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Sample records for adherent culture conditions

  1. Neurosphere and adherent culture conditions are equivalent for malignant glioma stem cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Reyner, Karina; Deleyrolle, Loic; Millette, Sebastien; Azari, Hassan; Day, Bryan W.; Stringer, Brett W.; Boyd, Andrew W.; Johns, Terrance G.; Blot, Vincent; Duggal, Rohit; Reynolds, Brent A.

    2015-01-01

    Certain limitations of the neurosphere assay (NSA) have resulted in a search for alternative culture techniques for brain tumor-initiating cells (TICs). Recently, reports have described growing glioblastoma (GBM) TICs as a monolayer using laminin. We performed a side-by-side analysis of the NSA and laminin (adherent) culture conditions to compare the growth and expansion of GBM TICs. GBM cells were grown using the NSA and adherent culture conditions. Comparisons were made using growth in culture, apoptosis assays, protein expression, limiting dilution clonal frequency assay, genetic affymetrix analysis, and tumorigenicity in vivo. In vitro expansion curves for the NSA and adherent culture conditions were virtually identical (P=0.24) and the clonogenic frequencies (5.2% for NSA vs. 5.0% for laminin, P=0.9) were similar as well. Likewise, markers of differentiation (glial fibrillary acidic protein and beta tubulin III) and proliferation (Ki67 and MCM2) revealed no statistical difference between the sphere and attachment methods. Several different methods were used to determine the numbers of dead or dying cells (trypan blue, DiIC, caspase-3, and annexin V) with none of the assays noting a meaningful variance between the two methods. In addition, genetic expression analysis with microarrays revealed no significant differences between the two groups. Finally, glioma cells derived from both methods of expansion formed large invasive tumors exhibiting GBM features when implanted in immune-compromised animals. A detailed functional, protein and genetic characterization of human GBM cells cultured in serum-free defined conditions demonstrated no statistically meaningful differences when grown using sphere (NSA) or adherent conditions. Hence, both methods are functionally equivalent and remain suitable options for expanding primary high-grade gliomas in tissue culture. PMID:25806119

  2. Laminin-adherent versus suspension-non-adherent cell culture conditions for the isolation of cancer stem cells in the DAOY medulloblastoma cell line.

    PubMed

    de la Rosa, Javier; Sáenz Antoñanzas, Ander; Shahi, Mehdi H; Meléndez, Bárbara; Rey, Juan A; Castresana, Javier S

    2016-09-01

    Medulloblastoma (MB) is a highly malignant tumor of childhood. MB seems to be initiated and maintained by a small group of cells, known as cancer stem cells (CSCs). The CSC hypothesis suggests that a subset of tumor cells is able to proliferate, sustain the tumor, and develop chemoresistance, all of which make of CSC an interesting target for new anticancer therapies. The MB cell line DAOY was cultured in suspension by a medullosphere traditional culturing method and in adherent conditions by laminin-pre-coated flasks and serum-free medium enriched with specific growth factors. An increase in the stem features was shown when cells were successively cultured in hypoxia conditions. By contrast, a reduction in these properties was appreciated when cells were exposed to differentiation conditions. In addition, the CD133+ and CD133- subpopulations were isolated from cells grown in laminin-pre-coated flasks, and in vitro experiments showed that the CD133+ fraction represented the stem population and it could have CSC with a higher probability than the CD133- fraction. We can conclude that the laminin culture method in adherent conditions and the medullosphere traditional culturing method in suspension are similarly good for obtaining stem-like cells in the DAOY cell line.

  3. Lipophilic rather than hydrophilic photosensitizers show strong adherence to standard cell culture microplates under cell-free conditions.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, Victoria; Kiesslich, Tobias; Berlanda, Juergen; Hofbauer, Stefanie; Krammer, Barbara; Plaetzer, Kristjan

    2011-06-02

    Analysis of photosensitizer (PS) uptake kinetics into tumor cells is a standard cell culture experiment in photodynamic therapy (PDT) - usually performed in plastic microplates or petri dishes. Organic substances such as PS can potentially interact with the plastic surfaces. In this study, we provide a qualitative comparison of three lipophilic PS (hypericin, Foscan® and Photofrin®) and two rather hydrophilic PS formulations (PVP-hypericin and aluminum (III) phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate chloride) regarding their adherence to the surfaces of 96-well microplates obtained from four different manufacturers. For estimation of the relevance of PS adherence for cellular uptake studies we compared the fluorescence signal of the respective PS in microplates containing A431 human epithelial carcinoma cells with microplates incubated with the respective PS under cell-free conditions. We demonstrate that lipophilic PS substances show a strong adherence to microplates - in case of direct lysis and fluorescence measurement resulting in 50% up to 90% of the overall signal to be caused by adherence of the substances to the plastic materials in a cellular uptake experiment. For the hydrophilic compounds, adherence is negligible. Interestingly, adherence of PS agents to microplates takes place in a time-dependent and thus kinetic-like manner, requiring up to several hours to reach a plateau of the fluorescence signal. Furthermore, PS adherence is a function of the PS concentration applied and no saturation effect was observed for the concentrations used in this study. Taken together, this study provides a systematic analysis under which conditions PS adherence to cell culture plates may contribute to the overall fluorescence signal in - for example - PS uptake experiments.

  4. Long-term cultures of stem/progenitor cells from lobular and ductal breast carcinomas under non-adherent conditions

    PubMed Central

    Nardone, Agostina; Corvigno, Sara; Brescia, Annalisa; D’Andrea, Daniel; Limite, Gennaro

    2010-01-01

    A small subpopulation of stem/progenitor cells can give rise to the diversity of differentiated cells that comprise the bulk of the tumor. Are proliferating cells, within the bulk of tumor, few cells with uncommon features? The cell biological approach provides a limitless model for studying the hierarchical organization of progenitor subpopulation and identifying potential therapeutic targets. Aim of the study was to expand patients’ breast cancer cells for evaluating functional cell properties, and to characterize the protein expression profile of selected cells to be compared with that of primary tumors. Breast cancer cells from estrogen receptor (ERα) positive, HER2 negative lobular (LoBS cells) and ductal (DuBS cells) histotype were cultured under non-adherent conditions to form mammospheres. Sorting of the cells by their surface expression of CD24 and CD44 gave rise to subpopulations which were propagated, enriched and characterized for the expression of epithelial and stromal markers. We found that non-adherent culture conditions generate mammospheres of slowly proliferating cells; single cells, dissociated from mammospheres, grow in soft agar; long-term cultured LoBS and DuBS cells, CD44+/CD24low, express cytokeratin 5 (CK5), α-smooth muscle actin (α-sma) and vimentin, known as markers of basal/myoepithelial cells; and ERα (only DuBS cells), HER1 (EGF-Receptor), activated HER2, and cyclinD1 as markers of luminal epithelial cell. Isolates of cells from breast cancer patients may be a tool for a marker-driven testing of targeted therapies. PMID:21188518

  5. Adherence to Antihypertensives in Patients With Comorbid Condition

    PubMed Central

    Saadat, Zahra; Nikdoust, Farahnaz; Aerab-Sheibani, Hossein; Bahremand, Mostafa; Shobeiri, Elham; Saadat, Habibollah; Moharramzad, Yashar; Morisky, Donald E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Comorbidity has been noted as a potential barrier to proper adherence to antihypertensive medications. Objectives: We decided to investigate whether comorbidity could significantly affect adherence of Iranian patients with hypertension to their medication regimen. Patients and Methods: Two hundred and eighty consecutive hypertensive patients were interviewed in 4 cities of Iran. The 8-item Morisky medication adherence scale (MMAS-8) (validated in Persian) was used to assess medication adherence. This scale determines adherence by scores as lower than 6 (low adherence), 6 or 7 (moderate adherence), and 8 (high adherence). Comorbidity was considered as any concomitant medical condition, which necessitates the patient to take medicine for a minimum of 6 months prior to the interviews. Results: The most common comorbid conditions were ischemic heart disease (65 patients, 23.2%), diabetes mellitus (55 patients, 19.6%), and dyslipidemia (51 patients, 18.2%). Mean (± SD) MMAS-8 score in comorbid group was 5.68 (± 1.85) and in non-comorbid hypertensive patients, it was 5.83 (± 1.91) (P = 0.631). Mean (± SD) number of comorbidities was 1.53 (± 0.75) in low adherence group compared to 1.54 (± 0.77) in moderate/high adherers (P = 0.98). With increasing the number of comorbid diseases, the proportion of patients with high adherence decreased successively from 20% in those with no comorbid disease to 14.1% in those with one or two comorbid conditions, and finally 11.1% in those with 3 to 5 comorbid conditions. Conclusions: With increasing the number of comorbid conditions, the proportion of patients with high adherence decreases. In our opinion, this finding is a useful clinical note for healthcare providers when managing patients with hypertension who have other medical problems at the same time. PMID:26539419

  6. Differentiation of cultured keratinocytes promotes the adherence of Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Darmstadt, G L; Fleckman, P; Jonas, M; Chi, E; Rubens, C E

    1998-01-01

    Based on a consideration of the histopathology of nonbullous impetigo that shows localization of Streptococcus pyogenes to highly differentiated, subcorneal keratinocytes, we hypothesized that adherence of an impetigo strain of S. pyogenes would be promoted by terminal differentiation of keratinocytes. An assay was developed in which S. pyogenes adhered via pilus-like projections from the cell wall to the surface of cultured human keratinocytes in a time- and inoculum-dependent manner suggestive of a receptor-mediated process. Terminal differentiation of keratinocytes was induced by increasing the calcium concentration in the growth medium, and was confirmed by morphologic analysis using electron microscopy. Adherence of S. pyogenes was three and fourfold greater to keratinocytes differentiated in 1.0 and 1.5 mM calcium, respectively, compared with undifferentiated keratinocytes in 0.15 mM calcium. The presence of calcium during the adherence assay further enhanced adherence nearly twofold. Adherence occurred preferentially to sites of contact between adjacent keratinocytes, suggesting that the keratinocyte receptor may be a molecule involved in cell-to-cell adhesion. In contrast, nonpathogenic Streptococcus gordonii adhered poorly to keratinocytes regardless of their state of terminal differentiation, and adherence of a pharyngeal strain of S. pyogenes was twofold greater to undifferentiated than differentiated keratinocytes. This is the first report of in vitro adherence of S. pyogenes to keratinocytes in a manner that emulates human impetigo. Adherence of only the impetigo strain, and not the pharyngeal strain of S. pyogenes or the nonpathogenic S. gorgonii isolate, was promoted by keratinocyte differentiation. This result provides a model system for investigating the molecular pathogenesis of streptococcal skin infections. PMID:9421474

  7. Roles of adherent myogenic cells and dynamic culture in engineered muscle function and maintenance of satellite cells.

    PubMed

    Juhas, Mark; Bursac, Nenad

    2014-11-01

    Highly functional engineered skeletal muscle constructs could serve as physiological models of muscle function and regeneration and have utility in therapeutic replacement of damaged or diseased muscle tissue. In this study, we examined the roles of different myogenic cell fractions and culturing conditions in the generation of highly functional engineered muscle. Fibrin-based muscle bundles were fabricated using either freshly-isolated myogenic cells or their adherent fraction pre-cultured for 36 h. Muscle bundles made of these cells were cultured in both static and dynamic conditions and systematically characterized with respect to early myogenic events and contractile function. Following 2 weeks of culture, we observed both individual and synergistic benefits of using the adherent cell fraction and dynamic culture on muscle formation and function. In particular, optimal culture conditions resulted in significant increase in the total cross-sectional muscle area (- 3-fold), myofiber size (- 1.6-fold), myonuclei density (- 1.2-fold), and force generation (- 9-fold) compared to traditional use of freshly-isolated cells and static culture. Curiously, we observed that only a simultaneous use of the adherent cell fraction and dynamic culture resulted in accelerated formation of differentiated myofibers which were critical for providing a niche-like environment for maintenance of a satellite cell pool early during culture. Our study identifies key parameters for engineering large-size, highly functional skeletal muscle tissues with improved ability for retention of functional satellite cells.

  8. Sonoporation of adherent cells under regulated ultrasound cavitation conditions.

    PubMed

    Muleki Seya, Pauline; Fouqueray, Manuela; Ngo, Jacqueline; Poizat, Adrien; Inserra, Claude; Béra, Jean-Christophe

    2015-04-01

    A sonoporation device dedicated to the adherent cell monolayer has been implemented with a regulation process allowing the real-time monitoring and control of inertial cavitation activity. Use of the cavitation-regulated device revealed first that adherent cell sonoporation efficiency is related to inertial cavitation activity, without inducing additional cell mortality. Reproducibility is enhanced for the highest sonoporation rates (up to 17%); sonoporation efficiency can reach 26% when advantage is taken of the standing wave acoustic configuration by applying a frequency sweep with ultrasound frequency tuned to the modal acoustic modes of the cavity. This device allows sonoporation of adherent and suspended cells, and the use of regulation allows some environmental parameters such as the temperature of the medium to be overcome, resulting in the possibility of cell sonoporation even at ambient temperature.

  9. Adherence to Medication Regimens among Low-Income Patients with Multiple Comorbid Chronic Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishra, Shiraz I.; Gioia, Deborah; Childress, Saltanat; Barnet, Beth; Webster, Ramothea L.

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative study sought to explore facilitators and barriers to adherence to multiple medications among low-income patients with comorbid chronic physical and mental health conditions. The 50 focus group participants identified personal/contextual and health system factors as major impediments to adherence to multiple medications. These…

  10. Cultural Rationales Guiding Medication Adherence Among African American with HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Neufeld, Stewart; Berry, Rico; Luborsky, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Abstract To date, only modest gains have been achieved in explaining adherence to medical regimens, limiting effective interventions. This is a particularly important issue for African Americans who are disproportionately affected by the HIV epidemic. Few studies have focused on intragroup variation among African Americans in adherence to ART. The aim of this study was to identify and describe the cultural rationales guiding African American patients' formulation and evaluation of adherence. Rationales are key features of purposeful human action. In-depth interviews with 80 seropositive African Americans were tape recorded, transcribed, and analyzed. Participant CD4, viral load and medical histories were collected at each data point. Analysis of four waves of panel data identified three types of adherence rationales: Authoritative Knowledge Rationale (AKR; n=29, 36.3%), Following Doctors' Orders Rationale (DOR; n=24, 30.0%) and Individualized Adherence Rationale (IAR; n=27, 33.8%). Differences in mean reported adherence between the rationale groups did not achieve statistical significance. However, the fraction reporting low adherence (<70%), although not different by rationale group at the first interview (T1), was significantly higher for the IAR group by the fourth interview (T4). Objective clinical markers (CD4 and viral load) improved over time (from T1 to T4) for AKR and DOR groups, but remained unchanged for the IAR group, yet self-reported adherence declined for all groups over the course of the four interviews. PMID:21777141

  11. A Minimally Invasive Method for Retrieving Single Adherent Cells of Different Types from Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jia; Mohammadreza, Aida; Gao, Weimin; Merza, Saeed; Smith, Dean; Kelbauskas, Laimonas; Meldrum, Deirdre R.

    2014-01-01

    The field of single-cell analysis has gained a significant momentum over the last decade. Separation and isolation of individual cells is an indispensable step in almost all currently available single-cell analysis technologies. However, stress levels introduced by such manipulations remain largely unstudied. We present a method for minimally invasive retrieval of selected individual adherent cells of different types from cell cultures. The method is based on a combination of mechanical (shear flow) force and biochemical (trypsin digestion) treatment. We quantified alterations in the transcription levels of stress response genes in individual cells exposed to varying levels of shear flow and trypsinization. We report optimal temperature, RNA preservation reagents, shear force and trypsinization conditions necessary to minimize changes in the stress-related gene expression levels. The method and experimental findings are broadly applicable and can be used by a broad research community working in the field of single cell analysis. PMID:24957932

  12. Association between adherence to medications for COPD and medications for other chronic conditions in COPD patients

    PubMed Central

    Dhamane, Amol D; Schwab, Phil; Hopson, Sari; Moretz, Chad; Annavarapu, Srinivas; Burslem, Kate; Renda, Andrew; Kaila, Shuchita

    2017-01-01

    Background Patients with COPD often have multiple comorbidities requiring use of multiple medications, and adherence rates for maintenance COPD (mCOPD) medications are already known to be suboptimal. Presence of comorbidities in COPD patients, and use of medications used to treat those comorbidities (non-COPD medications), may have an adverse impact on adherence to mCOPD medications. Objective The objective of the study was to evaluate the association between non-adherence to mCOPD medications and non-COPD medications in COPD patients. Methods COPD patients were identified using a large administrative claims database. Selected patients were 40–89 years old and continuously enrolled for 12 months prior to and 24 months after the first identified COPD diagnosis (index date) during January 1, 2009 to December 31, 2010. Patients were required to have ≥1 prescription for a mCOPD medication within 365 days of the index date and ≥1 prescription for one of 12 non-COPD medication classes within ±30 days of the first COPD prescription. Adherence (proportion of days covered [PDC]) was measured during 365 days following the first COPD prescription. The association between non-adherence (PDC <0.8) to mCOPD and non-adherence to non-COPD medications was determined using logistic regression, controlling for baseline patient characteristics. Results A total of 14,117 patients, with a mean age of 69.9 years, met study criteria. Of these, 40.9% were males and 79.2% were non-adherent to mCOPD medications with a mean PDC of 0.47. Non-adherence to mCOPD medications was associated with non-adherence to 10 of 12 non-COPD medication classes (odds ratio 1.38–1.78, all P<0.01). Conclusion Adherence to mCOPD medications is low. Non-adherence (or adherence) to mCOPD medications is positively related to non-adherence (or adherence) to non-COPD medications, implying that the need to take medications prescribed for comorbid conditions does not adversely impact adherence to m

  13. Automated and online characterization of adherent cell culture growth in a microfabricated bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Jaccard, Nicolas; Macown, Rhys J; Super, Alexandre; Griffin, Lewis D; Veraitch, Farlan S; Szita, Nicolas

    2014-10-01

    Adherent cell lines are widely used across all fields of biology, including drug discovery, toxicity studies, and regenerative medicine. However, adherent cell processes are often limited by a lack of advances in cell culture systems. While suspension culture processes benefit from decades of development of instrumented bioreactors, adherent cultures are typically performed in static, noninstrumented flasks and well-plates. We previously described a microfabricated bioreactor that enables a high degree of control on the microenvironment of the cells while remaining compatible with standard cell culture protocols. In this report, we describe its integration with automated image-processing capabilities, allowing the continuous monitoring of key cell culture characteristics. A machine learning-based algorithm enabled the specific detection of one cell type within a co-culture setting, such as human embryonic stem cells against the background of fibroblast cells. In addition, the algorithm did not confuse image artifacts resulting from microfabrication, such as scratches on surfaces, or dust particles, with cellular features. We demonstrate how the automation of flow control, environmental control, and image acquisition can be employed to image the whole culture area and obtain time-course data of mouse embryonic stem cell cultures, for example, for confluency.

  14. Modulating temporal and spatial oxygenation over adherent cellular cultures.

    PubMed

    Oppegard, Shawn C; Nam, Ki-Hwan; Carr, Janai R; Skaalure, Stacey C; Eddington, David T

    2009-09-03

    Oxygen is a key modulator of many cellular pathways, but current devices permitting in vitro oxygen modulation fail to meet the needs of biomedical research. A microfabricated insert for multiwell plates has been developed to more effectively control the temporal and spatial oxygen concentration to better model physiological phenomena found in vivo. The platform consists of a polydimethylsiloxane insert that nests into a standard multiwell plate and serves as a passive microfluidic gas network with a gas-permeable membrane aimed to modulate oxygen delivery to adherent cells. Equilibration time is on the order of minutes and a wide variety of oxygen profiles can be attained based on the device design, such as the cyclic profile achieved in this study, and even oxygen gradients to mimic those found in vivo. The proper biological consequences of the device's oxygen delivery were confirmed in cellular models via a proliferation assay and western analysis of the upregulation of hypoxia inducible transcription factor-1alpha. These experiments serve as a demonstration for the platform as a viable tool to increase experimental throughput and permit novel experimental possibilities in any biomedical research lab.

  15. Conditional economic incentives to improve HIV treatment adherence: literature review and theoretical considerations.

    PubMed

    Galárraga, Omar; Genberg, Becky L; Martin, Rosemarie A; Barton Laws, M; Wilson, Ira B

    2013-09-01

    We present selected theoretical issues regarding conditional economic incentives (CEI) for HIV treatment adherence. High HIV treatment adherence is essential not only to improve individual health for persons living with HIV, but also to reduce transmission. The incentives literature spans several decades and various disciplines, thus we selectively point out useful concepts from economics, psychology and HIV clinical practice to elucidate the complex interaction between socio-economic issues, psychological perspectives and optimal treatment adherence. Appropriately-implemented CEI can help patients improve their adherence to HIV treatment in the short-term, while the incentives are in place. However, more research is needed to uncover mechanisms that can increase habit formation or maintenance effects in the longer-term. We suggest some potentially fruitful avenues for future research in this area, including the use of concepts from self-determination theory. This general framework may have implications for related research among disadvantaged communities with high rates of HIV/AIDS infection.

  16. Adherence to a Depression Self-Care Intervention among Primary Care Patients with Chronic Physical Conditions: A Randomised Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCusker, Jane; Cole, Martin G.; Yaffe, Mark; Strumpf, Erin; Sewitch, Maida; Sussman, Tamara; Ciampi, Antonio; Lavoie, Kim; Belzile, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Among primary care patients with chronic physical conditions and comorbid depressive symptoms, to assess (1) the effect of lay telephone coaching on adherence to a psycho-educational intervention for depression, (2) demographic characteristics that predict adherence and (3) the association between adherence and 6-month outcomes. Design:…

  17. Specificity in calcium oxalate adherence to papillary epithelial cells in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Riese, R.J.; Riese, J.W.; Kleinman, J.G.; Wiessner, J.H.; Mandel, G.S.; Mandel, N.S. )

    1988-11-01

    Attachment of microcystallites to cellular membranes may be an important component of the pathophysiology of many diseases including urolithiasis. This study attempts to characterize the interaction of calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystals and apatite (AP) crystals with renal papillary collecting tubule (RPCT) cells in primary culture. Primary cultures of RPCT cells showed the characteristic monolayer growth with sporadically interspersed clumped cells. Cultures were incubated with ({sup 14}C)CaOx crystals, and the crystals that bound were quantified by microscopy and adherent radioactivity. Per unit of cross-sectional area, 32 times more CaOx crystals were bound to the clumps than to the monolayer. CaOx adherence demonstrated concentration-dependent saturation with a {beta} value (fraction of cell culture area binding CaOx crystals) of 0.179 and a 1/{alpha}{sub ox} value of 287 {mu}g/cm{sup 2}. On incubation with AP crystals, CaOx binding demonstrated concentration-dependent inhibition with a 1/{alpha}{sub AP} value of 93 {mu}g/cm{sup 2}. Microcystallite adherence to RPCT cells demonstrates selectivity for cellular clumps, saturation, and inhibition. These features suggest specific binding.

  18. Inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus Adherence to Collagen under Dynamic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Nehal; Teeters, Mark A.; Patti, Joseph M.; Höök, Magnus; Ross, Julia M.

    1999-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the most common etiological agent of bacterial arthritis and acute osteomyelitis and has been shown to bind to type II collagen under static and dynamic conditions. We have previously reported the effect of shear on the adhesion of S. aureus Phillips to collagen and found that this process is shear dependent (Z. Li, M. Höök, J. M. Patti, and J. M. Ross, Ann. Biomed. Eng. 24[Suppl. 1]:S–55). In this study, we used recombinant collagen adhesin fragments as well as polyclonal antibodies generated against adhesin fragments in attempts to inhibit bacterial adhesion. A parallel-plate flow chamber was used in a dynamic adhesion assay, and quantification of adhesion was accomplished by phase contrast video microscopy coupled with digital image processing. We report that both recombinant fragments studied, M19 and M55, and both polyclonal antibodies studied, α-M17 and α-M55, inhibit adhesion to varying degrees and that these processes are shear dependent. The M55 peptide and α-M55 cause much higher levels of inhibition than M19 and α-M17, respectively, at all wall shear rates studied. Our results demonstrate the importance of using a dynamic system in the assessment of inhibitory strategies and suggest the possible use of M55 and α-M55 in clinical applications to prevent infections caused by S. aureus adhesion to collagen. PMID:9916063

  19. Highly Efficient Neural Conversion of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells in Adherent and Animal-Free Conditions.

    PubMed

    Lukovic, Dunja; Diez Lloret, Andrea; Stojkovic, Petra; Rodríguez-Martínez, Daniel; Perez Arago, Maria Amparo; Rodriguez-Jimenez, Francisco Javier; González-Rodríguez, Patricia; López-Barneo, José; Sykova, Eva; Jendelova, Pavla; Kostic, Jelena; Moreno-Manzano, Victoria; Stojkovic, Miodrag; Bhattacharya, Shomi S; Erceg, Slaven

    2017-04-01

    Neural differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) can produce a valuable and robust source of human neural cell subtypes, holding great promise for the study of neurogenesis and development, and for treating neurological diseases. However, current hESCs and hiPSCs neural differentiation protocols require either animal factors or embryoid body formation, which decreases efficiency and yield, and strongly limits medical applications. Here we develop a simple, animal-free protocol for neural conversion of both hESCs and hiPSCs in adherent culture conditions. A simple medium formula including insulin induces the direct conversion of >98% of hESCs and hiPSCs into expandable, transplantable, and functional neural progenitors with neural rosette characteristics. Further differentiation of neural progenitors into dopaminergic and spinal motoneurons as well as astrocytes and oligodendrocytes indicates that these neural progenitors retain responsiveness to instructive cues revealing the robust applicability of the protocol in the treatment of different neurodegenerative diseases. The fact that this protocol includes animal-free medium and human extracellular matrix components avoiding embryoid bodies makes this protocol suitable for the use in clinic. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:1217-1226.

  20. [Modified method for whole bone marrow adherent culture of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Qing; Zhong, Zhao-Dong; Chen, Zhi-Chao; Zou, Ping

    2014-04-01

    This study was aimed to investigate a more convenient and efficient method to cultivate the human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells by means of natural erythrocyte sedimentation principle, based on the whole bone marrow adherent method. The bone marrow was cultured with a six-well plate instead of the flasks.Firstly, the bone marrow specimen was cultivated with the MSC complete medium for 48 h, then the upper RBC-free supernatant layer was drawn and placed into the new wells to isolate MSC. Inverted microscope was used to observe the cell morphology and to record the adherent time of first cell passage, first passaging time. The traditional whole bone marrow adherent method was used as the control. The cell cycle and cell surface markers were detected by flow cytometry,and the differentiative capacity of MSC into osteocyte and adipocyte was identified by alkaline phosphatase kit and oil red O, respectively. Besides, the proliferative curve of P1,P3,P5 of BMSC was depicted by counting method. The results showed that MSC cultured by the modified method highly expressed CD90, CD105, CD13, CD44 and lowly expressed CD14, CD45, CD34. Concerning the cell cycle feature, it was found that most of the cells were in G0/G1 phase (88.76%) , followed by G2/M phase (3.04%) and S phase (8.2%), which was in accordance with stem cell cycle characteristics. The proliferative curve showed a typical "S" type, and both the oil red O and alkaline phosphatase staining of MSC were positive. Compared with the traditional method, the modified method had the advantage of high adherence rate (P = 0.0001) and shorter passaging time for the first passage (P = 0.001), with the statistically significant difference. It is concluded that there is a large number of adherent, active and suspended MSC in the RBC-free supernatant layer after the culture of bone marrow for 48 h. Isolating MSC by the modified method is more convenient and efficient than the traditional whole bone marrow adherent method.

  1. The association between optimal lifestyle adherence and short-term incidence of chronic conditions among employees.

    PubMed

    Pronk, Nicolaas P; Lowry, Marcia; Kottke, Thomas E; Austin, Erin; Gallagher, Jason; Katz, Abigail

    2010-12-01

    "Optimal lifestyle," comprising abstinence from smoking, adequate physical activity, eating 5 servings of fruits and vegetables each day, and consuming limited or no alcohol, is associated with low risk of chronic disease when unselected populations are observed for long periods of time. It is unclear whether these same associations are present when observation is limited to employed individuals followed for a brief period of time. The purpose of this investigation was to study the association between adherence to optimal lifestyle and the incidence of chronic conditions among employees over a 2-year period. Logistic regression was used to assess the association between employees' (N  = 6848) adherence to optimal lifestyle and the incidence of diabetes, heart disease, cancer, hypertension, high cholesterol, and back pain during a 2-year period. All data were self-reported. Adherence to any 3 components of the optimal lifestyle was associated with a significantly lower near-term incidence of diabetes (odds ratio [OR] =  0.56; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.31-0.97) and back pain (OR = 0.69; 95% CI = 0.53-0.92). Adherence to all 4 optimal lifestyle components was significantly associated with lower near-term incidence of back pain (OR = 0.44; 95% CI = 0.26-0.76). Physical activity was associated with significantly lower near-term incidence risk of heart disease (OR = 0.60; 95% CI = 0.38-0.95), high cholesterol (OR = 0.80; 95% CI = 0.66-0.99), and diabetes (OR = 0.51; 95% CI = 0.30-0.86). Adherence to optimal lifestyle, in particular adequate physical activity, is associated with lower near-term risk of developing several chronic conditions. Employers and payers should consider this fact when formulating policy or allocating resources for health care and health promotion.

  2. Adherence to Asian Cultural Values and Cultural Fit in Korean American Undergraduates' Help-Seeking Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gloria, Alberta M.; Castellanos, Jeanett; Park, Yong Sue; Kim, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Differences in and relationships of Asian cultural values, cultural congruity, perception of the university environment, and help-seeking attitudes for 1st- and 2nd-generation Korean American undergraduates (N = 228) were examined. Women reported significantly higher cultural congruity and more positive help-seeking attitudes than did men. Asian…

  3. Growth condition-dependent Esp expression by Enterococcus faecium affects initial adherence and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Van Wamel, Willem J B; Hendrickx, Antoni P A; Bonten, Marc J M; Top, Janetta; Posthuma, George; Willems, Rob J L

    2007-02-01

    A genetic subpopulation of Enterococcus faecium, called clonal complex 17 (CC-17), is strongly associated with hospital outbreaks and invasive infections. Most CC-17 strains contain a putative pathogenicity island encoding the E. faecium variant of enterococcal surface protein (Esp). Western blotting, flow cytometric analyses, and electron microscopy showed that Esp is expressed and exposed on the surface of E. faecium, though Esp expression and surface exposure are highly varied among different strains. Furthermore, Esp expression depends on growth conditions like temperature and anaerobioses. When grown at 37 degrees C, five of six esp-positive E. faecium strains showed significantly increased levels of surface-exposed Esp compared to bacteria grown at 21 degrees C, which was confirmed at the transcriptional level by real-time PCR. In addition, a significant increase in surface-exposed Esp was found in half of these strains when grown at 37 degrees C under anaerobic conditions compared to the level in bacteria grown under aerobic conditions. Finally, amounts of surface-exposed Esp correlated with initial adherence to polystyrene (R(2) = 0.7146) and biofilm formation (R(2) = 0.7535). Polystyrene adherence was competitively inhibited by soluble recombinant N-terminal Esp. This study demonstrates that Esp expression on the surface of E. faecium (i) varies consistently between strains, (ii) is growth condition dependent, and (iii) is quantitatively correlated with initial adherence and biofilm formation. These data indicate that E. faecium senses and responds to changing environmental conditions, which might play a role in the early stages of infection when bacteria transit from oxygen-rich conditions at room temperature to anaerobic conditions at body temperature. In addition, variation of surface exposure may explain the contrasting findings reported on the role of Esp in biofilm formation.

  4. Bioluminescent high-throughput assay for the bacteria adherence to the tissue culture cells.

    PubMed

    Brovko, L; Minikh, O; Piekna, A; Griffiths, M W

    2011-07-01

    The goal of this study was develop a rapid high-throughput method for the assessment of the bacterial adhesion to tissue culture cells and test this method by investigation of the adhesion and growth of pathogenic and non-pathogenic Escherichia coli strains in the presence of HeLa human epithelial cells. Fifteen strains of E. coli were transformed with a plasmid carrying the entire lux operon of Photorhabdus luminescens to make them bioluminescent. By using the Time-to-Detection approach and bioluminescence imaging in microplate format, the adherence and growth of bacteria in tissue culture medium in the presence of HeLa cells was monitored. It was observed that Eagle's minimal essential medium (EMEM) supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) significantly inhibited growth of E. coli. However, in the presence of HeLa cells the detected growth of E. coli was similar to the growth observed in LB medium. It was established that the initial number of E. coli cells present in the microplate directly correlated with the time necessary for the bioluminescence signal to reach the threshold level, hence allowing the accurate assessment of the adhered cells within 8-10 h. Neither bacterial adherence nor growth kinetics correlated with the pathogenicity of the strain though they were strain-specific. The developed approach provided new information on the interaction of E. coli with epithelial cells and could be used for both pathogenicity research and for the screening of potential therapeutic agents for the ability to minimize pathogen colonization of human tissues.

  5. The majority of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli strains produce the E. coli common pilus when adhering to cultured epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Avelino, Fabiola; Saldaña, Zeus; Islam, Sohidul; Monteiro-Neto, Valerio; Dall'Agnol, Monique; Eslava, Carlos A; Girón, Jorge A

    2010-11-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) have emerged as a significant worldwide cause of chronic diarrhea in the pediatric population and in HIV patients. The vast majority of EAEC strains do not produce the aggregative adherence fimbriae I-III (AAFs) so far reported and thus, what adherence factors are present in these strains remains unknown. Here, we investigated the prevalence of the chromosomal E. coli common pilus (ECP) genes and ECP production amongst 130 EAEC strains of diverse origin as well as the role of ECP in EAEC adherence. Through multiplex PCR analysis we found that 96% of EAEC strains contained the ecpA structural pilin gene whereas only 3.1% and 5.4% were positive for AAF fimbrial genes aggA or aafA, respectively. Among the ecpA(+) strains, 63% produced ECP when adhering to cultured epithelial cells. An ecpA mutant derived from prototypic strain 042 (AAF/II(+)) was not altered in adherence suggesting that the AAF/II, and not ECP, plays a major role in this strain. In contrast, strain 278-1 (AAF(-)) deleted of the ecpA gene was significantly reduced in adherence to cultured epithelial cells. In all, these data indicate a potential role of ECP in adherence for EAEC strains lacking the known AAFs and that in association with other adhesive determinants, ECP may contribute to their survival and persistence within the host and in the environment.

  6. Non-invasive and non-destructive measurements of confluence in cultured adherent cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Busschots, Steven; O’Toole, Sharon; O’Leary, John J.; Stordal, Britta

    2014-01-01

    Many protocols used for measuring the growth of adherent monolayer cells in vitro are invasive, destructive and do not allow for the continued, undisturbed growth of cells within flasks. Protocols often use indirect methods for measuring proliferation. Microscopy techniques can analyse cell proliferation in a non-invasive or non-destructive manner but often use expensive equipment and software algorithms. In this method images of cells within flasks are captured by photographing under a standard inverted phase contract light microscope using a digital camera with a camera lens adaptor. Images are analysed for confluence using ImageJ freeware resulting in a measure of confluence known as an Area Fraction (AF) output. An example of the AF method in use on OVCAR8 and UPN251 cell lines is included. • Measurements of confluence from growing adherent cell lines in cell culture flasks is obtained in a non-invasive, non-destructive, label-free manner. • The technique is quick, affordable and eliminates sample manipulation. • The technique provides an objective, consistent measure of when cells reach confluence and is highly correlated to manual counting with a haemocytometer. The average correlation co-efficient from a Spearman correlation (n = 3) was 0.99 ± 0.008 for OVCAR8 (p = 0.01) and 0.99 ± 0.01 for UPN251 (p = 0.01) cell lines. PMID:26150966

  7. Non-invasive and non-destructive measurements of confluence in cultured adherent cell lines.

    PubMed

    Busschots, Steven; O'Toole, Sharon; O'Leary, John J; Stordal, Britta

    2015-01-01

    Many protocols used for measuring the growth of adherent monolayer cells in vitro are invasive, destructive and do not allow for the continued, undisturbed growth of cells within flasks. Protocols often use indirect methods for measuring proliferation. Microscopy techniques can analyse cell proliferation in a non-invasive or non-destructive manner but often use expensive equipment and software algorithms. In this method images of cells within flasks are captured by photographing under a standard inverted phase contract light microscope using a digital camera with a camera lens adaptor. Images are analysed for confluence using ImageJ freeware resulting in a measure of confluence known as an Area Fraction (AF) output. An example of the AF method in use on OVCAR8 and UPN251 cell lines is included. •Measurements of confluence from growing adherent cell lines in cell culture flasks is obtained in a non-invasive, non-destructive, label-free manner.•The technique is quick, affordable and eliminates sample manipulation.•The technique provides an objective, consistent measure of when cells reach confluence and is highly correlated to manual counting with a haemocytometer. The average correlation co-efficient from a Spearman correlation (n = 3) was 0.99 ± 0.008 for OVCAR8 (p = 0.01) and 0.99 ± 0.01 for UPN251 (p = 0.01) cell lines.

  8. An approach to collaborative care and consultation: interviewing, cultural competence, and enhancing rapport and adherence.

    PubMed

    Beck, B J; Gordon, Christopher

    2010-11-01

    Although changes in the US health care system promote a population-based approach, increases in population diversity emphasize the need for culturally competent, patient-centered, participatory care. Despite this perceived conflict, the global view has improved the recognition of mental health issues as a driver of overall health as well as health care spending. This recognition, along with the many forces that keep mental health care in the primary care sector, actually encourages the development of collaborative models that capitalize on the primary care provider's opportunity to leverage their rapport with the patient to improve access to, and comfort with, specialty mental health services. Engaging patients in their own path to recovery or well-being improves engagement in, and adherence to, the treatment plan and ultimately improves outcomes.

  9. [Adherent and single-cell suspension culture of Madin-Darby canine kidney cells in serum-free medium].

    PubMed

    Huang, Ding; Zhao, Liang; Tan, Wensong

    2011-04-01

    In recent years, there are tremendous economic and social losses across the world because of virus-related diseases. It is well known that Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells are easily handled, quickly amplified and efficiently infected with influenza virus. Therefore, they are considered as one of the most important cell lines for the production of influenza vaccine. In this work, we first developed a serum-free adherent culture process for MDCK cells with an in-house prepared serum-free medium MDCK-SFM. Next, we derived a cell line named ssf-MDCK, which was amenable for single-cell suspension culture in the serum-free medium. We found that during serum-free batch culture of MDCK cells, the peak viable cell density and maximum specific growth rate were 3.81 x 10(6) cells/mL and 0.056 h(-1), respectively; 3.6- and 1.6-fold increase compared with those in serum-containing adherent batch culture. In addition, we compared growth and metabolic characteristics of MDCK cells in serum-containing adherent culture, serum-free adherent culture and serum-free single-cell suspension culture. We found that less metabolic by-products were produced in both serum-free cultures. In serum-free single-cell suspension batch culture, the viable cell density was highest. These results are critical for establishing large-scale suspension culture of MDCK cells as subsequent well as large-scale influenza vaccine production.

  10. Long-term culture of mouse embryonic stem cell-derived adherent neurospheres and functional neurons.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Mirian A F; Guerreiro, Juliano R; Cassola, Antonio C; Lizier, Nelson F; Kerkis, Alexandre; Camargo, Antonio C M; Kerkis, Irina

    2010-12-01

    Innumerous protocols, using the mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells as model for in vitro study of neurons functional properties and features, have been developed. Most of these protocols are short lasting, which, therefore, does not allow a careful analysis of the neurons maturation, aging, and death processes. We describe here a novel and efficient long-lasting protocol for in vitro ES cells differentiation into neuronal cells. It consists of obtaining embryoid bodies, followed by induction of neuronal differentiation with retinoic acid of nonadherent embryoid bodies (three-dimensional model), which further allows their adherence and formation of adherent neurospheres (AN, bi-dimensional model). The AN can be maintained for at least 12 weeks in culture under repetitive mechanical splitting, providing a constant microenvironment (in vitro niche) for the neuronal progenitor cells avoiding mechanical dissociation of AN. The expression of neuron-specific proteins, such as nestin, sox1, beta III-tubulin, microtubule-associated protein 2, neurofilament medium protein, Tau, neuronal nuclei marker, gamma-aminobutyric acid, and 5-hydroxytryptamine, were confirmed in these cells maintained during 3 months under several splitting. Additionally, expression pattern of microtubule-associated proteins, such as lissencephaly (Lis1) and nuclear distribution element-like (Ndel1), which were shown to be essential for differentiation and migration of neurons during embryogenesis, was also studied. As expected, both proteins were expressed in undifferentiated ES cells, AN, and nonrosette neurons, although presenting different spatial distribution in AN. In contrast to previous studies, using cultured neuronal cells derived from embryonic and adult tissues, only Ndel1 expression was observed in the centrosome region of early neuroblasts from AN. Mature neurons, obtained from ES cells in this work, display ionic channels and oscillations of membrane electrical potential typical of

  11. Extending metabolome coverage for untargeted metabolite profiling of adherent cultured hepatic cells.

    PubMed

    García-Cañaveras, Juan Carlos; López, Silvia; Castell, José Vicente; Donato, M Teresa; Lahoz, Agustín

    2016-02-01

    MS-based metabolite profiling of adherent mammalian cells comprises several challenging steps such as metabolism quenching, cell detachment, cell disruption, metabolome extraction, and metabolite measurement. In LC-MS, the final metabolome coverage is strongly determined by the separation technique and the MS conditions used. Human liver-derived cell line HepG2 was chosen as adherent mammalian cell model to evaluate the performance of several commonly used procedures in both sample processing and LC-MS analysis. In a first phase, metabolite extraction and sample analysis were optimized in a combined manner. To this end, the extraction abilities of five different solvents (or combinations) were assessed by comparing the number and the levels of the metabolites comprised in each extract. Three different chromatographic methods were selected for metabolites separation. A HILIC-based method which was set to specifically separate polar metabolites and two RP-based methods focused on lipidome and wide-ranging metabolite detection, respectively. With regard to metabolite measurement, a Q-ToF instrument operating in both ESI (+) and ESI (-) was used for unbiased extract analysis. Once metabolite extraction and analysis conditions were set up, the influence of cell harvesting on metabolome coverage was also evaluated. Therefore, different protocols for cell detachment (trypsinization or scraping) and metabolism quenching were compared. This study confirmed the inconvenience of trypsinization as a harvesting technique, and the importance of using complementary extraction solvents to extend metabolome coverage, minimizing interferences and maximizing detection, thanks to the use of dedicated analytical conditions through the combination of HILIC and RP separations. The proposed workflow allowed the detection of over 300 identified metabolites from highly polar compounds to a wide range of lipids.

  12. Understanding exercise uptake and adherence for people with chronic conditions: a new model demonstrating the importance of exercise identity, benefits of attending and support.

    PubMed

    Pentecost, C; Taket, A

    2011-10-01

    Understanding the factors influencing uptake and adherence to exercise for people with chronic conditions from different ages, genders and ethnicities is important for planning exercise services. This paper presents evidence supporting a new model of exercise uptake and adherence applicable to people with chronic conditions from diverse socio-demographic backgrounds. The study is based on 130 semi-structured interviews with people with chronic conditions, including both those who did and those who did not attend exercise services, and supporters of those who attended. Analysis followed the guidelines of 'framework analysis'. Results show that three factors were particularly important in influencing adherence behavior: (i) exercise identity, (ii) support and (iii) perceived benefits of attending. Social and cultural identities impacted on willingness to exercise, importance of exercise and perceived appropriateness of exercising. Having at least one supporter providing different types of support was associated with high levels of attendance. Those people who valued the social and psychological benefits of attending were more likely to be high attenders. The new model illustrates interaction between these three factors and discusses how these can be taken into account when planning exercise services for people with chronic conditions drawn from diverse socio-demographic groups.

  13. Culturing conditions determine neuronal and glial excitability.

    PubMed

    Stoppelkamp, Sandra; Riedel, Gernot; Platt, Bettina

    2010-12-15

    The cultivation of pure neuronal cultures is considered advantageous for the investigation of cell-type specific responses (such as transmitter release and also pharmacological agents), however, divergent results are a likely consequence of media modifications and culture composition. Using Fura-2 based imaging techniques, we here set out to compare calcium responses of rat hippocampal neurones and glia to excitatory stimulation with l-glutamate in different culture types and media. Neurones in neurone-enriched cultures had increased responses to 10 μM and 100 μM l-glutamate (+43 and 45%, respectively; p's< 0.001) and a slower recovery compared to mixed cultures, indicating heightened excitability. In matured (15-20 days in vitro) mixed cultures, neuronal responder rates were suppressed in a neurone-supportive medium (Neurobasal-A, NB: 65%) compared to a general-purpose medium (supplemented minimal essential medium, MEM: 96%). Glial response size in contrast did not differ greatly in isolated or mixed cultures maintained in MEM, but responder rates were suppressed in both culture types in NB (e.g. 10 μM l-glutamate responders in mixed cultures: 29% in NB, 71% in MEM). This indicates that medium composition is more important for glial excitability than the presence of neurones, whereas the presence of glia has an important impact on neuronal excitability. Therefore, careful consideration of culturing conditions is crucial for interpretation and comparison of experimental results. Especially for investigations of toxicity and neuroprotection mixed cultures may be more physiologically relevant over isolated cultures as they comprise aspects of mutual influences between glia and neurones.

  14. HIGHLIGHTING DIFFERENCES BETWEEN CONDITIONAL AND UNCONDITIONAL QUANTILE REGRESSION APPROACHES THROUGH AN APPLICATION TO ASSESS MEDICATION ADHERENCE

    PubMed Central

    BORAH, BIJAN J.; BASU, ANIRBAN

    2014-01-01

    The quantile regression (QR) framework provides a pragmatic approach in understanding the differential impacts of covariates along the distribution of an outcome. However, the QR framework that has pervaded the applied economics literature is based on the conditional quantile regression method. It is used to assess the impact of a covariate on a quantile of the outcome conditional on specific values of other covariates. In most cases, conditional quantile regression may generate results that are often not generalizable or interpretable in a policy or population context. In contrast, the unconditional quantile regression method provides more interpretable results as it marginalizes the effect over the distributions of other covariates in the model. In this paper, the differences between these two regression frameworks are highlighted, both conceptually and econometrically. Additionally, using real-world claims data from a large US health insurer, alternative QR frameworks are implemented to assess the differential impacts of covariates along the distribution of medication adherence among elderly patients with Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:23616446

  15. Retinoid modulation of collagenase production by adherent human mononuclear cells in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, A; Louie, J S; Uitto, J

    1987-01-01

    Previous observations have suggested that retinoids might be useful for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. In this study we examined the effects of various retinoids on collagenase production by adherent human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in culture. We have previously shown that these cells, consisting predominantly of monocyte-macrophages, actively synthesize and secrete collagenase upon stimulation with concanavalin A. The cells were incubated in serum free medium with all-trans-retinoic acid, 13-cis-retinoic acid, all-trans-retinal, or Ro 10-9359 (trimethylmethoxyphenyl retinoic acid ethyl ester) for up to 72 hours, and the collagenase activity was determined with [3H]proline labelled type I collagen as substrate. The incubation of mononuclear cells with all-trans-retinoic acid in the concentration range 10(-7)-10(-5) mol/l resulted in a dose dependent inhibition of the collagenase production. All-trans-retinal was also a potent inhibitor, whereas 13-cis-retinoic acid and Ro 10-9359 in a concentration of 10(-5) mol/l had a lesser effect. Control experiments indicated that the inhibition of collagenase production by all-trans-retinoic acid did not result from inhibition of total protein synthesis nor could it be explained by induction of an inhibitory molecule. These results indicate that retinoids with distinct structural features can inhibit collagenase production by monocyte-macrophages, and suggest a role for retinoids in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:3036026

  16. Fabrication and operation of an oxygen insert for adherent cellular cultures.

    PubMed

    Oppegard, Shawn; Sinkala, Elly; Eddington, David

    2010-01-06

    Oxygen is a key modulator of many cellular pathways, but current devices permitting in vitro oxygen modulation fail to meet the needs of biomedical research. The hypoxic chamber offers a simple system to control oxygenation in standard culture vessels, but lacks precise temporal and spatial control over the oxygen concentration at the cell surface, preventing its application in studying a variety of physiological phenomena. Other systems have improved upon the hypoxic chamber, but require specialized knowledge and equipment for their operation, making them intimidating for the average researcher. A microfabricated insert for multiwell plates has been developed to more effectively control the temporal and spatial oxygen concentration to better model physiological phenomena found in vivo. The platform consists of a polydimethylsiloxane insert that nests into a standard multiwell plate and serves as a passive microfluidic gas network with a gas-permeable membrane aimed to modulate oxygen delivery to adherent cells. The device is simple to use and is connected to gas cylinders that provide the pressure to introduce the desired oxygen concentration into the platform. Fabrication involves a combination of standard SU-8 photolithography, replica molding, and defined PDMS spinning on a silicon wafer. The components of the device are bonded after surface treatment using a hand-held plasma system. Validation is accomplished with a planar fluorescent oxygen sensor. Equilibration time is on the order of minutes and a wide variety of oxygen profiles can be attained based on the device design, such as the cyclic profile achieved in this study, and even oxygen gradients to mimic those found in vivo. The device can be sterilized for cell culture using common methods without loss of function. The device's applicability to studying the in vitro wound healing response will be demonstrated.

  17. Attitudes to cosmetic surgery among ethnic minority groups in Britain: cultural mistrust, adherence to traditional cultural values, and ethnic identity salience as protective factors.

    PubMed

    Swami, Viren; Hendrikse, Sinead

    2013-01-01

    Previous work has suggested that ethnic minority women have more negative attitudes to cosmetic surgery than British Whites, but reasons for this are not fully understood. To overcome this dearth in the literature, the present study asked 250 British Asian and 250 African Caribbean university students to complete measures of attitudes to cosmetic surgery, cultural mistrust, adherence to traditional cultural values, ethnic identity salience, self-esteem, and demographics. Preliminary analyses showed that there were significant between-group differences only on cultural mistrust and self-esteem, although effect sizes were small (d values = .21-.37). Further analyses showed that more negative attitudes to cosmetic surgery were associated with greater cultural mistrust, stronger adherence to traditional values, and stronger ethnic identity salience, although these relationships were weaker for African Caribbean women than for British Asians. These results are discussed in relation to perceptions of cosmetic surgery among ethnic minority women.

  18. Conditioning film and environmental effects on the adherence of Candida spp. to silicone and poly(vinylchloride) biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Jones, D S; McGovern, J G; Adair, C G; Woolfson, A D; Gorman, S P

    2001-05-01

    The reported incidence of colonization of oropharyngeal medical devices with Candida spp. has increased in recent years, although few studies that have systematically examined the adherence of yeast cells to such biomaterials, the primary step in the process of colonization. This study, therefore, examined the effects of oropharyngeal atmospheric conditions (5% v/v carbon dioxide) and the presence of a salivary conditioning film on both the surface properties and adherence of Candida albicans, Candida krusei and Candida tropicalis to PVC and silicone. Furthermore, the effects of the salivary conditioning film on the surface properties of these biomaterials are reported. Growth of the three Candida spp. in an atmosphere containing 5% v/v CO2 significantly increased their cell surface hydrophobicity and reduced the zeta potential of C. albicans and C. krusei yet increased the zeta potential of C. tropicalis (p<0.05). Furthermore, growth in 5% v/v CO2 decreased the adherence of C. tropicalis and C. albicans to both PVC and silicone, however, increased adherence of C. krusei (p<0.05). Pre-treatment of the microorganisms with pooled human saliva significantly decreased their cell surface hydrophobicity and increased their adherence to either biomaterial in comparison to yeast cells that had been pre-treated with PBS (p<0.05). Saliva treatment of the microorganisms had no consistent effect on microbial zeta potential. Interestingly, adherence of the three, saliva-treated Candida spp. to saliva-treated silicone and PVC was significantly lower than whenever the microorganisms and biomaterials had been treated with PBS (p<0.05). Treatment of silicone and PVC with saliva significantly altered the surface properties, notably reducing both the advancing and receding contact angles and, additionally, the microrugosity. These effects may contribute to the decreased adherence of saliva-treated microorganisms to these biomaterials. In conclusion, this study has demonstrated the

  19. Sustaining a "culture of silence" in the neonatal intensive care unit during nonemergency situations: a grounded theory on ensuring adherence to behavioral modification to reduce noise levels.

    PubMed

    Swathi, S; Ramesh, A; Nagapoornima, M; Fernandes, Lavina M; Jisina, C; Rao, P N Suman; Swarnarekha, A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to generate a substantive theory explaining how the staff in a resource-limited neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) of a developing nation manage to ensure adherence to behavioral modification components of a noise reduction protocol (NsRP) during nonemergency situations. The study was conducted after implementation of an NsRP in a level III NICU of south India. The normal routine of the NICU is highly dynamic because of various categories of staff conducting clinical rounds followed by care-giving activities. This is unpredictably interspersed with very noisy emergency management of neonates who suddenly fall sick. In-depth interviews were conducted with 36 staff members of the NICU (20 staff nurses, six nursing aides, and 10 physicians). Group discussions were conducted with 20 staff nurses and six nursing aides. Data analysis was done in line with the reformulated grounded theory approach, which was based on inductive examination of textual information. The results of the analysis showed that the main concern was to ensure adherence to behavioral modification components of the NsRP. This was addressed by using strategies to "sustain a culture of silence in NICU during nonemergency situations" (core category). The main strategies employed were building awareness momentum, causing awareness percolation, developing a sense of ownership, expansion of caring practices, evolution of adherence, and displaying performance indicators. The "culture of silence" reconditions the existing staff and conditions new staff members joining the NICU. During emergency situations, a "noisy culture" prevailed because of pragmatic neglect of behavioral modification when life support overrode all other concerns. In addition to this, the process of operant conditioning should be formally conducted once every 18 months. The results of this study may be adapted to create similar strategies and establish context specific NsRPs in NICUs with resource constraints.

  20. Non-adherent culture induces paclitaxel resistance in H460 lung cancer cells via ERK-mediated up-regulation of βIVa-tubulin.

    PubMed

    Atjanasuppat, Korakot; Lirdprapamongkol, Kriengsak; Jantaree, Phatcharida; Svasti, Jisnuson

    2015-10-23

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are metastasizing epithelial cancer cells that adapt to survive when floating in bloodstream during metastasis. This condition can be mimicked in vitro by using non-adherent cell culture. The chemosensitivity of CTCs appears to correlate with the response of metastatic cancer patients to therapy, but chemoresistance is also frequently observed in advanced stage cancer patients, who have never previously received chemotherapy. We hypothesize that adaptation of epithelial cancer cells to become floating CTCs could lead to development of chemoresistance. Here, we explore whether chemoresistance is induced in epithelial cancer cells when cultured under non-adherent conditions. Increased paclitaxel-specific resistance was observed in floating cells compared to attached cells in H460, MCF-7, and HepG2 human cancer cell lines, by 15.6-, 3.9-, and 2.6-fold increases in IC50 values, respectively. qRT-PCR analysis showed that a paclitaxel-resistant β-tubulin isotype, βIVa-tubulin, was the most up-regulated gene compared with other β-tubulin isotypes in H460 floating cells, concomitant with elevated ERK activation. ERK inhibitor treatment could attenuate the up-regulation of βIVa-tubulin, and decreased the paclitaxel resistance of H460 floating cells, even though other β-tubulin isotypes were up-regulated when the ERK activation was blocked. In conclusion, we show induction of paclitaxel resistance in epithelial cancer cells, when floating in non-adherent culture, and this might occur with CTCs of cancer patients.

  1. Effects of Fibronectin Coating on Bacterial and Osteoblast Progenitor Cells Adherence in a Co-culture Assay.

    PubMed

    Hindié, Mathilde; Wu, Dongni; Anselme, Karine; Gallet, Olivier; Di Martino, Patrick

    2016-07-06

    Bacterial adherence to the surface of implants functionalized with cell-adhesive biomolecules is a critical first step of infection development. This study was designed to determine how the immobilization of human plasmatic fibronectin (pFN) could impact bacterial and osteoblast cells interaction with the surface during concomitant exposition to the two cell-types. Calibrated suspensions of P. aeruginosa PAOI or S. aureus CIP4.83 bacteria and STRO-1(+)A osteoblast progenitor cells were mixed, co-seeded on glass coverslips coated or not with pFN and incubated at 37 °C. After 3 h of co-culture, the presence of bacteria did not modify the STRO-1(+)A cells adherence to glass. pFN coating significantly enhanced STRO-1(+)A cells, CIP4.83 and PAOI adherence to glass and bacterial interaction with STRO-1(+)A cells. Confocal laser scanning microscopy observations revealed that cells on the pFN-coated substrate exhibited a greater spreading, better organized network of cytoskeletal filaments, and an increased cellular FN expression than cells on the uncoated substrate. The use of fluorescently labeled pFN showed that adherent STRO-1(+)A cells were able to remodel and to concentrate coated pFN at the cells surface. Thus, the use of FN coating could increase the risk of bacterial adherence to the material surface, acting either directly onto the coating layer or indirectly on adherent osteoblastic cells. This may increase the infection risk in the presence of bacterial contamination.

  2. Factors influencing bacterial adherence to biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Merritt, K; Chang, C C

    1991-01-01

    The adherence of bacteria to implanted medical devices is believed to be important in the development of implant associated infections. Measures which reduce bacterial adherence should reduce the incidence of these infections. However, in order to assess the importance of adherence, the effectiveness of methods to reduce adherence, and compare data from different laboratories, the conditions of the in vitro studies on adherence need to be specified. There are currently no correct and incorrect methods, however, methods used need to be carefully described. The studies reported here indicate that the definition of adherence needs to be established, with the use of polystyrene as the reference material recommended. Since the adherent organisms lose adherence traits with culture, cultures must be selected for adherence regularly. It is important to control the number of organisms/ml but the volume used is not important. The medium used to grow the organisms and the use of stationary, rocking or flow conditions will alter adherence and need to be specified and be consistent within a set of experiments. Culture conditions, methods of rinsing the material, methods of elution and counting, or direct counting of organisms on the material need to be specified. Finally, as much information as possible on the bulk and surface properties of the material should be provided. The handling of the material for the experiments should be careful and defined. Fingerprints, contact with protein, wet surfaces vs dry surfaces, etc., will all affect the subsequent adherence. The materials should not be re-used since the removal of the adherent proteins or the biofilm is very difficult. Progress can be made in this important area if the details of procedures are specified.

  3. Adherent cells in granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-induced bone marrow-derived dendritic cell culture system are qualified dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Gong-Bo; Lu, Guang-Xiu

    2010-01-01

    A widely-used method for generating dendritic cell (DC) is to culture bone marrow cells in granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-containing medium for 6-10 days. Usually, non-adherent cells are used as qualified dendritic cells while the adherent ones are discarded as "non-dendritic cells" or macrophages. In this study, we show that the adherent cells are nearly identical to the non-adherent cells in both dendritic cell surface markers expression and main dendritic cell-related functions, hence to prove that these "junk cells" are actually qualified dendritic cells.

  4. Medication Adherence and Blood Pressure Control Among Hypertensive Patients With Coexisting Long-Term Conditions in Primary Care Settings

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu Ting; Wang, Harry H.X.; Liu, Kirin Q.L.; Lee, Gabrielle K.Y.; Chan, Wai Man; Griffiths, Sian M.; Chen, Ruo Ling

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hypertension is a typical example of long-term disease posing formidable challenges to health care. One goal of antihypertensive therapy is to achieve optimal blood pressure (BP) control and reduce co-occurring chronic conditions (multimorbidity). This study aimed to assess the influence of multimorbidity on medication adherence, and to explore the association between poor BP control and multimorbidity, with implications for hypertension management. A cross-sectional design with multistage sampling was adopted to recruit Chinese hypertensive patients attending general out-patient clinics from 3 geographic regions in Hong Kong. A modified systemic sampling methodology with 1 patient as a sampling unit was used to recruit consecutive samples in each general out-patient clinic. Data were collected by face-to-face interviews using a standardized protocol. Poor BP control was defined as having systolic BP/diastolic BP ≥130/80 mm Hg for those with diabetes or chronic kidney disease; and ≥140/90 mm Hg for others. Medication adherence was assessed by a validated Chinese version of the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale. A simple unweighted enumeration was adopted to measure the combinations of coexisting long-term conditions. Binary logistic regression analysis was conducted with medication adherence and multimorbidity as outcome variables, respectively, after controlling for effects of patient-level covariates. The prevalence of multimorbidity was 47.4% (95% confidence interval [CI] 45.4%–49.4%) among a total of 2445 hypertensive patients. The proportion of subjects having 0, 1, and ≥2 additional long-term conditions was 52.6%, 29.1%, and 18.3%, respectively. The overall rate of poor adherence to medication was 46.6%, whereas the rate of suboptimal BP control was 48.7%. Albeit the influence of multimorbidity on medication adherence was not found to be statistically significant, patients with poorly controlled BP were more likely to have multimorbidity

  5. Experiments with osteoblasts cultured under hypergravity conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kacena, Melissa A.; Todd, Paul; Gerstenfeld, Louis C.; Landis, William J.

    2004-01-01

    To understand further the role of gravity in osteoblast attachment, osteoblasts were subjected to hypergravity conditions in vitro. Scanning electron microscopy of all confluent coverslips from FPA units show that the number of attached osteoblasts was similar among gravitational levels and growth durations (90 cells/microscopic field). Specifically, confluent 1.0 G control cultures contained an average of 91 +/- 8 cells/field, 3.3 G samples had 88 +/- 8 cells/field, and 4.0 G cultures averaged 90 +/- 7 cells/field. The sparsely plated cultures assessed by immunohistochemistry also had similar numbers of cells at each time point (l.0 G was similar to 3.3 and 4.0 G), but cell number changed from one time point to the next as those cells proliferated. Immunohistochemistry of centrifuged samples showed an increase in number (up to 160% increase) and thickness (up to 49% increase) of actin fibers, a decrease in intensity of fibronectin fluorescence (18-23% decrease) and an increase in number of vinculin bulbs (202-374% increase in number of vinculin bulbs/area). While hypergravity exposure did not alter the number of attached osteoblasts, it did result in altered actin, fibronectin, and vinculin elements, changing some aspects of osteoblast- substrate adhesion.

  6. Development and Cultural Adaptation Of the Spanish Version of the End Stage Renal Disease Adherence Questionnaire (SESRD-AQ)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youngmee; Evangelista, Lorraine S.

    2015-01-01

    We previously developed and validated the End-Stage Renal Disease Adherence Questionnaire (ESRD-AQ) to measure adherence behaviors (e.g., hemodialysis attendance, medication use, fluid restrictions, and diet) of patients on maintenance hemodialysis. To determine whether the ESRD-AQ can be used to measure adherence behaviors in non- English-speaking patients, we translated and adapted the ESRD-AQ into Spanish (SESRD-AQ) using forward and backward translation and cultural adaptation of the content. Validity and reliability were measured using item-level content validity indexes, intraclass correlation coefficients, and known-group analysis. All validity indices were within an acceptable range; strong test-retest stability existed across all items, with intraclass correlation coefficients ranging from 0.82 to 1.00. The developed SESRD-AQ is a valid assessment tool for use among Spanish-speaking patients on maintenance hemodialysis. This instrument refinement and validation process can be replicated with other maintenance hemodialysis population groups. PMID:24579396

  7. Effects of anti-odor automobile air-conditioning system products on adherence of Serratia marcescens to aluminum.

    PubMed

    Drago, G K; Simmons, R B; Price, D L; Crow, S A; Ahearn, D G

    2002-12-01

    Sixteen commercial products for use in automobile air-conditioning systems (ACS), most designated for abatement of malodors presumably of microbial origin, were examined for their potential to inhibit attachment and to detach cells of the Gram-negative bacterium Serratia marcescens on aluminum sections. Numbers of attached cells were appreciably reduced (>60%) following immersion in three alcohol-type and two acrylic-coating-type products. Several products had essentially no effect on the attached cells. Most of the products indicated for alleviation of associated microbial odors from ACS provided only short-term effects. When products were coated onto aluminum prior to exposure to the cells, water-insoluble coatings appeared to provide more consistent inhibition of primary adherence of S. marcescens. The differences in degrees of primary adherence of a selected strain of S. marcescens to variously treated aluminum provided a rapid and reproducible assessment of potential antimicrobial efficacy of ACS products.

  8. Characterization of Three-Dimensional Retinal Tissue Derived from Human Embryonic Stem Cells in Adherent Monolayer Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ratnesh K.; Mallela, Ramya K.; Cornuet, Pamela K.; Reifler, Aaron N.; Chervenak, Andrew P.; West, Michael D.; Wong, Kwoon Y.; Nasonkin, Igor O.

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapy of retinal degenerative conditions is a promising modality to treat blindness, but requires new strategies to improve the number of functionally integrating cells. Grafting semidifferentiated retinal tissue rather than progenitors allows preservation of tissue structure and connectivity in retinal grafts, mandatory for vision restoration. Using human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), we derived retinal tissue growing in adherent conditions consisting of conjoined neural retina and retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and evaluated cell fate determination and maturation in this tissue. We found that deriving such tissue in adherent conditions robustly induces all eye field genes (RX, PAX6, LHX2, SIX3, SIX6) and produces four layers of pure populations of retinal cells: RPE (expressing NHERF1, EZRIN, RPE65, DCT, TYR, TYRP, MITF, PMEL), early photoreceptors (PRs) (coexpressing CRX and RCVRN), inner nuclear layer neurons (expressing CALB2), and retinal ganglion cells [RGCs, expressing BRN3B and Neurofilament (NF) 200]. Furthermore, we found that retinal progenitors divide at the apical side of the hESC-derived retinal tissue (next to the RPE layer) and then migrate toward the basal side, similar to that found during embryonic retinogenesis. We detected synaptogenesis in hESC-derived retinal tissue, and found neurons containing many synaptophysin-positive boutons within the RGC and PR layers. We also observed long NF200-positive axons projected by RGCs toward the apical side. Whole-cell recordings demonstrated that putative amacrine and/or ganglion cells exhibited electrophysiological responses reminiscent of those in normal retinal neurons. These responses included voltage-gated Na+ and K+ currents, depolarization-induced spiking, and responses to neurotransmitter receptor agonists. Differentiation in adherent conditions allows generation of long and flexible pieces of 3D retinal tissue suitable for isolating transplantable slices of tissue for

  9. Differential Radiosensitizing Effect of Valproic Acid in Differentiation Versus Self-Renewal Promoting Culture Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Debeb, Bisrat G.; Xu Wei; Mok, Henry; Li Li; Robertson, Fredika; Ueno, Naoto T.; Reuben, Jim; Lucci, Anthony; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Woodward, Wendy A.

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: It has been shown that valproic acid (VA) enhances the proliferation and self-renewal of normal hematopoietic stem cells and that breast cancer stem/progenitor cells can be resistant to radiation. From these data, we hypothesized that VA would fail to radiosensitize breast cancer stem/progenitor cells grown to three-dimensional (3D) mammospheres. Methods and Materials: We used the MCF7 breast cancer cell line grown under stem cell-promoting culture conditions (3D mammosphere) and standard nonstem cell monolayer culture conditions (two-dimensional) to examine the effect of pretreatment with VA on radiation sensitivity in clonogenic survival assays and on the expression of embryonic stem cell transcription factors. Results: 3D-cultured MCF-7 cells expressed higher levels of Oct4, Nanog, and Sox2. The 3D passage enriched self-renewal and increased radioresistance in the 3D mammosphere formation assays. VA radiosensitized adherent cells but radioprotected 3D cells in single-fraction clonogenic assays. Moreover, fractionated radiation sensitized VA-treated adherent MCF7 cells but did not have a significant effect on VA-treated single cells grown to mammospheres. Conclusion: We have concluded that VA might preferentially radiosensitize differentiated cells compared with those expressing stem cell surrogates and that stem cell-promoting culture is a useful tool for in vitro evaluation of novel cancer therapeutic agents and radiosensitizers.

  10. Improved conditions for murine epidermal cell culture.

    PubMed

    Fischer, S M; Viaje, A; Harris, K L; Miller, D R; Bohrman, J S; Slaga, T J

    1980-02-01

    An improved method for cultivating newborn mouse epidermal cells has been developed that increases the longevity, epithelial nature and efficiency of cell-line establishment. The use of Super Medium, an enriched Waymouth's formulation, increased proliferation for long periods of time, as did incubation at 31 degrees C rather than 37 degrees C. The fetal bovine serum requirement was found to be reduced at the lower temperature. An increase in labeling indices was seen when epidermal growth factor (EGF) or the cyclic nucleotides were added and the presence of EGF receptors was determined. Of the prostaglandins (PG) examined, PGE1 and PGE2 produced the greatest increase in DNA synthesis. The PG precursors, arachidonic and 8,11,14-eicosatrienoic acid, were also greatly stimulatory. The use of a lethally irradiated 3T3 feeder layer at 31 degrees C proved superior in maintenance of an epithelial morphology. Subculturable cell lines were established much more readily and reproducibly in carcinogen-treated cultures grown under the improved conditions.

  11. Conditioning Factors of an Organizational Learning Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rebelo, Teresa Manuela; Gomes, Adelino Duarte

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to assess the relationship between some variables (organizational structure, organizational dimension and age, human resource characteristics, the external environment, strategy and quality) and organizational learning culture and evaluate the way they interact with this kind of culture.…

  12. African-Americans' perceptions of health care provider cultural competence that promote HIV medical self-care and antiretroviral medication adherence.

    PubMed

    Gaston, Gina B

    2013-01-01

    Most studies of cultural competence in healthcare examine healthcare providers' definitions of cultural competence practices. This study is unique in that it examines the relationship between African-American patients' perceptions of the cultural competence of their HIV healthcare providers and the adherence of these patients to medical self-care and antiretroviral therapy (ART). This cross-sectional, exploratory, descriptive study was conducted at the Ruth Rothstein CORE Center in Chicago, Illinois. The sample consisted of 202 HIV-positive African-Americans who completed surveys during clinic visits. Multiple measures were used, including the Patient Assessments of Cultural Competency survey instrument developed by the Department of Health and Human Services Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Medical self-care was measured using the advice and instructions scale and the self-care symptom management for people living with HIV/AIDS categorical scale. ART adherence was measured using the Adherence Behaviors Self-Report and Adherence Self-Report scales. The data revealed many significant correlations between variables. The more patients believed that providers should integrate culture in HIV treatment; the better their reported health (F1,138=0.151, P=0.05) and the more they followed their provider's advice and instructions (medical self-care; F1,138=0.029, P=0.05). Participants who trusted their providers engaged in more medical self-care (F1,138=0.280, P=0.01). More shared treatment decisions were reported among participants who had higher levels of education (F1,127=0.337, P=0.05). Findings of this study indicate the need for increased attention to the role of cultural competence in HIV/AIDS care. Understanding patient perceptions of provider cultural competence has the potential to improve HIV treatment adherence and health outcomes.

  13. Extracellular mass transport considerations for space flight research concerning suspended and adherent in vitro cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Klaus, David M; Benoit, Michael R; Nelson, Emily S; Hammond, Timmothy G

    2004-03-01

    Conducting biological research in space requires consideration be given to isolating appropriate control parameters. For in vitro cell cultures, numerous environmental factors can adversely affect data interpretation. A biological response attributed to microgravity can, in theory, be explicitly correlated to a specific lack of weight or gravity-driven motion occurring to, within or around a cell. Weight can be broken down to include the formation of hydrostatic gradients, structural load (stress) or physical deformation (strain). Gravitationally induced motion within or near individual cells in a fluid includes sedimentation (or buoyancy) of the cell and associated shear forces, displacement of cytoskeleton or organelles, and factors associated with intra- or extracellular mass transport. Finally, and of particular importance for cell culture experiments, the collective effects of gravity must be considered for the overall system consisting of the cells, their environment and the device in which they are contained. This does not, however, rule out other confounding variables such as launch acceleration, on orbit vibration, transient acceleration impulses or radiation, which can be isolated using onboard centrifuges or vibration isolation techniques. A framework is offered for characterizing specific cause-and-effect relationships for gravity-dependent responses as a function of the above parameters.

  14. Extracellular mass transport considerations for space flight research concerning suspended and adherent in vitro cell cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klaus, David M.; Benoit, Michael R.; Nelson, Emily S.; Hammond, Timmothy G.

