the development of heart failure following cardiac hypertrophy in rats.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Daniele O; Blefari, Valdecir; Prado, Fernanda P; Silva, Carlos A; Fazan, Rubens; Salgado, Helio C; Ramos, Simone G; Prado, Cibele M

    2016-02-01

    Hypertension causes cardiac hypertrophy, cardiac dysfunction and heart failure (HF). The mechanisms implicated in the transition from compensated to decompensated cardiac hypertrophy are not fully understood. This study was aimed to investigate whether alterations in the expression of intercalated disk proteins could contribute to the transition of compensated cardiac hypertrophy to dilated heart development that culminates in HF. Male rats were submitted to abdominal aortic constriction and at 90 days post surgery (dps), three groups were observed: sham-operated animals (controls), animals with hypertrophic hearts (HH) and animals with hypertrophic + dilated hearts (HD). Blood pressure was evaluated. The hearts were collected and Western blot and immunofluorescence were performed to desmoglein-2, desmocollin-2, N-cadherin, plakoglobin, Bcatenin, and connexin-43. Cardiac systolic function was evaluated using the Vevo 2100 ultrasound system. Data were considered significant when p b 0.05. Seventy percent of the animals presented with HH and 30% were HD at 90 dps. The blood pressure increased in both groups. The amount of desmoglein-2 and desmocollin-2 expression was increased in both groups and no difference was observed in either group. The expression of N-cadherin, plakoglobin and B-catenin increased in the HHgroup and decreased in the HDgroup; and connexin-43 decreased only in theHDgroup. Therewas no difference between the ejection fraction and fractional shortening at 30 and 60 dps; however, they were decreased in the HD group at 90 dps. We found that while some proteins have increased expression accompanied by the increase in the cell volume associated with preserved systolic cardiac function in theHHgroup, these same proteins had decreased expression evenwithout significant reduction in the cell volume associated with decreased systolic cardiac function in HD group. The increased expression of desmoglein-2 and desmocollin-2 in both the HH and HD groups could

  10. Differential regulation of the Hippo pathway by adherens junctions and apical-basal cell polarity modules.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chih-Chao; Graves, Hillary K; Moya, Ivan M; Tao, Chunyao; Hamaratoglu, Fisun; Gladden, Andrew B; Halder, Georg

    2015-02-10

    Adherens junctions (AJs) and cell polarity complexes are key players in the establishment and maintenance of apical-basal cell polarity. Loss of AJs or basolateral polarity components promotes tumor formation and metastasis. Recent studies in vertebrate models show that loss of AJs or loss of the basolateral component Scribble (Scrib) cause deregulation of the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway and hyperactivation of its downstream effectors Yes-associated protein (YAP) and Transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ). However, whether AJs and Scrib act through the same or independent mechanisms to regulate Hippo pathway activity is not known. Here, we dissect how disruption of AJs or loss of basolateral components affect the activity of the Drosophila YAP homolog Yorkie (Yki) during imaginal disc development. Surprisingly, disruption of AJs and loss of basolateral proteins produced very different effects on Yki activity. Yki activity was cell-autonomously decreased but non-cell-autonomously elevated in tissues where the AJ components E-cadherin (E-cad) or α-catenin (α-cat) were knocked down. In contrast, scrib knockdown caused a predominantly cell-autonomous activation of Yki. Moreover, disruption of AJs or basolateral proteins had different effects on cell polarity and tissue size. Simultaneous knockdown of α-cat and scrib induced both cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous Yki activity. In mammalian cells, knockdown of E-cad or α-cat caused nuclear accumulation and activation of YAP without overt effects on Scrib localization and vice versa. Therefore, our results indicate the existence of multiple, genetically separable inputs from AJs and cell polarity complexes into Yki/YAP regulation.

  11. RacGAP1-driven focal adhesion formation promotes melanoma transendothelial migration through mediating adherens junction disassembly.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pu; Bai, Huiyuan; Fu, Changliang; Chen, Feng; Zeng, Panying; Wu, Chengxiang; Ye, Qichao; Dong, Cheng; Song, Yang; Song, Erqun

    2015-03-27

    Melanoma cell migration across vascular endothelial cells is an essential step of tumor metastasis. Here, we provide evidence that RacGAP1, a cytokinesis-related Rho GTPase-activating protein, contributed to this process. Depletion of RacGAP1 with RacGAP1-targeting siRNA or overexpression of RacGAP1 mutant (T249A) attenuated melanoma cell transendothelial migration and concomitant changes of adherens junctions. In addition, RacGAP1 promoted the activations of RhoA, FAK, paxillin and triggered focal adhesion formation and cytoskeletal rearrangement. By overexpressing FAK-related non-kinase (FRNK) in endothelium, we showed that RacGAP1 mediated endothelial barrier function loss and melanoma transmigration in a focal adhesion-dependent manner. These results suggest that endothelial RacGAP1 may play critical roles in pathogenic processes of cancer by regulating endothelial permeability.

  12. Adherens junctions determine the apical position of the midbody during follicular epithelial cell division.

    PubMed

    Morais-de-Sá, Eurico; Sunkel, Claudio

    2013-08-01

    Cytokinesis is asymmetric along the apical-basal axis of epithelial cells, positioning the midbody near the apical domain. However, little is known about the mechanism and purpose of this asymmetry. We use live imaging of Drosophila follicle cell division to show that asymmetric cytokinesis does not result from intrinsic polarization of the main contractile ring components. We show that adherens junctions (AJs) maintain close contact with the apical side of the contractile ring during cytokinesis. Asymmetric distribution of AJ components within follicle cells and in the otherwise unpolarized S2 cells is sufficient to recruit the midbody, revealing that asymmetric cytokinesis is determined by apical AJs in the epithelia. We further show that ectopic midbody localization induces epithelial invaginations, shifting the position of the apical interface between daughter cells relative to the AB axis of the tissue. Thus, apical midbody localization is essential to maintain epithelial tissue architecture during proliferation.

  13. Nectin and junctional adhesion molecule are critical cell adhesion molecules for the apico-basal alignment of adherens and tight junctions in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Tomohiro; Kuramitsu, Kaori; Rikitsu, Etsuko; Kurita, Souichi; Ikeda, Wataru; Takai, Yoshimi

    2013-11-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) and adherens junctions (AJs) form an apical junctional complex at the apical side of the lateral membranes of epithelial cells, in which TJs are aligned at the apical side of AJs. Many cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) and cell polarity molecules (CPMs) cooperatively regulate the formation of the apical junctional complex, but the mechanism for the alignment of TJs at the apical side of AJs is not fully understood. We developed a cellular system with which epithelial-like TJs and AJs were reconstituted in fibroblasts and analyzed the cooperative roles of CAMs and CPMs. We exogenously expressed various combinations of CAMs and CPMs in fibroblasts that express negligible amounts of these molecules endogenously. In these cells, the nectin-based cell-cell adhesion was formed at the apical side of the junctional adhesion molecule (JAM)-based cell-cell adhesion, and cadherin and claudin were recruited to the nectin-3- and JAM-based cell-cell adhesion sites to form AJ-like and TJ-like domains, respectively. This inversed alignment of the AJ-like and TJ-like domains was reversed by complementary expression of CPMs Par-3, atypical protein kinase C, Par-6, Crb3, Pals1 and Patj. We describe the cooperative roles of these CAMs and CPMs in the apico-basal alignment of TJs and AJs in epithelial cells.

  14. The vav oncogene antagonises EGFR signalling and regulates adherens junction dynamics during Drosophila eye development.

    PubMed

    Martín-Bermudo, Maria-Dolores; Bardet, Pierre-Luc; Bellaïche, Yohanns; Malartre, Marianne

    2015-04-15

    Organ shaping and patterning depends on the coordinated regulation of multiple processes. The Drosophila compound eye provides an excellent model to study the coordination of cell fate and cell positioning during morphogenesis. Here, we find that loss of vav oncogene function during eye development is associated with a disorganised retina characterised by the presence of additional cells of all types. We demonstrate that these defects result from two distinct roles of Vav. First, and in contrast to its well-established role as a positive effector of the EGF receptor (EGFR), we show that readouts of the EGFR pathway are upregulated in vav mutant larval eye disc and pupal retina, indicating that Vav antagonises EGFR signalling during eye development. Accordingly, decreasing EGFR signalling in vav mutant eyes restores retinal organisation and rescues most vav mutant phenotypes. Second, using live imaging in the pupal retina, we observe that vav mutant cells do not form stable adherens junctions, causing various defects, such as recruitment of extra primary pigment cells. In agreement with this role in junction dynamics, we observe that these phenotypes can be exacerbated by lowering DE-Cadherin or Cindr levels. Taken together, our findings establish that Vav acts at multiple times during eye development to prevent excessive cell recruitment by limiting EGFR signalling and by regulating junction dynamics to ensure the correct patterning and morphogenesis of the Drosophila eye.

  15. Multicomponent Analysis of Junctional Movements Regulated by Myosin II Isoforms at the Epithelial Zonula Adherens

    PubMed Central

    Smutny, Michael; Wu, Selwin K.; Gomez, Guillermo A.; Mangold, Sabine; Yap, Alpha S.; Hamilton, Nicholas A.

    2011-01-01

    The zonula adherens (ZA) of epithelial cells is a site of cell-cell adhesion where cellular forces are exerted and resisted. Increasing evidence indicates that E-cadherin adhesion molecules at the ZA serve to sense force applied on the junctions and coordinate cytoskeletal responses to those forces. Efforts to understand the role that cadherins play in mechanotransduction have been limited by the lack of assays to measure the impact of forces on the ZA. In this study we used 4D imaging of GFP-tagged E-cadherin to analyse the movement of the ZA. Junctions in confluent epithelial monolayers displayed prominent movements oriented orthogonal (perpendicular) to the ZA itself. Two components were identified in these movements: a relatively slow unidirectional (translational) component that could be readily fitted by least-squares regression analysis, upon which were superimposed more rapid oscillatory movements. Myosin IIB was a dominant factor responsible for driving the unilateral translational movements. In contrast, frequency spectrum analysis revealed that depletion of Myosin IIA increased the power of the oscillatory movements. This implies that Myosin IIA may serve to dampen oscillatory movements of the ZA. This extends our recent analysis of Myosin II at the ZA to demonstrate that Myosin IIA and Myosin IIB make distinct contributions to junctional movement at the ZA. PMID:21799860

  16. Formation of adherens junctions leads to the emergence of a tissue-level tension in epithelial monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Andrew R.; Daeden, Alicia; Charras, Guillaume T.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adherens junctions and desmosomes integrate the cytoskeletons of adjacent cells into a mechanical syncitium. In doing so, intercellular junctions endow tissues with the strength needed to withstand the mechanical stresses encountered in normal physiology and to coordinate tension during morphogenesis. Though much is known about the biological mechanisms underlying junction formation, little is known about how tissue-scale mechanical properties are established. Here, we use deep atomic force microscopy (AFM) indentation to measure the apparent stiffness of epithelial monolayers reforming from dissociated cells and examine which cellular processes give rise to tissue-scale mechanics. We show that the formation of intercellular junctions coincided with an increase in the apparent stiffness of reforming monolayers that reflected the generation of a tissue-level tension. Tension rapidly increased, reaching a maximum after 150 min, before settling to a lower level over the next 3 h as monolayers established homeostasis. The emergence of tissue tension correlated with the formation of adherens junctions but not desmosomes. As a consequence, inhibition of any of the molecular mechanisms participating in adherens junction initiation, remodelling and maturation significantly impeded the emergence of tissue-level tension in monolayers. PMID:24659804

  17. VEGFR2 pY949 signalling regulates adherens junction integrity and metastatic spread

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiujuan; Padhan, Narendra; Sjöström, Elisabet O.; Roche, Francis P.; Testini, Chiara; Honkura, Naoki; Sáinz-Jaspeado, Miguel; Gordon, Emma; Bentley, Katie; Philippides, Andrew; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Dejana, Elisabetta; Stan, Radu V.; Vestweber, Dietmar; Ballmer-Hofer, Kurt; Betsholtz, Christer; Pietras, Kristian; Jansson, Leif; Claesson-Welsh, Lena

    2016-01-01

    The specific role of VEGFA-induced permeability and vascular leakage in physiology and pathology has remained unclear. Here we show that VEGFA-induced vascular leakage depends on signalling initiated via the VEGFR2 phosphosite Y949, regulating dynamic c-Src and VE-cadherin phosphorylation. Abolished Y949 signalling in the mouse mutant Vegfr2Y949F/Y949F leads to VEGFA-resistant endothelial adherens junctions and a block in molecular extravasation. Vessels in Vegfr2Y949F/Y949F mice remain sensitive to inflammatory cytokines, and vascular morphology, blood pressure and flow parameters are normal. Tumour-bearing Vegfr2Y949F/Y949F mice display reduced vascular leakage and oedema, improved response to chemotherapy and, importantly, reduced metastatic spread. The inflammatory infiltration in the tumour micro-environment is unaffected. Blocking VEGFA-induced disassembly of endothelial junctions, thereby suppressing tumour oedema and metastatic spread, may be preferable to full vascular suppression in the treatment of certain cancer forms. PMID:27005951

  18. E–N-cadherin heterodimers define novel adherens junctions connecting endoderm-derived cells

    PubMed Central

    Straub, Beate K.; Rickelt, Steffen; Zimbelmann, Ralf; Grund, Christine; Kuhn, Caecilia; Iken, Marcus; Ott, Michael; Schirmacher, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Intercellular junctions play a pivotal role in tissue development and function and also in tumorigenesis. In epithelial cells, decrease or loss of E-cadherin, the hallmark molecule of adherens junctions (AJs), and increase of N-cadherin are widely thought to promote carcinoma progression and metastasis. In this paper, we show that this “cadherin switch” hypothesis does not hold for diverse endoderm-derived cells and cells of tumors derived from them. We show that the cadherins in a major portion of AJs in these cells can be chemically cross-linked in E–N heterodimers. We also show that cells possessing E–N heterodimer AJs can form semistable hemihomotypic AJs with purely N-cadherin–based AJs of mesenchymally derived cells, including stroma cells. We conclude that these heterodimers are the major AJ constituents of several endoderm-derived tissues and tumors and that the prevailing concept of antagonistic roles of these two cadherins in developmental and tumor biology has to be reconsidered. PMID:22105347

  19. Segmentation and tracking of adherens junctions in 3D for the analysis of epithelial tissue morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cilla, Rodrigo; Mechery, Vinodh; Hernandez de Madrid, Beatriz; Del Signore, Steven; Dotu, Ivan; Hatini, Victor

    2015-04-01

    Epithelial morphogenesis generates the shape of tissues, organs and embryos and is fundamental for their proper function. It is a dynamic process that occurs at multiple spatial scales from macromolecular dynamics, to cell deformations, mitosis and apoptosis, to coordinated cell rearrangements that lead to global changes of tissue shape. Using time lapse imaging, it is possible to observe these events at a system level. However, to investigate morphogenetic events it is necessary to develop computational tools to extract quantitative information from the time lapse data. Toward this goal, we developed an image-based computational pipeline to preprocess, segment and track epithelial cells in 4D confocal microscopy data. The computational pipeline we developed, for the first time, detects the adherens junctions of epithelial cells in 3D, without the need to first detect cell nuclei. We accentuate and detect cell outlines in a series of steps, symbolically describe the cells and their connectivity, and employ this information to track the cells. We validated the performance of the pipeline for its ability to detect vertices and cell-cell contacts, track cells, and identify mitosis and apoptosis in surface epithelia of Drosophila imaginal discs. We demonstrate the utility of the pipeline to extract key quantitative features of cell behavior with which to elucidate the dynamics and biomechanical control of epithelial tissue morphogenesis. We have made our methods and data available as an open-source multiplatform software tool called TTT (http://github.com/morganrcu/TTT).

  20. Rab35 regulates cadherin-mediated adherens junction formation and myoblast fusion

    PubMed Central

    Charrasse, Sophie; Comunale, Franck; De Rossi, Sylvain; Echard, Arnaud; Gauthier-Rouvière, Cécile

    2013-01-01

    Cadherins are homophilic cell–cell adhesion molecules implicated in many fundamental processes, such as morphogenesis, cell growth, and differentiation. They accumulate at cell–cell contact sites and assemble into large macromolecular complexes named adherens junctions (AJs). Cadherin targeting and function are regulated by various cellular processes, many players of which remain to be uncovered. Here we identify the small GTPase Rab35 as a new regulator of cadherin trafficking and stabilization at cell–cell contacts in C2C12 myoblasts and HeLa cells. We find that Rab35 accumulates at cell–cell contacts in a cadherin-dependent manner. Knockdown of Rab35 or expression of a dominant-negative form of Rab35 impaired N- and M-cadherin recruitment to cell–cell contacts, their stabilization at the plasma membrane, and association with p120 catenin and led to their accumulation in transferrin-, clathrin-, and AP-2–positive intracellular vesicles. We also find that Rab35 function is required for PIP5KIγ accumulation at cell–cell contacts and phosphatidyl inositol 4,5-bisphosphate production, which is involved in cadherin stabilization at contact sites. Finally, we show that Rab35 regulates myoblast fusion, a major cellular process under the control of cadherin-dependent signaling. Taken together, these results reveal that Rab35 regulates cadherin-dependent AJ formation and myoblast fusion. PMID:23197472

  1. Segmentation and Tracking of Adherens Junctions in 3D for the Analysis of Epithelial Tissue Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Cilla, Rodrigo; Mechery, Vinodh; Hernandez de Madrid, Beatriz; Del Signore, Steven; Dotu, Ivan; Hatini, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial morphogenesis generates the shape of tissues, organs and embryos and is fundamental for their proper function. It is a dynamic process that occurs at multiple spatial scales from macromolecular dynamics, to cell deformations, mitosis and apoptosis, to coordinated cell rearrangements that lead to global changes of tissue shape. Using time lapse imaging, it is possible to observe these events at a system level. However, to investigate morphogenetic events it is necessary to develop computational tools to extract quantitative information from the time lapse data. Toward this goal, we developed an image-based computational pipeline to preprocess, segment and track epithelial cells in 4D confocal microscopy data. The computational pipeline we developed, for the first time, detects the adherens junctions of epithelial cells in 3D, without the need to first detect cell nuclei. We accentuate and detect cell outlines in a series of steps, symbolically describe the cells and their connectivity, and employ this information to track the cells. We validated the performance of the pipeline for its ability to detect vertices and cell-cell contacts, track cells, and identify mitosis and apoptosis in surface epithelia of Drosophila imaginal discs. We demonstrate the utility of the pipeline to extract key quantitative features of cell behavior with which to elucidate the dynamics and biomechanical control of epithelial tissue morphogenesis. We have made our methods and data available as an open-source multiplatform software tool called TTT (http://github.com/morganrcu/TTT) PMID:25884654

  2. Adherens junction remodeling by the Notch pathway in Drosophila melanogaster oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Grammont, Muriel

    2007-04-09

    Identifying genes involved in the control of adherens junction (AJ) remodeling is essential to understanding epithelial morphogenesis. During follicular epithelium development in Drosophila melanogaster, the main body follicular cells (MBFCs) are displaced toward the oocyte and become columnar. Concomitantly, the stretched cells (StCs) become squamous and flatten around the nurse cells. By monitoring the expression of epithelial cadherin and Armadillo, I have discovered that the rate of AJ disassembly between the StCs is affected in follicles with somatic clones mutant for fringe or Delta and Serrate. This results in abnormal StC flattening and delayed MBFC displacement. Additionally, accumulation of the myosin II heavy chain Zipper is delayed at the AJs that require disassembly. Together, my results demonstrate that the Notch pathway controls AJ remodeling between the StCs and that this role is crucial for the timing of MBFC displacement and StC flattening. This provides new evidence that Notch, besides playing a key role in cell differentiation, also controls cell morphogenesis.

  3. Slit Diaphragms Contain Tight Junction Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fukasawa, Hirotaka; Bornheimer, Scott; Kudlicka, Krystyna; Farquhar, Marilyn G.

    2009-01-01

    Slit diaphragms are essential components of the glomerular filtration apparatus, as changes in these junctions are the hallmark of proteinuric diseases. Slit diaphragms, considered specialized adherens junctions, contain both unique membrane proteins (e.g., nephrin, podocin, and Neph1) and typical adherens junction proteins (e.g., P-cadherin, FAT, and catenins). Whether slit diaphragms also contain tight junction proteins is unknown. Here, immunofluorescence, immunogold labeling, and cell fractionation demonstrated that rat slit diaphragms contain the tight junction proteins JAM-A (junctional adhesion molecule A), occludin, and cingulin. We found these proteins in the same protein complexes as nephrin, podocin, CD2AP, ZO-1, and Neph1 by cosedimentation, coimmunoprecipitation, and pull-down assays. PAN nephrosis increased the protein levels of JAM-A, occludin, cingulin, and ZO-1 several-fold in glomeruli and loosened their attachment to the actin cytoskeleton. These data extend current information about the molecular composition of slit diaphragms by demonstrating the presence of tight junction proteins, although slit diaphragms lack the characteristic morphologic features of tight junctions. The contribution of these proteins to the assembly of slit diaphragms and potential signaling cascades requires further investigation. PMID:19478094

  4. Quantitative cell polarity imaging defines leader-to-follower transitions during collective migration and the key role of microtubule-dependent adherens junction formation.

    PubMed

    Revenu, Céline; Streichan, Sebastian; Donà, Erika; Lecaudey, Virginie; Hufnagel, Lars; Gilmour, Darren

    2014-03-01

    The directed migration of cell collectives drives the formation of complex organ systems. A characteristic feature of many migrating collectives is a 'tissue-scale' polarity, whereby 'leader' cells at the edge of the tissue guide trailing 'followers' that become assembled into polarised epithelial tissues en route. Here, we combine quantitative imaging and perturbation approaches to investigate epithelial cell state transitions during collective migration and organogenesis, using the zebrafish lateral line primordium as an in vivo model. A readout of three-dimensional cell polarity, based on centrosomal-nucleus axes, allows the transition from migrating leaders to assembled followers to be quantitatively resolved for the first time in vivo. Using live reporters and a novel fluorescent protein timer approach, we investigate changes in cell-cell adhesion underlying this transition by monitoring cadherin receptor localisation and stability. This reveals that while cadherin 2 is expressed across the entire tissue, functional apical junctions are first assembled in the transition zone and become progressively more stable across the leader-follower axis of the tissue. Perturbation experiments demonstrate that the formation of these apical adherens junctions requires dynamic microtubules. However, once stabilised, adherens junction maintenance is microtubule independent. Combined, these data identify a mechanism for regulating leader-to-follower transitions within migrating collectives, based on the relocation and stabilisation of cadherins, and reveal a key role for dynamic microtubules in this process.

  5. The Interaction of JRAB/MICAL-L2 with Rab8 and Rab13 Coordinates the Assembly of Tight Junctions and Adherens Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Yamamura, Rie; Nishimura, Noriyuki; Nakatsuji, Hiroyoshi; Arase, Seiji

    2008-01-01

    The assembly of tight junctions (TJs) and adherens junctions (AJs) is regulated by the transport of integral TJ and AJ proteins to and/or from the plasma membrane (PM) and it is tightly coordinated in epithelial cells. We previously reported that Rab13 and a junctional Rab13-binding protein (JRAB)/molecule interacting with CasL-like 2 (MICAL-L2) mediated the endocytic recycling of an integral TJ protein occludin and the formation of functional TJs. Here, we investigated the role of Rab13 and JRAB/MICAL-L2 in the transport of other integral TJ and AJ proteins claudin-1 and E-cadherin to the PM by using a Ca2+-switch model. Although knockdown of Rab13 specifically suppressed claudin-1 and occludin but not E-cadherin transport, knockdown of JRAB/MICAL-L2 and expression of its Rab13-binding domain (JRAB/MICAL-L2-C) inhibited claudin-1, occludin, and E-cadherin transport. We then identified Rab8 as another JRAB/MICAL-L2-C-binding protein. Knockdown of Rab8 inhibited the Rab13-independent transport of E-cadherin to the PM. Rab8 and Rab13 competed with each other for the binding to JRAB/MICAL-L2 and functionally associated with JRAB/MICAL-L2 at the perinuclear recycling/storage compartments and PM, respectively. These results suggest that the interaction of JRAB/MICAL-L2 with Rab8 and Rab13 coordinates the assembly of AJs and TJs. PMID:18094055

  6. Negatively Charged Silver Nanoparticles Cause Retinal Vascular Permeability by Activating Plasma Contact System and Disrupting Adherens Junction

    PubMed Central

    Long, Yan-Min; Zhao, Xing-Chen; Clermont, Allen C.; Zhou, Qun-Fang; Liu, Qian; Feener, Edward P.; Yan, Bing; Jiang, Gui-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been extensively used as antibacterial component in numerous healthcare, biomedical, and consumer products. Therefore, their adverse effects to biological systems have become a major concern. AgNPs have been shown to be absorbed into circulation and redistributed into various organs. It is thus of great importance to understand how these nanoparticles affect vascular permeability and uncover the underlying molecular mechanisms. A negatively charged mecaptoundeonic acid capped silver nanoparticle (MUA@AgNP) was investigated in this work. Ex-vivo experiments in mouse plasma revealed that MUA@AgNPs caused plasma prekallikrein cleavage, while positively charged or neutral AgNPs, as well as Ag ions had no effect. In-vitro tests revealed that MUA@AgNPs activated the plasma kallikrein-kinin system (KKS) by triggering Hageman factor autoactivation. By using specific inhibitors aprotinin and HOE 140, we demonstrated that KKS activation caused the release of bradykinin, which activated B2 receptors and induced the shedding of adherens junction protein, VE-cadherin. These biological perturbations eventually resulted in endothelial paracellular permeability in mouse retina after intravitreal injection of MUA@AgNPs. The findings from this work provided key insights for toxicity modulation and biomedical applications of AgNPs. PMID:26399585

  7. Negatively charged silver nanoparticles cause retinal vascular permeability by activating plasma contact system and disrupting adherens junction.

    PubMed

    Long, Yan-Min; Zhao, Xing-Chen; Clermont, Allen C; Zhou, Qun-Fang; Liu, Qian; Feener, Edward P; Yan, Bing; Jiang, Gui-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been extensively used as antibacterial component in numerous healthcare, biomedical and consumer products. Therefore, their adverse effects to biological systems have become a major concern. AgNPs have been shown to be absorbed into circulation and redistributed into various organs. It is thus of great importance to understand how these nanoparticles affect vascular permeability and uncover the underlying molecular mechanisms. A negatively charged mecaptoundeonic acid-capped silver nanoparticle (MUA@AgNP) was investigated in this work. Ex vivo experiments in mouse plasma revealed that MUA@AgNPs caused plasma prekallikrein cleavage, while positively charged or neutral AgNPs, as well as Ag ions had no effect. In vitro tests revealed that MUA@AgNPs activated the plasma kallikrein-kinin system (KKS) by triggering Hageman factor autoactivation. By using specific inhibitors aprotinin and HOE 140, we demonstrated that KKS activation caused the release of bradykinin, which activated B2 receptors and induced the shedding of adherens junction protein, VE-cadherin. These biological perturbations eventually resulted in endothelial paracellular permeability in mouse retina after intravitreal injection of MUA@AgNPs. The findings from this work provided key insights for toxicity modulation and biomedical applications of AgNPs.

  8. Mild hypothermia alleviates brain oedema and blood-brain barrier disruption by attenuating tight junction and adherens junction breakdown in a swine model of cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiebin; Li, Chunsheng; Yuan, Wei; Wu, Junyuan; Li, Jie; Li, Zhenhua; Zhao, Yongzhen

    2017-01-01

    Mild hypothermia improves survival and neurological recovery after cardiac arrest (CA) and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). However, the mechanism underlying this phenomenon is not fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to determine whether mild hypothermia alleviates early blood–brain barrier (BBB) disruption. We investigated the effects of mild hypothermia on neurologic outcome, survival rate, brain water content, BBB permeability and changes in tight junctions (TJs) and adherens junctions (AJs) after CA and CPR. Pigs were subjected to 8 min of untreated ventricular fibrillation followed by CPR. Mild hypothermia (33°C) was intravascularly induced and maintained at this temperature for 12 h, followed by active rewarming. Mild hypothermia significantly reduced cortical water content, decreased BBB permeability and attenuated TJ ultrastructural and basement membrane breakdown in brain cortical microvessels. Mild hypothermia also attenuated the CPR-induced decreases in TJ (occludin, claudin-5, ZO-1) and AJ (VE-cadherin) protein and mRNA expression. Furthermore, mild hypothermia decreased the CA- and CPR-induced increases in matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and increased angiogenin-1 (Ang-1) expression. Our findings suggest that mild hypothermia attenuates the CA- and resuscitation-induced early brain oedema and BBB disruption, and this improvement might be at least partially associated with attenuation of the breakdown of TJ and AJ, suppression of MMP-9 and VEGF expression, and upregulation of Ang-1 expression. PMID:28355299

  9. Polymorphonuclear leukocyte adhesion triggers the disorganization of endothelial cell-to-cell adherens junctions

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) infiltration into tissues is frequently accompanied by increase in vascular permeability. This suggests that PMN adhesion and transmigration could trigger modifications in the architecture of endothelial cell-to-cell junctions. In the present paper, using indirect immunofluorescence, we found that PMN adhesion to tumor necrosis factor-activated endothelial cells (EC) induced the disappearance from endothelial cell-to-cell contacts of adherens junction (AJ) components: vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin, alpha-catenin, beta-catenin, and plakoglobin. Immunoprecipitation and Western blot analysis of the VE- cadherin/catenin complex showed that the amount of beta-catenin and plakoglobin was markedly reduced from the complex and from total cell extracts. In contrast, VE-cadherin and alpha-catenin were only partially affected. Disorganization of endothelial AJ by PMN was not accompanied by EC retraction or injury and was specific for VE- cadherin/catenin complex, since platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1) distribution at cellular contacts was unchanged. PMN adhesion to EC seems to be a prerequisite for VE-cadherin/catenin complex disorganization. This phenomenon could be fully inhibited by blocking PMN adhesion with an anti-integrin beta 2 mAb, while it could be reproduced by any condition that induced increase of PMN adhesion, such as addition of PMA or an anti-beta 2-activating mAb. The effect on endothelial AJ was specific for PMN since adherent activated lymphocytes did not induce similar changes. High concentrations of protease inhibitors and oxygen metabolite scavengers were unable to prevent AJ disorganization mediated by PMN. PMN adhesion to EC was accompanied by increase in EC permeability in vitro. This effect was dependent on PMN adhesion, was not mediated by proteases and oxygen- reactive metabolites, and could be reproduced by EC treatment with EGTA. Finally, immunohistochemical analysis showed that VE

  10. VASP, zyxin and TES are tension-dependent members of Focal Adherens Junctions independent of the α-catenin-vinculin module

    PubMed Central

    Oldenburg, Joppe; van der Krogt, Gerard; Twiss, Floor; Bongaarts, Annika; Habani, Yasmin; Slotman, Johan A.; Houtsmuller, Adriaan; Huveneers, Stephan; de Rooij, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical forces are integrated at cadherin-based adhesion complexes to regulate morphology and strength of cell-cell junctions and organization of associated F-actin. A central mechanosensor at the cadherin complex is α-catenin, whose stretching recruits vinculin to regulate adhesion strength. The identity of the F-actin regulating signals that are also activated by mechanical forces at cadherin-based junctions has remained elusive. Here we identify the actin-regulators VASP, zyxin and TES as members of punctate, tensile cadherin-based junctions called Focal Adherens Junctions (FAJ) and show that they display mechanosensitive recruitment similar to that of vinculin. However, this recruitment is not altered by destroying or over-activating the α-catenin/vinculin module. Structured Illumination Microscopy (SIM) indicates that these tension sensitive proteins concentrate at locations within FAJs that are distinct from the core cadherin complex proteins. Furthermore, localization studies using mutated versions of VASP and zyxin indicate that these two proteins require binding to each other in order to localize to the FAJs. We conclude that there are multiple force sensitive modules present at the FAJ that are activated at distinct locations along the cadherin-F-actin axis and regulate specific aspects of junction dynamics. PMID:26611125

  11. VASP, zyxin and TES are tension-dependent members of Focal Adherens Junctions independent of the α-catenin-vinculin module.

    PubMed

    Oldenburg, Joppe; van der Krogt, Gerard; Twiss, Floor; Bongaarts, Annika; Habani, Yasmin; Slotman, Johan A; Houtsmuller, Adriaan; Huveneers, Stephan; de Rooij, Johan

    2015-11-27

    Mechanical forces are integrated at cadherin-based adhesion complexes to regulate morphology and strength of cell-cell junctions and organization of associated F-actin. A central mechanosensor at the cadherin complex is α-catenin, whose stretching recruits vinculin to regulate adhesion strength. The identity of the F-actin regulating signals that are also activated by mechanical forces at cadherin-based junctions has remained elusive. Here we identify the actin-regulators VASP, zyxin and TES as members of punctate, tensile cadherin-based junctions called Focal Adherens Junctions (FAJ) and show that they display mechanosensitive recruitment similar to that of vinculin. However, this recruitment is not altered by destroying or over-activating the α-catenin/vinculin module. Structured Illumination Microscopy (SIM) indicates that these tension sensitive proteins concentrate at locations within FAJs that are distinct from the core cadherin complex proteins. Furthermore, localization studies using mutated versions of VASP and zyxin indicate that these two proteins require binding to each other in order to localize to the FAJs. We conclude that there are multiple force sensitive modules present at the FAJ that are activated at distinct locations along the cadherin-F-actin axis and regulate specific aspects of junction dynamics.

  12. Formation of adherens and communicating junctions coordinate the differentiation of the shedding-layer and beta-epidermal generation in regenerating lizard epidermis.

    PubMed

    Alibardi, Lorenzo

    2014-06-01

    In the lizard epidermis, the formation of a stratified alpha- and beta-layer, separated by a shedding complex for molting, suggests that keratinocytes communicate in a coordinated manner after they leave the basal layers during the shedding cycle. I have therefore studied the localization of cell junctional proteins such as beta-catenin and connexins 43 and 26 during scale regeneration in lizard using immunocytochemistry. Beta-catenin is also detected in nuclei of basal cells destined to give rise to the Oberhäutchen and beta-cells suggesting activation of the Wnt-pathway during beta-cell differentiation. The observations show that cells of the entire shedding layer (clear and Oberhäutchen) and beta-layer are connected by beta-catenin (adherens junctions) and connexins (communicating junctions) during their differentiation. This likely cell coupling determines the formation of a distinct shedding and beta-layer within the regenerating epidermis. The observed pattern of cell junctional stratification suggests that after departing from the basal layer Oberhäutchen and beta-cells form a continuous communicating compartment that coordinates the contemporaneous differentiation along the entire scale. While the beta-layer matures the junctions are lost while other cell junctions are formed in the following mesos- and alpha-cell layers. This process determines the formation of layers with different texture (harder or softer) and the precise localization of the shedding layer within lizard epidermis.

  13. Genetic deletion of afadin causes hydrocephalus by destruction of adherens junctions in radial glial and ependymal cells in the midbrain.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hideaki; Maruo, Tomohiko; Majima, Takashi; Ishizaki, Hiroyoshi; Tanaka-Okamoto, Miki; Miyoshi, Jun; Mandai, Kenji; Takai, Yoshimi

    2013-01-01

    Adherens junctions (AJs) play a role in mechanically connecting adjacent cells to maintain tissue structure, particularly in epithelial cells. The major cell-cell adhesion molecules at AJs are cadherins and nectins. Afadin binds to both nectins and α-catenin and recruits the cadherin-β-catenin complex to the nectin-based cell-cell adhesion site to form AJs. To explore the role of afadin in radial glial and ependymal cells in the brain, we generated mice carrying a nestin-Cre-mediated conditional knockout (cKO) of the afadin gene. Newborn afadin-cKO mice developed hydrocephalus and died neonatally. The afadin-cKO brain displayed enlarged lateral ventricles and cerebral aqueduct, resulting from stenosis of the caudal end of the cerebral aqueduct and obliteration of the ventral part of the third ventricle. Afadin deficiency further caused the loss of ependymal cells from the ventricular and aqueductal surfaces. During development, radial glial cells, which terminally differentiate into ependymal cells, scattered from the ventricular zone and were replaced by neurons that eventually covered the ventricular and aqueductal surfaces of the afadin-cKO midbrain. Moreover, the denuded ependymal cells were only occasionally observed in the third ventricle and the cerebral aqueduct of the afadin-cKO midbrain. Afadin was co-localized with nectin-1 and N-cadherin at AJs of radial glial and ependymal cells in the control midbrain, but these proteins were not concentrated at AJs in the afadin-cKO midbrain. Thus, the defects in the afadin-cKO midbrain most likely resulted from the destruction of AJs, because AJs in the midbrain were already established before afadin was genetically deleted. These results indicate that afadin is essential for the maintenance of AJs in radial glial and ependymal cells in the midbrain and is required for normal morphogenesis of the cerebral aqueduct and ventral third ventricle in the midbrain.

  14. A novel amphioxus cadherin that localizes to epithelial adherens junctions has an unusual domain organization with implications for chordate phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Oda, Hiroki; Wada, Hiroshi; Tagawa, Kunifumi; Akiyama-Oda, Yasuko; Satoh, Nori; Humphreys, Tom; Zhang, Shicui; Tsukita, Shoichiro

    2002-01-01

    Although data are available from only vertebrates, urochordates, and three nonchordate animals, there are definite differences in the structures of classic cadherins between vertebrates plus urochordates and nonchordates. In this study we examined structural diversity of classic cadherins among bilaterian animals by obtaining new data from an amphioxus (Cephalochordata, Chordata), an acorn worm (Hemichordata), a sea star (Echinodermata), and an oyster (Mollusca). The structures of newly identified nonchordate cadherins are grouped together with those of the known sea urchin and Drosophila cadherins, whereas the structure of an amphioxus (Branchiostoma belcheri) cadherin, designated BbC, is differently categorized from those of other known chordate cadherins. BbC is identified as a cadherin by its cytoplasmic domain whose sequence is highly related to the cytoplasmic sequences of all known classic cadherins, but it lacks all of the five repeats constituting the extracellular homophilic-binding domain of other chordate cadherins. The ectodomains of BbC match the ectodomains found in nonchordate cadherins but not present in other chordate cadherins. We show that the BbC functions as a cell-cell adhesion molecule when expressed in Drosophila S2 cells and localizes to adherens junctions in the ectodermal epithelia in amphioxus embryos. We argue that BbC is the amphioxus homologue of the classic cadherins involved in the formation of epithelial adherens junctions. The structural relationships of the cadherin molecules allow us to propose a possibility that cephalochordates might be basal to the sister-groups vertebrates and urochordates.

  15. Targeting Fyn in Ras-transformed cells induces F-actin to promote adherens junction-mediated cell-cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Fenton, Sarah E; Hutchens, Kelli A; Denning, Mitchell F

    2015-10-01

    Fyn, a member of the Src family kinases (SFK), is an oncogene in murine epidermis and is associated with cell-cell adhesion turnover and induction of cell migration. Additionally, Fyn upregulation has been reported in multiple tumor types, including cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC). Introduction of active H-Ras(G12V) into the HaCaT human keratinocyte cell line resulted in upregulation of Fyn mRNA (200-fold) and protein, while expression of other SFKs remained unaltered. Transduction of active Ras or Fyn was sufficient to induce an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in HaCaT cells. Inhibition of Fyn activity, using siRNA or the clinical SFK inhibitor Dasatinib, increased cell-cell adhesion and rapidly (5-60 min) increased levels of cortical F-actin. Fyn inhibition with siRNA or Dasatinib also induced F-actin in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, which have elevated Fyn. F-actin co-localized with adherens junction proteins, and Dasatinib-induced cell-cell adhesion could be blocked by Cytochalasin D, indicating that F-actin polymerization was a key initiator of cell-cell adhesion through the adherens junction. Conversely, inhibiting cell-cell adhesion with low Ca(2+) media did not block Dasatinib-induced F-actin polymerization. Inhibition of the Rho effector kinase ROCK blocked Dasatinib-induced F-actin and cell-cell adhesion, implicating relief of Rho GTPase inhibition as a mechanism of Dasatinib-induced cell-cell adhesion. Finally, topical Dasatinib treatment significantly reduced total tumor burden in the SKH1 mouse model of UV-induced skin carcinogenesis. Together these results identify the promotion of actin-based cell-cell adhesion as a newly described mechanism of action for Dasatinib and suggest that Fyn inhibition may be an effective therapeutic approach in treating cSCC.

  16. Interplay between the dividing cell and its neighbors regulates adherens junction formation during cytokinesis in epithelial tissue.

    PubMed

    Herszterg, Sophie; Leibfried, Andrea; Bosveld, Floris; Martin, Charlotte; Bellaiche, Yohanns

    2013-02-11

    How adherens junctions (AJs) are formed upon cell division is largely unexplored. Here, we found that AJ formation is coordinated with cytokinesis and relies on an interplay between the dividing cell and its neighbors. During contraction of the cytokinetic ring, the neighboring cells locally accumulate Myosin II and produce the cortical tension necessary to set the initial geometry of the daughter cell interface. However, the neighboring cell membranes impede AJ formation. Upon midbody formation and concomitantly to neighboring cell withdrawal, Arp2/3-dependent actin polymerization oriented by the midbody maintains AJ geometry and regulates AJ final length and the epithelial cell arrangement upon division. We propose that cytokinesis in epithelia is a multicellular process, whereby the cooperative actions of the dividing cell and its neighbors define a two-tiered mechanism that spatially and temporally controls AJ formation while maintaining tissue cohesiveness.

  17. Processus and recessus adhaerentes: giant adherens cell junction systems connect and attract human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wuchter, Patrick; Boda-Heggemann, Judit; Straub, Beate K; Grund, Christine; Kuhn, Caecilia; Krause, Ulf; Seckinger, Anja; Peitsch, Wiebke K; Spring, Herbert; Ho, Anthony D; Franke, Werner W

    2007-06-01

    Substrate-adherent cultured cells derived from human bone marrow or umbilical cord blood ("mesenchymal stem cells") are of special interest for regenerative medicine. We report that such cells, which can display considerable heterogeneity with respect to their cytoskeletal protein complement, are often interconnected by special tentacle-like cell processes contacting one or several other cells. These processus adhaerentes, studded with many (usually small) puncta adhaerentia and varying greatly in length (up to more than 400 microm long), either contact each other in the intercellular space ("ET touches") or insert in a tight-fitting manner into deep plasma membrane invaginations (recessus adhaerentes), thus forming a novel kind of long (up to 50 microm) continuous cuff-like junction (manubria adhaerentia). The cell processes contain an actin microfilament core that is stabilized with ezrin, alpha-actinin, and myosin and accompanied by microtubules, and their adhering junctions are characterized by a molecular complement comprising the transmembrane glycoproteins N-cadherin and cadherin-11, in combination with the cytoplasmic plaque proteins alpha- and beta-catenin, together with p120(ctn), plakoglobin, and afadin. The processes are also highly dynamic and rapidly foreshorten as cell colonies approach a denser state of cell packing. These structures are obviously able to establish cell-cell connections, even over long distances, and can form deep-rooted and tight cell-cell adhesions. The possible relationship to similar cell processes in the embryonic primary mesenchyme and their potential in cell sorting and tissue formation processes in the body are discussed.

  18. Disruption of CDH2/N-cadherin-based adherens junctions leads to apoptosis of ependymal cells and denudation of brain ventricular walls.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Cristian; González, César A; Alvial, Genaro; Flores, Carlos A; Rodríguez, Esteban M; Bátiz, Luis Federico

    2013-09-01

    Disruption/denudation of the ependymal lining has been associated with the pathogenesis of various human CNS disorders, including hydrocephalus, spina bifida aperta, and periventricular heterotopia. It has been traditionally considered that ependymal denudation is a consequence of mechanical forces such as ventricular enlargement. New evidence indicates that ependymal disruption can precede ventricular dilation, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the onset of ependymal denudation are unknown. Here, we present a novel model to study ependymal cell pathophysiology and demonstrate that selective disruption of N-cadherin-based adherens junctions is sufficient to provoke progressive ependymal denudation. Blocking N-cadherin function using specific peptides that interfere with the histidine-alanine-valine extracellular homophilic interaction domain caused early pathologic changes characterized by disruption of zonula adherens and abnormal intracellular accumulation of N-cadherin. These changes then triggered massive apoptosis of ependymal cells and denudation of brain ventricular walls. Because no typical extrinsic mechanical factors such as elevated pressure or stretching forces are involved in this model, the critical role of N-cadherin-based adherens junctions in ependymal survival/physiology is highlighted. Furthermore, the results suggest that abnormal adherens junctions between ependymal cells should be considered as key components of the pathogenesis of CNS disorders associated with ependymal denudation.

  19. Nornicotine impairs endothelial cell-cell adherens junction complexes in EA.hy926 cell line via structural reorganization of F-actin.

    PubMed

    Gagat, Maciej; Grzanka, Dariusz; Izdebska, Magdalena; Maczynska, Ewa; Grzanka, Alina

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate the effect of nornicotine on endothelial EA.hy926 cells in the context of its impact on cell-cell junctions. The objective of the study was to determine the relationship between junctional proteins and F-actin after treating the cells with nornicotine. After 24 h of cell exposure to 0.08, 0.12, and 0.16 ng/mL nornicotine, analysis was performed of cell death, cell migration, ultrastructure, and colocalization of beta-catenin/F-actin and zonula occludens (ZO)-1/F-actin. Our study did not reveal any alterations in EA.hy926 cell line survival following treatment with nornicotine. However, nornicotine exerted disparate effects on cell migration and led to changes in both the ultrastructure and organization of cell-cell junctional complexes and F-actin. Moreover, the cell migration observed in the experiments performed in the present work negatively correlated with the number of Weibel-Palade bodies seen through transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Moreover, the mechanism of cell migration promotion was VEGF-independent, and the decrease in the number of Weibel-Palade bodies resulted from nornicotine-induced F-actin depolymerization. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that low concentrations of nornicotine do not affect cell survival, but promote cell movement and impair adherens junctions through changes in F-actin organization. Our results indicate for the first time the effect of nornicotine on endothelial EA.hy926 cells and suggest that nornicotine may induce transmigration pathways and, consequently, facilitate the transendothelial migration of monocytes associated with atherosclerosis.

  20. Lateral assembly of N-cadherin drives tissue integrity by stabilizing adherens junctions

    PubMed Central

    Garg, S.; Fischer, S. C.; Schuman, E. M.; Stelzer, E. H. K.

    2015-01-01

    Cadherin interactions ensure the correct registry and anchorage of cells during tissue formation. Along the plasma membrane, cadherins form inter-junctional lattices via cis- and trans-dimerization. While structural studies have provided models for cadherin interactions, the molecular nature of cadherin binding in vivo remains unexplored. We undertook a multi-disciplinary approach combining live cell imaging of three-dimensional cell assemblies (spheroids) with a computational model to study the dynamics of N-cadherin interactions. Using a loss-of-function strategy, we demonstrate that each N-cadherin interface plays a distinct role in spheroid formation. We found that cis-dimerization is not a prerequisite for trans-interactions, but rather modulates trans-interfaces to ensure tissue stability. Using a model of N-cadherin junction dynamics, we show that the absence of cis-interactions results in low junction stability and loss of tissue integrity. By quantifying the binding and unbinding dynamics of the N-cadherin binding interfaces, we determined that mutating either interface results in a 10-fold increase in the dissociation constant. These findings provide new quantitative information on the steps driving cadherin intercellular adhesion and demonstrate the role of cis-interactions in junction stability. PMID:25589573

  1. Nectin-4 mutations causing ectodermal dysplasia with syndactyly perturb the rac1 pathway and the kinetics of adherens junction formation.

    PubMed

    Fortugno, Paola; Josselin, Emmanuelle; Tsiakas, Konstantinos; Agolini, Emanuele; Cestra, Gianluca; Teson, Massimo; Santer, René; Castiglia, Daniele; Novelli, Giuseppe; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Kurth, Ingo; Lopez, Marc; Zambruno, Giovanna; Brancati, Francesco

    2014-08-01

    Defective nectin-1 and -4 have been implicated in ectodermal dysplasia (ED) syndromes with variably associated features including orofacial and limb defects. In particular, nectin-1 mutations cause cleft lip/palate ED (CLPED1; OMIM#225060), whereas defective nectin-4 is associated with ED-syndactyly syndrome (EDSS1; OMIM#613573). Although the broad phenotypic overlap suggests a common mode of action of nectin-1 and -4, little is known about the pathogenic mechanisms involved. We report the identification of, to our knowledge, a previously undescribed nectin-4 homozygous p.Val242Met missense mutation in a patient with EDSS1. We used patient skin biopsy and primary keratinocytes, as well as nectin-4 ectopic expression in epithelial cell lines, to characterize functional consequences of p.Val242Met and p.Thr185Met mutations, the latter previously identified in compound heterozygosity with a truncating mutation. We show that nectin-4-altered expression perturbs nectin-1 clustering at keratinocyte contact sites and delays, but does not impede cell-cell aggregation and cadherin recruitment at adherens junctions (AJs). Moreover, trans-interaction of nectin-1 and -4 induces the activation of Rac1, a member of the Rho family of small GTPases, and regulates E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion. These data outline a synergistic action of nectin-1 and -4 in the early steps of AJ formation and implicate this interaction in modulating the Rac1 signaling pathway.

  2. Structural alteration of tight and adherens junctions in villous and crypt epithelium of the small and large intestine of conventional nursing piglets infected with porcine epidemic diarrhea virus.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kwonil; Eyerly, Bryan; Annamalai, Thavamathi; Lu, Zhongyan; Saif, Linda J

    2015-06-12

    Integrity of the intestinal epithelium is critical for proper functioning of the barrier that regulates absorption of water and restricts uptake of luminal bacteria. It is maintained mainly by tight junctions (TJs) and adherens junctions (AJs). We conducted immunofluorescence (IF) staining for in situ identification of zonula occludin (ZO)-1 proteins for TJ and E-Cadherin proteins for AJ in the small and large intestinal villous and crypt epithelium of nursing pigs infected with porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV). Twenty 9-day-old piglets [PEDV-infected (n=9) and Mock (n=11)] from PEDV seronegative sows, were orally inoculated [8.9 log₁₀ genomic equivalents/pig] with PEDV PC21A strain or mock. At post-inoculation days (PIDs) 1-5, infected pigs showed severe watery diarrhea and/or vomiting and severe atrophic enteritis. By immunohistochemistry, PEDV antigens were evident in enterocytes lining the villous epithelium. At PIDs 1-5, PEDV-infected pigs exhibited mildly to extensively disorganized, irregular distribution and reduced expression of ZO-1 or E-Cadherin in villous, but not crypt epithelial cells of the jejunum and ileum, but not in the large intestine, when compared to the negative controls. The structural destruction and disorganization of TJ and AJ were extensive in PEDV-infected pigs at PIDs 1-3, but then appeared to reversibly recover at PID 5, as evident by increased numbers of ZO-1-positive epithelial cells and markedly improved appearance of E-Cadherin-positive villous epithelium. Our results suggest a possible involvement of structurally impaired TJ and AJ in the pathogenesis of PEDV, potentially leading to secondary bacterial infections.

  3. Id-1 promotes TGF-{beta}1-induced cell motility through HSP27 activation and disassembly of adherens junction in prostate epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Di Kaijun; Wong, Y.C. Wang Xianghong

    2007-11-15

    Id-1 (inhibitor of differentiation or DNA binding-1) has been positively associated with cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, and invasiveness during tumorigenesis. In addition, Id-1 has been shown to modulate cellular sensitivity to TGF-{beta}1 (transforming growth factor {beta}1). Here we demonstrate a novel role of Id-1 in promoting TGF-{beta}1-induced cell motility in a non-malignant prostate epithelial cell line, NPTX. We found that Id-1 promoted F-actin stress fiber formation in response to TGF-{beta}1, which was associated with increased cell-substrate adhesion and cell migration in NPTX cells. In addition, this positive effect of Id-1 on TGF-{beta}1-induced cell motility was mediated through activation of MEK-ERK signaling pathway and subsequent phosphorylation of HSP27 (heat shock protein 27). Furthermore, Id-1 disrupted the adherens junction complex in TGF-{beta}1-treated cells through down-regulation of E-cadherin, redistribution of {beta}-catenin, along with up-regulation of N-cadherin. These lines of evidence reveal a novel tumorigenic role of Id-1 through reorganization of actin cytoskeleton and disassembly of cell-cell adhesion in response to TGF-{beta}1 in human prostate epithelial cells, and suggest that intracellular Id-1 levels might be a determining factor for switching TGF-{beta}1 from a growth inhibitor to a tumor promoter during prostate carcinogenesis.

  4. Tight Junction Proteins in Human Schwann Cell Autotypic Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Alanne, Maria H.; Pummi, Kati; Heape, Anthony M.; Grènman, Reidar; Peltonen, Juha; Peltonen, Sirkku

    2009-01-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) form physical barriers in various tissues and regulate paracellular transport of ions, water, and molecules. Myelinating Schwann cells form highly organized structures, including compact myelin, nodes of Ranvier, paranodal regions, Schmidt-Lanterman incisures, periaxonal cytoplasmic collars, and mesaxons. Autotypic TJs are formed in non-compacted myelin compartments between adjacent membrane lamellae of the same Schwann cell. Using indirect immunofluorescence and RT-PCR, we analyzed the expression of adherens junction (E-cadherin) and TJ [claudins, zonula occludens (ZO)-1, occludin] components in human peripheral nerve endoneurium, showing clear differences with published rodent profiles. Adult nerve paranodal regions contained E-cadherin, claudin-1, claudin-2, and ZO-1. Schmidt-Lanterman incisures contained E-cadherin, claudin-1, claudin-2, claudin-3, claudin-5, ZO-1, and occludin. Mesaxons contained E-cadherin, claudin-1, claudin-2, claudin-3, ZO-1, and occludin. None of the proteins studied were associated with nodal inter-Schwann cell junctions. Fetal nerve expression of claudin-1, claudin-3, ZO-1, and occludin was predominantly punctate, with a mesaxonal labeling pattern, but paranodal (ZO-1, claudin-3) and Schmidt-Lanterman incisure (claudins-1 and -3) expression profiles typical of compact myelin were visible by gestational week 37. The clear differences observed between human and published rodent nerve profiles emphasize the importance of human studies when translating the results of animal models to human diseases. (J Histochem Cytochem 57:523–529, 2009) PMID:19153196

  5. Bistable front dynamics in a contractile medium: Travelling wave fronts and cortical advection define stable zones of RhoA signaling at epithelial adherens junctions

    PubMed Central

    Budnar, Srikanth; Yap, Alpha S.

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical coherence of cell layers is essential for epithelia to function as tissue barriers and to control active tissue dynamics during morphogenesis. RhoA signaling at adherens junctions plays a key role in this process by coupling cadherin-based cell-cell adhesion together with actomyosin contractility. Here we propose and analyze a mathematical model representing core interactions involved in the spatial localization of junctional RhoA signaling. We demonstrate how the interplay between biochemical signaling through positive feedback, combined with diffusion on the cell membrane and mechanical forces generated in the cortex, can determine the spatial distribution of RhoA signaling at cell-cell junctions. This dynamical mechanism relies on the balance between a propagating bistable signal that is opposed by an advective flow generated by an actomyosin stress gradient. Experimental observations on the behavior of the system when contractility is inhibited are in qualitative agreement with the predictions of the model. PMID:28273072

  6. Junctional proteins of the blood-brain barrier: New insights into function and dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Stamatovic, Svetlana M; Johnson, Allison M; Keep, Richard F; Andjelkovic, Anuska V

    2016-01-01

    abstract The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a highly complex and dynamic barrier. It is formed by an interdependent network of brain capillary endothelial cells, endowed with barrier properties, and perivascular cells (astrocytes and pericytes) responsible for inducing and maintaining those properties. One of the primary properties of the BBB is a strict regulation of paracellular permeability due to the presence of junctional complexes (tight, adherens and gap junctions) between the endothelial cells. Alterations in junction assembly and function significantly affect BBB properties, particularly barrier permeability. However, such alterations are also involved in remodeling the brain endothelial cell surface and regulating brain endothelial cell phenotype. This review summarizes the characteristics of brain endothelial tight, adherens and gap junctions and highlights structural and functional alterations in junctional proteins that may contribute to BBB dysfunction. PMID:27141427

  7. Endocytosis and Recycling of Tight Junction Proteins in Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Utech, Markus; Mennigen, Rudolf; Bruewer, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    A critical function of the epithelial lining is to form a barrier that separates luminal contents from the underlying interstitium. This barrier function is primarily regulated by the apical junctional complex (AJC) consisting of tight junctions (TJs) and adherens junctions (AJs) and is compromised under inflammatory conditions. In intestinal epithelial cells, proinflammatory cytokines, for example, interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), induce internalization of TJ proteins by endocytosis. Endocytosed TJ proteins are passed into early and recycling endosomes, suggesting the involvement of recycling of internalized TJ proteins. This review summarizes mechanisms by which TJ proteins under inflammatory conditions are internalized in intestinal epithelial cells and point out comparable mechanism in nonintestinal epithelial cells. PMID:20011071

  8. fps/fes knockout mice display a lactation defect and the fps/fes tyrosine kinase is a component of E-cadherin-based adherens junctions in breast epithelial cells during lactation.

    PubMed

    Truesdell, Peter F; Zirngibl, Ralph A; Francis, Sarah; Sangrar, Waheed; Greer, Peter A

    2009-10-15

    The fps/fes proto-oncogene encodes a cytoplasmic protein-tyrosine kinase implicated in vesicular trafficking and cytokine and growth factor signaling in hematopoietic, neuronal, vascular endothelial and epithelial lineages. Genetic evidence has suggested a tumor suppressor role for Fps/Fes in breast and colon. Here we used fps/fes knockout mice to investigate potential roles for this kinase in development and function of the mammary gland. Fps/Fes expression was induced during pregnancy and lactation, and its kinase activity was dramatically enhanced. Milk protein and fat composition from nursing fps/fes-null mothers was normal; however, pups reared by them gained weight more slowly than pups reared by wild-type mothers. Fps/Fes displayed a predominantly dispersed punctate intracellular distribution which was consistent with vesicles within the luminal epithelial cells of lactating breast, while a small fraction co-localized with beta-catenin and E-cadherin on their basolateral surfaces. Fps/Fes was found to be a component of the E-cadherin adherens junction (AJ) complex; however, the phosphotyrosine status of beta-catenin and core AJ components in fps/fes-null breast tissue was unaltered, and epithelial cell AJs and gland morphology were intact. We conclude that Fps/Fes is not essential for the maintenance of epithelial cell AJs in the lactating breast but may instead play important roles in vesicular trafficking and milk secretion.

  9. Placenta Growth Factor-1 Exerts Time-Dependent Stabilization of Adherens Junctions Following VEGF-Induced Vascular Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Jun; Wu, Lin; Qi, Xiaoping; Shaw, Lynn; Li Calzi, Sergio; Caballero, Sergio; Jiang, Wen G.; Vinores, Stanley A.; Antonetti, David; Ahmed, Asif; Grant, Maria B.; Boulton, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    Increased vascular permeability is an early event characteristic of tissue ischemia and angiogenesis. Although VEGF family members are potent promoters of endothelial permeability the role of placental growth factor (PlGF) is hotly debated. Here we investigated PlGF isoforms 1 and 2 and present in vitro and in vivo evidence that PlGF-1, but not PlGF-2, can inhibit VEGF-induced permeability but only during a critical window post-VEGF exposure. PlGF-1 promotes VE-cadherin expression via the trans-activating Sp1 and Sp3 interaction with the VE-cadherin promoter and subsequently stabilizes transendothelial junctions, but only after activation of endothelial cells by VEGF. PlGF-1 regulates vascular permeability associated with the rapid localization of VE-cadherin to the plasma membrane and dephosphorylation of tyrosine residues that precedes changes observed in claudin 5 tyrosine phosphorylation and membrane localization. The critical window during which PlGF-1 exerts its effect on VEGF-induced permeability highlights the importance of the translational significance of this work in that PLGF-1 likely serves as an endogenous anti-permeability factor whose effectiveness is limited to a precise time point following vascular injury. Clinical approaches that would pattern nature's approach would thus limit treatments to precise intervals following injury and bring attention to use of agents only during therapeutic windows. PMID:21464949

  10. MicroRNAs regulate tight junction proteins and modulate epithelial/endothelial barrier functions.

    PubMed

    Cichon, Christoph; Sabharwal, Harshana; Rüter, Christian; Schmidt, M Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Tightly controlled epithelial and endothelial barriers are a prerequisite for life as these barriers separate multicellular organisms from their environment and serve as first lines of defense. Barriers between neighboring epithelial cells are formed by multiple intercellular junctions including the 'apical junctional complex-AJC' with tight junctions (TJ), adherens junctions (AJ), and desmosomes. TJ consist of tetraspan transmembrane proteins like occludin, various claudins that directly control paracellular permeability, and the 'Junctional Adhesion Molecules' (JAMs). For establishing tight barriers TJ are essential but at the same time have to allow also selective permeability. For this, TJ need to be tightly regulated and controlled. This is organized by a variety of adaptor molecules, i.e., protein kinases, phosphatases and GTPases, which in turn are regulated and fine-tuned involving microRNAs (miRNAs). In this review we summarize available data on the role and targeting of miRNAs in the maintenance of epithelial and/or endothelial barriers.

  11. Tight junction proteins: from barrier to tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Runkle, E Aaron; Mu, David

    2013-08-28

    The tight junction is a multi-protein complex and is the apical most junctional complex in certain epithelial and endothelial cells. A great deal of attention has been devoted to the understanding of these proteins in contributing to the barrier function - that is, regulating the paracellular flux or permeability between adjacent cells. However, tight junction proteins are now recognized as having functions beyond the barrier. The focus of this review is to discuss the barrier function of the tight junction and to summarize the literature with a focus on the role of tight junction proteins in proliferation, transformation, and metastasis.

  12. Tight Junction Proteins: From Barrier to Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Runkle, E. Aaron; Mu, David

    2013-01-01

    The tight junction is a multi-protein complex and is the apical most junctional complex in certain epithelial and endothelial cells. A great deal of attention has been devoted to the understanding of these proteins in contributing to the barrier function - that is, regulating the paracellular flux or permeability between adjacent cells. However, tight junction proteins are now recognized as having functions beyond the barrier. The focus of this review is to discuss the barrier function of the tight junction and to summarize the literature with a focus on the role of tight junction proteins in proliferation, transformation, and metastasis. PMID:23743355

  13. TLR4 Signaling Is Coupled to SRC Family Kinase Activation, Tyrosine Phosphorylation of Zonula Adherens Proteins, and Opening of the Paracellular Pathway in Human Lung Microvascular Endothelia*

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Ping; Angelini, Daniel J.; Yang, Shiqi; Xia, Guanjun; Cross, Alan S.; Mann, Dean; Bannerman, Douglas D.; Vogel, Stefanie N.; Goldblum, Simeon E.

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a key mediator in the vascular leak syndromes associated with Gram-negative bacterial infections. LPS opens the paracellular pathway in pulmonary vascular endothelia through protein tyrosine phosphorylation. We now have identified the protein-tyrosine kinases (PTKs) and their substrates required for LPS-induced protein tyrosine phosphorylation and opening of the paracellular pathway in human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC-Ls). LPS disrupted barrier integrity in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and prior broad spectrum PTK inhibition was protective. LPS increased tyrosine phosphorylation of zonula adherens proteins, VE-cadherin, γ-catenin, and p120ctn. Two SRC family PTK (SFK)-selective inhibitors, PP2 and SU6656, blocked LPS-induced increments in tyrosine phosphorylation of VE-cadherin and p120ctn and paracellular permeability. In HMVEC-Ls, c-SRC, YES, FYN, and LYN were expressed at both mRNA and protein levels. Selective small interfering RNA-induced knockdown of c-SRC, FYN, or YES diminished LPS-induced SRC Tyr416 phosphorylation, tyrosine phosphorylation of VE-cadherin and p120ctn, and barrier disruption, whereas knockdown of LYN did not. For VE-cadherin phosphorylation, knockdown of either c-SRC or FYN provided total protection, whereas YES knockdown was only partially protective. For p120ctn phosphorylation, knockdown of FYN, c-SRC, or YES each provided comparable but partial protection. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) was expressed both on the surface and intracellular compartment of HMVEC-Ls. Prior knockdown of TLR4 blocked both LPS-induced SFK activation and barrier disruption. These data indicate that LPS recognition by TLR4 activates the SFKs, c-SRC, FYN, and YES, which, in turn, contribute to tyrosine phosphorylation of zonula adherens proteins to open the endothelial paracellular pathway. PMID:18326860

  14. F-actin binding protein, anillin, regulates integrity of intercellular junctions in human epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Feygin, Alex; Ivanov, Andrei I.

    2015-01-01

    Tight junctions (TJ) and adherens junctions (AJ) are key morphological features of differentiated epithelial cells that regulate the integrity and permeability of tissue barriers. Structure and remodeling of epithelial junctions depends on their association with the underlying actomyosin cytoskeleton. Anillin is a unique scaffolding protein interacting with different cytoskeletal components, including actin filaments and myosin motors. Its role in the regulation of mammalian epithelial junctions remains unexplored. Downregulation of anillin expression in human prostate, colonic, and lung epithelial cells triggered AJ and TJ disassembly without altering the expression of junctional proteins. This junctional disassembly was accompanied by dramatic disorganization of the perijunctional actomyosin belt; while the general architecture of the actin cytoskeleton, and activation status of non-muscle myosin II, remained unchanged. Furthermore, loss of anillin disrupted the adducin-spectrin membrane skeleton at the areas of cell-cell contact, selectively decreased γ-adducin expression, and induced cytoplasmic aggregation of αII-spectrin. Anillin knockdown activated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and JNK inhibition restored AJ and TJ integrity and cytoskeletal organization in anillin-depleted cells. These findings suggest a novel role for anillin in regulating intercellular adhesion in model human epithelia by mechanisms involving the suppression of JNK activity and controlling the assembly of the perijunctional cytoskeleton. PMID:25809162

  15. Actin-interacting protein 1 controls assembly and permeability of intestinal epithelial apical junctions

    PubMed Central

    Baranwal, Somesh

    2015-01-01

    Adherens junctions (AJs) and tight junctions (TJs) are crucial regulators of the integrity and restitution of the intestinal epithelial barrier. The structure and function of epithelial junctions depend on their association with the cortical actin cytoskeleton that, in polarized epithelial cells, is represented by a prominent perijunctional actomyosin belt. The assembly and stability of the perijunctional cytoskeleton is controlled by constant turnover (disassembly and reassembly) of actin filaments. Actin-interacting protein (Aip) 1 is an emerging regulator of the actin cytoskeleton, playing a critical role in filament disassembly. In this study, we examined the roles of Aip1 in regulating the structure and remodeling of AJs and TJs in human intestinal epithelium. Aip1 was enriched at apical junctions in polarized human intestinal epithelial cells and normal mouse colonic mucosa. Knockdown of Aip1 by RNA interference increased the paracellular permeability of epithelial cell monolayers, decreased recruitment of AJ/TJ proteins to steady-state intercellular contacts, and attenuated junctional reassembly in a calcium-switch model. The observed defects of AJ/TJ structure and functions were accompanied by abnormal organization and dynamics of the perijunctional F-actin cytoskeleton. Moreover, loss of Aip1 impaired the apico-basal polarity of intestinal epithelial cell monolayers and inhibited formation of polarized epithelial cysts in 3-D Matrigel. Our findings demonstrate a previously unanticipated role of Aip1 in regulating the structure and remodeling of intestinal epithelial junctions and early steps of epithelial morphogenesis. PMID:25792565

  16. MicroRNA Regulation of Endothelial Junction Proteins and Clinical Consequence

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Yugang; Peng, Hu; Mastej, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Cellular junctions play a critical role in structural connection and signal communication between cells in various tissues. Although there are structural and functional varieties, cellular junctions include tight junctions, adherens junctions, focal adhesion junctions, and tissue specific junctions such as PECAM-1 junctions in endothelial cells (EC), desmosomes in epithelial cells, and hemidesmosomes in EC. Cellular junction dysfunction and deterioration are indicative of clinical diseases. MicroRNAs (miRNA) are ~20 nucleotide, noncoding RNAs that play an important role in posttranscriptional regulation for almost all genes. Unsurprisingly, miRNAs regulate junction protein gene expression and control junction structure integrity. In contrast, abnormal miRNA regulation of junction protein gene expression results in abnormal junction structure, causing related diseases. The major components of tight junctions include zonula occluden-1 (ZO-1), claudin-1, claudin-5, and occludin. The miRNA regulation of ZO-1 has been intensively investigated. ZO-1 and other tight junction proteins such as claudin-5 and occludin were positively regulated by miR-126, miR-107, and miR21 in different models. In contrast, ZO-1, claudin-5, and occludin were negatively regulated by miR-181a, miR-98, and miR150. Abnormal tight junction miRNA regulation accompanies cerebral middle artery ischemia, brain trauma, glioma metastasis, and so forth. The major components of adherens junctions include VE-cadherin, β-catenin, plakoglobin, P120, and vinculin. VE-cadherin and β-catenin were regulated by miR-9, miR-99b, miR-181a, and so forth. These regulations directly affect VE-cadherin-β-catenin complex stability and further affect embryo and tumor angiogenesis, vascular development, and so forth. miR-155 and miR-126 have been shown to regulate PECAM-1 and affect neutrophil rolling and EC junction integrity. In focal adhesion junctions, the major components are integrin β4, paxillin, and focal

  17. MicroRNAs regulate tight junction proteins and modulate epithelial/endothelial barrier functions

    PubMed Central

    Cichon, Christoph; Sabharwal, Harshana; Rüter, Christian; Schmidt, M Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Tightly controlled epithelial and endothelial barriers are a prerequisite for life as these barriers separate multicellular organisms from their environment and serve as first lines of defense. Barriers between neighboring epithelial cells are formed by multiple intercellular junctions including the ‘apical junctional complex—AJC’ with tight junctions (TJ), adherens junctions (AJ), and desmosomes. TJ consist of tetraspan transmembrane proteins like occludin, various claudins that directly control paracellular permeability, and the ‘Junctional Adhesion Molecules’ (JAMs). For establishing tight barriers TJ are essential but at the same time have to allow also selective permeability. For this, TJ need to be tightly regulated and controlled. This is organized by a variety of adaptor molecules, i.e., protein kinases, phosphatases and GTPases, which in turn are regulated and fine-tuned involving microRNAs (miRNAs). In this review we summarize available data on the role and targeting of miRNAs in the maintenance of epithelial and/or endothelial barriers. PMID:25610754

  18. Analysis of Myosin II Minifilament Orientation at Epithelial Zonula Adherens

    PubMed Central

    Michael, Magdalene; Liang, Xuan; Gomez, Guillermo A.

    2017-01-01

    Non-muscle myosin II (NMII) form bipolar filaments, which bind F-actin to exert cellular contractility during physiological processes (Vicente-Manzanares et al., 2009). Using a combinatorial approach to fluorescently label both N- and C-termini of the NMII heavy chain, recent works have demonstrated the ability to visualize NMII bipolar filaments at various subcellular localizations (Ebrahim et al., 2013; Beach et al., 2014). At the zonula adherens (ZA) of epithelia, NMII minifilaments bind the circumferential actin bundles in a pseudo-sarcomeric manner (Ebrahim et al., 2013), a conformation required to maintain junctional tension and tissue integrity (Ratheesh et al., 2012). By expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP)-NMIIA heavy chain and immunolabel it using a NMIIA C-terminus specific antibody, we were able to visualize the NMII minifilaments bound to F-actin bundles in Caco-2 cells (Michael et al., 2016), as previously reported (Ebrahim et al., 2013; Beach et al., 2014). In addition, we designed an FIJI/MATLAB analysis module to quantify the size, distance and alignment of these minifilaments with respect to junctional F-actin at the ZA. Measurements of the dispersion of minifilaments angles were proven to be a useful parameter that closely correlated to the extent of contractility at junctions (Michael et al., 2016). PMID:28251171

  19. Endocytosis of Epithelial Apical Junctional Proteins by a Clathrin-mediated Pathway into a Unique Storage Compartment

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Andrei I.; Nusrat, Asma; Parkos, Charles A.

