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Sample records for adherent cancer cells

  1. Single cell dual adherent-suspension co-culture micro-environment for studying tumor-stromal interactions with functionally selected cancer stem-like cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Chih; Zhang, Zhixiong; Fouladdel, Shamileh; Deol, Yadwinder; Ingram, Patrick N; McDermott, Sean P; Azizi, Ebrahim; Wicha, Max S; Yoon, Euisik

    2016-08-01

    Considerable evidence suggests that cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are critical in tumor pathogenesis, but their rarity and transience has led to much controversy about their exact nature. Although CSCs can be functionally identified using dish-based tumorsphere assays, it is difficult to handle and monitor single cells in dish-based approaches; single cell-based microfluidic approaches offer better control and reliable single cell derived sphere formation. However, like normal stem cells, CSCs are heavily regulated by their microenvironment, requiring tumor-stromal interactions for tumorigenic and proliferative behaviors. To enable single cell derived tumorsphere formation within a stromal microenvironment, we present a dual adherent/suspension co-culture device, which combines a suspension environment for single-cell tumorsphere assays and an adherent environment for co-culturing stromal cells in close proximity by selectively patterning polyHEMA in indented microwells. By minimizing dead volume and improving cell capture efficiency, the presented platform allows for the use of small numbers of cells (<100 cells). As a proof of concept, we co-cultured single T47D (breast cancer) cells and primary cancer associated fibroblasts (CAF) on-chip for 14 days to monitor sphere formation and growth. Compared to mono-culture, co-cultured T47D have higher tumorigenic potential (sphere formation rate) and proliferation rates (larger sphere size). Furthermore, 96-multiplexed single-cell transcriptome analyses were performed to compare the gene expression of co-cultured and mono-cultured T47D cells. Phenotypic changes observed in co-culture correlated with expression changes in genes associated with proliferation, apoptotic suppression, tumorigenicity and even epithelial-to-mesechymal transition. Combining the presented platform with single cell transcriptome analysis, we successfully identified functional CSCs and investigated the phenotypic and transcriptome effects induced

  2. Adherence to Survivorship Care Guidelines in Health Care Providers for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer and Colorectal Cancer Survivor Care

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage I Colon Cancer; Stage I Rectal Cancer; Stage IA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  3. Physics of adherent cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Ulrich S.; Safran, Samuel A.

    2013-07-01

    One of the most unique physical features of cell adhesion to external surfaces is the active generation of mechanical force at the cell-material interface. This includes pulling forces generated by contractile polymer bundles and networks, and pushing forces generated by the polymerization of polymer networks. These forces are transmitted to the substrate mainly by focal adhesions, which are large, yet highly dynamic adhesion clusters. Tissue cells use these forces to sense the physical properties of their environment and to communicate with each other. The effect of forces is intricately linked to the material properties of cells and their physical environment. Here a review is given of recent progress in our understanding of the role of forces in cell adhesion from the viewpoint of theoretical soft matter physics and in close relation to the relevant experiments.

  4. Robotic adherent cell injection for characterizing cell-cell communication.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Siragam, Vinayakumar; Gong, Zheng; Chen, Jun; Fridman, Michael D; Leung, Clement; Lu, Zhe; Ru, Changhai; Xie, Shaorong; Luo, Jun; Hamilton, Robert M; Sun, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Compared to robotic injection of suspended cells (e.g., embryos and oocytes), fewer attempts were made to automate the injection of adherent cells (e.g., cancer cells and cardiomyocytes) due to their smaller size, highly irregular morphology, small thickness (a few micrometers thick), and large variations in thickness across cells. This paper presents a robotic system for automated microinjection of adherent cells. The system is embedded with several new capabilities: automatically locating micropipette tips; robustly detecting the contact of micropipette tip with cell culturing surface and directly with cell membrane; and precisely compensating for accumulative positioning errors. These new capabilities make it practical to perform adherent cell microinjection truly via computer mouse clicking in front of a computer monitor, on hundreds and thousands of cells per experiment (versus a few to tens of cells as state of the art). System operation speed, success rate, and cell viability rate were quantitatively evaluated based on robotic microinjection of over 4000 cells. This paper also reports the use of the new robotic system to perform cell-cell communication studies using large sample sizes. The gap junction function in a cardiac muscle cell line (HL-1 cells), for the first time, was quantified with the system. PMID:25073160

  5. Hyaluronic Acid-Based Hydrogels as 3D Matrices for in Vitro Evaluation of Chemotherapeutic Drugs Using Poorly Adherent Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gurski, Lisa A.; Jha, Amit K.; Zhang, Chu; Jia, Xinqiao; Farach-Carson, Mary C.

    2009-01-01

    The current investigation aimed to develop a biomimetic, three-dimensional (3D) culture system for poorly adherent bone metastatic prostate cancer cells (C4-2B) for use as an in vitro platform for anti-cancer drug screening. To this end, hyaluronic acid (HA) derivatives carrying complementary aldehyde (HAALD) and hydrazide (HAADH) groups were synthesized and characterized. In situ encapsulation of C4-2B cells was achieved by simple mixing of HAALD and HAADH in the presence of the cells. Unlike two-dimensional (2D) monolayer culture in which cells adopt an atypical spread morphology, cells residing in the HA matrix formed distinct clustered structures which grew and merged, reminiscent of real tumors. Anti-cancer drugs added to the media surrounding the cell/gel construct diffused into the gel and killed the embedded cells. The HA hydrogel system was used successfully to test the efficacy of anti-cancer drugs including camptothecin, docetaxel, and rapamycin, alone and in combination, including specificity, dose and time responses. Responses of cells to anti-neoplastics differed between the 3D HA hydrogel and 2D monolayer systems. We suggest that the data obtained from 3D HA systems is superior to that from conventional 2D monolayers as the 3D system better reflects the bone metastatic microenvironment of the cancer cells. PMID:19695694

  6. Adherence to cancer prevention guidelines and risk of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Catsburg, Chelsea; Miller, Anthony B; Rohan, Thomas E

    2014-11-15

    Healthy eating patterns and keeping physically active are potentially more important for chronic disease prevention than intake or exclusion of specific food items or nutrients. To this end, many health organizations routinely publish dietary and lifestyle recommendations aimed at preventing chronic disease. Using data from the Canadian National Breast Screening Study, we investigated the association between breast cancer risk and adherence to two sets of guidelines specific for cancer prevention, namely the American Cancer Society (ACS) Guidelines and the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) Recommendations. At baseline, 49,613 women completed dietary and lifestyle questionnaires and height and weight measurements were taken. During a mean follow-up of 16.6 years, 2,503 incident cases of breast cancer were ascertained. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association of meeting each guideline, and number of guidelines met, with breast cancer risk. The two sets of guidelines yielded similar results. Specifically, adherence to all six ACS guidelines was associated with a 31% reduction in breast cancer risk when compared to subjects adhering to at most one guideline (HR=0.69; 95% CI=0.49-0.97); similarly, adherence to six or seven of the WCRF/AICR guidelines was also associated with a 31% reduction in breast cancer risk (HR=0.69; 95% CI=0.47-1.00). Under either classification, meeting each additional guideline was associated with a 4-6% reduction in breast cancer risk. These results suggest that adherence to cancer prevention guidelines is associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer. PMID:24723234

  7. Serum Proteins Enhance Dispersion Stability and Influence the Cytotoxicity and Dosimetry of ZnO Nanoparticles in Suspension and Adherent Cancer Cell Models.

    PubMed

    Anders, Catherine B; Chess, Jordan J; Wingett, Denise G; Punnoose, Alex

    2015-12-01

    Agglomeration and sedimentation of nanoparticles (NPs) within biological solutions is a major limitation in their use in many downstream applications. It has been proposed that serum proteins associate with the NP surface to form a protein corona that limits agglomeration and sedimentation. Here, we investigate the effect of fetal bovine serum (FBS) proteins on the dispersion stability, dosimetry, and NP-induced cytotoxicity of cationic zinc oxide nanoparticles (nZnO) synthesized via forced hydrolysis with a core size of 10 nm. Two different in vitro cell culture models, suspension and adherent, were evaluated by comparing a phosphate buffered saline (PBS) nZnO dispersion (nZnO/PBS) and an FBS-stabilized PBS nZnO dispersion (nZnO - FBS/PBS). Surface interactions of FBS on nZnO were analyzed via spectroscopic and optical techniques. Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) confirmed the adsorption of negatively charged protein components on the cationic nZnO surface through the disappearance of surfaced-adsorbed carboxyl functional groups and the subsequent detection of vibrational modes associated with the protein backbone of FBS-associated proteins. Further confirmation of these interactions was noted in the isoelectric point shift of the nZnO from the characteristic pH of 9.5 to a pH of 6.1. In nZnO - FBS/PBS dispersions, the FBS reduced agglomeration and sedimentation behaviors to impart long-term improvements (>24 h) to the nZnO dispersion stability. Furthermore, mathematical dosimetry models indicate that nZnO - FBS/PBS dispersions had consistent NP deposition patterns over time unlike unstable nZnO/PBS dispersions. In suspension cell models, the stable nZnO - FBS/PBS dispersion resulted in a ~33 % increase in the NP-induced cytotoxicity for both Jurkat leukemic and Hut-78 lymphoma cancer cells. In contrast, the nZnO - FBS/PBS dispersion resulted in 49 and 71 % reductions in the cytotoxicity observed towards the adherent breast (T-47D) and prostate

  8. Serum Proteins Enhance Dispersion Stability and Influence the Cytotoxicity and Dosimetry of ZnO Nanoparticles in Suspension and Adherent Cancer Cell Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anders, Catherine B.; Chess, Jordan J.; Wingett, Denise G.; Punnoose, Alex

    2015-11-01

    Agglomeration and sedimentation of nanoparticles (NPs) within biological solutions is a major limitation in their use in many downstream applications. It has been proposed that serum proteins associate with the NP surface to form a protein corona that limits agglomeration and sedimentation. Here, we investigate the effect of fetal bovine serum (FBS) proteins on the dispersion stability, dosimetry, and NP-induced cytotoxicity of cationic zinc oxide nanoparticles (nZnO) synthesized via forced hydrolysis with a core size of 10 nm. Two different in vitro cell culture models, suspension and adherent, were evaluated by comparing a phosphate buffered saline (PBS) nZnO dispersion (nZnO/PBS) and an FBS-stabilized PBS nZnO dispersion (nZnO - FBS/PBS). Surface interactions of FBS on nZnO were analyzed via spectroscopic and optical techniques. Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) confirmed the adsorption of negatively charged protein components on the cationic nZnO surface through the disappearance of surfaced-adsorbed carboxyl functional groups and the subsequent detection of vibrational modes associated with the protein backbone of FBS-associated proteins. Further confirmation of these interactions was noted in the isoelectric point shift of the nZnO from the characteristic pH of 9.5 to a pH of 6.1. In nZnO - FBS/PBS dispersions, the FBS reduced agglomeration and sedimentation behaviors to impart long-term improvements (>24 h) to the nZnO dispersion stability. Furthermore, mathematical dosimetry models indicate that nZnO - FBS/PBS dispersions had consistent NP deposition patterns over time unlike unstable nZnO/PBS dispersions. In suspension cell models, the stable nZnO - FBS/PBS dispersion resulted in a ~33 % increase in the NP-induced cytotoxicity for both Jurkat leukemic and Hut-78 lymphoma cancer cells. In contrast, the nZnO - FBS/PBS dispersion resulted in 49 and 71 % reductions in the cytotoxicity observed towards the adherent breast (T-47D) and prostate

  9. Microchamber Device for Detection of Transporter Activity of Adherent Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tsugane, Mamiko; Uejima, Etsuko; Suzuki, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    We present a method to detect the transporter activity of intact adherent cells using a microchamber device. When adherent cells are seeded onto the poly-di-methyl siloxane substrate having microchambers with openings smaller than the size of a cell, the cells form a confluent layer that covers the microchambers, creating minute, confined spaces. As substances exported across the cell membrane accumulate, transporter activity can be detected by observing the fluorescence intensity increase in the microchamber. We tested the microchamber device with HeLa cells over-expressing MDR1, an ATP-binding cassette transporter, and succeeded in detecting the transport of fluorescence-conjugated paclitaxel, the anti-cancer drug, at the single-cell level. PMID:25853126

  10. A Crosstalk Between K ras (Kirsten Rat Sarcoma Viral Oncogene Homologue) and Adherence Molecular Complex Leads to Disassociation of Cells-A Possible Contribution Towards Metastasis in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Murtaza, Bibi Nazia; Doak, Shareen; Morgan, Claire; Nadeem, Muhammad Shahid; Al-Ghanim, Khalid A; Shakoori, Abdul Rauf

    2016-10-01

    Constitutive activation of mutant K ras (Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homologue) and disassembly of E-cadherin-catenin complex (E-cadherin, α-catenin, β-catenin, and γ-catenin) play an important role in apoptosis, differentiation, and cell proliferation. In this study, the expression pattern of K ras and E-cadherin-catenin complex has been evaluated in normal and mutant colorectal cancer cell lines with an object to determine its impact on disassociation of cells from one another. We addressed the expression analysis of K ras with reference to its association with adherence molecules in two colorectal cancer cell lines, that is, Caco-2 (wild type K ras served as a control) and DLD1 (heterozygous mutation at codon 13) at message level by qRT-PCR and translational level by western blotting. Compared to the control Caco-2 cell lines, the K ras in DLD1 cell lines showed slightly higher values while α-catenin showed a slight lower (1.3-folds), β-catenin and E-cadherin showed significantly lower expression (4.2-fold decrease). It can be inferred that a possible cross talk exists between K ras and adherent junction mediated signalling. Mutation at codon 13 (G to D) leads to the overexpression of K ras and reduced expression of adherent junction complex resulting in metastasis. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2340-2345, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26945839

  11. Micromolded Arrays for Separation of Adherent Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuli; Phillips, Colleen; Xu, Wei; Pai, Jeng-Hao; Dhopeshwarkar, Rahul; Sims, Christopher E.; Allbritton, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    We present an efficient, yet inexpensive, approach for isolating viable single cells or colonies from a mixed population. This cell microarray platform possesses innovations in both the array manufacture and the manner of target cell release. Arrays of microwells with bases composed of detachable concave elements, termed microrafts, were fabricated by a dip-coating process using a polydimethylsiloxane mold as the template and the array substrate. This manufacturing approach enabled the use of materials other than photoresists to create the array elements. Thus microrafts possessing low autofluorescence could be fabricated for fluorescence-based identification of cells. Cells plated on the microarray settled and attached at the center of the wells due to the microrafts’ concavity. Individual microrafts were readily dislodged by the action of a needle inserted through the compliant polymer substrate. The hard polymer material (polystyrene or epoxy resin) of which the microrafts were composed protected the cells from damage by the needle. For cell analysis and isolation, cells of interest were identified using a standard inverted microscope and microrafts carrying target cells were dislodged with the needle. The released cells/microrafts could be efficiently collected, cultured and clonally expanded. During the separation and collection procedures, the cells remained adherent and provided a measure of protection during manipulation, thus providing an extremely high single-cell cloning rate (>95%). Generation of a transfected cell line based on expression of a fluorescent protein demonstrated an important application for performing on-chip cell separations. PMID:20838672

  12. Topography Influences Adherent Cell Regulation of Osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, M; Cooper, L F; Ogino, Y; Mendonca, D; Liang, R; Yang, S; Mendonca, G; Uoshima, K

    2016-03-01

    The importance of osteoclast-mediated bone resorption in the process of osseointegration has not been widely considered. In this study, cell culture was used to investigate the hypothesis that the function of implant-adherent bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in osteoclastogenesis is influenced by surface topography. BMSCs isolated from femur and tibia of Sprague-Dawley rats were seeded onto 3 types of titanium surfaces (smooth, micro, and nano) and a control surface (tissue culture plastic) with or without osteogenic supplements. After 3 to 14 d, conditioned medium (CM) was collected. Subsequently, rat bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) were cultured in media supplemented with soluble receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) as well as BMSC CM from each of the 4 surfaces. Gene expression levels of soluble RANKL, osteoprotegerin, tumor necrosis factor α, and M-CSF in cultured BMSCs at different time points were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The number of differentiated osteoclastic cells was determined after tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining. Analysis of variance and t test were used for statistical analysis. The expression of prominent osteoclast-promoting factors tumor necrosis factor α and M-CSF was increased by BMSCs cultured on both micro- and nanoscale titanium topographies (P < 0.01). BMSC CM contained a heat-labile factor that increased BMMs osteoclastogenesis. CM from both micro- and nanoscale surface-adherent BMSCs increased the osteoclast number (P < 0.01). Difference in surface topography altered BMSC phenotype and influenced BMM osteoclastogenesis. Local signaling by implant-adherent cells at the implant-bone interface may indirectly control osteoclastogenesis and bone accrual around endosseous implants. PMID:26553885

  13. Active mechanics and geometry of adherent cells and cell colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Shiladitya

    2014-03-01

    Measurements of traction stresses exerted by adherent cells or cell colonies on elastic substrates have yielded new insight on how the mechanical and geometrical properties of the substrate regulate cellular force distribution, mechanical energy, spreading, morphology or stress ber architecture. We have developed a generic mechanical model of adherent cells as an active contractile gel mechanically coupled to an elastic substrate and to neighboring cells in a tissue. The contractile gel model accurately predicts the distribution of cellular and traction stresses as observed in single cell experiments, and captures the dependence of cell shape, traction stresses and stress ber polarization on the substrate's mechanical and geometrical properties. The model further predicts that the total strain energy of an adherent cell is solely regulated by its spread area, in agreement with recent experiments on micropatterned substrates with controlled geometry. When used to describe the behavior of colonies of adherent epithelial cells, the model demonstrates the crucial role of the mechanical cross-talk between intercellular and extracellular adhesion in regulating traction force distribution. Strong intercellular mechanical coupling organizes traction forces to the colony periphery, whereas weaker intercellular coupling leads to the build up of traction stresses at intercellular junctions. Furthermore, in agreement with experiments on large cohesive keratinocyte colonies, the model predicts a linear scaling of traction forces with the colony size. This scaling suggests the emergence of an effective surface tension as a scale-free material property of the adherent tissue, originating from actomyosin contractility.

  14. Dynamic mechanical measurement of the viscoelasticity of single adherent cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbin, Elise A.; Adeniba, Olaoluwa O.; Ewoldt, Randy H.; Bashir, Rashid

    2016-02-01

    Many recent studies on the viscoelasticity of individual cells link mechanics with cellular function and health. Here, we introduce a measurement of the viscoelastic properties of individual human colon cancer cells (HT-29) using silicon pedestal microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) resonant sensors. We demonstrate that the viscoelastic properties of single adherent cells can be extracted by measuring a difference in vibrational amplitude of our resonant sensor platform. The magnitude of vibration of the pedestal sensor is measured using a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV). A change in amplitude of the sensor, compared with the driving amplitude (amplitude ratio), is influenced by the mechanical properties of the adhered cells. The amplitude ratio of the fixed cells was greater than the live cells, with a p-value <0.0001. By combining the amplitude shift with the resonant frequency shift measure, we determined the elastic modulus and viscosity values of 100 Pa and 0.0031 Pa s, respectively. Our method using the change in amplitude of resonant MEMS devices can enable the determination of a refined solution space and could improve measuring the stiffness of cells.

  15. Broadening cell selection criteria with micropallet arrays of adherent cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuli; Young, Grace; Aoto, Phillip C; Pai, Jeng-Hao; Bachman, Mark; Li, G P; Sims, Christopher E; Allbritton, Nancy L

    2007-10-01

    A host of technologies exists for the separation of living, nonadherent cells, with separation decisions typically based on fluorescence or immunolabeling of cells. Methods to separate adherent cells as well as to broaden the range of possible sorting criteria would be of high value and complementary to existing strategies. Cells were cultured on arrays of releasable pallets. The arrays were screened and individual cell(s)/pallets were released and collected. Conventional fluorescence and immunolabeling of cells were compatible with the pallet arrays, as were separations based on gene expression. By varying the size of the pallet and the number of cells cultured on the array, single cells or clonal colonies of cells were isolated from a heterogeneous population. Since cells remained adherent throughout the isolation process, separations based on morphologic characteristics, for example cell shape, were feasible. Repeated measurements of each cell in an array were performed permitting the selection of cells based on their temporal behavior, e.g. growth rate. The pallet array system provides the flexibility to select and collect adherent cells based on phenotypic and temporal criteria and other characteristics not accessible by alternative methods. PMID:17559133

  16. Program Spending to Increase Adherence: South African Cervical Cancer Screening

    PubMed Central

    Goldhaber-Fiebert, Jeremy D.; Denny, Lynette A.; De Souza, Michelle; Kuhn, Louise; Goldie, Sue J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Adherence is crucial for public health program effectiveness, though the benefits of increasing adherence must ultimately be weighed against the associated costs. We sought to determine the relationship between investment in community health worker (CHW) home visits and increased attendance at cervical cancer screening appointments in Cape Town, South Africa. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted an observational study of 5,258 CHW home visits made in 2003–4 as part of a community-based screening program. We estimated the functional relationship between spending on these visits and increased appointment attendance (adherence). Increased adherence was noted after each subsequent CHW visit. The costs of making the CHW visits was based on resource use including both personnel time and vehicle-related expenses valued in 2004 Rand. The CHW program cost R194,018, with 1,576 additional appointments attended. Adherence increased from 74% to 90%; 55% to 87%; 48% to 77%; and 56% to 80% for 6-, 12-, 24-, and 36-month appointments. Average per-woman costs increased by R14–R47. The majority of this increase occurred with the first 2 CHW visits (90%, 83%, 74%, and 77%; additional cost: R12–R26). Conclusions/Significance We found that study data can be used for program planning, identifying spending levels that achieve adherence targets given budgetary constraints. The results, derived from a single disease program, are retrospective, and should be prospectively replicated. PMID:19492097

  17. Contractile network models for adherent cells.

    PubMed

    Guthardt Torres, P; Bischofs, I B; Schwarz, U S

    2012-01-01

    Cells sense the geometry and stiffness of their adhesive environment by active contractility. For strong adhesion to flat substrates, two-dimensional contractile network models can be used to understand how force is distributed throughout the cell. Here we compare the shape and force distribution for different variants of such network models. In contrast to Hookean networks, cable networks reflect the asymmetric response of biopolymers to tension versus compression. For passive networks, contractility is modeled by a reduced resting length of the mechanical links. In actively contracting networks, a constant force couple is introduced into each link in order to model contraction by molecular motors. If combined with fixed adhesion sites, all network models lead to invaginated cell shapes, but only actively contracting cable networks lead to the circular arc morphology typical for strongly adhering cells. In this case, shape and force distribution are determined by local rather than global determinants and thus are suited to endow the cell with a robust sense of its environment. We also discuss nonlinear and adaptive linker mechanics as well as the relation to tissue shape. PMID:22400597

  18. Contractile network models for adherent cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guthardt Torres, P.; Bischofs, I. B.; Schwarz, U. S.

    2012-01-01

    Cells sense the geometry and stiffness of their adhesive environment by active contractility. For strong adhesion to flat substrates, two-dimensional contractile network models can be used to understand how force is distributed throughout the cell. Here we compare the shape and force distribution for different variants of such network models. In contrast to Hookean networks, cable networks reflect the asymmetric response of biopolymers to tension versus compression. For passive networks, contractility is modeled by a reduced resting length of the mechanical links. In actively contracting networks, a constant force couple is introduced into each link in order to model contraction by molecular motors. If combined with fixed adhesion sites, all network models lead to invaginated cell shapes, but only actively contracting cable networks lead to the circular arc morphology typical for strongly adhering cells. In this case, shape and force distribution are determined by local rather than global determinants and thus are suited to endow the cell with a robust sense of its environment. We also discuss nonlinear and adaptive linker mechanics as well as the relation to tissue shape.

  19. Health Information Seeking and Cancer Screening Adherence Rates.

    PubMed

    Shneyderman, Yuliya; Rutten, Lila J Finney; Arheart, Kristopher L; Byrne, Margaret M; Kornfeld, Julie; Schwartz, Seth J

    2016-03-01

    Effective screening tools are available for many of the top cancer killers in the USA. Searching for health information has previously been found to be associated with adhering to cancer screening guidelines, but Internet information seeking has not been examined separately. The current study examines the relationship between health and cancer Internet information seeking and adherence to cancer screening guidelines for breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer in a large nationally representative dataset. The current study was conducted using data from the Health Information National Trends Survey from 2003 and 2007. The study examined age-stratified models which correlated health and cancer information seeking with getting breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer screening on schedule, while controlling for several key variables. Internet health and cancer information seeking was positively associated with getting Pap screening on schedule, while information seeking from any sources was positively associated with getting colorectal screening on schedule. People who look for health or cancer information are more likely to get screened on schedule. Some groups of people, however, do not exhibit this relationship and, thus, may be more vulnerable to under-screening. These groups may benefit more from targeted interventions that attempt to engage people in their health care more actively. PMID:25619195

  20. Adherence to hormone therapy among women with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite the excellent results obtained with hormone therapy, the long treatment period and the side effects associated with its use make patient adherence difficult. Moreover, certain aspects of health care can mitigate or exacerbate non-adherence. This study aimed to identify the factors associated with adherence to hormone therapy for breast cancer, with the goal of contributing to the reformulation of the care process and to improvements in outcomes. Method This was a retrospective longitudinal study based on secondary data. The study integrated and analyzed data from a cohort of 5,861 women with breast cancer who were identified in the databases of the Brazilian National Cancer Institute [Instituto Nacional de Câncer - INCA] and the Unified Health System [Sistema Único de Saúde - SUS]. All of the patients were treated at INCA, which dispenses free medication, and the follow-up period lasted from 01/01/2004 to 10/29/2010. The outcome of interest was hormone treatment adherence, which was defined as the possession of medication, and a logistic regression model was employed to identify the socio-demographic, behavioral, clinical, and health care variables that were independently associated with the variations in this outcome. Results The proportion of women who adhered to hormone therapy was 76.3%. The likelihood of adherence to hormone therapy increased with each additional year of age, as well as among women with a secondary or higher level education, those with a partner, those who underwent surgery, those who had more consultations with a breast specialist and clinical oncologist, and those who underwent psychotherapy; the effect for the latter increased with each additional consultation. Conversely, the likelihood of adherence was lower among patients at a non-curable stage, those who were alcohol drinkers, those who received chemotherapy, those who had undergone more tests and had more hospitalizations, and those who used tamoxifen and combined

  1. Adherence to Diet and Physical Activity Cancer Prevention Guidelines and Cancer Outcomes: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Kohler, Lindsay N; Garcia, David O; Harris, Robin B; Oren, Eyal; Roe, Denise J; Jacobs, Elizabeth T

    2016-07-01

    Many studies have reported that adherence to health promotion guidelines for diet, physical activity, and maintenance of healthy body weight may decrease cancer incidence and mortality. A systematic review was performed to examine associations between adherence to established cancer prevention guidelines for diet and physical activity and overall cancer incidence and mortality. PubMed, Google Scholar, and Cochrane Reviews databases were searched following the current recommendations of Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis Approach (PRISMA). Twelve studies met inclusion criteria for this review. High versus low adherence to established nutrition and physical activity cancer prevention guidelines was consistently and significantly associated with decreases of 10% to 61% in overall cancer incidence and mortality. Consistent significant reductions were also shown for breast cancer incidence (19%-60%), endometrial cancer incidence (23%-60%), and colorectal cancer incidence in both men and women (27%-52%). Findings for lung cancer incidence were equivocal, and no significant relationships were found between adherence and ovarian or prostate cancers. Adhering to cancer prevention guidelines for diet and physical activity is consistently associated with lower risks of overall cancer incidence and mortality, including for some site-specific cancers. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(7); 1018-28. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27340121

  2. Adherence of Helicobacter pylori to primary human gastrointestinal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Clyne, M; Drumm, B

    1993-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori adheres only to gastric cells in vivo. However, the organism adheres to a wide variety of nongastric cells in vitro. In this study, we have used flow cytometry to assess the adherence of H. pylori to primary epithelial cells isolated from gastric, duodenal, and colonic biopsy specimens by collagenase digestion. After incubation of bacteria and cells together and subsequent staining with a two-stage fluorescein isothiocyanate-labelled H. pylori antibody method, cells with adherent bacteria could be easily distinguished from cells without bacteria. Binding to Kato III cells (a gastric adenocarcinoma cell line) was saturable when bacteria and cells were mixed at a ratio of 250:1. Adherence to cells isolated from gastric biopsy specimens was significantly better than adherence to cells isolated from duodenal or colonic biopsy specimens. Almost 70% of gastric cells had bacteria bound, in contrast to 30% of duodenal cells and 32% of colonic cells (P < 0.0001). There was no correlation between expression of hemagglutinins by the bacteria and ability to bind to either Kato III cells or primary epithelial cells isolated from gastric biopsy specimens. In view of the strict tropism that the organism exhibits in vivo for gastric cells, the results of this study indicate that primary cells are ideal for assessing the factors that might play a role in the pathogenesis of disease caused by the organism. Images PMID:8406792

  3. Complexities of Adherence and Post-Cancer Lymphedema Management

    PubMed Central

    Ostby, Pamela L.; Armer, Jane M.

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer survivors are at increased risk for breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL), a chronic, debilitating, condition that is progressive and requires lifelong self-management. Up to 40% of 3 million breast cancer survivors in the US will develop BCRL, which has no cure, is irreversible, and requires self-management with regimens that may include multiple components. The complexities of treatment can negatively affect adherence to BCRL self-management which is critical to preventing progressive swelling and infection. The aim of this review of contemporary literature published from 2005–2015 is to examine the complexities of BCRL self-management, to identify adherence-focused studies relevant to BCRL, and to summarize barriers to self-management of BCRL. Six electronic indices were searched from which 120 articles were retrieved; 17 were BCRL-focused; and eight met inclusion criteria. Seventeen of 120 articles identified barriers to self-management of BCRL such as complexities of treatment regimens, symptom burden, balance of time for treatment and life demands, and lack of education and support; however, only eight studies included outcome measures of adherence to BCRL treatment regimens with a subsequent improvement in reduced limb volumes and/or perceptions of self-efficacy and self-regulation. A major limitation is the few number of rigorously developed outcome measures of BCRL adherence. In addition, randomized studies are needed with larger sample sizes to establish adequate levels of evidence for establishing best practice standards for improving adherence to BCRL self-management treatment regimens. PMID:26580657

  4. Complexities of Adherence and Post-Cancer Lymphedema Management.

    PubMed

    Ostby, Pamela L; Armer, Jane M

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer survivors are at increased risk for breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL), a chronic, debilitating, condition that is progressive and requires lifelong self-management. Up to 40% of 3 million breast cancer survivors in the US will develop BCRL, which has no cure, is irreversible, and requires self-management with regimens that may include multiple components. The complexities of treatment can negatively affect adherence to BCRL self-management which is critical to preventing progressive swelling and infection. The aim of this review of contemporary literature published from 2005-2015 is to examine the complexities of BCRL self-management, to identify adherence-focused studies relevant to BCRL, and to summarize barriers to self-management of BCRL. Six electronic indices were searched from which 120 articles were retrieved; 17 were BCRL-focused; and eight met inclusion criteria. Seventeen of 120 articles identified barriers to self-management of BCRL such as complexities of treatment regimens, symptom burden, balance of time for treatment and life demands, and lack of education and support; however, only eight studies included outcome measures of adherence to BCRL treatment regimens with a subsequent improvement in reduced limb volumes and/or perceptions of self-efficacy and self-regulation. A major limitation is the few number of rigorously developed outcome measures of BCRL adherence. In addition, randomized studies are needed with larger sample sizes to establish adequate levels of evidence for establishing best practice standards for improving adherence to BCRL self-management treatment regimens. PMID:26580657

  5. Adherence of Bilophila wadsworthia to cultured human embryonic intestinal cells.

    PubMed

    Gerardo, S H; Garcia, M M; Wexler, H M; Finegold, S M

    1998-02-01

    Adherence of Bilophila wadsworthia to the cultured human embryonic intestinal cell line, Intestine 407 (Int 407), varied among the strains tested from strongly adherent (76-100% cells positive for one or more adherent bacteria) to non- or weakly adherent (0-25% positive cells). Although negative staining revealed that infrequent cells of an adherent strain, WAL 9077, the adherent type-strain, WAL 7959, and a non-adherent strain, WAL 8448, expressed loosely associated fimbrial structures, a role for these structures in adhesion could not be confirmed with either scanning or thin-section electron micrography. Ruthenium red staining of thin-section preparations and subsequent electron microscopy failed to reveal an extensive extracellular polysaccharide layer. SDS-PAGE analysis of crude outer membrane fractions of WAL 9077 and WAL 8448 demonstrated clear differences in their major and minor outer membrane protein components. Thus, we postulate that the adherence of B. wadsworthia to Int 407 cells is mediated by an outer membrane or cell wall component. PMID:16887620

  6. Cancer Screening in Women: BMI and Adherence to Physician Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Ferrante, Jeanne M.; Chen, Ping-Hsin; Crabtree, Benjamin F.; Wartenberg, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Objectives Reasons obese women are less likely to obtain mammograms and Pap smears are poorly understood. This study evaluated associations between body mass index (BMI) and receipt of and adherence to physician recommendations for mammography and Pap smear. Methods Data from the 2000 National Health Interview Survey (8289 women aged 40-74 years) were analyzed in 2006 using logistic regression. Women with prior hysterectomy were excluded from Pap smear analyses (n=5521). Outcome measures were being up-to-date with screening, receipt of physician recommendations, and women's adherence to physician recommendations for mammography and Pap smear. Results After adjusting for sociodemographic variables, health care access, health behaviors, and comorbidity, severely obese women (BMI ≥ 40 kg/m2) were less likely to have mammography within 2 years (OR 0.50; 95% CI 0.37, 0.68) and Pap smear within 3 years (OR, 0.43; 95% CI, 0.27,0.70). Obese women were as likely as normal weight women to receive physician recommendations for mammography and Pap smear. Severely obese women were less likely to adhere to physician recommendation for mammography (OR 0.49; 95% CI, 0.32-0.76). Women in all obese categories (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2) were less likely to adhere to physician recommendation for Pap smear (OR's ranged 0.17-0.28; p<0.001). Conclusions Obese women are less likely to adhere to physician recommendations for breast and cervical cancer screening. Interventions focusing solely on increasing physician recommendations for mammography and Pap smears will probably be insufficient for obese women. Additional strategies are needed to make cancer screening more acceptable for this high-risk group. PMID:17533069

  7. Cognitive mediators linking social support networks to colorectal cancer screening adherence.

    PubMed

    Honda, Keiko; Kagawa-Singer, Marjorie

    2006-10-01

    This paper argues that normative considerations are more important than attitudinal factors in engaging colorectal cancer screening, and tests a model explaining how unique cultural expressions of social networks influence screening adherence. Structural equation modeling was used to understand colorectal cancer screening in a population-based sample of 341 Japanese Americans aged 50 and over. The model accounted for 25% of the variance in screening adherence. Adherence was most strongly associated with family/friend subjective norms about colorectal cancer screening use. Emotional family support, but not the size of the networks, was indirectly related to adherence via increased family/friend subjective norms, while emotional friend support was directly related to adherence. While usual source of care was directly associated with adherence, better provider-patient communication was directly and indirectly associated with adherence via increased perceived benefits. The findings of this study support strengthening informal support networks to enhance adherence among Japanese Americans at risk. PMID:16958004

  8. Further observations on the specific red cell adherence test: effects of radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Richie, J.P.; Yap, W.T.

    1981-04-01

    To assess the effects of radiation therapy on the specific red cell adherence test we have evaluated 33 patients who underwent cystectomy for bladder cancer and in whom radiotherapy had been used. With this test negative tumors were found in 32 of the 33 cases. In a second series of 10 patients histologic examinations were done by biopsy before radiotherapy and by subsequent microscopic examination of the cystectomy specimen. The specific red cell adherence test results remained constant in all of these cases. These findings strongly suggest that 1) the specific red cell adherence test does remain negative after radiotherapy and 2) this test is a valuable prognosticator of the future likelihood of invasion in all patients with transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder.

  9. Adherence of Tritrichomonas foetus to bovine vaginal epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Corbeil, L B; Hodgson, J L; Jones, D W; Corbeil, R R; Widders, P R; Stephens, L R

    1989-01-01

    Adherence of Tritrichomonas foetus to bovine vaginal epithelial cells (VECs) in vitro was investigated with fresh washed bovine VECs and log-phase cultures of T. foetus. Observation under phase-contrast microscopy showed that T. foetus usually adhered first by the posterior flagellum and later by the body. Significantly more keratinized squamous epithelial cells were detected with attached parasites than nonkeratinized round epithelial cells. The optimal pH range for attachment was 6.0 to 7.5, with peak attachment at pH 6.5 for squamous VECs. Surface-reactive bovine antiserum to T. foetus prevented adherence to bovine squamous VECs. Inhibition of adherence occurred at nonagglutinating, nonimmobilizing serum dilutions. Antiserum fractions enriched for immunoglobulin G1 inhibited adherence, but fractions enriched for immunoglobulin G2 did not. The inhibitory antiserum was specific for several medium- to high-molecular-weight membrane antigens as detected in Western blots (immunoblots). The ability of surface-reactive antibodies to prevent adherence and to agglutinate and immobilize T. foetus indicates that they may be protective. Images PMID:2471692

  10. Micropallet arrays for the separation of single, adherent cells.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Georgina To'a; Wang, Yuli; Young, Grace; Bachman, Mark; Sims, Christopher E; Li, G P; Allbritton, Nancy L

    2007-01-15

    The selection and collection of single cells from within a heterogeneous population is required to produce genetically engineered cell lines, to develop new stem cell lines, and for single-cell studies. We describe a new platform for the positive selection of single live mammalian cells while the cells remain adherent to their growth surface. Cells were grown on arrays of microfabricated, releasable elements composed of SU-8 polymer termed "cell pallets". The presence of air between the elements restricted the cells to the top surfaces of the pallets. Single pallets situated within large arrays of pallets were released on demand using a single, focused, laser pulse. The laser pulses were low in energy (2-5 muJ) and did not detach nearby, nontargeted pallets. Since the SU-8 pallets and the underlying glass substrate were optically transparent, the cells on the pallets could be visualized by microscopy before and after release. Over 90% of cells remained attached to the pallet during laser-based release. The feasibility of growing the cells from the released pallets into clonal colonies was demonstrated. The pallet array system permits adherent cells to be inspected using conventional microscopy and selected cells released for further analysis. The ability to assess cells while they remain adherent to a surface will broaden the number of attributes that can be utilized for cell separation, for example, cell shape, cytoskeletal properties, and other attributes. PMID:17222037

  11. Adherence to cancer prevention guidelines and cancer incidence, cancer mortality, and total mortality: a prospective cohort study1234

    PubMed Central

    Kabat, Geoffrey C; Matthews, Charles E; Kamensky, Victor; Hollenbeck, Albert R; Rohan, Thomas E

    2015-01-01

    Background: Several health agencies have issued guidelines promoting behaviors to reduce chronic disease risk; however, little is known about the impact of such guidelines, particularly on cancer incidence. Objective: The objective was to determine whether greater adherence to the American Cancer Society (ACS) cancer prevention guidelines is associated with a reduction in cancer incidence, cancer mortality, and total mortality. Design: The NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study, a prospective cohort study of 566,401 adults aged 50–71 y at recruitment in 1995–1996, was followed for a median of 10.5 y for cancer incidence, 12.6 y for cancer mortality, and 13.6 y for total mortality. Participants who reported a history of cancer or who had missing data were excluded, yielding 476,396 subjects for analysis. We constructed a 5-level score measuring adherence to ACS guidelines, which included baseline body mass index, physical activity, alcohol intake, and several aspects of diet. Cox proportional hazards models were used to compute HRs and 95% CIs for the association of the adherence score with cancer incidence, cancer mortality, and total mortality. All analyses included fine adjustment for cigarette smoking. Results: Among 476,396 participants, 73,784 incident first cancers, 16,193 cancer deaths, and 81,433 deaths from all causes were identified in the cohort. Adherence to ACS guidelines was associated with reduced risk of all cancers combined: HRs (95% CIs) for the highest compared with the lowest level of adherence were 0.90 (0.87, 0.93) in men and 0.81 (0.77, 0.84) in women. Fourteen of 25 specific cancer sites showed a reduction in risk associated with increased adherence. Adherence was also associated with reduced cancer mortality [HRs (95% CIs) were 0.75 (0.70, 0.80) in men and 0.76 (0.70, 0.83) in women] and reduced all-cause mortality [HRs (95% CIs) were 0.74 (0.72, 0.76) in men and 0.67 (0.65, 0.70) in women]. Conclusions: In both men and women, adherence to the

  12. Elasticity of adherent active cells on a compliant substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Shiladitya; Mertz, Aaron F.; Dufresne, Eric R.; Marchetti, M. Cristina

    2012-02-01

    We present a continuum mechanical model of rigidity sensing by livings cells adhering to a compliant substrate. The cell or cell colony is modeled as an elastic active gel, adapting recently developed continuum theories of active viscoelastic fluids. The coupling to the substrate enters as a boundary condition that relates the cell's deformation field to local stress gradients. In the presence of activity, the substrate induces spatially inhomogeneous contractile stresses and deformations, with a power law dependence of the total traction forces on cell or colony size. This is in agreement with recent experiments on keratinocyte colonies adhered to fibronectin coated surfaces. In the presence of acto-myosin activity, the substrate also enhances the cell polarization, breaking the cell's front-rear symmetry. Maximal polarization is observed when the substrate stiffness matches that of the cell, in agreement with experiments on stem cells.

  13. Enhancing Adherence among Older African American Men Enrolled in a Longitudinal Cancer Screening Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Marvella E.; Havstad, Suzanne; Vernon, Sally W.; Davis, Shawna D.; Kroll, David; Lamerato, Lois; Swanson, G. Marie

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to enhance adherence among older (aged 55 years and older) African American men enrolled in a cancer screening trial for prostate, lung, and colorectal cancer. For this study, we defined "adherence" as completing the trial screenings. Design and Methods: We used a randomized trial design. Case managers…

  14. Growth and adherence on stainless steel by Enterococcus faecium cells.

    PubMed

    Andrade, N J; Ajao, D B; Zottola, E A

    1998-11-01

    Enterococcus faecium isolated from Brazilian raw milk was used in this study. For growth studies, E. faecium was inoculated into 10% RSM (reconstituted skim milk) and MRS both, incubated at 6.5 and 9 degrees C for 10 days and at 30, 42, and 45 degrees C for 48 h. Cells were enumerated after spread-plating onto MRS agar and incubating at 30 degrees C for 48 h. The ability of E. faecium cells to adhere to stainless-steel chips (6 by 6 by 1 mm, AISI 304, finish #4) was investigated. MRS broth containing stainless steel chips was inoculated to an initial concentration of 10(3) or 10(6) CFU/ml of E. faecium. Adherent cells were stained with acridine orange and enumerated by epifluorescence microscopy. E. faecium grew between 6.5 and 42 degrees C in MRS and between 9 and 40 degrees C in RSM. In MRS broth with 10(6) or 10(3) CFU/ml, the g (generation time) values were 0.62 and 0.42 h and R (growth rate) values were 1.6 and 2.4 h-1. Values of R = 2.3 h-1 and g = 0.43 h were determined for E. faecium growing in RSM with 10(3) CFU/ml. In MRS broth, for samples with a starting concentration of 10(6) cells per ml, adherence to stainless-steel chips was first observed at 2 h. However, adherence was first observed at 4 h in samples with an initial concentration of 10(3) cells per ml. After 10 h of exposure the number of adherent cells was similar for all samples regardless of initial inoculum. These results indicate that E. faecium readily adheres to stainless steel. It also underscores the need to control E. faecium by using appropriate low storage temperatures and adequate sanitizing practices in the dairy industry. PMID:9829184

  15. Vaccine production: upstream processing with adherent or suspension cell lines.

    PubMed

    Genzel, Yvonne; Rödig, Jana; Rapp, Erdmann; Reichl, Udo

    2014-01-01

    The production of viral vaccines in cell culture can be accomplished with primary, diploid, or continuous (transformed) cell lines. Each cell line, each virus type, and each vaccine preparation require the specific design of upstream and downstream processing. Media have to be selected as well as production vessels, cultivation conditions, and modes of operation. Many viruses only replicate to high titers in adherently growing cells, but similar to processes established for recombinant protein production, an increasing number of suspension cell lines is being evaluated for future use. Here, we describe key issues to be considered for the establishment of large-scale virus production in bioreactors. As an example upstream processing of cell culture-derived influenza virus production is described in more detail for adherently growing and for suspension cells. In particular, use of serum-containing, serum-free, and chemically defined media as well as choice of cultivation vessel are considered. PMID:24297427

  16. Canine PHA-stimulated adherent cell enhance interferon-gamma production and proliferation of autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Ide, Kaori; Momoi, Yasuyuki; Iwasaki, Toshiroh

    2005-03-01

    Dendritic cells are specialized antigen-presenting cells with immuno-modulating functions that are attractive for clinical applications for cancer immunotherapy. This study examined immunostimulatory functions of phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated adherent cells (PHA-Ad cells) from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in dogs. PHA-Ad cells enhanced interferon-gamma from autologous PBMC in vitro. PHA-Ad cells also stimulated antigen-independent proliferation of peripheral blood lymphocytes. These results suggest that PHA-Ad cells from PBMC possess a stimulatory function to evoke anti-tumour immunity and that they demonstrate potential for therapeutic applications in dogs. PMID:19379211

  17. Adherence, accumulation, and cell division of a natural adherent bacterial population.

    PubMed Central

    Bloomquist, C G; Reilly, B E; Liljemark, W F

    1996-01-01

    Developing dental bacterial plaques formed in vivo on enamel surfaces were examined in specimens from 18 adult volunteers during the first day of plaque formation. An intraoral model placing enamel pieces onto teeth was used to study bacterial plaque populations developing naturally to various cell densities per square millimeter of surface area of the enamel (W. F. Liljemark, C. G. Bloomquist, C. L. Bandt, B. L. Philstrom, J. E. Hinrichs, and L. F. Wolff, Oral Microbiol. Immunol. 8:5-15, 1993). Radiolabeled nucleoside incorporation was used to measure DNA synthesis concurrent with the taking of standard viable cell counts of the plaque samples. Results showed that in vivo plaque formation began with the rapid adherence of bacteria until ca. 12 to 32% of the enamel's salivary pellicle was saturated (ca. 2.5 x 10(5) to 6.3 x 10(5) cells per mm2). The pioneer adherent species were predominantly those of the "sanguis streptococci." At the above-noted density, the bacteria present on the salivary pellicle incorporated low levels of radiolabeled nucleoside per viable cell. As bacterial numbers reached densities between 8.0 x 10(5) and 2.0 x 10(6) cells per mm2, there was a small increase in the incorporation of radiolabeled nucleosides per cell. At 2.5 x 10(6) to 4.0 x 10(6) cells per mm2 of enamel surface, there was a marked increase in the incorporation of radiolabeled nucleosides per cell which appeared to be cell-density dependent. The predominant species group in developing dental plaque films during density-dependent growth was the sanguis streptococci; however, most other species present showed similar patterns of increased DNA synthesis as the density noted above approached 2.5 x 10(6) to 4.0 x 10(6) cells per mm2. PMID:8576054

  18. Silk screen based dual spin-filter module for perfusion culture of adherent and non-adherent mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Kamthan, Shweta; Gomes, James; Roychoudhury, Pradip K

    2014-08-01

    Spin-filters have been primarily used for producing therapeutic proteins from mammalian cells. However, disposability and/or high filter clogging of the existing spin-filter systems affect the process economy and productivity. Hence, to address these drawbacks a reusable dual spin-filter module for perfusion culture of adherent and non-adherent mammalian cells was designed. Two non-woven Bombyx mori silk layers were used as filter screen; the outer layer was conducive to cell attachment whilst the inner was non-conducive. Adherent cells can be cultured either in suspended mode using its inner single module or as monolayer of cells using its dual concentric module. We achieved 30 % higher urokinase productivity as compared to the stainless-steel spin-filter during perfusion experiments of adherent human kidney cells in suspended mode. This was due to the hydrophobic and negatively-charged silk screen that allows clog-free perfusion culture for prolonged periods. PMID:24737079

  19. Initial adherence of EPEC, EHEC and VTEC to host cells

    PubMed Central

    Bardiau, Marjorie; Szalo, Mihai; Mainil, Jacques G.

    2010-01-01

    Initial adherence to host cells is the first step of the infection of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC), enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) and verotoxigenic Escherichia coli (VTEC) strains. The importance of this step in the infection resides in the fact that (1) adherence is the first contact between bacteria and intestinal cells without which the other steps cannot occur and (2) adherence is the basis of host specificity for a lot of pathogens. This review describes the initial adhesins of the EPEC, EHEC and VTEC strains. During the last few years, several new adhesins and putative colonisation factors have been described, especially in EHEC strains. Only a few adhesins (BfpA, AF/R1, AF/R2, Ral, F18 adhesins) appear to be host and pathotype specific. The others are found in more than one species and/or pathotype (EPEC, EHEC, VTEC). Initial adherence of EPEC, EHEC and VTEC strains to host cells is probably mediated by multiple mechanisms. PMID:20423697

  20. A method for incorporating macromolecules into adherent cells

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    We describe a simple method for loading exogenous macromolecules into the cytoplasm of mammalian cells adherent to tissue culture dishes. Culture medium was replaced with a thin layer of fluorescently labeled macromolecules, the cells were harvested from the substrate by scraping with a rubber policeman, transferred immediately to ice cold media, washed, and then replated for culture. We refer to the method as "scrape-loading." Viability of cells was 50-60% immediately after scrape-loading and was 90% for those cells remaining after 24 h of culture. About 40% of adherent, well-spread fibroblasts contained fluorescent molecules 18 h after scrape-loading of labeled dextrans, ovalbumin, or immunoglobulin-G. On average, 10(7) dextran molecules (70,000-mol wt) were incorporated into each fibroblast by scrape- loading in 10 mg/ml dextran. The extent of loading depended on the concentration and molecular weight of the dextrans used. A fluorescent analog of actin could also be loaded into fibroblasts where it labeled stress fibers. HeLa cells, a macrophage-like cell line, 1774A.1, and human neutrophils were all successfully loaded with dextran by scraping. The method of scrape-loading should be applicable to a broad range of adherent cell types, and useful for loading of diverse kinds of macromolecules. PMID:6201494

  1. Establishment and characterization of a novel, spontaneously immortalized retinoblastoma cell line with adherent growth.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Hun; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Yu, Young Suk; Kim, Dong Hun; Kim, Chong Jai; Kim, Kyu-Won

    2007-09-01

    Retinoblastoma is the most common intraocular cancer of childhood, however, only a few cultured retinoblastoma cell lines are available to date. In the present study, we established a new human retinoblastoma cell line with adherent growth, named SNUOT-Rb1. The SNUOT-Rb1 cell line was established from an eye with retinoblastoma, which was enucleated from a 3-year-old Korean child. SNUOT-Rb1 has morphological and biochemical characteristics common to previous human retinoblastoma cell line, Y79: morphological features of fibroblast- or ganglion-like cells, and biochemical features of expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein and neuron-specific enolase. However, compared to Y79, SNUOT-Rb1 has a unique characteristic of growing in adherence, and the doubling time of SNUOT-Rb1 is shorter than Y79 in adherent or floating growth. In analysis of the tumorigenic potential of SNUOT-Rb1 in nude mice, orthotopic implantation of SNUOT-Rb1 mimics the pattern of local growth of retinoblastoma. In comparative genomic hybridization analysis, we found that SNUOT-Rb1 has significant chromosomal imbalances on chromosome 3, 9, 10, 11, 14, 16, 17, and 22. Therefore, SNUOT-Rb1 could be useful in studying the biological and genetic characteristics of retinoblastoma for insights into the heredity and genetics of childhood cancer. PMID:17671685

  2. Patterns of analgesic adherence predict health care utilization among outpatients with cancer pain

    PubMed Central

    Meghani, Salimah H; Knafl, George J

    2016-01-01

    Background Studies in chronic noncancer pain settings have found that opioid use increases health care utilization. Despite the key role of analgesics, specifically opioids, in the setting of cancer pain, there is no literature to our knowledge about the relationship between adherence to prescribed around-the-clock (ATC) analgesics and acute health care utilization (hospitalization) among patients with cancer pain. Purpose To identify adherence patterns over time for cancer patients taking ATC analgesics for pain, cluster these patterns into adherence types, combine the types into an adherence risk factor for hospitalization, identify other risk factors for hospitalization, and identify risk factors for inconsistent analgesic adherence. Materials and methods Data from a 3-month prospective observational study of patients diagnosed with solid tumors or multiple myeloma, having cancer-related pain, and having at least one prescription of oral ATC analgesics were collected. Adherence data were collected electronically using the medication event-monitoring system. Analyses were conducted using adaptive modeling methods based on heuristic search through alternative models controlled by likelihood cross-validation scores. Results Six adherence types were identified and combined into the risk factor for hospitalization of inconsistent versus consistent adherence over time. Twenty other individually significant risk factors for hospitalization were identified, but inconsistent analgesic adherence was the strongest of these predictors (ie, generating the largest likelihood cross-validation score). These risk factors were adaptively combined into a model for hospitalization based on six pairwise interaction risk factors with exceptional discrimination (ie, area under the receiver-operating-characteristic curve of 0.91). Patients had from zero to five of these risk factors, with an odds ratio of 5.44 (95% confidence interval 3.09–9.58) for hospitalization, with a unit

  3. Adherence to WCRF/AICR cancer prevention recommendations and metabolic syndrome in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Eleonora; Gargano, Giuliana; Villarini, Anna; Traina, Adele; Johansson, Harriet; Mano, Maria Piera; Santucci De Magistris, Maria; Simeoni, Milena; Consolaro, Elena; Mercandino, Angelica; Barbero, Maggiorino; Galasso, Rocco; Bassi, Maria Chiara; Zarcone, Maurizio; Zagallo, Emanuela; Venturelli, Elisabetta; Bellegotti, Manuela; Berrino, Franco; Pasanisi, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS), conventionally defined by the presence of at least three out of five dismetabolic traits (abdominal obesity, hypertension, low plasma HDL-cholesterol and high plasma glucose and triglycerides), has been associated with both breast cancer (BC) incidence and prognosis. We investigated the association between the prevalence of MetS and a score of adherence to the World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) and American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) recommendations for the prevention of cancer in a cross-sectional study of BC patients. The DIet and ANdrogen-5 study (DIANA-5) for the prevention of BC recurrences recruited 2092 early stage BC survivors aged 35-70. At recruitment, all women completed a 24-hour food frequency and physical activity diary on their consumption and activity of the previous day. Using these diaries we created a score of adherence to five relevant WCRF/AICR recommendations. The prevalence ratios (PRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of MetS associated with the number of recommendations met were estimated using a binomial regression model. The adjusted PRs of MetS decreased with increasing number of recommendations met (p < 0.001). Meeting all the five recommendations versus meeting none or only one was significantly associated with a 57% lower MetS prevalence (95% CI 0.35-0.73). Our results suggest that adherence to WCRF/AICR recommendations is a major determinant of MetS and may have a clinical impact. PMID:26175188

  4. The functions of the variable lipoprotein family of Mycoplasma hyorhinis in adherence to host cells.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Qiyan; Wang, Jia; Ji, Yan; Ni, Bo; Zhang, Bixiong; Ma, Qinghong; Wei, Yanna; Xiao, Shaobo; Feng, Zhixin; Liu, Maojun; Shao, Guoqing

    2016-04-15

    Mycoplasma hyorhinis (M. hyorhinis) is a swine pathogen that is associated with various human cancers and contamination in cell cultures. However, no studies on the adhesion molecules of this pathogen have yet been reported. The variable lipoprotein (Vlp) family is an important surface component of M. hyorhinis. Herein, we performed several experiments to identify the function of the Vlp family in adherence to host cells. Seven recombinant Vlp (rVlp) proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by affinity chromatography. The potential role of rVlp adherence to pig kidney (PK-15) and swine tracheal epithelial (STEC) cells was then studied by indirect immunofluorescence assay and microtiter plate adherence assay. Adhesion of M. hyorhinis to PK-15 and STEC cells was specifically inhibited by the addition of a cocktail of rVlp proteins. The rVlp protein mixture was shown to bind to both PK-15 and STEC cells. The binding increased in a dose-dependent manner and could be blocked by antisera against the rVlp proteins. Most of the rVlp proteins could bind individually to both PK-15 and STEC cells except for rVlpD and rVlpF, which bound only to STEC cells. Because Vlp members vary in size among different strains and generations, they may vary in their cytoadhesion capabilities in various strains. In summary, the present results indicate that the Vlp family functions as adhesins of M. hyorhinis. PMID:27016761

  5. Patterned Thermoresponsive Microgel Coatings for Noninvasive Processing of Adherent Cells.

    PubMed

    Uhlig, Katja; Wegener, Thomas; He, Jian; Zeiser, Michael; Bookhold, Johannes; Dewald, Inna; Godino, Neus; Jaeger, Magnus; Hellweg, Thomas; Fery, Andreas; Duschl, Claus

    2016-03-14

    Cultivation of adherently growing cells in artificial environments is of utmost importance in medicine and biotechnology to accomplish in vitro drug screening or to investigate disease mechanisms. Precise cell manipulation, like localized control over adhesion, is required to expand cells, to establish cell models for novel therapies and to perform noninvasive cell experiments. To this end, we developed a method of gentle, local lift-off of mammalian cells using polymer surfaces, which are reversibly and repeatedly switchable between a cell-attractive and a cell-repellent state. This property was introduced through micropatterned thermoresponsive polymer coatings formed from colloidal microgels. Patterning was obtained through automated nanodispensing or microcontact printing, making use of unspecific electrostatic interactions between microgels and substrates. This process is much more robust against ambient conditions than covalent coupling, thus lending itself to up-scaling. As an example, wound healing assays were accomplished at 37 °C with highly increased precision in microfluidic environments. PMID:26879608

  6. Lung cancer - small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC ...

  7. Lung cancer - small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC are ...

  8. Adherence to Guidelines for Cancer Survivors and Health-Related Quality of Life among Korean Breast Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Song, Sihan; Hwang, Eunkyung; Moon, Hyeong-Gon; Noh, Dong-Young; Lee, Jung Eun

    2015-01-01

    There is limited evidence on the association between adherence to guidelines for cancer survivors and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). In a cross-sectional study of Korean breast cancer survivors, we examined whether adherence to the guidelines of the American Cancer Society (ACS) and World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) for cancer survivors was related to levels of HRQoL, assessed by the Korean version of Core 30 (C30) and Breast cancer module 23 (BR23) of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer-Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC-QLQ). We included a total of 160 women aged 21 to 79 years who had been diagnosed with breast cancer according to American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stages I to III and had breast cancer surgery at least six months before the interview. Increasing adherence to ACS guidelines was associated with higher scores of social functioning (p for trend = 0.05), whereas increasing adherence to WCRF/AICR recommendations was associated with higher scores of arm symptoms (p for trend = 0.01). These associations were limited to those with stage II or III cancer. Diet may be an important factor in relation to quality of life among Korean breast cancer survivors, however our findings warrant further prospective studies to evaluate whether healthy diet improves survivors’ quality of life. PMID:26690215

  9. A Prestressed Cable Network Model of the Adherent Cell Cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Coughlin, Mark F.; Stamenović, Dimitrije

    2003-01-01

    A prestressed cable network is used to model the deformability of the adherent cell actin cytoskeleton. The overall and microstructural model geometries and cable mechanical properties were assigned values based on observations from living cells and mechanical measurements on isolated actin filaments, respectively. The models were deformed to mimic cell poking (CP), magnetic twisting cytometry (MTC) and magnetic bead microrheometry (MBM) measurements on living adherent cells. The models qualitatively and quantitatively captured the fibroblast cell response to the deformation imposed by CP while exhibiting only some qualitative features of the cell response to MTC and MBM. The model for CP revealed that the tensed peripheral actin filaments provide the key resistance to indentation. The actin filament tension that provides mechanical integrity to the network was estimated at ∼158 pN, and the nonlinear mechanical response during CP originates from filament kinematics. The MTC and MBM simulations revealed that the model is incomplete, however, these simulations show cable tension as a key determinant of the model response. PMID:12547813

  10. Evidence that extracellular components function in adherence of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans to epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, D H; Fives-Taylor, P M

    1993-01-01

    Extracellular microvesicles and a highly proteinaceous polymer associated with a leukotoxin-producing strain, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans SUNY 75, were shown to increase adherence of other weakly adherent A. actinomycetemcomitans strains to KB epithelial cells. Images PMID:8406899

  11. Adherence to Vaginal Dilation Following High Dose Rate Brachytherapy for Endometrial Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Lois C.; Abdallah, Rita; Schluchter, Mark; Panneerselvam, Ashok; Kunos, Charles A.

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: We report demographic, clinical, and psychosocial factors associated with adherence to vaginal dilation and describe the sexual and marital or nonmarital dyadic functioning of women following high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy for endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively evaluated women aged 18 years or older in whom early-stage endometrial (IAgr3-IIB) cancers were treated by HDR intravaginal brachytherapy within the past 3.5 years. Women with or without a sexual partner were eligible. Patients completed questionnaires by mail or by telephone assessing demographic and clinical variables, adherence to vaginal dilation, dyadic satisfaction, sexual functioning, and health beliefs. Results: Seventy-eight of 89 (88%) eligible women with early-stage endometrial cancer treated with HDR brachytherapy completed questionnaires. Only 33% of patients were adherers, based on reporting having used a dilator more than two times per week in the first month following radiation. Nonadherers who reported a perceived change in vaginal dimension following radiation reported that their vaginas were subjectively smaller after brachytherapy (p = 0.013). Adherers reported more worry about their sex lives or lack thereof than nonadherers (p = 0.047). Patients reported considerable sexual dysfunction following completion of HDR brachytherapy. Conclusions: Adherence to recommendations for vaginal dilator use following HDR brachytherapy for endometrial cancer is poor. Interventions designed to educate women about dilator use benefit may increase adherence. Although sexual functioning was compromised, it is likely that this existed before having cancer for many women in our study.

  12. Endometrial Mesenchymal Stem Cells Isolated from Menstrual Blood by Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xue; Yuan, Qing; Qu, Ye; Zhou, Yuan; Bei, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To find a convenient and efficient way to isolate MSCs from human menstrual blood and to investigate their biological characteristics, proliferative capacity, and secretion levels. Methods. MSCs were isolated from menstrual blood of 3 healthy women using adherence. Cell immunological phenotype was examined by flow cytometry; the adipogenic, osteogenic, and chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs was examined by Oil-Red-O staining, ALP staining, and Alcian Blue staining, respectively; and the secretion of cytokines, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), was detected using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results. MB-MSCs were successfully isolated from human menstrual blood using adherence. They were positive for CD73, CD105, CD29, and CD44, but negative for CD31 and CD45. The differentiated MB-MSCs were positive for ALP staining, Oil-Red-O staining, and Alcian Blue staining. In addition, they could secrete antiapoptotic cytokines, such as VEGF, IGF-1, and HGF. Conclusion. It is feasible to isolate MSCs from human menstrual blood, thus avoiding invasive procedures and ethical controversies. Adherence could be a promising alternative to the density gradient centrifugation for the isolation of MSCs from menstrual blood. PMID:26681948

  13. Adherence to the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research recommendations and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Harris, Holly R; Bergkvist, Leif; Wolk, Alicja

    2016-06-01

    The World Cancer Research Fund/American Association for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) has published eight nutrition-related recommendations for the prevention of cancer. However, few prospective studies have examined these recommendations by breast cancer hormone receptor subtype and only one case-control study has included the dietary supplements recommendation in their evaluation. We investigated whether adherence to the WCRF/AICR cancer prevention recommendations was associated with breast cancer incidence, overall and by hormone receptor subtype, in the Swedish Mammography Cohort. Among 31,514 primarily postmenopausal women diet and lifestyle factors were assessed with a self-administered food frequency questionnaire. A score was constructed based on adherence to the recommendations for body fatness, physical activity, energy density, plant foods, animal foods, alcoholic drinks and dietary supplements (score range 0-7). Cox proportional hazard models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). During 15 years of follow-up 1,388 cases of breast cancer were identified. Women who met six to seven recommendations had a 51% decreased risk of breast cancer compared to women meeting only zero to two recommendations (95% CI = 0.35-0.70). The association between each additional recommendation met and breast cancer risk was strongest for the ER-positive/PR-positive subtype (HR = 0.86; 95% CI = 0.79-0.94), while for the ER-negative/PR-negative subtype the individual recommendations regarding plant and animal foods were most strongly associated with reduced risk. Our findings support that adherence to the WCRF/AICR recommendations reduces breast cancer risk in a population of primarily postmenopausal women. Promoting these recommendations to the public could help reduce breast cancer incidence. PMID:26804371

  14. Predictors of adherence to an Iyengar yoga program in breast cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    Speed-Andrews, Amy E; Stevinson, Clare; Belanger, Lisa J; Mirus, Judith J; Courneya, Kerry S

    2012-01-01

    Context: Despite the known health benefits of physical activity, participation rates in cancer survivor groups remain low. Researchers have attempted to identify alternative modes of nontraditional physical activities that may increase participation and adherence rates. This study investigated the determinants of yoga in breast cancer survivors. Aim: To examine predictors of Iyengar yoga adherence in breast cancer survivors using the theory of planned behaviour. Settings and Design: Classes were held either in Campus Recreation facilities or at the Behavioral Medicine Fitness Center at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada. The study was an evaluation of an existing yoga program. Materials and Methods: Twenty-three post adjuvant therapy breast cancer survivors participating in a community-based, twice weekly, 12 week Iyengar yoga program were asked to complete baseline measures of the theory of planned behavior, demographic, medical, health/fitness, and psychosocial variables. Adherence was measured by objective attendance to the classes. Statistical Analysis: We analyzed univariate associations between predictors and yoga adherence with independent t-tests. Results: Adherence to the Iyengar yoga program was 63.9% and was predicted by stronger intention (P<0.001), greater self-efficacy (P=0.003), more positive instrumental attitude (Ps=0.025), higher disease stage (P=0.018), yoga experience in the past year, (P=0.044), diagnosis of a second cancer (P=0.008), lower fatigue (P=0.037), and greater happiness (P=0.023). Conclusions: Adherence to Iyengar yoga in breast cancer survivors was strongly related to motivational variables from the theory of planned behaviour. Researchers attempting to improve yoga adherence in breast cancer survivors may benefit from targeting the key constructs in the theory of planned behaviour. PMID:22346059

  15. Home-based Exercise among Cancer Survivors: Adherence and its Predictors

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Bernardine M.; Rabin, Carolyn; Dunsiger, Shira

    2010-01-01

    Objective Evidence of the benefits of exercise for those treated for cancer has led to several exercise interventions for this population. Some have questioned whether cancer patients offered a home-based intervention adhere to the exercise prescribed. Method We examined exercise adherence in a randomized controlled trial of a 12-week, home-based exercise trial for breast cancer patients. Three adherence outcomes were examined: minutes of exercise participation during each week of the intervention, number of steps taken during planned exercise during each intervention week, and whether the participant met her weekly exercise goal. Predictors of adherence (e.g., demographic and medical variables, Transtheoretical Model variables, history of exercise) were examined. Results Findings indicate that participants significantly increased their minutes of exercise and steps taken during planned exercise from the first to the last week of the intervention. The percentage of participants achieving exercise goals was highest in the first few weeks of the intervention. Exercise self-efficacy significantly predicted each adherence outcome. Baseline PA predicted mean exercise session steps over the 12 weeks. Conclusion Adherence to a home-based exercise intervention for breast cancer patients changes over time and may be related to baseline levels of self-efficacy for exercise. PMID:19242921

  16. Human placenta-derived adherent cells induce tolerogenic immune responses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Morschauser, Andrew; Zhang, Xin; Lu, Xiaohua; Gleason, Joseph; He, Shuyang; Chen, Hong-Jung; Jankovic, Vladimir; Ye, Qian; Labazzo, Kristen; Herzberg, Uri; Albert, Vivian R; Abbot, Stewart E; Liang, Bitao; Hariri, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Human placenta-derived adherent cells (PDAC cells) are a culture expanded, undifferentiated mesenchymal-like population derived from full-term placental tissue, with immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties. PDA-001 (cenplacel-L), an intravenous formulation of PDAC cells, is in clinical development for the treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying the immunoregulatory properties of PDAC cells, we investigated their effects on immune cell populations, including T cells and dendritic cells (DC) in vitro and in vivo. PDAC cells suppressed T-cell proliferation in an OT-II T-cell adoptive transfer model, reduced the severity of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein peptide-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and ameliorated inflammation in a delayed type hypersensitivity response model. In vitro, PDAC cells suppressed T-cell proliferation and inhibited Th1 and Th17 differentiation. Analysis of tissues derived from PDAC cell-treated animals revealed diminished CD86 expression on splenic DC, suggesting that they can also modulate DC populations. Furthermore, PDAC cells modulate the differentiation and maturation of mouse bone marrow-derived DC. Similarly, human DC differentiated from CD14(+) monocytes in the presence of PDAC cells acquired a tolerogenic phenotype. These tolerogenic DC failed to induce allogeneic T-cell proliferation and differentiation toward Th1, but skewed T-cell differentiation toward Th2. Inhibition of cyclo-oxygenase-2 activity resulted in a significant, but not complete, abrogation of PDAC cells' effects on DC phenotype and function, implying a role for prostaglandin E2 in PDAC-mediated immunomodulation. This study identifies modulation of DC differentiation toward immune tolerance as a key mechanism underlying the immunomodulatory activities of PDAC cells. PMID:25505962

  17. Better exercise adherence after treatment for cancer (BEAT Cancer) study: Rationale, design, and methods

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Laura Q.; McAuley, Edward; Anton, Philip M.; Courneya, Kerry S.; Vicari, Sandra; Hopkins-Price, Patricia; Verhulst, Steven; Mocharnuk, Robert; Hoelzer, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Most breast cancer survivors do not engage in regular physical activity. Our physical activity behavior change intervention for breast cancer survivors significantly improved physical activity and health outcomes post-intervention during a pilot, feasibility study. Testing in additional sites with a larger sample and longer follow-up is warranted to confirm program effectiveness short and longer term. Importantly, the pilot intervention resulted in changes in physical activity and social cognitive theory constructs, enhancing our potential for testing mechanisms mediating physical activity behavior change. Here, we report the rationale, design, and methods for a two-site, randomized controlled trial comparing the effects of the BEAT Cancer physical activity behavior change intervention to usual care on short and longer term physical activity adherence among breast cancer survivors. Secondary aims include examining social cognitive theory mechanisms of physical activity behavior change and health benefits of the intervention. Study recruitment goal is 256 breast cancer survivors with a history of ductal carcinoma in situ or Stage I, II, or IIIA disease who have completed primary cancer treatment. Outcome measures are obtained at baseline, 3 months (i.e., immediately post-intervention), 6 months, and 12 months and include physical activity, psychosocial factors, fatigue, sleep quality, lower extremity joint dysfunction, cardiorespiratory fitness, muscle strength, and waist-to-hip ratio. Confirming behavior change effectiveness, health effects, and underlying mechanisms of physical activity behavior change interventions will facilitate translation to community settings for improving the health and well-being of breast cancer survivors. PMID:21983625

  18. Squamous cell skin cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cell; NMSC - squamous cell; Squamous cell skin cancer; Squamous cell carcinoma of the skin ... squamous cell cancer is called Bowen disease (or squamous cell carcinoma in situ). This type does not spread to ...

