Science.gov

Sample records for adherent culture system

  1. Adherence of Bilophila wadsworthia to cultured human embryonic intestinal cells.

    PubMed

    Gerardo, S H; Garcia, M M; Wexler, H M; Finegold, S M

    1998-02-01

    Adherence of Bilophila wadsworthia to the cultured human embryonic intestinal cell line, Intestine 407 (Int 407), varied among the strains tested from strongly adherent (76-100% cells positive for one or more adherent bacteria) to non- or weakly adherent (0-25% positive cells). Although negative staining revealed that infrequent cells of an adherent strain, WAL 9077, the adherent type-strain, WAL 7959, and a non-adherent strain, WAL 8448, expressed loosely associated fimbrial structures, a role for these structures in adhesion could not be confirmed with either scanning or thin-section electron micrography. Ruthenium red staining of thin-section preparations and subsequent electron microscopy failed to reveal an extensive extracellular polysaccharide layer. SDS-PAGE analysis of crude outer membrane fractions of WAL 9077 and WAL 8448 demonstrated clear differences in their major and minor outer membrane protein components. Thus, we postulate that the adherence of B. wadsworthia to Int 407 cells is mediated by an outer membrane or cell wall component. PMID:16887620

  2. Automated adherent human cell culture (mesenchymal stem cells).

    PubMed

    Thomas, Robert; Ratcliffe, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Human cell culture processes developed at research laboratory scale need to be translated to large-scale production processes to achieve commercial application to a large market. To allow this transition of scale with consistent process performance and control of costs, it will be necessary to reduce manual processing and increase automation. There are a number of commercially available platforms that will reduce manual process intervention and improve process control for different culture formats. However, in many human cell-based applications, there is currently a need to remain close to the development format, usually adherent culture on cell culture plastic or matrix-coated wells or flasks due to deterioration of cell quality in other environments, such as suspension. This chapter presents an example method for adherent automated human stem cell culture using a specific automated flask handling platform, the CompacT SelecT.

  3. Evaluation of the ability of tilmicosin to prevent adherence of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae to cilia using a differentiated swine respiratory epithelial culture system.

    PubMed

    Thacker, E L; Young, T F; Erickson, B Z; DeBey, M C

    2001-01-01

    Mycoplasmal pneumonia caused by Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is a serious economic problem for swine producers in the United States. Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae colonizes ciliated respiratory epithelial cells. The organism has been shown to be sensitive to tilmicosin, a synthetic macrolide, in antibiotic sensitivity assays. The efficacy of tilmicosin to inhibit adherence of M. hyopneumoniae to ciliated epithelial cells without direct contact between the antibiotic and the organism was evaluated using in vitro methods. The study demonstrated that tilmicosin inhibited the adherence of M. hyopneumoniae at the highest level tested in the system (2 microg/ml) suggesting that tilmicosin may be efficacious against mycoplasmal pneumonia.

  4. Adherence of human basophils to cultured umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bochner, B S; Peachell, P T; Brown, K E; Schleimer, R P

    1988-01-01

    The mechanism by which circulating human basophils adhere to vascular endothelium and migrate to sites of allergic reactions is unknown. Agents have been identified which stimulate the adherence of purified basophils to cultured human umbilical vein vascular endothelial cells (HuVEC). Treatment of HuVEC with interleukin 1, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), bacterial endotoxin, and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) resulted in time and dose-dependent increases of adhesiveness for basophils. Coincubation of basophils and HuVEC for 10 min with C5a, formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine, the calcium ionophore A23187, platelet-activating factor, TNF, and TPA also resulted in significant dose-dependent increases in basophil adherence; this effect resulted from activation of the basophil. Adherence of basophils to HuVEC was time and temperature dependent, required divalent cations, and was unaffected by glucocorticoids. Monoclonal antibody 60.3, directed against the beta-subunit of the leukocyte adherence complex CD18, inhibited the binding of basophils to HuVEC. Adherence of basophils to vascular endothelium may be important in initiating basophil infiltrates in vivo. PMID:3130394

  5. Automated microinjection system for adherent cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youoku, Sachihiro; Suto, Yoshinori; Ando, Moritoshi; Ito, Akio

    2007-07-01

    We have developed an automated microinjection system that can handle more than 500 cells an hour. Microinjection injects foreign agents directly into cells using a micro-capillary. It can randomly introduce agents such as DNA, proteins and drugs into various types of cells. However, conventional methods require a skilled operator and suffer from low throughput. The new automated microinjection techniques we have developed consist of a Petri dish height measuring method and a capillary apex position measuring method. The dish surface height is measured by analyzing the images of cells that adhere to the dish surface. The contrast between the cell images is minimized when the focus plane of an object lens coincides with the dish surface. We have developed an optimized focus searching method with a height accuracy of +/-0.2 um. The capillary apex position detection method consists of three steps: rough, middle, and precise. These steps are employed sequentially to cover capillary displacements of up to +/-2 mm, and to ultimately accomplish an alignment accuracy of less than one micron. Experimental results using this system we developed show that it can introduce fluorescent material (Alexa488) into adherent cells, HEK293, with a success rate of 88.5%.

  6. Cultural Beliefs Underlying Medication Adherence in People of Chinese Descent in the United States.

    PubMed

    Jin, Lan; Acharya, Lalatendu

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the meanings, practices, and cultural beliefs underlying medication adherence in people of Chinese descent living in the United States. The narratives were analyzed using interpretive phenomenology, resulting in the following themes that influenced the communication and behaviors around medication adherence of the participants: (a) cultural concepts of yin yang balance and "qi," (b) understandings of Western and Chinese medicine's efficacy profiles, (c) importance of family and social support, and (d) level of acculturation. This article discusses the influence of these themes on medication adherence and proposes that health communication campaigns, interventions, and doctor-patient communication about increasing medication adherence with people of Chinese descent should engage these understandings.