    2004-01-01

    The adherens junction (AJ) and tight junction (TJ) are key regulators of epithelial polarity and barrier function. Loss of epithelial phenotype is accompanied by endocytosis of AJs and TJs via unknown mechanisms. Using a model of calcium depletion, we defined the pathway of internalization of AJ and TJ proteins (E-cadherin, p120 and β-catenins, occludin, JAM-1, claudins 1 and 4, and ZO-1) in T84 epithelial cells. Proteinase protection assay and immunocytochemistry revealed orchestrated internalization of AJs and TJs into a subapical cytoplasmic compartment. Disruption of caveolae/lipid rafts did not prevent endocytosis, nor did caveolin-1 colocalize with internalized junctional proteins. Furthermore, AJ and TJ proteins did not colocalize with the macropinocytosis marker dextran. Inhibitors of clathrin-mediated endocytosis blocked internalization of AJs and TJs, and junctional proteins colocalized with clathrin and α-adaptin. AJ and TJ proteins were observed to enter early endosomes followed by movement to organelles that stained with syntaxin-4 but not with markers of late and recycling endosomes, lysosomes, or Golgi. These results indicate that endocytosis of junctional proteins is a clathrin-mediated process leading into a unique storage compartment. Such mechanisms may mediate the disruption of intercellular contacts during normal tissue remodeling and in pathology. PMID:14528017

  20. Crucial Role of Rapgef2 and Rapgef6, a Family of Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors for Rap1 Small GTPase, in Formation of Apical Surface Adherens Junctions and Neural Progenitor Development in the Mouse Cerebral Cortex123

    PubMed Central

    Maeta, Kazuhiro; Edamatsu, Hironori; Nishihara, Kaori; Ikutomo, Junji; Bilasy, Shymaa E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cerebral neocortex development in mammals requires highly orchestrated events involving proliferation, differentiation, and migration of neural progenitors and neurons. Rapgef2 and Rapgef6 constitute a unique family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors for Rap1 small GTPase, which is known to play crucial roles in migration of postmitotic neurons. We previously reported that conditional knockout of Rapgef2 in dorsal telencephalon (Rapgef2-cKO) resulted in the formation of an ectopic cortical mass (ECM) resembling that of subcortical band heterotopia. Here we show that double knockout of Rapgef6 in Rapgef2-cKO mice (Rapgef2/6-dKO) results in marked enlargement of the ECM. While Rapgef2-cKO affects late-born neurons only, Rapgef2/6-dKO affects both early-born and late-born neurons. The Rapgef2-cKO cortex at embryonic day (E) 15.5, and the Rapgef2/6-dKO cortex at E13.5 and E15.5 show disruption of the adherens junctions (AJs) on the apical surface, detachment of radial glial cells (RGCs) from the apical surface and disorganization of the radial glial fiber system, which are accompanied by aberrant distribution of RGCs and intermediate progenitors, normally located in the ventricular zone and the subventricular zone, respectively, over the entire cerebral cortex. Moreover, intrauterine transduction of Cre recombinase into the Rapgef2flox/flox brains also results in the apical surface AJ disruption and the RGC detachment from the apical surface, both of which are effectively suppressed by cotransduction of the constitutively active Rap1 mutant Rap1G12V. These results demonstrate a cell-autonomous role of the Rapgef2/6-Rap1 pathway in maintaining the apical surface AJ structures, which is necessary for the proper development of neural progenitor cells. PMID:27390776

  1. Exercise regulation of intestinal tight junction proteins.

    PubMed

    Zuhl, Micah; Schneider, Suzanne; Lanphere, Katherine; Conn, Carole; Dokladny, Karol; Moseley, Pope

    2014-06-01

    Gastrointestinal distress, such as diarrhoea, cramping, vomiting, nausea and gastric pain are common among athletes during training and competition. The mechanisms that cause these symptoms are not fully understood. The stress of heat and oxidative damage during exercise causes disruption to intestinal epithelial cell tight junction proteins resulting in increased permeability to luminal endotoxins. The endotoxin moves into the blood stream leading to a systemic immune response. Tight junction integrity is altered by the phosphoylation state of the proteins occludin and claudins, and may be regulated by the type of exercise performed. Prolonged exercise and high-intensity exercise lead to an increase in key phosphorylation enzymes that ultimately cause tight junction dysfunction, but the mechanisms are different. The purpose of this review is to (1) explain the function and physiology of tight junction regulation, (2) discuss the effects of prolonged and high-intensity exercise on tight junction permeability leading to gastrointestinal distress and (3) review agents that may increase or decrease tight junction integrity during exercise.

  2. A complex of ZO-1 and the BAR-domain protein TOCA-1 regulates actin assembly at the tight junction

    PubMed Central

    Van Itallie, Christina M.; Tietgens, Amber Jean; Krystofiak, Evan; Kachar, Bechara; Anderson, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Assembly and sealing of the tight junction barrier are critically dependent on the perijunctional actin cytoskeleton, yet little is known about physical and functional links between barrier-forming proteins and actin. Here we identify a novel functional complex of the junction scaffolding protein ZO-1 and the F-BAR–domain protein TOCA-1. Using MDCK epithelial cells, we show that an alternative splice of TOCA-1 adds a PDZ-binding motif, which binds ZO-1, targeting TOCA-1 to barrier contacts. This isoform of TOCA-1 recruits the actin nucleation–promoting factor N-WASP to tight junctions. CRISPR-Cas9–mediated knockout of TOCA-1 results in increased paracellular flux and delayed recovery in a calcium switch assay. Knockout of TOCA-1 does not alter FRAP kinetics of GFP ZO-1 or occludin, but longer term (12 h) time-lapse microscopy reveals strikingly decreased tight junction membrane contact dynamics in knockout cells compared with controls. Reexpression of TOCA-1 with, but not without, the PDZ-binding motif rescues both altered flux and membrane contact dynamics. Ultrastructural analysis shows actin accumulation at the adherens junction in TOCA-1–knockout cells but unaltered freeze-fracture fibril morphology. Identification of the ZO-1/TOCA-1 complex provides novel insights into the underappreciated dependence of the barrier on the dynamic nature of cell-to-cell contacts and perijunctional actin. PMID:26063734

  3. Tight junction protein ZO-2 expression and relative function of ZO-1 and ZO-2 during mouse blastocyst formation

    SciTech Connect

    Sheth, Bhavwanti; Nowak, Rachael L.; Anderson, Rebecca; Kwong, Wing Yee; Papenbrock, Thomas; Fleming, Tom P.

    2008-11-01

    Apicolateral tight junctions (TJs) between epithelial cells are multiprotein complexes regulating membrane polarity and paracellular transport and also contribute to signalling pathways affecting cell proliferation and gene expression. ZO-2 and other ZO family members form a sub-membranous scaffold for binding TJ constituents. We investigated ZO-2 contribution to TJ biogenesis and function during trophectoderm epithelium differentiation in mouse preimplantation embryos. Our data indicate that ZO-2 is expressed from maternal and embryonic genomes with maternal ZO-2 protein associated with nuclei in zygotes and particularly early cleavage stages. Embryonic ZO-2 assembled at outer blastomere apicolateral junctional sites from the late 16-cell stage. Junctional ZO-2 first co-localised with E-cadherin in a transient complex comprising adherens junction and TJ constituents before segregating to TJs after their separation from the blastocyst stage (32-cell onwards). ZO-2 siRNA microinjection into zygotes or 2-cell embryos resulted in specific knockdown of ZO-2 mRNA and protein within blastocysts. Embryos lacking ZO-2 protein at trophectoderm TJs exhibited delayed blastocoel cavity formation but underwent normal cell proliferation and outgrowth morphogenesis. Quantitative analysis of trophectoderm TJs in ZO-2-deficient embryos revealed increased assembly of ZO-1 but not occludin, indicating ZO protein redundancy as a compensatory mechanism contributing to the mild phenotype observed. In contrast, ZO-1 knockdown, or combined ZO-1 and ZO-2 knockdown, generated a more severe inhibition of blastocoel formation indicating distinct roles for ZO proteins in blastocyst morphogenesis.

  4. Structure and function of gap junction proteins: role of gap junction proteins in embryonic heart development.

    PubMed

    Ahir, Bhavesh K; Pratten, Margaret K

    2014-01-01

    Intercellular (cell-to-cell) communication is a crucial and complex mechanism during embryonic heart development. In the cardiovascular system, the beating of the heart is a dynamic and key regulatory process, which is functionally regulated by the coordinated spread of electrical activity through heart muscle cells. Heart tissues are composed of individual cells, each bearing specialized cell surface membrane structures called gap junctions that permit the intercellular exchange of ions and low molecular weight molecules. Gap junction channels are essential in normal heart function and they assist in the mediated spread of electrical impulses that stimulate synchronized contraction (via an electrical syncytium) of cardiac tissues. This present review describes the current knowledge of gap junction biology. In the first part, we summarise some relevant biochemical and physiological properties of gap junction proteins, including their structure and function. In the second part, we review the current evidence demonstrating the role of gap junction proteins in embryonic development with particular reference to those involved in embryonic heart development. Genetics and transgenic animal studies of gap junction protein function in embryonic heart development are considered and the alteration/disruption of gap junction intercellular communication which may lead to abnormal heart development is also discussed.

  5. Clostridium difficile Toxins Disrupt Epithelial Barrier Function by Altering Membrane Microdomain Localization of Tight Junction Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Nusrat, A.; von Eichel-Streiber, C.; Turner, J. R.; Verkade, P.; Madara, J. L.; Parkos, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    The anaerobic bacterium Clostridium difficile is the etiologic agent of pseudomembranous colitis. C. difficile toxins TcdA and TcdB are UDP-glucosyltransferases that monoglucosylate and thereby inactivate the Rho family of GTPases (W. P. Ciesla, Jr., and D. A. Bobak, J. Biol. Chem. 273:16021–16026, 1998). We utilized purified reference toxins of C. difficile, TcdA-10463 (TcdA) and TcdB-10463 (TcdB), and a model intestinal epithelial cell line to characterize their influence on tight-junction (TJ) organization and hence to analyze the mechanisms by which they contribute to the enhanced paracellular permeability and disease pathophysiology of pseudomembranous colitis. The increase in paracellular permeability induced by TcdA and TcdB was associated with disorganization of apical and basal F-actin. F-actin restructuring was paralleled by dissociation of occludin, ZO-1, and ZO-2 from the lateral TJ membrane without influencing the subjacent adherens junction protein, E-cadherin. In addition, we observed decreased association of actin with the TJ cytoplasmic plaque protein ZO-1. Differential detergent extraction and fractionation in sucrose density gradients revealed TcdB-induced redistribution of occludin and ZO-1 from detergent-insoluble fractions constituting “raft-like” membrane microdomains, suggesting an important role of Rho proteins in maintaining the association of TJ proteins with such microdomains. These toxin-mediated effects on actin and TJ structure provide a mechanism for early events in the pathophysiology of pseudomembranous colitis. PMID:11179295

  6. Remodeling the zonula adherens in response to tension and the role of afadin in this response

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Bipul R.; Peyret, Grégoire; Fardin, Marc-Antoine; Mège, René-Marc; Ladoux, Benoit; Yap, Alpha S.; Fanning, Alan S.

    2016-01-01

    Morphogenesis requires dynamic coordination between cell–cell adhesion and the cytoskeleton to allow cells to change shape and move without losing tissue integrity. We used genetic tools and superresolution microscopy in a simple model epithelial cell line to define how the molecular architecture of cell–cell zonula adherens (ZA) is modified in response to elevated contractility, and how these cells maintain tissue integrity. We previously found that depleting zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1) family proteins in MDCK cells induces a highly organized contractile actomyosin array at the ZA. We find that ZO knockdown elevates contractility via a Shroom3/Rho-associated, coiled-coil containing protein kinase (ROCK) pathway. Our data suggest that each bicellular border is an independent contractile unit, with actin cables anchored end-on to cadherin complexes at tricellular junctions. Cells respond to elevated contractility by increasing junctional afadin. Although ZO/afadin knockdown did not prevent contractile array assembly, it dramatically altered cell shape and barrier function in response to elevated contractility. We propose that afadin acts as a robust protein scaffold that maintains ZA architecture at tricellular junctions. PMID:27114502

  7. The structural organization and protein composition of lens fiber junctions

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    The structural organization and protein composition of lens fiber junctions isolated from adult bovine and calf lenses were studied using combined electron microscopy, immunolocalization with monoclonal and polyclonal anti-MIP and anti-MP70 (two putative gap junction-forming proteins), and freeze-fracture and label-fracture methods. The major intrinsic protein of lens plasma membranes (MIP) was localized in single membranes and in an extensive network of junctions having flat and undulating surface topologies. In wavy junctions, polyclonal and monoclonal anti-MIPs labeled only the cytoplasmic surface of the convex membrane of the junction. Label-fracture experiments demonstrated that the convex membrane contained MIP arranged in tetragonal arrays 6-7 nm in unit cell dimension. The apposing concave membrane of the junction displayed fracture faces without intramembrane particles or pits. Therefore, wavy junctions are asymmetric structures composed of MIP crystals abutted against particle-free membranes. In thin junctions, anti-MIP labeled the cytoplasmic surfaces of both apposing membranes with varying degrees of asymmetry. In thin junctions, MIP was found organized in both small clusters and single membranes. These small clusters also abut against particle-free apposing membranes, probably in a staggered or checkerboard pattern. Thus, the structure of thin and wavy junctions differed only in the extent of crystallization of MIP, a property that can explain why this protein can produce two different antibody-labeling patterns. A conclusion of this study is that wavy and thin junctions do not contain coaxially aligned channels, and, in these junctions, MIP is unlikely to form gap junction-like channels. We suggest MIP may behave as an intercellular adhesion protein which can also act as a volume-regulating channel to collapse the lens extracellular space. Junctions constructed of MP70 have a wider overall thickness (18-20 nm) and are abundant in the cortical regions

  8. Regulation and roles for claudin-family tight junction proteins

    PubMed Central

    Findley, Mary K.; Koval, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Transmembrane proteins known as claudins play a critical role in tight junctions by regulating paracellular barrier permeability. The control of claudin assembly into tight junctions requires a complex interplay between several classes of claudins, other transmembrane proteins and scaffold proteins. Claudins are also subject to regulation by post-translational modifications including phosphorylation and palmitoylation. Several human diseases have been linked to claudin mutations, underscoring the physiologic function of these proteins. Roles for claudins in regulating cell phenotype and growth control also are beginning to emerge, suggesting a multifaceted role for claudins in regulation of cells beyond serving as a simple structural element of tight junctions. PMID:19319969

  9. Evolution and cell physiology. 4. Why invent yet another protein complex to build junctions in epithelial cells?

    PubMed

    Le Bivic, André

    2013-12-15

    The formation of the first epithelium was an essential step for animal evolution, since it has allowed coordination of the behavior of a cell layer and creation of a selective barrier between the internal medium and the outside world. The possibility of coupling the cells in a single layer has allowed morphogenetic events, such as tube formation, or gastrulation, to form more complex animal morphologies. The invention of sealed junctions between cells has allowed, on the other hand, creation of an asymmetry of nutrients or salts between the apical and the basal side of the epithelial layer. Creation of an internal medium has led to homeostasis, allowing the evolution of more complex physiological functions and the emergence of sophisticated animal shapes. During evolution, the origins of the first animals coincided with the invention of several protein complexes, including true cadherins and the polarity protein complexes. How these complexes regulate formation of the apicolateral border and the adherens junctions is still not fully understood. This review focuses on the role of these apical polarity complexes and, in particular, the Crumbs complex, which is essential for proper organization of epithelial layers from Drosophila to humans.

  10. Involvement of the helix-loop-helix protein Id-1 in the glucocorticoid regulation of tight junctions in mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Woo, P L; Cercek, A; Desprez, P Y; Firestone, G L

    2000-09-15

    Mammary epithelial cell-cell junctions undergo morphological and structural differentiation during pregnancy and lactation, but little is known about the transcriptional regulators that are involved in this process. In Con8 mammary epithelial tumor cells, we have previously documented that the synthetic glucocorticoid, dexamethasone, induces the reorganization of the tight junction and adherens junction and stimulates the monolayer transepithelial electrical resistance (TER), a reliable in vitro measurement of tight junction sealing. Western blots demonstrated that dexamethasone treatment rapidly and strongly stimulated the level of the Id-1 protein, which is a serum-inducible helix-loop-helix transcriptional repressor. The steroid induction of Id-1 was robust by 4 h of treatment and maintained over a 24-h period. Isopropyl-1-thio-beta-d-galactopyranoside-inducible expression of exogenous Id-1 in Con8 cells was shown to strongly facilitate the dexamethasone induction of TER in the absence of serum without altering the dexamethasone-dependent reorganization of ZO-1, beta-catenin, or F-actin. Ectopic overexpression of Id-1 in the SCp2 nontumorigenic mammary epithelial cells, which does not undergo complete dexamethasone-dependent tight junction reorganization, enhanced the dexamethasone-induced ZO-1 tight junction localization and stimulated the monolayer TER. Moreover, antisense reduction of Id-1 protein in SCp2 cells prevented the apical junction reorganization and dexamethasone-stimulated TER. Our results implicate Id-1 as acting as a critical regulator of mammary epithelial cell-cell interactions at an early step in the glucocorticoid-dependent signaling pathway that controls tight junction integrity.

  11. Comparative analysis of the gap junction protein from rat heart and liver: is there a tissue specificity of gap junctions?

    PubMed

    Gros, D B; Nicholson, B J; Revel, J P

    1983-12-01

    Gap junctions have been isolated from both rat heart and liver, tissues where junctions are typical in appearance and physiology. The purity of the fractions obtained was monitored by electron microscopy (thin-sectioning and negative staining) and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The myocardial gap junctions are comprised of a single polypeptide of Mr 28,000, apparently derived from a protein of Mr 30,000. Hepatic gap junctions are also comprised of a single native protein of Mr 28,000 as previously reported. Exhaustive trypsin digestion of the isolated junctions cleaves both of these proteins similarly, while leaving their characteristic junctional lattice structures intact. However, comparison of heart and liver junctional proteins by two-dimensional peptide mapping of tryptic and alpha-chymotryptic fragments, followed by high pressure liquid chromatography, reveals no homology between these proteins.

  12. Epithelial adhesive junctions

    PubMed Central

    Capaldo, Christopher T.; Farkas, Attila E.

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial adhesive cell-to-cell contacts contain large, plasma membrane-spanning multiprotein aggregates that perform vital structural and signaling functions. Three prominent adhesive contacts are the tight junction, adherens junction, and the desmosome. Each junction type has unique cellular functions and a complex molecular composition. In this review, we comment on recent and exciting advances in our understanding of junction composition and function. PMID:24592313

  13. ZEB2-transgene expression in the epidermis compromises the integrity of the epidermal barrier through the repression of different tight junction proteins.

    PubMed

    Tatari, Marianthi N; De Craene, Bram; Soen, Bieke; Taminau, Joachim; Vermassen, Petra; Goossens, Steven; Haigh, Katharina; Cazzola, Silvia; Lambert, Jo; Huylebroeck, Danny; Haigh, Jody J; Berx, Geert

    2014-09-01

    Epithelial homeostasis within the epidermis is maintained by means of multiple cell-cell adhesion complexes such as adherens junctions, tight junctions, gap junctions, and desmosomes. These complexes co-operate in the formation and the regulation of the epidermal barrier. Disruption of the epidermal barrier through the deregulation of the above complexes is the cause behind a number of skin disorders such as psoriasis, dermatitis, keratosis, and others. During epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), epithelial cells lose their adhesive capacities and gain mesenchymal properties. ZEB transcription factors are key inducers of EMT. In order to gain a better understanding of the functional role of ZEB2 in epidermal homeostasis, we generated a mouse model with conditional overexpression of Zeb2 in the epidermis. Our analysis revealed that Zeb2 expression in the epidermis leads to hyperproliferation due to the combined downregulation of different tight junction proteins compromising the epidermal barrier. Using two epidermis-specific in vivo models and in vitro promoter assays, we identified occludin as a new Zeb2 target gene. Immunohistological analysis performed on human skin biopsies covering various pathogeneses revealed ZEB2 expression in the epidermis of pemphigus vulgaris. Collectively, our data support the notion for a potential role of ZEB2 in intracellular signaling of this disease.

  14. AB223. Expression of tight junction proteins in rat vagina

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Kyung Jin; Lee, Hyun-Suk; Chung, Ho Suck; Ahn, Kyu Youn; Park, Kwangsung

    2014-01-01

    Aim Tight junction plays a role in apical cell-to-cell adhesion and epithelial polarity. In this study, we investigated the expression of tight junction proteins, such as Claudin-1, zonula occludens (ZO)-1, junction adhesion molecule (JAM)-A, and occludin in rat vagina. Methods Female Sprague-dawley rats (230-240 g, n=20) were divided into two groups: control (n=10) and bilateral ovariectomy (n=10). The expression and cellular localization of claudin-1, ZO-1, JAM-A, and occludin were determined in each group by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Results Immunolabeling of ZO-1 was mainly expressed in the capillaries and venules of the vagina. Claudin-1, JAM-A, and occludin were expressed in the epithelium of the vagina. The immunoreactivity and protein expression of claudin-1 was significantly decreased in the ovariectomy group compared with the control group. Conclusions Our results suggest that tight junction proteins may have an important role in the vagina. Further studies are needed to clarify the role of each tight junction protein on vaginal lubrication.

  15. Testosterone Regulates Tight Junction Proteins and Influences Prostatic Autoimmune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Jing; Mostaghel, Elahe A.; Vakar-Lopez, Funda; Montgomery, Bruce; True, Larry; Nelson, Peter S.

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone and inflammation have been linked to the development of common age-associated diseases affecting the prostate gland including prostate cancer, prostatitis, and benign prostatic hypertrophy. We hypothesized that testosterone regulates components of prostate tight junctions which serve as a barrier to inflammation, thus providing a connection between age- and treatment-associated testosterone declines and prostatic pathology. We examined the expression and distribution of tight junction proteins in prostate biospecimens from mouse models and a clinical study of chemical castration, using transcript profiling, immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. We determined that low serum testosterone is associated with reduced transcript and protein levels of Claudin 4 and Claudin 8, resulting in defective tight junction ultrastructure in benign prostate glands. Expression of Claudin 4 and Claudin 8 was negatively correlated with the mononuclear inflammatory infiltrate caused by testosterone deprivation. Testosterone suppression also induced an auto-immune humoral response directed toward prostatic proteins. Testosterone supplementation in castrate mice resulted in re-expression of tight junction components in prostate epithelium and significantly reduced prostate inflammatory cell numbers. These data demonstrate that tight junction architecture in the prostate is related to changes in serum testosterone levels, and identify an androgen-regulated mechanism that potentially contributes to the development of prostate inflammation and consequent pathology. PMID:21761342

  16. Irinotecan disrupts tight junction proteins within the gut

    PubMed Central

    Wardill, Hannah R; Bowen, Joanne M; Al-Dasooqi, Noor; Sultani, Masooma; Bateman, Emma; Stansborough, Romany; Shirren, Joseph; Gibson, Rachel J

    2014-01-01

    Chemotherapy for cancer causes significant gut toxicity, leading to severe clinical manifestations and an increased economic burden. Despite much research, many of the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood hindering effective treatment options. Recently there has been renewed interest in the role tight junctions play in the pathogenesis of chemotherapy-induced gut toxicity. To delineate the underlying mechanisms of chemotherapy-induced gut toxicity, this study aimed to quantify the molecular changes in key tight junction proteins, ZO-1, claudin-1, and occludin, using a well-established preclinical model of gut toxicity. Female tumor-bearing dark agouti rats received irinotecan or vehicle control and were assessed for validated parameters of gut toxicity including diarrhea and weight loss. Rats were killed at 6, 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120 h post-chemotherapy. Tight junction protein and mRNA expression in the small and large intestines were assessed using semi-quantitative immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. Significant changes in protein expression of tight junction proteins were seen in both the jejunum and colon, correlating with key histological changes and clinical features. mRNA levels of claudin-1 were significantly decreased early after irinotecan in the small and large intestines. ZO-1 and occludin mRNA levels remained stable across the time-course of gut toxicity. Findings strongly suggest irinotecan causes tight junction defects which lead to mucosal barrier dysfunction and the development of diarrhea. Detailed research is now warranted to investigate posttranslational regulation of tight junction proteins to delineate the underlying pathophysiology of gut toxicity and identify future therapeutic targets. PMID:24316664

  17. Mutations with pathogenic potential in proteins located in or at the composite junctions of the intercalated disk connecting mammalian cardiomyocytes: a reference thesaurus for arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathies and for Naxos and Carvajal diseases.

    PubMed

    Rickelt, Steffen; Pieperhoff, Sebastian

    2012-05-01

    In the past decade, an avalanche of findings and reports has correlated arrhythmogenic ventricular cardiomyopathies (ARVC) and Naxos and Carvajal diseases with certain mutations in protein constituents of the special junctions connecting the polar regions (intercalated disks) of mature mammalian cardiomyocytes. These molecules, apparently together with some specific cytoskeletal proteins, are components of (or interact with) composite junctions. Composite junctions contain the amalgamated fusion products of the molecules that, in other cell types and tissues, occur in distinct separate junctions, i.e. desmosomes and adherens junctions. As the pertinent literature is still in an expanding phase and is obviously becoming important for various groups of researchers in basic cell and molecular biology, developmental biology, histology, physiology, cardiology, pathology and genetics, the relevant references so far recognized have been collected and are presented here in the following order: desmocollin-2 (Dsc2, DSC2), desmoglein-2 (Dsg2, DSG2), desmoplakin (DP, DSP), plakoglobin (PG, JUP), plakophilin-2 (Pkp2, PKP2) and some non-desmosomal proteins such as transmembrane protein 43 (TMEM43), ryanodine receptor 2 (RYR2), desmin, lamins A and C, striatin, titin and transforming growth factor-β3 (TGFβ3), followed by a collection of animal models and of reviews, commentaries, collections and comparative studies.

  18. Somatostatin regulates tight junction proteins expression in colitis mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao; Wang, Qian; Xu, Hua; Tao, Liping; Lu, Jing; Cai, Lin; Wang, Chunhui

    2014-01-01

    Tight junction plays a critical role in intestinal defence. The alteration and perturbation of tight junction proteins could induce intestine barrier damage, and lead to the malabsorption of electrolytes and water. Previous studies had showed that colonic infection and inflammation could lead to the alteration of tight junction function, and somatostatin could protect intestinal epithelia. Thus, this study could explore that whether somatostatin could regulate tight junction in colitis mice. Colitis mice with diarrhea were induced by Citrobacter rodentium (CR) and Dextran sulfate sodium (DSS). In CR infected model, cladudin-1 and claudin-3 expression significantly decreased compared with the control mice (P<0.05); after octreotide treatment, claudin-1 and claudin-3 expression significantly increased compared with untreated CR infected mice (P<0.05). In DSS colitis model, occludin and claudin-3 expression significantly decreased compared with the control mice (P<0.05); and octreotide treatment could only significantly upregulate claudin-3 expression compared with untreated DSS colitis mice (P<0.05). To testify our results in vivo, we repeated the models in caco-2 cells by exposed with enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (E. Coli) and Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). The results in vitro were consistent with in vivo study. The results suggested that somatostatin play a role in intestinal barrier protection by modulating tight junction proteins expression.

  19. Somatostatin regulates tight junction proteins expression in colitis mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao; Wang, Qian; Xu, Hua; Tao, Liping; Lu, Jing; Cai, Lin; Wang, Chunhui

    2014-01-01

    Tight junction plays a critical role in intestinal defence. The alteration and perturbation of tight junction proteins could induce intestine barrier damage, and lead to the malabsorption of electrolytes and water. Previous studies had showed that colonic infection and inflammation could lead to the alteration of tight junction function, and somatostatin could protect intestinal epithelia. Thus, this study could explore that whether somatostatin could regulate tight junction in colitis mice. Colitis mice with diarrhea were induced by Citrobacter rodentium (CR) and Dextran sulfate sodium (DSS). In CR infected model, cladudin-1 and claudin-3 expression significantly decreased compared with the control mice (P < 0.05); after octreotide treatment, claudin-1 and claudin-3 expression significantly increased compared with untreated CR infected mice (P < 0.05). In DSS colitis model, occludin and claudin-3 expression significantly decreased compared with the control mice (P < 0.05); and octreotide treatment could only significantly upregulate claudin-3 expression compared with untreated DSS colitis mice (P < 0.05). To testify our results in vivo, we repeated the models in caco-2 cells by exposed with enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (E. Coli) and Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). The results in vitro were consistent with in vivo study. The results suggested that somatostatin play a role in intestinal barrier protection by modulating tight junction proteins expression. PMID:24966923

  20. Reciprocal influence of connexins and apical junction proteins on their expressions and functions

    PubMed Central

    Derangeon, Mickaël; Spray, David C.; Bourmeyster, Nicolas; Sarrouilhe, Denis; Hervé, Jean-Claude

    2009-01-01

    Membranes of adjacent cells form intercellular junctional complexes to mechanically anchor neighbour cells (anchoring junctions), to seal the paracellular space and to prevent diffusion of integral proteins within the plasma membrane (tight junctions) and to allow cell-to-cell diffusion of small ions and molecules (gap junctions). These different types of specialised plasma membrane microdomains, sharing common adaptor molecules, particularly zonula occludens proteins, frequently present intermingled relationships where the different proteins co-assemble into macromolecular complexes and their expressions are co-ordinately regulated. Proteins forming gap junction channels (connexins, particularly) and proteins fulfilling cell attachment or forming tight junction strands mutually influence expression and functions of one another. PMID:19046940

  1. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide increases tyrosine phosphorylation of zonula adherens proteins and opens the paracellular pathway in lung microvascular endothelia through TLR4, TRAF6, and src family kinase activation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: LPS is a key mediator in vascular leak syndromes associated with Gram-negative bacterial infections and opens the pulmonary vascular endothelial paracellular pathway through protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) activation. We asked which PTKs and signaling molecules mediate LPS-induced endothel...

  2. Alteration in synaptic junction proteins following traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Merlo, Lucia; Cimino, Francesco; Angileri, Filippo Flavio; La Torre, Domenico; Conti, Alfredo; Cardali, Salvatore Massimiliano; Saija, Antonella; Germanò, Antonino

    2014-08-15

    Extensive research and scientific efforts have been focused on the elucidation of the pathobiology of cellular and axonal damage following traumatic brain injury (TBI). Conversely, few studies have specifically addressed the issue of synaptic dysfunction. Synaptic junction proteins may be involved in post-TBI alterations, leading to synaptic loss or disrupted plasticity. A Synapse Protein Database on synapse ontology identified 109 domains implicated in synaptic activities and over 5000 proteins, but few of these demonstrated to play a role in the synaptic dysfunction after TBI. These proteins are involved in neuroplasticity and neuromodulation and, most importantly, may be used as novel neuronal markers of TBI for specific intervention.

  3. Hedgehog signaling regulates E-cadherin expression for the maintenance of the actin cytoskeleton and tight junctions

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Chang; Ogle, Sally A.; Schumacher, Michael A.; Schilling, Neal; Tokhunts, Robert A.; Orr-Asman, Melissa A.; Miller, Marian L.; Robbins, David J.; Hollande, Frederic

    2010-01-01

    In the stomach, strictly regulated cell adherens junctions are crucial in determining epithelial cell differentiation. Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) regulates epithelial cell differentiation in the adult stomach. We sought to identify whether Shh plays a role in regulating adherens junction protein E-cadherin as a mechanism for epithelial cell differentiation. Mouse nontumorigenic gastric epithelial (IMGE-5) cells treated with Hedgehog signaling inhibitor cyclopamine and anti-Shh 5E1 antibody or transduced with short hairpin RNA against Skinny Hedgehog (IMGE-5Ski) were cultured. A mouse model expressing a parietal cell-specific deletion of Shh (HKCre/ShhKO) was used to identify further changes in adherens and tight junctions. Inhibition of Hedgehog signaling in IMGE-5 cells caused loss of E-cadherin expression accompanied by disruption of F-actin cortical expression and relocalization of zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1). Loss of E-cadherin was also associated with increased proliferation in IMGE-5Ski cells and increased expression of the mucous neck cell lineage marker MUC6. Compared with membrane-expressed E-cadherin and ZO-1 protein in controls, dissociation of E-cadherin/β-catenin and ZO-1/occludin protein complexes was observed in HKCre/ShhKO mice. In conclusion, we demonstrate that Hedgehog signaling regulates E-cadherin expression that is required for the maintenance of F-actin cortical expression and stability of tight junction protein ZO-1. PMID:20847300

  4. Developmental Changes in Proximal Tubule Tight Junction Proteins

    PubMed Central

    HADDAD, MAHA; LIN, FANGMING; DWARAKANATH, VANGIPURAM; CORDES, KIMBERLY; BAUM, MICHEL

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrated previously that neonatal proximal tubules have a lower passive paracellular permeability to chloride ions and higher resistance than that of adult proximal tubules. In addition, administration of thyroid hormone to neonates, before the normal maturational increase in serum thyroid hormone levels, prematurely accelerates the developmental increase in chloride permeability to adult levels. To test the hypothesis that there is a maturational change in tight junction proteins and that thyroid hormone mediates these changes, we examined the two known tight junction proteins present in proximal tubules, occludin and claudin 2. Using immunoblot and immunohistochemistry, we demonstrated that claudin 2 has a 4-fold greater abundance in neonatal proximal tubules than in adult tubules. Occludin, however, has a 4-fold greater expression in adult tubules than in neonatal tubules. Administration of thyroid hormone to neonates did not affect claudin 2 expression, occludin expression, or the transepithelial resistance in rat proximal tubule cells in vitro. In conclusion, there are postnatal maturational changes in tight junction proteins. The factors that cause these maturational changes are unknown but unlikely to be due solely to the maturational increase in thyroid hormone. PMID:15585672

  5. Distribution of Tight Junction Proteins in Adult Human Salivary Glands

    PubMed Central

    Maria, Ola M.; Kim, Jung-Wan Martin; Gerstenhaber, Jonathan A.; Baum, Bruce J.; Tran, Simon D.

    2008-01-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) are an essential structure of fluid-secreting cells, such as those in salivary glands. Three major families of integral membrane proteins have been identified as components of the TJ: claudins, occludin, and junctional adhesion molecules (JAMs), plus the cytosolic protein zonula occludens (ZO). We have been working to develop an orally implantable artificial salivary gland that would be suitable for treating patients lacking salivary parenchymal tissue. To date, little is known about the distribution of TJ proteins in adult human salivary cells and thus what key molecular components might be desirable for the cellular component of an artificial salivary gland device. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the distribution of TJ proteins in human salivary glands. Salivary gland samples were obtained from 10 patients. Frozen and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections were stained using IHC methods. Claudin-1 was expressed in ductal, endothelial, and ∼25% of serous cells. Claudins-2, -3, and -4 and JAM-A were expressed in both ductal and acinar cells, whereas claudin-5 was expressed only in endothelial cells. Occludin and ZO-1 were expressed in acinar, ductal, and endothelial cells. These results provide new information on TJ proteins in two major human salivary glands and should serve as a reference for future studies to assess the presence of appropriate TJ proteins in a tissue-engineered human salivary gland. (J Histochem Cytochem 56:1093–1098, 2008) PMID:18765838

  6. Cleavage of transmembrane junction proteins and their role in regulating epithelial homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Nava, Porfirio; Kamekura, Ryuta; Nusrat, Asma

    2013-01-01

    Epithelial tissues form a selective barrier that separates the external environment from the internal tissue milieu. Single epithelial cells are densely packed and associate via distinct intercellular junctions. Intercellular junction proteins not only control barrier properties of the epithelium but also play an important role in regulating epithelial homeostasis that encompasses cell proliferation, migration, differentiation and regulated shedding. Recent studies have revealed that several proteases target epithelial junction proteins during physiological maturation as well as in pathologic states such as inflammation and cancer. This review discusses mechanisms and biological consequences of transmembrane junction protein cleavage. The influence of junction protein cleavage products on pathogenesis of inflammation and cancer is discussed. PMID:24665393

  7. Microtubules regulate disassembly of epithelial apical junctions

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Andrei I; McCall, Ingrid C; Babbin, Brian; Samarin, Stanislav N; Nusrat, Asma; Parkos, Charles A

    2006-01-01

    Background Epithelial tight junction (TJ) and adherens junction (AJ) form the apical junctional complex (AJC) which regulates cell-cell adhesion, paracellular permeability and cell polarity. The AJC is anchored on cytoskeletal structures including actin microfilaments and microtubules. Such cytoskeletal interactions are thought to be important for the assembly and remodeling of apical junctions. In the present study, we investigated the role of microtubules in disassembly of the AJC in intestinal epithelial cells using a model of extracellular calcium depletion. Results Calcium depletion resulted in disruption and internalization of epithelial TJs and AJs along with reorganization of perijunctional F-actin into contractile rings. Microtubules reorganized into dense plaques positioned inside such F-actin rings. Depolymerization of microtubules with nocodazole prevented junctional disassembly and F-actin ring formation. Stabilization of microtubules with either docetaxel or pacitaxel blocked contraction of F-actin rings and attenuated internalization of junctional proteins into a subapical cytosolic compartment. Likewise, pharmacological inhibition of microtubule motors, kinesins, prevented contraction of F-actin rings and attenuated disassembly of apical junctions. Kinesin-1 was enriched at the AJC in cultured epithelial cells and it also accumulated at epithelial cell-cell contacts in normal human colonic mucosa. Furthermore, immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated association of kinesin-1 with the E-cadherin-catenin complex. Conclusion Our data suggest that microtubules play a role in disassembly of the AJC during calcium depletion by regulating formation of contractile F-actin rings and internalization of AJ/TJ proteins. PMID:16509970

  8. Glutamine supplementation attenuates ethanol-induced disruption of apical junctional complexes in colonic epithelium and ameliorates gut barrier dysfunction and fatty liver in mice.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Kamaljit K; Shukla, Pradeep K; Mir, Hina; Manda, Bhargavi; Gangwar, Ruchika; Yadav, Nikki; McMullen, Megan; Nagy, Laura E; Rao, RadhaKrishna

    2016-01-01

    Previous in vitro studies showed that glutamine (Gln) prevents acetaldehyde-induced disruption of tight junctions and adherens junctions in Caco-2 cell monolayers and human colonic mucosa. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of Gln supplementation on ethanol-induced gut barrier dysfunction and liver injury in mice in vivo. Ethanol feeding caused a significant increase in inulin permeability in distal colon. Elevated permeability was associated with a redistribution of tight junction and adherens junction proteins and depletion of detergent-insoluble fractions of these proteins, suggesting that ethanol disrupts apical junctional complexes in colonic epithelium and increases paracellular permeability. Ethanol-induced increase in colonic mucosal permeability and disruption of junctional complexes were most severe in mice fed Gln-free diet. Gln supplementation attenuated ethanol-induced mucosal permeability and disruption of tight junctions and adherens junctions in a dose-dependent manner, indicating the potential role of Gln in nutritional intervention to alcoholic tissue injury. Gln supplementation dose-dependently elevated reduced-protein thiols in colon without affecting the level of oxidized-protein thiols. Ethanol feeding depleted reduced protein thiols and elevated oxidized protein thiols. Ethanol-induced protein thiol oxidation was most severe in mice fed with Gln-free diet and absent in mice fed with Gln-supplemented diet, suggesting that antioxidant effect is one of the likely mechanisms involved in Gln-mediated amelioration of ethanol-induced gut barrier dysfunction. Ethanol feeding elevated plasma transaminase and liver triglyceride, which was accompanied by histopathologic lesions in the liver; ethanol-induced liver damage was attenuated by Gln supplementation. These results indicate that Gln supplementation ameliorates alcohol-induced gut and liver injury.

  9. Glutamine Supplementation Attenuates Ethanol-Induced Disruption of Apical Junctional Complexes in Colonic Epithelium and Ameliorates Gut Barrier Dysfunction and Fatty Liver in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, Kamaljit K.; Shukla, Pradeep K.; Mir, Hina; Manda, Bhargavi; Gangwar, Ruchika; Yadav, Nikki; McMullen, Megan; Nagy, Laura E.; Rao, RadhaKrishna

    2015-01-01

    Previous in vitro studies showed that glutamine (Gln) prevents acetaldehyde-induced disruption of tight junctions and adherens junctions in Caco-2 cell monolayers and human colonic mucosa. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of Gln supplementation on ethanol-induced gut barrier dysfunction and liver injury in mice in vivo. Ethanol feeding caused a significant increase in inulin permeability in distal colon. Elevated permeability was associated with a redistribution of tight junction and adherens junction proteins and depletion of detergent-insoluble fractions of these proteins, suggesting that ethanol disrupts apical junctional complexes in colonic epithelium and increases paracellular permeability. Ethanol-induced increase in colonic mucosal permeability and disruption of junctional complexes were most severe in mice fed Gln-free diet. Gln supplementation attenuated ethanol-induced mucosal permeability and disruption of tight junctions and adherens junctions in a dose-dependent manner, indicating the potential role of glutamine in nutritional intervention to alcoholic tissue injury. Gln supplementation dose-dependently elevated reduced-protein thiols in colon without affecting the level of oxidized-protein thiols. Ethanol feeding depleted reduced protein thiols and elevated oxidized protein thiols. Ethanol-induced protein thiol oxidation was most severe in mice fed Gln-free diet and absent in mice fed Gln-supplemented diet, suggesting that antioxidant effect is one of the likely mechanisms involved in Gln-mediated amelioration of ethanol-induced gut barrier dysfunction. Ethanol feeding elevated plasma transaminase and liver triglyceride, which was accompanied by histopathologic lesions in the liver; ethanol-induced liver damage was attenuated by Gln supplementation. These results indicate that Gln supplementation ameliorates alcohol-induced gut and liver injury. PMID:26365579

  10. Expression of Tight Junction Proteins and Cadherin 17 in the Small Intestine of Young Goats Offered a Reduced N and/or Ca Diet.

    PubMed

    Elfers, Kristin; Marr, Isabell; Wilkens, Mirja R; Breves, Gerhard; Langeheine, Marion; Brehm, Ralph; Muscher-Banse, Alexandra S

    2016-01-01

    Diets fed to ruminants should contain nitrogen (N) as low as possible to reduce feed costs and environmental pollution. Though possessing effective N-recycling mechanisms to maintain the N supply for rumen microbial protein synthesis and hence protein supply for the host, an N reduction caused substantial changes in calcium (Ca) and phosphate homeostasis in young goats including decreased intestinal transepithelial Ca absorption as reported for monogastric species. In contrast to the transcellular component of transepithelial Ca transport, the paracellular route has not been investigated in young goats. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to characterise the effects of dietary N and/or Ca reduction on paracellular transport mechanisms in young goats. Electrophysiological properties of intestinal epithelia were investigated by Ussing chamber experiments. The expression of tight junction (TJ) and adherens junction (AJ) proteins in intestinal epithelia were examined on mRNA level by qPCR and on protein level by western blot analysis. Dietary N reduction led to a segment specific increase in tissue conductances in the proximal jejunum which might be linked to concomitantly decreased expression of cadherin 17 mRNA. Expression of occludin (OCLN) and zonula occludens protein 1 was increased in mid jejunal epithelia of N reduced fed goats on mRNA and partly on protein level. Reduced dietary Ca supply resulted in a segment specific increase in claudin 2 and claudin 12 expression and decreased the expression of OCLN which might have been mediated at least in part by calcitriol. These data show that dietary N as well as Ca reduction affected expression of TJ and AJ proteins in a segment specific manner in young goats and may thus be involved in modulation of paracellular Ca permeability.

  11. Expression of Tight Junction Proteins and Cadherin 17 in the Small Intestine of Young Goats Offered a Reduced N and/or Ca Diet

    PubMed Central

    Wilkens, Mirja R.; Breves, Gerhard; Langeheine, Marion; Brehm, Ralph; Muscher-Banse, Alexandra S.

    2016-01-01

    Diets fed to ruminants should contain nitrogen (N) as low as possible to reduce feed costs and environmental pollution. Though possessing effective N-recycling mechanisms to maintain the N supply for rumen microbial protein synthesis and hence protein supply for the host, an N reduction caused substantial changes in calcium (Ca) and phosphate homeostasis in young goats including decreased intestinal transepithelial Ca absorption as reported for monogastric species. In contrast to the transcellular component of transepithelial Ca transport, the paracellular route has not been investigated in young goats. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to characterise the effects of dietary N and/or Ca reduction on paracellular transport mechanisms in young goats. Electrophysiological properties of intestinal epithelia were investigated by Ussing chamber experiments. The expression of tight junction (TJ) and adherens junction (AJ) proteins in intestinal epithelia were examined on mRNA level by qPCR and on protein level by western blot analysis. Dietary N reduction led to a segment specific increase in tissue conductances in the proximal jejunum which might be linked to concomitantly decreased expression of cadherin 17 mRNA. Expression of occludin (OCLN) and zonula occludens protein 1 was increased in mid jejunal epithelia of N reduced fed goats on mRNA and partly on protein level. Reduced dietary Ca supply resulted in a segment specific increase in claudin 2 and claudin 12 expression and decreased the expression of OCLN which might have been mediated at least in part by calcitriol. These data show that dietary N as well as Ca reduction affected expression of TJ and AJ proteins in a segment specific manner in young goats and may thus be involved in modulation of paracellular Ca permeability. PMID:27120348

  12. Tight junctions, tight junction proteins and paracellular permeability across the gill epithelium of fishes: a review.

    PubMed

    Chasiotis, Helen; Kolosov, Dennis; Bui, Phuong; Kelly, Scott P

    2012-12-01

    Paracellular permeability characteristics of the fish gill epithelium are broadly accepted to play a key role in piscine salt and water balance. This is typically associated with differences between gill epithelia of teleost fishes residing in seawater versus those in freshwater. In the former, the gill is 'leaky' to facilitate Na(+) secretion and in the latter, the gill is 'tight' to limit passive ion loss. However, studies in freshwater fishes also suggest that varying epithelial 'tightness' can impact ionoregulatory homeostasis. Paracellular permeability of vertebrate epithelia is largely controlled by the tight junction (TJ) complex, and the fish gill is no exception. In turn, the TJ complex is composed of TJ proteins, the abundance and properties of which determine the magnitude of paracellular solute movement. This review provides consolidated information on TJs in fish gills and summarizes recent progress in research that seeks to understand the molecular composition of fish gill TJ complexes and what environmental and systemic factors influence those components.

  13. [Relationship between tight junction proteins and Helicobacter pylori-associated gastric diseases].

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Jiang, Mi-Zu

    2014-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection is an important cause of chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer, but their pathogenesis is unclear. The role of gastric mucosal barrier dysfunction induced by impaired structure and function of tight junction in the pathogenesis of Hp-associated gastric diseases has received considerable attention in recent years. Tight junction is composed of a variety of proteins and molecules, including 3 integral membrane proteins (occludin, claudins, and junctional adhesion molecules) and a cytoplasmic protein (zonula occludens). This paper mainly describes the composition and function of various tight junction proteins, changes in tight junction protein function induced by Hp infection and their relationship with the incidence of gastric diseases, and the significance of enhancing the tight junction protein function in the prevention and treatment of Hp-associated gastric diseases.

  14. Role of tight junction proteins in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is associated with impaired epithelial barrier function that is regulated by cell-cell contacts. The aim of the study was to investigate the expression pattern of selected components involved in the formation of tight junctions in relation to GERD. Methods Eighty-four patients with GERD-related symptoms with endoscopic signs (erosive: n = 47) or without them (non-erosive: n = 37) as well as 26 patients lacking GERD-specific symptoms as controls were included. Endoscopic and histological characterization of esophagitis was performed according to the Los Angeles and adapted Ismeil-Beigi criteria, respectively. Mucosal biopsies from distal esophagus were taken for analysis by histopathology, immunohistochemistry and quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of five genes encoding tight junction components [Occludin, Claudin-1, -2, Zona occludens (ZO-1, -2)]. Results Histopathology confirmed GERD-specific alterations as dilated intercellular spaces in the esophageal mucosa of patients with GERD compared to controls (P < 0.05). Claudin-1 and −2 were 2- to 6-fold upregulation on transcript (P < 0.01) and in part on protein level (P < 0.015) in GERD, while subgroup analysis of revealed this upregulation for ERD only. In both erosive and non-erosive reflux disease, expression levels of Occludin and ZO-1,-2 were not significantly affected. Notably, the induced expression of both claudins did not correlate with histopathological parameters (basal cell hyperplasia, dilated intercellular spaces) in patients with GERD. Conclusions Taken together, the missing correlation between the expression of tight junction-related components and histomorphological GERD-specific alterations does not support a major role of the five proteins studied in the pathogenesis of GERD. PMID:22994974

  15. Cadherin-catenin complexes during zebrafish oogenesis: heterotypic junctions between oocytes and follicle cells.

    PubMed

    Cerdà, J; Reidenbach, S; Prätzel, S; Franke, W W

    1999-09-01

    During vertebrate oogenesis, the germ cells and associated somatic cells remain connected by a variety of adhering junctional complexes. However, the molecular composition of these cellular structures is largely unknown. To identify the proteins forming the heterotypic adherens junctions between oocytes and follicle cells in the zebrafish (Danio rerio), the cDNAs encoding alphaE-catenin and plakoglobin were isolated. Using these cDNAs, in combination with the previously isolated beta-catenin cDNA, and antibodies specific for alpha- and beta-catenin, plakoglobin, and N- and E-cadherin, we found differences in catenin and plakoglobin gene expression during oogenesis. The immunolocalization of these plaque proteins, as well as of cadherins, in the ovarian follicle indicated an enrichment of alpha- and beta-catenin and of E-cadherin-like protein(s) in the oocyte cortex, notably at sites of oocyte-follicle cell contacts, suggesting the presence of hitherto unknown heterotypic adherens junctions between these cells. By contrast, plakoglobin and N-cadherin localization was restricted to cell-cell contacts in the follicle cell layer. During oocyte maturation, mRNAs for alphaE- and beta-catenin and plakoglobin accumulated, and all three plaque-forming proteins were stored in unfertilized eggs, either in complexed forms with cadherins or as free cytoplasmic pools. These findings suggest possible roles of these junctional proteins during early embryogenesis.

  16. Characterization of Tight Junction Proteins in Cultured Human Urothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rickard, Alice; Dorokhov, Nikolay; Ryerse, Jan; Klumpp, David J.; McHowat, Jane

    2010-01-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) are essential for normal function of epithelia, restricting paracellular diffusion and contributing to the maintainance of cell surface polarity. Superficial cells of the urothelium develop TJs, the basis for the paracellular permeability barrier of the bladder against diffusion of urinary solutes. Focusing on the superficial cell layer of stratified cell cultures of an immortalized human ureteral cell line, TEU-2 cells, we have examined the presence of TJ and TJ-associated proteins. TEU-2 cells were treated with calcium chloride and fetal bovine serum culture conditions used to induce stratification that resembles the normal transitional epithelial phenotype. Cultures were examined for TJ and TJ-associated proteins by confocal immuno-fluorescence microscopy and evaluated for TJ mRNA by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT- PCR). TEU-2 cultures exhibited immunoreactivity at intercellular margins for claudins 1, 4, 5, 7, 14 and 16 whereas claudins 2, 8 and 12 were intracellular. RT-PCR corroborated the presence of these claudins at the mRNA level. The TJ-associated proteins occludin, JAM-1, and zonula occludens (ZO-1, ZO-2 and ZO-3) were localized at cell margins. We have found that numerous TJs and TJ-associated proteins are expressed in stratified TEU-2 cultures. Further, we propose TEU-2s provide a useful ureteral model for future studies on the involvement of TJs proteins in the normal and pathological physiology of the human urinary system. PMID:18553212

  17. Fibrinogen Induces Alterations of Endothelial Cell Tight Junction Proteins

    PubMed Central

    PATIBANDLA, PHANI K.; TYAGI, NEETU; DEAN, WILLIAM L.; TYAGI, SURESH C.; ROBERTS, ANDREW M.; LOMINADZE, DAVID

    2009-01-01

    We previously showed that an elevated content of fibrinogen (Fg) increased formation of filamentous actin and enhanced endothelial layer permeability. In the present work we tested the hypothesis that Fg binding to endothelial cells (ECs) alters expression of actin-associated endothelial tight junction proteins (TJP). Rat cardiac microvascular ECs were grown in gold plated chambers of an electrical cell-substrate impedance system, 8-well chambered, or in 12-well plates. Confluent ECs were treated with Fg (2 or 4 mg/ml), Fg (4 mg/ml) with mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK) kinase inhibitors (PD98059 or U0126), Fg (4 mg/ml) with anti-ICAM-1 antibody or BQ788 (endothelin type B receptor blocker), endothelin-1, endothelin-1 with BQ788, or medium alone for 24 h. Fg induced a dose-dependent decrease in EC junction integrity as determined by transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER). Western blot analysis and RT-PCR data showed that the higher dose of Fg decreased the contents of TJPs, occludin, zona occluden-1 (ZO-1), and zona occluden-2 (ZO-2) in ECs. Fg-induced decreases in contents of the TJPs were blocked by PD98059, U0126, or anti-ICAM-1 antibody. While BQ788 inhibited endothelin-1-induced decrease in TEER, it did not affect Fg-induced decrease in TEER. These data suggest that Fg increases EC layer permeability via the MEK kinase signaling pathway by affecting occludin, ZO-1, and ZO-2, TJPs, which are bound to actin filaments. Therefore, increased binding of Fg to its major EC receptor, ICAM-1, during cardiovascular diseases may increase microvascular permeability by altering the content and possibly subcellular localization of endothelial TJPs. PMID:19507189

  18. A General Method for Insertion of Functional Proteins within Proteins via Combinatorial Selection of Permissive Junctions.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yingjie; Zeng, Wenwen; Ye, Hui; Han, Kyung Ho; Dharmarajan, Venkatasubramanian; Novick, Scott; Wilson, Ian A; Griffin, Patrick R; Friedman, Jeffrey M; Lerner, Richard A

    2015-08-20

    A major goal of modern protein chemistry is to create new proteins with different functions. One approach is to amalgamate secondary and tertiary structures from different proteins. This is difficult for several reasons, not the least of which is the fact that the junctions between secondary and tertiary structures are not degenerate and usually affect the function and folding of the entire complex. Here, we offer a solution to this problem by coupling a large combinatorial library of about 10(7) different N- and C-terminal junctions to a powerful system that selects for function. Using this approach, the entire Leptin and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) were inserted into an antibody. Complexes with full retention of function in vivo and in vitro, although rare, were found easily by using an autocrine selection system to search for hormonal activity. Such large diversity systems, when coupled to robust selection systems, should enable construction of novel therapeutic proteins.

  19. Calcium/Ask1/MKK7/JNK2/c-Src signalling cascade mediates disruption of intestinal epithelial tight junctions by dextran sulfate sodium.

    PubMed

    Samak, Geetha; Chaudhry, Kamaljit K; Gangwar, Ruchika; Narayanan, Damodaran; Jaggar, Jonathan H; Rao, RadhaKrishna

    2015-02-01

    Disruption of intestinal epithelial tight junctions is an important event in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis. Dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) induces colitis in mice with symptoms similar to ulcerative colitis. However, the mechanism of DSS-induced colitis is unknown. We investigated the mechanism of DSS-induced disruption of intestinal epithelial tight junctions and barrier dysfunction in Caco-2 cell monolayers in vitro and mouse colon in vivo. DSS treatment resulted in disruption of tight junctions, adherens junctions and actin cytoskeleton leading to barrier dysfunction in Caco-2 cell monolayers. DSS induced a rapid activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and the inhibition or knockdown of JNK2 attenuated DSS-induced tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction. In mice, DSS administration for 4 days caused redistribution of tight junction and adherens junction proteins from the epithelial junctions, which was blocked by JNK inhibitor. In Caco-2 cell monolayers, DSS increased intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, and depletion of intracellular Ca(2+) by 1,2-bis-(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetra-acetic acid tetrakis(acetoxymethyl ester) (BAPTA/AM) or thapsigargin attenuated DSS-induced JNK activation, tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction. Knockdown of apoptosis signal-regulated kinase 1 (Ask1) or MKK7 blocked DSS-induced tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction. DSS activated c-Src by a Ca2+ and JNK-dependent mechanism. Inhibition of Src kinase activity or knockdown of c-Src blocked DSS-induced tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction. DSS increased tyrosine phosphorylation of occludin, zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), E-cadherin and β-catenin. SP600125 abrogated DSS-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of junctional proteins. Recombinant JNK2 induced threonine phosphorylation and auto-phosphorylation of c-Src. The present study demonstrates that Ca(2+)/Ask1/MKK7/JNK2/cSrc signalling cascade mediates DSS-induced tight

  20. Emerging Multifunctional Roles of Claudin Tight Junction Proteins in Bone

    PubMed Central

    Alshbool, Fatima. Z.

    2014-01-01

    The imbalance between bone formation and resorption during bone remodeling has been documented to be a major factor in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis. Recent evidence suggests a significant role for the tight junction proteins, Claudins (Cldns), in the regulation of bone remodeling processes. In terms of function, whereas Cldns act “canonically” as key determinants of paracellular permeability, there is considerable recent evidence to suggest that Cldns also participate in cell signaling, ie, a “noncanonical function”. To this end, Cldns have been shown to regulate cell proliferation, differentiation, and gene expression in a variety of cell types. The present review will discuss Cldns' structure, their expression profile, regulation of expression, and their canonical and non- canonical functions in general with special emphasis on bone cells. In order to shed light on the noncanonical functions of Cldns in bone, we will highlight the role of Cldn-18 in regulating bone resorption and osteoclast differentiation. Collectively, we hope to provide a framework for guiding future research on understanding how Cldns modulate osteoblast and osteoclast function and overall bone homeostasis. Such studies should provide valuable insights into the pathogenesis of osteoporosis, and may highlight Cldns as novel targets for the diagnosis and therapeutic management of osteoporosis. PMID:24758302

  1. Emerging multifunctional roles of Claudin tight junction proteins in bone.

    PubMed

    Alshbool, Fatima Z; Mohan, Subburaman

    2014-07-01

    The imbalance between bone formation and resorption during bone remodeling has been documented to be a major factor in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis. Recent evidence suggests a significant role for the tight junction proteins, Claudins (Cldns), in the regulation of bone remodeling processes. In terms of function, whereas Cldns act "canonically" as key determinants of paracellular permeability, there is considerable recent evidence to suggest that Cldns also participate in cell signaling, ie, a "noncanonical function". To this end, Cldns have been shown to regulate cell proliferation, differentiation, and gene expression in a variety of cell types. The present review will discuss Cldns' structure, their expression profile, regulation of expression, and their canonical and non- canonical functions in general with special emphasis on bone cells. In order to shed light on the noncanonical functions of Cldns in bone, we will highlight the role of Cldn-18 in regulating bone resorption and osteoclast differentiation. Collectively, we hope to provide a framework for guiding future research on understanding how Cldns modulate osteoblast and osteoclast function and overall bone homeostasis. Such studies should provide valuable insights into the pathogenesis of osteoporosis, and may highlight Cldns as novel targets for the diagnosis and therapeutic management of osteoporosis.

  2. Transitions of protein traffic from cardiac ER to junctional SR.

    PubMed

    Sleiman, Naama H; McFarland, Timothy P; Jones, Larry R; Cala, Steven E

    2015-04-01

    The junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum (jSR) is an important and unique ER subdomain in the adult myocyte that concentrates resident proteins to regulate Ca(2+) release. To investigate cellular mechanisms for sorting and trafficking proteins to jSR, we overexpressed canine forms of junctin (JCT) or triadin (TRD) in adult rat cardiomyocytes. Protein accumulation over time was visualized by confocal fluorescence microscopy using species-specific antibodies. Newly synthesized JCTdog and TRDdog appeared by 12-24h as bright fluorescent puncta close to the nuclear surface, decreasing in intensity with increasing radial distance. With increasing time (24-48h), fluorescent puncta appeared at further radial distances from the nuclear surface, eventually populating jSR similar to steady-state patterns. CSQ2-DsRed, a form of CSQ that polymerizes ectopically in rough ER, prevented anterograde traffic of newly made TRDdog and JCTdog, demonstrating common pathways of intracellular trafficking as well as in situ binding to CSQ2 in juxtanuclear rough ER. Reversal of CSQ-DsRed interactions occurred when a form of TRDdog was used in which CSQ2-binding sites are removed ((del)TRD). With increasing levels of expression, CSQ2-DsRed revealed a novel smooth ER network that surrounds nuclei and connects the nuclear axis. TRDdog was retained in smooth ER by binding to CSQ2-DsRed, but escaped to populate jSR puncta. TRDdog and (del)TRD were therefore able to elucidate areas of ER-SR transition. High levels of CSQ2-DsRed in the ER led to loss of jSR puncta labeling, suggesting a plasticity of ER-SR transition sites. We propose a model of ER and SR protein traffic along microtubules, with prominent transverse/radial ER trafficking of JCT and TRD along Z-lines to populate jSR, and an abundant longitudinal/axial smooth ER between and encircling myonuclei, from which jSR proteins traffic.

  3. Intestinal epithelial barrier function and tight junction proteins with heat and exercise.

    PubMed

    Dokladny, Karol; Zuhl, Micah N; Moseley, Pope L

    2016-03-15

    A single layer of enterocytes and tight junctions (intercellular multiprotein complexes) form the intestinal epithelial barrier that controls transport of molecules through transcellular and paracellular pathways. A dysfunctional or "leaky" intestinal tight junction barrier allows augmented permeation of luminal antigens, endotoxins, and bacteria into the blood stream. Various substances and conditions have been shown to affect the maintenance of the intestinal epithelial tight junction barrier. The primary focus of the present review is to analyze the effects of exertional or nonexertional (passive hyperthermia) heat stress on tight junction barrier function in in vitro and in vivo (animals and humans) models. Our secondary focus is to review changes in tight junction proteins in response to exercise or hyperthermic conditions. Finally, we discuss some pharmacological or nutritional interventions that may affect the cellular mechanisms involved in maintaining homeostasis of the intestinal epithelial tight junction barrier during heat stress or exercise.

  4. Intestinal epithelial barrier function and tight junction proteins with heat and exercise

    PubMed Central

    Zuhl, Micah N.; Moseley, Pope L.

    2015-01-01

    A single layer of enterocytes and tight junctions (intercellular multiprotein complexes) form the intestinal epithelial barrier that controls transport of molecules through transcellular and paracellular pathways. A dysfunctional or “leaky” intestinal tight junction barrier allows augmented permeation of luminal antigens, endotoxins, and bacteria into the blood stream. Various substances and conditions have been shown to affect the maintenance of the intestinal epithelial tight junction barrier. The primary focus of the present review is to analyze the effects of exertional or nonexertional (passive hyperthermia) heat stress on tight junction barrier function in in vitro and in vivo (animals and humans) models. Our secondary focus is to review changes in tight junction proteins in response to exercise or hyperthermic conditions. Finally, we discuss some pharmacological or nutritional interventions that may affect the cellular mechanisms involved in maintaining homeostasis of the intestinal epithelial tight junction barrier during heat stress or exercise. PMID:26359485

  5. Garlic (Allium sativum) feeding impairs Sertoli cell junctional proteins in male Wistar rat testis: microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Hammami, I; Nahdi, A; Atig, F; El May, A; El May, M V

    2016-12-01

    Sertoli cell junctions, such as adhesion junction (AJ), gap junction (GJ) and tight junction (TJ), are important for maintaining spermatogenesis. In previous studies, we showed the inhibitory effect of crude garlic (Allium sativum, As) on spermatogenesis and steroidogenesis. The aim of this work was to complete our investigation on the impact of this plant, especially on Sertoli cell junctional proteins (SCJPs). During 1 month, 24 male rats were divided into groups: group control (0% of As) and treated groups fed 5%, 10% and 15% of As. Light and electron microscopy observations were performed to localise junctional proteins: connexin-43, Zona Occluding-1 and N-cadherin (immunohistochemistry) and to describe junctions. We showed that the specific cells involved in the localisation of the SCJP were similar in both control and treated groups, but with different immunoreactivity intensity between them. The electron microscopy observation focused on TJs between Sertoli cells, constituting the blood-testis barrier, showed ultrastructural changes such as fragmentation of TJs between adjacent Sertoli cell membranes and dilatation of rough endoplasmic reticulum saccules giving an aspect of scale to these junctions. We concluded that crude garlic consumption during 1 month induces perturbations on Sertoli cell junctions. These alterations can explain apoptosis in testicular germ cells previously showed.

  6. Differential effects of hydrocortisone and TNFα on tight junction proteins in an in vitro model of the human blood–brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Förster, Carola; Burek, Malgorzata; Romero, Ignacio A; Weksler, Babette; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Drenckhahn, Detlev

    2008-01-01

    Homeostasis of the central nervous system (CNS) microenvironment is maintained by the blood–brain barrier (BBB) which regulates the transport of molecules from blood into brain and back. Many disorders change the functionality and integrity of the BBB. Glucocorticoids are being used sucessfully in the treatment of some disorders while their effects on others are questionable. In addition, conflicting results between clinical and experimental experience using animal models has arisen, so that the results of molecular studies in animal models need to be revisited in an appropriate in vitro model of the human BBB for more effective treatment strategies. Using the human brain microvascular endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3, the influence of glucocorticoids on the expression of barrier constituting adherens junction and tight junction transmembrane proteins (VE-cadherin, occludin, claudins) was investigated and compared to other established BBB models. In hCMEC/D3 cells the administration of glucocorticoids induced expression of the targets occludin 2.75 ± 0.04-fold and claudin-5 up to 2.32 ± 0.11-fold, which is likely to contribute to the more than threefold enhancement of transendothelial electrical resistance reflecting barrier tightness. Our analyses further provide direct evidence that the GC hydrocortisone prevents endothelial barrier breakdown in response to pro-inflammatory stimuli (TNFα administration), which could be demonstrated to be partly based on maintenance of occludin levels. Our studies strongly suggest stabilization of BBB function as a mode of GC action on a molecular level in the human brain vasculature. PMID:18258663

  7. Do cell junction protein mutations cause an airway phenotype in mice or humans?

    PubMed

    Chang, Eugene H; Pezzulo, Alejandro A; Zabner, Joseph

    2011-08-01

    Cell junction proteins connect epithelial cells to each other and to the basement membrane. Genetic mutations of these proteins can cause alterations in some epithelia leading to varied phenotypes such as deafness, renal disease, skin disorders, and cancer. This review examines if genetic mutations in these proteins affect the function of lung airway epithelia. We review cell junction proteins with examples of disease mutation phenotypes in humans and in mouse knockout models. We also review which of these genes are expressed in airway epithelium by microarray expression profiling and immunocytochemistry. Last, we present a comprehensive literature review to find the lung phenotype when cell junction and adhesion genes are mutated or subject to targeted deletion. We found that in murine models, targeted deletion of cell junction and adhesion genes rarely result in a lung phenotype. Moreover, mutations in these genes in humans have no obvious lung phenotype. Our research suggests that simply because a cell junction or adhesion protein is expressed in an organ does not imply that it will exhibit a drastic phenotype when mutated. One explanation is that because a functioning lung is critical to survival, redundancy in the system is expected. Therefore mutations in a single gene might be compensated by a related function of a similar gene product. Further studies in human and animal models will help us understand the overlap in the function of cell junction gene products. Finally, it is possible that the human lung phenotype is subtle and has not yet been described.

  8. Internalization of adhesion junction proteins and their association with recycling endosome marker proteins in rat seminiferous epithelium.

    PubMed

    Young, J'Nelle S; Takai, Yoshimi; Kojic, Katarina L; Vogl, A Wayne

    2012-03-01

    Tubulobulbar complexes (TBCs) are elaborate cytoskeleton-related structures that are formed in association with intercellular junctions in the seminiferous epithelium. They consist of a cylindrical double-membrane core composed of the plasma membranes of the two attached cells, cuffed by a dendritic network of actin filaments. TBCs are proposed to be subcellular machines that internalize intercellular junctions during the extensive junction remodeling that occurs during spermatogenesis. At the apical sites of attachment between Sertoli cells and spermatids, junction disassembly is part of the sperm release mechanism. In this study, we used immunological probes to explore junction internalization and recycling at apical TBCs in the rat seminiferous epithelium. We demonstrate that β1-integrin and nectin 2 were concentrated at the ends of TBCs and for the first time show that the early endosome marker RAB5A was also distinctly localized at the ends of TBCs that appear to be the 'bulbar' regions of the complexes. Significantly, we also demonstrate that the 'long-loop' recycling endosome marker RAB11A was co-distributed with nectin 2 at junctions with early spermatids deeper in the epithelium. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that TBCs associated with late spermatids internalize adhesion junctions and also indicate that some of the internalized junction proteins may be recycled to form junctions with the next generation of spermatids.

  9. Kinetic Measurements Reveal Enhanced Protein-Protein Interactions at Intercellular Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Shashikanth, Nitesh; Kisting, Meridith A.; Leckband, Deborah E.