  19. Effects of Baseline Comorbidities on Cancer Screening Trial Adherence among Older African American Men

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Marvella E.; Havstad, Suzanne L.; Fields, Maya E.; Manigo, Brandy; McClary, Beth; Lamerato, Lois

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of baseline comorbidities on screening adherence in a sample of older African American men (ages ≥55 years) enrolled in a case management intervention in a cancer screening trial. Methods Baseline comorbidity data were obtained from 683 African American men who were randomly assigned to a case management intervention group (n = 344) or to a case management control group (n = 339). The effects of comorbidities on the screening adherence rates of each group were then assessed. Results No statistically significant interactions were found between each health history characteristic and the intervention. Therefore, analyses were not stratified by intervention status. In general, participants with comorbidities were no less likely to adhere to trial screening than participants without comorbidities. Exceptions were current smokers and participants with chronic bronchitis. Current smokers were less likely than others to adhere to the prostate-specific antigen test (P = 0.02) and the digital rectal examination for prostate cancer screening (P = 0.01), to the chest X-ray for lung cancer screening (P < 0.01), and to the flexible sigmoidoscopy for colorectal cancer screening (P = 0.04). Participants with chronic bronchitis had lower rates of adherence to the chest X-ray (P = 0.06). Having a relative with cancer positively influenced adherence to the digital rectal examination (P = 0.05). Conclusions Overall, older African American men with comorbidities appear to be very good candidates for participation in longitudinal cancer screening trials. However, smoking had a statistically significant and deleterious effect on adherence to all types of screening. PMID:18463399

  20. Imaging deformation of adherent cells due to shear stress using quantitative phase imaging.

    PubMed

    Eldridge, Will J; Sheinfeld, Adi; Rinehart, Matthew T; Wax, Adam

    2016-01-15

    We present a platform for detecting cellular deformations from mechanical stimuli, such as fluid shear stress, using rapid quantitative phase imaging. Rapid quantitative phase imaging was used to analyze changes in the optical path length of adherent skin cancer cells during mechanical displacement. Both the whole-cell phase displacement and the resultant shift of the cellular center of mass were calculated over the duration of the stimulus. Whole-cell phase displacement images were found to match expectation. Furthermore, center-of-mass shifts of adherent cells were found to resemble that of a one-dimensional Kelvin-Voigt (KV) viscoelastic solid. Cellular steady-state displacements from step fluid shear stimuli were found to be linearly related to the shear stress. Shear stiffness constants for cells exposed to a cytoskeletal disrupting toxin were found to be significantly lower than unexposed cells. This novel technique allows for elastographic analysis of whole-cell effective shear stiffness without the use of an exogenous force applicator, a specialized culture substrate, or tracking net perimeter movement of the cell. PMID:26766712

  1. A fully automated system for adherent cells microinjection.

    PubMed

    Becattini, Gabriele; Mattos, Leonardo S; Caldwell, Darwin G

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes an automated robotic system to perform cell microinjections to relieve human operators from this highly difficult and tedious manual procedure. The system, which uses commercial equipment currently found on most biomanipulation laboratories, consists of a multitask software framework combining computer vision and robotic control elements. The vision part features an injection pipette tracker and an automatic cell targeting system that is responsible for defining injection points within the contours of adherent cells in culture. The main challenge is the use of bright-field microscopy only, without the need for chemical markers normally employed to highlight the cells. Here, cells are identified and segmented using a threshold-based image processing technique working on defocused images. Fast and precise microinjection pipette positioning over the automatically defined targets is performed by a two-stage robotic system which achieves an average injection rate of 7.6 cells/min with a pipette positioning precision of 0.23 μm. The consistency of these microinjections and the performance of the visual targeting framework were experimentally evaluated using two cell lines (CHO-K1 and HEK) and over 500 cells. In these trials, the cells were automatically targeted and injected with a fluorescent marker, resulting in a correct cell detection rate of 87% and a successful marker delivery rate of 67.5%. These results demonstrate that the new system is capable of better performances than expert operators, highlighting its benefits and potential for large-scale application. PMID:24403406

  2. Barriers to and facilitative processes of endocrine therapy adherence among women with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bright, Emma E; Petrie, Keith J; Partridge, Ann H; Stanton, Annette L

    2016-07-01

    The treatment of chronic illness, and the prevention of disease progression and recurrence, often involve long-term adherence to prescription medications in breast cancer. Despite the survival benefit of endocrine therapies, nonadherence remains high. In this study, we examined barriers to and facilitators of endocrine therapy adherence among women with breast cancer (n = 1371). Participants currently taking tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors were recruited from Dr. Susan Love Research Foundation's Army of Women(®) Registry. Participants responded online to open-ended and close-ended questions about thoughts, feelings, and behaviors relevant to endocrine therapy. Two weeks later, women were invited to complete a second online questionnaire regarding current endocrine therapy adherence. Approximately one-third (36 %) of participants reported the presence of factors that make endocrine therapy difficult; reporting any barrier to medication adherence was significantly associated with nonadherence (P < 0.001). In addition, 31 % of women used one or more strategies to maintain their motivation to adhere and the use of cognitive self-talk (e.g., thoughts regarding endocrine therapy efficacy) was related to higher adherence. Hierarchical linear regressions revealed a significant behavioral barrier × behavioral facilitator interaction (P < 0.05); participants who endorsed a behavioral barrier in the absence of a behavioral facilitator reported the lowest adherence. Findings suggest that a sizeable minority of women face barriers to taking endocrine therapy, which are associated with nonadherence. PMID:27342455

  3. Incubator proof miniaturized Holomonitor to in situ monitor cancer cells exposed to green tea polyphenol and preosteoblast cells adhering on nanostructured titanate surfaces: validity of the measured parameters and their corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, Beatrix; Nador, Judit; Juhasz, Krisztina; Dobos, Agnes; Körösi, Laszlo; Székács, Inna; Patko, Daniel; Horvath, Robert

    2015-06-01

    The in situ observation of cell movements and morphological parameters over longer periods of time under physiological conditions is critical in basic cell research and biomedical applications. The quantitative phase-contrast microscope applied in this study has a remarkably small size, therefore it can be placed directly into a humidified incubator. Here, we report on the successful application of this M4 Holomonitor to observe cancer cell motility, motility speed, and migration in the presence of the green tea polyphenol, epigallocatechin gallate, as well as to monitor the adhesion of preosteoblast cells on nanostructured titanate coatings, relevant for biomedical applications. A special mechanical stage was developed to position the sample into that range of the optical arrangement where digital autofocusing works with high reproducibility and precision. By in-depth analyzing the obtained single cell morphological parameters, we show that the limited vertical resolution of the optical setup results in underestimated single cell contact area and volume and overestimated single cell averaged thickness. We propose a simple model to correct the recorded data to obtain more precise single cell parameters. We compare the results with the kinetic data recorded by a surface sensitive optical biosensor, optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy.

  4. Computational Tension Mapping of Adherent Cells Based on Actin Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Manifacier, Ian; Milan, Jean-Louis; Jeanneau, Charlotte; Chmilewsky, Fanny; Chabrand, Patrick; About, Imad

    2016-01-01

    Forces transiting through the cytoskeleton are known to play a role in adherent cell activity. Up to now few approaches haves been able to determine theses intracellular forces. We thus developed a computational mechanical model based on a reconstruction of the cytoskeleton of an adherent cell from fluorescence staining of the actin network and focal adhesions (FA). Our custom made algorithm converted the 2D image of an actin network into a map of contractile interactions inside a 2D node grid, each node representing a group of pixels. We assumed that actin filaments observed under fluorescence microscopy, appear brighter when thicker, we thus presumed that nodes corresponding to pixels with higher actin density were linked by stiffer interactions. This enabled us to create a system of heterogeneous interactions which represent the spatial organization of the contractile actin network. The contractility of this interaction system was then adapted to match the level of force the cell truly exerted on focal adhesions; forces on focal adhesions were estimated from their vinculin expressed size. This enabled the model to compute consistent mechanical forces transiting throughout the cell. After computation, we applied a graphical approach on the original actin image, which enabled us to calculate tension forces throughout the cell, or in a particular region or even in single stress fibers. It also enabled us to study different scenarios which may indicate the mechanical role of other cytoskeletal components such as microtubules. For instance, our results stated that the ratio between intra and extra cellular compression is inversely proportional to intracellular tension. PMID:26812601

  5. Computational Tension Mapping of Adherent Cells Based on Actin Imaging.

    PubMed

    Manifacier, Ian; Milan, Jean-Louis; Jeanneau, Charlotte; Chmilewsky, Fanny; Chabrand, Patrick; About, Imad

    2016-01-01

    Forces transiting through the cytoskeleton are known to play a role in adherent cell activity. Up to now few approaches haves been able to determine theses intracellular forces. We thus developed a computational mechanical model based on a reconstruction of the cytoskeleton of an adherent cell from fluorescence staining of the actin network and focal adhesions (FA). Our custom made algorithm converted the 2D image of an actin network into a map of contractile interactions inside a 2D node grid, each node representing a group of pixels. We assumed that actin filaments observed under fluorescence microscopy, appear brighter when thicker, we thus presumed that nodes corresponding to pixels with higher actin density were linked by stiffer interactions. This enabled us to create a system of heterogeneous interactions which represent the spatial organization of the contractile actin network. The contractility of this interaction system was then adapted to match the level of force the cell truly exerted on focal adhesions; forces on focal adhesions were estimated from their vinculin expressed size. This enabled the model to compute consistent mechanical forces transiting throughout the cell. After computation, we applied a graphical approach on the original actin image, which enabled us to calculate tension forces throughout the cell, or in a particular region or even in single stress fibers. It also enabled us to study different scenarios which may indicate the mechanical role of other cytoskeletal components such as microtubules. For instance, our results stated that the ratio between intra and extra cellular compression is inversely proportional to intracellular tension. PMID:26812601

  6. Characteristics and response of mouse bone marrow derived novel low adherent mesenchymal stem cells acquired by quantification of extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Ri-Cheng; Heo, Seong-Joo; Koak, Jai-Young; Lee, Joo-Hee; Park, Ji-Man

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of present study was to identify characteristic and response of mouse bone marrow (BM) derived low-adherent bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) obtained by quantification of extracellular matrix (ECM). MATERIALS AND METHODS Non-adherent cells acquired by ECM coated dishes were termed low-adherent BMMSCs and these cells were analyzed by in vitro and in vivo methods, including colony forming unit fibroblast (CFU-f), bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), multi-potential differentiation, flow cytometry and transplantation into nude mouse to measure the bone formation ability of these low-adherent BMMSCs. Titanium (Ti) discs with machined and anodized surfaces were prepared. Adherent and low-adherent BMMSCs were cultured on the Ti discs for testing their proliferation. RESULTS The amount of CFU-f cells was significantly higher when non-adherent cells were cultured on ECM coated dishes, which was made by 7 days culturing of adherent BMMSCs. Low-adherent BMMSCs had proliferation and differentiation potential as adherent BMMSCs in vitro. The mean amount bone formation of adherent and low-adherent BMMSCs was also investigated in vivo. There was higher cell proliferation appearance in adherent and low-adherent BMMSCs seeded on anodized Ti discs than machined Ti discs by time. CONCLUSION Low-adherent BMMSCs acquired by ECM from non-adherent cell populations maintained potential characteristic similar to those of the adherent BMMSCs and therefore could be used effectively as adherent BMMSCs in clinic. PMID:25352957

  7. Adherence to Recommended Breast Cancer Screening in Iranian Turkmen Women: The Role of Knowledge and Beliefs

    PubMed Central

    Charkazi, Abdurrahman; Samimi, Afieh; Razzaghi, Khadijeh; Kouchaki, Ghorban Mohammad; Moodi, Mitra; Meirkarimi, Kamal; Kouchaki, Ashoor Mohammad; Shahnazi, Hossein

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate breast cancer screening performance among Iranian Turkmen women along with their knowledge and beliefs. A cross-sectional study was carried out in June to December 2011. Through clustered sampling method, 1080 Iranian Turkmen women completed the questionnaire including breast cancer screening adherence, knowledge, fatalism beliefs, and perceived threat using Champions Health Belief Model Scale (CHBMS).The mean age of the participants was 43.04 (SD = 11.80) years. Compliance rate in a regular basis based on national guidelines was 13.1%, 2.5%, and 0.9% for SBE, CBE, and mammography, respectively. A mere 4% have been provided adequately with information about breast cancer. Having knowledge was the best predictor of breast cancer screening adherence along with high educated husbands for SBE performing. Susceptibility and fatalism were low and were influenced by participants' educational level and age. In conclusion, Iranian Turkmen women had insufficient knowledge, low perceived susceptibility, high fatalistic belief, and very poor adherence to breast cancer screening. There is a need for providing breast cancer education programs among the Iranian Turkmen women to increase their adherence rate. PMID:24977094

  8. Adherence to Competing Strategies for Colorectal Cancer Screening Over 3 Years

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Peter S.; Wheat, Chelle L.; Abhat, Anshu; Brenner, Alison T.; Fagerlin, Angela; Hayward, Rodney A.; Thomas, Jennifer P.; Vijan, Sandeep; Inadomi, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We have shown that, in a randomized trial comparing adherence to different colorectal cancer (CRC) screening strategies, participants assigned to either fecal occult blood testing (FOBT) or given a choice between FOBT and colonoscopy had significantly higher adherence than those assigned to colonoscopy during the first year. However, how adherence to screening changes over time is unknown. Methods In this trial, 997 participants were cluster randomized to one of the three screening strategies: (i) FOBT, (ii) colonoscopy, or (iii) a choice between FOBT and colonoscopy. Research assistants helped participants to complete testing only in the first year. Adherence to screening was defined as completion of three FOBT cards in each of 3 years after enrollment or completion of colonoscopy within the first year of enrollment. The primary outcome was adherence to assigned strategy over 3 years. Additional outcomes included identification of sociodemographic factors associated with adherence. Results Participants assigned to annual FOBT completed screening at a significantly lower rate over 3 years (14%) than those assigned to colonoscopy (38%, P<0.001) or choice (42%, P<0.001); however, completion of any screening test fell precipitously, indicating the strong effect of patient navigation. In multivariable logistic regression analysis, being randomized to the choice or colonoscopy group, Chinese language, homosexuality, being married/partnered, and having a non-nurse practitioner primary care provider were independently associated with greater adherence to screening (P<0.01). Conclusions In a 3-year follow-up of a randomized trial comparing competing CRC screening strategies, participants offered a choice between FOBT and colonoscopy continued to have relatively high adherence, whereas adherence in the FOBT group fell significantly below that of the choice and colonoscopy groups. Patient navigation is crucial to achieving adherence to CRC screening, and FOBT is

  9. Evaluation of a Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) assay (Keystone Sym)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our goal is to establish an in vitro model system to evaluate chemical effects using a single stem cell culture technique that would improve throughput and provide quantitative markers of differentiation and cell number. To this end, we have used an adherent cell differentiation ...

  10. Influence of Patient and Treatment Factors on Adherence to Adjuvant Endocrine Therapy in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Catherine M.; Gentry, Amanda L.; Brufsky, Adam M.; Casillo, Frances E.; Cohen, Susan M.; Dailey, Meredith M.; Donovan, Heidi S.; Dunbar-Jacob, Jacqueline; Jankowitz, Rachel C.; Rosenzweig, Margaret Q.; Sherwood, Paula R.; Sereika, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To comprehensively assess the patient and illness or treatment factors that may predict nonadherence to adjuvant endocrine therapy and to explore whether an interaction occurs between these factors in women with breast cancer. Design Repeated-measures design. Setting The Outpatient Services of the Women's Cancer Program at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute and participants' homes. Sample 91 women with early-stage breast cancer who received endocrine therapy. Methods Adherence was assessed continuously for the first 18 months of endocrine therapy. Patient and illness or treatment factors were assessed at four time points (Time 1 to Time 4). Time 1 (baseline) was within two weeks prior to the initiation of endocrine therapy. Times 2–4 occurred at six-month intervals, as many as 18 months after Time 1. Main Research Variables Adherence, patient factors, and illness or treatment factors. Findings Adherence to endocrine therapy declined significantly during the first 18 months of treatment in women with breast cancer. The presence of negative mood and symptoms before starting treatment predicted nonadherence to endocrine therapy over time. Perceptions of financial hardship, symptoms, disease stage, and more complex medication regimens intensified the effect of negative mood on adherence over time. Conclusions Women with breast cancer may be at risk for nonadherence to prescribed endocrine therapy if they experience depression or anxiety and symptoms prior to initiating therapy. Implications for Nursing Oncology nurses should be alert to women with breast cancer who are depressed or anxious or who are experiencing symptoms. Management of negative mood and symptoms may result in better adherence. PMID:24769592

  11. Factors involved in adherence of lactobacilli to human Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Greene, J D; Klaenhammer, T R

    1994-01-01

    A quantitative assay performed with bacterial cells labelled with [3H]thymidine was used to investigate factors involved in the adherence of human isolates Lactobacillus acidophilus BG2FO4 and NCFM/N2 and Lactobacillus gasseri ADH to human Caco-2 intestinal cells. For all three strains, adherence was concentration dependent, greater at acidic pH values, and significantly greater than adherence of a control dairy isolate, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus 1489. Adherence of L. acidophilus BG2FO4 and NCFM/N2 was decreased by protease treatment of the bacterial cells, whereas adherence of L. gasseri ADH either was not affected or was enhanced by protease treatment. Putative surface layer proteins were identified on L. acidophilus BG2FO4 and NCFM/N2 cells but were not involved in adherence. Periodate oxidation of bacterial cell surface carbohydrates significantly reduced adherence of L. gasseri ADH, moderately reduced adherence of L. acidophilus BG2FO4, and had no effect on adherence of L. acidophilus NCFM/N2. These results indicate that Lactobacillus species adhere to human intestinal cells via mechanisms which involve different combinations of carbohydrate and protein factors on the bacterial cell surface. The involvement of a secreted bridging protein, which has been proposed as the primary mediator of adherence of L. acidophilus BG2FO4 in spent culture supernatant (M.-H. Coconnier, T. R. Klaenhammer, S. Kernéis, M.-F. Bernet, and A. L. Servin, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 58:2034-2039, 1992), was not confirmed in this study. Rather, a pH effect on Caco-2 cells contributed significantly to the adherence of this strain in spent culture supernatant.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:7811085

  12. Soluble fibrin augments platelet/tumor cell adherence in vitro and in vivo, and enhances experimental metastasis.

    PubMed

    Biggerstaff, J P; Seth, N; Amirkhosravi, A; Amaya, M; Fogarty, S; Meyer, T V; Siddiqui, F; Francis, J L

    1999-01-01

    There is considerable evidence for a relationship between hemostasis and malignancy. Since platelet adhesion to tumor cells has been implicated in the metastatic process and plasma levels of fibrinogen (Fg) and soluble fibrin (sFn) monomer are increased in cancer, we hypothesized that these molecules might enhance tumor-platelet interaction. We therefore studied binding of sFn monomer to tumor cells in a static microplate adhesion assay and determined the effect of pre-treating tumor cells with sFn on tumor cell-induced thrombocytopenia and experimental metastasis. Soluble fibrin (produced by adding thrombin to FXIII- and plasminogen-free Fg in the presence of Gly-Pro-Arg-Pro-amide (GPRP-NH2) significantly increased platelet adherence to tumor cells. This effect was primarily mediated by the integrins alphaIIb beta3 on the platelet and CD 54 (ICAM-1) on the tumor cells. Platelets adhered to untreated A375 cells (28 +/- 8 platelets/tumor cell) and this was not significantly affected by pre-treatment of the tumor cells with fibrinogen or GPRP-NH2. Although thrombin treatment increased adherence, pre-incubation of the tumor cells with sFn resulted in a further increase in platelet binding to tumor cells. In contrast to untreated tumor cells, intravenous injection of sFn-treated A 375 cells reduced the platelet count in anticoagulated mice, supporting the in vitro finding that sFn enhanced tumor cell-platelet adherence. In a more aggressive model of experimental metastasis, treating tumor cells with sFn enhanced lung seeding by 65% compared to untreated cells. Extrapolation of our data to the clinical situation suggests that coagulation activation, and subsequent increase in circulating Fn monomer, may enhance platelet adhesion to circulating tumor cells and thereby facilitate metastatic spread. PMID:10919717

  13. Predictors of Non-Adherence to Breast Cancer Screening among Hospitalized Women

    PubMed Central

    Khaliq, Waseem; Aamar, Ali; Wright, Scott M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Disparities in screening mammography use persists among low income women, even those who are insured, despite the proven mortality benefit. A recent study reported that more than a third of hospitalized women were non-adherent with breast cancer screening. The current study explores prevalence of socio-demographic and clinical variables associated with non-adherence to screening mammography recommendations among hospitalized women. Patients and Methods A cross sectional bedside survey was conducted to collect socio-demographic and clinical comorbidity data thought to effect breast cancer screening adherence of hospitalized women aged 50–75 years. Logistic regression models were used to assess the association between these factors and non-adherence to screening mammography. Results Of 250 enrolled women, 61% were of low income, and 42% reported non-adherence to screening guidelines. After adjustment for socio-demographic and clinical predictors, three variables were found to be independently associated with non-adherence to breast cancer screening: low income (OR = 3.81, 95%CI; 1.84–7.89), current or ex-smoker (OR = 2.29, 95%CI; 1.12–4.67), and history of stroke (OR = 2.83, 95%CI; 1.21–6.60). By contrast, hospitalized women with diabetes were more likely to be compliant with breast cancer screening (OR = 2.70, 95%CI 1.35–5.34). Conclusion Because hospitalization creates the scenario wherein patients are in close proximity to healthcare resources, at a time when they may be reflecting upon their health status, strategies could be employed to counsel, educate, and motivate these patients towards health maintenance. Capitalizing on this opportunity would involve offering screening during hospitalization for those who are overdue, particularly for those who are at higher risk of disease. PMID:26709510

  14. Surface modification of closed plastic bags for adherent cell cultivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachmann, K.; Dohse, A.; Thomas, M.; Pohl, S.; Meyring, W.; Dittmar, K. E. J.; Lindenmeier, W.; Klages, C.-P.

    2011-07-01

    In modern medicine human mesenchymal stem cells are becoming increasingly important. However, a successful cultivation of this type of cells is only possible under very specific conditions. Of great importance, for instance, are the absence of contaminants such as foreign microbiological organisms, i.e., sterility, and the chemical functionalization of the ground on which the cells are grown. As cultivation of these cells makes high demands, a new procedure for cell cultivation has been developed in which closed plastic bags are used. For adherent cell growth chemical functional groups have to be introduced on the inner surface of the plastic bag. This can be achieved by a new, atmospheric-pressure plasma-based method presented in this paper. The method which was developed jointly by the Fraunhofer IST and the Helmholtz HZI can be implemented in automated equipment as is also shown in this contribution. Plasma process gases used include helium or helium-based gas mixtures (He + N2 + H2) and vapors of suitable film-forming agents or precursors such as APTMS, DACH, and TMOS in helium. The effect of plasma treatment is investigated by FTIR-ATR spectroscopy as well as surface tension determination based on contact angle measurements and XPS. Plasma treatment in nominally pure helium increases the surface tension of the polymer foil due to the presence of oxygen traces in the gas and oxygen diffusing through the gas-permeable foil, respectively, reacting with surface radical centers formed during contact with the discharge. Primary amino groups are obtained on the inner surface by treatment in mixtures with nitrogen and hydrogen albeit their amount is comparably small due to diffusion of oxygen through the gas-permeable bag, interfering with the plasma-amination process. Surface modifications introducing amino groups on the inner surface turned out to be most efficient in the promotion of cell growth.

  15. Validation of the Adherence Determinants Questionnaire scale among women with breast and cervical cancer1

    PubMed Central

    Lessa, Paula Renata Amorim; Ribeiro, Samila Gomes; Aquino, Priscila de Souza; de Almeida, Paulo Cesar; Pinheiro, Ana Karina Bezerra

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: the aim was to translate and culturally adapt the Adherence Determinants Questionnaire scale for the Portuguese language in the Brazilian context, and to check its reliability and validity to analyze the elements of the adherence of patients to the clinical treatment for breast and cervical cancer. Method: this was a methodological study, carried out in two oncology reference centers. The sample consisted of 198 participants, with 152 being treated for breast cancer and 46 being treated for cervical cancer. The content validation was performed by a committee of experts. The construct validation was demonstrated through factor analysis and the reliability was analyzed using Cronbach's alpha. Results: the committee of experts made the necessary adjustments so that the scale was adapted to the Brazilian context. The factor analysis suggested a reduction from seven to five factors and the maintenance of 38 items similar to those of the original scale. The reliability, investigated through Cronbach's alpha, was .829, showing high internal consistency. Conclusion: it was concluded that the Brazilian version of the Adherence Determinants Questionnaire scale is a valid and reliable instrument that is able to measure the elements of adherence to the treatment for breast and cervical cancer. PMID:26487149

  16. Patient-Oncologist Alliance, Psychosocial Well-Being, and Treatment Adherence Among Young Adults With Advanced Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Trevino, Kelly M.; Fasciano, Karen; Prigerson, Holly G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Patients who develop a strong alliance with their health care providers have been shown to have higher levels of psychosocial well-being and rates of treatment adherence. Young adults with cancer have lower levels of psychosocial well-being and treatment adherence relative to patients with cancer in other age groups. This study sought to evaluate the relationships between the patient-oncologist alliance, psychosocial well-being, and treatment adherence in young adults with advanced cancer. Patients and Methods Ninety-five young adults (age 20 to 40 years) with advanced cancer were administered measures of alliance, psychosocial well-being, willingness to adhere to treatment, and treatment adherence. Relationships between alliance and psychosocial well-being were examined bivariately. Multiple linear regression models examined the relationship between alliance and adherence, controlling for confounding influences (eg, psychosocial well-being). Results Alliance was significantly (P ≤ .01) and positively associated with greater perceived social support and less severe illness-related grief. After controlling for significant confounding influences (ie, metastases, appraised support, and grief), alliance remained significantly (P ≤ .01) associated with greater willingness to adhere to treatment and greater adherence to oral medication. Conclusion By developing a strong alliance, oncologists may enhance psychosocial well-being and increase treatment adherence in young adult patients with advanced cancer. PMID:23530105

  17. Traction Stresses Exerted by Adherent Cells: From Angiogenesis to Metastasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhart-King, Cynthia

    2010-03-01

    Cells exert traction stresses against their substrate that mediate their ability to sense the mechanical properties of their microenvironment. These same forces mediate cell adhesion, migration and the formation of stable cell-cell contacts during tissue formation. In this talk, I will present our data on the traction stresses generated by endothelial cells and metastatic breast cancer cells focused on understanding the processes of angiogenesis and metastasis, respectively. In the context of capillary formation, our data indicate that the mechanics of the substrate play a critical role in establishing endothelial cell-cell contacts. On more compliant substrates, endothelial cell shape and traction stresses polarize and promote the formation of stable cell-cell contacts. On stiffer substrates, traction stresses are less polarized and cell connectivity is disrupted. These data indicate that the mechanical properties of the microenvironment may drive cell connectivity and the formation of stable cell-cell contacts through the reorientation of traction stresses. In our studies of metastatic cell migration, we have found that traction stresses increase with increasing metastatic potential. We investigated three lines of varying metastatic potential (MCF10A, MCF7 and MDAMB231). MDAMB231, which are the most invasive, exert the most significant forces as measured by Traction Force Microscopy. These data present the possibility that cellular traction stress generation aids in the ability of metastatic cells to migrate through the matrix-dense tumor microenvironment. Such measurements are integral to link the mechanical and chemical microenvironment with the resulting response of the cell in health and disease.

  18. Adherence of Candida to cultured vascular endothelial cells: mechanisms of attachment and endothelial cell penetration.

    PubMed

    Rotrosen, D; Edwards, J E; Gibson, T R; Moore, J C; Cohen, A H; Green, I

    1985-12-01

    To elucidate the pathogenesis of hematogenous Candida infections, we developed an in vitro model of Candida adherence to and penetration of human endothelial cells. We enhanced or inhibited adherence in order to probe mechanisms of attachment. Adherence of Candida albicans showed a linear relation to Candida inoculum (range, 10(2)-10(5) cfu, r = .99, P less than .01) and exceeded that of less virulent Candida species and that of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (P less than .01). Candida immune serum blocked attachment (greater than 95% inhibition; P less than .001), however, this activity was abolished by immunoprecipitation of immune serum with C. albicans mannan (P less than .001) and was unaffected by immunoprecipitation with S. cerevisiae mannan or by adsorption with particulate chitin. Adherence was diminished by exposing C. albicans to heat (greater than 99% inhibition; P less than .01), UV light (98% inhibition; P less than .01), or sodium periodate (greater than 72% inhibition; P less than .01). An extract from heat-exposed C. albicans blocked adherence (greater than 51% inhibition; P less than .001). Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that viable or killed Candida organisms were attached to endothelial cells, were enveloped by membrane processes from the endothelial cell surface, and were incorporated into the endothelial cells within phagosomes. Cytochalasin B blocked incorporation without blocking surface attachment. PMID:3905987

  19. Educational opportunities in bladder cancer: increasing cystoscopic adherence and the availability of smoking-cessation programs.

    PubMed

    Kowalkowski, Marc A; Goltz, Heather Honoré; Petersen, Nancy J; Amiel, Gilad E; Lerner, Seth P; Latini, David M

    2014-12-01

    Cancer survivors who continue to smoke following diagnosis are at increased risk for recurrence. Yet, smoking prevalence among survivors is similar to the general population. Adherence to cystoscopic surveillance is an important disease-management strategy for non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) survivors, but data from Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program (SEER) suggest current adherence levels are insufficient to identify recurrences at critically early stages. This study was conducted to identify actionable targets for educational intervention to increase adherence to cystoscopic monitoring for disease recurrence or progression. NMIBC survivors (n = 109) completed telephone-based surveys. Adherence was determined by measuring time from diagnosis to interview date; cystoscopies received were then compared to American Urological Association (AUA) guidelines. Data were analyzed using non-parametric tests for univariate and logistic regression for multivariable analyses. Participants averaged 65 years (SD = 9.3) and were primarily white (95 %), male (75 %), married (75 %), and non-smokers (84 %). Eighty-three percent reported either Ta- or T1-stage bladder tumors. Forty-five percent met AUA guidelines for adherence. Compared to non-smokers, current smokers reported increased fear of recurrence and psychological distress (p < 0.05). In regression analyses, non-adherence was associated with smoking (OR = 33.91, p < 0.01), providing a behavioral marker to describe a survivor group with unmet needs that may contribute to low cystoscopic adherence. Research assessing survivorship needs and designing and evaluating educational programs for NMIBC survivors should be a high priority. Identifying unmet needs among NMIBC survivors and developing programs to address these needs may increase compliance with cystoscopic monitoring, improve outcomes, and enhance quality of life. PMID:24719024

  20. Examining Adherence With Recommendations for Follow-Up in the Prevention Among Colorectal Cancer Survivors Study

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Nikki A.; Berkowitz, Zahava; Rodriguez, Juan L.; Miller, Jacqueline W.; Sabatino, Susan A.; Pollack, Lori A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To explore the impact of health professionals’ recommendations for medical follow-up among colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors. Design Cross-sectional survey. Setting Mailed surveys and telephone interviews with CRC survivors in California. Sample 593 adults diagnosed with a primary CRC six to seven years before the time of the study. Methods Participants were identified through California Cancer Registry records and invited to take part in a survey delivered via mail or through telephone interview. Main Research Variables The survey assessed cancer history, current preventive health practices, health status, demographics, and other cancer-related experiences. Findings More than 70% of CRC survivors received recommendations for routine checkups, surveillance colonoscopy, or other cancer screenings after completing CRC treatment, and 18%–22% received no such recommendations. Recommendations were sometimes given in writing. Receiving a recommendation for a specific type of follow-up was associated with greater adherence to corresponding guidelines for routine checkups, colonoscopy, mammography, and Papanicolaou testing. Receiving written (versus unwritten) recommendations led to greater adherence only for colonoscopy. Conclusions Most CRC survivors reported receiving recommendations for long-term medical follow-up and largely adhered to guidelines for follow-up. Receiving a health professional’s recommendation for follow-up was consistently associated with patient adherence, and limited evidence showed that recommendations in written form led to greater adherence than unwritten recommendations. Implications for Nursing Given the increasingly important role of the oncology nurse in survivorship care, nurses can be instrumental in ensuring appropriate surveillance and follow-up care among CRC survivors. Conveying recommendations in written form, as is done in survivorship care plans, may be particularly effective. PMID:25901375

  1. Adherence to Cancer Prevention Recommendations and Antioxidant and Inflammatory Status in Premenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Yukiko; Beckford, Fanchon; Cooney, Robert V.; Franke, Adrian A.; Maskarinec, Gertraud

    2016-01-01

    For cancer prevention, the World Cancer Research Fund & American Institute for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) emphasize recommendations to improve individual behavior including avoidance of tobacco products, maintaining a lean body mass, participating in physical activity, consuming a plant based diet, and minimizing the consumption of calorie dense foods, such as sodas, red and processed meats, and alcohol. In this study of 275 healthy premenopausal women, we explored the association of adherence scores with levels of three biomarkers of antioxidant and inflammation status: serum C-reactive protein (CRP), serum γ-tocopherol, and urinary F2-isoprostane. The statistical analysis applied linear regression across categories of adherence to WCRF/AICR recommendations. Overall, 72 women were classified as low (≤4), 150 as moderate (5–6), and 53 as high adherers (≥7). The unadjusted means for CRP were 2.7, 2.0, and 1.7 mg/L for low, moderate, and high adherers (ptrend=0.03); this association was strengthened after adjustment for confounders (ptrend=0.006). The respective values for serum γ-tocopherol were 1.97, 1.63, and 1.45 μg/mL (ptrend=0.02 before and ptrend=0.03 after adjustment). Only for urinary F2-isoprostane, the lower values in high adherers (16.0, 14.5, and 13.3 ng/mL) did not reach statistical significance (ptrend=0.18). In an analysis by body mass index (BMI), overweight and obese women had higher biomarker levels than normal weight women; the trend was significant for CRP (ptrend<0.001) and γ-tocopherol (ptrend=0.003) but not for F2-isoprostane (ptrend=0.14). These findings suggest that both adherence to the WCRF/AICR guidelines and normal BMI status are associated with lower levels of biomarkers that indicate oxidative stress and inflammation. PMID:26051510

  2. A Personalized Automated Messaging System to Improve Adherence to Prostate Cancer Screening: Research Protocol

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Public adherence to cancer screening guidelines is poor. Patient confusion over multiple recommendations and modalities for cancer screening has been found to be a major barrier to screening adherence. Such problems will only increase as screening guidelines and timetables become individualized. Objective We propose to increase compliance with cancer screening through two-way rich media mobile messaging based on personalized risk assessment. Methods We propose to develop and test a product that will store algorithms required to personalize cancer screening in a central database managed by a rule-based workflow engine, and implemented via messaging to the patient’s mobile phone. We will conduct a randomized controlled trial focusing on prostate cancer screening to study the hypothesis that mobile reminders improve adherence to screening guidelines. We will also explore a secondary hypothesis that patients who reply to the messaging reminders are more engaged and at lower risk of non-adherence. We will conduct a randomized controlled trial in a sample of males between 40 and 75 years (eligible for prostate cancer screening) who are willing to receive text messages, email, or automated voice messages. Participants will be recruited from a primary care clinic and asked to schedule prostate cancer screening at the clinic within the next 3 weeks. The intervention group will receive reminders and confirmation communications for making an appointment, keeping the appointment, and reporting the test results back to the investigators. Three outcomes will be evaluated: (1) the proportion of participants who make an appointment with a physician following a mobile message reminder, (2) the proportion of participants who keep the appointment, and (3) the proportion of participants who report the results of the screening (via text or Web). Results This is an ongoing project, supported by by a small business commercialization grant from the National Center for

  3. A validated measure of adherence to antibiotic prophylaxis in children with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Natalie A; Kronenberger, William G; Hampton, Kisha C; Bloom, Ellen M; Rampersad, Angeli G; Roberson, Christopher P; Shapiro, Amy D

    2016-01-01

    Background Antibiotic prophylaxis is a mainstay in sickle cell disease management. However, adherence is estimated at only 66%. This study aimed to develop and validate a Sickle Cell Antibiotic Adherence Level Evaluation (SCAALE) to promote systematic and detailed adherence evaluation. Methods A 28-item questionnaire was created, covering seven adherence areas. General Adherence Ratings from the parent and one health care provider and medication possession ratios were obtained as validation measures. Results Internal consistency was very good to excellent for the total SCAALE (α=0.89) and four of the seven subscales. Correlations between SCAALE scores and validation measures were strong for the total SCAALE and five of the seven subscales. Conclusion The SCAALE provides a detailed, quantitative, multidimensional, and global measurement of adherence and can promote clinical care and research. PMID:27354768

  4. Adherence to physical activity guidelines among cancer support group participants.

    PubMed

    Stevinson, C; Lydon, A; Amir, Z

    2014-03-01

    Physical activity is recommended after cancer diagnosis for physical function, quality of life and survival benefits. This study provided preliminary data on the prevalence of physical activity among adult men and women with cancer in the UK. As part of a national survey of cancer support group participation, questionnaires including items on leisure-time physical activity and demographic information were completed by 748 cancer survivors. Overall, 395 (52.8%) participants reported no weekly moderate or vigorous intensity physical activity, 221 (29.5%) reported some activity but below minimum recommendations and 132 (17.6%) were meeting published guidelines. Gender, health status and socio-economic status were independently associated with meeting guidelines. Among participants in good or fair health who were not meeting guidelines, 59.9% thought that they ought to be more physically active. In conclusion, overall levels of physical activity are low among cancer survivors in the UK. However, the majority of insufficiently active participants showed awareness of the need to increase their activity, and may be receptive to interventions for promoting physical activity in this population. PMID:24127843

  5. Depression and medication adherence among breast cancer survivors: bridging the gap with the theory of planned behaviour.

    PubMed

    Manning, Mark; Bettencourt, B Ann

    2011-09-01

    Evidence suggests that more depressed breast cancer patients will less likely adhere to treatment plans. This study presents evidence that the theory of planned behaviour mediates the relation between depression and intentions to adhere to treatment plans and between depression and lack of adherence to medication regime. Two hundred and thirteen women undergoing breast cancer treatment participated in this study. Measures of depressive symptoms and planned behaviour variables were collected at the first time point; measures of medication adherence were collected at the second time point. Structural equation models were utilised to fit the data to the proposed models. Depressive symptoms were significantly correlated to both intentions and medication adherence. In support of hypotheses, the relation between depressive symptoms and treatment intention was mediated by attitudes towards health maintenance plans. The relation between depressive symptoms and medication adherence was fully mediated by the planned behaviour process. Conditions under which treatment intentions and perceptions of control in adhering to treatment were most related to medication adherence were elucidated. The results point to avenues for interventions to increase medication adherence among breast cancer patients. Manipulating attitudes and perceptions of control towards treatment plans will potentially serve to increase medication adherence. PMID:21929477

  6. A rapid and sensitive fluorometric microassay for determining cell mediated cytotoxicity to adherent growing cell lines.

    PubMed

    Krüger-Krasagakes, S; Garbe, C; Kossman, P; Orfanos, C E

    1992-11-25

    In order to measure cell mediated cytotoxicity to adherent growing cell lines in vitro more rapidly and conveniently, a fluorometric microassay was developed and results were compared with those obtained by the 51Cr release assay. The fluorometric method is based on the hydrolysis of the fluorochrome 4-methylumbelliferyl heptanoate (MUH) by intracellular esterases of viable cells. Melanoma cell monolayers were incubated with lymphokine activated killer (LAK) cells for 4 h at various effector: target (E:T) cell ratios (E:T = 16, 8, 4, 2:1). Thereafter surviving adherent melanoma cells were stained with MUH for 30 min and fluorescence was measured directly in a 96 well plate reader. For the calculation of LAK cell cytotoxicity fluorescence values were corrected for the number of nonspecifically detached tumor cells during the washes and the number of nonspecifically adherent LAK cells. Using identical target and effector cell preparations both assays showed a nearly proportional increase of percentage cytotoxicity with rising numbers of lymphocytes. Compared with the 51Cr release assay, however, higher cytotoxicity values were obtained with the fluorometric MUH microassay: 57% with MUH versus 26% with 51Cr and 39% versus 14% for cell lines StML-11 and SKMel-28, respectively (E:T ratio = 16:1). The higher cytotoxicity rates obtained with the fluorometric MUH microassay were not due to the additional 30 min staining with MUH or due to nonspecific hydrolysis of MUH by extracellular esterases released from damaged cells, as could be shown by a series of experiments. In conclusion, a simple and rapid fluorometric microassay has been developed showing reliable reproducibility and a higher sensitivity compared with the 51Cr release assay for the determination of cellular cytotoxicity to adherent growing cell lines, avoiding hazardous radioactive labels. PMID:1431156

  7. Adherence to Cancer Screening Guidelines and Predictors of Improvement Among Participants in the Kansas State Employee Wellness Program

    PubMed Central

    Engelman, Kimberly K.; Shireman, Theresa I.; Ellerbeck, Edward F.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Employee wellness programs (EWPs) have been used to implement worksite-based cancer prevention and control interventions. However, little is known about whether these programs result in improved adherence to cancer screening guidelines or how participants’ characteristics affect subsequent screening. This study was conducted to describe cancer screening behaviors among participants in a state EWP and identify factors associated with screening adherence among those who were initially nonadherent. Methods We identified employees and their dependents who completed health risk assessments (HRAs) as part of the Kansas state EWP in both 2008 and 2009. We examined baseline rates of adherence to cancer screening guidelines in 2008 and factors associated with adherence in 2009 among participants who were initially nonadherent. Results Of 53,095 eligible participants, 13,222 (25%) participated in the EWP in 2008 and 6,205 (12%) participated in both years. Among the multiyear participants, adherence was high at baseline to screening for breast (92.5%), cervical (91.8%), and colorectal cancer (72.7%). Of participants who were initially nonadherent in 2008, 52.4%, 41.3%, and 33.5%, respectively, became adherent in the following year to breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer screening. Suburban/urban residence and more frequent doctor visits predicted adherence to breast and colorectal cancer screening guidelines. Conclusion The effectiveness of EWPs for increasing cancer screening is limited by low HRA participation rates, high rates of adherence to screening at baseline, and failure of nonadherent participants to get screening. Improving overall adherence to cancer screening guidelines among employees will require efforts to increase HRA participation, stronger interventions for nonadherent participants, and better access to screening for rural employees. PMID:23845176

  8. WCRF/AICR recommendation adherence and breast cancer incidence among postmenopausal women with and without non-modifiable risk factors.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Sarah J O; Inoue-Choi, Maki; Lazovich, DeAnn; Robien, Kim

    2016-06-01

    Taller height, family history of breast cancer, greater number of years of potential fertility and nulliparity are established non-modifiable risk factors for postmenopausal breast cancer. Greater adherence to the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) diet, physical activity and body weight recommendations has previously been shown to be associated with lower breast cancer risk. However, no prior studies have evaluated whether women with non-modifiable risk factors receive similar benefits from recommendation adherence compared to women without these risk factors. In the Iowa Women's Health Study prospective cohort, we investigated whether associations of WCRF/AICR recommendation adherence differed by the presence/absence of non-modifiable breast cancer risk factors. Baseline (1986) questionnaire data from 36,626 postmenopausal women were used to create adherence scores for the WCRF/AICR recommendations (maximum score = 8.0). Overall and single recommendation adherence in relation to breast cancer risk (n = 3,189 cases) across levels of non-modifiable risk factors were evaluated using proportional hazards regression. Mean adherence score was 5.0 points (range: 0.5-8.0). Higher adherence scores (score ≥ 6.0 vs. ≤ 3.5, HR = 0.76, 95% CI = 0.67-0.87), and adherence to the individual recommendations for body weight and alcohol intake were associated with a lower breast cancer incidence. While not statistically significant among women with more non-modifiable risk factors (score ≥ 6.0 vs. ≤ 3.5, HR = 0.76, 95% CI = 0.36-1.63), hazard ratios were comparable to women with the no non-modifiable risk factors (score ≥ 6.0 vs. ≤ 3.5, HR = 0.74, 95% CI = 0.49-0.93) (p-interaction = 0.57). WCRF/AICR recommendation adherence is associated with lower breast cancer risk, regardless of non-modifiable risk factor status. PMID:26756307

  9. Hepatitis B virus efficiently infects non-adherent hepatoma cells via human sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide

    PubMed Central

    Okuyama-Dobashi, Kaori; Kasai, Hirotake; Tanaka, Tomohisa; Yamashita, Atsuya; Yasumoto, Jun; Chen, Wenjia; Okamoto, Toru; Maekawa, Shinya; Watashi, Koichi; Wakita, Takaji; Ryo, Akihide; Suzuki, Tetsuro; Matsuura, Yoshiharu; Enomoto, Nobuyuki; Moriishi, Kohji

    2015-01-01

    Sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP) has been reported as a functional receptor for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. However, HBV could not efficiently infect HepG2 cells expressing NTCP (NTCP-HepG2 cells) under adherent monolayer-cell conditions. In this study, NTCP was mainly detected in the basolateral membrane region, but not the apical site, of monolayer NTCP-HepG2 cells. We hypothesized that non-adherent cell conditions of infection would enhance HBV infectivity. Non-adherent NTCP-HepG2 cells were prepared by treatment with trypsin and EDTA, which did not degrade NTCP in the membrane fraction. HBV successfully infected NTCP-HepG2 cells at a viral dose 10 times lower in non-adherent phase than in adherent phase. Efficient infection of non-adherent NTCP-HepG2 cells with blood-borne or cell-culture-derived HBV was observed and was remarkably impaired in the presence of the myristoylated preS1 peptide. HBV could also efficiently infect HepaRG cells under non-adherent cell conditions. We screened several compounds using our culture system and identified proscillaridin A as a potent anti-HBV agent with an IC50 value of 7.2 nM. In conclusion, non-adherent host cell conditions of infection augmented HBV infectivity in an NTCP-dependent manner, thus providing a novel strategy to identify anti-HBV drugs and investigate the mechanism of HBV infection. PMID:26592202

  10. Fluorescence assay for the detection of adherent Candida yeasts to target cells in microtest plates.

    PubMed

    Borg-von Zepelin, M; Wagner, T

    1995-01-01

    We describe an assay based on photometric analysis for the measurement of adherence of Candida species to epithelial target cells (Vero cell line). Adherent Candida cells were detected by staining the cells with the fluorescent dye Calcofluor white (CFW), which binds to chitin and glucan in the yeasts. The tests were performed on microtest plates, which were analysed automatically by fluorescence plate readers. The assay is based on the following steps: (i) coating of the microtest plates with target cells (e.g. Vero cells); (ii) infection with Candida: (iii) staining of Candida with CFW; (iv) rinsing to remove non-adherent Candida cells and unbound dye; (v) detection of adherent fluorescent Candida cells. The test was able to detect 4 x 10(4) cells ml-1. The standard deviation was +/- 8%. Day-to-day variation was +/- 10% at most. The adherence of strains of different Candida species was assayed by a standard procedure. The results confirmed the order of adherence, with C. albicans ranking first, followed by C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis and C. glabrata. PMID:8569807

  11. Cell phones and cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer and cell phones; Do cell phones cause cancer? ... Several major studies show no link between cell phones and cancer at this time. However, since the information available is based on short-term studies, the impact of many years of exposure ...

  12. Cell phones and cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer and cell phones; Do cell phones cause cancer? ... Several major studies show no link between cell phones and cancer at this time. However, since the information available is based on short-term studies, the impact of many years of ...

  13. Mitogenic activation of B cells in vitro: the properties of adherent accessory cells as revealed by partition analysis.

    PubMed

    Kettman, J R; Soederberg, A; Lefkovits, I

    1986-08-15

    The requirement of B cells activated by mitogen (dextran sulfate plus lipopolysaccharide) for accessory cells was studied by partition analysis. Small numbers of splenic B cells were activated to clonal growth, as determined by visual inspection, and to immunoglobulin (Ig) synthesis, as determined by release of Ig into the culture fluid. By placing irradiated adherent cells in the periphery of the microculture wells and forcing responding cells to different areas of the well (slant experiments), it was observed that no cell contact was necessary for B cell activation, and that "promoted" contact ("Rock and Roll" experiments) does not increase the efficiency of activation. Sequential microcultures suggest that only some irradiated adherent cells act as accessory cells, but they can perform this function to more than one B cell. Attempts to perform limiting dilution analysis by varying irradiated adherent cell input showed non-single-hit behavior. When the data were rearranged, taking into account the distribution of irradiated adherent cells, then single-hit behavior with about 1 to 5% of irradiated adherent cells acting as an accessory cells for B cell clonal activation was observed. The evidence suggests that an uncommon irradiated adherent cell releases a soluble factor necessary for B cell activation and/or clonal proliferation. PMID:3488344

  14. Effect of hydrostatic pressure on the viability of non-adherent HL-60 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabuki, Takahiro; Yamanoha, Banri; Shimizu, Akio

    2013-06-01

    We investigated the effect of hydrostatic pressure on the viability of non-adherent HL-60 cell line derived from leukemic cells over a high pressure range. The HL-60 cells are resistant to pressures of up to 100 MPa under pressurization for 20 min at 25°C. However, cell viability decreased markedly between 100 and 200 MPa, and almost all cells died above 200 MPa. In the case of pressures up to 25 MPa at 25°C for four days, the viability of HL-60 cells was inhibited by increasing the pressure above 20 MPa. Although high viability was observed between 1.6 and 2.0 MPa for adherent astrocytes, viability did not change over pressures up to 2.0 MPa in the case of non-adherent HL-60 cells. It is thought that the response of cells to pressure varies among cell types.

  15. Late Adherent Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Form Bone and Restore the Hematopoietic Microenvironment In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Vianna, Verônica Fernandes; Bonfim, Danielle Cabral; Cavalcanti, Amanda dos Santos; Fernandes, Marco Cury; Kahn, Suzana Assad; Casado, Priscila Ladeira; Lima, Inayá Correa; Murray, Samuel S.; Murray, Elsa J. Brochmann; Duarte, Maria Eugenia Leite

    2013-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) are a valuable resource for skeletal regenerative medicine because of their osteogenic potential. In spite of the very general term “stem cell,” this population of cells is far from homogeneous, and different BMSCs clones have greatly different phenotypic properties and, therefore, potentially different therapeutic potential. Adherence to a culture flask surface is a primary defining characteristic of BMSCs. We hypothesized that based on the adherence time we could obtain an enriched population of cells with a greater therapeutic potential. We characterized two populations of bone marrow-derived cells, those that adhered by three days (R-cells) and those that did not adhere by three days but did by six days (L-cells). Clones derived from L-cells could be induced into adipogenic, chondrogenic, and osteogenic differentiation in vitro. L-cells appeared to have greater proliferative capacity, as manifested by larger colony diameter and clones with higher CD146 expression. Only clones from L-cells developed bone marrow stroma in vivo. We conclude that the use of late adherence of BMSCs is one parameter that can be used to enrich for cells that will constitute a superior final product for cell therapy in orthopedics. PMID:23710460

  16. Pap test adherence, cervical cancer perceptions, and HPV knowledge among HIV-infected women in a community health setting.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Crystal Chapman; Chandler, Rasheeta; McMillan, Susan; Kromrey, Jeffrey; Johnson-Mallard, Versie; Kurtyka, Don

    2015-01-01

    The Health Belief Model (HBM) has been widely used as a framework to explain health behaviors in diverse populations, but little HBM research has focused on HIV-infected women and their increased risks for cervical cancer. We used Champion's Health Belief Model and Self-Efficacy scales to assess relationships between Pap test adherence and constructs of the HBM among 300 HIV-infected women. In addition, we assessed the relationship between HPV and cervical cancer knowledge and key HBM concepts. Participants reported low levels of knowledge regarding risk for cervical cancer and HPV. They perceived lower personal risk for cervical cancer. Women with higher perceived self-efficacy and lower perceived barrier scores reported better Pap test adherence. Findings indicate that HIV-infected women are not aware of the risk for cervical cancer and may not take preventive actions. Further research is needed to identify the full range of factors that impact adherence to cervical cancer screening. PMID:25769754

  17. Filamentous hemagglutinin has a major role in mediating adherence of Bordetella pertussis to human WiDr cells.

    PubMed Central

    Urisu, A; Cowell, J L; Manclark, C R

    1986-01-01

    [35S]methionine-labeled Bordetella pertussis adhered to monolayers of WiDr cells, an epitheliumlike cell line from a human intestinal carcinoma. Adherence was proportional to the density of the WiDr cells and to the concentration of B. pertussis in the assay. Adherence of virulent phase I strains Tohama phase I, 114, and BP338 was much greater than adherence of avirulent strains Tohama phase III and 423 phase IV. Mutants deficient in the production of the filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA) were hemagglutination negative and adhered to WiDr cells much less efficiently than the parent strains. Preincubation of B. pertussis cells with FHA increased their hemagglutination activity and adherence to WiDr cells. Goat antibody to FHA inhibited, in a dose-dependent manner, the adherence of strain Tohama I but not the adherence of FHA-deficient mutant Tohama 325. At similar protein concentrations, normal goat antibody, goat antibody to pertussis toxin, or the Fab fragments of goat antibody to serotype 2 fimbriae had no effect on adherence. Also, an FHA-positive strain without fimbriae showed high adherence, while a fimbriated FHA-deficient mutant adhered poorly. Our data indicate that FHA plays a major role in adherence of B. pertussis to human WiDr cells. Fimbriae do not appear to mediate attachment of B. pertussis to WiDr cells. PMID:2872165

  18. Adherence to cancer prevention recommendations and antioxidant and inflammatory status in premenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Yukiko; Beckford, Fanchon; Cooney, Robert V; Franke, Adrian A; Maskarinec, Gertraud

    2015-07-14

    For cancer prevention, the World Cancer Research Fund and American Institute for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) emphasise recommendations to improve individual behaviour, including avoidance of tobacco products, maintaining a lean body mass, participating in physical activity, consuming a plant-based diet, and minimising the consumption of energy-dense foods, such as sodas, red and processed meats and alcohol. In the present study of 275 healthy premenopausal women, we explored the association of adherence scores with levels of three biomarkers of antioxidant and inflammation status: serum C-reactive protein (CRP), serum γ-tocopherol and urinary F2-isoprostane. The statistical analysis applied linear regression across categories of adherence to WCRF/AICR recommendations. Overall, seventy-two women were classified as low ( ≤ 4), 150 as moderate (5-6), and fifty-three as high adherers ( ≥ 7). The unadjusted means for CRP were 2.7, 2.0 and 1.7 mg/l for low, moderate and high adherers (P trend= 0.03); this association was strengthened after adjustment for confounders (P trend= 0.006). The respective values for serum γ-tocopherol were 1.97, 1.63 and 1.45 μg/ml (P trend= 0.02 before and P trend= 0.03 after adjustment). Only for urinary F2-isoprostane, the lower values in high adherers (16.0, 14.5, and 13.3 ng/ml) did not reach statistical significance (P trend= 0.18). In an analysis by BMI, overweight and obese women had higher biomarker levels than normal weight women; the trend was significant for CRP (P trend< 0.001) and γ-tocopherol (P trend= 0.003) but not for F2-isoprostane (P trend= 0.14). These findings suggest that both adherence to the WCRF/AICR guidelines and normal BMI status are associated with lower levels of biomarkers that indicate oxidative stress and inflammation. PMID:26051510

  19. Behavioral Interventions to Enhance Adherence to Hormone Therapy in Breast Cancer Survivors: A Systematic Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Hurtado-de-Mendoza, Alejandra; Cabling, Mark L; Lobo, Tania; Dash, Chiranjeev; Sheppard, Vanessa B

    2016-08-01

    Adjuvant hormone therapy contributes to reductions in recurrence and mortality for women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. However, adherence to hormone therapy is suboptimal. This is the first systematic literature review examining interventions aimed at improving hormone therapy adherence. Researchers followed the PRISMA guidelines. PubMed-Medline, CINAHL, PsychInfo, Ovid-Medline, and EMBASE were searched for behavioral interventions that aimed to enhance adherence to adjuvant hormone therapy in breast cancer survivors. A total of 376 articles were screened for eligibility. Five articles met the study criteria. All interventions presented adherence outcomes after 1-year follow-up. None significantly enhanced adherence compared to the usual care in the primary analysis (odds ratios ranged from 1.03 to 2.06 for adherence and from 1.11 to 1.18 for persistence). All studies targeted patients, and only 3 studies included postmenopausal breast cancer patients. Three tested the same intervention consisting of educational materials. Only one was conducted in the United States. Only one reported participants' ethnicity. Overall, it was unclear whether the studies contained bias. The use of different terminology and operationalization of adherence made comparisons challenging. Interventions to improve adherence to adjuvant hormone therapy in US breast cancer populations that include survivors who are ethnically diverse, premenopausal, and receiving tamoxifen therapy are necessary to inform future interventions. Adoption of consistent adherence definitions/measurements will provide a clearer framework to consolidate aggregate findings. Given the limited efficacy of tested interventions, it is important to engage oncologists and researchers to develop approaches that target different components associated with hormone therapy adherence, such as doctor-patient communication or social support. PMID:27133733

  20. The effect of adherent and phagocytic cells on human lymphocyte PHA responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Potter, M R; Moore, M

    1977-01-01

    The effect of small numbers of adherent and phagocytic cells on the human peripheral blood lymphocyte response to PHA was examined by depleting these cells from lymphocyte preparations. Lymphocyte preparations obtained by centrifugation on Ficoll--Triosil, which contained on average 85% lymphocytes, responded well to PHA. Depletion of cells adhering to nylon fibre, giving a population containing on average 95% lymphocytes, resulted in a considerably reduced response. Depletion of cells that adhered to plastic or ingested iron powder to give populations containing on average 90% lymphocytes, also reduced the PHA response, but to a lesser extent. Reduction in PHA responsiveness correlated with increasing lymphocyte purity. The responsiveness of nylon-column-filtered cells could be restored by adding a small number of cells from a monocyte-rich population. PMID:300303

  1. Factors affecting uptake and adherence to breast cancer chemoprevention: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, S. G.; Sestak, I.; Forster, A.; Partridge, A.; Side, L.; Wolf, M. S.; Horne, R.; Wardle, J.; Cuzick, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Preventive therapy is a risk reduction option for women who have an increased risk of breast cancer. The effectiveness of preventive therapy to reduce breast cancer incidence depends on adequate levels of uptake and adherence to therapy. We aimed to systematically review articles reporting uptake and adherence to therapeutic agents to prevent breast cancer among women at increased risk, and identify the psychological, clinical and demographic factors affecting these outcomes. Design Searches were carried out in PubMed, CINAHL, EMBASE and PsychInfo, yielding 3851 unique articles. Title, abstract and full text screening left 53 articles, and a further 4 studies were identified from reference lists, giving a total of 57. This review was prospectively registered with PROSPERO (CRD42014014957). Results Twenty-four articles reporting 26 studies of uptake in 21 423 women were included in a meta-analysis. The pooled uptake estimate was 16.3% [95% confidence interval (CI) 13.6–19.0], with high heterogeneity (I2 = 98.9%, P < 0.001). Uptake was unaffected by study location or agent, but was significantly higher in trials [25.2% (95% CI 18.3–32.2)] than in non-trial settings [8.7% (95% CI 6.8–10.9)] (P < 0.001). Factors associated with higher uptake included having an abnormal biopsy, a physician recommendation, higher objective risk, fewer side-effect or trial concerns, and older age. Adherence (day-to-day use or persistence) over the first year was adequate. However, only one study reported a persistence of ≥80% by 5 years. Factors associated with lower adherence included allocation to tamoxifen (versus placebo or raloxifene), depression, smoking and older age. Risk of breast cancer was discussed in all qualitative studies. Conclusion Uptake of therapeutic agents for the prevention of breast cancer is low, and long-term persistence is often insufficient for women to experience the full preventive effect. Uptake is higher in trials, suggesting further work

  2. Beyond Adherence: Health Care Disparities and the Struggle to Get Screened for Colon Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hunleth, Jean M; Steinmetz, Emily K; McQueen, Amy; James, Aimee S

    2016-01-01

    Dominant health care professional discourses on cancer take for granted high levels of individual responsibility in cancer prevention, especially in expectations about preventive screening. At the same time, adhering to screening guidelines can be difficult for lower income and under-insured individuals. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a prime example. Since the advent of CRC screening, disparities in CRC mortality have widened along lines of income, insurance, and race in the United States. We used a community-engaged research method, Photovoice, to examine how people from medically under-served areas experienced and gave meaning to CRC screening. In our analysis, we first discuss ways in which participants recounted screening as a struggle. Second, we highlight a category that participants suggested was key to successful screening: social connections. Finally, we identify screening as an emotionally laden process that is underpinned by feelings of uncertainty, guilt, fear, and relief. We discuss the importance of these findings to research and practice. PMID:26160775

  3. Adherence to human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC-L) of Plasmodium vivax isolates from Colombia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background For years Plasmodium vivax has been considered the cause of benign malaria. Nevertheless, it has been observed that this parasite can produce a severe disease comparable to Plasmodium falciparum. It has been suggested that some physiopathogenic processes might be shared by these two species, such as cytoadherence. Recently, it has been demonstrated that P. vivax-infected erythrocytes (Pv-iEs) have the capacity to adhere to endothelial cells, in which intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) seems to be involved in this process. Methods Adherence capacity of 21 Colombian isolates, from patients with P. vivax mono-infection to a microvascular line of human lung endothelium (HMVEC-L) was assessed in static conditions and binding was evaluated at basal levels or in tumor necrosis factor (TNF) stimulated cells. The adherence specificity for the ICAM-1 receptor was determined through inhibition with an anti-CD54 monoclonal antibody. Results The majority of P. vivax isolates, 13 out of 21 (61.9%), adhered to the HMVEC-L cells, but P. vivax adherence was at least seven times lower when compared to the four P. falciparum isolates. Moreover, HMVEC-L stimulation with TNF led to an increase of 1.6-fold in P. vivax cytoadhesion, similar to P. falciparum isolates (1.8-fold) at comparable conditions. Also, blockage of ICAM-1 receptor with specific antibodies showed a significant 50% adherence reduction. Conclusions Plasmodium vivax isolates found in Colombia are also capable of adhering specifically in vitro to lung endothelial cells, via ICAM-1 cell receptor, both at basal state and after cell stimulation with TNF. Collectively, these findings reinforce the concept of cytoadherence for P. vivax, but here, to a different endothelial cell line and using geographical distinct isolates, thus contributing to understanding P. vivax biology. PMID:24080027

  4. Relationship of cell surface morphology and composition of Streptococcus salivarius K+ to adherence and hydrophobicity.

    PubMed Central

    Weerkamp, A H; van der Mei, H C; Slot, J W

    1987-01-01

    The cell surfaces of a range of variants of Streptococcus salivarius HB, altered in cell wall antigen composition, were compared with those of the parent with respect to adherence, ability to adsorb to hexadecane, morphology, and exposure of lipoteichoic acid (LTA). Adherence to host surfaces was measured by using both saliva-coated hydroxyapatite beads and tissue-cultured HeLa cells, and interbacterial adherence was measured by using Veillonella alcalescens V1 cells. Progressive loss of the protease-sensitive fibril classes was generally associated with decreasing ability to adsorb to hexadecane. However, increased exposure of protein antigen C (AgC) increased the apparent hydrophobicity of the cell. This correlated with the finding that AgC was the most hydrophobic of the solubilized fibrillar cell wall antigens. Collectively, this demonstrates that adsorption to hydrophobic ligands is directly related to the density of the fibrillar layer on the cells and the properties and surface exposure of specific fibril classes. The involvement of hydrophobic interactions in AgC-associated attachment was suggested by its sensitivity to low levels of the hydrophobic bond-breaking agent tetramethyl urea, although the reduction was not to the level of adherence observed with strains lacking AgC. However, hydrophobicity was less essential to other adherence reactions. Circumstantial evidence, including immunoelectron microscopy, showing that LTA was virtually absent from the fibrillar layer, whole-cell enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, suggesting that surface exposure of LTA related inversely to the density of the fibrillar layer, and agarose gel electrophoresis, showing that LTA was not specifically associated with protein fibrillar antigens, strongly suggested that LTA does not confer hydrophobic properties to these cells and is not involved in adherence reactions associated with the cell wall protein antigens. Images PMID:3804445

  5. Adherence to adjuvant endocrine therapy in estrogen receptor–positive breast cancer patients with regular follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Renée; Latreille, Jean; Matte, Claire; Desjardins, Pierre; Bergeron, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Background Adjuvant hormonal therapy is crucial in the treatment of estrogen receptor–positive breast cancer. The nonadherence rate to hormonal treatment is reported to be as high as 60%. The goal of this study was to evaluate the factors evoked by the patients as well as the demographic and disease-related factors that could be associated with nonadherence to adjuvant hormonal therapy. Methods All consecutive patients treated for an estrogen receptor–positive breast cancer who showed up for regular follow-up with a single breast specialist between November 2008 and April 2009 were included in the study. We assessed adherence to hormonal therapy (either with tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitor). Reasons for adherence and nonadherence were collected. Records were also reviewed for demographic and cancer characteristics and for treatment components. Results We included 161 patients in the study; 150 (93.2%) adhered to hormonal treatment. Side effects and absence of conviction were the main reasons for nonadherence. The importance of the diagnosis of cancer, fear of recurrence and regular follow-up were reported as the main reasons for adherence. Conclusion Severity of disease and side effects are associated with nonadherence to treatment. Strict follow-up appears to be a necessary adjunct in the adherence to treatment. The association between demographic and cancer characteristics and treatment components needs further investigation. However, these factors may help identify patients at risk of nonadherence and help the oncology team. PMID:24461223

  6. Predictors of adherence to a 12-week exercise program among men treated for prostate cancer: ENGAGE study.

    PubMed

    Craike, Melinda; Gaskin, Cadeyrn J; Courneya, Kerry S; Fraser, Steve F; Salmon, Jo; Owen, Patrick J; Broadbent, Suzanne; Livingston, Patricia M

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the factors that influence adherence to exercise programs is necessary to develop effective interventions for people with cancer. We examined the predictors of adherence to a supervised exercise program for participants in the ENGAGE study - a cluster randomized controlled trial that assessed the efficacy of a clinician-referred 12-week exercise program among men treated for prostate cancer. Demographic, clinical, behavioral, and psychosocial data from 52 participants in the intervention group were collected at baseline through self-report and medical records. Adherence to the supervised exercise program was assessed through objective attendance records. Adherence to the supervised exercise program was 80.3%. In the univariate analyses, cancer-specific quality of life subscales (role functioning r = 0.37, P = 0.01; sexual activity r = 0.26, P = 0.06; fatigue r = -0.26, P = 0.06, and hormonal symptoms r = -0.31, P = 0.03) and education (d = -0.60, P = 0.011) were associated with adherence. In the subsequent multivariate analysis, role functioning (B = 0.309, P = 0.019) and hormonal symptoms (B = -0.483, P = 0.054) independently predicted adherence. Men who experienced more severe hormonal symptoms had lower levels of adherence to the exercise program. Those who experienced more positive perceptions of their ability to perform daily tasks and leisure activities had higher levels of adherence to the exercise program. Hormonal symptoms and role functioning need to be considered when conducting exercise programs for men who have been treated for prostate cancer. PMID:26872005

  7. Effect of Lewis blood group antigen expression on bacterial adherence to COS-1 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gaffney, R A; Schaeffer, A J; Anderson, B E; Duncan, J L

    1994-01-01

    Epithelial cells from secretor individuals demonstrate decreased bacterial adherence compared with cells from nonsecretors. Lewis blood group antigen expression is one component of the secretor/nonsecretor phenotype and several epidemiologic studies have suggested a link between Lewis blood group antigen phenotype and susceptibility to urinary tract infections. In this study, we examined the possibility that the expression of the difucosylated Lewis blood group determinants, Leb and Ley (associated with the secretor phenotype), made cells less susceptible to Escherichia coli adherence by masking receptors for pili. COS-1 cells, which do not produce Lewis (Lea, Leb, Le(x), and Ley) blood group antigens, were used as target cells for bacterial adherence. The surface blood group antigen expression pattern of the cells was then modified by cotransfection with plasmids containing DNA inserts encoding alpha (1,2)-fucosyltransferase and alpha (1,3)- and alpha (1,4)-fucosyltransferases, resulting in the expression of Leb and Ley. E. coli HB101 expressing various adhesins (type 1, PapJ96, PapIA2, PapAD110, Prs, and S) from recombinant plasmids bound equally well to untransfected cells and transfected cells expressing Lea and Le(x) (nonsecretor phenotype) and Leb and Ley (secretor phenotype) antigens. We conclude that the presence of Leb and Ley antigens on cells from secretors does not alone mask receptors for E. coli pili or hinder bacterial adherence. PMID:8005692

  8. A Selective and Purification-Free Strategy for Labeling Adherent Cells with Inorganic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yu; Lim, Jing; Yeo, David Chen Loong; Liao, Shanshan; Lans, Malin; Wang, Yaqi; Teoh, Swee-Hin; Goh, Bee Tin; Xu, Chenjie

    2016-03-01

    Cellular labeling with inorganic nanoparticles such as magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, quantum dots, and fluorescent silica nanoparticles is an important method for the noninvasive visualization of cells using various imaging modalities. Currently, this is mainly achieved through the incubation of cultured cells with the nanoparticles that eventually reach the intracellular compartment through specific or nonspecific internalization. This classic method is advantageous in terms of simplicity and convenience, but it suffers from issues such as difficulties in fully removing free nanoparticles (suspended in solution) and the lack of selectivity on cell types. This article reports an innovative strategy for the specific labeling of adherent cells without the concern of freely suspended nanoparticles. This method relies on a nanocomposite film that is prepared by homogeneously dispersing nanoparticles within a biodegradable polymeric film. When adherent cells are seeded on the film, they adhere, spread, and filtrate into the film through the micropores formed during the film fabrication. The pre-embedded nanoparticles are thus internalized by the cells during this infiltration process. As an example, fluorescent silica nanoparticles were homogeneously distributed within a polycaprolactone film by utilizing cryomilling and heat pressing. Upon incubation within physiological buffer, no silica nanoparticles were released from the nanocomposite film even after 20 d of incubation. However, when adherent cells (e.g., human mesenchymal stem cells) were grown on the film, they became fluorescent after 3 d, which suggests internalization of silica nanoparticles by cells. In comparison, the suspension cells (e.g., monocytes) in the medium remained nonfluorescent no matter whether there was the presence of adherent cells or not. This strategy eventually allowed the selective and concomitant labeling of mesenchymal stem cells during their harvest from bone marrow aspiration

  9. Variation in Adherence to External Beam Radiotherapy Quality Measures Among Elderly Men With Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bekelman, Justin E. Zelefsky, Michael J.; Jang, Thomas L.; Basch, Ethan M.; Schrag, Deborah

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: To characterize the variation in adherence to quality measures of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for localized prostate cancer and its relation to patient and provider characteristics in a population-based, representative sample of U.S. men. Methods and Materials: We evaluated EBRT quality measures proposed by a RAND expert panel of physicians among men aged {>=}65 years diagnosed between 2000 and 2002 with localized prostate cancer and treated with primary EBRT using data from the linked Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare program. We assessed the adherence to five EBRT quality measures that were amenable to analysis using SEER-Medicare data: (1) use of conformal RT planning; (2) use of high-energy (>10-MV) photons; (3) use of custom immobilization; (4) completion of two follow-up visits with a radiation oncologist in the year after therapy; and (5) radiation oncologist board certification. Results: Of the 11,674 patients, 85% had received conformal RT planning, 75% had received high-energy photons, and 97% had received custom immobilization. One-third of patients had completed two follow-up visits with a radiation oncologist, although 91% had at least one visit with a urologist or radiation oncologist. Most patients (85%) had been treated by a board-certified radiation oncologist. Conclusions: The overall high adherence to EBRT quality measures masked substantial variation in geography, socioeconomic status in the area of residence, and teaching affiliation of the RT facility. Future research should examine the reasons for the variations in these measures and whether the variation is associated with important clinical outcomes.