  7. Characterization and classification of adherent cells in monolayer culture using automated tracking and evolutionary algorithms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen; Bedder, Matthew; Smith, Stephen L; Walker, Dawn; Shabir, Saqib; Southgate, Jennifer

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a novel method for tracking and characterizing adherent cells in monolayer culture. A system of cell tracking employing computer vision techniques was applied to time-lapse videos of replicate normal human uro-epithelial cell cultures exposed to different concentrations of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and a selective purinergic P2X antagonist (PPADS), acquired over a 24h period. Subsequent analysis following feature extraction demonstrated the ability of the technique to successfully separate the modulated classes of cell using evolutionary algorithms. Specifically, a Cartesian Genetic Program (CGP) network was evolved that identified average migration speed, in-contact angular velocity, cohesivity and average cell clump size as the principal features contributing to the separation. Our approach not only provides non-biased and parsimonious insight into modulated class behaviours, but can be extracted as mathematical formulae for the parameterization of computational models. PMID:27267455

  8. Cultural Rationales Guiding Medication Adherence Among African American with HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Neufeld, Stewart; Berry, Rico; Luborsky, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Abstract To date, only modest gains have been achieved in explaining adherence to medical regimens, limiting effective interventions. This is a particularly important issue for African Americans who are disproportionately affected by the HIV epidemic. Few studies have focused on intragroup variation among African Americans in adherence to ART. The aim of this study was to identify and describe the cultural rationales guiding African American patients' formulation and evaluation of adherence. Rationales are key features of purposeful human action. In-depth interviews with 80 seropositive African Americans were tape recorded, transcribed, and analyzed. Participant CD4, viral load and medical histories were collected at each data point. Analysis of four waves of panel data identified three types of adherence rationales: Authoritative Knowledge Rationale (AKR; n=29, 36.3%), Following Doctors' Orders Rationale (DOR; n=24, 30.0%) and Individualized Adherence Rationale (IAR; n=27, 33.8%). Differences in mean reported adherence between the rationale groups did not achieve statistical significance. However, the fraction reporting low adherence (<70%), although not different by rationale group at the first interview (T1), was significantly higher for the IAR group by the fourth interview (T4). Objective clinical markers (CD4 and viral load) improved over time (from T1 to T4) for AKR and DOR groups, but remained unchanged for the IAR group, yet self-reported adherence declined for all groups over the course of the four interviews. PMID:21777141

  9. A fully automated system for adherent cells microinjection.

    PubMed

    Becattini, Gabriele; Mattos, Leonardo S; Caldwell, Darwin G

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes an automated robotic system to perform cell microinjections to relieve human operators from this highly difficult and tedious manual procedure. The system, which uses commercial equipment currently found on most biomanipulation laboratories, consists of a multitask software framework combining computer vision and robotic control elements. The vision part features an injection pipette tracker and an automatic cell targeting system that is responsible for defining injection points within the contours of adherent cells in culture. The main challenge is the use of bright-field microscopy only, without the need for chemical markers normally employed to highlight the cells. Here, cells are identified and segmented using a threshold-based image processing technique working on defocused images. Fast and precise microinjection pipette positioning over the automatically defined targets is performed by a two-stage robotic system which achieves an average injection rate of 7.6 cells/min with a pipette positioning precision of 0.23 μm. The consistency of these microinjections and the performance of the visual targeting framework were experimentally evaluated using two cell lines (CHO-K1 and HEK) and over 500 cells. In these trials, the cells were automatically targeted and injected with a fluorescent marker, resulting in a correct cell detection rate of 87% and a successful marker delivery rate of 67.5%. These results demonstrate that the new system is capable of better performances than expert operators, highlighting its benefits and potential for large-scale application. PMID:24403406

  10. A fully automated system for adherent cells microinjection.

    PubMed

    Becattini, Gabriele; Mattos, Leonardo S; Caldwell, Darwin G

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes an automated robotic system to perform cell microinjections to relieve human operators from this highly difficult and tedious manual procedure. The system, which uses commercial equipment currently found on most biomanipulation laboratories, consists of a multitask software framework combining computer vision and robotic control elements. The vision part features an injection pipette tracker and an automatic cell targeting system that is responsible for defining injection points within the contours of adherent cells in culture. The main challenge is the use of bright-field microscopy only, without the need for chemical markers normally employed to highlight the cells. Here, cells are identified and segmented using a threshold-based image processing technique working on defocused images. Fast and precise microinjection pipette positioning over the automatically defined targets is performed by a two-stage robotic system which achieves an average injection rate of 7.6 cells/min with a pipette positioning precision of 0.23 μm. The consistency of these microinjections and the performance of the visual targeting framework were experimentally evaluated using two cell lines (CHO-K1 and HEK) and over 500 cells. In these trials, the cells were automatically targeted and injected with a fluorescent marker, resulting in a correct cell detection rate of 87% and a successful marker delivery rate of 67.5%. These results demonstrate that the new system is capable of better performances than expert operators, highlighting its benefits and potential for large-scale application.

  11. Cultural competency assessment tool for hospitals: Evaluating hospitals’ adherence to the culturally and linguistically appropriate services standards

    PubMed Central

    Weech-Maldonado, Robert; Dreachslin, Janice L.; Brown, Julie; Pradhan, Rohit; Rubin, Kelly L.; Schiller, Cameron; Hays, Ron D.

    2016-01-01

    Background The U.S. national standards for culturally and linguistically appropriate services (CLAS) in health care provide guidelines on policies and practices aimed at developing culturally competent systems of care. The Cultural Competency Assessment Tool for Hospitals (CCATH) was developed as an organizational tool to assess adherence to the CLAS standards. Purposes First, we describe the development of the CCATH and estimate the reliability and validity of the CCATH measures. Second, we discuss the managerial implications of the CCATH as an organizational tool to assess cultural competency. Methodology/Approach We pilot tested an initial draft of the CCATH, revised it based on a focus group and cognitive interviews, and then administered it in a field test with a sample of California hospitals. The reliability and validity of the CCATH were evaluated using factor analysis, analysis of variance, and Cronbach’s alphas. Findings Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses identified 12 CCATH composites: leadership and strategic planning, data collection on inpatient population, data collection on service area, performance management systems and quality improvement, human resources practices, diversity training, community representation, availability of interpreter services, interpreter services policies, quality of interpreter services, translation of written materials, and clinical cultural competency practices. All the CCATH scales had internal consistency reliability of .65 or above, and the reliability was .70 or above for 9 of the 12 scales. Analysis of variance results showed that not-for-profit hospitals have higher CCATH scores than for-profit hospitals in five CCATH scales and higher CCATH scores than government hospitals in two CCATH scales. Practice Implications The CCATH showed adequate psychometric properties. Managers and policy makers can use the CCATH as a tool to evaluate hospital performance in cultural competency and identify and target

  12. Prebiotic Galactooligosaccharides Reduce Adherence of Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli to Tissue Culture Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Shoaf, Kari; Mulvey, George L.; Armstrong, Glen D.; Hutkins, Robert W.