    2016-01-01

    The binding properties of adhesion proteins are typically quantified from measurements with soluble fragments, under conditions that differ radically from the confined microenvironment of membrane bound proteins in adhesion zones. Using classical cadherin as a model adhesion protein, we tested the postulate that confinement within quasi two-dimensional intercellular gaps exposes weak protein interactions that are not detected in solution binding assays. Micropipette-based measurements of cadherin-mediated, cell-cell binding kinetics identified a unique kinetic signature that reflects both adhesive (trans) bonds between cadherins on opposing cells and lateral (cis) interactions between cadherins on the same cell. In solution, proposed lateral interactions were not detected, even at high cadherin concentrations. Mutations postulated to disrupt lateral cadherin association altered the kinetic signatures, but did not affect the adhesive (trans) binding affinity. Perturbed kinetics further coincided with altered cadherin distributions at junctions, wound healing dynamics, and paracellular permeability. Intercellular binding kinetics thus revealed cadherin interactions that occur within confined, intermembrane gaps but not in solution. Findings further demonstrate the impact of these revealed interactions on the organization and function of intercellular junctions. PMID:27009566

  10. Maize mesocotyl plasmodesmata proteins cross-react with connexin gap junction protein antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Yahalom, A; Warmbrodt, R D; Laird, D W; Traub, O; Revel, J P; Willecke, K; Epel, B L

    1991-01-01

    Polypeptide present in various cell fractions obtained from homogenized maize mesocotyls were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, immunoblotted, and screened for cross-reactivity with antibodies against three synthetic polypeptides spanning different regions of the rat heart gap junctional protein connexin43 and the whole mouse liver gap junctional protein connexin32. An antibody raised against a cytoplasmic loop region of connexin43 cross-reacted strongly with a cell wall-associated polypeptide (possibly a doublet) of 26 kilodaltons. Indirect immunogold labeling of thin sections of mesocotyl tissue with this antibody labeled the plasmodesmata of cortical cells along the entire length of the plasmodesmata, including the neck region and the cytoplasmic annulus. Sections labeled with control preimmune serum were essentially free of colloidal gold. An antibody against connexin32 cross-reacted with a 27-kilodalton polypeptide that was present in the cell wall and membrane fractions. Indirect immunogold labeling of thin sections with this antibody labeled the plasmodesmata mainly in the neck region. It is suggested that maize mesocotyl plasmodesmata contain at least two different proteins that have homologous domains with connexin proteins. PMID:1668654

  11. Voltage-dependent gap junction channels are formed by connexin32, the major gap junction protein of rat liver.

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, A P; de Carvalho, A C; Verselis, V; Eghbali, B; Spray, D C

    1991-01-01

    We report here experiments undertaken in pairs of hepatocytes that demonstrate a marked voltage sensivity of junctional conductance and, thus, contradict earlier findings reported by this laboratory (Spray, D.C., R.D.ginzberg, E.A., E. A. Morales, Z. Gatmaitan and I.M. Arias, 1986, J. Cell Biol. 101:135-144; Spray C.D. R.L. White, A.C. Campos de Carvalho, and M.V.L. Bennett. 1984. Biophys. J. 45:219-230) and by others (Dahl, G., T. Moller, D. Paul, R. Voellmy, and R. Werner. 1987. Science [Wash. DC] 236:1290-1293; Riverdin, E.C., and R. Weingart. 1988. Am. J. Physiol. 254:C226-C234). Expression in exogenous systems, lipid bilayers in which fragments of isolated gap junction membranes were incorporated (Young, J.D.-E., Z. Cohn, and N.B. Gilula. 1987. Cell. 48:733-743.) and noncommunicating cells transfected with connexin32 cDNA (Eghbali, B., J.A. Kessler, and D.C. Spray. 1990. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 87:1328-1331), support these findings and indicate that the voltage-dependent channel is composed of connexin32, the major gap junction protein of rat liver (Paul, D. 1986. J. Cell Biol. 103:123-134). PMID:1648416

  12. Estrogen Modulates Expression of Tight Junction Proteins in Rat Vagina

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Kyung-Jin; Ahn, Kyuyoun

    2016-01-01

    Background. The objectives of this study were to investigate the localization of tight junctions and the modulation of zonula occludens- (ZO-) 1, occludin and claudin-1 expression by estrogen in castrated female rat vagina. Female Sprague-Dawley rats (230–240 g, n = 45) were divided into three groups and subjected to a sham operation (control group, n = 15), bilateral ovariectomy (Ovx group, n = 15), or bilateral ovariectomy followed by daily subcutaneous injection of 17β-estradiol (50 μg/kg/day, Ovx + Est group, n = 15). The cellular localization and expression of ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-1 were determined in each group by immunohistochemistry and western blot. Results. Expression of ZO-1 was diffuse in all groups, with the highest intensity in the superficial epithelium in the control group. Occludin was localized in the intermediate and basal epithelium. Claudin-1 was most intense in the superficial layer of the vaginal epithelium in the control group. Expression of ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-1 was significantly decreased after ovariectomy and was restored to the level of the control after estrogen replacement. Conclusions. Tight junctions are distinctly localized in rat vagina, and estrogen modulates the expression of tight junctions. Further researches are needed to clarify the functional role of tight junctions in vaginal lubrication. PMID:27127786

  13. Estrogen Modulates Expression of Tight Junction Proteins in Rat Vagina.

    PubMed

    Oh, Kyung-Jin; Lee, Hyun-Suk; Ahn, Kyuyoun; Park, Kwangsung

    2016-01-01

    Background. The objectives of this study were to investigate the localization of tight junctions and the modulation of zonula occludens- (ZO-) 1, occludin and claudin-1 expression by estrogen in castrated female rat vagina. Female Sprague-Dawley rats (230-240 g, n = 45) were divided into three groups and subjected to a sham operation (control group, n = 15), bilateral ovariectomy (Ovx group, n = 15), or bilateral ovariectomy followed by daily subcutaneous injection of 17β-estradiol (50 μg/kg/day, Ovx + Est group, n = 15). The cellular localization and expression of ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-1 were determined in each group by immunohistochemistry and western blot. Results. Expression of ZO-1 was diffuse in all groups, with the highest intensity in the superficial epithelium in the control group. Occludin was localized in the intermediate and basal epithelium. Claudin-1 was most intense in the superficial layer of the vaginal epithelium in the control group. Expression of ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-1 was significantly decreased after ovariectomy and was restored to the level of the control after estrogen replacement. Conclusions. Tight junctions are distinctly localized in rat vagina, and estrogen modulates the expression of tight junctions. Further researches are needed to clarify the functional role of tight junctions in vaginal lubrication.

  14. Intraepithelial lymphocytes express junctional molecules in murine small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Inagaki-Ohara, Kyoko . E-mail: INAGAKI@med.miyazaki-u.ac.jp; Sawaguchi, Akira; Suganuma, Tatsuo; Matsuzaki, Goro; Nawa, Yukifumi

    2005-06-17

    Intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL) that reside at basolateral site regulate the proliferation and differentiation of epithelial cells (EC) for providing a first line of host defense in intestine. However, it remains unknown how IEL interact and communicate with EC. Here, we show that IEL express junctional molecules like EC. We identified mRNA expression of the junctional molecules in IEL such as zonula occludens (ZO)-1, occludin and junctional adhesion molecule (JAM) (tight junction), {beta}-catenin and E-cadherin (adherens junction), and connexin26 (gap junction). IEL constitutively expressed occludin and E-cadherin at protein level, while other T cells in the thymus, spleen, liver, mesenteric lymph node, and Peyer's patches did not. {gamma}{delta} IEL showed higher level of these expressions than {alpha}{beta} IEL. The expression of occludin was augmented by anti-CD3 Ab stimulation. These results suggest the possibility of a novel role of IEL concerning epithelial barrier and communication between IEL and EC.

  15. Hepatic immunohistochemical localization of the tight junction protein ZO-1 in rat models of cholestasis.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, J. M.; Glade, J. L.; Stevenson, B. R.; Boyer, J. L.; Mooseker, M. S.

    1989-01-01

    Structural alterations in hepatocyte tight junctions accompanying cholestasis were investigated using immunolocalization of ZO-1, the first known protein component of the tight junction. Disruption in the paracellular barrier function of the tight junction has been proposed to allow reflux of bile into the blood. Cholestasis was induced in 210 to 235 g male Sprague-Dawley rats either by five consecutive daily subcutaneous injections of 17-alpha-ethinyl estradiol (0.5 mg/kg/d in propylene glycol) or ligation of the common bile duct for 72 hours. The structural organization of the tight junction was assessed in each model by indirect immunofluorescent and immunoperoxidase staining for ZO-1 on frozen sections of liver and compared with controls. In control, sham-operated, and estradiol-injected animals, ZO-1 localizes in a uniform continuous manner along the margins of the canaliculi. In contrast, bile duct ligation results in the appearance of numerous discontinuities in ZO-1 staining accompanied by dilation or collapse of the lumenal space. Tissue content of the ZO-1 protein, as determined by quantitative immunoblotting, was unaffected in either cholestatic model compared with controls. These findings indicate that the molecular organization of the tight junction can be assessed from immunostaining patterns of ZO-1 in frozen sections of cholestatic livers. Under these experimental conditions, the organization of the tight junction at the level of the ZO-1 protein is altered by bile duct obstruction but not by ethinyl estradiol. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2719075

  16. Virus interaction with the apical junctional complex.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Mariscal, Lorenza; Garay, Erika; Lechuga, Susana

    2009-01-01

    In order to infect pathogens must breach the epithelial barriers that separate the organism from the external environment or that cover the internal cavities and ducts of the body. Epithelia seal the passage through the paracellular pathway with the apical junctional complex integrated by tight and adherens junctions. In this review we describe how viruses like coxsackie, swine vesicular disease virus, adenovirus, reovirus, feline calcivirus, herpes viruses 1 and 2, pseudorabies, bovine herpes virus 1, poliovirus and hepatitis C use as cellular receptors integral proteins present at the AJC of epithelial cells. Interaction with these proteins contributes in a significant manner in defining the particular tropism of each virus. Besides these proteins, viruses exhibit a wide range of cellular co-receptors among which proteins present in the basolateral cell surface like integrins are often found. Therefore targeting proteins of the AJC constitutes a strategy that might allow viruses to bypass the physical barrier that blocks their access to receptors expressed on the basolateral surface of epithelial cells.

  17. Morphological adaptation and protein modulation of myotendinous junction following moderate aerobic training.

    PubMed

    Curzi, Davide; Baldassarri, Valentina; De Matteis, Rita; Salamanna, Francesca; Bolotta, Alessandra; Frizziero, Antonio; Fini, Milena; Marini, Marina; Falcieri, Elisabetta

    2015-04-01

    Myotendinous junction is the muscle-tendon interface through which the contractile force can be transferred from myofibrils to the tendon extracellular matrix. At the ultrastructural level, aerobic training can modify the distal myotendinous junction of rat gastrocnemius, increasing the contact area between tissues. The aim of this work is to investigate the correlation between morphological changes and protein modulation of the myotendinous junction following moderate training. For this reason, talin, vinculin and type IV collagen amount and spatial distribution were investigated by immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy. The images were then digitally analyzed by evaluating fluorescence intensity. Morphometric analysis revealed a significant increased thickening of muscle basal lamina in the trained group (53.1 ± 0.4 nm) with respect to the control group (43.9 ± 0.3 nm), and morphological observation showed the presence of an electron-dense area in the exercised muscles, close to the myotendinous junction. Protein concentrations appeared significantly increased in the trained group (talin +22.2%; vinculin +22.8% and type IV collagen +11.8%) with respect to the control group. Therefore, our findings suggest that moderate aerobic training induces/causes morphological changes at the myotendinous junction, correlated to the synthesis of structural proteins of the muscular basal lamina and of the cytoskeleton.

  18. Septate Junction Proteins Play Essential Roles in Morphogenesis Throughout Embryonic Development in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Sonia; Ward, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    The septate junction (SJ) is the occluding junction found in the ectodermal epithelia of invertebrate organisms, and is essential to maintain chemically distinct compartments in epithelial organs, to provide the blood–brain barrier in the nervous system, and to provide an important line of defense against invading pathogens. More than 20 genes have been identified to function in the establishment or maintenance of SJs in Drosophila melanogaster. Numerous studies have demonstrated the cell biological function of these proteins in establishing the occluding junction, whereas very few studies have examined further developmental roles for them. Here we examined embryos with mutations in nine different core SJ genes and found that all nine result in defects in embryonic development as early as germ band retraction, with the most penetrant defect observed in head involution. SJ genes are also required for cell shape changes and cell rearrangements that drive the elongation of the salivary gland during midembryogenesis. Interestingly, these developmental events occur at a time prior to the formation of the occluding junction, when SJ proteins localize along the lateral membrane and have not yet coalesced into the region of the SJ. Together, these observations reveal an underappreciated role for a large group of SJ genes in essential developmental events during embryogenesis, and suggest that the function of these proteins in facilitating cell shape changes and rearrangements is independent of their role in the occluding junction. PMID:27261004

  19. Irinotecan disrupts tight junction proteins within the gut : implications for chemotherapy-induced gut toxicity.

    PubMed

    Wardill, Hannah R; Bowen, Joanne M; Al-Dasooqi, Noor; Sultani, Masooma; Bateman, Emma; Stansborough, Romany; Shirren, Joseph; Gibson, Rachel J

    2014-02-01

    Chemotherapy for cancer causes significant gut toxicity, leading to severe clinical manifestations and an increased economic burden. Despite much research, many of the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood hindering effective treatment options. Recently there has been renewed interest in the role tight junctions play in the pathogenesis of chemotherapy-induced gut toxicity. To delineate the underlying mechanisms of chemotherapy-induced gut toxicity, this study aimed to quantify the molecular changes in key tight junction proteins, ZO-1, claudin-1, and occludin, using a well-established preclinical model of gut toxicity. Female tumor-bearing dark agouti rats received irinotecan or vehicle control and were assessed for validated parameters of gut toxicity including diarrhea and weight loss. Rats were killed at 6, 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120 h post-chemotherapy. Tight junction protein and mRNA expression in the small and large intestines were assessed using semi-quantitative immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. Significant changes in protein expression of tight junction proteins were seen in both the jejunum and colon, correlating with key histological changes and clinical features. mRNA levels of claudin-1 were significantly decreased early after irinotecan in the small and large intestines. ZO-1 and occludin mRNA levels remained stable across the time-course of gut toxicity. Findings strongly suggest irinotecan causes tight junction defects which lead to mucosal barrier dysfunction and the development of diarrhea. Detailed research is now warranted to investigate posttranslational regulation of tight junction proteins to delineate the underlying pathophysiology of gut toxicity and identify future therapeutic targets.

  20. Side-stream smoking reduces intestinal inflammation and increases expression of tight junction proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Zhao, Jun-Xing; Hu, Nan; Ren, Jun; Du, Min; Zhu, Mei-Jun

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of side-stream smoking on gut microflora composition, intestinal inflammation and expression of tight junction proteins. METHODS: C57BL/6 mice were exposed to side-stream cigarette smoking for one hour daily over eight weeks. Cecal contents were collected for microbial composition analysis. Large intestine was collected for immunoblotting and quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analyses of the inflammatory pathway and tight junction proteins. RESULTS: Side-stream smoking induced significant changes in the gut microbiota with increased mouse intestinal bacteria, Clostridium but decreased Fermicutes (Lactoccoci and Ruminococcus), Enterobacteriaceae family and Segmented filamentous baceteria compared to the control mice. Meanwhile, side-stream smoking inhibited the nuclear factor-κB pathway with reduced phosphorylation of p65 and IκBα, accompanied with unchanged mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor-α or interleukin-6. The contents of tight junction proteins, claudin3 and ZO2 were up-regulated in the large intestine of mice exposed side-stream smoking. In addition, side-stream smoking increased c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38 MAPK kinase signaling, while inhibiting AMP-activated protein kinase in the large intestine. CONCLUSION: Side-stream smoking altered gut microflora composition and reduced the inflammatory response, which was associated with increased expression of tight junction proteins. PMID:22611310

  1. Toll-like receptor 4 signaling is coupled to src family kinase activation, tyrosine phosphorylation of zonula adherens proteins, and opening of the paracellular pathway in human lung microvascular endothelia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a key mediator in the vascular leak syndromes associated with Gram-negative bacterial infections. LPS opens the paracellular pathway in pulmonary vascular endothelia through protein tyrosine phosphorylation. We now have identified the protein tyrosine kinase (PT...

  2. Characterization of discontinuous buffer junctions using pH indicators in capillary electrophoresis for protein preconcentration.

    PubMed

    Jurcic, Kristina; Nesbitt, Chandra A; Yeung, Ken K-C

    2006-11-17

    An effective sample preconcentration technique for proteins and peptides was recently developed using capillary electrophoresis (CE) with discontinuous buffers [C.A. Nesbitt, J.T.-M. Lo, K.K.-C. Yeung, J. Chromatogr. A 1073 (2005) 175]. Two buffers of different pH created a junction to trap the sample molecules at their isoelectric points and resulted in over 1000-fold preconcentration for myoglobin within 30 min. To study the formation of pH junctions in CE, a pH indicator, bromothymol blue, is used in this work to reveal the pH changes at the discontinuous buffer boundary. Bromothymol blue (BTB) exhibits a drastic change in its visible absorption spectrum (300-600 nm) going from the acidic to basic pH conditions, and is therefore ideal for visualizing the changes in pH at the junctions created by various buffer combinations. Preconcentration of myoglobin was performed in discontinuous buffers containing BTB. Major differences in the BTB absorption profiles were identified from buffer systems that differ significantly in preconcentration performance, which in turn, allowed for the identification of ideal buffers for sample preconcentration. Up to 2000-fold preconcentrations of myoglobin were achieved in the buffer systems studied in this work. In addition, the role of the electroosmotic flow (EOF) on the preconcentration performance was investigated. A low EOF was found to be desirable, as the pH junction could stay longer in the capillary for accumulation of proteins. The pH junction also displayed characteristics to resist bandbroadening. Potential laminar flow resulted from the mismatched residual EOFs under the two pH conditions within the discontinuous buffers appeared to have minimal effect on the preconcentration. In fact, external applied pressure can be used to control the migration of the pH junction without compromising the protein preconcentration.

  3. C-reactive protein, sodium azide, and endothelial connexin43 gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsueh-Hsiao; Yeh, Hung-I; Wang, Chi-Young; Su, Cheng-Huang; Wu, Yih-Jer; Tseng, Yuen-Yi; Lin, Yi-Chun; Tsai, Cheng-Ho

    2010-04-01

    We investigated the effect of C-reactive protein (CRP) and sodium azide (NaN(3)) on endothelial Cx43 gap junctions. Human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) were treated with (a) detoxified CRP, (b) detoxified dialyzed CRP, (c) detoxified dialyzed CRP plus NaN(3), (d) NaN(3), or (e) dialyzed NaN(3). The concentration of CRP in all preparations was fixed to 25 microg/ml and that of NaN(3) in the preparations of (c) to (e) was equivalent to that contained in the 25 microg/ml CRP purchased commercially. The results showed that both the expression of Cx43 protein and gap junctional communication function post-48-h incubation were reduced and inhibited by the detoxified CRP, NaN(3), or detoxified dialyzed CRP plus NaN(3), but not by the detoxified dialyzed CRP or dialyzed NaN(3). Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis of cells treated for 72 h also showed a pattern of transcriptional regulation essentially the same as that for the proteins. We concluded that CRP does not have a significant effect on Cx43 gap junctions of HAEC, but NaN(3) inhibited the viability of cells and downregulate their junctions.

  4. CONNEXIN 43 AND BONE: NOT JUST A GAP JUNCTION PROTEIN

    PubMed Central

    Plotkin, Lilian I.

    2012-01-01

    Connexins are essential for the communication of cells among themselves and with their environment. Connexin hexamers assemble at the plasma membrane to form hemichannels that allow the exchange of cellular contents with the extracellular milieu. In addition, hemichannels expressed in neighboring cells align to form gap junction channels that mediate the exchange of contents among cells. Connexin 43 (Cx43) is the most abundant connexin expressed in bone cells and its deletion in all tissues leads to osteoblast dysfunction, as evidenced by reduced expression of osteoblast markers and delayed ossification. Moreover, Cx43 is essential for the survival of osteocytes; and mice lacking Cx43 in these cells exhibit increased prevalence of osteocyte apoptosis and empty lacunae in cortical bone. Work of several groups for the past few years has unveiled the role of Cx43 on the response of bone cells to a variety of stimuli. Thus, the preservation of the viability of osteoblasts and osteocytes by the anti-osteoporotic drugs bisphosphonates depends on Cx43 expression in vitro and in vivo. This survival effect does not require cell-to-cell communication and is mediated by unopposed hemichannels. Cx43 hemichannels are also required for the release of prostaglandins and ATP by osteocytes induced by mechanical stimulation in vitro. More recent evidence showed that the cAMP-mediated survival effect of parathyroid hormone (PTH) also requires Cx43 expression. Moreover, the hormone does not increase bone mineral content in mice haploinsufficient for Cx43 or lacking Cx43 in osteoblastic cells. Since inhibition of osteoblast apoptosis contributes, at least in part, to bone anabolism by PTH, the lack of response to the hormone might be due to the requirement of Cx43 for the effect of PTH on osteoblast survival. In summary, mounting evidence indicate that Cx43 is a key component of the intracellular machinery responsible for the transduction of signals in the skeleton in response to

  5. A Synthetic Peptide Corresponding to the Extracellular Domain of Occludin Perturbs the Tight Junction Permeability Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Vivian; Gumbiner, Barry M.

    1997-01-01

    Occludin, the putative tight junction integral membrane protein, is an attractive candidate for a protein that forms the actual sealing element of the tight junction. To study the role of occludin in the formation of the tight junction seal, synthetic peptides (OCC1 and OCC2) corresponding to the two putative extracellular domains of occludin were assayed for their ability to alter tight junctions in Xenopus kidney epithelial cell line A6. Transepithelial electrical resistance and paracellular tracer flux measurements indicated that the second extracellular domain peptide (OCC2) reversibly disrupted the transepithelial permeability barrier at concentrations of < 5 μM. Despite the increased paracellular permeability, there were no changes in gross epithelial cell morphology as determined by scanning EM. The OCC2 peptide decreased the amount of occludin present at the tight junction, as assessed by indirect immunofluorescence, as well as decreased total cellular content of occludin, as assessed by Western blot analysis. Pulse-labeling and metabolic chase analysis suggested that this decrease in occludin level could be attributed to an increase in turnover of cellular occludin rather than a decrease in occludin synthesis. The effect on occludin was specific because other tight junction components, ZO-1, ZO-2, cingulin, and the adherens junction protein E-cadherin, were unaltered by OCC2 treatment. Therefore, the peptide corresponding to the second extracellular domain of occludin perturbs the tight junction permeability barrier in a very specific manner. The correlation between a decrease in occludin levels and the perturbation of the tight junction permeability barrier provides evidence for a role of occludin in the formation of the tight junction seal. PMID:9015310

  6. Grainy head promotes expression of septate junction proteins and influences epithelial morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Narasimha, Maithreyi; Uv, Anne; Krejci, Alena; Brown, Nicholas H; Bray, Sarah J

    2008-03-15

    Transcription factors of the Grainy head (Grh) family are required in epithelia to generate the impermeable apical layer that protects against the external environment. This function is conserved in vertebrates and invertebrates, despite the differing molecular composition of the protective barrier. Epithelial cells also have junctions that create a paracellular diffusion barrier (tight or septate junctions). To examine whether Grh has a role in regulating such characteristics, we used an epidermal layer in the Drosophila embryo that has no endogenous Grh and lacks septate junctions, the amnioserosa. Expression of Grh in the amnioserosa caused severe defects in dorsal closure, a process similar to wound closure, and induced robust expression of the septate junction proteins Coracle, Fasciclin 3 and Sinuous. Grh-binding sites are present within the genes encoding these proteins, consistent with them being direct targets. Removal of Grh from imaginal disc cells caused a reduction in Fasciclin 3 and Coracle levels, suggesting that Grh normally fine tunes their epithelial expression and hence contributes to barrier properties. The fact that ectopic Grh arrests dorsal closure also suggests that this dynamic process relies on epithelia having distinct adhesive properties conferred by differential deployment of Grh.

  7. Intracellular cytoskeleton and junction proteins of endothelial cells in the porcine iris microvasculature.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongfang; Yu, Paula K; Cringle, Stephen J; Sun, Xinghuai; Yu, Dao-Yi

    2015-11-01

    Recently we reported studies of the iris microvasculature and its endothelial cells using intra-luminal micro-perfusion, fixation, and silver staining, suggesting that the iris vascular endothelium may be crucial for maintaining homeostasis in the ocular anterior segment. Here we present information regarding the intracellular structure and cell junctions of the iris endothelium. Thirty-seven porcine eyes were used for this study. The temporal long posterior ciliary artery was cannulated to assess the iris microvascular network and its endothelium using intra-luminal micro-perfusion, fixation, and staining with phalloidin for intracellular cytoskeleton f-actin, and with antibodies against claudin-5 and VE-cadherin for junction proteins. Nuclei were counterstained with Hoechst. The iris was flat-mounted for confocal imaging. The iris microvasculature was studied for its distribution, branch orders and endothelial morphometrics with endothelial cell length measured for each vessel order. Our results showed that morphometrics of the iris microvasculature was comparable with our previous silver staining. Abundant stress fibres and peripheral border staining were seen within the endothelial cells in larger arteries. An obvious decrease in cytoplasmic stress fibres was evident further downstream in the smaller arterioles, and they tended to be absent from capillaries and veins. Endothelial intercellular junctions throughout the iris vasculature were VE-cadherin and claudin-5 immuno-positive, indicating the presence of both adherent junctions and tight junctions between vascular endothelial cells throughout the iris microvasculature. Unevenness of claudin-5 staining was noted along the endothelial cell borders in almost every order of vessels, especially in veins and small arterioles. Our results suggest that significant heterogeneity of intracellular structure and junction proteins is present in different orders of the iris vasculature in addition to vascular diameter

  8. Degradation and resynthesis of gap junction protein in plasma membranes of regenerating liver after partial hepatectomy or cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Traub, Otto; Drüge, Petra Maria; Willecke, Klaus

    1983-01-01

    Changes in the total amount of the gap junction protein (Mr 26,000) after partial hepatectomy or bile duct ligation and recanalization were investigated in rat liver membranes by quantitative immunoblot with rabbit antiserum to the Mr 26,000 protein. The loss and reappearance of the Mr 26,000 protein roughly paralleled loss and reappearance of gap junction plaques analyzed previously under similar physiological conditions by freeze-fracture of hepatocyte surfaces. The total amount of the hepatic Mr 26,000 protein in liver plasma membranes and the total area of the hepatocyte surface occupied by gap junction plaques appeared to be proportional under these conditions. However, at the minimum, 28-35 hr after partial hepatectomy we still find about 15% of the Mr 26,000 protein, in contrast to <1% of gap junction plaques, determined by morphometric analysis. This discrepancy is probably due to the fact that very small gap junction plaques, single connexons, and free Mr 26,000 gap junction subunits are missed by the morphometric analysis. At the times of the minimal amount of the Mr 26,000 protein in hepatic plasma membranes after partial hepatectomy or bile duct ligation we found that crude hepatic lysosomal membranes of these rats contained less Mr 26,000 protein than lysosomal membranes of nonoperated control animals. Thus, we conclude that the decrease and increase of the total amount of the Mr 26,000 protein cannot be explained only by dispersal and reuse of gap junction subunits but are largely due to degradation and resynthesis of the Mr 26,000 protein. No significant change in the amount of the Mr 21,000 protein that had been isolated with gap junction plaques was observed in liver plasma membranes after partial hepatectomy. This confirms our previous conclusion that the Mr 26,000 and Mr 21,000 proteins are independent of each other. Images PMID:6298773

  9. Gap junction proteins: master regulators of the planarian stem cell response to tissue maintenance and injury.

    PubMed

    Peiris, T Harshani; Oviedo, Néstor J

    2013-01-01

    Gap junction (GJ) proteins are crucial mediators of cell-cell communication during embryogenesis, tissue regeneration and disease. GJ proteins form plasma membrane channels that facilitate passage of small molecules across cells and modulate signaling pathways and cellular behavior in different tissues. These properties have been conserved throughout evolution, and in most invertebrates GJ proteins are known as innexins. Despite their critical relevance for physiology and disease, the mechanisms by which GJ proteins modulate cell behavior are poorly understood. This review summarizes findings from recent work that uses planarian flatworms as a paradigm to analyze GJ proteins in the complexity of the whole organism. The planarian model allows access to a large pool of adult somatic stem cells (known as neoblasts) that support physiological cell turnover and tissue regeneration. Innexin proteins are present in planarians and play a fundamental role in controlling neoblast behavior. We discuss the possibility that GJ proteins participate as cellular sensors that inform neoblasts about local and systemic physiological demands. We believe that functional analyses of GJ proteins will bring a complementary perspective to studies that focus on the temporal expression of genes. Finally, integrating functional studies along with molecular genetics and epigenetic approaches would expand our understanding of cellular regulation in vivo and greatly enhance the possibilities for rationally modulating stem cell behavior in their natural environment. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The communicating junctions, roles and dysfunctions.

  10. Molecular cloning of cDNA for rat liver gap junction protein

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    An affinity-purified antibody directed against the 27-kD protein associated with isolated rat liver gap junctions was produced. Light and electron microscopic immunocytochemistry showed that this antigen was localized specifically to the cytoplasmic surfaces of gap junctions. The antibody was used to select cDNA from a rat liver library in the expression vector lambda gt11. The largest cDNA selected contained 1,494 bp and coded for a protein with a calculated molecular mass of 32,007 daltons. Northern blot analysis indicated that brain, kidney, and stomach express an mRNA with similar size and homology to that expressed in liver, but that heart and lens express differently sized, less homologous mRNA. PMID:3013898

  11. Effects of soybean agglutinin on intestinal barrier permeability and tight junction protein expression in weaned piglets.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuan; Qin, Guixin; Sun, Zewei; Che, Dongsheng; Bao, Nan; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2011-01-01

    This study was developed to provide further information on the intestinal barrier permeability and the tight junction protein expression in weaned piglets fed with different levels of soybean agglutinin (SBA). Twenty-five weaned crossbred barrows (Duroc × Landrace × Yorkshire) were selected and randomly allotted to five groups, each group with five replicates. The piglets in the control group were not fed with leguminous products. 0.05, 0.1, 0.15 and 0.2% SBA was added to the control diet to form four experimental diets, respectively. After the experimental period of 7 days (for each group), all the piglets were anesthetized with excess procaine and slaughtered. The d-lactic acid in plasma and the Ileal mucosa diamine oxidase (DAO) was analyzed to observe the change in the intestinal permeability. The tight junction proteins occludin and ZO-1 in the jejunum tissue distribution and relative expression were detected by immunohistochemistry and Western Blot. The results illustrated that a high dose of SBA (0.1-0.2%) could increase the intestinal permeability and reduce piglet intestinal epithelial tight junction protein occludin or ZO-1 expression, while low dose of SBA (0.05% of total diet) had no significant affects. The contents of DAO, d-lactic acid, occludin or ZO-1, had a linear relationship with the SBA levels (0-0.2%) in diets. The high dose SBA (0.1-0.2%) could increase the intestinal permeability and reduce piglet intestinal epithelial tight junction protein occludin or ZO-1 expression, while low dose of SBA (0.05% of total diet) had no affects.

  12. Connexin43 gap junction protein plays an essential role in morphogenesis of the embryonic chick face.

    PubMed

    McGonnell, I M; Green, C R; Tickle, C; Becker, D L

    2001-11-01

    Normal outgrowth and fusion of facial primordia during vertebrate development require interaction of diverse tissues and co-ordination of many different signalling pathways. Gap junction channels, made up of subunits consisting of connexin proteins, facilitate communication between cells and are implicated in embryonic development. Here we describe the distribution of connexin43 and connexin32 gap junction proteins in the developing chick face. To test the function of connexin43 protein, we applied antisense oligodeoxynucleotides that specifically reduced levels of connexin43 protein in cells of early chick facial primordia. This resulted in stunting of primordia outgrowth and led to facial defects. Furthermore, cell proliferation in regions of facial primordia that normally express high levels of connexin43 protein was reduced and this was associated with lower levels of Msx-1 expression. Facial defects arise when retinoic acid is applied to the face of chick embryos at later stages. This treatment also resulted in significant reduction in connexin43 protein, while connexin32 protein expression was unaffected. Taken together, these results indicate that connexin43 plays an essential role during early morphogenesis and subsequent outgrowth of the developing chick face.

  13. Novel Effects of Azithromycin on Tight Junction Proteins in Human Airway Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Asgrimsson, Valthor; Gudjonsson, Thorarinn; Gudmundsson, Gudmundur Hrafn; Baldursson, Olafur

    2006-01-01

    The macrolide antibiotic azithromycin improves lung function and prognosis among patients with cystic fibrosis or diffuse panbronchiolitis, independently of bacterial eradication. Anti-inflammatory effects have been implicated, but data from in vivo studies are scarce, and the link between abnormal electrolyte content in airway surface liquid and bronchial infections remains uncertain. In the present study, we treated human airway epithelia on filter supports with azithromycin and monitored transepithelial electrical resistance. We found that azithromycin increased transepithelial electrical resistance of airway epithelia in a dose-dependent manner. Immunocytochemistry and Western blotting showed that addition of azithromycin changed the locations of proteins in cell cultures and induced processing of the tight junction proteins claudin-1 and claudin-4, occludin, and junctional adhesion molecule-A. These effects were reversible, and no effect was seen when cells were treated with penicillin or erythromycin. The data indicate that azithromycin increases the transepithelial electrical resistance of human airway epithelia by changing the processing of tight junction proteins. The results are novel and may help explain the beneficial effects of azithromycin in patients with cystic fibrosis, diffuse panbronchiolitis, and community-acquired pneumonia. PMID:16641453

  14. Digestion of epithelial tight junction proteins by the commensal Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Pruteanu, Mihaela; Shanahan, Fergus

    2013-11-15

    The enteric microbiota contributes to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease, but the pathways involved and bacterial participants may vary in different hosts. We previously reported that some components of the human commensal microbiota, particularly Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens), have the proteolytic capacity for host matrix degradation and reduce transepithelial resistance. Here, we examined the C. perfringens-derived proteolytic activity against epithelial tight junction proteins using human intestinal epithelial cell lines. We showed that the protein levels of E-cadherin, occludin, and junctional adhesion molecule 1 decrease in colonic cells treated with C. perfringens culture supernatant. E-cadherin ectodomain shedding in C. perfringens-stimulated intestinal epithelial cells was detected with antibodies against the extracellular domain of E-cadherin, and we demonstrate that this process occurs in a time- and dose-dependent manner. In addition, we showed that the filtered sterile culture supernatant of C. perfringens has no cytotoxic activity on the human intestinal cells at the concentrations used in this study. The direct cleavage of E-cadherin by the proteases from the C. perfringens culture supernatant was confirmed by C. perfringens supernatant-induced in vitro degradation of the human recombinant E-cadherin. We conclude that C. perfringens culture supernatant mediates digestion of epithelial cell junctional proteins, which is likely to enable access to the extracellular matrix components by the paracellular pathway.

  15. Manufactured Aluminum Oxide Nanoparticles Decrease Expression of Tight Junction Proteins in Brain Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Yokel, Robert A.; Hennig, Bernhard

    2009-01-01

    Manufactured nanoparticles of aluminum oxide (nano-alumina) have been widely used in the environment; however, their potential toxicity provides a growing concern for human health. The present study focuses on the hypothesis that nano-alumina can affect the blood-brain barrier and induce endothelial toxicity. In the first series of experiments, human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) were exposed to alumina and control nanoparticles in dose- and time-responsive manners. Treatment with nano-alumina markedly reduced HBMEC viability, altered mitochondrial potential, increased cellular oxidation, and decreased tight junction protein expression as compared to control nanoparticles. Alterations of tight junction protein levels were prevented by cellular enrichment with glutathione. In the second series of experiments, rats were infused with nano-alumina at the dose of 29 mg/kg and the brains were stained for expression of tight junction proteins. Treatment with nano-alumina resulted in a marked fragmentation and disruption of integrity of claudin-5 and occludin. These results indicate that cerebral vasculature can be affected by nano-alumina. In addition, our data indicate that alterations of mitochondrial functions may be the underlying mechanism of nano-alumina toxicity. PMID:18830698

  16. Manufactured aluminum oxide nanoparticles decrease expression of tight junction proteins in brain vasculature.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Yokel, Robert A; Hennig, Bernhard; Toborek, Michal

    2008-12-01

    Manufactured nanoparticles of aluminum oxide (nano-alumina) have been widely used in the environment; however, their potential toxicity provides a growing concern for human health. The present study focuses on the hypothesis that nano-alumina can affect the blood-brain barrier and induce endothelial toxicity. In the first series of experiments, human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) were exposed to alumina and control nanoparticles in dose- and time-responsive manners. Treatment with nano-alumina markedly reduced HBMEC viability, altered mitochondrial potential, increased cellular oxidation, and decreased tight junction protein expression as compared to control nanoparticles. Alterations of tight junction protein levels were prevented by cellular enrichment with glutathione. In the second series of experiments, rats were infused with nano-alumina at the dose of 29 mg/kg and the brains were stained for expression of tight junction proteins. Treatment with nano-alumina resulted in a marked fragmentation and disruption of integrity of claudin-5 and occludin. These results indicate that cerebral vasculature can be affected by nano-alumina. In addition, our data indicate that alterations of mitochondrial functions may be the underlying mechanism of nano-alumina toxicity.

  17. Endogenous protein phosphatase 1 runs down gap junctional communication of rat ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Duthe, F; Plaisance, I; Sarrouilhe, D; Hervé, J C

    2001-11-01

    Gap junctional channels are essential for normal cardiac impulse propagation. In ventricular myocytes of newborn rats, channel opening requires the presence of ATP to allow protein kinase activities; otherwise, channels are rapidly deactivated by the action of endogenous protein phosphatases (PPs). The lack of influence of Mg(2+) and of selective PP2B inhibition is not in favor of the involvements of Mg(2+)-dependent PP2C and PP2B, respectively, in the loss of channel activity. Okadaic acid (1 microM) and calyculin A (100 nM), both inhibitors of PP1 and PP2A activities, significantly retarded the loss of channel activity. However, a better preservation was obtained in the presence of selective PP1 inhibitors heparin (100 microg/ml) or protein phosphatase inhibitor 2 (I2; 100 nM). Conversely, the stimulation of endogenous PP1 activity by p-nitrophenyl phosphate, in the presence of ATP, led to a progressive fading of junctional currents unless I2 was simultaneously added. Together, these results suggest that a basal phosphorylation-dephosphorylation turnover regulates gap junctional communication which is rapidly deactivated by PP1 activity when the phosphorylation pathway is hindered.

  18. Antofine-induced connexin43 gap junction disassembly in rat astrocytes involves protein kinase Cβ.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Fang; Liao, Chih-Kai; Lin, Jau-Chen; Jow, Guey-Mei; Wang, Hwai-Shi; Wu, Jiahn-Chun

    2013-03-01

    Antofine, a phenanthroindolizidine alkaloid derived from Cryptocaryachinensis and Ficusseptica in the Asclepiadaceae milkweed family, is cytotoxic for various cancer cell lines. In this study, we demonstrated that treatment of rat primary astrocytes with antofine induced dose-dependent inhibition of gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC), as assessed by scrape-loading 6-carboxyfluorescein dye transfer. Levels of Cx43 protein were also decreased in a dose- and time-dependent manner following antofine treatment. Double-labeling immunofluorescence microscopy showed that antofine (10ng/ml) induced endocytosis of surface gap junctions into the cytoplasm, where Cx43 was co-localized with the early endosome marker EEA1. Inhibition of lysosomes or proteasomes by co-treatment with antofine and their respective specific inhibitors, NH4Cl or MG132, partially inhibited the antofine-induced decrease in Cx43 protein levels, but did not inhibit the antofine-induced inhibition of GJIC. After 30min of treatment, antofine induced a rapid increase in the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration and activation of protein kinase C (PKC)α/βII, which was maintained for at least 6h. Co-treatment of astrocytes with antofine and the intracellular Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA-AM prevented downregulation of Cx43 and inhibition of GJIC. Moreover, co-treatment with antofine and a specific PKCβ inhibitor prevented endocytosis of gap junctions, downregulation of Cx43, and inhibition of GJIC. Taken together, these findings indicate that antofine induces Cx43 gap junction disassembly by the PKCβ signaling pathway. Inhibition of GJIC by antofine may undermine the neuroprotective effect of astrocytes in CNS.

  19. Expression of apical junction complex proteins in colorectal mucosa of miniature dachshunds with inflammatory colorectal polyps

    PubMed Central

    YOKOYAMA, Nozomu; OHTA, Hiroshi; KAGAWA, Yumiko; LEELA-ARPORN, Rommaneeya; DERMLIM, Angkhana; NISA, Khoirun; MORITA, Tomoya; OSUGA, Tatsuyuki; SASAKI, Noboru; MORISHITA, Keitaro; NAKAMURA, Kensuke; TAKIGUCHI, Mitsuyoshi

    2017-01-01

    We examine the expression of tight junction and adherence junction proteins in the colorectal mucosa of miniature dachshunds (MDs) with inflammatory colorectal polyps (ICRPs). Colorectal mucosa samples were endoscopically obtained from 8 MDs with ICRPs and 8 control dogs for immunoblotting. Paraffin-embedded tissues of surgically resected inflamed lesions from another 5 MDs with ICRPs and full-thickness colorectal specimens from 5 healthy beagles were obtained for immunohistochemistry. The expression patterns of claudin-1, -2, -3, -4, -5, -7 and -8, E-cadherin and β-catenin were analyzed in the non-inflamed mucosa and inflamed mucosa of ICRPs and colorectal mucosa of control dogs by immunoblotting. The localization of these proteins in the inflamed lesions was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. The expressions of each of claudin, E-cadherin and β-catenin were not significantly different between control dogs and non-inflamed colonic mucosa from MDs with ICRPs. In contrast, only E-cadherin and β-catenin were detected in the inflamed lesions of MDs with ICRPs. By immunohistochemistry, claudin-2, -3, -4, -5 and -7, E-cadherin and β-catenin were expressed in the colorectal epithelium within the inflamed mucosa, but not in granulation tissue. Distributions of claudin-2, -3, -4, -5, and -7, E-cadherin and β-catenin in the colonic epithelium were not different between MDs with ICRPs and control dogs. These results indicated that no significant alteration was detected in several tight junction or adherence junction proteins expression in the colorectal epithelium of ICRPs. PMID:28090006

  20. Alteration of Tight Junction Proteins Is an Early Event in Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Kirschner, Nina; Poetzl, Claudia; von den Driesch, Peter; Wladykowski, Ewa; Moll, Ingrid; Behne, Martin J.; Brandner, Johanna M.

    2009-01-01

    Psoriasis is an inflammatory skin disease characterized by hyperproliferation of keratinocytes, impaired barrier function, and pronounced infiltration of inflammatory cells. Tight junctions (TJs) are cell-cell junctions that form paracellular barriers for solutes and inflammatory cells. Altered localization of TJ proteins in the epidermis was described in plaque-type psoriasis. Here we show that localization of TJ proteins is already altered in early-stage psoriasis. Occludin, ZO-1, and claudin-4 are found in more layers than in normal epidermis, and claudin-1 and -7 are down-regulated in the basal and in the uppermost layers. In plaque-type psoriasis, the staining patterns of occludin and ZO-1 do not change, whereas the claudins are further down-regulated. Near transmigrating granulocytes, all TJ proteins except for junctional adhesion molecule-A are down-regulated. Treatment of cultured keratinocytes with interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α, which are present at elevated levels in psoriatic skin, results in an increase of transepithelial resistance at early time points and a decrease at later time points. Injection of interleukin-1β into an ex vivo skin model leads to an up-regulation of occludin and ZO-1, resembling TJ protein alteration in early psoriasis. Our results show for the first time that alteration of TJ proteins is an early event in psoriasis and is not the consequence of the more profound changes found in plaque-type psoriasis. Our data indicate that cytokines are involved in alterations of TJ proteins observed in psoriasis. PMID:19661441

  1. ATP counteracts the rundown of gap junctional channels of rat ventricular myocytes by promoting protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Verrecchia, F; Duthe, F; Duval, S; Duchatelle, I; Sarrouilhe, D; Herve, J C

    1999-04-15

    1. The degree of cell-to-cell coupling between ventricular myocytes of neonatal rats appeared well preserved when studied in the perforated version of the patch clamp technique or, in double whole-cell conditions, when ATP was present in the patch pipette solution. In contrast, when ATP was omitted, the amplitude of junctional current rapidly declined (rundown). 2. To examine the mechanism(s) of ATP action, an 'internal perfusion technique' was adapted to dual patch clamp conditions, and reintroduction of ATP partially reversed the rundown of junctional channels. 3. Cell-to-cell communication was not preserved by a non-hydrolysable ATP analogue (5'-adenylimidodiphosphate, AMP-PNP), indicating that the effect most probably did not involve direct interaction of ATP with the channel-forming proteins. 4. An ATP analogue supporting protein phosphorylation but not active transport processes (adenosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate), ATPgammaS) maintained normal intercellular communication, suggesting that the effect was due to kinase activity rather than to altered intracellular Ca2+. 5. A broad spectrum inhibitor of endogenous serine/threonine protein kinases (H7) reversibly reduced the intercellular coupling. A non-specific exogenous protein phosphatase (alkaline phosphatase) mimicked the effects of ATP deprivation. The non-specific inhibition of endogenous protein phosphatases resulted in the preservation of substantial cell-to-cell communication in ATP-free conditions. 6. The activity of gap junctional channels appears to require both the presence of ATP and protein kinase activity to counteract the tonic activity of endogenous phosphatase(s).

  2. Gap junctions of the medial collateral ligament: structure, distribution, associations and function

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Simon S; Rattner, JB; Sciore, Paul; Boorman, Richard; Lo, Ian KY

    2005-01-01

    Ligaments are composed of two major components: cells and extracellular matrix. The cells express gap junction proteins and are arranged into a series of rows that traverse the tissue, suggesting that all the cells of the tissue are functionally interconnected. The results of our study demonstrate that medial collateral ligament (MCL) cells do not have a uniform fusiform morphology or placement along a row of cells as previously suggested, but rather display a complex placement and form that weaves within the collagen matrix in a manner that is far more extensive and complex than previously appreciated. Within this morphological context, we find that MCL cells in vivo contain functional gap junctions (verified using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching) that are localized to sites of close cell–cell contact, and this pattern imparts or reflects a bipolarity inherent to each cell. When we studied ligament cells in conventional tissue culture we found that this bipolarity is lost, and the placement of gap junctions and their related proteins, as well as general cell morphology, is also altered. Finally, our study demonstrates, for the first time, that in addition to gap junctions, adherens junctions and desmosomes are also expressed by MCL cells both in vivo and in vitro and map to sites of cell–cell contact. PMID:16050901

  3. Density-enhanced Phosphatase 1 Regulates Phosphorylation of Tight Junction Proteins and Enhances Barrier Function of Epithelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Sallee, Jennifer L.; Burridge, Keith

    2009-01-01

    Cell-cell adhesion is a dynamic process that can activate multiple signaling pathways. These signaling pathways can be regulated through reversible tyrosine phosphorylation events. The level of tyrosine phosphorylation of junctional proteins reflects the balance between protein-tyrosine kinase and protein-tyrosine phosphatase activity. The receptor-tyrosine phosphatase DEP-1 (CD148/PTP-η) has been implicated in cell growth and differentiation as well as in regulating phosphorylation of junctional proteins. However, the role of DEP-1 in regulating tight junction phosphorylation and the integrity of cell-cell junctions is still under investigation. In this study, we used a catalytically dead substrate-trapping mutant of DEP-1 to identify potential substrates at cell-cell junctions. We have shown that in epithelial cells the trapping mutant of DEP-1 interacts with the tight junction proteins occludin and ZO-1 in a tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent manner. In contrast, PTP-PEST, Shp2, and PTPμ did not interact with these proteins, suggesting that the interaction of DEP-1 with occludin and ZO-1 is specific. In addition, occludin and ZO-1 were dephosphorylated by DEP-1 but not these other phosphatases in vitro. Overexpression of DEP-1 increased barrier function as measured by transepithelial electrical resistance and also reduced paracellular flux of fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran following a calcium switch. Reduced DEP-1 expression by small interfering RNA had a small but significant increase in junction permeability. These data suggest that DEP-1 can modify the phosphorylation state of tight junction proteins and play a role in regulating permeability. PMID:19332538

  4. They Must Hold Tight: Junction Proteins, Microbiota And Immunity In Intestinal Mucosa.

    PubMed

    Castoldi, Angela; Favero de Aguiar, Cristhiane; Moraes-Vieira, Pedro Manoel; Olsen Saraiva Câmara, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Homeostasis of the immune system depends on several factors. The gastrointestinal tract plays an important role in maintaining our immune system. With this aim, the intestinal immune system interacts with epithelial barrier molecules, especially tight junction proteins, that are key molecules involved in controlling paracellular permeability to increase the protection barrier against external antigens or possibly to respond to commensal microorganisms. During intestinal inflammatory diseases, the expression of innate immune receptors in intestinal epithelial cells and infiltration of immune cells are related, but it is still unclear how the immune system induces modulation of paracellular permeability. In this review, we provide an overview of the understanding of how the immune system modulates the expression of tight junctions to maintain the mucosal immune system.

  5. Specificity of Interaction between Clostridium perfringens Enterotoxin and Claudin-Family Tight Junction Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Leslie A.; Koval, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE), a major cause of food poisoning, forms physical pores in the plasma membrane of intestinal epithelial cells. The ability of CPE to recognize the epithelium is due to the C-terminal binding domain, which binds to a specific motif on the second extracellular loop of tight junction proteins known as claudins. The interaction between claudins and CPE plays a key role in mediating CPE toxicity by facilitating pore formation and by promoting tight junction disassembly. Recently, the ability of CPE to distinguish between specific claudins has been used to develop tools for studying roles for claudins in epithelial barrier function. Moreover, the high affinity of CPE to selected claudins makes CPE a useful platform for targeted drug delivery to tumors expressing these claudins. PMID:22069652

  6. Role of Extracellular Matrix Proteins and Their Receptors in the Development of the Vertebrate Neuromuscular Junction

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Neha; Martin, Paul T.

    2012-01-01

    The vertebrate neuromuscular junction remains the best-studied model for understanding the mechanisms involved in synaptogenesis, due to its relatively large size, its simplicity of patterning and its unparalleled experimental accessibility. During neuromuscular development, each skeletal myofiber secretes and deposits around its extracellular surface an assemblage of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins that ultimately form a basal lamina. This is also the case at the neuromuscular junction, where the motor nerve contributes additional factors. Before most of the current molecular components were known, it was clear that the synaptic ECM of adult skeletal muscles was unique in composition and contained factors sufficient to induce the differentiation of both pre- and postsynaptic membranes. Biochemical, genetic and microscopy studies have confirmed that agrin, laminin (221, 421, and 521), collagen IV (α3-α6), collagen XIII, perlecan and the ColQ-bound form of acetylcholinesterase are all synaptic ECM proteins with important roles in neuromuscular development. The roles of their many potential receptors and/or binding proteins has been more difficult to assess at the genetic level due to the complexity of membrane interactions with these large proteins, but roles for MuSK-LRP4 in agrin signaling and for integrins, dystroglycan, and voltage-gated calcium channels in laminin-dependent phenotypes have been identified. Synaptic extracellular matrix proteins and their receptors are involved in almost all aspects of synaptic development, including synaptic initiation, topography, ultrastructure, maturation, stability and transmission. PMID:21766463

  7. Diesel exhaust particles modulate the tight junction protein occludin in lung cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Andrea D; Blank, Fabian; Baum, Oliver; Gehr, Peter; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara M

    2009-01-01

    Background Using an in vitro triple cell co-culture model consisting of human epithelial cells (16HBE14o-), monocyte-derived macrophages and dendritic cells, it was recently demonstrated that macrophages and dendritic cells create a transepithelial network between the epithelial cells to capture antigens without disrupting the epithelial tightness. The expression of the different tight junction proteins in macrophages and dendritic cells, and the formation of tight junction-like structures with epithelial cells has been demonstrated. Immunofluorescent methods combined with laser scanning microscopy and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction were used to investigate if exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) (0.5, 5, 50, 125 μg/ml), for 24 h, can modulate the expression of the tight junction mRNA/protein of occludin, in all three cell types. Results Only the highest dose of DEP (125 μg/ml) seemed to reduce the occludin mRNA in the cells of the defence system however not in epithelial cells, although the occludin arrangement in the latter cell type was disrupted. The transepithelial electrical resistance was reduced in epithelial cell mono-cultures but not in the triple cell co-cultures, following exposure to high DEP concentration. Cytotoxicity was not found, in either epithelial mono-cultures nor in triple cell co-cultures, after exposure to the different DEP concentrations. Conclusion We concluded that high concentrations of DEP (125 μg/ml) can modulate the tight junction occludin mRNA in the cells of the defence system and that those cells play an important role maintaining the epithelial integrity following exposure to particulate antigens in lung cells. PMID:19814802

  8. Gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Goodenough, Daniel A; Paul, David L

    2009-07-01

    Gap junctions are aggregates of intercellular channels that permit direct cell-cell transfer of ions and small molecules. Initially described as low-resistance ion pathways joining excitable cells (nerve and muscle), gap junctions are found joining virtually all cells in solid tissues. Their long evolutionary history has permitted adaptation of gap-junctional intercellular communication to a variety of functions, with multiple regulatory mechanisms. Gap-junctional channels are composed of hexamers of medium-sized families of integral proteins: connexins in chordates and innexins in precordates. The functions of gap junctions have been explored by studying mutations in flies, worms, and humans, and targeted gene disruption in mice. These studies have revealed a wide diversity of function in tissue and organ biology.

  9. Gap Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Goodenough, Daniel A.; Paul, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Gap junctions are aggregates of intercellular channels that permit direct cell–cell transfer of ions and small molecules. Initially described as low-resistance ion pathways joining excitable cells (nerve and muscle), gap junctions are found joining virtually all cells in solid tissues. Their long evolutionary history has permitted adaptation of gap-junctional intercellular communication to a variety of functions, with multiple regulatory mechanisms. Gap-junctional channels are composed of hexamers of medium-sized families of integral proteins: connexins in chordates and innexins in precordates. The functions of gap junctions have been explored by studying mutations in flies, worms, and humans, and targeted gene disruption in mice. These studies have revealed a wide diversity of function in tissue and organ biology. PMID:20066080

  10. Dendrobium chrysotoxum Lindl. Alleviates Diabetic Retinopathy by Preventing Retinal Inflammation and Tight Junction Protein Decrease

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zengyang; Gong, Chenyuan; Lu, Bin; Yang, Li; Sheng, Yuchen; Ji, Lili; Wang, Zhengtao

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a serious complication of diabetes mellitus. This study aimed to observe the alleviation of the ethanol extract of Dendrobium chrysotoxum Lindl. (DC), a traditional Chinese herbal medicine, on DR and its engaged mechanism. After DC (30 or 300 mg/kg) was orally administrated, the breakdown of blood retinal barrier (BRB) in streptozotocin- (STZ-) induced diabetic rats was attenuated by DC. Decreased retinal mRNA expression of tight junction proteins (including occludin and claudin-1) in diabetic rats was also reversed by DC. Western blot analysis and retinal immunofluorescence staining results further confirmed that DC reversed the decreased expression of occludin and claudin-1 proteins in diabetic rats. DC reduced the increased retinal mRNA expressions of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), interleukin- (IL-) 6, and IL-1β in diabetic rats. In addition, DC alleviated the increased 1 and phosphorylated p65, IκB, and IκB kinase (IKK) in diabetic rats. DC also reduced the increased serum levels of TNFα, interferon-γ (IFN-γ), IL-6, IL-1β, IL-8, IL-12, IL-2, IL-3, and IL-10 in diabetic rats. Therefore, DC can alleviate DR by inhibiting retinal inflammation and preventing the decrease of tight junction proteins, such as occludin and claudin-1. PMID:25685822

  11. Nuclear localization of the tight junction protein ZO-2 in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Islas, Socorro; Vega, Jesús; Ponce, Lissette; González-Mariscal, Lorenza

    2002-03-10

    The tight junction constitutes the major barrier to solute and water flow through the paracellular space of epithelia and endothelia. It is formed by transmembrane proteins and submembranous molecules such as the MAGUKs ZOs. We have previously found that several MAGUKs, including those of the tight (ZO-1, ZO-2, and ZO-3) and septate junction (tamou and Dlg), contain one or two nuclear sorting signals located at their first PDZ and GK domains. Now we show that these proteins also contain a nuclear export signal and focus our study on the nuclear membrane shuttling of ZO-2. In sparse cultures this molecule concentrates at the nucleus in clusters, where it partially colocalizes with splicing factor SC35. Nuclear staining diminishes as the monolayer acquires confluence through a process sensitive to the nuclear export inhibitor leptomycin B. Nuclear localization can be induced by impairing cell-cell contacts, by mechanical injury. ZO-2 that shuttles from the cell periphery into the nucleus is not newly synthesized but originates from a preexistent pool. The movement of this protein is mediated by the actin cytoskeleton.

  12. Junction-mediating and regulatory protein (JMY) is essential for early porcine embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zi Li; Cui, Xiang-Shun; Namgoong, Suk; Kim, Nam-Hyung

    2015-01-01

    Junction-mediating and regulatory protein (JMY) is a regulator of both transcription and actin filament assembly. JMY is a critical nucleation-promoting factor (NPF); however, its role in the development of mammalian embryos is poorly understood. In the current study, we investigated the functional roles of the NPF JMY in porcine embryos. Porcine embryos expressed JMY mRNA and protein, and JMY protein moved from the cytoplasm to the nucleus at later embryonic developmental stages. Knockdown of JMY by RNA interference markedly decreased the rate of blastocyst development, validating its role in the development of porcine embryos. Furthermore, injection of JMY dsRNA also impaired actin and Arp2 expression, and co-injection of actin and Arp2 mRNA partially rescued blastocyst development. Taken together, our results show that the NPF JMY is involved in the development of porcine embryos by regulating the NPF-Arp2-actin pathway.

  13. Junction-mediating and regulatory protein (JMY) is essential for early porcine embryonic development

    PubMed Central

    LIN, Zi Li; CUI, Xiang-Shun; NAMGOONG, Suk; KIM, Nam-Hyung

    2015-01-01

    Junction-mediating and regulatory protein (JMY) is a regulator of both transcription and actin filament assembly. JMY is a critical nucleation-promoting factor (NPF); however, its role in the development of mammalian embryos is poorly understood. In the current study, we investigated the functional roles of the NPF JMY in porcine embryos. Porcine embryos expressed JMY mRNA and protein, and JMY protein moved from the cytoplasm to the nucleus at later embryonic developmental stages. Knockdown of JMY by RNA interference markedly decreased the rate of blastocyst development, validating its role in the development of porcine embryos. Furthermore, injection of JMY dsRNA also impaired actin and Arp2 expression, and co-injection of actin and Arp2 mRNA partially rescued blastocyst development. Taken together, our results show that the NPF JMY is involved in the development of porcine embryos by regulating the NPF-Arp2-actin pathway. PMID:26052154

  14. Cell-cell junction remodeling in the heart: possible role in cardiac conduction system function and arrhythmias?

    PubMed

    Mezzano, Valeria; Sheikh, Farah

    2012-02-27

    Anchoring cell-cell junctions (desmosomes, fascia adherens) play crucial roles in maintaining mechanical integrity of cardiac muscle cells and tissue. Genetic mutations and/or loss of critical components in these macromolecular structures are increasingly being associated with arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathies; however, their specific roles have been primarily attributed to effects within the working (ventricular) cardiac muscle. Growing evidence also points to a key role for anchoring cell-cell junction components in cardiac muscle cells of the cardiac conduction system. This is not only evidenced by the molecular and ultra-structural presence of anchoring cell junctions in specific compartments/structures of the cardiac conduction system (sinoatrial node, atrioventricular node, His-Purkinje system), but also because conduction system-related arrhythmias can be found in humans and mouse models of cardiomyopathies harboring defects and/or mutations in key anchoring cell-cell junction proteins. These studies emphasize the clinical need to understand the molecular and cellular role(s) for anchoring cell-cell junctions in cardiac conduction system function and arrhythmias. This review will focus on (i) experimental findings that underline an important role for anchoring cell-cell junctions in the cardiac conduction system, (ii) insights regarding involvement of these structures in age-related cardiac remodeling of the conduction system, (iii) summarizing available genetic mouse models that can target cardiac conduction system structures and (iv) implications of these findings on future therapies for arrhythmogenic heart diseases.

  15. Simvastatin Sodium Salt and Fluvastatin Interact with Human Gap Junction Gamma-3 Protein.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Andrew; Casey-Green, Katherine; Probert, Fay; Withall, David; Mitchell, Daniel A; Dilly, Suzanne J; James, Sean; Dimitri, Wade; Ladwa, Sweta R; Taylor, Paul C; Singer, Donald R J

    2016-01-01

    Finding pleiomorphic targets for drugs allows new indications or warnings for treatment to be identified. As test of concept, we applied a new chemical genomics approach to uncover additional targets for the widely prescribed lipid-lowering pro-drug simvastatin. We used mRNA extracted from internal mammary artery from patients undergoing coronary artery surgery to prepare a viral cardiovascular protein library, using T7 bacteriophage. We then studied interactions of clones of the bacteriophage, each expressing a different cardiovascular polypeptide, with surface-bound simvastatin in 96-well plates. To maximise likelihood of identifying meaningful interactions between simvastatin and vascular peptides, we used a validated photo-immobilisation method to apply a series of different chemical linkers to bind simvastatin so as to present multiple orientations of its constituent components to potential targets. Three rounds of biopanning identified consistent interaction with the clone expressing part of the gene GJC3, which maps to Homo sapiens chromosome 7, and codes for gap junction gamma-3 protein, also known as connexin 30.2/31.3 (mouse connexin Cx29). Further analysis indicated the binding site to be for the N-terminal domain putatively 'regulating' connexin hemichannel and gap junction pores. Using immunohistochemistry we found connexin 30.2/31.3 to be present in samples of artery similar to those used to prepare the bacteriophage library. Surface plasmon resonance revealed that a 25 amino acid synthetic peptide representing the discovered N-terminus did not interact with simvastatin lactone, but did bind to the hydrolysed HMG CoA inhibitor, simvastatin acid. This interaction was also seen for fluvastatin. The gap junction blockers carbenoxolone and flufenamic acid also interacted with the same peptide providing insight into potential site of binding. These findings raise key questions about the functional significance of GJC3 transcripts in the vasculature and

  16. Localization of dystrophin and dystrophin-related protein at the electromotor synapse and neuromuscular junction in Torpedo marmorata.

    PubMed

    Cartaud, A; Ludosky, M A; Tomé, F M; Collin, H; Stetzkowski-Marden, F; Khurana, T S; Kunkel, L M; Fardeau, M; Changeux, J P; Cartaud, J

    1992-06-01

    The immunological identification of dystrophin isoforms at the neuromuscular junction and Torpedo marmorata electromotor synapse was attempted using various antibodies. A polyclonal antibody raised against electrophoretically purified dystrophin from T. marmorata electrocyte has been thoroughly investigated. This antibody recognized dystrophin in the electric tissue as well as sarcolemmal and synaptic neuromuscular junction dystrophin in all studies species (T. marmorata, rat, mice and human) at serum dilutions as high as 1:10,000. At variance, no staining of either the sarcolemma or neuromuscular junction was observed in Duchenne muscular dystrophy or mdx mice skeletal muscles. In these muscles, other members of the dystrophin superfamily, in particular the dystrophin-related protein(s) encoded by autosomal genes are present. These data thus demonstrate the specificity of our antibodies for dystrophin. Anti-dystrophin-related protein antibodies [Khurana et al. (1991) Neuromusc. Disorders 1, 185-194] which gave a strong immunostaining of the neuromuscular junction in various species, including T. marmorata, cross-reacted weakly with the postsynaptic membrane of the electrocyte. Taken together, these observations are in favor of the existence of a protein very homologous to dystrophin at the electromotor synapse in T. marmorata, whereas both dystrophin and dystrophin-related protein co-localize at the neuromuscular junction as in all species studied. The electrocyte thus offers the unique opportunity to study the interaction of dystrophin with components of the postsynaptic membrane.

  17. Molecular cloning and functional expression of human connexin37, an endothelial cell gap junction protein.

    PubMed Central

    Reed, K E; Westphale, E M; Larson, D M; Wang, H Z; Veenstra, R D; Beyer, E C

    1993-01-01

    Gap junctions allow direct intercellular coupling between many cells including those in the blood vessel wall. They are formed by a group of related proteins called connexins, containing conserved transmembrane and extracellular domains, but unique cytoplasmic regions that may confer connexin-specific physiological properties. We used polymerase chain reaction amplification and cDNA library screening to clone DNA encoding a human gap junction protein, connexin37 (Cx37). The derived human Cx37 polypeptide contains 333 amino acids, with a predicted molecular mass of 37,238 D. RNA blots demonstrate that Cx37 is expressed in multiple organs and tissues (including heart, uterus, ovary, and blood vessel endothelium) and in primary cultures of vascular endothelial cells. Cx37 mRNA is coexpressed with connexin43 at similar levels in some endothelial cells, but at much lower levels in others. To demonstrate that Cx37 could form functional channels, we stably transfected communication-deficient Neuro2A cells with the Cx37 cDNA. The induced intercellular channels were studied by the double whole cell patch clamp technique. These channels were reversibly inhibited by the uncoupling agent, heptanol (2 mM). The expressed Cx37 channels exhibited multiple conductance levels and showed a pronounced voltage dependence. These electrophysiological characteristics are similar to, but distinct from, those of previously characterized connexins. Images PMID:7680674

  18. Activation of Holliday junction recognizing protein involved in the chromosomal stability and immortality of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kato, Tatsuya; Sato, Nagato; Hayama, Satoshi; Yamabuki, Takumi; Ito, Tomoo; Miyamoto, Masaki; Kondo, Satoshi; Nakamura, Yusuke; Daigo, Yataro

    2007-09-15

    We identified a novel gene HJURP (Holliday junction-recognizing protein) whose activation seemed to play a pivotal role in the immortality of cancer cells. HJURP was considered a possible downstream target for ataxia telangiectasia mutated signaling, and its expression was increased by DNA double-strand breaks (DSB). HJURP was involved in the homologous recombination pathway in the DSB repair process through interaction with hMSH5 and NBS1, which is a part of the MRN protein complex. HJURP formed nuclear foci in cells at S phase and those subjected to DNA damage. In vitro assays implied that HJURP bound directly to the Holliday junction and rDNA arrays. Treatment of cancer cells with small interfering RNA (siRNA) against HJURP caused abnormal chromosomal fusions and led to genomic instability and senescence. In addition, HJURP overexpression was observed in a majority of lung cancers and was associated with poor prognosis as well. We suggest that HJURP is an indispensable factor for chromosomal stability in immortalized cancer cells and is a potential novel therapeutic target for the development of anticancer drugs.

  19. The Tight Junction Proteins Claudin-1, -6, and -9 Are Entry Cofactors for Hepatitis C Virus▿

    PubMed Central

    Meertens, Laurent; Bertaux, Claire; Cukierman, Lisa; Cormier, Emmanuel; Lavillette, Dimitri; Cosset, François-Loïc; Dragic, Tatjana

    2008-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of liver disease in humans. The CD81 tetraspanin is necessary but not sufficient for HCV penetration into hepatocytes, and it was recently reported that the tight junction protein claudin-1 is a critical HCV entry cofactor. Here, we confirm the role of claudin-1 in HCV entry. In addition, we show that claudin-6 and claudin-9 expressed in CD81+ cells also enable the entry of HCV pseudoparticles derived from six of the major genotypes. Whereas claudin-1, -6, and -9 function equally well as entry cofactors in endothelial cells, claudin-1 is more efficient in hepatoma cells. This suggests that additional cellular factors modulate the ability of claudins to function as HCV entry cofactors. Our work has generated novel and essential means to investigate the mechanism of HCV penetration into hepatocytes and the role of the claudin protein family in HCV dissemination, replication, and pathogenesis. PMID:18234789

  20. A Gap Junction Protein, Inx2, Modulates Calcium Flux to Specify Border Cell Fate during Drosophila oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Ritabrata; Deshpande, Girish

    2017-01-01

    Intercellular communication mediated by gap junction (GJ) proteins is indispensable during embryogenesis, tissue regeneration and wound healing. Here we report functional analysis of a gap junction protein, Innexin 2 (Inx2), in cell type specification during Drosophila oogenesis. Our data reveal a novel involvement of Inx2 in the specification of Border Cells (BCs), a migratory cell type, whose identity is determined by the cell autonomous STAT activity. We show that Inx2 influences BC fate specification by modulating STAT activity via Domeless receptor endocytosis. Furthermore, detailed experimental analysis has uncovered that Inx2 also regulates a calcium flux that transmits across the follicle cells. We propose that Inx2 mediated calcium flux in the follicle cells stimulates endocytosis by altering Dynamin (Shibire) distribution which is in turn critical for careful calibration of STAT activation and, thus for BC specification. Together our data provide unprecedented molecular insights into how gap junction proteins can regulate cell-type specification. PMID:28114410

  1. Similar and Distinct Properties of MUPP1 and Patj, Two Homologous PDZ Domain-Containing Tight-Junction Proteins ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, Makoto; Hamazaki, Yoko; Kobayashi, Yuka; Itoh, Masahiko; Tsukita, Sachiko; Furuse, Mikio; Tsukita, Shoichiro

    2009-01-01

    MUPP1 and Patj are both composed of an L27 domain and multiple PDZ domains (13 and 10 domains, respectively) and are localized to tight junctions (TJs) in epithelial cells. Although Patj is known to be responsible for the organization of TJs and epithelial polarity, characterization of MUPP1 is lacking. In this study, we found that MUPP1 and Patj share several binding partners, including JAM1, ZO-3, Pals1, Par6, and nectins (cell-cell adhesion molecules at adherens junctions). MUPP1 and Patj exhibited similar subcellular distributions, and the mechanisms with which they localize to TJs also appear to overlap. Despite these similarities, functional studies have revealed that Patj is indispensable for the establishment of TJs and epithelial polarization, whereas MUPP1 is not. Thus, although MUPP1 and Patj share several molecular properties, their functions are entirely different. We present evidence that the signaling mediated by Pals1, which has a higher affinity for Patj than for MUPP1 and is involved in the activation of the Par6-aPKC complex, is of principal importance for the function of Patj in epithelial cells. PMID:19255144

  2. Differential expression of claudin tight junction proteins in the human cortical nephron

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, Adam; Campbell, Sara; Bass, Paul; Mason, Juan; Collins, Jane

    2010-01-01

    Background. In renal tubules, paracellular permeability is tightly controlled to facilitate solute absorption and urinary concentration and is regulated by tight junctions, which incorporate claudin proteins. There is very limited information confirming the localization of these proteins in the human renal cortex. Most data is inferred from mouse, bovine and rabbit studies and differences exist between mouse and other species. Methods. A survey of claudin staining was performed on human kidney cortex embedded in glycolmethacrylate resin to enhance tissue morphology and facilitate the cutting of 2 µm serial sections. Results. Claudin-2, -10 and -11 antibodies labelled renal tubular epithelial cells, correlating with Lotus tetragonolobus and N-cadherin positive proximal tubules. Claudin-3, -10, -11 and -16 antibodies strongly stained a population of tubules that were positive for Tamm Horsfall protein on adjacent sections, confirming expression in the thick ascending limb of the Loop of Henle. Claudin-3, -4 and -8 antibodies reacted with tubules that correlated with the distal nephron markers, E-cadherin, epithelial membrane antigen and Dolichos biflorus and claudin-3, -4, -7 and -8 with the distal tubule marker, calbindin, and the collecting duct marker, aquaporin-2. Claudin-14 was localized in distal convoluted tubules, correlating positively with calbindin but negatively with aquaporin-2, whereas claudin-1 staining was identified in the parietal epithelium of Bowman's capsule, distal convoluted tubule and collecting duct. Cellular and tight junction localization of claudin staining in renal tubules was heterogeneous and is discussed. Conclusions. Complex variation in the expression of human claudins likely determines paracellular permeability in the kidney. Altered claudin expression may influence pathologies involving abnormalities of absorption. PMID:20124215

  3. Effect of High Dietary Tryptophan on Intestinal Morphology and Tight Junction Protein of Weaned Pig

    PubMed Central

    Tossou, Myrlene Carine B.; Bai, Miaomiao; Chen, Shuai; Cai, Yinghua; Duraipandiyan, Veeramuthu; Liu, Hongbin; Adebowale, Tolulope O.; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Long, Lina; Tarique, Hussain; Oso, Abimbola O.; Liu, Gang; Yin, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    Tryptophan (Trp) plays an essential role in pig behavior and growth performances. However, little is known about Trp's effects on tight junction barrier and intestinal health in weaned pigs. In the present study, twenty-four (24) weaned pigs were randomly assigned to one of the three treatments with 8 piglets/treatments. The piglets were fed different amounts of L-tryptophan (L-Trp) as follows: 0.0%, 0.15, and 0.75%, respectively, named zero Trp (ZTS), low Trp (LTS), and high Trp (HTS), respectively. No significant differences were observed in average daily gain (ADG), average daily feed intake (ADFI), and gain: feed (G/F) ratio between the groups. After 21 days of the feeding trial, results showed that dietary Trp significantly increased (P < 0.05) crypt depth and significantly decreased (P < 0.05) villus height to crypt depth ratio (VH/CD) in the jejunum of pig fed HTS. In addition, pig fed HTS had higher (P < 0.05) serum diamine oxidase (DAO) and D-lactate. Furthermore, pig fed HTS significantly decreased mRNA expression of tight junction proteins occludin and ZO-1 but not claudin-1 in the jejunum. The number of intraepithelial lymphocytes and goblet cells were not significantly different (P > 0.05) between the groups. Collectively, these data suggest that dietary Trp supplementation at a certain level (0.75%) may negatively affect the small intestinal structure in weaned pig. PMID:27366740

  4. Effect of FCCP on tight junction permeability and cellular distribution of ZO-1 protein in epithelial (MDCK) cells.

    PubMed

    Li, C X; Poznansky, M J

    1990-12-14

    The effect of the uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation, FCCP (carbonylcyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone), on the tight junction of Madin-Darby canine kidney cells was examined. FCCP induced an abrupt decrease in the transepithelial electrical resistance of the confluent monolayers over a period of 20 s. When FCCP was withdrawn from the incubation medium, the monolayer resistance recovered to close to the original level in less than 2 h. Staining of the tight junction-associated protein ZO-1 showed that the changes in transepithelial electrical resistance were accompanied by a diffusing of the protein away from cell peripheries and a reconcentration to the tight junction areas following resistance recovery. Intracellular pH was decreased by FCCP on a similar time-scale with no obvious changes in ATP levels over this time-course. These data suggest that the uncoupler FCCP has a profound effect on tight junction permeability and cellular distribution of the tight junction protein ZO-1 in the epithelial cells and that it probably acts by breaking down proton gradients and altering intracellular pH.