  10. Racial/Ethnic and Socioeconomic Disparities in Endocrine Therapy Adherence in Breast Cancer: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Stephanie B.; Reeder-Hayes, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    We examined the current literature to understand factors that influence endocrine therapy (ET) adherence among racial/ethnic and socioeconomic subpopulations of breast cancer patients. We searched PubMed and PsycINFO databases for studies from January 1, 1978, to June 20, 2014, and January 1, 1991, to June 20, 2014, respectively, and hand-searched articles from relevant literature reviews. We abstracted and synthesized results within a social ecological framework. Fourteen articles met all inclusion criteria. The majority of included articles reported significant underuse of ET among minority and low-income women. Modifiable intrapersonal, interpersonal, and community-level factors are associated with ET use, and these factors vary across subgroups. Both race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status are associated with ET use in most settings. Variation in factors associated with ET use across subgroups indicates the need for more nuanced research and targeted interventions among breast cancer patients. PMID:25905855

  11. Proliferative activity of vervet monkey bone marrow-derived adherent cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kramvis, A.; Garnett, H.M.

    1987-11-01

    Vervet monkey bone marrow-derived adherent cell population cultured in Fischer's medium supplemented with 12.5% fetal calf serum and 12.5% horse serum consists of two cell shapes: fusiform (type I) and polygonal (type II). Limiting-dilution cloning of the cells suggested that the two morphologically distinct cell types belong to the same cellular system even though they differ in their proliferative capabilities. The labeling index of type II cells, as measured by autoradiography, was found to be consistently lower than that of type I cells. It is probable that these two phenotypes represent different stages of differentiation, where progenitor type I gives rise to type II cells. The bone marrow-derived adherent cells were found to be cytokinetically at rest in vivo, using the thymidine suicide test, and relatively radioresistant with a D0 = 2.1 Gy and n = 2.36 at the time of explantation from the bone. Furthermore, in culture these cells are characterized by a relatively long cell cycle of 60 h, where the length of the S phase is 30 h, G2 is 12 h, M is 6 h, and G1 is 12 h. Thus, the vervet monkey bone marrow-derived adherent cells represent a cell population with a low turnover rate both in vivo and in vitro.

  12. Adhesion and function of rat liver cells adherent to silk fibroin/collagen blend films.

    PubMed

    Cirillo, B; Morra, M; Catapano, G

    2004-01-01

    Collagen is often used in bioartificial livers as a biomimetic coating to promote liver cell adhesion and differentiation. Animal proteins are expensive and expose the host to risks of cross-species infection due to contamination with prions. Silk fibroin (SF) is a biocompatible protein produced by Bombyx mori silk worms and possibly an alternative to collagen. We prepared SF-collagen blend films with different SF content adherent to the bottom of standard tissue culture dishes, and characterized their surface morphology by SEM, their wettability and examined them for their capacity to support rat liver cell adhesion and metabolism. Cell metabolism was characterized by estimating the rate at which cells eliminated ammonia and synthesized urea for up to 48h of culture. SF-containing films were smooth, clear and more wettable than collagen. Cells readily adhered, formed junctions and small size aggregates on all films. As many cells adhered on SF as on collagen films. Cell adhesion to high collagen content blend films could not be reliably estimated because cells dwelt in the large cavities in the film. The effect of SF on cell metabolism differed with the investigated metabolic pathway. However, cells on SF-containing films eliminated ammonia and synthesized urea at rates generally comparable to, for urea synthesis at times higher than, that of cells on collagen. These results suggest that silk fibroin is a suitable substratum for liver cell attachment and culture, and a potential alternative to collagen as a biomimetic coating. PMID:14984185

  13. Localized, macromolecular transport for thin, adherent, single cells via an automated, single cell electroporation biomanipulator.

    PubMed

    Sakaki, Kelly; Esmaeilsabzali, Hadi; Massah, Shabnam; Prefontaine, Gratien G; Dechev, Nikolai; Burke, Robert D; Park, Edward J

    2013-11-01

    Single cell electroporation (SCE), via microcapillary, is an effective method for molecular, transmembrane transport used to gain insight on cell processes with minimal preparation. Although possessing great potential, SCE is difficult to execute and the technology spans broad fields within cell biology and engineering. The technical complexities, the focus and expertise demanded during manual operation, and the lack of an automated SCE platform limit the widespread use of this technique, thus the potential of SCE has not been realized. In this study, an automated biomanipulator for SCE is presented. Our system is capable of delivering molecules into the cytoplasm of extremely thin cellular features of adherent cells. The intent of the system is to abstract the technical challenges and exploit the accuracy and repeatability of automated instrumentation, leaving only the focus of the experimental design to the operator. Each sequence of SCE including cell and SCE site localization, tip-membrane contact detection, and SCE has been automated. Positions of low-contrast cells are localized and "SCE sites" for microcapillary tip placement are determined using machine vision. In addition, new milestones within automated cell manipulation have been achieved. The system described herein has the capability of automated SCE of "thin" cell features less than 10 μm in thickness. Finally, SCE events are anticipated using visual feedback, while monitoring fluorescing dye entering the cytoplasm of a cell. The execution is demonstrated by inserting a combination of a fluorescing dye and a reporter gene into NIH/3T3 fibroblast cells. PMID:23771309

  14. Adherence of Primary Care Physicians to Evidence-Based Recommendations to Reduce Ovarian Cancer Mortality.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Sherri L; Townsend, Julie S; Puckett, Mary C; Rim, Sun Hee

    2016-03-01

    Ovarian cancer is the deadliest gynecologic cancer. Receipt of treatment from a gynecologic oncologist is an evidence-based recommendation to reduce mortality from the disease. We examined knowledge and application of this evidence-based recommendation in primary care physicians as part of CDC gynecologic cancer awareness campaign efforts and discussed results in the context of CDC National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program (NCCCP). We analyzed primary care physician responses to questions about how often they refer patients diagnosed with ovarian cancer to gynecologic oncologists, and reasons for lack of referral. We also analyzed these physicians' knowledge of tests to help determine whether a gynecologic oncologist is needed for a planned surgery. The survey response rate was 52.2%. A total of 84% of primary care physicians (87% of family/general practitioners, 81% of internists and obstetrician/gynecologists) said they always referred patients to gynecologic oncologists for treatment. Common reasons for not always referring were patient preference or lack of gynecologic oncologists in the practice area. A total of 23% of primary care physicians had heard of the OVA1 test, which helps to determine whether gynecologic oncologist referral is needed. Although referral rates reported here are high, it is not clear whether ovarian cancer patients are actually seeing gynecologic oncologists for care. The NCCCP is undertaking several efforts to assist with this, including education of the recommendation among women and providers and assistance with treatment summaries and patient navigation toward appropriate treatment. Expansion of these efforts to all populations may help improve adherence to recommendations and reduce ovarian cancer mortality. PMID:26978124

  15. Microfluidic Probe for Single-Cell Lysis and Analysis in Adherent Tissue Culture

    PubMed Central

    Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Han, Jongyoon

    2014-01-01

    Single-cell analysis provides information critical to understanding key disease processes that are characterized by significant cellular heterogeneity. Few current methods allow single-cell measurement without removing cells from the context of interest, which not only destroys contextual information but also may perturb the process under study. Here we present a microfluidic probe that lyses single adherent cells from standard tissue culture and captures the contents to perform single-cell biochemical assays. We use this probe to measure kinase and housekeeping protein activities, separately or simultaneously, from single human hepatocellular carcinoma cells in adherent culture. This tool has the valuable ability to perform measurements that clarify connections between extracellular context, signals and responses, especially in cases where only a few cells exhibit a characteristic of interest. PMID:24594667

  16. Cell-mediated cytotoxicity of bovine mononuclear cells to IBRV-infected cells: dependence on Sephadex G-10 adherent cells.

    PubMed

    Campos, M; Rossi, C R

    1985-04-01

    Following intranasal inoculation of cattle with infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus (IBRV) mononuclear cells that produced a genetically unrestricted cytotoxic response against IBRV-infected, but not against uninfected cells, were present in peripheral blood. Cytotoxicity was detected between 6 and 14 days after primary infection in a 20 h, but not in a 5 h, 51Cr-release assay. Cytotoxic activity was present in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from infected and subsequently hyperimmunized cattle for a considerably longer time. Neither natural cytotoxicity, antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity, nor antibody produced during the assay was responsible for the cytotoxicity. However, cytotoxicity was dependent upon an adherent mononuclear cell that was partially removed by passage over nylon wool and completely removed by passage over Sephadex G-10. PMID:2408374

  17. Association between Lymphedema Self-Care Adherence and Lymphedema Outcomes among Women with Breast Cancer-Related Lymphedema

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Justin C.; Kumar, Anagha; Cheville, Andrea L.; Tchou, Julia C.; Troxel, Andrea B.; Harris, Susan R.; Schmitz, Kathryn H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine if adherence to self-care modalities for breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL) predicts BCRL outcomes among 128 breast cancer (BrCa) survivors who participated in the 12-month physical activity and lymphedema (PAL) trial. Design This was a prospective cohort study. Adherence to 10 BCRL self-care modalities, as recommended in the clinical practice guidelines for the management of BCRL was assessed by questionnaire at baseline. BCRL outcomes assessed at baseline and 12-months included volumetry, circumferences, bioimpedence spectroscopy, the Norman lymphedema survey, and clinician-defined lymphedema exacerbations requiring treatment. Generalized linear models were used to estimate the relationship between adherence to BCRL self-care modalities and the likelihood of experiencing a BCRL outcome. Results Adherence to BCRL self-care activities did not predict experiencing any BCRL outcomes at 12-months. Levels of adherence to BCRL self-care modalities did not predict a ≥5% decrease in interlimb volume (Ptrend=0.79), ≥5% decrease in the sum of interlimb arm circumferences (Ptrend=0.47), ≥10% decrease in bioimpedence spectroscopy (Ptrend=0.83), ≥1 decrease in self-reported lymphedema symptoms (Ptrend=0.91), or clinician-defined lymphedema exacerbation requiring treatment (Ptrend=0.84). Conclusions Our findings suggest levels of BCRL self-care adherence do not predict BCRL outcomes among BrCa survivors with stable lymphedema who were followed for 12-months. PMID:25171662

  18. [Ability of Staphylococcus cohnii strains to adhere to epithelial cells and solid surfaces in the hospital environment].

    PubMed

    Waldon, Edyta; Szewczyk, Eligia M

    2002-01-01

    Presented study describes abilities of staphylococci to adhere to exfoliated cheek and uroepithelial epithelium cells and to various surfaces such as plastics, glass and steel. The subject of the study were strains of Staphylococcus cohnii ssp. cohnii and Staphylococcus cohnii ssp. urealyticus isolated from Intensive Care Unit of Pediatric Hospital. Staphylococcus cohnii ssp.cohnii adhered in great number to epithelial cells. However, the adhesion differed by individual strains. We did not find relationship between slime production and adherence to epithelial cell. Most of investigated strains adhered closely to surfaces--especially of plastics and glass. This phenomenon was stronger in the presence of culture medium and phosphate buffer. PMID:12185691

  19. Adherence patterns to National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines for referral to cancer genetic professionals

    PubMed Central

    Febbraro, Terri; Robison, Katina; Wilbur, Jennifer Scalia; Laprise, Jessica; Bregar, Amy; Lopes, Vrishali; Legare, Robert; Stuckey, Ashley

    2016-01-01

    Objective Genetic predisposition is responsible for 5–10% of breast cancer, 10% of ovarian cancer and 2–5% of uterine cancer. The study objective was to compare genetic counseling and testing referral rates among women with breast cancer that met NCCN referral guidelines to the referral rates among women with gynecologic cancers and determine predictors of referral. Methods Utilizing an institutional tumor registry database, patients from an academic women's oncology program were identified who met a subset of NCCN guidelines for genetic referral between 2004 and 2010. Patients diagnosed with ovarian cancer, breast cancer ≤50 years of age, or uterine cancer <50 years of age were included. A retrospective electronic chart review was conducted to evaluate for a genetic referral and uptake of genetic testing. Results 820 women were included (216 uterine, 314 breast, and 290 ovarian cancer). The overall genetic referral rate was 21.7%. 34% of eligible breast cancer patients were referred compared to 13.4% of uterine cancer and 14.5% ofovarian cancer patients (p < 0.0001). Younger age, breast cancer diagnosis, family history and earlier stage were all significant referral predictors. The odds of being referred increased with the number of affected family members. 70.8% of referred patients, consulted with genetics. Among those who consulted with genetics, 95.2% underwent testing. Conclusions Although increasing, genetic counseling remains underutilized across cancer diagnosis. Women with breast cancer are more likely to be referred than women with gynecologic cancers. Younger age, earlier stage and positive family history appear to be predictive of referral for genetic evaluation. PMID:25933682

  20. Low adherence to colonoscopy in the screening of first‐degree relatives of patients with colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bujanda, Luis; Sarasqueta, Cristina; Zubiaurre, Leire; Cosme, Angel; Muñoz, Carmen; Sánchez, Araceli; Martín, Cristina; Tito, Llucia; Piñol, Virginia; Castells, Antoni; Llor, Xavier; Xicola, Rosa M; Pons, Elisenda; Clofent, Juan; de Castro, María L; Cuquerella, Jaime; Medina, Enrique; Gutierrez, Ana; Arenas, Juan I; Jover, Rodrigo

    2007-01-01

    Background Colonoscopy is one of the methods of choice for screening relatives of patients with colorectal cancer. Objective To evaluate the rate of adherence to colonoscopy in first‐degree relatives of patients with colorectal cancer and describe the lesions found. Methods A prospective, cross‐sectional, multicentre, nationwide study was conducted. The study population was composed of first‐degree relatives of patients with colorectal cancer selected randomly from the EPICOLON study. Seventy‐four index patients were included. These had 342 living first‐degree relatives (parents, siblings and children), of whom 281 were interviewed. Results The adherence rate was 38% (107/281). Adherence was greater in families with a higher degree of familial aggregation for colorectal cancer (88.9% for Amsterdam vs 33.3% for Bethesda and sporadic cancer; p<0.05), an index patient aged under 65 years (60% for patients <65 years vs 32.9% for patients ⩾65 years; p<0.05) and an index patient who was female (46.2% for women vs 31% for men; p = 0.28). Adherence was also greater in relatives under 65 years (54% in patients <65 years vs 18% in patients ⩾65 years; p = 0.05), in female relatives (49% in female relatives vs 27.3% in male relatives; p<0.05) and in siblings and children (40% in siblings and children vs 13% in parents; p<0.05). Lesions were found in 26% (28/107) of the study population. Nine (8.4%) individuals had a total of 18 advanced lesions. Conclusions These results indicate that adherence to colonoscopy in our population of first‐degree relatives was low. The adherence was more frequently associated with a higher degree of familial aggregation, a relative age of under 65 years, a sibling or offspring relationship, and female sex. PMID:17400596

  1. In vitro inhibition of Helicobacter pylori growth and adherence to gastric mucosal cells by Pycnogenol.

    PubMed

    Rohdewald, Peter; Beil, Winfried

    2008-05-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistant H. pylori strains has necessitated the identification of alternative additive therapies for the treatment of this infection. The study tested whether a specific pine bark extract (Pycnogenol is effective in inhibiting the growth and adherence of H. pylori in vitro. Inhibition of H. pylori growth by Pycnogenol was tested in liquid medium as well as in an in vitro model by using sessile bacteria attached to AGS cells. Adherence was determined by co-incubation of gastric cells with Pycnogenol and H. pylori in vitro. Pycnogenol inhibited H. pylori growth in suspension with an MIC(50) of 12.5 microg/mL. Growth of H. pylori in infected cells was reduced to 10% of the control value by 125 microg/mL Pycnogenol. Adherence of H. pylori to gastric cells was reduced by 70% after 3 h incubation with 125 microg/mL Pycnogenol. The results show a significant, yet limited inhibition of growth and adherence of H. pylori to gastric cells by Pycnogenol. In vivo studies have to demonstrate the clinical relevance of these findings. PMID:18350522

  2. Automated and Online Characterization of Adherent Cell Culture Growth in a Microfabricated Bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Jaccard, Nicolas; Macown, Rhys J.; Super, Alexandre; Griffin, Lewis D.; Veraitch, Farlan S.

    2014-01-01

    Adherent cell lines are widely used across all fields of biology, including drug discovery, toxicity studies, and regenerative medicine. However, adherent cell processes are often limited by a lack of advances in cell culture systems. While suspension culture processes benefit from decades of development of instrumented bioreactors, adherent cultures are typically performed in static, noninstrumented flasks and well-plates. We previously described a microfabricated bioreactor that enables a high degree of control on the microenvironment of the cells while remaining compatible with standard cell culture protocols. In this report, we describe its integration with automated image-processing capabilities, allowing the continuous monitoring of key cell culture characteristics. A machine learning–based algorithm enabled the specific detection of one cell type within a co-culture setting, such as human embryonic stem cells against the background of fibroblast cells. In addition, the algorithm did not confuse image artifacts resulting from microfabrication, such as scratches on surfaces, or dust particles, with cellular features. We demonstrate how the automation of flow control, environmental control, and image acquisition can be employed to image the whole culture area and obtain time-course data of mouse embryonic stem cell cultures, for example, for confluency. PMID:24692228

  3. The many ways adherent cells respond to applied stretch.

    PubMed

    Sears, Candice; Kaunas, Roland

    2016-05-24

    Cells in various tissues are subjected to mechanical stress and strain that have profound effects on cell architecture and function. The specific response of the cell to applied strain depends on multiple factors, including cell contractility, spatial and temporal strain pattern, and substrate dimensionality and rigidity. Recent work has demonstrated that the cell response to applied strain depends on a complex combination of these factors, but the way these factors interact to elicit a specific response is not intuitive. We submit that an understanding of the integrated response of a cell to these factors will provide new insight into mechanobiology and contribute to the effective design of deformable engineered scaffolds meant to provide appropriate mechanical cues to the resident cells. PMID:26515245

  4. RGD-functionalized spherulites as targeted vectors captured by adherent cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Chenevier, P; Delord, B; Amédée, J; Bareille, R; Ichas, F; Roux, D

    2002-12-16

    Spherulites are multilamellar vesicles consisting of concentric shells that can encapsulate small organic molecules or macromolecules. We investigate the possibility of targeting neutral spherulites to adherent culture cells by functionalizing their surface with RGD-containing ligands. The strength and specificity of association of RGD spherulites with several cell lines (EAhy 926 endothelial cell line, human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) and human osteoprogenitor (HOP) primary cells) was studied, and the molecular interaction of RGD spherulites with the EAhy 926 cell surface was investigated. We show that, after binding to cells, spherulites are internalized. PMID:12431780

  5. Screening ToxCast™ Phase I Chemicals in a Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) Assay

    EPA Science Inventory

    An Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) in vitro assay with mouse embryonic stem cells was used to screen the ToxCast Phase I chemical library for effects on cellular differentiation and cell number. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) established the ...

  6. Cell prestress. I. Stiffness and prestress are closely associated in adherent contractile cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ning; Tolic-Norrelykke, Iva Marija; Chen, Jianxin; Mijailovich, Srboljub M.; Butler, James P.; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.; Stamenovic, Dimitrije; Ingber, D. E. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    The tensegrity hypothesis holds that the cytoskeleton is a structure whose shape is stabilized predominantly by the tensile stresses borne by filamentous structures. Accordingly, cell stiffness must increase in proportion with the level of the tensile stress, which is called the prestress. Here we have tested that prediction in adherent human airway smooth muscle (HASM) cells. Traction microscopy was used to measure the distribution of contractile stresses arising at the interface between each cell and its substrate; this distribution is called the traction field. Because the traction field must be balanced by tensile stresses within the cell body, the prestress could be computed. Cell stiffness (G) was measured by oscillatory magnetic twisting cytometry. As the contractile state of the cell was modulated with graded concentrations of relaxing or contracting agonists (isoproterenol or histamine, respectively), the mean prestress ((t)) ranged from 350 to 1,900 Pa. Over that range, cell stiffness increased linearly with the prestress: G (Pa) = 0.18(t) + 92. While this association does not necessarily preclude other interpretations, it is the hallmark of systems that secure shape stability mainly through the prestress. Regardless of mechanism, these data establish a strong association between stiffness of HASM cells and the level of tensile stress within the cytoskeleton.

  7. Fragmentation of cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanapalli, Siva; Kamyabi, Nabiollah

    Tumor cells have to travel through blood capillaries to be able to metastasize and colonize in distant organs. Among the numerous cells that are shed by the primary tumor, very few survive in circulation. In vivo studies have shown that tumor cells can undergo breakup at microcapillary junctions affecting their survival. It is currently unclear what hydrodynamic and biomechanical factors contribute to fragmentation and moreover how different are the breakup dynamics of highly and weakly metastatic cells. In this study, we use microfluidics to investigate flow-induced breakup of prostate and breast cancer cells. We observe several different modes of breakup of cancer cells, which have striking similarities with breakup of viscous drops. We quantify the breakup time and find that highly metastatic cancer cells take longer to breakup than lowly metastatic cells suggesting that tumor cells may dynamically modify their deformability to avoid fragmentation. We also identify the role that cytoskeleton and membrane plays in the breakup process. Our study highlights the important role that tumor cell fragmentation plays in cancer metastasis. Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas.

  8. [ADHERING TO MEDICAL STANDARTS, EVIDENCE-BASED STAGING IN GYNECOLOGICAL CANCER].

    PubMed

    Chakalova, G

    2016-01-01

    Among the key factors that influence the survival of patients is adherence to medical treatment standards. Indicators are assessing the degree of adherence to medical standards and represent the relative shares (%) of patients who fulfilled the relevant aspect of any subject. Data from the BNCR of 9842 cases of patients with malignant diseases of the female reproductive diagnosed in 2011-2013 in Bulgaria has been analyzed. Patients with tumors of the vulva were incorrectly staged in 15% to 30% of the cases, and those with vaginal tumors were incorrectly staged in 20% to 23% of cases. In patients with malignant tumors of the cervix incorrect staging was established in 19% to 47% of the cases. Patients with tumors of the uterus were incorrectly staged in 6% to 26% of the cases. Among the patients with ovarian tumors were incorrectly staged in 18% to 43%. Our results show that one in three patients with gynecological cancer in Bulgaria was incorrectly staged. We recommend using the current TNM and FIGO systems. PMID:27514165

  9. A Localized Adherence-Like Pattern as a Second Pattern of Adherence of Classic Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli to HEp-2 Cells That Is Associated with Infantile Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Scaletsky, Isabel C. A.; Pedroso, Margareth Z.; Oliva, Carlos A. G.; Carvalho, Rozane L. B.; Morais, Mauro B.; Fagundes-Neto, Ulysses

    1999-01-01

    Escherichia coli strains that cause nonbloody diarrhea in infants are known to present three distinct patterns of adherence to epithelial cells, namely, localized (LA), diffuse (DA), and aggregative (AA) adherence. Strains with LA (typical Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli [EPEC]) are well recognized as a cause of secretory diarrhea, but the role of strains with DA (DAEC) is controversial, and strains with AA (EAEC) have been more frequently related to persistent diarrhea whereas its relationship with acute diarrhea is not well defined. To determine the relationship of the different types of E. coli adherence patterns with acute diarrhea (lasting less than 14 days) and persistent diarrhea (lasting more than 14 days) in São Paulo, Brazil, we studied stool specimens from 40 infants under 1 year of age with diarrhea and 40 age-matched control infants without any gastrointestinal symptoms. Twenty-eight (35.0%) of eighty cases yielded adherent E. coli (HEp-2 cells). Strains with localized and aggregative adherence were associated with acute and persistent diarrhea. A total of 11.2% of the adherent strains were typical EPEC serotypes and hybridized with the enteroadherence factor probe; 5.0% were EAEC and hybridized with the EAEC probe. DAEC strains were isolated from 10.0% of patients and 7.5% of controls and did not hybridize with the two probes used (daaC and AIDA-I). Strains with a localized adherence-like pattern (atypical EPEC) were found significantly more frequently (P = 0.028) in cultures from children with diarrhea (17.5%) than in controls (2.5%). PMID:10377120

  10. Triggering Death of Adherent Cells with Ultraviolet Radiation.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Lisa C; Waterhouse, Nigel J

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a convenient stimulus for triggering cell death that is available in most laboratories. We use a Stratalinker UV cross-linker because it is a safe, cheap, reliable, consistent, and easily controlled source of UV irradiation. This protocol describes using a Stratalinker to trigger UV-induced death of HeLa cells. PMID:27371593

  11. Basal cell cancer (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... is needed to prove the diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma. Treatment varies depending on the size, depth, and location of the cancer. Early treatment by a dermatologist may result in a cure rate of more than 95%, but regular examination ...

  12. Adherence of Candida albicans to a cell surface polysaccharide receptor on Streptococcus gordonii.

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, A R; Gopal, P K; Jenkinson, H F

    1995-01-01

    Candida albicans ATCC 10261 and CA2 bound to cells of the oral bacteria Streptococcus gordonii, Streptococcus oralis, and Streptococcus sanguis when these bacteria were immobilized onto microtiter plate wells, but they did not bind to cells of Streptococcus mutans or Streptococcus salivarius. Cell wall polysaccharide was extracted with alkali from S. gordonii NCTC 7869, the streptococcal species to which C. albicans bound with highest affinity, and was effective in blocking the coaggregation of C. albicans and S. gordonii cells in the fluid phase. When fixed to microtiter plate wells, the S. gordonii polysaccharide was bound by all strains of C. albicans tested. The polysaccharide contained Rha, Glc, GalNAc, GlcNAc, and Gal and was related compositionally to previously characterized cell wall polysaccharides from strains of S. oralis and S. sanguis. The adherence of yeast cells to the immobilized polysaccharide was not inhibitable by a number of saccharides. Antiserum raised to the S. gordonii NCTC 7869 polysaccharide blocked adherence of C. albicans ATCC 10261 to the polysaccharide. The results identify a complex cell wall polysaccharide of S. gordonii as the coaggregation receptor for C. albicans. Adherent interactions of yeast cells with streptococci and other bacteria may be important for colonization of both hard and soft oral surfaces by C. albicans. PMID:7729891

  13. Dynamic Switch Between Two Adhesion Phenotypes in Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Geng, Yue; Chandrasekaran, Siddarth; Agastin, Sivaprakash; Li, Jiahe; King, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    The hematogenous metastatic cascade is mediated by the interaction of cancer cells and the endothelial cell lining of blood vessels. In this work, we examine the colon cancer cell line COLO 205, which grows simultaneously in both adherent and suspended states in culture and can serve as a good model for studying tumor heterogeneity. The two subpopulations of cells have different molecular characteristics despite being from the same parent cell line. We found that the ratio of adherent to suspended cells in culture is maintained at 7:3 (equilibrium ratio). The ratio was maintained even when we separate the two populations and culture them separately. After 8 h in culture the equilibrium was achieved only from either adherent or suspended population. The adherent cells were found to express less E-selectin binding glycans and demonstrated significantly weaker interaction with E-selectin under flow than the suspended cells. Manipulation of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers β-catenin and E-cadherin expression, either by siRNA knockdown of β-catenin or incubation with E-cadherin antibody-coated microbeads, shifted the ratio of adherent to suspended cells to 9:1. Interestingly, human plasma supplemented media shifted the ratio of adherent to suspended cells in the opposite direction to 1:9, favoring the suspended state. The dynamic COLO 205 population switch presents unique differential phenotypes of their subpopulations and could serve as a good model for studying cell heterogeneity and the EMT process in vitro. PMID:24575161

  14. Optical painting and fluorescence activated sorting of single adherent cells labelled with photoswitchable Pdots.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chun-Ting; Thompson, Alison M; Gallina, Maria Elena; Ye, Fangmao; Johnson, Eleanor S; Sun, Wei; Zhao, Mengxia; Yu, Jiangbo; Wu, I-Che; Fujimoto, Bryant; DuFort, Christopher C; Carlson, Markus A; Hingorani, Sunil R; Paguirigan, Amy L; Radich, Jerald P; Chiu, Daniel T

    2016-01-01

    The efficient selection and isolation of individual cells of interest from a mixed population is desired in many biomedical and clinical applications. Here we show the concept of using photoswitchable semiconducting polymer dots (Pdots) as an optical 'painting' tool, which enables the selection of certain adherent cells based on their fluorescence, and their spatial and morphological features, under a microscope. We first develop a Pdot that can switch between the bright (ON) and dark (OFF) states reversibly with a 150-fold contrast ratio on irradiation with ultraviolet or red light. With a focused 633-nm laser beam that acts as a 'paintbrush' and the photoswitchable Pdots as the 'paint', we select and 'paint' individual Pdot-labelled adherent cells by turning on their fluorescence, then proceed to sort and recover the optically marked cells (with 90% recovery and near 100% purity), followed by genetic analysis. PMID:27118210

  15. Optical painting and fluorescence activated sorting of single adherent cells labelled with photoswitchable Pdots

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Chun-Ting; Thompson, Alison M.; Gallina, Maria Elena; Ye, Fangmao; Johnson, Eleanor S.; Sun, Wei; Zhao, Mengxia; Yu, Jiangbo; Wu, I-Che; Fujimoto, Bryant; DuFort, Christopher C.; Carlson, Markus A.; Hingorani, Sunil R.; Paguirigan, Amy L.; Radich, Jerald P.; Chiu, Daniel T.

    2016-01-01

    The efficient selection and isolation of individual cells of interest from a mixed population is desired in many biomedical and clinical applications. Here we show the concept of using photoswitchable semiconducting polymer dots (Pdots) as an optical ‘painting' tool, which enables the selection of certain adherent cells based on their fluorescence, and their spatial and morphological features, under a microscope. We first develop a Pdot that can switch between the bright (ON) and dark (OFF) states reversibly with a 150-fold contrast ratio on irradiation with ultraviolet or red light. With a focused 633-nm laser beam that acts as a ‘paintbrush' and the photoswitchable Pdots as the ‘paint', we select and ‘paint' individual Pdot-labelled adherent cells by turning on their fluorescence, then proceed to sort and recover the optically marked cells (with 90% recovery and near 100% purity), followed by genetic analysis. PMID:27118210

  16. Comparative study of the radiobiological effects induced on adherent vs suspended cells by BNCT, neutrons and gamma rays treatments.

    PubMed

    Cansolino, L; Clerici, A M; Zonta, C; Dionigi, P; Mazzini, G; Di Liberto, R; Altieri, S; Ballarini, F; Bortolussi, S; Carante, M P; Ferrari, M; González, S J; Postuma, I; Protti, N; Santa Cruz, G A; Ferrari, C

    2015-12-01

    The present work is part of a preclinical in vitro study to assess the efficacy of BNCT applied to liver or lung coloncarcinoma metastases and to limb osteosarcoma. Adherent growing cell lines can be irradiated as adherent to the culture flasks or as cell suspensions, differences in radio-sensitivity of the two modalities of radiation exposure have been investigated. Dose related cell survival and cell cycle perturbation results evidenced that the radiosensitivity of adherent cells is higher than that of the suspended ones. PMID:26256647

  17. Protective effects of osmolytes in cryopreserving adherent neuroblastoma (Neuro-2a) cells.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Trisha L; Wang, Mian; Solocinski, Jason; Nathan, Britto P; Chakraborty, Nilay; Menze, Michael A

    2015-12-01

    A simple method to cryopreserve adherent monolayers of neuronal cells is currently not available, but the development of this technique could facilitate numerous applications in the field of biomedical engineering, cell line development, and drug screening. However, complex tissues of some exceptional animals survive freezing in nature. These animals are known to accumulate several small molecular weight solutes prior to freezing. Following a similar strategy, we investigated the effects of osmolytes such as trehalose, proline, and sucrose as additives to the traditional cryoprotectant dimethyl sulfoxide (Me2SO) in modulating the cryopreservation outcome of mouse neuroblastoma (Neuro-2a) cells. Neuro-2a cells adhered to cell culture plates were incubated for 24 h at varying concentrations of trehalose, proline, sucrose and combinations of these compounds. Cells were cryopreserved for 24 h and cell viability post-freezing and thawing was quantified by trypan blue exclusion assay. On average, only 13.5% of adherent cells survived freezing in the presence of 10% Me2SO alone (control). Pre-incubation of cells with medium containing both trehalose and proline severely decreased cell proliferation, but increased cell recovery to about 53% of control. Furthermore, characterization using Raman microspectroscopy revealed that the addition of both trehalose and proline to 10% Me2SO substantially increased the size, and altered the nature, of ice crystals formed during freezing. Our results suggest that pre-incubation of Neuro-2a cells with trehalose and proline in combination provides cell protection along with alterations of ice structure in order to increase cell survival post-freezing. PMID:26408850

  18. How Leucocyte Cell Membrane Modified Janus Microcapsules are Phagocytosed by Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    He, Wenping; Frueh, Johannes; Wu, Zhenwei; He, Qiang

    2016-02-01

    Modern drug delivery systems rely on either antibody-based single-surface recognition or on surface-hydrophobicity-based approaches. For a tumor showing various surface mutations, both approaches fail. This publication hereby presents Janus capsules based on polyelectrolyte multilayer microcapsules exhibiting human leucocyte (THP-1 cell line) cell membranes for discriminating HUVEC cells from three different cancer cell lines. Despite destroying the cellular integrity of leucocyte cells, the modified Janus capsules are able to adhere to cancer cells. Leucocyte cell-membrane-coated Janus capsules are phagocytosed with the cellular membrane part pointing to the cells. PMID:26824329

  19. Fibrinogen-Induced Streptococcus mutans Biofilm Formation and Adherence to Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lombardo Bedran, Telma Blanca; Azelmat, Jabrane; Palomari Spolidorio, Denise

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans, the predominant bacterial species associated with dental caries, can enter the bloodstream and cause infective endocarditis. The aim of this study was to investigate S. mutans biofilm formation and adherence to endothelial cells induced by human fibrinogen. The putative mechanism by which biofilm formation is induced as well as the impact of fibrinogen on S. mutans resistance to penicillin was also evaluated. Bovine plasma dose dependently induced biofilm formation by S. mutans. Of the various plasma proteins tested, only fibrinogen promoted the formation of biofilm in a dose-dependent manner. Scanning electron microscopy observations revealed the presence of complex aggregates of bacterial cells firmly attached to the polystyrene support. S. mutans in biofilms induced by the presence of fibrinogen was markedly resistant to the bactericidal effect of penicillin. Fibrinogen also significantly increased the adherence of S. mutans to endothelial cells. Neither S. mutans cells nor culture supernatants converted fibrinogen into fibrin. However, fibrinogen is specifically bound to the cell surface of S. mutans and may act as a bridging molecule to mediate biofilm formation. In conclusion, our study identified a new mechanism promoting S. mutans biofilm formation and adherence to endothelial cells which may contribute to infective endocarditis. PMID:24222906

  20. Sortase inhibitor phenyl vinyl sulfone inhibits Renibacterium salmoninarum adherence and invasion of host cells.

    PubMed

    Sudheesh, Ponnerassery S; Crane, Samuel; Cain, Kenneth D; Strom, Mark S

    2007-12-13

    Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease in salmonid fishes, is a Gram-positive diplococcobacillus belonging to the family Micrococcaceae. Analysis of the genome sequence of the bacterium demonstrated the presence of a sortase homolog (srtD), a gene specifying an enzyme found in Gram-positive bacteria and required for covalent anchoring of cell surface proteins. Interference of sortase activity is being examined as a target for therapeutic prevention of infection by several pathogenic Gram-positive bacterial species. In silico analysis identified 8 open reading frames containing sortase recognition motifs, suggesting these proteins are translocated to the bacterial cell wall. The sortase and potential sortase substrate genes are transcribed in R. salmoninarum, suggesting they encode functional proteins. Treatment of R. salmoninarum with phenyl vinyl sulfone (PVS) significantly reduced bacterial adherence to Chinook salmon fibronectin. In addition, the ability of the PVS-treated bacteria to adhere to Chinook salmon embryo cells (CHSE-214) in vitro was dramatically reduced compared to that of untreated bacteria. More importantly, PVS-treated bacteria were unable to invade and replicate within CHSE-214 cells (demonstrated by an intracellular growth assay and by light microscopy). When treated with PVS, R. salmoninarum was not cytopathic to CHSE-214 cells, whereas untreated bacteria produced cytopathology within a few days. These findings clearly show that PVS, a small molecule drug and a known sortase inhibitor, can interfere with the ability of R. salmoninarum to adhere and colonize fish cells, with a corresponding decrease in virulence. PMID:18286808

  1. In vitro Enrichment of Ovarian Cancer Tumor-initiating Cells

    PubMed Central

    House, Carrie D.; Hernandez, Lidia; Annunziata, Christina M.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence suggests that small subpopulations of tumor cells maintain a unique self-renewing and differentiation capacity and may be responsible for tumor initiation and/or relapse. Clarifying the mechanisms by which these tumor-initiating cells (TICs) support tumor formation and progression could lead to the development of clinically favorable therapies. Ovarian cancer is a heterogeneous and highly recurrent disease. Recent studies suggest TICs may play an important role in disease biology. We have identified culture conditions that enrich for TICs from ovarian cancer cell lines. Growing either adherent cells or non-adherent ‘floater’ cells in a low attachment plate with serum free media in the presence of growth factors supports the propagation of ovarian cancer TICs with stem cell markers (CD133 and ALDH activity) and increased tumorigenicity without the need to physically separate the TICs from other cell types within the culture. Although the presence of floater cells is not common for all cell lines, this population of cells with innate low adherence may have high tumorigenic potential.Compared to adherent cells grown in the presence of serum, TICs readily form spheres, are significantly more tumorigenic in mice, and express putative stem cell markers. The conditions are easy to establish in a timely manner and can be used to study signaling pathways important for maintaining stem characteristics, and to identify drugs or combinations of drugs targeting TICs. The culture conditions described herein are applicable for a variety of ovarian cancer cells of epithelial origin and will be critical in providing new information about the role of TICs in tumor initiation, progression, and relapse. PMID:25742116

  2. Pseudomonas cepacia adherence to respiratory epithelial cells is enhanced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Saiman, L.; Cacalano, G.; Prince, A. )

    1990-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas cepacia are both opportunistic pathogens of patients with cystic fibrosis. The binding characteristics of these two species were compared to determine if they use similar mechanisms to adhere to respiratory epithelial cells. P. cepacia 249 was shown to be piliated, but there was no detectable homology between P. aeruginosa pilin gene probes and P. cepacia genomic DNA. P. cepacia and P. aeruginosa did not appear to compete for epithelial receptors. In the presence of purified P. aeruginosa pili, the adherence of 35S-labeled strain 249 to respiratory epithelial monolayers was unaffected, while that of P. aeruginosa PAO1 was decreased by 55%. The binding of P. cepacia 249 and 715j was increased by 2.4-fold and 1.5-fold, respectively, in the presence of an equal inoculum of PAO1. Interbacterial agglutination contributed to the increased adherence of P. cepacia, as the binding of 249 was increased twofold in the presence of irradiated PAO1. PAO1 exoproducts had a marked effect in enhancing the ability of the P. cepacia strains to adhere to the epithelial monolayers. A PAO1 supernatant increased the binding of 249 by eightfold and that of 715j by fourfold. Thus, there appears to be a synergistic relationship between P. aeruginosa and P. cepacia in which PAO1 exoproducts modify the epithelial cell surface, exposing receptors and facilitating increased P. cepacia attachment.

  3. Chemotherapy targeting cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haiguang; Lv, Lin; Yang, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Conventional chemotherapy is the main treatment for cancer and benefits patients in the form of decreased relapse and metastasis and longer overall survival. However, as the target therapy drugs and delivery systems are not wholly precise, it also results in quite a few side effects, and is less efficient in many cancers due to the spared cancer stem cells, which are considered the reason for chemotherapy resistance, relapse, and metastasis. Conventional chemotherapy limitations and the cancer stem cell hypothesis inspired our search for a novel chemotherapy targeting cancer stem cells. In this review, we summarize cancer stem cell enrichment methods, the search for new efficient drugs, and the delivery of drugs targeting cancer stem cells. We also discuss cancer stem cell hierarchy complexity and the corresponding combination therapy for both cancer stem and non-stem cells. Learning from cancer stem cells may reveal novel strategies for chemotherapy in the future. PMID:26045975

  4. Refining Measurement of Social Cognitive Theory Factors Associated with Exercise Adherence in Head and Neck Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Laura Q; Fogleman, Amanda; Verhulst, Steven; Bhugra, Mudita; Rao, Krishna; Malone, James; Robbs, Randall; Robbins, K Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Social cognitive theory (SCT) measures related to exercise adherence in head and neck cancer (HNCa) patients were developed. Enrolling 101 HNCa patients, psychometric properties and associations with exercise behavior were examined for barriers self-efficacy, perceived barriers interference, outcome expectations, enjoyment, and goal setting. Cronbach's alpha ranged from.84 to.95; only enjoyment demonstrated limited test-retest reliability. Subscales for barriers self-efficacy (motivational, physical health) and barriers interference (motivational, physical health, time, environment) were identified. Multiple SCT constructs were cross-sectional correlates and prospective predictors of exercise behavior. These measures can improve the application of the SCT to exercise adherence in HNCa patients. PMID:26177345

  5. Manipulation of a quasi-natural cell block for high-efficiency transplantation of adherent somatic cells.

    PubMed

    Chung, H J; Hassan, M M; Park, J O; Kim, H J; Hong, S T

    2015-05-01

    Recent advances have raised hope that transplantation of adherent somatic cells could provide dramatic new therapies for various diseases. However, current methods for transplanting adherent somatic cells are not efficient enough for therapeutic applications. Here, we report the development of a novel method to generate quasi-natural cell blocks for high-efficiency transplantation of adherent somatic cells. The blocks were created by providing a unique environment in which cultured cells generated their own extracellular matrix. Initially, stromal cells isolated from mice were expanded in vitro in liquid cell culture medium followed by transferring the cells into a hydrogel shell. After incubation for 1 day with mechanical agitation, the encapsulated cell mass was perforated with a thin needle and then incubated for an additional 6 days to form a quasi-natural cell block. Allograft transplantation of the cell block into C57BL/6 mice resulted in perfect adaptation of the allograft and complete integration into the tissue of the recipient. This method could be widely applied for repairing damaged cells or tissues, stem cell transplantation, ex vivo gene therapy, or plastic surgery. PMID:25742639

  6. Manipulation of a quasi-natural cell block for high-efficiency transplantation of adherent somatic cells

    PubMed Central

    Chung, H.J.; Hassan, M.M.; Park, J.O.; Kim, H.J.; Hong, S.T.

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances have raised hope that transplantation of adherent somatic cells could provide dramatic new therapies for various diseases. However, current methods for transplanting adherent somatic cells are not efficient enough for therapeutic applications. Here, we report the development of a novel method to generate quasi-natural cell blocks for high-efficiency transplantation of adherent somatic cells. The blocks were created by providing a unique environment in which cultured cells generated their own extracellular matrix. Initially, stromal cells isolated from mice were expanded in vitro in liquid cell culture medium followed by transferring the cells into a hydrogel shell. After incubation for 1 day with mechanical agitation, the encapsulated cell mass was perforated with a thin needle and then incubated for an additional 6 days to form a quasi-natural cell block. Allograft transplantation of the cell block into C57BL/6 mice resulted in perfect adaptation of the allograft and complete integration into the tissue of the recipient. This method could be widely applied for repairing damaged cells or tissues, stem cell transplantation, ex vivo gene therapy, or plastic surgery. PMID:25742639

  7. An in vitro clonal assay of adherent stem cells (ASC) in mouse marrow.

    PubMed

    Reincke, U; Rosenblatt, M; Hellman, S

    1984-11-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells with high proliferative capacity can be assayed when stromal bone marrow cultures are overlaid with limiting dilutions of marrow samples. This leads to hematopoietic growth after 4 weeks in a fraction of cultures, consistent with expectations based on Poisson statistics. It will be shown that monoclonal cultures are obtained that last from 2 to 15 weeks and that can generate up to several million mature granulocytes. The originating clone-forming cell is named adherent stem cell (ASC) because of its adherence to plastic or stromal surfaces. The ASC is comparable to the CFU-S in frequency, proliferative capacity and in its ability to give rise to CFU-S. As an unexpected additional finding we report that a mode of "clonal succession" was apparent in cultures which expressed more than one clone. PMID:6490726

  8. Mycoplasma pulmonis Vsa proteins and polysaccharide modulate adherence to pulmonary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bolland, Jeffrey R; Dybvig, Kevin

    2012-06-01

    The Mycoplasma pulmonis Vsa proteins are a family of size- and phase-variable lipoproteins that shield the mycoplasmas from complement and modulate attachment to abiotic surfaces. Mycoplasmas producing a long Vsa protein hemadsorb poorly and yet are proficient at colonizing rats and mice. The effect of the length of the Vsa protein on the attachment of mycoplasmas to epithelial cells has not been previously explored. We find that independent of Vsa isotype, mycoplasmas producing a long Vsa protein with many tandem repeats adhere poorly to murine MLE-12 cells compared with mycoplasmas producing a short Vsa. We also find that mutants lacking the EPS-I polysaccharide of M. pulmonis exhibited decreased adherence to MLE-12 cells, even though it has been shown previously that such mutants have an enhanced ability to form a biofilm. PMID:22428866

  9. Cancer Stem Cells in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Qi; Zhao, Yue; Renner, Andrea; Niess, Hanno; Seeliger, Hendrik; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Bruns, Christiane J.

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignant solid tumor well-known by early metastasis, local invasion, resistance to standard chemo- and radiotherapy and poor prognosis. Increasing evidence indicates that pancreatic cancer is initiated and propagated by cancer stem cells (CSCs). Here we review the current research results regarding CSCs in pancreatic cancer and discuss the different markers identifying pancreatic CSCs. This review will focus on metastasis, microRNA regulation and anti-CSC therapy in pancreatic cancer. PMID:24281178

  10. A mannose-specific adherence mechanism in Lactobacillus plantarum conferring binding to the human colonic cell line HT-29.

    PubMed Central

    Adlerberth, I; Ahrne, S; Johansson, M L; Molin, G; Hanson, L A; Wold, A E

    1996-01-01

    Two Lactobacillus plantarum strains of human intestinal origin, strains 299 (= DSM 6595) and 299v (= DSM 9843), have proved to be efficient colonizers of the human intestine under experimental conditions. These strains and 17 other L. plantarum strains were tested for the ability to adhere to cells of the human colonic cell line HT-29.L.plantarum 299 and 299v and nine other L. plantarum strains, including all six strains that belong to the same genetic subgroup as L. plantarum 299 and 299v, adhered to HT-29 cells in a manner that could be inhibited by methyl-alpha-D-mannoside. The ability to adhere to HT-29 cells correlated with an ability to agglutinate cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and erythrocytes in a mannose-sensitive manner and with adherence to D-mannose-coated agarose beads. L. plantarum 299 and 299v adhered to freshly isolated human colonic and ileal enterocytes, but the binding was not significantly inhibited by methyl-alpha-D-mannoside. Periodate treatment of HT-29 cells abolished mannose-sensitive adherence, confirming that the cell-bound receptor was of carbohydrate nature. Proteinase K treatment of the bacteria also abolished adherence, indicating that the binding involved protein structures on the bacterial cell surface. Thus, a mannose-specific adhesin has been identified in L. plantarum; this adhesin could be involved in the ability to colonize the intestine. PMID:8779562

  11. Impact Mediated Loading Cytoplasmic Loading of Macromolecules into Adherent Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Mark S. F.; Feeback, Daniel L.; Vanderburg, Charles R.

    2003-01-01

    The advent of modern molecular biology, including the development of gene array technologies, has resulted in an explosion of information concerning the specific genes activated during normal cellular development, as well as those associated with a variety of pathological conditions. These techniques have served as a highly efficient, broacI.-based screening approach for those specific genes involved. in regulating normal cellular physiology and identifying candidate genes directly associated with the etiology of specific disease states. However, this approach provides information at the transcriptional' level only and does not necessarily indicate . that the gene in question is in fact translated ito a protein, or whether or not post-translational modification of the protein occurs. The critical importance of post-translational modification (i.e. phosphorylation, glycosylation, sialyation, etc.) to protein function has been recognized with regard to a number of proteins involved in a variety of important disease states. For example, altered glycosylation of beta-amyloid precursor protein results in an increase in the amount of beta-amyloid peptide generated and hence secreted as insoluble extracellular amyloid deposits (Georgopoulou, McLaughlin et al. 2001; Walter, Fluhrer et al. 2001), a pathological hal1nark of Alzheimer's disease. Abnormal phosphorylaion of synapsin I has been linked to alterations in synaptic vesicle trafficking leading to defective neurotransmission in Huntington's disease (Lievens, Woodman et al. 2002). Altered phosphorylation of the TAU protein involved in microtubule function has been linked to a number of neurodegenative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (Billingsley and Kincaid 1997; Sanchez, Alvarez-Tllada et a1. 2001). Aberrant siaIyation of cell/I surface antigens has been detected in a number of different tumor cell types and has been linked to the acquisition of a neoplastic phenotype (Sell 1990), while improper' sia1yation of

  12. Relationship between cell surface composition of Candida albicans and adherence to acrylic after growth on different carbon sources.

    PubMed Central

    McCourtie, J; Douglas, L J

    1981-01-01

    The adherence of Candida albicans to acrylic was measured in vitro after growth of the yeast to stationary phase in defined medium containing glucose, sucrose, galactose, fructose, or maltose as the carbon source. In each case, yeast adherence was proportional to the concentration of sugar in the growth medium, but equimolar concentrations of different sugars promoted adherence to different extents. In vitro adherence was further increased by the addition of divalent cations to assay mixtures but was inhibited when saliva-treated acrylic strips were used or when yeasts were suspended in mixed saliva during the assay. The rate of spheroplast formation of yeasts grown in media containing a 500 mM concentration of the different sugars correlated well with the relative adherence of the cells to acrylic. Galactose-grown yeasts were most resistant to spheroplast formation with Zymolyase-5000 and most adherent to acrylic, whereas fructose-grown organisms were least resistant to spheroplast formation and least adherent to acrylic. These results indicate that when grown to stationary phase in media containing high concentrations of certain sugars, C. albicans undergoes a change in cell surface composition which facilitates its adherence to acrylic surfaces. Electron microscopy of yeasts harvested from such media revealed the presence of an additional surface layer which may be responsible for this enhanced adherence. Images PMID:7019091

  13. Increased neutrophil adherence and adhesion molecule mRNA expression in endothelial cells during selenium deficiency.

    PubMed

    Maddox, J F; Aherne, K M; Reddy, C C; Sordillo, L M

    1999-05-01

    Leukocyte aggregation and activation on endothelial cells (EC) are important preliminary events in leukocyte migration into tissue and subsequent inflammation. Thus, an increase in leukocyte adherence has the potential to affect inflammatory disease outcome. Selenium (Se) is an integral part of the antioxidant enzyme glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and plays an important role in the maintenance of the redox state of a cell. Se supplementation in the bovine has been shown to improve the outcome of acute mastitis caused by coliform bacteria, in part by enhancing the speed of neutrophil migration into the affected mammary gland. However, the mechanisms by which Se modulates neutrophil migration have not been elucidated. Therefore, an in vitro model of Se deficiency in primary bovine mammary artery EC was used to examine the impact of Se status on the adhesive properties of EC. The effect of Se on functional activities was examined by measuring neutrophil adherence to Se-deficient and Se-supplemented EC. Se-deficient EC showed significantly enhanced neutrophil adherence when stimulated with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) for 4 or 24 h, interleukin-1 for 12 h, or H2O2 for 20 min (P < 0.05). To determine the mechanisms underlying these changes in neutrophil adherence, the expression of EC adhesion molecules, ICAM-1, E-selectin, and P-selectin were examined at the molecular level by a competitive reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Results revealed higher mRNA expression for E-selectin and ICAM-1 in Se-deficient EC stimulated with TNF-alpha for 3 and 6 h, and greater expression of P-selectin mRNA in Se-supplemented EC with 3-h TNF-alpha stimulation. These studies provide new information to establish the role of Se nutrition in the initiation of leukocyte adherence to endothelium. PMID:10331495

  14. Development and validation of an instrument to measure factors related to colorectal cancer screening adherence.

    PubMed

    Vernon, S W; Myers, R E; Tilley, B C

    1997-10-01

    This report describes the development and refinement of a set of scales for use in research on predictors of colorectal cancer screening adherence. The study population included 2693 of 4490 eligible white male automotive employees who answered a mailed questionnaire (60% response rate) on beliefs and attitudes related to colorectal cancer and screening. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses and multitrait scaling analysis were used to evaluate the construct validity of a priori scales developed to measure salience and coherence, perceived susceptibility, worries about screening, screening efficacy, social influence, and intention. Analyses supported the construct validity of scales for salience and coherence, perceived susceptibility, and worries about screening. Four items originally assigned to the salience and coherence construct loaded on a separate factor that appeared to measure self-efficacy. There was no empirical support for scales measuring screening efficacy and social influence, and there was limited empirical support for a scale measuring intention. Confirmatory factor analysis of the scales measuring salience and coherence, self-efficacy, perceived susceptibility, and worries about screening showed a similar factor structure in white men with and without a personal history of polyps, indicating that the scales may be useful for studies of both colorectal cancer screening and surveillance. Multitrait scaling analysis showed some support for internal consistency reliability of those scales in women (n = 42) and in African-American men (n = 56), and there was some support for the factor structure in those two subgroups. Future studies should evaluate the psychometric properties of these and similar scales in diverse population subgroups. PMID:9332766

  15. Neurosphere and adherent culture conditions are equivalent for malignant glioma stem cell lines.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Maryam; Reyner, Karina; Deleyrolle, Loic; Millette, Sebastien; Azari, Hassan; Day, Bryan W; Stringer, Brett W; Boyd, Andrew W; Johns, Terrance G; Blot, Vincent; Duggal, Rohit; Reynolds, Brent A

    2015-03-01

    Certain limitations of the neurosphere assay (NSA) have resulted in a search for alternative culture techniques for brain tumor-initiating cells (TICs). Recently, reports have described growing glioblastoma (GBM) TICs as a monolayer using laminin. We performed a side-by-side analysis of the NSA and laminin (adherent) culture conditions to compare the growth and expansion of GBM TICs. GBM cells were grown using the NSA and adherent culture conditions. Comparisons were made using growth in culture, apoptosis assays, protein expression, limiting dilution clonal frequency assay, genetic affymetrix analysis, and tumorigenicity in vivo. In vitro expansion curves for the NSA and adherent culture conditions were virtually identical (P=0.24) and the clonogenic frequencies (5.2% for NSA vs. 5.0% for laminin, P=0.9) were similar as well. Likewise, markers of differentiation (glial fibrillary acidic protein and beta tubulin III) and proliferation (Ki67 and MCM2) revealed no statistical difference between the sphere and attachment methods. Several different methods were used to determine the numbers of dead or dying cells (trypan blue, DiIC, caspase-3, and annexin V) with none of the assays noting a meaningful variance between the two methods. In addition, genetic expression analysis with microarrays revealed no significant differences between the two groups. Finally, glioma cells derived from both methods of expansion formed large invasive tumors exhibiting GBM features when implanted in immune-compromised animals. A detailed functional, protein and genetic characterization of human GBM cells cultured in serum-free defined conditions demonstrated no statistically meaningful differences when grown using sphere (NSA) or adherent conditions. Hence, both methods are functionally equivalent and remain suitable options for expanding primary high-grade gliomas in tissue culture. PMID:25806119

  16. Temperature-induced labelling of Fluo-3 AM selectively yields brighter nucleus in adherent cells

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Guixian; Pan, Leiting; Li, Cunbo; Hu, Fen; Shi, Xuechen; Lee, Imshik; Drevenšek-Olenik, Irena; Zhang, Xinzheng; Xu, Jingjun

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •We detailedly examine temperature effects of Fluo-3 AM labelling in adherent cells. •4 °C Loading and 20 °C de-esterification of Fluo-3 AM yields brighter nuclei. •Brighter nuclei labelling by Fluo-3 AM also depends on cell adhesion quality. •A qualitative model of the brighter nucleus is proposed. -- Abstract: Fluo-3 is widely used to study cell calcium. Two traditional approaches: (1) direct injection and (2) Fluo-3 acetoxymethyl ester (AM) loading, often bring conflicting results in cytoplasmic calcium ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c}) and nuclear calcium ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub n}) imaging. AM loading usually yields a darker nucleus than in cytoplasm, while direct injection always induces a brighter nucleus which is more responsive to [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub n} detection. In this work, we detailedly investigated the effects of loading and de-esterification temperatures on the fluorescence intensity of Fluo-3 in response to [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub n} and [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c} in adherent cells, including osteoblast, HeLa and BV2 cells. Interestingly, it showed that fluorescence intensity of nucleus in osteoblast cells was about two times larger than that of cytoplasm when cells were loaded with Fluo-3 AM at 4 °C and allowed a subsequent step for de-esterification at 20 °C. Brighter nuclei were also acquired in HeLa and BV2 cells using the same experimental condition. Furthermore, loading time and adhesion quality of cells had effect on fluorescence intensity. Taken together, cold loading and room temperature de-esterification treatment of Fluo-3 AM selectively yielded brighter nucleus in adherent cells.

  17. Low white blood cell count and cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Neutropenia and cancer; Absolute neutrophil count and cancer; ANC and cancer ... A person with cancer can get a low white blood cell count from the cancer or from treatment for the cancer. Cancer may ...

  18. Household Net Worth, Racial Disparities, and Hormonal Therapy Adherence Among Women With Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hershman, Dawn L.; Tsui, Jennifer; Wright, Jason D.; Coromilas, Ellie J.; Tsai, Wei Yann; Neugut, Alfred I.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Nonadherence to adjuvant hormonal therapy is common and is associated with increased prescription copayment amount and black race. Studies suggest that household wealth may partly explain racial disparities. We investigated the impact of net worth on disparities in adherence and discontinuation. Patients and Methods We used the OptumInsight insurance claims database to identify women older than age 50 years diagnosed with early breast cancer, from January 1, 2007, to December 31, 2011, who were using hormonal therapy. Nonadherence was defined as a medication possession ratio of ≤ 80% of eligible days over a 2-year period. We evaluated the association of demographic and clinical characteristics, annual household income, household net worth (< $250,000, $250,000 to $750,000, or > $750,000), insurance type, and copayments (< $10, $10 to $20, or > $20) with adherence to hormonal therapy. Logistic regression analyses were conducted by sequentially adding sociodemographic and financial variables to race. Results We identified 10,302 patients; 2,473 (24%) were nonadherent. In the unadjusted analyses, adherence was negatively associated with black race (odds ratio [OR], 0.76; P < .001), advanced age, comorbidity, and Medicare insurance. Adherence was positively associated with medium (OR, 1.33; P < .001) and high (OR, 1.66; P < .001) compared with low net worth. The negative association of black race with adherence (OR, 0.76) was reduced by adding net worth to the model (OR, 0.84; P < .05). Correcting for other variables had a minimal impact on the association between race and adherence (OR, 0.87; P = .08). The interaction between net worth and race was significant (P < .01). Conclusion We found that net worth partially explains racial disparities in hormonal therapy adherence. These results suggest that economic factors may contribute to disparities in the quality of care. PMID:25691670

  19. Upon impact: the fate of adhering Pseudomonas fluorescens cells during nanofiltration.

    PubMed

    Habimana, Olivier; Semião, Andrea J C; Casey, Eoin

    2014-08-19

    Nanofiltration (NF) is a high-pressure membrane filtration process increasingly applied in drinking water treatment and water reuse processes. NF typically rejects divalent salts, organic matter, and micropollutants. However, the efficiency of NF is adversely affected by membrane biofouling, during which microorganisms adhere to the membrane and proliferate to create a biofilm. Here we show that adhered Pseudomonas fluorescens cells under high permeate flux conditions are met with high fluid shear and convective fluxes at the membrane-liquid interface, resulting in their structural damage and collapse. These results were confirmed by fluorescent staining, flow cytometry, and scanning electron microscopy. This present study offers a "first-glimpse" of cell damage and death during the initial phases of bacterial adhesion to NF membranes and raises a key question about the role of this observed phenomena during early-stage biofilm formation under permeate flux and cross-flow conditions. PMID:25072514

  20. Non-invasive and non-destructive measurements of confluence in cultured adherent cell lines.

    PubMed

    Busschots, Steven; O'Toole, Sharon; O'Leary, John J; Stordal, Britta

    2015-01-01

    Many protocols used for measuring the growth of adherent monolayer cells in vitro are invasive, destructive and do not allow for the continued, undisturbed growth of cells within flasks. Protocols often use indirect methods for measuring proliferation. Microscopy techniques can analyse cell proliferation in a non-invasive or non-destructive manner but often use expensive equipment and software algorithms. In this method images of cells within flasks are captured by photographing under a standard inverted phase contract light microscope using a digital camera with a camera lens adaptor. Images are analysed for confluence using ImageJ freeware resulting in a measure of confluence known as an Area Fraction (AF) output. An example of the AF method in use on OVCAR8 and UPN251 cell lines is included. •Measurements of confluence from growing adherent cell lines in cell culture flasks is obtained in a non-invasive, non-destructive, label-free manner.•The technique is quick, affordable and eliminates sample manipulation.•The technique provides an objective, consistent measure of when cells reach confluence and is highly correlated to manual counting with a haemocytometer. The average correlation co-efficient from a Spearman correlation (n = 3) was 0.99 ± 0.008 for OVCAR8 (p = 0.01) and 0.99 ± 0.01 for UPN251 (p = 0.01) cell lines. PMID:26150966

  1. Non-invasive and non-destructive measurements of confluence in cultured adherent cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Busschots, Steven; O’Toole, Sharon; O’Leary, John J.; Stordal, Britta

    2014-01-01

    Many protocols used for measuring the growth of adherent monolayer cells in vitro are invasive, destructive and do not allow for the continued, undisturbed growth of cells within flasks. Protocols often use indirect methods for measuring proliferation. Microscopy techniques can analyse cell proliferation in a non-invasive or non-destructive manner but often use expensive equipment and software algorithms. In this method images of cells within flasks are captured by photographing under a standard inverted phase contract light microscope using a digital camera with a camera lens adaptor. Images are analysed for confluence using ImageJ freeware resulting in a measure of confluence known as an Area Fraction (AF) output. An example of the AF method in use on OVCAR8 and UPN251 cell lines is included. • Measurements of confluence from growing adherent cell lines in cell culture flasks is obtained in a non-invasive, non-destructive, label-free manner. • The technique is quick, affordable and eliminates sample manipulation. • The technique provides an objective, consistent measure of when cells reach confluence and is highly correlated to manual counting with a haemocytometer. The average correlation co-efficient from a Spearman correlation (n = 3) was 0.99 ± 0.008 for OVCAR8 (p = 0.01) and 0.99 ± 0.01 for UPN251 (p = 0.01) cell lines. PMID:26150966

  2. Effects of mononuclear phagocyte system modulating agents on Fc and C3 receptors of adherent cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hitomi, M.; Shimizu, F.

    1985-01-01

    Agents which modulate the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS) were examined for their effects on Fc and C3 receptors of adherent cells (A-cells) as judged by rosette formation. Dextran sulphate, carrageenan, and immune complexes, known as MPS suppressants, reduced the percentage of receptor-positive A-cells, while levamisole, known as a MPS-activator, increased the percentage in vitro. The changes in the percentage of Fc receptor were parallel to those of the C3 receptor in vitro. The effects of these agents were also examined in vivo. PMID:2408651

  3. The expression of nonagglutinating fimbriae and its role in Proteus mirabilis adherence to epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tolson, D L; Harrison, B A; Latta, R K; Lee, K K; Altman, E

    1997-08-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a common causative agent of human urinary tract infections, especially in catheterized patients and in those patients with structural abnormalities of the urinary tract. In addition to the production of hemolysin and urease, fimbriae-mediated adherence to uroepithelial cells and kidney epithelium may be essential for virulence of P. mirabilis. A single P. mirabilis strain is capable of expressing several morphologically distinct fimbrial species, which can each be favoured by specific in vitro growth conditions. The fimbrial species reported to date include mannose-resistant/Proteus-like fimbriae, ambient temperature fimbriae, P. mirabilis fimbriae, and nonagglutinating fimbriae (NAF). Here, using intact bacteria or purified NAF as immunogens, we have generated the first reported NAF-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Bacteria expressing NAF as their only fimbrial species adhered strongly to a number of cell lines in vitro, including uroepithelial cell lines. Binding of P. mirabilis was markedly reduced following preincubation with NAF-specific mAbs and Fab fragments. The presence of NAF with highly conserved N-terminal sequences on all P. mirabilis strains so far examined, combined with the ability of both anti-NAF mAbs and purified NAF molecules to inhibit P. mirabilis adherence in vitro, suggests that NAF may contribute to the pathogenesis of P. mirabilis. PMID:9304781

  4. Array of Biodegradable Microraftsfor Isolation and Implantation of Living, Adherent Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuli; Phillips, Colleen N.; Herrera, Gabriela S.; Sims, Christopher E.; Yeh, Jen Jen; Allbritton, Nancy L.

    2013-01-01

    A new strategy for efficient sorting and implantation of viable adherent cells into animals is described. An array of biodegradable micro-structures (microrafts) was fabricated using a polydimethylsiloxane substrate for micromolding poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). Screening various forms of PLGA determined that the suitability of PLGA for microraft manufacture, biocompatibility and in vitro degradation was dependent on molecular weight and lactic/glycolic ratio. Cells plated on the array selectively attached to the microrafts and could be identified by their fluorescence, morphology or other criteria. The cells were efficiently dislodged and collected from the array using a microneedle device. The platform was used to isolate specific cells from a mixed population establishing the ability to sort target cells for direct implantation. As a proof of concept, fluorescently conjugated microrafts carrying tumor cells stably expressing luciferase were isolated from an array and implanted subcutaneously into mice. In vivo bio-luminescence imaging confirmed the growth of a tumor in the recipient animals. Imaging of tissue sections from the tumors demonstrated in vivo degradation of the implanted microrafts. The process is a new strategy for isolating and delivering a small number of adherent cells for animal implantation with potential applications in tissue repair, tumor induction, in vivo differentiation of stem cells and other biomedical research. PMID:23930219

  5. A visual targeting system for the microinjection of unstained adherent cells.

    PubMed

    Becattini, Gabriele; Mattos, Leonardo S; Caldwell, Darwin G

    2013-02-01

    Automatic localization and targeting are critical steps in automating the process of microinjecting adherent cells. This process is currently performed manually by highly trained operators and is characterized as a laborious task with low success rate. Therefore, automation is desired to increase the efficiency and consistency of the operations. This research offers a contribution to this procedure through the development of a vision system for a robotic microinjection setup. Its goals are to automatically locate adherent cells in a culture dish and target them for a microinjection. Here the major concern was the achievement of an error-free targeting system to guarantee high consistency in microinjection experiments. To accomplish this, a novel visual targeting algorithm integrating different image processing techniques was proposed. This framework employed defocusing microscopy to highlight cell features and improve cell segmentation and targeting reliability. Three main image processing techniques, operating at three different focus levels in a bright field (BF) microscope, were used: an anisotropic contour completion (ACC) method, a local intensity variation background-foreground classifier, and a grayscale threshold-based segmentation. The proposed framework combined information gathered by each of these methods using a validation map and this was shown to provide reliable cell targeting results. Experiments conducted with sets of real images from two different cell lines (CHO-K1 and HEK), which contained a total of more than 650 cells, yielded flawless targeting results along with a cell detection ratio greater than 50%. PMID:23287416

  6. Immune adherence in renal glomeruli. Complement receptor sites on glomerular capillary epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Burkholder, P. M.; Oberley, T. D.; Barber, T. A.; Beacom, A.; Koehler, C.