    2004-01-01

    Conducting biological research in space requires consideration be given to isolating appropriate control parameters. For in vitro cell cultures, numerous environmental factors can adversely affect data interpretation. A biological response attributed to microgravity can, in theory, be explicitly correlated to a specific lack of weight or gravity-driven motion occurring to, within or around a cell. Weight can be broken down to include the formation of hydrostatic gradients, structural load (stress) or physical deformation (strain). Gravitationally induced motion within or near individual cells in a fluid includes sedimentation (or buoyancy) of the cell and associated shear forces, displacement of cytoskeleton or organelles, and factors associated with intra- or extracellular mass transport. Finally, and of particular importance for cell culture experiments, the collective effects of gravity must be considered for the overall system consisting of the cells, their environment and the device in which they are contained. This does not, however, rule out other confounding variables such as launch acceleration, on orbit vibration, transient acceleration impulses or radiation, which can be isolated using onboard centrifuges or vibration isolation techniques. A framework is offered for characterizing specific cause-and-effect relationships for gravity-dependent responses as a function of the above parameters.

  15. The challenge of patient adherence

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Leslie R; Williams, Summer L; Haskard, Kelly B; DiMatteo, M Robin

    2005-01-01

    Quality healthcare outcomes depend upon patients' adherence to recommended treatment regimens. Patient nonadherence can be a pervasive threat to health and wellbeing and carry an appreciable economic burden as well. In some disease conditions, more than 40% of patients sustain significant risks by misunderstanding, forgetting, or ignoring healthcare advice. While no single intervention strategy can improve the adherence of all patients, decades of research studies agree that successful attempts to improve patient adherence depend upon a set of key factors. These include realistic assessment of patients' knowledge and understanding of the regimen, clear and effective communication between health professionals and their patients, and the nurturance of trust in the therapeutic relationship. Patients must be given the opportunity to tell the story of their unique illness experiences. Knowing the patient as a person allows the health professional to understand elements that are crucial to the patient's adherence: beliefs, attitudes, subjective norms, cultural context, social supports, and emotional health challenges, particularly depression. Physician–patient partnerships are essential when choosing amongst various therapeutic options to maximize adherence. Mutual collaboration fosters greater patient satisfaction, reduces the risks of nonadherence, and improves patients' healthcare outcomes. PMID:18360559

  16. Understanding Patients’ Adherence-Related Beliefs about Medicines Prescribed for Long-Term Conditions: A Meta-Analytic Review of the Necessity-Concerns Framework

    PubMed Central

    Horne, Rob; Chapman, Sarah C. E.; Parham, Rhian; Freemantle, Nick; Forbes, Alastair; Cooper, Vanessa

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients’ beliefs about treatment influence treatment engagement and adherence. The Necessity-Concerns Framework postulates that adherence is influenced by implicit judgements of personal need for the treatment (necessity beliefs) and concerns about the potential adverse consequences of taking it. Objective To assess the utility of the NCF in explaining nonadherence to prescribed medicines. Data sources We searched EMBASE, Medline, PsycInfo, CDSR/DARE/CCT and CINAHL from January 1999 to April 2013 and handsearched reference sections from relevant articles. Study eligibility criteria Studies using the Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire (BMQ) to examine perceptions of personal necessity for medication and concerns about potential adverse effects, in relation to a measure of adherence to medication. Participants Patients with long-term conditions. Study appraisal and synthesis methods Systematic review and meta-analysis of methodological quality was assessed by two independent reviewers. We pooled odds ratios for adherence using random effects models. Results We identified 3777 studies, of which 94 (N = 25,072) fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Across studies, higher adherence was associated with stronger perceptions of necessity of treatment, OR = 1.742, 95% CI [1.569, 1.934], p<0.0001, and fewer Concerns about treatment, OR = 0.504, 95% CI: [0.450, 0.564], p<0.0001. These relationships remained significant when data were stratified by study size, the country in which the research was conducted and the type of adherence measure used. Limitations Few prospective longitudinal studies using objective adherence measures were identified. Conclusions The Necessity-Concerns Framework is a useful conceptual model for understanding patients’ perspectives on prescribed medicines. Taking account of patients’ necessity beliefs and concerns could enhance the quality of prescribing by helping clinicians to engage patients in treatment decisions and

  17. The Chinese Life-Steps Program: A Cultural Adaptation of a Cognitive-Behavioral Intervention to Enhance HIV Medication Adherence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiu, Cheng-Shi; Chen, Wei-Ti; Simoni, Jane; Fredriksen-Goldsen, Karen; Zhang, Fujie; Zhou, Hongxin

    2013-01-01

    China is considered to be the new frontier of the global AIDS pandemic. Although effective treatment for HIV is becoming widely available in China, adherence to treatment remains a challenge. This study aimed to adapt an intervention promoting HIV-medication adherence--favorably evaluated in the West--for Chinese HIV-positive patients. The…

  18. Neutrophils use both shared and distinct mechanisms to adhere to selectins under static and flow conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Patel, K D; Moore, K L; Nollert, M U; McEver, R P

    1995-01-01

    Both P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) and L-selectin are localized on the microvilli of neutrophils and have been implicated in the attachment of neutrophils to P-selectin or E-selectin. We directly compared the attachment and rolling of neutrophils on P-selectin and E-selectin under flow, with emphasis on the functions of PSGL-1 and L-selectin. Flowing neutrophils attached more avidly and rolled at lower velocities on P-selectin than on E-selectin at matched densities. Studies with purified molecules indicated that P-selectin and E-selectin bound to a related site on PSGL-1 that overlapped the epitope for the anti-PSGL-1 mAb PL1. E-selectin bound with lower affinity than P-selectin to this site and also bound to an additional site(s) on PSGL-1.PL1 abolished adhesion of neutrophils to P-selectin under shear or static conditions, whereas DREG-56, a mAb to L-selectin, had no effect on adhesion to P-selectin. PL1 inhibited attachment of neutrophils to E-selectin under flow but not static conditions. DREG-56 also inhibited attachment of flowing neutrophils to E-selectin, and a combination of DREG-56 and PL1 nearly eliminated attachment to E-selectin under flow. These data suggest that PSGL-1 functions cooperatively with L-selectin to mediate optimal attachment of flowing neutrophils to E-selectin but not to P-selectin. Neutrophils attach more efficiently and with greater strength to P-selectin, perhaps because of the higher affinity of P-selectin for the PL1-defined site on PSGL-1. Images PMID:7560080

  19. Cultural adaptation of a cognitive-behavioural intervention to improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy among people living with HIV/AIDS in Zimbabwe: Nzira Itsva.

    PubMed

    Bere, Tarisai; Nyamayaro, Primrose; Magidson, Jessica F; Chibanda, Dixon; Chingono, Alfred; Munjoma, Ronald; Macpherson, Kirsty; Ndhlovu, Chiratidzo Ellen; O'Cleirigh, Conall; Kidia, Khameer; Safren, Steven A; Abas, Melanie

    2016-02-18

    Few evidence-based interventions to improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy have been adapted for use in Africa. We selected, culturally adapted and tested the feasibility of a cognitive-behavioural intervention for adherence and for delivery in a clinic setting in Harare, Zimbabwe. The intervention consisted of a single, 50-minute problem-solving cognitive-behavioural intervention session with four skill-based booster sessions, delivered by four lay adherence counsellors in the context of HIV care. Adaptation followed a theoretically driven approach to intervention adaptation, Assessment-Decision-Administration-Production-Topical Experts-Integration-Training-Testing (ADAPT-ITT), and included modifications to language, session length, tailoring content for delivery by lay counsellors and inclusion of culturally competent probes. The feasibility of the intervention was evaluated using a mixed-methods assessment, including ratings of provider fidelity of intervention delivery, and qualitative assessments of feasibility using individual semi-structured interviews with counsellors (n = 4) and patients (n = 15). The intervention was feasible and acceptable when administered to 42 patients and resulted in improved self-reported adherence in a subset of 15 patients who were followed up after 6 months. Next steps from this study include conducting a randomised control trial to evaluate the adapted intervention compared to standard of care in a larger sample over a long-term follow-up.

  20. AFBI assay – Aptamer Fluorescence Binding and Internalization assay for cultured adherent cells

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, William H.; Giangrande, Paloma H.

    2016-01-01

    The SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment) process allows for the enrichment of DNA or RNA aptamers from a complex nucleic acid library that are specific for a target molecule. The SELEX process has been adapted from identifying aptamers in vitro using recombinant target protein to cell-based methodologies (Cell-SELEX), where the targets are expressed on the surface of cells. One major advantage of Cell-SELEX is that the target molecules are maintained in a native confirmation. Additionally, Cell-SELEX may be used to discover novel therapeutic biomarkers by performing selections on diseased versus healthy cells. However, a caveat to Cell-SELEX is that testing of single aptamers identified in the selection is laborious, time-consuming, and expensive. The most frequently used methods to screen for aptamer binding and internalization on cells are flow cytometry and quantitative PCR (qPCR). While flow cytometry can directly assess binding of a fluorescently-labeled aptamer to a target, it requires significant starting material and is not easily scalable. qPCR-based approaches are highly sensitive but have non-negligible experiment-to-experiment variability due to the number of sample processing steps. Herein we describe a cell-based aptamer fluorescence binding and internalization (AFBI) assay. This assay requires minimal reagents and has few experimental steps/manipulations, thereby allowing for rapid screening of many aptamers and conditions simultaneously and direct quantitation of aptamer binding and internalization. PMID:26972784

  1. [Culture conditions and analysis of amanitins on Amanita spissa].

    PubMed

    Guo, Xue-Wu; Wang, Guo-Lun; Gong, Jian-Hua

    2006-06-01

    Isolate of Amanita spissa was obtained from basidiome stipe material collected from environment. It could utilize a broad range of carbon and nitrogen resources. Study on the influence of different conditions for solid culture was carried out. Optimal culture conditions were at 28 degrees C, pH6, in the dark. A. spissa was then fermentated in liquid culture for more mycelia. In flask and Airlift/ff bioreactor, maximum dry mycelia weight of A. spissa reached 0.893 g/L and 2.33 g/L, respectively. Mycelia obtained from solid culture and Airlift/ff bioreactor were then analyzed by HPLC. The results showed that mycelia from both cultures contained amatoxins but no phallotoxins. alpha-Amanitin in mycelia reached 26.02 microg/DWg under solid culture condition, and 15.25 microg/DWg under liquid culture condition. The amanitins were also confirmed by bud-inhibited assay. The results revealed that the effect of amanitin on mung bean cell was identical to that of authentic amanitins. This work suggests that it is possible to produce amatoxin by liquid culturing of A. spissa.

  2. Story-based scales: development and validation of questionnaires to measure subjective health status and cultural adherence in British Bangladeshis with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Greenhalgh, Trisha; Chowdhury, Mu'min; Wood, Gary W

    2006-11-01

    Questionnaires that measure subjective health status are increasingly used in clinical trials. But scales based on the quantification of subjective traits ("rate your feelings on a scale of 1 to 5") and initially developed in western population samples may not be valid for use in minority ethnic groups, even if accurately translated. The measurement of cultural adaptation and assimilation in immigrant groups is important for health research but has well documented methodological challenges. The aim of this study was to develop valid and reliable questionnaires to measure subjective health status and cultural adherence in a minority ethnic group, using the story as the unit of inquiry. The design was a multi-phase study involving (a) narrative interview, (b) vignette construction, (c) questionnaire development, and (d) questionnaire validation in relation to two scales (well-being and cultural adherence) in British Bangladeshis with diabetes. Using data from in-depth narrative interviews (i.e., a non-directive research technique in which the participant is invited to "tell me the story about your diabetes, starting with when you first noticed anything wrong", and the only prompts used are "tell me more about that" or "what happened next?"; Greenhalgh, Helman, & Chowdhury, 1998; Muller, 1999), we constructed culturally congruent vignettes to depict different subjective health states and behaviours. We refined these items in focus group interviews and validated the instruments on 98 Bangladeshi participants, randomly sampled from GP diabetes registers in inner London and interviewed by a Bangladeshi anthropologist. We used factor analysis to explore the underlying structure in the responses to questionnaire items, plus Cronbach alpha tests to measure internal consistency of scales. The questionnaires were acceptable and credible to Bangladeshi participants with diabetes. Ninety of 98 participants were able and willing to complete them with interviewer assistance

  3. The effect of neurosphere culture conditions on the cellular metabolism of glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Kahlert, Ulf Dietrich; Koch, Katharina; Suwala, Abigail Kora; Hartmann, Rudolf; Cheng, Menglin; Maciaczyk, Donata; Willbold, Dieter; Eberhart, Charles G; Glunde, Kristine; Maciaczyk, Jarek

    2015-01-01

    Malignant gliomas, with an average survival time of 16-19 months after initial diagnosis, account for one of the most lethal tumours overall. Current standards in patient care provide only unsatisfying strategies in diagnostic and treatment for high-grade gliomas. Here we describe metabolic phenomena in the choline and glycine network associated with stem cell culture conditions in the classical glioma cell line U87. Using high-resolution proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of cell culture metabolic extracts we compare the metabolic composition of U87 chronically propagated as adherent culture in medium supplemented with serum to serum-free neurosphere growth. We found that the switch to neurosphere growth, besides the increase of cells expressing the putative glioma stem cell marker CD133, modulated a number of intracellular metabolites including choline, creatine, glycine, and myo-inositol that have been previously reported as potential diagnostic markers in various tumours. These findings highlight the critical influence of culture conditions on glioma cell metabolism, and therefore particular caution should be drawn to the use of in vitro system research in order to investigate cancer metabolism.

  4. Adherence of platelets to in situ albumin-binding surfaces under flow conditions: role of surface-adsorbed albumin.

    PubMed

    Guha Thakurta, Sanjukta; Miller, Robert; Subramanian, Anuradha

    2012-08-01

    Surfaces that preferentially bind human serum albumin (HSA) were generated by grafting albumin-binding linear peptide (LP1) onto silicon surfaces. The research aim was to evaluate the adsorption pattern of proteins and the adhesion of platelets from platelet-poor plasma and platelet-rich plasma, respectively, by albumin-binding surfaces under physiological shear rate (96 and 319 s(-1)) conditions. Bound proteins were quantified using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. A ratio of ∼1000:100:1 of adsorbed HSA, human immunoglobulin (HIgG) and human fibrinogen (HFib) was noted, respectively, on LP1-functionalized surfaces, and a ratio of ∼5:2:1 of the same was noted on control surfaces, as confirmed by ELISAs. The surface-adsorbed von Willebrand factor was undetectable by sensitive ELISAs. The amount of adhered platelets correlated with the ratio of adsorbed HSA/HFib. Platelet morphology was more rounded on LP1-functionalized surfaces when compared to control surfaces. The platelet adhesion response on albumin-binding surfaces can be explained by the reduction in the co-adsorption of other plasma proteins in a surface environment where there is an excess of albumin molecules, coupled with restrictions in the conformational transitions of other surface-adsorbed proteins into hemostatically active forms.

  5. Sleep and Culture in Children with Medical Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Koinis-Mitchell, Daphne

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To provide an integrative review of the existing literature on the interrelationships among sleep, culture, and medical conditions in children. Methods A comprehensive literature search was conducted using PubMed, Medline, and PsychINFO computerized databases and bibliographies of relevant articles. Results Children with chronic illnesses experience more sleep problems than healthy children. Cultural beliefs and practices are likely to impact the sleep of children with chronic illnesses. Few studies have examined cultural factors affecting the relationship between sleep and illness, but existing evidence suggests the relationship between sleep and illness is exacerbated for diverse groups. Conclusions Sleep is of critical importance to children with chronic illnesses. Cultural factors can predispose children both to sleep problems and to certain medical conditions. Additional research is needed to address the limitations of the existing literature, and to develop culturally sensitive interventions to treat sleep problems in children with chronic illnesses. PMID:20332222

  6. Optimal Culture Conditions for Mycelial Growth of Lignosus rhinocerus.

    PubMed

    Lai, W H; Siti Murni, M J; Fauzi, D; Abas Mazni, O; Saleh, N M

    2011-06-01

    Lignosus rhinocerus is a macrofungus that belongs to Polyporaceae and is native to tropical regions. This highly priced mushroom has been used as folk medicine to treat diseases by indigenous people. As a preliminary study to develop a culture method for edible mushrooms, the cultural characteristics of L. rhinocerus were investigated in a range of culture media under different environmental conditions. Mycelial growth of this mushroom was compared on culture media composed of various carbon and nitrogen sources in addition to C/N ratios. The optimal conditions for mycelial growth were 30℃ at pH 6 and 7. Rapid mycelial growth of L. rhinocerus was observed on glucose-peptone and yeast extract peptone dextrose media. Carbon and nitrogen sources promoting mycelial growth of L. rhinocerus were glucose and potassium nitrate, respectively. The optimum C/N ratio was approximately 10 : 1 using 2% glucose supplemented as a carbon source in the basal media.

  7. Single cell dual adherent-suspension co-culture micro-environment for studying tumor-stromal interactions with functionally selected cancer stem-like cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Chih; Zhang, Zhixiong; Fouladdel, Shamileh; Deol, Yadwinder; Ingram, Patrick N; McDermott, Sean P; Azizi, Ebrahim; Wicha, Max S; Yoon, Euisik

    2016-08-07

    Considerable evidence suggests that cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are critical in tumor pathogenesis, but their rarity and transience has led to much controversy about their exact nature. Although CSCs can be functionally identified using dish-based tumorsphere assays, it is difficult to handle and monitor single cells in dish-based approaches; single cell-based microfluidic approaches offer better control and reliable single cell derived sphere formation. However, like normal stem cells, CSCs are heavily regulated by their microenvironment, requiring tumor-stromal interactions for tumorigenic and proliferative behaviors. To enable single cell derived tumorsphere formation within a stromal microenvironment, we present a dual adherent/suspension co-culture device, which combines a suspension environment for single-cell tumorsphere assays and an adherent environment for co-culturing stromal cells in close proximity by selectively patterning polyHEMA in indented microwells. By minimizing dead volume and improving cell capture efficiency, the presented platform allows for the use of small numbers of cells (<100 cells). As a proof of concept, we co-cultured single T47D (breast cancer) cells and primary cancer associated fibroblasts (CAF) on-chip for 14 days to monitor sphere formation and growth. Compared to mono-culture, co-cultured T47D have higher tumorigenic potential (sphere formation rate) and proliferation rates (larger sphere size). Furthermore, 96-multiplexed single-cell transcriptome analyses were performed to compare the gene expression of co-cultured and mono-cultured T47D cells. Phenotypic changes observed in co-culture correlated with expression changes in genes associated with proliferation, apoptotic suppression, tumorigenicity and even epithelial-to-mesechymal transition. Combining the presented platform with single cell transcriptome analysis, we successfully identified functional CSCs and investigated the phenotypic and transcriptome effects induced

  8. Mitigation of Lethal Radiation Syndrome in Mice by Intramuscular Injection of 3D Cultured Adherent Human Placental Stromal Cells.

    PubMed

    Gaberman, Elena; Pinzur, Lena; Levdansky, Lilia; Tsirlin, Maria; Netzer, Nir; Aberman, Zami; Gorodetsky, Raphael

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to high lethal dose of ionizing radiation results in acute radiation syndrome with deleterious systemic effects to different organs. A primary target is the highly sensitive bone marrow and the hematopoietic system. In the current study C3H/HeN mice were total body irradiated by 7.7 Gy. Twenty four hrs and 5 days after irradiation 2×10(6) cells from different preparations of human derived 3D expanded adherent placental stromal cells (PLX) were injected intramuscularly. Treatment with batches consisting of pure maternal cell preparations (PLX-Mat) increased the survival of the irradiated mice from ∼27% to 68% (P<0.001), while cell preparations with a mixture of maternal and fetal derived cells (PLX-RAD) increased the survival to ∼98% (P<0.0001). The dose modifying factor of this treatment for both 50% and 37% survival (DMF50 and DMF37) was∼1.23. Initiation of the more effective treatment with PLX-RAD injection could be delayed for up to 48 hrs after irradiation with similar effect. A delayed treatment by 72 hrs had lower, but still significantly effect (p<0.05). A faster recovery of the BM and improved reconstitution of all blood cell lineages in the PLX-RAD treated mice during the follow-up explains the increased survival of the cells treated irradiated mice. The number of CD45+/SCA1+ hematopoietic progenitor cells within the fast recovering population of nucleated BM cells in the irradiated mice was also elevated in the PLX-RAD treated mice. Our study suggests that IM treatment with PLX-RAD cells may serve as a highly effective "off the shelf" therapy to treat BM failure following total body exposure to high doses of radiation. The results suggest that similar treatments may be beneficial also for clinical conditions associated with severe BM aplasia and pancytopenia.

  9. Mitigation of Lethal Radiation Syndrome in Mice by Intramuscular Injection of 3D Cultured Adherent Human Placental Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gaberman, Elena; Pinzur, Lena; Levdansky, Lilia; Tsirlin, Maria; Netzer, Nir; Aberman, Zami; Gorodetsky, Raphael

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to high lethal dose of ionizing radiation results in acute radiation syndrome with deleterious systemic effects to different organs. A primary target is the highly sensitive bone marrow and the hematopoietic system. In the current study C3H/HeN mice were total body irradiated by 7.7 Gy. Twenty four hrs and 5 days after irradiation 2×106 cells from different preparations of human derived 3D expanded adherent placental stromal cells (PLX) were injected intramuscularly. Treatment with batches consisting of pure maternal cell preparations (PLX-Mat) increased the survival of the irradiated mice from ∼27% to 68% (P<0.001), while cell preparations with a mixture of maternal and fetal derived cells (PLX-RAD) increased the survival to ∼98% (P<0.0001). The dose modifying factor of this treatment for both 50% and 37% survival (DMF50 and DMF37) was∼1.23. Initiation of the more effective treatment with PLX-RAD injection could be delayed for up to 48 hrs after irradiation with similar effect. A delayed treatment by 72 hrs had lower, but still significantly effect (p<0.05). A faster recovery of the BM and improved reconstitution of all blood cell lineages in the PLX-RAD treated mice during the follow-up explains the increased survival of the cells treated irradiated mice. The number of CD45+/SCA1+ hematopoietic progenitor cells within the fast recovering population of nucleated BM cells in the irradiated mice was also elevated in the PLX-RAD treated mice. Our study suggests that IM treatment with PLX-RAD cells may serve as a highly effective “off the shelf” therapy to treat BM failure following total body exposure to high doses of radiation. The results suggest that similar treatments may be beneficial also for clinical conditions associated with severe BM aplasia and pancytopenia. PMID:23823334

  10. Rethinking adherence.

    PubMed

    Steiner, John F

    2012-10-16

    In 2012, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) will introduce measures of adherence to oral hypoglycemic, antihypertensive, and cholesterol-lowering drugs into its Medicare Advantage quality program. To meet these quality goals, delivery systems will need to develop and disseminate strategies to improve adherence. The design of adherence interventions has too often been guided by the mistaken assumptions that adherence is a single behavior that can be predicted from readily available patient characteristics and that individual clinicians alone can improve adherence at the population level.Effective interventions require recognition that adherence is a set of interacting behaviors influenced by individual, social, and environmental forces; adherence interventions must be broadly based, rather than targeted to specific population subgroups; and counseling with a trusted clinician needs to be complemented by outreach interventions and removal of structural and organizational barriers. To achieve the adherence goals set by CMS, front-line clinicians, interdisciplinary teams, organizational leaders, and policymakers will need to coordinate efforts in ways that exemplify the underlying principles of health care reform.

  11. Multiple roles of Activin/Nodal, bone morphogenetic protein, fibroblast growth factor and Wnt/β-catenin signalling in the anterior neural patterning of adherent human embryonic stem cell cultures

    PubMed Central

    Lupo, Giuseppe; Novorol, Claire; Smith, Joseph R.; Vallier, Ludovic; Miranda, Elena; Alexander, Morgan; Biagioni, Stefano; Pedersen, Roger A.; Harris, William A.

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have successfully produced a variety of neural cell types from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), but there has been limited systematic analysis of how different regional identities are established using well-defined differentiation conditions. We have used adherent, chemically defined cultures to analyse the roles of Activin/Nodal, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and Wnt/β-catenin signalling in neural induction, anteroposterior patterning and eye field specification in hESCs. We show that either BMP inhibition or activation of FGF signalling is required for effective neural induction, but these two pathways have distinct outcomes on rostrocaudal patterning. While BMP inhibition leads to specification of forebrain/midbrain positional identities, FGF-dependent neural induction is associated with strong posteriorization towards hindbrain/spinal cord fates. We also demonstrate that Wnt/β-catenin signalling is activated during neural induction and promotes acquisition of neural fates posterior to forebrain. Therefore, inhibition of this pathway is needed for efficient forebrain specification. Finally, we provide evidence that the levels of Activin/Nodal and BMP signalling have a marked influence on further forebrain patterning and that constitutive inhibition of these pathways represses expression of eye field genes. These results show that the key mechanisms controlling neural patterning in model vertebrate species are preserved in adherent, chemically defined hESC cultures and reveal new insights into the signals regulating eye field specification. PMID:23576785

  12. Economic Evaluation of Text-Messaging and Smartphone-Based Interventions to Improve Medication Adherence in Adolescents with Chronic Health Conditions: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Kuhns, Lisa M

    2016-01-01

    Background The rate of chronic health conditions (CHCs) in children and adolescents has doubled in the past 20 years, with increased health care costs. Technology-based interventions have demonstrated efficacy to improving medication adherence. However, data to support the cost effectiveness of these interventions are lacking. Objective The objective of this study is to conduct an economic evaluation of text-messaging and smartphone-based interventions that focus on improving medication adherence in adolescents with CHCs. Methods Searches included PubMed MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, PsycINFO, Web of Science, and Inspec. Eligibility criteria included age (12-24 years old), original articles, outcomes for medication adherence, and economic outcomes. Results Our search identified 1118 unique articles that were independently screened. A total of 156 articles met inclusion criteria and were then examined independently with full-text review. A total of 15 articles met most criteria but lacked economic outcomes such as cost effectiveness or cost-utility data. No articles met all predefined criteria to be included for final review. Only 4 articles (text messaging [n=3], electronic directly observed therapy [n=1]) described interventions with possible future cost-saving but no formal economic evaluation. Conclusions The evidence to support the cost effectiveness of text-messaging and smartphone-based interventions in improving medication adherence in adolescents with CHCs is insufficient. This lack of research highlights the need for comprehensive economic evaluation of such interventions to better understand their role in cost-savings while improving medication adherence and health outcomes. Economic evaluation of technology-based interventions can contribute to more evidence-based assessment of the scalability, sustainability, and benefits of broader investment of such technology

  13. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans adheres to human gingival fibroblasts and modifies cytoskeletal organization.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Venegas, Gloria; Kawasaki-Cárdenas, Perla; Garcés, Carla Portillo; Román-Alvárez, Patricia; Barajas-Torres, Carolina; Contreras-Marmolejo, Luis Arturo

    2007-09-01

    Adherence of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans to human gingival fibroblast cells induces cytoskeletal reorganization. A. actinomycetemcomitans is considered a pathogenic bacteria involved in localized aggressive periodontitis. Studies with epithelial cells have shown an adherent capacity of bacteria that is increased under anaerobic conditions. For adherence to take place, there is a need for interaction between extracellular vesicles and bacterial fimbriae. However, molecular events associated with the adherence process are still unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate whether A. actinomycetemcomitans adherence to human gingival fibroblasts promotes cytoskeletal reorganization. Adherence was determined with light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. For F-actin visualization, cells were treated with fluorescein-isothiocyanate-phalloidin and samples were examined with epifluorescence optics. Fluorescent was recorded on Kodak T-Max 400 film. We showed that A. actinomycetemcomitans adheres to human gingival fibroblast primary cultures, this property stimulating an increase in the intracellular calcium levels. In human gingival fibroblast primary cultures, we observed that maximal A. actinomycetemcomitans adherence took place 1.5h after culture infection occurred and remained for 6h. The adherence was associated with morphologic alterations and an increased in the intracellular calcium levels. These experiments suggest that A. actinomycetemcomitans adherence cause morphological alterations, induce actin stress fibers and recruitment of intracellular calcium levels.

  14. EFFECT OF CATALASE AND CULTURAL CONDITIONS ON GROWTH OF BEGGIATOA.

    PubMed

    BURTON, S D; MORITA, R Y

    1964-12-01

    Burton, Sheril D. (Oregon State University, Corvallis), and Richard Y. Morita. Effect of catalase and cultural conditions on growth of Beggiatoa. J. Bacteriol. 88:1755-1761. 1964.-The addition of catalase to culture medium increased the period of viability of Beggiatoa from 1 week to 2 months. Addition of catalase also produced a marked increase in cell yield and enzyme activity. Cultures grown without catalase exhibited an absorption peak characteristic of peroxides. This absorption peak was removed by addition of catalase during or after growth. Oxygen was required for growth, but carbon dioxide was not produced. Malate and acetate stimulated growth at low concentrations. Glucose and thiosulfate were not oxidized, and cytochromes were not detectable by spectrophotometric analysis.

  15. Exploring the cultural context of HIV stigma on antiretroviral therapy adherence among people living with HIV/AIDS in southwest Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Okoror, Titilayo A; Falade, Catherine O; Olorunlana, Adetayo; Walker, Ebunlomo M; Okareh, Oladapo T

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the cultural context of HIV stigma on antiretroviral therapy adherence among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in southwest Nigeria. Using purposive sampling, participants were recruited through a community-based organization. Consenting PLWHA participated in in-depth interviews and focus group discussions that were audio-taped. Using Deacon's conceptual framework of stigma, four opinion guides facilitated the interviews and discussions. Interviews and discussions were conducted in three languages, and lasted from 45 min to 2 h. A total of 35 women and men participated in the study. Participants ranged in age from 22 to 58 years, with an average of 4 years since clinical diagnosis of HIV/AIDS. All participants were receiving ART, and self-reported high adherence level. Using thematic analysis, three themes emerged: life before ART, life after ART, and strategies used in ART adherence. In describing their lives before ART, participants reported experiencing self, anticipated and enacted stigmas due to their sickly appearance from HIV-related complications. After initiating ART, participants talked about friends and families "returning to them" and "apologizing for abandoning" them once they started "looking well." In response to anticipated stigma, many reported sticking to their medications. Drawing from the cultural milieu as part of their strategies, participants discussed the use of plastic bags for medications and àkònpó, as ways of diverting attention from their use of many medications. Implications for ART program policies and stigma interventions were discussed, along with limitation of a short-term ART study on stigma since long-term use of ART can contribute to stigma by way of lipoatrophy as PLWHA age.

  16. Carotenoid Production by Halophilic Archaea Under Different Culture Conditions.

    PubMed

    Calegari-Santos, Rossana; Diogo, Ricardo Alexandre; Fontana, José Domingos; Bonfim, Tania Maria Bordin

    2016-05-01

    Carotenoids are pigments that may be used as colorants and antioxidants in food, pharmaceutical, and cosmetic industries. Since they also benefit human health, great efforts have been undertaken to search for natural sources of carotenoids, including microbial ones. The optimization of culture conditions to increase carotenoid yield is one of the strategies used to minimize the high cost of carotenoid production by microorganisms. Halophilic archaea are capable of producing carotenoids according to culture conditions. Their main carotenoid is bacterioruberin with 50 carbon atoms. In fact, the carotenoid has important biological functions since it acts as cell membrane reinforcement and it protects the microorganism against DNA damaging agents. Moreover, carotenoid extracts from halophilic archaea have shown high antioxidant capacity. Therefore, current review summarizes the effect of different culture conditions such as salt and carbon source concentrations in the medium, light incidence, and oxygen tension on carotenoid production by halophilic archaea and the strategies such as optimization methodology and two-stage cultivation already used to increase the carotenoid yield of these microorganisms.

  17. Biocatalytic polymer coatings: on-demand drug synthesis and localized therapeutic effect under dynamic cell culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Fejerskov, Betina; Jensen, Najah B S; Teo, Boon M; Städler, Brigitte; Zelikin, Alexander N

    2014-04-09

    Biocatalytic surface coatings are prepared herein for localized synthesis of drugs and their on-demand, site-specific delivery to adhering cells. This novel approach is based on the incorporation of an enzyme into multilayered polymer coatings to accomplish enzyme-prodrug therapy (EPT). The build-up of enzyme-containing multilayered coatings is characterized and correlations are drawn between the multilayer film assembly conditions and the enzymatic activity of the resulting coatings. Therapeutic effect elicited by the substrate mediated EPT (SMEPT) strategy is investigated using a prodrug for an anticancer agent, SN-38. The performance of biocatalytic coatings under flow conditions is investigated and it is demonstrated that EPT allows synthesizing the drugs on-demand, at the time desired and in a controllable amount to suit particular applications. Finally, using cells cultured in sequentially connected flow chambers, it is demonstrated that SMEPT affords a site-specific drug delivery, that is, exerts a higher therapeutic effect in cells adhering directly to the biocatalytic coatings than in the cells cultured "downstream". Taken together, these data illustrate biomedical opportunities made possible by engineering tools of EPT into multilayered polymer coatings and present a novel, highly versatile tool for surface mediated drug delivery.

  18. Linking non-culturable (qPCR) and culturable enterococci densities with hydrometeorological conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N.; Whitman, Richard L.; Shively, Dawn A.; Nevers, Meredith B.

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) measurement of enterococci has been proposed as a rapid technique for assessment of beach water quality, but the response of qPCR results to environmental conditions has not been fully explored. Culture-based E. coli and enterococci have been used in empirical predictive models to characterize their responses to environmental conditions and to increase monitoring frequency and efficiency. This approach has been attempted with qPCR results only in few studies. During the summer of 2006, water samples were collected from two southern Lake Michigan beaches and the nearby river outfall (Burns Ditch) and were analyzed for enterococci by culture-based and non-culture-based (i.e., qPCR) methods, as well as culture-based E. coli. Culturable enterococci densities (log CFU/100 ml) for the beaches were significantly correlated with enterococci qPCR cell equivalents (CE) (R = 0.650, P N = 32). Enterococci CE and CFU densities were highest in Burns Ditch relative to the beach sites; however, only CFUs were significantly higher (P R = 0.565, P N = 32). Culturable E. coli and enterococci densities were significantly correlated (R = 0.682, P N = 32). Regression analyses suggested that enterococci CFU could be predicted by lake turbidity, Burns Ditch discharge, and wind direction (adjusted R2 = 0.608); enterococci CE was best predicted by Burns Ditch discharge and log-transformed lake turbidity × wave height (adjusted R2 = 0.40). In summary, our results show that analytically, the qPCR method compares well to the non-culture-based method for measuring enterococci densities in beach water and that both these approaches can be predicted by hydrometeorological conditions. Selected predictors and model results highlight the differences between the environmental responses of the two method endpoints and the potentially high variance in qPCR results

  19. Effects of the Campylobacter jejuni CJIE1 prophage homologs on adherence and invasion in culture, patient symptoms, and source of infection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Prophages of enteric bacteria are frequently of key importance for the biology, virulence, or host adaptation of their host. Some C. jejuni isolates carry homologs of the CJIE1 (CMLP 1) prophage that carry cargo genes potentially involved in virulence. Possible role(s) of CJIE1 homologs in the biology and virulence of C. jejuni were therefore investigated by using in vitro cell culture assays and by assessing the association of C. jejuni isolates with and without these prophages with patients’ symptoms, with source, and with clonal lineages within the C. jejuni population. Results Four C. jejuni isolates, three carrying the CJIE1-like prophage and one without, were tested in cell culture assays for adherence and invasion. Both adherence and invasion of C. jejuni to cells in culture were increased by the presence of the CJIE1-family prophage. Differences in motility and growth rate did not appear to be responsible. The CJIE1 prophage was present in 23% of isolates from human and non-human sources combined that were obtained through sentinel-site surveillance, and the distribution of CJIE1 in this population showed modest clonal associations. There was no correlation between the presence of the CJIE1 prophage in C. jejuni and patient symptoms, although there was some statistical support for lower rates of abdominal pain and fever when the prophage was present. Little evidence was found for a role of the prophage in host adaptation or host specificity. Conclusion These biological effects suggest that the presence of the prophage may be a marker for differential virulence of some C. jejuni isolates. Ongoing research into the effects of the prophage on protein expression may provide additional insights into the roles the prophage may play in the biology of its host bacterium. PMID:23167543

  20. Primary Human Uterine Leiomyoma Cell Culture Quality Control: Some Properties of Myometrial Cells Cultured under Serum Deprivation Conditions in the Presence of Ovarian Steroids

    PubMed Central

    Sumikawa, Joana Tomomi; Batista, Fabrício Pereira; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar J.; Girão, Manoel J. B. C.; Oliva, Maria Luiza V.

    2016-01-01

    Cell culture is considered the standard media used in research to emulate the in vivo cell environment. Crucial in vivo experiments cannot be conducted in humans and depend on in vitro methodologies such as cell culture systems. However, some procedures involving the quality control of cells in culture have been gradually neglected by failing to acknowledge that primary cells and cell lines change over time in culture. Thus, we report methods based on our experience for monitoring primary cell culture of human myometrial cells derived from uterine leiomyoma. We standardized the best procedure of tissue dissociation required for the study of multiple genetic marker systems that include species-specific antigens, expression of myofibroblast or myoblast markers, growth curve, serum deprivation, starvation by cell cycle synchronization, culture on collagen coated plates, and 17 β-estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4) effects. The results showed that primary myometrial cells from patients with uterine leiomyoma displayed myoblast phenotypes before and after in vitro cultivation, and leiomyoma cells differentiated into mature myocyte cells under the appropriate differentiation-inducing conditions (serum deprivation). These cells grew well on collagen coated plates and responded to E2 and P4, which may drive myometrial and leiomyoma cells to proliferate and adhere into a focal adhesion complex involvement in a paracrine manner. The establishment of these techniques as routine procedures will improve the understanding of the myometrial physiology and pathogenesis of myometrium-derived diseases such as leiomyoma. Mimicking the in vivo environment of fibrotic conditions can prevent false results and enhance results that are based on cell culture integrity. PMID:27391384

  1. A simple method for establishing adherent ex vivo explant cultures from human eye pathologies for use in subsequent calcium imaging and inflammatory studies.

    PubMed

    Andjelic, Sofija; Lumi, Xhevat; Veréb, Zoltán; Josifovska, Natasha; Facskó, Andrea; Hawlina, Marko; Petrovski, Goran

    2014-01-01

    A novel, simple, and reproducible method for cultivating pathological tissues obtained from human eyes during surgery was developed using viscoelastic material as a tissue adherent to facilitate cell attachment and expansion and calcium imaging of cultured cells challenged by mechanical and acetylcholine (ACh) stimulation as well as inflammatory studies. Anterior lens capsule-lens epithelial cells (aLC-LECs) from cataract surgery and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) fibrovascular epiretinal membranes (fvERMs) from human eyes were used in the study. We hereby show calcium signaling in aLC-LECs by mechanical and acetylcholine (ACh) stimulation and indicate presence of ACh receptors in these cells. Furthermore, an ex vivo study model was established for measuring the inflammatory response in fvERMs and aLC-LECs upon TNFα treatment.

  2. A Simple Method for Establishing Adherent Ex Vivo Explant Cultures from Human Eye Pathologies for Use in Subsequent Calcium Imaging and Inflammatory Studies

    PubMed Central

    Veréb, Zoltán; Facskó, Andrea; Hawlina, Marko

    2014-01-01

    A novel, simple, and reproducible method for cultivating pathological tissues obtained from human eyes during surgery was developed using viscoelastic material as a tissue adherent to facilitate cell attachment and expansion and calcium imaging of cultured cells challenged by mechanical and acetylcholine (ACh) stimulation as well as inflammatory studies. Anterior lens capsule-lens epithelial cells (aLC-LECs) from cataract surgery and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) fibrovascular epiretinal membranes (fvERMs) from human eyes were used in the study. We hereby show calcium signaling in aLC-LECs by mechanical and acetylcholine (ACh) stimulation and indicate presence of ACh receptors in these cells. Furthermore, an ex vivo study model was established for measuring the inflammatory response in fvERMs and aLC-LECs upon TNFα treatment. PMID:25276840

  3. Influence of culture conditions on glutathione production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Santos, Lucielen Oliveira; Gonzales, Tatiane Araujo; Ubeda, Beatriz Torsani; Monte Alegre, Ranulfo

    2007-12-01

    A strategy of experimental design using a fractional factorial design (FFD) and a central composite rotatable design (CCRD) were carried out with the aim to obtain the best conditions of temperature (20-30 degrees C), agitation rate (100-300 rpm), initial pH (5.0-7.0), inoculum concentration (5-15%), and glucose concentration (30-70 g/l) for glutathione (GSH) production in shake-flask culture by Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATCC 7754. By a FFD (2(5-2)), the agitation rate, temperature, and pH were found to be significant factors for GSH production. In CCRD (2(2)) was obtained a second-order model equation, and the percent of variation explained by the model was 95%. The results showed that the optimal culture conditions were agitation rate, 300 rpm; temperature, 20 degrees C; initial pH, 5; glucose, 54 g/l; and inoculum concentration, 5%. The highest GSH concentration (154.5 mg/l) was obtained after 72 h of fermentation.

  4. Correlates of Pediatric CPAP Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Stephen M.M.; Jensen, Emily L.; Simon, Stacey L.; Friedman, Norman R.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common pediatric condition characterized by recurrent partial or complete cessation of airflow during sleep, typically due to inadequate upper airway patency. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a therapeutic option that reduces morbidity. Despite efforts to promote use, CPAP adherence is poor in both pediatric and adult populations. We sought to determine whether demographics, insurance status, OSA severity, therapeutic pressure, or comorbid conditions were associated with pediatric CPAP adherence. Methods: A retrospective review of adherence download data was performed on all pediatric patients with initiation or adjustment of CPAP treatment over a one-year period with documented in-laboratory CPAP titration. Patients were grouped as CPAP adherent or non-adherent, where adherence was defined as > 70% nightly use and average usage ≥ 4 hours per night. Differences between the groups were analyzed by χ2 test. Results: Overall, nearly half of participants were CPAP adherent (49%, 69/140). Of the demographic data collected (age, ethnicity, sex, insurance status), only female sex was associated with better adherence (60.9% vs 39.5% of males adherent; odds ratio [OR] = 2.41, 95%CI = 1.20–4.85; p = 0.01). Severity of OSA (diagnostic apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] and degree of hypoxemia), therapeutic pressure, and residual AHI did not impact CPAP adherence (p > 0.05). Patients with developmental delay (DD) were more likely to be adherent with CPAP than those without a DD diagnosis (OR = 2.55, 95%CI = 1.27–5.13; p = 0.007). Female patients with trisomy 21 tended to be more adherent, but this did not reach significance or account for the overall increased adherence associated with female sex. Conclusions: Our study demonstrates that adherence to CPAP therapy is poor but suggests that female sex and developmental delay are associated with better adherence. These findings support efforts to understand the

  5. Adherence to Asian and European American Cultural Values and Attitudes toward Seeking Professional Psychological Help among Asian American College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Bryan S. K.

    2007-01-01

    Possible relations among enculturation and acculturation to cultural values and attitudes toward seeking professional psychological help were examined among 146 Asian American college students. In addition, possible relations between various dimensions of Asian values and attitudes toward seeking professional psychological help were examined. As…

  6. Media Compositions for Three Dimensional Mammalian Tissue Growth Under Microgravity Culture Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Normal mammalian tissue and the culturing process has been developed for the three groups of organ, structural and blood tissue. The cells are grown in vitro under microgravity culture conditions and form three dimensional cells aggregates with normal cell function. The microgravity culture conditions may be microgravity or simulated microgravity created in a horizontal rotating wall culture vessel.

  7. Media Compositions for Three-Dimensional Mammalian Tissue Growth under Microgravity Culture Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Normal mammalian tissue and the culturing process has been developed for the three groups of organ, structural and blood tissue.The cells are grown in vitro under microgravity culture conditions and form three dimensional cells aggregates with normal cell function. The microgravity culture conditions may be microgravity or simulated microgravity created in a horizontal rotating wall culture vessel.

  8. Cell sourcing and culture conditions for fibrin-based valve constructs.

    PubMed

    Williams, Chrysanthi; Johnson, Sandra L; Robinson, Paul S; Tranquillo, Robert T

    2006-06-01

    Cell sourcing for tissue-engineered heart valves remains a critical issue. In this work, human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) or porcine valve interstitial cells (PVIC) were entrapped in adherent fibrin disk constructs and harvested at 3 and 5 weeks. We compared the fibrin remodeling abilities of each cell type in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium (DMEM) and DMEM/F12 supplemented with transforming growth factor beta (TGF), and the response of PVIC to DMEM/F12 supplemented with fibroblast growth factor (FGF), a combination of FGF and TGF, and TGF with varying ascorbic acid (AA) concentrations. Culture media were supplemented with serum, insulin, AA, a fibrinolysis inhibitor, and antibiotics. DMEM maximized collagen and elastin deposition by HDF, while DMEM/F12 with FGF yielded the highest fibrin remodeling response by PVIC. HDF degraded fibrin slower than PVIC, and PVIC constructs had higher cellularity than HDF constructs in DMEM and DMEM/F12 at 3 weeks. FGF addition increased collagen content, collagen deposited per cell, and collagen as percentage of total protein compared to medium supplemented with TGF or TGF and FGF. AA addition increased collagen deposition by PVIC, but there was no dose dependence between 50 and 150 microg/mL AA. These results collectively show that PVIC are able to remodel fibrin faster and exhibit greater mechanical stiffening compared to HDF. Conditions for increased collagen deposition are also identified toward the engineering of valve constructs.

  9. Comparison of Cultured and Wild Sheepshead Minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus) Health Condition Metrics

    EPA Science Inventory

    Four standard health condition metrics (hepatosomatic index, HSI; gonadosomatic index, GSI; fecundity, condition factor) were compared between cultured and wild caught sheepshead minnow (Cyrprinodon variegatus) to determine if laboratory cultured were representative of wild popul...

  10. The Culture Conditions for the Mycelial Growth of Phellinus spp.

    PubMed Central

    Rew, Young-Hyun; Choi, Sung-Guk; Seo, Geon-Sik; Sung, Jae-Mo; Uhm, Jae-Youl

    2006-01-01

    Phellinus genus belonged to Hymenochaetaceae of Basidiomycetes and has been well known as one of the most popular medicinal mushrooms due to high antitumor activity. This study was carried out to obtain the basic information for mycelial culture conditions of Phellinus linteus, P. baumii, and P. gilvus. According to colony diameter and mycelial density, the media for suitable mycelial growth of them were shown in MEA, glucose peptone, and MCM. The optimum temperature for mycelial growth was 30℃. Carbon and nitrogen sources were mannose and malt extract, respectively. The optimum C/N ratio was 10 : 1 to 5 : 1 with 2% glucose concentration, vitamin was thiamine-HCl, organic acid was succinic acid, and mineral salt was MgSO4·7H2O. PMID:24039499

  11. The Culture Conditions for the Mycelial Growth of Phellinus spp.

    PubMed

    Jo, Woo-Sik; Rew, Young-Hyun; Choi, Sung-Guk; Seo, Geon-Sik; Sung, Jae-Mo; Uhm, Jae-Youl

    2006-12-01

    Phellinus genus belonged to Hymenochaetaceae of Basidiomycetes and has been well known as one of the most popular medicinal mushrooms due to high antitumor activity. This study was carried out to obtain the basic information for mycelial culture conditions of Phellinus linteus, P. baumii, and P. gilvus. According to colony diameter and mycelial density, the media for suitable mycelial growth of them were shown in MEA, glucose peptone, and MCM. The optimum temperature for mycelial growth was 30℃. Carbon and nitrogen sources were mannose and malt extract, respectively. The optimum C/N ratio was 10 : 1 to 5: 1 with 2% glucose concentration, vitamin was thiamine-HCl, organic acid was succinic acid, and mineral salt was MgSO4·7H2O.

  12. Impact of environmental factors on the culturability and viability of Listeria monocytogenes under conditions encountered in food processing plants.

    PubMed

    Overney, Anaïs; Jacques-André-Coquin, Joséphine; Ng, Patricia; Carpentier, Brigitte; Guillier, Laurent; Firmesse, Olivier

    2017-03-06

    The ability of Listeria monocytogenes to adhere to and persist on surfaces for months or even years may be responsible for its transmission from contaminated surfaces to food products. Hence the necessity to find effective means to prevent the establishment of L. monocytogenes in food processing environments. The aim of this study was to assess, through a fractional experimental design, the environmental factors that could affect the survival of L. monocytogenes cells on surfaces to thereby prevent the persistence of this pathogen in conditions mimicking those encountered in food processing plants: culture with smoked salmon juice or meat exudate, use of two materials with different hygiene status, biofilm of L. monocytogenes in pure-culture or dual-culture with a Pseudomonas fluorescens strain, application of a drying step after cleaning and disinfection (C&D) and comparison of two strains of L. monocytogenes. Bacterial survival was assessed by culture, qPCR to quantify total cells, and propidium monoazide coupled with qPCR to quantify viable cells and highlight viable but non-culturable (VBNC) cells. Our results showed that failure to apply C&D causes cell persistence on surfaces. Moreover, the sanitation procedure leads only to a loss of culturability and appearance of VBNC populations. However, an additional daily drying step after C&D optimises the effectiveness of these procedures to reduce culturable populations. Our results reinforce the importance to use molecular tools to monitor viable pathogens in food processing plants to avoid underestimating the amounts of cells using only methods based on cell culture.

  13. Relating Health Locus of Control to Health Care Use, Adherence, and Transition Readiness Among Youths With Chronic Conditions, North Carolina, 2015

    PubMed Central

    Nazareth, Meaghan; Richards, Jordan; Javalkar, Karina; Haberman, Cara; Zhong, Yi; Rak, Eniko; Jain, Nina; Ferris, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Health locus of control refers to the belief that health is in one’s control (internal control) or is not in one’s control (external control). Among adults, external locus of control is associated with negative health outcomes, whereas internal locus of control is associated with favorable outcomes. Few studies examined these associations among youths. The objective of our study was to determine how locus of control relates to health care use, medication adherence, missed school, and readiness for transition to adult medical care for youths with chronic conditions. Methods Participants at a camp for youths aged 6 to 17 years with chronic health conditions completed a survey measuring locus of control, readiness for transition to adult care, and medication adherence. Their parents completed a separate part of the survey about health care use and missed school days in the past year. Results A total of 163 youths completed the survey (78.5% white; 52.1% female; mean age, 12.3 y). Internal locus of control (β = 0.196; P = .013) and external Doctor locus of control with doctors controlling disease (β = 0.181; P = .025) were positively associated with transition readiness. External control by chance or with others controlling disease was negatively associated with transition readiness (β = −0.248; P = .002) and positively associated with emergency department visits (β = 0.225; P = .004) and with number of hospital inpatient nights at hospital (β = 0.166; P = .04). Conclusion Adolescents with external control of their health by chance or by other people are at increased risk for negative health outcomes and may fail to develop the self-management skills needed for successful transitioning to adult care. Future studies should examine effects of changes in locus of control on health outcomes among youths. PMID:27442993

  14. Optimizing enrichment culture conditions for detecting Helicobacter pylori in foods.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiuping; Doyle, Michael P

    2002-12-01

    The survival and growth of Helicobacter pylori under enrichment conditions in fresh, autoclaved and irradiated ground beef were determined. H. pylori grew in autoclaved ground beef at 37 degrees C under microaerobic conditions in brain heart infusion broth with 7% horse serum at pH 7.3 after 3 to 7 days of lag time but did not grow within 7 days in irradiated (10 kGy) ground beef under the same enrichment conditions. Adjustment of the enrichment broth to pH 5.5 enabled the growth (ca. 2 log10 CFU/ml) of H. pylori within 7 days in the presence of irradiated ground beef and the prolific growth (ca. 3 to 4 log10 CFU/ml) of H. pylori within 3 days in the presence of autoclaved beef. H. pylori in fresh ground beef could not be isolated from enrichment media with antibiotics; however. H. pylori ureA could be detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in such enrichment media after 1 to 3 days of incubation at 37 degrees C. The addition of supplements, i.e., 0.3% mucin, 0.05% ferrous sulfate, and 0.05% sodium pyruvate or 0.008 M urea, or the adjustment of the enrichment broth pH to 5.5 or 4.5 enabled the detection of H. pylori ureA in enrichment media incubated for 1, 2, 3, and/or 7 days at 37 degrees C. H. pylori in sterile milk refrigerated at 4 degrees C at an initial level of 10(6) CFU/ml was inactivated to an undetectable level within 6 days; however, H. pylori was not detected either by a PCR assay or by the plating of enrichment cultures of 120 raw bovine milk samples.

  15. Hypoxic culture conditions enhance the generation of regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Neildez-Nguyen, Thi My Anh; Bigot, Jérémy; Da Rocha, Sylvie; Corre, Guillaume; Boisgerault, Florence; Paldi, Andràs; Galy, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The generation of large amounts of induced CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ regulatory T (iTreg) cells is of great interest for several immunotherapy applications, therefore a better understanding of signals controlling iTreg cell differentiation and expansion is required. There is evidence that oxidative metabolism may regulate several key signalling pathways in T cells. This prompted us to investigate the effects of oxygenation on iTreg cell generation by comparing the effects of atmospheric (21%) or of low (5%) O2 concentrations on the phenotype of bead-stimulated murine splenic CD4+ T cells from Foxp3-KI-GFP T-cell receptor transgenic mice. The production of intracellular reactive oxygen species was shown to play a major role in the generation of iTreg cells, a process characterized by increased levels of Sirt1, PTEN and Glut1 on the committed cells, independently of the level of oxygenation. The suppressive function of iTreg cells generated either in atmospheric or low oxygen levels was equivalent. However, greater yields of iTreg cells were obtained under low oxygenation, resulting from a higher proliferative rate of the committed Treg cells and higher levels of Foxp3, suggesting a better stability of the differentiation process. Higher expression of Glut1 detected on iTreg cells generated under hypoxic culture conditions provides a likely explanation for the enhanced proliferation of these cells as compared to those cultured under ambient oxygen. Such results have important implications for understanding Treg cell homeostasis and developing in vitro protocols for the generation of Treg cells from naive T lymphocytes. PMID:25243909

  16. Topography Influences Adherent Cell Regulation of Osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, M; Cooper, L F; Ogino, Y; Mendonca, D; Liang, R; Yang, S; Mendonca, G; Uoshima, K

    2016-03-01

    The importance of osteoclast-mediated bone resorption in the process of osseointegration has not been widely considered. In this study, cell culture was used to investigate the hypothesis that the function of implant-adherent bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in osteoclastogenesis is influenced by surface topography. BMSCs isolated from femur and tibia of Sprague-Dawley rats were seeded onto 3 types of titanium surfaces (smooth, micro, and nano) and a control surface (tissue culture plastic) with or without osteogenic supplements. After 3 to 14 d, conditioned medium (CM) was collected. Subsequently, rat bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) were cultured in media supplemented with soluble receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) as well as BMSC CM from each of the 4 surfaces. Gene expression levels of soluble RANKL, osteoprotegerin, tumor necrosis factor α, and M-CSF in cultured BMSCs at different time points were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The number of differentiated osteoclastic cells was determined after tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining. Analysis of variance and t test were used for statistical analysis. The expression of prominent osteoclast-promoting factors tumor necrosis factor α and M-CSF was increased by BMSCs cultured on both micro- and nanoscale titanium topographies (P < 0.01). BMSC CM contained a heat-labile factor that increased BMMs osteoclastogenesis. CM from both micro- and nanoscale surface-adherent BMSCs increased the osteoclast number (P < 0.01). Difference in surface topography altered BMSC phenotype and influenced BMM osteoclastogenesis. Local signaling by implant-adherent cells at the implant-bone interface may indirectly control osteoclastogenesis and bone accrual around endosseous implants.

  17. Non-viral engineering of skin precursor-derived Schwann cells for enhanced NT-3 production in adherent and microcarrier culture.

    PubMed

    Shakhbazau, A; Shcharbin, D; Bryszewska, M; Kumar, R; Wobma, H M; Kallos, M S; Goncharova, N; Seviaryn, I; Kosmacheva, S; Potapnev, M; Midha, R

    2012-01-01

    Genetic engineering of stem cells and their derivatives has the potential to enhance their regenerative capabilities. Here, dendrimer- and lipofection-based approaches were used for non-viral neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) over-expression in Schwann cells differentiated from skin precursors (SKP-SCs). A variety of dendrimers were first tested for transfection efficiency on HEK 293T cells, with PAMAMNH2 G4 found most effective and used subsequently for SKP-SCs transfection. Plasmid-based expression resulted in increased NT-3 release from SKP-SCs in both adherent and microcarrier-based culture. In a proof-of-concept study, the microcarrier/SKP-SCs were implanted into the injured nerve, and transfected cells were shown to detach, integrate into the nerve tissue and associate with regenerating axons. Virus-free systems for transient neurotrophin expression are a feasible and biologically safe option to increase the therapeutic value of stem cells and stem cell-derived cells in nerve repair strategies. Further work to develop bioprocesses for expansion of SKP-SCs on microcarriers in bioreactors is still needed.

  18. [Cross-cultural adaptation and psychometric tests of a self-efficacy scale and an adherence scale for French adolescents with Type 1 diabetes

    PubMed

    Colson, Sébastien; Coté, José; Collombier, Madeleine; Debout, Christophe; Bonnel, Galadriel; Reynaud, Rachel; Lagouanelle-Simeoni, Marie-Claude

    2016-12-01

    Introduction : many structured educational programs, using the concept of self-efficacy, have been studied in English-speaking countries. Background : tools were developed in English to assess this concept along with treatment adherence. However, there seems to be no French version of these tools in scientific literature. Aim : to adapt the tools to the French language and to test the psychometric properties of the Self-Efficacy for Diabetes Self-Management (SEDM) and the Diabetes Self-Management Profile (DSMP). Methods : a cross-cultural adaptation of the SEDM and DSMP in French was performed. The psychometric properties were tested in a pilot study that took place between January 1st and December 31st, 2015. Results : Cronbach’s alpha coefficient of SEDM in French was 0.84, test-retest reliability 0.80 and sensitivity to change was moderate. The Cronbach’s alpha and sensitivity to change of the French DSMP were low, and the test-retest was 0.71. Discussion and conclusions : the first results of the psychometric properties of French SEDM were rather encouraging. The use of the French version of DSMP seems compromised in terms of psychometric properties and the opinion of the participants.

  19. Effect of osteoblastic culture conditions on the structure of poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) foam scaffolds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, A. S.; Zhu, G.; Morris, G. E.; Meszlenyi, R. K.; Mikos, A. G.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) foams are an osteoconductive support that holds promise for the development of bone tissue in vitro and implantation into orthopedic defects. Because it is desirable that foams maintain their shape and size, we examined a variety of foams cultured in vitro with osteoblastic cells. Foams were prepared with different porosities and pore sizes by the method of solvent casting/porogen leaching using 80, 85, and 90 wt% NaCl sieved with particle sizes of 150-300 and 300-500 microm and characterized by mercury intrusion porosimetry. Foams seeded with cells were found to have volumes after 7 days in static culture that decreased with increasing porosity: the least porous exhibited no change in volume while the most porous foams decreased by 39 +/- 10%. In addition, a correlation was observed between decreasing foam volume after 7 days in culture and decreasing internal surface area of the foams prior to seeding. Furthermore, foams prepared with the 300-500 microm porogen had lower porosities, greater mean wall thicknesses between adjacent pores, and larger volumes after 7 days in culture than those prepared with the smaller porogen. Two culture conditions for maintaining cells, static and agitated (in a rotary vessel), were found to have similar influences on foam size, cell density, and osteoblastic function for 7 and 14 days in culture. Finally, we examined unseeded foams in aqueous solutions of pH 3.0, 5.0, and 7.4 and found no significant decrease in foam size with degradation. This study demonstrates that adherent osteoblastic cells may collapse very porous PLGA foams prepared by solvent casting/particulate leaching: a potentially undesirable property for repair of orthopedic defects.

  20. Effect of osteoblastic culture conditions on the structure of poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) foam scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, A S; Zhu, G; Morris, G E; Meszlenyi, R K; Mikos, A G

    1999-10-01

    Poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) foams are an osteoconductive support that holds promise for the development of bone tissue in vitro and implantation into orthopedic defects. Because it is desirable that foams maintain their shape and size, we examined a variety of foams cultured in vitro with osteoblastic cells. Foams were prepared with different porosities and pore sizes by the method of solvent casting/porogen leaching using 80, 85, and 90 wt% NaCl sieved with particle sizes of 150-300 and 300-500 microm and characterized by mercury intrusion porosimetry. Foams seeded with cells were found to have volumes after 7 days in static culture that decreased with increasing porosity: the least porous exhibited no change in volume while the most porous foams decreased by 39 +/- 10%. In addition, a correlation was observed between decreasing foam volume after 7 days in culture and decreasing internal surface area of the foams prior to seeding. Furthermore, foams prepared with the 300-500 microm porogen had lower porosities, greater mean wall thicknesses between adjacent pores, and larger volumes after 7 days in culture than those prepared with the smaller porogen. Two culture conditions for maintaining cells, static and agitated (in a rotary vessel), were found to have similar influences on foam size, cell density, and osteoblastic function for 7 and 14 days in culture. Finally, we examined unseeded foams in aqueous solutions of pH 3.0, 5.0, and 7.4 and found no significant decrease in foam size with degradation. This study demonstrates that adherent osteoblastic cells may collapse very porous PLGA foams prepared by solvent casting/particulate leaching: a potentially undesirable property for repair of orthopedic defects.

  1. Predictors of Positive Airway Pressure Therapy Adherence in Children: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    DiFeo, Natalie; Meltzer, Lisa J.; Beck, Suzanne E.; Karamessinis, Laurie R.; Cornaglia, Mary Anne; Traylor, Joel; Samuel, John; Gallagher, Paul R.; Radcliffe, Jerilynn; Beris, Heidi; Menello, Mary Kate; Marcus, Carole L.

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: Children with obstructive sleep apnea are increasingly being treated with positive airway pressure (PAP), particularly if they have underlying medical conditions. Although PAP is an effective treatment, its use is challenging due to poor adherence. We hypothesized that demographic, psychosocial, and polysomnographic parameters would be related to PAP adherence. We therefore prospectively collected data potentially pertaining to PAP adherence, and correlated it with PAP use. Methods: Fifty-six patients and their parents completed a series of psychosocial questionnaires prior to PAP initiation. Objective adherence data were obtained after 1 and 3 months of PAP use. Results: The population was primarily obese; 23% had neurodevelopmental disabilities. PAP adherence varied widely, with PAP being worn 22 ± 8 nights in month-1, but mean use was only 3 ± 3 h/night. The greatest predictor of use was maternal education (p = 0.002 for nights used; p = 0.033 for mean h used/night). Adherence was lower in African American children vs other races (p = 0.021). In the typically developing subgroup, adherence correlated inversely with age. Adherence did not correlate with severity of apnea, pressure levels, or psychosocial parameters other than a correlation between family social support and nights of PAP use in month-3. Conclusions: PAP adherence in children and adolescents is related primarily to family and demographic factors rather than severity of apnea or measures of psychosocial functioning. Further research is needed to determine the relative contributions of maternal education, socioeconomic status and cultural beliefs to PAP adherence in children, in order to develop better adherence programs. Citation: DiFeo N; Meltzer LJ; Beck SE; Karamessinis LR; Cornaglia MA; Traylor J; Samuel J; Gallagher PR; Radcliffe J; Beris H; Menello MK; Marcus CL. Predictors of positive airway pressure therapy adherence in children: a prospective study. J Clin Sleep Med 2012

  2. Encoding Conditions Affect Recognition of Vocally Expressed Emotions Across Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Jürgens, Rebecca; Drolet, Matthis; Pirow, Ralph; Scheiner, Elisabeth; Fischer, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Although the expression of emotions in humans is considered to be largely universal, cultural effects contribute to both emotion expression and recognition. To disentangle the interplay between these factors, play-acted and authentic (non-instructed) vocal expressions of emotions were used, on the assumption that cultural effects may contribute differentially to the recognition of staged and spontaneous emotions. Speech tokens depicting four emotions (anger, sadness, joy, fear) were obtained from German radio archives and re-enacted by professional actors, and presented to 120 participants from Germany, Romania, and Indonesia. Participants in all three countries were poor at distinguishing between play-acted and spontaneous emotional utterances (58.73% correct on average with only marginal cultural differences). Nevertheless, authenticity influenced emotion recognition: across cultures, anger was recognized more accurately when play-acted (z = 15.06, p < 0.001) and sadness when authentic (z = 6.63, p < 0.001), replicating previous findings from German populations. German subjects revealed a slight advantage in recognizing emotions, indicating a moderate in-group advantage. There was no difference between Romanian and Indonesian subjects in the overall emotion recognition. Differential cultural effects became particularly apparent in terms of differential biases in emotion attribution. While all participants labeled play-acted expressions as anger more frequently than expected, German participants exhibited a further bias toward choosing anger for spontaneous stimuli. In contrast to the German sample, Romanian and Indonesian participants were biased toward choosing sadness. These results support the view that emotion recognition rests on a complex interaction of human universals and cultural specificities. Whether and in which way the observed biases are linked to cultural differences in self-construal remains an issue for further investigation. PMID

  3. Reinforcing adherence to antihypertensive medications.

    PubMed

    Petry, Nancy M; Alessi, Sheila M; Byrne, Shannon; White, William B

    2015-01-01

    This pilot study evaluated a reinforcement intervention to improve adherence to antihypertensive therapy. Twenty-nine participants were randomized to standard care or standard care plus financial reinforcement for 12 weeks. Participants in the reinforcement group received a cell phone to self-record videos of adherence, for which they earned rewards. These participants sent videos demonstrating on-time adherence 97.8% of the time. Pill count adherence differed significantly between the groups during treatment, with 98.8%±1.5% of pills taken during treatment in the reinforcement condition vs 92.6%±9.2% in standard care (P<.002). Benefits persisted throughout a 3-month follow-up, with 93.8%±9.3% vs 78.0%±18.5% of pills taken (P<.001). Pill counts correlated significantly (P<.001) with self-reports of adherence, which also differed between groups over time (P<.01). Systolic blood pressure decreased modestly over time in participants overall (P<.01) but without significant time-by-group effects. These results suggest that reinforcing medication adherence via cellular phone technology and financial reinforcement holds potential to improve adherence.

  4. Model of socio-cultural dimensions involved in adherence to antiretroviral therapy for HIV/AIDS in public health care centers in Chile.

    PubMed

    Stuardo Ávila, Valeria; Manriquez Urbina, Jose Manuel; Fajreldin Chuaqui, Valentina; Belmar Prieto, Julieta; Valenzuela Santibáñez, Victoria

    2016-11-01

    In Chile, over 14,000 adults are living with HIV receive antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Adequate adherence to HAART has a major impact on survival. There is little consensus on the causes of poor adherence, due to the unique and diverse sociocultural parameters involved in the issue. The objective of this study was to identify sociocultural dimensions that serve as barriers or facilitators to HAART adherence among persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLHIV) in Chile. A qualitative study design, with an exploratory followed by a descriptive phase was conducted. The study population consisted of adults living with HIV/AIDS, with and without HAART. A theoretical sample was designed and three gender profiles defined: women, men, and transwomen. Data collection methods included in-depth interviews by anthropologists in seven public health care centers for PLHIV. The model of sociocultural dimensions indicated that factors associated with family, expectations, gender/sexuality, affect, relationship with HIV, HAART, work, social support and networks, and stigma and discrimination influenced adherence, with different patterns among profiles. This study found that adherence is a dynamic category. It is crucial to consider sociocultural factors in developing strategies to improve HAART adherence.

  5. SPI-9 of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi is constituted by an operon positively regulated by RpoS and contributes to adherence to epithelial cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Velásquez, Juan C; Hidalgo, Alejandro A; Villagra, Nicolás; Santiviago, Carlos A; Mora, Guido C; Fuentes, Juan A

    2016-08-01

    The genomic island 9 (SPI-9) from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) carries three ORFs (STY2876, STY2877, STY2878) presenting 98 % identity with a type 1 secretory apparatus (T1SS), and a single ORF (STY2875) similar to a large RTX-like protein exhibiting repeated Ig domains. BapA, the Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis orthologous to S. Typhi STY2875, has been associated with biofilm formation, and is described as a virulence factor in mice. Preliminary in silico analyses revealed that S. Typhi STY2875 ORF has a 600 bp deletion compared with S. Enteritidis bapA, suggesting that S. Typhi STY2875 might be non-functional. At present, SPI-9 has not been studied in S. Typhi. We found that the genes constituting SPI-9 are arranged in an operon whose promoter was up-regulated in high osmolarity and low pH in a RpoS-dependent manner. All the proteins encoded by S. Typhi SPI-9 were located at the membrane fraction, consistent with their putative role as T1SS. Furthermore, SPI-9 contributed to adherence of S. Typhi to epithelial cells when bacteria were grown under high osmolarity or low pH. Under the test conditions, S. Typhi SPI-9 did not participate in biofilm formation. SPI-9 is functional in S. Typhi and encodes an adhesin induced under conditions normally found in the intestine, such as high osmolarity. Hence, this is an example of a locus that might be designated a pseudogene by computational approaches but not by direct biological assays.

  6. Native Libraries: Cross-Cultural Conditions in the Circumpolar Countries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hills, Gordon H.

    This book draws on an extensive literature review and personal experience to examine cross-cultural issues in the development of libraries for Arctic indigenous communities. Although the book highlights circumstances in Alaska, its geographical scope is circumpolar, including Canada, Greenland, and the former Soviet Union and present-day Russian…

  7. Learning Elementary School Mathematics as a Culturally Conditioned Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasco, Carlos E.

    Mathematics is thought to be the most culturally independent of all academic subjects. "New Math" textbooks printed in the United States or Belgium were translated into Spanish and Portuguese with only minor variations in the story problems and are now taught in most Latin-American countries. Looking backwards, it was not different in past years…

  8. Efficiency of neural network-based combinatorial model predicting optimal culture conditions for maximum biomass yields in hairy root cultures.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, Shakti; Prakash, O; Khan, Feroz; Kukreja, A K

    2013-02-01

    KEY MESSAGE : ANN-based combinatorial model is proposed and its efficiency is assessed for the prediction of optimal culture conditions to achieve maximum productivity in a bioprocess in terms of high biomass. A neural network approach is utilized in combination with Hidden Markov concept to assess the optimal values of different environmental factors that result in maximum biomass productivity of cultured tissues after definite culture duration. Five hidden Markov models (HMMs) were derived for five test culture conditions, i.e. pH of liquid growth medium, volume of medium per culture vessel, sucrose concentration (%w/v) in growth medium, nitrate concentration (g/l) in the medium and finally the density of initial inoculum (g fresh weight) per culture vessel and their corresponding fresh weight biomass. The artificial neural network (ANN) model was represented as the function of these five Markov models, and the overall simulation of fresh weight biomass was done with this combinatorial ANN-HMM. The empirical results of Rauwolfia serpentina hairy roots were taken as model and compared with simulated results obtained from pure ANN and ANN-HMMs. The stochastic testing and Cronbach's α-value of pure and combinatorial model revealed more internal consistency and skewed character (0.4635) in histogram of ANN-HMM compared to pure ANN (0.3804). The simulated results for optimal conditions of maximum fresh weight production obtained from ANN-HMM and ANN model closely resemble the experimentally optimized culture conditions based on which highest fresh weight was obtained. However, only 2.99 % deviation from the experimental values could be observed in the values obtained from combinatorial model when compared to the pure ANN model (5.44 %). This comparison showed 45 % better potential of combinatorial model for the prediction of optimal culture conditions for the best growth of hairy root cultures.

  9. HIV Medication Adherence

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment HIV Medication Adherence (Last updated 3/2/2017; last reviewed 3/2/2017) Key Points Medication adherence means sticking firmly to ... Before and After Starting HIV Medicines . What is medication adherence? Adherence means “to stick firmly.” So for ...

