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Sample records for adherent culture conditions

  1. Neurosphere and adherent culture conditions are equivalent for malignant glioma stem cell lines.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Maryam; Reyner, Karina; Deleyrolle, Loic; Millette, Sebastien; Azari, Hassan; Day, Bryan W; Stringer, Brett W; Boyd, Andrew W; Johns, Terrance G; Blot, Vincent; Duggal, Rohit; Reynolds, Brent A

    2015-03-01

    Certain limitations of the neurosphere assay (NSA) have resulted in a search for alternative culture techniques for brain tumor-initiating cells (TICs). Recently, reports have described growing glioblastoma (GBM) TICs as a monolayer using laminin. We performed a side-by-side analysis of the NSA and laminin (adherent) culture conditions to compare the growth and expansion of GBM TICs. GBM cells were grown using the NSA and adherent culture conditions. Comparisons were made using growth in culture, apoptosis assays, protein expression, limiting dilution clonal frequency assay, genetic affymetrix analysis, and tumorigenicity in vivo. In vitro expansion curves for the NSA and adherent culture conditions were virtually identical (P=0.24) and the clonogenic frequencies (5.2% for NSA vs. 5.0% for laminin, P=0.9) were similar as well. Likewise, markers of differentiation (glial fibrillary acidic protein and beta tubulin III) and proliferation (Ki67 and MCM2) revealed no statistical difference between the sphere and attachment methods. Several different methods were used to determine the numbers of dead or dying cells (trypan blue, DiIC, caspase-3, and annexin V) with none of the assays noting a meaningful variance between the two methods. In addition, genetic expression analysis with microarrays revealed no significant differences between the two groups. Finally, glioma cells derived from both methods of expansion formed large invasive tumors exhibiting GBM features when implanted in immune-compromised animals. A detailed functional, protein and genetic characterization of human GBM cells cultured in serum-free defined conditions demonstrated no statistically meaningful differences when grown using sphere (NSA) or adherent conditions. Hence, both methods are functionally equivalent and remain suitable options for expanding primary high-grade gliomas in tissue culture. PMID:25806119

  2. Adherence of Bilophila wadsworthia to cultured human embryonic intestinal cells.

    PubMed

    Gerardo, S H; Garcia, M M; Wexler, H M; Finegold, S M

    1998-02-01

    Adherence of Bilophila wadsworthia to the cultured human embryonic intestinal cell line, Intestine 407 (Int 407), varied among the strains tested from strongly adherent (76-100% cells positive for one or more adherent bacteria) to non- or weakly adherent (0-25% positive cells). Although negative staining revealed that infrequent cells of an adherent strain, WAL 9077, the adherent type-strain, WAL 7959, and a non-adherent strain, WAL 8448, expressed loosely associated fimbrial structures, a role for these structures in adhesion could not be confirmed with either scanning or thin-section electron micrography. Ruthenium red staining of thin-section preparations and subsequent electron microscopy failed to reveal an extensive extracellular polysaccharide layer. SDS-PAGE analysis of crude outer membrane fractions of WAL 9077 and WAL 8448 demonstrated clear differences in their major and minor outer membrane protein components. Thus, we postulate that the adherence of B. wadsworthia to Int 407 cells is mediated by an outer membrane or cell wall component. PMID:16887620

  3. Silk screen based dual spin-filter module for perfusion culture of adherent and non-adherent mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Kamthan, Shweta; Gomes, James; Roychoudhury, Pradip K

    2014-08-01

    Spin-filters have been primarily used for producing therapeutic proteins from mammalian cells. However, disposability and/or high filter clogging of the existing spin-filter systems affect the process economy and productivity. Hence, to address these drawbacks a reusable dual spin-filter module for perfusion culture of adherent and non-adherent mammalian cells was designed. Two non-woven Bombyx mori silk layers were used as filter screen; the outer layer was conducive to cell attachment whilst the inner was non-conducive. Adherent cells can be cultured either in suspended mode using its inner single module or as monolayer of cells using its dual concentric module. We achieved 30 % higher urokinase productivity as compared to the stainless-steel spin-filter during perfusion experiments of adherent human kidney cells in suspended mode. This was due to the hydrophobic and negatively-charged silk screen that allows clog-free perfusion culture for prolonged periods. PMID:24737079

  4. Communication and culture: predictors of treatment adherence among Mexican immigrant patients.

    PubMed

    Villagran, Melinda; Hajek, Christopher; Zhao, Xiaoquan; Peterson, Emily; Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine

    2012-04-01

    This study examined communication and culture in clinicians' interactions with Mexican immigrants in Texas. Specifically, we explore the unique interplay among levels of acculturation, beliefs about culturally-based medical practices, perceptions of medical encounters, and the likelihood of adherence to medical therapy recommendations from US providers. Results suggest that: (a) acculturation predicts perceptions of out-group membership in the patient-provider interaction; (b) beliefs about complementary and alternative medicine are negatively related to medical adherence; (c) quality of care mediates the relationship between physician accommodation and medical adherence; and (d) there exists a complex relationship between out-group perceptions and adherence. PMID:21900335

  5. Cultural influences on antiretroviral therapy adherence among HIV-infected Puerto Ricans.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Reuben N; D'Aquila, Erica; Morgello, Susan; Byrd, Desiree; Remien, Robert H; Mindt, Monica Rivera

    2012-01-01

    Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is integral to the successful treatment of HIV infection. Research has indicated that HIV-infected Latinos may have difficulty adhering to ART. While studies have demonstrated strong relationships between numerous psychosocial factors and ART adherence, no research has examined if cultural factors are also involved in ART adherence among Latinos. Our study examined the relationship between acculturation to mainstream U.S. culture, bicultural self-efficacy, and ART adherence among HIV-infected Puerto Rican adults living in the United States. Participants with ≥ 95% adherence scored higher on U.S.- and Latino-involvement acculturation scales and on a measure of bicultural self-efficacy compared to those with suboptimal adherence. Among bicultural HIV-infected Puerto Ricans, both acculturation and self-efficacy to navigate between cultures were positively related to adherence. Understanding the role of an individual's sociocultural experience may help elucidate why HIV-infected Latinos have difficulties achieving optimal ART adherence and improve ART adherence interventions. PMID:22525858

  6. Adherence properties of Staphylococcus aureus under static and flow conditions: roles of agr and sar loci, platelets, and plasma ligands.

    PubMed

    Shenkman, B; Rubinstein, E; Cheung, A L; Brill, G E; Dardik, R; Tamarin, I; Savion, N; Varon, D

    2001-07-01

    Global regulatory genes in Staphylococcus aureus, including agr and sar, are known to regulate the expression of multiple virulence factors, including cell wall adhesins. In the present study, the adherence of S. aureus RN6390 (wild type), RN6911 (agr), ALC136 (sar), and ALC135 (agr sar) to immobilized fibrinogen, fibronectin, von Willebrand factor (vWF), extracellular matrix (ECM), and human endothelial cells (EC) EAhy.926 was studied. Bacteria grown to postexponential phase were subjected to light oscillation (static condition) or to shear stress at 200 s(-1) (flow condition) on tissue culture polystyrene plates coated with either protein ligands, ECM, or EC. Adherence of nonlabeled bacteria to immobilized ligands was measured by an image analysis system, while adherence of [(3)H]thymidine-labeled S. aureus to ECM and EC was measured by a beta-scintillation counter. The results showed increased adherence of agr and agr sar mutants to immobilized fibrinogen and higher potential of these mutants to induce platelet aggregation in suspension, decreased adherence of sar and agr sar mutants to immobilized fibronectin and vWF as well as to ECM and EC, increased adherence of both S. aureus wild type and sar mutant to EC treated with platelet-rich plasma (PRP) compared to platelet-poor plasma (PPP) and to EC treated with PPP compared to the control, and increased adherence of S. aureus wild type to EC coated with PRP in which platelets were activated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate compared to intact PRP. This finding paralleled the increased adherence to EC of activated compared to intact platelets. It is suggested that platelet-mediated S. aureus adherence to EC depends on platelet activation and the number of adherent platelets and available receptors on the platelet membrane. In conclusion, the agr locus downregulates S. aureus adherence to fibrinogen, while the sar locus upregulates S. aureus adherence to fibronectin, vWF, ECM, and EC. The effect of both agr and

  7. Adherence Properties of Staphylococcus aureus under Static and Flow Conditions: Roles of agr and sar Loci, Platelets, and Plasma Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Shenkman, Boris; Rubinstein, Ethan; Cheung, Ambrose L.; Brill, Grigory E.; Dardik, Rima; Tamarin, Ilya; Savion, Naphtali; Varon, David

    2001-01-01

    Global regulatory genes in Staphylococcus aureus, including agr and sar, are known to regulate the expression of multiple virulence factors, including cell wall adhesins. In the present study, the adherence of S. aureus RN6390 (wild type), RN6911 (agr), ALC136 (sar), and ALC135 (agr sar) to immobilized fibrinogen, fibronectin, von Willebrand factor (vWF), extracellular matrix (ECM), and human endothelial cells (EC) EAhy.926 was studied. Bacteria grown to postexponential phase were subjected to light oscillation (static condition) or to shear stress at 200 s−1 (flow condition) on tissue culture polystyrene plates coated with either protein ligands, ECM, or EC. Adherence of nonlabeled bacteria to immobilized ligands was measured by an image analysis system, while adherence of [3H]thymidine-labeled S. aureus to ECM and EC was measured by a β-scintillation counter. The results showed increased adherence of agr and agr sar mutants to immobilized fibrinogen and higher potential of these mutants to induce platelet aggregation in suspension, decreased adherence of sar and agr sar mutants to immobilized fibronectin and vWF as well as to ECM and EC, increased adherence of both S. aureus wild type and sar mutant to EC treated with platelet-rich plasma (PRP) compared to platelet-poor plasma (PPP) and to EC treated with PPP compared to the control, and increased adherence of S. aureus wild type to EC coated with PRP in which platelets were activated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate compared to intact PRP. This finding paralleled the increased adherence to EC of activated compared to intact platelets. It is suggested that platelet-mediated S. aureus adherence to EC depends on platelet activation and the number of adherent platelets and available receptors on the platelet membrane. In conclusion, the agr locus downregulates S. aureus adherence to fibrinogen, while the sar locus upregulates S. aureus adherence to fibronectin, vWF, ECM, and EC. The effect of both agr and sar

  8. Nonadherent cultures of human monocytes kill Mycobacterium smegmatis, but adherent cultures do not.

    PubMed Central

    Barker, K; Fan, H; Carroll, C; Kaplan, G; Barker, J; Hellmann, W; Cohn, Z A

    1996-01-01

    Human peripheral blood monocytes are permissive for the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, but the fate of nonpathogenic Mycobacterium smegmatis in these cells is not known. Since M. smegmatis may be used as a host with which to express and screen for M. tuberculosis genes needed for survival in monocytes, we determined whether human peripheral blood monocytes could restrict the growth of Mycobacterium smegmatis. Adherent human peripheral blood monocytes were permissive for the growth of M. smegmatis, as measured by ex vivo [3H]uracil uptake. However, human peripheral blood monocytes which were cultured nonadherently in Teflon wells were able to restrict the growth of M. smegmatis while remaining permissive for the growth of M. tuberculosis H37Ra. The loss of viability of M. smegmatis in nonadherent cells was correlated with an increase in nonspacious phagocytic vacuoles. The killing of M. smegmatis was not blocked by NG-monomethyl-L-arginine, suggesting that it was not due to the production of reactive nitrogen intermediates. Incubation of the monocytes for 1 to 7 days before infection had no effect on the fate of M. smegmatis, suggesting that adherence versus nonadherence, and not differentiation, was the key determinant for the difference in functional ability. Nonadherent human peripheral blood monocytes may be a more appropriate model than adherent cells for the study of factors employed by bacterial to survive within monocytes and for selection screening of bacterial genes needed for intracellular survival. PMID:8550187

  9. Cultural Rationales Guiding Medication Adherence Among African American with HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Neufeld, Stewart; Berry, Rico; Luborsky, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Abstract To date, only modest gains have been achieved in explaining adherence to medical regimens, limiting effective interventions. This is a particularly important issue for African Americans who are disproportionately affected by the HIV epidemic. Few studies have focused on intragroup variation among African Americans in adherence to ART. The aim of this study was to identify and describe the cultural rationales guiding African American patients' formulation and evaluation of adherence. Rationales are key features of purposeful human action. In-depth interviews with 80 seropositive African Americans were tape recorded, transcribed, and analyzed. Participant CD4, viral load and medical histories were collected at each data point. Analysis of four waves of panel data identified three types of adherence rationales: Authoritative Knowledge Rationale (AKR; n=29, 36.3%), Following Doctors' Orders Rationale (DOR; n=24, 30.0%) and Individualized Adherence Rationale (IAR; n=27, 33.8%). Differences in mean reported adherence between the rationale groups did not achieve statistical significance. However, the fraction reporting low adherence (<70%), although not different by rationale group at the first interview (T1), was significantly higher for the IAR group by the fourth interview (T4). Objective clinical markers (CD4 and viral load) improved over time (from T1 to T4) for AKR and DOR groups, but remained unchanged for the IAR group, yet self-reported adherence declined for all groups over the course of the four interviews. PMID:21777141

  10. Adherence to Medication Regimens among Low-Income Patients with Multiple Comorbid Chronic Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishra, Shiraz I.; Gioia, Deborah; Childress, Saltanat; Barnet, Beth; Webster, Ramothea L.

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative study sought to explore facilitators and barriers to adherence to multiple medications among low-income patients with comorbid chronic physical and mental health conditions. The 50 focus group participants identified personal/contextual and health system factors as major impediments to adherence to multiple medications. These…

  11. A highly adherent phenotype associated with virulent Bvg+-phase swine isolates of Bordetella bronchiseptica grown under modulating conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Register, K B; Ackermann, M R

    1997-01-01

    The ability of Bvg(-)-phase and Bvg(+)-phase Bordetella bronchiseptica swine isolates, grown under modulating or nonmodulating conditions, to adhere to swine ciliated nasal epithelial cells was determined. When virulent strains were cultivated at 37 degrees C in the Bvg+ phase, numerous adherent bacteria (approximately eight per cell, depending on the strain used) were observed. However, when such strains were grown under modulating conditions (23 degrees C), a significant increase in the level of attachment was seen, suggesting that B. bronchiseptica produces a Bvg-repressed adhesin under these conditions. bvg mutant strains, including an isogenic bvgS mutant, adhered minimally. Western blots indicated that two putative B. bronchiseptica adhesins, filamentous hemagglutinin and pertactin, were not detectable in cultures displaying the highly adherent phenotype. Several proteins apparent in Western blots obtained by using bacterial extracts enriched in outer membrane proteins derived from B. bronchiseptica grown at 23 degrees C were not present in similar extracts prepared from an isogenic bvgS mutant grown at 23 degrees C or from the parent strain grown at 37 degrees C. Adherence of bacteria cultivated at 23 degrees C was almost completely abolished by pretreatment of organisms at 60 degrees C; adherence was reduced by 57% when bacteria were pretreated with pronase E. Temperature shift experiments revealed that the heightened level of adhesion that occurs following growth at 23 degrees C was maintained for up to 18 h when bacteria were subsequently incubated at 37 degrees C. We propose that a Bvg-repressed adhesin, expressed only by modulated bvg+ strains of B. bronchiseptica, may play a key role in the initial colonization of naturally infected swine. PMID:9393829

  12. Automated and Online Characterization of Adherent Cell Culture Growth in a Microfabricated Bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Jaccard, Nicolas; Macown, Rhys J.; Super, Alexandre; Griffin, Lewis D.; Veraitch, Farlan S.

    2014-01-01

    Adherent cell lines are widely used across all fields of biology, including drug discovery, toxicity studies, and regenerative medicine. However, adherent cell processes are often limited by a lack of advances in cell culture systems. While suspension culture processes benefit from decades of development of instrumented bioreactors, adherent cultures are typically performed in static, noninstrumented flasks and well-plates. We previously described a microfabricated bioreactor that enables a high degree of control on the microenvironment of the cells while remaining compatible with standard cell culture protocols. In this report, we describe its integration with automated image-processing capabilities, allowing the continuous monitoring of key cell culture characteristics. A machine learning–based algorithm enabled the specific detection of one cell type within a co-culture setting, such as human embryonic stem cells against the background of fibroblast cells. In addition, the algorithm did not confuse image artifacts resulting from microfabrication, such as scratches on surfaces, or dust particles, with cellular features. We demonstrate how the automation of flow control, environmental control, and image acquisition can be employed to image the whole culture area and obtain time-course data of mouse embryonic stem cell cultures, for example, for confluency. PMID:24692228

  13. The association between combination antiretroviral adherence and AIDS-defining conditions at HIV diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Abara, Winston E; Xu, Junjun; Adekeye, Oluwatoyosi A; Rust, George

    2016-08-01

    Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) has changed the clinical course of HIV. AIDS-defining conditions (ADC) are suggestive of severe or advanced disease and are a leading cause of HIV-related hospitalizations and death among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in the USA. Optimal adherence to cART can mitigate the impact of ADC and disease severity on the health and survivability of PLWHA. The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between ADC at HIV diagnosis and optimal adherence among PLWHA. Using data from the 2008 and 2009 Medicaid data from 29 states, we identified individuals, between 18 and 49 years, recently infected with HIV and with a cART prescription. Frequencies and descriptive statistics were conducted to characterize sample. Univariate and multivariable Poisson regression analyses were employed to evaluate the association optimal cART adherence (defined as ≥ 95% study days covered by cART) and ADC at HIV diagnosis (≥1 ADC) were assessed. Approximately 17% of respondents with ADC at HIV diagnosis reported optimal cART adherence. After adjusting for covariates, respondents with an ADC at HIV diagnosis were less likely to report optimal cART adherence (adjusted prevalence ratio (APR) = 0.64, 95% confidence intervals (CI), 0.54-0.75). Among the covariates, males (APR=1.10, 95% CI, 1.02-1.19) compared to females were significantly more likely to report optimal adherence while younger respondents, 18-29 years (APR=0.67, 95% CI, 0.57-0.77), 30-39 years (APR=0.86, 95% CI, 0.79-0.95) compared to older respondents were significantly less likely to report optimal adherence. PLWHA with ADC at HIV diagnosis are at risk of suboptimal cART adherence. Multiple adherence strategies that include healthcare providers, case managers, and peer navigators should be utilized to improve cART adherence and optimize health outcomes among PLWHA with ADC at HIV diagnosis. Targeted adherence programs and services are required to address

  14. Microfluidic Probe for Single-Cell Lysis and Analysis in Adherent Tissue Culture

    PubMed Central

    Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Han, Jongyoon

    2014-01-01

    Single-cell analysis provides information critical to understanding key disease processes that are characterized by significant cellular heterogeneity. Few current methods allow single-cell measurement without removing cells from the context of interest, which not only destroys contextual information but also may perturb the process under study. Here we present a microfluidic probe that lyses single adherent cells from standard tissue culture and captures the contents to perform single-cell biochemical assays. We use this probe to measure kinase and housekeeping protein activities, separately or simultaneously, from single human hepatocellular carcinoma cells in adherent culture. This tool has the valuable ability to perform measurements that clarify connections between extracellular context, signals and responses, especially in cases where only a few cells exhibit a characteristic of interest. PMID:24594667

  15. Adherence to medication regimens among low-income patients with multiple comorbid chronic conditions.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Shiraz I; Gioia, Deborah; Childress, Saltanat; Barnet, Beth; Webster, Ramothea L

    2011-11-01

    This qualitative study sought to explore facilitators and barriers to adherence to multiple medications among low-income patients with comorbid chronic physical and mental health conditions. The 50 focus group participants identified personal/contextual and health system factors as major impediments to adherence to multiple medications. These factors included medication side effects, fear of harm from medication, fear of dependence on medication, complex instructions, suboptimal communications with doctor, suspicion about doctors' and pharmaceutical companies' motives in prescribing medication, and the high cost ofmedications. Participants also identified motivators, both internal (self-initiated) and external (initiated by family, doctor, support groups),to ensure adherence to multiple medications. These motivators included self-discipline, sense of personal responsibility, faith, support from family members and doctors, and focused health education and self-management support. Three themes emerged that enhanced understanding of the complexity of adherence to multiple medications: (1) reaching one's own threshold for medication adherence, (2) lack of shared information and decision making, and (3) taking less than the prescribed medication. Further analysis of the data revealed that the patients perceived a lack of shared decision making in the management of their comorbid chronic conditions and their medication regimen. PMID:22308877

  16. Mechanisms of adherence of Candida albicans to cultured human epidermal keratinocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Ollert, M W; Söhnchen, R; Korting, H C; Ollert, U; Bräutigam, S; Bräutigam, W

    1993-01-01

    We established an in vitro adherence model with primarily cultured human keratinocytes as target cells which allows for the investigation of the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for Candida albicans host cell attachment in the initiation of cutaneous candidosis. The extent of C. albicans binding to cultured human keratinocytes was dependent on the yeast inoculum size and the incubation temperature. Heat and paraform-aldehyde treatment of yeasts completely abolished the binding activity of C. albicans. Of the different Candida species tested, C. albicans was by far the most adhesive species. C. albicans adherence was blocked by the acid protease inhibitor pepstatin A and the metabolic inhibitor sodium azide. The latter, however, was much less effective when yeasts were preincubated, suggesting that sodium azide was mainly acting on the keratinocytes. The extracellular matrix protein fibronectin was slightly inhibitory, whereas the fibronectin-derived peptides RGD and RGDS were not able to prevent attachment. PepTite-2000, another RGD-containing synthetic peptide, reduced C. albicans adherence by a margin of 25% (P < 0.005). CDPGYIGSR-NH2, which is a synthetic adhesive peptide derived from the laminin B chain, was much more efficient in its inhibitory activity than the RGD peptides and reduced C. albicans adherence to cultured human keratinocytes up to 76% (P < 0.001). Laminin itself and the synthetic pentapeptide YIGSR were less active. A dose-dependent reduction in adherence was also observed with collagen type III. Additionally, saccharides were tested for their potential to inhibit C. albicans attachment to keratinocytes. The most potent competitive saccharide inhibitors of C. albicans adherence to human keratinocytes were the amino sugars D-(+)-glucosamine and D-(+)-galactosamine with one isolate of C. albicans (4918) and D-(+)-glucosamine and alpha-D-(+)-fucose with another C. albicans isolate (Sp-1). Collectively, our data suggest the existence of

  17. Geopolitical and cultural factors affecting ARV adherence on the US-Mexico border.

    PubMed

    Shedlin, Michele G; Decena, Carlos Ulises; Beltran, Oscar

    2013-10-01

    The data discussed represent the findings from a study by the NIH-funded Hispanic Health Disparities Research Center, exploring the influence of institutional and psychosocial factors on adherence to antiretroviral medications by Mexican-origin persons living with AIDS on the US-Mexico Border. A qualitative approach was utilized consisting of clinic observations, baseline and follow-up interviews with patients (N = 113), key informant interviews (N = 9) and focus groups (5) with patients and health providers. Findings include the social-normative, institutional and geo-political factors affecting treatment and service delivery as well as individual variation and culturally patterned behaviors. ARV adherence and retention were found to depend on complex interactions and negotiation of co-occurring factors including the experience of medications and side-effects, patient/provider relationships, cultural norms and the changing dynamics of international borders. We note effects of drug-related violence which created border-crossing obstacles influencing mobility, access to services and adherence. PMID:22797951

  18. RGD-functionalized spherulites as targeted vectors captured by adherent cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Chenevier, P; Delord, B; Amédée, J; Bareille, R; Ichas, F; Roux, D

    2002-12-16

    Spherulites are multilamellar vesicles consisting of concentric shells that can encapsulate small organic molecules or macromolecules. We investigate the possibility of targeting neutral spherulites to adherent culture cells by functionalizing their surface with RGD-containing ligands. The strength and specificity of association of RGD spherulites with several cell lines (EAhy 926 endothelial cell line, human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) and human osteoprogenitor (HOP) primary cells) was studied, and the molecular interaction of RGD spherulites with the EAhy 926 cell surface was investigated. We show that, after binding to cells, spherulites are internalized. PMID:12431780

  19. Conditional economic incentives to improve HIV treatment adherence: literature review and theoretical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Galárraga, Omar; Genberg, Becky L.; Martin, Rosemarie A.; Laws, M. Barton; Wilson, Ira B.

    2013-01-01

    We present selected theoretical issues regarding conditional economic incentives (CEI) for HIV treatment adherence. High HIV treatment adherence is essential not only to improve individual health for persons living with HIV, but also to reduce transmission. The incentives literature spans several decades and various disciplines, thus we selectively point out useful concepts from economics, psychology and HIV clinical practice to elucidate the complex interaction between socio-economic issues, psychological perspectives and optimal treatment adherence. Appropriately-implemented CEI can help patients improve their adherence to HIV treatment in the short-term, while the incentives are in place. However, more research is needed to uncover mechanisms that can increase habit formation or maintenance effects in the longer-term. We suggest some potentially fruitful avenues for future research in this area, including the use of concepts from self-determination theory. This general framework may have implications for related research among disadvantaged communities with high rates of HIV/AIDS infection. PMID:23370833

  20. Conditional economic incentives to improve HIV treatment adherence: literature review and theoretical considerations.

    PubMed

    Galárraga, Omar; Genberg, Becky L; Martin, Rosemarie A; Barton Laws, M; Wilson, Ira B

    2013-09-01

    We present selected theoretical issues regarding conditional economic incentives (CEI) for HIV treatment adherence. High HIV treatment adherence is essential not only to improve individual health for persons living with HIV, but also to reduce transmission. The incentives literature spans several decades and various disciplines, thus we selectively point out useful concepts from economics, psychology and HIV clinical practice to elucidate the complex interaction between socio-economic issues, psychological perspectives and optimal treatment adherence. Appropriately-implemented CEI can help patients improve their adherence to HIV treatment in the short-term, while the incentives are in place. However, more research is needed to uncover mechanisms that can increase habit formation or maintenance effects in the longer-term. We suggest some potentially fruitful avenues for future research in this area, including the use of concepts from self-determination theory. This general framework may have implications for related research among disadvantaged communities with high rates of HIV/AIDS infection. PMID:23370833

  1. Adherence to Asian Cultural Values and Cultural Fit in Korean American Undergraduates' Help-Seeking Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gloria, Alberta M.; Castellanos, Jeanett; Park, Yong Sue; Kim, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Differences in and relationships of Asian cultural values, cultural congruity, perception of the university environment, and help-seeking attitudes for 1st- and 2nd-generation Korean American undergraduates (N = 228) were examined. Women reported significantly higher cultural congruity and more positive help-seeking attitudes than did men. Asian…

  2. Automated Method for the Rapid and Precise Estimation of Adherent Cell Culture Characteristics from Phase Contrast Microscopy Images

    PubMed Central

    Jaccard, Nicolas; Griffin, Lewis D; Keser, Ana; Macown, Rhys J; Super, Alexandre; Veraitch, Farlan S; Szita, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    The quantitative determination of key adherent cell culture characteristics such as confluency, morphology, and cell density is necessary for the evaluation of experimental outcomes and to provide a suitable basis for the establishment of robust cell culture protocols. Automated processing of images acquired using phase contrast microscopy (PCM), an imaging modality widely used for the visual inspection of adherent cell cultures, could enable the non-invasive determination of these characteristics. We present an image-processing approach that accurately detects cellular objects in PCM images through a combination of local contrast thresholding and post hoc correction of halo artifacts. The method was thoroughly validated using a variety of cell lines, microscope models and imaging conditions, demonstrating consistently high segmentation performance in all cases and very short processing times (<1 s per 1,208 × 960 pixels image). Based on the high segmentation performance, it was possible to precisely determine culture confluency, cell density, and the morphology of cellular objects, demonstrating the wide applicability of our algorithm for typical microscopy image processing pipelines. Furthermore, PCM image segmentation was used to facilitate the interpretation and analysis of fluorescence microscopy data, enabling the determination of temporal and spatial expression patterns of a fluorescent reporter. We created a software toolbox (PHANTAST) that bundles all the algorithms and provides an easy to use graphical user interface. Source-code for MATLAB and ImageJ is freely available under a permissive open-source license. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2014;111: 504–517. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24037521

  3. Determinants of Adherence to Treatment in Hypertensive Patients of African Descent and the Role of Culturally Appropriate Education

    PubMed Central

    Meinema, Jennita G.; van Dijk, Nynke; Beune, Erik J. A. J.; Jaarsma, Debbie A. D. C.; van Weert, Henk C. P. M.; Haafkens, Joke A.

    2015-01-01

    Background In Western countries, better knowledge about patient-related determinants of treatment adherence (medication and lifestyle) is needed to improve treatment adherence and outcomes among hypertensive ethnic minority patients of African descent. Objective To identify patient-related determinants of adherence to lifestyle and medication recommendations among hypertensive African Surinamese and Ghanaian patients with suboptimal treatment results (SBP≥140) living in the Netherlands and how culturally appropriate hypertension education (CAHE) influenced those determinants. Methods This study analysed data of 139 patients who participated in the CAHE trial. Univariate logistic regression analysis was used to measure the association between patient-related determinants (medication self-efficacy, beliefs about medication and hypertension, social support, and satisfaction with care) and treatment adherence. We also tested whether CAHE influenced the determinants. Results Medication self-efficacy and social support were associated with medication adherence at baseline. At six months, more medication self-efficacy and fewer concerns about medication use were associated with improved medication adherence. Self-efficacy was also associated with adherence to lifestyle recommendations at baseline. CAHE influenced patients’ illness perceptions by creating more understanding of hypertension, its chronic character, and more concerns about the associated risks. Conclusion In this high-risk population, health care providers can support medication adherence by paying attention to patients’ medication self-efficacy, the concerns they may have about medication use and patients’ perceptions on hypertension. The CAHE intervention improved patients’ perception on hypertension. PMID:26267453

  4. Non-invasive and non-destructive measurements of confluence in cultured adherent cell lines.

    PubMed

    Busschots, Steven; O'Toole, Sharon; O'Leary, John J; Stordal, Britta

    2015-01-01

    Many protocols used for measuring the growth of adherent monolayer cells in vitro are invasive, destructive and do not allow for the continued, undisturbed growth of cells within flasks. Protocols often use indirect methods for measuring proliferation. Microscopy techniques can analyse cell proliferation in a non-invasive or non-destructive manner but often use expensive equipment and software algorithms. In this method images of cells within flasks are captured by photographing under a standard inverted phase contract light microscope using a digital camera with a camera lens adaptor. Images are analysed for confluence using ImageJ freeware resulting in a measure of confluence known as an Area Fraction (AF) output. An example of the AF method in use on OVCAR8 and UPN251 cell lines is included. •Measurements of confluence from growing adherent cell lines in cell culture flasks is obtained in a non-invasive, non-destructive, label-free manner.•The technique is quick, affordable and eliminates sample manipulation.•The technique provides an objective, consistent measure of when cells reach confluence and is highly correlated to manual counting with a haemocytometer. The average correlation co-efficient from a Spearman correlation (n = 3) was 0.99 ± 0.008 for OVCAR8 (p = 0.01) and 0.99 ± 0.01 for UPN251 (p = 0.01) cell lines. PMID:26150966

  5. Non-invasive and non-destructive measurements of confluence in cultured adherent cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Busschots, Steven; O’Toole, Sharon; O’Leary, John J.; Stordal, Britta

    2014-01-01

    Many protocols used for measuring the growth of adherent monolayer cells in vitro are invasive, destructive and do not allow for the continued, undisturbed growth of cells within flasks. Protocols often use indirect methods for measuring proliferation. Microscopy techniques can analyse cell proliferation in a non-invasive or non-destructive manner but often use expensive equipment and software algorithms. In this method images of cells within flasks are captured by photographing under a standard inverted phase contract light microscope using a digital camera with a camera lens adaptor. Images are analysed for confluence using ImageJ freeware resulting in a measure of confluence known as an Area Fraction (AF) output. An example of the AF method in use on OVCAR8 and UPN251 cell lines is included. • Measurements of confluence from growing adherent cell lines in cell culture flasks is obtained in a non-invasive, non-destructive, label-free manner. • The technique is quick, affordable and eliminates sample manipulation. • The technique provides an objective, consistent measure of when cells reach confluence and is highly correlated to manual counting with a haemocytometer. The average correlation co-efficient from a Spearman correlation (n = 3) was 0.99 ± 0.008 for OVCAR8 (p = 0.01) and 0.99 ± 0.01 for UPN251 (p = 0.01) cell lines. PMID:26150966

  6. The influence of cultural and religious orientations on social support and its potential impact on medication adherence

    PubMed Central

    Hatah, Ernieda; Lim, Kien Ping; Ali, Adliah Mohd; Mohamed Shah, Noraida; Islahudin, Farida

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Social support can positively influence patients’ health outcomes through a number of mechanisms, such as increases in patients’ adherence to medication. Although there have been studies on the influence of social support on medication adherence, these studies were conducted in Western settings, not in Asian settings where cultural and religious orientations may be different. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of cultural orientation and religiosity on social support and its relation to patients’ medication adherence. Methods This was a cross-sectional study of patients with chronic diseases in two tertiary hospitals in Selangor, Malaysia. Patients who agreed to participate in the study were asked to answer questions in the following areas: 1) perceived group and higher authority cultural orientations; 2) religiosity: organizational and non-organizational religious activities, and intrinsic religiosity; 3) perceived social support; and 4) self-reported medication adherence. Patients’ medication adherence was modeled using multiple logistic regressions, and only variables with a P-value of <0.25 were included in the analysis. Results A total of 300 patients completed the questionnaire, with the exception of 40 participants who did not complete the cultural orientation question. The mean age of the patients was 57.6±13.5. Group cultural orientation, organizational religious activity, non-organizational religious activity, and intrinsic religiosity demonstrated significant associations with patients’ perceived social support (r=0.181, P=0.003; r=0.230, P<0.001; r=0.135, P=0.019; and r=0.156, P=0.007, respectively). In the medication adherence model, only age, duration of treatment, organizational religious activity, and disease type (human immunodeficiency virus) were found to significantly influence patients’ adherence to medications (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.05, P=0.002; OR 0.99, P=0.025; OR 1.19, P=0.038; and OR 9.08, P<0

  7. Cultural competency assessment tool for hospitals: Evaluating hospitals’ adherence to the culturally and linguistically appropriate services standards

    PubMed Central

    Weech-Maldonado, Robert; Dreachslin, Janice L.; Brown, Julie; Pradhan, Rohit; Rubin, Kelly L.; Schiller, Cameron; Hays, Ron D.

    2016-01-01

    Background The U.S. national standards for culturally and linguistically appropriate services (CLAS) in health care provide guidelines on policies and practices aimed at developing culturally competent systems of care. The Cultural Competency Assessment Tool for Hospitals (CCATH) was developed as an organizational tool to assess adherence to the CLAS standards. Purposes First, we describe the development of the CCATH and estimate the reliability and validity of the CCATH measures. Second, we discuss the managerial implications of the CCATH as an organizational tool to assess cultural competency. Methodology/Approach We pilot tested an initial draft of the CCATH, revised it based on a focus group and cognitive interviews, and then administered it in a field test with a sample of California hospitals. The reliability and validity of the CCATH were evaluated using factor analysis, analysis of variance, and Cronbach’s alphas. Findings Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses identified 12 CCATH composites: leadership and strategic planning, data collection on inpatient population, data collection on service area, performance management systems and quality improvement, human resources practices, diversity training, community representation, availability of interpreter services, interpreter services policies, quality of interpreter services, translation of written materials, and clinical cultural competency practices. All the CCATH scales had internal consistency reliability of .65 or above, and the reliability was .70 or above for 9 of the 12 scales. Analysis of variance results showed that not-for-profit hospitals have higher CCATH scores than for-profit hospitals in five CCATH scales and higher CCATH scores than government hospitals in two CCATH scales. Practice Implications The CCATH showed adequate psychometric properties. Managers and policy makers can use the CCATH as a tool to evaluate hospital performance in cultural competency and identify and target

  8. Extending metabolome coverage for untargeted metabolite profiling of adherent cultured hepatic cells.

    PubMed

    García-Cañaveras, Juan Carlos; López, Silvia; Castell, José Vicente; Donato, M Teresa; Lahoz, Agustín

    2016-02-01

    MS-based metabolite profiling of adherent mammalian cells comprises several challenging steps such as metabolism quenching, cell detachment, cell disruption, metabolome extraction, and metabolite measurement. In LC-MS, the final metabolome coverage is strongly determined by the separation technique and the MS conditions used. Human liver-derived cell line HepG2 was chosen as adherent mammalian cell model to evaluate the performance of several commonly used procedures in both sample processing and LC-MS analysis. In a first phase, metabolite extraction and sample analysis were optimized in a combined manner. To this end, the extraction abilities of five different solvents (or combinations) were assessed by comparing the number and the levels of the metabolites comprised in each extract. Three different chromatographic methods were selected for metabolites separation. A HILIC-based method which was set to specifically separate polar metabolites and two RP-based methods focused on lipidome and wide-ranging metabolite detection, respectively. With regard to metabolite measurement, a Q-ToF instrument operating in both ESI (+) and ESI (-) was used for unbiased extract analysis. Once metabolite extraction and analysis conditions were set up, the influence of cell harvesting on metabolome coverage was also evaluated. Therefore, different protocols for cell detachment (trypsinization or scraping) and metabolism quenching were compared. This study confirmed the inconvenience of trypsinization as a harvesting technique, and the importance of using complementary extraction solvents to extend metabolome coverage, minimizing interferences and maximizing detection, thanks to the use of dedicated analytical conditions through the combination of HILIC and RP separations. The proposed workflow allowed the detection of over 300 identified metabolites from highly polar compounds to a wide range of lipids. PMID:26769129

  9. An Index of Multiple Psychosocial, Syndemic Conditions Is Associated with Antiretroviral Medication Adherence Among HIV-Positive Youth.

    PubMed

    Kuhns, Lisa M; Hotton, Anna L; Garofalo, Rob; Muldoon, Abigail L; Jaffe, Kaitlyn; Bouris, Alida; Voisin, Dexter; Schneider, John

    2016-04-01

    Medication adherence among HIV-infected individuals is critical to limit disease progression and onward transmission. Evidence indicates that among youth living with HIV (YLH), adherence is suboptimal and related to co-morbid psychosocial conditions. Cross-sectional data from 212 YLH, ages 16-29, collected between 2011-2014 in Chicago were analyzed to assess the relationship of multiple psychosocial conditions (e.g., depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms, moderate/heavy marijuana use, moderate/heavy alcohol use, HIV-related stigma) to ART adherence (i.e., a "syndemic.") Adherence was regressed on an index of increasing numbers of psychosocial conditions, controlling for demographic and treatment factors as well as enrollment site. The mean age of participants was 24, 89% were male, 87% black, and 91% behaviorally infected. Psychosocial conditions were prevalent, including 38% and 34% with high depressive and anxiety symptoms, respectively, 54% and 25% with a moderate/high level of marijuana and alcohol use, respectively, and 46% reporting high HIV-related stigma. In regression analysis, the likelihood of ART adherence decreased with the number of syndemic conditions (linear dose response, p = 0.02) as did the odds of viral load suppression (p = 0.008). Interventions to address these conditions in concert with biomedical treatment as prevention for YLH are needed. PMID:27028184

  10. Approaching ADHD as a chronic condition: implications for long-term adherence.

    PubMed

    Van Cleave, Jeanne; Leslie, Laurel K

    2008-08-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is one of the most common chronic conditions of childhood. Although evidence-based treatments for ADHD, including stimulant medication and behavior modification, have long been established, and guidelines for care of ADHD in primary care settings have been developed, adherence to long-term therapy is poor among youth with ADHD. This article proposes use of the Chronic Care Model for Child Health, the purpose of which is to develop informed, activated patients who will interact with a prepared, proactive health care team. Six "pillars" make up the model: decision support, delivery system design, clinical information systems, family and self-management support, community resources and policies, and health care organizations. Each of these is discussed, and an individual example is described. Adopting the Chronic Care Model for Child Health has the potential to improve the quality of care for ADHD. PMID:18777966

  11. Indispensable functions of ABL and PDGF receptor kinases in epithelial adherence of attaching/effacing pathogens under physiological conditions.

    PubMed

    Manthey, Carolin F; Calabio, Christine B; Wosinski, Anna; Hanson, Elaine M; Vallance, Bruce A; Groisman, Alex; Martín, Martín G; Wang, Jean Y J; Eckmann, Lars

    2014-07-15

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) and Citrobacter rodentium are attaching-and-effacing (A/E) pathogens that cause intestinal inflammation and diarrhea. The bacteria adhere to the intestinal epithelium, destroy microvilli, and induce actin-filled membranous pedestals but do not invade the mucosa. Adherence leads to activation of several host cell kinases, including FYN, n-SRC, YES, ABL, and ARG, phosphorylation of the bacterial translocated intimin receptor, and actin polymerization and pedestal formation in cultured cells. However, marked functional redundancy appears to exist between kinases, and their physiological importance in A/E pathogen infections has remained unclear. To address this question, we employed a novel dynamic in vitro infection model that mimics transient and short-term interactions in the intestinal tract. Screening of a kinase inhibitor library and RNA interference experiments in vitro revealed that ABL and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor (PDGFR) kinases, as well as p38 MAP kinase, have unique, indispensable roles in early attachment of EPEC to epithelial cells under dynamic infection conditions. Studies with mutant EPEC showed that the attachment functions of ABL and PDGFR were independent of the intimin receptor but required bacterial bundle-forming pili. Furthermore, inhibition of ABL and PDGFR with imatinib protected against infection of mice with modest loads of C. rodentium, whereas the kinases were dispensable for high inocula or late after infection. These results indicate that ABL and PDGFR have indispensable roles in early A/E pathogen attachment to intestinal epithelial cells and for in vivo infection with limiting inocula but are not required for late intimate bacterial attachment or high inoculum infections. PMID:24848114

  12. Attitudes to cosmetic surgery among ethnic minority groups in Britain: cultural mistrust, adherence to traditional cultural values, and ethnic identity salience as protective factors.

    PubMed

    Swami, Viren; Hendrikse, Sinead

    2013-01-01

    Previous work has suggested that ethnic minority women have more negative attitudes to cosmetic surgery than British Whites, but reasons for this are not fully understood. To overcome this dearth in the literature, the present study asked 250 British Asian and 250 African Caribbean university students to complete measures of attitudes to cosmetic surgery, cultural mistrust, adherence to traditional cultural values, ethnic identity salience, self-esteem, and demographics. Preliminary analyses showed that there were significant between-group differences only on cultural mistrust and self-esteem, although effect sizes were small (d values = .21-.37). Further analyses showed that more negative attitudes to cosmetic surgery were associated with greater cultural mistrust, stronger adherence to traditional values, and stronger ethnic identity salience, although these relationships were weaker for African Caribbean women than for British Asians. These results are discussed in relation to perceptions of cosmetic surgery among ethnic minority women. PMID:22376196

  13. The Chinese Life-Steps Program: A Cultural Adaptation of a Cognitive-Behavioral Intervention to Enhance HIV Medication Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Shiu, Cheng-Shi; Chen, Wei-Ti; Simoni, Jane; Fredriksen-Goldsen, Karen; Zhang, Fujie; Zhou, Hongxin

    2013-01-01

    China is considered to be the new frontier of the global AIDS pandemic. Although effective treatment for HIV is becoming widely available in China, adherence to treatment remains a challenge. This study aimed to adapt an intervention promoting HIV-medication adherence—favorably evaluated in the West—for Chinese HIV-positive patients. The adaptation process was theory-driven and covered several key issues of cultural adaptation. We considered the importance of interpersonal relationships and family in China and cultural notions of health. Using an evidence-based treatment protocol originally designed for Western HIV-positive patients, we developed an 11-step Chinese Life-Steps program with an additional culture-specific intervention option. We describe in detail how the cultural elements were incorporated into the intervention and put into practice at each stage. Clinical considerations are also outlined and followed by two case examples that are provided to illustrate our application of the intervention. Finally, we discuss practical and research issues and limitations emerging from our field experiments in a HIV clinic in Beijing. The intervention was tailored to address both universal and culturally specific barriers to adherence and is readily applicable to generalized clinical settings. This evidence-based intervention provides a case example of the process of adapting behavioral interventions to culturally diverse communities with limited resources. PMID:23667305

  14. "Being dealt with as a whole person." Care seeking and adherence: the benefits of culturally competent care.

    PubMed

    Schilder, A J; Kennedy, C; Goldstone, I L; Ogden, R D; Hogg, R S; O'Shaughnessy, M V

    2001-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the relationship between identity and health care experiences (including antiretroviral therapy utilization) among HIV-positive sexual minority males. This qualitative study used grounded theory with data collection occurring through focus groups and interviews. A questionnaire was used to complete a demographic profile. The study included 47 HIV positive participants from three minorities: gay men, bisexual men and transgendered persons, gender identifying as female and or living as women. Sessions elicited information on: (1) general experiences with health care, (2) experiences with HIV antiretroviral therapies and issues surrounding access, and (3) adherence to these therapies and identity in relation to health care. These textual data revealed three themes: (1) the importance of sexual identity and its social and cultural context, (2) the differences in the health concerns between the sexual minorities and (3) a wide spectrum of experiences with the health care system that provide information surrounding the access to and adequacy of health care. Successful health care providers are aware of different issues that may play a role in the provision of health care to these sexual minorities. Providers awareness of sexual and social identity and the related different cultural values, beliefs and custom enhance care seeking and therapeutic adherence. For sexual minorities, primary care remains the most important entry point into the health care system. Cultural competence of care providers can foster patient's care seeking and adherence to treatment. PMID:11327138

  15. Cloning of a genetic determinant from Clostridium difficile involved in adherence to tissue culture cells and mucus.

    PubMed Central

    Karjalainen, T; Barc, M C; Collignon, A; Trollé, S; Boureau, H; Cotte-Laffitte, J; Bourlioux, P

    1994-01-01

    Our laboratory has previously shown that Clostridium difficile adherence to Caco-2 cells is greatly enhanced after heat shock at 60 degrees C and that it is mediated by a proteinaceous surface component. The experiments described here show that C. difficile could adhere to several types of tissue culture cells (Vero, HeLa, and KB) after heat shock. The type of culture medium (liquid or solid, with or without blood) had little effect on adhesion. To clone the adhesin gene, polyclonal antibodies against C. difficile heated at 60 degrees C were used to screen a genomic library of C. difficile constructed in lambda ZapII. Ten positive clones were identified in the library, one of which (pCL6) agglutinated several types of erythrocytes in the presence of mannose. In Western blots (immunoblots), this clone expressed in Escherichia coli a 40- and a 27-kDa protein; a 27-kDa protein has been previously identified in the surface extracts of heat-shocked C. difficile as a possible adhesin. The clone adhered to Vero, Caco-2, KB, and HeLa cells; the adherence was blocked by anti-C. difficile antibodies, by a surface extract of C. difficile, and by mucus isolated from axenic mice. Furthermore, the clone could attach ex vivo to intestinal mucus isolated from axenic mice. Preliminary studies on the receptor moieties implicated in C. difficile adhesion revealed that glucose and galactose could partially block adhesion to tissue culture cells, as did di- or trisaccharides containing these sugars, suggesting that the adhesin is a lectin. In addition, N-acetylgalactosamine, a component of mucus, and gelatin partially impeded cell attachment. Images PMID:7927694

  16. Adherence of Candida to cultured vascular endothelial cells: mechanisms of attachment and endothelial cell penetration.

    PubMed

    Rotrosen, D; Edwards, J E; Gibson, T R; Moore, J C; Cohen, A H; Green, I

    1985-12-01

    To elucidate the pathogenesis of hematogenous Candida infections, we developed an in vitro model of Candida adherence to and penetration of human endothelial cells. We enhanced or inhibited adherence in order to probe mechanisms of attachment. Adherence of Candida albicans showed a linear relation to Candida inoculum (range, 10(2)-10(5) cfu, r = .99, P less than .01) and exceeded that of less virulent Candida species and that of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (P less than .01). Candida immune serum blocked attachment (greater than 95% inhibition; P less than .001), however, this activity was abolished by immunoprecipitation of immune serum with C. albicans mannan (P less than .001) and was unaffected by immunoprecipitation with S. cerevisiae mannan or by adsorption with particulate chitin. Adherence was diminished by exposing C. albicans to heat (greater than 99% inhibition; P less than .01), UV light (98% inhibition; P less than .01), or sodium periodate (greater than 72% inhibition; P less than .01). An extract from heat-exposed C. albicans blocked adherence (greater than 51% inhibition; P less than .001). Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that viable or killed Candida organisms were attached to endothelial cells, were enveloped by membrane processes from the endothelial cell surface, and were incorporated into the endothelial cells within phagosomes. Cytochalasin B blocked incorporation without blocking surface attachment. PMID:3905987

  17. Enzymatic treatment of long-term human marrow cultures reveals the preferential location of primitive hemopoietic progenitors in the adherent layer.

    PubMed

    Coulombel, L; Eaves, A C; Eaves, C J

    1983-08-01

    Recent studies with long-term mouse marrow cultures have indicated the importance of the adherent layer as a primary reservoir of the most primitive stem cells, from which derivative stem cells and more differentiated progenitors are continuously generated. We have now examined the role of the adherent cell layer in long-term human marrow cultures from this point of view. Prerequisite to such an undertaking was the development of a nontoxic and reproducible method for detaching the adherent layer and making it into a single-cell suspension suitable for characterization by colony assays. Both trypsin and collagenase could be used to obtain suspensions that met these criteria. Lack of toxicity was demonstrated by the preservation of CFU-E, BFU-E, and CFU-C plating efficiency in fresh human marrow cell suspensions exposed to the same enzymatic treatments. Collagenase treatment of long-term marrow culture adherent layers was considered superior because it freed all hemopoietic colony-forming cells but left some of the other cells still adherent. Using this method, we found that CFU-C, BFU-E, and CFU-G/E were consistently detectable in the adherent layer for at least 8 wk, with the majority of the BFU-E and CFU-G/E being located in the adherent layer (70%-75% after 2-3 wk and more than 90% by 7-8 wk). Although corresponding numerical differences in adherent and nonadherent CFU-C populations were not observed, the colonies derived from them showed marked differences in the size they achieved; the adherent layer being the exclusive site of CFU-C, with a very high proliferative capacity. These findings emphasize the importance of assessing the progenitor content of the adherent layer of long-term human marrow cultures and provide an appropriate methodology. PMID:6307430

  18. Experiments with osteoblasts cultured under hypergravity conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kacena, Melissa A.; Todd, Paul; Gerstenfeld, Louis C.; Landis, William J.

    2004-01-01

    To understand further the role of gravity in osteoblast attachment, osteoblasts were subjected to hypergravity conditions in vitro. Scanning electron microscopy of all confluent coverslips from FPA units show that the number of attached osteoblasts was similar among gravitational levels and growth durations (90 cells/microscopic field). Specifically, confluent 1.0 G control cultures contained an average of 91 +/- 8 cells/field, 3.3 G samples had 88 +/- 8 cells/field, and 4.0 G cultures averaged 90 +/- 7 cells/field. The sparsely plated cultures assessed by immunohistochemistry also had similar numbers of cells at each time point (l.0 G was similar to 3.3 and 4.0 G), but cell number changed from one time point to the next as those cells proliferated. Immunohistochemistry of centrifuged samples showed an increase in number (up to 160% increase) and thickness (up to 49% increase) of actin fibers, a decrease in intensity of fibronectin fluorescence (18-23% decrease) and an increase in number of vinculin bulbs (202-374% increase in number of vinculin bulbs/area). While hypergravity exposure did not alter the number of attached osteoblasts, it did result in altered actin, fibronectin, and vinculin elements, changing some aspects of osteoblast- substrate adhesion.

  19. Development and Cultural Adaptation Of the Spanish Version of the End Stage Renal Disease Adherence Questionnaire (SESRD-AQ)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youngmee; Evangelista, Lorraine S.

    2015-01-01

    We previously developed and validated the End-Stage Renal Disease Adherence Questionnaire (ESRD-AQ) to measure adherence behaviors (e.g., hemodialysis attendance, medication use, fluid restrictions, and diet) of patients on maintenance hemodialysis. To determine whether the ESRD-AQ can be used to measure adherence behaviors in non- English-speaking patients, we translated and adapted the ESRD-AQ into Spanish (SESRD-AQ) using forward and backward translation and cultural adaptation of the content. Validity and reliability were measured using item-level content validity indexes, intraclass correlation coefficients, and known-group analysis. All validity indices were within an acceptable range; strong test-retest stability existed across all items, with intraclass correlation coefficients ranging from 0.82 to 1.00. The developed SESRD-AQ is a valid assessment tool for use among Spanish-speaking patients on maintenance hemodialysis. This instrument refinement and validation process can be replicated with other maintenance hemodialysis population groups. PMID:24579396

  20. Medication Adherence and Blood Pressure Control Among Hypertensive Patients With Coexisting Long-Term Conditions in Primary Care Settings

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu Ting; Wang, Harry H.X.; Liu, Kirin Q.L.; Lee, Gabrielle K.Y.; Chan, Wai Man; Griffiths, Sian M.; Chen, Ruo Ling

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hypertension is a typical example of long-term disease posing formidable challenges to health care. One goal of antihypertensive therapy is to achieve optimal blood pressure (BP) control and reduce co-occurring chronic conditions (multimorbidity). This study aimed to assess the influence of multimorbidity on medication adherence, and to explore the association between poor BP control and multimorbidity, with implications for hypertension management. A cross-sectional design with multistage sampling was adopted to recruit Chinese hypertensive patients attending general out-patient clinics from 3 geographic regions in Hong Kong. A modified systemic sampling methodology with 1 patient as a sampling unit was used to recruit consecutive samples in each general out-patient clinic. Data were collected by face-to-face interviews using a standardized protocol. Poor BP control was defined as having systolic BP/diastolic BP ≥130/80 mm Hg for those with diabetes or chronic kidney disease; and ≥140/90 mm Hg for others. Medication adherence was assessed by a validated Chinese version of the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale. A simple unweighted enumeration was adopted to measure the combinations of coexisting long-term conditions. Binary logistic regression analysis was conducted with medication adherence and multimorbidity as outcome variables, respectively, after controlling for effects of patient-level covariates. The prevalence of multimorbidity was 47.4% (95% confidence interval [CI] 45.4%–49.4%) among a total of 2445 hypertensive patients. The proportion of subjects having 0, 1, and ≥2 additional long-term conditions was 52.6%, 29.1%, and 18.3%, respectively. The overall rate of poor adherence to medication was 46.6%, whereas the rate of suboptimal BP control was 48.7%. Albeit the influence of multimorbidity on medication adherence was not found to be statistically significant, patients with poorly controlled BP were more likely to have multimorbidity

  1. Transport and storage conditions for cultural recovery of Chlamydia pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Maass, M; Dalhoff, K

    1995-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae is characterized by rapidly decreasing viability outside the host cell, and efficient preservation of its infectivity is a prerequisite for subsequent cell culture recovery. Extracellular survival of three C. pneumoniae stock strains and three wild-type strains subjected to simulated conditions of transport was therefore examined in order to establish recommendations for transport and storage of clinical specimens. The presence of fetal calf serum in transport media as well as refrigeration distinctly improved chlamydial retrieval during prolonged transport. Loss of infectivity was kept to a minimum in Eagle's minimal essential medium or sucrose-phosphate-glutamine medium. Storage at 22 degrees C permitted a stock strain recovery of 81% after 12 h. When refrigeration to 4 degrees C was provided, recovery rates of 74% could be achieved after 48 h. Though the strains were from different geographic regions, requirements for good survival were comparable and should therefore apply worldwide. The results indicate that the laboratory strains are not extremely labile. However, comparative examination of the wild-type strains showed less stability: primary isolates were not satisfactorily retrievable beyond 4 h at 22 degrees C or beyond 24 h at 4 degrees C. Further extension of storage times resulted in rapidly decreasing recovery, indicating a requirement to freeze samples at -75 degrees C to preserve viability. Adherence to the shorter storage periods suggested by the data obtained with primary isolates is recommended to ensure successful transport until more extensive testing with clinical materials is available. PMID:7665648

  2. Effects of anti-odor automobile air-conditioning system products on adherence of Serratia marcescens to aluminum.

    PubMed

    Drago, G K; Simmons, R B; Price, D L; Crow, S A; Ahearn, D G

    2002-12-01

    Sixteen commercial products for use in automobile air-conditioning systems (ACS), most designated for abatement of malodors presumably of microbial origin, were examined for their potential to inhibit attachment and to detach cells of the Gram-negative bacterium Serratia marcescens on aluminum sections. Numbers of attached cells were appreciably reduced (>60%) following immersion in three alcohol-type and two acrylic-coating-type products. Several products had essentially no effect on the attached cells. Most of the products indicated for alleviation of associated microbial odors from ACS provided only short-term effects. When products were coated onto aluminum prior to exposure to the cells, water-insoluble coatings appeared to provide more consistent inhibition of primary adherence of S. marcescens. The differences in degrees of primary adherence of a selected strain of S. marcescens to variously treated aluminum provided a rapid and reproducible assessment of potential antimicrobial efficacy of ACS products. PMID:12483481

  3. Characterization of Three-Dimensional Retinal Tissue Derived from Human Embryonic Stem Cells in Adherent Monolayer Cultures.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ratnesh K; Mallela, Ramya K; Cornuet, Pamela K; Reifler, Aaron N; Chervenak, Andrew P; West, Michael D; Wong, Kwoon Y; Nasonkin, Igor O

    2015-12-01

    Stem cell-based therapy of retinal degenerative conditions is a promising modality to treat blindness, but requires new strategies to improve the number of functionally integrating cells. Grafting semidifferentiated retinal tissue rather than progenitors allows preservation of tissue structure and connectivity in retinal grafts, mandatory for vision restoration. Using human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), we derived retinal tissue growing in adherent conditions consisting of conjoined neural retina and retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and evaluated cell fate determination and maturation in this tissue. We found that deriving such tissue in adherent conditions robustly induces all eye field genes (RX, PAX6, LHX2, SIX3, SIX6) and produces four layers of pure populations of retinal cells: RPE (expressing NHERF1, EZRIN, RPE65, DCT, TYR, TYRP, MITF, PMEL), early photoreceptors (PRs) (coexpressing CRX and RCVRN), inner nuclear layer neurons (expressing CALB2), and retinal ganglion cells [RGCs, expressing BRN3B and Neurofilament (NF) 200]. Furthermore, we found that retinal progenitors divide at the apical side of the hESC-derived retinal tissue (next to the RPE layer) and then migrate toward the basal side, similar to that found during embryonic retinogenesis. We detected synaptogenesis in hESC-derived retinal tissue, and found neurons containing many synaptophysin-positive boutons within the RGC and PR layers. We also observed long NF200-positive axons projected by RGCs toward the apical side. Whole-cell recordings demonstrated that putative amacrine and/or ganglion cells exhibited electrophysiological responses reminiscent of those in normal retinal neurons. These responses included voltage-gated Na(+) and K(+) currents, depolarization-induced spiking, and responses to neurotransmitter receptor agonists. Differentiation in adherent conditions allows generation of long and flexible pieces of 3D retinal tissue suitable for isolating transplantable slices of tissue

  4. Differential Radiosensitizing Effect of Valproic Acid in Differentiation Versus Self-Renewal Promoting Culture Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Debeb, Bisrat G.; Xu Wei; Mok, Henry; Li Li; Robertson, Fredika; Ueno, Naoto T.; Reuben, Jim; Lucci, Anthony; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Woodward, Wendy A.

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: It has been shown that valproic acid (VA) enhances the proliferation and self-renewal of normal hematopoietic stem cells and that breast cancer stem/progenitor cells can be resistant to radiation. From these data, we hypothesized that VA would fail to radiosensitize breast cancer stem/progenitor cells grown to three-dimensional (3D) mammospheres. Methods and Materials: We used the MCF7 breast cancer cell line grown under stem cell-promoting culture conditions (3D mammosphere) and standard nonstem cell monolayer culture conditions (two-dimensional) to examine the effect of pretreatment with VA on radiation sensitivity in clonogenic survival assays and on the expression of embryonic stem cell transcription factors. Results: 3D-cultured MCF-7 cells expressed higher levels of Oct4, Nanog, and Sox2. The 3D passage enriched self-renewal and increased radioresistance in the 3D mammosphere formation assays. VA radiosensitized adherent cells but radioprotected 3D cells in single-fraction clonogenic assays. Moreover, fractionated radiation sensitized VA-treated adherent MCF7 cells but did not have a significant effect on VA-treated single cells grown to mammospheres. Conclusion: We have concluded that VA might preferentially radiosensitize differentiated cells compared with those expressing stem cell surrogates and that stem cell-promoting culture is a useful tool for in vitro evaluation of novel cancer therapeutic agents and radiosensitizers.

  5. Scalable expansion of human induced pluripotent stem cells in the defined xeno-free E8 medium under adherent and suspension culture conditions☆

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Chou, Bin-Kuan; Dowey, Sarah; He, Chaoxia; Gerecht, Sharon; Cheng, Linzhao

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale production of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) by robust and economic methods has been one of the major challenges for translational realization of hiPSC technology. Here we demonstrate a scalable culture system for hiPSC expansion using the E8 chemically defined and xeno-free medium under either adherent or suspension conditions. To optimize suspension conditions guided by a computational simulation, we developed a method to efficiently expand hiPSCs as undifferentiated aggregates in spinner flasks. Serial passaging of two different hiPSC lines in the spinner flasks using the E8 medium preserved their normal karyotype and expression of undifferentiated state markers of TRA-1–60, SSEA4, OCT4, and NANOG. The hiPSCs cultured in spinner flasks for more than 10 passages not only could be remained pluripotent as indicated by in vitro and in vivo assays, but also could be efficiently induced toward mesodermal and hematopoietic differentiation. Furthermore, we established a xeno-free protocol of single-cell cryopreservation and recovery for the scalable production of hiPSCs in spinner flasks. This system is the first to enable an efficient scale-up bioprocess in completely xeno-free condition for the expansion and cryopreservation of hiPSCs with the quantity and quality compliant for clinical applications. PMID:23973800

  6. Conditioning Factors of an Organizational Learning Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rebelo, Teresa Manuela; Gomes, Adelino Duarte

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to assess the relationship between some variables (organizational structure, organizational dimension and age, human resource characteristics, the external environment, strategy and quality) and organizational learning culture and evaluate the way they interact with this kind of culture.…

  7. Managing treatment for end-stage renal disease--a qualitative study exploring cultural perspectives on facilitators and barriers to treatment adherence.

    PubMed

    Griva, K; Ng, H J; Loei, J; Mooppil, N; McBain, H; Newman, S P

    2013-01-01

    Although adherence to hemodialysis (HD) regimes is important to maximise good clinical outcomes, it remains suboptimal and not well understood, particularly for those in non-Western settings and patients from Asian cultures. This qualitative study sought to explore cultural perspectives on facilitators and barriers to treatment adherence in HD patients. A descriptive exploratory design was used for the study, incorporating individual semi-structured interviews (n = 17) and three focus groups (n = 20). Each interview/focus group was audio-taped and transcribed verbatim, and coding was conducted by two coders using an iterative process. Study participants identified personal and social/contextual factors as major barriers or facilitators of treatment adherence. Barriers include time consumption, forgetfulness, concerns about safety, poor knowledge/understanding, poor communication and lack of control/social pressure. Participants also identified facilitators, both internal (self-initiated) and external (initiated by family, health care professional and peers) to ensure treatment adherence. These included support from family members and social obligation towards others, risk perception, establishment of routines and peer support. Internal and external factors can hinder or facilitate adherence to diet, fluid and medications in the context of dialysis. Several of these barriers/facilitators can be effectively addressed in the context of interventions and psycho-educational programmes. PMID:22780853

  8. The Sca2 Autotransporter Protein from Rickettsia conorii Is Sufficient To Mediate Adherence to and Invasion of Cultured Mammalian Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Cardwell, Marissa M.; Martinez, Juan J.

    2009-01-01

    Obligate intracellular bacteria of the genus Rickettsia must adhere to and invade the host endothelium in order to establish an infection. These processes require the interaction of rickettsial surface proteins with mammalian host cell receptors. A previous bioinformatic analysis of sequenced rickettsial species identified a family of at least 17 predicted “surface cell antigen” (sca) genes whose products resemble autotransporter proteins. Two members of this family, rOmpA and rOmpB of spotted fever group (SFG) rickettsiae have been identified as adhesion and invasion factors, respectively; however, little is known about the putative functions of the other sca gene products. An intact sca2 gene is found in the majority of pathogenic SFG rickettsiae and, due to its sequence conservation among these species, we predict that Sca2 may play an important function at the rickettsial surface. Here we have shown that sca2 is transcribed and expressed in Rickettsia conorii and have used a heterologous gain-of-function assay in E. coli to determine the putative role of Sca2. Using this system, we have demonstrated that expression of Sca2 at the outer membrane of nonadherent, noninvasive E. coli is sufficient to mediate adherence to and invasion of a panel of mammalian cells, including endothelial cells. Furthermore, soluble Sca2 protein is capable of diminishing R. conorii invasion of cultured mammalian cells. This is the first evidence that Sca2 participates in the interaction between SFG rickettsiae and host cells and suggests that in addition to other surface proteins, Sca2 may play a critical role in rickettsial pathogenesis. PMID:19805531

  9. Specific adherence of Borrelia burgdorferi extracellular vesicles to human endothelial cells in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Shoberg, R J; Thomas, D D

    1993-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi produces extracellular vesicles which contain some of the outer surface proteins of the bacterium (e.g., OspA and OspB). Borrelial vesicles, isolated by differential centrifugation and filtration, were tested for the ability to bind to cultured human umbilical vein endothelial (HUVE) cells in culture. The recently described lipoprotein OspD was expressed on vesicles. Vesicles exhibited differential expression of OspB and OspD in a relationship with passage number and medium serum supplement type, respectively. Qualitative immunoblotting analyses demonstrated dose-dependent, passage number-dependent adsorption of vesicles by HUVE cells. This adsorption was demonstrated to be dependent upon a borrelial component of the vesicle and not due to the presence of minor contamination with intact spirochetes. Quantitative experiments examining inhibition of B. burgdorferi-HUVE association as a function of prior vesicle-HUVE association demonstrated dependence upon (i) a borrelial component(s) in the vesicle, (ii) low passage number, and (iii) vesicle protein concentration. However, vesicle pretreatment of the HUVE cell monolayer was not requisite for this inhibition. Vesicles from highly passaged borrelias were noninhibitory for B. burgdorferi-HUVE cell association, regardless of the serum used to supplement the medium. The use of vesicles as a tool for studying B. burgdorferi pathogenesis and/or physiology is proposed. Images PMID:8359911

  10. Extracellular mass transport considerations for space flight research concerning suspended and adherent in vitro cell cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klaus, David M.; Benoit, Michael R.; Nelson, Emily S.; Hammond, Timmothy G.

    2004-01-01

    Conducting biological research in space requires consideration be given to isolating appropriate control parameters. For in vitro cell cultures, numerous environmental factors can adversely affect data interpretation. A biological response attributed to microgravity can, in theory, be explicitly correlated to a specific lack of weight or gravity-driven motion occurring to, within or around a cell. Weight can be broken down to include the formation of hydrostatic gradients, structural load (stress) or physical deformation (strain). Gravitationally induced motion within or near individual cells in a fluid includes sedimentation (or buoyancy) of the cell and associated shear forces, displacement of cytoskeleton or organelles, and factors associated with intra- or extracellular mass transport. Finally, and of particular importance for cell culture experiments, the collective effects of gravity must be considered for the overall system consisting of the cells, their environment and the device in which they are contained. This does not, however, rule out other confounding variables such as launch acceleration, on orbit vibration, transient acceleration impulses or radiation, which can be isolated using onboard centrifuges or vibration isolation techniques. A framework is offered for characterizing specific cause-and-effect relationships for gravity-dependent responses as a function of the above parameters.

  11. cGMP-Compliant Expansion of Human iPSC Cultures as Adherent Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Parr, Ann M; Walsh, Patrick J; Truong, Vincent; Dutton, James R

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic uses of cells differentiated from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), either embryonic stem (ES) cells or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), are now being tested in clinical trials, and it is likely that this will lead to increased commercial interest in the clinical translation of promising hPSC research. Recent technical advances in the use of defined media and culture substrates have significantly improved both the simplicity and predictability of growing hPSCs, allowing a much more straightforward application of current good manufacturing practices (cGMP) to the culture of these cells. In addition, the adoption of cGMP-compliant techniques in research environments will both improve the replication of results and make the transition of promising investigations to the commercial sector significantly less cumbersome. However, passaging methods for hPSCs are inherently unpredictable and rely on operator experience and expertise. This is problematic for the cell manufacturing process where operator time and process predictability are often determining cost drivers. We have adopted a human iPSC system using defined media and a recombinant substrate that employs cell dissociation with a hypertonic citrate solution which eliminates variability during hPSC cell expansion and provides a simple cGMP-compliant technique for hiPSC cultivation that is appropriate in both research and commercial applications. PMID:25863788

  12. The challenge of patient adherence.

    PubMed

    Martin, Leslie R; Williams, Summer L; Haskard, Kelly B; Dimatteo, M Robin

    2005-09-01

    Quality healthcare outcomes depend upon patients' adherence to recommended treatment regimens. Patient nonadherence can be a pervasive threat to health and wellbeing and carry an appreciable economic burden as well. In some disease conditions, more than 40% of patients sustain significant risks by misunderstanding, forgetting, or ignoring healthcare advice. While no single intervention strategy can improve the adherence of all patients, decades of research studies agree that successful attempts to improve patient adherence depend upon a set of key factors. These include realistic assessment of patients' knowledge and understanding of the regimen, clear and effective communication between health professionals and their patients, and the nurturance of trust in the therapeutic relationship. Patients must be given the opportunity to tell the story of their unique illness experiences. Knowing the patient as a person allows the health professional to understand elements that are crucial to the patient's adherence: beliefs, attitudes, subjective norms, cultural context, social supports, and emotional health challenges, particularly depression. Physician-patient partnerships are essential when choosing amongst various therapeutic options to maximize adherence. Mutual collaboration fosters greater patient satisfaction, reduces the risks of nonadherence, and improves patients' healthcare outcomes. PMID:18360559

  13. The Chinese Life-Steps Program: A Cultural Adaptation of a Cognitive-Behavioral Intervention to Enhance HIV Medication Adherence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiu, Cheng-Shi; Chen, Wei-Ti; Simoni, Jane; Fredriksen-Goldsen, Karen; Zhang, Fujie; Zhou, Hongxin

    2013-01-01

    China is considered to be the new frontier of the global AIDS pandemic. Although effective treatment for HIV is becoming widely available in China, adherence to treatment remains a challenge. This study aimed to adapt an intervention promoting HIV-medication adherence--favorably evaluated in the West--for Chinese HIV-positive patients. The…

  14. AFBI assay – Aptamer Fluorescence Binding and Internalization assay for cultured adherent cells

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, William H.; Giangrande, Paloma H.