    1977-01-01

    Several very recent reports have indicated the presence of receptor sites for the third component of complement in human but not other vertebrate renal glomeruli. The present study constitutes a demonstration that the glomerular capillary epithelial cell bears this receptor, detectable with either EAC complexes (EAC1423b) or fluores ceinated zymosan-C3 (ZC3b) complexes, Fresh, unfixed frozen sections of normal or diseased human kidneys, mechanically isolated human glomeruli, dissociated glomerular cells, and glomeruli and golmerular cells maintained in tissue culture were examined with various EAC complexes or ZC3b and examined by phase light microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, or transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Clearly, by scanning electron microscopy it was determined that glomerular capillary epithelial cells bind the immune-adherence EAC indicator cells. Because glomeruli or glomerular epithelial cells did not bind E, EA, EACI, EAC14, or EAC142 but did bind EAC1423b or ZC3b, it is concluded that C3b (activated bound fragment of the third component of complement) is responsible for the immune-adherence reaction in glomeruli. Preliminary examination of diseased renal biopsies indicates that sclerotic glomeruli, focal segmental sclerotic or proliferative glomerular capillary lesions, and proliferative epithelial crescents are immune-adherence negative. Furthermore, a clear or consistent inverse relationship between glomerular capillary deposits of C3 which presumably might block epithelial C3 receptor sites, and immune-adherence reactivity with EAC in vitro was not as evident in this study as reported previously by other investigators. Nevertheless, it is still attractive to conceive that glomerular C3 receptor sites might be responsible for binding of antigen-antibody-complement complexes and formation of immune-complex deposits, at least on the epimembranous (subepithelial) surface of glomerular capillary walls. Inability to demonstrate this

  7. Extragonadal Germ Cell Cancer (EGC)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Testicular Cancer Resource Center Extragonadal Germ Cell Cancer (EGC) 95% of all testicular tumors are germ cell ... seen in young adults. Patients with mediastinal nonseminomatous EGC are typically classed as poor risk patients because ...

  8. Correlates of Adherence to a Telephone-Based Multiple Health Behavior Change Cancer Preventive Intervention for Teens: The Healthy for Life Program (HELP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mays, Darren; Peshkin, Beth N.; Sharff, McKane E.; Walker, Leslie R.; Abraham, Anisha A.; Hawkins, Kirsten B.; Tercyak, Kenneth P.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined factors associated with teens' adherence to a multiple health behavior cancer preventive intervention. Analyses identified predictors of trial enrollment, run-in completion, and adherence (intervention initiation, number of sessions completed). Of 104 teens screened, 73% (n = 76) were trial eligible. White teens were more…

  9. Towards high-throughput automated targeted femtosecond laser-based transfection of adherent cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antkowiak, Maciej; Torres-Mapa, Maria Leilani; Gunn-Moore, Frank; Dholakia, Kishan

    2011-03-01

    Femtosecond laser induced cell membrane poration has proven to be an attractive alternative to the classical methods of drug and gene delivery. It is a selective, sterile, non-contact technique that offers a highly localized operation, low toxicity and consistent performance. However, its broader application still requires the development of robust, high-throughput and user-friendly systems. We present a system capable of unassisted enhanced targeted optoinjection and phototransfection of adherent mammalian cells with a femtosecond laser. We demonstrate the advantages of a dynamic diffractive optical element, namely a spatial light modulator (SLM) for precise three dimensional positioning of the beam. It enables the implementation of a "point-and-shoot" system in which using the software interface a user simply points at the cell and a predefined sequence of precisely positioned doses can be applied. We show that irradiation in three axial positions alleviates the problem of exact beam positioning on the cell membrane and doubles the number of viably optoinjected cells when compared with a single dose. The presented system enables untargeted raster scan irradiation which provides transfection of adherent cells at the throughput of 1 cell per second.

  10. Evaluation of Gelatin Microparticles as Adherent-Substrates for Mesenchymal Stem Cells in a Hydrogel Composite.

    PubMed

    Lu, Steven; Lee, Esther J; Lam, Johnny; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Mikos, Antonios G

    2016-06-01

    Due to the lack of cell-adhesive moieties in traditional synthetic hydrogels, the present work investigated the use of degradable gelatin microparticles (GMPs) as temporary adherent substrates for anchorage-dependent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). MSCs were seeded onto GMPs of varying crosslinking densities and sizes to investigate their role on influencing MSC differentiation and aggregation. The MSC-seeded GMPs were then encapsulated in poly(ethylene glycol)-based hydrogels and cultured in serum-free, growth factor-free osteochondral medium. Non-seeded MSCs co-encapsulated with GMPs in the hydrogels were used as a control for comparison. Over the course of 35 days, MSCs seeded on GMPs exhibited more cell-cell contacts, greater chondrogenic potential, and a down-regulation of osteogenic markers compared to the controls. Although the factors of GMP crosslinking and size had nominal influence on MSC differentiation and aggregation, GMPs demonstrate potential as an adherent-substrate for improving cell delivery from hydrogel scaffolds by facilitating cell-cell contacts and improving MSC differentiation. PMID:26935924

  11. Slow-Adhering Stem Cells Derived from Injured Skeletal Muscle Have Improved Regenerative Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Xiaodong; Xiang, Guosheng; Rathbone, Christopher R.; Pan, Haiying; Bellayr, Ian H.; Walters, Thomas J.; Li, Yong

    2011-01-01

    A wide variety of myogenic cell sources have been used for repair of injured and diseased muscle including muscle stem cells, which can be isolated from skeletal muscle as a group of slow-adhering cells on a collagen-coated surface. The therapeutic use of muscle stem cells for improving muscle regeneration is promising; however, the effect of injury on their characteristics and engraftment potential has yet to be described. In the present study, slow-adhering stem cells (SASCs) from both laceration-injured and control noninjured skeletal muscles in mice were isolated and studied. Migration and proliferation rates, multidifferentiation potentials, and differences in gene expression in both groups of cells were compared in vitro. Results demonstrated that a larger population of SASCs could be isolated from injured muscle than from control noninjured muscle. In addition, SASCs derived from injured muscle demonstrated improved migration, a higher rate of proliferation and multidifferentiation, and increased expression of Notch1, STAT3, Msx1, and MMP2. Moreover, when transplanted into dystrophic muscle in MDX/SCID mice, SASCs from injured muscle generated greater engraftments with a higher capillary density than did SASCs from control noninjured muscle. These data suggest that traumatic injury may modify stem cell characteristics through trophic factors and improve the transplantation potential of SASCs in alleviating skeletal muscle injuries and diseases. PMID:21684246

  12. Membrane in cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Galeotti, T.; Cittadini, A.; Neri, G.; Scarpa, A.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains papers presented at a conference on membranes in cancer cells. Topics covered include Oncogenies, hormones, and free-radical processes in malignant transformation in vitro and Superoxide onion may trigger DNA strand breaks in human granulorytes by acting as a membrane target.

  13. Pancreatic small cell cancer.

    PubMed

    El Rassy, Elie; Tabchi, Samer; Kourie, Hampig Raphael; Assi, Tarek; Chebib, Ralph; Farhat, Fadi; Kattan, Joseph

    2016-06-01

    Small cell carcinoma (SCC) is most commonly associated with lung cancer. Extra-pulmonary SCC can originate in virtually any organ system, with the gastrointestinal tract being the most common site of involvement. We review the clinical presentation, pathogenesis, histology, imaging modalities and optimal therapeutic management of PSCC in light of available evidence. PMID:26566245

  14. Nonsmall cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Sculier, Jean-Paul

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this review is to report the Clinical Year in Review proceedings in the field of nonsmall cell lung cancer that were presented at the 2012 European Respiratory Society Congress in Vienna, Austria. Various topics were reviewed, including epidemiology, screening, diagnosis, treatment, prognosis, and palliative and end of life care. PMID:23457162

  15. Phenotypic analysis of nylon-wool-adherent suppressor cells that inhibit the effector process of tumour cell lysis by lymphokine-activated killer cells in patients with advanced gastric carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Koyama, S; Fukao, K

    1994-01-01

    The causes of down-regulation of cytotoxic immune responses in cancer patients have not been fully evaluated. We previously demonstrated that T-cell-growth-factor-activated peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) with the surface phenotype CD8+ CD11b-, from patients with widespread metastasis of gastric carcinoma, inhibited the effector process of lymphokine-activated-killer(LAK)-cell-mediated cytolysis. In this study, we examined suppressor cell activity in freshly prepared PBL from 18 patients with advanced gastric carcinoma, and 10 normal healthy individuals. The suppressor cell activity was assayed by recording whether or not PBL inhibited directly the effector process of LAK cell cytotoxicity. Most of the PBL suspensions from cancer patients showed that they contained a population of cells that can directly inhibit the effector phase of tumor cell lysis of the cytotoxic cells. To analyze further the PBL responsible for the suppression, the cells were passed over a nylon-wool column. Nylon-wool-adherent cells significantly augmented the suppression, while the cells passing through abrogated the suppressive effect. Most nylon-wool-adherent cells from 10 normal healthy controls did not inhibit the cytotoxic reaction. To determine further the suppressor-effector population in nylon-wool-adherent cells, negative-selection studies using CD8-, CD4- or CD11b-coated magnetic beads, and positive-selection studies using CD8- or CD4-coated magnetic beads were performed. Finally the results suggest that the suppressor-effector cells comprise at least two different surface phenotypes: CD8+ T and CD8-CD11b+ cells. The possible role of CD4+ T cells and HLA-DR+ LeuM3+ macrophages as suppressor cells was ruled out in nylon-wool-adherent cells. CD8+ T and possibly CD8-CD11b+ cells apparently suppressed the efferent limb of the antitumor immunity. The selective immune suppression mediated by these cells may partly be concerned with escape mechanisms of gastric carcinoma from the host

  16. Toxicity Minimized Cryoprotectant Addition and Removal Procedures for Adherent Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Allyson Fry; Glasscock, Cameron; McClanahan, Danielle R.; Benson, James D.; Higgins, Adam Z.

    2015-01-01

    Ice-free cryopreservation, known as vitrification, is an appealing approach for banking of adherent cells and tissues because it prevents dissociation and morphological damage that may result from ice crystal formation. However, current vitrification methods are often limited by the cytotoxicity of the concentrated cryoprotective agent (CPA) solutions that are required to suppress ice formation. Recently, we described a mathematical strategy for identifying minimally toxic CPA equilibration procedures based on the minimization of a toxicity cost function. Here we provide direct experimental support for the feasibility of these methods when applied to adherent endothelial cells. We first developed a concentration- and temperature-dependent toxicity cost function by exposing the cells to a range of glycerol concentrations at 21°C and 37°C, and fitting the resulting viability data to a first order cell death model. This cost function was then numerically minimized in our state constrained optimization routine to determine addition and removal procedures for 17 molal (mol/kg water) glycerol solutions. Using these predicted optimal procedures, we obtained 81% recovery after exposure to vitrification solutions, as well as successful vitrification with the relatively slow cooling and warming rates of 50°C/min and 130°C/min. In comparison, conventional multistep CPA equilibration procedures resulted in much lower cell yields of about 10%. Our results demonstrate the potential for rational design of minimally toxic vitrification procedures and pave the way for extension of our optimization approach to other adherent cell types as well as more complex systems such as tissues and organs. PMID:26605546

  17. Applications of electroporation of adherent cells in situ, on a partly conductive slide.

    PubMed

    Raptis, L H; Brownell, H L; Liu, S K; Firth, K L; MacKenzie, L W; Stiles, C D; Alberta, J A

    1995-10-01

    Nontraumatic, simple, and reproducible procedures for the introduction of nonpermeant molecules into adherent mammalian cells by in situ electroporation are described. Cells are grown on a glass slide, half of which is coated with electrically conductive, optically transparent, indium-tin oxide. An electric pulse is applied in the presence of the molecules to be introduced, and their effect on the cellular phenotype can be observed. The cells growing on the nonconductive side of the slide do not receive any pulse and serve as controls. Careful adjustment of electric field strength can achieve the introduction of the molecules into essentially 100% of the cells, and this treatment causes no detectable disruption to cellular metabolism. This is applied in the presence of the fluorescent dye, Lucifer yellow, causing its penetration into the cells growing on the conductive half of the slide. The migration of the dye to the nonelectroporated cells growing on the nonconductive area is microscopically observed under fluorescence illumination. PMID:8556428

  18. Preoperative radiotherapy for rectal cancer: a comparative study of quality control adherence at two cancer hospitals in Spain and Poland

    PubMed Central

    Fundowicz, Magdalena; Macia, Miguel; Marin, Susanna; Bogusz-Czerniewicz, Marta; Konstanty, Ewelina; Modolel, Ignaci; Malicki, Julian; Guedea, Ferran

    2014-01-01

    Background We performed a clinical audit of preoperative rectal cancer treatment at two European radiotherapy centres (Poland and Spain). The aim was to independently verify adherence to a selection of indicators of treatment quality and to identify any notable inter-institutional differences. Methods A total of 162 patients, in Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO) 68 and in Greater Poland Cancer Centre (GPCC) 94, diagnosed with locally advanced rectal cancer and treated with preoperative radiotherapy or radio-chemotherapy were included in retrospective study. A total of 7 quality control measures were evaluated: waiting time, multidisciplinary treatment approach, portal verification, in vivo dosimetry, informed consent, guidelines for diagnostics and therapy, and patient monitoring during treatment. Results Several differences were observed. Waiting time from pathomorphological diagnosis to initial consultation was 31 (ICO) vs. 8 (GPCC) days. Waiting time from the first visit to the beginning of the treatment was twice as long at the ICO. At the ICO, 82% of patient experienced treatment interruptions. The protocol for portal verification was the same at both institutions. In vivo dosimetry is not used for this treatment localization at the ICO. The ICO utilizes locally-developed guidelines for diagnostics and therapy, while the GPCC is currently developing its own guidelines. Conclusions An independent external clinical audit is an excellent approach to identifying and resolving deficiencies in quality control procedures. We identified several procedures amenable to improvement. Both institutions have since implemented changes to improve quality standards. We believe that all radiotherapy centres should perform a comprehensive clinical audit to identify and rectify deficiencies. PMID:24991212

  19. Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kalemkerian, Gregory P.; Akerley, Wallace; Bogner, Paul; Borghaei, Hossein; Chow, Laura QM; Downey, Robert J.; Gandhi, Leena; Ganti, Apar Kishor P.; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Grecula, John C.; Hayman, James; Heist, Rebecca Suk; Horn, Leora; Jahan, Thierry; Koczywas, Marianna; Loo, Billy W.; Merritt, Robert E.; Moran, Cesar A.; Niell, Harvey B.; O’Malley, Janis; Patel, Jyoti D.; Ready, Neal; Rudin, Charles M.; Williams, Charles C.; Gregory, Kristina; Hughes, Miranda

    2013-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors account for approximately 20% of lung cancers; most (≈15%) are small cell lung cancer (SCLC). These NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for SCLC focus on extensive-stage SCLC because it occurs more frequently than limited-stage disease. SCLC is highly sensitive to initial therapy; however, most patients eventually die of recurrent disease. In patients with extensive-stage disease, chemotherapy alone can palliate symptoms and prolong survival in most patients; however, long-term survival is rare. Most cases of SCLC are attributable to cigarette smoking; therefore, smoking cessation should be strongly promoted. PMID:23307984

  20. Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) assay-Book Chapter*

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are thousands of environmental chemicals for which there is limited toxicological information, motivating the development and application of in vitro systems to profile the biological effects of xenobiotic exposure and predict their potential developmental hazard. An adhere...

  1. Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) Assay: Book Chapter

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are thousands of environmental chemicals for which there is limited toxicological information, motivating the development and application of in vitro systems to profile the biological effects of xenobiotic exposure and predict their potential developmental hazard. An adher...

  2. Cell Phone-Based and Adherence Device Technologies for HIV Care and Treatment in Resource-Limited Settings: Recent Advances.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Jeffrey I; Haberer, Jessica E

    2015-12-01

    Numerous cell phone-based and adherence monitoring technologies have been developed to address barriers to effective HIV prevention, testing, and treatment. Because most people living with HIV and AIDS reside in resource-limited settings (RLS), it is important to understand the development and use of these technologies in RLS. Recent research on cell phone-based technologies has focused on HIV education, linkage to and retention in care, disease tracking, and antiretroviral therapy adherence reminders. Advances in adherence devices have focused on real-time adherence monitors, which have been used for both antiretroviral therapy and pre-exposure prophylaxis. Real-time monitoring has recently been combined with cell phone-based technologies to create real-time adherence interventions using short message service (SMS). New developments in adherence technologies are exploring ingestion monitoring and metabolite detection to confirm adherence. This article provides an overview of recent advances in these two families of technologies and includes research on their acceptability and cost-effectiveness when available. It additionally outlines key challenges and needed research as use of these technologies continues to expand and evolve. PMID:26439917

  3. Measles virus hemagglutinin mediates monocyte aggregation and increased adherence to measles-infected endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Soilu-Hänninen, M; Hänninen, A; Ilonen, J; Salmi, A; Salonen, R

    1996-09-01

    The effect of measles virus (MV) infection on monocyte adhesion was studied using human peripheral blood monocytes and monocytic and endothelial cell lines. The infection of monocytic U-937 cells led to the formation of large cellular aggregates. Aggregation was independent of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1)/lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), but could be inhibited by monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against the MV hemagglutinin glycoprotein (MV-H). mAb against the MV receptor, CD46, also blocked aggregation. No significant changes in the cell surface expression of adhesion molecules CD11a, CD11b, CD11c, CD18, CD54, CD44, CD49d (alpha 4-integrin) and CD62L (L-selectin) were observed on MV-infected monocytes. Infection of a human endothelial cell line, EAhy 926 (HEC), with MV led to a two-fold increase in 1CAM-1 expression and a two-fold increase in monocyte adherence to the HEC (from 22 +/- 1.6% to 42 +/- 4.8%). However, ICAM-1 mAb reduced monocyte adhesion to the control and MV-infected HEC to a similar degree, whereas anti-MV-H antibodies abolished the difference between binding to infected and control HEC. We conclude that MV hemagglutinin mediated both the homo typic aggregation in infected monocyte cultures and increased monocyte adherence to the infected endothelial cells. PMID:8884738

  4. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli TibA Glycoprotein Adheres to Human Intestine Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lindenthal, Christoph; Elsinghorst, Eric A.

    2001-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is capable of invading epithelial cell lines derived from the human ileum and colon. Two separate invasion loci (tia and tib) that direct noninvasive E. coli strains to adhere to and invade cultured human intestine epithelial cells have previously been isolated from the classical ETEC strain H10407. The tib locus directs the synthesis of TibA, a 104-kDa outer membrane glycoprotein. Synthesis of TibA is directly correlated with the adherence and invasion phenotypes of the tib locus, suggesting that this protein is an adhesin and invasin. Here we report the purification of TibA and characterization of its biological activity. TibA was purified by continuous-elution preparative sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Purified TibA was biotin labeled and then shown to bind to HCT8 human ileocecal epithelial cells in a specific and saturable manner. Unlabeled TibA competed with biotin-labeled TibA, suggesting the presence of a specific TibA receptor in HCT8 cells. These results show that TibA acts as an adhesin. Polyclonal anti-TibA antiserum inhibited invasion of ETEC strain H10407 and of recombinant E. coli bearing tib locus clones, suggesting that TibA also acts as an invasin. The ability of TibA to direct epithelial cell adhesion suggests a role for this protein in ETEC pathogenesis. PMID:11119488

  5. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli TibA glycoprotein adheres to human intestine epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lindenthal, C; Elsinghorst, E A

    2001-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is capable of invading epithelial cell lines derived from the human ileum and colon. Two separate invasion loci (tia and tib) that direct noninvasive E. coli strains to adhere to and invade cultured human intestine epithelial cells have previously been isolated from the classical ETEC strain H10407. The tib locus directs the synthesis of TibA, a 104-kDa outer membrane glycoprotein. Synthesis of TibA is directly correlated with the adherence and invasion phenotypes of the tib locus, suggesting that this protein is an adhesin and invasin. Here we report the purification of TibA and characterization of its biological activity. TibA was purified by continuous-elution preparative sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Purified TibA was biotin labeled and then shown to bind to HCT8 human ileocecal epithelial cells in a specific and saturable manner. Unlabeled TibA competed with biotin-labeled TibA, suggesting the presence of a specific TibA receptor in HCT8 cells. These results show that TibA acts as an adhesin. Polyclonal anti-TibA antiserum inhibited invasion of ETEC strain H10407 and of recombinant E. coli bearing tib locus clones, suggesting that TibA also acts as an invasin. The ability of TibA to direct epithelial cell adhesion suggests a role for this protein in ETEC pathogenesis. PMID:11119488

  6. Adherence to hydroxyurea medication by children with sickle cell disease (SCD) using an electronic device: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Susumu; Kodjebacheva, Gergana; Scherrer, Tammy; Rice, Gary; Grigorian, Matthew; Blankenship, Jeremy; Onwuzurike, Nkechi

    2016-08-01

    Adherence to hydroxyurea (HU) is a significant modifying factor in sickle cell vaso-occlusive pain. We conducted a study using an electronic medication container-monitor-reminder device (GlowCap™) to track adherence and determine whether use of this device affected rates of HU adherence. Subjects were regular attendees to our clinic. They were given a 37-item questionnaire and were asked to use a GlowCap containing HU. When the device cap is opened, it makes a remote "medication taken" record. The device also provides usage reminder in the form of lights and alarm sounds if the cap opening is delayed. Nineteen subjects participated in the survey, and 17 in the intervention phase. Of the 17, 12 had reliable adherence data. Seventeen caregivers of patients and two patients completed the survey. Two most common barriers to adherence identified were lack of reminders and absence of medicine home delivery. The intervention component of this study, which used both the electronic (GlowCap) method and medication possession ratio showed that the median adherence rate for the 12 patients evaluated was 85 %. The GlowCap device accurately kept a record of adherence rates. This device may be an effective tool for increasing HU medication adherence. PMID:27225236

  7. Experimental evidence for the role of lipids in adherence of Candida spp. to human buccal epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ghannoum, M A; Burns, G R; Elteen, K A; Radwan, S S

    1986-01-01

    Lipids extracted from Candida albicans and C. tropicalis, but not from the weakly adherent C. pseudotropicalis, significantly blocked in vitro adherence of the respective yeast cells to buccal epithelial cells. The percentage of reduction from control values ranged between 16.4 and 42.1%, depending on the species, the strain, and the solvent used for lipid extraction. The constituent lipid classes of both the acetone and chloroform-methanol extracts of C. albicans ATCC 10231 were qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed. The individual classes were isolated by preparative thin-layer chromatography and then tested for their effects on the adherence of this strain to buccal epithelial cells. Individual phospholipids, sterols, and steryl esters blocked adherence significantly (between 15.5 and 55.7% reduction). Triacylglycerols and free fatty acids showed no effect whatsoever. The same results were obtained when standard lipid samples were investigated. Images PMID:3759234

  8. Cell shape-dependent shear stress on adherent cells in a micro-physiologic system as revealed by FEM.

    PubMed

    Pfister, C; Bozsak, C; Wolf, P; Demmel, F; Brischwein, M

    2015-05-01

    Flow-induced shear stress on adherent cells leads to biochemical signaling and mechanical responses of the cells. To determine the flow-induced shear stress on adherent cells cultured in a micro-scaled reaction chamber, we developed a suitable finite element method model. The influence of the most important parameters-cell shape, cell density, shear modulus and fluid velocity-was investigated. Notably, the cell shape strongly influences the resulting shear stress. Long and smooth cells undergo lower shear stress than more rounded cells. Changes in the curvature of the cells lead to stress peaks and single cells experience higher shear stress values than cells of a confluent monolayer. The computational results of the fluid flow simulation were validated experimentally. We also analyzed the influence of flow-induced shear stress on the metabolic activity and shape of L929, a mouse fibroblast cell line, experimentally. The results indicate that threshold stress values for continuous flow conditions cannot be transferred to quasi static flow conditions interrupted by short fluid exchange events. PMID:25856467

  9. Interleukin-3 greatly expands non-adherent endothelial forming cells with pro-angiogenic properties.

    PubMed

    Moldenhauer, Lachlan M; Cockshell, Michaelia P; Frost, Lachlan; Parham, Kate A; Tvorogov, Denis; Tan, Lih Y; Ebert, Lisa M; Tooley, Katie; Worthley, Stephen; Lopez, Angel F; Bonder, Claudine S

    2015-05-01

    Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) provide revascularisation for cardiovascular disease and the expansion of these cells opens up the possibility of their use as a cell therapy. Herein we show that interleukin-3 (IL3) strongly expands a population of human non-adherent endothelial forming cells (EXnaEFCs) with low immunogenicity as well as pro-angiogenic capabilities in vivo, making their therapeutic utilisation a realistic option. Non-adherent CD133(+) EFCs isolated from human umbilical cord blood and cultured under different conditions were maximally expanded by day 12 in the presence of IL3 at which time a 350-fold increase in cell number was obtained. Cell surface marker phenotyping confirmed expression of the hematopoietic progenitor cell markers CD133, CD117 and CD34, vascular cell markers VEGFR2 and CD31, dim expression of CD45 and absence of myeloid markers CD14 and CD11b. Functional experiments revealed that EXnaEFCs exhibited classical properties of endothelial cells (ECs), namely binding of Ulex europaeus lectin, up-take of acetylated-low density lipoprotein and contribution to EC tube formation in vitro. These EXnaEFCs demonstrated a pro-angiogenic phenotype within two independent in vivo rodent models. Firstly, a Matrigel plug assay showed increased vascularisation in mice. Secondly, a rat model of acute myocardial infarction demonstrated reduced heart damage as determined by lower levels of serum creatinine and a modest increase in heart functionality. Taken together, these studies show IL3 as a potent growth factor for human CD133(+) cell expansion with clear pro-angiogenic properties (in vitro and in vivo) and thus may provide clinical utility for humans in the future. PMID:25900163

  10. Comparative genomic hybridization analysis of newly established retinoblastoma cell lines of adherent growth compared with Y79 of nonadherent growth.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Hun; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Yu, Young Suk; Kim, Dong Hun; Kim, Yong Kyu; Kim, Kyu-Won

    2008-08-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB) shows cytogenetic aberrations involving genes other than RB gene located on 13q14. We analyzed genomic aberration in newly established RB cell lines SNUOT-RB1 and SNUOT-RB4 of adherent growth and Y79 cell line of nonadherent growth by microarray comparative genomic hybridization. SNUOT-RB1 showed 44 significant copy number changes (gain in 11 and loss in 33, P<0.0005). SNUOT-RB4 showed 42 significant copy number changes (gain in 8 and loss in 34, P<0.0005). Y79 cell line had the greatest gain of 19.65-fold in the locus of MYCN gene 2p24.1, whereas SNUOT-RB1 and SNUOT-RB4 showed no significant gain. SNUOT-RB1 and SNUOT-RB4 gained chromosomal copy numbers commonly in chromosome 11, especially in locus 11q13, which is responsible for cancer-related genes such as CCND1, MEN1, and FGF3. Losses of copy numbers occurred in chromosomes 3, 9, 10, 11, 16, and 17. In summary, SNUOT-RB1 and SNUOT-RB4 represented similar pattern in gain and loss of chromosomal copy number changes, while different from Y79. The loss of CYLD gene of tumor suppressor gene, 16q12-q13, was only on locus of common involvement in 3 cell lines. PMID:18799932

  11. Aspergillus fumigatus MedA governs adherence, host cell interactions and virulence

    PubMed Central

    Gravelat, Fabrice N.; Ejzykowicz, Daniele E.; Chiang, Lisa Y.; Chabot, Josée C.; Urb, Mirjam; Macdonald, K. Denyese; al-Bader, Nadia; Filler, Scott G.; Sheppard, Donald C.

    2010-01-01

    In medically important fungi, regulatory elements that control development and asexual reproduction often govern the expression of virulence traits. We therefore cloned the Aspergillus fumigatus developmental modifier MedA and characterized its role in conidiation, host cell interactions and virulence. As in the model organism Aspergillus nidulans, disruption of medA in A. fumigatus dramatically reduced conidiation. However, the conidiophore morphology was markedly different between the two species. Further, gene expression analysis suggested that MedA governs conidiation through different pathways in A. fumigatus compared to A. nidulans. The A. fumigatus ΔmedA strain was impaired in biofilm production and adherence to plastic, as well as adherence to pulmonary epithelial cells, endothelial cells and fibronectin in vitro. The ΔmedA strain also had reduced capacity to damage pulmonary epithelial cells, and stimulate pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA and protein expression. Consistent with these results, the A. fumigatus ΔmedA strain also exhibited reduced virulence in both an invertebrate and a mammalian model of invasive aspergillosis. Collectively these results suggest that the downstream targets of A. fumigatus MedA mediate virulence, and may provide novel therapeutic targets for invasive aspergillosis. PMID:19889083

  12. The Rickettsia conorii Autotransporter Protein Sca1 Promotes Adherence to Nonphagocytic Mammalian Cells ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Sean P.; Goh, Kenneth C.; Hermanas, Timothy M.; Cardwell, Marissa M.; Chan, Yvonne G. Y.; Martinez, Juan J.

    2010-01-01

    The pathogenesis of spotted fever group (SFG) Rickettsia species, including R. conorii and R. rickettsii, is acutely dependent on adherence to and invasion of host cells, including cells of the mammalian endothelial system. Bioinformatic analyses of several rickettsia genomes revealed the presence of a cohort of genes designated sca genes that are predicted to encode proteins with homology to autotransporter proteins of Gram-negative bacteria. Previous work demonstrated that three members of this family, rOmpA (Sca0), Sca2, and rOmpB (Sca5) are involved in the interaction with mammalian cells; however, very little was known about the function of other conserved rickettsial Sca proteins. Here we demonstrate that sca1, a gene present in nearly all SFG rickettsia genomes, is actively transcribed and expressed in R. conorii cells. Alignment of Sca1 sequences from geographically diverse SFG Rickettsia species showed that there are high degrees of sequence identity and conservation of these sequences, suggesting that Sca1 may have a conserved function. Using a heterologous expression system, we demonstrated that production of R. conorii Sca1 in the Escherichia coli outer membrane is sufficient to mediate attachment to but not invasion of a panel of cultured mammalian epithelial and endothelial cells. Furthermore, preincubation of a recombinant Sca1 peptide with host cells blocked R. conorii cell association. Together, these results demonstrate that attachment to mammalian cells can be uncoupled from the entry process and that Sca1 is involved in the adherence of R. conorii to host cells. PMID:20176791

  13. Isolation and manipulation of living adherent cells by micromolded magnetic rafts

    PubMed Central

    Gach, Philip C.; Wang, Yuli; Phillips, Colleen; Sims, Christopher E.; Allbritton, Nancy L.

    2011-01-01

    A new strategy for magnetically manipulating and isolating adherent cells with extremely high post-collection purity and viability is reported. Micromolded magnetic elements (termed microrafts) were fabricated in an array format and used as culture surfaces and carriers for living, adherent cells. A poly(styrene-co-acrylic acid) polymer containing well dispersed magnetic nanoparticles was developed for creating the microstructures by molding. Nanoparticles of γFe2O3 at concentrations up to 1% wt.∕wt. could be used to fabricate microrafts that were optically transparent, highly magnetic, biocompatible, and minimally fluorescent. To prevent cellular uptake of nanoparticles from the magnetic polymer, a poly(styrene-co-acrylic acid) layer lacking γFe2O3 nanoparticles was placed over the initial magnetic microraft layer to prevent cellular uptake of the γFe2O3 during culture. The microraft surface geometry and physical properties were altered by varying the polymer concentration or layering different polymers during fabrication. Cells plated on the magnetic microrafts were visualized using standard imaging techniques including brightfield, epifluorescence, and confocal microscopy. Magnetic microrafts possessing cells of interest were dislodged from the array and efficiently collected with an external magnet. To demonstrate the feasibility of cell isolation using the magnetic microrafts, a mixed population of wild-type cells and cells stably transfected with a fluorescent protein was plated onto an array. Microrafts possessing single, fluorescent cells were released from the array and magnetically collected. A post-sorting single-cell cloning rate of 92% and a purity of 100% were attained. PMID:22007266

  14. Stochastic elimination of cancer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Michor, Franziska; Nowak, Martin A; Frank, Steven A; Iwasa, Yoh

    2003-01-01

    Tissues of multicellular organisms consist of stem cells and differentiated cells. Stem cells divide to produce new stem cells or differentiated cells. Differentiated cells divide to produce new differentiated cells. We show that such a tissue design can reduce the rate of fixation of mutations that increase the net proliferation rate of cells. It has, however, no consequence for the rate of fixation of neutral mutations. We calculate the optimum relative abundance of stem cells that minimizes the rate of generating cancer cells. There is a critical fraction of stem cell divisions that is required for a stochastic elimination ('wash out') of cancer cells. PMID:14561289

  15. Trichomonas vaginalis lipophosphoglycan mutants have reduced adherence and cytotoxicity to human ectocervical cells.

    PubMed

    Bastida-Corcuera, Felix D; Okumura, Cheryl Y; Colocoussi, Angie; Johnson, Patricia J

    2005-11-01

    The extracellular human pathogen Trichomonas vaginalis is covered by a dense glycocalyx thought to play a role in host-parasite interactions. The main component of the glycocalyx is lipophosphoglycan (LPG), a polysaccharide anchored in the plasma membrane by inositol phosphoceramide. To study the role of LPG in trichomonads, we produced T. vaginalis LPG mutants by chemical mutagenesis and lectin selection and characterized them using morphological, biochemical, and functional assays. Two independently selected LPG mutants, with growth rates comparable to that of the wild-type (parent) strain, lost the ability to bind the lectins Ricinnus comunis agglutinin I (RCA120) and wheat germ agglutinin, indicating alterations in surface galactose and glucosamine residues. LPG isolated from mutants migrated faster than parent strain LPG on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, suggesting the mutants had shorter LPG molecules. Dionex high-performance anion exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection analyses revealed galactosamine, glucosamine, galactose, glucose, mannose/xylose, and rhamnose as the main monosaccharides of T. vaginalis parent strain LPG. LPG from both mutants showed a reduction of galactose and glucosamine, corresponding with the reduced size of their LPG molecules and inability to bind the lectins RCA120 and wheat germ agglutinin. Mutant parasites were defective in attachment to plastic, a characteristic associated with avirulent strains of T. vaginalis. Moreover, the mutants were less adherent and less cytotoxic to human vaginal ectocervical cells in vitro than the parental strain. Finally, while parent strain LPG could inhibit the attachment of parent strain parasites to vaginal cells, LPG from either mutant could not inhibit attachment. These combined results demonstrate that T. vaginalis adherence to host cells is LPG mediated and that an altered LPG leads to reduced adherence and cytotoxicity of this parasite. PMID

  16. Trichomonas vaginalis Lipophosphoglycan Mutants Have Reduced Adherence and Cytotoxicity to Human Ectocervical Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bastida-Corcuera, Felix D.; Okumura, Cheryl Y.; Colocoussi, Angie; Johnson, Patricia J.

    2005-01-01

    The extracellular human pathogen Trichomonas vaginalis is covered by a dense glycocalyx thought to play a role in host-parasite interactions. The main component of the glycocalyx is lipophosphoglycan (LPG), a polysaccharide anchored in the plasma membrane by inositol phosphoceramide. To study the role of LPG in trichomonads, we produced T. vaginalis LPG mutants by chemical mutagenesis and lectin selection and characterized them using morphological, biochemical, and functional assays. Two independently selected LPG mutants, with growth rates comparable to that of the wild-type (parent) strain, lost the ability to bind the lectins Ricinnus comunis agglutinin I (RCA120) and wheat germ agglutinin, indicating alterations in surface galactose and glucosamine residues. LPG isolated from mutants migrated faster than parent strain LPG on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, suggesting the mutants had shorter LPG molecules. Dionex high-performance anion exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection analyses revealed galactosamine, glucosamine, galactose, glucose, mannose/xylose, and rhamnose as the main monosaccharides of T. vaginalis parent strain LPG. LPG from both mutants showed a reduction of galactose and glucosamine, corresponding with the reduced size of their LPG molecules and inability to bind the lectins RCA120 and wheat germ agglutinin. Mutant parasites were defective in attachment to plastic, a characteristic associated with avirulent strains of T. vaginalis. Moreover, the mutants were less adherent and less cytotoxic to human vaginal ectocervical cells in vitro than the parental strain. Finally, while parent strain LPG could inhibit the attachment of parent strain parasites to vaginal cells, LPG from either mutant could not inhibit attachment. These combined results demonstrate that T. vaginalis adherence to host cells is LPG mediated and that an altered LPG leads to reduced adherence and cytotoxicity of this parasite. PMID

  17. Fucoidans Disrupt Adherence of Helicobacter pylori to AGS Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Eng-Guan; Verbrugghe, Phebe; Perkins, Timothy T.; Tay, Chin-Yen

    2015-01-01

    Fucoidans are complex sulphated polysaccharides derived from abundant and edible marine algae. Helicobacter pylori is a stomach pathogen that persists in the hostile milieu of the human stomach unless treated with antibiotics. This study aims to provide preliminary data to determine, in vitro, if fucoidans can inhibit the growth of H. pylori and its ability to adhere to gastric epithelial cells (AGS). We analysed the activity of three different fucoidan preparations (Fucus A, Fucus B, and Undaria extracts). Bacterial growth was not arrested or inhibited by the fucoidan preparations supplemented into culture media. All fucoidans, when supplemented into tissue culture media at 1000 µg mL−1, were toxic to AGS cells and reduced the viable cell count significantly. Fucoidan preparations at 100 µg mL−1 were shown to significantly reduce the number of adherent H. pylori. These in vitro findings provide the basis for further studies on the clinical use of sulphated polysaccharides as complementary therapeutic agents. PMID:26604968

  18. Fucoidans Disrupt Adherence of Helicobacter pylori to AGS Cells In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Chua, Eng-Guan; Verbrugghe, Phebe; Perkins, Timothy T; Tay, Chin-Yen

    2015-01-01

    Fucoidans are complex sulphated polysaccharides derived from abundant and edible marine algae. Helicobacter pylori is a stomach pathogen that persists in the hostile milieu of the human stomach unless treated with antibiotics. This study aims to provide preliminary data to determine, in vitro, if fucoidans can inhibit the growth of H. pylori and its ability to adhere to gastric epithelial cells (AGS). We analysed the activity of three different fucoidan preparations (Fucus A, Fucus B, and Undaria extracts). Bacterial growth was not arrested or inhibited by the fucoidan preparations supplemented into culture media. All fucoidans, when supplemented into tissue culture media at 1000 µg mL(-1), were toxic to AGS cells and reduced the viable cell count significantly. Fucoidan preparations at 100 µg mL(-1) were shown to significantly reduce the number of adherent H. pylori. These in vitro findings provide the basis for further studies on the clinical use of sulphated polysaccharides as complementary therapeutic agents. PMID:26604968

  19. Extending metabolome coverage for untargeted metabolite profiling of adherent cultured hepatic cells.

    PubMed

    García-Cañaveras, Juan Carlos; López, Silvia; Castell, José Vicente; Donato, M Teresa; Lahoz, Agustín

    2016-02-01

    MS-based metabolite profiling of adherent mammalian cells comprises several challenging steps such as metabolism quenching, cell detachment, cell disruption, metabolome extraction, and metabolite measurement. In LC-MS, the final metabolome coverage is strongly determined by the separation technique and the MS conditions used. Human liver-derived cell line HepG2 was chosen as adherent mammalian cell model to evaluate the performance of several commonly used procedures in both sample processing and LC-MS analysis. In a first phase, metabolite extraction and sample analysis were optimized in a combined manner. To this end, the extraction abilities of five different solvents (or combinations) were assessed by comparing the number and the levels of the metabolites comprised in each extract. Three different chromatographic methods were selected for metabolites separation. A HILIC-based method which was set to specifically separate polar metabolites and two RP-based methods focused on lipidome and wide-ranging metabolite detection, respectively. With regard to metabolite measurement, a Q-ToF instrument operating in both ESI (+) and ESI (-) was used for unbiased extract analysis. Once metabolite extraction and analysis conditions were set up, the influence of cell harvesting on metabolome coverage was also evaluated. Therefore, different protocols for cell detachment (trypsinization or scraping) and metabolism quenching were compared. This study confirmed the inconvenience of trypsinization as a harvesting technique, and the importance of using complementary extraction solvents to extend metabolome coverage, minimizing interferences and maximizing detection, thanks to the use of dedicated analytical conditions through the combination of HILIC and RP separations. The proposed workflow allowed the detection of over 300 identified metabolites from highly polar compounds to a wide range of lipids. PMID:26769129

  20. Effect of reminders mailed to general practitioners on colorectal cancer screening adherence: a cluster-randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Le Breton, Julien; Ferrat, Émilie; Attali, Claude; Bercier, Sandrine; Le Corvoisier, Philippe; Brixi, Zahida; Veerabudun, Kalaivani; Renard, Vincent; Bastuji-Garin, Sylvie

    2016-09-01

    Reminders have been used in various settings, but failed to produce convincing evidence of benefits on patient adherence to colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of sending general practitioners (GPs) printed reminders about CRC screening. We conducted a cluster-randomized controlled trial involving 144 GPs in the Val-de-Marne district (France), who provided care for any reason to 20 778 patients eligible for CRC screening between June 2010 and November 2011. Data were collected from the main statutory health-insurance programme and local cancer screening agency. GPs were randomly assigned in a 1 : 1 proportion to the intervention or the control group. Every 4 months, intervention-group GPs received a computer-generated printed list of patients who had not performed scheduled faecal occult blood test (FOBT) screening. The primary outcome was patient adherence to FOBT screening or exclusion from CRC screening for medical reasons. The screening adherence rate was 31.2% [95% confidence interval (CI) 30.3-32.1] in the control group and 32.9% (95% CI 32.0-33.8) in the intervention group [crude relative risk, 1.05 (95% CI 1.01-1.09), P<0.01]. This rate was not significantly different between groups by multilevel modelling accounting for clustering and confounding variables [adjusted relative risk, 1.07 (95% CI 0.95-1.20), P=0.27]. Computer-generated printed reminders sent to GPs did not significantly improve patient adherence to organized CRC screening by the FOBT. PMID:26340058

  1. In vitro adherence patterns of Shigella serogroups to bovine recto-anal junction squamous epithelial (RSE) cells are similar to those of Escherichia coli O157

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this study was to determine whether Shigella species, which are human gastrointestinal pathogens, can adhere to cattle recto-anal junction squamous epithelial (RSE) cells using a recently standardized adherence assay, and to compare their adherence patterns to that of Escherichia coli O15...

  2. Human Placenta-Derived Adherent Cells Prevent Bone loss, Stimulate Bone formation, and Suppress Growth of Multiple Myeloma in Bone

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Ling, Wen; Pennisi, Angela; Wang, Yuping; Khan, Sharmin; Heidaran, Mohammad; Pal, Ajai; Zhang, Xiaokui; He, Shuyang; Zeitlin, Andy; Abbot, Stewart; Faleck, Herbert; Hariri, Robert; Shaughnessy, John D.; van Rhee, Frits; Nair, Bijay; Barlogie, Bart; Epstein, Joshua; Yaccoby, Shmuel

    2011-01-01

    Human placenta has emerged as a valuable source of transplantable cells of mesenchymal and hematopoietic origin for multiple cytotherapeutic purposes, including enhanced engraftment of hematopoietic stem cells, modulation of inflammation, bone repair, and cancer. Placenta-derived adherent cells (PDACs) are mesenchymal-like stem cells isolated from postpartum human placenta. Multiple myeloma is closely associated with induction of bone disease and large lytic lesions, which are often not repaired and are usually the sites of relapses. We evaluated the antimyeloma therapeutic potential, in vivo survival, and trafficking of PDACs in the severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID)–rab model of medullary myeloma-associated bone loss. Intrabone injection of PDACs into non-myelomatous and myelomatous implanted bone in SCID-rab mice promoted bone formation by stimulating endogenous osteoblastogenesis, and most PDACs disappeared from bone within 4 weeks. PDACs inhibitory effects on myeloma bone disease and tumor growth were dose-dependent and comparable with those of fetal human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Intrabone, but not subcutaneous, engraftment of PDACs inhibited bone disease and tumor growth in SCID-rab mice. Intratumor injection of PDACs had no effect on subcutaneous growth of myeloma cells. A small number of intravenously injected PDACs trafficked into myelomatous bone. Myeloma cell growth rate in vitro was lower in coculture with PDACs than with MSCs from human fetal bone or myeloma patients. PDACs also promoted apoptosis in osteoclast precursors and inhibited their differentiation. This study suggests that altering the bone marrow microenvironment with PDAC cytotherapy attenuates growth of myeloma and that PDAC cytotherapy is a promising therapeutic approach for myeloma osteolysis. PMID:21732484

  3. The role of alginate in Pseudomonas aeruginosa EPS adherence, viscoelastic properties and cell attachment.

    PubMed

    Orgad, Oded; Oren, Yoram; Walker, Sharon L; Herzberg, Moshe

    2011-08-01

    Among various functions, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) provide microbial biofilms with mechanical stability and affect initial cell attachment, the first stage in the biofilm formation process. The role of alginate, an abundant polysaccharide in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms, in the viscoelastic properties and adhesion kinetics of EPS was analyzed using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) monitoring technology. EPS was extracted from two P. aeruginosa biofilms, a wild type strain, PAO1, and a mucoid strain, PAOmucA22 that over-expresses alginate production. The higher alginate content in the EPS originating from the mucoid biofilms was clearly shown to increase both the rate and the extent of attachment of the EPS, as well as the layer's thickness. Also, the presence of calcium and elevated ionic strength increased the thickness of the EPS layer. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) showed that the presence of calcium and elevated ionic strength induced intermolecular attractive interactions in the mucoid EPS molecules. For the wild type EPS, in the presence of calcium, an elevated shift in the distribution of the diffusion coefficients was observed with DLS due to a more compacted conformation of the EPS molecules. Moreover, the alginate over-expression effect on EPS adherence was compared to the effect of alginate over-expression on P. aeruginosa cell attachment. In a parallel plate flow cell, under similar hydraulic and aquatic conditions as those applied for the EPS adsorption tests in the QCM-D flow cell, reduced adherence of the mucoid strain was clearly observed compared to the wild type isogenic bacteria. The results suggest that alginate contributes to steric hindrance and shielding of cell surface features and adhesins that are known to promote cell attachment. PMID:21797737

  4. Targeting Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Suling; Wicha, Max S.

    2010-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that many cancers, including breast cancer, contain populations of cells that display stem-cell properties. These breast cancer stem cells, by virtue of their relative resistance to radiation and cytotoxic chemotherapy, may contribute to treatment resistance and relapse. The elucidation of pathways that regulate these cells has led to the identification of potential therapeutic targets. A number of agents capable of targeting breast cancer stem cells in preclinical models are currently entering clinical trials. Assessment of the efficacy of the agents will require development of innovative clinical trial designs with appropriate biologic and clinical end points. The effective targeting of breast cancer stem cells has the potential to significantly improve outcome for women with both early-stage and advanced breast cancer. PMID:20498387

  5. Lactobacilli Interfere with Streptococcus pyogenes Hemolytic Activity and Adherence to Host Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Saroj, Sunil D; Maudsdotter, Lisa; Tavares, Raquel; Jonsson, Ann-Beth

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes [Group A streptococcus (GAS)], a frequent colonizer of the respiratory tract mucosal surface, causes a variety of human diseases, ranging from pharyngitis to the life-threatening streptococcal toxic shock-like syndrome. Lactobacilli have been demonstrated to colonize the respiratory tract. In this study, we investigated the interference of lactobacilli with the virulence phenotypes of GAS. The Lactobacillus strains L. rhamnosus Kx151A1 and L. reuteri PTA-5289, but not L. salivarius LMG9477, inhibited the hemolytic activity of S. pyogenes S165. The inhibition of hemolytic activity was attributed to a decrease in the production of streptolysin S (SLS). Conditioned medium (CM) from the growth of L. rhamnosus Kx151A1 and L. reuteri PTA-5289 was sufficient to down-regulate the expression of the sag operon, encoding SLS. The Lactobacillus strains L. rhamnosus Kx151A1, L. reuteri PTA-5289, and L. salivarius LMG9477 inhibited the initial adherence of GAS to host epithelial cells. Intriguingly, competition with a combination of Lactobacillus species reduced GAS adherence to host cells most efficiently. The data suggest that an effector molecule released from certain Lactobacillus strains attenuates the production of SLS at the transcriptional level and that combinations of Lactobacillus strains may protect the pharyngeal mucosa more efficiently from the initial colonization of GAS. The effector molecules released from Lactobacillus strains affecting the virulence phenotypes of pathogens hold potential in the development of a new generation of therapeutics. PMID:27524981

  6. Lactobacilli Interfere with Streptococcus pyogenes Hemolytic Activity and Adherence to Host Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Saroj, Sunil D.; Maudsdotter, Lisa; Tavares, Raquel; Jonsson, Ann-Beth

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes [Group A streptococcus (GAS)], a frequent colonizer of the respiratory tract mucosal surface, causes a variety of human diseases, ranging from pharyngitis to the life-threatening streptococcal toxic shock-like syndrome. Lactobacilli have been demonstrated to colonize the respiratory tract. In this study, we investigated the interference of lactobacilli with the virulence phenotypes of GAS. The Lactobacillus strains L. rhamnosus Kx151A1 and L. reuteri PTA-5289, but not L. salivarius LMG9477, inhibited the hemolytic activity of S. pyogenes S165. The inhibition of hemolytic activity was attributed to a decrease in the production of streptolysin S (SLS). Conditioned medium (CM) from the growth of L. rhamnosus Kx151A1 and L. reuteri PTA-5289 was sufficient to down-regulate the expression of the sag operon, encoding SLS. The Lactobacillus strains L. rhamnosus Kx151A1, L. reuteri PTA-5289, and L. salivarius LMG9477 inhibited the initial adherence of GAS to host epithelial cells. Intriguingly, competition with a combination of Lactobacillus species reduced GAS adherence to host cells most efficiently. The data suggest that an effector molecule released from certain Lactobacillus strains attenuates the production of SLS at the transcriptional level and that combinations of Lactobacillus strains may protect the pharyngeal mucosa more efficiently from the initial colonization of GAS. The effector molecules released from Lactobacillus strains affecting the virulence phenotypes of pathogens hold potential in the development of a new generation of therapeutics. PMID:27524981

  7. Role of specific determinants in mannan of Candida albicans serotype A in adherence to human buccal epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Miyakawa, Y; Kuribayashi, T; Kagaya, K; Suzuki, M; Nakase, T; Fukazawa, Y

    1992-01-01

    Candida albicans serotype A (C. albicans A) possesses a specific antigen, designated antigen 6, which resides in mannans on the cell surface. To determine the role of the mannan moiety of the C. albicans cell wall in adherence to buccal epithelial cells, we used antigen 6-deficient mutants which had been isolated by screening with an agglutinating monoclonal antibody against antigen 6 (MAb-6). 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectral analysis of the purified mannans from the mutants showed a loss of the signals related to that beta-linkage of the side chains. Moreover, acetolyzed fragments of the mutant mannans showed a decreased amount of mannohexaose and mannopentaose. The mutant yeast cells exhibited significantly reduced ability to adhere both to exfoliated buccal epithelial cells and to a human buccal cell line. A number of strains of C. albicans A, C. tropicalis, and C. glabrata, all of which bear antigen 6, showed significantly higher adherence to the cell line than did those of C. albicans serotype B, which lack antigen 6. The whole mannan from the C. albicans A parent inhibited the adherence of C. albicans A to epithelial cells dose dependently, whereas mannan from a mutant strains did not. Moreover, C. albicans A treated with MAb-6 or polyclonal factor 6 serum showed reduced adherence. A close correlation was found between adhesive ability and agglutinability with MAb-6 in the C. albicans A parent, the antigenic mutants, and their spontaneous revertants. These results suggest that so far as mannan adhesion is concerned, serotype A-specific determinants are largely involved in the mechanisms of adherence of C. albicans A to human buccal epithelial cells. PMID:1375200

  8. Muscle-derived stem cells isolated as non-adherent population give rise to cardiac, skeletal muscle and neural lineages

    SciTech Connect

    Arsic, Nikola; Mamaeva, Daria; Lamb, Ned J.; Fernandez, Anne

    2008-04-01

    Stem cells with the ability to differentiate in specialized cell types can be extracted from a wide array of adult tissues including skeletal muscle. Here we have analyzed a population of cells isolated from skeletal muscle on the basis of their poor adherence on uncoated or collagen-coated dishes that show multi-lineage differentiation in vitro. When analysed under proliferative conditions, these cells express stem cell surface markers Sca-1 (65%) and Bcrp-1 (80%) but also MyoD (15%), Neuronal {beta} III-tubulin (25%), GFAP (30%) or Nkx2.5 (1%). Although capable of growing as non-attached spheres for months, when given an appropriate matrix, these cells adhere giving rise to skeletal muscle, neuronal and cardiac muscle cell lineages. A similar cell population could not be isolated from either bone marrow or cardiac tissue suggesting their specificity to skeletal muscle. When injected into damaged muscle, these non-adherent muscle-derived cells are retrieved expressing Pax7, in a sublaminar position characterizing satellite cells and participate in forming new myofibers. These data show that a non-adherent stem cell population can be specifically isolated and expanded from skeletal muscle and upon attachment to a matrix spontaneously differentiate into muscle, cardiac and neuronal lineages in vitro. Although competing with resident satellite cells, these cells are shown to significantly contribute to repair of injured muscle in vivo supporting that a similar muscle-derived non-adherent cell population from human muscle may be useful in treatment of neuromuscular disorders.

  9. Lithium attenuates lead induced toxicity on mouse non-adherent bone marrow cells.

    PubMed

    Banijamali, Mahsan; Rabbani-Chadegani, Azra; Shahhoseini, Maryam

    2016-07-01

    Lead is a poisonous heavy metal that occurs in all parts of environment and causes serious health problems in humans. The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible protective effect of lithium against lead nitrate induced toxicity in non-adherent bone marrow stem cells. Trypan blue and MTT assays represented that exposure of the cells to different concentrations of lead nitrate decreased viability in a dose dependent manner, whereas, pretreatment of the cells with lithium protected the cells against lead toxicity. Lead reduced the number and differentiation status of bone marrow-derived precursors when cultured in the presence of colony stimulating factor (CSF), while the effect was attenuated by lithium. The cells treated with lead nitrate exhibited cell shrinkage, DNA fragmentation, anion superoxide production, but lithium prevented lead action. Moreover, apoptotic indexes such as PARP cleavage and release of HMGB1 induced by lead, were protected by lithium, suggesting anti-apoptotic effect of lithium. Immunoblot analysis of histone H3K9 acetylation indicated that lithium overcame lead effect on acetylation. In conclusion, lithium efficiently reduces lead toxicity suggesting new insight into lithium action which may contribute to increased cell survival. It also provides a potentially new therapeutic strategy for lithium and a cost-effective approach to minimize destructive effects of lead on bone marrow stem cells. PMID:27259346

  10. Viability of adhered bacterial cells: tracking MinD protein oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Matt; Colville, Keegan; Schultz-Nielsen, Chris; Jericho, Manfred; Dutcher, John

    2010-03-01

    To study bacterial cells using atomic force microscopy, it is necessary to immobilize the cells on a substrate. Because bacterial cells and common substrates such as glass and mica have a net negative charge, positively charged polymers such as poly-L-lysine (PLL) and polyethyleneimine (PEI) are commonly used as adhesion layers. However, the use of adhesion polymers could stress the cell and even render it inviable. Viable E. coli cells use oscillations of Min proteins along the axis of the rod-shaped cells to ensure accurate cell division. By tagging MinD proteins with GFP, oscillations can be observed using fluorescence microscopy. For a healthy cell in an ideal environment, the oscillation period is measured to be ˜40 s. Prior experiments have shown that PLL increases the oscillation period significantly (up to 80%). In the present study, we have used epifluorescence and total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) to track MinD protein oscillations in E. coli bacteria adhered to a variety of positively charged polymers on mica as a function of polymer surface coverage.

  11. Treatment Option Overview (Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  12. Stages of Small Cell Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  13. The HAART cell phone adherence trial (WelTel Kenya1): a randomized controlled trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    Lester, Richard T; Mills, Edward J; Kariri, Antony; Ritvo, Paul; Chung, Michael; Jack, William; Habyarimana, James; Karanja, Sarah; Barasa, Samson; Nguti, Rosemary; Estambale, Benson; Ngugi, Elizabeth; Ball, T Blake; Thabane, Lehana; Kimani, Joshua; Gelmon, Lawrence; Ackers, Marta; Plummer, Francis A

    2009-01-01

    Background The objectives are to compare the effectiveness of cell phone-supported SMS messaging to standard care on adherence, quality of life, retention, and mortality in a population receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Nairobi, Kenya. Methods and Design A multi-site randomized controlled open-label trial. A central randomization centre provided opaque envelopes to allocate treatments. Patients initiating ART at three comprehensive care clinics in Kenya will be randomized to receive either a structured weekly SMS ('short message system' or text message) slogan (the intervention) or current standard of care support mechanisms alone (the control). Our hypothesis is that using a structured mobile phone protocol to keep in touch with patients will improve adherence to ART and other patient outcomes. Participants are evaluated at baseline, and then at six and twelve months after initiating ART. The care providers keep a weekly study log of all phone based communications with study participants. Primary outcomes are self-reported adherence to ART and suppression of HIV viral load at twelve months scheduled follow-up. Secondary outcomes are improvements in health, quality of life, social and economic factors, and retention on ART. Primary analysis is by 'intention-to-treat'. Sensitivity analysis will be used to assess per-protocol effects. Analysis of covariates will be undertaken to determine factors that contribute or deter from expected and determined outcomes. Discussion This study protocol tests whether a novel structured mobile phone intervention can positively contribute to ART management in a resource-limited setting. Trial Registration Trial Registration Number: NCT00830622 PMID:19772596

  14. Adherence to Cervical Cancer Screening Guidelines for U.S. Women Aged 25–64: Data from the 2005 Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS)

    PubMed Central

    Moser, Richard P.; Gaffey, Allison; Waldron, William

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Although it is widely accepted that Papanicolaou (Pap) screening can reduce cervical cancer mortality, many women still do not maintain regular cervical cancer screenings. Objective To describe the prevalence of cervical cancer screening and the demographic, behavioral, psychological, and cancer-related knowledge factors associated with adherence to U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) cervical cancer screening guidelines among women in the United States. Methods Data for women aged 25–64 were obtained from the National Cancer Institute's (NCI) 2005 Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS). Women were considered adherent to screening guidelines if they had two consecutive, on-schedule screenings and planned to have another within the next 3 years. The sample comprised 2070 women. Results Ninety-eight percent of women reported ever having a Pap smear, 90% reported having had a recent Pap smear (within 3 years), and 84% were adherent to USPSTF screening guidelines. Maintaining regular cervical cancer screening was significantly associated with having health insurance, normal body mass index (BMI), smoking status (nonsmoker), mood (absence of a mood disturbance), and being knowledgeable about cervical cancer screening and human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Conclusions Based on the observation that women who were current smokers, obese, or experiencing a substantial degree of psychological distress were significantly less likely to adhere to recommended screening guidelines, we suggest that healthcare providers pay particular attention to the screening needs of these more vulnerable women. PMID:19951209

  15. NLRP3 protects alveolar barrier integrity by an inflammasome-independent increase of epithelial cell adherence.

    PubMed

    Kostadinova, Elena; Chaput, Catherine; Gutbier, Birgitt; Lippmann, Juliane; Sander, Leif E; Mitchell, Timothy J; Suttorp, Norbert; Witzenrath, Martin; Opitz, Bastian

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is a major cause of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome, characterized by alveolar barrier disruption. NLRP3 is best known for its ability to form inflammasomes and to regulate IL-1β and IL-18 production in myeloid cells. Here we show that NLRP3 protects the integrity of the alveolar barrier in a mouse model of Streptococcus pneumoniae-induced pneumonia, and ex vivo upon treatment of isolated perfused and ventilated lungs with the purified bacterial toxin, pneumolysin. We reveal that the preserving effect of NLRP3 on the lung barrier is independent of inflammasomes, IL-1β and IL-18. NLRP3 improves the integrity of alveolar epithelial cell monolayers by enhancing cellular adherence. Collectively, our study uncovers a novel function of NLRP3 by demonstrating that it protects epithelial barrier function independently of inflammasomes. PMID:27476670

  16. NLRP3 protects alveolar barrier integrity by an inflammasome-independent increase of epithelial cell adherence

    PubMed Central

    Kostadinova, Elena; Chaput, Catherine; Gutbier, Birgitt; Lippmann, Juliane; Sander, Leif E.; Mitchell, Timothy J.; Suttorp, Norbert; Witzenrath, Martin; Opitz, Bastian

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is a major cause of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome, characterized by alveolar barrier disruption. NLRP3 is best known for its ability to form inflammasomes and to regulate IL-1β and IL-18 production in myeloid cells. Here we show that NLRP3 protects the integrity of the alveolar barrier in a mouse model of Streptococcus pneumoniae-induced pneumonia, and ex vivo upon treatment of isolated perfused and ventilated lungs with the purified bacterial toxin, pneumolysin. We reveal that the preserving effect of NLRP3 on the lung barrier is independent of inflammasomes, IL-1β and IL-18. NLRP3 improves the integrity of alveolar epithelial cell monolayers by enhancing cellular adherence. Collectively, our study uncovers a novel function of NLRP3 by demonstrating that it protects epithelial barrier function independently of inflammasomes. PMID:27476670

  17. Mechanical Restrictions on Biological Responses by Adherent Cells within Collagen Gels

    PubMed Central

    Simon, D.D.; Horgan, C.O.; Humphrey, J.D.

    2012-01-01

    Cell-seeded collagen and fibrin gels represent excellent assays for studying interactions between adherent interstitial cells and the three-dimensional extracellular matrix in which they reside. Over one hundred papers have employed the free-floating collagen gel assay alone since its introduction in 1979 and much has been learned about mechanobiological responses of diverse types of cells. Yet, given that mechanobiology is the study of biological responses by cells to mechanical stimuli that must respect the basic laws of mechanics, we must quantify better the mechanical conditions that are imposed on or arise in cell-seeded gels. In this paper, we suggest that cell responses and associated changes in matrix organization within the classical free-floating gel assay are highly restricted by the mechanics. In particular, many salient but heretofore unexplained or misinterpreted observations in free-floating gels can be understood in terms of apparent cell-mediated residual stress fields that satisfy quasi-static equilibria and continuity of tractions. There is a continuing need, therefore, to bring together the allied fields of mechanobiology and biomechanics as we continue to elucidate cellular function within both native connective tissues and tissue equivalents that are used in basic scientific investigations or regenerative medicine. PMID:23022259

  18. Investigation on cytoskeleton dynamics for non-adherent cells under point-like stimuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miccio, Lisa; Memmolo, Pasquale; Merola, Francesco; Mugnano, Martina; Fusco, Sabato; Paciello, Antonio; Ferraro, Pietro; Netti, Paolo A.

    2015-05-01

    In the present paper, Holographic Optical Tweezers (HOT) is employed to trap and manage functionalized micrometric latex beads with the aim at probing cellular forces in no-adherent state. For the first time at best of our knowledge, a suspended cell, subjected to mechanical stress, structures its cytoskeleton when anchored to point-like bonds. We exploit the HOT arrangement to induce mechanical deformation in suspended NIH 3T3 fibroblast. Our investigation is devoted to understand the inner cell mechanism when it is mechanically stressed by point-like stimulus without the substrate influence. In our experiment, cell adhesion is prevented and the stimulus is applied through latex beads trapped by HOT and positioned externally to the cell membrane. Our aims are devoted to analyze cell response during the transition from an homogeneous and isotropic structure (as it's in suspension) to a mechanically stressed state. To analyze the cell material interaction we combine the HOT arrangement with two imaging systems: a Digital Holography (DH) setup in microscope configuration that is an investigation method useful for quantitative, label-free and full-field analysis of low contrast object and a fluorescence modulus. HOT are exploited to induce cellular response to specific stimuli while DH allows to measure such responses in no-invasive way. Finally, fluorescence imaging is added to discriminate the inner cell structures.

  19. Curli modulates adherence of Escherichia coli O157 to bovine recto-anal junction squamous epithelial cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our recent studies have shown that Intimin and the Locus of Enterocyte Effacement-encoded proteins do not play a role in Escherichia coli O157 (O157) adherence to the bovine recto-anal junction squamous epithelial cells (RSE) cells. Hence, to define factors that play a contributory role, we investi...

  20. Factors Associated with Adherence to Adjuvant Endocrine Therapy Among Privately Insured and Newly Diagnosed Breast Cancer Patients: A Quantile Regression Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Farias, Albert J.; Hansen, Ryan N.; Zeliadt, Steven B.; Ornelas, India J.; Li, Christopher I.; Thompson, Beti

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Adherence to adjuvant endocrine therapy (AET) for estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer remains suboptimal, which suggests that women are not getting the full benefit of the treatment to reduce breast cancer recurrence and mortality. The majority of studies on adherence to AET focus on identifying factors among those women at the highest levels of adherence and provide little insight on factors that influence medication use across the distribution of adherence. OBJECTIVE To understand how factors influence adherence among women across low and high levels of adherence. METHODS A retrospective evaluation was conducted using the Truven Health MarketScan Commercial Claims and Encounters Database from 2007–2011. Privately insured women aged 18-64 years who were recently diagnosed and treated for breast cancer and who initiated AET within 12 months of primary treatment were assessed. Adherence was measured as the proportion of days covered (PDC) over a 12-month period. Simultaneous multivariable quantile regression was used to assess the association between treatment and demographic factors, use of mail order pharmacies, medication switching, and out-of-pocket costs and adherence. The effect of each variable was examined at the 40th, 60th, 80th, and 95th quantiles. RESULTS Among the 6,863 women in the cohort, mail order pharmacies had the greatest influence on adherence at the 40th quantile, associated with a 29.6% (95% CI = 22.2–37.0) higher PDC compared with retail pharmacies. Out-of-pocket cost for a 30-day supply of AET greater than $20 was associated with an 8.6% (95% CI = 2.8–14.4) lower PDC versus $0-$9.99. The main factors that influenced adherence at the 95th quantile were mail order pharmacies, associated with a 4.4% higher PDC (95% CI = 3.8-5.0) versus retail pharmacies, and switching AET medication 2 or more times, associated with a 5.6% lower PDC versus not switching (95% CI = 2.3–9.0). CONCLUSIONS Factors associated with adherence

  1. Enrichment and characterization of cancer stem cells from a human non-small cell lung cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Changhong; Setrerrahmane, Sarra; Xu, Hanmei

    2015-10-01

    Tumor cells from the same origin comprise different cell populations. Among them, cancer stem cells (CSCs) have higher tumorigenicity. It is necessary to enrich CSCs to determine an effective way to suppress and eliminate them. In the present study, using the non-adhesive culture system, tumor spheres were successfully generated from human A549 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell line within 2 weeks. Compared to A549 adherent cells, sphere cells had a higher self-renewal ability and increased resistance to cytotoxic drugs. Sphere cells were more invasive and expressed stem cell markers including octamer‑binding transcription factor 4 (Oct4) and sex-determining region Y-box 2 (Sox2) at high levels. CD133, a disputed marker of lung CSCs, was also upregulated. Tumor sphere cells showed higher tumorigenic ability in vivo, indicating that more CSCs were enriched in the sphere cells. More blood vessels were formed in the tumor generated by sphere cells suggesting the interaction between CSCs and blood vessel. A reliable model of enriching CSCs from the human A549 NSCLC cell line was established that was simple and cost-effective compared to other methods. PMID:26239272

  2. The effects of disodium cromoglycate on enhanced adherence of Haemophilus influenzae to A549 cells infected with respiratory syncytial virus.

    PubMed

    Fukasawa, Chie; Ishiwada, Naruhiko; Ogita, Junko; Hishiki, Haruka; Kohno, Yoichi

    2009-08-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) secondary infection often complicates respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections. Previous studies have revealed that RSV infections enhance NTHi adherence to airway epithelial cells. In this study, we investigated the effects of disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) and corticosteroids, which are frequently used for the treatment of wheezing often related to RSV infections, on the adherence of NTHi to RSV-infected A549 cells. DSCG inhibited enhanced adherence of NTHi to RSV-infected A549 cells, whereas dexamethasone (Dex) and fluticasone propionate (Fp) did not. DSCG suppressed the expression of ICAM-1, which is one of the NTHi receptors. Furthermore, DSCG exhibited an inhibitory effect on RSV infections. It is suggested that DSCG exerts an anti-RSV effect, and consequently attenuates the expression of NTHi receptors. PMID:19390482

  3. Laser-generated Micro-bubbles for Molecular Delivery to Adherent Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genc, Suzanne Lee

    We examine the use of optical breakdown in aqueous media as a means to deliver molecules into live adherent cell cultures. This process, called optoinjection (OI), is affected both by the media composition and the cellular exposure to hydrodynamic stresses associated with the cavitation bubble formed by the optical breakdown process. Here we explore the possibility of performing OI using laser microbeams focused at low numerical aperture to provide conditions where OI can be performed at high-throughput. We first investigate the effect of media composition on plasma and cavitation bubble formation. We make the discovery that irradiation of minimal essential media, supports the formation of low-density plasmas (LDP) resulting in the generation of small (2--20 mum radius) cavitation bubbles. This provides gentle specific hydrodynamic perturbations to single or small groups of cells. The addition of supplemental fetal bovine serum to the medium prevents the formation LDPs and the resulting avalanche ionization generates larger (> 100 mum radius) bubbles and more violent hydrodynamic effects. Second, using high-speed photography we provide the first visualization of LDP-generated cavitation bubbles at precise offset locations relative to a boundary on which a cell monolayer can be cultured. These images depict the cellular exposure to different hydrodynamic conditions depending on the normalized offset distance (gamma = s/Rmax) and show how it affects the cellular exposure to shear stresses upon bubble expansion and different distributions of bubble energy upon collapse. Lastly, we examine the effects of pulse energy, parameters, and single vs. multiple laser exposures on the ability to deliver 3-5 kDa dextrans into adherent cells using both small (< 20 mum) and large (100mu m) radius bubbles. For single exposures, we identify several conditions under which OI can be optimized: (a) conditions where cell viability is maximized (˜90%) but optoinjection of viable cells

  4. Orosphere Assay: A method for propagation of head and neck cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamurthy, Sudha; Nör, Jacques E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent evidence suggests that head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) harbor a small sub-population of highly tumorigenic cells, named cancer stem cells. A limiting factor in cancer stem cell research is the intrinsic difficulty of expanding cells in an undifferentiated state in vitro. Methods Here, we describe the development of the orosphere assay, a method for the study of putative head and neck cancer stem cells. An orosphere is defined as a non-adherent colony of cells sorted from primary HNSCC or from HNSCC cell lines and cultured in 3-D soft agar or ultra-low attachment plates. Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity and CD44 expression were used here as stem cell markers. Results This assay allowed for the propagation of head and neck cancer cells that retained stemness and self-renewal. Conclusion The orosphere assay is well suited for studies designed to understand the pathobiology of head and neck cancer stem cells. PMID:22791367

  5. Role of the Amino-Terminal Region of Porphyromonas gingivalis Fimbriae in Adherence to Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sojar, Hakimuddin T.; Han, Yiping; Hamada, Nobushiro; Sharma, Ashu; Genco, Robert J.