  5. Ezrin: a regulator of actin microfilaments in cell junctions of the rat testis

    PubMed Central

    Gungor-Ordueri, N Ece; Celik-Ozenci, Ciler; Cheng, C Yan

    2015-01-01

    Ezrin, radixin, moesin and merlin (ERM) proteins are highly homologous actin-binding proteins that share extensive sequence similarity with each other. These proteins tether integral membrane proteins and their cytoplasmic peripheral proteins (e.g., adaptors, nonreceptor protein kinases and phosphatases) to the microfilaments of actin-based cytoskeleton. Thus, these proteins are crucial to confer integrity of the apical membrane domain and its associated junctional complex, namely the tight junction and the adherens junction. Since ectoplasmic specialization (ES) is an F-actin-rich testis-specific anchoring junction-a highly dynamic ultrastructure in the seminiferous epithelium due to continuous transport of germ cells, in particular spermatids, across the epithelium during the epithelial cycle-it is conceivable that ERM proteins are playing an active role in these events. Although these proteins were first reported almost 25 years and have since been extensively studied in multiple epithelia/endothelia, few reports are found in the literature to examine their role in the actin filament bundles at the ES. Studies have shown that ezrin is also a constituent protein of the actin-based tunneling nanotubes (TNT) also known as intercellular bridges, which are transient cytoplasmic tubular ultrastructures that transport signals, molecules and even organelles between adjacent and distant cells in an epithelium to coordinate cell events that occur across an epithelium. Herein, we critically evaluate recent data on ERM in light of recent findings in the field in particular ezrin regarding its role in actin dynamics at the ES in the testis, illustrating additional studies are warranted to examine its physiological significance in spermatogenesis. PMID:25652626

  6. Connexin Type and Fluorescent Protein Fusion Tag Determine Structural Stability of Gap Junction Plaques*

    PubMed Central

    Stout, Randy F.; Snapp, Erik Lee; Spray, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Gap junctions (GJs) are made up of plaques of laterally clustered intercellular channels and the membranes in which the channels are embedded. Arrangement of channels within a plaque determines subcellular distribution of connexin binding partners and sites of intercellular signaling. Here, we report the discovery that some connexin types form plaque structures with strikingly different degrees of fluidity in the arrangement of the GJ channel subcomponents of the GJ plaque. We uncovered this property of GJs by applying fluorescence recovery after photobleaching to GJs formed from connexins fused with fluorescent protein tags. We found that connexin 26 (Cx26) and Cx30 GJs readily diffuse within the plaque structures, whereas Cx43 GJs remain persistently immobile for more than 2 min after bleaching. The cytoplasmic C terminus of Cx43 was required for stability of Cx43 plaque arrangement. We provide evidence that these qualitative differences in GJ arrangement stability reflect endogenous characteristics, with the caveat that the sizes of the GJs examined were necessarily large for these measurements. We also uncovered an unrecognized effect of non-monomerized fluorescent protein on the dynamically arranged GJs and the organization of plaques composed of multiple connexin types. Together, these findings redefine our understanding of the GJ plaque structure and should be considered in future studies using fluorescent protein tags to probe dynamics of highly ordered protein complexes. PMID:26265468

  7. Altered distribution of tight junction proteins after intestinal ischaemia/reperfusion injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiurong; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Chenyang; Liu, Xiaoxiang; Qu, Linlin; Gu, Lili; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2009-01-01

    Tight junction (TJ) disruptions have been demonstrated both in vitro and more recently in vivo in infection. However, the molecular basis for changes of TJ during ischaemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury is poorly understood. In the present study, intestinal damage was induced by I/R in an animal model. As assessed by TUNEL and propidium iodide uptake, we showed that I/R injury induced apoptosis as well as necrosis in rat colon, and the frequency of apoptotic and necrotic cells reached the maximum at 5 hrs of reperfusion. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that claudins 1, 3 and 5 are strongly expressed in the surface epithelial cells of the colon; however, labelling of all three proteins was present diffusely within cells and no longer focused at the lateral cell boundaries after I/R. Using Western blot analysis, we found that distribution of TJ proteins in membrane microdomains of TJ was markedly affected in I/R injury rats. Occludin, ZO-1, claudin-1 and claudin-3 were completely displaced from TX-100 insoluble fractions to TX-100 soluble fractions, and claudin-5 was partly displaced. The distribution of lipid raft marker protein caveolin-1 was also changed after I/R. I/R injury results in the disruption of TJs, which characterized by relocalization of the claudins 1, 3 and 5 and an increase in intestinal permeability using molecular tracer measurement. I/R injury altered distribution of TJ proteins in vivo that was associated with functional TJ deficiencies. PMID:19929946

  8. Interleukin-34 restores blood-brain barrier integrity by upregulating tight junction proteins in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Shijie; Sonobe, Yoshifumi; Kawanokuchi, Jun; Horiuchi, Hiroshi; Cheng, Yi; Wang, Yue; Mizuno, Tetsuya; Takeuchi, Hideyuki; Suzumura, Akio

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-34 (IL-34) is a newly discovered cytokine as an additional ligand for colony stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF1R), and its functions are expected to overlap with colony stimulating factor-1/macrophage-colony stimulating factor. We have previously shown that the IL-34 is primarily produced by neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) and induces proliferation and neuroprotective properties of microglia which express CSF1R. However, the functions of IL-34 in the CNS are still elucidative. Here we show that CNS capillary endothelial cells also express CSF1R. IL-34 protected blood-brain barrier integrity by restored expression levels of tight junction proteins, which were downregulated by pro-inflammatory cytokines. The novel function of IL-34 on the blood-brain barrier may give us a clue for new therapeutic strategies in neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases such as multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease.

  9. Interleukin-34 Restores Blood–Brain Barrier Integrity by Upregulating Tight Junction Proteins in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Shijie; Sonobe, Yoshifumi; Kawanokuchi, Jun; Horiuchi, Hiroshi; Cheng, Yi; Wang, Yue; Mizuno, Tetsuya; Takeuchi, Hideyuki; Suzumura, Akio

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-34 (IL-34) is a newly discovered cytokine as an additional ligand for colony stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF1R), and its functions are expected to overlap with colony stimulating factor-1/macrophage-colony stimulating factor. We have previously shown that the IL-34 is primarily produced by neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) and induces proliferation and neuroprotective properties of microglia which express CSF1R. However, the functions of IL-34 in the CNS are still elucidative. Here we show that CNS capillary endothelial cells also express CSF1R. IL-34 protected blood–brain barrier integrity by restored expression levels of tight junction proteins, which were downregulated by pro-inflammatory cytokines. The novel function of IL-34 on the blood–brain barrier may give us a clue for new therapeutic strategies in neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases such as multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25535736

  10. PPARα and PPARγ attenuate HIV-induced dysregulation of tight junction proteins by modulations of matrix metalloproteinase and proteasome activities

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wen; Eum, Sung Yong; András, Ibolya E; Hennig, Bernhard; Toborek, Michal

    2009-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) plays an important role in HIV trafficking into the brain and the development of the central nervous system complications in HIV infection. Tight junctions are the main structural and functional elements that regulate the BBB integrity. Exposure of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3 cell line) to HIV-infected monocytes resulted in decreased expression of tight junction proteins, such as junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM)-A, occludin, and zonula occludens (ZO)-1. Control experiments involved exposure to uninfected monocytes. Alterations of tight junction protein expression were associated with increased endothelial permeability and elevated transendothelial migration of HIV-infected monocytes across an in vitro model of the BBB. Notably, overexpression of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)α or PPARγ attenuated HIV-mediated dysregulation of tight junction proteins. With the use of exogenous PPARγ agonists and silencing of PPARα or PPARγ, these protective effects were connected to down-regulation of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) and proteasome activities. Indeed, the HIV-induced decrease in the expression of JAM-A and occludin was restored by inhibition of MMP activity. Moreover, both MMP and proteasome inhibitors attenuated HIV-mediated altered expression of ZO-1. The present data indicate that down-regulation of MMP and proteasome activities constitutes a novel mechanism of PPAR-induced protections against HIV-induced disruption of brain endothelial cells.—Huang, W., Eum, S. Y., András, I. E., Hennig, B., Toborek, M. PPARα and PPARγ attenuate HIV-induced dysregulation of tight junction proteins by modulations of matrix metalloproteinase and proteasome activities. PMID:19141539

  11. Ischemia-reperfusion impairs blood-brain barrier function and alters tight junction protein expression in the ovine fetus.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Threlkeld, S W; Cummings, E E; Juan, I; Makeyev, O; Besio, W G; Gaitanis, J; Banks, W A; Sadowska, G B; Stonestreet, B S

    2012-12-13

    The blood-brain barrier is a restrictive interface between the brain parenchyma and the intravascular compartment. Tight junctions contribute to the integrity of the blood-brain barrier. Hypoxic-ischemic damage to the blood-brain barrier could be an important component of fetal brain injury. We hypothesized that increases in blood-brain barrier permeability after ischemia depend upon the duration of reperfusion and that decreases in tight junction proteins are associated with the ischemia-related impairment in blood-brain barrier function in the fetus. Blood-brain barrier function was quantified with the blood-to-brain transfer constant (K(i)) and tight junction proteins by Western immunoblot in fetal sheep at 127 days of gestation without ischemia, and 4, 24, or 48 h after ischemia. The largest increase in K(i) (P<0.05) was 4 h after ischemia. Occludin and claudin-5 expressions decreased at 4 h, but returned toward control levels 24 and 48 h after ischemia. Zonula occludens-1 and -2 decreased after ischemia. Inverse correlations between K(i) and tight junction proteins suggest that the decreases in tight junction proteins contribute to impaired blood-brain barrier function after ischemia. We conclude that impaired blood-brain barrier function is an important component of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in the fetus, and that increases in quantitatively measured barrier permeability (K(i)) change as a function of the duration of reperfusion after ischemia. The largest increase in permeability occurs 4 h after ischemia and blood-brain barrier function improves early after injury because the blood-brain barrier is less permeable 24 and 48 than 4 h after ischemia. Changes in the tight junction molecular composition are associated with increases in blood-brain barrier permeability after ischemia.

  12. Connexin35/36 gap junction proteins are expressed in photoreceptors of the tiger salamander retina.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Wu, Samuel M

    2004-02-23

    Photoreceptors in the vertebrate retina are electrically coupled with one another. Such coupling plays important roles in visual information processing. Physiological properties of rod-rod and rod-cone coupling have been best studied in the salamander retina, yet the cellular and molecular basis of these electrical synapses has not been established. Recently, connexin35/36 (Cx35/36) gap junction proteins were found to be highly expressed in brain and retina, suggesting that it may mediate photoreceptor coupling. To test this idea, we examined the cellular distribution of Cx35/36 in the salamander retina. Western blot analysis showed the expression of Cx35/36 proteins, and confocal microscopy revealed characteristic punctate Cx35/36 immunoreactivity in both synaptic layers. In addition, Cx35/36-positive plaques were detected in the outer nuclear layer (ONL) between neighboring rods, and these plaques outlined the mosaic of the rod network at a level distal to the external limiting membrane. Moreover, although Cx35/36 plaques were detected between some cones and their adjacent rods, the number and size of these plaques was smaller, and their staining intensity was diminished compared with the plaques between adjacent rods. Furthermore, Lucifer yellow injection together with confocal microscopy revealed that Cx35/36-puncta were colocalized with finlike structures of rod cell membrane, with the ultrastructure of gap junctions between paired rod fins having been found by electron microscopy. Therefore, our findings demonstrate that Cx35/36 expression in photoreceptors is primarily located between rods and to a lesser extent between rods and cones, suggesting that Cx35/36 may participate in electrical coupling between rods and between rods and cones in the salamander retina.

  13. Probiotics modify tight-junction proteins in an animal model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Briskey, David; Heritage, Mandy; Jaskowski, Lesley-Anne; Peake, Jonathan; Gobe, Glenda; Subramaniam, V. Nathan; Crawford, Darrell; Campbell, Catherine; Vitetta, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Background: We have investigated the effects of a multispecies probiotic preparation containing a combination of probiotic bacterial genera that included Bifidobacteria, Lactobacilli and a Streptococcus in a mouse model of high-fat diet or obesity-induced liver steatosis. Methods: Three groups of C57B1/6J mice were fed either a standard chow or a high-fat diet for 20 weeks, while a third group was fed a high-fat diet for 10 weeks and then concomitantly administered probiotics for a further 10 weeks. Serum, liver and large bowel samples were collected for analysis. Results: The expression of the tight-junction proteins ZO-1 and ZO-2 was reduced (p < 0.05) in high-fat diet-fed mice compared to chow-fed mice. Probiotic supplementation helped to maintain tight ZO-1 and ZO-2 expression compared with the high-fat diet group (p < 0.05), but did not restore ZO-1 or ZO-2 expression compared with chow-fed mice. Mice fed a high-fat diet ± probiotics had significant steatosis development compared with chow-fed mice (p < 0.05); steatosis was less severe in the probiotics group compared with the high-fat diet group. Hepatic triglyceride concentration was higher in mice fed a high-fat diet ± probiotics compared with the chow group (p < 0.05), and was lower in the probiotics group compared with the high-fat diet group (p < 0.05). Compared with chow-fed mice, serum glucose, cholesterol concentration and the activity of alanine transaminase were higher (p < 0.05), whereas serum triglyceride concentration was lower (p < 0.05) in mice fed a high-fat diet ± probiotics. Conclusions: Supplementation with a multispecies probiotic formulation helped to maintain tight-junction proteins ZO-1 and ZO-2, and reduced hepatic triglyceride concentration compared with a high-fat diet alone. PMID:27366215

  14. Maternal Treatment with Glucocorticoids Modulates Gap Junction Protein Expression in the Ovine Fetal Brain

    PubMed Central

    Sadowska, Grazyna B.; Stonestreet, Barbara S.

    2014-01-01

    Gap junctions facilitate intercellular communication and are important in brain development. Connexins (Cx) comprise a transmembrane protein family that forms gap junctions. Cx-32 is expressed in oligodendrocytes and neurons, Cx-36 in neurons, and Cx-43 in astrocytes. Although single antenatal steroid courses are recommended for fetal lung maturation, multiple courses can be given to women at recurrent risk for premature delivery. We examined the effects of single and multiple glucocorticoid courses on Cx-32, Cx-36, and Cx-43 protein expression in fetal cerebral cortex, cerebellum, and spinal cord, and differences in connexin expression among brain regions under basal conditions. In the single course groups, the ewes received dexamethasone (6 mg) or placebo as four intramuscular injections every 12 h over 48 h. In the multiple course groups, the ewes received the same treatment, once a week for five weeks starting at 76–78 days of gestation. Connexins were measured by Western immunoblot on brain samples from 105–108 day gestation fetuses. A single dexamethasone course was associated with increases (P<0.05) in cerebral cortical and spinal cord Cx-36 and Cx-43 and multiple courses with increases in cerebellar and spinal cord Cx-36, and cerebral cortical and cerebellar Cx-43. Cx-32 did not change. Cx-32 was higher in cerebellum than cerebral cortex and spinal cord, Cx-36 higher in spinal cord than cerebellum, and Cx-43 higher in cerebellum and spinal cord than cerebral cortex during basal conditions. In conclusion, maternal glucocorticoid therapy increases specific connexins, responses to different maternal courses vary among connexins and brain regions, and connexin expression differs among brain regions under basal conditions. Maternal treatment with glucocorticoids differentially modulates connexins in the fetal brain. PMID:24929069

  15. Expression of a connexin 43/beta-galactosidase fusion protein inhibits gap junctional communication in NIH3T3 cells

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Gap junctions contain membrane channels that mediate the cell-to-cell movement of ions, metabolites and cell signaling molecules. As gap junctions are comprised of a hexameric array of connexin polypeptides, the expression of a mutant connexin polypeptide may exert a dominant negative effect on gap junctional communication. To examine this possibility, we constructed a connexin 43 (Cx43)/beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) expression vector in which the bacterial beta-gal protein is fused in frame to the carboxy terminus of Cx43. This vector was transfected into NIH3T3 cells, a cell line which is well coupled via gap junctions and expresses high levels of Cx43. Transfectant clones were shown to express the fusion protein by northern and western analysis. X-Gal staining further revealed that all of the fusion protein containing cells also expressed beta-gal enzymatic activity. Double immunostaining with a beta-gal and Cx43 antibody demonstrated that the fusion protein is immunolocalized to the perinuclear region of the cytoplasm and also as punctate spots at regions of cell-cell contact. This pattern is similar to that of Cx43 in the parental 3T3 cells, except that in the fusion protein expressing cells, Cx43 expression was reduced at regions of cell-cell contact. Examination of gap junctional communication (GJC) with dye injection studies further showed that dye coupling was inhibited in the fusion protein expressing cells, with the largest reduction in coupling found in a clone exhibiting little Cx43 localization at regions of cell-cell contact. When the fusion protein expression vector was transfected into the communication poor C6 cell line, abundant fusion protein expression was observed, but unlike the transfected NIH3T3 cells, no fusion protein was detected at the cell surface. Nevertheless, dye coupling was inhibited in these C6 cells. Based on these observations, we propose that the fusion protein may inhibit GJC by sequestering the Cx43 protein intracellularly

  16. Simvastatin Sodium Salt and Fluvastatin Interact with Human Gap Junction Gamma-3 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Andrew; Casey-Green, Katherine; Probert, Fay; Withall, David; Mitchell, Daniel A.; Dilly, Suzanne J.; James, Sean; Dimitri, Wade; Ladwa, Sweta R.; Taylor, Paul C.; Singer, Donald R. J.

    2016-01-01

    Finding pleiomorphic targets for drugs allows new indications or warnings for treatment to be identified. As test of concept, we applied a new chemical genomics approach to uncover additional targets for the widely prescribed lipid-lowering pro-drug simvastatin. We used mRNA extracted from internal mammary artery from patients undergoing coronary artery surgery to prepare a viral cardiovascular protein library, using T7 bacteriophage. We then studied interactions of clones of the bacteriophage, each expressing a different cardiovascular polypeptide, with surface-bound simvastatin in 96-well plates. To maximise likelihood of identifying meaningful interactions between simvastatin and vascular peptides, we used a validated photo-immobilisation method to apply a series of different chemical linkers to bind simvastatin so as to present multiple orientations of its constituent components to potential targets. Three rounds of biopanning identified consistent interaction with the clone expressing part of the gene GJC3, which maps to Homo sapiens chromosome 7, and codes for gap junction gamma-3 protein, also known as connexin 30.2/31.3 (mouse connexin Cx29). Further analysis indicated the binding site to be for the N-terminal domain putatively ‘regulating’ connexin hemichannel and gap junction pores. Using immunohistochemistry we found connexin 30.2/31.3 to be present in samples of artery similar to those used to prepare the bacteriophage library. Surface plasmon resonance revealed that a 25 amino acid synthetic peptide representing the discovered N-terminus did not interact with simvastatin lactone, but did bind to the hydrolysed HMG CoA inhibitor, simvastatin acid. This interaction was also seen for fluvastatin. The gap junction blockers carbenoxolone and flufenamic acid also interacted with the same peptide providing insight into potential site of binding. These findings raise key questions about the functional significance of GJC3 transcripts in the vasculature and

  17. Reinforcing endothelial junctions prevents microvessel permeability increase and tumor cell adhesion in microvessels in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Bingmei M.; Yang, Jinlin; Cai, Bin; Fan, Jie; Zhang, Lin; Zeng, Min

    2015-10-01

    Tumor cell adhesion to the microvessel wall is a critical step during tumor metastasis. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a secretion of tumor cells, can increase microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion in the microvessel. To test the hypothesis that inhibiting permeability increase can reduce tumor cell adhesion, we used in vivo fluorescence microscopy to measure both microvessel permeability and adhesion rates of human mammary carcinoma MDA-MB-231 cells in post-capillary venules of rat mesentery under the treatment of VEGF and a cAMP analog, 8-bromo-cAMP, which can decrease microvessel permeability. By immunostaining adherens junction proteins between endothelial cells forming the microvessel wall, we further investigated the structural mechanism by which cAMP abolishes VEGF-induced increase in microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion. Our results demonstrate that 1) Pretreatment of microvessels with cAMP can abolish VEGF-enhanced microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion; 2) Tumor cells prefer to adhere to the endothelial cell junctions instead of cell bodies; 3) VEGF increases microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion by compromising endothelial junctions while cAMP abolishes these effects of VEGF by reinforcing the junctions. These results suggest that strengthening the microvessel wall integrity can be a potential approach to inhibiting hematogenous tumor metastasis.

  18. Reinforcing endothelial junctions prevents microvessel permeability increase and tumor cell adhesion in microvessels in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Bingmei M.; Yang, Jinlin; Cai, Bin; Fan, Jie; Zhang, Lin; Zeng, Min

    2015-01-01

    Tumor cell adhesion to the microvessel wall is a critical step during tumor metastasis. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a secretion of tumor cells, can increase microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion in the microvessel. To test the hypothesis that inhibiting permeability increase can reduce tumor cell adhesion, we used in vivo fluorescence microscopy to measure both microvessel permeability and adhesion rates of human mammary carcinoma MDA-MB-231 cells in post-capillary venules of rat mesentery under the treatment of VEGF and a cAMP analog, 8-bromo-cAMP, which can decrease microvessel permeability. By immunostaining adherens junction proteins between endothelial cells forming the microvessel wall, we further investigated the structural mechanism by which cAMP abolishes VEGF-induced increase in microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion. Our results demonstrate that 1) Pretreatment of microvessels with cAMP can abolish VEGF-enhanced microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion; 2) Tumor cells prefer to adhere to the endothelial cell junctions instead of cell bodies; 3) VEGF increases microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion by compromising endothelial junctions while cAMP abolishes these effects of VEGF by reinforcing the junctions. These results suggest that strengthening the microvessel wall integrity can be a potential approach to inhibiting hematogenous tumor metastasis. PMID:26507779

  19. TRAF4 Is a Novel Phosphoinositide-Binding Protein Modulating Tight Junctions and Favoring Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Rousseau, Adrien; McEwen, Alastair G.; Poussin-Courmontagne, Pierre; Rognan, Didier; Nominé, Yves; Rio, Marie-Christine; Tomasetto, Catherine; Alpy, Fabien

    2013-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-associated factor 4 (TRAF4) is frequently overexpressed in carcinomas, suggesting a specific role in cancer. Although TRAF4 protein is predominantly found at tight junctions (TJs) in normal mammary epithelial cells (MECs), it accumulates in the cytoplasm of malignant MECs. How TRAF4 is recruited and functions at TJs is unclear. Here we show that TRAF4 possesses a novel phosphoinositide (PIP)-binding domain crucial for its recruitment to TJs. Of interest, this property is shared by the other members of the TRAF protein family. Indeed, the TRAF domain of all TRAF proteins (TRAF1 to TRAF6) is a bona fide PIP-binding domain. Molecular and structural analyses revealed that the TRAF domain of TRAF4 exists as a trimer that binds up to three lipids using basic residues exposed at its surface. Cellular studies indicated that TRAF4 acts as a negative regulator of TJ and increases cell migration. These functions are dependent from its ability to interact with PIPs. Our results suggest that TRAF4 overexpression might contribute to breast cancer progression by destabilizing TJs and favoring cell migration. PMID:24311986

  20. Effects of fumaric acid esters on blood-brain barrier tight junction proteins.

    PubMed

    Bénardais, Karelle; Pul, Refik; Singh, Vikramjeet; Skripuletz, Thomas; Lee, De-Hyung; Linker, Ralf A; Gudi, Viktoria; Stangel, Martin

    2013-10-25

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is composed of a network of tight junctions (TJ) which interconnect cerebral endothelial cells (EC). Alterations in the TJ proteins are common in inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) like multiple sclerosis (MS). Modulation of the BBB could thus represent a therapeutic mechanism. One pathway to modulate BBB integrity could be the induction of nuclear-factor (erythroid derived 2) related factor-2 (Nrf2) mediated oxidative stress responses which are targeted by fumaric acid esters (FAE). Here we analyze effects of FAE on the expression of TJ proteins in the human cerebral endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3 and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). We show that dimethylfumarate (DMF) and its primary metabolite monomethylfumarate (MMF) induce the expression of the Nrf2/NQO1 pathway in endothelial cells. Neither MMF nor DMF had a consistent modulatory effect on the expression of TJ molecules in hCMEC/D3 cells. Tumor necrosis factor (TNFα)-induced downregulation of TJ proteins was at least partially reversed by treatment with FAE. However, DMF had no effect on claudin-5 expression in EAE, despite its effect on the clinical score and infiltration of immune cells. These data suggest that the modulation of the BBB is not a major mechanism of action of FAE in inflammatory demyelinating diseases of the CNS.

  1. Eya1 protein phosphatase regulates tight junction formation in lung distal epithelium.

    PubMed

    El-Hashash, Ahmed H K; Turcatel, Gianluca; Varma, Saaket; Berika, Mohamed; Al Alam, Denise; Warburton, David

    2012-09-01

    Little is known about the regulatory mechanisms underlying lung epithelial tight junction (TJ) assembly, which is inextricably linked to the preservation of epithelial polarity, and is highly coordinated by proteins that regulate epithelial cell polarity, such as aPKCζ. We recently reported that Eya1 phosphatase functions through aPKCζ-Notch1 signaling to control cell polarity in the lung epithelium. Here, we have extended these observations to TJ formation to demonstrate that Eya1 is crucial for the maintenance of TJ protein assembly in the lung epithelium, probably by controlling aPKCζ phosphorylation levels, aPKCζ-mediated TJ protein phosphorylation and Notch1-Cdc42 activity. Thus, TJs are disassembled after interfering with Eya1 function in vivo or during calcium-induced TJ assembly in vitro. These effects are reversed by reintroduction of wild-type Eya1 or partially inhibiting aPKCζ in Eya1siRNA cells. Moreover, genetic activation of Notch1 rescues Eya1(-/-) lung epithelial TJ defects. These findings uncover novel functions for the Eya1-aPKCζ-Notch1-Cdc42 pathway as a crucial regulatory mechanism of TJ assembly and polarity of the lung epithelium, providing a conceptual framework for future mechanistic and translational studies in this area.

  2. Eps homology domain endosomal transport proteins differentially localize to the neuromuscular junction

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Recycling of endosomes is important for trafficking and maintenance of proteins at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). We have previously shown high expression of the endocytic recycling regulator Eps15 homology domain-containing (EHD)1 proteinin the Torpedo californica electric organ, a model tissue for investigating a cholinergic synapse. In this study, we investigated the localization of EHD1 and its paralogs EHD2, EHD3, and EHD4 in mouse skeletal muscle, and assessed the morphological changes in EHD1−/− NMJs. Methods Localization of the candidate NMJ protein EHD1 was assessed by confocal microscopy analysis of whole-mount mouse skeletal muscle fibers after direct gene transfer and immunolabeling. The potential function of EHD1 was assessed by specific force measurement and α-bungarotoxin-based endplate morphology mapping in EHD1−/− mouse skeletal muscle. Results Endogenous EHD1 localized to primary synaptic clefts of murine NMJ, and this localization was confirmed by expression of recombinant green fluorescent protein labeled-EHD1 in murine skeletal muscle in vivo. EHD1−/− mouse skeletal muscle had normal histology and NMJ morphology, and normal specific force generation during muscle contraction. The EHD 1–4 proteins showed differential localization in skeletal muscle: EHD2 to muscle vasculature, EHD3 to perisynaptic regions, and EHD4 to perinuclear regions and to primary synaptic clefts, but at lower levels than EHD1. Additionally, specific antibodies raised against mammalian EHD1-4 recognized proteins of the expected mass in the T. californica electric organ. Finally, we found that EHD4 expression was more abundant in EHD1−/− mouse skeletal muscle than in wild-type skeletal muscle. Conclusion EHD1 and EHD4 localize to the primary synaptic clefts of the NMJ. Lack of obvious defects in NMJ structure and muscle function in EHD1−/− muscle may be due to functional compensation by other EHD paralogs. PMID:22974368

  3. L. plantarum prevents Enteroinvasive Escherichia coli-induced tight junction proteins changes in intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background It is increasingly recognized that Lactobacillus plantarum (L. plantarum) has the ability to protect against Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC)-induced damage of the epithelial monolayer barrier function by preventing changes in host cell morphology, attaching/effacing (A/E) lesion formation, monolayer resistance, and macromolecular permeability. However, the cellular mechanism involved in this protective effect still remained to be clarified. Methods This study was to investigate the effect of L. plantarum on the changes of Caco-2 cells responding to Enteroinvasive Escherichia coli (EIEC), the permeability of cell monolayer and the transmissivity of dextran, and the distribution and expression of the tight junction (TJ) proteins, such as Claudin-1, Occludin, JAM-1 and ZO-1 were examined when infected with EIEC or adhesived of L. plantarum after infection by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), immunohistochemistry and Western blotting, the cytoskeleton protein F-actin were observed with FITC-phalloidin. Results This study demonstrated that the transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) step down and dextran integrated intensity (DII) step up with time after infected with EIEC, but after treating with L. plantarum, the changes of TER and DII were improved as compared with EIEC group. L. plantarum prevented the damage of expression and rearrangement of Claudin-1, Occludin, JAM-1 and ZO-1 proteins induced by EIEC, and could ameliorate the injury of cytoskeleton protein F-actin infected with EIEC. Conclusion L. plantarum exerted a protective effect against the damage to integrity of Caco-2 monolayer cells and the structure and distribution of TJ proteins by EIEC infection. PMID:19331693

  4. Ouabain induces endocytosis and degradation of tight junction proteins through ERK1/2-dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Rincon-Heredia, Ruth; Flores-Benitez, David; Flores-Maldonado, Catalina; Bonilla-Delgado, José; García-Hernández, Vicky; Verdejo-Torres, Odette; Castillo, Aida M; Larré, Isabel; Poot-Hernández, Augusto C; Franco, Martha; Gariglio, Patricio; Reyes, José L; Contreras, Rubén G

    2014-01-01

    In addition to being a very well-known ion pump, Na(+), K(+)-ATPase is a cell-cell adhesion molecule and the receptor of digitalis, which transduces regulatory signals for cell adhesion, growth, apoptosis, motility and differentiation. Prolonged ouabain (OUA) blockage of activity of Na(+), K(+)-ATPase leads to cell detachment from one another and from substrates. Here, we investigated the cellular mechanisms involved in tight junction (TJ) disassembly upon exposure to toxic levels of OUA (≥300 nM) in epithelial renal canine cells (MDCK). OUA induces a progressive decrease in the transepithelial electrical resistance (TER); inhibitors of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, PD153035), cSrc (SU6656 and PP2) and ERK1/2 kinases (PD98059) delay this decrease. We have determined that the TER decrease depends upon internalization and degradation of the TJs proteins claudin (CLDN) 2, CLDN-4, occludin (OCLN) and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1). OUA-induced degradation of proteins is either sensitive (CLDN-4, OCLN and ZO-1) or insensitive (CLDN-2) to ERK1/2 inhibition. In agreement with the protein degradation findings, OUA decreases the cellular content of ZO-1 and CLDN-2 mRNAs but surprisingly, increases the mRNA of CLDN-4 and OCLN. Changes in the mRNA levels are sensitive (CLDN-4, OCLN and ZO-1) or insensitive (CLDN-2) to ERK1/2 inhibition as well. Thus, toxic levels of OUA activate the EGFR-cSrc-ERK1/2 pathway to induce endocytosis, internalization and degradation of TJ proteins. We also observed decreases in the levels of CLDN-2 protein and mRNA, which were independent of the EGFR-cSrc-ERK1/2 pathway.

  5. AMP-18 protects barrier function of colonic epithelial cells: role of tight junction proteins

    PubMed Central

    Walsh-Reitz, Margaret M.; Huang, Erick F.; Musch, Mark W.; Chang, Eugene B.; Martin, Terence E.; Kartha, Sreedharan; Toback, F. Gary

    2005-01-01

    AMP-18, a novel gastric antrum mucosal protein, and a synthetic peptide of amino acids 77-97, have mitogenic and motogenic properties for epithelial cells. The possibility that AMP-18 is also protective was evaluated in the colonic mucosa of mice and monolayer cultures of human colonic epithelial Caco2/bbe (C2) cells. Administration of AMP peptide to mice with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colonic injury delayed the onset of bloody diarrhea, and reduced weight loss. Treatment of C2 cells with AMP peptide protected monolayers against decreases in transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) induced by the oxidant monochloramine, indomethacin, or DSS. A molecular mechanism for these barrier-protective effects was sought by asking if AMP peptide acted on specific tight junction (TJ) proteins. Immunoblots of detergent-insoluble fractions of C2 cells treated with AMP peptide exhibited increased accumulation of specific TJ proteins. Occludin immunoreactivity was also increased in detergent-insoluble fractions obtained from colonic mucosal cells of mice injected with AMP peptide. Laser scanning confocal microscopy (CF) supported the capacity of AMP peptide to enhance accumulation of occludin and ZO-1 in TJ domains of C2 cell monolayers, and together with immunoblot analysis showed that the peptide protected against loss of these TJ proteins following oxidant injury. AMP peptide also protected against a fall in TER during disruption of actin filaments by cytochalasin D, and stabilized perijunctional actin during oxidant injury when assessed by CF. These findings suggest that AMP-18 could protect the intestinal mucosal barrier by acting on specific TJ proteins and stabilizing perijunctional actin. PMID:15961882

  6. Proteins in load-bearing junctions: the histidine-rich metal-binding protein of mussel byssus.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hua; Waite, J Herbert

    2006-11-28

    Building complex load-bearing scaffolds depends on effective ways of joining functionally different biomacromolecules. The junction between collagen fibers and foamlike adhesive plaques in mussel byssus is robust despite the strikingly dissimilar connected structures. mcfp-4, the matrix protein from this junction, and its presecreted form from the foot tissue of Mytilus californianus were isolated and characterized. mcfp-4 has a mass of approximately 93 kDa as determined by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Its composition is dominated by histidine (22 mol %), but levels of lysine, arginine, and aspartate are also significant. A small amount of 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-l-alanine (2 mol %) can be detected by amino acid analysis and redox cycling assays. The cDNA-deduced sequence of mcfp-4 reveals multiple variants with highly repetitive internal structures, including approximately 36 tandemly repeated His-rich decapeptides (e.g., HVHTHRVLHK) in the N-terminal half and 16 somewhat more degenerate aspartate-rich undecapeptides (e.g., DDHVNDIAQTA) in the C-terminal half. Incubation of a synthetic peptide based on the His-rich decapeptide with Fe3+, Co2+, Ni2+, Zn2+, and Cu2+ indicates that only Cu is strongly bound. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry of the peptide modified with diethyl pyrocarbonate before and after Cu binding suggests that histidine residues dominate Cu binding. In contrast, the aspartate-rich undecapeptides preferentially bind Ca2+. mcfp-4 is strategically positioned to function as a macromolecular bifunctional linker by using metal ions to couple its own His-rich domains to the His-rich termini of the preCOLs. Ca2+ may mediate coupling of the C-terminus to other calcium-binding plaque proteins.

  7. Reproductive age-related changes in the blood brain barrier: Expression of IgG and tight junction proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bake, Shameena; Friedman, Jonathan A; Sohrabji, Farida

    2009-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that there is significantly greater transfer of intravenously-injected Evan’s blue dye into the forebrain of acyclic (reproductive senescent) females compared to young adult females, indicating that blood brain barrier permeability is compromised in the reproductive senescent forebrain. The present study examined brain IgG expression and microvessel tight junction proteins to assess ovarian age-related changes in microvascular permeability, and further compared young and senescent females with age-matched males to distinguish changes attributable to age and reproductive senescence. Blood brain barrier breakdown are often associated with increased extravasation of plasma proteins and high levels of immunoglobulin G (IgG) in brain. In the present study, IgG expression was dramatically increased in the hippocampus and thalamus, but not the hypothalamus of reproductive senescent females compared to young adult females. In males, IgG expression was increased in all these regions in middle aged animals (aged-matched to senescent females) as compared to young males (age-matched to the young adult females). Furthermore, the proportion of hippocampal microvessels with perivascular IgG immunoreactivity was significantly greater in reproductive senescent females as compared to young adult females, while middle aged males and young adult males did not differ. The tight junctions between adjacent microvascular endothelial cells regulated by transmembrane proteins such as claudin-5 and occludin play a critical role in maintaining the blood brain barrier integrity. Increased hippocampal IgG expression in senescent females was paralleled by poor junctional localization of the tight junction protein claudin-5 in hippocampal microvessels. However, there was no difference in hippocampal claudin-5 localization between young adult and middle aged males, indicating that dysregulation of this junctional protein was associated with ovarian aging. Parallel

  8. Protein Kinase A Mediates Regulation of Gap Junctions Containing Connexin35 Through a Complex Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Xiaosen; Winbow, Virginia M.; Patel, Leena S.; Burr, Gary S.; Mitchell, Cheryl K.; O’Brien, John

    2008-01-01

    Connexin 35 (Cx35) is a major component of electrical synapses in the central nervous system. Many gap junctions containing Cx35 are regulated by dopamine receptor pathways that involve protein kinase A (PKA). To study the mechanism of PKA regulation, we analyzed direct phosphorylation of Cx35 by PKA in vitro, and studied the regulation of Neurobiotin tracer coupling in HeLa cells expressing Cx35 or Cx35 mutants that lack phosphorylation sites. In Cx35-transfected cells, application of the PKA activator Sp-8-cpt-cAMPS caused a significant decline in coupling, while a PKA inhibitor, Rp-8-cpt-cAMPS, significantly increased tracer coupling. In vitro phosphorylation and mutagenic analysis showed that PKA phosphorylates Cx35 directly at two major sites, Ser110 in the intracellular loop and Ser276 in the carboxyl terminus. In addition, a minor phosphorylation site in the C-terminus was identified by truncation of the last 7 amino acids at Ser298. The mutations Ser110Ala or Ser276Ala significantly reduced regulation of coupling by the PKA activator, while a combination of the two eliminated regulation. Truncation at Ser298 reversed the regulation such that the PKA activator significantly increased and the PKA inhibitor significantly decreased coupling. The activation was eliminated in the S110A,S276A,S298ter triple mutant. We conclude that PKA regulates Cx35 coupling in a complex manner that requires both major phosphorylation sites. Furthermore, the tip of the C-terminus acts as a “switch” that determines whether phosphorylation will inhibit or enhance coupling. Reliance on the combined states of three sites provides fine control over the degree of coupling through Cx35 gap junctions. PMID:15857663

  9. THE WERNER AND BLOOM SYNDROME PROTEINS HELP RESOLVE REPLICATION BLOCKAGE BY CONVERTING (REGRESSED) HOLLIDAY JUNCTIONS TO FUNCTIONAL REPLICATION FORKS

    PubMed Central

    Machwe, Amrita; Karale, Rajashree; Xu, Xioahua; Liu, Yilun; Orren, David K.

    2011-01-01

    Cells cope with blockage of replication fork progression in a manner so that DNA synthesis can be completed and genomic instability minimized. Models for resolution of blocked replication involve fork regression to form Holliday junction structures. The human RecQ helicases WRN and BLM (deficient in Werner and Bloom syndromes, respectively) are critical for maintaining genomic stability and postulated to function in accurate resolution of replication blockage. Consistent with this notion, WRN and BLM localize to sites of blocked replication after certain DNA damaging treatments and exhibit enhanced activity on replication and recombination intermediates. Here we examined the actions of WRN and BLM on a special Holliday junction substrate reflective of a regressed replication fork. Our results demonstrate that, in reactions requiring ATP hydrolysis, both WRN and BLM convert this Holliday junction substrate primarily to a four-stranded replication fork structure, suggesting they target the Holliday junction to initiate branch migration. In agreement, the Holliday junction binding protein RuvA inhibits the WRN- and BLM-mediated conversion reactions. Importantly, this conversion product is suitable for replication with its leading daughter strand readily extended by DNA polymerases. Furthermore, binding to and conversion of this Holliday junction is optimal in low MgCl2, suggesting that WRN and BLM preferentially act on the square planar (open) conformation of Holliday junctions. Our findings suggest that, subsequent to fork regression events, WRN and/or BLM could re-establish functional replication forks to help overcome fork blockage. Such a function is highly consistent with phenotypes associated with WRN- and BLM-deficient cells. PMID:21736299

  10. Arp2/3 promotes junction formation and maintenance in the Caenorhabditis elegans intestine by regulating membrane association of apical proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bernadskaya, Yelena Y.; Patel, Falshruti B.; Hsu, Hsiao-Ting; Soto, Martha C.

    2011-01-01

    It has been proposed that Arp2/3, which promotes nucleation of branched actin, is needed for epithelial junction initiation but is less important as junctions mature. We focus here on how Arp2/3 contributes to the Caenorhabditis elegans intestinal epithelium and find important roles for Arp2/3 in the maturation and maintenance of junctions in embryos and adults. Electron microscope studies show that embryos depleted of Arp2/3 form apical actin-rich microvilli and electron-dense apical junctions. However, whereas apical/basal polarity initiates, apical maturation is defective, including decreased apical F-actin enrichment, aberrant lumen morphology, and reduced accumulation of some apical junctional proteins, including DLG-1. Depletion of Arp2/3 in adult animals leads to similar intestinal defects. The DLG-1/AJM-1 apical junction proteins, and the ezrin–radixin–moesin homologue ERM-1, a protein that connects F-actin to membranes, are required along with Arp2/3 for apical F-actin enrichment in embryos, whereas cadherin junction proteins are not. Arp2/3 affects the subcellular distribution of DLG-1 and ERM-1. Loss of Arp2/3 shifts both ERM-1 and DLG-1 from pellet fractions to supernatant fractions, suggesting a role for Arp2/3 in the distribution of membrane-associated proteins. Thus, Arp2/3 is required as junctions mature to maintain apical proteins associated with the correct membranes. PMID:21697505

  11. Effect of caveolin-1 on the expression of tight junction-associated proteins in rat glioma-derived microvascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yao; Liu, Li-Bo; Ma, Teng; Wang, Ping; Xue, Yi-Xue

    2015-01-01

    Caveolin-1 affects the permeability of blood-tumor barrier (BTB) by regulating the expression of tight junction-associated proteins. However, the effect is still controversial. In the present work, we studied the regulative effect of caveolin-1 on the expression of tight junction-associated proteins and BTB via directly silencing and overexpressing of caveolin-1 by recombinant adenovirus transduction of glioma-derived microvascular endothelial cells in rat brain. The results show that the caveolin-1 downregulation resulted in decreased expression of tight junction-associated proteins, opening of tight junctions, and increasing the permeability of BTB, whereas the overexpression of caveolin-1 presented the opposite effects. Therefore, we conclude that caveolin-1 regulates the expression of tight junction-associated proteins in a positive manner, which further plays a role in the regulation of BTB permeability. This finding provides a novel therapeutic target for selectively opening of BTB. PMID:26722502

  12. PHD3 Stabilizes the Tight Junction Protein Occludin and Protects Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Function*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Zhang, Hai-Sheng; Fong, Guo-Hua; Xi, Qiu-Lei; Wu, Guo-Hao; Bai, Chen-Guang; Ling, Zhi-Qiang; Fan, Li; Xu, Yi-Ming; Qin, Yan-Qing; Yuan, Tang-Long; Sun, Heng; Fang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Prolyl hydroxylase domain proteins (PHDs) control cellular adaptation to hypoxia. PHDs are found involved in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); however, the exact role of PHD3, a member of the PHD family, in IBD remains unknown. We show here that PHD3 plays a critical role in maintaining intestinal epithelial barrier function. We found that genetic ablation of Phd3 in intestinal epithelial cells led to spontaneous colitis in mice. Deletion of PHD3 decreases the level of tight junction protein occludin, leading to a failure of intestinal epithelial barrier function. Further studies indicate that PHD3 stabilizes occludin by preventing the interaction between the E3 ligase Itch and occludin, in a hydroxylase-independent manner. Examination of biopsy of human ulcerative colitis patients indicates that PHD3 is decreased with disease severity, indicating that PHD3 down-regulation is associated with progression of this disease. We show that PHD3 protects intestinal epithelial barrier function and reveal a hydroxylase-independent function of PHD3 in stabilizing occludin. These findings may help open avenues for developing a therapeutic strategy for IBD. PMID:26124271

  13. Alterations in junctional proteins, inflammatory mediators and extracellular matrix molecules in eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Abdulnour-Nakhoul, Solange M; Al-Tawil, Youhanna; Gyftopoulos, Alex A; Brown, Karen L; Hansen, Molly; Butcher, Kathy F; Eidelwein, Alexandra P; Noel, Robert A; Rabon, Edd; Posta, Allison; Nakhoul, Nazih L

    2013-08-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), an inflammatory atopic disease of the esophagus, causes massive eosinophil infiltration, basal cell hyperplasia, and sub-epithelial fibrosis. To elucidate cellular and molecular factors involved in esophageal tissue damage and remodeling, we examined pinch biopsies from EoE and normal pediatric patients. An inflammation gene array confirmed that eotaxin-3, its receptor CCR3 and interleukins IL-13 and IL-5 were upregulated. An extracellular matrix (ECM) gene array revealed upregulation of CD44 & CD54, and of ECM proteases (ADAMTS1 & MMP14). A cytokine antibody array showed a marked decrease in IL-1α and IL-1 receptor antagonist and an increase in eotaxin-2 and epidermal growth factor. Western analysis indicated reduced expression of intercellular junction proteins, E-cadherin and claudin-1 and increased expression of occludin and vimentin. We have identified a number of novel genes and proteins whose expression is altered in EoE. These findings provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms of the disease.

  14. Adaptive evolution of tight junction protein claudin-14 in echolocating whales.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huihui; Liu, Yang; He, Guimei; Rossiter, Stephen J; Zhang, Shuyi

    2013-11-10

    Toothed whales and bats have independently evolved specialized ultrasonic hearing for echolocation. Recent findings have suggested that several genes including Prestin, Tmc1, Pjvk and KCNQ4 appear to have undergone molecular adaptations associated with the evolution of this ultrasonic hearing in mammals. Here we studied the hearing gene Cldn14, which encodes the claudin-14 protein and is a member of tight junction proteins that functions in the organ of Corti in the inner ear to maintain a cationic gradient between endolymph and perilymph. Particular mutations in human claudin-14 give rise to non-syndromic deafness, suggesting an essential role in hearing. Our results uncovered two bursts of positive selection, one in the ancestral branch of all toothed whales and a second in the branch leading to the delphinid, phocoenid and ziphiid whales. These two branches are the same as those previously reported to show positive selection in the Prestin gene. Furthermore, as with Prestin, the estimated hearing frequencies of whales significantly correlate with numbers of branch-wise non-synonymous substitutions in Cldn14, but not with synonymous changes. However, in contrast to Prestin, we found no evidence of positive selection in bats. Our findings from Cldn14, and comparisons with Prestin, strongly implicate multiple loci in the acquisition of echolocation in cetaceans, but also highlight possible differences in the evolutionary route to echolocation taken by whales and bats.

  15. Junctional Adhesion Molecule-A Is Required for Hematogenous Dissemination of Reovirus

    PubMed Central

    Antar, Annukka A. R.; Konopka, Jennifer L.; Campbell, Jacquelyn A.; Henry, Rachel A.; Perdigoto, Ana L.; Carter, Bruce D.; Pozzi, Ambra; Abel, Ty W.; Dermody, Terence S.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Diverse families of viruses bind immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) proteins located in tight junctions (TJs) and adherens junctions of epithelium and endothelium. However, little is known about the roles of these receptors in the pathogenesis of viral disease. Junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) is an IgSF protein that localizes to TJs and serves as a receptor for mammalian reovirus. We inoculated wild-type (wt) and isogenic JAM-A−/− mice perorally with reovirus and found that JAM-A is dispensable for viral replication in the intestine but required for systemic dissemination. Reovirus replication in the brain and tropism for discrete neural regions are equivalent in wt and JAM-A−/− mice following intracranial inoculation, suggesting a function for JAM-A in reovirus spread to extra-intestinal sites. JAM-A promotes reovirus infection of endothelial cells, providing a conduit for the virus into the bloodstream. These findings indicate that a broadly expressed IgSF viral receptor specifically mediates hematogenous dissemination in the host. PMID:19154988

  16. Comparative analysis of theophylline and cholera toxin in rat colon reveals an induction of sealing tight junction proteins.

    PubMed

    Markov, Alexander G; Falchuk, Evgeny L; Kruglova, Natalia M; Rybalchenko, Oksana V; Fromm, Michael; Amasheh, Salah

    2014-11-01

    Claudin tight junction proteins have been identified to primarily determine intestinal epithelial barrier properties. While functional contribution of single claudins has been characterized in detail, information on the interplay with secretory mechanisms in native intestinal epithelium is scarce. Therefore, effects of cholera toxin and theophylline on rat colon were analyzed, including detection of sealing claudins. Tissue specimens were stripped off submucosal tissue layers and mounted in Ussing chambers, and short-circuit current (ISC) and transepithelial resistance (TER) were recorded. In parallel, expression and localization of claudins was analyzed and histological studies were performed employing hematoxylin-eosin staining and light and electron microscopy. Theophylline induced a strong increase of ISC in colon tissue specimens. In parallel, a decrease of TER was observed. In contrast, cholera toxin did not induce a significant increase of ISC, whereas an increase of TER was detected after 120 min. Western blots of membrane fractions revealed an increase of claudin-3 and -4 after incubation with cholera toxin, and theophylline induced an increase of claudin-4. In accordance, confocal laser-scanning microscopy exhibited increased signals of claudin-3 and -4 after incubation with cholera toxin, and increased signals of claudin-4 after incubation with theophylline, within tight junction complexes. Morphological analyses revealed no general changes of tight junction complexes, but intercellular spaces were markedly widened after incubation with cholera toxin and theophylline. We conclude that cholera toxin and theophylline have different effects on sealing tight junction proteins in native colon preparations, which may synergistically contribute to transport functions, in vitro.

  17. Tight Junction Proteins Claudin-3 and Claudin-4 Control Tumor Growth and Metastases12

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Xiying; Lin, Xinjian; Alvarez, Edwin; Manorek, Gerald; Howell, Stephen B

    2012-01-01

    The extent of tight junction (TJ) formation is one of many factors that regulate motility, invasion, and metastasis. Claudins are required for the formation and maintenance of TJs. Claudin-3 (CLDN3) and claudin-4 (CLDN4) are highly expressed in the majority of ovarian cancers. We report here that CLDN3 and CLDN4 each serve to constrain the growth of human 2008 cancer xenografts and limit metastatic potential. Knockdown of CLDN3 increased in vivo growth rate by 2.3-fold and knockdown of CLDN4 by 3.7-fold in the absence of significant change in in vitro growth rate. Both types of tumors exhibited increase in birth rate as measured by Ki67 staining and decrease in death rate as reflected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining. Knockdown of either claudin did not alter expression of other TJ protein but did reduce TJ formation as measured by transepithelial resistance and paracellular flux of dextran, enhance migration and invasion in in vitro assays, and increase lung colonization following intravenous injection. Knockdown of CLDN3 and CLDN4 increased total lung metastatic burden by 1.7-fold and 2.4-fold, respectively. Loss of either CLDN3 or CLDN4 resulted in down-regulation of E-cadherin mRNA and protein, increased inhibitory phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), and activation of β-catenin pathway signaling as evidenced by increases in nuclear β-catenin, the dephosphorylated form of the protein, and transcriptional activity of β-catenin/T-cell factor (TCF). We conclude that both CLDN3 and CLDN4 mediate interactions with other cells in vivo that restrain growth and metastatic potential by sustaining expression of E-cadherin and limiting β-catenin signaling. PMID:23097631

  18. Tight junction proteins expression and modulation in immune cells and multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Mandel, Ilana; Paperna, Tamar; Glass-Marmor, Lea; Volkowich, Anat; Badarny, Samih; Schwartz, Ilya; Vardi, Pnina; Koren, Ilana; Miller, Ariel

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The tight junction proteins (TJPs) are major determinants of endothelial cells comprising physiological vascular barriers such as the blood–brain barrier, but little is known about their expression and role in immune cells. In this study we assessed TJP expression in human leukocyte subsets, their induction by immune activation and modulation associated with autoimmune disease states and therapies. A consistent expression of TJP complexes was detected in peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs), predominantly in B and T lymphocytes and monocytes, whereas the in vitro application of various immune cell activators led to an increase of claudin 1 levels, yet not of claudin 5. Claudins 1 and 5 levels were elevated in PBLs of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients in relapse, relative to patients in remission, healthy controls and patients with other neurological disorders. Interestingly, claudin 1 protein levels were elevated also in PBLs of patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Following glucocorticoid treatment of MS patients in relapse, RNA levels of JAM3 and CLDN5 and claudin 5 protein levels in PBLs decreased. Furthermore, a correlation between CLDN5 pre-treatment levels and clinical response phenotype to interferon-β therapy was detected. Our findings indicate that higher levels of leukocyte claudins are associated with immune activation and specifically, increased levels of claudin 5 are associated with MS disease activity. This study highlights a potential role of leukocyte TJPs in physiological states, and autoimmunity and suggests they should be further evaluated as biomarkers for aberrant immune activity and response to therapy in immune-mediated diseases such as MS. PMID:21762372

  19. Acidic bile salts modulate the squamous epithelial barrier function by modulating tight junction proteins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Oshima, Tadayuki; Tomita, Toshihiko; Fukui, Hirokazu; Watari, Jiro; Matsumoto, Takayuki; Miwa, Hiroto

    2011-08-01

    Experimental models for esophageal epithelium in vitro either suffer from poor differentiation or complicated culture systems. An air-liquid interface system with normal human bronchial epithelial cells can serve as a model of esophageal-like squamous epithelial cell layers. Here, we explore the influence of bile acids on barrier function and tight junction (TJ) proteins. The cells were treated with taurocholic acid (TCA), glycocholic acid (GCA), or deoxycholic acid (DCA) at different pH values, or with pepsin. Barrier function was measured by transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and the diffusion of paracellular tracers (permeability). The expression of TJ proteins, including claudin-1 and claudin-4, was examined by Western blotting of 1% Nonidet P-40-soluble and -insoluble fractions. TCA and GCA dose-dependently decreased TEER and increased paracellular permeability at pH 3 after 1 h. TCA (4 mM) or GCA (4 mM) did not change TEER and permeability at pH 7.4 or pH 4. The combination of TCA and GCA at pH 3 significantly decreased TEER and increased permeability at lower concentrations (2 mM). Pepsin (4 mg/ml, pH 3) did not have any effect on barrier function. DCA significantly decreased the TEER and increased permeability at pH 6, a weakly acidic condition. TCA (4 mM) and GCA (4 mM) significantly decreased the insoluble fractions of claudin-1 and claudin-4 at pH 3. In conclusion, acidic bile salts disrupted the squamous epithelial barrier function partly by modulating the amounts of claudin-1 and claudin-4. These results provide new insights for understanding the role of TJ proteins in esophagitis.

  20. Inactivation of hepatocyte nuclear factor-4α mediates alcohol-induced downregulation of intestinal tight junction proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Wei; Zhao, Yantao; McClain, Craig J.; Kang, Y. James

    2010-01-01

    Chronic alcohol exposure has been shown to increase the gut permeability in the distal intestine, in part, through induction of zinc deficiency. The present study evaluated the molecular mechanisms whereby zinc deficiency mediates alcohol-induced intestinal barrier dysfunction. Examination of zinc finger transcription factors in the gastrointestinal tract of mice revealed a prominent distribution of hepatocyte nuclear factor-4α (HNF-4α). HNF-4α exclusively localizes in the epithelial nuclei and exhibited an increased abundance in mRNA and protein levels in the distal intestine. Chronic alcohol exposure to mice repressed the HNF-4α gene expression in the ileum and reduced the protein level and DNA binding activity of HNF-4α in all of the intestinal segments with the most remarkable changes in the ileum. Chronic alcohol exposure also decreased the mRNA levels of tight junction proteins, particularly in the ileum. Caco-2 cell culture studies were conducted to determine the role of HNF-4α in regulation of the epithelial tight junction and barrier function. Knockdown of HNF-4α in Caco-2 cells decreased the mRNA and protein levels of tight junction proteins in association with disruption of the epithelial barrier. Alcohol treatment inactivated HNF-4α, which was prevented by N-acetyl-cysteine or zinc. The link between zinc and HNF-4α function was confirmed by zinc deprivation, which inhibited HNF-4α DNA binding activity. These results indicate that inactivation of HNF-4α due to oxidative stress and zinc deficiency is likely a novel mechanism contributing to the deleterious effects of alcohol on the tight junctions and the intestinal barrier function. PMID:20576917

  1. The Role of Circulating Tight Junction Proteins in Evaluating Blood Brain Barrier Disruption following Intracranial Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Xiaoyang; He, Ping; Li, Yazhen; Fan, Zhicheng; Si, Mengya; Xie, Qingdong; Chang, Xiaolan; Huang, Dongyang

    2015-01-01

    Brain injury after intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) results in significant morbidity and mortality. Blood brain barrier (BBB) disruption is a hallmark of ICH-induced brain injury; however, data mirroring BBB disruption in human ICH are scarce. The aim of this study was to assess the significance of circulating biomarkers in evaluating BBB disruption after ICH. Twenty-two patients with ICH were recruited in this study. Concentrations of the tight junction proteins (TJs) Claudin-5 (CLDN5), Occludin (OCLN), and zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) were measured by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples obtained from patients with ICH. The white blood cell (WBC) count in blood and CSF, albumin (ALB) levels in the CSF (ALBCSF), and the BBB ratio were significantly higher in the ICH than in controls (p < 0.05). Significantly higher levels of CLDN5, OCLN, ZO-1, MMP-9, and VEGF in CSF were observed in the ICH group; these biomarkers were also positively associated with BBB ratio (p < 0.05). Our data revealed that circulating TJs could be considered the potential biomarkers reflecting the integrity of the BBB in ICH.

  2. Endothelial STAT3 Activation Increases Vascular Leakage Through Downregulating Tight Junction Proteins: Implications for Diabetic Retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Yun, Jang-Hyuk; Park, Sung Wook; Kim, Kyung-Jin; Bae, Jong-Sup; Lee, Eun Hui; Paek, Sun Ha; Kim, Seung U; Ye, Sangkyu; Kim, Jeong-Hun; Cho, Chung-Hyun

    2017-05-01

    Vascular inflammation is characteristic feature of diabetic retinopathy. In diabetic retina, a variety of the pro-inflammatory cytokines are elevated and involved in endothelial dysfunction. STAT3 transcription factor has been implicated in mediating cytokine signaling during vascular inflammation. However, whether and how STAT3 is involved in the direct regulation of the endothelial permeability is currently undefined. Our studies revealed that IL-6-induced STAT3 activation increases retinal endothelial permeability and vascular leakage in retinas of mice through the reduced expression of the tight junction proteins ZO-1 and occludin. In a co-culture model with microglia and endothelial cells under a high glucose condition, the microglia-derived IL-6 induced STAT3 activation in the retinal endothelial cells, leading to increasing endothelial permeability. In addition, IL-6-induced STAT3 activation was independent of ROS generation in the retinal endothelial cells. Moreover, we demonstrated that STAT3 activation downregulates the ZO-1 and occludin levels and increases the endothelial permeability through the induction of VEGF production in retinal endothelial cells. These results suggest the potential importance of IL-6/STAT3 signaling in regulating endothelial permeability and provide a therapeutic target to prevent the pathology of diabetic retinopathy. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 1123-1134, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. The Role of Circulating Tight Junction Proteins in Evaluating Blood Brain Barrier Disruption following Intracranial Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Xiaoyang; He, Ping; Li, Yazhen; Fan, Zhicheng; Si, Mengya; Xie, Qingdong; Chang, Xiaolan; Huang, Dongyang

    2015-01-01

    Brain injury after intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) results in significant morbidity and mortality. Blood brain barrier (BBB) disruption is a hallmark of ICH-induced brain injury; however, data mirroring BBB disruption in human ICH are scarce. The aim of this study was to assess the significance of circulating biomarkers in evaluating BBB disruption after ICH. Twenty-two patients with ICH were recruited in this study. Concentrations of the tight junction proteins (TJs) Claudin-5 (CLDN5), Occludin (OCLN), and zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) were measured by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples obtained from patients with ICH. The white blood cell (WBC) count in blood and CSF, albumin (ALB) levels in the CSF (ALBCSF), and the BBB ratio were significantly higher in the ICH than in controls (p < 0.05). Significantly higher levels of CLDN5, OCLN, ZO-1, MMP-9, and VEGF in CSF were observed in the ICH group; these biomarkers were also positively associated with BBB ratio (p < 0.05). Our data revealed that circulating TJs could be considered the potential biomarkers reflecting the integrity of the BBB in ICH. PMID:26586924

  4. Circulating tight junction proteins mirror blood-brain barrier integrity in leukaemia central nervous system metastasis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jing-Cheng; Si, Meng-Ya; Li, Ya-Zhen; Chen, Huan-Zhu; Fan, Zhi-Cheng; Xie, Qing-Dong; Jiao, Xiao-Yang

    2016-03-21

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical significance of circulating tight junction (TJ) proteins as biomarkers reflecting of leukaemia central nervous system (CNS) metastasis. TJs [claudin5 (CLDN5), occludin (OCLN) and ZO-1] concentrations were measured in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples obtained from 45 leukaemia patients. Serum ZO-1 was significantly higher (p < 0.05), but CSF ZO-1 levels were not significantly higher in the CNS leukaemia (CNSL) compared to the non-CNSL. The CNSL patients also had a lower CLDN5/ZO1 ratio in both serum and CSF than in non-CNSL patients (p < 0.05). The TJ index was negatively associated with WBCCSF , ALBCSF and BBB values in leukaemia patients. Among all of the parameters studied, CLDN5CSF had the highest specificity in discriminating between CNSL and non-CNSL patients. Therefore, analysing serum and CSF levels of CLDN5, OCLN and the CLDN5/ZO1 ratio is valuable in evaluating the potential of leukaemia CNS metastasis. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Tight junction protein expression and barrier properties of immortalized mouse brain microvessel endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Brown, Rachel C; Morris, Andrew P; O'Neil, Roger G

    2007-01-26

    Understanding the molecular and biochemical mechanisms regulating the blood-brain barrier is aided by in vitro model systems. Many studies have used primary cultures of brain microvessel endothelial cells for this purpose. However, primary cultures limit the generation of material for molecular and biochemical assays since cells grow slowly, are prone to contamination by other neurovascular unit cells, and lose blood-brain barrier characteristics when passaged. To address these issues, immortalized cell lines have been generated. In these studies, we assessed the suitability of the immortalized mouse brain endothelial cell line, bEnd3, as a blood-brain barrier model. RT-PCR and immunofluorescence indicated expression of multiple tight junction proteins. bEnd3 cells formed barriers to radiolabeled sucrose, and responded like primary cultures to disrupting stimuli. Exposing cells to serum-free media on their basolateral side significantly decreased paracellular permeability; astrocyte-conditioned media did not enhance barrier properties. The serum-free media-induced decrease in permeability was correlated with an increase in claudin-5 and zonula occludens-1 immunofluorescence at cell-cell contracts. We conclude that bEnd3 cells are an attractive candidate as a model of the blood-brain barrier due to their rapid growth, maintenance of blood-brain barrier characteristics over repeated passages, formation of functional barriers and amenability to numerous molecular interventions.

  6. Role of calcium and vesicle-docking proteins in remobilising dormant neuromuscular junctions in desert frogs.

    PubMed

    Lavidis, Nickolas A; Hudson, Nicholas J; Choy, Peng T; Lehnert, Sigrid A; Franklin, Craig E

    2008-01-01

    Despite prolonged immobility the desert frog, Cyclorana alboguttata, suffers little impairment in muscle function. To determine compensatory mechanisms at neuromuscular junctions, transmitter release was examined along primary terminals in C. alboguttata iliofibularis muscle. Using extracellular recording we found the amplitudes of evoked endplate currents were significantly smaller in dormant frogs. In active frogs we identified two negatively sloping proximal-distal gradients of transmitter frequency and quantal content; a shallow proximal-distal gradient with low probability of transmitter release (<0.2) and a second much steeper proximal-distal gradient for quantal content with high probability release sites (>0.6). During aestivation, only a shallow gradient was identified. The high probability release sites in control frogs were inhibited during aestivation by a mechanism that could be reversed by (1) increasing the extracellular calcium concentration, and (2) increasing the frequency of stimulation. This suggests that transmitter vesicles are available during aestivation but not released. We quantified expression of messenger RNA transcripts coding for the transmitter vesicle-docking proteins synaptotagmin 1, syntaxin 1B and UNC-13. All three were rare transcripts maintained at control values during aestivation. Neuromuscular remobilisation after dormancy in C. alboguttata is more likely a product of rapidly reversible physiologic mechanisms than reorganisations of the neuromuscular transcriptome.

  7. Arsenic-induced cutaneous hyperplastic lesions are associated with the dysregulation of Yap, a Hippo signaling-related protein

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Changzhao; Srivastava, Ritesh K.; Elmets, Craig A.; Afaq, Farrukh; Athar, Mohammad

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Arsenic activates canonical Hippo signaling pathway and up-regulates αCatenin in the skin. •Arsenic activates transcriptional activity of Yap by its nuclear translocation. •Yap is involved in the disruption of tight/adherens junctions in arsenic-exposed animals. -- Abstract: Arsenic exposure in humans causes a number of toxic manifestations in the skin including cutaneous neoplasm. However, the mechanism of these alterations remains elusive. Here, we provide novel observations that arsenic induced Hippo signaling pathway in the murine skin. This pathway plays crucial roles in determining organ size during the embryonic development and if aberrantly activated in adults, contributes to the pathogenesis of epithelial neoplasm. Arsenic treatment enhanced phosphorylation-dependent activation of LATS1 kinase and other Hippo signaling regulatory proteins Sav1 and MOB1. Phospho-LATS kinase is known to catalyze the inactivation of a transcriptional co-activator, Yap. However, in arsenic-treated epidermis, we did not observed its inactivation. Thus, as expected, unphosphorylated-Yap was translocated to the nucleus in arsenic-treated epidermis. Yap by binding to the transcription factors TEADs induces transcription of its target genes. Consistently, an up-regulation of Yap-dependent target genes Cyr61, Gli2, Ankrd1 and Ctgf was observed in the skin of arsenic-treated mice. Phosphorylated Yap is important in regulating tight and adherens junctions through its binding to αCatenin. We found disruption of these junctions in the arsenic-treated mouse skin despite an increase in αCatenin. These data provide evidence that arsenic-induced canonical Hippo signaling pathway and Yap-mediated disruption of tight and adherens junctions are independently regulated. These effects together may contribute to the carcinogenic effects of arsenic in the skin.

  8. Transcriptional Control of Tight Junction Proteins via a Protein Kinase C Signal Pathway in Human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase-Transfected Human Pancreatic Duct Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Kojima, Takashi; Ito, Tatsuya; Kimura, Yasutoshi; Imamura, Masafumi; Son, Seiichi; Koizumi, Jun-ichi; Murata, Masaki; Nagayama, Minoru; Nobuoka, Takayuki; Tanaka, Satoshi; Hirata, Koichi; Sawada, Norimasa

    2010-01-01

    In human pancreatic cancer, integral membrane proteins of tight junction claudins are abnormally regulated, making these proteins promising molecular diagnostic and therapeutic targets. However, the regulation of claudin-based tight junctions remains unknown not only in the pancreatic cancer cells but also in normal human pancreatic duct epithelial (HPDE) cells. To investigate the regulation of tight junction molecules including claudins in normal HPDE cells, we introduced the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene into HPDE cells in primary culture. The hTERT-transfected HPDE (hTERT-HPDE) cells were positive for the pancreatic duct epithelial markers such as CK7, CK19, and carbonic anhydrase isozyme 2 and expressed epithelial tight junction molecules claudin-1, -4, -7 and, -18, occludin, JAM-A, ZO-1, ZO-2, and tricellulin. By treatment with fetal bovine serum or 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA), the tight junction molecules were up-regulated at the transcriptional level via a protein kinase C (PKC) signal pathway. A PKC-α inhibitor, Gö6976, prevented up-regulation of claudin-4 by TPA. Furthermore, a PKC-δ inhibitor, rottlerin, prevented up-regulation of claudin-7, occludin, ZO-1, and ZO-2 by TPA. By GeneChip analysis, up-regulation of the transcription factor ELF3 was observed in both fetal bovine serum- and TPA-treated cells. Treatment with small interfering RNAs of ELF3 prevented up-regulation of claudin-7 by TPA. These data suggest that tight junctions of normal HPDE cells were at least in part regulated via a PKC signal pathway by transcriptional control. PMID:20566751

  9. Organization of pp60src and selected cytoskeletal proteins within adhesion plaques and junctions of Rous sarcoma virus-transformed rat cells

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    The localization of pp60src within adhesion structures of epithelioid rat kidney cells transformed by the Schmidt-Ruppin strain of Rous sarcoma virus was compared to the organization of actin, alpha-actinin, vinculin (a 130,000-dalton protein), tubulin, and the 58,000-dalton intermediate filament protein. The adhesion structures included both adhesion plaques and previously uncharacterized adhesive regions formed at cell-cell junctions. We have termed these latter structures "adhesion junctions." Both adhesion plaques and adhesion junctions were identified by interference-reflection microscopy and compared to the location of pp60src and the various cytoskeletal proteins by double fluorescence. The results demonstrated that the src gene product was found within both adhesion plaques and the adhesion junctions. In addition, actin, alpha-actinin, and vinculin were also localized within the same pp60src-containing adhesion structures. In contrast, tubulin and the 58,000-dalton intermediate filament protein were not associated with either adhesion plaques or adhesion junctions. Both adhesion plaques and adhesion junctions were isolated as substratum-bound structures and characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Immunofluorescence revealed that pp60src, actin, alpha-actinin, and vinculin were organized within specific regions of the adhesion junctions. Heavy accumulations of actin and alpha-actinin were found on both sides of the junctions with a narrow gap of unstained material at the midline, whereas pp60src stain was more intense in this central region. Antibody to vinculin stained double narrow lines defining the periphery of the junctional complexes but was excluded from the intervening region. In addition, the distribution of vinculin relative to pp60src within adhesion plaques suggested an inverse relationship between the presence of these two proteins. Overall, these results establish a close link between the src gene product and components of the

  10. Altered expression of tight junction proteins and matrix metalloproteinases in thiamine-deficient mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Beauchesne, Elizabeth; Desjardins, Paul; Hazell, Alan S; Butterworth, Roger F

    2009-09-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) in humans is a metabolic disorder caused by thiamine deficiency (TD). In both humans and experimental animals, TD leads to selective neuronal cell death in diencephalic and brainstem structures. Neuropathologic features of WE include petechial hemorrhagic lesions, and blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown has been suggested to play an important role in the pathogenesis of TD. The goal of the present study was to examine expression of the tight junction (TJ) protein occludin, its associated scaffolding proteins zona occludens (ZO-1 and ZO-2), and to measure matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) levels as a function of regional BBB permeability changes in thiamine-deficient mice. TD was induced in 12-week-old male C57Bl/6 mice by feeding a thiamine-deficient diet and administration of the central thiamine antagonist pyrithiamine. BBB permeability was measured by IgG extravasation; expression of occludin, ZO-1 and ZO-2 was measured by Western blot analysis and RT-PCR, structural integrity of the BBB was assessed using occludin and ZO-1 immunostaining, and MMPs levels were measured by gelatin zymography and immunohistochemistry. Studies were performed in vulnerable (medial thalamus) versus spared (frontal cortex) regions of the brain. Hemorrhagic lesions, selective increases in brain IgG extravasation, a concomitant loss in protein expression of occludin, ZO-1 and ZO-2, as well as decreased and disrupted patterns of occludin and ZO-1 immunostaining were observed in the medial thalamus of thiamine-deficient mice. MMP-9 levels were also selectively increased in the medial thalamus of these animals, and were found to be localized in the vascular endothelium, as well as in cells with an apparent polymorphonuclear morphology. No changes of TJ gene expression were observed. These results indicate that alterations in TJ proteins occur in TD, and offer a plausible explanation for the selective increase in BBB permeability in thiamine-deficient animals

  11. Flexible and efficient eletrokinetic stacking of DNA and proteins at an HF etched porous junction on a fused silica capillary.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhi-Yong; Fang, Fang; He, Yan-Qin; Li, Ting-Ting; Li, Jing-Jing; Tian, Li

    2012-08-21

    Better understanding of the mechanism is important for exploring the potentials of a preconcentration method. In this work, we show for the first time that the HF etched porous junction on a fused silica capillary behaves not only as a filter but also as an integrated nanofluidic interface. This junction exhibits an obvious ion concentration polarization (CP) effect, with which highly efficient electrokinetic stacking (ES) inside the capillary can be achieved without molecular size or charge type limitation. Two major types of CP based ES were proposed, and an autostop etching principle was presented for avoiding overetching. The ES can be performed in a broad range of pH and buffer concentration. Over a billion times of concentration was demonstrated by a fluorescein probe with laser induced fluorescent (LIF) detection. ES of fluorescently labeled and native DNA and protein were characterized by charge-coupled device (CCD) imaging and online capillary gel electrophoresis (CGE) with ultraviolet (UV) absorption detections, respectively. With this junction, highly efficient ES can be performed easily by voltage manipulation without any mechanical operation. We may foresee that the performance of capillary-based conventional and chip electrophoresis could be greatly enhanced with this junction in the analysis of low abundance biomolecules.

