Science.gov

Sample records for adherent cell line

  1. Vaccine production: upstream processing with adherent or suspension cell lines.

    PubMed

    Genzel, Yvonne; Rödig, Jana; Rapp, Erdmann; Reichl, Udo

    2014-01-01

    The production of viral vaccines in cell culture can be accomplished with primary, diploid, or continuous (transformed) cell lines. Each cell line, each virus type, and each vaccine preparation require the specific design of upstream and downstream processing. Media have to be selected as well as production vessels, cultivation conditions, and modes of operation. Many viruses only replicate to high titers in adherently growing cells, but similar to processes established for recombinant protein production, an increasing number of suspension cell lines is being evaluated for future use. Here, we describe key issues to be considered for the establishment of large-scale virus production in bioreactors. As an example upstream processing of cell culture-derived influenza virus production is described in more detail for adherently growing and for suspension cells. In particular, use of serum-containing, serum-free, and chemically defined media as well as choice of cultivation vessel are considered. PMID:24297427

  2. Establishment and characterization of a novel, spontaneously immortalized retinoblastoma cell line with adherent growth.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Hun; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Yu, Young Suk; Kim, Dong Hun; Kim, Chong Jai; Kim, Kyu-Won

    2007-09-01

    Retinoblastoma is the most common intraocular cancer of childhood, however, only a few cultured retinoblastoma cell lines are available to date. In the present study, we established a new human retinoblastoma cell line with adherent growth, named SNUOT-Rb1. The SNUOT-Rb1 cell line was established from an eye with retinoblastoma, which was enucleated from a 3-year-old Korean child. SNUOT-Rb1 has morphological and biochemical characteristics common to previous human retinoblastoma cell line, Y79: morphological features of fibroblast- or ganglion-like cells, and biochemical features of expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein and neuron-specific enolase. However, compared to Y79, SNUOT-Rb1 has a unique characteristic of growing in adherence, and the doubling time of SNUOT-Rb1 is shorter than Y79 in adherent or floating growth. In analysis of the tumorigenic potential of SNUOT-Rb1 in nude mice, orthotopic implantation of SNUOT-Rb1 mimics the pattern of local growth of retinoblastoma. In comparative genomic hybridization analysis, we found that SNUOT-Rb1 has significant chromosomal imbalances on chromosome 3, 9, 10, 11, 14, 16, 17, and 22. Therefore, SNUOT-Rb1 could be useful in studying the biological and genetic characteristics of retinoblastoma for insights into the heredity and genetics of childhood cancer. PMID:17671685

  3. Non-invasive and non-destructive measurements of confluence in cultured adherent cell lines.

    PubMed

    Busschots, Steven; O'Toole, Sharon; O'Leary, John J; Stordal, Britta

    2015-01-01

    Many protocols used for measuring the growth of adherent monolayer cells in vitro are invasive, destructive and do not allow for the continued, undisturbed growth of cells within flasks. Protocols often use indirect methods for measuring proliferation. Microscopy techniques can analyse cell proliferation in a non-invasive or non-destructive manner but often use expensive equipment and software algorithms. In this method images of cells within flasks are captured by photographing under a standard inverted phase contract light microscope using a digital camera with a camera lens adaptor. Images are analysed for confluence using ImageJ freeware resulting in a measure of confluence known as an Area Fraction (AF) output. An example of the AF method in use on OVCAR8 and UPN251 cell lines is included. •Measurements of confluence from growing adherent cell lines in cell culture flasks is obtained in a non-invasive, non-destructive, label-free manner.•The technique is quick, affordable and eliminates sample manipulation.•The technique provides an objective, consistent measure of when cells reach confluence and is highly correlated to manual counting with a haemocytometer. The average correlation co-efficient from a Spearman correlation (n = 3) was 0.99 ± 0.008 for OVCAR8 (p = 0.01) and 0.99 ± 0.01 for UPN251 (p = 0.01) cell lines.

  4. Non-invasive and non-destructive measurements of confluence in cultured adherent cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Busschots, Steven; O’Toole, Sharon; O’Leary, John J.; Stordal, Britta

    2014-01-01

    Many protocols used for measuring the growth of adherent monolayer cells in vitro are invasive, destructive and do not allow for the continued, undisturbed growth of cells within flasks. Protocols often use indirect methods for measuring proliferation. Microscopy techniques can analyse cell proliferation in a non-invasive or non-destructive manner but often use expensive equipment and software algorithms. In this method images of cells within flasks are captured by photographing under a standard inverted phase contract light microscope using a digital camera with a camera lens adaptor. Images are analysed for confluence using ImageJ freeware resulting in a measure of confluence known as an Area Fraction (AF) output. An example of the AF method in use on OVCAR8 and UPN251 cell lines is included. • Measurements of confluence from growing adherent cell lines in cell culture flasks is obtained in a non-invasive, non-destructive, label-free manner. • The technique is quick, affordable and eliminates sample manipulation. • The technique provides an objective, consistent measure of when cells reach confluence and is highly correlated to manual counting with a haemocytometer. The average correlation co-efficient from a Spearman correlation (n = 3) was 0.99 ± 0.008 for OVCAR8 (p = 0.01) and 0.99 ± 0.01 for UPN251 (p = 0.01) cell lines. PMID:26150966

  5. Porcine intestinal epithelial cell lines as a new in vitro model for studying adherence and pathogenesis of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Koh, Seung Y; George, Sajan; Brözel, Volker; Moxley, Rodney; Francis, David; Kaushik, Radhey S

    2008-07-27

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infections result in large economic losses in the swine industry worldwide. The organism causes diarrhea by adhering to and colonizing enterocytes in the small intestines. While much progress has been made in understanding the pathogenesis of ETEC, no homologous intestinal epithelial cultures suitable for studying porcine ETEC pathogenesis have been described prior to this report. In the current study, we investigated the adherence of various porcine ETEC strains to two porcine (IPEC-1 and IPEC-J2) and one human (INT-407) small intestinal epithelial cell lines. Each cell line was assessed for its ability to support the adherence of E. coli expressing fimbrial adhesins K88ab, K88ac, K88ad, K99, F41, 987P, and F18. Wild-type ETEC expressing K88ab, K88ac, and K88ad efficiently bound to both IPEC-1 and IPEC-J2 cells. An ETEC strain expressing both K99 and F41 bound heavily to both porcine cell lines but an E. coli strain expressing only K99 bound very poorly to these cells. E. coli expressing F18 adhesin strongly bound to IPEC-1 cells but did not adhere to IPEC-J2 cells. The E. coli strains G58-1 and 711 which express no fimbrial adhesins and those that express 987P fimbriae failed to bind to either porcine cell line. Only strains B41 and K12:K99 bound in abundance to INT-407 cells. The binding of porcine ETEC to IPEC-J2, IPEC-1 and INT-407 with varying affinities, together with lack of binding of 987P ETEC and non-fimbriated E. coli strains, suggests strain-specific E. coli binding to these cell lines. These findings suggest the potential usefulness of porcine intestinal cell lines for studying ETEC pathogenesis.

  6. Neurosphere and adherent culture conditions are equivalent for malignant glioma stem cell lines.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Maryam; Reyner, Karina; Deleyrolle, Loic; Millette, Sebastien; Azari, Hassan; Day, Bryan W; Stringer, Brett W; Boyd, Andrew W; Johns, Terrance G; Blot, Vincent; Duggal, Rohit; Reynolds, Brent A

    2015-03-01

    Certain limitations of the neurosphere assay (NSA) have resulted in a search for alternative culture techniques for brain tumor-initiating cells (TICs). Recently, reports have described growing glioblastoma (GBM) TICs as a monolayer using laminin. We performed a side-by-side analysis of the NSA and laminin (adherent) culture conditions to compare the growth and expansion of GBM TICs. GBM cells were grown using the NSA and adherent culture conditions. Comparisons were made using growth in culture, apoptosis assays, protein expression, limiting dilution clonal frequency assay, genetic affymetrix analysis, and tumorigenicity in vivo. In vitro expansion curves for the NSA and adherent culture conditions were virtually identical (P=0.24) and the clonogenic frequencies (5.2% for NSA vs. 5.0% for laminin, P=0.9) were similar as well. Likewise, markers of differentiation (glial fibrillary acidic protein and beta tubulin III) and proliferation (Ki67 and MCM2) revealed no statistical difference between the sphere and attachment methods. Several different methods were used to determine the numbers of dead or dying cells (trypan blue, DiIC, caspase-3, and annexin V) with none of the assays noting a meaningful variance between the two methods. In addition, genetic expression analysis with microarrays revealed no significant differences between the two groups. Finally, glioma cells derived from both methods of expansion formed large invasive tumors exhibiting GBM features when implanted in immune-compromised animals. A detailed functional, protein and genetic characterization of human GBM cells cultured in serum-free defined conditions demonstrated no statistically meaningful differences when grown using sphere (NSA) or adherent conditions. Hence, both methods are functionally equivalent and remain suitable options for expanding primary high-grade gliomas in tissue culture.

  7. Comparative genomic hybridization analysis of newly established retinoblastoma cell lines of adherent growth compared with Y79 of nonadherent growth.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Hun; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Yu, Young Suk; Kim, Dong Hun; Kim, Yong Kyu; Kim, Kyu-Won

    2008-08-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB) shows cytogenetic aberrations involving genes other than RB gene located on 13q14. We analyzed genomic aberration in newly established RB cell lines SNUOT-RB1 and SNUOT-RB4 of adherent growth and Y79 cell line of nonadherent growth by microarray comparative genomic hybridization. SNUOT-RB1 showed 44 significant copy number changes (gain in 11 and loss in 33, P<0.0005). SNUOT-RB4 showed 42 significant copy number changes (gain in 8 and loss in 34, P<0.0005). Y79 cell line had the greatest gain of 19.65-fold in the locus of MYCN gene 2p24.1, whereas SNUOT-RB1 and SNUOT-RB4 showed no significant gain. SNUOT-RB1 and SNUOT-RB4 gained chromosomal copy numbers commonly in chromosome 11, especially in locus 11q13, which is responsible for cancer-related genes such as CCND1, MEN1, and FGF3. Losses of copy numbers occurred in chromosomes 3, 9, 10, 11, 16, and 17. In summary, SNUOT-RB1 and SNUOT-RB4 represented similar pattern in gain and loss of chromosomal copy number changes, while different from Y79. The loss of CYLD gene of tumor suppressor gene, 16q12-q13, was only on locus of common involvement in 3 cell lines. PMID:18799932

  8. Adherence of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae to cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Zielinski, G C; Young, T; Ross, R F; Rosenbusch, R F

    1990-03-01

    This work was an attempt to develop an in vitro adherence model for Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, using monolayers of human and porcine lung fibroblasts and porcine kidney cells. Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae grown in Friis mycoplasma broth was radiolabeled with 35[S]-methionine, washed, concentrated, and inoculated on the monolayers. After 15 minutes of centrifugation to facilitate adherence, monolayers were washed 3 times, dissolved with 0.1N NaOH, and suspended in scintillation liquid, and the radioactivity was determined in a liquid scintillation counter. Adherence, measured as a percentage of counts added, varied according to the mycoplasma strain and the cell line used. Comparison of strains J, 144L, and 232 of M hyopneumoniae revealed 7.5 +/- 5.9, 31.9 +/- 13, and 9.6 +/- 5% adherence to porcine kidney cells, respectively. Slightly different, but proportionally the same relationships were obtained with swine or human fibroblasts. Adherence was decreased slightly by repeated washings of the mycoplasma-treated cell monolayers; however, a plateau was reached, indicating irreversibility of the adherence process. Pretreatment of cell monolayers with nonlabeled organisms substantially blocked adherence by labeled organisms. Dilution of labeled organisms resulted in an increased proportion adhering. Therefore, it appears that the adherence was a receptor-dependent event. Treatment of the mycoplasmas with trypsin prior to the inoculation of monolayers resulted in a marked reduction in adherence. Treatment of the mycoplasmas with hyperimmune swine serum against M hyopneumoniae or normal swine serum resulted in 80 to 90% reduction of adherence; however, no inhibition occurred when mycoplasmas were treated with purified IgG from the hyperimmune serum.

  9. Involvement of the heparan sulphate-binding proteins of Helicobacter pylori in its adherence to HeLa S3 and Kato III cell lines.

    PubMed

    Guzman-Murillo, M A; Ruiz-Bustos, E; Ho, B; Ascencio, F

    2001-04-01

    To determine whether Helicobacter pylori heparan sulphate-binding proteins (HSBPs) are involved in the adherence of H. pylori to HeLa and Kato III cells, monolayers were pre-incubated with various preparations and concentrations of H. pylori HSBPs at 37 degrees C, washed and then challenged with bacteria. HSBPs did not prevent but enhanced H. pylori adherence. However, challenging cultured cells with H. pylori previously incubated with rabbit anti-HSBP IgG resulted in significant inhibition of bacterial adherence. These data demonstrate that the extracellular HSBP plays an important role in promoting H. pylori attachment to Kato III and HeLa S3 cells, that adhesion of H. pylori to Kato III and HeLa S3 cells is promoted by the presence of the 71.5-kDa extracellular HSBP and that rabbit polyclonal antibodies against this HSBP can inhibit adhesion of H. pylori to the cultured cell lines and detach cell-bound H. pylori. PMID:11289517

  10. Physics of adherent cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Ulrich S.; Safran, Samuel A.

    2013-07-01

    One of the most unique physical features of cell adhesion to external surfaces is the active generation of mechanical force at the cell-material interface. This includes pulling forces generated by contractile polymer bundles and networks, and pushing forces generated by the polymerization of polymer networks. These forces are transmitted to the substrate mainly by focal adhesions, which are large, yet highly dynamic adhesion clusters. Tissue cells use these forces to sense the physical properties of their environment and to communicate with each other. The effect of forces is intricately linked to the material properties of cells and their physical environment. Here a review is given of recent progress in our understanding of the role of forces in cell adhesion from the viewpoint of theoretical soft matter physics and in close relation to the relevant experiments.

  11. The Adherent/Invasive Escherichia coli Strain LF82 Invades and Persists in Human Prostate Cell Line RWPE-1, Activating a Strong Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Aleandri, Marta; Marazzato, Massimiliano; Conte, Antonietta L.; Ambrosi, Cecilia; Nicoletti, Mauro; Zagaglia, Carlo; Gambara, Guido; Palombi, Fioretta; De Cesaris, Paola; Ziparo, Elio; Palamara, Anna T.; Riccioli, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Adherent/invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) strains have recently been receiving increased attention because they are more prevalent and persistent in the intestine of Crohn's disease (CD) patients than in healthy subjects. Since AIEC strains show a high percentage of similarity to extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC), neonatal meningitis-associated E. coli (NMEC), and uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) strains, here we compared AIEC strain LF82 with a UPEC isolate (strain EC73) to assess whether LF82 would be able to infect prostate cells as an extraintestinal target. The virulence phenotypes of both strains were determined by using the RWPE-1 prostate cell line. The results obtained indicated that LF82 and EC73 are able to adhere to, invade, and survive within prostate epithelial cells. Invasion was confirmed by immunofluorescence and electron microscopy. Moreover, cytochalasin D and colchicine strongly inhibited bacterial uptake of both strains, indicating the involvement of actin microfilaments and microtubules in host cell invasion. Moreover, both strains belong to phylogenetic group B2 and are strong biofilm producers. In silico analysis reveals that LF82 shares with UPEC strains several virulence factors: namely, type 1 pili, the group II capsule, the vacuolating autotransporter toxin, four iron uptake systems, and the pathogenic island (PAI). Furthermore, compared to EC73, LF82 induces in RWPE-1 cells a marked increase of phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and of NF-κB already by 5 min postinfection, thus inducing a strong inflammatory response. Our in vitro data support the hypothesis that AIEC strains might play a role in prostatitis, and, by exploiting host-cell signaling pathways controlling the innate immune response, likely facilitate bacterial multiplication and dissemination within the male genitourinary tract. PMID:27600504

  12. Adherence of Bilophila wadsworthia to cultured human embryonic intestinal cells.

    PubMed

    Gerardo, S H; Garcia, M M; Wexler, H M; Finegold, S M

    1998-02-01

    Adherence of Bilophila wadsworthia to the cultured human embryonic intestinal cell line, Intestine 407 (Int 407), varied among the strains tested from strongly adherent (76-100% cells positive for one or more adherent bacteria) to non- or weakly adherent (0-25% positive cells). Although negative staining revealed that infrequent cells of an adherent strain, WAL 9077, the adherent type-strain, WAL 7959, and a non-adherent strain, WAL 8448, expressed loosely associated fimbrial structures, a role for these structures in adhesion could not be confirmed with either scanning or thin-section electron micrography. Ruthenium red staining of thin-section preparations and subsequent electron microscopy failed to reveal an extensive extracellular polysaccharide layer. SDS-PAGE analysis of crude outer membrane fractions of WAL 9077 and WAL 8448 demonstrated clear differences in their major and minor outer membrane protein components. Thus, we postulate that the adherence of B. wadsworthia to Int 407 cells is mediated by an outer membrane or cell wall component. PMID:16887620

  13. Micromolded Arrays for Separation of Adherent Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuli; Phillips, Colleen; Xu, Wei; Pai, Jeng-Hao; Dhopeshwarkar, Rahul; Sims, Christopher E.; Allbritton, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    We present an efficient, yet inexpensive, approach for isolating viable single cells or colonies from a mixed population. This cell microarray platform possesses innovations in both the array manufacture and the manner of target cell release. Arrays of microwells with bases composed of detachable concave elements, termed microrafts, were fabricated by a dip-coating process using a polydimethylsiloxane mold as the template and the array substrate. This manufacturing approach enabled the use of materials other than photoresists to create the array elements. Thus microrafts possessing low autofluorescence could be fabricated for fluorescence-based identification of cells. Cells plated on the microarray settled and attached at the center of the wells due to the microrafts’ concavity. Individual microrafts were readily dislodged by the action of a needle inserted through the compliant polymer substrate. The hard polymer material (polystyrene or epoxy resin) of which the microrafts were composed protected the cells from damage by the needle. For cell analysis and isolation, cells of interest were identified using a standard inverted microscope and microrafts carrying target cells were dislodged with the needle. The released cells/microrafts could be efficiently collected, cultured and clonally expanded. During the separation and collection procedures, the cells remained adherent and provided a measure of protection during manipulation, thus providing an extremely high single-cell cloning rate (>95%). Generation of a transfected cell line based on expression of a fluorescent protein demonstrated an important application for performing on-chip cell separations. PMID:20838672

  14. P2Y2 nucleotide receptor activation up-regulates vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 [corrected] expression and enhances lymphocyte adherence to a human submandibular gland cell line.

    PubMed

    Baker, Olga J; Camden, Jean M; Rome, Danny E; Seye, Cheikh I; Weisman, Gary A

    2008-01-01

    Sjögren's syndrome (SS) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease that causes salivary and lacrimal gland tissue destruction resulting in impaired secretory function. Although lymphocytic infiltration of salivary epithelium is associated with SS, the mechanisms involved have not been adequately elucidated. Our previous studies have shown that the G protein-coupled P2Y2 nucleotide receptor (P2Y2R) is up-regulated in response to damage or stress of salivary gland epithelium, and in salivary glands of the NOD.B10 mouse model of SS-like autoimmune exocrinopathy. Additionally, we have shown that P2Y2R activation up-regulates vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) expression in endothelial cells leading to the binding of monocytes. The present study demonstrates that activation of the P2Y2R in dispersed cell aggregates from rat submandibular gland (SMG) and in human submandibular gland ductal cells (HSG) up-regulates the expression of VCAM-1. Furthermore, P2Y2R activation mediated the up-regulation of VCAM-1 expression in HSG cells leading to increased adherence of lymphocytic cells. Inhibitors of EGFR phosphorylation and metalloprotease activity abolished P2Y2R-mediated VCAM-1 expression and decreased lymphocyte binding to HSG cells. Moreover, silencing of EGFR expression abolished UTP-induced VCAM-1 up-regulation in HSG cells. These results suggest that P2Y2R activation in salivary gland cells increases the EGFR-dependent expression of VCAM-1 and the binding of lymphocytes, a pathway relevant to inflammation associated with SS.

  15. P2Y2 Nucleotide Receptor Activation Up-regulates Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecular-1 Expression and Enhances Lymphocyte Adherence to a Human Submandibular Gland Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Olga J.; Camden, Jean M.; Rome, Danny E.; Seye, Cheikh I.; Weisman, Gary A.

    2007-01-01

    Sjögren’s syndrome (SS) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease that causes salivary and lacrimal gland tissue destruction resulting in impaired secretory function. Although lymphocytic infiltration of salivary epithelium is associated with SS, the mechanisms involved have not been adequately elucidated. Our previous studies have shown that the G protein-coupled P2Y2 nucleotide receptor (P2Y2R) is up-regulated in response to damage or stress of salivary gland epithelium, and in salivary glands of the NOD.B10 mouse model of SS-like autoimmune exocrinopathy. Additionally, we have shown that P2Y2R activation up-regulates vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) expression in endothelial cells leading to the binding of monocytes. The present study demonstrates that activation of the P2Y2R in dispersed cell aggregates from rat submandibular gland (SMG) and in human submandibular gland ductal cells (HSG) up-regulates the expression of VCAM-1. Furthermore, P2Y2R activation mediated the up-regulation of VCAM-1 expression in HSG cells leading to increased adherence of lymphocytic cells. Inhibitors of EGFR phosphorylation and metalloprotease activity abolished P2Y2R-mediated VCAM-1 expression and decreased lymphocyte binding to HSG cells. Moreover, silencing of EGFR expression abolished UTP-induced VCAM-1 up-regulation in HSG cells. These results suggest that P2Y2R activation in salivary gland cells increases the EGFR-dependent expression of VCAM-1 and the binding of lymphocytes, a pathway relevant to inflammation associated with SS. PMID:17599409

  16. Measurement of adherent cell mass and growth

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kidong; Millet, Larry J.; Kim, Namjung; Li, Huan; Jin, Xiaozhong; Popescu, Gabriel; Aluru, N. R.; Hsia, K. Jimmy; Bashir, Rashid

    2010-01-01

    The characterization of physical properties of cells such as their mass and stiffness has been of great interest and can have profound implications in cell biology, tissue engineering, cancer, and disease research. For example, the direct dependence of cell growth rate on cell mass for individual adherent human cells can elucidate the mechanisms underlying cell cycle progression. Here we develop an array of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) resonant mass sensors that can be used to directly measure the biophysical properties, mass, and growth rate of single adherent cells. Unlike conventional cantilever mass sensors, our sensors retain a uniform mass sensitivity over the cell attachment surface. By measuring the frequency shift of the mass sensors with growing (soft) cells and fixed (stiff) cells, and through analytical modeling, we derive the Young’s modulus of the unfixed cell and unravel the dependence of the cell mass measurement on cell stiffness. Finally, we grew individual cells on the mass sensors and measured their mass for 50+ hours. Our results demonstrate that adherent human colon epithelial cells have increased growth rates with a larger cell mass, and the average growth rate increases linearly with the cell mass, at 3.25%/hr. Our sensitive mass sensors with a position-independent mass sensitivity can be coupled with microscopy for simultaneous monitoring of cell growth and status, and provide an ideal method to study cell growth, cell cycle progression, differentiation, and apoptosis. PMID:21068372

  17. Use of purified F1845 fimbrial adhesin to study localization and expression of receptors for diffusely adhering Escherichia coli during enterocytic differentiation of human colon carcinoma cell lines HT-29 and Caco-2 in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Kerneis, S; Bilge, S S; Fourel, V; Chauviere, G; Coconnier, M H; Servin, A L

    1991-01-01

    Whole diffusely adhering Escherichia coli (DAEC) C1845 cells bearing the F1845 adhesive factor bind diffusely to differentiated human colon carcinoma cell lines HT-29 and Caco-2. By using antibodies directed against the purified fimbrial adhesin F1845 factor, the expression of the DAEC F1845-specific brush border receptors in the polarized human intestinal HT-29 and Caco-2 epithelial cells was studied by indirect immunofluorescence. A low level of DAEC F1845 receptors in undifferentiated intestinal cells was detected; they were localized in a cluster of cells. DAEC F1845 receptors were expressed at a high level in differentiated HT-29 and Caco-2 cells. DAEC F1845 receptors were expressed at a strikingly high level in the apical domains of the cells and developed during enterocytic differentiation in culture, in parallel with the apical expression of the intestinal brush border hydrolase, sucrase-isomaltase. Images PMID:1682255

  18. Ion channels involved in cell volume regulation: effects on migration, proliferation, and programmed cell death in non adherent EAT cells and adherent ELA cells.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Else Kay

    2011-01-01

    This mini review outlines studies of cell volume regulation in two closely related mammalian cell lines: nonadherent Ehrlich ascites tumour cells (EATC) and adherent Ehrlich Lettre ascites (ELA) cells. Focus is on the regulatory volume decrease (RVD) that occurs after cell swelling, the volume regulatory ion channels involved, and the mechanisms (cellular signalling pathways) that regulate these channels. Finally, I shall also briefly review current investigations in these two cell lines that focuses on how changes in cell volume can regulate cell functions such as cell migration, proliferation, and programmed cell death.

  19. Eikenella corrodens adherence to human buccal epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Y; Ebisu, S; Okada, H

    1981-01-01

    The mechanism of Eikenella corrodens adherence to human buccal epithelial cells in vitro was studied. Initial experiments to determine the optimal conditions for adherence of E. corrodens to buccal epithelial cells showed that adherence was dependent on time, temperature, bacterial concentration, and pH. Different strains of E. corrodens varied in their ability to adhere, and strain 1073 showed the greatest ability in adherence. Strain 1073 was selected for studies of adherence mechanisms. Trypsin treatment or heating (100 degrees C, 10 min) of the bacterial cells abolished their capacity to adhere to buccal epithelial cells. Treatment of buccal epithelial cells with trypsin also abolished adherence of E. corrodens 1073, whereas neuraminidase treatment of buccal epithelial cells enhanced the adherence. The adherence was inhibited by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and restored by adding Ca2+. The adherence was remarkably inhibited by sugars containing D-galactose and n-acetyl-D-galactosamine. Treatment of neuraminidase-treated epithelial cells with sodium metaperiodate or alpha- and beta-galactosidase did not decrease the adherence. These data suggest that adherence of E. corrodens 1073 to human buccal epithelial cells may require the interaction of lectin-like proteins on the bacterial surface with galactose-like receptors on the surface of epithelial cells. PMID:6260661

  20. Automated microinjection system for adherent cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youoku, Sachihiro; Suto, Yoshinori; Ando, Moritoshi; Ito, Akio

    2007-07-01

    We have developed an automated microinjection system that can handle more than 500 cells an hour. Microinjection injects foreign agents directly into cells using a micro-capillary. It can randomly introduce agents such as DNA, proteins and drugs into various types of cells. However, conventional methods require a skilled operator and suffer from low throughput. The new automated microinjection techniques we have developed consist of a Petri dish height measuring method and a capillary apex position measuring method. The dish surface height is measured by analyzing the images of cells that adhere to the dish surface. The contrast between the cell images is minimized when the focus plane of an object lens coincides with the dish surface. We have developed an optimized focus searching method with a height accuracy of +/-0.2 um. The capillary apex position detection method consists of three steps: rough, middle, and precise. These steps are employed sequentially to cover capillary displacements of up to +/-2 mm, and to ultimately accomplish an alignment accuracy of less than one micron. Experimental results using this system we developed show that it can introduce fluorescent material (Alexa488) into adherent cells, HEK293, with a success rate of 88.5%.

  1. Role of sulfated glycans in adherence of the microsporidian Encephalitozoon intestinalis to host cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hayman, J Russell; Southern, Timothy R; Nash, Theodore E

    2005-02-01

    Microsporidia are obligate intracellular opportunistic protists that infect a wide variety of animals, including humans, via environmentally resistant spores. Infection requires that spores be in close proximity to host cells so that the hollow polar tube can pierce the cell membrane and inject the spore contents into the cell cytoplasm. Like other eukaryotic microbes, microsporidia may use specific mechanisms for adherence in order to achieve target cell proximity and increase the likelihood of successful infection. Our data show that Encephalitozoon intestinalis exploits sulfated glycans such as the cell surface glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in selection of and attachment to host cells. When exogenous sulfated glycans are used as inhibitors in spore adherence assays, E. intestinalis spore adherence is reduced by as much as 88%. However, there is no inhibition when nonsulfated glycans are used, suggesting that E. intestinalis spores utilize sulfated host cell glycans in adherence. These studies were confirmed by exposure of host cells to xylopyranoside, which limits host cell surface GAGs, and sodium chlorate, which decreases surface sulfation. Spore adherence studies with CHO mutant cell lines that are deficient in either surface GAGs or surface heparan sulfate also confirmed the necessity of sulfated glycans. Furthermore, when spore adherence is inhibited, host cell infection is reduced, indicating a direct association between spore adherence and infectivity. These data show that E. intestinalis specifically adheres to target cells by way of sulfated host cell surface GAGs and that this mechanism serves to enhance infectivity.

  2. Topography Influences Adherent Cell Regulation of Osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, M; Cooper, L F; Ogino, Y; Mendonca, D; Liang, R; Yang, S; Mendonca, G; Uoshima, K

    2016-03-01

    The importance of osteoclast-mediated bone resorption in the process of osseointegration has not been widely considered. In this study, cell culture was used to investigate the hypothesis that the function of implant-adherent bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in osteoclastogenesis is influenced by surface topography. BMSCs isolated from femur and tibia of Sprague-Dawley rats were seeded onto 3 types of titanium surfaces (smooth, micro, and nano) and a control surface (tissue culture plastic) with or without osteogenic supplements. After 3 to 14 d, conditioned medium (CM) was collected. Subsequently, rat bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) were cultured in media supplemented with soluble receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) as well as BMSC CM from each of the 4 surfaces. Gene expression levels of soluble RANKL, osteoprotegerin, tumor necrosis factor α, and M-CSF in cultured BMSCs at different time points were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The number of differentiated osteoclastic cells was determined after tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining. Analysis of variance and t test were used for statistical analysis. The expression of prominent osteoclast-promoting factors tumor necrosis factor α and M-CSF was increased by BMSCs cultured on both micro- and nanoscale titanium topographies (P < 0.01). BMSC CM contained a heat-labile factor that increased BMMs osteoclastogenesis. CM from both micro- and nanoscale surface-adherent BMSCs increased the osteoclast number (P < 0.01). Difference in surface topography altered BMSC phenotype and influenced BMM osteoclastogenesis. Local signaling by implant-adherent cells at the implant-bone interface may indirectly control osteoclastogenesis and bone accrual around endosseous implants. PMID:26553885

  3. Active mechanics and geometry of adherent cells and cell colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Shiladitya

    2014-03-01

    Measurements of traction stresses exerted by adherent cells or cell colonies on elastic substrates have yielded new insight on how the mechanical and geometrical properties of the substrate regulate cellular force distribution, mechanical energy, spreading, morphology or stress ber architecture. We have developed a generic mechanical model of adherent cells as an active contractile gel mechanically coupled to an elastic substrate and to neighboring cells in a tissue. The contractile gel model accurately predicts the distribution of cellular and traction stresses as observed in single cell experiments, and captures the dependence of cell shape, traction stresses and stress ber polarization on the substrate's mechanical and geometrical properties. The model further predicts that the total strain energy of an adherent cell is solely regulated by its spread area, in agreement with recent experiments on micropatterned substrates with controlled geometry. When used to describe the behavior of colonies of adherent epithelial cells, the model demonstrates the crucial role of the mechanical cross-talk between intercellular and extracellular adhesion in regulating traction force distribution. Strong intercellular mechanical coupling organizes traction forces to the colony periphery, whereas weaker intercellular coupling leads to the build up of traction stresses at intercellular junctions. Furthermore, in agreement with experiments on large cohesive keratinocyte colonies, the model predicts a linear scaling of traction forces with the colony size. This scaling suggests the emergence of an effective surface tension as a scale-free material property of the adherent tissue, originating from actomyosin contractility.

  4. Filamentous hemagglutinin has a major role in mediating adherence of Bordetella pertussis to human WiDr cells.

    PubMed Central

    Urisu, A; Cowell, J L; Manclark, C R

    1986-01-01

    [35S]methionine-labeled Bordetella pertussis adhered to monolayers of WiDr cells, an epitheliumlike cell line from a human intestinal carcinoma. Adherence was proportional to the density of the WiDr cells and to the concentration of B. pertussis in the assay. Adherence of virulent phase I strains Tohama phase I, 114, and BP338 was much greater than adherence of avirulent strains Tohama phase III and 423 phase IV. Mutants deficient in the production of the filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA) were hemagglutination negative and adhered to WiDr cells much less efficiently than the parent strains. Preincubation of B. pertussis cells with FHA increased their hemagglutination activity and adherence to WiDr cells. Goat antibody to FHA inhibited, in a dose-dependent manner, the adherence of strain Tohama I but not the adherence of FHA-deficient mutant Tohama 325. At similar protein concentrations, normal goat antibody, goat antibody to pertussis toxin, or the Fab fragments of goat antibody to serotype 2 fimbriae had no effect on adherence. Also, an FHA-positive strain without fimbriae showed high adherence, while a fimbriated FHA-deficient mutant adhered poorly. Our data indicate that FHA plays a major role in adherence of B. pertussis to human WiDr cells. Fimbriae do not appear to mediate attachment of B. pertussis to WiDr cells. PMID:2872165

  5. Automated adherent human cell culture (mesenchymal stem cells).

    PubMed

    Thomas, Robert; Ratcliffe, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Human cell culture processes developed at research laboratory scale need to be translated to large-scale production processes to achieve commercial application to a large market. To allow this transition of scale with consistent process performance and control of costs, it will be necessary to reduce manual processing and increase automation. There are a number of commercially available platforms that will reduce manual process intervention and improve process control for different culture formats. However, in many human cell-based applications, there is currently a need to remain close to the development format, usually adherent culture on cell culture plastic or matrix-coated wells or flasks due to deterioration of cell quality in other environments, such as suspension. This chapter presents an example method for adherent automated human stem cell culture using a specific automated flask handling platform, the CompacT SelecT.

  6. A fully automated system for adherent cells microinjection.

    PubMed

    Becattini, Gabriele; Mattos, Leonardo S; Caldwell, Darwin G

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes an automated robotic system to perform cell microinjections to relieve human operators from this highly difficult and tedious manual procedure. The system, which uses commercial equipment currently found on most biomanipulation laboratories, consists of a multitask software framework combining computer vision and robotic control elements. The vision part features an injection pipette tracker and an automatic cell targeting system that is responsible for defining injection points within the contours of adherent cells in culture. The main challenge is the use of bright-field microscopy only, without the need for chemical markers normally employed to highlight the cells. Here, cells are identified and segmented using a threshold-based image processing technique working on defocused images. Fast and precise microinjection pipette positioning over the automatically defined targets is performed by a two-stage robotic system which achieves an average injection rate of 7.6 cells/min with a pipette positioning precision of 0.23 μm. The consistency of these microinjections and the performance of the visual targeting framework were experimentally evaluated using two cell lines (CHO-K1 and HEK) and over 500 cells. In these trials, the cells were automatically targeted and injected with a fluorescent marker, resulting in a correct cell detection rate of 87% and a successful marker delivery rate of 67.5%. These results demonstrate that the new system is capable of better performances than expert operators, highlighting its benefits and potential for large-scale application. PMID:24403406

  7. A fully automated system for adherent cells microinjection.

    PubMed

    Becattini, Gabriele; Mattos, Leonardo S; Caldwell, Darwin G

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes an automated robotic system to perform cell microinjections to relieve human operators from this highly difficult and tedious manual procedure. The system, which uses commercial equipment currently found on most biomanipulation laboratories, consists of a multitask software framework combining computer vision and robotic control elements. The vision part features an injection pipette tracker and an automatic cell targeting system that is responsible for defining injection points within the contours of adherent cells in culture. The main challenge is the use of bright-field microscopy only, without the need for chemical markers normally employed to highlight the cells. Here, cells are identified and segmented using a threshold-based image processing technique working on defocused images. Fast and precise microinjection pipette positioning over the automatically defined targets is performed by a two-stage robotic system which achieves an average injection rate of 7.6 cells/min with a pipette positioning precision of 0.23 μm. The consistency of these microinjections and the performance of the visual targeting framework were experimentally evaluated using two cell lines (CHO-K1 and HEK) and over 500 cells. In these trials, the cells were automatically targeted and injected with a fluorescent marker, resulting in a correct cell detection rate of 87% and a successful marker delivery rate of 67.5%. These results demonstrate that the new system is capable of better performances than expert operators, highlighting its benefits and potential for large-scale application.

  8. Ferromagnetic Micropallets for Magnetic Capture of Single Adherent Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gunn, Nicholas M.; Chang, Ruth; Westerhof, Trisha; Li, Guann-Pyng; Bachman, Mark; Nelson, Edward L.

    2010-01-01

    We present a magnetic micropallet array and demonstration of its capacity to recover specific, individual adherent cells from large populations and deliver them for downstream single cell analysis. A ferromagnetic photopolymer was formulated, characterized, and used to fabricate magnetic micropallets, which are microscale pedestals that provide demarcated cell growth surfaces, with preservation of biophysical properties including photopatternability, biocompatibility, and optical clarity. Each micropallet holds a single adherent cell in culture and hundreds of thousands of micropallets compose a single micropallet array. Any micropallet in the array can be recovered on demand, carrying the adhered cell with it. We used this platform to selectively recover single cells, which were subsequently analyzed using single cell RT-qPCR. PMID:20968293

  9. Adherence to human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC-L) of Plasmodium vivax isolates from Colombia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background For years Plasmodium vivax has been considered the cause of benign malaria. Nevertheless, it has been observed that this parasite can produce a severe disease comparable to Plasmodium falciparum. It has been suggested that some physiopathogenic processes might be shared by these two species, such as cytoadherence. Recently, it has been demonstrated that P. vivax-infected erythrocytes (Pv-iEs) have the capacity to adhere to endothelial cells, in which intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) seems to be involved in this process. Methods Adherence capacity of 21 Colombian isolates, from patients with P. vivax mono-infection to a microvascular line of human lung endothelium (HMVEC-L) was assessed in static conditions and binding was evaluated at basal levels or in tumor necrosis factor (TNF) stimulated cells. The adherence specificity for the ICAM-1 receptor was determined through inhibition with an anti-CD54 monoclonal antibody. Results The majority of P. vivax isolates, 13 out of 21 (61.9%), adhered to the HMVEC-L cells, but P. vivax adherence was at least seven times lower when compared to the four P. falciparum isolates. Moreover, HMVEC-L stimulation with TNF led to an increase of 1.6-fold in P. vivax cytoadhesion, similar to P. falciparum isolates (1.8-fold) at comparable conditions. Also, blockage of ICAM-1 receptor with specific antibodies showed a significant 50% adherence reduction. Conclusions Plasmodium vivax isolates found in Colombia are also capable of adhering specifically in vitro to lung endothelial cells, via ICAM-1 cell receptor, both at basal state and after cell stimulation with TNF. Collectively, these findings reinforce the concept of cytoadherence for P. vivax, but here, to a different endothelial cell line and using geographical distinct isolates, thus contributing to understanding P. vivax biology. PMID:24080027

  10. Comparative study of the radiobiological effects induced on adherent vs suspended cells by BNCT, neutrons and gamma rays treatments.

    PubMed

    Cansolino, L; Clerici, A M; Zonta, C; Dionigi, P; Mazzini, G; Di Liberto, R; Altieri, S; Ballarini, F; Bortolussi, S; Carante, M P; Ferrari, M; González, S J; Postuma, I; Protti, N; Santa Cruz, G A; Ferrari, C

    2015-12-01

    The present work is part of a preclinical in vitro study to assess the efficacy of BNCT applied to liver or lung coloncarcinoma metastases and to limb osteosarcoma. Adherent growing cell lines can be irradiated as adherent to the culture flasks or as cell suspensions, differences in radio-sensitivity of the two modalities of radiation exposure have been investigated. Dose related cell survival and cell cycle perturbation results evidenced that the radiosensitivity of adherent cells is higher than that of the suspended ones. PMID:26256647

  11. Comparative study of the radiobiological effects induced on adherent vs suspended cells by BNCT, neutrons and gamma rays treatments.

    PubMed

    Cansolino, L; Clerici, A M; Zonta, C; Dionigi, P; Mazzini, G; Di Liberto, R; Altieri, S; Ballarini, F; Bortolussi, S; Carante, M P; Ferrari, M; González, S J; Postuma, I; Protti, N; Santa Cruz, G A; Ferrari, C

    2015-12-01

    The present work is part of a preclinical in vitro study to assess the efficacy of BNCT applied to liver or lung coloncarcinoma metastases and to limb osteosarcoma. Adherent growing cell lines can be irradiated as adherent to the culture flasks or as cell suspensions, differences in radio-sensitivity of the two modalities of radiation exposure have been investigated. Dose related cell survival and cell cycle perturbation results evidenced that the radiosensitivity of adherent cells is higher than that of the suspended ones.

  12. Role of different classes of mammalian cell surface molecules in adherence of coagulase positive and coagulase negative staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Hafez, Mohamed M; Aboulwafa, Mohammad M; Yassien, Mahmoud A; Hassouna, Nadia A

    2008-10-01

    In the present study the role of different mammalian cell receptors in adherence of the coagulase positive pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus and some coagulase negative staphylococci, namely Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus saprophyticus was investigated. Upon testing the adherence to Vero and Hep-2 cells, S. aureus isolates showed an adherence to both cell lines while S. epidermidis and S. saprophyticus isolates adhered to Vero cells only. According to the obtained results, both O-linked and N-linked mammalian cell surface glycoproteins are involved in the adherence of S. aureus isolates to Vero and Hep-2 cells, whereas only the O-linked ones serve as receptors for adherence of S. epidermidis and S. saprophyticus isolates to Vero cells. Of the O-linked glycoproteins, GAG-like receptors are involved in adherence of all tested isolates to Vero cells. The coagulase positive staphylococci preferred to adhere to the highly sulphated GAGs (Heparin and chondroitin sulphate B) while the coagulase negative isolates showed higher affinity to the less sulphated ones (Chondroitin sulphate A and C). Mucin like receptors appeared to be important for the adherence of all tested staphylococci. The role exhibited by fibronectin- and fibrinogen-like receptors was detected with S. aureus and S. epidermidis but not with S. saprophyticus isolates. While, collagen and gelatin were found to contribute to the adherence of S. aureus isolates only. Neither carbohydrate moieties of the glycoconjugates nor lipid molecules on the mammalian cell surface played a role in the adherence of the tested staphylococcal isolates. Taken together, the results revealed that both coagulase negative and coagulase positive staphylococcal tested isolates adhere to the same classes of mammalian cell surface receptors such as mucin-like, fibrinogen-like, fibronectin-like and GAG-like receptors. However, the tested isolates exhibited different degrees of affinities to such receptors.

  13. Microfluidic device capable of medium recirculation for non-adherent cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Angela R.; Rajan, Shrinidhi; Kuo, Chuan-Hsien; Bersano, Tom; Wold, Rachel; Futai, Nobuyuki; Takayama, Shuichi; Mehta, Geeta

    2014-01-01

    We present a microfluidic device designed for maintenance and culture of non-adherent mammalian cells, which enables both recirculation and refreshing of medium, as well as easy harvesting of cells from the device. We demonstrate fabrication of a novel microfluidic device utilizing Braille perfusion for peristaltic fluid flow to enable switching between recirculation and refresh flow modes. Utilizing fluid flow simulations and the human promyelocytic leukemia cell line, HL-60, non-adherent cells, we demonstrate the utility of this RECIR-REFRESH device. With computer simulations, we profiled fluid flow and concentration gradients of autocrine factors and found that the geometry of the cell culture well plays a key role in cell entrapping and retaining autocrine and soluble factors. We subjected HL-60 cells, in the device, to a treatment regimen of 1.25% dimethylsulfoxide, every other day, to provoke differentiation and measured subsequent expression of CD11b on day 2 and day 4 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) on day 4. Our findings display perfusion sensitive CD11b expression, but not TNF-α build-up, by day 4 of culture, with a 1:1 ratio of recirculation to refresh flow yielding the greatest increase in CD11b levels. RECIR-REFRESH facilitates programmable levels of cell differentiation in a HL-60 non-adherent cell population and can be expanded to other types of non-adherent cells such as hematopoietic stem cells. PMID:24753733

  14. Elasticity of adherent active cells on a compliant substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Shiladitya; Mertz, Aaron F.; Dufresne, Eric R.; Marchetti, M. Cristina

    2012-02-01

    We present a continuum mechanical model of rigidity sensing by livings cells adhering to a compliant substrate. The cell or cell colony is modeled as an elastic active gel, adapting recently developed continuum theories of active viscoelastic fluids. The coupling to the substrate enters as a boundary condition that relates the cell's deformation field to local stress gradients. In the presence of activity, the substrate induces spatially inhomogeneous contractile stresses and deformations, with a power law dependence of the total traction forces on cell or colony size. This is in agreement with recent experiments on keratinocyte colonies adhered to fibronectin coated surfaces. In the presence of acto-myosin activity, the substrate also enhances the cell polarization, breaking the cell's front-rear symmetry. Maximal polarization is observed when the substrate stiffness matches that of the cell, in agreement with experiments on stem cells.

  15. Measuring Survival of Adherent Cells with the Colony-Forming Assay.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Lisa C; Christensen, Melinda E; Waterhouse, Nigel J

    2016-01-01

    Measuring cell death with colorimetric or fluorimetric dyes such as trypan blue and propidium iodide (PI) can provide an accurate measure of the number of dead cells in a population at a specific time; however, these assays cannot be used to distinguish cells that are dying or marked for future death. In many cases it is essential to measure the proliferative capacity of treated cells to provide an indirect measurement of cell death. This can be achieved using the colony-forming assay described here. This protocol specifically applies to measurement of HeLa cells but can be used for most adherent cell lines with limited motility. PMID:27480717

  16. Adherence of human basophils to cultured umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bochner, B S; Peachell, P T; Brown, K E; Schleimer, R P

    1988-01-01

    The mechanism by which circulating human basophils adhere to vascular endothelium and migrate to sites of allergic reactions is unknown. Agents have been identified which stimulate the adherence of purified basophils to cultured human umbilical vein vascular endothelial cells (HuVEC). Treatment of HuVEC with interleukin 1, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), bacterial endotoxin, and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) resulted in time and dose-dependent increases of adhesiveness for basophils. Coincubation of basophils and HuVEC for 10 min with C5a, formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine, the calcium ionophore A23187, platelet-activating factor, TNF, and TPA also resulted in significant dose-dependent increases in basophil adherence; this effect resulted from activation of the basophil. Adherence of basophils to HuVEC was time and temperature dependent, required divalent cations, and was unaffected by glucocorticoids. Monoclonal antibody 60.3, directed against the beta-subunit of the leukocyte adherence complex CD18, inhibited the binding of basophils to HuVEC. Adherence of basophils to vascular endothelium may be important in initiating basophil infiltrates in vivo. PMID:3130394

  17. Apa is a trimeric autotransporter adhesin of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae responsible for autoagglutination and host cell adherence.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Longwen; Zhou, Liang; Sun, Changjiang; Feng, Xin; Du, ChongTao; Gao, Yu; Ji, Qun; Yang, Shuxin; Wang, Yu; Han, Wenyu; Langford, P R; Lei, Liancheng

    2012-10-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is the causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia, and adherence to host cells is a key step in the pathogenic process. Although trimeric autotransporter adhesins (TAAs) were identified in many pathogenic bacteria in recent years, none in A. pleuropneumoniae have been characterized. In this study, we identified a TAA from A. pleuropneumoniae, Apa, and characterized the contribution of its amino acid residues to the adhesion process. Sequence analysis of the C-terminal amino acid residues of Apa revealed the presence of a putative translocator domain and six conserved HsfBD1-like or HsfBD2-like binding domains. Western blot analysis revealed that the 126 C-terminal amino acids of Apa could form trimeric molecules. By confocal laser scanning microscopy, one of these six domains (ApaBD3) was determined to mediate adherence to epithelial cells. Adherence assays and adherence inhibition assays using a recombinant E. coli- ApaBD3 strain which expressed ApaBD3 on the surface of E. coli confirmed that this domain was responsible for the adhesion activity. Moreover, cellular enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays demonstrated that ApaBD3 mediated high-level adherence to epithelial cell lines. Intriguingly, autoagglutination was observed with the E. coli- ApaBD3 strain, and this phenomenon was dependent upon the association of the expressed ApaBD3 with the C-terminal translocator domain.

  18. ENHANCE—(Electronic Hydroxyurea Adherence): A Protocol to Increase Hydroxyurea Adherence in Patients with Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chisolm, Deena J; O’Brien, Sarah H

    2016-01-01

    Background Hydroxyurea (HU) is the only disease-modifying medication for patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). HU can reduce SCD-related complications but only 35% to 50% of pediatric patients adhere to HU at the rates achieved in clinical trials and this limits its clinical effectiveness. Mobile Directly Observed Therapy (Mobile DOT) is a pilot-tested, electronic, multidimensional, HU adherence intervention that targets many components of the Health Behavior Model. Objective The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of Mobile DOT on HU adherence in children with SCD. The objective of our study is to inform the development of future adherence interventions and pediatric SCD protocols. Methods This is a single-arm crossover study of pediatric patients with SCD. Participants self-record videos of their daily HU administrations and receive text message alerts to take HU, feedback on their HU adherence, and incentives when they achieve adherence goals during the 6-month Mobile DOT phase. Participants’ HU adherence during the Mobile DOT phase is compared with their baseline HU adherence (6 months prior to study entry) and to their HU adherence 6 months after completing the Mobile DOT phase. The primary outcome of this study is HU adherence measured by medication possession ratio. Results The trial is ongoing. Preliminary review of participant satisfaction results suggest that most participants can complete Mobile DOT in less than 5 minutes per day and are satisfied with the intervention. Conclusions If effective, the Mobile DOT strategy will increase HU adherence and this could improve patients’ clinical outcomes and reduce costs of care. PMID:27697749

  19. Electroporation chip for adherent cells on photochemically modified polymer surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olbrich, Michael; Rebollar, Esther; Heitz, Johannes; Frischauf, Irene; Romanin, Christoph

    2008-01-01

    We present a polytetrafluoroethylene electroporation microchip with integrated electrodes for transfection of adherent biological cells. For fabrication, UV-surface modification was employed in combination with metal deposition. UV irradiation in reactive atmosphere resulted in introduction of polar chemical groups into the polytetrafluoroethylene surface for significant adhesion enhancement of both biological cells as well as metal electrodes thereon. Electroporation was demonstrated by transfection of human embryonic kidney cells with the enhanced green fluorescent protein. Transparent, working at low voltages, and easy to handle, this chip yields the potential to reduce the amount of sequential working steps necessary for transfection.

  20. Dynamic mechanical measurement of the viscoelasticity of single adherent cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbin, Elise A.; Adeniba, Olaoluwa O.; Ewoldt, Randy H.; Bashir, Rashid

    2016-02-01

    Many recent studies on the viscoelasticity of individual cells link mechanics with cellular function and health. Here, we introduce a measurement of the viscoelastic properties of individual human colon cancer cells (HT-29) using silicon pedestal microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) resonant sensors. We demonstrate that the viscoelastic properties of single adherent cells can be extracted by measuring a difference in vibrational amplitude of our resonant sensor platform. The magnitude of vibration of the pedestal sensor is measured using a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV). A change in amplitude of the sensor, compared with the driving amplitude (amplitude ratio), is influenced by the mechanical properties of the adhered cells. The amplitude ratio of the fixed cells was greater than the live cells, with a p-value <0.0001. By combining the amplitude shift with the resonant frequency shift measure, we determined the elastic modulus and viscosity values of 100 Pa and 0.0031 Pa s, respectively. Our method using the change in amplitude of resonant MEMS devices can enable the determination of a refined solution space and could improve measuring the stiffness of cells.

  1. Differences in Haemophilus parasuis adherence to and invasion of AOC-45 porcine aorta endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis of Haemophilus parasuis depends on the bacterium’s ability to interact with endothelial cells and invade adjacent tissues. In this study, we investigated the abilities of eight H. parasuis reference strains belonging to serovars 1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 9, 10 and 13 to adhere to and invade porcine aortic endothelial cells (AOC-45 cell line). Results The strains belonging to serovars 1, 2 and 5 were able to attach at high rates between 60 and 240 min of incubation, and serovars 4, 7 and 13 had moderate attachment rates; however, the strains belonging to serovars 9 and 10 had low adherence at all time points. Strong adherence was observed by scanning electron microscopy for the strains of serovars 5 and 4, which had high and moderate numbers, respectively, of H. parasuis cells attached to AOC-45 cells after 240 min of incubation. The highest invasiveness was reached at 180 min by the serovar 4 strain, followed by the serovar 5 strain at 240 min. The invasion results differed substantially depending on the strain. Conclusion The reference strains of H. parasuis serovars 1, 2, 4 and 5 exhibited high adhesion and invasion levels to AOC-45 porcine aorta endothelial cells, and these findings could aid to better explain the pathogenesis of the disease caused by these serovars. PMID:24119995

  2. pH changes during in vitro adherence of Escherichia coli to HeLa cells.

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, K; Mann, M D; Bowie, M D

    1994-01-01

    Escherichia coli-induced acidic pH conditions were observed during the in vitro adherence of E. coli to HeLa cells. No pH changes occurred in the absence of adherence. This suggests that adherence affects the function or interaction of HeLa cells and E. coli. PMID:7927801

  3. Contractile Film Model for Polymorphism in Adherent Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Shiladitya; Giomi, Luca

    2013-03-01

    The optimal shapes attained by contractile cells on elastic substrates are determined by the crosstalk between intracellular forces and extracellular forces of adhesion. We model an adherent stationary cell as a contractile film bounded by an elastic cortex and connected to the substrate via elastic links. When the adhesion sites are continuously distributed, optimal cell shape is constrained by the adhesion geometry, with a spread area sensitively dependent on the substrate stiffness and contractile tension. For discrete adhesion sites, equilibrium cell shape is convex at weak contractility, while developing local concavities at intermediate values of contractility. Increasing contractility beyond a critical value, controlled by substrate stiffness, cell contour undergoes a discontinuous transition to a star-shaped configuration with cusps and protrusions, accompanied by a region of bistability and hysteresis.

  4. CLO: The cell line ontology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cell lines have been widely used in biomedical research. The community-based Cell Line Ontology (CLO) is a member of the OBO Foundry library that covers the domain of cell lines. Since its publication two years ago, significant updates have been made, including new groups joining the CLO consortium, new cell line cells, upper level alignment with the Cell Ontology (CL) and the Ontology for Biomedical Investigation, and logical extensions. Construction and content Collaboration among the CLO, CL, and OBI has established consensus definitions of cell line-specific terms such as ‘cell line’, ‘cell line cell’, ‘cell line culturing’, and ‘mortal’ vs. ‘immortal cell line cell’. A cell line is a genetically stable cultured cell population that contains individual cell line cells. The hierarchical structure of the CLO is built based on the hierarchy of the in vivo cell types defined in CL and tissue types (from which cell line cells are derived) defined in the UBERON cross-species anatomy ontology. The new hierarchical structure makes it easier to browse, query, and perform automated classification. We have recently added classes representing more than 2,000 cell line cells from the RIKEN BRC Cell Bank to CLO. Overall, the CLO now contains ~38,000 classes of specific cell line cells derived from over 200 in vivo cell types from various organisms. Utility and discussion The CLO has been applied to different biomedical research studies. Example case studies include annotation and analysis of EBI ArrayExpress data, bioassays, and host-vaccine/pathogen interaction. CLO’s utility goes beyond a catalogue of cell line types. The alignment of the CLO with related ontologies combined with the use of ontological reasoners will support sophisticated inferencing to advance translational informatics development. PMID:25852852

  5. Photosensitizer Adhered to Cell Culture Microplates Induces Phototoxicity in Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Verena; Kiesslich, Tobias; Krammer, Barbara; Plaetzer, Kristjan

    2013-01-01

    In vitro experiments in plastic receptacles are the basis of characterization of new photosensitizers (PSs) for the photodynamic therapy. We recently reported that lipophilic PSs adhere to cell culture microplates in a kinetic-like manner (Engelhardt et al., 2011). In the current study, we examined the interaction and phototoxic effects of the microplate-adhered PS in cancer cells. Therefore, we preloaded microplates with hypericin, Foscan, PVP-hypericin, or aluminum (III) phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate chloride (AlPCS4) for 24 hours and measured the PS distribution after addition of A431 human carcinoma cells: following another 24 hours up to 68% of hypericin were detected in the cell fraction. The hydrophilic PVP-hypericin and AlPCS4 also diffused into the cells, but the quantities of PS adherence were considerably lower. Microplate-adhered Foscan appeared not to be redistributed. In contrast to the hydrophilic PSs, the cellular phototoxicity of microplate-adhered lipophilic PS was high, independent of whether the PS (i) was pre-loaded onto microplates or (ii) added simultaneously with the cells or (iii) one day after cell seeding. Based on these results, we suggest testing lipophilic PS dyes for their adherence to microplates. Furthermore, the ability of plastic materials to (reversibly) store PSs might represent a new approach for the PS delivery or the development of antimicrobial coatings. PMID:23509741

  6. Transglutaminase 2 is essential for adherence of Porphyromonas gingivalis to host cells

    PubMed Central

    Boisvert, Heike; Lorand, Laszlo; Duncan, Margaret J.

    2014-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is the major causative agent of periodontitis, and it may also be involved in the development of systemic diseases (atherosclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis). P. gingivalis is found on and within oral and gingival epithelial cells following binding to surface components of host cells, which serve as receptors for the bacterium. Evidence is presented in this study that shows that transglutaminase 2 (TG2) plays a critical role in the adherence of P. gingivalis to host cells. Studies of confocal microscopy indicate colocalization of P. gingivalis with TG2 on the surface of HEp-2 epithelial cells, with clusters of TG2 seen at bacterial attachment sites. By silencing the expression of TG2 with siRNA in HEp-2 cells, P. gingivalis association was greatly diminished. The bacterium does not bind well to a mouse fibroblast cell line that produces low amounts of surface TG2, but binding can be restored by introduction of TG2 expressed on a plasmid. TG2 can form very tight complexes with fibronectin (FN), and the complementary binding sites of the two proteins are known. A synthetic peptide that mimics the main FN-binding sequence of TG2 blocks the formation of TG2–FN complexes and is highly effective in inhibiting adherence of P. gingivalis to host cells. These findings provide evidence of a role for cell-surface TG2 in bacterial attachment and subsequent internalization. PMID:24706840

  7. Computational Tension Mapping of Adherent Cells Based on Actin Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Manifacier, Ian; Milan, Jean-Louis; Jeanneau, Charlotte; Chmilewsky, Fanny; Chabrand, Patrick; About, Imad

    2016-01-01

    Forces transiting through the cytoskeleton are known to play a role in adherent cell activity. Up to now few approaches haves been able to determine theses intracellular forces. We thus developed a computational mechanical model based on a reconstruction of the cytoskeleton of an adherent cell from fluorescence staining of the actin network and focal adhesions (FA). Our custom made algorithm converted the 2D image of an actin network into a map of contractile interactions inside a 2D node grid, each node representing a group of pixels. We assumed that actin filaments observed under fluorescence microscopy, appear brighter when thicker, we thus presumed that nodes corresponding to pixels with higher actin density were linked by stiffer interactions. This enabled us to create a system of heterogeneous interactions which represent the spatial organization of the contractile actin network. The contractility of this interaction system was then adapted to match the level of force the cell truly exerted on focal adhesions; forces on focal adhesions were estimated from their vinculin expressed size. This enabled the model to compute consistent mechanical forces transiting throughout the cell. After computation, we applied a graphical approach on the original actin image, which enabled us to calculate tension forces throughout the cell, or in a particular region or even in single stress fibers. It also enabled us to study different scenarios which may indicate the mechanical role of other cytoskeletal components such as microtubules. For instance, our results stated that the ratio between intra and extra cellular compression is inversely proportional to intracellular tension. PMID:26812601

  8. Selective adherence of non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) to mucus or epithelial cells in the chinchilla eustachian tube and middle ear.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, N; Bakaletz, L O

    1996-11-01

    Frozen sections of chinchilla Eustachian tube (ET) and middle ear mucosa were incubated with either FITC-labeled non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) or Bordetella pertussis. The number of bacteria adherent to "roof" vs "floor" regions was compared for each of three anatomic portions of the ET and for middle ear epithelium noting whether bacteria adhered to mucus or to epithelial cells. NTHi strains adhered significantly greater to mucus in the ET lumen whereas B. pertussis preferentially adhered to epithelial cells lining the ET (P < or = 0.05). A non-fimbriated isogenic mutant of NTHi adhered significantly less to mucus than the parental isolate at all sites of the ET floor (P < or = 0.05). Isolated fimbrin protein adhered to ET mucus and blocked adherence of whole organisms. Treatment with the mucolytic agent N-acetyl-L-cysteine resulted in significantly reduced adherence of NTHi to mucus (P < or = 0.001) and eliminated the ability to detect binding of isolated fimbrin protein. N-acetyl-L-cysteine treatment did not affect adherence of either B. pertussis or NTHi to epithelial cells. These data indicated that NTHi may mediate ascension of the ET from the nasopharynx primarily via adherence to and growth in mucus overlying the floor region of the tubal lumen. The OMP P5-homologous fimbriae were shown to contribute to this binding.

  9. Characteristics and response of mouse bone marrow derived novel low adherent mesenchymal stem cells acquired by quantification of extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Ri-Cheng; Heo, Seong-Joo; Koak, Jai-Young; Lee, Joo-Hee; Park, Ji-Man

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of present study was to identify characteristic and response of mouse bone marrow (BM) derived low-adherent bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) obtained by quantification of extracellular matrix (ECM). MATERIALS AND METHODS Non-adherent cells acquired by ECM coated dishes were termed low-adherent BMMSCs and these cells were analyzed by in vitro and in vivo methods, including colony forming unit fibroblast (CFU-f), bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), multi-potential differentiation, flow cytometry and transplantation into nude mouse to measure the bone formation ability of these low-adherent BMMSCs. Titanium (Ti) discs with machined and anodized surfaces were prepared. Adherent and low-adherent BMMSCs were cultured on the Ti discs for testing their proliferation. RESULTS The amount of CFU-f cells was significantly higher when non-adherent cells were cultured on ECM coated dishes, which was made by 7 days culturing of adherent BMMSCs. Low-adherent BMMSCs had proliferation and differentiation potential as adherent BMMSCs in vitro. The mean amount bone formation of adherent and low-adherent BMMSCs was also investigated in vivo. There was higher cell proliferation appearance in adherent and low-adherent BMMSCs seeded on anodized Ti discs than machined Ti discs by time. CONCLUSION Low-adherent BMMSCs acquired by ECM from non-adherent cell populations maintained potential characteristic similar to those of the adherent BMMSCs and therefore could be used effectively as adherent BMMSCs in clinic. PMID:25352957

  10. Moraxella catarrhalis Expresses a Cardiolipin Synthase That Impacts Adherence to Human Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Buskirk, Sean W.

    2014-01-01

    The major phospholipid constituents of Moraxella catarrhalis membranes are phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, and cardiolipin (CL). However, very little is known regarding the synthesis and function of these phospholipids in M. catarrhalis. In this study, we discovered that M. catarrhalis expresses a cardiolipin synthase (CLS), termed MclS, that is responsible for the synthesis of CL within the bacterium. The nucleotide sequence of mclS is highly conserved among M. catarrhalis isolates and is predicted to encode a protein with significant amino acid similarity to the recently characterized YmdC/ClsC protein of Escherichia coli. Isogenic mclS mutant strains were generated in M. catarrhalis isolates O35E, O12E, and McGHS1 and contained no observable levels of CL. Site-directed mutagenesis of a highly conserved HKD motif of MclS also resulted in a CL-deficient strain. Moraxella catarrhalis, which depends on adherence to epithelial cells for colonization of the human host, displays significantly reduced levels of adherence to HEp-2 and A549 cell lines in the mclS mutant strains compared to wild-type bacteria. The reduction in adherence appears to be attributed to the absence of CL. These findings mark the first instance in which a CLS has been related to a virulence-associated trait. PMID:24142255

  11. Evaluation of a Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) assay (Keystone Sym)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our goal is to establish an in vitro model system to evaluate chemical effects using a single stem cell culture technique that would improve throughput and provide quantitative markers of differentiation and cell number. To this end, we have used an adherent cell differentiation ...

  12. [Observation on the biological behavior of human umbilical cord blood adherent cells].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi; Wang, Pin; Chen, Xing-Hua; Liu, Lin; Peng, Xian-Gui; Kong, Pei-Yan; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Qing-Yu

    2005-02-01

    To study the possibility of separation and culture of human umbilical cord blood adherent cell (HUCBAC), the umbilical cord blood CD34(+) cells were cultured in Dexter system in order to evaluate and observe the biological behavior of adherent cells in vitro. The results showed that all cells were cultured with Dexter system. By day 9-14 (at a median of 11.2 days), adherent cell colonies formed and reached their maximum at 15-22 days (mean 19.6 days), by day 28, all adherent cells spread over the bottom of Petri dish. By means of light microscopy, these cells were found to differentiate into three kinds of cells in culture of 28 days: fibroblast-liked cell, macrophage liked cell and small-round cells. The ratio of these three kinds of cells was 56.8%, 38%, 5.5% respectively. Cytochemistry assay revealed that the positive rate reached 100% in NSE stain and PAS stain; the adherent cell by ALP stain were shown 35% positive, but in POX stain the result was negative. Immunohistochemistry stain revealed that the positive rate of cord adherent cells for CD106, CD29, CD44, CD45, CD50, Fn, Ln, collagen IV etc reached 96%, 93%, 98%, 68%, 72%, 92%, 74%, 83% respectively. It is concluded there are hematopoietic adherent precursors in cord blood CD34(+) cells and the HUCBAC shows some biological behavior of hematopoietic stromal cells.

  13. Heparin-mediated inhibition of Chlamydia psittaci adherence to HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Martín, C B; Ojcius, D M; Hsia, R; Hellio, R; Bavoil, P M; Dautry-Varsat, A

    1997-01-01

    The adherence of human strains of Chlamydia trachomatis has been recently shown to be inhibitable by heparin and heparitinase, leading to the proposal that Chlamydia binding to host cells may be mediated by a glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-dependent mechanism. We here describe the adherence of the guinea-pig pathogen, Chlamydia psittaci GPIC, to HeLa cells, which was measured by cytofluorometry with chlamydiae whose DNA was fluorescently labelled. Adherence could be inhibited by heat or trypsin pretreatment of the bacteria, and binding was much faster at 37 degrees C (reaching a plateau within 1 h) than 4 degrees C. Little binding remained when host cells were pre-fixed with paraformaldehyde, suggesting that host cell receptor mobility may be required for effective adherence. Visualization by confocal microscopy confirmed that the bacteria were at or near the host cell surface during the entire time-course of these experiments. Adherence increased as a function of pH between pH 6 and pH 8.0-8.5. Both adherence and infection of HeLa cells could be inhibited with heparin when the adherence step was performed at 4 degrees C, but only infection was inhibited when the adherence step was performed at 37 degrees C, even though heparitinase could block adherence at either 4 degrees C or 37 degrees C. Even at 4 degrees C, heparin-mediated inhibition was significantly lower at pH 8 than pH 7.4, suggesting that GAG-independent mechanisms may play a role in the higher adherence observed at basic pH. These results therefore demonstrate that a GAG-dependent adherence step may be operative in C. psittaci, and raise the possibility that other adherence mechanisms may also contribute to binding by this chlamydial strain. Furthermore, they suggest that there may not be a strict correlation between C. psittaci adherence and the ability to cause productive infections.

  14. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli TibA Glycoprotein Adheres to Human Intestine Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lindenthal, Christoph; Elsinghorst, Eric A.

    2001-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is capable of invading epithelial cell lines derived from the human ileum and colon. Two separate invasion loci (tia and tib) that direct noninvasive E. coli strains to adhere to and invade cultured human intestine epithelial cells have previously been isolated from the classical ETEC strain H10407. The tib locus directs the synthesis of TibA, a 104-kDa outer membrane glycoprotein. Synthesis of TibA is directly correlated with the adherence and invasion phenotypes of the tib locus, suggesting that this protein is an adhesin and invasin. Here we report the purification of TibA and characterization of its biological activity. TibA was purified by continuous-elution preparative sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Purified TibA was biotin labeled and then shown to bind to HCT8 human ileocecal epithelial cells in a specific and saturable manner. Unlabeled TibA competed with biotin-labeled TibA, suggesting the presence of a specific TibA receptor in HCT8 cells. These results show that TibA acts as an adhesin. Polyclonal anti-TibA antiserum inhibited invasion of ETEC strain H10407 and of recombinant E. coli bearing tib locus clones, suggesting that TibA also acts as an invasin. The ability of TibA to direct epithelial cell adhesion suggests a role for this protein in ETEC pathogenesis. PMID:11119488

  15. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli TibA glycoprotein adheres to human intestine epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lindenthal, C; Elsinghorst, E A

    2001-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is capable of invading epithelial cell lines derived from the human ileum and colon. Two separate invasion loci (tia and tib) that direct noninvasive E. coli strains to adhere to and invade cultured human intestine epithelial cells have previously been isolated from the classical ETEC strain H10407. The tib locus directs the synthesis of TibA, a 104-kDa outer membrane glycoprotein. Synthesis of TibA is directly correlated with the adherence and invasion phenotypes of the tib locus, suggesting that this protein is an adhesin and invasin. Here we report the purification of TibA and characterization of its biological activity. TibA was purified by continuous-elution preparative sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Purified TibA was biotin labeled and then shown to bind to HCT8 human ileocecal epithelial cells in a specific and saturable manner. Unlabeled TibA competed with biotin-labeled TibA, suggesting the presence of a specific TibA receptor in HCT8 cells. These results show that TibA acts as an adhesin. Polyclonal anti-TibA antiserum inhibited invasion of ETEC strain H10407 and of recombinant E. coli bearing tib locus clones, suggesting that TibA also acts as an invasin. The ability of TibA to direct epithelial cell adhesion suggests a role for this protein in ETEC pathogenesis. PMID:11119488

  16. Surface modification of closed plastic bags for adherent cell cultivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachmann, K.; Dohse, A.; Thomas, M.; Pohl, S.; Meyring, W.; Dittmar, K. E. J.; Lindenmeier, W.; Klages, C.-P.

    2011-07-01

    In modern medicine human mesenchymal stem cells are becoming increasingly important. However, a successful cultivation of this type of cells is only possible under very specific conditions. Of great importance, for instance, are the absence of contaminants such as foreign microbiological organisms, i.e., sterility, and the chemical functionalization of the ground on which the cells are grown. As cultivation of these cells makes high demands, a new procedure for cell cultivation has been developed in which closed plastic bags are used. For adherent cell growth chemical functional groups have to be introduced on the inner surface of the plastic bag. This can be achieved by a new, atmospheric-pressure plasma-based method presented in this paper. The method which was developed jointly by the Fraunhofer IST and the Helmholtz HZI can be implemented in automated equipment as is also shown in this contribution. Plasma process gases used include helium or helium-based gas mixtures (He + N2 + H2) and vapors of suitable film-forming agents or precursors such as APTMS, DACH, and TMOS in helium. The effect of plasma treatment is investigated by FTIR-ATR spectroscopy as well as surface tension determination based on contact angle measurements and XPS. Plasma treatment in nominally pure helium increases the surface tension of the polymer foil due to the presence of oxygen traces in the gas and oxygen diffusing through the gas-permeable foil, respectively, reacting with surface radical centers formed during contact with the discharge. Primary amino groups are obtained on the inner surface by treatment in mixtures with nitrogen and hydrogen albeit their amount is comparably small due to diffusion of oxygen through the gas-permeable bag, interfering with the plasma-amination process. Surface modifications introducing amino groups on the inner surface turned out to be most efficient in the promotion of cell growth.