    1999-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis fimbriae elicit many responses in eukaryotic cells, including mitogenicity, cytokine production, epithelial cell invasion, and cellular immune response. Specific domains of the major fimbrial protein (FimA) have been shown to be important in triggering some of these functions. The goal of the present study was to identify the domain(s) of P. gingivalis FimA responsible for specific interaction with human mucosal epithelial cells. Fimbriated P. gingivalis strains have been shown to bind to buccal epithelial cells, whereas nonfimbriated strains bind at low levels or not at all. This and other studies provide evidence that FimA mediates the adherence of P. gingivalis to oral epithelial cells. To determine the specific region(s) of P. gingivalis FimA involved in epithelial cell binding, specific antipeptide antibodies were used to inhibit the binding of iodinated purified fimbriae as well as the binding of P. gingivalis cells to epithelial cells. Antibodies directed against peptides 49 to 68 (VVMANTAGAMELVGKTLAEVK) and 69 to 90 (ALTTELTAENQEAAGLIMTAEP) were found to highly inhibit both the binding of fimbriae and the binding of P. gingivalis cells to epithelial cells. The antibody against FimA peptides 69 to 90 also reacted with P. gingivalis fimbriae in immunogold labeling and immunoblot analysis, thereby indicating that this peptide domain is exposed on the surface of fimbriae. Our results suggest that the amino-terminal domain corresponding to amino acid residues 49 to 90 of the fimbrillin protein is a major epithelial cell binding domain of P. gingivalis fimbriae. PMID:10531284

  6. Enhanced adherence of mouse fibroblast and vascular cells to plasma modified polyethylene.

    PubMed

    Reznickova, Alena; Novotna, Zdenka; Kolska, Zdenka; Kasalkova, Nikola Slepickova; Rimpelova, Silvie; Svorcik, Vaclav

    2015-01-01

    Since the last decade, tissue engineering has shown a sensational promise in providing more viable alternatives to surgical procedures for harvested tissues, implants and prostheses. Biomedical polymers, such as low-density polyethylene (LDPE), high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), were activated by Ar plasma discharge. Degradation of polymer chains was examined by determination of the thickness of ablated layer. The amount of an ablated polymer layer was measured by gravimetry. Contact angle, measured by goniometry, was studied as a function of plasma exposure and post-exposure aging times. Chemical structure of modified polymers was characterized by angle resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Surface chemistry and polarity of the samples were investigated by electrokinetic analysis. Changes in surface morphology were followed using atomic force microscopy. Cytocompatibility of plasma activated polyethylene foils was studied using two distinct model cell lines; VSMCs (vascular smooth muscle cells) as a model for vascular graft testing and connective tissue cells L929 (mouse fibroblasts) approved for standardized material cytotoxicity testing. Specifically, the cell number, morphology, and metabolic activity of the adhered and proliferated cells on the polyethylene matrices were studied in vitro. It was found that the plasma treatment caused ablation of the polymers, resulting in dramatic changes in their surface morphology and roughness. ARXPS and electrokinetic measurements revealed oxidation of the polymer surface. It was found that plasma activation has a positive effect on the adhesion and proliferation of VSMCs and L929 cells. PMID:25953566

  7. Effects of pressure and temperature on the survival rate of adherent A-172 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuhara, Ryo; Kushida, Ryo; Ishii, Shiwori; Yamanoha, Banri; Shimizu, Akio

    2013-06-01

    Preservation of cells under high pressure is an important alternative to cryopreservation. We studied the effect of temperature (4, 25, 37°C) and pressure (0.1-350 MPa) on the survival rate of A-172 glioblastoma cells. The survival rate was not changed by brief (10 min) pressurization of up to 150 MPa, but the survival rate began to decrease from 150 MPa, and most of the A-172 cells died when treated with over 200 MPa. Lengthy pressurization (4 days) at lower pressure (upto 20.1 MPa) without medium exchange showed complex results. The survival rate of cells preserved at 25°C showed two maxima at 1.6 and 20.1 MPa. After preservation, cells adhered and proliferated in the same way as normal cells when cultured at 37°C in a CO2 incubator. The other two temperatures, 4° and 37°C, showed no maximum survival rate. Therefore, a high survival rate can be maintained with high pressure treatment.

  8. The impact of environmental changes upon the microrheological response of adherent cells.

    PubMed

    Picard, C; Donald, A

    2009-10-01

    The mechanical behaviour of adherent cells cultured in vitro is known to be dependent on the mechanical properties of the substrate. We show that this mechanical behaviour is also strongly affected by the cells' environment. We focus here on the impact of temperature and pH. Experiments carried out on individual cells in a tuneable environment reveal that the intra-cellular mechanical behaviour exhibits large and fast changes when the external cell environment is changed. Fast passive microrheometry measurements allow for the precise characterisation of the transient regime observed during a temperature drop. When maintained at a non-physiological temperature, the cells reach a stabilised state distinct from the state observed in physiological conditions. The perturbation can be reversed but exhibits hysteretic behaviour when physiological conditions are restored. The transient regime observed during the recovery process is found to be different from the transient regime observed when leaving physiological conditions. A modified generalized Stokes-Einstein equation taking into account the cell activity through an effective temperature is proposed here to fit the experimental results. Excellent agreement between the model and the measurements is obtained for time lags from 10⁻³ to 1 s considered in this study. PMID:19551417

  9. Adherent-phagocytic cells influence suppressed concanavalin-A induced proliferation of spleen lymphoid cells in copper deficient rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, T.R.; Briske-Anderson, M.; Johnson, W.T.

    1986-03-01

    Weanling male Lewis rats (N = 10/group) were fed ad-libitum for 42 days diets based on AIN standards containing 21% casein, 5% safflower oil, and deficient (0.6 ..mu..g/g) or adequate (5.6 ..mu..g/g) levels of cu. Cu-deficient rats showed typical biochemical and hematological changes. Immunological changes exhibited by Cu-deficient rats were influenced by the presence of splenic adherent-phagocytic cells (macrophage-like), but not by cytochrome-c oxidase activity of spleen lymphoid cells (SLC). Decreased proliferation was exhibited by concanavalin-A (Con-A) stimulated SLC of Cu-deficient rats. Following removal of plastic-adherent phagocytic cells from the SLC suspensions, equivalent proliferation was exhibited by Con-A stimulated nonadherent-SLC of Cu-deficient and Cu-adequate rats. Decreased cytochrome-c oxidase activity was exhibited by both unstimulated SLC and nonadherent-SLC of Cu-deficient rats, but decreased proliferation was exhibited only in Con-A stimulated SLC of Cu-deficient rats. These findings indicate that nonadherent splenic T-lymphocytes of Cu-deficient rats are not impaired in their ability to proliferate, and that cytochrome-c oxidase activity in unstimulated lymphoid cells of Cu-deficient rats is apparently not related to levels of proliferation by the Con-A stimulated cells.

  10. Akkermansia muciniphila Adheres to Enterocytes and Strengthens the Integrity of the Epithelial Cell Layer.

    PubMed

    Reunanen, Justus; Kainulainen, Veera; Huuskonen, Laura; Ottman, Noora; Belzer, Clara; Huhtinen, Heikki; de Vos, Willem M; Satokari, Reetta

    2015-06-01

    Akkermansia muciniphila is a Gram-negative mucin-degrading bacterium that resides in the gastrointestinal tracts of humans and animals. A. muciniphila has been linked with intestinal health and improved metabolic status in obese and type 2 diabetic subjects. Specifically, A. muciniphila has been shown to reduce high-fat-diet-induced endotoxemia, which develops as a result of an impaired gut barrier. Despite the accumulating evidence of the health-promoting effects of A. muciniphila, the mechanisms of interaction of the bacterium with the host have received little attention. In this study, we used several in vitro models to investigate the adhesion of A. muciniphila to the intestinal epithelium and its interaction with the host mucosa. We found that A. muciniphila adheres strongly to the Caco-2 and HT-29 human colonic cell lines but not to human colonic mucus. In addition, A. muciniphila showed binding to the extracellular matrix protein laminin but not to collagen I or IV, fibronectin, or fetuin. Importantly, A. muciniphila improved enterocyte monolayer integrity, as shown by a significant increase in the transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) of cocultures of Caco-2 cells with the bacterium. Further, A. muciniphila induced interleukin 8 (IL-8) production by enterocytes at cell concentrations 100-fold higher than those for Escherichia coli, suggesting a very low level of proinflammatory activity in the epithelium. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that A. muciniphila adheres to the intestinal epithelium and strengthens enterocyte monolayer integrity in vitro, suggesting an ability to fortify an impaired gut barrier. These results support earlier associative in vivo studies and provide insights into the interaction of A. muciniphila with the host. PMID:25795669

  11. Akkermansia muciniphila Adheres to Enterocytes and Strengthens the Integrity of the Epithelial Cell Layer

    PubMed Central

    Reunanen, Justus; Kainulainen, Veera; Huuskonen, Laura; Ottman, Noora; Belzer, Clara; Huhtinen, Heikki; de Vos, Willem M.

    2015-01-01

    Akkermansia muciniphila is a Gram-negative mucin-degrading bacterium that resides in the gastrointestinal tracts of humans and animals. A. muciniphila has been linked with intestinal health and improved metabolic status in obese and type 2 diabetic subjects. Specifically, A. muciniphila has been shown to reduce high-fat-diet-induced endotoxemia, which develops as a result of an impaired gut barrier. Despite the accumulating evidence of the health-promoting effects of A. muciniphila, the mechanisms of interaction of the bacterium with the host have received little attention. In this study, we used several in vitro models to investigate the adhesion of A. muciniphila to the intestinal epithelium and its interaction with the host mucosa. We found that A. muciniphila adheres strongly to the Caco-2 and HT-29 human colonic cell lines but not to human colonic mucus. In addition, A. muciniphila showed binding to the extracellular matrix protein laminin but not to collagen I or IV, fibronectin, or fetuin. Importantly, A. muciniphila improved enterocyte monolayer integrity, as shown by a significant increase in the transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) of cocultures of Caco-2 cells with the bacterium. Further, A. muciniphila induced interleukin 8 (IL-8) production by enterocytes at cell concentrations 100-fold higher than those for Escherichia coli, suggesting a very low level of proinflammatory activity in the epithelium. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that A. muciniphila adheres to the intestinal epithelium and strengthens enterocyte monolayer integrity in vitro, suggesting an ability to fortify an impaired gut barrier. These results support earlier associative in vivo studies and provide insights into the interaction of A. muciniphila with the host. PMID:25795669

  12. Lung cancer - non-small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - non-small cell; Non-small cell lung cancer; NSCLC; Adenocarcinoma - lung; Squamous cell carcinoma - lung ... Smoking causes most cases (around 90%) of lung cancer. The risk depends on the number of cigarettes ...

  13. Radioresistance of cancer stem-like cell derived from canine tumours.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, A; Deguchi, T; Sato, T; Nemoto, Y; Maruo, T; Madarame, H; Shida, T; Naya, Y; Ogihara, K; Sahara, H

    2016-09-01

    Cancer stem-like cells (CSCs)/cancer-initiating cells (CICs) are a small subpopulation of cancer cells that are responsible for the initiation, recurrence and metastasis of cancer. We previously demonstrated that, using the Hoechst 33342 dye-based side population technique, CSCs/CICs in canine lung adenocarcinoma cell line exist. In this study, as CSCs/CICs are known to form spheres in anchorage-independent environment in vitro, we evaluated the stemness of spheroid cells derived from canine lung adenocarcinoma and osteosarcoma cells by expression of stemness markers, and investigated radioresistance. Spheroid cells showed greater expression of stemness markers Oct-4 and CD133 gene than those of adherent-cultured cells. In nude mouse xenograft models, spheroid cells showed higher tumourigenic ability than adherent-cultured cells. In addition, spheroid cells showed significantly resistant against radioactivity as compared with adherent-cultured cells. These results suggest that spheroid cells could possess stemness and provide a CSCs/CICs research tool to investigate CSCs/CICs of canine tumour cells. PMID:25070729

  14. Contemporary Renal Cell Cancer Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Wong-Ho; Devesa, Susan S.

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed renal cell cancer incidence patterns in the United States and reviewed recent epidemiologic evidence with regard to environmental and host genetic determinants of renal cell cancer risk. Renal cell cancer incidence rates continued to rise among all racial/ethnic groups in the United States, across all age groups, and for all tumor sizes, with the most rapid increases for localized stage disease and small tumors. Recent cohort studies confirmed the association of smoking, excess body weight, and hypertension with an elevated risk of renal cell cancer, and suggested that these factors can be modified to reduce the risk. There is increasing evidence for an inverse association between renal cell cancer risk and physical activity and moderate intake of alcohol. Occupational exposure to TCE has been positively associated with renal cell cancer risk in several recent studies, but its link with somatic mutations of the VHL gene has not been confirmed. Studies of genetic polymorphisms in relation to renal cell cancer risk have produced mixed results, but genome-wide association studies with larger sample size and a more comprehensive approach are underway. Few epidemiologic studies have evaluated risk factors by subtypes of renal cell cancer defined by somatic mutations and other tumor markers. PMID:18836333

  15. Lactoferrin affects the adherence and invasion of Streptococcus dysgalactiae ssp. dysgalactiae in mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    O'Halloran, Fiona; Beecher, Christine; Chaurin, Valerie; Sweeney, Torres; Giblin, Linda

    2016-06-01

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae ssp. dysgalactiae is an important causative agent of bovine mastitis worldwide. Lactoferrin is an innate immune protein that is associated with many functions including immunomodulatory, antiproliferative, and antimicrobial properties. This study aimed to investigate the interactions between lactoferrin and a clinical bovine mastitis isolate, Strep. dysgalactiae ssp. dysgalactiae DPC5345. Initially a deliberate in vivo bovine intramammary challenge was performed with Strep. dysgalactiae DPC5345. Results demonstrated a significant difference in lactoferrin mRNA levels in milk cells between the control and infused quarters 7h postinfusion. Milk lactoferrin levels in the Strep. dysgalactiae DPC5345 infused quarters were significantly increased compared with control quarters at 48h postinfusion. In vitro studies demonstrated that lactoferrin had a bacteriostatic effect on the growth of Strep. dysgalactiae DPC5345 and significantly decreased the ability of the bacteria to internalize into HC-11 mammary epithelial cells. Confocal microscopy images of HC-11 cells exposed to Strep. dysgalactiae and lactoferrin further supported this effect by demonstrating reduced invasion of bacteria to HC-11 cells. The combined data suggest that a bovine immune response to Strep. dysgalactiae infection includes a significant increase in lactoferrin expression in vivo, and based on in vitro data, lactoferrin limits mammary cell invasion of this pathogen by binding to the bacteria and preventing its adherence. PMID:27016824

  16. Surface glycosaminoglycans mediate adherence between HeLa cells and Lactobacillus salivarius Lv72

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The adhesion of lactobacilli to the vaginal surface is of paramount importance to develop their probiotic functions. For this reason, the role of HeLa cell surface proteoglycans in the attachment of Lactobacillus salivarius Lv72, a mutualistic strain of vaginal origin, was investigated. Results Incubation of cultures with a variety of glycosaminoglycans (chondroitin sulfate A and C, heparin and heparan sulfate) resulted in marked binding interference. However, no single glycosaminoglycan was able to completely abolish cell binding, the sum of all having an additive effect that suggests cooperation between them and recognition of specific adhesins on the bacterial surface. In contrast, chondroitin sulfate B enhanced cell to cell attachment, showing the relevance of the stereochemistry of the uronic acid and the sulfation pattern on binding. Elimination of the HeLa surface glycosaminoglycans with lyases also resulted in severe adherence impairment. Advantage was taken of the Lactobacillus-glycosaminoglycans interaction to identify an adhesin from the bacterial surface. This protein, identify as a soluble binding protein of an ABC transporter system (OppA) by MALDI-TOF/(MS), was overproduced in Escherichia coli, purified and shown to interfere with L. salivarius Lv72 adhesion to HeLa cells. Conclusions These data suggest that glycosaminoglycans play a fundamental role in attachment of mutualistic bacteria to the epithelium that lines the cavities where the normal microbiota thrives, OppA being a bacterial adhesin involved in the process. PMID:24044741

  17. Raman micro-spectroscopy study of living SH-SY5Y cells adhering on different substrates.

    PubMed

    Caponi, S; Mattana, S; Ricci, M; Sagini, K; Urbanelli, L; Sassi, P; Morresi, A; Emiliani, C; Dalla Serra, M; Iannotta, S; Musio, C; Fioretto, D

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we test the ability of Raman micro-spectroscopy and Raman mapping to investigate the status of cells grown in adhesion on different substrates. The spectra of immortalized SH-SY5Y cells, grown on silicon and on metallic substrates are compared with those obtained for the same type of cells adhering on organic polyaniline (PANI), a memristive substrate chosen to achieve a living bio-hybrid system. Raman spectra give information on the status of the single cell, its local biochemical composition, and on the modifications induced by the substrate interaction. The good agreement between Raman spectra collected from cells adhering on different substrates confirms that the PANI, besides allowing the cell growth, doesn't strongly affect the general biochemical properties of the cell. The investigation of the cellular state in a label free condition is challenging and the obtained results confirm the Raman ability to achieve this information. PMID:26256426

  18. Osteoblast Adhesion of Breast Cancer Cells with Scanning Acoustic Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyasaka, C.; Mercer, R. R.; Mastro, A. M.

    Conditioned medium was collected from a bone-metastatic breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231, and cultured with an immature osteoblast cell line, MC3T3-E1. Under these conditions the osteoblasts acquired a changed morphology and appeared to adhere in a different way to the substrate and to each other. To characterize cellular adhesion, MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts were cultured with or without MDA-MB-231 conditioned medium for two days. With mechanical scanning acoustic reflection microscopy, we were able to detect a change in the adhesive condition of the interface between the cell and the substrate, but not with optical microscopy

  19. Stress response of adherent cells on a polymer blend surface composed of a segmented polyurethane and MPC copolymers.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Shin-Ichi; Iwasaki, Yasuhiko; Nakabayashi, Nobuo; Ishihara, Kazuhiko

    2006-12-01

    To better understand the effect of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) copolymer in improving the biocompatibility of segmented polyurethane (SPU), the expression of heat shock protein (HSP) mRNA in HeLa S3 cells adhered on SPU blended with MPC copolymers was measured. Conventionally, MPC copolymers (PMEH) were synthesized by changing the feed ratios of MPC and 2-ethylhexyl methacrylate. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analysis of the SPU/PMEH film indicated that the surface concentration of MPC units on the SPU/PMEH film increased with an increase in PMEH composition. HeLa S3 cells were cultured on SPU/PMEH films. The number of adherent cells on the SPU/PMEH films decreased with an increase in the concentration of PMEH. When the PMEH composition was greater than 0.5 wt %, cell adhesion and proliferation decreased markedly. Expressions of HSP27 and HSP47 mRNA were detected using the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). After incubation for 24 h, both the HSP mRNA expressions in the HeLa S3 cells showed no significant differences among all samples. In HeLa S3 cells that adhered to the SPU film for 48 h, the expressions of HSP27 and HSP47 mRNA increased significantly when compared with those incubated for 24 h. In contrast, the two kinds of mRNA expressions decreased in the HeLa S3 cells that adhered to the SPU/PMEH films for 48 h. From these results, we concluded that PMEH was quite important in suppressing the stress response of adherent HeLa S3 cells. Therefore, SPU/PMEH blend polymers are useful as implantable biomedical materials. PMID:16758458

  20. Human placenta-derived adherent cells improve cardiac performance in mice with chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Jung; Chen, Chien-Hsi; Chang, Ming-Yao; Tsai, Da-Ching; Baum, Ellen Z; Hariri, Robert; Herzberg, Uri; Hsieh, Patrick C H

    2015-03-01

    Human placenta-derived adherent cells (PDACs) are a culture-expanded, undifferentiated mesenchymal-like population derived from full-term placental tissue, with immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory, angiogenic, and neuroprotective properties. PDA-001 (cenplacel-L), an intravenous formulation of PDAC cells, is in clinical development for the treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. We tested the therapeutic effects of PDA-001 in mice with chronic heart failure (CHF). Three weeks after transaortic constriction surgery to induce CHF, the mice underwent direct intramyocardial (IM) or i.v. injection of PDA-001 at a high (0.5 × 10(6) cells per mouse), medium (0.5 × 10(5) cells per mouse), or low (0.5 × 10(4) cells per mouse) dose. The mice were sacrificed 4 weeks after treatment. Echocardiography and ventricular catheterization showed that IM injection of PDA-001 significantly improved left ventricular systolic and diastolic function compared with injection of vehicle or i.v. injection of PDA-001. IM injection of PDA-001 also decreased cardiac fibrosis, shown by trichrome staining in the vicinity of the injection sites. Low-dose treatment showed the best improvement in cardiac performance compared with the medium- and high-dose groups. In another independent study to determine the mechanism of action with bromodeoxyuridine labeling, the proliferation rates of endothelial cells and cardiomyocytes were significantly increased by low or medium IM dose PDA-001. However, no surviving PDA-001 cells were detected in the heart 1 month after injection. In vivo real-time imaging consistently revealed that the PDA-001 cells were detectable only within 2 days after IM injection of luciferase-expressing PDA-001. Together, these results have demonstrated the cardiac therapeutic potential of PDA-001, likely through a paracrine effect. PMID:25673767

  1. Human Cardiac-Derived Adherent Proliferating Cells Reduce Murine Acute Coxsackievirus B3-Induced Myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Miteva, Kapka; Haag, Marion; Peng, Jun; Savvatis, Kostas; Becher, Peter Moritz; Seifert, Martina; Warstat, Katrin; Westermann, Dirk; Ringe, Jochen; Sittinger, Michael; Schultheiss, Heinz-Peter

    2011-01-01

    Background Under conventional heart failure therapy, inflammatory cardiomyopathy typically has a progressive course, indicating a need for alternative therapeutic strategies to improve long-term outcomes. We recently isolated and identified novel cardiac-derived cells from human cardiac biopsies: cardiac-derived adherent proliferating cells (CAPs). They have similarities with mesenchymal stromal cells, which are known for their anti-apoptotic and immunomodulatory properties. We explored whether CAPs application could be a novel strategy to improve acute Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3)-induced myocarditis. Methodology/Principal Findings To evaluate the safety of our approach, we first analyzed the expression of the coxsackie- and adenovirus receptor (CAR) and the co-receptor CD55 on CAPs, which are both required for effective CVB3 infectivity. We could demonstrate that CAPs only minimally express both receptors, which translates to minimal CVB3 copy numbers, and without viral particle release after CVB3 infection. Co-culture of CAPs with CVB3-infected HL-1 cardiomyocytes resulted in a reduction of CVB3-induced HL-1 apoptosis and viral progeny release. In addition, CAPs reduced CD4 and CD8 T cell proliferation. All CAPs-mediated protective effects were nitric oxide- and interleukin-10-dependent and required interferon-γ. In an acute murine model of CVB3-induced myocarditis, application of CAPs led to a decrease of cardiac apoptosis, cardiac CVB3 viral load and improved left ventricular contractility parameters. This was associated with a decline in cardiac mononuclear cell activity, an increase in T regulatory cells and T cell apoptosis, and an increase in left ventricular interleukin-10 and interferon-γ mRNA expression. Conclusions We conclude that CAPs are a unique type of cardiac-derived cells and promising tools to improve acute CVB3-induced myocarditis. PMID:22174827

  2. Interactions between Periodontal Bacteria and Human Oral Epithelial Cells: Fusobacterium nucleatum Adheres to and Invades Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yiping W.; Shi, Wenyuan; Huang, George T.-J.; Kinder Haake, Susan; Park, No-Hee; Kuramitsu, Howard; Genco, Robert J.

    2000-01-01

    Bacteria are causative agents of periodontal diseases. Interactions between oral bacteria and gingival epithelial cells are essential aspects of periodontal infections. Using an in vitro tissue culture model, a selected group of gram-negative anaerobic bacteria frequently associated with periodontal diseases, including Bacteroides forsythus, Campylobacter curvus, Eikenella corrodens, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Prevotella intermedia, were examined for their ability to adhere to and invade primary cultures of human gingival epithelial cells (HGEC). The effects of these bacteria on the production of interleukin-8 (IL-8), a proinflammatory chemokine, were also measured. These studies provided an initial demonstration that F. nucleatum adhered to and invaded HGEC and that this was accompanied by high levels of IL-8 secretion from the epithelial cells. The attachment and invasion characteristics of F. nucleatum were also tested using KB cells, an oral epithelial cell line. The invasion was verified by transmission electron microscopy and with metabolic inhibitors. Invasion appeared to occur via a “zipping” mechanism and required the involvement of actins, microtubules, signal transduction, protein synthesis, and energy metabolism of the epithelial cell, as well as protein synthesis by F. nucleatum. A spontaneous mutant, lam, of F. nucleatum, isolated as defective in autoagglutination, was unable to attach to or invade HGEC or KB cells, further indicating the requirement of bacterial components in these processes. Sugar inhibition assays indicated that lectin-like interactions were involved in the attachment of F. nucleatum to KB cells. Investigation of these new virulence phenotypes should improve our understanding of the role of F. nucleatum in periodontal infections. PMID:10816455

  3. The Change From Brand-Name to Generic Aromatase Inhibitors and Hormone Therapy Adherence for Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tsui, Jennifer; Meyer, Jay; Glied, Sherry; Hillyer, Grace Clarke; Wright, Jason D.; Neugut, Alfred I.

    2014-01-01

    Background Nonadherence to hormonal therapy is common and is associated with increased copayment amount. We investigated the change in adherence after the introduction of generic aromatase inhibitors (AIs) in 2010. Methods Using deidentified pharmacy and claims data from OptumInsight, we identified women older than 50 years on brand-name AIs (BAIs) and/or generic AIs (GAIs) for early breast cancer between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2012. Clinical, demographic, and financial variables were evaluated. Adherence was defined as a medication possession ratio (MPR) 80% or greater. Results We identified 5511 women, 2815 (51.1%) on BAI, 1411 (25.6%) on GAI, and 1285 (23.3%) who switched from BAI to GAI. The median 30-day copayment was higher for BAI ($33.3) than for GAI ($9.04). In a multivariable Cox-proportional hazard analysis, women who took GAI were less likely to discontinue therapy (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.69, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.57 to 0.84) compared with BAI. Discontinuation was positively associated with a higher monthly copayment of $15 to $30 (HR = 1.21, 95% CI = 1.01 to 1.44) and more than $30 (HR = 1.49, 95% CI = 1.23 to 1.80) compared with less than $15. In a multivariable logistic regression analysis, adherence (medication possession ratio ≥ 80%) was positively associated with GAI use (odds ratio = 1.53, 95% CI = 1.22 to 1.91) compared with BAI and inversely associated with increased monthly copayment. In addition, adherence was associated with a high annual income of more than $100k/year (odds ratio = 1.58, 95% CI = 1.17 to 2.11). Conclusions Higher prescription copayment amount was associated with nonadherence and discontinuation of AIs. After controlling for copayment, discontinuation was higher and adherence was lower with Brand AIs. Because nonadherence is associated with worse survival, efforts should be directed towards reducing out-of-pocket costs for these life-saving medications. PMID:25349080

  4. A computational model of the response of adherent cells to stretch and changes in substrate stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Lutchen, Kenneth R.; Suki, Béla

    2014-01-01

    Cells in the body exist in a dynamic mechanical environment where they are subject to mechanical stretch as well as changes in composition and stiffness of the underlying extracellular matrix (ECM). However, the underlying mechanisms by which cells sense and adapt to their dynamic mechanical environment, in particular to stretch, are not well understood. In this study, we hypothesized that emergent phenomena at the level of the actin network arising from active structural rearrangements driven by nonmuscle myosin II molecular motors play a major role in the cellular response to both stretch and changes in ECM stiffness. To test this hypothesis, we introduce a simple network model of actin-myosin interactions that links active self-organization of the actin network to the stiffness of the network and the traction forces generated by the network. We demonstrate that such a network replicates not only the effect of changes in substrate stiffness on cellular traction and stiffness and the dependence of rate of force development by a cell on the stiffness of its substrate, but also explains the physical response of adherent cells to transient and cyclic stretch. Our results provide strong indication that network phenomena governed by the active reorganization of the actin-myosin structure plays an important role in cellular mechanosensing and response to both changes in ECM stiffness and externally applied mechanical stretch. PMID:24408996

  5. CsrRS and environmental pH regulate group B streptococcus adherence to human epithelial cells and extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Park, Su Eun; Jiang, Shengmei; Wessels, Michael R

    2012-11-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus or GBS) is a common colonizer of the gastrointestinal and genital tracts and an important cause of invasive infections in newborn infants and in adults with predisposing chronic conditions or advanced age. Attachment to epithelial surfaces at mucosal sites is a critical step in the successful colonization of a human host, and regulation of this process is likely to play an important role in both commensalism and dissemination to cause invasive disease. We found that inactivation of the CsrRS (or CovRS) two-component system increased GBS adherence to epithelial cells derived from human vaginal, cervical, and respiratory epithelium, as well as increasing adherence to extracellular matrix proteins and increasing biofilm formation on polystyrene. Neutral (as opposed to acidic) pH enhanced GBS binding to vaginal epithelial cells and to fibrinogen and fibronectin, effects that were partially dependent on CsrRS. The regulatory effects of CsrRS and environmental pH on bacterial adherence correlated with their effects on the expression of multiple surface adhesins, as assessed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. We conclude that GBS adherence to epithelial and abiotic surfaces is regulated by the CsrRS two-component system and by environmental pH through their regulatory effects on the expression of bacterial surface adhesins. Dynamic regulation of GBS adherence enhances the organism's adaptability to survival in multiple niches in the human host. PMID:22949550

  6. CsrRS and Environmental pH Regulate Group B Streptococcus Adherence to Human Epithelial Cells and Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Park, Su Eun; Jiang, Shengmei

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus or GBS) is a common colonizer of the gastrointestinal and genital tracts and an important cause of invasive infections in newborn infants and in adults with predisposing chronic conditions or advanced age. Attachment to epithelial surfaces at mucosal sites is a critical step in the successful colonization of a human host, and regulation of this process is likely to play an important role in both commensalism and dissemination to cause invasive disease. We found that inactivation of the CsrRS (or CovRS) two-component system increased GBS adherence to epithelial cells derived from human vaginal, cervical, and respiratory epithelium, as well as increasing adherence to extracellular matrix proteins and increasing biofilm formation on polystyrene. Neutral (as opposed to acidic) pH enhanced GBS binding to vaginal epithelial cells and to fibrinogen and fibronectin, effects that were partially dependent on CsrRS. The regulatory effects of CsrRS and environmental pH on bacterial adherence correlated with their effects on the expression of multiple surface adhesins, as assessed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. We conclude that GBS adherence to epithelial and abiotic surfaces is regulated by the CsrRS two-component system and by environmental pH through their regulatory effects on the expression of bacterial surface adhesins. Dynamic regulation of GBS adherence enhances the organism's adaptability to survival in multiple niches in the human host. PMID:22949550

  7. Application of Organosilane Monolayer Template to Quantitative Evaluation of Cancer Cell Adhesive Ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanii, Takashi; Sasaki, Kosuke; Ichisawa, Kota; Demura, Takanori; Beppu, Yuichi; Vu, Hoan Anh; Thanh Chi, Hoan; Yamamoto, Hideaki; Sato, Yuko

    2011-06-01

    The adhesive ability of two human pancreatic cancer cell lines was evaluated using organosilane monolayer templates (OMTs). Using the OMT, the spreading area of adhered cells can be limited, and this enables us to focus on the initial attachment process of adhesion. Moreover, it becomes possible to arrange the cells in an array and to quantitatively evaluate the number of attached cells. The adhesive ability of the cancer cells cultured on the OMT was controlled by adding (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), which blocks a receptor that mediates cell adhesion and is overexpressed in cancer cells. Measurement of the relative ability of the cancer cells to attach to the OMT revealed that the ability for attachment decreased with increasing EGCG concentration. The results agreed well with the western blot analysis, indicating that the OMT can potentially be employed to evaluate the adhesive ability of various cancer cells.

  8. Large-scale enrichment of mobilized CD34+ peripheral blood hematopoietic progenitors by removal of nylon wool-adherent mature cells.

    PubMed

    Di Nicola, M; Siena, S; Bregni, M; Ravagnani, F; Vitello, F; Belli, N; Dodero, A; Magni, M; Bonadonna, G; Gianni, A M

    1994-12-01

    With the aim of facilitating the ex vivo manipulation of peripheral blood hematopoietic progenitors (CPCs = circulating progenitor cells) collected by leukapheresis, we removed polymorphonuclear cells and monocytes that naturally adhere to nylon wool fibers. Leukapheresed cells harvested at the time of hematopoietic recovery after cancer therapy with high-dose cyclophosphamide plus hematopoietic growth factors were incubated with nylon wool fibers for 1 h at 37 degrees C. Evaluation of the cells non-adherent to the nylon wool in all experiments (n = 14) showed that the median recovery of nucleated cells and CPCs detected as CD34+ cells, CFU-GM and BFU-E was 16.4% (range 4.8%-34.0%), 60.0% (range 30.8-80.8%), 60.9% (range 33.4-74.5%) and 65.5% (range 30.8-69.2%), respectively. Therefore exposure to the nylon wool determined a selective removal of mature cells and a complementary enrichment of CPCs. The wide range of results depended on the significantly different cell compositions of the unmanipulated leukaphereses. The latter from patients receiving rhG-CSF (n = 10) comprised a median of 88.5% (range 77.8-93.8%) and 11.5% (range 6.2-22.2%) polymorphonuclear and mononuclear cells, respectively. In contrast, leukaphereses from patients receiving rhGM-CSF or PIXY321 (n = 4) comprised a median of 71.1% (range 55.4-85.0%) and 28.9% (range 15.0-44.6%) polymorphonuclear and mononuclear cells, respectively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7536068

  9. Prevalence of Escherichia coli strains with localized, diffuse, and aggregative adherence to HeLa cells in infants with diarrhea and matched controls.

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, T A; Blake, P A; Trabulsi, L R

    1989-01-01

    To determine the possible role of Escherichia coli strains with three different patterns of adherence to HeLa cells in causing diarrhea in infants in São Paulo, Brazil, we studied stool specimens from 100 infants up to 1 year of age with acute diarrheal illnesses and 100 age-matched control infants without recent diarrhea. E. coli with localized adherence to HeLa cells was much more common in patients (23%) than in controls (2%) (P less than 0.0001) and was detected more frequently than rotavirus (19%) was in patients, even though the study was conducted during the coldest months of the year. Most (80%) of the E. coli colonies with localized adherence were of traditional enteropathogenic E. coli serotypes. Little difference was found between patients and controls in the rate of isolation of E. coli with diffuse adherence (31 and 32%, respectively) or aggregative adherence (10 and 8%, respectively). A genetic probe used to detect a plasmid-mediated adhesin which confers expression of localized adherence proved to be 100% sensitive and 99.9% specific in detecting E. coli with localized adherence to HeLa cells. Although E. coli strains with localized adherence have now been shown to be enteric pathogens in several parts of the world, the role of strains showing diffuse adherence and aggregative adherence is still uncertain. PMID:2563383

  10. Characterization of Binding of Candida albicans to Small Intestinal Mucin and Its Role in Adherence to Mucosal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    de Repentigny, Louis; Aumont, Francine; Bernard, Karine; Belhumeur, Pierre

    2000-01-01

    In order to approximate and adhere to mucosal epithelial cells, Candida must traverse the overlying mucus layer. Interactions of Candida species with mucin and human buccal epithelial cells (BECs) were thus investigated in vitro. Binding of the Candida species to purified small intestinal mucin showed a close correlation with their hierarchy of virulence. Significant differences (P < 0.05) were found among three categories of Candida species adhering highly (C. dubliniensis, C. tropicalis, and C. albicans), moderately (C. parapsilosis and C. lusitaniae) or weakly (C. krusei and C. glabrata) to mucin. Adherence of C. albicans to BECs was quantitatively inhibited by graded concentrations of mucin. However, inhibition of adherence was reversed by pretreatment of mucin with pronase or C. albicans secretory aspartyl proteinase Sap2p but not with sodium periodate. Saturable concentration- and time-dependent binding of mucin to C. albicans was abrogated by pronase or Sap2p treatment of mucin but was unaffected by β-mercaptoethanol, sodium periodate, neuraminidase, lectins, or potentially inhibitory sugars. Probing of membrane blots of the mucin with C. albicans revealed binding of the yeast to the 66-kDa cleavage product of the 118-kDa C-terminal glycopeptide of mucin. Although no evidence was found for the participation of C. albicans cell surface mannoproteins in specific receptor-ligand binding to mucin, inhibition of binding by p-nitrophenol (1 mM) and tetramethylurea (0.36 M) revealed that hydrophobic interactions are involved in adherence of C. albicans to mucin. These results suggest that C. albicans may both adhere to and enzymatically degrade mucins by the action of Saps, and that both properties may act to modulate Candida populations in the oral cavity and gastrointestinal tract. PMID:10816460

  11. The role of Listeria monocytogenes cell wall surface anchor protein LapB in virulence, adherence, and intracellular replication

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lmof2365_2117 is a Listeria monocytogenes putative cell wall surface anchor protein with a conserved domain found in collagen binding proteins. We constructed a deletion mutation in lmof2365_2117 in serotype 4b strain F2365, evaluated its virulence, and determined its ability to adhere and invade co...

  12. Adherence of Candida albicans to human buccal epithelial cells: host-induced protein synthesis and signaling events.

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, A; Wadsworth, E; Calderone, R

    1995-01-01

    The synthesis of proteins by Candida albicans was studied following adherence of blastoconidia to human buccal epithelial cells (HBEC). Initially, labeling of HBEC, C. albicans, and HBEC-C. albicans with [35S]methionine was performed. After a 3-h incubation and prior to labeling with [35S]methionine, the cultures were treated with cycloheximide to prevent HBEC protein synthesis. The HBEC-C. albicans mixture as well as C. albicans and HBEC incubated separately were extracted with beta-mercaptoethanol (beta-ME). These extracts as well as the cell residue (solubilized by boiling with sodium dodecyl sulfate [SDS]) were examined by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. In comparison to cultures of C. albicans incubated without HBEC, proteins with molecular masses of approximately 52 to 56 kDa from beta-ME extracts and from SDS-solubilized cells were observed only from adhering cultures. In addition, unlabeled beta-ME extracts were electrotransferred to nitrocellulose and immunoblotted with antiphosphotyrosine antibodies to determine whether cell signaling events were occurring during adherence. Proteins with molecular masses of 54 and 60 kDa were recognized only in mixed cultures of C. albicans and HBEC. These data indicate that following adherence of C. albicans to HBEC, new Candida proteins are expressed. Further, these events are accompanied by the expression of signal proteins, presumably of Candida origin. PMID:7822023

  13. Automatic segmentation and quantification of fluorescing microspheres adhering to capillary endothelial cells in the rat lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Thomas A.; Fingar, Victor H.; Taber, Scott W.; Wieman, Thomas J.

    1995-05-01

    Adhesion molecules present in the cellular membrane of the endothelium provide sites of leukocyte adherence as a first step in the process of leukocyte migration into the interstitium. New evidence suggests the same adhesion proteins may be responsible for the spread of metastatic tumors by providing a location for tumor cell attachment. A method was sought to quantitate the degree of adhesion molecule expression in the pulmonary capillary endothelium using a recently developed animal model which allows for viewing the lung surface in vivo. Videoimages of the pulmonary vascular system were gathered using this new lung chamber technique. A fully automated digital image processing and analysis (DIPA) system was also developed to estimate the level of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression on the capillary endothelial cells in these videoimages. Fluorescent microspheres were immunologically bound to the ICAM-1 molecules present on the endothelial cell surface. The DIPA system then located and quantified the fluorescent spots present in the videoimages. The ability of this system to locate and measure the fluorescence was compared with human measurements of the same images.

  14. The cell-cell junctions of mammalian testes: I. The adhering junctions of the seminiferous epithelium represent special differentiation structures.

    PubMed

    Domke, Lisa M; Rickelt, Steffen; Dörflinger, Yvette; Kuhn, Caecilia; Winter-Simanowski, Stefanie; Zimbelmann, Ralf; Rosin-Arbesfeld, Rina; Heid, Hans; Franke, Werner W

    2014-09-01

    The seminiferous tubules and the excurrent ducts of the mammalian testis are physiologically separated from the mesenchymal tissues and the blood and lymph system by a special structural barrier to paracellular translocations of molecules and particles: the "blood-testis barrier", formed by junctions connecting Sertoli cells with each other and with spermatogonial cells. In combined biochemical as well as light and electron microscopical studies we systematically determine the molecules located in the adhering junctions of adult mammalian (human, bovine, porcine, murine, i.e., rat and mouse) testis. We show that the seminiferous epithelium does not contain desmosomes, or "desmosome-like" junctions, nor any of the desmosome-specific marker molecules and that the adhering junctions of tubules and ductules are fundamentally different. While the ductules contain classical epithelial cell layers with E-cadherin-based adherens junctions (AJs) and typical desmosomes, the Sertoli cells of the tubules lack desmosomes and "desmosome-like" junctions but are connected by morphologically different forms of AJs. These junctions are based on N-cadherin anchored in cytoplasmic plaques, which in some subforms appear thick and dense but in other subforms contain only scarce and loosely arranged plaque structures formed by α- and β-catenin, proteins p120, p0071 and plakoglobin, together with a member of the striatin family and also, in rodents, the proteins ZO-1 and myozap. These N-cadherin-based AJs also include two novel types of junctions: the "areae adhaerentes", i.e., variously-sized, often very large cell-cell contacts and small sieve-plate-like AJs perforated by cytoplasm-to-cytoplasm channels of 5-7 nm internal diameter ("cribelliform junctions"). We emphasize the unique character of this epithelium that totally lacks major epithelial marker molecules and structures such as keratin filaments and desmosomal elements as well as EpCAM- and PERP-containing junctions. We also

  15. Autophagy, cell death, and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lin; Baehrecke, Eric H

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved intracellular catabolic process that is used by all cells to degrade dysfunctional or unnecessary cytoplasmic components through delivery to the lysosome. Increasing evidence reveals that autophagic dysfunction is associated with human diseases, such as cancer. Paradoxically, although autophagy is well recognized as a cell survival process that promotes tumor development, it can also participate in a caspase-independent form of programmed cell death. Induction of autophagic cell death by some anticancer agents highlights the potential of this process as a cancer treatment modality. Here, we review our current understanding of the molecular mechanism of autophagy and the potential roles of autophagy in cell death, cancer development, and cancer treatment. PMID:27308466

  16. Crucial role of HMGA1 in the self-renewal and drug resistance of ovarian cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Kyoung; Seo, Eun Jin; Choi, Eun J; Lee, Su In; Kwon, Yang Woo; Jang, Il Ho; Kim, Seung-Chul; Kim, Ki-Hyung; Suh, Dong-Soo; Seong-Jang, Kim; Lee, Sang Chul; Kim, Jae Ho

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells are a subpopulation of cancer cells characterized by self-renewal ability, tumorigenesis and drug resistance. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of HMGA1, a chromatin remodeling factor abundantly expressed in many different cancers, in the regulation of cancer stem cells in ovarian cancer. Spheroid-forming cancer stem cells were isolated from A2780, SKOV3 and PA1 ovarian cancer cells by three-dimensional spheroid culture. Elevated expression of HMGA1 was observed in spheroid cells along with increased expression of stemness-related genes, such as SOX2, KLF4, ALDH, ABCB1 and ABCG2. Furthermore, spheroid A2780 cells, compared with adherent cells, showed higher resistance to chemotherapeutic agents such as paclitaxel and doxorubicin. HMGA1 knockdown in spheroid cells reduced the proliferative advantage and spheroid-forming efficiency of the cells and the expression of stemness-related genes. HMGA1 overexpression in adherent A2780 cells increased cancer stem cell properties, including proliferation, spheroid-forming efficiency and the expression of stemness-related genes. In addition, HMGA1 regulated ABCG2 promoter activity through HMGA1-binding sites. Knockdown of HMGA1 in spheroid cells reduced resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, whereas the overexpression of HMGA1 in adherent ovarian cancer cells increased resistance to chemotherapeutic agents in vitro. Furthermore, HMGA1-overexpressing A2780 cells showed a significant survival advantage after chemotherapeutic agent treatment in a xenograft tumorigenicity assay. Together, our results provide novel insights regarding the critical role of HMGA1 in the regulation of the cancer stem cell characteristics of ovarian cancer cells, thus suggesting that HMGA1 may be an important target in the development of therapeutics for ovarian cancer patients. PMID:27561949

  17. Crucial role of HMGA1 in the self-renewal and drug resistance of ovarian cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Kyoung; Seo, Eun Jin; Choi, Eun J; Lee, Su In; Kwon, Yang Woo; Jang, Il Ho; Kim, Seung-Chul; Kim, Ki-Hyung; Suh, Dong-Soo; Seong-Jang, Kim; Lee, Sang Chul; Kim, Jae Ho

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells are a subpopulation of cancer cells characterized by self-renewal ability, tumorigenesis and drug resistance. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of HMGA1, a chromatin remodeling factor abundantly expressed in many different cancers, in the regulation of cancer stem cells in ovarian cancer. Spheroid-forming cancer stem cells were isolated from A2780, SKOV3 and PA1 ovarian cancer cells by three-dimensional spheroid culture. Elevated expression of HMGA1 was observed in spheroid cells along with increased expression of stemness-related genes, such as SOX2, KLF4, ALDH, ABCB1 and ABCG2. Furthermore, spheroid A2780 cells, compared with adherent cells, showed higher resistance to chemotherapeutic agents such as paclitaxel and doxorubicin. HMGA1 knockdown in spheroid cells reduced the proliferative advantage and spheroid-forming efficiency of the cells and the expression of stemness-related genes. HMGA1 overexpression in adherent A2780 cells increased cancer stem cell properties, including proliferation, spheroid-forming efficiency and the expression of stemness-related genes. In addition, HMGA1 regulated ABCG2 promoter activity through HMGA1-binding sites. Knockdown of HMGA1 in spheroid cells reduced resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, whereas the overexpression of HMGA1 in adherent ovarian cancer cells increased resistance to chemotherapeutic agents in vitro. Furthermore, HMGA1-overexpressing A2780 cells showed a significant survival advantage after chemotherapeutic agent treatment in a xenograft tumorigenicity assay. Together, our results provide novel insights regarding the critical role of HMGA1 in the regulation of the cancer stem cell characteristics of ovarian cancer cells, thus suggesting that HMGA1 may be an important target in the development of therapeutics for ovarian cancer patients. PMID:27561949

  18. OSTEOBLAST ADHESION OF BREAST CANCER CELLS WITH SCANNING ACOUSTIC MICROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Chiaki Miyasaka; Robyn R. Mercer; Andrea M. Mastro; Ken L. Telschow

    2005-03-01

    Breast cancer frequently metastasizes to the bone. Upon colonizing bone tissue, the cancer cells stimulate osteoclasts (cells that break bone down), resulting in large lesions in the bone. The breast cancer cells also affect osteoblasts (cells that build new bone). Conditioned medium was collected from a bone-metastatic breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231, and cultured with an immature osteoblast cell line, MC3T3-E1. Under these conditions the osteoblasts acquired a changed morphology and appeared to adherer in a different way to the substrate and to each other. To characterize cell adhesion, MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts were cultured with or without MDA-MB-231 conditioned medium for two days, and then assayed with a mechanical scanning acoustic reflection microscope (SAM). The SAM indicated that in normal medium the MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts were firmly attached to their plastic substrate. However, MC3T3-E1 cells cultured with MDA-MB-231 conditioned medium displayed both an abnormal shape and poor adhesion at the substrate interface. The cells were fixed and stained to visualize cytoskeletal components using optical microscopic techniques. We were not able to observe these differences until the cells were quite confluent after 7 days of culture. However, using the SAM, we were able to detect these changes within 2 days of culture with MDA-MB-231 conditioned medium

  19. Cell surface adhesiveness of mouse sarcoma lines evaluated by latex particle adherence assay: correlation with growth behavior and electrophoretic mobility.

    PubMed

    Bubeník, J; Jandlová, T; Suhajová, E; Malkovský, M

    1979-01-01

    Using the latex particle adherence assay and five mouse sarcoma cell lines of the identical origin, etiology and genotype but differing in malignancy we attempted to correlate the degree of cell surface adhesiveness with growth behavior and electrophoretic mobility of cells. Higher tumorigenicity of four of the cell lines (Mc11--Mc14) was associated with lower cell surface adhesiveness and, conversely, lower malignancy of the fifth line (Mc15) with higher cell surface adhesiveness. No simple correlation or causal relationship was found among the electrophoretic mobility of the lines and other cellular characteristics. PMID:522921

  20. Expansion of CD133+ colon cancer cultures retaining stem cell properties to enable cancer stem cell target discovery

    PubMed Central

    Fang, D D; Kim, Y J; Lee, C N; Aggarwal, S; McKinnon, K; Mesmer, D; Norton, J; Birse, C E; He, T; Ruben, S M; Moore, P A

    2010-01-01

    Background: Despite earlier studies demonstrating in vitro propagation of solid tumour cancer stem cells (CSCs) as non-adherent tumour spheres, it remains controversial as to whether CSCs can be maintained in vitro. Additional validation of the CSC properties of tumour spheres would support their use as CSC models and provide an opportunity to discover additional CSC cell surface markers to aid in CSC detection and potential elimination. Methods: Primary tumour cells isolated from 13 surgically resected colon tumour specimens were propagated using serum-free CSC-selective conditions. The CSC properties of long-term cultured tumour spheres were established and mass spectrometry-based proteomics performed. Results: Freshly isolated CD133+ colorectal cancer cells gave rise to long-term tumour sphere (or spheroids) cultures maintaining CD133 expression. These spheroid cells were able to self-renew and differentiate into adherent epithelial lineages and recapitulate the phenotype of the original tumour. Relative to their differentiated progeny, tumour spheroid cells were more resistant to the chemotherapeutic irinotecan. Finally, CD44, CD166, CD29, CEACAM5, cadherin 17, and biglycan were identified by mass spectrometry to be enriched in CD133+ tumour spheroid cells. Conclusion: Our data suggest that ex vivo-expanded colon CSCs isolated from clinical specimens can be maintained in culture enabling the identification of CSC cell surface-associated proteins. PMID:20332776

  1. Platelet activating factor amplifies human neutrophil adherence to bovine endothelial cells: evidence for a lipoxygenase dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Damtew, B; Spagnuolo, P J

    1992-10-01

    Platelet activating factor (PAF) is a potent lipid mediator that induces the release of leukotrienes and prostaglandins from various cells and tissues. We examined the capacity of PAF alone and in combination with soluble stimuli to enhance eicosanoid synthesis and adherence of human neutrophils. Neutrophils were preincubated with PAF and washed before exposure to the soluble stimuli F-Met-Leu-Phe (FMLP), calcium ionophore A23187, and phorbol myristate acetate. Preincubation of neutrophils with 1 microM PAF enhanced the release of both LTB4 and LTC4 in response to each of the three agonists, in contrast with the unprimed neutrophils. Priming was specific for PAF since lyso-PAF was inactive. Priming concentrations of PAF also augmented the adherence of neutrophils to endothelium in the presence of the soluble agonists A23187, phorbol myristate acetate, and FMLP. The priming effect of PAF on eicosanoid release and neutrophil adherence was shown to have similar time- and dose-dependent effects. Further, the priming effects of PAF on adherence could be reversed by preincubation of neutrophils with the lipoxygenase inhibitors nordihydroguiaretic acid and 5,8,11,14-ETYA but not by preincubation with the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin. These data demonstrate that PAF amplifies neutrophil adherence to endothelium through a lipoxygenase dependent mechanism. PMID:1330924

  2. Drugs Approved for Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer This page lists cancer drugs ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Afinitor (Everolimus) Aldesleukin Avastin (Bevacizumab) ...

  3. Role of M3 protein in the adherence and internalization of an invasive Streptococcus pyogenes strain by epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Eyal, Osnat; Jadoun, Jeries; Bitler, Arcady; Skutelski, Ehud; Sela, Shlomo

    2003-10-15

    Streptococcus pyogenes utilizes multiple mechanisms for adherence to and internalization by epithelial cells. One of the molecules suggested of being involved in adherence and internalization is the M protein. Although strains of the M3 serotype form the second largest group isolated from patients with severe invasive diseases and fatal infections, not much information is known regarding the interactions of M3 protein with mammalian cells. In this study we have constructed an emm3 mutant of an invasive M3 serotype (SP268), and demonstrated that the M3 protein is involved in both adherence to and internalization by HEp-2 cells. Fibronectin promoted both adherence and internalization of SP268 in an M3-independent pathway. Utilizing speB and speB/emm3 double mutants, it was found that M3 protein is not essential for the maturation of SpeB, as was reported for the M1 protein. Increased internalization efficiency observed in both the speB and emm3/speB mutants suggested that inhibition of S. pyogenes internalization by SpeB is not related to the presence of an intact M3 protein. Thus, other proteins in SP268, which serve as targets for SpeB activity, have a prominent role in the internalization process. PMID:14522456

  4. Invasive cancer cells and metastasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2013-12-01

    The physics of cancer is a relatively new emerging field of cancer research. In the last decade it has become a focus of biophysical research as well as becoming a novel focus for classical cancer research. This special section of Physical Biology focusing on invasive cancer cells and metastasis (physical oncology) will give greater insight into the different subfields where physical approaches are being applied to cancer research. This focus on the physical aspects of cancer is necessary because novel approaches in the field of genomics and proteomics have not altered the field of cancer research dramatically, due to the fact that few breakthroughs have been made. It is still not understood why some primary tumors metastasize and thus have a worse outcome compared to others that do not metastasize. As biophysicists, we and others suggest that the mechanical properties of the cancer cells, which possess the ability to transmigrate, are quite different compared to non-metastatic and non-invasive cancer cells. Furthermore, we hypothesize that these cancer cells undergo a selection process within the primary tumor that enables them to weaken their cell-cell adhesions and to alter their cell-matrix adhesions in order to be able to cross the outermost boundary of the primary tumor, as well as the surrounding basement membrane, and to invade the connective tissue. This prerequisite may also help the cancer cells to enter blood or lymph vessels, get transported with the vessel flow and form secondary tumors either within the vessel, directly on the endothelium, or in a different organ after crossing the endothelial lining a second time. This special section begins with a paper by Mark F Coughlin and Jeffrey J Fredberg on the changes in cytoskeletal dynamics and nonlinear rheology due to the metastatic capability of cancer cells from different cancer tissue types such as skin, bladder, prostate and kidney [1]. The hypothesis was that the metastatic outcome is impacted by

  5. Adherence to a healthy Nordic food index is associated with a lower incidence of colorectal cancer in women: the Diet, Cancer and Health cohort study.

    PubMed

    Kyrø, Cecilie; Skeie, Guri; Loft, Steffen; Overvad, Kim; Christensen, Jane; Tjønneland, Anne; Olsen, Anja

    2013-03-14

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a multi-factorial disease in which diet is believed to play a role. Little is known about the health effects of specific regional diets. The Nordic diet is high in fat and sugar but also includes a range of traditional products with anticipated health-promoting effects. The aim of this cohort study was to determine whether a healthy Nordic food index consisting of fish, cabbage, rye bread, oatmeal, apples, pears and root vegetables was related to CRC incidence. Data were obtained from a prospective cohort study of 57,053 Danish men and women aged 50-64 years, of whom 1025 developed CRC (13 years' follow-up). Incidence rate ratios (IRR) with 95 % CI were calculated from Cox proportional hazard models. Women who strongly adhered to a healthy Nordic food index had a 35 % lower incidence of CRC than women with poor adherence (adjusted IRR, 0·65; 95 % CI 0·46, 0·94); a similar tendency was found for men. Women had a 9 % lower incidence of CRC per point adherence to the healthy Nordic food index, but no significant effect was found for men. A regional diet based on healthy Nordic food items was therefore associated with a lower incidence of CRC in women. The protective effect was of the same magnitude as previously found for the Mediterranean diet, suggesting that healthy regional diets should be promoted in order to ensure health; this will also preserve cultural heredity and the environment. PMID:22874538

  6. Fimbria-mediated adherence of Candida albicans to glycosphingolipid receptors on human buccal epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, L; Lee, K K; Sheth, H B; Lane-Bell, P; Srivastava, G; Hindsgaul, O; Paranchych, W; Hodges, R S; Irvin, R T

    1994-01-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunist fungal pathogen that has the ability to adhere to host cell surface receptors via a number of adhesins. Yu et al. (L. Yu, K. K. Lee, K. Ens, P. C. Doig, M. R. Carpenter, W. Staddon, R. S. Hodges, W. Paranchych, and R. T. Irvin, Infect. Immun. 62:2834-2842, 1994) described the purification and initial characterization of a fimbrial adhesin from C. albicans. In this paper, we show that C. albicans fimbriae also bind to asialo-GM1 [gangliotetraosylceramide: beta Gal(1-3)beta GalNAc(1-4) beta Gal(1-4)beta Glc(1-1)Cer] immobilized on microtiter plates in a saturable and concentration-dependent manner. C. albicans fimbrial binding to exfoliated human buccal epithelial cells (BECs) was inhibited by asialo-GM1 in in vitro binding assays. The fimbriae interact with the glycosphingolipid receptors via the carbohydrate portion of the receptors, since fimbriae were observed to bind to synthetic beta GalNAc(1-4)beta Gal-protein conjugates and the disaccharide was able to inhibit binding of fimbriae to BECs in in vitro binding assays. We conclude from these results that the C. albicans yeast form expresses a fimbrial adhesin that binds to glycosphingolipids displayed on the surface of human BECs. Images PMID:8005674

  7. Protein phosphatase 2A activity is required for functional adherent junctions in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kása, Anita; Czikora, István; Verin, Alexander D; Gergely, Pál; Csortos, Csilla

    2013-09-01

    Reversible Ser/Thr phosphorylation of cytoskeletal and adherent junction (AJ) proteins has a critical role in the regulation of endothelial cell (EC) barrier function. We have demonstrated earlier that protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity is important in EC barrier integrity. In the present work, macro- and microvascular EC were examined and we provided further evidence on the significance of PP2A in the maintenance of EC cytoskeleton and barrier function with special focus on the Bα (regulatory) subunit of PP2A. Immunofluorescent staining revealed that the inhibition of PP2A results in changes in the organization of EC cytoskeleton as microtubule dissolution and actin re-arrangement were detected. Depletion of Bα regulatory subunit of PP2A had similar effect on the cytoskeleton structure of the cells. Furthermore, transendothelial electric resistance measurements demonstrated significantly slower barrier recovery of Bα depleted EC after thrombin treatment. AJ proteins, VE-cadherin and β-catenin, were detected along with Bα in pull-down assay. Also, the inhibition of PP2A (by okadaic acid or fostriecin) or depletion of Bα caused β-catenin translocation from the membrane to the cytoplasm in parallel with its phosphorylation on Ser552. In conclusion, our data suggest that the A/Bα/C holoenzyme form of PP2A is essential in EC barrier integrity both in micro- and macrovascular EC. PMID:23721711

  8. Evaluation of a Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) assay (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Embryonic Stem Cell Test (EST) has been used to evaluate the effects of xenobiotics using three endpoints, stem cell differentiation, stem cell viability and 3T3-cell viability. Our research goal is to establish amodel system that would evaluate chemical effects using a singl...

  9. Fibronectin-binding protein of Streptococcus pyogenes: sequence of the binding domain involved in adherence of streptococci to epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Talay, S R; Valentin-Weigand, P; Jerlström, P G; Timmis, K N; Chhatwal, G S

    1992-01-01

    The sequence of the fibronectin-binding domain of the fibronectin-binding protein of Streptococcus pyogenes (Sfb protein) was determined, and its role in streptococcal adherence was investigated by use of an Sfb fusion protein in adherence studies. A 1-kb DNA fragment coding for the binding domain of Sfb protein was cloned into the expression vector pEX31 to produce an Sfb fusion protein consisting of the N-terminal part of MS2 polymerase and a C-terminal fragment of the streptococcal protein. Induction of the vector promoter resulted in hyperexpression of fibronectin-binding fusion protein in the cytoplasm of the recombinant Escherichia coli cells. Sequence determination of the cloned 1-kb fragment revealed an in-frame reading frame for a 268-amino-acid peptide composed of a 37-amino-acid sequence which is completely repeated three times and incompletely repeated a fourth time. Cloning of one repeat into pEX31 resulted in expression of small fusion peptides that show fibronectin-binding activity, indicating that one repeat contains at least one binding domain. Each repeat exhibits two charged domains and shows high homology with the 38-amino-acid D3 repeat of the fibronectin-binding protein of Staphylococcus aureus. Sequence comparison with other streptococcal ligand-binding surface proteins, including M protein, failed to reveal significant homology, which suggests that Sfb protein represents a novel type of functional protein in S. pyogenes. The Sfb fusion protein isolated from the cytoplasm of recombinant cells was purified by fast protein liquid chromatography. It showed a strong competitive inhibition of fibronectin binding to S. pyogenes and of the adherence of bacteria to cultured epithelial cells. In contrast, purified streptococcal lipoteichoic acid showed only a weak inhibition of fibronectin binding and streptococcal adherence. These results demonstrate that Sfb protein is directly involved in the fibronectin-mediated adherence of S. pyogenes to

  10. Cancer stem cells and cisplatin-resistant cells isolated from non-small-lung cancer cell lines constitute related cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Ayllon, Blanca D; Moncho-Amor, Veronica; Abarrategi, Ander; de Cáceres, Inmaculada Ibañez; Castro-Carpeño, Javier; Belda-Iniesta, Cristobal; Perona, Rosario; Sastre, Leandro

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is the top cause of cancer-related deceases. One of the reasons is the development of resistance to the chemotherapy treatment. In particular, cancer stem cells (CSCs), can escape treatment and regenerate the bulk of the tumor. In this article, we describe a comparison between cancer cells resistant to cisplatin and CSCs, both derived from the non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines H460 and A549. Cisplatin-resistant cells were obtained after a single treatment with the drug. CSCs were isolated by culture in defined media, under nonadherent conditions. The isolated CSCs were clonogenic, could be differentiated into adherent cells and were less sensitive to cisplatin than the original cells. Cisplatin resistant and CSCs were able to generate primary tumors and to metastasize when injected into immunodeficient Nu/Nu mice, although they formed smaller tumors with a larger latency than untreated cells. Notably, under appropriated proportions, CSCs synergized with differentiated cells to form larger tumors. CSCs also showed increased capacity to induce angiogenesis in Nu/Nu mice. Conversely, H460 cisplatin-resistant cells showed increased tendency to develop bone metastasis. Gene expression analysis showed that several genes involved in tumor development and metastasis (EGR1, COX2, MALAT1, AKAP12, ADM) were similarly induced in CSC and cisplatin-resistant H460 cells, in agreement with a close similarity between these two cell populations. Cells with the characteristic growth properties of CSCs were also isolated from surgical samples of 18 out of 44 lung cancer patients. A significant correlation (P = 0.028) was found between the absence of CSCs and cisplatin sensitivity. PMID:24961511

  11. Cancer stem cells and cisplatin-resistant cells isolated from non-small-lung cancer cell lines constitute related cell populations.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Ayllon, Blanca D; Moncho-Amor, Veronica; Abarrategi, Ander; Ibañez de Cáceres, Inmaculada; Castro-Carpeño, Javier; Belda-Iniesta, Cristobal; Perona, Rosario; Sastre, Leandro

    2014-10-01

    Lung cancer is the top cause of cancer-related deceases. One of the reasons is the development of resistance to the chemotherapy treatment. In particular, cancer stem cells (CSCs), can escape treatment and regenerate the bulk of the tumor. In this article, we describe a comparison between cancer cells resistant to cisplatin and CSCs, both derived from the non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines H460 and A549. Cisplatin-resistant cells were obtained after a single treatment with the drug. CSCs were isolated by culture in defined media, under nonadherent conditions. The isolated CSCs were clonogenic, could be differentiated into adherent cells and were less sensitive to cisplatin than the original cells. Cisplatin resistant and CSCs were able to generate primary tumors and to metastasize when injected into immunodeficient Nu/Nu mice, although they formed smaller tumors with a larger latency than untreated cells. Notably, under appropriated proportions, CSCs synergized with differentiated cells to form larger tumors. CSCs also showed increased capacity to induce angiogenesis in Nu/Nu mice. Conversely, H460 cisplatin-resistant cells showed increased tendency to develop bone metastasis. Gene expression analysis showed that several genes involved in tumor development and metastasis (EGR1, COX2, MALAT1, AKAP12, ADM) were similarly induced in CSC and cisplatin-resistant H460 cells, in agreement with a close similarity between these two cell populations. Cells with the characteristic growth properties of CSCs were also isolated from surgical samples of 18 out of 44 lung cancer patients. A significant correlation (P = 0.028) was found between the absence of CSCs and cisplatin sensitivity. PMID:24961511

  12. Adherence to Surveillance Care Guidelines after Breast and Colorectal Cancer Treatment with Curative Intent

    PubMed Central

    Salloum, Ramzi G.; Hornbrook, Mark C.; Fishman, Paul A.; Ritzwoller, Debra P.; Rossetti, Maureen C. O’Keeffe; Lafata, Jennifer Elston

    2012-01-01

    Background Evidence-based guidelines recommend routine surveillance, including office visits and testing, to detect new and recurrent disease among breast and colorectal cancer survivors. The extent to which surveillance practice is consistent with guideline recommendations or may vary by age is not known. Methods Cohorts of adult patients diagnosed with breast (n=6,205) and colorectal (n=2,297) cancer between 2000 and 2008 and treated with curative intent in four, geographically diverse, managed care environments were identified via tumor registries. Kaplan-Meier estimates were used to describe time to initial and subsequent surveillance service receipt. Cox proportional hazards models evaluated the relationship between patient characteristics and receipt of metastatic screening. Results Within 18-months of treatment, 87.2% of breast cancer survivors received recommended mammograms, with significantly higher rates for patients aged 50–65. Among colorectal cancer survivors, only 55.0% received recommended colon examinations, with significantly lower rates for those ≥ aged 75. Most breast (64.7%) and colorectal (73.3%) cancer survivors received non-recommended metastatic disease testing. In breast cancer, factors associated with metastatic disease testing include white race (HR=1.13), comorbidities (HR=1.17), and younger age. In colorectal cancer, these factors included younger age and comorbidities (HR=1.10). Conclusions Among an insured population, we found wide variation in the use of surveillance care by age and relative to guideline recommendations. Breast cancer survivors have high rates of both guideline recommended recurrence testing and non-guideline recommended metastatic testing. Only about half of colorectal cancer survivors receive recommended tests but over two thirds received metastatic testing. PMID:22434568

  13. Butyrate modulates bacterial adherence on LS174T human colorectal cells by stimulating mucin secretion and MAPK signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Tae-Hwan; Park, Jeong Hyeon; Han, Kyoung-Sik

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Fermentation of dietary fiber results in production of various short chain fatty acids in the colon. In particular, butyrate is reported to regulate the physical and functional integrity of the normal colonic mucosa by altering mucin gene expression or the number of goblet cells. The objective of this study was to investigate whether butyrate modulates mucin secretion in LS174T human colorectal cells, thereby influencing the adhesion of probiotics such as Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium strains and subsequently inhibiting pathogenic bacteria such as E. coli. In addition, possible signaling pathways involved in mucin gene regulation induced by butyrate treatment were also investigated. MATERIALS/METHODS Mucin protein content assay and periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining were performed in LS174T cells treated with butyrate at various concentrations. Effects of butyrate on the ability of probiotics to adhere to LS174T cells and their competition with E. coli strains were examined. Real time polymerase chain reaction for mucin gene expression and Taqman array 96-well fast plate-based pathway analysis were performed on butyrate-treated LS174T cells. RESULTS Treatment with butyrate resulted in a dose-dependent increase in mucin protein contents in LS174T cells with peak effects at 6 or 9 mM, which was further confirmed by PAS staining. Increase in mucin protein contents resulted in elevated adherence of probiotics, which subsequently reduced the adherent ability of E. coli. Treatment with butyrate also increased transcriptional levels of MUC3, MUC4, and MUC12, which was accompanied by higher gene expressions of signaling kinases and transcription factors involved in mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways. CONCLUSIONS Based on our results, butyrate is an effective regulator of modulation of mucin protein production at the transcriptional and translational levels, resulting in changes in the adherence of gut microflora. Butyrate

  14. Glucosyltransferases of Viridans Group Streptococci Modulate Interleukin-6 and Adhesion Molecule Expression in Endothelial Cells and Augment Monocytic Cell Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Chiou-Yueh; Chen, Jen-Yang; Chia, Jean-San

    2006-01-01

    Recruitment of monocytes plays important roles during vegetation formation and endocardial inflammation in the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis (IE). Bacterial antigens or modulins can activate endothelial cells through the expression of cytokines or adhesion molecules and modulate the recruitment of leukocytes. We hypothesized that glucosyltransferases (GTFs), modulins of viridans group streptococci, may act directly to up-regulate the expression of adhesion molecules and also interleukin-6 (IL-6) to augment monocyte attachment to endothelial cells. Using primary cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) as an in vitro model, we demonstrated that GTFs (in the cell-bound or free form) could specifically modulate the expression of IL-6, and also adhesion molecules, in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Results of inhibition assays suggested that enhanced expression of adhesion molecules was dependent on the activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase and that p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways also contributed to the release of IL-6. Streptococcus-infected HUVECs or treatment with purified IL-6 plus soluble IL-6 receptor α enhanced the expression of ICAM-1 and the adherence of the monocytic cell line U937. These results suggest that streptococcal GTFs might play an important role in recruiting monocytic cells during inflammation in IE through induction of adhesion molecules and IL-6, a cytokine involved in transition from neutrophil to monocyte recruitment. PMID:16428777

  15. Effects of Fluid Shear Stress on Cancer Stem Cell Viability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunday, Brittney; Triantafillu, Ursula; Domier, Ria; Kim, Yonghyun

    2014-11-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), which are believed to be the source of tumor formation, are exposed to fluid shear stress as a result of blood flow within the blood vessels. It was theorized that CSCs would be less susceptible to cell death than non-CSCs after both types of cell were exposed to a fluid shear stress, and that higher levels of fluid shear stress would result in lower levels of cell viability for both cell types. To test this hypothesis, U87 glioblastoma cells were cultured adherently (containing smaller populations of CSCs) and spherically (containing larger populations of CSCs). They were exposed to fluid shear stress in a simulated blood flow through a 125-micrometer diameter polyetheretherketone (PEEK) tubing using a syringe pump. After exposure, cell viability data was collected using a BioRad TC20 Automated Cell Counter. Each cell type was tested at three physiological shear stress values: 5, 20, and 60 dynes per centimeter squared. In general, it was found that the CSC-enriched U87 sphere cells had higher cell viability than the CSC-depleted U87 adherent cancer cells. Interestingly, it was also observed that the cell viability was not negatively affected by the higher fluid shear stress values in the tested range. In future follow-up studies, higher shear stresses will be tested. Furthermore, CSCs from different tumor origins (e.g. breast tumor, prostate tumor) will be tested to determine cell-specific shear sensitivity. National Science Foundation Grant #1358991 supported the first author as an REU student.