    2006-01-01

    Prebiotic oligosaccharides are thought to provide beneficial effects in the gastrointestinal tract of humans and animals by stimulating growth of selected members of the intestinal microflora. Another means by which prebiotic oligosaccharides may confer health benefits is via their antiadhesive activity. Specifically, these oligosaccharides may directly inhibit infections by enteric pathogens due to their ability to act as structural mimics of the pathogen binding sites that coat the surface of gastrointestinal epithelial cells. In this study, the ability of commercial prebiotics to inhibit attachment of microcolony-forming enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) was investigated. The adherence of EPEC strain E2348/69 on HEp-2 and Caco-2 cells, in the presence of fructooligosaccharides, inulin, galactooligosaccharides (GOS), lactulose, and raffinose was determined by cultural enumeration and microscopy. Purified GOS exhibited the greatest adherence inhibition on both HEp-2 and Caco-2 cells, reducing the adherence of EPEC by 65 and 70%, respectively. In addition, the average number of bacteria per microcolony was significantly reduced from 14 to 4 when GOS was present. Adherence inhibition by GOS was dose dependent, reaching a maximum at 16 mg/ml. When GOS was added to adhered EPEC cells, no displacement was observed. The expression of BfpA, a bundle-forming-pilus protein involved in localized adherence, was not affected by GOS, indicating that adherence inhibition was not due to the absence of this adherence factor. In addition, GOS did not affect autoaggregation. These observations suggest that some prebiotic oligosaccharides may have antiadhesive activity and directly inhibit the adherence of pathogens to the host epithelial cell surface. PMID:16982832

  13. Photosensitizer Adhered to Cell Culture Microplates Induces Phototoxicity in Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Verena; Kiesslich, Tobias; Krammer, Barbara; Plaetzer, Kristjan

    2013-01-01

    In vitro experiments in plastic receptacles are the basis of characterization of new photosensitizers (PSs) for the photodynamic therapy. We recently reported that lipophilic PSs adhere to cell culture microplates in a kinetic-like manner (Engelhardt et al., 2011). In the current study, we examined the interaction and phototoxic effects of the microplate-adhered PS in cancer cells. Therefore, we preloaded microplates with hypericin, Foscan, PVP-hypericin, or aluminum (III) phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate chloride (AlPCS4) for 24 hours and measured the PS distribution after addition of A431 human carcinoma cells: following another 24 hours up to 68% of hypericin were detected in the cell fraction. The hydrophilic PVP-hypericin and AlPCS4 also diffused into the cells, but the quantities of PS adherence were considerably lower. Microplate-adhered Foscan appeared not to be redistributed. In contrast to the hydrophilic PSs, the cellular phototoxicity of microplate-adhered lipophilic PS was high, independent of whether the PS (i) was pre-loaded onto microplates or (ii) added simultaneously with the cells or (iii) one day after cell seeding. Based on these results, we suggest testing lipophilic PS dyes for their adherence to microplates. Furthermore, the ability of plastic materials to (reversibly) store PSs might represent a new approach for the PS delivery or the development of antimicrobial coatings. PMID:23509741

  14. Neurosphere and adherent culture conditions are equivalent for malignant glioma stem cell lines.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Maryam; Reyner, Karina; Deleyrolle, Loic; Millette, Sebastien; Azari, Hassan; Day, Bryan W; Stringer, Brett W; Boyd, Andrew W; Johns, Terrance G; Blot, Vincent; Duggal, Rohit; Reynolds, Brent A

    2015-03-01

    Certain limitations of the neurosphere assay (NSA) have resulted in a search for alternative culture techniques for brain tumor-initiating cells (TICs). Recently, reports have described growing glioblastoma (GBM) TICs as a monolayer using laminin. We performed a side-by-side analysis of the NSA and laminin (adherent) culture conditions to compare the growth and expansion of GBM TICs. GBM cells were grown using the NSA and adherent culture conditions. Comparisons were made using growth in culture, apoptosis assays, protein expression, limiting dilution clonal frequency assay, genetic affymetrix analysis, and tumorigenicity in vivo. In vitro expansion curves for the NSA and adherent culture conditions were virtually identical (P=0.24) and the clonogenic frequencies (5.2% for NSA vs. 5.0% for laminin, P=0.9) were similar as well. Likewise, markers of differentiation (glial fibrillary acidic protein and beta tubulin III) and proliferation (Ki67 and MCM2) revealed no statistical difference between the sphere and attachment methods. Several different methods were used to determine the numbers of dead or dying cells (trypan blue, DiIC, caspase-3, and annexin V) with none of the assays noting a meaningful variance between the two methods. In addition, genetic expression analysis with microarrays revealed no significant differences between the two groups. Finally, glioma cells derived from both methods of expansion formed large invasive tumors exhibiting GBM features when implanted in immune-compromised animals. A detailed functional, protein and genetic characterization of human GBM cells cultured in serum-free defined conditions demonstrated no statistically meaningful differences when grown using sphere (NSA) or adherent conditions. Hence, both methods are functionally equivalent and remain suitable options for expanding primary high-grade gliomas in tissue culture.