  17. The Acinetobacter baumannii biofilm-associated protein plays a role in adherence to human epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Brossard, Kari A; Campagnari, Anthony A

    2012-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a significant source of nosocomial infections worldwide. This bacterium has the ability to survive and persist on multiple abiotic surfaces in health care facilities, and once a focus has been established, this opportunistic pathogen is difficult to eradicate. This paper demonstrates that the A. baumannii biofilm-associated protein (Bap) is necessary for mature biofilm formation on medically relevant surfaces, including polypropylene, polystyrene, and titanium. Scanning electron microscopy analyses of biofilms show that Bap is required for three-dimensional tower structure and water channel formation. In conjunction with persistence on abiotic surfaces, adherence to eukaryotic cells is an important step in bacterial colonization resulting in infection of the host. We have described Bap as the surface structure involved in adherence of A. baumannii to both normal human bronchial epithelial cells and normal human neonatal keratinocytes. However, Bap is not involved in internalization of the bacterium in these two cell lines. Furthermore, this study shows that the presence of Bap increases the bacterial cell surface hydrophobicity. The results of this study are pertinent, as the data lead to a better understanding of the role of Bap in biofilm formation on medical surfaces and in colonization of the host.

  18. Adherence of Candida to cultured vascular endothelial cells: mechanisms of attachment and endothelial cell penetration.

    PubMed

    Rotrosen, D; Edwards, J E; Gibson, T R; Moore, J C; Cohen, A H; Green, I

    1985-12-01

    To elucidate the pathogenesis of hematogenous Candida infections, we developed an in vitro model of Candida adherence to and penetration of human endothelial cells. We enhanced or inhibited adherence in order to probe mechanisms of attachment. Adherence of Candida albicans showed a linear relation to Candida inoculum (range, 10(2)-10(5) cfu, r = .99, P less than .01) and exceeded that of less virulent Candida species and that of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (P less than .01). Candida immune serum blocked attachment (greater than 95% inhibition; P less than .001), however, this activity was abolished by immunoprecipitation of immune serum with C. albicans mannan (P less than .001) and was unaffected by immunoprecipitation with S. cerevisiae mannan or by adsorption with particulate chitin. Adherence was diminished by exposing C. albicans to heat (greater than 99% inhibition; P less than .01), UV light (98% inhibition; P less than .01), or sodium periodate (greater than 72% inhibition; P less than .01). An extract from heat-exposed C. albicans blocked adherence (greater than 51% inhibition; P less than .001). Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that viable or killed Candida organisms were attached to endothelial cells, were enveloped by membrane processes from the endothelial cell surface, and were incorporated into the endothelial cells within phagosomes. Cytochalasin B blocked incorporation without blocking surface attachment. PMID:3905987

  19. A validated measure of adherence to antibiotic prophylaxis in children with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Natalie A; Kronenberger, William G; Hampton, Kisha C; Bloom, Ellen M; Rampersad, Angeli G; Roberson, Christopher P; Shapiro, Amy D

    2016-01-01

    Background Antibiotic prophylaxis is a mainstay in sickle cell disease management. However, adherence is estimated at only 66%. This study aimed to develop and validate a Sickle Cell Antibiotic Adherence Level Evaluation (SCAALE) to promote systematic and detailed adherence evaluation. Methods A 28-item questionnaire was created, covering seven adherence areas. General Adherence Ratings from the parent and one health care provider and medication possession ratios were obtained as validation measures. Results Internal consistency was very good to excellent for the total SCAALE (α=0.89) and four of the seven subscales. Correlations between SCAALE scores and validation measures were strong for the total SCAALE and five of the seven subscales. Conclusion The SCAALE provides a detailed, quantitative, multidimensional, and global measurement of adherence and can promote clinical care and research. PMID:27354768

  20. Biology of SNU Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Ja-Lok

    2005-01-01

    SNU (Seoul National University) cell lines have been established from Korean cancer patients since 1982. Of these 109 cell lines have been characterized and reported, i.e., 17 colorectal carcinoma, 12 hepatocellular carcinoma, 11 gastric carcinoma, 12 uterine cervical carcinoma, 17 B-lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from cancer patients, 5 ovarian carcinoma, 3 malignant mixed Mllerian tumor, 6 laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma, 7 renal cell carcinoma, 9 brain tumor, 6 biliary tract, and 4 pancreatic carcinoma cell lines. These SNU cell lines have been distributed to biomedical researchers domestic and worldwide through the KCLB (Korean Cell Line Bank), and have proven to be of value in various scientific research fields. The characteristics of these cell lines have been reported in over 180 international journals by our laboratory and by many other researchers from 1987. In this paper, the cellular and molecular characteristics of SNU human cancer cell lines are summarized according to their genetic and epigenetic alterations and functional analysis. PMID:19956504

  1. Extending metabolome coverage for untargeted metabolite profiling of adherent cultured hepatic cells.

    PubMed

    García-Cañaveras, Juan Carlos; López, Silvia; Castell, José Vicente; Donato, M Teresa; Lahoz, Agustín

    2016-02-01

    MS-based metabolite profiling of adherent mammalian cells comprises several challenging steps such as metabolism quenching, cell detachment, cell disruption, metabolome extraction, and metabolite measurement. In LC-MS, the final metabolome coverage is strongly determined by the separation technique and the MS conditions used. Human liver-derived cell line HepG2 was chosen as adherent mammalian cell model to evaluate the performance of several commonly used procedures in both sample processing and LC-MS analysis. In a first phase, metabolite extraction and sample analysis were optimized in a combined manner. To this end, the extraction abilities of five different solvents (or combinations) were assessed by comparing the number and the levels of the metabolites comprised in each extract. Three different chromatographic methods were selected for metabolites separation. A HILIC-based method which was set to specifically separate polar metabolites and two RP-based methods focused on lipidome and wide-ranging metabolite detection, respectively. With regard to metabolite measurement, a Q-ToF instrument operating in both ESI (+) and ESI (-) was used for unbiased extract analysis. Once metabolite extraction and analysis conditions were set up, the influence of cell harvesting on metabolome coverage was also evaluated. Therefore, different protocols for cell detachment (trypsinization or scraping) and metabolism quenching were compared. This study confirmed the inconvenience of trypsinization as a harvesting technique, and the importance of using complementary extraction solvents to extend metabolome coverage, minimizing interferences and maximizing detection, thanks to the use of dedicated analytical conditions through the combination of HILIC and RP separations. The proposed workflow allowed the detection of over 300 identified metabolites from highly polar compounds to a wide range of lipids.

  2. Bead transfection: rapid and efficient gene transfer into marrow stromal and other adherent mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Matthews, K E; Mills, G B; Horsfall, W; Hack, N; Skorecki, K; Keating, A

    1993-05-01

    We report a simple, rapid, efficient and cost-effective method of gene transfer into bone marrow stromal and other adherent mammalian cells. Our approach involves brief incubation of cells with glass beads in a solution containing the DNA to be transferred. We optimized the technique using COS cells (SV40 transformed kidney cell line from African green monkey) and a transient expression assay for chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT). Factors affecting gene transfer include size and condition of the beads and DNA concentration, but not DNA conformation. Gene transfer efficiency, assessed in a transient expression assay for beta-galactosidase activity, was 5 and 3% in nontransformed human bone marrow stromal cells and COS cells, respectively. Long-term stable expression with the selectable marker, neomycin phosphotransferase, was demonstrated in clonogenic COS cells at a frequency of 27%. Southern analysis of resistant clones revealed the transferred DNA to be integrated in low copy number at one or two sites in the host cell genome. Comparison with electroporation and DEAE-dextran indicates that bead transfection is more efficient than the latter and less costly than either of these methods. In view of its simplicity and because the use of retroviral sequences can be avoided, bead transfection may be an attractive means of gene insertion for gene therapy.

  3. Localized electroporation effect on adherent cells in modified electric cell-substrate impedance sensing circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yu Jin; Ram Song, Ka; Kim, Hee-Dae; Park, Bum Chul; Kim, Young Keun; Kang, Chi Jung

    2016-10-01

    Electroporation is a physical transfection method for introducing foreign genes or drugs into cells. It does not require toxic reagents or transfection vectors. However, its applications have been limited because of cell damage and nonspecific transport. Here, we present an effective method for selective and localized electroporation using atomic force microscopy. This electroporation method is applied to adherent cells on substrates, instead of conventionally used suspended cells, and offers relatively effective cell transfection. Moreover, this method enables localized transfection into targeted areas at the single-cell level.

  4. Inhibition of Pneumococcal Adherence to Human Nasopharyngeal Epithelial Cells by Anti-PsaA Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Steiner, Sandra; Pilishvili, Tamar; Sampson, Jacquelyn S.; Johnson, Scott E.; Stinson, Annie; Carlone, George M.; Ades, Edwin W.

    2003-01-01

    The role of pneumococcal (Pnc) surface adhesin A (PsaA) in the adherence of Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) to host cells is not well defined. We examined the effect of anti-PsaA antibodies in an inhibition of adherence assay using Detroit 562 nasopharyngeal human epithelial cells. Rabbit polyclonal (Pab) anti-recombinant PsaA (rPsaA) sera, a purified mouse monoclonal antibody (MAb) (MAb 6F62G8E12), and 22 healthy adult sera with known anti-PsaA IgG levels (obtained by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) were evaluated for their abilities to inhibit Pnc adherence to confluent monolayers (measured as percent reduction in CFU counts compared to those of uninhibited controls). Pnc adherence was dependent on capsular phenotype (no or low adherence for opaque strains). With an inoculum of 104 to 105 bacteria/well, the mean ± standard deviation count in controls was 163 ± 32 CFU/well for transparent strains. Low adherence was observed for a PsaA-minus mutant even at higher inoculum doses. Mean percent inhibitions of adherence with Pab and MAb were 54 and 50%, respectively. Adult sera showed inhibition in a dose-response fashion with a range of 98 to 8%, depending on the serum anti-PsaA antibody concentration. Absorption of Pab with rPsaA restored Pnc adherence to control levels. Absorption of sera with a PsaA-minus mutant did not result in a significant decrease (P >0.05) of inhibition of adherence activity. Additionally, nearly 100% of Pnc adherence was inhibited by lipidated rPsaA at 2.5 μg/ml. Our data support the argument that PsaA is an adhesin that mediates Pnc adherence to human nasopharyngeal cells. This functional assay may be useful in evaluating antibodies elicited in response to PsaA vaccination. PMID:12626450

  5. Hepatitis B virus efficiently infects non-adherent hepatoma cells via human sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide

    PubMed Central

    Okuyama-Dobashi, Kaori; Kasai, Hirotake; Tanaka, Tomohisa; Yamashita, Atsuya; Yasumoto, Jun; Chen, Wenjia; Okamoto, Toru; Maekawa, Shinya; Watashi, Koichi; Wakita, Takaji; Ryo, Akihide; Suzuki, Tetsuro; Matsuura, Yoshiharu; Enomoto, Nobuyuki; Moriishi, Kohji

    2015-01-01

    Sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP) has been reported as a functional receptor for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. However, HBV could not efficiently infect HepG2 cells expressing NTCP (NTCP-HepG2 cells) under adherent monolayer-cell conditions. In this study, NTCP was mainly detected in the basolateral membrane region, but not the apical site, of monolayer NTCP-HepG2 cells. We hypothesized that non-adherent cell conditions of infection would enhance HBV infectivity. Non-adherent NTCP-HepG2 cells were prepared by treatment with trypsin and EDTA, which did not degrade NTCP in the membrane fraction. HBV successfully infected NTCP-HepG2 cells at a viral dose 10 times lower in non-adherent phase than in adherent phase. Efficient infection of non-adherent NTCP-HepG2 cells with blood-borne or cell-culture-derived HBV was observed and was remarkably impaired in the presence of the myristoylated preS1 peptide. HBV could also efficiently infect HepaRG cells under non-adherent cell conditions. We screened several compounds using our culture system and identified proscillaridin A as a potent anti-HBV agent with an IC50 value of 7.2 nM. In conclusion, non-adherent host cell conditions of infection augmented HBV infectivity in an NTCP-dependent manner, thus providing a novel strategy to identify anti-HBV drugs and investigate the mechanism of HBV infection. PMID:26592202

  6. Hepatitis B virus efficiently infects non-adherent hepatoma cells via human sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Okuyama-Dobashi, Kaori; Kasai, Hirotake; Tanaka, Tomohisa; Yamashita, Atsuya; Yasumoto, Jun; Chen, Wenjia; Okamoto, Toru; Maekawa, Shinya; Watashi, Koichi; Wakita, Takaji; Ryo, Akihide; Suzuki, Tetsuro; Matsuura, Yoshiharu; Enomoto, Nobuyuki; Moriishi, Kohji

    2015-01-01

    Sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP) has been reported as a functional receptor for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. However, HBV could not efficiently infect HepG2 cells expressing NTCP (NTCP-HepG2 cells) under adherent monolayer-cell conditions. In this study, NTCP was mainly detected in the basolateral membrane region, but not the apical site, of monolayer NTCP-HepG2 cells. We hypothesized that non-adherent cell conditions of infection would enhance HBV infectivity. Non-adherent NTCP-HepG2 cells were prepared by treatment with trypsin and EDTA, which did not degrade NTCP in the membrane fraction. HBV successfully infected NTCP-HepG2 cells at a viral dose 10 times lower in non-adherent phase than in adherent phase. Efficient infection of non-adherent NTCP-HepG2 cells with blood-borne or cell-culture-derived HBV was observed and was remarkably impaired in the presence of the myristoylated preS1 peptide. HBV could also efficiently infect HepaRG cells under non-adherent cell conditions. We screened several compounds using our culture system and identified proscillaridin A as a potent anti-HBV agent with an IC50 value of 7.2 nM. In conclusion, non-adherent host cell conditions of infection augmented HBV infectivity in an NTCP-dependent manner, thus providing a novel strategy to identify anti-HBV drugs and investigate the mechanism of HBV infection. PMID:26592202

  7. Adherence to HEp-2 cells and enteropathogenic potential of Aeromonas spp.

    PubMed

    Grey, P A; Kirov, S M

    1993-04-01

    Aeromonas strains (total = 60) of clinical, water and food origin were tested for adherence to HEp-2 cells. Environmental strains were selected (except for A. caviae) to include primarily those expressing other virulence-associated properties. Adhesion was markedly species-dependent (A. veronii biotype sobria, 15 of 26 [58%]. A caviae, 4 of 12 [33%] and A. hydrophila, 2 of 8 [11%]). A. veronii biotype sobria were adhesive, irrespective of source (62 and 54% for clinical and environmental strains, respectively). Adherent strains of this species were enterotoxin-positive and most (13 of 15) grew at 43 degrees C. A. caviae isolated from clinical specimens contained a higher proportion (75%) of adherent strains than environmental strains (13%). Virulent subsets of A. veronii biotype sobria and A. caviae are adherent to HEp-2 cells. The HEp-2 assay is a useful model for investigating mechanisms of adherence and enteropathogenicity of virulent Aeromonas species.

  8. Inhibitory effects of bovine lactoferrin on the adherence of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli to host cells.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Y; Tazume, S; Shimizu, K; Matsuzawa, H; Dosako, S; Isoda, H; Tsukiji, M; Fujimura, R; Muranaka, Y; Isihida, H

    2000-02-01

    Adherence is an essential and prerequisite step for the colonization of mucosal surfaces by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC). We studied the effect of bovine lactoferrin (BLF) on the adherence of ETEC to human epithelial cells in vitro, and to intestinal mucosa of ICR germfree mice in vivo. In the in vitro study, BLF was found to inhibit the adherence of ETEC. This adhesion-inhibiting activity of BLF was found to lessen with decreasing BLF concentration, but the data obtained suggest a positive inhibitory effect of BLF against the adhesion of ETEC cells. In the in vivo study, the counts of adherent bacteria in various sections of the intestinal tract (duodenum, jejunoileum, and large intestine) were lower in the BLF group than in the control group, suggesting the possible action of BLF as an intestinal tract adherence-blocking agent with regards to ETEC.

  9. Immunoregulatory adherent cells in human tuberculosis: radiation-sensitive antigen-specific suppression by monocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinhenz, M.E.; Ellner, J.J.

    1985-07-01

    In human tuberculosis, adherent mononuclear cells (AMC) selectively depress in vitro responses to the mycobacterial antigen tuberculin purified protein derivative (PPD). The phenotype of this antigen-specific adherent suppressor cell was characterized by examining the functional activity of adherent cells after selective depletion of sheep erythrocyte-rosetting T cells or OKM1-reactive monocytes. Adherent cell suppression was studied in the (/sup 3/H)thymidine-incorporation microculture assay by using T cells rigorously depleted of T cells with surface receptors for the Fc portion of IgG (T gamma cells) as antigen-responsive cells. PPD-induced (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation by these non gamma T cells was uniformly reduced (mean, 42% +/- 10% (SD)) when autologous AMC were added to non gamma T cells at a ratio of 1:2. Antigen-specific suppression by AMC was not altered by depletion of sheep erythrocyte-rosetting T cells or treatment with indomethacin. However, AMC treated with OKM1 and complement or gamma irradiation (1,500 rads) no longer suppressed tuberculin responses in vitro. These studies identify the antigen-specific adherent suppressor cell in tuberculosis as an OKM1-reactive, non-erythrocyte-rosetting monocyte. The radiosensitivity of this monocyte immunoregulatory function may facilitate its further definition.

  10. Cell fusion through a microslit between adhered cells and observation of their nuclear behavior.

    PubMed

    Wada, Ken-Ichi; Hosokawa, Kazuo; Kondo, Eitaro; Ito, Yoshihiro; Maeda, Mizuo

    2014-07-01

    This paper describes a novel cell fusion method which induces cell fusion between adhered cells through a microslit for preventing nuclear mixing. For this purpose, a microfluidic device which had ∼ 100 cell pairing structures (CPSs) making cell pairs through microslits with 2.1 ± 0.3 µm width was fabricated. After trapping NIH3T3 cells with hydrodynamic forces at the CPSs, the cells were fused through the microslit by the Sendai virus envelope method. With following timelapse observation, we discovered that the spread cells were much less susceptible to nuclear migration passing through the microslit compared with round cells, and that cytoplasmic fraction containing mitochondria was transferred through the microslit without nuclear mixing. These findings will provide an effective method for cell fusion without nuclear mixing, and will lead to an efficient method for reprograming and transdifferentiation of target cells toward regenerative medicine.

  11. Late Adherent Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Form Bone and Restore the Hematopoietic Microenvironment In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Vianna, Verônica Fernandes; Bonfim, Danielle Cabral; Cavalcanti, Amanda dos Santos; Fernandes, Marco Cury; Kahn, Suzana Assad; Casado, Priscila Ladeira; Lima, Inayá Correa; Murray, Samuel S.; Murray, Elsa J. Brochmann; Duarte, Maria Eugenia Leite

    2013-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) are a valuable resource for skeletal regenerative medicine because of their osteogenic potential. In spite of the very general term “stem cell,” this population of cells is far from homogeneous, and different BMSCs clones have greatly different phenotypic properties and, therefore, potentially different therapeutic potential. Adherence to a culture flask surface is a primary defining characteristic of BMSCs. We hypothesized that based on the adherence time we could obtain an enriched population of cells with a greater therapeutic potential. We characterized two populations of bone marrow-derived cells, those that adhered by three days (R-cells) and those that did not adhere by three days but did by six days (L-cells). Clones derived from L-cells could be induced into adipogenic, chondrogenic, and osteogenic differentiation in vitro. L-cells appeared to have greater proliferative capacity, as manifested by larger colony diameter and clones with higher CD146 expression. Only clones from L-cells developed bone marrow stroma in vivo. We conclude that the use of late adherence of BMSCs is one parameter that can be used to enrich for cells that will constitute a superior final product for cell therapy in orthopedics. PMID:23710460

  12. Adherence of clinically isolated lactobacilli to human cervical cells in competition with Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Vielfort, Katarina; Sjölinder, Hong; Roos, Stefan; Jonsson, Hans; Aro, Helena

    2008-10-01

    Lactobacilli are normal inhabitants of our microbiota and are known to protect against pathogens. Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a human specific pathogenic bacterium that colonises the urogenital tract where it causes gonorrhoea. In this study we analysed early interactions between lactobacilli and gonococci and investigated how they compete for adherence to human epithelial cervical cells. We show that lactobacilli adhere at various levels and that the number of adherent bacteria does not correlate to the level of protection against gonococcal infection. Protection against gonococcal adhesion varied between Lactobacillus species. Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus gasseri and Lactobacillus reuteri were capable of reducing gonococcal adherence while Lactobacillus rhamnosus was not. Lactobacillus strains of vaginal origin had the best capacity to remain attached to the host cell during gonococcal adherence. Further, we show that gonococci and lactobacilli interact with each other with resultant lactobacilli incorporation into the gonococcal microcolony. Hence, gonococci bind to colonised lactobacilli and this complex frequently detaches from the epithelial cell surface, resulting in reduced bacterial colonisation. Also, purified gonococcal pili are capable of removing adherent lactobacilli from the cell surface. Taken together, we reveal novel data regarding gonococcal and lactobacilli competition for adherence that will benefit future gonococcal prevention and treatments.

  13. Enhanced adherence of mouse fibroblast and vascular cells to plasma modified polyethylene.

    PubMed

    Reznickova, Alena; Novotna, Zdenka; Kolska, Zdenka; Kasalkova, Nikola Slepickova; Rimpelova, Silvie; Svorcik, Vaclav

    2015-01-01

    Since the last decade, tissue engineering has shown a sensational promise in providing more viable alternatives to surgical procedures for harvested tissues, implants and prostheses. Biomedical polymers, such as low-density polyethylene (LDPE), high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), were activated by Ar plasma discharge. Degradation of polymer chains was examined by determination of the thickness of ablated layer. The amount of an ablated polymer layer was measured by gravimetry. Contact angle, measured by goniometry, was studied as a function of plasma exposure and post-exposure aging times. Chemical structure of modified polymers was characterized by angle resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Surface chemistry and polarity of the samples were investigated by electrokinetic analysis. Changes in surface morphology were followed using atomic force microscopy. Cytocompatibility of plasma activated polyethylene foils was studied using two distinct model cell lines; VSMCs (vascular smooth muscle cells) as a model for vascular graft testing and connective tissue cells L929 (mouse fibroblasts) approved for standardized material cytotoxicity testing. Specifically, the cell number, morphology, and metabolic activity of the adhered and proliferated cells on the polyethylene matrices were studied in vitro. It was found that the plasma treatment caused ablation of the polymers, resulting in dramatic changes in their surface morphology and roughness. ARXPS and electrokinetic measurements revealed oxidation of the polymer surface. It was found that plasma activation has a positive effect on the adhesion and proliferation of VSMCs and L929 cells. PMID:25953566

  14. Enhanced adherence of mouse fibroblast and vascular cells to plasma modified polyethylene.

    PubMed

    Reznickova, Alena; Novotna, Zdenka; Kolska, Zdenka; Kasalkova, Nikola Slepickova; Rimpelova, Silvie; Svorcik, Vaclav

    2015-01-01

    Since the last decade, tissue engineering has shown a sensational promise in providing more viable alternatives to surgical procedures for harvested tissues, implants and prostheses. Biomedical polymers, such as low-density polyethylene (LDPE), high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), were activated by Ar plasma discharge. Degradation of polymer chains was examined by determination of the thickness of ablated layer. The amount of an ablated polymer layer was measured by gravimetry. Contact angle, measured by goniometry, was studied as a function of plasma exposure and post-exposure aging times. Chemical structure of modified polymers was characterized by angle resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Surface chemistry and polarity of the samples were investigated by electrokinetic analysis. Changes in surface morphology were followed using atomic force microscopy. Cytocompatibility of plasma activated polyethylene foils was studied using two distinct model cell lines; VSMCs (vascular smooth muscle cells) as a model for vascular graft testing and connective tissue cells L929 (mouse fibroblasts) approved for standardized material cytotoxicity testing. Specifically, the cell number, morphology, and metabolic activity of the adhered and proliferated cells on the polyethylene matrices were studied in vitro. It was found that the plasma treatment caused ablation of the polymers, resulting in dramatic changes in their surface morphology and roughness. ARXPS and electrokinetic measurements revealed oxidation of the polymer surface. It was found that plasma activation has a positive effect on the adhesion and proliferation of VSMCs and L929 cells.

  15. Inverting adherent cells for visualizing ECM interactions at the basal cell side.

    PubMed

    Gudzenko, Tetyana; Franz, Clemens M

    2013-05-01

    Interactions with the extracellular matrix (ECM) govern a wide range of cellular functions, including survival, migration and invasion. However, in adherent cells these interactions occur primarily on the basal cell side, making them inaccessible to high-resolution, surface-scanning imaging techniques such as atomic force microscopy (AFM) or scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Here we describe a fast and reliable method for inverting adherent cells, exposing the basal cell membrane for direct analysis by AFM or SEM in combination with fluorescence microscopy. Cells including their matrix adhesion sites remain intact during the inversion process and are transferred together with the complete array of basally associated ECM proteins. Molecular features of ECM proteins, such as the characteristic 67 nm collagen D-periodicity, are well preserved after inversion. To demonstrate the versatility of the method, we compared basal interactions of fibroblasts with fibrillar collagen I and fibronectin matrices. While fibroblasts remodel the fibronectin layer exclusively from above, they actively invade even thin collagen layers by contacting individual collagen nanofibrils both basally and apically through a network of cellular extensions. Cell-matrix entanglement coincides with enhanced cell spreading and flattening, indicating that nanoscale ECM interactions govern macroscopic changes in cell morphology. The presented cell inversion technique can thus provide novel insight into nanoscale cell-matrix interactions at the basal cell side.

  16. Distinct mechanical behavior of HEK293 cells in adherent and suspended states.

    PubMed

    Haghparast, Seyed Mohammad Ali; Kihara, Takanori; Miyake, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical features of individual animal cells have been regarded as indicators of cell type and state. Previously, we investigated the surface mechanics of cancer and normal stromal cells in adherent and suspended states using atomic force microscopy. Cancer cells possessed specific mechanical and actin cytoskeleton features that were distinct from normal stromal cells in adherent and suspended states. In this paper, we report the unique mechanical and actin cytoskeletal features of human embryonic kidney HEK293 cells. Unlike normal stromal and cancer cells, the surface stiffness of adherent HEK293 cells was very low, but increased after cell detachment from the culture surface. Induced actin filament depolymerization revealed that the actin cytoskeleton was the underlying source of the stiffness in suspended HEK293 cells. The exclusive mechanical response of HEK293 cells to perturbation of the actin cytoskeleton resembled that of adherent cancer cells and suspended normal stromal cells. Thus, with respect to their special cell-surface mechanical features, HEK293 cells could be categorized into a new class distinct from normal stromal and cancer cells.

  17. Surface glycosaminoglycans mediate adherence between HeLa cells and Lactobacillus salivarius Lv72

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The adhesion of lactobacilli to the vaginal surface is of paramount importance to develop their probiotic functions. For this reason, the role of HeLa cell surface proteoglycans in the attachment of Lactobacillus salivarius Lv72, a mutualistic strain of vaginal origin, was investigated. Results Incubation of cultures with a variety of glycosaminoglycans (chondroitin sulfate A and C, heparin and heparan sulfate) resulted in marked binding interference. However, no single glycosaminoglycan was able to completely abolish cell binding, the sum of all having an additive effect that suggests cooperation between them and recognition of specific adhesins on the bacterial surface. In contrast, chondroitin sulfate B enhanced cell to cell attachment, showing the relevance of the stereochemistry of the uronic acid and the sulfation pattern on binding. Elimination of the HeLa surface glycosaminoglycans with lyases also resulted in severe adherence impairment. Advantage was taken of the Lactobacillus-glycosaminoglycans interaction to identify an adhesin from the bacterial surface. This protein, identify as a soluble binding protein of an ABC transporter system (OppA) by MALDI-TOF/(MS), was overproduced in Escherichia coli, purified and shown to interfere with L. salivarius Lv72 adhesion to HeLa cells. Conclusions These data suggest that glycosaminoglycans play a fundamental role in attachment of mutualistic bacteria to the epithelium that lines the cavities where the normal microbiota thrives, OppA being a bacterial adhesin involved in the process. PMID:24044741

  18. Akkermansia muciniphila Adheres to Enterocytes and Strengthens the Integrity of the Epithelial Cell Layer

    PubMed Central

    Reunanen, Justus; Kainulainen, Veera; Huuskonen, Laura; Ottman, Noora; Belzer, Clara; Huhtinen, Heikki; de Vos, Willem M.

    2015-01-01

    Akkermansia muciniphila is a Gram-negative mucin-degrading bacterium that resides in the gastrointestinal tracts of humans and animals. A. muciniphila has been linked with intestinal health and improved metabolic status in obese and type 2 diabetic subjects. Specifically, A. muciniphila has been shown to reduce high-fat-diet-induced endotoxemia, which develops as a result of an impaired gut barrier. Despite the accumulating evidence of the health-promoting effects of A. muciniphila, the mechanisms of interaction of the bacterium with the host have received little attention. In this study, we used several in vitro models to investigate the adhesion of A. muciniphila to the intestinal epithelium and its interaction with the host mucosa. We found that A. muciniphila adheres strongly to the Caco-2 and HT-29 human colonic cell lines but not to human colonic mucus. In addition, A. muciniphila showed binding to the extracellular matrix protein laminin but not to collagen I or IV, fibronectin, or fetuin. Importantly, A. muciniphila improved enterocyte monolayer integrity, as shown by a significant increase in the transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) of cocultures of Caco-2 cells with the bacterium. Further, A. muciniphila induced interleukin 8 (IL-8) production by enterocytes at cell concentrations 100-fold higher than those for Escherichia coli, suggesting a very low level of proinflammatory activity in the epithelium. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that A. muciniphila adheres to the intestinal epithelium and strengthens enterocyte monolayer integrity in vitro, suggesting an ability to fortify an impaired gut barrier. These results support earlier associative in vivo studies and provide insights into the interaction of A. muciniphila with the host. PMID:25795669

  19. Thyroid cell lines in research on goitrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gerber, H; Peter, H J; Asmis, L; Studer, H

    1991-12-01

    Thyroid cell lines have contributed a lot to the understanding of goitrogenesis. The cell lines mostly used in thyroid research are briefly discussed, namely the rat thyroid cell lines FRTL and FRTL-5, the porcine thyroid cell lines PORTHOS and ARTHOS, The sheep thyroid cell lines OVNIS 5H and 6H, the cat thyroid cell lines PETCAT 1 to 4 and ROMCAT, and the human thyroid cell lines FTC-133 and HTh 74. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and COS-7 cells, stably transfected with TSH receptor cDNA and expressing a functional TSH receptor, are discussed as examples for non-thyroidal cells, transfected with thyroid genes. PMID:1726925

  20. Rethinking adherence.

    PubMed

    Steiner, John F

    2012-10-16

    In 2012, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) will introduce measures of adherence to oral hypoglycemic, antihypertensive, and cholesterol-lowering drugs into its Medicare Advantage quality program. To meet these quality goals, delivery systems will need to develop and disseminate strategies to improve adherence. The design of adherence interventions has too often been guided by the mistaken assumptions that adherence is a single behavior that can be predicted from readily available patient characteristics and that individual clinicians alone can improve adherence at the population level.Effective interventions require recognition that adherence is a set of interacting behaviors influenced by individual, social, and environmental forces; adherence interventions must be broadly based, rather than targeted to specific population subgroups; and counseling with a trusted clinician needs to be complemented by outreach interventions and removal of structural and organizational barriers. To achieve the adherence goals set by CMS, front-line clinicians, interdisciplinary teams, organizational leaders, and policymakers will need to coordinate efforts in ways that exemplify the underlying principles of health care reform.

  1. Relationship of cell surface morphology and composition of Streptococcus salivarius K+ to adherence and hydrophobicity.

    PubMed Central

    Weerkamp, A H; van der Mei, H C; Slot, J W

    1987-01-01

    The cell surfaces of a range of variants of Streptococcus salivarius HB, altered in cell wall antigen composition, were compared with those of the parent with respect to adherence, ability to adsorb to hexadecane, morphology, and exposure of lipoteichoic acid (LTA). Adherence to host surfaces was measured by using both saliva-coated hydroxyapatite beads and tissue-cultured HeLa cells, and interbacterial adherence was measured by using Veillonella alcalescens V1 cells. Progressive loss of the protease-sensitive fibril classes was generally associated with decreasing ability to adsorb to hexadecane. However, increased exposure of protein antigen C (AgC) increased the apparent hydrophobicity of the cell. This correlated with the finding that AgC was the most hydrophobic of the solubilized fibrillar cell wall antigens. Collectively, this demonstrates that adsorption to hydrophobic ligands is directly related to the density of the fibrillar layer on the cells and the properties and surface exposure of specific fibril classes. The involvement of hydrophobic interactions in AgC-associated attachment was suggested by its sensitivity to low levels of the hydrophobic bond-breaking agent tetramethyl urea, although the reduction was not to the level of adherence observed with strains lacking AgC. However, hydrophobicity was less essential to other adherence reactions. Circumstantial evidence, including immunoelectron microscopy, showing that LTA was virtually absent from the fibrillar layer, whole-cell enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, suggesting that surface exposure of LTA related inversely to the density of the fibrillar layer, and agarose gel electrophoresis, showing that LTA was not specifically associated with protein fibrillar antigens, strongly suggested that LTA does not confer hydrophobic properties to these cells and is not involved in adherence reactions associated with the cell wall protein antigens. Images PMID:3804445

  2. Effect of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection on the adherence of pathogenic bacteria to human epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Faden, H.; Hong, J.J.; Ogra, P.L.

    1986-03-01

    The effect of RSV infection on the adherence of Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP), Haemophilus influenzae (HI) and Staphylococcus aureus (SA) to human epithelial cells was determined. RSV-infected Hep-2 cell cultures at different stages of expression of surface viral antigens and bacteria labeled with /sup 3/H-thymidine were employed to examine the kinetics of bacterial adherence to virus-infected cells. RSV infection did not alter the magnitude of adherence of HI or SA to HEp-2 cells. However, adherence of SP to HEp-2 cells was significantly (P < 0.01) enhanced by prior RSV infection. The degree of adherence was directly related to the amount of viral antigen expressed on the cell surface. The adherence was temperature dependent, with maximal adherence observed at 37/sup 0/C. Heat-inactivation of SP did not alter adherence characteristics. These data suggest that RSV infection increases adherence of SP to the surface of epithelial cells in vitro. Since attachment of bacteria to mucosal surfaces is the first step in many infections, it is suggested that viral infections of epithelial cells render them more susceptible to bacterial adherence. Thus, RSV infection in vivo may predispose children to SP infections, such as in otitis media, by increasing colonization with SP.

  3. Spontaneous cytotoxicity of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells for the lymphoblastoid cell line CCRF-CEM: augmentation by bacterial lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Schacter, B; Kleinhenz, M E; Edmonds, K; Ellner, J J

    1981-01-01

    Spontaneous cell-mediated cytotoxicity (SCMC) of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells for a poor target, CCRF-CEM, a lymphoblastoid cell line, was rapidly and markedly elevated by E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS). SCMC for K562, a myeloid cell line sensitive to SCMC, was only slightly elevated by LPS. The cytotoxicities of both adherent and non-adherent mononuclear cells for CCRF-CEM were elevated. A response to LPS was found in Fc gamma R-positive and Fc gamma R-negative T cells. LPS increased the binding of non-adherent cells to both targets, but analysis of the binding suggests that a subsequent step, either triggering of the cytotoxic mechanisms or susceptibility of the target was the basis for the increased SCMC. PMID:7039896

  4. Partner-Focused Adherence Intervention for Second-line Antiretroviral Therapy: A Multinational Randomized Trial (ACTG A5234)

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Robert; Zheng, Lu; La Rosa, Alberto; Sun, Xin; Rosenkranz, Susan L.; Cardoso, Sandra Wagner; Ssali, Francis; Camp, Rob; Godfrey, Catherine; Cohn, Susan E.; Robbins, Gregory K.; Chisada, Anthony; Wallis, Carole L.; Reynolds, Nancy R.; Lu, Darlene; Safren, Steven A.; Hosey, Lara; Severe, Patrice; Collier, Ann C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Adherence is key to antiretroviral therapy (ART) success. Enhanced partner support may benefit patients with prior treatment failure. Methods We conducted a 1:1 randomized trial of a partner-based modified directly observed therapy (mDOT) compared with standard of care (SOC) at 9 sites in 8 countries. Participants had failed a first-line regimen with HIV RNA >1000 copies/mL and a willing partner. Randomization was computer generated and balanced by site. Participants and site investigators were not masked to group assignment. ART included lopinavir/ritonavir (400/100 mg) twice daily and emtricitabine/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (200/300 mg) once daily. Trained partners observed one ART dose daily ≥5 days/week for 24 weeks. Primary outcome was HIV RNA >400 copies/mL before or at week 48 and adherence measured with microelectronic monitors was a secondary outcome. Findings We randomized 129 participants to mDOT and 128 to SOC, 130 (51%) males, 204 (79%) of African origin, 52 (20%) Latino, with median age 38 years. Partners were parents, 57 (22%), spouses 55 (21%), siblings 50 (19%), friends 41 (16%), and others 54 (21%). Primary outcome occurred in 26% (34/129) of mDOT and 18% (23/128) of SOC participants at week 48 (p=0.13). Median adherence was similar [Q1: 95% vs. 96% p=0.38, Q2: 91% vs. 94% p=0.40, Q3: 90% vs. 93% p=0.17, Q4: 90% vs. 93% p=0.36] in mDOT and SOC, respectively. Interpretation This intervention had no effect on outcomes. Potential reasons include study visits maximizing adherence in both groups and control partners already providing sufficient support. Partner-based training with mDOT does not appear promising to enhance adherence. Intensive follow-up with clinic staff may be a viable strategy in this setting. PMID:25664336

  5. Cell surface and transcriptional characterization of human adipose-derived adherent stromal (hADAS) cells.

    PubMed

    Katz, Adam J; Tholpady, Ashok; Tholpady, Sunil S; Shang, Hulan; Ogle, Roy C

    2005-03-01

    Adult human subcutaneous adipose tissue contains cells with intriguing multilineage developmental plasticity, much like marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. Putative stem or progenitor cells from fat have been given many different names in the literature, reflecting an early and evolving consensus regarding their phenotypic characterization. The study reported here used microarrays to evaluate over 170 genes relating to angiogenesis and extracellular matrix in undifferentiated, early-passage human adipose-derived adherent stromal (hADAS) cells isolated from three separate donors. The hADAS populations unanimously transcribed 66% of the screened genes, and 83% were transcribed by at least two of the three populations. The most highly transcribed genes relate to functional groupings such as cell adhesion, matrix proteins, growth factors and receptors, and proteases. The transcriptome of hADAS cells demonstrated by this work reveals many similarities to published profiles of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In addition, flow analysis of over 24 hADAS cell surface proteins (n = 7 donors) both confirms and expands on the existing literature and reveals strong intergroup correlation, despite an inconsistent nomenclature and the lack of standardized protocols for cell isolation and culture. Finally, based on flow analysis and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction studies, our results suggest that hADAS cells do not express several proteins that are implicated as markers of "stemness" in other stem cell populations, including telomerase, CD133, and the membrane transporter ABCG2.

  6. Fibronectin synthesized by a human hepatoma cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Glasgow, J.E.; Colman, R.W.

    1984-07-01

    Fibronectin is a family of immunologically similar glycoproteins which mediate a variety of cell-cell and cell-substratum interactions. It is a constituent of the extracellular matrix of connective tissue and circulates in plasma. When suspension and adherent cultures of a human hepatoma cell line (SK-HEP-1) were incubated in serum-free medium, the resulting conditioned medium contained material which was specifically immunoprecipitated by antisera to human plasma fibronectin. By double immunodiffusion, a component in the conditioned culture medium was shown to form a line of identity with fibronectin in human plasma and to migrate as an alpha 2- to beta-globulin during immunoelectrophoresis. Human fibronectin was quantified in conditioned medium by electroimmunodiffusion, and was found to increase for at least three days at about 0.1 micrograms/10(6) cells/day. Adherent cultures of SK-HEP-1 cells were incubated with L-(/sup 35/S)methionine to label newly synthesized proteins. Labeled fibronectin in conditioned medium or in cell extracts comigrated with fibronectin in human plasma as shown by autoradiography following crossed-immunoelectrophoresis. Fibronectin was demonstrated in the extra-cellular matrix of adherent SK-HEP-1 cultures by immunofluorescence. It was shown previously that SK-HEP-1 cells synthesize alpha 1-protease inhibitor, one of the products of normal hepatocytes. The finding that these hepatoma cells also synthesize fibronectin supports the concept that the hepatocyte may be one source of circulating fibronectin, a possibility consistent with the established role of this cell type in blood plasma protein synthesis.

  7. Automated method for the rapid and precise estimation of adherent cell culture characteristics from phase contrast microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Jaccard, Nicolas; Griffin, Lewis D; Keser, Ana; Macown, Rhys J; Super, Alexandre; Veraitch, Farlan S; Szita, Nicolas

    2014-03-01

    The quantitative determination of key adherent cell culture characteristics such as confluency, morphology, and cell density is necessary for the evaluation of experimental outcomes and to provide a suitable basis for the establishment of robust cell culture protocols. Automated processing of images acquired using phase contrast microscopy (PCM), an imaging modality widely used for the visual inspection of adherent cell cultures, could enable the non-invasive determination of these characteristics. We present an image-processing approach that accurately detects cellular objects in PCM images through a combination of local contrast thresholding and post hoc correction of halo artifacts. The method was thoroughly validated using a variety of cell lines, microscope models and imaging conditions, demonstrating consistently high segmentation performance in all cases and very short processing times (<1 s per 1,208 × 960 pixels image). Based on the high segmentation performance, it was possible to precisely determine culture confluency, cell density, and the morphology of cellular objects, demonstrating the wide applicability of our algorithm for typical microscopy image processing pipelines. Furthermore, PCM image segmentation was used to facilitate the interpretation and analysis of fluorescence microscopy data, enabling the determination of temporal and spatial expression patterns of a fluorescent reporter. We created a software toolbox (PHANTAST) that bundles all the algorithms and provides an easy to use graphical user interface. Source-code for MATLAB and ImageJ is freely available under a permissive open-source license. PMID:24037521

  8. Automated method for the rapid and precise estimation of adherent cell culture characteristics from phase contrast microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Jaccard, Nicolas; Griffin, Lewis D; Keser, Ana; Macown, Rhys J; Super, Alexandre; Veraitch, Farlan S; Szita, Nicolas

    2014-03-01

    The quantitative determination of key adherent cell culture characteristics such as confluency, morphology, and cell density is necessary for the evaluation of experimental outcomes and to provide a suitable basis for the establishment of robust cell culture protocols. Automated processing of images acquired using phase contrast microscopy (PCM), an imaging modality widely used for the visual inspection of adherent cell cultures, could enable the non-invasive determination of these characteristics. We present an image-processing approach that accurately detects cellular objects in PCM images through a combination of local contrast thresholding and post hoc correction of halo artifacts. The method was thoroughly validated using a variety of cell lines, microscope models and imaging conditions, demonstrating consistently high segmentation performance in all cases and very short processing times (<1 s per 1,208 × 960 pixels image). Based on the high segmentation performance, it was possible to precisely determine culture confluency, cell density, and the morphology of cellular objects, demonstrating the wide applicability of our algorithm for typical microscopy image processing pipelines. Furthermore, PCM image segmentation was used to facilitate the interpretation and analysis of fluorescence microscopy data, enabling the determination of temporal and spatial expression patterns of a fluorescent reporter. We created a software toolbox (PHANTAST) that bundles all the algorithms and provides an easy to use graphical user interface. Source-code for MATLAB and ImageJ is freely available under a permissive open-source license.

  9. Contrasting effects of inflammatory stimuli on neutrophil and monocyte adherence to endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kamp, D W; Bauer, K D; Knap, A; Dunn, M M

    1989-08-01

    Leukocyte adherence to endothelial cells (EC) is an important early event in inflammatory responses, which are often characterized by a predominance of either neutrophils (PMN) or monocytes. However, there is little information concerning the molecular events important in leukocyte adherence to EC. Intracellular activation of protein kinase C and the calcium-second messenger system leads to the stimulation of a number of important functions in PMN and monocytes. We compared the effects of members of these pathways on human PMN and monocyte adherence to cultured bovine aortic EC. We observed that phorbol myristate acetate, phorbol, 12,13-dibutyrate, L-alpha-1-oleoyl-2-acetoyl-sn-3-glycerol, and ionomycin each induced significant dose-dependent increases in PMN adherence to EC monolayers. In contrast, similar concentrations of each of these agents induced significant decreases in EC adherence of monocytes enriched by countercurrent centrifugal elutriation. Separate experiments determined that the differences in PMN and monocyte adherence to EC were not related to differences in oxidant production because 1) phorbol myristate acetate and L-alpha-1-oleoyl-2-acetoyl-sn-3-glycerol caused similar marked increases in both PMN and monocyte superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide production and 2) ionomycin, which had opposing effects on PMN and monocyte adherence, had no effect on PMN and monocyte superoxide anion or hydrogen peroxide release. We conclude that activators of protein kinase C and the Ca-second messenger pathway have opposite effects on PMN and monocyte adherence to EC and that these effects are mediated by O2 radical-independent mechanisms.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Use of a solid phase red blood cell adherence method for pretransfusion platelet compatibility testing.

    PubMed

    Rachel, J M; Summers, T C; Sinor, L T; Plapp, F V

    1988-07-01

    A solid phase red blood cell adherence method has been used for platelet antibody detection and crossmatching for refractory platelet recipients. Patient sera were first screened for HLA or platelet-specific antibodies, then crossmatched with potential apheresis platelet donors. The overall correlation of platelet crossmatch results with transfusion outcome was 97% in patients with no evidence of nonimmune platelet destruction. The solid phase red blood cell adherence method provided a feasible and effective alternative to HLA matching as a means of donor selection for refractory platelet recipients. The speed and simplicity of this method may allow most hospital laboratories to perform platelet antibody screening before routine platelet transfusions.

  11. Proliferative activity of vervet monkey bone marrow-derived adherent cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kramvis, A.; Garnett, H.M.

    1987-11-01

    Vervet monkey bone marrow-derived adherent cell population cultured in Fischer's medium supplemented with 12.5% fetal calf serum and 12.5% horse serum consists of two cell shapes: fusiform (type I) and polygonal (type II). Limiting-dilution cloning of the cells suggested that the two morphologically distinct cell types belong to the same cellular system even though they differ in their proliferative capabilities. The labeling index of type II cells, as measured by autoradiography, was found to be consistently lower than that of type I cells. It is probable that these two phenotypes represent different stages of differentiation, where progenitor type I gives rise to type II cells. The bone marrow-derived adherent cells were found to be cytokinetically at rest in vivo, using the thymidine suicide test, and relatively radioresistant with a D0 = 2.1 Gy and n = 2.36 at the time of explantation from the bone. Furthermore, in culture these cells are characterized by a relatively long cell cycle of 60 h, where the length of the S phase is 30 h, G2 is 12 h, M is 6 h, and G1 is 12 h. Thus, the vervet monkey bone marrow-derived adherent cells represent a cell population with a low turnover rate both in vivo and in vitro.

  12. Adhesion and function of rat liver cells adherent to silk fibroin/collagen blend films.

    PubMed

    Cirillo, B; Morra, M; Catapano, G

    2004-01-01

    Collagen is often used in bioartificial livers as a biomimetic coating to promote liver cell adhesion and differentiation. Animal proteins are expensive and expose the host to risks of cross-species infection due to contamination with prions. Silk fibroin (SF) is a biocompatible protein produced by Bombyx mori silk worms and possibly an alternative to collagen. We prepared SF-collagen blend films with different SF content adherent to the bottom of standard tissue culture dishes, and characterized their surface morphology by SEM, their wettability and examined them for their capacity to support rat liver cell adhesion and metabolism. Cell metabolism was characterized by estimating the rate at which cells eliminated ammonia and synthesized urea for up to 48h of culture. SF-containing films were smooth, clear and more wettable than collagen. Cells readily adhered, formed junctions and small size aggregates on all films. As many cells adhered on SF as on collagen films. Cell adhesion to high collagen content blend films could not be reliably estimated because cells dwelt in the large cavities in the film. The effect of SF on cell metabolism differed with the investigated metabolic pathway. However, cells on SF-containing films eliminated ammonia and synthesized urea at rates generally comparable to, for urea synthesis at times higher than, that of cells on collagen. These results suggest that silk fibroin is a suitable substratum for liver cell attachment and culture, and a potential alternative to collagen as a biomimetic coating. PMID:14984185

  13. The evolution of pretransfusion testing: from agglutination to solid-phase red cell adherence tests.

    PubMed

    Plapp, F V; Sinor, L T; Rachel, J M

    1989-01-01

    Hospital transfusion services and blood centers still use manual hemagglutination tests for most of their serological procedures. Automation of hemagglutination reactions has proven to be difficult, primarily because hemagglutination lacks an objective endpoint which can be easily interpreted by inexpensive instruments. Alternatively, solid-phase red cell adherence assays for ABO cell and serum grouping, Rh typing, red cell and platelet antibody screening, red cell and platelet crossmatching, IgA deficiency screening, hepatitis B surface antigen, and HIV antibody screening have been developed. The performance of these assays compares favorably with current hemagglutination and enzyme immunoassay methods. All of these tests share a common objective endpoint of adherence or nonadherence of indicator red cells. This uniformity allows easy interpretation of results visually, spectrophotometrically, or by image analysis. The latter technique has the potential to revolutionize the reading and interpretation of all agglutination tests. Solid-phase red cell adherence tests in microplates are ideal for batch processing large numbers of specimens. However, adherence tests are not restricted to this format. Therefore, blood grouping dipsticks have been produced, which permit testing of individual blood samples even outside of the laboratory.

  14. Use of bovine primary mammary epithelial cells for the comparison of adherence and invasion ability of Staphylococcus aureus strains.

    PubMed

    Hensen, S M; Pavicić, M J; Lohuis, J A; Poutrel, B

    2000-03-01

    Adherence and invasion of epithelial cells are thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of Staphylococcus aureus mastitis. A cell culture model with primary mammary epithelial cells originating from the secretory tissue from the bovine udder was used to study adherence and invasion of S. aureus. The cells were characterized with antibodies against several cell markers that had been validated on histologic cryostat sections of bovine mammary tissue. All cells stained positively with the anticytokeratin antibodies, which are restricted to epithelial cells. The cell cultures contained a small number of alpha-smooth-muscle-actin positive cells (< 1%), probably myoepithelial cells. The use of bovine primary mammary epithelial cells and bovine S. aureus isolates, which were cultured in milk serum, results in a system similar to in vivo. Strain differences for adherence and invasion of S. aureus strains cultured in milk serum were studied. In addition, the correlation between adherence and invasion was evaluated. The number of adhered and invaded bacteria was strain dependent. The percentage of adherence after 5 min of incubation was correlated to the percentage of adherence after 3 h of incubation (r = 0.94; Pearson's correlation test). Fourteen of the 20 strains were able to invade epithelial cells. The percentage of invasion was correlated to the percentage of adherence after 5 min and to the percentage adherence after 3 h (r = 0.95 and 0.90, respectively; Pearson's correlation test). Results indicate that strain differences of adherence and invasion exist for S. aureus and that the invasion is a post adherence event.

  15. Characterization of antibody inhibiting adherence of Bordetella pertussis to human respiratory epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Tuomanen, E I; Zapiain, L A; Galvan, P; Hewlett, E L

    1984-01-01

    We have recently established the topographic specificity of the adherence of Bordetella pertussis to human ciliated respiratory epithelial cells. For this study, we employed the same quantitative, immunofluorescent adherence assay to test the possibility that sera of patients recovering from naturally acquired whooping cough or immunized with pertussis vaccine may contain activity capable of interfering with this specific adherence. Evaluation of paired sera from six children with culture-proven pertussis demonstrated that antiadherence activity appeared in serum during convalescence from disease. Nine children immunized with diptheria-pertussin-tetanus vaccine also showed activity against adherence, although it was significantly less than in those with clinical disease. Naturally acquired serum antiadherence activity was identified in both immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA antibody classes, whereas, as expected, only IgG antibody was present in children receiving the parenteral vaccine. The findings suggest that natural infection or vaccination are associated with the acquisition of serum activity inhibiting the adherence of B. pertussis to ciliated cells. Immunization may fail to elicit IgA antiadherence activity. PMID:6092416

  16. Cell prestress. I. Stiffness and prestress are closely associated in adherent contractile cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ning; Tolic-Norrelykke, Iva Marija; Chen, Jianxin; Mijailovich, Srboljub M.; Butler, James P.; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.; Stamenovic, Dimitrije; Ingber, D. E. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    The tensegrity hypothesis holds that the cytoskeleton is a structure whose shape is stabilized predominantly by the tensile stresses borne by filamentous structures. Accordingly, cell stiffness must increase in proportion with the level of the tensile stress, which is called the prestress. Here we have tested that prediction in adherent human airway smooth muscle (HASM) cells. Traction microscopy was used to measure the distribution of contractile stresses arising at the interface between each cell and its substrate; this distribution is called the traction field. Because the traction field must be balanced by tensile stresses within the cell body, the prestress could be computed. Cell stiffness (G) was measured by oscillatory magnetic twisting cytometry. As the contractile state of the cell was modulated with graded concentrations of relaxing or contracting agonists (isoproterenol or histamine, respectively), the mean prestress ((t)) ranged from 350 to 1,900 Pa. Over that range, cell stiffness increased linearly with the prestress: G (Pa) = 0.18(t) + 92. While this association does not necessarily preclude other interpretations, it is the hallmark of systems that secure shape stability mainly through the prestress. Regardless of mechanism, these data establish a strong association between stiffness of HASM cells and the level of tensile stress within the cytoskeleton.

  17. Screening ToxCast™ Phase I Chemicals in a Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) Assay

    EPA Science Inventory

    An Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) in vitro assay with mouse embryonic stem cells was used to screen the ToxCast Phase I chemical library for effects on cellular differentiation and cell number. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) established the ...

  18. Soluble fibrin inhibits monocyte adherence and cytotoxicity against tumor cells: implications for cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Biggerstaff, John P; Weidow, Brandy; Vidosh, Jacqueline; Dexheimer, Judith; Patel, Shonak; Patel, Pretesh

    2006-01-01

    Background Soluble fibrin (sFn) is a marker for disseminated intravascular coagulation and may have prognostic significance, especially in metastasis. However, a role for sFn in the etiology of metastatic cancer growth has not been extensively studied. We have reported that sFn cross-linked platelet binding to tumor cells via the major platelet fibrin receptor αIIbβ3, and tumor cell CD54 (ICAM-1), which is the receptor for two of the leukocyte β2 integrins (αLβ2 and aMβ2). We hypothesized that sFn may also affect leukocyte adherence, recognition, and killing of tumor cells. Furthermore, in a rat experimental metastasis model sFn pre-treatment of tumor cells enhanced metastasis by over 60% compared to untreated cells. Other studies have shown that fibrin(ogen) binds to the monocyte integrin αMβ2. This study therefore sought to investigate the effect of sFn on β2 integrin mediated monocyte adherence and killing of tumor cells. Methods The role of sFn in monocyte adherence and cytotoxicity against tumor cells was initially studied using static microplate adherence and cytotoxicity assays, and under physiologically relevant flow conditions in a microscope perfusion incubator system. Blocking studies were performed using monoclonal antibodies specific for β2 integrins and CD54, and specific peptides which inhibit sFn binding to these receptors. Results Enhancement of monocyte/tumor cell adherence was observed when only one cell type was bound to sFn, but profound inhibition was observed when sFn was bound to both monocytes and tumor cells. This effect was also reflected in the pattern of monocyte cytotoxicity. Studies using monoclonal blocking antibodies and specific blocking peptides (which did not affect normal coagulation) showed that the predominant mechanism of fibrin inhibition is via its binding to αMβ2 on monocytes, and to CD54 on both leukocytes and tumor cells. Conclusion sFn inhibits monocyte adherence and cytotoxicity of tumor cells by blocking

  19. Inhibition of mitogenesis induced by phytohemagglutinin and Lens culinaris lectin in adherent-cell supernatants treated with protein extract of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Parra, C; Montaño, L F; Huesca, M; Rayón, I; Willms, K; Goodsaid, F

    1986-01-01

    Specific stimulation of T cells by phytohemagglutinin and Lens culinaris lectin was inhibited by a soluble factor(s) secreted by normal adherent cells stimulated with culture filtrate protein extract (CFPE) derived from bacterial cultures of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra (avirulent) and H37Rv (virulent). The induction of the inhibitory factor was blocked by the presence of hyperimmune antisera to H37Rv or H37Ra CFPE. The inhibitory factor did not seem to be a CFPE reprocessed by the adherent cells. Inhibitory activity was maximal in supernatants of adherent-cell cultures incubated for 48 h; the inhibitory factor was heat labile, and its production was dependent on the concentration of M. tuberculosis CFPE. A mouse monocyte-macrophage cell line, ATCC J774A.1, produced an identical inhibitory factor, thus excluding a non-macrophage-contaminating adherent cell as the source of the factor. This inhibitory factor also interfered with the recognition of phytohemagglutinin and Lens culinaris lectin by T cells. PMID:3082760

  20. Triggering Death of Adherent Cells with Ultraviolet Radiation.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Lisa C; Waterhouse, Nigel J

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a convenient stimulus for triggering cell death that is available in most laboratories. We use a Stratalinker UV cross-linker because it is a safe, cheap, reliable, consistent, and easily controlled source of UV irradiation. This protocol describes using a Stratalinker to trigger UV-induced death of HeLa cells. PMID:27371593

  1. Campylobacter jejuni: components for adherence to and invasion of eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Lugert, Raimond; Gross, Uwe; Zautner, Andreas E

    2015-01-01

    Campylobacter (C.) jejuni is the most important reported cause for bacterial diarrhoea. The infection can be accompanied by fever and abdominal cramps and in rare cases the Guillain-Barré syndrome or reactive arthritis can develop as a post-infection complication. Several biological properties of Cjejuni, e. g. motility and chemotaxis, contribute to the biological fitness of the pathogen. For this, deficiencies in the function of these features clearly reduce the pathogenicity of C. jejuni without being a virulence factor per se. Opposing to this, there are two essential requirements to determine the virulence of C. jejuni which represent the adherence to, and the invasion of host cells. Thereby, adherence, as a virulence factor, is mediated by many different bacterial-derived components like proteins but also by several oligo- and polysaccharide structures that are linked to surface proteins but also to the flagella. In addition, several invasion-relevant features of C. jejuni have been detected so far. Whereas some of them are described functionally to modulate cytoskeleton arrangement of the host cell, others are only described as invasion relevant. Indeed, investigations with respect to the pathogenic potential of some adherence- and invasion-relevant components did not give identical results indicating that their relevance might depend on the interplay of the respective C. jejuni strains used in these studies with the corresponding host cells. This review summarizes the C. jejuni components for adherence to and invasion of host cells together with their particular mode of action if known.

  2. Human Adrenocortical Carcinoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Rainey, William E.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The human adrenal cortex secretes mineralocorticoids, glucocorticoids and adrenal androgens. These steroids are produced from unique cell types located within the three distinct zones of the adrenal cortex. Disruption of adrenal steroid production results in a variety of diseases that can lead to hypertension, metabolic syndrome, infertility and androgen excess. The adrenal cortex is also a common site for the development of adenomas, and rarely the site for the development of carcinomas. The adenomas can lead to diseases associated with adrenal steroid excess, while the carcinomas are particularly aggressive and have a poor prognosis. In vitro cell culture models provide an important tool to examine molecular and cellular mechanisms controlling both the normal and pathologic function of the adrenal cortex. Herein we discuss the human adrenocortical cell lines and their use as model systems for adrenal studies. PMID:21924324

  3. IL-2 induces T cell adherence to extracellular matrix: inhibition of adherence and migration by IL-2 peptides generated by leukocyte elastase.

    PubMed

    Ariel, A; Yavin, E J; Hershkoviz, R; Avron, A; Franitza, S; Hardan, I; Cahalon, L; Fridkin, M; Lider, O

    1998-09-01

    Migration of inflammatory cells requires cell adhesion and their subsequent detachment from the extracellular matrix (ECM). Leukocyte activation and migration must be terminated to stop inflammation. Here, we report that IL-2 enhances human T cell adherence to laminin, collagen type IV, and fibronectin (FN). In contrast, neutrophil elastase, an enzyme activated during inflammation, degrades IL-2 to yield IL-2 fractions that inhibit IL-2-induced T cell adhesion to FN. The amino acid composition of two of these IL-2 fractions, which appear to block T cell adherence to FN, were analyzed, and three peptides were consequently synthesized. The three peptides IVL, RMLT, and EFLNRWIT, but not the corresponding inversely synthesized peptides, inhibited T cell adhesion to FN induced by a variety of activators: IL-2, IL-7, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1beta, and PMA, as well as anti-CD3 and anti-beta1 integrin-activating mAb. Moreover, these IL-2 peptides inhibited T cell chemotaxis via FN-coated membranes induced by IL-2 and MIP-1beta. Inhibition of T cell adherence and migration apparently involves abrogation of the rearrangement of the T cell actin cytoskeleton. Thus, the migrating immune cells, the cytokines, and the ECM can create a functional relationship in which both inflammation-inducing signals and inhibitory molecules of immune responses can coexist; the enzymatic products of IL-2 may serve as natural feedback inhibitors of inflammation. PMID:9725245

  4. Adherence of Candida albicans to a cell surface polysaccharide receptor on Streptococcus gordonii.

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, A R; Gopal, P K; Jenkinson, H F

    1995-01-01

    Candida albicans ATCC 10261 and CA2 bound to cells of the oral bacteria Streptococcus gordonii, Streptococcus oralis, and Streptococcus sanguis when these bacteria were immobilized onto microtiter plate wells, but they did not bind to cells of Streptococcus mutans or Streptococcus salivarius. Cell wall polysaccharide was extracted with alkali from S. gordonii NCTC 7869, the streptococcal species to which C. albicans bound with highest affinity, and was effective in blocking the coaggregation of C. albicans and S. gordonii cells in the fluid phase. When fixed to microtiter plate wells, the S. gordonii polysaccharide was bound by all strains of C. albicans tested. The polysaccharide contained Rha, Glc, GalNAc, GlcNAc, and Gal and was related compositionally to previously characterized cell wall polysaccharides from strains of S. oralis and S. sanguis. The adherence of yeast cells to the immobilized polysaccharide was not inhibitable by a number of saccharides. Antiserum raised to the S. gordonii NCTC 7869 polysaccharide blocked adherence of C. albicans ATCC 10261 to the polysaccharide. The results identify a complex cell wall polysaccharide of S. gordonii as the coaggregation receptor for C. albicans. Adherent interactions of yeast cells with streptococci and other bacteria may be important for colonization of both hard and soft oral surfaces by C. albicans. PMID:7729891

  5. The functions of the variable lipoprotein family of Mycoplasma hyorhinis in adherence to host cells.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Qiyan; Wang, Jia; Ji, Yan; Ni, Bo; Zhang, Bixiong; Ma, Qinghong; Wei, Yanna; Xiao, Shaobo; Feng, Zhixin; Liu, Maojun; Shao, Guoqing

    2016-04-15

    Mycoplasma hyorhinis (M. hyorhinis) is a swine pathogen that is associated with various human cancers and contamination in cell cultures. However, no studies on the adhesion molecules of this pathogen have yet been reported. The variable lipoprotein (Vlp) family is an important surface component of M. hyorhinis. Herein, we performed several experiments to identify the function of the Vlp family in adherence to host cells. Seven recombinant Vlp (rVlp) proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by affinity chromatography. The potential role of rVlp adherence to pig kidney (PK-15) and swine tracheal epithelial (STEC) cells was then studied by indirect immunofluorescence assay and microtiter plate adherence assay. Adhesion of M. hyorhinis to PK-15 and STEC cells was specifically inhibited by the addition of a cocktail of rVlp proteins. The rVlp protein mixture was shown to bind to both PK-15 and STEC cells. The binding increased in a dose-dependent manner and could be blocked by antisera against the rVlp proteins. Most of the rVlp proteins could bind individually to both PK-15 and STEC cells except for rVlpD and rVlpF, which bound only to STEC cells. Because Vlp members vary in size among different strains and generations, they may vary in their cytoadhesion capabilities in various strains. In summary, the present results indicate that the Vlp family functions as adhesins of M. hyorhinis. PMID:27016761

  6. Optical painting and fluorescence activated sorting of single adherent cells labelled with photoswitchable Pdots

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Chun-Ting; Thompson, Alison M.; Gallina, Maria Elena; Ye, Fangmao; Johnson, Eleanor S.; Sun, Wei; Zhao, Mengxia; Yu, Jiangbo; Wu, I-Che; Fujimoto, Bryant; DuFort, Christopher C.; Carlson, Markus A.; Hingorani, Sunil R.; Paguirigan, Amy L.; Radich, Jerald P.; Chiu, Daniel T.

    2016-01-01

    The efficient selection and isolation of individual cells of interest from a mixed population is desired in many biomedical and clinical applications. Here we show the concept of using photoswitchable semiconducting polymer dots (Pdots) as an optical ‘painting' tool, which enables the selection of certain adherent cells based on their fluorescence, and their spatial and morphological features, under a microscope. We first develop a Pdot that can switch between the bright (ON) and dark (OFF) states reversibly with a 150-fold contrast ratio on irradiation with ultraviolet or red light. With a focused 633-nm laser beam that acts as a ‘paintbrush' and the photoswitchable Pdots as the ‘paint', we select and ‘paint' individual Pdot-labelled adherent cells by turning on their fluorescence, then proceed to sort and recover the optically marked cells (with 90% recovery and near 100% purity), followed by genetic analysis. PMID:27118210

  7. Molluscan cells in culture: primary cell cultures and cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino, T. P.; Bickham, U.; Bayne, C. J.

    2013-01-01

    In vitro cell culture systems from molluscs have significantly contributed to our basic understanding of complex physiological processes occurring within or between tissue-specific cells, yielding information unattainable using intact animal models. In vitro cultures of neuronal cells from gastropods show how simplified cell models can inform our understanding of complex networks in intact organisms. Primary cell cultures from marine and freshwater bivalve and gastropod species are used as biomonitors for environmental contaminants, as models for gene transfer technologies, and for studies of innate immunity and neoplastic disease. Despite efforts to isolate proliferative cell lines from molluscs, the snail Biomphalaria glabrata Say, 1818 embryonic (Bge) cell line is the only existing cell line originating from any molluscan species. Taking an organ systems approach, this review summarizes efforts to establish molluscan cell cultures and describes the varied applications of primary cell cultures in research. Because of the unique status of the Bge cell line, an account is presented of the establishment of this cell line, and of how these cells have contributed to our understanding of snail host-parasite interactions. Finally, we detail the difficulties commonly encountered in efforts to establish cell lines from molluscs and discuss how these difficulties might be overcome. PMID:24198436

  8. Pseudomonas cepacia adherence to respiratory epithelial cells is enhanced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Saiman, L.; Cacalano, G.; Prince, A. )

    1990-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas cepacia are both opportunistic pathogens of patients with cystic fibrosis. The binding characteristics of these two species were compared to determine if they use similar mechanisms to adhere to respiratory epithelial cells. P. cepacia 249 was shown to be piliated, but there was no detectable homology between P. aeruginosa pilin gene probes and P. cepacia genomic DNA. P. cepacia and P. aeruginosa did not appear to compete for epithelial receptors. In the presence of purified P. aeruginosa pili, the adherence of 35S-labeled strain 249 to respiratory epithelial monolayers was unaffected, while that of P. aeruginosa PAO1 was decreased by 55%. The binding of P. cepacia 249 and 715j was increased by 2.4-fold and 1.5-fold, respectively, in the presence of an equal inoculum of PAO1. Interbacterial agglutination contributed to the increased adherence of P. cepacia, as the binding of 249 was increased twofold in the presence of irradiated PAO1. PAO1 exoproducts had a marked effect in enhancing the ability of the P. cepacia strains to adhere to the epithelial monolayers. A PAO1 supernatant increased the binding of 249 by eightfold and that of 715j by fourfold. Thus, there appears to be a synergistic relationship between P. aeruginosa and P. cepacia in which PAO1 exoproducts modify the epithelial cell surface, exposing receptors and facilitating increased P. cepacia attachment.

  9. A dual fluorescence flow cytometric analysis of bacterial adherence to mammalian host cells

    PubMed Central

    Hara-Kaonga, Bochiwe; Pistole, Thomas G.

    2009-01-01

    Flow cytometry has provided a powerful tool for analyzing bacteria-host cell associations. Established approaches have used bacteria, labeled either directly with fluorochromes or indirectly with fluorescently conjugated antibodies, to detect these associations. Although useful, these techniques are unable consistently to include all host cells in the analysis while excluding free, aggregated bacteria. This study describes a new flow cytometry method of assessing bacterial adherence to host cells based on direct fluorescent labeling of both bacteria and host cells. Eukaryotic host cells were labeled with PKH-26, a red fluorescent dye, and bacteria were labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate, a green fluorescent dye. The red host cells were gated and the mean green fluorescence intensity (MFI) of these red cells was determined. We used MFI values obtained from control samples (unlabeled and labeled host cells with unlabeled bacteria) to eliminate contributions due to autofluorescence. The final MFI values represent fluorescence of host cells resulting from the adherent bacteria. Because all red fluorescent cells are analyzed, this method includes all the eukaryotic cells for analysis but excludes all free or aggregated bacteria that are not bound to target cells. PMID:17222473

  10. A dual fluorescence flow cytometric analysis of bacterial adherence to mammalian host cells.

    PubMed

    Hara-Kaonga, Bochiwe; Pistole, Thomas G

    2007-04-01

    Flow cytometry has provided a powerful tool for analyzing bacteria-host cell associations. Established approaches have used bacteria, labeled either directly with fluorochromes or indirectly with fluorescently conjugated antibodies, to detect these associations. Although useful, these techniques are consistently unable to include all host cells in the analysis while excluding free, aggregated bacteria. This study describes a new flow cytometry method of assessing bacterial adherence to host cells based on direct fluorescent labeling of both bacteria and host cells. Eukaryotic host cells were labeled with PKH-26, a red fluorescent dye, and bacteria were labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate, a green fluorescent dye. The red host cells were gated and the mean green fluorescence intensity (MFI) of these red cells was determined. We used MFI values obtained from control samples (unlabeled and labeled host cells with unlabeled bacteria) to eliminate contributions due to autofluorescence. The final MFI values represent fluorescence of host cells resulting from the adherent bacteria. Because all red fluorescent cells are analyzed, this method includes all the eukaryotic cells for analysis but excludes all free or aggregated bacteria that are not bound to target cells.

  11. Cell line: 2004-2014.

    PubMed

    2014-11-20

    2014 marks Cell's 40th anniversary, and over the year we have looked back at how discoveries of the last four decades have molded our understanding of biology. The final decade of the Cell Line features a selection of the exceptional scientific work-both landmark papers and essential reviews. Select entries can be read as an "Annotated Classic," which includes the original paper and accompanying reflections of a leading scientist, considering the work from our current vantage point. Our last installment includes a harbinger of the interplay between microbiota and mammalian hosts in 2004, revolutionary papers in 2006 and 2007 unlocking cellular reprogramming, the discovery of beige adipocytes in 2012, and the first example of CRISPR-based genome editing in a nonhuman primate in 2014. In addition to landmark publications, there were innovative developments at the journal in this decade, with the complete redesign of the print journal and the creation of Leading Edge in late 2005 and the restructuring of the online display of the article in 2010. Keeping pace with the changing nature of biological research, over the decade Cell added new article types, introduced guidelines for the organization of supplementary material, and expanded the journal's web-based content to bring editors' and authors' excitement and perspective on individual papers to the readership. An interactive version of the timeline, with links to the papers, full author lists, and Annotated Classics, is available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cell.2014.11.004. PMID:25416957

  12. Manipulation of a quasi-natural cell block for high-efficiency transplantation of adherent somatic cells.

    PubMed

    Chung, H J; Hassan, M M; Park, J O; Kim, H J; Hong, S T

    2015-05-01

    Recent advances have raised hope that transplantation of adherent somatic cells could provide dramatic new therapies for various diseases. However, current methods for transplanting adherent somatic cells are not efficient enough for therapeutic applications. Here, we report the development of a novel method to generate quasi-natural cell blocks for high-efficiency transplantation of adherent somatic cells. The blocks were created by providing a unique environment in which cultured cells generated their own extracellular matrix. Initially, stromal cells isolated from mice were expanded in vitro in liquid cell culture medium followed by transferring the cells into a hydrogel shell. After incubation for 1 day with mechanical agitation, the encapsulated cell mass was perforated with a thin needle and then incubated for an additional 6 days to form a quasi-natural cell block. Allograft transplantation of the cell block into C57BL/6 mice resulted in perfect adaptation of the allograft and complete integration into the tissue of the recipient. This method could be widely applied for repairing damaged cells or tissues, stem cell transplantation, ex vivo gene therapy, or plastic surgery.