  16. Correlative VIS-fluorescence and soft X-ray cryo-microscopy/tomography of adherent cells.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Christoph; Guttmann, Peter; Klupp, Barbara; Werner, Stephan; Rehbein, Stefan; Mettenleiter, Thomas C; Schneider, Gerd; Grünewald, Kay

    2012-02-01

    Soft X-ray cryo-microscopy/tomography of vitreous samples is becoming a valuable tool in structural cell biology. Within the 'water-window' wavelength region (2.34-4.37nm), it provides absorption contrast images with high signal to noise ratio and resolution of a few tens of nanometer. Soft X-rays with wavelengths close to the K-absorption edge of oxygen penetrate biological samples with thicknesses in the micrometer range. Here, we report on the application of a recently established extension of the transmission soft X-ray cryo-microscope (HZB TXM) at the beamline U41-XM of the BESSY II electron storage ring by an in-column epi-fluorescence and reflected light cryo-microscope. We demonstrate the new capability for correlative fluorescence and soft X-ray cryo-microscopy/tomography of this instrument along a typical life science experimental approach - the correlation of a fluorophore-tagged protein (pUL34-GFP of pseudorabies virus, PrV, the nuclear membrane-anchored component of the nuclear egress complex of the Herpesviridae which interacts with viral pUL31) in PrV pUL34-GFP/pUL31 coexpressing mammalian cells, with virus-induced vesicular structures in the nucleus, expanding the nucleoplasmic reticulum. Taken together, our results demonstrate new possibilities to study the role of specific proteins in substructures of adherent cells, especially of the nucleus in toto, accessible to electron microscopy in thinned samples only. PMID:22210307

  17. Correlative VIS-fluorescence and soft X-ray cryo-microscopy/tomography of adherent cells

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Christoph; Guttmann, Peter; Klupp, Barbara; Werner, Stephan; Rehbein, Stefan; Mettenleiter, Thomas C.; Schneider, Gerd; Grünewald, Kay

    2012-01-01

    Soft X-ray cryo-microscopy/tomography of vitreous samples is becoming a valuable tool in structural cell biology. Within the ‘water-window’ wavelength region (2.34–4.37 nm), it provides absorption contrast images with high signal to noise ratio and resolution of a few tens of nanometer. Soft X-rays with wavelengths close to the K-absorption edge of oxygen penetrate biological samples with thicknesses in the micrometer range. Here, we report on the application of a recently established extension of the transmission soft X-ray cryo-microscope (HZB TXM) at the beamline U41-XM of the BESSY II electron storage ring by an in-column epi-fluorescence and reflected light cryo-microscope. We demonstrate the new capability for correlative fluorescence and soft X-ray cryo-microscopy/tomography of this instrument along a typical life science experimental approach – the correlation of a fluorophore-tagged protein (pUL34-GFP of pseudorabies virus, PrV, the nuclear membrane-anchored component of the nuclear egress complex of the Herpesviridae which interacts with viral pUL31) in PrV pUL34-GFP/pUL31 coexpressing mammalian cells, with virus-induced vesicular structures in the nucleus, expanding the nucleoplasmic reticulum. Taken together, our results demonstrate new possibilities to study the role of specific proteins in substructures of adherent cells, especially of the nucleus in toto, accessible to electron microscopy in thinned samples only. PMID:22210307

  18. Plasmids in Yersinia enterocolitica serotypes O:3 and O:9: correlation with epithelial cell adherence in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Vesikari, T; Nurmi, T; Mäki, M; Skurnik, M; Sundqvist, C; Granfors, K; Grönroos, P

    1981-01-01

    Human isolates of Yersinia enterocolitica serotypes O:3 (biotype 4) and O:9 (biotype 3) harbored plasmids sized approximately 47 and 44 megadaltons, respectively. No such plasmids were found in "apathogenic" strains of Y. enterocolitica belonging to biotype 1. There was a positive correlation among the presence of plasmid, autoagglutination, and adherence to and toxicity for HEp-2 cell cultures; all of these properties were lost by culturing at 37 degrees C in the absence of calcium. Strains of Y. enterocolitica O:3 and O:9 cured of the plasmids showed increased invasiveness in the HEp-2 cell culture model, but no invasiveness in guinea pig eye. It is suggested that the plasmids of Y. enterocolitica primarily determine epithelial cell adherence, but may also be associated with other pathogenic properties. Images PMID:7287174

  19. Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) assay

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Embryonic Stem Cell Test (EST) is an assay which evaluates xenobiotic-induced effects using three endpoints: mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) differentiation, mESC viability, and 3T3-cell viability. Our research goal was to develop an improved high-throughput assay by establi...

  20. Salivary Gland Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Adams, April; Warner, Kristy; Nör, Jacques E.

    2013-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests the existence of a tumorigenic population of cancer cells that demonstrate stem cell-like properties such as self-renewal and multipotency. These cells, termed cancer stem cells (CSC), are able to both initiate and maintain tumor formation and progression. Studies have shown that CSC are resistant to traditional chemotherapy treatments preventing complete eradication of the tumor cell population. Following treatment, CSC are able to re-initiate tumor growth leading to patient relapse. Salivary gland cancers are relatively rare but constitute a highly significant public health issue due to the lack of effective treatments. In particular, patients with mucoepidermoid carcinoma or adenoid cystic carcinoma, the two most common salivary malignancies, have low long-term survival rates due to the lack of response to current therapies. Considering the role of CSC in resistance to therapy in other tumor types, it is possible that this unique sub-population of cells is involved in resistance of salivary gland tumors to treatment. Characterization of CSC can lead to better understanding of the pathobiology of salivary gland malignancies as well as to the development of more effective therapies. Here, we make a brief overview of the state-of-the-science in salivary gland cancer, and discuss possible implications of the cancer stem cell hypothesis to the treatment of salivary gland malignancies. PMID:23810400

  1. Non-small cell lung cancer cells survived ionizing radiation treatment display cancer stem cell and epithelial-mesenchymal transition phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is used for patients diagnosed with unresectable non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), however radiotherapy remains largely palliative due to radioresistance. Cancer stem cells (CSCs), as well as epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), may contribute to drug and radiation resistance mechanisms in solid tumors. Here we investigated the molecular phenotype of A549 and H460 NSCLC cells that survived treatment with IR (5Gy) and are growing as floating tumor spheres and cells that are maintained in a monolayer after irradiation. Non-irradiated and irradiated cells were collected after one week, seeded onto ultra low attachment plates and propagated as tumor spheres. Bulk NSCLC cells which survived radiation and grew in spheres express cancer stem cell surface and embryonic stem cell markers and are able to self-renew, and generate differentiated progeny. These cells also have a mesenchymal phenotype. Particularly, the radiation survived sphere cells express significantly higher levels of CSC markers (CD24 and CD44), nuclear β-catenin and EMT markers (Snail1, Vimentin, and N-cadherin) than non-irradiated lung tumor sphere cells. Upregulated levels of Oct-4, Sox2 and beta-catenin were detected in H460 cells maintained in a monolayer after irradiation, but not in radiation survived adherent A459 cells. PDGFR-beta was upregulated in radiation survived sphere cells and in radiation survived adherent cells in both A549 and H460 cell lines. Combining IR treatment with axitinib or dasatinib, inhibitors with anti-PDFGR activity, potentiates the efficacy of NSCLC radiotherapy in vitro. Our findings suggest that radiation survived cells have a complex phenotype combining the properties of CSCs and EMT. CD44, SNAIL and PDGFR-beta are dramatically upregulated in radiation survived cells and might be considered as markers of radiotherapy response in NSCLC. PMID:23947765

  2. Non-small cell lung cancer cells survived ionizing radiation treatment display cancer stem cell and epithelial-mesenchymal transition phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Casal, Roberto; Bhattacharya, Chitralekha; Ganesh, Nandita; Bailey, Lisa; Basse, Per; Gibson, Michael; Epperly, Michael; Levina, Vera

    2013-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is used for patients diagnosed with unresectable non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), however radiotherapy remains largely palliative due to radioresistance. Cancer stem cells (CSCs), as well as epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), may contribute to drug and radiation resistance mechanisms in solid tumors. Here we investigated the molecular phenotype of A549 and H460 NSCLC cells that survived treatment with IR (5Gy) and are growing as floating tumor spheres and cells that are maintained in a monolayer after irradiation.Non-irradiated and irradiated cells were collected after one week, seeded onto ultra low attachment plates and propagated as tumor spheres. Bulk NSCLC cells which survived radiation and grew in spheres express cancer stem cell surface and embryonic stem cell markers and are able to self-renew, and generate differentiated progeny. These cells also have a mesenchymal phenotype. Particularly, the radiation survived sphere cells express significantly higher levels of CSC markers (CD24 and CD44), nuclear β-catenin and EMT markers (Snail1, Vimentin, and N-cadherin) than non-irradiated lung tumor sphere cells. Upregulated levels of Oct-4, Sox2 and beta-catenin were detected in H460 cells maintained in a monolayer after irradiation, but not in radiation survived adherent A459 cells.PDGFR-beta was upregulated in radiation survived sphere cells and in radiation survived adherent cells in both A549 and H460 cell lines. Combining IR treatment with axitinib or dasatinib, inhibitors with anti-PDFGR activity, potentiates the efficacy of NSCLC radiotherapy in vitro.Our findings suggest that radiation survived cells have a complex phenotype combining the properties of CSCs and EMT. CD44, SNAIL and PDGFR-beta are dramatically upregulated in radiation survived cells and might be considered as markers of radiotherapy response in NSCLC. PMID:23947765

  3. An adherent cell perifusion technique to study the overall and sequential response of rat alveolar macrophages to toxic substances.

    PubMed Central

    Forget, G; Lacroix, M J; Cadieux, A; Calvert, R; Grose, J H; Sirois, P

    1983-01-01

    Essentially pure (97%) alveolar macrophages were isolated by bronchoalveolar lavage of rats with warm (37 degrees C) PBS solution. These cells were allowed to adhere to the inside walls of open-ended glass cylinders which were closed off at each end by three-way stopcocks. The adhering cells were perifused with RPMI-1640 medium supplemented with 5% fetal bovine serum for 18 hr at the rate of 1 mL/hr, and the effluent medium was collected automatically in 2-mL aliquots. Cell recoveries and viabilities did not differ from those found for Petri cultures treated similarly, indicating that the perifusion method under study offered an adequate milieu for short-term primary cultures. The alveolar macrophages in culture were subjected to the presence of particulate (chrysotile asbestos) and soluble (phorbol myristate) toxicants, and their response was monitored in the effluent medium by measuring the release of prostaglandins (PGE) by radioimmunoassay. A significant increase in the sequential release of PGE was observed in the presence of asbestos (100 micrograms/mL) or phorbol myristate (200 ng/mL). Treatment of the cells with indomethacin (20 microM) completely abolished the release of PGE stimulated with phorbol myristate. A cumulative response to the toxicants was also observed when cells were harvested manually from the chambers: asbestos caused a 2-fold increase in cell mortality relative to control, while phorbol myristate brought about a 3-fold increase in the number of dead cells. This effect was not prevented by the presence of indomethacin. Cell aggregation was also observed when cells were perifused in the presence of phorbol myristate, whether indomethacin was present or absent. Our results indicate that the cell perifusion system combines the advantages of conventional adherent cell cultures (viability, aggregation) with those of perifusion techniques (sequential metabolism studies). Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 6. PMID:6641651

  4. Cloning of a genetic determinant from Clostridium difficile involved in adherence to tissue culture cells and mucus.

    PubMed Central

    Karjalainen, T; Barc, M C; Collignon, A; Trollé, S; Boureau, H; Cotte-Laffitte, J; Bourlioux, P

    1994-01-01

    Our laboratory has previously shown that Clostridium difficile adherence to Caco-2 cells is greatly enhanced after heat shock at 60 degrees C and that it is mediated by a proteinaceous surface component. The experiments described here show that C. difficile could adhere to several types of tissue culture cells (Vero, HeLa, and KB) after heat shock. The type of culture medium (liquid or solid, with or without blood) had little effect on adhesion. To clone the adhesin gene, polyclonal antibodies against C. difficile heated at 60 degrees C were used to screen a genomic library of C. difficile constructed in lambda ZapII. Ten positive clones were identified in the library, one of which (pCL6) agglutinated several types of erythrocytes in the presence of mannose. In Western blots (immunoblots), this clone expressed in Escherichia coli a 40- and a 27-kDa protein; a 27-kDa protein has been previously identified in the surface extracts of heat-shocked C. difficile as a possible adhesin. The clone adhered to Vero, Caco-2, KB, and HeLa cells; the adherence was blocked by anti-C. difficile antibodies, by a surface extract of C. difficile, and by mucus isolated from axenic mice. Furthermore, the clone could attach ex vivo to intestinal mucus isolated from axenic mice. Preliminary studies on the receptor moieties implicated in C. difficile adhesion revealed that glucose and galactose could partially block adhesion to tissue culture cells, as did di- or trisaccharides containing these sugars, suggesting that the adhesin is a lectin. In addition, N-acetylgalactosamine, a component of mucus, and gelatin partially impeded cell attachment. Images PMID:7927694

  5. Basal cell skin cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur on skin that is regularly exposed to sunlight or other ultraviolet radiation. This type of skin ... skin cancer is to reduce your exposure to sunlight . Always use sunscreen: Apply sunscreen with sun protection ...

  6. Squamous cell skin cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur on skin that is regularly exposed to sunlight or other ultraviolet radiation. The earliest form of ... skin cancer is to reduce your exposure to sunlight . Always use sunscreen: Apply sunscreen with sun protection ...

  7. The adherence of endothelial cells to Dacron induces the expression of the intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1).

    PubMed Central

    Margiotta, M S; Robertson, F S; Greco, R S

    1992-01-01

    The intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1) is a glycoprotein expressed by endothelial cells activated by cytokines. The lymphocyte-function-associated antigen (LFA-1) is an integrin expressed by activated white blood cells. Together, this receptor-ligand pair is responsible, in part, for the localization of neutrophils at sites of inflammation. Using an in vitro model, the authors studied the binding of antibodies against ICAM-1 by human saphenous vein endothelial cells (HSVEC) adherent to Dacron and control cultureware. After adherence to Dacron pretreated with fibronectin, 24% more HSVEC-bound antibody against ICAM-1 compared with HSVEC on controls. In contrast, 90% more HSVEC adherent to Dacron incubated with whole blood bound anti-ICAM-1 antibodies. These cells bound 17.7-fold greater amounts of antibody compared with HSVEC on controls. Pretreating Dacron with plasma resulted in no increase in antibody binding compared with control. Our studies suggest that the cellular components of blood in contact with Dacron create a microenvironment that activates HSVEC and enhances ICAM-1 expression. Induction of this adhesion molecule may play a pivotal role in the migration and localization of leukocytes at the site of the vascular prosthesis. PMID:1359845

  8. Schwann cells induce cancer cell dispersion and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Deborde, Sylvie; Lyubchik, Anna; Zhou, Yi; He, Shizhi; McNamara, William F.; Chernichenko, Natalya; Lee, Sei-Young; Barajas, Fernando; Chen, Chun-Hao; Bakst, Richard L.; Vakiani, Efsevia; He, Shuangba; Hall, Alan; Wong, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Nerves enable cancer progression, as cancers have been shown to extend along nerves through the process of perineural invasion, which carries a poor prognosis. Furthermore, the innervation of some cancers promotes growth and metastases. It remains unclear, however, how nerves mechanistically contribute to cancer progression. Here, we demonstrated that Schwann cells promote cancer invasion through direct cancer cell contact. Histological evaluation of murine and human cancer specimens with perineural invasion uncovered a subpopulation of Schwann cells that associates with cancer cells. Coculture of cancer cells with dorsal root ganglion extracts revealed that Schwann cells direct cancer cells to migrate toward nerves and promote invasion in a contact-dependent manner. Upon contact, Schwann cells induced the formation of cancer cell protrusions in their direction and intercalated between the cancer cells, leading to cancer cell dispersion. The formation of these processes was dependent on Schwann cell expression of neural cell adhesion molecule 1 (NCAM1) and ultimately promoted perineural invasion. Moreover, NCAM1-deficient mice showed decreased neural invasion and less paralysis. Such Schwann cell behavior reflects normal Schwann cell programs that are typically activated in nerve repair but are instead exploited by cancer cells to promote perineural invasion and cancer progression. PMID:26999607

  9. Innate Lymphoid Cells in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Vallentin, Blandine; Barlogis, Vincent; Piperoglou, Christelle; Cypowyj, Sophie; Zucchini, Nicolas; Chéné, Matthieu; Navarro, Florent; Farnarier, Catherine; Vivier, Eric; Vély, Frédéric

    2015-10-01

    The world of lymphocytes has recently expanded. A group of cells, innate lymphoid cells (ILC), has been defined. It includes lymphoid cells that have been known for decades, such as natural killer (NK) cells and lymphoid tissue-inducer (LTi) cells. NK cells recognize a vast array of tumor cells, which they help to eliminate through cytotoxicity and the production of cytokines, such as IFNγ. Advances in our understanding of NK-cell biology have led to a growing interest in the clinical manipulation of these cells in cancer. The other ILCs are found mostly in the mucosae and mucosal-associated lymphoid tissues, where they rapidly initiate immune responses to pathogens without the need for specific sensitization. Here, we outline the basic features of ILCs and review the role of ILCs other than NK cells in cancer. Much of the role of these ILCs in cancer remains unknown, but several findings should lead to further efforts to dissect the contribution of different ILC subsets to the promotion, maintenance, or elimination of tumors at various anatomic sites. This will require the development of standardized reagents and protocols for monitoring the presence and function of ILCs in human blood and tissue samples. PMID:26438443

  10. Cancer stem cell signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Matsui, William H

    2016-09-01

    Tissue development and homeostasis are governed by the actions of stem cells. Multipotent cells are capable of self-renewal during the course of one's lifetime. The accurate and appropriate regulation of stem cell functions is absolutely critical for normal biological activity. Several key developmental or signaling pathways have been shown to play essential roles in this regulatory capacity. Specifically, the Janus-activated kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription, Hedgehog, Wnt, Notch, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/phosphatase and tensin homolog, and nuclear factor-κB signaling pathways have all been shown experimentally to mediate various stem cell properties, such as self-renewal, cell fate decisions, survival, proliferation, and differentiation. Unsurprisingly, many of these crucial signaling pathways are dysregulated in cancer. Growing evidence suggests that overactive or abnormal signaling within and among these pathways may contribute to the survival of cancer stem cells (CSCs). CSCs are a relatively rare population of cancer cells capable of self-renewal, differentiation, and generation of serially transplantable heterogeneous tumors of several types of cancer. PMID:27611937

  11. Characterization of Three-Dimensional Retinal Tissue Derived from Human Embryonic Stem Cells in Adherent Monolayer Cultures.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ratnesh K; Mallela, Ramya K; Cornuet, Pamela K; Reifler, Aaron N; Chervenak, Andrew P; West, Michael D; Wong, Kwoon Y; Nasonkin, Igor O

    2015-12-01

    Stem cell-based therapy of retinal degenerative conditions is a promising modality to treat blindness, but requires new strategies to improve the number of functionally integrating cells. Grafting semidifferentiated retinal tissue rather than progenitors allows preservation of tissue structure and connectivity in retinal grafts, mandatory for vision restoration. Using human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), we derived retinal tissue growing in adherent conditions consisting of conjoined neural retina and retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and evaluated cell fate determination and maturation in this tissue. We found that deriving such tissue in adherent conditions robustly induces all eye field genes (RX, PAX6, LHX2, SIX3, SIX6) and produces four layers of pure populations of retinal cells: RPE (expressing NHERF1, EZRIN, RPE65, DCT, TYR, TYRP, MITF, PMEL), early photoreceptors (PRs) (coexpressing CRX and RCVRN), inner nuclear layer neurons (expressing CALB2), and retinal ganglion cells [RGCs, expressing BRN3B and Neurofilament (NF) 200]. Furthermore, we found that retinal progenitors divide at the apical side of the hESC-derived retinal tissue (next to the RPE layer) and then migrate toward the basal side, similar to that found during embryonic retinogenesis. We detected synaptogenesis in hESC-derived retinal tissue, and found neurons containing many synaptophysin-positive boutons within the RGC and PR layers. We also observed long NF200-positive axons projected by RGCs toward the apical side. Whole-cell recordings demonstrated that putative amacrine and/or ganglion cells exhibited electrophysiological responses reminiscent of those in normal retinal neurons. These responses included voltage-gated Na(+) and K(+) currents, depolarization-induced spiking, and responses to neurotransmitter receptor agonists. Differentiation in adherent conditions allows generation of long and flexible pieces of 3D retinal tissue suitable for isolating transplantable slices of tissue

  12. Isolation of a protein-containing cell surface component from Streptococcus sanguis which affects its adherence to saliva-coated hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed Central

    Liljemark, W F; Bloomquist, C G

    1981-01-01

    The isolation and partial characterization of a protein-containing cell surface component from Streptococcus sanguis which blocks the adherence of this microbe to saliva-coated hydroxyapatite are described. Several methods of extraction were attempted. Sonication of whole cells and cell walls proved to be the most successful and yielded biologically active adherence-blocking components. The adherence-blocking ability of these components was effective in intraspecies blocking experiments. The extract obtained from cell walls of S. sanguis was examined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and shown to contain one major and two to three minor bands when stained with Coomassie blue. The molecular weight of the major band was estimated to be 70,000 to 90,000. Gel filtration of the sonified cell wall extract on 10% agarose yielded two active adherence-blocking peaks, the void volume and a second peak. Images PMID:6273317

  13. Association between adherence to an antimicrobial stewardship program and mortality among hospitalised cancer patients with febrile neutropaenia: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Initial management of chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropaenia (FN) comprises empirical therapy with a broad-spectrum antimicrobial. Currently, there is sufficient evidence to indicate which antibiotic regimen should be administered initially. However, no randomized trial has evaluated whether adherence to an antimicrobial stewardship program (ASP) results in lower rates of mortality in this setting. The present study sought to assess the association between adherence to an ASP and mortality among hospitalised cancer patients with FN. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study in a single tertiary hospital from October 2009 to August 2011. All adult patients who were admitted to the haematology ward with cancer and FN were followed up for 28 days. ASP adherence to the initial antimicrobial prescription was determined. The mortality rates of patients who were treated with antibiotics according to the ASP protocol were compared with those of patients treated with other antibiotic regimens. The multivariate Cox proportional hazards model and propensity score were used to estimate 28-day mortality risk. Results A total of 307 FN episodes in 169 subjects were evaluated. The rate of adherence to the ASP was 53%. In a Cox regression analysis, adjusted for propensity scores and other potential confounding factors, ASP adherence was independently associated with lower mortality (hazard ratio, 0.36; 95% confidence interval, 0.14–0.92). Conclusions Antimicrobial selection is important for the initial management of patients with FN, and adherence to the ASP, which calls for the rational use of antibiotics, was associated with lower mortality rates in this setting. PMID:24884397

  14. Rethinking adherence.

    PubMed

    Steiner, John F

    2012-10-16

    In 2012, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) will introduce measures of adherence to oral hypoglycemic, antihypertensive, and cholesterol-lowering drugs into its Medicare Advantage quality program. To meet these quality goals, delivery systems will need to develop and disseminate strategies to improve adherence. The design of adherence interventions has too often been guided by the mistaken assumptions that adherence is a single behavior that can be predicted from readily available patient characteristics and that individual clinicians alone can improve adherence at the population level.Effective interventions require recognition that adherence is a set of interacting behaviors influenced by individual, social, and environmental forces; adherence interventions must be broadly based, rather than targeted to specific population subgroups; and counseling with a trusted clinician needs to be complemented by outreach interventions and removal of structural and organizational barriers. To achieve the adherence goals set by CMS, front-line clinicians, interdisciplinary teams, organizational leaders, and policymakers will need to coordinate efforts in ways that exemplify the underlying principles of health care reform. PMID:23070491

  15. Escherichia coli isolated from a Crohn's disease patient adheres, invades, and induces inflammatory responses in polarized intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Eaves-Pyles, Tonyia; Allen, Christopher A; Taormina, Joanna; Swidsinski, Alexander; Tutt, Christopher B; Jezek, G Eric; Islas-Islas, Martha; Torres, Alfredo G

    2008-07-01

    Inflammatory diseases of the intestinal tract are a major health concern both in the United States and around the world. Evidence now suggests that a new category of Escherichia coli, designated Adherent Invasive E. coli (AIEC) is highly prevalent in Crohn's Disease (CD) patients. AIEC strains have been shown to colonize and adhere to intestinal epithelial cells (IEC). However, the role AIEC strains play in the induction of an inflammatory response is not known. Therefore, we examined several E. coli strains (designated LF82, O83:H1, 6604 and 6655) that were isolated from CD patients for their ability to induce inflammation in two IEC, Caco-2BBe and T-84 cells. Results showed that each strain had varying abilities to adhere to and invade IEC as well as induced cytokine secretion from polarized IEC. However, E. coli O83:H1 displayed the best characteristics of AIEC strains as compared to the prototype AIEC strain LF82, inducing cytokine secretion from IEC and promoting immune cell migration through IEC. Upon further analysis, E. coli O83:H1 did not harbor virulence genes present in known pathogenic intestinal organisms. Further characterization of E. coli O83:H1 virulence determinants showed that a non-flagellated O83:H1 strain significantly decreased the organism's ability to adhere to and invade both IEC and elicit IEC cytokine secretion compared to the wild type and complemented strains. These findings demonstrate that E. coli O83:H1 possesses the characteristics of the AIEC LF82 strain that may contribute to the low-grade, chronic inflammation observed in Crohn's disease. PMID:17900983

  16. Nanomechanical analysis of cells from cancer patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Sarah E.; Jin, Yu-Sheng; Rao, Jianyu; Gimzewski, James K.

    2007-12-01

    Change in cell stiffness is a new characteristic of cancer cells that affects the way they spread. Despite several studies on architectural changes in cultured cell lines, no ex vivo mechanical analyses of cancer cells obtained from patients have been reported. Using atomic force microscopy, we report the stiffness of live metastatic cancer cells taken from the body (pleural) fluids of patients with suspected lung, breast and pancreas cancer. Within the same sample, we find that the cell stiffness of metastatic cancer cells is more than 70% softer, with a standard deviation over five times narrower, than the benign cells that line the body cavity. Different cancer types were found to display a common stiffness. Our work shows that mechanical analysis can distinguish cancerous cells from normal ones even when they show similar shapes. These results show that nanomechanical analysis correlates well with immunohistochemical testing currently used for detecting cancer.

  17. Hydrodynamic Determinants of Cell Necrosis and Molecular Delivery Produced by Pulsed Laser Microbeam Irradiation of Adherent Cells

    PubMed Central

    Compton, Jonathan L.; Hellman, Amy N.; Venugopalan, Vasan

    2013-01-01

    Time-resolved imaging, fluorescence microscopy, and hydrodynamic modeling were used to examine cell lysis and molecular delivery produced by picosecond and nanosecond pulsed laser microbeam irradiation in adherent cell cultures. Pulsed laser microbeam radiation at λ = 532 nm was delivered to confluent monolayers of PtK2 cells via a 40×, 0.8 NA microscope objective. Using laser microbeam pulse durations of 180–1100 ps and pulse energies of 0.5–10.5 μJ, we examined the resulting plasma formation and cavitation bubble dynamics that lead to laser-induced cell lysis, necrosis, and molecular delivery. The cavitation bubble dynamics are imaged at times of 0.5 ns to 50 μs after the pulsed laser microbeam irradiation, and fluorescence assays assess the resulting cell viability and molecular delivery of 3 kDa dextran molecules. Reductions in both the threshold laser microbeam pulse energy for plasma formation and the cavitation bubble energy are observed with decreasing pulse duration. These energy reductions provide for increased precision of laser-based cellular manipulation including cell lysis, cell necrosis, and molecular delivery. Hydrodynamic analysis reveals critical values for the shear-stress impulse generated by the cavitation bubble dynamics governs the location and spatial extent of cell necrosis and molecular delivery independent of pulse duration and pulse energy. Specifically, cellular exposure to a shear-stress impulse J≳0.1 Pa s ensures cell lysis or necrosis, whereas exposures in the range of 0.035≲J≲0.1 Pa s preserve cell viability while also enabling molecular delivery of 3 kDa dextran. Exposure to shear-stress impulses of J≲0.035 Pa s leaves the cells unaffected. Hydrodynamic analysis of these data, combined with data from studies of 6 ns microbeam irradiation, demonstrates the primacy of shear-stress impulse in determining cellular outcome resulting from pulsed laser microbeam irradiation spanning a nearly two

  18. Hydrodynamic determinants of cell necrosis and molecular delivery produced by pulsed laser microbeam irradiation of adherent cells.

    PubMed

    Compton, Jonathan L; Hellman, Amy N; Venugopalan, Vasan

    2013-11-01

    Time-resolved imaging, fluorescence microscopy, and hydrodynamic modeling were used to examine cell lysis and molecular delivery produced by picosecond and nanosecond pulsed laser microbeam irradiation in adherent cell cultures. Pulsed laser microbeam radiation at λ = 532 nm was delivered to confluent monolayers of PtK2 cells via a 40×, 0.8 NA microscope objective. Using laser microbeam pulse durations of 180-1100 ps and pulse energies of 0.5-10.5 μJ, we examined the resulting plasma formation and cavitation bubble dynamics that lead to laser-induced cell lysis, necrosis, and molecular delivery. The cavitation bubble dynamics are imaged at times of 0.5 ns to 50 μs after the pulsed laser microbeam irradiation, and fluorescence assays assess the resulting cell viability and molecular delivery of 3 kDa dextran molecules. Reductions in both the threshold laser microbeam pulse energy for plasma formation and the cavitation bubble energy are observed with decreasing pulse duration. These energy reductions provide for increased precision of laser-based cellular manipulation including cell lysis, cell necrosis, and molecular delivery. Hydrodynamic analysis reveals critical values for the shear-stress impulse generated by the cavitation bubble dynamics governs the location and spatial extent of cell necrosis and molecular delivery independent of pulse duration and pulse energy. Specifically, cellular exposure to a shear-stress impulse J≳0.1 Pa s ensures cell lysis or necrosis, whereas exposures in the range of 0.035≲J≲0.1 Pa s preserve cell viability while also enabling molecular delivery of 3 kDa dextran. Exposure to shear-stress impulses of J≲0.035 Pa s leaves the cells unaffected. Hydrodynamic analysis of these data, combined with data from studies of 6 ns microbeam irradiation, demonstrates the primacy of shear-stress impulse in determining cellular outcome resulting from pulsed laser microbeam irradiation spanning a nearly two-orders-of-magnitude range of

  19. Stationary nanoliter droplet array with a substrate of choice for single adherent/nonadherent cell incubation and analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shemesh, Jonathan; Ben Arye, Tom; Avesar, Jonathan; Kang, Joo H.; Fine, Amir; Super, Michael; Meller, Amit; Ingber, Donald E.; Levenberg, Shulamit

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic water-in-oil droplets that serve as separate, chemically isolated compartments can be applied for single-cell analysis; however, to investigate encapsulated cells effectively over prolonged time periods, an array of droplets must remain stationary on a versatile substrate for optimal cell compatibility. We present here a platform of unique geometry and substrate versatility that generates a stationary nanodroplet array by using wells branching off a main microfluidic channel. These droplets are confined by multiple sides of a nanowell and are in direct contact with a biocompatible substrate of choice. The device is operated by a unique and reversed loading procedure that eliminates the need for fine pressure control or external tubing. Fluorocarbon oil isolates the droplets and provides soluble oxygen for the cells. By using this approach, the metabolic activity of single adherent cells was monitored continuously over time, and the concentration of viable pathogens in blood-derived samples was determined directly by measuring the number of colony-formed droplets. The method is simple to operate, requires a few microliters of reagent volume, is portable, is reusable, and allows for cell retrieval. This technology may be particularly useful for multiplexed assays for which prolonged and simultaneous visual inspection of many isolated single adherent or nonadherent cells is required. PMID:25053808

  20. Method of making a membrane having hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces for adhering cells or antibodies by using atomic oxygen or hydroxyl radicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steven L. (Inventor); Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A portion of an organic polymer article such as a membrane is made hydrophilic by exposing a hydrophobic surface of the article to a depth of about 50 to about 5000 angstroms to atomic oxygen or hydroxyl radicals at a temperature below 100C., preferably below 40 C, to form a hydrophilic uniform surface layer of hydrophilic hydroxyl groups. The atomic oxygen and hydroxyl radicals are generated by a flowing afterglow microwave discharge, and the surface is outside of a plasma produced by the discharge. A membrane having both hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces can be used in an immunoassay by adhering antibodies to the hydrophobic surface. In another embodiment, the membrane is used in cell culturing where cells adhere to the hydrophilic surface. Prior to adhering cells, the hydrophilic surface may be grafted with a compatibilizing compound. A plurality of hydrophilic regions bounded by adjacent hydrophobic regions can be produced such that a maximum of one cell per each hydrophilic region adheres.

  1. Genome Wide assessment of Early Osseointegration in Implant-Adherent Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalji, Ghadeer N.

    Objectives: To determine the molecular processes involved in osseointegration. Materials and methods: A structured literature review concerning in vitro and in vivo molecular assessment of osseointegration was performed. A rat and a human model were then used to identify the early molecular processes involved in osseointegration associated with a micro roughened and nanosurface superimposed featured implants. In the rat model, 32 titanium implants with surface topographies exhibiting a micro roughened (AT-II) and nanosurface superimposed featured implants (AT-I) were placed in the tibiae of 8 rats and subsequently harvested at 2 and 4 days after placement. Whereas in the human model, four titanium mini-implants with either a moderately roughened surface (TiOblast) or super-imposed nanoscale topography (Osseospeed) were placed in edentulous sites of eleven systemically healthy subjects and subsequently removed after 3 and 7 days. Total RNA was isolated from cells adherent to retrieved implants. A whole genome microarray using the Affymetrix 1.1 ST Array platform was used to describe the gene expression profiles that were differentially regulated by the implant surfaces. Results: The literature review provided evidence that particular topographic cues can be specifically integrated among the many extracellular signals received by the cell in its signal transduction network. In the rat model, functionally relevant categories related to ossification, skeletal system development, osteoblast differentiation, bone development and biomineral tissue development were upregulated and more prominent at AT-I compared to AT-II. In the human model, there were no significant differences when comparing the two-implant surfaces at each time point. However, the microarray identified several genes that were differentially regulated at day 7 vs. day 3 for both implant surfaces. Functionally relevant categories related to the extracellular matrix, collagen fibril organization and

  2. Association between the Adherence to the International Guidelines for Cancer Prevention and Mammographic Density

    PubMed Central

    Castelló, Adela; Prieto, Leandro; Ederra, María; Salas-Trejo, Dolores; Vidal, Carmen; Sánchez-Contador, Carmen; Santamariña, Carmen; Pedraz, Carmen; Moreo, Pilar; Aragonés, Nuria; Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz; Lope, Virginia; Vioque, Jesús; Pollán, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Mammographic density (MD) is considered a strong predictor of Breast Cancer (BC). The objective of the present study is to explore the association between MD and the compliance with the World Cancer Research Fund and the American Institute for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) recommendations for cancer prevention. Methods Data of 3584 women attending screening from a population-based multicenter cross-sectional study (DDM-Spain) collected from October 7, 2007 through July 14, 2008, was used to calculate a score that measures the level of compliance with the WCRF/AICR recommendations: R1)Maintain adequate body weight; R2)Be physically active; 3R)Limit the intake of high density foods; R4)Eat mostly plant foods; R5)Limit the intake of animal foods; R6)Limit alcohol intake; R7)Limit salt and salt preserved food intake; R8)Meet nutritional needs through diet. The association between the score and MD (assessed by a single radiologist using a semi-quantitative scale) was evaluated using ordinal logistic models with random center-specific intercepts adjusted for the main determinants of MD. Stratified analyses by menopausal status and smoking status were also carried out. Results A higher compliance with the WCRF/AICR recommendations was associated with lower MD (OR1-unit increase = 0.93 95%CI:0.86;0.99). The association was stronger in postmenopausal women (OR = 0.91 95%CI:0.84;0.99) and nonsmokers (OR = 0.87;95%CI:0.80;0.96 for nonsmokers, OR = 1.01 95%CI:0.91;1.12 for smokers, P-interaction = 0.042). Among nonsmokers, maintaining adequate body weight (OR = 0.81 95%CI:0.65;1.01), practicing physical activity (OR = 0.68 95%CI:0.48;0.96) and moderating the intake of high-density foods (OR = 0.58 95%CI:0.40;0.86) and alcoholic beverages (OR = 0.76 95%CI:0.55;1.05) were the recommendations showing the strongest associations with MD. Conclusions postmenopausal women and non-smokers with greater compliance with the WCRF/AICR guidelines have lower MD. These results may

  3. Mechanism of Adherence of Streptococcus mutans to Smooth Surfaces I. Roles of Insoluble Dextran-Levan Synthetase Enzymes and Cell Wall Polysaccharide Antigen in Plaque Formation

    PubMed Central

    Mukasa, Hidehiko; Slade, Hutton D.

    1973-01-01

    The mechanism of adherence of Streptococcus mutans to smooth glass surfaces has been studied. The results with both viable and heat-killed cells showed that the process required (i) the synthesis of a water-insoluble dextran-levan polymer by cell-bound enzymes and (ii) the participation of a binding site on the surface of the S. mutans cell. Synthesis of the polymer from sucrose in the presence of the cells was required for adherence, and indicates that an “active” form of the polymer was required. Polymer synthesized by cell-free S. mutans enzymes when added to S. mutans cells did not produce adherence. Purified antibody globulin, specific for the a-d site in the polysaccharide S. mutans group a antigen, completely inhibited adherence. Antibody to the second antigen present in the polysaccharide molecule, the a antigen, did not inhibit adherence. The evidence indicates that adherence did not require an antigenic binding site which might be common to all S. mutans strains. The orientation of the synthetase enzyme(s), antigenic binding site, and dextran-levan polymer on the cell surface is under study. Images PMID:4582634

  4. General Information about Small Cell Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  5. General Information about Renal Cell Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Renal Cell Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Renal Cell Cancer Go to Health Professional ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  6. Role of flagella in adherence, internalization, and translocation of Campylobacter jejuni in nonpolarized and polarized epithelial cell cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Grant, C C; Konkel, M E; Cieplak, W; Tompkins, L S

    1993-01-01

    Previous studies of Campylobacter jejuni have suggested that flagellin is an adhesin for epithelial cells and that motility is a virulence factor of this bacterium. The role of flagella in the interactions of C. jejuni with nonpolarized and polarized epithelial cells was examined with flagellar mutants. Flagellated, nonmotile (flaA flaB+ Mot-) and nonflagellated, nonmotile (flaA flaB Mot-) mutants of C. jejuni were constructed by in vivo homologous recombination and gene replacement techniques. Both classes of mutants were found to adhere to cells of human epithelial origin (INT 407) equally well; however, on the basis of the percentage of the inoculum internalized, internalization of the flaA flaB Mot- mutants was decreased by factors ranging from approximately 30 to 40 compared with the parent. The flaA flaB+ Mot- mutant was internalized by the INT 407 cells at levels six- to sevenfold higher than the flaA flaB Mot- mutants. Both classes of mutants, unlike the parent, were unable to translocate across polarized Caco-2 monolayers. These results indicate that flagella are not involved in C. jejuni adherence to epithelial cells but that they do play a role in internalization. Furthermore, the results suggest that either the motility of C. jejuni or the product of flaA is essential for the bacterium to cross polarized epithelial cell monolayers. Images PMID:8478066

  7. A Clark-type oxygen chip for in situ estimation of the respiratory activity of adhering cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ching-Chou; Luk, Hsiang-Ning; Lin, Yen-Ting Tsai; Yuan, Chia-Yin

    2010-04-15

    A Clark-type oxygen chip consisting of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) reservoir containing an amino group-modified PDMS oxygen-permeable membrane (OPM) and a glass substrate containing a three-electrode detector has been constructed by using microfabrication techniques, and it is utilized for in situ measurement of the respiration activity of adhering cells. Use of the alginate sol electrolyte and the electroplating Ag/AgCl pseudo-reference electrode can effectively diminish the crosstalk between the electrochemical electrodes and supply a stable potential for the detection of dissolved oxygen, respectively. The Clark-type oxygen chips possess only 1.00% residual current, response time of 13.4s and good linearity with a correlation coefficient of 0.9933. The modification of amino groups for the OPM obviously facilitates the adhesion of HeLa cells onto the PDMS OPM surface and allows the cells to spread after 2h of incubation. The oxygen consumption of the cells in the cell-adhesion process increases with the adhesion time, and the increment of cellular oxygen consumption per minute reaches a maximum after 30 min of incubation. Moreover, the change in the respiration activity of adhering HeLa cells stimulated by the high concentration of glucose or propofol anaesthetic can be monitored in real time with the Clark-type oxygen chip. PMID:20188913

  8. Invasive cancer cells and metastasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2013-12-01

    The physics of cancer is a relatively new emerging field of cancer research. In the last decade it has become a focus of biophysical research as well as becoming a novel focus for classical cancer research. This special section of Physical Biology focusing on invasive cancer cells and metastasis (physical oncology) will give greater insight into the different subfields where physical approaches are being applied to cancer research. This focus on the physical aspects of cancer is necessary because novel approaches in the field of genomics and proteomics have not altered the field of cancer research dramatically, due to the fact that few breakthroughs have been made. It is still not understood why some primary tumors metastasize and thus have a worse outcome compared to others that do not metastasize. As biophysicists, we and others suggest that the mechanical properties of the cancer cells, which possess the ability to transmigrate, are quite different compared to non-metastatic and non-invasive cancer cells. Furthermore, we hypothesize that these cancer cells undergo a selection process within the primary tumor that enables them to weaken their cell-cell adhesions and to alter their cell-matrix adhesions in order to be able to cross the outermost boundary of the primary tumor, as well as the surrounding basement membrane, and to invade the connective tissue. This prerequisite may also help the cancer cells to enter blood or lymph vessels, get transported with the vessel flow and form secondary tumors either within the vessel, directly on the endothelium, or in a different organ after crossing the endothelial lining a second time. This special section begins with a paper by Mark F Coughlin and Jeffrey J Fredberg on the changes in cytoskeletal dynamics and nonlinear rheology due to the metastatic capability of cancer cells from different cancer tissue types such as skin, bladder, prostate and kidney [1]. The hypothesis was that the metastatic outcome is impacted by

  9. Display of Cell Surface Sites for Fibronectin Assembly Is Modulated by Cell Adherence to 1F3 and C-Terminal Modules of Fibronectin

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qinghong; Annis, Douglas S.; Erickson, Harold P.; Mosher, Deane F.

    2009-01-01

    Background Fibronectin-null cells assemble soluble fibronectin shortly after adherence to a substrate coated with intact fibronectin but not when adherent to the cell-binding domain of fibronectin (modules 7F3-10F3). Interactions of adherent cells with regions of adsorbed fibronectin other than modules 7F3-10F3, therefore, are required for early display of the cell surface sites that initiate and direct fibronectin assembly. Methodology/Principal Findings To identify these regions, coatings of proteolytically derived or recombinant pieces of fibronectin containing modules in addition to 7F3-10F3 were tested for effects on fibronectin assembly by adherent fibronectin-null fibroblasts. Pieces as large as one comprising modules 2F3-14F3, which include the heparin-binding and cell adhesion domains, were not effective in supporting fibronectin assembly. Addition of module 1F3 or the C-terminal modules to modules 2F3-14F3 resulted in some activity, and addition of both 1F3 and the C-terminal modules resulted in a construct, 1F3-C, that best mimicked the activity of a coating of intact fibronectin. Constructs 1F3-C V0, 1F3-C V64, and 1F3-C Δ(V15F310F1) were all able to support fibronectin assembly, suggesting that 1F3 through 11F1 and/or 12F1 were important for activity. Coatings in which the active parts of 1F3-C were present in different proteins were much less active than intact 1F3-C. Conclusions These results suggest that 1F3 acts together with C-terminal modules to induce display of fibronectin assembly sites on adherent cells. PMID:19119318

  10. Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and the integrin VLA-4 mediate adhesion of human B cell precursors to cultured bone marrow adherent cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, D H; Nuccie, B L; Abboud, C N; Winslow, J M

    1991-01-01

    Adhesion of B cell precursors to accessory cells in the bone marrow microenvironment may be required for normal early B cell development. Human bone marrow B cell precursors adhere more avidly than mature B cells to bone marrow-derived fibroblasts. To determine the mechanism of this adhesion, expression of adhesion proteins on human B precursor cells and cell lines was measured by flow cytometry. The very late antigen (VLA) integrins VLA-4 and VLA-5 were the only adhesion proteins expressed at higher levels in B cell precursors than mature B cells. Antibodies to the alpha and beta chains of VLA-4, but not VLA-5, significantly blocked binding to bone marrow-derived fibroblasts of immature B cells and cell lines. Although fibronectin is a ligand for VLA-4, anti-fibronectin antibody and a soluble fibronectin fragment containing the VLA-4 binding domain did not block adhesion, suggesting that VLA-4 is involved in adhesion of B cell precursors, but not as a fibronectin receptor. Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), the other known counterreceptor for VLA-4, was identified on bone marrow-derived fibroblasts, and anti-VCAM-1 significantly blocked adhesion of normal B cell precursors to bone marrow-derived fibroblasts, indicating that VLA-4/VCAM-1 interactions are important in adhesion of B cell precursors to the bone marrow microenvironment. Images PMID:1715889

  11. Effectiveness of three interventions in improving adherence to cervical cancer screening.

    PubMed

    López-Torres Hidalgo, Jesús; Sánchez Ortiz, María P; Rabanales Sotos, Joseba; Simarro Herráez, María J; López-Torres López, Jaime; Campos Rosa, Monchi

    2016-09-01

    In countries where cervical cancer screening programmes are conducted on an opportunistic basis, an active search for women at risk should be made to increase coverage. The objective of our study was to assess the effectiveness of three primary care interventions consisting of providing written, telephone and face-to-face information to increase screening participation among women over the age of 25 years. A randomized experimental study with only one post-test control group was conducted on women aged 25-70 years. A total of 1676 women were randomly distributed into four groups and the following interventions were implemented: written briefing; telephone briefing; an invitation to attend a group meeting and no briefing (control group). The women were evaluated 2 years after the intervention. The outcome variable was participation or nonparticipation in cervical cancer screening. It proved possible to interview a total of 1122 women. Among the groups, homogeneity was tested in terms of sociodemographic characteristics and health-related variables. Women who had undergone cytological testing in the 2 years preceding evaluation had a lower mean age (P<0.001) than women who had not done so (45.5±11.0 vs. 48.8±13.0 years). The proportion of women who had participated in screening was as follows: 35.3% in the written information group [95% confidence interval (CI) 29.8-40.9]; 38.4% in the telephone information group (95% CI 32.5-44.2); 29.3% in the face-to-face information group (95% CI 22.8-35.7) and 26.1% in the control group (95% CI 21.2-30.9), with this difference proving statistically significant (P=0.005). Logistic regression showed that only the interventions based on written or telephone briefing were effective vis-à-vis the control group. In conclusion, both written and telephone information can serve to improve women's participation in opportunistic cervical cancer screening. Current preventive strategies could be optimized by means of simple interventions

  12. Targeting the Checkpoint to Kill Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Benada, Jan; Macurek, Libor

    2015-01-01

    Cancer treatments such as radiotherapy and most of the chemotherapies act by damaging DNA of cancer cells. Upon DNA damage, cells stop proliferation at cell cycle checkpoints, which provides them time for DNA repair. Inhibiting the checkpoint allows entry to mitosis despite the presence of DNA damage and can lead to cell death. Importantly, as cancer cells exhibit increased levels of endogenous DNA damage due to an excessive replication stress, inhibiting the checkpoint kinases alone could act as a directed anti-cancer therapy. Here, we review the current status of inhibitors targeted towards the checkpoint effectors and discuss mechanisms of their actions in killing of cancer cells. PMID:26295265

  13. Lung cancer - non-small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - non-small cell; Non-small cell lung cancer; NSCLC; Adenocarcinoma - lung; Squamous cell carcinoma - lung ... Smoking causes most cases (around 90%) of lung cancer. The risk ... day and for how long you have smoked. Being around the smoke ...

  14. On the Stem Cell Origin of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sell, Stewart

    2010-01-01

    In each major theory of the origin of cancer—field theory, chemical carcinogenesis, infection, mutation, or epigenetic change—the tissue stem cell is involved in the generation of cancer. Although the cancer type is identified by the more highly differentiated cells in the cancer cell lineage or hierarchy (transit-amplifying cells), the property of malignancy and the molecular lesion of the cancer exist in the cancer stem cell. In the case of teratocarcinomas, normal germinal stem cells have the potential to become cancers if placed in an environment that allows expression of the cancer phenotype (field theory). In cancers due to chemically induced mutations, viral infections, somatic and inherited mutations, or epigenetic changes, the molecular lesion or infection usually first occurs in the tissue stem cells. Cancer stem cells then give rise to transit-amplifying cells and terminally differentiated cells, similar to what happens in normal tissue renewal. However, the major difference between cancer growth and normal tissue renewal is that whereas normal transit amplifying cells usually differentiate and die, at various levels of differentiation, the cancer transit-amplifying cells fail to differentiate normally and instead accumulate (ie, they undergo maturation arrest), resulting in cancer growth. PMID:20431026

  15. Cancer stem cells and exosome signaling.

    PubMed

    Hannafon, Bethany N; Ding, Wei-Qun

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes have been recognized as mediators of intercellular communication among different cell populations in various biological model systems. By transfer of signaling molecules such as proteins, lipids, and RNAs between different cell types, exosomes are implicated in both physiological and pathological processes. The tumor microenvironment consists of multiple types of cells including adult stem cells, cancer stem cells, and stromal cells. These cells are known to intercommunicate with each other thereby modulating tumor progression. Recent studies have provided evidence demonstrating that exosomes mediate the interactions among different types of cells within the tumor microenvironment, providing new insight into how these cells interact with each other through exosome signaling. This review is focused on recent studies that have examined exosome-mediated intercommunication among cancer stem cells, adult stem cells, cancer cells, and stromal cells within the tumor microenvironment. Based on the current literature, it seems clear that adult stem cells and cancer stem cells secret exosomes that can be transferred to their surrounding cells thereby modulating cancer progression. Likewise, cancer cells and stromal cells also release exosomes that can be taken up by cancer stem cells or adult stem cells, leading to alterations to their phenotype. The molecular mechanisms and biological consequences of the exosome-mediated interactions of these cells remain to be further elucidated. A better understanding of how exosomes mediate intercellular communication in the tumor microenvironment and the specific biological consequences of these interactions will likely offer new opportunities in the development of diagnostic or therapeutic strategies against cancer. PMID:27358879

  16. Cancer stem cells and exosome signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hannafon, Bethany N.

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes have been recognized as mediators of intercellular communication among different cell populations in various biological model systems. By transfer of signaling molecules such as proteins, lipids, and RNAs between different cell types, exosomes are implicated in both physiological and pathological processes. The tumor microenvironment consists of multiple types of cells including adult stem cells, cancer stem cells, and stromal cells. These cells are known to intercommunicate with each other thereby modulating tumor progression. Recent studies have provided evidence demonstrating that exosomes mediate the interactions among different types of cells within the tumor microenvironment, providing new insight into how these cells interact with each other through exosome signaling. This review is focused on recent studies that have examined exosome-mediated intercommunication among cancer stem cells, adult stem cells, cancer cells, and stromal cells within the tumor microenvironment. Based on the current literature, it seems clear that adult stem cells and cancer stem cells secret exosomes that can be transferred to their surrounding cells thereby modulating cancer progression. Likewise, cancer cells and stromal cells also release exosomes that can be taken up by cancer stem cells or adult stem cells, leading to alterations to their phenotype. The molecular mechanisms and biological consequences of the exosome-mediated interactions of these cells remain to be further elucidated. A better understanding of how exosomes mediate intercellular communication in the tumor microenvironment and the specific biological consequences of these interactions will likely offer new opportunities in the development of diagnostic or therapeutic strategies against cancer.

  17. Frailty and Adherence to Adjuvant Hormonal Therapy in Older Women With Breast Cancer: CALGB Protocol 369901

    PubMed Central

    Sheppard, Vanessa B.; Faul, Leigh Anne; Luta, George; Clapp, Jonathan D.; Yung, Rachel L.; Wang, Judy Huei-yu; Kimmick, Gretchen; Isaacs, Claudine; Tallarico, Michelle; Barry, William T.; Pitcher, Brandelyn N.; Hudis, Clifford; Winer, Eric P.; Cohen, Harvey J.; Muss, Hyman B.; Hurria, Arti; Mandelblatt, Jeanne S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Most patients with breast cancer age ≥ 65 years (ie, older patients) are eligible for adjuvant hormonal therapy, but use is not universal. We examined the influence of frailty on hormonal therapy noninitiation and discontinuation. Patients and Methods A prospective cohort of 1,288 older women diagnosed with invasive, nonmetastatic breast cancer recruited from 78 sites from 2004 to 2011 were included (1,062 had estrogen receptor–positive tumors). Interviews were conducted at baseline, 6 months, and annually for up to 7 years to collect sociodemographic, health care, and psychosocial data. Hormonal initiation was defined from records and discontinuation from self-report. Baseline frailty was measured using a previously validated 35-item scale and grouped as prefrail or frail versus robust. Logistic regression and proportional hazards models were used to assess factors associated with noninitiation and discontinuation, respectively. Results Most women (76.4%) were robust. Noninitiation of hormonal therapy was low (14%), but in prefrail or frail (v robust) women the odds of noninitiation were 1.63 times as high (95% CI, 1.11 to 2.40; P = .013) after covariate adjustment. Nonwhites (v whites) had higher odds of noninitiation (odds ratio, 1.71; 95% CI, 1.04 to 2.80; P = .033) after covariate adjustment. Among initiators, the 5-year continuation probability was 48.5%. After adjustment, the risk of discontinuation was higher with increasing age (P = .005) and lower for stage ≥ IIB (v stage I) disease (P = .003). Conclusion Frailty is associated with noninitiation of hormonal therapy, but it does not seem to be a major predictor of early discontinuation in older patients. PMID:24934786

  18. Detection of cancerous cervical cells using physical adhesion of fluorescent silica particles and centripetal force.

    PubMed

    Gaikwad, Ravi M; Dokukin, Maxim E; Iyer, K Swaminathan; Woodworth, Craig D; Volkov, Dmytro O; Sokolov, Igor

    2011-04-01

    Here we describe a non-traditional method to identify cancerous human cervical epithelial cells in a culture dish based on physical adhesion between silica beads and cells. It is a simple optical fluorescence-based technique which detects the relative difference in the amount of fluorescent silica beads physically adherent to surfaces of cancerous and normal cervical cells. The method utilizes the centripetal force gradient that occurs in a rotating culture dish. Due to the variation in the balance between adhesion and centripetal forces, cancerous and normal cells demonstrate clearly distinctive distributions of the fluorescent particles adherent to the cell surface over the culture dish. The method demonstrates higher adhesion of silica particles to normal cells compared to cancerous cells. The difference in adhesion was initially observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The AFM data were used to design the parameters of the rotational dish experiment. The optical method that we describe is much faster and technically simpler than AFM. This work provides proof of the concept that physical interactions can be used to accurately discriminate normal and cancer cells. PMID:21305062

  19. Detection of cancerous cervical cells using physical adhesion of fluorescent silica particles and centripetal force

    PubMed Central

    Gaikwad, Ravi M.; Dokukin, Maxim E.; Iyer, K. Swaminathan; Woodworth, Craig D.; Volkov, Dmytro O.; Sokolov, Igor

    2012-01-01

    Here we describe a non-traditional method to identify cancerous human cervical epithelial cells in a culture dish based on physical interaction between silica beads and cells. It is a simple optical fluorescence-based technique which detects the relative difference in the amount of fluorescent silica beads physically adherent to surfaces of cancerous and normal cervical cells. The method utilizes the centripetal force gradient that occurs in a rotating culture dish. Due to the variation in the balance between adhesion and centripetal forces, cancerous and normal cells demonstrate clearly distinctive distributions of the fluorescent particles adherent to the cell surface over the culture dish. The method demonstrates higher adhesion of silica particles to normal cells compared to cancerous cells. The difference in adhesion was initially observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The AFM data were used to design the parameters of the rotational dish experiment. The optical method that we describe is much faster and technically simpler than AFM. This work provides proof of the concept that physical interactions can be used to accurately discriminate normal and cancer cells. PMID:21305062

  20. Basal cell skin cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur in younger people who have had extensive sun exposure. You are more likely to get basal cell ... severe sunburns early in life Long-term daily sun exposure (such as the sun exposure received by people ...

  1. Catechin-based procyanidins from Peumus boldus Mol. aqueous extract inhibit Helicobacter pylori urease and adherence to adenocarcinoma gastric cells.

    PubMed

    Pastene, Edgar; Parada, Víctor; Avello, Marcia; Ruiz, Antonieta; García, Apolinaria

    2014-11-01

    In this work, the anti-Helicobacter pylori effect of an aqueous extract from dried leaves of Peumus boldus Mol. (Monimiaceae) was evaluated. This extract displayed high inhibitory activity against H. pylori urease. Therefore, in order to clarify the type of substances responsible for such effect, a bioassay-guided fractionation strategy was carried out. The active compounds in the fractions were characterized through different chromatographic methods (RP-HPLC; HILIC-HPLC). The fraction named F5 (mDP = 7.8) from aqueous extract was the most active against H. pylori urease with an IC50  = 15.9 µg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/mL. HPLC analysis evidenced that F5 was composed mainly by catechin-derived proanthocyanidins (LC-MS and phloroglucinolysis). The anti-adherent effect of boldo was assessed by co-culture of H. pylori and AGS cells. Both the aqueous extract and F5 showed an anti-adherent effect in a concentration-dependent manner. An 89.3% of inhibition was reached at 2.0 mg GAE/mL of boldo extract. In conjunction, our results suggest that boldo extract has a potent anti-urease activity and anti-adherent effect against H. pylori, properties directly linked with the presence of catechin-derived proanthocyanidins. PMID:24853276

  2. Effect of shear stress and of transmural pressure on cAMP-dependent responses of cells adhering to a biomaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chotard-Ghodsnia, R.; Drochon, A.; Faucheux, N.; Nagel, M.-D.; Grebe, R.

    2002-02-01

    Biomaterials used in some bioreactors are porous and exposed to normal and tangential flow of physiological fluid. Flow-induced forces may influence the morphological and biochemical responses of cells adhering to these materials. The objective of this work is to examine the capacity of mechanical stress to cause changes in cell morphology via the cAMP pathway (cyclic adenosine monophosphate). This second messenger is known to modulate cell morphology in static conditions. In classical flow devices, cells are submitted to only tangential stresses. We designed a new flow system, a Hele-Shaw cell with a porous bottom wall, in order to take into account the influence of a transmural pressure. This flow chamber allows to follow up continuously the shape changes of cells that are adherent to a porous biomaterial (polyacrylonitrile) and are exposed to controlled levels of shear stress or transmural pressure. Mouse Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts exposed to a 1.1-Pa shear stress, as well as those exposed to a 84-mm Hg transmural pressure, round up (up to 50%) in a few minutes. If the cAMP pathway is inhibited when a mechanical stress is applied, cell rounding is significantly prevented. These observations suggest that flow-induced cell shape changes are cAMP-dependent. This conclusion is supported by an increased cAMP accumulation measured in cells under mechanical stress when compared to static experiments. Our in vitro flow system is thus useful to study the influence of transmural pressure or shear stress on the early morphological and biochemical responses of cells in contact with a biomaterial.

  3. Adherent invasive Escherichia coli strains from patients with Crohn's disease survive and replicate within macrophages without inducing host cell death.

    PubMed

    Glasser, A L; Boudeau, J; Barnich, N; Perruchot, M H; Colombel, J F; Darfeuille-Michaud, A

    2001-09-01

    Escherichia coli strains recovered from Crohn's disease (CD) lesions are able to adhere to and invade cultured intestinal epithelial cells. We analyzed the behavior within macrophages of adherent invasive E. coli (AIEC) strains isolated from patients with CD. All the 15 AIEC strains tested were able to replicate extensively within J774-A1 cells: the numbers of intracellular bacteria increased 2.2- to 74.2-fold at 48 h over that at 1 h postinfection. By use of murine peritoneal macrophages and human monocyte-derived-macrophages, the reference AIEC strain LF82 was confirmed to be able to survive intracellularly. Transmission electron micrographs of AIEC LF82-infected macrophages showed that at 24 h postinfection, infected cells harbored large vacuoles containing numerous bacteria, as a result of the fusion of several vacuoles occurring after 8 h postinfection. No lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, no sign of DNA fragmentation or degradation, and no binding to fluorescein isothlocyanate-labeled annexin V were observed with LF82-infected J774-A1 cells, even after 24 h postinfection. LF82-infected J774-A1 cells secreted 2.7-fold more tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) than cells stimulated with 1 microg of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/ml. No release of interleukin-1beta was observed with LPS-prestimulated J774-A1 cells infected with AIEC LF82. These findings showed that (i) AIEC strains are able to survive and to replicate within macrophages, (ii) AIEC LF82 replication does not induce any cell death of the infected cells, and (iii) LF82-infected J774-A1 cells release high levels of TNF-alpha. These properties could be related to some features of CD and particularly to granuloma formation, one of the hallmarks of CD lesions. PMID:11500426

  4. Large-Scale Production of High-Quality Helper-Dependent Adenoviral Vectors Using Adherent Cells in Cell Factories

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Masataka; Cela, Racel; Clarke, Christian; Bertin, Terry K.; Mouriño, Susana

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The most efficient and widely used system for generating helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HDAds) is the Cre/loxP system developed by Graham and co-workers (Parks, R.J., Chen, L., Anton, M., Sankar, U., Rudnicki, M.A., and Graham, F.L. [1996]. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 93, 13565–13570). Alternative systems have been developed for HDAd production, but all are limited by the technical complexity of a three-component vector production system for reproducibly generating large quantities of adenovirus with high infectivity and low helper virus (HV) contamination. Recently, these problems were addressed by Ng and co-workers (Palmer, D., and Ng, P. [2003]. Mol Ther. 8, 846–852), who developed an improved system that combines the use of a suspension-adapted producer cell line expressing high levels of Cre recombinase, a HV resistant to mutation, and a refined purification protocol. With this system, >1 × 1013 highly infectious vector particles are easily produced without vector genome rearrangements and having very low HV contamination levels. However, the Ng system incorporates a spinner flask culture system that involves considerable time, effort, and tissue culture medium to produce HDAds. We have an alternative system to obtain comparable quantities with equivalent quality to the spinner flask approach but requiring reduced labor and lower volumes of medium. This method utilizes a 10-chamber cell factory with adherent cells to produce high infectivity of HDAds with minimal HV contamination while improving yield and reducing technical complexity, effort, and medium requirements. This system is easily translatable to the production of clinical-grade HDAds for human trials. PMID:19719388

  5. [Dendritic cells in cancer immunotherapy].

    PubMed

    Gato, M; Liechtenstein, T; Blanco-Luquín, I; Zudaire, M I; Kochan, G; Escors, D

    2015-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 20th century, biomedical scientists have tried to take advantage of the natural anti-cancer activities of the immune system. However, all the scientific and medical efforts dedicated to this have not resulted in the expected success. In fact, classical antineoplastic treatments such as surgery, radio and chemotherapy are still first line treatments. Even so, there is a quantity of experimental evidence demonstrating that cancer cells are immunogenic. However, the effective activation of anti-cancer T cell responses closely depends on an efficient antigen presentation carried out by professional antigen presenting cells such as DC. Although there are a number of strategies to strengthen antigen presentation by DC, anti-cancer immunotherapy is not as effective as we would expect according to preclinical data accumulated in recent decades. We do not aim to make an exhaustive review of DC immunotherapy here, which is an extensive research subject already dealt with in many specialised reviews. Instead, we present the experimental approaches undertaken by our group over the last decade, by modifying DC to improve their anti-tumour capacities. PMID:26486534

  6. Effects of cryopreservation and phenylacetate on biological characters of adherent LAK cells from patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Ning; Ye, Sheng-Long; Sun, Rui-Xia; Zhao, Yan; Tang, Zhao-You

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To improve the preparation of adherent lymphokine-activated killer (A-LAK) cells and to study the effects of cryopreservation and phenylacetate (PA) on biological characters of A-LAK cells. METHODS: A-LAK cells were obtained from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of the patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) by using L-phenylalanine methyl ester (PME) to deplete immunosuppressive monocytes. Proliferative activity of SMMC7721 cell line after treatment with phenylacetate (PA) was observed. A-LAK cells were treated with the supernatant of SMMC7721 cells that had been pretreated with PA. The changes of proliferation, cytotoxicity and phenotype of A-LAK cells were investigated after cryopreservation. RESULTS: The expansion of A-LAK cells (96.79 ± 69.10 folds on Day 14) was significantly higher than that of non-adherent LAK (NA-LAK) cells (22.77 ± 13.20) as well as conventional LAK cells (4.64 ± 0.91). PA significantly suppressed the growth of SMMC7721 cells, and the inhibitor ratio was 46%. The supernatant of cultured tumor cells intensively suppressed the proliferation and cytotoxicity of A-LAK cells, but the suppressive effect of the supernatant was previously decreased after treatment with PA. Impairments in proliferation and cytotoxicity of A-LAK cells immediately after thawing of cryopreservation and recovery after reincubation with IL-2 were observed. The cytotoxicity of thawed A-LAK cells on Day 5 was significantly higher than that of fresh A-LAK before freezing (54.8% ± 10.2% vs 40.5% ± 6.4%). No significant change in the percentage of lymphocyte subsets was identified in frozen A-LAK cells as compared with that in the fresh control cells. CONCLUSION: A-LAK cells can be simply prepared by using PME, and showed a synergistic anti-tumor effect with the combination of PA. Cryopreservation can increase the immunoactivities of A-LAK cells from the patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:11925598

  7. Prostate Cancer Stem Cells: Research Advances

    PubMed Central

    Jaworska, Dagmara; Król, Wojciech; Szliszka, Ewelina

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells have been defined as cells within a tumor that possesses the capacity to self-renew and to cause the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells that comprise the tumor. Experimental evidence showed that these highly tumorigenic cells might be responsible for initiation and progression of cancer into invasive and metastatic disease. Eradicating prostate cancer stem cells, the root of the problem, has been considered as a promising target in prostate cancer treatment to improve the prognosis for patients with advanced stages of the disease. PMID:26593898

  8. Impact of release dynamics of laser-irradiated polymer micropallets on the viability of selected adherent cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Huan; Mismar, Wael; Wang, Yuli; Small, Donald W.; Ras, Mat; Allbritton, Nancy L.; Sims, Christopher E.; Venugopalan, Vasan

    2012-01-01

    We use time-resolved interferometry, fluorescence assays and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations to examine the viability of confluent adherent cell monolayers to selection via laser microbeam release of photoresist polymer micropallets. We demonstrate the importance of laser microbeam pulse energy and focal volume position relative to the glass–pallet interface in governing the threshold energies for pallet release as well as the pallet release dynamics. Measurements using time-resolved interferometry show that increases in laser pulse energy result in increasing pallet release velocities that can approach 10 m s−1 through aqueous media. CFD simulations reveal that the pallet motion results in cellular exposure to transient hydrodynamic shear stress amplitudes that can exceed 100 kPa on microsecond timescales, and which produces reduced cell viability. Moreover, CFD simulation results show that the maximum shear stress on the pallet surface varies spatially, with the largest shear stresses occurring on the pallet periphery. Cell viability of confluent cell monolayers on the pallet surface confirms that the use of larger pulse energies results in increased rates of necrosis for those cells situated away from the pallet centre, while cells situated at the pallet centre remain viable. Nevertheless, experiments that examine the viability of these cell monolayers following pallet release show that proper choices for laser microbeam pulse energy and focal volume position lead to the routine achievement of cell viability in excess of 90 per cent. These laser microbeam parameters result in maximum pallet release velocities below 6 m s−1 and cellular exposure of transient hydrodynamic shear stresses below 20 kPa. Collectively, these results provide a mechanistic understanding that relates pallet release dynamics and associated transient shear stresses with subsequent cellular viability. This provides a quantitative, mechanistic basis for determining

  9. Resistance of papillary thyroid cancer stem cells to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    GIUFFRIDA, RAFFAELLA; ADAMO, LUANA; IANNOLO, GIOACCHIN; VICARI, LUISA; GIUFFRIDA, DARIO; ERAMO, ADRIANA; GULISANO, MASSIMO; MEMEO, LORENZO; CONTICELLO, CONCETTA

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid carcinoma is the most common endocrine neoplasm, with the highest mortality rate of all the endocrine cancers. Among the endocrine malignancies, ~80% are papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTCs). In the initiation and progression of this tumor, genetic alterations in the mitogen-associated protein kinase pathway, including RAS point mutations, RET/PTC oncogene rearrangements and BRAF point mutations, play an important role, particularly in deciding targeted therapy. In the present study, a small population of thyroid tumor cells, known as tumor spheres, were isolated and characterized from PTC surgical samples. These spheres can be expanded indefinitely in vitro and give rise to differentiated adherent cells when cultivated in differentiative conditions. The present study showed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and flow cytometric analysis that the undifferentiated PTC cells exhibited a characteristic antigen expression profile of adult progenitor/stem cells. The cells were more resistant to chemotherapeutics, including bortezomib, taxol, cisplatin, etoposide, doxorubicin and vincristine, than differentiated PTC cells and the majority possessed a quiescent status, as revealed by the various cell cycle characteristics and anti-apoptotic protein expression. Such advances in cancer thyroid stem cell biology may provide relevant information for future targeted therapies. PMID:27347201

  10. EnP1, a Microsporidian Spore Wall Protein That Enables Spores To Adhere to and Infect Host Cells In Vitro▿

    PubMed Central

    Southern, Timothy R.; Jolly, Carrie E.; Lester, Melissa E.; Hayman, J. Russell

    2007-01-01

    Microsporidia are spore-forming fungal pathogens that require the intracellular environment of host cells for propagation. We have shown that spores of the genus Encephalitozoon adhere to host cell surface glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in vitro and that this adherence serves to modulate the infection process. In this study, a spore wall protein (EnP1; Encephalitozoon cuniculi ECU01_0820) from E. cuniculi and Encephalitozoon intestinalis is found to interact with the host cell surface. Analysis of the amino acid sequence reveals multiple heparin-binding motifs, which are known to interact with extracellular matrices. Both recombinant EnP1 protein and purified EnP1 antibody inhibit spore adherence, resulting in decreased host cell infection. Furthermore, when the N-terminal heparin-binding motif is deleted by site-directed mutagenesis, inhibition of adherence is ablated. Our transmission immunoelectron microscopy reveals that EnP1 is embedded in the microsporidial endospore and exospore and is found in high abundance in the polar sac/anchoring disk region, an area from which the everting polar tube is released. Finally, by using a host cell binding assay, EnP1 is shown to bind host cell surfaces but not to those that lack surface GAGs. Collectively, these data show that given its expression in both the endospore and the exospore, EnP1 is a microsporidian cell wall protein that may function both in a structural capacity and in modulating in vitro host cell adherence and infection. PMID:17557882

  11. B-lymphocyte responses to trinitrophenyl-conjugated Ficoll: requirement for T lymphocytes and Ia-bearing adherent cells.