  15. Microfluidic device capable of medium recirculation for non-adherent cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Angela R.; Rajan, Shrinidhi; Kuo, Chuan-Hsien; Bersano, Tom; Wold, Rachel; Futai, Nobuyuki; Takayama, Shuichi; Mehta, Geeta

    2014-01-01

    We present a microfluidic device designed for maintenance and culture of non-adherent mammalian cells, which enables both recirculation and refreshing of medium, as well as easy harvesting of cells from the device. We demonstrate fabrication of a novel microfluidic device utilizing Braille perfusion for peristaltic fluid flow to enable switching between recirculation and refresh flow modes. Utilizing fluid flow simulations and the human promyelocytic leukemia cell line, HL-60, non-adherent cells, we demonstrate the utility of this RECIR-REFRESH device. With computer simulations, we profiled fluid flow and concentration gradients of autocrine factors and found that the geometry of the cell culture well plays a key role in cell entrapping and retaining autocrine and soluble factors. We subjected HL-60 cells, in the device, to a treatment regimen of 1.25% dimethylsulfoxide, every other day, to provoke differentiation and measured subsequent expression of CD11b on day 2 and day 4 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) on day 4. Our findings display perfusion sensitive CD11b expression, but not TNF-α build-up, by day 4 of culture, with a 1:1 ratio of recirculation to refresh flow yielding the greatest increase in CD11b levels. RECIR-REFRESH facilitates programmable levels of cell differentiation in a HL-60 non-adherent cell population and can be expanded to other types of non-adherent cells such as hematopoietic stem cells. PMID:24753733

  16. Effects of Counseling Style and Client Adherence to Asian Cultural Values on Counseling Process With Asian American College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Lisa C.; Kim, Bryan S. K.

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of counseling style and client adherence to Asian cultural values on career-focused counseling process with Asian American college students. Fifty-two clients were classified as having either high or low adherence to Asian values and assigned to a counseling session with a European American female counselor, who…

  17. Geopolitical and cultural factors affecting ARV adherence on the US-Mexico border.

    PubMed

    Shedlin, Michele G; Decena, Carlos Ulises; Beltran, Oscar

    2013-10-01

    The data discussed represent the findings from a study by the NIH-funded Hispanic Health Disparities Research Center, exploring the influence of institutional and psychosocial factors on adherence to antiretroviral medications by Mexican-origin persons living with AIDS on the US-Mexico Border. A qualitative approach was utilized consisting of clinic observations, baseline and follow-up interviews with patients (N = 113), key informant interviews (N = 9) and focus groups (5) with patients and health providers. Findings include the social-normative, institutional and geo-political factors affecting treatment and service delivery as well as individual variation and culturally patterned behaviors. ARV adherence and retention were found to depend on complex interactions and negotiation of co-occurring factors including the experience of medications and side-effects, patient/provider relationships, cultural norms and the changing dynamics of international borders. We note effects of drug-related violence which created border-crossing obstacles influencing mobility, access to services and adherence. PMID:22797951

  18. Adherence to Asian Cultural Values and Cultural Fit in Korean American Undergraduates' Help-Seeking Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gloria, Alberta M.; Castellanos, Jeanett; Park, Yong Sue; Kim, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Differences in and relationships of Asian cultural values, cultural congruity, perception of the university environment, and help-seeking attitudes for 1st- and 2nd-generation Korean American undergraduates (N = 228) were examined. Women reported significantly higher cultural congruity and more positive help-seeking attitudes than did men. Asian…

  19. Drug delivery systems improve pharmaceutical profile and facilitate medication adherence.

    PubMed

    Wertheimer, Albert I; Santella, Thomas M; Finestone, Albert J; Levy, Richard A

    2005-01-01

    Innovations in dosage forms and dose delivery systems across a wide range of medications offer substantial clinical advantages, including reduced dosing frequency and improved patient adherence; minimized fluctuation of drug concentrations and maintenance of blood levels within a desired range; localized drug delivery; and the potential for reduced adverse effects and increased safety. The advent of new large-molecule drugs for previously untreatable or only partially treatable diseases is stimulating the development of suitable delivery systems for these agents. Although advanced formulations may be more expensive than conventional dosage forms, they often have a more favorable pharmacologic profile and can be cost-effective. Inclusion of these dosage forms on drug formulary lists may help patients remain on therapy and reduce the economic and social burden of care.

  20. Non-invasive and non-destructive measurements of confluence in cultured adherent cell lines.

    PubMed

    Busschots, Steven; O'Toole, Sharon; O'Leary, John J; Stordal, Britta

    2015-01-01

    Many protocols used for measuring the growth of adherent monolayer cells in vitro are invasive, destructive and do not allow for the continued, undisturbed growth of cells within flasks. Protocols often use indirect methods for measuring proliferation. Microscopy techniques can analyse cell proliferation in a non-invasive or non-destructive manner but often use expensive equipment and software algorithms. In this method images of cells within flasks are captured by photographing under a standard inverted phase contract light microscope using a digital camera with a camera lens adaptor. Images are analysed for confluence using ImageJ freeware resulting in a measure of confluence known as an Area Fraction (AF) output. An example of the AF method in use on OVCAR8 and UPN251 cell lines is included. •Measurements of confluence from growing adherent cell lines in cell culture flasks is obtained in a non-invasive, non-destructive, label-free manner.•The technique is quick, affordable and eliminates sample manipulation.•The technique provides an objective, consistent measure of when cells reach confluence and is highly correlated to manual counting with a haemocytometer. The average correlation co-efficient from a Spearman correlation (n = 3) was 0.99 ± 0.008 for OVCAR8 (p = 0.01) and 0.99 ± 0.01 for UPN251 (p = 0.01) cell lines.

  1. Non-invasive and non-destructive measurements of confluence in cultured adherent cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Busschots, Steven; O’Toole, Sharon; O’Leary, John J.; Stordal, Britta

    2014-01-01

    Many protocols used for measuring the growth of adherent monolayer cells in vitro are invasive, destructive and do not allow for the continued, undisturbed growth of cells within flasks. Protocols often use indirect methods for measuring proliferation. Microscopy techniques can analyse cell proliferation in a non-invasive or non-destructive manner but often use expensive equipment and software algorithms. In this method images of cells within flasks are captured by photographing under a standard inverted phase contract light microscope using a digital camera with a camera lens adaptor. Images are analysed for confluence using ImageJ freeware resulting in a measure of confluence known as an Area Fraction (AF) output. An example of the AF method in use on OVCAR8 and UPN251 cell lines is included. • Measurements of confluence from growing adherent cell lines in cell culture flasks is obtained in a non-invasive, non-destructive, label-free manner. • The technique is quick, affordable and eliminates sample manipulation. • The technique provides an objective, consistent measure of when cells reach confluence and is highly correlated to manual counting with a haemocytometer. The average correlation co-efficient from a Spearman correlation (n = 3) was 0.99 ± 0.008 for OVCAR8 (p = 0.01) and 0.99 ± 0.01 for UPN251 (p = 0.01) cell lines. PMID:26150966

  2. Numerical fluid-dynamic optimization of microchannel-provided porous scaffolds for the co-culture of adherent and non-adherent cells.