    2016-01-01

    The SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment) process allows for the enrichment of DNA or RNA aptamers from a complex nucleic acid library that are specific for a target molecule. The SELEX process has been adapted from identifying aptamers in vitro using recombinant target protein to cell-based methodologies (Cell-SELEX), where the targets are expressed on the surface of cells. One major advantage of Cell-SELEX is that the target molecules are maintained in a native confirmation. Additionally, Cell-SELEX may be used to discover novel therapeutic biomarkers by performing selections on diseased versus healthy cells. However, a caveat to Cell-SELEX is that testing of single aptamers identified in the selection is laborious, time-consuming, and expensive. The most frequently used methods to screen for aptamer binding and internalization on cells are flow cytometry and quantitative PCR (qPCR). While flow cytometry can directly assess binding of a fluorescently-labeled aptamer to a target, it requires significant starting material and is not easily scalable. qPCR-based approaches are highly sensitive but have non-negligible experiment-to-experiment variability due to the number of sample processing steps. Herein we describe a cell-based aptamer fluorescence binding and internalization (AFBI) assay. This assay requires minimal reagents and has few experimental steps/manipulations, thereby allowing for rapid screening of many aptamers and conditions simultaneously and direct quantitation of aptamer binding and internalization. PMID:26972784

  15. AFBI assay - Aptamer Fluorescence Binding and Internalization assay for cultured adherent cells.

    PubMed

    Thiel, William H; Giangrande, Paloma H

    2016-07-01

    The SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment) process allows for the enrichment of DNA or RNA aptamers from a complex nucleic acid library that are specific for a target molecule. The SELEX process has been adapted from identifying aptamers in vitro using recombinant target protein to cell-based methodologies (Cell-SELEX), where the targets are expressed on the surface of cells. One major advantage of Cell-SELEX is that the target molecules are maintained in a native confirmation. Additionally, Cell-SELEX may be used to discover novel therapeutic biomarkers by performing selections on diseased versus healthy cells. However, a caveat to Cell-SELEX is that testing of single aptamers identified in the selection is laborious, time-consuming, and expensive. The most frequently used methods to screen for aptamer binding and internalization on cells are flow cytometry and quantitative PCR (qPCR). While flow cytometry can directly assess binding of a fluorescently-labeled aptamer to a target, it requires significant starting material and is not easily scalable. qPCR-based approaches are highly sensitive but have non-negligible experiment-to-experiment variability due to the number of sample processing steps. Herein we describe a cell-based aptamer fluorescence binding and internalization (AFBI) assay. This assay requires minimal reagents and has few experimental steps/manipulations, thereby allowing for rapid screening of many aptamers and conditions simultaneously and direct quantitation of aptamer binding and internalization. PMID:26972784

  16. Optimization of culture conditions for Gardnerella vaginalis biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Machado, Daniela; Palmeira-de-Oliveira, Ana; Cerca, Nuno

    2015-11-01

    Bacterial vaginosis is the leading vaginal disorder in women in reproductive age. Although bacterial vaginosis is related with presence of a biofilm composed predominantly by Gardnerella vaginalis, there has not been a detailed information addressing the environmental conditions that influence the biofilm formation of this bacterial species. Here, we evaluated the influence of some common culture conditions on G. vaginalis biofilm formation, namely inoculum concentration, incubation period, feeding conditions and culture medium composition. Our results showed that culture conditions strongly influenced G. vaginalis biofilm formation and that biofilm formation was enhanced when starting the culture with a higher inoculum, using a fed-batch system and supplementing the growth medium with maltose. PMID:26381661

  17. Neutrophils use both shared and distinct mechanisms to adhere to selectins under static and flow conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Patel, K D; Moore, K L; Nollert, M U; McEver, R P

    1995-01-01

    Both P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) and L-selectin are localized on the microvilli of neutrophils and have been implicated in the attachment of neutrophils to P-selectin or E-selectin. We directly compared the attachment and rolling of neutrophils on P-selectin and E-selectin under flow, with emphasis on the functions of PSGL-1 and L-selectin. Flowing neutrophils attached more avidly and rolled at lower velocities on P-selectin than on E-selectin at matched densities. Studies with purified molecules indicated that P-selectin and E-selectin bound to a related site on PSGL-1 that overlapped the epitope for the anti-PSGL-1 mAb PL1. E-selectin bound with lower affinity than P-selectin to this site and also bound to an additional site(s) on PSGL-1.PL1 abolished adhesion of neutrophils to P-selectin under shear or static conditions, whereas DREG-56, a mAb to L-selectin, had no effect on adhesion to P-selectin. PL1 inhibited attachment of neutrophils to E-selectin under flow but not static conditions. DREG-56 also inhibited attachment of flowing neutrophils to E-selectin, and a combination of DREG-56 and PL1 nearly eliminated attachment to E-selectin under flow. These data suggest that PSGL-1 functions cooperatively with L-selectin to mediate optimal attachment of flowing neutrophils to E-selectin but not to P-selectin. Neutrophils attach more efficiently and with greater strength to P-selectin, perhaps because of the higher affinity of P-selectin for the PL1-defined site on PSGL-1. Images PMID:7560080

  18. Condition Self-Management in Pediatric Spina Bifida: A Longitudinal Investigation of Medical Adherence, Responsibility-Sharing, and Independence Skills

    PubMed Central

    Psihogios, Alexandra M.; Kolbuck, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate rates of medical adherence, responsibility, and independence skills across late childhood and adolescence in youth with spina bifida (SB) and to explore associations among these disease self-management variables. Method 111 youth with SB, their parents, and a health professional participated at two time points. Informants completed questionnaires regarding medical adherence, responsibility-sharing, and child independence skills. Results Youth gained more responsibility and independence skills across time, although adherence rates did not follow a similar trajectory. Increased child medical responsibility was related to poorer adherence, and father-reported independence skills were associated with increased child responsibility. Conclusions This study highlights medical domains that are the most difficult for families to manage (e.g., skin checks). Although youth appear to gain more autonomy across time, ongoing parental involvement in medical care may be necessary to achieve optimal adherence across adolescence. PMID:26002195

  19. Milk digesta and milk protein fractions influence the adherence of Lactobacillus gasseri R and Lactobacillus casei FMP to human cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Volstatova, Tereza; Havlik, Jaroslav; Potuckova, Miroslava; Geigerova, Martina

    2016-08-10

    Adhesion to the intestinal epithelium is considered an important feature of probiotic bacteria, which may increase their persistence in the intestine, allowing them to exert their beneficial health effect or promote the colonisation process. However, this feature might be largely dependent on the host specificity or diet. In the present study, we investigated the effect of selected milks and milk protein fractions on the ability of selected lactobacilli to adhere to the cells of an intestinal model based on co-culture Caco-2/HT29-MTX cell lines. Most milk digesta did not significantly affect bacterial adhesion except for UHT-treated milk and sheep milk. The presence of UHT-treated milk digesta reduced the adhesion of Lactobacillus gasseri R by 61% but not that of Lactobacillus casei FMP. However, sheep milk significantly increased the adherence of L. casei FMP (P < 0.05) but not of L. gasseri R. Among the protein fractions, rennet casein (RCN) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) showed reproducible patterns and strain-specific effects on bacterial adherence. While RCN reduced the adherence of L. gasseri R to <50% compared to the control, it did not have a significant effect on L. casei FMP. In contrast, BSA reduced L. casei FMP adherence to a higher extent than that of L. gasseri R. Whey protein (WH) tended to increase the adherence of both strains by 130%-180%. Recently, interactions between the host diet and its microbiota have attracted considerable interest. Our results may explain one of the aspects of the role of milk in the development of microbiota or support of probiotic supplements. Based on our data, we conclude that the persistence of probiotic strains supplemented as part of dairy food or constitutional microbiota in the gut might be affected negatively or positively by the food matrix through complex strain or concentration dependent effects. PMID:27435508

  20. Adherence to abiotic surface induces SOS response in Escherichia coli K-12 strains under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Costa, Suelen B; Campos, Ana Carolina C; Pereira, Ana Claudia M; de Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana Luiza; Júnior, Raphael Hirata; Rosa, Ana Cláudia P; Asad, Lídia M B O

    2014-09-01

    During the colonization of surfaces, Escherichia coli bacteria often encounter DNA-damaging agents and these agents can induce several defence mechanisms. Base excision repair (BER) is dedicated to the repair of oxidative DNA damage caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by chemical and physical agents or by metabolism. In this work, we have evaluated whether the interaction with an abiotic surface by mutants derived from E. coli K-12 deficient in some enzymes that are part of BER causes DNA damage and associated filamentation. Moreover, we studied the role of endonuclease V (nfi gene; 1506 mutant strain) in biofilm formation. Endonuclease V is an enzyme that is involved in DNA repair of nitrosative lesions. We verified that endonuclease V is involved in biofilm formation. Our results showed more filamentation in the xthA mutant (BW9091) and triple xthA nfo nth mutant (BW535) than in the wild-type strain (AB1157). By contrast, the mutant nfi did not present filamentation in biofilm, although its wild-type strain (1466) showed rare filaments in biofilm. The filamentation of bacterial cells attaching to a surface was a consequence of SOS induction measured by the SOS chromotest. However, biofilm formation depended on the ability of the bacteria to induce the SOS response since the mutant lexA Ind(-) did not induce the SOS response and did not form any biofilm. Oxygen tension was an important factor for the interaction of the BER mutants, since these mutants exhibited decreased quantitative adherence under anaerobic conditions. However, our results showed that the presence or absence of oxygen did not affect the viability of BW9091 and BW535 strains. The nfi mutant and its wild-type did not exhibit decreased biofilm formation under anaerobic conditions. Scanning electron microscopy was also performed on the E. coli K-12 strains that had adhered to the glass, and we observed the presence of a structure similar to an extracellular matrix that depended on the

  1. Cultural adaptation of an evidence-based nursing intervention to improve medication adherence among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in China

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Ann B.; Wang, Honghong; Burgess, Jane; Li, Xianhong; Danvers, Karina

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Adapting nursing interventions to suit the needs and culture of a new population (cultural adaptation) is an important early step in the process of implementation and dissemination. While the need for cultural adaptation is widely accepted, research-based strategies for doing so are not well articulated. Non-adherence to medications for chronic disease is a global problem and cultural adaptation of existing evidence-based interventions could be useful. OBJECTIVES This paper aims to describe the cultural adaptation of an evidence-based nursing intervention to improve medication adherence among people living with HIV/AIDS and to offer recommendations for adaptation of interventions across cultures and borders. SITE The intervention, which demonstrated efficacy in a randomized controlled trial in North America, was adapted for the cultural and social context of Hunan Province, in south central China. SOURCES OF DATA The adaptation process was undertaken by intervention stakeholders including the original intervention study team, the proposed adaptation team, and members of a Community Advisory Board, including people living with HIV/AIDS, family members, and health care workers at the target clinical sites. PROCEDURES The adaptation process was driven by quantitative and qualitative data describing the new population and context and was guided by principles for cultural adaptation drawn from prevention science research. RESULTS The primary adaptation to the intervention was the inclusion of family members in intervention activities, in response to the cultural and social importance of the family in rural China. In a pilot test of the adapted intervention, self-reported medication adherence improved significantly in the group receiving the intervention compared to the control group (p=0.01). Recommendations for cultural adaptation of nursing interventions include 1) involve stakeholders from the beginning; 2) assess the population, need, and context; 3

  2. Heterogeneous Demographic and Cultural Profiles of Non-adherent Chinese-American Patients to Colorectal Cancer Screening: A Latent Class Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Strong, Carol; Ji, Cheng Shuang; Liang, Wenchi; Ma, Grace; Brown, Roger; Wang, Judy Huei-yu

    2013-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer death for Chinese Americans, but their CRC screening rates remain low. Objective We examined subgroups of Chinese-American patients non-adherent to CRC screening guidelines to better inform clinical practices to effectively promote screening. Methods Using latent class analysis (LCA) of data from 327 participants recruited from 18 primary care clinics, we classified non-adherent patients based on sociodemographics, screening barriers, attitudinal and clinical factors for CRC screening. Results The best-fitting LCA model described three distinctive classes: Western Healthcare Class (WHC, 35%), Eastern Healthcare Class (EHC, 18%) and Mixed Healthcare Class (MHC, 46%). WHC patients were highly-educated with average 20 years of U.S. residency, high level of English proficiency, the least Eastern cultural views of care and the greatest exposure to physician recommendations, but reported having no time for screenings. EHC patients were highly-educated seniors and recent immigrants with the least CRC knowledge and the more Eastern cultural views. MHC patients had low level of education, resided in the U.S. for 20 years, and had relatively long relationships with physicians, but their knowledge and cultural views were similar to those of EHC patients. Conclusions Non-adherent Chinese-American patients are heterogeneous. It is essential to have future intervention programs tailored to address specific screening beliefs and barriers for subtypes of non-adherent patients. Implications for Practice Training primary care physicians to recognize patients’ different demographic characteristics and healthcare beliefs may facilitate physician’s communication with patients to overcome their barriers and improve screening behaviors. PMID:23519040

  3. Optimal Culture Conditions for Mycelial Growth of Lignosus rhinocerus

    PubMed Central

    Siti Murni, M.J.; Fauzi, D.; Abas Mazni, O.; Saleh, N.M.

    2011-01-01

    Lignosus rhinocerus is a macrofungus that belongs to Polyporaceae and is native to tropical regions. This highly priced mushroom has been used as folk medicine to treat diseases by indigenous people. As a preliminary study to develop a culture method for edible mushrooms, the cultural characteristics of L. rhinocerus were investigated in a range of culture media under different environmental conditions. Mycelial growth of this mushroom was compared on culture media composed of various carbon and nitrogen sources in addition to C/N ratios. The optimal conditions for mycelial growth were 30℃ at pH 6 and 7. Rapid mycelial growth of L. rhinocerus was observed on glucose-peptone and yeast extract peptone dextrose media. Carbon and nitrogen sources promoting mycelial growth of L. rhinocerus were glucose and potassium nitrate, respectively. The optimum C/N ratio was approximately 10 : 1 using 2% glucose supplemented as a carbon source in the basal media. PMID:22783083

  4. Reproducible expansion and characterization of mouse neural stem/progenitor cells in adherent cultures derived from the adult subventricular zone

    PubMed Central

    Theus, Michelle H.; Ricard, Jerome; Liebl, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Endogenous neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) residing in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the adult mouse forebrain have been shown to enhance their neurogenic potential in response to CNS injury. Mechanisms involved in regulating adult neurogenesis under naïve or stressed conditions can be studied using a monolayer cell-culture system of the nestin-expressing NSPC lineage to analyze proliferation, survival and differentiation. Here, we describe a protocol for the expansion of NSPCs for studies aimed at understanding the functional role of NSPCs in maintaining adult neurogenic processes. In this unit, we outline in detail the procedures for: (1) isolation, maintenance and culture of the NSPC component of the SVZ niche from the lateral wall of the lateral ventricle; (2) characterization of NSPC functions by examining proliferation, survival and differentiation; and (3) efficient siRNA transfection methods in 96-well format. PMID:22415840

  5. Single cell dual adherent-suspension co-culture micro-environment for studying tumor-stromal interactions with functionally selected cancer stem-like cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Chih; Zhang, Zhixiong; Fouladdel, Shamileh; Deol, Yadwinder; Ingram, Patrick N; McDermott, Sean P; Azizi, Ebrahim; Wicha, Max S; Yoon, Euisik

    2016-08-01

    Considerable evidence suggests that cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are critical in tumor pathogenesis, but their rarity and transience has led to much controversy about their exact nature. Although CSCs can be functionally identified using dish-based tumorsphere assays, it is difficult to handle and monitor single cells in dish-based approaches; single cell-based microfluidic approaches offer better control and reliable single cell derived sphere formation. However, like normal stem cells, CSCs are heavily regulated by their microenvironment, requiring tumor-stromal interactions for tumorigenic and proliferative behaviors. To enable single cell derived tumorsphere formation within a stromal microenvironment, we present a dual adherent/suspension co-culture device, which combines a suspension environment for single-cell tumorsphere assays and an adherent environment for co-culturing stromal cells in close proximity by selectively patterning polyHEMA in indented microwells. By minimizing dead volume and improving cell capture efficiency, the presented platform allows for the use of small numbers of cells (<100 cells). As a proof of concept, we co-cultured single T47D (breast cancer) cells and primary cancer associated fibroblasts (CAF) on-chip for 14 days to monitor sphere formation and growth. Compared to mono-culture, co-cultured T47D have higher tumorigenic potential (sphere formation rate) and proliferation rates (larger sphere size). Furthermore, 96-multiplexed single-cell transcriptome analyses were performed to compare the gene expression of co-cultured and mono-cultured T47D cells. Phenotypic changes observed in co-culture correlated with expression changes in genes associated with proliferation, apoptotic suppression, tumorigenicity and even epithelial-to-mesechymal transition. Combining the presented platform with single cell transcriptome analysis, we successfully identified functional CSCs and investigated the phenotypic and transcriptome effects induced

  6. Mitigation of Lethal Radiation Syndrome in Mice by Intramuscular Injection of 3D Cultured Adherent Human Placental Stromal Cells.

    PubMed

    Gaberman, Elena; Pinzur, Lena; Levdansky, Lilia; Tsirlin, Maria; Netzer, Nir; Aberman, Zami; Gorodetsky, Raphael

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to high lethal dose of ionizing radiation results in acute radiation syndrome with deleterious systemic effects to different organs. A primary target is the highly sensitive bone marrow and the hematopoietic system. In the current study C3H/HeN mice were total body irradiated by 7.7 Gy. Twenty four hrs and 5 days after irradiation 2×10(6) cells from different preparations of human derived 3D expanded adherent placental stromal cells (PLX) were injected intramuscularly. Treatment with batches consisting of pure maternal cell preparations (PLX-Mat) increased the survival of the irradiated mice from ∼27% to 68% (P<0.001), while cell preparations with a mixture of maternal and fetal derived cells (PLX-RAD) increased the survival to ∼98% (P<0.0001). The dose modifying factor of this treatment for both 50% and 37% survival (DMF50 and DMF37) was∼1.23. Initiation of the more effective treatment with PLX-RAD injection could be delayed for up to 48 hrs after irradiation with similar effect. A delayed treatment by 72 hrs had lower, but still significantly effect (p<0.05). A faster recovery of the BM and improved reconstitution of all blood cell lineages in the PLX-RAD treated mice during the follow-up explains the increased survival of the cells treated irradiated mice. The number of CD45+/SCA1+ hematopoietic progenitor cells within the fast recovering population of nucleated BM cells in the irradiated mice was also elevated in the PLX-RAD treated mice. Our study suggests that IM treatment with PLX-RAD cells may serve as a highly effective "off the shelf" therapy to treat BM failure following total body exposure to high doses of radiation. The results suggest that similar treatments may be beneficial also for clinical conditions associated with severe BM aplasia and pancytopenia. PMID:23823334

  7. Mitigation of Lethal Radiation Syndrome in Mice by Intramuscular Injection of 3D Cultured Adherent Human Placental Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gaberman, Elena; Pinzur, Lena; Levdansky, Lilia; Tsirlin, Maria; Netzer, Nir; Aberman, Zami; Gorodetsky, Raphael

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to high lethal dose of ionizing radiation results in acute radiation syndrome with deleterious systemic effects to different organs. A primary target is the highly sensitive bone marrow and the hematopoietic system. In the current study C3H/HeN mice were total body irradiated by 7.7 Gy. Twenty four hrs and 5 days after irradiation 2×106 cells from different preparations of human derived 3D expanded adherent placental stromal cells (PLX) were injected intramuscularly. Treatment with batches consisting of pure maternal cell preparations (PLX-Mat) increased the survival of the irradiated mice from ∼27% to 68% (P<0.001), while cell preparations with a mixture of maternal and fetal derived cells (PLX-RAD) increased the survival to ∼98% (P<0.0001). The dose modifying factor of this treatment for both 50% and 37% survival (DMF50 and DMF37) was∼1.23. Initiation of the more effective treatment with PLX-RAD injection could be delayed for up to 48 hrs after irradiation with similar effect. A delayed treatment by 72 hrs had lower, but still significantly effect (p<0.05). A faster recovery of the BM and improved reconstitution of all blood cell lineages in the PLX-RAD treated mice during the follow-up explains the increased survival of the cells treated irradiated mice. The number of CD45+/SCA1+ hematopoietic progenitor cells within the fast recovering population of nucleated BM cells in the irradiated mice was also elevated in the PLX-RAD treated mice. Our study suggests that IM treatment with PLX-RAD cells may serve as a highly effective “off the shelf” therapy to treat BM failure following total body exposure to high doses of radiation. The results suggest that similar treatments may be beneficial also for clinical conditions associated with severe BM aplasia and pancytopenia. PMID:23823334

  8. Adhering heat-killed human Lactobacillus acidophilus, strain LB, inhibits the process of pathogenicity of diarrhoeagenic bacteria in cultured human intestinal cells.

    PubMed

    Coconnier, M H; Bernet, M F; Chauvière, G; Servin, A L

    1993-12-01

    Heat-killed L. acidophilus, strain LB, was tested for its ability to adhere in vitro onto human enterocyte-like Caco-2 and muco-secreting HT29-MTX cells in culture. The heat-killed LB bacteria exhibited a high adhesive property. A diffuse pattern of adhesion was observed to the undifferentiated cells, the apical brush border of the enterocytic cells, and to the mucus layer that covered the surface of the mucus-secreting cells. The inhibitory effect of heat-killed LB organisms against the human intestinal Caco-2 cell-adhesion and cell-invasion by a large variety of diarrhoeagenic bacteria was investigated. The following dose-dependent inhibitions were obtained: (i) against the cell-association of enterotoxigenic, diffusely-adhering and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, and Salmonella typhimurium; (ii) against the cell-invasion by enteropathogenic Escherichia coli, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella typhimurium. PMID:8188996

  9. Primary cancer cell culture: mammary-optimized vs conditional reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Alamri, Ahmad M; Kang, Keunsoo; Groeneveld, Svenja; Wang, Weisheng; Zhong, Xiaogang; Kallakury, Bhaskar; Hennighausen, Lothar; Liu, Xuefeng; Furth, Priscilla A

    2016-07-01

    The impact of different culture conditions on biology of primary cancer cells is not always addressed. Here, conditional reprogramming (CRC) was compared with mammary-optimized EpiCult-B (EpiC) for primary mammary epithelial cell isolation and propagation, allograft generation, and genome-wide transcriptional consequences using cancer and non-cancer mammary tissue from mice with different dosages of Brca1 and p53 Selective comparison to DMEM was included. Primary cultures were established with all three media, but CRC was most efficient for initial isolation (P<0.05). Allograft development was faster using cells grown in EpiC compared with CRC (P<0.05). Transcriptome comparison of paired CRC and EpiC cultures revealed 1700 differentially expressed genes by passage 20. CRC promoted Trp53 gene family upregulation and increased expression of epithelial differentiation genes, whereas EpiC elevated expression of epithelial-mesenchymal transition genes. Differences did not persist in allografts where both methods yielded allografts with relatively similar transcriptomes. Restricting passage (<7) reduced numbers of differentially expressed genes below 50. In conclusion, CRC was most efficient for initial cell isolation but EpiC was quicker for allograft generation. The extensive culture-specific gene expression patterns that emerged with longer passage could be limited by reducing passage number when both culture transcriptomes were equally similar to that of the primary tissue. Defining impact of culture condition and passage on the transcriptome of primary cells could assist experimental design and interpretation. For example, differences that appear with passage and culture condition are potentially exploitable for comparative studies targeting specific biological networks in different transcriptional environments. PMID:27267121

  10. Multiple roles of Activin/Nodal, bone morphogenetic protein, fibroblast growth factor and Wnt/β-catenin signalling in the anterior neural patterning of adherent human embryonic stem cell cultures

    PubMed Central

    Lupo, Giuseppe; Novorol, Claire; Smith, Joseph R.; Vallier, Ludovic; Miranda, Elena; Alexander, Morgan; Biagioni, Stefano; Pedersen, Roger A.; Harris, William A.

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have successfully produced a variety of neural cell types from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), but there has been limited systematic analysis of how different regional identities are established using well-defined differentiation conditions. We have used adherent, chemically defined cultures to analyse the roles of Activin/Nodal, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and Wnt/β-catenin signalling in neural induction, anteroposterior patterning and eye field specification in hESCs. We show that either BMP inhibition or activation of FGF signalling is required for effective neural induction, but these two pathways have distinct outcomes on rostrocaudal patterning. While BMP inhibition leads to specification of forebrain/midbrain positional identities, FGF-dependent neural induction is associated with strong posteriorization towards hindbrain/spinal cord fates. We also demonstrate that Wnt/β-catenin signalling is activated during neural induction and promotes acquisition of neural fates posterior to forebrain. Therefore, inhibition of this pathway is needed for efficient forebrain specification. Finally, we provide evidence that the levels of Activin/Nodal and BMP signalling have a marked influence on further forebrain patterning and that constitutive inhibition of these pathways represses expression of eye field genes. These results show that the key mechanisms controlling neural patterning in model vertebrate species are preserved in adherent, chemically defined hESC cultures and reveal new insights into the signals regulating eye field specification. PMID:23576785

  11. Multiple roles of Activin/Nodal, bone morphogenetic protein, fibroblast growth factor and Wnt/β-catenin signalling in the anterior neural patterning of adherent human embryonic stem cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Lupo, Giuseppe; Novorol, Claire; Smith, Joseph R; Vallier, Ludovic; Miranda, Elena; Alexander, Morgan; Biagioni, Stefano; Pedersen, Roger A; Harris, William A

    2013-04-01

    Several studies have successfully produced a variety of neural cell types from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), but there has been limited systematic analysis of how different regional identities are established using well-defined differentiation conditions. We have used adherent, chemically defined cultures to analyse the roles of Activin/Nodal, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and Wnt/β-catenin signalling in neural induction, anteroposterior patterning and eye field specification in hESCs. We show that either BMP inhibition or activation of FGF signalling is required for effective neural induction, but these two pathways have distinct outcomes on rostrocaudal patterning. While BMP inhibition leads to specification of forebrain/midbrain positional identities, FGF-dependent neural induction is associated with strong posteriorization towards hindbrain/spinal cord fates. We also demonstrate that Wnt/β-catenin signalling is activated during neural induction and promotes acquisition of neural fates posterior to forebrain. Therefore, inhibition of this pathway is needed for efficient forebrain specification. Finally, we provide evidence that the levels of Activin/Nodal and BMP signalling have a marked influence on further forebrain patterning and that constitutive inhibition of these pathways represses expression of eye field genes. These results show that the key mechanisms controlling neural patterning in model vertebrate species are preserved in adherent, chemically defined hESC cultures and reveal new insights into the signals regulating eye field specification. PMID:23576785

  12. Enhancing adherence through education.

    PubMed

    Smrtka, Jennifer; Caon, Christina; Saunders, Carol; Becker, Brenda L; Baxter, Nancy

    2010-10-01

    The treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) has advanced greatly since the introduction of disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) in the early 1990s. Although the DMTs have exhibited significant efficacy in relapsing-remitting MS and other forms of the disease, the degree of benefit depends heavily on patient adherence to recommended regimens. This article addresses some of the most pressing areas of unmet need in educating advanced-practice nurses, neurologists, patients, and support care partners regarding strategies that can overcome obstacles to adherence. The observations presented here are based on clinical experience with real-life cognitive, psychosocial, and cultural impediments to adherence. The article also explores the ways in which adherence may be affected by emerging therapies for MS (such as oral agents) as well as the educational needs that will arise with the further evolution of MS care. PMID:21049830

  13. Rethinking adherence.

    PubMed

    Steiner, John F

    2012-10-16

    In 2012, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) will introduce measures of adherence to oral hypoglycemic, antihypertensive, and cholesterol-lowering drugs into its Medicare Advantage quality program. To meet these quality goals, delivery systems will need to develop and disseminate strategies to improve adherence. The design of adherence interventions has too often been guided by the mistaken assumptions that adherence is a single behavior that can be predicted from readily available patient characteristics and that individual clinicians alone can improve adherence at the population level.Effective interventions require recognition that adherence is a set of interacting behaviors influenced by individual, social, and environmental forces; adherence interventions must be broadly based, rather than targeted to specific population subgroups; and counseling with a trusted clinician needs to be complemented by outreach interventions and removal of structural and organizational barriers. To achieve the adherence goals set by CMS, front-line clinicians, interdisciplinary teams, organizational leaders, and policymakers will need to coordinate efforts in ways that exemplify the underlying principles of health care reform. PMID:23070491

  14. Granulocytes and phorbol myristate acetate increase permeability to albumin of cultured endothelial monolayers and isolated perfused lungs. Role of oxygen radicals and granulocyte adherence.

    PubMed

    Shasby, D M; Shasby, S S; Peach, M J

    1983-01-01

    Human granulocytes and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) increased permeability to albumin of monolayers of cultured endothelial cells grown on micropore filters. Granulocytes from a patient with chronic granulomatous disease and PMA did not increase endothelial permeability to albumin, demonstrating that the increase in permeability is dependent on granulocyte-derived oxygen radicals. When granulocytes were separated from the endothelial cells by a micropore filter, granulocytes and PMA no longer increased endothelial permeability to albumin, demonstrating that PMA-stimulated granulocytes must be closely approximated to endothelial cells to increase endothelial permeability. The relevance of these in vitro findings to an intact microvasculature was confirmed by demonstrating that agents that reduce granulocyte adherence to endothelium reduce edema formed in isolated lungs by granulocytes and PMA, an oxygen radical dependent process. Pretreatment of granulocytes with cytochalasin B or addition of 2% dextran to isolated lung perfusates reduced granulocyte adherence and markedly reduced edema formation in isolated lungs. These studies demonstrate that PMA-stimulated granulocytes must be closely apposed to endothelial cells to increase endothelial permeability through an oxygen-radical-dependent mechanism, and they suggest that reduction of granulocyte adherence may protect against granulocyte-dependent edema. PMID:6849554

  15. Medication Adherence and Blood Pressure Control Among Hypertensive Patients With Coexisting Long-Term Conditions in Primary Care Settings: A Cross-Sectional Analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu Ting; Wang, Harry H X; Liu, Kirin Q L; Lee, Gabrielle K Y; Chan, Wai Man; Griffiths, Sian M; Chen, Ruo Ling

    2016-05-01

    Hypertension is a typical example of long-term disease posing formidable challenges to health care. One goal of antihypertensive therapy is to achieve optimal blood pressure (BP) control and reduce co-occurring chronic conditions (multimorbidity). This study aimed to assess the influence of multimorbidity on medication adherence, and to explore the association between poor BP control and multimorbidity, with implications for hypertension management.A cross-sectional design with multistage sampling was adopted to recruit Chinese hypertensive patients attending general out-patient clinics from 3 geographic regions in Hong Kong. A modified systemic sampling methodology with 1 patient as a sampling unit was used to recruit consecutive samples in each general out-patient clinic. Data were collected by face-to-face interviews using a standardized protocol. Poor BP control was defined as having systolic BP/diastolic BP ≥130/80 mm Hg for those with diabetes or chronic kidney disease; and ≥140/90 mm Hg for others. Medication adherence was assessed by a validated Chinese version of the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale. A simple unweighted enumeration was adopted to measure the combinations of coexisting long-term conditions. Binary logistic regression analysis was conducted with medication adherence and multimorbidity as outcome variables, respectively, after controlling for effects of patient-level covariates.The prevalence of multimorbidity was 47.4% (95% confidence interval [CI] 45.4%-49.4%) among a total of 2445 hypertensive patients. The proportion of subjects having 0, 1, and ≥2 additional long-term conditions was 52.6%, 29.1%, and 18.3%, respectively. The overall rate of poor adherence to medication was 46.6%, whereas the rate of suboptimal BP control was 48.7%. Albeit the influence of multimorbidity on medication adherence was not found to be statistically significant, patients with poorly controlled BP were more likely to have multimorbidity (adjusted

  16. Culture Conditions Affect Expression of DUX4 in FSHD Myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Sachchida Nand; Khawaja, Hunain; Chen, Yi-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is believed to be caused by aberrant expression of double homeobox 4 (DUX4) due to epigenetic changes of the D4Z4 region at chromosome 4q35. Detecting DUX4 is challenging due to its stochastic expression pattern and low transcription level. In this study, we examined different cDNA synthesis strategies and the sensitivity for DUX4 detection. In addition, we investigated the effects of dexamethasone and knockout serum replacement (KOSR) on DUX4 expression in culture. Our data showed that DUX4 was consistently detected in cDNA samples synthesized using Superscript III. The sensitivity of DUX4 detection was higher in the samples synthesized using oligo(dT) primers compared to random hexamers. Adding dexamethasone to the culture media significantly suppressed DUX4 expression in immortalized (1.3 fold, p < 0.01) and primary (4.7 fold, p < 0.01) FSHD myoblasts, respectively. Culture medium with KOSR increased DUX4 expression and the response is concentration dependent. The findings suggest that detection strategies and culture conditions should be carefully considered when studying DUX4 in cultured cells. PMID:26007167

  17. Effect of culture conditions on morphological changes of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, K; Hamasaki, N; Watanabe, T; Uchida, T; Fujiwara, Y; Takaishi, O; Higuchi, K; Arakawa, T; Ishii, E; Kobayashi, K; Yano, I; Kuroki, T

    1999-01-01

    The morphological conversion of Helicobacter pylori from the spiral form to the coccoid form may be the expression of a transitory adaptation to an unsuitable environment. The mechanism(s) of this conversion are not clear. In this study, we examined whether the morphological conversion of H. pylori is affected by various culture conditions, such as oxygen concentration, pH, temperature, or the presence of beta-cyclodextrin. H. pylori (NTCC11916) was cultured on Brucella agar, followed by culture in Brucella broth containing 1% agar under several conditions. Morphological conversion of individual H. pylori on the agar plate was investigated with time after incubation under phase contrast microscopy. When H. pylori was inoculated in Brucella broth containing beta-cyclodextrin, the spiral form of the organism was observed even after 6 days of incubation under standard culture conditions: 37 degrees C, pH 7, and microaerobic atmosphere (5% O2/10% CO2/85% N2) (control). The morphological conversion of H. pylori was completed on day 3 in an aerobic atmosphere (20% O2 supply) and on day 2 in an undermicroaerobic atmosphere (<0.1% O2). Its complete morphological conversion was observed at pH 8 on day 5 and at pH 4 on day 6. All of the H. pylori (100%) incubated at 20 degrees or 42 degrees C had converted from the bacillary to the coccoid form on day 4. Conditioned medium without beta-cyclodextrin caused complete conversion on day 5. These results suggest that oxygen concentration, pH, temperature, and beta-cyclodextrin may be related to the H. pylori morphological conversion from the bacillary to the coccoid form. PMID:10616762

  18. Carotenoid Production by Halophilic Archaea Under Different Culture Conditions.

    PubMed

    Calegari-Santos, Rossana; Diogo, Ricardo Alexandre; Fontana, José Domingos; Bonfim, Tania Maria Bordin

    2016-05-01

    Carotenoids are pigments that may be used as colorants and antioxidants in food, pharmaceutical, and cosmetic industries. Since they also benefit human health, great efforts have been undertaken to search for natural sources of carotenoids, including microbial ones. The optimization of culture conditions to increase carotenoid yield is one of the strategies used to minimize the high cost of carotenoid production by microorganisms. Halophilic archaea are capable of producing carotenoids according to culture conditions. Their main carotenoid is bacterioruberin with 50 carbon atoms. In fact, the carotenoid has important biological functions since it acts as cell membrane reinforcement and it protects the microorganism against DNA damaging agents. Moreover, carotenoid extracts from halophilic archaea have shown high antioxidant capacity. Therefore, current review summarizes the effect of different culture conditions such as salt and carbon source concentrations in the medium, light incidence, and oxygen tension on carotenoid production by halophilic archaea and the strategies such as optimization methodology and two-stage cultivation already used to increase the carotenoid yield of these microorganisms. PMID:26750123

  19. Linking non-culturable (qPCR) and culturable enterococci densities with hydrometeorological conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N.; Whitman, Richard L.; Shively, Dawn A.; Nevers, Meredith B.

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) measurement of enterococci has been proposed as a rapid technique for assessment of beach water quality, but the response of qPCR results to environmental conditions has not been fully explored. Culture-based E. coli and enterococci have been used in empirical predictive models to characterize their responses to environmental conditions and to increase monitoring frequency and efficiency. This approach has been attempted with qPCR results only in few studies. During the summer of 2006, water samples were collected from two southern Lake Michigan beaches and the nearby river outfall (Burns Ditch) and were analyzed for enterococci by culture-based and non-culture-based (i.e., qPCR) methods, as well as culture-based E. coli. Culturable enterococci densities (log CFU/100 ml) for the beaches were significantly correlated with enterococci qPCR cell equivalents (CE) (R = 0.650, P N = 32). Enterococci CE and CFU densities were highest in Burns Ditch relative to the beach sites; however, only CFUs were significantly higher (P R = 0.565, P N = 32). Culturable E. coli and enterococci densities were significantly correlated (R = 0.682, P N = 32). Regression analyses suggested that enterococci CFU could be predicted by lake turbidity, Burns Ditch discharge, and wind direction (adjusted R2 = 0.608); enterococci CE was best predicted by Burns Ditch discharge and log-transformed lake turbidity × wave height (adjusted R2 = 0.40). In summary, our results show that analytically, the qPCR method compares well to the non-culture-based method for measuring enterococci densities in beach water and that both these approaches can be predicted by hydrometeorological conditions. Selected predictors and model results highlight the differences between the environmental responses of the two method endpoints and the potentially high variance in qPCR results

  20. Role of flagella in adherence, internalization, and translocation of Campylobacter jejuni in nonpolarized and polarized epithelial cell cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Grant, C C; Konkel, M E; Cieplak, W; Tompkins, L S

    1993-01-01

    Previous studies of Campylobacter jejuni have suggested that flagellin is an adhesin for epithelial cells and that motility is a virulence factor of this bacterium. The role of flagella in the interactions of C. jejuni with nonpolarized and polarized epithelial cells was examined with flagellar mutants. Flagellated, nonmotile (flaA flaB+ Mot-) and nonflagellated, nonmotile (flaA flaB Mot-) mutants of C. jejuni were constructed by in vivo homologous recombination and gene replacement techniques. Both classes of mutants were found to adhere to cells of human epithelial origin (INT 407) equally well; however, on the basis of the percentage of the inoculum internalized, internalization of the flaA flaB Mot- mutants was decreased by factors ranging from approximately 30 to 40 compared with the parent. The flaA flaB+ Mot- mutant was internalized by the INT 407 cells at levels six- to sevenfold higher than the flaA flaB Mot- mutants. Both classes of mutants, unlike the parent, were unable to translocate across polarized Caco-2 monolayers. These results indicate that flagella are not involved in C. jejuni adherence to epithelial cells but that they do play a role in internalization. Furthermore, the results suggest that either the motility of C. jejuni or the product of flaA is essential for the bacterium to cross polarized epithelial cell monolayers. Images PMID:8478066

  1. Adherence To JNC-VII and WHO-ISH guidelines of antihypertensive medications prescribed to hypertensive patients with co-morbid conditions.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Nitin; Ganguly, Barna

    2015-01-01

    The present study aims at comparing the prescribing pattern of antihypertensive drugs in essential hypertension with specific co-morbid conditions with JNC-VII and WHO-ISH guidelines. Adult patients of both sex, who were attending medicine OPD of Shri Krishna Hospital, Karamsad, Gujarat since last 6 months and being prescribed antihypertensive drug/s for hypertension, were selected for the study. Hypertensive patients with co-morbities diabetes mellitus, ischemic heart diseases, congestive heart failure, and chronic renal diseases were included in the study. Adherence to JNC-VII guideline and WHO-ISH guidelines with respect to prescribing antihypertensive drugs in patients with diabetes mellitus were found to be 97% and 40.81% respectively, while it was found to be 72.27% to both the guidelines in patients with IHD. Similarly in cases of hypertension with CHF, adherence to prescribing antihypertensive were found to be 93.62% and 38.30% respectively, whereas for CKD patients, adherence to both guidelines was found to be same i.e. 33.33%. There is need of following such authentic guidelines in managing hypertension like chronic disease since these guidelines are based on various clinical trials and successful attainment of target BP in patients will be much easier by implementing them. PMID:26571984

  2. Primary Human Uterine Leiomyoma Cell Culture Quality Control: Some Properties of Myometrial Cells Cultured under Serum Deprivation Conditions in the Presence of Ovarian Steroids

    PubMed Central

    Sumikawa, Joana Tomomi; Batista, Fabrício Pereira; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar J.; Girão, Manoel J. B. C.; Oliva, Maria Luiza V.

    2016-01-01

    Cell culture is considered the standard media used in research to emulate the in vivo cell environment. Crucial in vivo experiments cannot be conducted in humans and depend on in vitro methodologies such as cell culture systems. However, some procedures involving the quality control of cells in culture have been gradually neglected by failing to acknowledge that primary cells and cell lines change over time in culture. Thus, we report methods based on our experience for monitoring primary cell culture of human myometrial cells derived from uterine leiomyoma. We standardized the best procedure of tissue dissociation required for the study of multiple genetic marker systems that include species-specific antigens, expression of myofibroblast or myoblast markers, growth curve, serum deprivation, starvation by cell cycle synchronization, culture on collagen coated plates, and 17 β-estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4) effects. The results showed that primary myometrial cells from patients with uterine leiomyoma displayed myoblast phenotypes before and after in vitro cultivation, and leiomyoma cells differentiated into mature myocyte cells under the appropriate differentiation-inducing conditions (serum deprivation). These cells grew well on collagen coated plates and responded to E2 and P4, which may drive myometrial and leiomyoma cells to proliferate and adhere into a focal adhesion complex involvement in a paracrine manner. The establishment of these techniques as routine procedures will improve the understanding of the myometrial physiology and pathogenesis of myometrium-derived diseases such as leiomyoma. Mimicking the in vivo environment of fibrotic conditions can prevent false results and enhance results that are based on cell culture integrity. PMID:27391384

  3. Cultural conditionally and aid to education in east Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock-Utne, Birgit

    1995-05-01

    Aid to African education often involves the imposition of conditions that create dependency and undermine indigenous educational patterns. Such conditions can include the insistence on textbooks written and published abroad, the use of examination systems devised in Europe or North America, and the neglect of African culture and languages. In the first part of this article the author examines the attempts at educational reform after the African states had achieved independence. The second part highlights the renewed dangers of educational dependency following the 1990 World Conference on Education for All, held in Jomtien, Thailand. The last part of the article discusses whether there is such a thing as "educational aid for empowerment" and gives some examples of good educational aid projects in Africa.

  4. Krüppel-Like Factor 4 Overexpression Initiates a Mesenchymal-to-Epithelial Transition and Redifferentiation of Human Pancreatic Cells following Expansion in Long Term Adherent Culture

    PubMed Central

    Docherty, Hilary M.; McGowan, Neil W. A.; Forbes, Shareen; Heremans, Yves; Forbes, Stuart J.; Heimberg, Harry; Casey, John; Docherty, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    A replenishable source of insulin-producing cells has the potential to cure type 1 diabetes. Attempts to culture and expand pancreatic β-cells in vitro have resulted in their transition from insulin-producing epithelial cells to mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) with high proliferative capacity but devoid of any hormone production. The aim of this study was to determine whether the transcription factor Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4), could induce a mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET) of the cultured cells. Islet-enriched pancreatic cells, allowed to dedifferentiate and expand in adherent cell culture, were transduced with an adenovirus containing KLF4 (Ad-Klf4). Cells were subsequently analysed for changes in cell morphology by light microscopy, and for the presence of epithelial and pancreatic markers by immunocytochemistry and quantitative RT/PCR. Infection with Ad-Klf4 resulted in morphological changes, down-regulation of mesenchymal markers, and re-expression of both epithelial and pancreatic cell markers including insulin and transcription factors specific to β-cells. This effect was further enhanced by culturing cells in suspension. However, the effects of Ad-KLf4 were transient and this was shown to be due to increased apoptosis in Klf4-expressing cells. Klf4 has been recently identified as a pioneer factor with the ability to modulate the structure of chromatin and enhance reprogramming/transdifferentiation. Our results show that Klf4 may have a role in the redifferentiation of expanded pancreatic cells in culture, but before this can be achieved the off-target effects that result in increased apoptosis would need to be overcome. PMID:26457418

  5. Media Compositions for Three-Dimensional Mammalian Tissue Growth under Microgravity Culture Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Normal mammalian tissue and the culturing process has been developed for the three groups of organ, structural and blood tissue.The cells are grown in vitro under microgravity culture conditions and form three dimensional cells aggregates with normal cell function. The microgravity culture conditions may be microgravity or simulated microgravity created in a horizontal rotating wall culture vessel.

  6. Media Compositions for Three Dimensional Mammalian Tissue Growth Under Microgravity Culture Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Normal mammalian tissue and the culturing process has been developed for the three groups of organ, structural and blood tissue. The cells are grown in vitro under microgravity culture conditions and form three dimensional cells aggregates with normal cell function. The microgravity culture conditions may be microgravity or simulated microgravity created in a horizontal rotating wall culture vessel.

  7. Comparison of Cultured and Wild Sheepshead Minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus) Health Condition Metrics

    EPA Science Inventory

    Four standard health condition metrics (hepatosomatic index, HSI; gonadosomatic index, GSI; fecundity, condition factor) were compared between cultured and wild caught sheepshead minnow (Cyrprinodon variegatus) to determine if laboratory cultured were representative of wild popul...

  8. Adherence to Asian and European American Cultural Values and Attitudes toward Seeking Professional Psychological Help among Asian American College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Bryan S. K.

    2007-01-01

    Possible relations among enculturation and acculturation to cultural values and attitudes toward seeking professional psychological help were examined among 146 Asian American college students. In addition, possible relations between various dimensions of Asian values and attitudes toward seeking professional psychological help were examined. As…

  9. HIV Medication Adherence

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment HIV Medication Adherence (Last updated 3/1/2016; last reviewed 3/1/2016) Key Points Medication adherence means sticking ... exactly as prescribed. Why is adherence to an HIV regimen important? Adherence to an HIV regimen gives ...

  10. Production of high-titer human influenza A virus with adherent and suspension MDCK cells cultured in a single-use hollow fiber bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Tapia, Felipe; Vogel, Thomas; Genzel, Yvonne; Behrendt, Ilona; Hirschel, Mark; Gangemi, J David; Reichl, Udo

    2014-02-12

    Hollow fiber bioreactors (HFBRs) have been widely described as capable of supporting the production of highly concentrated monoclonal antibodies and recombinant proteins. Only recently HFBRs have been proposed as new single-use platforms for production of high-titer influenza A virus. These bioreactors contain multiple hollow fiber capillary tubes that separate the bioreactor in an intra- and an extra-capillary space. Cells are usually cultured in the extra-capillary space and can grow to a very high cell concentration. This work describes the evaluation of the single-use hollow fiber bioreactor PRIMER HF (Biovest International Inc., USA) for production of influenza A virus. The process was setup, characterized and optimized by running a total of 15 cultivations. The HFBRs were seeded with either adherent or suspension MDCK cells, and infected with influenza virus A/PR/8/34 (H1N1), and the pandemic strain A/Mexico/4108/2009 (H1N1). High HA titers and TCID₅₀ of up to 3.87 log₁₀(HA units/100 μL) and 1.8 × 10(10)virions/mL, respectively, were obtained for A/PR/8/34 influenza strain. Influenza virus was collected by performing multiple harvests of the extra-capillary space during a virus production time of up to 12 days. Cell-specific virus yields between 2,000 and 8,000 virions/cell were estimated for adherent MDCK cells, and between 11,000 and 19,000 virions/cell for suspension MDCK.SUS2 cells. These results do not only coincide with the cell-specific virus yields obtained with cultivations in stirred tank bioreactors and other high cell density systems, but also demonstrate that HFBRs are promising and competitive single-use platforms that can be considered for commercial production of influenza virus. PMID:24269322

  11. Relating Health Locus of Control to Health Care Use, Adherence, and Transition Readiness Among Youths With Chronic Conditions, North Carolina, 2015

    PubMed Central

    Nazareth, Meaghan; Richards, Jordan; Javalkar, Karina; Haberman, Cara; Zhong, Yi; Rak, Eniko; Jain, Nina; Ferris, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Health locus of control refers to the belief that health is in one’s control (internal control) or is not in one’s control (external control). Among adults, external locus of control is associated with negative health outcomes, whereas internal locus of control is associated with favorable outcomes. Few studies examined these associations among youths. The objective of our study was to determine how locus of control relates to health care use, medication adherence, missed school, and readiness for transition to adult medical care for youths with chronic conditions. Methods Participants at a camp for youths aged 6 to 17 years with chronic health conditions completed a survey measuring locus of control, readiness for transition to adult care, and medication adherence. Their parents completed a separate part of the survey about health care use and missed school days in the past year. Results A total of 163 youths completed the survey (78.5% white; 52.1% female; mean age, 12.3 y). Internal locus of control (β = 0.196; P = .013) and external Doctor locus of control with doctors controlling disease (β = 0.181; P = .025) were positively associated with transition readiness. External control by chance or with others controlling disease was negatively associated with transition readiness (β = −0.248; P = .002) and positively associated with emergency department visits (β = 0.225; P = .004) and with number of hospital inpatient nights at hospital (β = 0.166; P = .04). Conclusion Adolescents with external control of their health by chance or by other people are at increased risk for negative health outcomes and may fail to develop the self-management skills needed for successful transitioning to adult care. Future studies should examine effects of changes in locus of control on health outcomes among youths. PMID:27442993

  12. Topography Influences Adherent Cell Regulation of Osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, M; Cooper, L F; Ogino, Y; Mendonca, D; Liang, R; Yang, S; Mendonca, G; Uoshima, K

    2016-03-01

    The importance of osteoclast-mediated bone resorption in the process of osseointegration has not been widely considered. In this study, cell culture was used to investigate the hypothesis that the function of implant-adherent bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in osteoclastogenesis is influenced by surface topography. BMSCs isolated from femur and tibia of Sprague-Dawley rats were seeded onto 3 types of titanium surfaces (smooth, micro, and nano) and a control surface (tissue culture plastic) with or without osteogenic supplements. After 3 to 14 d, conditioned medium (CM) was collected. Subsequently, rat bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) were cultured in media supplemented with soluble receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) as well as BMSC CM from each of the 4 surfaces. Gene expression levels of soluble RANKL, osteoprotegerin, tumor necrosis factor α, and M-CSF in cultured BMSCs at different time points were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The number of differentiated osteoclastic cells was determined after tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining. Analysis of variance and t test were used for statistical analysis. The expression of prominent osteoclast-promoting factors tumor necrosis factor α and M-CSF was increased by BMSCs cultured on both micro- and nanoscale titanium topographies (P < 0.01). BMSC CM contained a heat-labile factor that increased BMMs osteoclastogenesis. CM from both micro- and nanoscale surface-adherent BMSCs increased the osteoclast number (P < 0.01). Difference in surface topography altered BMSC phenotype and influenced BMM osteoclastogenesis. Local signaling by implant-adherent cells at the implant-bone interface may indirectly control osteoclastogenesis and bone accrual around endosseous implants. PMID:26553885

  13. The influence of the air plasma jet on early adherent events of L929 fibroblasts on cell culture polystyrene plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung-Hwan; Kwon, Jae-Sung; Om, Ji-Yeon; Kim, Yong-Hee; Choi, Eun-Ha; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2012-10-01

    Recently, atmospheric pressure plasma was applied to biological field. The aim of this study was to identify whether the air plasma jet increases fibroblast early attachment under moving motion on the cell culture polystyrene plate. Polystyrene plate was treated with plasma jet using compressed air. After 2 minutes of treatment, L929 was seeded on polystyrene plate as well as on untreated plate. Cells were allowed to attach for 4 hours under 70 RPM. FE-SEM, confocal microscopy and RT-PCR were used to evaluate characters of cells. The results suggested that plasma treatment on the polystyrene plate altered surface energy without change of roughness. In occasion of treatment plate, attached L292 were significantly found but not found on untreated surface. Also, despite the small area of treated center by the flame of the plasma jet, cells were also attached on round surface of the area covered by the flame, which suggests that the effect was not only due to the jet flame but perhaps due to the jet interacting with surrounding atmosphere. In the light of this study, the air plasma jet could be useful for early attachment of L292 on the polystyrene plate under moving motion and can be applied to biomaterials.

  14. Effect of osteoblastic culture conditions on the structure of poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) foam scaffolds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, A. S.; Zhu, G.; Morris, G. E.; Meszlenyi, R. K.; Mikos, A. G.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) foams are an osteoconductive support that holds promise for the development of bone tissue in vitro and implantation into orthopedic defects. Because it is desirable that foams maintain their shape and size, we examined a variety of foams cultured in vitro with osteoblastic cells. Foams were prepared with different porosities and pore sizes by the method of solvent casting/porogen leaching using 80, 85, and 90 wt% NaCl sieved with particle sizes of 150-300 and 300-500 microm and characterized by mercury intrusion porosimetry. Foams seeded with cells were found to have volumes after 7 days in static culture that decreased with increasing porosity: the least porous exhibited no change in volume while the most porous foams decreased by 39 +/- 10%. In addition, a correlation was observed between decreasing foam volume after 7 days in culture and decreasing internal surface area of the foams prior to seeding. Furthermore, foams prepared with the 300-500 microm porogen had lower porosities, greater mean wall thicknesses between adjacent pores, and larger volumes after 7 days in culture than those prepared with the smaller porogen. Two culture conditions for maintaining cells, static and agitated (in a rotary vessel), were found to have similar influences on foam size, cell density, and osteoblastic function for 7 and 14 days in culture. Finally, we examined unseeded foams in aqueous solutions of pH 3.0, 5.0, and 7.4 and found no significant decrease in foam size with degradation. This study demonstrates that adherent osteoblastic cells may collapse very porous PLGA foams prepared by solvent casting/particulate leaching: a potentially undesirable property for repair of orthopedic defects.

  15. Studies on culture and osteogenic induction of human mesenchymal stem cells under CO2-independent conditions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Zhang, Cui; Feng, Yiding; Zong, Chen; Chen, Jiarong; Tang, Zihua; Jia, Bingbing; Tong, Xiangming; Zheng, Qiang; Wang, Jinfu

    2013-04-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are one of the important factors that regulate bone anabolism. Osteoporosis resulting from microgravity during spaceflight may possibly be due to a decrease in osteogenesis mediated by hMSCs. This speculation should be verified through culture and osteogenic induction of hMSCs in a microgravity environment during spaceflight. Control of CO2 is a key component in current experimental protocols for growth, survival, and proliferation of in vitro cultured cells. However, carrying CO2 tanks on a spaceflight and devoting space/mass allowances for classical CO2 control protocols make experimentation on culture and osteogenesis difficult during most missions. Therefore, an experimental culture and osteogenic medium was developed through modifying the components of buffer salts in conventional culture medium. This experimental medium was used to culture and induce hMSCs under CO2-independent conditions. The results showed that culture and induction of hMSCs with conventional culture medium and conventional osteogenic medium under CO2-independent conditions resulted in an increase of pH in medium. The proliferation of hMSCs was also inhibited. hMSCs cultured with experimental culture medium under CO2-independent conditions showed a proliferation potential that was the same as those cultured with conventional culture medium under CO2-dependent conditions. The experimental osteogenic medium could promote hMSCs to differentiate into osteoblast-like cells under CO2-independent conditions. Cells induced by this induction system showed high alkaline phosphatase activity. The expression levels of osteogenic genes in cells induced with experimental osteogenic medium under CO2-independent conditions were not significantly different from those cells induced with conventional osteogenic medium under CO2-dependent conditions. These results suggest that the experimental culture and induction system could be used to culture hMSCs and induce the

  16. Encoding Conditions Affect Recognition of Vocally Expressed Emotions Across Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Jürgens, Rebecca; Drolet, Matthis; Pirow, Ralph; Scheiner, Elisabeth; Fischer, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Although the expression of emotions in humans is considered to be largely universal, cultural effects contribute to both emotion expression and recognition. To disentangle the interplay between these factors, play-acted and authentic (non-instructed) vocal expressions of emotions were used, on the assumption that cultural effects may contribute differentially to the recognition of staged and spontaneous emotions. Speech tokens depicting four emotions (anger, sadness, joy, fear) were obtained from German radio archives and re-enacted by professional actors, and presented to 120 participants from Germany, Romania, and Indonesia. Participants in all three countries were poor at distinguishing between play-acted and spontaneous emotional utterances (58.73% correct on average with only marginal cultural differences). Nevertheless, authenticity influenced emotion recognition: across cultures, anger was recognized more accurately when play-acted (z = 15.06, p < 0.001) and sadness when authentic (z = 6.63, p < 0.001), replicating previous findings from German populations. German subjects revealed a slight advantage in recognizing emotions, indicating a moderate in-group advantage. There was no difference between Romanian and Indonesian subjects in the overall emotion recognition. Differential cultural effects became particularly apparent in terms of differential biases in emotion attribution. While all participants labeled play-acted expressions as anger more frequently than expected, German participants exhibited a further bias toward choosing anger for spontaneous stimuli. In contrast to the German sample, Romanian and Indonesian participants were biased toward choosing sadness. These results support the view that emotion recognition rests on a complex interaction of human universals and cultural specificities. Whether and in which way the observed biases are linked to cultural differences in self-construal remains an issue for further investigation. PMID

  17. Bisphosphonates adherence for treatment of osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Osteoporosis is a disease of bone metabolism in which bisphosphonates (BPS) are the most common medications used in its treatment, whose main objective is to reduce the risk of fractures. The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review on BPs adherence for treatment of osteoporosis. Methods Systematic review of articles on BPs adherence for treatment of osteoporosis, indexed on MEDLINE (via PubMed) databases, from inception of databases until January 2013. Search terms were “Adherence, Medication” (MeSH term), “Bisphosphonates” (MeSH term), and “Osteoporosis” (MeSH term). Results Of the 78 identified studies, 27 met the eligibility criteria. Identified studies covered a wide range of aspects regarding adherence and associated factors, adherence and fracture, adherence and BPs dosage. The studies are mostly observational, conducted with women over 45 years old, showing low rates of adherence to treatment. Several factors may influence adherence: socio-economic and cultural, participation of physicians when guidance is given to the patient, the use of bone turnover markers, and use of generic drugs. The monthly dosage is associated with greater adherence compared to weekly dosage. Conclusions Considering the methodological differences between the studies, the results converge to show that adherence to treatment of osteoporosis with BPs is still inadequate. Further experimental studies are needed to evaluate the adherence and suggest new treatment options. PMID:23705998

  18. Native Libraries: Cross-Cultural Conditions in the Circumpolar Countries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hills, Gordon H.

    This book draws on an extensive literature review and personal experience to examine cross-cultural issues in the development of libraries for Arctic indigenous communities. Although the book highlights circumstances in Alaska, its geographical scope is circumpolar, including Canada, Greenland, and the former Soviet Union and present-day Russian…

  19. Biosorption of uranium by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and surface interactions under culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingxue; Dong, Faqin; Yan, Xiuying; Zeng, Wenming; Hou, Liangyu; Pang, Xiaofeng

    2010-11-01

    Few studies have focused on biosorption by microorganisms under culture conditions. To explore the biosorption of uranium by Saccharomyces cerevisiae under culture conditions, the S. cerevisiae growth curve, biosorption capacity and surface interaction under batch culture conditions were investigated in this study. The growth curve showed that uranium (<300mgL(-1)) did not markedly inhibit the growth of S. cerevisiae under short culture time. The maximum scavenging efficiency reached 92.4% under 6-10h culture conditions, and the adsorption quantity of S. cerevisiae increased with initial uranium concentration. Centrifuging and drying after biosorption caused the volume reduction ratio to reach 99%. Scanning electron microscope results demonstrated that uranium interacted with yeast cell surfaces, as well as culture medium, and produced uranium precipitate on cell surfaces. Fourier transformed infrared spectra revealed that cell walls were the major sorption sites, and -O--H, -C==O and -PO(2-) contributed to the major binding groups. PMID:20599379

  20. Sensitive and selective culture medium for detection of environmental Clostridium difficile isolates without requirement for anaerobic culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Cadnum, Jennifer L; Hurless, Kelly N; Deshpande, Abhishek; Nerandzic, Michelle M; Kundrapu, Sirisha; Donskey, Curtis J

    2014-09-01

    Effective and easy-to-use methods for detecting Clostridium difficile spore contamination would be useful for identifying environmental reservoirs and monitoring the effectiveness of room disinfection. Culture-based detection methods are sensitive for detecting C. difficile, but their utility is limited due to the requirement of anaerobic culture conditions and microbiological expertise. We developed a low-cost selective broth medium containing thioglycolic acid and l-cystine, termed C. difficile brucella broth with thioglycolic acid and l-cystine (CDBB-TC), for the detection of C. difficile from environmental specimens under aerobic culture conditions. The sensitivity and specificity of CDBB-TC (under aerobic culture conditions) were compared to those of CDBB (under anaerobic culture conditions) for the recovery of C. difficile from swabs collected from hospital room surfaces. CDBB-TC was significantly more sensitive than CDBB for recovering environmental C. difficile (36/41 [88%] versus 21/41 [51%], respectively; P = 0.006). C. difficile latex agglutination, an enzyme immunoassay for toxins A and B or glutamate dehydrogenase, and a PCR for toxin B genes were all effective as confirmatory tests. For 477 total environmental cultures, the specificity of CDBB-TC versus that of CDBB based upon false-positive yellow-color development of the medium without recovery of C. difficile was 100% (0 false-positive results) versus 96% (18 false-positive results), respectively. False-positive cultures for CDBB were attributable to the growth of anaerobic non-C. difficile organisms that did not grow in CDBB-TC. Our results suggest that CDBB-TC provides a sensitive and selective medium for the recovery of C. difficile organisms from environmental samples, without the need for anaerobic culture conditions. PMID:24958803

  1. Noninvasive Oxygen Monitoring in Three-Dimensional Tissue Cultures Under Static and Dynamic Culture Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Weyand, Birgit; Nöhre, Mariel; Schmälzlin, Elmar; Stolz, Marvin; Israelowitz, Meir; Gille, Christoph; von Schroeder, Herb P.; Reimers, Kerstin; Vogt, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We present a new method for noninvasive real-time oxygen measurement inside three-dimensional tissue-engineered cell constructs in static and dynamic culture settings in a laminar flow bioreactor. The OPAL system (optical oxygen measurement system) determines the oxygen-dependent phosphorescence lifetime of spherical microprobes and uses a two-frequency phase-modulation technique, which fades out the interference of background fluorescence from the cell carrier and culture medium. Higher cell densities in the centrum of the scaffolds correlated with lower values of oxygen concentration obtained with the OPAL system. When scaffolds were placed in the bioreactor, higher oxygen values were measured compared to statically cultured scaffolds in a Petri dish, which were significantly different at day 1–3 of culture. This technique allows the use of signal-weak microprobes in biological environments and monitors the culture process inside a bioreactor. PMID:26309802

  2. Hepatitis B virus efficiently infects non-adherent hepatoma cells via human sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide

    PubMed Central

    Okuyama-Dobashi, Kaori; Kasai, Hirotake; Tanaka, Tomohisa; Yamashita, Atsuya; Yasumoto, Jun; Chen, Wenjia; Okamoto, Toru; Maekawa, Shinya; Watashi, Koichi; Wakita, Takaji; Ryo, Akihide; Suzuki, Tetsuro; Matsuura, Yoshiharu; Enomoto, Nobuyuki; Moriishi, Kohji

    2015-01-01

    Sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP) has been reported as a functional receptor for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. However, HBV could not efficiently infect HepG2 cells expressing NTCP (NTCP-HepG2 cells) under adherent monolayer-cell conditions. In this study, NTCP was mainly detected in the basolateral membrane region, but not the apical site, of monolayer NTCP-HepG2 cells. We hypothesized that non-adherent cell conditions of infection would enhance HBV infectivity. Non-adherent NTCP-HepG2 cells were prepared by treatment with trypsin and EDTA, which did not degrade NTCP in the membrane fraction. HBV successfully infected NTCP-HepG2 cells at a viral dose 10 times lower in non-adherent phase than in adherent phase. Efficient infection of non-adherent NTCP-HepG2 cells with blood-borne or cell-culture-derived HBV was observed and was remarkably impaired in the presence of the myristoylated preS1 peptide. HBV could also efficiently infect HepaRG cells under non-adherent cell conditions. We screened several compounds using our culture system and identified proscillaridin A as a potent anti-HBV agent with an IC50 value of 7.2 nM. In conclusion, non-adherent host cell conditions of infection augmented HBV infectivity in an NTCP-dependent manner, thus providing a novel strategy to identify anti-HBV drugs and investigate the mechanism of HBV infection. PMID:26592202

  3. Overactive bladder: strategies to ensure treatment compliance and adherence

    PubMed Central

    Dhaliwal, Prabhpreet; Wagg, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Overactive bladder is a common, debilitating condition for many patients who may benefit from pharmacological management of their condition. However, adherence to medication in this condition is markedly worse than other chronic medical conditions. This review explores what is known about persistence and the factors which influence medication adherence for overactive bladder, those factors that might be modifiable to improve adherence, and the measures the health care provider can take to optimize adherence to therapy and thereby improve treatment outcomes. PMID:27350744

  4. Performance of mesophilic biohydrogen-producing cultures at thermophilic conditions.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Medhavi; Gomez-Flores, Maritza; Nasr, Noha; Elbeshbishy, Elsayed; Hafez, Hisham; Hesham El Naggar, M; Nakhla, George

    2015-09-01

    In this study, batch tests were conducted to investigate the performance of mesophilic anaerobic digester sludge (ADS) at thermophilic conditions and estimate kinetic parameters for co-substrate fermentation. Starch and cellulose were used as mono-substrate and in combination as co-substrates (1:1 mass ratio) to conduct a comparative assessment between mesophilic (37 °C) and thermophilic (60 °C) biohydrogen production. Unacclimatized mesophilic ADS responded well to the temperature change. The highest hydrogen yield of 1.13 mol H2/mol hexose was observed in starch-only batches at thermophilic conditions. The thermophilic cellulose-only yield (0.42 mol H2/mol hexose) was three times the mesophilic yield (0.13 mol H2/mol hexose). Interestingly, co-fermentation of starch-cellulose at mesophilic conditions enhanced the hydrogen yield by 26% with respect to estimated mono-substrate yields, while under thermophilic conditions no enhancement in the overall yield was observed. Interestingly, the estimated overall Monod kinetic parameters showed higher rates at mesophilic than thermophilic conditions. PMID:26101964

  5. Vaccine production: upstream processing with adherent or suspension cell lines.

    PubMed

    Genzel, Yvonne; Rödig, Jana; Rapp, Erdmann; Reichl, Udo

    2014-01-01

    The production of viral vaccines in cell culture can be accomplished with primary, diploid, or continuous (transformed) cell lines. Each cell line, each virus type, and each vaccine preparation require the specific design of upstream and downstream processing. Media have to be selected as well as production vessels, cultivation conditions, and modes of operation. Many viruses only replicate to high titers in adherently growing cells, but similar to processes established for recombinant protein production, an increasing number of suspension cell lines is being evaluated for future use. Here, we describe key issues to be considered for the establishment of large-scale virus production in bioreactors. As an example upstream processing of cell culture-derived influenza virus production is described in more detail for adherently growing and for suspension cells. In particular, use of serum-containing, serum-free, and chemically defined media as well as choice of cultivation vessel are considered. PMID:24297427

  6. Patient Characteristics Associated with Medication Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Rolnick, Sharon J; Pawloski, Pamala A.; Hedblom, Brita D.; Asche, Stephen E.; Bruzek, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Despite evidence indicating therapeutic benefit for adhering to a prescribed regimen, many patients do not take their medications as prescribed. Non-adherence often leads to morbidity and to higher health care costs. The objective of the study was to assess patient characteristics associated with medication adherence across eight diseases. Design Retrospective data from a repository within an integrated health system was used to identify patients ≥18 years of age with ICD-9-CM codes for primary or secondary diagnoses for any of eight conditions (depression, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, multiple sclerosis, cancer, or osteoporosis). Electronic pharmacy data was then obtained for 128 medications used for treatment. Methods Medication possession ratios (MPR) were calculated for those with one condition and one drug (n=15,334) and then for the total population having any of the eight diseases (n=31,636). The proportion of patients adherent (MPR ≥80%) was summarized by patient and living-area (census) characteristics. Bivariate associations between drug adherence and patient characteristics (age, sex, race, education, and comorbidity) were tested using contingency tables and chi-square tests. Logistic regression analysis examined predictors of adherence from patient and living area characteristics. Results Medication adherence for those with one condition was higher in males, Caucasians, older patients, and those living in areas with higher education rates and higher income. In the total population, adherence increased with lower comorbidity and increased number of medications. Substantial variation in adherence was found by condition with the lowest adherence for diabetes (51%) and asthma (33%). Conclusions The expectation of high adherence due to a covered pharmacy benefit, and to enhanced medication access did not hold. Differences in medication adherence were found across condition and by

  7. Referral for psychological therapy of people with long term conditions improves adherence to antidepressants and reduces emergency department attendance: Controlled before and after study

    PubMed Central

    de Lusignan, Simon; Chan, Tom; Tejerina Arreal, Maria C.; Parry, Glenys; Dent-Brown, Kim; Kendrick, Tony

    2013-01-01

    Background Referral to psychological therapies is recommended for people with common mental health problems (CMHP) however its impact on healthcare utilisation in people with long term conditions (LTCs) is not known. Method Routinely collected primary care, psychological therapy clinic and hospital data were extracted for the registered population of 20 practices (N = 121199). These data were linked using the SAPREL (Secure and Private Record Linkage) method. We linked the 1118 people referred to psychological therapies with 6711 controls, matched for age, gender and practice. We compared utilisation of healthcare resources by people with LTCs, 6 months before and after referral, and conducted a controlled before and after study to compare health utilisation with controls. We made the assumption that collection of a greater number of repeat prescriptions for antidepressants was associated with greater adherence. Results Overall 21.8% of people with an LTC had CMHP vs. 18.8% without (p < 0.001). People with LTCs before referral were more likely to use health care resources (2-tailed t-test p < 0.001). Cases with LTCs showed referral to the psychological therapies clinic was associated with increased antidepressant medication prescribing (mean differences 0.62, p < 0.001) and less use of emergency department than controls (mean difference −0.21, p = 0.003). Conclusions Referral to improved access to psychological therapies (IAPT) services appears of value to people with LTC. It is associated with the issue of a greater number of prescriptions for anti-depressant medicines and less use of emergency services. Further studies are needed to explore bed occupancy and outpatient attendance. PMID:23639304

  8. Antibody against the Carboxyl Terminus of Intimin α Reduces Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Adherence to Tissue Culture Cells and Subsequent Induction of Actin Polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Humberto M.; Teel, Louise D.; Kokai-Kun, John F.; O'Brien, Alison D.

    2005-01-01

    The C-terminal third of intimin binds to its translocated receptor (Tir) to promote attaching and effacing lesion formation during infection with enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC). We observed that the adherence of EPEC strains to HEp-2 cells was reduced and that actin polymerization was blocked by antibody raised against the C-terminal third of intimin α. PMID:15784601

  9. Defining cell culture conditions to improve human norovirus infectivity assays.

    PubMed

    Straub, T M; Hutchison, J R; Bartholomew, R A; Valdez, C O; Valentine, N B; Dohnalkova, A; Ozanich, R M; Bruckner-Lea, C J

    2013-01-01

    Significant difficulties remain for determining whether human noroviruses (hNoV) recovered from water, food, and environmental samples are infectious. Three-dimensional (3-D) tissue culture of human intestinal cells has shown promise in developing an infectivity assay, but reproducibility, even within a single laboratory, remains problematic. From the literature and our observations, we hypothesized that the common factors that lead to more reproducible hNoV infectivity in vitro requires that the cell line be (1) of human gastrointestinal origin, (2) expresses apical microvilli, and (3) be a positive secretor cell line. The C2BBe1 cell line, which is a brush-border producing clone of Caco-2, meets these three criteria. When challenged with Genogroup II viruses, we observed a 2 Log(10) increase in viral RNA titer. A passage experiment with GII viruses showed evidence of the ability to propagate hNoV by both quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and microscopy. In our hands, using 3-D C2BBe1 cells improves reproducibility of the infectivity assay for hNoV, but the assay can still be variable. Two sources of variability include the cells themselves (mixed phenotypes of small and large intestine) and initial titer measurements using qRT-PCR that measures all RNA vs. plaque assays that measure infectious virus. PMID:23306266

  10. Defining cell culture conditions to improve human norovirus infectivity assays

    SciTech Connect

    Straub, Tim M.; Hutchison, Janine R.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Valentine, Nancy B.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Ozanich, Richard M.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.

    2013-01-10

    Significant difficulties remain for determining whether human noroviruses (hNoV) recovered from water, food, and environmental samples are infectious. Three-dimensional tissue culture of human intestinal cells has shown promise in developing an infectivity assay, but reproducibility, even within a single laboratory, remains problematic. From the literature and our observations, we hypothesized that the common factors that leads to more reproducible hNoV infectivity in vitro requires that the cell line be 1) of human gastrointestinal origin, 2) expresses apical microvilli, and 3) be a positive secretor cell line. The C2BBe1 cell line, which is a brush-border producing clone of Caco-2, meets these three criteria. When challenged with Genogroup II viruses, we observed a 2 Log10 increase in viral RNA titer. A passage experiment with GII viruses showed evidence of the ability to propagate hNoV by both reverse transcription quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) and microscopy. Using 3-D C2BBe1 cells improves reproducibility of the infectivity assay for hNoV, but the assay can still be variable. Two sources of variability include the cells themselves (mixed phenotypes of small and large intestine) and initial titer measurements using quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) that measures all RNA vs. plaque assays that measure infectious virus.

  11. Basic Demography of Caenorhabditis remanei Cultured under Standard Laboratory Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lindström, Jan; Haydon, Daniel T.

    2008-01-01

    Species of the Caenorhabditis genus have been used as model systems in genetics and molecular research for more than 30 years. Despite this, basic information about their demography, in the wild and in the lab, has remained unknown until very recently. Here, we provide for the first time a closely quantified life-cycle of the gonochoristic nematode C. remanei. Using C. elegans protocols, modified for an outcrossing nematode, we estimated the basic demography for individuals of two strains (JU724 and MY12-G) which were recently isolated from the wild. We used a half-sib breeding design to estimate the phenotypic variance of traits of related (within line) and unrelated individuals (between lines) of the two strains cultured in a common environment in the lab. Comparisons between these strains showed that JU724 was characterized by significantly lower overall lifetime fecundity and by differences in age-specific fecundity relative to MY12-G, but there were no differences in their life expectancy and reproductive lifespan. We found high phenotypic variance among all traits. The variance within lines was relatively high compared to the low variation between lines. We suggest this could be the result of high gene flow in these wild-type strains. Finally, comparisons between species suggest that, despite the differences in reproductive strategies (i.e., sex ratios, lifetime fecundity), C. remanei has developmental time similar to the hermaphroditic N2 strain of C. elegans. PMID:19440256

  12. Studies on Culture and Osteogenic Induction of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells under CO2-Independent Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian; Zhang, Cui; Feng, Yiding; Zong, Chen; Chen, Jiarong; Tang, Zihua; Jia, Bingbing; Tong, Xiangming; Zheng, Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are one of the important factors that regulate bone anabolism. Osteoporosis resulting from microgravity during spaceflight may possibly be due to a decrease in osteogenesis mediated by hMSCs. This speculation should be verified through culture and osteogenic induction of hMSCs in a microgravity environment during spaceflight. Control of CO2 is a key component in current experimental protocols for growth, survival, and proliferation of in vitro cultured cells. However, carrying CO2 tanks on a spaceflight and devoting space/mass allowances for classical CO2 control protocols make experimentation on culture and osteogenesis difficult during most missions. Therefore, an experimental culture and osteogenic medium was developed through modifying the components of buffer salts in conventional culture medium. This experimental medium was used to culture and induce hMSCs under CO2-independent conditions. The results showed that culture and induction of hMSCs with conventional culture medium and conventional osteogenic medium under CO2-independent conditions resulted in an increase of pH in medium. The proliferation of hMSCs was also inhibited. hMSCs cultured with experimental culture medium under CO2-independent conditions showed a proliferation potential that was the same as those cultured with conventional culture medium under CO2-dependent conditions. The experimental osteogenic medium could promote hMSCs to differentiate into osteoblast-like cells under CO2-independent conditions. Cells induced by this induction system showed high alkaline phosphatase activity. The expression levels of osteogenic genes in cells induced with experimental osteogenic medium under CO2-independent conditions were not significantly different from those cells induced with conventional osteogenic medium under CO2-dependent conditions. These results suggest that the experimental culture and induction system could be used to culture hMSCs and induce

  13. Conditions for Long-Term Culture of Cattle Undifferentiated Spermatogonia.

    PubMed

    Oatley, Melissa J; Kaucher, Amy V; Yang, Qi-En; Waqas, Muhammad Salman; Oatley, Jon M

    2016-07-01

    Continual and robust spermatogenesis relies on the actions of an undifferentiated spermatogonial population that contains stem cells. A remarkable feature of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) is the capacity to regenerate spermatogenesis following isolation from a donor testis and transplantation into a permissive recipient testis. This capacity has enormous potential as a tool for enhancing the reproductive capacity of livestock, which can improve production efficiency. Because SSCs are a rare subset of the undifferentiated spermatogonial population, a period of in vitro amplification in number following isolation from donor testicular tissue is essential. Here, we describe methodology for isolation of a cell fraction from prepubertal bull testes that is enriched for undifferentiated spermatogonia and long-term maintenance of the cells in both the feeder cell coculture and the feeder-free format. To achieve this method, we derived bovine fetal fibroblasts (BFF) to serve as feeders for optimizing medium conditions that promote maintenance of bovine undifferentiated spermatogonia for at least 2 mo. In addition, we devised a feeder-free system with BFF-conditioned medium that sustained bovine undifferentiated spermatogonia for at least 1 mo in vitro. The methodologies described could be optimized to provide platforms for exponential expansion of bovine SSCs that will provide the numbers needed for transplantation into recipient testes. PMID:27251094

  14. Carotenoids production in different culture conditions by Sporidiobolus pararoseus.

    PubMed

    Han, Mei; He, Qian; Zhang, Wei-Guo

    2012-01-01

    Carotenoids produced by Sporidiobolus pararoseus were studied. It was found that biomass was connected with carbon source, temperature, and pH, but carotenoids proportion was seriously influenced by dissolved oxygen and nitrogen source. Different carotenoids could be obtained by using selected optimum conditions. In the end we established the strategies to produce β-carotene or torulene. Fed-batch fermentation in fermentor was used to prove the authenticity of our conclusions. The cell biomass, β-carotene content, and β-carotene proportion could reach 56.32 g/L, 18.92 mg/L and 60.43%, respectively, by using corn steep liquor at 0-5% of dissolved oxygen saturation. β-Carotene content was 271% higher than before this addition. The cell biomass, torulene content, and torulene proportion could reach 62.47 g/L, 31.74 mg/L, and 70.41%, respectively, by using yeast extract at 30-35% of dissolved oxygen saturation. Torulene content was 152% higher than before this addition. The strategy for enhancing specific carotenoid production by selected fermentation conditions may provide an alternative approach to enhance carotenoid production with other strains. PMID:22708808

  15. Rapid Induction of Aldosterone Synthesis in Cultured Neonatal Rat Cardiomyocytes under High Glucose Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Nagoshi, Tomohisa; Nishikawa, Tetsuo; Date, Taro; Yoshimura, Michihiro

    2013-01-01

    In addition to classical adrenal cortical biosynthetic pathway, there is increasing evidence that aldosterone is produced in extra-adrenal tissues. Although we previously reported aldosterone production in the heart, the concept of cardiac aldosterone synthesis remains controversial. This is partly due to lack of established experimental models representing aldosterone synthase (CYP11B2) expression in robustly reproducible fashion. We herein investigated suitable conditions in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRCMs) culture system producing CYP11B2 with considerable efficacy. NRCMs were cultured with various glucose doses for 2–24 hours. CYP11B2 mRNA expression and aldosterone concentrations secreted from NRCMs were determined using real-time PCR and enzyme immunoassay, respectively. We found that suitable conditions for CYP11B2 induction included four-hour incubation with high glucose conditions. Under these particular conditions, CYP11B2 expression, in accordance with aldosterone secretion, was significantly increased compared to those observed in the cells cultured under standard-glucose condition. Angiotensin II receptor blocker partially inhibited this CYP11B2 induction, suggesting that there is local renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system activation under high glucose conditions. The suitable conditions for CYP11B2 induction in NRCMs culture system are now clarified: high-glucose conditions with relatively brief period of culture promote CYP11B2 expression in cardiomyocytes. The current system will help to accelerate further progress in research on cardiac tissue aldosterone synthesis. PMID:24288663

  16. Three-dimensional Culture Conditions Lead to Decreased Radiation Induced Crytoxicity in Human Mammary Epithelial Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sowa, Marianne B.; Chrisler, William B.; Zens, Kyra D.; Ashjian, Emily J.; Opresko, Lee K.