  10. Hepatitis B virus efficiently infects non-adherent hepatoma cells via human sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide

    PubMed Central

    Okuyama-Dobashi, Kaori; Kasai, Hirotake; Tanaka, Tomohisa; Yamashita, Atsuya; Yasumoto, Jun; Chen, Wenjia; Okamoto, Toru; Maekawa, Shinya; Watashi, Koichi; Wakita, Takaji; Ryo, Akihide; Suzuki, Tetsuro; Matsuura, Yoshiharu; Enomoto, Nobuyuki; Moriishi, Kohji

    2015-01-01

    Sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP) has been reported as a functional receptor for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. However, HBV could not efficiently infect HepG2 cells expressing NTCP (NTCP-HepG2 cells) under adherent monolayer-cell conditions. In this study, NTCP was mainly detected in the basolateral membrane region, but not the apical site, of monolayer NTCP-HepG2 cells. We hypothesized that non-adherent cell conditions of infection would enhance HBV infectivity. Non-adherent NTCP-HepG2 cells were prepared by treatment with trypsin and EDTA, which did not degrade NTCP in the membrane fraction. HBV successfully infected NTCP-HepG2 cells at a viral dose 10 times lower in non-adherent phase than in adherent phase. Efficient infection of non-adherent NTCP-HepG2 cells with blood-borne or cell-culture-derived HBV was observed and was remarkably impaired in the presence of the myristoylated preS1 peptide. HBV could also efficiently infect HepaRG cells under non-adherent cell conditions. We screened several compounds using our culture system and identified proscillaridin A as a potent anti-HBV agent with an IC50 value of 7.2 nM. In conclusion, non-adherent host cell conditions of infection augmented HBV infectivity in an NTCP-dependent manner, thus providing a novel strategy to identify anti-HBV drugs and investigate the mechanism of HBV infection. PMID:26592202

  11. Noninvasive Oxygen Monitoring in Three-Dimensional Tissue Cultures Under Static and Dynamic Culture Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Weyand, Birgit; Nöhre, Mariel; Schmälzlin, Elmar; Stolz, Marvin; Israelowitz, Meir; Gille, Christoph; von Schroeder, Herb P.; Reimers, Kerstin; Vogt, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We present a new method for noninvasive real-time oxygen measurement inside three-dimensional tissue-engineered cell constructs in static and dynamic culture settings in a laminar flow bioreactor. The OPAL system (optical oxygen measurement system) determines the oxygen-dependent phosphorescence lifetime of spherical microprobes and uses a two-frequency phase-modulation technique, which fades out the interference of background fluorescence from the cell carrier and culture medium. Higher cell densities in the centrum of the scaffolds correlated with lower values of oxygen concentration obtained with the OPAL system. When scaffolds were placed in the bioreactor, higher oxygen values were measured compared to statically cultured scaffolds in a Petri dish, which were significantly different at day 1–3 of culture. This technique allows the use of signal-weak microprobes in biological environments and monitors the culture process inside a bioreactor. PMID:26309802

  12. Referral for psychological therapy of people with long term conditions improves adherence to antidepressants and reduces emergency department attendance: Controlled before and after study

    PubMed Central

    de Lusignan, Simon; Chan, Tom; Tejerina Arreal, Maria C.; Parry, Glenys; Dent-Brown, Kim; Kendrick, Tony

    2013-01-01

    Background Referral to psychological therapies is recommended for people with common mental health problems (CMHP) however its impact on healthcare utilisation in people with long term conditions (LTCs) is not known. Method Routinely collected primary care, psychological therapy clinic and hospital data were extracted for the registered population of 20 practices (N = 121199). These data were linked using the SAPREL (Secure and Private Record Linkage) method. We linked the 1118 people referred to psychological therapies with 6711 controls, matched for age, gender and practice. We compared utilisation of healthcare resources by people with LTCs, 6 months before and after referral, and conducted a controlled before and after study to compare health utilisation with controls. We made the assumption that collection of a greater number of repeat prescriptions for antidepressants was associated with greater adherence. Results Overall 21.8% of people with an LTC had CMHP vs. 18.8% without (p < 0.001). People with LTCs before referral were more likely to use health care resources (2-tailed t-test p < 0.001). Cases with LTCs showed referral to the psychological therapies clinic was associated with increased antidepressant medication prescribing (mean differences 0.62, p < 0.001) and less use of emergency department than controls (mean difference −0.21, p = 0.003). Conclusions Referral to improved access to psychological therapies (IAPT) services appears of value to people with LTC. It is associated with the issue of a greater number of prescriptions for anti-depressant medicines and less use of emergency services. Further studies are needed to explore bed occupancy and outpatient attendance. PMID:23639304

  13. Modifying culture conditions in chemical library screening identifies alternative inhibitors of mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Miller, Christopher H; Nisa, Shahista; Dempsey, Sandi; Jack, Cameron; O'Toole, Ronan

    2009-12-01

    In this study, application of a dual absorbance/fluorescence assay to a chemical library screen identified several previously unknown inhibitors of mycobacteria. In addition, growth conditions had a significant effect on the activity profile of the library. Some inhibitors such as Se-methylselenocysteine were detected only when screening was performed under nutrient-limited culture conditions as opposed to nutrient-rich culture conditions. We propose that multiple culture condition library screening is required for complete inhibitory profiling and for maximal antimycobacterial compound detection.

  14. Quantitative colorimetric measurement of cellulose degradation under microbial culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Haft, Rembrandt J F; Gardner, Jeffrey G; Keating, David H

    2012-04-01

    We have developed a simple, rapid, quantitative colorimetric assay to measure cellulose degradation based on the absorbance shift of Congo red dye bound to soluble cellulose. We term this assay "Congo Red Analysis of Cellulose Concentration," or "CRACC." CRACC can be performed directly in culture media, including rich and defined media containing monosaccharides or disaccharides (such as glucose and cellobiose). We show example experiments from our laboratory that demonstrate the utility of CRACC in probing enzyme kinetics, quantifying cellulase secretion, and assessing the physiology of cellulolytic organisms. CRACC complements existing methods to assay cellulose degradation, and we discuss its utility for a variety of applications.

  15. Effective extraction of Arabidopsis adherent seed mucilage by ultrasonic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xianhai; Qiao, Lijun; Wu, Ai-Min

    2017-01-01

    The Arabidopsis seed coat is composed of two layers of mucilage, a water-soluble non-adherent outer layer and an adherent inner layer. The non-adherent mucilage can easily be extracted by gentle shaking. However, adherent mucilage is extremely difficult to dissociate from the seed coat. Despite various treatments to extract the adherent mucilage, including EDTA, ammonium oxalate, dilute alkali or acid washes, most of it remains on the seed coat. Here, we show for the first time the extraction of almost all of the adherent mucilage from the Arabidopsis seed coat. Our results demonstrate that ultrasonic treatment was able to extract the adherent mucilage effectively within 20 seconds. Adherent mucilage, like non-adherent mucilage, is mainly composed of rhamnogalacturonan I (RG I). The crystalline cellulose content in adherent mucilage was measured as 3.7 mg g−1 of dry seed. Compared with non-adherent mucilage, the adherent mucilage exhibits relatively stable levels of sugar under various environmental conditions. In all cases, adherent mucilage showed higher levels of sugar than non-adherent mucilage. The cell wall remnant could associate with the adherent mucilage, which could prevent the extraction of the adherent mucilage. Our results show that ultrasonic treatment is an effective method for the quick extraction of Arabidopsis adherent mucilage with little effort. PMID:28091592

  16. Clonogenic Assay: Adherent Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rafehi, Haloom; Orlowski, Christian; Georgiadis, George T.; Ververis, Katherine; El-Osta, Assam; Karagiannis, Tom C.

    2011-01-01

    The clonogenic (or colony forming) assay has been established for more than 50 years; the original paper describing the technique was published in 19561. Apart from documenting the method, the initial landmark study generated the first radiation-dose response curve for X-ray irradiated mammalian (HeLa) cells in culture1. Basically, the clonogenic assay enables an assessment of the differences in reproductive viability (capacity of cells to produce progeny; i.e. a single cell to form a colony of 50 or more cells) between control untreated cells and cells that have undergone various treatments such as exposure to ionising radiation, various chemical compounds (e.g. cytotoxic agents) or in other cases genetic manipulation. The assay has become the most widely accepted technique in radiation biology and has been widely used for evaluating the radiation sensitivity of different cell lines. Further, the clonogenic assay is commonly used for monitoring the efficacy of radiation modifying compounds and for determining the effects of cytotoxic agents and other anti-cancer therapeutics on colony forming ability, in different cell lines. A typical clonogenic survival experiment using adherent cells lines involves three distinct components, 1) treatment of the cell monolayer in tissue culture flasks, 2) preparation of single cell suspensions and plating an appropriate number of cells in petri dishes and 3) fixing and staining colonies following a relevant incubation period, which could range from 1-3 weeks, depending on the cell line. Here we demonstrate the general procedure for performing the clonogenic assay with adherent cell lines with the use of an immortalized human keratinocyte cell line (FEP-1811)2. Also, our aims are to describe common features of clonogenic assays including calculation of the plating efficiency and survival fractions after exposure of cells to radiation, and to exemplify modification of radiation-response with the use of a natural antioxidant

  17. Effects of cultural conditions on protease production by Aeromonas hydrophila.

    PubMed Central

    O'Reilly, T; Day, D F

    1983-01-01

    Production of extracellular proteolytic activity by Aeromonas hydrophila was influenced by temperature, pH, and aeration. Conditions which produced maximal growth also resulted in maximal protease production. Enzyme production appeared to be modulated by an inducer catabolite repression system whereby NH4+ and glucose repressed enzyme production and complex nitrogen and nonglucose, carbon energy sources promoted it. Under nutritional stress, protease production was high, despite poor growth. PMID:6342534

  18. Establishment and in vitro culture of porcine spermatogonial germ cells in low temperature culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won-Young; Park, Hyun-Jung; Lee, Ran; Lee, Kyung-Hoon; Kim, Yong-Hee; Ryu, Buom-Yong; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Kim, Jin-Hoi; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Moon, Sung-Hwan; Park, Jin-Ki; Chung, Hak-Jae; Kim, Dong-Hoon; Song, Hyuk

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this study was to establish a porcine spermatogonial germ cell (pSGC) line and develop an in vitro culture system. Isolated total testicular cells (TTCs) from 5-day-old porcine testes were primary cultured at 31, 34, and 37°C. Although the time of colony appearance was delayed at 31°C, strong alkaline phosphatase staining, expressions of pluripotency marker genes such as OCT4, NANOG, and THY1, and the gene expressions of the undifferentiated germ cell markers PLZF and protein gene product 9.5 (PGP9.5) were identified compared to 34 and 37°C. Cell cycle analysis for both pSGC and feeder cells at the three temperatures revealed that more pSGCs were in the G2/M phase at 31°C than 37°C at the subculture stage. In vitro, pSGCs could stably maintain undifferentiated germ cell and stem cell characteristics for over 60days during culture at 31°C. Xenotransplantation of pSGCs to immune deficient mice demonstrated a successful colonization and localization on the seminiferous tubule basement membrane in the recipient testes. In conclusion, pSGCs from neonatal porcine were successfully established and cultured for long periods under a low temperature culture environment in vitro.

  19. Defining cell culture conditions to improve human norovirus infectivity assays.

    PubMed

    Straub, T M; Hutchison, J R; Bartholomew, R A; Valdez, C O; Valentine, N B; Dohnalkova, A; Ozanich, R M; Bruckner-Lea, C J

    2013-01-01

    Significant difficulties remain for determining whether human noroviruses (hNoV) recovered from water, food, and environmental samples are infectious. Three-dimensional (3-D) tissue culture of human intestinal cells has shown promise in developing an infectivity assay, but reproducibility, even within a single laboratory, remains problematic. From the literature and our observations, we hypothesized that the common factors that lead to more reproducible hNoV infectivity in vitro requires that the cell line be (1) of human gastrointestinal origin, (2) expresses apical microvilli, and (3) be a positive secretor cell line. The C2BBe1 cell line, which is a brush-border producing clone of Caco-2, meets these three criteria. When challenged with Genogroup II viruses, we observed a 2 Log(10) increase in viral RNA titer. A passage experiment with GII viruses showed evidence of the ability to propagate hNoV by both quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and microscopy. In our hands, using 3-D C2BBe1 cells improves reproducibility of the infectivity assay for hNoV, but the assay can still be variable. Two sources of variability include the cells themselves (mixed phenotypes of small and large intestine) and initial titer measurements using qRT-PCR that measures all RNA vs. plaque assays that measure infectious virus.

  20. Defining cell culture conditions to improve human norovirus infectivity assays

    SciTech Connect

    Straub, Tim M.; Hutchison, Janine R.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Valentine, Nancy B.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Ozanich, Richard M.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.

    2013-01-10

    Significant difficulties remain for determining whether human noroviruses (hNoV) recovered from water, food, and environmental samples are infectious. Three-dimensional tissue culture of human intestinal cells has shown promise in developing an infectivity assay, but reproducibility, even within a single laboratory, remains problematic. From the literature and our observations, we hypothesized that the common factors that leads to more reproducible hNoV infectivity in vitro requires that the cell line be 1) of human gastrointestinal origin, 2) expresses apical microvilli, and 3) be a positive secretor cell line. The C2BBe1 cell line, which is a brush-border producing clone of Caco-2, meets these three criteria. When challenged with Genogroup II viruses, we observed a 2 Log10 increase in viral RNA titer. A passage experiment with GII viruses showed evidence of the ability to propagate hNoV by both reverse transcription quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) and microscopy. Using 3-D C2BBe1 cells improves reproducibility of the infectivity assay for hNoV, but the assay can still be variable. Two sources of variability include the cells themselves (mixed phenotypes of small and large intestine) and initial titer measurements using quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) that measures all RNA vs. plaque assays that measure infectious virus.

  1. Adherence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to contact lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.J.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to examined the interactions of P. aeruginosa with hydrogel contact lenses and other substrata, and characterize adherence to lenses under various physiological and physicochemical conditions. Isolates adhered to polystyrene, glass, and hydrogel lenses. With certain lens types, radiolabeled cells showed decreased adherence with increasing water content of the lenses, however, this correlation with not found for all lenses. Adherence to rigid gas permeable lenses was markedly greater than adherence to hydrogels. Best adherence occurred near pH 7 and at a sodium chloride concentration of 50 mM. Passive adhesion of heat-killed cells to hydrogels was lower than the adherence obtained of viable cells. Adherence to hydrogels was enhanced by mucin, lactoferrin, lysozyme, IgA, bovine serum albumin, and a mixture of these macromolecules. Adherence to coated and uncoated lenses was greater with a daily-wear hydrogel when compared with an extended-wear hydrogel of similar polymer composition. Greater adherence was attributed to a higher concentration of adsorbed macromolecules on the 45% water-content lens in comparison to the 55% water-content lens.

  2. Transformation of Corporate Culture in Conditions of Transition to Knowledge Economics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korsakova, Tatiana V.; Chelnokova, Elena A.; Kaznacheeva, Svetlana N.; Bicheva, Irena B.; Lazutina, Antonina L.; Perova, Tatyana V.

    2016-01-01

    This article is devoted to the problem of corporate culture transformations which are conditioned by changes in social-economic situation. The modern paradigm of knowledge management is assumed to become the main value for forming a new vision of corporate culture. The starting point for transformations can be found in the actual corporate culture…

  3. Comprehensive model of microalgae photosynthesis rate as a function of culture conditions in photobioreactors.

    PubMed

    Costache, T A; Acién Fernández, F Gabriel; Morales, M M; Fernández-Sevilla, J M; Stamatin, I; Molina, E

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, the influence of culture conditions (irradiance, temperature, pH, and dissolved oxygen) on the photosynthesis rate of Scenedesmus almeriensis cultures is analyzed. Short-run experiments were performed to study cell response to variations in culture conditions, which take place in changing environments such as outdoor photobioreactors. Experiments were performed by subjecting diluted samples of cells to different levels of irradiance, temperature, pH, and dissolved oxygen concentration. Results demonstrate the existence of photoinhibition phenomena at irradiances higher than 1,000 μE/m(2) s; in addition to reduced photosynthesis rates at inadequate temperatures or pH-the optimal values being 35 °C and 8, respectively. Moreover, photosynthesis rate reduction at dissolved oxygen concentrations above 20 mg/l is demonstrated. Data have been used to develop an integrated model based on considering the simultaneous influence of irradiance, temperature, pH, and dissolved oxygen. The model fits the experimental results in the range of culture conditions tested, and it was validated using data obtained by the simultaneous variation of two of the modified variables. Furthermore, the model fits experimental results obtained from an outdoor culture of S. almeriensis performed in an open raceway reactor. Results demonstrate that photosynthetic efficiency is modified as a function of culture conditions, and can be used to determine the proximity of culture conditions to optimal values. Optimal conditions found (T = 35 °C, pH = 8, dissolved oxygen concentration <20 mg/l) allows to maximize the use of light by the cells. The developed model is a powerful tool for the optimal design and management of microalgae-based processes, especially outdoors, where the cultures are subject to daily culture condition variations.

  4. Monochloramine Cometabolism by Mixed-Culture Nitrifiers under Drinking Water Conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    The current research investigated monochloramine cometabolism by nitrifying mixed cultures grown under drinking water relevant conditions and harvested from sand-packed reactors before conducting suspended growth batch kinetic experiments. Three batch reactors were used in each ...

  5. Trophic effects of mesenchymal stem cells in chondrocyte co-cultures are independent of culture conditions and cell sources.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ling; Prins, Henk-Jan; Helder, Marco N; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A; Karperien, Marcel

    2012-08-01

    Earlier, we have shown that the increased cartilage production in pellet co-cultures of chondrocytes and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) is due to a trophic role of the MSC in stimulating chondrocyte proliferation and matrix production rather than MSCs actively undergoing chondrogenic differentiation. These studies were performed in a culture medium that was not compatible with the chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs. In this study, we tested whether the trophic role of the MSCs is dependent on culturing co-culture pellets in a medium that is compatible with the chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs. In addition, we investigated whether the trophic role of the MSCs is dependent on their origins or is a more general characteristic of MSCs. Human BM-MSCs and bovine primary chondrocytes were co-cultured in a medium that was compatible with the chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs. Enhanced matrix production was confirmed by glycosaminoglycans (GAG) quantification. A species-specific quantitative polymerase chain reaction demonstrated that the cartilage matrix was mainly of bovine origin, indicative of a lack of the chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs. In addition, pellet co-cultures were overgrown by bovine cells over time. To test the influence of origin on MSCs' trophic effects, the MSCs isolated from adipose tissue and the synovial membrane were co-cultured with human primary chondrocytes, and their activity was compared with BM-MSCs, which served as control. GAG quantification again confirmed increased cartilage matrix production, irrespective of the source of the MSCs. EdU staining combined with cell tracking revealed an increased proliferation of chondrocytes in each condition. Irrespective of the MSC source, a short tandem repeat analysis of genomic DNA showed a decrease in MSCs in the co-culture over time. Our results clearly demonstrate that in co-culture pellets, the MSCs stimulate cartilage formation due to a trophic effect on the

  6. Effect of culture conditions on synthesis of triterpenoids in suspension cultures of Lantana camara L.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Priyanka; Sisodia, Vikash; Chaturvedi, Rakhi

    2011-01-01

    Present report is aimed to study the batch kinetics of Lantana camara. Dynamic changes of parameters, such as pH, conductivity, wet and dry cell concentrations, consumption of major nutrients, carbon source and agitation speeds were investigated to understand the culture characteristics of suspended cells grown on MS + BAP + 2,4-D + NAA in shake flasks. Results indicated that the consumption of phosphate resulted in the onset of stationary phase in cultures. Maltose as carbon source resulted in production of maximum triterpenoid content (31.08 mg/L) while the least was found on glucose (10.69 mg/L). Notably, both did not support accumulation of betulinic acid. Sucrose, although stood second in terms of quantity (21.6 mg/L), supported the production of all the three triterpenoids-oleanolic, ursolic and betulinic acids. Maximum viable cultures were obtained at a rotation speed of 120 rpm. The present finding will form a background for further scale-up related studies.

  7. Microfluidically supported biochip design for culture of endothelial cell layers with improved perfusion conditions.

    PubMed

    Raasch, Martin; Rennert, Knut; Jahn, Tobias; Peters, Sven; Henkel, Thomas; Huber, Otmar; Schulz, Ingo; Becker, Holger; Lorkowski, Stefan; Funke, Harald; Mosig, Alexander

    2015-03-02

    Hemodynamic forces generated by the blood flow are of central importance for the function of endothelial cells (ECs), which form a biologically active cellular monolayer in blood vessels and serve as a selective barrier for macromolecular permeability. Mechanical stimulation of the endothelial monolayer induces morphological remodeling in its cytoskeleton. For in vitro studies on EC biology culture devices are desirable that simulate conditions of flow in blood vessels and allow flow-based adhesion/permeability assays under optimal perfusion conditions. With this aim we designed a biochip comprising a perfusable membrane that serves as cell culture platform multi-organ-tissue-flow (MOTiF biochip). This biochip allows an effective supply with nutrition medium, discharge of catabolic cell metabolites and defined application of shear stress to ECs under laminar flow conditions. To characterize EC layers cultured in the MOTiF biochip we investigated cell viability, expression of EC marker proteins and cell adhesion molecules of ECs dynamically cultured under low and high shear stress, and compared them with an endothelial culture in established two-dimensionally perfused flow chambers and under static conditions. We show that ECs cultured in the MOTiF biochip form a tight EC monolayer with increased cellular density, enhanced cell layer thickness, presumably as the result of a rapid and effective adaption to shear stress by remodeling of the cytoskeleton. Moreover, endothelial layers in the MOTiF biochip express higher amounts of EC marker proteins von-Willebrand-factor and PECAM-1. EC layers were highly responsive to stimulation with TNFα as detected at the level of ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and E-selectin expression and modulation of endothelial permeability in response to TNFα/IFNγ treatment under flow conditions. Compared to static and two-dimensionally perfused cell culture condition we consider MOTiF biochips as a valuable tool for studying EC biology in vitro under

  8. Optimization of Cultural Conditions for Antioxidant Exopolysaccharides from Xerocomus badius Grown in Shrimp Byproduct

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiujun; Yan, Peisheng; Liu, Xin; Wang, Jianbing; Yu, Jiajia

    2016-01-01

    To optimize the production conditions for exopolysaccharides with higher antioxidant activities from Xerocomus badius cultured in shrimp byproduct medium, Plackett-Burman design, path of steepest ascent, and response surface methodology were explored. Based on the results of Plackett-Burman design and path of steepest ascent, a Box-Behnken design was applied to optimization and the regression models. The optimal cultural condition for high yield and antioxidant activity of the exopolysaccharides was determined to be 10.347% of solid-to-liquid ratio, a 4.322% content of bran powder, and a 1.217% concentration of glacial acetic acid. Culturing with the optimal cultural conditions resulted in an exopolysaccharides yield of 4.588 ± 0.346 g/L and a total antioxidant activity of 2.956 ± 0.105 U/mg. These values are consistent with the values predicted by the corresponding regression models (RSD < 5%). PMID:26998481

  9. Maintenance of human embryonic stem cells in animal serum- and feeder layer-free culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Amit, Michal; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    The availability of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) reflects their outstanding potential for research areas such as human developmental biology, teratology, and cell-based therapies. To allow their continuous growth as undifferentiated cells, isolation and culturing were traditionally conducted on mouse embryonic fibroblast feeder layers, using medium supplemented with fetal bovine serum. However, these conditions allow possible exposure of the cells to animal pathogens. Because both research and future clinical application require an animal-free and well-defined culture system for hESCs, these conventional conditions would prevent the use of hESCs in human therapy. This chapter describes optional culture conditions based on either animal-free or feeder-free culture methods for hESCs.

  10. Hydrocortisone differentially affects the ability of murine stromal cells and human marrow-derived adherent cells to promote the differentiation of CD34++/CD38- long-term culture-initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Croisille, L; Auffray, I; Katz, A; Izac, B; Vainchenker, W; Coulombel, L

    1994-12-15

    Very primitive human hematopoietic progenitor cells are identified indirectly by their ability to give rise to clonogenic progenitors in the presence of either human or murine stromal cells. These long-term culture-initiating cell (LTC-IC) assays are usually performed in the presence of hydrocortisone based on the initial observation that hydrocortisone was required for prolonged hematopoiesis in standard long-term bone marrow cultures. In this report, we investigated the role of hydrocortisone in LTC-IC assays initiated with CD34++/CD38- cells seeded onto either human bone marrow LTC-derived adherent cells or a murine marrow-derived stromal cell line, MS-5. It was found that weekly addition of hydrocortisone to the cultures reduced the frequency of LTC-IC (from 1/5 to 1/20) calculated from limiting dilution experiments and also reduced fivefold to 10-fold the number of their progeny clonogenic cells detected after 4 to 5 weeks. In contrast, the frequency and differentiative potential of CD34++/CD38- grown in the presence of human marrow feeders was unaltered by the addition of glucocorticoids. Data are consistent with the hypothesis that hydrocortisone inhibited LTC-IC differentiation by downregulating the expression of a synergistic factor produced by MS-5 cells. (1) In the absence of hydrocortisone, the number of clonogenic progenitors generated by LTC-IC was much higher in cultures seeded on MS-5 than in cultures seeded on human marrow adherent cells, which was also true when cytokines were added to the cocultures. However, based on the phenotype of the colonies, progenitors produced in MS-5 cocultures were more mature than those generated on human marrow adherent cells. (2) Hydrocortisone counteracted the stimulatory effect of recombinant human cytokines (interleukin-3, interleukin-6, and steel factor) in assays performed on MS-5 but not on human marrow feeders. (3) Hydrocortisone led to a 50% decrease in the numbers of colony-forming units

  11. Chromosomal variability of human mesenchymal stem cells cultured under hypoxic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ueyama, Hanae; Horibe, Tomohisa; Hinotsu, Shiro; Tanaka, Tomoaki; Inoue, Takeomi; Urushihara, Hisashi; Kitagawa, Akira; Kawakami, Koji

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) have attracted great interest from both bench and clinical researchers because of their pluripotency and ease of expansion ex vivo. However, these cells do finally reach a senescent stage and lose their multipotent potential. Proliferation of these cells is limited up to the time of their senescence, which limits their supply, and they may accumulate chromosomal changes through ex vivo culturing. The safe, rapid expansion of hMSCs is critical for their clinical application. Chromosomal aberration is known as one of the hallmarks of human cancer, and therefore it is important to understand the chromosomal stability and variability of ex vivo expanded hMSCs before they are used widely in clinical applications. In this study, we examined the effects of culturing under ambient (20%) or physiologic (5%) O2 concentrations on the rate of cell proliferation and on the spontaneous transformation of hMSCs in primary culture and after expansion, because it has been reported that culturing under hypoxic conditions accelerates the propagation of hMSCs. Bone marrow samples were collected from 40 patients involved in clinical research. We found that hypoxic conditions promote cell proliferation more favourably than normoxic conditions. Chromosomal aberrations, including structural instability or aneuploidy, were detected in significantly earlier passages under hypoxic conditions than under normoxic culture conditions, suggesting that amplification of hMSCs in a low-oxygen environment facilitated chromosomal instability. Furthermore, smoothed hazard-function modelling of chromosomal aberrations showed increased hazard after the fourth passage under both sets of culture conditions, and showed a tendency to increase the detection rate of primary karyotypic abnormalities among donors aged 60 years and over. In conclusion, we propose that the continuous monitoring of hMSCs will be required before they are used in

  12. Optimization of Large-Scale Culture Conditions for the Production of Cordycepin with Cordyceps militaris by Liquid Static Culture

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Chao; Wen, Ting-Chi; Kang, Ji-Chuan; Meng, Ze-Bing; Li, Guang-Rong; Hyde, Kevin D.

    2014-01-01

    Cordycepin is one of the most important bioactive compounds produced by species of Cordyceps sensu lato, but it is hard to produce large amounts of this substance in industrial production. In this work, single factor design, Plackett-Burman design, and central composite design were employed to establish the key factors and identify optimal culture conditions which improved cordycepin production. Using these culture conditions, a maximum production of cordycepin was 2008.48 mg/L for 700 mL working volume in the 1000 mL glass jars and total content of cordycepin reached 1405.94 mg/bottle. This method provides an effective way for increasing the cordycepin production at a large scale. The strategies used in this study could have a wide application in other fermentation processes. PMID:25054182

  13. Infection Control Practice in the Operating Room: Staff Adherence to Existing Policies in a Developing Country

    PubMed Central

    Cawich, Shamir O; Tennant, Ingrid A; McGaw, Clarence D; Harding, Hyacinth; Walters, Christine A; Crandon, Ivor W

    2013-01-01

    Context: Infection control interventions are important for containing surgery-related infections. For this reason, the modern operating room (OR) should have well-developed infection control policies. The efficacy of these policies depends on how well the OR staff adhere to them. There is a lack of available data documenting adherence to infection control policies. Objective: To evaluate OR staff adherence to existing infection control policies in Jamaica. Methods: We administered a questionnaire to all OR staff to assess their training, knowledge of local infection control protocols, and practice with regard to 8 randomly selected guidelines. Adherence to each guideline was rated with fixed-choice items on a 4-point Likert scale. The sum of points determined the adherence score. Two respondent groups were defined: adherent (score > 26) and nonadherent (score ≤ 26). We evaluated the relationship between respondent group and age, sex, occupational rank, and time since completion of basic medical training. We used χ2 and Fisher exact tests to assess associations and t tests to compare means between variables of interest. Results: The sample comprised 132 participants (90 physicians and 42 nurses) with a mean age of 36 (standard deviation ± 9.5) years. Overall, 40.1% were adherent to existing protocols. There was no significant association between the distribution of adherence scores and sex (p = 0.319), time since completion of basic training (p = 0.595), occupational rank (p = 0.461), or age (p = 0.949). Overall, 19% felt their knowledge of infection control practices was inadequate. Those with working knowledge of infection control practices attained it mostly through informal communication (80.4%) and self-directed research (62.6%). Conclusion: New approaches to the problem of nonadherence to infection control guidelines are needed in the Caribbean. Several unique cultural, financial, and environmental factors influence adherence in this region, in contrast to

  14. Medication adherence in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Francisco Javier; Hernández, José Luis; Pereira, José; Herrera, Judit; Rodríguez, Carlos J

    2012-10-22

    Non-adherence is a major problem in the treatment of schizophrenia. Its high prevalence, potentially severe consequences and associated costs make the study of this phenomenon a priority issue. In this article, basic non-adherence concepts of prevalence, consequences, evaluation methods, methodological restrictions of available studies, risk factors and intervention strategies, are reviewed. Studying non-adherence risk factors is a necessary step toward designing adequately oriented intervention strategies. An operative definition of adherence and good knowledge of its evaluation methods are essential to study this phenomenon. Unfortunately, most available studies contain methodological restrictions, especially concerning the evaluation methods, and an agreed operative definition of adherence has only very recently been reached. Knowing non-adherence risk factors, intervention strategies and available evidence on their effectiveness is essential in making treatment decisions in daily clinical practice.

  15. Characterization of bovine embryos cultured under conditions appropriate for sustaining human naïve pluripotency

    PubMed Central

    van Tol, Helena T. A.; Groot Koerkamp, Marian J. A.; Wubbolts, Richard W.; Haagsman, Henk P.; Roelen, Bernard A. J.

    2017-01-01

    In mammalian preimplantation development, pluripotent cells are set aside from cells that contribute to extra-embryonic tissues. Although the pluripotent cell population of mouse and human embryos can be cultured as embryonic stem cells, little is known about the pathways involved in formation of a bovine pluripotent cell population, nor how to maintain these cells in vitro. The objective of this study was to determine the transcriptomic profile related to bovine pluripotency. Therefore, in vitro derived embryos were cultured in various culture media that recently have been reported capable of maintaining the naïve pluripotent state of human embryonic cells. Gene expression profiles of embryos cultured in these media were compared using microarray analysis and quantitative RT-PCR. Compared to standard culture conditions, embryo culture in ‘naïve’ media reduced mRNA expression levels of the key pluripotency markers NANOG and POU5F1. A relatively high percentage of genes with differential expression levels were located on the X-chromosome. In addition, reduced XIST expression was detected in embryos cultured in naïve media and female embryos contained fewer cells with H3K27me3 foci, indicating a delay in X-chromosome inactivation. Whole embryos cultured in one of the media, 5iLA, could be maintained until 23 days post fertilization. Together these data indicate that ‘naïve’ conditions do not lead to altered expression of known genes involved in pluripotency. Interestingly, X-chromosome inactivation and development of bovine embryos were dependent on the culture conditions. PMID:28241084

  16. Osteogenic induction of human periodontal ligament fibroblasts under two- and three-dimensional culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Inanc, Bülend; Elcin, A Eser; Elcin, Y Murat

    2006-02-01

    Human periodontal ligament fibroblasts (hPDLF) play a key role in the regeneration of periodontal compartment during guided tissue regeneration procedures. This property is attributed to the progenitor cell subsets residing in the area. The aim of this study was to investigate whether hPDLFs could undergo an osteogenic differentiation under two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) culture conditions upon osteogenic induction. hPDLFs were isolated from six healthy donors, cultured, and expanded according to standard protocols. Then, three osteogenic culture conditions (dexamethasone, ascorbic acid, and beta-glycerophosphate) were established: 1) 2D culture as single-cell monolayer, 2) 3D-static culture on mineralized poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) scaffold, and 3) 3D culture on mineralized PLGA scaffold inside the NASA-approved bioreactor stimulating microgravity conditions. After 21 days of osteogenic induction, the majority of monolayer cultures had undergone differentiation toward osteogenic lineage, as indicated by morphological changes, mineralization assay, and some phenotypical properties. However, immunohistochemistry revealed that the scaffold cultures expressed higher levels of osteogenic marker proteins compared with that of the monolayers. Secondly, hPDLF-PLGA constructs in bioreactor showed an increased expression of osteopontin and osteocalcin compared with that of static 3D culture after 21 days. Results indicate that human periodontal ligament contains a subpopulation of cells capable of undergoing osteogenic differentiation and presumably contributing to regeneration of bone defects in the adjacent area. Human PDLF-seeded mineralized PLGA scaffold in microgravity bioreactor may be used to support osteogenic differentiation in vitro. Thus, this system may offer new potential benefits as a tool for periodontal tissue engineering.

  17. Effects of culture conditions and biofilm formation on the iodine susceptibility of Legionella pneumophila

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cargill, K. L.; Pyle, B. H.; Sauer, R. L.; McFeters, G. A.

    1992-01-01

    The susceptibility of Legionella pneumophila to iodination was studied with cultures grown in well water, on rich agar media, and attached to stainless-steel surfaces. Legionella pneumophila grown in water cultures in association with other microorganisms were less sensitive to disinfection by chlorine and iodine than were agar-passaged cultures. Differences in sensitivity to disinfection between water-cultured and agar-grown legionellae were determined by comparing C x T values (concentration in milligrams per litre multiplied by time in minutes to achieve 99% decrease in viability) and CM x T values (concentration in molarity). Iodine (1500x) gave a greater difference in CM x T values than did chlorine (68x). Iodine was 50 times more effective than chlorine when used with agar-grown cultures but was only twice as effective when tested against water-grown Legionella cultures. C x T x S values (C x T multiplied by percent survivors), which take into consideration the percent surviving bacteria, were used to compare sensitivities in very resistant populations, such as those in biofilms. Water cultures of legionellae associated with stainless-steel surfaces were 135 times more resistant to iodination than were unattached legionellae, and they were 210,000 times more resistant than were agar-grown cultures. These results indicate that the conditions under which legionellae are grown can dramatically affect their susceptibility to some disinfectants and must be considered when evaluating the efficacy of a disinfecting agent.

  18. Motivating patient adherence to allergic rhinitis treatments.

    PubMed

    Bender, Bruce G

    2015-03-01

    Patient nonadherence significantly burdens the treatment of allergic rhinitis (AR). Fewer than half of prescribed doses of intranasal corticosteroid medication are taken. The challenges for immunotherapies are even greater. While sustained treatment for 3 to 5 years is required for full benefit, most patients receiving immunotherapy, either subcutaneous or sublingual, stop treatment within the first year. Although research into interventions to improve AR adherence is lacking, lessons learned from adherence interventions in other chronic health conditions can be applied to AR. Two well-established, overriding models of care-the chronic care model and patient-centered care-can improve adherence. The patient-centered care model includes important lessons for allergy providers in their daily practice, including understanding and targeting modifiable barriers to adherence. Additionally, recent studies have begun to leverage health information and communication technologies to reach out to patients and promote adherence, extending patient-centered interventions initiated by providers during office visits.

  19. Linguistic and Cultural Adaptation of a Computer-Based Counseling Program (CARE+ Spanish) to Support HIV Treatment Adherence and Risk Reduction for People Living With HIV/AIDS: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Chhun, Nok; Cleland, Charles M; Crespo-Fierro, Michele; Parés-Avila, José A; Lizcano, John A; Shedlin, Michele G; Johnston, Barbara E; Sharp, Victoria L

    2016-01-01

    Background Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease in the United States disproportionately affects minorities, including Latinos. Barriers including language are associated with lower antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence seen among Latinos, yet ART and interventions for clinic visit adherence are rarely developed or delivered in Spanish. Objective The aim was to adapt a computer-based counseling tool, demonstrated to reduce HIV-1 viral load and sexual risk transmission in a population of English-speaking adults, for use during routine clinical visits for an HIV-positive Spanish-speaking population (CARE+ Spanish); the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) was the theoretical framework guiding program development. Methods A longitudinal randomized controlled trial was conducted from June 4, 2010 to March 29, 2012. Participants were recruited from a comprehensive HIV treatment center comprising three clinics in New York City. Eligibility criteria were (1) adults (age ≥18 years), (2) Latino birth or ancestry, (3) speaks Spanish (mono- or multilingual), and (4) on antiretrovirals. Linear and generalized mixed linear effects models were used to analyze primary outcomes, which included ART adherence, sexual transmission risk behaviors, and HIV-1 viral loads. Exit interviews were offered to purposively selected intervention participants to explore cultural acceptability of the tool among participants, and focus groups explored the acceptability and system efficiency issues among clinic providers, using the TAM framework. Results A total of 494 Spanish-speaking HIV clinic attendees were enrolled and randomly assigned to the intervention (arm A: n=253) or risk assessment-only control (arm B, n=241) group and followed up at 3-month intervals for one year. Gender distribution was 296 (68.4%) male, 110 (25.4%) female, and 10 (2.3%) transgender. By study end, 433 of 494 (87.7%) participants were retained. Although intervention participants had reduced viral loads, increased

  20. Biodegradation of 4-chlorophenol by Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus A6: effect of culture conditions and degradation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, N K; Pakshirajan, K; Ghosh, P K; Ghosh, A

    2011-04-01

    Among known microbial species, Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus A6 has shown very good potential to treat phenolic wastewaters. In this study, the levels of various culture conditions, namely initial pH, agitation (rpm), temperature (°C), and inoculum age (h) were optimized to enhance 4-chlorophenol (4-CP) biodegradation and the culture specific growth rate. For optimization, central composite design of experiments followed by response surface methodology (RSM) was applied. Results showed that among the four independent variables, i.e., pH, agitation (rpm), temperature (°C), and inoculum age (h) investigated in this study, interaction effect between agitation and inoculum age as well as that between agitation and temperature were significant on both 4-CP biodegradation efficiency and culture specific growth rate. Also, at the RSM optimized settings of 7.5 pH, 207 rpm, 29.6°C and 39.5 h inoculum age, 100% biodegradation of 4-CP at a high initial concentration of 300 mg l(-1) was achieved within a short span of 18.5 h of culture. The enhancement in the 4-CP biodegradation efficiency was found to be 23% higher than that obtained at the unoptimized settings of the culture conditions. Results of batch growth kinetics of A. chlorophenolicus A6 for various 4-CP initial concentrations revealed that the culture followed substrate inhibition kinetics. Biokinetic constants involved in the process were estimated by fitting the experimental data to several models available from the literature.

  1. Protein secretory patterns of rat Sertoli and peritubular cells are influenced by culture conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kierszenbaum, A.L.; Crowell, J.A.; Shabanowitz, R.B.; DePhilip, R.M.; Tres, L.L.

    1986-08-01

    An approach combining two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and autoradiography was used to correlate patterns of secretory proteins in cultures of Sertoli and peritubular cells with those observed in the incubation medium from segments of seminiferous tubules. Sertoli cells in culture and in seminiferous tubules secreted three proteins designated S70 (Mr 72,000-70,000), S45 (Mr 45,000), and S35 (Mr 35,000). Cultured Sertoli and peritubular cells and incubated seminiferous tubules secreted two proteins designated SP1 (Mr 42,000) and SP2 (Mr 50,000). SP1 and S45 have similar Mr but differ from each other in isoelectric point (pI). Cultured peritubular cells secreted a protein designated P40 (Mr 40,000) that was also seen in intact seminiferous tubules but not in seminiferous tubules lacking the peritubular cell wall. However, a large number of high-Mr proteins were observed only in the medium of cultured peritubular cells but not in the incubation medium of intact seminiferous tubules. Culture conditions influence the morphology and patterns of protein secretion of cultured peritubular cells. Peritubular cells that display a flat-stellate shape transition when placed in culture medium free of serum (with or without hormones and growth factors), accumulate various proteins in the medium that are less apparent when these cells are maintained in medium supplemented with serum. Two secretory proteins stimulated by follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) (designated SCm1 and SCm2) previously found in the medium of cultured Sertoli cells, were also observed in the incubation medium of seminiferous tubular segments stimulated by FSH. Results of this study show that, although cultured Sertoli and peritubular cells synthesize and secrete proteins also observed in segments of incubated seminiferous tubules anther group of proteins lacks seminiferous tubular correlates.

  2. The effects of low-shear stress on Adherent-invasive Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Allen, Christopher A; Niesel, David W; Torres, Alfredo G

    2008-06-01

    The impact of low-shear stress (LSS) was evaluated on an Adherent-invasive Escherichia coli clinical isolate (AIEC strain O83:H1) from a Crohn's disease patient. High-aspect ratio vessels (HARVs) were used to model LSS conditions to characterize changes in environmental stress resistance and adhesion/invasive properties. Low-shear stress-grown cultures exhibited enhanced thermal and oxidative stress resistance as well as increased adherence to Caco-2 cells, but no changes in invasion were observed. An AIEC rpoS mutant was constructed to examine the impact of this global stress regulator. The absence of RpoS under LSS conditions resulted in increased sensitivity to oxidative stress while adherence levels were elevated in comparison with the wild-type strain. TnphoA mutagenesis and rpoS complementation were carried out on the rpoS mutant to identify those factors involved in the LSS-induced adherence phenotype. Mutagenesis results revealed that one insertion disrupted the tnaB gene (encoding tryptophan permease) and the rpoS tnaB double mutant exhibited decreased adherence under LSS. Complementation of the tnaB gene, or medium supplemented with exogenous indole, restored adhesion of the rpoS tnaB mutant under LSS conditions. Overall, our study demonstrated how mechanical stresses such as LSS altered AIEC phenotypic characteristics and identified novel functions for some RpoS-regulated proteins.

  3. Standard culture medium allows clonal dilution of Trypanosoma brucei procyclic cells after auto-conditioning.

    PubMed

    Archer, Stuart K

    2009-03-01

    Trypanosoma brucei can be cultured in vitro in the mammalian bloodstream form or in the procyclic (PC) form found in the insect vector. Bloodstream trypanosomes can be cloned by limiting dilution, but PCs can only be diluted in conditioned medium, i.e., medium in which PC cells have previously been grown. It is shown here that this limitation does not apply to the most commonly used PC cell strain, Lister 427, if free radicals are removed from the medium. The reported benefit of conditioning media may arise in part from a process of hemin-catalysed depletion of peroxide ("auto-conditioning") which occurs during extended incubation at growth temperature. Scavenging free radicals by addition of pyruvate also improves PC cell viability. However, other PC cell strains such as Treu 927 require cell-conditioned media unless grown in a 5% CO2 atmosphere. Several other culture parameters that affect growth rates and dilution capability were identified.

  4. Optimization of culture conditions of Fusarium solani for the production of neoN-methylsansalvamide.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee-Seok; Phat, Chanvorleak; Nam, Woo-Seon; Lee, Chan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to optimize the culture conditions of Fusarium solani KCCM90040 on cereal grain for the production of neoN-methylsansalvamide, a novel low-molecular-weight cyclic pentadepsipeptide exhibiting cytotoxic and multidrug resistance reversal effects. From the analysis of variance results using response surface methodology, temperature, initial moisture content, and growth time were shown to be important parameters for the production of neoN-methylsansalvamide on cereal grain. A model was established in the present study to describe the relationship between environmental conditions and the production of neoN-methylsansalvamide on rice, the selected cereal grain. The optimal culture conditions were determined at 25.79 °C with the initial moisture content of 40.79%, and 16.19 days of growth time. This report will give important information concerning the optimization of environmental conditions using statistic methodology for the production of a new cyclic pentadepsipeptide from fungi.

  5. Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose: evaluation of cellulase culture filtrates under use conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Mandels, M.; Medeiros, J.E.; Andreotti, R.E.; Bissett, F.H.

    1981-09-01

    Culture filtrates from three mutant strains of Trichoderma reesei grown on lactose and on cellulose were compared under use conditions on four cellulose substrates. Cellulose culture filtrates contained five to six times as much cellulase as lactose culture filtrates. Unconcentrated cellulose culture filtrates produced up to 10% sugar solutions from 15% cellulose in 24 hours. Specific activity in enzyme assays and efficiency in saccharification tests were low for enzymes from all the mutants. Over a wide range the percent saccharification of a substrate in a given time was directly proportional to the logarithm of the ratio of initial concentrations of enzyme and substrate. As a result of this, dilute enzyme is more efficient than concentrated enzyme, but if high sugar concentrations are desired, very large quantities of enzyme are required. Since the slopes of these plots varied, the relative activity of cellulase on different substrates may be affected by enzyme concentration. (Refs. 28).

  6. Cholera toxin expression by El Tor Vibrio cholerae in shallow culture growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Cobaxin, Mayra; Martínez, Haydee; Ayala, Guadalupe; Holmgren, Jan; Sjöling, Asa; Sánchez, Joaquín

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae O1 classical, El Tor and O139 are the primary biotypes that cause epidemic cholera, and they also express cholera toxin (CT). Although classical V. cholerae produces CT in various settings, the El Tor and O139 strains require specific growth conditions for CT induction, such as the so-called AKI conditions, which consist of growth in static conditions followed by growth under aerobic shaking conditions. However, our group has demonstrated that CT production may also take place in shallow static cultures. How these type of cultures induce CT production has been unclear, but we now report that in shallow culture growth conditions, there is virtual depletion of dissolved oxygen after 2.5 h of growth. Concurrently, during the first three to 4 h, endogenous CO2 accumulates in the media and the pH decreases. These findings may explain CT expression at the molecular level because CT production relies on a regulatory cascade, in which the key regulator AphB may be activated by anaerobiosis and by low pH. AphB activation stimulates TcpP synthesis, which induces ToxT production, and ToxT directly stimulates ctxAB expression, which encodes CT. Importantly, ToxT activity is enhanced by bicarbonate. Therefore, we suggest that in shallow cultures, AphB is activated by initial decreases in oxygen and pH, and subsequently, ToxT is activated by intracellular bicarbonate that has been generated from endogenous CO2. This working model would explain CT production in shallow cultures and, possibly, also in other growth conditions.

  7. Methods and Compositions Based on Culturing Microorganisms in Low Sedimental Fluid Shear Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, C. Mark; Nickerson, Cheryl A.; Wilson, James W.; Sarker, Shameema; Nauman, Eric A.; Schurr, Michael J.; Nelman-Gonzalez, Mayra A.

    2012-01-01

    The benefits of applying a low sedimental fluid shear environment to manipulate microorganisms were examined. Microorganisms obtained from a low sedimental fluid shear culture, which exhibit modified phenotypic and molecular genetic characteristics, are useful for the development of novel and improved diagnostics, therapeutics, vaccines, and bio-industrial products. Furthermore, application of low sedimental fluid conditions to microorganisms permits identification of molecules uniquely expressed under these conditions, providing a basis for the design of new therapeutic targets.

  8. Mid-Infrared and Near-Infrared Spectroscopic Properties of Fusarium Isolates: Effects of Culture Conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Fusarium genus includes soil saprobes as well as pathogenic or toxin-producing species. Traditional classification of Fusarium isolates is slow and requires a high level of expertise. The objective of this project is to describe culture condition effects on mid-infrared (MidIR) and near-infrared...

  9. Cryopreservation of adherent neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wu; O'Shaughnessy, Thomas; Chang, Eddie

    2006-07-31

    Neuronal networks have been widely used for neurophysiology, drug discovery and toxicity testing. An essential prerequisite for future widespread application of neuronal networks is the development of efficient cryopreservation protocols to facilitate their storage and transportation. Here is the first report on cryopreservation of mammalian adherent neuronal networks. Dissociated spinal cord cells were attached to a poly-d-lysine/laminin surface and allowed to form neuronal networks. Adherent neuronal networks were embedded in a thin film of collagen gel and loaded with trehalose prior to transfer to a freezing medium containing DMSO, FBS and culture medium. This was followed by a slow rate of cooling to -80 degrees C for 24 h and then storage for up to 2 months in liquid nitrogen at -196 degrees C. The three components: DMSO, collagen gel entrapment and trehalose loading combined provided the highest post-thaw viability, relative to individual or two component protocols. The post-thaw cells with this protocol demonstrated similar neuronal and astrocytic markers and morphological structure as those detected in unfrozen cells. Fluorescent dye FM1-43 staining revealed active recycling of synaptic vesicles upon depolarizing stimulation in the post-thaw neuronal networks. These results suggest that a combination of DMSO, collagen gel entrapment and trehalose loading can significantly improve conventional slow-cooling methods in cryopreservation of adherent neuronal networks.

  10. Different Culture Conditions Modulate the Immunological Properties of Adipose Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sivula, Jyrki; Huhtala, Heini; Helminen, Mika; Salo, Fanny; Mannerström, Bettina; Miettinen, Susanna

    2014-01-01

    The potential of human adipose stem cells (ASCs) for regenerative medicine has received recognition owing to their ease of isolation and their multilineage differentiation capacity. Additionally, low immunogenicity and immunosuppressive properties make them a relevant cell source when considering immunomodulation therapies and allogeneic stem cell treatments. In the current study, immunogenicity and immunosuppression of ASCs were determined through mixed lymphocyte reactions. The immunogenic response was analyzed after cell isolation and expansion in fetal bovine serum (FBS), human serum (HS)-supplemented medium, and xeno-free and serum-free (XF/SF) conditions. Additionally, the immunophenotype and the secretion of CXC chemokine ligand 8 (CXCL8), CXCL9, CXCL10, C-C chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2), CCL5, interleukin 2 (IL-2), IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-17A, tumor necrosis factor-α, interferon-γ, transforming growth factor-β1, indoleamine 2,3-deoxygenase, Galectin-1, and Galectin-3 were analyzed. The results showed that ASCs were weakly immunogenic when expanded in any of the three conditions. The significantly strongest suppression was observed with cells expanded in FBS conditions, whereas higher ASC numbers were required to display suppression in HS or XF/SF conditions. In addition, statistically significant differences in protein secretion were observed between direct versus indirect cocultures and between different culture conditions. The characteristic immunophenotype of ASCs was maintained in all conditions. However, in XF/SF conditions, a significantly lower expression of CD54 (intercellular adhesion molecule 1) and a higher expression of CD45 (lymphocyte common antigen) was observed at a low passage number. Although culture conditions have an effect on the immunogenicity, immunosuppression, and protein secretion profile of ASCs, our findings demonstrated that ASCs have low immunogenicity and promising immunosuppressive potential whether cultured in FBS, HS, or XF

  11. Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Culture and Delivery in Autologous Conditions: A Smart Approach for Orthopedic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Trombi, Luisa; Danti, Serena; Savelli, Sara; Moscato, Stefania; D'Alessandro, Delfo; Ricci, Claudio; Giannotti, Stefano; Petrini, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (hMSCs) are cultured in vitro with different media. Limits on their use in clinical settings, however, mainly depend on potential biohazard and inflammation risks exerted by xenogeneic nutrients for their culture. Human derivatives or recombinant materials are the first choice candidates to reduce these reactions. Therefore, culture supplements and materials of autologous origin represent the best nutrients and the safest products. Here, we describe a new protocol for the isolation and culture of bone marrow hMSCs in autologous conditions — namely, patient-derived serum as a supplement for the culture medium and fibrin as a scaffold for hMSC administration. Indeed, hMSC/fibrin clot constructs could be extremely useful for several clinical applications. In particular, we focus on their use in orthopedic surgery, where the fibrin clot derived from the donor's own blood allowed effective cell delivery and nutrient/waste exchanges. To ensure optimal safety conditions, it is of the utmost importance to avoid the risks of hMSC transformation and tissue overgrowth. For these reasons, the approach described in this paper also indicates a minimally ex vivo hMSC expansion, to reduce cell senescence and morphologic changes, and short-term osteo-differentiation before implantation, to induce osteogenic lineage specification, thus decreasing the risk of subsequent uncontrolled proliferation. PMID:28060333

  12. System for measuring oxygen consumption rates of mammalian cells in static culture under hypoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Yuki; Miyahara, Hirotaka; Ota, Yuri; Tsuneda, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Estimating the oxygen consumption rates (OCRs) of mammalian cells in hypoxic environments is essential for designing and developing a three-dimensional (3-D) cell culture system. However, OCR measurements under hypoxic conditions are infrequently reported in the literature. Here, we developed a system for measuring OCRs at low oxygen levels. The system injects nitrogen gas into the environment and measures the oxygen concentration by an optical oxygen microsensor that consumes no oxygen. The developed system was applied to HepG2 cells in static culture. Specifically, we measured the spatial profiles of the local dissolved oxygen concentration in the medium, then estimated the OCRs of the cells. The OCRs, and also the pericellular oxygen concentrations, decreased nonlinearly as the oxygen partial pressure in the environment decreased from 19% to 1%. The OCRs also depended on the culture period and the matrix used for coating the dish surface. Using this system, we can precisely estimate the OCRs of various cell types under environments that mimic 3-D culture conditions, contributing crucial data for an efficient 3-D culture system design.

  13. Optimization of Conditions for In Vitro Culture of the Microphallid Digenean Gynaecotyla adunca.

    PubMed

    West, Jenna; Mitchell, Alexandra; Pung, Oscar J

    2014-01-01

    In vitro cultivation of digeneans would aid the development of effective treatments and studies of the biology of the parasites. The goal of this study was to optimize culture conditions for the trematode, Gynaecotyla adunca. Metacercariae of the parasite from fiddler crabs, Uca pugnax, excysted in trypsin, were incubated overnight to permit fertilization, and were cultured in different conditions to find those that resulted in maximum worm longevity and egg production. When cultured in media lacking serum, worms lived longer in Hanks balanced salt solution and Dulbecco's Modified Eagle medium/F-12 (DME/F-12) than in RPMI-1640 but produced the most eggs in DME/F-12. Worm longevity and egg production increased when worms were grown in DME/F-12 supplemented with 20% chicken, horse, or newborn calf serum but the greatest number of eggs was deposited in cultures containing horse or chicken serum. Horse serum was chosen over chicken serum due to the formation of a precipitate in chicken serum. The optimal concentration of horse serum with respect to egg production ranged from 5 to 20%. Infectivity of eggs deposited by worms in culture was tested by feeding eggs to mud snails, Ilyanassa obsoleta. None of these snails produced G. adunca cercariae.

  14. Determination of the optimal culture conditions for detecting thermophilic campylobacters in environmental water.

    PubMed

    Lévesque, Simon; St-Pierre, Karen; Frost, Eric; Arbeit, Robert D; Michaud, Sophie

    2011-07-01

    This study evaluated alternative protocols for culturing thermophilic campylobacters in environmental water. All samples were filtered through a sterile 0.45μm pore-size membrane, which was then incubated in Preston enrichment broth. Four variables were compared: water sample volume (2000mL vs. 500mL), enrichment broth volume (25mL vs. 100mL), enrichment incubation duration (24h vs. 48h), and number of enrichment passages (one vs. two). In addition, DNA extracts were prepared from all final broths and analyzed using three rRNA PCR assays. River water was collected at 3 sampling sites weekly for 9 weeks. Among these 27 collections, 25 (93%) yielded Campylobacter spp. under at least one of the 16 culture conditions. By univariate analysis, yields were significantly better for the 2000mL sample volume (68.5% vs. 43.0%, p<0.0001) and the 25mL enrichment broth volume (64.5% vs. 47.0%, p<0.0004). Neither of the enrichment period had a significant effect, although there was a trend in favor of 48h incubation (59.5% vs. 52.0%, p=0.13). The three PCR methods gave concordant results for 66 (33%) of the culture-negative samples and 103 (50%) of the culture-positive samples. Compared with culture results, Lubeck's 16S PCR assay had the best performance characteristics, with a sensitivity of 82% and a specificity of 94%. Of the 12 culture-negative samples positive by Lubeck's PCR assay, 11 (92%) samples were also positive by Denis' 16S PCR assay, suggesting that in these cases the culture might have been falsely negative. Based on our results, we conclude that the optimal conditions for detecting Campylobacter spp. in natural waters include 2000mL sample volume and a single enrichment broth of 25mL PB incubated for 48h.

  15. An integrated system for synchronous culture of animal cells under controlled conditions.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Pérez, Elena; Hernández, Vanessa; Palomares, Laura A; Serrato, José A

    2016-01-01

    The cell cycle has fundamental effects on cell cultures and their products. Tools to synchronize cultured cells allow the study of cellular physiology and metabolism at particular cell cycle phases. However, cells are most often arrested by methods that alter their homeostasis and are then cultivated in poorly controlled environments. Cell behavior could then be affected by the synchronization method and culture conditions used, and not just by the particular cell cycle phase under study. Moreover, only a few viable cells are recovered. Here, we designed an integrated system where a large number of cells from a controlled bioreactor culture is separated by centrifugal elutriation at high viabilities. In contrast to current elutriation methods, cells are injected directly from a bioreactor into an injection loop, allowing the introduction of a large number of cells into the separation chamber without stressful centrifugation. A low pulsation peristaltic pump increases the stability of the elutriation chamber. Using this approach, a large number of healthy cells at each cell cycle phase were obtained, allowing their direct inoculation into fully instrumented bioreactors. Hybridoma cells synchronized and cultured in this system behaved as expected for a synchronous culture.

  16. Optical examination of cell culture in bioreactors creating simulated in vivo conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolfe, Peter J.

    2005-01-01

    Cell culture using bioreactors is a vital part of Cellular and Tissue Engineering. Bioreactor design continues to advance, in order to allow control over physical and chemical parameters as well as continuous assessment of cell behaviour, gene expression, and tissue formation and growth. Measurement or monitoring of many such parameters or features can be achieved with optical techniques. The current aim of cell culture is to re-create in vivo conditions and in order to achieve this control of the chemical environment is required and some cell types must be subjected to shear stress and/or axial loads. For creating tissue engineered cartilage chondrocytes are cultured within a biodegradable scaffold. Influences of cyclic loading and of oxygen supply on phenotype are studied. Vascular endothelial cells are subjected to fluid shear stress and the influence on prostacyclin production is measured. Optical interrogation of culture fluid, attached cells, cells in suspension and tissue constructs is carried out using a combination of spectrophotometry, analysis of scattering, and chemical sensing. Insertion of sensing probes within the culture vessel presents problems of protein adsorption to sensing surfaces. Approaches based on cell membrane mimicry are being evaluated for their potential to overcome this problem. Sensors based on immobilised fluorophores and chromaphores within either wall-mounted membranes or within optical fibres are assessed. Culture fluid turbidity is evaluated with scattering determinations and circulating glucose concentration is measured spectrophotometrically. Formed tissue is interrogated with NIR radiation and in the future will include the use of OCT.

  17. Redox interactions between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces uvarum in mixed culture under enological conditions.

    PubMed

    Cheraiti, Naoufel; Guezenec, Stéphane; Salmon, Jean-Michel

    2005-01-01

    Wine yeast starters that contain a mixture of different industrial yeasts with various properties may soon be introduced to the market. The mechanisms underlying the interactions between the different strains in the starter during alcoholic fermentation have never been investigated. We identified and investigated some of these interactions in a mixed culture containing two yeast strains grown under enological conditions. The inoculum contained the same amount (each) of a strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and a natural hybrid strain of S. cerevisiae and Saccharomyces uvarum. We identified interactions that affected biomass, by-product formation, and fermentation kinetics, and compared the redox ratios of monocultures of each strain with that of the mixed culture. The redox status of the mixed culture differed from that of the two monocultures, showing that the interactions between the yeast strains involved the diffusion of metabolite(s) within the mixed culture. Since acetaldehyde is a potential effector of fermentation, we investigated the kinetics of acetaldehyde production by the different cultures. The S. cerevisiae-S. uvarum hybrid strain produced large amounts of acetaldehyde for which the S. cerevisiae strain acted as a receiving strain in the mixed culture. Since yeast response to acetaldehyde involves the same mechanisms that participate in the response to other forms of stress, the acetaldehyde exchange between the two strains could play an important role in inhibiting some yeast strains and allowing the growth of others. Such interactions could be of particular importance in understanding the ecology of the colonization of complex fermentation media by S. cerevisiae.

  18. Impact of culture conditions on the chlorophyll content of microalgae for biotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    da Silva Ferreira, Veronica; Sant'Anna, Celso

    2017-01-01

    Chlorophyll is a commercially important natural green pigment responsible for the absorption of light energy and its conversion into chemical energy via photosynthesis in plants and algae. This bioactive compound is widely used in the food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. Chlorophyll has been consumed for health benefits as a nutraceutical agent with antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antimutagenic, and antimicrobial properties. Microalgae are photosynthesizing microorganisms which can be extracted for several high-value bioproducts in the biotechnology industry. These microorganisms are highly efficient at adapting to physicochemical variations in the local environment. This allows optimization of culture conditions for inducing microalgal growth and biomass production as well as for changing their biochemical composition. The modulation of microalgal culture under controlled conditions has been proposed to maximize chlorophyll accumulation. Strategies reported in the literature to promote the chlorophyll content in microalgae include variation in light intensity, culture agitation, and changes in temperature and nutrient availability. These factors affect chlorophyll concentration in a species-specific manner; therefore, optimization of culture conditions has become an essential requirement. This paper provides an overview of the current knowledge on the effects of key environmental factors on microalgal chlorophyll accumulation, focusing on small-scale laboratory experiments.

  19. Low calcium culture condition induces mesenchymal cell-like phenotype in normal human epidermal keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Takagi, Ryo; Yamato, Masayuki; Murakami, Daisuke; Sugiyama, Hiroaki; Okano, Teruo

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} Normal human epidermal keratinocytes serially cultured under low calcium concentration were cytokeratin and vimentin double positive cells. {yields} The human keratinocytes expressed some epithelial stem/progenitor cell makers, mesenchymal cell markers, and markers of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. {yields} Mesenchymal cell-like phenotype in the keratinocytes was suppressed under high-calcium condition. -- Abstract: Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an important cellular phenomenon in organ developments, cancer invasions, and wound healing, and many types of transformed cell lines are used for investigating for molecular mechanisms of EMT. However, there are few reports for EMT in normal human epithelial cells, which are non-transformed or non-immortalized cells, in vitro. Therefore, normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK) serially cultured in low-calcium concentration medium (LCM) were used for investigating relations between differentiation and proliferation and mesenchymal-like phenotype in the present study, since long-term cultivation of NHEK is achieved in LCM. Interestingly, NHEK serially cultured in LCM consisted essentially of cytokeratin-vimentin double positive cells (98%), although the NHEK exhibited differentiation under high-calcium culture condition with 3T3 feeder layer. The vimentin expression was suppressed under high-calcium condition. These results may indicate the importance of mesenchymal-like phenotype for serially cultivation of NHEK in vitro.

  20. A semi-empirical glycosylation model of a camelid monoclonal antibody under hypothermia cell culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Aghamohseni, Hengameh; Spearman, Maureen; Ohadi, Kaveh; Braasch, Katrin; Moo-Young, Murray; Butler, Michael; Budman, Hector M

    2017-03-11

    The impact of cell culture environment on the glycan distribution of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) has been investigated through a combination of experiments and modeling. A newly developed CHO DUXB cell line was cultivated at two levels of initial Glutamine (Gln) concentrations (0, 4 mM) and incubation temperatures of (33 and 37 °C) in batch operation mode. Hypothermia was applied either through the entire culture duration or only during the post-exponential phase. Beyond reducing cell growth and increasing productivity, hypothermia significantly altered the galactosylation index profiles as compared to control conditions. A novel semi-empirical dynamic model was proposed for elucidating the connections between the extracellular cell culture conditions to galactosylation index. The developed model is based on a simplified balance of nucleotides sugars and on the correlation between sugars' levels to the galactosylation index (GI). The model predictions were found to be in a good agreement with the experimental data. The proposed empirical model is expected to be useful for controlling the glycoprofiles by manipulating culture conditions.

  1. Organisation of the chondrocyte cytoskeleton and its response to changing mechanical conditions in organ culture

    PubMed Central

    DURRANT, L. A.; ARCHER, C. W.; BENJAMIN, M.; RALPHS, J. R.

    1999-01-01

    Articular cartilage undergoes cycles of compressive loading during joint movement, leading to its cyclical deformation and recovery. This loading is essential for chondrocytes to perform their normal function of maintenance of the extracellular matrix. Various lines of evidence suggest the involvement of the cytoskeleton in load sensing and response. The purpose of the present study is to describe the 3-dimensional (3D) architecture of the cytoskeleton of chondrocytes within their extracellular matrix, and to examine cytoskeletal responses to experimentally varied mechanical conditions. Uniformly sized explants of articular cartilage were dissected from adult rat femoral heads. Some were immediately frozen, cryosectioned and labelled for filamentous actin using phalloidin, and for the focal contact component vinculin or for vimentin by indirect immunofluorescence. Sections were examined by confocal microscopy and 3D modelling. Actin occurred in all chondrocytes, appearing as bright foci at the cell surface linked to an irregular network beneath the surface. Cell surface foci colocalised with vinculin, suggesting the presence of focal contacts between the chondrocyte and its pericellular matrix. Vimentin label occurred mainly in cells of the deep zone. It had a complex intracellular distribution, with linked networks of fibres surrounding the nucleus and beneath the plasma membrane. When cartilage explants were placed into organ culture, where in the absence of further treatments cartilage imbibes fluid from the culture medium and swells, cytoskeletal changes were observed. After 1 h in culture the vimentin cytoskeleton was disassembled, leading to diffuse labelling of cells. After a further hour in culture filamentous vimentin label reappeared in deep zone chondrocytes, and then over the next 48 h became more widespread in cells of the explants. Actin distribution was unaffected by culture. Further experiments were performed to test the effects of load on the

  2. Quantification of conserved antigens in Helicobacter pylori during different culture conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Lindholm, C; Osek, J; Svennerholm, A M

    1997-01-01

    In this study, we raised monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against three conserved Helicobacter pylori antigens, i.e., the N-acetylneuraminyllactose-binding fibrillar hemagglutinin, HpaA; the flagellin subunits, FlaA and FlaB; and a species-specific 26-kDa protein. The MAbs were used for the development of sensitive inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for quantification of these antigens in H. pylori during various culture conditions. The quantities of these antigens varied considerably (up to 8-fold) during different culture procedures and between strains (up to 10-fold). PMID:9393845

  3. Blood culture series benefit may be limited to selected clinical conditions: time to reassess.

    PubMed

    Khatib, R; Simeunovic, G; Sharma, M; Fakih, M G; Johnson, L B; Briski, L; Lebar, W

    2015-04-01

    Blood cultures are often submitted as series (two to three sets per 24 hours) to maximize sample recovery. We assessed the actual benefit of additional sets. Blood cultures submitted from adults (≥ 18 years old) over 1 year (1 February 2012 to 31 January 2013) were examined. The medical records of patients with positive cultures were reviewed. Cultures with commensal organisms were considered contamination in the absence of a source and clinical findings. The impact of additional sets on antibiotic therapy was estimated. We evaluated 15,394 blood cultures. They were submitted as two to five sets per 24 hours in 12,236 (79.5%) instances. Pathogens were detected in 1227 sets, representing 741 bacteremias, of which 618 (83.4%) were detected in the first set and 123 (16.6%) in the additional sets. Pathogens missed in the first set were recovered from patients receiving antibiotics (n = 72; 58.5%) and after undergoing a procedure (n = 54; 43.9%). The additional sets' results could have influenced antibiotic therapy in 76/6235 (1.2%) instances, including 40 (0.6%) antibiotic switches and 36 (0.6%) possible extensions of therapy. The potential impact of the detection of missed pathogens on antibiotic therapy was not apparent in patients who had an endovascular infection (26/27, 96.3%) and those who lacked an obvious source of pathogens (10/10, 100%). These findings suggest that one blood culture is probably adequate in patients with an obvious source of pathogens. Blood culture series are beneficial in patients without an obvious source of pathogens and in those with endovascular infections. It is time to reassess the benefit of blood culture series, perhaps limiting them to selected conditions.

  4. Optimization of cultural conditions for conversion of glycerol to ethanol by Enterobacter aerogenes S012

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this research is to optimize the cultural conditions for the conversion of glycerol to ethanol by Enterobacter aerogenes S012. Taguchi method was used to screen the cultural conditions based on their signal to noise ratio (SN). Temperature (°C), agitation speed (rpm) and time (h) were found to have the highest influence on both glycerol utilization and ethanol production by the organism while pH had the lowest. Full factorial design, statistical analysis, and regression model equation were used to optimize the selected cultural parameters for maximum ethanol production. The result showed that fermentation at 38°C and 200 rpm for 48 h would be ideal for the bacteria to produce maximum amount of ethanol from glycerol. At these optimum conditions, ethanol production, yield and productivity were 25.4 g/l, 0.53 g/l/h, and 1.12 mol/mol-glycerol, repectively. Ethanol production increased to 26.5 g/l while yield and productivity decreased to 1.04 mol/mol-glycerol and 0.37 g/l/h, respectively, after 72 h. Analysis of the fermentation products was performed using HPLC, while anaerobic condition was created by purging the fermentation vessel with nitrogen gas. PMID:23388539

  5. Medication adherence behaviors of Medicare beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    Carr-Lopez, Sian M; Shek, Allen; Lastimosa, Janine; Patel, Rajul A; Woelfel, Joseph A; Galal, Suzanne M; Gundersen, Berit

    2014-01-01

    Background Medication adherence is crucial for positive outcomes in the management of chronic conditions. Comprehensive medication consultation can improve medication adherence by addressing intentional and unintentional nonadherence. The Medicare Part D prescription drug benefit has eliminated some cost barriers. We sought to examine variables that impact self-reported medication adherence behaviors in an ambulatory Medicare-beneficiary population and to identify the factors that influence what information is provided during a pharmacist consultation. Methods Medicare beneficiaries who attended health fairs in northern California were offered medication therapy management (MTM) services during which demographic, social, and health information, and responses to survey questions regarding adherence were collected. Beneficiaries were also asked which critical elements of a consultation were typically provided by their community pharmacist. Survey responses were examined as a function of demographic, socioeconomic, and health-related factors. Results Of the 586 beneficiaries who were provided MTM services, 575 (98%) completed the adherence questions. Of responders, 406 (70%) reported taking medications “all of the time”. Of the remaining 169 (30%), the following reasons for nonadherence were provided: 123 (73%) forgetfulness; 18 (11%) side effects; and 17 (10%) the medication was not needed. Lower adherence rates were associated with difficulty paying for medication, presence of a medication-related problem, and certain symptomatic chronic conditions. Of the 532 who completed survey questions regarding the content of a typical pharmacist consultation, the topics included: 378 (71%) medication name and indication; 361 (68%) administration instructions; 307 (58%) side effects; 257 (48%) missed-dose instructions; and 245 (46%) interactions. Subsidy recipients and non-English speakers were significantly less likely to be counseled on drug name, indication, and side

  6. Enhanced Bioactive Exopolysaccharide Production by Mossy Maze Polypore, Cerrena unicolor (Higher Basidiomycetes) in Submerged Culture Conditions.

    PubMed

    Altinay, Burcu; Karaduman, Ayse Betul; Gursu, Bukay Yenice; Yamac, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the culture requirements of the Cerrena unicolor OBCC 5005 strain were determined to optimize bioactive exopolysaccharide production in submerged culture. The effects of initial medium pH, carbon and nitrogen sources, inoculum age and amount, and mineral source on exopolysaccharide and mycelial biomass production by the C. unicolor OBCC 5005 strain were studied using a one-factor-at-a-time method. The highest exopolysaccharide production was obtained when culture parameters were used as initial medium pH: 5.5, 5% sucrose, 5% mycological peptone, and 5% of 4-day inoculants in the presence of 5 mM Fe2+. Optimized culture conditions at a flask scale were applied to a 3-L stirred tank reactor. As a result, 7.92 g/L and 7.34 g/L maximum exopolysaccharide production in optimized conditions at flask and stirred-tank reactor scales were achieved, respectively. The present study is the first to prove that C. unicolor can yield high bioactive exopolysaccharide production at flask and stirred-tank reactor scales.