    PubMed

    Cantini, Marco; Fiore, Gianfranco B; Redaelli, Alberto; Soncini, Monica

    2009-03-01

    Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) techniques were used to optimize the microenvironment inside scaffolds for hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) culture in a perfusion bioreactor. These matrices are meant to be seeded with adherent bone marrow stromal cells and then co-cultivated with HSCs; the scaffold micro-architecture and the fluid-dynamic conditions have to be optimized to avoid non-adherent stem cells being dragged away while ensuring adequate nutrient supply. The insertion of longitudinal microchannels was tested as a tool to improve perfusion in a homogeneous porous scaffold. Models of microchannel-provided scaffolds, characterized by different values of geometric parameters concerning pores and channels, were built, and numerical fluid-dynamic and oxygen-transfer analyses were carried out. The results of the computations indicated that the microchannels created preferential paths for culture medium flow, causing low shear stresses and drag forces within the pores; meanwhile, they improved oxygen delivery by forcing its penetration into the scaffold bulk. In particular, an 85% porous, 3-mm-thick scaffold with 175-microm-diameter pores was considered; at a constant average drag force guaranteeing stem cell suspension inside this porous bulk, the addition of approximately 260-microm-diameter, 700-microm-spaced channels resulted in 34% higher oxygen partial pressure at the exit (approximately 135 vs 101 mmHg), maintaining a wall shear stress median value of approximately 0.14 mPa. The present work demonstrates the capacity of microchannel-provided scaffolds to ensure suitable conditions for HSC culture and shows that CFD methods are a valuable tool to retrieve significant clues for the design of the culture environment.

  3. Anaerobic thermophilic culture system

    DOEpatents

    Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Wiegel, Jurgen K. W.

    1981-01-01

    A mixed culture system of the newly discovered microorganism Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus ATCC31550 and the microorganism Clostridium thermocellum ATCC31549 is described. In a mixed nutrient culture medium that contains cellulose, these microorganisms have been coupled and cultivated to efficiently ferment cellulose to produce recoverable quantities of ethanol under anaerobic, thermophilic conditions.

  4. Comparisons of mouse mesenchymal stem cells in primary adherent culture of compact bone fragments and whole bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yiting; Liu, Tianshu; Fang, Fang; Xiong, Chengliang; Shen, Shiliang

    2015-01-01

    The purification of mouse bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) by using the standard method of whole bone marrow adherence to plastic still remains ineffective. An increasing number of studies have indicated compact bone as an alternative source of BMSCs. We isolated BMSCs from cultured compact bone fragments and investigated the proliferative capacity, surface immunophenotypes, and osteogenic and adipogenic differentiations of the cells after the first trypsinization. The fragment culture was based on the fact that BMSCs were assembled in compact bones. Thus, the procedure included flushing bone marrow out of bone cavity and culturing the fragments without any collagenase digestion. The cell yield from cultured fragments was slightly less than that from cultured bone marrow using the same bone quantity. However, the trypsinized cells from cultured fragments exhibited significantly higher proliferation and were accompanied with more CD90 and CD44 expressions and less CD45 expression. The osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation capacity of cells from cultured fragments were better than those of cells from bone marrow. The directly adherent culture of compact bone is suitable for mouse BMSC isolation, and more BMSCs with potentially improved proliferation capacity can be obtained in the primary culture.

  5. Attitudes to cosmetic surgery among ethnic minority groups in Britain: cultural mistrust, adherence to traditional cultural values, and ethnic identity salience as protective factors.

    PubMed

    Swami, Viren; Hendrikse, Sinead

    2013-01-01

    Previous work has suggested that ethnic minority women have more negative attitudes to cosmetic surgery than British Whites, but reasons for this are not fully understood. To overcome this dearth in the literature, the present study asked 250 British Asian and 250 African Caribbean university students to complete measures of attitudes to cosmetic surgery, cultural mistrust, adherence to traditional cultural values, ethnic identity salience, self-esteem, and demographics. Preliminary analyses showed that there were significant between-group differences only on cultural mistrust and self-esteem, although effect sizes were small (d values = .21-.37). Further analyses showed that more negative attitudes to cosmetic surgery were associated with greater cultural mistrust, stronger adherence to traditional values, and stronger ethnic identity salience, although these relationships were weaker for African Caribbean women than for British Asians. These results are discussed in relation to perceptions of cosmetic surgery among ethnic minority women.

  6. The influence of parental factors on therapist adherence in multi-systemic therapy.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Mesha L; Weiss, Bahr; Han, Susan; Gallop, Robert

    2010-08-01

    Therapist treatment adherence has received a great deal of attention in recent years, in part because of its relation to treatment outcomes. Although certain therapist behaviors have been found to be associated with treatment outcomes, little is known about client factors impacting on therapists' ability to adhere to treatment protocols. In this study, we evaluated effects of parental beliefs, psychopathology, and interaction styles on therapists' adherence to Multi-systemic Therapy (MST) principles. Eighty-two parents participating in a clinical trial of MST completed baseline measures assessing psychopathology, family functioning, and treatment expectations. Analyses indicated that parental perceptions of therapist adherence were established within the first 4 weeks of treatment, and that parental psychopathology, motivation, expectations, and child rearing practices were related to parental ratings of therapist adherence. Results were essentially unchanged when controlling for parental positive response style. Clinical and research implications of the findings are discussed.