    2010-05-01

    For both targeted and non-targeted exposures, the cellular responses to ionizing radiation have predominantly been measured in two dimensional monolayer cultures. Although convenient for biochemical analysis, the true interactions in vivo depend upon complex interactions between cells themselves and the surrounding extra cellular matrix. This study directly compares the influence of culture conditions on radiation induced cytotoxicity following exposure to low-LET ionizing radiation. Using a three dimensional (3D) human mammary epithelial tissue model, we have found a protective effect of 3D cell culture on cell survival after irradiation. The initial state of the cells (i.e., 2D vs. 3D culture) at the time of irradiation does not alter survival, nor does the presence of extracellular matrix during and after exposure to dose, but long term culture in 3D which offers significant reduction in cytotoxicity at a given dose (e.g. ~4 fold increased survival at 5 Gy). The cell cycle delay induced following exposure to 2 and 5 Gy was almost identical between 2D and 3D culture conditions and cannot account for the observed differences in radiation responses. However the amount of apoptosis following radiation exposure is significantly decreased in 3D culture relative to the 2D monolayer after the same dose. A likely mechanism of the cytoprotective effect afforded by 3D culture conditions is the down regulation of radiation induced apoptosis in 3D structures

  17. Optimization of Cultural Conditions for Antioxidant Exopolysaccharides from Xerocomus badius Grown in Shrimp Byproduct

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiujun; Yan, Peisheng; Liu, Xin; Wang, Jianbing; Yu, Jiajia

    2016-01-01

    To optimize the production conditions for exopolysaccharides with higher antioxidant activities from Xerocomus badius cultured in shrimp byproduct medium, Plackett-Burman design, path of steepest ascent, and response surface methodology were explored. Based on the results of Plackett-Burman design and path of steepest ascent, a Box-Behnken design was applied to optimization and the regression models. The optimal cultural condition for high yield and antioxidant activity of the exopolysaccharides was determined to be 10.347% of solid-to-liquid ratio, a 4.322% content of bran powder, and a 1.217% concentration of glacial acetic acid. Culturing with the optimal cultural conditions resulted in an exopolysaccharides yield of 4.588 ± 0.346 g/L and a total antioxidant activity of 2.956 ± 0.105 U/mg. These values are consistent with the values predicted by the corresponding regression models (RSD < 5%). PMID:26998481

  18. Transcriptome analysis and physiology of Bifidobacterium longum NCC2705 cells under continuous culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Mozzetti, V; Grattepanche, F; Moine, D; Berger, B; Rezzonico, E; Arigoni, F; Lacroix, C

    2012-12-01

    A central issue in the use of probiotics in food and food supplements is their sensitivity to many environmental stress factors. The resistance of probiotic cells to lethal stress can be improved by application of homologous or heterologous sub-lethal stress during culture. This screening procedure is generally performed using batch cultures. Continuous cultures could be a suitable and more efficient method to test different stress factors on one culture instead of repeating several batch cultures. However, before testing stresses using continuous cultures, the physiological stability of continuously produced cells over a considered time period must be first evaluated. A continuous culture of Bifidobacterium longum NCC2705 was maintained for 211 h at a dilution rate of 0.1 per h, mimicking a deceleration growth phase culture. Stable viable cell counts were measured over the culture period, decreasing only moderately from 8.8 to 8.6 log10 cfu/ml. A slight shift in metabolite production, characterized by increased lactate and decreased acetate, formate and ethanol concentrations was observed. Susceptibilities to antibiotics and stress conditions were stable (cefotaxim, ampicillin, ceftazidime) or moderately affected (simulated gastric juices, heat, bile salts, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, penicillin, vancomycin and neomycin) over culturing time. Comparison of gene transcription profiles between samples collected after 31 h of continuous culture and samples collected after 134 and 211 h revealed only limited changes in expression of 1.0 and 3.8% of total genes, respectively. Based on these results, we propose that continuous culture can be used to produce bacterial cells with stable physiological properties suitable for fast and efficient screening of sub-lethal stress conditions. PMID:23234728

  19. Metabolite profiling of microfluidic cell culture conditions for droplet based screening

    PubMed Central

    Bjork, Sara M.; Sjostrom, Staffan L.; Andersson-Svahn, Helene; Joensson, Haakan N.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the impact of droplet culture conditions on cell metabolic state by determining key metabolite concentrations in S. cerevisiae cultures in different microfluidic droplet culture formats. Control of culture conditions is critical for single cell/clone screening in droplets, such as directed evolution of yeast, as cell metabolic state directly affects production yields from cell factories. Here, we analyze glucose, pyruvate, ethanol, and glycerol, central metabolites in yeast glucose dissimilation to establish culture formats for screening of respiring as well as fermenting yeast. Metabolite profiling provides a more nuanced estimate of cell state compared to proliferation studies alone. We show that the choice of droplet incubation format impacts cell proliferation and metabolite production. The standard syringe incubation of droplets exhibited metabolite profiles similar to oxygen limited cultures, whereas the metabolite profiles of cells cultured in the alternative wide tube droplet incubation format resemble those from aerobic culture. Furthermore, we demonstrate retained droplet stability and size in the new better oxygenated droplet incubation format. PMID:26392830

  20. Optimization of large-scale culture conditions for the production of cordycepin with Cordyceps militaris by liquid static culture.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chao; Wen, Ting-Chi; Kang, Ji-Chuan; Meng, Ze-Bing; Li, Guang-Rong; Hyde, Kevin D

    2014-01-01

    Cordycepin is one of the most important bioactive compounds produced by species of Cordyceps sensu lato, but it is hard to produce large amounts of this substance in industrial production. In this work, single factor design, Plackett-Burman design, and central composite design were employed to establish the key factors and identify optimal culture conditions which improved cordycepin production. Using these culture conditions, a maximum production of cordycepin was 2008.48 mg/L for 700 mL working volume in the 1000 mL glass jars and total content of cordycepin reached 1405.94 mg/bottle. This method provides an effective way for increasing the cordycepin production at a large scale. The strategies used in this study could have a wide application in other fermentation processes. PMID:25054182

  1. Optimization of Large-Scale Culture Conditions for the Production of Cordycepin with Cordyceps militaris by Liquid Static Culture

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Chao; Wen, Ting-Chi; Kang, Ji-Chuan; Meng, Ze-Bing; Li, Guang-Rong; Hyde, Kevin D.

    2014-01-01

    Cordycepin is one of the most important bioactive compounds produced by species of Cordyceps sensu lato, but it is hard to produce large amounts of this substance in industrial production. In this work, single factor design, Plackett-Burman design, and central composite design were employed to establish the key factors and identify optimal culture conditions which improved cordycepin production. Using these culture conditions, a maximum production of cordycepin was 2008.48 mg/L for 700 mL working volume in the 1000 mL glass jars and total content of cordycepin reached 1405.94 mg/bottle. This method provides an effective way for increasing the cordycepin production at a large scale. The strategies used in this study could have a wide application in other fermentation processes. PMID:25054182

  2. Embryonic Stem Cell Culture Conditions Support Distinct States Associated with Different Developmental Stages and Potency.

    PubMed

    Martin Gonzalez, Javier; Morgani, Sophie M; Bone, Robert A; Bonderup, Kasper; Abelchian, Sahar; Brakebusch, Cord; Brickman, Joshua M

    2016-08-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are cell lines derived from the mammalian pre-implantation embryo. Here we assess the impact of derivation and culture conditions on both functional potency and ESC transcriptional identity. Individual ESCs cultured in either two small-molecule inhibitors (2i) or with knockout serum replacement (KOSR), but not serum, can generate high-level chimeras regardless of how these cells were derived. ESCs cultured in these conditions showed a transcriptional correlation with early pre-implantation embryos (E1.5-E3.5) and contributed to development from the 2-cell stage. Conversely, the transcriptome of serum-cultured ESCs correlated with later stages of development (E4.5), at which point embryonic cells are more restricted in their developmental potential. Thus, ESC culture systems are not equivalent, but support cell types that resemble distinct developmental stages. Cells derived in one condition can be reprogrammed to another developmental state merely by adaptation to another culture condition. PMID:27509134

  3. Infection Control Practice in the Operating Room: Staff Adherence to Existing Policies in a Developing Country

    PubMed Central

    Cawich, Shamir O; Tennant, Ingrid A; McGaw, Clarence D; Harding, Hyacinth; Walters, Christine A; Crandon, Ivor W

    2013-01-01

    Context: Infection control interventions are important for containing surgery-related infections. For this reason, the modern operating room (OR) should have well-developed infection control policies. The efficacy of these policies depends on how well the OR staff adhere to them. There is a lack of available data documenting adherence to infection control policies. Objective: To evaluate OR staff adherence to existing infection control policies in Jamaica. Methods: We administered a questionnaire to all OR staff to assess their training, knowledge of local infection control protocols, and practice with regard to 8 randomly selected guidelines. Adherence to each guideline was rated with fixed-choice items on a 4-point Likert scale. The sum of points determined the adherence score. Two respondent groups were defined: adherent (score > 26) and nonadherent (score ≤ 26). We evaluated the relationship between respondent group and age, sex, occupational rank, and time since completion of basic medical training. We used χ2 and Fisher exact tests to assess associations and t tests to compare means between variables of interest. Results: The sample comprised 132 participants (90 physicians and 42 nurses) with a mean age of 36 (standard deviation ± 9.5) years. Overall, 40.1% were adherent to existing protocols. There was no significant association between the distribution of adherence scores and sex (p = 0.319), time since completion of basic training (p = 0.595), occupational rank (p = 0.461), or age (p = 0.949). Overall, 19% felt their knowledge of infection control practices was inadequate. Those with working knowledge of infection control practices attained it mostly through informal communication (80.4%) and self-directed research (62.6%). Conclusion: New approaches to the problem of nonadherence to infection control guidelines are needed in the Caribbean. Several unique cultural, financial, and environmental factors influence adherence in this region, in contrast to

  4. Conditions for initiating Lake Victoria haplochromine (Oreochromis esculentus) primary cell cultures from caudal fin biopsies.

    PubMed

    Filice, Melissa; Lee, C; Mastromonaco, Gabriela F

    2014-10-01

    The global decline of freshwater fishes has created a need to cryopreserve biological materials from endangered species in an effort to conserve the biodiversity within this taxon. Since maternal gametes and embryos from fish are difficult to cryopreserve, somatic cells obtained from caudal fins have become an increasingly popular resource as they contain both maternal and paternal DNA ensuring valuable traits are not lost from the population. Somatic cells stored in cryobanks can be used to supplement endangered populations with genetically valuable offspring with the use of assisted reproductive technologies. However, initiating primary cell cultures from caudal fin biopsies of endangered species can be challenging as standardized protocols have not yet been developed. The objective of this study was to identify culture conditions, including antibiotic supplementation, biopsy size, and culture temperature, suitable for establishing primary cell cultures of ngege (Oreochromis esculentus), a critically endangered African cichlid. Six-millimeter caudal fin biopsies provided sufficient material to develop a primary cell culture when incubated at 25°C using standard fish cell culture medium containing 1× Primocin. Further investigation and application of these culture conditions for other endangered freshwater fishes is necessary. PMID:24985486

  5. Evidence for degradation of 2-chlorophenol by enrichment cultures under denitrifying conditions.

    PubMed

    Bae, Hee-Sung; Yamagishi, Takao; Suwa, Yuichi

    2002-01-01

    Although chlorophenol (CP) degradation has been studied, no bacterium responsible for degradation of CP under denitrifying conditions has been isolated. Moreover, little substantial evidence for anaerobic degradation of CPs coupled with denitrification is available even for mixed cultures. Degradation of CP [2-CP, 3-CP, 4-CP, 2,4-dichlorophenol (DCP) or 2,6-DCP] under denitrifying conditions was examined in anaerobic batch culture inoculated with activated sludge. Although 3-CP, 4-CP, 2,4-DCP and 2,6-DCP were not stably degraded, 2-CP was degraded and its degradation capability was sustained in a subculture. However, the rate of 2-CP degradation was not significantly enhanced by subculturing. In 2-CP-degrading cultures, nitrate was consumed stoichiometrically and concomitantly during 2-CP degradation, and a dechlorination intermediate was not detected, suggesting that 2-CP degradation was coupled with nitrate reduction. A 2-CP-degrading enrichment culture degraded 2-CP in the presence of nitrate, but did not in the absence of nitrate or the presence of sulfate. This suggests that the enrichment culture strictly requires nitrate for degradation of 2-CP. The apparent specific growth rate of the 2-CP degrading species was 0.0139 d(-1). Thus the apparent doubling time of the 2-CP-degrading population in the enrichment culture was greater than 50 d, which may explain difficulty in enrichment and isolation of micro-organisms responsible for CP degradation under denitrifying conditions. PMID:11782514

  6. Effects of culture conditions and biofilm formation on the iodine susceptibility of Legionella pneumophila

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cargill, K. L.; Pyle, B. H.; Sauer, R. L.; McFeters, G. A.

    1992-01-01

    The susceptibility of Legionella pneumophila to iodination was studied with cultures grown in well water, on rich agar media, and attached to stainless-steel surfaces. Legionella pneumophila grown in water cultures in association with other microorganisms were less sensitive to disinfection by chlorine and iodine than were agar-passaged cultures. Differences in sensitivity to disinfection between water-cultured and agar-grown legionellae were determined by comparing C x T values (concentration in milligrams per litre multiplied by time in minutes to achieve 99% decrease in viability) and CM x T values (concentration in molarity). Iodine (1500x) gave a greater difference in CM x T values than did chlorine (68x). Iodine was 50 times more effective than chlorine when used with agar-grown cultures but was only twice as effective when tested against water-grown Legionella cultures. C x T x S values (C x T multiplied by percent survivors), which take into consideration the percent surviving bacteria, were used to compare sensitivities in very resistant populations, such as those in biofilms. Water cultures of legionellae associated with stainless-steel surfaces were 135 times more resistant to iodination than were unattached legionellae, and they were 210,000 times more resistant than were agar-grown cultures. These results indicate that the conditions under which legionellae are grown can dramatically affect their susceptibility to some disinfectants and must be considered when evaluating the efficacy of a disinfecting agent.

  7. Linguistic and Cultural Adaptation of a Computer-Based Counseling Program (CARE+ Spanish) to Support HIV Treatment Adherence and Risk Reduction for People Living With HIV/AIDS: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Chhun, Nok; Cleland, Charles M; Crespo-Fierro, Michele; Parés-Avila, José A; Lizcano, John A; Shedlin, Michele G; Johnston, Barbara E; Sharp, Victoria L

    2016-01-01

    Background Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease in the United States disproportionately affects minorities, including Latinos. Barriers including language are associated with lower antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence seen among Latinos, yet ART and interventions for clinic visit adherence are rarely developed or delivered in Spanish. Objective The aim was to adapt a computer-based counseling tool, demonstrated to reduce HIV-1 viral load and sexual risk transmission in a population of English-speaking adults, for use during routine clinical visits for an HIV-positive Spanish-speaking population (CARE+ Spanish); the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) was the theoretical framework guiding program development. Methods A longitudinal randomized controlled trial was conducted from June 4, 2010 to March 29, 2012. Participants were recruited from a comprehensive HIV treatment center comprising three clinics in New York City. Eligibility criteria were (1) adults (age ≥18 years), (2) Latino birth or ancestry, (3) speaks Spanish (mono- or multilingual), and (4) on antiretrovirals. Linear and generalized mixed linear effects models were used to analyze primary outcomes, which included ART adherence, sexual transmission risk behaviors, and HIV-1 viral loads. Exit interviews were offered to purposively selected intervention participants to explore cultural acceptability of the tool among participants, and focus groups explored the acceptability and system efficiency issues among clinic providers, using the TAM framework. Results A total of 494 Spanish-speaking HIV clinic attendees were enrolled and randomly assigned to the intervention (arm A: n=253) or risk assessment-only control (arm B, n=241) group and followed up at 3-month intervals for one year. Gender distribution was 296 (68.4%) male, 110 (25.4%) female, and 10 (2.3%) transgender. By study end, 433 of 494 (87.7%) participants were retained. Although intervention participants had reduced viral loads, increased

  8. Modulation of androgen receptor protein by culture conditions of human skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Palma, Marcela M; Fernandez, Mireya; Vivanco, Ximena; Pino, Ana M

    2002-10-01

    Cultures of skin fibroblasts show variation of androgen binding with culture conditions; binding variations are usually avoided by using confluent cultures. In this work, we analysed the effect of cell density and mitogenic agents on the level of androgen receptor (AR) of cultured human skin fibroblasts. Results demonstrated that in cultures of human skin fibroblasts, cellular binding of dihydrotestosterone was higher in cells grown at low than at high cell density. The reduction in binding resulted from a decrease in the number of high affinity receptors and not from a change in receptor affinity. Immunocytochemistry for AR showed greater staining intensity in cells grown at low than at high cell density. Additionally, immunoblot analysis demonstrated more AR protein in low cell density cultures. On the other hand, it was observed that cells grown at low cell density showed diminished androgen binding capacity after 24 h of treatment with insulin-like growth factor (IGF-l), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), or granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF); this effect of growth factors was not observed in cells grown at high cell density. In conclusion, we found that cell density of cultures and mitogenic agents can regulate AR binding activity in human fibroblasts. While we do not yet know how changes in cell density affect the amount of AR, we conclude that the mechanism could be mediated by activation of the tyrosine kinase pathway, as the effect was reproduced by mitogens. PMID:12270026

  9. The effect of culture conditions on cytodifferentiation of fetal mouse lung respiratory passageways.

    PubMed

    Hilfer, S R; Schneck, S L; Brown, J W

    1986-01-01

    Differentiation of the respiratory region of fetal mouse lungs was investigated in serum-free medium supplemented with growth factors and hormones. Terminal buds from the margins of a lobe were removed from 16-day fetuses and organ cultures prepared either in submersion culture or at the air-medium interface. It was found that glycyl-L-histidyl-L-lysine, transferrin, and somatostatin were sufficient to promote branching in the absence of serum. However, type II pneumocytes containing lamellar bodies formed only in the presence of thyroxine or dexamethasone. At concentrations of these hormones slightly above the physiological range most of the cells became cuboidal and contained lamellar bodies; at lower concentrations regions of flattened cells appeared. In submersion culture a large, central cavity surrounded by saccules was formed rather than a branched tree. Thus, the pattern of differentiation is significantly influenced by culture conditions. PMID:2869941

  10. The Seven Stages of Man: The Role of Developmental Stage on Medication Adherence in Respiratory Diseases.

    PubMed

    Costello, Richard W; Foster, Juliet M; Grigg, Jonathan; Eakin, Michelle N; Canonica, Walter; Yunus, Fasail; Ryan, Dermot

    2016-01-01

    The circumstances and drivers of the decision to initiate, implement, or persist with a medication differ for individuals at each developmental stage. For school-age children with asthma, the social environment of their family's cultural beliefs and the influence of peer networks and school policies are strong determinants of medication adherence. The stage of adolescence can be a particularly challenging time because there is a reduction in parental supervision of asthma management as the young person strives to become more autonomous. To illustrate the importance of such factors, adherence interventions in children and young adults with asthma have used peer-based supports and social supports, particularly social media platforms. In older patients, it is internal rather than external factors and age-related decline that pose challenges to medication adherence. Seniors face the challenges of polypharmacy, reduced social support, increased isolation, and loss of cognitive function. Strategies to promote adherence must be tailored to the developmental stage and respective behavioral determinants of the target group. This review considers the different attitudes toward medication and the different adherence behaviors in young and elderly patients with chronic respiratory conditions, specifically asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Opportunities to intervene to optimize adherence are suggested. PMID:27587315

  11. Correlates of Adherence to Varenicline Among HIV+ Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Tuo-Yen; Gonzalez, Mirelis; Krebs, Paul; Wong, Selena; Furberg, Robert; Sherman, Scott; Schoenthaler, Antoinette; Urbina, Anthony; Cleland, Charles M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Low rates of adherence to smoking cessation pharmacotherapy may limit the effectiveness of treatment. However, few studies have examined adherence in smoking cessation trials thus, there is a limited understanding of factors that influence adherence behaviors. This brief report analyzes correlates of adherence to varenicline among people living with HIV/AIDS. Methods: Study participants were recruited from three HIV care centers in New York City and enrolled in a three-arm randomized controlled pilot study in which all subjects received varenicline. At the 1-month study visit, there were no significant differences in adherence by study condition, therefore we combined treatment arms to examine correlates of adherence (n = 127). We used pill counts to assess varenicline adherence, defined as taking at least 80% of the prescribed dose. We conducted a multivariate path analysis to assess factors proposed by the information-motivation-behavioral skills model to predict adherence. Results: Only 56% of smokers were at least 80% adherent to varenicline at 1 month. Adherence-related information, self-efficacy, a college degree, and non-Hispanic white race/ethnicity were associated with increased varenicline adherence. In path analysis, information and motivation were associated with increased adherence self-efficacy, and adherence self-efficacy was associated with increased adherence, but with marginal significance. These associations with adherence were no longer significant after controlling for race/ethnicity and education. Conclusions: Further exploration of the role of a modifiable correlates of adherence, such as adherence-related information, motivation and self-efficacy is warranted. Interventions are needed that can address disparities in these and other psychosocial factors that may mediate poor medication adherence. PMID:26180221

  12. Investigation of fatty acid accumulation in the engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae under nitrogen limited culture condition.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaoling; Chen, Wei Ning

    2014-06-01

    In this study, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild type strain and engineered strain with an overexpressed heterologous ATP-citrate lyase (acl) were cultured in medium with different carbon and nitrogen concentrations, and their fatty acid production levels were investigated. The results showed that when the S. cerevisiae engineered strain was cultivated under nitrogen limited culture condition, the yield of mono-unsaturated fatty acids showed higher than that under non-nitrogen limited condition; with the carbon concentration increased, the accumulation become more apparent, whereas in the wild type strain, no such correlation was found. Besides, the citrate level in the S. cerevisiae under nitrogen limited condition was found to be much higher than that under non-nitrogen limited condition, which indicated a relationship between the diminution of nitrogen and accumulation of citrate in the S. cerevisiae. The accumulated citrate could be further cleaved by acl to provide substrate for fatty acid synthesis. PMID:24755317

  13. Methods and Compositions Based on Culturing Microorganisms in Low Sedimental Fluid Shear Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, C. Mark; Nickerson, Cheryl A.; Wilson, James W.; Sarker, Shameema; Nauman, Eric A.; Schurr, Michael J.; Nelman-Gonzalez, Mayra A.

    2012-01-01

    The benefits of applying a low sedimental fluid shear environment to manipulate microorganisms were examined. Microorganisms obtained from a low sedimental fluid shear culture, which exhibit modified phenotypic and molecular genetic characteristics, are useful for the development of novel and improved diagnostics, therapeutics, vaccines, and bio-industrial products. Furthermore, application of low sedimental fluid conditions to microorganisms permits identification of molecules uniquely expressed under these conditions, providing a basis for the design of new therapeutic targets.

  14. Human Airway Primary Epithelial Cells Show Distinct Architectures on Membrane Supports Under Different Culture Conditions.

    PubMed

    Min, Kyoung Ah; Rosania, Gus R; Shin, Meong Cheol

    2016-06-01

    To facilitate drug development for lung delivery, it is highly demanding to establish appropriate airway epithelial cell models as transport barriers to evaluate pharmacokinetic profiles of drug molecules. Besides the cancer-derived cell lines, as the primary cell model, normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells have been used for drug screenings because of physiological relevance to in vivo. Therefore, to accurately interpret drug transport data in NHBE measured by different laboratories, it is important to know biophysical characteristics of NHBE grown on membranes in different culture conditions. In this study, NHBE was grown on the polyester membrane in a different medium and its transport barrier properties as well as cell architectures were fully characterized by functional assays and confocal imaging throughout the days of cultures. Moreover, NHBE cells on inserts in a different medium were subject to either of air-interfaced culture (AIC) or liquid-covered culture (LCC) condition. Cells in the AIC condition were cultivated on the membrane with medium in the basolateral side only, whereas cells with medium in apical and basolateral sides under the LCC condition. Quantitative microscopic imaging with biophysical examination revealed distinct multilayered architectures of differentiated NHBE cells, suggesting NHBE as functional cell barriers for the lung-targeting drug transport. PMID:26818810

  15. Derivation of iPSCs after Culture of Human Dental Pulp Cells under Defined Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Takeda-Kawaguchi, Tomoko; Sugiyama, Ken; Chikusa, Shunji; Iida, Kazuki; Aoki, Hitomi; Tamaoki, Naritaka; Hatakeyama, Daijiro; Kunisada, Takahiro; Shibata, Toshiyuki; Fusaki, Noemi; Tezuka, Ken-ichi

    2014-01-01

    Human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) are a promising resource for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering and can be used for derivation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). However, current protocols use reagents of animal origin (mainly fetal bovine serum, FBS) that carry the potential risk of infectious diseases and unwanted immunogenicity. Here, we report a chemically defined protocol to isolate and maintain the growth and differentiation potential of hDPCs. hDPCs cultured under these conditions showed significantly less primary colony formation than those with FBS. Cell culture under stringently defined conditions revealed a donor-dependent growth capacity; however, once established, the differentiation capabilities of the hDPCs were comparable to those observed with FBS. DNA array analyses indicated that the culture conditions robustly altered hDPC gene expression patterns but, more importantly, had little effect on neither pluripotent gene expression nor the efficiency of iPSC induction. The chemically defined culture conditions described herein are not perfect serum replacements, but can be used for the safe establishment of iPSCs and will find utility in applications for cell-based regenerative medicine. PMID:25521610

  16. Mid-Infrared and Near-Infrared Spectroscopic Properties of Fusarium Isolates: Effects of Culture Conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Fusarium genus includes soil saprobes as well as pathogenic or toxin-producing species. Traditional classification of Fusarium isolates is slow and requires a high level of expertise. The objective of this project is to describe culture condition effects on mid-infrared (MidIR) and near-infrared...

  17. System for measuring oxygen consumption rates of mammalian cells in static culture under hypoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Yuki; Miyahara, Hirotaka; Ota, Yuri; Tsuneda, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Estimating the oxygen consumption rates (OCRs) of mammalian cells in hypoxic environments is essential for designing and developing a three-dimensional (3-D) cell culture system. However, OCR measurements under hypoxic conditions are infrequently reported in the literature. Here, we developed a system for measuring OCRs at low oxygen levels. The system injects nitrogen gas into the environment and measures the oxygen concentration by an optical oxygen microsensor that consumes no oxygen. The developed system was applied to HepG2 cells in static culture. Specifically, we measured the spatial profiles of the local dissolved oxygen concentration in the medium, then estimated the OCRs of the cells. The OCRs, and also the pericellular oxygen concentrations, decreased nonlinearly as the oxygen partial pressure in the environment decreased from 19% to 1%. The OCRs also depended on the culture period and the matrix used for coating the dish surface. Using this system, we can precisely estimate the OCRs of various cell types under environments that mimic 3-D culture conditions, contributing crucial data for an efficient 3-D culture system design. PMID:26558344

  18. Clinical Supervision in Treatment Transport: Effects on Adherence and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Schoenwald, Sonja K.; Sheidow, Ashli J.; Chapman, Jason E.

    2009-01-01

    This non-experimental study used Mixed-Effects Regression Models (MRMs) to examine relations among supervisor adherence to a clinical supervision protocol, therapist adherence, and changes in the behavior and functioning of youth with serious antisocial behavior treated with an empirically supported treatment (i.e., Multisystemic Therapy), one-year post treatment. Participants were 1979 youth and families treated by 429 clinicians across 45 provider organizations in North America. Four dimensions of clinical supervision were examined. MRM results showed one dimension, supervisor focus on adherence to treatment principles, predicted greater therapist adherence. Two supervision dimensions, adherence to the structure and process of supervision, and focus on clinician development, predicted changes in youth behavior. Conditions required to test hypothesized mediation by therapist adherence of supervisor adherence effects on youth outcomes were not met, and direct effects of each were observed in models including both supervisor and therapist adherence. PMID:19485583

  19. Isolation method and xeno-free culture conditions influence multipotent differentiation capacity of human Wharton’s jelly-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Human Wharton’s jelly (WJ) has become a preferred source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) whose clinical applications are limited by the use of adequate xeno-free (XF), in vitro manipulation conditions. Therefore, the objective of our study was to characterize WJ-derived MSCs (WJ-MSCs), isolated by different methods and cultured in a commercially available, MSC XF medium, not least of all by investigating their endothelial differentiation capacity. Methods WJ explants and enzymatically dissociated WJ cells were cultured in a defined, XF medium for MSCs. Adherent cells at passages 2 and 5 were characterized as MSCs by flow cytometry, MTT, real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR, and functional multipotent differentiation assays. The endothelial differentiation capacity of MSCs isolated and expanded until passage 2 in the MSC XF medium, and then subcultured for five passages in a commercially available endothelial growth medium (group A), was assessed over serial passages, as compared to adherent WJ-derived cells isolated and expanded for five consecutive passages in the endothelial medium (group B). Results The MSC phenotype of WJ explant- and pellet-derived cells, isolated and expanded in the MSC XF medium, was proven based on the expression of CD44/CD73/CD90/CD105 surface markers and osteo-/adipo-/chondrogenic multipotent differentiation potential, which differed according to the isolation method and/or passage number. Upon exposure to endothelial differentiation cues, cells belonging to group A did not exhibit endothelial cell characteristics over serial passages; by contrast, WJ pellet-derived cells belonging to group B expressed endothelial characteristics at gene, protein and functional levels, potentially due to culture conditions favoring the isolation of other stem/progenitor cell types than MSCs, able to give rise to an endothelial progeny. Conclusions The use of defined, MSC XF media for isolation and expansion of human WJ-MSCs is

  20. An integrated system for synchronous culture of animal cells under controlled conditions.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Pérez, Elena; Hernández, Vanessa; Palomares, Laura A; Serrato, José A

    2016-01-01

    The cell cycle has fundamental effects on cell cultures and their products. Tools to synchronize cultured cells allow the study of cellular physiology and metabolism at particular cell cycle phases. However, cells are most often arrested by methods that alter their homeostasis and are then cultivated in poorly controlled environments. Cell behavior could then be affected by the synchronization method and culture conditions used, and not just by the particular cell cycle phase under study. Moreover, only a few viable cells are recovered. Here, we designed an integrated system where a large number of cells from a controlled bioreactor culture is separated by centrifugal elutriation at high viabilities. In contrast to current elutriation methods, cells are injected directly from a bioreactor into an injection loop, allowing the introduction of a large number of cells into the separation chamber without stressful centrifugation. A low pulsation peristaltic pump increases the stability of the elutriation chamber. Using this approach, a large number of healthy cells at each cell cycle phase were obtained, allowing their direct inoculation into fully instrumented bioreactors. Hybridoma cells synchronized and cultured in this system behaved as expected for a synchronous culture. PMID:27625207

  1. Optical examination of cell culture in bioreactors creating simulated in vivo conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolfe, Peter J.

    2005-01-01

    Cell culture using bioreactors is a vital part of Cellular and Tissue Engineering. Bioreactor design continues to advance, in order to allow control over physical and chemical parameters as well as continuous assessment of cell behaviour, gene expression, and tissue formation and growth. Measurement or monitoring of many such parameters or features can be achieved with optical techniques. The current aim of cell culture is to re-create in vivo conditions and in order to achieve this control of the chemical environment is required and some cell types must be subjected to shear stress and/or axial loads. For creating tissue engineered cartilage chondrocytes are cultured within a biodegradable scaffold. Influences of cyclic loading and of oxygen supply on phenotype are studied. Vascular endothelial cells are subjected to fluid shear stress and the influence on prostacyclin production is measured. Optical interrogation of culture fluid, attached cells, cells in suspension and tissue constructs is carried out using a combination of spectrophotometry, analysis of scattering, and chemical sensing. Insertion of sensing probes within the culture vessel presents problems of protein adsorption to sensing surfaces. Approaches based on cell membrane mimicry are being evaluated for their potential to overcome this problem. Sensors based on immobilised fluorophores and chromaphores within either wall-mounted membranes or within optical fibres are assessed. Culture fluid turbidity is evaluated with scattering determinations and circulating glucose concentration is measured spectrophotometrically. Formed tissue is interrogated with NIR radiation and in the future will include the use of OCT.

  2. CULTURE CONDITIONS PROFOUNDLY IMPACT PHENOTYPE IN BEAS-2B, A HUMAN PULMONARY EPITHELIAL MODEL

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Fei; Klimecki, Walter T.

    2015-01-01

    BEAS-2B, an immortalized, human lung epithelial cell line, has been used to model pulmonary epithelial function for over 30 years. The BEAS-2B phenotype can be modulated by culture conditions that include the presence or absence of fetal bovine serum (FBS). The popularity of BEAS-2B as a model of arsenic toxicology, and the common use of BEAS-2B cultured both with and without FBS, led us to investigate the impact of FBS on BEAS-2B in the context of arsenic toxicology. Comparison of genome-wide gene expression in BEAS-2B cultured with or without FBS revealed altered expression in several biological pathways, including those related to carcinogenesis and energy metabolism. Real-time measurements of oxygen consumption and glycolysis in BEAS-2B demonstrated that FBS culture conditions were associated with a 1.4-fold increase in total glycolytic capacity, a 1.9-fold increase in basal respiration, a 2.0-fold increase in oxygen consumed for ATP production, and a 2.8-fold increase in maximal respiration, compared to BEAS-2B cultured without FBS. Comparisons of the transcriptome changes in BEAS-2B resulting from FBS exposure to the transcriptome changes resulting from exposure to 1 μM sodium arsenite revealed that mRNA levels of 43% of the arsenite-modulated genes were also modulated by FBS. Cytotoxicity studies revealed that BEAS-2B cells exposed to 5% FBS for 8 weeks were almost 5 times more sensitive to arsenite cytotoxicity than non-FBS-exposed BEAS-2B cells. Phenotype changes induced in BEAS-2B by FBS suggest that culture conditions should be carefully considered when using BEAS-2B as an experimental model of arsenic toxicity. PMID:25524072

  3. Low calcium culture condition induces mesenchymal cell-like phenotype in normal human epidermal keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Takagi, Ryo; Yamato, Masayuki; Murakami, Daisuke; Sugiyama, Hiroaki; Okano, Teruo

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} Normal human epidermal keratinocytes serially cultured under low calcium concentration were cytokeratin and vimentin double positive cells. {yields} The human keratinocytes expressed some epithelial stem/progenitor cell makers, mesenchymal cell markers, and markers of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. {yields} Mesenchymal cell-like phenotype in the keratinocytes was suppressed under high-calcium condition. -- Abstract: Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an important cellular phenomenon in organ developments, cancer invasions, and wound healing, and many types of transformed cell lines are used for investigating for molecular mechanisms of EMT. However, there are few reports for EMT in normal human epithelial cells, which are non-transformed or non-immortalized cells, in vitro. Therefore, normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK) serially cultured in low-calcium concentration medium (LCM) were used for investigating relations between differentiation and proliferation and mesenchymal-like phenotype in the present study, since long-term cultivation of NHEK is achieved in LCM. Interestingly, NHEK serially cultured in LCM consisted essentially of cytokeratin-vimentin double positive cells (98%), although the NHEK exhibited differentiation under high-calcium culture condition with 3T3 feeder layer. The vimentin expression was suppressed under high-calcium condition. These results may indicate the importance of mesenchymal-like phenotype for serially cultivation of NHEK in vitro.

  4. Influence of culture conditions on mycelial growth and bioluminescence of Gerronema viridilucens.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Luiz F; Bastos, Erick L; Desjardin, Dennis E; Stevani, Cassius V

    2008-05-01

    Herein we describe a procedure for measuring the total light emission of the naturally bioluminescent tropical fungus Gerronema viridilucens and the optimization of culture conditions using multivariate factorial anova. Cultures growing on an agar surface in 35 mm Petri dishes at 90% humidity show optimal bioluminescence emission at 25 degrees C in the presence of 1.0% sugar cane molasses, 0.10% yeast extract and pH 6.0 (nonbuffered). Temperature and pH are the most important factors for both mycelial growth and bioluminescence. PMID:18355288

  5. Masters of their conditions: at the crossroads of health, culture and performance.

    PubMed

    Arpin, Jacques

    2003-09-01

    Achieving one's cultural or clinical identity is a matter of performance. The performing body is made through a series of apprenticeships that lead to mastery and then transmission. Performance, like culture and medicine, has its systems of learning, i.e. in the professions of the performing arts. This article examines the methodology of theater anthropology and other aspects of performance studies. Applications to intercultural work are described that make it possible for patient and healer to collaborate to master the condition. PMID:14649848

  6. Influence of culture conditions on thermostable lipase production by a thermophilic alkalitolerant strain of Bacillus sp.

    PubMed

    Kambourova, M; Emanuilova, E; Dimitrov, P

    1996-01-01

    The effect of different culture conditions on thermostable lipase production by Bacillus sp. was studied in shake flasks. A maximum enzyme activity of 67-75 nkat/mL was observed in a medium consisting of 0.5% soybean flour and 0.1% stearyl glycerol esters or natural fats. A lipase activity of about 117 nkat/mL was established when the cultivation was carried out in a laboratory fermentor at 20% minimal dissolved oxygen level, the enzyme production being increased 1.5 fold compared to that in a flask culture. PMID:9138309

  7. Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and the integrin VLA-4 mediate adhesion of human B cell precursors to cultured bone marrow adherent cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, D H; Nuccie, B L; Abboud, C N; Winslow, J M

    1991-01-01

    Adhesion of B cell precursors to accessory cells in the bone marrow microenvironment may be required for normal early B cell development. Human bone marrow B cell precursors adhere more avidly than mature B cells to bone marrow-derived fibroblasts. To determine the mechanism of this adhesion, expression of adhesion proteins on human B precursor cells and cell lines was measured by flow cytometry. The very late antigen (VLA) integrins VLA-4 and VLA-5 were the only adhesion proteins expressed at higher levels in B cell precursors than mature B cells. Antibodies to the alpha and beta chains of VLA-4, but not VLA-5, significantly blocked binding to bone marrow-derived fibroblasts of immature B cells and cell lines. Although fibronectin is a ligand for VLA-4, anti-fibronectin antibody and a soluble fibronectin fragment containing the VLA-4 binding domain did not block adhesion, suggesting that VLA-4 is involved in adhesion of B cell precursors, but not as a fibronectin receptor. Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), the other known counterreceptor for VLA-4, was identified on bone marrow-derived fibroblasts, and anti-VCAM-1 significantly blocked adhesion of normal B cell precursors to bone marrow-derived fibroblasts, indicating that VLA-4/VCAM-1 interactions are important in adhesion of B cell precursors to the bone marrow microenvironment. Images PMID:1715889

  8. Characteristics and response of mouse bone marrow derived novel low adherent mesenchymal stem cells acquired by quantification of extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Ri-Cheng; Heo, Seong-Joo; Koak, Jai-Young; Lee, Joo-Hee; Park, Ji-Man

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of present study was to identify characteristic and response of mouse bone marrow (BM) derived low-adherent bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) obtained by quantification of extracellular matrix (ECM). MATERIALS AND METHODS Non-adherent cells acquired by ECM coated dishes were termed low-adherent BMMSCs and these cells were analyzed by in vitro and in vivo methods, including colony forming unit fibroblast (CFU-f), bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), multi-potential differentiation, flow cytometry and transplantation into nude mouse to measure the bone formation ability of these low-adherent BMMSCs. Titanium (Ti) discs with machined and anodized surfaces were prepared. Adherent and low-adherent BMMSCs were cultured on the Ti discs for testing their proliferation. RESULTS The amount of CFU-f cells was significantly higher when non-adherent cells were cultured on ECM coated dishes, which was made by 7 days culturing of adherent BMMSCs. Low-adherent BMMSCs had proliferation and differentiation potential as adherent BMMSCs in vitro. The mean amount bone formation of adherent and low-adherent BMMSCs was also investigated in vivo. There was higher cell proliferation appearance in adherent and low-adherent BMMSCs seeded on anodized Ti discs than machined Ti discs by time. CONCLUSION Low-adherent BMMSCs acquired by ECM from non-adherent cell populations maintained potential characteristic similar to those of the adherent BMMSCs and therefore could be used effectively as adherent BMMSCs in clinic. PMID:25352957

  9. Client Adherence to Asian Cultural Values, Common Factors in Counseling, and Session Outcome with Asian American Clients at a University Counseling Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Bryan S. K.; Ng, Gladys F.; Ahn, Annie J.

    2009-01-01

    Based on data from 61 Asian American clients at a university counseling center, the study found that client-perceived match on client-counselor belief about problem etiology was related to counselor credibility, empathy, and cross-cultural competence; the client-counselor working alliance; session depth; and the likelihood of the client…

  10. Conditioned Media From Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells Accelerates Healing in 3-Dimensional Skin Cultures.

    PubMed

    Collawn, Sherry S; Mobley, James A; Banerjee, N Sanjib; Chow, Louise T

    2016-04-01

    Wound healing involves a number of factors that results in the production of a "closed" wound. Studies have shown, in animal models, acceleration of wound healing with the addition of adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSC). The cause for the positive effect which these cells have on wound healing has not been elucidated. We have previously shown that addition of ADSC to the dermal equivalent in 3-dimensional skin cultures accelerates reepithelialization. We now demonstrate that conditioned media (CM) from cultured ADSC produced a similar rate of healing. This result suggests that a feedback from the 3-dimensional epithelial cultures to ADSC was not necessary to effect the accelerated reepithelialization. Mass spectrometry of CM from ADSC and primary human fibroblasts revealed differences in secretomes, some of which might have roles in the accelerating wound healing. Thus, the use of CM has provided some preliminary information on a possible mode of action. PMID:26954733

  11. Optimization of cultural conditions for conversion of glycerol to ethanol by Enterobacter aerogenes S012.

    PubMed

    Nwachukwu, Raymond E S; Shahbazi, Abolghasem; Wang, Lijun; Worku, Mulumebet; Ibrahim, Salam; Schimmel, Keith

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this research is to optimize the cultural conditions for the conversion of glycerol to ethanol by Enterobacter aerogenes S012. Taguchi method was used to screen the cultural conditions based on their signal to noise ratio (SN). Temperature (°C), agitation speed (rpm) and time (h) were found to have the highest influence on both glycerol utilization and ethanol production by the organism while pH had the lowest. Full factorial design, statistical analysis, and regression model equation were used to optimize the selected cultural parameters for maximum ethanol production. The result showed that fermentation at 38°C and 200 rpm for 48 h would be ideal for the bacteria to produce maximum amount of ethanol from glycerol. At these optimum conditions, ethanol production, yield and productivity were 25.4 g/l, 0.53 g/l/h, and 1.12 mol/mol-glycerol, repectively. Ethanol production increased to 26.5 g/l while yield and productivity decreased to 1.04 mol/mol-glycerol and 0.37 g/l/h, respectively, after 72 h. Analysis of the fermentation products was performed using HPLC, while anaerobic condition was created by purging the fermentation vessel with nitrogen gas. PMID:23388539

  12. Significantly enhanced production of recombinant nitrilase by optimization of culture conditions and glycerol feeding.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun-Feng; Zhang, Zhi-Jun; Li, Ai-Tao; Pan, Jiang; Xu, Jian-He

    2011-02-01

    The production of a recombinant nitrilase expressed in Escherichia coli JM109/pNLE was optimized in the present work. Various culture conditions and process parameters, including medium composition, inducer, induction condition, pH and temperature, were systematically examined. The results showed that nitrilase production in E. coli JM109/pNLE was greatly affected by the pH condition and the temperature in batch culture, and the highest nitrilase production was obtained when the fermentation was carried out at 37°C, initial pH 7.0 without control and E. coli was induced with 0.2 mM isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactoside at 4.0 h. Furthermore, enzyme production could be significantly enhanced by adopting the glycerol feeding strategy with lower flow rate. The enzyme expression was also authenticated by sodium dodecyl phosphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis. Finally, under the optimized conditions for fed-batch culture, cell growth, specific activity and nitrilase production of the recombinant E. coli were increased by 9.0-, 5.5-, and 50-fold, respectively. PMID:20862583

  13. Optimization of cultural conditions for conversion of glycerol to ethanol by Enterobacter aerogenes S012

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this research is to optimize the cultural conditions for the conversion of glycerol to ethanol by Enterobacter aerogenes S012. Taguchi method was used to screen the cultural conditions based on their signal to noise ratio (SN). Temperature (°C), agitation speed (rpm) and time (h) were found to have the highest influence on both glycerol utilization and ethanol production by the organism while pH had the lowest. Full factorial design, statistical analysis, and regression model equation were used to optimize the selected cultural parameters for maximum ethanol production. The result showed that fermentation at 38°C and 200 rpm for 48 h would be ideal for the bacteria to produce maximum amount of ethanol from glycerol. At these optimum conditions, ethanol production, yield and productivity were 25.4 g/l, 0.53 g/l/h, and 1.12 mol/mol-glycerol, repectively. Ethanol production increased to 26.5 g/l while yield and productivity decreased to 1.04 mol/mol-glycerol and 0.37 g/l/h, respectively, after 72 h. Analysis of the fermentation products was performed using HPLC, while anaerobic condition was created by purging the fermentation vessel with nitrogen gas. PMID:23388539

  14. How can we improve adherence?

    PubMed

    Price, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Many patients with wound healing difficulties are also coping with the management of a chronic disease or chronic condition that requires them to make lifestyle behaviour changes, for example, managing glucose levels through diet and exercise and regular foot inspection. Many find it difficult to make such changes and often experience feelings of powerlessness when faced with a lifetime of behavioural and psychological change. This article will explore the importance of understanding the patient difficulties associated with adherence to a regime and how life changes can be difficult to maintain over sustained periods of time. However, the article will also discuss the importance of this topic in trying to understand the clinical evidence base for treatment--as many clinical trials investigating treatments for the diabetic foot do not include information on the extent to which patients in the trial conformed to the trial protocol. The article gives an overview of recent developments--including lessons we can learn from other chronic conditions where permanent life changes are required--in particular the need to keep health messages simple, tailored to the individual and repeated frequently. The evidence to date suggests that no one single form of adherence intervention will work with all patients; this is not surprising given complex and multifactorial nature of adherence and the myriad of barriers that exist that patients and health care professionals need to overcome. PMID:26453542

  15. Metabolic analysis of antibody producing Chinese hamster ovary cell culture under different stresses conditions.

    PubMed

    Badsha, Md Bahadur; Kurata, Hiroyuki; Onitsuka, Masayoshi; Oga, Takushi; Omasa, Takeshi

    2016-07-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are commonly used as the host cell lines concerning their ability to produce therapeutic proteins with complex post-translational modifications. In this study, we have investigated the time course extra- and intracellular metabolome data of the CHO-K1 cell line, under a control and stress conditions. The addition of NaCl and trehalose greatly suppressed cell growth, where the maximum viable cell density of NaCl and trehalose cultures were 2.2-fold and 2.8-fold less than that of a control culture. Contrariwise, the antibody production of both the NaCl and trehalose cultures was sustained for a longer time to surpass that of the control culture. The NaCl and trehalose cultures showed relatively similar dynamics of cell growth, antibody production, and substrate/product concentrations, while they indicated different dynamics from the control culture. The principal component analysis of extra- and intracellular metabolome dynamics indicated that their dynamic behaviors were consistent with biological functions. The qualitative pattern matching classification and hierarchical clustering analyses for the intracellular metabolome identified the metabolite clusters whose dynamic behaviors depend on NaCl and trehalose. The volcano plot revealed several reporter metabolites whose dynamics greatly change between in the NaCl and trehalose cultures. The elastic net identified some critical, intracellular metabolites that are distinct between the NaCl and trehalose. While a relatively small number of intracellular metabolites related to the cell growth, glucose, glutamine, lactate and ammonium ion concentrations, the mechanism of antibody production was suggested to be very complicated or not to be explained by elastic net regression analysis. PMID:26803706

  16. Optimizing culture conditions for free-living stages of the nematode parasite Strongyloides ratti.

    PubMed

    Dulovic, Alex; Puller, Vadim; Streit, Adrian

    2016-09-01

    The rat parasitic nematode Strongyloides ratti (S. ratti) has recently emerged as a model system for various aspects of parasite biology and evolution. In addition to parasitic parthenogenetic females, this species can also form facultative free-living generations of sexually reproducing adults. These free-living worms are bacteriovorous and grow very well when cultured in the feces of their host. However, in fecal cultures the worms are rather difficult to find for observation and experimental manipulation. Therefore, it has also been attempted to raise S. ratti on Nematode Growth Media (NGM) plates with Escherichia coli OP50 as food, exactly as described for the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Whilst worms did grow on these plates, their longevity and reproductive output compared to fecal cultures were dramatically reduced. In order to improve the culture success we tested other plates occasionally used for C. elegans and, starting from the best performing one, systematically varied the plate composition, the temperature and the food in order to further optimize the conditions. Here we present a plate culturing protocol for free-living stages of S. ratti with strongly improved reproductive success and longevity. PMID:27334397

  17. Nonlinear Dielectric Properties of Yeast Cells Cultured in Different Environmental Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawanishi, Gomon; Fukuda, Naoki; Muraji, Masafumi

    The harmonics of the electric current through yeast suspensions, the nonlinear dielectric properties of yeast cells, have particular patterns according to the biological activity of the cells and the measurement of these patterns is a technique for determining the activity of living cells. The concentration of glucose and oxygen in yeast culture medium influences the manifestation of fermentation or respiration of yeast cells. Measurements were made with yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) cultured aerobically and anaerobically in sufficient glucose concentration, aerobic fermentation and anaerobic fermentation, and aerobically in limited glucose concentration, respiration. The results showed that the harmonics were barely apparent for yeast cells in aerobic fermentation and respiratory; however, cells in the anaerobic fermentation displayed substantial third and fifth harmonics. We can say that environmental condition affects the yeast cells' nonlinear properties, from another viewpoint, the measurements of the nonlinear properties are available to determine the activity of yeast cells adjusted to the conditions of their cultivation.

  18. Adherence to Insulin Therapy.

    PubMed

    Sarbacker, G Blair; Urteaga, Elizabeth M

    2016-08-01

    IN BRIEF Six million people with diabetes use insulin either alone or in combination with an oral medication. Many barriers exist that lead to poor adherence with insulin. However, there is an underwhelming amount of data on interventions to address these barriers and improve insulin adherence. Until pharmacological advancements create easier, more acceptable insulin regimens, it is imperative to involve patients in shared decision-making. PMID:27574371

  19. [Adherence to chronic medication: also a frequent problem in Belgium!].

    PubMed

    Liekens, S; Hulshagen, L; Dethier, M; Laekeman, G; Foulon, V

    2013-12-01

    Medication adherence in chronic conditions such as asthma, type 2 diabetes, heart failure, HIV and cancer appears to be a frequent problem. However, the literature on adherence in patients who use inhaled corticosteroids (ICS), oral hypoglycemic agents, drugs for heart failure, antiretrovirals or oral chemotherapy, contains little or no relevant data for Belgium. In the context of a Master thesis in Pharmaceutical care at KU Leuven, a quantitative study was performed to determine the prevalence of adherence to chronic medication in Belgium. This retrospective, cross-sectional study used a database containing refill data of a regional pharmacists' association (KLAV). Out of the 603 pharmacies affiliated with this association, all 50 pharmacies where HIV medication was delivered, were selected. Dispensing data from the selected pharmacies were collected from 01/07/2008 to 31/12/2009 for five pathologies, i.e.; asthma, type 2 diabetes, heart failure, HIV and cancer. Adherence (TT) was calculated with the Medication Refill Adherence (MRA) method. In order to determine whether there were associations between age, gender, drug class and adherence, Chi-square tests were used. Compared with the other patients, cancer patients were the most adherent in taking their drugs (median adherence rate = 88%). In addition, this was the only group in which the median adherence rate was above the set limit of 80%. The patients who were prescribed inhaled corticosteroids were the least adherent (median adherence rate = 38%). More than 50% of patients with asthma/COPD, heart failure and diabetes were classified as "under-users". Furthermore, the results showed a significant association within asthma patients between gender and adherence. In asthma, type 2 diabetes, heart failure and HIV patients there was a significant relationship between age and adherence and drug class and adherence. As the current study has some limitations, the results should be handled with caution. Nevertheless

  20. Selective advantage of trisomic human cells cultured in non-standard conditions

    PubMed Central

    Rutledge, Samuel D.; Douglas, Temple A.; Nicholson, Joshua M.; Vila-Casadesús, Maria; Kantzler, Courtney L.; Wangsa, Darawalee; Barroso-Vilares, Monika; Kale, Shiv D.; Logarinho, Elsa; Cimini, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    An abnormal chromosome number, a condition known as aneuploidy, is a ubiquitous feature of cancer cells. A number of studies have shown that aneuploidy impairs cellular fitness. However, there is also evidence that aneuploidy can arise in response to specific challenges and can confer a selective advantage under certain environmental stresses. Cancer cells are likely exposed to a number of challenging conditions arising within the tumor microenvironment. To investigate whether aneuploidy may confer a selective advantage to cancer cells, we employed a controlled experimental system. We used the diploid, colorectal cancer cell line DLD1 and two DLD1-derived cell lines carrying single-chromosome aneuploidies to assess a number of cancer cell properties. Such properties, which included rates of proliferation and apoptosis, anchorage-independent growth, and invasiveness, were assessed both under standard culture conditions and under conditions of stress (i.e., serum starvation, drug treatment, hypoxia). Similar experiments were performed in diploid vs. aneuploid non-transformed human primary cells. Overall, our data show that aneuploidy can confer selective advantage to human cells cultured under non-standard conditions. These findings indicate that aneuploidy can increase the adaptability of cells, even those, such as cancer cells, that are already characterized by increased proliferative capacity and aggressive tumorigenic phenotypes. PMID:26956415

  1. Selective advantage of trisomic human cells cultured in non-standard conditions.

    PubMed

    Rutledge, Samuel D; Douglas, Temple A; Nicholson, Joshua M; Vila-Casadesús, Maria; Kantzler, Courtney L; Wangsa, Darawalee; Barroso-Vilares, Monika; Kale, Shiv D; Logarinho, Elsa; Cimini, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    An abnormal chromosome number, a condition known as aneuploidy, is a ubiquitous feature of cancer cells. A number of studies have shown that aneuploidy impairs cellular fitness. However, there is also evidence that aneuploidy can arise in response to specific challenges and can confer a selective advantage under certain environmental stresses. Cancer cells are likely exposed to a number of challenging conditions arising within the tumor microenvironment. To investigate whether aneuploidy may confer a selective advantage to cancer cells, we employed a controlled experimental system. We used the diploid, colorectal cancer cell line DLD1 and two DLD1-derived cell lines carrying single-chromosome aneuploidies to assess a number of cancer cell properties. Such properties, which included rates of proliferation and apoptosis, anchorage-independent growth, and invasiveness, were assessed both under standard culture conditions and under conditions of stress (i.e., serum starvation, drug treatment, hypoxia). Similar experiments were performed in diploid vs. aneuploid non-transformed human primary cells. Overall, our data show that aneuploidy can confer selective advantage to human cells cultured under non-standard conditions. These findings indicate that aneuploidy can increase the adaptability of cells, even those, such as cancer cells, that are already characterized by increased proliferative capacity and aggressive tumorigenic phenotypes. PMID:26956415

  2. Enhanced photo-H₂ production by unsaturated flow condition in continuous culture.

    PubMed

    Guo, Cheng-Long; Cao, Hong-Xia; Guo, Fei-Qiang; Huang, Cong-Liang; Wang, Huan-Guang; Rao, Zhong-Hao

    2015-02-01

    A biofilm photobioreactor under unsaturated flow condition (BFPBR-U) is proposed using a polished optical fiber as the internal light source for photo-H2 production in continuous culture. The main chamber was filled with spherical glass beads to create the reaction bed and the cells were immobilized to form a biofilm under unsaturated flow condition obtained by pumping substrate solution over a packing bed at a rate to create a thin fluid film and injecting the argon to maintain the gas phase space. The effects of operational conditions, including flow rate and influent substrate concentration, on the photo-H2 production performance were investigated. The unsaturated flow conditions eliminated the inhibition caused by high organic loading rate and enhanced light transmission efficiency, leading to an improvement in the photo-H2 production performance. PMID:25257592

  3. USE of pseudomonas stutzeri and candida utilis in the improvement of the conditions of artemia culture and protection against pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Abdelkarim, Mahdhi; Kamel, Chaieb; Fathi, Kammoun; Amina, Bakhrouf

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of two bacterial strains isolated from Artemia cysts and yeast (Candida utilis) on the survival, growth and total biomass production of its larvae, challenge tests were performed with Candida utilis, Pseudomonas stutzeri and Pasteurella haemolityca. In addition, a pathogenic strain of Vibrio alginolyticus was tested for comparative purposes. Pseudomonas stutzeri and Candida utilis have no impact on survival, but enhance growth and total biomass production of the larvae. However, we noted that Pasteurella haemolityca affect negatively Artemia larvae. The adhesion and antagonism assay demonstrates that Candida utilis and Pseudomonas stutzeri are fairly adherent and play an important role in the enhancement of the protection of Artemia culture against pathogens. On the basis of these results, it’s suggested that it’s possible to use Candida utilis and Pseudomonas stutzeri, potential candidates, as probiotic for the culture of Artemia larvae. PMID:24031470

  4. Statistical analysis of optimal culture conditions for Gluconacetobacter hansenii cellulose production

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchens, Stacy A; Leon, R. V.; O'Neill, Hugh Michael; Evans, Barbara R

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of different culture parameters on Gluconacetobacter hansenii (ATCC 10821) to determine which conditions provided optimum cellulose growth. Five culture factors were investigated: carbon source, addition of ethanol, inoculation ratio, pH and temperature. JMP Software (SAS, Cary, NC, USA) was used to design this experiment using a fractional factorial design. After 22 days of static culture, the cellulose produced by the bacteria was harvested, purified and dried to compare the cellulose yields. The results were analyzed by fitting the data to a first-order model with two-factor interactions. The study confirmed that carbon source, addition of ethanol, and temperature were significant factors in the production of cellulose of this G. hansenii strain. While pH alone does not significantly affect average cellulose production, cellulose yields are affected by pH interaction with the carbon source. Culturing the bacteria on glucose at pH 6-5 produces more cellulose than at pH 5-5, while using mannitol at pH 5-5 produces more cellulose than at pH 6-5. The bacteria produced the most cellulose when cultured on mannitol, at pH 5-5, without ethanol, at 20 C. Inoculation ratio was not found to be a significant factor or involved in any significant two-factor interaction. These findings give insight into the conditions necessary to maximize cellulose production from this G. hansenii strain. In addition, this work demonstrates how the fractional factorial design can be used to test a large number of factors using an abbreviated set of experiments. Fitting a statistical model determined the significant factors as well as the significant two-factor interactions.

  5. The antioxidant effect of the Malaysian Gelam honey on pancreatic hamster cells cultured under hyperglycemic conditions.

    PubMed

    Batumalaie, Kalaivani; Qvist, Rajes; Yusof, Kamaruddin Mohd; Ismail, Ikram Shah; Sekaran, Shamala Devi

    2014-05-01

    Type 2 diabetes consists of progressive hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, and pancreatic β-cell failure which could result from glucose toxicity, inflammatory cytokines, and oxidative stress. In the present study, we investigate the effect of pretreatment with Gelam honey (Melaleuca spp.) and the individual flavonoid components chrysin, luteolin, and quercetin, on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), cell viability, lipid peroxidation, and insulin content in hamster pancreatic cells (HIT-T15 cells), cultured under normal and hyperglycemic conditions. Phenolic extracts from a local Malaysian species of Gelam honey (Melaleuca spp.) were prepared using the standard extraction methods. HIT-T15 cells were cultured in 5 % CO2 and then preincubated with Gelam honey extracts (20, 40, 60, and 80 μg/ml) as well as some of its flavonoid components chrysin, luteolin, and quercetin (20, 40, 60, and 80 μM), prior to stimulation by 20 and 50 mM of glucose. The antioxidative effects were measured in these cultured cells at different concentrations and time point by DCFH-DA assay. Pretreatment of cells with Gelam honey extract or the flavonoid components prior to culturing in 20 or 50 mM glucose showed a significant decrease in the production of ROS, glucose-induced lipid peroxidation, and a significant increase in insulin content and the viability of cells cultured under hyperglycemic condition. Our results show the in vitro antioxidative property of the Gelam honey and the flavonoids on the β-cells from hamsters and its cytoprotective effect against hyperglycemia. PMID:23584372

  6. Hypertonic conditions enhance cartilage formation in scaffold-free primary chondrocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Ylärinne, Janne H; Qu, Chengjuan; Lammi, Mikko J

    2014-11-01

    The potential of hypertonic conditions at in vivo levels to promote cartilage extracellular matrix accumulation in scaffold-free primary chondrocyte cultures was investigated. Six million bovine primary chondrocytes were cultured in transwell inserts in low glucose (LG), high glucose (HG), or hypertonic high glucose (HHG) DMEM supplemented with fetal bovine serum, antibiotics, and ascorbate under 5 % or 20 % O2 tension with and without transforming growth factor (TGF)-β3 for 6 weeks. Samples were collected for histological staining of proteoglycans (PGs) and type II collagen, analysis by quantitative reverse transcription plus the polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of mRNA expression of aggrecan and procollagen α1 (II) and of Sox9 and procollagen α2 (I), and quantitation of PGs and PG separation in agarose gels. Cartilage tissues produced at 20 % O2 tension were larger than those formed at 5 % O2 tension. Compared with LG, the tissues grew to larger sizes in HG or HHG medium. Histological staining showed the strongest PG and type II collagen staining in cartilage generated in HG or HHG medium at 20 % O2 tension. Quantitative RT-PCR results indicated significantly higher expression of procollagen α1 (II) mRNA in cartilage generated in HHG medium at 20 % O2 tension compared with that in the other samples. TGF-β3 supplements in the culture medium provided no advantage for cartilage formation. Thus, HHG medium used at 20 % O2 tension is the most beneficial combination of the tested culture conditions for scaffold-free cartilage production in vitro and should improve cell culture for research into cartilage repair or tissue engineering. PMID:25107609

  7. Culture conditions and salt effects on essential oil composition of sweet marjoram (Origanum majorana) from Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Baâtour, Olfa; Tarchoune, Imen; Mahmoudi, Hela; Nassri, Nawel; Abidi, Wissal; Kaddour, Rym; Hamdaoui, Ghaith; Nasri-Ayachi, Mouhiba Ben; Lachaâl, Mohtar; Marzouk, Brahim

    2012-06-01

    O. majorana shoots were investigated for their essential oil (EO) composition. Two experiments were carried out; the first on hydroponic medium in a culture chamber and the second on inert sand in a greenhouse for 20 days. Plants were cultivated for 17 days in hydroponic medium supplemented with NaCl 100 mmol L⁻¹. The results showed that the O. majorana hydroponic medium offered higher essential oil yield than that from the greenhouse. The latter increased significantly in yield (by 50 %) under saline constraint while it did not change in the culture chamber. Under greenhouse conditions and in the absence of salt treatment, the major constituents were terpinen-4-ol and trans-sabinene hydrate. However, in the culture chamber, the major volatile components were cis-sabinene hydrate and terpinen-4-ol. In the presence of NaCl, new compounds appeared, such as eicosane, spathulenol, eugenol, and phenol. In addition, in the greenhouse, with or without salt, a very important change of trans-sabinene hydrate concentration in EO occurred, whereas in the culture chamber change appeared in cis-sabinene hydrate content. PMID:22750822

  8. Optimization of culture conditions of Fusarium solani for the production of neoN-methylsansalvamide.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee-Seok; Phat, Chanvorleak; Nam, Woo-Seon; Lee, Chan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to optimize the culture conditions of Fusarium solani KCCM90040 on cereal grain for the production of neoN-methylsansalvamide, a novel low-molecular-weight cyclic pentadepsipeptide exhibiting cytotoxic and multidrug resistance reversal effects. From the analysis of variance results using response surface methodology, temperature, initial moisture content, and growth time were shown to be important parameters for the production of neoN-methylsansalvamide on cereal grain. A model was established in the present study to describe the relationship between environmental conditions and the production of neoN-methylsansalvamide on rice, the selected cereal grain. The optimal culture conditions were determined at 25.79 °C with the initial moisture content of 40.79%, and 16.19 days of growth time. This report will give important information concerning the optimization of environmental conditions using statistic methodology for the production of a new cyclic pentadepsipeptide from fungi. PMID:25130748

  9. Optimization of culturing conditions for toxicity testing with the alga Oophila sp. (Chlorophyceae), an amphibian endosymbiont.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Gil, José Luis; Brain, Richard; Baxter, Leilan; Ruffell, Sarah; McConkey, Brendan; Solomon, Keith; Hanson, Mark

    2014-11-01

    Eggs of the yellow-spotted salamander (Ambystoma maculatum) have a symbiotic relationship with green algae. It has been suggested that contaminants that are preferentially toxic to algae, such as herbicides, may impair the symbiont and, hence, indirectly affect the development of the salamander embryo. To enable testing under near-standard conditions for first-tier toxicity screening, the authors isolated the alga from field-collected eggs and identified conditions providing exponential growth rates in the apparent asexual phase of the alga. This approach provided a uniform, single-species culture, facilitating assessment of common toxicity end points and comparison of sensitivity relative to other species. Sequencing of the 18s ribosomal DNA indicated that the isolated alga is closely related to the recently described Oophila amblystomatis but is more similar to other known Chlamydomonas species, suggesting possible biogeographical variability in the genetic identity of the algal symbiont. After a tiered approach to culturing method refinement, a modified Bristol's media with 1 mM NH4 (+) as nitrogen source was found to provide suitable conditions for toxicity testing at 18 °C and 200 µmol m(-2) s(-1) photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) on a 24-h light cycle. The validity of the approach was demonstrated with Zn(2+) as a reference toxicant. Overall, the present study shows that screening for direct effects of contaminants on the algal symbiont without the presence of the host salamander is possible under certain laboratory conditions. PMID:25113146

  10. Effect of culture conditions and calcium phosphate coating on ectopic bone formation.

    PubMed

    Vaquette, Cédryck; Ivanovski, Saso; Hamlet, Stephen M; Hutmacher, Dietmar W

    2013-07-01

    This study investigated the effect of a calcium phosphate (CaP) coating onto a polycaprolactone melt electrospun scaffold and in vitro culture conditions on ectopic bone formation in a subcutaneous rat model. The CaP coating resulted in an increased alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP) in ovine osteoblasts regardless of the culture conditions and this was also translated into higher levels of mineralisation. A subcutaneous implantation was performed and increasing ectopic bone formation was observed over time for the CaP-coated samples previously cultured in osteogenic media whereas the corresponding non-coated samples displayed a lag phase before bone formation occurred from 4 to 8 weeks post-implantation. Histology and immunohistochemistry revealed bone fill through the scaffolds 8 weeks post-implantation for coated and non-coated specimens and that ALP, osteocalcin and collagen 1 were present at the ossification front and in the bone tissues. Vascularisation in the vicinity of the bone tissues was also observed indicating that the newly formed bone was not deprived of oxygen and nutrients. We found that in vitro osteogenic induction was essential for achieving bone formation and CaP coating accelerated the osteogenic process. We conclude that high cell density and preservation of the collagenous and mineralised extracellular matrix secreted in vitro are factors of importance for ectopic bone formation. PMID:23623428

  11. Lignolytic enzymes produced by Trametes villosa ccb176 under different culture conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yamanaka, Renata; Soares, Clarissa F.; Matheus, Dácio R.; Machado, Kátia M.G.

    2008-01-01

    The expression of the enzymatic system produced by basidiomycetous fungi, which is involved in the degradation of xenobiotics, mainly depends on culture conditions, especially of the culture medium composition. Trametes villosa is a strain with a proven biotechnological potential for the degradation of organochlorine compounds and for the decolorization of textile dyes. The influence of glucose concentration, addition of a vegetable oil-surfactant emulsion, nature of the surfactant and the presence of manganese and copper on the growth, pH and production of laccase, total peroxidase and manganese-dependent peroxidase activities were evaluated. In general, acidification of the medium was observed, with the pH reaching a value close to 3.5 within the first days of growth. Laccase was the main activity detected under the different conditions and was produced throughout the culture period of the fungus, irrespective of the growth phase. Supplementation of the medium with vegetable oil emulsified with a surfactant induced manganese-dependent peroxidase activity in T. villosa. Higher specific yields of laccase activity were obtained with the addition of copper. PMID:24031184

  12. Oral anticancer agent medication adherence by outpatients.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Michio; Usami, Eiseki; Iwai, Mina; Nakao, Toshiya; Yoshimura, Tomoaki; Mori, Hiromi; Sugiyama, Tadashi; Teramachi, Hitomi

    2014-11-01

    In the present study, medication adherence and factors affecting adherence were examined in patients taking oral anticancer agents. In June 2013, 172 outpatients who had been prescribed oral anticancer agents by Ogaki Municipal Hospital (Ogaki, Gifu, Japan) completed a questionnaire survey, with answers rated on a five-point Likert scale. The factors that affect medication adherence were evaluated using a customer satisfaction (CS) analysis. For patients with good and insufficient adherence to medication, the median ages were 66 years (range, 21-85 years) and 73 years (range, 30-90 years), respectively (P=0.0004), while the median dosing time was 131 days (range, 3-3,585 days) and 219 days (24-3,465 days), respectively (P=0.0447). In 36.0% (62 out of 172) of the cases, there was insufficient medication adherence; 64.5% of those cases (40 out of 62) showed good medication compliance (4-5 point rating score). However, these patients did not fully understand the effects or side-effects of the drugs, giving a score of three points or less. The percentage of patients with good medication compliance was 87.2% (150 out of 172). Through the CS analysis, three items, the interest in the drug, the desire to consult about the drug and the condition of the patient, were extracted as items for improvement. Overall, the medication compliance of the patients taking the oral anticancer agents was good, but the medication adherence was insufficient. To improve medication adherence, a better understanding of the effectiveness and necessity of drugs and their side-effects is required. In addition, the interest of patients in their medication should be encouraged and intervention should be tailored to the condition of the patient. These steps should lead to improved medication adherence. PMID:25295117

  13. Oral anticancer agent medication adherence by outpatients

    PubMed Central

    KIMURA, MICHIO; USAMI, EISEKI; IWAI, MINA; NAKAO, TOSHIYA; YOSHIMURA, TOMOAKI; MORI, HIROMI; SUGIYAMA, TADASHI; TERAMACHI, HITOMI

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, medication adherence and factors affecting adherence were examined in patients taking oral anticancer agents. In June 2013, 172 outpatients who had been prescribed oral anticancer agents by Ogaki Municipal Hospital (Ogaki, Gifu, Japan) completed a questionnaire survey, with answers rated on a five-point Likert scale. The factors that affect medication adherence were evaluated using a customer satisfaction (CS) analysis. For patients with good and insufficient adherence to medication, the median ages were 66 years (range, 21–85 years) and 73 years (range, 30–90 years), respectively (P=0.0004), while the median dosing time was 131 days (range, 3–3,585 days) and 219 days (24–3,465 days), respectively (P=0.0447). In 36.0% (62 out of 172) of the cases, there was insufficient medication adherence; 64.5% of those cases (40 out of 62) showed good medication compliance (4–5 point rating score). However, these patients did not fully understand the effects or side-effects of the drugs, giving a score of three points or less. The percentage of patients with good medication compliance was 87.2% (150 out of 172). Through the CS analysis, three items, the interest in the drug, the desire to consult about the drug and the condition of the patient, were extracted as items for improvement. Overall, the medication compliance of the patients taking the oral anticancer agents was good, but the medication adherence was insufficient. To improve medication adherence, a better understanding of the effectiveness and necessity of drugs and their side-effects is required. In addition, the interest of patients in their medication should be encouraged and intervention should be tailored to the condition of the patient. These steps should lead to improved medication adherence. PMID:25295117

  14. Lymphocyte culture: induction of colonies by conditioned medium from human lymphoid cell lines.

    PubMed

    Galbraith, R M; Goust, J M; Fudenberg, H H

    1977-12-01

    The presence of phytohemagglutinin or pokeweed mitogen in cultures of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in agar is known to stimulate the formation of lymphoid colonies. We now report that similar colonies can be induced in the absence of plant lectins upon addition of filtered and ultracentrifuged conditioned medium (CM) obtained from certain human lymphoblastoid cell lines. Colony formation required at least 6 X 10(5) mononuclear cells per milliliter, and optimum results were obtained at concentrations of 1 X 10(6) cells/ml in the presence of 20% CM (50-500 colonies per 10(6) cells cultured). Individual cells within colonies displayed uniform morphological characteristics of lymphoid cells, and the majority formed rosettes with sheep erythrocytes, suggesting that they were of T-cell type. PMID:303689

  15. Culture Conditions stimulating high γ-Linolenic Acid accumulation by Spirulina platensis

    PubMed Central

    Ronda, Srinivasa Reddy; Lele, S.S.