  7. Metabolic analysis of antibody producing Chinese hamster ovary cell culture under different stresses conditions.

    PubMed

    Badsha, Md Bahadur; Kurata, Hiroyuki; Onitsuka, Masayoshi; Oga, Takushi; Omasa, Takeshi

    2016-07-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are commonly used as the host cell lines concerning their ability to produce therapeutic proteins with complex post-translational modifications. In this study, we have investigated the time course extra- and intracellular metabolome data of the CHO-K1 cell line, under a control and stress conditions. The addition of NaCl and trehalose greatly suppressed cell growth, where the maximum viable cell density of NaCl and trehalose cultures were 2.2-fold and 2.8-fold less than that of a control culture. Contrariwise, the antibody production of both the NaCl and trehalose cultures was sustained for a longer time to surpass that of the control culture. The NaCl and trehalose cultures showed relatively similar dynamics of cell growth, antibody production, and substrate/product concentrations, while they indicated different dynamics from the control culture. The principal component analysis of extra- and intracellular metabolome dynamics indicated that their dynamic behaviors were consistent with biological functions. The qualitative pattern matching classification and hierarchical clustering analyses for the intracellular metabolome identified the metabolite clusters whose dynamic behaviors depend on NaCl and trehalose. The volcano plot revealed several reporter metabolites whose dynamics greatly change between in the NaCl and trehalose cultures. The elastic net identified some critical, intracellular metabolites that are distinct between the NaCl and trehalose. While a relatively small number of intracellular metabolites related to the cell growth, glucose, glutamine, lactate and ammonium ion concentrations, the mechanism of antibody production was suggested to be very complicated or not to be explained by elastic net regression analysis.

  8. Germ-cell culture conditions facilitate the production of mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Ibeas, Priscila; Pericuesta, Eva; Fernández-González, Raúl; Gutiérrez-Adán, Alfonso; Ramírez, Miguel Ángel

    2014-09-01

    The derivation of embryonic stem-cell (ESC) lines from blastocysts is a very inefficient process. Murine ESCs are thought to arise from epiblast cells that are already predisposed to a primordial-germ-cell fate. During the process of ESC derivation from B6D2 F1 hybrid mice, if we first culture the embryo from the two-cell stage in medium supplemented with LIF, we improve the quality of the blastocyst. When the blastocyst is then cultured in a germ-line stem-cell culture medium (GSCm), we are able to more efficiently (28.3%) obtain quality ESC lines that have a normal karyotype, proper degree of chimerism, and exhibit germ-line transmission when microinjected into blastocysts. Although germ-cell-specific genes were expressed in all culture medium conditions, GSCm did not shift the transcriptome towards germ-cell specification. A correlation was further observed between ESC derivation efficiency and the expression of some imprinted genes and retrotransposable elements. In conclusion, the combination of LIF supplementation followed by culture in GSCm establishes a higher efficiency method for ESC derivation.

  9. Nonlinear Dielectric Properties of Yeast Cells Cultured in Different Environmental Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawanishi, Gomon; Fukuda, Naoki; Muraji, Masafumi

    The harmonics of the electric current through yeast suspensions, the nonlinear dielectric properties of yeast cells, have particular patterns according to the biological activity of the cells and the measurement of these patterns is a technique for determining the activity of living cells. The concentration of glucose and oxygen in yeast culture medium influences the manifestation of fermentation or respiration of yeast cells. Measurements were made with yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) cultured aerobically and anaerobically in sufficient glucose concentration, aerobic fermentation and anaerobic fermentation, and aerobically in limited glucose concentration, respiration. The results showed that the harmonics were barely apparent for yeast cells in aerobic fermentation and respiratory; however, cells in the anaerobic fermentation displayed substantial third and fifth harmonics. We can say that environmental condition affects the yeast cells' nonlinear properties, from another viewpoint, the measurements of the nonlinear properties are available to determine the activity of yeast cells adjusted to the conditions of their cultivation.

  10. Medication Adherence in the General Population

    PubMed Central

    Glombiewski, Julia A.; Nestoriuc, Yvonne; Rief, Winfried; Glaesmer, Heide; Braehler, Elmar

    2012-01-01

    Background Adherence to medication is low in specific populations who need chronic medication. However, adherence to medication is also of interest in a more general fashion, independent of specific populations or side effects of particular drugs. If clinicians and researchers expect patients to show close to full adherence, it is relevant to know how likely the achievement of this goal is. Population based rates can provide an estimate of efforts needed to achieve near complete adherence in patient populations. The objective of the study was to collect normative data for medication nonadherence in the general population. Methods and Findings We assessed 2,512 persons (a representative sample of German population). Adherence was measured by Rief Adherence Index. We also assessed current medication intake and side effects. We found that at least 33% of Germans repeatedly fail to follow their doctor's recommendations regarding pharmacological treatments and only 25% of Germans describe themselves as fully adherent. Nonadherence to medication occurs more often in younger patients with higher socioeconomic status taking short-term medications than in older patients with chronic conditions. Experience with medication side effects was the most prominent predictor of nonadherence. Conclusions The major strengths of our study are a representative sample and a novel approach to assess adherence. Nonadherece seems to be commonplace in the general population. Therefore adherence cannot be expected per se but needs special efforts on behalf of prescribers and public health initiatives. Nonadherence to medication should not only be considered as a drug-specific behaviour problem, but as a behaviour pattern that is independent of the prescribed medication. PMID:23272064

  11. Influence of culture conditions on growth and protective antigenicity of Clostridium chauvoei.

    PubMed

    Cortiñas, T I; Micalizzi, B; de Guzman, A M

    1994-10-01

    The effect of culture conditions on growth and immunogenicity of Clostridium chauvoei were examined. The pH control and partial feeding of the carbon source at high concentrations were beneficial for growth. The biomass yield was significatively improved, however the butanol concentration reached toxic levels hampering further growth. For each experimental condition the immunogenicity of cells was tested. No differences were found with cells obtained at different temperatures, but it decreased significatively with the partial supply of the carbon source and pH control.

  12. Selective advantage of trisomic human cells cultured in non-standard conditions

    PubMed Central

    Rutledge, Samuel D.; Douglas, Temple A.; Nicholson, Joshua M.; Vila-Casadesús, Maria; Kantzler, Courtney L.; Wangsa, Darawalee; Barroso-Vilares, Monika; Kale, Shiv D.; Logarinho, Elsa; Cimini, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    An abnormal chromosome number, a condition known as aneuploidy, is a ubiquitous feature of cancer cells. A number of studies have shown that aneuploidy impairs cellular fitness. However, there is also evidence that aneuploidy can arise in response to specific challenges and can confer a selective advantage under certain environmental stresses. Cancer cells are likely exposed to a number of challenging conditions arising within the tumor microenvironment. To investigate whether aneuploidy may confer a selective advantage to cancer cells, we employed a controlled experimental system. We used the diploid, colorectal cancer cell line DLD1 and two DLD1-derived cell lines carrying single-chromosome aneuploidies to assess a number of cancer cell properties. Such properties, which included rates of proliferation and apoptosis, anchorage-independent growth, and invasiveness, were assessed both under standard culture conditions and under conditions of stress (i.e., serum starvation, drug treatment, hypoxia). Similar experiments were performed in diploid vs. aneuploid non-transformed human primary cells. Overall, our data show that aneuploidy can confer selective advantage to human cells cultured under non-standard conditions. These findings indicate that aneuploidy can increase the adaptability of cells, even those, such as cancer cells, that are already characterized by increased proliferative capacity and aggressive tumorigenic phenotypes. PMID:26956415

  13. Morphogenesis of human embryonic stem cells into mature neurons under in vitro culture conditions

    PubMed Central

    Shroff, Geeta

    2016-01-01

    AIM To describe the morphogenesis of different neuronal cells from the human embryonic stem cell (hESC) line, SCT-N, under in vitro culture conditions. METHODS The directed neuronal cell line was produced from a single, spare, pre-implantation stage fertilized ovum that was obtained during a natural in vitro fertilization process. The hESCs were cultured and maintained as per our proprietary in-house technology in a Good Manufacturing Practice, Good Laboratory Practice and Good Tissue Practice compliant laboratory. The cell line was derived and incubated in aerobic conditions. The cells were examined daily under a phase contrast microscope for their growth and differentiation. RESULTS Different neural progenitor cells (NPCs) and differentiating neurons were observed under the culture conditions. Multipotent NPCs differentiated into all three types of nervous system cells, i.e., neurons, oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. Small projections resembling neurites or dendrites, and protrusion coming out of the cells, were observed. Differentiating cells were observed at day 18 to 20. The differentiating neurons, neuronal bodies, axons, and neuronal tissue were observed on day 21 and day 30 of the culture. On day 25 and day 30, prominent neurons, axons and neuronal tissue were observed under phase contrast microscopy. 4’, 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole staining also indicated the pattern of differentiating neurons, axonal structure and neuronal tissue. CONCLUSION This study describes the generation of different neuronal cells from an hESC line derived from biopsy of blastomeres at the two-cell cleavage stage from a discarded embryo. PMID:27909687

  14. Physiological pulsatile flow culture conditions to generate functional endothelium on a sulfated silk fibroin nanofibrous scaffold.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xianghui; Liu, Haifeng; Ding, Xili; Liu, Meili; Li, Xiaoming; Zheng, Lisha; Jia, Xiaoling; Zhou, Gang; Zou, Yuanwen; Li, Jinchuan; Huang, Xuejin; Fan, Yubo

    2014-06-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that in vitro shear stress conditioning of endothelial cell-seeded small-diameter vascular grafts can improve cell retention and function. However, the laminar flow and pulsatile flow conditions which are commonly used in vascular tissue engineering and hemodynamic studies are quite different from the actual physiological pulsatile flow which is pulsatile in nature with typical pressure and flow waveforms. The actual physiological pulsatile flow leading to temporal and spatial variations of the wall shear stress may result in different phenotypes and functions of ECs. Thus, the aim of this study is to find out the best in vitro dynamic culture conditions to generate functional endothelium on sulfated silk fibroin nanofibrous scaffolds for small-diameter vascular tissue engineering. Rat aortic endothelial cells (RAECs) were seeded on sulfated silk fibroin nanofibrous scaffolds and cultured under three different patterns of flow conditioning, e.g., steady laminar flow (SLF), sinusoidal flow (SF), or physiological pulsatile flow (PPF) representative of a typical femoral distal pulse wave in vivo for up to 24 h. Cell morphology, cytoskeleton alignment, fibronectin assembly, apoptosis, and retention on the scaffolds were investigated and were compared between three different patterns of flow conditioning. The results showed that ECs responded differentially to different exposure time and different flow patterns. The actual PPF conditioning demonstrated excellent EC retention on sulfated silk fibroin scaffolds in comparison with SLF and SF, in addition to the alignment of cells in the direction of fluid flow, the formation of denser and regular F-actin microfilament bundles in the same direction, the assembly of thicker and highly crosslinked fibronectin, and the significant inhibition of cell apoptosis. Therefore, the actual PPF conditioning might contribute importantly to the generation of functional endothelium on a sulfated silk

  15. Culture conditions and salt effects on essential oil composition of sweet marjoram (Origanum majorana) from Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Baâtour, Olfa; Tarchoune, Imen; Mahmoudi, Hela; Nassri, Nawel; Abidi, Wissal; Kaddour, Rym; Hamdaoui, Ghaith; Nasri-Ayachi, Mouhiba Ben; Lachaâl, Mohtar; Marzouk, Brahim

    2012-06-01

    O. majorana shoots were investigated for their essential oil (EO) composition. Two experiments were carried out; the first on hydroponic medium in a culture chamber and the second on inert sand in a greenhouse for 20 days. Plants were cultivated for 17 days in hydroponic medium supplemented with NaCl 100 mmol L⁻¹. The results showed that the O. majorana hydroponic medium offered higher essential oil yield than that from the greenhouse. The latter increased significantly in yield (by 50 %) under saline constraint while it did not change in the culture chamber. Under greenhouse conditions and in the absence of salt treatment, the major constituents were terpinen-4-ol and trans-sabinene hydrate. However, in the culture chamber, the major volatile components were cis-sabinene hydrate and terpinen-4-ol. In the presence of NaCl, new compounds appeared, such as eicosane, spathulenol, eugenol, and phenol. In addition, in the greenhouse, with or without salt, a very important change of trans-sabinene hydrate concentration in EO occurred, whereas in the culture chamber change appeared in cis-sabinene hydrate content.

  16. Optimization of culturing conditions of recombined Escherichia coli to produce umami octopeptide-containing protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yin; Wei, Xiong; Lu, Zhou; Pan, Zhongli; Gou, Xinhua; Venkitasamy, Chandrasekar; Guo, Siya; Zhao, Liming

    2017-07-15

    Using synthesized peptides to verify the taste of natural peptides was probably the leading cause for tasting disputes regarding umami peptides. A novel method was developed to prepare the natural peptide which could be used to verify the taste of umami peptide. A controversial octopeptide was selected and gene engineering was used to structure its Escherichia coli. expressing vector. A response surface method was adopted to optimize the expression conditions of the recombinant protein. The results of SDS-PAGE for the recombinant protein indicated that the recombinant expression system was successfully structured. The fitting results of the response surface experiment showed that the OD600 value was the key factor which influenced the expression of the recombinant protein. The optimal culturing process conditions predicted with the fitting model were an OD600 value of 0.5, an IPTG concentration of 0.6mM, a culturing temperature of 28.75°C and a culturing time of 5h.

  17. Simulated Microgravity Combined with Polyglycolic Acid Scaffold Culture Conditions Improves the Function of Pancreatic Islets

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yimin; Wei, Zheng; Song, Chun; Xie, Shanshan; Feng, Jinfa; Fan, Jiehou; Zhang, Zengling; Shi, Yubo

    2013-01-01

    The in vitro culture of pancreatic islets reduces their immunogenicity and prolongs their availability for transplantation. Both simulated microgravity (sMG) and a polyglycolic acid scaffold (PGA) are believed to confer advantages to cell culture. Here, we evaluated the effects of sMG combined with a PGA on the viability, insulin-producing activity and morphological alterations of pancreatic islets. Under PGA-sMG conditions, the purity of the islets was ≥85%, and the islets had a higher survival rate and an increased ability to secrete insulin compared with islets cultured alone in the static, sMG, or PGA conditions. In addition, morphological analysis under scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that the PGA-sMG treatment preserved the integral structure of the islets and facilitated islet adhesion to the scaffolds. These results suggest that PGA-sMG coculture has the potential to improve the viability and function of islets in vitro and provides a promising method for islet transplantation. PMID:24024182

  18. Lignolytic enzymes produced by Trametes villosa ccb176 under different culture conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yamanaka, Renata; Soares, Clarissa F.; Matheus, Dácio R.; Machado, Kátia M.G.

    2008-01-01

    The expression of the enzymatic system produced by basidiomycetous fungi, which is involved in the degradation of xenobiotics, mainly depends on culture conditions, especially of the culture medium composition. Trametes villosa is a strain with a proven biotechnological potential for the degradation of organochlorine compounds and for the decolorization of textile dyes. The influence of glucose concentration, addition of a vegetable oil-surfactant emulsion, nature of the surfactant and the presence of manganese and copper on the growth, pH and production of laccase, total peroxidase and manganese-dependent peroxidase activities were evaluated. In general, acidification of the medium was observed, with the pH reaching a value close to 3.5 within the first days of growth. Laccase was the main activity detected under the different conditions and was produced throughout the culture period of the fungus, irrespective of the growth phase. Supplementation of the medium with vegetable oil emulsified with a surfactant induced manganese-dependent peroxidase activity in T. villosa. Higher specific yields of laccase activity were obtained with the addition of copper. PMID:24031184

  19. Drinking water biofilm assessment of total and culturable bacteria under different operating conditions.

    PubMed

    Simões, L C; Azevedo, N; Pacheco, A; Keevil, C W; Vieira, M J

    2006-01-01

    Monitoring of biofilms subjected to different operating conditions was performed using a flow cell system. The system was fed by chlorine-free tap water, with and without added nutrients (0.5 mg l(-1) carbon, 0.1 mg l(-1) nitrogen and 0.01 mg l(-1) phosphorus), and biofilms were grown on polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and stainless steel (SS) coupons, both in laminar and turbulent flow. The parameters analysed were culturable cells, using R2A, and total bacteria, which was assessed using the 4,6-diamino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining method. The impact of the different operating conditions in the studied parameters was established using Multivariate Analysis of Variance (MANOVA). From the most relevant to the least relevant factor, the total and culturable bacteria in biofilms increased due to the addition of nutrients to water (F = 20.005; p < 0.001); the use of turbulent (Re = 11000) instead of laminar (Re = 2000) hydrodynamic flows (F = 9.173; p < 0.001); and the use of PVC instead of SS as the support material (F = 2.848; p = 0.060). Interactions between these conditions, namely between surface and flow (F = 8.235; p < 0.001) and also flow and nutrients (F = 5.498; p < 0.05) have also proved to significantly influence biofilm formation. This work highlights the need for a deeper understanding of how the large spectrum of conditions interact and affect biofilm formation potential and accumulation with the final purpose of predicting the total and culturable bacteria attached to real drinking water distribution pipes based on the system characteristics.

  20. Growth of Geobacter sulfurreducens under nutrient-limiting conditions in continuous culture.

    PubMed

    Esteve-Núñez, Abraham; Rothermich, Mary; Sharma, Manju; Lovley, Derek

    2005-05-01

    A system for growing Geobacter sulfurreducens under anaerobic conditions in chemostats was developed in order to study the physiology of this organism under conditions that might more closely approximate those found in the subsurface than batch cultures. Geobacter sulfurreducens could be cultured under acetate-limiting conditions with fumarate or Fe(III)-citrate as the electron acceptor at growth rates between 0.04 and 0.09 h(-1). The molar growth yield was threefold higher with fumarate as the electron acceptor than with Fe(III), despite the lower mid-point potential of the fumarate/succinate redox couple. When growth was limited by availability of fumarate, high steady-state concentrations were detected, suggesting that fumarate is unlikely to be an important electron acceptor in sedimentary environments. The half-saturation constant, Ks, for acetate in Fe(III)-grown cultures (10 microM) suggested that the growth of Geobacter species is likely to be acetate limited in most subsurface sediments, but that when millimolar quantities of acetate are added to the subsurface in order to promote the growth of Geobacter for bioremediation applications, this should be enough to overcome any acetate limitations. When the availability of electron acceptors, rather than acetate, limited growth, G. sulfurreducens was less efficient in incorporating acetate into biomass but had higher respiration rates, a desirable physiological characteristic when adding acetate to stimulate the activity of Geobacter species during in situ uranium bioremediation. These results demonstrate that the ability to study the growth of G. sulfurreducens under steady-state conditions can provide insights into its physiological characteristics that have relevance for its activity in a diversity of sedimentary environments.

  1. Lymphocyte culture: induction of colonies by conditioned medium from human lymphoid cell lines.

    PubMed

    Galbraith, R M; Goust, J M; Fudenberg, H H

    1977-12-01

    The presence of phytohemagglutinin or pokeweed mitogen in cultures of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in agar is known to stimulate the formation of lymphoid colonies. We now report that similar colonies can be induced in the absence of plant lectins upon addition of filtered and ultracentrifuged conditioned medium (CM) obtained from certain human lymphoblastoid cell lines. Colony formation required at least 6 X 10(5) mononuclear cells per milliliter, and optimum results were obtained at concentrations of 1 X 10(6) cells/ml in the presence of 20% CM (50-500 colonies per 10(6) cells cultured). Individual cells within colonies displayed uniform morphological characteristics of lymphoid cells, and the majority formed rosettes with sheep erythrocytes, suggesting that they were of T-cell type.

  2. Development of tissue culture techniques and hardware to study mineralization under microgravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Loon, J. J. W. A.; Veldhuijzen, J. P.; Windgassen, E. J.; Brouwer, T.; Wattel, K.; van Vilsteren, M.; Maas, P.

    1994-08-01

    To study the effects of weightlessness on mouse fetal long bone rudiment growth and mineralization we have developed a tissue culture system for the Biorack facility of Spacelab. The technique uses standard liquid tissue culture medium, supplemented with Na-β-glycerophosphate, confined in gas permeable polyethylene bags mounted inside ESA Biorack Type I experiment containers. The containers can be flushed with an air/5% CO2 gas mixture necessary for the physiological bicarbonate buffer used. Small amounts of fluid can be introduced at the beginning (e.g. radioactive labels for incorporation studies) or at the end of the experiment (fixatives). A certain form of mechanical stimulation (continuous compression) can be used to counteract the, possibly, adverse effect of μ-gravity. Using 16 day old metatarsals the in vitro calcification process under μ-gravity conditions can be studied for a 4 day period.

  3. Adherence to Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Treatment for Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Implications for Future Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Terri E.; Sawyer, Amy M.

    2010-01-01

    Adherence to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a critical problem with adherence rates ranging from 30–60%. Poor adherence to CPAP is widely recognized as a significant limiting factor in treating OSA, reducing the overall effectiveness of the treatment and leaving many OSA patients at heightened risk for comorbid conditions, impaired function and quality of life. The extant literature examining adherence to CPAP provides critical insight to measuring adherence outcomes, defining optimal adherence levels, and predicting CPAP adherence. This research has revealed salient factors that are associated with or predict CPAP adherence and may guide the development of interventions to promote CPAP adherence. Over the past 10 years, intervention studies to promote CPAP adherence have incorporated a multitude of strategies including education, support, cognitive behavioral approaches, and mixed strategies. This review of the current state of science of CPAP adherence will (1) synthesize the extant literature with regard to measuring, defining, and predicting CPAP adherence, (2) review published intervention studies aimed at promoting CPAP adherence, and (3) suggest directions for future empiric study of adherence to CPAP that will have implications for translational science. Our current understanding of CPAP adherence suggests that adherence is a multi-factorial, complex clinical problem that requires similarly designed approaches to effectively address poor CPAP adherence in the OSA population. PMID:20308750

  4. Survival and retention of the probiotic properties of Bacillus sp. strains under marine stress starvation conditions and their potential use as a probiotic in Artemia culture.

    PubMed

    Mahdhi, Abdelkarim; Esteban, Maria Ángeles; Hmila, Zeineb; Bekir, Karima; Kamoun, Fathi; Bakhrouf, Amina; Krifi, Boubaker

    2012-12-01

    The probiotic properties of Bacillus strains isolated from Artemia culture and the effect of marine stress on viability and survival were investigated, as well as the changes occurring in their properties. Analyses showed that these bacteria corresponded to the genus Bacillus sp. Antagonism and adherence assays revealed that Bacillus strains have an inhibitory effect against tested pathogenic bacteria and are fairly adherent. Normal and starved cells showed different enzymatic profiles. Challenge tests performed with Artemia larvae provided evidence that the tested Bacillus strains were neither pathogenic nor toxic to the host and conferred protection for Artemia culture against pathogens. The tested strains maintained their viability and their probiotic properties during the period of study. The results suggest that the tested strains have suffered changes allowing them to survive in seawater in the absence of nutrients and outside their natural host, identifying them as potential probiotic candidates for Artemia culture.

  5. Culture Conditions Determine the Balance between Two Different Exopolysaccharides Produced by Lactobacillus pentosus LPS26▿

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Jorge-Ignacio; Martínez, Beatriz; Guillén, Rafael; Jiménez-Díaz, Rufino; Rodríguez, Ana

    2006-01-01

    Lactobacillus pentosus LPS26, isolated from a natural fermentation of green olives, produces a capsular polymer constituted of two exopolysaccharides (EPS): EPS A, a high-molecular-weight (high-Mw) polysaccharide (1.9 × 106 Da) composed of glucose and rhamnose (3:1), and EPS B, a low-Mw polysaccharide (3.3 × 104 Da) composed of glucose and mannose (3:1). Fermentation experiments in a chemically semidefined medium with different carbon sources (glucose, fructose, mannitol, and lactose) showed that all of them except fructose supported EPS A production rather than EPS B production. The influence of temperature and pH was further analyzed. As the temperature dropped, increased synthesis of both EPS was detected. The control of pH especially enhanced EPS B production. With regard to this, the maximum total EPS production (514 mg liter−1) was achieved at a suboptimal growth temperature (20°C) and pH 6.0. Continuous cultures showed that EPS A, synthesized mainly at low dilution rates, is clearly dependent on the growth rate, whereas EPS B synthesis was hardly affected. EPS production was also detected in supplemented skimmed milk, but no increase on the viscosity of the fermented milk was recorded. This could be linked to the high proportion of the low-Mw polysaccharide produced in these conditions in contrast to that observed in culture media. Overall, the present study shows that culture conditions have a clear impact on the type and concentration of EPS produced by strain LPS26, and consequently, these conditions should be carefully selected for optimization and application studies. Finally, it should be noted that this is, to our knowledge, the first report on EPS production by L. pentosus. PMID:17012595

  6. Effect of culture conditions on microRNA expression in primary adult control and COPD lung fibroblasts in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ikari, Jun; Smith, Lynette M; Nelson, Amy J; Iwasawa, Shunichiro; Gunji, Yoko; Farid, Maha; Wang, Xingqi; Basma, Hesham; Feghali-Bostwick, Carol; Liu, Xiangde; DeMeo, Dawn L; Rennard, Stephen I

    2015-04-01

    In vitro cell cultures, including lung fibroblasts, have been used to identify microRNAs (miRNAs) associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) pathogenesis. However, culture conditions may affect miRNA expression. We examined whether miRNA expression in primary adult lung fibroblasts varies with cell density or passage in vitro and whether culture conditions confound the identification of altered miRNA expression in COPD lung fibroblasts. Primary adult control and COPD lung fibroblasts were cultured until passage 3 or 8, after which cells were further cultured for 3 or 7 d (low vs. high density). Then, cells at low density were cultured with serum-free media, and those at high density were cultured with serum-free media in the absence or presence of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) for 24 h. RNA was extracted to perform miRNA microarray from which 1.25-fold differential expression and 10% false discovery rate were applied to identify "invariant" and "variant" miRNA for the various culture conditions. Of the 2226 miRNAs evaluated, 39.0% for cell density, 40.7% for cell passage, and 29.4% for both conditions were identified as "invariant" miRNAs. Furthermore, 38.1% of the evaluated miRNAs were "invariant" for cell passage with IL-1β and TNF-α. Differentially expressed miRNAs between control and COPD lung fibroblasts were identified with and without IL-1β and TNF-α, and of these, 32 out of the 34 top-ranked miRNAs exceeded the differences due to culture conditions. Thus, culture conditions may affect miRNA expression of adult human lung fibroblasts. Nevertheless, in vitro cultures can be used to assess differential miRNA expression in COPD lung fibroblasts.

  7. Production of mouse monoclonal antibodies which inhibit in vitro adherence of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites.

    PubMed Central

    Ravdin, J I; Petri, W A; Murphy, C F; Smith, R D

    1986-01-01

    Adherence by axenic Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites to mammalian cells is mediated by an N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc)-inhibitable adhesin on the surface of the parasite. We isolated 35 hybridoma cell lines producing antibodies to E. histolytica as indicated by ELISA with sonicated amebic protein or by immunofluorescence assay with fixed whole trophozoites. Tissue culture supernatants were further screened for subcloning by the ability to bind to Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells which were first exposed to a partially purified soluble preparation of the amebic GalNAc-inhibitable lectin. Eight tissue culture supernatants were positive in this assay. Antibodies from four subcloned cell lines (D3-14, H8-5, I12-2, and I1-21) inhibited amebic adherence to CHO cells (P less than 0.01). Of the original 35 tissue culture supernatants, 3 also inhibited amebic adherence (P less than 0.01; F1, F14, and J10); monoclonal antibodies in these supernatants did not bind to lectin-exposed CHO cells. Three purified monoclonal antibodies (H8-5, I12-2, and I1-21) inhibited amebic adherence at greater than or equal to 2 micrograms/10(4) amebae (P less than 0.05). None of these inhibitory monoclonal antibodies immunoprecipitated with a soluble amebic protein preparation following sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under denaturing conditions. Monoclonal antibodies which inhibit in vitro adherence by E. histolytica will be useful in purification of the GalNAc-inhibitable lectin. PMID:2873102

  8. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3)-inhibitor SB216763 promotes the conversion of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells into neural precursors in adherent culture.

    PubMed

    Gao, Liyang; Zhao, Mingyan; Li, Peng; Kong, Junchao; Liu, Zhijun; Chen, Yonghua; Huang, Rui; Chu, Jiaqi; Quan, Juanhua; Zeng, Rong

    2017-01-01

    The ability to generate neural progenitor cells from human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSCs) has provided an option to treat neurodegenerative diseases. To establish a method for this purpose, we characterized the early neural markers of hUC-MSCs-derived cells under different conditions. We found that neither the elimination of signals for alternative fate nor N2 supplement was sufficient to differentiate hUC-MSCs into neural precursor cells, but the GSK3 inhibitor SB216763 could promote an efficient neural commitment of hUC-MSCs. The results indicated that Wnt/β-catenin might play an important role during the early neural differentiation of hUC-MSCs. Here, we report a method for hUC-MSCs to commit efficiently into a neural fate within a short period of time. This protocol provides an efficient method for hUC-MSCs-based neural regeneration.

  9. [Effects of culture conditions on coenzyme Q10 production by Rhizobium radiobacter by metabolic flux analysis].

    PubMed

    Wu, Zu-fang; Du, Guo-cheng; Chen, Jian

    2005-04-01

    Metabolic pathway network of CoQ10 synthesis by R. radiobacter WSH2601 were instructed. The metabolic flux and its changes were determined under the conditions of changing DO concentration and addition of 1% CSL in the medium. The results illustrated that the Ru5P flux (r7) increased by 26.6 when increasing the DO concentration, r7 increased by 17.2 when addition of 1% CSL. The ratio of EMP and HMP flux as well as TCA flux decreased at these two conditions. DPP flux had a little change at these two conditions. Therefore, the CoQ10 accumulation is greatly determined by two key enzymes activities of condensation reaction between p-hydroxybenzoate acid (PHB) and decaprenyl diphosphate (DPP). The nodes of G6P, pyruvate and PEP are principal nodes in primary metabolism of CoQ10 fermentation. The flexibility of principal nodes was evaluated that the G6P node is elastic, while pyruvate node is weakly flexibility, at the condition of changing culture conditions. The increase of DCW is associated with the improvement of HMP pathway flux.

  10. Effect of cultural conditions on production of eicosapentaenoic acid by Pythium irregulare.

    PubMed

    Stinson, E E; Kwoczak, R; Kurantz, M J

    1991-10-01

    The effect of culture conditions upon lipid content and fatty acid composition of mycelia of Pythium irregulare was investigated with particular attention to increasing the yield of 5,8,11,14,17-eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5; omega-3)(EPA). All experiments were done by shake flask culture using a yeast extract + malt extract medium. The maximum growth rate was obtained at 25 degrees C, but maximum EPA production was obtained at 12 degrees C. The highest EPA production was 76.5 micrograms EPA/ml 13 days fermentation at 12 degrees C. Addition of glucose during fermentation increased the yield considerably. The highest yield was 112 micrograms/ml, obtained at 13 days fermentation with spiking on day 11. Fermentation time could be shortened by initial incubation at 25 degrees C for 2 days, followed by incubation at 12 degrees C for 6 days. The culture also produced arachidonic acid and other omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids. EPA production was also obtained with lactose or sweet whey permeate, a by-product of cheese manufacture that contains lactose as the main carbohydrate.

  11. Mycelial mass production of fungi Duddingtonia flagrans and Monacrosporium thaumasium under different culture conditions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Duddingtonia flagrans and Monacrosporium thaumasium are promising fungus species in veterinary biological control of gastrointestinal nematodes because of their production capacity of fungal structures (conidia and/or chlamydospores), growth efficiency in laboratory solid media and especially their predatory capacity. However, their large-scale production remains a challenge. This work aimed at evaluating the mycelial mass production of D. flagrans (AC001 and CG722) and M. thaumasium (NF34A) nematophagous fungi under different culture conditions. Results The results did not present significant differences (p > 0.05) in mycelia mass production between the isolates cultured under pH 4.0. Furthermore, after 168 hrs., the isolate CG722 presented a lower production of mycelial mass in medium CM (corn meal) (p < 0.05). Conclusion We therefore concluded the use of culture media SD (soy dextrose) and CG (corn grits) at pH values between 6.0 and 7.0 is suitable for high mycelial mass production of D. flagrans and M. thaumasium. PMID:23985336

  12. Removal of methyl parathion by cyanobacteria Microcystis novacekii under culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Fioravante, Isabela Araújo; Barbosa, Francisco Antônio Rodrigues; Augusti, Rodinei; Magalhães, Sérgia Maria Starling

    2010-06-01

    This study investigated the removal of methyl parathion by cyanobacteria Microcystis novacekii in culture conditions and evaluated toxicity in terms of EC(50) of the pesticide for the species. This is the first report on the removal and toxicity of methyl parathion for the species that is abundant and easily accessible in Brazilian lakes. The results have shown that Microcystis novacekii is capable of removing methyl parathion, an organophosphorus pesticide, from the culture medium with an extraction rate higher than 90%. Spontaneous degradation was not significant, which indicates a high efficiency level of biological removal. No metabolites of methyl parathion were detected in the culture medium at the concentration levels evaluated (0.10 to 2.00 mg/dm(3)). The mechanisms proposed to explain pesticide removal are bioaccumulation and mineralization. EC(50) for 72 h was 17.60 mg/dm(3), which is much higher than the usual concentrations in surface waters. This indicates that M. novacekii is highly tolerant of this pesticide and may represent an important bioremediation agent of contaminated environments.

  13. Effect of Culture Conditions on the Production of d-Galactose Oxidase by Dactylium dendroides1

    PubMed Central

    Markus, Z.; Miller, G.; Avigad, G.

    1965-01-01

    The effects on enzyme production of inoculum size and age, medium composition, and culture conditions were studied in shake flasks and in a pilot-plant fermentor. Using a medium consisting of glucose, yeast extract, and inorganic salts in deionized water, we found that the addition of Cu++ was essential for the formation of active enzyme. Cultures grown in the absence of added copper produced an inactive enzyme protein which could be activated by 10-3 M Cu++. Thiamine fulfilled all requirements for exogenous vitamins for growth and enzyme production. Glucose concentrations higher than 1% markedly suppressed enzyme formation. The mycelium inactivated the enzyme on prolonged incubation of the culture. Mycelial autolysates and sonic extracts were found to contain a thermostable and slowly dialyzable galactose oxidase-inactivating factor. The experiments suggest that this factor operates as a chelating agent which forms complexes with the copper of the enzyme. Copper ions (10-3 M) prevented enzyme inactivation and restored activity to samples previously inactivated by this factor. PMID:5867649

  14. Monochloramine Cometabolism by Mixed-Culture Nitrifiers under Drinking Water Conditions.

    PubMed

    Maestre, Juan P; Wahman, David G; Speitel, Gerald E

    2016-06-21

    Chloramines are the second most used secondary disinfectant by United States water utilities. However, chloramination may promote nitrifying bacteria. Recently, monochloramine cometabolism by the pure culture ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, Nitrosomonas europaea, was shown to increase monochloramine demand. The current research investigated monochloramine cometabolism by nitrifying mixed cultures grown under more relevant drinking water conditions and harvested from sand-packed reactors before conducting suspended growth batch kinetic experiments. Four types of batch kinetic experiments were conducted: (1) positive controls to estimate ammonia kinetic parameters, (2) negative controls to account for biomass reactivity, (3) utilization associated product (UAP) controls to account for UAP reactivity, and (4) cometabolism experiments to estimate cometabolism kinetic parameters. Kinetic parameters were estimated in AQUASIM with a simultaneous fit to the experimental data. Cometabolism kinetics were best described by a first-order model. Monochloramine cometabolism kinetics were similar to those of ammonia metabolism, and monochloramine cometabolism accounted for 30% of the observed monochloramine loss. These results demonstrated that monochloramine cometabolism occurred in mixed cultures similar to those found in drinking water distribution systems; therefore, monochloramine cometabolism may be a significant contribution to monochloramine loss during nitrification episodes in drinking water distribution systems.

  15. Soil adherence to human skin

    SciTech Connect

    Driver, J.H.; Konz, J.J.; Whitmyre, G.K. )

    1989-12-01

    Dermal exposure to soils contaminated with toxic chemicals represents a potential public health hazard. These soils, contaminated with chemicals such as PCBs and dioxins, may be found at various locations throughout the US. Furthermore, dermal contact with pesticide-containing particles and contaminated soil particles is of importance for exposures to agricultural workers who reenter fields after pesticide application. With respect to dermal exposure to pesticide-contaminated particulate matter, several occurrences of human toxicity to ethyl parathion in citrus groves have been reported. These exposures resulted from dermal contact with high concentrations of the toxic transformation product paraoxon in soil dust contaminated as a result of application of pesticide to the overhead foliage of trees. To assess dermal exposure to chemically-contaminated soil at sites of concern, dermal adherence of soil must be determined prior to the assessment of dermal absorption. The purpose of the experiment reported herein was to determine the amount of soil (mg/cm{sup 2}) that adheres to adult hands under various soil conditions. These conditions include the type of soil, the organic content of the soil, and the particle size of the soil.

  16. Control of CO₂ input conditions during outdoor culture of Chlorella vulgaris in bubble column photobioreactors.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhi; Phooi, Wei Boon Alfred; Lim, Zi Jian; Tong, Yen Wah

    2015-06-01

    A study on the optimization of CO2 usage during outdoor microalgae cultivation in order to further maximize the CO2 to biomass conversion efficiency is presented. A constant supply of CO2 was found to be non-essential for culturing microalgae outdoors in 80 L (8 L×10 sets) bubble columns. Among the different CO2 input conditions that were studied, 2% CO2 with intermittent supply and 2%+4% CO2 alternation did not affect the algal growth as compared to having a constant supply of 2% CO2. However, during both input conditions, the CO2 to biomass conversion efficiency was doubled while the amount of CO2 used was reduced by 50%. The algal biomass obtained was found to have a higher carbohydrate yield but a lower protein yield as compared to previously published studies. The findings from this study could be applied for large-scale microalgae production so as to minimize cultivation and energy costs.

  17. Enhancement of Exopolysaccharide Production of Lactobacillus fermentum TDS030603 by Modifying Culture Conditions.

    PubMed

    Shi, Tala; Aryantini, Ni Putu Desy; Uchida, Kenji; Urashima, Tadasu; Fukuda, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    To optimize culture conditions that enhance production of a highly viscous exopolysaccharide of Lactobacillus fermentum TDS030603, a chemically defined medium was examined. The best yield was found to be 199 ± 23 mg/l when 48-hr cultivation was microaerobically performed at 30°C in the chemically defined medium supplemented with 5% glucose and 1% ammonium citrate without pH control. In response to the optimized exopolysaccharide production, the mRNA expression levels of epsB, epsE, and epsG elevated significantly. Our results indicated that the optimal C/N ratio and/or microaerobic condition can alter the expression levels of several exopolysaccharide biosynthesis-related genes promoting the exopolysaccharide production yield.

  18. Bridging Mediterranean cultures in the IYS: A documentary exhibition on irrigation techniques in water scarcity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barontini, Stefano; Louki, Amina; Ben Slima, Zied; Ezzahra Ghaouch, Fatima; Labaran, Raisa; Raffelli, Giulia; Peli, Marco; Vitale, Nicola

    2015-04-01

    Brescia, an industrial city in Northern Italy, is now experiencing a crucial change in its traditional structure. In recent years in fact it has been elected as living and working seat by many foreigners and it is now one of the cities with the greatest percentage of migrants in the Country. This is an important challenge for the city and an opportunity to merge, compare and integrate different cultures to build its future. In this context some students of different Courses (engineering and medicine), belonging both to the Arabian and local community, met together and with researchers in the study team 'Al-B¯i r¯u n¯i , for culture, science and society'. The team aims at organising cultural events in which, starting from the figure of the Persian scientist Ab¯u Raih. ¯a n Al-B¯i r¯u n¯i (about 973, 1051), the contribution of the Arabian and Islamic culture to the development of the European one in the middle ages is investigated. Moving from the initial idea of the study team Al-B¯i r¯u n¯i and from the suggestions of the World Soil Day 2014 and of the International Year of Soils 2015, we built a documentary exhibition entitled 'Irrigation techniques in water scarcity conditions'. The exhibition, which stresses the importance of the irrigation techniques for the soil conservation, is focused on the idea of disseminating two main concepts, i.e. (1) the technological continuity of some water supply systems in countries, around the Mediterranean Sea, affected by similar conditions of water availability, and (2) the possibility of building environments where, due to severe or extreme climatic conditions, the sustainability is reached when the man lives in equilibrium with the nature. The exhibition, which is written in Italian and will move around in the city during all 2015, consists of about twenty posters organized into three main chapters, corresponding to three main classes of water supply systems which are common in most of the countries surrounding

  19. Hydrogen isotope fractionation by Methanothermobacter thermoautotrophicus in coculture and pure culture conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshioka, Hideyoshi; Sakata, Susumu; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2008-06-01

    We grew a hydrogen-utilizing methanogen, Methanothermobacter thermoautotrophicus strain ΔH, in coculture and pure culture conditions to evaluate the hydrogen isotope fractionation associated with carbonate reduction under low (< several tens of μM; coculture) and high (>6 mM; pure culture) concentrations of H 2 in the headspace. In the cocultures, which were grown at 55 °C with a thermophilic butyrate-oxidizing syntroph, the hydrogen isotopic relationship between methane and water was well represented by the following equation: δD=0.725(±0.003)·δDO-275(±3), in which the hydrogen isotope fractionation factor ( αH) was 0.725 ± 0.003. The relationship was consistent with the isotopic data on methane and water from terrestrial fields (a peat bog in Washington State, USA, and a sandy aquifer in Denmark), where carbonate reduction was reported to be the dominant pathway of methanogenesis. In the pure cultures, grown at 55 and 65 °C, the αH values were 0.755 ± 0.014 and 0.749 ± 0.014, respectively. Dependence of αH on growth temperature was not observed. The αH value at 55 °C in the pure culture was slightly higher than that in the coculture, a finding that disagrees with a hypothesis proposed by Burke [Burke, Jr. R. A. (1993) Possible influence of hydrogen concentration on microbial methane stable hydrogen isotopic composition. Chemosphere26, 55-67] that hydrogen isotope fractionation between methane and water increases (and αH decreases) with increasing H 2 concentration.

  20. Metabolomic Profiling of 13 Diatom Cultures and Their Adaptation to Nitrate-Limited Growth Conditions.

    PubMed

    Bromke, Mariusz A; Sabir, Jamal S; Alfassi, Fahad A; Hajarah, Nahid H; Kabli, Saleh A; Al-Malki, Abdulrahman L; Ashworth, Matt P; Méret, Michaël; Jansen, Robert K; Willmitzer, Lothar

    2015-01-01

    Diatoms are very efficient in their use of available nutrients. Changes in nutrient availability influence the metabolism and the composition of the cell constituents. Since diatoms are valuable candidates to search for oil producing algae, measurements of diatom-produced compounds can be very useful for biotechnology. In order to explore the diversity of lipophilic compounds produced by diatoms, we describe the results from an analysis of 13 diatom strains. With the help of a lipidomics platform, which combines an UPLC separation with a high resolution/high mass accuracy mass spectrometer, we were able to measure and annotate 142 lipid species. Out of these, 32 were present in all 13 cultures. The annotated lipid features belong to six classes of glycerolipids. The data obtained from the measurements were used to create lipidomic profiles. The metabolomic overview of analysed cultures is amended by the measurement of 96 polar compounds. To further increase the lipid diversity and gain insight into metabolomic adaptation to nitrogen limitation, diatoms were cultured in media with high and low concentrations of nitrate. The growth in nitrogen-deplete or nitrogen-replete conditions affects metabolite accumulation but has no major influence on the species-specific metabolomic profile. Thus, the genetic component is stronger in determining metabolic patterns than nitrogen levels. Therefore, lipid profiling is powerful enough to be used as a molecular fingerprint for diatom cultures. Furthermore, an increase of triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulation was observed in low nitrogen samples, although this trend was not consistent across all 13 diatom strains. Overall, our results expand the current understanding of metabolomics diversity in diatoms and confirm their potential value for producing lipids for either bioenergy or as feed stock.

  1. Effect of medium components and culture conditions in Bacillus subtilis EA-CB0575 spore production.

    PubMed

    Posada-Uribe, Luisa F; Romero-Tabarez, Magally; Villegas-Escobar, Valeska

    2015-10-01

    Bacillus subtilis spores have important biotechnological applications; however, achieving both, high spore cell densities and sporulation efficiencies in fermentation, is poorly reported. In this study, medium components and culture conditions were optimized with different statistical methods to increase spore production of the plant growth promoting rhizobacteria B. subtilis EA-CB0575. Key medium components were determined with Plackett-Burman (PB) design, and the optimum concentration levels of two components (glucose, MgSO4·7H2O) were optimized with a full factorial and central composite design, achieving 1.37 × 10(9) CFU/mL of spore cell density and 93.5 % of sporulation efficiency in shake flask. The optimized medium was used to determine the effect of culture conditions on spore production at bioreactor level, finding that maintaining pH control did not affect significantly spore production, while the interaction of agitation and aeration rates had a significant effect on spore cell density. The overall optimization generated a 17.2-fold increase in spore cell density (8.78 × 10(9) CFU/mL) and 1.9-fold increase in sporulation efficiency (94.2 %) compared to that of PB design. These results indicate the potential of B. subtilis EA-CB0575 to produce both, high spore cell densities and sporulation efficiencies, with very low nutrient requirements and short incubation period which can represent savings of process production.

  2. Fatty acid profiles of four filamentous green algae under varying culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junzhuo; Vanormelingen, Pieter; Vyverman, Wim

    2016-01-01

    Although benthic filamentous algae are interesting targets for wastewater treatment and biotechnology, relatively little is known about their biochemical composition and variation in response to growth conditions. Fatty acid composition of four benthic filamentous green algae was determined in different culture conditions. Although the response was partly species-dependent, increasing culture age, nitrogen deprivation and dark exposure of stationary phase greatly increased both total fatty acid content (TFA) from 12-35 to 40-173mgg(-1) dry weight (DW) and the relative proportion of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) from 21-58% to 55-87% of TFA, with dark exposure having the greatest effect. However, the main variation in fatty acid composition was between species, with Uronema being rich in C16:0 (2.3% of DW), Klebsormidium in C18:2ω6 (5.4% of DW) and Stigeoclonium in C18:3ω3 (11.1% of DW). This indicates the potential of the latter two species as potential sources of these PUFAs.

  3. Conditioned Media from Microvascular Endothelial Cells Cultured in Simulated Microgravity Inhibit Osteoblast Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cazzaniga, Alessandra; Castiglioni, Sara; Maier, Jeanette A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims. Gravity contributes to the maintenance of bone integrity. Accordingly, weightlessness conditions during space flight accelerate bone loss and experimental models in real and simulated microgravity show decreased osteoblastic and increased osteoclastic activities. It is well known that the endothelium and bone cells cross-talk and this intercellular communication is vital to regulate bone homeostasis. Because microgravity promotes microvascular endothelial dysfunction, we anticipated that the molecular cross-talk between endothelial cells exposed to simulated microgravity and osteoblasts might be altered. Results. We cultured human microvascular endothelial cells in simulated microgravity using the rotating wall vessel device developed by NASA. Endothelial cells in microgravity show growth inhibition and release higher amounts of matrix metalloproteases type 2 and interleukin-6 than controls. Conditioned media collected from microvascular endothelial cells in simulated microgravity were used to culture human osteoblasts and were shown to retard osteoblast proliferation and inhibit their activity. Discussion. Microvascular endothelial cells in microgravity are growth retarded and release high amounts of matrix metalloproteases type 2 and interleukin-6, which might play a role in retarding the growth of osteoblasts and impairing their osteogenic activity. Conclusions. We demonstrate that since simulated microgravity modulates microvascular endothelial cell function, it indirectly impairs osteoblastic function. PMID:25210716

  4. Finite element study of scaffold architecture design and culture conditions for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Olivares, Andy L; Marsal, Elia; Planell, Josep A; Lacroix, Damien

    2009-10-01

    Tissue engineering scaffolds provide temporary mechanical support for tissue regeneration and transfer global mechanical load to mechanical stimuli to cells through its architecture. In this study the interactions between scaffold pore morphology, mechanical stimuli developed at the cell microscopic level, and culture conditions applied at the macroscopic scale are studied on two regular scaffold structures. Gyroid and hexagonal scaffolds of 55% and 70% porosity were modeled in a finite element analysis and were submitted to an inlet fluid flow or compressive strain. A mechanoregulation theory based on scaffold shear strain and fluid shear stress was applied for determining the influence of each structures on the mechanical stimuli on initial conditions. Results indicate that the distribution of shear stress induced by fluid perfusion is very dependent on pore distribution within the scaffold. Gyroid architectures provide a better accessibility of the fluid than hexagonal structures. Based on the mechanoregulation theory, the differentiation process in these structures was more sensitive to inlet fluid flow than axial strain of the scaffold. This study provides a computational approach to determine the mechanical stimuli at the cellular level when cells are cultured in a bioreactor and to relate mechanical stimuli with cell differentiation.

  5. The use of incentives to reinforce medication adherence

    PubMed Central

    DeFulio, Anthony; Silverman, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Objective Poor medication adherence is a longstanding problem, and is especially pertinent for individuals with chronic conditions or diseases. Adherence to medications can improve patient outcomes and greatly reduce the cost of care. The purpose of the present review is to describe the literature on the use of incentives as applied to the problem of medication adherence. Methods We conducted a systematic review of peer-reviewed empirical evaluations of incentives provided to patients contingent upon medication adherence. Results This review suggests that incentive-based medication adherence interventions can be very effective, but there are few controlled studies. The studies on incentive-based medication adherence interventions most commonly feature patients taking medication for drug or alcohol dependence, HIV, or latent tuberculosis. Across studies that reported percent adherence comparisons, incentives increased adherence by a mean of 20 percentage points, but effects varied widely. Cross-study comparisons indicate a positive relationship between the value of the incentive and the impact of the intervention. Post-intervention evaluations were rare, but tended to find that adherence effects diminish after the interventions are discontinued. Conclusions Incentive-based medication adherence interventions are promising but understudied. A significant challenge for research in this area is the development of sustainable and cost-effective long-term interventions. PMID:22580095

  6. Biomass and nutrient productivities of Tetraselmis chuii under mixotrophic culture conditions with various C:N ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Lin; Wang, Jun; Yang, Guanpin; Zhu, Baohua; Pan, Kehou

    2017-03-01

    Mass microalgal culture plays an irreplaceable role in aquaculture, but microalgal productivity is restricted by traditional autotrophic culture conditions. In the present study, a Tetraselmis chuii strain belonging to the phylum Chlorophyta was isolated from south Yellow Sea. The growth rate and biomass productivity of this strain was higher under mixotrophic conditions with different carbon:nitrogen (C:N) ratios than those under autotrophic conditions. When the C:N ratio was 16, the optical density and biomass productivity were 3.7- and 5-fold higher than their corresponding values under autotrophic culture conditions, respectively. Moreover, T. chuii synthesized more polysaccharides and total lipids under mixotrophic conditions. In addition, T. chuii cultured under mixotrophic conditions synthesized more types of fatty acids than autotrophic culture conditions. At a C:N ratio of 16, the percentage of C16:0 and C18:1 reached 30.08% and 24.65% of the total fatty acid (TFA) content, respectively. These findings may provide a basis for large-scale mixotrophic culture of T. chuii, as a potential bait-microalga.

  7. Biomass and nutrient productivities of Tetraselmis chuii under mixotrophic culture conditions with various C:N ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Lin; Wang, Jun; Yang, Guanpin; Zhu, Baohua; Pan, Kehou

    2016-05-01

    Mass microalgal culture plays an irreplaceable role in aquaculture, but microalgal productivity is restricted by traditional autotrophic culture conditions. In the present study, a Tetraselmis chuii strain belonging to the phylum Chlorophyta was isolated from south Yellow Sea. The growth rate and biomass productivity of this strain was higher under mixotrophic conditions with different carbon:nitrogen (C:N) ratios than those under autotrophic conditions. When the C:N ratio was 16, the optical density and biomass productivity were 3.7- and 5-fold higher than their corresponding values under autotrophic culture conditions, respectively. Moreover, T. chuii synthesized more polysaccharides and total lipids under mixotrophic conditions. In addition, T. chuii cultured under mixotrophic conditions synthesized more types of fatty acids than autotrophic culture conditions. At a C:N ratio of 16, the percentage of C16:0 and C18:1 reached 30.08% and 24.65% of the total fatty acid (TFA) content, respectively. These findings may provide a basis for largescale mixotrophic culture of T. chuii, as a potential bait-microalga.

  8. Nanoparticle growth and surface chemistry changes in cell-conditioned culture medium

    PubMed Central

    Kendall, Michaela; Hodges, Nikolas J.; Whitwell, Harry; Tyrrell, Jess; Cangul, Hakan

    2015-01-01

    When biomolecules attach to engineered nanoparticle (ENP) surfaces, they confer the particles with a new biological identity. Physical format may also radically alter, changing ENP stability and agglomeration state within seconds. In order to measure which biomolecules are associated with early ENP growth, we studied ENPs in conditioned medium from A549 cell culture, using dynamic light scattering (DLS) and linear trap quadrupole electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry. Two types of 100 nm polystyrene particles (one uncoated and one with an amine functionalized surface) were used to measure the influence of surface type. In identically prepared conditioned medium, agglomeration was visible in all samples after 1 h, but was variable, indicating inter-sample variability in secretion rates and extracellular medium conditions. In samples conditioned for 1 h or more, ENP agglomeration rates varied significantly. Agglomerate size measured by DLS was well correlated with surface sequestered peptide number for uncoated but not for amine coated polystyrene ENPs. Amine-coated ENPs grew much faster and into larger agglomerates associated with fewer sequestered peptides, but including significant sequestered lactose dehydrogenase. We conclude that interference with extracellular peptide balance and oxidoreductase activity via sequestration is worthy of further study, as increased oxidative stress via this new mechanism may be important for cell toxicity. PMID:25533102

  9. Propagation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells on Human Amniotic Fluid Cells as Feeder Cells in Xeno-Free Culture Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Juwon; Baek, Jin Ah; Seol, Hye Won; Choi, Young Min

    2016-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have been routinely cultured on mouse embryonic fibroblast feederlayers with a medium containing animal materials. For clinical application of hESCs, animal-derived products from the animal feeder cells, animal substrates such as gelatin or Matrigel and animal serum are strictly to be eliminated in the culture system. In this study, we performed that SNUhES32 and H1 were cultured on human amniotic fluid cells (hAFCs) with KOSR XenoFree and a humanized substrate. All of hESCs were relatively well propagated on hAFCs feeders with xeno-free conditions and they expressed pluripotent stem cell markers, alkaline phosphatase, SSEA-4, TRA1-60, TRA1-81, Oct-4, and Nanog like hESCs cultured on STO or human foreskin fibroblast feeders. In addition, we observed the expression of nonhuman N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5GC) molecules by flow cytometry, which was xenotransplantation components of contamination in hESCs cultured on animal feeder conditions, was not detected in this xeno-free condition. In conclusion, SNUhES32 and H1 could be maintained on hAFCs for humanized culture conditions, therefore, we suggested that new xenofree conditions for clinical grade hESCs culture will be useful data in future clinical studies. PMID:27294211

  10. Ethical considerations in adherence research

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Nupur U; Moore, Blake A; Craver, Rebekah F; Feldman, Steven R

    2016-01-01

    Poor adherence to treatment is a common cause of medical treatment failure. Studying adherence is complicated by the potential for the study environment to impact adherence behavior. Studies performed without informing patients about adherence monitoring must balance the risks of deception against the potential benefits of the knowledge to be gained. Ethically monitoring a patient’s adherence to a treatment plan without full disclosure of the monitoring plan requires protecting the patient’s rights and upholding the fiduciary obligations of the investigator. Adherence monitoring can utilize different levels of deception varying from stealth monitoring, debriefing after the study while informing the subject that some information had been withheld in regard to the use of adherence monitoring (withholding), informed consent that discloses some form of adherence monitoring is being used and will be disclosed at the end of the study (authorized deception), and full disclosure. Different approaches offer different benefits and potential pitfalls. The approach used must balance the risk of nondisclosure against the potential for confounding the adherence monitoring data and the potential benefits that adherence monitoring data will have for the research subjects and/or other populations. This commentary aims to define various methods of adherence monitoring and to provide a discussion of the ethical considerations that accompany the use of each method and adherence monitoring in general as it is used in clinical research. PMID:27980394

  11. Ethical considerations in adherence research.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nupur U; Moore, Blake A; Craver, Rebekah F; Feldman, Steven R

    2016-01-01

    Poor adherence to treatment is a common cause of medical treatment failure. Studying adherence is complicated by the potential for the study environment to impact adherence behavior. Studies performed without informing patients about adherence monitoring must balance the risks of deception against the potential benefits of the knowledge to be gained. Ethically monitoring a patient's adherence to a treatment plan without full disclosure of the monitoring plan requires protecting the patient's rights and upholding the fiduciary obligations of the investigator. Adherence monitoring can utilize different levels of deception varying from stealth monitoring, debriefing after the study while informing the subject that some information had been withheld in regard to the use of adherence monitoring (withholding), informed consent that discloses some form of adherence monitoring is being used and will be disclosed at the end of the study (authorized deception), and full disclosure. Different approaches offer different benefits and potential pitfalls. The approach used must balance the risk of nondisclosure against the potential for confounding the adherence monitoring data and the potential benefits that adherence monitoring data will have for the research subjects and/or other populations. This commentary aims to define various methods of adherence monitoring and to provide a discussion of the ethical considerations that accompany the use of each method and adherence monitoring in general as it is used in clinical research.

  12. Trace element proxies for surface ocean conditions: A synthesis of culture calibrations with planktic foraminifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Katherine A.; Hönisch, Bärbel; Eggins, Stephen M.; Haynes, Laura L.; Rosenthal, Yair; Yu, Jimin

    2016-11-01

    The trace element composition of planktic foraminiferal calcite provides a useful means of determining past surface ocean conditions. We have assembled the results of culture experiments for three species of symbiont-bearing planktic foraminifera, Globigerinoides ruber, Globigerinoides sacculifer, and Orbulina universa, and one symbiont-barren species, Globigerina bulloides, to evaluate their responses to temperature, salinity, pH, carbonate ion, and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) growth conditions. Trace element ratios (Li/Ca, B/Ca, Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca, Mn/Ca, Cd/Ca, Ba/Ca, Na/Ca, and U/Ca) were measured simultaneously on samples grown with the same culture techniques, which provides robust, relatable calibrations that may be used together in multi-proxy paleoceanographic studies. Our data confirm that temperature is the dominant control on foraminiferal Mg/Ca under the ranges of conditions studied and that the potential effects of salinity and CO32- on Mg/Ca of these tropical species across late Pleistocene glacial cycles are relatively small. Carbonate system experiments suggest that Sr/Ca may be useful for reconstructing large DIC changes. Na/Ca increases with salinity in G. ruber (pink), but not in G. sacculifer. As these emerging proxy relationships become more firmly established, the synthesis of multiple trace element ratios may help paleoceanographers isolate the effects of different environmental parameters in paleo records. Calcification rates (μg/day) vary among species and do not respond consistently to any experimental parameter. Comparison of our calcification rates with those observed in inorganic calcite precipitation experiments suggest that foraminifera calcify ∼100× more slowly than inorganic calcites grown in similar solutions. We suggest that calcification rate does not typically exert a dominant control on trace element partitioning in planktic foraminiferal calcite, though it may play a role for some elements under certain circumstances

  13. Using communication skills to improve adherence in children with chronic disease: the adherence equation.

    PubMed

    Brand, Paul L P; Klok, Ted; Kaptein, Adrian A

    2013-12-01

    Nonadherence to maintenance medication is common in paediatric chronic conditions. Despite the common belief that nonadherence is therapy-resistant, and the apparent lack of evidence for successful interventions to improve adherence, there is, in fact, a considerable body of evidence suggesting that adherence can be improved by applying specific communicative consultation skills. These can be summarized as the adherence equation: adherence=follow-up+dialogue+barriers and beliefs+empathy and education => concordance. Close follow-up of children with a chronic condition is needed to establish a therapeutic partnership with the family. Teaching self management skills is not a unidirectional process of providing information, but requires a constructive and collaborative dialogue between the medical team and the family. Identifying barriers to adherence can be achieved in a non-confrontational manner, by showing a genuine interest what the patient's views and preferences are. In particular, parental illness perceptions and medication beliefs should be identified, because they are strong drivers of nonadherence. Through empathic evidence-based education, such perceptions and beliefs can be modified. By applying these strategies, concordance between the child's family and the medical team can be achieved, resulting in optimal adherence to the jointly created treatment plan.

  14. Adherence to Sports-Injury Rehabilitation Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, A. Craig; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Analysis of 41 injured college athletes' responses to a questionnaire revealed that those athletes who adhered to their rehabilitation program were more self-motivated, tolerated pain better, perceived that they worked harder at their rehabilitation, and were less bothered by scheduling of sessions and athletic training environmental conditions.…

  15. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for HIV Medication Adherence and Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safren, Steven A.; Hendriksen, Ellen S.; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Mimiaga, Matthew J.; Pickard, Robert; Otto, Michael W.

    2004-01-01

    For patients with HIV, depression is a common, distressing condition that can interfere with a critical self-care behavior--adherence to antiretroviral therapy. The present study describes a cognitive-behavioral treatment designed to integrate cognitive-behavioral therapy for depression with our previously tested approach to improving adherence to…

  16. Gender differences in Chinese immigrants: predictors for antihypertensive medication adherence.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Wen; Froelicher, Erika S

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe gender differences in predictors for antihypertensive medication adherence in Chinese immigrants. A cross-sectional design was used with recruitment with a convenience sample of 100 men and 100 women with hypertension. Measurements for demographics, cultural factors, clinical factors, and medication adherence were self-administered by the participants. Blood pressure was checked twice. A multivariate logistic regression was used to establish a parsimonious prediction model for medication adherence. It was found that in men, longer length of stay in the United States was a predictor for nonadherence. The predictor of nonadherence in women was lower perceived benefits of antihypertensive medications. To increase adherence in women, the benefits of antihypertensive medications should be emphasized. For men who have lived in the United States for 12 years or more, their adherence should be closely monitored.

  17. Method for Producing Non-Neoplastic, Three Dimensional, Mammalian Tissue and Cell Aggregates Under Microgravity Culture Conditions and the Products Produced Therefrom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor); Wolf, David A. (Inventor); Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor); Prewett, Tracey L. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Normal mammalian tissue and the culturing process has been developed for the three groups of organ, structural, and blood tissue. The cells are grown in vitro under microgravity culture conditions and form three dimensional cells aggregates with normal cell function. The microgravity culture conditions may be microgravity or simulated microgravity created in a horizontal rotating wall culture vessel.

  18. Medication adherence: process for implementation

    PubMed Central

    Mendys, Phil; Zullig, Leah L; Burkholder, Rebecca; Granger, Bradi B; Bosworth, Hayden B

    2014-01-01

    Improving medication adherence is a critically important, but often enigmatic objective of patients, providers, and the overall health care system. Increasing medication adherence has the potential to reduce health care costs while improving care quality, patient satisfaction and health outcomes. While there are a number of papers that describe the benefits of medication adherence in terms of cost, safety, outcomes, or quality of life, there are limited reviews that consider how best to seamlessly integrate tools and processes directed at improving medication adherence. We will address processes for implementing medication adherence interventions with the goal of better informing providers and health care systems regarding the safe and effective use of medications. PMID:25114513

  19. Maintenance of undifferentiated mouse embryonic stem cells in suspension by the serum- and feeder-free defined culture condition

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Yukiiko; Yoshimura, Naoko; Aoki, Hitomi; Sharov, Alexei A.; Ko, Minoru S.H.; Motohashi, Tsutomu; Kunisada, Takahiro

    2008-01-01

    The proven pluripotency of ES cells is expected to allow their therapeutic use for regenerative medicine. We present here a novel suspension culture method that facilitates the proliferation of pluripotent ES cells without feeder cells. The culture medium contains polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), free of either animal-derived or synthetic serum, and contains very low amounts of peptidic or proteinaceous materials, which are favorable for therapeutic use. ES cells showed sustained proliferation in the suspension culture, and their undifferentiated state and pluripotency were experimentally verified. DNA microarray analyses showed a close relationship between the elevated expression of genes related to cell adhesions. We suggest that this suspension culture condition provides a better alternative to the conventional attached cell culture condition, especially for possible therapeutic use, by limiting the exposure of ES cells to feeder cells and animal products. PMID:18624284

  20. Production of antibacterial compounds and biofilm formation by Roseobacter species are influenced by culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Bruhn, Jesper Bartholin; Gram, Lone; Belas, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Bacterial communities associated with marine algae are often dominated by members of the Roseobacter clade, and in the present study, we describe Roseobacter phenotypes that may provide this group of bacteria with selective advantages when colonizing this niche. Nine of 14 members of the Roseobacter clade, of which half were isolated from cultures of the dinoflagellate Pfiesteria piscicida, produced antibacterial compounds. Many non-Roseobacter marine bacteria were inhibited by sterile filtered supernatants of Silicibacter sp. TM1040 and Phaeobacter (formerly Roseobacter) strain 27-4, which had the highest production of antibacterial compound. In contrast, Roseobacter strains were susceptible only when exposed to concentrated compound. The production of antibacterial compound was influenced by the growth conditions, as production was most pronounced when bacteria were grown in liquid medium under static conditions. Under these conditions, Silicibacter sp. TM1040 cells attached to one another, forming rosettes, as has previously been reported for Phaeobacter 27-4. A spontaneous Phaeobacter 27-4 mutant unable to form rosettes was also defective in biofilm formation and the production of antibacterial compound, indicating a possible link between these phenotypes. Rosette formation was observed in 8 of 14 Roseobacter clade strains examined and was very pronounced under static growth in 5 of these strains. Attachment to surfaces and biofilm formation at the air-liquid interface by these five strains was greatly facilitated by growth conditions that favored rosette formation, and rosette-forming strains were 13 to 30 times more efficient in attaching to glass compared to strains under conditions where rosette formation was not pronounced. We hypothesize that the ability to produce antibacterial compounds that principally inhibit non-Roseobacter species, combined with an enhancement in biofilm formation, may give members of the Roseobacter clade a selective advantage and

  1. Atrazine degradation by fungal co-culture enzyme extracts under different soil conditions.

    PubMed

    Chan-Cupul, Wilberth; Heredia-Abarca, Gabriela; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Refugio

    2016-01-01

    This investigation was undertaken to determine the atrazine degradation by fungal enzyme extracts (FEEs) in a clay-loam soil microcosm contaminated at field application rate (5 μg g(-1)) and to study the influence of different soil microcosm conditions, including the effect of soil sterilization, water holding capacity, soil pH and type of FEEs used in atrazine degradation through a 2(4) factorial experimental design. The Trametes maxima-Paecilomyces carneus co-culture extract contained more laccase activity and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) content (laccase = 18956.0 U mg protein(-1), H2O2 = 6.2 mg L(-1)) than the T. maxima monoculture extract (laccase = 12866.7 U mg protein(-1), H2O2 = 4.0 mg L(-1)). Both extracts were able to degrade atrazine at 100%; however, the T. maxima monoculture extract (0.32 h) achieved a lower half-degradation time than its co-culture with P. carneus (1.2 h). The FEE type (p = 0.03) and soil pH (p = 0.01) significantly affected atrazine degradation. The best degradation rate was achieved by the T. maxima monoculture extract in an acid soil (pH = 4.86). This study demonstrated that both the monoculture extracts of the native strain T. maxima and its co-culture with P. carneus can efficiently and quickly degrade atrazine in clay-loam soils.

  2. Electrical conditioning of adipose-derived stem cells in a multi-chamber culture platform.

    PubMed

    Pavesi, A; Soncini, M; Zamperone, A; Pietronave, S; Medico, E; Redaelli, A; Prat, M; Fiore, G B

    2014-07-01

    In tissue engineering, several factors play key roles in providing adequate stimuli for cells differentiation, in particular biochemical and physical stimuli, which try to mimic the physiological microenvironments. Since electrical stimuli are important in the developing heart, we have developed an easy-to-use, cost-effective cell culture platform, able to provide controlled electrical stimulation aimed at investigating the influence of the electric field in the stem cell differentiation process. This bioreactor consists of an electrical stimulator and 12 independent, petri-like culture chambers and a 3-D computational model was used to characterize the distribution and the intensity of the electric field generated in the cell culture volume. We explored the effects of monophasic and biphasic square wave pulse stimulation on a mouse adipose-derived stem cell line (m17.ASC) comparing cell viability, proliferation, protein, and gene expression. Both monophasic (8 V, 2 ms, 1 Hz) and biphasic (+4 V, 1 ms and -4 V, 1 ms; 1 Hz) stimulation were compatible with cell survival and proliferation. Biphasic stimulation induced the expression of Connexin 43, which was found to localize also at the cell membrane, which is its recognized functional mediating intercellular electrical coupling. Electrically stimulated cells showed an induced transcriptional profile more closely related to that of neonatal cadiomyocytes, particularly for biphasic stimulation. The developed platform thus allowed to set-up precise conditions to drive adult stem cells toward a myocardial phenotype solely by physical stimuli, in the absence of exogenously added expensive bioactive molecules, and can thus represent a valuable tool for translational applications for heart tissue engineering and regeneration.

  3. Differences in morphogenesis of 3D cultured primary human osteoblasts under static and microfluidic growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Altmann, Brigitte; Löchner, Anne; Swain, Michael; Kohal, Ralf-Joachim; Giselbrecht, Stefan; Gottwald, Eric; Steinberg, Thorsten; Tomakidi, Pascal

    2014-03-01

    As information on osteoblast mechanosensitivity response to biomechanical cues in three-dimensional (3D) in vitro microenvironments is sparse, the present study compared morphogenesis of primary human alveolar bone osteoblasts (PHABO) under microchip-based 3D-static conditions, and 3D-fluid flow-mediated biomechanical stimulation in perfusion bioreactors. Discrimination of the respective microenvironment by differential morphogenesis was evident from fluid flow-induced PHABO reorganization into rotund bony microtissue, comprising more densely packed multicellular 3D-aggregates, while viability of microtissues was flow rate dependent. Time-lapse microscopy and simple modeling of biomechanical conditions revealed that physiologically relevant fluid flow-mediated PHABO stimulation was associated with formation of mulberry-like PHABO aggregates within the first 24 h. Differential extracellular matrix deposition patterns and gene expression modulation in PHABO aggregates at day 7 further indicates progressive osteoblast differentiation exclusively in perfusion culture-developed bony microtissues. The results of our study strongly suggest PHABO morphogenesis as discriminator of microenvironmental growth conditions, which in case of the microfluidic 3D microchip-bioreactor are substantiated by triggering in vitro bone microtissue formation concomitant with progressive osteoblastic differentiation. Such microtissue outcomes provide unique insight for mechanobiological studies in response to biomechanical fluid flow cues, and clinically appear promising for in vitro PHABO preconditioning, enabling innovative bone augmentation procedures.

  4. Optimization of culture conditions for flexirubin production by Chryseobacterium artocarpi CECT 8497 using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Venil, Chidambaram Kulandaisamy; Zakaria, Zainul Akmar; Ahmad, Wan Azlina

    2015-01-01

    Flexirubins are the unique type of bacterial pigments produced by the bacteria from the genus Chryseobacterium, which are used in the treatment of chronic skin disease, eczema etc. and may serve as a chemotaxonomic marker. Chryseobacterium artocarpi CECT 8497, an yellowish-orange pigment producing strain was investigated for maximum production of pigment by optimizing medium composition employing response surface methodology (RSM). Culture conditions affecting pigment production were optimized statistically in shake flask experiments. Lactose, l-tryptophan and KH2PO4 were the most significant variables affecting pigment production. Box Behnken design (BBD) and RSM analysis were adopted to investigate the interactions between variables and determine the optimal values for maximum pigment production. Evaluation of the experimental results signified that the optimum conditions for maximum production of pigment (521.64 mg/L) in 50 L bioreactor were lactose 11.25 g/L, l-tryptophan 6 g/L and KH2PO4 650 ppm. Production under optimized conditions increased to 7.23 fold comparing to its production prior to optimization. Results of this study showed that statistical optimization of medium composition and their interaction effects enable short listing of the significant factors influencing maximum pigment production from Chryseobacterium artocarpi CECT 8497. In addition, this is the first report optimizing the process parameters for flexirubin type pigment production from Chryseobacterium artocarpi CECT 8497.