  13. Impact Mediated Loading Cytoplasmic Loading of Macromolecules into Adherent Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Mark S. F.; Feeback, Daniel L.; Vanderburg, Charles R.

    2003-01-01

    The advent of modern molecular biology, including the development of gene array technologies, has resulted in an explosion of information concerning the specific genes activated during normal cellular development, as well as those associated with a variety of pathological conditions. These techniques have served as a highly efficient, broacI.-based screening approach for those specific genes involved. in regulating normal cellular physiology and identifying candidate genes directly associated with the etiology of specific disease states. However, this approach provides information at the transcriptional' level only and does not necessarily indicate . that the gene in question is in fact translated ito a protein, or whether or not post-translational modification of the protein occurs. The critical importance of post-translational modification (i.e. phosphorylation, glycosylation, sialyation, etc.) to protein function has been recognized with regard to a number of proteins involved in a variety of important disease states. For example, altered glycosylation of beta-amyloid precursor protein results in an increase in the amount of beta-amyloid peptide generated and hence secreted as insoluble extracellular amyloid deposits (Georgopoulou, McLaughlin et al. 2001; Walter, Fluhrer et al. 2001), a pathological hal1nark of Alzheimer's disease. Abnormal phosphorylaion of synapsin I has been linked to alterations in synaptic vesicle trafficking leading to defective neurotransmission in Huntington's disease (Lievens, Woodman et al. 2002). Altered phosphorylation of the TAU protein involved in microtubule function has been linked to a number of neurodegenative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (Billingsley and Kincaid 1997; Sanchez, Alvarez-Tllada et a1. 2001). Aberrant siaIyation of cell/I surface antigens has been detected in a number of different tumor cell types and has been linked to the acquisition of a neoplastic phenotype (Sell 1990), while improper' sia1yation of

  14. Design of a randomized trial to evaluate the influence of mobile phone reminders on adherence to first line antiretroviral treatment in South India - the HIVIND study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Poor adherence to antiretroviral treatment has been a public health challenge associated with the treatment of HIV. Although different adherence-supporting interventions have been reported, their long term feasibility in low income settings remains uncertain. Thus, there is a need to explore sustainable contextual adherence aids in such settings, and to test these using rigorous scientific designs. The current ubiquity of mobile phones in many resource-constrained settings, make it a contextually appropriate and relatively low cost means of supporting adherence. In India, mobile phones have wide usage and acceptability and are potentially feasible tools for enhancing adherence to medications. This paper presents the study protocol for a trial, to evaluate the influence of mobile phone reminders on adherence to first-line antiretroviral treatment in South India. Methods/Design 600 treatment naïve patients eligible for first-line treatment as per the national antiretroviral treatment guidelines will be recruited into the trial at two clinics in South India. Patients will be randomized into control and intervention arms. The control arm will receive the standard of care; the intervention arm will receive the standard of care plus mobile phone reminders. Each reminder will take the form of an automated call and a picture message. Reminders will be delivered once a week, at a time chosen by the patient. Patients will be followed up for 24 months or till the primary outcome i.e. virological failure, is reached, whichever is earlier. Self-reported adherence is a secondary outcome. Analysis is by intention-to-treat. A cost-effectiveness study of the intervention will also be carried out. Discussion Stepping up telecommunications technology in resource-limited healthcare settings is a priority of the World Health Organization. The trial will evaluate if the use of mobile phone reminders can influence adherence to first-line antiretrovirals in an Indian context

  15. Heparin modulates intracellular cyclic AMP in human trabecular bone cells and adherent rheumatoid synovial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Crisp, A J; Roelke, M S; Goldring, S R; Krane, S M

    1984-01-01

    Cells were cultured from explants of human trabecular bone excised from eight patients and incubated usually for 20 minutes with bovine parathyroid hormone, salmon calcitonin, prostaglandin E2, or heparin. The intracellular content of cyclic AMP was measured by radioimmunoassay and was significantly increased by parathyroid hormone in four, by calcitonin in two, by prostaglandin E2 in eight, and by heparin in seven out of eight cultures. In the two cultures containing calcitonin-responsive cells heparin inhibited the cyclic AMP response induced by calcitonin. Heparin did not affect the cyclic AMP response to parathyroid hormone or prostaglandin E2. Heparin also increased the cyclic AMP content of cultured adherent rheumatoid synovial cells. It is proposed that, in certain situations of focal pathological bone resorption, although concentrations of circulating hormones may be normal, the local release of products such as heparin may modify the effect of hormones which regulate connective tissue homoeostasis. local changes in hormone responses could contribute to the enhanced bone resorption associated with inflammatory processes such as rheumatoid arthritis. Images PMID:6089675

  16. Increased neutrophil adherence and adhesion molecule mRNA expression in endothelial cells during selenium deficiency.

    PubMed

    Maddox, J F; Aherne, K M; Reddy, C C; Sordillo, L M

    1999-05-01

    Leukocyte aggregation and activation on endothelial cells (EC) are important preliminary events in leukocyte migration into tissue and subsequent inflammation. Thus, an increase in leukocyte adherence has the potential to affect inflammatory disease outcome. Selenium (Se) is an integral part of the antioxidant enzyme glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and plays an important role in the maintenance of the redox state of a cell. Se supplementation in the bovine has been shown to improve the outcome of acute mastitis caused by coliform bacteria, in part by enhancing the speed of neutrophil migration into the affected mammary gland. However, the mechanisms by which Se modulates neutrophil migration have not been elucidated. Therefore, an in vitro model of Se deficiency in primary bovine mammary artery EC was used to examine the impact of Se status on the adhesive properties of EC. The effect of Se on functional activities was examined by measuring neutrophil adherence to Se-deficient and Se-supplemented EC. Se-deficient EC showed significantly enhanced neutrophil adherence when stimulated with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) for 4 or 24 h, interleukin-1 for 12 h, or H2O2 for 20 min (P < 0.05). To determine the mechanisms underlying these changes in neutrophil adherence, the expression of EC adhesion molecules, ICAM-1, E-selectin, and P-selectin were examined at the molecular level by a competitive reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Results revealed higher mRNA expression for E-selectin and ICAM-1 in Se-deficient EC stimulated with TNF-alpha for 3 and 6 h, and greater expression of P-selectin mRNA in Se-supplemented EC with 3-h TNF-alpha stimulation. These studies provide new information to establish the role of Se nutrition in the initiation of leukocyte adherence to endothelium. PMID:10331495

  17. Urease prevents adherence of Helicobacter pylori to Kato III gastric epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Makristathis, A; Rokita, E; Pasching, E; Apfalter, P; Willinger, B; Rotter, M L; Hirschl, A M

    2001-08-15

    The role of urease in Helicobacter pylori adherence to and internalization by Kato III cells was investigated. Kato III cells were incubated with wild-type strains (N6 or P1), with isogenic mutants lacking urease (N6ureB::TnKm or P1ureA::TnMax5) or producing the inactive apoprotein (N6ureG::TnKm), and with urease-positive clones recovered after complementation of N6ureB::TnKm with ureAB. Bacteria were stained with the green fluorescent dye PKH2, and the bacteria load of cells was analyzed by flow cytometry. With mutants lacking urease, the bacteria load was considerably increased, in comparison with the corresponding parental strains (P<.001). With clone K2(3), producing larger amounts of urease than N6, a significant reduction of bacteria load was observed, in comparison with the wild type (P<.001). N6ureG::TnKm showed adherence characteristics similar to those of N6. The role of urease in internalization was not clear. Thus, urease significantly inhibits H. pylori adherence to Kato III cells by a mechanism largely independent of enzymatic activity. PMID:11471101

  18. Temperature-induced labelling of Fluo-3 AM selectively yields brighter nucleus in adherent cells

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Guixian; Pan, Leiting; Li, Cunbo; Hu, Fen; Shi, Xuechen; Lee, Imshik; Drevenšek-Olenik, Irena; Zhang, Xinzheng; Xu, Jingjun

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •We detailedly examine temperature effects of Fluo-3 AM labelling in adherent cells. •4 °C Loading and 20 °C de-esterification of Fluo-3 AM yields brighter nuclei. •Brighter nuclei labelling by Fluo-3 AM also depends on cell adhesion quality. •A qualitative model of the brighter nucleus is proposed. -- Abstract: Fluo-3 is widely used to study cell calcium. Two traditional approaches: (1) direct injection and (2) Fluo-3 acetoxymethyl ester (AM) loading, often bring conflicting results in cytoplasmic calcium ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c}) and nuclear calcium ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub n}) imaging. AM loading usually yields a darker nucleus than in cytoplasm, while direct injection always induces a brighter nucleus which is more responsive to [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub n} detection. In this work, we detailedly investigated the effects of loading and de-esterification temperatures on the fluorescence intensity of Fluo-3 in response to [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub n} and [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c} in adherent cells, including osteoblast, HeLa and BV2 cells. Interestingly, it showed that fluorescence intensity of nucleus in osteoblast cells was about two times larger than that of cytoplasm when cells were loaded with Fluo-3 AM at 4 °C and allowed a subsequent step for de-esterification at 20 °C. Brighter nuclei were also acquired in HeLa and BV2 cells using the same experimental condition. Furthermore, loading time and adhesion quality of cells had effect on fluorescence intensity. Taken together, cold loading and room temperature de-esterification treatment of Fluo-3 AM selectively yielded brighter nucleus in adherent cells.

  19. Adherence of bacteria, yeast, blood cells, and latex spheres to large-porosity membrane filters.

    PubMed Central

    Zierdt, C H

    1979-01-01

    Strong adherence of bacteria, yeast, erythrocytes, leukocytes, platelets, spores, and polystyrene spheres to membrane filter materials was noted during filtration through membranes with pore size diameters much larger than the particles themselves. Quantitative recovery on the membrane filters of these particles from low-concentration suspensions was achieved during gravity- or vacuum-assisted filtration through membranes with pore diameters as much as 30 times that of the filtered particles. Mechanical sieving was not responsible. The phenomenon was judged to be electrostatic. It could be partially blocked by pretreating the filter with a nonionic surfactant (Tween 20), and elution of adherent particles was achieved with 0.05% Tween 20. Gram-positive cocci were removed from suspension more efficiently than gram-negative rods. The commonly used cellulose membranes adsorbed more bacteria, blood cells, and other particles than did polycarbonate filters. Of lesser adsorptive capacity were vinyl acetate, nylon, acrylic, and Teflon membranes. Backwashing with saline, serum, 6% NaCl, dextran solutions, or phosphate buffers of varying molality and pH removed only a fraction of adherent particles. Tween 20 (0.05%) eluted up to 45% of adherent particles in a single back-filtration. Selected filters quantitatively removed the particles tested, which then could be washed and subjected to reagents for a variety of purposes. It is important to anticipate the removal of particles during membrane filtration, since it is not a simple mechanical event. Images PMID:393171

  20. Upon impact: the fate of adhering Pseudomonas fluorescens cells during nanofiltration.

    PubMed

    Habimana, Olivier; Semião, Andrea J C; Casey, Eoin

    2014-08-19

    Nanofiltration (NF) is a high-pressure membrane filtration process increasingly applied in drinking water treatment and water reuse processes. NF typically rejects divalent salts, organic matter, and micropollutants. However, the efficiency of NF is adversely affected by membrane biofouling, during which microorganisms adhere to the membrane and proliferate to create a biofilm. Here we show that adhered Pseudomonas fluorescens cells under high permeate flux conditions are met with high fluid shear and convective fluxes at the membrane-liquid interface, resulting in their structural damage and collapse. These results were confirmed by fluorescent staining, flow cytometry, and scanning electron microscopy. This present study offers a "first-glimpse" of cell damage and death during the initial phases of bacterial adhesion to NF membranes and raises a key question about the role of this observed phenomena during early-stage biofilm formation under permeate flux and cross-flow conditions. PMID:25072514

  1. Automated Method for the Rapid and Precise Estimation of Adherent Cell Culture Characteristics from Phase Contrast Microscopy Images

    PubMed Central

    Jaccard, Nicolas; Griffin, Lewis D; Keser, Ana; Macown, Rhys J; Super, Alexandre; Veraitch, Farlan S; Szita, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    The quantitative determination of key adherent cell culture characteristics such as confluency, morphology, and cell density is necessary for the evaluation of experimental outcomes and to provide a suitable basis for the establishment of robust cell culture protocols. Automated processing of images acquired using phase contrast microscopy (PCM), an imaging modality widely used for the visual inspection of adherent cell cultures, could enable the non-invasive determination of these characteristics. We present an image-processing approach that accurately detects cellular objects in PCM images through a combination of local contrast thresholding and post hoc correction of halo artifacts. The method was thoroughly validated using a variety of cell lines, microscope models and imaging conditions, demonstrating consistently high segmentation performance in all cases and very short processing times (<1 s per 1,208 × 960 pixels image). Based on the high segmentation performance, it was possible to precisely determine culture confluency, cell density, and the morphology of cellular objects, demonstrating the wide applicability of our algorithm for typical microscopy image processing pipelines. Furthermore, PCM image segmentation was used to facilitate the interpretation and analysis of fluorescence microscopy data, enabling the determination of temporal and spatial expression patterns of a fluorescent reporter. We created a software toolbox (PHANTAST) that bundles all the algorithms and provides an easy to use graphical user interface. Source-code for MATLAB and ImageJ is freely available under a permissive open-source license. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2014;111: 504–517. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24037521

  2. Morphology and growth of murine cell lines on model biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Godek, Marisha L; Duchsherer, Nichole L; McElwee, Quinn; Grainger, David W

    2004-01-01

    All biomaterial implants are assaulted by the host "foreign body" immune response. Understanding the complex, dynamic relationship between cells, biomaterials and milieu is an important first step towards controlling this reaction. Material surface chemistry dictates protein adsorption, and thus subsequent cell interactions. The cell-implant is a microenvironment involving 1) proteins that coat the surface and 2) cells that interact with these proteins. Macrophages and fibroblasts are two cell types that interact with proteins on biomaterials surfaces and play different related, but equally important, roles in biomaterials rejection and implant failure. Growth characteristics of four murine cell lines on model biomaterials surfaces were examined. Murine monocyte-macrophages (RAW 264.7 and J774A.1), murine macrophage (IC-21) and murine fibroblast (NIH 3T3) cell lines were tested to determine whether differences exist in adhesion, proliferation, differentiation, spreading, and fusion (macrophage lineages only) on these surfaces. Differences were observed in the ability of cells to adhere to and subsequently proliferate on polymer surfaces. (Monocyte-) macrophages grew well on all surfaces tested and growth rates were measured on three representative polymer biomaterials surfaces: tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS), polystyrene, and Teflon-AF. J774A.1 cultures grown on TCPS and treated with exogenous cytokines IL-4 and GM-CSF were observed to contain multinucleate cells with unusual morphologies. Thus, (monocyte-) macrophage cell lines were found to effectively attach to and interrogate each surface presented, with evidence of extensive spreading on Teflon-AF surfaces, particularly in the IC-21 cultures. The J774A.1 line was able to proliferate and/or differentiate to more specialized cell types (multinucleate/dendritic-like cells) in the presence of soluble chemokine cues. PMID:15133927

  3. Morphological investigations of cells that adhered to the irregular patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surface without reagents.

    PubMed

    Chung, Sung Hee; Min, Junhong

    2009-07-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surface consisting irregular pattern was investigated to develop cell-based biochip using PDMS. PDMS surface was modified with nano- and micro-combined patterns using surface deformation technology. Hydrophobicity of nano-patterned PDMS surface was sustained. Nevertheless it has irregular patterns consisting of micro- and nano-patterns. According to atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal microscopy results by immunostaining method, human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) adhered well on irregularly patterned surface without any reagents such as gelatin and collagen, compared to commercial culture dish. It implies PDMS material can be utilized as template for cell-based biochip without any reagents. PMID:19427124

  4. Trichomonas vaginalis surface proteinase activity is necessary for parasite adherence to epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Arroyo, R; Alderete, J F

    1989-01-01

    The role of cysteine proteinases in adherence of Trichomonas vaginalis NYH 286 to HeLa and human vaginal epithelial cells was evaluated. Only pretreatment of trichomonads, but not epithelial cells, with N-alpha-p-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone (TLCK), an inhibitor of trichomonad cysteine proteinases, greatly diminished the ability of T. vaginalis to recognize and bind to epithelial cells. Leupeptin and L-1-tosylamide-2-phenylethyl chloromethyl ketone, other cysteine proteinase inhibitors, also decreased T. vaginalis cytadherence. Parasites incubated with TLCK and washed extensively still did not adhere to cells at levels equal to those seen for control trichomonads treated with phosphate-buffered saline or culture medium alone. Exposure of TLCK-treated organisms with other cysteine proteinases restored cytadherence levels, indicating that proteinase action on the parasite surface is prerequisite for host cell attachment. Concentrations of TLCK which inhibited cytadherence did not alter the metabolism of T. vaginalis, as determined by metabolic labeling of trichomonad proteins; the protein patterns of T. vaginalis in the presence and absence of TLCK were identical. Kinetics of TLCK-mediated inhibition of cytadherence of other T. vaginalis isolates with different levels of epithelial-cell parasitism were similar to the concentration-dependent inhibition seen for isolate NYH 286. Incubation of TLCK-treated, washed organisms in growth medium resulted in regeneration of adherence. Finally, treatment of T. vaginalis organisms with proteinase inhibitors for abrogation of cytadherence effectively rendered the trichomonads unable to kill host cells, which is consistent with the contact-dependent nature of host cytotoxicity. These data show for the first time the involvement of T. vaginalis cysteine proteinases in parasite attachment to human epithelial cells. These results have implications for future pharmacologic intervention at a key step in infection. PMID:2789190

  5. Towards high-throughput automated targeted femtosecond laser-based transfection of adherent cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antkowiak, Maciej; Torres-Mapa, Maria Leilani; Gunn-Moore, Frank; Dholakia, Kishan

    2011-03-01

    Femtosecond laser induced cell membrane poration has proven to be an attractive alternative to the classical methods of drug and gene delivery. It is a selective, sterile, non-contact technique that offers a highly localized operation, low toxicity and consistent performance. However, its broader application still requires the development of robust, high-throughput and user-friendly systems. We present a system capable of unassisted enhanced targeted optoinjection and phototransfection of adherent mammalian cells with a femtosecond laser. We demonstrate the advantages of a dynamic diffractive optical element, namely a spatial light modulator (SLM) for precise three dimensional positioning of the beam. It enables the implementation of a "point-and-shoot" system in which using the software interface a user simply points at the cell and a predefined sequence of precisely positioned doses can be applied. We show that irradiation in three axial positions alleviates the problem of exact beam positioning on the cell membrane and doubles the number of viably optoinjected cells when compared with a single dose. The presented system enables untargeted raster scan irradiation which provides transfection of adherent cells at the throughput of 1 cell per second.

  6. Bio-chemo-mechanical models for nuclear deformation in adherent eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Nava, Michele M; Raimondi, Manuela T; Pietrabissa, Riccardo

    2014-10-01

    Adherent eukaryotic cells are subjected to a broad variety of extracellular and intracellular stimuli regulating their behaviour. These stimuli can be either purely chemical, for example soluble factors binding to the cell membrane, or mechano-chemical, for example integrin-based adhesion complexes stretching the cell cytoskeleton. Here, we focus on mechano-chemical stimuli such as extracellular forces (interstitial flow, pressurization) and intracellular forces (due to cell adhesion), which may combine generating stress-strain states in the cytoskeleton. These states are transferred to the nucleus to influence the transcription of specific genes, likely by changing the chromatin organization and by altering the permeability of the nuclear membrane. While there exists increasing experimental evidence of the mechanosensing role of the cell nucleus, both the underlying molecular mechanisms involved, and the nuclear structural behaviour in response to forces, are still poorly understood. Here, we review the existing literature on computational models developed to investigate the chemo-mechanical behaviour of adherent eukaryotic cells. We analyse two main classes of models of single-cell mechanics, based either on the discrete or on the continuum approaches. We focus on the bio-chemo-mechanical model and modelling techniques accounting for the nuclear body. The modelling techniques are discussed highlighting their ability in predicting cytoskeletal contractility states and nuclear stress-strain states.

  7. Effect of enteroviruses on adherence to and invasion of HEp-2 cells by Campylobacter isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Konkel, M E; Joens, L A

    1990-01-01

    Coinfection of HEp-2 epithelial cells with coxsackievirus B3, echovirus 7, poliovirus (LSc type 1), porcine enterovirus, and Campylobacter isolates was performed to determine if a synergistic effect could be obtained. The invasiveness of Campylobacter jejuni ATCC 33560 was significantly increased for HEp-2 cells preinfected with echovirus 7, coxsackievirus B3, and UV-inactivated (noninfectious) coxsackievirus B3 particles. Additionally, the invasiveness of C. jejuni M96, a clinical isolate, was significantly increased for HEp-2 cells preinfected with coxsackievirus B3. Poliovirus and porcine enterovirus had no effect on C. jejuni ATCC 33560 adherence and invasiveness. Furthermore, poliovirus had no effect on the ability of C. jejuni M96 to adhere to and invade HEp-2 cells. Campylobacter hyointestinalis and Campylobacter mucosalis, two noninvasive isolates, did not invade virus-infected HEp-2 cells. The increase in the invasiveness of C. jejuni appeared to be the result of specific interactions between the virus and the HEp-2 cell membrane. The data suggest that the invasiveness of Campylobacter spp. is dependent upon the inherent properties of the organism. Virus-induced cell alterations can potentiate the invasiveness of virulent Campylobacter spp. but are not sufficient to allow internalization of noninvasive bacteria. PMID:2156779

  8. Pathogenic hantaviruses direct the adherence of quiescent platelets to infected endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gavrilovskaya, Irina N; Gorbunova, Elena E; Mackow, Erich R

    2010-05-01

    Hantavirus infections are noted for their ability to infect endothelial cells, cause acute thrombocytopenia, and trigger 2 vascular-permeability-based diseases. However, hantavirus infections are not lytic, and the mechanisms by which hantaviruses cause capillary permeability and thrombocytopenia are only partially understood. The role of beta(3) integrins in hemostasis and the inactivation of beta(3) integrin receptors by pathogenic hantaviruses suggest the involvement of hantaviruses in altered platelet and endothelial cell functions that regulate permeability. Here, we determined that pathogenic hantaviruses bind to quiescent platelets via a beta(3) integrin-dependent mechanism. This suggests that platelets may contribute to hantavirus dissemination within infected patients and provides a means by which hantavirus binding to beta(3) integrin receptors prevents platelet activation. The ability of hantaviruses to bind platelets further suggested that cell-associated hantaviruses might recruit platelets to the endothelial cell surface. Our findings indicate that Andes virus (ANDV)- or Hantaan virus (HTNV)-infected endothelial cells specifically direct the adherence of calcein-labeled platelets. In contrast, cells comparably infected with nonpathogenic Tula virus (TULV) failed to recruit platelets to the endothelial cell surface. Platelet adherence was dependent on endothelial cell beta(3) integrins and neutralized by the addition of the anti-beta(3) Fab fragment, c7E3, or specific ANDV- or HTNV-neutralizing antibodies. These findings indicate that pathogenic hantaviruses displayed on the surface of infected endothelial cells bind platelets and that a platelet layer covers the surface of infected endothelial cells. This fundamentally changes the appearance of endothelial cells and has the potential to alter cellular immune responses, platelet activation, and endothelial cell functions that affect vascular permeability. Hantavirus-directed platelet quiescence and

  9. Milk digesta and milk protein fractions influence the adherence of Lactobacillus gasseri R and Lactobacillus casei FMP to human cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Volstatova, Tereza; Havlik, Jaroslav; Potuckova, Miroslava; Geigerova, Martina

    2016-08-10

    Adhesion to the intestinal epithelium is considered an important feature of probiotic bacteria, which may increase their persistence in the intestine, allowing them to exert their beneficial health effect or promote the colonisation process. However, this feature might be largely dependent on the host specificity or diet. In the present study, we investigated the effect of selected milks and milk protein fractions on the ability of selected lactobacilli to adhere to the cells of an intestinal model based on co-culture Caco-2/HT29-MTX cell lines. Most milk digesta did not significantly affect bacterial adhesion except for UHT-treated milk and sheep milk. The presence of UHT-treated milk digesta reduced the adhesion of Lactobacillus gasseri R by 61% but not that of Lactobacillus casei FMP. However, sheep milk significantly increased the adherence of L. casei FMP (P < 0.05) but not of L. gasseri R. Among the protein fractions, rennet casein (RCN) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) showed reproducible patterns and strain-specific effects on bacterial adherence. While RCN reduced the adherence of L. gasseri R to <50% compared to the control, it did not have a significant effect on L. casei FMP. In contrast, BSA reduced L. casei FMP adherence to a higher extent than that of L. gasseri R. Whey protein (WH) tended to increase the adherence of both strains by 130%-180%. Recently, interactions between the host diet and its microbiota have attracted considerable interest. Our results may explain one of the aspects of the role of milk in the development of microbiota or support of probiotic supplements. Based on our data, we conclude that the persistence of probiotic strains supplemented as part of dairy food or constitutional microbiota in the gut might be affected negatively or positively by the food matrix through complex strain or concentration dependent effects. PMID:27435508

  10. Milk digesta and milk protein fractions influence the adherence of Lactobacillus gasseri R and Lactobacillus casei FMP to human cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Volstatova, Tereza; Havlik, Jaroslav; Potuckova, Miroslava; Geigerova, Martina

    2016-08-10

    Adhesion to the intestinal epithelium is considered an important feature of probiotic bacteria, which may increase their persistence in the intestine, allowing them to exert their beneficial health effect or promote the colonisation process. However, this feature might be largely dependent on the host specificity or diet. In the present study, we investigated the effect of selected milks and milk protein fractions on the ability of selected lactobacilli to adhere to the cells of an intestinal model based on co-culture Caco-2/HT29-MTX cell lines. Most milk digesta did not significantly affect bacterial adhesion except for UHT-treated milk and sheep milk. The presence of UHT-treated milk digesta reduced the adhesion of Lactobacillus gasseri R by 61% but not that of Lactobacillus casei FMP. However, sheep milk significantly increased the adherence of L. casei FMP (P < 0.05) but not of L. gasseri R. Among the protein fractions, rennet casein (RCN) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) showed reproducible patterns and strain-specific effects on bacterial adherence. While RCN reduced the adherence of L. gasseri R to <50% compared to the control, it did not have a significant effect on L. casei FMP. In contrast, BSA reduced L. casei FMP adherence to a higher extent than that of L. gasseri R. Whey protein (WH) tended to increase the adherence of both strains by 130%-180%. Recently, interactions between the host diet and its microbiota have attracted considerable interest. Our results may explain one of the aspects of the role of milk in the development of microbiota or support of probiotic supplements. Based on our data, we conclude that the persistence of probiotic strains supplemented as part of dairy food or constitutional microbiota in the gut might be affected negatively or positively by the food matrix through complex strain or concentration dependent effects.

  11. Subinhibitory concentrations of triclosan promote Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation and adherence to oral epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bedran, Telma Blanca Lombardo; Grignon, Louis; Spolidorio, Denise Palomari; Grenier, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Triclosan is a general membrane-active agent with a broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity that is commonly used in oral care products. In this study, we investigated the effect of sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of triclosan on the capacity of the cariogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans to form biofilm and adhere to oral epithelial cells. As quantified by crystal violet staining, biofilm formation by two reference strains of S. mutans was dose-dependently promoted, in the range of 2.2- to 6.2-fold, by 1/2 and 1/4 MIC of triclosan. Observations by scanning electron microscopy revealed the presence of a dense biofilm attached to the polystyrene surface. Growth of S. mutans in the presence of triclosan at sub-MICs also increased its capacity to adhere to a monolayer of gingival epithelial cells. The expression of several genes involved in adherence and biofilm formation in S. mutans was investigated by quantitative RT-PCR. It was found that sub-MICs of triclosan significantly increased the expression of comD, gtfC, and luxS, and to a lesser extent of gtfB and atlA genes. These findings stress the importance of maintaining effective bactericidal concentrations of therapeutic triclosan since sub-MICs may promote colonization of the oral cavity by S. mutans.

  12. Toxicity Minimized Cryoprotectant Addition and Removal Procedures for Adherent Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Allyson Fry; Glasscock, Cameron; McClanahan, Danielle R.; Benson, James D.; Higgins, Adam Z.

    2015-01-01

    Ice-free cryopreservation, known as vitrification, is an appealing approach for banking of adherent cells and tissues because it prevents dissociation and morphological damage that may result from ice crystal formation. However, current vitrification methods are often limited by the cytotoxicity of the concentrated cryoprotective agent (CPA) solutions that are required to suppress ice formation. Recently, we described a mathematical strategy for identifying minimally toxic CPA equilibration procedures based on the minimization of a toxicity cost function. Here we provide direct experimental support for the feasibility of these methods when applied to adherent endothelial cells. We first developed a concentration- and temperature-dependent toxicity cost function by exposing the cells to a range of glycerol concentrations at 21°C and 37°C, and fitting the resulting viability data to a first order cell death model. This cost function was then numerically minimized in our state constrained optimization routine to determine addition and removal procedures for 17 molal (mol/kg water) glycerol solutions. Using these predicted optimal procedures, we obtained 81% recovery after exposure to vitrification solutions, as well as successful vitrification with the relatively slow cooling and warming rates of 50°C/min and 130°C/min. In comparison, conventional multistep CPA equilibration procedures resulted in much lower cell yields of about 10%. Our results demonstrate the potential for rational design of minimally toxic vitrification procedures and pave the way for extension of our optimization approach to other adherent cell types as well as more complex systems such as tissues and organs. PMID:26605546

  13. Applications of electroporation of adherent cells in situ, on a partly conductive slide.

    PubMed

    Raptis, L H; Brownell, H L; Liu, S K; Firth, K L; MacKenzie, L W; Stiles, C D; Alberta, J A

    1995-10-01

    Nontraumatic, simple, and reproducible procedures for the introduction of nonpermeant molecules into adherent mammalian cells by in situ electroporation are described. Cells are grown on a glass slide, half of which is coated with electrically conductive, optically transparent, indium-tin oxide. An electric pulse is applied in the presence of the molecules to be introduced, and their effect on the cellular phenotype can be observed. The cells growing on the nonconductive side of the slide do not receive any pulse and serve as controls. Careful adjustment of electric field strength can achieve the introduction of the molecules into essentially 100% of the cells, and this treatment causes no detectable disruption to cellular metabolism. This is applied in the presence of the fluorescent dye, Lucifer yellow, causing its penetration into the cells growing on the conductive half of the slide. The migration of the dye to the nonelectroporated cells growing on the nonconductive area is microscopically observed under fluorescence illumination. PMID:8556428

  14. Fibrin clots keep non-adhering living cells in place on glass for perfusion or fixation.

    PubMed

    Forer, Arthur; Pickett-Heaps, Jeremy

    2005-09-01

    We describe a method to hold living cells in place that ordinarily do not adhere to glass coverslips. The method, developed for insect spermatocytes but with application to other cell types, consists of embedding cells in a fibrin clot that forms after the enzyme thrombin cleaves the blood protein fibrinogen. The method permits continuous observation of living cells as they are treated with and recover from drug or other treatments: when held in the clot the living cells remain in place and keep their shapes when perfused with drugs that ordinarily cause drastic shape changes, and they remain in place and keep their shapes through lysis/fixation procedures. We describe how to place live cells in a fibrin clot and how subsequently to perfuse them. PMID:16095930

  15. Standardized orthotopic xenografts in zebrafish reveal glioma cell-line-specific characteristics and tumor cell heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Welker, Alessandra M.; Jaros, Brian D.; Puduvalli, Vinay K.; Imitola, Jaime; Kaur, Balveen; Beattie, Christine E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Glioblastoma (GBM) is a deadly brain cancer, for which few effective drug treatments are available. Several studies have used zebrafish models to study GBM, but a standardized approach to modeling GBM in zebrafish was lacking to date, preventing comparison of data across studies. Here, we describe a new, standardized orthotopic xenotransplant model of GBM in zebrafish. Dose-response survival assays were used to define the optimal number of cells for tumor formation. Techniques to measure tumor burden and cell spread within the brain over real time were optimized using mouse neural stem cells as control transplants. Applying this standardized approach, we transplanted two patient-derived GBM cell lines, serum-grown adherent cells and neurospheres, into the midbrain region of embryonic zebrafish and analyzed transplanted larvae over time. Progressive brain tumor growth and premature larval death were observed using both cell lines; however, fewer transplanted neurosphere cells were needed for tumor growth and lethality. Tumors were heterogeneous, containing both cells expressing stem cell markers and cells expressing markers of differentiation. A small proportion of transplanted neurosphere cells expressed glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) or vimentin, markers of more differentiated cells, but this number increased significantly during tumor growth, indicating that these cells undergo differentiation in vivo. By contrast, most serum-grown adherent cells expressed GFAP and vimentin at the earliest times examined post-transplant. Both cell types produced brain tumors that contained Sox2+ cells, indicative of tumor stem cells. Transplanted larvae were treated with currently used GBM therapeutics, temozolomide or bortezomib, and this resulted in a reduction in tumor volume in vivo and an increase in survival. The standardized model reported here facilitates robust and reproducible analysis of glioblastoma tumor cells in real time and provides a platform for

  16. Adherence of Staphylococcus epidermidis to human endothelial cells is associated with a polysaccharidic component of its extracellular mucous layer.

    PubMed

    Krevvata, Maria I; Spiliopoulou, Anastasia; Anastassiou, Evangelos D; Karamanos, Nikos; Kolonitsiou, Fevronia

    2011-06-01

    Bacterial adherence to eukaryotic cells is highly contributing to microbial pathogenesis. Bacterial adhesins, macromolecules, and glycosaminoglycan chains of the endothelial cell surface have been implicated in staphylococcal attachment. Our research group has isolated an antigenic polysaccharidic component of Staphylococcus epidermidis extracellular layer, known as 20-kDa PS (PS), and showed that antibodies against this polysaccharide protect from infections. Therefore, the role of PS in S. epidermidis adherence to endothelial cells was studied. For this purpose we examined the impact of PS on the ability of two S. epidermidis strains (a PS-producing and a non-PS-producing strain) to adhere to human endothelial cells in the presence or absence of specific antibodies to this polysaccharide. Hence, it is established that exogenous chondroitin sulfate (CS) decreases, in part, the S. epidermidis' attachment to endothelial cells and the antagonistic binding effect of CS and PS was also studied. The results obtained demonstrate that PS facilitates the adherence of S. epidermidis to both strains. CS abolished the PS-induced adherence in PS-producing strain and partially in the non-PS-producing one. Conclusively, the adherence of S. epidermidis to human endothelial cells is associated with its extracellular PS component and it is suggested that the bacterial binding via glycosaminoglycan chains is an important mechanism underlining the PS-induced binding to endothelial cells.

  17. Participation of Integrin α5β1 in the Fibronectin-Mediated Adherence of Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli to Intestinal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Izquierdo, Mariana; Nataro, James P.; Ruiz-Perez, Fernando; Farfan, Mauricio J.

    2014-01-01

    Adherence to the intestinal epithelia is a key feature in enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) infection. The aggregative adherence fimbriae (AAFs) are involved in EAEC interaction with receptors at the surface of intestinal cells. We and others have demonstrated that fibronectin is a receptor for AAF/II fimbriae. Considering that the major cellular receptor of fibronectin is integrin α5β1, in this study we evaluated the participation of this receptor in the fibronectin-mediated adherence of EAEC strain 042 to intestinal cells. We found that EAEC strain 042 has the ability to bind directly and indirectly to integrin α5β1; direct binding was not mediated by AAF/II fimbriae and indirect binding was mediated by AAF/II and fibronectin. Coimmunoprecipitation assays confirmed the formation of the complex AafA/fibronectin/integrin α5β1. To evaluate EAEC adherence to intestinal cells, T84 cells were incubated with fibronectin and an antibody that blocks the interaction region of integrin α5β1 to fibronectin, the RGD site. Under these conditions, we found the number of adherent bacteria to epithelial cells significantly reduced. Additionally, fibronectin-mediated adherence of EAEC strain 042 was abolished in HEp-2 cells transfected with integrin α5 shRNA. Altogether, our data support the involvement of integrin α5β1 in the fibronectin-mediated EAEC binding to intestinal cells. PMID:25177698

  18. Participation of integrin α5β1 in the fibronectin-mediated adherence of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli to intestinal cells.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, Mariana; Alvestegui, Alejandra; Nataro, James P; Ruiz-Perez, Fernando; Farfan, Mauricio J

    2014-01-01

    Adherence to the intestinal epithelia is a key feature in enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) infection. The aggregative adherence fimbriae (AAFs) are involved in EAEC interaction with receptors at the surface of intestinal cells. We and others have demonstrated that fibronectin is a receptor for AAF/II fimbriae. Considering that the major cellular receptor of fibronectin is integrin α5β1, in this study we evaluated the participation of this receptor in the fibronectin-mediated adherence of EAEC strain 042 to intestinal cells. We found that EAEC strain 042 has the ability to bind directly and indirectly to integrin α5β1; direct binding was not mediated by AAF/II fimbriae and indirect binding was mediated by AAF/II and fibronectin. Coimmunoprecipitation assays confirmed the formation of the complex AafA/fibronectin/integrin α5β1. To evaluate EAEC adherence to intestinal cells, T84 cells were incubated with fibronectin and an antibody that blocks the interaction region of integrin α5β1 to fibronectin, the RGD site. Under these conditions, we found the number of adherent bacteria to epithelial cells significantly reduced. Additionally, fibronectin-mediated adherence of EAEC strain 042 was abolished in HEp-2 cells transfected with integrin α5 shRNA. Altogether, our data support the involvement of integrin α5β1 in the fibronectin-mediated EAEC binding to intestinal cells.

  19. Participation of integrin α5β1 in the fibronectin-mediated adherence of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli to intestinal cells.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, Mariana; Alvestegui, Alejandra; Nataro, James P; Ruiz-Perez, Fernando; Farfan, Mauricio J

    2014-01-01

    Adherence to the intestinal epithelia is a key feature in enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) infection. The aggregative adherence fimbriae (AAFs) are involved in EAEC interaction with receptors at the surface of intestinal cells. We and others have demonstrated that fibronectin is a receptor for AAF/II fimbriae. Considering that the major cellular receptor of fibronectin is integrin α5β1, in this study we evaluated the participation of this receptor in the fibronectin-mediated adherence of EAEC strain 042 to intestinal cells. We found that EAEC strain 042 has the ability to bind directly and indirectly to integrin α5β1; direct binding was not mediated by AAF/II fimbriae and indirect binding was mediated by AAF/II and fibronectin. Coimmunoprecipitation assays confirmed the formation of the complex AafA/fibronectin/integrin α5β1. To evaluate EAEC adherence to intestinal cells, T84 cells were incubated with fibronectin and an antibody that blocks the interaction region of integrin α5β1 to fibronectin, the RGD site. Under these conditions, we found the number of adherent bacteria to epithelial cells significantly reduced. Additionally, fibronectin-mediated adherence of EAEC strain 042 was abolished in HEp-2 cells transfected with integrin α5 shRNA. Altogether, our data support the involvement of integrin α5β1 in the fibronectin-mediated EAEC binding to intestinal cells. PMID:25177698

  20. Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) assay-Book Chapter*

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are thousands of environmental chemicals for which there is limited toxicological information, motivating the development and application of in vitro systems to profile the biological effects of xenobiotic exposure and predict their potential developmental hazard. An adhere...

  1. Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) Assay: Book Chapter

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are thousands of environmental chemicals for which there is limited toxicological information, motivating the development and application of in vitro systems to profile the biological effects of xenobiotic exposure and predict their potential developmental hazard. An adher...

  2. HLA expression in hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Wadee, A A; Paterson, A; Coplan, K A; Reddy, S G

    1994-08-01

    The present study undertook to investigate the biological significance of human leucocyte antigen expression in hepatocellular carcinoma and to elucidate the role of potential modulating agents on human leucocyte antigen expression. These studies used several hepatic tumour-derived cell lines as in vitro model systems. The cell lines included PLC/PRF/5 (Alexander cell line), Hep3B, HepG2, TONG PHC, HA22T/VGH, HA59T/VGH and Mahlavu. The cell lines K562 and Raji were used as negative and positive controls, respectively. K562, a B lymphoid-derived cell line, was shown to express negligible amounts of human leucocyte antigens, while Raji, an erythromyeloid-derived cell line, expressed both class I and class II human leucocyte antigens as well as their respective invariant chains, beta 2-microglobulin and Ii. Using an ELISA, experiments performed on these cell lines confirmed the natural expression of class I and class II antigens by the HA22T/VGH and HA59T/VGH cell lines, whereas PLC/PRF/5 displayed class II surface antigens only. The effects of modulating agents such as interferon-gamma sodium butyrate and clofazimine on human leucocyte antigen expression were investigated using the HA22T/VGH, HA59T/VGH and TONG PHC cell lines. These agents increased class II and class II human leucocyte antigen expression on HA22T/VGH and TONG PHC cells, but had no effect on the HA59T/VGH cell line. The results suggest a potential use for these agents as modulators of human leucocyte antigen expression by human heptocellular cell lines.

  3. Visualization of adherent cell monolayers by cryo-electron microscopy: A snapshot of endothelial adherens junctions.

    PubMed

    Le Bihan, Olivier; Decossas, Marion; Gontier, Etienne; Gerbod-Giannone, Marie-Christine; Lambert, Olivier

    2015-12-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) allows the visualization of the cell architecture in its native state. We developed a robust solution to adapt cryo-electron microscopy of vitreous sections (CEMOVIS) to a monolayer of adherent cells using a functionalized polyacrylamide hydrogel growing substrate. We applied this method to reconstitute an endothelial cell monolayer to visualize the morphology of adherens junctions (AJs) which regulate permeability and integrity of the vascular barrier. The fine morphology and ultrastructure of AJs from cultured primary human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) were analyzed in their native state by using CEMOVIS. Doxycycline and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) are known as efficient regulators of endothelial permeability. Doxycycline and S1P treatments both led to a drastic morphological switch from very uneven to standardized 14-17 nm wide AJs over several microns indicative of a better membrane tethering. Repetitive structures were occasionally noticed within the AJ cleft reflecting a local improved structural organization of VE-cadherin molecules. The ultrastructural stabilization of AJs observed upon treatment likely indicates a better adhesion and thus provides structural clues on the mechanism by which these treatments improve the endothelial barrier function. This method was also successfully extended to a thick epithelial barrier model. We expect our strategy to extend the reliable application of CEMOVIS to virtually any adherent cultured cell systems.

  4. Cell Phone-Based and Adherence Device Technologies for HIV Care and Treatment in Resource-Limited Settings: Recent Advances.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Jeffrey I; Haberer, Jessica E

    2015-12-01

    Numerous cell phone-based and adherence monitoring technologies have been developed to address barriers to effective HIV prevention, testing, and treatment. Because most people living with HIV and AIDS reside in resource-limited settings (RLS), it is important to understand the development and use of these technologies in RLS. Recent research on cell phone-based technologies has focused on HIV education, linkage to and retention in care, disease tracking, and antiretroviral therapy adherence reminders. Advances in adherence devices have focused on real-time adherence monitors, which have been used for both antiretroviral therapy and pre-exposure prophylaxis. Real-time monitoring has recently been combined with cell phone-based technologies to create real-time adherence interventions using short message service (SMS). New developments in adherence technologies are exploring ingestion monitoring and metabolite detection to confirm adherence. This article provides an overview of recent advances in these two families of technologies and includes research on their acceptability and cost-effectiveness when available. It additionally outlines key challenges and needed research as use of these technologies continues to expand and evolve.

  5. Characterization and classification of adherent cells in monolayer culture using automated tracking and evolutionary algorithms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen; Bedder, Matthew; Smith, Stephen L; Walker, Dawn; Shabir, Saqib; Southgate, Jennifer

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a novel method for tracking and characterizing adherent cells in monolayer culture. A system of cell tracking employing computer vision techniques was applied to time-lapse videos of replicate normal human uro-epithelial cell cultures exposed to different concentrations of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and a selective purinergic P2X antagonist (PPADS), acquired over a 24h period. Subsequent analysis following feature extraction demonstrated the ability of the technique to successfully separate the modulated classes of cell using evolutionary algorithms. Specifically, a Cartesian Genetic Program (CGP) network was evolved that identified average migration speed, in-contact angular velocity, cohesivity and average cell clump size as the principal features contributing to the separation. Our approach not only provides non-biased and parsimonious insight into modulated class behaviours, but can be extracted as mathematical formulae for the parameterization of computational models. PMID:27267455

  6. Adherence to hydroxyurea medication by children with sickle cell disease (SCD) using an electronic device: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Susumu; Kodjebacheva, Gergana; Scherrer, Tammy; Rice, Gary; Grigorian, Matthew; Blankenship, Jeremy; Onwuzurike, Nkechi

    2016-08-01

    Adherence to hydroxyurea (HU) is a significant modifying factor in sickle cell vaso-occlusive pain. We conducted a study using an electronic medication container-monitor-reminder device (GlowCap™) to track adherence and determine whether use of this device affected rates of HU adherence. Subjects were regular attendees to our clinic. They were given a 37-item questionnaire and were asked to use a GlowCap containing HU. When the device cap is opened, it makes a remote "medication taken" record. The device also provides usage reminder in the form of lights and alarm sounds if the cap opening is delayed. Nineteen subjects participated in the survey, and 17 in the intervention phase. Of the 17, 12 had reliable adherence data. Seventeen caregivers of patients and two patients completed the survey. Two most common barriers to adherence identified were lack of reminders and absence of medicine home delivery. The intervention component of this study, which used both the electronic (GlowCap) method and medication possession ratio showed that the median adherence rate for the 12 patients evaluated was 85 %. The GlowCap device accurately kept a record of adherence rates. This device may be an effective tool for increasing HU medication adherence. PMID:27225236

  7. Interleukin-3 greatly expands non-adherent endothelial forming cells with pro-angiogenic properties.

    PubMed

    Moldenhauer, Lachlan M; Cockshell, Michaelia P; Frost, Lachlan; Parham, Kate A; Tvorogov, Denis; Tan, Lih Y; Ebert, Lisa M; Tooley, Katie; Worthley, Stephen; Lopez, Angel F; Bonder, Claudine S

    2015-05-01

    Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) provide revascularisation for cardiovascular disease and the expansion of these cells opens up the possibility of their use as a cell therapy. Herein we show that interleukin-3 (IL3) strongly expands a population of human non-adherent endothelial forming cells (EXnaEFCs) with low immunogenicity as well as pro-angiogenic capabilities in vivo, making their therapeutic utilisation a realistic option. Non-adherent CD133(+) EFCs isolated from human umbilical cord blood and cultured under different conditions were maximally expanded by day 12 in the presence of IL3 at which time a 350-fold increase in cell number was obtained. Cell surface marker phenotyping confirmed expression of the hematopoietic progenitor cell markers CD133, CD117 and CD34, vascular cell markers VEGFR2 and CD31, dim expression of CD45 and absence of myeloid markers CD14 and CD11b. Functional experiments revealed that EXnaEFCs exhibited classical properties of endothelial cells (ECs), namely binding of Ulex europaeus lectin, up-take of acetylated-low density lipoprotein and contribution to EC tube formation in vitro. These EXnaEFCs demonstrated a pro-angiogenic phenotype within two independent in vivo rodent models. Firstly, a Matrigel plug assay showed increased vascularisation in mice. Secondly, a rat model of acute myocardial infarction demonstrated reduced heart damage as determined by lower levels of serum creatinine and a modest increase in heart functionality. Taken together, these studies show IL3 as a potent growth factor for human CD133(+) cell expansion with clear pro-angiogenic properties (in vitro and in vivo) and thus may provide clinical utility for humans in the future. PMID:25900163

  8. Isolation and manipulation of living adherent cells by micromolded magnetic rafts

    PubMed Central

    Gach, Philip C.; Wang, Yuli; Phillips, Colleen; Sims, Christopher E.; Allbritton, Nancy L.

    2011-01-01

    A new strategy for magnetically manipulating and isolating adherent cells with extremely high post-collection purity and viability is reported. Micromolded magnetic elements (termed microrafts) were fabricated in an array format and used as culture surfaces and carriers for living, adherent cells. A poly(styrene-co-acrylic acid) polymer containing well dispersed magnetic nanoparticles was developed for creating the microstructures by molding. Nanoparticles of γFe2O3 at concentrations up to 1% wt.∕wt. could be used to fabricate microrafts that were optically transparent, highly magnetic, biocompatible, and minimally fluorescent. To prevent cellular uptake of nanoparticles from the magnetic polymer, a poly(styrene-co-acrylic acid) layer lacking γFe2O3 nanoparticles was placed over the initial magnetic microraft layer to prevent cellular uptake of the γFe2O3 during culture. The microraft surface geometry and physical properties were altered by varying the polymer concentration or layering different polymers during fabrication. Cells plated on the magnetic microrafts were visualized using standard imaging techniques including brightfield, epifluorescence, and confocal microscopy. Magnetic microrafts possessing cells of interest were dislodged from the array and efficiently collected with an external magnet. To demonstrate the feasibility of cell isolation using the magnetic microrafts, a mixed population of wild-type cells and cells stably transfected with a fluorescent protein was plated onto an array. Microrafts possessing single, fluorescent cells were released from the array and magnetically collected. A post-sorting single-cell cloning rate of 92% and a purity of 100% were attained. PMID:22007266

  9. Fucoidans Disrupt Adherence of Helicobacter pylori to AGS Cells In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Chua, Eng-Guan; Verbrugghe, Phebe; Perkins, Timothy T; Tay, Chin-Yen

    2015-01-01

    Fucoidans are complex sulphated polysaccharides derived from abundant and edible marine algae. Helicobacter pylori is a stomach pathogen that persists in the hostile milieu of the human stomach unless treated with antibiotics. This study aims to provide preliminary data to determine, in vitro, if fucoidans can inhibit the growth of H. pylori and its ability to adhere to gastric epithelial cells (AGS). We analysed the activity of three different fucoidan preparations (Fucus A, Fucus B, and Undaria extracts). Bacterial growth was not arrested or inhibited by the fucoidan preparations supplemented into culture media. All fucoidans, when supplemented into tissue culture media at 1000 µg mL(-1), were toxic to AGS cells and reduced the viable cell count significantly. Fucoidan preparations at 100 µg mL(-1) were shown to significantly reduce the number of adherent H. pylori. These in vitro findings provide the basis for further studies on the clinical use of sulphated polysaccharides as complementary therapeutic agents. PMID:26604968

  10. Non-adherent culture induces paclitaxel resistance in H460 lung cancer cells via ERK-mediated up-regulation of βIVa-tubulin.

    PubMed

    Atjanasuppat, Korakot; Lirdprapamongkol, Kriengsak; Jantaree, Phatcharida; Svasti, Jisnuson

    2015-10-23

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are metastasizing epithelial cancer cells that adapt to survive when floating in bloodstream during metastasis. This condition can be mimicked in vitro by using non-adherent cell culture. The chemosensitivity of CTCs appears to correlate with the response of metastatic cancer patients to therapy, but chemoresistance is also frequently observed in advanced stage cancer patients, who have never previously received chemotherapy. We hypothesize that adaptation of epithelial cancer cells to become floating CTCs could lead to development of chemoresistance. Here, we explore whether chemoresistance is induced in epithelial cancer cells when cultured under non-adherent conditions. Increased paclitaxel-specific resistance was observed in floating cells compared to attached cells in H460, MCF-7, and HepG2 human cancer cell lines, by 15.6-, 3.9-, and 2.6-fold increases in IC50 values, respectively. qRT-PCR analysis showed that a paclitaxel-resistant β-tubulin isotype, βIVa-tubulin, was the most up-regulated gene compared with other β-tubulin isotypes in H460 floating cells, concomitant with elevated ERK activation. ERK inhibitor treatment could attenuate the up-regulation of βIVa-tubulin, and decreased the paclitaxel resistance of H460 floating cells, even though other β-tubulin isotypes were up-regulated when the ERK activation was blocked. In conclusion, we show induction of paclitaxel resistance in epithelial cancer cells, when floating in non-adherent culture, and this might occur with CTCs of cancer patients.

  11. Development of a cell line from the American eel brain expressing endothelial cell properties.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Sophia R; Vo, Nguyen T K; Walsh, Sarah K; Chen, Cici; Lee, Lucy E J; Hodson, Peter V; Bols, Niels C

    2016-04-01

    A cell line (eelB) was developed from the outgrowth of adherent cells from brain explants of the American eel, Anguilla rostrata (Lesueur). EelB cells have been grown routinely in L-15 with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS), undergone over 100 passages, and cryopreserved successfully. The cells from late-passage cultures (>45) were polygonal, formed capillary-like structures (CLS) on Matrigel, and stained immunocytochemically for von Willebrand factor (vWF) and for three tight junction proteins, zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), claudin 3, and claudin 5. These results suggest that eelB is an endothelial cell line, one of the few from fish and the first from the brain. Despite this, eelB did not respond to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) with the induction of CYP1A protein. The cells from early-passage cultures (<20) had more varied shapes and did not form CLS on Matrigel. Only cells from early-passage cultures formed in suspension three-dimensional aggregates that had some cells expressing alkaline phosphatase and nestin. These cells are thought to be neural stem cells and the aggregates neurospheres. The emergence of endothelial-like cells upon the continued subcultivation of cells from early-passage cultures that had neural stem cells has been described previously for mammals, but this is a first for teleosts. Remarkably, cells from all passage levels were stained strongly for senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA β-Gal) activity.

  12. Acinetobacter baumannii and A. pittii clinical isolates lack adherence and cytotoxicity to lung epithelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lázaro-Díez, María; Navascués-Lejarza, Teresa; Remuzgo-Martínez, Sara; Navas, Jesús; Icardo, José Manuel; Acosta, Felix; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Ramos-Vivas, José

    2016-09-01

    The molecular and genetic basis of Acinetobacter baumannii and Acinetobacter pittii virulence remains poorly understood, and there is still lack of knowledge in host cell response to these bacteria. In this study, we have used eleven clinical Acinetobacter strains (A. baumannii n = 5; A. pittii n = 6) to unravel bacterial adherence, invasion and cytotoxicity to human lung epithelial cells. Our results showed that adherence to epithelial cells by Acinetobacter strains is scarce and cellular invasion was not truly detected. In addition, all Acinetobacter strains failed to induce any cytotoxic effect on A549 cells.

  13. Surfactant protein D inhibits adherence of uropathogenic Escherichia coli to the bladder epithelial cells and the bacterium-induced cytotoxicity: a possible function in urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Kurimura, Yuichiro; Nishitani, Chiaki; Ariki, Shigeru; Saito, Atsushi; Hasegawa, Yoshihiro; Takahashi, Motoko; Hashimoto, Jiro; Takahashi, Satoshi; Tsukamoto, Taiji; Kuroki, Yoshio

    2012-11-16

    The adherence of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) to the host urothelial surface is the first step for establishing UPEC infection. Uroplakin Ia (UPIa), a glycoprotein expressed on bladder urothelium, serves as a receptor for FimH, a lectin located at bacterial pili, and their interaction initiates UPEC infection. Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is known to be expressed on mucosal surfaces in various tissues besides the lung. However, the functions of SP-D in the non-pulmonary tissues are poorly understood. The purposes of this study were to investigate the possible function of SP-D expressed in the bladder urothelium and the mechanisms by which SP-D functions. SP-D was expressed in human bladder mucosa, and its mRNA was increased in the bladder of the UPEC infection model in mice. SP-D directly bound to UPEC and strongly agglutinated them in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. Co-incubation of SP-D with UPEC decreased the bacterial adherence to 5637 cells, the human bladder cell line, and the UPEC-induced cytotoxicity. In addition, preincubation of SP-D with 5637 cells resulted in the decreased adherence of UPEC to the cells and in a reduced number of cells injured by UPEC. SP-D directly bound to UPIa and competed with FimH for UPIa binding. Consistent with the in vitro data, the exogenous administration of SP-D inhibited UPEC adherence to the bladder and dampened UPEC-induced inflammation in mice. These results support the conclusion that SP-D can protect the bladder urothelium against UPEC infection and suggest a possible function of SP-D in urinary tract.

  14. In vitro adherence patterns of Shigella serogroups to bovine recto-anal junction squamous epithelial (RSE) cells are similar to those of Escherichia coli O157

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this study was to determine whether Shigella species, which are human gastrointestinal pathogens, can adhere to cattle recto-anal junction squamous epithelial (RSE) cells using a recently standardized adherence assay, and to compare their adherence patterns to that of Escherichia coli O15...

  15. Characterization of the Murine Myeloid Precursor Cell Line MuMac-E8

    PubMed Central

    Fricke, Stephan; Riemschneider, Sina; Kohlschmidt, Janine; Hilger, Nadja; Fueldner, Christiane; Knauer, Jens; Sack, Ulrich; Emmrich, Frank; Lehmann, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Starting point for the present work was the assumption that the cell line MuMac-E8 represents a murine cell population with stem cell properties. Preliminary studies already pointed to the expression of stem-cell associated markers and a self-regenerative potential of the cells. The cell line MuMac-E8 should be examined for their differential stage within stem cell hierarchy. MuMac-E8 cells were derived from a chimeric mouse model of arthritis. It could be shown that MuMac-E8 cells express mRNA of some genes associated with pluripotent stem cells (Nanog, Nucleostemin), of genes for hematopoietic markers (EPCR, Sca-1, CD11b, CD45), for the mesenchymal marker CD105 and of genes for the neural markers Pax-6 and Ezrin. In methylcellulose and May-Grünwald-Giemsa staining, hematopoietic colonies were obtained but the hematopoietic system of lethally irradiated mice could not be rescued. Osteogenic differentiation was not detectable. Thus, it became evident that MuMac-E8 represents not a stem cell line. However, MuMac-E8 cells expressed several myeloid surface markers (i.e. CD11b, F4/80, CD14, CD64), showed phagocytosis and is capable of producing nitric oxide. Thus, this cell line seems to be arrested an advanced stage of myeloid differentiation. Adherence data measured by impedance-based real-time cell analysis together with cell morphology data suggested that MuMac-E8 represents a new macrophage precursor cell line exhibiting weak adherence. This cell line is suitable as an in-vitro model for testing of macrophage functions. Moreover, it might be also useful for differentiation or reprogramming studies. PMID:25546418

  16. Characterization of the murine myeloid precursor cell line MuMac-E8.

    PubMed

    Fricke, Stephan; Pfefferkorn, Cathleen; Wolf, Doris; Riemschneider, Sina; Kohlschmidt, Janine; Hilger, Nadja; Fueldner, Christiane; Knauer, Jens; Sack, Ulrich; Emmrich, Frank; Lehmann, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Starting point for the present work was the assumption that the cell line MuMac-E8 represents a murine cell population with stem cell properties. Preliminary studies already pointed to the expression of stem-cell associated markers and a self-regenerative potential of the cells. The cell line MuMac-E8 should be examined for their differential stage within stem cell hierarchy. MuMac-E8 cells were derived from a chimeric mouse model of arthritis. It could be shown that MuMac-E8 cells express mRNA of some genes associated with pluripotent stem cells (Nanog, Nucleostemin), of genes for hematopoietic markers (EPCR, Sca-1, CD11b, CD45), for the mesenchymal marker CD105 and of genes for the neural markers Pax-6 and Ezrin. In methylcellulose and May-Grünwald-Giemsa staining, hematopoietic colonies were obtained but the hematopoietic system of lethally irradiated mice could not be rescued. Osteogenic differentiation was not detectable. Thus, it became evident that MuMac-E8 represents not a stem cell line. However, MuMac-E8 cells expressed several myeloid surface markers (i.e. CD11b, F4/80, CD14, CD64), showed phagocytosis and is capable of producing nitric oxide. Thus, this cell line seems to be arrested an advanced stage of myeloid differentiation. Adherence data measured by impedance-based real-time cell analysis together with cell morphology data suggested that MuMac-E8 represents a new macrophage precursor cell line exhibiting weak adherence. This cell line is suitable as an in-vitro model for testing of macrophage functions. Moreover, it might be also useful for differentiation or reprogramming studies.

  17. The role of alginate in Pseudomonas aeruginosa EPS adherence, viscoelastic properties and cell attachment.

    PubMed

    Orgad, Oded; Oren, Yoram; Walker, Sharon L; Herzberg, Moshe

    2011-08-01

    Among various functions, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) provide microbial biofilms with mechanical stability and affect initial cell attachment, the first stage in the biofilm formation process. The role of alginate, an abundant polysaccharide in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms, in the viscoelastic properties and adhesion kinetics of EPS was analyzed using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) monitoring technology. EPS was extracted from two P. aeruginosa biofilms, a wild type strain, PAO1, and a mucoid strain, PAOmucA22 that over-expresses alginate production. The higher alginate content in the EPS originating from the mucoid biofilms was clearly shown to increase both the rate and the extent of attachment of the EPS, as well as the layer's thickness. Also, the presence of calcium and elevated ionic strength increased the thickness of the EPS layer. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) showed that the presence of calcium and elevated ionic strength induced intermolecular attractive interactions in the mucoid EPS molecules. For the wild type EPS, in the presence of calcium, an elevated shift in the distribution of the diffusion coefficients was observed with DLS due to a more compacted conformation of the EPS molecules. Moreover, the alginate over-expression effect on EPS adherence was compared to the effect of alginate over-expression on P. aeruginosa cell attachment. In a parallel plate flow cell, under similar hydraulic and aquatic conditions as those applied for the EPS adsorption tests in the QCM-D flow cell, reduced adherence of the mucoid strain was clearly observed compared to the wild type isogenic bacteria. The results suggest that alginate contributes to steric hindrance and shielding of cell surface features and adhesins that are known to promote cell attachment.

  18. Morphological changes in amphibian and fish cell lines infected with Andrias davidianus ranavirus.

    PubMed

    Gao, X C; Chen, Z Y; Yuan, J D; Zhang, Q Y

    2015-01-01

    Andrias davidianus ranavirus (ADRV) is an emerging viral pathogen that causes severe disease in Chinese giant salamanders, the largest extant amphibian in the world. A fish cell line, Epithelioma papulosum cyprinid (EPC), and a new amphibian cell line, Chinese giant salamander spleen cell (GSSC), were infected with ADRV and observed by light and electron microscopy. The morphological changes in these two cell lines infected with ADRV were compared. Cytopathic effect (CPE) began with rounding of the cells, progressing to cell detachment in the cell monolayer, followed by cell lysis. Significant CPE was visualized as early as 24 h post infection (hpi) in EPC cells and at 36 hpi in GSSC cells. Microscopical examination showed clear and significant CPE in EPC cells, while less extensive and irregular CPE with some adherent cells remaining was observed in GSSC cells. Following ADRV infection, CPE became more extensive. Transmission electron micrographs showed many virus particles around cytoplasmic vacuoles, formed as crystalline arrays or scattered in the cytoplasm of infected cells. Infected cells showed alteration in nuclear morphology, with condensed and marginalized nuclear chromatin on the inner aspect of the nuclear membrane and formation of a cytoplasmic viromatrix adjacent to the nucleus in both cell lines. Some virus particles were also detected in the nucleus of infected GSSC cells. Both cell lines are able to support replication of ADRV and can therefore be used to investigate amphibian ranaviruses.

  19. Lactobacilli Interfere with Streptococcus pyogenes Hemolytic Activity and Adherence to Host Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Saroj, Sunil D; Maudsdotter, Lisa; Tavares, Raquel; Jonsson, Ann-Beth

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes [Group A streptococcus (GAS)], a frequent colonizer of the respiratory tract mucosal surface, causes a variety of human diseases, ranging from pharyngitis to the life-threatening streptococcal toxic shock-like syndrome. Lactobacilli have been demonstrated to colonize the respiratory tract. In this study, we investigated the interference of lactobacilli with the virulence phenotypes of GAS. The Lactobacillus strains L. rhamnosus Kx151A1 and L. reuteri PTA-5289, but not L. salivarius LMG9477, inhibited the hemolytic activity of S. pyogenes S165. The inhibition of hemolytic activity was attributed to a decrease in the production of streptolysin S (SLS). Conditioned medium (CM) from the growth of L. rhamnosus Kx151A1 and L. reuteri PTA-5289 was sufficient to down-regulate the expression of the sag operon, encoding SLS. The Lactobacillus strains L. rhamnosus Kx151A1, L. reuteri PTA-5289, and L. salivarius LMG9477 inhibited the initial adherence of GAS to host epithelial cells. Intriguingly, competition with a combination of Lactobacillus species reduced GAS adherence to host cells most efficiently. The data suggest that an effector molecule released from certain Lactobacillus strains attenuates the production of SLS at the transcriptional level and that combinations of Lactobacillus strains may protect the pharyngeal mucosa more efficiently from the initial colonization of GAS. The effector molecules released from Lactobacillus strains affecting the virulence phenotypes of pathogens hold potential in the development of a new generation of therapeutics. PMID:27524981

  20. An optical pressure chamber designed for high numerical aperture studies on adherent living cells.

    PubMed

    Pagliaro, L; Reitz, F; Wang, J

    1995-06-01

    We have developed an optical pressure chamber designed for use with high numerical aperture oil immersion microscope objectives at working pressures up to 1,000 psi (67 atm abs). The chamber is optimized for studies of living, adherent, cultured mammalian cells using high resolution epifluorescence and phase contrast microscopy, and biophysical techniques such as fluorescence redistribution after photobleaching and optical trapping. The primary optical window assembly of the chamber can be removed and placed into a standard 35-mm tissue culture dish, allowing for culture, microinjection, and micromanipulation of adherent cells before they are loaded into the chamber. The chamber is designed to fit into a commercially available stage heater for temperature control, and we used a computer-controlled high pressure liquid chromatography pump for pressure control. A graphic software interface allows the user to program "dive" profiles and to link temperature and pressure data with digital image files of specimens under study. A minor modification of the present design will allow perfusion at high pressure. PMID:7633279

  1. Lactobacilli Interfere with Streptococcus pyogenes Hemolytic Activity and Adherence to Host Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Saroj, Sunil D; Maudsdotter, Lisa; Tavares, Raquel; Jonsson, Ann-Beth

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes [Group A streptococcus (GAS)], a frequent colonizer of the respiratory tract mucosal surface, causes a variety of human diseases, ranging from pharyngitis to the life-threatening streptococcal toxic shock-like syndrome. Lactobacilli have been demonstrated to colonize the respiratory tract. In this study, we investigated the interference of lactobacilli with the virulence phenotypes of GAS. The Lactobacillus strains L. rhamnosus Kx151A1 and L. reuteri PTA-5289, but not L. salivarius LMG9477, inhibited the hemolytic activity of S. pyogenes S165. The inhibition of hemolytic activity was attributed to a decrease in the production of streptolysin S (SLS). Conditioned medium (CM) from the growth of L. rhamnosus Kx151A1 and L. reuteri PTA-5289 was sufficient to down-regulate the expression of the sag operon, encoding SLS. The Lactobacillus strains L. rhamnosus Kx151A1, L. reuteri PTA-5289, and L. salivarius LMG9477 inhibited the initial adherence of GAS to host epithelial cells. Intriguingly, competition with a combination of Lactobacillus species reduced GAS adherence to host cells most efficiently. The data suggest that an effector molecule released from certain Lactobacillus strains attenuates the production of SLS at the transcriptional level and that combinations of Lactobacillus strains may protect the pharyngeal mucosa more efficiently from the initial colonization of GAS. The effector molecules released from Lactobacillus strains affecting the virulence phenotypes of pathogens hold potential in the development of a new generation of therapeutics.

  2. Lactobacilli Interfere with Streptococcus pyogenes Hemolytic Activity and Adherence to Host Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Saroj, Sunil D.; Maudsdotter, Lisa; Tavares, Raquel; Jonsson, Ann-Beth

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes [Group A streptococcus (GAS)], a frequent colonizer of the respiratory tract mucosal surface, causes a variety of human diseases, ranging from pharyngitis to the life-threatening streptococcal toxic shock-like syndrome. Lactobacilli have been demonstrated to colonize the respiratory tract. In this study, we investigated the interference of lactobacilli with the virulence phenotypes of GAS. The Lactobacillus strains L. rhamnosus Kx151A1 and L. reuteri PTA-5289, but not L. salivarius LMG9477, inhibited the hemolytic activity of S. pyogenes S165. The inhibition of hemolytic activity was attributed to a decrease in the production of streptolysin S (SLS). Conditioned medium (CM) from the growth of L. rhamnosus Kx151A1 and L. reuteri PTA-5289 was sufficient to down-regulate the expression of the sag operon, encoding SLS. The Lactobacillus strains L. rhamnosus Kx151A1, L. reuteri PTA-5289, and L. salivarius LMG9477 inhibited the initial adherence of GAS to host epithelial cells. Intriguingly, competition with a combination of Lactobacillus species reduced GAS adherence to host cells most efficiently. The data suggest that an effector molecule released from certain Lactobacillus strains attenuates the production of SLS at the transcriptional level and that combinations of Lactobacillus strains may protect the pharyngeal mucosa more efficiently from the initial colonization of GAS. The effector molecules released from Lactobacillus strains affecting the virulence phenotypes of pathogens hold potential in the development of a new generation of therapeutics. PMID:27524981

  3. Viability of adhered bacterial cells: tracking MinD protein oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Matt; Colville, Keegan; Schultz-Nielsen, Chris; Jericho, Manfred; Dutcher, John

    2010-03-01

    To study bacterial cells using atomic force microscopy, it is necessary to immobilize the cells on a substrate. Because bacterial cells and common substrates such as glass and mica have a net negative charge, positively charged polymers such as poly-L-lysine (PLL) and polyethyleneimine (PEI) are commonly used as adhesion layers. However, the use of adhesion polymers could stress the cell and even render it inviable. Viable E. coli cells use oscillations of Min proteins along the axis of the rod-shaped cells to ensure accurate cell division. By tagging MinD proteins with GFP, oscillations can be observed using fluorescence microscopy. For a healthy cell in an ideal environment, the oscillation period is measured to be ˜40 s. Prior experiments have shown that PLL increases the oscillation period significantly (up to 80%). In the present study, we have used epifluorescence and total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) to track MinD protein oscillations in E. coli bacteria adhered to a variety of positively charged polymers on mica as a function of polymer surface coverage.

  4. Effect of Iron on Adherence and Cytotoxicity of Entamoeba histolytica to CHO Cell Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jongweon; Park, Soon-Jung

    2008-01-01

    Iron is an essential element for almost all living organisms. The possible role of iron for growth, adherence and cytotoxicity of Entamoeba histolytica was evaluated in this study. The absence of iron from TYI-S-33 medium stopped amebic growth in vitro. However, iron concentrations in the culture media of 21.4-285.6 µM did not affect the growth of the amebae. Although growth was not retarded at these concentrations, the adhesive abilities of E. histolytica and their cytotoxicities to CHO cell monolayer were correlated with iron concentration. Amebic adhesion to CHO cell monolayers was significantly reduced by low-iron (24.6 ± 2.1%) compared with 62.7 ± 2.8 and 63.1 ± 1.4% of amebae grown in a normal-iron and high-iron media, respectively. E. histolytica cultured in the normal- and high-iron media destroyed 69.1 ± 4.3% and 72.6 ± 5.7% of cultured CHO cell monolayers, but amebae grown in the low-iron medium showed a significantly reduced level of cytotoxicity to CHO cells (2.8 ± 0.2%). Addition of divalent cations other than iron to amebic trophozoites grown in the low-iron medium failed to restore levels of the cytotoxicity. However, when E. histolytica grown in low-iron medium were transferred to normal-iron medium, the amebae showed completely restored cytotoxicity within 7 days. The result suggests that iron is an important factor in the adherence and cytotoxicity of E. histolytica to CHO cell monolayer. PMID:18344676

  5. Muscle-derived stem cells isolated as non-adherent population give rise to cardiac, skeletal muscle and neural lineages

    SciTech Connect

    Arsic, Nikola; Mamaeva, Daria; Lamb, Ned J.; Fernandez, Anne

    2008-04-01

    Stem cells with the ability to differentiate in specialized cell types can be extracted from a wide array of adult tissues including skeletal muscle. Here we have analyzed a population of cells isolated from skeletal muscle on the basis of their poor adherence on uncoated or collagen-coated dishes that show multi-lineage differentiation in vitro. When analysed under proliferative conditions, these cells express stem cell surface markers Sca-1 (65%) and Bcrp-1 (80%) but also MyoD (15%), Neuronal {beta} III-tubulin (25%), GFAP (30%) or Nkx2.5 (1%). Although capable of growing as non-attached spheres for months, when given an appropriate matrix, these cells adhere giving rise to skeletal muscle, neuronal and cardiac muscle cell lineages. A similar cell population could not be isolated from either bone marrow or cardiac tissue suggesting their specificity to skeletal muscle. When injected into damaged muscle, these non-adherent muscle-derived cells are retrieved expressing Pax7, in a sublaminar position characterizing satellite cells and participate in forming new myofibers. These data show that a non-adherent stem cell population can be specifically isolated and expanded from skeletal muscle and upon attachment to a matrix spontaneously differentiate into muscle, cardiac and neuronal lineages in vitro. Although competing with resident satellite cells, these cells are shown to significantly contribute to repair of injured muscle in vivo supporting that a similar muscle-derived non-adherent cell population from human muscle may be useful in treatment of neuromuscular disorders.