    2008-01-01

    Gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) production by Spirulina platensis under different stress-inducing conditions was studied. Submerged culture studies showed that low temperature (25°C), strong light intensity (6 klux) and primrose oil supplement (0.8%w/v) induced 13.2 mg/g, 14.6 mg/g and 13.5 mg linolenic acid per gram dry cell weight respectively. A careful observation of fatty acid profile of the cyanobacteria shows that, oleic acid and linoleic acid, in experiments with varying growth temperature and oil supplements respectively, helped in accumulating excess γ-linolenic acid. In addition, cultures grown at increasing light regimes maintained the γ-linolenic acid to the total fatty acid ratio(GLA/TFA) constant, despite any change in γ-linolenic acid content of the cyanobacteria. PMID:24031291

  16. Differentiation of cones in cultured rabbit retina: effects of retinal pigment epithelial cell-conditioned medium.

    PubMed

    Mack, Andreas F; Uhlmann, Daniela; Germer, Angela; Szél, Agoston; Enzmann, Volker; Reichenbach, Andreas

    2003-04-24

    This study was aimed at investigating the postnatal differentiation of cone photoreceptors in the rabbit retina in an organotypic explant culture system. Both short wavelength (S) and middle wavelength (M) cone opsins were expressed in culture but M cones appeared only in retinal explants from the dorsal half of the eye. Stimulating the explants with retinal pigment epithelial cell (RPE) conditioned medium resulted in a suppression of opsin expression despite of an increase of the number of presumptive peanut agglutinin-labeled cones. These results suggest that at birth the immature cones are largely undetermined in terms of their final cone identity although some positional information ('dorsal' vs. 'ventral' retina) is present. Furthermore, factors from RPE may inhibit as well as stimulate different steps of cone cell differentiation. PMID:12676342

  17. Effect of culture conditions on tremorgen production by some Penicillium species.

    PubMed Central

    di Menna, M E; Lauren, D R; Wyatt, P A

    1986-01-01

    Four strains each of seven tremorgenic Penicillium species were grown under various conditions and tested for tremorgen production by intraperitoneal injection of mice and by chemical analysis. Half of the strains had previously been found to be tremorgenic on bioassay after growth on Czapek Dox yeast extract broth or potato-milk-sucrose broth for 3 weeks at 26 degrees C. In the tests reported here nearly all previously nontremorgenic strains were either tremorgenic to mice or produced tremorgens detectable by chemical analysis but did so after longer incubation periods than used in the original screening. Bioassay was not suitable for the estimation of absolute levels but was preferable to chemical analysis when the identity of the tremorgens was not known. Species and strains within species gave different responses to changes in culture medium, incubation temperature, light irradiation, and shaking. Overall, tremorgen production was maximal at 20 or 26 degrees C, increased with time, and was reduced in shaken culture. PMID:3707124

  18. Effect of culture conditions on tremorgen production by some Penicillium species.

    PubMed

    di Menna, M E; Lauren, D R; Wyatt, P A

    1986-04-01

    Four strains each of seven tremorgenic Penicillium species were grown under various conditions and tested for tremorgen production by intraperitoneal injection of mice and by chemical analysis. Half of the strains had previously been found to be tremorgenic on bioassay after growth on Czapek Dox yeast extract broth or potato-milk-sucrose broth for 3 weeks at 26 degrees C. In the tests reported here nearly all previously nontremorgenic strains were either tremorgenic to mice or produced tremorgens detectable by chemical analysis but did so after longer incubation periods than used in the original screening. Bioassay was not suitable for the estimation of absolute levels but was preferable to chemical analysis when the identity of the tremorgens was not known. Species and strains within species gave different responses to changes in culture medium, incubation temperature, light irradiation, and shaking. Overall, tremorgen production was maximal at 20 or 26 degrees C, increased with time, and was reduced in shaken culture. PMID:3707124

  19. Adherence to Sublingual Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Incorvaia, Cristoforo; Mauro, Marina; Leo, Gualtiero; Ridolo, Erminia

    2016-02-01

    Adherence is a major issue in any medical treatment. Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is particularly affected by a poor adherence because a flawed application prevents the immunological effects that underlie the clinical outcome of the treatment. Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) was introduced in the 1990s, and the early studies suggested that adherence and compliance to such a route of administration was better than the traditional subcutaneous route. However, the recent data from manufacturers revealed that only 13% of patients treated with SLIT reach the recommended 3-year duration. Therefore, improved adherence to SLIT is an unmet need that may be achieved by various approaches. The utility of patient education and accurate monitoring during the treatment was demonstrated by specific studies, while the success of technology-based tools, including online platforms, social media, e-mail, and a short message service by phone, is currently considered to improve the adherence. This goal is of pivotal importance to fulfill the object of SLIT that is to modify the natural history of allergy, ensuring a long-lasting clinical benefit, and a consequent pharmaco-economic advantage, when patients complete at least a 3-year course of treatment. PMID:26758865

  20. Culture conditions affect the cholinergic development of an isolated subpopulation of chick mesencephalic neural crest cells.

    PubMed

    Barald, K F

    1989-10-01

    Although neural crest cells are known to be very responsive to environmental cues during their development, recent evidence indicates that at least some subpopulations may be committed to a specific differentiation program prior to migration. Because the neural crest is composed of a heterogeneous mixture of cells that contributes to many vertebrate cell lineages, assessing the properties of specific subpopulations and the effect of the environment on their development has been difficult. To address this problem, we have isolated a pure subpopulation of chick mesencephalic neural crest cells by fluorescence no-flow cytometry after labeling them with monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) to a 75-kDa cell surface antigen that is associated with high affinity choline uptake. When cultures of chick mesencephalic neural crest cells are labeled with these Mabs and a fluorescent second step antibody, approximately 5% of the cells are antigen-positive (A+). After sorting, 100% of the resulting cultured mesencephalic neural crest cells are A+. The Mabs we used also label all of the neurons of the embryonic chick and quail ciliary ganglion in vivo and in vitro. We have compared the effect of various cell culture media on the isolated neural crest subpopulation and the heterogeneous chick mesencephalic neural crest from which it was derived. A+ cells were passaged and grown in a variety of media, each of which differently affected its characteristics and development. A+ cells proliferated in the presence of 15% fetal bovine serum (FBS) and high concentrations (10-15%) of chick embryo extract, but did not differentiate, although they retained basal levels of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) activity. However, in chick serum and high (25 mM as opposed to 7 mM) K+, and heart-, iris-, or lung-conditioned medium, all of which are known to promote survival and/or cholinergic development of ciliary ganglion neurons, the cells ceased to proliferate and all of the cells in the culture became

  1. [Developmental conditions of medicine and spiritual culture at the time of grand Prince Stefan Nemanja].

    PubMed

    Ilić-Tasić, Slobodanka; Ravinić, Dragan; Pantović, Mihailo; Bojanić, Vladmila; Pavlović, Budimir

    2012-01-01

    Medieval medicine and pharmacy were the subjects of numerous researches. The enviable level of health culture and social care of the diseased and debilitated people of the Serbian medieval state was far advanced for the time. However, there are scarce written records of the conditions. The purpose of this paper is to point out the conditions which enabled the foundation of the first Serbian hospitals, development of scientific medicine and spiritual culture in medieval Serbian lands. Favourable conditions for the development of medieval medicine are linked with the arrival of the Nemanjić dynasty to the throne of the Serbian medieval state, i.e. Stefan Nemanja, and later with the life and work of his son Prince Rastko Nemanjić - Saint Sava. The wide field of activity of the Grand Prince Stefan Nemanja included the creation of stable and independent state ("the unifier of all Serbian lands") with a significant and shrewd political activity (vassal to Byzantine Emperor Manuel Comnenus, participation in great alliances against Byzantium), building of churches, defender of the Orthodox Christianity, foundation of the first Serbian hospital outside of borders of Serbian state in Hilandar monastery, social care about people and cultivating literary activity. PMID:22650117

  2. Adherence to Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Treatment for Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Implications for Future Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Terri E.; Sawyer, Amy M.

    2010-01-01

    Adherence to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a critical problem with adherence rates ranging from 30–60%. Poor adherence to CPAP is widely recognized as a significant limiting factor in treating OSA, reducing the overall effectiveness of the treatment and leaving many OSA patients at heightened risk for comorbid conditions, impaired function and quality of life. The extant literature examining adherence to CPAP provides critical insight to measuring adherence outcomes, defining optimal adherence levels, and predicting CPAP adherence. This research has revealed salient factors that are associated with or predict CPAP adherence and may guide the development of interventions to promote CPAP adherence. Over the past 10 years, intervention studies to promote CPAP adherence have incorporated a multitude of strategies including education, support, cognitive behavioral approaches, and mixed strategies. This review of the current state of science of CPAP adherence will (1) synthesize the extant literature with regard to measuring, defining, and predicting CPAP adherence, (2) review published intervention studies aimed at promoting CPAP adherence, and (3) suggest directions for future empiric study of adherence to CPAP that will have implications for translational science. Our current understanding of CPAP adherence suggests that adherence is a multi-factorial, complex clinical problem that requires similarly designed approaches to effectively address poor CPAP adherence in the OSA population. PMID:20308750

  3. Soft-focused extracorporeal shock waves increase the expression of tendon-specific markers and the release of anti-inflammatory cytokines in an adherent culture model of primary human tendon cells.

    PubMed

    de Girolamo, Laura; Stanco, Deborah; Galliera, Emanuela; Viganò, Marco; Lovati, Arianna Barbara; Marazzi, Monica Gioia; Romeo, Pietro; Sansone, Valerio

    2014-06-01

    Focused extracorporeal shock waves have been found to upregulate the expression of collagen and to initiate cell proliferation in healthy tenocytes and to positively affect the metabolism of tendons, promoting the healing process. Recently, soft-focused extracorporeal shock waves have also been found to have a significant effect on tissue regeneration. However, very few in vitro reports have dealt with the application of this type of shock wave to cells, and in particular, no previous studies have investigated the response of tendon cells to this impulse. We devised an original model to investigate the in vitro effects of soft-focused shock waves on a heterogeneous population of human resident tendon cells in adherent monolayer culture. Our results indicate that soft-focused extracorporeal shock wave treatment (0.17 mJ/mm(2)) is able to induce positive modulation of cell viability, proliferation and tendon-specific marker expression, as well as release of anti-inflammatory cytokines. This could prefigure a new rationale for routine employment of soft-focused shock waves to treat the failed healing status that distinguishes tendinopathies. PMID:24631378

  4. Adherence to treatment in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Taddeo, Danielle; Egedy, Maud; Frappier, Jean-Yves

    2008-01-01

    Health care professionals must be alert to the high prevalence of low adherence to treatment during adolescence. Low adherence increases morbidity and medical complications, contributes to poorer quality of life and an overuse of the health care system. Many different factors have an impact on adherence. However, critical factors to consider in teens are their developmental stage and challenges, emotional issues and family dysfunction. Direct and indirect methods have been described to assess adherence. Eliciting an adherence history is the most useful way for clinicians to evaluate adherence, and could be the beginning of a constructive dialogue with the adolescent. Interventions to improve adherence are multiple – managing mental health issues appropriately, building a strong relationship, customizing the treatment regimen if possible, empowering the adolescent to deal with adherence issues, providing information, ensuring family and peer support, and motivational enhancement therapy. Evaluation of adherence at regular intervals should be an important aspect of health care for adolescents. PMID:19119348

  5. Mycelial mass production of fungi Duddingtonia flagrans and Monacrosporium thaumasium under different culture conditions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Duddingtonia flagrans and Monacrosporium thaumasium are promising fungus species in veterinary biological control of gastrointestinal nematodes because of their production capacity of fungal structures (conidia and/or chlamydospores), growth efficiency in laboratory solid media and especially their predatory capacity. However, their large-scale production remains a challenge. This work aimed at evaluating the mycelial mass production of D. flagrans (AC001 and CG722) and M. thaumasium (NF34A) nematophagous fungi under different culture conditions. Results The results did not present significant differences (p > 0.05) in mycelia mass production between the isolates cultured under pH 4.0. Furthermore, after 168 hrs., the isolate CG722 presented a lower production of mycelial mass in medium CM (corn meal) (p < 0.05). Conclusion We therefore concluded the use of culture media SD (soy dextrose) and CG (corn grits) at pH values between 6.0 and 7.0 is suitable for high mycelial mass production of D. flagrans and M. thaumasium. PMID:23985336

  6. Stable maintenance of plasmid in continuous culture of yeast under non-selective conditions.

    PubMed

    Gupta, J C; Mukherjee, K J

    2001-01-01

    A recombinant yeast plasmid containing the gene for beta-galactosidase was tested for stability in a host auxotrophic for leucine. Plasmid loss was studied at different dilution rates in continuous culture under selective as well as non-selective conditions. It was observed that the instability of the culture was higher at low dilution rates in selective medium, while the pattern was reversed when complex non-selective medium was used, with plasmid-containing cells competing effectively with plasmid-free cells at low dilution rates. This was attributed to a low residual yeast extract concentration in the medium at low dilution rates. Since yeast extract was the sole source of leucine, this limited the growth of plasmid-free cells, which were auxotrophic for leucine. Growth rate studies also indicated a competitive advantage of the plasmid-containing cells over the plasmid-free cells at low yeast extract concentrations in semi-defined medium. Using the above data, a modified continuous culture was run using non-selective medium at a low dilution rate of 0.05 h(-1). This resulted in stable coexistence of plasmid-containing and plasmid-free cells and hence sustained expression of beta-galactosidase at approximately 330 OD420l(-1) h(-1) throughout the period of cultivation (134 h). PMID:16233104

  7. Optimization of culture conditions to obtain maximal growth of penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Restrepo, Andrea V; Salazar, Beatriz E; Agudelo, María; Rodriguez, Carlos A; Zuluaga, Andres F; Vesga, Omar

    2005-01-01

    Background Streptococcus pneumoniae, particularly penicillin-resistant strains (PRSP), constitute one of the most important causes of serious infections worldwide. It is a fastidious microorganism with exquisite nutritional and environmental requirements to grow, a characteristic that prevents the development of useful animal models to study the biology of the microorganism. This study was designed to determine optimal conditions for culture and growth of PRSP. Results We developed a simple and reproducible method for culture of diverse strains of PRSP representing several invasive serotypes of clinical and epidemiological importance in Colombia. Application of this 3-step culture protocol consistently produced more than 9 log10 CFU/ml of viable cells in the middle part of the logarithmic phase of their growth curve. Conclusion A controlled inoculum size grown in 3 successive steps in supplemented agar and broth under 5% CO2 atmosphere, with pH adjustment and specific incubation times, allowed production of great numbers of PRSP without untimely activation of autolysis mechanisms. PMID:15932633

  8. Monochloramine Cometabolism by Mixed-Culture Nitrifiers under Drinking Water Conditions.

    PubMed

    Maestre, Juan P; Wahman, David G; Speitel, Gerald E

    2016-06-21

    Chloramines are the second most used secondary disinfectant by United States water utilities. However, chloramination may promote nitrifying bacteria. Recently, monochloramine cometabolism by the pure culture ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, Nitrosomonas europaea, was shown to increase monochloramine demand. The current research investigated monochloramine cometabolism by nitrifying mixed cultures grown under more relevant drinking water conditions and harvested from sand-packed reactors before conducting suspended growth batch kinetic experiments. Four types of batch kinetic experiments were conducted: (1) positive controls to estimate ammonia kinetic parameters, (2) negative controls to account for biomass reactivity, (3) utilization associated product (UAP) controls to account for UAP reactivity, and (4) cometabolism experiments to estimate cometabolism kinetic parameters. Kinetic parameters were estimated in AQUASIM with a simultaneous fit to the experimental data. Cometabolism kinetics were best described by a first-order model. Monochloramine cometabolism kinetics were similar to those of ammonia metabolism, and monochloramine cometabolism accounted for 30% of the observed monochloramine loss. These results demonstrated that monochloramine cometabolism occurred in mixed cultures similar to those found in drinking water distribution systems; therefore, monochloramine cometabolism may be a significant contribution to monochloramine loss during nitrification episodes in drinking water distribution systems. PMID:27196729

  9. Production of mouse monoclonal antibodies which inhibit in vitro adherence of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites.

    PubMed Central

    Ravdin, J I; Petri, W A; Murphy, C F; Smith, R D

    1986-01-01

    Adherence by axenic Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites to mammalian cells is mediated by an N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc)-inhibitable adhesin on the surface of the parasite. We isolated 35 hybridoma cell lines producing antibodies to E. histolytica as indicated by ELISA with sonicated amebic protein or by immunofluorescence assay with fixed whole trophozoites. Tissue culture supernatants were further screened for subcloning by the ability to bind to Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells which were first exposed to a partially purified soluble preparation of the amebic GalNAc-inhibitable lectin. Eight tissue culture supernatants were positive in this assay. Antibodies from four subcloned cell lines (D3-14, H8-5, I12-2, and I1-21) inhibited amebic adherence to CHO cells (P less than 0.01). Of the original 35 tissue culture supernatants, 3 also inhibited amebic adherence (P less than 0.01; F1, F14, and J10); monoclonal antibodies in these supernatants did not bind to lectin-exposed CHO cells. Three purified monoclonal antibodies (H8-5, I12-2, and I1-21) inhibited amebic adherence at greater than or equal to 2 micrograms/10(4) amebae (P less than 0.05). None of these inhibitory monoclonal antibodies immunoprecipitated with a soluble amebic protein preparation following sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under denaturing conditions. Monoclonal antibodies which inhibit in vitro adherence by E. histolytica will be useful in purification of the GalNAc-inhibitable lectin. PMID:2873102

  10. In vivo ectopic bone formation by devitalized mineralized stem cell carriers produced under mineralizing culture condition.

    PubMed

    Chai, Yoke Chin; Geris, Liesbet; Bolander, Johanna; Pyka, Grzegorz; Van Bael, Simon; Luyten, Frank P; Schrooten, Jan

    2014-12-01

    Functionalization of tissue engineering scaffolds with in vitro-generated bone-like extracellular matrix (ECM) represents an effective biomimetic approach to promote osteogenic differentiation of stem cells in vitro. However, the bone-forming capacity of these constructs (seeded with or without cells) is so far not apparent. In this study, we aimed at developing a mineralizing culture condition to biofunctionalize three-dimensional (3D) porous scaffolds with highly mineralized ECM in order to produce devitalized, osteoinductive mineralized carriers for human periosteal-derived progenitors (hPDCs). For this, three medium formulations [i.e., growth medium only (BM1), with ascorbic acid (BM2), and with ascorbic acid and dexamethasone (BM3)] supplemented with calcium (Ca(2+)) and phosphate (PO4 (3-)) ions simultaneously as mineralizing source were investigated. The results showed that, besides the significant impacts on enhancing cell proliferation (the highest in BM3 condition), the formulated mineralizing media differentially regulated the osteochondro-related gene markers in a medium-dependent manner (e.g., significant upregulation of BMP2, bone sialoprotein, osteocalcin, and Wnt5a in BM2 condition). This has resulted in distinguished cell populations that were identifiable by specific gene signatures as demonstrated by the principle component analysis. Through devitalization, mineralized carriers with apatite crystal structures unique to each medium condition (by X-ray diffraction and SEM analysis) were obtained. Quantitatively, BM3 condition produced carriers with the highest mineral and collagen contents as well as human-specific VEGF proteins, followed by BM2 and BM1 conditions. Encouragingly, all mineralized carriers (after reseeded with hPDCs) induced bone formation after 8 weeks of subcutaneous implantation in nude mice models, with BM2-carriers inducing the highest bone volume, and the lowest in the BM3 condition (as quantitated by nano-computed tomography

  11. In Vivo Ectopic Bone Formation by Devitalized Mineralized Stem Cell Carriers Produced Under Mineralizing Culture Condition

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Yoke Chin; Geris, Liesbet; Bolander, Johanna; Pyka, Grzegorz; Van Bael, Simon; Luyten, Frank P.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Functionalization of tissue engineering scaffolds with in vitro–generated bone-like extracellular matrix (ECM) represents an effective biomimetic approach to promote osteogenic differentiation of stem cells in vitro. However, the bone-forming capacity of these constructs (seeded with or without cells) is so far not apparent. In this study, we aimed at developing a mineralizing culture condition to biofunctionalize three-dimensional (3D) porous scaffolds with highly mineralized ECM in order to produce devitalized, osteoinductive mineralized carriers for human periosteal-derived progenitors (hPDCs). For this, three medium formulations [i.e., growth medium only (BM1), with ascorbic acid (BM2), and with ascorbic acid and dexamethasone (BM3)] supplemented with calcium (Ca2+) and phosphate (PO43−) ions simultaneously as mineralizing source were investigated. The results showed that, besides the significant impacts on enhancing cell proliferation (the highest in BM3 condition), the formulated mineralizing media differentially regulated the osteochondro-related gene markers in a medium-dependent manner (e.g., significant upregulation of BMP2, bone sialoprotein, osteocalcin, and Wnt5a in BM2 condition). This has resulted in distinguished cell populations that were identifiable by specific gene signatures as demonstrated by the principle component analysis. Through devitalization, mineralized carriers with apatite crystal structures unique to each medium condition (by X-ray diffraction and SEM analysis) were obtained. Quantitatively, BM3 condition produced carriers with the highest mineral and collagen contents as well as human-specific VEGF proteins, followed by BM2 and BM1 conditions. Encouragingly, all mineralized carriers (after reseeded with hPDCs) induced bone formation after 8 weeks of subcutaneous implantation in nude mice models, with BM2-carriers inducing the highest bone volume, and the lowest in the BM3 condition (as quantitated by nano

  12. Growth and toxin production of Azadinium poporum strains in batch cultures under different nutrient conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, Aifeng; Jiang, Baozhou; Chen, Huidan; Gu, Haifeng

    2016-05-01

    Azaspiracid-2 (AZA2) is the dominant toxin produced by Azadinium poporum strains AZDY06 and AZFC22 isolated from the South China Sea. Biomass and AZA2-production were examined within batch cultures with variation in experimental concentrations of nitrate (0, 88, 882, and 2647µM) or phosphate (0, 3.6, 36, and 109µM), different nitrogen sources (nitrate and urea) and media (f/2-Si, L1-Si, and K-Si) in the present study. Growth of both strains positively responded to nitrate or phosphate nutrients, but the growth status was significantly repressed by the highest additional level of phosphate (109µM). Both AZDY06 and AZFC22 grew well with higher specific growth rates, but with shorter growth periods, within f/2-Si medium spiked with urea than that within media spiked with nitrate. L1-Si medium with relatively high concentrations of trace metals was relatively favorable to both strains of A. poporum tested here. No obvious change within the toxin profile occurred in all cultures of both strains under the various nutrient conditions, although trace amounts of some suspicious derivatives of AZA2 occurred in some cultures. AZA2 cell quotas within both strains significantly (p<0.05) increased at the stationary phase under lower additional phosphate (0 and 3.6µM). Significant differences were not found within AZA2 cell quotas in cultures with additional nitrate ranging from 0 to 2647µM. The highest AZA2 cell quota and maximum AZA2 quantity per culture volume occurred in batch culture at the stationary phase under phosphate concentrations at 3.6µM. Neither A. poporum strain exhibited significant changes in AZA2 cell quotas within f/2-Si media spiked with urea or nitrate as nitrogen sources. The AZA2 cell quota of strain AZDY06 also did not change remarkably within f/2-Si, L1-Si, and K-Si media, however the AZA2 cell quota of strain AZFC22 within L1-Si medium was significantly (p<0.05) higher than that within f/2-Si medium. PMID:26820226

  13. Metabolomic Profiling of 13 Diatom Cultures and Their Adaptation to Nitrate-Limited Growth Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Bromke, Mariusz A.; Sabir, Jamal S.; Alfassi, Fahad A.; Hajarah, Nahid H.; Kabli, Saleh A.; Al-Malki, Abdulrahman L.; Ashworth, Matt P.; Méret, Michaël; Jansen, Robert K.; Willmitzer, Lothar

    2015-01-01

    Diatoms are very efficient in their use of available nutrients. Changes in nutrient availability influence the metabolism and the composition of the cell constituents. Since diatoms are valuable candidates to search for oil producing algae, measurements of diatom-produced compounds can be very useful for biotechnology. In order to explore the diversity of lipophilic compounds produced by diatoms, we describe the results from an analysis of 13 diatom strains. With the help of a lipidomics platform, which combines an UPLC separation with a high resolution/high mass accuracy mass spectrometer, we were able to measure and annotate 142 lipid species. Out of these, 32 were present in all 13 cultures. The annotated lipid features belong to six classes of glycerolipids. The data obtained from the measurements were used to create lipidomic profiles. The metabolomic overview of analysed cultures is amended by the measurement of 96 polar compounds. To further increase the lipid diversity and gain insight into metabolomic adaptation to nitrogen limitation, diatoms were cultured in media with high and low concentrations of nitrate. The growth in nitrogen-deplete or nitrogen-replete conditions affects metabolite accumulation but has no major influence on the species-specific metabolomic profile. Thus, the genetic component is stronger in determining metabolic patterns than nitrogen levels. Therefore, lipid profiling is powerful enough to be used as a molecular fingerprint for diatom cultures. Furthermore, an increase of triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulation was observed in low nitrogen samples, although this trend was not consistent across all 13 diatom strains. Overall, our results expand the current understanding of metabolomics diversity in diatoms and confirm their potential value for producing lipids for either bioenergy or as feed stock. PMID:26440112

  14. Bridging Mediterranean cultures in the IYS: A documentary exhibition on irrigation techniques in water scarcity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barontini, Stefano; Louki, Amina; Ben Slima, Zied; Ezzahra Ghaouch, Fatima; Labaran, Raisa; Raffelli, Giulia; Peli, Marco; Vitale, Nicola

    2015-04-01

    Brescia, an industrial city in Northern Italy, is now experiencing a crucial change in its traditional structure. In recent years in fact it has been elected as living and working seat by many foreigners and it is now one of the cities with the greatest percentage of migrants in the Country. This is an important challenge for the city and an opportunity to merge, compare and integrate different cultures to build its future. In this context some students of different Courses (engineering and medicine), belonging both to the Arabian and local community, met together and with researchers in the study team 'Al-B¯i r¯u n¯i , for culture, science and society'. The team aims at organising cultural events in which, starting from the figure of the Persian scientist Ab¯u Raih. ¯a n Al-B¯i r¯u n¯i (about 973, 1051), the contribution of the Arabian and Islamic culture to the development of the European one in the middle ages is investigated. Moving from the initial idea of the study team Al-B¯i r¯u n¯i and from the suggestions of the World Soil Day 2014 and of the International Year of Soils 2015, we built a documentary exhibition entitled 'Irrigation techniques in water scarcity conditions'. The exhibition, which stresses the importance of the irrigation techniques for the soil conservation, is focused on the idea of disseminating two main concepts, i.e. (1) the technological continuity of some water supply systems in countries, around the Mediterranean Sea, affected by similar conditions of water availability, and (2) the possibility of building environments where, due to severe or extreme climatic conditions, the sustainability is reached when the man lives in equilibrium with the nature. The exhibition, which is written in Italian and will move around in the city during all 2015, consists of about twenty posters organized into three main chapters, corresponding to three main classes of water supply systems which are common in most of the countries surrounding

  15. Transcriptome Sequencing and Gene Expression Analysis of Trichoderma brevicompactum under Different Culture Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Shentu, Xu-Ping; Liu, Wei-Ping; Zhan, Xiao-Huan; Xu, Yi-Peng; Xu, Jian-Feng; Yu, Xiao-Ping; Zhang, Chuan-Xi

    2014-01-01

    Background Trichoderma brevicompactum is the Trichoderma species producing simple trichothecenes-trichodermin, a potential antifungal antibiotic and a protein synthesis inhibitor. However, the biosynthetic pathway of trichodermin in Trichoderma is not completely clarified. Therefore, transcriptome and gene expression profiling data for this species are needed as an important resource to better understand the mechanism of the trichodermin biosynthesis and provide a blueprint for further study of T. brevicompactum. Results In this study, de novo assembly of the T. brevicompactum transcriptome using the short-read sequencing technology (Illumina) was performed. In addition, two digital gene expression (DGE) libraries of T. brevicompactum under the trichodermin-producing and trichodermin-nonproducing culture conditions, respectively, were constructed to identify the differences in gene expression. A total of 23,351 unique transcripts with a mean length of 856 bp were obtained by a new Trinity de novo assembler. The variations of the gene expression under different culture conditions were also identified. The expression profiling data revealed that 3,282 unique transcripts had a significantly differential expression under the trichodermin-producing condition, as compared to the trichodermin-nonproducing condition. This study provides a large amount of transcript sequence data that will contribute to the study of the trichodermin biosynthesis in T. brevicompactum. Furthermore, quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) was found to be useful to confirm the differential expression of the unique transcripts. Conclusion Our study provides considerable gene expression information of T. brevicompactum at the transcriptional level,which will help accelerate the research on the trichodermin biosynthesis. Additionally, we have demonstrated the feasibility of using the Illumina sequencing based DGE system for gene expression profiling, and have shed new light on functional studies of

  16. Conditioned Media from Microvascular Endothelial Cells Cultured in Simulated Microgravity Inhibit Osteoblast Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cazzaniga, Alessandra; Castiglioni, Sara; Maier, Jeanette A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims. Gravity contributes to the maintenance of bone integrity. Accordingly, weightlessness conditions during space flight accelerate bone loss and experimental models in real and simulated microgravity show decreased osteoblastic and increased osteoclastic activities. It is well known that the endothelium and bone cells cross-talk and this intercellular communication is vital to regulate bone homeostasis. Because microgravity promotes microvascular endothelial dysfunction, we anticipated that the molecular cross-talk between endothelial cells exposed to simulated microgravity and osteoblasts might be altered. Results. We cultured human microvascular endothelial cells in simulated microgravity using the rotating wall vessel device developed by NASA. Endothelial cells in microgravity show growth inhibition and release higher amounts of matrix metalloproteases type 2 and interleukin-6 than controls. Conditioned media collected from microvascular endothelial cells in simulated microgravity were used to culture human osteoblasts and were shown to retard osteoblast proliferation and inhibit their activity. Discussion. Microvascular endothelial cells in microgravity are growth retarded and release high amounts of matrix metalloproteases type 2 and interleukin-6, which might play a role in retarding the growth of osteoblasts and impairing their osteogenic activity. Conclusions. We demonstrate that since simulated microgravity modulates microvascular endothelial cell function, it indirectly impairs osteoblastic function. PMID:25210716

  17. Chemosensitivity measurements of human tumour cells by soft agar assays are influenced by the culture conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Endresen, L.; Tveit, K. M.; Rugstad, H. E.; Pihl, A.

    1985-01-01

    To investigate the influence of culture conditions on the in vitro responses of tumour cells to anticancer drugs, the sensitivities observed with the soft agar methods of Hamburger & Salmon (1977) (H-S) and of Courtenay & Mills (1978) (C-M) were compared. In all cases the ID50 values were determined from dose-response curves. Six human tumour cell lines exposed to 10 different agents, and 9 patients' melanomas exposed to 5 different agents, were examined. In the studies of cell lines the H-S method gave higher sensitivity values than the C-M method in 38 out of 52 cases, whereas in 14 cases the results were the same. In the patients' tumours the H-S method gave higher sensitivity in 21 of 35 cases, equal sensitivity in 11, and lower sensitivity in 3 cases. In many instances the ID50 values obtained with the two test systems differed by factors of 10 or more, both in the case of cell lines and tumour specimens. Systematic alterations in the culture conditions indicated that the presence or absence of rat erythrocytes is the most important factor responsible for the differences observed. Also, other factors, such as supplements (in the H-S method) and the use of different serum types, appeared to influence both colony growth and chemosensitivity. PMID:4005141

  18. Enhancing inulinase yield by irradiation mutation associated with optimization of culture conditions

    PubMed Central

    Gou, Yafeng; Li, Jianhua; Zhu, Junbao; Xu, Wanyun; Gao, Jianfeng

    2015-01-01

    A new inulinase-producing strain was isolated from rhizosphere soils of Jerusalem artichoke collected from Shihezi (Xinjiang, China) using Jerusalem artichoke power (JAP) as sole carbon source. It was identified as an Aspergillus niger strain by analysis of 16S rRNA. To improve inulinase production, this fungus was subjected to mutagenesis induced by 60Co γ-irradiation. A genetically stable mutant (designated E12) was obtained and it showed 2.7-fold higher inulinase activity (128 U/mL) than the parental strain in the supernatant of a submerged culture. Sequential methodology was used to optimize the inulinase production of stain E12. A screening trial was first performed using Plackett-Burman design and variables with statistically significant effects on inulinase bio-production were identified. These significant factors were further optimized by central composite design experiments and response surface methodology. Finally, it was found that the maximum inulinase production (185 U/mL) could be achieved under the optimized conditions namely pH 7.0, yeast extract concentration of 5.0 g/L, JAP concentration of 66.5 g/L, peptone concentration of 29.1 g/L, solution volume of 49.4 mL in 250-mL shake flasks, agitation speed of 180 rpm, and fermentation time of 60 h. The yield of inulinase under optimized culture conditions was approximately 1.4-fold of that obtained by using basal culture medium. These findings are of significance for the potential industrial application of the mutant E12. PMID:26413078

  19. Enhancing inulinase yield by irradiation mutation associated with optimization of culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Gou, Yafeng; Li, Jianhua; Zhu, Junbao; Xu, Wanyun; Gao, Jianfeng

    2015-01-01

    A new inulinase-producing strain was isolated from rhizosphere soils of Jerusalem artichoke collected from Shihezi (Xinjiang, China) using Jerusalem artichoke power (JAP) as sole carbon source. It was identified as an Aspergillus niger strain by analysis of 16S rRNA. To improve inulinase production, this fungus was subjected to mutagenesis induced by (60)Co γ-irradiation. A genetically stable mutant (designated E12) was obtained and it showed 2.7-fold higher inulinase activity (128 U/mL) than the parental strain in the supernatant of a submerged culture. Sequential methodology was used to optimize the inulinase production of stain E12. A screening trial was first performed using Plackett-Burman design and variables with statistically significant effects on inulinase bio-production were identified. These significant factors were further optimized by central composite design experiments and response surface methodology. Finally, it was found that the maximum inulinase production (185 U/mL) could be achieved under the optimized conditions namely pH 7.0, yeast extract concentration of 5.0 g/L, JAP concentration of 66.5 g/L, peptone concentration of 29.1 g/L, solution volume of 49.4 mL in 250-mL shake flasks, agitation speed of 180 rpm, and fermentation time of 60 h. The yield of inulinase under optimized culture conditions was approximately 1.4-fold of that obtained by using basal culture medium. These findings are of significance for the potential industrial application of the mutant E12. PMID:26413078

  20. Biomass and nutrient productivities of Tetraselmis chuii under mixotrophic culture conditions with various C:N ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Lin; Wang, Jun; Yang, Guanpin; Zhu, Baohua; Pan, Kehou

    2016-05-01

    Mass microalgal culture plays an irreplaceable role in aquaculture, but microalgal productivity is restricted by traditional autotrophic culture conditions. In the present study, a Tetraselmis chuii strain belonging to the phylum Chlorophyta was isolated from south Yellow Sea. The growth rate and biomass productivity of this strain was higher under mixotrophic conditions with different carbon:nitrogen (C:N) ratios than those under autotrophic conditions. When the C:N ratio was 16, the optical density and biomass productivity were 3.7- and 5-fold higher than their corresponding values under autotrophic culture conditions, respectively. Moreover, T. chuii synthesized more polysaccharides and total lipids under mixotrophic conditions. In addition, T. chuii cultured under mixotrophic conditions synthesized more types of fatty acids than autotrophic culture conditions. At a C:N ratio of 16, the percentage of C16:0 and C18:1 reached 30.08% and 24.65% of the total fatty acid (TFA) content, respectively. These findings may provide a basis for largescale mixotrophic culture of T. chuii, as a potential bait-microalga.

  1. Comparative adherence of granulocytes to endothelial monolayers and nylon fiber.

    PubMed

    MacGregor, R R; Macarak, E J; Kefalides, N A

    1978-03-01

    Adherence of granulocytes to tissue culture monolayers of endothelium averaged 26.2 +/- 1.3% SEM, which was similar to their adherence on 50-mg nylon fiber columns (27.7 +/- 3.6%). In contrast, adherence to epithelial cells, fibroblasts, kidney cells, and plastic Petri dishes without monolayers was only 12.4, 9.9, 11.1, and 4.3%, respectively. Cyclic nucleotides and adherence-modifying plasma factors induced changes of adherence to endothelium similar to those in nylon fiber columns. Adherence of granulocytes in whole blood was the same as for purified granulocytes in Hank's balanced salt solution. Exposure of endothelial monolayers to 0.18% trypsin for 10 min reduced subsequent granulocyte adherence to 25.2% of control values. Incubation of trypsin-treated monolayers with nutrient medium for 4 h did not improve adherence, but values returned to normal or above by 24 h, with or without serum proteins present in the nutrient medium. The similarity of granulocyte adherence to nylon fiber and to endothelial monolayers in vitro suggests that results with the nylon fiber assay reflect in vivo granulocyte-endothelium interaction. Furthermore, the endothelial monolayer offers a new model for studying this cell-cell relationship in vitro. PMID:641148

  2. Propagation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells on Human Amniotic Fluid Cells as Feeder Cells in Xeno-Free Culture Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Juwon; Baek, Jin Ah; Seol, Hye Won; Choi, Young Min

    2016-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have been routinely cultured on mouse embryonic fibroblast feederlayers with a medium containing animal materials. For clinical application of hESCs, animal-derived products from the animal feeder cells, animal substrates such as gelatin or Matrigel and animal serum are strictly to be eliminated in the culture system. In this study, we performed that SNUhES32 and H1 were cultured on human amniotic fluid cells (hAFCs) with KOSR XenoFree and a humanized substrate. All of hESCs were relatively well propagated on hAFCs feeders with xeno-free conditions and they expressed pluripotent stem cell markers, alkaline phosphatase, SSEA-4, TRA1-60, TRA1-81, Oct-4, and Nanog like hESCs cultured on STO or human foreskin fibroblast feeders. In addition, we observed the expression of nonhuman N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5GC) molecules by flow cytometry, which was xenotransplantation components of contamination in hESCs cultured on animal feeder conditions, was not detected in this xeno-free condition. In conclusion, SNUhES32 and H1 could be maintained on hAFCs for humanized culture conditions, therefore, we suggested that new xenofree conditions for clinical grade hESCs culture will be useful data in future clinical studies. PMID:27294211

  3. Nanoparticle growth and surface chemistry changes in cell-conditioned culture medium

    PubMed Central

    Kendall, Michaela; Hodges, Nikolas J.; Whitwell, Harry; Tyrrell, Jess; Cangul, Hakan

    2015-01-01

    When biomolecules attach to engineered nanoparticle (ENP) surfaces, they confer the particles with a new biological identity. Physical format may also radically alter, changing ENP stability and agglomeration state within seconds. In order to measure which biomolecules are associated with early ENP growth, we studied ENPs in conditioned medium from A549 cell culture, using dynamic light scattering (DLS) and linear trap quadrupole electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry. Two types of 100 nm polystyrene particles (one uncoated and one with an amine functionalized surface) were used to measure the influence of surface type. In identically prepared conditioned medium, agglomeration was visible in all samples after 1 h, but was variable, indicating inter-sample variability in secretion rates and extracellular medium conditions. In samples conditioned for 1 h or more, ENP agglomeration rates varied significantly. Agglomerate size measured by DLS was well correlated with surface sequestered peptide number for uncoated but not for amine coated polystyrene ENPs. Amine-coated ENPs grew much faster and into larger agglomerates associated with fewer sequestered peptides, but including significant sequestered lactose dehydrogenase. We conclude that interference with extracellular peptide balance and oxidoreductase activity via sequestration is worthy of further study, as increased oxidative stress via this new mechanism may be important for cell toxicity. PMID:25533102

  4. Nanoparticle growth and surface chemistry changes in cell-conditioned culture medium.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Michaela; Hodges, Nikolas J; Whitwell, Harry; Tyrrell, Jess; Cangul, Hakan

    2015-02-01

    When biomolecules attach to engineered nanoparticle (ENP) surfaces, they confer the particles with a new biological identity. Physical format may also radically alter, changing ENP stability and agglomeration state within seconds. In order to measure which biomolecules are associated with early ENP growth, we studied ENPs in conditioned medium from A549 cell culture, using dynamic light scattering (DLS) and linear trap quadrupole electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry. Two types of 100 nm polystyrene particles (one uncoated and one with an amine functionalized surface) were used to measure the influence of surface type. In identically prepared conditioned medium, agglomeration was visible in all samples after 1 h, but was variable, indicating inter-sample variability in secretion rates and extracellular medium conditions. In samples conditioned for 1 h or more, ENP agglomeration rates varied significantly. Agglomerate size measured by DLS was well correlated with surface sequestered peptide number for uncoated but not for amine coated polystyrene ENPs. Amine-coated ENPs grew much faster and into larger agglomerates associated with fewer sequestered peptides, but including significant sequestered lactose dehydrogenase. We conclude that interference with extracellular peptide balance and oxidoreductase activity via sequestration is worthy of further study, as increased oxidative stress via this new mechanism may be important for cell toxicity. PMID:25533102

  5. Soil adherence to human skin

    SciTech Connect

    Driver, J.H.; Konz, J.J.; Whitmyre, G.K. )

    1989-12-01

    Dermal exposure to soils contaminated with toxic chemicals represents a potential public health hazard. These soils, contaminated with chemicals such as PCBs and dioxins, may be found at various locations throughout the US. Furthermore, dermal contact with pesticide-containing particles and contaminated soil particles is of importance for exposures to agricultural workers who reenter fields after pesticide application. With respect to dermal exposure to pesticide-contaminated particulate matter, several occurrences of human toxicity to ethyl parathion in citrus groves have been reported. These exposures resulted from dermal contact with high concentrations of the toxic transformation product paraoxon in soil dust contaminated as a result of application of pesticide to the overhead foliage of trees. To assess dermal exposure to chemically-contaminated soil at sites of concern, dermal adherence of soil must be determined prior to the assessment of dermal absorption. The purpose of the experiment reported herein was to determine the amount of soil (mg/cm{sup 2}) that adheres to adult hands under various soil conditions. These conditions include the type of soil, the organic content of the soil, and the particle size of the soil.

  6. Optimization of culture conditions for an efficient xeno-feeder free limbal cell culture system towards ocular surface regeneration.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Viji Mary; Prasad, Tilak; Kumary, T V

    2010-10-01

    Ex vivo expansion of limbal stem cells from a small biopsy and its subsequent transplantation is the golden choice of treatment for limbal stem cell deficiency. Use of murine 3T3 feeder layer is a prerequisite for this ex vivo expansion. There is an ever-increasing demand for feeder free cultures to avoid xenotoxicity and transmission of xeno-diseases to human system. This study was aimed to establish an efficient xeno-feeder free limbal culture system towards ocular surface regeneration. To study the effect of initial dispase treatment and culture system used, migratory distance of cells from explants was analyzed from phase contrast images using "interactive measurements" of Qwin software (Leica). Expression of p63 in different culture systems was studied by immunofluorescent staining, followed by quantitative confocal microscopy (Carl Zeiss). Results showed dispase treatment was not necessary for establishing limbal explant culture. A combination of Iscove's modified Dulbecco's medium and Panserin 801 resulted in formation of autofeeder layer with maintenance of progenitor characteristics, thus mimicking natural tissue architecture. Further analysis of this culture system showed that cells could be cultured till confluency. Immunofluorescent staining of ABCG2 revealed presence of stem cell marker in the confluent cell layer. Scanning Electron Micrographs demonstrated homogenous population of tightly packed cells in this culture system. Replacement of bovine serum with autologous serum did not affect morphology or growth of cells in this culture system. This study will be a major step in the development of xeno-feeder free epithelial equivalents towards ocular surface reconstruction. PMID:20196106

  7. Method for Producing Non-Neoplastic, Three Dimensional, Mammalian Tissue and Cell Aggregates Under Microgravity Culture Conditions and the Products Produced Therefrom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor); Wolf, David A. (Inventor); Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor); Prewett, Tracey L. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Normal mammalian tissue and the culturing process has been developed for the three groups of organ, structural, and blood tissue. The cells are grown in vitro under microgravity culture conditions and form three dimensional cells aggregates with normal cell function. The microgravity culture conditions may be microgravity or simulated microgravity created in a horizontal rotating wall culture vessel.

  8. Atrazine degradation by fungal co-culture enzyme extracts under different soil conditions.

    PubMed

    Chan-Cupul, Wilberth; Heredia-Abarca, Gabriela; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Refugio

    2016-05-01

    This investigation was undertaken to determine the atrazine degradation by fungal enzyme extracts (FEEs) in a clay-loam soil microcosm contaminated at field application rate (5 μg g(-1)) and to study the influence of different soil microcosm conditions, including the effect of soil sterilization, water holding capacity, soil pH and type of FEEs used in atrazine degradation through a 2(4) factorial experimental design. The Trametes maxima-Paecilomyces carneus co-culture extract contained more laccase activity and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) content (laccase = 18956.0 U mg protein(-1), H2O2 = 6.2 mg L(-1)) than the T. maxima monoculture extract (laccase = 12866.7 U mg protein(-1), H2O2 = 4.0 mg L(-1)). Both extracts were able to degrade atrazine at 100%; however, the T. maxima monoculture extract (0.32 h) achieved a lower half-degradation time than its co-culture with P. carneus (1.2 h). The FEE type (p = 0.03) and soil pH (p = 0.01) significantly affected atrazine degradation. The best degradation rate was achieved by the T. maxima monoculture extract in an acid soil (pH = 4.86). This study demonstrated that both the monoculture extracts of the native strain T. maxima and its co-culture with P. carneus can efficiently and quickly degrade atrazine in clay-loam soils. PMID:26830051

  9. Optimization of culture conditions for flexirubin production by Chryseobacterium artocarpi CECT 8497 using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Venil, Chidambaram Kulandaisamy; Zakaria, Zainul Akmar; Ahmad, Wan Azlina

    2015-01-01

    Flexirubins are the unique type of bacterial pigments produced by the bacteria from the genus Chryseobacterium, which are used in the treatment of chronic skin disease, eczema etc. and may serve as a chemotaxonomic marker. Chryseobacterium artocarpi CECT 8497, an yellowish-orange pigment producing strain was investigated for maximum production of pigment by optimizing medium composition employing response surface methodology (RSM). Culture conditions affecting pigment production were optimized statistically in shake flask experiments. Lactose, l-tryptophan and KH2PO4 were the most significant variables affecting pigment production. Box Behnken design (BBD) and RSM analysis were adopted to investigate the interactions between variables and determine the optimal values for maximum pigment production. Evaluation of the experimental results signified that the optimum conditions for maximum production of pigment (521.64 mg/L) in 50 L bioreactor were lactose 11.25 g/L, l-tryptophan 6 g/L and KH2PO4 650 ppm. Production under optimized conditions increased to 7.23 fold comparing to its production prior to optimization. Results of this study showed that statistical optimization of medium composition and their interaction effects enable short listing of the significant factors influencing maximum pigment production from Chryseobacterium artocarpi CECT 8497. In addition, this is the first report optimizing the process parameters for flexirubin type pigment production from Chryseobacterium artocarpi CECT 8497. PMID:25979288

  10. Studies of mineralization in tissue culture: optimal conditions for cartilage calcification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boskey, A. L.; Stiner, D.; Doty, S. B.; Binderman, I.; Leboy, P.

    1992-01-01

    The optimal conditions for obtaining a calcified cartilage matrix approximating that which exists in situ were established in a differentiating chick limb bud mesenchymal cell culture system. Using cells from stage 21-24 embryos in a micro-mass culture, at an optimal density of 0.5 million cells/20 microliters spot, the deposition of small crystals of hydroxyapatite on a collagenous matrix and matrix vesicles was detected by day 21 using X-ray diffraction, FT-IR microscopy, and electron microscopy. Optimal media, containing 1.1 mM Ca, 4 mM P, 25 micrograms/ml vitamin C, 0.3 mg/ml glutamine, no Hepes buffer, and 10% fetal bovine serum, produced matrix resembling the calcifying cartilage matrix of fetal chick long bones. Interestingly, higher concentrations of fetal bovine serum had an inhibitory effect on calcification. The cartilage phenotype was confirmed based on the cellular expression of cartilage collagen and proteoglycan mRNAs, the presence of type II and type X collagen, and cartilage type proteoglycan at the light microscopic level, and the presence of chondrocytes and matrix vesicles at the EM level. The system is proposed as a model for evaluating the events in cell mediated cartilage calcification.

  11. Neurite-promoting factor in conditioned medium from RN22 Schwannoma cultures: bioassay, fractionation, and properties.

    PubMed

    Manthorpe, M; Varon, S; Adler, R

    1981-09-01

    On polyornithine (PORN) substrata dissociated 8-day chick embryo ciliary ganglionic neurons will survive if the culture medium is supplemented with Ciliary neuronotrophic Factor. However, neuritic growth will not occur unless the substratum is derivatized with a PORN-bindable Neurite Promoting Factor (PNPF). In this preliminary study we report that soluble PNPF can be (1) assayed by a convenient in vitro system; (2) obtained in relatively large amounts from serum-free media conditioned over RN22 Schwannoma cultures; (3) concentrated by using Amicon XM100 ultrafiltration; and (4) separated from nearly all of the non-active protein by using ion-exchange chromatography. The partially purified PNPF can be concentrated using XM100 and is heat- and protease-sensitive. In the course of these fractionation studies we observed in some cases a concentration-dependent interference with the expression of PNPF activity in the bioassay; we propose graphical methods to permit the simultaneous determination of PNPF and the extent of such interference. Different treatments that affected the interference property did not always affect PNPF activity in a reciprocal manner, leaving open the possibility that the interference with PNPF activity results from reversible alteration of the PNPF molecule, or that there exists a separate interfering agent. PMID:7276956

  12. Re-evaluation of the culture condition of polymorphonuclear cells for the study of apoptosis induction.

    PubMed

    Hiroi, M; Tajima, M; Shimojima, T; Kashimata, M; Miyata, T; Sakagami, H

    1998-01-01

    The culture conditions of human peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) in the study of apoptosis induction were re-evaluated. The changes in the relative viable cell number of PMNs after tumor necrosis factor (TNF) treatment were colorimetrically investigated using a cell counting kit. The relative potency of PMNs to produce the superoxide anion (O2-) was measured as the reduction of color intensity by addition of superoxide dismutase (SOD). When the PMNs were cultured in conventional RPMI1640 medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS), the stimulation effect of TNF on O2- generation by PMNs was observed only for the first 6 hours. When FBS was replaced with human serum, the effect of TNF was maintained for longer incubation periods. Prolonged incubation of PMNs spontaneously produced large DNA fragments, and the extent of DNA fragmentation was relatively smaller in human serum-containing medium. TNF, LPS, hyperthermia or potassium thiocyanate slightly accelerated the production of large DNA fragments, as well as the induction of trace amounts of internucleosomal DNA cleavage in PMNs, which became detectable only after concentration by fractional isopropanol precipitation. The present study suggests the importance of the use of human serum rather than conventional FBS for the study of apoptosis induction in PMNs. PMID:9673409

  13. [Is it possible to "cancel" aging process of cell cultures under optimal conditions for cultivation?].

    PubMed

    Bozhkov, A I; Kovaleva, M K; Menzianova, N G

    2011-01-01

    The characteristics of the cells epigenotypes Dunaliella viridis Teod. in the process of chronological and replicative aging were investigated. By 40th day of accumulative cultivation (which coincided with the stationary growth phase) DNA content in the cells of Dunaliella viridis increased 2 times, triacylglycerides 3 times, beta-carotene and carbonyl proteins 2 times, RNA content decreased in comparison with cells in exponential growth phase, i. e., the 40th day of growth of culture forms the age-related epigenotype. 4 received subcultures were being transplanted during 2 years in mid-logarithmic growth phase (subculture-10), early stationary phase of growth (subculture-20), in the mid-stationary growth phase (subculture-30), and late stationary growth phase (subculture-40). It is shown that epigenotype of subculture-10 remained unchanged over 2 years of cultivation, i. e., it does not manifest replicative aging. At the same time, the subculture-20, although long enough (at least 40 passages), maintained epigenotype characteristic of young cultures, and showed age-related changes. Pronounced age-dependent changes of epigenotype in the course of cultivation were identified for subculture-30, and subculture-40 was characterized by unstable epigenotype. Thus, cultivation conditions determine the intensity of replicative aging in Dunaliella viridis. PMID:21809617

  14. Optimization of culture medium and conditions for penicillin acylase production by Streptomyces lavendulae ATCC 13664.

    PubMed

    Torres-Bacete, Jesús; Arroyo, Miguel; Torres-Guzmán, Raquel; De La Mata, Isabel; Acebal, Carmen; Castillón, M Pilar

    2005-08-01

    The culture medium for Streptomyces lavendulae ATCC 13664 was optimized on a shake-flask scale by using a statistical factorial design for enhanced production of penicillin acylase. This extracellular enzyme recently has been reported to be a penicillin K acylase, presenting also high hydrolytic activity against penicillin V and other natural aliphatic penicillins such as penicillin K, penicillin F, and penicillin dihydroF. The factorial design indicated that the main factors that positively affect penicillin acylase production by S. lavendulae were the concentration of yeast extract and the presence of oligoelements in the fermentation medium, whereas the presence of olive oil in the medium had no effect on enzyme production. An initial concentration of 2.5% (w/v) yeast extract and 3 microg/mL of CuSO4 x 5H2O was found to be best for acylase production. In such optimized culture medium, fermentation of the microorganism yielded 289 IU/L of enzyme in 72 h when employing a volume medium/volume flask ratio of 0.4 and a 300-rpm shaking speed. The presence of copper, alone and in combination with other metals, stimulated biomass as well as penicillin acylase production. The time course of penicillin acylase production was also studied in the optimized medium and conditions. Enzyme production showed catabolite repression by different carbon sources such as glucose, lactose, citrate, glycerol, and glycine. PMID:16118466

  15. Dynamic Culture Conditions to Generate Silk-Based Tissue-Engineered Vascular Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaohui; Wang, Xiuli; Keshav, Vinny; Wang, Xiaoqin; Johanas, Jacqueline; Leisk, Gary; Kaplan, David L

    2009-01-01

    Tissue engineering is an alternative approach for the preparation of small-diameter (<6 mm) vascular grafts due to the potential to control thrombosis, anastomotic cellular hyperplasia and matrix production. This control also requires the maintenance of graft patency in vivo, appropriate mechanical properties and the formation of a functional endothelium. As a first step in generating such tissue-engineered vascular grafts (TEVG), our objective was to develop a tissue-engineered construct that mimicked the structure of blood vessels using tubular electrospun silk fibroin scaffolds (ESFS) with suitable mechanical properties. Human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMCs) and human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) were sequentially seeded onto the luminal surface of the tubular scaffolds and cultivated under physiological pulsatile flow. The results demonstrated that TEVGs under dynamic flow conditions had better outcome than static culture controls in terms of cell proliferation and alignment, ECM production and cell phenotype based on transcript and protein level assessments. The metabolic activity of HCASMCs present in the TEGs indicated the advantage of dynamic flow over static culture in effective nutrient and oxygen distribution to the cells. A matrigel coating as a basement membrane mimic for ECM significantly improved endothelium coverage and retention under physiological shear forces. The results demonstrate the successful integration of vascular cells into silk electrospun tubular scaffolds as a step toward the development of a TEVG similar to native vessels in terms of vascular cell outcomes and mechanical properties. PMID:19232717

  16. Marker expression, behaviors, and responses vary in different lines of conditionally immortalized cultured podocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chittiprol, Seetharamaiah; Chen, Phylip; Petrovic-Djergovic, Danica; Eichler, Tad

    2011-01-01

    The state-of-the-art cultured podocyte is conditionally immortalized by expression of a temperature-sensitive mutant of the SV40 large-T antigen. These cultures proliferate at 33°C and differentiate at 37°C into arborized cells that more closely resemble in vivo podocytes. However, the degree of resemblance remains controversial. In this study, several parameters were measured in podocyte cell lines derived from mouse (JR, KE), human (MS), and rat (HK). In all lines, the quantities of NEPH1 and podocin proteins and NEPH1 and SYNPO mRNAs were comparable to glomeruli, while synaptopodin and nephrin proteins and NPHS1 and NPHS2 mRNAs were <5% of glomerular levels. Expression of Wilms' tumor-1 (WT1) mRNA in mouse lines was comparable to glomeruli, but rat and human lines expressed little WT1. Undifferentiated human and mouse lines had similar proliferation rates that decreased after differentiation, while the rate in rat cells remained constant. The motility of different lines varied as measured by both general motility and wound-healing assays. The toxicity of puromycin aminonucleoside was MS ∼ JR >> KE, and of doxorubicin was JR ∼ KE > MS, while HK cells were almost unaffected. Process formation was largely a result of contractile action after formation of lamellipodia. These findings demonstrate dramatic differences in marker expression, response to toxins, and motility between lines of podocytes from different species and even between similarly-derived mouse lines. PMID:21632959

  17. Effects of culture conditions on growth and docosahexaenoic acid production from Schizochytrium limacinum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Luying; Zhang, Xuecheng; Ren, Xueying; Zhu, Qinghua

    2008-02-01

    The effects of temperature, initial pH, salinity of culture medium, and carbon and nitrogen sources on growth and docosahexaenoic acid (C22: 6 n-3, DHA) production from Schizochytrium limacinum OUC88 were investigated in the present study. The results revealed that the optimal temperature, initial pH and salinity level of the medium for DHA production were 23°C, 7.0 and 18, respectively. Glucose was proved the best carbon source for the growth and DHA production from S. limacinum. Among the nitrogen sources tested, soybean cake hydrolysate, a cheap by-product, was found to be effective for the accumulation of DHA in S. limacinum cells. In addition, increasing the concentration of carbon sources in the medium caused a significant increase in cell biomass; however, accumulation of DHA in cells was mainly stimulated by the ratio of C/N in the medium. Under the optimal culture conditions, the maximum DHA yield achieved in flasks was 4.08 g L-1 after 5 d of cultivation.

  18. Effects of culture conditions on monosaccharide composition of Ganoderma lucidum exopolysaccharide and on activities of related enzymes.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lin; Qiao, Shuangkui; Xu, Zhenghong; Guan, Feng; Ding, Zhongyang; Gu, Zhenghua; Zhang, Liang; Shi, Guiyang

    2015-11-20

    We investigated the relationship between monosaccharide composition of Ganoderma lucidum exopolysaccharide (EPS) and activities of EPS synthesis enzymes under various culture temperatures and initial pH values. The mole percentages of three major EPS monosaccharides, glucose, galactose and mannose, varied depending on culture conditions and the resulting EPS displayed differing anti-tumor activities. In nine tested enzymes, higher enzyme activities were correlated with higher temperature and lower initial pH. Altered mole percentages of galactose and mannose under various culture conditions were associated with activities of α-phosphoglucomutase (PGM) and phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI), respectively, and that of mannose was also associated with phosphomannose isomerase (PMI) activity only under various pH. Our findings suggest that mole percentages of G. lucidum EPS monosaccharides can be manipulated by changes of culture conditions that affect enzyme activities, and that novel fermentation strategies based on this approach may enhance production and biological activity of EPS. PMID:26344261

  19. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for HIV Medication Adherence and Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safren, Steven A.; Hendriksen, Ellen S.; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Mimiaga, Matthew J.; Pickard, Robert; Otto, Michael W.

    2004-01-01

    For patients with HIV, depression is a common, distressing condition that can interfere with a critical self-care behavior--adherence to antiretroviral therapy. The present study describes a cognitive-behavioral treatment designed to integrate cognitive-behavioral therapy for depression with our previously tested approach to improving adherence to…

  20. Cultural conditions on the production of extracellular enzymes by Trichoderma isolates from tobacco rhizosphere.

    PubMed

    Mallikharjuna Rao, K L N; Siva Raju, K; Ravisankar, H

    2016-01-01

    Twelve isolates of Trichoderma spp. isolated from tobacco rhizosphere were evaluated for their ability to produce chitinase and β-1,3-glucanase extracellular hydrolytic enzymes. Isolates ThJt1 and TvHt2, out of 12 isolates, produced maximum activities of chitinase and β-1,3-glucanase, respectively. In vitro production of chitinase and β-1,3-glucanase by isolates ThJt1 and TvHt2 was tested under different cultural conditions. The enzyme activities were significantly influenced by acidic pH and the optimum temperature was 30°C. The chitin and cell walls of Sclerotium rolfsii, as carbon sources, supported the maximum and significantly higher chitinase activity by both isolates. The chitinase activity of isolate ThJt1 was suppressed significantly by fructose (80.28%), followed by glucose (77.42%), whereas the β-1,3-glucanase activity of ThJt1 and both enzymes of isolate TvHt2 were significantly suppressed by fructose, followed by sucrose. Ammonium nitrate as nitrogen source supported the maximum activity of chitinase in both isolates, whereas urea was a poor nitrogen source. Production of both enzymes by the isolates was significantly influenced by the cultural conditions. Thus, the isolates ThJt1 and TvHt2 showed higher levels of chitinase and β-1,3-glucanase activities and were capable of hydrolyzing the mycelium of S. rolfsii infecting tobacco. These organisms can be used therefore for assessment of their synergism in biomass production and biocontrol efficacy and for their field biocontrol ability against S. rolfsii and Pythium aphanidermatum infecting tobacco. PMID:26887223

  1. Cultural conditions on the production of extracellular enzymes by Trichoderma isolates from tobacco rhizosphere

    PubMed Central

    Mallikharjuna Rao, K.L.N.; Siva Raju, K.; Ravisankar, H.

    2016-01-01

    Twelve isolates of Trichoderma spp. isolated from tobacco rhizosphere were evaluated for their ability to produce chitinase and β-1,3-glucanase extracellular hydrolytic enzymes. Isolates ThJt1 and TvHt2, out of 12 isolates, produced maximum activities of chitinase and β-1,3-glucanase, respectively. In vitro production of chitinase and β-1,3-glucanase by isolates ThJt1 and TvHt2 was tested under different cultural conditions. The enzyme activities were significantly influenced by acidic pH and the optimum temperature was 30 °C. The chitin and cell walls of Sclerotium rolfsii, as carbon sources, supported the maximum and significantly higher chitinase activity by both isolates. The chitinase activity of isolate ThJt1 was suppressed significantly by fructose (80.28%), followed by glucose (77.42%), whereas the β-1,3-glucanase activity of ThJt1 and both enzymes of isolate TvHt2 were significantly suppressed by fructose, followed by sucrose. Ammonium nitrate as nitrogen source supported the maximum activity of chitinase in both isolates, whereas urea was a poor nitrogen source. Production of both enzymes by the isolates was significantly influenced by the cultural conditions. Thus, the isolates ThJt1 and TvHt2 showed higher levels of chitinase and β-1,3-glucanase activities and were capable of hydrolyzing the mycelium of S. rolfsii infecting tobacco. These organisms can be used therefore for assessment of their synergism in biomass production and biocontrol efficacy and for their field biocontrol ability against S. rolfsii and Pythium aphanidermatum infecting tobacco. PMID:26887223

  2. Optimization of conditions for the efficient production of mutan in streptococcal cultures and post-culture liquids.

    PubMed

    Wiater, A; Szczodrak, J; Pleszczyńska, M

    2005-01-01

    The strain Streptococcus sobrinus CCUG 21020 was found to produce water-insoluble and adhesive mutan. The factors influencing both stages of the mutan production, i.e. streptococcal cultures and glucan synthesis in post-culture supernatants were standardized. The application of optimized process parameters for mutan production on a larger scale made it possible to obtain approximately 2.2 g of water-insoluble glucan per 11 of culture supernate--this productivity was higher than the best reported in the literature. It was shown that some of the tested beet sugars might be successfully utilized as substitutes for pure sucrose in the process of mutan synthesis. Nuclear magnetic resonance analyses confirmed that the insoluble biopolymer synthesized by a mixture of crude glucosyltransferases was a mixed-linkage (1-->3), (1-->6)-alpha-D-glucan (the so-called mutan) with a greater proportion of 1,3 to 1,6 linkages. PMID:15813222

  3. Treatment adherence among Native Hawaiians living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Ka'opua, Lana Sue L; Mueller, Charles W

    2004-01-01

    Cultural competence is essential in helping people living with HIV cope with the biopsychosocial and spiritual challenges associated with this illness. Efforts to understand the relationship of cultural values and social support practices to health-related behavior have rarely been more critical than in the emerging issue of treatment adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), a multidrug regime that potentially extends the longevity of those living with HIV but may be complex to manage. This article highlights findings from a study on health beliefs, perceived social support, and HAART adherence among Native Hawaiians, a group with historic difficulty in using Western health care services because of cultural conflict. Implications are suggested for social workers and other health care providers in the development of interventions that use cultural preferences to support HAART adherence. PMID:14964518

  4. Treatment Adherence among Native Hawaiians Living with HIV

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ka'opua, Lana Sue I.; Mueller, Charles W.

    2004-01-01

    Cultural competence is essential in helping people living with HIV cope with the biopsychosocial and spiritual challenges associated with this illness. Efforts to understand the relationship of cultural values and social support practices to health-related behavior have rarely been more critical than in the emerging issue of treatment adherence to…

  5. Systematic microcarrier screening and agitated culture conditions improves human mesenchymal stem cell yield in bioreactors

    PubMed Central

    Rafiq, Qasim A.; Coopman, Karen; Nienow, Alvin W.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Production of human mesenchymal stem cells for allogeneic cell therapies requires scalable, cost‐effective manufacturing processes. Microcarriers enable the culture of anchorage‐dependent cells in stirred‐tank bioreactors. However, no robust, transferable methodology for microcarrier selection exists, with studies providing little or no reason explaining why a microcarrier was employed. We systematically evaluated 13 microcarriers for human bone marrow‐derived MSC (hBM‐MSCs) expansion from three donors to establish a reproducible and transferable methodology for microcarrier selection. Monolayer studies demonstrated input cell line variability with respect to growth kinetics and metabolite flux. HBM‐MSC1 underwent more cumulative population doublings over three passages in comparison to hBM‐MSC2 and hBM‐MSC3. In 100 mL spinner flasks, agitated conditions were significantly better than static conditions, irrespective of donor, and relative microcarrier performance was identical where the same microcarriers outperformed others with respect to growth kinetics and metabolite flux. Relative growth kinetics between donor cells on the microcarriers were the same as the monolayer study. Plastic microcarriers were selected as the optimal microcarrier for hBM‐MSC expansion. HBM‐MSCs were successfully harvested and characterised, demonstrating hBM‐MSC immunophenotype and differentiation capacity. This approach provides a systematic method for microcarrier selection, and the findings identify potentially significant bioprocessing implications for microcarrier‐based allogeneic cell therapy manufacture. PMID:26632496

  6. Transformation of trinitrotoluene to triaminotoluene by mixed cultures incubated under methanogenic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, P.; Chow, T.; Adrian, N.R.

    2000-04-01

    2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene (TNT) is an explosive widely used by the military. Although it is no longer manufactured in the US, large amounts of wastewater are generated annually from load, assembly, packing, and demilitarization operations. Granular-activated carbon adsorption is the standard technology for treating wastewater containing TNT and maintaining discharges within the limits established under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System. Studies evaluating biological treatment of pink water with an anaerobic fluidized-bed, granular-activated carbon bioreactor have been promising, but the fate of TNT is unknown. The authors investigated the anaerobic transformation of TNT by biofilm microorganisms obtained from a wastewater treatment plant receiving explosive manufacturing wastewater. The TNT was transformed to a mixture of 2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene; 4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene; 2,4-diamino-6-nitrotoluene; and 2,6-diamino-4-nitrotoluene before culminating in the formation of triaminotoluene (TAT). Triaminotoluene was susceptible to further degradation under anaerobic conditions, but its fate was not determined. Methane formation was inhibited but resumed after the depletion of the diaminonitrotoluene isomers. These studies demonstrate near stoichiometric formation of TAT from TNT and the transformation of 2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene to 2,4-diamino-6-nitrotoluene and 2,6-diamino-4-nitrotoluene by a mixed culture incubated under methanogenic conditions. This evidence indicates TAT is also a likely end-product of TNT biodegradation in the anaerobic fluidized fed bioreactor.

  7. Control of CO₂ input conditions during outdoor culture of Chlorella vulgaris in bubble column photobioreactors.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhi; Phooi, Wei Boon Alfred; Lim, Zi Jian; Tong, Yen Wah

    2015-06-01

    A study on the optimization of CO2 usage during outdoor microalgae cultivation in order to further maximize the CO2 to biomass conversion efficiency is presented. A constant supply of CO2 was found to be non-essential for culturing microalgae outdoors in 80 L (8 L×10 sets) bubble columns. Among the different CO2 input conditions that were studied, 2% CO2 with intermittent supply and 2%+4% CO2 alternation did not affect the algal growth as compared to having a constant supply of 2% CO2. However, during both input conditions, the CO2 to biomass conversion efficiency was doubled while the amount of CO2 used was reduced by 50%. The algal biomass obtained was found to have a higher carbohydrate yield but a lower protein yield as compared to previously published studies. The findings from this study could be applied for large-scale microalgae production so as to minimize cultivation and energy costs. PMID:25817035

  8. Dynamics and cultural specifics of information needs under conditions of long-term space flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feichtinger, Elena; Shved, Dmitry; Gushin, Vadim

    Life in conditions of space flight or chamber study with prolonged isolation is associated with lack of familiar stimuli (sensory deprivation), monotony, significant limitation of communication, and deficit of information and media content (Myasnikov V.I., Stepanova S.I. et al., 2000). Fulfillment of a simulation experiment or flight schedule implies necessity of performance of sophisticated tasks and decision making with limited means of external support. On the other hand, the “stream” of information from the Mission Control (MC) and PI’s (reminders about different procedures to be performed, requests of reports, etc.) is often inadequate to communication needs of crewmembers. According to the theory of “information stress” (Khananashvili M.M., 1984), a distress condition could be formed if: a) it’s necessary to process large amounts of information and make decisions under time pressure; b) there is a prolonged deficit of necessary (e.g. for decision making) information. Thus, we suppose that one of the important goals of psychological support of space or space simulation crews should be forming of favorable conditions of information environment. For that purpose, means of crew-MC information exchange (quantitative characteristics and, if possible, content of radiograms, text and video messages, etc.) should be studied, as well as peculiarities of the crewmembers’ needs in different information and media content, and their reactions to incoming information. In the space simulation experiment with 520-day isolation, communication of international crew with external parties had been studied. Dynamics of quantitative and content characteristics of the crew’s messages was related to the experiment’s stage, presence of “key” events in the schedule (periods of high autonomy, simulated “planetary landing”, etc.), as well as to events not related to the experiment (holidays, news, etc.). It was shown that characteristics of information exchange

  9. Cognitive mediators linking social support networks to colorectal cancer screening adherence.

    PubMed

    Honda, Keiko; Kagawa-Singer, Marjorie

    2006-10-01

    This paper argues that normative considerations are more important than attitudinal factors in engaging colorectal cancer screening, and tests a model explaining how unique cultural expressions of social networks influence screening adherence. Structural equation modeling was used to understand colorectal cancer screening in a population-based sample of 341 Japanese Americans aged 50 and over. The model accounted for 25% of the variance in screening adherence. Adherence was most strongly associated with family/friend subjective norms about colorectal cancer screening use. Emotional family support, but not the size of the networks, was indirectly related to adherence via increased family/friend subjective norms, while emotional friend support was directly related to adherence. While usual source of care was directly associated with adherence, better provider-patient communication was directly and indirectly associated with adherence via increased perceived benefits. The findings of this study support strengthening informal support networks to enhance adherence among Japanese Americans at risk. PMID:16958004

  10. Effect of ionizing radiation on acinar morphogenesis of human prostatic epithelial cells under three-dimensional culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Wang, T; X, S Ma; Kong, D; Yi, H; Wang, X; Liang, B; Xu, H; He, M; Jia, L; Qased, A B; Yang, Y; Liu, X

    2012-01-01

    Homeostasis is maintained by the interplay of multiple factors that directly or indirectly regulate cell proliferation and cell death. Complex multiple interactions between cells and the extracellular matrix occur during acinar morphogenesis and changes in these might indicate carcinogenesis of cells from a normal to a malignant, invasive phenotype. In this study, the human prostatic epithelial cell line RWPE-1 was cultured under three-dimensional (3-D) culture conditions, and the effect of ionizing radiation on acinar morphogenesis and its association with autophagy were discussed. The results illustrated that formation of specific spheroid (acinar) structures was detectable under 3-D culture conditions. Radiation induced the disruption of acini in different cell models using either gene overexpression (Akt) or gene knock-down (Beclin 1 and ATG7). Introduction of Akt not only accelerated the growth of cells (i.e., caused the cells to manifest elongating and microspike-like structures that are obviously different from structures seen in wild-type RWPE-1 cells under two-dimensional conditions), but also changed their morphological characteristics under 3-D culture conditions. Knock-down of autophagy-related genes (Beclin 1 and ATG7) increased the radiosensitivity of cells under 3-D culture conditions, and cells died of non-apoptotic death after radiation. The results suggested that ionizing radiation may change the cell phenotype and the formation of acini. Additionally even the autophagy mechanism may play a role in these processes. PMID:22296497

  11. Low intensity red laser action on Escherichia coli cultures submitted to stress conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, J. N.; Roos, C.; Barboza, L. L.; Paoli, F.; Fonseca, A. S.