  12. Discovery of a junctional epitope antibody that stabilizes IL-6 and gp80 protein:protein interaction and modulates its downstream signaling

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Ralph; Burnley, Rebecca J.; Valenzano, Chiara R.; Qureshi, Omar; Doyle, Carl; Lumb, Simon; del Carmen Lopez, Maria; Griffin, Robert; McMillan, David; Taylor, Richard D.; Meier, Chris; Mori, Prashant; Griffin, Laura M.; Wernery, Ulrich; Kinne, Jörg; Rapecki, Stephen; Baker, Terry S.; Lawson, Alastair D. G.; Wright, Michael; Ettorre, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Protein:protein interactions are fundamental in living organism homeostasis. Here we introduce VHH6, a junctional epitope antibody capable of specifically recognizing a neo-epitope when two proteins interact, albeit transiently, to form a complex. Orthogonal biophysical techniques have been used to prove the “junctional epitope” nature of VHH6, a camelid single domain antibody recognizing the IL-6–gp80 complex but not the individual components alone. X-ray crystallography, HDX-MS and SPR analysis confirmed that the CDR regions of VHH6 interact simultaneously with IL-6 and gp80, locking the two proteins together. At the cellular level, VHH6 was able to alter the response of endothelial cells to exogenous IL-6, promoting a sustained STAT3 phosphorylation signal, an accumulation of IL-6 in vesicles and an overall pro-inflammatory phenotype supported further by transcriptomic analysis. Junctional epitope antibodies, like VHH6, not only offer new opportunities in screening and structure-aided drug discovery, but could also be exploited as therapeutics to modulate complex protein:protein interactions. PMID:28134246

  13. Rescue of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS)-mediated Sertoli cell injury by overexpression of gap junction protein connexin 43

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Nan; Mruk, Dolores D.; Chen, Haiqi; Wong, Chris K. C.; Lee, Will M.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2016-07-01

    Perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) is an environmental toxicant used in developing countries, including China, as a stain repellent for clothing, carpets and draperies, but it has been banned in the U.S. and Canada since the late 2000s. PFOS perturbed the Sertoli cell tight junction (TJ)-permeability barrier, causing disruption of actin microfilaments in cell cytosol, perturbing the localization of cell junction proteins (e.g., occluden-ZO-1, N-cadherin-ß-catenin). These changes destabilized Sertoli cell blood-testis barrier (BTB) integrity. These findings suggest that human exposure to PFOS might induce BTB dysfunction and infertility. Interestingly, PFOS-induced Sertoli cell injury associated with a down-regulation of the gap junction (GJ) protein connexin43 (Cx43). We next investigated if overexpression of Cx43 in Sertoli cells could rescue the PFOS-induced cell injury. Indeed, overexpression of Cx43 in Sertoli cells with an established TJ-barrier blocked the disruption in PFOS-induced GJ-intercellular communication, resulting in the re-organization of actin microfilaments, which rendered them similar to those in control cells. Furthermore, cell adhesion proteins that utilized F-actin for attachment became properly distributed at the cell-cell interface, resealing the disrupted TJ-barrier. In summary, Cx43 is a good target that might be used to manage PFOS-induced reproductive dysfunction.

  14. A novel synaptic junction preparation for the identification and characterization of cleft proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tao-Cheng, Jung-Hwa; Dosemeci, Ayse

    2017-01-01

    Identification of synaptic cleft components has been hampered by the lack of a suitable preparation enriched in synaptic junctions devoid of adjoining peripheral membranes. Prior strategies for the isolation of synaptic junctions, relying on detergents for the removal of peripheral membranes, resulted in substantial loss of membranes lining the cleft. Here, a novel, detergent-free method is described for the preparation of a synaptic junction (SJ) fraction, using phospholipase A2. Limited digestion of synaptic plasma membrane (SPM) fraction with phospholipase A2 followed by centrifugation over a sucrose cushion results in selective removal of membranes peripheral to the cleft while junctional membranes remain relatively intact as observed by electron microscopy. Enrichment in synaptic junctional structures and loss of membranes peripheral to the junctional area are further verified by demonstrating enrichment in PSD-95 and loss in mGluR5, respectively. The SJ fraction is enriched in neuroligins and neurexins, in agreement with immuno-electron microscopy data showing their selective localization to the junctional area. Among additional cell adhesion molecules tested, N-cadherin and specific isoforms of the SynCAM and SALM families also show marked enrichment in the SJ fraction, suggesting preferential localization at the synaptic cleft while others show little enrichment or decrease, suggesting that they are not restricted to or concentrated at the synaptic cleft. Treatment of the SJ fraction with glycosidases results in electrophoretic mobility shifts of all cell adhesion molecules tested, indicating glycosylation at the synaptic cleft. Biochemical and ultrastructural data presented indicate that the novel synaptic junction preparation can be used as a predictive tool for the identification and characterization of the components of the synaptic cleft. PMID:28362857

  15. cAMP Promotes Cell Migration Through Cell Junctional Complex Dynamics and Actin Cytoskeleton Remodeling: Implications in Skin Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Ok; Ryu, Jung Min; Suh, Han Na; Park, Soo Hyun; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Lee, Sang Hun; Han, Ho Jae

    2015-11-01

    Stem cells have attracted great interest for their therapeutic capacity in tissue regeneration. Cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP), existing in high concentration at wound sites, mediated various signaling pathways such as cytoskeleton dynamics, cell adhesion, and cell migration in stem cells, which suggest the critical roles of cAMP in the wound healing process through functional regulation of stem cells. However, the mechanisms behind the effect of cAMP on mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) motility and its roles on skin wound healing remain to be fully elucidated. In the present study, 8-Bromo cAMP-treated mESCs showed significant wound closure and improved neovascularization. Moreover, 8-Bromo cAMP stimulated mESC migration into the wound bed. 8-Bromo cAMP also increased ESC motility in in vitro migration assay. 8-Bromo cAMP induced myosin light chain phosphorylation through Rac1 and Cdc42 signaling, which were involved in 8-Bromo cAMP-induced decrease in expression of junction proteins (connexin 43, E-cadherin, and occludin) at the plasma membrane. Subsequently, 8-Bromo cAMP induced the disruption of cell junctions (including gap junctions, adherens junctions, and tight junctions), which reduced the function of the gap junctions and cell adhesion. In addition, 8-Bromo cAMP-induced Rac1 and Cdc42 activation increased Arp3, TOCA, PAK, and N-WASP expression, but decreased cofilin phosphorylation level, which elicited actin cytoskeleton remodeling. In contrast to the control, 8-Bromo cAMP evoked a substantial migration of cells into the denuded area, which was blocked by the small interfering RNAs of the signaling pathway-related molecules or by inhibitors. In conclusion, cAMP enhanced the migration of mESCs through effective coordination of junctional disruption and actin cytoskeleton remodeling, which increased the wound healing capacity of ESCs.

  16. The tight junction protein ZO-2 and Janus kinase 1 mediate intercellular communications in vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tkachuk, Natalia; Tkachuk, Sergey; Patecki, Margret; Kusch, Angelika; Korenbaum, Elena; Haller, Hermann; Dumler, Inna

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} The tight junction protein ZO-2 associates with Jak1 in vascular smooth muscle cells via ZO-2 N-terminal fragment. {yields} Jak1 mediates ZO-2 tyrosine phosphorylation and ZO-2 localization to the sites of homotypic intercellular contacts. {yields} The urokinase receptor uPAR regulates ZO-2/Jak1 functional association. {yields} The ZO-2/Jak1/uPAR signaling complex is required for vascular smooth muscle cells functional network formation. -- Abstract: Recent evidence points to a multifunctional role of ZO-2, the tight junction protein of the MAGUK (membrane-associated guanylate kinase-like) family. Though ZO-2 has been found in cell types lacking tight junction structures, such as vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC), little is known about ZO-2 function in these cells. We provide evidence that ZO-2 mediates specific homotypic cell-to-cell contacts between VSMC. Using mass spectrometry we found that ZO-2 is associated with the non-receptor tyrosine kinase Jak1. By generating specific ZO-2 constructs we further found that the N-terminal fragment of ZO-2 molecule is responsible for this interaction. Adenovirus-based expression of Jak1 inactive mutant demonstrated that Jak1 mediates ZO-2 tyrosine phosphorylation. By means of RNA silencing, expression of Jak1 mutant form and fluorescently labeled ZO-2 fusion protein we further specified that active Jak1, but not Jak1 inactive mutant, mediates ZO-2 localization to the sites of intercellular contacts. We identified the urokinase receptor uPAR as a pre-requisite for these cellular events. Functional requirement of the revealed signaling complex for VSMC network formation was confirmed in experiments using Matrigel and in contraction assay. Our findings imply involvement of the ZO-2 tight junction independent signaling complex containing Jak1 and uPAR in VSMC intercellular communications. This mechanism may contribute to vascular remodeling in occlusive cardiovascular diseases and in arteriogenesis.

  17. Probing the cis-arrangement of prototype tight junction proteins claudin-1 and claudin-3.

    PubMed

    Milatz, Susanne; Piontek, Jörg; Schulzke, Jörg-Dieter; Blasig, Ingolf E; Fromm, Michael; Günzel, Dorothee

    2015-06-15

    Claudins form a large family of TJ (tight junction) proteins featuring four transmembrane segments (TM1-TM4), two extracellular loops, one intracellular loop and intracellular N- and C-termini. They form continuous and branched TJ strands by homo- or heterophilic interaction within the same membrane (cis-interaction) and with claudins of the opposing lateral cell membrane (trans-interaction). In order to clarify the molecular organization of TJ strand formation, we investigated the cis-interaction of two abundant prototypic claudins. Human claudin-1 and claudin-3, fused to ECFP or EYFP at the N- or C-terminus, were expressed in the TJ-free cell line HEK (human embryonic kidney)-293. Using FRET analysis, the proximity of claudin N- and C-termini integrated in homopolymeric strands composed of claudin-3 or of heteropolymeric strands composed of claudin-1 and claudin-3 were determined. The main results are that (i) within homo- and heteropolymers, the average distance between the cytoplasmic ends of the TM1s of cis-interacting claudin molecules is shorter than the average distance between their TM4s, and (ii) TM1 segments of neighbouring claudins are oriented towards each other as the cytoplasmic end of TM1 is in close proximity to more other TM1 segments than TM4 is to other TM4 segments. The results indicate at least two different cis-interaction interfaces within claudin-3 homopolymers as well as within claudin-1/claudin-3 heteropolymers. The data provide novel insight into the molecular TJ architecture consistent with a model with an antiparallel double-row cis-arrangement of classic claudin protomers within strands.

  18. Molecular Architecture of the Blood Brain Barrier Tight Junction Proteins--A Synergistic Computational and In Vitro Approach.

    PubMed

    Irudayanathan, Flaviyan Jerome; Trasatti, John P; Karande, Pankaj; Nangia, Shikha

    2016-01-14

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) constituted by claudin-5 tight junctions is critical in maintaining the homeostasis of the central nervous system, but this highly selective molecular interface is an impediment for therapeutic interventions in neurodegenerative and neurological diseases. Therapeutic strategies that can exploit the paracellular transport remain elusive due to lack of molecular insights of the tight junction assembly. This study focuses on analyzing the membrane driven cis interactions of claudin-5 proteins in the formation of the BBB tight junctions. We have adopted a synergistic approach employing in silico multiscale dynamics and in vitro cross-linking experiments to study the claudin-5 interactions. Long time scale simulations of claudin-5 monomers, in seven different lipid compositions, show formation of cis dimers that subsequently aggregate into strands. In vitro formaldehyde cross-linking studies also conclusively show that cis-interacting claudin-5 dimers cross-link with short methylene spacers. Using this synergistic approach, we have identified five unique dimer interfaces in our simulations that correlate with the cross-linking experiments, four of which are mediated by transmembrane (TM) helices and the other mediated by extracellular loops (ECL). Potential of mean force calculations of these five dimers revealed that the TM mediated interfaces, which can have distinctive leucine zipper interactions in some cases, are more stable than the ECL mediated interface. Additionally, simulations show that claudin-5 dimerization is significantly influenced by the lipid microenvironment. This study captures the fundamental interactions responsible for the BBB tight junction assembly and offers a framework for extending this work to other tight junctions found in the body.

  19. Impact of obesity on 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-induced altered ovarian connexin gap junction proteins in female mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ganesan, Shanthi Nteeba, Jackson Keating, Aileen F.

    2015-01-01

    The ovarian gap junction proteins alpha 4 (GJA4 or connexin 37; CX37), alpha 1 (GJA1 or connexin 43; CX43) and gamma 1 (GJC1 or connexin 45; CX45) are involved in cell communication and folliculogenesis. 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) alters Cx37 and Cx43 expression in cultured neonatal rat ovaries. Additionally, obesity has an additive effect on DMBA-induced ovarian cell death and follicle depletion, thus, we investigated in vivo impacts of obesity and DMBA on CX protein levels. Ovaries were collected from lean and obese mice aged 6, 12, 18, or 24 wks. A subset of 18 wk old mice (lean and obese) were dosed with sesame oil or DMBA (1 mg/kg; ip) for 14 days and ovaries collected 3 days thereafter. Cx43 and Cx45 mRNA and protein levels decreased (P < 0.05) after 18 wks while Cx37 mRNA and protein levels decreased (P < 0.05) after 24 wks in obese ovaries. Cx37 mRNA and antral follicle protein staining intensity were reduced (P < 0.05) by obesity while total CX37 protein was reduced (P < 0.05) in DMBA exposed obese ovaries. Cx43 mRNA and total protein levels were decreased (P < 0.05) by DMBA in both lean and obese ovaries while basal protein staining intensity was reduced (P < 0.05) in obese controls. Cx45 mRNA, total protein and protein staining intensity level were decreased (P < 0.05) by obesity. These data support that obesity temporally alters gap junction protein expression and that DMBA-induced ovotoxicity may involve reduced gap junction protein function. - Highlights: • Ovarian gap junction proteins are affected by ovarian aging and obesity. • DMBA exposure negatively impacts gap junction proteins. • Altered gap junction proteins may contribute to infertility.

  20. The tight junction protein JAM-A functions as coreceptor for rotavirus entry into MA104 cells.

    PubMed

    Torres-Flores, Jesús M; Silva-Ayala, Daniela; Espinoza, Marco A; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F

    2015-01-15

    Several molecules have been identified as receptors or coreceptors for rotavirus infection, including glycans, integrins, and hsc70. In this work we report that the tight junction proteins JAM-A, occludin, and ZO-1 play an important role during rotavirus entry into MA104 cells. JAM-A was found to function as coreceptor for rotavirus strains RRV, Wa, and UK, but not for rotavirus YM. Reassortant viruses derived from rotaviruses RRV and YM showed that the virus spike protein VP4 determines the use of JAM-A as coreceptor.

  1. Ultrastructural studies of the junctional complex in the musculature of the arrow-worm (Sagitta setosa) (Chaetognatha).

    PubMed

    Duvert, M; Gros, D; Salat, C

    1980-01-01

    In the A fibres of the primary musculature of Sagitta, the junctional complex is made up of three kinds of junctions. From the apex to the base they occur in the following order: an apical zonula adherens, a columnar zonula then columnar maculae intermingled with gap junction. Each columnar junction joins two intracellular filament networks in adjacent cells; this cytoskeleton is largely developed around the nucleus of the A fibres and in close relation with the contractile apparatus, especially at the I band level. The B fibres, which never reach the general cavity, lack zonula adherens and columnar zonula. The columnar junction constitutes a new type of junction which seems to belong to the adherens kind. At their level fibrous columns cross the extracellular space, joining the membranes. Each column faces two cytoplasmic densities localized against the cytoplasmic leaflets of the membranes. A cytoskeleton composed of bunldes of cytoplasmic filaments is in close contact with these cytoplasmic densities. The great number of columnar junctions and associated cytoskeleton assure the cohesion of the tissue and the distribution of contractile forces in the absence of connective tissue. The abundance of gap junctions can account for the metabolic and ionic coupling of the fibres.

  2. Structural basis for the selective permeability of channels made of communicating junction proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ek-Vitorin, Jose F.; Burt, Janis M.

    2012-01-01

    The open state(s) of gap junction channels is evident from their permeation by small ions in response to an applied intercellular (transjunctional/transchannel) voltage gradient. That an open channel allows variable amounts of current to transit from cell-to-cell in the face of a constant intercellular voltage difference indicates channel open/closing can be complete or partial. The physiological significance of such open state options is, arguably, the main concern of junctional regulation. Because gap junctions are permeable to many substances, it is sensible to inquire whether and how each open state influences the intercellular diffusion of molecules as valuable as, but less readily detected than current-carrying ions. Presumably, structural changes perceived as shifts in channel conductivity would significantly alter the transjunctional diffusion of molecules whose limiting diameter approximates the pore’s limiting diameter. Moreover, changes in junctional permeability to some molecules might occur without evident changes in conductivity, either at macroscopic or single channel level. Open gap junction channels allow the exchange of cytoplasmic permeants between contacting cells by simple diffusion. The identity of such permeants, and the functional circumstances and consequences of their junctional exchange presently constitute the most urgent (and demanding) themes of the field. Here, we consider the necessity for regulating this exchange, the possible mechanism(s) and structural elements likely involved in such regulation, and how regulatory phenomena could be perceived as changes in chemical vs. electrical coupling; an overall reflection on our collective knowledge of junctional communication is then applied to suggest new avenues of research. PMID:22342665

  3. A protein interaction map for cell-cell adhesion regulators identifies DUSP23 as a novel phosphatase for β-catenin

    PubMed Central

    Gallegos, Lisa Leon; Ng, Mei Rosa; Sowa, Mathew E.; Selfors, Laura M.; White, Anne; Zervantonakis, Ioannis K.; Singh, Pragya; Dhakal, Sabin; Harper, J. Wade; Brugge, Joan S.

    2016-01-01

    Cell-cell adhesion is central to morphogenesis and maintenance of epithelial cell state. We previously identified 27 candidate cell-cell adhesion regulatory proteins (CCARPs) whose down-regulation disrupts epithelial cell-cell adhesion during collective migration. Using a protein interaction mapping strategy, we found that 18 CCARPs link to core components of adherens junctions or desmosomes. We further mapped linkages between the CCARPs and other known cell-cell adhesion proteins, including hits from recent screens uncovering novel components of E-cadherin adhesions. Mechanistic studies of one novel CCARP which links to multiple cell-cell adhesion proteins, the phosphatase DUSP23, revealed that it promotes dephosphorylation of β-catenin at Tyr 142 and enhances the interaction between α- and β-catenin. DUSP23 knockdown specifically diminished adhesion to E-cadherin without altering adhesion to fibronectin matrix proteins. Furthermore, DUSP23 knockdown produced “zipper-like” cell-cell adhesions, caused defects in transmission of polarization cues, and reduced coordination during collective migration. Thus, this study identifies multiple novel connections between proteins that regulate cell-cell interactions and provides evidence for a previously unrecognized role for DUSP23 in regulating E-cadherin adherens junctions through promoting the dephosphorylation of β-catenin. PMID:27255161

  4. Mouse Cx50, a functional member of the connexin family of gap junction proteins, is the lens fiber protein MP70.

    PubMed Central

    White, T W; Bruzzone, R; Goodenough, D A; Paul, D L

    1992-01-01

    The crystalline lens is an attractive system to study the biology of intercellular communication; however, the identity of the structural components of gap junctions in the lens has been controversial. We have cloned a novel member of the connexin family of gap junction proteins, Cx50, and have shown that it is likely to correspond to the previously described lens fiber protein MP70. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of MP70 closely matches the sequence predicted by the clone. Cx50 mRNA is detected only in the lens, among the 12 organs tested, and this distribution is indistinguishable from that of MP70 protein. A monoclonal antibody directed against MP70 and an anti-Cx50 antibody produced against a synthetic peptide identify the same proteins on western blots and produce identical patterns of immunofluorescence on frozen sections of rodent lens. We also show that expression of Cx50 in paired Xenopus oocytes induces high levels of voltage-dependent conductance. This indicates that Cx50 is a functional member of the connexin family with unique physiological properties. With the cloning of Cx50, all known participants in gap junction formation between various cell types in the lens are available for study and reconstitution in experimental systems. Images PMID:1325220

  5. Oncostatin M induces upregulation of claudin-2 in rodent hepatocytes coinciding with changes in morphology and function of tight junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Imamura, Masafumi; Kojima, Takashi . E-mail: ktakashi@sapmed.ac.jp; Lan, Mengdong; Son, Seiichi; Murata, Masaki; Osanai, Makoto; Chiba, Hideki; Hirata, Koichi; Sawada, Norimasa

    2007-05-15

    In rodent livers, integral tight junction (TJ) proteins claudin-1, -2, -3, -5 and -14 are detected and play crucial roles in the barrier to keep bile in bile canaculi away from the blood circulation. Claudin-2 shows a lobular gradient increasing from periportal to pericentral hepatocytes, whereas claudin-1 and -3 are expressed in the whole liver lobule. Although claudin-2 expression induces cation-selective channels in tight junctions of epithelial cells, the physiological functions and regulation of claudin-2 in hepatocytes remain unclear. Oncostatin M (OSM) is a multifunctional cytokine implicated in the differentiation of hepatocytes that induces formation of E-cadherin-based adherens junctions in fetal hepatocytes. In this study, we examined whether OSM could induce expression and function of claudin-2 in rodent hepatocytes, immortalized mouse and primary cultured proliferative rat hepatocytes. In the immortalized mouse and primary cultured proliferative rat hepatocytes, treatment with OSM markedly increased mRNA and protein of claudin-2 together with formation of developed networks of TJ strands. The increase of claudin-2 enhanced the paracellular barrier function which depended on molecular size. The increase of claudin-2 expression induced by OSM in rodent hepatocytes was regulated through distinct signaling pathways including PKC. These results suggest that expression of claudin-2 in rodent hepatocytes may play a specific role as controlling the size of paracellular permeability in the barrier to keep bile in bile canaculi.

  6. Kin of IRRE-like Protein 2 Is a Phosphorylated Glycoprotein That Regulates Basal Insulin Secretion*

    PubMed Central

    Yesildag, Burcak; Bock, Thomas; Herrmanns, Karolin; Wollscheid, Bernd; Stoffel, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Direct interactions among pancreatic β-cells via cell surface proteins inhibit basal and enhance stimulated insulin secretion. Here, we functionally and biochemically characterized Kirrel2, an immunoglobulin superfamily protein with β-cell-specific expression in the pancreas. Our results show that Kirrel2 is a phosphorylated glycoprotein that co-localizes and interacts with the adherens junction proteins E-cadherin and β-catenin in MIN6 cells. We further demonstrate that the phosphosites Tyr595–596 are functionally relevant for the regulation of Kirrel2 stability and localization. Analysis of the extracellular and intracellular domains of Kirrel2 revealed that it is cleaved and shed from MIN6 cells and that the remaining membrane spanning cytoplasmic domain is processed by γ-secretase complex. Kirrel2 knockdown with RNA interference in MIN6 cells and ablation of Kirrel2 from mice with genetic deletion resulted in increased basal insulin secretion from β-cells, with no immediate influence on stimulated insulin secretion, total insulin content, or whole body glucose metabolism. Our results show that in pancreatic β-cells Kirrel2 localizes to adherens junctions, is regulated by multiple post-translational events, including glycosylation, extracellular cleavage, and phosphorylation, and engages in the regulation of basal insulin secretion. PMID:26324709

  7. The Role of Aquaporin and Tight Junction Proteins in the Regulation of Water Movement in Larval Zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    PubMed Central

    Kwong, Raymond W. M.; Kumai, Yusuke; Perry, Steve F.

    2013-01-01

    Teleost fish living in freshwater are challenged by passive water influx; however the molecular mechanisms regulating water influx in fish are not well understood. The potential involvement of aquaporins (AQP) and epithelial tight junction proteins in the regulation of transcellular and paracellular water movement was investigated in larval zebrafish (Danio rerio). We observed that the half-time for saturation of water influx (Ku) was 4.3±0.9 min, and reached equilibrium at approximately 30 min. These findings suggest a high turnover rate of water between the fish and the environment. Water influx was reduced by the putative AQP inhibitor phloretin (100 or 500 μM). Immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy revealed that AQP1a1 protein was expressed in cells on the yolk sac epithelium. A substantial number of these AQP1a1-positive cells were identified as ionocytes, either H+-ATPase-rich cells or Na+/K+-ATPase-rich cells. AQP1a1 appeared to be expressed predominantly on the basolateral membranes of ionocytes, suggesting its potential involvement in regulating ionocyte volume and/or water flux into the circulation. Additionally, translational gene knockdown of AQP1a1 protein reduced water influx by approximately 30%, further indicating a role for AQP1a1 in facilitating transcellular water uptake. On the other hand, incubation with the Ca2+-chelator EDTA or knockdown of the epithelial tight junction protein claudin-b significantly increased water influx. These findings indicate that the epithelial tight junctions normally act to restrict paracellular water influx. Together, the results of the present study provide direct in vivo evidence that water movement can occur through transcellular routes (via AQP); the paracellular routes may become significant when the paracellular permeability is increased. PMID:23967101

  8. The role of aquaporin and tight junction proteins in the regulation of water movement in larval zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Kwong, Raymond W M; Kumai, Yusuke; Perry, Steve F

    2013-01-01

    Teleost fish living in freshwater are challenged by passive water influx; however the molecular mechanisms regulating water influx in fish are not well understood. The potential involvement of aquaporins (AQP) and epithelial tight junction proteins in the regulation of transcellular and paracellular water movement was investigated in larval zebrafish (Danio rerio). We observed that the half-time for saturation of water influx (K(u)) was 4.3±0.9 min, and reached equilibrium at approximately 30 min. These findings suggest a high turnover rate of water between the fish and the environment. Water influx was reduced by the putative AQP inhibitor phloretin (100 or 500 μM). Immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy revealed that AQP1a1 protein was expressed in cells on the yolk sac epithelium. A substantial number of these AQP1a1-positive cells were identified as ionocytes, either H⁺-ATPase-rich cells or Na⁺/K⁺-ATPase-rich cells. AQP1a1 appeared to be expressed predominantly on the basolateral membranes of ionocytes, suggesting its potential involvement in regulating ionocyte volume and/or water flux into the circulation. Additionally, translational gene knockdown of AQP1a1 protein reduced water influx by approximately 30%, further indicating a role for AQP1a1 in facilitating transcellular water uptake. On the other hand, incubation with the Ca²⁺-chelator EDTA or knockdown of the epithelial tight junction protein claudin-b significantly increased water influx. These findings indicate that the epithelial tight junctions normally act to restrict paracellular water influx. Together, the results of the present study provide direct in vivo evidence that water movement can occur through transcellular routes (via AQP); the paracellular routes may become significant when the paracellular permeability is increased.

  9. A high-grain diet alters the omasal epithelial structure and expression of tight junction proteins in a goat model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun-Hua; Xu, Ting-Ting; Zhu, Wei-Yun; Mao, Sheng-Yong

    2014-07-01

    The omasal epithelial barrier plays important roles in maintaining nutrient absorption and immune homeostasis in ruminants. However, little information is currently available about the changes in omasal epithelial barrier function at the structural and molecular levels during feeding of a high-grain (HG) diet. Ten male goats were randomly assigned to two groups, fed either a hay diet (0% grain; n = 5) or HG diet (65% grain; n = 5). Changes in omasal epithelial structure and expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins were determined via electron microscopy and Western blot analysis. After 7 weeks on each diet, omasal contents in the HG group showed significantly lower pH (P <0.001) and significantly higher concentrations of free lipopolysaccharides (LPS; P = 0.001) than the hay group. The goats fed a HG diet showed profound alterations in omasal epithelial structure and TJ proteins, corresponding to depression of thickness of total epithelia, stratum granulosum, and the sum of the stratum spinosum and stratum basale, marked epithelial cellular damage, erosion of intercellular junctions and down-regulation in expression of the TJ proteins, claudin-4 and occludin. The study demonstrates that feeding a HG diet is associated with omasal epithelial cellular damage and changes in expression of TJ proteins. These research findings provide an insight into the possible significance of diet on the omasal epithelial barrier in ruminants.

  10. Drosophila Syncrip modulates the expression of mRNAs encoding key synaptic proteins required for morphology at the neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Suzanne M; Yang, Lu; Halstead, James M; Hamilton, Russell S; Meignin, Carine; Davis, Ilan

    2014-10-01

    Localized mRNA translation is thought to play a key role in synaptic plasticity, but the identity of the transcripts and the molecular mechanism underlying their function are still poorly understood. Here, we show that Syncrip, a regulator of localized translation in the Drosophila oocyte and a component of mammalian neuronal mRNA granules, is also expressed in the Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction, where it regulates synaptic growth. We use RNA-immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing and qRT-PCR to show that Syncrip associates with a number of mRNAs encoding proteins with key synaptic functions, including msp-300, syd-1, neurexin-1, futsch, highwire, discs large, and α-spectrin. The protein levels of MSP-300, Discs large, and a number of others are significantly affected in syncrip null mutants. Furthermore, syncrip mutants show a reduction in MSP-300 protein levels and defects in muscle nuclear distribution characteristic of msp-300 mutants. Our results highlight a number of potential new players in localized translation during synaptic plasticity in the neuromuscular junction. We propose that Syncrip acts as a modulator of synaptic plasticity by regulating the translation of these key mRNAs encoding synaptic scaffolding proteins and other important components involved in synaptic growth and function.

  11. Behavior of Primary Cilia and Tricellular Tight Junction Proteins during Differentiation in Temperature-Sensitive Mouse Cochlear Precursor Hair Cells.

    PubMed

    Kakuki, Takuya; Kaneko, Yakuto; Takano, Kenichi; Ninomiya, Takafumi; Kohno, Takayuki; Kojima, Takashi; Himi, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    In the sensory hair cells of the mammalian cochlea, the primary cilia in the planar cell polarity as well as the tight junctions in the epithelial cell polarity and the barrier are important to maintain normal hearing. Temperature-sensitive mouse cochlear precursor hair cells were used to investigate the behavior of primary cilia and tricellular tight junction proteins during the differentiation of sensory hair cells. In undifferentiated cells (incubated at 33°C), many acetylated tubulin-positive primary cilia were observed, and each was accompanied with an x03B3;-tubulin-positive basal body. The primary cilia had a '9 + 0' architecture with nine outer microtubule doublets but lacking a central pair of microtubules. In differentiated cells (incubated at 39°C), acetylated tubulin-positive primary cilia as well as acetylated tubulin-positive cilia-like structures were partially observed on the cell surface. In differentiated cells, the number of primary cilia was markedly reduced compared with undifferentiated cells, and innumerable cilia-like structures with no ciliary pockets were partially observed on the cell surface. In undifferentiated cells, few tricellulin molecules and lipolysis-stimulated lipoprotein receptors (LSRs) were observed in the cytoplasm. In differentiated cells, many tricellulin molecules and LSRs were observed on the membranes and within the cytoplasm. Conditional immortalized mouse cochlear precursor hair cells may be useful to investigate the roles of primary cilia and tricellular tight junctions during cellular differentiation and degeneration such as apoptosis.

  12. Butyrate enhances the intestinal barrier by facilitating tight junction assembly via activation of AMP-activated protein kinase in Caco-2 cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Peng, Luying; Li, Zhong-Rong; Green, Robert S; Holzman, Ian R; Lin, Jing

    2009-09-01

    Butyrate, one of the SCFA, promotes the development of the intestinal barrier. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the butyrate regulation of the intestinal barrier are unknown. To test the hypothesis that the effect of butyrate on the intestinal barrier is mediated by the regulation of the assembly of tight junctions involving the activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), we determined the effect of butyrate on the intestinal barrier by measuring the transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and inulin permeability in a Caco-2 cell monolayer model. We further used a calcium switch assay to study the assembly of epithelial tight junctions and determined the effect of butyrate on the assembly of epithelial tight junctions and AMPK activity. We demonstrated that the butyrate treatment increased AMPK activity and accelerated the assembly of tight junctions as shown by the reorganization of tight junction proteins, as well as the development of TER. AMPK activity was also upregulated by butyrate during calcium switch-induced tight junction assembly. Compound C, a specific AMPK inhibitor, inhibited the butyrate-induced activation of AMPK. The facilitating effect of butyrate on the increases in TER in standard culture media, as well as after calcium switch, was abolished by compound C. We conclude that butyrate enhances the intestinal barrier by regulating the assembly of tight junctions. This dynamic process is mediated by the activation of AMPK. These results suggest an intriguing link between SCFA and the intracellular energy sensor for the development of the intestinal barrier.

  13. The Drosophila tricellular junction protein Gliotactin regulates its own mRNA levels through BMP-mediated induction of miR-184

    PubMed Central

    Sharifkhodaei, Zohreh; Padash-Barmchi, Mojgan; Gilbert, Mary M.; Samarasekera, Gayathri; Fulga, Tudor A.; Van Vactor, David; Auld, Vanessa J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epithelial bicellular and tricellular junctions are essential for establishing and maintaining permeability barriers. Tricellular junctions are formed by the convergence of three bicellular junctions at the corners of neighbouring epithelia. Gliotactin, a member of the Neuroligin family, is located at the Drosophila tricellular junction, and is crucial for the formation of tricellular and septate junctions, as well as permeability barrier function. Gliotactin protein levels are tightly controlled by phosphorylation at tyrosine residues and endocytosis. Blocking endocytosis or overexpressing Gliotactin results in the spread of Gliotactin from the tricellular junction, resulting in apoptosis, delamination and migration of epithelial cells. We show that Gliotactin levels are also regulated at the mRNA level by micro (mi)RNA-mediated degradation and that miRNAs are targeted to a short region in the 3′UTR that includes a conserved miR-184 target site. miR-184 also targets a suite of septate junction proteins, including NrxIV, coracle and Mcr. miR-184 expression is triggered when Gliotactin is overexpressed, leading to activation of the BMP signalling pathway. Gliotactin specifically interferes with Dad, an inhibitory SMAD, leading to activation of the Tkv type-I receptor and activation of Mad to elevate the biogenesis and expression of miR-184. PMID:26906422

  14. Absence of mutations in the regulatory domain of the gap junction protein connexin 43 in patients with visceroatrial heterotaxy.

    PubMed Central

    Penman Splitt, M.; Tsai, M. Y.; Burn, J.; Goodship, J. A.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequency of mutations in the regulatory domain of the gap junction protein connexin 43 in patients with visceroatrial heterotaxy. DESIGN: Mutation screening of the terminal 200 base pairs of connexin43 gene coding sequence in a series of patients from tertiary care centres. PATIENTS: 48 patients with visceroatrial heterotaxy attending UK Regional Paediatric Cardiology Centres. RESULTS: No changes from the published connexin43 consensus sequence were found in any of the 48 patients studied. CONCLUSIONS: Germline mutations of the phosphorylation sites in teh regulatory domain of the connexin43 gene are rare in patients with visceroatrial heterotaxy. PMID:9155619

  15. Quantitative atlas of blood-brain barrier transporters, receptors, and tight junction proteins in rats and common marmoset.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, Yutaro; Uchida, Yasuo; Tachikawa, Masanori; Inoue, Takashi; Ohtsuki, Sumio; Terasaki, Tetsuya

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the protein amounts of blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability-related transporters, receptors, and tight junction proteins in Sprague Dawley and Wistar rats and common marmoset, and also to investigate inter-species and inter-strain differences across rodents and primates. Quantification of target proteins in isolated brain capillaries was conducted by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry-based quantitative targeted absolute proteomics, with in silico peptide selection. Most target proteins showed inter-rodent, inter-primate species, and inter-rat strain differences of less than 2-fold. Comparison of rat and human BBB showed that P-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance-associated protein 4, monocarboxylate transporter 1, l-type amino acid transporter, and organic anion transporter 3 exhibited differences of more than two-fold in protein abundance, whereas the amounts of breast cancer resistance protein, glucose transporter 1, and insulin receptor were similar in rat and human. In contrast, the differences between marmoset and human BBB were less than 2-fold for almost all measured proteins. Thus, the molecular basis of BBB functions may be similar in marmoset and human, whereas that of rats shows significant differences. The marmoset may be a good model to access in vivo human BBB permeability characteristics, as an alternative to rat and macaque monkey.

  16. Tight Junction Proteins Claudin-1 and Occludin Control Hepatitis C Virus Entry and Are Downregulated during Infection To Prevent Superinfection ▿ §

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shufeng; Yang, Wei; Shen, Le; Turner, Jerrold R.; Coyne, Carolyn B.; Wang, Tianyi

    2009-01-01

    A tight junction (TJ) protein, claudin-1 (CLDN1), was identified recently as a key factor for hepatitis C virus (HCV) entry. Here, we show that another TJ protein, occludin, is also required for HCV entry. Mutational study of CLDN1 revealed that its tight junctional distribution plays an important role in mediating viral entry. Together, these data support the model in which HCV enters liver cells from the TJ. Interestingly, HCV infection of Huh-7 hepatoma cells downregulated the expression of CLDN1 and occludin, preventing superinfection. The altered TJ protein expression may contribute to the morphological and functional changes observed in HCV-infected hepatocytes. PMID:19052094

  17. Possible role of HIWI2 in modulating tight junction proteins in retinal pigment epithelial cells through Akt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Sivagurunathan, Suganya; Palanisamy, Karthikka; Arunachalam, Jayamuruga Pandian; Chidambaram, Subbulakshmi

    2017-03-01

    PIWI subfamily of proteins is shown to be primarily expressed in germline cells. They maintain the genomic integrity by silencing the transposable elements. Although the role of PIWI proteins in germ cells has been documented, their presence and function in somatic cells remains unclear. Intriguingly, we detected all four members of PIWI-like proteins in human ocular tissues and somatic cell lines. When HIWI2 was knocked down in retinal pigment epithelial cells, the typical honeycomb morphology was affected. Further analysis showed that the expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins, CLDN1, and TJP1 were altered in HIWI2 knockdown. Moreover, confocal imaging revealed disrupted TJP1 assembly at the TJ. Previous studies report the role of GSK3β in regulating TJ proteins. Accordingly, phospho-kinase proteome profiler array indicated increased phosphorylation of Akt and GSK3α/β in HIWI2 knockdown, suggesting that HIWI2 might affect TJ proteins through Akt-GSK3α/β signaling axis. Moreover, treating the HIWI2 knockdown cells with wortmannin increased the levels of TJP1 and CLDN1. Taken together, our study demonstrates the presence of PIWI-like proteins in somatic cells and the possible role of HIWI2 in preserving the functional integrity of epithelial cells probably by modulating the phosphorylation status of Akt.

  18. Effects of Interleukin-6 on the Expression of Tight Junction Proteins in Isolated Cerebral Microvessels from Yearling and Adult Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Susan S.; Min, May; Cummings, Erin E.; Chen, Xiaodi; Sadowska, Grazyna B.; Sharma, Surendra; Stonestreet, Barbara S.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The blood-brain barrier is a selective diffusion barrier between brain parenchyma and the intravascular compartment. Tight junctions (TJs) are integral components of the blood-brain barrier. Pro-inflammatory cytokines are important in the pathogenesis of brain injury and could modify the protein constituents of TJs. We hypothesized that IL-6 down-regulates key protein constituents of endothelial TJs (e.g., occludin and claudin-5). Methods We examined the effects of IL-6 on TJ protein expression using an in vitro blood-brain barrier model. We isolated microvessels from yearling and adult ovine cerebral cortex and placed them into culture with IL-6 concentrations of 0 (control, phosphate buffered saline), 1, 10, and 100 ng/mL for 24 hours. Cerebral microvessels were harvested, Western immunoblot performed for occludin and claudin-5, densitometry performed, and results expressed as a ratio to control values. Results Western immunoblot analysis showed that treatment with 100 ng/ml of IL-6, but not the lower concentrations, reduced (P<0.05) occludin expression in microvessels from yearling and adult sheep, and claudin-5 in microvessels from adult sheep However, treatment with 10 ng/ml of IL-6 increased claudin-5 in microvessels from yearling sheep. The percent of lactate dehydrogenase released from the microvessels into the surrounding media was not increased by IL-6 treatment, suggesting that the reductions in TJ proteins did not result from cell death. Treatment of adult cerebral cortical microvessels with IL-6 pre-incubated with anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibodies partially attenuated the reduction in claudin-5. Conclusion We conclude that IL-6 modulates tight junction protein expression in cerebral cortical microvessels from yearling and adult sheep. PMID:23867217

  19. Loss of tight junction proteins (Claudin 1, 4, and 7) correlates with aggressive behavior in colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Süren, Dinç; Yıldırım, Mustafa; Kaya, Vildan; Alikanoğlu, Arsenal Sezgin; Bülbüller, Nurullah; Yıldız, Mustafa; Sezer, Cem

    2014-01-01

    Background Tight junction proteins in the cell organize paracellular permeability and they play a critical role in apical cell-to-cell adhesion and epithelial polarity. Claudins are major integral membrane proteins of tight junctions, especially Claudin 1, 4, and 7, which are known as the impermeability Claudins. In this study, we investigated the importance of loss of Claudin 1, 4, and 7 expression, and their relation to tumor progression in colorectal cancer patients. Material/Methods Loss of Claudin 1, 4, and 7 expression was examined by immunohistochemical method in 70 patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer. Cases with loss of Claudin expression in <1/3 of tumor cells were classified as mild loss, whereas cases with loss of Claudin expression ≥1/3 of tumor cells were classified as moderate-to-marked loss in order to evaluate the relation between loss of Claudin 1, 4, and 7 expression and clinicopathologic data. Results The severe suppression of Claudin 1, 4, and 7 expression was found to be significantly related to the depth of tumor invasion, positive regional lymph nodes, histological grade, lymphovascular invasion, perineural invasion, and lymphocytic response. Additionally, severity of loss in Claudin 4 expression was found to have a relation with distant metastasis. Conclusions Claudin 1, 4, and 7 are important building blocks of paracellular adhesion molecules. Their decreased expression in colorectal cancer seems to have critical effects on cell proliferation, motility, invasion, and immune response against the tumor. PMID:25038829

  20. ROCK1 but not ROCK2 contributes to RhoA signaling and NMIIA-mediated contractility at the epithelial zonula adherens

    PubMed Central

    Priya, Rashmi; Liang, Xuan; Teo, Jessica L.; Duszyc, Kinga; Yap, Alpha S.; Gomez, Guillermo A.

    2017-01-01

    Rho kinases (ROCK1 and ROCK2) function downstream of the small GTPase RhoA to drive actomyosin cytoskeletal remodeling. It has often been believed that ROCK1 and ROCK2 may be functionally redundant, as they share a highly conserved kinase domain. However, in this study, we report differential functional effects for these ROCKs at the epithelial zonula adherens (ZA). Using specific siRNA, we found that ROCK1 depletion disrupted cadherin organization at the ZA, accompanied by loss of F-actin and NMIIA, whereas ROCK2 knockdown had no significant effect. Further, ROCK1, but not ROCK2, was necessary to stabilize GTP-RhoA at the ZA, thereby sustaining junctional tension and inhibiting intraepithelial cell movement. We also found that nonmuscle myosin IIA is a major determinant of ROCK1 cortical stability. Thus, despite sharing the catalytic domain with ROCK2, ROCK1 appears to be the dominant kinase essential for junctional integrity and contractile tension at epithelial ZA. PMID:28035042

  1. Localization and Function of Pals1-associated Tight Junction Protein in Drosophila Is Regulated by Two Distinct Apical Complexes.

    PubMed

    Sen, Arnab; Sun, Rui; Krahn, Michael P

    2015-05-22

    The transmembrane protein Crumbs (Crb) and its intracellular adaptor protein Pals1 (Stardust, Sdt in Drosophila) play a crucial role in the establishment and maintenance of apical-basal polarity in epithelial cells in various organisms. In contrast, the multiple PDZ domain-containing protein Pals1-associated tight junction protein (PATJ), which has been described to form a complex with Crb/Sdt, is not essential for apical basal polarity or for the stability of the Crb/Sdt complex in the Drosophila epidermis. Here we show that, in the embryonic epidermis, Sdt is essential for the correct subcellular localization of PATJ in differentiated epithelial cells but not during cellularization. Consistently, the L27 domain of PATJ is crucial for the correct localization and function of the protein. Our data further indicate that the four PDZ domains of PATJ function, to a large extent, in redundancy, regulating the function of the protein. Interestingly, the PATJ-Sdt heterodimer is not only recruited to the apical cell-cell contacts by binding to Crb but depends on functional Bazooka (Baz). However, biochemical experiments show that PATJ associates with both complexes, the Baz-Sdt and the Crb-Sdt complex, in the mature epithelium of the embryonic epidermis, suggesting a role of these two complexes for the function of PATJ during the development of Drosophila.

  2. Establishment of cell-cell junctions depends on the oligomeric states of VE-cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Bibert, Stéphanie; Ayari, Hélène; Riveline, Daniel; Concord, Evelyne; Hermant, Bastien; Vernet, Thierry; Gulino-Debrac, Danièle

    2008-01-01

    Specifically expressed at intercellular adherens junctions of endothelial cells, VE-cadherin is a receptor that exhibits particular self-association properties. Indeed, in vitro studies demonstrated that the extracellular part of VE-cadherin elaborates Ca++-dependent hexameric structures. We hypothesized that this assembly could be at the basis of a new cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion mechanism. To verify this assumption, we first demonstrated that VE-cadherin can elaborate hexamers at the cell surface of confluent endothelial cells. Second, mutations were introduced within the extracellular part of VE-cadherin to destabilize the hexamer. Following an in vitro screening, three mutants were selected, among which, one is able to elaborate only dimers. The selected mutations were expressed as C-terminal Green Fluorescent Protein fusions in CHO cells. Despite their capacity to elaborate nascent cell-cell contacts, the mutants seem to be rapidly degraded and or internalized. Altogether, our results suggest that the formation of VE-cadherin hexamers protects this receptor and might allow the elaboration of mature endothelial cell-cell junctions. PMID:18343874

  3. CHOLESTEROL DEPLETION ALTERS DETERGENT-SPECIFIC SOLUBILITY PROFILES OF SELECTED TIGHT JUNCTION PROTEINS AND THE PHOSPHORYLATION OF OCCLUDIN

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Robert D.; Francis, Stacy A.; McCarthy, Karin M.; Casas, Elizabeth; Thiele, Christoph; Schneeberger, Eveline E.

    2007-01-01

    Differential centrifugation of Triton X-100 or CHAPS lysates from control and cholesterol (CH) depleted MDCK II cells, segregated integral tight junction (TJ) proteins associated with detergent resistant membranes (DRMs) into two groups. Group A proteins (occludin, claudin-2 and -3) were detected in large, intermediate and small aggregates in both detergents, whereas group B proteins (claudin-1, -4 and -7) were observed in small aggregates in TX-100 and in intermediate and small aggregates in CHAPS. Depletion of CH altered the distribution of group A and B proteins among the three size categories in a detergent-specific manner. In lysates produced with octyl glucoside, a detergent that selectively extracts proteins from DRMs, group A proteins were undetectable in large aggregates and CH depletion did not alter the distribution of either group A or B proteins in intermediate or small aggregates. Neither occludin (group A) nor claudin-1 (group B) was in intimate enough contact with CH to be cross-linked to [3H]-photo-cholesterol. However, antibodies to either TJ protein co-immunoprecipitated caveolin-1, a CH-binding protein. Unlike claudins, occludin’s presence in TJs and DRMs did not require palmitoylation. Equilibrium density centrifugation on discontinuous OptiPrep gradients revealed detergent-related differences in the densities of TJ-bearing DRMs. There was little or no change in those densities after CH depletion. Removing CH from the plasma membrane increased tyrosine and threonine phosphorylation of occludin, and transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) within 30 min. After 2 h of CH efflux, phospho-occludin levels and TER fell below control values. We conclude that the association of integral TJ proteins with DRMS, pelleted at low speeds, is partially CH dependent. However, the buoyant density of TJ-associated DRMs is a function of the detergent used and is insensitive to decreases in CH. PMID:17574235

  4. Claudin-8 and -27 tight junction proteins in puffer fish Tetraodon nigroviridis acclimated to freshwater and seawater.

    PubMed

    Bagherie-Lachidan, Mazdak; Wright, Stephen I; Kelly, Scott P

    2009-05-01

    Genes encoding for claudin-8 and -27 tight junction proteins in the euryhaline puffer fish (Tetraodon nigroviridis) were identified using its recently sequenced genome. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that multiple genes encoding for claudin-8 proteins (designated Tncldn8a, Tncldn8b, Tncldn8c and Tncldn8d) arose by tandem gene duplication. In contrast, both tandem and whole genome duplication events appear to have generated genes encoding for claudin-27 proteins (designated Tncldn27a, Tncldn27b, Tncldn27c and Tncldn27d). Tncldn8 and Tncldn27 mRNA were widely distributed in Tetraodon, suggesting involvement in various physiological processes. All Tncldn8 and Tncldn27 genes were expressed in gill and skin tissue (i.e., epithelia exposed directly to the external environment). A potential role for claudin-8 and -27 proteins in the regulation of hydromineral balance in Tetraodon was investigated by examining alterations in mRNA abundance in select ionoregulatory tissue of fish acclimated to freshwater (FW) and seawater (SW). In FW or SW, Tetraodon exhibited alterations in Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity (a correlate of transcellular transport) typical of a euryhaline teleost fish. Simultaneously, tissue and gene specific alterations in Tncldn8 and Tncldn27 transcript abundance occurred. These data provide some insight into the duplication history of cldn8 and cldn27 genes in fishes and suggest a possible role for claudin-8 and -27 proteins in the osmoregulatory strategies of euryhaline teleosts.

  5. Mechanism of Holliday junction resolution by the human GEN1 protein

    PubMed Central

    Rass, Ulrich; Compton, Sarah A.; Matos, Joao; Singleton, Martin R.; Ip, Stephen C.Y.; Blanco, Miguel G.; Griffith, Jack D.; West, Stephen C.

    2010-01-01

    Holliday junction (HJ) resolution is essential for chromosome segregation at meiosis and the repair of stalled/collapsed replication forks in mitotic cells. All organisms possess nucleases that promote HJ resolution by the introduction of symmetrically related nicks in two strands at, or close to, the junction point. GEN1, a member of the Rad2/XPG nuclease family, was isolated recently from human cells and shown to promote HJ resolution in vitro and in vivo. Here, we provide the first biochemical/structural characterization of GEN1, showing that, like the Escherichia coli HJ resolvase RuvC, it binds specifically to HJs and resolves them by a dual incision mechanism in which nicks are introduced in the pair of continuous (noncrossing) strands within the lifetime of the GEN1–HJ complex. In contrast to RuvC, but like other Rad2/XPG family members such as FEN1, GEN1 is a monomeric 5′-flap endonuclease. However, the unique feature of GEN1 that distinguishes it from other Rad2/XPG nucleases is its ability to dimerize on HJs. This functional adaptation provides the two symmetrically aligned active sites required for HJ resolution. PMID:20634321

  6. Resolvin D1 reduces deterioration of tight junction proteins by upregulating HO-1 in LPS-induced mice.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wanli; Wang, Huiqing; Wang, Lei; Yao, Chengye; Yuan, Ruixia; Wu, Qingping

    2013-09-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by increased pulmonary permeability with high mortality. Resolvin D1 (RvD1), which has potent anti-inflammatory and pro-resolving activity, can attenuate pulmonary edema in the animal model of ALI. However, the mechanism underlying the protection of RvD1 on pulmonary edema is still unknown. Here we explore the effects and mechanism of RvD1 on the disruption of tight junction protein that results in the permeability edema in a model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI. The severity of pulmonary edema was assessed by wet-to-dry rate and Evans blue infiltration; expressions of tight junction (TJ) proteins occludin and zona occludin-1 (ZO-1) were examined by immunofluorescence staining and western blot; mRNA in lung tissue was studied by real time-PCR; the TUNEL kit was performed for the detection of apoptosis of pulmonary barrier. Twenty-four hours after LPS inhalation by mice, wet-to-dry rate and Evans blue infiltration indicated that pretreatment with RvD1 relieved the pulmonary edema and pulmonary capillary permeability. Moreover, RvD1 attenuated the LPS-induced deterioration of TJ protein ZO-1 and occludin significantly. And we found that RvD1 increased heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression contributed to the protection on the deterioration of TJs. In addition, we found that RvD1 could reduce pulmonary cellular apoptosis in LPS-induced mice. In conclusion, RvD1 possesses the ability that relieves the pulmonary edema and restores pulmonary capillary permeability and reduces disruption of TJs in LPS-induced ALI of mice, at least in part, by upregulating HO-1 expression.

  7. Chlorogenic Acid Decreases Intestinal Permeability and Increases Expression of Intestinal Tight Junction Proteins in Weaned Rats Challenged with LPS

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Zheng; Liu, Shiqiang; Zhou, Yan; Mi, Shumei; Liu, Gang; Wu, Xin; Yao, Kang; Assaad, Houssein; Deng, Zeyuan; Hou, Yongqing; Wu, Guoyao; Yin, Yulong

    2014-01-01

    Chlorogenic acid, a natural phenolic acid present in fruits and plants, provides beneficial effects for human health. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether chlorogenic acid (CHA) could improve the intestinal barrier integrity for weaned rats with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Thirty-two weaned male Sprague Dawley rats (21±1 d of age; 62.26±2.73 g) were selected and randomly allotted to four treatments, including weaned rat control, LPS-challenged and chlorogenic acid (CHA) supplemented group (orally 20 mg/kg and 50 mg/kg body). Dietary supplementation with CHA decreased (P<0.05) the concentrations of urea and albumin in the serum, compared to the LPS-challenged group. The levels of IFN-γ and TNF-α were lower (P<0.05) in the jejunal and colon of weaned rats receiving CHA supplementation, in comparison with the control group. CHA supplementation increased (P<0.05) villus height and the ratio of villus height to crypt depth in the jejunal and ileal mucosae under condictions of LPS challenge. CHA supplementation decreased (P<0.05) intestinal permeability, which was indicated by the ratio of lactulose to mannitol and serum DAO activity, when compared to weaned rats with LPS challenge. Immunohistochemical analysis of tight junction proteins revealed that ZO-1 and occludin protein abundances in the jejunum and colon were increased (P<0.05) by CHA supplementation. Additionally, results of immunoblot analysis revealed that the amount of occludin in the colon was also increased (P<0.05) in CHA-supplemented rats. In conclusion, CHA decreases intestinal permeability and increases intestinal expression of tight junction proteins in weaned rats challenged with LPS. PMID:24887396

  8. Chlorogenic acid decreases intestinal permeability and increases expression of intestinal tight junction proteins in weaned rats challenged with LPS.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Zheng; Liu, Shiqiang; Zhou, Yan; Mi, Shumei; Liu, Gang; Wu, Xin; Yao, Kang; Assaad, Houssein; Deng, Zeyuan; Hou, Yongqing; Wu, Guoyao; Yin, Yulong

    2014-01-01

    Chlorogenic acid, a natural phenolic acid present in fruits and plants, provides beneficial effects for human health. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether chlorogenic acid (CHA) could improve the intestinal barrier integrity for weaned rats with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Thirty-two weaned male Sprague Dawley rats (21 ± 1 d of age; 62.26 ± 2.73 g) were selected and randomly allotted to four treatments, including weaned rat control, LPS-challenged and chlorogenic acid (CHA) supplemented group (orally 20 mg/kg and 50 mg/kg body). Dietary supplementation with CHA decreased (P<0.05) the concentrations of urea and albumin in the serum, compared to the LPS-challenged group. The levels of IFN-γ and TNF-α were lower (P<0.05) in the jejunal and colon of weaned rats receiving CHA supplementation, in comparison with the control group. CHA supplementation increased (P<0.05) villus height and the ratio of villus height to crypt depth in the jejunal and ileal mucosae under condictions of LPS challenge. CHA supplementation decreased (P<0.05) intestinal permeability, which was indicated by the ratio of lactulose to mannitol and serum DAO activity, when compared to weaned rats with LPS challenge. Immunohistochemical analysis of tight junction proteins revealed that ZO-1 and occludin protein abundances in the jejunum and colon were increased (P<0.05) by CHA supplementation. Additionally, results of immunoblot analysis revealed that the amount of occludin in the colon was also increased (P<0.05) in CHA-supplemented rats. In conclusion, CHA decreases intestinal permeability and increases intestinal expression of tight junction proteins in weaned rats challenged with LPS.

  9. Calcium Dobesilate Inhibits the Alterations in Tight Junction Proteins and Leukocyte Adhesion to Retinal Endothelial Cells Induced by Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Leal, Ermelindo C.; Martins, João; Voabil, Paula; Liberal, Joana; Chiavaroli, Carlo; Bauer, Jacques; Cunha-Vaz, José; Ambrósio, António F.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Calcium dobesilate (CaD) has been used in the treatment of diabetic retinopathy in the last decades, but its mechanisms of action are not elucidated. CaD is able to correct the excessive vascular permeability in the retina of diabetic patients and in experimental diabetes. We investigated the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the protective effects of CaD against the increase in blood–retinal barrier (BRB) permeability induced by diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Wistar rats were divided into three groups: controls, streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, and diabetic rats treated with CaD. The BRB breakdown was evaluated using Evans blue. The content or distribution of tight junction proteins (occludin, claudin-5, and zonula occluden-1 [ZO-1]), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) was evaluated by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Leukocyte adhesion was evaluated in retinal vessels and in vitro. Oxidative stress was evaluated by the detection of oxidized carbonyls and tyrosine nitration. NF-κB activation was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS Diabetes increased the BRB permeability and retinal thickness. Diabetes also decreased occludin and claudin-5 levels and altered the distribution of ZO-1 and occludin in retinal vessels. These changes were inhibited by CaD treatment. CaD also inhibited the increase in leukocyte adhesion to retinal vessels or endothelial cells and in ICAM-1 levels, induced by diabetes or elevated glucose. Moreover, CaD decreased oxidative stress and p38 MAPK and NF-κB activation caused by diabetes. CONCLUSIONS CaD prevents the BRB breakdown induced by diabetes, by restoring tight junction protein levels and organization and decreasing leukocyte adhesion to retinal vessels. The protective effects of CaD are likely to involve the inhibition of p38 MAPK and NF-κB activation, possibly through the inhibition of oxidative

  10. Effects of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate on gap and tight junction protein expression in the testis of prepubertal rats.

    PubMed

    Sobarzo, Cristian M; Lustig, Livia; Ponzio, Roberto; Suescun, María Olga; Denduchis, Berta

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze whether di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), a Sertoli and Leydig cell toxicant, is able to induce alterations in the expression of testicular gap and tight junction proteins. DEHP was administered by gavage (1 g/5 mL corn oil/kg body weight/day) to 25-day-old male Sprague-Dawley rats for 2 days (DEHP-27d) and control rats were treated with corn-oil vehicle for 2 days (C-27d); animals were killed 24 h after the last treatment. Testes of DEHP-27d rats showed different degrees of germ cell sloughing of seminiferous tubules (ST). No alterations of the blood testis barrier (BTB) by lanthanum tracer study were observed. ST of DEHP-27d rats showed a milder immunofluorescence and more restricted expression of connexin-43 (Cx43) in the adluminal and basal compartment compared to C-27d. In DEHP-27d rats, we found a discontinuous immunofluorescent (IF) pattern for zonula occludens (ZO-1), contrasting with the continuous IF profile observed in C-27d, and a delocalization of claudin-11. A decrease in Cx43 and ZO-1 and no changes in occludin expression were detected by Western blot in the testes of DEHP-27d rats. Results from 57-day-old rats treated with DEHP for 2 days and held for 30 days without treatment showed that the alterations in protein expression induced by DEHP are reversible. However, a delay of spermatogenesis compared to C-57d rats, occurred. Data demonstrated that DEHP does not impair BTB permeability but induces germ cell sloughing that might respond to a down regulation of Cx43 and ZO-1 that alters cell junction proteins.

  11. Tight Junction Proteins Claudin-2 and -12 Are Critical for Vitamin D-dependent Ca2+ Absorption between Enterocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Hiroki; Sugimoto, Kotaro; Inatomi, Shuichiro; Maeda, Toshihiro; Osanai, Makoto; Uchiyama, Yasushi; Yamamoto, Yoko; Wada, Takuro; Kojima, Takashi; Yokozaki, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Toshihiko; Kato, Shigeaki; Sawada, Norimasa

    2008-01-01

    Ca2+ is absorbed across intestinal epithelial monolayers via transcellular and paracellular pathways, and an active form of vitamin D3, 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1α,25(OH)2D3], is known to promote intestinal Ca2+ absorption. However, the molecules driving the paracellular Ca2+ absorption and its vitamin D dependency remain obscure. Because the tight junction proteins claudins are suggested to form paracellular channels for selective ions between neighboring cells, we hypothesized that specific intestinal claudins might facilitate paracellular Ca2+ transport and that expression of these claudins could be induced by 1α,25(OH)2D3. Herein, we show, by using RNA interference and overexpression strategies, that claudin-2 and claudin-12 contribute to Ca2+ absorption in intestinal epithelial cells. We also provide evidence showing that expression of claudins-2 and -12 is up-regulated in enterocytes in vitro and in vivo by 1α,25(OH)2D3 through the vitamin D receptor. These findings strongly suggest that claudin-2- and/or claudin-12-based tight junctions form paracellular Ca2+ channels in intestinal epithelia, and they highlight a novel mechanism behind vitamin D-dependent calcium homeostasis. PMID:18287530

  12. Tissue-specific expression of the tight junction proteins claudins and occludin in the rat salivary glands

    PubMed Central

    Peppi, M; Ghabriel, M N

    2004-01-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) are essential features of endothelial barrier membranes and of fluid-secreting epithelial cells, such as in the salivary glands. Novel integral membrane proteins have been identified as components of TJs, namely claudins and occludin. The aim of the present study was to determine the distribution of occludin and claudins in the large salivary glands of the rat. The parotid, submandibular and sublingual salivary glands were harvested from adult Sprague–Dawley rats and cryostat sections were stained using immunoperoxidase and immunofluorescence methods. Claudin-1 was expressed in endothelial cells of microvessels and in short selected segments of the duct system. Claudin-3 was expressed principally in the acinar cells and intercalated ducts, while claudin-4 was principally expressed by the striated and interlobular ducts. Claudin-5 was specific to endothelial cells of microvessels. Occludin was ubiquitously detected in the duct system. Double labelling and confocal microscopy showed some co-localization of claudin-3 with claudin-4, and minimal co-localization of occludin with claudin-4, in the striated ducts. Claudin 2 was not detected in any of the salivary glands. The results indicate specificity of the chemical composition of tight junctions in the rat salivary glands, and may reflect different physiological roles for TJs in the glandular and duct epithelial cells, and in endothelial cells of salivary gland microvessels. PMID:15447685

  13. The uncoupling effect of diacylglycerol on gap junctional communication of mammalian heart cells is independent of protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Bastide, B; Hervé, J C; Délèze, J

    1994-10-01

    Possible regulatory effects on cell-to-cell communication of a synthetic diacylglycerol, an activator of protein kinase C (PKC), were examined in pairs of synchronously beating ventricular myocytes of neonatal rats in primary culture. Junctional communication was estimated by measuring either the rate constant of dye diffusion, with the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching technique, or the cell-to-cell electrical conductance with a double whole-cell voltage clamp. The addition of a freshly prepared emulsion of 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol (OAG, 100 micrograms/ml), either in the bath or in the solution filling the patch pipet, was seen to interrupt intercellular communication within approximately 8 to 10 min. This effect is neither mimicked by stimulation of PKC by a phorbol ester, nor prevented by PKC inhibitors, making it unlikely that, in these cells, PKC activation could induce intercellular uncoupling. During OAG exposures, the intracellular calcium concentration was very modestly increased (by a factor 1.5 to 2), which does not suffice to account for uncoupling. OAG might trigger interruption of cell-to-cell communication by a mechanism analogous to that of other lipophilic molecules (such as aliphatic alcohols or long chain unsaturated fatty acids) which interfere with gap junctions.

  14. The PIKfyve Inhibitor YM201636 Blocks the Continuous Recycling of the Tight Junction Proteins Claudin-1 and Claudin-2 in MDCK cells

    PubMed Central

    Dukes, Joseph D.

    2012-01-01

    Tight junctions mediate the intercellular diffusion barrier found in epithelial tissues but they are not static complexes; instead there is rapid movement of individual proteins within the junctions. In addition some tight junction proteins are continuously being endocytosed and recycled back to the plasma membrane. Understanding the dynamic behaviour of tight junctions is important as they are altered in a range of pathological conditions including cancer and inflammatory bowel disease. In this study we investigate the effect of treating epithelial cells with a small molecule inhibitor (YM201636) of the lipid kinase PIKfyve, a protein which is involved in endocytic trafficking. We show that MDCK cells treated with YM201636 accumulate the tight junction protein claudin-1 intracellularly. In contrast YM201636 did not alter the localization of other junction proteins including ZO-1, occludin and E-cadherin. A biochemical trafficking assay was used to show that YM201636 inhibited the endocytic recycling of claudin-1, providing an explanation for the intracellular accumulation. Claudin-2 was also found to constantly recycle in confluent MDCK cells and treatment with YM201636 blocked this recycling and caused accumulation of intracellular claudin-2. However, claudin-4 showed negligible endocytosis and no detectable intracellular accumulation occurred following treatment with YM201636, suggesting that not all claudins show the same rate of endocytic trafficking. Finally, we show that, consistent with the defects in claudin trafficking, incubation with YM201636 delayed formation of the epithelial permeability barrier. Therefore, YM201636 treatment blocks the continuous recycling of claudin-1/claudin-2 and delays epithelial barrier formation. PMID:22396724

  15. Microfluidic chips with multi-junctions: an advanced tool in recovering proteins from inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Miyazaki, Masaya

    2015-01-01

    Active recombinant proteins are used for studying the biological functions of genes and for the development of therapeutic drugs. Overexpression of recombinant proteins in bacteria often results in the formation of inclusion bodies, which are protein aggregates with non-native conformations. Protein refolding is an important process for obtaining active recombinant proteins from inclusion bodies. However, the conventional refolding method of dialysis or dilution is time-consuming and recovered active protein yields are often low, and a cumbersome trial-and-error process is required to achieve success. To circumvent these difficulties, we used controllable diffusion through laminar flow in microchannels to regulate the denaturant concentration. This method largely aims at reducing protein aggregation during the refolding procedure. This Commentary introduces the principles of the protein refolding method using microfluidic chips and the advantage of our results as a tool for rapid and efficient recovery of active recombinant proteins from inclusion bodies.

  16. Radixin, a barbed end-capping actin-modulating protein, is concentrated at the cleavage furrow during cytokinesis [published erratum appears in J Cell Biol 1991 Sep;114(5):1101-3

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Radixin is a barbed end-capping actin-modulating protein which was first identified in isolated cell-to-cell adherens junctions from rat liver (Tsukita, Sa., Y. Hieda, and Sh. Tsukita, 1989. J. Cell Biol. 108:2369-2382). In the present study, we have analyzed the distribution of radixin in dividing cells. For this purpose, an mAb specific for radixin was obtained using chicken gizzard radixin as an antigen. By immunofluorescence microscopy with this mAb and a polyclonal antibody obtained previously, it was clearly shown in rat fibroblastic cells (3Y1 cells) that radixin was highly concentrated at the cleavage furrow during cytokinesis. Radixin appeared to accumulate rapidly at the cleavage furrow at the onset of furrowing, continued to be concentrated at the furrow during anaphase and telophase, and was finally enriched at the midbody. This concentration of radixin at the cleavage furrow was detected in all other cultured cells we examined: bovine epithelial cells (MDBK cells), mouse myeloma cells (P3 cells), rat kangaroo Ptk2 cells, mouse teratocarcinoma cells, and chicken fibroblasts. Furthermore, it became clear that the epitope for the mAb was immunofluorescently masked in the cell-to-cell adherens junctions. Together, these results lead us to conclude that radixin is present in the undercoat of the cell-to-cell adherens junctions and that of the cleavage furrow, although their respective molecular architectures are distinct. The possible roles of radixin at the cleavage furrow are discussed with special reference to the molecular mechanism of the actin filament-plasma membrane interaction at the furrow. PMID:1707055

  17. Reversed cellular polarity in primary cutaneous mucinous carcinoma: A study on tight junction protein expression in sweat gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Yusuke; Ishida-Yamamoto, Akemi

    2017-04-01

    Primary cutaneous mucinous carcinoma (PCMC) is a rare sweat gland tumor characterized by the presence of abundant mucin around the tumor islands, but the molecular mechanisms for this structure are not well elucidated. Because mucin is epithelial in nature, it is likely to be produced by epithelial tumor cells, not by surrounding stromal cells. We hypothesized that the abundant mucin is a result of reversed cellular polarity of the tumor. To test this hypothesis, we conducted an immunohistological study to investigate expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins occludin and ZO-1 in PCMC, as well as in normal sweat glands and other sweat gland tumors. Dot-like or linear expression of TJ proteins was observed at ductal structures of sweat glands, and ductal or cystic structures of related tumors. In PCMC, however, TJ protein expression was clearly visible at the edges of tumor cell islands. This study provides evidence to show that the characteristic histological structure of PCMC is caused by inverse polarization of the tumor cells, and that TJ proteins are useful markers of ductal differentiation in sweat gland tumors.

  18. Effects of phenol on barrier function of a human intestinal epithelial cell line correlate with altered tight junction protein localization

    SciTech Connect

    McCall, Ingrid C.; Betanzos, Abigail; Weber, Dominique A.; Nava, Porfirio; Miller, Gary W.; Parkos, Charles A.