  6. Silencing the ap65 gene reduces adherence to vaginal epithelial cells by Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Mundodi, V; Kucknoor, A S; Klumpp, D J; Chang, T-H; Alderete, J F

    2004-08-01

    Host parasitism by Trichomonas vaginalis is complex and in part mediated by adherence to vaginal epithelial cells (VECs). Four trichomonad surface proteins bind VECs as adhesins, and AP65 is a major adhesin with sequence identity to an enzyme of the hydrogenosome organelle that is involved in energy generation. In order to perform genetic analysis and assess the role of AP65 in T. vaginalis adherence, we silenced expression of ap65 using antisense RNA. The gene for ap65 was inserted into the vector pBS-neo in sense and antisense orientations to generate plasmids pBS-neoS (S) and pBS-neoAS (AS), respectively. Trichomonads were then transfected with S and AS plasmids for selection of stable transfectants using Geneticin, and the presence of plasmid in transfectants was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction of the neo gene. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Northern blot analysis showed decreased amounts of ap65 transcript in AS transfected parasites. Growth kinetics of the antisense-transfected and wild type organisms were similar, suggesting that silencing AP65 did not affect overall energy generation for growth. Immunoblot analysis using monoclonal antibody (mAb) to AP65 of AS transfectants showed decreased amounts of AP65 when compared to wild type or S transfectants. Not unexpectedly, this corresponded to decreased amounts of AP65 bound to VECs in a functional ligand assay. Reduction in parasite surface expression of AP65 was related to lower levels of adherence to VECs by AS-transfectants compared to control organisms. Antisense silencing of ap65 was not alleviated by growth of trichomonads in high iron, which up-regulates transcription of ap65. Our work reaffirms the role for AP65 as an adhesin, and in addition, we demonstrate antisense RNA gene silencing in T. vaginalis to study the contribution of specific genes in pathogenesis. PMID:15306014

  7. The HAART cell phone adherence trial (WelTel Kenya1): a randomized controlled trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    Lester, Richard T; Mills, Edward J; Kariri, Antony; Ritvo, Paul; Chung, Michael; Jack, William; Habyarimana, James; Karanja, Sarah; Barasa, Samson; Nguti, Rosemary; Estambale, Benson; Ngugi, Elizabeth; Ball, T Blake; Thabane, Lehana; Kimani, Joshua; Gelmon, Lawrence; Ackers, Marta; Plummer, Francis A

    2009-01-01

    Background The objectives are to compare the effectiveness of cell phone-supported SMS messaging to standard care on adherence, quality of life, retention, and mortality in a population receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Nairobi, Kenya. Methods and Design A multi-site randomized controlled open-label trial. A central randomization centre provided opaque envelopes to allocate treatments. Patients initiating ART at three comprehensive care clinics in Kenya will be randomized to receive either a structured weekly SMS ('short message system' or text message) slogan (the intervention) or current standard of care support mechanisms alone (the control). Our hypothesis is that using a structured mobile phone protocol to keep in touch with patients will improve adherence to ART and other patient outcomes. Participants are evaluated at baseline, and then at six and twelve months after initiating ART. The care providers keep a weekly study log of all phone based communications with study participants. Primary outcomes are self-reported adherence to ART and suppression of HIV viral load at twelve months scheduled follow-up. Secondary outcomes are improvements in health, quality of life, social and economic factors, and retention on ART. Primary analysis is by 'intention-to-treat'. Sensitivity analysis will be used to assess per-protocol effects. Analysis of covariates will be undertaken to determine factors that contribute or deter from expected and determined outcomes. Discussion This study protocol tests whether a novel structured mobile phone intervention can positively contribute to ART management in a resource-limited setting. Trial Registration Trial Registration Number: NCT00830622 PMID:19772596

  8. Silencing the ap65 gene reduces adherence to vaginal epithelial cells by Trichomonas vaginalis

    PubMed Central

    Mundodi, V.; Kucknoor, A. S.; Klumpp, D. J.; Chang, T.-H.; Alderete, J. F.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Host parasitism by Trichomonas vaginalis is complex and in part mediated by adherence to vaginal epithelial cells (VECs). Four trichomonad surface proteins bind VECs as adhesins, and AP65 is a major adhesin with sequence identity to an enzyme of the hydrogenosome organelle that is involved in energy generation. In order to perform genetic analysis and assess the role of AP65 in T. vaginalis adherence, we silenced expression of ap65 using antisense RNA. The gene for ap65 was inserted into the vector pBS-neo in sense and antisense orientations to generate plasmids pBS-neoS (S) and pBS-neoAS (AS), respectively. Trichomonads were then transfected with S and AS plasmids for selection of stable transfectants using Geneticin, and the presence of plasmid in transfectants was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction of the neo gene. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Northern blot analysis showed decreased amounts of ap65 transcript in AS transfected parasites. Growth kinetics of the antisense-transfected and wild type organisms were similar, suggesting that silencing AP65 did not affect overall energy generation for growth. Immunoblot analysis using monoclonal antibody (mAb) to AP65 of AS transfectants showed decreased amounts of AP65 when compared to wild type or S transfectants. Not unexpectedly, this corresponded to decreased amounts of AP65 bound to VECs in a functional ligand assay. Reduction in parasite surface expression of AP65 was related to lower levels of adherence to VECs by AS-transfectants compared to control organisms. Antisense silencing of ap65 was not alleviated by growth of trichomonads in high iron, which up-regulates transcription of ap65. Our work reaffirms the role for AP65 as an adhesin, and in addition, we demonstrate antisense RNA gene silencing in T. vaginalis to study the contribution of specific genes in pathogenesis. PMID:15306014

  9. Whole-cell biosensor for label-free detection of GPCR-mediated drug responses in personal cell lines.

    PubMed

    Hillger, Julia M; Schoop, Jeffison; Boomsma, Dorret I; Slagboom, P Eline; IJzerman, Adriaan P; Heitman, Laura H

    2015-12-15

    Deciphering how genetic variation in drug targets such as G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) affects drug response is essential for precision medicine. GPCR signaling is traditionally investigated in artificial cell lines which do not provide sufficient physiological context. Patient-derived cell lines such as lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) could represent the ideal cellular model system. Here we describe a novel label-free, whole-cell biosensor method for characterizing GPCR-mediated drug responses in LCLs. Generally, such biosensor technology is deemed only compatible with adherent cell lines. We optimized and applied the methodology to study cellular adhesion properties as well as GPCR drug responses in LCLs, which are suspension cells. Coating the detector surface with the extracellular matrix protein fibronectin resulted in cell adherence and allowed detection of cellular responses. A prototypical GPCR present on these cells, i.e. the cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2), was selected for pharmacological characterization. Receptor activation with the agonist JWH133, blockade by antagonist AM630 as well as downstream signaling inhibition by PTX could be monitored sensitively and receptor-specifically. Potencies and effects were comparable between LCLs of two genetically unrelated individuals, providing the proof-of-principle that this biosensor technology can be applied to LCLs, despite their suspension cell nature, in order to serve as an in vitro model system for the evaluation of individual genetic influences on GPCR-mediated drug responses.

  10. Flow-induced detachment of red blood cells adhering to surfaces by specific antigen-antibody bonds.

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Z; Goldsmith, H L; van de Ven, T G

    1994-01-01

    Fixed spherical swollen human red blood cells of blood type B adhering on a glass surface through antigen-antibody bonds to monoclonal mouse antihuman IgM, adsorbed or covalently linked on the surface, were detached by known hydrodynamic forces created in an impinging jet. The dynamic process of detachment of the specifically bound cells was recorded and analyzed. The fraction of adherent cells remaining on the surface decreased with increasing hydrodynamic force. For an IgM coverage of 0.26%, a tangential force on the order of 100 pN was able to detach almost all of the cells from the surface within 20 min. After a given time of exposure to hydrodynamic force, the fraction of adherent cells remaining increased with time, reflecting an increase in adhesion strength. The characteristic time for effective aging was approximately 4 h. Results from experiments in which the adsorbed antibody molecules were immobilized through covalent coupling and from evanescent wave light scattering of adherent cells, imply that deformation of red cells at the contact area was the principal cause for aging, rather than local clustering of the antibody through surface diffusion. Experiments with latex beads specifically bound to red blood cells suggest that, instead of breaking the antigen-antibody bonds, antigen molecules were extracted from the cell membrane during detachment. Images FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 PMID:8038393

  11. NLRP3 protects alveolar barrier integrity by an inflammasome-independent increase of epithelial cell adherence

    PubMed Central

    Kostadinova, Elena; Chaput, Catherine; Gutbier, Birgitt; Lippmann, Juliane; Sander, Leif E.; Mitchell, Timothy J.; Suttorp, Norbert; Witzenrath, Martin; Opitz, Bastian

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is a major cause of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome, characterized by alveolar barrier disruption. NLRP3 is best known for its ability to form inflammasomes and to regulate IL-1β and IL-18 production in myeloid cells. Here we show that NLRP3 protects the integrity of the alveolar barrier in a mouse model of Streptococcus pneumoniae-induced pneumonia, and ex vivo upon treatment of isolated perfused and ventilated lungs with the purified bacterial toxin, pneumolysin. We reveal that the preserving effect of NLRP3 on the lung barrier is independent of inflammasomes, IL-1β and IL-18. NLRP3 improves the integrity of alveolar epithelial cell monolayers by enhancing cellular adherence. Collectively, our study uncovers a novel function of NLRP3 by demonstrating that it protects epithelial barrier function independently of inflammasomes. PMID:27476670

  12. Mechanical Restrictions on Biological Responses by Adherent Cells within Collagen Gels

    PubMed Central

    Simon, D.D.; Horgan, C.O.; Humphrey, J.D.

    2012-01-01

    Cell-seeded collagen and fibrin gels represent excellent assays for studying interactions between adherent interstitial cells and the three-dimensional extracellular matrix in which they reside. Over one hundred papers have employed the free-floating collagen gel assay alone since its introduction in 1979 and much has been learned about mechanobiological responses of diverse types of cells. Yet, given that mechanobiology is the study of biological responses by cells to mechanical stimuli that must respect the basic laws of mechanics, we must quantify better the mechanical conditions that are imposed on or arise in cell-seeded gels. In this paper, we suggest that cell responses and associated changes in matrix organization within the classical free-floating gel assay are highly restricted by the mechanics. In particular, many salient but heretofore unexplained or misinterpreted observations in free-floating gels can be understood in terms of apparent cell-mediated residual stress fields that satisfy quasi-static equilibria and continuity of tractions. There is a continuing need, therefore, to bring together the allied fields of mechanobiology and biomechanics as we continue to elucidate cellular function within both native connective tissues and tissue equivalents that are used in basic scientific investigations or regenerative medicine. PMID:23022259

  13. Investigation on cytoskeleton dynamics for non-adherent cells under point-like stimuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miccio, Lisa; Memmolo, Pasquale; Merola, Francesco; Mugnano, Martina; Fusco, Sabato; Paciello, Antonio; Ferraro, Pietro; Netti, Paolo A.

    2015-05-01

    In the present paper, Holographic Optical Tweezers (HOT) is employed to trap and manage functionalized micrometric latex beads with the aim at probing cellular forces in no-adherent state. For the first time at best of our knowledge, a suspended cell, subjected to mechanical stress, structures its cytoskeleton when anchored to point-like bonds. We exploit the HOT arrangement to induce mechanical deformation in suspended NIH 3T3 fibroblast. Our investigation is devoted to understand the inner cell mechanism when it is mechanically stressed by point-like stimulus without the substrate influence. In our experiment, cell adhesion is prevented and the stimulus is applied through latex beads trapped by HOT and positioned externally to the cell membrane. Our aims are devoted to analyze cell response during the transition from an homogeneous and isotropic structure (as it's in suspension) to a mechanically stressed state. To analyze the cell material interaction we combine the HOT arrangement with two imaging systems: a Digital Holography (DH) setup in microscope configuration that is an investigation method useful for quantitative, label-free and full-field analysis of low contrast object and a fluorescence modulus. HOT are exploited to induce cellular response to specific stimuli while DH allows to measure such responses in no-invasive way. Finally, fluorescence imaging is added to discriminate the inner cell structures.

  14. Laser-generated Micro-bubbles for Molecular Delivery to Adherent Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genc, Suzanne Lee

    We examine the use of optical breakdown in aqueous media as a means to deliver molecules into live adherent cell cultures. This process, called optoinjection (OI), is affected both by the media composition and the cellular exposure to hydrodynamic stresses associated with the cavitation bubble formed by the optical breakdown process. Here we explore the possibility of performing OI using laser microbeams focused at low numerical aperture to provide conditions where OI can be performed at high-throughput. We first investigate the effect of media composition on plasma and cavitation bubble formation. We make the discovery that irradiation of minimal essential media, supports the formation of low-density plasmas (LDP) resulting in the generation of small (2--20 mum radius) cavitation bubbles. This provides gentle specific hydrodynamic perturbations to single or small groups of cells. The addition of supplemental fetal bovine serum to the medium prevents the formation LDPs and the resulting avalanche ionization generates larger (> 100 mum radius) bubbles and more violent hydrodynamic effects. Second, using high-speed photography we provide the first visualization of LDP-generated cavitation bubbles at precise offset locations relative to a boundary on which a cell monolayer can be cultured. These images depict the cellular exposure to different hydrodynamic conditions depending on the normalized offset distance (gamma = s/Rmax) and show how it affects the cellular exposure to shear stresses upon bubble expansion and different distributions of bubble energy upon collapse. Lastly, we examine the effects of pulse energy, parameters, and single vs. multiple laser exposures on the ability to deliver 3-5 kDa dextrans into adherent cells using both small (< 20 mum) and large (100mu m) radius bubbles. For single exposures, we identify several conditions under which OI can be optimized: (a) conditions where cell viability is maximized (˜90%) but optoinjection of viable cells

  15. On-chip integrated lensless microscopy module for optical monitoring of adherent growing mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Knoll, Thorsten; Thielecke, Hagen

    2010-01-01

    Lab-on-a-chip systems are increasingly applied in cell-based assays for toxicology and drug testing. In this paper, an on-chip integrated lensless microscopy module using a direct projection method for optical monitoring of the shadow images of adherent growing mammalian cells is presented. The biological cells are conserved and interfaced by a microfabricated cavity chip with a 1 microm thick silicon nitride (Si(3)N(4)) substrate onto the surface of a 5 megapixel CMOS image sensor with 2.2 microm pixel size. The optical resolution of the assembly is estimated by the contact/proximate printing theory from optical lithography. Further characterization is made by imaging microbeads in chips with the Si(3)N(4)-membrane as well as in cavity chips with membranes made from dry film resist (DFR, thickness 20, 40 and 60 microm). The module represents a 3 × optical microscope for cell morphology imaging. The function is demonstrated by the growth monitoring of L929 cells cultured in cavity chips with Si(3)N(4) substrate for 2 days and by checking the colorimetric staining of cells with a compromised membrane. PMID:21096993

  16. Soluble fibrin augments platelet/tumor cell adherence in vitro and in vivo, and enhances experimental metastasis.

    PubMed

    Biggerstaff, J P; Seth, N; Amirkhosravi, A; Amaya, M; Fogarty, S; Meyer, T V; Siddiqui, F; Francis, J L

    1999-01-01

    There is considerable evidence for a relationship between hemostasis and malignancy. Since platelet adhesion to tumor cells has been implicated in the metastatic process and plasma levels of fibrinogen (Fg) and soluble fibrin (sFn) monomer are increased in cancer, we hypothesized that these molecules might enhance tumor-platelet interaction. We therefore studied binding of sFn monomer to tumor cells in a static microplate adhesion assay and determined the effect of pre-treating tumor cells with sFn on tumor cell-induced thrombocytopenia and experimental metastasis. Soluble fibrin (produced by adding thrombin to FXIII- and plasminogen-free Fg in the presence of Gly-Pro-Arg-Pro-amide (GPRP-NH2) significantly increased platelet adherence to tumor cells. This effect was primarily mediated by the integrins alphaIIb beta3 on the platelet and CD 54 (ICAM-1) on the tumor cells. Platelets adhered to untreated A375 cells (28 +/- 8 platelets/tumor cell) and this was not significantly affected by pre-treatment of the tumor cells with fibrinogen or GPRP-NH2. Although thrombin treatment increased adherence, pre-incubation of the tumor cells with sFn resulted in a further increase in platelet binding to tumor cells. In contrast to untreated tumor cells, intravenous injection of sFn-treated A 375 cells reduced the platelet count in anticoagulated mice, supporting the in vitro finding that sFn enhanced tumor cell-platelet adherence. In a more aggressive model of experimental metastasis, treating tumor cells with sFn enhanced lung seeding by 65% compared to untreated cells. Extrapolation of our data to the clinical situation suggests that coagulation activation, and subsequent increase in circulating Fn monomer, may enhance platelet adhesion to circulating tumor cells and thereby facilitate metastatic spread.

  17. Soluble fibrin augments platelet/tumor cell adherence in vitro and in vivo, and enhances experimental metastasis.

    PubMed

    Biggerstaff, J P; Seth, N; Amirkhosravi, A; Amaya, M; Fogarty, S; Meyer, T V; Siddiqui, F; Francis, J L

    1999-01-01

    There is considerable evidence for a relationship between hemostasis and malignancy. Since platelet adhesion to tumor cells has been implicated in the metastatic process and plasma levels of fibrinogen (Fg) and soluble fibrin (sFn) monomer are increased in cancer, we hypothesized that these molecules might enhance tumor-platelet interaction. We therefore studied binding of sFn monomer to tumor cells in a static microplate adhesion assay and determined the effect of pre-treating tumor cells with sFn on tumor cell-induced thrombocytopenia and experimental metastasis. Soluble fibrin (produced by adding thrombin to FXIII- and plasminogen-free Fg in the presence of Gly-Pro-Arg-Pro-amide (GPRP-NH2) significantly increased platelet adherence to tumor cells. This effect was primarily mediated by the integrins alphaIIb beta3 on the platelet and CD 54 (ICAM-1) on the tumor cells. Platelets adhered to untreated A375 cells (28 +/- 8 platelets/tumor cell) and this was not significantly affected by pre-treatment of the tumor cells with fibrinogen or GPRP-NH2. Although thrombin treatment increased adherence, pre-incubation of the tumor cells with sFn resulted in a further increase in platelet binding to tumor cells. In contrast to untreated tumor cells, intravenous injection of sFn-treated A 375 cells reduced the platelet count in anticoagulated mice, supporting the in vitro finding that sFn enhanced tumor cell-platelet adherence. In a more aggressive model of experimental metastasis, treating tumor cells with sFn enhanced lung seeding by 65% compared to untreated cells. Extrapolation of our data to the clinical situation suggests that coagulation activation, and subsequent increase in circulating Fn monomer, may enhance platelet adhesion to circulating tumor cells and thereby facilitate metastatic spread. PMID:10919717

  18. Adherent-phagocytic cells influence suppressed concanavalin-A induced proliferation of spleen lymphoid cells in copper deficient rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, T.R.; Briske-Anderson, M.; Johnson, W.T.

    1986-03-01

    Weanling male Lewis rats (N = 10/group) were fed ad-libitum for 42 days diets based on AIN standards containing 21% casein, 5% safflower oil, and deficient (0.6 ..mu..g/g) or adequate (5.6 ..mu..g/g) levels of cu. Cu-deficient rats showed typical biochemical and hematological changes. Immunological changes exhibited by Cu-deficient rats were influenced by the presence of splenic adherent-phagocytic cells (macrophage-like), but not by cytochrome-c oxidase activity of spleen lymphoid cells (SLC). Decreased proliferation was exhibited by concanavalin-A (Con-A) stimulated SLC of Cu-deficient rats. Following removal of plastic-adherent phagocytic cells from the SLC suspensions, equivalent proliferation was exhibited by Con-A stimulated nonadherent-SLC of Cu-deficient and Cu-adequate rats. Decreased cytochrome-c oxidase activity was exhibited by both unstimulated SLC and nonadherent-SLC of Cu-deficient rats, but decreased proliferation was exhibited only in Con-A stimulated SLC of Cu-deficient rats. These findings indicate that nonadherent splenic T-lymphocytes of Cu-deficient rats are not impaired in their ability to proliferate, and that cytochrome-c oxidase activity in unstimulated lymphoid cells of Cu-deficient rats is apparently not related to levels of proliferation by the Con-A stimulated cells.

  19. Isolation of an Escherichia coil strain mutant unable to form biofilm on polystyrene and to adhere to human pneumocyte cells: involvement of tryptophanase.

    PubMed

    Di Martino, P; Merieau, A; Phillips, R; Orange, N; Hulen, C

    2002-02-01

    Escherichia coli adherence to biotic and abiotic surfaces constitutes the first step of infection by promoting colonization and biofilm formation. The aim of this study was to gain a better understanding of the relationship between E. coli adherence to different biotic surfaces and biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces. We isolated mutants defective in A549 pneumocyte cells adherence, fibronectin adherence, and biofilm formation by random transposition mutagenesis and sequential passages over A549 cell monolayers. Among the 97 mutants tested, 80 were decreased in biofilm formation, 8 were decreased in A549 cells adherence, 7 were decreased in their adherence to fibronectin, and 17 had no perturbations in either of the three phenotypes. We observed a correlation between adherence to fibronectin or A549 cells and biofilm formation, indicating that biotic adhesive factors are involved in biofilm formation by E. coli. Molecular analysis of the mutants revealed that a transposon insertion in the tnaA gene encoding for tryptophanase was associated with a decrease in both A549 cells adherence and biofilm formation by E. coli. The complementation of the tnaA mutant with plasmid-located wild-type tnaA restored the tryptophanase activity, epithelial cells adherence, and biofilm formation on polystyrene. The possible mechanism of tryptophanase involvement in E. coli adherence and biofilm formation is discussed.

  20. Immune responses to an encapsulated allogeneic islet {beta}-cell line in diabetic NOD mice

    SciTech Connect

    Black, Sasha P. . E-mail: Sasha.Black@ca.crl.com; Constantinidis, Ioannis; Cui, Hong; Tucker-Burden, Carol; Weber, Collin J.; Safley, Susan A.

    2006-02-03

    Our goal is to develop effective islet grafts for treating type 1 diabetes. Since human islets are scarce, we evaluated the efficacy of a microencapsulated insulin-secreting conditionally transformed allogeneic {beta}-cell line ({beta}TC-tet) in non-obese diabetic mice treated with tetracycline to inhibit cell growth. Relatively low serum levels of tetracycline controlled proliferation of {beta}TC-tet cells without inhibiting effective control of hyperglycemia in recipients. There was no significant host cellular reaction to the allografts or host cell adherence to microcapsules, and host cytokine levels were similar to those of sham-operated controls. We conclude that encapsulated allogeneic {beta}-cell lines may be clinically relevant, because they effectively restore euglycemia and do not elicit a strong cellular immune response following transplantation. To our knowledge, this is First extensive characterization of the kinetics of host cellular and cytokine responses to an encapsulated islet cell line in an animal model of type 1 diabetes.

  1. Numerical fluid-dynamic optimization of microchannel-provided porous scaffolds for the co-culture of adherent and non-adherent cells.

    PubMed

    Cantini, Marco; Fiore, Gianfranco B; Redaelli, Alberto; Soncini, Monica

    2009-03-01

    Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) techniques were used to optimize the microenvironment inside scaffolds for hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) culture in a perfusion bioreactor. These matrices are meant to be seeded with adherent bone marrow stromal cells and then co-cultivated with HSCs; the scaffold micro-architecture and the fluid-dynamic conditions have to be optimized to avoid non-adherent stem cells being dragged away while ensuring adequate nutrient supply. The insertion of longitudinal microchannels was tested as a tool to improve perfusion in a homogeneous porous scaffold. Models of microchannel-provided scaffolds, characterized by different values of geometric parameters concerning pores and channels, were built, and numerical fluid-dynamic and oxygen-transfer analyses were carried out. The results of the computations indicated that the microchannels created preferential paths for culture medium flow, causing low shear stresses and drag forces within the pores; meanwhile, they improved oxygen delivery by forcing its penetration into the scaffold bulk. In particular, an 85% porous, 3-mm-thick scaffold with 175-microm-diameter pores was considered; at a constant average drag force guaranteeing stem cell suspension inside this porous bulk, the addition of approximately 260-microm-diameter, 700-microm-spaced channels resulted in 34% higher oxygen partial pressure at the exit (approximately 135 vs 101 mmHg), maintaining a wall shear stress median value of approximately 0.14 mPa. The present work demonstrates the capacity of microchannel-provided scaffolds to ensure suitable conditions for HSC culture and shows that CFD methods are a valuable tool to retrieve significant clues for the design of the culture environment.

  2. Streptococcus pneumoniae ClpL Modulates Adherence to A549 Human Lung Cells through Rap1/Rac1 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Cuong Thach; Le, Nhat-Tu; Tran, Thao Dang-Hien; Kim, Eun-Hye; Park, Sang-Sang; Luong, Truc Thanh; Chung, Kyung-Tae; Pyo, Suhkneung

    2014-01-01

    Caseinolytic protease L (ClpL) is a member of the HSP100/Clp chaperone family, which is found mainly in Gram-positive bacteria. ClpL is highly expressed during infection for refolding of stress-induced denatured proteins, some of which are important for adherence. However, the role of ClpL in modulating pneumococcal virulence is poorly understood. Here, we show that ClpL impairs pneumococcal adherence to A549 lung cells by inducing and activating Rap1 and Rac1, thus increasing phosphorylation of cofilin (inactive form). Moreover, infection with a clpL mutant (ΔclpL) causes a greater degree of filopodium formation than D39 wild-type (WT) infection. Inhibition of Rap1 and Rac1 impairs filopodium formation and pneumococcal adherence. Therefore, ClpL can reduce pneumococcal adherence to A549 cells, likely via modulation of Rap1- and Rac1-mediated filopodium formation. These results demonstrate a potential role for ClpL in pneumococcal resistance to host cell adherence during infection. This study provides insight into further understanding the interactions between hosts and pathogens. PMID:24980975

  3. Cyclic Amphipathic Peptide-DNA Complexes Mediate High-Efficiency Transfection of Adherent Mammalian Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legendre, Jean-Yves; Szoka, Francis C., Jr.

    1993-02-01

    A DNA transfection protocol has been developed that makes use of the cyclic cationic amphipathic peptide gramicidin S and dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine. The DNA complex is formed by mixing gramicidin S with DNA at a 1:1 charge ratio and then adding phosphatidylethanolamine at a lipid/peptide molar ratio of 5:1. The complex mediates rapid association of DNA with cells and leads to transient expression levels of β-galactosidase ranging from 1 to 30% of the transfected cells, with long-term expression being about an order of magnitude lower. The respective roles of peptide and phospholipid are not yet resolved but optimal transfection requires both the cyclic peptide and the hexagonal phase-competent phospholipid PtdEtn. Transfection in CV-1 cells is not affected by lysomotrophic agents, which suggests that DNA entry into the cell is via the plasma membrane. This technique that is simple, economical, and reproducible mediates transfection levels up to 20-fold higher than cationic liposomes in adherent mammalian cells.

  4. A novel multi-coaxial hollow fiber bioreactor for adherent cell types. Part 1: hydrodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Stephen P; Hsu, Edward; Reid, Lola M; Macdonald, Jeffrey M

    2002-01-01

    A novel multi-coaxial bioreactor for three-dimensional cultures of adherent cell types, such as liver, is described. It is composed of four tubes of increasing diameter placed one inside the other, creating four spatially isolated compartments. Liver acinar structure and physiological parameters are mimicked by sandwiching cells in the space between the two innermost semi-permeable tubes, or hollows fibers, and creating a radial flow of media from an outer compartment (ECC), through the cell mass compartment, and to an inner compartment (ICC). The outermost compartment is created by gas-permeable tubing, and the housing is used to oxygenate the perfusion media to periportal levels in the ECC. Experiments were performed using distilled water to correlate the radial flow rate (Q(r)) with (1) the pressure drop (DeltaP) between the media compartments that sandwich the cell compartment and (2) the pressure in the cell compartment (P(c)). These results were compared with the theoretical profile calculated based on the hydraulic permeability of the two innermost fibers. Phase-contrast velocity-encoded magnetic resonance imaging was used to visualize directly the axial velocities inside the bioreactor and confirm the assumptions of laminar flow and zero axial velocity at the boundaries of each compartment in the bioreactor. Axial flow rates were calculated from the magnetic resonance imaging results and were similar to the measured axial flow rates for the previously described experiments.

  5. Neuroblastoma cell lines showing smooth muscle cell phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, T; Mine, H; Horii, Y; Takahashi, K; Nagai, R; Morishita, R; Komada, M; Asada, Y; Sawada, T

    2000-12-01

    Neuroblastoma is a tumor that is derived from the neural crest. Recent studies demonstrated that several human neuroblastoma cell lines exhibit at least three morphologic types: neuroblastic (N)-type, substrate-adhesive (S)-type and intermediate (I)-type cells. However, the origin of the S-type cells has not been clearly identified. In this study, the expressions of smooth muscle-specific proteins (desmin, alpha-smooth muscle actin, basic calponin and the smooth muscle myosin heavy-chain isoforms of SM1 and SM2) in three parent and four cloned neuroblastoma cell lines, composed of S-type cells, were examined by indirect immunofluorescence, Western blot and/or by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Desmin was found in two of the seven cell lines, and alpha-smooth muscle actin and basic calponin were detected in all of seven of the cell lines. In three parent cell lines and one cloned cell line composed of N-type cells, none of three smooth muscle-specific proteins were detected. In smooth muscle myosin heavy-chain isoforms, SM1 was detected in two parent cell lines composed of S-type cells (MP-N-MS and KP-N-YS) by immunofluorescence, Western blot and/or by RT-PCR, whereas the SM2 isoform was detected in one parent cell line (MP-N-MS) by RT-PCR. These findings indicate that S-type cells have either the immature or mature smooth muscle cell phenotype, and neural crest cells very likely have the ability of to differentiate into smooth muscle cells in the human system.

  6. Establishment and characterization of two new cell lines from the mosquito Armigeres subalbatus (Coquillett) (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Keita; Isawa, Haruhiko; Kuwata, Ryusei; Tajima, Shigeru; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Iwabuchi, Kikuo; Sawabe, Kyoko; Kobayashi, Mutsuo; Sasaki, Toshinori

    2015-08-01

    Armigeres subalbatus (Coquillett) is a medically important mosquito and a model species for immunology research. We successfully established two cell lines from the neonate larvae of A. subalbatus using two different media. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an established Armigeres mosquito cell line. The cell lines, designated as Ar-3 and Ar-13, consist of adherent and diploid cells with compact colonies. Both these cell lines grow slowly after passage at a split ratio of 1:5 and a population doubling time of 2.7 and 3.0 d, respectively. Random amplified polymorphic DNA polymerase chain reaction (RAPD-PCR) was used to confirm that these lines correspond to the species of origin and are clearly distinct from seven other insect cell lines. Furthermore, reverse-transcription PCR was used to demonstrate that the Ar-3 cell line is susceptible to the Japanese encephalitis virus and two insect flaviviruses associated with Culex and Aedes mosquitoes but relatively insensitive to dengue virus. These data indicate that the newly established cell lines are cellular models of A. subalbatus as well as beneficial tools for the propagation of viruses associated with the Armigeres mosquito.

  7. Reproducible establishment of hemopoietic supportive stromal cell lines from murine bone marrow

    SciTech Connect

    Itoh, K.; Tezuka, H.; Sakoda, H.; Konno, M.; Nagata, K.; Uchiyama, T.; Uchino, H.; Mori, K.J.

    1989-02-01

    Stromal cell lines, designated MS-1, -2, -3, -4, -5, -6, and -7 were established by irradiating the adherent cells in long-term bone marrow cultures with 900-rad x-rays. Two of the cell lines, MS-1 and MS-5, have the capacity to support the growth of hemopoietic stem cells (spleen colony-forming cells and granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming cells) for greater than 2 months in vitro. These two cell lines were alkaline phosphatase-, peroxidase-, and factor VIII-negative and positive for periodic acid-Schiff and nonspecific esterase. Extracellular matrix proteins such as fibronectin, laminin, and collagen type I were produced by these two cell lines. Neither MS-1 cell- nor MS-5 cell-conditioned medium supported the growth of hemopoietic stem cells, and hemopoietic stem cells were found preferentially to be under and on MS-1 and MS-5 layers rather than in suspension. Close contact with the MS-1 cell layer or the MS-5 cell layer appears to be essential in maintaining hemopoiesis in vitro. Conditioned media from MS-1 cells and MS-5 cells stimulated granulocyte colony formation from murine bone marrow cells in semisolid culture.

  8. Raman micro-spectroscopy study of living SH-SY5Y cells adhering on different substrates.

    PubMed

    Caponi, S; Mattana, S; Ricci, M; Sagini, K; Urbanelli, L; Sassi, P; Morresi, A; Emiliani, C; Dalla Serra, M; Iannotta, S; Musio, C; Fioretto, D

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we test the ability of Raman micro-spectroscopy and Raman mapping to investigate the status of cells grown in adhesion on different substrates. The spectra of immortalized SH-SY5Y cells, grown on silicon and on metallic substrates are compared with those obtained for the same type of cells adhering on organic polyaniline (PANI), a memristive substrate chosen to achieve a living bio-hybrid system. Raman spectra give information on the status of the single cell, its local biochemical composition, and on the modifications induced by the substrate interaction. The good agreement between Raman spectra collected from cells adhering on different substrates confirms that the PANI, besides allowing the cell growth, doesn't strongly affect the general biochemical properties of the cell. The investigation of the cellular state in a label free condition is challenging and the obtained results confirm the Raman ability to achieve this information. PMID:26256426

  9. Virus Discovery Using Tick Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Bell-Sakyi, Lesley; Attoui, Houssam

    2016-01-01

    While ticks have been known to harbor and transmit pathogenic arboviruses for over 80 years, the application of high-throughput sequencing technologies has revealed that ticks also appear to harbor a diverse range of endogenous tick-only viruses belonging to many different families. Almost nothing is known about these viruses; indeed, it is unclear in most cases whether the identified viral sequences are derived from actual replication-competent viruses or from endogenous virus elements incorporated into the ticks’ genomes. Tick cell lines play an important role in virus discovery and isolation through the identification of novel viruses chronically infecting such cell lines and by acting as host cells to aid in determining whether or not an entire replication-competent, infective virus is present in a sample. Here, we review recent progress in tick-borne virus discovery and comment on the actual and potential applications for tick cell lines in this emerging research area. PMID:27679414

  10. Virus Discovery Using Tick Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Bell-Sakyi, Lesley; Attoui, Houssam

    2016-01-01

    While ticks have been known to harbor and transmit pathogenic arboviruses for over 80 years, the application of high-throughput sequencing technologies has revealed that ticks also appear to harbor a diverse range of endogenous tick-only viruses belonging to many different families. Almost nothing is known about these viruses; indeed, it is unclear in most cases whether the identified viral sequences are derived from actual replication-competent viruses or from endogenous virus elements incorporated into the ticks’ genomes. Tick cell lines play an important role in virus discovery and isolation through the identification of novel viruses chronically infecting such cell lines and by acting as host cells to aid in determining whether or not an entire replication-competent, infective virus is present in a sample. Here, we review recent progress in tick-borne virus discovery and comment on the actual and potential applications for tick cell lines in this emerging research area.

  11. Virus Discovery Using Tick Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Bell-Sakyi, Lesley; Attoui, Houssam

    2016-01-01

    While ticks have been known to harbor and transmit pathogenic arboviruses for over 80 years, the application of high-throughput sequencing technologies has revealed that ticks also appear to harbor a diverse range of endogenous tick-only viruses belonging to many different families. Almost nothing is known about these viruses; indeed, it is unclear in most cases whether the identified viral sequences are derived from actual replication-competent viruses or from endogenous virus elements incorporated into the ticks' genomes. Tick cell lines play an important role in virus discovery and isolation through the identification of novel viruses chronically infecting such cell lines and by acting as host cells to aid in determining whether or not an entire replication-competent, infective virus is present in a sample. Here, we review recent progress in tick-borne virus discovery and comment on the actual and potential applications for tick cell lines in this emerging research area. PMID:27679414

  12. Killer cell lines against Shope carcinoma cells in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, M; Yamade, I; Seto, A

    1991-09-01

    Killer cell activity against Shope carcinoma cells was not detected in PBL nor in spleen cells from tumor-bearing B/J rabbits, but was induced by in vitro culture of these cells in the presence of IL-2 and X-irradiated carcinoma cells. HTLV-I-transformed killer cell lines were successfully obtained by the culturing of PBL from an HTLV-I-infected and tumor-bearing Chbb:HM rabbit. These killer cells included large cells with azurophilic granules in the cytoplasm and with a reniform nucleus, thus resembling large granular lymphocytes. The killer activity was similar against the Vx2K cell line from a random-bred rabbit and SCB cell lines from an B/J rabbit, suggesting the absence of MHC restriction. PMID:1655241

  13. A computational model of the response of adherent cells to stretch and changes in substrate stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Lutchen, Kenneth R.; Suki, Béla

    2014-01-01

    Cells in the body exist in a dynamic mechanical environment where they are subject to mechanical stretch as well as changes in composition and stiffness of the underlying extracellular matrix (ECM). However, the underlying mechanisms by which cells sense and adapt to their dynamic mechanical environment, in particular to stretch, are not well understood. In this study, we hypothesized that emergent phenomena at the level of the actin network arising from active structural rearrangements driven by nonmuscle myosin II molecular motors play a major role in the cellular response to both stretch and changes in ECM stiffness. To test this hypothesis, we introduce a simple network model of actin-myosin interactions that links active self-organization of the actin network to the stiffness of the network and the traction forces generated by the network. We demonstrate that such a network replicates not only the effect of changes in substrate stiffness on cellular traction and stiffness and the dependence of rate of force development by a cell on the stiffness of its substrate, but also explains the physical response of adherent cells to transient and cyclic stretch. Our results provide strong indication that network phenomena governed by the active reorganization of the actin-myosin structure plays an important role in cellular mechanosensing and response to both changes in ECM stiffness and externally applied mechanical stretch. PMID:24408996

  14. CsrRS and Environmental pH Regulate Group B Streptococcus Adherence to Human Epithelial Cells and Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Park, Su Eun; Jiang, Shengmei

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus or GBS) is a common colonizer of the gastrointestinal and genital tracts and an important cause of invasive infections in newborn infants and in adults with predisposing chronic conditions or advanced age. Attachment to epithelial surfaces at mucosal sites is a critical step in the successful colonization of a human host, and regulation of this process is likely to play an important role in both commensalism and dissemination to cause invasive disease. We found that inactivation of the CsrRS (or CovRS) two-component system increased GBS adherence to epithelial cells derived from human vaginal, cervical, and respiratory epithelium, as well as increasing adherence to extracellular matrix proteins and increasing biofilm formation on polystyrene. Neutral (as opposed to acidic) pH enhanced GBS binding to vaginal epithelial cells and to fibrinogen and fibronectin, effects that were partially dependent on CsrRS. The regulatory effects of CsrRS and environmental pH on bacterial adherence correlated with their effects on the expression of multiple surface adhesins, as assessed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. We conclude that GBS adherence to epithelial and abiotic surfaces is regulated by the CsrRS two-component system and by environmental pH through their regulatory effects on the expression of bacterial surface adhesins. Dynamic regulation of GBS adherence enhances the organism's adaptability to survival in multiple niches in the human host. PMID:22949550

  15. Refractory lining for electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Blander, Milton; Cook, Glenn M.

    1987-01-01

    Apparatus for processing a metallic fluid containing iron oxide, container for a molten metal including an electrically conductive refractory disposed for contact with the molten metal which contains iron oxide, an electrolyte in the form of a basic slag on top of the molten metal, an electrode in the container in contcat with the slag electrically separated from the refractory, and means for establishing a voltage across the refractory and the electrode to reduce iron oxide to iron at the surface of the refractory in contact with the iron oxide containing fluid. A process is disclosed for refining an iron product containing not more than about 10% by weight oxygen and not more than about 10% by weight sulfur, comprising providing an electrolyte of a slag containing one or more of calcium oxide, magnesium oxide, silica or alumina, providing a cathode of the iron product in contact with the electrolyte, providing an anode in contact with the electrolyte electrically separated from the cathode, and operating an electrochemical cell formed by the anode, the cathode and the electrolyte to separate oxygen or sulfur present in the iron product therefrom.

  16. Trichomonas vaginalis adherence mediates differential gene expression in human vaginal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Kucknoor, Ashwini; Mundodi, Vasanthakrishna; Alderete, John F.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Trichomonas vaginalis, an ancient protist, colonizes the vaginal mucosa causing trichomonosis, a vaginitis that sometimes leads to severe health complications. Preparatory to colonization of the vagina is the adhesion to vaginal epithelial cells (VECs) by trichomonads. We hypothesized that VECs alter the gene expression to form a complex signalling cascade in response to trichomonal adherence. In order to identify the genes that are upregulated, we constructed a subtraction cDNA library after contact with parasites that is enriched for differentially expressed genes from the immortalized MS-74 VECs. Sixty cDNA clones were sequenced and to our knowledge for the first time, differentially regulated genes were identified in response to early trichomonal infection. The identified genes were found to encode functional proteins with specific functions associated with cell structure maintenance and extracellular matrix components, proinflammatory molecules and apoptosis. Semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) confirmed expression of selected genes. Further, cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) protein expression was analysed using Western blot and immunofluorescence assays. Data suggest that p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and tyrosine kinases play a role in COX-2 induction. Finally, T. vaginalis and Tritrichomonas foetus but not Pentatrichomonas hominis induce expression of COX-2. This is a first attempt at elucidating the basis of interaction of trichomonads with host cells and the corresponding host responses triggered by the parasites. PMID:15888089

  17. The role of Listeria monocytogenes cell wall surface anchor protein LapB in virulence, adherence, and intracellular replication

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lmof2365_2117 is a Listeria monocytogenes putative cell wall surface anchor protein with a conserved domain found in collagen binding proteins. We constructed a deletion mutation in lmof2365_2117 in serotype 4b strain F2365, evaluated its virulence, and determined its ability to adhere and invade co...

  18. Non-invasive, label-free cell counting and quantitative analysis of adherent cells using digital holography.

    PubMed

    Mölder, A; Sebesta, M; Gustafsson, M; Gisselson, L; Wingren, A Gjörloff; Alm, K

    2008-11-01

    Manual cell counting is time consuming and requires a high degree of skill on behalf of the person performing the count. Here we use a technique that utilizes digital holography, allowing label-free and completely non-invasive cell counting directly in cell culture vessels with adherent viable cells. The images produced can provide both quantitative and qualitative phase information from a single hologram. The recently constructed microscope Holomonitor (Phase Holographic Imaging AB, Lund, Sweden) combines the commonly used phase contrast microscope with digital holography, the latter giving us the possibility of achieving quantitative information on cellular shape, area, confluence and optical thickness. This project aimed at determining the accuracy and repeatability of cell counting measurements using digital holography compared to the conventional manual cell counting method using a haemocytometer. The collected data were also used to determine cell size and cellular optical thickness. The results show that digital holography can be used for non-invasive automatic cell counting as precisely as conventional manual cell counting. PMID:19017223

  19. Umbelliprenin Induces Apoptosis in CLL Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Ziai, Seyed Ali; Gholami, Omid; Iranshahi, Mehrdad; Zamani, Amir Hassan; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood

    2012-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) remains an incurable disease that requires innovative new approaches to improve therapeutic outcome. Many Ferula species, including F. asa-foetida, synthesize terpenyloxy coumarins. One of these coumarins is umbelliprenin, which has been implicated with induction of apoptosis in some cancer cell lines. In this study induction of apoptosis by umbelliprenin on Jurkat T-CLL and Raji B-CLL cell lines was studied. In this regard, cells were incubated with various concentrations of umbelliprenin in-vitro for different times and assayed for apoptosis with annexin V-FITC/PI double staining flowcytometry method. Results showed that umbelliprenin induced apoptosis in leukemic cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner and that CLL cells were more susceptible to umbelliprenin induced cell death than normal peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMCs). Moreover, we study the induction of apoptosis in Jurkat cells by umbelliprenin in the presence of interleukin 4 (IL-4) as an agent that causes resistance to apoptosis in CLL cells, was also student. We showed that IL-4 can not reduce apoptotic effect of umbelliprenin. The preferential toxicity of umbelliprenin for CLL cells, supports the hypothesis that oral administration of umbelliprenin in the form of foods or folk medicines containing this coumarin, might enhance protection against the development of CLL in man with little side effects. In conclusion, umbelliprenin may be an effective therapeutic agent in the treatment of CLL, and thus clinical studies with umbelliprenin may be appropriate.

  20. Umbelliprenin Induces Apoptosis in CLL Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Ziai, Seyed Ali; Gholami, Omid; Iranshahi, Mehrdad; Zamani, Amir Hassan; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood

    2012-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) remains an incurable disease that requires innovative new approaches to improve therapeutic outcome. Many Ferula species, including F. asa-foetida, synthesize terpenyloxy coumarins. One of these coumarins is umbelliprenin, which has been implicated with induction of apoptosis in some cancer cell lines. In this study induction of apoptosis by umbelliprenin on Jurkat T-CLL and Raji B-CLL cell lines was studied. In this regard, cells were incubated with various concentrations of umbelliprenin in-vitro for different times and assayed for apoptosis with annexin V–FITC/PI double staining flowcytometry method. Results showed that umbelliprenin induced apoptosis in leukemic cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner and that CLL cells were more susceptible to umbelliprenin induced cell death than normal peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMCs). Moreover, we study the induction of apoptosis in Jurkat cells by umbelliprenin in the presence of interleukin 4 (IL-4) as an agent that causes resistance to apoptosis in CLL cells, was also student. We showed that IL-4 can not reduce apoptotic effect of umbelliprenin. The preferential toxicity of umbelliprenin for CLL cells, supports the hypothesis that oral administration of umbelliprenin in the form of foods or folk medicines containing this coumarin, might enhance protection against the development of CLL in man with little side effects. In conclusion, umbelliprenin may be an effective therapeutic agent in the treatment of CLL, and thus clinical studies with umbelliprenin may be appropriate. PMID:24250490

  1. [Long-term subculture and biological characterization of the murine bone marrow endothelial cell line].

    PubMed

    Huang, Chang; Zhu, Wen-Biao; Zhu, Hai-Ling; Wang, Bao-He; Wang, Qi-Ru

    2007-12-01

    The murine bone marrow endothelial cell line (mBMEC) has been maintained by means of subculture and cryopreservation for over 10 years since it was established in our laboratory. This study was aimed to newly identify biological characteristics of this cell line for further study. The cultured mBMEC cells were observed by inverted microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). PECAM-1 (CD31) and von Willebrand factor (vWF) were detected by immunofluorescent staining. The phagocytotic activity of the cells in culture was tested by using fluorescent acetylated low-density lipoprotein (Dil-Ac-LDL). The cell growth kinetics analysis and karyotype analysis were performed. The results showed that the adherent cells were mostly elliptical, rounded and spindle-shaped, and some of them connected to each other to form cord- and network-like arrangements in mBMEC cultures at subconfluence. The adherent cells grew up to confluence as a cobblestone-like monolayer. Several ultrastructural features of the endothelial cells could be observed in TEM sections of the cultured cells. More than 94% of mBMEC cells were positive for either CD31 or vWF. The phagocytotic ingestion of Dil-Ac-LDL occurred in 98.5% of cells. In normal culture conditions, the cells grew with a mean population doubling time of 54.6 hours and the maximal mitotic index was 38 per thousand in the rapid growth period. The colony yields were 4.33% to 7.40% depending on the plating density of cells. Karyotypes of all the cells were aneuploidy with a greater percentage of hyperdiploid. It is concluded that mBMEC cells retain the fundamental properties of endothelial cells, but the growth kinetics and biological behaviors are slightly different from those in the early days after the establishment of this cell line.

  2. T lymphocytes adhere to airway smooth muscle cells via integrins and CD44 and induce smooth muscle cell DNA synthesis

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Asthma is a disease of airway inflammation and hyperreactivity that is associated with a lymphocytic infiltrate in the bronchial submucosa. The interactions between infiltrating T lymphocytes with cellular and extracellular matrix components of the airway and the consequences of these interactions have not been defined. We demonstrate the constitutive expression of CD44 on human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells in culture as well as in human bronchial tissue transplanted into severe combined immunodeficient mice. In contrast, basal levels of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) expression are minimal but are induced on ASM by inflammatory mediators such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). Activated, but not resting T cells, adhere to cultured ASM; stimulation of the ASM with TNF-alpha enhanced this adhesion. Adhesion was partially blocked by monoclonal antibodies (mAb) specific for lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) and very late antigen 4 (VLA-4) on T cells and ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 on ASM cells. The observed integrin-independent adhesion was mediated by CD44/hyaluronate interactions as it was inhibited by anti-CD44 mAb 5F12 and by hyaluronidase. Furthermore, the adhesion of activated T lymphocytes induced DNA synthesis in growth-arrested ASM cells. Thus, the interaction between T cells and ASM may provide insight into the mechanisms that induce bronchial inflammation and possibly ASM cell hyperplasia seen in asthma. PMID:7520473

  3. [Characterization of a liver metastatic cell line derived from a human gastric cancer cell line].

    PubMed

    Wakasugi, J

    1990-08-01

    This study was carried out to investigate whether there is any difference of biological characteristics between a gastric cancer cell line (KATOIII) and another cell line derived from liver metastasis of the same cell line (KATOIII-H2). The liver metastasis was produced by intrasplenic injection of the fluid containing of KATOIII in nude mouse and new cell line was established using the cells of metastatic site. The results are as follows. 1) Inoculation of KATOIII-H2 into the spleen produced liver metastases in all of the experimental animals, whereas the same procedure with KATOIII produced metastasis only in 30% of the animals. 2) KATOIII-H2 exhibited more prominent platelet-aggregating activity than KATOIII. 3) There is no difference between two cell lines on doubling time, histological findings of the xenografts and chromosomal number. 4) DNA index of KATOIII-H2 is lower than KATOIII and the trisomy in NO. 20 chromosome of KATOIII-H2 was noted. The results indicate that metastatic potential is different between two cell lines and this fact is probably in a part because of the different platelet-aggregating activity of each cell line. PMID:2233668

  4. Fimbria-mediated adherence of Candida albicans to glycosphingolipid receptors on human buccal epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, L; Lee, K K; Sheth, H B; Lane-Bell, P; Srivastava, G; Hindsgaul, O; Paranchych, W; Hodges, R S; Irvin, R T

    1994-01-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunist fungal pathogen that has the ability to adhere to host cell surface receptors via a number of adhesins. Yu et al. (L. Yu, K. K. Lee, K. Ens, P. C. Doig, M. R. Carpenter, W. Staddon, R. S. Hodges, W. Paranchych, and R. T. Irvin, Infect. Immun. 62:2834-2842, 1994) described the purification and initial characterization of a fimbrial adhesin from C. albicans. In this paper, we show that C. albicans fimbriae also bind to asialo-GM1 [gangliotetraosylceramide: beta Gal(1-3)beta GalNAc(1-4) beta Gal(1-4)beta Glc(1-1)Cer] immobilized on microtiter plates in a saturable and concentration-dependent manner. C. albicans fimbrial binding to exfoliated human buccal epithelial cells (BECs) was inhibited by asialo-GM1 in in vitro binding assays. The fimbriae interact with the glycosphingolipid receptors via the carbohydrate portion of the receptors, since fimbriae were observed to bind to synthetic beta GalNAc(1-4)beta Gal-protein conjugates and the disaccharide was able to inhibit binding of fimbriae to BECs in in vitro binding assays. We conclude from these results that the C. albicans yeast form expresses a fimbrial adhesin that binds to glycosphingolipids displayed on the surface of human BECs. Images PMID:8005674

  5. Protein phosphatase 2A activity is required for functional adherent junctions in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kása, Anita; Czikora, István; Verin, Alexander D; Gergely, Pál; Csortos, Csilla

    2013-09-01

    Reversible Ser/Thr phosphorylation of cytoskeletal and adherent junction (AJ) proteins has a critical role in the regulation of endothelial cell (EC) barrier function. We have demonstrated earlier that protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity is important in EC barrier integrity. In the present work, macro- and microvascular EC were examined and we provided further evidence on the significance of PP2A in the maintenance of EC cytoskeleton and barrier function with special focus on the Bα (regulatory) subunit of PP2A. Immunofluorescent staining revealed that the inhibition of PP2A results in changes in the organization of EC cytoskeleton as microtubule dissolution and actin re-arrangement were detected. Depletion of Bα regulatory subunit of PP2A had similar effect on the cytoskeleton structure of the cells. Furthermore, transendothelial electric resistance measurements demonstrated significantly slower barrier recovery of Bα depleted EC after thrombin treatment. AJ proteins, VE-cadherin and β-catenin, were detected along with Bα in pull-down assay. Also, the inhibition of PP2A (by okadaic acid or fostriecin) or depletion of Bα caused β-catenin translocation from the membrane to the cytoplasm in parallel with its phosphorylation on Ser552. In conclusion, our data suggest that the A/Bα/C holoenzyme form of PP2A is essential in EC barrier integrity both in micro- and macrovascular EC. PMID:23721711

  6. Development of a continuous cell line, PBLE, from an American eel peripheral blood leukocyte preparation.

    PubMed

    Dewitte-Orr, S J; Lepic, K; Bryson, S P; Walsh, S K; Lee, L E J; Bols, N C

    2006-01-01

    A continuous cell line, PBLE, was developed from the adherent cells in a culture of peripheral blood leukocytes from the American eel, Anguilla rostrata. The cells were grown in Leibovitz's L-15 basal medium supplemented with 20% fetal bovine serum (FBS). Under normal culture conditions at 18 degrees C, the morphology of PBLE was fibroblast-like. The cultures have been subcultured over 80 times and have been cryopreserved successfully. These cells have a diploid karyotype of 38 chromosomes, survived temperatures from 5 to 36 degrees C, and proliferated at temperatures from 5 degrees C to at least 30 degrees C. PBLE underwent apoptosis in response to gliotoxin, but did not show a respiratory burst. Results suggest that PBLE may have arisen from a circulating mesenchymal stem cell. PBLE was susceptible to Chum salmon reovirus (CSV) and supported CSV replication. Therefore this cell line should be useful in studying eel specific virus-host interactions.

  7. Sulfatides inhibit binding of Helicobacter pylori to the gastric cancer Kato III cell line.

    PubMed

    Wadström, T; Hirmo, S; Novak, H; Guzman, A; Ringnér-Pantzar, M; Utt, M; Aleljung, P

    1997-05-01

    Helicobacter pylori adhere to Kato III and Hela S3 cells in monolayer cultures. To explore whether cell surface glycoconjugates on these two cell lines mediate binding of H. pylori, various carbohydrates, glycoproteins, and glycolipids were tested to inhibit H.pylori cell adhesion. The adhesion was measured (i) with a urease-based assay and (ii) by cells stained with fluorescein. Sodium periodate and sialidase treatment (but not alpha- or beta-galactosidase, heparitinase,lysozyme, or trypsin) inhibited H. pylori binding to both cell lines. Sulfatides and sulfated glycoconjugates (50 microg/ml) but not heparin or a number of simple carbohydrates inhibited binding (1 mg/ml). The two H.pylori strains studied (CCUG 17874 and strain 25) showed high binding of soluble 125I-labeled heparin and other sulfated carbohydrate compounds. PMID:9099625

  8. Evaluation of a Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) assay (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Embryonic Stem Cell Test (EST) has been used to evaluate the effects of xenobiotics using three endpoints, stem cell differentiation, stem cell viability and 3T3-cell viability. Our research goal is to establish amodel system that would evaluate chemical effects using a singl...

  9. Airway goblet cells: responsive and adaptable front-line defenders.

    PubMed

    Rogers, D F

    1994-09-01

    Goblet cells are situated in the epithelium of the conducting airways, often with their apical surfaces protruding into the lumen, a location which fits them for a rapid response to inhaled airway insults. Together with the submucosal glands, goblet cells secrete high molecular weight mucus glycoproteins (mucins), which confer upon the airway surface fluid the requisite biochemical and biophysical properties which determine the efficiency of entrapment and transportation of inhaled irritants, particles and micro-organisms. The diversity of glycosylation of airway mucins may be important in facilitating adherence of micro-organisms to mucus prior to mucociliary clearance. Other secretory products, including lipids and "small" glycoproteins, may also be produced by goblet cells. It is possible that goblet cells have the potential to produce markedly more mucus than do the glands. Mucins are tightly packed in the intracellular granules of the goblet cell. The morphology of these granules varies with fixation technique, and release of mucins may be via a combination of merocrine and apocrine secretion. Discharge of mucus is accomplished remarkably rapidly (tens of milliseconds) and vast quantities of mucus are released (size expansions from the granule of many hundredfold). Depending upon species and preparation, goblet cells discharge mucus in response to a wide variety of stimuli, including proteinases, irritant gases, inflammatory mediators, reactive oxygen species, nerve activation and changes in the biophysical environment. Under normal conditions, goblet cell proliferation and differentiation, particularly to ciliated cells, contributes to maintenance of the airway epithelial cell population. In addition to participating in acute airway defence, goblet cells increase in number in response to chronic airway insult, with a resultant increase in output of mucus. The increase in number of cells is via hyperplastic and metaplastic mechanisms. Early triggers for the

  10. Differentiation of human ESCs to retinal ganglion cells using a CRISPR engineered reporter cell line

    PubMed Central

    Sluch, Valentin M.; Davis, Chung-ha O.; Ranganathan, Vinod; Kerr, Justin M.; Krick, Kellin; Martin, Russ; Berlinicke, Cynthia A.; Marsh-Armstrong, Nicholas; Diamond, Jeffrey S.; Mao, Hai-Quan; Zack, Donald J.

    2015-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) injury and cell death from glaucoma and other forms of optic nerve disease is a major cause of irreversible vision loss and blindness. Human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC)-derived RGCs could provide a source of cells for the development of novel therapeutic molecules as well as for potential cell-based therapies. In addition, such cells could provide insights into human RGC development, gene regulation, and neuronal biology. Here, we report a simple, adherent cell culture protocol for differentiation of hPSCs to RGCs using a CRISPR-engineered RGC fluorescent reporter stem cell line. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting of the differentiated cultures yields a highly purified population of cells that express a range of RGC-enriched markers and exhibit morphological and physiological properties typical of RGCs. Additionally, we demonstrate that aligned nanofiber matrices can be used to guide the axonal outgrowth of hPSC-derived RGCs for in vitro optic nerve-like modeling. Lastly, using this protocol we identified forskolin as a potent promoter of RGC differentiation. PMID:26563826

  11. Differentiation of human ESCs to retinal ganglion cells using a CRISPR engineered reporter cell line.

    PubMed

    Sluch, Valentin M; Davis, Chung-ha O; Ranganathan, Vinod; Kerr, Justin M; Krick, Kellin; Martin, Russ; Berlinicke, Cynthia A; Marsh-Armstrong, Nicholas; Diamond, Jeffrey S; Mao, Hai-Quan; Zack, Donald J

    2015-11-13

    Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) injury and cell death from glaucoma and other forms of optic nerve disease is a major cause of irreversible vision loss and blindness. Human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC)-derived RGCs could provide a source of cells for the development of novel therapeutic molecules as well as for potential cell-based therapies. In addition, such cells could provide insights into human RGC development, gene regulation, and neuronal biology. Here, we report a simple, adherent cell culture protocol for differentiation of hPSCs to RGCs using a CRISPR-engineered RGC fluorescent reporter stem cell line. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting of the differentiated cultures yields a highly purified population of cells that express a range of RGC-enriched markers and exhibit morphological and physiological properties typical of RGCs. Additionally, we demonstrate that aligned nanofiber matrices can be used to guide the axonal outgrowth of hPSC-derived RGCs for in vitro optic nerve-like modeling. Lastly, using this protocol we identified forskolin as a potent promoter of RGC differentiation.

  12. Differentiation of human ESCs to retinal ganglion cells using a CRISPR engineered reporter cell line.

    PubMed

    Sluch, Valentin M; Davis, Chung-ha O; Ranganathan, Vinod; Kerr, Justin M; Krick, Kellin; Martin, Russ; Berlinicke, Cynthia A; Marsh-Armstrong, Nicholas; Diamond, Jeffrey S; Mao, Hai-Quan; Zack, Donald J

    2015-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) injury and cell death from glaucoma and other forms of optic nerve disease is a major cause of irreversible vision loss and blindness. Human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC)-derived RGCs could provide a source of cells for the development of novel therapeutic molecules as well as for potential cell-based therapies. In addition, such cells could provide insights into human RGC development, gene regulation, and neuronal biology. Here, we report a simple, adherent cell culture protocol for differentiation of hPSCs to RGCs using a CRISPR-engineered RGC fluorescent reporter stem cell line. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting of the differentiated cultures yields a highly purified population of cells that express a range of RGC-enriched markers and exhibit morphological and physiological properties typical of RGCs. Additionally, we demonstrate that aligned nanofiber matrices can be used to guide the axonal outgrowth of hPSC-derived RGCs for in vitro optic nerve-like modeling. Lastly, using this protocol we identified forskolin as a potent promoter of RGC differentiation. PMID:26563826

  13. Cancer stem cell-like cells from a single cell of oral squamous carcinoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Felthaus, O.; Ettl, T.; Gosau, M.; Driemel, O.; Brockhoff, G.; Reck, A.; Zeitler, K.; Hautmann, M.; Reichert, T.E.; Schmalz, G.; Morsczeck, C.

    2011-04-01

    Research highlights: {yields} Four oral squamous cancer cell lines (OSCCL) were analyzed for cancer stem cells (CSCs). {yields} Single cell derived colonies of OSCCL express CSC-marker CD133 differentially. {yields} Monoclonal cell lines showed reduced sensitivity for Paclitaxel. {yields} In situ CD133{sup +} cells are slow cycling (Ki67-) indicating a reduced drug sensitivity. {yields} CD133{sup +} and CSC-like cells can be obtained from single colony forming cells of OSCCL. -- Abstract: Resistance of oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) to conventional chemotherapy or radiation therapy might be due to cancer stem cells (CSCs). The development of novel anticancer drugs requires a simple method for the enrichment of CSCs. CSCs can be enriched from OSCC cell lines, for example, after cultivation in serum-free cell culture medium (SFM). In our study, we analyzed four OSCC cell lines for the presence of CSCs. CSC-like cells could not be enriched with SFM. However, cell lines obtained from holoclone colonies showed CSC-like properties such as a reduced rate of cell proliferation and a reduced sensitivity to Paclitaxel in comparison to cells from the parental lineage. Moreover, these cell lines differentially expressed the CSC-marker CD133, which is also upregulated in OSCC tissues. Interestingly, CD133{sup +} cells in OSCC tissues expressed little to no Ki67, the cell proliferation marker that also indicates reduced drug sensitivity. Our study shows a method for the isolation of CSC-like cell lines from OSCC cell lines. These CSC-like cell lines could be new targets for the development of anticancer drugs under in vitro conditions.

  14. Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) assay

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Embryonic Stem Cell Test (EST) is an assay which evaluates xenobiotic-induced effects using three endpoints: mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) differentiation, mESC viability, and 3T3-cell viability. Our research goal was to develop an improved high-throughput assay by establi...

  15. Correlative VIS-fluorescence and soft X-ray cryo-microscopy/tomography of adherent cells.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Christoph; Guttmann, Peter; Klupp, Barbara; Werner, Stephan; Rehbein, Stefan; Mettenleiter, Thomas C; Schneider, Gerd; Grünewald, Kay

    2012-02-01

    Soft X-ray cryo-microscopy/tomography of vitreous samples is becoming a valuable tool in structural cell biology. Within the 'water-window' wavelength region (2.34-4.37nm), it provides absorption contrast images with high signal to noise ratio and resolution of a few tens of nanometer. Soft X-rays with wavelengths close to the K-absorption edge of oxygen penetrate biological samples with thicknesses in the micrometer range. Here, we report on the application of a recently established extension of the transmission soft X-ray cryo-microscope (HZB TXM) at the beamline U41-XM of the BESSY II electron storage ring by an in-column epi-fluorescence and reflected light cryo-microscope. We demonstrate the new capability for correlative fluorescence and soft X-ray cryo-microscopy/tomography of this instrument along a typical life science experimental approach - the correlation of a fluorophore-tagged protein (pUL34-GFP of pseudorabies virus, PrV, the nuclear membrane-anchored component of the nuclear egress complex of the Herpesviridae which interacts with viral pUL31) in PrV pUL34-GFP/pUL31 coexpressing mammalian cells, with virus-induced vesicular structures in the nucleus, expanding the nucleoplasmic reticulum. Taken together, our results demonstrate new possibilities to study the role of specific proteins in substructures of adherent cells, especially of the nucleus in toto, accessible to electron microscopy in thinned samples only. PMID:22210307

  16. Correlative VIS-fluorescence and soft X-ray cryo-microscopy/tomography of adherent cells

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Christoph; Guttmann, Peter; Klupp, Barbara; Werner, Stephan; Rehbein, Stefan; Mettenleiter, Thomas C.; Schneider, Gerd; Grünewald, Kay

    2012-01-01

    Soft X-ray cryo-microscopy/tomography of vitreous samples is becoming a valuable tool in structural cell biology. Within the ‘water-window’ wavelength region (2.34–4.37 nm), it provides absorption contrast images with high signal to noise ratio and resolution of a few tens of nanometer. Soft X-rays with wavelengths close to the K-absorption edge of oxygen penetrate biological samples with thicknesses in the micrometer range. Here, we report on the application of a recently established extension of the transmission soft X-ray cryo-microscope (HZB TXM) at the beamline U41-XM of the BESSY II electron storage ring by an in-column epi-fluorescence and reflected light cryo-microscope. We demonstrate the new capability for correlative fluorescence and soft X-ray cryo-microscopy/tomography of this instrument along a typical life science experimental approach – the correlation of a fluorophore-tagged protein (pUL34-GFP of pseudorabies virus, PrV, the nuclear membrane-anchored component of the nuclear egress complex of the Herpesviridae which interacts with viral pUL31) in PrV pUL34-GFP/pUL31 coexpressing mammalian cells, with virus-induced vesicular structures in the nucleus, expanding the nucleoplasmic reticulum. Taken together, our results demonstrate new possibilities to study the role of specific proteins in substructures of adherent cells, especially of the nucleus in toto, accessible to electron microscopy in thinned samples only. PMID:22210307

  17. An animal component free medium that promotes the growth of various animal cell lines for the production of viral vaccines.

    PubMed

    Rourou, Samia; Ben Ayed, Yousr; Trabelsi, Khaled; Majoul, Samy; Kallel, Héla

    2014-05-19

    IPT-AFM is a proprietary animal component free medium that was developed for rabies virus (strain LP 2061) production in Vero cells. In the present work, we demonstrated the versatility of this medium and its ability to sustain the growth of other cell lines and different virus strains. Here, three models were presented: Vero cells/rabies virus (strain LP 2061), MRC-5 cells/measles virus (strain AIK-C) and BHK-21 cells/rabies virus (strain PV-BHK21). The cell lines were first adapted to grow in IPT-AFM, by progressive reduction of the amount of serum in the culture medium. After their adaptation, BHK-21 cells grew in suspension by forming clumps, whereas MRC-5 cells remained adherent. Then, kinetics of cell growth were studied in agitated cultures for both cell lines. In addition, kinetics of virus replication were investigated.

  18. Complex cytokine modulation of a continuous line of mink lung epithelial cells (Mv1Lu).

    PubMed

    Kelley, J; Baldor, L; Absher, M

    1992-01-01

    The continuous mink lung epithelial cell line Mv1Lu has proven to be a sensitive reporter line in the bioassay for purified TGF-beta, exhibiting a sigmoid-shaped concentration-response relationship with an EC50 of 12 pM (0.3 ng/mL). Maximal inhibition of Mv1Lu cells generates a 75-95% decrement in the number of adherent cells. However, this bioassay is not specific for TGF-beta as originally claimed. Mv1Lu cells are sensitive to other cytokines and substances found in complex biological fluids. In this study the effects of other biological response modifiers in this assay were tested and several were found to have important growth modulatory capacities that confound the quantitation of TGF-beta. EGF, TGF-alpha, fibronectin, and IGF-I all induce Mv1Lu cell proliferation. In contrast, neither PDGF (-AA, -AB, -BB) nor endotoxin (< or = 10 micrograms/mL) affect Mv1Lu cell number. TGF-beta and TNF-alpha at high concentrations (> or = 10 ng/mL) are the only cytokines examined that inhibit Mv1Lu proliferation. TGF-beta decreases final cell number both by preventing mitosis and by inhibition of adherence of cells to the uncoated dish. Several strategies are suggested to assure the specificity of this otherwise convenient bioassay for TGF-beta.

  19. Comparative adherence of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis to human buccal epithelial cells and extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Rachael P C; Williams, David W; Moran, Gary P; Coleman, David C; Sullivan, Derek J

    2014-04-01

    Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis are very closely related pathogenic yeast species. Despite their close relationship, C. albicans is a far more successful colonizer and pathogen of humans. The purpose of this study was to determine if the disparity in the virulence of the two species is attributed to differences in their ability to adhere to human buccal epithelial cells (BECs) and/or extracellular matrix proteins. When grown overnight at 30°C in yeast extract peptone dextrose, genotype 1 C. dubliniensis isolates were found to be significantly more adherent to human BECs than C. albicans or C. dubliniensis genotypes 2-4 (P < 0.001). However, when the yeast cells were grown at 37°C, no significant difference between the adhesion of C. dubliniensis genotype 1 and C. albicans to human BECs was observed, and C. dubliniensis genotype 1 and C. albicans adhered to BECs in significantly greater numbers than the other C. dubliniensis genotypes (P < 0.001). Using surface plasmon resonance analysis, C. dubliniensis isolates were found to adhere in significantly greater numbers than C. albicans to type I and IV collagen, fibronectin, laminin, vitronectin, and proline-rich peptides. These data suggest that C. albicans is not more adherent to epithelial cells or matrix proteins than C. dubliniensis and therefore other factors must contribute to the greater levels of virulence exhibited by C. albicans.

  20. Evaluation of a solid phase red cell adherence technique for platelet antibody screening.

    PubMed

    Lown, J A; Ivey, J G

    1991-09-01

    Solid-phase red-cell adherence (SPRCA) techniques in platelet serology are used mainly for crossmatching. A SPRCA method for general diagnostic application was evaluated in parallel with the platelet suspension immunofluorescence test (PIFT). Of 149 patient sera sent for investigation of thrombocytopaenia, 76 were negative and 59 positive when studied by both methods, eight positive by PIFT only and six positive by SPRCA only. The reactivity observed for 24 sera containing HLA antibodies tested with chloroquine-treated and untreated platelets was similar for both methods. All of 14 sera containing quinine-associated antibodies reacted strongly to both techniques in the presence of added quinine. In comparison, however, whereas all sera were nonreactive to SPRCA in the absence of added quinine, and with PIFT, seven of the sera reacted weakly. Titration studies with three examples of anti-PlA1 and five sera containing HLA antibodies generally showed a one doubling dilution lower titre with the SPRCA procedure. End-point interpretation, however, was more readily achieved with the SPRCA method. The SPRCA technique displays similar sensitivity and specificity to the PIFT and is recommended for use by routine hospital laboratories to screen platelet antibodies.

  1. Haemophilus ducreyi Inhibits Phagocytosis by U-937 Cells, a Human Macrophage-Like Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Gwendolyn E.; Dutro, Susan M.; Totten, Patricia A.