    2014-12-01

    Clinical applications of low intensity lasers are based on the biostimulation effect and considered to occur mainly at cells under stressful conditions. Also, although the cytochrome is a chromophore to red and near infrared radiations, there are doubts whether indirect effects of these radiations could occur on the DNA molecule by oxidative mechanisms. Thus, this work evaluated the survival, filamentation and morphology of Escherichia coli cultures proficient and deficient in oxidative DNA damage repair exposed to low intensity red laser under stress conditions. Wild type and endonuclease III deficient E. coli cells were exposed to laser (658 nm, 1 and 8 J cm-2) under hyposmotic stress and bacterial survival, filamentation and cell morphology were evaluated. Laser exposure: (i) does not alter the bacterial survival in 0.9% NaCl, but increases the survival of wild type and decreases the survival of endonuclease III deficient cells under hyposmotic stress; (ii) increases filamentation in 0.9% NaCl but decreases in wild type and increases in endonuclease III deficient cells under hyposmotic stress; (iii) decreases the area and perimeter of wild type, does not alter these parameters in endonuclease III deficient cells under hyposmotic stress but increases the area of these in 0.9% NaCl. Low intensity red laser exposure has different effects on survival, filamentation phenotype and morphology of wild type and endonuclease III deficient cells under hyposmotic stress. Thus, our results suggest that therapies based on low intensity red lasers could take into account physiologic conditions and genetic characteristics of cells.

  12. Screening and characterization of Isochrysis strains and optimization of culture conditions for docosahexaenoic acid production.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin; Sommerfeld, Milton; Hu, Qiang

    2013-06-01

    Isochrysis is a genus of marine unicellular microalgae that produces docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6), a very long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) of significant health and nutritional value. Mass cultivation of Isochrysis for DHA production for human consumption has not been established due to disappointing low DHA productivity obtained from commonly used Isochrysis strains. In this study, 19 natural Isochrysis strains were screened for DHA yields and the results showed that the cellular DHA content ranged from 6.8 to 17.0 % of total fatty acids with the highest DHA content occurring in the exponential growth phase. Isochrysis galbana #153180 exhibited the greatest DHA production potential and was selected for further investigation. The effects of different light intensities, forms, and concentrations of nitrogen, phosphorus, and salinity on growth and DHA production of I. galbana #153180 were studied in a bubble column photobioreactor (PBR). Under favorable culture conditions, I. galbana #153180 contained DHA up to 17.5 % of total fatty acids or 1.7 % of cell dry weight. I. galbana #153180 was further tested in outdoor flat-plate PBRs varying in light path length, starting cell density (SCD), and culture mode (batch versus semicontinuous). When optimized, record high biomass and DHA productivity of I. galbana #153180 of 0.72 g L(-1) day(-1) and 13.6 mg L(-1) day(-1), or 26.4 g m(-2) day(-1) and 547.7 mg m(-2) day(-1), respectively, were obtained, suggesting that I. galbana #153180 may be a desirable strain for commercial production of DHA. PMID:23423326

  13. Proliferation and responsiveness to estrogen of human endometrial cancer cells under serum-free culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Holinka, C F; Anzai, Y; Hata, H; Kimmel, N; Kuramoto, H; Gurpide, E

    1989-06-15

    Studies of hormonal growth regulation in cultured human endometrial cancer cells are limited by the requirement of exogenous growth factors, usually supplied by addition of serum. The present report provides evidence that estradiol can stimulate proliferation of endometrial cancer cells of the Ishikawa line in the absence of serum or added growth factors. Mitogenic effects of estrogen were demonstrated in two different experimental systems, in cells attached to the substratum of mammalian tissue culture dishes, and in cells forming colonies in soft agar under anchorage-independent conditions. Addition of estradiol to a mixture of serum-free, phenol red-free Dulbecco's minimal essential medium and Ham's F-12 medium, supplemented with L-glutamine and 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazineethanesulfonic acid [basal medium: (BM)] significantly increased the proliferation of cells attached to culture dishes. Dose-response experiments revealed maximal estradiol stimulation at 10 nM; significant responses were also observed at 1 nM and at 100 nM concentrations. The mitogenic effect of 10 nM estradiol was comparable to that of 1% charcoal-treated fetal bovine serum and the two effects were additive. The presence of estradiol in serum-free BM resulted in a shortening of the doubling time of exponentially proliferating cells from 38 to 29 h. From the labeling index, measured after exposure to a pulse of [3H]thymidine, and from the mitotic index, both determined in exponentially proliferating cells, the lengths of the S and M phases were calculated to be 11 and 1 h, respectively. From these data it was estimated that estradiol shortened the G1 phase by approximately 40%, from 22 to 13 h. Estradiol doubled the colony formation efficiency of cells plated in BM containing 0.3% agar in the absence of serum as well as in the presence of 1% charcoal-treated fetal bovine serum. The stimulation of colony formation by estradiol was influenced by medium components, since no effects were

  14. Cultural repertoires and food-related household technology within colonia households under conditions of material hardship

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Mexican-origin women in the U.S. living in colonias (new-destination Mexican-immigrant communities) along the Texas-Mexico border suffer from a high incidence of food insecurity and diet-related chronic disease. Understanding environmental factors that influence food-related behaviors among this population will be important to improving the well-being of colonia households. This article focuses on cultural repertoires that enable food choice and the everyday uses of technology in food-related practice by Mexican-immigrant women in colonia households under conditions of material hardship. Findings are presented within a conceptual framework informed by concepts drawn from sociological accounts of technology, food choice, culture, and material hardship. Methods Field notes were provided by teams of promotora-researchers (indigenous community health workers) and public-health professionals trained as participant observers. They conducted observations on three separate occasions (two half-days during the week and one weekend day) within eight family residences located in colonias near the towns of Alton and San Carlos, Texas. English observations were coded inductively and early observations stressed the importance of technology and material hardship in food-related behavior. These observations were further explored and coded using the qualitative data package Atlas.ti. Results Technology included kitchen implements used in standard and adapted configurations and household infrastructure. Residents employed tools across a range of food-related activities identified as forms of food acquisition, storage, preparation, serving, feeding and eating, cleaning, and waste processing. Material hardships included the quality, quantity, acceptability, and uncertainty dimensions of food insecurity, and insufficient consumption of housing, clothing and medical care. Cultural repertoires for coping with material hardship included reliance on inexpensive staple foods and

  15. Reconceptualizing medication adherence: six phases of dynamic adherence.

    PubMed

    Gearing, Robin E; Townsend, Lisa; MacKenzie, Michael; Charach, Alice

    2011-01-01

    Nonadherence is the Achilles' heel of effective psychiatric treatment. It affects the resolution of mental health symptoms and interferes with the assessment of treatment response. The meaning of the term adherence has evolved over time and is now associated with a variety of definitions and measurement methods. The result has been a poorly operationalized and nonstandardized term that is often interpreted differently by providers and patients. Drawing extensively from the literature, this article aims to (1) describe changes in the concept of adherence, drawing from the mental health treatment literature, (2) present a more comprehensive definition of adherence that recognizes the role of patient-provider transactions, (3) introduce dynamic adherence, a six-phase model, which incorporates the role of transactional processes and other factors that influence patients' adherence decisions, and (4) provide recommendations for providers to improve adherence as well as their relationships with patients. PMID:21790266

  16. Adherent endotoxin on dental implant surfaces: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Morra, Marco; Cassinelli, Clara; Bollati, Daniele; Cascardo, Giovanna; Bellanda, Marco

    2015-02-01

    Osteoimmunology is the crosstalk between cells from the immune and skeletal systems, suggesting a role of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the stimulation of osteoclast activity. Endotoxin or bacterial challenges to inflammatory cells are directly relevant to dental implant pathologies involving bone resorption, such as osseointegration failure and peri-implantitis. While the endotoxin amount on implant devices is regulated by standards, it is unknown whether commercially available dental implants elicit different levels of adherent-endotoxin stimulated cytokines. The objective of this work is to develop a model system and evaluate endotoxin-induced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes relevant to osteoclast activation on commercially available dental implants. Murine J774-A1 macrophages were cultured on Ti disks with different level of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) contamination to define the time-course of the inflammatory response to endotoxin, as evaluated by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis. The developed protocol was then used to measure adherent endotoxin on commercially available packaged and sterile dental implants in the "as-implanted" condition. Results show that tested dental implants induce variable expression of endotoxin-stimulated genes, sometimes above the level expected to promote bone resorption in vivo. Results are unaffected by the specific surface treatment; rather, they likely reflect care in cleaning and packaging protocols. In conclusion, expression of genes that enhance osteoclast activity through endotoxin stimulation of inflammatory cells is widely different on commercially available dental implants. A reappraisal of the clinical impact of adherent endotoxins on dental (and bone) implant devices is required in light of increasing knowledge on crosstalk between cells from the immune and skeletal systems. PMID:25699642

  17. Materials Adherence Experiment: Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, P.P.; Landis, G.A.; Oberle, L.G.

    1997-12-31

    NASA`s Mars Pathfinder mission, launched December 4, 1996, reflects a new philosophy of exploiting new technologies to reduce mission cost and accelerate the pace of space exploration. Pathfinder will demonstrate a variety of new technologies aimed at reducing the cost of Mars exploration. Chief among these will be the demonstration of a solar-powered spacecraft on the surface of Mars. The Materials Adherence Experiment on Pathfinder was designed to measure the degradation of solar arrays due to dust settling out of the atmosphere and blocking light to the solar array, lowering the array power output.

  18. Identification of a New Marine Bacterial Strain SD8 and Optimization of Its Culture Conditions for Producing Alkaline Protease

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Hongxia; Yang, Muyang; Wang, Liping; Xian, Cory J.

    2015-01-01

    While much attention has been given to marine microorganisms for production of enzymes, which in general are relatively more stable and active compared to those from plants and animals, studies on alkaline protease production from marine microorganisms have been very limited. In the present study, the alkaline protease producing marine bacterial strain SD8 isolated from sea muds in the Geziwo Qinhuangdao sea area of China was characterized and its optimal culture conditions were investigated. Strain SD8 was initially classified to belong to genus Pseudomonas by morphological, physiological and biochemical characterizations, and then through 16S rDNA sequence it was identified to be likely Pseudomonas hibiscicola. In addition, the culture mediums, carbon sources and culture conditions of strain SD8 were optimized for maximum production of alkaline protease. Optimum enzyme production (236U/mL when cultured bacteria being at 0.75 mg dry weight/mL fermentation broth) was obtained when the isolate at a 3% inoculum size was grown in LB medium at 20 mL medium/100mL Erlenmeyer flask for 48h culture at 30°C with an initial of pH 7.5. This was the first report of strain Pseudomonas hibiscicola secreting alkaline protease, and the data for its optimal cultural conditions for alkaline protease production has laid a foundation for future exploration for the potential use of SD8 strain for alkaline protease production. PMID:26716833

  19. Identification of a New Marine Bacterial Strain SD8 and Optimization of Its Culture Conditions for Producing Alkaline Protease.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hongxia; Yang, Muyang; Wang, Liping; Xian, Cory J

    2015-01-01

    While much attention has been given to marine microorganisms for production of enzymes, which in general are relatively more stable and active compared to those from plants and animals, studies on alkaline protease production from marine microorganisms have been very limited. In the present study, the alkaline protease producing marine bacterial strain SD8 isolated from sea muds in the Geziwo Qinhuangdao sea area of China was characterized and its optimal culture conditions were investigated. Strain SD8 was initially classified to belong to genus Pseudomonas by morphological, physiological and biochemical characterizations, and then through 16S rDNA sequence it was identified to be likely Pseudomonas hibiscicola. In addition, the culture mediums, carbon sources and culture conditions of strain SD8 were optimized for maximum production of alkaline protease. Optimum enzyme production (236U/mL when cultured bacteria being at 0.75 mg dry weight/mL fermentation broth) was obtained when the isolate at a 3% inoculum size was grown in LB medium at 20 mL medium/100mL Erlenmeyer flask for 48h culture at 30°C with an initial of pH 7.5. This was the first report of strain Pseudomonas hibiscicola secreting alkaline protease, and the data for its optimal cultural conditions for alkaline protease production has laid a foundation for future exploration for the potential use of SD8 strain for alkaline protease production. PMID:26716833

  20. Improving adherence to antiretroviral therapy in sub-Saharan African HIV-positive populations: an enhanced adherence package.

    PubMed

    Kunutsor, S; Walley, J; Muchuro, S; Katabira, E; Balidawa, H; Namagala, E; Ikoona, E

    2012-01-01

    With the increasing access to antiretroviral therapy in sub-Saharan African HIV-positive populations, it is important to find additional simple, effective, and feasible methods of improving and maintaining adequately high levels of adherence. In this study, we undertook the development, testing, implementation, and evaluation of various adherence support interventions at four sites in Uganda. A one-group pre- and post-intervention design was employed under routine operational conditions. Various adherence support strategies were identified, adapted, and developed. These strategies which included a combination of elements such as counseling, group education, leaflets, late attendee tracing, and adherence diaries was implemented for an antiretroviral treatment cohort which had baseline levels of adherence measured preintervention. Follow-up was from August 2009 through August 2010. Mean adherence and proportions of clients achieving adherence levels of 95% and above were determined at end of follow-up. Of the 967 participants enrolled, 856 (88.5%) completed follow-up. A before-and-after comparison of outcomes demonstrated that mean adherence (95% confidence interval [CI]) improved statistically significant from baseline following implementation of the interventions (97.4% [96.9-97.9%] to 99.1% [99.0-99.3%], P=0.001). There was also a significant difference between proportions with optimal (≥ 95%) and suboptimal adherence (<95%) pre- and post-intervention (7.0% difference, 95% CI: 4.6-9.4%, P<0.001). We conclude that additional adherence strategies (including counseling, group education, leaflets, late attendee tracing, and adherence diaries) can substantially improve and maintain high levels of treatment adherence in the long term. Health systems in sub-Saharan African countries should consider integrating these elements into their treatment programs for HIV/AIDS. PMID:22621288

  1. Optimization to the Culture Conditions for Phellinus Production with Regression Analysis and Gene-Set Based Genetic Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhongwei; Xin, Yuezhen; Wang, Xun; Sun, Beibei; Xia, Shengyu; Li, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Phellinus is a kind of fungus and is known as one of the elemental components in drugs to avoid cancers. With the purpose of finding optimized culture conditions for Phellinus production in the laboratory, plenty of experiments focusing on single factor were operated and large scale of experimental data were generated. In this work, we use the data collected from experiments for regression analysis, and then a mathematical model of predicting Phellinus production is achieved. Subsequently, a gene-set based genetic algorithm is developed to optimize the values of parameters involved in culture conditions, including inoculum size, PH value, initial liquid volume, temperature, seed age, fermentation time, and rotation speed. These optimized values of the parameters have accordance with biological experimental results, which indicate that our method has a good predictability for culture conditions optimization. PMID:27610365

  2. Optimization to the Culture Conditions for Phellinus Production with Regression Analysis and Gene-Set Based Genetic Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhongwei; Xin, Yuezhen; Wang, Xun; Sun, Beibei; Xia, Shengyu; Li, Hui; Zhu, Hu

    2016-01-01

    Phellinus is a kind of fungus and is known as one of the elemental components in drugs to avoid cancers. With the purpose of finding optimized culture conditions for Phellinus production in the laboratory, plenty of experiments focusing on single factor were operated and large scale of experimental data were generated. In this work, we use the data collected from experiments for regression analysis, and then a mathematical model of predicting Phellinus production is achieved. Subsequently, a gene-set based genetic algorithm is developed to optimize the values of parameters involved in culture conditions, including inoculum size, PH value, initial liquid volume, temperature, seed age, fermentation time, and rotation speed. These optimized values of the parameters have accordance with biological experimental results, which indicate that our method has a good predictability for culture conditions optimization. PMID:27610365

  3. Growth and differentiation of primary and passaged equine bronchial epithelial cells under conventional and air-liquid-interface culture conditions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Horses develop recurrent airway obstruction (RAO) that resembles human bronchial asthma. Differentiated primary equine bronchial epithelial cells (EBEC) in culture that closely mimic the airway cells in vivo would be useful to investigate the contribution of bronchial epithelium in inflammation of airway diseases. However, because isolation and characterization of EBEC cultures has been limited, we modified and optimized techniques of generating and culturing EBECs from healthy horses to mimic in vivo conditions. Results Large numbers of EBEC were obtained by trypsin digestion and successfully grown for up to 2 passages with or without serum. However, serum or ultroser G proved to be essential for EBEC differentiation on membrane inserts at ALI. A pseudo-stratified muco-ciliary epithelium with basal cells was observed at differentiation. Further, transepithelial resistance (TEER) was more consistent and higher in P1 cultures compared to P0 cultures while ciliation was delayed in P1 cultures. Conclusions This study provides an efficient method for obtaining a high-yield of EBECs and for generating highly differentiated cultures. These EBEC cultures can be used to study the formation of tight junction or to identify epithelial-derived inflammatory factors that contribute to lung diseases such as asthma. PMID:21649893

  4. Associations between patient factors and medication adherence: A Jordanian experience

    PubMed Central

    Basheti, Iman A.; Hait, Sami Saqf El; Qunaibi, Eyad A.; Aburuz, Salah; Bulatova, Nailya

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effect of patient characteristics and health beliefs on their medication adherence. Methods: Patients (n=167) with chronic conditions (mean age 58.9; SD=13.54, 53% males) were recruited from March 2009- to March 2010 using a cross sectional study design. Data collected included patients’ demographics, medical conditions, medications therapeutic regimen, frequency of physician visits and health beliefs. Patient self-reported adherence to medications was assessed by the researcher using a validated and published scale. Treatment related problems (TRPs) were evaluated for each patient by competent clinical pharmacists. Associations between patient characteristics/health beliefs with adherence were explored. Results: About half of the patients (46.1%) were non-adherent. A significant association was found between lower adherence and higher number of disease states (p<0.001), higher number of medications (p=0.001), and higher number of identified TRPs (p = 0.003). Patient adherence was positively affected by older age, higher educational level, and higher number of physician visits per month, while it was negatively affected by reporting difficulties with getting prescription refills on time. Conclusion: This study identified different factors that may negatively affect adherence, including higher number of medications and disease states, higher number of identified TRPs and inability to getting prescription refills on time. Hence, more care needs to be provided to patients with complex therapeutic regimens in order to enhance adherence. PMID:27011772

  5. Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1997

    Twelve conference papers on cultural aspects of second language instruction include: "Towards True Multiculturalism: Ideas for Teachers" (Brian McVeigh); Comparing Cultures Through Critical Thinking: Development and Interpretations of Meaningful Observations" (Laurel D. Kamada); "Authority and Individualism in Japan and the USA" (Alisa Woodring);…

  6. Data from two different culture conditions of Thalassiosira weissflogii diatom and from cleaning procedures for obtaining monodisperse nanostructured biosilica.

    PubMed

    Vona, Danilo; Urbano, Laura; Bonifacio, Maria A; De Giglio, Elvira; Cometa, Stefania; Mattioli-Belmonte, Monica; Palumbo, Fabio; Ragni, Roberta; Cicco, Stefania R; Farinola, Gianluca M

    2016-09-01

    Diatoms microalgae produce biosilica nanoporous rigid outershells called frustules that exhibit an intricate nanostructured pore pattern. In this paper two specific Thalassiosira weissflogii culture conditions and size control procedures during the diatoms growth are described. Data from white field and fluorescence microscopy, evaluation of cell densities and cell parameters (k value and R value) according to cell culture conditions are listed. Different cleaning procedures for obtaining bare frustules are described. In addition, FTIR and spectrofluorimetric analyses of cleaned biosilica are shown. The data are related to the research article "Chemically Modified Diatoms Biosilica for Bone Cell Growth with Combined Drug-Delivery and Antioxidant Properties" [1]. PMID:27331108

  7. Systematic Identification of Culture Conditions for Induction and Maintenance of Naive Human Pluripotency

    PubMed Central

    Theunissen, Thorold W.; Powell, Benjamin E.; Wang, Haoyi; Mitalipova, Maya; Faddah, Dina A.; Reddy, Jessica; Fan, Zi Peng; Maetzel, Dorothea; Ganz, Kibibi; Shi, Linyu; Lungjangwa, Tenzin; Imsoonthornruksa, Sumeth; Stelzer, Yonatan; Rangarajan, Sudharshan; D’Alessio, Ana; Zhang, Jianming; Gao, Qing; Dawlaty, Meelad M.; Young, Richard A.; Gray, Nathanael S.; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    Summary Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) of mice and humans have distinct molecular and biological characteristics, raising the question of whether an earlier, “naive” state of pluripotency may exist in humans. Here we took a systematic approach to identify small molecules that support self-renewal of naive human ESCs based on maintenance of endogenous OCT4 distal enhancer activity, a molecular signature of ground state pluripotency. Iterative chemical screening identified a combination of five kinase inhibitors that induces and maintains OCT4 distal enhancer activity when applied directly to conventional human ESCs. These inhibitors generate human pluripotent cells in which transcription factors associated with the ground state of pluripotency are highly upregulated and bivalent chromatin domains are depleted. Comparison with previously reported naive human ESCs indicates that our conditions capture a distinct pluripotent state in humans that closely resembles that of mouse ESCs. This study presents a framework for defining the culture requirements of naive human pluripotent cells. PMID:25090446

  8. Volatile Compounds Originating from Mixed Microbial Cultures on Building Materials under Various Humidity Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Korpi, Anne; Pasanen, Anna-Liisa; Pasanen, Pertti

    1998-01-01

    We examined growth of mixed microbial cultures (13 fungal species and one actinomycete species) and production of volatile compounds (VOCs) in typical building materials in outside walls, separating walls, and bathroom floors at various relative humidities (RHs) of air. Air samples from incubation chambers were adsorbed on Tenax TA and dinitrophenylhydrazine cartridges and were analyzed by thermal desorption-gas chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography, respectively. Metabolic activity was measured by determining CO2 production, and microbial concentrations were determined by a dilution plate method. At 80 to 82% RH, CO2 production did not indicate that microbial activity occurred, and only 10% of the spores germinated, while slight increases in the concentrations of some VOCs were detected. All of the parameters showed that microbial activity occurred at 90 to 99% RH. The microbiological analyses revealed weak microbial growth even under drying conditions (32 to 33% RH). The main VOCs produced on the building materials studied were 3-methyl-1-butanol, 1-pentanol, 1-hexanol, and 1-octen-3-ol. In some cases fungal growth decreased aldehyde emissions. We found that various VOCs accompany microbial activity but that no single VOC is a reliable indicator of biocontamination in building materials. PMID:9687450

  9. Hypoxic Culture Conditions as a Solution for Mesenchymal Stem Cell Based Regenerative Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Nazmul; Rahman, Mohammad Tariqur; Abu Kasim, Noor Hayaty; Alabsi, Aied Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    Cell-based regenerative therapies, based on in vitro propagation of stem cells, offer tremendous hope to many individuals suffering from degenerative diseases that were previously deemed untreatable. Due to the self-renewal capacity, multilineage potential, and immunosuppressive property, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are considered as an attractive source of stem cells for regenerative therapies. However, poor growth kinetics, early senescence, and genetic instability during in vitro expansion and poor engraftment after transplantation are considered to be among the major disadvantages of MSC-based regenerative therapies. A number of complex inter- and intracellular interactive signaling systems control growth, multiplication, and differentiation of MSCs in their niche. Common laboratory conditions for stem cell culture involve ambient O2 concentration (20%) in contrast to their niche where they usually reside in 2–9% O2. Notably, O2 plays an important role in maintaining stem cell fate in terms of proliferation and differentiation, by regulating hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) mediated expression of different genes. This paper aims to describe and compare the role of normoxia (20% O2) and hypoxia (2–9% O2) on the biology of MSCs. Finally it is concluded that a hypoxic environment can greatly improve growth kinetics, genetic stability, and expression of chemokine receptors during in vitro expansion and eventually can increase efficiency of MSC-based regenerative therapies. PMID:24068884

  10. Fast screening of Bifidobacterium longum sublethal stress conditions in a novel two-stage continuous culture strategy.

    PubMed

    Mozzetti, V; Grattepanche, F; Berger, B; Rezzonico, E; Arigoni, F; Lacroix, C

    2013-06-01

    A central issue in the application of probiotics as food additives is their fastidious production and their sensitivity to many environmental stresses. The importance of inducible cell-protective mechanisms triggered by application of sublethal stresses for survival under stress conditions has been demonstrated. Continuous cultures could be a suitable and more efficient method to test stress factors on one culture instead of several repeated batch cultures. In this study, the application of a two-stage continuous culture of Bifidobacterium longum NCC2705 was investigated. The first reactor was operated under fixed conditions at 37 °C and pH 6.0 and used to produce cells with controlled physiology, mimicking cells in the late exponential growth phase. Stress pretreatment combinations of pH (6.0, 5.0 and 4.0), temperature (37, 45 and 47 °C) and NaCl (0, 5 and 10%) were tested in the second reactor. Of all tested combinations, only those of pH 4.0 significantly decreased cell viability in the second reactor compared to control conditions (37 °C, pH 6.0, 0% NaCl) and, therefore, could not be considered as sublethal stresses. Pretreatments with 5 or 10% NaCl had a negative effect on cell viability after gastric lethal stress. A significant improvement in cell resistance to heat lethal stress (56 °C, 5 min) was observed for cells pretreated at 47 °C. In contrast, heat pretreatment negatively affected cell viability after freeze drying and osmotic lethal stresses. The two-stage continuous culture allowed for efficient screening of several stress pretreatments during the same experiment with up to four different conditions tested per day. Optimal sublethal stress conditions can also be applied for producing cells with traditional batch cultures. PMID:23443949

  11. Developments in techniques for the isolation, enrichment, main culture conditions and identification of spermatogonial stem cells.

    PubMed

    He, Yanan; Chen, Xiaoli; Zhu, Huabin; Wang, Dong

    2015-12-01

    The in vitro culture system of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) provides a basis for studies on spermatogenesis, and also contributes to the development of new methods for the preservation of livestock and animal genetic modification. In vitro culture systems have mainly been established for mouse SSCs, but are lacking for farm animals. We reviewed and analyzed the current progress in SSC techniques such as isolation, purification, cultivation and identification. Based on the published studies, we concluded that two-step enzyme digestion and magnetic-activated cell sorting are fast becoming the main methods for isolation and enrichment of SSCs. With regard to the culture systems, serum and feeders were earlier thought to play an important role in the self-renewal and proliferation of SSCs, but serum- and feeder-free culture systems as a means of overcoming the limitations of SSC differentiation in long-term SSC culture are being explored. However, there is still a need to establish more efficient and ideal culture systems that can also be used for SSC culture in larger mammals. Although the lack of SSC-specific surface markers has seriously affected the efficiency of purification and identification, the transgenic study is helpful for our identification of SSCs. Therefore, future studies on SSC techniques should focus on improving serum- and feeder-free culture techniques, and discovering and identifying specific surface markers of SSCs, which will provide new ideas for the optimization of SSC culture systems for mice and promote related studies in farm animals. PMID:25749914

  12. Primary isolation of Mycobacterium bovis from bovine tissues: conditions for maximising the number of positive cultures.

    PubMed

    Corner, L A L; Gormley, E; Pfeiffer, D U

    2012-04-23

    In studies of Mycobacterium bovis infection in animals a definitive diagnosis requires the isolation of the organism. However, the optimum conditions for the primary isolation of M. bovis have not been determined. The aim of this study was to determine for primary isolation of M. bovis, (a) the incubation time required to achieve maximum sensitivity (i.e., the number of positive samples identified), (b) the effect of decontaminants on bacterial growth rates, and (c) the influence of media and the number of slopes of media on the number of positive samples detected. Two agar-based media, modified Middlebrook 7H11 (7H11) and tuberculosis blood agar (B83), and an egg-based medium, Stonebrink's (SB) were compared. Three decontaminants, 2% (w/v) sodium hydroxide (NaOH), 0.75% (w/v) and 0.075% (w/v) cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC, also called hexadecylpyridinium chloride, HPC) and 0.5% (w/v) benzalkonium chloride (BC) were evaluated against treatment with sterile distilled water. The inoculated media slopes were incubated for up to 15 weeks. Colonies first appeared after 2 weeks on all media types and 75% of positive slopes were identified by 8 weeks. An incubation time of 15 weeks was required to identify all positive samples. The slowest growth was associated with inocula that contained the fewest viable bacilli. The time to the appearance of colonies was influenced by medium type: the median time to detection of colonies was 28 days on 7H11 and B83, and 36 days on SB. However, SB returned the greatest number of positive samples. Decontamination procedures increased the minimum incubation time required to detect positive cultures, probably due to the toxic effect of the decontaminants. Increasing the number of inoculated slopes resulted in an increased number of positive samples and a decreased time to the detection of colonies. Overall, the detection of M. bovis was significantly influenced by the choice of media, the decontaminant and the duration of incubation of

  13. Pretreatments, conditioned medium and co-culture increase the incidence of somatic embryogenesis of different Cichorium species

    PubMed Central

    Couillerot, Jean-Paul; Windels, David; Vazquez, Franck; Michalski, Jean-Claude; Hilbert, Jean-Louis; Blervacq, Anne-Sophie

    2012-01-01

    Somatic embryogenesis (SE) in Cichorium involves dedifferentiation and redifferentiation of single cells and can be induced by specific in vitro culture conditions. We have tested the effect of various treatments on the incidence of SE (ISE) of an interspecific embryogenic hybrid (C. endivia x C. intybus) and of different commercial chicories (C. endivia and C. intybus) that are typically recalcitrant to SE in standard culture conditions. We found that the ISE of the hybrid is significantly increased by pretreatment of tissues by submersion in solutions of glycerol, abscisic acid, spermine, putrescine or of combinations of these compounds. Interestingly, the most efficient of these pretreatments also had an unexpectedly high effect on the ISE of the C. intybus cultivars. The ISE of the hybrid and of the commercial chicories were increased when explants were co-cultured with highly embryogenic chicory explants or when they were cultured in conditioned medium. These observations established that unidentified SE-promoting factors are released in the culture medium. HPLC analyses of secreted Arabino-Galactan Proteins (AGPs), which are known to stimulate SE, did not allow identifying a fraction containing differentially abundant AGP candidates. However, pointing to their role in promoting SE, we found that the hybrid had a drastically higher ISE when amino sugars and L-Proline, the putative precursors of secreted AGPs, were both added to the medium. PMID:22301978

  14. Interventional tools to improve medication adherence: review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Elísio; Giardini, Anna; Savin, Magda; Menditto, Enrica; Lehane, Elaine; Laosa, Olga; Pecorelli, Sergio; Monaco, Alessandro; Marengoni, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Medication adherence and persistence is recognized as a worldwide public health problem, particularly important in the management of chronic diseases. Nonadherence to medical plans affects every level of the population, but particularly older adults due to the high number of coexisting diseases they are affected by and the consequent polypharmacy. Chronic disease management requires a continuous psychological adaptation and behavioral reorganization. In literature, many interventions to improve medication adherence have been described for different clinical conditions, however, most interventions seem to fail in their aims. Moreover, most interventions associated with adherence improvements are not associated with improvements in other outcomes. Indeed, in the last decades, the degree of nonadherence remained unchanged. In this work, we review the most frequent interventions employed to increase the degree of medication adherence, the measured outcomes, and the improvements achieved, as well as the main limitations of the available studies on adherence, with a particular focus on older persons. PMID:26396502

  15. Nature conditionings of the cultural landscape in the area between the Ropa and Wisłok rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soszyński, Dawid

    2011-01-01

    The principal aim of the dissertation was to analyze the influence of natural environment components on main elements of the cultural landscape. The characteristics of each component were presented separately for the three main types of physiographic regions: mountains, foothills and depressions. Additionally, in selected cases, the analyses of cultural landscape evolution during the last centuries were presented. The research area is located between the Ropa and the Wisłok rivers in Beskid Niski and Doły Jasielsko-Sanockie - two regions in SE part of Poland. Besides, three small drainage basins were chosen for detailed investigation. The main method applied in dissertation, especially in spatial landscape structure research, was a cartographic analysis in GIS system. The elements of the cultural landscape described in this paper were: main communication routes, settlement patterns and dwellings (including spatial settlement distribution, country buildings, sacral landscape, industrial buildings) as well as land use. According to the research carried out in this work, the component of the natural environment which has had the most significant influence on the cultural landscape is land relief, especially land slopes. The impact of this factor is leading on all elements of the cultural landscape. The other factors (surface and ground waters, climate, soils, natural resources) have had a significant influence only on some of the analyzed elements. The elements of the cultural landscape which are most dependent on natural factors are spatial settlement distribution and the pattern of land use. In case of other cultural landscape elements, natural factors play less important but still significant role. The research proved that natural conditionings of the cultural landscape are less clear in the depression area and most clear within foothills and mountain areas, depending on analyzed cultural elements. A decrease of correlation intensity between natural and cultural

  16. [Adherence to psychopharmacological treatment: Psychotherapeutic strategies to enhance adherence].

    PubMed

    Lencer, R; Korn, D

    2015-05-01

    Effective psychopharmacological medication with good tolerability represents the cornerstone of treatment for severe mental illness; however, the 1-year adherence rates are only approximately 50%. The term adherence emphasizes the collaborative responsibility of the clinician and the patient for a positive treatment outcome. Reasons for non-adherence are manifold and include patient-specific factors, such as self-stigmatization, lack of social and familial support, cognitive impairment and substance use besides insufficient effectiveness and the occurrence of side effects of the psychotropic drugs. To enhance adherence, both clinician and patient have to fully understand all the reasons for and against adherence to medication before a collaborative decision is made on future long-term treatment. A positive attitude towards medication critically depends on whether patients feel that the medication supports the attainment of the individual goals. PMID:25903501

  17. Increased Risk of Genetic and Epigenetic Instability in Human Embryonic Stem Cells Associated with Specific Culture Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Garitaonandia, Ibon; Amir, Hadar; Boscolo, Francesca Sesillo; Wambua, Gerald K.; Schultheisz, Heather L.; Sabatini, Karen; Morey, Robert; Waltz, Shannon; Wang, Yu-Chieh; Tran, Ha; Leonardo, Trevor R.; Nazor, Kristopher; Slavin, Ileana; Lynch, Candace; Li, Yingchun; Coleman, Ronald; Gallego Romero, Irene; Altun, Gulsah; Reynolds, David; Dalton, Stephen; Parast, Mana; Loring, Jeanne F.; Laurent, Louise C.

    2015-01-01

    The self-renewal and differentiation capacities of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) make them a promising source of material for cell transplantation therapy, drug development, and studies of cellular differentiation and development. However, the large numbers of cells necessary for many of these applications require extensive expansion of hPSC cultures, a process that has been associated with genetic and epigenetic alterations. We have performed a combinatorial study on both hESCs and hiPSCs to compare the effects of enzymatic vs. mechanical passaging, and feeder-free vs. mouse embryonic fibroblast feeder substrate, on the genetic and epigenetic stability and the phenotypic characteristics of hPSCs. In extensive experiments involving over 100 continuous passages, we observed that both enzymatic passaging and feeder-free culture were associated with genetic instability, higher rates of cell proliferation, and persistence of OCT4/POU5F1-positive cells in teratomas, with enzymatic passaging having the stronger effect. In all combinations of culture conditions except for mechanical passaging on feeder layers, we noted recurrent deletions in the genomic region containing the tumor suppressor gene TP53, which was associated with decreased mRNA expression of TP53, as well as alterations in the expression of several downstream genes consistent with a decrease in the activity of the TP53 pathway. Among the hESC cultures, we also observed culture-associated variations in global gene expression and DNA methylation. The effects of enzymatic passaging and feeder-free conditions were also observed in hiPSC cultures. Our results highlight the need for careful assessment of the effects of culture conditions on cells intended for clinical therapies. PMID:25714340

  18. Anaerobic Biodegradation Of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether Under Iron-Reducing Conditions In Batch And Continuous-Flow Cultures

    EPA Science Inventory

    The feasibility of biodegradation of the fuel oxygenate methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) under iron-reducing conditions was explored in batch and continuous-flow systems. A porous pot completely-mixed reactor was seeded with diverse cultures and operated under iron-reducing...

  19. Culture Conditions for Production of Biomass, Adenosine, and Cordycepin from Cordyceps sinensis CS1197: Optimization by Desirability Function Method

    PubMed Central

    Ghatnur, Shashidhar M.; Parvatam, Giridhar; Balaraman, Manohar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cordyceps sinensis (CS) is a traditional Chinese medicine contains potent active metabolites such as nucleosides and polysaccharides. The submerged cultivation technique is studied for the large scale production of CS for biomass and metabolites production. Objective: To optimize culture conditions for large-scale production of CS1197 biomass and metabolites production. Materials and Methods: The CS1197 strain of CS was isolated from dead larvae of natural CS and the authenticity was assured by the presence of two major markers adenosine and cordycepin by high performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. A three-level Box-Behnken design was employed to optimize process parameters culturing temperature, pH, and inoculum volume for the biomass yield, adenosine and cordycepin. The experimental results were regressed to a second-order polynomial equation by a multiple regression analysis for the prediction of biomass yield, adenosine and cordycepin production. Multiple responses were optimized based on desirability function method. Results: The desirability function suggested the process conditions temperature 28°C, pH 7 and inoculum volume 10% for optimal production of nutraceuticals in the biomass. The water extracts from dried CS1197 mycelia showed good inhibition for 2 diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl and 2,2-azinobis-(3-ethyl-benzo-thiazoline-6-sulfonic acid-free radicals. Conclusion: The result suggests that response surface methodology-desirability function coupled approach can successfully optimize the culture conditions for CS1197. SUMMARY Authentication of CS1197 strain by the presence of adenosine and cordycepin and culturing period was determined to be for 14 daysContent of nucleosides in natural CS was found higher than in cultured CS1197 myceliumBox-Behnken design to optimize critical cultural conditions: temperature, pH and inoculum volumeWater extract showed better antioxidant activity proving credible source of natural antioxidants

  20. Effects of culture conditions of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain RB on the synthesis of CdSe nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ayano, Hiroyuki; Kuroda, Masashi; Soda, Satoshi; Ike, Michihiko

    2015-04-01

    Cadmium selenide (CdSe) was synthesized by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain RB in a culture containing lactic acid as a carbon source, 1 mM selenite, and 1 mM cadmium under various conditions. High purity (1.02-1.16 of the atomic ratio of Se to Cd) and efficient synthesis of biogenic CdSe nanoparticles were observed at 25-30°C, 0.05-10 g L(-1) NaCl, and neutral pH conditions compared with other tested conditions. However, the size and shape of synthesized CdSe nanoparticles were not changed by changing culture conditions. The contents of S and Se in the particles respectively increased under alkaline and weak acidic conditions. Furthermore, high temperature (>37°C), high salinity (>10 g L(-1) NaCl), and alkaline pH affected the CdSe-synthesizing rate by strain RB. This report is the first optimizing the culture conditions for synthesizing biogenic CdSe nanoparticles in a batch processing. PMID:25454693

  1. The Effects of Culture Conditions on the Glycosylation of Secreted Human Placental Alkaline Phosphatase Produced in Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Jong Hyun; Zhang, Fuming; Ermonval, Myriam; Linhardt, Robert J.; Sharfstein, Susan T.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of different culture conditions, suspension and microcarrier culture and temperature reduction on the structures of N-linked glycans attached to secreted human placental alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) were investigated for CHO cells grown in a controlled bioreactor. Both mass spectrometry and anion-exchange chromatography were used to probe the N-linked glycan structures and distribution. Complex-type glycans were the dominant structures with small amounts of high mannose glycans observed in suspension and reduced temperature cultures. Biantennary glycans were the most common structures detected by mass spectrometry, but triantennary and tetraantennary forms were also detected. The amount of sialic acid present was relatively low, approximately 0.4 mol sialic acid/mol SEAP for suspension cultures. Microcarrier cultures exhibited a decrease in productivity compared with suspension culture due to a decrease in both maximum viable cell density (15-20%) and specific productivity (30-50%). In contrast, a biphasic suspension culture in which the temperature was reduced at the beginning of the stationary phase from 37 to 33°C, showed a 7% increase in maximum viable cell density, a 62% increase in integrated viable cell density, and a 133% increase in specific productivity, leading to greater than threefold increase in total productivity. Both microcarrier and reduced temperature cultures showed increased sialylation and decreased fucosylation when compared to suspension culture. Our results highlight the importance of glycoform analysis after process modification as even subtle changes (e.g., changing from one microcarrier to another) may affect glycan distributions. PMID:18553404

  2. Improved adherence with contingency management.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Marc I; Dieckhaus, Kevin; McMahon, Thomas J; Valdes, Barbara; Petry, Nancy M; Cramer, Joyce; Rounsaville, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    Contingency management (CM) based interventions that reinforce adherence to prescribed medications have shown promise in a variety of disadvantaged populations. Fifty-six participants with histories of illicit substance use who were prescribed antiretroviral medication but evidenced suboptimal adherence during a baseline assessment were randomly assigned to 16 weeks of weekly CM-based counseling or supportive counseling, followed by 16 additional weeks of data collection and adherence feedback to providers. The CM intervention involved review of data generated by electronic pill-bottle caps that record bottle opening (MEMS) and brief substance abuse counseling. CM participants were reinforced for MEMS-measured adherence with drawings from a bowl for prizes and bonus drawings for consecutive weeks of perfect adherence. Potential total earnings averaged $800. Mean MEMS-measured adherence to the reinforced medication increased from 61% at baseline to 76% during the 16-week treatment phase and was significantly increased relative to the supportive counseling group (p = 0.01). Furthermore, mean log-transformed viral load was significantly lower in the CM group. However, by the end of the 16-week follow-up phase, differences between groups in adherence and viral load were no longer significantly different. Proportions of positive urine toxicology tests did not differ significantly between the two groups at any phase. A brief CM-based intervention was associated with significantly higher adherence and lower viral loads. Future studies should evaluate methods to extend effects for longer term benefits. PMID:17263651

  3. Optimizing adherence to antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sahay, Seema; Reddy, K. Srikanth; Dhayarkar, Sampada

    2011-01-01

    HIV has now become a manageable chronic disease. However, the treatment outcomes may get hampered by suboptimal adherence to ART. Adherence optimization is a concrete reality in the wake of ‘universal access’ and it is imperative to learn lessons from various studies and programmes. This review examines current literature on ART scale up, treatment outcomes of the large scale programmes and the role of adherence therein. Social, behavioural, biological and programme related factors arise in the context of ART adherence optimization. While emphasis is laid on adherence, retention of patients under the care umbrella emerges as a major challenge. An in-depth understanding of patients’ health seeking behaviour and health care delivery system may be useful in improving adherence and retention of patients in care continuum and programme. A theoretical framework to address the barriers and facilitators has been articulated to identify problematic areas in order to intervene with specific strategies. Empirically tested objective adherence measurement tools and approaches to assess adherence in clinical/ programme settings are required. Strengthening of ART programmes would include appropriate policies for manpower and task sharing, integrating traditional health sector, innovations in counselling and community support. Implications for the use of theoretical model to guide research, clinical practice, community involvement and policy as part of a human rights approach to HIV disease is suggested. PMID:22310817

  4. [Treatment adherence: a key element].

    PubMed

    Bastida, Guillermo; Sánchez Montes, Cristina; Aguas, Mariam

    2011-12-01

    A substantial percentage of patients fail to follow health professionals' recommendations, which affects the management of chronic diseases, reducing the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions and increasing the costs of the disease. Lack of adherence is a multidimensional phenomenon and is influenced by numerous factors that should be identified. A multiplicity of measures is available to improve adherence, such as simplifying treatment administration, but none of these measures is effective when used alone. One way of tackling lack of adherence is by identifying patients' barriers to medication and involving them in decision making. Ulcerative colitis (UC) poses a risk for lack of treatment adherence. In this disease, poor adherence correlates with poor disease control (drug effectiveness) and with higher costs. As in other chronic diseases, the causes associated with poor adherence are multiple, including psychosocial factors, the physician-patient relationship and patients' prejudices toward medication. A single dose of aminosalycylates (5-ASA) should be recommended, as this dose is as safe and effective as other regimens. However, by itself, this recommendation does not seem to improve adherence. Identifying the scale of the problem and developing strategies to involve the patient in decision making is crucial to improve treatment adherence. PMID:25443221

  5. Antidepressant adherence after psychiatric hospitalization

    PubMed Central

    Zivin, Kara; Ganoczy, Dara; Pfeiffer, Paul N.; Miller, Erin M.; Valenstein, Marcia

    2010-01-01

    Objective Depressed patients discharged from psychiatric hospitalizations face increased risks for adverse outcomes including suicide, yet antidepressant adherence rates during this high-risk period are unknown. Using Veterans Affairs (VA) data, we assessed antidepressant adherence and predictors of poor adherence among depressed veterans following psychiatric hospitalization. Method We identified VA patients nationwide with depressive disorders who had a psychiatric hospitalization between April 1, 1999 and September 30, 2003, received antidepressant medication, and had an outpatient appointment following discharge. We calculated medication possession ratios (MPRs), a measure of medication adherence, within three and six months following discharge. We assessed patient factors associated with having lower levels of adherence (MPRs <0.8) after discharge. Results 20,931 and 23,182 patients met criteria for three and six month MPRs. The mean three month MPR was 0.79 (s.d.=0.37). The mean six month MPR was 0.66 (s.d.=0.40). Patients with poorer adherence were male, younger, non-white, and had a substance abuse disorder, but were less likely to have PTSD or other anxiety disorders. Conclusion Poor antidepressant adherence is common among depressed patients after psychiatric hospitalization. Efforts to improve adherence at this time may be critical in improving the outcomes of these high-risk patients. PMID:19609666

  6. Biologic Influences on Exercise Adherence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dishman, Rod K.

    1981-01-01

    Diagnostic profiles of 362 male participants in an exercise program were analyzed to determine the biological variables between exercise adherence and symptoms of coronary disease. Findings indicated that individuals with lower metabolic capacity tended to adhere longer, to be less fit, were leaner, and began with more symptoms related to coronary…

  7. Maintenance and induction of naphthalene degradation activity in Pseudomonas putida and an Alcaligenes sp. under different culture conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Guerin, W.F.; Boyd, S.A.

    1995-11-01

    The expression of xenobiotic-degradative genes in indigenous bacteria or in bacteria introduced into an ecosystem is essential for the successful bioremediation of contaminated environments. The maintenance of naphthalene utilization activity is studied in Pseudomonas putida (ATCC 17484) and an Alcaligenes sp. (strain NP-Alk) under different batch culture conditions. Levels of activity decreased exponentially in stationary phase with half-lives of 43 and 13 h for strains ATCC 17484 nad NP-Alk, respectively. Activity half-lives were 2.7 and 5.3 times longer, respectively, in starved cultures than in stationary-phase cultures following growth on naphthalene. The treatment of starved cultures with chloramphenicol caused a loss of activity more rapid than that measured in untreated starved cultures, suggesting a continued enzyme synthesis in starved cultures in the absence of a substrate. Following growth in nutrient medium, activity decreased to undetectable levels in the Alcaligenes sp. but remained at measureable levels int he pseudomonad even after 9 months. The induction of naphthalene degradation activities in these cultures, when followed by radiorespirometry with {sup 14}C-labeled naphthalene as the substrate, was consistent with activity maintenance data. In the pseudomonad, naphthalene degradation activity was present constitutively at low levels under all growth conditions and was rapidly (in approximately 15 min) induced to high levels upon exposure to naphthalene. Adaptation in the uninduced Alcaligenes sp. occurred after many hours of exposure to naphthalene. In vivo labeling with {sup 35}S, to monitor the extent of de novo enzyme synthesis by naphthalene-challenged cells, provided an independent confirmation of the results. 43 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Increased exosome production from tumour cell cultures using the Integra CELLine Culture System.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, J Paul; Court, Jacqueline; Mason, Malcolm David; Tabi, Zsuzsanna; Clayton, Aled

    2008-06-01

    Exosomes are nanometer-sized vesicles, secreted from most cell types, with documented immune-modulatory functions. Exosomes can be purified from cultured cells but to do so effectively, requires maintenance of cells at high density in order to obtain sufficient accumulation of exosomes in the culture medium, prior to purification. Whilst high density cultures can be achieved with cells in suspension, this remains difficult with adherent cells, resulting in low quantity of exosomes for subsequent study. We have used the Integra CELLine culture system, originally designed for hybridoma cultures, to achieve a significant increase in obtainable exosomes from adherent and non-adherent tumour cells. Traditional cultures of mesothelioma cells (cultured in 75 cm(2) flasks) gave an average yield of 0.78 microg+/-0.14 microg exosome/ml of conditioned medium. The CELLine Adhere 1000 (CLAD1000) flask, housing the same cell line, increased exosome yield approximately 12 fold to 10.06 microg+/-0.97 microg/ml. The morphology, phenotype and immune function of these exosomes were compared, and found to be identical in all respects. Similarly an 8 fold increase in exosome production was obtained from NKL cells (a suspension cell line) using a CELLine 1000 (CL1000) flask. The CELLine system also incurred ~5.5 fold less cost and reduced labour for cell maintenance. This simple culture system is a cost effective, useful method for significantly increasing the quantity of exosomes available from cultured cells, without detrimental effects. This tool should prove advantageous in future studies of exosome-immune modulation in cancer and other settings. PMID:18423480

  9. Co-culture of early cattle embryos to the blastocyst stage with oviducal tissue or in conditioned medium.

    PubMed

    Eyestone, W H; First, N L

    1989-03-01

    In Exp. 1, 5-8-cell embryos from superovulated cattle were co-cultured with oviducal tissue suspended in Ham's F10 + 10% fetal calf serum (F10FCS) or in F10FCS alone. After 4 days, the proportion of embryos developing into compact morulae or blastocysts was greater (P less than 0.005) in co-culture (38/82; 46%) than in F10FCS (1/27; 4%). In Exp. 2, a solution of collagenase, trypsin, DNAse and EDTA was used to disperse oviducal tissue, which was then cultured in TCM199 + 10% fetal calf serum (M199FCS) to obtain monolayers. Embryos (1-8 cells) were then co-cultured with monolayers or in M199FCS alone. The proportion of embryos developing into compact morulae and blastocysts after 4-5 days was higher (P less than 0.005) in co-culture (15/34; 43%) than in M199FCS (1/37; 3%); mean numbers of cells/embryo were also higher (P less than 0.001) (27.70; range 2-82 in co-culture; 8.83; range 2-18 in M199FCS). In Exp. 3, embryos obtained from in-vitro maturation and fertilization were used to compare development between co-culture and medium conditioned by oviducal tissue. Initial cleavage rate (no. embryos greater than 1 cell/total) was 76% (611/807) and did not differ among treatments. After 5 days, the proportion cleaving to greater than 16 cells was higher (P less than 0.005) in co-culture (71/203; 35%) and conditioned medium (48/205; 23%) compared to M199FCS (14/203; 7%). Similarly, the proportion developing into compact morulae and blastocysts was greater (P less than 0.005) in co-culture (44/203; 22%) and conditioned medium (46/205; 22%) than in M199FCS (7/203; 3%).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2704004

  10. A Distinct Role for Interleukin‐6 as a Major Mediator of Cellular Adjustment to an Altered Culture Condition

    PubMed Central

    Son, Hwa‐Kyung; Park, Iha; Kim, Jue Young; Kim, Do Kyeong; Illeperuma, Rasika P.; Bae, Jung Yoon; Lee, Doo Young; Oh, Eun‐Sang; Jung, Da‐Woon; Williams, Darren R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tissue microenvironment adjusts biological properties of different cells by modulating signaling pathways and cell to cell interactions. This study showed that epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT)/ mesenchymal–epithelial transition (MET) can be modulated by altering culture conditions. HPV E6/E7‐transfected immortalized oral keratinocytes (IHOK) cultured in different media displayed reversible EMT/MET accompanied by changes in cell phenotype, proliferation, gene expression at transcriptional, and translational level, and migratory and invasive activities. Cholera toxin, a major supplement to culture medium, was responsible for inducing the morphological and biological changes of IHOK. Cholera toxin per se induced EMT by triggering the secretion of interleukin 6 (IL‐6) from IHOK. We found IL‐6 to be a central molecule that modulates the reversibility of EMT based not only on the mRNA level but also on the level of secretion. Taken together, our results demonstrate that IL‐6, a cytokine whose transcription is activated by alterations in culture conditions, is a key molecule for regulating reversible EMT/MET. This study will contribute to understand one way of cellular adjustment for surviving in unfamiliar conditions. J. Cell. Biochem. 116: 2552–2562, 2015. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Biochemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25939389

  11. Development and Maturation of the Neuromuscular Junciton in Cell Culture Under Conditions of Simulated Zero-gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruener, R.

    1985-01-01

    Alterations in gravitational conditions which alter the normal development and interactions of nerve and muscle cells grown in culture is examined. Clinostat conditions, similating Og, which produce changes in cell morphology and growth patterns is studied. Data show that rotation of cocultures of nerve and muscle cells results in morphologic changes which are predicted to significantly alter the functional interactions between the elements of a prototypic synapse. It is further predicted that similar alterations may occur in central synapses which may therefore affect the development of the central nervous system when subjected to altered gravitational conditions.

  12. Optimization of Cell Adhesion on Mg Based Implant Materials by Pre-Incubation under Cell Culture Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Willumeit, Regine; Möhring, Anneke; Feyerabend, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium based implants could revolutionize applications where orthopedic implants such as nails, screws or bone plates are used because they are load bearing and degrade over time. This prevents a second surgery to remove conventional implants. To improve the biocompatibility we studied here if and for how long a pre-incubation of the material under cell culture conditions is favorable for cell attachment and proliferation. For two materials, Mg and Mg10Gd1Nd, we could show that 6 h pre-incubation are already enough to form a natural protective layer suitable for cell culture. PMID:24857908

  13. Identification of Molecular and Cellular Responses of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Biofilms under Culture Conditions Relevant to Field Conditions for Bioreduction of

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, Judy D.

    2006-06-01

    Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough forms biofilms under stress and nutrient limitation conditions. Analysis of the transcriptional responses to acid exposure suggested that genes encoding arginine and polyamine biosynthesis were increased in expression. A literature search showed that polyamines had been suggested to stimulate biofilm formation in some bacteria. Therefore, biofilm formation by D. vulgaris was then examined. Two different assay methods were used to estimate the biofilm formation. First, the classical crystal violet stainable material attached to glass test tubes was measured. Second protein attached to the test tube sides and especially precipitated at the bottom was measured.

  14. Determinants of patient adherence: a review of systematic reviews

    PubMed Central

    Kardas, Przemyslaw; Lewek, Pawel; Matyjaszczyk, Michal

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: A number of potential determinants of medication non-adherence have been described so far. However, the heterogenic quality of existing publications poses the need for the use of a rigorous methodology in building a list of such determinants. The purpose of this study was a systematic review of current research on determinants of patient adherence on the basis of a recently agreed European consensus taxonomy and terminology. Methods: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, IPA, and PsycINFO were systematically searched for systematic reviews published between 2000/01/01 and 2009/12/31 that provided determinants on non-adherence to medication. The searches were limited to reviews having adherence to medication prescribed by health professionals for outpatient as a major topic. Results: Fifty-one reviews were included in this review, covering 19 different disease categories. In these reviews, exclusively assessing non-adherence to chronic therapies, 771 individual factor items were identified, of which most were determinants of implementation, and only 47—determinants of persistence with medication. Factors with an unambiguous effect on adherence were further grouped into 8 clusters of socio-economic-related factors, 6 of healthcare team- and system-related factors, 6 of condition-related factors, 6 of therapy-related factors, and 14 of patient-related factors. The lack of standardized definitions and use of poor measurement methods resulted in many inconsistencies. Conclusions: This study provides clear evidence that medication non-adherence is affected by multiple determinants. Therefore, the prediction of non-adherence of individual patients is difficult, and suitable measurement and multifaceted interventions may be the most effective answer toward unsatisfactory adherence. The limited number of publications assessing determinants of persistence with medication, and lack of those providing determinants of adherence to short-term treatment identify

  15. Medication adherence in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Phan, Stephanie V

    2016-01-01

    Medication nonadherence is common among patients with schizophrenia and due to a variety of factors including lack of insight, psychopathology, substance use disorder, issues associated with treatment, stigma, fragmentation of care, cultural influences, and socioeconomic status. Among this population, nonadherence is problematic because it can lead to decompensation or exacerbation of symptoms, relapse, rehospitalization or greater use of emergency psychiatric services, functional decline, and increased risk of death. Psychoeducational approaches alone are ineffective, but in combination with behavioral interventions, appear to be effective. Involving the patient's support system, in addition to other interventions, can improve treatment adherence. Many medication-related factors, such as effectiveness and tolerability of antipsychotics, regimen complexity, and past medication trials impact appropriate medication use. Therefore, optimizing the patient's pharmacotherapeutic regimens can improve adherence. Additional factors favorably influencing adherence include involving the patient in their treatment, fostering a therapeutic alliance, implementing/using reminder systems, and addressing substance use disorder. Medication nonadherence arises from multiple reasons that vary between patients. Thus, the most effective strategies to improve adherence are multifactorial and may involve both psychoeducational and behavioral techniques, as well as previously listed approaches. Strategies should be targeted toward the patient and their support system, whenever possible, to further improve the chances of appropriate medication use. Recognizing that all patients with schizophrenia are at risk for medication nonadherence is important. No one technique has been shown to be most effective; therefore, the risk for nonadherence should continually be assessed and multiple strategies should be targeted to the patient (and caregiver) and repeatedly implemented throughout the course

  16. Comparative study of the effects of various culture conditions on cell growth and Gagaminine synthesis in suspension culture of Cynanchum wilfordii (MAXIM.) HEMSLEY.

    PubMed

    Shin, Ga-Hee; Chio, Man-Gi; Lee, Dae-Won

    2003-09-01

    Gagaminine, a steroidal alkaloid isolated from the roots of Cynanchum wilfordii, exhibited potent inhibitory effects on aldehyde oxidase activity and lipid peroxidation. To determine whether it would be possible to mass produce this active component, which would be useful for animal tests, we tried to synthesize it using in vitro cell culture methods with various growth conditions. In a previous study it was found that calli were easily induced from the stem of this medicinal plant and cultivated effectively on MS medium containing 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) 2 mg/l. In this work we attempted to determine the effects of various culture conditions on cell growth and gagaminine synthesis in suspension culture. Gagaminine production was increased markedly when cell growth proceeded to the death phase. Cell growth was more effective with 5% (v/v) sucrose, in the light (at 38 microE/m(2) x s), on medium containing 2,4-D 2 mg/l, with 2.5 g/10 ml medium as the initial cell concentration. The concentration of gagaminine was optimal with 3% sucrose, in darkness on medium 2,4-D 1 mg/l, with 2.5 g/10 ml medium as an initial cell concentration. However, the highest growth rate was 0.18 d(-1), when the gagaminine concentration was seven- and three-fold (at 140 mu/ml) that of the plant stem and 10 ml of medium respectively, on the 50 ml of medium in suspension culture. PMID:12951479

  17. Clustering based on adherence data

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Adherence to a medical treatment means the extent to which a patient follows the instructions or recommendations by health professionals. There are direct and indirect ways to measure adherence which have been used for clinical management and research. Typically adherence measures are monitored over a long follow-up or treatment period, and some measurements may be missing due to death or other reasons. A natural question then is how to describe adherence behavior over the whole period in a simple way. In the literature, measurements over a period are usually combined just by using averages like percentages of compliant days or percentages of doses taken. In the paper we adapt an approach where patient adherence measures are seen as a stochastic process. Repeated measures are then analyzed as a Markov chain with finite number of states rather than as independent and identically distributed observations, and the transition probabilities between the states are assumed to fully describe the behavior of a patient. The patients can then be clustered or classified using their estimated transition probabilities. These natural clusters can be used to describe the adherence of the patients, to find predictors for adherence, and to predict the future events. The new approach is illustrated and shown to be useful with a simple analysis of a data set from the DART (Development of AntiRetroviral Therapy in Africa) trial in Uganda and Zimbabwe. PMID:21385451

  18. Response of Xylella fastidiosa to zinc: decreased culturability, increased exopolysaccharide production, and formation of resilient biofilms under flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Navarrete, Fernando; De La Fuente, Leonardo

    2014-02-01

    The bacterial plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa produces biofilm that accumulates in the host xylem vessels, affecting disease development in various crops and bacterial acquisition by insect vectors. Biofilms are sensitive to the chemical composition of the environment, and mineral elements being transported in the xylem are of special interest for this pathosystem. Here, X. fastidiosa liquid cultures were supplemented with zinc and compared with nonamended cultures to determine the effects of Zn on growth, biofilm, and exopolysaccharide (EPS) production under batch and flow culture conditions. The results show that Zn reduces growth and biofilm production under both conditions. However, in microfluidic chambers under liquid flow and with constant bacterial supplementation (closer to conditions inside the host), a dramatic increase in biofilm aggregates was seen in the Zn-amended medium. Biofilms formed under these conditions were strongly attached to surfaces and were not removed by medium flow. This phenomenon was correlated with increased EPS production in stationary-phase cells grown under high Zn concentrations. Zn did not cause greater adhesion to surfaces by individual cells. Additionally, viability analyses suggest that X. fastidiosa may be able to enter the viable but nonculturable state in vitro, and Zn can hasten the onset of this state. Together, these findings suggest that Zn can act as a stress factor with pleiotropic effects on X. fastidiosa and indicate that, although Zn could be used as a bactericide treatment, it could trigger the undesired effect of stronger biofilm formation upon reinoculation events. PMID:24271184

  19. Attachment of Listeria innocua to polystyrene: effects of ionic strength and conditioning films from culture media and milk proteins.

    PubMed

    Robitaille, Gilles; Choinière, Sébastien; Ells, Timothy; Deschènes, Louise; Mafu, Akier Assanta

    2014-03-01

    It is recognized that bacterial adhesion usually occurs on conditioning films made of organic macromolecules absorbed to abiotic surfaces. The objectives of this study were to determine the extent to which milk protein-coated polystyrene (PS) pegs interfere with biofilm formation and the synergistic effect of this conditioning and hypertonic growth media on the bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation of Listeria innocua, used as a nonpathogenic surrogate for Listeria monocytogenes. PS pegs were uncoated (bare PS) or individually coated with whey proteins isolate (WPI), β-lactoglobulin, bovine serum albumin, or tryptic soy broth (TSB) and were incubated in bacterial suspensions in modified Welshimer's broth. After 4 h, the number of adherent cells was dependent on the coating, as follows: TSB (10(7) CFU/ml) > bare PS > β-lactoglobulin > bovine serum albumin ∼ WPI (10(4) CFU/ml). The sessile cell counts increased up to 24 h, reaching > 10(7) CFU per peg for all surfaces (P > 0.1), except for WPI-coated PS; this indicates that the inhibitory effects of milk protein conditioning films are transient, slowing down the adhesion process. The 4-h bacterial adhesion on milk protein-coated PS in modified Welshimer's broth supplemented with salt (0 to 10% [wt/vol]) did not vary (P > 0.1), indicating that conditioning with milk proteins was the major determinant for inhibition of bacterial adhesion and that the synergetic effect of salt and milk proteins on adhesion was minimal. Moreover, the presence of 5 to 10% salt significantly inhibited 24-h biofilm formation on the TSB-coated and bare PS, with a decrease of >3 log at 10% (wt/vol) NaCl and almost completely depleted viable sessile bacteria on the milk protein-coated PS. PMID:24674434

  20. Surface-engineered substrates for improved human pluripotent stem cell culture under fully defined conditions.

    PubMed

    Saha, Krishanu; Mei, Ying; Reisterer, Colin M; Pyzocha, Neena Kenton; Yang, Jing; Muffat, Julien; Davies, Martyn C; Alexander, Morgan R; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2011-11-15

    The current gold standard for the culture of human pluripotent stem cells requires the use of a feeder layer of cells. Here, we develop a spatially defined culture system based on UV/ozone radiation modification of typical cell culture plastics to define a favorable surface environment for human pluripotent stem cell culture. Chemical and geometrical optimization of the surfaces enables control of early cell aggregation from fully dissociated cells, as predicted from a numerical model of cell migration, and results in significant increases in cell growth of undifferentiated cells. These chemically defined xeno-free substrates generate more than three times the number of cells than feeder-containing substrates per surface area. Further, reprogramming and typical gene-targeting protocols can be readily performed on these engineered surfaces. These substrates provide an attractive cell culture platform for the production of clinically relevant factor-free reprogrammed cells from patient tissue samples and facilitate the definition of standardized scale-up friendly methods for disease modeling and cell therapeutic applications. PMID:22065768

  1. Fate of extracellular polymeric substances of anaerobically digested sewage sludge during pre-dewatering conditioning with Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans culture.

    PubMed

    Murugesan, Kumarasamy; Ravindran, Balasubramani; Selvam, Ammaiyappan; Kurade, Mayur B; Yu, Shuk-Man; Wong, Jonathan W C

    2016-10-01

    This study investigated the fate of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of anaerobically digested saline sewage sludge during its preconditioning. Sludge was conditioned with Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans (AF) culture for 24h in the presence and absence of Fe(2+) as an energy substrate. pH decreased from 7.24 to 3.12 during sludge conditioning process. The capillary suction time (CST) of conditioned sludge significantly decreased to <10s, and specific resistance to filtration (SRF) was reduced by >94% as compared with control within 4h of conditioning with or without Fe(2+), indicating a significant (P<0.001) improvement in sludge dewaterability. A noticeable decrease in extractable EPS was observed in conditioned sludge. The EPS contents showed a significant negative correlation with dewaterability of sludge (P<0.05). The results suggest that bioacidification treatment using A. ferrooxidans effectively improved sludge dewaterability through modification of sludge EPS. PMID:27040507

  2. Influence of oxygen availability on physiology, verocytotoxin expression and adherence of Escherichia coli O157.

    PubMed

    James, B W; Keevil, C W

    1999-01-01

    A strain of Escherichia coli serotype O157 was grown in steady state chemostat culture under aerobic, oxygen-limited and anaerobic conditions. The growth and metabolic efficiency of oxygen-limited and anaerobic cultures was impaired, with biomass yield and the molar growth yield for glucose, Yglucose, reduced markedly in comparison with aerobic cultures. Steady state cells were typically short rods 2-3 microns long, and were encapsulated by a layer of extracellular material. The majority of cells were non-flagellated and fimbriae were not observed. Chemostat-grown cells were significantly more adhesive for HEp-2 monolayers than cells grown in aerobic batch culture. Furthermore, oxygen-limited and anaerobic cultures were significantly more adhesive for Hep-2 cells when compared with cells grown in aerobic chemostat culture, possibly reflecting increased pathogenicity associated with the induction of novel adhesins. Type 1 pili were not responsible for increased adherence. Verocytotoxins, VT1 and VT2, were expressed constitutively and were not influenced by oxygen availability. This study demonstrates that E. coli O157 is a versatile micro-organism, which responds to environmental conditions likely to be encountered during infection by inducing a phenotype which is more adhesive for human epithelial cells. PMID:10030015

  3. Treatment adherence to an antiretroviral regime: the lived experience of Native Hawaiians and kokua.

    PubMed

    Ka'opua, L

    2001-09-01

    Treatment adherence to Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) is a critical issue in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) care. HAART can extend the longevity of people living with HIV, but treatment efficacy relies on strict adherence that is difficult for many consumers to manage. Results presented in this article are based on semi-structured in-depth interviews with Native Hawaiian consumers (n = 6) who reported moderate to low levels of overall HAART adherence, and based on their kokua, or primary support. All interviews were recorded on audiotape, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using Grounded Theory methods. Research questions that guided the inquiry, included: What are the challenges of Hawaiians who report moderate to low levels of HAART adherence? How does non-adherence occur? What is the role of the kokua (primary caregiver) and/or family members in treatment adherence? What types of support enhance adherence? The unpredictability of living with HIV was a major challenge to adherence. Symptom distress and active use of alcohol and other drugs interfered with the capacity to appropriately adhere. Two patterns of non-adherence were identified: interrupted regime and intermittent use. Tangible and emotional types of support, sometimes delivered in culture-specific ways, were viewed as helpful in maintaining compliance and in resuming the regime when difficulties arose. The findings complement extant research on HAART by providing an understanding of adherence as a lived experience among Native Hawaiians and their kokua. PMID:12180508

  4. Chemically defined conditions for human iPS cell derivation and culture

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guokai; Gulbranson, Daniel R.; Hou, Zhonggang; Bolin, Jennifer M.; Ruotti, Victor; Probasco, Mitchell D.; Smuga-Otto, Kimberly; Howden, Sara E.; Diol, Nicole R.; Propson, Nicholas E.; Wagner, Ryan; Lee, Garrett O.; Antosiewicz-Bourget, Jessica; Teng, Joyce M. C.; Thomson, James A.

    2011-01-01

    We reexamine the individual components for human ES and iPS cell culture, and formulate a cell culture system in which all protein reagents for liquid media, attachment surfaces, and splitting are chemically defined. A major improvement is the lack of a serum albumin component, as variations in either animal or human sourced albumin batches have previously plagued human ES and iPS cell culture with inconsistencies. Using this new medium (E8) and vitronectin-coated surfaces, we demonstrate improved derivation efficiencies of vector-free human iPS cells with an episomal approach. This simplified E8 medium should facilitate both the research use and clinical applications of human ES and iPS cells and their derivatives, and should be applicable to other reprogramming methods. PMID:21478862

  5. Effect of weightlessness conditions on the somatic embryogenesis in the culture of carrot cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butenko, R. G.; Dmitriyeva, N. N.; Ongko, V.; Basyrova, L. V.

    1977-01-01

    A carrot cell culture seeded in Petri dishes in the United States and transported to the USSR was subjected to weightlessness for 20 days during the flight of Kosmos 782. The controls were cultures placed on a centrifuge (1 g) inside the satellite and cultures left on ground in the U.S.S.R. and the United States. A count of structures in the dishes after the flight showed that the number of developing embryonic structures and the extent of their differentiation in weightlessness did not reliably differ from the number and extent of differentiation in structures developed on the ground. Structures with long roots developed in weightlessness. Analysis of the root zones showed that these roots differed by the increased size of the zone of differentiated cells. The increased size of the zones of differentiated cells can indicate earlier development of embryonic structures.

  6. Simulated-Physiological Loading Conditions Preserve Biological and Mechanical Properties of Caprine Lumbar Intervertebral Discs in Ex Vivo Culture

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Cornelis P. L.; Zuiderbaan, Hendrik A.; Zandieh Doulabi, Behrouz; van der Veen, Albert J.; van de Ven, Peter M.; Smit, Theo H.; Helder, Marco N.; van Royen, Barend J.; Mullender, Margriet G.