    PubMed Central

    Letvin, N L; Benacerraf, B; Germain, R N

    1981-01-01

    These studies were done to characterize the cellular requirements for B-lymphocyte responses to the haptenated polysaccharide trinitrophenyl-conjugated Ficoll. By using an in vitro microculture system, it was demonstrated that hapten-specific anti-trinitrophenyl-conjugated Ficoll plaque-forming cell responses by B lymphocytes require Ia-bearing adherent accessory cells and Thy 1+ Lyt 1+2- nylon wool-nonadherent (T) lymphocytes. Such T cells could be primed in vivo with nonderivatized Ficoll to show carrier-specific helper cell function for derivatized Ficoll responses in vitro. The implications of these findings for our understanding of b-lymphocyte triggering by so-called T-independent antigens are discussed. PMID:6975477

  12. Decreased Adherence of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli to HEp-2 Cells in the Presence of Antibodies That Recognize the C-Terminal Region of Intimin

    PubMed Central

    Gansheroff, Lisa J.; Wachtel, Marian R.; O'Brien, Alison D.

    1999-01-01

    Antiserum raised against intimin from enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 strain 86-24 has been shown previously by our laboratory to inhibit adherence of this strain to HEp-2 cells. In the present study, we sought to identify the region(s) of intimin important for the effect of anti-intimin antisera on EHEC adherence and to determine whether antisera raised against intimin from an O157:H7 strain could reduce adherence of other strains. Compared to preimmune serum controls, polyclonal sera raised against the histidine-tagged intimin protein RIHisEae (intiminO157) or against His-tagged C-terminal fragments of intimin from strain 86-24 reduced adherence of this strain. Furthermore, an antibody fraction purified from the anti-RIHisEae serum that contained antibodies to the C-terminal third of intimin, the putative receptor-binding domain, also reduced adherence of strain 86-24, but a purified fraction containing antibodies to the N-terminal two-thirds of intimin did not inhibit adherence. The polyclonal anti-intiminO157 serum raised against RIHisEae inhibited, to different degrees, the adherence of another O157:H7 strain, an EHEC O55:H7 strain, one of two independent EHEC O111:NM isolates tested, and one of two EHEC O26:H11 strains tested. Adherence of the other O26:H11 and O111:NM strains and an EPEC O127:H6 strain was not reduced. Finally, immunoblot analysis indicated a correlation between the antigenic divergence in the C-terminal third of intimins from different strains and the capacity of anti-intiminO157 antiserum to reduce adherence of heterologous strains. Taken together, these data suggest that intiminO157 could be used as an immunogen to elicit adherence-blocking antibodies against O157:H7 strains and closely-related EHEC. PMID:10569757

  13. Acute myelogenous leukemia cells with the MLL-ELL translocation convert morphologically and functionally into adherent myofibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Tashiro, Haruko; Mizutani-Noguchi, Mitsuho; Shirasaki, Ryosuke

    2010-01-01

    Bone marrow-myofibroblasts, a major component of bone marrow-stroma, are reported to originate from hematopoietic stem cells. We show in this paper that non-adherent leukemia blasts can change into myofibroblasts. When myeloblasts from two cases of acute myelogenous leukemia with a fusion product comprising mixed lineage leukemia and RNA polymerase II elongation factor, were cultured long term, their morphology changed to that of myofibroblasts with similar molecular characteristics to the parental myeloblasts. The original leukemia blasts, when cultured on the leukemia blast-derived myofibroblasts, grew extensively. Leukemia blasts can create their own microenvironment for proliferation.

  14. Subcellular real-time in vivo imaging of intralymphatic and intravascular cancer-cell trafficking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McElroy, M.; Hayashi, K.; Kaushal, S.; Bouvet, M.; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2008-02-01

    With the use of fluorescent cells labeled with green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the nucleus and red fluorescent protein (RFP) in the cytoplasm and a highly sensitive small animal imaging system with both macro-optics and micro-optics, we have developed subcellular real-time imaging of cancer cell trafficking in live mice. Dual-color cancer cells were injected by a vascular route in an abdominal skin flap in nude mice. The mice were imaged with an Olympus OV100 small animal imaging system with a sensitive CCD camera and four objective lenses, parcentered and parfocal, enabling imaging from macrocellular to subcellular. We observed the nuclear and cytoplasmic behavior of cancer cells in real time in blood vessels as they moved by various means or adhered to the vessel surface in the abdominal skin flap. During extravasation, real-time dual-color imaging showed that cytoplasmic processes of the cancer cells exited the vessels first, with nuclei following along the cytoplasmic projections. Both cytoplasm and nuclei underwent deformation during extravasation. Different cancer cell lines seemed to strongly vary in their ability to extravasate. We have also developed real-time imaging of cancer cell trafficking in lymphatic vessels. Cancer cells labeled with GFP and/or RFP were injected into the inguinal lymph node of nude mice. The labeled cancer cells trafficked through lymphatic vessels where they were imaged via a skin flap in real-time at the cellular level until they entered the axillary lymph node. The bright dual-color fluorescence of the cancer cells and the real-time microscopic imaging capability of the Olympus OV100 enabled imaging the trafficking cancer cells in both blood vessels and lymphatics. With the dual-color cancer cells and the highly sensitive imaging system described here, the subcellular dynamics of cancer metastasis can now be observed in live mice in real time.

  15. Inhibition of Streptococcus pneumoniae adherence to human epithelial cells in vitro by the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Colonization of the nasopharynx by Streptococcus pneumoniae is considered a prerequisite for pneumococcal infections such as pneumonia and otitis media. Probiotic bacteria can influence disease outcomes through various mechanisms, including inhibition of pathogen colonization. Here, we examine the effect of the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) on S. pneumoniae colonization of human epithelial cells using an in vitro model. We investigated the effects of LGG administered before, at the same time as, or after the addition of S. pneumoniae on the adherence of four pneumococcal isolates. Results LGG significantly inhibited the adherence of all the pneumococcal isolates tested. The magnitude of inhibition varied with LGG dose, time of administration, and the pneumococcal isolate used. Inhibition was most effective when a higher dose of LGG was administered prior to establishment of pneumococcal colonization. Mechanistic studies showed that LGG binds to epithelial cells but does not affect pneumococcal growth or viability. Administration of LGG did not lead to any significant changes in host cytokine responses. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that LGG can inhibit pneumococcal colonization of human epithelial cells in vitro and suggest that probiotics could be used clinically to prevent the establishment of pneumococcal carriage. PMID:23561014

  16. Reversing breast cancer stem cell into breast somatic stem cell.

    PubMed

    Wijaya, L; Agustina, D; Lizandi, A O; Kartawinata, M M; Sandra, F

    2011-02-01

    Stem cells have an important role in cell biology, allowing tissues to be renewed by freshly created cells throughout their lifetime. The specific micro-environment of stem cells is called stem cell niche; this environment influences the development of stem cells from quiescence through stages of differentiation. Recent advance researches have improved the understanding of the cellular and molecular components of the micro-environment--or niche--that regulates stem cells. We point out an important trend to the study of niche activity in breast cancers. Breast cancer has long been known to conserve a heterogeneous population of cells. While the majority of cells that make up tumors are destined to differentiate and eventually stop dividing, only minority populations of cells, termed cancer stem cell, possess extensive self renewal capability. These cancer stem cells possess characteristics of both stem cells and cancer cells. Breast cancer stem cells reversal to breast somatic stem cells offer a new therapy, that not only can stop the spread of breast cancer cells, but also can differentiate breast cancer stem cells into normal breast somatic stem cells. These can replace damaged breast tissue. Nevertheless, the complexity of realizing this therapy approach needs further research. PMID:21044008

  17. Cancer stem cells in small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Verlicchi, Alberto; Rosell, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is one of the most aggressive lung tumors, with poor survival rates. Although patients may initially respond to treatment, this is followed by rapid development of drug resistance and disease progression. SCLC patients often present with metastasis at time of diagnosis, ruling out surgery as a treatment option. Currently, treatment options for this disease remain limited and platinum-based chemotherapy is the treatment of choice. A better understanding of the biology of SCLC could allow us to identify new therapeutic targets. Cancer stem cell (CSC) theory is currently crucial in cancer research and could provide a viable explanation for the heterogeneity, drug resistance, recurrence and metastasis of several types of tumors. Some characteristics of SCLC, such as aggressiveness, suggest that this kind of tumor could be enriched in CSCs, and drug resistance in SCLC could be attributable to the existence of a CSC subpopulation in SCLC. Herein we summarize current understanding of CSC in SCLC, including the evidence for CSC markers and signaling pathways involved in stemness. We also discuss potential ongoing strategies and areas of active research in SCLC, such as immunotherapy, that focus on inhibition of signaling pathways and targeting molecules driving stemness. Understanding of signaling pathways and the discovery of new therapeutic markers specific to CSCs will lead to new advances in therapy and improvements in prognosis of SCLC patients. Therefore, evaluation of these CSC-specific molecules and pathways may become a routine part of SCLC diagnosis and therapy. PMID:26958490

  18. Tracking in real time the crawling dynamics of adherent living cells with a high resolution surface plasmon microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streppa, L.; Berguiga, L.; Boyer Provera, E.; Ratti, F.; Goillot, E.; Martinez Torres, C.; Schaeffer, L.; Elezgaray, Juan; Arneodo, A.; Argoul, F.

    2016-03-01

    We introduce a high resolution scanning surface plasmon microscope for long term imaging of living adherent mouse myoblast cells. The coupling of a high numerical aperture objective lens with a fibered heterodyne interferometer provides both enhanced sensitivity and long term stability. This microscope takes advantage of the plasmon resonance excitation and the amplification of the electromagnetic field in near-field distance to the gold coated coverslip. This plasmon enhanced evanescent wave microscopy is particularly attractive for the study of cell adhesion and motility since it can be operated without staining of the biological sample. We show that this microscope allows very long-term imaging of living samples, and that it can capture and follow the temporal deformation of C2C12 myoblast cell protusions (lamellipodia), during their migration on a at surface.

  19. Multiple Myeloma Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huff, Carol Ann; Matsui, William

    2008-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is characterized by the clonal expansion of neoplastic plasma cells within the bone marrow, elevated serum immunoglobulin, and osteolytic bone disease. The disease is highly responsive to a wide variety of anticancer treatments including conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy, corticosteroids, radiation therapy, and a growing number of agents with novel mechanisms of action. However, few if any patients are cured with these modalities and relapse remains a critical issue. A better understanding of clonogenic multiple myleoma cells is essential to ultimately improving long-term outcomes, but the nature of the cells responsible for myeloma regrowth and disease relapse is unclear. We review evidence that functional heterogeneity exists in multiple myeloma and discuss potential strategies and clinical implications of the stem-cell model of cancer in this disease. PMID:18539970

  20. The anti-inflammatory drug nimesulide inhibits neutrophil adherence to and migration across monolayers of cytokine-activated endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Dapino, P; Ottonello, L; Dallegri, F

    1994-01-01

    Neutrophil migration through the microvascular endothelium represents a fundamental event for the cell accumulation at sites of tissue injury. Owing to their capacity to modify the structural and functional characteristics of endothelial cells, inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha) play a pivotal role in directing circulating neutrophils away from the bloodstream to the interstitial tissue. In order to study neutrophil transendothelial migration, human umbilical vein endothelial cells were grown to confluence on the polycarbonate filter of two-compartment migration chambers. Pretreatment of the endothelial cell monolayers with TNF alpha for 4 h resulted in rapid migration of approximately 50% of subsequently added neutrophils across the layers. In contrast, < 10% of added neutrophils penetrated untreated endothelial monolayers. Using TNF alpha-treated endothelium, neutrophil transmigration was inhibited by the methane sulfonanilide anti-inflammatory drug nimesulide. Moreover, neutrophil adherence to TNF alpha-treated endothelial monolayers, cultured in microtiter wells, was markedly reduced by nimesulide. A linear correlation between the drug-dependent inhibition of neutrophil transmigration and neutrophil adherence was found. Finally, nimesulide did not interfere with the TNF alpha ability to convert resting endothelium into a pro-adhesive and pro-locomotory cell layer. The data suggest that nimesulide reduces neutrophil transendothelial migration primarily by limiting the cell anchorage to the TNF alpha-activated endothelium. Therefore, the drug has the potential to down-regulate neutrophil extravasation and, in turn, the burden of neutrophil oxidants and proteases leading to tissue injury at sites of inflammation. PMID:7824814

  1. Group A Streptococcus Adheres to Pharyngeal Epithelial Cells with Salivary Proline-rich Proteins via GrpE Chaperone Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Jumpei; Terao, Yutaka; Morisaki, Ichijiro; Hamada, Shigeyuki; Kawabata, Shigetada

    2012-01-01

    Group A Streptococcus pyogenes (GAS) is an important human pathogen that frequently causes pharyngitis. GAS organisms can adhere to and invade pharyngeal epithelial cells, which are overlaid by salivary components. However, the role of salivary components in GAS adhesion to pharyngeal cells has not been reported precisely. We collected human saliva and purified various salivary components, including proline-rich protein (PRP), statherin, and amylase, and performed invasion assays. The GAS-HEp-2 association ratio (invasion/adhesion ratio) and invasion ratio of GAS were increased significantly with whole human saliva and PRP, while the anti-PRP antibody inhibited the latter. GAS strain NY-5, which lacks M and F proteins on the cell surface, was promoted to cohere with HEp-2 cells by whole human saliva and PRP. The 28-kDa protein of GAS bound to PRP and was identified as GrpE, a chaperone protein, whereas the N-terminal of GrpE was found to bind to PRP. A GrpE-deficient mutant of GAS strain B514Sm, TR-45, exhibited a reduced ability to adhere to and invade HEp-2 cells. Microscopic observations showed the GrpE was mainly expressed on the surface of the cell division site of GAS. Furthermore, GrpE-deficient mutants of GAS and Streptococcus pneumoniae showed an elongated morphology as compared with the wild type. Taken together, this is the first study to show an interaction between salivary PRP and GAS GrpE, which plays an important role in GAS infection on the pharynx, whereas the expression of GrpE on the surface of GAS helps to maintain morphology. PMID:22566698

  2. Automated Method for the Rapid and Precise Estimation of Adherent Cell Culture Characteristics from Phase Contrast Microscopy Images

    PubMed Central

    Jaccard, Nicolas; Griffin, Lewis D; Keser, Ana; Macown, Rhys J; Super, Alexandre; Veraitch, Farlan S; Szita, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    The quantitative determination of key adherent cell culture characteristics such as confluency, morphology, and cell density is necessary for the evaluation of experimental outcomes and to provide a suitable basis for the establishment of robust cell culture protocols. Automated processing of images acquired using phase contrast microscopy (PCM), an imaging modality widely used for the visual inspection of adherent cell cultures, could enable the non-invasive determination of these characteristics. We present an image-processing approach that accurately detects cellular objects in PCM images through a combination of local contrast thresholding and post hoc correction of halo artifacts. The method was thoroughly validated using a variety of cell lines, microscope models and imaging conditions, demonstrating consistently high segmentation performance in all cases and very short processing times (<1 s per 1,208 × 960 pixels image). Based on the high segmentation performance, it was possible to precisely determine culture confluency, cell density, and the morphology of cellular objects, demonstrating the wide applicability of our algorithm for typical microscopy image processing pipelines. Furthermore, PCM image segmentation was used to facilitate the interpretation and analysis of fluorescence microscopy data, enabling the determination of temporal and spatial expression patterns of a fluorescent reporter. We created a software toolbox (PHANTAST) that bundles all the algorithms and provides an easy to use graphical user interface. Source-code for MATLAB and ImageJ is freely available under a permissive open-source license. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2014;111: 504–517. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24037521

  3. Head and Neck Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamurthy, S.; Nör, J.E.

    2012-01-01

    Most cancers contain a small sub-population of cells that are endowed with self-renewal, multipotency, and a unique potential for tumor initiation. These properties are considered hallmarks of cancer stem cells. Here, we provide an overview of the field of cancer stem cells with a focus on head and neck cancers. Cancer stem cells are located in the invasive fronts of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) close to blood vessels (perivascular niche). Endothelial cell-initiated signaling events are critical for the survival and self-renewal of these stem cells. Markers such as aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), CD133, and CD44 have been successfully used to identify highly tumorigenic cancer stem cells in HNSCC. This review briefly describes the orosphere assay, a method for in vitro culture of undifferentiated head and neck cancer stem cells under low attachment conditions. Notably, recent evidence suggests that cancer stem cells are exquisitely resistant to conventional therapy and are the “drivers” of local recurrence and metastatic spread. The emerging understanding of the role of cancer stem cells in the pathobiology of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas might have a profound impact on the treatment paradigms for this malignancy. PMID:21933937

  4. Head and neck cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, S; Nör, J E

    2012-04-01

    Most cancers contain a small sub-population of cells that are endowed with self-renewal, multipotency, and a unique potential for tumor initiation. These properties are considered hallmarks of cancer stem cells. Here, we provide an overview of the field of cancer stem cells with a focus on head and neck cancers. Cancer stem cells are located in the invasive fronts of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) close to blood vessels (perivascular niche). Endothelial cell-initiated signaling events are critical for the survival and self-renewal of these stem cells. Markers such as aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), CD133, and CD44 have been successfully used to identify highly tumorigenic cancer stem cells in HNSCC. This review briefly describes the orosphere assay, a method for in vitro culture of undifferentiated head and neck cancer stem cells under low attachment conditions. Notably, recent evidence suggests that cancer stem cells are exquisitely resistant to conventional therapy and are the "drivers" of local recurrence and metastatic spread. The emerging understanding of the role of cancer stem cells in the pathobiology of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas might have a profound impact on the treatment paradigms for this malignancy. PMID:21933937

  5. How cell death shapes cancer

    PubMed Central

    Labi, V; Erlacher, M

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis has been established as a mechanism of anti-cancer defense. Members of the BCL-2 family are critical mediators of apoptotic cell death in health and disease, often found to be deregulated in cancer and believed to lead to the survival of malignant clones. However, over the years, a number of studies pointed out that a model in which cell death resistance unambiguously acts as a barrier against malignant disease might be too simple. This is based on paradoxical observations made in tumor patients as well as mouse models indicating that apoptosis can indeed drive tumor formation, at least under certain circumstances. One possible explanation for this phenomenon is that apoptosis can promote proliferation critically needed to compensate for cell loss, for example, upon therapy, and to restore tissue homeostasis. However, this, at the same time, can promote tumor development by allowing expansion of selected clones. Usually, tissue resident stem/progenitor cells are a major source for repopulation, some of them potentially carrying (age-, injury- or therapy-induced) genetic aberrations deleterious for the host. Thereby, apoptosis might drive genomic instability by facilitating the emergence of pathologic clones during phases of proliferation and subsequent replication stress-associated DNA damage. Tumorigenesis initiated by repeated cell attrition and repopulation, as confirmed in different genetic models, has parallels in human cancers, exemplified in therapy-induced secondary malignancies and myelodysplastic syndromes in patients with congenital bone marrow failure syndromes. Here, we aim to review evidence in support of the oncogenic role of stress-induced apoptosis. PMID:25741600

  6. Extinction models for cancer stem cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sehl, Mary; Zhou, Hua; Sinsheimer, Janet S.; Lange, Kenneth L.

    2012-01-01

    Cells with stem cell-like properties are now viewed as initiating and sustaining many cancers. This suggests that cancer can be cured by driving these cancer stem cells to extinction. The problem with this strategy is that ordinary stem cells are apt to be killed in the process. This paper sets bounds on the killing differential (difference between death rates of cancer stem cells and normal stem cells) that must exist for the survival of an adequate number of normal stem cells. Our main tools are birth–death Markov chains in continuous time. In this framework, we investigate the extinction times of cancer stem cells and normal stem cells. Application of extreme value theory from mathematical statistics yields an accurate asymptotic distribution and corresponding moments for both extinction times. We compare these distributions for the two cell populations as a function of the killing rates. Perhaps a more telling comparison involves the number of normal stem cells NH at the extinction time of the cancer stem cells. Conditioning on the asymptotic time to extinction of the cancer stem cells allows us to calculate the asymptotic mean and variance of NH. The full distribution of NH can be retrieved by the finite Fourier transform and, in some parameter regimes, by an eigenfunction expansion. Finally, we discuss the impact of quiescence (the resting state) on stem cell dynamics. Quiescence can act as a sanctuary for cancer stem cells and imperils the proposed therapy. We approach the complication of quiescence via multitype branching process models and stochastic simulation. Improvements to the τ-leaping method of stochastic simulation make it a versatile tool in this context. We conclude that the proposed therapy must target quiescent cancer stem cells as well as actively dividing cancer stem cells. The current cancer models demonstrate the virtue of attacking the same quantitative questions from a variety of modeling, mathematical, and computational perspectives

  7. Colon Cancer Cell Separation by Dielectrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fang; Yang, Xiaoming; Jiang, H.; Wood, P.; Hrushesky, W.; Wang, Guiren

    2009-11-01

    Separation of cancer cells from the other biological cells can be useful for clinical cancer diagnosis and cancer treatment. In this presentation, conventional dielectrophoresis (c-DEP) is used in a microfluidic chip to manipulate and collect colorectal cancer HCT116 cell, which is doped with Human Embryonic Kidney 293 cells (HEK 293). It is noticed that, the HCT116 cell are deflected to a side channel from a main channel clearly by apply electric field at particular AC frequency band. This motion caused by negative DEP can be used to separate the cancer cell from others. In this manuscript, chip design, flow condition, the DEP spectrum of the cancer cell are reported respectively, and the separation and collection efficiency are investigated as well. The sorter is microfabricated using plastic laminate technology. -/abstract- This work has been financially supported by the NSF RII funding (EP

  8. Cost-effectiveness of a tailored intervention designed to increase breast cancer screening among a non-adherent population: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although the percentage of women who initiate breast cancer screening is rising, the rate of continued adherence is poor. The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a tailored print intervention compared with a non-tailored print intervention for increasing the breast cancer screening rate among a non-adherent population. Methods In total, 1859 participants aged 51–59 years (except those aged 55 years) were recruited from a Japanese urban community setting. Participants were randomly assigned to receive either a tailored print reminder (tailored intervention group) or non-tailored print reminder (non-tailored intervention group). The primary outcome was improvement in the breast cancer screening rate. The screening rates and cost-effectiveness were examined for each treatment group (tailored vs. non-tailored) and each intervention subgroup during a follow-up period of five months. All analyses followed the intention-to-treat principle. Results The number of women who underwent a screening mammogram following the reminder was 277 (19.9%) in the tailored reminder group and 27 (5.8%) in the non-tailored reminder group. A logistic regression model revealed that the odds of a woman who received a tailored print reminder undergoing mammography was 4.02 times those of a women who had received a non-tailored print reminder (95% confidence interval, 2.67–6.06). The cost of one mammography screening increase was 2,544 JPY or 30 USD in the tailored intervention group and 4,366 JPY or 52 USD in the non-tailored intervention group. Conclusions Providing a tailored print reminder was an effective and cost-effective strategy for improving breast cancer screening rates among non-adherent women. PMID:22962858

  9. Receptor-like glycocompounds in human milk that inhibit classical and El Tor Vibrio cholerae cell adherence (hemagglutination).

    PubMed Central

    Holmgren, J; Svennerholm, A M; Lindblad, M

    1983-01-01

    The two biotypes of Vibrio cholerae were found to have cell-associated hemagglutinins which differ with regard to binding to different species of erythrocytes and inhibition by monosaccharides. A total of 12 classical V. cholerae strains (Inaba or Ogawa) strongly agglutinated human erythrocytes in a reaction specifically inhibited by L-fucose, whereas 12 El Tor strains preferably agglutinated chicken erythrocytes, a reaction reversed by D-mannose or by higher concentrations of D-fructose, D-glucose, alpha-methyl-D-mannoside, or sucrose. Milk from Swedish women inhibited both of these adherence reactions, and the predominating inhibitory activity for each reaction resisted boiling, was destroyed by periodate treatment, and bound a concanavalin A-Sepharose column, suggesting a carbohydrate structure. Further characterization indicated that the inhibitory activity for classical V. cholerae hemagglutination was distributed about equally on glycoprotein and free oligosaccharide, but was not present on glycolipid. The El Tor inhibiting activity, on the other hand, was almost exclusively of a high-molecular-weight glycoprotein nature. These results support our previous suggestion (Holmgren et al., Infect. Immun. 33:136-141, 1981) that human milk may contain receptor-like glycocompounds which can prevent bacterial adherence by competition with receptors on target cells. PMID:6295953

  10. Dual Pili Post-translational Modifications Synergize to Mediate Meningococcal Adherence to Platelet Activating Factor Receptor on Human Airway Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Benjamin L.; Power, Peter M.; Swords, W. Edward; Weiser, Jeffery N.; Apicella, Michael A.; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Jennings, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Pili of pathogenic Neisseria are major virulence factors associated with adhesion, twitching motility, auto-aggregation, and DNA transformation. Pili of N. meningitidis are subject to several different post-translational modifications. Among these pilin modifications, the presence of phosphorylcholine (ChoP) and a glycan on the pilin protein are phase-variable (subject to high frequency, reversible on/off switching of expression). In this study we report the location of two ChoP modifications on the C-terminus of N. meningitidis pilin. We show that the surface accessibility of ChoP on pili is affected by phase variable changes to the structure of the pilin-linked glycan. We identify for the first time that the platelet activating factor receptor (PAFr) is a key, early event receptor for meningococcal adherence to human bronchial epithelial cells and tissue, and that synergy between the pilin-linked glycan and ChoP post-translational modifications is required for pili to optimally engage PAFr to mediate adherence to human airway cells. PMID:23696740

  11. Heterogeneous Demographic and Cultural Profiles of Non-adherent Chinese-American Patients to Colorectal Cancer Screening: A Latent Class Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Strong, Carol; Ji, Cheng Shuang; Liang, Wenchi; Ma, Grace; Brown, Roger; Wang, Judy Huei-yu

    2013-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer death for Chinese Americans, but their CRC screening rates remain low. Objective We examined subgroups of Chinese-American patients non-adherent to CRC screening guidelines to better inform clinical practices to effectively promote screening. Methods Using latent class analysis (LCA) of data from 327 participants recruited from 18 primary care clinics, we classified non-adherent patients based on sociodemographics, screening barriers, attitudinal and clinical factors for CRC screening. Results The best-fitting LCA model described three distinctive classes: Western Healthcare Class (WHC, 35%), Eastern Healthcare Class (EHC, 18%) and Mixed Healthcare Class (MHC, 46%). WHC patients were highly-educated with average 20 years of U.S. residency, high level of English proficiency, the least Eastern cultural views of care and the greatest exposure to physician recommendations, but reported having no time for screenings. EHC patients were highly-educated seniors and recent immigrants with the least CRC knowledge and the more Eastern cultural views. MHC patients had low level of education, resided in the U.S. for 20 years, and had relatively long relationships with physicians, but their knowledge and cultural views were similar to those of EHC patients. Conclusions Non-adherent Chinese-American patients are heterogeneous. It is essential to have future intervention programs tailored to address specific screening beliefs and barriers for subtypes of non-adherent patients. Implications for Practice Training primary care physicians to recognize patients’ different demographic characteristics and healthcare beliefs may facilitate physician’s communication with patients to overcome their barriers and improve screening behaviors. PMID:23519040

  12. Spatially and temporally controlled gene transfer by electroporation into adherent cells on plasmid DNA-loaded electrodes.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Fumio; Kato, Koichi; Iwata, Hiroo

    2004-01-01

    Functional characterization of human genes is one of the most challenging tasks in current genomics. Owing to a large number of newly discovered genes, high-throughput methodologies are greatly needed to express in parallel each gene in living cells. To develop a method that allows efficient transfection of plasmids into adherent cells in spatial- and temporal-specific manners, we studied electric pulse-triggered gene transfer using a plasmid-loaded electrode. A plasmid was loaded on a gold electrode surface having an adsorbed layer of poly(ethyleneimine), and cells were then plated directly onto this modified surface. The plasmid was detached from the electrode by applying a short electric pulse and introduced into the cells cultured on the electrode, resulting in efficient gene expression, even in primary cultured cells. The location of transfected cells could be restricted within a small area on a micropatterned electrode, showing the versatility of the method for spatially controlled transfection. Plasmid transfection could also be performed in a temporally controlled manner without a marked loss of the efficiency when an electric pulse was applied within 3 days after cell plating. The method described here will provide an efficient means to transfer multiple genes, in parallel, into cultured mammalian cells for high-throughput reverse genetics research. PMID:15613595

  13. Mitochondria, cholesterol and cancer cell metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ribas, Vicent; García-Ruiz, Carmen; Fernández-Checa, José C

    2016-12-01

    Given the role of mitochondria in oxygen consumption, metabolism and cell death regulation, alterations in mitochondrial function or dysregulation of cell death pathways contribute to the genesis and progression of cancer. Cancer cells exhibit an array of metabolic transformations induced by mutations leading to gain-of-function of oncogenes and loss-of-function of tumor suppressor genes that include increased glucose consumption, reduced mitochondrial respiration, increased reactive oxygen species generation and cell death resistance, all of which ensure cancer progression. Cholesterol metabolism is disturbed in cancer cells and supports uncontrolled cell growth. In particular, the accumulation of cholesterol in mitochondria emerges as a molecular component that orchestrates some of these metabolic alterations in cancer cells by impairing mitochondrial function. As a consequence, mitochondrial cholesterol loading in cancer cells may contribute, in part, to the Warburg effect stimulating aerobic glycolysis to meet the energetic demand of proliferating cells, while protecting cancer cells against mitochondrial apoptosis due to changes in mitochondrial membrane dynamics. Further understanding the complexity in the metabolic alterations of cancer cells, mediated largely through alterations in mitochondrial function, may pave the way to identify more efficient strategies for cancer treatment involving the use of small molecules targeting mitochondria, cholesterol homeostasis/trafficking and specific metabolic pathways. PMID:27455839

  14. Cancer stem cells and differentiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Sell, Stewart

    2006-01-01

    Cancers arise from stem cells in adult tissues and the cells that make up a cancer reflect the same stem cell --> progeny --> differentiation progression observed in normal tissues. All adult tissues are made up of lineages of cells consisting of tissue stem cells and their progeny (transit-amplifying cells and terminally differentiated cells); the number of new cells produced in normal tissue lineages roughly equals the number of old cells that die. Cancers result from maturation arrest of this process, resulting in continued proliferation of cells and a failure to differentiate and die. The biological behavior, morphological appearance, and clinical course of a cancer depend on the stage of maturation at which the genetic lesion is activated. This review makes a comparison of cancer cells to embryonic stem cells and to adult tis sue stem cells while addressing two basic questions: (1) Where do cancers come from?, and (2) How do cancers grow? The answers to these questions are critical to the development of approaches to the detection, prevention, and treatment of cancer. PMID:16557043

  15. High-molecular-mass lipopolysaccharides are involved in Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae adherence to porcine respiratory tract cells.

    PubMed Central

    Paradis, S E; Dubreuil, D; Rioux, S; Gottschalk, M; Jacques, M

    1994-01-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is the causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia. The major adhesin of A. pleuropneumoniae has been identified as the lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) (M. Bélanger, D. Dubreuil, J. Harel, C. Girard, and M. Jacques, Infect. Immun. 58:3523-3530, 1990). Using immunoelectron microscopy and flow cytometry, we showed in the present study that LPSs were well exposed at the surface of this encapsulated microorganism. Immunolocalization with porcine lung and tracheal frozen sections showed that extracted LPS bound to the lung mesenchyme and vascular endothelium and to the tracheal epithelium, respectively. Inhibition of adherence of A. pleuropneumoniae with extracted LPS was also performed with lung and tracheal frozen sections. Acid hydrolysis of LPS revealed that the active component of LPS was not lipid A but the polysaccharides. LPSs from A. pleuropneumoniae serotypes 1 and 2 were separated by chromatography on Sephacryl S-300 SF, in the presence of sodium deoxycholate, according to their molecular masses. The adherence-inhibitory activity was found in the high-molecular-mass fractions. These high-molecular-mass fractions contained 2-keto-3-deoxyoctulosonic acid and neutral sugars, and they were recognized by a monoclonal antibody directed against A. pleuropneumoniae O antigen but not recognized by a monoclonal antibody against capsular antigen. Images PMID:8039902

  16. Heat-labile enterotoxin-induced activation of NF-κB and MAPK pathways in intestinal epithelial cells impacts enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) adherence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaogang; Gao, Xiaofei; Hardwidge, Philip R

    2012-08-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) causes human morbidity and mortality in developing nations and is an emerging threat to food safety in developed nations. The ETEC heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) not only causes diarrheal disease by deregulating host adenylate cyclase, but also enhances ETEC adherence to intestinal epithelial cells. The mechanism governing this LT pro-adherence phenotype is unclear. Here we investigated intestinal epithelial cell signal transduction pathways activated by ETEC and quantified the relative importance of these host pathways to LT-induced ETEC adherence. We show that ETEC activates both NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling pathways through mechanisms that are primarily dependent upon LT. LT-induced NF-κB activation depends upon the cAMP-dependent activation of the Ras-like GTPase Rap1 but is independent of protein kinase A (PKA). By using inhibitors of these pathways, we demonstrate that inhibiting the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase prevents LT from increasing ETEC adherence. By contrast, the LT pro-adherence phenotype appears unrelated to both LT-induced Rap1 activity and to subsequent NF-κB activation. We speculate that LT may alter host signal transduction to induce the presentation of ligands for ETEC adhesins in such a way that promotes ETEC adherence. Our findings provide insight into previously unexplored functions of LT and their relative importance to ETEC virulence. PMID:22452361

  17. Mast cells, angiogenesis and cancer.

    PubMed

    Ribatti, Domenico; Crivellato, Enrico

    2011-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) were first described by Paul Ehrlich 1 in his doctoral thesis. MCs have long been implicated in the pathogenesis of allergic reactions and certain protective responses to parasites. As most tumors contain inflammatory cell infiltrates, which often include plentiful MCs, the question as to the possible contribution of MCs to tumor development has progressively been emerging. In this chapter, the specific involvement of MCs in tumor biology and tumor fate will be considered, with particular emphasis on the capacity of these cells to stimulate tumor growth by promoting angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis. Data from experimental carcinogenesis and from different tumor settings in human pathology will be summarized. Information to be presented will suggest that MCs may serve as a novel therapeutic target for cancer treatment. PMID:21713661

  18. Ouabain enhances lung cancer cell detachment.

    PubMed

    Ruanghirun, Thidarat; Pongrakhananon, Varisa; Chanvorachote, Pithi

    2014-05-01

    A human steroid hormone, ouabain, has been shown to play a role in several types of cancer cell behavior; however, its effects on cancer metastasis are largely unknown. Herein, we demonstrate that sub-toxic concentrations of ouabain facilitate cancer cell detachment from the extracellular matrix in human lung cancer cells. Ouabain at concentrations of 0-10 pM significantly enhanced cell detachment in dose- and time- dependent manners, while having minimal effect on cell viability. The detachment-inducing effect of ouabain was found to be mediated through focal-adhesion kinase and ATP-dependent tyrosine kinase pathways. Alpha-5 and beta-1 integrins were found to be down-regulated in response to ouabain treatment. Since detachment of cancer cells is a prerequisite process for metastasis to begin, these insights benefit our understanding over the molecular basis of cancer biology. PMID:24778025

  19. Endothelial cell metabolism: parallels and divergences with cancer cell metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The stromal vasculature in tumors is a vital conduit of nutrients and oxygen for cancer cells. To date, the vast majority of studies have focused on unraveling the genetic basis of vessel sprouting (also termed angiogenesis). In contrast to the widely studied changes in cancer cell metabolism, insight in the metabolic regulation of angiogenesis is only just emerging. These studies show that metabolic pathways in endothelial cells (ECs) importantly regulate angiogenesis in conjunction with genetic signals. In this review, we will highlight these emerging insights in EC metabolism and discuss them in perspective of cancer cell metabolism. While it is generally assumed that cancer cells have unique metabolic adaptations, not shared by healthy non-transformed cells, we will discuss parallels and highlight differences between endothelial and cancer cell metabolism and consider possible novel therapeutic opportunities arising from targeting both cancer and endothelial cells. PMID:25250177

  20. The biology of cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Neethan A; Shimono, Yohei; Qian, Dalong; Clarke, Michael F

    2007-01-01

    Cancers originally develop from normal cells that gain the ability to proliferate aberrantly and eventually turn malignant. These cancerous cells then grow clonally into tumors and eventually have the potential to metastasize. A central question in cancer biology is, which cells can be transformed to form tumors? Recent studies elucidated the presence of cancer stem cells that have the exclusive ability to regenerate tumors. These cancer stem cells share many characteristics with normal stem cells, including self-renewal and differentiation. With the growing evidence that cancer stem cells exist in a wide array of tumors, it is becoming increasingly important to understand the molecular mechanisms that regulate self-renewal and differentiation because corruption of genes involved in these pathways likely participates in tumor growth. This new paradigm of oncogenesis has been validated in a growing list of tumors. Studies of normal and cancer stem cells from the same tissue have shed light on the ontogeny of tumors. That signaling pathways such as Bmi1 and Wnt have similar effects in normal and cancer stem cell self-renewal suggests that common molecular pathways regulate both populations. Understanding the biology of cancer stem cells will contribute to the identification of molecular targets important for future therapies. PMID:17645413

  1. Restoration of normal phenotype in cancer cells

    DOEpatents

    Bissell, Mina J.; Weaver, Valerie M.

    1998-01-01

    A method for reversing expression of malignant phenotype in cancer cells is described. The method comprises applying .beta..sub.1 integrin function-blocking antibody to the cells. The method can be used to assess the progress of cancer therapy. Human breast epithelial cells were shown to be particularly responsive.

  2. Restoration of normal phenotype in cancer cells

    DOEpatents

    Bissell, M.J.; Weaver, V.M.

    1998-12-08

    A method for reversing expression of malignant phenotype in cancer cells is described. The method comprises applying {beta}{sub 1} integrin function-blocking antibody to the cells. The method can be used to assess the progress of cancer therapy. Human breast epithelial cells were shown to be particularly responsive. 14 figs.

  3. A role for the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier as a repressor of the Warburg Effect and colon cancer cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Schell, John C.; Olson, Kristofor A.; Jiang, Lei; Hawkins, Amy J.; Van Vranken, Jonathan G.; Xie, Jianxin; Egnatchik, Robert A.; Earl, Espen G.; Deberardinis, Ralph J.; Rutter, Jared

    2014-01-01

    Summary Cancer cells are typically subject to profound metabolic alterations, including the Warburg effect wherein cancer cells oxidize a decreased fraction of the pyruvate generated from glycolysis. We show herein that the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier (MPC), composed of the products of the MPC1 and MPC2 genes, modulates fractional pyruvate oxidation. MPC1 is deleted or underexpressed in multiple cancers and correlates with poor prognosis. Cancer cells re-expressing MPC1 and MPC2 display increased mitochondrial pyruvate oxidation, with no changes in cell growth in adherent culture. MPC re-expression exerted profound effects in anchorage-independent growth conditions, however, including impaired colony formation in soft agar, spheroid formation, and xenograft growth. We also observed a decrease in markers of stemness and traced the growth effects of MPC expression to the stem cell compartment. We propose that reduced MPC activity is an important aspect of cancer metabolism, perhaps through altering the maintenance and fate of stem cells. PMID:25458841

  4. Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... body. Cancerous cells are also called malignant cells. Causes Cancer grows out of cells in the body. Normal ... of many cancers remains unknown. The most common cause of cancer-related death is lung cancer. In the U.S., ...

  5. Deregulation of Cell Signaling in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Giancotti, Filippo G.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Oncogenic mutations disrupt the regulatory circuits that govern cell function, enabling tumor cells to undergo de-regulated mitogenesis, to resist to proapoptotic insults, and to invade through tissue boundaries. Cancer cell biology has played a crucial role in elucidating the signaling mechanisms by which oncogenic mutations sustain these malignant behaviors and thereby in identifying rational targets for cancer drugs. The efficacy of such targeted therapies illustrate the power of a reductionist approach to the study of cancer. PMID:24561200

  6. Impact on disinfection efficiency of cell load and of planktonic/adherent/detached state: case of Hafnia alvei inactivation by plasma activated water.

    PubMed

    Kamgang-Youbi, Georges; Herry, Jean-Marie; Brisset, Jean-Louis; Bellon-Fontaine, Marie-Noëlle; Doubla, Avaly; Naïtali, Murielle

    2008-12-01

    This paper describes the effects of initial microbial concentration and planktonic/adherent/detached states on the efficiency of plasma-activated water. This disinfecting solution was obtained by treating distilled water with an atmospheric pressure plasma produced by gliding electric discharges in humid air. The inactivation kinetics of planktonic cells of Hafnia alvei (selected as a bacterial model) were found to be of the first order. They were influenced by the initial microbial concentration. Efficiency decreased when the initial viable population N(0) increased, and the inactivation rate k(max) was linearly modified as a function of Log(10) (N(0)). This relation was used to compare planktonic, adherent, and detached cells independently from the level of population. Bacteria adhering to stainless steel and high-density polyethylene were also sensitive to treatment, but at a lower rate than their free-living counterparts. Moreover, cells detached from these solid substrates exhibited an inactivation rate lower than that of planktonic cells but similar to adherent bacteria. This strongly suggests the induction of a physiological modification to bacteria during the adhesion step, rendering adherent--and further detached--bacteria less susceptible to the treatment, when compared to planktonic bacteria. PMID:18769918

  7. Targeting Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Cancer Stem Cells in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Landen, Charles N.; Goodman, Blake; Katre, Ashwini A.; Steg, Adam D.; Nick, Alpa M.; Stone, Rebecca L.; Miller, Lance D.; Mejia, Pablo Vivas; Jennings, Nicolas B.; Gershenson, David M.; Bast, Robert C.; Coleman, Robert L.; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Sood, Anil K.

    2010-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase-1A1 (ALDH1A1) expression characterizes a subpopulation of cells with tumor initiating or cancer stem cell properties in several malignancies. Our goal was to characterize the phenotype of ALDH1A1-positive ovarian cancer cells and examine the biological effects of ALDH1A1 gene silencing. In our analysis of multiple ovarian cancer cell lines, we found that ALDH1A1 expression and activity was significantly higher in taxane and platinum-resistant cell lines. In patient samples, 72.9% of ovarian cancers had ALDH1A1 expression, in whom the percent of ALDH1A1-positive cells correlated negatively with progression-free survival (6.05 v 13.81 months, p<0.035). Subpopulations of A2780cp20 cells with ALDH1A1 activity were isolated for orthotopic tumor initiating studies, where tumorigenicity was approximately 50-fold higher with ALDH1A1-positive cells. Interestingly, tumors derived from ALDH1A1-positive cells gave rise to both ALDH1A1-positive and ALDH1A1-negative populations, but ALDH1A1-negative cells could not generate ALDH1A1-positive cells. In an in vivo orthotopic mouse model of ovarian cancer, ALDH1A1 silencing using nanoliposomal siRNA sensitized both taxane- and platinum-resistant cell lines to chemotherapy, significantly reducing tumor growth in mice compared to chemotherapy alone (a 74–90% reduction, p<0.015). These data demonstrate that the ALDH1A1 subpopulation is associated with chemoresistance and outcome in ovarian cancer patients, and targeting ALDH1A1 sensitizes resistant cells to chemotherapy. ALDH1A1-positive cells have enhanced, but not absolute, tumorigenicity, but do have differentiation capacity lacking in ALDH1A1-negative cells. This enzyme may be important for identification and targeting of chemoresistant cell populations in ovarian cancer. PMID:20889728

  8. The alkaloid Berberine inhibits the growth of Anoikis-resistant MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines by inducing cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Kim, J B; Yu, J-H; Ko, E; Lee, K-W; Song, A K; Park, S Y; Shin, I; Han, W; Noh, D Y

    2010-05-01

    Berberine is a pure phenanthren alkaloid isolated from the roots and bark of herbal plants such as Berberis, Hydrastis canadensis and Coptis chinensis. Berberine has been established to inhibit the growth of breast cancer cells, but its effects on the drug resistance and anoikis-resistance of breast cancer cells have yet to be elucidated. Anoikis, or detachment-induced apoptosis, may prevent cancer progression and metastasis by blocking signals necessary for survival of localized cancer cells. Resistance to anoikis is regarded as a prerequisite for metastasis; however, little is known about the role of berberine in anoikis-resistance. We established anoikis-resistant cells from the breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 by culturing them on a Poly-Hema substratum. We then investigated the effects of berberine on the growth of these cells. The anoikis-resistant cells had a reduced growth rate and were more invasive than their respective adherent cell lines. The effect of berberine on growth was compared to that of doxorubicine, which is a drug commonly used to treat breast cancer, in both the adherent and anoikis-resistant cell lines. Berberine promoted the growth inhibition of anoikis-resistant cells to a greater extent than doxorubicine treatment. Treatment with berberine-induced cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 in the anoikis-resistant MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells as compared to untreated control cells. In summary, these results revealed that berberine can efficiently inhibit growth by inducing cell cycle arrest in anoikis-resistant MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. Further analysis of these phenotypes is essential for understanding the effect of berberine on anoikis-resistant breast cancer cells, which would be relevant for the therapeutic targeting of breast cancer metastasis. PMID:19800775

  9. 6-Shogaol Inhibits Breast Cancer Cells and Stem Cell-Like Spheroids by Modulation of Notch Signaling Pathway and Induction of Autophagic Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Ray, Anasuya; Vasudevan, Smreti; Sengupta, Suparna

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) pose a serious obstacle to cancer therapy as they can be responsible for poor prognosis and tumour relapse. In this study, we have investigated inhibitory activity of the ginger-derived compound 6-shogaol against breast cancer cells both in monolayer and in cancer-stem cell-like spheroid culture. The spheroids were generated from adherent breast cancer cells. 6-shogaol was effective in killing both breast cancer monolayer cells and spheroids at doses that were not toxic to noncancerous cells. The percentages of CD44+CD24-/low cells and the secondary sphere content were reduced drastically upon treatment with 6-shogaol confirming its action on CSCs. Treatment with 6-shogaol caused cytoplasmic vacuole formation and cleavage of microtubule associated protein Light Chain3 (LC3) in both monolayer and spheroid culture indicating that it induced autophagy. Kinetic analysis of the LC3 expression and a combination treatment with chloroquine revealed that the autophagic flux instigated cell death in 6-shogaol treated breast cancer cells in contrast to the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine. Furthermore, 6-shogaol-induced cell death got suppressed in the presence of chloroquine and a very low level of apoptosis was exhibited even after prolonged treatment of the compound, suggesting that autophagy is the major mode of cell death induced by 6-shogaol in breast cancer cells. 6-shogaol reduced the expression levels of Cleaved Notch1 and its target proteins Hes1 and Cyclin D1 in spheroids, and the reduction was further pronounced in the presence of a γ-secretase inhibitor. Secondary sphere formation in the presence of the inhibitor was also further reduced by 6-shogaol. Together, these results indicate that the inhibitory action of 6-shogaol on spheroid growth and sustainability is conferred through γ-secretase mediated down-regulation of Notch signaling. The efficacy of 6-shogaol in monolayer and cancer stem cell-like spheroids raise hope for its

  10. 6-Shogaol Inhibits Breast Cancer Cells and Stem Cell-Like Spheroids by Modulation of Notch Signaling Pathway and Induction of Autophagic Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Anasuya; Vasudevan, Smreti; Sengupta, Suparna

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) pose a serious obstacle to cancer therapy as they can be responsible for poor prognosis and tumour relapse. In this study, we have investigated inhibitory activity of the ginger-derived compound 6-shogaol against breast cancer cells both in monolayer and in cancer-stem cell-like spheroid culture. The spheroids were generated from adherent breast cancer cells. 6-shogaol was effective in killing both breast cancer monolayer cells and spheroids at doses that were not toxic to noncancerous cells. The percentages of CD44+CD24-/low cells and the secondary sphere content were reduced drastically upon treatment with 6-shogaol confirming its action on CSCs. Treatment with 6-shogaol caused cytoplasmic vacuole formation and cleavage of microtubule associated protein Light Chain3 (LC3) in both monolayer and spheroid culture indicating that it induced autophagy. Kinetic analysis of the LC3 expression and a combination treatment with chloroquine revealed that the autophagic flux instigated cell death in 6-shogaol treated breast cancer cells in contrast to the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine. Furthermore, 6-shogaol-induced cell death got suppressed in the presence of chloroquine and a very low level of apoptosis was exhibited even after prolonged treatment of the compound, suggesting that autophagy is the major mode of cell death induced by 6-shogaol in breast cancer cells. 6-shogaol reduced the expression levels of Cleaved Notch1 and its target proteins Hes1 and Cyclin D1 in spheroids, and the reduction was further pronounced in the presence of a γ-secretase inhibitor. Secondary sphere formation in the presence of the inhibitor was also further reduced by 6-shogaol. Together, these results indicate that the inhibitory action of 6-shogaol on spheroid growth and sustainability is conferred through γ-secretase mediated down-regulation of Notch signaling. The efficacy of 6-shogaol in monolayer and cancer stem cell-like spheroids raise hope for its

  11. Role of stem cells in cancer therapy and cancer stem cells: a review

    PubMed Central

    Sagar, Jayesh; Chaib, Boussad; Sales, Kevin; Winslet, Marc; Seifalian, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    For over 30 years, stem cells have been used in the replenishment of blood and immune systems damaged by the cancer cells or during treatment of cancer by chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Apart from their use in the immuno-reconstitution, the stem cells have been reported to contribute in the tissue regeneration and as delivery vehicles in the cancer treatments. The recent concept of 'cancer stem cells' has directed scientific communities towards a different wide new area of research field and possible potential future treatment modalities for the cancer. Aim of this review is primarily focus on the recent developments in the use of the stem cells in the cancer treatments, then to discuss the cancer stem cells, now considered as backbone in the development of the cancer; and their role in carcinogenesis and their implications in the development of possible new cancer treatment options in future. PMID:17547749

  12. Treatment Options by Stage (Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  13. Regulation of NANOG in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gong, Shuai; Li, Qiuhui; Jeter, Collene R; Fan, Qingxia; Tang, Dean G; Liu, Bigang

    2015-09-01

    As one of the key pluripotency transcription factors, NANOG plays a critical role in maintaining the self-renewal and pluripotency in normal embryonic stem cells. Recent data indicate that NANOG is expressed in a variety of cancers and its expression correlates with poor survival in cancer patients. Of interest, many studies suggest that NANOG enhances the defined characteristics of cancer stem cells and may thus function as an oncogene to promote carcinogenesis. Therefore, NANOG expression determines the cell fate not only in pluripotent cells but also in cancer cells. Although the regulation of NANOG in normal embryonic stem cells is reasonably well understood, the regulation of NANOG in cancer cells has only emerged recently. The current review provides a most updated summary on how NANOG expression is regulated during tumor development and progression. PMID:26013997

  14. Adhering heat-killed human Lactobacillus acidophilus, strain LB, inhibits the process of pathogenicity of diarrhoeagenic bacteria in cultured human intestinal cells.

    PubMed

    Coconnier, M H; Bernet, M F; Chauvière, G; Servin, A L

    1993-12-01

    Heat-killed L. acidophilus, strain LB, was tested for its ability to adhere in vitro onto human enterocyte-like Caco-2 and muco-secreting HT29-MTX cells in culture. The heat-killed LB bacteria exhibited a high adhesive property. A diffuse pattern of adhesion was observed to the undifferentiated cells, the apical brush border of the enterocytic cells, and to the mucus layer that covered the surface of the mucus-secreting cells. The inhibitory effect of heat-killed LB organisms against the human intestinal Caco-2 cell-adhesion and cell-invasion by a large variety of diarrhoeagenic bacteria was investigated. The following dose-dependent inhibitions were obtained: (i) against the cell-association of enterotoxigenic, diffusely-adhering and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, and Salmonella typhimurium; (ii) against the cell-invasion by enteropathogenic Escherichia coli, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella typhimurium. PMID:8188996

  15. Confocal Raman imaging for cancer cell classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieu, Evelien; Van Dorpe, Pol; Stakenborg, Tim; Liu, Chengxun; Lagae, Liesbet

    2014-05-01

    We propose confocal Raman imaging as a label-free single cell characterization method that can be used as an alternative for conventional cell identification techniques that typically require labels, long incubation times and complex sample preparation. In this study it is investigated whether cancer and blood cells can be distinguished based on their Raman spectra. 2D Raman scans are recorded of 114 single cells, i.e. 60 breast (MCF-7), 5 cervix (HeLa) and 39 prostate (LNCaP) cancer cells and 10 monocytes (from healthy donors). For each cell an average spectrum is calculated and principal component analysis is performed on all average cell spectra. The main features of these principal components indicate that the information for cell identification based on Raman spectra mainly comes from the fatty acid composition in the cell. Based on the second and third principal component, blood cells could be distinguished from cancer cells; and prostate cancer cells could be distinguished from breast and cervix cancer cells. However, it was not possible to distinguish breast and cervix cancer cells. The results obtained in this study, demonstrate the potential of confocal Raman imaging for cell type classification and identification purposes.

  16. Inhibition of mitogenesis induced by phytohemagglutinin and Lens culinaris lectin in adherent-cell supernatants treated with protein extract of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Parra, C; Montaño, L F; Huesca, M; Rayón, I; Willms, K; Goodsaid, F

    1986-01-01

    Specific stimulation of T cells by phytohemagglutinin and Lens culinaris lectin was inhibited by a soluble factor(s) secreted by normal adherent cells stimulated with culture filtrate protein extract (CFPE) derived from bacterial cultures of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra (avirulent) and H37Rv (virulent). The induction of the inhibitory factor was blocked by the presence of hyperimmune antisera to H37Rv or H37Ra CFPE. The inhibitory factor did not seem to be a CFPE reprocessed by the adherent cells. Inhibitory activity was maximal in supernatants of adherent-cell cultures incubated for 48 h; the inhibitory factor was heat labile, and its production was dependent on the concentration of M. tuberculosis CFPE. A mouse monocyte-macrophage cell line, ATCC J774A.1, produced an identical inhibitory factor, thus excluding a non-macrophage-contaminating adherent cell as the source of the factor. This inhibitory factor also interfered with the recognition of phytohemagglutinin and Lens culinaris lectin by T cells. PMID:3082760

  17. A Serine-Threonine Kinase (StkP) Regulates Expression of the Pneumococcal Pilus and Modulates Bacterial Adherence to Human Epithelial and Endothelial Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Jenny A.; Mitchell, Andrea M.; Mitchell, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    The pneumococcal serine threonine protein kinase (StkP) acts as a global regulator in the pneumococcus. Bacterial mutants deficient in StkP are less virulent in animal models of infection. The gene for this regulator is located adjacent to the gene for its cognate phosphatase in the pneumococcal genome. The phosphatase dephosphorylates proteins phosphorylated by StkP and has been shown to regulate a number of key pneumococcal virulence factors and to modulate adherence to eukaryotic cells. The role of StkP in adherence of pneumococci to human cells has not previously been reported. In this study we show StkP represses the pneumococcal pilus, a virulence factor known to be important for bacterial adhesion. In a serotype 4 strain regulation of the pilus by StkP modulates adherence to human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) and human lung epithelial cells. This suggests that the pneumococcal pilus may play a role in adherence during infections such as meningitis and pneumonia. We show that regulation of the pilus occurs at the population level as StkP alters the number of pili-positive cells within a single culture. As far as we are aware this is the first gene identified outside of the pilus islet that regulates the biphasic expression of the pilus. These findings suggest StkPs role in cell division may be linked to regulation of expression of a cell surface adhesin. PMID:26090876

  18. Dendritic cell-based cancer therapeutic vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Palucka, Karolina; Banchereau, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    The past decade has seen tremendous developments in novel cancer therapies, through targeting of tumor cell-intrinsic pathways whose activity is linked to genetic alterations, as well as the targeting of tumor cell-extrinsic factors such as growth factors. Furthermore, immunotherapies are entering the clinic at an unprecedented speed following the demonstration that T cells can efficiently reject tumors and that their anti-tumor activity can be enhanced with antibodies against immune regulatory molecules (checkpoints blockade). Current immunotherapy strategies include monoclonal antibodies against tumor cells or immune regulatory molecules, cell-based therapies such as adoptive transfer of ex vivo activated T cells and natural killer (NK) cells, and cancer vaccines. Herein, we discuss the immunological basis for therapeutic cancer vaccines and how the current understanding of dendritic cell (DC) and T cell biology might enable development of next-generation curative therapies for patients with cancer. PMID:23890062

  19. Epigenetic targeting of ovarian cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yinu; Cardenas, Horacio; Fang, Fang; Condello, Salvatore; Taverna, Pietro; Segar, Matthew; Liu, Yunlong; Nephew, Kenneth P; Matei, Daniela

    2014-09-01

    Emerging results indicate that cancer stem-like cells contribute to chemoresistance and poor clinical outcomes in many cancers, including ovarian cancer. As epigenetic regulators play a major role in the control of normal stem cell differentiation, epigenetics may offer a useful arena to develop strategies to target cancer stem-like cells. Epigenetic aberrations, especially DNA methylation, silence tumor-suppressor and differentiation-associated genes that regulate the survival of ovarian cancer stem-like cells (OCSC). In this study, we tested the hypothesis that DNA-hypomethylating agents may be able to reset OCSC toward a differentiated phenotype by evaluating the effects of the new DNA methytransferase inhibitor SGI-110 on OCSC phenotype, as defined by expression of the cancer stem-like marker aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). We demonstrated that ALDH(+) ovarian cancer cells possess multiple stem cell characteristics, were highly chemoresistant, and were enriched in xenografts residual after platinum therapy. Low-dose SGI-110 reduced the stem-like properties of ALDH(+) cells, including their tumor-initiating capacity, resensitized these OCSCs to platinum, and induced reexpression of differentiation-associated genes. Maintenance treatment with SGI-110 after carboplatin inhibited OCSC growth, causing global tumor hypomethylation and decreased tumor progression. Our work offers preclinical evidence that epigenome-targeting strategies have the potential to delay tumor progression by reprogramming residual cancer stem-like cells. Furthermore, the results suggest that SGI-110 might be administered in combination with platinum to prevent the development of recurrent and chemoresistant ovarian cancer. PMID:25035395

  20. Radiofrequency treatment alters cancer cell phenotype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ware, Matthew J.; Tinger, Sophia; Colbert, Kevin L.; Corr, Stuart J.; Rees, Paul; Koshkina, Nadezhda; Curley, Steven; Summers, H. D.; Godin, Biana

    2015-07-01

    The importance of evaluating physical cues in cancer research is gradually being realized. Assessment of cancer cell physical appearance, or phenotype, may provide information on changes in cellular behavior, including migratory or communicative changes. These characteristics are intrinsically different between malignant and non-malignant cells and change in response to therapy or in the progression of the disease. Here, we report that pancreatic cancer cell phenotype was altered in response to a physical method for cancer therapy, a non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) treatment, which is currently being developed for human trials. We provide a battery of tests to explore these phenotype characteristics. Our data show that cell topography, morphology, motility, adhesion and division change as a result of the treatment. These may have consequences for tissue architecture, for diffusion of anti-cancer therapeutics and cancer cell susceptibility within the tumor. Clear phenotypical differences were observed between cancerous and normal cells in both their untreated states and in their response to RF therapy. We also report, for the first time, a transfer of microsized particles through tunneling nanotubes, which were produced by cancer cells in response to RF therapy. Additionally, we provide evidence that various sub-populations of cancer cells heterogeneously respond to RF treatment.

  1. Radiofrequency treatment alters cancer cell phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Ware, Matthew J.; Tinger, Sophia; Colbert, Kevin L.; Corr, Stuart J.; Rees, Paul; Koshkina, Nadezhda; Curley, Steven; Summers, H. D.; Godin, Biana

    2015-01-01

    The importance of evaluating physical cues in cancer research is gradually being realized. Assessment of cancer cell physical appearance, or phenotype, may provide information on changes in cellular behavior, including migratory or communicative changes. These characteristics are intrinsically different between malignant and non-malignant cells and change in response to therapy or in the progression of the disease. Here, we report that pancreatic cancer cell phenotype was altered in response to a physical method for cancer therapy, a non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) treatment, which is currently being developed for human trials. We provide a battery of tests to explore these phenotype characteristics. Our data show that cell topography, morphology, motility, adhesion and division change as a result of the treatment. These may have consequences for tissue architecture, for diffusion of anti-cancer therapeutics and cancer cell susceptibility within the tumor. Clear phenotypical differences were observed between cancerous and normal cells in both their untreated states and in their response to RF therapy. We also report, for the first time, a transfer of microsized particles through tunneling nanotubes, which were produced by cancer cells in response to RF therapy. Additionally, we provide evidence that various sub-populations of cancer cells heterogeneously respond to RF treatment. PMID:26165830

  2. Dehydroeffusol effectively inhibits human gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry with low toxicity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenming; Meng, Mei; Zhang, Bin; Du, Longsheng; Pan, Yanyan; Yang, Ping; Gu, Zhenlun; Zhou, Quansheng; Cao, Zhifei

    2015-09-01

    Accumulated data has shown that various vasculogenic tumor cells, including gastric cancer cells, are able to directly form tumor blood vessels via vasculogenic mimicry, supplying oxygen and nutrients to tumors, and facilitating progression and metastasis of malignant tumors. Therefore, tumor vasculogenic mimicry is a rational target for developing novel anticancer therapeutics. However, effective antitumor vasculogenic mimicry-targeting drugs are not clinically available. In this study, we purified 2,7-dihydroxyl-1-methyl-5-vinyl-phenanthrene, termed dehydroeffusol, from the traditional Chinese medicinal herb Juncus effusus L., and found that dehydroeffusol effectively inhibited gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry in vitro and in vivo with very low toxicity. Dehydroeffusol significantly suppressed gastric cancer cell adhesion, migration, and invasion. Molecular mechanistic studies revealed that dehydroeffusol markedly inhibited the expression of a vasculogenic mimicry master gene VE-cadherin and reduced adherent protein exposure on the cell surface by inhibiting gene promoter activity. In addition, dehydroeffusol significantly decreased the expression of a key vasculogenic gene matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) in gastric cancer cells, and diminished MMP2 protease activity. Together, our results showed that dehydroeffusol effectively inhibited gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry with very low toxicity, suggesting that dehydroeffusol is a potential drug candidate for anti-gastric cancer neovascularization and anti-gastric cancer therapy. PMID:25982451

  3. Breast cancer cell lines: friend or foe?

    PubMed Central

    Burdall, Sarah E; Hanby, Andrew M; Lansdown, Mark RJ; Speirs, Valerie

    2003-01-01

    The majority of breast cancer research is conducted using established breast cancer cell lines as in vitro models. An alternative is to use cultures established from primary breast tumours. Here, we discuss the pros and cons of using both of these models in translational breast cancer research. PMID:12631387

  4. Mitigation of Lethal Radiation Syndrome in Mice by Intramuscular Injection of 3D Cultured Adherent Human Placental Stromal Cells.

    PubMed

    Gaberman, Elena; Pinzur, Lena; Levdansky, Lilia; Tsirlin, Maria; Netzer, Nir; Aberman, Zami; Gorodetsky, Raphael

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to high lethal dose of ionizing radiation results in acute radiation syndrome with deleterious systemic effects to different organs. A primary target is the highly sensitive bone marrow and the hematopoietic system. In the current study C3H/HeN mice were total body irradiated by 7.7 Gy. Twenty four hrs and 5 days after irradiation 2×10(6) cells from different preparations of human derived 3D expanded adherent placental stromal cells (PLX) were injected intramuscularly. Treatment with batches consisting of pure maternal cell preparations (PLX-Mat) increased the survival of the irradiated mice from ∼27% to 68% (P<0.001), while cell preparations with a mixture of maternal and fetal derived cells (PLX-RAD) increased the survival to ∼98% (P<0.0001). The dose modifying factor of this treatment for both 50% and 37% survival (DMF50 and DMF37) was∼1.23. Initiation of the more effective treatment with PLX-RAD injection could be delayed for up to 48 hrs after irradiation with similar effect. A delayed treatment by 72 hrs had lower, but still significantly effect (p<0.05). A faster recovery of the BM and improved reconstitution of all blood cell lineages in the PLX-RAD treated mice during the follow-up explains the increased survival of the cells treated irradiated mice. The number of CD45+/SCA1+ hematopoietic progenitor cells within the fast recovering population of nucleated BM cells in the irradiated mice was also elevated in the PLX-RAD treated mice. Our study suggests that IM treatment with PLX-RAD cells may serve as a highly effective "off the shelf" therapy to treat BM failure following total body exposure to high doses of radiation. The results suggest that similar treatments may be beneficial also for clinical conditions associated with severe BM aplasia and pancytopenia. PMID:23823334

  5. Mitigation of Lethal Radiation Syndrome in Mice by Intramuscular Injection of 3D Cultured Adherent Human Placental Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gaberman, Elena; Pinzur, Lena; Levdansky, Lilia; Tsirlin, Maria; Netzer, Nir; Aberman, Zami; Gorodetsky, Raphael

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to high lethal dose of ionizing radiation results in acute radiation syndrome with deleterious systemic effects to different organs. A primary target is the highly sensitive bone marrow and the hematopoietic system. In the current study C3H/HeN mice were total body irradiated by 7.7 Gy. Twenty four hrs and 5 days after irradiation 2×106 cells from different preparations of human derived 3D expanded adherent placental stromal cells (PLX) were injected intramuscularly. Treatment with batches consisting of pure maternal cell preparations (PLX-Mat) increased the survival of the irradiated mice from ∼27% to 68% (P<0.001), while cell preparations with a mixture of maternal and fetal derived cells (PLX-RAD) increased the survival to ∼98% (P<0.0001). The dose modifying factor of this treatment for both 50% and 37% survival (DMF50 and DMF37) was∼1.23. Initiation of the more effective treatment with PLX-RAD injection could be delayed for up to 48 hrs after irradiation with similar effect. A delayed treatment by 72 hrs had lower, but still significantly effect (p<0.05). A faster recovery of the BM and improved reconstitution of all blood cell lineages in the PLX-RAD treated mice during the follow-up explains the increased survival of the cells treated irradiated mice. The number of CD45+/SCA1+ hematopoietic progenitor cells within the fast recovering population of nucleated BM cells in the irradiated mice was also elevated in the PLX-RAD treated mice. Our study suggests that IM treatment with PLX-RAD cells may serve as a highly effective “off the shelf” therapy to treat BM failure following total body exposure to high doses of radiation. The results suggest that similar treatments may be beneficial also for clinical conditions associated with severe BM aplasia and pancytopenia. PMID:23823334

  6. Turning Cancer Cells into Cancer Killers.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Researchers have changed leukemia cells into natural killer cells by adding a specific antibody to bone marrow cells from patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia. The induced natural killer cells killed leukemia cells in culture. The antibody does not trigger the same conversion in bone marrow from healthy patients. PMID:26621762

  7. Cancer stem cell targeted therapy: progress amid controversies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Shigdar, Sarah; Gantier, Michael P.; Hou, Yingchun; Wang, Li; Li, Yong; Shamaileh, Hadi Al; Yin, Wang; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Zhao, Xinhan; Duan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Although cancer stem cells have been well characterized in numerous malignancies, the fundamental characteristics of this group of cells, however, have been challenged by some recent observations: cancer stem cells may not necessary to be rare within tumors; cancer stem cells and non-cancer stem cells may undergo reversible phenotypic changes; and the cancer stem cells phenotype can vary substantially between patients. Here the current status and progresses of cancer stem cells theory is illustrated and via providing a panoramic view of cancer therapy, we addressed the recent controversies regarding the feasibility of cancer stem cells targeted anti-cancer therapy. PMID:26496035

  8. In vitro inhibition of calcium oxalate crystallization and crystal adherence to renal tubular epithelial cells by Terminalia arjuna.

    PubMed

    Mittal, A; Tandon, S; Singla, S K; Tandon, C

    2016-04-01

    Urolithiasis is a multifactorial disease and remains a public health problem around the world. Of all types of renal stones, calcium oxalate (CaOx) is the most common composition formed in the urinary system of the patients with urolithiasis. The present study is aimed at evaluating the antiurolithiatic properties of the Tris-Cl extract (TE) of Terminalia arjuna (T. arjuna). The antilithiatic activity of TE of T. arjuna was investigated on nucleation, aggregation, and growth of the CaOx crystals, as well as its protective potency was tested on oxalate-induced cell injury of NRK-52E renal epithelial cells. Also, in vitro antioxidant activity of TE T. arjuna bark was also determined. The TE of T. arjuna exhibited a concentration-dependent inhibition of nucleation and growth of CaOx crystals. Inhibition of aggregation of CaOx crystals remains constant. When NRK-52E cells were injured by exposure to oxalate for 48 h, the TE prevented the cells from injury and CaOx crystal adherence resulting in increased cell viability in a dose-dependent manner. The TE also scavenged the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radicals with an IC50 at 51.72 µg/mL. The results indicated that T. arjuna is a potential candidate for phytotherapy against urolithiasis as it attains the ability to inhibit CaOx crystallization and scavenge DPPH free radicals in vitro along with a cytoprotective role. PMID:26424092

  9. Cancer stem cells in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Lathia, Justin D.; Mack, Stephen C.; Mulkearns-Hubert, Erin E.; Valentim, Claudia L.L.; Rich, Jeremy N.