    2001-01-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi is a gram-negative obligate human pathogen that causes the genital ulcer disease chancroid. Chancroid lesions are deep necrotic ulcers with an immune cell infiltrate that includes macrophages. Despite the presence of these phagocytic cells, chancroid ulcers can persist for months and live H. ducreyi can be isolated from these lesions. To analyze the interaction of H. ducreyi with macrophages, we investigated the ability of H. ducreyi strain 35000 to adhere to, invade, and survive within U-937 cells, a human macrophage-like cell line. We found that although H. ducreyi strain 35000 adhered efficiently to U-937 cells, few bacteria were internalized, suggesting that H. ducreyi avoids phagocytosis by human macrophages. The few bacteria that were phagocytosed in these experiments were rapidly killed. We also found that H. ducreyi inhibits the phagocytosis of a secondary target (opsonized sheep red blood cells). Antiphagocytic activity was found in logarithmic, stationary-phase, and plate-grown cultures and was associated with whole, live bacteria but not with heat-killed cultures, sonicates, or culture supernatants. Phagocytosis was significantly inhibited after a 15-min exposure to H. ducreyi, and a multiplicity of infection of approximately 1 CFU per macrophage was sufficient to cause a significant reduction in phagocytosis by U-937 cells. Finally, all of nine H. ducreyi strains tested were antiphagocytic, suggesting that this is a common virulence mechanism for this organism. This finding suggests a mechanism by which H. ducreyi avoids killing and clearance by macrophages in chancroid lesions and inguinal lymph nodes. PMID:11447144

  2. Cell lines from MYCN transgenic murine tumours reflect the molecular and biological characteristics of human neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Andy J; Cheng, Ngan Ching; Ford, Jette; Smith, Janice; Murray, Jayne E; Flemming, Claudia; Lastowska, Maria; Jackson, Michael S; Hackett, Christopher S; Weiss, William A; Marshall, Glenn M; Kees, Ursula R; Norris, Murray D; Haber, Michelle

    2007-06-01

    Overexpression of the human MYCN oncogene driven by a tyrosine hydroxylase promoter causes tumours in transgenic mice that recapitulate the childhood cancer neuroblastoma. To establish an in vitro model to study this process, a series of isogenic cell lines were developed from these MYCN-driven murine tumours. Lines were established from tumours arising in homozygous and hemizygous MYCN transgenic mice. Hemizygous tumours gave rise to cell lines growing only in suspension. Homozygous tumours gave rise to similar suspension lines as well as morphologically distinct substrate-adherent lines characteristic of human S-type neuroblastoma cells. FISH analysis demonstrated selective MYCN transgene amplification in cell lines derived from hemizygous mice. Comparative genomic hybridisation (CGH) and fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) analysis confirmed a range of neuroblastoma-associated genetic changes in the various lines, in particular, gain of regions syntenic with human 17q. These isogenic lines together with the transgenic mice thus represent valuable models for investigating the biological characteristics of aggressive neuroblastoma.

  3. Spontaneous Cell Competition in Immortalized Mammalian Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Penzo-Méndez, Alfredo I.; Chen, Yi-Ju; Li, Jinyang; Witze, Eric S.; Stanger, Ben Z.

    2015-01-01

    Cell competition is a form of cell-cell interaction by which cells compare relative levels of fitness, resulting in the active elimination of less-fit cells, “losers,” by more-fit cells, “winners.” Here, we show that in three routinely-used mammalian cell lines – U2OS, 3T3, and MDCK cells – sub-clones arise stochastically that exhibit context-dependent competitive behavior. Specifically, cell death is elicited when winner and loser sub-clones are cultured together but not alone. Cell competition and elimination in these cell lines is caspase-dependent and requires cell-cell contact but does not require de novo RNA synthesis. Moreover, we show that the phenomenon involves differences in cellular metabolism. Hence, our study demonstrates that cell competition is a common feature of immortalized mammalian cells in vitro and implicates cellular metabolism as a mechanism by which cells sense relative levels of “fitness.” PMID:26200654

  4. The Tribolium castaneum cell line TcA: a new tool kit for cell biology.

    PubMed

    Silver, Kristopher; Jiang, Hongbo; Fu, Jinping; Phillips, Thomas W; Beeman, Richard W; Park, Yoonseong

    2014-10-30

    The red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, is an agriculturally important insect pest that has been widely used as a model organism. Recently, an adherent cell line (BCIRL-TcA-CLG1 or TcA) was developed from late pupae of the red flour beetle. Next generation transcriptome sequencing of TcA cells demonstrated expression of a wide variety of genes associated with specialized functions in chitin metabolism, immune responses and cellular and systemic RNAi pathways. Accordingly, we evaluated the sensitivity of TcA cells to dsRNA to initiate an RNAi response. TcA cells were highly sensitive to minute amounts of dsRNA, with a minimum effective dose of 100 pg/mL resulting in significant suppression of gene expression. We have also developed a plasmid containing two TcA-specific promoters, the promoter from the 40S ribosomal protein subunit (TC006550) and a bi-directional heat shock promoter (TcHS70) from the intergenic space between heat shock proteins 68a and b. These promoters have been employed to provide high levels of either constitutive (TC006550) or inducible (TcHS70) gene expression of the reporter proteins. Our results show that the TcA cell line, with its sensitivity to RNAi and functional TcA-specific promoters, is an invaluable resource for studying basic molecular and physiological questions.

  5. Experience with the Vero cell line.

    PubMed

    Montagnon, B J; Vincent-Falquet, J C

    1998-01-01

    The Vero cell line has been managed with the Cell Bank system to produce at the 142nd passage IPV, OPV and rabies vaccines since 1982 by Pasteur Mérieux Serums & Vaccins (PMsv). The safety of the cell line was regularly validated at the Working Cell Bank (WCB) level according to the WHO and European Pharmacopoeia requirements for absence of bacteria, fungi, mycoplasma and viruses. A special emphasis was devoted to research on the absence of simian viruses (SV40, SIV, Retro-D virus and simian CMV). All these specific researches were negative. At a low level of passage, the Vero cells are not tumorigenic. Vaccines have been prepared in low passage level Vero cells and together with the excellent downstream purification have resulted in excellent safety as attested by pharmacovigilance of more than 100 million doses of IPV during 12 years, more than 20 million doses of rabies vaccine during 10 years and more than 1 billion of OPV during eight years.

  6. Fibrin monomer increases platelet adherence to tumor cells in a flowing system: a possible role in metastasis?

    PubMed

    Biggerstaff, J P; Seth, N B; Meyer, T V; Amirkhosravi, A; Francis, J L

    1998-12-15

    Considerable evidence exists linking hemostasis and malignancy. Platelet adhesion to tumor cells has been implicated in the metastatic process. Plasma fibrinogen (Fg) and fibrin (Fn) monomer, increased in cancer, may play a role in tumor biology. Binding of Fn monomer to tumor cells and its effect on platelet-tumor cell adhesion in a flowing system were studied. Fn monomer was produced by adding thrombin (1 micro/mL) to FXIII- and plasminogen-free Fg in the presence of Gly-Pro-Arg-Pro (GPRP) amide. Fn monomer binding to live A375 cells was visualized by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Adherent cells were perfused for 1h with Fn monomer, washed and stained in situ with anti-human Fn (American Biogenetic Sciences, Inc.) followed by goat anti-mouse IgG(FITC). Platelet adherence to Fn monomer treated A375 cells was performed under flow conditions by passing platelets (5x10(4)/microl 0.25 mL/min; labeled with the carbocyanine dye DiI) over the tumor cells for 30 min. CLSM images were obtained after washing. There was considerable binding of Fn monomer, but not Fg alone. Platelets adhered relatively weakly to untreated A375 cells and this was not significantly affected by pre-treatment of the tumor cells with fibrinogen or thrombin. However, pre-treatment with Fn monomer resulted in extensive platelet binding to tumor cells, suggesting that coagulation activation and the subsequent increase in circulating Fn monomer may enhance platelet adhesion to circulating tumor cells and thereby facilitate metastatic spread.

  7. Fibrin monomer increases platelet adherence to tumor cells in a flowing system: a possible role in metastasis?

    PubMed

    Biggerstaff, J P; Seth, N B; Meyer, T V; Amirkhosravi, A; Francis, J L

    1998-12-15

    Considerable evidence exists linking hemostasis and malignancy. Platelet adhesion to tumor cells has been implicated in the metastatic process. Plasma fibrinogen (Fg) and fibrin (Fn) monomer, increased in cancer, may play a role in tumor biology. Binding of Fn monomer to tumor cells and its effect on platelet-tumor cell adhesion in a flowing system were studied. Fn monomer was produced by adding thrombin (1 micro/mL) to FXIII- and plasminogen-free Fg in the presence of Gly-Pro-Arg-Pro (GPRP) amide. Fn monomer binding to live A375 cells was visualized by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Adherent cells were perfused for 1h with Fn monomer, washed and stained in situ with anti-human Fn (American Biogenetic Sciences, Inc.) followed by goat anti-mouse IgG(FITC). Platelet adherence to Fn monomer treated A375 cells was performed under flow conditions by passing platelets (5x10(4)/microl 0.25 mL/min; labeled with the carbocyanine dye DiI) over the tumor cells for 30 min. CLSM images were obtained after washing. There was considerable binding of Fn monomer, but not Fg alone. Platelets adhered relatively weakly to untreated A375 cells and this was not significantly affected by pre-treatment of the tumor cells with fibrinogen or thrombin. However, pre-treatment with Fn monomer resulted in extensive platelet binding to tumor cells, suggesting that coagulation activation and the subsequent increase in circulating Fn monomer may enhance platelet adhesion to circulating tumor cells and thereby facilitate metastatic spread. PMID:9886911

  8. An adherent cell perifusion technique to study the overall and sequential response of rat alveolar macrophages to toxic substances.

    PubMed Central

    Forget, G; Lacroix, M J; Cadieux, A; Calvert, R; Grose, J H; Sirois, P

    1983-01-01

    Essentially pure (97%) alveolar macrophages were isolated by bronchoalveolar lavage of rats with warm (37 degrees C) PBS solution. These cells were allowed to adhere to the inside walls of open-ended glass cylinders which were closed off at each end by three-way stopcocks. The adhering cells were perifused with RPMI-1640 medium supplemented with 5% fetal bovine serum for 18 hr at the rate of 1 mL/hr, and the effluent medium was collected automatically in 2-mL aliquots. Cell recoveries and viabilities did not differ from those found for Petri cultures treated similarly, indicating that the perifusion method under study offered an adequate milieu for short-term primary cultures. The alveolar macrophages in culture were subjected to the presence of particulate (chrysotile asbestos) and soluble (phorbol myristate) toxicants, and their response was monitored in the effluent medium by measuring the release of prostaglandins (PGE) by radioimmunoassay. A significant increase in the sequential release of PGE was observed in the presence of asbestos (100 micrograms/mL) or phorbol myristate (200 ng/mL). Treatment of the cells with indomethacin (20 microM) completely abolished the release of PGE stimulated with phorbol myristate. A cumulative response to the toxicants was also observed when cells were harvested manually from the chambers: asbestos caused a 2-fold increase in cell mortality relative to control, while phorbol myristate brought about a 3-fold increase in the number of dead cells. This effect was not prevented by the presence of indomethacin. Cell aggregation was also observed when cells were perifused in the presence of phorbol myristate, whether indomethacin was present or absent. Our results indicate that the cell perifusion system combines the advantages of conventional adherent cell cultures (viability, aggregation) with those of perifusion techniques (sequential metabolism studies). Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 6. PMID:6641651

  9. Identification of Cell Surface-Exposed Proteins Involved in the Fimbria-Mediated Adherence of Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli to Intestinal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Izquierdo, Mariana; Navarro-Garcia, Fernando; Nava-Acosta, Raul; Nataro, James P.; Ruiz-Perez, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Fimbria-mediated adherence to the intestinal epithelia is a key step in enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) pathogenesis. To date, four fimbriae have been described for EAEC; aggregative adherence fimbria II (AAF/II) is the most important adherence factor for EAEC prototype strain 042. Previously, we described results showing that extracellular matrix (ECM) components might be involved in the recognition of AAF/II fimbriae by intestinal cells. In this study, we sought to identify novel potential receptors on intestinal epithelial cells recognized by the AAF/II fimbriae. Purified AafA-dsc protein, the major subunit of AAF/II fimbriae, was incubated with a monolayer of T84 cells, cross-linked to the surface-exposed T84 cell proteins, and immunoprecipitated by using anti-AafA antibodies. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis of cellular proteins bound to AafA-dsc protein identified laminin (previously recognized as a potential receptor for AAF/II) and cytokeratin 8 (CK8). Involvement of the major subunit of AAF/II fimbriae (AafA protein) in the binding to recombinant CK8 was confirmed by adherence assays with purified AAF/II fimbriae, AafA-dsc protein, and strain 042. Moreover, HEp-2 cells transfected with CK8 small interfering RNA (siRNA) showed reduced 042 adherence compared with cells transfected with scrambled siRNA as a control. Adherence of 042 to HEp-2 cells preincubated with antibodies against ECM proteins or CK8 was substantially reduced. Altogether, our results supported the idea of a role of CK8 as a potential receptor for EAEC. PMID:24516112

  10. Identification of cell surface-exposed proteins involved in the fimbria-mediated adherence of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli to intestinal cells.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, Mariana; Navarro-Garcia, Fernando; Nava-Acosta, Raul; Nataro, James P; Ruiz-Perez, Fernando; Farfan, Mauricio J

    2014-04-01

    Fimbria-mediated adherence to the intestinal epithelia is a key step in enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) pathogenesis. To date, four fimbriae have been described for EAEC; aggregative adherence fimbria II (AAF/II) is the most important adherence factor for EAEC prototype strain 042. Previously, we described results showing that extracellular matrix (ECM) components might be involved in the recognition of AAF/II fimbriae by intestinal cells. In this study, we sought to identify novel potential receptors on intestinal epithelial cells recognized by the AAF/II fimbriae. Purified AafA-dsc protein, the major subunit of AAF/II fimbriae, was incubated with a monolayer of T84 cells, cross-linked to the surface-exposed T84 cell proteins, and immunoprecipitated by using anti-AafA antibodies. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis of cellular proteins bound to AafA-dsc protein identified laminin (previously recognized as a potential receptor for AAF/II) and cytokeratin 8 (CK8). Involvement of the major subunit of AAF/II fimbriae (AafA protein) in the binding to recombinant CK8 was confirmed by adherence assays with purified AAF/II fimbriae, AafA-dsc protein, and strain 042. Moreover, HEp-2 cells transfected with CK8 small interfering RNA (siRNA) showed reduced 042 adherence compared with cells transfected with scrambled siRNA as a control. Adherence of 042 to HEp-2 cells preincubated with antibodies against ECM proteins or CK8 was substantially reduced. Altogether, our results supported the idea of a role of CK8 as a potential receptor for EAEC.

  11. Identification of cell surface-exposed proteins involved in the fimbria-mediated adherence of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli to intestinal cells.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, Mariana; Navarro-Garcia, Fernando; Nava-Acosta, Raul; Nataro, James P; Ruiz-Perez, Fernando; Farfan, Mauricio J

    2014-04-01

    Fimbria-mediated adherence to the intestinal epithelia is a key step in enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) pathogenesis. To date, four fimbriae have been described for EAEC; aggregative adherence fimbria II (AAF/II) is the most important adherence factor for EAEC prototype strain 042. Previously, we described results showing that extracellular matrix (ECM) components might be involved in the recognition of AAF/II fimbriae by intestinal cells. In this study, we sought to identify novel potential receptors on intestinal epithelial cells recognized by the AAF/II fimbriae. Purified AafA-dsc protein, the major subunit of AAF/II fimbriae, was incubated with a monolayer of T84 cells, cross-linked to the surface-exposed T84 cell proteins, and immunoprecipitated by using anti-AafA antibodies. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis of cellular proteins bound to AafA-dsc protein identified laminin (previously recognized as a potential receptor for AAF/II) and cytokeratin 8 (CK8). Involvement of the major subunit of AAF/II fimbriae (AafA protein) in the binding to recombinant CK8 was confirmed by adherence assays with purified AAF/II fimbriae, AafA-dsc protein, and strain 042. Moreover, HEp-2 cells transfected with CK8 small interfering RNA (siRNA) showed reduced 042 adherence compared with cells transfected with scrambled siRNA as a control. Adherence of 042 to HEp-2 cells preincubated with antibodies against ECM proteins or CK8 was substantially reduced. Altogether, our results supported the idea of a role of CK8 as a potential receptor for EAEC. PMID:24516112

  12. The adherence of endothelial cells to Dacron induces the expression of the intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1).

    PubMed Central

    Margiotta, M S; Robertson, F S; Greco, R S

    1992-01-01

    The intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1) is a glycoprotein expressed by endothelial cells activated by cytokines. The lymphocyte-function-associated antigen (LFA-1) is an integrin expressed by activated white blood cells. Together, this receptor-ligand pair is responsible, in part, for the localization of neutrophils at sites of inflammation. Using an in vitro model, the authors studied the binding of antibodies against ICAM-1 by human saphenous vein endothelial cells (HSVEC) adherent to Dacron and control cultureware. After adherence to Dacron pretreated with fibronectin, 24% more HSVEC-bound antibody against ICAM-1 compared with HSVEC on controls. In contrast, 90% more HSVEC adherent to Dacron incubated with whole blood bound anti-ICAM-1 antibodies. These cells bound 17.7-fold greater amounts of antibody compared with HSVEC on controls. Pretreating Dacron with plasma resulted in no increase in antibody binding compared with control. Our studies suggest that the cellular components of blood in contact with Dacron create a microenvironment that activates HSVEC and enhances ICAM-1 expression. Induction of this adhesion molecule may play a pivotal role in the migration and localization of leukocytes at the site of the vascular prosthesis. PMID:1359845

  13. Cell receptor and surface ligand density effects on dynamic states of adhering circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiangjun; Cheung, Luthur Siu-Lun; Schroeder, Joyce A; Jiang, Linan; Zohar, Yitshak

    2011-10-21

    Dynamic states of cancer cells moving under shear flow in an antibody-functionalized microchannel are investigated experimentally and theoretically. The cell motion is analyzed with the aid of a simplified physical model featuring a receptor-coated rigid sphere moving above a solid surface with immobilized ligands. The motion of the sphere is described by the Langevin equation accounting for the hydrodynamic loadings, gravitational force, receptor-ligand bindings, and thermal fluctuations; the receptor-ligand bonds are modeled as linear springs. Depending on the applied shear flow rate, three dynamic states of cell motion have been identified: (i) free motion, (ii) rolling adhesion, and (iii) firm adhesion. Of particular interest is the fraction of captured circulating tumor cells, defined as the capture ratio, via specific receptor-ligand bonds. The cell capture ratio decreases with increasing shear flow rate with a characteristic rate. Based on both experimental and theoretical results, the characteristic flow rate increases monotonically with increasing either cell-receptor or surface-ligand density within certain ranges. Utilizing it as a scaling parameter, flow-rate dependent capture ratios for various cell-surface combinations collapse onto a single curve described by an exponential formula.

  14. Inhibition of the differentiation of human myeloid cell lines by redox changes induced through glutathione depletion.

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, F; Agosti, V; Morrone, G; Morra, F; Cuomo, C; Russo, T; Venuta, S; Cimino, F

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the effect of redox changes in vivo on the differentiation of two human myeloid cell lines, HL-60 and KG-1. The glutathione-depleting agent diethyl maleate (DEM) prevented the development of differentiated features in response to phorbol esters, including adherence of the cells to plastic surfaces and repression of the myeloperoxidase and CD34 genes. Moreover, DEM abolished phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-induced activation of the transcription factors AP-1 and Egr-1, suggesting that inhibition of differentiation may be due, at least in part, to redox modifications of these proteins. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7519845

  15. IL-6 acts on endothelial cells to preferentially increase their adherence for lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    WATSON, C; WHITTAKER, S; SMITH, N; VORA, A J; DUMONDE, D C; BROWN, K A

    1996-01-01

    Using a quantitative monolayer adhesion assay, the current report shows that treatment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) with IL-6 increases their adhesiveness for blood lymphocytes, particularly CD4+ cells, but not for polymorphonuclear cells and monocytes. This effect, which was most pronounced when using low concentrations of the cytokine (0.1–1.0 U/ml) and a short incubation period (4 h), was also apparent with microvascular endothelial cells and a hybrid endothelial cell line. Skin lesions from patients with mycosis fungoides contain high levels of IL-6, and blood lymphocytes from patients with this disorder also exhibited an enhanced adhesion to IL-6-treated HUVEC. The cytokine enhanced intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression and induced the expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and E-selectin on endothelial cells. Antibody blocking studies demonstrated that the vascular adhesion molecules ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and E-selectin and the leucocyte integrin LFA-1 all contributed to lymphocyte binding to endothelium activated by IL-6. It is proposed that IL-6 may be involved in the recruitment of lymphocytes into non-lymphoid tissue. PMID:8697617

  16. IL-6 acts on endothelial cells to preferentially increase their adherence for lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Watson, C; Whittaker, S; Smith, N; Vora, A J; Dumonde, D C; Brown, K A

    1996-07-01

    Using a quantitative monolayer adhesion assay, the current report shows that treatment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) with IL-6 increases their adhesiveness for blood lymphocytes, particularly CD4+ cells, but not for polymorphonuclear cells and monocytes. This effect, which was most pronounced when using low concentrations of the cytokine (0.1-1.0 U/ml) and a short incubation period (4h), was also apparent with microvascular endothelial cells and a hybrid endothelial cell line. Skin lesions from patients with mycosis fungoides contain high levels of IL-6, and blood lymphocytes from patients with this disorder also exhibited an enhanced adhesion to IL-6-treated HUVEC. The cytokine enhanced intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression and induced the expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and E-selectin on endothelial cells. Antibody blocking studies demonstrated that the vascular adhesion molecules ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and E-selectin and the leucocyte integrin LFA-1 all contributed to lymphocyte binding to endothelium activated by IL-6. It is proposed that IL-6 may be involved in the recruitment of lymphocytes into non-lymphoid tissue.

  17. Spheroid body-forming cells in the human gastric cancer cell line MKN-45 possess cancer stem cell properties.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianming; Ma, Lilin; Xu, Junfei; Liu, Chun; Zhang, Jianguo; Liu, Jie; Chen, Ruixin; Zhou, Youlang

    2013-02-01

    The cancer stem cell theory hypothesizes that cancer stem cells (CSCs), which possess self-renewal and other stem cell properties, are regarded as the cause of tumor formation, recurrence and metastasis. The isolation and identification of CSCs could help to develop novel therapeutic strategies specifically targeting CSCs. In this study, we enriched gastric cancer stem cells through spheroid body formation by cultivating the human gastric cancer cell line MKN-45 in defined serum-free medium. The stemness characteristics of spheroid body-forming cells, including self-renewal, proliferation, chemoresistance, tumorigenicity of the MKN-45 spheroid body-forming cells were evaluated, and the expression levels of stemness genes and related proteins in the MKN-45 spheroid body-forming cells were assessed. Furthermore, immunofluorescence staining for the stem cell markers on spheroid body-forming cells was examined to evaluate the association between stemness factors (Oct4, Sox2, Nanog) and the proposed CSC marker CD44. Our data demonstrated that non-adherent spheroid body-forming cells from the gastric cancer cell line MKN-45 cultured in stem cell-conditioned medium possessed gastric CSC properties, such as persistent self-renewal, extensive proliferation, drug resistance, high tumorigenic capacity and overexpression of CSC-related genes and proteins (Oct4, Sox2, Nanog and CD44), compared with the parental cells. More importantly, CD44-positive cells co-expressing the pluripotency genes Oct4, Sox2 and Nanog may represent gastric CSCs. Further experiments using more refined selection criteria such as a combination of two or multiple markers would be useful to specifically identify and purify CSCs.

  18. Solid Phase Red Cell Adherence Assay: a tubeless method for pretransfusion testing and other applications in transfusion science.

    PubMed

    Ching, Eric

    2012-06-01

    Solid Phase Red Cell Adherence Assay (SPRCA) is one of the two tubeless methods developed to improve sensitivity and specificity in blood group serology. The SPRCA (solid phase) and the column agglutination (gel) technology have gained wide acceptance following successful adaptation to fully automated platforms, The purpose of this paper is to discuss the development, principle, procedures as well as laboratory and clinical applications of the SPRCA in transfusion medicine.

  19. Establishment of an adherent cell feeder layer from human umbilical cord blood for support of long-term hematopoietic progenitor cell growth.

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Z Q; Burkholder, J K; Qiu, P; Schultz, J C; Shahidi, N T; Yang, N S

    1994-01-01

    Previous attempts to establish a stromal cell feeder layer from human umbilical cord blood (HUCB) have met with very limited success. It has been suggested that there is an insufficient number of stromal precursor cells in HUCB to form a hematopoietic-supporting feeder layer in primary cultures. The present study shows that HUCB does contain a significant accessory cell population that routinely develops into a confluent, adherent cell layer under defined primary culture conditions. HUCB-derived adherent layers were shown to support long-term hematopoietic activity for an average of 4 months. This was achieved by using a customized coverslip with a modified surface structure as the cell attachment substratum and using a specialized culture feeding regime. We have characterized the various cell types (including fibroblasts, macrophages, and endothelial cells) and extracellular matrix proteins (including fibronectin, collagen III, and laminin) that were present in abundance in the HUCB-derived adherent cell layer. In contrast, oil red O-staining fat cells were rarely detected. ELISA and bioassays showed that stem cell factor and interleukin 6 were produced by the HUCB stromal cell cultures, but interleukin 3 or granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor was not detected. Application of this hematopoietic culture system to transgenic and gene therapy studies of stem cells is discussed. Images PMID:7527553

  20. Suppression of unprimed T and B cells in antibody responses by irradiation-resistant and plastic-adherent suppressor cells in Toxoplasma gondii-infected mice.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Y; Kobayashi, A

    1983-01-01

    In the acute phase of Toxoplasma infection, the function of both helper T and B cells was suppressed in primary antibody responses to dinitrophenol (DNP)-conjugated protein antigens. During the course of infection, the suppressive effect on T cells seems to continue longer than that on B cells, since suppression in responses to sheep erythrocytes, a T-dependent antigen, persisted longer than those to DNP-Ficoll, a T-independent antigen. Plastic-adherent cells from the spleens of Toxoplasma-infected and X-irradiated (400 rads) mice had strong suppressor activity in primary anti-sheep erythrocyte antibody responses of normal mouse spleen cells in vitro. These data suggest that the activation of irradiation-resistant and plastic-adherent suppressor cells causes the suppression of both T and B cells in Toxoplasma-infected mice. PMID:6219954

  1. Contribution of Efa1/LifA to the adherence of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli to epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Badea, Luminita; Doughty, Stephen; Nicholls, Larissa; Sloan, Joan; Robins-Browne, Roy M; Hartland, Elizabeth L

    2003-05-01

    Enteropathogenic E. coli(EPEC) is an important diarrhoeal pathogen that induces characteristic lesions on the host intestine termed attaching and effacing (A/E) lesions. In this study we have examined the contribution of a large gene, efa1, which is present in all A/E pathogens, to the adherence phenotype of EPEC. An efa- derivative of EPEC JPN15 was constructed and this mutant was significantly less adherent to epithelial cells than the parent strain. The JPN15 efa- derivative was FAS-positive, produced EspA filaments and showed comparable levels of EspA secretion to JPN15. In addition, polyclonal antibodies raised to Efa1 partially inhibited the adherence of JPN15 to cultured epithelial cells. In further work, we showed that human and rabbit hosts infected with an A/E pathogen produced antibodies to Efa1 and we observed that the truncated form of efa1 present in EHEC O157:H7 was specific to that serotype. Generally efa1 was present in its entirety in the genomes of other A/E pathogens. Overall our data suggest that Efa1 has host cell binding activity, at least in tissue culture, and that it is produced during infection. These findings suggest that Efa1 may play a direct role in the pathogenesis of infections caused by A/E pathogens.

  2. Development, characterization, and optimization of a new suspension chicken-induced pluripotent stem cell line for the production of Newcastle disease vaccine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Traditionally, substrates for production of vaccines have been embryonated eggs or adherent cell culture. The daunting challenge of scaling up these technologies in the face of an outbreak has been a limitation for industrial applicability. Suspension cell lines are better suited in many ways to e...

  3. Atomic Force Microscopy Reveals a Role for Endothelial Cell ICAM-1 Expression in Bladder Cancer Cell Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, Valérie M.; Duperray, Alain; Sundar Rajan, Vinoth; Verdier, Claude

    2014-01-01

    Cancer metastasis is a complex process involving cell-cell interactions mediated by cell adhesive molecules. In this study we determine the adhesion strength between an endothelial cell monolayer and tumor cells of different metastatic potentials using Atomic Force Microscopy. We show that the rupture forces of receptor-ligand bonds increase with retraction speed and range between 20 and 70 pN. It is shown that the most invasive cell lines (T24, J82) form the strongest bonds with endothelial cells. Using ICAM-1 coated substrates and a monoclonal antibody specific for ICAM-1, we demonstrate that ICAM-1 serves as a key receptor on endothelial cells and that its interactions with ligands expressed by tumor cells are correlated with the rupture forces obtained with the most invasive cancer cells (T24, J82). For the less invasive cancer cells (RT112), endothelial ICAM-1 does not seem to play any role in the adhesion process. Moreover, a detailed analysis of the distribution of rupture forces suggests that ICAM-1 interacts preferentially with one ligand on T24 cancer cells and with two ligands on J82 cancer cells. Possible counter receptors for these interactions are CD43 and MUC1, two known ligands for ICAM-1 which are expressed by these cancer cells. PMID:24857933

  4. OmpD but not OmpC is involved in adherence of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium to human cells.

    PubMed

    Hara-Kaonga, Bochiwe; Pistole, Thomas G

    2004-09-01

    Conflicting reports exist regarding the role of porins OmpC and OmpD in infections due to Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. This study investigated the role of these porins in bacterial adherence to human macrophages and intestinal epithelial cells. ompC and ompD mutant strains were created by transposon mutagenesis using P22-mediated transduction of Tn10 and Tn5 insertions, respectively, into wild-type strain 14028. Fluorescein-labeled wild-type and mutant bacteria were incubated with host cells at various bacteria to cell ratios for 1 h at 37 degrees C and analyzed by flow cytometry. The mean fluorescence intensity of cells with associated wild-type and mutant bacteria was used to estimate the number of bacteria bound per host cell. Adherence was also measured by fluorescence microscopy. Neither assay showed a significant difference in binding of the ompC mutant and wild-type strains to the human cells. In contrast, the ompD mutant exhibited lowered binding to both cell types. Our findings suggest that OmpD but not OmpC is involved in the recognition of Salmonella serovar Typhimurium by human macrophages and intestinal epithelial cells.

  5. Morphological and biochemical changes in a hematopoietic cell line induced by jacalin, a lectin derived from Artocarpus integrifolia.

    PubMed

    Yagi, M; Campos-Neto, A; Gollahon, K

    1995-04-01

    Treatment of the human erythroleukemia cell line K562 with the galactose-binding lectin, jacalin, results in rapid and profound alterations in the morphology and biochemistry of the cells. Within minutes of lectin addition, the cells adhere to the plastic tissue culture surface, and within hours, the cells spread on the surface, acquiring a monocyte-like appearance. Jacalin treatment results in elevated expression of CD61 (integrin beta 3) and CD14, a monocyte-associated cell surface antigen. These results suggest that jacalin treatment of K562 cells triggers intracellular events that result in differentiation along the monocyte lineage.

  6. Methanocaldococcus villosus sp. nov., a heavily flagellated archaeon that adheres to surfaces and forms cell-cell contacts.

    PubMed

    Bellack, Annett; Huber, Harald; Rachel, Reinhard; Wanner, Gerhard; Wirth, Reinhard

    2011-06-01

    A novel chemolithoautotrophic, hyperthermophilic methanogen was isolated from a submarine hydrothermal system at the Kolbeinsey Ridge, north of Iceland. Based on its 16S rRNA gene sequence, the strain belongs to the order Methanococcales within the genus Methanocaldococcus, with approximately 95 % sequence similarity to Methanocaldococcus jannaschii as its closest relative. Cells of the novel organism stained Gram-negative and appeared as regular to irregular cocci possessing more than 50 polar flagella. These cell appendages mediated not only motility but also adherence to abiotic surfaces and the formation of cell-cell contacts. The new isolate grew at 55-90 °C, with optimum growth at 80 °C. The optimum NaCl concentration for growth was 2.5 % (w/v), and the optimal pH was 6.5. The cells gained their energy exclusively by reduction of CO(2) with H(2). Selenate, tungstate and yeast extract stimulated growth significantly. The genome size was determined to be in the range 1.8-2.0 kb, and the G+C content of the genomic DNA was 30 mol%. Despite being physiologically nearly identical to the other members of the genus Methanocaldococcus, analysis of whole-cell proteins revealed significant differences. Based on the results from phylogenetic, morphological and protein analyses, we conclude that the novel strain represents a novel species of the genus Methanocaldococcus, for which the name Methanocaldococcus villosus sp. nov. is proposed (type strain KIN24-T80(T)  = DSM 22612(T)  = JCM 16315(T)). PMID:20622057

  7. Cytosine methylation profiling of cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Ehrich, Mathias; Turner, Julia; Gibbs, Peter; Lipton, Lara; Giovanneti, Mara; Cantor, Charles; van den Boom, Dirk

    2008-01-01

    DNA-methylation changes in human cancer are complex and vary between the different types of cancer. Capturing this epigenetic variability in an atlas of DNA-methylation changes will be beneficial for basic research as well as translational medicine. Hypothesis-free approaches that interrogate methylation patterns genome-wide have already generated promising results. However, these methods are still limited by their quantitative accuracy and the number of CpG sites that can be assessed individually. Here, we use a unique approach to measure quantitative methylation patterns in a set of >400 candidate genes. In this high-resolution study, we employed a cell-line model consisting of 59 cancer cell lines provided by the National Cancer Institute and six healthy control tissues for discovery of methylation differences in cancer-related genes. To assess the effect of cell culturing, we validated the results from colon cancer cell lines by using clinical colon cancer specimens. Our results show that a large proportion of genes (78 of 400 genes) are epigenetically altered in cancer. Although most genes show methylation changes in only one tumor type (35 genes), we also found a set of genes that changed in many different forms of cancer (seven genes). This dataset can easily be expanded to develop a more comprehensive and ultimately complete map of quantitative methylation changes. Our methylation data also provide an ideal starting point for further translational research where the results can be combined with existing large-scale datasets to develop an approach that integrates epigenetic, transcriptional, and mutational findings. PMID:18353987

  8. Microplates with integrated oxygen sensors for kinetic cell respiration measurement and cytotoxicity testing in primary and secondary cell lines.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Rahul Ravi; Koch-Kirsch, Yvonne; Maas, Ruth; John, Gernot T; Krause, Christian; Heinzle, Elmar

    2005-06-01

    This paper presents a cytotoxicity and cell respiration assay that is nondestructive and kinetic. It makes use of 96-well microplates integrated with oxygen sensors. The oxygen signal monitored on-line gives an indication of the cell viability. We show its application for suspension cell lines (Chinese hamster ovary and HL60 cells) as well as adherent (Caco2 cells) and primary (rat hepatocytes) cells using well-known cytotoxic compounds (sodium azide, diclofenac, clozapine, sodium dodecyl sulfate, 2-thiouracil, tamoxifen, and tranylcypromine). The 50% lethality concentration (LC50) obtained from the assay is compared with the standard 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2- yl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide end-point assay. The cells can be grown directly in the plates, and the assay requires no further reagents or processing. The cells can be harvested for further analysis, if required. The on-line dynamic measurement allows the calculation of LC50 as a function of exposure time. LC50 was shown to decrease with time in HL60 cells. The dynamics of this process was considerably different for the three compounds sodium dodecyl sulfate, tamoxifen, and diclofenac, indicating a large potential of application of this method for cell death studies. The assay system can be applied to almost any cell-based systems with little adaptation. The assay is robust, flexible, and applicable for medium- to high-throughput systems requiring only minimal handling and no additional agent.

  9. Escherichia coli isolated from a Crohn's disease patient adheres, invades, and induces inflammatory responses in polarized intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Eaves-Pyles, Tonyia; Allen, Christopher A; Taormina, Joanna; Swidsinski, Alexander; Tutt, Christopher B; Jezek, G Eric; Islas-Islas, Martha; Torres, Alfredo G

    2008-07-01

    Inflammatory diseases of the intestinal tract are a major health concern both in the United States and around the world. Evidence now suggests that a new category of Escherichia coli, designated Adherent Invasive E. coli (AIEC) is highly prevalent in Crohn's Disease (CD) patients. AIEC strains have been shown to colonize and adhere to intestinal epithelial cells (IEC). However, the role AIEC strains play in the induction of an inflammatory response is not known. Therefore, we examined several E. coli strains (designated LF82, O83:H1, 6604 and 6655) that were isolated from CD patients for their ability to induce inflammation in two IEC, Caco-2BBe and T-84 cells. Results showed that each strain had varying abilities to adhere to and invade IEC as well as induced cytokine secretion from polarized IEC. However, E. coli O83:H1 displayed the best characteristics of AIEC strains as compared to the prototype AIEC strain LF82, inducing cytokine secretion from IEC and promoting immune cell migration through IEC. Upon further analysis, E. coli O83:H1 did not harbor virulence genes present in known pathogenic intestinal organisms. Further characterization of E. coli O83:H1 virulence determinants showed that a non-flagellated O83:H1 strain significantly decreased the organism's ability to adhere to and invade both IEC and elicit IEC cytokine secretion compared to the wild type and complemented strains. These findings demonstrate that E. coli O83:H1 possesses the characteristics of the AIEC LF82 strain that may contribute to the low-grade, chronic inflammation observed in Crohn's disease. PMID:17900983

  10. Epithelial cell invasion and adherence directed by the enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli tib locus is associated with a 104-kilodalton outer membrane protein.

    PubMed Central

    Elsinghorst, E A; Weitz, J A

    1994-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is capable of invading epithelial cell lines derived from the human colon and ileocecum. Two separate loci (tia and tib) that direct noninvasive E. coli HB101 to adhere to and invade intestinal epithelial cells have previously been cosmid cloned from ETEC H10407. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of cellular fractions from tib-positive HB101 shows that the tib locus directs the synthesis of a 104-kDa outer membrane protein (the TibA protein). The tib locus was subcloned to a maximum of 6.7 kb and mutagenized with transposon Tn5. Production of TibA was directly correlated with the capacity of the subclones and Tn5 mutants to invade and adhere to epithelial cells, suggesting that TibA was required for these phenotypes. The position and direction of transcription of the tibA gene were identified by complementation and in vivo T7 RNA polymerase-promoter induction experiments. The role of the tib locus in epithelial cell invasion was confirmed by the construction of chromosomal deletion derivatives in H10407. These deletion mutants invaded epithelial cells at about 15% of the parental level and were fully complemented by plasmids bearing the tib locus. The size and function of the TibA protein are similar to those of invasin from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis (103 kDa). However, a tib probe did not hybridize with the gene encoding invasin. Hybridization analyses of genomic DNA from a wide variety of pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacteria, including Salmonella, Shigella, Yersinia, and Escherichia species, indicate that the tib locus is unique to specific ETEC strains. Images PMID:8039917

  11. Epithelial cell invasion and adherence directed by the enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli tib locus is associated with a 104-kilodalton outer membrane protein.

    PubMed

    Elsinghorst, E A; Weitz, J A

    1994-08-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is capable of invading epithelial cell lines derived from the human colon and ileocecum. Two separate loci (tia and tib) that direct noninvasive E. coli HB101 to adhere to and invade intestinal epithelial cells have previously been cosmid cloned from ETEC H10407. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of cellular fractions from tib-positive HB101 shows that the tib locus directs the synthesis of a 104-kDa outer membrane protein (the TibA protein). The tib locus was subcloned to a maximum of 6.7 kb and mutagenized with transposon Tn5. Production of TibA was directly correlated with the capacity of the subclones and Tn5 mutants to invade and adhere to epithelial cells, suggesting that TibA was required for these phenotypes. The position and direction of transcription of the tibA gene were identified by complementation and in vivo T7 RNA polymerase-promoter induction experiments. The role of the tib locus in epithelial cell invasion was confirmed by the construction of chromosomal deletion derivatives in H10407. These deletion mutants invaded epithelial cells at about 15% of the parental level and were fully complemented by plasmids bearing the tib locus. The size and function of the TibA protein are similar to those of invasin from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis (103 kDa). However, a tib probe did not hybridize with the gene encoding invasin. Hybridization analyses of genomic DNA from a wide variety of pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacteria, including Salmonella, Shigella, Yersinia, and Escherichia species, indicate that the tib locus is unique to specific ETEC strains. PMID:8039917

  12. Stationary nanoliter droplet array with a substrate of choice for single adherent/nonadherent cell incubation and analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shemesh, Jonathan; Ben Arye, Tom; Avesar, Jonathan; Kang, Joo H.; Fine, Amir; Super, Michael; Meller, Amit; Ingber, Donald E.; Levenberg, Shulamit

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic water-in-oil droplets that serve as separate, chemically isolated compartments can be applied for single-cell analysis; however, to investigate encapsulated cells effectively over prolonged time periods, an array of droplets must remain stationary on a versatile substrate for optimal cell compatibility. We present here a platform of unique geometry and substrate versatility that generates a stationary nanodroplet array by using wells branching off a main microfluidic channel. These droplets are confined by multiple sides of a nanowell and are in direct contact with a biocompatible substrate of choice. The device is operated by a unique and reversed loading procedure that eliminates the need for fine pressure control or external tubing. Fluorocarbon oil isolates the droplets and provides soluble oxygen for the cells. By using this approach, the metabolic activity of single adherent cells was monitored continuously over time, and the concentration of viable pathogens in blood-derived samples was determined directly by measuring the number of colony-formed droplets. The method is simple to operate, requires a few microliters of reagent volume, is portable, is reusable, and allows for cell retrieval. This technology may be particularly useful for multiplexed assays for which prolonged and simultaneous visual inspection of many isolated single adherent or nonadherent cells is required. PMID:25053808

  13. Mogoltacin enhances vincristine cytotoxicity in human transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) cell line.

    PubMed

    Behnam Rassouli, F; Matin, M M; Iranshahi, M; Bahrami, A R; Neshati, V; Mollazadeh, S; Neshati, Z

    2009-03-01

    Bladder cancer is the second common cancer of the genitourinary system throughout the world and intravesical chemotherapy is usually used to reduce tumour recurrence and progression. Human transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is an epithelial-like adherent cell line originally established from primary bladder carcinoma. Here we report the effect of mogoltacin, a sesquiterpene coumarin from Ferula badrakema on TCC cells. Mogoltacin was isolated from the fruits of F. badrakema, using silica gel column chromatography and preparative thin layer chromatography. Mogoltacin did not have any significant cytotoxicity effect on neoplastic TCC cells at 16, 32, 64, 128, 200 and 600 microg ml(-1) concentrations. In order to analyse its combination effect, TCC cells were cultured in the presence of various combining concentrations of mogoltacin and vincristine. Cells were then observed for morphological changes (by light microscopy) and cytotoxicity using MTT assay. The effect of mogoltacin on vincristine toxicity was studied after 24, 48 and 72 h of drug administration. The results of MTT assay showed that mogoltacin can significantly enhance the cytotoxicity of vincristine and confirmed the morphological observations. Results revealed that combination of 40 microg ml(-1) vincristine with 16 microg ml(-1) mogoltacin increased the cytotoxicity of vincristine after 48 h by 32.8%.

  14. CellLineNavigator: a workbench for cancer cell line analysis.

    PubMed

    Krupp, Markus; Itzel, Timo; Maass, Thorsten; Hildebrandt, Andreas; Galle, Peter R; Teufel, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The CellLineNavigator database, freely available at http://www.medicalgenomics.org/celllinenavigator, is a web-based workbench for large scale comparisons of a large collection of diverse cell lines. It aims to support experimental design in the fields of genomics, systems biology and translational biomedical research. Currently, this compendium holds genome wide expression profiles of 317 different cancer cell lines, categorized into 57 different pathological states and 28 individual tissues. To enlarge the scope of CellLineNavigator, the database was furthermore closely linked to commonly used bioinformatics databases and knowledge repositories. To ensure easy data access and search ability, a simple data and an intuitive querying interface were implemented. It allows the user to explore and filter gene expression, focusing on pathological or physiological conditions. For a more complex search, the advanced query interface may be used to query for (i) differentially expressed genes; (ii) pathological or physiological conditions; or (iii) gene names or functional attributes, such as Kyoto Encyclopaedia of Genes and Genomes pathway maps. These queries may also be combined. Finally, CellLineNavigator allows additional advanced analysis of differentially regulated genes by a direct link to the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID) Bioinformatics Resources.

  15. Genome Wide assessment of Early Osseointegration in Implant-Adherent Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalji, Ghadeer N.

    Objectives: To determine the molecular processes involved in osseointegration. Materials and methods: A structured literature review concerning in vitro and in vivo molecular assessment of osseointegration was performed. A rat and a human model were then used to identify the early molecular processes involved in osseointegration associated with a micro roughened and nanosurface superimposed featured implants. In the rat model, 32 titanium implants with surface topographies exhibiting a micro roughened (AT-II) and nanosurface superimposed featured implants (AT-I) were placed in the tibiae of 8 rats and subsequently harvested at 2 and 4 days after placement. Whereas in the human model, four titanium mini-implants with either a moderately roughened surface (TiOblast) or super-imposed nanoscale topography (Osseospeed) were placed in edentulous sites of eleven systemically healthy subjects and subsequently removed after 3 and 7 days. Total RNA was isolated from cells adherent to retrieved implants. A whole genome microarray using the Affymetrix 1.1 ST Array platform was used to describe the gene expression profiles that were differentially regulated by the implant surfaces. Results: The literature review provided evidence that particular topographic cues can be specifically integrated among the many extracellular signals received by the cell in its signal transduction network. In the rat model, functionally relevant categories related to ossification, skeletal system development, osteoblast differentiation, bone development and biomineral tissue development were upregulated and more prominent at AT-I compared to AT-II. In the human model, there were no significant differences when comparing the two-implant surfaces at each time point. However, the microarray identified several genes that were differentially regulated at day 7 vs. day 3 for both implant surfaces. Functionally relevant categories related to the extracellular matrix, collagen fibril organization and

  16. Serum Proteins Enhance Dispersion Stability and Influence the Cytotoxicity and Dosimetry of ZnO Nanoparticles in Suspension and Adherent Cancer Cell Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anders, Catherine B.; Chess, Jordan J.; Wingett, Denise G.; Punnoose, Alex

    2015-11-01

    (LNCaP) cancer cell lines, respectively. Presence of FBS in the NP dispersions also increased the reactive oxygen species generation. These observations indicate that the improved dispersion stability leads to increased NP bioavailability for suspension cell models and reduced NP sedimentation onto adherent cell layers resulting in more accurate in vitro toxicity assessments.

  17. Establishment and Biological Characterization of a Panel of Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) and GBM Variant Oncosphere Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Binder, Zev A.; Wilson, Kelli M.; Salmasi, Vafi; Orr, Brent A.; Eberhart, Charles G.; Siu, I-Mei; Lim, Michael; Weingart, Jon D.; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Bettegowda, Chetan; Kassam, Amin B.; Olivi, Alessandro; Brem, Henry; Riggins, Gregory J.; Gallia, Gary L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Human tumor cell lines form the basis of the majority of present day laboratory cancer research. These models are vital to studying the molecular biology of tumors and preclinical testing of new therapies. When compared to traditional adherent cell lines, suspension cell lines recapitulate the genetic profiles and histologic features of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) with higher fidelity. Using a modified neural stem cell culture technique, here we report the characterization of GBM cell lines including GBM variants. Methods Tumor tissue samples were obtained intra-operatively and cultured in neural stem cell conditions containing growth factors. Tumor lines were characterized in vitro using differentiation assays followed by immunostaining for lineage-specific markers. In vivo tumor formation was assayed by orthotopic injection in nude mice. Genetic uniqueness was confirmed via short tandem repeat (STR) DNA profiling. Results Thirteen oncosphere lines derived from GBM and GBM variants, including a GBM with PNET features and a GBM with oligodendroglioma component, were established. All unique lines showed distinct genetic profiles by STR profiling. The lines assayed demonstrated a range of in vitro growth rates. Multipotency was confirmed using in vitro differentiation. Tumor formation demonstrated histologic features consistent with high grade gliomas, including invasion, necrosis, abnormal vascularization, and high mitotic rate. Xenografts derived from the GBM variants maintained histopathological features of the primary tumors. Conclusions We have generated and characterized GBM suspension lines derived from patients with GBMs and GBM variants. These oncosphere cell lines will expand the resources available for preclinical study. PMID:27028405

  18. High prevalence of side population in human cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Boesch, Maximilian; Zeimet, Alain G.; Fiegl, Heidi; Wolf, Barbara; Huber, Julia; Klocker, Helmut; Gastl, Guenther

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cell lines are essential platforms for performing cancer research on human cells. We here demonstrate that, across tumor entities, human cancer cell lines harbor minority populations of putative stem-like cells, molecularly defined by dye extrusion resulting in the side population phenotype. These findings establish a heterogeneous nature of human cancer cell lines and argue for their stem cell origin. This should be considered when interpreting research involving these model systems. PMID:27226981

  19. Method of making a membrane having hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces for adhering cells or antibodies by using atomic oxygen or hydroxyl radicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steven L. (Inventor); Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A portion of an organic polymer article such as a membrane is made hydrophilic by exposing a hydrophobic surface of the article to a depth of about 50 to about 5000 angstroms to atomic oxygen or hydroxyl radicals at a temperature below 100C., preferably below 40 C, to form a hydrophilic uniform surface layer of hydrophilic hydroxyl groups. The atomic oxygen and hydroxyl radicals are generated by a flowing afterglow microwave discharge, and the surface is outside of a plasma produced by the discharge. A membrane having both hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces can be used in an immunoassay by adhering antibodies to the hydrophobic surface. In another embodiment, the membrane is used in cell culturing where cells adhere to the hydrophilic surface. Prior to adhering cells, the hydrophilic surface may be grafted with a compatibilizing compound. A plurality of hydrophilic regions bounded by adjacent hydrophobic regions can be produced such that a maximum of one cell per each hydrophilic region adheres.

  20. SURVIVIN as a marker for quiescent-breast cancer stem cells-An intermediate, adherent, pre-requisite phase of breast cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Siddharth, Sumit; Das, Sarita; Nayak, Anmada; Kundu, Chanakya Nath

    2016-10-01

    Cancer stem cells drive the metastatic cascade by undergoing epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and again mesenchymal to epithelial transition (MET). Using multiple breast cancer cell lines including cigarette smoke induced breast cancer cells and tumor derived primary cells from patient sample; we developed a breast cancer metastasis model and reported the existence of an adherent, distinct pre-metastatic phase, quiescent-breast cancer stem cells (Q-BCSCs) prior to attaining an EMT. SURVIVIN was found to be expressed in Q-BCSCs. Time dependant biphasic expression of SURVIVIN in Q-BCSCs reveals that Q-BCSCs is a pre-metastatic phase distinct from both epithelial and mesenchymal counterparts. SURVIVIN favours metastasis and up-regulates WNT/β-CATENIN pathway in a PI3 K/AKT-dependant manner for self-renewal. Knockdown of SURVIVIN in Q-BCSCs lost the metastatic property of cells by inhibiting invasion, EMT-MET, PI3 K/AKT/WNT cascade, and induced apoptosis. Thus, our data suggest the existence of a novel pre-metastatic phase (Q-BCSCs) before EMT and SURVIVIN acts as a marker for Quiescent-BCSCs. PMID:27411340

  1. SURVIVIN as a marker for quiescent-breast cancer stem cells-An intermediate, adherent, pre-requisite phase of breast cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Siddharth, Sumit; Das, Sarita; Nayak, Anmada; Kundu, Chanakya Nath

    2016-10-01

    Cancer stem cells drive the metastatic cascade by undergoing epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and again mesenchymal to epithelial transition (MET). Using multiple breast cancer cell lines including cigarette smoke induced breast cancer cells and tumor derived primary cells from patient sample; we developed a breast cancer metastasis model and reported the existence of an adherent, distinct pre-metastatic phase, quiescent-breast cancer stem cells (Q-BCSCs) prior to attaining an EMT. SURVIVIN was found to be expressed in Q-BCSCs. Time dependant biphasic expression of SURVIVIN in Q-BCSCs reveals that Q-BCSCs is a pre-metastatic phase distinct from both epithelial and mesenchymal counterparts. SURVIVIN favours metastasis and up-regulates WNT/β-CATENIN pathway in a PI3 K/AKT-dependant manner for self-renewal. Knockdown of SURVIVIN in Q-BCSCs lost the metastatic property of cells by inhibiting invasion, EMT-MET, PI3 K/AKT/WNT cascade, and induced apoptosis. Thus, our data suggest the existence of a novel pre-metastatic phase (Q-BCSCs) before EMT and SURVIVIN acts as a marker for Quiescent-BCSCs.

  2. Comparisons of mouse mesenchymal stem cells in primary adherent culture of compact bone fragments and whole bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yiting; Liu, Tianshu; Fang, Fang; Xiong, Chengliang; Shen, Shiliang

    2015-01-01

    The purification of mouse bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) by using the standard method of whole bone marrow adherence to plastic still remains ineffective. An increasing number of studies have indicated compact bone as an alternative source of BMSCs. We isolated BMSCs from cultured compact bone fragments and investigated the proliferative capacity, surface immunophenotypes, and osteogenic and adipogenic differentiations of the cells after the first trypsinization. The fragment culture was based on the fact that BMSCs were assembled in compact bones. Thus, the procedure included flushing bone marrow out of bone cavity and culturing the fragments without any collagenase digestion. The cell yield from cultured fragments was slightly less than that from cultured bone marrow using the same bone quantity. However, the trypsinized cells from cultured fragments exhibited significantly higher proliferation and were accompanied with more CD90 and CD44 expressions and less CD45 expression. The osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation capacity of cells from cultured fragments were better than those of cells from bone marrow. The directly adherent culture of compact bone is suitable for mouse BMSC isolation, and more BMSCs with potentially improved proliferation capacity can be obtained in the primary culture.

  3. On the Ontology Based Representation of Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Ganzinger, Matthias; He, Shan; Breuhahn, Kai; Knaup, Petra

    2012-01-01

    Cell lines are frequently used as highly standardized and reproducible in vitro models for biomedical analyses and assays. Cell lines are distributed by cell banks that operate databases describing their products. However, the description of the cell lines' properties are not standardized across different cell banks. Existing cell line-related ontologies mostly focus on the description of the cell lines' names, but do not cover aspects like the origin or optimal growth conditions. The objective of this work is to develop an ontology that allows for a more comprehensive description of cell lines and their metadata, which should cover the data elements provided by cell banks. This will provide the basis for the standardized annotation of cell lines and corresponding assays in biomedical research. In addition, the ontology will be the foundation for automated evaluation of such assays and their respective protocols in the future. To accomplish this, a broad range of cell bank databases as well as existing ontologies were analyzed in a comprehensive manner. We identified existing ontologies capable of covering different aspects of the cell line domain. However, not all data fields derived from the cell banks' databases could be mapped to existing ontologies. As a result, we created a new ontology called cell culture ontology (CCONT) integrating existing ontologies where possible. CCONT provides classes from the areas of cell line identification, origin, cell line properties, propagation and tests performed. PMID:23144907

  4. Lulo cell line derived from Lutzomyia longipalpis (Diptera: Psychodidae): a novel model to assay Leishmania spp. and vector interaction

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Leishmania (Vianna) braziliensis, Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis and Leishmania (Leishmania) chagasi are important parasites in the scenario of leishmaniasis in Brazil. During the life cycle of these parasites, the promastigote forms adhere to the midgut epithelial microvillii of phlebotomine insects to avoid being secreted along with digestive products. Lulo cells are a potential model that will help to understand the features of this adhesion phenomenon. Here, we analyze the interaction between Leishmania spp. promastigotes and Lulo cells in vitro, specifically focusing on adhesion events occurring between three Leishmania species and this cell line. Methods Confluent monolayers of Lulo cells were incubated with promastigotes and adhesion was assessed using both light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Findings The results indicate that species from the subgenera Leishmania and Viannia have great potential to adhere to Lulo cells. The highest adherence rate was observed for L. (L.) chagasi after 24 h of incubation with Lulo cells (27.3 ± 1.8% of cells with adhered promastigotes), followed by L. (L.) amazonensis (16.0 ± 0.7%) and L. (V.) braziliensis (3.0 ± 0.7%), both after 48 h. In the ultrastructural analysis, promastigote adherence was also assessed by scanning electron microscopy, showing that, for parasites from both subgenera, adhesion occurs by both the body and the flagellum. The interaction of Lulo cells with Leishmania (L.) chagasi showed the participation of cytoplasmic projections from the former closely associating the parasites with the cells. Conclusions We present evidence that Lulo cells can be useful in studies of insect-parasite interactions for Leishmania species. PMID:22082050

  5. Assessment of mechanical properties of adherent living cells by bead micromanipulation: comparison of magnetic twisting cytometry vs optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Valérie M; Hénon, Sylvie; Planus, Emmanuelle; Fodil, Redouane; Balland, Martial; Isabey, Daniel; Gallet, François

    2002-08-01

    We compare the measurements of viscoelastic properties of adherent alveolar epithelial cells by two micromanipulation techniques: (i) magnetic twisting cytometry and (ii) optical tweezers, using microbeads of same size and similarly attached to F-actin. The values of equivalent Young modulus E, derived from linear viscoelasticity theory, become consistent when the degree of bead immersion in the cell is taken into account. E-values are smaller in (i) than in (ii): approximately 34-58 Pa vs approximately 29-258 Pa, probably because higher stress in (i) reinforces nonlinearity and cellular plasticity. Otherwise, similar relaxation time constants, around 2 s, suggest similar dissipative mechanisms.

  6. 77 FR 5489 - Identification of Human Cell Lines Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-03

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Identification of Human Cell Lines Project AGENCY: National... tandem repeat (STR) profiling up to 1500 human cell line samples as part of the Identification of Human Cell Lines Project. All data and corresponding information will be posted in a publically held...

  7. EXAFS studies of prostate cancer cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czapla, J.; Kwiatek, W. M.; Lekki, J.; Kisiel, A.; Steininger, R.; Goettlicher, J.

    2013-04-01

    Sulphur plays a vital role in every human organism. It is known, that sulphur-bearing compounds, such as for example cysteine and glutathione, play critical roles in development and progression of many diseases. Any alteration in sulphur's biochemistry could become a precursor of serious pathological conditions. One of such condition is prostate cancer, the most frequently diagnosed malignancy in the western world and the second leading cause of cancer related death in men. The purpose of presented studies was to examine what changes occur in the nearest chemical environment of sulphur in prostate cancer cell lines in comparison to healthy cells. The Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy was used, followed by theoretical calculations. The results of preliminary analysis is presented.

  8. The DNA damage/repair cascade in glioblastoma cell lines after chemotherapeutic agent treatment.

    PubMed

    Annovazzi, Laura; Caldera, Valentina; Mellai, Marta; Riganti, Chiara; Battaglia, Luigi; Chirio, Daniela; Melcarne, Antonio; Schiffer, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic resistance in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) has been linked to a subpopulation of cells with stem cell-like properties, the glioma stem cells (GSCs), responsible for cancer progression and recurrence. This study investigated the in vitro cytotoxicity of three chemotherapeutics, temozolomide (TMZ), doxorubicin (Dox) and paclitaxel (PTX) on glioma cell lines, by analyzing the molecular mechanisms leading to DNA repair and cell resistance, or to cell death. The drugs were tested on 16 GBM cell lines, grown as neurospheres (NS) or adherent cells (AC), by studying DNA damage occurrence by Comet assay, the expression by immunofluorescence and western blotting of checkpoint/repair molecules and apoptosis. The three drugs were able to provoke a genotoxic injury and to inhibit dose- and time-dependently cell proliferation, more evidently in AC than in NS. The first cell response to DNA damage was the activation of the damage sensors (p-ATM, p-53BP1, γ-H2AX), followed by repair effectors; the expression of checkpoint/repair molecules appeared higher in NS than in AC. The non-homologous repair pathway (NHEJ) seemed more involved than the homologous one (HR). Apoptosis occurred after long treatment times, but only a small percentage of cells in NS underwent death, even at high drug concentration, whereas most cells survived in a quiescent state and resumed proliferation after drug removal. In tumor specimens, checkpoint/repair proteins were constitutively expressed in GBMs, but not in low-grade gliomas.

  9. Characterization of a Distinct Population of Circulating Human Non-Adherent Endothelial Forming Cells and Their Recruitment via Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-3

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Emma J.; Barrett, Jeffrey M.; Tooley, Katie; Sen, Shaundeep; Sun, Wai Yan; Grose, Randall; Nicholson, Ian; Levina, Vitalina; Cooke, Ira; Talbo, Gert; Lopez, Angel F.; Bonder, Claudine S.

    2012-01-01

    Circulating vascular progenitor cells contribute to the pathological vasculogenesis of cancer whilst on the other hand offer much promise in therapeutic revascularization in post-occlusion intervention in cardiovascular disease. However, their characterization has been hampered by the many variables to produce them as well as their described phenotypic and functional heterogeneity. Herein we have isolated, enriched for and then characterized a human umbilical cord blood derived CD133+ population of non-adherent endothelial forming cells (naEFCs) which expressed the hematopoietic progenitor cell markers (CD133, CD34, CD117, CD90 and CD38) together with mature endothelial cell markers (VEGFR2, CD144 and CD31). These cells also expressed low levels of CD45 but did not express the lymphoid markers (CD3, CD4, CD8) or myeloid markers (CD11b and CD14) which distinguishes them from ‘early’ endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). Functional studies demonstrated that these naEFCs (i) bound Ulex europaeus lectin, (ii) demonstrated acetylated-low density lipoprotein uptake, (iii) increased vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) surface expression in response to tumor necrosis factor and (iv) in co-culture with mature endothelial cells increased the number of tubes, tubule branching and loops in a 3-dimensional in vitro matrix. More importantly, naEFCs placed in vivo generated new lumen containing vasculature lined by CD144 expressing human endothelial cells (ECs). Extensive genomic and proteomic analyses of the naEFCs showed that intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-3 is expressed on their cell surface but not on mature endothelial cells. Furthermore, functional analysis demonstrated that ICAM-3 mediated the rolling and adhesive events of the naEFCs under shear stress. We suggest that the distinct population of naEFCs identified and characterized here represents a new valuable therapeutic target to control aberrant vasculogenesis. PMID:23144795

  10. Catechin-based procyanidins from Peumus boldus Mol. aqueous extract inhibit Helicobacter pylori urease and adherence to adenocarcinoma gastric cells.

    PubMed

    Pastene, Edgar; Parada, Víctor; Avello, Marcia; Ruiz, Antonieta; García, Apolinaria

    2014-11-01

    In this work, the anti-Helicobacter pylori effect of an aqueous extract from dried leaves of Peumus boldus Mol. (Monimiaceae) was evaluated. This extract displayed high inhibitory activity against H. pylori urease. Therefore, in order to clarify the type of substances responsible for such effect, a bioassay-guided fractionation strategy was carried out. The active compounds in the fractions were characterized through different chromatographic methods (RP-HPLC; HILIC-HPLC). The fraction named F5 (mDP = 7.8) from aqueous extract was the most active against H. pylori urease with an IC50  = 15.9 µg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/mL. HPLC analysis evidenced that F5 was composed mainly by catechin-derived proanthocyanidins (LC-MS and phloroglucinolysis). The anti-adherent effect of boldo was assessed by co-culture of H. pylori and AGS cells. Both the aqueous extract and F5 showed an anti-adherent effect in a concentration-dependent manner. An 89.3% of inhibition was reached at 2.0 mg GAE/mL of boldo extract. In conjunction, our results suggest that boldo extract has a potent anti-urease activity and anti-adherent effect against H. pylori, properties directly linked with the presence of catechin-derived proanthocyanidins. PMID:24853276

  11. Catechin-based procyanidins from Peumus boldus Mol. aqueous extract inhibit Helicobacter pylori urease and adherence to adenocarcinoma gastric cells.

    PubMed

    Pastene, Edgar; Parada, Víctor; Avello, Marcia; Ruiz, Antonieta; García, Apolinaria

    2014-11-01

    In this work, the anti-Helicobacter pylori effect of an aqueous extract from dried leaves of Peumus boldus Mol. (Monimiaceae) was evaluated. This extract displayed high inhibitory activity against H. pylori urease. Therefore, in order to clarify the type of substances responsible for such effect, a bioassay-guided fractionation strategy was carried out. The active compounds in the fractions were characterized through different chromatographic methods (RP-HPLC; HILIC-HPLC). The fraction named F5 (mDP = 7.8) from aqueous extract was the most active against H. pylori urease with an IC50  = 15.9 µg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/mL. HPLC analysis evidenced that F5 was composed mainly by catechin-derived proanthocyanidins (LC-MS and phloroglucinolysis). The anti-adherent effect of boldo was assessed by co-culture of H. pylori and AGS cells. Both the aqueous extract and F5 showed an anti-adherent effect in a concentration-dependent manner. An 89.3% of inhibition was reached at 2.0 mg GAE/mL of boldo extract. In conjunction, our results suggest that boldo extract has a potent anti-urease activity and anti-adherent effect against H. pylori, properties directly linked with the presence of catechin-derived proanthocyanidins.

  12. Desmosomal molecules in and out of adhering junctions: normal and diseased States of epidermal, cardiac and mesenchymally derived cells.

    PubMed

    Pieperhoff, Sebastian; Barth, Mareike; Rickelt, Steffen; Franke, Werner W

    2010-01-01

    Current cell biology textbooks mention only two kinds of cell-to-cell adhering junctions coated with the cytoplasmic plaques: the desmosomes (maculae adhaerentes), anchoring intermediate-sized filaments (IFs), and the actin microfilament-anchoring adherens junctions (AJs), including both punctate (puncta adhaerentia) and elongate (fasciae adhaerentes) structures. In addition, however, a series of other junction types has been identified and characterized which contain desmosomal molecules but do not fit the definition of desmosomes. Of these special cell-cell junctions containing desmosomal glycoproteins or proteins we review the composite junctions (areae compositae) connecting the cardiomyocytes of mature mammalian hearts and their importance in relation to human arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathies. We also emphasize the various plakophilin-2-positive plaques in AJs (coniunctiones adhaerentes) connecting proliferatively active mesenchymally-derived cells, including interstitial cells of the heart and several soft tissue tumor cell types. Moreover, desmoplakin has also been recognized as a constituent of the plaques of the complexus adhaerentes connecting certain lymphatic endothelial cells. Finally, we emphasize the occurrence of the desmosomal transmembrane glycoprotein, desmoglein Dsg2, out of the context of any junction as dispersed cell surface molecules in certain types of melanoma cells and melanocytes. This broadening of our knowledge on the diversity of AJ structures indicates that it may still be too premature to close the textbook chapters on cell-cell junctions. PMID:20671973

  13. Generating Rho-0 Cells Using Mesenchymal Stem Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Moreno, Mercedes; Hermida-Gómez, Tamara; Gallardo, M. Esther; Dalmao-Fernández, Andrea; Rego-Pérez, Ignacio; Garesse, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The generation of Rho-0 cells requires the use of an immortalization process, or tumor cell selection, followed by culture in the presence of ethidium bromide (EtBr), incurring the drawbacks its use entails. The purpose of this work was to generate Rho-0 cells using human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) with reagents having the ability to remove mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) more safely than by using EtBr. Methodology Two immortalized hMSC lines (3a6 and KP) were used; 143B.TK-Rho-0 cells were used as reference control. For generation of Rho-0 hMSCs, cells were cultured in medium supplemented with each tested reagent. Total DNA was isolated and mtDNA content was measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Phenotypic characterization and gene expression assays were performed to determine whether 3a6 Rho-0 hMSCs maintain the same stem properties as untreated 3a6 hMSCs. To evaluate whether 3a6 Rho-0 hMSCs had a phenotype similar to that of 143B.TK-Rho-0 cells, in terms of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, apoptotic levels and mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) were measured by flow cytometry and mitochondrial respiration was evaluated using a SeaHorse XFp Extracellular Flux Analyzer. The differentiation capacity of 3a6 and 3a6 Rho-0 hMSCs was evaluated using real-time PCR, comparing the relative expression of genes involved in osteogenesis, adipogenesis and chondrogenesis. Results The results showed the capacity of the 3a6 cell line to deplete its mtDNA and to survive in culture with uridine. Of all tested drugs, Stavudine (dt4) was the most effective in producing 3a6-Rho cells. The data indicate that hMSC Rho-0 cells continue to express the characteristic MSC cell surface receptor pattern. Phenotypic characterization showed that 3a6 Rho-0 cells resembled 143B.TK-Rho-0 cells, indicating that hMSC Rho-0 cells are Rho-0 cells. While the adipogenic capability was higher in 3a6 Rho-0 cells than in 3a6 cells, the osteogenic and chondrogenic

  14. Impact of release dynamics of laser-irradiated polymer micropallets on the viability of selected adherent cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Huan; Mismar, Wael; Wang, Yuli; Small, Donald W.; Ras, Mat; Allbritton, Nancy L.; Sims, Christopher E.; Venugopalan, Vasan

    2012-01-01

    We use time-resolved interferometry, fluorescence assays and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations to examine the viability of confluent adherent cell monolayers to selection via laser microbeam release of photoresist polymer micropallets. We demonstrate the importance of laser microbeam pulse energy and focal volume position relative to the glass–pallet interface in governing the threshold energies for pallet release as well as the pallet release dynamics. Measurements using time-resolved interferometry show that increases in laser pulse energy result in increasing pallet release velocities that can approach 10 m s−1 through aqueous media. CFD simulations reveal that the pallet motion results in cellular exposure to transient hydrodynamic shear stress amplitudes that can exceed 100 kPa on microsecond timescales, and which produces reduced cell viability. Moreover, CFD simulation results show that the maximum shear stress on the pallet surface varies spatially, with the largest shear stresses occurring on the pallet periphery. Cell viability of confluent cell monolayers on the pallet surface confirms that the use of larger pulse energies results in increased rates of necrosis for those cells situated away from the pallet centre, while cells situated at the pallet centre remain viable. Nevertheless, experiments that examine the viability of these cell monolayers following pallet release show that proper choices for laser microbeam pulse energy and focal volume position lead to the routine achievement of cell viability in excess of 90 per cent. These laser microbeam parameters result in maximum pallet release velocities below 6 m s−1 and cellular exposure of transient hydrodynamic shear stresses below 20 kPa. Collectively, these results provide a mechanistic understanding that relates pallet release dynamics and associated transient shear stresses with subsequent cellular viability. This provides a quantitative, mechanistic basis for determining

  15. Derivation of three new human embryonic stem cell lines.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Cara K; Chami, Omar; Peura, Teija T; Bosman, Alexis; Dumevska, Biljana; Schmidt, Uli; Stojanov, Tomas

    2010-04-01

    Human embryonic stem cells are pluripotent cells capable of extensive self-renewal and differentiation to all cells of the embryo proper. Here, we describe the derivation and characterization of three Sydney IVF human embryonic stem cell lines not already reported elsewhere, designated SIVF001, SIVF002, and SIVF014. The cell lines display typical compact colony morphology of embryonic stem cells, have stable growth rates over more than 40 passages and are cytogenetically normal. Furthermore, the cell lines express pluripotency markers including Nanog, Oct4, SSEA3 and Tra-1-81, and are capable of generating teratoma cells derived from each of the three germ layers in immunodeficient mice. These experiments show that the cell lines constitute pluripotent stem cell lines. PMID:20198447

  16. Decreased Adherence of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli to HEp-2 Cells in the Presence of Antibodies That Recognize the C-Terminal Region of Intimin

    PubMed Central

    Gansheroff, Lisa J.; Wachtel, Marian R.; O'Brien, Alison D.