    2012-01-01

    Low-back pain (LBP) is a common medical complaint and associated with high societal costs. Degeneration of the intervertebral disc (IVD) is assumed to be an important causal factor of LBP. IVDs are continuously mechanically loaded and both positive and negative effects have been attributed to different loading conditions. In order to study mechanical loading effects, degeneration-associated processes and/or potential regenerative therapies in IVDs, it is imperative to maintain the IVDs' structural integrity. While in vivo models provide comprehensive insight in IVD biology, an accompanying organ culture model can focus on a single factor, such as loading and may serve as a prescreening model to reduce life animal testing. In the current study we examined the feasibility of organ culture of caprine lumbar discs, with the hypothesis that a simulated-physiological load will optimally preserve IVD properties. Lumbar caprine IVDs (n = 175) were cultured in a bioreactor up to 21 days either without load, low dynamic load (LDL), or with simulated-physiological load (SPL). IVD stiffness was calculated from measurements of IVD loading and displacement. IVD nucleus, inner- and outer annulus were assessed for cell viability, cell density and gene expression. The extracellular matrix (ECM) was analyzed for water, glycosaminoglycan and total collagen content. IVD biomechanical properties did not change significantly with loading conditions. With SPL, cell viability, cell density and gene expression were preserved up to 21 days. Both unloaded and LDL resulted in decreased cell viability, cell density and significant changes in gene expression, yet no differences in ECM content were observed in any group. In conclusion, simulated-physiological loading preserved the native properties of caprine IVDs during a 21-day culture period. The characterization of caprine IVD response to culture in the LDCS under SPL conditions paves the way for controlled analysis of degeneration- and

  7. Four therapeutic diets: adherence and acceptability.

    PubMed

    Berkow, Susan E; Barnard, Neal; Eckart, Jill; Katcher, Heather

    2010-01-01

    Many health conditions are treated, at least in part, by therapeutic diets. Although the success of any intervention depends on its acceptability to the patient, the acceptability of therapeutic diets and factors that influence it have been largely neglected in nutrition research. A working definition of acceptability is proposed and an examination and summary are provided of available data on the acceptability of common diet regimens used for medical conditions. The goal is to suggest ways to improve the success of therapeutic diets. The proposed working definition of "acceptability" refers to the user's judgment of the advantages and disadvantages of a therapeutic diet-in relation to palatability, costs, and effects on eating behaviour and health-that influence the likelihood of adherence. Very low-calorie, reduced-fat omnivorous, vegetarian and vegan, and low-carbohydrate diets all achieve acceptability among the majority of users in studies of up to one year, in terms of attrition and adherence rates and results of questionnaires assessing eating behaviours. Longer studies are fewer, but they suggest that vegetarian, vegan, and reduced-fat diets are acceptable, as indicated by sustained changes in nutrient intake. Few studies of this length have been published for very low-calorie or low-carbohydrate diets. Long-term studies of adherence and acceptability of these and other therapeutic diets are warranted. PMID:21144137

  8. Parametric Optimization of Cultural Conditions for Carboxymethyl Cellulase Production Using Pretreated Rice Straw by Bacillus sp. 313SI under Stationary and Shaking Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Arpana; Bhuwal, Anish Kumari; Singh, Gulab; Yadav, Anita; Aggarwal, Neeraj Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Carboxymethyl cellulase (CMCase) provides a key opportunity for achieving tremendous benefits of utilizing rice straw as cellulosic biomass. Out of total 80 microbial isolates from different ecological niches one bacterial strain, identified as Bacillus sp. 313SI, was selected for CMCase production under stationary as well as shaking conditions of growth. During two-stage pretreatment, rice straw was first treated with 0.5 M KOH to remove lignin followed by treatment with 0.1 N H2SO4 for removal of hemicellulose. The maximum carboxymethyl cellulase activity of 3.08 U/mL was obtained using 1% (w/v) pretreated rice straw with 1% (v/v) inoculum, pH 8.0 at 35°C after 60 h of growth under stationary conditions, while the same was obtained as 4.15 U/mL using 0.75% (w/v) pretreated substrate with 0.4% (v/v) inoculum, pH 8.0 at 30°C, under shaking conditions of growth for 48 h. For maximum titre of CMCase carboxymethyl cellulose was optimized as the best carbon source under both cultural conditions while ammonium sulphate and ammonium nitrate were optimized as the best nitrogen sources under stationary and shaking conditions, respectively. The present study provides the useful data about the optimized conditions for CMCase production by Bacillus sp. 313SI from pretreated rice straw. PMID:24868469

  9. Contributions of EspA Filaments and Curli Fimbriae in Cellular Adherence and Biofilm Formation of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vijay K; Kudva, Indira T; Bearson, Bradley L; Stasko, Judith A

    2016-01-01

    In Escherichia coli O157:H7 (O157), the filamentous structure of the type III secretion system is produced from the polymerization of the EspA protein. EspA filaments are essential for O157 adherence to epithelial cells. In previous studies, we demonstrated that O157 hha deletion mutants showed increased adherence to HEp-2 cells and produced abundant biofilms. Transcriptional analysis revealed increased expression of espA as well as the csgA gene, which encodes curli fimbriae that are essential for biofilm formation. In the present study, we constructed hha espA, hha csgA, and hha csgA espA deletion mutants to determine the relative importance of EspA and CsgA in O157 adherence to HEp-2 cells and biofilm formation. In vitro adherence assays, conducted at 37°C in a tissue culture medium containing 0.1% glucose, showed that HEp-2 cell adherence required EspA because hha espA and hha csgA espA mutants adhered to HEp-2 cells at higher levels only when complemented with an espA-expressing plasmid. Biofilm assays performed at 28°C in a medium lacking glucose showed dependency of biofilm formation on CsgA; however EspA was not produced under these conditions. Despite production of detectable levels of EspA at 37°C in media supplemented with 0.1% glucose, the biofilm formation occurred independent of EspA. These results indicate dependency of O157 adherence to epithelial cells on EspA filaments, while CsgA promoted biofilm formation under conditions mimicking those found in the environment (low temperature with nutrient limitations) and in the digestive tract of an host animal (higher temperature and low levels of glucose). PMID:26900701

  10. Contributions of EspA Filaments and Curli Fimbriae in Cellular Adherence and Biofilm Formation of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vijay K.; Kudva, Indira T.; Bearson, Bradley L.; Stasko, Judith A.

    2016-01-01

    In Escherichia coli O157:H7 (O157), the filamentous structure of the type III secretion system is produced from the polymerization of the EspA protein. EspA filaments are essential for O157 adherence to epithelial cells. In previous studies, we demonstrated that O157 hha deletion mutants showed increased adherence to HEp-2 cells and produced abundant biofilms. Transcriptional analysis revealed increased expression of espA as well as the csgA gene, which encodes curli fimbriae that are essential for biofilm formation. In the present study, we constructed hha espA, hha csgA, and hha csgA espA deletion mutants to determine the relative importance of EspA and CsgA in O157 adherence to HEp-2 cells and biofilm formation. In vitro adherence assays, conducted at 37°C in a tissue culture medium containing 0.1% glucose, showed that HEp-2 cell adherence required EspA because hha espA and hha csgA espA mutants adhered to HEp-2 cells at higher levels only when complemented with an espA-expressing plasmid. Biofilm assays performed at 28°C in a medium lacking glucose showed dependency of biofilm formation on CsgA; however EspA was not produced under these conditions. Despite production of detectable levels of EspA at 37°C in media supplemented with 0.1% glucose, the biofilm formation occurred independent of EspA. These results indicate dependency of O157 adherence to epithelial cells on EspA filaments, while CsgA promoted biofilm formation under conditions mimicking those found in the environment (low temperature with nutrient limitations) and in the digestive tract of an host animal (higher temperature and low levels of glucose). PMID:26900701

  11. Improved dominant selection markers and co-culturing conditions for efficient Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation of Ustilago scitaminea.

    PubMed

    Sun, Longhua; Yan, Meixin; Ding, Zhaojian; Liu, Yanbin; Du, Minge; Xi, Pinggen; Liao, Jinling; Ji, Lianghui; Jiang, Zide

    2014-06-01

    Ustilago scitaminea is the causal agent of sugar-cane smut disease. There is, however, no genetic transformation method for it. Here we report the development of an efficient mutagenesis method based on Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. To improve transformation efficiency, a range of conditions, including the codon-usage preference of the selection marker gene, promoters and the culture conditions for transformation were optimized. A strong promoter to drive marker gene expression, optimized codon usage of selection marker gene, controlled water content and pH of co-culture medium were critical factors affecting transformation efficiency. Our findings provide a useful tool for genetic analysis of this important plant pathogen. PMID:24563317

  12. Identification of Molecular and Cellular Responses of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Biofilms under Culture Conditions Relevant to Field Conditions for Bioreduction

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, Matthew W.

    2006-06-01

    Desulfovibrio vulgaris ATCC29579 is a sulfate- reducing bacterium (SRB) that is commonly used as a model for direct and indirect heavy metal reduction, and can also be a causitative agent of metal corrosion. During growth with lactate and sulfate, internal carbohydrate levels increased throughout exponential-phase, and peaked as the cells transitioned to stationary-phase. The carbohydrate to protein ratio (C:P) peaked at 0.05 ug/ug as the cells transitioned to stationary-phase, and then declined to 0.02 ug/ug during extended stationary-phase. In contrast, a strain of D. vulgaris that does not contain the megaplasmid, maintained higher internal carbohydrate levels and the C:P ratio peaked at 0.1 ug/ug (2-fold increase compared to wild-type). Under the tested growth conditions, we observed biofilm formation in wild-type cells, but the plasmid-less strain formed less biofilm (2-fold decrease). We hypothesized that carbohydrate was re-allocated to the external cell proper for biofilm formation. However, biofilm contained relatively little carbohydrate (0.6 to 1.0 ug/ml) and had a similar C:P ratio compared to wild-type early stationary-phase cells. Staining with calcafluor white also indicated the presence of little external carbohydrate in D. vulgaris biofilms. Less biofilm was formed in the presence of protinease K, trypsin, and chymotrypsin, however, the growth of planktonic cells was not affected. In addition, when D. vulgaris biofilm was treated with a protease, less biofilm was observed. Electron micrographs suggested the presence of filaments between the biofilm cells, and filaments appeared to be susceptible to protease treatment. Biofilm filtrates contained soluble protein, and SDS-PAGE analysis suggested different polypeptide profiles between a filtrate, a planktonic, and a biofilm sample.

  13. Adherence of Tritrichomonas foetus to bovine vaginal epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Corbeil, L B; Hodgson, J L; Jones, D W; Corbeil, R R; Widders, P R; Stephens, L R

    1989-01-01

    Adherence of Tritrichomonas foetus to bovine vaginal epithelial cells (VECs) in vitro was investigated with fresh washed bovine VECs and log-phase cultures of T. foetus. Observation under phase-contrast microscopy showed that T. foetus usually adhered first by the posterior flagellum and later by the body. Significantly more keratinized squamous epithelial cells were detected with attached parasites than nonkeratinized round epithelial cells. The optimal pH range for attachment was 6.0 to 7.5, with peak attachment at pH 6.5 for squamous VECs. Surface-reactive bovine antiserum to T. foetus prevented adherence to bovine squamous VECs. Inhibition of adherence occurred at nonagglutinating, nonimmobilizing serum dilutions. Antiserum fractions enriched for immunoglobulin G1 inhibited adherence, but fractions enriched for immunoglobulin G2 did not. The inhibitory antiserum was specific for several medium- to high-molecular-weight membrane antigens as detected in Western blots (immunoblots). The ability of surface-reactive antibodies to prevent adherence and to agglutinate and immobilize T. foetus indicates that they may be protective. Images PMID:2471692

  14. Characteristics of Teachers in Relation to Financial and Cultural Conditions of Their Childhood Homes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryans, David G.

    This study of a random national sample of 3,248 teachers in the continental United States and 304 teachers from Hawaii was conducted to find similarities and differences among groups of in-service teachers who were classified according to their self-reported childhood financial status and cultural background. A secondary goal of the study was the…

  15. Cultural and environmental factors governing tomato production: Local food production under elevated temperature conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-term fresh tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) production data was used to estimate cultural and environmental impacts on marketable tomato yields in eastern Oklahoma. Quantifying the interactive effects of planting date and growing season duration and the effects of cumulative heat units and heat...

  16. Person-Organization (Culture) Fit and Employee Commitment under Conditions of Organizational Change: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, John P.; Hecht, Tracy D.; Gill, Harjinder; Toplonytsky, Laryssa

    2010-01-01

    This longitudinal study examines how person-organization fit, operationalized as congruence between perceived and preferred organizational culture, relates to employees' affective commitment and intention to stay with an organization during the early stages of a strategic organizational change. Employees in a large energy company completed surveys…

  17. PLANT CULTURAL SYSTEM FOR MONITORING EVAPOTRANSPIRATION AND PHYSIOLOGICAL RESPONSES UNDER FIELD CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A plant culture system incorporating the water-table root-screen method for controlling plant water status was adapted for use in open-top field exposure chambers for studying the effects of drought stress on physiological responses. The daily transpiration rates of the plants we...

  18. Targeted Protein Degradation by Salmonella under Phagosome-Mimicking Culture Conditions Investigated Using Comparative Peptidomics

    SciTech Connect

    Manes, Nathan P.; Gustin, Jean K.; Rue, Joanne; Mottaz, Heather M.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Zimmer, Jennifer S.; Metz, Thomas O.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Smith, Richard D.; Heffron, Fred

    2007-04-01

    The pathogen Salmonella enterica is known to cause both food poisoning and typhoid fever. Due to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant isolates and the threat of bioterrorism (e.g., contamination of the food supply), there is a growing need to study this bacterium. In this investigation, comparative peptidomics was used to study Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium cultured in either a rich medium or in an acidic, low magnesium, and minimal nutrient medium designed to roughly mimic the macrophage phagosomal compartment (within which Salmonella are known to survive). Native peptides from cleared cell lysates were enriched by using isopropanol extraction and analyzed by using both LC-MS/MS and LC-FTICR-MS. We identified 5,163 distinct peptides originating from 682 proteins and the data clearly indicated that compared to cells cultured in the rich medium, Salmonella cultured in the phagosome-mimicking medium had dramatically higher abundances of a wide variety of protein degradation products, especially from ribosomal proteins. Salmonella from the same cultures were also analyzed by using bottom-up proteomics, and when the peptidomic and proteomic data were analyzed together, two clusters of proteins targeted for proteolysis were tentatively identified. Possible roles of targeted proteolysis by phagocytosed Salmonella are discussed.

  19. Thinking Globally, Teaching Locally: The "Nervous Conditions" of Cross-Cultural Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eck, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    Teaching postcolonial literature to American college students involves taking them through a dialectical process of thinking about identification. In the first stage, students are encouraged to note similarities between their own lives and those of the work's characters. With the second step, students examine how the work's cultural and historical…

  20. Production of Trametes pubescens Laccase under Submerged and Semi-Solid Culture Conditions on Agro-Industrial Wastes

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Alexander; Osma, Johann F.; Alméciga-Díaz, Carlos J.; Sánchez, Oscar F.

    2013-01-01

    Laccases are copper-containing enzymes involved in the degradation of lignocellulosic materials and used in the treatment of phenol-containing wastewater. In this study we investigated the effect of culture conditions, i.e. submerged or semi-solid, and copper supplementation on laccase production by Trametespubescens grown on coffee husk, soybean pod husk, or cedar sawdust. The highest specific laccase activity was achieved when the culture was conducted under submerged conditions supplemented with copper (5 mM), and using coffee husk as substrate. The crude extracts presented two laccase isoforms with molecular mass of 120 (Lac1) and 60 kDa (Lac2). Regardless of the substrate, enzymatic crude extract and purified fractions behaved similarly at different temperatures and pHs, most of them presented the maximum activity at 55 °C and a pH range between 2 and 3. In addition, they showed similar stability and electro-chemical properties. At optimal culture conditions laccase activity was 7.69±0.28 U mg-1 of protein for the crude extract, and 0.08±0.001 and 2.86±0.05 U mg-1 of protein for Lac1 and Lac2, respectively. In summary, these results show the potential of coffee husk as an important and economical growth medium to produce laccase, offering a new alternative use for this common agro-industrial byproduct. PMID:24019936

  1. Production of Trametes pubescens laccase under submerged and semi-solid culture conditions on agro-industrial wastes.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Juan C; Medina, Sandra C; Rodriguez, Alexander; Osma, Johann F; Alméciga-Díaz, Carlos J; Sánchez, Oscar F

    2013-01-01

    Laccases are copper-containing enzymes involved in the degradation of lignocellulosic materials and used in the treatment of phenol-containing wastewater. In this study we investigated the effect of culture conditions, i.e. submerged or semi-solid, and copper supplementation on laccase production by Trametespubescens grown on coffee husk, soybean pod husk, or cedar sawdust. The highest specific laccase activity was achieved when the culture was conducted under submerged conditions supplemented with copper (5 mM), and using coffee husk as substrate. The crude extracts presented two laccase isoforms with molecular mass of 120 (Lac1) and 60 kDa (Lac2). Regardless of the substrate, enzymatic crude extract and purified fractions behaved similarly at different temperatures and pHs, most of them presented the maximum activity at 55 °C and a pH range between 2 and 3. In addition, they showed similar stability and electro-chemical properties. At optimal culture conditions laccase activity was 7.69 ± 0.28 U mg(-1) of protein for the crude extract, and 0.08 ± 0.001 and 2.86 ± 0.05 U mg(-1) of protein for Lac1 and Lac2, respectively. In summary, these results show the potential of coffee husk as an important and economical growth medium to produce laccase, offering a new alternative use for this common agro-industrial byproduct. PMID:24019936

  2. Effect of culture conditions on the biosynthesis of gagaminine, a potent antioxidant from the roots of Cynanchum wilfordii.

    PubMed

    Lee, D W; Kim, C; Le, D U

    2001-12-01

    Gagaminine, a steroidal alkaloid isolated from the roots of Cynanchum wilfordii, exhibited potent inhibitory effects on the aldehyde oxidase activity and lipid peroxidation. To find a possible means of mass production of this active component, which will be useful for animal tests, we synthesized it by an in vitro culture method using various growth conditions. Calli were induced from the explants of this medicinal plant and cultivated under culture conditions which varied in light, and the kinds and concentration of plant growth regulators. The production of gagaminine was found to be significantly higher in the dark than in the light. The best gagaminine content (0.960%) was obtained after cultivation of stems on the medium containing 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D, 2.0 mg/l) only. However, gagaminine was not detected by the mixture of 2,4-D and kinetin, while the mixtures of 2,4-D/zeatin and 2,4-D/6-benzylaminopurine produced a low content of gagaminine (<0.4%). In addition, suspension medium was much better for the formation of gagaminine than solid medium with an increase from 0.960 to 2.227% yield. These results suggest that gagaminine can be produced massively by in vitro culture using stems under the conditions of dark and 2,4-D on liquid medium. PMID:11767123

  3. Medication Adherence Measures: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Wai Yin; Fresco, Paula

    2015-01-01

    WHO reported that adherence among patients with chronic diseases averages only 50% in developed countries. This is recognized as a significant public health issue, since medication nonadherence leads to poor health outcomes and increased healthcare costs. Improving medication adherence is, therefore, crucial and revealed on many studies, suggesting interventions can improve medication adherence. One significant aspect of the strategies to improve medication adherence is to understand its magnitude. However, there is a lack of general guidance for researchers and healthcare professionals to choose the appropriate tools that can explore the extent of medication adherence and the reasons behind this problem in order to orchestrate subsequent interventions. This paper reviews both subjective and objective medication adherence measures, including direct measures, those involving secondary database analysis, electronic medication packaging (EMP) devices, pill count, and clinician assessments and self-report. Subjective measures generally provide explanations for patient's nonadherence whereas objective measures contribute to a more precise record of patient's medication-taking behavior. While choosing a suitable approach, researchers and healthcare professionals should balance the reliability and practicality, especially cost effectiveness, for their purpose. Meanwhile, because a perfect measure does not exist, a multimeasure approach seems to be the best solution currently. PMID:26539470

  4. Medication Adherence Measures: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Lam, Wai Yin; Fresco, Paula

    2015-01-01

    WHO reported that adherence among patients with chronic diseases averages only 50% in developed countries. This is recognized as a significant public health issue, since medication nonadherence leads to poor health outcomes and increased healthcare costs. Improving medication adherence is, therefore, crucial and revealed on many studies, suggesting interventions can improve medication adherence. One significant aspect of the strategies to improve medication adherence is to understand its magnitude. However, there is a lack of general guidance for researchers and healthcare professionals to choose the appropriate tools that can explore the extent of medication adherence and the reasons behind this problem in order to orchestrate subsequent interventions. This paper reviews both subjective and objective medication adherence measures, including direct measures, those involving secondary database analysis, electronic medication packaging (EMP) devices, pill count, and clinician assessments and self-report. Subjective measures generally provide explanations for patient's nonadherence whereas objective measures contribute to a more precise record of patient's medication-taking behavior. While choosing a suitable approach, researchers and healthcare professionals should balance the reliability and practicality, especially cost effectiveness, for their purpose. Meanwhile, because a perfect measure does not exist, a multimeasure approach seems to be the best solution currently. PMID:26539470

  5. Catabolite repression of the toluene degradation pathway in Pseudomonas putida harboring pWW0 under various conditions of nutrient limitation in chemostat culture

    SciTech Connect

    Duetz, W.A.; Wind, B.; Andel, J.G. van

    1996-02-01

    Many xenobiotic compounds are biodegradable in laboratory bacterial cultures, but results in the environment are not as reassuring. Actual biodegradation rates of aromatics under natural conditions may be very low. This study mimicked limiting conditions of oxygen phosphate and nitrogen in chemostat cultures of Pseudomonas putida and studied the inducibility of TOL plasmid pathway in response to the nonmetabolizable inducer-o-xylene.

  6. Comparison between superficial and solid-state cultures of Isaria fumosorosea: conidial yields, quality and sensitivity to oxidant conditions.

    PubMed

    Muñiz-Paredes, Facundo; Garza-López, Paul Misael; Viniegra-González, Gustavo; Loera, Octavio

    2016-07-01

    Conidia production and quality from mycoinsecticides in solid-state cultures (SSC) are frequently inferred from superficial culture (SC) results. Both parameters were evaluated for two Isaria fumosorosea strains (ARSEF 3302 and CNRCB1), in SC and SSC, using culture media with the same chemical composition. For both strains, conidia production was higher in SC than SSC in terms of conidia per gram of dry substrate. Germination in both strains did not show significant differences between SC and SSC (>90 %). Similarly, conidia viability in ARSEF 3302 strain did not show differences at early stages between SC and SSC, but was higher in SC compared to SSC in the late stage of culture; in contrast, conidia from CNRCB1 strain did not differ between both culture systems. Some infectivity parameters improved in conidia from SSC, compared to SC at the early stages, but these differences disappeared at the final stage, independently of the strain. Both strains showed decreased conidia production when 26 % O2 pulses were applied; nevertheless, conidiation in SSC was two orders of magnitude more sensitive to oxidant pulses. In SC with 26 % O2 pulses, conidia viability for both strains at early stages, was higher than in normal atmospheric conditions. Infectivity towards Galleria mellonella larvae was similar between conidia from normal atmosphere and oxidant conditions; notably, for the strain ARSEF 3302 infectivity decreased at the final stage. This study shows the intrinsic differences between SC and SSC, which should be considered when using SC as a model to design production processes in SSC. PMID:27263006

  7. Norepinephrine stimulates progesterone production in highly estrogenic bovine granulosa cells cultured under serum-free, chemically defined conditions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Since noradrenergic innervation was described in the ovarian follicle, the actions of the intraovarian catecholaminergic system have been the focus of a variety of studies. We aimed to determine the gonadotropin-independent effects of the catecholamine norepinephrine (NE) in the steroid hormone profile of a serum-free granulosa cell (GC) culture system in the context of follicular development and dominance. Methods Primary bovine GCs were cultivated in a serum-free, chemically defined culture system supplemented with 0.1% polyvinyl alcohol. The culture features were assessed by hormone measurements and ultrastructural characteristics of GCs. Results GCs produced increasing amounts of estradiol and pregnenolone for 144h and maintained ultrastructural features of healthy steroidogenic cells. Progesterone production was also detected, although it significantly increased only after 96h of culture. There was a highly significant positive correlation between estradiol and pregnenolone production in high E2-producing cultures. The effects of NE were further evaluated in a dose–response study. The highest tested concentration of NE (10 (−7) M) resulted in a significant increase in progesterone production, but not in estradiol or pregnenolone production. The specificity of NE effects on progesterone productio n was further investigated by incubating GCs with propranolol (10 (−8) M), a non-selective beta-adrenergic antagonist. Conclusions The present culture system represents a robust model to study the impact of intrafollicular factors, such as catecholamines, in ovarian steroidogenesis and follicular development. The results of noradrenergic effects in the steroidogenesis of GC have implications on physiological follicular fate and on certain pathological ovarian conditions such as cyst formation and anovulation. PMID:23171052

  8. Culture condition-dependent metabolite profiling of Aspergillus fumigatus with antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Kang, Daejung; Son, Gun Hee; Park, Hye Min; Kim, Jiyoung; Choi, Jung Nam; Kim, Hyang Yeon; Lee, Sarah; Hong, Seung-Beom; Lee, Choong Hwan

    2013-03-01

    Three sections of Aspergillus (five species, 21 strains) were classified according to culture medium-dependent and time-dependent secondary metabolite profile-based chemotaxonomy. Secondary metabolites were analysed by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS-MS) and multivariate statistical methods. From the Aspergillus sections that were cultured on malt extract agar (MEA) and Czapek yeast extract agar (CYA) for 7, 12, and 16 d, Aspergillus sections Fumigati (A. fumigatus), Nigri (A. niger), and Flavi (A. flavus, A. oryzae, and A. sojae) clustered separately on the basis of the results of the secondary metabolite analyses at 16 d regardless of culture medium. Based on orthogonal projection to latent structures discriminant analysis by partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), we identified the secondary metabolites that helped differentiate sections between A. fumigatus and Aspergillus section Flavi to be gliotoxin G, fumigatin oxide, fumigatin, pseurotin A or D, fumiquinazoline D, fumagillin, helvolic acid, 1,2-dihydrohelvolic acid, and 5,8-dihydroxy-9,12-octadecadienoic acid (5,8-diHODE). Among these compounds, fumagillin, helvolic acid, and 1,2-dihydrohelvolic acid of A. fumigatus showed antifungal activities against Malassezia furfur, which is lipophilic yeast that causes epidermal skin disorders. PMID:23537878

  9. Glaucoma Medication Adherence among African Americans: Program Development

    PubMed Central

    Dreer, Laura E.; Girkin, Christopher A.; Campbell, Lisa; Wood, Andy; Gao, Liyan; Owsley, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To elucidate barriers and facilitators related to glaucoma medication adherence among African Americans (AA) with glaucoma and to elicit input from a community-based participatory research team in order to guide the development of a culturally informed, health promotion program for improving glaucoma medication adherence among AA’s. Methods The nominal group technique (NGT), a highly structured focus group methodology, was implemented with 12 separate groups of AA’s patients with glaucoma (N = 89) to identify barriers and facilitators related to glaucoma medication usage. Participant rank-ordering votes were summed across groups and categorized into themes. Next, an individually and culturally targeted health promotion program promoting appropriate medication adherence was developed based on focus group results and input from a community-based participatory research team. Results The top five barriers included problems with 1) forgetfulness, 2) side effects, 3) cost/affordability, 4) eye drop administration, and 5) the eye drop schedule. The most salient top five facilitators were 1) fear or thoughts about the consequences of not taking eye drops, 2) use of memory aids, cues, or strategies, 3) maintaining a regular routine or schedule for eye drop administration, 4) ability to afford eye drops, and 5) keeping eye drops in the same area. The resulting health promotion program was based on a multi-component empowerment framework that included glaucoma education, motivational interviewing, and problem-solving training to improve glaucoma medication adherence. Conclusions Barriers and facilitators related to glaucoma medication adherence among AA’s are multifactorial. Based on the NGT themes and input from the community-based participatory research team, a culturally informed, health promotion program was designed and holds great promise for improving medication adherence among this vulnerable population. PMID:23873033

  10. A novel method to optimize culture conditions for biomass and sporulation of the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana IBC1201

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Li

    2011-01-01

    Biomass yields and sporulation of Beauveria bassiana was concerned on culture conditions, environmental factors and cultivation method. We optimized the best culture conditions for biomass yields of B. bassiana IBC1201 with the novel “two-stage” cultivation method as well as orthogonal matrix method. Firstly, we cultured spore suspension on the basal medium (sucrose 19.00 g, soy peptone 4.06 g, K2HPO4 1.00 g, KCl 0.50 g, MgSO4 0.50 g, FeSO4 0.10 g and 17.00 g Bactor) for the first stage culture of 4 days under room condition. Then, we transferred them to another defined medium (Cellobiose 9.52 g, urea 1.70 g, ZnSO4•7H2O 0.05 g/L, MnSO4•H2O 0.005 g/L, CaCl2 1.00 g/L, CuSO4•5H2O 0.05 g/L and 17.00 g Bactor) for more 4 days cultivation with the environmental factors combination of water potential -1.2 MPa /pH 3 /12 h light cycle/23 ℃ for biomass yields, and with the environmental factors combination of water potential -0.8 MPa /pH 3 /24 h light cycle/23 ℃ for spore yields. These results provided important information for mass production (including biomass and spore yields) of this great potential biocontrol fungus. PMID:24031792

  11. Measuring beliefs about gluten free diet adherence in adult coeliac disease using the theory of planned behaviour.

    PubMed

    Sainsbury, Kirby; Mullan, Barbara

    2011-04-01

    The theory of planned behaviour (TPB) was used to elicit the salient beliefs about gluten free diet (GFD) adherence in adults with coeliac disease (CD) and to design a TPB questionnaire to predict adherence levels. This questionnaire was administered to 265 CD participants with adherence and quality of life (QOL) measures, a GFD knowledge test, and self-reported psychiatric history. Regression analyses were used to test the fit of the TPB in predicting adherence, and to determine the nature of the relationships between adherence, QOL, knowledge, and psychiatric history. The TPB combined with self-reported depression and anxiety, and QOL explained significant variance in intention (41.0%) and adherence (33.7%). Poorer dietary adherence and psychiatric history were also associated with lower QOL. Findings suggest that the TPB provides an adequate model for predicting GFD adherence in CD, and the presence of psychiatric conditions represents a potential intervention target to improve adherence and QOL. PMID:21277925

  12. EXAMINATION OF CULTURE CONDITIONS ON ESTERASE ACTIVITIES IN HUMAN AND MOUSE NEUROBLASTOMA CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because neuroblastoma cell lines have potential to be used as in vitro alternatives for screening of antiesterase compounds (e.g., organophosphates (OPs) and carbamates), information is needed on conditions under which the cells are grown as these conditions may contribute to exp...

  13. Regulation of heat shock protein message in Jurkat cells cultured under serum-starved and gravity-altered conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, M. L.; Hughes-Fulford, M.

    2000-01-01

    Although our understanding of effects of space flight on human physiology has advanced significantly over the past four decades, the potential contribution of stress at the cellular and gene regulation level is not characterized. The objective of this ground-based study was to evaluate stress gene regulation in cells exposed to altered gravity and environmentally suboptimal conditions. We designed primers to detect message for both the constitutive and inducible forms of the heat shock protein, HSP-70. Applying the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), we probed for HSP-70 message in human acute T-cell leukemia cells, Jurkat, subjected to three types of environmental stressors: (1) altered gravity achieved by centrifugation (hypergravity) and randomization of the gravity vector in rotating bioreactors, (2) serum starvation by culture in medium containing 0.05% serum, and (3) temperature elevation (42 degrees C). Temperature elevation, as the positive control, significantly increased HSP-70 message, while centrifugation and culture in rotating bioreactors did not upregulate heat shock gene expression. We found a fourfold increase in heat shock message in serum-starved cells. Message for the housekeeping genes, actin and cyclophilin, were constant and comparable to unstressed controls for all treatments. We conclude that gravitational perturbations incurred by centrifugal forces, exceeding those characteristic of a Space Shuttle launch (3g), and culture in rotating bioreactors do not upregulate HSP-70 gene expression. In addition, we found RT-PCR useful for evaluating stress in cultured cells. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Grape Cultivar and Sap Culture Conditions Affect the Development of Xylella fastidiosa Phenotypes Associated with Pierce's Disease.

    PubMed

    Hao, Lingyun; Zaini, Paulo A; Hoch, Harvey C; Burr, Thomas J; Mowery, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a xylem-limited bacterium in plant hosts and causes Pierce's disease (PD) of grapevines, which differ in susceptibility according to the Vitis species (spp.). In this work we compared X. fastidiosa biofilm formation and population dynamics when cultured in xylem saps from PD-susceptible and -resistant Vitis spp. under different conditions. Behaviors in a closed-culture system were compared to those in different sap-renewal cultures that would more closely mimic the physicochemical environment encountered in planta. Significant differences in biofilm formation and growth in saps from PD-susceptible and -resistant spp. were only observed using sap renewal culture. Compared to saps from susceptible V. vinifera, those from PD-resistant V. aestivalis supported lower titers of X. fastidiosa and less biofilm and V. champinii suppressed both growth and biofilm formation, behaviors which are correlated with disease susceptibility. Furthermore, in microfluidic chambers X. fastidiosa formed thick mature biofilm with three-dimensional (3-D) structures, such as pillars and mounds, in saps from all susceptible spp. In contrast, only small aggregates of various shapes were formed in saps from four out of five of the resistant spp.; sap from the resistant spp. V. mustangensis was an exception in that it also supported thick lawns of biofilm but not the above described 3-D structures typically seen in a mature biofilm from the susceptible saps. Our findings provide not only critical technical information for future bioassays, but also suggest further understanding of PD susceptibility. PMID:27508296

  15. Grape Cultivar and Sap Culture Conditions Affect the Development of Xylella fastidiosa Phenotypes Associated with Pierce's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hoch, Harvey C.; Burr, Thomas J.; Mowery, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a xylem-limited bacterium in plant hosts and causes Pierce’s disease (PD) of grapevines, which differ in susceptibility according to the Vitis species (spp.). In this work we compared X. fastidiosa biofilm formation and population dynamics when cultured in xylem saps from PD-susceptible and -resistant Vitis spp. under different conditions. Behaviors in a closed-culture system were compared to those in different sap-renewal cultures that would more closely mimic the physicochemical environment encountered in planta. Significant differences in biofilm formation and growth in saps from PD-susceptible and -resistant spp. were only observed using sap renewal culture. Compared to saps from susceptible V. vinifera, those from PD-resistant V. aestivalis supported lower titers of X. fastidiosa and less biofilm and V. champinii suppressed both growth and biofilm formation, behaviors which are correlated with disease susceptibility. Furthermore, in microfluidic chambers X. fastidiosa formed thick mature biofilm with three-dimensional (3-D) structures, such as pillars and mounds, in saps from all susceptible spp. In contrast, only small aggregates of various shapes were formed in saps from four out of five of the resistant spp.; sap from the resistant spp. V. mustangensis was an exception in that it also supported thick lawns of biofilm but not the above described 3-D structures typically seen in a mature biofilm from the susceptible saps. Our findings provide not only critical technical information for future bioassays, but also suggest further understanding of PD susceptibility. PMID:27508296

  16. Culture condition improvement for whole-cell lipase production in submerged fermentation by Rhizopus chinensis using statistical method.

    PubMed

    Teng, Yun; Xu, Yan

    2008-06-01

    Rhizopus chinensis CCTCC M201021 was a versatile strain capable of producing whole-cell lipase with synthetic activity in submerged fermentation. In order to improve the production of whole-cell lipase and study the culture conditions systematically, the combination of taguchi method and response surface methodology was performed. Taguchi method was used for the initial optimization, and eight factors viz., maltose, olive oil, peptone, K2HPO4, agitation, inoculum size, fermentation volume and pH were selected for this study. The whole-cell lipase activity yield was two times higher than the control experiment under initial optimal conditions, and four significant factors (inoculum, olive oil, fermentation volume and peptone) were selected to test the effect on the lipase production using response surface methodology. The optimal fermentation parameters for enhanced whole-cell lipase yield were found to be: inoculum 4.25 x 10(8) spores/L, olive oil 2.367% (w/v), fermentation volume 18 mL/250 mL flask, peptone 4.06% (w/v). Subsequent experimental trails confirmed the validity of the model. These optimal culture conditions in the shake flask led to a lipase yield of 13875 U/L, which 120% increased compare with the non-optimized conditions. PMID:17888652

  17. Low-cost lipid production by an oleaginous yeast cultured in non-sterile conditions using model waste resources

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The yeast Metschnikowia pulcherrima, previously utilised as a biological control agent, was evaluated for its potential to produce lipids for biofuel production. Results Cultivation in low cost non-sterile conditions was achieved by exploiting its ability to grow at low temperature and pH and to produce natural antimicrobial compounds. Although not previously classified as oleaginous, a combination of low temperature and restricted nutrient availability triggered high levels of oil production in M. pulcherrima cultures. This regime was designed to trigger the sporulation process but prevent its completion to allow the accumulation of a subset of a normally transitional, but oil-rich, ‘pulcherrima’ cell type. This approach resulted in yields of up to 40% lipid, which compares favourably with other oleaginous microbes. We also demonstrate that M. pulcherrima metabolises glycerol and a diverse range of other sugars, suggesting that heterogeneous biomass could provide a suitable carbon source. M. pulcherrima also grows well in a minimal media containing no yeast extract. Finally, we demonstrate the potential of the yeast to produce lipids inexpensively on an industrial scale by culturing the yeast in a 500 L, open air, tank reactor without any significant contamination. Conclusions The production of antimicrobial compounds coupled to efficient growth at low temperature and pH enables culture of this oleaginous yeast in inexpensive, non-sterile conditions providing a potential route to economic biofuel production. PMID:24593824

  18. Growth and development of cultured carrot cells and embryos under spaceflight conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krikorian, A. D.; Dutcher, F. R.; Quinn, C. E.; Steward, F. C.

    1981-01-01

    Morphogenetically competent proembryonic cells and well-developed somatic embryos of carrot at two levels of organization were exposed for 18.5 days to a hypogravity environment aboard the Soviet Biosatellite Cosmos 1129. It was confirmed that cultured totipotent cells of carrot can give rise to embryos with well-developed roots and minimally developed shoots. It was also shown that the space hypogravity environment could support the further growth of already-organized, later somatic embryonic stages and give rise to fully developed embryo-plantlets with roots and shoots.

  19. The Effect of Culture Conditions on Microorganism Identification by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, Nancy B.; Wunschel, Sharon C.; Wunschel, David S.; Petersen, Catherine E.; Wahl, Karen L.

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has been used to identify bacteria based upon protein signatures. This research shows that while some different proteins are produced by vegetative bacteria when they are cultured in different growth media, positive identification with MALDI-TOF MS is still possible with the protocol established at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)(11). A core set of small proteins remain constant under at least four different culture media conditions including minimal medium -M9, rich media - tryptic soy broth (TSB) or Luria-Bertani (LB) broth and blood agar plates such that analysis of the intact cells by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry allows for consistent identification.

  20. Degradation of Trimethylbenzene Isomers by an Enrichment Culture under N(inf2)O-Reducing Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Haner, A.; Hohener, P.; Zeyer, J.

    1997-01-01

    A microbial culture enriched from a diesel fuel-contaminated aquifer was able to grow on 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene (1,3,5-TMB) and 1,2,4-TMB under N(inf2)O-reducing conditions, but it did not degrade 1,2,3-TMB. The oxidation of 1,3,5-TMB to CO(inf2) was coupled to the production of biomass and the reduction of N(inf2)O. N(inf2)O was used to avoid toxic effects caused by NO(inf2)(sup-) accumulation during growth with NO(inf3)(sup-) as the electron acceptor. In addition to 1,3,5-TMB and 1,2,4-TMB, the culture degraded toluene, m-xylene, p-xylene, 3-ethyltoluene, and 4-ethyltoluene. PMID:16535546

  1. Efficiency of some soil bacteria for chemical oxygen demand reduction of synthetic chlorsulfuron solutions under agiated culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Erguven, G O; Yildirim, N

    2016-01-01

    This study searches the efficiency of certain soil bacteria on chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction of synthetic chlorsulfuron solutions under agitated culture conditions. It also aims to determine the turbidity of liquid culture medium with chlorsulfuron during bacterial incubation for 120 hours. As a result the highest and lowest COD removal efficiency of bacteria was determined for Bacillus simplex as 94% and for Micrococcus luteus as 70%, respectively at the end of the 96th hour. It was found that COD removal efficiency showed certain differences depend on the bacterial species. It was also observed that B. simplex had the highest COD removal efficiency and it was a suitable bacterium species for bioremediation of a chlorsulfuron contaminated soils. PMID:27262810

  2. Medication Adherence and the Use of Generic Drug Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Briesacher, Becky A.; Andrade, Susan E.; Fouayzi, Hassan; Chan, K. Arnold

    2010-01-01

    Objective to assess if the lower copayments often charged for generic drugs explains the improved drug adherence associated with use of generic drugs. Methods We analyzed 2001–2004 healthcare claims data from 45 large employers. Study subjects were aged 18 years +, had 1 or more of 5 study conditions (hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, hypothyroidism, seizure disorders, and type 2 diabetes), and new use of generic-only or brand-only drug therapy for that condition. We measured adherence as the medication possession ratio (MPR), and adequate adherence as MPR >= 80%. Logistic regressions were conducted to assess adequate adherence adjusting for copayments. Results We identified 327,629 new users of drug therapy for the study conditions. Proportion of individuals starting generic therapies ranged from 9% in hypothyroidism to 45% in hypertension. After 1 year of therapy, 66.2% of individuals with hypothyroidism achieved MPR >= 80% compared to 53.4% with hypertension, 53.2% with hypercholesterolemia, 52.0% with diabetes, and 42.2% with seizure disorders. Logistic regressions of adequate adherence showed generics were associated with higher adherence relative to brands in 2 conditions (hypercholesterolemia AOR 1.52, 95% CI: 1.44–1.60; diabetes AOR 1.06, 95% CI: 1.01–1.12, p<.05), with lower adherence in 2 conditions (hypertension AOR 0.75, 95% CI:.73-.77; hypothyroidism AOR 0.86, 95% CI:.78-.94, p<.05), and no difference in seizure disorders. In comparison, the likelihood of achieving MPR >= 80% with $0 copayments relative to $1-$9 ranged from AOR 1.32 for seizure disorders (95% CI: 1.41–1.43) to AOR 1.45 for hypothyroidism (95% CI: 1.43–1.48). Conclusion Generic prescribing was associated with improved medication adherence in 2 of 5 study conditions, and the effect was modest. Copayments of $0 were associated with improved adherence across all study conditions. PMID:19589012

  3. Factors involved in adherence of lactobacilli to human Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Greene, J D; Klaenhammer, T R

    1994-01-01

    A quantitative assay performed with bacterial cells labelled with [3H]thymidine was used to investigate factors involved in the adherence of human isolates Lactobacillus acidophilus BG2FO4 and NCFM/N2 and Lactobacillus gasseri ADH to human Caco-2 intestinal cells. For all three strains, adherence was concentration dependent, greater at acidic pH values, and significantly greater than adherence of a control dairy isolate, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus 1489. Adherence of L. acidophilus BG2FO4 and NCFM/N2 was decreased by protease treatment of the bacterial cells, whereas adherence of L. gasseri ADH either was not affected or was enhanced by protease treatment. Putative surface layer proteins were identified on L. acidophilus BG2FO4 and NCFM/N2 cells but were not involved in adherence. Periodate oxidation of bacterial cell surface carbohydrates significantly reduced adherence of L. gasseri ADH, moderately reduced adherence of L. acidophilus BG2FO4, and had no effect on adherence of L. acidophilus NCFM/N2. These results indicate that Lactobacillus species adhere to human intestinal cells via mechanisms which involve different combinations of carbohydrate and protein factors on the bacterial cell surface. The involvement of a secreted bridging protein, which has been proposed as the primary mediator of adherence of L. acidophilus BG2FO4 in spent culture supernatant (M.-H. Coconnier, T. R. Klaenhammer, S. Kernéis, M.-F. Bernet, and A. L. Servin, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 58:2034-2039, 1992), was not confirmed in this study. Rather, a pH effect on Caco-2 cells contributed significantly to the adherence of this strain in spent culture supernatant.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:7811085

  4. Stability of dietary polyphenols under the cell culture conditions: avoiding erroneous conclusions.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jianbo; Högger, Petra

    2015-02-11

    Most data of bioactivity from dietary polyphenols have been derived from in vitro cell culture experiments. In this context, little attention is paid to potential artifacts due to chemical instability of these natural antioxidants. An early degradation time ((C)T10) and half-degradation time ((C)T50) were defined to characterize the stability of 53 natural antioxidants incubated in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) at 37 °C. The degree of hydroxylation of flavones and flavonols significantly influenced the stability in order resorcinol-type > catechol-type > pyrogallol-type, with the pyrogallol-type being least stable. In contrast, any glycosylation of polyphenols obviously enhanced their stability. However, the glycosylation was less important compared to the substitution pattern of the nucleus rings. Methoxylation of flavonoids with more than three hydroxyl groups typically improved their stability as did the hydrogenation of the C2═C3 double bond of flavonoids to corresponding flavanoids. There was no significant correlation between the antioxidant potential of polyphenols and their stability. Notably, the polyphenols were clearly more stable in human plasma than in DMEM, which may be caused by polyphenol-protein interactions. It is strongly suggested to carry out stability tests in parallel with cell culture experiments for dietary antioxidants with catechol or pyrogallol structures and pyrogallol-type glycosides in order to avoid artifacts. PMID:25608051

  5. Effect of dynamic process conditions on nitrogen oxides emission from a nitrifying culture.

    PubMed

    Kampschreur, Marlies J; Tan, Nico C G; Kleerebezem, Robbert; Picioreanu, Cristian; Jetten, Mike S M; Van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2008-01-15

    Nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from nitrifying ecosystems are a serious threat to the environment. The factors influencing the emission and the responsible microorganisms and pathways were studied using a laboratory-scale nitrifying reactor system. The nitrifying culture was established at growth rates relevant to wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). During stable ammonia oxidation, 0.03% of ammonium was emitted as NO and 2.8% was emitted as N2O. Although mixed cultures were used, clear responses in emission of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) could be detected and it was concluded that the denitrification pathway of AOB was the main source of the emissions. Emissions of nitrogen oxides in the system were strongly influenced by oxygen, nitrite, and ammonium concentrations. Steady state emission levels greatly underestimate the total emission, because changes in oxygen, nitrite, and ammonium concentrations induced a dramatic rise in NO and N2O emission. The data presented can be used as an indication for NO and N2O emission by AOB in plug-flow activated sludge systems, which is highly relevant because of the atmospheric impact and potential health risk of these compounds. PMID:18284142

  6. Purified human pancreatic duct cell culture conditions defined by serum-free high-content growth factor screening.

    PubMed

    Hoesli, Corinne A; Johnson, James D; Piret, James M

    2012-01-01

    The proliferation of pancreatic duct-like CK19+ cells has implications for multiple disease states including pancreatic cancer and diabetes mellitus. The in vitro study of this important cell type has been hampered by their limited expansion compared to fibroblast-like vimentin+ cells that overgrow primary cultures. We aimed to develop a screening platform for duct cell mitogens after depletion of the vimentin+ population. The CD90 cell surface marker was used to remove the vimentin+ cells from islet-depleted human pancreas cell cultures by magnetic-activated cell sorting. Cell sorting decreased CD90+ cell contamination of the cultures from 34±20% to 1.3±0.6%, yielding purified CK19+ cultures with epithelial morphology. A full-factorial experimental design was then applied to test the mitogenic effects of bFGF, EGF, HGF, KGF and VEGF. After 6 days in test conditions, the cells were labelled with BrdU, stained and analyzed by high-throughput imaging. This screening assay confirmed the expected mitogenic effects of bFGF, EGF, HGF and KGF on CK19+ cells and additionally revealed interactions between these factors and VEGF. A serum-free medium containing bFGF, EGF, HGF and KGF led to CK19+ cell expansion comparable to the addition of 10% serum. The methods developed in this work should advance pancreatic cancer and diabetes research by providing effective cell culture and high-throughput screening platforms to study purified primary pancreatic CK19+ cells. PMID:22442738

  7. Unique characteristics of human mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (MSC) pre-activated in 3D cultures under different conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ylostalo, Joni H.; Bartosh, Thomas J.; Tiblow, April; Prockop, Darwin J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are being employed in clinical trials, but the best protocol to prepare the cells for administration to patients remains unclear. We previously demonstrated that MSCs could be pre-activated to express therapeutic factors by culturing the cells in 3D. Here we compared the activation of MSCs in 3D in fetal bovine serum (FBS) containing medium and in multiple xeno-free media formulations. Methods MSC aggregation and sphere formation was studied using hanging drop cultures with medium containing FBS or with various commercially available stem cell media with or without human serum albumin (HSA). Activation of MSCs was studied with gene expression and protein secretion measurements and with functional studies using macrophages and cancer cells. Results MSCs did not condense into tight spheroids and express a full complement of therapeutic genes in MEMα or several commercial stem-cell media. However, we identified a chemically-defined xeno-free media that when supplemented with HSA from blood or recombinant HSA, resulted in compact spheres with high cell viability, together with high expression of anti-inflammatory (PGE2, TSG-6) and anti-cancer molecules (TRAIL, IL-24). Furthermore, spheres cultured in this medium showed potent anti-inflammatory effects in an LPS-stimulated macrophage system, and suppressed the growth of prostate cancer cells by promoting cell-cycle arrest and cell death. Discussion We demonstrated that cell activation in 3D depends critically on the culture medium. The conditions developed here for 3D culture of MSCs should be useful in further research on MSCs and their potential therapeutic applications. PMID:25231893

  8. Culture of the hydrocarbon producing microalga Botryococcus braunii strain Showa: optimal CO2, salinity, temperature, and irradiance conditions.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Takeshi; Okada, Shigeru; Honda, Masaki

    2013-04-01

    Specific growth rates and hydrocarbon contents of Botryococcus braunii strain Showa were measured under a wide range of CO2, salinity, temperature, and irradiance conditions. The bubbling CO2 concentration of 0.2-5% and no addition of salinity were favorable conditions for growth. The strain cannot grow at 5°C and above 35°C under any irradiance levels. Maximum specific growth rate of 0.5 day(-1) (doubling time of 1.4 days), the highest value reported for B. braunii in the past studies, was observed at 30°C and 850 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1). Since hydrocarbon productivity, shown as the product of hydrocarbon content and specific growth rate, increased with the increasing specific growth rate, we conclude that more efficient hydrocarbon production by the mass culture of strain Showa can be achieved by maintaining higher specific growth rate based on the culture conditions presented in this study. PMID:23428820

  9. Production of extracellular acidic lipase by Rhizopus arrhizus as a function of culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Kumar, K K; Deshpande, B S; Ambedkar, S S

    1993-01-01

    Thermophilic strain of Rhizopus arrhizus accumulates an acidic lipase in culture fluid when grown in a medium containing ground nut oil, milk powder and inorganic salts. Addition of 2.0% ground nut oil yielded the highest productivity of enzyme. Soyabean meal and arabinose were found to be the best nitrogen and carbon sources for enzyme production respectively. Addition of metal ions such as MnCl2, SnCl2 and CaCl2 increased the enzyme productivity by 4 fold. The enzyme productivity in the fermenter was much higher (310 U/ml) than in shake-flask (180 U/ml). Crude lipase preparation showed pH and temperature activity optima at 3.5 and 45 degrees C respectively. The enzyme is thermostable and highly active in hydrolysing triglycerides and failed to hydrolyse-methyl esters of caprylate and palmitate. PMID:8181953

  10. Biomechanical Conditioning Enhanced Matrix Synthesis in Nucleus Pulposus Cells Cultured in Agarose Constructs with TGFβ

    PubMed Central

    Tilwani, Reshma K.; Bader, Dan L.; Chowdhury, Tina T.

    2012-01-01

    Biomechanical signals play an important role in normal disc metabolism and pathology. For instance, nucleus pulposus (NP) cells will regulate metabolic activities and maintain a balance between the anabolic and catabolic cascades. The former involves factors such as transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) and mechanical stimuli, both of which are known to regulate matrix production through autocrine and paracrine mechanisms. The present study examined the combined effect of TGFβ and mechanical loading on anabolic activities in NP cells cultured in agarose constructs. Stimulation with TGFβ and dynamic compression reduced nitrite release and increased matrix synthesis and gene expression of aggrecan and collagen type II. The findings from this work has the potential for developing regenerative treatment strategies which could either slow down or stop the degenerative process and/or promote healing mechanisms in the intervertebral disc. PMID:24956513

  11. Peptide-biphenyl hybrid-capped AuNPs: stability and biocompatibility under cell culture conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, Mona; Pérez, Yolanda; Mann, Enrique; Herradón, Bernardo; Fernández-Cruz, María L.; Navas, José M.

    2013-07-01

    In this study, we explored the biocompatibility of Au nanoparticles (NPs) capped with peptide-biphenyl hybrid (PBH) ligands containing glycine (Gly), cysteine (Cys), tyrosine (Tyr), tryptophan (Trp) and methionine (Met) amino acids in the human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line Hep G2. Five AuNPs, Au[(Gly-Tyr-Met)2B], Au[(Gly-Trp-Met)2B], Au[(Met)2B], Au[(Gly-Tyr-TrCys)2B] and Au[(TrCys)2B], were synthesised. Physico-chemical and cytotoxic properties were thoroughly studied. Transmission electron micrographs showed isolated near-spherical nanoparticles with diameters of 1.5, 1.6, 2.3, 1.8 and 2.3 nm, respectively. Dynamic light scattering evidenced the high stability of suspensions in Milli-Q water and culture medium, particularly when supplemented with serum, showing in all cases a tendency to form agglomerates with diameters approximately 200 nm. In the cytotoxicity studies, interference caused by AuNPs with some typical cytotoxicity assays was demonstrated; thus, only data obtained from the resazurin based assay were used. After 48-h incubation, only concentrations ≥50 μg/ml exhibited cytotoxicity. Such doses were also responsible for an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS). Some differences were observed among the studied NPs. Of particular importance is the AuNPs capped with the PBH ligand (Gly-Tyr-TrCys)2B showing remarkable stability in culture medium, even in the absence of serum. Moreover, these AuNPs have unique biological effects on Hep G2 cells while showing low toxicity. The production of ROS along with supporting optical microscopy images suggests cellular interaction/uptake of these particular AuNPs. Future research efforts should further test this hypothesis, as such interaction/uptake is highly relevant in drug delivery systems.

  12. Peptide-biphenyl hybrid-capped AuNPs: stability and biocompatibility under cell culture conditions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we explored the biocompatibility of Au nanoparticles (NPs) capped with peptide-biphenyl hybrid (PBH) ligands containing glycine (Gly), cysteine (Cys), tyrosine (Tyr), tryptophan (Trp) and methionine (Met) amino acids in the human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line Hep G2. Five AuNPs, Au[(Gly-Tyr-Met)2B], Au[(Gly-Trp-Met)2B], Au[(Met)2B], Au[(Gly-Tyr-TrCys)2B] and Au[(TrCys)2B], were synthesised. Physico-chemical and cytotoxic properties were thoroughly studied. Transmission electron micrographs showed isolated near-spherical nanoparticles with diameters of 1.5, 1.6, 2.3, 1.8 and 2.3 nm, respectively. Dynamic light scattering evidenced the high stability of suspensions in Milli-Q water and culture medium, particularly when supplemented with serum, showing in all cases a tendency to form agglomerates with diameters approximately 200 nm. In the cytotoxicity studies, interference caused by AuNPs with some typical cytotoxicity assays was demonstrated; thus, only data obtained from the resazurin based assay were used. After 48-h incubation, only concentrations ≥50 μg/ml exhibited cytotoxicity. Such doses were also responsible for an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS). Some differences were observed among the studied NPs. Of particular importance is the AuNPs capped with the PBH ligand (Gly-Tyr-TrCys)2B showing remarkable stability in culture medium, even in the absence of serum. Moreover, these AuNPs have unique biological effects on Hep G2 cells while showing low toxicity. The production of ROS along with supporting optical microscopy images suggests cellular interaction/uptake of these particular AuNPs. Future research efforts should further test this hypothesis, as such interaction/uptake is highly relevant in drug delivery systems. PMID:23829784

  13. Toxicological effects of cypermethrin to marine phytoplankton in a co-culture system under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhao-Hui; Nie, Xiang-Ping; Yue, Wen-Jie

    2011-08-01

    The growth of three marine phytoplankton species Skeletonema costatum, Scrippsiella trochoidea and Chattonella marina and the response of the antioxidant defense system have been investigated on exposure to commercial cypermethrin for 96 h and 32 days in a co-culture system. Growth of the three species was generally comparable over 96 h with an inoculation of 1:3:6.5 (C. marina:S. trochoidea:S. costatum), with stimulation at 5 μg l(-1) and inhibition under higher concentrations (50, 100 μg l(-1)). However, when inoculating at ratios of 1:1:1 during a 32 day test, S. costatum became the most sensitive species and was significantly inhibited in all test groups under the dual stresses of cypermethrin and interspecies competition. The growth of C. marina was significantly inhibited at the concentrations higher than 5 μg l(-1), while the growth of S. trochoidea was significantly promoted at low concentrations. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities significantly increased during 6-12 h exposure periods in test treatments at low concentrations, and enhanced in the control as well due to interspecies competition. The lipid peroxidation product malondialdehyde was enhanced at high concentrations, but did not increase in control and low concentration cultures with high SOD activities, indicating that algal cells activated the antioxidant enzymes promptly to protect the cells from lipid membrane damage. Results from this study suggested that cypermethrin pollution in maricultural sea waters might lead to a shift in phytoplankton community structure from diatom to harmful dinoflagellate species, and thus potentially stimulatory for harmful algal blooms. PMID:21499869

  14. Adherence of sputtered titanium carbides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Wheeler, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    Sputtered coatings of the refractory metal carbides are of great interest for applications where hard wear-resistant materials are desired. The usefulness of sputtered refractory carbides is often limited, in practice, by spalling or interfacial separation. In this work improvements in the adherence of refractory carbides on iron, nickel and titanium based alloys were obtained by using oxidation, reactive sputtering or sputtered interlayers to alter the coating-substrate interfacial region. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and argon ion etching were used to characterize the interfacial regions, and an attempt was made to correlate adherence as measured in wear tests with the chemical nature of the interface.

  15. Structural diversity of streptococcal mutans synthesized under different culture and environmental conditions and its effect on mutanase synthesis.

    PubMed

    Wiater, Adrian; Pleszczyńska, Małgorzata; Próchniak, Katarzyna; Szczodrak, Janusz

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcal mutans synthesized under different conditions by growing cultures or by their glucosyltransferases were shown to exhibit a great structural and property diversity. Culturing and environmental factors causing structural differences in mutans were specified. All of the obtained biopolymers (76 samples) were water-insoluble and most of them (72) had a structure with a predominance of α-(1→3)-linked glucose (i.e., the content of α-(1→3)-linkages in the glucan was always higher than 50%, but did not exceed 76%). An exception were four glucans containing more than 50% of α-(1→6)-sequences. In these structurally unique mutans, the ratio of α-(1→3)- to α-(1→6)-bonds ranged from 0.75 to 0.97. Aside from one polymer, all others had a heavily branched structures and differed in the number of α-(1→3), α-(1→6), and α-(1→3,6) linkages and their mutual proportion. The induction of mutanase production in shaken flask cultures of Trichoderma harzianum by the structurally diverse mutans resulted in enzyme activities ranging from 0.144 to 1.051 U/mL. No statistical correlation was found between the total percentage content of α-(1→3)-linkages in the α-glucan and mutanase activity. Thus, despite biosynthetic differences causing structural variation in the mutans, it did not matter which mutan structures were used to induce mutanase production. PMID:23047481

  16. [Accumulation of α-tocopherol and β-carotene in Euglena gracilis Cells under Autotrophic and Mixotrophic Culture Conditions].

    PubMed

    Mokrosnop, V M; Polishchuk, A V; Zolotareva, E K

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the work was to find the mode of cultivation of unicellular flagellate Euglena gracilis, favorable for the simultaneous accumulation of α-tocopherol and β-carotene. Cells were grown either in photoautotrophic or photoheterotrophic conditions in the presence of 100 mM ethanol (variant Et) or 40 mM glutamate (variant Gt), or their combination (variant EtGt). The exogenous substrates significantly stimulated light-dependent growth of E. gracilis. The largest increase of biomass was recorded on the 20th day in the variant EtGt and exceeded the autotrophic control by 7 times. The content of β-carotene and chlorophyll (Chl) per cell in mixotrophic cultures exceeded the control by 2-3 and 1.6-2 times, respectively. At the same time, α-tocopherol accumulation in autotrophic cells was greater than in the cells of mixotrophic cultures by 2-7 times. Total yield of tocopherol per unit volume of culture medium, which depended not only on its intracellular content, but also on the amount of accumulated biomass was highest in EtGt variant. A correlation between the accumulation of the antioxidants and the equilibrium concentration of oxygen in the growth medium, which depended on the intensities of photosynthesis and respiration has been analyzed. PMID:27266253

  17. Evaluation of Culture Conditions to Obtain Fatty Acids from Saline Microalgae Species: Dunaliella salina, Sinecosyfis sp., and Chroomonas sp.

    PubMed Central

    Castilla Casadiego, D. A.; Albis Arrieta, A. R.; Angulo Mercado, E. R.; Cervera Cahuana, S. J.; Baquero Noriega, K. S.; Suárez Escobar, A. F.; Morales Avendaño, E. D.

    2016-01-01

    The use of the saline microalgae, Dunaliella salina, Sinecosyfis sp., and Chroomonas sp., was explored as an alternative source for the production of fatty acids using fertilizer and glycerol as culture media. The nutrient medium used contained “Nutrifoliar,” a commercial fertilizer, and/or glycerol, in natural sea water. The microalgae were placed in cultures with different conditions. The parameters that favored the largest production of fatty acids were 24 hours of agitation and illumination, 1620 L/day of air supply, 2.25 L of air/min, and a temperature of 32°C using “Nutrifoliar” as the culture media. Results indicated that, from 3 g of microalgae in wet base of Chroomonas sp., 54.43 mg of oil was produced. The chromatographic characterization of oil obtained revealed the presence of essential fatty acids such as 9,12,15-octadecatrienoic acid (omega-3) and 4,7,10-hexadecatrienoic acid (omega-6) from the species Dunaliella salina. On the other hand, 9,12-octadecadienoic acid (omega-6) and cis-11-eicosenoic acid (omega-9) were identified from the species Chroomonas sp. The temperature variations played an important role in the velocity of growth or the production of the algae biomass, the amount of oil, and the ability to produce fatty acids. PMID:27376085

  18. Cytoskeletal remodeling of rat aortic smooth muscle cells in vitro: relationships to culture conditions and analogies to in vivo situations.

    PubMed

    Skalli, O; Bloom, W S; Ropraz, P; Azzarone, B; Gabbiani, G

    1986-07-01

    Cytoskeletal features of arterial smooth muscle cells (SMC) vary characteristically during development and during atheromatous plaque formation (Gabbiani et al., 1984; Kocher et al., 1985). We have analyzed the cytoskeletal features of rat aortic SMC placed in culture in the presence of 10% foetal calf serum (thus containing growth factors probably playing a role in SMC development and atheroma formation), as compared to SMC freshly isolated from the rat aortic media. Under these conditions, SMC show a typical cytoskeletal remodeling characterized by: 1) increased content of vimentin per cell, increased number of cells containing only vimentin, and decreased number of vimentin plus desmin containing cells; 2) decreased contents of actin, tropomyosin and myosin; 3) a switch in the pattern of actin isoforms with the appearance of a beta-type predominance. Some of these changes (e.g. increase of vimentin and decrease of alpha-type actin) are seen already in cells entering for the first time in S-phase after plating. Pulse-chase experiments with 3H-thymidine (3H-TdR) indicate that vimentin containing SMC possess a higher replicative activity than vimentin plus desmin containing SMC, thus explaining the selection of vimentin containing cells during culture. Our results indicate that during culture SMC develop features similar to those observed in normal foetal SMC or in SMC present in atheromatous plaques; this model may be useful for the understanding of mechanisms leading to SMC differentiation and to atheroma formation. PMID:3528513

  19. An endothelial cultured condition medium embedded porous PLGA scaffold for the enhancement of mouse embryonic stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Li, Ching-Wen; Pan, Wei-Ting; Ju, Jyh-Cherng; Wang, Gou-Jen

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we have developed a microporous poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) scaffold that combines a continuous release property and a three-dimensional (3D) scaffolding technique for the precise and efficient formation of endothelial cell lineage from embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Eight PLGA scaffolds (14.29%, 16.67%, 20% and 25% concentrations of PLGA solutions) mixed with two crystal sizes of sodium chloride (NaCl) were fabricated by leaching. Then, vascular endothelial cell conditioned medium (ECCM) mixed with gelatin was embedded into the scaffold for culturing of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). The 14.29% PLGA scaffolds fabricated using non-ground NaCl particles (NG-PLGA) and the 25% PLGA containing scaffolds fabricated using ground NaCl particles (G-PLGA) possessed minimum and maximum moisture content and bovine serum albumin (BSA) content properties, respectively. These two groups of scaffolds were used for future experiments in this study. Cell culture results demonstrated that the proposed porous scaffolds without growth factors were sufficient to induce mouse ESCs to differentiate into endothelial-like cells in the early culture stages, and combined with embedded ECCM could provide a long-term inducing system for ESC differentiation. PMID:27068738

  20. Identification of Molecular and Cellular Responses of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Biofilms under Culture Conditions Relevant to Field Conditions for Bioreduction of Toxic Metals and Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Judy D. Wall

    2011-06-09

    Our findings demonstrated that D. vulgaris surface-adhered populations produce extracellular structures, and that that the cells have altered carbon and energy flux compared to planktonic cells. Biofilms did not have greatly increased carbohydrate accumulation. Interestingly genes present on the native plasmid found in D. vulgaris Hildenborough were necessary for wild type biofilm formation. In addition, extracellular appendages dependent on functions or proteins encoded by flaG or fliA also contributed to biofilm formation. Studies with SRB biofilms have indicated that the reduction and precipitation of metals can occur within the biofilm matrix; however, little work has been done to elucidate the physiological state of surface-adhered cells during metal reduction (Cr6+, U6+) and how this process is affected by nutrient feed levels (i.e., the stimulant).

  1. Optimization of cultural conditions for biosurfactant production by Pleurotus djamor in solid state fermentation.

    PubMed

    Velioglu, Zulfiye; Ozturk Urek, Raziye

    2015-11-01

    Being eco-friendly, less toxic, more biodegradable and biocompatible, biological surfactants have higher activity and stability compared to synthetic ones. In spite of the fact that there are abundant benefits of biosurfactants over the synthetic congeners, the problem related with the economical and large scale production proceeds. The utilization of several industrial wastes in the production media as substrates reduces the production cost. This current study aims optimization of biosurfactant production conditions by Pleurotus djamor, grown on sunflower seed shell, grape wastes or potato peels as renewable cheap substrates in solid state fermentation. After determination of the best substrate for biosurfactant production, we indicate optimum size and amount of solid substrate, volume of medium, temperature, pH and Fe(2+) concentrations on biosurfactant production. In optimum conditions, by reducing water surface tension to 28.82 ± 0.3 mN/m and having oil displacement diameter of 3.9 ± 0.3 cm, 10.205 ± 0.5 g/l biosurfactant was produced. Moreover, chemical composition of biosurfactant produced in optimum condition was determined by FTIR. Lastly, laboratory's large-scale production was carried out in optimum conditions in a tray bioreactor designed by us and 8.9 ± 0.5 g/l biosurfactant was produced with a significant surface activity (37.74 ± 0.3 mN/m). With its economical suggestions and applicability of laboratory's large-scale production, this work indicates the possibility of using low cost agro-industrial wastes as renewable substrates for biosurfactant production. Therefore, using economically produced biosurfactant will reduce cost in several applications such as bioremediation, oil recovery and biodegradation of toxic chemicals. PMID:25865657

  2. Aspergillus oryzae S2 alpha-amylase production under solid state fermentation: optimization of culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Sahnoun, Mouna; Kriaa, Mouna; Elgharbi, Fatma; Ayadi, Dorra-Zouari; Bejar, Samir; Kammoun, Radhouane

    2015-04-01

    Aspergillus oryzae S2 was assayed for alpha-amylase production under solid state fermentation (SSF). In addition to AmyA and AmyB already produced in monitored submerged culture, the strain was noted to produce new AmyB oligomeric forms, in particular a dominant tetrameric form named AmyC. The latter was purified to homogeneity through fractional acetone precipitation and size exclusion chromatography. SDS-PAGE and native PAGE analyses revealed that, purified AmyC was an approximately 172 kDa tetramer of four 42 kDa subunits. AmyC was also noted to display the same NH2-terminal amino acid sequence residues and approximately the same physico-chemical properties of AmyA and AmyB, to exhibit maximum activity at pH 5.6 and 60 °C, and to produce maltose and maltotriose as major starch hydrolysis end-products. Soyabean meal was the best substitute to yeast extract compared to fish powder waste and wheat gluten waste. AmyC production was optimized under SSF using statistical design methodology. Moisture content of 76.25%, C/N substrate ratio of 0.62, and inoculum size of 10(6.87) spores allowed maximum activity of 22118.34 U/g of dried substrate, which was 33 times higher than the one obtained before the application of the central composite design (CCD). PMID:25617840

  3. Evaluation of Cronobacter Growth and Phenotypic Variation Under Modified Culture Conditions.

    PubMed

    Segars, Katharine; Simpson, Steven; Kerdahi, Khalil; Sulaiman, Irshad M

    2016-02-01

    Cronobacter sakazakii is an opportunistic pathogen known to cause acute meningitis and necrotizing enterocolitis in neonates and immunocompromised individuals. It has been isolated from a wide range of food and environmental samples, and has been linked to outbreaks associated with powdered infant formula. This study was carried out to assess variations in growth conditions (temperature, pH, and sugar supplement) and to establish how these changes impact phenotypic characteristics for successful recovery and identification of Cronobacter, particularly for routine surveillance purposes. A total of six Cronobacter isolates were tested to evaluate the above growth conditions, including three ATCC Cronobacter reference and three environmental isolates obtained from regulatory sample screening. Although only slight changes in colony-forming units were observed across the pH range and the sugars tested, the morphology was significantly impacted by changes in these growth factors. Incubation between 30 and 50 °C resulted in growth after 24 h, and the growth was slower at ambient temperature and colony formation was most robust at 30 °C. Results of this study suggest that 30 °C may be suitable for recovery of some Cronobacter strains, and minor variations in growth conditions can alter colony morphology and appearance. Expression of unique biological characteristics based on phenotypic observations may be beneficial for differentiating various Cronobacter strains. PMID:26567034

  4. When tuberculosis treatment fails. A social behavioral account of patient adherence.

    PubMed

    Sumartojo, E

    1993-05-01

    seriousness of their problems with tuberculosis are more likely to be adherent. Additional research on adherence predictors is needed, but it should reflect the complexity of the problem. This research requires a theory-based approach, which has been essentially missing from studies on adherence and tuberculosis. Research also needs to target predictors for specific groups of patients. There is clear evidence of the effect on adherence of culturally influenced beliefs and attitudes about tuberculosis and its treatment. Cultural factors are associated with misinformation about the medical aspects of the disease and the stigmatization of persons with tuberculosis. Culturally sensitive, targeted information is needed, and some has been developed by local tuberculosis programs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:8484650

  5. Toxicity of Functional Nano-Micro Zinc Oxide Tetrapods: Impact of Cell Culture Conditions, Cellular Age and Material Properties

    PubMed Central

    Papavlassopoulos, Heike; Mishra, Yogendra K.; Kaps, Sören; Paulowicz, Ingo; Abdelaziz, Ramzy; Elbahri, Mady; Maser, Edmund; Adelung, Rainer; Röhl, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    With increasing production and applications of nanostructured zinc oxide, e.g., for biomedical and consumer products, the question of safety is getting more and more important. Different morphologies of zinc oxide structures have been synthesized and accordingly investigated. In this study, we have particularly focused on nano-micro ZnO tetrapods (ZnO-T), because their large scale fabrication has been made possible by a newly introduced flame transport synthesis approach which will probably lead to several new applications. Moreover, ZnO-T provide a completely different morphology then classical spherical ZnO nanoparticles. To get a better understanding of parameters that affect the interactions between ZnO-T and mammalian cells, and thus their biocompatibility, we have examined the impact of cell culture conditions as well as of material properties on cytotoxicity. Our results demonstrate that the cell density of fibroblasts in culture along with their age, i.e., the number of preceding cell divisions, strongly affect the cytotoxic potency of ZnO-T. Concerning the material properties, the toxic potency of ZnO-T is found to be significantly lower than that of spherical ZnO nanoparticles. Furthermore, the morphology of the ZnO-T influenced cellular toxicity in contrast to surface charges modified by UV illumination or O2 treatment and to the material age. Finally, we have observed that direct contact between tetrapods and cells increases their toxicity compared to transwell culture models which allow only an indirect effect via released zinc ions. The results reveal several parameters that can be of importance for the assessment of ZnO-T toxicity in cell cultures and for particle development. PMID:24454775

  6. A method for incorporating macromolecules into adherent cells

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    We describe a simple method for loading exogenous macromolecules into the cytoplasm of mammalian cells adherent to tissue culture dishes. Culture medium was replaced with a thin layer of fluorescently labeled macromolecules, the cells were harvested from the substrate by scraping with a rubber policeman, transferred immediately to ice cold media, washed, and then replated for culture. We refer to the method as "scrape-loading." Viability of cells was 50-60% immediately after scrape-loading and was 90% for those cells remaining after 24 h of culture. About 40% of adherent, well-spread fibroblasts contained fluorescent molecules 18 h after scrape-loading of labeled dextrans, ovalbumin, or immunoglobulin-G. On average, 10(7) dextran molecules (70,000-mol wt) were incorporated into each fibroblast by scrape- loading in 10 mg/ml dextran. The extent of loading depended on the concentration and molecular weight of the dextrans used. A fluorescent analog of actin could also be loaded into fibroblasts where it labeled stress fibers. HeLa cells, a macrophage-like cell line, 1774A.1, and human neutrophils were all successfully loaded with dextran by scraping. The method of scrape-loading should be applicable to a broad range of adherent cell types, and useful for loading of diverse kinds of macromolecules. PMID:6201494

  7. Biosorption of strontium from simulated nuclear wastewater by Scenedesmus spinosus under culture conditions: adsorption and bioaccumulation processes and models.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingxue; Dong, Faqin; Kang, Wu; Sun, Shiyong; Wei, Hongfu; Zhang, Wei; Nie, Xiaoqin; Guo, Yuting; Huang, Ting; Liu, Yuanyuan

    2014-06-01

    Algae biosorption is an ideal wastewater treatment method when coupled with algae growth and biosorption. The adsorption and bioaccumulation of strontium from simulated nuclear wastewater by Scenedesmus spinosus were investigated in this research. One hundred mL of cultured S. spinosus cells with a dry weight of 1.0 mg in simulated nuclear wastewater were used to analyze the effects on S. spinosus cell growth as well as the adsorption and bioaccumulation characters under conditions of 25 ± 1 °C with approximately 3,000 lux illumination. The results showed that S. spinosus had a highly selective biosorption capacity for strontium, with a maximum bioremoval ratio of 76%. The adsorbed strontium ion on cell walls was approximately 90% of the total adsorbed amount; the bioaccumulation in the cytoplasm varied by approximately 10%. The adsorption quantity could be described with an equilibrium isotherm. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model suggested that adsorption was the rate-limiting step of the biosorption process. A new bioaccumulation model with three parameters was proposed and could give a good fit with the experiment data. The results suggested that S. spinosus may be a potential biosorbent for the treatment of nuclear wastewater in culture conditions. PMID:24919131

  8. Effect of culturing conditions on the expression of key enzymes in the proteolytic system of Lactobacillus bulgaricus.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jun-cai; Liu, Fei; Ren, Da-xi; Han, Wei-wei; Du, Yue-ou

    2015-04-01

    The proteolytic system of Lactobacillus bulgaricus breaks down milk proteins into peptides and amino acids, which are essential for the growth of the bacteria. The aim of this study was to determine the expressions of seven key genes in the proteolytic system under different culturing conditions (different phases, initial pH values, temperatures, and nitrogen sources) using real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The transcriptions of the seven genes were reduced by 30-fold on average in the stationary phase compared with the exponential growth phase. The transcriptions of the seven genes were reduced by 62.5-, 15.0-, and 59.0-fold in the strains KLDS 08006, KLDS 08007, and KLDS 08012, respectively, indicating that the expressions of the seven genes were significantly different among strains. In addition, the expressions of the seven genes were repressed in the MRS medium containing casein peptone. The effect of peptone supply on PepX transcription was the weakest compared with the other six genes, and the impact on OppD transcription was the strongest. Moreover, the expressions of the seven genes were significantly different among different strains (P<0.05). All these results indicated that the culturing conditions affected the expression of the proteolytic system genes in Lactobacillus bulgaricus at the transcription level. PMID:25845365

  9. Effect of culturing conditions on the expression of key enzymes in the proteolytic system of Lactobacillus bulgaricus *

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Jun-cai; Liu, Fei; Ren, Da-xi; Han, Wei-wei; Du, Yue-ou

    2015-01-01

    The proteolytic system of Lactobacillus bulgaricus breaks down milk proteins into peptides and amino acids, which are essential for the growth of the bacteria. The aim of this study was to determine the expressions of seven key genes in the proteolytic system under different culturing conditions (different phases, initial pH values, temperatures, and nitrogen sources) using real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The transcriptions of the seven genes were reduced by 30-fold on average in the stationary phase compared with the exponential growth phase. The transcriptions of the seven genes were reduced by 62.5-, 15.0-, and 59.0-fold in the strains KLDS 08006, KLDS 08007, and KLDS 08012, respectively, indicating that the expressions of the seven genes were significantly different among strains. In addition, the expressions of the seven genes were repressed in the MRS medium containing casein peptone. The effect of peptone supply on PepX transcription was the weakest compared with the other six genes, and the impact on OppD transcription was the strongest. Moreover, the expressions of the seven genes were significantly different among different strains (P<0.05). All these results indicated that the culturing conditions affected the expression of the proteolytic system genes in Lactobacillus bulgaricus at the transcription level. PMID:25845365

  10. Biosorption of Strontium from Simulated Nuclear Wastewater by Scenedesmus spinosus under Culture Conditions: Adsorption and Bioaccumulation Processes and Models

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mingxue; Dong, Faqin; Kang, Wu; Sun, Shiyong; Wei, Hongfu; Zhang, Wei; Nie, Xiaoqin; Guo, Yuting; Huang, Ting; Liu, Yuanyuan

    2014-01-01

    Algae biosorption is an ideal wastewater treatment method when coupled with algae growth and biosorption. The adsorption and bioaccumulation of strontium from simulated nuclear wastewater by Scenedesmus spinosus were investigated in this research. One hundred mL of cultured S. spinosus cells with a dry weight of 1.0 mg in simulated nuclear wastewater were used to analyze the effects on S. spinosus cell growth as well as the adsorption and bioaccumulation characters under conditions of 25 ± 1 °C with approximately 3,000 lux illumination. The results showed that S. spinosus had a highly selective biosorption capacity for strontium, with a maximum bioremoval ratio of 76%. The adsorbed strontium ion on cell walls was approximately 90% of the total adsorbed amount; the bioaccumulation in the cytoplasm varied by approximately10%. The adsorption quantity could be described with an equilibrium isotherm. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model suggested that adsorption was the rate-limiting step of the biosorption process. A new bioaccumulation model with three parameters was proposed and could give a good fit with the experiment data. The results suggested that S. spinosus may be a potential biosorbent for the treatment of nuclear wastewater in culture conditions. PMID:24919131

  11. Optimization of culturing condition and medium composition for the production of alginate lyase by a marine Vibrio sp. YKW-34

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiaoting; Lin, Hong; Kim, Sang Moo

    2008-02-01

    Carbohydrases secreted by marine Vibrio sp. YKW-34 with strong Laminaria cell wall degrading ability were screened, and among them alginate lyase was found to be dominant. The effects of medium composition and culturing condition on the production of alginate lyase by marine Vibrio sp. YKW-34 in flask were investigated in this study. In the culture medium of marine broth, no alginate lyase was produced. The activity of the alginate lyase, after being induced, reached 5 UmL-1. The best inoculum volume and inoculum age were 10% and 12 h, respectively. The optimal temperature for alginate lyase production was 25°C. The fermentation medium was composed of 0.5% of Laminaria powder and 0.2% of KNO3 with an initial acidity of pH 8.0. Alginate could induce alginate lyase production but not as efficiently as Laminaria powder did. The addition of fucoidan, cellulose and glucose had negative effect on the alginate lyase production. Other kinds of nitrogen sources, such as yeast extract, beef extract and peptone, had positive effect on the growth of the microorganism and negative effect on alginate lyase production. In addition, the time course of alginate lyase production under the optimized condition was described. The optimal harvest time was 48 h.