    2009-11-15

    Phenol contamination of soil and water has raised concerns among people living near phenol-producing factories and hazardous waste sites containing the chemical. Phenol, particularly in high concentrations, is an irritating and corrosive substance, making mucosal membranes targets of toxicity in humans. However, few data on the effects of phenol after oral exposure exist. We used an in vitro model employing human intestinal epithelial cells (SK-CO15) cultured on permeable supports to examine effects of phenol on epithelial barrier function. We hypothesized that phenol disrupts epithelial barrier by altering tight junction (TJ) protein expression. The dose-response effect of phenol on epithelial barrier function was determined using transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and FITC-dextran permeability measurements. We studied phenol-induced changes in cell morphology and expression of several tight junction proteins by immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis. Effects on cell viability were assessed by MTT, Trypan blue, propidium iodide and TUNEL staining. Exposure to phenol resulted in decreased TER and increased paracellular flux of FITC-dextran in a dose-dependent manner. Delocalization of claudin-1 and ZO-1 from TJs to cytosol correlated with the observed increase in permeability after phenol treatment. Additionally, the decrease in TER correlated with changes in the distribution of a membrane raft marker, suggesting phenol-mediated effects on membrane fluidity. Such observations were independent of effects of phenol on cell viability as enhanced permeability occurred at doses of phenol that did not cause cell death. Overall, these findings suggest that phenol may affect transiently the lipid bilayer of the cell membrane, thus destabilizing TJ-containing microdomains.

  19. Effects of phenol on barrier function of a human intestinal epithelial cell line correlate with altered tight junction protein localization

    PubMed Central

    McCall, Ingrid C.; Betanzos, Abigail; Weber, Dominique A.; Nava, Porfirio; Miller, Gary W.; Parkos, Charles A.

    2010-01-01

    Phenol contamination of soil and water has raised concerns among people living near phenol-producing factories and hazardous waste sites containing the chemical. Phenol, particularly in high concentrations, is an irritating and corrosive substance, making mucosal membranes targets of toxicity in humans. However, few data on the effects of phenol after oral exposure exist. We used an in vitro model employing human intestinal epithelial cells (SK-CO15) cultured on permeable supports to examine effects of phenol on epithelial barrier function. We hypothesized that phenol disrupts epithelial barrier by altering tight junction (TJ) protein expression. The dose-response effect of phenol on epithelial barrier function was determined using transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and FITC-dextran permeability measurements. We studied phenol-induced changes in cell morphology and expression of several tight junction proteins by immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis. Effects on cell viability were assessed by MTT, Trypan blue, propidium iodide and TUNEL staining. Exposure to phenol resulted in decreased TER and increased paracellular flux of FITC-dextran in a dose-dependent manner. Delocalization of claudin-1 and ZO-1 from TJs to cytosol correlated with the observed increase in permeability after phenol treatment. Additionally, the decrease in TER correlated with changes in the distribution of a membrane raft marker, suggesting phenol-mediated effects on membrane fluidity. Such observations were independent of effects of phenol on cell viability as enhanced permeability occurred at doses of phenol that did not cause cell death. Overall, these findings suggest that phenol may affect transiently the lipid bilayer of the cell membrane, thus destabilizing TJ-containing microdomains. PMID:19679145

  20. ZO-2 silencing in epithelial cells perturbs the gate and fence function of tight junctions and leads to an atypical monolayer architecture.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Sandra; Chavez Munguia, Bibiana; Gonzalez-Mariscal, Lorenza

    2007-05-01

    ZO-2 is a tight junction (TJ) protein that shuttles between the plasma membrane and the nucleus. ZO-2 contains several protein binding sites that allow it to function as a scaffold that clusters integral, adaptor and signaling proteins. To gain insight into the role of ZO-2 in epithelial cells, ZO-2 was silenced in MDCK cells with small interference RNA (siRNA). ZO-2 silencing triggered: (A) changes in the gate function of the TJ, determined by an increase in dextran flow through the paracellular route of mature monolayers and achievement of lower transepithelial electrical resistance values upon TJ de novo formation; (B) changes in the fence function of the TJ manifested by a non-polarized distribution of E-cadherin on the plasma membrane; (C) altered expression of TJ and adherens junction proteins, determined by a decreased amount of occludin and E-cadherin in mature monolayers and a delayed arrival to the plasma membrane of ZO-1, occludin and E-cadherin during a calcium switch assay; and (D) an atypical monolayer architecture characterized by the appearance of widened intercellular spaces, multistratification of regions in the culture and an altered pattern of actin at the cellular borders.

  1. ROCK activity regulates functional tight junction assembly during blastocyst formation in porcine parthenogenetic embryos

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Jeongwoo

    2016-01-01

    The Rho-associated coiled-coil-containing protein serine/threonine kinases 1 and 2 (ROCK1 and ROCK2) are Rho subfamily GTPase downstream effectors that regulate cell migration, intercellular adhesion, cell polarity, and cell proliferation by stimulating actin cytoskeleton reorganization. Inhibition of ROCK proteins affects specification of the trophectoderm (TE) and inner cell mass (ICM) lineages, compaction, and blastocyst cavitation. However, the molecules involved in blastocyst formation are not known. Here, we examined developmental competence and levels of adherens/tight junction (AJ/TJ) constituent proteins, such as CXADR, OCLN, TJP1, and CDH1, as well as expression of their respective mRNAs, after treating porcine parthenogenetic four-cell embryos with Y-27632, a specific inhibitor of ROCK, at concentrations of 0, 10, 20, 100 µM for 24 h. Following this treatment, the blastocyst development rates were 39.1, 20.7, 10.0, and 0% respectively. In embryos treated with 20 µM treatment, expression levels of CXADR, OCLN, TJP1, and CDH1 mRNA and protein molecules were significantly reduced (P < 0.05). FITC-dextran uptake assay revealed that the treatment caused an increase in TE TJ permeability. Interestingly, the majority of the four-cell and morula embryos treated with 20 µM Y-27643 for 24 h showed defective compaction and cavitation. Taken together, our results indicate that ROCK activity may differentially affect assembly of AJ/TJs as well as regulate expression of genes encoding junctional proteins. PMID:27077008

  2. Optimization of an immunohistochemical method to assess distribution of tight junction proteins in canine epidermis and adnexae.

    PubMed

    Roussel, A J J; Knol, A C; Bourdeau, P J; Bruet, V

    2014-01-01

    Epidermal tight junctions (TJs) have been well characterized in human medicine. Abnormality of these structures is involved in skin diseases such as atopic dermatitis. There is little information about the expression and distribution of TJ proteins in the canine skin. The aim of this study was to develop an optimal immunohistochemical method for assessment of the expression of TJ proteins in the skin of healthy dogs. Formalin-fixed and paraffin wax-embedded skin biopsy samples from healthy human and canine patients were used. Canine skin samples were from the inguinal region and the nasal planum. Immunohistochemistry was used to study the expression of zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), occludin and claudin-1, -4 and -7. Heat-induced antigen retrieval with EDTA (pH 9.0) yielded the best labelling of TJ proteins. ZO-1 and occludin were expressed in the cytoplasm and along the keratinocyte membrane, while claudin-1 and -4 were mainly membrane in distribution. ZO-1, occludin and claudin-1 were detected in all epidermal layers with the exception of the stratum corneum, while claudin-4 expression was restricted to the stratum granulosum. Expression of claudin-7 was difficult to evaluate. There was no difference in labelling pattern between inguinal and nasal planum skin.

  3. Exon junction complex proteins bind nascent transcripts independently of pre-mRNA splicing in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Subhendu Roy; Singh, Anand K; McLeod, Tina; Blanchette, Marco; Jang, Boyun; Badenhorst, Paul; Kanhere, Aditi; Brogna, Saverio

    2016-01-01

    Although it is currently understood that the exon junction complex (EJC) is recruited on spliced mRNA by a specific interaction between its central protein, eIF4AIII, and splicing factor CWC22, we found that eIF4AIII and the other EJC core proteins Y14 and MAGO bind the nascent transcripts of not only intron-containing but also intronless genes on Drosophila polytene chromosomes. Additionally, Y14 ChIP-seq demonstrates that association with transcribed genes is also splicing-independent in Drosophila S2 cells. The association of the EJC proteins with nascent transcripts does not require CWC22 and that of Y14 and MAGO is independent of eIF4AIII. We also show that eIF4AIII associates with both polysomal and monosomal RNA in S2 cell extracts, whereas Y14 and MAGO fractionate separately. Cumulatively, our data indicate a global role of eIF4AIII in gene expression, which would be independent of Y14 and MAGO, splicing, and of the EJC, as currently understood. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19881.001 PMID:27879206

  4. Mutational Analysis of Rab3 Function for Controlling Active Zone Protein Composition at the Drosophila Neuromuscular Junction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shirui; Gendelman, Hannah K; Roche, John P; Alsharif, Peter; Graf, Ethan R

    2015-01-01

    At synapses, the release of neurotransmitter is regulated by molecular machinery that aggregates at specialized presynaptic release sites termed active zones. The complement of active zone proteins at each site is a determinant of release efficacy and can be remodeled to alter synapse function. The small GTPase Rab3 was previously identified as playing a novel role that controls the distribution of active zone proteins to individual release sites at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction. Rab3 has been extensively studied for its role in the synaptic vesicle cycle; however, the mechanism by which Rab3 controls active zone development remains unknown. To explore this mechanism, we conducted a mutational analysis to determine the molecular and structural requirements of Rab3 function at Drosophila synapses. We find that GTP-binding is required for Rab3 to traffick to synapses and distribute active zone components across release sites. Conversely, the hydrolytic activity of Rab3 is unnecessary for this function. Through a structure-function analysis we identify specific residues within the effector-binding switch regions that are required for Rab3 function and determine that membrane attachment is essential. Our findings suggest that Rab3 controls the distribution of active zone components via a vesicle docking mechanism that is consistent with standard Rab protein function.

  5. The full-length Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sgs1 protein is a vigorous DNA helicase that preferentially unwinds holliday junctions.

    PubMed

    Cejka, Petr; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C

    2010-03-12

    The highly conserved RecQ family of DNA helicases has multiple roles in the maintenance of genome stability. Sgs1, the single RecQ homologue in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, acts both early and late during homologous recombination. Here we present the expression, purification, and biochemical analysis of full-length Sgs1. Unlike the truncated form of Sgs1 characterized previously, full-length Sgs1 binds diverse single-stranded and double-stranded DNA substrates, including DNA duplexes with 5'- and 3'-single-stranded DNA overhangs. Similarly, Sgs1 unwinds a variety of DNA substrates, including blunt-ended duplex DNA. Significantly, a substrate containing a Holliday junction is unwound most efficiently. DNA unwinding is catalytic, requires ATP, and is stimulated by replication protein A. Unlike RecQ homologues from multicellular organisms, Sgs1 is remarkably active at picomolar concentrations and can efficiently unwind duplex DNA molecules as long as 23,000 base pairs. Our analysis shows that Sgs1 resembles Escherichia coli RecQ protein more than any of the human RecQ homologues with regard to its helicase activity. The full-length recombinant protein will be invaluable for further investigation of Sgs1 biochemistry.

  6. Tight Junction Proteins and Oxidative Stress in Heavy Metals-Induced Nephrotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, José L.; Molina-Jijón, Eduardo; Rodríguez-Muñoz, Rafael; Bautista-García, Pablo; Debray-García, Yazmin; Namorado, María del Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Kidney is a target organ for heavy metals. They accumulate in several segments of the nephron and cause profound alterations in morphology and function. Acute intoxication frequently causes acute renal failure. The effects of chronic exposure have not been fully disclosed. In recent years increasing awareness of the consequences of their presence in the kidney has evolved. In this review we focus on the alterations induced by heavy metals on the intercellular junctions of the kidney. We describe that in addition to the proximal tubule, which has been recognized as the main site of accumulation and injury, other segments of the nephron, such as glomeruli, vessels, and distal nephron, show also deleterious effects. We also emphasize the participation of oxidative stress as a relevant component of the renal damage induced by heavy metals and the beneficial effect that some antioxidant drugs, such as vitamin A (all-trans-retinoic acid) and vitamin E (α-tocopherol), depict on the morphological and functional alterations induced by heavy metals. PMID:23710457

  7. Tight junction proteins and oxidative stress in heavy metals-induced nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Reyes, José L; Molina-Jijón, Eduardo; Rodríguez-Muñoz, Rafael; Bautista-García, Pablo; Debray-García, Yazmin; Namorado, María Del Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Kidney is a target organ for heavy metals. They accumulate in several segments of the nephron and cause profound alterations in morphology and function. Acute intoxication frequently causes acute renal failure. The effects of chronic exposure have not been fully disclosed. In recent years increasing awareness of the consequences of their presence in the kidney has evolved. In this review we focus on the alterations induced by heavy metals on the intercellular junctions of the kidney. We describe that in addition to the proximal tubule, which has been recognized as the main site of accumulation and injury, other segments of the nephron, such as glomeruli, vessels, and distal nephron, show also deleterious effects. We also emphasize the participation of oxidative stress as a relevant component of the renal damage induced by heavy metals and the beneficial effect that some antioxidant drugs, such as vitamin A (all-trans-retinoic acid) and vitamin E ( α -tocopherol), depict on the morphological and functional alterations induced by heavy metals.

  8. Early weaning increases intestinal permeability, alters expression of cytokine and tight junction proteins, and activates mitogen-activated protein kinases in pigs.

    PubMed

    Hu, C H; Xiao, K; Luan, Z S; Song, J

    2013-03-01

    Although weaning stress has been reported to impair intestinal barrier function, the mechanisms have not yet been elucidated. In the present study, the intestinal morphology and permeability and mRNA expressions of tight junction proteins and cytokines in the intestine of piglets during the 2 wk after weaning were assessed. The phosphorylated (activated) ratios of p38, c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK), and extracellular regulated kinases (ERK1/2) were determined to investigate whether mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways are involved in the early weaning process. A shorter villus and deeper crypt were observed on d 3 and 7 postweaning. Although damaged intestinal morphology recovered to preweaning values on d 14 postweaning, the intestinal mucosal barrier, which was reflected by transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and paracellular flux of dextran (4 kDa) in the Ussing chamber and tight junction protein expression, was not recovered. Compared with the preweaning stage (d 0), jejunal TER and mRNA expressions of occludin and claudin-1 on d 3, 7, and 14 postweaning and Zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) mRNA on d 3 and 7 postweaning were reduced, and paracellular flux of dextran on d 3, 7, and 14 postweaning was increased. An increase (P < 0.05) of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) mRNA on d 3 and d 7 postweaning and an increase (P < 0.05) of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) mRNA on d 3 postweaning were observed compared with d 0. No significant increase of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) mRNA after weaning was observed. The phosphorylated (activated) ratios of JNK and p38 on d 3 and 7 postweaning and the phosphorylated ratio of ERK1/2 on d 3 postweaning were increased (P < 0.05) compared with d 0. The results indicated that early weaning induced sustained impairment in the intestinal barrier, decreased mRNA expression of tight junction proteins, and upregulated the expression of proinflammatory

  9. Tight Junction Disruption Induced by Type 3 Secretion System Effectors Injected by Enteropathogenic and Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Ugalde-Silva, Paul; Gonzalez-Lugo, Octavio; Navarro-Garcia, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium consists of a single cell layer, which is a critical selectively permeable barrier to both absorb nutrients and avoid the entry of potentially harmful entities, including microorganisms. Epithelial cells are held together by the apical junctional complexes, consisting of adherens junctions, and tight junctions (TJs), and by underlying desmosomes. TJs lay in the apical domain of epithelial cells and are mainly composed by transmembrane proteins such as occludin, claudins, JAMs, and tricellulin, that are associated with the cytoplasmic plaque formed by proteins from the MAGUK family, such as ZO-1/2/3, connecting TJ to the actin cytoskeleton, and cingulin and paracingulin connecting TJ to the microtubule network. Extracellular bacteria such as EPEC and EHEC living in the intestinal lumen inject effectors proteins directly from the bacterial cytoplasm to the host cell cytoplasm, where they play a relevant role in the manipulation of the eukaryotic cell functions by modifying or blocking cell signaling pathways. TJ integrity depends on various cell functions such as actin cytoskeleton, microtubule network for vesicular trafficking, membrane integrity, inflammation, and cell survival. EPEC and EHEC effectors target most of these functions. Effectors encoded inside or outside of locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) disrupt the TJ strands. EPEC and EHEC exploit the TJ dynamics to open this structure, for causing diarrhea. EPEC and EHEC secrete effectors that mimic host proteins to manipulate the signaling pathways, including those related to TJ dynamics. In this review, we focus on the known mechanisms exploited by EPEC and EHEC effectors for causing TJ disruption. PMID:27606286

  10. Nanotube junctions

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, Vincent Henry; Cohen, Marvin Lou; Louie, Steven Gwon Sheng; Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter

    2003-01-01

    The present invention comprises a new nanoscale metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, or metal-metal junction, designed by introducing topological or chemical defects in the atomic structure of the nanotube. Nanotubes comprising adjacent sections having differing electrical properties are described. These nanotubes can be constructed from combinations of carbon, boron, nitrogen and other elements. The nanotube can be designed having different indices on either side of a junction point in a continuous tube so that the electrical properties on either side of the junction vary in a useful fashion. For example, the inventive nanotube may be electrically conducting on one side of a junction and semiconducting on the other side. An example of a semiconductor-metal junction is a Schottky barrier. Alternatively, the nanotube may exhibit different semiconductor properties on either side of the junction. Nanotubes containing heterojunctions, Schottky barriers, and metal-metal junctions are useful for microcircuitry.

  11. Nanotube junctions

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, Vincent Henry; Cohen, Marvin Lou; Louie, Steven Gwon; Zettl, Alexander Karlwalte

    2004-12-28

    The present invention comprises a new nanoscale metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, or metal-metal junction, designed by introducing topological or chemical defects in the atomic structure of the nanotube. Nanotubes comprising adjacent sections having differing electrical properties are described. These nanotubes can be constructed from combinations of carbon, boron, nitrogen and other elements. The nanotube can be designed having different indices on either side of a junction point in a continuous tube so that the electrical properties on either side of the junction vary in a useful fashion. For example, the inventive nanotube may be electrically conducting on one side of a junction and semiconducting on the other side. An example of a semiconductor-metal junction is a Schottky barrier. Alternatively, the nanotube may exhibit different semiconductor properties on either side of the junction. Nanotubes containing heterojunctions, Schottky barriers, and metal-metal junctions are useful for microcircuitry.

  12. Effects of cathepsin K deficiency on intercellular junction proteins, luminal mucus layers, and extracellular matrix constituents in the mouse colon.

    PubMed

    Arampatzidou, Maria; Schütte, André; Hansson, Gunnar C; Saftig, Paul; Brix, Klaudia

    2012-12-01

    Cathepsin K has been shown to exhibit antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities in the mouse colon. To further elucidate its role, we used Ctsk-/- mice and demonstrated that the absence of cathepsin K was accompanied by elevated protein levels of related cysteine cathepsins (cathepsins B, L, and X) in the colon. In principle, such changes could result in altered subcellular localization; however, the trafficking of cysteine cathepsins was not affected in the colon of Ctsk-/- mice. However, cathepsin K deficiency affected the extracellular matrix constituents, as higher amounts of collagen IV and laminin were observed. Moreover, the localization pattern of the intercellular junction proteins E-cadherin and occludin was altered in the colon of Ctsk-/- mice, suggesting potential impairment of the barrier function. Thus, we used an ex vivo method for assessing the mucus layers and showed that the absence of cathepsin K had no influence on mucus organization and growth. The data of this study support the notion that cathepsin K contributes to intestinal homeostasis and tissue architecture, but the lack of cathepsin K activity is not expected to affect the mucus-depending barrier functions of the mouse colon. These results are important with regard to oral administration of cathepsin K inhibitors that are currently under investigation in clinical trials.

  13. Purification from black widow spider venom of a protein factor causing the depletion of synaptic vesicles at neuromuscular junctions

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    The aqueous extract of the venom glands of black widow spiders was fractionated on a column of Sephadex G-200 and then on a column of DEAE- Sephadex A-50 pH 8.2. A protein fraction was obtained that caused a great increase in the frequency of occurrence of miniature end plate potentials at the frog neuromuscular junction, and caused swelling of the nerve terminals and depleted them of their vesicles. The fraction consists of a least four protein components that are similar in their molecular weights (about 130,000) and isoelectric points (ranging from pH 5.2 to 5.5) and are immunologically indistinguishable. It contains no sugar residues and has little or no lipolytic or proteolytic activity. The fraction is toxic to mice and is different from the fractions that act on houseflies, the crayfish stretch receptor and the cockroach heart. It seems pure enough to warrant a detailed study of its site and mode of action. PMID:1030703

  14. Atelectrauma disrupts pulmonary epithelial barrier integrity and alters the distribution of tight junction proteins ZO-1 and claudin 4

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Anne-Marie

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation inevitably exposes the delicate tissues of the airways and alveoli to abnormal mechanical stresses that can induce pulmonary edema and exacerbate conditions such as acute respiratory distress syndrome. The goal of our research is to characterize the cellular trauma caused by the transient abnormal fluid mechanical stresses that arise when air is forced into a liquid-occluded airway (i.e., atelectrauma). Using a fluid-filled, parallel-plate flow chamber to model the “airway reopening” process, our in vitro study examined consequent increases in pulmonary epithelial plasma membrane rupture, paracellular permeability, and disruption of the tight junction (TJ) proteins zonula occludens-1 and claudin-4. Computational analysis predicts the normal and tangential surface stresses that develop between the basolateral epithelial membrane and underlying substrate due to the interfacial stresses acting on the apical cell membrane. These simulations demonstrate that decreasing the velocity of reopening causes a significant increase in basolateral surface stresses, particularly in the region between neighboring cells where TJs concentrate. Likewise, pulmonary epithelial wounding, paracellular permeability, and TJ protein disruption were significantly greater following slower reopening. This study thus demonstrates that maintaining a higher velocity of reopening, which reduces the damaging fluid stresses acting on the airway wall, decreases the mechanical stresses on the basolateral cell surface while protecting cells from plasma membrane rupture and promoting barrier integrity. PMID:22898551

  15. Hypoxia/Aglycemia-induced endothelial barrier dysfunction and tight junction protein downregulation can be ameliorated by citicoline.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaotang; Zhang, Huiting; Pan, Qunwen; Zhao, Yuhui; Chen, Ji; Zhao, Bin; Chen, Yanfang

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the effect of citicoline on the permeability and expression of tight junction proteins (TJPs) in endothelial cells under hypoxia/aglycemia conditions. Hypoxia or oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) was utilized to induce endothelial barrier breakdown model on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells (bEnd.3s). The effect of citicoline on endothelial barrier breakdown models was determined at either low or high concentrations. FITC-Dextran flux was used to examine the endothelial permeability. The expression of TJPs was measured by immunofluorescence, Real-time PCR and Western Blot methods. Results showed that hypoxia or OGD increased the permeability of HUVECs accompanied with down-regulation of occludens-1 (ZO-1) and occludin at both mRNA and protein levels. Similarly in bEnd.3s, hypoxia increased the permeability and decreased the expression of ZO-1 and claudin-5. Citicoline treatment dose-dependently decreased the permeability in these two models, which paralleled with elevated expression of TJPs. The data demonstrate that citicoline restores the barrier function of endothelial cells compromised by hypoxia/aglycemia probably via up-regulating the expression of TJPs.

  16. Utilizing Ultrasound to Transiently Increase Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability, Modulate of the Tight Junction Proteins, and Alter Cytoskeletal Structure.

    PubMed

    Bae, Mi Jung; Lee, Young Mi; Kim, Yeoun Hee; Han, Hyung Soo; Lee, Hak Jong

    2015-01-01

    The central nervous system is protected by the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The tight junction (TJ) proteins claudin-5 and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) as well as the cytoskeletal component F-actin play key roles in maintaining homeostasis of the BBB. Increases in BBB permeability may be beneficial for the delivery of pharmacological substances into the brain. Therefore, here, we assessed the use of ultrasound to induce transient enhancement of BBB permeability. We used fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran 40 to detect changes in the membrane permeability of bEnd.3 cells during ultrasound treatment. Ultrasound increased FITC-dextran 40 uptake into bEnd.3 cells for 2-6 h after treatment; however, normal levels returned after 24 h. An insignificant increase in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage also occurred 3 and 6 h after ultrasound treatment, whereas at 24 h, LDH leakage was indistinguishable between the control and treatment groups. Expression of claudin-5, ZO-1, and F-actin at the messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels was assessed with real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. Ultrasound induced a transient decrease in claudin-5 mRNA and protein expression within 2 h of treatment; however, no significant changes in ZO-1 and F-actin expression were observed. Claudin-5, ZO-1, and F-actin immunofluorescence demonstrated that the cellular structures incorporating these proteins were transiently impaired by ultrasound. In conclusion, our ultrasound technique can temporarily increase BBB permeability without cytotoxicity to exposed cells, and the method can be exploited in the delivery of drugs to the brain with minimal damage.

  17. Perinatal administration of bisphenol A alters the expression of tight junction proteins in the uterus and reduces the implantation rate.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Peña, Annia A; Rivera-Baños, Jorge; Méndez-Carrillo, Laura L; Ramírez-Solano, Marcos I; Galindo-Bustamante, Aarón; Páez-Franco, J Carlos; Morimoto, Sumiko; González-Mariscal, Lorenza; Cruz, M Esther; Mendoza-Rodríguez, C Adriana

    2017-02-17

    We studied the effect of bisphenol-A (BPA) administration to rats, during the perinatal period, on the fertility of F1 generation and on the expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins in the uterus during early pregnancy. Pregnant Wistar dams (F0) received: BPA-L (0.05mg/kg/day), BPA-H (20mg/kg/day) or vehicle, from gestational day (GD) 6 to lactation day 21. F1 female pups were mated at 3 months of age and sacrificed at GD 1, 3, 6, and 7. Serum hormonal levels, ovulation rate, number of implantation sites and expression of TJ proteins in the uterus of F1 females were evaluated. BPA treatment induced no change in ovulation rate, but induced alterations in progesterone (P4) and estradiol (E2) serum levels, and in implantation rate. With regards to TJ proteins, BPA-H increased claudin-1 during all GDs; eliminated the peaks of claudins -3 and -4 at GD 3 and 6, respectively; and decreased claudin-7 at GD 6, ZO-1 from GD 1-6, and claudin-3 at GD 7 in stromal cells. BPA-L instead, eliminated claudin-3 peak at GD 3, increased claudin-4 and decreased claudin-7 from GD 1-6, decreased claudin-1 at GD 3 and 7 and claudin-4 at GD 7 in stromal cells. BPA-L also decreased ZO-1 at GDs 1 and 3 and increased ZO-1 at GD 6. Thus, BPA treatment during perinatal period perturbed, when the animals reached adulthood and became pregnant, the particular expression of TJ proteins in the uterine epithelium and reduced in consequence the number of implantation sites.

  18. Mispolarization of desmosomal proteins and altered intercellular adhesion in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Silberberg, Melina; Charron, Audra J; Bacallao, Robert; Wandinger-Ness, Angela

    2005-06-01

    Polycystin-1, the product of the major gene mutated in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), has been shown to associate with multiple epithelial cell junctions. Our hypothesis is that polycystin-1 is an important protein for the initial establishment of cell-cell junctions and maturation of the cell and that polycystin-1 localization is dependent on the degree of cell polarization. Using laser-scanning confocal microscopy and two models of cell polarization, polycystin-1 and desmosomes were found to colocalize during the initial establishment of cell-cell contact when junctions were forming. However, colocalization was lost in confluent monolayers. Parallel morphological and biochemical evaluations revealed a profound mispolarization of desmosomal components to both the apical and basolateral domains in primary ADPKD cells and tissue. Studies of the intermediate filament network associated with desmosomes showed that there is a decrease in cytokeratin levels and an abnormal expression of the mesenchymal protein vimentin in the disease. Moreover, we show for the first time that the structural alterations seen in adherens and desmosomal junctions have a functional impact, leaving the ADPKD cells with weakened cell-cell adhesion. In conclusion, in this paper we show that polycystin-1 transiently colocalizes with desmosomes and that desmosomal proteins are mislocalized as a consequence of polycystin-1 mutation.

  19. ADAM10 Is Involved in Cell Junction Assembly in Early Porcine Embryo Development

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Jeongwoo; Jeong, Sung-min; Choi, Inchul; Kim, Nam-Hyung

    2016-01-01

    ADAM10 (A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease domain-containing protein 10) is a cell surface protein with a unique structure possessing both potential adhesion and protease domains. However, the role of ADAM10 in preimplantation stage embryos is not clear. In this study, we examined the expression patterns and functional roles of ADAM10 in porcine parthenotes during preimplantation development. The transcription level of ADAM10 dramatically increased from the morula stage onward. Immunostaining revealed that ADAM10 was present in both the nucleus and cytoplasm in early cleavage stage embryos, and localized to the apical region of the outer cells in morula and blastocyst embryos. Knockdown (KD) of ADAM10 using double strand RNA did not alter preimplantation embryo development until morula stage, but resulted in significantly reduced development to blastocyst stage. Moreover, the KD blastocyst showed a decrease in gene expression of adherens and tight junction (AJ/TJ), and an increase in trophectoderm TJ permeability by disrupting TJ assembly. Treatment with an ADAM10 specific chemical inhibitor, GI254023X, at the morula stage also inhibited blastocyst development and led to disruption of TJ assembly. An in situ proximity ligation assay demonstrated direct interaction of ADAM10 with coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor (CXADR), supporting the involvement of ADAM10 in TJ assembly. In conclusion, our findings strongly suggest that ADADM10 is important for blastocyst formation rather than compaction, particularly for TJ assembly and stabilization in preimplantation porcine parthenogenetic development. PMID:27043020

  20. ADAM10 Is Involved in Cell Junction Assembly in Early Porcine Embryo Development.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jeongwoo; Jeong, Sung-min; Choi, Inchul; Kim, Nam-Hyung

    2016-01-01

    ADAM10 (A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease domain-containing protein 10) is a cell surface protein with a unique structure possessing both potential adhesion and protease domains. However, the role of ADAM10 in preimplantation stage embryos is not clear. In this study, we examined the expression patterns and functional roles of ADAM10 in porcine parthenotes during preimplantation development. The transcription level of ADAM10 dramatically increased from the morula stage onward. Immunostaining revealed that ADAM10 was present in both the nucleus and cytoplasm in early cleavage stage embryos, and localized to the apical region of the outer cells in morula and blastocyst embryos. Knockdown (KD) of ADAM10 using double strand RNA did not alter preimplantation embryo development until morula stage, but resulted in significantly reduced development to blastocyst stage. Moreover, the KD blastocyst showed a decrease in gene expression of adherens and tight junction (AJ/TJ), and an increase in trophectoderm TJ permeability by disrupting TJ assembly. Treatment with an ADAM10 specific chemical inhibitor, GI254023X, at the morula stage also inhibited blastocyst development and led to disruption of TJ assembly. An in situ proximity ligation assay demonstrated direct interaction of ADAM10 with coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor (CXADR), supporting the involvement of ADAM10 in TJ assembly. In conclusion, our findings strongly suggest that ADADM10 is important for blastocyst formation rather than compaction, particularly for TJ assembly and stabilization in preimplantation porcine parthenogenetic development.

  1. The MAPK/ERK-Signaling Pathway Regulates the Expression and Distribution of Tight Junction Proteins in the Mouse Proximal Epididymis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bongki; Breton, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    The initial segment (IS) in rodents is functionally and structurally distinct from other epididymal segments and plays an important role in sperm maturation. The MAPK/ERK1/2 pathway is maintained active in the IS by testicular luminal factors and plays crucial roles in the maintenance and differentiation of the IS epithelium. Tight junctions (TJs) are constituents of the blood-epididymis barrier, which mediates the paracellular transport of ions, solutes, and water and controls epithelial cell differentiation, thereby contributing to the establishment of a unique luminal environment. We examine here the role of the MAPK/ERK1/2 pathway in the regulation of TJ proteins in the IS. Inhibition of mitogen activated protein kinase kinase (MAPKK or MEK1/2) with PD325901, followed by reduction of ERK1/2 phosphorylation (pERK), decreased zonula occludens (ZO)-2 expression and increased ZO-3 expression in TJs but had no effect on ZO-1 expression. In control mice, in addition to being located in TJs, claudin (Cldn)-1, Cldn-3, and Cldn-4 were detected in the basolateral membrane of epithelial cells, with enriched expression of Cldn-1 and Cldn-4 in basal cells. PD325901 reduced the expression of Cldn-1 and Cldn-4 at all locations without affecting Cldn-3. Occludin was undetectable in the IS of control mice, but PD325901 triggered its expression in TJs. No effect was observed for any of the proteins examined in the other epididymal regions. Our results indicate the participation of the MAPK/ERK1/2 pathway in the regulation of cell-cell events that control the formation and maintenance of the blood-epididymis barrier.

  2. Connexin 35: a gap-junctional protein expressed preferentially in the skate retina.

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, J; al-Ubaidi, M R; Ripps, H

    1996-01-01

    We have used low stringency hybridization to clone a novel connexin from a skate retinal cDNA library. A rat connexin 32 clone was used to isolate a single partial clone that was subsequently used to isolate seven more overlapping clones of the same cDNA. Two clones containing the entire open reading frame have a consensus sequence of 1456 bp and predict a protein of 302 amino acids length and molecular mass of 35,044 daltons, referred to as connexin 35 or Cx35. Southern blot analysis suggests that the cloned sequence lies in a single gene with one intron. Polymerase chain reaction amplification from genomic DNA and partial sequencing of this intron showed that it was approximately 950 bp in length, and located within the coding region 71 bp after the translation start site. Hydropathy analysis of the predicted protein and alignments with previously cloned connexins indicate that Cx35 has a long cytoplasmic loop and a relatively short carboxyl terminal tail. Multiple sequence alignments show that Cx35 has similarities to both alpha and beta groups of connexins and suggests that its origins may be near the divergence point for the two groups. Consensus sequences consistent with sites for phosphorylation by protein kinase C and by cAMP - or cGMP -dependent protein kinase were identified. Two transcripts were detected in Northern blot analysis: a 1.95-kb primary transcript and a 4.6-kb minor transcript. In RNA samples from 10 tissues, transcripts were detected only in the retina. Images PMID:8688555

  3. The expression patterns of tight junction protein claudin-1, -3, and -4 in human gastric neoplasms and adjacent non-neoplastic tissues

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haiming; Yang, Xingwang

    2015-01-01

    Recently, there is growing evidence that tight junction proteins are often abnormally regulated in human tumors. The function of tight junction proteins in the maintenance of normal epithelial physiology has been well discussed, but their role in the tumorigenesis of gastric cancer is less well defined. To explore the expression distinction of the tight junction proteins claudin-1, -3, and -4 expression in the gastric cancer, the expression of claudin-1, -3, and -4 in 92 gastric cancer tissues and the non-neoplastic tissues adjacent to the tumors were examined by immunohistochemistry. Compared with adjacent non-neoplastic tissues, the expression of claudin-1 was down regulated. However, the expression of claudin-3 and claudin-4 were up-regulated in gastric cancer tissue. In addition, the expression of claudin-3 is correlated with claudin-4 expression in gastric cancer. Our present study reveals that claudin-1, -3, and -4 protein expression altered between human gastric cancers and adjacent non-neoplastic tissues. PMID:25755790

  4. Dynamic changes of connexin-43, gap junctional protein, in outer layers of cumulus cells are regulated by PKC and PI 3-kinase during meiotic resumption in porcine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Shimada, M; Maeda, T; Terada, T

    2001-04-01

    Mammalian oocytes are surrounded by numerous layers of cumulus cells, and the loss of gap junctional communication in the outer layers of cumulus cells induces meiotic resumption in oocytes. In this study, we investigated the dynamic changes in the gap junctional protein connexin-43 in cumulus cells during the meiotic resumption of porcine oocytes. The amount of connexin-43 in all layers of cumulus cells recovered from cumulus-oocyte complexes was increased after 4-h cultivation. However, at 12-h cultivation, the positive signal for connexin-43 immunoreactivity was markedly reduced in the outer layers of cumulus cells. When these reductions of connexin-43 were blocked by protein kinase C (PKC) or phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase inhibitor, networks of filamentous bivalents (i.e., advanced chromosomal status) were undetectable in the germinal vesicle of the oocyte. After 28-h cultivation, when the majority of oocytes were reaching the metaphase I (MI) stage, the connexin-43 in the inner layers of cumulus cells was phosphorylated, regardless of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activation. These results suggest that the initiation of meiotic resumption, namely, the formation of networks of filamentous bivalents in germinal vesicle, is associated with the reduction of gap junctional protein connexin-43 in the outer layers of cumulus cells via the PKC and/or PI 3-kinase pathway. Moreover, the connexin-43 in the inner layers of cumulus cells is phosphorylated during meiotic progression beyond the MI stage, regardless of MAP kinase activation in cumulus cells surrounding the oocyte.

  5. Intracellular Transport, Assembly, and Degradation of Wild-Type and Disease-linked Mutant Gap Junction Proteins

    PubMed Central

    VanSlyke, Judy K.; Deschenes, Suzanne M.; Musil, Linda S.

    2000-01-01

    More than 130 different mutations in the gap junction integral plasma membrane protein connexin32 (Cx32) have been linked to the human peripheral neuropathy X-linked Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease (CMTX). How these various mutants are processed by the cell and the mechanism(s) by which they cause CMTX are unknown. To address these issues, we have studied the intracellular transport, assembly, and degradation of three CMTX-linked Cx32 mutants stably expressed in PC12 cells. Each mutant had a distinct fate: E208K Cx32 appeared to be retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), whereas both the E186K and R142W mutants were transported to perinuclear compartments from which they trafficked either to lysosomes (R142W Cx32) or back to the ER (E186K Cx32). Despite these differences, each mutant was soluble in nonionic detergent but unable to assemble into homomeric connexons. Degradation of both mutant and wild-type connexins was rapid (t1/2 < 3 h) and took place at least in part in the ER by a process sensitive to proteasome inhibitors. The mutants studied are therefore unlikely to cause disease by accumulating in degradation-resistant aggregates but instead are efficiently cleared from the cell by quality control processes that prevent abnormal connexin molecules from traversing the secretory pathway. PMID:10848620

  6. Early inhibition of MMP activity in ischemic rat brain promotes expression of tight junction proteins and angiogenesis during recovery.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Thompson, Jeffrey F; Taheri, Saeid; Salayandia, Victor M; McAvoy, Thera A; Hill, Jeff W; Yang, Yirong; Estrada, Eduardo Y; Rosenberg, Gary A

    2013-07-01

    In cerebral ischemia, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have a dual role by acutely disrupting tight junction proteins (TJPs) in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and chronically promoting angiogenesis. Since TJP remodeling of the neurovascular unit (NVU) is important in recovery and early inhibition of MMPs is neuroprotective, we hypothesized that short-term MMP inhibition would reduce infarct size and promote angiogenesis after ischemia. Adult spontaneously hypertensive rats had a transient middle cerebral artery occlusion with reperfusion. At the onset of ischemia, they received a single dose of the MMP inhibitor, GM6001. They were studied at multiple times up to 4 weeks with immunohistochemistry, biochemistry, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We observed newly formed vessels in peri-infarct regions at 3 weeks after reperfusion. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI showed BBB opening in new vessels. Along with the new vessels, pericytes expressed zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and MMP-3, astrocytes expressed ZO-1, occludin, and MMP-2, while endothelial cells expressed claudin-5. The GM6001, which reduced tissue loss at 3 to 4 weeks, significantly increased new vessel formation with expression of TJPs and MMPs. Our results show that pericytes and astrocytes act spatiotemporally, contributing to extraendothelial TJP formation, and that MMPs are involved in BBB restoration during recovery. Early MMP inhibition benefits neurovascular remodeling after stroke.

  7. Electroacupuncture Treatment Improves Neurological Function Associated with Regulation of Tight Junction Proteins in Rats with Cerebral Ischemia Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ya-min; Xu, Hong; Sun, Hua; Chen, Su-hui; Wang, Fu-ming

    2014-01-01

    Strategies to develop effective neuroprotective therapy to reduce brain damage and related behavioral deficits in stroke patients are of great significance. Electroacupuncture (EA), which derives from traditional Chinese medicine, may be effective as a complementary and alternative method for promoting recovery of neurological function and quality of life. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: (1) sham, (2) middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model groups of 2 h MCAO followed by 1, 3, 5, or 7 d of reperfusion, and (3) EA groups of 2 h MCAO followed by 1, 3, 5, or 7 d of reperfusion. EA groups received EA therapy by needling at GV20 and left ST36. The results show that EA therapy improved the neurological function and reduced infarct volume, confirmed by modified neurological severity scores and TTC staining. Real-time PCR, immunohistochemistry, and western blot assay verified that EA upregulated the expression of tight junction (TJ) claudin-5, occludin, and zonula occluding-1 from 1 to 7 d after reperfusion. Our findings suggest that EA reduces brain damage and related behavioral deficits via upregulation of the TJ proteins. PMID:25009574

  8. Electroacupuncture treatment improves neurological function associated with regulation of tight junction proteins in rats with cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ya-Min; Xu, Hong; Sun, Hua; Chen, Su-Hui; Wang, Fu-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Strategies to develop effective neuroprotective therapy to reduce brain damage and related behavioral deficits in stroke patients are of great significance. Electroacupuncture (EA), which derives from traditional Chinese medicine, may be effective as a complementary and alternative method for promoting recovery of neurological function and quality of life. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: (1) sham, (2) middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model groups of 2 h MCAO followed by 1, 3, 5, or 7 d of reperfusion, and (3) EA groups of 2 h MCAO followed by 1, 3, 5, or 7 d of reperfusion. EA groups received EA therapy by needling at GV20 and left ST36. The results show that EA therapy improved the neurological function and reduced infarct volume, confirmed by modified neurological severity scores and TTC staining. Real-time PCR, immunohistochemistry, and western blot assay verified that EA upregulated the expression of tight junction (TJ) claudin-5, occludin, and zonula occluding-1 from 1 to 7 d after reperfusion. Our findings suggest that EA reduces brain damage and related behavioral deficits via upregulation of the TJ proteins.

  9. Early inhibition of MMP activity in ischemic rat brain promotes expression of tight junction proteins and angiogenesis during recovery

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Thompson, Jeffrey F; Taheri, Saeid; Salayandia, Victor M; McAvoy, Thera A; Hill, Jeff W; Yang, Yirong; Estrada, Eduardo Y; Rosenberg, Gary A

    2013-01-01

    In cerebral ischemia, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have a dual role by acutely disrupting tight junction proteins (TJPs) in the blood–brain barrier (BBB) and chronically promoting angiogenesis. Since TJP remodeling of the neurovascular unit (NVU) is important in recovery and early inhibition of MMPs is neuroprotective, we hypothesized that short-term MMP inhibition would reduce infarct size and promote angiogenesis after ischemia. Adult spontaneously hypertensive rats had a transient middle cerebral artery occlusion with reperfusion. At the onset of ischemia, they received a single dose of the MMP inhibitor, GM6001. They were studied at multiple times up to 4 weeks with immunohistochemistry, biochemistry, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We observed newly formed vessels in peri-infarct regions at 3 weeks after reperfusion. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI showed BBB opening in new vessels. Along with the new vessels, pericytes expressed zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and MMP-3, astrocytes expressed ZO-1, occludin, and MMP-2, while endothelial cells expressed claudin-5. The GM6001, which reduced tissue loss at 3 to 4 weeks, significantly increased new vessel formation with expression of TJPs and MMPs. Our results show that pericytes and astrocytes act spatiotemporally, contributing to extraendothelial TJP formation, and that MMPs are involved in BBB restoration during recovery. Early MMP inhibition benefits neurovascular remodeling after stroke. PMID:23571276

  10. MOSFET-BJT hybrid mode of the gated lateral bipolar junction transistor for C-reactive protein detection.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Heng; Kwon, Hyurk-Choon; Yeom, Se-Hyuk; Kwon, Dae-Hyuk; Kang, Shin-Won

    2011-10-15

    In this study, we propose a novel biosensor based on a gated lateral bipolar junction transistor (BJT) for biomaterial detection. The gated lateral BJT can function as both a BJT and a metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) with both the emitter and source, and the collector and drain, coupled. C-reactive protein (CRP), which is an important disease marker in clinical examinations, can be detected using the proposed device. In the MOSFET-BJT hybrid mode, the sensitivity, selectivity, and reproducibility of the gated lateral BJT for biosensors were evaluated in this study. According to the results, in the MOSFET-BJT hybrid mode, the gated lateral BJT shows good selectivity and reproducibility. Changes in the emitter (source) current of the device for CRP antigen detection were approximately 0.65, 0.72, and 0.80 μA/decade at base currents of -50, -30, and -10 μA, respectively. The proposed device has significant application in the detection of certain biomaterials that require a dilution process using a common biosensor, such as a MOSFET-based biosensor.

  11. Effects of Soybean Agglutinin on Mechanical Barrier Function and Tight Junction Protein Expression in Intestinal Epithelial Cells from Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Li; Qin, Guixin; Zhao, Yuan; Wang, Jun; Liu, Feifei; Che, Dongsheng

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we sought to investigate the role of soybean agglutinin (SBA) in mediating membrane permeability and the mechanical barrier function of intestinal epithelial cells. The IPEC-J2 cells were cultured and treated with 0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, or 3.0 mg/mL SBA. Transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity were measured to evaluate membrane permeability. The results showed a significant decrease in TEER values (p < 0.05) in a time- and dose-dependent manner, and a pronounced increase in AP activity (p < 0.05). Cell growth and cell morphology were used to evaluate the cell viability. A significant cell growth inhibition (p < 0.05) and alteration of morphology were observed when the concentration of SBA was increased. The results of western blotting showed that the expression levels of occludin and claudin-3 were decreased by 31% and 64% compared to those of the control, respectively (p < 0.05). In addition, immunofluorescence labeling indicated an obvious decrease in staining of these targets and changes in their localizations. In conclusion, SBA increased the membrane permeability, inhibited the cell viability and reduced the levels of tight junction proteins (occludin and claudin-3), leading to a decrease in mechanical barrier function in intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:24189218

  12. Shoichiro Tsukita: a life exploring the molecular architecture of the tight junction

    PubMed Central

    Takeichi, Masatoshi

    2006-01-01

    On December 11, 2005, Shoichiro Tsukita died at the young age of 52, after 14 months of treatment for cancer. Early in his career, Tsukita succeeded in isolating and purifying the adherens junction with his wife Sachiko, an accomplishment that he followed up with an impressive series of discoveries of cell adhesion and cytoskeletal molecules, including what may have been his greatest contribution to the field, the identification of occludin and the claudin family of molecules, which were watershed discoveries in the study of the molecular nature of tight junctions. PMID:16449186

  13. Ultrafast endocytosis at Caenorhabditis elegans neuromuscular junctions

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Shigeki; Liu, Qiang; Davis, M Wayne; Hollopeter, Gunther; Thomas, Nikita; Jorgensen, Nels B; Jorgensen, Erik M

    2013-01-01

    Synaptic vesicles can be released at extremely high rates, which places an extraordinary demand on the recycling machinery. Previous ultrastructural studies of vesicle recycling were conducted in dissected preparations using an intense stimulation to maximize the probability of release. Here, a single light stimulus was applied to motor neurons in intact Caenorhabditis elegans nematodes expressing channelrhodopsin, and the animals rapidly frozen. We found that docked vesicles fuse along a broad active zone in response to a single stimulus, and are replenished with a time constant of about 2 s. Endocytosis occurs within 50 ms adjacent to the dense projection and after 1 s adjacent to adherens junctions. These studies suggest that synaptic vesicle endocytosis may occur on a millisecond time scale following a single physiological stimulus in the intact nervous system and is unlikely to conform to current models of endocytosis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00723.001 PMID:24015355

  14. Claudins 6, 9, and 13 are developmentally expressed renal tight junction proteins

    PubMed Central

    Abuazza, Ghazala; Becker, Amy; Williams, Scott S.; Chakravarty, Sumana; Truong, Hoang-Trang; Lin, Fangming; Baum, Michel

    2014-01-01

    The adult proximal tubule is a low-resistance epithelium where there are high rates of both active transcellular and passive paracellular NaCl transport. We have previously demonstrated that the neonatal rabbit and rat proximal tubule have substantively different passive paracellular transport properties than the adult proximal tubule, which results in a maturational change in the paracellular passive flux of ions. Neonatal proximal tubules have a higher PNa/PCl ratio and lower chloride and bicarbonate permeabilities than adult proximal tubules. Claudins are a large family of proteins which are the gate keepers of the paracellular pathway, and claudin isoform expression determines the permeability characteristics of the paracellular pathway. Previous studies have shown that claudins 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 10, 11, 12, 15, and 16 are expressed in the adult mouse kidney. To determine whether there are developmental claudin isoforms, we compared the claudin isoforms present in the neonatal and adult kidney using RT-PCR to detect mRNA of claudin isoforms. Claudin 6, claudin 9, and claudin 13 were either not expressed or barely detectable in the adult mouse kidney using traditional PCR, but were expressed in the neonatal mouse kidney. Using real-time RT-PCR, we were able to detect a low level of claudin 6 mRNA expression in the adult kidney compared with the neonate, but claudin 9 and claudin 13 were only detected in the neonatal kidney. There was the same maturational decrease in these claudin proteins with Western blot analysis. Immunohistochemistry showed high levels of expression of claudin 6 in neonatal proximal tubules, thick ascending limb, distal convoluted tubules, and collecting ducts in a paracellular distribution but there was no expression of claudin 6 in the adult kidney. Using real-time RT-PCR claudin 6 and 9 mRNA were present in 1-day-old proximal convoluted tubules and were virtually undetectable in proximal convoluted tubules from adults. Claudin 13 was

  15. Double gene deletion reveals the lack of cooperation between claudin 11 and claudin 14 tight junction proteins

    PubMed Central

    Elkouby-Naor, Liron; Abassi, Zaid; Lagziel, Ayala; Gow, Alexander; Ben-Yosef, Tamar

    2010-01-01

    Summary Members of the claudin family of proteins are the main components of tight junctions (TJs), the major selective barrier of the paracellular pathway between epithelial cells. Selectivity and specificity of TJ strands are determined by the type of claudins present. It is thus important to understand the cooperation between different claudins in various tissues. To study the possible cooperation between claudin 11 and claudin 14 we generated claudin11/claudin 14 double deficient mice. These mice exhibit a combination of the phenotypes found in each of the singly deficient mutants, including deafness, neurological deficits and male sterility. In the kidney we found that these two claudins have distinct and partially overlapping expression patterns. Claudin 11 is located in both the proximal and the distal convoluted tubules, while claudin 14 is located in both the thin descending and the thick ascending limbs of the loop of Henle, as well as in the proximal convoluted tubules. Although daily urinary excretion of Mg++, and to a lesser extent of Ca++, tended to be higher in claudin11/claudin 14 double mutants, these changes did not reach statistical significance comparing to wt animals. These findings suggest that under normal conditions co-deletion of claudin11 and claudin 14 does not affect kidney function or ion balance. Our data demonstrate that despite the importance of each of these claudins, there is probably no functional cooperation between them. Generation of additional mouse models in which different claudins are abolished will provide further insight into the complex interactions between claudin proteins in various physiological systems. PMID:18663477

  16. Josephson junction

    DOEpatents

    Wendt, J.R.; Plut, T.A.; Martens, J.S.

    1995-05-02

    A novel method for fabricating nanometer geometry electronic devices is described. Such Josephson junctions can be accurately and reproducibly manufactured employing photolithographic and direct write electron beam lithography techniques in combination with aqueous etchants. In particular, a method is described for manufacturing planar Josephson junctions from high temperature superconducting material. 10 figs.

  17. Josephson junction

    DOEpatents

    Wendt, Joel R.; Plut, Thomas A.; Martens, Jon S.

    1995-01-01

    A novel method for fabricating nanometer geometry electronic devices is described. Such Josephson junctions can be accurately and reproducibly manufactured employing photolithographic and direct write electron beam lithography techniques in combination with aqueous etchants. In particular, a method is described for manufacturing planar Josephson junctions from high temperature superconducting material.

  18. CD24 regulated gene expression and distribution of tight junction proteins is associated with altered barrier function in oral epithelial monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Ping; Nadkarni, Mangala A; Simonian, Mary; Hunter, Neil

    2009-01-01

    Background Control of intercellular penetration of microbial products is critical for the barrier function of oral epithelia. We demonstrated that CD24 is selectively and strongly expressed in the cells of the epithelial attachment to the tooth and the epithelial lining of the diseased periodontal pocket and studies in vitro showed that CD24 regulated expression of the epithelial intercellular adhesion protein E-cadherin. Results In the present study, the barrier function of oral epithelial cell monolayers to low molecular weight dextran was assayed as a model for the normal physiological function of the epithelial attachment to limit ingress of microbial products from oral microbial biofilms. Paracellular transfer of low molecular weight dextran across monolayers of oral epithelial cells was specifically decreased following incubation with anti-CD24 peptide antibody whereas passage of dextran across the monolayer was increased following silencing of mRNA for CD24. Changes in barrier function were related to the selective regulation of the genes encoding zonula occludens-1, zonula occludens-2 and occludin, proteins implicated in tight junctions. More particularly, enhanced barrier function was related to relocation of these proteins to the cell periphery, compatible with tight junctions. Conclusion CD24 has the constitutive function of maintaining expression of selected genes encoding tight junction components associated with a marginal barrier function of epithelial monolayers. Activation by binding of an external ligand to CD24 enhances this expression but is also effective in re-deployment of tight junction proteins that is aligned with enhanced intercellular barrier function. These results establish the potential of CD24 to act as a potent regulator of the intercellular barrier function of epithelia in response to local microbial ecology. PMID:19138432

  19. Nitric Oxide and Airway Epithelial Barrier Function: Regulation of Tight Junction Proteins and Epithelial Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Nels; Greul, Anne-Katrin; Hristova, Milena; Bove, Peter F.; Kasahara, David I.; van der Vliet, Albert

    2008-01-01

    Acute airway inflammation is associated with enhanced production of nitric oxide (NO•) and altered airway epithelial barrier function, suggesting a role of NO• or its metabolites in epithelial permeability. While high concentrations of S-nitrosothiols disrupted transepithelial resistance (TER) and increased permeability in 16HBE14o- cells, no significant barrier disruption was observed by NONOates, in spite of altered distribution and expression of some TJ proteins. Barrier disruption of mouse tracheal epithelial (MTE) cell monolayers in response to inflammatory cytokines was independent of NOS2, based on similar effects in MTE cells from NOS2-/- mice and a lack of effect of the NOS2-inhibitor 1400W. Cell pre-incubation with LPS protected MTE cells from TER loss and increased permeability by H2O2, which was independent of NOS2. However, NOS2 was found to contribute to epithelial wound repair and TER recovery after mechanical injury. Overall, our results demonstrate that epithelial NOS2 is not responsible for epithelial barrier dysfunction during inflammation, but may contribute to restoration of epithelial integrity. PMID:19100237

  20. Tight junction protein ZO-1 controls organic cation/carnitine transporter OCTN2 (SLC22A5) in a protein kinase C-dependent way.

    PubMed

    Jurkiewicz, Dominika; Michalec, Katarzyna; Skowronek, Krzysztof; Nałęcz, Katarzyna A

    2017-05-01

    OCTN2 (SLC22A5) is an organic cation/carnitine transporter belonging to the solute carrier transporters (SLC) family. OCTN2 is ubiquitously expressed and its presence was shown in various brain cells, including the endothelial cells forming blood-brain barrier, where it was mainly detected at abluminal membrane and in proximity of tight junctions (TJ). Since OCTN2 contains a PDZ-binding domain, the present study was focused on a possible role of transporter interaction with a TJ-associated protein ZO-1, containing PDZ domains and detected in rat Octn2 proteome. We showed previously that activation of protein kinase C (PKC) in rat astrocytes regulates Octn2 surface presence and activity. Regulation of a wild type Octn2 and its deletion mutant without a PDZ binding motif were studied in heterologous expression system in HEK293 cells. Plasma membrane presence of overexpressed Octn2 did not depend on either PKC activation or presence of PDZ-binding motif, anyhow, as assayed in proximity ligation assay, the truncation of PDZ binding motif resulted in a strongly diminished Octn2/ZO-1 interaction and in a decreased transporter activity. The same effects on Octn2 activity were detected upon PKC activation, what correlated with ZO-1 phosphorylation. It is postulated that ZO-1, when not phosphorylated by PKC, keeps Octn2 in an active state, while elimination of this binding in ΔPDZ mutant or after ZO-1 phosphorylation leads to diminution of Octn2 activity.

  1. Structure of Yeast OSBP-Related Protein Osh1 Reveals Key Determinants for Lipid Transport and Protein Targeting at the Nucleus-Vacuole Junction.

    PubMed

    Manik, Mohammad Kawsar; Yang, Huiseon; Tong, Junsen; Im, Young Jun

    2017-03-10

    Yeast Osh1 belongs to the oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP) family of proteins and contains multiple targeting modules optimized for lipid transport at the nucleus-vacuole junction (NVJ). The key determinants for NVJ targeting and the role of Osh1 at NVJs have remained elusive because of unknown lipid specificities. In this study, we determined the structures of the ankyrin repeat domain (ANK), and OSBP-related domain (ORD) of Osh1, in complex with Nvj1 and ergosterol, respectively. The Osh1 ANK forms a unique bi-lobed structure that recognizes a cytosolic helical segment of Nvj1. We discovered that Osh1 ORD binds ergosterol and phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate PI(4)P in a competitive manner, suggesting counter-transport function of the two lipids. Ergosterol is bound to the hydrophobic pocket in a head-down orientation, and the structure of the PI(4)P-binding site in Osh1 is well conserved. Our results suggest that Osh1 performs non-vesicular transport of ergosterol and PI(4)P at the NVJ.

  2. Gap Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Morten Schak; Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Sorgen, Paul L.; Verma, Vandana; Delmar, Mario; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Gap junctions are essential to the function of multicellular animals, which require a high degree of coordination between cells. In vertebrates, gap junctions comprise connexins and currently 21 connexins are known in humans. The functions of gap junctions are highly diverse and include exchange of metabolites and electrical signals between cells, as well as functions, which are apparently unrelated to intercellular communication. Given the diversity of gap junction physiology, regulation of gap junction activity is complex. The structure of the various connexins is known to some extent; and structural rearrangements and intramolecular interactions are important for regulation of channel function. Intercellular coupling is further regulated by the number and activity of channels present in gap junctional plaques. The number of connexins in cell-cell channels is regulated by controlling transcription, translation, trafficking, and degradation; and all of these processes are under strict control. Once in the membrane, channel activity is determined by the conductive properties of the connexin involved, which can be regulated by voltage and chemical gating, as well as a large number of posttranslational modifications. The aim of the present article is to review our current knowledge on the structure, regulation, function, and pharmacology of gap junctions. This will be supported by examples of how different connexins and their regulation act in concert to achieve appropriate physiological control, and how disturbances of connexin function can lead to disease. © 2012 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 2:1981-2035, 2012. PMID:23723031

  3. Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 and -9 Secreted by Leukemic Cells Increase the Permeability of Blood-Brain Barrier by Disrupting Tight Junction Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Saran; Cen, Jiannong; Huang, Yihong; Shen, Hongjie; Yao, Li; Wang, Yuanyuan; Chen, Zixing

    2011-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) involvement remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality in acute leukemia, the mechanisms of leukemic cell infiltration into the CNS have not yet been elucidated. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) makes CNS become a refugee to leukemic cells and serves as a resource of cells that seed extraneural sites. How can the leukemic cells disrupt this barrier and invasive the CNS, even if many of the currently available chemotherapies can not cross the BBB? Tight junction in endothelial cells occupies a central role in the function of the BBB. Except the well known role of degrading extracellular matrix in metastasis of cancer cells, here we show matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9, secreted by leukemic cells, mediate the BBB opening by disrupting tight junction proteins in the CNS leukemia. We demonstrated that leukemic cells impaired tight junction proteins ZO-1, claudin-5 and occludin resulting in increased permeability of the BBB. However, these alterations reduced when MMP-2 and -9 activities were inhibited by RNA interference strategy or by MMP inhibitor GM6001 in an in vitro BBB model. We also found that the disruption of the BBB in company with the down-regulation of ZO-1, claudin-5 and occludin and the up-regulation of MMP-2 and -9 in mouse brain tissues with leukemic cell infiltration by confocal imaging and the assay of in situ gelatin zymography. Besides, GM6001 protected all mice against CNS leukemia. Our findings suggest that the degradation of tight junction proteins ZO-1, claudin-5 and occludin by MMP-2 and -9 secreted by leukemic cells constitutes an important mechanism in the BBB breakdown which contributes to the invasion of leukemic cells to the CNS in acute leukemia. PMID:21857898

  4. The Src Homology 3 Domain Is Required for Junctional Adhesion Molecule Binding to the Third PDZ Domain of the Scaffolding Protein ZO-1

    SciTech Connect

    Nomme, Julian; Fanning, Alan S.; Caffrey, Michael; Lye, Ming F.; Anderson, James M.; Lavie, Arnon

    2012-01-20

    Tight junctions are cell-cell contacts that regulate the paracellular flux of solutes and prevent pathogen entry across cell layers. The assembly and permeability of this barrier are dependent on the zonula occludens (ZO) membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) proteins ZO-1, -2, and -3. MAGUK proteins are characterized by a core motif of protein-binding domains that include a PDZ domain, a Src homology 3 (SH3) domain, and a region of homology to guanylate kinase (GUK); the structure of this core motif has never been determined for any MAGUK. To better understand how ZO proteins organize the assembly of protein complexes we have crystallized the entire PDZ3-SH3-GUK core motif of ZO-1. We have also crystallized this core motif in complex with the cytoplasmic tail of the ZO-1 PDZ3 ligand, junctional adhesion molecule A (JAM-A) to determine how the activity of different domains is coordinated. Our study shows a new feature for PDZ class II ligand binding that implicates the two highly conserved Phe{sup -2} and Ser{sup -3} residues of JAM. Our x-ray structures and NMR experiments also show for the first time a role for adjacent domains in the binding of ligands to PDZ domains in the MAGUK proteins family.

  5. Escherichia coli heat-stable toxin b impairs intestinal epithelial barrier function by altering tight junction proteins.

    PubMed

    Ngendahayo Mukiza, Clément; Dubreuil, J Daniel

    2013-08-01

    Escherichia coli heat-stable toxin b (STb) causes diarrhea in animals. STb binds to sulfatide, its receptor, and is then internalized. In the cytoplasm, through a cascade of events, STb triggers the opening of ion channels, allowing ion secretion and water loss and leading to diarrhea. Tight junctions (TJs) are well known for controlling paracellular traffic of ions and water by forming a physical intercellular barrier in epithelial cells, and some bacterial toxins are known to affect adversely TJs. The present study aimed at determining the effect of STb on TJs. T84 cells were treated for 24 h with purified STb and a nontoxic STb mutant (D30V). Transepithelial resistance (TER), paracellular flux marker, and confocal microscopy were used to analyze the effect of STb on TJs. Purified STb caused a significant reduction of TER parallel to an increase in paracellular permeability compared to the results seen in untreated cells or mutant D30V. The increased paracellular permeability was associated with a marked alteration of F-actin stress fibers. F-actin filament dissolution and condensation were accompanied by redistribution and/or fragmentation of ZO-1, claudin-1, and occludin. These changes were also observed following treatment of T84 cells with an 8-amino-acid peptide found in the STb sequence corresponding to a consensus sequence of Vibrio cholerae Zot toxin. These effects were not observed with a scrambled peptide or mutant D30V. Our findings indicate that STb induces epithelial barrier dysfunction through changes in TJ proteins that could contribute to diarrhea.

  6. Dietary calcium concentration and cereals differentially affect mineral balance and tight junction proteins expression in jejunum of weaned pigs.

    PubMed

    Metzler-Zebeli, Barbara U; Mann, Evelyne; Ertl, Reinhard; Schmitz-Esser, Stephan; Wagner, Martin; Klein, Dieter; Ritzmann, Mathias; Zebeli, Qendrim

    2015-04-14

    Ca plays an essential role in bone development; however, little is known about its effect on intestinal gene expression in juvenile animals. In the present study, thirty-two weaned pigs (9·5 (SEM 0·11) kg) were assigned to four diets that differed in Ca concentration (adequate v. high) and cereal composition (wheat-barley v. maize) to assess the jejunal and colonic gene expression of nutrient transporters, tight junction proteins, cytokines and pathogen-associated molecular patterns, nutrient digestibility, Ca balance and serum acute-phase response. To estimate the impact of mucosal bacteria on colonic gene expression, Spearman's correlations between colonic gene expression and bacterial abundance were computed. Faecal Ca excretion indicated that more Ca was available along the intestinal tract of the pigs fed high Ca diets as compared to the pigs fed adequate Ca diets (P> 0.05). High Ca diets decreased jejunal zonula occludens 1 (ZO1) and occludin (OCLN) expression, up-regulated jejunal expression of toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and down-regulated colonic GLUT2 expression as compared to the adequate Ca diets (P< 0.05). Dietary cereal composition up-regulated jejunal TLR2 expression and interacted (P= 0.021) with dietary Ca on colonic IL1B expression; high Ca concentration up-regulated IL1B expression with wheat-barley diets and down-regulated it with maize diets. Spearman's correlations (r> 0·35; P< 0·05) indicated an association between operational taxonomic units assigned to the phyla Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria and bacterial metabolites and mucosal gene expression in the colon. The present results indicate that high Ca diets have the potential to modify the jejunal and colonic mucosal gene expression response which, in turn, interacts with the composition of the basal diet and mucosa-associated bacteria in weaned pigs.

  7. Different segments of the cerebral vasculature reveal specific endothelial specifications, while tight junction proteins appear equally distributed.

    PubMed

    Hanske, Sophie; Dyrna, Felix; Bechmann, Ingo; Krueger, Martin

    2017-04-01

    The identification of the "paucity of transportation vesicles" and "belt-like" tight junctions (TJs) of endothelial cells as the "morphological correlate of a blood-brain barrier" (BBB) by Reese and Karnovsky (J Cell Biol 34:207-217, 1967) has become textbook knowledge, and countless studies have helped to further define the elements, functions, and dynamics of the BBB. Most work, however, has focused on parenchymal capillaries or less clearly defined "microvessels", while a systematic study on similarities and differences between BBB architecture along the vascular tree within the brain and the meninges has been lacking. Since astrocytes induce endothelial cells to display BBB-typical characteristics by sonic hedgehog and Wnt/β-catenin signaling, we hypothesized that BBB-typical features should be most pronounced in parenchymal capillaries, where endothelium and astrocytes are separated by a basement membrane only. In contrast, this intimate contact is absent in leptomeningeal vessels, thereby potentially affecting BBB architecture. However, here, we show that claudin-3, claudin-5, zonula occludens-1, and occludin as typical constitutes of BBB TJs are comparably distributed in all segments of the parenchymal and the meningeal vascular tree of C57Bl6 mice. While electron microscopy revealed equally occluded interendothelial clefts, arterial vessels of the brain parenchyma but not within the meninges exhibited significantly longer TJ overlaps compared to capillaries. The highest density of endothelial vesicles was found in arterial vessels. Thus, endothelial expression of BBB-typical TJ proteins is not reflected by the distance to surrounding astrocytes, but electron microscopy reveals significant differences of endothelial specification along different segments of the CNS vasculature.

  8. Escherichia coli Heat-Stable Toxin b Impairs Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Function by Altering Tight Junction Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ngendahayo Mukiza, Clément

    2013-01-01

    Escherichia coli heat-stable toxin b (STb) causes diarrhea in animals. STb binds to sulfatide, its receptor, and is then internalized. In the cytoplasm, through a cascade of events, STb triggers the opening of ion channels, allowing ion secretion and water loss and leading to diarrhea. Tight junctions (TJs) are well known for controlling paracellular traffic of ions and water by forming a physical intercellular barrier in epithelial cells, and some bacterial toxins are known to affect adversely TJs. The present study aimed at determining the effect of STb on TJs. T84 cells were treated for 24 h with purified STb and a nontoxic STb mutant (D30V). Transepithelial resistance (TER), paracellular flux marker, and confocal microscopy were used to analyze the effect of STb on TJs. Purified STb caused a significant reduction of TER parallel to an increase in paracellular permeability compared to the results seen in untreated cells or mutant D30V. The increased paracellular permeability was associated with a marked alteration of F-actin stress fibers. F-actin filament dissolution and condensation were accompanied by redistribution and/or fragmentation of ZO-1, claudin-1, and occludin. These changes were also observed following treatment of T84 cells with an 8-amino-acid peptide found in the STb sequence corresponding to a consensus sequence of Vibrio cholerae Zot toxin. These effects were not observed with a scrambled peptide or mutant D30V. Our findings indicate that STb induces epithelial barrier dysfunction through changes in TJ proteins that could contribute to diarrhea. PMID:23716609

  9. Role of gap junctions and protein kinase A during the development of oocyte maturational competence in Ayu (Plecoglossus altivelis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yamamoto, Y.; Yoshizaki, G.; Takeuchi, T.; Soyano, K.; Patino, R.

    2008-01-01

    Meiotic resumption in teleost oocytes is induced by a maturation-inducing hormone (MIH). The sensitivity of oocytes to MIH, also known as oocyte maturational competence (OMC), is induced by LH via mechanisms that are not fully understood. A previous study of Ayu (Plecoglossus altivelis) showed the presence of functional heterologous gap junctions (GJs) between oocytes and their surrounding granulosa cells. The objectives of this study were to determine the role of ovarian GJs and of protein kinase A (PKA) during the acquisition of OMC. We examined the effects of the specific GJ inhibitor carbenoxolone (CBX) and 18??-glycyrrhetinic acid (??-GA) on the LH-(hCG)-dependent acquisition of OMC and on MIH-(17,20??-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one)-dependent meiotic resumption; measured the cAMP content of ovarian follicles during the hCG-dependent acquisition of OMC; and determined the effects of PK activators and inhibitors on hCG-dependent OMC. Production of follicular cAMP increased during the hCG-dependent acquisition of OMC. Both GJ inhibitors and the PKA inhibitor H8-dihydrochloride, but not the PKC inhibitor GF109203X, suppressed the hCG-dependent acquisition of OMC in a dose-dependent manner. The PKA activator forskolin induced OMC with a similar potency to hCG. Unlike previous observations with teleosts where disruption of heterologous GJ either blocks or stimulates meiotic resumption, treatment with GJ inhibitors did not affect MIH-dependent meiotic resumption in maturationally competent follicles of Ayu. These observations suggest that ovarian GJs are essential for LH-dependent acquisition of OMC but not for MIH-dependent meiotic resumption, and that the stimulation of OMC by LH is mediated by cAMP-dependent PKA. They are also consistent with the view that a precise balance between GJ-mediated signals (positive or negative) and oocyte maturational readiness is required for hormonally regulated meiotic resumption. ?? 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Localization and expression pattern of amelotin, odontogenic ameloblast-associated protein and follicular dendritic cell-secreted protein in the junctional epithelium of inflamed gingiva.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Yohei; Kobayashi, Ryoki; Matsui, Sari; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Iwai, Yasunobu; Noda, Keisuke; Yamazaki, Mizuho; Kurita-Ochiai, Tomoko; Yoshimura, Atsutoshi; Shinomura, Tamayuki; Ganss, Bernhard; Ogata, Yorimasa

    2016-11-02

    The purpose of this study is to elucidate the localization of amelotin (AMTN), odontogenic ameloblast-associated protein (ODAM) and follicular dendritic cell-secreted protein (FDC-SP) at the junctional epithelium (JE) in Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans infected mice and inflamed and non-inflamed human gingiva. We performed immunostaining to determine the localization and expression pattern of AMTN, ODAM and FDC-SP. AMTN, ODAM and FDC-SP in A. actinomycetemcomitans infected mice did not change dramatically compared with non-infected mice. AMTN and FDC-SP expressions were observed stronger in P. gingivalis infected mice at early stage. However, at the following stage, the coronal part of the AMTN expression disappeared from the JE, and FDC-SP expression decreased due to severe inflammation by P. gingivalis. ODAM expressed internal and external basal lamina, and the expression increased not only at early stage but also at the following stage in the inflammatory JE induced by P. gingivalis. In the human gingival tissues, AMTN was detected at the surface of the sulcular epithelium and JE in the non-inflamed and inflamed gingiva, and the localization did not change the process of inflammation. ODAM and FDC-SP were more widely detected at the sulcular epithelium and JE in the non-inflamed gingiva. In the inflamed gingiva, localization of ODAM and FDC-SP was spread into the gingival epithelium, compared to AMTN. These studies demonstrated that the expression pattern of AMTN, ODAM and FDC-SP at the JE were changed during inflammation process and these three proteins might play an important role in the resistance to inflammation.