    1999-01-01

    Antiserum raised against intimin from enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 strain 86-24 has been shown previously by our laboratory to inhibit adherence of this strain to HEp-2 cells. In the present study, we sought to identify the region(s) of intimin important for the effect of anti-intimin antisera on EHEC adherence and to determine whether antisera raised against intimin from an O157:H7 strain could reduce adherence of other strains. Compared to preimmune serum controls, polyclonal sera raised against the histidine-tagged intimin protein RIHisEae (intiminO157) or against His-tagged C-terminal fragments of intimin from strain 86-24 reduced adherence of this strain. Furthermore, an antibody fraction purified from the anti-RIHisEae serum that contained antibodies to the C-terminal third of intimin, the putative receptor-binding domain, also reduced adherence of strain 86-24, but a purified fraction containing antibodies to the N-terminal two-thirds of intimin did not inhibit adherence. The polyclonal anti-intiminO157 serum raised against RIHisEae inhibited, to different degrees, the adherence of another O157:H7 strain, an EHEC O55:H7 strain, one of two independent EHEC O111:NM isolates tested, and one of two EHEC O26:H11 strains tested. Adherence of the other O26:H11 and O111:NM strains and an EPEC O127:H6 strain was not reduced. Finally, immunoblot analysis indicated a correlation between the antigenic divergence in the C-terminal third of intimins from different strains and the capacity of anti-intiminO157 antiserum to reduce adherence of heterologous strains. Taken together, these data suggest that intiminO157 could be used as an immunogen to elicit adherence-blocking antibodies against O157:H7 strains and closely-related EHEC. PMID:10569757

  17. Acute myelogenous leukemia cells with the MLL-ELL translocation convert morphologically and functionally into adherent myofibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Tashiro, Haruko; Mizutani-Noguchi, Mitsuho; Shirasaki, Ryosuke

    2010-01-01

    Bone marrow-myofibroblasts, a major component of bone marrow-stroma, are reported to originate from hematopoietic stem cells. We show in this paper that non-adherent leukemia blasts can change into myofibroblasts. When myeloblasts from two cases of acute myelogenous leukemia with a fusion product comprising mixed lineage leukemia and RNA polymerase II elongation factor, were cultured long term, their morphology changed to that of myofibroblasts with similar molecular characteristics to the parental myeloblasts. The original leukemia blasts, when cultured on the leukemia blast-derived myofibroblasts, grew extensively. Leukemia blasts can create their own microenvironment for proliferation.

  18. Capsule of Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus hampers the adherence and invasion of epithelial and endothelial cells and is attenuated during internalization.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bin; Pei, Xiaomeng; Su, Yiqi; Ma, Zhe; Fan, Hongjie

    2016-08-01

    Direct interaction between pathogens and host cells often is a prerequisite for colonization, infection and dissemination. Regulated production of capsular polysaccharide (CPS), which is made of hyaluronic acid, is essential for the pathogenicity of Streptococcus equi subsp. Zooepidemicus (SEZ). Here, we constructed a CPS-deleted mutant and analyzed it along with the parental wild-type strain in attachment and invasion of mammalian epithelial and endothelial cell lines. The CPS-deleted mutant exhibited significant increase in adherence and invasion by several orders of magnitude compared with the wild-type strain through quantitative analysis and electron microscopy observation. After the wild-type strain was recovered from invaded cells, its morphology was analyzed by visual methods and scanning electron microscopy, which revealed that its capsule was almost completely absent. Capsule measurements showed a similar result in which CPS production was nearly attenuated to the same extent as in the CPS-deleted mutant. qPCR assays revealed a marked reduction in the transcriptional levels of the CPS biosynthesis genes, has operon. Moreover, the repression in capsular production was stable inheritance. Our findings indicate that SEZ is a facultative intracellular bacterium, capsule attenuation in SEZ contributes to attachment and invasion in interactions with host cells, and the active regulation of capsule breakdown is controlled by SEZ during internalization. PMID:27388015

  19. Neuronal cell lines as model dorsal root ganglion neurons

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Kathleen; Baillie, Gregory J

    2016-01-01

    Background Dorsal root ganglion neuron-derived immortal cell lines including ND7/23 and F-11 cells have been used extensively as in vitro model systems of native peripheral sensory neurons. However, while it is clear that some sensory neuron-specific receptors and ion channels are present in these cell lines, a systematic comparison of the molecular targets expressed by these cell lines with those expressed in intact peripheral neurons is lacking. Results In this study, we examined the expression of RNA transcripts in the human neuroblastoma-derived cell line, SH-SY5Y, and two dorsal root ganglion hybridoma cell lines, F-11 and ND7/23, using Illumina next-generation sequencing, and compared the results with native whole murine dorsal root ganglions. The gene expression profiles of these three cell lines did not resemble any specific defined dorsal root ganglion subclass. The cell lines lacked many markers for nociceptive sensory neurons, such as the Transient receptor potential V1 gene, but expressed markers for both myelinated and unmyelinated neurons. Global gene ontology analysis on whole dorsal root ganglions and cell lines showed similar enrichment of biological process terms across all samples. Conclusions This paper provides insights into the receptor repertoire expressed in common dorsal root ganglion neuron-derived cell lines compared with whole murine dorsal root ganglions, and illustrates the limits and potentials of these cell lines as tools for neuropharmacological exploration. PMID:27130590

  20. Different Roles of a Rat Cortical Thymic Epithelial Cell Line In Vitro on Thymocytes and Thymocyte Hybridoma Cells: Phagocytosis, Induction of Apoptosis, Nursing and Growth Promoting Activities

    PubMed Central

    Vučević, Dragana; Čolić, Miodrag; Popović, Petar; Gašić, Sonja

    2002-01-01

    In this work, the interaction between a rat cortical thymic epithelial cell (TEC) line (R-TNC.1) with nursing activity and thymocytes as well as BWRT 8 thymocyte hybridoma (TH) cells has been studied. The R-TNC.1 cell line significantly bound thymocytes and TH. Binding was stronger during the first 30 min of cell incubation and was followed by a progressive deadhesion. Among adherent thymocytes the proportion of apoptotic cells increased with culture time which was a consequence of higher capacity of the line for binding of apoptotic than viable cells and induction of apoptosis in a subset of adherent thymocytes. Emperiopolesis activity of this thymic nurse cell (TNC) line was manifested by engulfment of thymocytes as well as TH cells. A subset of viable intra-TNC thymocytes has been triggered to die by apoptosis, whereas other internalized thymocytes have been stimulated to proliferate, as measured by an increase in the percentage of cells in mitosis and higher incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), in comparison to thymocytes cultivated alone. A significant stimulation of proliferation of engulfed TH cells was also observed. The R-TNC.1 cell line efficiently phagocytosed both apoptotic thymocytes and TH, and the process is followed by intra-TNC destruction of ingested cells. Cumulatively, these results suggest different role of the R-TNC.1 clone: phagocytosis of apoptotic cells; induction of apoptotic cell death in a subset of both bound and internalized thymocytes and stimulation of proliferation of a subset of intra-TNC thymocytes or TH cells. PMID:12739783

  1. Establishment and characterization of a lung cancer cell line, SMC-L001, from a lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Choi, So-Jung; Lee, Hyeseon; Choe, Chungyoul; Shin, Yong-Sung; Lee, Jinseon; Moon, Sung-Hwan; Kim, Jhingook

    2014-06-01

    Lung cancer cell lines are a valuable tool for elucidating lung tumorigenesis and developing novel therapies. However, the majority of cell lines currently available were established from tumors in patients of Caucasian origin, limiting our ability to investigate how cancers in patients of different ethnicities differ from one another in terms of tumor biology and drug responses. In this study, we established a human non-small cell lung carcinoma cell line, SMC-L001, and characterized its genome and tumorigenic potential. SMC-L001 cells were isolated from a Korean lung adenocarcinoma patient (male, pStage IIb) and were propagated in culture. SMC-L001 cells were adherent. DNA fingerprinting analysis indicated that the SMC-L001 cell line originated from parental tumor tissue. Comparison of the genomic profile of the SMC-L001 cell line and the original tumor revealed an identical profile with 739 mutations in 46 cancer-related genes, including mutations in TP53 and KRAS. Furthermore, SMC-L001 cells were highly tumorigenic, as evidenced by the induction of solid tumors in immunodeficient mice. In summary, we established a new lung cancer cell line with point mutations in TP53 and KRAS from a Korean lung adenocarcinoma patient that will be useful for investigating ethnic differences in lung cancer biology and drug response.

  2. Tracking in real time the crawling dynamics of adherent living cells with a high resolution surface plasmon microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streppa, L.; Berguiga, L.; Boyer Provera, E.; Ratti, F.; Goillot, E.; Martinez Torres, C.; Schaeffer, L.; Elezgaray, Juan; Arneodo, A.; Argoul, F.

    2016-03-01

    We introduce a high resolution scanning surface plasmon microscope for long term imaging of living adherent mouse myoblast cells. The coupling of a high numerical aperture objective lens with a fibered heterodyne interferometer provides both enhanced sensitivity and long term stability. This microscope takes advantage of the plasmon resonance excitation and the amplification of the electromagnetic field in near-field distance to the gold coated coverslip. This plasmon enhanced evanescent wave microscopy is particularly attractive for the study of cell adhesion and motility since it can be operated without staining of the biological sample. We show that this microscope allows very long-term imaging of living samples, and that it can capture and follow the temporal deformation of C2C12 myoblast cell protusions (lamellipodia), during their migration on a at surface.

  3. Cardiomyocyte marker expression in a human lymphocyte cell line using mouse cardiomyocyte extract.

    PubMed

    Vojdani, Zahra; Tavakolinejad, Sima; Talaei-Khozani, Tahereh; Esmaeilpour, Tahereh; Rasooli, Manuchehr

    2011-03-01

    Cell transplantation shows potential for the treatment of cardiac diseases. Embryonic stem cells, cord blood and mesenchymal stem cells have been suggested as sources for transplantation therapy. Because of some technical limitations with the use of stem cells, transdifferentiation of fully differentiated cells is a potentially useful alternative. We investigated whether human peripheral blood cells could transdifferentiate into cardiomyocyte. Transdifferentiation was induced in a human B lymphocyte cell line (Raji). Cardiomyocyte extract was prepared from adult mouse cardiomyocytes. The cells were treated with 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine and trichostatin A, permeabilized with streptolysin O, and exposed to the mouse cardiomyocyte extract. They were cultured for 10 days, 3 weeks and 4 weeks. Cardiomyocyte markers were detected with immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry. Immunocytochemistry revealed that some cells expressed myosin heavy chain, α-actinin and cardiac troponin T after 3 and 4 weeks. Flow cytometry confirmed these data. In cells exposed to trichostatin A and 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine and permeabilized in the presence of the cardiomyocyte extract, troponin T expression was seen in 3.53% of the cells and 3.11% of them expressed α-actinin. After exposure to the cardiomyocyte extract, some permeabilized cells adhered to the plate loosely; however, the morphology did not change significantly, and they continued to show a rounded shape after 4 weeks. Our treated lymphocytes expressed cardiomyocyte markers. Our results suggest that lymphocytes may be useful in future research as a source of cells for reprogramming procedures.

  4. Receptor-like glycocompounds in human milk that inhibit classical and El Tor Vibrio cholerae cell adherence (hemagglutination).

    PubMed Central

    Holmgren, J; Svennerholm, A M; Lindblad, M

    1983-01-01

    The two biotypes of Vibrio cholerae were found to have cell-associated hemagglutinins which differ with regard to binding to different species of erythrocytes and inhibition by monosaccharides. A total of 12 classical V. cholerae strains (Inaba or Ogawa) strongly agglutinated human erythrocytes in a reaction specifically inhibited by L-fucose, whereas 12 El Tor strains preferably agglutinated chicken erythrocytes, a reaction reversed by D-mannose or by higher concentrations of D-fructose, D-glucose, alpha-methyl-D-mannoside, or sucrose. Milk from Swedish women inhibited both of these adherence reactions, and the predominating inhibitory activity for each reaction resisted boiling, was destroyed by periodate treatment, and bound a concanavalin A-Sepharose column, suggesting a carbohydrate structure. Further characterization indicated that the inhibitory activity for classical V. cholerae hemagglutination was distributed about equally on glycoprotein and free oligosaccharide, but was not present on glycolipid. The El Tor inhibiting activity, on the other hand, was almost exclusively of a high-molecular-weight glycoprotein nature. These results support our previous suggestion (Holmgren et al., Infect. Immun. 33:136-141, 1981) that human milk may contain receptor-like glycocompounds which can prevent bacterial adherence by competition with receptors on target cells. PMID:6295953

  5. Dual Pili Post-translational Modifications Synergize to Mediate Meningococcal Adherence to Platelet Activating Factor Receptor on Human Airway Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Benjamin L.; Power, Peter M.; Swords, W. Edward; Weiser, Jeffery N.; Apicella, Michael A.; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Jennings, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Pili of pathogenic Neisseria are major virulence factors associated with adhesion, twitching motility, auto-aggregation, and DNA transformation. Pili of N. meningitidis are subject to several different post-translational modifications. Among these pilin modifications, the presence of phosphorylcholine (ChoP) and a glycan on the pilin protein are phase-variable (subject to high frequency, reversible on/off switching of expression). In this study we report the location of two ChoP modifications on the C-terminus of N. meningitidis pilin. We show that the surface accessibility of ChoP on pili is affected by phase variable changes to the structure of the pilin-linked glycan. We identify for the first time that the platelet activating factor receptor (PAFr) is a key, early event receptor for meningococcal adherence to human bronchial epithelial cells and tissue, and that synergy between the pilin-linked glycan and ChoP post-translational modifications is required for pili to optimally engage PAFr to mediate adherence to human airway cells. PMID:23696740

  6. Development and characterization of a new human hepatic cell line.

    PubMed

    Ramboer, Eva; De Craene, Bram; De Kock, Joey; Berx, Geert; Rogiers, Vera; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Vinken, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    The increasing demand and hampered use of primary human hepatocytes for research purposes have urged scientists to search for alternative cell sources, such as immortalized hepatic cell lines. The aim of this study was to develop a human hepatic cell line using the combined overexpression of TERT and the cell cycle regulators cyclin D1 and mutant isoform CDK4R24C. Following transduction of adult human primary hepatocytes with the selected immortalization genes, cell growth was triggered and a cell line was established. When cultured under appropriate conditions, the cell line expressed several hepatocytic markers and liver-enriched transcription factors at the transcriptional and/or translational level, secreted liver-specific proteins and showed glycogen deposition. These results suggest that the immortalization strategy applied to primary human hepatocytes could generate a novel hepatic cell line that seems to retain some key hepatic characteristics. PMID:26869867

  7. Development and characterization of a new human hepatic cell line

    PubMed Central

    Ramboer, Eva; De Craene, Bram; De Kock, Joey; Berx, Geert; Rogiers, Vera; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Vinken, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    The increasing demand and hampered use of primary human hepatocytes for research purposes have urged scientists to search for alternative cell sources, such as immortalized hepatic cell lines. The aim of this study was to develop a human hepatic cell line using the combined overexpression of TERT and the cell cycle regulators cyclin D1 and mutant isoform CDK4R24C. Following transduction of adult human primary hepatocytes with the selected immortalization genes, cell growth was triggered and a cell line was established. When cultured under appropriate conditions, the cell line expressed several hepatocytic markers and liver-enriched transcription factors at the transcriptional and/or translational level, secreted liver-specific proteins and showed glycogen deposition. These results suggest that the immortalization strategy applied to primary human hepatocytes could generate a novel hepatic cell line that seems to retain some key hepatic characteristics. PMID:26869867

  8. Distinct differentiation characteristics of individual human embryonic stem cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Mikkola, Milla; Olsson, Cia; Palgi, Jaan; Ustinov, Jarkko; Palomaki, Tiina; Horelli-Kuitunen, Nina; Knuutila, Sakari; Lundin, Karolina; Otonkoski, Timo; Tuuri, Timo

    2006-01-01

    Background Individual differences between human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines are poorly understood. Here, we describe the derivation of five hESC lines (called FES 21, 22, 29, 30 and 61) from frozen-thawed human embryos and compare their individual differentiation characteristic. Results The cell lines were cultured either on human or mouse feeder cells. The cells grew significantly faster and could be passaged enzymatically only on mouse feeders. However, this was found to lead to chromosomal instability after prolonged culture. All hESC lines expressed the established markers of pluripotent cells as well as several primordial germ cell (PGC) marker genes in a uniform manner. However, the cell lines showed distinct features in their spontaneous differentiation patterns. The embryoid body (EB) formation frequency of FES 30 cell line was significantly lower than that of other lines and cells within the EBs differentiated less readily. Likewise, teratomas derived from FES 30 cells were constantly cystic and showed only minor solid tissue formation with a monotonous differentiation pattern as compared with the other lines. Conclusion hESC lines may differ substantially in their differentiation properties although they appear similar in the undifferentiated state. PMID:16895598

  9. Spatially and temporally controlled gene transfer by electroporation into adherent cells on plasmid DNA-loaded electrodes.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Fumio; Kato, Koichi; Iwata, Hiroo

    2004-01-01

    Functional characterization of human genes is one of the most challenging tasks in current genomics. Owing to a large number of newly discovered genes, high-throughput methodologies are greatly needed to express in parallel each gene in living cells. To develop a method that allows efficient transfection of plasmids into adherent cells in spatial- and temporal-specific manners, we studied electric pulse-triggered gene transfer using a plasmid-loaded electrode. A plasmid was loaded on a gold electrode surface having an adsorbed layer of poly(ethyleneimine), and cells were then plated directly onto this modified surface. The plasmid was detached from the electrode by applying a short electric pulse and introduced into the cells cultured on the electrode, resulting in efficient gene expression, even in primary cultured cells. The location of transfected cells could be restricted within a small area on a micropatterned electrode, showing the versatility of the method for spatially controlled transfection. Plasmid transfection could also be performed in a temporally controlled manner without a marked loss of the efficiency when an electric pulse was applied within 3 days after cell plating. The method described here will provide an efficient means to transfer multiple genes, in parallel, into cultured mammalian cells for high-throughput reverse genetics research. PMID:15613595

  10. Contributions of O Island 48 to Adherence of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 to Epithelial Cells In Vitro and in Ligated Pig Ileal Loops▿

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xianhua; Wheatcroft, Roger; Chambers, James R.; Liu, Bianfang; Zhu, Jing; Gyles, Carlton L.

    2009-01-01

    O island 48 (OI-48) of Escherichia coli consists of three functional gene clusters that encode urease, tellurite resistance (Ter), and putative adhesins Iha and AIDA-1. The functions of these clusters in enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) O157:H7 infection are unknown. Deletion mutants for these three regions were constructed and evaluated for their ability to adhere to epithelial cells in vitro and in ligated pig ileal loops. Deletion of the Ter gene cluster reduced the ability of the organism to adhere to and form large clusters on IPEC-J2 and HEp-2 cells. Complementation of the mutation by introducing the wild-type ter genes restored adherence and large-cluster formation. Tests in ligated pig ileal loops showed a decrease in colonization by the Ter-negative mutant, but the difference was not significant compared to colonization by the wild type (26.4% ± 21.2% versus 40.1% ± 19.1%; P = 0.168). The OI-48 aidA gene deletion had no effect on adherence in vitro or in vivo. Deletion of the iha and ureC genes had no effect on adherence in vitro but significantly reduced the colonization of EHEC O157:H7 in the ligated pig intestine. These data suggest that Ter, Iha, and urease may contribute to EHEC O157:H7 pathogenesis by promoting adherence of the pathogen to the host intestinal epithelium. PMID:19633120

  11. Heat-labile enterotoxin-induced activation of NF-κB and MAPK pathways in intestinal epithelial cells impacts enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) adherence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaogang; Gao, Xiaofei; Hardwidge, Philip R

    2012-08-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) causes human morbidity and mortality in developing nations and is an emerging threat to food safety in developed nations. The ETEC heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) not only causes diarrheal disease by deregulating host adenylate cyclase, but also enhances ETEC adherence to intestinal epithelial cells. The mechanism governing this LT pro-adherence phenotype is unclear. Here we investigated intestinal epithelial cell signal transduction pathways activated by ETEC and quantified the relative importance of these host pathways to LT-induced ETEC adherence. We show that ETEC activates both NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling pathways through mechanisms that are primarily dependent upon LT. LT-induced NF-κB activation depends upon the cAMP-dependent activation of the Ras-like GTPase Rap1 but is independent of protein kinase A (PKA). By using inhibitors of these pathways, we demonstrate that inhibiting the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase prevents LT from increasing ETEC adherence. By contrast, the LT pro-adherence phenotype appears unrelated to both LT-induced Rap1 activity and to subsequent NF-κB activation. We speculate that LT may alter host signal transduction to induce the presentation of ligands for ETEC adhesins in such a way that promotes ETEC adherence. Our findings provide insight into previously unexplored functions of LT and their relative importance to ETEC virulence. PMID:22452361

  12. Continuous human cell lines and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Stampfer, M.R.

    1985-07-01

    Substantially genetically stable continuous human cell lines derived from normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) and processes for making and using the same. In a preferred embodiment, the cell lines are derived by treating normal human mammary epithelial tissue with a chemical carcinogen such as benzo(a)pyrene. The novel cell lines serve as useful substrates for elucidating the potential effects of a number of toxins, carcinogens and mutagens as well as of the addition of exogenous genetic material. The autogenic parent cells from which the cell lines are derived serve as convenient control samples for testing. The cell lines are not neoplastically transformed, although they have acquired several properties which distinguish them from their normal progenitors. 2 tabs.

  13. Continuous human cell lines and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Stampfer, Martha R.

    1989-01-01

    Substantially genetically stable continuous human cell lines derived from normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) and processes for making and using the same. In a preferred embodiment, the cell lines are derived by treating normal human mammary epithelial tissue with a chemical carcinogen such as benzo[a]pyrene. The novel cell lines serve as useful substrates for elucidating the potential effects of a number of toxins, carcinogens and mutagens as well as of the addition of exogenous genetic material. The autogenic parent cells from which the cell lines are derived serve as convenient control samples for testing. The cell lines are not neoplastically transformed, although they have acquired several properties which distinguish them from their normal progenitors.

  14. Establishment and characterization of a new human myxoid liposarcoma cell line (DL-221) with the FUS-DDIT3 translocation

    PubMed Central

    de Graaff, Marieke A.; Yu, Jamie S.E.; Cheung, Hannah C.; Ingram, Davis R.; Nguyen, Theresa; Liu, Jeffrey Juehui; Bolshakov, Svetlana; Szuhai, Károly; Åman, Pierre; Torres, Keila E.; Lev, Dina; Nielsen, Torsten O.; Bovée, Judith V.M.G.; Lazar, Alexander J.; Somaiah, Neeta

    2016-01-01

    Myxoid liposarcoma has the pathognomonic fusion oncogene FUS-DDIT3 encoding a chimeric transcription factor. Metastatic risk is higher with an increased round cell component and has been linked to aberrations involving the IGFR/PI3K/AKT pathway. These molecular insights have yet to translate to targeted therapies and the lack of experimental models is a major hindrance. We describe the initial in-depth characterization of a new cell line (DL-221) and establishment of a mouse xenograft model. The cell line DL-221 was derived from a metastatic pleural lesion showing myxoid and round cell histology. This newly established cell line was characterized for phenotypic properties and molecular cytogenetic profile, using PCR, COBRA-FISH and western blot. Next-generation whole exome sequencing was performed to further characterize the cell line and the parent tumor. NOD-SCID-IL2R gamma knockout mice were xenograft hosts. DL-221 cells grew an adhering monolayer and COBRA-FISH showed an aneuploid karyotype with t(12;16)(q13;p11) and several other rearrangements; RT-PCR demonstrated a FUS-DDIT3 fusion transcript type 1. Both the cell line and the original tumor harbored a TP53 compound heterozygous mutation in exon 4 and 7 and were wild type for PIK3CA. Moreover, among the 1254 variants called by whole exome sequencing, there was 77% concordance between the cell line and parent tumor. The recently described hotspot mutation in the TERT promoter region in myxoid liposarcomas was also found at C228T in DL-221. Xenografts suitable for additional pre-clinical studies were successfully established in mice after subcutaneous injection. The established DL-221 cell line is the only published available myxoid liposarcoma cell line that underwent spontaneous immortalization, without requiring SV40 transformation. The cell line and its xenograft model are unique and helpful tools to study the biology and novel potential targeted treatment approaches for myxoid liposarcoma. PMID:27270875

  15. Differential Flo8p-dependent regulation of FLO1 and FLO11 for cell-cell and cell-substrate adherence of S. cerevisiae S288c.

    PubMed

    Fichtner, Lars; Schulze, Florian; Braus, Gerhard H

    2007-12-01

    Cell-cell and cell-surface adherence represents initial steps in forming multicellular aggregates or in establishing cell-surface interactions. The commonly used Saccharomyces cerevisiae laboratory strain S288c carries a flo8 mutation, and is only able to express the flocculin-encoding genes FLO1 and FLO11, when FLO8 is restored. We show here that the two flocculin genes exhibit differences in regulation to execute distinct functions under various environmental conditions. In contrast to the laboratory strain Sigma1278b, haploids of the S288c genetic background require FLO1 for cell-cell and cell-substrate adhesion, whereas FLO11 is required for pseudohyphae formation of diploids. In contrast to FLO11, FLO1 repression requires the Sin4p mediator tail component, but is independent of the repressor Sfl1p. FLO1 regulation also differs from FLO11, because it requires neither the KSS1 MAP kinase cascade nor the pathways which lead to the transcription factors Gcn4p or Msn1p. The protein kinase A pathway and the transcription factors Flo8p and Mss11p are the major regulators for FLO1 expression. Therefore, S. cerevisiae is prepared to simultaneously express two genes of its otherwise silenced FLO reservoir resulting in an appropriate cellular surface for different environments. PMID:18001350

  16. Alpha-2 Heremans Schmid Glycoprotein (AHSG) Modulates Signaling Pathways in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cell Line SQ20B

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Pamela D.; Sakwe, Amos; Koumangoye, Rainelli; Yarbrough, Wendell G.; Ochieng, Josiah; Marshall, Dana R.

    2014-02-15

    This study was performed to identify the potential role of Alpha-2 Heremans Schmid Glycoprotein (AHSG) in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (HNSCC) tumorigenesis using an HNSCC cell line model. HNSCC cell lines are unique among cancer cell lines, in that they produce endogenous AHSG and do not rely, solely, on AHSG derived from serum. To produce our model, we performed a stable transfection to down-regulate AHSG in the HNSCC cell line SQ20B, resulting in three SQ20B sublines, AH50 with 50% AHSG production, AH20 with 20% AHSG production and EV which is the empty vector control expressing wild-type levels of AHSG. Utilizing these sublines, we examined the effect of AHSG depletion on cellular adhesion, proliferation, migration and invasion in a serum-free environment. We demonstrated that sublines EV and AH50 adhered to plastic and laminin significantly faster than the AH20 cell line, supporting the previously reported role of exogenous AHSG in cell adhesion. As for proliferative potential, EV had the greatest amount of proliferation with AH50 proliferation significantly diminished. AH20 cells did not proliferate at all. Depletion of AHSG also diminished cellular migration and invasion. TGF-β was examined to determine whether levels of the TGF-β binding AHSG influenced the effect of TGF-β on cell signaling and proliferation. Whereas higher levels of AHSG blunted TGF-β influenced SMAD and ERK signaling, it did not clearly affect proliferation, suggesting that AHSG influences on adhesion, proliferation, invasion and migration are primarily due to its role in adhesion and cell spreading. The previously reported role of AHSG in potentiating metastasis via protecting MMP-9 from autolysis was also supported in this cell line based model system of endogenous AHSG production in HNSCC. Together, these data show that endogenously produced AHSG in an HNSCC cell line, promotes in vitro cellular properties identified as having a role in tumorigenesis. Highlights: • Head

  17. The effect of nedocromil sodium on human airway epithelial cell-induced eosinophil chemotaxis and adherence to human endothelial cell in vitro.

    PubMed

    Abdelaziz, M M; Devalia, J L; Khair, O A; Rusznak, C; Calderon, M; Sapsford, R J; Bayram, H; Davies, R J

    1997-04-01

    Although some studies have shown that long-term treatment of asthmatics with nedocromil sodium can reduce airway hyperresponsiveness and improve symptoms and lung function, the mechanisms underlying its effects are not well understood. We have investigated the effect of nedocromil sodium on eosinophil chemotaxis, eosinophil adherence to human endothelial cells and release of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) from endothelial cells, induced by conditioned medium collected from cultured human bronchial epithelial cells. Conditioned medium significantly increased eosinophil chemotaxis from a baseline median value of 2.1 (range 1.9-4.5) cells-high power field(-1) (HPF) to 10.5 (range 7.8-12.3) cells-HPF(-1) (p<0.05). Similarly, conditioned medium significantly increased eosinophil adherence to endothelial cells from a baseline value of 9 (range 8-12)% to 23 (range 21-30)% (p<0.05). Nedocromil sodium, at 10(-5) M concentration, significantly attenuated the eosinophil chemotaxis and adherence induced by conditioned medium. Conditioned medium also significantly increased the release of sICAM-1 from endothelial cells, from a baseline value of 11.5 (range 8.1-15.4) pg x microg(-1) protein to 67.6 (range 55.6-73.5) pg x microg(-1) protein (p<0.05). This was significantly attenuated by anti-tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), anti-interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and 10(-5) M nedocromil sodium. These findings suggest that human bronchial epithelial cell-derived mediators may potentiate eosinophil activity, and that this can be modulated by nedocromil sodium, suggesting a possible mechanism underlying its anti-inflammatory effect.

  18. Establishment and Characterization of a New Cell Line of Canine Inflammatory Mammary Cancer: IPC-366

    PubMed Central

    Caceres, Sara; Peña, Laura; de Andres, Paloma J.; Illera, Maria J.; Lopez, Mirtha S.; Woodward, Wendy A.; Reuben, James M.; Illera, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    Canine inflammatory mammary cancer (IMC) shares epidemiologic, histopathological and clinical characteristics with the disease in humans and has been proposed as a natural model for human inflammatory breast cancer (IBC). The aim of this study was to characterize a new cell line from IMC (IPC-366) for the comparative study of both IMC and IBC. Tumors cells from a female dog with clinical IMC were collected. The cells were grown under adherent conditions. The growth, cytological, ultrastructural and immunohistochemical (IHC) characteristics of IPC-366 were evaluated. Ten female Balb/SCID mice were inoculated with IPC-366 cells to assess their tumorigenicity and metastatic potential. Chromosome aberration test and Karyotype revealed the presence of structural aberration, numerical and neutral rearrangements, demonstrating a chromosomal instability. Microscopic examination of tumor revealed an epithelial morphology with marked anysocytosis. Cytological and histological examination of smears and ultrathin sections by electron microscopy revealed that IPC-366 is formed by highly malignant large round or polygonal cells characterized by marked atypia and prominent nucleoli and frequent multinucleated cells. Some cells had cytoplasmic empty spaces covered by cytoplasmic membrane resembling capillary endothelial cells, a phenomenon that has been related to s vasculogenic mimicry. IHC characterization of IPC-366 was basal-like: epithelial cells (AE1/AE3+, CK14+, vimentin+, actin-, p63-, ER-, PR-, HER-2, E-cadherin, overexpressed COX-2 and high Ki-67 proliferation index (87.15 %). At 2 weeks after inoculating the IPC-366 cells, a tumor mass was found in 100 % of mice. At 4 weeks metastases in lung and lymph nodes were found. Xenograph tumors maintained the original IHC characteristics of the female dog tumor. In summary, the cell line IPC-366 is a fast growing malignant triple negative cell line model of inflammatory mammary carcinoma that can be used for the comparative

  19. Nanoscopic vibrations of bacteria with different cell-wall properties adhering to surfaces under flow and static conditions.

    PubMed

    Song, Lei; Sjollema, Jelmer; Sharma, Prashant K; Kaper, Hans J; van der Mei, Henny C; Busscher, Henk J

    2014-08-26

    Bacteria adhering to surfaces demonstrate random, nanoscopic vibrations around their equilibrium positions. This paper compares vibrational amplitudes of bacteria adhering to glass. Spring constants of the bond are derived from vibrational amplitudes and related to the electrophoretic softness of the cell surfaces and dissipation shifts measured upon bacterial adhesion in a quartz-crystal-microbalance (QCM-D). Experiments were conducted with six bacterial strains with pairwise differences in cell surface characteristics. Vibrational amplitudes were highest in low ionic strength suspensions. Under fluid flow, vibrational amplitudes were lower in the direction of flow than perpendicular to it because stretching of cell surface polymers in the direction of flow causes stiffening of the polyelectrolyte network surrounding a bacterium. Under static conditions (0.57 mM), vibrational amplitudes of fibrillated Streptococcus salivarius HB7 (145 nm) were higher than that of a bald mutant HB-C12 (76 nm). Amplitudes of moderately extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) producing Staphylococcus epidermidis ATCC35983 (47 nm) were more than twice the amplitudes of strongly EPS producing S. epidermidis ATCC35984 (21 nm). No differences were found between Staphylococcus aureus strains differing in membrane cross-linking. High vibrational amplitudes corresponded with low dissipation shifts in QCM-D. In streptococci, the polyelectrolyte network surrounding a bacterium is formed by fibrillar surface appendages and spring constants derived from vibrational amplitudes decreased with increasing fibrillar density. In staphylococci, EPS constitutes the main network component, and larger amounts of EPS yielded higher spring constants. Spring constants increased with increasing ionic strength and strains with smaller electrophoretically derived bacterial cell surface softnesses possessed the highest spring constants. PMID:25025495

  20. A new permanent cell line derived from the bank vole (Myodes glareolus) as cell culture model for zoonotic viruses

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Approximately 60% of emerging viruses are of zoonotic origin, with three-fourths derived from wild animals. Many of these zoonotic diseases are transmitted by rodents with important information about their reservoir dynamics and pathogenesis missing. One main reason for the gap in our knowledge is the lack of adequate cell culture systems as models for the investigation of rodent-borne (robo) viruses in vitro. Therefore we established and characterized a new cell line, BVK168, using the kidney of a bank vole, Myodes glareolus, the most abundant member of the Arvicolinae trapped in Germany. Results BVK168 proved to be of epithelial morphology expressing tight junctions as well as adherence junction proteins. The BVK168 cells were analyzed for their infectability by several arbo- and robo-viruses: Vesicular stomatitis virus, vaccinia virus, cowpox virus, Sindbis virus, Pixuna virus, Usutu virus, Inkoo virus, Puumalavirus, and Borna disease virus (BDV). The cell line was susceptible for all tested viruses, and most interestingly also for the difficult to propagate BDV. Conclusion In conclusion, the newly established cell line from wildlife rodents seems to be an excellent tool for the isolation and characterization of new rodent-associated viruses and may be used as in vitro-model to study properties and pathogenesis of these agents. PMID:21729307

  1. VOLIN and KJON-Two novel hyperdiploid myeloma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Våtsveen, Thea Kristin; Børset, Magne; Dikic, Aida; Tian, Erming; Micci, Francesca; Lid, Ana H B; Meza-Zepeda, Leonardo A; Coward, Eivind; Waage, Anders; Sundan, Anders; Kuehl, W Michael; Holien, Toril

    2016-11-01

    Multiple myeloma can be divided into two distinct genetic subgroups: hyperdiploid (HRD) or nonhyperdiploid (NHRD) myeloma. Myeloma cell lines are important tools to study myeloma cell biology and are commonly used for preclinical screening and testing of new drugs. With few exceptions human myeloma cell lines are derived from NHRD patients, even though about half of the patients have HRD myeloma. Thus, there is a need for cell lines of HRD origin to enable more representative preclinical studies. Here, we present two novel myeloma cell lines, VOLIN and KJON. Both of them were derived from patients with HRD disease and shared the same genotype as their corresponding primary tumors. The cell lines' chromosomal content, genetic aberrations, gene expression, immunophenotype as well as some of their growth characteristics are described. Neither of the cell lines was found to harbor immunoglobulin heavy chain translocations. The VOLIN cell line was established from a bone marrow aspirate and KJON from peripheral blood. We propose that these unique cell lines may be used as tools to increase our understanding of myeloma cell biology. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27311012

  2. Single cell dual adherent-suspension co-culture micro-environment for studying tumor-stromal interactions with functionally selected cancer stem-like cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Chih; Zhang, Zhixiong; Fouladdel, Shamileh; Deol, Yadwinder; Ingram, Patrick N; McDermott, Sean P; Azizi, Ebrahim; Wicha, Max S; Yoon, Euisik

    2016-08-01

    Considerable evidence suggests that cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are critical in tumor pathogenesis, but their rarity and transience has led to much controversy about their exact nature. Although CSCs can be functionally identified using dish-based tumorsphere assays, it is difficult to handle and monitor single cells in dish-based approaches; single cell-based microfluidic approaches offer better control and reliable single cell derived sphere formation. However, like normal stem cells, CSCs are heavily regulated by their microenvironment, requiring tumor-stromal interactions for tumorigenic and proliferative behaviors. To enable single cell derived tumorsphere formation within a stromal microenvironment, we present a dual adherent/suspension co-culture device, which combines a suspension environment for single-cell tumorsphere assays and an adherent environment for co-culturing stromal cells in close proximity by selectively patterning polyHEMA in indented microwells. By minimizing dead volume and improving cell capture efficiency, the presented platform allows for the use of small numbers of cells (<100 cells). As a proof of concept, we co-cultured single T47D (breast cancer) cells and primary cancer associated fibroblasts (CAF) on-chip for 14 days to monitor sphere formation and growth. Compared to mono-culture, co-cultured T47D have higher tumorigenic potential (sphere formation rate) and proliferation rates (larger sphere size). Furthermore, 96-multiplexed single-cell transcriptome analyses were performed to compare the gene expression of co-cultured and mono-cultured T47D cells. Phenotypic changes observed in co-culture correlated with expression changes in genes associated with proliferation, apoptotic suppression, tumorigenicity and even epithelial-to-mesechymal transition. Combining the presented platform with single cell transcriptome analysis, we successfully identified functional CSCs and investigated the phenotypic and transcriptome effects induced

  3. Hodgkin lymphoma cell lines bind to platelets. Incubation with platelets induces CD15 and P-selectin dependent adhesion of the cell lines to Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial cells (HUVEC).

    PubMed

    Ohana, Ofra Malka; Ozer, Janet; Prinsloo, Isebrand; Benharroch, Daniel; Gopas, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Hodgkin's lymphoma is believed to spread in an orderly fashion within the lymphatic compartment. In a minority of cases, after reaching the spleen, the neoplasm disseminates, reminiscent of metastasis. In the spleen, the Hodgkin-Reed-Sternberg tumor cells come across platelets in the blood vessels and mainly in the splenic red pulp. Based on this knowledge, we investigated the possibility of platelets inducing cell adhesion in Hodgkin's lymphoma cell lines. We showed that L428 and KMH-2 cells strongly adhere to thrombin-activated platelets. Cell adhesion to platelets is partially dependent on CD15 antigens (Lewis(X)), mainly sialyl-CD15, and P-selectin. KMH-2, as compared to L428 cells, showed increased binding due to its differential high expression of the sialyl-CD15. As a consequence of incubation with platelets, KMH-2 cells also produced increased amounts of tumor necrosis factors α (TNFα) followed by enhanced binding to human vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC). Incubation of both cell lines with activated platelets also induced activation of AP-1 transcription complex. Our findings are consistent with the concept that platelets play a critical role in the dissemination of HRS cells in HL, predominantly in the spleen, by increasing cell adhesion and thus promoting their proliferative and migratory properties beyond the lymphatic system.

  4. Hodgkin lymphoma cell lines bind to platelets. Incubation with platelets induces CD15 and P-selectin dependent adhesion of the cell lines to Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial cells (HUVEC).

    PubMed

    Ohana, Ofra Malka; Ozer, Janet; Prinsloo, Isebrand; Benharroch, Daniel; Gopas, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Hodgkin's lymphoma is believed to spread in an orderly fashion within the lymphatic compartment. In a minority of cases, after reaching the spleen, the neoplasm disseminates, reminiscent of metastasis. In the spleen, the Hodgkin-Reed-Sternberg tumor cells come across platelets in the blood vessels and mainly in the splenic red pulp. Based on this knowledge, we investigated the possibility of platelets inducing cell adhesion in Hodgkin's lymphoma cell lines. We showed that L428 and KMH-2 cells strongly adhere to thrombin-activated platelets. Cell adhesion to platelets is partially dependent on CD15 antigens (Lewis(X)), mainly sialyl-CD15, and P-selectin. KMH-2, as compared to L428 cells, showed increased binding due to its differential high expression of the sialyl-CD15. As a consequence of incubation with platelets, KMH-2 cells also produced increased amounts of tumor necrosis factors α (TNFα) followed by enhanced binding to human vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC). Incubation of both cell lines with activated platelets also induced activation of AP-1 transcription complex. Our findings are consistent with the concept that platelets play a critical role in the dissemination of HRS cells in HL, predominantly in the spleen, by increasing cell adhesion and thus promoting their proliferative and migratory properties beyond the lymphatic system. PMID:26418972

  5. Hodgkin lymphoma cell lines bind to platelets. Incubation with platelets induces CD15 and P-selectin dependent adhesion of the cell lines to Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial cells (HUVEC)

    PubMed Central

    Ohana, Ofra Malka; Ozer, Janet; Prinsloo, Isebrand; Benharroch, Daniel; Gopas, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Hodgkin's lymphoma is believed to spread in an orderly fashion within the lymphatic compartment. In a minority of cases, after reaching the spleen, the neoplasm disseminates, reminiscent of metastasis. In the spleen, the Hodgkin-Reed-Sternberg tumor cells come across platelets in the blood vessels and mainly in the splenic red pulp. Based on this knowledge, we investigated the possibility of platelets inducing cell adhesion in Hodgkin's lymphoma cell lines. We showed that L428 and KMH-2 cells strongly adhere to thrombin-activated platelets. Cell adhesion to platelets is partially dependent on CD15 antigens (LewisX), mainly sialyl-CD15, and P-selectin. KMH-2, as compared to L428 cells, showed increased binding due to its differential high expression of the sialyl-CD15. As a consequence of incubation with platelets, KMH-2 cells also produced increased amounts of tumor necrosis factors α (TNFα) followed by enhanced binding to human vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC). Incubation of both cell lines with activated platelets also induced activation of AP-1 transcription complex. Our findings are consistent with the concept that platelets play a critical role in the dissemination of HRS cells in HL, predominantly in the spleen, by increasing cell adhesion and thus promoting their proliferative and migratory properties beyond the lymphatic system. PMID:26418972

  6. Cell lines used for the selection of recombinant baculovirus.

    PubMed

    Maruniak, J E; Garcia-Canedo, A; Rodrigues, J J

    1994-04-01

    Four insect cell lines were used to isolate two recombinant baculoviruses which had the beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) gene for colorimetric assay purposes. Plaque assays were performed using two Trichoplusia ni cell lines: BTI-TN-5B1-4 and TN-368, and two Spodptera frugiperda cell lines: IPLB-SF-21AE and SF9. The number of plaques (occlusion positive and blue beta-gal+ recombinants) formed in the Trichoplusia cells was higher than in the Spodoptera cells. The appearance of Autographa californica NPV polyhedra was also faster in the T. ni cell lines. The effect of cell passage on the plaque formation proved to be critical when two different passages of the SF9 cells were tested. The higher passage produced a lower viral titration. The size and time of appearance of the plaques was also different.

  7. Authentication of the R06E Fruit Bat Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Ingo; Munster, Vincent J.; Sandig, Volker

    2012-01-01

    Fruit bats and insectivorous bats are believed to provide a natural reservoir for a wide variety of infectious diseases. Several lines of evidence, including the successful isolation of infectious viruses, indicate that Marburg virus and Ravn virus have found a major reservoir in colonies of the Egyptian rousette (Rousettus aegyptiacus). To facilitate molecular studies on virus-reservoir host interactions and isolation of viruses from environmental samples, we established cell lines from primary cells of this animal. The cell lines were given to several laboratories until we realized that a contamination with Vero cells in one of the cultures had occurred. Here we describe a general diagnostic procedure for identification of cross-species contamination with the focus on Vero and Rousettus cell lines, and summarize newly discovered properties of the cell lines that may pertain to pathogen discovery. PMID:22754654

  8. Scalable expansion of human induced pluripotent stem cells in the defined xeno-free E8 medium under adherent and suspension culture conditions☆

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Chou, Bin-Kuan; Dowey, Sarah; He, Chaoxia; Gerecht, Sharon; Cheng, Linzhao

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale production of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) by robust and economic methods has been one of the major challenges for translational realization of hiPSC technology. Here we demonstrate a scalable culture system for hiPSC expansion using the E8 chemically defined and xeno-free medium under either adherent or suspension conditions. To optimize suspension conditions guided by a computational simulation, we developed a method to efficiently expand hiPSCs as undifferentiated aggregates in spinner flasks. Serial passaging of two different hiPSC lines in the spinner flasks using the E8 medium preserved their normal karyotype and expression of undifferentiated state markers of TRA-1–60, SSEA4, OCT4, and NANOG. The hiPSCs cultured in spinner flasks for more than 10 passages not only could be remained pluripotent as indicated by in vitro and in vivo assays, but also could be efficiently induced toward mesodermal and hematopoietic differentiation. Furthermore, we established a xeno-free protocol of single-cell cryopreservation and recovery for the scalable production of hiPSCs in spinner flasks. This system is the first to enable an efficient scale-up bioprocess in completely xeno-free condition for the expansion and cryopreservation of hiPSCs with the quantity and quality compliant for clinical applications. PMID:23973800

  9. Characterization and Comparison of Intercellular Adherent Junctions Expressed by Human Corneal Endothelial Cells in Vivo and in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ying-Ting, Zhu; Hayashida, Yasutaka; Kheirkhah, Ahmad; He, Hua; Sue-Yue, Chen; Tseng, Scheffer C. G.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Human corneal endothelial cell (HCEC) proliferation is controlled by their cell junctions, of which the mechanism remains unknown. We sought to characterize adherent junction components of in vivo HCECs, and compare their gene expression and their proliferative potential to those of in vitro counterparts. Methods Stripped human Descemet’s membranes were digested with collagenase A, and the resultant HCEC aggregates were cultured for 7, 14, and 21 days in supplemented hormonal epithelial medium (SHEM). Growth of HCEC monolayers was monitored by BrdU labeling performed 24 h before termination. Both in vivo and in vitro HCECs were subjected to immunostaining to FITC-phalloidin and antibodies to different junction components and BrdU. Their mRNA expressions were determined by RT-PCR. Results In vivo HCECs expressed transcripts of N-, VE-, E-, and P-cadherins, α-, β-, γ-, and p120-catenins, and p190. In vitro HCEC counterparts also expressed all these mRNAs except P-cadherin. In vivo HCECs displayed continuous circular F-actin, N-cadherin, β- and p120-catenins, and p190, discontinuous circular VE-cadherin bands at/close to cell junctions, and E-cadherin in the cytoplasm. Such an in vivo pattern was gradually achieved by in vitro HCECs at day 21 and was correlated with a progressive decline of BrdU labeling. Conclusions Both in vivo and in vitro HCECs displayed distinct protein cytolocalization of N-, VE-, and E-cadherins, β- and p120-catenins, and p190. Progressive maturation of adherent junctions was associated with a decline of the proliferative potential. This information allows us to devise new strategies to engineer in vitro HCECs by targeting these components. PMID:18502989

  10. Open-channel microfluidic membrane device for long-term FT-IR spectromicroscopy of live adherent cells.

    PubMed

    Loutherback, Kevin; Chen, Liang; Holman, Hoi-Ying N

    2015-01-01

    Spatially resolved infrared spectroscopy is a label-free and nondestructive analytical technique that can provide spatiotemporal information on functional groups in biomolecules of a sample by their characteristic vibrational modes. One difficulty in performing long-term FT-IR measurements on live cells is the competition between the strong IR absorption from water and the need to supply nutrients and remove waste. In this proof of principle study, we developed an open-channel membrane device that allows long-term continuous IR measurement of live, adherent mammalian cells. Composed of a gold-coated porous membrane between a feeding channel and a viewing chamber, it allows cells to be maintained on the upper membrane surface in a thin layer of fluid while media is replenished from the feeding channel below. Using this device, we monitored the spatiotemporal chemical changes in living colonies of PC12 cells under nerve growth factor (NGF) stimulation for up to 7 days using both conventional globar and high-resolution synchrotron radiation-based IR sources. We identified the primary chemical change cells undergo is an increase in glycogen that may be associated with secretion of glycoprotein to protect the cells from evaporative stress at the air-liquid interface. Analyzing the spectral maps with multivariate methods of hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and principal component analysis (PCA), we found that the cells at the boundary of the colony and in a localized region in the center of the colony tend to produce more glycogen and glycoprotein than cells located elsewhere in the colony and that the degree of spatial heterogeneity decreases with time. This method provides a promising approach for long-term live-cell spectromicroscopy on mammalian cell systems. PMID:25886198

  11. Establishment and characterization of the Bombyx mandarina cell line.

    PubMed

    Iwanaga, Masashi; Arai, Rika; Shibano, Yuka; Kawasaki, Hideki; Imanishi, Shigeo

    2009-06-01

    A new cell line, designated as NIAS-Boma-529b, was established from the larval fat bodies of Bombyx mandarina (B. mandarina), which is believed to be an ancestor of Bombyx mori (B. mori). This cell line has been cultured for approximately 150 passages during 2years in an IPL-41 medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum at a constant temperature of 26 degrees C. The morphology of this line includes adhesive round and spindle-shaped cells. Random-amplified polymorphic DNA analysis (RAPD) using 7 primers and a statistical analysis based on Nei's genetic distance revealed that this cell line was closely related to B. mori-derived cell lines. An infection study also revealed that this cell line was susceptible to B. mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV); however, it had no apparent susceptibility to Autographa californica NPV (AcNPV), which is closely related to BmNPV. Nevertheless, cells infected with AcNPV showed an extensive cytopathic effect (CPE), including a rough cell surface, rounding, nuclear expansion, and cell blebbing. These results suggest that this cell line can be useful to clarify the mechanism of host range determination of BmNPV and AcNPV.

  12. Pharmacogenomic agreement between two cancer cell line data sets.

    PubMed

    2015-12-01

    Large cancer cell line collections broadly capture the genomic diversity of human cancers and provide valuable insight into anti-cancer drug response. Here we show substantial agreement and biological consilience between drug sensitivity measurements and their associated genomic predictors from two publicly available large-scale pharmacogenomics resources: The Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia and the Genomics of Drug Sensitivity in Cancer databases.

  13. Trichloroethylene toxicity in a human hepatoma cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Thevenin, E.; McMillian, J.

    1994-12-31

    The experiments conducted in this study were designed to determine the usefullness of hepatocyte cultures and a human hepatoma cell line as model systems for assessing human susceptibility to hepatocellular carcinoma due to exposure to trichloroethylene. The results from these studies will then be analyzed to determine if human cell lines can be used to conduct future experiments of this nature.

  14. Hemin toxicity in a human epithelioid sarcoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Braverman, S; Helson, C; Helson, L

    1995-01-01

    The major cytotoxic component of hemin was identified as metal free protoporphyrin IX in an epithelioid sarcoma cell line (VA-ES-BJ) and a glioblastoma cell line (U-373 MG) by exposing the cell lines to the iron chelator deferoxamine, tin-protoporphyrin IX, and protoporphyrin IX. The contribution of lipid peroxidation and free radical generation to toxicity was examined using DL-buthionine-[S,R]-sulfoximine (BSO), and 21-aminosteroid (lazaroid, U74500A). Hemin caused significantly greater toxicity in VA-ES-BJ than in U-373 MG. While exogenous PpIX was more toxic than hemin in both cell lines, this toxicity was not due to iron depletion following intracellular heme formation since ferric citrate did not reverse PpIX toxicity. Pre-treatment with BSO enhanced hemin toxicity in the VA-ES-BJ cell line but not in U-373 MG, suggesting different modes of toxicity in the two cell lines. Exposure to lazaroid protected only VA-ES-BJ from protoporphyrin-induced toxicity implicating a specific sensitivity to lipid peroxidation and/or free radical generation by this cell line. These characteristics of the VA-ES-BJ cell line distinguish it from the glioblastoma and emphasize its utility for exploring cytotoxic effects of hemin and its precursors.

  15. Derivation of the human embryonic stem cell line RCM1.

    PubMed

    De Sousa, P A; Tye, B J; Sneddon, S; Bruce, K; Dand, P; Russell, G; Collins, D M; Greenshields, A; McDonald, K; Bradburn, H; Gardner, J; Downie, J M; Courtney, A; Brison, D R

    2016-03-01

    The human embryonic stem cell line RCM-1 was derived from a failed to fertilise egg undergoing parthenogenetic stimulation. The cell line shows normal pluripotency marker expression and differentiation to three germ layers in vitro and in vivo. It has a normal 46XX female karyotype and microsatellite PCR identity, HLA and blood group typing data is available. PMID:27346018

  16. Establishment of the first humpback whale fibroblast cell lines and their application in chemical risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Burkard, Michael; Whitworth, Deanne; Schirmer, Kristin; Nash, Susan Bengtson

    2015-10-01

    This paper reports the first successful derivation and characterization of humpback whale fibroblast cell lines. Primary fibroblasts were isolated from the dermal connective tissue of skin biopsies, cultured at 37 °C and 5% CO2 in the standard mammalian medium DMEM/F12 supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS). Of nine initial biopsies, two cell lines were established from two different animals and designated HuWa1 and HuWa2. The cells have a stable karyotype with 2n=44, which has commonly been observed in other baleen whale species. Cells were verified as being fibroblasts based on their spindle-shaped morphology, adherence to plastic and positive immunoreaction to vimentin. Population doubling time was determined to be ∼41 h and cells were successfully cryopreserved and thawed. To date, HuWa1 cells have been propagated 30 times. Cells proliferate at the tested temperatures, 30, 33.5 and 37 °C, but show the highest rate of proliferation at 37 °C. Short-term exposure to para,para'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE), a priority compound accumulating in southern hemisphere humpback whales, resulted in a concentration-dependent loss of cell viability. The effective concentration which caused a 50% reduction in HuWa1 cell viability (EC50 value) was approximately six times greater than the EC50 value for the same chemical measured with human dermal fibroblasts. HuWa1 exposed to a natural, p,p'-DDE-containing, chemical mixture extracted from whale blubber showed distinctively higher sensitivity than to p,p'-DDE alone. Thus, we provide the first cytotoxicological data for humpback whales and with establishment of the HuWa cell lines, a unique in vitro model for the study of the whales' sensitivity and cellular response to chemicals and other environmental stressors.

  17. Regulated expression of erythropoietin by two human hepatoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, M.A.; Glass, G.A.; Cunningham, J.M.; Bunn, H.F.

    1987-11-01

    The development of a cell culture system that produces erythropoietin (Epo) in a regulated manner has been the focus of much effort. The authors have screened multiple renal and hepatic cell lines for either constitutive or regulated expression of Epo. Only the human hepatoma cell lines, Hep3B and HepG2, made significant amounts of Epo as measured both by radioimmunoassay and in vitro bioassay (as much as 330 milliunits per 10/sup 6/ cells in 24 hr). The constitutive production of Epo increased dramatically as a function of cell density in both cell lines. At cell densities < 3.3 x 10/sup 5/ cells per cm/sup 2/, there was little constitutive release of Epo in the medium. With Hep3B cells grown at low cell densities, a mean 18-fold increase in Epo expression was seen in response to hypoxia and a 6-fold increase was observed in response to incubation in medium containing 50 ..mu..M cobalt(II) chloride. At similar low cell densities, Epo production in HepG2 cells could be enhanced an average of about 3-fold by stimulation with either hypoxia or cobalt(II) chloride. Upon such stimulation, both cell lines demonstrated markedly elevated levels of Epo mRNA. Hence, both Hep3B and HepG2 cell lines provide an excellent in vitro system in which to study the physiological regulation of Epo expression.

  18. Trichomonas vaginalis induces cytopathic effect on human lung alveolar basal carcinoma epithelial cell line A549.

    PubMed

    Salvador-Membreve, Daile Meek C; Jacinto, Sonia D; Rivera, Windell L

    2014-12-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis, the causative agent of trichomoniasis is generally known to inhabit the genitourinary tract. However, several case reports with supporting molecular and immunological identifications have documented its occurrence in the respiratory tract of neonates and adults. In addition, the reports have documented that its occurrence is associated with respiratory failures. The medical significance or consequence of this association is unclear. Thus, to establish the possible outcome from the interaction of T. vaginalis with lung cells, the cytopathic effects of the parasites were evaluated using monolayer cultures of the human lung alveolar basal carcinoma epithelial cell line A549. The possible effect of association of T. vaginalis with A549 epithelial cells was analyzed using phase-contrast, scanning electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy. MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide), crystal-violet and TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labelling) assays were conducted for cytotoxicity testing. The results demonstrate that T. vaginalis: (1) adheres to A549 epithelial cells, suggesting a density-dependent parasite-cell association; (2) adherence on A549 is through flagella, membrane and axostyle; (3) causes cell detachment and cytotoxicity (50-72.4%) to A549 and this effect is a function of parasite density; and (4) induces apoptosis in A549 about 20% after 6 h of incubation. These observations indicate that T. vaginalis causes cytopathic effects on A549 cell. To date, this is the first report showing a possible interaction of T. vaginalis with the lung cells using A549 monolayer cultures. Further studies are recommended to completely elucidate this association.

  19. HIV Medication Adherence

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment HIV Medication Adherence (Last updated 3/1/2016; last reviewed 3/1/2016) Key Points Medication adherence means sticking ... exactly as prescribed. Why is adherence to an HIV regimen important? Adherence to an HIV regimen gives ...

  20. GREG cells, a dysferlin-deficient myogenic mouse cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Humphrey, Glen W.; Mekhedov, Elena; Blank, Paul S.; Morree, Antoine de; Pekkurnaz, Gulcin; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; Zimmerberg, Joshua

    2012-01-15

    The dysferlinopathies (e.g. LGMD2b, Myoshi myopathy) are progressive, adult-onset muscle wasting syndromes caused by mutations in the gene coding for dysferlin. Dysferlin is a large ({approx} 200 kDa) membrane-anchored protein, required for maintenance of plasmalemmal integrity in muscle fibers. To facilitate analysis of dysferlin function in muscle cells, we have established a dysferlin-deficient myogenic cell line (GREG cells) from the A/J mouse, a genetic model for dysferlinopathy. GREG cells have no detectable dysferlin expression, but proliferate normally in growth medium and fuse into functional myotubes in differentiation medium. GREG myotubes exhibit deficiencies in plasma membrane repair, as measured by laser wounding in the presence of FM1-43 dye. Under the wounding conditions used, the majority ({approx} 66%) of GREG myotubes lack membrane repair capacity, while no membrane repair deficiency was observed in dysferlin-normal C2C12 myotubes, assayed under the same conditions. We discuss the possibility that the observed heterogeneity in membrane resealing represents genetic compensation for dysferlin deficiency.

  1. Fast, Efficient, and Gentle Transfection of Human Adherent Cells in Suspension.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Pranav; Ingle, Nilesh P; Boyle, William S; Ward, Emily; Tolar, Jakub; Dorfman, Kevin D; Reineke, Theresa M

    2016-04-13

    We demonstrate a highly efficient method for gene delivery into clinically relevant human cell types, such as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and fibroblasts, reducing the protocol time by one full day. To preserve cell physiology during gene transfer, we designed a microfluidic strategy, which facilitates significant gene delivery in a short transfection time (<1 min) for several human cell types. This fast, optimized and generally applicable cell transfection method can be used for rapid screening of different delivery systems and has significant potential for high-throughput cell therapy applications. PMID:27035392

  2. Non-Viral Transfection Methods Optimized for Gene Delivery to a Lung Cancer Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Salimzadeh, Loghman; Jaberipour, Mansooreh; Hosseini, Ahmad; Ghaderi, Abbas

    2013-01-01

    Background Mehr-80 is a newly established adherent human large cell lung cancer cell line that has not been transfected until now. This study aims to define the optimal transfection conditions and effects of some critical elements for enhancing gene delivery to this cell line by utilizing different non-viral transfection Procedures. Methods In the current study, calcium phosphate (CaP), DEAE-dextran, superfect, electroporation and lipofection transfection methods were used to optimize delivery of a plasmid construct that expressed Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP). Transgene expression was detected by fluorescent microscopy and flowcytometry. Toxicities of the methods were estimated by trypan blue staining. In order to evaluate the density of the transfected gene, we used a plasmid construct that expressed the Stromal cell-Derived Factor-1 (SDF-1) gene and measured its expression by real-time PCR. Results Mean levels of GFP-expressing cells 48 hr after transfection were 8.4% (CaP), 8.2% (DEAE-dextran), 4.9% (superfect), 34.1% (electroporation), and 40.1% (lipofection). Lipofection had the highest intense SDF-1 expression of the analyzed methods. Conclusion This study has shown that the lipofection and electroporation methods were more efficient at gene delivery to Mehr-80 cells. The quantity of DNA per transfection, reagent concentration, and incubation time were identified as essential factors for successful transfection in all of the studied methods. PMID:23799175

  3. Modification of Solid Phase Red Cell Adherence Assay for the Detection of Platelet Antibodies in Patients With Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Vongchan, Preeyanat; Nawarawong, Weerasak; Linhardt, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Platelet refractoriness is caused by HLA antibodies and platelet-specific antibodies. Current methods used to detect antiplatelet antibodies have limitations. Solid phase red cell adherence (SPRCA) lacks sensitivity and requires a second assay using chloroquine-treated intact platelets to specify the response due to anti-HLA. We modified SPRCA by using 2 types of antihuman platelet antibodies with different specificities toward platelet lysate and tested samples from 361 patients (69 with unexplained thrombocytopenia and 292 with poor response to platelet transfusions not explicable by alloimmunization or the clinical situation) and 50 from healthy volunteers. Our method compared favorably with platelet suspension direct immunofluorescence. All samples from healthy volunteers were negative; of the samples from the patient population, 240 were positive (147 samples had only antiplatelet and 3 samples had only anti-HLA antibodies). This modified technique had a sensitivity of 98% and a specificity of 91%. PMID:18701420

  4. Modification of solid phase red cell adherence assay for the detection of platelet antibodies in patients with thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Vongchan, Preeyanat; Nawarawong, Weerasak; Linhardt, Robert J

    2008-09-01

    Platelet refractoriness is caused by HLA antibodies and platelet-specific antibodies. Current methods used to detect antiplatelet antibodies have limitations. Solid phase red cell adherence (SPRCA) lacks sensitivity and requires a second assay using chloroquine-treated intact platelets to specify the response due to anti-HLA. We modified SPRCA by using 2 types of antihuman platelet antibodies with different specificities toward platelet lysate and tested samples from 361 patients (69 with unexplained thrombocytopenia and 292 with poor response to platelet transfusions not explicable by alloimmunization or the clinical situation) and 50 from healthy volunteers. Our method compared favorably with platelet suspension direct immunofluorescence. All samples from healthy volunteers were negative; of the samples from the patient population, 240 were positive (147 samples had only antiplatelet and 3 samples had only anti-HLA antibodies). This modified technique had a sensitivity of 98% and a specificity of 91%.

  5. CACO-2 CELL LINES IN DRUG DISCOVERY- AN UPDATED PERSPECTIVE

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Kalyan K.V; Karnati, Swathi; Reddy, Mamatha B; Chandramouli, R

    2010-01-01

    Cell lines are the invitro models used for the drug permeability studies in the preclinical and clinical phases of the drug discovery. Cell line models are simple and quick to use and avoids the usage of animal models for pharmacological and toxicological studies and hence cost effective, produce reliable and reproducible results for understanding and evaluating the permeability characteristics of the potential lead drug candidates. Different cell line models used in the drug permeability studies, their characteristics has been summarized emphasizing on CACO-2. By virtue of its merits, CACO-2 cell line development, transport experiments, automated assays, optimization of experimental conditions and mechanistic uses of CACO-2 cell lines dealt comprehensively in the following context. PMID:24825967

  6. Response of adherent cells to mechanical perturbations of the surrounding matrix.

    PubMed

    Ben-Yaakov, Dan; Golkov, Roman; Shokef, Yair; Safran, Samuel A

    2015-02-01

    We present a generic and unified theory to explain how cells respond to perturbations of their mechanical environment such as the presence of neighboring cells, slowly applied stretch, or gradients of matrix rigidity. Motivated by experiments, we calculate the local balance of forces that give rise to a tendency for the cell to locally move or reorient, with a focus on the contribution of feedback and homeostasis to cell contractility (manifested by a fixed displacement, strain or stress) that acts on the adhesions at the cell boundary. These forces can be either reinforced or diminished by elastic stresses due to mechanical perturbations of the matrix. Our model predicts these changes and how their balance with local protrusive forces that act on the cell's leading edge either increase or decrease the tendency of the cell to locally move (toward neighboring cells or rigidity gradients) or reorient (in the direction of slowly applied stretch or rigidity gradients).

  7. Stepwise, non-adherent differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells to generate basal forebrain cholinergic neurons via hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Crompton, Lucy A; Byrne, Meg L; Taylor, Hannah; Kerrigan, Talitha L; Bru-Mercier, Gilles; Badger, Jennifer L; Barbuti, Peter A; Jo, Jihoon; Tyler, Sue J; Allen, Shelley J; Kunath, Tilo; Cho, Kwangwook; Caldwell, Maeve A

    2013-11-01

    Basal forebrain cholinergic neurons (bfCNs) which provide innervation to the hippocampus and cortex, are required for memory and learning, and are primarily affected in Alzheimer's Disease (AD), resulting in related cognitive decline. Therefore generation of a source of bfCNs from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) is crucial for in vitro disease modeling and development of novel AD therapies. In addition, for the advancement of regenerative approaches there is a requirement for an accurate developmental model to study the neurogenesis and survival of this population. Here we demonstrate the efficient production of bfCNs, using a novel embryoid body (EB) based non-adherent differentiation (NAdD) protocol. We establish a specific basal forebrain neural stem cell (NSC) phenotype via expression of the basal forebrain transcription factors NKX2.1 and LHX8, as well as the general forebrain marker FOXG1. We present evidence that this lineage is achieved via recapitulation of embryonic events, with induction of intrinsic hedgehog signaling, through the use of a 3D non-adherent differentiation system. This is the first example of hPSC-derived basal forebrain-like NSCs, which are scalable via self-renewal in prolonged culture. Furthermore upon terminal differentiation these basal forebrain-like NSCs generate high numbers of cholinergic neurons expressing the specific markers ChAT, VACht and ISL1. These hPSC-derived bfCNs possess characteristics that are crucial in a model to study AD related cholinergic neuronal loss in the basal forebrain. Examples are expression of the therapeutic target p75(NTR), the release of acetylcholine, and demonstration of a mature, and functional electrophysiological profile. In conclusion, this work provides a renewable source of human functional bfCNs applicable for studying AD specifically in the cholinergic system, and also provides a model of the key embryonic events in human bfCN development. PMID:24013066

  8. Cystone – An ayurvedic polyherbal formulation inhibits adherence of uropathogenic E. coli and modulates H2O2-induced toxicity in NRK-52E cells

    PubMed Central

    Vidyashankar, Satyakumar; Maheshkumar, Puttanarasaiah; Patki, Pralhad S

    2010-01-01

    Gentamicin is a widely used antibiotic for the treatment of adverse urinary tract infections (UTI), which in turn causes nephrotoxicity to uroepithelial cells and hence an alternative safe herbal remedy is much desired to compensate these toxic effects. The bacterial adhesion to the uroepithelial cells is the primary step in UTI and it induces various immunogenic reactions leading to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are detrimental to the cells survival. Inhibition of bacterial adherence to urinary tract epithelial cells has been assumed to account for the beneficial action ascribed to cystone (an ayurvedic polyherbal formulation) in the prevention of UTI. In this study, we have examined the effect of cystone on the adherence of pathogenic [2-14C]-acetate labeled Escherichia coli (MTCC-729) to rat proximal renal tubular cells (NRK-52E cells). Further, the antioxidant property of cystone was studied using hydrogen peroxide (400 μM) as a pro-oxidant in NRK-52E cells. The results showed that cystone inhibited the adherence of E. coli to NRK-52E cells significantly. Additionally cystone effectively combats the toxicity induced by H2O2 in NRK-52E cells. The cytoprotective effect of cystone is brought about by inhibiting lipid peroxidation by 36% in cells treated with cystone compared to H2O2-treated cells without cystone. The antioxidant enzymes catalase, glutathione were increased by 53% and 68% respectively and superoxide dismutase activity was increased 3-fold. The glutathione content was significantly increased by 2.4-fold in NRK-52E cells treated with cystone compared to H2O2 control group. These results suggest that cystone effectively inhibits bacterial adherence to NRK-52E cells and attenuates H2O2-induced toxicity in NRK-52E cells by inhibiting lipid peroxidation and increasing the antioxidant defense mechanism. PMID:27186087

  9. Cystone - An ayurvedic polyherbal formulation inhibits adherence of uropathogenic E. coli and modulates H2O2-induced toxicity in NRK-52E cells.

    PubMed

    Vidyashankar, Satyakumar; Maheshkumar, Puttanarasaiah; Patki, Pralhad S

    2010-01-01

    Gentamicin is a widely used antibiotic for the treatment of adverse urinary tract infections (UTI), which in turn causes nephrotoxicity to uroepithelial cells and hence an alternative safe herbal remedy is much desired to compensate these toxic effects. The bacterial adhesion to the uroepithelial cells is the primary step in UTI and it induces various immunogenic reactions leading to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are detrimental to the cells survival. Inhibition of bacterial adherence to urinary tract epithelial cells has been assumed to account for the beneficial action ascribed to cystone (an ayurvedic polyherbal formulation) in the prevention of UTI. In this study, we have examined the effect of cystone on the adherence of pathogenic [2-(14)C]-acetate labeled Escherichia coli (MTCC-729) to rat proximal renal tubular cells (NRK-52E cells). Further, the antioxidant property of cystone was studied using hydrogen peroxide (400 μM) as a pro-oxidant in NRK-52E cells. The results showed that cystone inhibited the adherence of E. coli to NRK-52E cells significantly. Additionally cystone effectively combats the toxicity induced by H2O2 in NRK-52E cells. The cytoprotective effect of cystone is brought about by inhibiting lipid peroxidation by 36% in cells treated with cystone compared to H2O2-treated cells without cystone. The antioxidant enzymes catalase, glutathione were increased by 53% and 68% respectively and superoxide dismutase activity was increased 3-fold. The glutathione content was significantly increased by 2.4-fold in NRK-52E cells treated with cystone compared to H2O2 control group. These results suggest that cystone effectively inhibits bacterial adherence to NRK-52E cells and attenuates H2O2-induced toxicity in NRK-52E cells by inhibiting lipid peroxidation and increasing the antioxidant defense mechanism.

  10. Adherence Reduction of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli Strains to HEp-2 Cells by Mannan Oligosaccharides and a High-Molecular-Weight Component of Cranberry Extract.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Hernandez, Alejandra; Rupnow, John; Hutkins, Robert W

    2015-08-01

    Campylobacter infections are a leading cause of human bacterial gastroenteritis in the United States and are a major cause of diarrheal disease throughout the world. Colonization and subsequent infection and invasion of Campylobacter require that the bacteria adhere to the surface of host cells. Agents that inhibit adherence could be used prophylactically to reduce Campylobacter carriage and infection. Mannan oligosaccharides (MOS) have been used as a feed supplement in livestock animals to improve performance and to replace growth-promoting antibiotics. However, MOS and other nondigestible oligosaccharides may also prevent pathogen colonization by inhibiting adherence in the gastrointestinal tract. In addition, plant extracts, including those derived from cranberries, have been shown to have antiadherence activity against pathogens. The goal of this study was to assess the ability of MOS and cranberry fractions to serve as antiadherence agents against strains of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli. Adherence experiments were performed using HEp-2 cells. Significant reductions in adherence of C. jejuni 29438, C. jejuni 700819, C. jejuni 3329, and C. coli 43485 were observed in the presence of MOS (up to 40 mg/ml) and with a high-molecular-weight fraction of cranberry extract (up to 3 mg/ml). However, none of the tested materials reduced adherence of C. coli BAA-1061. No additive effect in adherence inhibition was observed for an MOS-cranberry blend. These results suggest that both components, MOS and cranberry, could be used to reduce Campylobacter colonization and carriage in livestock animals and potentially limit human exposure to this pathogen.