  12. Interphase Chromosome Conformation and Chromatin-Chromatin Interactions in Human Epithelial Cells Cultured Under Different Gravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Wong, Michael; Hada, Megumi; Wu, Honglu

    2015-01-01

    Microgravity has been shown to alter global gene expression patterns and protein levels both in cultured cells and animal models. It has been suggested that the packaging of chromatin fibers in the interphase nucleus is closely related to genome function, and the changes in transcriptional activity are tightly correlated with changes in chromatin folding. This study explores the changes of chromatin conformation and chromatin-chromatin interactions in the simulated microgravity environment, and investigates their correlation to the expression of genes located at different regions of the chromosome. To investigate the folding of chromatin in interphase under various culture conditions, human epithelial cells, fibroblasts, and lymphocytes were fixed in the G1 phase. Interphase chromosomes were hybridized with a multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) probe for chromosome 3 which distinguishes six regions of the chromosome as separate colors. After images were captured with a laser scanning confocal microscope, the 3-dimensional structure of interphase chromosome 3 was reconstructed at multi-mega base pair scale. In order to determine the effects of microgravity on chromosome conformation and orientation, measures such as distance between homologous pairs, relative orientation of chromosome arms about a shared midpoint, and orientation of arms within individual chromosomes were all considered as potentially impacted by simulated microgravity conditions. The studies revealed non-random folding of chromatin in interphase, and suggested an association of interphase chromatin folding with radiation-induced chromosome aberration hotspots. Interestingly, the distributions of genes with expression changes over chromosome 3 in cells cultured under microgravity environment are apparently clustered on specific loci and chromosomes. This data provides important insights into how mammalian cells respond to microgravity at molecular level.

  13. Improvement of culture conditions to overproduce beta-galactosidase from Escherichia coli in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Martínez, A; Ramírez, O T; Valle, F

    1997-01-01

    The effect of some culture variables in the production of beta-galactosidase from Escherichia coli in Bacillus subtilis was evaluated. The lacZ gene was expressed in B. subtilis using the regulatory region of the subtilisin gene aprE. The host contained also the hpr2 and degU32 mutations, which are known to overexpress the aprE gene. We found that, when this overproducing B. subtilis strain was grown in mineral medium supplemented with glucose (MMG), beta-galactosidase production was partially growth-associated, as 40%-60% of the maximum enzyme activity was produced before the onset of the stationary phase. In contrast, when a complex medium was used, beta-galactosidase was produced only at low levels during vegetative growth, whereas it accumulated to high levels during early stationary phase. Compared with the results obtained in complex media, a 20% increase in specific beta-galactosidase activity in MMG supplemented with 11.6 g/l glucose was obtained. On the 1-1 fermenter scale, a three-fold increase in volumetric beta-galactosidase activity was obtained when the glucose concentration was varied from 11 g/l to 26 g/l. In addition, glucose feeding during the stationary phase resulted in a twofold increase in volumetric enzyme activity as cellular lysis was prevented. Finally, we showed that oxygen uptake and carbon dioxide evolution rates can be used for on-line determination of the onset of stationary phase, glucose depletion and biomass concentration. PMID:9035409

  14. Hypoxic culture conditions induce increased metabolic rate and collagen gene expression in ACL-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Tomasz J; Leong, Natalie L; Dar, Ayelet; Wu, Ling; Kabir, Nima; Khan, Adam Z; Eliasberg, Claire D; Pedron, Andrew; Karayan, Ashant; Lee, Siyoung; Di Pauli von Treuheim, Theodor; Jiacheng, Jin; Wu, Ben M; Evseenko, Denis; McAllister, David R; Petrigliano, Frank A

    2016-06-01

    There has been substantial effort directed toward the application of bone marrow and adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in the regeneration of musculoskeletal tissue. Recently, resident tissue-specific stem cells have been described in a variety of mesenchymal structures including ligament, tendon, muscle, cartilage, and bone. In the current study, we systematically characterize three novel anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-derived cell populations with the potential for ligament regeneration: ligament-forming fibroblasts (LFF: CD146(neg) , CD34(neg) CD44(pos) , CD31(neg) , CD45(neg) ), ligament perivascular cells (LPC: CD146(pos) CD34(neg) CD44(pos) , CD31(neg) , CD45(neg) ) and ligament interstitial cells (LIC: CD34(pos) CD146(neg) , CD44(pos) , CD31(neg) , CD45(neg) )-and describe their proliferative and differentiation potential, collagen gene expression and metabolism in both normoxic and hypoxic environments, and their trophic potential in vitro. All three groups of cells (LIC, LPC, and LFF) isolated from adult human ACL exhibited progenitor cell characteristics with regard to proliferation and differentiation potential in vitro. Culture in low oxygen tension enhanced the collagen I and III gene expression in LICs (by 2.8- and 3.3-fold, respectively) and LFFs (by 3- and 3.5-fold, respectively) and increased oxygen consumption rate and extracellular acidification rate in LICs (by 4- and 3.5-fold, respectively), LFFs (by 5.5- and 3-fold, respectively), LPCs (by 10- and 4.5-fold, respectively) as compared to normal oxygen concentration. In summary, this study demonstrates for the first time the presence of three novel progenitor cell populations in the adult ACL that demonstrate robust proliferative and matrix synthetic capacity; these cells may play a role in local ligament regeneration, and consequently represent a potential cell source for ligament engineering applications. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc

  15. Screening of phenylpyruvic acid producers and optimization of culture conditions in bench scale bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Coban, Hasan B; Demirci, Ali; Patterson, Paul H; Elias, Ryan J

    2014-11-01

    Alpha keto acids are deaminated forms of amino acids that have received significant attention as feed and food additives in the agriculture and medical industries. To date, their production has been commonly performed at shake-flask scale with low product concentrations. In this study, production of phenylpyruvic acid (PPA), which is the alpha keto acid of phenylalanine was investigated. First, various microorganisms were screened to select the most efficient producer. Thereafter, growth parameters (temperature, pH, and aeration) were optimized in bench scale bioreactors to maximize both PPA and biomass concentration in bench scale bioreactors, using response surface methodology. Among the four different microorganisms evaluated, Proteus vulgaris was the most productive strain for PPA production. Optimum temperature, pH, and aeration conditions were determined as 34.5 °C, 5.12, and 0.5 vvm for PPA production, whereas 36.9 °C, pH 6.87, and 0.96 vvm for the biomass production. Under these optimum conditions, PPA concentration was enhanced to 1,054 mg/L, which was almost three times higher than shake-flask fermentation concentrations. Moreover, P. vulgaris biomass was produced at 3.25 g/L under optimum conditions. Overall, this study demonstrated that optimization of growth parameters improved PPA production in 1-L working volume bench-scale bioreactors compared to previous studies in the literature and was a first step to scale up the production to industrial production. PMID:24861313

  16. Improving Patient's Primary Medication Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Leguelinel-Blache, Géraldine; Dubois, Florent; Bouvet, Sophie; Roux-Marson, Clarisse; Arnaud, Fabrice; Castelli, Christel; Ray, Valérie; Kinowski, Jean-Marie; Sotto, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Quality of transitions of care is one of the first concerns in patient safety. Redesigning the discharge process to incorporate clinical pharmacy activities could reduce the incidence of postdischarge adverse events by improving medication adherence. The present study investigated the value of pharmacist counseling sessions on primary medication adherence after hospital discharge. This study was conducted in a 1844-bed hospital in France. It was divided in an observational period and an interventional period of 3 months each. In both periods, ward-based clinical pharmacists performed medication reconciliation and inpatient follow-up. In interventional period, initial counseling and discharge counseling sessions were added to pharmaceutical care. The primary medication adherence was assessed by calling community pharmacists 7 days after patient discharge. We compared the measure of adherence between the patients from the observational period (n = 201) and the interventional period (n = 193). The rate of patients who were adherent increased from 51.0% to 66.7% between both periods (P < 0.01). When discharge counseling was performed (n = 78), this rate rose to 79.7% (P < 0.001). The multivariate regression performed on data from both periods showed that age of at least 78 years old, and 3 or less new medications on discharge order were predictive factors of adherence. New medications ordered at discharge represented 42.0% (n = 1018/2426) of all medications on discharge order. The rate of unfilled new medications decreased from 50.2% in the observational period to 32.5% in the interventional period (P < 10−7). However, patients included in the observational period were not significantly more often readmitted or visited the emergency department than the patients who experienced discharge counseling during the interventional period (45.3% vs. 46.2%; P = 0.89). This study highlights that discharge counseling sessions are

  17. Bioethanol production from Scenedesmus obliquus sugars: the influence of photobioreactors and culture conditions on biomass production.

    PubMed

    Miranda, J R; Passarinho, P C; Gouveia, L

    2012-10-01

    A closed-loop vertical tubular photobioreactor (PBR), specially designed to operate under conditions of scarce flat land availability and irregular solar irradiance conditions, was used to study the potential of Scenedesmus obliquus biomass/sugar production. The results obtained were compared to those from an open-raceway pond and a closed-bubble column. The influence of the type of light source and the regime (natural vs artificial and continuous vs light/dark cycles) on the growth of the microalga and the extent of the sugar accumulation was studied in both PBRs. The best type of reactor studied was a closed-loop PBR illuminated with natural light/dark cycles. In all the cases, the relationship between the nitrate depletion and the sugar accumulation was observed. The microalga Scenedesmus was cultivated for 53 days in a raceway pond (4,500 L) and accumulated a maximum sugar content of 29 % g/g. It was pre-treated for carrying out ethanol fermentation assays, and the highest ethanol concentration obtained in the hydrolysate fermented by Kluyveromyces marxianus was 11.7 g/L. PMID:22899495

  18. Influence of Culturing Conditions on Bioprospecting and the Antimicrobial Potential of Endophytic Fungi from Schinus terebinthifolius.

    PubMed

    Tonial, Fabiana; Maia, Beatriz H L N S; Gomes-Figueiredo, Josiane A; Sobottka, Andrea M; Bertol, Charise D; Nepel, Angelita; Savi, Daiani C; Vicente, Vânia A; Gomes, Renata R; Glienke, Chirlei

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we analyzed the antimicrobial activity of extracts harvested from 17 endophytic fungi isolated from the medicinal plant Schinus terebinthifolius. Morphological and molecular analyses indicated that these fungal species belonged to the genera Alternaria, Bjerkandera, Colletotrichum, Diaporthe, Penicillium, and Xylaria. Of the endophytes analyzed, 64.7 % produced antimicrobial compounds under at least one of the fermentation conditions tested. Nine isolates produced compounds that inhibited growth of Staphylococcus aureus, four produced compounds that inhibited Candida albicans, and two that inhibited Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The fermentation conditions of the following endophytes were optimized: Alternaria sp. Sect. Alternata-LGMF626, Xylaria sp.-LGMF673, and Bjerkandera sp.-LGMF713. Specifically, the carbon and nitrogen sources, initial pH, temperature, and length of incubation were varied. In general, production of antimicrobial compounds was greatest when galactose was used as a carbon source, and acidification of the growth medium enhanced the production of compounds that inhibited C. albicans. Upon large-scale fermentation, Alternaria sp. Sect. Alternata-LGMF626 produced an extract containing two fractions that were active against methicillin-resistant S. aureus. One of the extracts exhibited high activity (minimum inhibitory concentration of 18.52 µg/mL), and the other exhibited moderate activity (minimum inhibitory concentration of 55.55 µg/mL). The compounds E-2-hexyl-cinnamaldehyde and two compounds of the pyrrolopyrazine alkaloids class were identified in the active fractions by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. PMID:26563302

  19. Cellular Adherence, Glucosyltransferase Adsorption, and Glucan Synthesis of Streptococcus mutans AHT Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Koga, Toshihiko; Inoue, Masakazu

    1978-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans AHT mutants M1, M2, and M13 failed to adhere to a glass surface, whereas mutants M9 and M35 exhibited decreased and increased adherence, respectively, as compared with the parent strain, when grown in sucrose broth. Extracellular glucosyltransferase prepared from glucose-grown cultures of the adherent strains (wild type, M9, and M35) induced adherence of heat-killed cells of the homologous and heterologous streptococcal strains as well as of Escherichia coli K-12 and uncoated resin particles. The glucosyltransferase was adsorbed on all the streptococcal cells and glucan-coated resins, but not on E. coli cells and the uncoated resins. Glucosyltransferase from the nonadhering mutants (M1, M2, M13) neither was significantly adsorbed on nor induced adherence of any of the cells and resins. Cell-free enzymes from the glucose-grown adherent strains produced water-soluble and water-insoluble glucans, whereas those from the nonadhering mutants produced only water-soluble glucans. Small amounts of alkali-soluble, cell-associated glucan were recovered from the sucrose-grown nonadhering mutants. Thus, the relative proportions of glucosyltransferase isozymes elaborated by the S. mutans mutants, insofar as they affect the physico-chemical properties of the glucans produced, seem to determine the adherence abilities of the cells. The adsorption of glucosyltransferase on glucan molecules on the cell surface is not required for the adherence of S. mutans, but de novo glucan synthesis is important in the adherence process. PMID:631879

  20. Human bone marrow stem cells cultured under hypoxic conditions present altered characteristics and enhanced in vivo tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Seok; Park, Jung-Chul; Kim, Tae-Wan; Jung, Byung-Joo; Lee, Youngseok; Shim, Eun-Kyung; Park, Soyon; Choi, Eun-Young; Cho, Kyoo-Sung; Kim, Chang-Sung

    2015-09-01

    Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) were isolated from bone marrow of the vertebral body. The hBMSCs were cultured under either hypoxic (1% O2) or normoxic (21% O2; control) conditions and the characteristics as mesenchymal stem cells were compared. Results revealed that hypoxia reduced proliferative potential and colony-forming efficiency of hBMSCs, and significantly enhanced osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation. The hBMSCs enhanced the regenerative potential of bone in vivo. In vitro synthesis of soluble and insoluble collagen was significantly increased in the hypoxic condition. In vivo collagen tissue regeneration was also enhanced under the hypoxic condition, with concomitant increased expressions of various subtypes of collagen and lysyl-oxidase family mRNA. MicroRNA assays revealed that miR-155-5p, which negatively regulates HIF-1α, was significantly highly expressed. These observations demonstrate that hBMSCs obtained from human vertebrae exhibit altered characteristics under hypoxic conditions, and each factor contributing to hBMSC-mediated tissue healing should be evaluated with the goal of allowing their clinical application. PMID:25952967

  1. Effect of fermentation conditions on biohydrogen production from cassava starch by anaerobic mixed cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tien, Hai M.; Le, Kien A.; Tran, An T.; Le, Phung K.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, a series of batch tests were conducted to investigate the effect of pH, temperature, fermentation time, and inoculums ratio to hydrogen production using cassava starch as a substrate. The statistical analysis of the experiment indicated that the significant effects for the fermentation yield were the main effect of temperature, pH and inoculums ratio. It was fouund that the suitable fermentation conditions of biohydrogen production should be at temperature 40 ° C; pH 6.5, inoculums to medium ratio 10 % and COD operation at 4800 g/mL. The maximum value of hydrogen volume produced was 76.22 mL. These affected has been evaluated and the result can be used as an reference for the pilot or industrial biohydrogen production.

  2. Investigating the neuroglial differentiation effect of neuroblastoma conditioned medium in human endometrial stem cells cultured on 3D nanofibrous scaffold.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi-Barough, Somayeh; Hoveizi, Elham; Norouzi Javidan, Abbas; Ai, Jafar

    2015-08-01

    Neural tissue engineering is an important area of research in the field of tissue-engineering especially for neurodegenerative disease such as spinal cord injury. The differentiation capacity of human endometrial stem cells (hEnSCs) into neuronal cells has yet to be elucidated. Here, the major aim of the present study was to investigate the differentiation ability of hEnSCs cultured on polylactic acid/chitosan (PLA/CS) nanofibrous scaffold into neuroglial cells in response to conditioned medium of BE(2)-C human neuroblastoma cells and growth factors. Here we investigated the use PLA/CS scaffold as a three dimensional (3D) system that increased neuro-glial cells differentiation. Human EnSCs after three passages were differentiated in neuro-glial like cells under neuroblastoma conditioned medium with FGF2/PDGF-AA on PLA/CS scaffold. By day 18, differentiated cells were analyzed for expression of neuroglial markers by qRT-PCR and immunofluorescence. The results revealed that hEnSCs attach, grow and differentiation on the nanofibrous PLA/CS scaffold. Additionally, our study showed the expression of neural and glial lineage markers such as Nestin, NF-L, MAP2, PDGFRa, CNP, Olig2, MBP, and GFAP in the level of mRNA and MAP2, Tuj-1, and NF-L in the protein level after 18 days. Our results demonstrate that hEnSCs cultured on PLA/CS nanofibrous scaffold have the potential to differentiate in neuronal and glial cells in presence of neuroblastoma conditioned medium on PLA/CS scaffold. The result of this study may have impact in tissue engineering and cells-base therapy of neurodegenerative diseases and have a great potential for wide application. PMID:25611196

  3. Improving medication adherence in migraine treatment.

    PubMed

    Seng, Elizabeth K; Rains, Jeanetta A; Nicholson, Robert A; Lipton, Richard B

    2015-06-01

    Medication adherence is integral to successful treatment of migraine and other headache. The existing literature examining medication adherence in migraine is small, and the methodologies used to assess adherence are limited. However, these studies broadly suggest poor adherence to both acute and preventive migraine medications, with studies using more objective monitoring reporting lower adherence rates. Methods for improving medication adherence are described, including organizational strategies, provider-monitoring and self-monitoring of adherence, regimen strategies, patient education, self-management skills training (e.g., stimulus control, behavioral contracts), and cognitive-behavioral therapy techniques. The article concludes by discussing the future of research regarding adherence to medications for migraine and other headaches. PMID:26040703

  4. Factors influencing human leukocyte adherence in vitro.

    PubMed

    Stepniewicz, W; Tchórzewski, H; Luciak, M

    1983-01-01

    Studies were performed on factors influencing leucocyte adherence in vitro. Blood condensation was found to increase leukocyte adherence. Addition of heparin, dextran or ethanol caused a significant reduction of white blood cell count in blood samples in comparison with blood mixed with sodium EDTA or ACD solution. This suggests the existence of two granulocyte subpopulations; viz, rapidly adhering and slowly adhering. Heparin enhanced granulocyte adherence, while dextran and ethanol decreased it. Five-day storage of ACD blood led to a decrease in granulocyte adherence, while addition of heparin or histamine to ACD blood prevented this change to occur. The glucose concentration of 1,000 mg/dl augmented granulocyte adherence, while higher glucose concentrations induced its progressive fall below the control values. There was no significant change of lymphocyte adherence during the experiments. PMID:6194070

  5. Culture change in infection control: applying psychological principles to improve hand hygiene.

    PubMed

    Cumbler, Ethan; Castillo, Leilani; Satorie, Laura; Ford, Deborah; Hagman, Jan; Hodge, Therese; Price, Lisa; Wald, Heidi

    2013-01-01

    Hand hygiene occurs at the intersection of habit and culture. Psychological and social principles, including operant conditioning and peer pressure of conforming social norms, facilitate behavior change. Participatory leadership and level hierarchies are needed for sustainable patient safety culture. Application of these principles progressively and significantly improved hand hygiene compared with the hospital aggregate control. Changes to hand hygiene auditing and response processes demonstrate ability to improve and sustain adherence rates within a clinical microsystem. PMID:23669615

  6. Influence of culture conditions of Streptomyces sp. (strain S242) on chitinase production.

    PubMed

    Saadoun, Ismail; Al-Omari, Ruqayyah; Jaradat, Ziad; Ababneh, Qotaiba

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of growth conditions and medium composition on the production ofchitinase by Streptomyces sp. (strain S242). Production of chitinase by strain S242 was detected on colloidal chitin agar (CCA) medium after 8 days of incubation at 28 degrees C resulting in a clear zone 10 mm around the colony. Chitinase activity was assayed as the amount of N-acetylglucosamine released in micromol/ml/min using the dinitrosalicylic acid assay method. The crude enzyme had maximum activity (0.162 U ml/l) after 4 days of incubation at pH 7 and 30 degrees C when the broth medium was supplemented with 1.6% of colloidal chitin. However, enzyme activity was strongly decreased at 40 degrees C and extreme acidic and alkaline pH values. SDS-PAGE and zymogram analysis revealed six distinctive bands that range from 39 to 97 kDa with chitinolytic activity. The findings of this investigation create a possibility for the use of the organism in the commercial production of chitinase. In addition, it can be a source of DNA for cloning the chitinase gene(s) to generate phytopathogen resistant transgenic plants. PMID:20380144

  7. Submerged culture conditions for the production of mycelial biomass and antimicrobial metabolites by Polyporus tricholoma Mont.

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Gladys Rosane Thomé; Liebl, Mariane; Tavares, Lorena Benathar Ballod; Paulert, Roberta; Smânia Júnior, Artur

    2008-01-01

    Basidiomycete fungi of the Polyporus genus are a source of secondary metabolites which are of medicinal interest as antibacterial compounds. As these substances are produced in a small amount by the fungi, the study of the cultivation conditions in vitro that could possibly optimize their production seems of major importance. The effects of glucose and lactose, pH and agitation on biomass concentration and on the specific growth rate caused by the basidiomycete Polyporus tricholoma were investigated. The initial pH (4.5, 6.5 and 8.5) was autoregulated at pH 5.5, and the agitation increased the mycelial growth and the specific growth rate. The high concentration of carbon sources (4%) increased biomass production. The lactose concentration and the absence of agitation were determinant in the production of antibacterial metabolites. The characterization of the antibacterial substance by GC-MS indicated a major compound, isodrimenediol, produced by the fungus Polyporus tricholoma with activity against Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:24031266

  8. Improvement of submerged culture conditions to produce colorants by Penicillium purpurogenum.

    PubMed

    Santos-Ebinuma, Valéria Carvalho; Roberto, Inês Conceição; Teixeira, Maria Francisca Simas; Pessoa, Adalberto

    2014-01-01

    Safety issues related to the employment of synthetic colorants in different industrial segments have increased the interest in the production of colorants from natural sources, such as microorganisms. Improved cultivation technologies have allowed the use of microorganisms as an alternative source of natural colorants. The objective of this work was to evaluate the influence of some factors on natural colorants production by a recently isolated from Amazon Forest, Penicillium purpurogenum DPUA 1275 employing statistical tools. To this purpose the following variables: orbital stirring speed, pH, temperature, sucrose and yeast extract concentrations and incubation time were studied through two fractional factorial, one full factorial and a central composite factorial designs. The regression analysis pointed out that sucrose and yeast extract concentrations were the variables that influenced more in colorants production. Under the best conditions (yeast extract concentration around 10 g/L and sucrose concentration of 50 g/L) an increase of 10, 33 and 23% respectively to yellow, orange and red colorants absorbance was achieved. These results show that P. purpurogenum is an alternative colorants producer and the production of these biocompounds can be improved employing statistical tool. PMID:25242965

  9. Improvement of submerged culture conditions to produce colorants by Penicillium purpurogenum

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Ebinuma, Valéria Carvalho; Roberto, Inês Conceição; Teixeira, Maria Francisca Simas; Pessoa, Adalberto

    2014-01-01

    Safety issues related to the employment of synthetic colorants in different industrial segments have increased the interest in the production of colorants from natural sources, such as microorganisms. Improved cultivation technologies have allowed the use of microorganisms as an alternative source of natural colorants. The objective of this work was to evaluate the influence of some factors on natural colorants production by a recently isolated from Amazon Forest, Penicillium purpurogenum DPUA 1275 employing statistical tools. To this purpose the following variables: orbital stirring speed, pH, temperature, sucrose and yeast extract concentrations and incubation time were studied through two fractional factorial, one full factorial and a central composite factorial designs. The regression analysis pointed out that sucrose and yeast extract concentrations were the variables that influenced more in colorants production. Under the best conditions (yeast extract concentration around 10 g/L and sucrose concentration of 50 g/L) an increase of 10, 33 and 23% respectively to yellow, orange and red colorants absorbance was achieved. These results show that P. purpurogenum is an alternative colorants producer and the production of these biocompounds can be improved employing statistical tool. PMID:25242965

  10. Effect of environmental and cultural conditions on medium pH and explant growth performance of Douglas-fir ( Pseudotsuga menziesii) shoot cultures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Chih; Bates, Rick; Carlson, John

    2014-01-01

    The medium pH level of plant tissue cultures has been shown to be essential to many aspects of explant development and growth. Sensitivity or tolerance of medium pH change in vitro varies according to specific requirements of individual species. The objectives of this study are to 1) determine medium pH change over time in storage conditions and with presence of explants, 2) evaluate the effects of medium pH change on explant growth performance and 3) assess the effects of adding a pH stabilizer, 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid (MES) that is commonly used in Douglas-fir micropropagation medium. Vegetative buds were collected in the spring before breaking dormancy from juvenile and mature donor trees for conducting these evaluations. Medium, with or without MES, was pre-adjusted to five pH levels before adding MES, agar and autoclaving. Medium pH changes and explant growth parameters were measured at eight different incubation times. Overall, MES provided a more stable medium pH, relative to starting pH values, under both light and dark storage conditions as well as with presence of explants. A general trend of decreasing medium pH over time was found comparing explants from juvenile and mature donor genotypes. Explant height and weight growth increased over time, but differ among explants from juvenile and mature donor genotypes. Our findings suggest that a 21-day subculture practice may best sustain medium freshness, medium pH level and desirable explant growth. PMID:26535110

  11. Effect of environmental and cultural conditions on medium pH and explant growth performance of Douglas-fir ( Pseudotsuga menziesii) shoot cultures

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chien-Chih; Bates, Rick; Carlson, John

    2015-01-01

    The medium pH level of plant tissue cultures has been shown to be essential to many aspects of explant development and growth. Sensitivity or tolerance of medium pH change in vitro varies according to specific requirements of individual species. The objectives of this study are to 1) determine medium pH change over time in storage conditions and with presence of explants, 2) evaluate the effects of medium pH change on explant growth performance and 3) assess the effects of adding a pH stabilizer, 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid (MES) that is commonly used in Douglas-fir micropropagation medium. Vegetative buds were collected in the spring before breaking dormancy from juvenile and mature donor trees for conducting these evaluations. Medium, with or without MES, was pre-adjusted to five pH levels before adding MES, agar and autoclaving. Medium pH changes and explant growth parameters were measured at eight different incubation times. Overall, MES provided a more stable medium pH, relative to starting pH values, under both light and dark storage conditions as well as with presence of explants. A general trend of decreasing medium pH over time was found comparing explants from juvenile and mature donor genotypes. Explant height and weight growth increased over time, but differ among explants from juvenile and mature donor genotypes. Our findings suggest that a 21-day subculture practice may best sustain medium freshness, medium pH level and desirable explant growth. PMID:26535110

  12. Evidence-based Assessment of Adherence to Medical Treatments in Pediatric Psychology

    PubMed Central

    Modi, Avani C.; Lemanek, Kathleen L.; Ievers-Landis, Carolyn E.; Rapoff, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives Adherence to medical regimens for children and adolescents with chronic conditions is generally below 50% and is considered the single, greatest cause of treatment failure. As the prevalence of chronic illnesses in pediatric populations increases and awareness of the negative consequences of poor adherence become clearer, the need for reliable and valid measures of adherence has grown. Methods This review evaluated empirical evidence for 18 measures utilizing three assessment methods: (a) self-report or structured interviews, (b) daily diary methods, and (c) electronic monitors. Results Ten measures met the “well-established” evidence-based (EBA) criteria. Conclusions Several recommendations for improving adherence assessment were made. In particular, consideration should be given to the use of innovative technologies that provide a window into the “real time” behaviors of patients and families. Providing written treatment plans, identifying barriers to good adherence, and examining racial and ethnic differences in attitudes, beliefs and behaviors affecting adherence were strongly recommended. PMID:17846042

  13. Assessment of actin cytoskeleton and nuclei in bovine blastocysts developed under different culture conditions using a novel computer program.

    PubMed

    Kuzmany, A; Havlicek, V; Brem, G; Walter, I; Besenfelder, U

    2011-02-01

    This study was performed to investigate the effects, in terms of nuclear material and actin cytoskeleton quantities (fluorescent pixel counts), of four different bovine blastocyst culturing techniques (in vitro, stepwise in vitro-to-in vivo, or purely in vivo). Cumulus oocyte complexes from abattoir-sourced ovaries were matured in vitro and allocated to four groups: IVP-group embryos developed up to blastocyst stage in vitro. Gamete intra-fallopian transfer (GIFT)-group oocytes were co-incubated with semen for 4 h before transfer to oviducts of heifers. Following in vitro fertilization, cleaved embryos (day 2 of embryo development, day 2-7 group) were transferred into oviducts on day 2. Multiple ovulation embryo transfer (MOET)-group embryos were obtained by superovulating and inseminating heifers; the heifers' genital tracts were flushed at day 7 of blastocyst development. Within each group, ten blastocysts were selected to be differentially dyed (for nuclei and actin cytoskeleton) with fluorescent stains. A novel computer program (ColorAnalyzer) provided differential pixel counts representing organelle quantities. Blastocysts developed only in vivo (MOET group) showed significantly more nuclear material than did blastocysts produced by any other technique. In terms of actin cytoskeleton quantity, blastocysts produced by IVP and by day 2-7 transfer did not differ significantly from each other. Gamete intra-fallopian transfer- and MOET-group embryos showed significantly larger quantities of actin cytoskeleton when compared with any other group and differed significantly from each other. The results of this study indicate that culturing under in vitro conditions, even with part time in vivo techniques, may adversely affect the quantity of blastocyst nuclear material and actin cytoskeleton. The software employed may be useful for culture environment evaluation/developmental competence assessment. PMID:20477985

  14. An Interdisciplinary Conservation Module for Condition Survey on Cultural Heritages with a 3d Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedelì, C.

    2013-07-01

    In order to make the most of the digital outsourced documents, based on new technologies (e.g.: 3D LASER scanners, photogrammetry, etc.), a new approach was followed and a new ad hoc information system was implemented. The obtained product allow to the final user to reuse and manage the digital documents providing graphic tools and an integrated specific database to manage the entire documentation and conservation process, starting from the condition assessment until the conservation / restoration work. The system is organised on two main modules: Archaeology and Conservation. This paper focus on the features and the advantages of the second one. In particular it is emphasized its logical organisation, the possibility to easily mapping by using a very precise 3D metric platform, to benefit of the integrated relational database which allows to well organise, compare, keep and manage different kind of information at different level. Conservation module can manage along the time the conservation process of a site, monuments, object or excavation and conservation work in progress. An alternative approach called OVO by the author of this paper, force the surveyor to observe and describe the entity decomposing it on functional components, materials and construction techniques. Some integrated tools as the "ICOMOS-ISCS Illustrated glossary … " help the user to describe pathologies with a unified approach and terminology. Also the conservation project phase is strongly supported to envision future intervention and cost. A final section is devoted to record the conservation/restoration work already done or in progress. All information areas of the conservation module are interconnected to each other to allows to the system a complete interchange of graphic and alphanumeric data. The conservation module it self is connected to the archaeological one to create an interdisciplinary daily tool.

  15. Ordered, adherent layers of nanofibers enabled by supramolecular interactions

    PubMed Central

    Highley, Christopher B.; Rodell, Christopher B.; Kim, Iris L.; Wade, Ryan J.; Burdick, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Aligned nanofibrous substrates can be created by electrospinning, but methods for creating multilamellar structures of aligned fibers are limited. Here, apposed nanofibrous scaffolds with pendant β-cyclodextrin (CD) were adhered together by adamantane (Ad) modified hyaluronic acid, exploiting the guest-host interactions of CD and Ad for macroscopic assembly. Stable user-defined multi-layered scaffolds were formed for cell culture or tissue engineering. PMID:25408916

  16. Enhancing Adherence in Clinical Exercise Trials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neal, Heather A.; Blair, Steven N.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses exercise adherence from the perspective of adhering to an exercise treatment in a controlled trial, focusing on: adherence (to intervention and measurement); the development of randomized clinical trials; exemplary randomized clinical trials in exercise science (exercise training studies and physical activity interventions); and study…

  17. Growth response and toxin concentration of cultured Pyrodinium bahamense var. compressum to varying salinity and temperature conditions.

    PubMed

    Gedaria, Alice Ilaya; Luckas, Bernd; Reinhardt, Katrin; Azanza, Rhodora V

    2007-09-15

    The growth and toxin production of a Philippine Pyrodinium bahamense isolate in nutrient replete batch cultures were investigated under conditions affected by varying salinity, temperature and combined effects of salinity and temperature. Early exponential growth stage was reached after 7 days with a cell division rate of 0.26 div day(-1). The toxin content reached a peak of 298 fmol cell-1 at mid exponential phase and rapidly declined to 54 fmol cell-1 as it approached the death phase. Only three sets of toxins composed of STX, dcSTX and B1 were detected in which STX made up to 85-98 mol%toxincell-1. P. bahamense was able to grow in salinities and temperatures ranging from 26 per thousand to 36 per thousand and 23 to 36 degrees C, respectively. The optimum growth under varying salinity and temperature conditions was observed at 36 per thousand and 25 degrees C. Toxin content reached a peak of 376 fmol cell-1 at 25 degrees C and was lower (80-116 fmol cell-1) at higher temperatures (32-35 degrees C). Combined effects of salinity and temperature showed that P. bahamense was not able to grow at low salinity and temperature (i.e. below 26 per thousand-28 degrees C). Optimum growth was observed in higher salinities at all temperature conditions. PMID:17585981

  18. Continuous enrichment culturing of thermophiles under sulfate and nitrate-reducing conditions and at deep-sea hydrostatic pressures.

    PubMed

    Houghton, J L; Seyfried, W E; Banta, A B; Reysenbach, A-L

    2007-03-01

    A continuous culture bioreactor was developed to enrich for nitrate and sulfate reducing thermophiles under in situ deep-sea pressures. The ultimate objective of this experimental design was to be able to study microbial activities at chemical and physical conditions relevant to seafloor hydrothermal vents. Sulfide, sulfate and oxide minerals from sampled seafloor vent-chimney structures [East Pacific Rise (9 degrees 46'N)] served as source mineral and microbial inoculum for enrichment culturing using nitrate and sulfate-enriched media at 70 and 90 degrees C and 250 bars. Changes in microbial diversity during the continuous reaction flow were monitored using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of PCR amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments. Time series changes in fluid chemistry were also monitored throughout the experiment to assess the feedback between mineral-fluid reaction and metabolic processes. Data indicate a shift from the dominance of epsilon Proteobacteria in the initial inoculum to the several Aquificales-like phylotypes in nitrate-reducing enrichment media and Thermodesulfobacteriales in the sulfate-reducing enrichment media. Methanogens were detected in the original sulfide sample and grew in selected sulfate-enriched experiments. Microbial interactions with anhydrite and pyrrhotite in the chimney material resulted in measurable changes in fluid chemistry despite a fluid residence time only 75 min in the reactor. Changes in temperature rather than source material resulted in greater differences in microbial enrichments and mediated geochemical reactions. PMID:17221162

  19. Narratives of Ugandan women adhering to HIV/AIDS medication.

    PubMed

    Matovu, Sarah Natalia; La cour, Karen; Hemmingsson, Helena

    2012-12-01

    Adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is essential to improving the quality of life of people living with HIV/AIDS; however, it still remains a challenge especially for young African women. The purpose of the study was to explore how young women with HIV/AIDS in Uganda experience the influence of their everyday life occupations on adherence to HAART after more than 1 year on the medication. Narratives of six participants were elicited using two semistructured interviews within a period of 1 month. Narrative analysis was used to develop themes reflecting the participants' stories of coping with everyday activities. The participants described their adherence to HAART in relation to everyday life occupations as a "tug of war", which describes the struggles they had taking medication because they were afraid of being discriminated by peers and the general society. They also expressed fear of not being included in many activities if people knew they have HIV/AIDS because there are many beliefs associated with the illness especially for young women in which they are branded promiscuous. However, in the Ugandan culture, women are considered to be home makers, which restricted their activities mostly around domestic work making it hard for them to prioritize their medication, and when they young women prioritized, it was all about fun activities that seemed to consume much time, hence contributing to the poor adherence. It is therefore important to assess the everyday occupations of young women before they start taking medication, so that HAART is scheduled in accordance with their everyday life occupation to reduce poor adherence. The implications of the study on practice is that it will enable occupational therapists working with persons with HIV/AIDS develop age-specific activities taking into consideration HAART as an everyday life activity rather than one that needs to be incorporated into their already existing activities, hence improving their

  20. Changes in Adherence to Non-Pharmacological Guidelines for Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyong; Cho, Sukyung; Bower, Julie K

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to compare levels of adherence to non-pharmacological guidelines between patients with and without hypertension diagnoses, and examined temporal changes in adherence during recent decades. We used data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1998-2012), including 13,768 Korean hypertensive patients aged ≥ 30 years who were categorized according to the presence or absence of a hypertension diagnosis, based on blood pressure and self-reported information. Adherence to the guidelines was calculated for 6 components, including dietary and lifestyle habits. A multivariable generalized linear regression model was used. The proportion of hypertensive patients aware of their condition increased from 33.4% in 1998 to 74.8% in 2012 (p < 0.001), although these increments plateaued during recent survey years. Patients with hypertension diagnoses were older, and more likely to be female,and have lower education levels than those without hypertension diagnoses, for most survey years. Overall adherence levels were poor (mean score 2 of 6), and levels of adherence to non-pharmacological habits did not significantly differ between patients with and without hypertension diagnoses. However, overall adherence levels improved significantly among patients with hypertension diagnoses: from 2.09 in 1998 to 2.27 in 2012 (p = 0.007), particularly regarding sufficient vegetable/seaweed consumption (p = 0.03), maintaining a normal weight (p = 0.03), and avoidance of smoking (p < 0.001). Awareness of hypertension is increasing, but hypertensive Korean patients demonstrate poor overall adherence to non-pharmacological hypertension management guidelines. These findings suggest that well-planned education programs should be continued after hypertension is diagnosed. PMID:27561006

  1. Changes in Adherence to Non-Pharmacological Guidelines for Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyong; Cho, Sukyung; Bower, Julie K.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to compare levels of adherence to non-pharmacological guidelines between patients with and without hypertension diagnoses, and examined temporal changes in adherence during recent decades. We used data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1998–2012), including 13,768 Korean hypertensive patients aged ≥ 30 years who were categorized according to the presence or absence of a hypertension diagnosis, based on blood pressure and self-reported information. Adherence to the guidelines was calculated for 6 components, including dietary and lifestyle habits. A multivariable generalized linear regression model was used. The proportion of hypertensive patients aware of their condition increased from 33.4% in 1998 to 74.8% in 2012 (p < 0.001), although these increments plateaued during recent survey years. Patients with hypertension diagnoses were older, and more likely to be female,and have lower education levels than those without hypertension diagnoses, for most survey years. Overall adherence levels were poor (mean score 2 of 6), and levels of adherence to non-pharmacological habits did not significantly differ between patients with and without hypertension diagnoses. However, overall adherence levels improved significantly among patients with hypertension diagnoses: from 2.09 in 1998 to 2.27 in 2012 (p = 0.007), particularly regarding sufficient vegetable/seaweed consumption (p = 0.03), maintaining a normal weight (p = 0.03), and avoidance of smoking (p < 0.001). Awareness of hypertension is increasing, but hypertensive Korean patients demonstrate poor overall adherence to non-pharmacological hypertension management guidelines. These findings suggest that well-planned education programs should be continued after hypertension is diagnosed. PMID:27561006

  2. An examination of the living conditions of urban American Indian children in unmarried families: increasing cultural competence in child welfare.

    PubMed

    Limb, Gordon E; Garza, Ryan

    2012-01-01

    The past 50 years have revealed dramatically shifting trends in the familial structure of American society. When examining these trends, and family research in general, the American Indian family unit has received little to no attention. This study utilized data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study to examine the living conditions of urban American Indian children in unmarried families. Results showed that while these children appear to have a strong start, concerns are raised regarding American Indian mothers' low educational achievement and high incidence of poverty. These concerns can lead to potential issues regarding sustained development that can arise as the children grow. Therefore, child welfare workers must understand these issues and work to ameliorate them in order to provide culturally competent services to urban American Indian families and children. PMID:23444795

  3. The effect of cognitive functioning on treatment attendance and adherence in comorbid bipolar disorder and cocaine dependence.

    PubMed

    Fagan, Colleen S; Carmody, Thomas J; McClintock, Shawn M; Suris, Alina; Nakamura, Alyson; Jeon-Slaughter, Haekyung; Lo, Alexander; Brown, E Sherwood

    2015-02-01

    Although bipolar disorder and substance dependence are both associated with treatment non-adherence and cognitive impairment, no studies have investigated relationships between treatment adherence and cognitive functioning in this population. As part of a clinical trial, baseline performance on two neuropsychological tests in 120 outpatients with bipolar disorder and cocaine dependence was used to examine whether cognitive functioning was associated with appointment attendance, medication adherence, and return of medication bottles. This study found that higher baseline cognitive functioning measured by the Stroop Color-Word condition predicted better treatment adherence. However, this study also reports measurement sensitivity of cognition as it relates to treatment adherence when applied to this dual diagnosis population. Poorer performance in simple visual attention tasks as assessed by the Stroop Word condition was inversely associated with some measures of adherence. Future studies are warranted that include a comprehensive neuropsychological battery and advanced medication adherence measures to confirm these findings. PMID:25108685

  4. 77 FR 20637 - Request for Information on Prescription Medication Adherence

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-05

    ...The Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health is seeking information about causes, impact and potential solutions associated with the public health problem of prescription medication non-adherence in adults with chronic conditions. The purpose of this notice is to provide individuals and organizations with the opportunity to identify issues relevant to all levels of government, as well as......

  5. Molecular characterization of forest soil based Paenibacillus elgii and optimization of various culture conditions for its improved antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S N; Jacob, Jubi; Reshma, U R; Rajesh, R O; Kumar, B S D

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms have provided a bounty of bioactive secondary metabolites with very exciting biological activities such as antibacterial, antifungal antiviral, and anticancer, etc. The present study aims at the optimization of culture conditions for improved antimicrobial production of Paenibacillus elgii obtained from Wayanad forest of Western Ghats region of Kerala, India. A bacterial strain isolated from the Western Ghats forest soil of Wayanad, Kerala, India was identified as P. elgii by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. P. elgii recorded significant board spectrum activity against all human and plant pathogenic microorganism tested except Candida albicans. It has been well known that even minor variations in the fermentation medium may impact not only the quantity of desired bioactive metabolites but also the general metabolic profile of the producing microorganisms. Thus, further studies were carried out to assess the impact of medium components on the antimicrobial production of P. elgii and to optimize an ideal fermentation medium to maximize its antimicrobial production. Out of three media [nutrient broth (NA), Luria broth (LB) and Trypticase soy broth (TSB)] used for fermentation, TSB medium recorded significant activity. Glucose and meat peptone were identified as the best carbon and nitrogen sources, which significantly affected the antibiotic production when supplemented with TSB medium. Next the effect of various fermentation conditions such as temperature, pH, and incubation time on the production of antimicrobial compounds was studied on TSB + glucose + meat peptone and an initial pH of 7 and a temperature of 30°C for 3 days were found to be optimum for maximum antimicrobial production. The results indicate that medium composition in the fermentation media along with cultural parameters plays a vital role in the enhanced production of antimicrobial substances. PMID:26539188

  6. Molecular characterization of forest soil based Paenibacillus elgii and optimization of various culture conditions for its improved antimicrobial activity

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, S. N.; Jacob, Jubi; Reshma, U. R.; Rajesh, R. O.; Kumar, B. S. D.

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms have provided a bounty of bioactive secondary metabolites with very exciting biological activities such as antibacterial, antifungal antiviral, and anticancer, etc. The present study aims at the optimization of culture conditions for improved antimicrobial production of Paenibacillus elgii obtained from Wayanad forest of Western Ghats region of Kerala, India. A bacterial strain isolated from the Western Ghats forest soil of Wayanad, Kerala, India was identified as P. elgii by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. P. elgii recorded significant board spectrum activity against all human and plant pathogenic microorganism tested except Candida albicans. It has been well known that even minor variations in the fermentation medium may impact not only the quantity of desired bioactive metabolites but also the general metabolic profile of the producing microorganisms. Thus, further studies were carried out to assess the impact of medium components on the antimicrobial production of P. elgii and to optimize an ideal fermentation medium to maximize its antimicrobial production. Out of three media [nutrient broth (NA), Luria broth (LB) and Trypticase soy broth (TSB)] used for fermentation, TSB medium recorded significant activity. Glucose and meat peptone were identified as the best carbon and nitrogen sources, which significantly affected the antibiotic production when supplemented with TSB medium. Next the effect of various fermentation conditions such as temperature, pH, and incubation time on the production of antimicrobial compounds was studied on TSB + glucose + meat peptone and an initial pH of 7 and a temperature of 30°C for 3 days were found to be optimum for maximum antimicrobial production. The results indicate that medium composition in the fermentation media along with cultural parameters plays a vital role in the enhanced production of antimicrobial substances. PMID:26539188

  7. An antagonist of the platelet-activating factor receptor inhibits adherence of both nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae to cultured human bronchial epithelial cells exposed to cigarette smoke

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Shakti D; Fairbairn, Rory L; Gell, David A; Latham, Roger D; Sohal, Sukhwinder S; Walters, Eugene H; O’Toole, Ronan F

    2016-01-01

    Background COPD is emerging as the third largest cause of human mortality worldwide after heart disease and stroke. Tobacco smoking, the primary risk factor for the development of COPD, induces increased expression of platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFr) in the lung epithelium. Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) and Streptococcus pneumoniae adhere to PAFr on the luminal surface of human respiratory tract epithelial cells. Objective To investigate PAFr as a potential drug target for the prevention of infections caused by the main bacterial drivers of acute exacerbations in COPD patients, NTHi and S. pneumoniae. Methods Human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells were exposed to cigarette smoke extract (CSE). PAFr expression levels were determined using immunocytochemistry and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The epithelial cells were challenged with either NTHi or S. pneumoniae labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate, and bacterial adhesion was measured using immunofluorescence. The effect of a well-evaluated antagonist of PAFr, WEB-2086, on binding of the bacterial pathogens to BEAS-2B cells was then assessed. In silico studies of the tertiary structure of PAFr and the binding pocket for PAF and its antagonist WEB-2086 were undertaken. Results PAFr expression by bronchial epithelial cells was upregulated by CSE, and significantly associated with increased bacterial adhesion. WEB-2086 reduced the epithelial adhesion by both NTHi and S. pneumoniae to levels observed for non-CSE-exposed cells. Furthermore, it was nontoxic toward the bronchial epithelial cells. In silico analyses identified a binding pocket for PAF/WEB-2086 in the predicted PAFr structure. Conclusion WEB-2086 represents an innovative class of candidate drugs for inhibiting PAFr-dependent lung infections caused by the main bacterial drivers of smoking-related COPD. PMID:27524890

  8. Women victims of sexual violence: adherence to chemoprevention of HIV.

    PubMed

    Diniz, Normélia Maria Freire; de Almeida, Lílian Conceição Guimarães; dos S Ribeiro, Bárbara Cristina; de Macêdo, Valéria Góes

    2007-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the adherence of women victims of sexual violence, to AIDS chemoprevention treatment. A quantitative study was carried out at a care service to victims of sexual violence in Salvador (Bahia, Brazil). Study participants were 172 women. Data were collected through interviews with forms and consultation of patient files. The results showed that 45.4% of the abused women were teenagers and 40.7% of the attended women were raped. Only 54% of the women were advised to use antiretrovirals to prevent HIV. Adherence to treatment occurred in 57.4% of cases and discontinuity corresponded to 42.6%. Non-adherence to treatment was attributed to psychological or emotional disorders and non-understanding of the established treatment. Therefore, it is important that professionals pay careful attention in order to perceive the conditions that might increase women's vulnerability to the infection. PMID:17375226

  9. Culture and Chronic Illness: Raising Children with Disabling Conditions in a Culturally Diverse World. Papers presented at an Invitational Conference (Racine, Wisconsin, June 1992).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pediatrics, 1993

    1993-01-01

    This special supplement presents two background papers, three working papers, and key recommendations from a conference on culture and chronic illness in childhood. The meeting had as its goal the identification of the state of knowledge on the interface among culture, chronic illness, child development, and family functioning, for the purpose of…

  10. Interactions between Mesenchymal Stem Cells, Adipocytes, and Osteoblasts in a 3D Tri-Culture Model of Hyperglycemic Conditions in the Bone Marrow Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Rinker, Torri E.; Hammoudi, Taymour M.; Kemp, Melissa L.; Lu, Hang; Temenoff, Johnna S.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have found that uncontrolled diabetes and consequential hyperglycemic conditions can lead to increased incidence of osteoporosis. Osteoblasts, adipocytes, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are all components of the bone marrow microenvironment and thus may have an effect on diabetes-related osteoporosis. However, few studies have investigated the influence of these three cell types on each other, especially in the context of hyperglycemia. Thus, we developed a hydrogel-based 3D culture platform engineered to allow live-cell retrieval in order to investigate the interactions between MSCs, osteoblasts, and adipocytes in mono-, co-, and tri-culture configurations under hyperglycemic conditions for 7 days of culture. Gene expression, histochemical analysis of differentiation markers, and cell viability were measured for all cell types, and MSC-laden hydrogels were degraded to retrieve cells to assess colony-forming capacity. Multivariate models of gene expression data indicated that primary discrimination was dependent on neighboring cell type, validating the need for co-culture configurations to study conditions modeling this disease state. MSC viability and clonogenicity were reduced when mono- and co-cultured with osteoblasts in high glucose levels. In contrast, MSCs had no reduction of viability or clonogenicity when cultured with adipocytes in high glucose conditions and adipogenic gene expression indicated that cross-talk between MSCs and adipocytes may occur. Thus, our unique culture platform combined with post-culture multivariate analysis provided novel insight into cellular interactions within the MSC microenvironment and highlights the necessity of multi-cellular culture systems for further investigation of complex pathologies such as diabetes and osteoporosis. PMID:24463781

  11. [Long term adherence to HAART in Senegal].

    PubMed

    Bastard, M; Fall, M Basty Koita

    2014-10-01

    Adherence is one of the main predictors of antiretroviral treatment success. A governmental initiative was launched in 1998 for HIV-infected patients in Senegal to provide access to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Adherence measurements, defined as pills taken/pills prescribed, were assessed between November 1999 and June 2010 using a pill count along with a questionnaire for 330 patients. Predictors of adherence and identification of adherence trajectories were explored through latent class mixed model. We also performed a survival analysis using Cox proportional hazard model. Three adherence behaviours were revealed as well as a better adherence for women. A third of patients had a high adherence trajectory over time and a third had an intermediate one. Male gender and low adherence behaviour over time were independently associated with a higher mortality rate. This study shows that an overall good adherence can be obtained in the long term in Senegal, suggests a better adherence for women and points out a large subsample of patients with intermediate level of adherence behaviour who are at risk for developing resistance to antiretroviral drugs. PMID:24615434

  12. Adherence of Veillonella Species Mediated by Extracellular Glucosyltransferase from Streptococcus salivarius

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, R. M.; Donkersloot, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of extracellular products from Streptococcus salivarius on sucrose-dependent adherence to smooth surfaces by other oral bacteria was studied in vitro. Strains of Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Veillonella parvula without innate ability to adhere to a steel wire were able to do so when incubated with sucrose and cell-free culture fluid from S. salivarius strains 9759, 25975, CNII, and MEPI. These culture fluids synthesized more adherent material and water-insoluble glucan than those from Streptococcus mutans C67-1 and seven other S. salivarius strains. Among the S. salivarius strains, glucosyltransferase (GT; dextransucrase, EC 2.4.1.5) activity varied more than 100-fold. Cells of Veillonella and S. mitis S3 that had been incubated in culture fluids from S. salivarius 25975 and 9759, respectively, and then washed adhered upon subsequent incubation with sucrose. This was due to adsorbed GT because (i) the adherence was sensitive to dextranase; (ii) it was observed only with the high-GT culture fluids; (iii) it was dependent on sucrose; and (iv) the washed Veillonella cells synthesized glucan, but not fructan, from sucrose. These results suggest that sucrose-dependent adherence of bacteria without such innate ability can be mediated by (i) entrapment in insoluble glucan synthesized by S. salivarius culture fluids, and (ii) prior adsorption of GT from S. salivarius culture fluids. The possibility that GT formed by high-yield strains of S. salivarius is distributed through the mouth by the action of salivary flow and contributes to sucrose-dependent adherence and plaque formation is considered. Images PMID:591064

  13. Escherichia coli O157:H7 Cells Exposed to Lettuce Leaf Lysate in Refrigerated Conditions Exhibit Differential Expression of Selected Virulence and Adhesion-Related Genes with Altered Mammalian Cell Adherence.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Nicole M; Mukherjee, Nabanita; Banerjee, Pratik

    2016-07-01

    Contamination by and persistence of pathogenic bacteria in ready-to-eat produce have emerged as significant food safety and public health concerns. Viable produceborne pathogens cope with several stresses (e.g., temperature fluctuations and lowtemperature storage) during production and storage of the commodities. In this study, we investigated the impact of transient cold shock on Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EcO157) cells in a produce matrix (romaine lettuce leaf lysate). EcO157 cells were exposed to 25°C for 1 h, 4°C for 1 h, and 4°C for 10 min in lettuce lysate. The expression of selected genes coding for virulence, stress response, and heat and cold shock proteins was quantified by real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR assay. Treated EcO157 cells adhered to MAC-T mammalian cells were enumerated by in vitro bioassay. Expression of the Shiga toxin 1 gene (stx1a) was upregulated significantly (P < 0.05) upon cold shock treatments, but virulence genes related to EcO157 attachment (eaeA, lpfA, and hcpA) were down-regulated. Two key members of the cold shock regulon, cold shock protein (cspA) and gyrA, were significantly induced (P < 0.05) at the refrigeration temperature (4°C). Significant upregulation of an SOS response gene, recA, was also observed. E. coli heat shock regulon member grpE was induced, but a universal stress protein (uspA) was downregulated at the refrigeration temperatures in lettuce lysate. The adhesion assay revealed a temperature-dependent reduction in the attachment of cold-shocked EcO157 cells. The results of the current study indicate a reduction in the attachment of cold-shocked EcO157 to epithelial cells and higher levels of Shiga toxin gene expression at the molecular level. PMID:27357048

  14. Peptide-conjugated hyaluronic acid surface for the culture of human induced pluripotent stem cells under defined conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaohong; Zhou, Ping; Zhao, Yinghui; Wang, Mengke; Wei, Shicheng

    2016-01-20

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) has been cross-linked to form hydrogel for potential applications in the self-renewal and differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) for years. However, HA hydrogel with improved residence time and mechanical integrity that allows the survival of hPSCs under defined conditions is still much needed for clinical applications. In this study, HA was modified with methacrylate functional groups (MeHA) and cross-linked by photo-crosslinking method. After subsequent conjugation with adhesive peptide, these MeHA surfaces demonstrated performance in facilitating human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) proliferation, and good pluripotency maintenance of hiPSCs under defined conditions. Moreover, MeHA films on glass-slides exhibited long residence time and mechanical stability throughout hiPSC culture. Our photo-crosslinkable MeHA possesses great value in accelerating the application of HA hydrogel in hiPSCs proliferation and differentiation with the conjugation of adhesive peptides. PMID:26572447

  15. Cyclooxygenase-2 level and culture conditions influence NS398-induced apoptosis and caspase activation in lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, H C; Weng, C F

    2001-01-01

    Cyclooxygenases (COXs) catalyze the synthesis of prostaglandins (PGs) from arachidonic acid. Overexpression of COX-2 is frequently found in human cancers and is suggested to play an important role in tumorigenesis. Recent studies indicated that COX-2 inhibitors exert potent anti-cancer effects on a number of cancers. Interestingly, some COX-2 inhibitors potently induce apoptosis, while other COX-2 inhibitors primarily induce growth inhibition. Therefore, there is a variability in the effects that different COX-2 inhibitors have on cancer cells. In this study, we demonstrated that induction of apoptosis of high COX-2-expressing A549 lung cancer cells by a specific COX-2 inhibitor NS398 was observed in cells cultured under serum-free condition. However, this drug induced G1 growth arrest rather than apoptosis in A549 cells maintained in 10% serum medium. Conversely, low COX-2-expressing H226 lung cancer cells were resistant to NS398-induced apoptosis under both serum-free and serum-containing conditions. Moreover, our results showed that NS398-induced apoptosis is associated with activation of caspase-3, a cysteine protease that plays a crucial role in the execution phase of apoptosis. These results suggest that the cytotoxic effect of COX-2 inhibitors on cancer cells may be influenced by extracellular environments and the anti-cancer action of these inhibitors in vivo needs careful evaluation. Additionally, a correlation between the level of COX-2 expression and the extent of apoptosis induced by COX-2 inhibitors was found. PMID:11605058

  16. On the influence of the culture conditions in bacterial antifouling bioassays and biofilm properties: Shewanella algae, a case study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A variety of conditions (culture media, inocula, incubation temperatures) are employed in antifouling tests with marine bacteria. Shewanella algae was selected as model organism to evaluate the effect of these parameters on: bacterial growth, biofilm formation, the activity of model antifoulants, and the development and nanomechanical properties of the biofilms. The main objectives were: 1) To highlight and quantify the effect of these conditions on relevant parameters for antifouling studies: biofilm morphology, thickness, roughness, surface coverage, elasticity and adhesion forces. 2) To establish and characterise in detail a biofilm model with a relevant marine strain. Results Both the medium and the temperature significantly influenced the total cell densities and biofilm biomasses in 24-hour cultures. Likewise, the IC50 of three antifouling standards (TBTO, tralopyril and zinc pyrithione) was significantly affected by the medium and the initial cell density. Four media (Marine Broth, MB; 2% NaCl Mueller-Hinton Broth, MH2; Luria Marine Broth, LMB; and Supplemented Artificial Seawater, SASW) were selected to explore their effect on the morphological and nanomechanical properties of 24-h biofilms. Two biofilm growth patterns were observed: a clear trend to vertical development, with varying thickness and surface coverage in MB, LMB and SASW, and a horizontal, relatively thin film in MH2. The Atomic Force Microscopy analysis showed the lowest Young modulii for MB (0.16 ± 0.10 MPa), followed by SASW (0.19 ± 0.09 MPa), LMB (0.22 ± 0.13 MPa) and MH2 (0.34 ± 0.16 MPa). Adhesion forces followed an inverted trend, being higher in MB (1.33 ± 0.38 nN) and lower in MH2 (0.73 ± 0.29 nN). Conclusions All the parameters significantly affected the ability of S. algae to grow and form biofilms, as well as the activity of antifouling molecules. A detailed study has been carried out in order to establish a biofilm model for further assays. The morphology and

  17. Improving illiterate patients understanding and adherence to discharge medications

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, Matthew; Syed, Faizan; Rashid, Amjid; Fayyaz, Umer

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Adherence to a hospital discharge medication regime is crucial for successful treatment and to avoid increasing rates of drug resistance. A patient's success in adhering to their medication regime is dependent on many social, cultural, economic, illness and therapy-related factors, and these are often more pronounced in the developing world. Anecdotal evidence in Services Hospital, Lahore (Pakistan) suggested that the relatively high levels of illiteracy in the patient population was a major factor in poor adherence. Baseline measurement revealed that 48% of all the hospital's patients were illiterate with just 5%–12% of illiterate patients being able to interpret their handwritten discharge prescription after leaving hospital. Unsurprisingly follow-up clinics reported very poor adherence. This quality improvement project intervened by designing a new discharge prescription proforma which used pictures and symbols rather than words to convey the necessary information. Repeated surveys demonstrated large relative increases in comprehension of the new proformas amongst illiterate patients with between 23%–35% of illiterate patients understanding the new proformas. PMID:26734151

  18. Increasing Antiretroviral Adherence for HIV-Positive African Americans (Project Rise): A Treatment Education Intervention Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Bogart, Laura M; Mutchler, Matt G; McDavitt, Bryce; Mutepfa, Kieta D; Risley, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Background HIV-positive African Americans have been shown to have lower adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) than those of other races/ethnicities, yet adherence interventions have rarely been tailored to the needs of this population. Objective We developed and will evaluate a treatment education adherence intervention (called Rise) that was culturally adapted to address the needs of African Americans living with HIV. Methods This randomized controlled trial will examine the effects of the Rise intervention on ART adherence and HIV viral load. African Americans on ART who report adherence problems will be recruited from the community and randomly assigned to receive the intervention or usual care for 6 months. The intervention consists of 6-10 individual counseling sessions, with more sessions provided to those who demonstrate lower adherence. Primary outcomes include adherence as monitored continuously with Medication Event Monitoring Systems (MEMS) caps, and viral load data received from the participant’s medical provider. Survey assessments will be administered at baseline and month 6. Results The trial is ongoing. Conclusions If effective, the Rise intervention will provide community-based organizations with an intervention tailored to address the needs of African Americans for promoting optimal ART adherence and HIV clinical outcomes. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01350544; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01350544 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6fjqqnmn0). PMID:27025399

  19. Adherence to Methotrexate therapy in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Arshad, Nasim; Ahmad, Nighat Mir; Saeed, Muhammad Ahmed; Khan, Saira; Batool, Shabnam; Farman, Sumaira

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine adherence to methotrexate (MTX) therapy in patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) and to identify factors that promote either adherence or non adherence. Methods: One hundred Rheumatoid Arthritis patients on MTX for at least two months were enrolled. Questionnaire was completed by direct interview. Details recorded were, demographics (age, sex, education, monthly income), disease duration, duration on MTX and current dose. Disease Activity Score on 28 joint counts (DAS 28) at the current visit, concomitant drugs taken and number of doses of MTX missed in the previous 8 weeks were noted. Non adherence was defined as omission of any three or more prescribed doses of MTX in previous 8 week. Patients were asked for the factors that motivated their adherence to MTX as well as factors for non adherence. Presence of side effects due to MTX was also recorded. Result: Non adherence was found among 23% of cases. Patients of low socioeconomic group (p <0.0001) and on MTX for longer duration (p <0.001) had higher non adherence. Non adherent patients had significantly higher disease activity as measured by DAS 28 (p<0.001). Good counseling and education by the doctor was a strong predictor of adherence (p <0.001). Lack of affordability (p <0.001); lack of availability at local pharmacy (p <0.001); lack of family support (p <0.001) and lack of awareness regarding need and importance of MTX (p < 0.001were found as significant factors for non adherence. Conclusion: MTX non adherence in RA is noted in about one fourth of study group. Various economical and social issues lead to non adherence but good patient education and counseling by doctor could promote adherence in this study group. PMID:27182251

  20. [Ability of Staphylococcus cohnii strains to adhere to epithelial cells and solid surfaces in the hospital environment].

    PubMed

    Waldon, Edyta; Szewczyk, Eligia M

    2002-01-01

    Presented study describes abilities of staphylococci to adhere to exfoliated cheek and uroepithelial epithelium cells and to various surfaces such as plastics, glass and steel. The subject of the study were strains of Staphylococcus cohnii ssp. cohnii and Staphylococcus cohnii ssp. urealyticus isolated from Intensive Care Unit of Pediatric Hospital. Staphylococcus cohnii ssp.cohnii adhered in great number to epithelial cells. However, the adhesion differed by individual strains. We did not find relationship between slime production and adherence to epithelial cell. Most of investigated strains adhered closely to surfaces--especially of plastics and glass. This phenomenon was stronger in the presence of culture medium and phosphate buffer. PMID:12185691

  1. Cell culture condition-dependent impact of AGE-rich food extracts on kinase activation and cell survival on human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Nass, Norbert; Weissenberg, Kristian; Somoza, Veronika; Ruhs, Stefanie; Silber, Rolf-Edgar; Simm, Andreas

    2014-03-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are stable end products of the Maillard reaction. Effects of food extracts are often initially analysed in cellular test systems and it is not clear how different cell culture conditions might influence the results. Therefore, we compared the effects of two models for AGE-rich food, bread crust and coffee extract (CE) on WI-38 human lung fibroblasts under different cell culture conditions (sub-confluent versus confluent cells, with and without serum). WI-38 cells responded to coffee and bread crust extract (BCE) with a rapid phosphorylation of PKB (AKT), p42/44 MAPK (ERK 1/2) and p38 MAPK, strongly depending on culture conditions. BCE resulted in increased cell numbers, whereas CE appeared to be cytotoxic. When cell numbers under all culture conditions and treatments were correlated with kinase phosphorylation, the relation between phospho-p38 MAPK and phospho-AKT represented a good, cell culture condition-independent predictor of cell survival. PMID:24111510

  2. Effect of culture conditions on growth, lipid content, and fatty acid composition of Aurantiochytrium mangrovei strain BL10

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the influence of various culture conditions on the biomass, lipid content, production of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and fatty acid composition of Aurantiochytrium mangrovei strain BL10. The variables examined in this study include the species and concentration of salt, the concentrations of the two substrates glucose and yeast extract, the level of dissolved oxygen, the cerulenin treatment, and the stages of BL10 growth. Our results demonstrate that BL10 culture produces maximum biomass when salinity levels are between 0.2 and 3.0%. Decreasing salinity to 0.1% resulted in a considerable decrease in the biomass, lipid content, DHA production, and DHA to palmitic acid (PA) (DHA/PA) ratio, signifying deterioration in the quality of the oil produced. The addition of 0.9% sodium sulfate to replenish salinity from 0.1% to 1.0% successfully recovered biomass, lipid content and DHA production levels; however, this also led to a decrease in DHA/PA ratio. An increase in oxygen and cerulenin levels resulted in a concomitant decrease in the DHA to docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) (DHA/DPA) ratio in BL10 oil. Furthermore, the DHA/DPA and DHA/PA ratios varied considerably before and after the termination of cell division, which occurred around the 24 hour mark. These results could serve as a foundation for elucidating the biochemistry underlying the accumulation of lipids, and a definition of the extrinsic (environmental or nutritional) and intrinsic (cell growth stage) factors that influence lipid quality and the production of DHA by BL10. PMID:22883641

  3. Optimization of culture conditions and medium composition for the marine algicidal bacterium Alteromonas sp. DH46 by uniform design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jing; Zheng, Wei; Tian, Yun; Wang, Guizhong; Zheng, Tianling

    2013-09-01

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) have led to extensive ecological and environmental issues and huge economic losses. Various HAB control techniques have been developed, and biological methods have been paid more attention. Algicidal bacteria is a general designation for bacteria which inhibit algal growth in a direct or indirect manner, and kill or damage the algal cells. A metabolite which is strongly toxic to the dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense was produced by strain DH46 of the alga-lysing bacterium Alteromonas sp. The culture conditions were optimized using a single-factor test method. Factors including carbon source, nitrogen source, temperature, initial pH value, rotational speed and salinity were studied. The results showed that the cultivation of the bacteria at 28°C and 180 r min-1 with initial pH 7 and 30 salt contcentration favored both the cell growth and the lysing effect of strain DH46. The optimal medium composition for strain DH46 was determined by means of uniform design experimentation, and the most important components influencing the cell density were tryptone, yeast extract, soluble starch, NaNO3 and MgSO4. When the following culture medium was used (tryptone 14.0g, yeast extract 1.63g, soluble starch 5.0 g, NaNO3 1.6 g, MgSO4 2.3 g in 1L), the largest bacterial dry weight (7.36 g L-1) was obtained, which was an enhancement of 107% compared to the initial medium; and the algal lysis rate was as high as 98.4% which increased nearly 10% after optimization.

  4. Effects of nerve growth factor and heart cell conditioned medium on neurite regeneration of aged sympathetic neurons in culture.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Y; Tomonaga, M

    1985-11-25

    The effects of nerve growth factor (NGF) and heart-cell-conditioned medium (HCM) on the neurite regeneration of aged sympathetic neurons were investigated in culture. Investigation of HCM was carried out by two different methods: one was the use of whole HCM on collagen substratum, which reflected component(s) effective in solution (HCM-S); the other was the use of polyornithine (PORN)-binding component(s) (P-HCM). Superior cervical ganglion neurons prepared from male mice from 6 to 30 months of age were cultured in MEM-10% FCS on collagen or gelatin-PORN substratum for 3 days. The number of neurons with neurites and the length of neurites were quantified as neurite production and elongation, respectively. Neuronal survival was not affected by addition of NGF, HCM-S or P-HCM. Neurite production of early adult neurons was enhanced by NGF, HCM-S or P-HCM. In contrast, neurite production of aged neurons was enhanced by only HCM-S, but not NGF or P-HCM. HCM-S did not promote neurite elongation in neurons at any age. Neurite elongation of early adult neurons was enhanced by NGF or P-HCM. Neurite elongation of aged neurons was enhanced by P-HCM. However, responsiveness of NGF for neurite elongation varied according to substrata. No age-related difference was found in neurite production and elongation in the absence of NGF, HCM-S or P-HCM. These results indicate that responsiveness of aged sympathetic neurons is various in different growth factors. PMID:3840716

  5. Effects of culture conditions on estrogen-mediated hepatic in vitro gene expression and correlation to in vivo responses

    SciTech Connect

    Fong, C.J.; Burgoon, L.D.; Zacharewski, T.R. . E-mail: tzachare@msu.edu

    2006-08-15

    Refinement of in vitro systems for predictive toxicology is important in order to develop high-throughput early toxicity screening assays and to minimize animal testing studies. This study assesses the ability of mouse Hepa-1c1c7 hepatoma cell model under differing culture conditions to predict in vivo estrogen-induced hepatic gene expression changes. Custom mouse cDNA microarrays were used to compare Hepa-1c1c7 temporal gene expression profiles treated with 10 nM 17{beta}-estradiol (E2) in serum-free and charcoal-stripped serum supplemented media at 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, and 24 h. Stripped serum supplemented media increased the number gene expression changes and overall responsiveness likely due to the presence of serum factors supporting proliferation and mitochondrial activity. Data from both experiments were compared to a gene expression time course study examining the hepatic effects of 100 {mu}g/kg 17{alpha}-ethynyl estradiol (EE) in C57BL/6 mice at 2, 4, 8, 12, 18, and 24 h. Only 18 genes overlapped between the serum-free and in vivo studies, whereas 238 genes were in common between Hepa-1c1c7 cells in stripped serum data and C57BL/6 liver samples. Stripped serum cultured cells exhibited E2-elicited gene expression changes associated with proliferation, cytoskeletal re-organization, cholesterol uptake and synthesis, increased fatty acid {beta}-oxidation, and oxidative stress, which correlated with in vivo hepatic responses. These results demonstrate that E2 treatment of Hepa-1c1c7 cells in serum supplemented media modulate responses in selected pathways which appropriately model estrogen-elicited in vivo hepatic responses.