  11. Heat shock treatment protects osmotic stress–induced dysfunction of the blood-brain barrier through preservation of tight junction proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Tzong-Shi; Chen, Hsiang-Wen; Huang, Maw-Hsiung; Wang, Shu-Jung; Yang, Rei-Cheng

    2004-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a specialized structure in the central nervous system (CNS), which participates in maintenance of a state of cerebrospinal fluid homeostasis. The endothelial cells of the cerebral capillaries and the tight junctions between them form the basis of the BBB. Research has shown that destruction of the BBB is associated with diseases of the CNS. However, there is little research on how the BBB might be protected. In this study, we used a high osmotic solution (1.6 M d-mannitol) to open the BBB of rats and Evans blue dye as a macromolecular marker. The effect of heat shock treatment was evaluated. The results show that increased synthesis of heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72) was induced in the heated group only. BBB permeability was significantly less in the heat shock–treated group after hyperosmotic shock. The major tight junction proteins, occludin and zonula occludens (ZO)-1, were significantly decreased after d-mannitol treatment in the nonheated group, whereas they were preserved in the heated group. The coimmunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that Hsp72 could be detected in the precipitates of brain extract interacting with anti–ZO-1 antibodies as well as those interacting with anti–occludin antibodies in the heated group. We conclude that the integrity of tight junctions could be maintained by previous heat shock treatment, which might be associated with the increased production of Hsp72. PMID:15633295

  12. Transcription of the gene for the gap junctional protein connexin43 and expression of functional cell-to-cell channels are regulated by cAMP.

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, P P; Yamamoto, M; Rose, B

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the mechanism by which cyclic AMP (cAMP) induces gap junctional communication via cell-to-cell channels in a communication-deficient rat Morris hepatoma cell line. We found that under basal conditions, the cells transcribe cx43 at a low level but do not transcribe cx26 or cx32. Elevation of intracellular cAMP, which induced communication, increased cx43 mRNA 15- to 40-fold and the rate of cx43 transcription 6-fold. Cx43 protein was detected by immunostaining in junctions of only those cells in which communication had been induced. We found the regulation by cAMP also in other cell lines; namely, in those with a low basal level of cx43 mRNA. Images PMID:1327297

  13. Effect of Phoneutria nigriventer venom on the expression of junctional protein and P-gp efflux pump function in the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Rapôso, Catarina; Odorissi, Paulo Alexandre Miranda; Oliveira, Alexandre L R; Aoyama, Hiroshi; Ferreira, Carmen Verissima; Verinaud, Liana; Fontana, Karina; Ruela-de-Sousa, Roberta R; da Cruz-Höfling, Maria Alice

    2012-09-01

    Phoneutria nigriventer spider venom (PNV) contains Ca(2+), K(+) and Na(+) channel-acting peptides that affect neurotransmitter release and causes excitotoxicity in PNS and CNS. It has been demonstrated that PNV causes blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown of hippocampal microvessels time-dependently through enhanced microtubule-mediated vesicular transport. Herein, it is hypothesized that PNV can cause BBB breakdown in the hippocampus and cerebellum time-dependently through other molecular mechanisms. The BBB integrity was assessed through the analysis of expression of Poly-glycoprotein (P-gp) efflux transporter protein, laminin from basement membrane and endothelial tight junctional and adhesion junctional (TJ/AJ) proteins. Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) and protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) expression, which are known to have a role in the phosphorylation of junctional proteins and BBB opening, were also investigated. Astrocytes P-gp activity was determined by flow cytometry. The study demonstrated temporary decreased expression of laminin, TJ and AJ proteins (ZO1//occludin//claudin-5//beta-catenin) and P-gp (more prominently in hippocampus), which was completely or partially resolved between 2 and 5 h (and more quickly for cerebellum). PNV inhibited P-gp activity in astrocytes. PP2A phosphorylation, which inhibits the enzyme activity, was increased in both regions (15-45 min); however the phosphorylation level returned to baseline after 2 h. In conclusion, PNV disrupts paracellular transport in the BBB and possesses substrates for the active P-gp efflux transporter located in the BBB complex. Further studies into cellular mechanisms of astrocyte/endothelial interactions, using PNV as tool, may identify how astrocytes regulate the BBB, a characteristic that may be useful for the temporary opening of the BBB.

  14. Acetaldehyde disrupts tight junctions in Caco-2 cell monolayers by a protein phosphatase 2A-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Dunagan, Mitzi; Chaudhry, Kamaljit; Samak, Geetha; Rao, R K

    2012-12-15

    Acetaldehyde is accumulated at high concentrations in the colonic lumen following ethanol administration. Previous studies demonstrated that acetaldehyde disrupts intestinal epithelial tight junctions and increases paracellular permeability. In the present study, we investigated the role of PP2A in the acetaldehyde-induced disruption of intestinal epithelial tight junctions. Caco-2 cell monolayers were exposed to 200-600 μM acetaldehyde for varying times, and the epithelial barrier function was evaluated by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance and inulin permeability. Acetaldehyde treatment resulted in a time-dependent increase in inulin permeability and redistribution of occludin and ZO-1 from the intercellular junctions. Treatment of cells with fostriecin (a PP2A-selective inhibitor) or knockdown of PP2A by siRNA blocked acetaldehyde-induced increase in inulin permeability and redistribution of occludin and ZO-1. The effects of fostriecin and acetaldehyde were confirmed in mouse intestine ex vivo. Acetaldehyde-induced tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction were also attenuated by a PP2A-specific inhibitory peptide, TPDYFL. Coimmunoprecipitation studies showed that acetaldehyde increased the interaction of PP2A with occludin and induced dephosphorylation of occludin on threonine residues. Fostriecin and TPDYFL significantly reduced acetaldehyde-induced threonine dephosphorylation of occludin. Acetaldehyde failed to change the level of the methylated form of PP2A-C subunit. However, genistein (a tyrosine kinase inhibitor) blocked acetaldehyde-induced association of PP2A with occludin and threonine dephosphorylation of occludin. These results demonstrate that acetaldehyde-induced disruption of tight junctions is mediated by PP2A translocation to tight junctions and dephosphorylation of occludin on threonine residues.

  15. Effect of Acute Stress on Immune Cell Counts and the Expression of Tight Junction Proteins in the Duodenal Mucosa of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hong Sub; Kim, Dong-Kyu; Kim, Young Bae

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims Duodenal immune alterations have been reported in a subset of patients with functional dyspepsia (FD). The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of acute stress on immune cell counts and the expression of tight junction proteins in the duodenal mucosa. Methods Twenty-one male rats were divided into the following three experimental groups: 1) the nonstressed, control group, 2) the 2-hour-stressed group, and 3) the 4-hour-stressed group. Eosinophils, mast cells and CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes in the duodenal mucosa were counted. The protein and mRNA expressions of occludin and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) were examined. Results Eosinophils, mast cells and CD8+ T lymphocyte counts did not differ between the stressed and control groups. The number of CD4+ T lymphocytes and the protein and mRNA expressions of occludin and ZO-1 were significantly lower in the 4-hour-stressed group compared with the control group. The plasma adrenocorticotrophic hormone and cortisol levels of the 4-hour-stressed group were significantly higher than those of the control group. Conclusions Acute stress reduces the number of CD4+ T lymphocytes and the expression of tight junction proteins in the duodenal mucosa, which might be associated with the duodenal immune alterations found in a subset of FD patients. PMID:23560155

  16. The interaction of Streptococcus pneumoniae with plasmin mediates transmigration across endothelial and epithelial monolayers by intercellular junction cleavage.

    PubMed

    Attali, Cécile; Durmort, Claire; Vernet, Thierry; Di Guilmi, Anne Marie

    2008-11-01

    The precise mechanisms by which Streptococcus pneumoniae overcomes epithelial and endothelial barriers to access underlying human tissues remain to be determined. The plasminogen system is highly important for the tissue barrier degradation which allows cell migration. Plasminogen is known to interact with pneumococci via enolase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and choline-binding protein E. These observations prompted us to evaluate the role of this proteolytic system in the pneumococcal invasion process. We observed that coating of S. pneumoniae R6 strain with plasminogen or inactivated plasmin increased adherence to pulmonary epithelial A549 and vascular endothelial EaHy cells in vitro. This indicates that plasminogen-mediated adherence is independent of the protease activity and involves plasminogen binding to receptors on eukaryotic cell surfaces. Conversely, decreased adherence of bacterial cells coated with active plasmin was observed, indicating that the protease activity limits bacterial attachment on the cell surface. We were then interested in investigating the role of the proteolytic plasmin activity in the traversal of tissue barriers. We observed that adherence of plasmin-coated D39 (encapsulated) or R6 (unencapsulated) pneumococci induced sporadic disruptions of EaHy and A549 monolayer cell junctions. This was not observed when plasmin was inhibited by aprotinin. Endothelial junction disorganization may proceed by proteolysis of the cell junction components. This is supported by our observation of the in vitro cleavage by plasmin bound to pneumococci of recombinant vascular endothelial cadherin, the main component of endothelial adherens junctions. Finally, junction damage induced by plasmin may be related to tissue barrier traversal, as we measured an increase of S. pneumoniae transmigration across epithelial A549 and endothelial EaHy layers when active plasmin was present on the bacterial surface. Our results highlight a novel function

  17. Diets high in fermentable protein and fibre alter tight junction protein composition with minor effects on barrier function in piglet colon.

    PubMed

    Richter, Jan F; Pieper, Robert; Zakrzewski, Silke S; Günzel, Dorothee; Schulzke, Joerg D; Van Kessel, Andrew G

    2014-03-28

    Protein fermentation end products may damage the colonic mucosa, which could be counteracted by dietary inclusion of fermentable carbohydrates (fCHO). Although fermentable crude protein (fCP) and fCHO are known to affect microbial ecology, their interactive effects on epithelial barrier function are unknown. In the present study, in a 2 × 2 factorial experiment, thirty-two weaned piglets were fed low-fCP/low-fCHO (14·5 % crude protein (CP)/14·5 % total dietary fibre (TDF)), low-fCP/high-fCHO (14·8 % CP/16·6 % TDF), high-fCP/low-fCHO (19·8 % CP/14·5 % TDF) and high-fCP/high-fCHO (20·1 % CP/18·0 % TDF) diets. After 21-23 d, samples of proximal and distal colonic mucosae were investigated in Ussing chambers with respect to the paracellular and transcytotic passages of macromolecules and epithelial ion transport. The high-fCHO diets were found to reduce the permeability of the distal colon to the transcytotic marker horseradish peroxidase (HRP, 44 kDa; P <0·05) and also reduce the paracellular permeation of N-hydroxysuccinimide-biotin into the submucosa (443 Da; P <0·05), whereas that of HRP was decreased by the high-fCP diets (P <0·01). Short-circuit current (active ion transport), transepithelial resistance (barrier function) and charge selectivity were largely unaffected in both the segments. However, the high-fCP diets were found to suppress the aldosterone-induced epithelial Na channel activity (P <0·01) irrespective of fCHO inclusion. The high-fCP diets generally reduced the expression of colonic claudin-1, claudin-2 and claudin-3 (P <0·01), while that of claudin-4 was increased by the high-fCHO diets (P <0·01). The high-fCHO diets also altered the ratio between occludin forms (P <0·05) and increased the expression of tricellulin in the proximal colon, which was not observed with high-fCP diets. In conclusion, dietary fCHO and fCP exerted few and largely independent effects on functional measurements, but altered tight junction

  18. Changes in the distribution pattern of Claudin tight junction proteins during the progression of mouse skin tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Arabzadeh, Azadeh; Troy, Tammy-Claire; Turksen, Kursad

    2007-01-01

    Background Despite the fact that morphological and physiological observations suggest that the tight junction (TJ)-based permeability barrier is modified/disrupted in tumorigenesis, the role of members of the Claudin (Cldn) family of TJ proteins is not well-understood. Using a well-established two-stage chemical carcinogenesis model, we investigated the temporal and spatial changes in expression of those Cldns that we have previously demonstrated to be important in epidermal differentiation and the formation of the epidermal permeability barrier, i.e., Cldn1, Cldn6, Cldn11, Cldn12 and Cldn18. Methods The lower dorsal backskin of mice was treated topically with 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA; 0.25 mg/ml in acetone) and following a 10-day incubation period, 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA; 25 μg/ml in acetone) was applied three times a week to the same area. Backskin samples were dissected 2, 4, 6, 8 and 12 weeks after the initiation of the experimental protocol and immunohistochemistry was performed on sections using antibodies against the following: Cldn1, Cldn6, Cldn11, Cldn12, Cldn18, Ki67 and CD3. Results Our data indicate that along with the changes in epidermal cell morphology and differentiation that occur during tumor formation, there is a dramatic change in Cldn distribution consistent with cell polarity and barrier selectivity changes. Specifically, in the early stages of DMBA/TPA treatment, the suprabasal-specific Cldns occupy an expanded zone of expression corresponding to an increased number of suprabasal epidermal cell layers. As tumorigenesis progressed, the number of suprabasal epidermal layers positive for Cldn6, Cldn11, Cldn12 and Cldn18 was reduced, especially in the lower strata of the expanded suprabasal zone. In addition, a variably reduced cell membrane association of those differentiation-specific Cldns was observed, especially within the infiltrating epidermal structures. In contrast, Cldn1 (which is normally expressed in

  19. p38 Mitogen-activated protein kinase and c-Jun NH2-terminal protein kinase regulate the accumulation of a tight junction protein, ZO-1, in cell-cell contacts in HaCaT cells.

    PubMed

    Minakami, Masahiko; Kitagawa, Norio; Iida, Hiroshi; Anan, Hisashi; Inai, Tetsuichiro

    2015-02-01

    To investigate the involvement of stress-activated protein kinases, JNK and p38 MAPK, in the assembly of tight junctions in keratinocytes, we treated HaCaT cells with various combinations of SP600125 (an inhibitor of JNK), SB202190 (an inhibitor of p38 MAPK) and anisomycin (an activator of both JNK and p38 MAPK) and examined the localization of ZO-1, an undercoat constitutive protein of the tight junction. Short-term (8h) incubation with SP600125, SB202190 or anisomycin induced the accumulation of ZO-1 in the cell-cell contacts, with reduced ZO-1 staining in the cytoplasm, while only long-term (24h) incubation with SP600125 induced the accumulation of ZO-1. SP600125, SB202190 or SP600125 plus SB202190 treatment induced thin linear staining for ZO-1 in the cell-cell contacts. Anisomycin treatment induced thick and irregular linear staining for ZO-1, while anisomycin plus SP600125 treatment induced zipper-like staining for ZO-1. Anisomycin plus SB202190 treatment or anisomycin plus both SP600125 and SB202190 treatment for 8h failed to lead to the accumulation of ZO-1 in cell-cell contacts, but induced thin linear staining with several gaps 16 h after removal of these agents. These results suggest that the localization of ZO-1 in cell-cell contacts is differently regulated by activation and inhibition of JNK and/or p38 MAPK depending on the incubation period.

  20. FAP20 is an inner junction protein of doublet microtubules essential for both the planar asymmetrical waveform and stability of flagella in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Haru-aki; Mathis, Garrison; Oda, Toshiyuki; Hirono, Masafumi; Richey, Elizabeth A; Ishikawa, Hiroaki; Marshall, Wallace F; Kikkawa, Masahide; Qin, Hongmin

    2014-05-01

    The axoneme-the conserved core of eukaryotic cilia and flagella-contains highly specialized doublet microtubules (DMTs). A long-standing question is what protein(s) compose the junctions between two tubules in DMT. Here we identify a highly conserved flagellar-associated protein (FAP), FAP20, as an inner junction (IJ) component. The flagella of Chlamydomonas FAP20 mutants have normal length but beat with an abnormal symmetrical three-dimensional pattern. In addition, the mutant axonemes are liable to disintegrate during beating, implying that interdoublet connections may be weakened. Conventional electron microscopy shows that the mutant axonemes lack the IJ, and cryo-electron tomography combined with a structural labeling method reveals that the labeled FAP20 localizes at the IJ. The mutant axonemes also lack doublet-specific beak structures, which are localized in the proximal portion of the axoneme and may be involved in planar asymmetric flagellar bending. FAP20 itself, however, may not be a beak component, because uniform localization of FAP20 along the entire length of all nine DMTs is inconsistent with the beak's localization. FAP20 is the first confirmed component of the IJ. Our data also suggest that the IJ is important for both stabilizing the axoneme and scaffolding intra-B-tubular substructures required for a planar asymmetrical waveform.

  1. Testicular cell junction: a novel target for male contraception.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nikki P Y; Wong, Elissa W P; Mruk, Dolores D; Cheng, C Yan

    2009-01-01

    Even though various contraceptive methods are widely available, the number of unwanted pregnancies is still on the rise in developing countries, pressurizing the already resource limited nations. One of the major underlying reasons is the lack of effective, low cost, and safe contraceptives for couples. During the past decade, some studies were performed using animal models to decipher if the Sertoli-germ cell junction in the testis is a target for male fertility regulation. Some of these study models were based on the use of hormones and/or chemicals to disrupt the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis (e.g., androgen-based implants or pills) and others utilized a panel of chemical entities or synthetic peptides to perturb spermatogenesis either reversibly or non-reversibly. Among them, adjudin, a potential male contraceptive, is one of the compounds exerting its action on the unique adherens junctions, known as ectoplasmic specializations, in the testis. Since the testis is equipped with inter-connected cell junctions, an initial targeting of one junction type may affect the others and these accumulative effects could lead to spermatogenic arrest. This review attempts to cover an innovative theme on how male infertility can be achieved by inducing junction instability and defects in the testis, opening a new window of research for male contraceptive development. While it will still take much time and effort of intensive investigation before a product can reach the consumable market, these findings have provided hope for better family planning involving men.

  2. Histidine Prevents Cu-Induced Oxidative Stress and the Associated Decreases in mRNA from Encoding Tight Junction Proteins in the Intestine of Grass Carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella)

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Lin; Jiang, Jun; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Wu, Pei; Tang, Ling; Tang, Wu-Neng; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu; Liu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Copper (Cu) is a common heavy metal pollutant in aquatic environments that originates from natural as well as anthropogenic sources. The present study investigated whether Cu causes oxidative damage and induces changes in the expression of genes that encode tight junction (TJ) proteins, cytokines and antioxidant-related genes in the intestine of the grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella). We demonstrated that Cu decreases the survival rate of fish and increases oxidative damage as measured by increases in malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl contents. Cu exposure significantly decreased the expression of genes that encode the tight junction proteins, namely, claudin (CLDN)-c, -3 and -15 as well as occludin and zonula occludens-1, in the intestine of fish. In addition, Cu exposure increases the mRNA levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, specifically, IL-8, TNF-α and its related signalling factor (nuclear factor kappa B, NF-κB), which was partly correlated to the decreased mRNA levels of NF-κB inhibitor protein (IκB). These changes were associated with Cu-induced oxidative stress detected by corresponding decreases in glutathione (GSH) content, as well as decreases in the copper, zinc-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities and mRNA levels, which were associated with the down-regulated antioxidant signalling factor NF-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) mRNA levels, and the Kelch-like-ECH-associated protein1 (Keap1) mRNA levels in the intestine of fish. Histidine supplementation in diets (3.7 up to 12.2 g/kg) blocked Cu-induced changes. These results indicated that Cu-induced decreases in intestinal TJ proteins and cytokine mRNA levels might be partially mediated by oxidative stress and are prevented by histidine supplementation in fish diet. PMID:27280406

  3. Histidine Prevents Cu-Induced Oxidative Stress and the Associated Decreases in mRNA from Encoding Tight Junction Proteins in the Intestine of Grass Carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei-Dan; Qu, Biao; Feng, Lin; Jiang, Jun; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Wu, Pei; Tang, Ling; Tang, Wu-Neng; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu; Liu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Copper (Cu) is a common heavy metal pollutant in aquatic environments that originates from natural as well as anthropogenic sources. The present study investigated whether Cu causes oxidative damage and induces changes in the expression of genes that encode tight junction (TJ) proteins, cytokines and antioxidant-related genes in the intestine of the grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella). We demonstrated that Cu decreases the survival rate of fish and increases oxidative damage as measured by increases in malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl contents. Cu exposure significantly decreased the expression of genes that encode the tight junction proteins, namely, claudin (CLDN)-c, -3 and -15 as well as occludin and zonula occludens-1, in the intestine of fish. In addition, Cu exposure increases the mRNA levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, specifically, IL-8, TNF-α and its related signalling factor (nuclear factor kappa B, NF-κB), which was partly correlated to the decreased mRNA levels of NF-κB inhibitor protein (IκB). These changes were associated with Cu-induced oxidative stress detected by corresponding decreases in glutathione (GSH) content, as well as decreases in the copper, zinc-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities and mRNA levels, which were associated with the down-regulated antioxidant signalling factor NF-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) mRNA levels, and the Kelch-like-ECH-associated protein1 (Keap1) mRNA levels in the intestine of fish. Histidine supplementation in diets (3.7 up to 12.2 g/kg) blocked Cu-induced changes. These results indicated that Cu-induced decreases in intestinal TJ proteins and cytokine mRNA levels might be partially mediated by oxidative stress and are prevented by histidine supplementation in fish diet.

  4. Gap Junction Proteins in the Blood-Brain Barrier Control Nutrient-Dependent Reactivation of Drosophila Neural Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Spéder, Pauline; Brand, Andrea H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Neural stem cells in the adult brain exist primarily in a quiescent state but are reactivated in response to changing physiological conditions. How do stem cells sense and respond to metabolic changes? In the Drosophila CNS, quiescent neural stem cells are reactivated synchronously in response to a nutritional stimulus. Feeding triggers insulin production by blood-brain barrier glial cells, activating the insulin/insulin-like growth factor pathway in underlying neural stem cells and stimulating their growth and proliferation. Here we show that gap junctions in the blood-brain barrier glia mediate the influence of metabolic changes on stem cell behavior, enabling glia to respond to nutritional signals and reactivate quiescent stem cells. We propose that gap junctions in the blood-brain barrier are required to translate metabolic signals into synchronized calcium pulses and insulin secretion. PMID:25065772

  5. Differential distribution of tight junction proteins suggests a role for tanycytes in blood-hypothalamus barrier regulation in the adult mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Mullier, Amandine; Bouret, Sébastien G.; Prevot, Vincent; Dehouck, Bénédicte

    2010-01-01

    The median eminence is one of the seven so-called circumventricular organs. It is located in the basal hypothalamus, ventral to the third ventricle and adjacent to the arcuate nucleus. This structure characteristically contains a rich capillary plexus and features a fenestrated endothelium, making it a direct target of blood-borne molecules. The median eminence also contains highly specialized ependymal cells called tanycytes which line the floor of the third ventricle. It has been hypothesized that one of the functions of these cells is to create a barrier that prevents substances in the portal capillary spaces from entering the brain. In this paper, we report on our use of immunohistochemistry to study the expression of tight junction proteins in the cells that compose the median eminence in adult mice. Our results indicate that tanycytes of the median eminence express occludin, ZO-1, and claudin 1 and 5, but not claudin 3. Remarkably, these molecules are organized as a continuous belt around the cell bodies of the tanycytes that line the ventral part of the third ventricle. In contrast, the tanycytes at the periphery of the arcuate nucleus do not express claudin 1 and instead exhibit a disorganized expression pattern of occludin, ZO-1 and claudin 5. Consistent with these observations, permeability studies using peripheral or central injections of Evans blue dye show that only the tanycytes of the median eminence are joined at their apices by functional tight junctions, whereas tanycytes located at the level of the arcuate nucleus form a permeable layer. In conclusion, this study reveals a unique expression pattern of tight junction proteins in hypothalamic tanycytes, which yields new insights into their barrier properties. PMID:20127760

  6. Differential distribution of tight junction proteins suggests a role for tanycytes in blood-hypothalamus barrier regulation in the adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Mullier, Amandine; Bouret, Sebastien G; Prevot, Vincent; Dehouck, Bénédicte

    2010-04-01

    The median eminence is one of the seven so-called circumventricular organs. It is located in the basal hypothalamus, ventral to the third ventricle and adjacent to the arcuate nucleus. This structure characteristically contains a rich capillary plexus and features a fenestrated endothelium, making it a direct target of blood-borne molecules. The median eminence also contains highly specialized ependymal cells called tanycytes, which line the floor of the third ventricle. It has been hypothesized that one of the functions of these cells is to create a barrier that prevents substances in the portal capillary spaces from entering the brain. In this paper, we utilize immunohistochemistry to study the expression of tight junction proteins in the cells that compose the median eminence in adult mice. Our results indicate that tanycytes of the median eminence express occludin, ZO-1, and claudin 1 and 5, but not claudin 3. Remarkably, these molecules are organized as a continuous belt around the cell bodies of the tanycytes that line the ventral part of the third ventricle. In contrast, the tanycytes at the periphery of the arcuate nucleus do not express claudin 1 and instead exhibit a disorganized expression pattern of occludin, ZO-1, and claudin 5. Consistent with these observations, permeability studies using peripheral or central injections of Evans blue dye show that only the tanycytes of the median eminence are joined at their apices by functional tight junctions, whereas tanycytes located at the level of the arcuate nucleus form a permeable layer. In conclusion, this study reveals a unique expression pattern of tight junction proteins in hypothalamic tanycytes, which yields new insights into their barrier properties.

  7. Sequence and tissue distribution of a second protein of hepatic gap junctions, Cx26, as deduced from its cDNA

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    While a number of different gap junction proteins have now been identified, hepatic gap junctions are unique in being the first demonstrated case where two homologous, but distinct, proteins (28,000 and 21,000 Mr) are found within a single gap junctional plaque (Nicholson, B. J., R. Dermietzel, D. Teplow, O. Traub, K. Willecke, and J.-P. Revel. 1987. Nature [Lond.]. 329:732-734). The cDNA for the major 28,000-Mr component has been cloned (Paul, D. L. 1986. J. Cell Biol. 103:123-134) (Kumar, N. M., and N. B. Gilula. 1986. J. Cell Biol. 103:767-776) and, based on its deduced formula weight of 32,007, has been designated connexin 32 (or Cx32 as used here). We now report the selection and characterization of clones for the second 21,000-Mr protein using an oligonucleotide derived from the amino-terminal protein sequence. Together the cDNAs represent 2.4 kb of the single 2.5- kb message detected in Northern blots. An open reading frame of 678 bp coding for a protein with a calculated molecular mass of 26,453 D was identified. Overall sequence homology with Cx32 and Cx43 (64 and 51% amino acid identities, respectively) and a similar predicted tertiary structure confirm that this protein forms part of the connexin family and is consequently referred to as Cx26. Consistent with observations on Cx43 (Beyer, E. C., D. L. Paul, and D. A. Goodenough. 1987. J. Cell Biol. 105:2621-2629) the most marked divergence between Cx26 and other members of the family lies in the sequence of the cytoplasmic domains. The Cx26 gene is present as a single copy per haploid genome in rat and, based on Southern blots, appears to contain at least one intron outside the open reading frame. Northern blots indicate that Cx32 and Cx26 are typically coexpressed, messages for both having been identified in liver, kidney, intestine, lung, spleen, stomach, testes, and brain, but not heart and adult skeletal muscle. This raises the interesting prospect of having differential modes of regulating

  8. AMP-activated protein kinase fortifies epithelial tight junctions during energetic stress via its effector GIV/Girdin

    PubMed Central

    Aznar, Nicolas; Patel, Arjun; Rohena, Cristina C; Dunkel, Ying; Joosen, Linda P; Taupin, Vanessa; Kufareva, Irina; Farquhar, Marilyn G; Ghosh, Pradipta

    2016-01-01

    Loss of epithelial polarity impacts organ development and function; it is also oncogenic. AMPK, a key sensor of metabolic stress stabilizes cell-cell junctions and maintains epithelial polarity; its activation by Metformin protects the epithelial barrier against stress and suppresses tumorigenesis. How AMPK protects the epithelium remains unknown. Here, we identify GIV/Girdin as a novel effector of AMPK, whose phosphorylation at a single site is both necessary and sufficient for strengthening mammalian epithelial tight junctions and preserving cell polarity and barrier function in the face of energetic stress. Expression of an oncogenic mutant of GIV (cataloged in TCGA) that cannot be phosphorylated by AMPK increased anchorage-independent growth of tumor cells and helped these cells to evade the tumor-suppressive action of Metformin. This work defines a fundamental homeostatic mechanism by which the AMPK-GIV axis reinforces cell junctions against stress-induced collapse and also provides mechanistic insight into the tumor-suppressive action of Metformin. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20795.001 PMID:27813479

  9. The expression of gingival epithelial junctions in response to subgingival biofilms.

    PubMed

    Belibasakis, Georgios N; Kast, Jeannette I; Thurnheer, Thomas; Akdis, Cezmi A; Bostanci, Nagihan

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is an infectious inflammatory disease that destroys the tooth-supporting tissues. It is caused by the formation of subgingival biofilms on the surface of the tooth. Characteristic bacteria associated with subgingival biofilms are the Gram-negative anaerobes Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia and Treponema denticola, collectively known as the "red complex" species. Inter-epithelial junctions ensure the barrier integrity of the gingival epithelium. This may however be disrupted by the biofilm challenge. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the effect of subgingival biofilms on the expression of inter-epithelial junctions by gingival epithelia, and evaluate the relative role of the red complex. Multi-layered human gingival epithelial cultures were challenged with a 10-species in vitro subgingival biofilm model, or its variant without the red complex, for 3 h and 24 h. A low-density array microfluidic card platform was then used for analyzing the expression of 62 genes encoding for tight junctions, gap junctions, adherens junctions, and desmosomes. Although there was a limited effect of the biofilms on the expression of tight, adherens and gap junctions, the expression of a number of desmosomal components was affected. In particular, Desmoglein-1 displayed a limited and transient up-regulation in response to the biofilm. In contrast, Desmocollin-2, Desmoplakin and Plakoglobin were down-regulated equally by both biofilm variants, after 24 h. In conclusion, this subgingival biofilm model may down-regulate selected desmosomal junctions in the gingival epithelium, irrespective of the presence of the "red complex." In turn, this could compromise the structural integrity of the gingival tissue, favoring bacterial invasion and chronic infection.

  10. The expression of gingival epithelial junctions in response to subgingival biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Belibasakis, Georgios N; Kast, Jeannette I; Thurnheer, Thomas; Akdis, Cezmi A; Bostanci, Nagihan

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is an infectious inflammatory disease that destroys the tooth-supporting tissues. It is caused by the formation of subgingival biofilms on the surface of the tooth. Characteristic bacteria associated with subgingival biofilms are the Gram-negative anaerobes Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia and Treponema denticola, collectively known as the “red complex” species. Inter-epithelial junctions ensure the barrier integrity of the gingival epithelium. This may however be disrupted by the biofilm challenge. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the effect of subgingival biofilms on the expression of inter-epithelial junctions by gingival epithelia, and evaluate the relative role of the red complex. Multi-layered human gingival epithelial cultures were challenged with a 10-species in vitro subgingival biofilm model, or its variant without the red complex, for 3 h and 24 h. A low-density array microfluidic card platform was then used for analyzing the expression of 62 genes encoding for tight junctions, gap junctions, adherens junctions, and desmosomes. Although there was a limited effect of the biofilms on the expression of tight, adherens and gap junctions, the expression of a number of desmosomal components was affected. In particular, Desmoglein-1 displayed a limited and transient up-regulation in response to the biofilm. In contrast, Desmocollin-2, Desmoplakin and Plakoglobin were down-regulated equally by both biofilm variants, after 24 h. In conclusion, this subgingival biofilm model may down-regulate selected desmosomal junctions in the gingival epithelium, irrespective of the presence of the “red complex.” In turn, this could compromise the structural integrity of the gingival tissue, favoring bacterial invasion and chronic infection. PMID:26305580

  11. Depletion of Caco-2 cell cholesterol disrupts barrier function by altering the detergent solubility and distribution of specific tight-junction proteins

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, we have investigated the role of cholesterol in maintaining the barrier properties of the model intestinal cell line Caco-2. We have extracted membrane cholesterol using methyl-β-cyclodextrin and demonstrated that maximally, methyl-β-cyclodextrin lowered cell cholesterol levels by 40–45%. Depletion of cell cholesterol was accompanied by an 80–90% decrease in monolayer transepithelial electrical resistance and a significant increase in the paracellular permeability of dextrans of 4, 10 and 40 kDa. The increase in dextran permeability was most pronounced for the two lower molecular mass species. In addition to the decline in the barrier properties of the monolayers, extraction of cell cholesterol produced an increase in the Triton X-100 solubility of claudin 3, claudin 4 and occludin, and the loss of all three proteins from the plasma membrane (tight junctions). In contrast, removal of cholesterol had no detectable influence on the detergent solubility or morphological distribution of claudin 1. These results indicate that membrane cholesterol is a critical factor in maintaining the barrier property of epithelial monolayers. More specifically, cholesterol appears to stabilize the association of certain proteins with the tight junctions. PMID:15500448

  12. Distribution of the neuronal gap junction protein Connexin36 in the spinal cord enlargements of developing and adult opossums, Monodelphis domestica.

    PubMed

    Lemieux, Maxime; Cabana, Thérèse; Pflieger, Jean-François

    2010-01-01

    We use opossums Monodelphis domestica to study the development of mammalian motor systems. The immature forelimbs of the newborn perform rhythmic and alternating movements that are likely under spinal control. The hindlimbs start moving in the second week. Chemical synapses are scant in the spinal enlargements of neonatal opossums and the presence of electrochemical synapses has not been evaluated in this species or in other marsupials. As a first step aiming at evaluating the existence of such synapses in the neonatal spinal cord, we have investigated the presence of the exclusively neuronal gap junction protein connexin36 (Cx36) by immunohistochemistry in light microscopy. At birth, Cx36 immunoreactivity is moderate in the presumptive gray matter in both enlargements. Thereafter, it decreases gradually, except in the superficial dorsal horn where it increases to a plateau between P10 and P20. Cx36 labeling is detected in the presumptive white matter at birth, but then decreases except in the dorsal part of the lateral funiculus, where it is dense between P10 and P20. Cx36 has become virtually undetectable by P52. The presence of Cx36 in the spinal enlargements of postnatal opossums suggests that neurons might be linked by gap junctions at a time when chemical synapses are only beginning to form. The greater abundance of Cx36 observed transiently in the superficial dorsal horn suggests a stronger involvement of this protein in spinal sensory systems than in direct motor control of the limbs.

  13. Transforming growth factor-β3 regulates cell junction restructuring via MAPK-mediated mRNA destabilization and Smad-dependent protein degradation of junctional adhesion molecule B (JAM-B).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Lui, Wing-Yee

    2015-06-01

    Junctional adhesion molecule-B (JAM-B) is found between Sertoli cells at the blood-testis barrier (BTB) as well as between Sertoli and germ cells at the apical ectoplasmic specializations (ES) in the testis. The expression of JAM-B is tightly regulated to modulate the passage of spermatocytes across the BTB as well as the release of mature spermatozoa from the seminiferous epithelium. Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) family is implicated in the regulation of testicular cell junction dynamics during spermatogenesis. This study aims to investigate the effects of TGF-β3 on the expression of JAM-B as well as the underlying mechanisms on how TGF-β3 regulates JAM-B expression to facilitate the disassembly of the BTB and apical ES. Our results revealed that TGF-β3 suppresses JAM-B at post-transcriptional and post-translational levels. Inhibitor, siRNA knockdown and co-immunoprecipitation have shown that TGF-β3 induces JAM-B protein degradation via ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Immunofluorescence staining further confirmed that blockage of ubiquitin-proteasome pathway could abrogate TGF-β3-induced loss of JAM-B at the cell-cell interface. siRNA knockdown and immunofluorescence staining also demonstrated that activation of Smad signaling is required for TGF-β3-induced JAM-B protein degradation. In addition, TGF-β3 reduces JAM-B mRNA levels, at least in part, via post-transcriptional regulation. mRNA stability assay has confirmed that TGF-β3 promotes the degradation of JAM-B transcript and TGF-β3-mediated mRNA destabilization requires the activation of ERK1/2 and p54 JNK signal cascades. Taken together, TGF-β3 significantly downregulates JAM-B expression via post-transcriptional and post-translational modulation and results in the disruption of BTB and apical ES.

  14. Models for the Binary Complex of Bacteriophage T4 Gp59 Helicase Loading Protein. GP32 Single-Stranded DNA-Binding Protein and Ternary Complex with Pseudo-Y Junction DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Hinerman, Jennifer M.; Dignam, J. David; Mueser, Timothy C.

    2012-04-05

    The bacteriophage T4 gp59 helicase assembly protein (gp59) is required for loading of gp41 replicative helicase onto DNA protected by gp32 single-stranded DNA-binding protein. The gp59 protein recognizes branched DNA structures found at replication and recombination sites. Binding of gp32 protein (full-length and deletion constructs) to gp59 protein measured by isothermal titration calorimetry demonstrates that the gp32 protein C-terminal A-domain is essential for protein-protein interaction in the absence of DNA. Sedimentation velocity experiments with gp59 protein and gp32ΔB protein (an N-terminal B-domain deletion) show that these proteins are monomers but form a 1:1 complex with a dissociation constant comparable with that determined by isothermal titration calorimetry. Small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) studies indicate that the gp59 protein is a prolate monomer, consistent with the crystal structure and hydrodynamic properties determined from sedimentation velocity experiments. SAXS experiments also demonstrate that gp32ΔB protein is a prolate monomer with an elongated A-domain protruding from the core. Moreover, fitting structures of gp59 protein and the gp32 core into the SAXS-derived molecular envelope supports a model for the gp59 protein-gp32ΔB protein complex. Our earlier work demonstrated that gp59 protein attracts full-length gp32 protein to pseudo-Y junctions. A model of the gp59 protein-DNA complex, modified to accommodate new SAXS data for the binary complex together with mutational analysis of gp59 protein, is presented in the accompanying article (Dolezal, D., Jones, C. E., Lai, X., Brister, J. R., Mueser, T. C., Nossal, N. G., and Hinton, D. M. (2012) J. Biol. Chem. 287, 18596–18607).

  15. In vitro formation of gap junction vesicles.

    PubMed

    Goodenough, D A

    1976-02-01

    A method is described that uses trypsin digestion combined with collagenase-hyaluronidase which produces a population of gap junction vesicles. The hexagonal lattice of subunits ("connexons") comprising the gapjunctions appears unaltered by various structural criteria and by buoyant density measurements. The gap junction vesciles are closed by either a single or a double profile of nonjunctional "membrane," which presents a smooth, particle-free fracture face. Horseradish peroxidase and cytochrome c studies have revealed that about 20% of the gap junction vesicles are impermeable to proteins 12,000 daltons or larger. The increased purity of the trypsinized junction preparation suggests that one of the disulfide reduction products of the gap-junction principal protein may be a nonjunctional contaminating peptide. The gap junction appears to be composed of a single 18,000-dalton protein, connexin, which may be reduced to a single 9,000-dalton peak. The number of peptides in this reduced peak are still unknown.

  16. Direct Exposure to Ethanol Disrupts Junctional Cell-Cell Contact and Hippo-YAP Signaling in HL-1 Murine Atrial Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Noritake, Kanako; Aki, Toshihiko; Funakoshi, Takeshi; Unuma, Kana; Uemura, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Direct exposure of cardiomyocytes to ethanol causes cardiac damage such as cardiac arrythmias and apoptotic cell death. Cardiomyocytes are connected to each other through intercalated disks (ID), which are composed of a gap junction (GJ), adherens junction, and desmosome. Changes in the content as well as the subcellular localization of connexin43 (Cx43), the main component of the cardiac GJ, are reportedly involved in cardiac arrythmias and subsequent damage. Recently, the hippo-YAP signaling pathway, which links cellular physical status to cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis, has been implicated in cardiac homeostasis under physiological as well as pathological conditions. This study was conducted to explore the possible involvement of junctional intercellular communication, mechanotransduction through cytoskeletal organization, and the hippo-YAP pathway in cardiac damage caused by direct exposure to ethanol. HL-1 murine atrial cardiac cells were used since these cells retain cardiac phenotypes through ID formation and subsequent synchronous contraction. Cells were exposed to 0.5–2% ethanol; significant apoptotic cell death was observed after exposure to 2% ethanol for 48 hours. A decrease in Cx43 levels was already observed after 3 hours exposure to 2% ethanol, suggesting a rapid degradation of this protein. Upon exposure to ethanol, Cx43 translocated into lysosomes. Cellular cytoskeletal organization was also dysregulated by ethanol, as demonstrated by the disruption of myofibrils and intermediate filaments. Coinciding with the loss of cell-cell adherence, decreased phosphorylation of YAP, a hippo pathway effector, was also observed in ethanol-treated cells. Taken together, the results provide evidence that cells exposed directly to ethanol show 1) impaired cell-cell adherence/communication, 2) decreased cellular mechanotransduction by the cytoskeleton, and 3) a suppressed hippo-YAP pathway. Suppression of hippo-YAP pathway signaling should be

  17. Mechanism of IFN-γ-induced Endocytosis of Tight Junction Proteins: Myosin II-dependent Vacuolarization of the Apical Plasma Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Utech, Markus; Ivanov, Andrei I.; Samarin, Stanislav N.; Bruewer, Matthias; Turner, Jerrold R.; Mrsny, Randall J.; Parkos, Charles A.; Nusrat, Asma

    2005-01-01

    Disruption of epithelial barrier by proinflammatory cytokines such as IFN-γ represents a major pathophysiological consequence of intestinal inflammation. We have previously shown that IFN-γ increases paracellular permeability in model T84 epithelial cells by inducing endocytosis of tight junction (TJ) proteins occludin, JAM-A, and claudin-1. The present study was designed to dissect mechanisms of IFN-γ-induced endocytosis of epithelial TJ proteins. IFN-γ treatment of T84 cells resulted in internalization of TJ proteins into large actin-coated vacuoles that originated from the apical plasma membrane and resembled the vacuolar apical compartment (VAC) previously observed in epithelial cells that lose cell polarity. The IFN-γ dependent formation of VACs required ATPase activity of a myosin II motor but was not dependent on rapid turnover of F-actin. In addition, activated myosin II was observed to colocalize with VACs after IFN-γ exposure. Pharmacological analyses revealed that formation of VACs and endocytosis of TJ proteins was mediated by Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) but not myosin light chain kinase (MLCK). Furthermore, IFN-γ treatment resulted in activation of Rho GTPase and induced expressional up-regulation of ROCK. These results, for the first time, suggest that IFN-γ induces endocytosis of epithelial TJ proteins via RhoA/ROCK-mediated, myosin II-dependent formation of VACs. PMID:16055505

  18. Use of Z310 Cells as an In Vitro Blood-Cerebrospinal Fluid Barrier Model: Tight Junction Proteins and Transport Properties

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lewis Zhichang; Li, G. Jane; Wang, Shunzhen; Zheng, Wei

    2009-01-01

    Immortalized rat choroidal epithelial Z310 cells have the potential to become an in vitro model for studying transport of materials at blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCB) (Shi and Zheng, Brain Research 1057:37-48, 2005). This study was designed to demonstrate the presence of tight junction properties in Z310 cells and the functionality of Z310 monolayer in transport of selected model compounds. Western blot analyses revealed the presence of claudin-1, ZO-1, and occludin in Z310 cells. Transmission electron microscopy showed a “tight junction” type of structure in the sub-apical lateral membranes between adjacent Z310 cells. Real-time RT-PCR revealed that Z310 cells expressed representative transporters such as DMT1, MTP1, TfR, p-glycoprotein, ATP7A, ZnT1, ABCC1, Oat3, OCT1 and OB-Ra. Moreover, Z310 cells cultured in a two-chamber Transwell device possessed the ability to transport zidovudine (anionic drug), thyroxine (hormone), thymidine (nucleoside), and leptin (large polypeptide) with kinetic properties similar to those obtained from the in vitro model based on primary culture of choroidal epithelial cells. Taken together, these data indicate that the Z310 BCB model expresses major tight junction proteins and forms a tight barrier in vitro. The model also exhibits the ability to transport substances of various categories across the barrier. PMID:17825520

  19. Long noncoding RNA SPRY4-IT1 regulates intestinal epithelial barrier function by modulating the expression levels of tight junction proteins.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Lan; Rao, Jaladanki N; Cao, Shan; Liu, Lan; Chung, Hee Kyoung; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Jennifer; Liu, Yulan; Gorospe, Myriam; Wang, Jian-Ying

    2016-02-15

    Epithelial cells line the intestinal mucosa and form an important barrier to a wide array of noxious substances in the lumen. Disruption of the barrier integrity occurs commonly in various pathologies. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) control diverse biological processes, but little is known about the role of lncRNAs in regulation of the gut permeability. Here we show that the lncRNA SPRY4-IT1 regulates the intestinal epithelial barrier function by altering expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins. SPRY4-IT1 silencing led to dysfunction of the epithelial barrier in cultured cells by decreasing the stability of mRNAs encoding TJ proteins claudin-1, claudin-3, occludin, and JAM-1 and repressing their translation. In contrast, increasing the levels of SPRY4-IT1 in the intestinal mucosa protected the gut barrier in mice exposed to septic stress by increasing the abundance of TJ proteins. SPRY4-IT1 directly interacted with TJ mRNAs, and this process was enhanced through the association with the RNA-binding protein HuR. Of interest, the intestinal mucosa from patients with increased gut permeability exhibited a decrease in the levels of SPRY4-IT1. These findings highlight a novel role for SPRY4-IT1 in controlling the intestinal epithelial barrier and define a mechanism by which SPRY4-IT1 modulates TJ expression by altering the stability and translation of TJ mRNAs.

  20. Long noncoding RNA SPRY4-IT1 regulates intestinal epithelial barrier function by modulating the expression levels of tight junction proteins

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Lan; Rao, Jaladanki N.; Cao, Shan; Liu, Lan; Chung, Hee Kyoung; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Jennifer; Liu, Yulan; Gorospe, Myriam; Wang, Jian-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial cells line the intestinal mucosa and form an important barrier to a wide array of noxious substances in the lumen. Disruption of the barrier integrity occurs commonly in various pathologies. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) control diverse biological processes, but little is known about the role of lncRNAs in regulation of the gut permeability. Here we show that the lncRNA SPRY4-IT1 regulates the intestinal epithelial barrier function by altering expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins. SPRY4-IT1 silencing led to dysfunction of the epithelial barrier in cultured cells by decreasing the stability of mRNAs encoding TJ proteins claudin-1, claudin-3, occludin, and JAM-1 and repressing their translation. In contrast, increasing the levels of SPRY4-IT1 in the intestinal mucosa protected the gut barrier in mice exposed to septic stress by increasing the abundance of TJ proteins. SPRY4-IT1 directly interacted with TJ mRNAs, and this process was enhanced through the association with the RNA-binding protein HuR. Of interest, the intestinal mucosa from patients with increased gut permeability exhibited a decrease in the levels of SPRY4-IT1. These findings highlight a novel role for SPRY4-IT1 in controlling the intestinal epithelial barrier and define a mechanism by which SPRY4-IT1 modulates TJ expression by altering the stability and translation of TJ mRNAs. PMID:26680741

  1. Polarity and Bypass of DNA Heterology during Branch Migration of Holliday Junctions by Human RAD54, BLM, and RECQ1 Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Mazina, Olga M.; Rossi, Matthew J.; Deakyne, Julianna S.; Huang, Fei; Mazin, Alexander V.

    2012-01-01

    Several proteins have been shown to catalyze branch migration (BM) of the Holliday junction, a key intermediate in DNA repair and recombination. Here, using joint molecules made by human RAD51 or Escherichia coli RecA, we find that the polarity of the displaced ssDNA strand of the joint molecules defines the polarity of BM of RAD54, BLM, RECQ1, and RuvAB. Our results demonstrate that RAD54, BLM, and RECQ1 promote BM preferentially in the 3′→5′ direction, whereas RuvAB drives it in the 5′→3′ direction relative to the displaced ssDNA strand. Our data indicate that the helicase activity of BM proteins does not play a role in the heterology bypass. Thus, RAD54 that lacks helicase activity is more efficient in DNA heterology bypass than BLM or REQ1 helicases. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the BLM helicase and BM activities require different protein stoichiometries, indicating that different complexes, monomers and multimers, respectively, are responsible for these two activities. These results define BM as a mechanistically distinct activity of DNA translocating proteins, which may serve an important function in DNA repair and recombination. PMID:22356911

  2. Akt1 promotes stimuli-induced endothelial-barrier protection through FoxO-mediated tight-junction protein turnover.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fei; Artham, Sandeep; Sabbineni, Harika; Al-Azayzih, Ahmad; Peng, Xiao-Ding; Hay, Nissim; Adams, Ralf H; Byzova, Tatiana V; Somanath, Payaningal R

    2016-10-01

    Vascular permeability regulated by the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) through endothelial-barrier junctions is essential for inflammation. Mechanisms regulating vascular permeability remain elusive. Although 'Akt' and 'Src' have been implicated in the endothelial-barrier regulation, it is puzzling how both agents that protect and disrupt the endothelial-barrier activate these kinases to reciprocally regulate vascular permeability. To delineate the role of Akt1 in endothelial-barrier regulation, we created endothelial-specific, tamoxifen-inducible Akt1 knockout mice and stable ShRNA-mediated Akt1 knockdown in human microvascular endothelial cells. Akt1 loss leads to decreased basal and angiopoietin1-induced endothelial-barrier resistance, and enhanced VEGF-induced endothelial-barrier breakdown. Endothelial Akt1 deficiency resulted in enhanced VEGF-induced vascular leakage in mice ears, which was rescued upon re-expression with Adeno-myrAkt1. Furthermore, co-treatment with angiopoietin1 reversed VEGF-induced vascular leakage in an Akt1-dependent manner. Mechanistically, our study revealed that while VEGF-induced short-term vascular permeability is independent of Akt1, its recovery is reliant on Akt1 and FoxO-mediated claudin expression. Pharmacological inhibition of FoxO transcription factors rescued the defective endothelial barrier due to Akt1 deficiency. Here we provide novel insights on the endothelial-barrier protective role of VEGF in the long term and the importance of Akt1-FoxO signaling on tight-junction stabilization and prevention of vascular leakage through claudin expression.

  3. Expression of tight junction proteins and transporters for xenobiotic metabolism at the blood-CSF barrier during development in the nonhuman primate (P. hamadryas).

    PubMed

    Ek, C Joakim; D'Angelo, Barbara; Lehner, Christine; Nathanielsz, Peter; Li, Cun; Mallard, Carina

    2015-08-15

    The choroid plexus (CP) is rich in barrier mechanisms including transporters and enzymes which can influence drug disposition between blood and brain. We have limited knowledge of their state in fetus. We have studied barrier mechanisms along with metabolism and transporters influencing xenobiotics, using RNAseq and protein analysis, in the CP during the second-half of gestation in a nonhuman primate (Papio hamadryas). There were no differences in the expression of the tight-junctions at the CP suggesting a well-formed fetal blood-CSF barrier during this period of gestation. Further, the fetal CP express many enzymes for phase I-III metabolisms as well as transporters suggesting that it can greatly influence drug disposition and has a significant machinery to deactivate reactive molecules with only minor gestational changes. In summary, the study suggests that from, at least, midgestation, the CP in the nonhuman primate is restrictive and express most known genes associated with barrier function and transport.

  4. Localization of the tight junction protein gene TJP1 to human chromosome 15q13, distal to the Prader-Willi/Angelman region, and to mouse chromosome 7

    SciTech Connect

    Mohandas, T.K.; Chen, X.N.; Korenberg, J.R.

    1995-12-10

    The gene encoding the tight junction (zonula occludens) protein, TJP1, was mapped to human chromosome 15q13 by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using a cDNA probe. The Jackson Laboratory backcross DNA panel derived from the cross (C57BL/6JEi X SPRET/Ei) F1 females X SPRET/Ei males was used to map the mouse Tjp1 to chromosome 7 near position 30 on the Chromosome Committee Map, a region with conserved homology to human chromosome 15q13. FISH studies on metaphases from patients with the Prader-Willi (PWS) or the Angelman syndrome (AS) showed that TJP1 maps close but distal to the PWS/AS chromosome region. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Deficiency of angulin-2/ILDR1, a tricellular tight junction-associated membrane protein, causes deafness with cochlear hair cell degeneration in mice.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Tomohito; Katsuno, Tatsuya; Kitajiri, Shin-Ichiro; Furuse, Mikio

    2015-01-01

    Tricellular tight junctions seal the extracellular spaces of tricellular contacts, where the vertices of three epithelial cells meet, and are required for the establishment of a strong barrier function of the epithelial cellular sheet. Angulins and tricellulin are known as specific protein components of tricellular tight junctions, where angulins recruit tricellulin. Mutations in the genes encoding angulin-2/ILDR1 and tricellulin have been reported to cause human hereditary deafness DFNB42 and DFNB49, respectively. To investigate the pathogenesis of DFNB42, we analyzed mice with a targeted disruption of Ildr1, which encodes angulin-2/ILDR1. Ildr1 null mice exhibited profound deafness. Hair cells in the cochlea of Ildr1 null mice develop normally, but begin to degenerate by two weeks after birth. Tricellulin localization at tricellular contacts of the organ of Corti in the cochlea was retained in Ildr1 null mice, but its distribution along the depth of tricellular contacts was affected. Interestingly, compensatory tricellular contact localization of angulin-1/LSR was observed in the organ of Corti in Ildr1 null mice although it was hardly detected in the organ of Corti in wild-type mice. The onset of hair cell degeneration in Ildr1 null mice was earlier than that in the reported Tric mutant mice, which mimic one of the tricellulin mutations in DFNB49 deafness. These results indicate that the angulin-2/ILDR1 deficiency causes the postnatal degenerative loss of hair cells in the cochlea, leading to human deafness DFNB42. Our data also suggest that angulin family proteins have distinct functions in addition to their common roles of tricellulin recruitment and that the function of angulin-2/ILDR1 for hearing cannot be substituted by angulin-1/LSR.

  6. Arecoline induced disruption of expression and localization of the tight junctional protein ZO-1 is dependent on the HER 2 expression in human endometrial Ishikawa cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Approximately 600 million people chew Betel nut, making this practice the fourth most popular oral habit in the world. Arecoline, the major alkaloid present in betel nut is one of the causative agents for precancerous lesions and several cancers of mouth among those who chew betel nut. Arecoline can be detected in the human embryonic tissue and is correlated to low birth weight of newborns whose mothers chew betel nut during pregnancy, suggesting that arecoline can induce many systemic effects. However, few reports exist as to the effects of arecoline in human tissues other than oral cancer cell lines. Furthermore, in any system, virtually nothing is known about the cellular effects of arecoline treatment on membrane associated signaling components of human cancer cells. Results Using the human Ishikawa endometrial cancer cell line, we investigated the effects of arecoline on expression, localization and functional connections between the ZO-1 tight junction protein and the HER2 EGF receptor family member. Treatment of Ishikawa cells with arecoline coordinately down-regulated expression of both ZO-1 and HER2 protein and transcripts in a dose dependent manner. Biochemical fractionation of cells as well as indirect immunofluorescence revealed that arecoline disrupted the localization of ZO-1 to the junctional complex at the cell periphery. Compared to control transfected cells, ectopic expression of exogenous HER2 prevented the arecoline mediated down-regulation of ZO-1 expression and restored the localization of ZO-1 to the cell periphery. Furthermore, treatment with dexamethasone, a synthetic glucocorticoid reported to up-regulate expression of HER2 in Ishikawa cells, precluded arecoline from down-regulating ZO-1 expression and disrupting ZO-1 localization. Conclusion Arecoline is known to induce precancerous lesions and cancer in the oral cavity of betel nut users. The arecoline down-regulation of ZO-1 expression and subcellular distribution suggests

  7. Structure of the tight junctions of the human eccrine sweat gland.

    PubMed

    Briggman, J V; Bank, H L; Bigelow, J B; Graves, J S; Spicer, S S

    1981-12-01

    The human eccrine sweat gland contains two anatomically and functionally discrete segments: the secretory coil, which produces an isotonic or slightly hypertonic precursor fluid, and the coiled duct, which reabsorbs Na+ and Cl- to yield a hypotonic sweat. We examined the freeze-fracture morphology of tight junctions from isolated secretory coil and coiled duct segments to assess indirectly the contribution of paracellular ion transport in secretion and resorption in the sweat gland. In the secretory coil, tight junctions of the intercellular canaliculus and main lumen consisted of approximately 9 and 6, closely spaced, parallel or anastomosing elements, respectively. Tight junctions of the coiled duct were similar in appearance to those at the main lumen of the secretory coil. In both the secretory coil and coiled duct, and average of 2 to 3, widely spaced junctional elements were usually observed basolateral to the closely spaced junctional elements in the region corresponding to the location of the zonula adherens in Epon sections. The complexity of the tight junctions of the secretory coil exceeded what we expected for an epithelium secreting an isosmotic fluid. The elaborate tight junctions of the coiled duct support other evidence for an intermediate to high transepithelial resistance.

  8. Nitric oxide attenuates hydrogen peroxide-induced barrier disruption and protein tyrosine phosphorylation in monolayers of intestinal epithelial cell.

    PubMed

    Katsube, Takanori; Tsuji, Hideo; Onoda, Makoto

    2007-06-01

    The intestinal epithelium provides a barrier to the transport of harmful luminal molecules into the systemic circulation. A dysfunctional epithelial barrier is closely associated with the pathogenesis of a variety of intestinal and systemic disorders. We investigated here the effects of nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) on the barrier function of a human intestinal epithelial cell line, Caco-2. When treated with H(2)O(2), Caco-2 cell monolayers grown on permeable supports exhibited several remarkable features of barrier dysfunction as follows: a decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance, an increase in paracellular permeability to dextran, and a disruption of the intercellular junctional localization of the scaffolding protein ZO-1. In addition, an induction of tyrosine phosphorylation of numerous cellular proteins including ZO-1, E-cadherin, and beta-catenin, components of tight and adherens junctions, was observed. On the other hand, combined treatment of Caco-2 monolayers with H(2)O(2) and an NO donor (NOC5 or NOC12) relieved the damage to the barrier function and suppressed the protein tyrosine phosphorylation induced by H(2)O(2) alone. These results suggest that NO protects the barrier function of intestinal epithelia from oxidative stress by modulating some intracellular signaling pathways of protein tyrosine phosphorylation in epithelial cells.

  9. The levels of epithelial anchor proteins β-catenin and zona occludens-1 are altered by E7 of human papillomaviruses 5 and 8.

    PubMed

    Heuser, Sandra; Hufbauer, Martin; Marx, Benjamin; Tok, Ali; Majewski, Slawomir; Pfister, Herbert; Akgül, Baki

    2016-02-01

    Infection with viruses of the genus Betapapillomavirus, β-human papillomaviruses (β-HPV), is implicated in the development of non-melanoma skin cancer. This was first evidenced for HPV5 and HPV8 in patients with the skin disease epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV). The relocalization of the junctional bridging proteins β-catenin and zona occludens-1 (ZO-1) from the adherens and tight junctions are common processes of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) associated with tumour invasion. Here, we report that β-catenin and ZO-1 are strongly upregulated by the E7 oncoproteins of HPV5 and HPV8 in keratinocytes grown in organotypic skin cultures. Although the membrane-tethered form of β-catenin was elevated, no signs of β-catenin activity within the canonical Wnt signalling pathway could be detected. The upregulation of β-catenin and ZO-1 could also be confirmed in the skin of HPV8 transgenic mice as well as in cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas of EV patients. These data provide the first evidence that β-catenin and ZO-1 are direct targets of E7 of the oncogenic β-HPV types 5 and 8. The ability to deregulate these epithelial junction proteins may contribute to the oncogenic potential of these viruses in human skin.

  10. Necrotizing Enterocolitis in a mouse model leads to widespread renal inflammation, acute kidney injury and disruption of renal tight junction proteins

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Parvesh M; Tatum, Rodney; Ravisankar, Srikanth; Shekhawat, Prem S; Chen, Yan-Hua

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a devastating condition affecting premature infants and leads to high mortality and chronic morbidity. Severe form of NEC is associated with acute renal failure, fluid imbalance, hyponatremia and acidosis. We investigated the effect of NEC on tight junction (TJ) proteins in kidneys using a NEC mouse model to investigate the basis for the observed renal dysfunction. METHODS NEC was induced in C57BL/6 mice by formula feeding and subjecting them to periods of hypoxia and cold stress. NEC was confirmed by gross and histological examination. We studied various markers of inflammation in kidneys and investigated changes in expression of several TJ proteins and AQP2 using immunofluorecent staining and Western blotting. RESULTS We found markedly increased expression of NFκB, TGFβ and ERK1/2 along with claudin-1, -2, -3, -4, -8 and AQP-2 in NEC kidneys. The membrane localization of claudin-2 was altered in the NEC kidneys and its immunostaining signal at TJ was disrupted. CONCLUSION NEC led to a severe inflammatory response not only in the gut but also the kidneys. NEC increased expression of several TJ proteins and caused disruption of claudin-2 in renal tubules. These observed changes can help explain some of the clinical findings observed in NEC. PMID:26270572

  11. Ferulate protects the epithelial barrier by maintaining tight junction protein expression and preventing apoptosis in tert-butyl hydroperoxide-induced Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Lee, Eun Kyeong; Park, Min Hi; Ha, Young Mi; Jung, Kyung Jin; Kim, Min-Sun; Kim, Mi Kyung; Yu, Byung Pal; Chung, Hae Young

    2013-03-01

    Epithelial barrier function is determined by both transcellular and paracellular permeability, the latter of which is mainly influenced by tight junctions (TJs) and apoptotic leaks within the epithelium. We investigated the protective effects of ferulate on epithelial barrier integrity by examining permeability, TJ protein expression, and apoptosis in Caco-2 cells treated with tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP), a strong reactive species inducer. Caco-2 cells pretreated with ferulate (5 or 15 μM) were exposed to t-BHP (100 μM), and ferulate suppressed the t-BHP-mediated increases in reactive species and epithelial permeability in Caco-2 cells. Moreover, ferulate inhibited epithelial cell leakage induced by t-BHP, which was accompanied by decreased expression of the TJ proteins zonula occludens-1 and occludin. In addition, pretreatment with ferulate markedly protected cells against t-BHP-induced apoptosis, as evidenced by decreased nuclear condensation, cytochrome c release, and caspase-3 cleavage and an increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. These results suggest that ferulate protects the epithelial barrier of Caco-2 cells against oxidative stress, which results in increased epithelial permeability, decreased TJ protein expression, and increased apoptosis. The most significant finding of our study is the demonstration of protective, ferulate-mediated antioxidant effects on barrier integrity, with a particular focus on intracellular molecular mechanisms.

  12. Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase in Ginger Binds with Importin-α through Its Junction Domain for Nuclear Localization, and Further Interacts with NAC Transcription Factor

    PubMed Central

    Vivek, Padmanabhan Jayanthi; Resmi, Mohankumar Saraladevi; Sreekumar, Sweda; Sivakumar, K. C.; Tuteja, Narendra; Soniya, Eppurathu Vasudevan

    2017-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are important sensors of Ca2+ elevations in plant cells regulating the gene expression linked with various cellular processes like stress response, growth and development, metabolism, and cytoskeleton dynamics. Ginger is an extensively used spice due to its unique flavor and immense medicinal value. The two major threats that interfere with the large scale production of ginger are the salinity and drought stress. ZoCDPK1 (Zingiber officinale Calcium-dependent protein kinase 1) is a salinity and drought-inducible CDPK gene isolated from ginger and undergoes dynamic subcellular localization during stress conditions. ZoCDPK1, with signature features of a typical Ca2+ regulated kinase, also possesses a bipartite nuclear localization sequence (NLS) in its junction domain (JD). A striking feature in ZoCDPK1 is the rare occurrence of a coupling between the NLS in JD and consensus sequences in regulatory domain. Here, we further identified its nature of nuclear localization and its interaction partners. In the homology model generated for ZoCDPK1, the regulatory domain mimics the crystal structure of the regulatory domain in Arabidopsis CDPK1. Molecular docking simulation of importin (ZoIMPα), an important protein involved in nuclear translocation, into the NLS of ZoCDPK1 was well-visualized. Furthermore, the direct interaction of ZoCDPK1 and ZoIMPα proteins was studied by the yeast 2-hybrid (Y2H) system, which confirmed that junction domain (JD) is an important interaction module required for ZoCDPK1 and ZoIMPα binding. The probable interacting partners of ZoCDPK1 were also identified using Y2H experiment. Of the 10 different stress-related interacting partners identified for ZoCDPK1, NAC transcription factor (TF) needs special mention, especially in the context of ZoCDPK1 function. The interaction between ZoCDPK1 and NAC TF, in fact, corroborate with the results of gene expression and over-expression studies of ZoCDPK1. Hence

  13. Intestinal Fluid Permeability in Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar L.) Is Affected by Dietary Protein Source

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Haibin; Kortner, Trond M.; Gajardo, Karina; Chikwati, Elvis; Tinsley, John; Krogdahl, Åshild

    2016-01-01

    In Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.), and also in other fish species, certain plant protein ingredients can increase fecal water content creating a diarrhea-like condition which may impair gut function and reduce fish growth. The present study aimed to strengthen understanding of the underlying mechanisms by observing effects of various alternative plant protein sources when replacing fish meal on expression of genes encoding proteins playing key roles in regulation of water transport across the mucosa of the distal intestine (DI). A 48-day feeding trial was conducted with five diets: A reference diet (FM) in which fish meal (72%) was the only protein source; Diet SBMWG with a mix of soybean meal (30%) and wheat gluten (22%); Diet SPCPM with a mix of soy protein concentrate (30%) and poultry meal (6%); Diet GMWG with guar meal (30%) and wheat gluten (14.5%); Diet PM with 58% poultry meal. Compared to fish fed the FM reference diet, fish fed the soybean meal containing diet (SBMWG) showed signs of enteritis in the DI, increased fecal water content of DI chyme and higher plasma osmolality. Altered DI expression of a battery of genes encoding aquaporins, ion transporters, tight junction and adherens junction proteins suggested reduced transcellular transport of water as well as a tightening of the junction barrier in fish fed the SBMWG diet, which may explain the observed higher fecal water content and plasma osmolality. DI structure was not altered for fish fed the other experimental diets but alterations in target gene expression and fecal water content were observed, indicating that alterations in water transport components may take place without clear effects on intestinal structure. PMID:27907206

  14. Afa/Dr diffusely adhering Escherichia coli C1845 infection promotes selective injuries in the junctional domain of polarized human intestinal Caco-2/TC7 cells.

    PubMed

    Peiffer, I; Blanc-Potard, A B; Bernet-Camard, M F; Guignot, J; Barbat, A; Servin, A L

    2000-06-01

    The Afa/Dr diffusely adhering Escherichia coli (DAEC) C1845 strain harboring the F1845 fimbrial adhesin interacts with the brush border-associated CD55 molecule and promotes elongation of brush border microvilli resulting from rearrangement of the F-actin network. This phenomenon involves the activation of a cascade of signaling coupled to the glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored receptor of the F1845 adhesin. We provide evidence that infection of the polarized human intestinal cell line Caco-2/TC7 by strain C1845 is followed by an increase in the paracellular permeability for [(3)H]mannitol without a decrease of the transepithelial resistance of the monolayers. Alterations in the distribution of tight-junction (TJ)-associated occludin and ZO-1 protein are observed, whereas the distribution of the zonula adherens-associated E-cadherin is not affected. Using the recombinant E. coli strains HB101(pSSS1) and -(pSSS1C) expressing the F1845 fimbrial adhesin, we demonstrate that the adhesin-CD55 interaction is not sufficient for the induction of structural and functional TJ lesions. Moreover, using the actin filament-stabilizing agent Jasplakinolide, we demonstrate that the C1845-induced functional alterations in TJs are independent of the C1845-induced apical cytoskeleton rearrangements. The results indicated that pathogenic factor(s) other than F1845 adhesin may be operant in Afa/Dr DAEC C1845.

  15. Intestinal immune function, antioxidant status and tight junction proteins mRNA expression in young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) fed riboflavin deficient diet.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Feng, Lin; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Jiang, Jun; Wu, Pei; Zhao, Juan; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Tang, Ling; Tang, Wu-Neng; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu; Liu, Yang

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated the effects of riboflavin on intestinal immunity, tight junctions and antioxidant status of young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella). Fish were fed diets containing graded levels of riboflavin (0.63-10.04 mg/kg diet) for 8 weeks. The study indicated that riboflavin deficiency decreased lysozyme, acid phosphatase, copper/zinc superoxide dismutase, glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase activities, and contents of complement component 3 and reduced glutathione in the intestine of fish (P < 0.05). Meanwhile, riboflavin deficiency increased reactive oxygen species, malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl contents and catalase activity (P < 0.05) in the intestine of fish. Furthermore, real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis was used to investigate mRNA expression patterns and found that the mRNA levels of interleukin 10 and transforming growth factor β1, Occludin, zonula occludens 1, Claudin-b and Claudin-c, inhibitor protein κBα, target of rapamycin, ribosomal S6 protein kinase 1 and NF-E2-related factor 2, copper/zinc superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase were decreased (P < 0.05) in the intestine of fish fed riboflavin-deficient diet. Conversely, the mRNA levels of tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 1β, interleukin 8, nuclear factor kappa B p65, Ikappa B kinase β, Ikappa B kinase γ, Kelch-like-ECH-associated protein 1b, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, myosin light chain kinase and Claudin-12 were increased (P < 0.05) in the intestine of fish fed riboflavin-deficient diet. In conclusion, riboflavin deficiency decreased immunity and structural integrity of fish intestine. The optimum riboflavin level for intestinal acid phosphatase activity of young grass carp was estimated to be 6.65 mg/kg diet.

  16. Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Middle Ear Inflammation Disrupts the cochlear Intra-Strial Fluid–Blood Barrier through Down-Regulation of Tight Junction Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinhui; Chen, Songlin; Hou, Zhiqiang; Cai, Jing; Dong, Mingmin; Shi, Xiaorui

    2015-01-01

    blood barrier, essential for cochlear homeostasis. The barrier is degraded as the expression of tight junction-associated proteins such as zona occludens 1, occludin, and vascular endothelial cadherin are down-regulated. PMID:25815897

  17. Lipopolysaccharide-induced middle ear inflammation disrupts the cochlear intra-strial fluid-blood barrier through down-regulation of tight junction proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinhui; Chen, Songlin; Hou, Zhiqiang; Cai, Jing; Dong, Mingmin; Shi, Xiaorui

    2015-01-01

    , essential for cochlear homeostasis. The barrier is degraded as the expression of tight junction-associated proteins such as zona occludens 1, occludin, and vascular endothelial cadherin are down-regulated.

  18. Role of Tau, a microtubule associated protein, in Drosophila photoreceptor morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nam, Sang-Chul

    2016-11-01

    Cell polarity genes have important functions in photoreceptor morphogenesis. Based on recent discovery of stabilized microtubule cytoskeleton in developing photoreceptors and its role in photoreceptor cell polarity, microtubule associated proteins might have important roles in controlling cell polarity proteins' localizations in developing photoreceptors. Here, Tau, a microtubule associated protein, was analyzed to find its potential role in photoreceptor cell polarity. Tau colocalizes with acetylated/stabilized microtubules in developing pupal photoreceptors. Although it is known that tau mutant photoreceptor has no defects in early eye differentiation and development, it shows dramatic disruptions of cell polarity proteins, adherens junctions, and the stable microtubules in developing pupal photoreceptors. This role of Tau in cell polarity proteins' localization in photoreceptor cells during the photoreceptor morphogenesis was further supported by Tau's overexpression studies. Tau overexpression caused dramatic expansions of apical membrane domains where the polarity proteins localize in the developing pupal photoreceptors. It is also found that Tau's role in photoreceptor cell polarity depends on Par-1 kinase. Furthermore, a strong genetic interaction between tau and crumbs was found. It is found that Tau has a crucial role in cell polarity protein localization during pupal photoreceptor morphogenesis stage, but not in early eye development including eye cell differentiation.