  11. Adherence Reduction of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli Strains to HEp-2 Cells by Mannan Oligosaccharides and a High-Molecular-Weight Component of Cranberry Extract.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Hernandez, Alejandra; Rupnow, John; Hutkins, Robert W

    2015-08-01

    Campylobacter infections are a leading cause of human bacterial gastroenteritis in the United States and are a major cause of diarrheal disease throughout the world. Colonization and subsequent infection and invasion of Campylobacter require that the bacteria adhere to the surface of host cells. Agents that inhibit adherence could be used prophylactically to reduce Campylobacter carriage and infection. Mannan oligosaccharides (MOS) have been used as a feed supplement in livestock animals to improve performance and to replace growth-promoting antibiotics. However, MOS and other nondigestible oligosaccharides may also prevent pathogen colonization by inhibiting adherence in the gastrointestinal tract. In addition, plant extracts, including those derived from cranberries, have been shown to have antiadherence activity against pathogens. The goal of this study was to assess the ability of MOS and cranberry fractions to serve as antiadherence agents against strains of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli. Adherence experiments were performed using HEp-2 cells. Significant reductions in adherence of C. jejuni 29438, C. jejuni 700819, C. jejuni 3329, and C. coli 43485 were observed in the presence of MOS (up to 40 mg/ml) and with a high-molecular-weight fraction of cranberry extract (up to 3 mg/ml). However, none of the tested materials reduced adherence of C. coli BAA-1061. No additive effect in adherence inhibition was observed for an MOS-cranberry blend. These results suggest that both components, MOS and cranberry, could be used to reduce Campylobacter colonization and carriage in livestock animals and potentially limit human exposure to this pathogen. PMID:26219363

  12. Derivation of Genea057 human embryonic stem cell line.

    PubMed

    Dumevska, Biljana; Chami, Omar; McKernan, Robert; Goel, Divya; Schmidt, Uli

    2016-01-01

    The Genea057 human embryonic stem cell line was derived from a donated, fully commercially consented ART blastocyst, through ICM outgrowth on inactivated human feeders. The line showed pluripotent cell morphology and genomic analysis verified a 46, XX karyotype and female allele pattern through traditional karyotyping, CGH and STR analysis. Pluripotency of Genea057 was demonstrated with 97% of cells expressing Nanog, 81% Oct4, 75% Tra1-60 and 97% SSEA4, a PluriTest Pluripotency score of 27.59 and Novelty score of 1.32. The cell line was negative for Mycoplasma and any visible contamination. PMID:27345782

  13. Derivation of Genea042 human embryonic stem cell line.

    PubMed

    Dumevska, Biljana; Chami, Omar; McKernan, Robert; Goel, Divya; Schmidt, Uli

    2016-03-01

    The Genea042 human embryonic stem cell line was derived from a donated, fully commercially consented ART blastocyst, through ICM outgrowth on inactivated human feeders. The line showed pluripotent cell morphology and genomic analysis verified a 46, XX karyotype and female allele pattern through traditional karyotyping, CGH and STR analysis. Pluripotency of Genea042 was demonstrated with 81% of cells expressing Nanog, 95% Oct4, 53% Tra1-60 and 97% SSEA4, a PluriTest Pluripotency score of 30.06, Novelty score of 1.24 and Alkaline Phosphatase activity. The cell line was negative for Mycoplasma and any visible contamination. PMID:27345994

  14. Derivation of Genea002 human embryonic stem cell line.

    PubMed

    Dumevska, Biljana; Bosman, Alexis; McKernan, Robert; Goel, Divya; Peura, Teija; Schmidt, Uli

    2016-01-01

    The Genea002 human embryonic stem cell line was derived from a donated, fully commercially consented ART blastocyst, through ICM outgrowth on inactivated feeders. The line showed pluripotent cell morphology and genomic analysis verified a 46, XY karyotype by CGH and male Allele pattern through STR analysis. Pluripotency of Genea002 was demonstrated with 75% of cells expressing Nanog, 93% Oct4, 83% Tra1-60 and 98% SSEA4, a Pluritest pluripotency score of 24.55, Novelty score of 1.39, teratomas with tissues from all embryonic germ layers and Alkaline Phosphatase activity. The cell line was negative for Mycoplasma and any visible contamination. PMID:27345802

  15. Derivation of Genea052 human embryonic stem cell line.

    PubMed

    Dumevska, Biljana; Chami, Omar; McKernan, Robert; Goel, Divya; Schmidt, Uli

    2016-03-01

    The Genea052 human embryonic stem cell line was derived from a donated, fully commercially consented ART blastocyst, through ICM outgrowth on inactivated human feeders. The line showed pluripotent cell morphology and genomic analysis verified a 46, XY karyotype and male allele pattern through CGH and STR analysis. Pluripotency of Genea052 was demonstrated with 85% of cells expressing Nanog, 87% Oct4, 60% Tra1-60 and 97% SSEA4, a PluriTest Pluripotency score of 27.21, Novelty score of 1.2 and tri-lineage teratoma formation. The cell line was negative for Mycoplasma and any visible contamination. PMID:27345996

  16. Derivation of human embryonic stem cell line Genea023.

    PubMed

    Dumevska, Biljana; Bosman, Alexis; McKernan, Robert; Goel, Divya; Schmidt, Uli; Peura, Teija

    2016-03-01

    The Genea023 human embryonic stem cell line was derived from a donated, fully commercially consented ART blastocyst, through ICM outgrowth on inactivated feeders. The line showed pluripotent cell morphology and genomic analysis verified a 46, XY karyotype and male allele pattern through CGH and STR analysis. Pluripotency of Genea023 was demonstrated with 85% of cells expressed Nanog, 98% Oct4, 55% Tra1-60 and 98% SSEA4, gave a Pluritest Pluripotency score of 42.76, Novelty of 1.23, demonstrated Alkaline Phosphatase activity and tri-lineage teratoma formation. The cell line was negative for Mycoplasma and visible contamination. PMID:27346015

  17. Derivation of Genea015 human embryonic stem cell line.

    PubMed

    Dumevska, Biljana; Chami, Omar; McKernan, Robert; Goel, Divya; Schmidt, Uli

    2016-03-01

    The Genea015 human embryonic stem cell line was derived from a donated, fully commercially consented ART blastocyst, through ICM outgrowth on inactivated human feeders. The line showed pluripotent cell morphology and genomic analysis verified a 46, XY karyotype and male Allele pattern through traditional karyotyping, CGH and STR analysis. Pluripotency of Genea015 was demonstrated with 80% of cells expressing Nanog, 97% Oct4, 75% Tra1-60 and 98% SSEA4, a PluriTest Pluripotency score of 29.52, Novelty score of 1.3 and Alkaline Phosphatase activity. The cell line was negative for Mycoplasma and any visible contamination. PMID:27346028

  18. Derivation of human embryonic stem cell line Genea022.

    PubMed

    Dumevska, Biljana; Bosman, Alexis; McKernan, Robert; Schmidt, Uli; Peura, Teija

    2016-03-01

    The Genea022 human embryonic stem cell line was derived from a donated, fully commercially consented ART blastocyst, through ICM outgrowth on inactivated feeders. The line showed pluripotent cell morphology and genomic analysis verified a 46, XY karyotype and male allele pattern through CGH and STR analysis. Pluripotency of Genea022 was demonstrated with 84% of cells expressed Nanog, 98% Oct4, 55% Tra1-60 and 97% SSEA4, gave a Pluritest Pluripotency score of 42.95, Novelty of 1.23, demonstrated Alkaline Phosphatase activity and tri-lineage teratoma formation. The cell line was negative for Mycoplasma and visible contamination. PMID:27346017

  19. Derivation of Genea047 human embryonic stem cell line.

    PubMed

    Dumevska, Biljana; Chami, Omar; McKernan, Robert; Goel, Divya; Schmidt, Uli

    2016-03-01

    The Genea047 human embryonic stem cell line was derived from a donated, fully commercially consented ART blastocyst, through ICM outgrowth on inactivated human feeders. The line showed pluripotent cell morphology and genomic analysis verified a 46, XX karyotype and female allele pattern through traditional karyotyping, CGH and STR analysis. Pluripotency of Genea047 was demonstrated with 88% of cells expressing Nanog, 95% Oct4, 59% Tra1-60 and 99% SSEA4, a PluriTest Pluripotency score of 30.86, Novelty score of 1.23 and tri-lineage teratoma formation. The cell line was negative for Mycoplasma and any visible contamination. PMID:27345995

  20. Derivation of Genea043 human embryonic stem cell line.

    PubMed

    Dumevska, Biljana; Chami, Omar; McKernan, Robert; Goel, Divya; Schmidt, Uli

    2016-01-01

    The Genea043 human embryonic stem cell line was derived from a donated, fully commercially consented ART blastocyst, through ICM outgrowth on inactivated human feeders. The line showed pluripotent cell morphology and genomic analysis verified a 46, XY karyotype and male allele pattern through traditional karyotyping, CGH and STR analysis. Pluripotency of Genea043 was demonstrated with 92% of cells expressing Nanog, 95% Oct4, 61% Tra1-60 and 99% SSEA4, a PluriTest Pluripotency score of 31.74, Novelty score of 1.2 and Alkaline Phosphatase activity. The cell line was negative for Mycoplasma and any visible contamination. PMID:27345801

  1. Derivation of Genea016 human embryonic stem cell line.

    PubMed

    Dumevska, Biljana; Chami, Omar; McKernan, Robert; Goel, Divya; Peura, Teija; Schmidt, Uli

    2016-01-01

    The Genea016 human embryonic stem cell line was derived from a donated, fully commercially consented ART blastocyst, through ICM outgrowth on inactivated human feeders. The line showed pluripotent cell morphology and genomic analysis verified a 46, XX karyotype and female Allele pattern through traditional karyotyping, CGH and STR analysis. Pluripotency of Genea016 was demonstrated with 77% of cells expressing Nanog, 95% Oct4, 53% Tra1-60 and 98% SSEA4, a PluriTest Pluripotency score of 28.4, Novelty score of 1.37 and Alkaline Phosphatase activity. The cell line was negative for Mycoplasma and any visible contamination. PMID:27345780

  2. Mouse thymic epithelial cell lines expressing "Aire" and peripheral tissue-specific antigens reproduce in vitro negative selection of T cells.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Yoshitaka; Takayanagi, Atsushi; Chen, Jiabing; Sakai, Kosuke; Kudoh, Jun; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi

    2011-08-15

    In the human thymus, AIRE (autoimmune regulator) gene is expressed in a very limited type of medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) and no cognate cell lines are available, hence the molecular analysis of AIRE gene function has been difficult. To improve this situation, we attempted to isolate Aire-expressing cells and established three cell lines (Aire⁺TEC1, Aire⁺TEC2, Aire⁺DC) from the abnormally enlarged thymus, which was developed in the transgenic mice expressing SV40 T-antigen driven by the mouse Aire gene promoter. When these Aire⁺ cell lines were co-cultured with fresh thymocytes, they adhered to the majority of thymocytes and induced apoptosis as if negative selection of T-cells in the thymus is occurring in vitro. Further analysis revealed that these Aire⁺ cell lines are derived from mTECs and exhibit characteristic natures of "antigen presenting cells" including several distinct abilities: to express a variety of peripheral tissue-specific antigens, to produce immunoproteasome and immunological synapse, and to express some of TNFSFs (tumor necrosis factor super families). Thus, the newly established Aire⁺ cell lines will be invaluable for the further detailed analysis of AIRE gene function in the central tolerance of immunity and autoimmune disease.

  3. Differential effects of bisphosphonates on breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Verdijk, R; Franke, H R; Wolbers, F; Vermes, I

    2007-02-01

    Bisphosphonates may induce direct anti-tumor effects in breast cancer cells in vitro. In this study, six bisphosphonates were administered to three breast cancer cell lines. Cell proliferation was measured by quantification of the expression of Cyclin D1 mRNA. Apoptosis was determined by flow cytometry of a DNA fragmentation assay. We demonstrated that bisphosphonates have direct effects on cell proliferation and apoptosis in different breast cancer cell lines. However, not all bisphosphonates act equally on breast cancer cells in vitro. Zoledronate seems to be the most potent of the six bisphosphonates. This in vitro study showed that bisphosphonates possess promising anti-tumor potential.

  4. Recombinant protein production from stable mammalian cell lines and pools.

    PubMed

    Hacker, David L; Balasubramanian, Sowmya

    2016-06-01

    We highlight recent developments for the production of recombinant proteins from suspension-adapted mammalian cell lines. We discuss the generation of stable cell lines using transposons and lentivirus vectors (non-targeted transgene integration) and site-specific recombinases (targeted transgene integration). Each of these methods results in the generation of cell lines with protein yields that are generally superior to those achievable through classical plasmid transfection that depends on the integration of the transfected DNA by non-homologous DNA end-joining. This is the main reason why these techniques can also be used for the generation of stable cell pools, heterogenous populations of recombinant cells generated by gene delivery and genetic selection without resorting to single cell cloning. This allows the time line from gene transfer to protein production to be reduced.

  5. Recombinant protein production from stable mammalian cell lines and pools.

    PubMed

    Hacker, David L; Balasubramanian, Sowmya

    2016-06-01

    We highlight recent developments for the production of recombinant proteins from suspension-adapted mammalian cell lines. We discuss the generation of stable cell lines using transposons and lentivirus vectors (non-targeted transgene integration) and site-specific recombinases (targeted transgene integration). Each of these methods results in the generation of cell lines with protein yields that are generally superior to those achievable through classical plasmid transfection that depends on the integration of the transfected DNA by non-homologous DNA end-joining. This is the main reason why these techniques can also be used for the generation of stable cell pools, heterogenous populations of recombinant cells generated by gene delivery and genetic selection without resorting to single cell cloning. This allows the time line from gene transfer to protein production to be reduced. PMID:27322762

  6. Deriving cell lines from zebrafish embryos and tumors.

    PubMed

    Choorapoikayil, Suma; Overvoorde, John; den Hertog, Jeroen

    2013-09-01

    Over the last two decades the zebrafish has emerged as a powerful model organism in science. The experimental accessibility, the broad range of zebrafish mutants, and the highly conserved genetic and biochemical pathways between zebrafish and mammals lifted zebrafish to become one of the most attractive vertebrate models to study gene function and to model human diseases. Zebrafish cell lines are highly attractive to investigate cell biology and zebrafish cell lines complement the experimental tools that are available already. We established a straightforward method to culture cells from a single zebrafish embryo or a single tumor. Here we describe the generation of fibroblast-like cell lines from wild-type and ptenb(-/-) embryos and an endothelial-like cell line from a tumor of an adult ptena(+/-)ptenb(-/-) zebrafish. This protocol can easily be adapted to establish stable cell lines from any mutant or transgenic zebrafish line and the average time to obtain a pro-stable cell line is 3-5 months.

  7. Eternity and functionality - rational access to physiologically relevant cell lines.

    PubMed

    Lipps, Christoph; May, Tobias; Hauser, Hansjörg; Wirth, Dagmar

    2013-12-01

    In the first 50 years of cell culture, the development of new cell lines was mainly based on trial and error. Due to the understanding of the molecular networks of aging, senescence, proliferation, and adaption by mutation, the generation of new cell lines with physiologic properties has become more systematic. This endeavor has been supported by the availability of new technological achievements and increasing knowledge about the biology of cell differentiation and cell-cell communication. Here, we review some promising developments that are contributing toward this goal. These include molecular tools frequently used for the immortalization process. In addition to these broadly acting immortalization regimens, we focus on the developments of cell type-specific immortalization and on the methodologies of how to control the growth of newly established cell lines.

  8. Vertical nanopillars for in situ probing of nuclear mechanics in adherent cells.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Lindsey; Zhao, Wenting; Lou, Hsin-Ya; Lin, Ziliang Carter; Lee, Seok Woo; Chowdary, Praveen; Cui, Yi; Cui, Bianxiao

    2015-06-01

    The mechanical stability and deformability of the cell nucleus are crucial to many biological processes, including migration, proliferation and polarization. In vivo, the cell nucleus is frequently subjected to deformation on a variety of length and time scales, but current techniques for studying nuclear mechanics do not provide access to subnuclear deformation in live functioning cells. Here we introduce arrays of vertical nanopillars as a new method for the in situ study of nuclear deformability and the mechanical coupling between the cell membrane and the nucleus in live cells. Our measurements show that nanopillar-induced nuclear deformation is determined by nuclear stiffness, as well as opposing effects from actin and intermediate filaments. Furthermore, the depth, width and curvature of nuclear deformation can be controlled by varying the geometry of the nanopillar array. Overall, vertical nanopillar arrays constitute a novel approach for non-invasive, subcellular perturbation of nuclear mechanics and mechanotransduction in live cells. PMID:25984833

  9. Vertical nanopillars for in situ probing of nuclear mechanics in adherent cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Lindsey; Zhao, Wenting; Lou, Hsin-Ya; Lin, Ziliang Carter; Lee, Seok Woo; Chowdary, Praveen; Cui, Yi; Cui, Bianxiao

    2015-06-01

    The mechanical stability and deformability of the cell nucleus are crucial to many biological processes, including migration, proliferation and polarization. In vivo, the cell nucleus is frequently subjected to deformation on a variety of length and time scales, but current techniques for studying nuclear mechanics do not provide access to subnuclear deformation in live functioning cells. Here we introduce arrays of vertical nanopillars as a new method for the in situ study of nuclear deformability and the mechanical coupling between the cell membrane and the nucleus in live cells. Our measurements show that nanopillar-induced nuclear deformation is determined by nuclear stiffness, as well as opposing effects from actin and intermediate filaments. Furthermore, the depth, width and curvature of nuclear deformation can be controlled by varying the geometry of the nanopillar array. Overall, vertical nanopillar arrays constitute a novel approach for non-invasive, subcellular perturbation of nuclear mechanics and mechanotransduction in live cells.

  10. Vertical nanopillars for in situ probing of nuclear mechanics in adherent cells.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Lindsey; Zhao, Wenting; Lou, Hsin-Ya; Lin, Ziliang Carter; Lee, Seok Woo; Chowdary, Praveen; Cui, Yi; Cui, Bianxiao

    2015-06-01

    The mechanical stability and deformability of the cell nucleus are crucial to many biological processes, including migration, proliferation and polarization. In vivo, the cell nucleus is frequently subjected to deformation on a variety of length and time scales, but current techniques for studying nuclear mechanics do not provide access to subnuclear deformation in live functioning cells. Here we introduce arrays of vertical nanopillars as a new method for the in situ study of nuclear deformability and the mechanical coupling between the cell membrane and the nucleus in live cells. Our measurements show that nanopillar-induced nuclear deformation is determined by nuclear stiffness, as well as opposing effects from actin and intermediate filaments. Furthermore, the depth, width and curvature of nuclear deformation can be controlled by varying the geometry of the nanopillar array. Overall, vertical nanopillar arrays constitute a novel approach for non-invasive, subcellular perturbation of nuclear mechanics and mechanotransduction in live cells.

  11. Application of DNA fingerprints for cell-line individualization.

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, D A; Reid, Y A; Gail, M H; Pee, D; White, C; Hay, R J; O'Brien, S J

    1990-01-01

    DNA fingerprints of 46 human cell lines were derived using minisatellite probes for hypervariable genetic loci. The incidence of 121 HaeIII DNA fragments among 33 cell lines derived from unrelated individuals was used to estimate allelic and genotypic frequencies for each fragment and for composite individual DNA fingerprints. We present a quantitative estimate of the extent of genetic difference between individuals, an estimate based on the percentage of restriction fragments at which they differ. The average percent difference (APD) among pairwise combinations from the population of 33 unrelated cell lines was 76.9%, compared with the APD in band sharing among cell lines derived from the same individual (less than or equal to 1.2%). Included in this survey were nine additional cell lines previously implicated as HeLa cell derivatives, and these lines were clearly confirmed as such by DNA fingerprints (APD less than or equal to 0.6%). On the basis of fragment frequencies in the tested cell line population, a simple genetic model was developed to estimate the frequencies of each DNA fingerprint in the population. The median incidence was 2.9 X 10(-17), and the range was 2.4 X 10(-21) to 6.6 X 10(-15). This value approximates the probability that a second cell line selected at random from unrelated individuals will match a given DNA fingerprint. Related calculations address the chance that any two DNA fingerprints would be identical among a large group of cell lines. This estimate is still very slight; for example, the chance of two or more common DNA fingerprints among 1 million distinct individuals is less than .001. The procedure provides a straightforward, easily interpreted, and statistically robust method for identification and individualization of human cells. Images p[504]-a PMID:1975479

  12. A family of cell-adhering peptides homologous to fibrinogen C-termini

    SciTech Connect

    Levy-Beladev, Liron; Levdansky, Lilia; Gaberman, Elena; Friedler, Assaf; Gorodetsky, Raphael

    2010-10-08

    Research highlights: {yields} Cell-adhesive sequences homologous to fibrinogen C-termini exist in other proteins. {yields} The extended homologous cell-adhesive C-termini peptides family is termed Haptides. {yields} In membrane-like environment random coiled Haptides adopt a helical conformation. {yields} Replacing positively charged residues with alanine reduces Haptides activity. -- Abstract: A family of cell-adhesive peptides homologous to sequences on different chains of fibrinogen was investigated. These homologous peptides, termed Haptides, include the peptides C{beta}, preC{gamma}, and C{alpha}E, corresponding to sequences on the C-termini of fibrinogen chains {beta}, {gamma}, and {alpha}E, respectively. Haptides do not affect cell survival and rate of proliferation of the normal cell types tested. The use of new sensitive assays of cell adhesion clearly demonstrated the ability of Haptides, bound to inert matrices, to mediate attachment of different matrix-dependent cell types including normal fibroblasts, endothelial, and smooth muscle cells. Here we present new active Haptides bearing homologous sequences derived from the C-termini of other proteins, such as angiopoietin 1 and 2, tenascins C and X, and microfibril-associated glycoprotein-4. The cell adhesion properties of all the Haptides were found to be associated mainly with their 11 N-terminal residues. Mutated preC{gamma} peptides revealed that positively charged residues account for their attachment effect. These results suggest a mechanism of direct electrostatic interaction of Haptides with the cell membrane. The extended Haptides family may be applied in modulating adhesion of cells to scaffolds for tissue regeneration and for enhancement of nanoparticulate transfection into cells.

  13. A Functional Assay for Gap Junctional Examination; Electroporation of Adherent Cells on Indium-Tin Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Geletu, Mulu; Guy, Stephanie; Firth, Kevin; Raptis, Leda

    2014-01-01

    In this technique, cells are cultured on a glass slide that is partly coated with indium-tin oxide (ITO), a transparent, electrically conductive material. A variety of molecules, such as peptides or oligonucleotides can be introduced into essentially 100% of the cells in a non-traumatic manner.  Here, we describe how it can be used to study intercellular, gap junctional communication. Lucifer yellow penetrates into the cells when an electric pulse, applied to the conductive surface on which they are growing, causes pores to form through the cell membrane. This is electroporation. Cells growing on the nonconductive glass surface immediately adjacent to the electroporated region do not take up Lucifer yellow by electroporation but do acquire the fluorescent dye as it is passed to them via gap junctions that link them to the electroporated cells. The results of the transfer of dye from cell to cell can be observed microscopically under fluorescence illumination. This technique allows for precise quantitation of gap junctional communication. In addition, it can be used for the introduction of peptides or other non-permeant molecules, and the transfer of small electroporated peptides via gap junctions to inhibit the signal in the adjacent, non-electroporated cells is a powerful demonstration of signal inhibition. PMID:25350637

  14. AFBI assay – Aptamer Fluorescence Binding and Internalization assay for cultured adherent cells

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, William H.; Giangrande, Paloma H.

    2016-01-01

    The SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment) process allows for the enrichment of DNA or RNA aptamers from a complex nucleic acid library that are specific for a target molecule. The SELEX process has been adapted from identifying aptamers in vitro using recombinant target protein to cell-based methodologies (Cell-SELEX), where the targets are expressed on the surface of cells. One major advantage of Cell-SELEX is that the target molecules are maintained in a native confirmation. Additionally, Cell-SELEX may be used to discover novel therapeutic biomarkers by performing selections on diseased versus healthy cells. However, a caveat to Cell-SELEX is that testing of single aptamers identified in the selection is laborious, time-consuming, and expensive. The most frequently used methods to screen for aptamer binding and internalization on cells are flow cytometry and quantitative PCR (qPCR). While flow cytometry can directly assess binding of a fluorescently-labeled aptamer to a target, it requires significant starting material and is not easily scalable. qPCR-based approaches are highly sensitive but have non-negligible experiment-to-experiment variability due to the number of sample processing steps. Herein we describe a cell-based aptamer fluorescence binding and internalization (AFBI) assay. This assay requires minimal reagents and has few experimental steps/manipulations, thereby allowing for rapid screening of many aptamers and conditions simultaneously and direct quantitation of aptamer binding and internalization. PMID:26972784

  15. Apo A-I inhibits foam cell formation in apo E–deficient mice after monocyte adherence to endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Dansky, Hayes M.; Charlton, Sherri A.; Barlow, Courtenay B.; Tamminen, Minna; Smith, Jonathan D.; Frank, Joy S.; Breslow, Jan L.

    1999-01-01

    We have previously shown that expression of the human apo A-I transgene on the apo E–deficient background increases HDL cholesterol and greatly diminishes fatty streak lesion formation. To examine the mechanism, prelesional events in atherosclerotic plaque development were examined in 6- to 8-week-old apo E–deficient and apo E–deficient/human apo A-I transgenic mice. A quantitative assessment of subendothelial lipid deposition by freeze-fracture and deep-etch electron microscopy indicated that elevated apo A-I did not affect the distribution or amount of aortic arch subendothelial lipid deposits. Immunohistochemical staining for VCAM-1 demonstrated similar expression on endothelial cells at prelesional aortic branch sites from both apo E–deficient and apo E–deficient/human apo A-I transgenic mice. Transmission electron microscopy revealed monocytes bound to the aortic arch in mice of both genotypes, and immunohistochemical staining demonstrated that the area occupied by bound mononuclear cells was unchanged. Serum paraoxonase and aryl esterase activity did not differ between apo E–deficient and apo E–deficient/human apo A-I transgenic mice. These data suggest that increases in apo A-I and HDL cholesterol inhibit foam cell formation in apo E–deficient/human apo A-I transgenic mice at a stage following lipid deposition, endothelial activation, and monocyte adherence, without increases in HDL-associated paraoxonase. PMID:10393696

  16. Exopolysaccharides of Lactobacillus reuteri: Their influence on adherence of E. coli to epithelial cells and inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Kšonžeková, Petra; Bystrický, Peter; Vlčková, Silvia; Pätoprstý, Vladimír; Pulzová, Lucia; Mudroňová, Dagmar; Kubašková, Terézia; Csank, Tomáš; Tkáčiková, Ľudmila

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the study was to characterize exopolysaccharides (EPS) originated from Lactobacillus reuteri strain DSM 17938 (EPS-DSM17938) and L. reuteri strain L26 Biocenol™ (EPS-L26) and evaluate their influence on adherence of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) to IPEC-1 cells and proinflammatory gene expression. Both EPS were d-glucan polysaccharides with higher molecular weight (Mw), but differing in spatial conformation and elicited variable cytokine profile. EPS-DSM17938, relatively linear polysaccharide with (1→4) and (1→6) glycosidic linkages, increased IL-1β gene expression (0.1mg/mL; P<0.05), while EPS-L26, more branched polysaccharide with (1→3) and (1→6) glycosidic linkages, exerted slight but statistically significant up-regulation of NF-κB, TNF-α and IL-6 mRNA (P<0.05). The most significant finding is that preincubation of IPEC-1 cells with both EPS followed by ETEC infection inhibit ETEC adhesion on IPEC-1 cells (P<0.01) and ETEC-induced gene expression of proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β and IL-6 (P<0.01). PMID:26876991

  17. [DNA fingerprinting analysis of silkworm embryo cell lines].

    PubMed

    Pan, Min Hui; Feng, Zhen Yue; Tian, Zhi Qiang; Liu, Min; Lu, Cheng

    2006-12-01

    DNA extraction and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were used on DNA genomes study of cell lines of Bombyx mori. DNA polymorphic marker analysis was conducted and DNA fingerprint of cell lines of Bombyx mori. was carried out using ISSR and RAPD. Primers that can reliably find polymorphic bands were screened out. 26 ISSR primers were selected from them any available, and 797 polymorphic bands were abtained through PCR amplification in 9 samples, including 3 embryo cell lines of Bombyx mori (BmE-SWU1, BmE-SWU2, BmE-SWU3), 5 passage cell lines (BmE, BmN, Sf9, Sf21, Hi5) and the embryos from which BmE-SWU1 originated. The ration of polymorphic bands was 89.9%. 43 RAPD primers were selected out through PCR amplification, and 1205 polymorphic bands were obtained in 9 samples. The ration of polymorphic bands was 76.6%. There were many DNA polymorphic bands differences in the cell lines of Bombyx mori. The special DNA markers of the 3 embryo cell lines were found respectively. The similarity index Nei and genetic distance of the 9 samples were calculated and the phylogeny tree of 9 samples was constructed by UPGMA. Results showed that 2 groups were divided,one group including the 3 embryo cell lines and the embryo of XQ has close relative. Another group constructed by five insect cell lines came from different species, their genetic distance was closer than the 3 embryo cell lines.

  18. Radiosensitivity of hepatoma cell lines and human normal liver cell lines exposed to 12C6+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, X.; Yang, J.; Li, W.; Guo, C.; Dang, B.; Wang, J.; Zhou, L.; Wei, W.; Gao, Q.

    AIM To investigate the radiosensitivity of hepatoma cell lines and human normal liver cell lines METHODS Accelerated carbon ions by heavy ion research facility in Lanzhou HIRFL have high LET We employed it to study the radiosensitivity of hepatoma cell lines SMMC-7721 and human normal liver cell lines L02 using premature chromosome condensation technique PCC Cell survive was documented by a colony assay Chromatid breaks were measured by counting the number of chromatid breaks and isochromatid breaks immediately after prematurely chromosome condensed by Calyculin-A RESULTS The survival curve of the two cell lines presented a good linear relationship and the survival fraction of L02 is higher than that of SMMC-7721 Additionally the two types of G 2 phase chromosome breaks chromatid breaks and isochromatid breaks of L02 are lower than that of SMMC-7721 CONCLUSION Human normal liver cell line have high radioresistance than that of hepatoma cell line It imply that it is less damage to normal organs when radiotherapy to hepatoma

  19. Development of a cell line from Echinococcus granulosus germinal layer.

    PubMed

    Albani, Clara María; Cumino, Andrea Carina; Elissondo, María Celina; Denegri, Guillermo María

    2013-10-01

    In vitro culture of parasitic helminths provides an important tool to study cell regeneration and physiology, as well as for molecular biology and genetic engineering studies. In the present study, we established in vitro propagation of cells from Echinococcus granulosus germinal cyst layer. E. granulosus germinal cells grew beyond 100 passages and showed no signs of reduced proliferation capacity. Microscopic analysis revealed that cells grew both attached to the substrate and in suspension, forming three-dimensional structures like mammalian stem cell aggregates. Examination of the chromosome number of attached germinal cells showed a high degree of heteroploidy, suggesting the occurrence of transformation during culture. Monolayer cells survived cryopreservation and were able to proliferate after thawing. Based on the characteristics displayed by E. granulosus germinal cells, we establish a cell line from the E. granulosus germinal layer. Furthermore, we propose that this cell line could be useful for drug screening and for obtaining parasite material.

  20. Adherence to Mediterranean-style dietary pattern and risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma: a case-control study in Iran

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The benefit of adherence to a Mediterranean-style dietary pattern in relation to the risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) has not been investigated among non-Mediterranean high-risk populations. The objective of the present study was to examine the association of compliance with the Med...

  1. [Decontamination of continual cell lines spontaneously infected with mycoplasmas].

    PubMed

    Machatková, M; Jurmanová, K; Snejdar, V

    1986-07-01

    The continual cell lines of bovine kidneys MDBK and AUBEK, and porcine kidneys RPD and IBRS, spontaneously infected with Mycoplasma arginini and Acholeplasma laidlawii, were decontaminated by the method of selective elimination. Two elimination procedures were modified to be used for the decontamination: one based on the reduction of infection by the light treatment of the cultures, the other based on the selection of mycoplasma-free cell population through cell clonation. On the basis of a long-continued control of the cell clones a methodical procedure of the preparation of mycoplasma-free cell lines was worked out. PMID:3090766

  2. Development and characterization of a largemouth bass cell line.

    PubMed

    Getchell, Rodman G; Groocock, Geoffrey H; Cornwell, Emily R; Schumacher, Vanessa L; Glasner, Lindsay I; Baker, Barry J; Frattini, Stephen A; Wooster, Gregory A; Bowser, Paul R

    2014-09-01

    Abstract The development and characterization of a new cell line, derived from the ovary of Largemouth Bass Micropterus salmoides, is described. Gonad tissue was collected from Largemouth Bass that were electrofished from Oneida Lake, New York. The tissue was processed and grown in culture flasks at approximately 22°C for more than 118 passages during an 8-year period from 2004 to 2011. The identity of these cells as Largemouth Bass origin was confirmed by sequencing a portion of the cytochrome b gene. Growth rate at three different temperatures was documented. The cell line was susceptible to Largemouth Bass virus (LMBV) and its replication was compared with that of Bluegill Lepomis macrochirus fry (BF-2), one of the cell lines recommended for LMBV isolation by the American Fisheries Society Fish Health Section Blue Book. Quantitative PCR results from the replication trial showed the BF-2 cell line produced approximately 10-fold more LMBV copies per cell than the new Largemouth Bass cell line after 6 d, while the titration assay showed similar quantities in each cell line after 1 week. Received February 18, 2014; accepted April 16, 2014. PMID:25229492

  3. Development and characterization of a largemouth bass cell line.

    PubMed

    Getchell, Rodman G; Groocock, Geoffrey H; Cornwell, Emily R; Schumacher, Vanessa L; Glasner, Lindsay I; Baker, Barry J; Frattini, Stephen A; Wooster, Gregory A; Bowser, Paul R

    2014-09-01

    Abstract The development and characterization of a new cell line, derived from the ovary of Largemouth Bass Micropterus salmoides, is described. Gonad tissue was collected from Largemouth Bass that were electrofished from Oneida Lake, New York. The tissue was processed and grown in culture flasks at approximately 22°C for more than 118 passages during an 8-year period from 2004 to 2011. The identity of these cells as Largemouth Bass origin was confirmed by sequencing a portion of the cytochrome b gene. Growth rate at three different temperatures was documented. The cell line was susceptible to Largemouth Bass virus (LMBV) and its replication was compared with that of Bluegill Lepomis macrochirus fry (BF-2), one of the cell lines recommended for LMBV isolation by the American Fisheries Society Fish Health Section Blue Book. Quantitative PCR results from the replication trial showed the BF-2 cell line produced approximately 10-fold more LMBV copies per cell than the new Largemouth Bass cell line after 6 d, while the titration assay showed similar quantities in each cell line after 1 week. Received February 18, 2014; accepted April 16, 2014.

  4. Inhibition of LINE-1 retrotransposon-encoded reverse transcriptase modulates the expression of cell differentiation genes in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Patnala, Radhika; Lee, Sung-Hun; Dahlstrom, Jane E; Ohms, Stephen; Chen, Long; Dheen, S Thameem; Rangasamy, Danny

    2014-01-01

    Long Interspersed Elements (L1 elements) are biologically active retrotransposons that are capable of autonomous replication using their own reverse transcriptase (RT) enzyme. Expression of the normally repressed RT has been implicated in cancer cell growth. However, at present, little is known about the expression of L1-encoded RT activity or the molecular changes that are associated with RT activity in the development of breast cancer. Here, we report that RT activity is widespread in breast cancer cells. The expression of RT protein decreased markedly in breast cancer cells after treatment with the antiretroviral drug, efavirenz. While the majority of cells showed a significant reduction in proliferation, inhibition of RT was also accompanied by cell-specific differences in morphology. MCF7 cells displayed elongated microtubule extensions that adhered tightly to their substrate, while a large fraction of the T47D cells that we studied formed long filopodia projections. These morphological changes were reversible upon cessation of RT inhibition, confirming their dependence on RT activity. We also carried out gene expression profiling with microarrays and determined the genes that were differentially expressed during the process of cellular differentiation. Genes involved in proliferation, cell migration, and invasive activity were repressed in RT-inhibited cells. Concomitantly, genes involved in cell projection, formation of vacuolar membranes, and cell-to-cell junctions were significantly upregulated in RT-inhibited cells. qRT-PCR examination of the mRNA expression of these genes in additional cell lines yielded close correlation between their differential expression and the degree of cellular differentiation. Our study demonstrates that the inhibition of L1-encoded RT can reduce the rate of proliferation and promote differentiation of breast cancer cells. Together, these results provide a direct functional link between the expression of L1 retrotransposons and

  5. Apoptotic effect of noscapine in breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Quisbert-Valenzuela, Edwin O; Calaf, Gloria M

    2016-06-01

    Cancer is a public health problem in the world and breast cancer is the most frequently cancer in women. Approximately 15% of the breast cancers are triple-negative. Apoptosis regulates normal growth, homeostasis, development, embryogenesis and appropriate strategy to treat cancer. Bax is a protein pro-apoptotic enhancer of apoptosis in contrast to Bcl-2 with antiapoptotic properties. Initiator caspase-9 and caspase-8 are features of intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis pathway, respectively. NF-κB is a transcription factor known to be involved in the initiation and progression of breast cancer. Noscapine, an alkaloid derived from opium is used as antitussive and showed antitumor properties that induced apoptosis in cancer cell lines. The aim of the present study was to determine the apoptotic effect of noscapine in breast cancer cell lines compared to breast normal cell line. Three cell lines were used: i) a control breast cell line MCF-10F; ii) a luminal-like adenocarcinoma triple-positive breast cell line MCF-7; iii) breast cancer triple-negative cell line MDA-MB-231. Our results showed that noscapine had lower toxicity in normal cells and was an effective anticancer agent that induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells because it increases Bax gene and protein expression in three cell lines, while decreases Bcl-xL gene expression, and Bcl-2 protein expression decreased in breast cancer cell lines. Therefore, Bax/Bcl-2 ratio increased in the three cell lines. This drug increased caspase-9 gene expression in breast cancer cell lines and caspase-8 gene expression increased in MCF-10F and MDA-MB-231. Furthermore, it increased cleavage of caspase-8, suggesting that noscapine-induced apoptosis is probably due to the involvement of extrinsic and intrinsic apoptosis pathways. Antiapoptotic gene and protein expression diminished and proapoptotic gene and protein expression increased noscapine-induced expression, probably due to decrease in NF-κB gene and protein expression

  6. Characterization of an epithelial cell line from bovine mammary gland.

    PubMed

    German, Tania; Barash, Itamar

    2002-05-01

    Elucidation of the bovine mammary gland's unique characteristics depends on obtaining an authentic cell line that will reproduce its function in vitro. Representative clones from bovine mammary cell populations, differing in their attachment capabilities, were cultured. L-1 cells showed strong attachment to the plate, whereas H-7 cells detached easily. Cultures established from these clones were nontumorigenic upon transplantation to an immunodeficient host; they exhibited the epithelial cell characteristics of positive cytokeratin but not smooth muscle actin staining. Both cell lines depended on fetal calf serum for proliferation. They exhibited distinct levels of differentiation on Matrigel in serum-free, insulin-supplemented medium on the basis of their organization and beta-lactoglobulin (BLG) secretion. H-7 cells organized into mammospheres, whereas L-1 cells arrested in a duct-like morphology. In both cell lines, prolactin activated phosphorylation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription, Stat5-a regulator of milk protein gene transcription, and of PHAS-I-an inhibitor of translation initiation in its nonphosphorylated form. De novo synthesis and secretion of BLG were detected in differentiated cultures: in L-1 cells, BLG was dependent on lactogenic hormones for maximal induction but was less stringently controlled than was beta-casein in the mouse CID-9 cell line. L-1 cells also encompassed a near-diploid chromosomal karyotype and may serve as a tool for studying functional characteristics of the bovine mammary gland.

  7. Molecular profiling reveals primary mesothelioma cell lines recapitulate human disease.

    PubMed

    Chernova, T; Sun, X M; Powley, I R; Galavotti, S; Grosso, S; Murphy, F A; Miles, G J; Cresswell, L; Antonov, A V; Bennett, J; Nakas, A; Dinsdale, D; Cain, K; Bushell, M; Willis, A E; MacFarlane, M

    2016-07-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is an aggressive, fatal tumor strongly associated with asbestos exposure. There is an urgent need to improve MM patient outcomes and this requires functionally validated pre-clinical models. Mesothelioma-derived cell lines provide an essential and relatively robust tool and remain among the most widely used systems for candidate drug evaluation. Although a number of cell lines are commercially available, a detailed comparison of these commercial lines with freshly derived primary tumor cells to validate their suitability as pre-clinical models is lacking. To address this, patient-derived primary mesothelioma cell lines were established and characterized using complementary multidisciplinary approaches and bioinformatic analysis. Clinical markers of mesothelioma, transcriptional and metabolic profiles, as well as the status of p53 and the tumor suppressor genes CDKN2A and NF2, were examined in primary cell lines and in two widely used commercial lines. Expression of MM-associated markers, as well as the status of CDKN2A, NF2, the 'gatekeeper' in MM development, and their products demonstrated that primary cell lines are more representative of the tumor close to its native state and show a degree of molecular diversity, thus capturing the disease heterogeneity in a patient cohort. Molecular profiling revealed a significantly different transcriptome and marked metabolic shift towards a greater glycolytic phenotype in commercial compared with primary cell lines. Our results highlight that multiple, appropriately characterised, patient-derived tumor cell lines are required to enable concurrent evaluation of molecular profiles versus drug response. Furthermore, application of this approach to other difficult-to-treat tumors would generate improved cellular models for pre-clinical evaluation of novel targeted therapies.

  8. Molecular profiling reveals primary mesothelioma cell lines recapitulate human disease

    PubMed Central

    Chernova, T; Sun, X M; Powley, I R; Galavotti, S; Grosso, S; Murphy, F A; Miles, G J; Cresswell, L; Antonov, A V; Bennett, J; Nakas, A; Dinsdale, D; Cain, K; Bushell, M; Willis, A E; MacFarlane, M

    2016-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is an aggressive, fatal tumor strongly associated with asbestos exposure. There is an urgent need to improve MM patient outcomes and this requires functionally validated pre-clinical models. Mesothelioma-derived cell lines provide an essential and relatively robust tool and remain among the most widely used systems for candidate drug evaluation. Although a number of cell lines are commercially available, a detailed comparison of these commercial lines with freshly derived primary tumor cells to validate their suitability as pre-clinical models is lacking. To address this, patient-derived primary mesothelioma cell lines were established and characterized using complementary multidisciplinary approaches and bioinformatic analysis. Clinical markers of mesothelioma, transcriptional and metabolic profiles, as well as the status of p53 and the tumor suppressor genes CDKN2A and NF2, were examined in primary cell lines and in two widely used commercial lines. Expression of MM-associated markers, as well as the status of CDKN2A, NF2, the ‘gatekeeper' in MM development, and their products demonstrated that primary cell lines are more representative of the tumor close to its native state and show a degree of molecular diversity, thus capturing the disease heterogeneity in a patient cohort. Molecular profiling revealed a significantly different transcriptome and marked metabolic shift towards a greater glycolytic phenotype in commercial compared with primary cell lines. Our results highlight that multiple, appropriately characterised, patient-derived tumor cell lines are required to enable concurrent evaluation of molecular profiles versus drug response. Furthermore, application of this approach to other difficult-to-treat tumors would generate improved cellular models for pre-clinical evaluation of novel targeted therapies. PMID:26891694

  9. Extracellular mass transport considerations for space flight research concerning suspended and adherent in vitro cell cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klaus, David M.; Benoit, Michael R.; Nelson, Emily S.; Hammond, Timmothy G.

    2004-01-01

    Conducting biological research in space requires consideration be given to isolating appropriate control parameters. For in vitro cell cultures, numerous environmental factors can adversely affect data interpretation. A biological response attributed to microgravity can, in theory, be explicitly correlated to a specific lack of weight or gravity-driven motion occurring to, within or around a cell. Weight can be broken down to include the formation of hydrostatic gradients, structural load (stress) or physical deformation (strain). Gravitationally induced motion within or near individual cells in a fluid includes sedimentation (or buoyancy) of the cell and associated shear forces, displacement of cytoskeleton or organelles, and factors associated with intra- or extracellular mass transport. Finally, and of particular importance for cell culture experiments, the collective effects of gravity must be considered for the overall system consisting of the cells, their environment and the device in which they are contained. This does not, however, rule out other confounding variables such as launch acceleration, on orbit vibration, transient acceleration impulses or radiation, which can be isolated using onboard centrifuges or vibration isolation techniques. A framework is offered for characterizing specific cause-and-effect relationships for gravity-dependent responses as a function of the above parameters.

  10. Extracellular mass transport considerations for space flight research concerning suspended and adherent in vitro cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Klaus, David M; Benoit, Michael R; Nelson, Emily S; Hammond, Timmothy G

    2004-03-01

    Conducting biological research in space requires consideration be given to isolating appropriate control parameters. For in vitro cell cultures, numerous environmental factors can adversely affect data interpretation. A biological response attributed to microgravity can, in theory, be explicitly correlated to a specific lack of weight or gravity-driven motion occurring to, within or around a cell. Weight can be broken down to include the formation of hydrostatic gradients, structural load (stress) or physical deformation (strain). Gravitationally induced motion within or near individual cells in a fluid includes sedimentation (or buoyancy) of the cell and associated shear forces, displacement of cytoskeleton or organelles, and factors associated with intra- or extracellular mass transport. Finally, and of particular importance for cell culture experiments, the collective effects of gravity must be considered for the overall system consisting of the cells, their environment and the device in which they are contained. This does not, however, rule out other confounding variables such as launch acceleration, on orbit vibration, transient acceleration impulses or radiation, which can be isolated using onboard centrifuges or vibration isolation techniques. A framework is offered for characterizing specific cause-and-effect relationships for gravity-dependent responses as a function of the above parameters.

  11. Mercury specifically induces LINE-1 activity in a human neuroblastoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Habibi, Laleh; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Tabrizi, Mina; Modarressi, Mohammad Hossein; Akrami, Seyed Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    L1 retro-elements comprise 17% of the human genome. Approximately 100 copies of these autonomous mobile elements are active in our DNA and can cause mutations, gene disruptions, and genomic instability. Therefore, human cells control the activities of L1 elements, in order to prevent their deleterious effects through different mechanisms. However, some toxic agents increase the retrotransposition activity of L1 elements in somatic cells. In order to identify specific effects of neurotoxic metals on L1 activity in neuronal cells, we studied the effects of mercury and cobalt on L1-retroelement activity by measuring levels of cellular transcription, protein expression, and genomic retrotransposition in a neuroblastoma cell line compared with the effects in three non-neuronal cell lines. Our results show that mercury increased the expression of L1 RNA, the activity of the L1 5'UTR, and L1 retrotransposition exclusively in the neuroblastoma cell line but not in non-neuronal cell lines. However, cobalt increased the expression of L1 RNA in neuroblastoma cells, HeLa cells, and wild-type human fibroblasts, and also increased the activity of the L1 5'UTR as well as the SV40 promoter in HeLa cells but not in neuroblastoma cells. Exposure to cobalt did not result in increased retrotransposition activity in HeLa cells or neuroblastoma cells. We conclude that non-toxic levels of the neurotoxic agent mercury could influence DNA by increasing L1 activities, specifically in neuronal cells, and may make these cells susceptible to neurodegeneration over time.

  12. Pathway-specific differences between tumor cell lines and normal and tumor tissue cells

    PubMed Central

    Ertel, Adam; Verghese, Arun; Byers, Stephen W; Ochs, Michael; Tozeren, Aydin

    2006-01-01

    Background Cell lines are used in experimental investigation of cancer but their capacity to represent tumor cells has yet to be quantified. The aim of the study was to identify significant alterations in pathway usage in cell lines in comparison with normal and tumor tissue. Methods This study utilized a pathway-specific enrichment analysis of publicly accessible microarray data and quantified the gene expression differences between cell lines, tumor, and normal tissue cells for six different tissue types. KEGG pathways that are significantly different between cell lines and tumors, cell lines and normal tissues and tumor and normal tissue were identified through enrichment tests on gene lists obtained using Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM). Results Cellular pathways that were significantly upregulated in cell lines compared to tumor cells and normal cells of the same tissue type included ATP synthesis, cell communication, cell cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, purine, pyrimidine and pyruvate metabolism, and proteasome. Results on metabolic pathways suggested an increase in the velocity nucleotide metabolism and RNA production. Pathways that were downregulated in cell lines compared to tumor and normal tissue included cell communication, cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), and ECM-receptor interaction. Only a fraction of the significantly altered genes in tumor-to-normal comparison had similar expressions in cancer cell lines and tumor cells. These genes were tissue-specific and were distributed sparsely among multiple pathways. Conclusion Significantly altered genes in tumors compared to normal tissue were largely tissue specific. Among these genes downregulation was a major trend. In contrast, cell lines contained large sets of significantly upregulated genes that were common to multiple tissue types. Pathway upregulation in cell lines was most pronounced over metabolic pathways including cell nucleotide metabolism and oxidative phosphorylation. Signaling

  13. Global Conservation of Protein Status between Cell Lines and Xenografts.

    PubMed

    Biau, Julian; Chautard, Emmanuel; Court, Frank; Pereira, Bruno; Verrelle, Pierre; Devun, Flavien; De Koning, Leanne; Dutreix, Marie

    2016-08-01

    Common preclinical models for testing anticancer treatment include cultured human tumor cell lines in monolayer, and xenografts derived from these cell lines in immunodeficient mice. Our goal was to determine how similar the xenografts are compared with their original cell line and to determine whether it is possible to predict the stability of a xenograft model beforehand. We studied a selection of 89 protein markers of interest in 14 human cell cultures and respective subcutaneous xenografts using the reverse-phase protein array technology. We specifically focused on proteins and posttranslational modifications involved in DNA repair, PI3K pathway, apoptosis, tyrosine kinase signaling, stress, cell cycle, MAPK/ERK signaling, SAPK/JNK signaling, NFκB signaling, and adhesion/cytoskeleton. Using hierarchical clustering, most cell culture-xenograft pairs cluster together, suggesting a global conservation of protein signature. Particularly, Akt, NFkB, EGFR, and Vimentin showed very stable protein expression and phosphorylation levels highlighting that 4 of 10 pathways were highly correlated whatever the model. Other proteins were heterogeneously conserved depending on the cell line. Finally, cell line models with low Akt pathway activation and low levels of Vimentin gave rise to more reliable xenograft models. These results may be useful for the extrapolation of cell culture experiments to in vivo models in novel targeted drug discovery. PMID:27567954

  14. Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial to assess the feasibility of an open label intervention to improve hydroxyurea adherence in youth with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Smaldone, Arlene; Findley, Sally; Bakken, Suzanne; Matiz, L. Adriana; Rosenthal, Susan L.; Jia, Haomiao; Matos, Sergio; Manwani, Deepa; Green, Nancy S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Community health workers (CHW) are increasingly recognized as a strategy to improve health outcomes for the underserved with chronic diseases but has not been formally explored in adolescents with sickle cell disease (SCD). SCD primarily affects African American, Hispanic and other traditionally underserved populations. Hydroxyurea (HU), an oral, once-daily medication, is the only approved therapeutic drug for sickle cell disease and markedly reduces symptoms, morbidity and mortality and improves quality of life largely by increasing hemoglobin F blood levels. This paper presents the rationale, study design and protocol for an open label randomized controlled trial to improve parent-youth partnerships in self-management and medication adherence to HU in adolescents with SCD. Methods/Design A CHW intervention augmented by text messaging was designed for adolescents with SCD ages 10–18 years and their parents to improve daily HU adherence. Thirty adolescent parent dyads will be randomized with 2:1 intervention group allocation. Intervention dyads will establish a relationship with a culturally aligned CHW to identify barriers to HU use, identify cues to build a habit, and develop a dyad partnership to improve daily HU adherence and achieve their individualized “personal best” hemoglobin F target. Intervention feasibility, acceptability and efficacy will be assessed via a 2-site trial. Outcomes of interest are HU adherence, dyad self-management communication, quality of life, and resource use. Discussion Despite known benefits, poor HU adherence is common. If feasible and acceptable, the proposed intervention may improve health of underserved adolescents with SCD by enhancing long-term HU adherence. PMID:27327779

  15. Cancer stem cells and cisplatin-resistant cells isolated from non-small-lung cancer cell lines constitute related cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Ayllon, Blanca D; Moncho-Amor, Veronica; Abarrategi, Ander; de Cáceres, Inmaculada Ibañez; Castro-Carpeño, Javier; Belda-Iniesta, Cristobal; Perona, Rosario; Sastre, Leandro

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is the top cause of cancer-related deceases. One of the reasons is the development of resistance to the chemotherapy treatment. In particular, cancer stem cells (CSCs), can escape treatment and regenerate the bulk of the tumor. In this article, we describe a comparison between cancer cells resistant to cisplatin and CSCs, both derived from the non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines H460 and A549. Cisplatin-resistant cells were obtained after a single treatment with the drug. CSCs were isolated by culture in defined media, under nonadherent conditions. The isolated CSCs were clonogenic, could be differentiated into adherent cells and were less sensitive to cisplatin than the original cells. Cisplatin resistant and CSCs were able to generate primary tumors and to metastasize when injected into immunodeficient Nu/Nu mice, although they formed smaller tumors with a larger latency than untreated cells. Notably, under appropriated proportions, CSCs synergized with differentiated cells to form larger tumors. CSCs also showed increased capacity to induce angiogenesis in Nu/Nu mice. Conversely, H460 cisplatin-resistant cells showed increased tendency to develop bone metastasis. Gene expression analysis showed that several genes involved in tumor development and metastasis (EGR1, COX2, MALAT1, AKAP12, ADM) were similarly induced in CSC and cisplatin-resistant H460 cells, in agreement with a close similarity between these two cell populations. Cells with the characteristic growth properties of CSCs were also isolated from surgical samples of 18 out of 44 lung cancer patients. A significant correlation (P = 0.028) was found between the absence of CSCs and cisplatin sensitivity. PMID:24961511

  16. Guanylate-Binding Protein-1 protects ovarian cancer cell lines but not breast cancer cell lines from killing by paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Tipton, Aaron R; Nyabuto, Geoffrey O; Trendel, Jill A; Mazur, Travis M; Wilson, John P; Wadi, Suzan; Justinger, Jacob S; Moore, Garret L; Nguyen, Peter T; Vestal, Deborah J

    2016-09-30

    Forced expression of the cytokine-induced large GTPase, human Guanylate-Binding Protein-1 (hGBP-1), in ovarian cancer cell lines increases resistance to paclitaxel. Elevated hGBP-1 RNA in ovarian tumors correlates with shorter recurrence-free survival. In contract, hGBP-1 is part of a gene signature predicting improved prognosis in all subtypes of breast cancers. hGBP-1 does not confer paclitaxel resistance on MCF-7 and TMX2-28 breast cancer cells. Expression of the isotype of the hGBP-1-interacting protein, PIM1, which may contribute to paclitaxel resistance when associated with hGBP-1, is different in breast and ovarian cancer cell lines. Breast cancer cell lines express the 44 kDa isoform of PIM-1, and ovarian cancer cell lines express the 33 kDa isoform. PMID:27590579

  17. MORPHOMETRIC SUBTYPING FOR A PANEL OF BREAST CANCER CELL LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Ju; Chang, Hang; Fontenay, Gerald; Wang, Nicholas J.; Gray, Joe W.; Parvin, Bahram

    2009-05-08

    A panel of cell lines of diverse molecular background offers an improved model system for high-content screening, comparative analysis, and cell systems biology. A computational pipeline has been developed to collect images from cell-based assays, segment individual cells and colonies, represent segmented objects in a multidimensional space, and cluster them for identifying distinct subpopulations. While each segmentation strategy can vary for different imaging assays, representation and subpopulation analysis share a common thread. Application of this pipeline to a library of 41 breast cancer cell lines is demonstrated. These cell lines are grown in 2D and imaged through immunofluorescence microscopy. Subpopulations in this panel are identified and shown to correlate with previous subtyping literature that was derived from transcript data.

  18. Effects of ethanol on an intestinal epithelial cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Nano, J.L.; Cefai, D.; Rampal, P. )

    1990-02-01

    The effect of exposure of an intestinal epithelial cell line to various concentrations of ethanol (217 mM (1%) to 652 mM (3%)) during 24, 48, and 72 hr was investigated in vitro using a rat intestinal epithelial cell line (IRD 98). Incubation of these cells in the presence of ethanol significantly decreased cell growth. This inhibition was accompanied by a strong increase in cellular protein. Stimulation of specific disaccharidases, gamma-glutamyl transferase, and aminopeptidase activities by ethanol was dose- and time-dependent. Ethanol induces a change in the relative proportions of the different lipid classes synthesized; triglycerides, fatty acids, and cholesterol esters were preferentially synthethysed. Our findings show that cell lines are good models for investigation of the effects of ethanol, and that alcohol considerably modifies the functions of intestinal epithelial cells.

  19. Derivation of human embryonic stem cell lines, towards clinical quality.

    PubMed

    Hovatta, Outi

    2006-01-01

    Human embryonic stem (hES) cells offer an excellent source of cells for transplantation in the treatment of severe diseases. To be clinically safe, the lines have to be derived using strict quality criteria and good manufacturing practice. Animal proteins are immunogenic and may contain microbes, and they should not be used in establishing or propagating hES cells. Derivation systems have been improved towards clinical quality by establishing all 25 hES cell lines using human skin fibroblasts as feeder cells instead of mouse fibroblasts. A further 21 cell lines have been established using synthetic serum instead of fetal calf serum in the medium. In the five latest derivations, the inner cell mass was isolated mechanically instead of by immunosurgery (animal antibodies). Feeder-free derivation would be optimal, but it is not yet considered safe. Clinical-quality lines can be derived by establishing the skin fibroblast feeders in the good manufacturing practice laboratory with human serum in the medium, and by establishing the hES cells on such feeders. In this process, a serum replacement that contains only human protein can be used, the inner cell mass has to be isolated mechanically, and the colonies have to be split mechanically for passaging. Somatic cell nuclear transfer would help to overcome rejection of transplanted cells. PMID:17147930

  20. DNA fingerprinting of the NCI-60 cell line panel.

    PubMed

    Lorenzi, Philip L; Reinhold, William C; Varma, Sudhir; Hutchinson, Amy A; Pommier, Yves; Chanock, Stephen J; Weinstein, John N

    2009-04-01

    The National Cancer Institute's NCI-60 cell line panel, the most extensively characterized set of cells in existence and a public resource, is frequently used as a screening tool for drug discovery. Because many laboratories around the world rely on data from the NCI-60 cells, confirmation of their genetic identities represents an essential step in validating results from them. Given the consequences of cell line contamination or misidentification, quality control measures should routinely include DNA fingerprinting. We have, therefore, used standard DNA microsatellite short tandem repeats to profile the NCI-60, and the resulting DNA fingerprints are provided here as a reference. Consistent with previous reports, the fingerprints suggest that several NCI-60 lines have common origins: the melanoma lines MDA-MB-435, MDA-N, and M14; the central nervous system lines U251 and SNB-19; the ovarian lines OVCAR-8 and OVCAR-8/ADR (also called NCI/ADR); and the prostate lines DU-145, DU-145 (ATCC), and RC0.1. Those lines also show that the ability to connect two fingerprints to the same origin is not affected by stable transfection or by the development of multidrug resistance. As expected, DNA fingerprints were not able to distinguish different tissues-of-origin. The fingerprints serve principally as a barcodes.

  1. Roles for Cell Wall Glycopeptidolipid in Surface Adherence and Planktonic Dispersal of Mycobacterium avium

    EPA Science Inventory

    The opportunistic pathogen Mycobacterium avium is a significant inhabitant of biofilms in drinking water distribution systems. M. avium expresses on its cell surface serovar-specific glycopeptidolipids (ssGPLs). Studies have implicated the core GPL in biofilm formation by M. aviu...

  2. West Nile virus adheres to human red blood cells in whole blood.

    PubMed

    Rios, Maria; Daniel, Sylvester; Chancey, Caren; Hewlett, Indira K; Stramer, Susan L

    2007-07-15

    Background. West Nile virus (WNV) is endemic in the United States. It is transmissible by blood transfusion, and the nation's blood supply is currently screened for WNV. Documented transmission of WNV infection through red blood cell (RBC) units in which the plasma co-component had a low viral load could be explained, in at least 1 instance, by cell-association of WNV; in this case, the RBC unit was released as negative by minipool nucleic acid testing (NAT) performed on plasma but was intermittently NAT-positive when subsequently tested as an individual sample. We hypothesized that a proportion of WNV bound to blood cells and was not measured by NAT performed on plasma samples. We have investigated whether WNV binds to RBCs, leading to reduction of WNV RNA detection by NAT performed on plasma samples.Methods. Equal volumes of leukoreduced RBCs and their corresponding plasma components from 20 blood donors with NAT results that were positive for WNV were tested in 5 replicates by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction TaqMan for WNV. In addition, aliquots from 8 of the RBC units were tested by infectivity assays using Vero cells.Results. The reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction TaqMan assay showed that the viral load in the RBC components exceeded that in the corresponding plasma units by 1 order of magnitude. In addition, viruses associated with the RBCs were infectious in Vero cell cultures.Conclusions. These observations reinforce the notion that extraction of viral RNA from whole blood could improve assay sensitivity for blood donor screening and further reduce the residual risk of WNV transmission through transfusion.

  3. Antiproliferative Effect of Solanum nigrum on Human Leukemic Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Gabrani, Reema; Jain, Ramya; Sharma, Anjali; Sarethy, Indira P.; Dang, Shweta; Gupta, S.

    2012-01-01

    Solanum nigrum is used in various traditional medical systems for antiproliferative, antiinflammatory, antiseizure and hepatoprotective activities. We have evaluated organic solvent and aqueous extracts obtained from berries of Solanum nigrum for antiproliferative activity on leukemic cell lines, Jurkat and HL-60 (Human promyelocytic leukemia cells). The cell viability after the treatment with Solanum nigrum extract was measured by MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide) assay. Results indicated increased cytotoxicity with increasing extract concentrations. Comparative analysis indicated that 50% inhibitory concentration value of methanol extract is the lowest on both cell lines. PMID:23716874

  4. Measles virus persistence in an immortalized murine macrophage cell line.

    PubMed

    Goldman, M B; Buckthal, D J; Picciotto, S; O'Bryan, T A; Goldman, J N

    1995-02-20

    Persistent infection with the Edmonston strain of measles virus (MV) has been established in IC-21 cells, an immortalized murine macrophage cell line. Persistence was established immediately without syncytia formation or cytopathic effects. MV was expressed in the majority of the cells as evidenced by immunofluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry, infectious centers assays, and limiting dilution analysis. Hemagglutinin (H) and phosphoprotein expressed in persistently infected IC-21 cells had retarded migration in SDS-PAGE gels when compared to these proteins expressed in Vero cells. H protein differences were also found between freshly infected IC-21 cells and persistently infected IC-21 cells passaged for over 2 years. Six sublines of IC-21 cells, infected at different times, have maintained these characteristics for 2 years of passage. During this time period the intensity of immunofluorescence and the number of infectious virus particles recoverable fluctuated in five of the six cell lines. In one cell line virus expression remained at a consistent high level. The ability to establish a persistent MV infection in murine macrophages allows studies using a cell important in disseminating the infection. It facilitates experiments on immunological aspects of viral immunity by enabling cell mixing experiments with histocompatible cell populations and by making available the wide array of cellular and humoral reagents in the mouse. PMID:7871720

  5. Histamine increases sickle erythrocyte adherence to endothelium.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Matthew C; Eckman, James R; Wick, Timothy M

    2006-02-01

    Complications of sickle cell anaemia include vascular occlusion triggered by the adherence of sickle erythrocytes to endothelium in the postcapillary venules. Adherence can be promoted by inflammatory mediators that induce endothelial cell adhesion molecule expression and arrest flowing erythrocytes. The present study characterised the effect of histamine stimulation on the kinetics of sickle cell adherence to large vessel and microvascular endothelium under physiological flow. Increased sickle cell adherence was observed within minutes of endothelial activation by histamine and reached a maximum value within 30 min. At steady state, sickle cell adherence to histamine-stimulated endothelium was 47 +/- 4 adherent cells/mm(2), 2.6-fold higher than sickle cell adherence to unstimulated endothelial cells. Histamine-induced sickle cell adherence occurred rapidly and transiently. Studies using histamine receptor agonists and antagonists suggest that histamine-induced sickle cell adhesion depends on simultaneous stimulation of the H(2) and H(4) histamine receptors and endothelial P-selectin expression. These data show that histamine release may promote sickle cell adherence and vaso-occlusion. In vivo histamine release should be studied to determine its role in sickle complications and whether blocking of specific histamine receptors may prevent clinical complications or adverse effects from histamine release stimulated by opiate analgesic treatment.

  6. Metronidazole Decreases Viability of DLD-1 Colorectal Cancer Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Sadowska, Anna; Krętowski, Rafał; Szynaka, Beata; Cechowska-Pasko, Marzanna

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of metronidazole (MTZ) on DLD-1 colorectal cancer cell (CRC) line. Toxicity of MTZ was determined by MTT test. Cells were incubated with MTZ used in different concentrations for 24, 48, and 72 hours. The effect of MTZ on DNA synthesis was measured as [3H]-thymidine incorporation. The morphological changes in human DLD-1 cell line were defined by transmission electron microscope OPTON 900. The influence of MTZ on the apoptosis of DLD-1 cell lines was detected by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy, while cell concentration, volume, and diameter were displayed by Scepter Cell Counter from Millipore. Our results show that cell viability was diminished in all experimental groups in comparison with the control, and the differences were statistically significant. We did not find any significant differences in [3H]-thymidine incorporation in all experimental groups and times of observation. Cytofluorimetric assays demonstrated a statistically significant increase of apoptotic rate in MTZ concentrations 10 and 50 μg/mL after 24 hours; 0.1, 10, 50, and 250 μg/mL after 48 hours; and in all concentrations after 72 hours compared with control groups. In the ultrastructural studies, necrotic or apoptotic cells were occasionally seen. In conclusion, MTZ affects human CRC cell line viability. The reduction of cell viability was consistent with the apoptotic test. PMID:23777253

  7. Inducible human immunodeficiency virus type 1 packaging cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, H; Rabson, A B; Kaul, M; Ron, Y; Dougherty, J P

    1996-01-01

    Packaging cell lines are important tools for transferring genes into eukaryotic cells. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-based packaging cell lines are difficult to obtain, in part owing to the problem that some HIV-1 proteins are cytotoxic in a variety of cells. To overcome this, we have developed an HIV-1-based packaging cell line which has an inducible expression system. The tetracycline-inducible expression system was utilized to control the expression of the Rev regulatory protein, which in turn controls the expression of the late proteins including Gag, Pol, and Env. Western blotting (immunoblotting) demonstrated that the expression of p24gag and gp120env from the packaging cells peaked on days 6 and 7 postinduction. Reverse transcriptase activity could be detected by day 4 after induction and also peaked on days 6 and 7. Defective vector virus could be propagated, yielding titers as high as 7 x 10(3) CFU/ml, while replication-competent virus was not detectable at any time. Thus, the cell line should enable the transfer of specific genes into CD4+ cells and should be a useful tool for studying the biology of HIV-1. We have also established an inducible HIV-1 Env-expressing cell line which could be used to propagate HIV-1 vectors that require only Env in trans. The env-minus vector virus titer produced from the Env-expressing cells reached 2 x 10(4) CFU/ml. The inducible HIV-1 Env-expressing cell line should be a useful tool for the study of HIV-1 Env as well. PMID:8676479

  8. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor induced the differentiation of amniotic fluid-derived stem cells into vascular endothelial-like cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruyu; Lu, Ying; Li, Ju; Wang, Jia; Liu, Caixia; Gao, Fang; Sun, Dong

    2016-02-01

    Amniotic fluid-derived stem cells (AFSCs) are a novel source of stem cells that are isolated and cultured from second trimester amniocentesis. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) acts as a tissue morphogen and regulates stem cell proliferation and differentiation. This study investigated the effect of an adenovirus-mediated GDNF gene, which was engineered into AFSCs, on the cells' biological properties and whether GDNF in combination with AFSCs can be directionally differentiated into vascular endothelial-like cells in vitro. AFSCs were isolated and cultured using the plastic adherence method in vitro and identified by the transcription factor Oct-4, which is the primary marker of pluripotent stem cells. AFSCs were efficiently transfected by a GFP-labeled plasmid system of an adenovirus vector carrying the GDNF gene (Ad-GDNF-GFP). Transfected AFSCs stably expressed GDNF. Transfected AFSCs were cultured in endothelial growth medium-2 containing vascular endothelial growth factor. After 1 week, AFSCs were positive for von Willebrand factor (vWF) and CD31, which are markers of endothelial cells, and the recombinant GDNF group was significantly higher than undifferentiated controls and the GFP only group. These results demonstrated that AFSCs differentiated into vascular endothelial-like cells in vitro, and recombinant GDNF promoted differentiation. The differentiation-induced AFSCs may be used as seed cells to provide a new manner of cell and gene therapies for transplantation into the vascular injury site to promote angiogenesis.

  9. Anti-adherence potential of Enterococcus durans cells and its cell-free supernatant on plastic and stainless steel against foodborne pathogens.

    PubMed

    Amel, Ait Meddour; Farida, Bendali; Djamila, Sadoun

    2015-07-01

    It is demonstrated that numerous bacteria are able to attach to surfaces of equipment used for food handling or processing. In this study, a strain of Enterococcus durans, originally isolated from a milking machine surface, was firstly studied for its biofilm formation potential on plastic and stainless steel supports. The strain was found to be a biofilm producer either at 25, 30 or 37 °C on polystyrene microtitre plates, with a best adherence level observed at 25 °C. En. durans showed a strong adhesion to stainless steel AISI-304. Antibacterial and anti-adherence activities of En. durans were tested against four foodborne pathogens (Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853 and Listeria innocua CLIP 74915) which were shown as biofilm producers on both plastic and stainless steel. En. durans cells and cell-free culture supernatant showed a significant (P < 0.05) inhibition potential of the pathogens either on solid media or in broth co-cultures. Characterization of the antibacterial substances indicated their proteinaceous nature which assigned them most probably to bacteriocins group.

  10. Anti-adherence potential of Enterococcus durans cells and its cell-free supernatant on plastic and stainless steel against foodborne pathogens.

    PubMed

    Amel, Ait Meddour; Farida, Bendali; Djamila, Sadoun

    2015-07-01

    It is demonstrated that numerous bacteria are able to attach to surfaces of equipment used for food handling or processing. In this study, a strain of Enterococcus durans, originally isolated from a milking machine surface, was firstly studied for its biofilm formation potential on plastic and stainless steel supports. The strain was found to be a biofilm producer either at 25, 30 or 37 °C on polystyrene microtitre plates, with a best adherence level observed at 25 °C. En. durans showed a strong adhesion to stainless steel AISI-304. Antibacterial and anti-adherence activities of En. durans were tested against four foodborne pathogens (Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853 and Listeria innocua CLIP 74915) which were shown as biofilm producers on both plastic and stainless steel. En. durans cells and cell-free culture supernatant showed a significant (P < 0.05) inhibition potential of the pathogens either on solid media or in broth co-cultures. Characterization of the antibacterial substances indicated their proteinaceous nature which assigned them most probably to bacteriocins group. PMID:25466409

  11. Plasmodium chabaudi-Infected Erythrocytes Adhere to CD36 and Bind to Microvascular Endothelial Cells in an Organ-Specific Way

    PubMed Central

    Mota, Maria M.; Jarra, William; Hirst, Elizabeth; Patnaik, Pradeep K.; Holder, Anthony A.