  7. The Influence of Parental Factors on Therapist Adherence in Multi-systemic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Mesha; Weiss, Bahr; Han, Susan; Gallop, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Therapist treatment adherence has received a great deal of attention in recent years, in part because of its relation to treatment outcomes. Although certain therapist behaviors have been found to be associated with treatment outcomes, little is known about client factors impacting on therapists’ ability to adhere to treatment protocols. In this study, we evaluated effects of parental beliefs, psychopathology, and interaction styles on therapists’ adherence to Multi-systemic Therapy (MST) principles. Eighty-two parents participating in a clinical trial of MST completed baseline measures assessing psychopathology, family functioning, and treatment expectations. Analyses indicated that parental perceptions of therapist adherence were established within the first 4 weeks of treatment, and that parental psychopathology, motivation, expectations, and child rearing practices were related to parental ratings of therapist adherence. Results were essentially unchanged when controlling for parental positive response style. Clinical and research implications of the findings are discussed. PMID:20369379

  8. Rethinking adherence.

    PubMed

    Steiner, John F

    2012-10-16

    In 2012, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) will introduce measures of adherence to oral hypoglycemic, antihypertensive, and cholesterol-lowering drugs into its Medicare Advantage quality program. To meet these quality goals, delivery systems will need to develop and disseminate strategies to improve adherence. The design of adherence interventions has too often been guided by the mistaken assumptions that adherence is a single behavior that can be predicted from readily available patient characteristics and that individual clinicians alone can improve adherence at the population level.Effective interventions require recognition that adherence is a set of interacting behaviors influenced by individual, social, and environmental forces; adherence interventions must be broadly based, rather than targeted to specific population subgroups; and counseling with a trusted clinician needs to be complemented by outreach interventions and removal of structural and organizational barriers. To achieve the adherence goals set by CMS, front-line clinicians, interdisciplinary teams, organizational leaders, and policymakers will need to coordinate efforts in ways that exemplify the underlying principles of health care reform.

  9. The Chinese Life-Steps Program: A Cultural Adaptation of a Cognitive-Behavioral Intervention to Enhance HIV Medication Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Shiu, Cheng-Shi; Chen, Wei-Ti; Simoni, Jane; Fredriksen-Goldsen, Karen; Zhang, Fujie; Zhou, Hongxin

    2013-01-01

    China is considered to be the new frontier of the global AIDS pandemic. Although effective treatment for HIV is becoming widely available in China, adherence to treatment remains a challenge. This study aimed to adapt an intervention promoting HIV-medication adherence—favorably evaluated in the West—for Chinese HIV-positive patients. The adaptation process was theory-driven and covered several key issues of cultural adaptation. We considered the importance of interpersonal relationships and family in China and cultural notions of health. Using an evidence-based treatment protocol originally designed for Western HIV-positive patients, we developed an 11-step Chinese Life-Steps program with an additional culture-specific intervention option. We describe in detail how the cultural elements were incorporated into the intervention and put into practice at each stage. Clinical considerations are also outlined and followed by two case examples that are provided to illustrate our application of the intervention. Finally, we discuss practical and research issues and limitations emerging from our field experiments in a HIV clinic in Beijing. The intervention was tailored to address both universal and culturally specific barriers to adherence and is readily applicable to generalized clinical settings. This evidence-based intervention provides a case example of the process of adapting behavioral interventions to culturally diverse communities with limited resources. PMID:23667305

  10. Culture systems: air quality.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Theodore

    2012-01-01

    Poor laboratory air quality is a known hazard to the culture of human gametes and embryos. Embryologists and chemists have employed analytical methods for identifying and measuring bulk and select air pollutants to assess the risk they pose to the embryo culture system. However, contaminant concentrations that result in gamete or embryotoxicity are poorly defined. Combating the ill effects of poor air quality requires an understanding of how toxicants can infiltrate the laboratory, the incubator, and ultimately the culture media. A further understanding of site-specific air quality can then lead to the consideration of laboratory design and management strategies that can minimize the deleterious effects that air contamination may have on early embryonic development in vitro.

  11. Adherence of Candida to cultured vascular endothelial cells: mechanisms of attachment and endothelial cell penetration.

    PubMed

    Rotrosen, D; Edwards, J E; Gibson, T R; Moore, J C; Cohen, A H; Green, I

    1985-12-01

    To elucidate the pathogenesis of hematogenous Candida infections, we developed an in vitro model of Candida adherence to and penetration of human endothelial cells. We enhanced or inhibited adherence in order to probe mechanisms of attachment. Adherence of Candida albicans showed a linear relation to Candida inoculum (range, 10(2)-10(5) cfu, r = .99, P less than .01) and exceeded that of less virulent Candida species and that of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (P less than .01). Candida immune serum blocked attachment (greater than 95% inhibition; P less than .001), however, this activity was abolished by immunoprecipitation of immune serum with C. albicans mannan (P less than .001) and was unaffected by immunoprecipitation with S. cerevisiae mannan or by adsorption with particulate chitin. Adherence was diminished by exposing C. albicans to heat (greater than 99% inhibition; P less than .01), UV light (98% inhibition; P less than .01), or sodium periodate (greater than 72% inhibition; P less than .01). An extract from heat-exposed C. albicans blocked adherence (greater than 51% inhibition; P less than .001). Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that viable or killed Candida organisms were attached to endothelial cells, were enveloped by membrane processes from the endothelial cell surface, and were incorporated into the endothelial cells within phagosomes. Cytochalasin B blocked incorporation without blocking surface attachment. PMID:3905987

  12. Automated method for the rapid and precise estimation of adherent cell culture characteristics from phase contrast microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Jaccard, Nicolas; Griffin, Lewis D; Keser, Ana; Macown, Rhys J; Super, Alexandre; Veraitch, Farlan S; Szita, Nicolas

    2014-03-01

    The quantitative determination of key adherent cell culture characteristics such as confluency, morphology, and cell density is necessary for the evaluation of experimental outcomes and to provide a suitable basis for the establishment of robust cell culture protocols. Automated processing of images acquired using phase contrast microscopy (PCM), an imaging modality widely used for the visual inspection of adherent cell cultures, could enable the non-invasive determination of these characteristics. We present an image-processing approach that accurately detects cellular objects in PCM images through a combination of local contrast thresholding and post hoc correction of halo artifacts. The method was thoroughly validated using a variety of cell lines, microscope models and imaging conditions, demonstrating consistently high segmentation performance in all cases and very short processing times (<1 s per 1,208 × 960 pixels image). Based on the high segmentation performance, it was possible to precisely determine culture confluency, cell density, and the morphology of cellular objects, demonstrating the wide applicability of our algorithm for typical microscopy image processing pipelines. Furthermore, PCM image segmentation was used to facilitate the interpretation and analysis of fluorescence microscopy data, enabling the determination of temporal and spatial expression patterns of a fluorescent reporter. We created a software toolbox (PHANTAST) that bundles all the algorithms and provides an easy to use graphical user interface. Source-code for MATLAB and ImageJ is freely available under a permissive open-source license. PMID:24037521