  19. Mutations in contactin-1, a neural adhesion and neuromuscular junction protein, cause a familial form of lethal congenital myopathy.

    PubMed

    Compton, Alison G; Albrecht, Douglas E; Seto, Jane T; Cooper, Sandra T; Ilkovski, Biljana; Jones, Kristi J; Challis, Daniel; Mowat, David; Ranscht, Barbara; Bahlo, Melanie; Froehner, Stanley C; North, Kathryn N

    2008-12-01

    We have previously reported a group of patients with congenital onset weakness associated with a deficiency of members of the syntrophin-alpha-dystrobrevin subcomplex and have demonstrated that loss of syntrophin and dystrobrevin from the sarcolemma of skeletal muscle can also be associated with denervation. Here, we have further studied four individuals from a consanguineous Egyptian family with a lethal congenital myopathy inherited in an autosomal-recessive fashion and characterized by a secondary loss of beta2-syntrophin and alpha-dystrobrevin from the muscle sarcolemma, central nervous system involvement, and fetal akinesia. We performed homozygosity mapping and candidate gene analysis and identified a mutation that segregates with disease within CNTN1, the gene encoding for the neural immunoglobulin family adhesion molecule, contactin-1. Contactin-1 transcripts were markedly decreased on gene-expression arrays of muscle from affected family members compared to controls. We demonstrate that contactin-1 is expressed at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) in mice and man in addition to the previously documented expression in the central and peripheral nervous system. In patients with secondary dystroglycanopathies, we show that contactin-1 is abnormally localized to the sarcolemma instead of exclusively at the NMJ. The cntn1 null mouse presents with ataxia, progressive muscle weakness, and postnatal lethality, similar to the affected members in this family. We propose that loss of contactin-1 from the NMJ impairs communication or adhesion between nerve and muscle resulting in the severe myopathic phenotype. This disorder is part of the continuum in the clinical spectrum of congenital myopathies and congenital myasthenic syndromes.

  20. The roles of tricellular tight junction protein lipolysis-stimulated lipoprotein receptor in malignancy of human endometrial cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Hiroshi; Satohisa, Seiro; Kohno, Takayuki; Takahashi, Syunta; Hatakeyama, Tsubasa; Konno, Takumi; Tsujiwaki, Mitsuhiro; Saito, Tsuyoshi; Kojima, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Lipolysis-stimulated lipoprotein receptor (LSR) has been identified as a novel molecular constituent of tricellular contacts that have a barrier function for the cellular sheet. LSR recruits tricellulin (TRIC), which is the first molecular component of tricellular tight junctions. Knockdown of LSR increases cell motility and invasion of certain cancer cells. However, the behavior and the roles of LSR in endometrial cancer remain unknown. In the present study, we investigated the behavior and roles of LSR in normal and endometrial cancer cells in vivo and in vitro. In endometriosis and endometrial cancer, LSR was observed not only in the subapical region but also throughout the lateral region as well as in normal endometrial epithelial cells in the secretory phase, and LSR in the cancer was reduced in correlation with the malignancy. Knockdown of LSR by the siRNA in cells of the endometrial cancer cell line Sawano, induced cell migration, invasion and proliferation, while TRIC relocalized from the tricellular region to the bicellular region at the membrane. In Sawano cells and normal HEEs, a decrease of LSR induced by leptin and an increase of LSR induced by adiponectin and the drugs for type 2 diabetes metformin and berberine were observed via distinct signaling pathways including JAK2/STAT. In Sawano cells, metformin and berberine prevented cell migration and invasion induced by downregulation of LSR by the siRNA and leptin treatment. The dissection of the mechanism in the downregulation of endometrial LSR during obesity is important in developing new diagnostic and therapy for endometrial cancer. PMID:27036040

  1. The roles of tricellular tight junction protein lipolysis-stimulated lipoprotein receptor in malignancy of human endometrial cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Hiroshi; Satohisa, Seiro; Kohno, Takayuki; Takahashi, Syunta; Hatakeyama, Tsubasa; Konno, Takumi; Tsujiwaki, Mitsuhiro; Saito, Tsuyoshi; Kojima, Takashi

    2016-05-10

    Lipolysis-stimulated lipoprotein receptor (LSR) has been identified as a novel molecular constituent of tricellular contacts that have a barrier function for the cellular sheet. LSR recruits tricellulin (TRIC), which is the first molecular component of tricellular tight junctions. Knockdown of LSR increases cell motility and invasion of certain cancer cells. However, the behavior and the roles of LSR in endometrial cancer remain unknown. In the present study, we investigated the behavior and roles of LSR in normal and endometrial cancer cells in vivo and in vitro. In endometriosis and endometrial cancer, LSR was observed not only in the subapical region but also throughout the lateral region as well as in normal endometrial epithelial cells in the secretory phase, and LSR in the cancer was reduced in correlation with the malignancy. Knockdown of LSR by the siRNA in cells of the endometrial cancer cell line Sawano, induced cell migration, invasion and proliferation, while TRIC relocalized from the tricellular region to the bicellular region at the membrane. In Sawano cells and normal HEEs, a decrease of LSR induced by leptin and an increase of LSR induced by adiponectin and the drugs for type 2 diabetes metformin and berberine were observed via distinct signaling pathways including JAK2/STAT. In Sawano cells, metformin and berberine prevented cell migration and invasion induced by downregulation of LSR by the siRNA and leptin treatment. The dissection of the mechanism in the downregulation of endometrial LSR during obesity is important in developing new diagnostic and therapy for endometrial cancer.

  2. Multiplexed multi-scale imaging: novel roles for the scaffold protein IQGAP1 in epithelial cell development (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweikhard, Volker

    2016-02-01

    The precise sub-cellular spatial localization of multi-protein complexes is increasingly recognized as a key mechanism governing the organization of mammalian cells. Consequently, there is a need for novel microscopy techniques capable of investigating such sub-cellular architectures in comprehensive detail. Here, we applied a novel multiplexed STORM super-resolution microscopy technique, in combination with high-throughput immunofluorescence microscopy and live-cell imaging, to investigate the roles of the scaffold protein IQGAP1 in epithelial cells. IQGAP1 is known to orchestrate a wide range of biological processes, including intracellular signaling, cytoskeletal regulation, cell-cell adhesion, and protein trafficking, by forming distinct complexes with a number of known interaction partners, and recruiting these complexes to specific subcellular locations. Our results demonstrate that, in addition to supporting epithelial adherens junctions by associating with specialized cortical actin structures, IQGAP1 plays a second role in which it controls the confinement of a unique, previously undocumented class of membranous compartments to the basal actin cortex. These largely immotile yet highly dynamic structures appear transiently as cells merge into clusters and establish of apical-basolateral (epithelial) polarity, and are identified as an intermediate compartment in the endocytic recycling pathways for cell junction complexes and cell surface receptors. Although these two functions of IQGAP1 occur in parallel and largely independently of each other, they both support the maturation and maintenance of polarized epithelial cell architectures.

  3. Different Changes in the Expression of Multiple Kinds of Tight-Junction Proteins during Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury of the Rat Ileum

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Kaori; Oyamada, Masahito; Mitsufuji, Shoji; Okanoue, Takeshi; Takamatsu, Tetsuro

    2006-01-01

    Dysfunction of tight junctions (TJs), located at the most apical part of the intestinal epithelium, is believed to result in various complications in intestinal disease. However, the behaviors of multiple kinds of TJ proteins during ischemia-reperfusion injury are not understood in detail. To determine changes in expression and localization of TJ proteins during intestinal-barrier recovery, we induced intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats, measured mucosa-to-blood permeability of fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran-4 kDa, and compared it with spatiotemporal changes of ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-1, -2, -3, -4, and -5 by immunoconfocal microscopy. At 1 hour post-reperfusion, villi were denuded and intestinal-barrier function was lost. From 6 to 24 hours post-reperfusion, villous epithelium was restored by cell migration, and barrier function together with reticular pattern expression of ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-1, -3, and -5, recovered time-dependently. To the contrary, after ischemia-reperfusion injury, the localized expression of claudin-2 and claudin-4 observed in the non-treated control was lost and replaced with broader expression from crypts to villi with increased basolateral claudin-4 expression in epithelial cells. These data demonstrated that recovery of intestinal barrier function is associated with expression of ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-1, -3, and -5, whereas claudin-2 and claudin-4 show unique changes in expression and localization. PMID:17375208

  4. Age-related deficits in skeletal muscle recovery following disuse are associated with neuromuscular junction instability and ER stress, not impaired protein synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Baehr, Leslie M.; West, Daniel W.D.; Marcotte, George; Marshall, Andrea G.; De Sousa, Luis Gustavo; Baar, Keith; Bodine, Sue C.

    2016-01-01

    Age-related loss of muscle mass and strength can be accelerated by impaired recovery of muscle mass following a transient atrophic stimulus. The aim of this study was to identify the mechanisms underlying the attenuated recovery of muscle mass and strength in old rats following disuse-induced atrophy. Adult (9 month) and old (29 month) male F344BN rats underwent hindlimb unloading (HU) followed by reloading. HU induced significant atrophy of the hindlimb muscles in both adult (17-38%) and old (8-29%) rats, but only the adult rats exhibited full recovery of muscle mass and strength upon reloading. Upon reloading, total RNA and protein synthesis increased to a similar extent in adult and old muscles. At baseline and upon reloading, however, proteasome-mediated degradation was suppressed leading to an accumulation of ubiquitin-tagged proteins and p62. Further, ER stress, as measured by CHOP expression, was elevated at baseline and upon reloading in old rats. Analysis of mRNA expression revealed increases in HDAC4, Runx1, myogenin, Gadd45a, and the AChRs in old rats, suggesting neuromuscular junction instability/denervation. Collectively, our data suggests that with aging, impaired neuromuscular transmission and deficits in the proteostasis network contribute to defects in muscle fiber remodeling and functional recovery of muscle mass and strength. PMID:26826670

  5. Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin elicits rapid and specific cytolysis of breast carcinoma cells mediated through tight junction proteins claudin 3 and 4.

    PubMed

    Kominsky, Scott L; Vali, Mustafa; Korz, Dorian; Gabig, Theodore G; Weitzman, Sigmund A; Argani, Pedram; Sukumar, Saraswati

    2004-05-01

    Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE) induces cytolysis very rapidly through binding to its receptors, the tight junction proteins CLDN 3 and 4. In this study, we investigated CLDN 3 and 4 expression in breast cancer and tested the potential of CPE-mediated therapy. CLDN 3 and 4 proteins were detected in all primary breast carcinomas tested (n = 21) and, compared to normal mammary epithelium, were overexpressed in approximately 62% and 26%, respectively. Treatment of breast cancer cell lines in culture with CPE resulted in rapid and dose-dependent cytolysis exclusively in cells that expressed CLDN 3 and 4. Intratumoral CPE treatment of xenografts of T47D breast cancer cells in immunodeficient mice resulted in a significant reduction in tumor volume (P = 0.007), with accompanying necrosis. Necrotic reactions were also seen in three freshly resected primary breast carcinoma samples treated with CPE for 12 hours, while isolated primary breast carcinoma cells underwent rapid and complete cytolysis within 1 hour. Thus, expression of CLDN 3 and 4 sensitizes primary breast carcinomas to CPE-mediated cytolysis and emphasizes the potential of CPE in breast cancer therapy.

  6. Clostridium perfringens Enterotoxin Elicits Rapid and Specific Cytolysis of Breast Carcinoma Cells Mediated through Tight Junction Proteins Claudin 3 and 4

    PubMed Central

    Kominsky, Scott L.; Vali, Mustafa; Korz, Dorian; Gabig, Theodore G.; Weitzman, Sigmund A.; Argani, Pedram; Sukumar, Saraswati

    2004-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE) induces cytolysis very rapidly through binding to its receptors, the tight junction proteins CLDN 3 and 4. In this study, we investigated CLDN 3 and 4 expression in breast cancer and tested the potential of CPE-mediated therapy. CLDN 3 and 4 proteins were detected in all primary breast carcinomas tested (n = 21) and, compared to normal mammary epithelium, were overexpressed in approximately 62% and 26%, respectively. Treatment of breast cancer cell lines in culture with CPE resulted in rapid and dose-dependent cytolysis exclusively in cells that expressed CLDN 3 and 4. Intratumoral CPE treatment of xenografts of T47D breast cancer cells in immunodeficient mice resulted in a significant reduction in tumor volume (P = 0.007), with accompanying necrosis. Necrotic reactions were also seen in three freshly resected primary breast carcinoma samples treated with CPE for 12 hours, while isolated primary breast carcinoma cells underwent rapid and complete cytolysis within 1 hour. Thus, expression of CLDN 3 and 4 sensitizes primary breast carcinomas to CPE-mediated cytolysis and emphasizes the potential of CPE in breast cancer therapy. PMID:15111309

  7. A residue located at the junction of the head and stalk regions of measles virus fusion protein regulates membrane fusion by controlling conformational stability.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Yuto; Yonemori, Saeka; Hirose, Mitsuhiro; Shogaki, Hiroko; Wakimoto, Hiroshi; Kitagawa, Yoshinori; Gotoh, Bin; Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Ken-Ichi; Itoh, Masae

    2017-02-01

    The fusion (F) protein of measles virus performs refolding from the thermodynamically metastable prefusion form to the highly stable postfusion form via an activated unstable intermediate stage, to induce membrane fusion. Some amino acids involved in the fusion regulation cluster in the heptad repeat B (HR-B) domain of the stalk region, among which substitution of residue 465 by various amino acids revealed that fusion activity correlates well with its side chain length from the Cα (P<0.01) and van der Waals volume (P<0.001), except for Phe, Tyr, Trp, Pro and His carrying ring structures. Directed towards the head region, longer side chains of the non-ring-type 465 residues penetrate more deeply into the head region and may disturb the hydrophobic interaction between the stalk and head regions and cause destabilization of the molecule by lowering the energy barrier for refolding, which conferred the F protein enhanced fusion activity. Contrarily, the side chain of ring-type 465 residues turned away from the head region, resulting in not only no contact with the head region but also extensive coverage of the HR-B surface, which may prevent the dissociation of the HR-B bundle for initiation of membrane fusion and suppress fusion activity. Located in the HR-B domain just at the junction between the head and stalk regions, amino acid 465 is endowed with a possible ability to either destabilize or stabilize the F protein depending on its molecular volume and the direction of the side chain, regulating fusion activity of measles virus F protein.

  8. Expressions of Tight Junction Proteins Occludin and Claudin-1 Are under the Circadian Control in the Mouse Large Intestine: Implications in Intestinal Permeability and Susceptibility to Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Oh-oka, Kyoko; Kono, Hiroshi; Ishimaru, Kayoko; Miyake, Kunio; Kubota, Takeo; Ogawa, Hideoki; Okumura, Ko; Shibata, Shigenobu; Nakao, Atsuhito

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims The circadian clock drives daily rhythms in behavior and physiology. A recent study suggests that intestinal permeability is also under control of the circadian clock. However, the precise mechanisms remain largely unknown. Because intestinal permeability depends on tight junction (TJ) that regulates the epithelial paracellular pathway, this study investigated whether the circadian clock regulates the expression levels of TJ proteins in the intestine. Methods The expression levels of TJ proteins in the large intestinal epithelium and colonic permeability were analyzed every 4, 6, or 12 hours between wild-type mice and mice with a mutation of a key clock gene Period2 (Per2; mPer2m/m). In addition, the susceptibility to dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis was compared between wild-type mice and mPer2m/m mice. Results The mRNA and protein expression levels of Occludin and Claudin-1 exhibited daily variations in the colonic epithelium in wild-type mice, whereas they were constitutively high in mPer2m/m mice. Colonic permeability in wild-type mice exhibited daily variations, which was inversely associated with the expression levels of Occludin and Claudin-1 proteins, whereas it was constitutively low in mPer2m/m mice. mPer2m/m mice were more resistant to the colonic injury induced by DSS than wild-type mice. Conclusions Occludin and Claudin-1 expressions in the large intestine are under the circadian control, which is associated with temporal regulation of colonic permeability and also susceptibility to colitis. PMID:24845399

  9. All-trans retinoic acid prevents oxidative stress-induced loss of renal tight junction proteins in type-1 diabetic model.

    PubMed

    Molina-Jijón, Eduardo; Rodríguez-Muñoz, Rafael; Namorado, María del Carmen; Bautista-García, Pablo; Medina-Campos, Omar Noel; Pedraza-Chaverri, José; Reyes, José L

    2015-05-01

    We previously reported that diabetes decreased the expression of renal tight junction (TJ) proteins claudin-5 in glomerulus, and claudin-2 and occludin in proximal tubule through an oxidative stress dependent way. Now we investigated whether all-trans retinoic acid (atRA), a compound that plays a relevant role in kidney maintenance and that possesses antioxidant properties, prevents loss of TJ proteins in streptozotocin (STZ)-treated rats. atRA was administered daily by gavage (1mg/kg) from Days 3-21 after STZ administration. atRA attenuated loss of body weight, proteinuria and natriuresis but it did not prevent hyperglucemia. Other metabolic alterations, such as: increased kidney injury molecule (KIM)-1, oxidative stress, protein kinase C (PKC) beta 2, NADPH oxidase subunits (p47(phox) and gp91(phox)) expressions and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) uncoupling, and decreased nitric oxide synthesis, nuclear factor-erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expressions were also attenuated by atRA. In vitro scavenging capacity assays showed that atRA scavenged peroxyl radicals (ROO•), singlet oxygen ((1)O2) and hypochlorous acid (HOCl) in a concentration-dependent manner. Decreased expressions of occludin, claudins-2 and -5 induced by diabetes were ameliorated by atRA. We also found that diabetes induced tyrosine nitration (3-NT), SUMOylation and phosphorylation in serine residues of claudin-2 and atRA prevented these changes. In conclusion, atRA exerted nephroprotective effects by attenuating oxidative stress and preventing loss of renal TJ proteins.

  10. Exposure to vehicle emissions results in altered blood brain barrier permeability and expression of matrix metalloproteinases and tight junction proteins in mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Traffic-generated air pollution-exposure is associated with adverse effects in the central nervous system (CNS) in both human exposures and animal models, including neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. While alterations in the blood brain barrier (BBB) have been implicated as a potential mechanism of air pollution-induced CNS pathologies, pathways involved have not been elucidated. Objectives To determine whether inhalation exposure to mixed vehicle exhaust (MVE) mediates alterations in BBB permeability, activation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) -2 and −9, and altered tight junction (TJ) protein expression. Methods Apolipoprotein (Apo) E−/− and C57Bl6 mice were exposed to either MVE (100 μg/m3 PM) or filtered air (FA) for 6 hr/day for 30 days and resulting BBB permeability, expression of ROS, TJ proteins, markers of neuroinflammation, and MMP activity were assessed. Serum from study mice was applied to an in vitro BBB co-culture model and resulting alterations in transport and permeability were quantified. Results MVE-exposed Apo E−/− mice showed increased BBB permeability, elevated ROS and increased MMP-2 and −9 activity, compared to FA controls. Additionally, cerebral vessels from MVE-exposed mice expressed decreased levels of TJ proteins, occludin and claudin-5, and increased levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and interleukin (IL)-1β in the parenchyma. Serum from MVE-exposed animals also resulted in increased in vitro BBB permeability and altered P-glycoprotein transport activity. Conclusions These data indicate that inhalation exposure to traffic-generated air pollutants promotes increased MMP activity and degradation of TJ proteins in the cerebral vasculature, resulting in altered BBB permeability and expression of neuroinflammatory markers. PMID:24344990

  11. The EhCPADH112 Complex of Entamoeba histolytica Interacts with Tight Junction Proteins Occludin and Claudin-1 to Produce Epithelial Damage

    PubMed Central

    Betanzos, Abigail; Javier-Reyna, Rosario; García-Rivera, Guillermina; Bañuelos, Cecilia; González-Mariscal, Lorenza; Schnoor, Michael; Orozco, Esther

    2013-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, the protozoan responsible for human amoebiasis, causes between 30,000 and 100,000 deaths per year worldwide. Amoebiasis is characterized by intestinal epithelial damage provoking severe diarrhea. However, the molecular mechanisms by which this protozoan causes epithelial damage are poorly understood. Here, we studied the initial molecular interactions between the E. histolytica EhCPADH112 virulence complex and epithelial MDCK and Caco-2 cells. By confocal microscopy, we discovered that after contact with trophozoites or trophozoite extracts (TE), EhCPADH112 and proteins forming this complex (EhCP112 and EhADH112) co-localize with occludin and claudin-1 at tight junctions (TJ). Immunoprecipitation assays revealed interaction between EhCPADH112 and occludin, claudin-1, ZO-1 and ZO-2. Overlay assays confirmed an interaction of EhCP112 and EhADH112 with occludin and claudin-1, whereas only EhADH112 interacted also with ZO-2. We observed degradation of all mentioned TJ proteins after incubation with TE. Importantly, inhibiting proteolytic activity or blocking the complex with a specific antibody not only prevented TJ protein degradation but also epithelial barrier disruption. Furthermore, we discovered that TE treatment induces autophagy and apoptosis in MDCK cells that could contribute to the observed barrier disruption. Our results suggest a model in which epithelial damage caused by E. histolytica is initiated by the interaction of EhCP112 and EhADH112 with TJ proteins followed by their degradation. Disruption of TJs then induces increased paracellular permeability, thus facilitating the entry of more proteases and other parasite molecules leading eventually to tissue destruction. PMID:23762290

  12. LAP proteins are localized at the post-synaptic membrane of neuromuscular junctions and appear to modulate synaptic morphology and transmission.

    PubMed

    Kravic, Bojana; Huraskin, Danyil; Frick, Alexander D; Jung, Jasmin; Redai, Veronika; Palmisano, Ralf; Marchetto, Sylvie; Borg, Jean-Paul; Mei, Lin; Hashemolhosseini, Said

    2016-11-01

    Erbin, Lano, Scribble, and Densin-180 belong to LAP (leucine-rich repeats and PDZ domain) adaptor proteins involved in cell signaling pathways. Previously, we identified Erbin, Lano, and Scribble, but not Densin-180, in muscle cells, where they are involved in regulating the aggregation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in vitro. Here, we analyzed their cellular localization at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) in skeletal muscles of mice. Erbin, Lano, and Scribble were significantly accumulated at NMJs and localized in different synaptic cells. Moreover, we used mouse mutants to analyze the role of Erbin at the NMJ. We used two Erbin mutant mouse strains that either completely lack Erbin protein (Erbin(null/null) ) or express a truncated Erbin mutant where the carboxy-terminal PDZ domain is replaced by β-galactosidase (Erbin(ΔC/ΔC) ) thereby abolishing its interaction with ErbB receptor tyrosine kinases. Neither the lack of the PDZ domain of Erbin, nor its complete absence interfered with the general localization of LAP proteins at NMJs, but Lano and Scribble transcript levels were up-regulated in homozygous Erbin-null muscles. Furthermore, grip strength was reduced and neural transmission impaired in homozygous aged Erbin-null but not Erbin-ΔC mice. Erbin-null skeletal muscles did not reveal any conspicuous impairment of the muscle fiber. Localization of other NMJ marker proteins was not affected either. Quantitative 3D morphometry showed that NMJs of Erbin-null muscles were significantly smaller and fragmented in the soleus. We speculate that Erbin, Lano, and Scribble act at the post-synaptic membrane of NMJs in a concerted fashion to regulate nicotinic acetylcholine receptors cluster morphology and neural transmission. Cover Image for this issue: doi: 10.1111/jnc.13340.

  13. Global ischemia-induced increases in the gap junctional proteins connexin 32 (Cx32) and Cx36 in hippocampus and enhanced vulnerability of Cx32 knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Oguro, K; Jover, T; Tanaka, H; Lin, Y; Kojima, T; Oguro, N; Grooms, S Y; Bennett, M V; Zukin, R S

    2001-10-01

    Gap junctions are conductive channels that connect the interiors of coupled cells. In the hippocampus, GABA-containing hippocampal interneurons are interconnected by gap junctions, which mediate electrical coupling and synchronous firing and thereby promote inhibitory transmission. The present study was undertaken to examine the hypothesis that the gap junctional proteins connexin 32 (Cx32; expressed by oligodendrocytes, interneurons, or both), Cx36 (expressed by interneurons), and Cx43 (expressed by astrocytes) play a role in defining cell-specific patterns of neuronal death in hippocampus after global ischemia in mice. Global ischemia did not significantly alter Cx32 and Cx36 mRNA expression and slightly increased Cx43 mRNA expression in the vulnerable CA1, as assessed by Northern blot analysis and in situ hybridization. Global ischemia induced a selective increase in Cx32 and Cx36 but not Cx43 protein abundance in CA1 before onset of neuronal death, as assessed by Western blot analysis. The increase in Cx32 and Cx36 expression was intense and specific to parvalbumin-positive inhibitory interneurons of CA1, as assessed by double immunofluorescence. Protein abundance was unchanged in CA3 and dentate gyrus. The finding of increase in connexin protein without increase in mRNA suggests regulation of Cx32 and Cx36 expression at the translational or post-translational level. Cx32(Y/-) null mice exhibited enhanced vulnerability to brief ischemic insults, consistent with a role for Cx32 gap junctions in neuronal survival. These findings suggest that Cx32 and Cx36 gap junctions may contribute to the survival and resistance of GABAergic interneurons, thereby defining cell-specific patterns of global ischemia-induced neuronal death.

  14. Impact of 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene exposure on connexin gap junction proteins in cultured rat ovaries

    SciTech Connect

    Ganesan, Shanthi Keating, Aileen F.

    2014-01-15

    7,12-Dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) destroys ovarian follicles in a concentration-dependent manner. The impact of DMBA on connexin (CX) proteins that mediate communication between follicular cell types along with pro-apoptotic factors p53 and Bax were investigated. Postnatal day (PND) 4 Fisher 344 rat ovaries were cultured for 4 days in vehicle medium (1% DMSO) followed by a single exposure to vehicle control (1% DMSO) or DMBA (12.5 nM or 75 nM) and cultured for 4 or 8 days. RT-PCR was performed to quantify Cx37, Cx43, p53 and Bax mRNA level. Western blotting and immunofluorescence staining were performed to determine CX37 or CX43 level and/or localization. Cx37 mRNA and protein increased (P < 0.05) at 4 days of 12.5 nM DMBA exposure. Relative to vehicle control-treated ovaries, mRNA encoding Cx43 decreased (P < 0.05) but CX43 protein increased (P < 0.05) at 4 days by both DMBA exposures. mRNA expression of pro-apoptotic p53 was decreased (P < 0.05) but no changes in Bax expression were observed after 4 days of DMBA exposures. In contrast, after 8 days, DMBA decreased Cx37 and Cx43 mRNA and protein but increased both p53 and Bax mRNA levels. CX43 protein was located between granulosa cells, while CX37 was located at the oocyte cell surface of all follicle stages. These findings support that DMBA exposure impacts ovarian Cx37 and Cx43 mRNA and protein prior to both observed changes in pro-apoptotic p53 and Bax and follicle loss. It is possible that such interference in follicular cell communication is detrimental to follicle viability, and may play a role in DMBA-induced follicular atresia. - Highlights: • DMBA increases Cx37 and Cx43 expression prior to follicle loss. • During follicle loss both Cx37 and Cx43 expressions are reduced. • CX43 protein is absent in follicle remnants lacking an oocyte.

  15. The MAPK/ERK-Signaling Pathway Regulates the Expression and Distribution of Tight Junction Proteins in the Mouse Proximal Epididymis1

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bongki; Breton, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    The initial segment (IS) in rodents is functionally and structurally distinct from other epididymal segments and plays an important role in sperm maturation. The MAPK/ERK1/2 pathway is maintained active in the IS by testicular luminal factors and plays crucial roles in the maintenance and differentiation of the IS epithelium. Tight junctions (TJs) are constituents of the blood-epididymis barrier, which mediates the paracellular transport of ions, solutes, and water and controls epithelial cell differentiation, thereby contributing to the establishment of a unique luminal environment. We examine here the role of the MAPK/ERK1/2 pathway in the regulation of TJ proteins in the IS. Inhibition of mitogen activated protein kinase kinase (MAPKK or MEK1/2) with PD325901, followed by reduction of ERK1/2 phosphorylation (pERK), decreased zonula occludens (ZO)-2 expression and increased ZO-3 expression in TJs but had no effect on ZO-1 expression. In control mice, in addition to being located in TJs, claudin (Cldn)-1, Cldn-3, and Cldn-4 were detected in the basolateral membrane of epithelial cells, with enriched expression of Cldn-1 and Cldn-4 in basal cells. PD325901 reduced the expression of Cldn-1 and Cldn-4 at all locations without affecting Cldn-3. Occludin was undetectable in the IS of control mice, but PD325901 triggered its expression in TJs. No effect was observed for any of the proteins examined in the other epididymal regions. Our results indicate the participation of the MAPK/ERK1/2 pathway in the regulation of cell-cell events that control the formation and maintenance of the blood-epididymis barrier. PMID:26658708

  16. Methamphetamine transiently increases the blood-brain barrier permeability in the hippocampus: role of tight junction proteins and matrix metalloproteinase-9.

    PubMed

    Martins, Tânia; Baptista, Sofia; Gonçalves, Joana; Leal, Ermelindo; Milhazes, Nuno; Borges, Fernanda; Ribeiro, Carlos F; Quintela, Oscar; Lendoiro, Elena; López-Rivadulla, Manuel; Ambrósio, António F; Silva, Ana P

    2011-09-09

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a powerful stimulant drug of abuse that has steadily gained popularity worldwide. It is known that METH is highly neurotoxic and causes irreversible damage of brain cells leading to neurological and psychiatric abnormalities. Recent studies suggested that METH-induced neurotoxicity might also result from its ability to compromise blood-brain barrier (BBB) function. Due to the crucial role of BBB in the maintenance of brain homeostasis and protection against toxic molecules and pathogenic organisms, its dysfunction could have severe consequences. In this study, we investigated the effect of an acute high dose of METH (30mg/kg) on BBB permeability after different time points and in different brain regions. For that, young adult mice were sacrificed 1h, 24h or 72h post-METH administration. METH increased BBB permeability, but this effect was detected only at 24h after administration, being therefore a transitory effect. Interestingly, we also found that the hippocampus was the most susceptible brain region to METH, comparing to frontal cortex and striatum. Moreover, in an attempt to identify the key players in METH-induced BBB dysfunction we further investigated potential alterations in tight junction (TJ) proteins and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). METH was able to decrease the protein levels of zonula occludens (ZO)-1, claudin-5 and occludin in the hippocampus 24h post-injection, and increased the activity and immunoreactivity of MMP-9. The pre-treatment with BB-94 (30mg/kg), a matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor, prevented the METH-induced increase in MMP-9 immunoreactivity in the hippocampus. Overall, the present data demonstrate that METH transiently increases the BBB permeability in the hippocampus, which can be explained by alterations on TJ proteins and MMP-9.

  17. Lentivirus-mediated RNAi knockdown of the gap junction protein, Cx43, attenuates the development of vascular restenosis following balloon injury

    PubMed Central

    HAN, XIAO-JIAN; CHEN, MIN; HONG, TAO; ZHU, LING-YU; HE, DAN; FENG, JIU-GENG; JIANG, LI-PING

    2015-01-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention [PCI or percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA)] has been developed into a mature interventional treatment for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. However, the long-term therapeutic effect is compromised by the high incidence of vascular restenosis following angioplasty, and the underlying mechanisms of vascular restenosis have not yet been fully elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the role of the gap junction (GJ) protein, connexin 43 (Cx43), in the development of vascular restenosis. To establish vascular restenosis, rat carotid arteries were subjected to balloon angioplasty injury. At 0, 7, 14 and 2 days following balloon injury, the arteries were removed, and the intimal/medial area of the vessels was measured to evaluate the degree of restenosis. We found that the intimal area gradually increased following balloon injury. Intimal hyperplasia and restenosis were particularly evident at 14 and 28 days after injury. In addition, the mRNA and protein expression of Cx43 was temporarily decreased at 7 days, and subsequently increased at 14 and 28 days following balloon injury, as shown by RT-PCR and western blot analysis. To determine the involvement of Cx43 in vascular restenosis, the lentivirus vector expressing shRNA targeting Cx43, Cx43-RNAi-LV, was used to silence Cx43 in the rat carotid arteries. The knockdown of Cx43 effectively attenuated the development of intimal hyperplasia and vascular restenosis following balloon injury. Thus, our data indicate the vital role of the GJ protein, Cx43, in the development of vascular restenosis, and provide new insight into the pathogenesis of vascular reste-nosis. Cx43 may prove to be a novel potential pharmacological target for the prevention of vascular restenosis following PCI. PMID:25625334

  18. Reversal of West Nile virus-induced blood-brain barrier disruption and tight junction proteins degradation by matrix metalloproteinases inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Saguna; Kumar, Mukesh; Gurjav, Ulziijargal; Lum, Stephanie; Nerurkar, Vivek R.

    2011-01-01

    Though compromised blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a pathological hallmark of WNV- associated neurological sequelae, underlying mechanisms are unclear. We characterized the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) in WNV-infected human brain-microvascular endothelial cells (HBMVE) and -cortical astrocytes (HBCA), components of BBB and their role in BBB disruption. Expression of multiple MMPs was significantly induced in WNV-infected HBCA cells. Naïve HBMVE cells incubated with the supernatant from WNV-infected HBCA cells demonstrated loss of tight junction proteins, which was rescued in the presence of MMP inhibitor, GM6001. Further, supernatant from WNV-infected HBCA cells compromised the in-vitro BBB models integrity. Our data suggests astrocytes as one of the sources of MMP in the brain, which mediates BBB disruption allowing unrestricted entry of immune cells into the brain, thereby contributing to WNV-neuropathogenesis. Because of the unavailability of WNV antivirals and vaccines, use of MMP inhibitors as an adjunct therapy to ameliorate WNV disease progression is warranted. PMID:19922973

  19. Transforming Growth Factor-β Regulation of Epithelial Tight Junction Proteins Enhances Barrier Function and Blocks Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7-Induced Increased Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Kathryn L.; Reardon, Colin; Wang, Arthur; Nazli, Aisha; McKay, Derek M.

    2005-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EHEC) is an enteric pathogen that causes potentially fatal symptoms after intimate adhesion, modulation of intestinal epithelial signal transduction, and alteration of epithelial function (eg, barrier disruption). Although the epithelial barrier is critical to gut homeostasis, only a few agents, such as transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, can enhance or protect epithelial barrier function. Our aims were to delineate the mechanism(s) behind TGF-β-induced barrier enhancement and to determine whether TGF-β could prevent EHEC-induced barrier disruption. Using monolayers of the human T84 colonic epithelial cell line, we found that TGF-β induced a significant increase in transepithelial electrical resistance (a measure of paracellular permeability) through activation of ERK MAPK and SMAD signaling pathways and up-regulation of the tight junction protein claudin-1. Additionally, TGF-β pretreatment of epithelia blocked the decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance and the increase in transepithelial passage of [3H]-mannitol caused by EHEC infection. EHEC infection was associated with reduced expression of zonula occludens-1, occludin, and claudin-2 (but not claudin-1 or claudin-4); TGF-β pretreatment prevented these changes. These studies provide insight into EHEC pathogenesis by illustrating the mechanisms underlying TGF-β-induced epithelial barrier enhancement and identifying TGF-β as an agent capable of blocking EHEC-induced increases in epithelial permeability via maintenance of claudin-2, occludin, and zonula occludens-1 levels. PMID:16314472

  20. Influence of Th2 Cytokines on the Cornified Envelope, Tight Junction Proteins, and ß-Defensins in Filaggrin-Deficient Skin Equivalents.

    PubMed

    Hönzke, Stefan; Wallmeyer, Leonie; Ostrowski, Anja; Radbruch, Moritz; Mundhenk, Lars; Schäfer-Korting, Monika; Hedtrich, Sarah

    2016-03-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronic skin condition with complex etiology. It is characterized by skin barrier defects and T helper type 2 (Th2)-polarized inflammation. Although mutations in the filaggrin gene are known to be prominent genetic risk factors for the development of atopic dermatitis, the interdependency between these and an altered cytokine milieu is not fully understood. In this study, we evaluated the direct effects of filaggrin deficiency on the cornified envelope, tight junction proteins, and innate immune response, and report the effects of Th2 cytokines in normal and filaggrin-deficient skin equivalents. Supplementation with IL-4 and IL-13 led to distinct histologic changes and significantly increased skin surface pH, both of which were enhanced in filaggrin knockdown skin equivalents. We detected a compensatory up-regulation of involucrin and occludin in filaggrin-deficient skin that was dramatically disturbed when simultaneous inflammation occurred. Furthermore, we found that a lack of filaggrin triggered an up-regulation of human ?-defensin 2 via an unknown mechanism, which was abolished by Th2 cytokine supplementation. Taken together, these results indicate that defects in the epidermal barrier, skin permeability, and cutaneous innate immune response are not primarily linked to filaggrin deficiency but are rather secondarily induced by Th2 inflammation.

  1. Hypertonicity-induced transmitter release at Drosophila neuromuscular junctions is partly mediated by integrins and cAMP/protein kinase A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Grinnell, Alan D.; Kidokoro, Yoshiaki

    2002-01-01

    The frequency of quantal transmitter release increases upon application of hypertonic solutions. This effect bypasses the Ca(2+) triggering step, but requires the presence of key molecules involved in vesicle fusion, and hence could be a useful tool for dissecting the molecular process of vesicle fusion. We have examined the hypertonicity response at neuromuscular junctions of Drosophila embryos in Ca(2+)-free saline. Relative to wild-type, the response induced by puff application of hypertonic solution was enhanced in a mutant, dunce, in which the cAMP level is elevated, or in wild-type embryos treated with forskolin, an activator of adenylyl cyclase, while protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitors decreased it. The response was also smaller in a mutant, DC0, which lacks the major subunit of PKA. Thus the cAMP/PKA cascade is involved in the hypertonicity response. Peptides containing the sequence Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD), which inhibit binding of integrins to natural ligands, reduced the response, whereas a peptide containing the non-binding sequence Arg-Gly-Glu (RGE) did not. A reduced response persisted in a mutant, myospheroid, which expresses no integrins, and the response in DC0 was unaffected by RGD peptides. These data indicate that there are at lease two components in the hypertonicity response: one that is integrin mediated and involves the cAMP/PKA cascade, and another that is not integrin mediated and does not involve the cAMP/PKA cascade.

  2. Inhibition of gap junctional intercellular communication and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase by tumor-promoting organic peroxides and protection by resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Upham, Brad L; Guzvić, Miodrag; Scott, Jacob; Carbone, Joseph M; Blaha, Ludek; Coe, Chad; Li, Lan Lan; Rummel, Alisa M; Trosko, James E

    2007-01-01

    Dicumyl peroxide (di-CuOOH) and benzoyl peroxide (BzOOH) act as tumor promoters in SENCAR mice, whereas di-tert-butylhydroperoxide does not. Tumor promotion requires the removal of growth suppression by inhibition of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) and the induction of mitogenic intracellular pathways. We showed that di-CuOOH and BzOOH both reversibly inhibited GJIC and transiently activated mitogen-activated protein kinase, specifically, the extracellular receptor kinase at noncytotoxic conditions in WB-F344 rat liver epithelial cells, whereas the non-tumor-promoting di-tert-butylhydroperoxide did not inhibit GJIC or activate extracellular receptor kinase. di-CuOOH but not BzOOH inhibited GJIC through a phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C-dependent mechanism. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) was needed to prevent a cytotoxic, glutathione-depleting effect of BzOOH, whereas di-CuOOH was noncytotoxic and did not alter glutathione levels at all doses and times tested. Pretreatment of WB-F344 cells with resveratrol, a polyphenolic antioxidant present in red wine, prevented at physiological doses the inhibition of GJIC by di-CuOOH but not from BzOOH and was effective in significantly preventing extracellular receptor kinase activation by both peroxides. NAC did not prevent any of the peroxide effects on either GJIC or extracellular receptor kinase, suggesting a specific antioxidant effect of resveratrol.

  3. Neuropeptide Y, substance P, and human bone morphogenetic protein 2 stimulate human osteoblast osteogenic activity by enhancing gap junction intercellular communication

    PubMed Central

    Ma, W.H.; Liu, Y.J.; Wang, W.; Zhang, Y.Z.

    2015-01-01

    Bone homeostasis seems to be controlled by delicate and subtle “cross talk” between the nervous system and “osteo-neuromediators” that control bone remodeling. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of interactions between neuropeptides and human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (hBMP2) on human osteoblasts. We also investigated the effects of neuropeptides and hBMP2 on gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC). Osteoblasts were treated with neuropeptide Y (NPY), substance P (SP), or hBMP2 at three concentrations. At various intervals after treatment, cell viability was measured by the MTT assay. In addition, cellular alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and osteocalcin were determined by colorimetric assay and radioimmunoassay, respectively. The effects of NPY, SP and hBMP on GJIC were determined by laser scanning confocal microscopy. The viability of cells treated with neuropeptides and hBMP2 increased significantly in a time-dependent manner, but was inversely associated with the concentration of the treatments. ALP activity and osteocalcin were both reduced in osteoblasts exposed to the combination of neuropeptides and hBMP2. The GJIC of osteoblasts was significantly increased by the neuropeptides and hBMP2. These results suggest that osteoblast activity is increased by neuropeptides and hBMP2 through increased GJIC. Identification of the GJIC-mediated signal transduction capable of modulating the cellular activities of bone cells represents a novel approach to studying the biology of skeletal innervation. PMID:25714881

  4. [Gap junctions and cancer: implications and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Mesnil, Marc

    2004-02-01

    Gap junctions are made of intercellular channels which permit the diffusion from cytoplasm to cytoplasm of small hydrophilic molecules (<1,200 Da) such as ions, sugars, amino acids, nucleotides, second messengers (calcium, inositol triphosphate, etc.). Since their discovery in the early sixties, several groups have described the loss of their function in cancer cells. The accumulation of such data led to the hypothesis that gap junctions are involved in the carcinogenesis process. This assumption has been confirmed by data establishing that gap junctional intercellular communication is inhibited by most of the tumor promoters and that the restoration of such a communication, by transfection of cDNAs encoding gap junction proteins (connexins), inhibits the aberrant growth rates of tumorigenic cells. Despite these important informations, several fundamental questions remain still open. First, we do not know how gap junctions mediate such a tumor suppressor effect and whether it may depend either on the cell type or on the connexin type. Moreover, most of the data concerning a possible involvement of gap junctions in carcinogenesis have been obtained from in vitro and animal models. The very few results which have been currently collected from human tumors are not sufficient to have a clear idea concerning the real involvement of gap junctions in sporadic human cancers. These points as well as other unresolved questions about the role of gap junctional intercellular communication in carcinogenesis are mentioned. To bring some answers, some prospects are proposed with the objective to use gap junctions for increasing the effect of anticancer therapies.

  5. Leukotriene B4 receptor type 2 (BLT2) enhances skin barrier function by regulating tight junction proteins.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Yumiko; Saeki, Kazuko; Liu, Min; Sasaki, Fumiyuki; Koga, Tomoaki; Kitajima, Keiko; Meno, Chikara; Okuno, Toshiaki; Yokomizo, Takehiko

    2016-02-01

    GPCRs are involved in numerous physiologic functions and are important drug targets. Although the epithelial barrier is important for protection from invading pathogens, the correlation between GPCRs and epithelial barrier function remains unknown. Leukotriene B4 (LTB4) receptor type 2 (BLT2), mainly expressed in epithelial cells, is a GPCR for 12(S)-hydroxyheptadeca-5Z,8E,10E-trienoic acid (12-HHT) and LTB4. In our study, BLT2 localized at the lateral membrane in BLT2-overexpressing Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) II cells and in the small intestine of BLT2-transgenic mice. BLT2-deficient mice exhibited higher transepidermal water loss and were more sensitive to epicutaneous sensitization. MDCK-BLT2 cells recovered transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) after a calcium switch faster than did MDCK-Mock cells, and 12-HHT stimulation accelerated TER recovery only in MDCK-BLT2 cells. Quantitative PCR and immunoblot analyses revealed that the 12-HHT/BLT2 axis up-regulated claudin-4 (CLDN4) expression in MDCK-BLT2 cells and human primary keratinocytes, and CLDN4 knockdown abolished 12-HHT-dependent TER recovery. Acceleration of TER recovery and induction of CLDN4 expression by 12-HHT stimulation were abolished by inhibition of Gαi protein or p38 MAPK. These results show that 12-HHT/BLT2 enhances epithelial barrier function by increasing CLDN4 expression via the Gαi protein-p38 MAPK pathway.

  6. West Nile virus infection modulates human brain microvascular endothelial cells tight junction proteins and cell adhesion molecules: Transmigration across the in vitro blood-brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Saguna; Lo, Yeung; Chapagain, Moti; Lum, Stephanie; Kumar, Mukesh; Gurjav, Ulziijargal; Luo, Haiyan; Nakatsuka, Austin; Nerurkar, Vivek R.

    2009-01-01

    Neurological complications such as inflammation, failure of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and neuronal death contribute to the mortality and morbidity associated with WNV-induced meningitis. Compromised BBB indicates the ability of the virus to gain entry into the CNS via the BBB, however, the underlying mechanisms, and the specific cell types associated with WNV-CNS trafficking are not well understood. Brain microvascular endothelial cells, main component of the BBB, represent a barrier to virus dissemination into the CNS and could play key role in WNV spread via hematogenous route. To investigate WNV entry into the CNS, we infected primary human brain microvascular endothelial (HBMVE) cells with the neurovirulent strain of WNV (NY99) and examined WNV replication kinetics together with the changes in the expressions of key tight junction proteins (TJP) and cell adhesion molecules (CAM). WNV infection of HBMVE cells was productive as analyzed by plaque assay and qRT-PCR, and did not induce cytopathic effect. Increased mRNA and protein expressions of TJP (claudin-1) and CAM (vascular cell adhesion molecule and E-selectin) were observed at days 2 and 3 after infection, respectively, which coincided with the peak in WNV replication. Further, using an in vitro BBB model comprised of HBMVE cells, we demonstrate that cell-free WNV can cross the BBB, without compromising the BBB integrity. These data suggest that infection of HBMVE cells can facilitate entry of cell-free virus into the CNS without disturbing the BBB, and increased CAM may assist in the trafficking of WNV-infected immune cells into the CNS, via ‘Trojan horse’ mechanism, thereby contributing to WNV dissemination in the CNS and associated pathology. PMID:19135695

  7. Matrix metalloproteinase-mediated disruption of tight junction proteins in cerebral vessels is reversed by synthetic matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor in focal ischemia in rat.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Estrada, Eduardo Y; Thompson, Jeffrey F; Liu, Wenlan; Rosenberg, Gary A

    2007-04-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) disrupt the blood-brain barrier (BBB) during reperfusion. Occludin and claudins are recently described tight junction proteins (TJPs) that form the BBB. We hypothesized that the opening of the BBB was because of the degradation of TJPs by the MMPs. Spontaneously hypertensive rats had a 90 mins middle cerebral artery occlusion with reperfusion for 2, 3, or 24 h. Matrix metalloproteinases were measured by immunohistochemistry and in situ and gel zymography. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) measured mRNAs of MMP-2 and -9, furin, membrane-type MMP (MT1-MMP), occludin, and claudin-5. There was opening of the BBB in the piriform cortex after 3 h of reperfusion, and an MMP inhibitor, BB-1101 (30 mg/kg), prevented the opening. At 3 h, in situ zymograms showed gelatinase activity. Zymography and PCR showed greater increases in MMP-2 than in MMP-9. There were increased mRNA and immunohistochemistry for MT1-MMP and furin, which activate MMP-2. Claudin-5 and occludin mRNA expression decreased at 2 h in both hemispheres with fragments of both proteins seen on Western blot by 3 h on the ischemic side; treatment with BB-1101 reversed the degradation of the TJPs. Immunohistochemistry at 3 h showed fragmented TJPs within the endothelial cell clefts. By 24 h, in situ zymography showed gelatinase activity and gel zymography showed elevated levels of MMP-9. Disrupted TJPs previously seen in endothelial cells appeared in the surrounding astrocytes. Our results provide direct evidence that MMPs open the BBB by degrading TJPs and that an MMP inhibitor prevents degradation of the TJPs by MMPs.

  8. Moderate Hypoxia Followed by Reoxygenation Results in Blood-Brain Barrier Breakdown via Oxidative Stress-Dependent Tight-Junction Protein Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Zehendner, Christoph M.; Librizzi, Laura; Hedrich, Jana; Bauer, Nina M.; Angamo, Eskedar A.; de Curtis, Marco; Luhmann, Heiko J.

    2013-01-01

    Re-canalization of cerebral vessels in ischemic stroke is pivotal to rescue dysfunctional brain areas that are exposed to moderate hypoxia within the penumbra from irreversible cell death. Goal of the present study was to evaluate the effect of moderate hypoxia followed by reoxygenation (MHR) on the evolution of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity in brain endothelial cells (BEC). BBB integrity was assessed in BEC in vitro and in microvessels of the guinea pig whole brain in situ preparation. Probes were exposed to MHR (2 hours 67-70 mmHg O2, 3 hours reoxygenation, BEC) or towards occlusion of the arteria cerebri media (MCAO) with or without subsequent reperfusion in the whole brain preparation. In vitro BBB integrity was evaluated using trans-endothelial electrical resistance (TEER) and transwell permeability assays. ROS in BEC were evaluated using 2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCF), MitoSox and immunostaining for nitrotyrosine. Tight-junction protein (TJ) integrity in BEC, stainings for nitrotyrosine and FITC-albumin extravasation in the guinea pig brain preparation were assessed by confocal microscopy. Diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) was used to investigate NADPH oxidase dependent ROS evolution and its effect on BBB parameters in BEC. MHR impaired TJ proteins zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1) and claudin 5 (Cl5), decreased TEER, and significantly increased cytosolic ROS in BEC. These events were blocked by the NADPH oxidase inhibitor DPI. MCAO with or without subsequent reoxygenation resulted in extravasation of FITC-albumin and ROS generation in the penumbra region of the guinea pig brain preparation and confirmed BBB damage. BEC integrity may be impaired through ROS in MHR on the level of TJ and the BBB is also functionally impaired in moderate hypoxic conditions followed by reperfusion in a complex guinea pig brain preparation. These findings suggest that the BBB is susceptible towards MHR and that ROS play a key role in

  9. Reduction of brain barrier tight junctional proteins by lead exposure: role of activation of nonreceptor tyrosine kinase Src via chaperon GRP78.

    PubMed

    Song, Han; Zheng, Gang; Shen, Xue-Feng; Liu, Xin-Qin; Luo, Wen-Jing; Chen, Jing-Yuan

    2014-04-01

    Lead (Pb) has long been recognized as a neurodevelopmental toxin. Developing blood-brain barrier (BBB) is known to be a target of Pb neurotoxicity; however, the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Recent evidence suggests that intracellular nonreceptor protein tyrosine kinase Src regulates tight junctional proteins (TJPs). This study was designed to investigate whether Pb acted on the Src-mediated cascade event leading to an altered TJP expression at BBB. Rats aged 20-22 days were exposed to Pb in drinking water (0, 100, 200, and 300 ppm Pb) for eight weeks. Electron microscopic and Western blot analyses revealed a severe leakage of BBB and significantly decreased expressions of TJP occludin and ZO-1. When cultured brain endothelial RBE4 cells were exposed to 10μM Pb for 24 h, expressions of phosphor-Src and an upstream regulator GRP78 were significantly increased by 6.42-fold and 8.29-fold (p < 0.01), respectively. Inactivation of Src pathway by a Src-specific inhibitor reversed Pb-induced downregulation of occludin, but not ZO-1; small interfering RNA knockdown of GRP78 attenuated Pb-induced Src phosphorylation and occludin reduction. Furthermore, Pb exposure caused redistribution of GRP78 from endoplasmic reticulum to cytosol and toward cell member. However, the data from immunoneutralization studies did not show the involvement of cell-surface GRP78 in regulating Src phosphorylation upon Pb exposure, suggesting that the cytosolic GRP78, rather than cell-surface GRP78, was responsible to Pb-induced Src activation and ensuing occludin reduction. Taken together, this study provides the evidence of a novel linkage of GRP78, Src activation to downregulation of occludin, and BBB disruption during Pb exposure.

  10. Arsenic downregulates tight junction claudin proteins through p38 and NF-κB in intestinal epithelial cell line, HT-29.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Chang Hee; Seok, Jin Sil; Petriello, Michael C; Han, Sung Gu

    2017-03-15

    Arsenic is a naturally occurring metalloid that often is found in foods and drinking water. Human exposure to arsenic is associated with the development of gastrointestinal problems such as fluid loss, diarrhea and gastritis. Arsenic is also known to induce toxic responses including oxidative stress in cells of the gastrointestinal track. Tight junctions (TJs) regulate paracellular permeability and play a barrier role by inhibiting the movement of water, solutes and microorganisms in the paracellular space. Since oxidative stress and TJ damage are known to be associated, we examined whether arsenic produces TJ damage such as downregulation of claudins in the human colorectal cell line, HT-29. To confirm the importance of oxidative stress in arsenic-induced TJ damage, effects of the antioxidant compound (e.g., N-acetylcysteine (NAC)) were also determined in cells. HT-29 cells were treated with arsenic trioxide (40μM, 12h) to observe the modified expression of TJ proteins. Arsenic decreased expression of TJ proteins (i.e., claudin-1 and claudin-5) and transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) whereas pretreatment of NAC (5-10mM, 1h) attenuated the observed claudins downregulation and TEER. Arsenic treatment produced cellular oxidative stress via superoxide generation and lowering glutathione (GSH) levels, while NAC restored cellular GSH levels and decreased oxidative stress. Arsenic increased phosphorylation of p38 and nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) p65, while NAC attenuated these intracellular events. Results demonstrated that arsenic can damage intestinal epithelial cells by proinflammatory process (oxidative stress, p38 and NF-κB) which resulted in the downregulation of claudins and NAC can protect intestinal TJs from arsenic toxicity.

  11. Low Level Pro-inflammatory Cytokines Decrease Connexin36 Gap Junction Coupling in Mouse and Human Islets through Nitric Oxide-mediated Protein Kinase Cδ*

    PubMed Central

    Farnsworth, Nikki L.; Walter, Rachelle L.; Hemmati, Alireza; Westacott, Matthew J.; Benninger, Richard K. P.

    2016-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines contribute to the decline in islet function during the development of diabetes. Cytokines can disrupt insulin secretion and calcium dynamics; however, the mechanisms underlying this are poorly understood. Connexin36 gap junctions coordinate glucose-induced calcium oscillations and pulsatile insulin secretion across the islet. Loss of gap junction coupling disrupts these dynamics, similar to that observed during the development of diabetes. This study investigates the mechanisms by which pro-inflammatory cytokines mediate gap junction coupling. Specifically, as cytokine-induced NO can activate PKCδ, we aimed to understand the role of PKCδ in modulating cytokine-induced changes in gap junction coupling. Isolated mouse and human islets were treated with varying levels of a cytokine mixture containing TNF-α, IL-1β, and IFN-γ. Islet dysfunction was measured by insulin secretion, calcium dynamics, and gap junction coupling. Modulators of PKCδ and NO were applied to determine their respective roles in modulating gap junction coupling. High levels of cytokines caused cell death and decreased insulin secretion. Low levels of cytokine treatment disrupted calcium dynamics and decreased gap junction coupling, in the absence of disruptions to insulin secretion. Decreases in gap junction coupling were dependent on NO-regulated PKCδ, and altered membrane organization of connexin36. This study defines several mechanisms underlying the disruption to gap junction coupling under conditions associated with the development of diabetes. These mechanisms will allow for greater understanding of islet dysfunction and suggest ways to ameliorate this dysfunction during the development of diabetes. PMID:26668311

  12. DIFFERENTIATION OF THE JUNCTIONAL COMPLEX OF SURFACE CELLS IN THE DEVELOPING FUNDULUS BLASTODERM

    PubMed Central

    Lentz, Thomas L.; Trinkaus, J. P.

    1971-01-01

    The structure of the junctional complex between surface cells was investigated in blastula, mid gastrula, late gastrula, and early embryo of the teleost fish Fundulus heteroclitus. In blastulae, the intercellular complex is simple and consists of an apical region where the adjacent membranes are closely apposed (40–60 A) and in places touch, an intermediate zone with a wider intercellular space (> 100 A), and incipient desmosomes. In gastrulae, there are frequent points of fusion of membranes along the apical zone of the complex. Dilatations and an increased number of desmosomes in different stages of development are found along the intermediate zone. In mid gastrula, a close or gap junction with an intercellular space of 20 A occurs below the level of the desmosomes. In late gastrula, the gap junction is reduced in extent and desmosomes are better developed. In the early embryo, the basic organization of the complex is the same, although the deeply situated close junctions are no longer apparent and desmosomes and their associated system of filaments are well developed. At this time, the junctional complex is comparable to that of many epithelia and consists of an apical zonula occludens, a short zonula adherens, and deeply situated maculae adherentes. PMID:5545331

  13. Current trends in salivary gland tight junctions

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Olga J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tight junctions form a continuous intercellular barrier between epithelial cells that is required to separate tissue spaces and regulate selective movement of solutes across the epithelium. They are composed of strands containing integral membrane proteins (e.g., claudins, occludin and tricellulin, junctional adhesion molecules and the coxsackie adenovirus receptor). These proteins are anchored to the cytoskeleton via scaffolding proteins such as ZO-1 and ZO-2. In salivary glands, tight junctions are involved in polarized saliva secretion and barrier maintenance between the extracellular environment and the glandular lumen. This review seeks to provide an overview of what is currently known, as well as the major questions and future research directions, regarding tight junction expression, organization and function within salivary glands. PMID:27583188

  14. Diversity of desmosomal proteins in regenerating epidermis: immunohistochemical study using a human skin organ culture model.

    PubMed

    Moll, I; Houdek, P; Schäfer, S; Nuber, U; Moll, R

    1999-01-01

    We recently established a skin organ culture model for epithelial healing by creating a central defect in freshly excised human skin specimens and keeping them in culture for up to 7 days, either untreated or with transplantation of allogenic or autologous keratinocytes. In this study the molecular diversity of cell-cell junction proteins in the regenerating epidermis was analysed immunohistochemically using a broad spectrum of monoclonal antibodies against glycoproteins (cadherins) and plaque proteins of desmosomes. At all stages studied the entire set of desmosomal cadherins [desmogleins (Dsg) 1-3 and desmocollins (Dsc) 1-3] was detected, with Dsg3, Dsc2 and Dsc3 being the most prominent. In the disordered neoepithelium at day 3 (after transplantation) some desmosomal cadherins appeared in their respective stratum compartments. In regenerating epidermis on day 7, which exhibited a more ordered stratification and a compact horny layer, stratification-related patterns of desmosomal cadherins were more pronounced. However, some immaturity of the day-7 neoepidermis was reflected by relatively low levels of the maturation-associated Dsgl and Dsc1 and a strong basal layer expression of Dsg2 which is sparse in normal epidermis. Desmosomal plaque proteins showed expression patterns similar to those in normal healthy epidermis. The adherens junction-related E-cadherin was also detected. Dendritic cells (melanocytes, Langerhans cells) were mainly present at the wound margins. In conclusion, this study demonstrated partial but not complete epidermal maturation and junction development during regeneration up to day 7. This model should also be useful in future studies to evaluate the effects of growth hormones to be used in therapeutic trials on chronic leg ulcers.

  15. Gap junction- and hemichannel-independent actions of connexins

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jean X.; Gu, Sumin

    2007-01-01

    Connexins have been known to be the protein building blocks of gap junctions and mediate cell–cell communication. In contrast to the conventional dogma, recent evidence suggests that in addition to forming gap junction channels, connexins possess gap junction-independent functions. One important gap junction-independent function for connexins is to serve as the major functional component for hemichannels, the un-apposed halves of gap junctions. Hemichannels, as independent functional units, play roles that are different from that of gap junctions in the cell. The other functions of connexins appear to be gap junction- and hemichannel-independent. Published studies implicate the latter functions of connexins in cell growth, differentiation, tumorigenicity, injury, and apoptosis, although the mechanistic aspects of these actions remain largely unknown. In this review, gap junction- and hemichannel-independent functions of connexins are summarized, and the molecular mechanisms underlying these connexin functions are speculated and discussed. PMID:15955305

  16. Wideband rotating junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pochernyaev, V. N.

    1993-06-01

    Rotating junctions of coaxial-waveguide and waveguide type with a traveling wave coefficient exceeding 0.8 in a wide frequency range are considered. The design of these junctions is based on a method of the theory of electrodynamic circuits. Numerical results are obtained for rotating junctions of partially filled rectangular waveguide type and their particular cases.

  17. Modulation of cytoskeletal dynamics by mammalian nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDPK) proteins.

    PubMed

    Snider, Natasha T; Altshuler, Peter J; Omary, M Bishr

    2015-02-01

    Nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDPK) proteins comprise a family of ten human isoforms that participate in the regulation of multiple cellular processes via enzymatic and nonenzymatic functions. The major enzymatic function of NDPKs is the generation of nucleoside triphosphates, such as guanosine triphosphate (GTP). Mechanisms behind the nonenzymatic NDPK functions are not clear but likely involve context-dependent signaling roles of NDPK within multi-protein complexes. This is most evident for NDPK-A, which is encoded by the human NME1 gene, the first tumor metastasis suppressor gene to be identified. Understanding which protein interactions are most relevant for the biological and metastasis-related functions of NDPK will be important in the potential utilization of NDPK as a disease target. Accumulating evidence suggests that NDPK interacts with and affects various components and regulators of the cytoskeleton, including actin-binding proteins, intermediate filaments, and cytoskeletal attachment structures (adherens junctions, desmosomes, and focal adhesions). We review the existing literature on this topic and highlight outstanding questions and potential future directions that should clarify the impact of NDPK on the different cytoskeletal systems.

  18. Baicalin Protects against TNF-α-Induced Injury by Down-Regulating miR-191a That Targets the Tight Junction Protein ZO-1 in IEC-6 Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Zhang, Ren; Chen, Jian; Wu, Qihui; Kuang, Zaoyuan

    2017-04-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) plays an important role in the developing process of inflammatory bowel disease. Tight junction protein zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), one of epithelial junctional proteins, maintains the permeability of intestinal barrier. The objective of this study was to investigate the mechanism of the protective effect of baicalin on TNF-α-induced injury and ZO-1 expression in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). We found that baicalin pretreatment significantly improved cell viability and cell migration following TNF-α stimulation. miR-191a inhibitor increased the protective effect of baicalin on cell motility injured by TNF-α. In addition, miR-191a down-regulated the mRNA and protein level of its target gene ZO-1. TNF-α stimulation increased miR-191a expression, leading to the decline of ZO-1 mRNA and protein. Moreover, pretreatment with baicalin reversed TNF-α induced decrease of ZO-1 and increase of miR-191a, miR-191a inhibitor significantly enhanced ZO-1 protein expression restored by baicalin. These results indicate that baicalin exerts a protective effect on IEC-6 (rat small intestinal epithelial cells) cells against TNF-α-induced injury, which is at least partly via inhibiting the expression of miR-191a, thus increasing ZO-1 mRNA and protein levels.

  19. ATP Induces Disruption of Tight Junction Proteins via IL-1 Beta-Dependent MMP-9 Activation of Human Blood-Brain Barrier In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fuxing; Zhao, Kai; Zhang, Xiufeng; Zhang, Jun; Xu, Bainan

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB) follows brain trauma or central nervous system (CNS) stress. However, the mechanisms leading to this process or the underlying neural plasticity are not clearly known. We hypothesized that ATP/P2X7R signaling regulates the integrity of BBB. Activation of P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) by ATP induces the release of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), which in turn enhances the activity of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). Degradation of tight junction proteins (TJPs) such as ZO-1 and occludin occurs, which finally contributes to disruption of BBB. A contact coculture system using human astrocytes and hCMEC/D3, an immortalized human brain endothelial cell line, was used to mimic BBB in vitro. Permeability was used to evaluate changes in the integrity of TJPs. ELISA, Western blot, and immunofluorescent staining procedures were used. Our data demonstrated that exposure to the photoreactive ATP analog, 3'-O-(4-benzoyl)benzoyl adenosine 5'-triphosphate (BzATP), induced a significant decrease in ZO-1 and occludin expression. Meanwhile, the decrease of ZO-1 and occludin was significantly attenuated by P2X7R inhibitors, as well as IL-1R and MMP antagonists. Further, the induction of IL-1β and MMP-9 was closely linked to ATP/P2X7R-associated BBB leakage. In conclusion, our study explored the mechanism of ATP/P2X7R signaling in the disruption of BBB following brain trauma/stress injury, especially focusing on the relationship with IL-1β and MMP-9.

  20. Polychlorinated biphenyls impair blood-brain barrier integrity via disruption of tight junction proteins in cerebrum, cerebellum and hippocampus of female Wistar rats: neuropotential role of quercetin.

    PubMed

    Selvakumar, K; Prabha, R Lakshmi; Saranya, K; Bavithra, S; Krishnamoorthy, G; Arunakaran, J

    2013-07-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) comprise a ubiquitous class of toxic substances associated with carcinogenic and tumor-promoting effects as well as neurotoxic properties. Reactive oxygen species, which is produced from PCBs, alters blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity, which is paralleled by cytoskeletal rearrangements and redistribution and disappearance of tight junction proteins (TJPs) like claudin-5 and occludin. Quercetin, a potent antioxidant present in onion and other vegetables, appears to protect brain cells against oxidative stress, a tissue-damaging process associated with Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative disorders. The aim of this study is to analyze the role of quercetin on oxidative stress markers and transcription of transmembrane and cytoplasmic accessory TJPs on cerebrum, cerebellum and hippocampus of female rats exposed to PCBs. Rats were divided into the following four groups. Group I: received only vehicle (corn oil) intraperitoneally (i.p.); group II: received Aroclor 1254 at a dose of 2 mg/kg body weight (bwt)/day (i.p); group III: received Aroclor 1254 (i.p.) and simultaneously quercetin 50 mg/kg bwt/day through gavage and group IV: received quercetin alone gavage. From the experiment, the levels of hydrogen peroxide, lipid peroxidation and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances were observed to increase significantly in cerebrum, cerebellum and hippocampus as 50%, 25% and 20%, respectively, after exposure to PCB, and the messenger RNA expression of TJP in rats exposed to PCBs is decreased and is retrieved to the normal level simultaneously in quercetin-treated rats. Hence, quercetin can be used as a preventive medicine to PCBs exposure and prevents neurodegenerative disorders.

  1. Hyperbaric oxygen preconditioning ameliorates blood-brain barrier damage induced by hypoxia through modulation of tight junction proteins in an in vitro model

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Lei; Guo, Xiuming; Zou, Can; Zhou, Huchuan; Tian, Hong; Zhang, Yubo; Song, Chuan; Liu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Aim To explore the effects of hyperbaric oxygen preconditioning (HBOP) on the permeability of blood-brain barrier (BBB) and expression of tight junction proteins under hypoxic conditions in vitro. Methods A BBB in vitro model was constructed using the hCMEC/D3 cell line and used when its trans-endothelial electrical resistance (TEER) reached 80-120 Ω · cm2 (tested by Millicell-Electrical Resistance System). The cells were randomly divided into the control group cultured under normal conditions, the group cultured under hypoxic conditions (2%O2) for 24 h (hypoxia group), and the group first subjected to HBOP for 2 h and then to hypoxia (HBOP group). Occludin and ZO-1 expression were analyzed by immunofluorescence assay. Results Normal hCMEC/D3 was spindle-shaped and tightly integrated. TEER was significantly reduced in the hypoxia (P = 0.001) and HBOP group (P = 0.014) compared to control group, with a greater decrease in the hypoxia group. Occludin membranous expression was significantly decreased in the hypoxia group (P = 0.001) compared to the control group, but there was no change in the HBOP group. ZO-1 membranous expression was significantly decreased (P = 0.002) and cytoplasmic expression was significantly increased (P = 0.001) in the hypoxia group compared to the control group, although overall expression levels did not change. In the HBOP group, there was no significant change in ZO-1 expression compared to the control group. Conclusion Hyperbaric oxygen preconditioning protected the integrity of BBB in an in vitro model through modulation of occludin and ZO-1 expression under hypoxic conditions. PMID:26935614

  2. ATP Induces Disruption of Tight Junction Proteins via IL-1 Beta-Dependent MMP-9 Activation of Human Blood-Brain Barrier In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB) follows brain trauma or central nervous system (CNS) stress. However, the mechanisms leading to this process or the underlying neural plasticity are not clearly known. We hypothesized that ATP/P2X7R signaling regulates the integrity of BBB. Activation of P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) by ATP induces the release of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), which in turn enhances the activity of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). Degradation of tight junction proteins (TJPs) such as ZO-1 and occludin occurs, which finally contributes to disruption of BBB. A contact coculture system using human astrocytes and hCMEC/D3, an immortalized human brain endothelial cell line, was used to mimic BBB in vitro. Permeability was used to evaluate changes in the integrity of TJPs. ELISA, Western blot, and immunofluorescent staining procedures were used. Our data demonstrated that exposure to the photoreactive ATP analog, 3′-O-(4-benzoyl)benzoyl adenosine 5′-triphosphate (BzATP), induced a significant decrease in ZO-1 and occludin expression. Meanwhile, the decrease of ZO-1 and occludin was significantly attenuated by P2X7R inhibitors, as well as IL-1R and MMP antagonists. Further, the induction of IL-1β and MMP-9 was closely linked to ATP/P2X7R-associated BBB leakage. In conclusion, our study explored the mechanism of ATP/P2X7R signaling in the disruption of BBB following brain trauma/stress injury, especially focusing on the relationship with IL-1β and MMP-9. PMID:27795859

  3. H19 Long Noncoding RNA Regulates Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Function via MicroRNA 675 by Interacting with RNA-Binding Protein HuR

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Tongtong; Jaladanki, Suraj K.; Liu, Lan; Xiao, Lan; Chung, Hee Kyoung; Wang, Jun-Yao; Xu, Yan; Gorospe, Myriam

    2016-01-01

    The disruption of the intestinal epithelial barrier function occurs commonly in various pathologies, but the exact mechanisms responsible are unclear. The H19 long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) regulates the expression of different genes and has been implicated in human genetic disorders and cancer. Here, we report that H19 plays an important role in controlling the intestinal epithelial barrier function by serving as a precursor for microRNA 675 (miR-675). H19 overexpression increased the cellular abundance of miR-675, which in turn destabilized and repressed the translation of mRNAs encoding tight junction protein ZO-1 and adherens junction E-cadherin, resulting in the dysfunction of the epithelial barrier. Increasing the level of the RNA-binding protein HuR in cells overexpressing H19 prevented the stimulation of miR-675 processing from H19, promoted ZO-1 and E-cadherin expression, and restored the epithelial barrier function to a nearly normal level. In contrast, the targeted deletion of HuR in intestinal epithelial cells enhanced miR-675 production in the mucosa and delayed the recovery of the gut barrier function after exposure to mesenteric ischemia/reperfusion. These results indicate that H19 interacts with HuR and regulates the intestinal epithelial barrier function via the H19-encoded miR-675 by altering ZO-1 and E-cadherin expression posttranscriptionally. PMID:26884465

  4. ANKS1B Interacts with the Cerebral Cavernous Malformation Protein-1 and Controls Endothelial Permeability but Not Sprouting Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Moll, Iris; Yang, Wan-Jen; Wüstehube-Lausch, Joycelyn; Fischer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations are fragile blood vessel conglomerates in the central nervous system that are caused by mutations in the CCM1/KRIT1, CCM2 or CCM3 genes. The gene products form a protein complex at adherens junctions and loss of either CCM protein disrupts endothelial cell quiescence leadin