  5. Piracy of decay-accelerating factor (CD55) signal transduction by the diffusely adhering strain Escherichia coli C1845 promotes cytoskeletal F-actin rearrangements in cultured human intestinal INT407 cells.

    PubMed

    Peiffer, I; Servin, A L; Bernet-Camard, M F

    1998-09-01

    Diffusely adhering Escherichia coli (DAEC) C1845 (clinical isolate) harboring the fimbrial adhesin F1845 can infect cultured human differentiated intestinal epithelial cells; this process is followed by the disassembly of the actin network in the apical domain. The aim of this study was to examine the mechanism by which DAEC C1845 promotes F-actin rearrangements. For this purpose, we used a human embryonic intestinal cell line (INT407) expressing the membrane-associated glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) protein-anchored decay-accelerating factor (DAF), the receptor of the F1845 adhesin. We show here that infection of INT407 cells by DAEC C1845 can provoke dramatic F-actin rearrangements without cell entry. Clustering of phosphotyrosines was observed, revealing that the DAEC C1845-DAF interaction involves the recruitment of signal transduction molecules. A pharmacological approach with a subset of inhibitors of signal transduction molecules was used to identify the cascade of signal transduction molecules that are coupled to the DAF, that are activated upon infection, and that promote the F-actin rearrangements. DAEC C1845-induced F-actin rearrangements can be blocked dose dependently by protein tyrosine kinase, phospholipase Cgamma, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, protein kinase C, and Ca2+ inhibitors. F-actin rearrangements and blocking by inhibitors were observed after infection of the cells with two E. coli recombinants carrying the plasmids containing the fimbrial adhesin F1845 or the fimbrial hemagglutinin Dr, belonging to the same family of adhesins. These findings show that the DAEC Dr family of pathogens promotes alterations in the intestinal cell cytoskeleton by piracy of the DAF-GPI signal cascade without bacterial cell entry.

  6. Studies of mineralization in tissue culture: optimal conditions for cartilage calcification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boskey, A. L.; Stiner, D.; Doty, S. B.; Binderman, I.; Leboy, P.

    1992-01-01

    The optimal conditions for obtaining a calcified cartilage matrix approximating that which exists in situ were established in a differentiating chick limb bud mesenchymal cell culture system. Using cells from stage 21-24 embryos in a micro-mass culture, at an optimal density of 0.5 million cells/20 microliters spot, the deposition of small crystals of hydroxyapatite on a collagenous matrix and matrix vesicles was detected by day 21 using X-ray diffraction, FT-IR microscopy, and electron microscopy. Optimal media, containing 1.1 mM Ca, 4 mM P, 25 micrograms/ml vitamin C, 0.3 mg/ml glutamine, no Hepes buffer, and 10% fetal bovine serum, produced matrix resembling the calcifying cartilage matrix of fetal chick long bones. Interestingly, higher concentrations of fetal bovine serum had an inhibitory effect on calcification. The cartilage phenotype was confirmed based on the cellular expression of cartilage collagen and proteoglycan mRNAs, the presence of type II and type X collagen, and cartilage type proteoglycan at the light microscopic level, and the presence of chondrocytes and matrix vesicles at the EM level. The system is proposed as a model for evaluating the events in cell mediated cartilage calcification.

  7. A novel buoyancy technique optimizes simulated microgravity conditions for whole sensory organ culture in rotating bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Heinz J P; Müller, Marcus; Waldhaus, Jörg; Hahn, Hartmut; Löwenheim, Hubert

    2010-02-01

    Whole-organ culture of a sensory organ in a rotating wall vessel bioreactor provides a powerful in vitro model for physiological and pathophysiological investigation as previously demonstrated for the postnatal inner ear. The model is of specific relevance as a tool for regeneration research. In the immature inner ear explant, the density was only 1.29 g/cm(3). The high density of 1.68 g/cm(3) of the functionally mature organ resulted in enhanced settling velocity and deviation from its ideal circular orbital path causing enhanced shear stress. The morphometric and physical properties, as well as the dynamic motion patterns of explants, were analyzed and numerically evaluated by an orbital path index. Application of a novel buoyancy bead technique resulted in a 6.5- to 14.8-fold reduction of the settling velocity. The deviation of the explant from its ideal circular orbital path was adjusted as indicated by an optimum value for the orbital path index (-1.0). Shear stress exerted on the inner ear explant was consequently reduced 6.4- to 15.0-fold. The culture conditions for postnatal stages were optimized, and the preconditions for transferring this in vitro model toward mature high-density stages established. This buoyancy technique may also be useful in tissue engineering of other high-density structures.

  8. Proteomic Analysis of Extracellular Proteins from Aspergillus oryzae Grown under Submerged and Solid-State Culture Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Oda, Ken; Kakizono, Dararat; Yamada, Osamu; Iefuji, Haruyuki; Akita, Osamu; Iwashita, Kazuhiro

    2006-01-01

    Filamentous fungi are widely used for the production of homologous and heterologous proteins. Recently, there has been increasing interest in Aspergillus oryzae because of its ability to produce heterologous proteins in solid-state culture. To provide an overview of protein secretion by A. oryzae in solid-state culture, we carried out a comparative proteome analysis of extracellular proteins in solid-state and submerged (liquid) cultures. Extracellular proteins prepared from both cultures sequentially from 0 to 40 h were subjected to two-dimensional electrophoresis, and protein spots at 40 h were identified by peptide mass fingerprinting using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry. We also attempted to identify cell wall-bound proteins of the submerged culture. We analyzed 85 spots from the solid-state culture and 110 spots from the submerged culture. We identified a total of 29 proteins, which were classified into 4 groups. Group 1 consisted of extracellular proteins specifically produced in the solid-state growth condition, such as glucoamylase B and alanyl dipeptidyl peptidase. Group 2 consisted of extracellular proteins specifically produced in the submerged condition, such as glucoamylase A (GlaA) and xylanase G2 (XynG2). Group 3 consisted of proteins produced in both conditions, such as xylanase G1. Group 4 consisted of proteins that were secreted to the medium in the solid-state growth condition but trapped in the cell wall in the submerged condition, such as α-amylase (TAA) and β-glucosidase (Bgl). A Northern analysis of seven genes from the four groups suggested that the secretion of TAA and Bgl was regulated by trapping these proteins in the cell wall in submerged culture and that secretion of GlaA and XynG2 was regulated at the posttranscriptional level in the solid-state culture. PMID:16672490

  9. Effects of culture conditions on monosaccharide composition of Ganoderma lucidum exopolysaccharide and on activities of related enzymes.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lin; Qiao, Shuangkui; Xu, Zhenghong; Guan, Feng; Ding, Zhongyang; Gu, Zhenghua; Zhang, Liang; Shi, Guiyang

    2015-11-20

    We investigated the relationship between monosaccharide composition of Ganoderma lucidum exopolysaccharide (EPS) and activities of EPS synthesis enzymes under various culture temperatures and initial pH values. The mole percentages of three major EPS monosaccharides, glucose, galactose and mannose, varied depending on culture conditions and the resulting EPS displayed differing anti-tumor activities. In nine tested enzymes, higher enzyme activities were correlated with higher temperature and lower initial pH. Altered mole percentages of galactose and mannose under various culture conditions were associated with activities of α-phosphoglucomutase (PGM) and phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI), respectively, and that of mannose was also associated with phosphomannose isomerase (PMI) activity only under various pH. Our findings suggest that mole percentages of G. lucidum EPS monosaccharides can be manipulated by changes of culture conditions that affect enzyme activities, and that novel fermentation strategies based on this approach may enhance production and biological activity of EPS.

  10. Cultural conditions on the production of extracellular enzymes by Trichoderma isolates from tobacco rhizosphere.

    PubMed

    Mallikharjuna Rao, K L N; Siva Raju, K; Ravisankar, H

    2016-01-01

    Twelve isolates of Trichoderma spp. isolated from tobacco rhizosphere were evaluated for their ability to produce chitinase and β-1,3-glucanase extracellular hydrolytic enzymes. Isolates ThJt1 and TvHt2, out of 12 isolates, produced maximum activities of chitinase and β-1,3-glucanase, respectively. In vitro production of chitinase and β-1,3-glucanase by isolates ThJt1 and TvHt2 was tested under different cultural conditions. The enzyme activities were significantly influenced by acidic pH and the optimum temperature was 30°C. The chitin and cell walls of Sclerotium rolfsii, as carbon sources, supported the maximum and significantly higher chitinase activity by both isolates. The chitinase activity of isolate ThJt1 was suppressed significantly by fructose (80.28%), followed by glucose (77.42%), whereas the β-1,3-glucanase activity of ThJt1 and both enzymes of isolate TvHt2 were significantly suppressed by fructose, followed by sucrose. Ammonium nitrate as nitrogen source supported the maximum activity of chitinase in both isolates, whereas urea was a poor nitrogen source. Production of both enzymes by the isolates was significantly influenced by the cultural conditions. Thus, the isolates ThJt1 and TvHt2 showed higher levels of chitinase and β-1,3-glucanase activities and were capable of hydrolyzing the mycelium of S. rolfsii infecting tobacco. These organisms can be used therefore for assessment of their synergism in biomass production and biocontrol efficacy and for their field biocontrol ability against S. rolfsii and Pythium aphanidermatum infecting tobacco.

  11. Cultural conditions on the production of extracellular enzymes by Trichoderma isolates from tobacco rhizosphere

    PubMed Central

    Mallikharjuna Rao, K.L.N.; Siva Raju, K.; Ravisankar, H.

    2016-01-01

    Twelve isolates of Trichoderma spp. isolated from tobacco rhizosphere were evaluated for their ability to produce chitinase and β-1,3-glucanase extracellular hydrolytic enzymes. Isolates ThJt1 and TvHt2, out of 12 isolates, produced maximum activities of chitinase and β-1,3-glucanase, respectively. In vitro production of chitinase and β-1,3-glucanase by isolates ThJt1 and TvHt2 was tested under different cultural conditions. The enzyme activities were significantly influenced by acidic pH and the optimum temperature was 30 °C. The chitin and cell walls of Sclerotium rolfsii, as carbon sources, supported the maximum and significantly higher chitinase activity by both isolates. The chitinase activity of isolate ThJt1 was suppressed significantly by fructose (80.28%), followed by glucose (77.42%), whereas the β-1,3-glucanase activity of ThJt1 and both enzymes of isolate TvHt2 were significantly suppressed by fructose, followed by sucrose. Ammonium nitrate as nitrogen source supported the maximum activity of chitinase in both isolates, whereas urea was a poor nitrogen source. Production of both enzymes by the isolates was significantly influenced by the cultural conditions. Thus, the isolates ThJt1 and TvHt2 showed higher levels of chitinase and β-1,3-glucanase activities and were capable of hydrolyzing the mycelium of S. rolfsii infecting tobacco. These organisms can be used therefore for assessment of their synergism in biomass production and biocontrol efficacy and for their field biocontrol ability against S. rolfsii and Pythium aphanidermatum infecting tobacco. PMID:26887223

  12. Treatment Adherence among Native Hawaiians Living with HIV

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ka'opua, Lana Sue I.; Mueller, Charles W.

    2004-01-01

    Cultural competence is essential in helping people living with HIV cope with the biopsychosocial and spiritual challenges associated with this illness. Efforts to understand the relationship of cultural values and social support practices to health-related behavior have rarely been more critical than in the emerging issue of treatment adherence to…

  13. Adherence of bacteria to heart valves in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gould, K; Ramirez-Ronda, C H; Holmes, R K; Sanford, J P

    1975-12-01

    The abilities of 14 strains of aerobic gram-positive cocci and gram-negative bacilli to adhere in vitro to human or canine aortic valve leaflets were compared. 2-mm sections of excised valve leaflets were obtained by punch biopsy and were incubated under standardized conditions in suspensions of bacteria. Valve sections were subsequently washed and homogenized, and quantitative techniques were used to determine the proportions of bacteria from the initial suspensions that had adhered to the valve sections. Comparable results were obtained when these adherence ratios were determined by two independent methods based either on measurements of bacterial viability or of radioactivity in 51Cr-labeled bacteria. For each bacterial strain, the adherence ratio was constant over a wide range of concentrations of bacteria in the incubation medium. Strains of enterococci, viridans streptococci, coagulase-positive and coagulase-negative staphylococci and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (adherence ratios 0.003-0.017) were found to adhere more readily to valve sections than strains of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae (adherence ratios 0.00002-0.00004). The organisms that most frequently cause bacterial endocarditis were found to adhere best to heart valves in vitro, suggesting that the ability to adhere to valvular endothelium may be an important or essential charcteristic of bacteria that cause endocarditis in man.

  14. Cognitive mediators linking social support networks to colorectal cancer screening adherence.

    PubMed

    Honda, Keiko; Kagawa-Singer, Marjorie

    2006-10-01

    This paper argues that normative considerations are more important than attitudinal factors in engaging colorectal cancer screening, and tests a model explaining how unique cultural expressions of social networks influence screening adherence. Structural equation modeling was used to understand colorectal cancer screening in a population-based sample of 341 Japanese Americans aged 50 and over. The model accounted for 25% of the variance in screening adherence. Adherence was most strongly associated with family/friend subjective norms about colorectal cancer screening use. Emotional family support, but not the size of the networks, was indirectly related to adherence via increased family/friend subjective norms, while emotional friend support was directly related to adherence. While usual source of care was directly associated with adherence, better provider-patient communication was directly and indirectly associated with adherence via increased perceived benefits. The findings of this study support strengthening informal support networks to enhance adherence among Japanese Americans at risk.

  15. The trouble with memes : Inference versus imitation in cultural creation.

    PubMed

    Atran, S

    2001-12-01

    Memes are hypothetical cultural units passed on by imitation; although nonbiological, they undergo Darwinian selection like genes. Cognitive study of multimodular human minds undermines memetics: unlike in genetic replication, high-fidelity transmission of cultural information is the exception, not the rule. Constant, rapid "mutation" of information during communication generates endlessly varied creations that nevertheless adhere to modular input conditions. The sort of cultural information most susceptible to modular processing is that most readily acquired by children, most easily transmitted across individuals, most apt to survive within a culture, most likely to recur in different cultures, and most disposed to cultural variation and elaboration.

  16. Conditioned media cause increases in select osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation markers in mesenchymal stem cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Maxson, Scott; Burg, Karen J L

    2008-01-01

    The optimal mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) culture conditions that would allow clinically viable tissue-engineered devices are still yet to be determined. Most MSCs are found in the bone marrow, an area that also contains numerous osteoblasts and adipocytes. Paracrine signalling may be leveraged to modulate MSC differentiation in the preparation of a tissue-engineered device. Thus, the objectives of this study were to determine the effects of adipocyte-conditioned medium (CM) on MSC differentiation to osteoblasts and to determine the effects of osteoblast CM on MSC differentiation to adipocytes. Two groups of murine MSCs were given either an osteogenic differentiation medium or an adipogenic differentiation medium. CM was taken from one group and administered to the opposite group in concentrations of 25% or 50%. Metabolic activity, total protein and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) assays were conducted on the osteogenic group at predefined time points throughout the 21 day study, while metabolic activity, triglyceride and oil red O assays were conducted on the adipogenic group at predefined time points. Adipocyte CM administered at a concentration of 50% increased the ALP production of MSCs undergoing osteogenic differentiation. Additionally, osteoblast CM increased the triglyceride production of MSCs undergoing adipogenic differentiation and enlarged the lipid vesicles that were produced by the cells. The effects of the osteoblast CM were seen at both concentrations, but were greatest at the 50% CM level.

  17. Effect of enteropeptidase on survival of cultured hippocampal neurons under conditions of glutamate toxicity.

    PubMed

    Makarova, A M; Gorbacheva, L R; Savinkova, I V; Mikhailova, A G; Rumsh, L D; Pinelis, V G; Strukova, S M

    2010-09-01

    The effects of full-size bovine enteropeptidase (BEK) and of human recombinant light chain enteropeptidase (L-HEP) on survival of cultured hippocampal neurons were studied under conditions of glutamate excitotoxicity. Low concentrations of L-HEP or BEK (0.1-1 and 0.1-0.5 nM, respectively) protected hippocampal neurons against the death caused by 100 µM glutamate. Using the PAR1 (proteinase-activated receptor) antagonist SCH 79797, we revealed a PAR1-dependent mechanism of neuroprotective action of low concentrations of enteropeptidase. The protective effect of full-size enteropeptidase was not observed at the concentrations of 1 and 10 nM; moreover, 10 nM of BEK caused death of 88.9% of the neurons, which significantly exceeded the cell death caused by glutamate (31.9%). Under conditions of glutamate cytotoxicity the survival of neurons was 26.8% higher even in the presence of 10 nM of L-HEP than in the presence of 10 nM BEK. Pretreatment of cells with 10 nM of either form of enteropeptidase abolished the protective effect of 10 nM thrombin under glutamate cytotoxicity. High concentrations of BEK and L-HEP caused the death of neurons mainly through necrosis.

  18. Comparison of red microalgae (Porphyridium cruentum) culture conditions for bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ho Myeong; Oh, Chi Hoon; Bae, Hyeun-Jong

    2017-02-12

    Microalgae biomass are useful resources in biofuel production. The objective of this study was to evaluate bioethanol production in response to Porphyridium cruemtum culture conditions. Enzymatic hydrolysis of seawater P. cruemtum (SPC) and freshwater P. cruemtum (FPC, 1% substrate loading, w/v) resulted in glucose conversion yields of 89.8 and 85.3%, respectively, without any pretreatment. However, FPC hydrolysate was more efficiently converted to ethanol about 7.1% than SPC hydrolysate. The comparison of separate hydrolysis and fermentation (SHF) and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) showed that SSF processing is a superior method for bioethanol production from both SPC and FPC. Though SSF processing (5% substrate loading, w/v) in a 500-mL twin-neck round bottom flask, we achieved ethanol conversion yields of 65.4 and 70.3% from SPC and FPC, respectively, after 9h. These findings indicate that P. cruemtum can grow in freshwater conditions and is an efficient candidate for bioethanol production.

  19. Siderophore production by Bacillus megaterium: effect of growth phase and cultural conditions.

    PubMed

    Santos, Sofia; Neto, Isabel F F; Machado, Manuela D; Soares, Helena M V M; Soares, Eduardo V

    2014-01-01

    Siderophore production by Bacillus megaterium was detected, in an iron-deficient culture medium, during the exponential growth phase, prior to the sporulation, in the presence of glucose; these results suggested that the onset of siderophore production did not require glucose depletion and was not related with the sporulation. The siderophore production by B. megaterium was affected by the carbon source used. The growth on glycerol promoted the very high siderophore production (1,182 μmol g(-1) dry weight biomass); the opposite effect was observed in the presence of mannose (251 μmol g(-1) dry weight biomass). The growth in the presence of fructose, galactose, glucose, lactose, maltose or sucrose, originated similar concentrations of siderophore (546-842 μmol g(-1) dry weight biomass). Aeration had a positive effect on the production of siderophore. Incubation of B. megaterium under static conditions delayed and reduced the growth and the production of siderophore, compared with the incubation in stirred conditions.

  20. Quantitative proteome and transcriptome analysis of the archaeon Thermoplasma acidophilum cultured under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Sun, Na; Pan, Cuiping; Nickell, Stephan; Mann, Matthias; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Nagy, István

    2010-09-03

    A comparative proteome and transcriptome analysis of Thermoplasma acidophilum cultured under aerobic and anaerobic conditions has been performed. One-thousand twenty-five proteins were identified covering 88% of the cytosolic proteome. Using a label-free quantitation method, we found that approximately one-quarter of the identified proteome (263 proteins) were significantly induced (>2 fold) under anaerobic conditions. Thirty-nine macromolecular complexes were identified, of which 28 were quantified and 15 were regulated under anaerobiosis. In parallel, a whole genome cDNA microarray analysis was performed showing that the expression levels of 445 genes were influenced by the absence of oxygen. Interestingly, more than 40% of the membrane protein-encoding genes (145 out of 335 ORFs) were up- or down-regulated at the mRNA level. Many of these proteins are functionally associated with extracellular protein or peptide degradation or ion and amino acid transport. Comparison of the transcriptome and proteome showed only a weak positive correlation between mRNA and protein expression changes, which is indicative of extensive post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms in T. acidophilum. Integration of transcriptomics and proteomics data generated hypotheses for physiological adaptations of the cells to anaerobiosis, and the quantitative proteomics data together with quantitative analysis of protein complexes provide a platform for correlation of MS-based proteomics studies with cryo-electron tomography-based visual proteomics approaches.

  1. Dynamics and cultural specifics of information needs under conditions of long-term space flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feichtinger, Elena; Shved, Dmitry; Gushin, Vadim

    Life in conditions of space flight or chamber study with prolonged isolation is associated with lack of familiar stimuli (sensory deprivation), monotony, significant limitation of communication, and deficit of information and media content (Myasnikov V.I., Stepanova S.I. et al., 2000). Fulfillment of a simulation experiment or flight schedule implies necessity of performance of sophisticated tasks and decision making with limited means of external support. On the other hand, the “stream” of information from the Mission Control (MC) and PI’s (reminders about different procedures to be performed, requests of reports, etc.) is often inadequate to communication needs of crewmembers. According to the theory of “information stress” (Khananashvili M.M., 1984), a distress condition could be formed if: a) it’s necessary to process large amounts of information and make decisions under time pressure; b) there is a prolonged deficit of necessary (e.g. for decision making) information. Thus, we suppose that one of the important goals of psychological support of space or space simulation crews should be forming of favorable conditions of information environment. For that purpose, means of crew-MC information exchange (quantitative characteristics and, if possible, content of radiograms, text and video messages, etc.) should be studied, as well as peculiarities of the crewmembers’ needs in different information and media content, and their reactions to incoming information. In the space simulation experiment with 520-day isolation, communication of international crew with external parties had been studied. Dynamics of quantitative and content characteristics of the crew’s messages was related to the experiment’s stage, presence of “key” events in the schedule (periods of high autonomy, simulated “planetary landing”, etc.), as well as to events not related to the experiment (holidays, news, etc.). It was shown that characteristics of information exchange

  2. Do cultural conditions induce differential protein expression: Profiling of extracellular proteome of Aspergillus terreus CM20.

    PubMed

    M, Saritha; Singh, Surender; Tiwari, Rameshwar; Goel, Renu; Nain, Lata

    2016-11-01

    The present study reports the diversity in extracellular proteins expressed by the filamentous fungus, Aspergillus terreus CM20 with respect to differential hydrolytic enzyme production profiles in submerged fermentation (SmF) and solid-state fermentation (SSF) conditions, and analysis of the extracellular proteome. The SSF method was superior in terms of increase in enzyme activities resulting in 1.5-3 fold enhancement as compared to SmF, which was explained by the difference in growth pattern of the fungus under the two culture conditions. As revealed by zymography, multiple isoforms of endo-β-glucanase, β-glucosidase and xylanase were expressed in SSF, but not in SmF. Extracellular proteome profiling of A. terreus CM20 under SSF condition using liquid chromatography coupled tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) identified 63 proteins. Functional classification revealed the hydrolytic system to be composed of glycoside hydrolases (56%), proteases (16%), oxidases and dehydrogenases (6%), decarboxylases (3%), esterases (3%) and other proteins (16%). Twenty families of glycoside hydrolases (GH) (1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 11, 12, 15, 16, 28, 30, 32, 35, 43, 54, 62, 67, 72, 74 and 125), and one family each of auxiliary activities (AA7) and carbohydrate esterase (CE1) were detected, unveiling the vast diversity of synergistically acting biomass-cleaving enzymes expressed by the fungus. Saccharification of alkali-pretreated paddy straw with A. terreus CM20 proteins released high amounts of glucose (439.63±1.50mg/gds), xylose (121.04±1.25mg/gds) and arabinose (56.13±0.56mg/gds), thereby confirming the potential of the enzyme cocktail in bringing about considerable conversion of lignocellulosic polysaccharides to sugar monomers.

  3. Adherent endotoxin on dental implant surfaces: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Morra, Marco; Cassinelli, Clara; Bollati, Daniele; Cascardo, Giovanna; Bellanda, Marco

    2015-02-01

    Osteoimmunology is the crosstalk between cells from the immune and skeletal systems, suggesting a role of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the stimulation of osteoclast activity. Endotoxin or bacterial challenges to inflammatory cells are directly relevant to dental implant pathologies involving bone resorption, such as osseointegration failure and peri-implantitis. While the endotoxin amount on implant devices is regulated by standards, it is unknown whether commercially available dental implants elicit different levels of adherent-endotoxin stimulated cytokines. The objective of this work is to develop a model system and evaluate endotoxin-induced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes relevant to osteoclast activation on commercially available dental implants. Murine J774-A1 macrophages were cultured on Ti disks with different level of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) contamination to define the time-course of the inflammatory response to endotoxin, as evaluated by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis. The developed protocol was then used to measure adherent endotoxin on commercially available packaged and sterile dental implants in the "as-implanted" condition. Results show that tested dental implants induce variable expression of endotoxin-stimulated genes, sometimes above the level expected to promote bone resorption in vivo. Results are unaffected by the specific surface treatment; rather, they likely reflect care in cleaning and packaging protocols. In conclusion, expression of genes that enhance osteoclast activity through endotoxin stimulation of inflammatory cells is widely different on commercially available dental implants. A reappraisal of the clinical impact of adherent endotoxins on dental (and bone) implant devices is required in light of increasing knowledge on crosstalk between cells from the immune and skeletal systems.

  4. Cultural repertoires and food-related household technology within colonia households under conditions of material hardship

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Mexican-origin women in the U.S. living in colonias (new-destination Mexican-immigrant communities) along the Texas-Mexico border suffer from a high incidence of food insecurity and diet-related chronic disease. Understanding environmental factors that influence food-related behaviors among this population will be important to improving the well-being of colonia households. This article focuses on cultural repertoires that enable food choice and the everyday uses of technology in food-related practice by Mexican-immigrant women in colonia households under conditions of material hardship. Findings are presented within a conceptual framework informed by concepts drawn from sociological accounts of technology, food choice, culture, and material hardship. Methods Field notes were provided by teams of promotora-researchers (indigenous community health workers) and public-health professionals trained as participant observers. They conducted observations on three separate occasions (two half-days during the week and one weekend day) within eight family residences located in colonias near the towns of Alton and San Carlos, Texas. English observations were coded inductively and early observations stressed the importance of technology and material hardship in food-related behavior. These observations were further explored and coded using the qualitative data package Atlas.ti. Results Technology included kitchen implements used in standard and adapted configurations and household infrastructure. Residents employed tools across a range of food-related activities identified as forms of food acquisition, storage, preparation, serving, feeding and eating, cleaning, and waste processing. Material hardships included the quality, quantity, acceptability, and uncertainty dimensions of food insecurity, and insufficient consumption of housing, clothing and medical care. Cultural repertoires for coping with material hardship included reliance on inexpensive staple foods and

  5. Adherence to antiepilepsy drug therapy.

    PubMed

    Faught, Edward

    2012-11-01

    Adherence to antiepilepsy drug (AED) therapy is critical for effective disease management, yet adherence and persistence rates are low due to several barriers. The definitions of adherence (80% rate of total pills taken, medication possession ratio, and days covered by prescriptions filled) and methods of measurement (patient self-reports, serum drug levels, pill counts, electronic bottle tops, and reviews of pharmacy records) are not without limitations, and their applicability to epilepsy is not clear. The use of simple adherence scales during office visits can provide an overall impression of a patient's adherence and can serve as a basis for practitioner-patient dialog. Efforts to improve adherence should focus on provider and healthcare system determinants versus those focused only on the patient. These interventions include non-judgmental communication, patient education, simplification of the dosage regimen with once-daily therapies, and the use of patient reminders.

  6. Induction of a photomixotrophic plant cell culture of Helianthus annuus and optimization of culture conditions for improved α-tocopherol production.

    PubMed

    Geipel, Katja; Song, Xue; Socher, Maria Lisa; Kümmritz, Sibylle; Püschel, Joachim; Bley, Thomas; Ludwig-Müller, Jutta; Steingroewer, Juliane

    2014-03-01

    Tocopherols, collectively known as vitamin E, are lipophilic antioxidants, which are synthesized only by photosynthetic organisms. Due to their enormous potential to protect cells from oxidative damage, tocopherols are used, e.g., as nutraceuticals and additives in pharmaceuticals. The most biologically active form of vitamin E is α-tocopherol. Most tocopherols are currently produced via chemical synthesis. Nevertheless, this always results in a racemic mixture of different and less effective stereoisomers because the natural isomer has the highest biological activity. Therefore, tocopherols synthesized in natural sources are preferred for medical purposes. The annual sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) is a well-known source for α-tocopherol. Within the presented work, sunflower callus and suspension cultures were established growing under photomixotrophic conditions to enhance α-tocopherol yield. The most efficient callus induction was achieved with sunflower stems cultivated on solid Murashige and Skoog medium supplemented with 30 g l(-1) sucrose, 0.5 mg l(-1) of the auxin 1-naphthalene acetic acid, and 0.5 mg l(-1) of the cytokinin 6-benzylaminopurine. Photomixotrophic sunflower suspension cultures were induced by transferring previously established callus into liquid medium. The effects of light intensity, sugar concentration, and culture age on growth rate and α-tocopherol synthesis rate were characterized. A considerable increase (max. 230%) of α-tocopherol production in the cells was obtained within the photomixotrophic cell culture compared to a heterotrophic cell culture. These results will be useful for improving α-tocopherol yields of plant in vitro cultures.

  7. Identification of a New Marine Bacterial Strain SD8 and Optimization of Its Culture Conditions for Producing Alkaline Protease.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hongxia; Yang, Muyang; Wang, Liping; Xian, Cory J

    2015-01-01

    While much attention has been given to marine microorganisms for production of enzymes, which in general are relatively more stable and active compared to those from plants and animals, studies on alkaline protease production from marine microorganisms have been very limited. In the present study, the alkaline protease producing marine bacterial strain SD8 isolated from sea muds in the Geziwo Qinhuangdao sea area of China was characterized and its optimal culture conditions were investigated. Strain SD8 was initially classified to belong to genus Pseudomonas by morphological, physiological and biochemical characterizations, and then through 16S rDNA sequence it was identified to be likely Pseudomonas hibiscicola. In addition, the culture mediums, carbon sources and culture conditions of strain SD8 were optimized for maximum production of alkaline protease. Optimum enzyme production (236U/mL when cultured bacteria being at 0.75 mg dry weight/mL fermentation broth) was obtained when the isolate at a 3% inoculum size was grown in LB medium at 20 mL medium/100mL Erlenmeyer flask for 48h culture at 30°C with an initial of pH 7.5. This was the first report of strain Pseudomonas hibiscicola secreting alkaline protease, and the data for its optimal cultural conditions for alkaline protease production has laid a foundation for future exploration for the potential use of SD8 strain for alkaline protease production.

  8. Identification of a New Marine Bacterial Strain SD8 and Optimization of Its Culture Conditions for Producing Alkaline Protease

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Hongxia; Yang, Muyang; Wang, Liping; Xian, Cory J.

    2015-01-01

    While much attention has been given to marine microorganisms for production of enzymes, which in general are relatively more stable and active compared to those from plants and animals, studies on alkaline protease production from marine microorganisms have been very limited. In the present study, the alkaline protease producing marine bacterial strain SD8 isolated from sea muds in the Geziwo Qinhuangdao sea area of China was characterized and its optimal culture conditions were investigated. Strain SD8 was initially classified to belong to genus Pseudomonas by morphological, physiological and biochemical characterizations, and then through 16S rDNA sequence it was identified to be likely Pseudomonas hibiscicola. In addition, the culture mediums, carbon sources and culture conditions of strain SD8 were optimized for maximum production of alkaline protease. Optimum enzyme production (236U/mL when cultured bacteria being at 0.75 mg dry weight/mL fermentation broth) was obtained when the isolate at a 3% inoculum size was grown in LB medium at 20 mL medium/100mL Erlenmeyer flask for 48h culture at 30°C with an initial of pH 7.5. This was the first report of strain Pseudomonas hibiscicola secreting alkaline protease, and the data for its optimal cultural conditions for alkaline protease production has laid a foundation for future exploration for the potential use of SD8 strain for alkaline protease production. PMID:26716833

  9. Adherence as a language game.

    PubMed

    Kolberg, Espen Skarstein

    2017-03-02

    Non-adherence, i.e. medication intake behavior not corresponding with agreed recommendations, is associated with increased morbidity and death, and it has been estimated that as many as 50% of patients in developed countries are not taking their medications as prescribed. But even as efforts in improving medication adherence over the years have increased, results are inconsistent, with only a minority of clinical trials showing any improvement in both adherence and clinical outcome. Since patient education is central to promoting good medication adherence, and language is integral to education, perhaps an exploration of the meaning and use of language, using the philosophy of Ludwig Wittgenstein, is in order.

  10. Optimization to the Culture Conditions for Phellinus Production with Regression Analysis and Gene-Set Based Genetic Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhongwei; Xin, Yuezhen; Wang, Xun; Sun, Beibei; Xia, Shengyu; Li, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Phellinus is a kind of fungus and is known as one of the elemental components in drugs to avoid cancers. With the purpose of finding optimized culture conditions for Phellinus production in the laboratory, plenty of experiments focusing on single factor were operated and large scale of experimental data were generated. In this work, we use the data collected from experiments for regression analysis, and then a mathematical model of predicting Phellinus production is achieved. Subsequently, a gene-set based genetic algorithm is developed to optimize the values of parameters involved in culture conditions, including inoculum size, PH value, initial liquid volume, temperature, seed age, fermentation time, and rotation speed. These optimized values of the parameters have accordance with biological experimental results, which indicate that our method has a good predictability for culture conditions optimization. PMID:27610365

  11. Impact of Treatment Adherence Intervention on a Social Skills Program Targeting Criticism Behaviours.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piccinin, Serge; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Investigated effect of cognitive-behavioral treatment adherence intervention in course of criticism skill group training program. Assigned 86 participants to treatment condition with or without adherence intervention or to control. Results suggest that adherence activities facilitated arousal optimal to greater program attendance and outcome gains…

  12. Volatile compounds originating from mixed microbial cultures on building materials under various humidity conditions.

    PubMed

    Korpi, A; Pasanen, A L; Pasanen, P

    1998-08-01

    We examined growth of mixed microbial cultures (13 fungal species and one actinomycete species) and production of volatile compounds (VOCs) in typical building materials in outside walls, separating walls, and bathroom floors at various relative humidities (RHs) of air. Air samples from incubation chambers were adsorbed on Tenax TA and dinitrophenylhydrazine cartridges and were analyzed by thermal desorption-gas chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography, respectively. Metabolic activity was measured by determining CO2 production, and microbial concentrations were determined by a dilution plate method. At 80 to 82% RH, CO2 production did not indicate that microbial activity occurred, and only 10% of the spores germinated, while slight increases in the concentrations of some VOCs were detected. All of the parameters showed that microbial activity occurred at 90 to 99% RH. The microbiological analyses revealed weak microbial growth even under drying conditions (32 to 33% RH). The main VOCs produced on the building materials studied were 3-methyl-1-butanol, 1-pentanol, 1-hexanol, and 1-octen-3-ol. In some cases fungal growth decreased aldehyde emissions. We found that various VOCs accompany microbial activity but that no single VOC is a reliable indicator of biocontamination in building materials.

  13. Identifying the shared metabolic objectives of glycerol bioconversion in Klebsiella pneumoniae under different culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Gongxian; Li, Caixia

    2017-03-18

    This paper addresses the problem of identifying the shared metabolic objectives of glycerol bioconversion in Klebsiella pneumoniae for production of 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PD) under different culture conditions. To achieve this goal, we propose a multi-level programming model. This model includes three optimization problems, where the constraint region of the first level problem is implicitly determined by the other two optimization problems. The optimized objectives of the first and second level problems are to minimize the set of fluxes that are of major importance to glycerol metabolism and the difference between the observed fluxes and those computed by the model, respectively. The third level problem in the proposed multi-level programming simultaneously solves a set of flux balance analysis (FBA) models. A method is proposed to solve efficiently the presented multi-level programming problem. In this method, we first transform the proposed multi-level problem into a bi-level problem by applying the dual theory of linear programming to the FBA models of the third level. Next, the optimal solution of the above bi-level problem is obtained by iteratively solving a sequence of mixed integer programming problems. Optimization results reveal that the proposed method can identify the shared metabolic objectives of glycerol bioconversion in Klebsiella pneumoniae under three groups of experimental data.

  14. Isolation of dendritic cells from umbilical cord blood using magnetic activated cell sorting or adherence.

    PubMed

    Bie, Yachun; Xu, Qiuxiang; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2015-07-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are a highly specialized type of antigen-presenting cell. The present study describes and compares two methods for preparing DCs from umbilical cord blood. The first method involves the isolation of DCs by magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS). This technique isolates CD34(+) cells from cord blood and induces the formation of DCs by the addition of cytokines, granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor and interleukin-4. The second method involves the generation of large numbers of DCs from cord blood using an adherent method, which isolates umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells and induces DCs in the same conditions as those used in MACS. The DCs were harvested following 7 days of incubation and observed with an inverted microscope. The phenotype of the cells was then analyzed by flow cytometry. The results revealed that, subsequent to 7 days of incubation, the differentiated DCs obtained using the adherent method were more mature than those isolated using MACS. However, these cells were unable to be maintained in culture for more than 9-10 days. By contrast, the DCs derived from CD34(+) cells by MACS were phenotypically stable and could be maintained for up to 3 weeks in culture. Either method produced DCs from cord blood. However, the DCs isolated using the MACS method demonstrated higher homogeneity, yield and viability than those obtained using the adherent method. Due to the various compositions of the monocyte subsets isolated, isolation methods affect the phenotypes and functions of the resultant DCs.

  15. Zonation related function and ubiquitination regulation in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells in dynamic vs. static culture conditions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Understanding hepatic zonation is important both for liver physiology and pathology. There is currently no effective systemic chemotherapy for human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and its pathogenesis is of special interest. Genomic and proteomic data of HCC cells in different culture models, coupled to pathway-based analysis, can help identify HCC-related gene and pathway dysfunctions. Results We identified zonation-related expression profiles contributing to selective phenotypes of HCC, by integrating relevant experimental observations through gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA). Analysis was based on gene and protein expression data measured on a human HCC cell line (HepG2/C3A) in two culture conditions: dynamic microfluidic biochips and static Petri dishes. Metabolic activity (HCC-related cytochromes P450) and genetic information processing were dominant in the dynamic cultures, in contrast to kinase signaling and cancer-specific profiles in static cultures. That, together with analysis of the published literature, leads us to propose that biochips culture conditions induce a periportal-like hepatocyte phenotype while standard plates cultures are more representative of a perivenous-like phenotype. Both proteomic data and GSEA results further reveal distinct ubiquitin-mediated protein regulation in the two culture conditions. Conclusions Pathways analysis, using gene and protein expression data from two cell culture models, confirmed specific human HCC phenotypes with regard to CYPs and kinases, and revealed a zonation-related pattern of expression. Ubiquitin-mediated regulation mechanism gives plausible explanations of our findings. Altogether, our results suggest that strategies aimed at inhibiting activated kinases and signaling pathways may lead to enhanced metabolism-mediated drug resistance of treated tumors. If that were the case, mitigating inhibition or targeting inactive forms of kinases would be an alternative. PMID:22296956

  16. Interventional tools to improve medication adherence: review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Elísio; Giardini, Anna; Savin, Magda; Menditto, Enrica; Lehane, Elaine; Laosa, Olga; Pecorelli, Sergio; Monaco, Alessandro; Marengoni, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Medication adherence and persistence is recognized as a worldwide public health problem, particularly important in the management of chronic diseases. Nonadherence to medical plans affects every level of the population, but particularly older adults due to the high number of coexisting diseases they are affected by and the consequent polypharmacy. Chronic disease management requires a continuous psychological adaptation and behavioral reorganization. In literature, many interventions to improve medication adherence have been described for different clinical conditions, however, most interventions seem to fail in their aims. Moreover, most interventions associated with adherence improvements are not associated with improvements in other outcomes. Indeed, in the last decades, the degree of nonadherence remained unchanged. In this work, we review the most frequent interventions employed to increase the degree of medication adherence, the measured outcomes, and the improvements achieved, as well as the main limitations of the available studies on adherence, with a particular focus on older persons. PMID:26396502

  17. Novel 3-D cell culture system for in vitro evaluation of anticancer drugs under anchorage-independent conditions.

    PubMed

    Aihara, Ayako; Abe, Natsuki; Saruhashi, Koichiro; Kanaki, Tatsuro; Nishino, Taito

    2016-12-01

    Anticancer drug discovery efforts have used 2-D cell-based assay models, which fail to forecast in vivo efficacy and result in a lower success rate of clinical approval. Recent 3-D cell culture models are expected to bridge the gap between 2-D and in vivo models. However, 3-D cell culture methods that are available for practical anticancer drug screening have not yet been fully attained. In this study, we screened several polymers for their ability to suspend cells or cell spheroids homogeneously in a liquid medium without changing the viscosity behavior, and identified gellan gum (FP001), as the most potent polymer. FP001 promoted cell dispersion in the medium and improved the proliferation of a wide range of cancer cell lines under low attachment conditions by inhibiting the formation of large-sized spheroids. In addition, cancer cells cultured with FP001-containing medium were more susceptible to inhibitors of epidermal growth factor (EGF) signaling than those cultured under attachment conditions. We also showed that ligands of the EGF receptor family clearly enhance proliferation of SKOV3 ovarian carcinoma cells under anchorage-independent conditions with FP001. Consistent with this result, the cells grown with FP001 showed higher EGF receptor content compared with cells cultured under attachment conditions. In conclusion, we developed a novel 3-D cell culture system that is available for high throughput screening of anticancer agents, and is suitable for evaluation of molecular-targeted anticancer drugs. Three-dimensional cell culture using FP001 will be of value in the development of useful technologies for anticancer drug discovery.

  18. Measurement of Psychiatric Treatment Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Sajatovic, Martha; Velligan, Dawn; Weiden, Peter J.; Valenstein, Marcia; Ogedegbe, Gbenga

    2014-01-01

    Objective Nonadherence to medications for mental disorders substantially limits treatment effectiveness and results in higher rates of relapse, hospitalization, and disability. Accurate measurement of medication adherence is important not only in adherence research, but also in clinical trials in which medications are being evaluated, and in clinical practice where failure to detect nonadherence results in premature medication changes, unnecessary polypharmacy, and greater likelihoods of functional deteriorations and hospitalizations. This is a review of psychiatric treatment adherence methods and measures arising from a meeting on “Methodological Challenges in Psychiatric Treatment Adherence Research” held on September 27-28, 2007 in Bethesda, MD and organized by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). Methods This paper reviews the range of modalities currently available for assessing adherence behavior including pill counts, pharmacy records, technology-assisted monitoring, biological assays, and a range of self-report and interviewer-rated scales. Measures of adherence attitudes are also reviewed. Results Each of the adherence measures described are imperfect estimates of actual medication ingestion but each provides informative estimates of adherence or the attitudinal factors associated with adherence. Measure selection depends on a range of factors including the patient sample, the context in which the measure is being used, and the clinical outcomes expected from various levels of nonadherence. The use of multiple measures of adherence is encouraged to balance the limitations of individual measures. Conclusion While adherence assessment has become increasingly sophisticated in recent years there remains a need for refinement and expansion on currently available methods and measures. PMID:21109048

  19. Developments in techniques for the isolation, enrichment, main culture conditions and identification of spermatogonial stem cells.

    PubMed

    He, Yanan; Chen, Xiaoli; Zhu, Huabin; Wang, Dong

    2015-12-01

    The in vitro culture system of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) provides a basis for studies on spermatogenesis, and also contributes to the development of new methods for the preservation of livestock and animal genetic modification. In vitro culture systems have mainly been established for mouse SSCs, but are lacking for farm animals. We reviewed and analyzed the current progress in SSC techniques such as isolation, purification, cultivation and identification. Based on the published studies, we concluded that two-step enzyme digestion and magnetic-activated cell sorting are fast becoming the main methods for isolation and enrichment of SSCs. With regard to the culture systems, serum and feeders were earlier thought to play an important role in the self-renewal and proliferation of SSCs, but serum- and feeder-free culture systems as a means of overcoming the limitations of SSC differentiation in long-term SSC culture are being explored. However, there is still a need to establish more efficient and ideal culture systems that can also be used for SSC culture in larger mammals. Although the lack of SSC-specific surface markers has seriously affected the efficiency of purification and identification, the transgenic study is helpful for our identification of SSCs. Therefore, future studies on SSC techniques should focus on improving serum- and feeder-free culture techniques, and discovering and identifying specific surface markers of SSCs, which will provide new ideas for the optimization of SSC culture systems for mice and promote related studies in farm animals.

  20. Visually guided whole cell patch clamp of mouse supraoptic nucleus neurons in cultured and acute conditions.

    PubMed

    Stachniak, Tevye J E; Bourque, Charles W

    2006-07-01

    Recent advances in neuronal culturing techniques have supplied a new set of tools for studying neural tissue, providing effective means to study molecular aspects of regulatory elements in the supraoptic nucleus of the hypothalamus (SON). To combine molecular biology techniques with electrophysiological recording, we modified an organotypic culture protocol to permit transfection and whole cell patch-clamp recordings from SON cells. Neonatal mouse brain coronal sections containing the SON were dissected out, placed on a filter insert in culture medium, and incubated for at least 4 days to allow attachment to the insert. The SON was identifiable using gross anatomical landmarks, which remained intact throughout the culturing period. Immunohistochemical staining identified both vasopressinergic and oxytocinergic cells present in the cultures, typically appearing in well-defined clusters. Whole cell recordings from these cultures demonstrated that certain properties of the neonatal mouse SON were comparable to adult mouse magnocellular neurons. SON neurons in both neonatal cultures and acute adult slices showed similar sustained outward rectification above -60 mV and action potential broadening during evoked activity. Membrane potential, input resistance, and rapidly inactivating potassium current density (IA) were reduced in the cultures, whereas whole cell capacitance and spontaneous synaptic excitation were increased, perhaps reflecting developmental changes in cell physiology that warrant further study. The use of the outlined organotypic culturing procedures will allow the study of such electrophysiological properties of mouse SON using whole cell patch-clamp, in addition to various molecular, techniques that require longer incubation times.

  1. The effect of prebiotics on adherence of probiotics.

    PubMed

    Kadlec, Robert; Jakubec, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Prebiotics are generally considered to promote the function or viability of probiotics via their fermentation, but their effect on the adherence of probiotics is still unclear. In this study, we examined the effect of 4 commercially available prebiotics [Orafti GR, Orafti P95, and Orafti Synergy (Beneo GmbH, Mannheim, Germany), and Vivinal (Friesland Foods Domo, Amersfoort, the Netherlands)] and 3 simple saccharides (glucose, galactose, and lactose) on the adherence of 5 probiotic type strains, 2 lactococci starter cultures, and 5 potential dairy probiotic strains from the Culture Collection of Dairy Microorganisms (Tábor, Czech Republic). Adherence was tested in microtiter plates on the following types of substrate: polystyrene alone and polystyrene coated with either porcine mucus or cocultures of the human colon cell lines Caco2 and HT29-MXT (1:9 ratio of HT29-MXT:Caco2). Adherence was evaluated as a change in fluorescence in the well of a microtiter plate. The most commonly observed effect (with a few exceptions) of prebiotics was decreased adherence of the tested strains observed on all types of substrate. The tested saccharides, which are part of the residual compounds of the used prebiotics, had a very similar effect-eliciting a decrease in adherence ability in the majority of the probiotic strains.

  2. [Treatment adherence: a key element].

    PubMed

    Bastida, Guillermo; Sánchez Montes, Cristina; Aguas, Mariam

    2011-12-01

    A substantial percentage of patients fail to follow health professionals' recommendations, which affects the management of chronic diseases, reducing the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions and increasing the costs of the disease. Lack of adherence is a multidimensional phenomenon and is influenced by numerous factors that should be identified. A multiplicity of measures is available to improve adherence, such as simplifying treatment administration, but none of these measures is effective when used alone. One way of tackling lack of adherence is by identifying patients' barriers to medication and involving them in decision making. Ulcerative colitis (UC) poses a risk for lack of treatment adherence. In this disease, poor adherence correlates with poor disease control (drug effectiveness) and with higher costs. As in other chronic diseases, the causes associated with poor adherence are multiple, including psychosocial factors, the physician-patient relationship and patients' prejudices toward medication. A single dose of aminosalycylates (5-ASA) should be recommended, as this dose is as safe and effective as other regimens. However, by itself, this recommendation does not seem to improve adherence. Identifying the scale of the problem and developing strategies to involve the patient in decision making is crucial to improve treatment adherence.

  3. Biologic Influences on Exercise Adherence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dishman, Rod K.

    1981-01-01

    Diagnostic profiles of 362 male participants in an exercise program were analyzed to determine the biological variables between exercise adherence and symptoms of coronary disease. Findings indicated that individuals with lower metabolic capacity tended to adhere longer, to be less fit, were leaner, and began with more symptoms related to coronary…

  4. Optimizing adherence to antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sahay, Seema; Reddy, K. Srikanth; Dhayarkar, Sampada

    2011-01-01

    HIV has now become a manageable chronic disease. However, the treatment outcomes may get hampered by suboptimal adherence to ART. Adherence optimization is a concrete reality in the wake of ‘universal access’ and it is imperative to learn lessons from various studies and programmes. This review examines current literature on ART scale up, treatment outcomes of the large scale programmes and the role of adherence therein. Social, behavioural, biological and programme related factors arise in the context of ART adherence optimization. While emphasis is laid on adherence, retention of patients under the care umbrella emerges as a major challenge. An in-depth understanding of patients’ health seeking behaviour and health care delivery system may be useful in improving adherence and retention of patients in care continuum and programme. A theoretical framework to address the barriers and facilitators has been articulated to identify problematic areas in order to intervene with specific strategies. Empirically tested objective adherence measurement tools and approaches to assess adherence in clinical/ programme settings are required. Strengthening of ART programmes would include appropriate policies for manpower and task sharing, integrating traditional health sector, innovations in counselling and community support. Implications for the use of theoretical model to guide research, clinical practice, community involvement and policy as part of a human rights approach to HIV disease is suggested. PMID:22310817

  5. Antidepressant adherence after psychiatric hospitalization

    PubMed Central

    Zivin, Kara; Ganoczy, Dara; Pfeiffer, Paul N.; Miller, Erin M.; Valenstein, Marcia

    2010-01-01

    Objective Depressed patients discharged from psychiatric hospitalizations face increased risks for adverse outcomes including suicide, yet antidepressant adherence rates during this high-risk period are unknown. Using Veterans Affairs (VA) data, we assessed antidepressant adherence and predictors of poor adherence among depressed veterans following psychiatric hospitalization. Method We identified VA patients nationwide with depressive disorders who had a psychiatric hospitalization between April 1, 1999 and September 30, 2003, received antidepressant medication, and had an outpatient appointment following discharge. We calculated medication possession ratios (MPRs), a measure of medication adherence, within three and six months following discharge. We assessed patient factors associated with having lower levels of adherence (MPRs <0.8) after discharge. Results 20,931 and 23,182 patients met criteria for three and six month MPRs. The mean three month MPR was 0.79 (s.d.=0.37). The mean six month MPR was 0.66 (s.d.=0.40). Patients with poorer adherence were male, younger, non-white, and had a substance abuse disorder, but were less likely to have PTSD or other anxiety disorders. Conclusion Poor antidepressant adherence is common among depressed patients after psychiatric hospitalization. Efforts to improve adherence at this time may be critical in improving the outcomes of these high-risk patients. PMID:19609666

  6. Pretreatments, conditioned medium and co-culture increase the incidence of somatic embryogenesis of different Cichorium species

    PubMed Central

    Couillerot, Jean-Paul; Windels, David; Vazquez, Franck; Michalski, Jean-Claude; Hilbert, Jean-Louis; Blervacq, Anne-Sophie

    2012-01-01

    Somatic embryogenesis (SE) in Cichorium involves dedifferentiation and redifferentiation of single cells and can be induced by specific in vitro culture conditions. We have tested the effect of various treatments on the incidence of SE (ISE) of an interspecific embryogenic hybrid (C. endivia x C. intybus) and of different commercial chicories (C. endivia and C. intybus) that are typically recalcitrant to SE in standard culture conditions. We found that the ISE of the hybrid is significantly increased by pretreatment of tissues by submersion in solutions of glycerol, abscisic acid, spermine, putrescine or of combinations of these compounds. Interestingly, the most efficient of these pretreatments also had an unexpectedly high effect on the ISE of the C. intybus cultivars. The ISE of the hybrid and of the commercial chicories were increased when explants were co-cultured with highly embryogenic chicory explants or when they were cultured in conditioned medium. These observations established that unidentified SE-promoting factors are released in the culture medium. HPLC analyses of secreted Arabino-Galactan Proteins (AGPs), which are known to stimulate SE, did not allow identifying a fraction containing differentially abundant AGP candidates. However, pointing to their role in promoting SE, we found that the hybrid had a drastically higher ISE when amino sugars and L-Proline, the putative precursors of secreted AGPs, were both added to the medium. PMID:22301978

  7. [Strategies to improve medication adherence].

    PubMed

    Laufs, U; Böhm, M; Kroemer, H K; Schüssel, K; Griese, N; Schulz, M

    2011-08-01

    Up to 50 % of patients with chronic diseases do not take their medication regularly. Poor adherence to drug therapy is associated with higher morbidity and mortality. A selective literature search using the terms adherence, compliance, concordance, persistence, medication management, and pharmaceutical care was performed. Evidence for improving adherence has been provided for the following principles: individual counselling of patients and care givers, medication management including simplifying dosing and use of combination tablets as well as the use of individual unit doses, e. g. blister cards. The effectiveness has only been shown for the duration of the interventions. The improvement of medication adherence represents an area of research with high impact on outcomes and cost. Measures to improve adherence may be as important as the development of novel therapies. However, prospective clinical evaluations with clinical endpoints are missing especially for the German health care system in order to develop recommendations for clinical practice. Joint efforts of physicians and pharmacists are needed.

  8. Adherence to nutritional therapy in obese adolescents; a review.

    PubMed

    França, Silvana Lima Guimarães; Sahade, Viviane; Nunes, Mônica; Adan, Luis F

    2013-01-01

    Considering the controversies existent on the subject, the aim of this review is to discuss adherence to diet in obese adolescents. The selection of articles was made in the SCOPUS, COCHRANE, APA Psyc Net, SciELO, LILACS, CAPES Journals, PUBMED/MEDLINE and GOOGLE ACADEMIC databases. Studies published between 2002 and 2012 were selected. There was lack of evidence of conceptual discussion about adherence to diet in obesity in the child-youth context, in addition to scarcity of data on adherence to diet itself in obese adolescents and the methods of evaluating this. Lastly, multiple interdependent factors were found which both facilitated and made the process of adherence to diet difficult for obese youngsters. The majority of these (factors) belong to the socioeconomic and cultural dimension, in addition to pointing out cognitive and psychological factors and those associated with health services and professionals.

  9. Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1997

    Twelve conference papers on cultural aspects of second language instruction include: "Towards True Multiculturalism: Ideas for Teachers" (Brian McVeigh); Comparing Cultures Through Critical Thinking: Development and Interpretations of Meaningful Observations" (Laurel D. Kamada); "Authority and Individualism in Japan and the…

  10. Pedagogical Conditions for the Development of Students' Intellect within the Framework of the Research Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mizimbayeva, Almira; Ashirbayeva, Nazilya; Oralkenuly, Danabek; Sabyt, Taulanov

    2016-01-01

    The article presents different opinions for the concept of "research culture," gives the characteristics of this phenomenon from the point of view of the pedagogical science including the functions, components of this phenomenon; the article studies the complex of research skills as the basis of the research culture. Special attention is…

  11. Across the Great Divide: Cultural Analysis and the Condition of Democracy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murdock, Graham

    1995-01-01

    Responds to an article in the same issue of this journal. Suggests that the author is unwilling to establish an entry point in the realm of culture because he privileges the moment of production over that of consumption. Suggests disregarding the demarcation lines separating cultural studies from critical political economy, and both from the…

  12. Increased Risk of Genetic and Epigenetic Instability in Human Embryonic Stem Cells Associated with Specific Culture Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Garitaonandia, Ibon; Amir, Hadar; Boscolo, Francesca Sesillo; Wambua, Gerald K.; Schultheisz, Heather L.; Sabatini, Karen; Morey, Robert; Waltz, Shannon; Wang, Yu-Chieh; Tran, Ha; Leonardo, Trevor R.; Nazor, Kristopher; Slavin, Ileana; Lynch, Candace; Li, Yingchun; Coleman, Ronald; Gallego Romero, Irene; Altun, Gulsah; Reynolds, David; Dalton, Stephen; Parast, Mana; Loring, Jeanne F.; Laurent, Louise C.

    2015-01-01

    The self-renewal and differentiation capacities of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) make them a promising source of material for cell transplantation therapy, drug development, and studies of cellular differentiation and development. However, the large numbers of cells necessary for many of these applications require extensive expansion of hPSC cultures, a process that has been associated with genetic and epigenetic alterations. We have performed a combinatorial study on both hESCs and hiPSCs to compare the effects of enzymatic vs. mechanical passaging, and feeder-free vs. mouse embryonic fibroblast feeder substrate, on the genetic and epigenetic stability and the phenotypic characteristics of hPSCs. In extensive experiments involving over 100 continuous passages, we observed that both enzymatic passaging and feeder-free culture were associated with genetic instability, higher rates of cell proliferation, and persistence of OCT4/POU5F1-positive cells in teratomas, with enzymatic passaging having the stronger effect. In all combinations of culture conditions except for mechanical passaging on feeder layers, we noted recurrent deletions in the genomic region containing the tumor suppressor gene TP53, which was associated with decreased mRNA expression of TP53, as well as alterations in the expression of several downstream genes consistent with a decrease in the activity of the TP53 pathway. Among the hESC cultures, we also observed culture-associated variations in global gene expression and DNA methylation. The effects of enzymatic passaging and feeder-free conditions were also observed in hiPSC cultures. Our results highlight the need for careful assessment of the effects of culture conditions on cells intended for clinical therapies. PMID:25714340

  13. Degradation of natural rubber by Achromobacter sp. NRB and evaluation of culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Berekaa, Mahmoud M; Barakaat, A; El-Sayed, S M; El-Aassar, S A

    2005-01-01

    A natural rubber degrading candidate was isolated from a soil sample from Aswan, Egypt. The strain was able to grow on natural rubber as a sole source for carbon and energy. According to its degradation behavior, it grew adhesively and in direct contact with the rubber substrate and led to disintegration of the material during cultivation. Furthermore, this strain was not able to form a clear zone (translucent halos) around bacterial colonies after cultivation on NR latex plates. Taxonomic analysis of the strain based on partial 16S rRNA similarity examinations indicated that bacterial candidate belongs to genus Achromobacter sp. Schiff's reagent staining tests performed during cultivation of the strain on NR latex gloves of different sizes, treated or nontreated, revealed that the strain was able to colonize the rubber surface. Formation of bacterial films and occurrence of compounds containing aldehyde groups during cultivation was observed. The tested strain showed a higher colonization efficiency on small or treated pieces of NR latex gloves, while a lower colonization efficiency was recognized when grown on large or nontreated NR latex gloves. Plackett-Burman experimental design, based on numerical modeling, was applied to evaluate the significance of culture conditions affecting natural rubber degradation by the bacterial candidate. Eleven variables through fourteen trials were studied simultaneously. Based on rubber mineralization data, the highest positive variables affecting rubber degradation were NR granules, K2HPO4, Na-succinate and NH4Cl, while MgSO4 x 7H2O and KH2PO4 were the lowest significant variables.

  14. Response surface methodology for optimising the culture conditions for eicosapentaenoic acid production by marine bacteria.

    PubMed

    Abd Elrazak, Ahmed; Ward, Alan C; Glassey, Jarka

    2013-05-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), especially eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), are increasingly attracting scientific attention owing to their significant health-promoting role in the human body. However, the human body lacks the ability to produce them in vivo. The limitations associated with the current sources of ω-3 fatty acids from animal and plant sources have led to increased interest in microbial production. Bacterial isolate 717 was identified as a potential high EPA producer. As an important step in the process development of the microbial PUFA production, the culture conditions at the bioreactor scale were optimised for the isolate 717 using a response surface methodology exploring the significant effect of temperature, pH and dissolved oxygen and the interaction between them on the EPA production. This optimisation strategy led to a significant increase in the amount of EPA produced by the isolate under investigation, where the amount of EPA increased from 9 mg/g biomass (33 mg/l representing 7.6 % of the total fatty acids) to 45 mg/g (350 mg/l representing 25 % of the total fatty acids). To avoid additional costs associated with extreme cooling at large scale, a temperature shock experiment was carried out reducing the overall cooling time from the whole cultivation process to 4 h only prior to harvest. The ability of the organism to produce EPA under the complete absence of oxygen was tested revealing that oxygen is not critically required for the biosynthesis of EPA but the production improved in the presence of oxygen. The stability of the produced oil and the complete absence of heavy metals in the bacterial biomass are considered as an additional benefit of bacterial EPA compared to other sources of PUFA. To our knowledge this is the first report of a bacterial isolate producing EPA with such high yields making the large-scale manufacture much more economically viable.

  15. Anaerobic Biodegradation Of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether Under Iron-Reducing Conditions In Batch And Continuous-Flow Cultures

    EPA Science Inventory

    The feasibility of biodegradation of the fuel oxygenate methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) under iron-reducing conditions was explored in batch and continuous-flow systems. A porous pot completely-mixed reactor was seeded with diverse cultures and operated under iron-reducing...

  16. Effects of culture conditions of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain RB on the synthesis of CdSe nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ayano, Hiroyuki; Kuroda, Masashi; Soda, Satoshi; Ike, Michihiko

    2015-04-01

    Cadmium selenide (CdSe) was synthesized by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain RB in a culture containing lactic acid as a carbon source, 1 mM selenite, and 1 mM cadmium under various conditions. High purity (1.02-1.16 of the atomic ratio of Se to Cd) and efficient synthesis of biogenic CdSe nanoparticles were observed at 25-30°C, 0.05-10 g L(-1) NaCl, and neutral pH conditions compared with other tested conditions. However, the size and shape of synthesized CdSe nanoparticles were not changed by changing culture conditions. The contents of S and Se in the particles respectively increased under alkaline and weak acidic conditions. Furthermore, high temperature (>37°C), high salinity (>10 g L(-1) NaCl), and alkaline pH affected the CdSe-synthesizing rate by strain RB. This report is the first optimizing the culture conditions for synthesizing biogenic CdSe nanoparticles in a batch processing.

  17. Culture Conditions for Production of Biomass, Adenosine, and Cordycepin from Cordyceps sinensis CS1197: Optimization by Desirability Function Method

    PubMed Central

    Ghatnur, Shashidhar M.; Parvatam, Giridhar; Balaraman, Manohar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cordyceps sinensis (CS) is a traditional Chinese medicine contains potent active metabolites such as nucleosides and polysaccharides. The submerged cultivation technique is studied for the large scale production of CS for biomass and metabolites production. Objective: To optimize culture conditions for large-scale production of CS1197 biomass and metabolites production. Materials and Methods: The CS1197 strain of CS was isolated from dead larvae of natural CS and the authenticity was assured by the presence of two major markers adenosine and cordycepin by high performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. A three-level Box-Behnken design was employed to optimize process parameters culturing temperature, pH, and inoculum volume for the biomass yield, adenosine and cordycepin. The experimental results were regressed to a second-order polynomial equation by a multiple regression analysis for the prediction of biomass yield, adenosine and cordycepin production. Multiple responses were optimized based on desirability function method. Results: The desirability function suggested the process conditions temperature 28°C, pH 7 and inoculum volume 10% for optimal production of nutraceuticals in the biomass. The water extracts from dried CS1197 mycelia showed good inhibition for 2 diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl and 2,2-azinobis-(3-ethyl-benzo-thiazoline-6-sulfonic acid-free radicals. Conclusion: The result suggests that response surface methodology-desirability function coupled approach can successfully optimize the culture conditions for CS1197. SUMMARY Authentication of CS1197 strain by the presence of adenosine and cordycepin and culturing period was determined to be for 14 daysContent of nucleosides in natural CS was found higher than in cultured CS1197 myceliumBox-Behnken design to optimize critical cultural conditions: temperature, pH and inoculum volumeWater extract showed better antioxidant activity proving credible source of natural antioxidants

  18. Morbidly adherent placenta.

    PubMed

    Abuhamad, Alfred

    2013-10-01

    Morbidly adherent placenta, which describes placenta accreta, increta, and percreta, implies an abnormal implantation of the placenta into the uterine wall. The incidence of placenta accreta has increased significantly over the past several decades, with the main risk factors include prior cesarean section and placental previa. Sonographic markers of placenta accreta can be present as early as the first trimester and include a low uterine implantation of a gestational sac, multiple vascular lacunae within the placenta, loss of the normal hypoechoic retroplacental zone, and abnormality of the uterine serosa-bladder interface, among others. Ultrasound has high sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of placenta accreta and MRI should be reserved for rare cases in which the ultrasound is non-diagnostic. The optimum time for planned delivery for a patient with placenta accreta is around 34-35 weeks following a course of corticosteroid injection. The successful management of placenta accreta includes a multidisciplinary care team approach with the successful management relying heavily on the prenatal diagnosis of this entity and preparing for the surgical management in a multidisciplinary approach by assuring the most skilled team is available for those patients.

  19. Biological treatment of sewage treatment plant sludge by pure bacterial culture with optimum process conditions in a stirred tank bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Alam, M Z; Muyibi, Suleyman A; Jamal, P

    2007-09-01

    Biological treatment of sewage treatment plant (STP) sludge by potential pure bacterial culture (Bacillus sp.) with optimum process conditions for effective biodegradation and bioseparation was carried out in the laboratory. The effective and efficient bioconversion was evaluated with the treatment of pure bacterial culture and existing microbes (uninnoculated) in sludge. The optimum process conditions i.e., temperature, 40 degrees C; pH, 6; inoculum, 5% (v/v); aeration, 1 vvm; agitation speed, 50 rpm obtained from the previous studies with chemical oxygen demand COD at 30 mgL(-1) were applied for the biological treatment of sludge. The results indicated that pure bacterial culture (Bacillus sp.) showed higher degradation and separation of treated sludge compared to treatment with the existing mixed microbes in a stirred tank bioreactor. The treated STP sludge by potential pure bacterial culture and existing microbes gave 30% and 11%; 91.2% and 59.1; 88.5% and 52.3%; 98.4% and 51.3%; 96.1% and 75.2%; 99.4% and 72.8% reduction of total suspended solids (TSS, biosolids), COD, soluble protein, turbidity, total dissolved solids (TDS) and specific resistance to filtration (SRF), respectively within 7 days of treatment. The pH was observed at 6.5 and 4 during the treatment of sludge by pure culture and existing microbes, respectively.

  20. Identification of Molecular and Cellular Responses of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Biofilms under Culture Conditions Relevant to Field Conditions for Bioreduction of

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, Judy D.

    2006-06-01

    Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough forms biofilms under stress and nutrient limitation conditions. Analysis of the transcriptional responses to acid exposure suggested that genes encoding arginine and polyamine biosynthesis were increased in expression. A literature search showed that polyamines had been suggested to stimulate biofilm formation in some bacteria. Therefore, biofilm formation by D. vulgaris was then examined. Two different assay methods were used to estimate the biofilm formation. First, the classical crystal violet stainable material attached to glass test tubes was measured. Second protein attached to the test tube sides and especially precipitated at the bottom was measured.

  1. Culture of the hydrocarbon producing microalga Botryococcus braunii strain Showa: optimal CO2, salinity, temperature, and irradiance conditions.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Takeshi; Okada, Shigeru; Honda, Masaki

    2013-04-01

    Specific growth rates and hydrocarbon contents of Botryococcus braunii strain Showa were measured under a wide range of CO2, salinity, temperature, and irradiance conditions. The bubbling CO2 concentration of 0.2-5% and no addition of salinity were favorable conditions for growth. The strain cannot grow at 5°C and above 35°C under any irradiance levels. Maximum specific growth rate of 0.5 day(-1) (doubling time of 1.4 days), the highest value reported for B. braunii in the past studies, was observed at 30°C and 850 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1). Since hydrocarbon productivity, shown as the product of hydrocarbon content and specific growth rate, increased with the increasing specific growth rate, we conclude that more efficient hydrocarbon production by the mass culture of strain Showa can be achieved by maintaining higher specific growth rate based on the culture conditions presented in this study.

  2. Maintenance and induction of naphthalene degradation activity in Pseudomonas putida and an Alcaligenes sp. under different culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Guerin, W F; Boyd, S A

    1995-11-01

    The expression of xenobiotic-degradative genes in indigenous bacteria or in bacteria introduced into an ecosystem is essential for the successful bioremediation of contaminated environments. The maintenance of naphthalene utilization activity is studied in Pseudomonas putida (ATCC 17484) and an Alcaligenes sp. (strain NP-Alk) under different batch culture conditions. Levels of activity decreased exponentially in stationary phase with half-lives of 43 and 13 h for strains ATCC 17484 and NP-Alk, respectively. Activity half-lives were 2.7 and 5.3 times longer, respectively, in starved cultures than in stationary-phase cultures following growth on naphthalene. The treatment of starved cultures with chloramphenicol caused a loss of activity more rapid than that measured in untreated starved cultures, suggesting a continued enzyme synthesis in starved cultures in the absence of a substrate. Following growth in nutrient medium, activity decreased to undetectable levels in the Alcaligenes sp. but remained at measurable levels in the pseudomonad even after 9 months. The induction of naphthalene degradation activities in these cultures, when followed by radiorespirometry with 14C-labeled naphthalene as the substrate, was consistent with activity maintenance data. In the pseudomonad, naphthalene degradation activity was present constitutively at low levels under all growth conditions and was rapidly (in approximately 15 min) induced to high levels upon exposure to naphthalene. Adaptation in the uninduced Alcaligenes sp. occurred after many hours of exposure to naphthalene. In vivo labeling with 35S, to monitor the extent of de novo enzyme synthesis by naphthalene-challenged cells, provided an independent confirmation of the results.

  3. Maintenance and induction of naphthalene degradation activity in Pseudomonas putida and an Alcaligenes sp. under different culture conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Guerin, W.F.; Boyd, S.A.

    1995-11-01

    The expression of xenobiotic-degradative genes in indigenous bacteria or in bacteria introduced into an ecosystem is essential for the successful bioremediation of contaminated environments. The maintenance of naphthalene utilization activity is studied in Pseudomonas putida (ATCC 17484) and an Alcaligenes sp. (strain NP-Alk) under different batch culture conditions. Levels of activity decreased exponentially in stationary phase with half-lives of 43 and 13 h for strains ATCC 17484 nad NP-Alk, respectively. Activity half-lives were 2.7 and 5.3 times longer, respectively, in starved cultures than in stationary-phase cultures following growth on naphthalene. The treatment of starved cultures with chloramphenicol caused a loss of activity more rapid than that measured in untreated starved cultures, suggesting a continued enzyme synthesis in starved cultures in the absence of a substrate. Following growth in nutrient medium, activity decreased to undetectable levels in the Alcaligenes sp. but remained at measureable levels int he pseudomonad even after 9 months. The induction of naphthalene degradation activities in these cultures, when followed by radiorespirometry with {sup 14}C-labeled naphthalene as the substrate, was consistent with activity maintenance data. In the pseudomonad, naphthalene degradation activity was present constitutively at low levels under all growth conditions and was rapidly (in approximately 15 min) induced to high levels upon exposure to naphthalene. Adaptation in the uninduced Alcaligenes sp. occurred after many hours of exposure to naphthalene. In vivo labeling with {sup 35}S, to monitor the extent of de novo enzyme synthesis by naphthalene-challenged cells, provided an independent confirmation of the results. 43 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Development and Maturation of the Neuromuscular Junciton in Cell Culture Under Conditions of Simulated Zero-gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruener, R.