    2000-01-01

    Adherence of erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium falciparum to microvascular endothelial cells (sequestration) is considered to play an important role in parasite virulence and pathogenesis. However, the real importance of sequestration for infection and disease has never been fully assessed. The absence of an appropriate in vivo model for sequestration has been a major barrier. We have examined the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium chabaudi chabaudi AS in mice as a potential model. Erythrocytes infected with this parasite adhere in vitro to purified CD36, a critical endothelium receptor for binding P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes. P. c. chabaudi-infected erythrocytes adhere in vitro to endothelial cells in a gamma interferon-dependent manner, suggesting the involvement of additional adhesion molecules in the binding process, as is also the case with P. falciparum-infected cells. Furthermore, plasma or sera from infected and hyperimmune mice, respectively, have the ability to block binding of infected erythrocytes to endothelial cells. In vivo, erythrocytes containing mature P. c. chabaudi parasites are sequestered from the peripheral circulation. Sequestration is organ specific, occurring primarily in the liver, although intimate contact between infected erythrocytes and endothelial cells is also observed in the spleen and brain. The results are discussed in the context of the use of this model to study (i) the relationship between endothelial cell activation and the level of sequestration and (ii) the primary function of sequestration in malaria infection. PMID:10858230

  12. Regeneration of lateral line and inner ear vestibular cells.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, J M

    1991-01-01

    Labelling experiments with [3H]thymidine demonstrate a continuous production of cells in the mechanoreceptive lateral line organs of the eel (Anguilla anguilla) and butterfly fish (Pantodon buchholzi) as well as in the electroreceptive ampullary organ of the transparent catfish (Kryptopterus bicirrhus). Shortly after [3H]thymidine injection many cells are labelled in the middle and basal parts of the sensory organ and after a few days' survival sensory cells are also labelled. The vestibular sensory organs of selected species of fishes, amphibians, reptiles and birds also show a continuous production of cells. In the budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus) labelled cells are found in the basal and middle layer of the sensory epithelium a few hours after injection with [3H]thymidine. A few days after the injection labelled cells are found in non-calyceal hair cells. After one month the calyceal cells are also labelled. Similar experiments with the bat Pipistrellus nathusii and with normal and gentamicin-treated mice (Mus musculus) show no labelled cells in the inner ear sensory epithelia. The lateral line organs and vestibular epithelia of non-mammalian vertebrates all contain a small number of dark cells with the characteristics of apoptotic cells. Macrophages and inclusions in some cells, thought to be remnants of apoptotic cells, are occasionally seen. Fixation at different osmolarities has little effect on the number of dark cells. It is suggested that the continually produced cells replace apoptotic dying cells.

  13. AHCC Activation and Selection of Human Lymphocytes via Genotypic and Phenotypic Changes to an Adherent Cell Type: A Possible Novel Mechanism of T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Olamigoke, Loretta; Mansoor, Elvedina; Mann, Vivek; Ellis, Ivory; Okoro, Elvis; Wakame, Koji; Fuji, Hajime; Kulkarni, Anil; Francoise Doursout, Marie; Sundaresan, Alamelu

    2015-01-01

    Active Hexose Correlated Compound (AHCC) is a fermented mushroom extract and immune supplement that has been used to treat a wide range of health conditions. It helps in augmentation of the natural immune response and affects immune cell activation and outcomes. The goal of this project was to study and understand the role and mechanisms of AHCC supplementation in the prevention of immunosuppression through T cell activation. The method described here involves “in vitro” culturing of lymphocytes, exposing them to different concentrations of AHCC (0 μg/mL, 50 μg/mL, 100 μg/mL, 250 μg/mL, and 500 μg/mL) at 0 hours. Interestingly, clumping and aggregation of the cells were seen between 24 and 72 hours of incubation. The cells lay down extracellular matrix, which become adherent, and phenotypical changes from small rounded lymphocytes to large macrophage-like, spindle shaped, elongated, fibroblast-like cells even beyond 360 hours were observed. These are probably translated from genotypic changes in the cells since the cells propagate for at least 3 to 6 generations (present observations). RNA isolated was subjected to gene array analysis. We hypothesize that cell adhesion is an activation and survival pathway in lymphocytes and this could be the mechanism of AHCC activation in human lymphocytes. PMID:26788109

  14. Experimental Adaptation of Rotaviruses to Tumor Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Carlos A.; Guerrero, Rafael A.; Silva, Elver; Acosta, Orlando; Barreto, Emiliano

    2016-01-01

    A number of viruses show a naturally extended tropism for tumor cells whereas other viruses have been genetically modified or adapted to infect tumor cells. Oncolytic viruses have become a promising tool for treating some cancers by inducing cell lysis or immune response to tumor cells. In the present work, rotavirus strains TRF-41 (G5) (porcine), RRV (G3) (simian), UK (G6-P5) (bovine), Ym (G11-P9) (porcine), ECwt (murine), Wa (G1-P8), Wi61 (G9) and M69 (G8) (human), and five wild-type human rotavirus isolates were passaged multiple times in different human tumor cell lines and then combined in five different ways before additional multiple passages in tumor cell lines. Cell death caused by the tumor cell-adapted isolates was characterized using Hoechst, propidium iodide, 7-AAD, Annexin V, TUNEL, and anti-poly-(ADP ribose) polymerase (PARP) and -phospho-histone H2A.X antibodies. Multiple passages of the combined rotaviruses in tumor cell lines led to a successful infection of these cells, suggesting a gain-of-function by the acquisition of greater infectious capacity as compared with that of the parental rotaviruses. The electropherotype profiles suggest that unique tumor cell-adapted isolates were derived from reassortment of parental rotaviruses. Infection produced by such rotavirus isolates induced chromatin modifications compatible with apoptotic cell death. PMID:26828934

  15. Exometabolom analysis of breast cancer cell lines: Metabolic signature

    PubMed Central

    Willmann, Lucas; Erbes, Thalia; Halbach, Sebastian; Brummer, Tilman; Jäger, Markus; Hirschfeld, Marc; Fehm, Tanja; Neubauer, Hans; Stickeler, Elmar; Kammerer, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells show characteristic effects on cellular turnover and DNA/RNA modifications leading to elevated levels of excreted modified nucleosides. We investigated the molecular signature of different subtypes of breast cancer cell lines and the breast epithelial cell line MCF-10A. Prepurification of cell culture supernatants was performed by cis-diol specific affinity chromatography using boronate-derivatized polyacrylamide gel. Samples were analyzed by application of reversed phase chromatography coupled to a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. Collectively, we determined 23 compounds from RNA metabolism, two from purine metabolism, five from polyamine/methionine cycle, one from histidine metabolism and two from nicotinate and nicotinamide metabolism. We observed major differences of metabolite excretion pattern between the breast cancer cell lines and MCF-10A, just as well as between the different breast cancer cell lines themselves. Differences in metabolite excretion resulting from cancerous metabolism can be integrated into altered processes on the cellular level. Modified nucleosides have great potential as biomarkers in due consideration of the heterogeneity of breast cancer that is reflected by the different molecular subtypes of breast cancer. Our data suggests that the metabolic signature of breast cancer cell lines might be a more subtype-specific tool to predict breast cancer, rather than a universal approach. PMID:26293811

  16. New approaches for understanding the nuclear force balance in living, adherent cells.

    PubMed

    Neelam, Srujana; Dickinson, Richard B; Lele, Tanmay P

    2016-02-01

    Cytoskeletal forces are transmitted to the nucleus to position and shape it. Linkages mediated by the LINC (linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton) complex transfer these forces to the nuclear envelope. Nuclear position and shape can be thought to be determined by a balance of cytoskeletal forces generated by microtubule motors that shear the nuclear surface, actomyosin forces that can pull, push and shear the nucleus, and intermediate filaments that may passively resist nuclear decentering and deformation. Parsing contributions of these different forces to nuclear mechanics is a very challenging task. Here we review new approaches that can be used in living cells to probe and understand the nuclear force balance.

  17. The mucosal T cell integrin alpha M290 beta 7 recognizes a ligand on mucosal epithelial cell lines.

    PubMed

    Roberts, K; Kilshaw, P J

    1993-07-01

    The integrin alpha M290 beta 7 is expressed at high levels on mucosal T cells, particularly on those within the epithelium of the gut. We now report that a mouse T cell hybridoma, MTC-1, with similar surface expression of this molecule, adhered strongly to cells of the mouse rectal carcinoma line CMT93 and that adhesion was blocked completely by the monoclonal antibody (mAb) M290. Other mAb to the alpha M290 or beta 7 subunits had little or no inhibitory effect. M290 also inhibited adhesion of the hybridoma to cells of the mouse lung carcinomas CTM64/61 and KLN205 but had little or no effect on adhesion to seven other mouse epithelial cell lines or to the human colon carcinoma line, HT29. Intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL) isolated from the small intestine of BALB/c mice displayed potent T cell receptor-dependent cytotoxic effector function against CMT93 in the presence of low concentrations of Phytolacca americana lectin. This cytotoxic activity also was inhibited by the M290 mAb. Treatment of CMT93 cells with tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interferon-gamma induced expression de novo of ICAM-1 and reduced the inhibitory effect of M290 in tests both for adhesion and cytotoxicity. In further experiments cytotoxic activity of IEL against the mastocytoma P815 was investigated. This target cell was considered not to possess a ligand for the integrin. In this case cytotoxic effector function was triggered by anti-CD3 mAb and, in contrast to results with CMT93, target cell lysis was increased in the presence of M290 and other antibodies to the integrin, suggesting a co-stimulatory effect. These results show that alpha M290 beta 7 recognizes a ligand on the surface of certain epithelial cell lines. Further, they provide the first clear indication that this integrin may play an important role in functional interactions between T cells and the mucosal epithelium.

  18. Generation of stable Drosophila cell lines using multicistronic vectors.

    PubMed

    González, Monika; Martín-Ruíz, Itziar; Jiménez, Silvia; Pirone, Lucia; Barrio, Rosa; Sutherland, James D

    2011-01-01

    Insect cell culture is becoming increasingly important for applications including recombinant protein production and cell-based screening with chemical or RNAi libraries. While stable mammalian cell lines expressing a protein of interest can be efficiently prepared using IRES-based vectors or viral-based approaches, options for stable insect cell lines are more limited. Here, we describe pAc5-STABLEs, new vectors for use in Drosophila cell culture to facilitate stable transformation. We show that viral-derived 2A-like (or "CHYSEL") peptides function in Drosophila cells and can mediate the multicistronic expression of two or three proteins of interest under control of the Actin5C constitutive promoter. The current vectors allow mCherry and/or GFP fusions to be generated for positive selection by G418 resistance in cells and should serve as a flexible platform for future applications. PMID:22355594

  19. Pilus phase variation switches gonococcal adherence to invasion by caveolin-1-dependent host cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Faulstich, Michaela; Böttcher, Jan-Peter; Meyer, Thomas F; Fraunholz, Martin; Rudel, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Many pathogenic bacteria cause local infections but occasionally invade into the blood stream, often with fatal outcome. Very little is known about the mechanism underlying the switch from local to invasive infection. In the case of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, phase variable type 4 pili (T4P) stabilize local infection by mediating microcolony formation and inducing anti-invasive signals. Outer membrane porin PorB(IA), in contrast, is associated with disseminated infection and facilitates the efficient invasion of gonococci into host cells. Here we demonstrate that loss of pili by natural pilus phase variation is a prerequisite for the transition from local to invasive infection. Unexpectedly, both T4P-mediated inhibition of invasion and PorB(IA)-triggered invasion utilize membrane rafts and signaling pathways that depend on caveolin-1-Y14 phosphorylation (Cav1-pY14). We identified p85 regulatory subunit of PI3 kinase (PI3K) and phospholipase Cγ1 as new, exclusive and essential interaction partners for Cav1-pY14 in the course of PorBIA-induced invasion. Active PI3K induces the uptake of gonococci via a new invasion pathway involving protein kinase D1. Our data describe a novel route of bacterial entry into epithelial cells and offer the first mechanistic insight into the switch from local to invasive gonococcal infection. PMID:23717204

  20. Reduction of Adherence of E. coli O157:H7 to HEp-2 Cells and to Bovine Large Intestinal Mucosal Explants by Colicinogenic E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Etcheverría, A. I.; Arroyo, G. H.; Alzola, R.; Parma, A. E.

    2011-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic E. coli strains (EHEC) had emerged as foodborne pathogens and cause in human diarrhea and hemolytic-uremic syndrome. Because of the widespread distribution of EHEC serotypes and O157 and non-O157 in cattle population, its control will require interventions at the farm level such as the administration of probiotics that produce inhibitory metabolites. E. coli O157:H7 shows tissue tropisms for the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of cattle. The aim of this study was to test the ability of a colicinogenic E. coli (isolated from bovine) to reduce the adherence of E. coli O157:H7 to HEp-2 cells and to GIT of cattle. We inoculated HEp-2 cells and bovine colon explants with both kinds of strains. Colicinogenic E. coli was able to reduce the adherence of E. coli O157:H7 to HEp-2 cells and to bovine tissues. PMID:23724308

  1. Ormocomp-modified glass increases collagen binding and promotes the adherence and maturation of human embryonic stem cell-derived retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Käpylä, Elli; Sorkio, Anni; Teymouri, Shokoufeh; Lahtonen, Kimmo; Vuori, Leena; Valden, Mika; Skottman, Heli; Kellomäki, Minna; Juuti-Uusitalo, Kati

    2014-12-01

    In in vitro live-cell imaging, it would be beneficial to grow and assess human embryonic stem cell-derived retinal pigment epithelial (hESC-RPE) cells on thin, transparent, rigid surfaces such as cover glasses. In this study, we assessed how the silanization of glass with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES), 3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl methacrylate (MAPTMS), or polymer-ceramic material Ormocomp affects the surface properties, protein binding, and maturation of hESC-RPE cells. The surface properties were studied by contact angle measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and a protein binding assay. The cell adherence and proliferation were evaluated by culturing hESCRPE cells on collagen IV-coated untreated or silanized surfaces for 42 days. The Ormocomp treatment significantly increased the hydrophobicity and roughness of glass surfaces compared to the APTES and MAPTMS treatments. The XPS results indicated that the Ormocomp treatment changes the chemical composition of the glass surface by increasing the carbon content and the number of C-O/═O bonds. The protein-binding test confirmed that the Ormocomp-treated surfaces bound more collagen IV than did APTES- or MAPTMS-treated surfaces. All of the silane treatments increased the number of cells: after 42 days of culture, Ormocomp had 0.38, APTES had 0.16, MAPTMS had 0.19, and untreated glass had only 0.062, all presented as million cells cm(-2). There were no differences in cell numbers compared to smoother to rougher Ormocomp surfaces, suggesting that the surface chemistry and, more specifically, the collagen binding in combination with Ormocomp are beneficial to hESC-RPE cell culture. This study clearly demonstrates that Ormocomp treatment combined with collagen coating significantly increases hESC-RPE cell attachment compared to commonly used silanizing agents APTES and MAPTMS. Ormocomp silanization could thus enable the use of microscopic live cell imaging methods for h

  2. Performance characteristics of two automated solid-phase red cell adherence systems for pretransfusion antibody screening: a cautionary tale.

    PubMed

    Quillen, K; Caron, J; Murphy, K

    2012-01-01

    Out institution has implemented two instruments, the Galileo and the Echo, that use different solid-phase red cell adherence assays for antibody screening in pretransfusion compatibility testing.During the initial implementation of these two instruments, we noticed very different problems: falsely positive results on the Galileo, and falsely negative results and lack of reproducibility on the Echo. Comparison of falsely positive antibody screen results from approximately equivalent numbers of samples run on the Galileo and samples tested by standard manual tube technique using low-ionic-strength saline enhancement showed a false-positive rate of 1.4 percent on the Galileo (defined as a positive screen with a negative panel). Testing using the Echo identified four cases of falsely negative antibody screens, (defined as a negative screen on a patient sample subsequently shown to be positive by the same method). In addition, we note a lack of reproducibility on the Echo, which emphasizes the importance of replicate testing during validation of automated antibody screening platforms.

  3. Detection of drug-dependent, platelet-reactive antibodies by solid-phase red cell adherence assays.

    PubMed

    Leach, M F; Cooper, L K; AuBuchon, J P

    1997-06-01

    We developed a simple modification of the solid-phase red cell adherence (SPRCA) assay system that can be used to identify drug-dependent platelet antibodies (DDPAs) reactive by either the hapten or immune complex reaction mechanisms. Between January 1994 and August 1996 we tested sera from 173 patients [123 (71%) with unexplained thrombocytopenia and 50 (29%) because of poor responses to platelet transfusions not explicable by alloimmunization or the clinical situation] for DDPAs possibly associated with the receipt of 61 different drugs. We correlated positive results with patients' clinical courses. DDPAs were identified in samples from 138 (80%) of the patients tested. Antibodies reactive only by the hapten mechanism were identified in 51 (37%) of those sera exhibiting positive reactions. The clinical courses of 108 (78%) patients were evaluable. Discontinuation of the implicated drug(s) resulted in prompt (<5 d) resolution of the thrombocytopenia or improvement in response to transfusion in all of these patients. In four cases thrombocytopenia returned upon re-exposure to the implicated drug. This adaptation of SPRCA provides a simple means of investigating the possibility of DDPAs and documents a higher frequency of these antibodies than has previously been suspected.

  4. Detection of drug-dependent platelet antibodies by use of solid-phase red cell adherence techniques.

    PubMed

    Leach, M F; Cooper, L K; Aubuchon, J P

    1995-01-01

    Many drugs have been reported to cause drug-dependent thrombocytopenia, either by the immune complex or by hapten mechanisms. Testing for the presence of these platelet antibodies has not been considered feasible for transfusion services because their presence was thought to be rare, and their detection involved complex and costly methods. We have developed a new technique for detection of these antibodies that can be performed without the need for specialized and expensive instrumentation. A solid-phase red cell adherence assay was used to detect drug-dependent platelet antibodies active by either the immune complex or the hapten mechanism. Three cases were evaluated for the presence of drug-dependent platelet antibodies. Two patients presented with thrombocytopenia that could not be attributed to other causes. The third case was evaluated for the presence of drug-dependent antibodies after poor responses to platelet transfusions. In these three cases, discontinuation of the implicated drugs, i.e., porcine heparin, quinine sulfate, amoxicillin, Bactrim, and albuterol, was followed by a correction of thrombocytopenia or improved platelet transfusion response within 72 hours. This test methodology and protocol has proven very useful in avoiding transfusions with little likelihood of benefit, and in identifying drugs interfering with platelet recovery or survival. Further investigations with this technique may expand our knowledge of the capability of this technique and of the observed frequency of drug-related immunologic platelet destruction.

  5. Three-dimensional cultured glioma cell lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R. (Inventor); Marley, Garry M. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Three-dimensional glioma spheroids were produced in vitro with size and histological differentiation previously unattained. The spheroids were grown in liquid media suspension in a Johnson Space Center (JSC) Rotating Wall Bioreactor without using support matrices such as microcarrier beads. Spheroid volumes of greater than 3.5 cu mm and diameters of 2.5 mm were achieved with a viable external layer or rim of proliferating cells, a transitional layer beneath the external layer with histological differentiation, and a degenerative central region with a hypoxic necrotic core. Cell debris was evident in the degenerative central region. The necrotics centers of some of the spheroids had hyaline droplets. Granular bodies were detected predominantly in the necrotic center.

  6. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Systems PVL Line

    SciTech Connect

    Susan Shearer - Stark State College; Gregory Rush - Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems

    2012-05-01

    In July 2010, Stark State College (SSC), received Grant DE-EE0003229 from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Golden Field Office, for the development of the electrical and control systems, and mechanical commissioning of a unique 20kW scale high-pressure, high temperature, natural gas fueled Stack Block Test System (SBTS). SSC worked closely with subcontractor, Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems (US) Inc. (RRFCS) over a 13 month period to successfully complete the project activities. This system will be utilized by RRFCS for pre-commercial technology development and training of SSC student interns. In the longer term, when RRFCS is producing commercial products, SSC will utilize the equipment for workforce training. In addition to DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies program funding, RRFCS internal funds, funds from the state of Ohio, and funding from the DOE Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) program have been utilized to design, develop and commission this equipment. Construction of the SBTS (mechanical components) was performed under a Grant from the State of Ohio through Ohio's Third Frontier program (Grant TECH 08-053). This Ohio program supported development of a system that uses natural gas as a fuel. Funding was provided under the Department of Energy (DOE) Solid-state Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) program for modifications required to test on coal synthesis gas. The subject DOE program provided funding for the electrical build, control system development and mechanical commissioning. Performance testing, which includes electrical commissioning, was subsequently performed under the DOE SECA program. Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems is developing a megawatt-scale solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stationary power generation system. This system, based on RRFCS proprietary technology, is fueled with natural gas, and operates at elevated pressure. A critical success factor for development of the full scale system is the capability to

  7. Cell Wall-Associated Protein Antigens of Streptococcus salivarius: Purification, Properties, and Function in Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Weerkamp, Anton H.; Jacobs, Ton

    1982-01-01

    Three cell wall-associated protein antigens (antigens b, c, and d) were isolated from mutanolysin-solubilized cell walls of Streptococcus salivarius HB and purified to apparent homogeneity by a combination of ion-exchange chromatography, gel filtration, and immunoadsorption chromatography. Antigens b and c were also isolated from culture supernatants. Antigen b consisted of more than 80% protein and had an apparent molecular weight as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of 320,000. Antigen c consisted of 57% protein, about 30% neutral sugar, and about 13% amino sugar, and its glycoprotein nature was confirmed by specific staining techniques. During sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis antigen c resolved into two or more bands, depending on the source or the isolation procedure, in the molecular weight range from 220,000 to 280,000. Antigen d consisted of 95% protein and was observed in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis as two bands with molecular weights of 129,000 and 121,000. Under nondenaturing conditions all three antigens had molecular weights in the range from 1 × 106 to 3 × 106 as determined by gel filtration. The amino acid compositions of antigens b, c, and d were characterized by low amounts of basic amino acids and relatively high levels of nonpolar amino acids. Among oral streptococcal species antigens b and c were virtually restricted to strains of S. salivarius and most often to serotype I strains. Antigen b was recognized as the factor that mediates coaggregation of S. salivarius with Veillonella strains. The purified protein retained its biological activity. Antigen c could be linked to functions relating to adhesion of the streptococci to host tissues on the basis of its absence in mutant strains and blocking by specific antisera. The purified molecule had no detectable biological activity. Antigen d could not be linked to an established adhesion function. Images

  8. Both enzymatic and non-enzymatic properties of heat-labile enterotoxin are responsible for LT-enhanced adherence of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli to porcine IPEC-J2 cells.

    PubMed

    Fekete, Peter Z; Mateo, Kristina S; Zhang, Weiping; Moxley, Rodney A; Kaushik, Radhey S; Francis, David H

    2013-06-28

    Previous studies in piglets indicate that heat labile enterotoxin (LT) expression enhances intestinal colonization by K88 adhesin-producing enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) as wild-type ETEC adhered to intestinal epithelium in substantially greater numbers than did non-toxigenic constructs. Enzymatic activity of the toxin was also shown to contribute to the adhesion of ETEC and non-ETEC bacteria to epithelial cells in culture. To further characterize the contribution of LT to host cell adhesion, a nontoxigenic, K88-producing E. coli was transformed with either the gene encoding for LT holotoxin, a catalytically-attenuated form of the toxin [LT(R192G)], or LTB subunits, and resultant changes in bacterial adherence to IPEC-J2 porcine intestinal epithelial cells were measured. Strains expressing LT holotoxin or mutants were able to adhere in significantly higher numbers to IPEC-J2 cells than was an isogenic, toxin-negative construct. LT+ strains were also able to significantly block binding of a wild-type LT+ ETEC strain to IPEC-J2 cells. Adherence of isogenic strains to IPEC-J2 cells was unaltered by cycloheximide treatment, suggesting that LT enhances ETEC adherence to IPEC-J2 cells independent of host cell protein synthesis. However, pretreating IPEC-J2 cells with LT promoted adherence of negatively charged latex beads (a surrogate for bacteria which carry a negative change), which adherence was inhibited by cycloheximide, suggesting LT may induce a change in epithelial cell membrane potential. Overall, these data suggest that LT may enhance ETEC adherence by promoting an association between LTB and epithelial cells, and by altering the surface charge of the host plasma membrane to promote non-specific adherence.

  9. Both enzymatic and non-enzymatic properties of heat-labile enterotoxin are responsible for LT-enhanced adherence of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli to porcine IPEC-J2 cells.

    PubMed

    Fekete, Peter Z; Mateo, Kristina S; Zhang, Weiping; Moxley, Rodney A; Kaushik, Radhey S; Francis, David H

    2013-06-28

    Previous studies in piglets indicate that heat labile enterotoxin (LT) expression enhances intestinal colonization by K88 adhesin-producing enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) as wild-type ETEC adhered to intestinal epithelium in substantially greater numbers than did non-toxigenic constructs. Enzymatic activity of the toxin was also shown to contribute to the adhesion of ETEC and non-ETEC bacteria to epithelial cells in culture. To further characterize the contribution of LT to host cell adhesion, a nontoxigenic, K88-producing E. coli was transformed with either the gene encoding for LT holotoxin, a catalytically-attenuated form of the toxin [LT(R192G)], or LTB subunits, and resultant changes in bacterial adherence to IPEC-J2 porcine intestinal epithelial cells were measured. Strains expressing LT holotoxin or mutants were able to adhere in significantly higher numbers to IPEC-J2 cells than was an isogenic, toxin-negative construct. LT+ strains were also able to significantly block binding of a wild-type LT+ ETEC strain to IPEC-J2 cells. Adherence of isogenic strains to IPEC-J2 cells was unaltered by cycloheximide treatment, suggesting that LT enhances ETEC adherence to IPEC-J2 cells independent of host cell protein synthesis. However, pretreating IPEC-J2 cells with LT promoted adherence of negatively charged latex beads (a surrogate for bacteria which carry a negative change), which adherence was inhibited by cycloheximide, suggesting LT may induce a change in epithelial cell membrane potential. Overall, these data suggest that LT may enhance ETEC adherence by promoting an association between LTB and epithelial cells, and by altering the surface charge of the host plasma membrane to promote non-specific adherence. PMID:23517763

  10. Molecular dissection of AKT activation in lung cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yanan; Du, Jinyan; Kwiatkowski, David J

    2013-01-01

    AKT is a critical signaling node downstream of PI3K, which is often activated in cancer. We analyzed the state of activation of AKT in 80 human non-small cell lung cancer cell lines under serum starvation conditions. We identified 13 lines which showed persistent AKT activation in the absence of serum. In 12 of the 13 lines, AKT activation could be attributed to loss of PTEN, activating mutation in EGFR or PIK3CA, or amplification of ERBB2. HCC2429 was the only cell line that had no alterations in those genes, but had high phospho-AKT(Ser473) levels under serum starvation conditions. However, the activation of AKT in HCC2429 was PI3K- and mTORC2-dependent based upon use of specific inhibitors. Kinome tyrosine phosphorylation profiling showed that both Notch and SRC were highly activated in this cell line. Despite the activation of Notch, AKT activation and cell survival were not affected by Notch inhibitors DAPT or Compound E. In contrast, SRC inhibitors PP2 and dasatinib both significantly decreased pAKT(Ser473) levels and reduced cell survival by inducing apoptosis. Further, a combination of SRC and mTOR inhibition synergistically blocked activation of AKT and induced apoptosis. Over-expression of SRC has been identified previously in human lung cancers, and these results suggest that a combination of SRC and mTOR inhibitors may have unique therapeutic benefit for a subset of lung cancers with these molecular features. PMID:23319332

  11. Heterozygous Embryonic Stem Cell Lines Derived from Nonhuman Primate Parthenotes

    PubMed Central

    Dighe, Vikas; Clepper, Lisa; Pedersen, Darlene; Byrne, James; Ferguson, Betsy; Gokhale, Sumita; Penedo, M. Cecilia T.; Wolf, Don; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat

    2009-01-01

    Monoparental parthenotes represent a potential source of histocompatible stem cells that should be isogenic with the oocyte donor and therefore suitable for use in cell or tissue replacement therapy. We generated five rhesus monkey parthenogenetic embryonic stem cell (PESC) lines with stable, diploid female karyotypes that were morphologically indistinguishable from biparental controls, expressed key pluripotent markers, and generated cell derivatives representative of all three germ layers following in vivo and in vitro differentiation. Interestingly, high levels of heterozygosity were observed at the majority of loci that were polymorphic in the oocyte donors. Some PESC lines were also heterozygous in the major histocompatibility complex region, carrying haplotypes identical to those of the egg donor females. Expression analysis revealed transcripts from some imprinted genes that are normally expressed from only the paternal allele. These results indicate that limitations accompanying the potential use of PESC-derived phenotypes in regenerative medicine, including aberrant genomic imprinting and high levels of homozygosity, are cell line-dependent and not always present. PESC lines were derived in high enough yields to be practicable, and their derivatives are suitable for autologous transplantation into oocyte donors or could be used to establish a bank of histocompatible cell lines for a broad spectrum of patients. PMID:18192229

  12. Heterozygous embryonic stem cell lines derived from nonhuman primate parthenotes.

    PubMed

    Dighe, Vikas; Clepper, Lisa; Pedersen, Darlene; Byrne, James; Ferguson, Betsy; Gokhale, Sumita; Penedo, M Cecilia T; Wolf, Don; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat

    2008-03-01

    Monoparental parthenotes represent a potential source of histocompatible stem cells that should be isogenic with the oocyte donor and therefore suitable for use in cell or tissue replacement therapy. We generated five rhesus monkey parthenogenetic embryonic stem cell (PESC) lines with stable, diploid female karyotypes that were morphologically indistinguishable from biparental controls, expressed key pluripotent markers, and generated cell derivatives representative of all three germ layers following in vivo and in vitro differentiation. Interestingly, high levels of heterozygosity were observed at the majority of loci that were polymorphic in the oocyte donors. Some PESC lines were also heterozygous in the major histocompatibility complex region, carrying haplotypes identical to those of the egg donor females. Expression analysis revealed transcripts from some imprinted genes that are normally expressed from only the paternal allele. These results indicate that limitations accompanying the potential use of PESC-derived phenotypes in regenerative medicine, including aberrant genomic imprinting and high levels of homozygosity, are cell line-dependent and not always present. PESC lines were derived in high enough yields to be practicable, and their derivatives are suitable for autologous transplantation into oocyte donors or could be used to establish a bank of histocompatible cell lines for a broad spectrum of patients.

  13. Novel cell lines derived from transgenic mice expressing recombinant human proteins. Transgenic hepatoma-derived cell lines.

    PubMed

    Perraud, F; Dalemans, W; Ali-Hadji, D; Pavirani, A

    1992-01-01

    We have used transgenic mouse technology to establish immortalized hepatoma cell lines stably secreting heterologous proteins, such as human alpha 1-antitrypsin and human factor IX. Hepatocyte-specific regulatory DNA sequences were used to target both the expression of an onc gene and the gene coding for the human protein to the liver of transgenic mice which eventually developed hepatocellular carcinomas. Tumour cells were subsequently established as permanent cell lines, which maintained a differentiated phenotype under specific culture conditions, being capable of producing biologically active and correctly processed human alpha 1-antitrypsin and factor IX. Moreover, a preliminary analysis has shown that certain cell lines express elevated total cytochrome P450 activity. These cells could therefore represent a useful alternative to the use of animals or primary cultures in drug safety testing. PMID:1369183

  14. Germ line development: lessons learned from pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Arroyo, Ana M; Medrano, Jose V; Remohí, José; Simón, Carlos

    2014-10-01

    Current knowledge about mammalian germ line development is mainly based on the mouse model and little is known about how this fundamental process occurs in humans. This review summarizes our current knowledge of genetic and epigenetic germ line development in mammals, mainly focusing on primordial germ cell (PGC) specification events, comparing the differences between mouse and human models. We also emphasize the knowledge derived from the most successful strategies used to generate germ cell-like cells in vitro in both models and major obstacles to obtaining bona fide in vitro-derived gametes are considered. PMID:25461452

  15. Colonization of human epithelial cell lines by Corynebacterium ulcerans from human and animal sources.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Elena; Ott, Lisa; Hasselt, Kristin; Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana Luiza; Tauch, Andreas; Burkovski, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    Corynebacterium ulcerans is an emerging pathogen transmitted by a zoonotic pathway to humans. Despite rising numbers of infections and potentially fatal outcomes, data on the colonization of the human host are lacking up to now. In this study, adhesion of two C. ulcerans isolates to human epithelial cells, invasion of host cells and the function of two putative virulence factors with respect to these processes were investigated. C. ulcerans strains BR-AD22 and 809 were able to adhere to Detroit562 and HeLa cells, and invade these epithelial cell lines with a rate comparable to other pathogens as shown by scanning electron microscopy, fluorescence microscopy and replication assays. Infection led to detrimental effects on the cells as deduced from measurements of transepithelial resistance. Mutant strains of putative virulence factors phospholipase D and DIP0733 homologue CULC22_00609 generated in this study showed no influence on colonization under the experimental conditions tested. The data presented here indicate a high infectious potential of this emerging pathogen.

  16. Induction of apoptosis in a flounder gill cell line by lymphocystis disease virus infection.

    PubMed

    Hu, G-B; Cong, R-S; Fan, T-J; Mei, X-G

    2004-11-01

    Lymphocystis disease virus (LCDV), a large icosahedral DNA virus classified to the iridovirus family, is the causative agent of lymphocystis, a disease which occurs in marine and freshwater fish species and is characterized by formation of papilloma-like lesions on the surface of the skin. In vitro, LCDV infection causes flounder gill cells, an adherent cell line, to exhibit an obvious cytopathic effect (CPE). In order to test whether apoptosis is responsible for the observed CPE, cells infected with LCDV at a multiplicity of infection (m.o.i.) of 5 PFU per cell were examined at various time intervals for the appearance of apoptotic signs. Nuclear fragmentation, DNA laddering and caspase activation were observed in the infected cells at the time (i.e. 10 days post-infection) when an intensive CPE was observed. These findings demonstrate that LCDV is capable of inducing apoptosis in vitro, which is different from the result of LCDV infection in vivo, and consequently suggest an intricate LCDV-host interaction. PMID:15509260

  17. Guidelines for the use of cell lines in biomedical research

    PubMed Central

    Geraghty, R J; Capes-Davis, A; Davis, J M; Downward, J; Freshney, R I; Knezevic, I; Lovell-Badge, R; Masters, J R W; Meredith, J; Stacey, G N; Thraves, P; Vias, M

    2014-01-01

    Cell-line misidentification and contamination with microorganisms, such as mycoplasma, together with instability, both genetic and phenotypic, are among the problems that continue to affect cell culture. Many of these problems are avoidable with the necessary foresight, and these Guidelines have been prepared to provide those new to the field and others engaged in teaching and instruction with the information necessary to increase their awareness of the problems and to enable them to deal with them effectively. The Guidelines cover areas such as development, acquisition, authentication, cryopreservation, transfer of cell lines between laboratories, microbial contamination, characterisation, instability and misidentification. Advice is also given on complying with current legal and ethical requirements when deriving cell lines from human and animal tissues, the selection and maintenance of equipment and how to deal with problems that may arise. PMID:25117809

  18. Guidelines for the use of cell lines in biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Geraghty, R J; Capes-Davis, A; Davis, J M; Downward, J; Freshney, R I; Knezevic, I; Lovell-Badge, R; Masters, J R W; Meredith, J; Stacey, G N; Thraves, P; Vias, M

    2014-09-01

    Cell-line misidentification and contamination with microorganisms, such as mycoplasma, together with instability, both genetic and phenotypic, are among the problems that continue to affect cell culture. Many of these problems are avoidable with the necessary foresight, and these Guidelines have been prepared to provide those new to the field and others engaged in teaching and instruction with the information necessary to increase their awareness of the problems and to enable them to deal with them effectively. The Guidelines cover areas such as development, acquisition, authentication, cryopreservation, transfer of cell lines between laboratories, microbial contamination, characterisation, instability and misidentification. Advice is also given on complying with current legal and ethical requirements when deriving cell lines from human and animal tissues, the selection and maintenance of equipment and how to deal with problems that may arise. PMID:25117809

  19. Derivation of human embryonic stem cell line Genea019.

    PubMed

    Dumevska, Biljana; Peura, Teija; McKernan, Robert; Goel, Divya; Schmidt, Uli

    2016-03-01

    The Genea019 human embryonic stem cell line was derived from a donated, fully commercially consented ART blastocyst, through ICM outgrowth on inactivated feeders. The line showed pluripotent cell morphology and genomic analysis verified a 46, XX karyotype, female Allele pattern and unaffected Htt CAG repeat length, compared to HD affected sibling Genea020. Pluripotency of Genea019 was demonstrated with 75% of cells expressing Nanog, 89% Oct4, 48% Tra1-60 and 85% SSEA4, a Pluritest Pluripotency score of 22.97, Novelty score of 1.42, tri-lineage teratoma formation and Alkaline Phosphatase activity. The cell line was negative for Mycoplasma and any visible contamination. PMID:27346002

  20. Three-dimensional imaging of adherent cells using FIB/SEM and STEM.

    PubMed

    Villinger, Clarissa; Schauflinger, Martin; Gregorius, Heiko; Kranz, Christine; Höhn, Katharina; Nafeey, Soufi; Walther, Paul

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter we describe three different approaches for three-dimensional imaging of electron microscopic samples: serial sectioning transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) tomography, and focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM) tomography. With these methods, relatively large volumes of resin-embedded biological structures can be analyzed at resolutions of a few nm within a reasonable expenditure of time. The traditional method is serial sectioning and imaging the same area in all sections. Another method is TEM tomography that involves tilting a section in the electron beam and then reconstruction of the volume by back projection of the images. When the scanning transmission (STEM) mode is used, thicker sections (up to 1 μm) can be analyzed. The third approach presented here is focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM) tomography, in which a sample is repeatedly milled with a focused ion beam (FIB) and each newly produced block face is imaged with the scanning electron microscope (SEM). This process can be repeated ad libitum in arbitrary small increments allowing 3D analysis of relatively large volumes such as eukaryotic cells. We show that resolution of this approach is considerably improved when the secondary electron signal is used. However, the most important prerequisite for three-dimensional imaging is good specimen preparation. For all three imaging methods, cryo-fixed (high-pressure frozen) and freeze-substituted samples have been used.

  1. Tools for Targeted Genome Engineering of Established Drosophila Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Cherbas, Lucy; Hackney, Jennifer; Gong, Lei; Salzer, Claire; Mauser, Eric; Zhang, Dayu; Cherbas, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We describe an adaptation of φC31 integrase–mediated targeted cassette exchange for use in Drosophila cell lines. Single copies of an attP-bounded docking platform carrying a GFP-expression marker, with or without insulator elements flanking the attP sites, were inserted by P-element transformation into the Kc167 and Sg4 cell lines; each of the resulting docking-site lines carries a single mapped copy of one of the docking platforms. Vectors for targeted substitution contain a cloning cassette flanked by attB sites. Targeted substitution occurs by integrase-mediated substitution between the attP sites (integrated) and the attB sites (vector). We describe procedures for isolating cells carrying the substitutions and for eliminating the products of secondary off-target events. We demonstrate the technology by integrating a cassette containing a Cu2+-inducible mCherry marker, and we report the expression properties of those lines. When compared with clonal lines made by traditional transformation methods, which lead to the illegitimate insertion of tandem arrays, targeted insertion lines give more uniform expression, lower basal expression, and higher induction ratios. Targeted substitution, though intricate, affords results that should greatly improve comparative expression assays—a major emphasis of cell-based studies. PMID:26450921

  2. Comparative antibiotic eradication of mycoplasma infections from continuous cell lines.

    PubMed

    Uphoff, Cord C; Drexler, Hans G

    2002-02-01

    Accumulating data implicate mycoplasma contamination as the single biggest problem in the culture of continuous cell lines. Mycoplasma infection can affect virtually every parameter and functional activity of the eukaryotic cells. A successful alternative to discarding infected cultures is to attempt to eliminate the contaminants by treatment with specific and efficient antimycoplasma antibiotics. The addition of antibiotics to the culture medium during a limited period of time (1-3 wk) is a simple, inexpensive, and very practical approach for decontaminating continuous cell lines. Here, we examined the effectiveness of several antibiotic treatment protocols that we have employed routinely in our cell lines bank. On an aggregate, 673 cultures from 236 chronically mycoplasma-positive cell lines were exposed to one of the following five antibiotic regimens: mycoplasma removal agent (quinolone; a 1-wk treatment), enrofloxacin (quinolone; 1 wk), sparfloxacin (quinolone; 1 wk), ciprofloxacin (quinolone; 2 wk), and BM-Cyclin (alternating tiamulin and minocycline; 3 wk). The mycoplasma infection was permanently (as determined by three solid mycoplasma detection assays) eliminated by the various antibiotics in 66-85% of the cultures treated. Mycoplasma resistance was seen in 7-21%, and loss of the culture as a result of cytotoxically caused cell death occurred in 3-11% of the cultures treated. Overall, 223 of the 236 mycoplasma-positive cell lines could be cured in a first round of antibiotic treatment with at least one regimen. Taken together, 95% of the mycoplasma-infected cell lines were permanently cleansed of the contaminants by antibiotic treatment, which validates this approach as an efficient and technically simple mycoplasma eradication method.

  3. Comparative antibiotic eradication of mycoplasma infections from continuous cell lines.

    PubMed

    Uphoff, Cord C; Drexler, Hans G

    2002-02-01

    Accumulating data implicate mycoplasma contamination as the single biggest problem in the culture of continuous cell lines. Mycoplasma infection can affect virtually every parameter and functional activity of the eukaryotic cells. A successful alternative to discarding infected cultures is to attempt to eliminate the contaminants by treatment with specific and efficient antimycoplasma antibiotics. The addition of antibiotics to the culture medium during a limited period of time (1-3 wk) is a simple, inexpensive, and very practical approach for decontaminating continuous cell lines. Here, we examined the effectiveness of several antibiotic treatment protocols that we have employed routinely in our cell lines bank. On an aggregate, 673 cultures from 236 chronically mycoplasma-positive cell lines were exposed to one of the following five antibiotic regimens: mycoplasma removal agent (quinolone; a 1-wk treatment), enrofloxacin (quinolone; 1 wk), sparfloxacin (quinolone; 1 wk), ciprofloxacin (quinolone; 2 wk), and BM-Cyclin (alternating tiamulin and minocycline; 3 wk). The mycoplasma infection was permanently (as determined by three solid mycoplasma detection assays) eliminated by the various antibiotics in 66-85% of the cultures treated. Mycoplasma resistance was seen in 7-21%, and loss of the culture as a result of cytotoxically caused cell death occurred in 3-11% of the cultures treated. Overall, 223 of the 236 mycoplasma-positive cell lines could be cured in a first round of antibiotic treatment with at least one regimen. Taken together, 95% of the mycoplasma-infected cell lines were permanently cleansed of the contaminants by antibiotic treatment, which validates this approach as an efficient and technically simple mycoplasma eradication method. PMID:11929000

  4. Establishment, Immortalisation and Characterisation of Pteropid Bat Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Crameri, Gary; Todd, Shawn; Grimley, Samantha; McEachern, Jennifer A.; Marsh, Glenn A.; Smith, Craig; Tachedjian, Mary; De Jong, Carol; Virtue, Elena R.; Yu, Meng; Bulach, Dieter; Liu, Jun-Ping; Michalski, Wojtek P.; Middleton, Deborah; Field, Hume E.; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2009-01-01

    Background Bats are the suspected natural reservoir hosts for a number of new and emerging zoonotic viruses including Nipah virus, Hendra virus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus and Ebola virus. Since the discovery of SARS-like coronaviruses in Chinese horseshoe bats, attempts to isolate a SL-CoV from bats have failed and attempts to isolate other bat-borne viruses in various mammalian cell lines have been similarly unsuccessful. New stable bat cell lines are needed to help with these investigations and as tools to assist in the study of bat immunology and virus-host interactions. Methodology/Findings Black flying foxes (Pteropus alecto) were captured from the wild and transported live to the laboratory for primary cell culture preparation using a variety of different methods and culture media. Primary cells were successfully cultured from 20 different organs. Cell immortalisation can occur spontaneously, however we used a retroviral system to immortalise cells via the transfer and stable production of the Simian virus 40 Large T antigen and the human telomerase reverse transcriptase protein. Initial infection experiments with both cloned and uncloned cell lines using Hendra and Nipah viruses demonstrated varying degrees of infection efficiency between the different cell lines, although it was possible to infect cells in all tissue types. Conclusions/Significance The approaches developed and optimised in this study should be applicable to bats of other species. We are in the process of generating further cell lines from a number of different bat species using the methodology established in this study. PMID:20011515

  5. Monoclonal antibodies against the human leukemia cell line K 562.

    PubMed

    Böttger, V; Hering, S; Jantscheff, P; Micheel, B

    1985-01-01

    Three monoclonal antibodies raised against K 562, a cell line originally established from a patient with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in terminal blast crisis, were selected according to their distinct reaction pattern. Whereas two antibodies (ZIK-C1-A/C5 and ZIK-C1-A/H5 also designated C and H) recognized antigens, present on K 562 cells and other immature and mature hematopoietic cells (cell lines and normal blood and bone marrow cells), antibody ZIK-C1-A/D9 also designated Y showed an exclusive binding to K 562 cells. The results obtained (here and in the following paper) indicate, that antibody ZIK-C1-A/D9 defines an early differentiation antigen of hematopoiesis or a leukemia-associated antigen.

  6. JNK Inhibition Inhibits Lateral Line Neuromast Hair Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Chengfu; Lin, Jinchao; Sun, Shaoyang; He, Yingzi

    2016-01-01

    JNK signaling is known to play a role in regulating cell behaviors such as cell cycle progression, cell proliferation, and apoptosis, and recent studies have suggested important roles for JNK signaling in embryonic development. However, the precise function of JNK signaling in hair cell development remains poorly studied. In this study, we used the small molecule JNK inhibitor SP600125 to examine the effect of JNK signaling abrogation on the development of hair cells in the zebrafish lateral line neuromast. Our results showed that SP600125 reduced the numbers of both hair cells and supporting cells in neuromasts during larval development in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, JNK inhibition strongly inhibited the proliferation of neuromast cells, which likely explains the decrease in the number of differentiated hair cells in inhibitor-treated larvae. Furthermore, western blot and in situ analysis showed that JNK inhibition induced cell cycle arrest through induction of p21 expression. We also showed that SP600125 induced cell death in developing neuromasts as measured by cleaved caspase-3 immunohistochemistry, and this was accompanied with an induction of p53 gene expression. Together these results indicate that JNK might be an important regulator in the development of hair cells in the lateral line in zebrafish by controlling both cell cycle progression and apoptosis. PMID:26903805

  7. Non-targeted radiation effects in vertebrate cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Lorna

    Radiation effects, such as bystander effects, hyper radiosensitivity/induced radioresistance (HRS/IRR) and adaptive response that are not related to direct DNA damage are now accepted. However the inter-relationship between them and the possible impact on the scientific basis for radiation protection are highly controversial. This thesis attempts to elucidate the mechanisms of some of these well known but little understood effects. Each paper examines some aspect of bystander effects, adaptive responses and HRS/IRR in an effort to understand how they vary with cell type, dose and time of exposure to single or multiple doses. All the effects involve non-linear dose effect curves and are mainly evident following low doses. Overall findings of the thesis include (1) A clear difference was observed between radioresistant, tumorigenic cell lines with mutant p53 gene expression, and radiosensitive, more normal, cell lines with wild type p53. In general death inducing bystander responses are induced in normal cell populations exposed to low doses of radiation while survival inducing IRR and adaptive responses are seen in the radioresistant tumorigenic cell lines. (2) A cohort of fish cell lines which demonstrated survival promoting bystander effects, also did not show a protective adaptive responses. (3) Adaptive responses traditionally occur when a large challenge dose is given 4--6hrs following low (10--100mGy) priming doses but this thesis shows that for the epithelial cell lines tested, the size of the priming dose (range 0.1--2Gy) does not appear to alter the size of the recovery response. Additionally increased survival could be detected in some cases when the challenge dose was given within one hour of the priming dose. The overall conclusion is that cell lines induce either a bystander response or a protective/adaptive response depending on genetic background and other factors. Care is needed in the interpretation of data generated from only one or two cell lines

  8. Structure and function of sinusoidal lining cells in the liver.

    PubMed

    Wisse, E; Braet, F; Luo, D; De Zanger, R; Jans, D; Crabbé, E; Vermoesen, A

    1996-01-01

    , interleukin 1, interleukin 6, and a series of eicosanoids (28) and become cytotoxic against tumor cells [e.g., colon carcinoma cells (19, 22, 48)]. Toxic secretory products can cause necrosis of the liver parenchyma, which constitutes a crucial factor in liver transplantation (55). Pit cells possess characteristic azurophylic granules and display a high level of spontaneous cytolytic activity against various tumor cells, identifying themselves as natural killer cells (10). The number and cytotoxicity of pit cells can be considerably enhanced with biological response modifiers, such as Zymosan or interleukin 2 (8). Pit cell proliferation occurs within the liver, but recent evidence indicates that blood large granular lymphocytes develop into pit cells in 2 steps involving high- and low-density pit cells (88). Kupffer cells control the motility, adherence, viability, and cytotoxicity of pit cells (89), whereas cytotoxicity against tumor cells is synergistically enhanced (80, 81). PMID:8839287

  9. SENSORY HAIR CELL REGENERATION IN THE ZEBRAFISH LATERAL LINE

    PubMed Central

    Lush, Mark E.; Piotrowski, Tatjana

    2014-01-01

    Damage or destruction of sensory hair cells in the inner ear leads to hearing or balance deficits that can be debilitating, especially in older adults. Unfortunately, the damage is permanent, as regeneration of the inner ear sensory epithelia does not occur in mammals. Zebrafish and other non-mammalian vertebrates have the remarkable ability to regenerate sensory hair cells and understanding the molecular and cellular basis for this regenerative ability will hopefully aid us in designing therapies to induce regeneration in mammals. Zebrafish not only possess hair cells in the ear but also in the sensory lateral line system. Hair cells in both organs are functionally analogous to hair cells in the inner ear of mammals. The lateral line is a mechanosensory system found in most aquatic vertebrates that detects water motion and aids in predator avoidance, prey capture, schooling and mating. Although hair cell regeneration occurs in both the ear and lateral line, most research to date has focused on the lateral line due to its relatively simple structure and accessibility. Here we review the recent discoveries made during the characterization of hair cell regeneration in zebrafish. PMID:25045019

  10. Comparative Metabolic Flux Profiling of Melanoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Scott, David A.; Richardson, Adam D.; Filipp, Fabian V.; Knutzen, Christine A.; Chiang, Gary G.; Ronai, Ze'ev A.; Osterman, Andrei L.; Smith, Jeffrey W.

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic rewiring is an established hallmark of cancer, but the details of this rewiring at a systems level are not well characterized. Here we acquire this insight in a melanoma cell line panel by tracking metabolic flux using isotopically labeled nutrients. Metabolic profiling and flux balance analysis were used to compare normal melanocytes to melanoma cell lines in both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. All melanoma cells exhibited the Warburg phenomenon; they used more glucose and produced more lactate than melanocytes. Other changes were observed in melanoma cells that are not described by the Warburg phenomenon. Hypoxic conditions increased fermentation of glucose to lactate in both melanocytes and melanoma cells (the Pasteur effect). However, metabolism was not strictly glycolytic, as the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle was functional in all melanoma lines, even under hypoxia. Furthermore, glutamine was also a key nutrient providing a substantial anaplerotic contribution to the TCA cycle. In the WM35 melanoma line glutamine was metabolized in the “reverse” (reductive) direction in the TCA cycle, particularly under hypoxia. This reverse flux allowed the melanoma cells to synthesize fatty acids from glutamine while glucose was primarily converted to lactate. Altogether, this study, which is the first comprehensive comparative analysis of metabolism in melanoma cells, provides a foundation for targeting metabolism for therapeutic benefit in melanoma. PMID:21998308

  11. Establishment of a rat nasal epithelial tumor cell line.

    PubMed

    Hood, A T; Currie, D; Garte, S J

    1987-04-01

    A new cell line designated NAS 2BL has been established from a rat nasal tumor induced by inhalation of the direct-acting carcinogen methylmethane sulfonate. The cells are epithelial in morphology, have a generation time of 34 h, require 10% fetal bovine serum for optimal growth, and exhibit keratinization at confluence. The karyotype is aneuploid, with several marker chromosomes, and the cells are transformed by the criterion of nude mouse tumorigenicity.

  12. Artificial islets from hybrid spheroids of three pancreatic cell lines.

    PubMed

    Jo, Y H; Jang, I J; Nemeno, J G; Lee, S; Kim, B Y; Nam, B M; Yang, W; Lee, K M; Kim, H; Takebe, T; Kim, Y S; Lee, J I

    2014-05-01

    Pancreatic islets have been the focus of recent studies exploring the pathologic mechanisms of diabetes mellitus as well as more effective and radical treatments for this disease. Islet transplantation is a promising therapeutic strategy; however, isolation of pancreatic islets for this purpose has been challenging, because the technique is time consuming and technically difficult, and tissue handling can be variable. Pseudo-islets can be used as an alternative to naïve islets, but require cellular sources or artificial materials. In this study, pancreas-derived cells were used to generate pseudo-islets. Because the pancreas is composed of a variety of cell types, namely α cells, β cells, δ cells, and other pancreatic cells that perform different functions, we used 3 different cell lines-NIT-1 (a β-cell line), α TC1 clone 6 (an α-cell line), and TGP52 (a pancreatic epithelial-like cell line)-which we cocultured in nonadhesive culture plates to produce hybrid cellular spheroids. These pseudo-islets had an oval shape and were morphologically similar to naïve islets; additionally, they expressed and secreted the pancreatic hormones insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin, as confirmed by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results demonstrate that pseudo-islets that mimic naïve islets can be successfully generated by a coculture method. These artificial islets can potentially be used for in vitro tests related to diabetes mellitus, specifically, in drug discovery or for investigating pathology. Moreover, they can be useful for examining basic questions pertaining to cell-cell interactions and tissue development. PMID:24815150

  13. Anti-Retroviral Lectins Have Modest Effects on Adherence of Trichomonas vaginalis to Epithelial Cells In Vitro and on Recovery of Tritrichomonas foetus in a Mouse Vaginal Model

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Aparajita; Ratner, Daniel M.; Ryan, Christopher M.; Johnson, Patricia J.; O’Keefe, Barry R.; Secor, W. Evan; Anderson, Deborah J.; Robbins, Phillips W.; Samuelson, John

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis causes vaginitis and increases the risk of HIV transmission by heterosexual sex, while Tritrichomonas foetus causes premature abortion in cattle. Our goals were to determine the effects, if any, of anti-retroviral lectins, which are designed to prevent heterosexual transmission of HIV, on adherence of Trichomonas to ectocervical cells and on Tritrichomonas infections in a mouse model. We show that Trichomonas Asn-linked glycans (N-glycans), like those of HIV, bind the mannose-binding lectin (MBL) that is part of the innate immune system. N-glycans of Trichomonas and Tritrichomonas bind anti-retroviral lectins (cyanovirin-N and griffithsin) and the 2G12 monoclonal antibody, each of which binds HIV N-glycans. Binding of cyanovirin-N appears to be independent of susceptibility to metronidazole, the major drug used to treat Trichomonas. Anti-retroviral lectins, MBL, and galectin-1 cause Trichomonas to self-aggregate and precipitate. The anti-retroviral lectins also increase adherence of ricin-resistant mutants, which are less adherent than parent cells, to ectocervical cell monolayers and to organotypic EpiVaginal tissue cells. Topical application of either anti-retroviral lectins or yeast N-glycans decreases by 40 to 70% the recovery of Tritrichomonas from the mouse vagina. These results, which are explained by a few simple models, suggest that the anti-retroviral lectins have a modest potential for preventing or treating human infections with Trichomonas. PMID:26252012

  14. The use of cell phone support for non-adherent HIV-infected youth and young adults: an initial randomized and controlled intervention trial.

    PubMed

    Belzer, Marvin E; Naar-King, Sylvie; Olson, Johanna; Sarr, Moussa; Thornton, Sarah; Kahana, Shoshana Y; Gaur, Aditya H; Clark, Leslie F

    2014-04-01

    This randomized behavioral trial examined whether youth living with HIV (YLH) receiving cell-phone support with study funded phone plans, demonstrated improved adherence and viral control during the 24 week intervention and 24 weeks post-intervention compared to controls. Monday through Friday phone calls confirmed medications were taken, provided problem-solving support, and referred to services to address adherence barriers. Of 37 participants (ages 15-24), 62 % were male and 70 % were African American. Self-reported adherence was significantly higher in the intervention group compared to the control at 24 and 48 weeks for the past month (P = 0.007) and log 10 HIV VL was significantly lower at both 24 weeks (2.82 versus 4.52 P = 0.002) and 48 weeks (3.23 versus 4.23 P = 0.043). Adherence and viral load showed medium to large effect sizes across the 48 week study. This is the first study to demonstrate sustained clinically significant reductions in HIV VL using youth friendly technology.

  15. The Use of Cell Phone Support for Non-adherent HIV-Infected Youth and Young Adults: An Initial Randomized and Controlled Intervention Trial

    PubMed Central

    Belzer, Marvin E.; Naar-King, Sylvie; Olson, Johanna; Sarr, Moussa; Thornton, Sarah; Kahana, Shoshana Y.; Gaur, Aditya H.; Clark, Leslie F.

    2014-01-01

    This randomized behavioral trial examined whether youth living with HIV (YLH) receiving cell-phone support with study funded phone plans, demonstrated improved adherence and viral control during the 24 week intervention and 24 weeks post-intervention compared to controls. Monday through Friday phone calls confirmed medications were taken, provided problem-solving support, and referred to services to address adherence barriers. Of 37 participants (ages 15–24), 62 % were male and 70 % were African American. Self-reported adherence was significantly higher in the intervention group compared to the control at 24 and 48 weeks for the past month (P = 0.007) and log 10 HIV VL was significantly lower at both 24 weeks (2.82 versus 4.52 P = 0.002) and 48 weeks (3.23 versus 4.23 P = 0.043). Adherence and viral load showed medium to large effect sizes across the 48 week study. This is the first study to demonstrate sustained clinically significant reductions in HIV VL using youth friendly technology. PMID:24271347

  16. Comparative proteomic profiling of Hodgkin lymphoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Vergara, D; Simeone, P; De Matteis, S; Carloni, S; Lanuti, P; Marchisio, M; Miscia, S; Rizzello, A; Napolitano, R; Agostinelli, C; Maffia, M

    2016-01-01

    Classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) is a malignancy with complex pathogenesis. The hallmark of the disease is the presence of large mononucleated Hodgkin and bi- or multinucleated Reed/Sternberg (H/RS) cells. The origin of HRS cells in cHL is controversial as these cells show the coexpression of markers of several lineages. Using a proteomic approach, we compared the protein expression profile of cHL models of T- and B-cell derivation to find proteins differentially expressed in these cell lines. A total of 67 proteins were found differentially expressed between the two cell lines including metabolic proteins and proteins involved in the regulation of the cytoskeleton and/or cell migration, which were further validated by western blotting. Additionally, the expression of selected B- and T-cell antigens was also assessed by flow cytometry to reveal significant differences in the expression of different surface markers. Bioinformatics analysis was then applied to our dataset to find enriched pathways and networks, and to identify possible key regulators. In the present study, a proteomic approach was used to compare the protein expression profiles of two cHL cell lines. The identified proteins and/or networks, many of which not previously related to cHL, may be important to better define the pathogenesis of the disease, to identify novel diagnostic markers, and to design new therapeutic strategies. PMID:26588820

  17. Implantation of Vascular Grafts Lined with Genetically Modified Endothelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, James M.; Birinyi, Louis K.; Salomon, Robert N.; Libby, Peter; Callow, Allan D.; Mulligan, Richard C.

    1989-06-01

    The possibility of using the vascular endothelial cell as a target for gene replacement therapy was explored. Recombinant retroviruses were used to transduce the lacZ gene into endothelial cells harvested from mongrel dogs. Prosthetic vascular grafts seeded with the genetically modified cells were implanted as carotid interposition grafts into the dogs from which the original cells were harvested. Analysis of the graft 5 weeks after implantation revealed genetically modified endothelial cells lining the luminal surface of the graft. This technology could be used in the treatment of atherosclerosis disease and the design of new drug delivery systems.

  18. Characterization of a Novel Radiation-Induced Sarcoma Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Lang, J.E.; Zhu, W.; Nokes, B.T.; Sheth, G.R.; Novak, P.; Fuchs, L.; Watts, G.S.; Futscher, B.W.; Mineyev, N.; Ring, A.; LeBeau, L.; Nagle, R.; Cranmer, L.D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Radiation-induced sarcoma (RIS) is a potential complication of cancer treatment. No widely available cell line models exist to facilitate studies of RIS. Methods We derived a spontaneously immortalized primary human cell line, UACC-SARC1, from a RIS. Results Short tandem repeat (STR) profiling of UACC-SARC1 was virtually identical to its parental tumor. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis of the tumor and immunocytochemistry (ICC) analysis of UACC-SARC1 revealed shared expression of vimentin, osteonectin, CD68, Ki67 and PTEN but tumor-restricted expression of the histiocyte markers α1-antitrypsin and α1-antichymotrypsin. Karyotyping of the tumor demonstrated aneuploidy. Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) provided direct genetic comparison between the tumor and UACC-SARC1. Sequencing of 740 mutation hotspots revealed no mutations in UACC-SARC1 nor in the tumor. NOD/SCID gamma mouse xenografts demonstrated tumor formation and metastasis. Clonogenicity assays demonstrated that 90% of single cells produced viable colonies. NOD/SCID gamma mice produced useful patient-derived xenografts for orthotopic or metastatic models. Conclusion Our novel RIS strain constitutes a useful tool for pre-clinical studies of this rare, aggressive disease. UACC-SARC1 is an aneuploid cell line with complex genomics lacking common oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes as drivers of its biology. The UACC-SARC1 cell line will enable further studies of the drivers of RIS. Synopsis We derived a spontaneously immortalized primary human cell line, UACC-SARC1, from a radiation-induced sarcoma (RIS). Our novel RIS cell line constitutes a useful tool for pre-clinical studies of this rare, aggressive disease. PMID:25644184

  19. Low adherent cancer cell subpopulations are enriched in tumorigenic and metastatic epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition-induced cancer stem-like cells

    PubMed Central

    Morata-Tarifa, Cynthia; Jiménez, Gema; García, María A.; Entrena, José M.; Griñán-Lisón, Carmen; Aguilera, Margarita; Picon-Ruiz, Manuel; Marchal, Juan A.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells are responsible for tumor progression, metastasis, therapy resistance and cancer recurrence, doing their identification and isolation of special relevance. Here we show that low adherent breast and colon cancer cells subpopulations have stem-like properties. Our results demonstrate that trypsin-sensitive (TS) breast and colon cancer cells subpopulations show increased ALDH activity, higher ability to exclude Hoechst 33342, enlarged proportion of cells with a cancer stem-like cell phenotype and are enriched in sphere- and colony-forming cells in vitro. Further studies in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells reveal that TS subpopulation expresses higher levels of SLUG, SNAIL, VIMENTIN and N-CADHERIN while show a lack of expression of E-CADHERIN and CLAUDIN, being this profile characteristic of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). The TS subpopulation shows CXCL10, BMI-1 and OCT4 upregulation, differing also in the expression of several miRNAs involved in EMT and/or cell self-renewal such as miR-34a-5p, miR-34c-5p, miR-21-5p, miR-93-5p and miR-100-5p. Furthermore, in vivo studies in immunocompromised mice demonstrate that MDA-MB-231 TS cells form more and bigger xenograft tumors with shorter latency and have higher metastatic potential. In conclusion, this work presents a new, non-aggressive, easy, inexpensive and reproducible methodology to isolate prospectively cancer stem-like cells for subsequent biological and preclinical studies. PMID:26752044

  20. Casein gene expression in mouse mammary epithelial cell lines: Dependence upon extracellular matrix and cell type

    SciTech Connect

    Medina, D.; Oborn, C.J. ); Li, M.L.; Bissell, M.J. )

    1987-09-01

    The COMMA-D mammary cell line exhibits mammary-specific functional differentiation under appropriate conditions in cell culture. The cytologically heterogeneous COMMA-D parental line and the clonal lines DB-1, TA-5, and FA-1 derived from the COMMA-D parent were examined for similar properties of functional differentiation. In monolayer cell culture, the cell lines DB-1, TA-5, FA-1, and MA-4 were examined for expression of mammary-specific and epithelial-specific proteins by an indirect immunofluorescence assay. The clonal cell lines were relatively homogeneous in their respective staining properties and seemed to represent three subpopulations found in the heterogeneous parental COMMA-D lines. None of the four clonal lines appeared to represent myoepithelial cells. The cell lines were examined for expression of {beta}-casein mRNA in the presence or absence of prolactin. The inducibility of {beta}-casein in the COMMA-D cell line was further enhanced by a reconstituted basement membrane preparation enriched in laminin, collagen IV, and proteoglycans. These results support the hypothesis that the functional response of inducible mammary cell populations is a result of interaction among hormones, multiple extracellular matrix components, and specific cell types.

  1. Human cell lines: A promising alternative for recombinant FIX production.

    PubMed

    de Sousa Bomfim, Aline; Cristina Corrêa de Freitas, Marcela; Picanço-Castro, Virgínia; de Abreu Soares Neto, Mário; Swiech, Kamilla; Tadeu Covas, Dimas; Maria de Sousa Russo, Elisa

    2016-05-01

    Factor IX (FIX) is a vitamin K-dependent protein, and it has become a valuable pharmaceutical in the Hemophilia B treatment. We evaluated the potential of recombinant human FIX (rhFIX) expression in 293T and SK-Hep-1 human cell lines. SK-Hep-1-FIX cells produced higher levels of biologically active protein. The growth profile of 293T-FIX cells was not influenced by lentiviral integration number into the cellular genome. SK-Hep-1-FIX cells showed a significantly lower growth rate than SK-Hep-1 cells. γ-carboxylation process is significant to FIX biological activity, thus we performed a expression analysis of genes involved in this process. The 293T gene expression suggests that this cell line could efficiently carboxylate FIX, however only 28% of the total secreted protein is active. SK-Hep-1 cells did not express high amounts of VKORC1 and carboxylase, but this cell line secreted large amounts of active protein. Enrichment of culture medium with Ca(+2) and Mg(+2) ions did not affect positively rhFIX expression in SK-Hep-1 cells. In 293T cells, the addition of 0.5 mM Ca(+2) and 1 mM Mg(+2) resulted in higher rhFIX concentration. SK-Hep-1 cell line proved to be very effective in rhFIX production, and it can be used as a novel biotechnological platform for the production of recombinant proteins.

  2. Phase transitions in tumor growth: II prostate cancer cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llanos-Pérez, J. A.; Betancourt-Mar, A.; De Miguel, M. P.; Izquierdo-Kulich, E.; Royuela-García, M.; Tejera, E.; Nieto-Villar, J. M.

    2015-05-01

    We propose a mechanism for prostate cancer cell lines growth, LNCaP and PC3 based on a Gompertz dynamics. This growth exhibits a multifractal behavior and a "second order" phase transition. Finally, it was found that the cellular line PC3 exhibits a higher value of entropy production rate compared to LNCaP, which is indicative of the robustness of PC3, over to LNCaP and may be a quantitative index of metastatic potential tumors.

  3. Phenotypic analysis of nylon-wool-adherent suppressor cells that inhibit the effector process of tumour cell lysis by lymphokine-activated killer cells in patients with advanced gastric carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Koyama, S; Fukao, K

    1994-01-01

    The causes of down-regulation of cytotoxic immune responses in cancer patients have not been fully evaluated. We previously demonstrated that T-cell-growth-factor-activated peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) with the surface phenotype CD8+ CD11b-, from patients with widespread metastasis of gastric carcinoma, inhibited the effector process of lymphokine-activated-killer(LAK)-cell-mediated cytolysis. In this study, we examined suppressor cell activity in freshly prepared PBL from 18 patients with advanced gastric carcinoma, and 10 normal healthy individuals. The suppressor cell activity was assayed by recording whether or not PBL inhibited directly the effector process of LAK cell cytotoxicity. Most of the PBL suspensions from cancer patients showed that they contained a population of cells that can directly inhibit the effector phase of tumor cell lysis of the cytotoxic cells. To analyze further the PBL responsible for the suppression, the cells were passed over a nylon-wool column. Nylon-wool-adherent cells significantly augmented the suppression, while the cells passing through abrogated the suppressive effect. Most nylon-wool-adherent cells from 10 normal healthy controls did not inhibit the cytotoxic reaction. To determine further the suppressor-effector population in nylon-wool-adherent cells, negative-selection studies using CD8-, CD4- or CD11b-coated magnetic beads, and positive-selection studies using CD8- or CD4-coated magnetic beads were performed. Finally the results suggest that the suppressor-effector cells comprise at least two different surface phenotypes: CD8+ T and CD8-CD11b+ cells. The possible role of CD4+ T cells and HLA-DR+ LeuM3+ macrophages as suppressor cells was ruled out in nylon-wool-adherent cells. CD8+ T and possibly CD8-CD11b+ cells apparently suppressed the efferent limb of the antitumor immunity. The selective immune suppression mediated by these cells may partly be concerned with escape mechanisms of gastric carcinoma from the host

  4. Analysis of LINE-1 expression in human pluripotent cells.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Lopez, Martin; Garcia-Cañadas, Marta; Macia, Angela; Morell, Santiago; Garcia-Perez, Jose L

    2012-01-01

    Half of the human genome is composed of repeated DNA, and some types are mobile within our genome (transposons and retrotransposons). Despite their abundance, only a small fraction of them are currently active in our genome (Long Interspersed Element-1 (LINE-1), Alu, and SVA elements). LINE-1 or L1 elements are a family of active non-LTR retrotransposons, the ongoing mobilization of which still impacts our genome. As selfish DNA elements, L1 activity is more prominent in early human development, where new insertions would be transmitted to the progeny. Here, we describe the conventional methods aimed to determine the expression level of LINE-1 elements in pluripotent human cells.

  5. Registration of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Lines: Korea, 2010

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji-Yoon; Lee, Dae-Yeon; Choi, Young-Sil; Lee, Kyoung-Jae; Kim, Yong-Ou

    2011-01-01

    In an effort to increase the credibility of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines established in Korea, obligatory registration was introduced by the Bioethics and Safety Act 2008, effective as of January 1, 2010. The DNA fingerprint, chromosome stability, expression of pluripotency markers, and contamination of mycoplasma of the submitted lines were analyzed by Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (KCDC). The characterization data and ethical aspects, such as informed consent for donation of surplus embryos, were reviewed by a 10-member advisory review committee for stem cell registry. A total of 55 domestic hESC lines were submitted for registration in 2010; among them 51 were registered. Among these submitted lines, 26 were additionally characterized by KCDC, while 25 lines previously characterized by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology were not additionally analyzed by KCDC. Registration completed an oversight system for embryo research by registering the products of licensed embryo research projects, making embryo research more transparent in Korea. Information about hESC lines is available at the website of the Korea Stem Cell Registry (kscr.nih.go.kr). PMID:24159464

  6. Isolation of dengue virus with a human promonocyte cell line.

    PubMed

    Liu, W T; Chen, C L; Lee, S S; Chan, C C; Lo, F L; Ko, Y C

    1991-05-01

    In October-November, 1988 there was an outbreak of dengue fever in the Kaoshiung area of southern Taiwan. We collected 100 serum samples from 96 patients at the onset of their fever for virus cultures and identification. A human promonocyte cell line (HL-CZ) established in our laboratory was used and proved to be susceptible for dengue virus propagation. Type 1 dengue virus in the HL-CZ cell culture was identified by immunofluorescence tests using monoclonal antibodies, and also by hemagglutination tests with goose red blood cells. The density of the virus particles, as measured by sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation, ranged from 1.186 to 1.224 g/ml. The virus yield from this cell culture is comparable with that from the C6/36 mosquito cell line. There was a significant correlation between the antibody responses tested with Western dot blots and hemagglutination inhibition techniques.

  7. Truncated enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 intimin (EaeA) fusion proteins promote adherence of EHEC strains to HEp-2 cells.

    PubMed Central

    McKee, M L; O'Brien, A D

    1996-01-01

    Intimin, the product of the eaeA gene in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EHEC), is required for intimate adherence of these organisms to tissue culture cells and formation of the attaching and effacing lesion in the gnotobiotic pig. Because of the importance of intimin in the pathogenesis of EHEC O157:H7 infection in this animal model, we began a structure-function analysis of EaeA. For this purpose, we constructed amino-terminal fusions of the intimin protein with six histidine residues to form two independent fusions. The longer fusion, RIHisEae, contained 900 of the 935 predicted amino acids and included all but the extreme amino terminus. The second fusion, RVHdHisEae, consisted of the carboxyl two-thirds of the protein. Purified extracts of either construct enhanced binding of wild-type 86-24 to HEp-2 cells and conferred HEp-2 cell adherence on 86-24eaeDelta10, an eaeA deletion mutant, and B2F1, an EHEC O91:1-121 eae