  13. Automated method for the rapid and precise estimation of adherent cell culture characteristics from phase contrast microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Jaccard, Nicolas; Griffin, Lewis D; Keser, Ana; Macown, Rhys J; Super, Alexandre; Veraitch, Farlan S; Szita, Nicolas

    2014-03-01

    The quantitative determination of key adherent cell culture characteristics such as confluency, morphology, and cell density is necessary for the evaluation of experimental outcomes and to provide a suitable basis for the establishment of robust cell culture protocols. Automated processing of images acquired using phase contrast microscopy (PCM), an imaging modality widely used for the visual inspection of adherent cell cultures, could enable the non-invasive determination of these characteristics. We present an image-processing approach that accurately detects cellular objects in PCM images through a combination of local contrast thresholding and post hoc correction of halo artifacts. The method was thoroughly validated using a variety of cell lines, microscope models and imaging conditions, demonstrating consistently high segmentation performance in all cases and very short processing times (<1 s per 1,208 × 960 pixels image). Based on the high segmentation performance, it was possible to precisely determine culture confluency, cell density, and the morphology of cellular objects, demonstrating the wide applicability of our algorithm for typical microscopy image processing pipelines. Furthermore, PCM image segmentation was used to facilitate the interpretation and analysis of fluorescence microscopy data, enabling the determination of temporal and spatial expression patterns of a fluorescent reporter. We created a software toolbox (PHANTAST) that bundles all the algorithms and provides an easy to use graphical user interface. Source-code for MATLAB and ImageJ is freely available under a permissive open-source license.

  14. Manuals of Cultural Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballonoff, Paul

    2014-10-01

    Ethnography often studies social networks including empirical descriptions of marriages and families. We initially concentrate on a special subset of networks which we call configurations. We show that descriptions of the possible outcomes of viable histories form a manual, and an orthoalgebra. We then study cases where family sizes vary, and show that this also forms a manual. In fact, it demonstrates adiabatic invariance, a property often associated with physical system conservation laws, and which here expresses conservation of the viability of a cultural system.

  15. Development and cultural adaptation of the Spanish version of the End Stage Renal Disease Adherence Questionnaire (SESRD-AQ).

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngmee; Evangelista, Lorraine S

    2013-01-01

    We previously developed and validated the End-Stage Renal Disease Adherence Questionnaire (ESRD-AQ) to measure adherence behaviors (e.g., hemodialysis attendance, medication use, fluid restrictions, and diet) of patients on maintenance hemodialysis. To determine whether the ESRD-AQ can be used to measure adherence behaviors in non-English-speaking patients, we translated and adapted the ESRD-AQ into Spanish (SESRD-AQ) using forward and backward translation and cultural adaptation of the content. Validity and reliability were measured using item-level content validity indexes, intraclass correlation coefficients, and known-group analysis. All validity indices were within an acceptable range; strong test-retest stability existed across all items, with intraclass correlation coefficients ranging from 0.82 to 1.00. The developed SESRD-AQ is a valid assessment tool for use among Spanish-speaking patients on maintenance hemodialysis. This instrument refinement and validation process can be replicated with other maintenance hemodialysis population groups.

  16. A medication adherence monitoring system for pill bottles based on a wearable inertial sensor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Kehtarnavaz, Nasser; Jafari, Roozbeh

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a medication adherence monitoring system for pill bottles based on a wearable inertial sensor. Signal templates corresponding to the two actions of twist-cap and hand-to-mouth are created using a camera-assisted training phase. The act of pill intake is then identified by performing a moving window dynamic time warping in real-time between signal templates and the signals acquired by the wearable inertial sensor. The outcomes of the experimentations carried out indicate that the developed medical adherence monitoring system identifies the act of pill intake with a high degree of accuracy.

  17. Health Care System-level Factors Associated With Performance on Medicare STAR Adherence Metrics in a Large, Integrated Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Gregory A.; Dyer, Wendy; Steiner, John F.; Karter, Andrew J.; Raebel, Marsha A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services provide significant incentives to health plans that score well on Medicare STAR metrics for cardiovascular disease risk factor medication adherence. Information on modifiable health system-level predictors of adherence can help clinicians and health plans develop strategies for improving Medicare STAR scores, and potentially improve cardiovascular disease outcomes. Objective: To examine the association of Medicare STAR adherence metrics with system-level factors. Research Design: A cross-sectional study. Subjects: A total of 129,040 diabetes patients aged 65 years and above in 2010 from 3 Kaiser Permanente regions. Measures: Adherence to antihypertensive, antihyperlipidemic, and oral antihyperglycemic medications in 2010, defined by Medicare STAR as the proportion of days covered ≥80%. Results: After controlling for individual-level factors, the strongest predictor of achieving STAR-defined medication adherence was a mean prescribed medication days’ supply of >90 days (RR=1.61 for antihypertensives, oral antihyperglycemics, and statins; all P<0.001). Using mail order pharmacy to fill medications >50% of the time was independently associated with better adherence with these medications (RR=1.07, 1.06, 1.07; P<0.001); mail order use had an increased positive association among black and Hispanic patients. Medication copayments ≤$10 for 30 days’ supply (RR=1.02, 1.02, 1.02; P<0.01) and annual individual out-of-pocket maximums ≤$2000 (RR=1.02, 1.01, 1.02; P<0.01) were also significantly associated with higher adherence for all 3 therapeutic groupings. Conclusions: Greater medication days’ supply and mail order pharmacy use, and lower copayments and out-of-pocket maximums, are associated with better Medicare STAR adherence. Initiatives to improve adherence should focus on modifiable health system-level barriers to obtaining evidence-based medications. PMID:25719517

  18. Extracellular mass transport considerations for space flight research concerning suspended and adherent in vitro cell cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klaus, David M.; Benoit, Michael R.; Nelson, Emily S.; Hammond, Timmothy G.