    1985-01-01

    Alterations in gravitational conditions which alter the normal development and interactions of nerve and muscle cells grown in culture is examined. Clinostat conditions, similating Og, which produce changes in cell morphology and growth patterns is studied. Data show that rotation of cocultures of nerve and muscle cells results in morphologic changes which are predicted to significantly alter the functional interactions between the elements of a prototypic synapse. It is further predicted that similar alterations may occur in central synapses which may therefore affect the development of the central nervous system when subjected to altered gravitational conditions.

  5. Definition of culture conditions for Arxula adeninivorans, a rational basis for studying heterologous gene expression in this dimorphic yeast.

    PubMed

    Stöckmann, Christoph; Palmen, Thomas G; Schroer, Kirsten; Kunze, Gotthard; Gellissen, Gerd; Büchs, Jochen

    2014-06-01

    The yeast Arxula adeninivorans is considered to be a promising producer of recombinant proteins. However, growth characteristics are poorly investigated and no industrial process has been established yet. Though of vital interest for strain screening and production processes, rationally defined culture conditions remain to be developed. A cultivation system was evolved based on targeted sampling and mathematical analysis of rationally designed small-scale cultivations in shake flasks. The oxygen and carbon dioxide transfer rates were analyzed as conclusive online parameters. Oxygen limitation extended cultivation and led to ethanol formation in cultures supplied with glucose. Cultures were inhibited at pH-values below 2.8. The phosphorus demand was determined as 1.55 g phosphorus per 100 g cell dry weight. Synthetic SYN6 medium with 20 g glucose l(-1) was optimized for cultivation in shake flasks by buffering at pH 6.4 with 140 mmol MES l(-1). Optimized SYN6 medium and operating conditions provided non-limited cultivations without by-product formation. A maximal specific growth rate of 0.32 h(-1) and short fermentations of 15 h were achieved. A pH optimum curve was derived from the oxygen transfer rates of differently buffered cultures, showing maximal growth between pH 2.8 and 6.5. Furthermore, it was shown that the applied medium and cultivation conditions were also suitable for non-limiting growth and product formation of a genetically modified A. adeninivorans strain expressing a heterologous phytase.

  6. Quality evaluation of green tea leaf cultured under artificial light condition using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Miyauchi, Shunsuke; Yonetani, Tsutomu; Yuki, Takayuki; Tomio, Ayako; Bamba, Takeshi; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2017-02-01

    For an experimental model to elucidate the relationship between light quality during plant culture conditions and plant quality of crops or vegetables, we cultured tea plants (Camellia sinensis) and analyzed their leaves as tea material. First, metabolic profiling of teas from a tea contest in Japan was performed with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), and then a ranking predictive model was made which predicted tea rankings from their metabolite profile. Additionally, the importance of some compounds (glutamine, glutamic acid, oxalic acid, epigallocatechin, phosphoric acid, and inositol) was elucidated for measurement of the quality of tea leaf. Subsequently, tea plants were cultured in artificial conditions to control these compounds. From the result of prediction by the ranking predictive model, the tea sample supplemented with ultraviolet-A (315-399 nm) showed the highest ranking. The improvement in quality was thought to come from the high amino-acid and decreased epigallocatechin content in tea leaves. The current study shows the use and value of metabolic profiling in the field of high-quality crops and vegetables production that has been conventionally evaluated by human sensory analysis. Metabolic profiling enables us to form hypothesis to understand and develop high quality plant cultured under artificial condition.

  7. A Distinct Role for Interleukin‐6 as a Major Mediator of Cellular Adjustment to an Altered Culture Condition

    PubMed Central

    Son, Hwa‐Kyung; Park, Iha; Kim, Jue Young; Kim, Do Kyeong; Illeperuma, Rasika P.; Bae, Jung Yoon; Lee, Doo Young; Oh, Eun‐Sang; Jung, Da‐Woon; Williams, Darren R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tissue microenvironment adjusts biological properties of different cells by modulating signaling pathways and cell to cell interactions. This study showed that epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT)/ mesenchymal–epithelial transition (MET) can be modulated by altering culture conditions. HPV E6/E7‐transfected immortalized oral keratinocytes (IHOK) cultured in different media displayed reversible EMT/MET accompanied by changes in cell phenotype, proliferation, gene expression at transcriptional, and translational level, and migratory and invasive activities. Cholera toxin, a major supplement to culture medium, was responsible for inducing the morphological and biological changes of IHOK. Cholera toxin per se induced EMT by triggering the secretion of interleukin 6 (IL‐6) from IHOK. We found IL‐6 to be a central molecule that modulates the reversibility of EMT based not only on the mRNA level but also on the level of secretion. Taken together, our results demonstrate that IL‐6, a cytokine whose transcription is activated by alterations in culture conditions, is a key molecule for regulating reversible EMT/MET. This study will contribute to understand one way of cellular adjustment for surviving in unfamiliar conditions. J. Cell. Biochem. 116: 2552–2562, 2015. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Biochemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25939389

  8. Optimization of Cell Adhesion on Mg Based Implant Materials by Pre-Incubation under Cell Culture Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Willumeit, Regine; Möhring, Anneke; Feyerabend, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium based implants could revolutionize applications where orthopedic implants such as nails, screws or bone plates are used because they are load bearing and degrade over time. This prevents a second surgery to remove conventional implants. To improve the biocompatibility we studied here if and for how long a pre-incubation of the material under cell culture conditions is favorable for cell attachment and proliferation. For two materials, Mg and Mg10Gd1Nd, we could show that 6 h pre-incubation are already enough to form a natural protective layer suitable for cell culture. PMID:24857908

  9. Magnetic labeling of non-phagocytic adherent cells with iron oxide nanoparticles: a comprehensive study.

    PubMed

    Boutry, Sébastien; Brunin, Stéphanie; Mahieu, Isabelle; Laurent, Sophie; Vander Elst, Luce; Muller, Robert N

    2008-01-01

    Small particles of iron oxide (SPIO) and ultrasmall particles of iron oxide (USPIO), inducing a strong negative contrast on T(2) and T(2)*-weighted MR images, are the most commonly used systems for the magnetic labeling of cultured cells and their subsequent detection by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The purpose of this work is to study the influence of iron incubation concentration, nanoparticle size and nanoparticle coating on the magnetic labeling and the viability of non-phagocytic adherent cells in culture. The magnetic labeling of 3T6 fibroblasts was studied by T(2)-weighted MRI at 4.7 T and by dosing-or cytochemical revealing-of iron through methods based on Perl's Prussian blue staining. Cells were incubated for 48 h with increasing iron concentrations of SPIO (25-1000 microg Fe/ml Endorem. Sinerem, a USPIO (20-40 nm) coated with neutral dextran, and Resovist (65 nm), a SPIO bearing an anionic carboxydextran coating, were compared with Endorem (dextran-coated, 80-150 nm) as magnetic tags. The iron loading of marrow stromal cell primary cultures (MSCs) isolated from rat femurs was compared with that of 3T6 fibroblasts. The SPIO-labeling of cells with Endorem was found to be dependent on the iron incubation concentration. MSCs, more sparsely distributed in the culture, exhibited higher iron contents than more densely populated 3T6 fibroblast cultures. A larger iron loading was achieved with Resovist than with Endorem, which in turn was more efficient than Sinerem as a magnetic tag. The magnetic labeling of cultured non-phagocytic adherent cells with iron oxide nanoparticles was thus found to be dependent on the relative concentration of the magnetic tag and of the cells in culture, on the nanoparticle size, and on the coating type. The viability of cells, estimated by methods assessing cell membrane permeability, was not affected by magnetic labeling in the conditions used in this work.

  10. Effects of medium components and culture conditions on mycelial biomass and the production of bioactive ingredients in submerged culture of Xylaria nigripes (Ascomycetes), a Chinese medicinal fungus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian-Zhi; Lo, Hui-Chen; Lin, Fang-Yi; Chang, Shih-Liang; Hsieh, Changwei; Liang, Zeng-Chin; Ho, Wai-Jane; Hsu, Tai-Hao

    2014-01-01

    The optimal culture conditions were investigated to maximize the production of mycelial biomass and bioactive ingredients in submerged cultivation of Xylaria nigripes, a Chinese medicinal fungus. The one-factor-at-a-time method was used to explore the effects of medium components, including carbon, nitrogen, mineral sources, and initial pH of the medium and environmental factors, such as culture temperature and rotation speed, on mycelial growth and production of bioactive ingredients. The results indicated that the optimal culture temperature and rotation speed were 25°C and 100 rpm in a medium with 20 g fructose, 6 g yeast extract, and 2 g magnesiun sulfate heptahydrate as carbon, nitrogen, and mineral sources, respectively, in 1 L distilled water with an initial medium pH of 5.5. With optimal medium components and conditions of cultivation, the maximal production of mycelial biomass was 6.64 ± 0.88 g/L, with maximal production of bioactive ingredients such as extracellular polysaccharides (2.36 ± 0.18 mg/mL), intracellular polysaccharides (2.38 ± 0.07 mg/g), adenosine (43.27 ± 2.37 mg/g), total polyphenols (36.57 ± 1.36 mg/g), and triterpenoids (31.29 ± 1.17 mg/g) in a shake flask culture. These results suggest that different bioactive ingredients including intracellular polysaccharides, adenosine, total polyphenols and triterpenoids in mycelia and extracellular polysaccharides in broth can be obtained from one simple medium for submerged cultivation of X. nigripes.

  11. Surface-engineered substrates for improved human pluripotent stem cell culture under fully defined conditions.

    PubMed

    Saha, Krishanu; Mei, Ying; Reisterer, Colin M; Pyzocha, Neena Kenton; Yang, Jing; Muffat, Julien; Davies, Martyn C; Alexander, Morgan R; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2011-11-15

    The current gold standard for the culture of human pluripotent stem cells requires the use of a feeder layer of cells. Here, we develop a spatially defined culture system based on UV/ozone radiation modification of typical cell culture plastics to define a favorable surface environment for human pluripotent stem cell culture. Chemical and geometrical optimization of the surfaces enables control of early cell aggregation from fully dissociated cells, as predicted from a numerical model of cell migration, and results in significant increases in cell growth of undifferentiated cells. These chemically defined xeno-free substrates generate more than three times the number of cells than feeder-containing substrates per surface area. Further, reprogramming and typical gene-targeting protocols can be readily performed on these engineered surfaces. These substrates provide an attractive cell culture platform for the production of clinically relevant factor-free reprogrammed cells from patient tissue samples and facilitate the definition of standardized scale-up friendly methods for disease modeling and cell therapeutic applications.

  12. Living Conditions and Psychological Distress in Latino Migrant Day Laborers: The Role of Cultural and Community Protective Factors.

    PubMed

    Organista, Kurt C; Ngo, Samantha; Neilands, Torsten B; Kral, Alex H

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between typically difficult living conditions and psychological distress in Latino migrant day laborers (LMDLs), with attention to the potentially protective roles of contact with family in country of origin (i.e., communication, sending money, etc.), availability of local culture (i.e., food, music, people from one's country of origin), and utilization of community resources perceived to be culturally competent (i.e., services that are respectful, able to serve Latinos, able to solve problems, in Spanish, etc.). Participants were 344 LMDLs surveyed in the San Francisco Bay Area. As hypothesized: (a) difficult living conditions were related to depression, anxiety, and desesperación [desperation], the latter a popular Latino idiom of psychological distress recently validated on LMDLs; (b) contact with family moderated the relation between difficult living conditions and depression and desesperación but not anxiety and (c) access to local culture, and utilization of community resources, mediated the relation between difficult living conditions and depression and desesperación but not anxiety. Implications for intervening at local and larger levels in order to provide some protection against distress built into the LMDL experience in the United States are discussed.

  13. Response of Xylella fastidiosa to zinc: decreased culturability, increased exopolysaccharide production, and formation of resilient biofilms under flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Navarrete, Fernando; De La Fuente, Leonardo

    2014-02-01

    The bacterial plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa produces biofilm that accumulates in the host xylem vessels, affecting disease development in various crops and bacterial acquisition by insect vectors. Biofilms are sensitive to the chemical composition of the environment, and mineral elements being transported in the xylem are of special interest for this pathosystem. Here, X. fastidiosa liquid cultures were supplemented with zinc and compared with nonamended cultures to determine the effects of Zn on growth, biofilm, and exopolysaccharide (EPS) production under batch and flow culture conditions. The results show that Zn reduces growth and biofilm production under both conditions. However, in microfluidic chambers under liquid flow and with constant bacterial supplementation (closer to conditions inside the host), a dramatic increase in biofilm aggregates was seen in the Zn-amended medium. Biofilms formed under these conditions were strongly attached to surfaces and were not removed by medium flow. This phenomenon was correlated with increased EPS production in stationary-phase cells grown under high Zn concentrations. Zn did not cause greater adhesion to surfaces by individual cells. Additionally, viability analyses suggest that X. fastidiosa may be able to enter the viable but nonculturable state in vitro, and Zn can hasten the onset of this state. Together, these findings suggest that Zn can act as a stress factor with pleiotropic effects on X. fastidiosa and indicate that, although Zn could be used as a bactericide treatment, it could trigger the undesired effect of stronger biofilm formation upon reinoculation events.

  14. Parametric Optimization of Cultural Conditions for Carboxymethyl Cellulase Production Using Pretreated Rice Straw by Bacillus sp. 313SI under Stationary and Shaking Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Arpana; Bhuwal, Anish Kumari; Singh, Gulab; Yadav, Anita; Aggarwal, Neeraj Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Carboxymethyl cellulase (CMCase) provides a key opportunity for achieving tremendous benefits of utilizing rice straw as cellulosic biomass. Out of total 80 microbial isolates from different ecological niches one bacterial strain, identified as Bacillus sp. 313SI, was selected for CMCase production under stationary as well as shaking conditions of growth. During two-stage pretreatment, rice straw was first treated with 0.5 M KOH to remove lignin followed by treatment with 0.1 N H2SO4 for removal of hemicellulose. The maximum carboxymethyl cellulase activity of 3.08 U/mL was obtained using 1% (w/v) pretreated rice straw with 1% (v/v) inoculum, pH 8.0 at 35°C after 60 h of growth under stationary conditions, while the same was obtained as 4.15 U/mL using 0.75% (w/v) pretreated substrate with 0.4% (v/v) inoculum, pH 8.0 at 30°C, under shaking conditions of growth for 48 h. For maximum titre of CMCase carboxymethyl cellulose was optimized as the best carbon source under both cultural conditions while ammonium sulphate and ammonium nitrate were optimized as the best nitrogen sources under stationary and shaking conditions, respectively. The present study provides the useful data about the optimized conditions for CMCase production by Bacillus sp. 313SI from pretreated rice straw. PMID:24868469

  15. Effect of weightlessness conditions on the somatic embryogenesis in the culture of carrot cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butenko, R. G.; Dmitriyeva, N. N.; Ongko, V.; Basyrova, L. V.

    1977-01-01

    A carrot cell culture seeded in Petri dishes in the United States and transported to the USSR was subjected to weightlessness for 20 days during the flight of Kosmos 782. The controls were cultures placed on a centrifuge (1 g) inside the satellite and cultures left on ground in the U.S.S.R. and the United States. A count of structures in the dishes after the flight showed that the number of developing embryonic structures and the extent of their differentiation in weightlessness did not reliably differ from the number and extent of differentiation in structures developed on the ground. Structures with long roots developed in weightlessness. Analysis of the root zones showed that these roots differed by the increased size of the zone of differentiated cells. The increased size of the zones of differentiated cells can indicate earlier development of embryonic structures.

  16. Identification of Molecular and Cellular Responses of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Biofilms under Culture Conditions Relevant to Field Conditions for Bioreduction

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, Matthew W.

    2006-06-01

    Desulfovibrio vulgaris ATCC29579 is a sulfate- reducing bacterium (SRB) that is commonly used as a model for direct and indirect heavy metal reduction, and can also be a causitative agent of metal corrosion. During growth with lactate and sulfate, internal carbohydrate levels increased throughout exponential-phase, and peaked as the cells transitioned to stationary-phase. The carbohydrate to protein ratio (C:P) peaked at 0.05 ug/ug as the cells transitioned to stationary-phase, and then declined to 0.02 ug/ug during extended stationary-phase. In contrast, a strain of D. vulgaris that does not contain the megaplasmid, maintained higher internal carbohydrate levels and the C:P ratio peaked at 0.1 ug/ug (2-fold increase compared to wild-type). Under the tested growth conditions, we observed biofilm formation in wild-type cells, but the plasmid-less strain formed less biofilm (2-fold decrease). We hypothesized that carbohydrate was re-allocated to the external cell proper for biofilm formation. However, biofilm contained relatively little carbohydrate (0.6 to 1.0 ug/ml) and had a similar C:P ratio compared to wild-type early stationary-phase cells. Staining with calcafluor white also indicated the presence of little external carbohydrate in D. vulgaris biofilms. Less biofilm was formed in the presence of protinease K, trypsin, and chymotrypsin, however, the growth of planktonic cells was not affected. In addition, when D. vulgaris biofilm was treated with a protease, less biofilm was observed. Electron micrographs suggested the presence of filaments between the biofilm cells, and filaments appeared to be susceptible to protease treatment. Biofilm filtrates contained soluble protein, and SDS-PAGE analysis suggested different polypeptide profiles between a filtrate, a planktonic, and a biofilm sample.

  17. Adherence of Tritrichomonas foetus to bovine vaginal epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Corbeil, L B; Hodgson, J L; Jones, D W; Corbeil, R R; Widders, P R; Stephens, L R

    1989-01-01

    Adherence of Tritrichomonas foetus to bovine vaginal epithelial cells (VECs) in vitro was investigated with fresh washed bovine VECs and log-phase cultures of T. foetus. Observation under phase-contrast microscopy showed that T. foetus usually adhered first by the posterior flagellum and later by the body. Significantly more keratinized squamous epithelial cells were detected with attached parasites than nonkeratinized round epithelial cells. The optimal pH range for attachment was 6.0 to 7.5, with peak attachment at pH 6.5 for squamous VECs. Surface-reactive bovine antiserum to T. foetus prevented adherence to bovine squamous VECs. Inhibition of adherence occurred at nonagglutinating, nonimmobilizing serum dilutions. Antiserum fractions enriched for immunoglobulin G1 inhibited adherence, but fractions enriched for immunoglobulin G2 did not. The inhibitory antiserum was specific for several medium- to high-molecular-weight membrane antigens as detected in Western blots (immunoblots). The ability of surface-reactive antibodies to prevent adherence and to agglutinate and immobilize T. foetus indicates that they may be protective. Images PMID:2471692

  18. Contributions of EspA Filaments and Curli Fimbriae in Cellular Adherence and Biofilm Formation of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vijay K.; Kudva, Indira T.; Bearson, Bradley L.; Stasko, Judith A.

    2016-01-01

    In Escherichia coli O157:H7 (O157), the filamentous structure of the type III secretion system is produced from the polymerization of the EspA protein. EspA filaments are essential for O157 adherence to epithelial cells. In previous studies, we demonstrated that O157 hha deletion mutants showed increased adherence to HEp-2 cells and produced abundant biofilms. Transcriptional analysis revealed increased expression of espA as well as the csgA gene, which encodes curli fimbriae that are essential for biofilm formation. In the present study, we constructed hha espA, hha csgA, and hha csgA espA deletion mutants to determine the relative importance of EspA and CsgA in O157 adherence to HEp-2 cells and biofilm formation. In vitro adherence assays, conducted at 37°C in a tissue culture medium containing 0.1% glucose, showed that HEp-2 cell adherence required EspA because hha espA and hha csgA espA mutants adhered to HEp-2 cells at higher levels only when complemented with an espA-expressing plasmid. Biofilm assays performed at 28°C in a medium lacking glucose showed dependency of biofilm formation on CsgA; however EspA was not produced under these conditions. Despite production of detectable levels of EspA at 37°C in media supplemented with 0.1% glucose, the biofilm formation occurred independent of EspA. These results indicate dependency of O157 adherence to epithelial cells on EspA filaments, while CsgA promoted biofilm formation under conditions mimicking those found in the environment (low temperature with nutrient limitations) and in the digestive tract of an host animal (higher temperature and low levels of glucose). PMID:26900701

  19. Medication Adherence Measures: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Lam, Wai Yin; Fresco, Paula

    2015-01-01

    WHO reported that adherence among patients with chronic diseases averages only 50% in developed countries. This is recognized as a significant public health issue, since medication nonadherence leads to poor health outcomes and increased healthcare costs. Improving medication adherence is, therefore, crucial and revealed on many studies, suggesting interventions can improve medication adherence. One significant aspect of the strategies to improve medication adherence is to understand its magnitude. However, there is a lack of general guidance for researchers and healthcare professionals to choose the appropriate tools that can explore the extent of medication adherence and the reasons behind this problem in order to orchestrate subsequent interventions. This paper reviews both subjective and objective medication adherence measures, including direct measures, those involving secondary database analysis, electronic medication packaging (EMP) devices, pill count, and clinician assessments and self-report. Subjective measures generally provide explanations for patient's nonadherence whereas objective measures contribute to a more precise record of patient's medication-taking behavior. While choosing a suitable approach, researchers and healthcare professionals should balance the reliability and practicality, especially cost effectiveness, for their purpose. Meanwhile, because a perfect measure does not exist, a multimeasure approach seems to be the best solution currently.

  20. Medication Adherence Measures: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Wai Yin; Fresco, Paula

    2015-01-01

    WHO reported that adherence among patients with chronic diseases averages only 50% in developed countries. This is recognized as a significant public health issue, since medication nonadherence leads to poor health outcomes and increased healthcare costs. Improving medication adherence is, therefore, crucial and revealed on many studies, suggesting interventions can improve medication adherence. One significant aspect of the strategies to improve medication adherence is to understand its magnitude. However, there is a lack of general guidance for researchers and healthcare professionals to choose the appropriate tools that can explore the extent of medication adherence and the reasons behind this problem in order to orchestrate subsequent interventions. This paper reviews both subjective and objective medication adherence measures, including direct measures, those involving secondary database analysis, electronic medication packaging (EMP) devices, pill count, and clinician assessments and self-report. Subjective measures generally provide explanations for patient's nonadherence whereas objective measures contribute to a more precise record of patient's medication-taking behavior. While choosing a suitable approach, researchers and healthcare professionals should balance the reliability and practicality, especially cost effectiveness, for their purpose. Meanwhile, because a perfect measure does not exist, a multimeasure approach seems to be the best solution currently. PMID:26539470

  1. Simulated-physiological loading conditions preserve biological and mechanical properties of caprine lumbar intervertebral discs in ex vivo culture.

    PubMed

    Paul, Cornelis P L; Zuiderbaan, Hendrik A; Zandieh Doulabi, Behrouz; van der Veen, Albert J; van de Ven, Peter M; Smit, Theo H; Helder, Marco N; van Royen, Barend J; Mullender, Margriet G

    2012-01-01

    Low-back pain (LBP) is a common medical complaint and associated with high societal costs. Degeneration of the intervertebral disc (IVD) is assumed to be an important causal factor of LBP. IVDs are continuously mechanically loaded and both positive and negative effects have been attributed to different loading conditions.In order to study mechanical loading effects, degeneration-associated processes and/or potential regenerative therapies in IVDs, it is imperative to maintain the IVDs' structural integrity. While in vivo models provide comprehensive insight in IVD biology, an accompanying organ culture model can focus on a single factor, such as loading and may serve as a prescreening model to reduce life animal testing. In the current study we examined the feasibility of organ culture of caprine lumbar discs, with the hypothesis that a simulated-physiological load will optimally preserve IVD properties.Lumbar caprine IVDs (n = 175) were cultured in a bioreactor up to 21 days either without load, low dynamic load (LDL), or with simulated-physiological load (SPL). IVD stiffness was calculated from measurements of IVD loading and displacement. IVD nucleus, inner- and outer annulus were assessed for cell viability, cell density and gene expression. The extracellular matrix (ECM) was analyzed for water, glycosaminoglycan and total collagen content.IVD biomechanical properties did not change significantly with loading conditions. With SPL, cell viability, cell density and gene expression were preserved up to 21 days. Both unloaded and LDL resulted in decreased cell viability, cell density and significant changes in gene expression, yet no differences in ECM content were observed in any group.In conclusion, simulated-physiological loading preserved the native properties of caprine IVDs during a 21-day culture period. The characterization of caprine IVD response to culture in the LDCS under SPL conditions paves the way for controlled analysis of degeneration- and

  2. Bioreactor culture of oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) and effects of nitrogen source, inoculum size, and conditioned medium on biomass production.

    PubMed

    Gorret, Nathalie; bin Rosli, Samsul Kamal; Oppenheim, Sheldon F; Willis, Laura B; Lessard, Philip A; Rha, ChoKyun; Sinskey, Anthony J

    2004-03-18

    We report the successful culture of oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) suspension cells in a bioreactor. In vitro propagation of this perennial monocotyledonous tree is an important part of the oil palm industry's approach to clonal propagation of high-yielding accessions. During culture of oil palm cells in a batch bioreactor, nutrients and extracellular metabolites were monitored, and kinetic parameters and nutrient-to-biomass conversion yields were calculated. The biomass increased approximately 3.5-fold per month, consistent with values reported for shake flask cultures. Although the carbon source was completely depleted by the end of the run, nitrogen sources remained in large excess and the sugar-to-biomass conversion yield remained low. Linear growth indicated that the cells were limited. The results obtained from the bioreactor runs indicated that we should be able to improve biomass production by carrying out optimization studies. Therefore, we initiated multi-factorial analyses using response surface experimental designs to investigate the effects of different nitrogen sources, as well as inoculum size and conditioned medium, on biomass production in flask cultures. Whereas glutamine does not have a significant effect on biomass production, ammonia has a positive effect up to an optimum concentration. Both inoculum density and conditioned medium have positive, synergistic effects on biomass production.

  3. Effect of cultural conditions on antrodin C production by basidiomycete Antrodia camphorata in solid-state fermentation.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yongjun; Wang, Yuanlong; Zhang, Bobo; Xu, Ganrong; Ai, Lianzhong

    2014-01-01

    Antrodia camphorata is a medicinal fungus and antrodin C is one of the main bioactive components of A. camphorata in the submerged fermentation (SmF). To optimize the culture conditions, the factors influencing the production of antrodin C by A. camphorata under solid-state fermentation (SSF) were investigated in this study. Different solid substrates and external nitrogen sources were tested for their efficiency in producing antrodin C. The response surface methodology was applied to evaluate the influence of several variables, namely, the concentrations of soybean meal, initial moisture content, and inoculum density on antrodin C production in solid-state fermentation. The experimental results show that the optimum fermentation medium for antrodin C production by A. camphorata was composed of 0.578 g soybean meal, 0.05 g Na2 HPO4 , 0.05 g MgSO4 for 100 g rice, with 51.83% initial moisture content, 22 day culture time, 28 °C culture temperature, and 35.54% inoculum density. At optimized conditions, 6,617.36 ± 92.71 mg kg(-1) yield of antrodin C was achieved. Solid-state fermentation is one good cultural method to improve the production of antrodin C by A. camphorata.

  4. An ideal oocyte activation protocol and embryo culture conditions for somatic cell nuclear transfer using sheep oocytes.

    PubMed

    Patel, Hiren; Chougule, Shruti; Chohan, Parul; Shah, Naval; Bhartiya, Deepa

    2014-10-01

    Pluripotent stem cells are possibly the best candidates for regenerative medicine, and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is one of the viable options to make patient-specific embryonic stem cells. Till date efficacy of SCNT embryos is very low and requires further improvement like ideal oocyte activation and in vitro culture system. The aim of the present study was to evaluate ideal oocyte activation using different stimulation protocols and to study the effect of cumulus co-culture conditions on embryo development. Results demonstrate that between electric stimulation and chemical stimulation using calcium ionomycin and ionophore, best oocyte activation was obtained using calcium ionomycin (5 microM for 5 min) which resulted in 83% cleavage followed by 7% of early blastocyst which further increased to 15% when a cumulus bed was also introduced during embryo culture. Sequential modified Charles Rosenkrans 2 (mCR2) medium was used for embryo culture in which glucose levels were increased from 1 mM to 5 mM from Day 3 onwards. SCNT using cumulus cells as donor somatic cell, calcium ionomycin to activate the reconstructed oocyte and embryo culture on a cumulus bed in sequential mCR2 medium, resulted in the development of 6% embryos to early blastocyst stage. Such technological advances will make SCNT a viable option to make patient-specific pluripotent stem cell lines in near future.

  5. Applying social and cultural capital frameworks: understanding employment perspectives of transition age youth with serious mental health conditions.

    PubMed

    Vorhies, Vanessa; Davis, Kristin E; Frounfelker, Rochelle L; Kaiser, Susan M

    2012-07-01

    Vulnerable transition age youth, such as those in foster care and with serious mental health conditions, are at increased risk for lower rates of employment. Social capital is empirically linked to employment in the general population, yet little is known about the role of social capital in employment for at-risk transition age youth. Focus groups were conducted with young people with serious mental health conditions and their vocational specialists. Discussions reveal that both social and cultural capital influence employment processes. Those with employment experience value the motivation to work provided through others compared to those with no employment experience. Consistently employed describe strong working relationships with vocational specialists and possession of self-awareness, professionalism, and work-place knowledge as critical for employment success, while inconsistently employed describe worries about controlling emotions or behaviors on the job. Building social and cultural capital are explored as potential service provider goals.

  6. Cultural Narratives about Success and the Material Conditions of Class at the Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    Traditional American cultural narratives about hard work, self-improvement, and "success"--moving from "rags to riches"--play a very important role in shaping the thinking of most college students, and most other Americans too, of course, regardless of age, class, ethnicity, or gender. This article presents several narratives that will help shape…

  7. Targeted Protein Degradation by Salmonella under Phagosome-Mimicking Culture Conditions Investigated Using Comparative Peptidomics

    SciTech Connect

    Manes, Nathan P.; Gustin, Jean K.; Rue, Joanne; Mottaz, Heather M.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Zimmer, Jennifer S.; Metz, Thomas O.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Smith, Richard D.; Heffron, Fred

    2007-04-01

    The pathogen Salmonella enterica is known to cause both food poisoning and typhoid fever. Due to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant isolates and the threat of bioterrorism (e.g., contamination of the food supply), there is a growing need to study this bacterium. In this investigation, comparative peptidomics was used to study Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium cultured in either a rich medium or in an acidic, low magnesium, and minimal nutrient medium designed to roughly mimic the macrophage phagosomal compartment (within which Salmonella are known to survive). Native peptides from cleared cell lysates were enriched by using isopropanol extraction and analyzed by using both LC-MS/MS and LC-FTICR-MS. We identified 5,163 distinct peptides originating from 682 proteins and the data clearly indicated that compared to cells cultured in the rich medium, Salmonella cultured in the phagosome-mimicking medium had dramatically higher abundances of a wide variety of protein degradation products, especially from ribosomal proteins. Salmonella from the same cultures were also analyzed by using bottom-up proteomics, and when the peptidomic and proteomic data were analyzed together, two clusters of proteins targeted for proteolysis were tentatively identified. Possible roles of targeted proteolysis by phagocytosed Salmonella are discussed.

  8. Person-Organization (Culture) Fit and Employee Commitment under Conditions of Organizational Change: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, John P.; Hecht, Tracy D.; Gill, Harjinder; Toplonytsky, Laryssa

    2010-01-01

    This longitudinal study examines how person-organization fit, operationalized as congruence between perceived and preferred organizational culture, relates to employees' affective commitment and intention to stay with an organization during the early stages of a strategic organizational change. Employees in a large energy company completed surveys…

  9. Thinking Globally, Teaching Locally: The "Nervous Conditions" of Cross-Cultural Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eck, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    Teaching postcolonial literature to American college students involves taking them through a dialectical process of thinking about identification. In the first stage, students are encouraged to note similarities between their own lives and those of the work's characters. With the second step, students examine how the work's cultural and historical…

  10. Cultural and environmental factors governing tomato production: Local food production under elevated temperature conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-term fresh tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) production data was used to estimate cultural and environmental impacts on marketable tomato yields in eastern Oklahoma. Quantifying the interactive effects of planting date and growing season duration and the effects of cumulative heat units and heat...

  11. Pilot study examining the efficacy of an electronic intervention to promote HIV medication adherence.

    PubMed

    Claborn, Kasey R; Leffingwell, Thad R; Miller, Mary Beth; Meier, Ellen; Stephens, Johnny R

    2014-01-01

    Widespread dissemination of current interventions designed to improve HIV medication adherence is limited by several barriers, including additional time and expense burdens on the health care systems. Electronic interventions could aid in dissemination of interventions in the clinic setting. This study developed and tested the feasibility and acceptability of a computer-based adaption of an empirically supported face-to-face adherence promotion intervention. HIV-positive individuals (N = 92) on antiretroviral therapy with self-reported adherence <95% were randomized to the electronic intervention + treatment as usual (TAU) or TAU only. Study outcome variables which included treatment self-efficacy and self-reported medication adherence were assessed at baseline and follow-up. Time × condition interaction effects in mixed model analysis of variance (ANOVAs) examined the differences in patterns of change in the outcome variables over time between the two groups. Participants in the electronic intervention condition reported higher levels of self-efficacy to adhere to their medication at follow-up compared to the control condition. Although nonsignificant, levels of adherence tended to improve over time in the intervention condition, while TAU adherence remained constant. This was the first study to investigate a single-session, computer-based adherence intervention. Results suggest that electronic interventions are feasible and this method may be effective at increasing self-efficacy and adherence among patients reporting suboptimal adherence levels.

  12. A clinically suitable ex vivo expansion culture system for LTC-IC and CFC using stroma-conditioned medium.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, R; McGlave, P B; Miller, J S; Wissink, S; Lin, W N; Verfaillie, C M

    1997-08-01

    FACS-selected CD34+ HLA-DR- cells (DR- cells) may provide a source of benign stem cells suitable for autografting in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and other hematological malignancies. However, DR- cell selection depletes the majority of committed hematopoietic progenitors, which may be important for early engraftment. Furthermore, only a small number of DR- cells may be selectable in certain patients. These impediments to the use of DR- cells for autografting may be overcome through the development of ex vivo culture systems that support expansion and initial differentiation of primitive progenitors. Because 2-week culture of DR- cells in a stroma "noncontact" system supplemented with interleukin-3 (IL-3) and macrophage inflammatory protein 1-alpha (MIP-1alpha) expands both long-term culture-initiating cells (LTC-ICs) and colony-forming cells (CFCs), we adapted this system to a clinically applicable method for expanding LTC-ICs and CFCs ex vivo. In initial small-scale studies, DR cells were grown in stroma conditioned medium (SCM) supplemented with IL-3 with or without additional growth-promoting cytokines and the chemokines PF-4 and BB10010, all approved for clinical use. An IL-3 dose-dependent expansion of committed progenitors and LTC-ICs was observed when DR- cells were cultured in tissue culture plates in SCM+IL-3 for 2 weeks. Similar CFC expansion along with increased (5-fold) LTC-IC expansion was observed following addition of PF-4 to SCM+IL-3 cultures. The addition of stem cell factor (SCF), but not of IL-6, IL-11, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte-macrophage (GM)-CSF, IL-1, and IL-7, increased CFC and LTC-IC expansion beyond the levels observed with SCM+IL-3 alone. We next evaluated the suitability of this culture system for scale-up. Culture of 2-6 x 10(5) DR- cells in gas-permeable bags with SCM+IL-3 resulted in similar CFC and LTC-IC expansion as seen in small-scale cultures. In addition, we observed that progenitors

  13. Effects of luxCDABEG induction in Vibrio fischeri: Enhancement of symbiotic colonization and conditional attenuation of growth in culture

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Jeffrey L.; Rosenberg, Charles S.; Stabb, Eric V.

    2014-01-01

    Production of bioluminescence theoretically represents a cost, energetic or otherwise, that could slow Vibrio fischeri growth; however, bioluminescence is also thought to enable full symbiotic colonization of the Euprymna scolopes light organ by V. fischeri. Previous tests of these models have proven inconclusive, partly because they compared nonisogenic strains, or undefined and/or pleiotropic mutants. To test the influence of the bioluminescence-producing lux operon on growth and symbiotic competence, we generated dark ΔluxCDABEG mutants in strains MJ1 and ES114 without disrupting the luxR-luxI regulatory circuit. The MJ1 ΔluxCDABEG mutant out-competed its visibly luminescent parent ~26% per generation in a carbon-limited chemostat. Similarly, induction of luminescence in the otherwise dim ES114 strain slowed growth relative to ΔluxCDABEG mutants. Some culture conditions yielded no detectable effect of luminescence on growth, indicating that luminescence is not always growth limiting; however, luminescence was never found to confer an advantage in culture. In contrast to this conditional disadvantage of lux expression, ES114 achieved ~4-fold higher populations than its ΔluxCDABEG mutant in the light organ of E. scolopes. These results demonstrate that induction of luxCDABEG can slow V. fischeri growth under certain culture conditions and is a positive symbiotic colonization factor. PMID:18521572

  14. Production of Trametes pubescens Laccase under Submerged and Semi-Solid Culture Conditions on Agro-Industrial Wastes

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Alexander; Osma, Johann F.; Alméciga-Díaz, Carlos J.; Sánchez, Oscar F.

    2013-01-01

    Laccases are copper-containing enzymes involved in the degradation of lignocellulosic materials and used in the treatment of phenol-containing wastewater. In this study we investigated the effect of culture conditions, i.e. submerged or semi-solid, and copper supplementation on laccase production by Trametespubescens grown on coffee husk, soybean pod husk, or cedar sawdust. The highest specific laccase activity was achieved when the culture was conducted under submerged conditions supplemented with copper (5 mM), and using coffee husk as substrate. The crude extracts presented two laccase isoforms with molecular mass of 120 (Lac1) and 60 kDa (Lac2). Regardless of the substrate, enzymatic crude extract and purified fractions behaved similarly at different temperatures and pHs, most of them presented the maximum activity at 55 °C and a pH range between 2 and 3. In addition, they showed similar stability and electro-chemical properties. At optimal culture conditions laccase activity was 7.69±0.28 U mg-1 of protein for the crude extract, and 0.08±0.001 and 2.86±0.05 U mg-1 of protein for Lac1 and Lac2, respectively. In summary, these results show the potential of coffee husk as an important and economical growth medium to produce laccase, offering a new alternative use for this common agro-industrial byproduct. PMID:24019936

  15. Glaucoma Medication Adherence among African Americans: Program Development

    PubMed Central

    Dreer, Laura E.; Girkin, Christopher A.; Campbell, Lisa; Wood, Andy; Gao, Liyan; Owsley, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To elucidate barriers and facilitators related to glaucoma medication adherence among African Americans (AA) with glaucoma and to elicit input from a community-based participatory research team in order to guide the development of a culturally informed, health promotion program for improving glaucoma medication adherence among AA’s. Methods The nominal group technique (NGT), a highly structured focus group methodology, was implemented with 12 separate groups of AA’s patients with glaucoma (N = 89) to identify barriers and facilitators related to glaucoma medication usage. Participant rank-ordering votes were summed across groups and categorized into themes. Next, an individually and culturally targeted health promotion program promoting appropriate medication adherence was developed based on focus group results and input from a community-based participatory research team. Results The top five barriers included problems with 1) forgetfulness, 2) side effects, 3) cost/affordability, 4) eye drop administration, and 5) the eye drop schedule. The most salient top five facilitators were 1) fear or thoughts about the consequences of not taking eye drops, 2) use of memory aids, cues, or strategies, 3) maintaining a regular routine or schedule for eye drop administration, 4) ability to afford eye drops, and 5) keeping eye drops in the same area. The resulting health promotion program was based on a multi-component empowerment framework that included glaucoma education, motivational interviewing, and problem-solving training to improve glaucoma medication adherence. Conclusions Barriers and facilitators related to glaucoma medication adherence among AA’s are multifactorial. Based on the NGT themes and input from the community-based participatory research team, a culturally informed, health promotion program was designed and holds great promise for improving medication adherence among this vulnerable population. PMID:23873033

  16. Effects of different cryopreservation methods on post-thaw culture conditions of in vitro produced bovine embryos.

    PubMed

    Nicacio, Alessandra Corallo; Simões, Renata; de Paula-Lopes, Fabiola Freitas; de Barros, Flavia Regina Oliveira; Peres, Maria Angelica; Assumpção, Mayra Elena Ortiz D'Avila; Visintin, Jose Antonio

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of cryopreservation protocols on subsequent development of in vitro produced bovine embryos under different culture conditions. Expanded in vitro produced blastocysts (n = 600) harvested on days 7-9 were submitted to controlled freezing [slow freezing group: 10% ethylene glycol (EG) for 10 min and 1.2°C/min cryopreservation]; quick-freezing [rapid freezing group: 10% EG for 10 min, 20% EG + 20% glycerol (Gly) for 30 s]; or vitrification [vitrification group: 10% EG for 10 min, 25% EG + 25% Gly for 30 s] protocols. Control group embryos were not exposed to cryoprotectant or cryopreservation protocols and the hatching rate was evaluated on day 12 post-insemination. In order to evaluate development, frozen-thawed embryos were subjected to granulosa cell co-culture in TCM199 or SOFaa for 4 days. Data were analyzed by PROC MIXED model using SAS Systems for Windows®. Values were significant at p < 0.05. The hatching rate of the control group was 46.09%. In embryos cultured in TCM199, slow freezing and vitrification group hatching rates were 44.65 ± 5.94% and 9.43 ± 6.77%, respectively. In embryos cultured in SOFaa, slow freezing and vitrification groups showed hatching rates of 11.65 ± 3.37 and 8.67 ± 4.47%, respectively. In contrast, the rapid freezing group embryos did not hatch, regardless of culture medium. The slow freezing group showed higher hatching rates than other cryopreservation groups. Under such conditions, controlled freezing (1.2°C/min) can be an alternative to cryopreservation of in vitro produced bovine embryos.

  17. Protective potential of SCF for mice preimplantation embryos cultured in vitro in suboptimal conditions

    PubMed Central

    Wiszniewska, Barbara; Kurzawa, Rafal

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To examine the effect of stem cell factor (SCF) to embryos exposed to detrimental factors. Methods Mice embryos cultured in control medium or Exp.1. with FasL or FasL+SCF Exp.2. with hydrogen peroxide (HP) or HP+SCF; Exp.3. frozen–thawed and cultured with or without SCF. Immunohistochemistry for Fas and c-kit receptors was performed in blastocysts. Blastocyst rates, total numbers of blastocyst cells (TB) and inner cell mass cell counts (ICM) were determined. Results Immunohistochemical studies revealed expression of both Fas and c-kit in blastocyst cells. Exp.1. Significantly more blastocysts were found in control when compared to FasL group and to FasL+SCF group. TB and ICM counts in control and FasL+SCF group were significantly higher comparing to FasL group. Exp.2. We found significant differences between three groups in all three evaluated parameters. The highest blastocyst rates, TB and ICM counts were found in control, lower in HP+SCF group and the worst in HP group. Exp.3. No significant differences in TB and ICM counts were found. More embryos formed blastocyst in control than in two cryopreserved groups. Blastocyst rates did not differ between two cryopreserved groups. Conclusion SCF may improve culture of embryos exposed to unfavorable milieu. PMID:18797989

  18. Controlling the rheology of gellan gum hydrogels in cell culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Moxon, Samuel R; Smith, Alan M

    2016-03-01

    Successful culturing of tissues within polysaccharide hydrogels is reliant upon specific mechanical properties. Namely, the stiffness and elasticity of the gel have been shown to have a profound effect on cell behaviour in 3D cell cultures and correctly tuning these mechanical properties is critical to the success of culture. The usual way of tuning mechanical properties of a hydrogel to suit tissue engineering applications is to change the concentration of polymer or its cross-linking agents. In this study sonication applied at various amplitudes was used to control mechanical properties of gellan gum solutions and gels. This method enables the stiffness and elasticity of gellan gum hydrogels cross-linked with DMEM to be controlled without changing either polymer concentration or cross-linker concentration. Controlling the mechanical behaviour of gellan hydrogels impacted upon the activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) in encapsulated MC3T3 pre-osteoblasts. This shows the potential of applying a simple technique to generate hydrogels where tissue-specific mechanical properties can be produced that subsequently influence cell behaviour.

  19. Chondrogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells in polyglycolic acid mesh scaffolds under dynamic culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudifar, Nastaran; Doran, Pauline M

    2010-05-01

    Chondrogenic differentiation of human adult adipose-derived stem cells was studied in vitro for the development of engineered cartilage tissue. Cells cultured under dynamic conditions in polyglycolic acid (PGA) scaffolds produced substantially higher glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and total collagen levels than cells in pellet cultures. This result reflects the importance of cell attachment and cell-scaffold interactions in stem cell differentiation and chondrogenesis. Although gene expression levels for both aggrecan and collagen type II were up-regulated significantly in PGA cultures treated with transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1), synthesis of GAG but not collagen type II was enhanced in tissue constructs when TGF-beta1 was added to the medium. Bone morphogenetic protein-6 (BMP-6) in the presence of TGF-beta1 was effective in improving GAG and total collagen production when the cells were pre-treated with fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) prior to scaffold seeding. Extending the culture duration from 2 to 5 weeks did not improve cartilage development in PGA scaffolds; loss of cells from the constructs suggested that the rate of scaffold degradation exceeded the rate of replacement by ECM during the 5-week period. Stem cells in PGA scaffolds were cultured in perfusion-type recirculation bioreactors operated with periodic medium flow reversal. The highest levels of GAG and collagen type II accumulation were achieved in the bioreactor cultures after the seeding cell density was increased from 2x10(7) to 4x10(7) cells per scaffold.

  20. Role of culture conditions on in vitro transformation and cellular colonization of biomimetic HA-Col scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Doris M.; Soares, Gloria A.

    2013-01-01

    We have recently developed new 3D hydroxyapatite/collagen (50/50 wt%) scaffolds using a biomimetic synthesis approach. The first in vitro tests performed in static culture showed a limited cell colonization and survival inside the scaffolds. The current study evaluated in dynamic culture the scaffold changes and colonization by human immortalized osteoprogenitor STRO-1A cells. The stability of our scaffolds in the different culture conditions (static, low flow, high flow) was validated by the maintenance of the pore diameter and interconnectivity over 21 d. The colonization and the viability of STRO-1A cells inside the scaffolds were further evaluated on histological sections. It was demonstrated that only the high flow-rate allowed cell survival after 7 d and a complete scaffold colonization. Moreover, the colonization and viability were different in function of the scaffold position inside the perfusion container. The differentiation markers (alkaline phosphatase activity, type I procollagen and osteocalcin synthesis) of STRO-1A cells were analyzed in the culture medium after 7, 14 and 21 d. The low flow-rate increased significantly the three markers compared with static conditions. In contrast, markers were reduced in high flow-rate compared with low flow-rate. To explain this surprising result, we hypothesized that the different molecules were actually adsorbed on the scaffold because of the closed circuit used in the high flow-rate conditions. In summary, this study provides original results on the influence of flow rate but mostly of the circuit used (open/closed) on the structural modifications and cell colonization of collagen-HA scaffolds. PMID:23719179

  1. Lasting effect of preceding culture conditions on the susceptibility of C6 cells to peroxide-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Sibylle; Gülden, Michael; Maser, Edmund; Seibert, Hasso

    2010-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of the maintenance culture conditions on the competence of C6 rat glioma cells to cope with peroxide-induced oxidative stress. C6 cells were maintained either in Ham's nutrient mixture F-10 supplemented with 15% horse serum and 2.5% foetal bovine serum (FBS) or in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium (DMEM) supplemented with 5% FBS. The differently cultured cells were exposed under identical conditions to hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) and cumene hydroperoxide (CHP) in serum-free DMEM. The cells maintained in high serum Ham's F-10 medium (1) were less sensitive towards the cytotoxic action of both peroxides (EC₅₀-values: H₂O₂: 193 ± 23 μM; CHP: 94 ± 16 μM) than the cells maintained in low serum DMEM (EC₅₀-values: H₂O₂: 51 ± 10 μM; CHP: 27 ± 11 μM), (2) eliminated the peroxides (initial concentration: 100 μM) with higher rates (H₂O₂: 56 ± 5.5 vs. 32 ± 2.7, CHP: 32 ± 6 vs. 3.4 ± 0.6 nmol/min mg protein), (3) contained more glutathione (30 ± 2.5 vs. 14 ± 1.1 nmol/mg protein) and (4) owned a higher glutathione peroxidase activity (28 ± 3.4 vs. 9.5 ± 0.8 mU/mg protein). Glutathione reductase and catalase activities were not affected. These results demonstrate that the preceding culture conditions have a lasting effect on the susceptibility of cultured cells to oxidative stressors like peroxides. As cause for these differences a dissimilar supply of the cells with serum born antioxidants like selenium and α-tocopherol is discussed.

  2. [Optimization of induction and culture conditions for hairy roots of Salvia miltiorrhiza].

    PubMed

    Tan, Rong-Hui; Zhang, Jin-Jia; Zhao, Shu-Juan

    2014-08-01

    To establish induction and liquid culture system for hairy roots of Danshen (Salvia miltiorrhiza), Agrobacterium rhizogenes A4, LBA9402, 15834 as test bacterium were used to infect aseptic leaves of Danshen. The hairy roots were induced and positive transgenic hairy roots were selected with PCR using rolB and rolC as the target gene. Then hairy roots of S. miltiorrhiza were harvested and salvianolic acids were extracted with 70% methanol containing 1% formic acid. The content of salvianolic acid B (SalB) and rosmarinic acid (RA) were determined by HPLC. According to the above research results, the Danshen hairy roots induced by A. rhizogenes LBA9402 were inoculated into the following group of culture media: MSOH, MS, B5, and 6,7-V liquid media. Then the same methods of extraction and determination for the content of Danshen hairy roots were adopted. Last, the hairy roots of S. miltiorrhiza induced by A. rhizogenes LBA9402 were inoculated into the MSOH liquid media with different pH values. The content of salvianolic acid were extracted with 70% methanol containing 1% formic acid and determined by HPLC. As a result, three kinds of A. rhizogenes A4, LBA9402, 15834 could induce hairy roots and Ri plasmids were integrated into the genome of S. miltiorrhiza by PCR. Danshen hairy roots induced by A. rhizogenes LBA9402 and A4 produced much more salvianolic acid, which were (3.27 ± 0.37)% [including (1.04 ±0.36)% of RA and (2.22 ± 0.29)% of SalB] and (3.17 ± 0.20)% [including (0.92 ± 0.31)% of RA and (2.25 ± 0.26)% of SalB], respectively. Hairy roots induced by A. rhizogenes LBA9402 when they were cultured in MSOH liquid media produced much more salvianolic acid, which was (4.56 ± 0.36)%, including (1.12 ± 0.26)% of RA and (3.44 ± 0.23)% of SalB. Hairy roots induced by A. rhizogenes LBA9402 produced the most salvianolic acid when they were cultured in MSOH liquid media with the pH value 4.81, which was 4.85%, including 1.16% of RA and 3.69% of SalB. So Danshen

  3. Acculturation, Medication Adherence, Lifestyle Behaviors, and Blood Pressure Control Among Arab Americans

    PubMed Central

    Tailakh, Ayman K.; Evangelista, Lorraine S.; Morisky, Donald E.; Mentes, Janet C.; Pike, Nancy A.; Phillips, Linda R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between acculturation, medication adherence, lifestyle behaviors (e.g., physical activity, nutrition, weight control), and blood pressure control among hypertensive Arab Americans. Design The study utilized a cross-sectional descriptive design. A convenience sample of 126 participants completed questionnaires and had measures of blood pressure, weight, and height. Forty-six participants were hypertensive and were included in the analysis. Results Only 29.2% of participants reported high medication adherence. High medication adherence was associated with lower diastolic blood pressure, eating a healthy diet, and following lifestyle modifications. Acculturation was significantly associated with physical activity and body mass index. Conclusion Our study found that acculturated participants were more adherent to medications and physical activity and had better blood pressure control. Further studies are needed to explore how acculturation improves adherence and what factors contribute to better adherence in order to design culturally sensitive interventions. PMID:24848347

  4. Effect of submerged culture conditions on exopolysaccharides production by Armillaria luteo-virens Sacc QH and kinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Xu, De Qin; Fu, Ming Liang; Chen, Qi He; Liu, Jing

    2011-01-01

    This work aimed to develop the submerged cultivation conditions for improved exopolysaccharides (EPS) production by Armillaria luteo-virens Sacc. The effects of culture temperature, aeration rate, inoculum level, initial pH, and additives on EPS formation and mycelial growth are investigated. The aeration rate, initial pH, and inoculum level significantly affected EPS production under the submerged cultivation. The developed conditions were as follows: cultivation temperature 23 °C, initial pH 5.0, aeration rate 0.5 vvm, 0.5% Tween 80, inoculum level 5% (v/v), and shaking speed 120 r/min. Under the developed conditions, the highest EPS production was 13.01 g/L at 5 days culture time. EPS production was examined in a 5 L bioreactor, and an unstructured kinetic model for EPS formation was well developed. The verified investigations in the large-scale cultivation system showed that the developed models are able to predict the submerged cultivation process of EPS formation. Current results revealed that the submerged cultivation conditions can be utilized to control EPS production, and the unstructured models developed are suitable for explaining EPS production by A. luteo-virens Sacc QH in a large-scale cultivation bioreactor.

  5. A Qualitative Study Exploring Factors Associated with Provider Adherence to Severe Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Brolliar, Sarah M; Moore, Megan; Thompson, Hilaire J; Whiteside, Lauren K; Mink, Richard B; Wainwright, Mark S; Groner, Jonathan I; Bell, Michael J; Giza, Christopher C; Zatzick, Douglas F; Ellenbogen, Richard G; Ng Boyle, Linda; Mitchell, Pamela H; Rivara, Frederick P; Vavilala, Monica S

    2016-08-15

    Despite demonstrated improvement in patient outcomes with use of the Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Guidelines (Guidelines), there are differential rates of adherence. Provider perspectives on barriers and facilitators to adherence have not been elucidated. This study aimed to identify and explore in depth the provider perspective on factors associated with adherence to the Guidelines using 19 focus groups with nurses and physicians who provided acute management for pediatric patients with TBI at five university-affiliated Level 1 trauma centers. Data were examined using deductive and inductive content analysis. Results indicated that three inter-related domains were associated with clinical adherence: 1) perceived guideline credibility and applicability to individual patients, 2) implementation, dissemination, and enforcement strategies, and 3) provider culture, communication styles, and attitudes towards protocols. Specifically, Guideline usefulness was determined by the perceived relevance to the individual patient given age, injury etiology, and severity and the strength of the evidence. Institutional methods to formally endorse, codify, and implement the Guidelines into the local culture were important. Providers wanted local protocols developed using interdisciplinary consensus. Finally, a culture of collaboration, including consistent, respectful communication and interdisciplinary cooperation, facilitated adherence. Provider training and experience, as well as attitudes towards other standardized care protocols, mirror the use and attitudes towards the Guidelines. Adherence was determined by the interaction of each of these guideline, institutional, and provider factors acting in concert. Incorporating provider perspectives on barriers and facilitators to adherence into hospital and team protocols is an important step toward improving adherence and ultimately patient outcomes.

  6. Pill count adherence to prenatal multivitamin/mineral supplement use among low-income women.

    PubMed

    Jasti, Sunitha; Siega-Riz, Anna Maria; Cogswell, Mary E; Hartzema, Abraham G; Bentley, Margaret E

    2005-05-01

    In the United States, the prevalence of third trimester anemia among low-income pregnant women is 29% and has not improved since the 1980s. Although low adherence has been linked to the ineffectiveness of iron supplementation programs, data regarding adherence to supplementation in low-income women are currently lacking. Hence this study was conducted to better understand the factors associated with adherence to the use of iron-containing prenatal multivitamin/mineral supplements among low-income pregnant women. Adherence to supplement use was assessed by pill counts among 244 pregnant women of 867 women who were initially randomized to receive 1 of 3 prenatal supplements. All women received care at a public prenatal clinic. Maternal characteristics associated with adherence were identified using predictive modeling. Women took 74% of supplements as prescribed. Adherence was higher among non-Hispanic white women than among non-Hispanic black women (79% vs. 72%, P adherence. In contrast, among the black women, supplement use 3 mo prior to current pregnancy and no loss of appetite were positively associated with adherence. Further research investigating the influence of cultural factors is necessary to better understand adherence to supplement use and the differences in adherence among ethnic groups.

  7. Regulation of heat shock protein message in Jurkat cells cultured under serum-starved and gravity-altered conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, M. L.; Hughes-Fulford, M.

    2000-01-01

    Although our understanding of effects of space flight on human physiology has advanced significantly over the past four decades, the potential contribution of stress at the cellular and gene regulation level is not characterized. The objective of this ground-based study was to evaluate stress gene regulation in cells exposed to altered gravity and environmentally suboptimal conditions. We designed primers to detect message for both the constitutive and inducible forms of the heat shock protein, HSP-70. Applying the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), we probed for HSP-70 message in human acute T-cell leukemia cells, Jurkat, subjected to three types of environmental stressors: (1) altered gravity achieved by centrifugation (hypergravity) and randomization of the gravity vector in rotating bioreactors, (2) serum starvation by culture in medium containing 0.05% serum, and (3) temperature elevation (42 degrees C). Temperature elevation, as the positive control, significantly increased HSP-70 message, while centrifugation and culture in rotating bioreactors did not upregulate heat shock gene expression. We found a fourfold increase in heat shock message in serum-starved cells. Message for the housekeeping genes, actin and cyclophilin, were constant and comparable to unstressed controls for all treatments. We conclude that gravitational perturbations incurred by centrifugal forces, exceeding those characteristic of a Space Shuttle launch (3g), and culture in rotating bioreactors do not upregulate HSP-70 gene expression. In addition, we found RT-PCR useful for evaluating stress in cultured cells. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Grape Cultivar and Sap Culture Conditions Affect the Development of Xylella fastidiosa Phenotypes Associated with Pierce's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hoch, Harvey C.; Burr, Thomas J.; Mowery, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a xylem-limited bacterium in plant hosts and causes Pierce’s disease (PD) of grapevines, which differ in susceptibility according to the Vitis species (spp.). In this work we compared X. fastidiosa biofilm formation and population dynamics when cultured in xylem saps from PD-susceptible and -resistant Vitis spp. under different conditions. Behaviors in a closed-culture system were compared to those in different sap-renewal cultures that would more closely mimic the physicochemical environment encountered in planta. Significant differences in biofilm formation and growth in saps from PD-susceptible and -resistant spp. were only observed using sap renewal culture. Compared to saps from susceptible V. vinifera, those from PD-resistant V. aestivalis supported lower titers of X. fastidiosa and less biofilm and V. champinii suppressed both growth and biofilm formation, behaviors which are correlated with disease susceptibility. Furthermore, in microfluidic chambers X. fastidiosa formed thick mature biofilm with three-dimensional (3-D) structures, such as pillars and mounds, in saps from all susceptible spp. In contrast, only small aggregates of various shapes were formed in saps from four out of five of the resistant spp.; sap from the resistant spp. V. mustangensis was an exception in that it also supported thick lawns of biofilm but not the above described 3-D structures typically seen in a mature biofilm from the susceptible saps. Our findings provide not only critical technical information for future bioassays, but also suggest further understanding of PD susceptibility. PMID:27508296

  9. Low-cost lipid production by an oleaginous yeast cultured in non-sterile conditions using model waste resources

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The yeast Metschnikowia pulcherrima, previously utilised as a biological control agent, was evaluated for its potential to produce lipids for biofuel production. Results Cultivation in low cost non-sterile conditions was achieved by exploiting its ability to grow at low temperature and pH and to produce natural antimicrobial compounds. Although not previously classified as oleaginous, a combination of low temperature and restricted nutrient availability triggered high levels of oil production in M. pulcherrima cultures. This regime was designed to trigger the sporulation process but prevent its completion to allow the accumulation of a subset of a normally transitional, but oil-rich, ‘pulcherrima’ cell type. This approach resulted in yields of up to 40% lipid, which compares favourably with other oleaginous microbes. We also demonstrate that M. pulcherrima metabolises glycerol and a diverse range of other sugars, suggesting that heterogeneous biomass could provide a suitable carbon source. M. pulcherrima also grows well in a minimal media containing no yeast extract. Finally, we demonstrate the potential of the yeast to produce lipids inexpensively on an industrial scale by culturing the yeast in a 500 L, open air, tank reactor without any significant contamination. Conclusions The production of antimicrobial compounds coupled to efficient growth at low temperature and pH enables culture of this oleaginous yeast in inexpensive, non-sterile conditions providing a potential route to economic biofuel production. PMID:24593824

  10. Rational optimization of culture conditions for the most efficient ethanol production in Scheffersomyces stipitis using design of experiments.

    PubMed

    Unrean, Pornkamol; Nguyen, Nhung H A

    2012-01-01

    Optimization of culture parameters for achieving the most efficient ethanol fermentation is challenging due to multiple variables involved. Here we presented a rationalized methodology for multi-variables optimization through the design of experiments DoE approach. Three critical parameters, pH, temperature, and agitation speed, affecting ethanol fermentation in S. stipitis was investigated. A predictive model showed that agitation speed significantly affected ethanol synthesis. Reducing pH and temperature also improved ethanol production. The model identified the optimum culture conditions for the most efficient ethanol production with the yield and productivity of 0.46 g/g and 0.28 g/l h, respectively, which is consistent with experimental observation. The results also indicated the scalability of the model from shake flask to bioreactor. Thus, DoE is a promising tool permitting the rapid establishment of culture conditions for the most efficient ethanol fermentation in S. stipitis. The approach could be useful to reduce process development time in lignocellulosic ethanol industry.

  11. Effects of different culture conditions on biological potential and metabolites production in three Penicillium isolates.

    PubMed

    Reis, Filipa S; Ćirić, Ana; Stojković, Dejan; Barros, Lillian; Ljaljević-Grbić, Milica; Soković, Marina; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2015-02-01

    The genus Penicillium is well known for its importance in drug and food production. Certain species are produced on an industrial scale for the production of antibiotics (e.g. penicillin) or for insertion in food (e.g. cheese). In the present work, three Penicillium species, part of the natural mycobiota growing on various food products were selected - P. ochrochloron, P. funiculosum and P. verrucosum var. cyclopium. The objective of our study was to value these species from the point of view of production of bioactive metabolites. The species were obtained after inoculation and growth in Czapek and Malt media. Both mycelia and culture media were analyzed to monitor the production of different metabolites by each fungus and their release to the culture medium. The concentrations of sugars, organic acids, phenolic acids and tocopherols were determined. Antioxidant activity of the phenolic extracts was evaluated, as also the antimicrobial activity of phenolic acids, organic acids and tocopherols extracts. Rhamnose, xylose, fructose and trehalose were found in all the mycelia and culture media; the prevailing organic acids were oxalic and fumaric acids, and protocatechuic and p-hydroxybenzoic acids were the most common phenolic acids; γ-tocopherol was the most abundant vitamin E isoform. Generally, the phenolic extracts corresponding to the mycelia samples revealed higher antioxidant activity. Concerning the antimicrobial activity there were some fluctuations, however all the studied species revealed activity against the tested strains. Therefore, the in-vitro bioprocesses can be an alternative for the production of bioactive metabolites that can be used by pharmaceutical industry.

  12. Growth and development of cultured carrot cells and embryos under spaceflight conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krikorian, A. D.; Dutcher, F. R.; Quinn, C. E.; Steward, F. C.

    1981-01-01

    Morphogenetically competent proembryonic cells and well-developed somatic embryos of carrot at two levels of organization were exposed for 18.5 days to a hypogravity environment aboard the Soviet Biosatellite Cosmos 1129. It was confirmed that cultured totipotent cells of carrot can give rise to embryos with well-developed roots and minimally developed shoots. It was also shown that the space hypogravity environment could support the further growth of already-organized, later somatic embryonic stages and give rise to fully developed embryo-plantlets with roots and shoots.

  13. Factors involved in adherence of lactobacilli to human Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Greene, J D; Klaenhammer, T R

    1994-01-01

    A quantitative assay performed with bacterial cells labelled with [3H]thymidine was used to investigate factors involved in the adherence of human isolates Lactobacillus acidophilus BG2FO4 and NCFM/N2 and Lactobacillus gasseri ADH to human Caco-2 intestinal cells. For all three strains, adherence was concentration dependent, greater at acidic pH values, and significantly greater than adherence of a control dairy isolate, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus 1489. Adherence of L. acidophilus BG2FO4 and NCFM/N2 was decreased by protease treatment of the bacterial cells, whereas adherence of L. gasseri ADH either was not affected or was enhanced by protease treatment. Putative surface layer proteins were identified on L. acidophilus BG2FO4 and NCFM/N2 cells but were not involved in adherence. Periodate oxidation of bacterial cell surface carbohydrates significantly reduced adherence of L. gasseri ADH, moderately reduced adherence of L. acidophilus BG2FO4, and had no effect on adherence of L. acidophilus NCFM/N2. These results indicate that Lactobacillus species adhere to human intestinal cells via mechanisms which involve different combinations of carbohydrate and protein factors on the bacterial cell surface. The involvement of a secreted bridging protein, which has been proposed as the primary mediator of adherence of L. acidophilus BG2FO4 in spent culture supernatant (M.-H. Coconnier, T. R. Klaenhammer, S. Kernéis, M.-F. Bernet, and A. L. Servin, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 58:2034-2039, 1992), was not confirmed in this study. Rather, a pH effect on Caco-2 cells contributed significantly to the adherence of this strain in spent culture supernatant.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:7811085

  14. Totipotent embryonic stem cells arise in ground-state culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Morgani, Sophie M; Canham, Maurice A; Nichols, Jennifer; Sharov, Alexei A; Migueles, Rosa Portero; Ko, Minoru S H; Brickman, Joshua M

    2013-06-27

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are derived from mammalian embryos during the transition from totipotency, when individual blastomeres can make all lineages, to pluripotency, when they are competent to make only embryonic lineages. ESCs maintained with inhibitors of MEK and GSK3 (2i) are thought to represent an embryonically restricted ground state. However, we observed heterogeneous expression of the extraembryonic endoderm marker Hex in 2i-cultured embryos, suggesting that 2i blocked development prior to epiblast commitment. Similarly, 2i ESC cultures were heterogeneous and contained a Hex-positive fraction primed to differentiate into trophoblast and extraembryonic endoderm. Single Hex-positive ESCs coexpressed epiblast and extraembryonic genes and contributed to all lineages in chimeras. The cytokine LIF, necessary for ESC self-renewal, supported the expansion of this population but did not directly support Nanog-positive epiblast-like ESCs. Thus, 2i and LIF support a totipotent state comparable to early embryonic cells that coexpress embryonic and extraembryonic determinants.

  15. Stability of dietary polyphenols under the cell culture conditions: avoiding erroneous conclusions.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jianbo; Högger, Petra

    2015-02-11

    Most data of bioactivity from dietary polyphenols have been derived from in vitro cell culture experiments. In this context, little attention is paid to potential artifacts due to chemical instability of these natural antioxidants. An early degradation time ((C)T10) and half-degradation time ((C)T50) were defined to characterize the stability of 53 natural antioxidants incubated in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) at 37 °C. The degree of hydroxylation of flavones and flavonols significantly influenced the stability in order resorcinol-type > catechol-type > pyrogallol-type, with the pyrogallol-type being least stable. In contrast, any glycosylation of polyphenols obviously enhanced their stability. However, the glycosylation was less important compared to the substitution pattern of the nucleus rings. Methoxylation of flavonoids with more than three hydroxyl groups typically improved their stability as did the hydrogenation of the C2═C3 double bond of flavonoids to corresponding flavanoids. There was no significant correlation between the antioxidant potential of polyphenols and their stability. Notably, the polyphenols were clearly more stable in human plasma than in DMEM, which may be caused by polyphenol-protein interactions. It is strongly suggested to carry out stability tests in parallel with cell culture experiments for dietary antioxidants with catechol or pyrogallol structures and pyrogallol-type glycosides in order to avoid artifacts.

  16. Totipotent Embryonic Stem Cells Arise in Ground-State Culture Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Morgani, Sophie M.; Canham, Maurice A.; Nichols, Jennifer; Sharov, Alexei A.; Migueles, Rosa Portero; Ko, Minoru S.H.; Brickman, Joshua M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are derived from mammalian embryos during the transition from totipotency, when individual blastomeres can make all lineages, to pluripotency, when they are competent to make only embryonic lineages. ESCs maintained with inhibitors of MEK and GSK3 (2i) are thought to represent an embryonically restricted ground state. However, we observed heterogeneous expression of the extraembryonic endoderm marker Hex in 2i-cultured embryos, suggesting that 2i blocked development prior to epiblast commitment. Similarly, 2i ESC cultures were heterogeneous and contained a Hex-positive fraction primed to differentiate into trophoblast and extraembryonic endoderm. Single Hex-positive ESCs coexpressed epiblast and extraembryonic genes and contributed to all lineages in chimeras. The cytokine LIF, necessary for ESC self-renewal, supported the expansion of this population but did not directly support Nanog-positive epiblast-like ESCs. Thus, 2i and LIF support a totipotent state comparable to early embryonic cells that coexpress embryonic and extraembryonic determinants. PMID:23746443

  17. Optimization of conditions for profiling bacterial populations in food by culture-independent methods.

    PubMed

    Cocolin, Luca; Diez, Ana; Urso, Rosalinda; Rantsiou, Kalliopi; Comi, Giuseppe; Bergmaier, Ingrid; Beimfohr, Claudia

    2007-11-30

    In this study we used culture-independent methods to profile bacterial populations in food products. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) were employed in order to identify bacterial species without the need of isolation and biochemical identification. The protocols used to extract the DNA, subsequently subjected to PCR amplification for DGGE, as well as the hybridization procedure for FISH, were optimised. Moreover, an extensive study on the primers and probes to be used for the direct detection and identification of microorganisms commonly found in food, was carried out. Meat and cheese samples, fresh or processed, were subjected to DGGE and FISH analysis and the results obtained highlighted how the processing in food industry is decreasing the bacterial biodiversity. Not only processed cheese or meat but also fermented products were dominated by only one or few species. Lactobacillus sakei, Lactobacillus curvatus and Brochothrix thermosphacta were the main species found in meat products, while in cheese(s) Lactococcus lactis, Streptococcus thermophilus and Leuconostoc spp. were repeatedly detected. The results obtained by the two culture-independent methods used always correlated well.

  18. Antagonism of Trichoderma harzianum ETS 323 on Botrytis cinerea mycelium in culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chi-Hua; Yang, Chia-Ann; Peng, Kou-Cheng

    2012-11-01

    ABSTRACT Previous studies have shown that the extracellular proteins of Trichoderma harzianum ETS 323 grown in the presence of deactivated Botrytis cinerea in culture include a putative l-amino acid oxidase and have suggested the involvement of this enzyme in the antagonistic mechanism. Here, we hypothesized that the mycoparasitic process of Trichoderma spp. against B. cinerea involves two steps; that is, an initial hyphal coiling stage and a subsequent hyphal coiling stage, with different coiling rates. The two-step antagonism of T. harzianum ETS 323 against B. cinerea during the mycoparasitic process in culture was evaluated using a biexponential equation. In addition, an l-amino acid oxidase (Th-l-AAO) was identified from T. harzianum ETS 323. The secretion of Th-l-AAO was increased when T. harzianum ETS 323 was grown with deactivated hyphae of B. cinerea. Moreover, in vitro assays indicated that Th-l-AAO effectively inhibited B. cinerea hyphal growth, caused cytosolic vacuolization in the hyphae, and led to hyphal lysis. Th-l-AAO also showed disease control against the development of B. cinerea on postharvest apple fruit and tobacco leaves. Furthermore, an apoptosis-like response, including the generation of reactive oxygen species, was observed in B. cinerea after treatment with Th-l-AAO, suggesting that Th-l-AAO triggers programmed cell death in B. cinerea. This may be associated with the two-step antagonism of T. harzianum ETS 323 against B. cinerea.

  19. Efficiency of some soil bacteria for chemical oxygen demand reduction of synthetic chlorsulfuron solutions under agiated culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Erguven, G O; Yildirim, N

    2016-05-30

    This study searches the efficiency of certain soil bacteria on chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction of synthetic chlorsulfuron solutions under agitated culture conditions. It also aims to determine the turbidity of liquid culture medium with chlorsulfuron during bacterial incubation for 120 hours. As a result the highest and lowest COD removal efficiency of bacteria was determined for Bacillus simplex as 94% and for Micrococcus luteus as 70%, respectively at the end of the 96th hour. It was found that COD removal efficiency showed certain differences depend on the bacterial species. It was also observed that B. simplex had the highest COD removal efficiency and it was a suitable bacterium species for bioremediation of a chlorsulfuron contaminated soils.