    2015-01-01

    Tissues with defined cellular hierarchies in development and homeostasis give rise to tumors with cellular hierarchies, suggesting that tumors recapitulate specific tissues and mimic their origins. Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most prevalent and malignant primary brain tumor and contains self-renewing, tumorigenic cancer stem cells (CSCs) that contribute to tumor initiation and therapeutic resistance. As normal stem and progenitor cells participate in tissue development and repair, these developmental programs re-emerge in CSCs to support the development and progressive growth of tumors. Elucidation of the molecular mechanisms that govern CSCs has informed the development of novel targeted therapeutics for GBM and other brain cancers. CSCs are not self-autonomous units; rather, they function within an ecological system, both actively remodeling the microenvironment and receiving critical maintenance cues from their niches. To fulfill the future goal of developing novel therapies to collapse CSC dynamics, drawing parallels to other normal and pathological states that are highly interactive with their microenvironments and that use developmental signaling pathways will be beneficial. PMID:26109046

  10. HIV Medication Adherence

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment HIV Medication Adherence (Last updated 3/1/2016; last reviewed 3/1/2016) Key Points Medication adherence means sticking ... exactly as prescribed. Why is adherence to an HIV regimen important? Adherence to an HIV regimen gives ...

  11. ROCK inhibition promotes microtentacles that enhance reattachment of breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Bhandary, Lekhana; Whipple, Rebecca A.; Vitolo, Michele I.; Charpentier, Monica S.; Boggs, Amanda E.; Chakrabarti, Kristi R.; Thompson, Keyata N.; Martin, Stuart S.

    2015-01-01

    The presence of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in blood predicts poor patient outcome and CTC frequency is correlated with higher risk of metastasis. Recently discovered, novel microtubule-based structures, microtentacles, can enhance reattachment of CTCs to the vasculature. Microtentacles are highly dynamic membrane protrusions formed in detached cells and occur when physical forces generated by the outwardly expanding microtubules overcome the contractile force of the actin cortex. Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) is a major regulator of actomyosin contractility and Rho/ROCK over-activation is implicated in tumor metastasis. ROCK inhibitors are gaining popularity as potential cancer therapeutics based on their success in reducing adherent tumor cell migration and invasion. However, the effect of ROCK inhibition on detached cells in circulation is largely unknown. In this study, we use breast tumor cells in suspension to mimic detached CTCs and show that destabilizing the actin cortex through ROCK inhibition in suspended cells promotes the formation of microtentacles and enhances reattachment of cells from suspension. Conversely, increasing actomyosin contraction by Rho over-activation reduces microtentacle frequency and reattachment. Although ROCK inhibitors may be effective in reducing adherent tumor cell behavior, our results indicate that they could inadvertently increase metastatic potential of non-adherent CTCs by increasing their reattachment efficacy. PMID:25749040

  12. Interfacial geometry dictates cancer cell tumorigenicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Junmin; Abdeen, Amr A.; Wycislo, Kathryn L.; Fan, Timothy M.; Kilian, Kristopher A.

    2016-08-01

    Within the heterogeneous architecture of tumour tissue there exists an elusive population of stem-like cells that are implicated in both recurrence and metastasis. Here, by using engineered extracellular matrices, we show that geometric features at the perimeter of tumour tissue will prime a population of cells with a stem-cell-like phenotype. These cells show characteristics of cancer stem cells in vitro, as well as enhanced tumorigenicity in murine models of primary tumour growth and pulmonary metastases. We also show that interfacial geometry modulates cell shape, adhesion through integrin α5β1, MAPK and STAT activity, and initiation of pluripotency signalling. Our results for several human cancer cell lines suggest that interfacial geometry triggers a general mechanism for the regulation of cancer-cell state. Similar to how a growing tumour can co-opt normal soluble signalling pathways, our findings demonstrate how cancer can also exploit geometry to orchestrate oncogenesis.

  13. Interfacial geometry dictates cancer cell tumorigenicity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Junmin; Abdeen, Amr A; Wycislo, Kathryn L; Fan, Timothy M; Kilian, Kristopher A

    2016-08-01

    Within the heterogeneous architecture of tumour tissue there exists an elusive population of stem-like cells that are implicated in both recurrence and metastasis. Here, by using engineered extracellular matrices, we show that geometric features at the perimeter of tumour tissue will prime a population of cells with a stem-cell-like phenotype. These cells show characteristics of cancer stem cells in vitro, as well as enhanced tumorigenicity in murine models of primary tumour growth and pulmonary metastases. We also show that interfacial geometry modulates cell shape, adhesion through integrin α5β1, MAPK and STAT activity, and initiation of pluripotency signalling. Our results for several human cancer cell lines suggest that interfacial geometry triggers a general mechanism for the regulation of cancer-cell state. Similar to how a growing tumour can co-opt normal soluble signalling pathways, our findings demonstrate how cancer can also exploit geometry to orchestrate oncogenesis. PMID:27043781

  14. Modification of Solid Phase Red Cell Adherence Assay for the Detection of Platelet Antibodies in Patients With Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Vongchan, Preeyanat; Nawarawong, Weerasak; Linhardt, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Platelet refractoriness is caused by HLA antibodies and platelet-specific antibodies. Current methods used to detect antiplatelet antibodies have limitations. Solid phase red cell adherence (SPRCA) lacks sensitivity and requires a second assay using chloroquine-treated intact platelets to specify the response due to anti-HLA. We modified SPRCA by using 2 types of antihuman platelet antibodies with different specificities toward platelet lysate and tested samples from 361 patients (69 with unexplained thrombocytopenia and 292 with poor response to platelet transfusions not explicable by alloimmunization or the clinical situation) and 50 from healthy volunteers. Our method compared favorably with platelet suspension direct immunofluorescence. All samples from healthy volunteers were negative; of the samples from the patient population, 240 were positive (147 samples had only antiplatelet and 3 samples had only anti-HLA antibodies). This modified technique had a sensitivity of 98% and a specificity of 91%. PMID:18701420

  15. Breast Cancer Stem Cell Culture and Enrichment Using Poly(ε-Caprolactone) Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Palomeras, Sònia; Rabionet, Marc; Ferrer, Inés; Sarrats, Ariadna; Garcia-Romeu, Maria Luisa; Puig, Teresa; Ciurana, Joaquim

    2016-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) population displays self-renewal capabilities, resistance to conventional therapies, and a tendency to post-treatment recurrence. Increasing knowledge about CSCs' phenotype and functions is needed to investigate new therapeutic strategies against the CSC population. Here, poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL), a biocompatible polymer free of toxic dye, has been used to fabricate scaffolds, solid structures suitable for 3D cancer cell culture. It has been reported that scaffold cell culture enhances the CSCs population. A RepRap BCN3D+ printer and 3 mm PCL wire were used to fabricate circular scaffolds. PCL design and fabrication parameters were first determined and then optimized considering several measurable variables of the resulting scaffolds. MCF7 breast carcinoma cell line was used to assess scaffolds adequacy for 3D cell culture. To evaluate CSC enrichment, the Mammosphere Forming Index (MFI) was performed in 2D and 3D MCF7 cultures. Results showed that the 60° scaffolds were more suitable for 3D culture than the 45° and 90° ones. Moreover, 3D culture experiments, in adherent and non-adherent conditions, showed a significant increase in MFI compared to 2D cultures (control). Thus, 3D cell culture with PCL scaffolds could be useful to improve cancer cell culture and enrich the CSCs population. PMID:27120585

  16. Cystone – An ayurvedic polyherbal formulation inhibits adherence of uropathogenic E. coli and modulates H2O2-induced toxicity in NRK-52E cells

    PubMed Central

    Vidyashankar, Satyakumar; Maheshkumar, Puttanarasaiah; Patki, Pralhad S

    2010-01-01

    Gentamicin is a widely used antibiotic for the treatment of adverse urinary tract infections (UTI), which in turn causes nephrotoxicity to uroepithelial cells and hence an alternative safe herbal remedy is much desired to compensate these toxic effects. The bacterial adhesion to the uroepithelial cells is the primary step in UTI and it induces various immunogenic reactions leading to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are detrimental to the cells survival. Inhibition of bacterial adherence to urinary tract epithelial cells has been assumed to account for the beneficial action ascribed to cystone (an ayurvedic polyherbal formulation) in the prevention of UTI. In this study, we have examined the effect of cystone on the adherence of pathogenic [2-14C]-acetate labeled Escherichia coli (MTCC-729) to rat proximal renal tubular cells (NRK-52E cells). Further, the antioxidant property of cystone was studied using hydrogen peroxide (400 μM) as a pro-oxidant in NRK-52E cells. The results showed that cystone inhibited the adherence of E. coli to NRK-52E cells significantly. Additionally cystone effectively combats the toxicity induced by H2O2 in NRK-52E cells. The cytoprotective effect of cystone is brought about by inhibiting lipid peroxidation by 36% in cells treated with cystone compared to H2O2-treated cells without cystone. The antioxidant enzymes catalase, glutathione were increased by 53% and 68% respectively and superoxide dismutase activity was increased 3-fold. The glutathione content was significantly increased by 2.4-fold in NRK-52E cells treated with cystone compared to H2O2 control group. These results suggest that cystone effectively inhibits bacterial adherence to NRK-52E cells and attenuates H2O2-induced toxicity in NRK-52E cells by inhibiting lipid peroxidation and increasing the antioxidant defense mechanism. PMID:27186087

  17. Adherence Reduction of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli Strains to HEp-2 Cells by Mannan Oligosaccharides and a High-Molecular-Weight Component of Cranberry Extract.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Hernandez, Alejandra; Rupnow, John; Hutkins, Robert W

    2015-08-01

    Campylobacter infections are a leading cause of human bacterial gastroenteritis in the United States and are a major cause of diarrheal disease throughout the world. Colonization and subsequent infection and invasion of Campylobacter require that the bacteria adhere to the surface of host cells. Agents that inhibit adherence could be used prophylactically to reduce Campylobacter carriage and infection. Mannan oligosaccharides (MOS) have been used as a feed supplement in livestock animals to improve performance and to replace growth-promoting antibiotics. However, MOS and other nondigestible oligosaccharides may also prevent pathogen colonization by inhibiting adherence in the gastrointestinal tract. In addition, plant extracts, including those derived from cranberries, have been shown to have antiadherence activity against pathogens. The goal of this study was to assess the ability of MOS and cranberry fractions to serve as antiadherence agents against strains of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli. Adherence experiments were performed using HEp-2 cells. Significant reductions in adherence of C. jejuni 29438, C. jejuni 700819, C. jejuni 3329, and C. coli 43485 were observed in the presence of MOS (up to 40 mg/ml) and with a high-molecular-weight fraction of cranberry extract (up to 3 mg/ml). However, none of the tested materials reduced adherence of C. coli BAA-1061. No additive effect in adherence inhibition was observed for an MOS-cranberry blend. These results suggest that both components, MOS and cranberry, could be used to reduce Campylobacter colonization and carriage in livestock animals and potentially limit human exposure to this pathogen. PMID:26219363

  18. Breast cancer stem cells rely on fermentative glycolysis and are sensitive to 2-deoxyglucose treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ciavardelli, D; Rossi, C; Barcaroli, D; Volpe, S; Consalvo, A; Zucchelli, M; De Cola, A; Scavo, E; Carollo, R; D'Agostino, D; Forlì, F; D'Aguanno, S; Todaro, M; Stassi, G; Di Ilio, C; De Laurenzi, V; Urbani, A

    2014-01-01

    A number of studies suggest that cancer stem cells are essential for tumour growth, and failure to target these cells can result in tumour relapse. As this population of cells has been shown to be resistant to radiation and chemotherapy, it is essential to understand their biology and identify new therapeutic approaches. Targeting cancer metabolism is a potential alternative strategy to counteract tumour growth and recurrence. Here we applied a proteomic and targeted metabolomic analysis in order to point out the main metabolic differences between breast cancer cells grown as spheres and thus enriched in cancer stem cells were compared with the same cells grown in adherent differentiating conditions. This integrated approach allowed us to identify a metabolic phenotype associated with the stem-like condition and shows that breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) shift from mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation towards fermentative glycolysis. Functional validation of proteomic and metabolic data provide evidences for increased activities of key enzymes of anaerobic glucose fate such as pyruvate kinase M2 isoform, lactate dehydrogenase and glucose 6-phopshate dehydrogenase in cancer stem cells as well as different redox status. Moreover, we show that treatment with 2-deoxyglucose, a well known inhibitor of glycolysis, inhibits BCSC proliferation when used alone and shows a synergic effect when used in combination with doxorubicin. In conclusion, we suggest that inhibition of glycolysis may be a potentially effective strategy to target BCSCs. PMID:25032859

  19. Response of adherent cells to mechanical perturbations of the surrounding matrix.

    PubMed

    Ben-Yaakov, Dan; Golkov, Roman; Shokef, Yair; Safran, Samuel A

    2015-02-01

    We present a generic and unified theory to explain how cells respond to perturbations of their mechanical environment such as the presence of neighboring cells, slowly applied stretch, or gradients of matrix rigidity. Motivated by experiments, we calculate the local balance of forces that give rise to a tendency for the cell to locally move or reorient, with a focus on the contribution of feedback and homeostasis to cell contractility (manifested by a fixed displacement, strain or stress) that acts on the adhesions at the cell boundary. These forces can be either reinforced or diminished by elastic stresses due to mechanical perturbations of the matrix. Our model predicts these changes and how their balance with local protrusive forces that act on the cell's leading edge either increase or decrease the tendency of the cell to locally move (toward neighboring cells or rigidity gradients) or reorient (in the direction of slowly applied stretch or rigidity gradients). PMID:25604950

  20. Cancer: The Transforming Power of Cell Competition.

    PubMed

    Gil, Jesus; Rodriguez, Tristan

    2016-02-22

    The tumour-host microenvironment plays key roles in cancer, but the mechanisms involved are not fully understood. Two new studies provide insight into this problem by showing that through cell competition, a fitness-sensing process that usually eliminates defective cells, pre-cancerous lesions signal the death of surrounding tissue that in turn promotes their neoplastic transformation. PMID:26906487

  1. Learning about Cancer by Studying Stem Cells

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Cancer by Studying Stem Cells Inside Life Science View All Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Learning About Cancer by Studying Stem ... Once Upon a Stem Cell This Inside Life Science article also appears on LiveScience . Learn about related ...

  2. Measurement of annexin V uptake and lactadherin labeling for the quantification of apoptosis in adherent Tca8113 and ACC-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, T; Shi, J; Jiao, X; Zhou, J; Yin, X

    2008-09-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure occurs during the cell death program and fluorescein-labeled lactadherin permits the detection of PS exposure earlier than annexin V in suspended cell lines. Adherent cell lines were studied for this apoptosis-associated phenomenon to determine if PS probing methods are reliable because specific membrane damage may occur during harvesting. Apoptosis was induced in the human tongue squamous carcinoma cell line (Tca8113) and the adenoid cystic carcinoma cell line (ACC-2) by arsenic trioxide. Cells were harvested with a modified procedure and labeled with lactadherin and/or annexin V. PS exposure was localized by confocal microscopy and apoptosis was quantified by flow cytometry. The detachment procedure without trypsinization did not induce cell damage. In competition binding experiments, phospholipid vesicles competed for more than 95 and 90% of lactadherin but only about 75 and 70% of annexin V binding to Tca8113 and ACC-2 cells. These data indicate that PS exposure occurs in three stages during the cell death program and that fluorescein-labeled lactadherin permitted the detection of early PS exposure. A similar pattern of PS exposure has been observed in two malignant cell lines with different adherence, suggesting that this pattern of PS exposure is common in adherent cells. Both lactadherin and annexin V could be used in adherent Tca8113 and ACC-2 cell lines when an appropriate harvesting procedure was used. Lactadherin is more sensitive than annexin V for the detection of PS exposure as the physical structure of PS in these blebs and condensed apoptotic cell surface may be more conducive to binding lactadherin than annexin V. PMID:18820763

  3. Correlates of Adherence to a Telephone-Based Multiple Health Behavior Change Cancer Preventive Intervention for Teens: The Healthy for Life Program (HELP)

    PubMed Central

    Mays, Darren; Peshkin, Beth N.; Sharff, McKane E.; Walker, Leslie R.; Abraham, Anisha A.; Hawkins, Kirsten; Tercyak, Kenneth P.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined factors associated with teens’ adherence to a multiple health behavior cancer preventive intervention. Analyses identified predictors of trial enrollment, run-in completion, and adherence (intervention initiation, number of sessions completed). Of 104 teens screened, 73% (n = 76) were trial-eligible. White teens were more likely to enroll than non-whites (χ2 [1] df = 4.49, p = 0.04). Among enrolled teens, 76% (n = 50) completed the run-in; there were no differences between run-in completers and non-completers. A majority of run-in completers (70%, n = 35) initiated the intervention, though teens who initiated the intervention were significantly younger than those who did not (p < 0.05). The mean number of sessions completed was 5.7 (SD = 2.6; maximum = 8). After adjusting for age, teens with poorer session engagement (e.g., less cooperative) completed fewer sessions (B = -1.97, p = 0.003, R2 = 0.24). Implications for adolescent cancer prevention research are discussed. PMID:21632437

  4. Correlates of adherence to a telephone-based multiple health behavior change cancer preventive intervention for teens: the Healthy for Life Program (HELP).

    PubMed

    Mays, Darren; Peshkin, Beth N; Sharff, McKane E; Walker, Leslie R; Abraham, Anisha A; Hawkins, Kirsten B; Tercyak, Kenneth P

    2012-02-01

    This study examined factors associated with teens' adherence to a multiple health behavior cancer preventive intervention. Analyses identified predictors of trial enrollment, run-in completion, and adherence (intervention initiation, number of sessions completed). Of 104 teens screened, 73% (n = 76) were trial eligible. White teens were more likely to enroll than non-Whites (χ(2)[1] df = 4.49, p = .04). Among enrolled teens, 76% (n = 50) completed the run-in; there were no differences between run-in completers and noncompleters. A majority of run-in completers (70%, n = 35) initiated the intervention, though teens who initiated the intervention were significantly younger than those who did not (p < .05). The mean number of sessions completed was 5.7 (SD = 2.6; maximum = 8). After adjusting for age, teens with poorer session engagement (e.g., less cooperative) completed fewer sessions (B = -1.97, p = .003, R (2) = .24). Implications for adolescent cancer prevention research are discussed. PMID:21632437

  5. Dehydroeffusol effectively inhibits human gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry with low toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenming; Meng, Mei; Zhang, Bin; Du, Longsheng; Pan, Yanyan; Yang, Ping; Gu, Zhenlun; Zhou, Quansheng Cao, Zhifei

    2015-09-01

    Accumulated data has shown that various vasculogenic tumor cells, including gastric cancer cells, are able to directly form tumor blood vessels via vasculogenic mimicry, supplying oxygen and nutrients to tumors, and facilitating progression and metastasis of malignant tumors. Therefore, tumor vasculogenic mimicry is a rational target for developing novel anticancer therapeutics. However, effective antitumor vasculogenic mimicry-targeting drugs are not clinically available. In this study, we purified 2,7-dihydroxyl-1-methyl-5-vinyl-phenanthrene, termed dehydroeffusol, from the traditional Chinese medicinal herb Juncus effusus L., and found that dehydroeffusol effectively inhibited gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry in vitro and in vivo with very low toxicity. Dehydroeffusol significantly suppressed gastric cancer cell adhesion, migration, and invasion. Molecular mechanistic studies revealed that dehydroeffusol markedly inhibited the expression of a vasculogenic mimicry master gene VE-cadherin and reduced adherent protein exposure on the cell surface by inhibiting gene promoter activity. In addition, dehydroeffusol significantly decreased the expression of a key vasculogenic gene matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) in gastric cancer cells, and diminished MMP2 protease activity. Together, our results showed that dehydroeffusol effectively inhibited gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry with very low toxicity, suggesting that dehydroeffusol is a potential drug candidate for anti-gastric cancer neovascularization and anti-gastric cancer therapy. - Highlights: • Dehydroeffusol markedly inhibits gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry. • Dehydroeffusol suppresses the expression of vasculogenic mimicry key gene VE-cadherin. • Dehydroeffusol decreases the MMP2 expression and activity in gastric cancer cells. • Dehydroeffusol is a potential anti-cancer drug candidate with very low toxicity.

  6. Rapidly Self-Renewing Human Multipotent Marrow Stromal Cells (hMSC) Express Sialyl Lewis X and Actively Adhere to Arterial Endothelium in a Chick Embryo Model System

    PubMed Central

    McFerrin, Harris E.; Olson, Scott D.; Gutschow, Miriam V.; Semon, Julie A.; Sullivan, Deborah E.; Prockop, Darwin J.

    2014-01-01

    Background There have been conflicting observations regarding the receptors utilized by human multipotent mesenchymal bone marrow stromal cells (hMSC) to adhere to endothelial cells (EC). To address the discrepancies, we performed experiments with cells prepared with a standardized, low-density protocol preserving a sub-population of small cells that are rapidly self-renewing. Methods Sialyl Lewis X (SLeX) and α4 integrin expression were determined by flow cytometry. Fucosyltransferase expression was determined by quantitative realtime RT-PCR. Cell adhesion assays were carried out with a panel of endothelial cells from arteries, veins and the microvasculature in vitro. In vivo experiments were performed to determine single cell interactions in the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). The CAM is a well-characterized respiratory organ allowing for time-lapse image acquisition of large numbers of cells treated with blocking antibodies against adhesion molecules expressed on hMSC. Results hMSC expressed α4 integrin, SLeX and fucosyltransferase 4 and adhered to human EC from arteries, veins and the microvasculature under static conditions in vitro. In vivo, hMSC rolled on and adhered to arterioles in the chick embryo CAM, whereas control melanoma cells embolized. Inhibition of α4 integrin and/or SLeX with blocking antibodies reduced rolling and adhesion in arterioles and increased embolism of hMSC. Conclusions The results demonstrated that rapidly self-renewing hMSC were retained in the CAM because they rolled on and adhered to respiratory arteriolar EC in an α4 integrin- and SLeX-dependent manner. It is therefore important to select cells based on their cell adhesion receptor profile as well as size depending on the intended target of the cell and the injection route. PMID:25144321

  7. Acute Shear Stress Direction Dictates Adherent Cell Remodeling and Verifies Shear Profile of Spinning Disc Assays

    PubMed Central

    Fuhrmann, Alexander; Engler, Adam J.

    2015-01-01

    Several methods have been developed to quantify population level changes in cell attachment strength given its large heterogeneity. One such method is the rotating disc chamber or “spinning disc” in which a range of shear forces are applied to attached cells to quantify detachment force, i.e. attachment strength, which can be heterogeneous within cell populations. However, computing the exact force vectors that act upon cells is complicated by complex flow fields and variable cell morphologies. Recent observations suggest that cells may remodel their morphology and align during acute shear exposure, but contrary to intuition, shear is not orthogonal to the radial direction. Here we theoretically derive the magnitude and direction of applied shear and demonstrate that cells, under certain physiological conditions, align in this direction within minutes. Shear force magnitude is also experimentally verified which validates that for spread cells shear forces and not torque or drag dominate in this assay, and demonstrates that the applied force per cell area is largely independent of initial morphology. These findings suggest that direct quantified comparison of the effects of shear on a wide array of cell types and conditions can be made with confidence using this assay without the need for computational or numerical modeling. PMID:25619322

  8. Response of Breast Cancer Cells and Cancer Stem Cells to Metformin and Hyperthermia Alone or Combined

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyemi; Park, Heon Joo; Park, Chang-Shin; Oh, Eun-Taex; Choi, Bo-Hwa; Williams, Brent; Lee, Chung K.; Song, Chang W.

    2014-01-01

    Metformin, the most widely prescribed drug for treatment of type 2 diabetes, has been shown to exert significant anticancer effects. Hyperthermia has been known to kill cancer cells and enhance the efficacy of various anti-cancer drugs and radiotherapy. We investigated the combined effects of metformin and hyperthermia against MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell, and MIA PaCa-2 human pancreatic cancer cells. Incubation of breast cancer cells with 0.5–10 mM metformin for 48 h caused significant clonogenic cell death. Culturing breast cancer cells with 30 µM metformin, clinically relevant plasma concentration of metformin, significantly reduced the survival of cancer cells. Importantly, metformin was preferentially cytotoxic to CD44high/CD24low cells of MCF-7 cells and, CD44high/CD24high cells of MIA PaCa-2 cells, which are known to be cancer stem cells (CSCs) of MCF-7 cells and MIA PaCa-2 cells, respectively. Heating at 42°C for 1 h was slightly toxic to both cancer cells and CSCs, and it markedly enhanced the efficacy of metformin to kill cancer cells and CSCs. Metformin has been reported to activate AMPK, thereby suppressing mTOR, which plays an important role for protein synthesis, cell cycle progression, and cell survival. For the first time, we show that hyperthermia activates AMPK and inactivates mTOR and its downstream effector S6K. Furthermore, hyperthermia potentiated the effect of metformin to activate AMPK and inactivate mTOR and S6K. Cell proliferation was markedly suppressed by metformin or combination of metformin and hyperthermia, which could be attributed to activation of AMPK leading to inactivation of mTOR. It is conclude that the effects of metformin against cancer cells including CSCs can be markedly enhanced by hyperthermia. PMID:24505341

  9. Drug-eluting microarrays to identify effective chemotherapeutic combinations targeting patient-derived cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Carstens, Matthew R.; Fisher, Robert C.; Acharya, Abhinav P.; Butterworth, Elizabeth A.; Scott, Edward; Huang, Emina H.; Keselowsky, Benjamin G.

    2015-01-01

    A new paradigm in oncology establishes a spectrum of tumorigenic potential across the heterogeneous phenotypes within a tumor. The cancer stem cell hypothesis postulates that a minute fraction of cells within a tumor, termed cancer stem cells (CSCs), have a tumor-initiating capacity that propels tumor growth. An application of this discovery is to target this critical cell population using chemotherapy; however, the process of isolating these cells is arduous, and the rarity of CSCs makes it difficult to test potential drug candidates in a robust fashion, particularly for individual patients. To address the challenge of screening drug libraries on patient-derived populations of rare cells, such as CSCs, we have developed a drug-eluting microarray, a miniaturized platform onto which a minimal quantity of cells can adhere and be exposed to unique treatment conditions. Hundreds of drug-loaded polymer islands acting as drug depots colocalized with adherent cells are surrounded by a nonfouling background, creating isolated culture environments on a solid substrate. Significant results can be obtained by testing <6% of the cells required for a typical 96-well plate. Reliability was demonstrated by an average coefficient of variation of 14% between all of the microarrays and 13% between identical conditions within a single microarray. Using the drug-eluting array, colorectal CSCs isolated from two patients exhibited unique responses to drug combinations when cultured on the drug-eluting microarray, highlighting the potential as a prognostic tool to identify personalized chemotherapeutic regimens targeting CSCs. PMID:26124098

  10. Vertical nanopillars for in situ probing of nuclear mechanics in adherent cells.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Lindsey; Zhao, Wenting; Lou, Hsin-Ya; Lin, Ziliang Carter; Lee, Seok Woo; Chowdary, Praveen; Cui, Yi; Cui, Bianxiao

    2015-06-01

    The mechanical stability and deformability of the cell nucleus are crucial to many biological processes, including migration, proliferation and polarization. In vivo, the cell nucleus is frequently subjected to deformation on a variety of length and time scales, but current techniques for studying nuclear mechanics do not provide access to subnuclear deformation in live functioning cells. Here we introduce arrays of vertical nanopillars as a new method for the in situ study of nuclear deformability and the mechanical coupling between the cell membrane and the nucleus in live cells. Our measurements show that nanopillar-induced nuclear deformation is determined by nuclear stiffness, as well as opposing effects from actin and intermediate filaments. Furthermore, the depth, width and curvature of nuclear deformation can be controlled by varying the geometry of the nanopillar array. Overall, vertical nanopillar arrays constitute a novel approach for non-invasive, subcellular perturbation of nuclear mechanics and mechanotransduction in live cells. PMID:25984833

  11. Vertical nanopillars for in situ probing of nuclear mechanics in adherent cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Lindsey; Zhao, Wenting; Lou, Hsin-Ya; Lin, Ziliang Carter; Lee, Seok Woo; Chowdary, Praveen; Cui, Yi; Cui, Bianxiao

    2015-06-01

    The mechanical stability and deformability of the cell nucleus are crucial to many biological processes, including migration, proliferation and polarization. In vivo, the cell nucleus is frequently subjected to deformation on a variety of length and time scales, but current techniques for studying nuclear mechanics do not provide access to subnuclear deformation in live functioning cells. Here we introduce arrays of vertical nanopillars as a new method for the in situ study of nuclear deformability and the mechanical coupling between the cell membrane and the nucleus in live cells. Our measurements show that nanopillar-induced nuclear deformation is determined by nuclear stiffness, as well as opposing effects from actin and intermediate filaments. Furthermore, the depth, width and curvature of nuclear deformation can be controlled by varying the geometry of the nanopillar array. Overall, vertical nanopillar arrays constitute a novel approach for non-invasive, subcellular perturbation of nuclear mechanics and mechanotransduction in live cells.

  12. Wnt Signaling in Cancer Stem Cell Biology

    PubMed Central

    de Sousa e Melo, Felipe; Vermeulen, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant regulation of Wnt signaling is a common theme seen across many tumor types. Decades of research have unraveled the epigenetic and genetic alterations that result in elevated Wnt pathway activity. More recently, it has become apparent that Wnt signaling levels identify stem-like tumor cells that are responsible for fueling tumor growth. As therapeutic targeting of these tumor stem cells is an intense area of investigation, a concise understanding on how Wnt activity relates to cancer stem cell traits is needed. This review attempts at summarizing the intricacies between Wnt signaling and cancer stem cell biology with a special emphasis on colorectal cancer. PMID:27355964

  13. Breast cancer stem cells and radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Tiffany Marie

    2007-12-01

    The present studies explore the response of breast cancer stem cells (BCSC's) to radiation and the implications for clinical cancer treatment. Current cancer therapy eliminates bulky tumor mass but may fail to eradicate a critical tumor initiating cell population termed "cancer stem cells". These cells are potentially responsible for tumor formation, metastasis, and recurrence. Recently cancer stem cells have been prospectively identified in various malignancies, including breast cancer. The breast cancer stem cell has been identified by the surface markers CD44+/CD24 -(low). In vitro mammosphere cultures allow for the enrichment of the cancer stem cell population and were utilized in order to study differential characteristics of BCSC's. Initial studies found that BCSC's display increased radiation resistance as compared to other non-stem tumor cells. This resistance was accompanied by decreased H2AX phosphorylation, decreased reactive oxygen species formation, and increased phosphorylation of the checkpoint protein Chk1. These studies suggest differential DNA damage and repair within the BCSC population. Studies then examined the consequences of fractionated radiation on the BCSC population and found a two-fold increase in BCSC's following 5 x 3Gy. This observation begins to tie cancer stem cell self-renewal to the clinical stem cell phenomenon of accelerated repopulation. Accelerated repopulation is observed when treatment gaps increase between sequential fractions of radiotherapy and may be due to cancer stem cell symmetric self-renewal. The balance between asymmetric and symmetric stem cell division is vital for proper maintenance; deregulation is likely linked to cancer initiation and progression. The developmental Notch-1 pathway was found to regulate BCSC division. Over-expressing the constitutively active Notch-1-ICD in MCF7 cells produced an increase in the BCSC population. Additionally, radiation was observed to increase the expression of the Notch-1

  14. A family of cell-adhering peptides homologous to fibrinogen C-termini

    SciTech Connect

    Levy-Beladev, Liron; Levdansky, Lilia; Gaberman, Elena; Friedler, Assaf; Gorodetsky, Raphael

    2010-10-08

    Research highlights: {yields} Cell-adhesive sequences homologous to fibrinogen C-termini exist in other proteins. {yields} The extended homologous cell-adhesive C-termini peptides family is termed Haptides. {yields} In membrane-like environment random coiled Haptides adopt a helical conformation. {yields} Replacing positively charged residues with alanine reduces Haptides activity. -- Abstract: A family of cell-adhesive peptides homologous to sequences on different chains of fibrinogen was investigated. These homologous peptides, termed Haptides, include the peptides C{beta}, preC{gamma}, and C{alpha}E, corresponding to sequences on the C-termini of fibrinogen chains {beta}, {gamma}, and {alpha}E, respectively. Haptides do not affect cell survival and rate of proliferation of the normal cell types tested. The use of new sensitive assays of cell adhesion clearly demonstrated the ability of Haptides, bound to inert matrices, to mediate attachment of different matrix-dependent cell types including normal fibroblasts, endothelial, and smooth muscle cells. Here we present new active Haptides bearing homologous sequences derived from the C-termini of other proteins, such as angiopoietin 1 and 2, tenascins C and X, and microfibril-associated glycoprotein-4. The cell adhesion properties of all the Haptides were found to be associated mainly with their 11 N-terminal residues. Mutated preC{gamma} peptides revealed that positively charged residues account for their attachment effect. These results suggest a mechanism of direct electrostatic interaction of Haptides with the cell membrane. The extended Haptides family may be applied in modulating adhesion of cells to scaffolds for tissue regeneration and for enhancement of nanoparticulate transfection into cells.

  15. Dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy for colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kajihara, Mikio; Takakura, Kazuki; Kanai, Tomoya; Ito, Zensho; Saito, Keisuke; Takami, Shinichiro; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Okamoto, Masato; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers and a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Although systemic therapy is the standard care for patients with recurrent or metastatic CRC, the prognosis is extremely poor. The optimal sequence of therapy remains unknown. Therefore, alternative strategies, such as immunotherapy, are needed for patients with advanced CRC. This review summarizes evidence from dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy strategies that are currently in clinical trials. In addition, we discuss the possibility of antitumor immune responses through immunoinhibitory PD-1/PD-L1 pathway blockade in CRC patients. PMID:27158196

  16. AFBI assay – Aptamer Fluorescence Binding and Internalization assay for cultured adherent cells

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, William H.; Giangrande, Paloma H.

    2016-01-01

    The SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment) process allows for the enrichment of DNA or RNA aptamers from a complex nucleic acid library that are specific for a target molecule. The SELEX process has been adapted from identifying aptamers in vitro using recombinant target protein to cell-based methodologies (Cell-SELEX), where the targets are expressed on the surface of cells. One major advantage of Cell-SELEX is that the target molecules are maintained in a native confirmation. Additionally, Cell-SELEX may be used to discover novel therapeutic biomarkers by performing selections on diseased versus healthy cells. However, a caveat to Cell-SELEX is that testing of single aptamers identified in the selection is laborious, time-consuming, and expensive. The most frequently used methods to screen for aptamer binding and internalization on cells are flow cytometry and quantitative PCR (qPCR). While flow cytometry can directly assess binding of a fluorescently-labeled aptamer to a target, it requires significant starting material and is not easily scalable. qPCR-based approaches are highly sensitive but have non-negligible experiment-to-experiment variability due to the number of sample processing steps. Herein we describe a cell-based aptamer fluorescence binding and internalization (AFBI) assay. This assay requires minimal reagents and has few experimental steps/manipulations, thereby allowing for rapid screening of many aptamers and conditions simultaneously and direct quantitation of aptamer binding and internalization. PMID:26972784

  17. A functional assay for gap junctional examination; electroporation of adherent cells on indium-tin oxide.

    PubMed

    Geletu, Mulu; Guy, Stephanie; Firth, Kevin; Raptis, Leda

    2014-01-01

    In this technique, cells are cultured on a glass slide that is partly coated with indium-tin oxide (ITO), a transparent, electrically conductive material. A variety of molecules, such as peptides or oligonucleotides can be introduced into essentially 100% of the cells in a non-traumatic manner. Here, we describe how it can be used to study intercellular, gap junctional communication. Lucifer yellow penetrates into the cells when an electric pulse, applied to the conductive surface on which they are growing, causes pores to form through the cell membrane. This is electroporation. Cells growing on the nonconductive glass surface immediately adjacent to the electroporated region do not take up Lucifer yellow by electroporation but do acquire the fluorescent dye as it is passed to them via gap junctions that link them to the electroporated cells. The results of the transfer of dye from cell to cell can be observed microscopically under fluorescence illumination. This technique allows for precise quantitation of gap junctional communication. In addition, it can be used for the introduction of peptides or other non-permeant molecules, and the transfer of small electroporated peptides via gap junctions to inhibit the signal in the adjacent, non-electroporated cells is a powerful demonstration of signal inhibition. PMID:25350637

  18. AFBI assay - Aptamer Fluorescence Binding and Internalization assay for cultured adherent cells.

    PubMed

    Thiel, William H; Giangrande, Paloma H

    2016-07-01

    The SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment) process allows for the enrichment of DNA or RNA aptamers from a complex nucleic acid library that are specific for a target molecule. The SELEX process has been adapted from identifying aptamers in vitro using recombinant target protein to cell-based methodologies (Cell-SELEX), where the targets are expressed on the surface of cells. One major advantage of Cell-SELEX is that the target molecules are maintained in a native confirmation. Additionally, Cell-SELEX may be used to discover novel therapeutic biomarkers by performing selections on diseased versus healthy cells. However, a caveat to Cell-SELEX is that testing of single aptamers identified in the selection is laborious, time-consuming, and expensive. The most frequently used methods to screen for aptamer binding and internalization on cells are flow cytometry and quantitative PCR (qPCR). While flow cytometry can directly assess binding of a fluorescently-labeled aptamer to a target, it requires significant starting material and is not easily scalable. qPCR-based approaches are highly sensitive but have non-negligible experiment-to-experiment variability due to the number of sample processing steps. Herein we describe a cell-based aptamer fluorescence binding and internalization (AFBI) assay. This assay requires minimal reagents and has few experimental steps/manipulations, thereby allowing for rapid screening of many aptamers and conditions simultaneously and direct quantitation of aptamer binding and internalization. PMID:26972784

  19. Wnt and the Cancer Niche: Paracrine Interactions with Gastrointestinal Cancer Cells Undergoing Asymmetric Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Hong-Wu; Ambe, Chenwi M.; Ray, Satyajit; Kim, Bo-Kyu; Koizumi, Tomotake; Wiegand, Gordon W.; Hari, Danielle; Mullinax, John E.; Jaiswal, Kshama R.; Garfield, Susan H.; Stojadinovic, Alexander; Rudloff, Udo; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S.; Avital, Itzhak

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Stem-like cancer cells contribute to cancer initiation and maintenance. Stem cells can self-renew by asymmetric cell division (ACD). ACD with non-random chromosomal cosegregation (ACD-NRCC) is one possible self-renewal mechanism. There is a paucity of evidence supporting ACD-NRCC in human cancer. Our aim was to investigate ACD-NRCC and its potential interactions with the cancer niche (microenvironment) in gastrointestinal cancers. Design: We used DNA double and single labeling approaches with FACS to isolate live cells undergoing ACD-NRCC. Results: Gastrointestinal cancers contain rare subpopulations of cells capable of ACD-NRCC. ACD-NRCC was detected preferentially in subpopulations of cells previously suggested to be stem-like/tumor-initiating cancer cells. ACD-NRCC was independent of cell-to-cell contact, and was regulated by the cancer niche in a heat-sensitive paracrine fashion. Wnt pathway genes and proteins are differentially expressed in cells undergoing ACD-NRCC vs. symmetric cell division. Blocking the Wnt pathway with IWP2 (WNT antagonist) or siRNA-TCF4 resulted in suppression of ACD-NRCC. However, using a Wnt-agonist did not increase the relative proportion of cells undergoing ACD-NRCC. Conclusion: Gastrointestinal cancers contain subpopulations of cells capable of ACD-NRCC. Here we show for the first time that ACD-NRCC can be regulated by the Wnt pathway, and by the cancer niche in a paracrine fashion. However, whether ACD-NRCC is exclusively associated with stem-like cancer cells remains to be determined. Further study of these findings might generate novel insights into stem cell and cancer biology. Targeting the mechanism of ACD-NRCC might engender novel approaches for cancer therapy. PMID:23901343

  20. Antibody against the Carboxyl Terminus of Intimin α Reduces Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Adherence to Tissue Culture Cells and Subsequent Induction of Actin Polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Humberto M.; Teel, Louise D.; Kokai-Kun, John F.; O'Brien, Alison D.

    2005-01-01

    The C-terminal third of intimin binds to its translocated receptor (Tir) to promote attaching and effacing lesion formation during infection with enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC). We observed that the adherence of EPEC strains to HEp-2 cells was reduced and that actin polymerization was blocked by antibody raised against the C-terminal third of intimin α. PMID:15784601

  1. Adherence to Mediterranean-style dietary pattern and risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma: a case-control study in Iran

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The benefit of adherence to a Mediterranean-style dietary pattern in relation to the risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) has not been investigated among non-Mediterranean high-risk populations. The objective of the present study was to examine the association of compliance with the Med...

  2. Exopolysaccharides of Lactobacillus reuteri: Their influence on adherence of E. coli to epithelial cells and inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Kšonžeková, Petra; Bystrický, Peter; Vlčková, Silvia; Pätoprstý, Vladimír; Pulzová, Lucia; Mudroňová, Dagmar; Kubašková, Terézia; Csank, Tomáš; Tkáčiková, Ľudmila

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the study was to characterize exopolysaccharides (EPS) originated from Lactobacillus reuteri strain DSM 17938 (EPS-DSM17938) and L. reuteri strain L26 Biocenol™ (EPS-L26) and evaluate their influence on adherence of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) to IPEC-1 cells and proinflammatory gene expression. Both EPS were d-glucan polysaccharides with higher molecular weight (Mw), but differing in spatial conformation and elicited variable cytokine profile. EPS-DSM17938, relatively linear polysaccharide with (1→4) and (1→6) glycosidic linkages, increased IL-1β gene expression (0.1mg/mL; P<0.05), while EPS-L26, more branched polysaccharide with (1→3) and (1→6) glycosidic linkages, exerted slight but statistically significant up-regulation of NF-κB, TNF-α and IL-6 mRNA (P<0.05). The most significant finding is that preincubation of IPEC-1 cells with both EPS followed by ETEC infection inhibit ETEC adhesion on IPEC-1 cells (P<0.01) and ETEC-induced gene expression of proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β and IL-6 (P<0.01). PMID:26876991

  3. Epitaxially Grown Collagen Fibrils Reveal Diversity in Contact Guidance Behavior among Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Invasion of cancer cells into the surrounding tissue is an important step during cancer progression and is driven by cell migration. Cell migration can be random, but often it is directed by various cues such as aligned fibers composed of extracellular matrix (ECM), a process called contact guidance. During contact guidance, aligned fibers bias migration along the long axis of the fibers. These aligned fibers of ECM are commonly composed of type I collagen, an abundant structural protein around tumors. In this paper, we epitaxially grew several different patterns of organized type I collagen on mica and compared the morphology and contact guidance behavior of two invasive breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-231 and MTLn3 cells). Others have shown that these cells randomly migrate in qualitatively different ways. MDA-MB-231 cells exert large traction forces, tightly adhere to the ECM, and migrate with spindle-shaped morphology and thus adopt a mesenchymal mode of migration. MTLn3 cells exert small traction forces, loosely adhere to the ECM, and migrate with a more rounded morphology and thus adopt an amoeboid mode of migration. As the degree of alignment of type I collagen fibrils increases, cells become more elongated and engage in more directed contact guidance. MDA-MB-231 cells perceive the directional signal of highly aligned type I collagen fibrils with high fidelity, elongating to large extents and migrating directionally. Interestingly, behavior in MTLn3 cells differs. While highly aligned type I collagen fibril patterns facilitate spreading and random migration of MTLn3 cells, they do not support elongation or directed migration. Thus, different contact guidance cues bias cell migration differently and the fidelity of contact guidance is cell type dependent, suggesting that ECM alignment is a permissive cue for contact guidance, but requires a cell to have certain properties to interpret that cue. PMID:25531276

  4. Further evidence for the existence of 'homing' receptors on murine leukemia cells which mediate adherence to normal bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Kamenov, B; Longenecker, B M

    1985-01-01

    A significant proportion of 131IUDR-labelled cells from murine leukemia cell lines L1210 and P388, but not the L5178Y lymphoma cell line, are retained in the bone marrow (B.M.) following i.v. injection into syngeneic mice. Following this, L1210 and P388 cells grow and rapidly replace the normal hematopoietic cells of the B.M. L1210 and P388 cells, but not several lymphoma cell lines, also bind avidly to monolayers of B.M. stromal cells (Dexter cultures) and soon overgrow the cultures following rapid cell proliferation. P388 cells bound equally well to confluent monolayers of B.M., whole mouse embryo and newborn mouse kidney while L1210 cells bound well to B.M. and whole mouse embryo but showed little binding to newborn kidney monolayers. The accumulation of the two leukemia cell lines in the B.M. was constant and indistinguishable over a 48-h period. In contrast, in both spleen and liver the number of L1210 cells decreased during the same period while P388 cells were retained at a constant level. Generally there was a lack of correlation of B.M. metastasis of a cell line and its metastasis to other organs although P388 cells, but not L1210 cells, demonstrated a tremendous capacity for metastatic growth in both spleen and liver. Normal B.M. cells were fused with the syngeneic SP2/0 murine myeloma fusor line and 10 hybridomas plus the SP2/0 parent were tested for in-vitro adherence to B.M. monolayers and in-vivo metastatic behavior. The same 3 (out of 10) hybridomas showed a high level of adherence to B.M. monolayers, high levels of retention of cells in the B.M. following i.v. injection, and rapid growth and takeover of the normal B.M. In marked contrast, neither the SP2/0 parent nor the remaining 7 hybridomas show significant adherence, B.M. retention or growth in the B.M. A distinct lack of correlation of B.M. vs liver or spleen metastasis was once again noted for the hybridomas although all of the hybridomas showed much less metastatic growth in the liver than

  5. The ERK signaling target RNF126 regulates anoikis resistance in cancer cells by changing the mitochondrial metabolic flux

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino, Seiko; Hara, Toshiro; Nakaoka, Hiroki J; Kanamori, Akane; Murakami, Yoshinori; Seiki, Motoharu; Sakamoto, Takeharu

    2016-01-01

    Loss of anchorage to the extracellular matrix leads to apoptosis (anoikis) in normal cells, but cancerous cells are usually resistant to such stress. Here we report the pivotal role of an E3 ubiquitin ligase, ring-finger protein 126 (RNF126), in the resistance of cancer cells to the stress associated with non-adherent conditions. Non-adherent cancer cells exhibited increased flux through the tricarboxylic acid cycle via increased conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA. RNF126 was found to act as a ubiquitin ligase for pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDKs), resulting in their proteasomal degradation. This decrease in PDK levels allowed pyruvate dehydrogenases to catalyze the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA. Moreover, depletion of RNF126 or increased expression of PDK1 in cancer cells suppressed colony formation in soft agar as well as tumorigenicity in mice. RNF126 expression in cancer cells was found to be under the control of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathway, which is essential for anoikis resistance. Thus, RNF126 is an attractive molecule for treating cancer by selectively targeting anchorage-independent growth. PMID:27462466

  6. Invitro study of adherent mandibular osteoblast-like cells on carrier materials.

    PubMed

    Turhani, D; Weissenböck, M; Watzinger, E; Yerit, K; Cvikl, B; Ewers, R; Thurnher, D

    2005-07-01

    Augmentation of the craniofacial region is necessary for many aesthetic and reconstructive procedures. Tissue engineering offers a new option to supplement existing treatment regimens. In this procedure, materials composed of hydroxyapatite (HA), of synthetic or natural origin, are used as scaffolds. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of three HA materials on cultured human osteoblasts in vitro. Explant cultures of cells from human alveolar bone were established. Human osteoblasts were cultured on the surface of HA calcified from red algae (C GRAFT/Algipore), deproteinized bovine HA (Bio-Oss) and bovine HA carrying the cell binding peptide P-15 (Pep Gen P-15). Cultured cells were evaluated with respect to cell attachment, proliferation and differentiation. Cells were cultured for 6 and 21 days under osteogenic differentiation conditions, and tissue-culture polystyrene dishes were used as control. The ability of cells to proliferate and form extracellular matrix on these scaffolds was assessed by a DNA quantification assay, protein synthesis analysis and by scanning electron microscopical examination. Osteogenic differentiation was screened by the expression of alkaline phosphatase. The osteoblastic phenotype of the cells was monitored using mRNA levels of the bone-related proteins including osteocalcin, osteopontin and collagen Type I. We found that cells cultured on C GRAFT/Algipore) and Pep Gen P-15 showed a continuous increase in DNA content and protein synthesis. Cells cultured on Bio-Oss showed a decrease in DNA content from Day 6 (P < 0.05) to Day 21 (P < 0.0001) and protein synthesis on Day 21 (P < 0.005). Alkaline phosphatase activity increased in cells grown on C GRAFT/Algipore and Pep Gen P-15 in contrast to cells grown on Bio-Oss, in which the lowest levels of activity could be observed on Day 21 (P < 0.05). Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis confirmed the osteoblastic phenotype of the cells grown on all three

  7. Cancer Stem Cells in the Thyroid

    PubMed Central

    Nagayama, Yuji; Shimamura, Mika; Mitsutake, Norisato

    2016-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) model posits that CSCs are a small, biologically distinct subpopulation of cancer cells in each tumor that have self-renewal and multi-lineage potential, and are critical for cancer initiation, metastasis, recurrence, and therapy-resistance. Numerous studies have linked CSCs to thyroid biology, but the candidate markers and signal transduction pathways that drive thyroid CSC growth are controversial, the origin(s) of thyroid CSCs remain elusive, and it is unclear whether thyroid CSC biology is consistent with the original hierarchical CSC model or the more recent dynamic CSC model. Here, we critically review the thyroid CSC literature with an emphasis on research that confirmed the presence of thyroid CSCs by in vitro sphere formation or in vivo tumor formation assays with dispersed cells from thyroid cancer tissues or bona fide thyroid cancer cell lines. Future perspectives of thyroid CSC research are also discussed. PMID:26973599

  8. Therapeutic strategies targeting cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Xiaoyan; Shu, Jianchang; Du, Yiqi; Ben, Qiwen; Li, Zhaoshen

    2013-01-01

    Increasing studies have demonstrated a small proportion of cancer stem cells (CSCs) exist in the cancer cell population. CSCs have powerful self-renewal capacity and tumor-initiating ability and are resistant to chemotherapy and radiation. Conventional anticancer therapies kill the rapidly proliferating bulk cancer cells but spare the relatively quiescent CSCs, which cause cancer recurrence. So it is necessary to develop therapeutic strategies acting specifically on CSCs. In recent years, studies have shown that therapeutic agents such as metformin, salinomycin, DECA-14, rapamycin, oncostatin M (OSM), some natural compounds, oncolytic viruses, microRNAs, cell signaling pathway inhibitors, TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL), interferon (IFN), telomerase inhibitors, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and monoclonal antibodies can suppress the self-renewal of CSCs in vitro and in vivo. A combination of these agents and conventional chemotherapy drugs can significantly inhibit tumor growth, metastasis and recurrence. These strategies targeting CSCs may bring new hopes to cancer therapy. PMID:23358473

  9. Cell Fate Decisions During Breast Cancer Development

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Kayla; Wronski, Ania; Skibinski, Adam; Phillips, Sarah; Kuperwasser, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    During the formation of breast cancer, many genes become altered as cells evolve progressively from normal to a pre-malignant to a malignant state of growth. How mutations in genes lead to specific subtypes of human breast cancer is only partially understood. Here we review how initial genetic or epigenetic alterations within mammary epithelial cells (MECs) can alter cell fate decisions and put pre-malignant cells on a path towards cancer development with specific phenotypes. Understanding the early stages of breast cancer initiation and progression and how normal developmental processes are hijacked during transformation has significant implications for improving early detection and prevention of breast cancer. In addition, insights gleaned from this understanding may also be important for developing subtype-specific treatment options. PMID:27110512

  10. Therapeutic strategies targeting cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ning, Xiaoyan; Shu, Jianchang; Du, Yiqi; Ben, Qiwen; Li, Zhaoshen

    2013-04-01

    Increasing studies have demonstrated a small proportion of cancer stem cells (CSCs) exist in the cancer cell population. CSCs have powerful self-renewal capacity and tumor-initiating ability and are resistant to chemotherapy and radiation. Conventional anticancer therapies kill the rapidly proliferating bulk cancer cells but spare the relatively quiescent CSCs, which cause cancer recurrence. So it is necessary to develop therapeutic strategies acting specifically on CSCs. In recent years, studies have shown that therapeutic agents such as metformin, salinomycin, DECA-14, rapamycin, oncostatin M (OSM), some natural compounds, oncolytic viruses, microRNAs, cell signaling pathway inhibitors, TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL), interferon (IFN), telomerase inhibitors, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and monoclonal antibodies can suppress the self-renewal of CSCs in vitro and in vivo. A combination of these agents and conventional chemotherapy drugs can significantly inhibit tumor growth, metastasis and recurrence. These strategies targeting CSCs may bring new hopes to cancer therapy. PMID:23358473

  11. Cancer Stem Cells in the Thyroid.

    PubMed

    Nagayama, Yuji; Shimamura, Mika; Mitsutake, Norisato

    2016-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) model posits that CSCs are a small, biologically distinct subpopulation of cancer cells in each tumor that have self-renewal and multi-lineage potential, and are critical for cancer initiation, metastasis, recurrence, and therapy-resistance. Numerous studies have linked CSCs to thyroid biology, but the candidate markers and signal transduction pathways that drive thyroid CSC growth are controversial, the origin(s) of thyroid CSCs remain elusive, and it is unclear whether thyroid CSC biology is consistent with the original hierarchical CSC model or the more recent dynamic CSC model. Here, we critically review the thyroid CSC literature with an emphasis on research that confirmed the presence of thyroid CSCs by in vitro sphere formation or in vivo tumor formation assays with dispersed cells from thyroid cancer tissues or bona fide thyroid cancer cell lines. Future perspectives of thyroid CSC research are also discussed. PMID:26973599

  12. Ultrasound Effect on Cancerous versus Non-Cancerous Cells.

    PubMed

    Azagury, Aharon; Amar-Lewis, Eliz; Yudilevitch, Yana; Isaacson, Carol; Laster, Brenda; Kost, Joseph

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies have found that cancer cells whose metastatic potential is low are more vulnerable to mechanical stress-induced trauma to their cytoskeleton compared with benign cells. Because ultrasound induces mechanical stresses on cells and tissues, it is postulated that there may be a way to apply ultrasound to tumors to reduce their ability to metastasize. The difference between low-malignant-potential cancer cells and benign cells could be a result of their different responses to the mechanical stress insonation induced. This hypothesis was tested in vitro and in vivo. Low-malignant-potential cells were found to be more sensitive to insonation, resulting in a significantly higher mortality rate compared with that of benign cells, 89% versus 21%, respectively. This effect can be controlled by varying ultrasound parameters: intensity, duration, and duty cycle. Thus, the results presented in this study suggest the application of ultrasound to discriminate between benign and malignant cells. PMID:27067417

  13. Cancer stem cells in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Nilanjan; Matsui, William

    2009-05-01

    Several key observations providing evidence for the cancer stem cell hypothesis and insights into the unique biology of these cells have come from the study of multiple myeloma. These include evidence that cancer cells may be functionally heterogeneous in spite of their genetic homogeneity and that malignant progenitors share many biological features with normal adult stem cells including drug resistance and regulatory processes governing self-renewal. We review studies that have examined clonogenic cells in multiple myeloma, highlight controversies regarding the cell of origin in multiple myeloma, and discuss potential targeting strategies. PMID:18809245

  14. Hallmarks of cancer stem cell metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Sancho, Patricia; Barneda, David; Heeschen, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells adapt cellular metabolism to cope with their high proliferation rate. Instead of primarily using oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), cancer cells use less efficient glycolysis for the production of ATP and building blocks (Warburg effect). However, tumours are not uniform, but rather functionally heterogeneous and harbour a subset of cancer cells with stemness features. Such cancer cells have the ability to repopulate the entire tumour and thus have been termed cancer stem cells (CSCs) or tumour-initiating cells (TICs). As opposed to differentiated bulk tumour cells relying on glycolysis, CSCs show a distinct metabolic phenotype that, depending on the cancer type, can be highly glycolytic or OXPHOS dependent. In either case, mitochondrial function is critical and takes centre stage in CSC functionality. Remaining controversies in this young and emerging research field may be related to CSC isolation techniques and/or the use of less suitable model systems. Still, the apparent dependence of CSCs on mitochondrial function, regardless of their primary metabolic phenotype, represents a previously unrecognised Achilles heel amendable for therapeutic intervention. Elimination of highly chemoresistant CSCs as the root of many cancers via inhibition of mitochondrial function bears the potential to prevent relapse from disease and thus improve patients' long-term outcome. PMID:27219018

  15. Hallmarks of cancer stem cell metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sancho, Patricia; Barneda, David; Heeschen, Christopher

    2016-06-14

    Cancer cells adapt cellular metabolism to cope with their high proliferation rate. Instead of primarily using oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), cancer cells use less efficient glycolysis for the production of ATP and building blocks (Warburg effect). However, tumours are not uniform, but rather functionally heterogeneous and harbour a subset of cancer cells with stemness features. Such cancer cells have the ability to repopulate the entire tumour and thus have been termed cancer stem cells (CSCs) or tumour-initiating cells (TICs). As opposed to differentiated bulk tumour cells relying on glycolysis, CSCs show a distinct metabolic phenotype that, depending on the cancer type, can be highly glycolytic or OXPHOS dependent. In either case, mitochondrial function is critical and takes centre stage in CSC functionality. Remaining controversies in this young and emerging research field may be related to CSC isolation techniques and/or the use of less suitable model systems. Still, the apparent dependence of CSCs on mitochondrial function, regardless of their primary metabolic phenotype, represents a previously unrecognised Achilles heel amendable for therapeutic intervention. Elimination of highly chemoresistant CSCs as the root of many cancers via inhibition of mitochondrial function bears the potential to prevent relapse from disease and thus improve patients' long-term outcome. PMID:27219018

  16. Survivorship Care Planning in Patients With Colorectal or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-12-16

    Stage I Colon Cancer; Stage I Rectal Cancer; Stage IA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  17. Sialidases Affect the Host Cell Adherence and Epsilon Toxin-Induced Cytotoxicity of Clostridium perfringens Type D Strain CN3718

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jihong; Sayeed, Sameera; Robertson, Susan; Chen, Jianming; McClane, Bruce A.

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens type B or D isolates, which cause enterotoxemias or enteritis in livestock, produce epsilon toxin (ETX). ETX is exceptionally potent, earning it a listing as a CDC class B select toxin. Most C. perfringens strains also express up to three different sialidases, although the possible contributions of those enzymes to type B or D pathogenesis remain unclear. Type D isolate CN3718 was found to carry two genes (nanI and nanJ) encoding secreted sialidases and one gene (nanH) encoding a cytoplasmic sialidase. Construction in CN3718 of single nanI, nanJ and nanH null mutants, as well as a nanI/nanJ double null mutant and a triple sialidase null mutant, identified NanI as the major secreted sialidase of this strain. Pretreating MDCK cells with NanI sialidase, or with culture supernatants of BMC206 (an isogenic CN3718 etx null mutant that still produces sialidases) enhanced the subsequent binding and cytotoxic effects of purified ETX. Complementation of BMC207 (an etx/nanH/nanI/nanJ null mutant) showed this effect is mainly attributable to NanI production. Contact between BMC206 and certain mammalian cells (e.g., enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells) resulted in more rapid sialidase production and this effect involved increased transcription of BMC206 nanI gene. BMC206 was shown to adhere to some (e.g. Caco-2 cells), but not all mammalian cells, and this effect was dependent upon sialidase, particularly NanI, expression. Finally, the sialidase activity of NanI (but not NanJ or NanH) could be enhanced by trypsin. Collectively these in vitro findings suggest that, during type D disease originating in the intestines, trypsin may activate NanI, which (in turn) could contribute to intestinal colonization by C. perfringens type D isolates and also increase ETX action. PMID:22174687

  18. Extracellular mass transport considerations for space flight research concerning suspended and adherent in vitro cell cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klaus, David M.; Benoit, Michael R.; Nelson, Emily S.; Hammond, Timmothy G.

    2004-01-01

    Conducting biological research in space requires consideration be given to isolating appropriate control parameters. For in vitro cell cultures, numerous environmental factors can adversely affect data interpretation. A biological response attributed to microgravity can, in theory, be explicitly correlated to a specific lack of weight or gravity-driven motion occurring to, within or around a cell. Weight can be broken down to include the formation of hydrostatic gradients, structural load (stress) or physical deformation (strain). Gravitationally induced motion within or near individual cells in a fluid includes sedimentation (or buoyancy) of the cell and associated shear forces, displacement of cytoskeleton or organelles, and factors associated with intra- or extracellular mass transport. Finally, and of particular importance for cell culture experiments, the collective effects of gravity must be considered for the overall system consisting of the cells, their environment and the device in which they are contained. This does not, however, rule out other confounding variables such as launch acceleration, on orbit vibration, transient acceleration impulses or radiation, which can be isolated using onboard centrifuges or vibration isolation techniques. A framework is offered for characterizing specific cause-and-effect relationships for gravity-dependent responses as a function of the above parameters.

  19. A Method to Evaluate the Efficiency of Transfection Reagents in an Adherent Zebrafish Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Aschberger, Teresa; Pelster, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    Abstract We present a simple and robust method to evaluate the transfection efficiency of commercially available transfection reagents intended to be established for use in nonmammalian cell lines. To illustrate the method, we compare the ability of four different reagents to transfect the embryonic zebrafish cell line Z3. Z3 cells were seeded in a 96-well plate and simultaneously transfected in several variations by using minimum volumes of transfection reagent and a vector DNA encoding an amplified version of green fluorescent protein (GFP). After 24 and 48 h, transfection efficiency was determined by a dual fluorescence plate reader measurement of GFP and Hoechst 33342 fluorescence, an indicator of cell density. Of the four different reagents tested, certain variations of JetPrime™ reagent and X-tremeGene™ HP reagent produced the highest fluorescence signal per cell after 24- and 48-h incubation, respectively. The simultaneous multivariate setup enables comparing different reagent/DNA combinations at different time points well, independent of cell growth variability or seeding density. PMID:23515475

  20. Milk digesta and milk protein fractions influence the adherence of Lactobacillus gasseri R and Lactobacillus casei FMP to human cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Volstatova, Tereza; Havlik, Jaroslav; Potuckova, Miroslava; Geigerova, Martina

    2016-08-10

    Adhesion to the intestinal epithelium is considered an important feature of probiotic bacteria, which may increase their persistence in the intestine, allowing them to exert their beneficial health effect or promote the colonisation process. However, this feature might be largely dependent on the host specificity or diet. In the present study, we investigated the effect of selected milks and milk protein fractions on the ability of selected lactobacilli to adhere to the cells of an intestinal model based on co-culture Caco-2/HT29-MTX cell lines. Most milk digesta did not significantly affect bacterial adhesion except for UHT-treated milk and sheep milk. The presence of UHT-treated milk digesta reduced the adhesion of Lactobacillus gasseri R by 61% but not that of Lactobacillus casei FMP. However, sheep milk significantly increased the adherence of L. casei FMP (P < 0.05) but not of L. gasseri R. Among the protein fractions, rennet casein (RCN) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) showed reproducible patterns and strain-specific effects on bacterial adherence. While RCN reduced the adherence of L. gasseri R to <50% compared to the control, it did not have a significant effect on L. casei FMP. In contrast, BSA reduced L. casei FMP adherence to a higher extent than that of L. gasseri R. Whey protein (WH) tended to increase the adherence of both strains by 130%-180%. Recently, interactions between the host diet and its microbiota have attracted considerable interest. Our results may explain one of the aspects of the role of milk in the development of microbiota or support of probiotic supplements. Based on our data, we conclude that the persistence of probiotic strains supplemented as part of dairy food or constitutional microbiota in the gut might be affected negatively or positively by the food matrix through complex strain or concentration dependent effects. PMID:27435508

  1. Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial to assess the feasibility of an open label intervention to improve hydroxyurea adherence in youth with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Smaldone, Arlene; Findley, Sally; Bakken, Suzanne; Matiz, L. Adriana; Rosenthal, Susan L.; Jia, Haomiao; Matos, Sergio; Manwani, Deepa; Green, Nancy S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Community health workers (CHW) are increasingly recognized as a strategy to improve health outcomes for the underserved with chronic diseases but has not been formally explored in adolescents with sickle cell disease (SCD). SCD primarily affects African American, Hispanic and other traditionally underserved populations. Hydroxyurea (HU), an oral, once-daily medication, is the only approved therapeutic drug for sickle cell disease and markedly reduces symptoms, morbidity and mortality and improves quality of life largely by increasing hemoglobin F blood levels. This paper presents the rationale, study design and protocol for an open label randomized controlled trial to improve parent-youth partnerships in self-management and medication adherence to HU in adolescents with SCD. Methods/Design A CHW intervention augmented by text messaging was designed for adolescents with SCD ages 10–18 years and their parents to improve daily HU adherence. Thirty adolescent parent dyads will be randomized with 2:1 intervention group allocation. Intervention dyads will establish a relationship with a culturally aligned CHW to identify barriers to HU use, identify cues to build a habit, and develop a dyad partnership to improve daily HU adherence and achieve their individualized “personal best” hemoglobin F target. Intervention feasibility, acceptability and efficacy will be assessed via a 2-site trial. Outcomes of interest are HU adherence, dyad self-management communication, quality of life, and resource use. Discussion Despite known benefits, poor HU adherence is common. If feasible and acceptable, the proposed intervention may improve health of underserved adolescents with SCD by enhancing long-term HU adherence. PMID:27327779

  2. Cancer stem cells in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Allegra, Eugenia; Trapasso, Serena

    2012-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), also called "cells that start the tumor," represent in themselves one of the most topical and controversial issues in the field of cancer research. Tumor stem cells are able to self-propagate in vitro (self-renewal), giving rise both to other tumor stem cells and most advanced cells in the line of differentiation (asymmetric division). A final characteristic is tumorigenicity, a fundamental property, which outlines the tumor stem cell as the only cell able to initiate the formation of a tumor when implanted in immune-deficient mice. The hypothesis of a hierarchical organization of tumor cells dates back more than 40 years, but only in 1997, thanks to the work of John Dick and Dominique Bonnet, was there the formal proof of such an organization in acute myeloid leukemia. Following this, many other research groups were able to isolate CSCs, by appropriate selection markers, in various malignancies, such as breast, brain, colon, pancreas, and liver cancers and in melanoma. To date, however, it is not possible to isolate stem cells from all types of neoplasia, particularly in solid tumors. From a therapeutic point of view, the concept of tumor stem cells implies a complete revision of conventional antineoplastic treatment. Conventional cytotoxic agents are designed to target actively proliferating cells. In the majority of cases, this is not sufficient to eliminate the CSCs, which thanks to their reduced proliferative activity and/or the presence of proteins capable of extruding chemotherapeutics from the cell are not targeted. Therefore, the theory of cancer stem cells can pose new paradigms in terms of cancer treatment. Potential approaches, even in the very early experimental stages, relate to the selective inhibition of pathways connected with self-renewal, or more specifically based on the presence of specific surface markers for selective cytotoxic agent vehicles. Finally, some research groups are trying to induce these cells to

  3. Surface Functionalized Graphene Biosensor on Sapphire for Cancer Cell Detection.

    PubMed

    Joe, Daniel J; Hwang, Jeonghyun; Johnson, Christelle; Cha, Ho-Young; Lee, Jo-Won; Shen, Xiling; Spencer, Michael G; Tiwari, Sandip; Kim, Moonkyung

    2016-01-01

    Graphene has several unique physical, optical and electrical properties such as a two-dimensional (2D) planar structure, high optical transparency and high carrier mobility at room temperature. These make graphene interesting for electrical biosensing. Using a catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method, graphene film is grown on a sapphire substrate. There is a single or a few sheets as confirmed by Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Electrical graphene biosensors are fabricated to detect large-sized biological analytes such as cancer cells. Human colorectal carcinoma cells are sensed by the resistance change of an active bio-functionalized graphene device as the cells are captured by the immobilized antibody surface. The functionalized sensors show an increase in resistance as large as ~20% of the baseline with a small number of adhered cells. This study suggests that the bio-functionalized electrical graphene sensors on sapphire, which is a highly transparent material, can potentially detect circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and monitor cellular electrical behavior while being compatible with fluorescence-based optical-detection bioassays. PMID:27398439

  4. Cell Senescence: Aging and Cancer

    ScienceCinema

    Campisi, Judith

    2013-05-29

    Scientists have identified a molecular cause behind the ravages of old age and in doing so have also shown how a natural process for fighting cancer in younger persons can actually promote cancer in older individuals.

  5. Cell Senescence: Aging and Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Campisi, Judith

    2008-01-01

    Scientists have identified a molecular cause behind the ravages of old age and in doing so have also shown how a natural process for fighting cancer in younger persons can actually promote cancer in older individuals.

  6. Nonlinear Growth Kinetics of Breast Cancer Stem Cells: Implications for Cancer Stem Cell Targeted Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinfeng; Johnson, Sara; Liu, Shou; Kanojia, Deepak; Yue, Wei; Singn, Udai; Wang, Qian; Wang, Qi; Nie, Qing; Chen, Hexin

    2013-08-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been identified in primary breast cancer tissues and cell lines. The CSC population varies widely among cancerous tissues and cell lines, and is often associated with aggressive breast cancers. Despite of intensive research, how the CSC population is regulated within a tumor is still not well understood so far. In this paper, we present a mathematical model to explore the growth kinetics of CSC population both in vitro and in vivo. Our mathematical models and supporting experiments suggest that there exist non-linear growth kinetics of CSCs and negative feedback mechanisms to control the balance between the population of CSCs and that of non-stem cancer cells. The model predictions can help us explain a few long-standing questions in the field of cancer stem cell research, and can be potentially used to predict the efficicacy of anti-cancer therapy.

  7. Immunosuppression associated with the development of chronic infections with Rickettsia tsutsugamushi: adherent suppressor cell activity and macrophage activation.