  6. Effect of culture conditions and mother's age on the sensitivity of Daphnia magna Straus 1820 (Cladocera) neonates to hexavalent chromium.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Jerónimo, Fernando; Martínez-Jerónimo, Laura; Espinosa-Chávez, Félix

    2006-04-01

    Daphnia magna is a freshwater cladoceran used worldwide as test organism in aquatic toxicity assays. In Mexico there is a test protocol for this species; nevertheless, some aspects of the controlled neonate production, as well as the possible consequences of the reproducers' culture conditions on the response of neonates to the toxic substance, are not completely known. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of temperature and photoperiod on the acute toxicity of CrVI in D. magna neonates, aimed at providing useful information on the Median Lethal Concentration (LC50) to this heavy metal, which is used as reference toxicant in some laboratories. D. magna was cultured at 20 and 25 degrees C, in combination with two photoperiod values: 16:8 and 12:12 (light:dark) during 40 days; the green microalga Ankistrodesmus falcatus (4x10(5) cells ml(-1)) was supplied as food. Once the reproduction began, the neonates were removed and acute toxicity bioassays at 20 and 25 degrees C were performed, by exposing them to hexavalent chromium. We also determined changes in neonates' size at 20 and 25 degrees C. Chromium toxicity increased along with increasing temperatures, and LC50 values were slightly lower for the first and last clutches in the observed period, but these findings are not conclusive because of the large variability recorded. The average LC50's were 0.2076+/-0.0164 mg l(-1) (at 20 degrees C) and 0.1544+/-0.0175 mg l(-1) (at 25 degrees C). The reproducers' culture temperature had no effect on neonates' sensitivity to chromium, in spite of performing the tests at temperatures either lower or higher than those at which the neonates had been obtained. The length of neonates produced during the first two clutches (<1.25 mm) was significantly lower than that measured in neonates of following reproductions (>1.3 mm), and were smaller at 25 degrees C; however, this did not seem to affect their sensitivity to chromium. PMID:16570207

  7. Elastohydrodynamics of contact in adherent sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Andreas; Mandre, Shreyas; Mahadevan, L.

    2015-11-01

    The dynamics of contact between a thin elastic film and a solid arises in many scientific and engineering applications, from the simple saran-wrap to cellular adhesion to grounding lines in ice sheets. Here, we use a mathematical description of the multi-scale processes associated with microscopic adhesion, fluid flow and elastic thin film deformation to deduce the dynamics of the onset of adhesion, as well as the speed and the shape of the adhesion zone. Our analysis is consistent with prior experimental observations, provides new testable predictions for the shape, size and dynamics of adherent contact in thin sheets and in addition provides a broadly applicable prescription for the boundary conditions at elastic contact lines.

  8. Medication Adherence in People With Parkinson Disease.

    PubMed

    Shin, Ju Young; Habermann, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder in the United States. Because there is no cure for PD currently, pharmacological therapy is the mainstay of PD symptom management. Despite the importance of medication adherence in PD, several studies have reported medication nonadherence and/or suboptimal adherence. This literature review provides an overview of medication adherence issues in people with PD. Articles were identified for this study using computerized database searches and journal hand searches. Of the 72 medication adherence articles reviewed, the following articles were eligible for this review: (a) 10 articles measuring medication adherence in people with PD, (b) four medication adherence intervention articles, and (c) six studies of medication adherence in hospitalized settings. The importance of adherence assessment and strategies in improving medication adherence are discussed with the goal of improving symptom management and clinical outcomes in people with PD. Because medication taking is a complex and multifaceted phenomena, patient-centered, theory-driven interventions are needed to improve medication adherence and quality of care and life in people with PD. PMID:27224682

  9. Broadening cell selection criteria with micropallet arrays of adherent cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuli; Young, Grace; Aoto, Phillip C; Pai, Jeng-Hao; Bachman, Mark; Li, G P; Sims, Christopher E; Allbritton, Nancy L

    2007-10-01

    A host of technologies exists for the separation of living, nonadherent cells, with separation decisions typically based on fluorescence or immunolabeling of cells. Methods to separate adherent cells as well as to broaden the range of possible sorting criteria would be of high value and complementary to existing strategies. Cells were cultured on arrays of releasable pallets. The arrays were screened and individual cell(s)/pallets were released and collected. Conventional fluorescence and immunolabeling of cells were compatible with the pallet arrays, as were separations based on gene expression. By varying the size of the pallet and the number of cells cultured on the array, single cells or clonal colonies of cells were isolated from a heterogeneous population. Since cells remained adherent throughout the isolation process, separations based on morphologic characteristics, for example cell shape, were feasible. Repeated measurements of each cell in an array were performed permitting the selection of cells based on their temporal behavior, e.g. growth rate. The pallet array system provides the flexibility to select and collect adherent cells based on phenotypic and temporal criteria and other characteristics not accessible by alternative methods. PMID:17559133

  10. Association of Continuity of Primary Care and Statin Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Warren, James R.; Falster, Michael O.; Tran, Bich; Jorm, Louisa

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Deficiencies in medication adherence are a major barrier to effectiveness of chronic condition management. Continuity of primary care may promote adherence. We assessed the association of continuity of primary care with adherence to long-term medication as exemplified by statins. Research Design We linked data from a prospective study of 267,091 Australians aged 45 years and over to national data sets on prescription reimbursements, general practice claims, hospitalisations and deaths. For participants having a statin dispense within 90 days of study entry, we computed medication possession ratio (MPR) and usual provider continuity index (UPI) for the subsequent two years. We used multivariate Poisson regression to calculate the relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for the association between tertiles of UPI and MPR adjusted for socio-demographic and health-related patient factors, including age, gender, remoteness of residence, smoking, alcohol intake, fruit and vegetable intake, physical activity, prior heart disease and speaking a language other than English at home. We performed a comparison approach using propensity score matching on a subset of the sample. Results 36,144 participants were eligible and included in the analysis among whom 58% had UPI greater than 75%. UPI was significantly associated with 5% increased MPR for statin adherence (95% CI 1.04–1.06) for highest versus lowest tertile. Dichotomised analysis using a cut-off of UPI at 75% showed a similar effect size. The association between UPI and statin adherence was independent of socio-demographic and health-related factors. Stratification analyses further showed a stronger association among those who were new to statins (RR 1.33, 95% CI 1.15–1.54). Conclusions Greater continuity of care has a positive association with medication adherence for statins which is independent of socio-demographic and health-related factors. PMID:26448561

  11. cap alpha. -transforming growth factor secreted by untransformed bovine anterior pituitary cells in culture. I. Purification from conditioned medium

    SciTech Connect

    Samsoondar, J.; Kobrin, M.S.; Kudlow, J.E.

    1986-11-05

    A 6-kDa ..cap alpha..-transforming growth factor (TGF) was purified 100,000-fold to homogeneity from the culture fluid conditioned by normal bovine anterior pituitary-derived cells. Initial purification of the acid-soluble TGF from concentrated conditioned medium was achieved by Bio-Gel P-60 gel filtration (apparent molecular mass of 9 kDa). After the Bio-Gel step, three different steps of reverse-phase fast-protein liquid chromatography on the same Pharmacia C/sub 18/ column, using linear acetonitrile gradients, gave complete purification. The ion-pairing agents used in the three consecutive steps were: 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid, 0.13% heptafluorobutyric acid, and again, 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid at a shallower gradient. Homogeneity was confirmed by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography, and by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, where TGF visualization was facilitated by autoradiography of /sup 125/I-TGF. The /sup 125/I-TGF bound to epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptors and after elution ran identically to the starting material. The molecular mass of TGF is 6 kDa by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and 6.6 kDa by amino acid analysis. The amino acid composition of bovine TGF is similar to that of rat or human ..cap alpha..TGF and distinct from epidermal growth factor. Colony-stimulating activity was lost after purification, but the TGF retained its ability to stimulate thymidine uptake by quiescent cells. This mitogenic activity could be blocked completely by anti-EGF-receptor monoclonal antibodies, indicating that the activity was mediated through the EGF-receptor.

  12. Effect of Proline-Containing Oligopeptides PGP and RGP on Proliferative and Protein-Synthesizing Activity of Cultured Pulmonary Fibroblasts under Conditions of Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Tolstenok, I V; Fleishman, M Yu; Sazonova, E N; Lebed'ko, O A; Maltseva, I M; Myasoedov, N F; Timoshin, S S

    2016-05-01

    We studied the effect of glyprolines Pro-Gly-Pro (PGP) and Arg-Gly-Pro (RGP) on the primary culture of pulmonary fibroblasts from newborn albino rats under normal conditions and during oxidative stress. Under physiological conditions, the peptides had no effect on parameters of cell division. Hydrogen peroxide induced intensive oxidative stress accompanied by suppression of protein-synthesizing function. When hydrogen peroxide was added to the culture containing the test peptides, correction of the oxidative status was observed accompanied by activation of DNA-synthesizing activity and inhibition of lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence. PMID:27265140

  13. A Novel Liquid Medium for the Efficient Growth of the Salmonid Pathogen Piscirickettsia salmonis and Optimization of Culture Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Sergio H.; Henríquez, Vitalia; Gómez, Fernando A.; Martínez, Irene; Altamirano, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Piscirickettsia salmonis is the bacterium that causes Piscirickettsiosis, a systemic disease of salmonid fish responsible for significant economic losses within the aquaculture industry worldwide. The growth of the bacterium for vaccine formulation has been traditionally accomplished by infecting eukaryotic cell lines, a process that involves high production costs and is time-consuming. Recent research has demonstrated that it is possible to culture pure P. salmonis in a blood containing (cell-free) medium. In the present work we demonstrate the growth of P. salmonis in a liquid medium free from blood and serum components, thus establishing a novel and simplified bacteriological medium. Additionally, the new media reported provides improved growth conditions for P. salmonis, where biomass concentrations of approximately 800 mg cell dry weight L−1 were obtained, about eight times higher than those reported for the blood containing medium. A 2- level full factorial design was employed to evaluate the significance of the main medium components on cell growth and an optimal temperature range of 23–27°C was determined for the microorganism to grow in the novel liquid media. Therefore, these results represent a breakthrough regarding P. salmonis research in order to optimize pure P. salmonis growth in liquid blood and serum free medium. PMID:24039723

  14. NAP (davunetide) protects primary hippocampus culture by modulating expression profile of antioxidant genes during limiting oxygen conditions.

    PubMed

    Arya, A; Meena, R; Sethy, N K; Das, M; Sharma, M; Bhargava, K

    2015-04-01

    Hypoxia is a well-known threat to neuronal cells and triggers the pathophysiological syndromes in extreme environments such as high altitudes and traumatic conditions such as stroke. Among several prophylactic molecules proven suitable for ameliorating free radical damage, NAP (an octapeptide with initial amino acids: asparagine/N, alanine/A, and proline/P) can be considered superlative, primarily due to its high permeability into brain through blood-brain barrier and observed activity at femtomolar concentrations. Several mechanisms of action of NAP have been hypothesized for its protective role during hypoxia, yet any distinct mechanism is unknown. Oxidative stress is advocated as the leading event in hypoxia; we, therefore, investigated the regulation of key antioxidant genes to understand the regulatory role of NAP in providing neuroprotection. Primary neuronal culture of rat was subjected to cellular hypoxia by limiting the oxygen concentration to 0.5% for 72 h and observing the prophylactic efficacies of 15fM NAP by conventional cell death assays using flow cytometry. We performed real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction to comprehend the regulatory mechanism. Further, we validated the significantly regulated candidates by enzyme assays and immunoblotting. In the present study, we report that NAP regulates a major clad of cellular antioxidants and there is an involvement of more than one route of action in neuroprotection during hypoxia. PMID:25727410

  15. Expression of myostatin in the spotted rose snapper Lutjanus guttatus during larval and juvenile development under cultured conditions.

    PubMed

    Torres-Velarde, J; Ibarra-Castro, L; Rodríguez-Ibarra, E; Sifuentes-Romero, I; Hernández-Cornejo, R; García-Gasca, A

    2015-11-01

    In this study, the developmental expression pattern of myostatin (mstn) in the spotted rose snapper Lutjanus guttatus under culture conditions is presented. The full coding sequence of mstn from L. guttatus was isolated from muscle tissue, obtaining 1134 nucleotides which encode a peptide of 377 amino acids. The phylogenetic analysis indicated that this sequence corresponds to mstn-1. mstn expression was detected in embryonic stages, and maintained at low levels until 28 days post-hatch, when it showed a significant increase, coinciding with the onset of metamorphosis. After that, expression was fluctuating, coinciding probably with periods of rapid and slow muscle growth or individual growth rates. mstn expression was also analysed by body mass with higher levels detected in smaller animals, irrespective of age. mstn was also expressed in other tissues from L. guttatus, presenting higher levels in brain, eye and gill. In brain for instance, two variants of mstn were isolated, both coding sequences were identical to muscle, except that one of them contained a 75 nucleotide deletion in exon 1, maintaining the reading frame but deleting two conserved cysteine residues. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that this brain variant was also mstn-1. The function of this variant is not clear and needs further investigation. These results indicate that mstn-1 participates in different physiological processes other than muscle growth in fishes. PMID:26376729

  16. Isolation and characterization of ubiquinol oxidase complexes from Paracoccus denitrificans cells cultured under various limiting growth conditions in the chemostat.

    PubMed

    Bosma, G; Braster, M; Stouthamer, A H; van Verseveld, H W

    1987-06-15

    To obtain more information about the composition of the respiratory chain under different growth conditions and about the regulation of electron-transfer to several oxidases and reductases, ubiquinol oxidase complexes were partially purified from membranes of Paracoccus denitrificans cells grown in carbon-source-limited aerobic, nitrate-limited anaerobic and oxygen-limited chemostat cultures. The isolated enzymes consisted of cytochromes bc1, c552 and aa3. In comparison with the aerobic ubiquinol oxidase complex, the oxygen- and nitrate-limited ones contained, respectively, less and far less of the cytochrome aa3 subunits and the anaerobic complex also contained lower amounts of cytochrome c552. In addition, extra haem-containing polypeptides were present with apparent Mr of 14,000, 30,000 and 45,000, the former one only in the anaerobic and the latter two in both the anaerobic and oxygen-limited preparations. This is the first report describing four different membrane-bound c-type cytochromes. The potentiometric and spectral characteristics of the redox components in membrane particles and isolated ubiquinol oxidase fractions were determined by combined potentiometric analysis and spectrum deconvolution. Membranes of nitrate- and oxygen-limited cells contained extra high-potential cytochrome b in comparison with the membranes of aerobically grown cells. No difference was detected between the three isolated ubiquinol oxidase complexes. Aberrances with already published values of redox potentials are discussed. PMID:3036512

  17. Optimization of Culture Conditions for Some Identified Fungal Species and Stability Profile of α-Galactosidase Produced

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, A. S.; Srivastava, N.; Kehri, H. K.; Sharma, B.

    2013-01-01

    Microbial α-galactosidase preparations have implications in medicine and in the modification of various agricultural products as well. In this paper, four isolated fungal strains such as AL-3, WF-3, WP-4 and CL-4 from rhizospheric soil identified as Penicillium glabrum (AL-3), Trichoderma evansii (WF-3), Lasiodiplodia theobromae (WP-4) and Penicillium flavus (CL-4) based on their morphology and microscopic examinations, are screened for their potential towards α-galactosidases production. The culture conditions have been optimized and supplemented with specific carbon substrates (1%, w/v) by using galactose-containing polysaccharides like guar gum (GG), soya casein (SC) and wheat straw (WS). All strains significantly released galactose from GG, showing maximum production of enzyme at 7th day of incubation in rotary shaker (120 rpm) that is 190.3, 174.5, 93.9 and 28.8 U/mL, respectively, followed by SC and WS. The enzyme activity was stable up to 7days at −20°C, then after it declines. This investigation reveals that AL-3 show optimum enzyme activity in guar gum media, whereas WF-3 exhibited greater enzyme stability. Results indicated that the secretion of proteins, enzyme and the stability of enzyme activity varied not only from one strain to another but also differed in their preferences of utilization of different substrates. PMID:23424684

  18. Mortality and pathology in brown bullheads Amieurus nebulosus associated with a spontaneous Edwardsiella ictaluri outbreak under tank culture conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iwanowicz, L.R.; Griffin, A.R.; Cartwright, Deborah D.; Blazer, V.S.

    2006-01-01

    Brown bullheads Amieurus nebulosus (family Ictaluridae) are commonly used as a sentinel of environmental contamination. These fish are not generally cultured under laboratory conditions and little is known about their disease susceptibility. Here we report an outbreak of disease due to Edwardsiella ictaluri in a laboratory population of tank-reared, wild-caught brown bullheads. The isolate was positively identified as E. ictaluri using standard bacteriological substrate utilization tests and a monoclonal antibody specific for this bacterium. This pathogen causes a significant disease in channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus and is associated with disease in other ictalurid and non-ictalurid fishes. It appears that E. ictaluri is also a significant pathogen in brown bullheads and produces clinical signs and lesions similar but not identical to those observed in channel catfish. Since commercial sources of bullheads for laboratory tank studies are not available, precautions should be taken to prevent potential E. ictaluri disease outbreaks from wild-caught bullheads intended for laboratory research. ?? Inter-Research 2006.

  19. Influence of Culture Conditions and Extracellular Matrix Alignment on Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Invasion into Decellularized Engineered Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Weidenhamer, Nathan K.; Moore, Dusty L.; Lobo, Fluvio L.; Klair, Nathaniel T.; Tranquillo, Robert T.

    2015-01-01

    The variables that influence the in vitro recellularization potential of decellularized engineered tissues, such as cell culture conditions and scaffold alignment, have yet to be explored. The goal of this work was to explore the influence of insulin and ascorbic acid and extracellular matrix alignment on the recellularization of decellularized engineered tissue by human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Aligned and non-aligned tissues were created by specifying the geometry and associated mechanical constraints to fibroblast-mediated fibrin gel contraction and remodeling using circular and C-shaped molds. Decellularized tissues (matrices) of the same alignment were created by decellularization with detergents. Ascorbic acid promoted the invasion of hMSCs into the matrices due to a stimulated increase in motility and proliferation. Invasion correlated with hyaluronic acid secretion, α-smooth muscle actin expression, and decreased matrix thickness. Furthermore, hMSC invasion into aligned and non-aligned matrices was not different, although there was a difference in cell orientation. Finally, we show that hMSCs on the matrix surface appear to be differentiating toward a smooth muscle cell or myofibroblast phenotype with ascorbic acid treatment. These results inform the strategy of recellularizing decellularized engineered tissue with hMSCs. PMID:25556358

  20. A Qualitative Study Exploring Factors Associated with Provider Adherence to Severe Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Brolliar, Sarah M; Moore, Megan; Thompson, Hilaire J; Whiteside, Lauren K; Mink, Richard B; Wainwright, Mark S; Groner, Jonathan I; Bell, Michael J; Giza, Christopher C; Zatzick, Douglas F; Ellenbogen, Richard G; Ng Boyle, Linda; Mitchell, Pamela H; Rivara, Frederick P; Vavilala, Monica S

    2016-08-15

    Despite demonstrated improvement in patient outcomes with use of the Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Guidelines (Guidelines), there are differential rates of adherence. Provider perspectives on barriers and facilitators to adherence have not been elucidated. This study aimed to identify and explore in depth the provider perspective on factors associated with adherence to the Guidelines using 19 focus groups with nurses and physicians who provided acute management for pediatric patients with TBI at five university-affiliated Level 1 trauma centers. Data were examined using deductive and inductive content analysis. Results indicated that three inter-related domains were associated with clinical adherence: 1) perceived guideline credibility and applicability to individual patients, 2) implementation, dissemination, and enforcement strategies, and 3) provider culture, communication styles, and attitudes towards protocols. Specifically, Guideline usefulness was determined by the perceived relevance to the individual patient given age, injury etiology, and severity and the strength of the evidence. Institutional methods to formally endorse, codify, and implement the Guidelines into the local culture were important. Providers wanted local protocols developed using interdisciplinary consensus. Finally, a culture of collaboration, including consistent, respectful communication and interdisciplinary cooperation, facilitated adherence. Provider training and experience, as well as attitudes towards other standardized care protocols, mirror the use and attitudes towards the Guidelines. Adherence was determined by the interaction of each of these guideline, institutional, and provider factors acting in concert. Incorporating provider perspectives on barriers and facilitators to adherence into hospital and team protocols is an important step toward improving adherence and ultimately patient outcomes. PMID:26760283

  1. Co-Regulation of p16INK4a and Migratory Genes in Culture Conditions that Lead to Premature Senescence in Human Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Darbro, Benjamin W.; Schneider, Galen B.; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J.

    2007-01-01

    Cellular stasis, also known as telomere-independent senescence, prevents many epithelial cells from becoming immortalized by telomerase alone. As human keratinocytes age in culture, protein levels of the tumor suppressor p16INK4a continue to increase, resulting in growth arrest independent of telomere length. Differences in culture conditions have been shown to modulate both p16INK4a expression and replicative capacity of human keratinocytes; however, the mechanism of p16INK4a induction under these conditions is unknown. Using multiple primary keratinocyte cell strains, we verified a delay in p16INK4a induction and an extended lifespan of human keratinocytes when grown in co-culture with post-mitotic fibroblast feeder cells as compared with keratinocytes grown on tissue culture plastic alone. Evaluation of gene expression levels in the two culture conditions by microarray analysis, and subsequent validation, demonstrated that keratinocytes cultured on plastic alone had significantly increased expression of many genes involved in keratinocyte migration and reduced expression levels of genes involved in keratinocyte differentiation. Higher levels of p16INK4a expression were present in cells that also displayed increased amounts of autophosphorylated focal adhesion kinase and urokinase plaminogen activator receptor (uPAR), both markers of keratinocyte migration. Furthermore, when tyrosine phosphorylation or urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA)/uPAR function was inhibited, both keratinocyte migration and p16INK4a expression were reduced. Our results indicate that keratinocytes cultured in the absence of feeder cells exhibit a migratory phenotype and suggest that p16INK4a is selectively induced under these conditions by a mechanism involving tyrosine kinase activity and the urokinase plasminogen activation system. PMID:16117791

  2. Culturing Protozoa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Paul

    1980-01-01

    Compares various nutrient media, growth conditions, and stock solutions used in culturing protozoa. A hay infusion in Chalkey's solution maintained at a stable temperature is recommended for producing the most dense and diverse cultures. (WB)

  3. Artifacts in dilution pharmacokinetic models caused by adherent bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Haag, R; Lexa, P; Werkhäuser, I

    1986-01-01

    Liquid cultures of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain in Mueller-Hinton broth diluted at rates higher than the bacterial growth rate showed the expected decrease in CFU only for 1 to 2 h. Later the CFU started to increase. This phenomenon can be explained by a hypothesis that assumes that the bacteria multiply in two different compartments. From the first compartment, which comprises bacteria homogeneously distributed in the broth, cells are eliminated at a rate that is dependent on the dilution and growth rates. Concomitantly, the second compartment is formed as a nondilutable adherent population on the surface of the culture vessel. Eventually, only cells stemming from that population appeared in the medium and were subsequently diluted. This hypothesis can be described mathematically by a linear combination of two exponential functions. The calculated values fit the experimental data well. Because similar CFU versus time curves were also found with other strains, care should be taken in interpreting results of experiments performed in liquid cultures and evaluated in terms of CFU. One should bear in mind that within a liquid culture an adherent population may exist, which differs in size according to selective influences (dilution, addition of antibiotics, etc.). This may give rise to artificial and unexpected results. PMID:3089140

  4. Improving hand hygiene adherence among nursing staff.

    PubMed

    Harne-Britner, Sarah; Allen, Marianne; Fowler, Kimberly A

    2011-01-01

    This quasi-experimental study explored initial and sustained effects of educational and behavioral interventions on hand hygiene adherence and the relationships between hand hygiene adherence and health care-associated infections. Education paired with positive reinforcement behavioral interventions significantly improved hand hygiene adherence after the first month (χ² = 4.27; P = .039); however, the improvement was not sustained over 6 months. There were no significant differences in infection rates between the treatment and control groups. PMID:20407392

  5. Mechanical properties evolution of a PLGA-PLCL composite scaffold for ligament tissue engineering under static and cyclic traction-torsion in vitro culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Cyril J F; Ziani, Kahina; Zhang, Ye Min; Liu, Jian; Tran, Nguyen; Babin, Jérôme; de Isla, Natalia; Six, Jean-Luc; Wang, Xiong

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the in vitro degradation of a poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid)-poly(L-lactic-co-ϵ-caprolactone) (PLGA-PLCL) composite scaffold's mechanical properties under static culture condition and 2 h period per day of traction-torsion cyclic culture conditions of simultaneous 10% uniaxial strain and 90° of torsion cycles at 0.33 Hz. Scaffolds were cultured in static conditions, during 28 days, with or without cell seeded or under dynamic conditions during 14 days in a bioreactor. Scaffolds' biocompatibility and proliferation were investigated with Alamar Blue tests and cell nuclei staining. Scaffolds' mechanical properties were tested during degradation by uniaxial traction test. The PLGA-PLCL composite scaffold showed a good cytocompatibility and a high degree of colonization in static conditions. Mechanical tests showed a competition between two process of degradation which have been associated to hydrolytic and enzymatic degradation for the reinforce yarn in poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). The enzymatic degradation led to a decrease effect on mechanical properties of cell-seeded scaffolds during the 21st days, but the hydrolytic degradation was preponderant at day 28. In conclusion, the structure of this scaffold is adapted to culture in terms of biocompatibility and cell orientation (microfiber) but must be improved by delaying the degradation of it reinforce structure in PLGA. PMID:23647247

  6. Using Phenotype MicroArrays to Determine Culture Conditions That Induce or Repress Toxin Production by Clostridium difficile and Other Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Xiang-He; Bochner, Barry R.

    2013-01-01

    Toxin production is a central issue in the pathogenesis of Clostridium difficile and many other pathogenic microorganisms. Toxin synthesis is influenced by a variety of known and unknown factors of genetics, physiology, and environment. To facilitate the study of toxin production by C. difficile, we have developed a new, reliable, quantitative, and robust cell-based cytotoxicity assay. Then we combined this new assay with Phenotype MicroArrays (PM) technology which provides high throughput testing of culture conditions. This allowed us to quantitatively measure toxin production by C. difficile type strain ATCC 9689 under 768 culture conditions. The culture conditions include different carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur sources. Among these, 89 conditions produced strong toxin induction and 31 produced strong toxin repression. Strong toxin inducers included adenine, guanosine, arginine dipeptides, γ-D-Glu-Gly, methylamine, and others. Some leucine dipeptides and the triple-leucine tripeptide were among the strongest toxin repressors. While some results are consistent with previous observations, others are new observations that provide insights into toxin regulation and pathogenesis of C. difficile. Additionally, we have demonstrated that this combined assay technology can be applied broadly to a wide range of toxin producing microorganisms. This study is the first demonstration of simultaneous assessment of a large number of culture conditions influencing bacterial toxin production. The new functional cytotoxin quantitation method developed provides a valuable tool for studying toxigenic microorganisms and may also find applications in clinical and epidemiological research. PMID:23437164

  7. Medication Adherence: A Call for Action

    PubMed Central

    Bosworth, Hayden B.; Granger, Bradi B.; Mendys, Phil; Brindis, Ralph; Burkholder, Rebecca; Czajkowski, Susan M.; Daniel, Jodi G.; Ekman, Inger; Ho, Michael; Johnson, Mimi; Kimmel, Stephen E.; Liu, Larry Z; Musaus, John; Shrank, William H.; Buono, Elizabeth Whalley; Weiss, Karen; Granger, Christopher B.

    2013-01-01

    Poor adherence to efficacious cardiovascular related medications has led to considerable morbidity, mortality, and avoidable health care costs. This paper provides results of a recent think tank meeting in which various stakeholder groups representing key experts from consumers, community health providers, the academic community, decision-making government officials (FDA, NIH, etc), and industry scientists met to evaluate the current status of medication adherence and provide recommendations for improving outcomes. Below, we review the magnitude of the problem of medication adherence, prevalence, impact, and cost. We then summarize proven effective approaches and conclude with a discussion of recommendations to address this growing and significant public health issue of medication non adherence. PMID:21884856

  8. Medication adherence among adult patients on hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Alkatheri, Abdulmalik M; Alyousif, Sarah M; Alshabanah, Najla; Albekairy, Abdulkareem M; Alharbi, Shemylan; Alhejaili, Fayze F; Alsayyari, Abdullah A; Qandil, Abeer Ma; Qandil, Amjad M

    2014-07-01

    Medication adherence was assessed in 89 patients on hemodialysis (HD) at the King Abdul Aziz Medical City using an Arabic version of the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MASS-8). The results of the study revealed that 31.46% and 40.45% of the participants showed low and medium adherence, respectively, while 28.09% showed high medication adherence. Accordingly, 71.91% of the patients visiting the dialysis unit were considered medication non-adherent. While being of older age (P = 0.012), being married (P = 0.012) increased the level of adherence, being of medium level of education (P = 0.024) decreased adherence levels. On the other hand, gender, presence of a care-giver, number of members in the household and employment status seems to have no effect on the level of medication adherence. These results call upon the practitioners in HD units to develop intervention programs that can increase the level of medication adherence. PMID:24969185

  9. Family interaction and treatment adherence after stroke.

    PubMed

    Evans, R L; Bishop, D S; Matlock, A L; Stranahan, S; Smith, G G; Halar, E M

    1987-08-01

    Caregivers of 60 stroke patients were assessed five months after patient discharge from a stroke care unit to determine the relationship between family function and poststroke treatment adherence. Areas of family interaction which were significantly related to ratings of treatment adherence included problem solving, communication, and affective involvement. Better functioning families were consistently high on signs of treatment adherence. Findings suggest that families with specific dysfunction may not be as capable of helping patients comply with rehabilitation efforts as families who function more effectively. Thorough family assessment to identify which areas of family interaction are most problematic in relation to adherence issues is recommended. PMID:3619615

  10. Axenic cultures of Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrobacter winogradskyi in autotrophic conditions: a new protocol for kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Farges, B; Poughon, L; Roriz, D; Creuly, C; Dussap, C-G; Lasseur, C

    2012-07-01

    As a part of a natural biological N-cycle, nitrification is one of the steps included in the conception of artificial ecosystems designed for extraterrestrial life support systems (LSS) such as Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative (MELiSSA) project, which is the LSS project of the European Space Agency. Nitrification in aerobic environments is carried out by two groups of bacteria in a two-step process. The ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (Nitrosomonas europaea) realize the oxidation of ammonia to nitrite, and the nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (Nitrobacter winogradskyi), the oxidation of nitrite to nitrate. In both cases, the bacteria achieve these oxidations to obtain an energy and reductant source for their growth and maintenance. Furthermore, both groups also use CO₂ predominantly as their carbon source. They are typically found together in ecosystems, and consequently, nitrite accumulation is rare. Due to the necessity of modeling accurately conversion yields and transformation rates to achieve a complete modeling of MELiSSA, the present study focuses on the experimental determination of nitrogen to biomass conversion yields. Kinetic and mass balance studies for axenic cultures of Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrobacter winogradskyi in autotrophic conditions are performed. The follow-up of these cultures is done using flow cytometry for assessing biomass concentrations and ionic chromatography for ammonium, nitrite, and nitrate concentrations. A linear correlation is observed between cell count and optical density (OD) measurement (within a 10 % accuracy) validating OD measurements for an on-line estimation of biomass quantity even at very low biomass concentrations. The conversion between cell count and biomass concentration has been determined: 7.1 × 10¹² cells g dry matter (DM)⁻¹ for Nitrobacter and 6.3 × 10¹² cells g DM⁻¹ for Nitrosomonas. Nitrogen substrates and products are assessed redundantly showing excellent agreement for mass

  11. Instability of anthocyanin composition under different subculture conditions during long-term suspension cultures of Vitis vinifera L. var. Gamay Fréaux.

    PubMed

    Qu, Junge; Zhang, Wei; Yu, Xingju

    2011-11-01

    The instability of secondary metabolite production is a ubiquitous problem in plant cell culture. In order to understand the instability in plant cell culture, we investigated anthocyanin accumulation in suspension cultures of Vitis vinifera, as a model system, in our laboratory. Not only the anthocyanin contents but also its composition exhibited instability along with the long-term subculture. New methods were developed to indicate the instability of plant cell culture. Both the definition of instability coefficient (delta) and the application of factor scores were the first time in this field. To examine the effects of culture conditions on instability of anthocyanin biosynthesis, different subculture cycles and inoculum sizes had been investigated. Subculture cycle and inoculum size were both environmental cues driving the instability. Compared with subculture cycle, inoculum size was more effective in working on the instability of anthocyanin accumulation. Among all the conditions investigated in our study, (6.5 d, 2.00 g), (7 d, 2.00 g), (7.5 d, 2.00 g), (7 d, 1.60 g) and (7 d, 2.40 g), the condition of 7 d-subculture cycle together with 1.60 g-inoculum size was the best one to keep the stable production of anthocyanins. PMID:22393716

  12. Cognitive functioning, depression, and HIV medication adherence in India: a randomized pilot trial

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Ryan; Waldrop-Valverde, Drenna; Sharma, Aman; Vamos, Szonja; Mahajan, Biraaj; Weiss, Stephen M.; Kumar, Mahendra; Nehra, Ritu; Jones, Deborah L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: India is home to the third-largest number of people living with HIV in the world, and no-cost antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been available across the country since 2004. However, rates of adherence to ART are often subpar in India, and interventions to increase adherence are warranted. Cognitive impairment and depression have been associated with ART non-adherence, and may also limit the impact of behavioral interventions designed to improve adherence. Studies have not evaluated the impact of cognitive impairment and depression on response to adherence interventions in India. Methods: Individuals new to ART (≤12 months prescribed) were recruited from a public hospital in Chandigarh, India. Participants (N = 80) were randomized to either a group medication adherence intervention (MAI) or an enhanced standard of care (ESOC) condition. The MAI consisted of three monthly gender-concordant group cognitive-behavioral sessions addressing HIV and ART, adherence, and HIV-related coping and social support. Participants were assessed at baseline for depression and cognitive functioning, and assessed monthly for adherence by pill count. Results: Adherence among participants receiving the MAI improved by about one day's dose over the course of the study, and no improvement was noted among those in the ESOC. Additionally, high rates of cognitive impairment (57%) and depression (25%) were identified among participants. There was no evidence that cognitive impairment moderated response to the intervention. However, while non-depressed participants benefitted from the intervention, depressed participants failed to show the same improvement. Conclusions: Results of this pilot study suggest that group behavioral interventions can be an effective strategy to promote ART adherence in this population, even among those demonstrating cognitive impairment. However, because of the negative impact of depression on adherence, future studies should continue to develop

  13. Adherence to wearing therapeutic shoes among people with diabetes: a systematic review and reflections

    PubMed Central

    Jarl, Gustav; Lundqvist, Lars-Olov

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Therapeutic shoes are prescribed to prevent diabetic foot ulcers, but adherence to wearing the shoes is often poor. Aim The aim of this study was to review the literature on factors that are associated with adherence to wearing therapeutic shoes and construct a model of adherence to aid future research and development in the field. Methods We conducted a systematic search in PubMed, CINAHL, and PsycINFO for quantitative studies on factors associated with adherence to wearing therapeutic shoes among people with diabetes. Results Six studies were included in the review. The studies focused mainly on patient-, therapy-, and condition-related adherence factors. There is some evidence (three to five studies) that sex, diabetes duration, and ulcer history are not associated with adherence. The evidence for or against the other factors was weak (only one or two studies) or conflicting. Conclusion There is no conclusive evidence for using any factor to predict adherence to wearing therapeutic shoes, but there is some evidence against using certain factors for predicting adherence. Future studies should include a broader range of factors, including health system and social/economic factors, and they should investigate perceived costs and benefits of wearing therapeutic shoes in comparison with other shoes or no shoes. A seesaw model is presented illustrating the complex phenomenon of adherence. Further research is needed to identify factors associated with adherence to wearing therapeutic shoes, to enable the development of interventions to improve adherence and thereby reduce ulceration rates among people with diabetic foot complications. PMID:27540284

  14. Effects of Culture Conditions and Tuberculin Source on Interferon-gamma production in Whole Blood Cultures from Mycobacterium bovis Infected Cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The BOVIGAM® interferon (IFN) - gamma assay constitutes an ante-mortem, in vitro laboratory-based tuberculosis test and is used complementary to the tuberculin skin test. The assay is performed in two stages: firstly, whole blood is cultured with antigens stimulating blood leucocytes to produce IFN...

  15. Effects of Culture Conditions and Tuberculin Source on Interferon-gamma Production in Whole Blood Cultures from Mycobacterium bovis Infected Cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The BOVIGAM® interferon (IFN) - gamma assay constitutes an ante-mortem, in vitro laboratory-based tuberculosis test and is used complementary to the tuberculin skin test. The assay is performed in two stages: firstly, whole blood is cultured with antigens stimulating blood leucocytes to produce IFN-...

  16. Micromolded Arrays for Separation of Adherent Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuli; Phillips, Colleen; Xu, Wei; Pai, Jeng-Hao; Dhopeshwarkar, Rahul; Sims, Christopher E.; Allbritton, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    We present an efficient, yet inexpensive, approach for isolating viable single cells or colonies from a mixed population. This cell microarray platform possesses innovations in both the array manufacture and the manner of target cell release. Arrays of microwells with bases composed of detachable concave elements, termed microrafts, were fabricated by a dip-coating process using a polydimethylsiloxane mold as the template and the array substrate. This manufacturing approach enabled the use of materials other than photoresists to create the array elements. Thus microrafts possessing low autofluorescence could be fabricated for fluorescence-based identification of cells. Cells plated on the microarray settled and attached at the center of the wells due to the microrafts’ concavity. Individual microrafts were readily dislodged by the action of a needle inserted through the compliant polymer substrate. The hard polymer material (polystyrene or epoxy resin) of which the microrafts were composed protected the cells from damage by the needle. For cell analysis and isolation, cells of interest were identified using a standard inverted microscope and microrafts carrying target cells were dislodged with the needle. The released cells/microrafts could be efficiently collected, cultured and clonally expanded. During the separation and collection procedures, the cells remained adherent and provided a measure of protection during manipulation, thus providing an extremely high single-cell cloning rate (>95%). Generation of a transfected cell line based on expression of a fluorescent protein demonstrated an important application for performing on-chip cell separations. PMID:20838672

  17. Degradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons at Low Temperature under Aerobic and Nitrate-Reducing Conditions in Enrichment Cultures from Northern Soils

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Mikael; Sodersten, Erik; Yu, Zhongtang; Dalhammar, Gunnel; Mohn, William W.

    2003-01-01

    The potential for biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at low temperature and under anaerobic conditions is not well understood, but such biodegradation would be very useful for remediation of polluted sites. Biodegradation of a mixture of 11 different PAHs with two to five aromatic rings, each at a concentration of 10 μg/ml, was studied in enrichment cultures inoculated with samples of four northern soils. Under aerobic conditions, low temperature severely limited PAH biodegradation. After 90 days, aerobic cultures at 20°C removed 52 to 88% of the PAHs. The most extensive PAH degradation under aerobic conditions at 7°C, 53% removal, occurred in a culture from creosote-contaminated soil. Low temperature did not substantially limit PAH biodegradation under nitrate-reducing conditions. Under nitrate-reducing conditions, naphthalene, 2-methylnaphthalene, fluorene, and phenanthrene were degraded. The most extensive PAH degradation under nitrate-reducing conditions at 7°C, 39% removal, occurred in a culture from fuel-contaminated Arctic soil. In separate transfer cultures from the above Arctic soil, incubated anaerobically at 7°C, removal of 2-methylnaphthalene and fluorene was stoichiometrically coupled to nitrate removal. Ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis suggested that enrichment resulted in a few predominant bacterial populations, including members of the genera Acidovorax, Bordetella, Pseudomonas, Sphingomonas, and Variovorax. Predominant populations from different soils often included phylotypes with nearly identical partial 16S rRNA gene sequences (i.e., same genus) but never included phylotypes with identical ribosomal intergenic spacers (i.e., different species or subspecies). The composition of the enriched communities appeared to be more affected by presence of oxygen, than by temperature or source of the inoculum. PMID:12514005

  18. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition of A549 cells is enhanced by co-cultured with THP-1 macrophages under hypoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Sueki, Akane; Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Iwashita, Chinami; Taira, Chiaki; Ishimine, Nau; Shigeto, Shohei; Kawasaki, Kenji; Sugano, Mitsutoshi; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Honda, Takayuki

    2014-10-31

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is associated with pulmonary fibrosis, including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). In this study, we investigated EMT of human pulmonary epithelial-derived cells (A549). A549 cells was either cultured by itself or co-cultured with THP-1 macrophages under normoxic (21% O2) and hypoxic (2% O2) conditions. We evaluated the presence of EMT by determining the expression of EMT markers, E-cadherin, vimentin, and fibronectin. To determine the role of TGF-β1 and IL-1β in EMT of the A549 cells, we analyzed the effects of blocking their activity with TGF-β1 inhibitor or IL-1β neutralizing antibody respectively. The A549 cells presented EMT when they were co-cultured with THP-1 macrophages. The EMT of the A549 cells co-cultured with THP-1 macrophages was exacerbated under hypoxia. In addition, the EMT were prevented by the addition of TGF-β1 type I receptor kinase inhibitor. The hypoxic condition increased the mRNA levels of TGF-β1 in A549 cells and THP-1 macrophages and that of IL-1β in THP-1 macrophages when each cells were co-cultured. Anti-IL-1β neutralizing antibody attenuated TGF-β1 secretion in co-culture media under hypoxic conditions. Thus, the IL-1β from THP-1 macrophages up-regulated the TGF-β1 from A549 cells and THP-1 macrophages, and then the TGF-β1 from both cells induced and promoted the EMT of A549 cells when they were co-cultured under hypoxia. Together, these results demonstrate that the interaction between type II pneumocytes and macrophages under hypoxia is necessary for the development of pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:25445593

  19. Creating a Culture of Healing in Multiethnic Communities: An Integrative Approach to Prevention and Amelioration of Violence-Induced Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danesh, H. B.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author describes the nature and dynamics of the culture of healing and the prerequisites for its creation. The concept of the culture of healing emerged over the course of 7 years of implementation of the Education for Peace (EFP) Program in over 100 primary and secondary schools in the ethnically divided Bosnia and…

  20. A Study of Pupil Ethnocentrism toward Pre-Western Eskimo Culture in Relation to Certain Instructional Conditions. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, David S.

    The study investigated the failure of foreign culture studies to create awareness of human universality. Major objectives were to: (1) analyze the relationship of several independent variables such as sex, intelligence, dogmatism, and socio-economic status to the ethnocentrism expressed by children toward pre-Western Eskimo culture, (2) determine…

  1. An ontology for factors affecting tuberculosis treatment adherence behavior in sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Ogundele, Olukunle Ayodeji; Moodley, Deshendran; Pillay, Anban W; Seebregts, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Adherence behavior is a complex phenomenon influenced by diverse personal, cultural, and socioeconomic factors that may vary between communities in different regions. Understanding the factors that influence adherence behavior is essential in predicting which individuals and communities are at risk of nonadherence. This is necessary for supporting resource allocation and intervention planning in disease control programs. Currently, there is no known concrete and unambiguous computational representation of factors that influence tuberculosis (TB) treatment adherence behavior that is useful for prediction. This study developed a computer-based conceptual model for capturing and structuring knowledge about the factors that influence TB treatment adherence behavior in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Methods An extensive review of existing categorization systems in the literature was used to develop a conceptual model that captured scientific knowledge about TB adherence behavior in SSA. The model was formalized as an ontology using the web ontology language. The ontology was then evaluated for its comprehensiveness and applicability in building predictive models. Conclusion The outcome of the study is a novel ontology-based approach for curating and structuring scientific knowledge of adherence behavior in patients with TB in SSA. The ontology takes an evidence-based approach by explicitly linking factors to published clinical studies. Factors are structured around five dimensions: factor type, type of effect, regional variation, cross-dependencies between factors, and treatment phase. The ontology is flexible and extendable and provides new insights into the nature of and interrelationship between factors that influence TB adherence. PMID:27175067

  2. Adherence of sputtered titanium carbides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Wheeler, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    The study searches for interface treatment that would increase the adhesion of TiC coating to nickel- and titanium-base alloys. Rene 41 (19 wt percent Cr, 11 wt percent Mo, 3 wt percent Ti, balance Ni) and Ti-6Al-4V (6 wt percent Al, 4 wt percent V, balance Ti) are considered. Adhesion of the coatings is evaluated in pin-and disk friction tests. The coatings and interface regions are examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Results suggest that sputtered refractory compound coatings adhere best when a mixed compound of coating and substrate metals is formed in the interfacial region. The most effective type of refractory compound interface appears to depend on both substrate and coating material. A combination of metallic interlayer deposition and mixed compound interface formation may be more effective for some substrate coating combinations than either alone.

  3. Individualism and collectivism: cultural orientation in locus of control and moral attribution under conditions of social change.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Jose H; Tarantino, Santo J

    2002-12-01

    This study examined the validity of the view that the constructs of individualism and collectivism are coherent cultural manifestations necessarily reflected in an individual's attribution patterns. It was hypothesized that the attribution patterns of locus of control and moral accountability would show divergent individualistic and collectivistic influences in a culture during change from a collectivist culture to an individualist culture. 98 university students from the United States and Puerto Rico were administered the Singelis Individualism-Collectivism Scale, Rotter's Locus of Control Scale, and Miller and Luthar's justice-related moral accountability vignettes. Contrary to expectation, the Puerto Rican sample scored less external in locus of control than the United States sample. No cultural differences in moral accountability were found. No strong correlations were found among the variables at the individual level of analysis. Accounting for these results included the lack of representativeness of the samples, the independence of relation between variables at different levels of analysis, and social change. PMID:12585530

  4. Distinct MicroRNA Expression Signatures of Porcine Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells under Mouse and Human ESC Culture Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Han, Jianyong

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that microRNAs play a very important role in regulating reprogramming, pluripotency and cell fate decisions. Porcine induced pluripotent stem cells (piPSCs) are now available for studying the pluripotent regulation network in pigs. Two types of piPSCs have been derived from human and mouse embryonic stem cell (ESC) culture conditions: hpiPSCs and mpiPSCs, respectively. The hpiPSCs were morphologically similar to human ESCs, and the mpiPSCs resembled mouse ESCs. However, our current understanding of the role of microRNAs in the development of piPSCs is still very limited. Here, we performed small RNA sequencing to profile the miRNA expression in porcine fibroblasts (pEFs), hpiPSCs and mpiPSCs. There were 22 differential expressed (DE) miRNAs down-regulated in both types of piPSCs compared with pEFs, such as ssc-miR-145-5p and ssc-miR-98. There were 27 DE miRNAs up-regulated in both types of piPSCs compared with pEFs. Among these up-regulated DE miRNAs in piPSCs, ssc-miR-217, ssc-miR-216, ssc-miR-142-5p, ssc-miR-182, ssc-miR-183 and ssc-miR-96-5p have much higher expression levels in mpiPSCs, while ssc-miR-106a, ssc-miR-363, ssc-miR-146b, ssc-miR-195, ssc-miR-497, ssc-miR-935 and ssc-miR-20b highly expressed in hpiPSCs. Quantitative stem-loop RT-PCR was performed to confirm selected DE miRNAs expression levels. The results were consistent with small RNA sequencing. Different expression patterns were observed for key miRNA clusters, such as the miR-17-92 cluster, the let-7 family, the miR-106a-363 cluster and the miR-182-183 cluster, in the mpiPSCs and hpiPSCs. Novel miRNAs were also predicted in this study, including a putative porcine miR-302 cluster: ssc_38503, ssc_38503 and ssc_38501 (which resemble human miR-302a and miR-302b) found in both types of piPSCs. The miR-106a-363 cluster and putative miR-302 cluster increased the reprogramming efficiency of pEFs. The study revealed significant differences in the miRNA signatures of hpiPSCs and mpi

  5. Oxygen Partial Pressure Is a Rate-Limiting Parameter for Cell Proliferation in 3D Spheroids Grown in Physioxic Culture Condition

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Aurélie; Guillaume, Ludivine; Grimes, David Robert; Fehrenbach, Jérôme; Lobjois, Valérie; Ducommun, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    The in situ oxygen partial pressure in normal and tumor tissues is in the range of a few percent. Therefore, when studying cell growth in 3D culture systems, it is essential to consider how the physiological oxygen concentration, rather than the one in the ambient air, influences the proliferation parameters. Here, we investigated the effect of reducing oxygen partial pressure from 21% to 5% on cell proliferation rate and regionalization in a 3D tumor spheroid model. We found that 5% oxygen concentration strongly inhibited spheroid growth, changed the proliferation gradient and reduced the 50% In Depth Proliferation index (IDP50), compared with culture at 21% oxygen. We then modeled the oxygen partial pressure profiles using the experimental data generated by culturing spheroids in physioxic and normoxic conditions. Although hypoxia occurred at similar depth in spheroids grown in the two conditions, oxygen partial pressure was a major rate-limiting factor with a critical effect on cell proliferation rate and regionalization only in spheroids grown in physioxic condition and not in spheroids grown at atmospheric normoxia. Our findings strengthen the need to consider conducting experiment in physioxic conditions (i.e., tissue normoxia) for proper understanding of cancer cell biology and the evaluation of anticancer drugs in 3D culture systems. PMID:27575790

  6. Oxygen Partial Pressure Is a Rate-Limiting Parameter for Cell Proliferation in 3D Spheroids Grown in Physioxic Culture Condition.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Aurélie; Guillaume, Ludivine; Grimes, David Robert; Fehrenbach, Jérôme; Lobjois, Valérie; Ducommun, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    The in situ oxygen partial pressure in normal and tumor tissues is in the range of a few percent. Therefore, when studying cell growth in 3D culture systems, it is essential to consider how the physiological oxygen concentration, rather than the one in the ambient air, influences the proliferation parameters. Here, we investigated the effect of reducing oxygen partial pressure from 21% to 5% on cell proliferation rate and regionalization in a 3D tumor spheroid model. We found that 5% oxygen concentration strongly inhibited spheroid growth, changed the proliferation gradient and reduced the 50% In Depth Proliferation index (IDP50), compared with culture at 21% oxygen. We then modeled the oxygen partial pressure profiles using the experimental data generated by culturing spheroids in physioxic and normoxic conditions. Although hypoxia occurred at similar depth in spheroids grown in the two conditions, oxygen partial pressure was a major rate-limiting factor with a critical effect on cell proliferation rate and regionalization only in spheroids grown in physioxic condition and not in spheroids grown at atmospheric normoxia. Our findings strengthen the need to consider conducting experiment in physioxic conditions (i.e., tissue normoxia) for proper understanding of cancer cell biology and the evaluation of anticancer drugs in 3D culture systems. PMID:27575790

  7. Dietary potassium diformate did not affect growth and survival but did reduce nutrient digestibility of Pacific white shrimp cultured under clean water conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigated the effect of a dietary supplement potassium diformate (PDF) on growth performance, survival and nutrient digestibility of Pacific white shrimp cultured under clean water conditions. We found that weight gain was not significantly (P>0.05) affected by the different levels of ...

  8. Treatment adherence redefined: a critical analysis of technotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Marilou; Jacob, Jean Daniel; Guta, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    GAGNON M, JACOB JD and GUTA A. Nursing Inquiry 2013; 20: 60–70 Treatment adherence redefined: a critical analysis of technotherapeutics Treatment adherence issues in the context of chronic illnesses have become an important concern worldwide and a top priority in the field of health-care. The development of devices that will allow healthcare providers to track treatment adherence and monitor physiological parameters with exact precision raises important questions and concerns. The aim of this study is to interrogate the use of these new technological devices which allow for previously unavailable data to be recorded on an ongoing basis and transmitted via a tiny microchip inserted into the body. Drawing on the work of Michel Foucault, we analyze how this anatomo-political and bio-political instrument serves to discipline chronically ill individuals and govern the health of entire populations who suffer from chronic conditions. To support our analysis, this article comprises three sections. First, we provide an overview of treatment adherence and technotherapeutics. Then, we explain how technotherapeutics concern the government of bodies and conducts at the individual level and population level more generally. Lastly, we provide an example of how this analysis can be connected to routine nursing practice in the field of HIV. PMID:22381079

  9. Use of Response Surface Methodology to Optimize Culture Conditions for Hydrogen Production by an Anaerobic Bacterial Strain from Soluble Starch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieu, Hoa Thi Quynh; Nguyen, Yen Thi; Dang, Yen Thi; Nguyen, Binh Thanh

    2016-05-01

    Biohydrogen is a clean source of energy that produces no harmful byproducts during combustion, being a potential sustainable energy carrier for the future. Therefore, biohydrogen produced by anaerobic bacteria via dark fermentation has attracted attention worldwide as a renewable energy source. However, the hydrogen production capability of these bacteria depends on major factors such as substrate, iron-containing hydrogenase, reduction agent, pH, and temperature. In this study, the response surface methodology (RSM) with central composite design (CCD) was employed to improve the hydrogen production by an anaerobic bacterial strain isolated from animal waste in Phu Linh, Soc Son, Vietnam (PL strain). The hydrogen production process was investigated as a function of three critical factors: soluble starch concentration (8 g L-1 to 12 g L-1), ferrous iron concentration (100 mg L-1 to 200 mg L-1), and l-cysteine concentration (300 mg L-1 to 500 mg L-1). RSM analysis showed that all three factors significantly influenced hydrogen production. Among them, the ferrous iron concentration presented the greatest influence. The optimum hydrogen concentration of 1030 mL L-1 medium was obtained with 10 g L-1 soluble starch, 150 mg L-1 ferrous iron, and 400 mg L-1 l-cysteine after 48 h of anaerobic fermentation. The hydrogen concentration produced by the PL strain was doubled after using RSM. The obtained results indicate that RSM with CCD can be used as a technique to optimize culture conditions for enhancement of hydrogen production by the selected anaerobic bacterial strain. Hydrogen production from low-cost organic substrates such as soluble starch using anaerobic fermentation methods may be one of the most promising approaches.

  10. Cultural and socio-economic conditions as factors contributing to chronic stress in sub-Saharan African communities.

    PubMed

    Henley, Phaedra; Lowthers, Megan; Koren, Gideon; Fedha, Pamela Tsimbiri; Russell, Evan; VanUum, Stan; Arya, Sumedha; Darnell, Regna; Creed, Irena F; Trick, Charles G; Bend, John R

    2014-09-01

    Stress is known to contribute to overall health status. Many individuals in sub-Saharan Africa are believed to be stressed about their employment, income, and health. This study aimed to investigate hair cortisol as a biomarker of chronic stress in settlement communities in Kenya. Hair samples were collected from 108 volunteers from settlement communities in Kenya. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay technique was used to measure hair cortisol concentrations. In parallel, a health survey was completed. The mean ± SD for the cortisol concentration in the hair of volunteers from the settlement communities in Naivasha was 639 ± 300 ng/g, which was higher than found for a Caucasian reference group (299 ± 110 ng/g; one-way ANOVA, P = 0.0003). There were no differences in hair cortisol concentrations between members of slum settlements adjacent to large floriculture farms in Naivasha (Karagita, Kamere/Kwa Muhia/DCK, and Kasarani) compared with those well-removed from all floriculture in Mogotio (Mogotio and Westlands/Katorongot). However, hair cortisol concentrations were significantly higher in females, divorced volunteers, those who made below minimum wage, and those who reported feeling unsafe collecting water or using sanitation facilities within these 2 settlement groups. We found no evidence for increased chronic stress (measured by hair cortisol content) between members of slum settlements adjacent to versus distant to large floriculture farms. Cultural and socio-economic conditions that prevail in much of sub-Saharan Africa were found to be factors contributing to chronic stress. PMID:25083791

  11. Psychiatric symptoms and antiretroviral non-adherence in US youth with perinatal HIV: A longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Kacanek, Deborah; Angelidou, Konstantia; Williams, Paige L.; Chernoff, Miriam; Gadow, Kenneth D.; Nachman, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The relationship of specific psychiatric conditions to adherence has not been examined in longitudinal studies of youth with perinatal HIV infection (PHIV). We examined associations between psychiatric conditions and ARV non-adherence over two years. Design Longitudinal study in 294 PHIV youth, 6–17 years old, in the US and Puerto Rico. Methods We annually assessed three non-adherence outcomes: missed >5% of doses in past 3 days, missed a dose within the past month, and unsuppressed viral load (VL) (>400 copies/mL). We fit multivariable logistic models for non-adherence using Generalized Estimating Equations and evaluated associations of psychiatric conditions (ADHD, disruptive behavior, depression, anxiety) at entry with incident non-adherence using multivariable logistic regression. Results Non-adherence prevalence at study entry was 14% (3-day recall), 32% (past month non-adherence), and 38% (unsuppressed VL), remaining similar over time. At entry, 38% met symptom cutoff criteria for ≥1 psychiatric condition. Greater odds of 3-day recall non-adherence were observed at Week 96 for those with depression (Adjusted Odds Ratio (aOR)=4.14; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.11–15.42) or disruptive behavior (aOR=3.36; 95% CI: 1.02–11.10) but not at entry. Those with vs. without ADHD had elevated odds of unsuppressed VL at Weeks 48 (aOR=2.46; 95% CI: 1.27–4.78) and 96 (aOR=2.35; 95% CI: 1.01–5.45) but not at entry. Among 232 youth adherent at entry, 16% reported incident 3-day recall non-adherence. Disruptive behavior conditions at entry were associated with incident 3-day recall non-adherence (aOR=3.01; 95% CI: 1.24–7.31). Conclusions In PHIV youth, comprehensive adherence interventions that address psychiatric conditions throughout the transition to adult care are needed. PMID:26035322

  12. Optimization and partial characterization of culture conditions for the production of alkaline protease from Bacillus licheniformis P003.

    PubMed

    Sarker, Palash Kumar; Talukdar, Saimon Ahmad; Deb, Promita; Sayem, Sm Abu; Mohsina, Kaniz

    2013-01-01

    Proteolytic enzymes have occupied a pivotal position for their practical applications. The present study was carried out under shake flask conditions for the production of alkaline protease from Bacillus licheniformis P003 in basal medium containing glucose, peptone, K2HPO4, MgSO4 and Na2CO3 at pH 10. The effect of culture conditions and medium components for maximum production of alkaline protease was investigated using one factor constant at a time method along with its characterization. Maximum level of enzyme production was obtained after 48h of incubation with 2% inoculum size at 42°C, under continuous agitation at 150 rpm, in growth medium of pH 9. Highest enzyme production was obtained using 1% rice flour as carbon source and 0.8% beef extract as organic nitrogen source. Results indicated that single organic nitrogen source alone was more suitable than using in combinations and there was no significant positive effect of adding inorganic nitrogen sources in basal medium. After optimization of the parameters, enzyme production was increased about 20 fold than that of in basal medium. The crude enzyme was highly active at pH 10 and stable from pH 7-11. The enzyme showed highest activity (100%) at 50°C, and retained 78% relative activity at 70°C. Stability studies showed that the enzyme retained 75% of its initial activity after heating at 60°C for 1h. The enzyme retained about 66% and 46% of its initial activity after 28 days of storage at 4°C and room temperature (25°C) respectively. Mn(2+) and Mg(2+) increased the residual activity of the enzyme, whereas Fe(2+) moderately inhibited its residual activity. When pre-incubated with Tween-20, Tween-80, SDS and H2O2, each at 0.5% concentration, the enzyme showed increased residual activity. These characteristics may make the enzyme suitable for several industrial applications, especially in leather industries. PMID:24133650

  13. Preexposure prophylaxis-related stigma: strategies to improve uptake and adherence - a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Haire, Bridget G

    2015-01-01

    Despite high levels of efficacy, the implementation of preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) as a strategy to prevent new HIV infection has been slow. Studies show that PrEP works so long as it is taken, making adherence one of the great challenges of effective PrEP implementation alongside issues of access and uptake. Given that effective PrEP use requires ongoing self-administration of pills by people at high risk of HIV acquisition, it is a strategy best understood not as simply biomedical, but as biobehavioral or biopsychosocial, meaning that that social, psychological, cultural, and structural factors all contribute to the success or failure of the intervention. The willingness of people at risk of HIV to take up and adhere to PrEP depends greatly upon social understandings - whether it is seen as effective, as a healthy option, and a socially acceptable strategy for preventing HIV. Stigma - unfavorable associations - can negatively influence the implementation of PrEP. Because it is associated with high-risk sexual activity, PrEP risks multiple stigmas that can differ according to specific cultural conditions. This includes the stigma of being related to HIV (which may also relate to other stigmas, such as homosexuality, sex work, and/or drug use) and the stigma of PrEP being an alternative to condoms (as condom use is associated with responsible sexual activity). PrEP-related stigma has emerged as a significant social harm that can arise from PrEP research participation, reported by trial participants from a range of different trial sites, different trial populations, and spanning different continents. Social marketing needs to redress PrEP-related stigmas through health promotion campaigns aimed at clinicians, HIV-affected communities, and people at high risk of HIV who might benefit from PrEP access. PrEP access needs to be reframed as a positive and responsible option to help people remain HIV-negative. PMID:26508889

  14. Laser-generated Micro-bubbles for Molecular Delivery to Adherent Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genc, Suzanne Lee

    We examine the use of optical breakdown in aqueous media as a means to deliver molecules into live adherent cell cultures. This process, called optoinjection (OI), is affected both by the media composition and the cellular exposure to hydrodynamic stresses associated with the cavitation bubble formed by the optical breakdown process. Here we explore the possibility of performing OI using laser microbeams focused at low numerical aperture to provide conditions where OI can be performed at high-throughput. We first investigate the effect of media composition on plasma and cavitation bubble formation. We make the discovery that irradiation of minimal essential media, supports the formation of low-density plasmas (LDP) resulting in the generation of small (2--20 mum radius) cavitation bubbles. This provides gentle specific hydrodynamic perturbations to single or small groups of cells. The addition of supplemental fetal bovine serum to the medium prevents the formation LDPs and the resulting avalanche ionization generates larger (> 100 mum radius) bubbles and more violent hydrodynamic effects. Second, using high-speed photography we provide the first visualization of LDP-generated cavitation bubbles at precise offset locations relative to a boundary on which a cell monolayer can be cultured. These images depict the cellular exposure to different hydrodynamic conditions depending on the normalized offset distance (gamma = s/Rmax) and show how it affects the cellular exposure to shear stresses upon bubble expansion and different distributions of bubble energy upon collapse. Lastly, we examine the effects of pulse energy, parameters, and single vs. multiple laser exposures on the ability to deliver 3-5 kDa dextrans into adherent cells using both small (< 20 mum) and large (100mu m) radius bubbles. For single exposures, we identify several conditions under which OI can be optimized: (a) conditions where cell viability is maximized (˜90%) but optoinjection of viable cells

  15. Psychological Determinants of Adolescent Exercise Adherence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douthitt, Vicki L.

    1994-01-01

    High school physical education students completed questionnaires which represented four psychological variables, and one physical activity variable (exercise adherence) in classroom setting (n=132) and in summer setting (n=110). Found Perceived Romantic Appeal predictive of male exercise adherence and Perceived Athletic Competency, Perceived…

  16. Predicting asthma exacerbations employing remotely monitored adherence.

    PubMed

    Killane, Isabelle; Sulaiman, Imran; MacHale, Elaine; Breathnach, Aoife; Taylor, Terence E; Holmes, Martin S; Reilly, Richard B; Costello, Richard W

    2016-03-01

    This Letter investigated the efficacy of a decision-support system, designed for respiratory medicine, at predicting asthma exacerbations in a multi-site longitudinal randomised control trial. Adherence to inhaler medication was acquired over 3 months from patients with asthma employing a dose counter and a remote monitoring adherence device which recorded participant's inhaler use: n = 184 (23,656 audio files), 61% women, age (mean ± sd) 49.3 ± 16.4. Data on occurrence of exacerbations was collected at three clinical visits, 1 month apart. The relative risk of an asthma exacerbation for those with good and poor adherence was examined employing a univariate and multivariate modified Poisson regression approach; adjusting for age, gender and body mass index. For all months dose counter adherence was significantly (p < 0.01) higher than remote monitoring adherence. Overall, those with poor adherence had a 1.38 ± 0.34 and 1.42 ± 0.39 (remotely monitored) and 1.25 ± 0.32 and 1.18 ± 0.31 (dose counter) higher relative risk of an exacerbation in model 1 and model 2, respectively. However, this was not found to be statistically significantly different. Remotely monitored adherence holds important clinical information and future research should focus on refining adherence and exacerbation measures. Decision-support systems based on remote monitoring may enhance patient-physician communication, possibly reducing preventable adverse events. PMID:27222733

  17. A Review of Treatment Adherence Measurement Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenwald, Sonja K.; Garland, Ann F.

    2013-01-01

    Fidelity measurement is critical for testing the effectiveness and implementation in practice of psychosocial interventions. Adherence is a critical component of fidelity. The purposes of this review were to catalogue adherence measurement methods and assess existing evidence for the valid and reliable use of the scores that they generate and the…

  18. An improved method for western blotting when extracting proteins from mammalian cells cultured on a collagen gel under serum-free conditions.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Seiichiro; Mizutani, Takeomi; Kawabata, Kazushige; Haga, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    Western blotting is a widely used method for detection and quantification of specific proteins extracted from mammalian cells. In the conventional method of protein extraction, we found that collagen-containing gels interfered with detection of the p65 protein (one of the subunits in the NF-κB family of proteins) in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells cultured on a collagen gel containing serum. In contrast, the collagen gels did not affect detection of the GAPDH protein. Then, we established an improved method for preparation of protein extracts (using trichloroacetic acid fixation and collagenase treatment) from the cells cultured on the collagen gel. Using the improved method, we were able to detect p65 proteins without loss in A549 cells cultured on a collagen gel under serum-free conditions, but we could not detect the proteins if serum was present in cell culture. Thus, using western blotting and serum-free culture conditions, we succeeded in comparing the p65 expression between the cells grown in a plastic dish and cells grown on a collagen gel. PMID:25005915

  19. Ensuring patient adherence to clean intermittent self-catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Seth, Jai H; Haslam, Collette; Panicker, Jalesh N

    2014-01-01

    Patient performance of clean intermittent self-catheterization is a crucial component of the management of incomplete bladder emptying, which can arise from a variety of conditions. This allows patients to have more control over their bladder emptying, and avoids the inconveniences that come with an indwelling urethral catheter. There are, however, barriers that patients face when performing this task which may ultimately limit adherence. In this article, these barriers are discussed in more detail with potential solutions to counter them. PMID:24611001

  20. African Americans’ Perceptions of Adherence to Medications and Lifestyle Changes Prescribed to Treat Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Pettey, Christina M.; McSweeney, Jean C.; Stewart, Katharine E.; Cleves, Mario A.; Price, Elvin T.; Heo, Seongkum; Souder, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    More than 80 million Americans have hypertension (HTN), and African Americans (AAs) are disproportionately affected. AAs also have lower rates of adherence to HTN treatment. It is important to understand AAs’ perceptions of adherence to develop effective interventions. The aim of this study is to examine AAs’ perceptions of adherence to medications and lifestyle changes prescribed to treat HTN. In this qualitative study, we used purposive sampling to recruit Southern AAs with HTN aged 21 and older from a free, faith-based clinic. We recorded individual, in-person interviews about perceptions related to adherence to treatment of HTN and analyzed verbatim transcripts using content analysis and constant comparison. We also conducted medical record audits. Twenty-nine AAs participated (52% female, 38% were <50 years of age, 52% had taken anti-HTN medications for ≥5 years). Audits indicated that 65% had uncontrolled HTN during the previous year. Two main themes included causes of HTN and ways to improve blood pressure. Perceived causes of HTN included diet, stress, unhealthy actions, genes, and obesity. Ways to improve HTN included using cultural treatments “passed down,” increasing exercise, reducing stress, and losing weight. Many reported using home remedies to control HTN, including drinking pickle juice. More than half of this sample had uncontrolled HTN. They identified influences of culture on perceptions of adherence including causes and treatment of HTN, and possibly detrimental home remedies. It is imperative that clinicians identify culturally appropriate interventions for this high-risk group. PMID:27148469

  1. Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy and Virologic Failure

    PubMed Central

    Bezabhe, Woldesellassie M.; Chalmers, Leanne; Bereznicki, Luke R.; Peterson, Gregory M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The often cited need to achieve ≥95% (nearly perfect) adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) for successful virologic outcomes in HIV may present a barrier to initiation of therapy in the early stages of HIV. This meta-analysis synthesized 43 studies (27,905 participants) performed across >26 countries, to determine the relationship between cut-off point for optimal adherence to ART and virologic outcomes. Meta-analysis was performed using a random-effect model to calculate pooled odds ratios with corresponding 95% confidence intervals. The mean rate of patients reporting optimal adherence was 63.4%. Compared with suboptimal adherence, optimal adherence was associated with a lower risk of virologic failure (0.34; 95% CI: 0.26–0.44). There were no significant differences in the pooled odds ratios among different optimal adherence thresholds (≥98–100%, ≥95%, ≥80–90%). Study design (randomized controlled trial vs observational study) (regression coefficient 0.74, 95% CI: 0.04–1.43, P < 0.05) and study region (developing vs developed countries; regression coefficient 0.56, 95% CI: 0.01–1.12, P < 0.05) remained as independent predictors of between-study heterogeneity, with more patients with optimal adherence from developing countries or randomized controlled trials experiencing virologic failure. The threshold for optimal adherence to achieve better virologic outcomes appears to be wider than the commonly used cut-off point (≥95% adherence). The cut-off point for optimal adherence could be redefined to a slightly lower level to encourage the prescribing ART at an early stage of HIV infection. PMID:27082595

  2. Adherence to Hip Protectors and Implications for U.S. Long-Term Care Settings

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Sheryl; Magaziner, Jay; Birge, Stanley J.; Barton, Bruce A.; Kronsberg, Shari S.; Kiel, Douglas P.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Determine nursing home characteristics related to adherence to use of a hip protector (HP) to prevent fracture; also describe adherence and related resident characteristics. Design: A multi-center, randomized controlled trial of a HP in which adherence to wearing the HP was monitored by research staff three times a week for up to 21 months; data were collected by interviews and chart review. Setting: Thirty-five nursing homes in Boston, St. Louis, and Baltimore. Participants: A total of 797 eligible residents, 633 (79%) of whom passed the run-in period, 397 (63%) of whom remained in the study until the end of follow-up. Intervention: Residents wore a single HP on their right or left side. Measurements: In addition to regular monitoring of adherence, data were collected regarding facility characteristics, staffing, policies and procedures, perception of HPs and related experience, and research staff ratings of environmental and overall quality; and also resident demographic characteristics, and function, health, and psychosocial status. Results: Facility characteristics related to more adherence were not being chain-affiliated; less Medicaid case-mix; fewer residents wearing HPs; more paraprofessional staff training; more rotating workers; and having administrators who were less involved in meetings. Conclusion: Efforts to increase adherence to the use of HPs should focus on facilities with more Medicaid case-mix to reduce disparities in care, and those that have less of a culture of training. Staff may need support to increase adherence, and when adherence cannot be maintained, HP use should be targeted to those who remain adherent. PMID:20142065

  3. Robotic adherent cell injection for characterizing cell-cell communication.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Siragam, Vinayakumar; Gong, Zheng; Chen, Jun; Fridman, Michael D; Leung, Clement; Lu, Zhe; Ru, Changhai; Xie, Shaorong; Luo, Jun; Hamilton, Robert M; Sun, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Compared to robotic injection of suspended cells (e.g., embryos and oocytes), fewer attempts were made to automate the injection of adherent cells (e.g., cancer cells and cardiomyocytes) due to their smaller size, highly irregular morphology, small thickness (a few micrometers thick), and large variations in thickness across cells. This paper presents a robotic system for automated microinjection of adherent cells. The system is embedded with several new capabilities: automatically locating micropipette tips; robustly detecting the contact of micropipette tip with cell culturing surface and directly with cell membrane; and precisely compensating for accumulative positioning errors. These new capabilities make it practical to perform adherent cell microinjection truly via computer mouse clicking in front of a computer monitor, on hundreds and thousands of cells per experiment (versus a few to tens of cells as state of the art). System operation speed, success rate, and cell viability rate were quantitatively evaluated based on robotic microinjection of over 4000 cells. This paper also reports the use of the new robotic system to perform cell-cell communication studies using large sample sizes. The gap junction function in a cardiac muscle cell line (HL-1 cells), for the first time, was quantified with the system. PMID:25073160

  4. A Brief Adherence Intervention that Improved Glycemic Control: Mediation by Patterns of Adherence

    PubMed Central

    de Vries McClintock, Heather F.; Morales, Knashawn H.; Small, Dylan S.; Bogner, Hillary R.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined whether longitudinal adherence profiles mediated the relationship between a brief adherence intervention and glycemic control among patients with Type 2 diabetes. Adherence was assessed using the Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS). Longitudinal analysis via growth curve mixture modeling was carried out to classify patients according to patterns of adherence to oral hypoglycemic agents. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) assays were used to measure glycemic control as the clinical outcome. Across the whole sample, longitudinal adherence profiles mediated 35.2% (13.2%, 81.0%) of the effect of a brief adherence intervention on glycemic control (from odds ratio (OR) = 8.48, 95% CI (3.24, 22.2) to 4.00, 95% CI (1.34, 11.93)). Our results suggest that patients in the intervention had better glycemic control largely due to their greater likelihood of adherence to oral hypoglycemic agents. PMID:24913600

  5. Bacterial adherence to separated modular components in joint prosthesis: a clinical study.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Barrena, Enrique; Esteban, Jaime; Medel, Francisco; Molina-Manso, Diana; Ortiz-Pérez, Alberto; Cordero-Ampuero, Jose; Puértolas, José A</