  20. Examination of various cell culture techniques for co-incubation of virulent Treponema pallidum (Nichols I strain) under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Sandok, P L; Knight, S T; Jenkin, H M

    1976-01-01

    Treponema pallidum (Nichols virulent) was incubated with and without cells in cell culture medium reduced to -275 mV Ecal, pH 7.3, under deoxygenated conditions. Five to ten percent of the treponemes attached to cells and remained motile for at least 120 h in cell-treponeme systems of co-incubation. Virulent treponemes could be detected after 120 to 144 h in the supernatant fluids of cell-treponeme co-incubation cultures and in cell-free tubes containing medium harvested from aerobically cultivated mammalian cells. Medium supplemented with ox serum ultrafiltrate, pyruvate, and sodium thioglycolate and gas mixtures containing H2 and CO2 enhanced treponemal survival. Increases in treponemal numbers were observed using dark-field microscopy but were not substantiated using the rabbit lesion test. Continuous passage of the treponeme was not achieved in vitro. PMID:789395

  1. Optimization of Culture Conditions for Fermentation of Soymilk Using Lactobacillus casei by Response Surface Methodology.

    PubMed

    Khoshayand, Feriyar; Goodarzi, Sanaz; Shahverdi, Ahmad Reza; Khoshayand, Mohammad Reza

    2011-12-01

    Soymilk was fermented with Lactobacillus casei, and statistical experimental design was used to investigate factors affecting viable cells of L. casei, including temperature, glucose, niacin, riboflavin, pyridoxine, folic acid and pantothenic acid. Initial screening by Plackett-Burman design revealed that among these factors, temperature, glucose and niacin have significant effects on the growth of L. casei. Further optimization with Box-Behnken design and response surface analysis showed that a second-order polynomial model fits the experimental data appropriately. The optimum conditions for temperature, glucose and niacin were found to be 15.77 °C, 5.23 and 0.63 g/L, respectively. The concentration of viable L. casei cells under these conditions was 8.23 log10 (CFU/mL). The perfect agreement between the observed values and the values predicted by the equation confirms the statistical significance of the model and the model's adequate precision in predicting optimum conditions.

  2. Suppression of Eis and expression of Wag31 and GroES in Mycobacterium tuberculosis cytosol under anaerobic culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Maurya, Vineet K; Singh, Kavita; Sinha, Sudhir

    2014-08-01

    A major impediment in chemotherapy of Tuberculosis (TB) is the persistence of M. tuberculosis in a latent or dormant state, possibly perpetuated by paucity of oxygen within the lung granuloma. Proteome analysis of the anaerobically persisting microbe could therefore provide novel targets for drugs against latent TB infection (LTBI). An Indian clinical isolate of M. tuberculosis was cultured under aerobic and anaerobic conditions following Wayne's hypoxia model and its cytosolic proteins were resolved by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE). Peptide mass fingerprinting of 32 differentially expressed spots using MALDI TOF-TOF MS-MS resulted in identification of 23 proteins. Under the anaerobic culture conditions, expression of 12 of these proteins was highly suppressed (>2 fold reduction in spot volumes), with 4 of them (GrpE, CanB, MoxR1 and Eis) appearing as completely suppressed since corresponding spots were not detectable in the anaerobic sample. On the other hand, 4 proteins were highly expressed, with two of them (Wag31 and GroES) being uniquely expressed under anaerobic conditions. Suppression of Eis could make the anaerobically persisting bacilli susceptible to the aminoglycoside antibiotics which are known to be acetylated and inactivated by Eis. Although all 4 overexpressed proteins can be considered as putative drug targets for LTBI, Wag31 appears particularly interesting in view of its role in the cell wall biogenesis.

  3. Mycelium transformation of Streptomyces toxytricini into pellet: Role of culture conditions and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Punit; Dubey, Kashyap Kumar

    2017-03-01

    The present study envisages the role of different carbon sources, nitrogen sources, metals, pH, inoculum volume and agitation rate in pellet formation of S. toxytricini at shake-flask level. It was found that galactose, ammonium sulphate, sodium nitrate, Cu(2+), Zn(2+), higher inoculum volume (5% v/v) and agitation rate at 300rpm caused significant reduction in pellet size (up to the range of 30μm-0.5mm) but biomass formations was also reduced subsequently. Interestingly diffused type of morphology was obtained in Fe(2+) supplemented medium with reduced biomass (1.5gL(-1)). Rheological study revealed that non-Newtonian behaviour of culture broth. Besides this, kinetics study was also made to understand the growth kinetics (0.39gL(-1)h(-1)), oxygen uptake rate (0.1146mgL(-1)h(-1)), and production of lipstatin (0.0072gh(-1)).

  4. [Effect of conditions od Trichosporon pullulans culturing on the synthesis of immunomodulating glycoprotein].

    PubMed

    Eroshin, V K; Dediukhina, E G; Vagabov, V M; Kulaev, I S

    1999-01-01

    An extracellular glycoprotein (GP) exhibiting immunomodulating activity produced by the yeast Trichosporon pullulans grown in a defined ethanol-containing medium differed substantially in its composition from that of the yeast cell walls: therefore, it cannot be considered a structural component of the cell walls. In batch culture, the greatest GP production (40 mg/l) occurred in the exponential phase of the yeast growth. Under continuous cultivation, in both chemostat and pH-auxostat regimes, the specific rate of GP synthesis (qGP) increased with the increasing specific growth rate (mu) and reached 1.55 mg/(g h) at mumax. Under limitation of the yeast growth by zinc qGP was three times lower than under nitrogen or iron limitation. The rate of GP production depended inversely on the oxygen concentration.

  5. In vitro culture conditions using chemically defined media for in vitro matured and intracytoplasmically inseminated porcine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Chisato; Kobayashi, Mariko; Fukui, Yutaka

    2006-10-01

    The present study investigated in vitro culture methods [droplet and Well of the Well (WOW)] using semi-defined and defined media [modified porcine zygote medium (mPZM)] and the additional effects of insulin on in vitro matured and intracytoplasmically inseminated porcine oocytes. In Experiment 1, in vitro matured and intracytoplasmically inseminated porcine oocytes were cultured for 6 days in the following four groups: 1) mPZM-3 (containing bovine serum albumin) + droplet (30 mul), 2) mPZM-3 + WOW, 3) mPZM-4 (containing polyvinyl alcohol) + droplet, and 4) mPZM-4+ WOW. The culture media (mPZM-3 and mPZM-4) and methods (droplet and WOW) did not significantly affect the cleavage rate, but the blastocyst rate of the oocytes cultured in mPZM-3 was significantly (P<0.01) higher than that of mPZM-4 (20.1 and 9.4%, respectively). The blastocyst rates as percentages of the cleaved oocytes (51.8 and 16.9%) and the hatched blastocyst rate as percentages of the number of blastocysts (12.3 and 2.2%) were also significantly (P<0.01) higher in mPZM-3 compared with those in mPZM-4. There was significant interaction (P<0.05) between the two main factors; the effects of the culture media and methods on the rate of hatched blasyocysts as percentages of the blastocysts produced and, the hatched blastocyst rate (20.3%) as percentages of the number of blastocysts produced in mPZM-3 were significantly (P<0.05) higher than in the other groups. In Experiment 2, the additional effects of insulin (100 ng/ml) in mPZM-3 and mPZM-4 media was investigated in the WOW culture system. Insulin addition did not improve cleavage, blastocyst formation, or the number of cells in blastocysts. However, as in Experiment 1, mPZM-3 resulted in a significantly higher blastocyst rate as percentages of the cleaved oocytes than mPZM-4 (33.9 and 18.4%). These results indicate that a chemically defined medium (mPZM-4) needs to be improved to provide more suitable culture conditions for in vitro development of in

  6. Toxicological effects of cypermethrin to marine phytoplankton in a co-culture system under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhao-Hui; Nie, Xiang-Ping; Yue, Wen-Jie

    2011-08-01

    The growth of three marine phytoplankton species Skeletonema costatum, Scrippsiella trochoidea and Chattonella marina and the response of the antioxidant defense system have been investigated on exposure to commercial cypermethrin for 96 h and 32 days in a co-culture system. Growth of the three species was generally comparable over 96 h with an inoculation of 1:3:6.5 (C. marina:S. trochoidea:S. costatum), with stimulation at 5 μg l(-1) and inhibition under higher concentrations (50, 100 μg l(-1)). However, when inoculating at ratios of 1:1:1 during a 32 day test, S. costatum became the most sensitive species and was significantly inhibited in all test groups under the dual stresses of cypermethrin and interspecies competition. The growth of C. marina was significantly inhibited at the concentrations higher than 5 μg l(-1), while the growth of S. trochoidea was significantly promoted at low concentrations. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities significantly increased during 6-12 h exposure periods in test treatments at low concentrations, and enhanced in the control as well due to interspecies competition. The lipid peroxidation product malondialdehyde was enhanced at high concentrations, but did not increase in control and low concentration cultures with high SOD activities, indicating that algal cells activated the antioxidant enzymes promptly to protect the cells from lipid membrane damage. Results from this study suggested that cypermethrin pollution in maricultural sea waters might lead to a shift in phytoplankton community structure from diatom to harmful dinoflagellate species, and thus potentially stimulatory for harmful algal blooms.

  7. Peptide-biphenyl hybrid-capped AuNPs: stability and biocompatibility under cell culture conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, Mona; Pérez, Yolanda; Mann, Enrique; Herradón, Bernardo; Fernández-Cruz, María L.; Navas, José M.

    2013-07-01

    In this study, we explored the biocompatibility of Au nanoparticles (NPs) capped with peptide-biphenyl hybrid (PBH) ligands containing glycine (Gly), cysteine (Cys), tyrosine (Tyr), tryptophan (Trp) and methionine (Met) amino acids in the human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line Hep G2. Five AuNPs, Au[(Gly-Tyr-Met)2B], Au[(Gly-Trp-Met)2B], Au[(Met)2B], Au[(Gly-Tyr-TrCys)2B] and Au[(TrCys)2B], were synthesised. Physico-chemical and cytotoxic properties were thoroughly studied. Transmission electron micrographs showed isolated near-spherical nanoparticles with diameters of 1.5, 1.6, 2.3, 1.8 and 2.3 nm, respectively. Dynamic light scattering evidenced the high stability of suspensions in Milli-Q water and culture medium, particularly when supplemented with serum, showing in all cases a tendency to form agglomerates with diameters approximately 200 nm. In the cytotoxicity studies, interference caused by AuNPs with some typical cytotoxicity assays was demonstrated; thus, only data obtained from the resazurin based assay were used. After 48-h incubation, only concentrations ≥50 μg/ml exhibited cytotoxicity. Such doses were also responsible for an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS). Some differences were observed among the studied NPs. Of particular importance is the AuNPs capped with the PBH ligand (Gly-Tyr-TrCys)2B showing remarkable stability in culture medium, even in the absence of serum. Moreover, these AuNPs have unique biological effects on Hep G2 cells while showing low toxicity. The production of ROS along with supporting optical microscopy images suggests cellular interaction/uptake of these particular AuNPs. Future research efforts should further test this hypothesis, as such interaction/uptake is highly relevant in drug delivery systems.

  8. Peptide-biphenyl hybrid-capped AuNPs: stability and biocompatibility under cell culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Mona; Pérez, Yolanda; Mann, Enrique; Herradón, Bernardo; Fernández-Cruz, María L; Navas, José M

    2013-07-06

    In this study, we explored the biocompatibility of Au nanoparticles (NPs) capped with peptide-biphenyl hybrid (PBH) ligands containing glycine (Gly), cysteine (Cys), tyrosine (Tyr), tryptophan (Trp) and methionine (Met) amino acids in the human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line Hep G2. Five AuNPs, Au[(Gly-Tyr-Met)2B], Au[(Gly-Trp-Met)2B], Au[(Met)2B], Au[(Gly-Tyr-TrCys)2B] and Au[(TrCys)2B], were synthesised. Physico-chemical and cytotoxic properties were thoroughly studied. Transmission electron micrographs showed isolated near-spherical nanoparticles with diameters of 1.5, 1.6, 2.3, 1.8 and 2.3 nm, respectively. Dynamic light scattering evidenced the high stability of suspensions in Milli-Q water and culture medium, particularly when supplemented with serum, showing in all cases a tendency to form agglomerates with diameters approximately 200 nm. In the cytotoxicity studies, interference caused by AuNPs with some typical cytotoxicity assays was demonstrated; thus, only data obtained from the resazurin based assay were used. After 48-h incubation, only concentrations ≥50 μg/ml exhibited cytotoxicity. Such doses were also responsible for an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS). Some differences were observed among the studied NPs. Of particular importance is the AuNPs capped with the PBH ligand (Gly-Tyr-TrCys)2B showing remarkable stability in culture medium, even in the absence of serum. Moreover, these AuNPs have unique biological effects on Hep G2 cells while showing low toxicity. The production of ROS along with supporting optical microscopy images suggests cellular interaction/uptake of these particular AuNPs. Future research efforts should further test this hypothesis, as such interaction/uptake is highly relevant in drug delivery systems.

  9. Peptide-biphenyl hybrid-capped AuNPs: stability and biocompatibility under cell culture conditions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we explored the biocompatibility of Au nanoparticles (NPs) capped with peptide-biphenyl hybrid (PBH) ligands containing glycine (Gly), cysteine (Cys), tyrosine (Tyr), tryptophan (Trp) and methionine (Met) amino acids in the human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line Hep G2. Five AuNPs, Au[(Gly-Tyr-Met)2B], Au[(Gly-Trp-Met)2B], Au[(Met)2B], Au[(Gly-Tyr-TrCys)2B] and Au[(TrCys)2B], were synthesised. Physico-chemical and cytotoxic properties were thoroughly studied. Transmission electron micrographs showed isolated near-spherical nanoparticles with diameters of 1.5, 1.6, 2.3, 1.8 and 2.3 nm, respectively. Dynamic light scattering evidenced the high stability of suspensions in Milli-Q water and culture medium, particularly when supplemented with serum, showing in all cases a tendency to form agglomerates with diameters approximately 200 nm. In the cytotoxicity studies, interference caused by AuNPs with some typical cytotoxicity assays was demonstrated; thus, only data obtained from the resazurin based assay were used. After 48-h incubation, only concentrations ≥50 μg/ml exhibited cytotoxicity. Such doses were also responsible for an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS). Some differences were observed among the studied NPs. Of particular importance is the AuNPs capped with the PBH ligand (Gly-Tyr-TrCys)2B showing remarkable stability in culture medium, even in the absence of serum. Moreover, these AuNPs have unique biological effects on Hep G2 cells while showing low toxicity. The production of ROS along with supporting optical microscopy images suggests cellular interaction/uptake of these particular AuNPs. Future research efforts should further test this hypothesis, as such interaction/uptake is highly relevant in drug delivery systems. PMID:23829784

  10. Occurrence and Distribution of Phytochemicals in the Leaves of 17 In vitro Cultured Hypericum spp. Adapted to Outdoor Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kucharíková, Andrea; Kusari, Souvik; Sezgin, Selahaddin; Spiteller, Michael; Čellárová, Eva

    2016-01-01

    A plethora of plants belonging to the genus Hypericum have been investigated so far owing to the biological efficacies of pharmacologically important secondary metabolites produced by several Hypericum species. However, there is currently a dearth of information about the localization (accumulation) of these compounds in the plants in situ. In particular, the biosynthetic and ecological consequence of acclimatization of in vitro cultured Hypericum spp. to outdoor conditions is not fully known. Herein, we report an application of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization high-resolution mass spectrometry (MALDI-HRMS) to reveal the distribution of major naphthodianthrones hypericin, pseudohypericin, protohypericin, and their proposed precursor emodin as well as emodin anthrone, along with the phloroglucinol derivative hyperforin, the flavonoids quercetin, quercitrin, rutin and hyperoside (and/or isoquercitrin), and chlorogenic acid in Hypericum leaves. Plants encompassing seventeen Hypericum species classified into eleven sections, which were first cultured in vitro and later acclimatized to outdoor conditions, were studied. We focused both on the secretory (dark and translucent glands, other types of glands, and glandular-like structures) as well as the non-secretory leaf tissues. We comparatively analyzed and interpreted the occurrence and accumulation of our target compounds in different leaf tissues of the seventeen species to get an intra-sectional as well as inter-sectional perspective. The naphthodianthrones, along with emodin, were present in all species containing the dark glands. In selected species, hypericin and pseudohypericin accumulated not only in the dark glands, but also in translucent glands and non-secretory leaf tissues. Although hyperforin was localized mainly in translucent glands, it was present sporadically in the dark glands in selected species. The flavonoids quercetin, quercitrin, and hyperoside (and/or isoquercitrin) were distributed

  11. Identification of Molecular and Cellular Responses of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Biofilms under Culture Conditions Relevant to Field Conditions for Bioreduction of Toxic Metals and Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Judy D. Wall

    2011-06-09

    Our findings demonstrated that D. vulgaris surface-adhered populations produce extracellular structures, and that that the cells have altered carbon and energy flux compared to planktonic cells. Biofilms did not have greatly increased carbohydrate accumulation. Interestingly genes present on the native plasmid found in D. vulgaris Hildenborough were necessary for wild type biofilm formation. In addition, extracellular appendages dependent on functions or proteins encoded by flaG or fliA also contributed to biofilm formation. Studies with SRB biofilms have indicated that the reduction and precipitation of metals can occur within the biofilm matrix; however, little work has been done to elucidate the physiological state of surface-adhered cells during metal reduction (Cr6+, U6+) and how this process is affected by nutrient feed levels (i.e., the stimulant).

  12. When tuberculosis treatment fails. A social behavioral account of patient adherence.

    PubMed

    Sumartojo, E

    1993-05-01

    seriousness of their problems with tuberculosis are more likely to be adherent. Additional research on adherence predictors is needed, but it should reflect the complexity of the problem. This research requires a theory-based approach, which has been essentially missing from studies on adherence and tuberculosis. Research also needs to target predictors for specific groups of patients. There is clear evidence of the effect on adherence of culturally influenced beliefs and attitudes about tuberculosis and its treatment. Cultural factors are associated with misinformation about the medical aspects of the disease and the stigmatization of persons with tuberculosis. Culturally sensitive, targeted information is needed, and some has been developed by local tuberculosis programs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  13. Optimization of Culture Conditions for Growth Associated with Cr(VI) Removal by Wickerhamomyces anomalus M10.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Pablo Marcelo; Cruz, Elías Leonardo; Viñarta, Silvana Carolina; Castellanos de Figueroa, Lucía Inés

    2017-03-01

    Chromate-resistant microorganisms with the ability of reducing toxic Cr(VI) to less toxic Cr(III), are candidates for bioremediation. An alternative culture medium to reduce Cr(VI) using Wickerhamomyces anomalus M10 was optimized. Using the Plackett-Burman design, it was determined that sucrose, K2HPO4 and inoculum size had significant effects on chromate removal (i.e., reduction) at 24 h. Concentrations of these significant factors were adjusted using a complete factorial design. In this case, only the K2HPO4 effect was significant at 12 h of culture, with greater Cr(VI) removal at low concentration (1.2 g L(-1)). The optimum medium was validated at the fermenter scale level. Optimal culture conditions for complete removal of Cr(VI) (1 mM) were 400 rpm agitation and air flow of 1 vvm. Moreover, W. anomalus M10 completely removed consecutively added pulses of Cr(VI) (1 mM). These results show interesting characteristics from the standpoint of biotechnology because the development of a future remediation process using W. anomalus M10 can represent an efficient and highly profitable technology for removing the toxic form of Cr.

  14. [Effects of nutrient conditions and fed-batch culture on CoQ10 production by Rhizobium radiobacter WSH2601].

    PubMed

    Zu-Fan, Wu; Du, Guo-Cheng; Chen, Jian

    2003-03-01

    The effects of the variables, including the concentrations of glucose, sucrose, corn steep liquor (CSL) and peptone, and the conditions of fed-batch culture, on CoQ10 fermentation by Rhizobium radiobacter WSH2601 were assessed. The results showed that the optimum concentrations of glucose, sucrose, CSL and peptone were 30 g/L, 40 g/L, 11 g/L and 16 g/L respectively. Addition of CSL and tomato juice stimulated the cell growth. CSL, L-methionine and isopentyl alcohol efficiently increased the biosynthesis of CoQ10. In a 7L fermentor, the fed-batch culture improved both cell growth and CoQ10 production compared to a batch culture; and suitable mixed feeding of CSL and sucrose enhanced CoQ10 yield to 52.4 mg/L. The DCW reached 26.4 g/L, an increase of 53% in comparison to that without feeding, and an increase of 24% to that feeding with sucrose only. The C/B value reached 2.38 mg/g(DCW), representing an increase of 33% to that of without feeding, and an increase of 26% to that of feeding with sucrose only.

  15. Evaluation of Culture Conditions to Obtain Fatty Acids from Saline Microalgae Species: Dunaliella salina, Sinecosyfis sp., and Chroomonas sp.

    PubMed Central

    Castilla Casadiego, D. A.; Albis Arrieta, A. R.; Angulo Mercado, E. R.; Cervera Cahuana, S. J.; Baquero Noriega, K. S.; Suárez Escobar, A. F.; Morales Avendaño, E. D.

    2016-01-01

    The use of the saline microalgae, Dunaliella salina, Sinecosyfis sp., and Chroomonas sp., was explored as an alternative source for the production of fatty acids using fertilizer and glycerol as culture media. The nutrient medium used contained “Nutrifoliar,” a commercial fertilizer, and/or glycerol, in natural sea water. The microalgae were placed in cultures with different conditions. The parameters that favored the largest production of fatty acids were 24 hours of agitation and illumination, 1620 L/day of air supply, 2.25 L of air/min, and a temperature of 32°C using “Nutrifoliar” as the culture media. Results indicated that, from 3 g of microalgae in wet base of Chroomonas sp., 54.43 mg of oil was produced. The chromatographic characterization of oil obtained revealed the presence of essential fatty acids such as 9,12,15-octadecatrienoic acid (omega-3) and 4,7,10-hexadecatrienoic acid (omega-6) from the species Dunaliella salina. On the other hand, 9,12-octadecadienoic acid (omega-6) and cis-11-eicosenoic acid (omega-9) were identified from the species Chroomonas sp. The temperature variations played an important role in the velocity of growth or the production of the algae biomass, the amount of oil, and the ability to produce fatty acids. PMID:27376085

  16. Radiation sensitivity of poliovirus, a model for norovirus, inoculated in oyster ( Crassostrea gigas) and culture broth under different conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Pil-Mun; Park, Jae Seok; Park, Jin-Gyu; Park, Jae-Nam; Han, In-Jun; Song, Beom-Seok; Choi, Jong-il; Kim, Jae-Hun; Byun, Myung-Woo; Baek, Min; Chung, Young-Jin; Lee, Ju-Woon

    2009-07-01

    Poliovirus is a recognized surrogate for norovirus, pathogen in water and food, due to the structural and genetic similarity. Although radiation sensitivity of poliovirus in water or media had been reported, there has been no research in food model such as shellfish. In this study, oyster ( Crassostrea gigas) was incubated in artificial seawater contaminated with poliovirus, and thus radiation sensitivity of poliovirus was determined in inoculated oyster. The effects of ionizing radiation on the sensitivity of poliovirus were also evaluated under different conditions such as pH (4-7) and salt concentration (1-15%) in culture broth, and temperature during irradiation. The D10 value of poliovirus in PBS buffer, virus culture broth and oyster was determined to 0.46, 2.84 and 2.94 kGy, respectively. The initial plaque forming unit (PFU) of poliovirus in culture broth was slightly decreased as the decrease of pH and the increase of salt concentration, but radiation sensitivity was not affected by pH and salt contents. However, radiation resistance of poliovirus was increased at frozen state. These results provide the basic information for the inactivation of pathogenic virus in foods by using irradiation.

  17. [Accumulation of α-tocopherol and β-carotene in Euglena gracilis Cells under Autotrophic and Mixotrophic Culture Conditions].

    PubMed

    Mokrosnop, V M; Polishchuk, A V; Zolotareva, E K

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the work was to find the mode of cultivation of unicellular flagellate Euglena gracilis, favorable for the simultaneous accumulation of α-tocopherol and β-carotene. Cells were grown either in photoautotrophic or photoheterotrophic conditions in the presence of 100 mM ethanol (variant Et) or 40 mM glutamate (variant Gt), or their combination (variant EtGt). The exogenous substrates significantly stimulated light-dependent growth of E. gracilis. The largest increase of biomass was recorded on the 20th day in the variant EtGt and exceeded the autotrophic control by 7 times. The content of β-carotene and chlorophyll (Chl) per cell in mixotrophic cultures exceeded the control by 2-3 and 1.6-2 times, respectively. At the same time, α-tocopherol accumulation in autotrophic cells was greater than in the cells of mixotrophic cultures by 2-7 times. Total yield of tocopherol per unit volume of culture medium, which depended not only on its intracellular content, but also on the amount of accumulated biomass was highest in EtGt variant. A correlation between the accumulation of the antioxidants and the equilibrium concentration of oxygen in the growth medium, which depended on the intensities of photosynthesis and respiration has been analyzed.

  18. An endothelial cultured condition medium embedded porous PLGA scaffold for the enhancement of mouse embryonic stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Li, Ching-Wen; Pan, Wei-Ting; Ju, Jyh-Cherng; Wang, Gou-Jen

    2016-04-12

    In this study, we have developed a microporous poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) scaffold that combines a continuous release property and a three-dimensional (3D) scaffolding technique for the precise and efficient formation of endothelial cell lineage from embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Eight PLGA scaffolds (14.29%, 16.67%, 20% and 25% concentrations of PLGA solutions) mixed with two crystal sizes of sodium chloride (NaCl) were fabricated by leaching. Then, vascular endothelial cell conditioned medium (ECCM) mixed with gelatin was embedded into the scaffold for culturing of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). The 14.29% PLGA scaffolds fabricated using non-ground NaCl particles (NG-PLGA) and the 25% PLGA containing scaffolds fabricated using ground NaCl particles (G-PLGA) possessed minimum and maximum moisture content and bovine serum albumin (BSA) content properties, respectively. These two groups of scaffolds were used for future experiments in this study. Cell culture results demonstrated that the proposed porous scaffolds without growth factors were sufficient to induce mouse ESCs to differentiate into endothelial-like cells in the early culture stages, and combined with embedded ECCM could provide a long-term inducing system for ESC differentiation.

  19. Contribution of oocyte source and culture conditions to phenotypic and transcriptomic variation in commercially produced bovine blastocysts.

    PubMed

    Plourde, Dany; Vigneault, Christian; Lemay, Alexandra; Breton, Lévéke; Gagné, Dominic; Laflamme, Isabelle; Blondin, Patrick; Robert, Claude

    2012-07-01

    Bovine embryo production is practiced worldwide for commercial purposes. A major concern of embryo suppliers is the impact of in vitro production systems on embryo quality. In the present study, we compared Buffalo Rat Liver cell coculture with semidefined, medium-based culture, oocytes recovered postmortem with those obtained from live animals, and in vitro with in vivo embryo development. Gene expression levels in expanded blastocysts were measured using microarray and quantitative RT-PCR. The systems were similar in terms of blastocyst yield and rate of development, whereas embryo productivity was greater for immature oocytes collected in vivo. Although immature oocytes collected in vivo had greater developmental competence, they yielded blastocysts that were indistinguishable (in terms of level of gene expression) from embryos derived from immature oocytes recovered postmortem. Culture conditions had a significant impact on gene expression, particularly among genes involved in lipid metabolism. Numerous uncharacterized novel transcript regions were also influenced by in vitro treatments. In conclusion, ovum pick-up combined with in vitro culture in semidefined medium provided a high blastocyst yield, without the deleterious effects associated with coculture.

  20. Evaluation of Culture Conditions to Obtain Fatty Acids from Saline Microalgae Species: Dunaliella salina, Sinecosyfis sp., and Chroomonas sp.

    PubMed

    Castilla Casadiego, D A; Albis Arrieta, A R; Angulo Mercado, E R; Cervera Cahuana, S J; Baquero Noriega, K S; Suárez Escobar, A F; Morales Avendaño, E D

    2016-01-01

    The use of the saline microalgae, Dunaliella salina, Sinecosyfis sp., and Chroomonas sp., was explored as an alternative source for the production of fatty acids using fertilizer and glycerol as culture media. The nutrient medium used contained "Nutrifoliar," a commercial fertilizer, and/or glycerol, in natural sea water. The microalgae were placed in cultures with different conditions. The parameters that favored the largest production of fatty acids were 24 hours of agitation and illumination, 1620 L/day of air supply, 2.25 L of air/min, and a temperature of 32°C using "Nutrifoliar" as the culture media. Results indicated that, from 3 g of microalgae in wet base of Chroomonas sp., 54.43 mg of oil was produced. The chromatographic characterization of oil obtained revealed the presence of essential fatty acids such as 9,12,15-octadecatrienoic acid (omega-3) and 4,7,10-hexadecatrienoic acid (omega-6) from the species Dunaliella salina. On the other hand, 9,12-octadecadienoic acid (omega-6) and cis-11-eicosenoic acid (omega-9) were identified from the species Chroomonas sp. The temperature variations played an important role in the velocity of growth or the production of the algae biomass, the amount of oil, and the ability to produce fatty acids.

  1. Molecular mechanisms and pathways involved in bovine embryonic genome activation and their regulation by alternative in vivo and in vitro culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Gad, Ahmed; Hoelker, Michael; Besenfelder, Urban; Havlicek, Vitezslav; Cinar, Ulas; Rings, Franca; Held, Eva; Dufort, Isabelle; Sirard, Marc-André; Schellander, Karl; Tesfaye, Dawit

    2012-10-01

    Understanding gene expression patterns in response to altered environmental conditions at different time points of the preimplantation period would improve our knowledge on regulation of embryonic development. Here we aimed to examine the effect of alternative in vivo and in vitro culture conditions at the time of major embryonic genome activation (EGA) on the development and transcriptome profile of bovine blastocysts. Four different blastocyst groups were produced under alternative in vivo and in vitro culture conditions before or after major EGA. Completely in vitro- and in vivo-produced blastocysts were used as controls. We compared gene expression patterns between each blastocyst group and in vivo blastocyst control group using EmbryoGENE's bovine microarray. The data showed that changing culture conditions from in vivo to in vitro or vice versa, either before or after the time of major EGA, had no effect on the developmental rates; however, in vitro conditions during that time critically influenced the transcriptome of the blastocysts produced. The source of oocyte had a critical effect on developmental rates and the ability of the embryo to react to changing culture conditions. Ontological classification highlighted a marked contrast in expression patterns for lipid metabolism and oxidative stress response between blastocysts generated in vivo versus in vitro, with opposite trends. Molecular mechanisms and pathways that are influenced by altered culture conditions during EGA were defined. These results will help in the development of new strategies to modify culture conditions at this critical stage to enhance the development of competent blastocysts.

  2. Optimization of cultural conditions for biosurfactant production by Pleurotus djamor in solid state fermentation.

    PubMed

    Velioglu, Zulfiye; Ozturk Urek, Raziye

    2015-11-01

    Being eco-friendly, less toxic, more biodegradable and biocompatible, biological surfactants have higher activity and stability compared to synthetic ones. In spite of the fact that there are abundant benefits of biosurfactants over the synthetic congeners, the problem related with the economical and large scale production proceeds. The utilization of several industrial wastes in the production media as substrates reduces the production cost. This current study aims optimization of biosurfactant production conditions by Pleurotus djamor, grown on sunflower seed shell, grape wastes or potato peels as renewable cheap substrates in solid state fermentation. After determination of the best substrate for biosurfactant production, we indicate optimum size and amount of solid substrate, volume of medium, temperature, pH and Fe(2+) concentrations on biosurfactant production. In optimum conditions, by reducing water surface tension to 28.82 ± 0.3 mN/m and having oil displacement diameter of 3.9 ± 0.3 cm, 10.205 ± 0.5 g/l biosurfactant was produced. Moreover, chemical composition of biosurfactant produced in optimum condition was determined by FTIR. Lastly, laboratory's large-scale production was carried out in optimum conditions in a tray bioreactor designed by us and 8.9 ± 0.5 g/l biosurfactant was produced with a significant surface activity (37.74 ± 0.3 mN/m). With its economical suggestions and applicability of laboratory's large-scale production, this work indicates the possibility of using low cost agro-industrial wastes as renewable substrates for biosurfactant production. Therefore, using economically produced biosurfactant will reduce cost in several applications such as bioremediation, oil recovery and biodegradation of toxic chemicals.

  3. The conditional inhibition of gene expression in cultured Drosophila cells by antisense RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Bunch, T A; Goldstein, L S

    1989-01-01

    Genes producing antisense RNA are becoming important tools for the selective inhibition of gene expression. Experiments in different biological systems, targeting different mRNAs have yielded diverse results with respect to the success of the technique and its mechanism of action. We have examined the potential of three antisense genes, whose transcription is driven by a Drosophila metallothionein promoter, to inhibit the expression of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) or a microtubule associated protein (205K MAP) in cultured Drosophila cells. Expression of ADH was significantly reduced upon induction of the anti-ADH genes. The ADH mRNA does not appear to be destabilized by the presence of antisense RNA but rather exists at similar levels in hybrid form. Hybrids are detected with both spliced and unspliced ADH RNA. In contrast to these results, antisense genes producing antisense RNA in great excess to 205K MAP mRNA, which is itself far less abundant than the ADH mRNA, failed to show any inhibition of 205K MAP expression. Images PMID:2481266

  4. Submerged culture conditions for the production of alternative natural colorants by a new isolated Penicillium purpurogenum DPUA 1275.

    PubMed

    Santos-Ebinuma, Valéria Carvalho; Teixeira, Maria Francisca Simas; Pessoa, Adalberto

    2013-06-28

    This work aims at investigating the production of yellow, orange, and red natural colorants in a submerged culture of Penicillium purpurogenum DPUA 1275. For this purpose, different experimental conditions evaluating the effect of incubation time, type and size of inoculum, and different carbon and nitrogen sources were performed. Furthermore, the growth kinetics were obtained in the conditions of 10(8) spores/ml and 5 mycelia agar discs during 360 h. These experiments showed that 5 mycelia agar discs and 336 h promoted the highest yellow (3.08 UA400nm), orange (1.44 UA470nm), and red (2.27 UA490nm) colorants production. Moreover, sucrose and yeast extract were the most suitable carbon and nitrogen sources for natural colorants production. Thus, the present study shows a new source of natural colorants, which can be used as an alternative to others available in the market after toxicological studies.

  5. Current Concepts for PrEP Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Haberer, Jessica E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review This review describes 1) the current understanding of adherence to oral PrEP, 2) methods for adherence measurement, 3) approaches to supporting PrEP adherence, and 4) guidance for defining PrEP adherence goals within the larger context of HIV prevention. Recent findings PrEP adherence has generally been higher in recent trials, open-label extensions, and demonstration projects compared to the initial clinical trials; potential explanations include known PrEP efficacy and different motivations to take PrEP. Recent studies have explored adherence monitoring through electronic pill containers, short message service (SMS), and drug concentrations in hair and dried blood spots. The few PrEP adherence interventions developed to date include combinations of enhanced counseling, feedback of objective adherence measurement, and SMS. Conceptualization of PrEP adherence is evolving. The goal is not 100% adherence indefinitely, as it was in clinical trials. PrEP adherence should be defined with respect to HIV exposure, which varies over time by sexual behavior and use of other prevention strategies. Summary PrEP adherence beyond clinical trials has generally been high enough to achieve reliable HIV prevention. Future efforts to measure and support PrEP adherence should focus on the context of risk for HIV acquisition, accounting for dynamic behaviors and choices among HIV prevention options. PMID:26633638

  6. Effect of Culture Condition Variables on Human Endostatin Gene Expression in Escherichia coli Using Response Surface Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Mohajeri, Abbas; Pilehvar-Soltanahmadi, Yones; Abdolalizadeh, Jalal; Karimi, Pouran; Zarghami, Nosratollah

    2016-01-01

    Background Recombinant human endostatin (rhES) is an angiogenesis inhibitor used as a specific drug for the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer. As mRNA concentration affects the recombinant protein expression level, any factor affecting mRNA concentration can alter the protein expression level. Response surface methodology (RSM) based on the Box-Behnken design (BBD) is a statistical tool for experimental design and for optimizing biotechnological processes. Objectives This investigation aimed to predict and develop the optimal culture conditions for mRNA expression of the synthetic human endostatin (hES) gene in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). Materials and Methods The hES gene was amplified, cloned, and expressed in the E. coli expression system. Three factors, including isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) concentration, post-induction time, and cell density before induction, were selected as important factors. The mRNA expression level was determined using real-time PCR. The expression levels of hES mRNA under the different growth conditions were analyzed. SDS-PAGE and western blot analyses were carried out for further confirmation of interest-gene expression. Results A maximum rhES mRNA level of 376.16% was obtained under the following conditions: 0.6 mM IPTG, 7 hours post-induction time, and 0.9 cell density before induction. The level of rhES mRNA was significantly correlated with post-induction time, IPTG concentration, and cell density before induction (P < 0.05). The expression of the hES gene was confirmed by western blot. Conclusions The obtained results indicate that RSM is an effective method for the optimization of culture conditions for hES gene expression in E. coli. PMID:27800134

  7. Derivation of transgene-free human induced pluripotent stem cells from human peripheral T cells in defined culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Kishino, Yoshikazu; Seki, Tomohisa; Fujita, Jun; Yuasa, Shinsuke; Tohyama, Shugo; Kunitomi, Akira; Tabei, Ryota; Nakajima, Kazuaki; Okada, Marina; Hirano, Akinori; Kanazawa, Hideaki; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    Recently, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were established as promising cell sources for revolutionary regenerative therapies. The initial culture system used for iPSC generation needed fetal calf serum in the culture medium and mouse embryonic fibroblast as a feeder layer, both of which could possibly transfer unknown exogenous antigens and pathogens into the iPSC population. Therefore, the development of culture systems designed to minimize such potential risks has become increasingly vital for future applications of iPSCs for clinical use. On another front, although donor cell types for generating iPSCs are wide-ranging, T cells have attracted attention as unique cell sources for iPSCs generation because T cell-derived iPSCs (TiPSCs) have a unique monoclonal T cell receptor genomic rearrangement that enables their differentiation into antigen-specific T cells, which can be applied to novel immunotherapies. In the present study, we generated transgene-free human TiPSCs using a combination of activated human T cells and Sendai virus under defined culture conditions. These TiPSCs expressed pluripotent markers by quantitative PCR and immunostaining, had a normal karyotype, and were capable of differentiating into cells from all three germ layers. This method of TiPSCs generation is more suitable for the therapeutic application of iPSC technology because it lowers the risks associated with the presence of undefined, animal-derived feeder cells and serum. Therefore this work will lead to establishment of safer iPSCs and extended clinical application.

  8. Screening of phenylpyruvic acid producers and optimization of culture conditions in bench scale bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Coban, Hasan B; Demirci, Ali; Patterson, Paul H; Elias, Ryan J

    2014-11-01

    Alpha keto acids are deaminated forms of amino acids that have received significant attention as feed and food additives in the agriculture and medical industries. To date, their production has been commonly performed at shake-flask scale with low product concentrations. In this study, production of phenylpyruvic acid (PPA), which is the alpha keto acid of phenylalanine was investigated. First, various microorganisms were screened to select the most efficient producer. Thereafter, growth parameters (temperature, pH, and aeration) were optimized in bench scale bioreactors to maximize both PPA and biomass concentration in bench scale bioreactors, using response surface methodology. Among the four different microorganisms evaluated, Proteus vulgaris was the most productive strain for PPA production. Optimum temperature, pH, and aeration conditions were determined as 34.5 °C, 5.12, and 0.5 vvm for PPA production, whereas 36.9 °C, pH 6.87, and 0.96 vvm for the biomass production. Under these optimum conditions, PPA concentration was enhanced to 1,054 mg/L, which was almost three times higher than shake-flask fermentation concentrations. Moreover, P. vulgaris biomass was produced at 3.25 g/L under optimum conditions. Overall, this study demonstrated that optimization of growth parameters improved PPA production in 1-L working volume bench-scale bioreactors compared to previous studies in the literature and was a first step to scale up the production to industrial production.

  9. Effect of culturing conditions on the expression of key enzymes in the proteolytic system of Lactobacillus bulgaricus.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jun-cai; Liu, Fei; Ren, Da-xi; Han, Wei-wei; Du, Yue-ou

    2015-04-01

    The proteolytic system of Lactobacillus bulgaricus breaks down milk proteins into peptides and amino acids, which are essential for the growth of the bacteria. The aim of this study was to determine the expressions of seven key genes in the proteolytic system under different culturing conditions (different phases, initial pH values, temperatures, and nitrogen sources) using real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The transcriptions of the seven genes were reduced by 30-fold on average in the stationary phase compared with the exponential growth phase. The transcriptions of the seven genes were reduced by 62.5-, 15.0-, and 59.0-fold in the strains KLDS 08006, KLDS 08007, and KLDS 08012, respectively, indicating that the expressions of the seven genes were significantly different among strains. In addition, the expressions of the seven genes were repressed in the MRS medium containing casein peptone. The effect of peptone supply on PepX transcription was the weakest compared with the other six genes, and the impact on OppD transcription was the strongest. Moreover, the expressions of the seven genes were significantly different among different strains (P<0.05). All these results indicated that the culturing conditions affected the expression of the proteolytic system genes in Lactobacillus bulgaricus at the transcription level.

  10. Optimization of culturing condition and medium composition for the production of alginate lyase by a marine Vibrio sp. YKW-34

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiaoting; Lin, Hong; Kim, Sang Moo

    2008-02-01

    Carbohydrases secreted by marine Vibrio sp. YKW-34 with strong Laminaria cell wall degrading ability were screened, and among them alginate lyase was found to be dominant. The effects of medium composition and culturing condition on the production of alginate lyase by marine Vibrio sp. YKW-34 in flask were investigated in this study. In the culture medium of marine broth, no alginate lyase was produced. The activity of the alginate lyase, after being induced, reached 5 UmL-1. The best inoculum volume and inoculum age were 10% and 12 h, respectively. The optimal temperature for alginate lyase production was 25°C. The fermentation medium was composed of 0.5% of Laminaria powder and 0.2% of KNO3 with an initial acidity of pH 8.0. Alginate could induce alginate lyase production but not as efficiently as Laminaria powder did. The addition of fucoidan, cellulose and glucose had negative effect on the alginate lyase production. Other kinds of nitrogen sources, such as yeast extract, beef extract and peptone, had positive effect on the growth of the microorganism and negative effect on alginate lyase production. In addition, the time course of alginate lyase production under the optimized condition was described. The optimal harvest time was 48 h.

  11. Effect of in vitro culture conditions on somaclonal variation in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata Walp.) using RAPD markers.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, P; Rajesh, S; Gnanam, R; Manickam, A

    2011-03-01

    We report a high frequency regeneration protocol in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata Walp. var. C 152) via somatic embryogenesis from 10-d-old primary leaf explants. A study was conducted to examine the effect of somaclonal variations in in vitro derived cowpea plants under field conditions. The regenerated plantlets were successfully transferred to field after hardening in vitro and grown for collecting R0, R1 and R2 seeds. The seeds of R1 and R2 generations were subsequently, grown under field conditions and their various biometrical traits were compared and evaluated with non-tissue cultured cowpea plants as check. There was no detectable somaclonal variation induced in R0-R2 in any of the biometrical traits. The results indicate that the inclusion of different plant growth promoters at specified concentrations and duration in our earlier tissue culture work did not induce any detectable mutation. The RAPD analysis also shows that there is no genetic variation among R2 cowpea plants. The somatic embryogenesis protocol we report could thus be safely applied for high frequency true-to-type regeneration and transformations protocols without any somaclonal variation.

  12. Quantitative Characterization of the Growth of Deinococcus geothermalis DSM-11302: Effect of Inoculum Size, Growth Medium and Culture Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Bornot, Julie; Molina-Jouve, Carole; Uribelarrea, Jean-Louis; Gorret, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Due to their remarkable resistance to extreme conditions, Deinococcaceae strains are of great interest to biotechnological prospects. However, the physiology of the extremophile strain Deinococcus geothermalis has scarcely been studied and is not well understood. The physiological behaviour was then studied in well-controlled conditions in flask and bioreactor cultures. The growth of D. geothermalis type strains was compared. Among the strains tested, the strain from the German Collection of Microorganisms (Deutsche Sammlung von Mikroorganismen DSM) DSM-11302 was found to give the highest biomass concentration and growth rate: in a complex medium with glucose, the growth rate reached 0.75 h−1 at 45 °C. Yeast extract concentration in the medium had significant constitutive and catalytic effects. Furthermore, the results showed that the physiological descriptors were not affected by the inoculum preparation steps. A batch culture of D. geothermalis DSM-11302 on defined medium was carried out: cells grew exponentially with a maximal growth rate of 0.28 h−1 and D. geothermalis DSM-11302 biomass reached 1.4 g·L−1 in 20 h. Then, 1.4 gDryCellWeight of biomass (X) was obtained from 5.6 g glucose (Glc) consumed as carbon source, corresponding to a yield of 0.3 CmolX·CmolGlc−1; cell specific oxygen uptake and carbon dioxide production rates reached 216 and 226 mmol.CmolX−1·h−1, respectively, and the respiratory quotient (QR) value varied from 1.1 to 1.7. This is the first time that kinetic parameters and yields are reported for D. geothermalis DSM-11302 grown on a mineral medium in well-controlled batch culture. PMID:27682099

  13. Quantitative Characterization of the Growth of Deinococcus geothermalis DSM-11302: Effect of Inoculum Size, Growth Medium and Culture Conditions.

    PubMed

    Bornot, Julie; Molina-Jouve, Carole; Uribelarrea, Jean-Louis; Gorret, Nathalie

    2015-08-20

    Due to their remarkable resistance to extreme conditions, Deinococcaceae strains are of great interest to biotechnological prospects. However, the physiology of the extremophile strain Deinococcus geothermalis has scarcely been studied and is not well understood. The physiological behaviour was then studied in well-controlled conditions in flask and bioreactor cultures. The growth of D. geothermalis type strains was compared. Among the strains tested, the strain from the German Collection of Microorganisms (Deutsche Sammlung von Mikroorganismen DSM) DSM-11302 was found to give the highest biomass concentration and growth rate: in a complex medium with glucose, the growth rate reached 0.75 h(-1) at 45 °C. Yeast extract concentration in the medium had significant constitutive and catalytic effects. Furthermore, the results showed that the physiological descriptors were not affected by the inoculum preparation steps. A batch culture of D. geothermalis DSM-11302 on defined medium was carried out: cells grew exponentially with a maximal growth rate of 0.28 h(-1) and D. geothermalis DSM-11302 biomass reached 1.4 g·L(-1) in 20 h. Then, 1.4 gDryCellWeight of biomass (X) was obtained from 5.6 g glucose (Glc) consumed as carbon source, corresponding to a yield of 0.3 CmolX·CmolGlc(-1); cell specific oxygen uptake and carbon dioxide production rates reached 216 and 226 mmol.CmolX(-1)·h(-1), respectively, and the respiratory quotient (QR) value varied from 1.1 to 1.7. This is the first time that kinetic parameters and yields are reported for D. geothermalis DSM-11302 grown on a mineral medium in well-controlled batch culture.

  14. Interphase Chromosome Conformation and Chromatin-Chromatin Interactions in Human Epithelial Cells Cultured Under Different Gravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Wong, Michael; Hada, Megumi; Wu, Honglu

    2015-01-01

    Microgravity has been shown to alter global gene expression patterns and protein levels both in cultured cells and animal models. It has been suggested that the packaging of chromatin fibers in the interphase nucleus is closely related to genome function, and the changes in transcriptional activity are tightly correlated with changes in chromatin folding. This study explores the changes of chromatin conformation and chromatin-chromatin interactions in the simulated microgravity environment, and investigates their correlation to the expression of genes located at different regions of the chromosome. To investigate the folding of chromatin in interphase under various culture conditions, human epithelial cells, fibroblasts, and lymphocytes were fixed in the G1 phase. Interphase chromosomes were hybridized with a multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) probe for chromosome 3 which distinguishes six regions of the chromosome as separate colors. After images were captured with a laser scanning confocal microscope, the 3-dimensional structure of interphase chromosome 3 was reconstructed at multi-mega base pair scale. In order to determine the effects of microgravity on chromosome conformation and orientation, measures such as distance between homologous pairs, relative orientation of chromosome arms about a shared midpoint, and orientation of arms within individual chromosomes were all considered as potentially impacted by simulated microgravity conditions. The studies revealed non-random folding of chromatin in interphase, and suggested an association of interphase chromatin folding with radiation-induced chromosome aberration hotspots. Interestingly, the distributions of genes with expression changes over chromosome 3 in cells cultured under microgravity environment are apparently clustered on specific loci and chromosomes. This data provides important insights into how mammalian cells respond to microgravity at molecular level.

  15. Assessment of ‘one-step’ versus ‘sequential’ embryo culture conditions through embryonic genome methylation and hydroxymethylation changes

    PubMed Central

    Salvaing, J.; Peynot, N.; Bedhane, M. N.; Veniel, S.; Pellier, E.; Boulesteix, C.; Beaujean, N.; Daniel, N.; Duranthon, V.

    2016-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION In comparison to in vivo development, how do different conditions of in vitro culture (‘one step’ versus ‘sequential medium’) impact DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation in preimplantation embryos? SUMMARY ANSWER Using rabbit as a model, we show that DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation are both affected by in vitro culture of preimplantation embryos and the effect observed depends on the culture medium used. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Correct regulation of DNA methylation is essential for embryonic development and DNA hydroxymethylation appears more and more to be a key player. Modifications of the environment of early embryos are known to have long term effects on adult phenotypes and health; these probably rely on epigenetic alterations. STUDY DESIGN SIZE, DURATION The study design we used is both cross sectional (control versus treatment) and longitudinal (time-course). Each individual in vivo experiment used embryos flushed from the donor at the 2-, 4-, 8-, 16- or morula stage. Each stage was analyzed in at least two independent experiments. Each individual in vitro experiment used embryos flushed from donors at the 1-cell stage (19 h post-coïtum) which were then cultured in parallel in the two tested media until the 2-, 4-, 8- 16-cell or morula stages. Each stage was analyzed in at least three independent experiments. In both the in vivo and in vitro experiments, 4-cell stage embryos were always included as an internal reference. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS Immunofluorescence with antibodies specific for 5-methylcytosine (5meC) and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmeC) was used to quantify DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation levels in preimplantation embryos. We assessed the expression of DNA methyltransferases (DNMT), of ten eleven translocation (TET) dioxigenases and of two endogenous retroviral sequences (ERV) using RT-qPCR, since the expression of endogenous retroviral sequences is known to be regulated by DNA methylation

  16. Inflammatory responses in aggregating rat brain cell cultures subjected to different demyelinating conditions.

    PubMed

    Defaux, Antoinette; Zurich, Marie-Gabrielle; Honegger, Paul; Monnet-Tschudi, Florianne

    2010-09-24

    To study inflammatory reactions occurring in relation to demyelination, aggregating rat brain cell cultures were subjected to three different demyelinating insults, i.e., (i) lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC), (ii) interferon-gamma combined with lipopolysaccharide (IFN-gamma+LPS), and (iii) anti-MOG antibodies plus complement (alpha-MOG+C). Demyelination was assessed by measuring the expression of myelin basic protein (MBP) and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), and the activity of 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphohydrolase (CNP). The accompanying inflammatory reactions were examined by the quantification of microglia-specific staining, by immunostaining for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and by measuring the mRNA expression of a panel of inflammation-related genes. It was found that all three demyelinating insults decreased the expression of MBP and MOG, and induced microglial reactivity. LPC and alpha-MOG+C, but not IFN-gamma+LPS, decreased CNP activity; they also caused the appearance of macrophagic microglia, and increased GFAP staining indicating astrogliosis. LPC affected also the integrity of neurons and astrocytes. LPC and IFN-gamma+LPS upregulated the expression of the inflammation-related genes IL-6, TNF-alpha, Ccl5, Cxcl1, and iNOS, although to different degrees. Other inflammatory markers were upregulated by only one of the three insults, e.g., Cxcl2 by LPC; IL-1beta and IL-15 by IFN-gamma+LPS; and IFN-gamma by alpha-MOG+C. These findings indicate that each of the three demyelinating insults caused distinct patterns of demyelination and inflammatory reactivity, and that of the demyelinating agents tested only LPC exhibited general toxicity.

  17. Hypoxic culture conditions induce increased metabolic rate and collagen gene expression in ACL-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Tomasz J; Leong, Natalie L; Dar, Ayelet; Wu, Ling; Kabir, Nima; Khan, Adam Z; Eliasberg, Claire D; Pedron, Andrew; Karayan, Ashant; Lee, Siyoung; Di Pauli von Treuheim, Theodor; Jiacheng, Jin; Wu, Ben M; Evseenko, Denis; McAllister, David R; Petrigliano, Frank A

    2016-06-01

    There has been substantial effort directed toward the application of bone marrow and adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in the regeneration of musculoskeletal tissue. Recently, resident tissue-specific stem cells have been described in a variety of mesenchymal structures including ligament, tendon, muscle, cartilage, and bone. In the current study, we systematically characterize three novel anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-derived cell populations with the potential for ligament regeneration: ligament-forming fibroblasts (LFF: CD146(neg) , CD34(neg) CD44(pos) , CD31(neg) , CD45(neg) ), ligament perivascular cells (LPC: CD146(pos) CD34(neg) CD44(pos) , CD31(neg) , CD45(neg) ) and ligament interstitial cells (LIC: CD34(pos) CD146(neg) , CD44(pos) , CD31(neg) , CD45(neg) )-and describe their proliferative and differentiation potential, collagen gene expression and metabolism in both normoxic and hypoxic environments, and their trophic potential in vitro. All three groups of cells (LIC, LPC, and LFF) isolated from adult human ACL exhibited progenitor cell characteristics with regard to proliferation and differentiation potential in vitro. Culture in low oxygen tension enhanced the collagen I and III gene expression in LICs (by 2.8- and 3.3-fold, respectively) and LFFs (by 3- and 3.5-fold, respectively) and increased oxygen consumption rate and extracellular acidification rate in LICs (by 4- and 3.5-fold, respectively), LFFs (by 5.5- and 3-fold, respectively), LPCs (by 10- and 4.5-fold, respectively) as compared to normal oxygen concentration. In summary, this study demonstrates for the first time the presence of three novel progenitor cell populations in the adult ACL that demonstrate robust proliferative and matrix synthetic capacity; these cells may play a role in local ligament regeneration, and consequently represent a potential cell source for ligament engineering applications. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc

  18. Metallothionein-3 regulates lysosomal function in cultured astrocytes under both normal and oxidative conditions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sook-Jeong; Park, Mi-Ha; Kim, Hyun-Jae; Koh, Jae-Young

    2010-08-01

    Cellular zinc plays a key role in lysosomal change and cell death in neurons and astrocytes under oxidative stress. Here, using astrocytes lacking metallothionein-3 (MT3), a potential source of labile zinc in the brain, we studied the role of MT3 in oxidative stress responses. H(2)O(2) induced a large increase in labile zinc in wild-type (WT) astrocytes, but stimulated only a modest rise in MT3-null astrocytes. In addition, H(2)O(2)-induced lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) and cell death were comparably attenuated in MT3-null astrocytes. Expression and glycosylation of Lamp1 (lysosome-associated membrane protein 1) and Lamp2 were increased in MT3-null astrocytes, and the activities of several lysosomal enzymes were significantly reduced, indicating an effect of MT3 on lysosomal components. Consistent with lysosomal dysfunction in MT3-null cells, the level of LC3-II (microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3), a marker of early autophagy, was increased by oxidative stress in WT astrocytes, but not in MT3-null cells. Similar changes in Lamp1, LC3, and cathepsin-D were induced by the lysosomal inhibitors bafilomycin A1, chloroquine, and monensin, indicating that lysosomal dysfunction may lie upstream of changes observed in MT3-null astrocytes. Consistent with this idea, lysosomal accumulation of cholesterol and lipofuscin were augmented in MT3-null astrocytes. Similar to the results seen in MT3-null cells, MT3 knockdown by siRNA inhibited oxidative stress-induced increases in zinc and LMP. These results indicate that MT3 may play a key role in normal lysosomal function in cultured astrocytes.

  19. Bioethanol production from Scenedesmus obliquus sugars: the influence of photobioreactors and culture conditions on biomass production.

    PubMed

    Miranda, J R; Passarinho, P C; Gouveia, L

    2012-10-01

    A closed-loop vertical tubular photobioreactor (PBR), specially designed to operate under conditions of scarce flat land availability and irregular solar irradiance conditions, was used to study the potential of Scenedesmus obliquus biomass/sugar production. The results obtained were compared to those from an open-raceway pond and a closed-bubble column. The influence of the type of light source and the regime (natural vs artificial and continuous vs light/dark cycles) on the growth of the microalga and the extent of the sugar accumulation was studied in both PBRs. The best type of reactor studied was a closed-loop PBR illuminated with natural light/dark cycles. In all the cases, the relationship between the nitrate depletion and the sugar accumulation was observed. The microalga Scenedesmus was cultivated for 53 days in a raceway pond (4,500 L) and accumulated a maximum sugar content of 29 % g/g. It was pre-treated for carrying out ethanol fermentation assays, and the highest ethanol concentration obtained in the hydrolysate fermented by Kluyveromyces marxianus was 11.7 g/L.

  20. Influence of Culturing Conditions on Bioprospecting and the Antimicrobial Potential of Endophytic Fungi from Schinus terebinthifolius.

    PubMed

    Tonial, Fabiana; Maia, Beatriz H L N S; Gomes-Figueiredo, Josiane A; Sobottka, Andrea M; Bertol, Charise D; Nepel, Angelita; Savi, Daiani C; Vicente, Vânia A; Gomes, Renata R; Glienke, Chirlei

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we analyzed the antimicrobial activity of extracts harvested from 17 endophytic fungi isolated from the medicinal plant Schinus terebinthifolius. Morphological and molecular analyses indicated that these fungal species belonged to the genera Alternaria, Bjerkandera, Colletotrichum, Diaporthe, Penicillium, and Xylaria. Of the endophytes analyzed, 64.7 % produced antimicrobial compounds under at least one of the fermentation conditions tested. Nine isolates produced compounds that inhibited growth of Staphylococcus aureus, four produced compounds that inhibited Candida albicans, and two that inhibited Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The fermentation conditions of the following endophytes were optimized: Alternaria sp. Sect. Alternata-LGMF626, Xylaria sp.-LGMF673, and Bjerkandera sp.-LGMF713. Specifically, the carbon and nitrogen sources, initial pH, temperature, and length of incubation were varied. In general, production of antimicrobial compounds was greatest when galactose was used as a carbon source, and acidification of the growth medium enhanced the production of compounds that inhibited C. albicans. Upon large-scale fermentation, Alternaria sp. Sect. Alternata-LGMF626 produced an extract containing two fractions that were active against methicillin-resistant S. aureus. One of the extracts exhibited high activity (minimum inhibitory concentration of 18.52 µg/mL), and the other exhibited moderate activity (minimum inhibitory concentration of 55.55 µg/mL). The compounds E-2-hexyl-cinnamaldehyde and two compounds of the pyrrolopyrazine alkaloids class were identified in the active fractions by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

  1. Prevalence, predictors, and clinical consequences of medical adherence in IBD: how to improve it?

    PubMed

    Lakatos, Peter Laszlo

    2009-09-14

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are chronic diseases with a relapsing-remitting disease course necessitating lifelong treatment. However, non-adherence has been reported in over 40% of patients, especially those in remission taking maintenance therapies for IBD. The economical impact of non-adherence to medical therapy including absenteeism, hospitalization risk, and the health care costs in chronic conditions, is enormous. The causes of medication non-adherence are complex, where the patient-doctor relationship, treatment regimen, and other disease-related factors play key roles. Moreover, subjective assessment might underestimate adherence. Poor adherence may result in more frequent relapses, a disabling disease course, in ulcerative colitis, and an increased risk for colorectal cancer. Improving medication adherence in patients is an important challenge for physicians. Understanding the different patient types, the reasons given by patients for non-adherence, simpler and more convenient dosage regimens, dynamic communication within the health care team, a self-management package incorporating enhanced patient education and physician-patient interaction, and identifying the predictors of non-adherence will help devise suitable plans to optimize patient adherence. This editorial summarizes the available literature on frequency, predictors, clinical consequences, and strategies for improving medical adherence in patients with IBD.

  2. Human bone marrow stem cells cultured under hypoxic conditions present altered characteristics and enhanced in vivo tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Seok; Park, Jung-Chul; Kim, Tae-Wan; Jung, Byung-Joo; Lee, Youngseok; Shim, Eun-Kyung; Park, Soyon; Choi, Eun-Young; Cho, Kyoo-Sung; Kim, Chang-Sung

    2015-09-01

    Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) were isolated from bone marrow of the vertebral body. The hBMSCs were cultured under either hypoxic (1% O2) or normoxic (21% O2; control) conditions and the characteristics as mesenchymal stem cells were compared. Results revealed that hypoxia reduced proliferative potential and colony-forming efficiency of hBMSCs, and significantly enhanced osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation. The hBMSCs enhanced the regenerative potential of bone in vivo. In vitro synthesis of soluble and insoluble collagen was significantly increased in the hypoxic condition. In vivo collagen tissue regeneration was also enhanced under the hypoxic condition, with concomitant increased expressions of various subtypes of collagen and lysyl-oxidase family mRNA. MicroRNA assays revealed that miR-155-5p, which negatively regulates HIF-1α, was significantly highly expressed. These observations demonstrate that hBMSCs obtained from human vertebrae exhibit altered characteristics under hypoxic conditions, and each factor contributing to hBMSC-mediated tissue healing should be evaluated with the goal of allowing their clinical application.

  3. Effect of fermentation conditions on biohydrogen production from cassava starch by anaerobic mixed cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tien, Hai M.; Le, Kien A.; Tran, An T.; Le, Phung K.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, a series of batch tests were conducted to investigate the effect of pH, temperature, fermentation time, and inoculums ratio to hydrogen production using cassava starch as a substrate. The statistical analysis of the experiment indicated that the significant effects for the fermentation yield were the main effect of temperature, pH and inoculums ratio. It was fouund that the suitable fermentation conditions of biohydrogen production should be at temperature 40 ° C; pH 6.5, inoculums to medium ratio 10 % and COD operation at 4800 g/mL. The maximum value of hydrogen volume produced was 76.22 mL. These affected has been evaluated and the result can be used as an reference for the pilot or industrial biohydrogen production.

  4. Investigating the neuroglial differentiation effect of neuroblastoma conditioned medium in human endometrial stem cells cultured on 3D nanofibrous scaffold.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi-Barough, Somayeh; Hoveizi, Elham; Norouzi Javidan, Abbas; Ai, Jafar

    2015-08-01

    Neural tissue engineering is an important area of research in the field of tissue-engineering especially for neurodegenerative disease such as spinal cord injury. The differentiation capacity of human endometrial stem cells (hEnSCs) into neuronal cells has yet to be elucidated. Here, the major aim of the present study was to investigate the differentiation ability of hEnSCs cultured on polylactic acid/chitosan (PLA/CS) nanofibrous scaffold into neuroglial cells in response to conditioned medium of BE(2)-C human neuroblastoma cells and growth factors. Here we investigated the use PLA/CS scaffold as a three dimensional (3D) system that increased neuro-glial cells differentiation. Human EnSCs after three passages were differentiated in neuro-glial like cells under neuroblastoma conditioned medium with FGF2/PDGF-AA on PLA/CS scaffold. By day 18, differentiated cells were analyzed for expression of neuroglial markers by qRT-PCR and immunofluorescence. The results revealed that hEnSCs attach, grow and differentiation on the nanofibrous PLA/CS scaffold. Additionally, our study showed the expression of neural and glial lineage markers such as Nestin, NF-L, MAP2, PDGFRa, CNP, Olig2, MBP, and GFAP in the level of mRNA and MAP2, Tuj-1, and NF-L in the protein level after 18 days. Our results demonstrate that hEnSCs cultured on PLA/CS nanofibrous scaffold have the potential to differentiate in neuronal and glial cells in presence of neuroblastoma conditioned medium on PLA/CS scaffold. The result of this study may have impact in tissue engineering and cells-base therapy of neurodegenerative diseases and have a great potential for wide application.

  5. Enhancing Adherence in Clinical Exercise Trials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neal, Heather A.; Blair, Steven N.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses exercise adherence from the perspective of adhering to an exercise treatment in a controlled trial, focusing on: adherence (to intervention and measurement); the development of randomized clinical trials; exemplary randomized clinical trials in exercise science (exercise training studies and physical activity interventions); and study…

  6. Evidence-based Assessment of Adherence to Medical Treatments in Pediatric Psychology

    PubMed Central

    Modi, Avani C.; Lemanek, Kathleen L.; Ievers-Landis, Carolyn E.; Rapoff, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives Adherence to medical regimens for children and adolescents with chronic conditions is generally below 50% and is considered the single, greatest cause of treatment failure. As the prevalence of chronic illnesses in pediatric populations increases and awareness of the negative consequences of poor adherence become clearer, the need for reliable and valid measures of adherence has grown. Methods This review evaluated empirical evidence for 18 measures utilizing three assessment methods: (a) self-report or structured interviews, (b) daily diary methods, and (c) electronic monitors. Results Ten measures met the “well-established” evidence-based (EBA) criteria. Conclusions Several recommendations for improving adherence assessment were made. In particular, consideration should be given to the use of innovative technologies that provide a window into the “real time” behaviors of patients and families. Providing written treatment plans, identifying barriers to good adherence, and examining racial and ethnic differences in attitudes, beliefs and behaviors affecting adherence were strongly recommended. PMID:17846042

  7. Optimization of culture conditions for hydrogen production by Ethanoligenens harbinense B49 using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wan-Qian; Ren, Nan-Qi; Wang, Xiang-Jing; Xiang, Wen-Sheng; Ding, Jie; You, Yang; Liu, Bing-Feng

    2009-02-01

    The design of an optimum and cost-efficient medium for high-level production of hydrogen by Ethanoligenens harbinense B49 was attempted by using response surface methodology (RSM). Based on the Plackett-Burman design, Fe(2+) and Mg(2+) were selected as the most critical nutrient salts. Subsequently, the optimum combination of the selected factors and the sole carbon source glucose were investigated by the Box-Behnken design. Results showed that the maximum hydrogen yield of 2.21 mol/mol glucose was predicted when the concentrations of glucose, Fe(2+) and Mg(2+) were 14.57 g/L, 177.28 mg/L and 691.98 mg/L, respectively. The results were further verified by triplicate experiments. The batch reactors were operated under an optimized condition of the respective glucose, Fe(2+) and Mg(2+) concentration of 14.5 g/L, 180 mg/L and 690 mg/L, the initial pH of 6.0 and experimental temperature of 35+/-1(o)C. Without further pH adjustment, the maximum hydrogen yield of 2.20 mol/mol glucose was obtained based on the optimized medium with further verified the practicability of this optimum strategy.

  8. Improvement of submerged culture conditions to produce colorants by Penicillium purpurogenum.

    PubMed

    Santos-Ebinuma, Valéria Carvalho; Roberto, Inês Conceição; Teixeira, Maria Francisca Simas; Pessoa, Adalberto

    2014-01-01

    Safety issues related to the employment of synthetic colorants in different industrial segments have increased the interest in the production of colorants from natural sources, such as microorganisms. Improved cultivation technologies have allowed the use of microorganisms as an alternative source of natural colorants. The objective of this work was to evaluate the influence of some factors on natural colorants production by a recently isolated from Amazon Forest, Penicillium purpurogenum DPUA 1275 employing statistical tools. To this purpose the following variables: orbital stirring speed, pH, temperature, sucrose and yeast extract concentrations and incubation time were studied through two fractional factorial, one full factorial and a central composite factorial designs. The regression analysis pointed out that sucrose and yeast extract concentrations were the variables that influenced more in colorants production. Under the best conditions (yeast extract concentration around 10 g/L and sucrose concentration of 50 g/L) an increase of 10, 33 and 23% respectively to yellow, orange and red colorants absorbance was achieved. These results show that P. purpurogenum is an alternative colorants producer and the production of these biocompounds can be improved employing statistical tool.

  9. Influence of culture conditions on production of phytase by Zygosaccharomyces baili var. balil.

    PubMed

    Lata, Suman; Rastogi, Smita; Kapoor, Ashima; Imran, Mohd

    2015-07-01

    Microbial phytases are phosphohydrolytic enzymes which are gaining attention for their commercial exploitation in feed and food industry. In the present study, ten yeasts were isolated from different soil samples and screened for their phytase producing capability. Among these isolates, the most promising yeast strain was Zygosaccharomyces bailii var. bailii which produced highest phytase yield (6.36 U ml(-1)) in malt yeast extract glucose peptone (MYGP) medium. In order to improve phytase production by Zygosaccharomyces bailii, different physio-chemical parameters were optimized. The optimal conditions for phytase production was found to be: incubation time-42 hr, temperature-30 degrees C, medium pH-6.0 and substrate (calcium phytate) concentration-0.1%. Glucose at 0.5% concentration supported higher phytase production (13.75 U ml(-1)) than other carbon sources tested. Metal ions (Ca+/+, Na+, K+, Mg++) and additives; ethylene diamine tetraacetate (EDTA), sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) and toluene did not affect enzyme production. However, Zn++, Ni++, Ba++, Pb++ and detergents like Triton X-100 and Tweens strongly inhibited (>90%) phytase production. An overall 2.21-fold enhancement in phytase activity (6.36-->14.03 U ml(-1)) was attained after optimization studies.

  10. Submerged culture conditions for the production of mycelial biomass and antimicrobial metabolites by Polyporus tricholoma Mont.

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Gladys Rosane Thomé; Liebl, Mariane; Tavares, Lorena Benathar Ballod; Paulert, Roberta; Smânia Júnior, Artur

    2008-01-01

    Basidiomycete fungi of the Polyporus genus are a source of secondary metabolites which are of medicinal interest as antibacterial compounds. As these substances are produced in a small amount by the fungi, the study of the cultivation conditions in vitro that could possibly optimize their production seems of major importance. The effects of glucose and lactose, pH and agitation on biomass concentration and on the specific growth rate caused by the basidiomycete Polyporus tricholoma were investigated. The initial pH (4.5, 6.5 and 8.5) was autoregulated at pH 5.5, and the agitation increased the mycelial growth and the specific growth rate. The high concentration of carbon sources (4%) increased biomass production. The lactose concentration and the absence of agitation were determinant in the production of antibacterial metabolites. The characterization of the antibacterial substance by GC-MS indicated a major compound, isodrimenediol, produced by the fungus Polyporus tricholoma with activity against Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:24031266

  11. Changes in Adherence to Non-Pharmacological Guidelines for Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyong; Cho, Sukyung; Bower, Julie K.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to compare levels of adherence to non-pharmacological guidelines between patients with and without hypertension diagnoses, and examined temporal changes in adherence during recent decades. We used data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1998–2012), including 13,768 Korean hypertensive patients aged ≥ 30 years who were categorized according to the presence or absence of a hypertension diagnosis, based on blood pressure and self-reported information. Adherence to the guidelines was calculated for 6 components, including dietary and lifestyle habits. A multivariable generalized linear regression model was used. The proportion of hypertensive patients aware of their condition increased from 33.4% in 1998 to 74.8% in 2012 (p < 0.001), although these increments plateaued during recent survey years. Patients with hypertension diagnoses were older, and more likely to be female,and have lower education levels than those without hypertension diagnoses, for most survey years. Overall adherence levels were poor (mean score 2 of 6), and levels of adherence to non-pharmacological habits did not significantly differ between patients with and without hypertension diagnoses. However, overall adherence levels improved significantly among patients with hypertension diagnoses: from 2.09 in 1998 to 2.27 in 2012 (p = 0.007), particularly regarding sufficient vegetable/seaweed consumption (p = 0.03), maintaining a normal weight (p = 0.03), and avoidance of smoking (p < 0.001). Awareness of hypertension is increasing, but hypertensive Korean patients demonstrate poor overall adherence to non-pharmacological hypertension management guidelines. These findings suggest that well-planned education programs should be continued after hypertension is diagnosed. PMID:27561006

  12. Quantum dot labeling of butyrylcholinesterase maintains substrate and inhibitor interactions and cell adherence features.

    PubMed

    Waiskopf, Nir; Shweky, Itzhak; Lieberman, Itai; Banin, Uri; Soreq, Hermona

    2011-03-16

    Butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) is the major acetylcholine hydrolyzing enzyme in peripheral mammalian systems. It can either reside in the circulation or adhere to cells and tissues and protect them from anticholinesterases, including insecticides and poisonous nerve gases. In humans, impaired cholinesterase functioning is causally involved in many pathologies, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, trait anxiety, and post stroke conditions. Recombinant cholinesterases have been developed for therapeutic use; therefore, it is important to follow their in vivo path, location, and interactions. Traditional labeling methods, such as fluorescent dyes and proteins, generally suffer from sensitivity to environmental conditions, from proximity to different molecules or special enzymes which can alter them, and from relatively fast photobleaching. In contrast, emerging development in synthesis and surface engineering of semiconductor nanocrystals enable their use to detect and follow molecules in biological milieus at high sensitivity and in real time. Therefore, we developed a platform for conjugating highly purified recombinant human BChE dimers (rhBChE) to CdSe/CdZnS quantum dots (QDs). We report the development and characterization of highly fluorescent aqueous soluble QD-rhBChE conjugates, present maintenance of hydrolytic activity, inhibitor sensitivity, and adherence to the membrane of cultured live cells of these conjugates, and outline their advantageous features for diverse biological applications.

  13. Quantum Dot Labeling of Butyrylcholinesterase Maintains Substrate and Inhibitor Interactions and Cell Adherence Features

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) is the major acetylcholine hydrolyzing enzyme in peripheral mammalian systems. It can either reside in the circulation or adhere to cells and tissues and protect them from anticholinesterases, including insecticides and poisonous nerve gases. In humans, impaired cholinesterase functioning is causally involved in many pathologies, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases, trait anxiety, and post stroke conditions. Recombinant cholinesterases have been developed for therapeutic use; therefore, it is important to follow their in vivo path, location, and interactions. Traditional labeling methods, such as fluorescent dyes and proteins, generally suffer from sensitivity to environmental conditions, from proximity to different molecules or special enzymes which can alter them, and from relatively fast photobleaching. In contrast, emerging development in synthesis and surface engineering of semiconductor nanocrystals enable their use to detect and follow molecules in biological milieus at high sensitivity and in real time. Therefore, we developed a platform for conjugating highly purified recombinant human BChE dimers (rhBChE) to CdSe/CdZnS quantum dots (QDs). We report the development and characterization of highly fluorescent aqueous soluble QD-rhBChE conjugates, present maintenance of hydrolytic activity, inhibitor sensitivity, and adherence to the membrane of cultured live cells of these conjugates, and outline their advantageous features for diverse biological applications. PMID:22778863

  14. An Interdisciplinary Conservation Module for Condition Survey on Cultural Heritages with a 3d Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedelì, C.

    2013-07-01

    In order to make the most of the digital outsourced documents, based on new technologies (e.g.: 3D LASER scanners, photogrammetry, etc.), a new approach was followed and a new ad hoc information system was implemented. The obtained product allow to the final user to reuse and manage the digital documents providing graphic tools and an integrated specific database to manage the entire documentation and conservation process, starting from the condition assessment until the conservation / restoration work. The system is organised on two main modules: Archaeology and Conservation. This paper focus on the features and the advantages of the second one. In particular it is emphasized its logical organisation, the possibility to easily mapping by using a very precise 3D metric platform, to benefit of the integrated relational database which allows to well organise, compare, keep and manage different kind of information at different level. Conservation module can manage along the time the conservation process of a site, monuments, object or excavation and conservation work in progress. An alternative approach called OVO by the author of this paper, force the surveyor to observe and describe the entity decomposing it on functional components, materials and construction techniques. Some integrated tools as the "ICOMOS-ISCS Illustrated glossary … " help the user to describe pathologies with a unified approach and terminology. Also the conservation project phase is strongly supported to envision future intervention and cost. A final section is devoted to record the conservation/restoration work already done or in progress. All information areas of the conservation module are interconnected to each other to allows to the system a complete interchange of graphic and alphanumeric data. The conservation module it self is connected to the archaeological one to create an interdisciplinary daily tool.

  15. Effect of environmental and cultural conditions on medium pH and explant growth performance of Douglas-fir ( Pseudotsuga menziesii) shoot cultures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Chih; Bates, Rick; Carlson, John

    2014-01-01

    The medium pH level of plant tissue cultures has been shown to be essential to many aspects of explant development and growth. Sensitivity or tolerance of medium pH change in vitro varies according to specific requirements of individual species. The objectives of this study are to 1) determine medium pH change over time in storage conditions and with presence of explants, 2) evaluate the effects of medium pH change on explant growth performance and 3) assess the effects of adding a pH stabilizer, 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid (MES) that is commonly used in Douglas-fir micropropagation medium. Vegetative buds were collected in the spring before breaking dormancy from juvenile and mature donor trees for conducting these evaluations. Medium, with or without MES, was pre-adjusted to five pH levels before adding MES, agar and autoclaving. Medium pH changes and explant growth parameters were measured at eight different incubation times. Overall, MES provided a more stable medium pH, relative to starting pH values, under both light and dark storage conditions as well as with presence of explants. A general trend of decreasing medium pH over time was found comparing explants from juvenile and mature donor genotypes. Explant height and weight growth increased over time, but differ among explants from juvenile and mature donor genotypes. Our findings suggest that a 21-day subculture practice may best sustain medium freshness, medium pH level and desirable explant growth.

  16. Effect of environmental and cultural conditions on medium pH and explant growth performance of Douglas-fir ( Pseudotsuga menziesii) shoot cultures

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chien-Chih; Bates, Rick; Carlson, John

    2015-01-01

    The medium pH level of plant tissue cultures has been shown to be essential to many aspects of explant development and growth. Sensitivity or tolerance of medium pH change in vitro varies according to specific requirements of individual species. The objectives of this study are to 1) determine medium pH change over time in storage conditions and with presence of explants, 2) evaluate the effects of medium pH change on explant growth performance and 3) assess the effects of adding a pH stabilizer, 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid (MES) that is commonly used in Douglas-fir micropropagation medium. Vegetative buds were collected in the spring before breaking dormancy from juvenile and mature donor trees for conducting these evaluations. Medium, with or without MES, was pre-adjusted to five pH levels before adding MES, agar and autoclaving. Medium pH changes and explant growth parameters were measured at eight different incubation times. Overall, MES provided a more stable medium pH, relative to starting pH values, under both light and dark storage conditions as well as with presence of explants. A general trend of decreasing medium pH over time was found comparing explants from juvenile and mature donor genotypes. Explant height and weight growth increased over time, but differ among explants from juvenile and mature donor genotypes. Our findings suggest that a 21-day subculture practice may best sustain medium freshness, medium pH level and desirable explant growth. PMID:26535110

  17. Cultivating conditions effects on kefiran production by the mixed culture of lactic acid bacteria imbedded within kefir grains.

    PubMed

    Zajšek, Katja; Goršek, Andreja; Kolar, Mitja

    2013-08-15

    The influence of fermentation temperature, agitation rate, and additions of carbon sources, nitrogen sources, vitamins and minerals on production of kefiran by kefir grains lactic acid bacteria was studied in a series of experiments. The main aim of the work was to increase the exopolysaccharide (EPS) production where customised milk was used as fermentation medium. It was proved that the controlling of culturing conditions and the modifying of fermentation medium conditions (i.e., carbon, nitrogen, mineral sources and vitamins) can dramatically enhance the production of the EPS. The temperature and agitation rate were critical for kefiran production during the 24 h cultivation of grains; our optimised conditions being 25°C and 80 rpm, respectively. In addition, when optimising the effects of additional nutrition, it was found that 5% (w/v) lactose, 0.1% (w/v) thiamine, and 0.1% (w/v) FeCl3 led to the maximal production of EPS. The results indicate that nutrients can be utilised to improve the production of EPS and that good kefir grains growth does not appear to be a determining factor for a high production yield of EPS.

  18. Growth response and toxin concentration of cultured Pyrodinium bahamense var. compressum to varying salinity and temperature conditions.

    PubMed

    Gedaria, Alice Ilaya; Luckas, Bernd; Reinhardt, Katrin; Azanza, Rhodora V

    2007-09-15

    The growth and toxin production of a Philippine Pyrodinium bahamense isolate in nutrient replete batch cultures were investigated under conditions affected by varying salinity, temperature and combined effects of salinity and temperature. Early exponential growth stage was reached after 7 days with a cell division rate of 0.26 div day(-1). The toxin content reached a peak of 298 fmol cell-1 at mid exponential phase and rapidly declined to 54 fmol cell-1 as it approached the death phase. Only three sets of toxins composed of STX, dcSTX and B1 were detected in which STX made up to 85-98 mol%toxincell-1. P. bahamense was able to grow in salinities and temperatures ranging from 26 per thousand to 36 per thousand and 23 to 36 degrees C, respectively. The optimum growth under varying salinity and temperature conditions was observed at 36 per thousand and 25 degrees C. Toxin content reached a peak of 376 fmol cell-1 at 25 degrees C and was lower (80-116 fmol cell-1) at higher temperatures (32-35 degrees C). Combined effects of salinity and temperature showed that P. bahamense was not able to grow at low salinity and temperature (i.e. below 26 per thousand-28 degrees C). Optimum growth was observed in higher salinities at all temperature conditions.

  19. A novel Fe(III) dependent bioflocculant from Klebsiella oxytoca GS-4-08: culture conditions optimization and flocculation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lei; Tang, Qing-Wen; Zhang, Yu-Jia; Chen, Rong-Ping; Liu, Xin; Qiao, Wei-Chuan; Li, Wen-Wei; Ruan, Hong-Hua; Song, Xin

    2016-10-07

    In this work, the effect of cultivation factors on the flocculation efficiency (FE) of bioflocculant P-GS408 from Klebsiella oxytoca was optimized by the response surface methodology. The most significant factor, i.e. culture time, was determined by gray relational analysis. A total of 240 mg of purified P-GS408 was prepared from 1 liter of culture solution under the optimal conditions. GC-MS analysis results indicated that the polysaccharide of P-GS408 mainly contains Rhamnose and Galactose, and the existence of abundant hydroxyl, carboxyl and amino groups was evidenced by FTIR and XPS analyses. With the aid of Fe(3+), the FE of kaolin solution by P-GS408 could achieve 99.48% in ten minutes. Functional groups of polysaccharide were involved in the first adsorption step and the zeta potential of kaolin solution changed from -39.0 mV to 43.4 mV in the presence of Fe(3+) and P-GS408. Three-dimensional excitation-emission (EEM) fluorescence spectra demonstrates that the trivalent Fe(3+) and Al(3+) can bind efficiently with P-GS408, while those univalent and divalent cations cannot. With the help of SEM images, FTIR, zeta potential and EEM spectra, we proposed the P-GS408 flocculation mechanism, which consists of coordination bond combination, charge neutrality, adsorption and bridging, and net catching.

  20. A novel Fe(III) dependent bioflocculant from Klebsiella oxytoca GS-4-08: culture conditions optimization and flocculation mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lei; Tang, Qing-wen; Zhang, Yu-jia; Chen, Rong-ping; Liu, Xin; Qiao, Wei-chuan; Li, Wen-wei; Ruan, Hong-hua; Song, Xin

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the effect of cultivation factors on the flocculation efficiency (FE) of bioflocculant P-GS408 from Klebsiella oxytoca was optimized by the response surface methodology. The most significant factor, i.e. culture time, was determined by gray relational analysis. A total of 240 mg of purified P-GS408 was prepared from 1 liter of culture solution under the optimal conditions. GC-MS analysis results indicated that the polysaccharide of P-GS408 mainly contains Rhamnose and Galactose, and the existence of abundant hydroxyl, carboxyl and amino groups was evidenced by FTIR and XPS analyses. With the aid of Fe3+, the FE of kaolin solution by P-GS408 could achieve 99.48% in ten minutes. Functional groups of polysaccharide were involved in the first adsorption step and the zeta potential of kaolin solution changed from −39.0 mV to 43.4 mV in the presence of Fe3+ and P-GS408. Three-dimensional excitation-emission (EEM) fluorescence spectra demonstrates that the trivalent Fe3+ and Al3+ can bind efficiently with P-GS408, while those univalent and divalent cations cannot. With the help of SEM images, FTIR, zeta potential and EEM spectra, we proposed the P-GS408 flocculation mechanism, which consists of coordination bond combination, charge neutrality, adsorption and bridging, and net catching. PMID:27713559

  1. Adherence to Continuous Positive Airway Pressure in Existing Users: Self-Efficacy Enhances the Association between Continuous Positive Airway Pressure and Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Dzierzewski, Joseph M.; Wallace, Douglas M.; Wohlgemuth, William K.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) is a common sleep disorder associated with a myriad of sequelae. OSAHS is effectively treated with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. However, fewer than 50% of patients are compliant with their CPAP therapy prescriptions. The current study sought to explore an integrated, biopsychological approach to CPAP adherence among experienced CPAP users. Methods: We performed a retrospective, cross-sectional analysis of a cohort of veterans with a diagnosis of OSAHS (n = 191) who were prescribed CPAP therapy and returned for adherence download at the Miami VA Sleep Clinic. The relationships between biomedical characteristics (e.g., CPAP pressure, self-reported sleepiness, and change in sleep efficiency) and psychological factors (e.g., self-efficacy beliefs and psychological diagnoses) and objectively measured CPAP use were examined to determine whether psychological factors moderated the relationships between biomedical characteristics and CPAP adherence. Results: Hierarchical regression analyses predicting CPAP adherence (adjusting for time since CPAP prescription, age, education, prescribed CPAP pressure, daytime sleepiness, changes in sleep efficiency with CPAP, and psychiatric conditions) revealed the following: (1) CPAP self-efficacy and CPAP pressure were positively related to adherence, and (2) CPAP self-efficacy moderates the relationship between CPAP pressure and CPAP adherence. Conclusions: There was no relationship between CPAP pressure and adherence in individuals with low self-efficacy beliefs. However, for individuals with high self-efficacy beliefs, there was a significant positive relationship between CPAP pressure and adherence. Self-efficacy beliefs appear to be a prime target for focused interventions aimed at improving CPAP adherence among those individuals with higher pressure prescriptions. Citation: Dzierzewski JM, Wallace DM, Wohlgemuth WK. Adherence to continuous

  2. Role of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Rhizophagus custos in the dissipation of PAHs under root-organ culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Elisabet; Scervino, José Martín; Godoy, Patricia; Reina, Rocío; Ocampo, Juan Antonio; Wittich, Regina-Michaela; García-Romera, Inmaculada

    2013-10-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are one of the most common contaminants in soil. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi make host plants resistant to pollutants. This study aims to evaluate the impact of anthracene, phenanthrene and dibenzothiophene on the AM fungus Rhizophagus custos, isolated from soil contaminated by heavy metals and PAHs, under monoxenic conditions. We found a high level of tolerance in R. custos to the presence of PAHs, especially in the case of anthracene, in which no negative effect on AM-colonized root dry weight (root yield) was observed, and also a decrease in the formation of anthraquinone was detected. Increased PAH dissipation in the mycorrhizal root culture medium was observed; however, dissipation was affected by the level of concentration and the specific PAH, which lead us to a better understanding of the possible contribution of AM fungi, and in particular R. custos, to pollutant removal.

  3. An antagonist of the platelet-activating factor receptor inhibits adherence of both nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae to cultured human bronchial epithelial cells exposed to cigarette smoke

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Shakti D; Fairbairn, Rory L; Gell, David A; Latham, Roger D; Sohal, Sukhwinder S; Walters, Eugene H; O’Toole, Ronan F

    2016-01-01

    Background COPD is emerging as the third largest cause of human mortality worldwide after heart disease and stroke. Tobacco smoking, the primary risk factor for the development of COPD, induces increased expression of platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFr) in the lung epithelium. Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) and Streptococcus pneumoniae adhere to PAFr on the luminal surface of human respiratory tract epithelial cells. Objective To investigate PAFr as a potential drug target for the prevention of infections caused by the main bacterial drivers of acute exacerbations in COPD patients, NTHi and S. pneumoniae. Methods Human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells were exposed to cigarette smoke extract (CSE). PAFr expression levels were determined using immunocytochemistry and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The epithelial cells were challenged with either NTHi or S. pneumoniae labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate, and bacterial adhesion was measured using immunofluorescence. The effect of a well-evaluated antagonist of PAFr, WEB-2086, on binding of the bacterial pathogens to BEAS-2B cells was then assessed. In silico studies of the tertiary structure of PAFr and the binding pocket for PAF and its antagonist WEB-2086 were undertaken. Results PAFr expression by bronchial epithelial cells was upregulated by CSE, and significantly associated with increased bacterial adhesion. WEB-2086 reduced the epithelial adhesion by both NTHi and S. pneumoniae to levels observed for non-CSE-exposed cells. Furthermore, it was nontoxic toward the bronchial epithelial cells. In silico analyses identified a binding pocket for PAF/WEB-2086 in the predicted PAFr structure. Conclusion WEB-2086 represents an innovative class of candidate drugs for inhibiting PAFr-dependent lung infections caused by the main bacterial drivers of smoking-related COPD. PMID:27524890

  4. Phosphatase activity and culture conditions of the yeast Candida mycoderma sp. and analysis of organic phosphorus hydrolysis ability.

    PubMed

    Yan, Mang; Yu, Liufang; Zhang, Liang; Guo, Yuexia; Dai, Kewei; Chen, Yuru

    2014-11-01

    Orthophosphate is an essential but limiting macronutrient for plant growth. About 67% cropland in China lacks sufficient phosphorus, especially that with red soil. Extensive soil phosphorus reserves exist in the form of organic phosphorus, which is unavailable for root uptake unless hydrolyzed by secretory acid phosphatases. Thus, many microorganisms with the ability to produce phosphatase have been exploited. In this work, the activity of an extracellular acid phosphatase and yeast biomass from Candida mycoderma was measured under different culture conditions, such as pH, temperature, and carbon source. A maximal phosphatase activity of 8.47×10(5)±0.11×10(5)U/g was achieved by C. Mycoderma in 36 hr under the optimal conditions. The extracellular acid phosphatase has high activity over a wide pH tolerance range from 2.5 to 5.0 (optimum pH3.5). The effects of different phosphorus compounds on the acid phosphatase production were also studied. The presence of phytin, lecithin or calcium phosphate reduced the phosphatase activity and biomass yield significantly. In addition, the pH of the culture medium was reduced significantly by lecithin. The efficiency of the strain in releasing orthophosphate from organic phosphorus was studied in red soil (used in planting trees) and rice soil (originating as red soil). The available phosphorus content was increased by 230% after inoculating 20 days in rice soil and decreased by 50% after inoculating 10 days in red soil. This work indicates that the yeast strain C. mycoderma has potential application for enhancing phosphorus utilization in plants that grow in rice soil.

  5. Molecular characterization of forest soil based Paenibacillus elgii and optimization of various culture conditions for its improved antimicrobial activity

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, S. N.; Jacob, Jubi; Reshma, U. R.; Rajesh, R. O.; Kumar, B. S. D.

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms have provided a bounty of bioactive secondary metabolites with very exciting biological activities such as antibacterial, antifungal antiviral, and anticancer, etc. The present study aims at the optimization of culture conditions for improved antimicrobial production of Paenibacillus elgii obtained from Wayanad forest of Western Ghats region of Kerala, India. A bacterial strain isolated from the Western Ghats forest soil of Wayanad, Kerala, India was identified as P. elgii by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. P. elgii recorded significant board spectrum activity against all human and plant pathogenic microorganism tested except Candida albicans. It has been well known that even minor variations in the fermentation medium may impact not only the quantity of desired bioactive metabolites but also the general metabolic profile of the producing microorganisms. Thus, further studies were carried out to assess the impact of medium components on the antimicrobial production of P. elgii and to optimize an ideal fermentation medium to maximize its antimicrobial production. Out of three media [nutrient broth (NA), Luria broth (LB) and Trypticase soy broth (TSB)] used for fermentation, TSB medium recorded significant activity. Glucose and meat peptone were identified as the best carbon and nitrogen sources, which significantly affected the antibiotic production when supplemented with TSB medium. Next the effect of various fermentation conditions such as temperature, pH, and incubation time on the production of antimicrobial compounds was studied on TSB + glucose + meat peptone and an initial pH of 7 and a temperature of 30°C for 3 days were found to be optimum for maximum antimicrobial production. The results indicate that medium composition in the fermentation media along with cultural parameters plays a vital role in the enhanced production of antimicrobial substances. PMID:26539188

  6. Differentiation of cellular processes involved in the induction and maintenance of stimulated neutrophil adherence.

    PubMed

    English, D; Gabig, T G

    1986-05-01

    granule enzyme release. Thus, conditions have been identified under which degranulation occurs in the absence of adherence (removal of Mg++) and adherence occurs without concurrent degranulation. Since neutrophil cytoplasts do contain some granule products and granule material can be identified on cytoplast membranes, it is possible that degranulation or granule products may be involved in the adherent response. However, hyperadherence was shown to develop in the absence of de novo degranulation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  7. Acidic fibroblast growth factor modulates Staphylococcus aureus adherence to human endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Blumberg, E A; Hatcher, V B; Lowy, F D

    1988-01-01

    Alteration of human endothelial cells may increase their susceptibility to staphylococcal invasion and thus may contribute to the development of intravascular staphylococcal disease. Acidic fibroblast growth factor, a potent regulator of endothelial cell function, had a significant effect on Staphylococcus aureus infection of cultured human endothelial cells. Three of four S. aureus strains had diminished adherence to endothelial cells when the latter were grown in the presence of acidic fibroblast growth factor (P less than 0.05). The diminished adherence was time dependent, maximal at 72 h, and independent of the initial bacterial inoculum. A twofold enhancement of S. aureus adherence was observed when endothelial cells were pretreated with heparitinase. Adherence was unaffected by endothelial cell activation by interleukin-1 or endotoxin. Thus, acidic fibroblast growth factor exerted a protective effect, deterring S. aureus adherence to cultured endothelial cells. Endothelial cell heparan sulfate was also directly involved in the adherence process. Subtle modulations of endothelial cells can significantly affect the ability of S. aureus to adhere to and then infect these cells. Similar alterations may contribute to the ability of S. aureus to infect endovascular tissue in vivo. PMID:3259546

  8. Increasing Antiretroviral Adherence for HIV-Positive African Americans (Project Rise): A Treatment Education Intervention Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Bogart, Laura M; Mutchler, Matt G; McDavitt, Bryce; Mutepfa, Kieta D; Risley, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Background HIV-positive African Americans have been shown to have lower adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) than those of other races/ethnicities, yet adherence interventions have rarely been tailored to the needs of this population. Objective We developed and will evaluate a treatment education adherence intervention (called Rise) that was culturally adapted to address the needs of African Americans living with HIV. Methods This randomized controlled trial will examine the effects of the Rise intervention on ART adherence and HIV viral load. African Americans on ART who report adherence problems will be recruited from the community and randomly assigned to receive the intervention or usual care for 6 months. The intervention consists of 6-10 individual counseling sessions, with more sessions provided to those who demonstrate lower adherence. Primary outcomes include adherence as monitored continuously with Medication Event Monitoring Systems (MEMS) caps, and viral load data received from the participant’s medical provider. Survey assessments will be administered at baseline and month 6. Results The trial is ongoing. Conclusions If effective, the Rise intervention will provide community-based organizations with an intervention tailored to address the needs of African Americans for promoting optimal ART adherence and HIV clinical outcomes. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01350544; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01350544 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6fjqqnmn0). PMID:27025399

  9. Future directions in research on consumer-provider communication and adherence to cancer prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    DiMatteo, M Robin

    2003-05-01

    The goal of this paper is to examine emerging issues in consumer-provider communication and patient adherence to cancer prevention, screening, diagnosis, treatment, and coping with survivorship. Many factors that have been shown to affect adherence can be supported or hindered by provider-patient communication, including the provider-patient relationship, patients' beliefs, social and cultural norms, family and social support, mood, and behavioral management. Six research questions are posed, and substantive and methodological recommendations are offered for empirical research on the measurement and achievement of patient adherence.

  10. Interactions between Mesenchymal Stem Cells, Adipocytes, and Osteoblasts in a 3D Tri-Culture Model of Hyperglycemic Conditions in the Bone Marrow Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Rinker, Torri E.; Hammoudi, Taymour M.; Kemp, Melissa L.; Lu, Hang; Temenoff, Johnna S.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have found that uncontrolled diabetes and consequential hyperglycemic conditions can lead to increased incidence of osteoporosis. Osteoblasts, adipocytes, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are all components of the bone marrow microenvironment and thus may have an effect on diabetes-related osteoporosis. However, few studies have investigated the influence of these three cell types on each other, especially in the context of hyperglycemia. Thus, we developed a hydrogel-based 3D culture platform engineered to allow live-cell retrieval in order to investigate the interactions between MSCs, osteoblasts, and adipocytes in mono-, co-, and tri-culture configurations under hyperglycemic conditions for 7 days of culture. Gene expression, histochemical analysis of differentiation markers, and cell viability were measured for all cell types, and MSC-laden hydrogels were degraded to retrieve cells to assess colony-forming capacity. Multivariate models of gene expression data indicated that primary discrimination was dependent on neighboring cell type, validating the need for co-culture configurations to study conditions modeling this disease state. MSC viability and clonogenicity were reduced when mono- and co-cultured with osteoblasts in high glucose levels. In contrast, MSCs had no reduction of viability or clonogenicity when cultured with adipocytes in high glucose conditions and adipogenic gene expression indicated that cross-talk between MSCs and adipocytes may occur. Thus, our unique culture platform combined with post-culture multivariate analysis provided novel insight into cellular interactions within the MSC microenvironment and highlights the necessity of multi-cellular culture systems for further investigation of complex pathologies such as diabetes and osteoporosis. PMID:24463781

  11. Optimization of culture conditions to improve Helicobacter pylori growth in Ham's F-12 medium by response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Bessa, L J; Correia, D M; Cellini, L; Azevedo, N F; Rocha, I

    2012-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a gastroduodenal pathogen that colonizes the human stomach and is the causal agent of gastric diseases. From the clinical and epidemiological point of view, enhancing and improving the growth of this bacterium in liquid media is an important goal to achieve in order to allow the performance of accurate physiological studies. The aim of this work was to optimize three culture conditions that influence the growth of H. pylori in the defined medium Ham s F-12 supplemented with 5 percent fetal bovine serum by using response surface methodology as a statistical technique to obtain the optimal conditions. The factors studied in this experimental design (Box-Behnken design) were the pH of the medium, the shaking speed (rpm) and the percentage of atmospheric oxygen, in a total of 17 experiments. The biomass specific growth rate was the response measured. The model was validated for pH and shaking speed. The percentage of atmospheric oxygen did not influence the growth for the range of values studied. At the optimal values found for pH and shaking speed, 8 and 130 rpm, respectively, a specific growth rate value of 0.164 h-1, corresponding to a maximal concentration of approximately 1.5x108 CFU/ml, was reached after 8 h. The experimental design strategy allowed, for the first time, the optimization of H. pylori growth in a semi-synthetic medium, which may be important to improve physiological and metabolic studies of this fastidious bacterium.

  12. Characterization of Phenotypic and Transcriptional Differences in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells under 2D and 3D Culture Conditions.

    PubMed

    Kamei, Ken-Ichiro; Koyama, Yoshie; Tokunaga, Yumie; Mashimo, Yasumasa; Yoshioka, Momoko; Fockenberg, Christopher; Mosbergen, Rowland; Korn, Othmar; Wells, Christine; Chen, Yong

    2016-11-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells hold great promise for applications in drug discovery and regenerative medicine. Microfluidic technology is a promising approach for creating artificial microenvironments; however, although a proper 3D microenvironment is required to achieve robust control of cellular phenotypes, most current microfluidic devices provide only 2D cell culture and do not allow tuning of physical and chemical environmental cues simultaneously. Here, the authors report a 3D cellular microenvironment plate (3D-CEP), which consists of a microfluidic device filled with thermoresponsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-β-poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogel (HG), which enables systematic tuning of both chemical and physical environmental cues as well as in situ cell monitoring. The authors show that H9 human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and 253G1 human induced pluripotent stem cells in the HG/3D-CEP system maintain their pluripotent marker expression under HG/3D-CEP self-renewing conditions. Additionally, global gene expression analyses are used to elucidate small variations among different test environments. Interestingly, the authors find that treatment of H9 hESCs under HG/3D-CEP self-renewing conditions results in initiation of entry into the neural differentiation process by induction of PAX3 and OTX1 expression. The authors believe that this HG/3D-CEP system will serve as a versatile platform for developing targeted functional cell lines and facilitate advances in drug screening and regenerative medicine.

  13. HPLC analysis of midodrine and desglymidodrine in culture medium: evaluation of static and shaken conditions on the biotransformation by fungi.

    PubMed

    Barth, Thiago; Aleu, Josefina; Pupo, Mônica Tallarico; Bonato, Pierina Sueli; Collado, Isidro G

    2013-01-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method is presented for the simultaneous determination of midodrine and desglymidodrine (DMAE) in Czapek-Dox culture medium, to be used in biotransformation studies by fungi. The HPLC analysis was conducted using a Lichrospher 100 RP18 column, acetonitrile-40 mmol/L formic acid solution (60:40, v/v) as mobile phase, and ultraviolet detection at 290 nm. The sample preparation was conducted by liquid-liquid extraction using ethyl acetate as extractor solvent. The method was linear over the concentration range of 0.4-40.0 µg/mL for midodrine (r ≥ 0.9997) and DMAE (r ≥ 0.9998). Within-day and between-day precision and accuracy were evaluated by relative standard deviations (≤ 8.2%) and relative errors (-7.3 to 7.4%), respectively. The validated method was used to assess midodrine biotransformation by the fungi Papulaspora immersa Hotson SS13, Botrytis cinerea UCA 992 and Botrytis cinerea 2100 under static and shaken conditions. Under shaken conditions, the biotransformation of midodrine to DMAE was more efficient for all studied fungi, especially for the fungus Botrytis cinerea 2100, which converted 42.2% of midodrine to DMAE.

  14. Brain stem slice conditioned medium contains endogenous BDNF and GDNF that affect neural crest boundary cap cells in co-culture.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Andreas; Kale, Ajay; Novozhilova, Ekaterina; Siratirakun, Piyaporn; Aquino, Jorge B; Thonabulsombat, Charoensri; Ernfors, Patrik; Olivius, Petri

    2014-05-30

    Conditioned medium (CM), made by collecting medium after a few days in cell culture and then re-using it to further stimulate other cells, is a known experimental concept since the 1950s. Our group has explored this technique to stimulate the performance of cells in culture in general, and to evaluate stem- and progenitor cell aptitude for auditory nerve repair enhancement in particular. As compared to other mediums, all primary endpoints in our published experimental settings have weighed in favor of conditioned culture medium, where we have shown that conditioned culture medium has a stimulatory effect on cell survival. In order to explore the reasons for this improved survival we set out to analyze the conditioned culture medium. We utilized ELISA kits to investigate whether brain stem (BS) slice CM contains any significant amounts of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and glial cell derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). We further looked for a donor cell with progenitor characteristics that would be receptive to BDNF and GDNF. We chose the well-documented boundary cap (BC) progenitor cells to be tested in our in vitro co-culture setting together with cochlear nucleus (CN) of the BS. The results show that BS CM contains BDNF and GDNF and that survival of BC cells, as well as BC cell differentiation into neurons, were enhanced when BS CM were used. Altogether, we conclude that BC cells transplanted into a BDNF and GDNF rich environment could be suitable for treatment of a traumatized or degenerated auditory nerve.

  15. On the influence of the culture conditions in bacterial antifouling bioassays and biofilm properties: Shewanella algae, a case study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A variety of conditions (culture media, inocula, incubation temperatures) are employed in antifouling tests with marine bacteria. Shewanella algae was selected as model organism to evaluate the effect of these parameters on: bacterial growth, biofilm formation, the activity of model antifoulants, and the development and nanomechanical properties of the biofilms. The main objectives were: 1) To highlight and quantify the effect of these conditions on relevant parameters for antifouling studies: biofilm morphology, thickness, roughness, surface coverage, elasticity and adhesion forces. 2) To establish and characterise in detail a biofilm model with a relevant marine strain. Results Both the medium and the temperature significantly influenced the total cell densities and biofilm biomasses in 24-hour cultures. Likewise, the IC50 of three antifouling standards (TBTO, tralopyril and zinc pyrithione) was significantly affected by the medium and the initial cell density. Four media (Marine Broth, MB; 2% NaCl Mueller-Hinton Broth, MH2; Luria Marine Broth, LMB; and Supplemented Artificial Seawater, SASW) were selected to explore their effect on the morphological and nanomechanical properties of 24-h biofilms. Two biofilm growth patterns were observed: a clear trend to vertical development, with varying thickness and surface coverage in MB, LMB and SASW, and a horizontal, relatively thin film in MH2. The Atomic Force Microscopy analysis showed the lowest Young modulii for MB (0.16 ± 0.10 MPa), followed by SASW (0.19 ± 0.09 MPa), LMB (0.22 ± 0.13 MPa) and MH2 (0.34 ± 0.16 MPa). Adhesion forces followed an inverted trend, being higher in MB (1.33 ± 0.38 nN) and lower in MH2 (0.73 ± 0.29 nN). Conclusions All the parameters significantly affected the ability of S. algae to grow and form biofilms, as well as the activity of antifouling molecules. A detailed study has been carried out in order to establish a biofilm model for further assays. The morphology and

  16. Practical methods for handling human periodontal ligament stem cells in serum-free and serum-containing culture conditions under hypoxia: implications for regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Murabayashi, Dai; Mochizuki, Mai; Tamaki, Yuichi; Nakahara, Taka

    2017-02-06

    Stem cell-based therapies depend on the reliable expansion of patient-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in vitro. The supplementation of cell culture media with serum is associated with several risks; accordingly, serum-free media are commercially available for cell culture. Furthermore, hypoxia is known to accelerate the expansion of MSCs. The present study aimed to characterize the properties of periodontal ligament-derived MSCs (PDLSCs) cultivated in serum-free and serum-containing media, under hypoxic and normoxic conditions. Cell growth, gene and protein expression, cytodifferentiation potential, genomic stability, cytotoxic response, and in vivo hard tissue generation of PDLSCs were examined. Our findings indicated that cultivation in serum-free medium does not affect the MSC phenotype or chromosomal stability of PDLSCs. PDLSCs expanded in serum-free medium exhibited more active growth than in fetal bovine serum-containing medium. We found that hypoxia does not alter the cell growth of PDLSCs under serum-free conditions, but inhibits their osteogenic and adipogenic cytodifferentiation while enabling maintenance of their multidifferentiation potential regardless of the presence of serum. PDLSCs expanded in serum-free medium were found to retain common MSC characteristics, including the capacity for hard tissue formation in vivo. However, PDLSCs cultured in serum-free culture conditions were more susceptible to damage following exposure to extrinsic cytotoxic stimuli than those cultured in medium supplemented with serum, suggesting that serum-free culture conditions do not exert protective effects against cytotoxicity on PDLSC cultures. The present work provides a comparative evaluation of cell culture in serum-free and serum-containing media, under hypoxic and normoxic conditions, for applications in regenerative medicine.

  17. Natural variability of in vitro adherence to fibrinogen and fibronectin does not correlate with in vivo infectivity of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Ythier, Mathilde; Entenza, Jose M; Bille, Jacques; Vandenesch, François; Bes, Michèle; Moreillon, Philippe; Sakwinska, Olga

    2010-04-01

    Adherence to fibrinogen and fibronectin plays a crucial role in Staphylococcus aureus experimental endocarditis. Previous genetic studies have shown that infection and carriage isolates do not systematically differ in their virulence-related genes, including genes conferring adherence, such as clfA and fnbA. We set out to determine the range of adherence phenotypes in carriage isolates of S. aureus, to compare the adherence of these isolates to the adherence of infection isolates, and to determine the relationship between adherence and infectivity in a rat model of experimental endocarditis. A total of 133 healthy carriage isolates were screened for in vitro adherence to fibrinogen and fibronectin, and 30 isolates were randomly chosen for further investigation. These 30 isolates were compared to 30 infective endocarditis isolates and 30 blood culture isolates. The infectivities of the carriage isolates, which displayed either extremely low or high adherence to fibrinogen and fibronectin, were tested using a rat model of experimental endocarditis. The levels of adherence to both fibrinogen and fibronectin were very similar for isolates from healthy carriers and members of the two groups of infection isolates. All three groups of isolates showed a wide range of adherence to fibrinogen and fibronectin. Moreover, the carriage isolates that showed minimal adherence and the carriage isolates that showed strong adherence had the same infectivity in experimental endocarditis. Adherence was proven to be important for pathogenesis in experimental endocarditis, but even the least adherent carriage strains had the ability to induce infection. We discuss the roles of differential gene expression, human host factors, and gene redundancy in resolving this apparent paradox.

  18. Optimization of culture conditions and medium composition for the marine algicidal bacterium Alteromonas sp. DH46 by uniform design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jing; Zheng, Wei; Tian, Yun; Wang, Guizhong; Zheng, Tianling

    2013-09-01

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) have led to extensive ecological and environmental issues and huge economic losses. Various HAB control techniques have been developed, and biological methods have been paid more attention. Algicidal bacteria is a general designation for bacteria which inhibit algal growth in a direct or indirect manner, and kill or damage the algal cells. A metabolite which is strongly toxic to the dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense was produced by strain DH46 of the alga-lysing bacterium Alteromonas sp. The culture conditions were optimized using a single-factor test method. Factors including carbon source, nitrogen source, temperature, initial pH value, rotational speed and salinity were studied. The results showed that the cultivation of the bacteria at 28°C and 180 r min-1 with initial pH 7 and 30 salt contcentration favored both the cell growth and the lysing effect of strain DH46. The optimal medium composition for strain DH46 was determined by means of uniform design experimentation, and the most important components influencing the cell density were tryptone, yeast extract, soluble starch, NaNO3 and MgSO4. When the following culture medium was used (tryptone 14.0g, yeast extract 1.63g, soluble starch 5.0 g, NaNO3 1.6 g, MgSO4 2.3 g in 1L), the largest bacterial dry weight (7.36 g L-1) was obtained, which was an enhancement of 107% compared to the initial medium; and the algal lysis rate was as high as 98.4% which increased nearly 10% after optimization.

  19. Effects of culture conditions on estrogen-mediated hepatic in vitro gene expression and correlation to in vivo responses.

    PubMed

    Fong, C J; Burgoon, L D; Zacharewski, T R

    2006-08-15

    Refinement of in vitro systems for predictive toxicology is important in order to develop high-throughput early toxicity screening assays and to minimize animal testing studies. This study assesses the ability of mouse Hepa-1c1c7 hepatoma cell model under differing culture conditions to predict in vivo estrogen-induced hepatic gene expression changes. Custom mouse cDNA microarrays were used to compare Hepa-1c1c7 temporal gene expression profiles treated with 10 nM 17beta-estradiol (E2) in serum-free and charcoal-stripped serum supplemented media at 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, and 24 h. Stripped serum supplemented media increased the number gene expression changes and overall responsiveness likely due to the presence of serum factors supporting proliferation and mitochondrial activity. Data from both experiments were compared to a gene expression time course study examining the hepatic effects of 100 microg/kg 17alpha-ethynyl estradiol (EE) in C57BL/6 mice at 2, 4, 8, 12, 18, and 24 h. Only 18 genes overlapped between the serum-free and in vivo studies, whereas 238 genes were in common between Hepa-1c1c7 cells in stripped serum data and C57BL/6 liver samples. Stripped serum cultured cells exhibited E2-elicited gene expression changes associated with proliferation, cytoskeletal re-organization, cholesterol uptake and synthesis, increased fatty acid beta-oxidation, and oxidative stress, which correlated with in vivo hepatic responses. These results demonstrate that E2 treatment of Hepa-1c1c7 cells in serum supplemented media modulate responses in selected pathways which appropriately model estrogen-elicited in vivo hepatic responses.

  20. Effects of cultural medium and conditions on the proliferation and hypoglycemic activity of Saccharomyces pastorianus no. 54.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chien-Hui; Lin, Hong-Ting; Wu, Guan-James; Wang, Sheng-Hong; Tsai, Guo-Jane

    2011-08-01

    A yeast strain of Saccharomyces pastorianus no. 54 with hypoglycemic activity was isolated from soils of a winery. The aims of this study were first to investigate the effects of the cultivation conditions on proliferation and hypoglycemic activity of this yeast using the assay model of the differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes, and then, to confirm in vivo the hypoglycemic activity of cultured yeast by oral administration in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. Among 7 diluted fruit juice samples the diluted strawberry juice (1.74 g/L reducing sugar content) was chosen as the basal medium. After investigation of the effects of addition of various substances, including 1% of 5 different sugars and glycerol, 0.1% of 6 nitrogen-containing substances, and 1 ppm of 7 growth factors, the diluted strawberry juice added with 1% glucose, 0.1% yeast extract and 1 ppm aspartic acid was optimized at 20 °C with initial pH value of 6.0 for cultivating S. pastorianus no. 54 in flask. The scale-up system of a 5-L fermentor was further established by using the same medium with initial pH 6.0 and being incubated at 20 °C with an aeration rate of 1.2 vvm for 96 h. The hypoglycemic activity of yeast cells cultivated in fermentor was 3.11 times of that in flask. Oral administration of the cultured yeast at a dosage of 130 mg/kg body weight/day for 6 days could significantly reduce the plasma glucose content in STZ-induced diabetic mice and keep their body weights in the normal range.

  1. Effect of culture conditions on growth, lipid content, and fatty acid composition of Aurantiochytrium mangrovei strain BL10.

    PubMed

    Chaung, Kai-Chuang; Chu, Chun-Yao; Su, Yu-Ming; Chen, Yi-Min

    2012-08-10

    This study explored the influence of various culture conditions on the biomass, lipid content, production of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and fatty acid composition of Aurantiochytrium mangrovei strain BL10. The variables examined in this study include the species and concentration of salt, the concentrations of the two substrates glucose and yeast extract, the level of dissolved oxygen, the cerulenin treatment, and the stages of BL10 growth. Our results demonstrate that BL10 culture produces maximum biomass when salinity levels are between 0.2 and 3.0%. Decreasing salinity to 0.1% resulted in a considerable decrease in the biomass, lipid content, DHA production, and DHA to palmitic acid (PA) (DHA/PA) ratio, signifying deterioration in the quality of the oil produced. The addition of 0.9% sodium sulfate to replenish salinity from 0.1% to 1.0% successfully recovered biomass, lipid content and DHA production levels; however, this also led to a decrease in DHA/PA ratio. An increase in oxygen and cerulenin levels resulted in a concomitant decrease in the DHA to docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) (DHA/DPA) ratio in BL10 oil. Furthermore, the DHA/DPA and DHA/PA ratios varied considerably before and after the termination of cell division, which occurred around the 24 hour mark. These results could serve as a foundation for elucidating the biochemistry underlying the accumulation of lipids, and a definition of the extrinsic (environmental or nutritional) and intrinsic (cell growth stage) factors that influence lipid quality and the production of DHA by BL10.

  2. Effects of culture conditions on estrogen-mediated hepatic in vitro gene expression and correlation to in vivo responses

    SciTech Connect

    Fong, C.J.; Burgoon, L.D.; Zacharewski, T.R. . E-mail: tzachare@msu.edu

    2006-08-15

    Refinement of in vitro systems for predictive toxicology is important in order to develop high-throughput early toxicity screening assays and to minimize animal testing studies. This study assesses the ability of mouse Hepa-1c1c7 hepatoma cell model under differing culture conditions to predict in vivo estrogen-induced hepatic gene expression changes. Custom mouse cDNA microarrays were used to compare Hepa-1c1c7 temporal gene expression profiles treated with 10 nM 17{beta}-estradiol (E2) in serum-free and charcoal-stripped serum supplemented media at 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, and 24 h. Stripped serum supplemented media increased the number gene expression changes and overall responsiveness likely due to the presence of serum factors supporting proliferation and mitochondrial activity. Data from both experiments were compared to a gene expression time course study examining the hepatic effects of 100 {mu}g/kg 17{alpha}-ethynyl estradiol (EE) in C57BL/6 mice at 2, 4, 8, 12, 18, and 24 h. Only 18 genes overlapped between the serum-free and in vivo studies, whereas 238 genes were in common between Hepa-1c1c7 cells in stripped serum data and C57BL/6 liver samples. Stripped serum cultured cells exhibited E2-elicited gene expression changes associated with proliferation, cytoskeletal re-organization, cholesterol uptake and synthesis, increased fatty acid {beta}-oxidation, and oxidative stress, which correlated with in vivo hepatic responses. These results demonstrate that E2 treatment of Hepa-1c1c7 cells in serum supplemented media modulate responses in selected pathways which appropriately model estrogen-elicited in vivo hepatic responses.

  3. Genetic stability and mutant selection in Sabin 2 strain of oral poliovirus vaccine grown under different cell culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Taffs, R E; Chumakov, K M; Rezapkin, G V; Lu, Z; Douthitt, M; Dragunsky, E M; Levenbook, I S

    1995-06-01

    Mutations that consistently accumulated in the attenuated Sabin 2 strain of poliovirus during propagation in cell cultures were identified by sequence heterogeneity assay and quantified by mutant analysis by PCR and restriction enzyme cleavage (MAPREC). Eight additional sites previously identified in stool isolates were also examined by MAPREC in the virus passages. The pattern of selectable mutations and the rate of their accumulation depended on the type and confluence of the cell culture and the temperature of virus growth. Five unstable genomic sites were identified in Sabin 2 virus passaged 10 times at 34 degrees in African green monkey kidney (AGMK) cells, with the mutations accumulating in the range 1 to 24%. Accumulation of these mutations did not appear to result in a loss of attenuated phenotype since the virus passaged under these conditions passed the monkey neurovirulence test (MNVT). The content of the 481-G revertant known to be related to neurovirulence in monkeys did not increase. Thus, our results suggest that upon growth of Sabin 2 virus in AGMK cells at 34 degrees, the key determinant(s) of attenuation remained stable, and the mutations that occurred did not affect monkey neurovirulence. In virus passaged 10 times at 37 degrees in AGMK cells, 4 unstable genomic sites were identified, in some of them accumulating up to 12% of the mutants. This virus sample severely failed the MNVT. Virus passaged in Vero cells at 34 and 37 degrees accumulated mutants at 7 and 14 genomic sites, respectively, including 481-G in both cases, with almost complete substitution of the original nucleotides at some of the sites. We tested 44 commercial monopools of Type 2 OPV and found out that all of them contained 481-G revertants in the range 0.4-1.1%. An increase in the 481-G revertants in passaged viruses to the level of 4% and above correlated with failure of these samples by the MNVT. Since the pattern of selectable mutations differed in viruses grown in the two

  4. SP 03-1 POLYPILL STRATEGY TO IMPROVED ADHERENCE.

    PubMed

    Prabhakaran, Dorairaj

    2016-09-01

    Among individuals with established CVD, multiple medications (aspirin, blood pressure lowering drugs and statins) are required to manage CVD and it is well established that non adherence to prescribed treatments is substantial in the long term. Such discontinuation of CV-preventive medications and low adherence rates has been shown to affect the success of CVD prevention efforts. In low- and middle income countries only less than 20% patients receive recommended therapy for CVD prevention, but even in high-income countries treatment coverage in the community is only about 50% in those with heart disease and 35% in those with stroke. Patients adherence to CV drugs is likely to be adversely affected by a number of factors including patients' beliefs, complexity of medication regime, lack of understanding of their condition or medication, and medication cost and associated clinic visits cost. Fixed-dose combination (FDC) polypill therapy may reduce these treatment gaps by reducing cost, complexity, therapeutic inertia, and low adherence. There are several mechanisms whereby an FDC strategy may enhance adherence. These encompass ease of prescription, overcoming physician inertia, patient acceptability, packaged delivery, and ease of taking. Recent evidence from well-designed randomized controlled trials (UMPIRE, Kanyini-GAP, IMPACT) and meta-analysis (SPACE collaboration) of RCTs have shown that access to FDC polypill in patients with CVD or similarly high risk improved adherence, BP, and cholesterol levels. These trials have shown that physicians are willing to prescribe polypill to this group of patients by involving them in the trial, and at the end of the study more patients were taking the FDC treatment. In order to achieve substantial reduction of CVD burden, immediate use of FDC/polypill in secondary prevention is indicated; however, the evidence in primary prevention needs to be adjudicated.

  5. Uptake of macrominerals and trace elements by the cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis (Arthrospira platensis PCC 8005) under photoautotrophic conditions: culture medium optimization.

    PubMed

    Cogne, Guillaume; Lehmann, Bernd; Dussap, Claude-Gilles; Gros, Jean-Bernard

    2003-03-05

    Uptake rates of macrominerals and trace elements were characterized in batch and continuous cultures of Spirulina platensis under photoautotropic conditions. The values of yield coefficients were determined using inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy (ICP-ES). Further simplifications of culture medium proved possible, mainly in the trace element solutions; concentrations of some elements were lowered and trace elements B, Mo, V, Cr, Ni, Co, W, and Ti were removed.

  6. Patient perceptions of voice therapy adherence.

    PubMed

    van Leer, Eva; Connor, Nadine P

    2010-07-01

    Patient perspectives of behavioral voice therapy, including perspectives of treatment adherence, have not been formally documented. Because treatment adherence is, to a large extent, determined by patient beliefs, assessment of patient perspectives is integral to the study of adherence. Fifteen patients who had undergone at least two sessions of direct voice therapy for a variety of voice disorders/complaints were interviewed about their perspectives on voice therapy, with a particular focus on adherence. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed for content according to qualitative methods. Three common content themes emerged from the transcripts: Voice Therapy is Hard, Make it Happen, and The Match Matters. Findings were compared with reports of patient experiences in other behavioral interventions, such as diet and exercise, and related to existing theoretical models of behavior change and therapeutic process. This study yields information toward the development of scales to measure adherence-related constructs and strategies to improve treatment adherence in voice therapy.

  7. Understanding the life experience of people on hemodialysis: adherence to treatment and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Guerra-Guerrerro, Verónica; Plazas, Maria del Pilar Camargo; Cameron, Brenda L; Salas, Anna Valeria Santos; González, Carmen Gloria Cofre

    2014-01-01

    This hermeneutic-phenomenological study explores the lived experiences of patients on hemodialysis in regard to the adherence to treatment and quality of life. Fifteen patients were interviewed, including six women and nine men from three dialysis centers in Chile. Two main themes derived from the analysis: 1) embracing the disease and dialysis, and 2) preventing progression of the disease through treatment management. The findings suggest that patients recognize adherence to treatment and quality of life as conditions that derive from self-care and environmental conditions, which the healthcare provider must constantly assess for care planning to improve the adherence and quality of life in this population.

  8. Medication Adherence: A Call for Action

    PubMed Central

    Bosworth, Hayden B.; Granger, Bradi B.; Mendys, Phil; Brindis, Ralph; Burkholder, Rebecca; Czajkowski, Susan M.; Daniel, Jodi G.; Ekman, Inger; Ho, Michael; Johnson, Mimi; Kimmel, Stephen E.; Liu, Larry Z; Musaus, John; Shrank, William H.; Buono, Elizabeth Whalley; Weiss, Karen; Granger, Christopher B.

    2013-01-01

    Poor adherence to efficacious cardiovascular related medications has led to considerable morbidity, mortality, and avoidable health care costs. This paper provides results of a recent think tank meeting in which various stakeholder groups representing key experts from consumers, community health providers, the academic community, decision-making government officials (FDA, NIH, etc), and industry scientists met to evaluate the current status of medication adherence and provide recommendations for improving outcomes. Below, we review the magnitude of the problem of medication adherence, prevalence, impact, and cost. We then summarize proven effective approaches and conclude with a discussion of recommendations to address this growing and significant public health issue of medication non adherence. PMID:21884856

  9. Key Process Conditions for Production of C4 Dicarboxylic Acids in Bioreactor Batch Cultures of an Engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain▿

    PubMed Central

    Zelle, Rintze M.; de Hulster, Erik; Kloezen, Wendy; Pronk, Jack T.; van Maris, Antonius J. A.

    2010-01-01

    A recent effort to improve malic acid production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae by means of metabolic engineering resulted in a strain that produced up to 59 g liter−1 of malate at a yield of 0.42 mol (mol glucose)−1 in calcium carbonate-buffered shake flask cultures. With shake flasks, process parameters that are important for scaling up this process cannot be controlled independently. In this study, growth and product formation by the engineered strain were studied in bioreactors in order to separately analyze the effects of pH, calcium, and carbon dioxide and oxygen availability. A near-neutral pH, which in shake flasks was achieved by adding CaCO3, was required for efficient C4 dicarboxylic acid production. Increased calcium concentrations, a side effect of CaCO3 dissolution, had a small positive effect on malate formation. Carbon dioxide enrichment of the sparging gas (up to 15% [vol/vol]) improved production of both malate and succinate. At higher concentrations, succinate titers further increased, reaching 0.29 mol (mol glucose)−1, whereas malate formation strongly decreased. Although fully aerobic conditions could be achieved, it was found that moderate oxygen limitation benefitted malate production. In conclusion, malic acid production with the engineered S. cerevisiae strain could be successfully transferred from shake flasks to 1-liter batch bioreactors by simultaneous optimization of four process parameters (pH and concentrations of CO2, calcium, and O2). Under optimized conditions, a malate yield of 0.48 ± 0.01 mol (mol glucose)−1 was obtained in bioreactors, a 19% increase over yields in shake flask experiments. PMID:20008165

  10. Development of an economical, autonomous pHstat system for culturing phytoplankton under steady state or dynamic conditions.

    PubMed

    Golda, Rachel L; Golda, Mark D; Hayes, Jacqueline A; Peterson, Tawnya D; Needoba, Joseph A

    2017-05-01

    Laboratory investigations of physiological processes in phytoplankton require precise control of experimental conditions. Chemostats customized to control and maintain stable pH levels (pHstats) are ideally suited for investigations of the effects of pH on phytoplankton physiology, for example in context of ocean acidification. Here we designed and constructed a simple, flexible pHstat system and demonstrated its operational capabilities under laboratory culture conditions. In particular, the system is useful for simulating natural cyclic pH variability within aquatic ecosystems, such as diel fluctuations that result from metabolic activity or tidal mixing in estuaries. The pHstat system operates in two modes: (1) static/set point pH, which maintains pH at a constant level, or (2) dynamic pH, which generates regular, sinusoidal pH fluctuations by systematically varying pH according to user-defined parameters. The pHstat is self-regulating through the use of interchangeable electronically controlled reagent or gas-mediated pH-modification manifolds, both of which feature flow regulation by solenoid valves. Although effective pH control was achieved using both liquid reagent additions and gas-mediated methods, the liquid manifold exhibited tighter control (±0.03pH units) of the desired pH than the gas manifold (±0.10pH units). The precise control provided by this pHstat system, as well as its operational flexibility will facilitate studies that examine responses by marine microbiota to fluctuations in pH in aquatic ecosystems.

  11. Mortality and pathology in brown bullheads Amieurus nebulosus associated with a spontaneous Edwardsiella ictaluri outbreak under tank culture conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iwanowicz, L.R.; Griffin, A.R.; Cartwright, Deborah D.; Blazer, V.S.

    2006-01-01

    Brown bullheads Amieurus nebulosus (family Ictaluridae) are commonly used as a sentinel of environmental contamination. These fish are not generally cultured under laboratory conditions and little is known about their disease susceptibility. Here we report an outbreak of disease due to Edwardsiella ictaluri in a laboratory population of tank-reared, wild-caught brown bullheads. The isolate was positively identified as E. ictaluri using standard bacteriological substrate utilization tests and a monoclonal antibody specific for this bacterium. This pathogen causes a significant disease in channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus and is associated with disease in other ictalurid and non-ictalurid fishes. It appears that E. ictaluri is also a significant pathogen in brown bullheads and produces clinical signs and lesions similar but not identical to those observed in channel catfish. Since commercial sources of bullheads for laboratory tank studies are not available, precautions should be taken to prevent potential E. ictaluri disease outbreaks from wild-caught bullheads intended for laboratory research. ?? Inter-Research 2006.

  12. A novel liquid medium for the efficient growth of the salmonid pathogen Piscirickettsia salmonis and optimization of culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Henríquez, Mirtha; González, Ernesto; Marshall, Sergio H; Henríquez, Vitalia; Gómez, Fernando A; Martínez, Irene; Altamirano, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Piscirickettsia salmonis is the bacterium that causes Piscirickettsiosis, a systemic disease of salmonid fish responsible for significant economic losses within the aquaculture industry worldwide. The growth of the bacterium for vaccine formulation has been traditionally accomplished by infecting eukaryotic cell lines, a process that involves high production costs and is time-consuming. Recent research has demonstrated that it is possible to culture pure P. salmonis in a blood containing (cell-free) medium. In the present work we demonstrate the growth of P. salmonis in a liquid medium free from blood and serum components, thus establishing a novel and simplified bacteriological medium. Additionally, the new media reported provides improved growth conditions for P. salmonis, where biomass concentrations of approximately 800 mg cell dry weight L(-1) were obtained, about eight times higher than those reported for the blood containing medium. A 2- level full factorial design was employed to evaluate the significance of the main medium components on cell growth and an optimal temperature range of 23-27°C was determined for the microorganism to grow in the novel liquid media. Therefore, these results represent a breakthrough regarding P. salmonis research in order to optimize pure P. salmonis growth in liquid blood and serum free medium.

  13. Optimization of Culture Conditions for Some Identified Fungal Species and Stability Profile of α-Galactosidase Produced

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, A. S.; Srivastava, N.; Kehri, H. K.; Sharma, B.

    2013-01-01

    Microbial α-galactosidase preparations have implications in medicine and in the modification of various agricultural products as well. In this paper, four isolated fungal strains such as AL-3, WF-3, WP-4 and CL-4 from rhizospheric soil identified as Penicillium glabrum (AL-3), Trichoderma evansii (WF-3), Lasiodiplodia theobromae (WP-4) and Penicillium flavus (CL-4) based on their morphology and microscopic examinations, are screened for their potential towards α-galactosidases production. The culture conditions have been optimized and supplemented with specific carbon substrates (1%, w/v) by using galactose-containing polysaccharides like guar gum (GG), soya casein (SC) and wheat straw (WS). All strains significantly released galactose from GG, showing maximum production of enzyme at 7th day of incubation in rotary shaker (120 rpm) that is 190.3, 174.5, 93.9 and 28.8 U/mL, respectively, followed by SC and WS. The enzyme activity was stable up to 7days at −20°C, then after it declines. This investigation reveals that AL-3 show optimum enzyme activity in guar gum media, whereas WF-3 exhibited greater enzyme stability. Results indicated that the secretion of proteins, enzyme and the stability of enzyme activity varied not only from one strain to another but also differed in their preferences of utilization of different substrates. PMID:23424684

  14. Optimization of Culture Conditions for Some Identified Fungal Species and Stability Profile of α-Galactosidase Produced.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, A S; Srivastava, N; Kehri, H K; Sharma, B

    2013-01-01

    Microbial α-galactosidase preparations have implications in medicine and in the modification of various agricultural products as well. In this paper, four isolated fungal strains such as AL-3, WF-3, WP-4 and CL-4 from rhizospheric soil identified as Penicillium glabrum (AL-3), Trichoderma evansii (WF-3), Lasiodiplodia theobromae (WP-4) and Penicillium flavus (CL-4) based on their morphology and microscopic examinations, are screened for their potential towards α-galactosidases production. The culture conditions have been optimized and supplemented with specific carbon substrates (1%, w/v) by using galactose-containing polysaccharides like guar gum (GG), soya casein (SC) and wheat straw (WS). All strains significantly released galactose from GG, showing maximum production of enzyme at 7th day of incubation in rotary shaker (120 rpm) that is 190.3, 174.5, 93.9 and 28.8 U/mL, respectively, followed by SC and WS. The enzyme activity was stable up to 7days at -20°C, then after it declines. This investigation reveals that AL-3 show optimum enzyme activity in guar gum media, whereas WF-3 exhibited greater enzyme stability. Results indicated that the secretion of proteins, enzyme and the stability of enzyme activity varied not only from one strain to another but also differed in their preferences of utilization of different substrates.

  15. NAP (davunetide) protects primary hippocampus culture by modulating expression profile of antioxidant genes during limiting oxygen conditions.

    PubMed

    Arya, A; Meena, R; Sethy, N K; Das, M; Sharma, M; Bhargava, K

    2015-04-01

    Hypoxia is a well-known threat to neuronal cells and triggers the pathophysiological syndromes in extreme environments such as high altitudes and traumatic conditions such as stroke. Among several prophylactic molecules proven suitable for ameliorating free radical damage, NAP (an octapeptide with initial amino acids: asparagine/N, alanine/A, and proline/P) can be considered superlative, primarily due to its high permeability into brain through blood-brain barrier and observed activity at femtomolar concentrations. Several mechanisms of action of NAP have been hypothesized for its protective role during hypoxia, yet any distinct mechanism is unknown. Oxidative stress is advocated as the leading event in hypoxia; we, therefore, investigated the regulation of key antioxidant genes to understand the regulatory role of NAP in providing neuroprotection. Primary neuronal culture of rat was subjected to cellular hypoxia by limiting the oxygen concentration to 0.5% for 72 h and observing the prophylactic efficacies of 15fM NAP by conventional cell death assays using flow cytometry. We performed real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction to comprehend the regulatory mechanism. Further, we validated the significantly regulated candidates by enzyme assays and immunoblotting. In the present study, we report that NAP regulates a major clad of cellular antioxidants and there is an involvement of more than one route of action in neuroprotection during hypoxia.

  16. Pathogen and host differences in bacterial adherence to human buccal epithelial cells in a northeast Brazilian community.

    PubMed Central

    Walser, B L; Newman, R D; Lima, A A; Guerrant, R L

    1992-01-01

    The adherence of several strains of Escherichia coli to human buccal epithelial cells was studied, using cells obtained from five groups: healthy adults, healthy children, children with acute diarrhea, children with persistent diarrhea associated with cryptosporidial parasites, and children with noncryptosporidial persistent diarrhea. All groups lived or worked in an urban slum in northeastern Brazil. Samples of buccal epithelial cells from subjects in each of these groups were incubated with wild-type E. coli K-12 (strain C600), the enteroaggregative E. coli strains 17-2 and PDAS 30-5, CFA/II-positive E. coli 1392+ and its plasmid-cured derivative 1392-, and hydrophobic E. coli 132-3. Samples were evaluated microscopically to determine background contamination and the percentage of cells with more than 15% of their surface area obscured by adherent bacteria after incubation and washing. The assay was tested under field conditions and was shown to produce reliable and consistent results. Both enteroaggregative strains of E. coli were shown to adhere to a significantly higher percentage of all groups of human buccal epithelial cells than any of the other tested strains. In addition, buccal epithelial cells from children with nonparasitic persistent diarrhea showed substantially more bacterial adherence in both the native state and with all tested strains of E. coli than did cells from children with persistent cryptosporidial diarrhea or acute diarrhea or from healthy controls. This study provides evidence that enteroaggregative strains of E. coli demonstrate increased adherence to human buccal epithelial cells (as well as to cultured HEp-2 cells) and that buccal epithelial cells from children with noncryptosporidial persistent diarrhea appear to be more susceptible to bacterial adherence and colonization than buccal epithelial cells from control groups. These findings suggest that host differences as well as pathogen differences are important in the pathogenesis of

  17. Development of cystic embryoid bodies with visceral yolk-sac-like structures from mouse embryonic stem cells using low-adherence 96-well plate.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Emiko; Seki, Yuji; Higuchi, Takatoshi; Nakashima, Fumio; Noda, Tomozumi; Kurosawa, Hiroshi

    2009-04-01

    Cystic embryoid bodies with visceral yolk-sac-like structure (cystic EB-Vs) are used as a model for the study of early extraembryonic tissue formation containing visceral endoderm-like derivatives. In this study, we optimized the cell density of embryonic stem (ES) cells for developing cystic EB-Vs in a low-adherence 96-well plate. When ES cells were seeded at a density of 4000 cells/well, the cystic EB-Vs were most efficiently developed from ES cells via forming multicellular spherical aggregates called embryoid bodies (EBs). The suspension culture in the low-adherence plate was preferable for developing EBs into cystic EB-Vs rather than the attachment culture in the plate coated with 0.1% gelatin. The seeding cell density of 4000 cells/well was always superior to 1000 cells/well in the efficiency of cystic EB-V development. Because the high-cell density culture generally raises the limitation of oxygen and nutrient supplies, we investigated the effects of low-oxygen and low-nutrient conditions on the development of cystic EB-Vs. It was found that low oxygen tension was not a factor for promoting the development of cystic EB-Vs. It was suggested that a low-nutrient medium is preferred for developing cystic EB-Vs rather than a sufficient-nutrient medium. In conclusion, the suspension culture in the low-adherence 96-well plate seeded with 4000 ES cells/well was optimum for developing cystic EB-Vs. The low-nutrient condition may be one of the factors for promoting the development of cystic EB-Vs.

  18. Cognitive functioning, depression, and HIV medication adherence in India: a randomized pilot trial

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Ryan; Waldrop-Valverde, Drenna; Sharma, Aman; Vamos, Szonja; Mahajan, Biraaj; Weiss, Stephen M.; Kumar, Mahendra; Nehra, Ritu; Jones, Deborah L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: India is home to the third-largest number of people living with HIV in the world, and no-cost antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been available across the country since 2004. However, rates of adherence to ART are often subpar in India, and interventions to increase adherence are warranted. Cognitive impairment and depression have been associated with ART non-adherence, and may also limit the impact of behavioral interventions designed to improve adherence. Studies have not evaluated the impact of cognitive impairment and depression on response to adherence interventions in India. Methods: Individuals new to ART (≤12 months prescribed) were recruited from a public hospital in Chandigarh, India. Participants (N = 80) were randomized to either a group medication adherence intervention (MAI) or an enhanced standard of care (ESOC) condition. The MAI consisted of three monthly gender-concordant group cognitive-behavioral sessions addressing HIV and ART, adherence, and HIV-related coping and social support. Participants were assessed at baseline for depression and cognitive functioning, and assessed monthly for adherence by pill count. Results: Adherence among participants receiving the MAI improved by about one day's dose over the course of the study, and no improvement was noted among those in the ESOC. Additionally, high rates of cognitive impairment (57%) and depression (25%) were identified among participants. There was no evidence that cognitive impairment moderated response to the intervention. However, while non-depressed participants benefitted from the intervention, depressed participants failed to show the same improvement. Conclusions: Results of this pilot study suggest that group behavioral interventions can be an effective strategy to promote ART adherence in this population, even among those demonstrating cognitive impairment. However, because of the negative impact of depression on adherence, future studies should continue to develop

  19. Adherence to wearing therapeutic shoes among people with diabetes: a systematic review and reflections

    PubMed Central

    Jarl, Gustav; Lundqvist, Lars-Olov

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Therapeutic shoes are prescribed to prevent diabetic foot ulcers, but adherence to wearing the shoes is often poor. Aim The aim of this study was to review the literature on factors that are associated with adherence to wearing therapeutic shoes and construct a model of adherence to aid future research and development in the field. Methods We conducted a systematic search in PubMed, CINAHL, and PsycINFO for quantitative studies on factors associated with adherence to wearing therapeutic shoes among people with diabetes. Results Six studies were included in the review. The studies focused mainly on patient-, therapy-, and condition-related adherence factors. There is some evidence (three to five studies) that sex, diabetes duration, and ulcer history are not associated with adherence. The evidence for or against the other factors was weak (only one or two studies) or conflicting. Conclusion There is no conclusive evidence for using any factor to predict adherence to wearing therapeutic shoes, but there is some evidence against using certain factors for predicting adherence. Future studies should include a broader range of factors, including health system and social/economic factors, and they should investigate perceived costs and benefits of wearing therapeutic shoes in comparison with other shoes or no shoes. A seesaw model is presented illustrating the complex phenomenon of adherence. Further research is needed to identify factors associated with adherence to wearing therapeutic shoes, to enable the development of interventions to improve adherence and thereby reduce ulceration rates among people with diabetic foot complications. PMID:27540284

  20. Co-Regulation of p16INK4a and Migratory Genes in Culture Conditions that Lead to Premature Senescence in Human Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Darbro, Benjamin W.; Schneider, Galen B.; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J.

    2007-01-01

    Cellular stasis, also known as telomere-independent senescence, prevents many epithelial cells from becoming immortalized by telomerase alone. As human keratinocytes age in culture, protein levels of the tumor suppressor p16INK4a continue to increase, resulting in growth arrest independent of telomere length. Differences in culture conditions have been shown to modulate both p16INK4a expression and replicative capacity of human keratinocytes; however, the mechanism of p16INK4a induction under these conditions is unknown. Using multiple primary keratinocyte cell strains, we verified a delay in p16INK4a induction and an extended lifespan of human keratinocytes when grown in co-culture with post-mitotic fibroblast feeder cells as compared with keratinocytes grown on tissue culture plastic alone. Evaluation of gene expression levels in the two culture conditions by microarray analysis, and subsequent validation, demonstrated that keratinocytes cultured on plastic alone had significantly increased expression of many genes involved in keratinocyte migration and reduced expression levels of genes involved in keratinocyte differentiation. Higher levels of p16INK4a expression were present in cells that also displayed increased amounts of autophosphorylated focal adhesion kinase and urokinase plaminogen activator receptor (uPAR), both markers of keratinocyte migration. Furthermore, when tyrosine phosphorylation or urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA)/uPAR function was inhibited, both keratinocyte migration and p16INK4a expression were reduced. Our results indicate that keratinocytes cultured in the absence of feeder cells exhibit a migratory phenotype and suggest that p16INK4a is selectively induced under these conditions by a mechanism involving tyrosine kinase activity and the urokinase plasminogen activation system. PMID:16117791

  1. Three-dimensional culture conditions differentially affect astrocyte modulation of brain endothelial barrier function in response to transforming growth factor β1.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Brian T; Grego, Sonia; Sellgren, Katelyn L

    2015-05-22

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) function is regulated by dynamic interactions among cell types within the neurovascular unit, including astrocytes and endothelial cells. Co-culture models of the BBB typically involve astrocytes seeded on two-dimensional (2D) surfaces, which recent studies indicate cause astrocytes to express a phenotype similar to that of reactive astrocytes in situ. We hypothesized that the culture conditions of astrocytes would differentially affect their ability to modulate BBB function in vitro. Brain endothelial cells were grown alone or in co-culture with astrocytes. Astrocytes were grown either as conventional (2D) monolayers, or in a collagen-based gel which allows them to grow in a three-dimensional (3D) construct. Astrocytes were viable in 3D conditions, and displayed a marked reduction in their expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), suggesting reduced activation. Stimulation of astrocytes with transforming growth factor (TGF)β1 decreased transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) and reduced expression of claudin-5 in co-cultures, whereas treatment of endothelial cells in the absence of astrocytes was without effect. The effect of TGFβ1 on TEER was significantly more pronounced in endothelial cells cultured with 3D astrocytes compared to 2D astrocytes. These results demonstrate that astrocyte culture conditions differentially affect their ability to modulate brain endothelial barrier function, and suggest a direct relationship between reactive gliosis and BBB permeability. Moreover, these studies demonstrate the potential importance of physiologically relevant culture conditions to in vitro modeling of disease processes that affect the neurovascular unit.

  2. Adherence of sputtered titanium carbides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Wheeler, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    The study searches for interface treatment that would increase the adhesion of TiC coating to nickel- and titanium-base alloys. Rene 41 (19 wt percent Cr, 11 wt percent Mo, 3 wt percent Ti, balance Ni) and Ti-6Al-4V (6 wt percent Al, 4 wt percent V, balance Ti) are considered. Adhesion of the coatings is evaluated in pin-and disk friction tests. The coatings and interface regions are examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Results suggest that sputtered refractory compound coatings adhere best when a mixed compound of coating and substrate metals is formed in the interfacial region. The most effective type of refractory compound interface appears to depend on both substrate and coating material. A combination of metallic interlayer deposition and mixed compound interface formation may be more effective for some substrate coating combinations than either alone.