    2004-01-01

    Conducting biological research in space requires consideration be given to isolating appropriate control parameters. For in vitro cell cultures, numerous environmental factors can adversely affect data interpretation. A biological response attributed to microgravity can, in theory, be explicitly correlated to a specific lack of weight or gravity-driven motion occurring to, within or around a cell. Weight can be broken down to include the formation of hydrostatic gradients, structural load (stress) or physical deformation (strain). Gravitationally induced motion within or near individual cells in a fluid includes sedimentation (or buoyancy) of the cell and associated shear forces, displacement of cytoskeleton or organelles, and factors associated with intra- or extracellular mass transport. Finally, and of particular importance for cell culture experiments, the collective effects of gravity must be considered for the overall system consisting of the cells, their environment and the device in which they are contained. This does not, however, rule out other confounding variables such as launch acceleration, on orbit vibration, transient acceleration impulses or radiation, which can be isolated using onboard centrifuges or vibration isolation techniques. A framework is offered for characterizing specific cause-and-effect relationships for gravity-dependent responses as a function of the above parameters.

  19. cGMP-Compliant Expansion of Human iPSC Cultures as Adherent Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Parr, Ann M; Walsh, Patrick J; Truong, Vincent; Dutton, James R

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic uses of cells differentiated from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), either embryonic stem (ES) cells or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), are now being tested in clinical trials, and it is likely that this will lead to increased commercial interest in the clinical translation of promising hPSC research. Recent technical advances in the use of defined media and culture substrates have significantly improved both the simplicity and predictability of growing hPSCs, allowing a much more straightforward application of current good manufacturing practices (cGMP) to the culture of these cells. In addition, the adoption of cGMP-compliant techniques in research environments will both improve the replication of results and make the transition of promising investigations to the commercial sector significantly less cumbersome. However, passaging methods for hPSCs are inherently unpredictable and rely on operator experience and expertise. This is problematic for the cell manufacturing process where operator time and process predictability are often determining cost drivers. We have adopted a human iPSC system using defined media and a recombinant substrate that employs cell dissociation with a hypertonic citrate solution which eliminates variability during hPSC cell expansion and provides a simple cGMP-compliant technique for hiPSC cultivation that is appropriate in both research and commercial applications. PMID:25863788

  20. Extracellular mass transport considerations for space flight research concerning suspended and adherent in vitro cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Klaus, David M; Benoit, Michael R; Nelson, Emily S; Hammond, Timmothy G

    2004-03-01

    Conducting biological research in space requires consideration be given to isolating appropriate control parameters. For in vitro cell cultures, numerous environmental factors can adversely affect data interpretation. A biological response attributed to microgravity can, in theory, be explicitly correlated to a specific lack of weight or gravity-driven motion occurring to, within or around a cell. Weight can be broken down to include the formation of hydrostatic gradients, structural load (stress) or physical deformation (strain). Gravitationally induced motion within or near individual cells in a fluid includes sedimentation (or buoyancy) of the cell and associated shear forces, displacement of cytoskeleton or organelles, and factors associated with intra- or extracellular mass transport. Finally, and of particular importance for cell culture experiments, the collective effects of gravity must be considered for the overall system consisting of the cells, their environment and the device in which they are contained. This does not, however, rule out other confounding variables such as launch acceleration, on orbit vibration, transient acceleration impulses or radiation, which can be isolated using onboard centrifuges or vibration isolation techniques. A framework is offered for characterizing specific cause-and-effect relationships for gravity-dependent responses as a function of the above parameters.

  1. Persuasive System Design Does Matter: A Systematic Review of Adherence to Web-Based Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Kok, Robin N; Ossebaard, Hans C; Van Gemert-Pijnen, Julia EWC

    2012-01-01

    Background Although web-based interventions for promoting health and health-related behavior can be effective, poor adherence is a common issue that needs to be addressed. Technology as a means to communicate the content in web-based interventions has been neglected in research. Indeed, technology is often seen as a black-box, a mere tool that has no effect or value and serves only as a vehicle to deliver intervention content. In this paper we examine technology from a holistic perspective. We see it as a vital and inseparable aspect of web-based interventions to help explain and understand adherence. Objective This study aims to review the literature on web-based health interventions to investigate whether intervention characteristics and persuasive design affect adherence to a web-based intervention. Methods We conducted a systematic review of studies into web-based health interventions. Per intervention, intervention characteristics, persuasive technology elements and adherence were coded. We performed a multiple regression analysis to investigate whether these variables could predict adherence. Results We included 101 articles on 83 interventions. The typical web-based intervention is meant to be used once a week, is modular in set-up, is updated once a week, lasts for 10 weeks, includes interaction with the system and a counselor and peers on the web, includes some persuasive technology elements, and about 50% of the participants adhere to the intervention. Regarding persuasive technology, we see that primary task support elements are most commonly employed (mean 2.9 out of a possible 7.0). Dialogue support and social support are less commonly employed (mean 1.5 and 1.2 out of a possible 7.0, respectively). When comparing the interventions of the different health care areas, we find significant differences in intended usage (p = .004), setup (p < .001), updates (p < .001), frequency of interaction with a counselor (p < .001), the system (p = .003) and peers (p

  2. Culture and Social Systems Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Talcott

    1972-01-01

    A brief statement of the history of the relation between culture concepts is given, then, proceeding on the assumption that all human societies are interpenetrated with culture, the author attempts a relatively systematic outline of the structure of cultural systems and of their modes of articulation in social systems. (JB)

  3. Automated Method for the Rapid and Precise Estimation of Adherent Cell Culture Characteristics from Phase Contrast Microscopy Images

    PubMed Central

    Jaccard, Nicolas; Griffin, Lewis D; Keser, Ana; Macown, Rhys J; Super, Alexandre; Veraitch, Farlan S; Szita, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    The quantitative determination of key adherent cell culture characteristics such as confluency, morphology, and cell density is necessary for the evaluation of experimental outcomes and to provide a suitable basis for the establishment of robust cell culture protocols. Automated processing of images acquired using phase contrast microscopy (PCM), an imaging modality widely used for the visual inspection of adherent cell cultures, could enable the non-invasive determination of these characteristics. We present an image-processing approach that accurately detects cellular objects in PCM images through a combination of local contrast thresholding and post hoc correction of halo artifacts. The method was thoroughly validated using a variety of cell lines, microscope models and imaging conditions, demonstrating consistently high segmentation performance in all cases and very short processing times (<1 s per 1,208 × 960 pixels image). Based on the high segmentation performance, it was possible to precisely determine culture confluency, cell density, and the morphology of cellular objects, demonstrating the wide applicability of our algorithm for typical microscopy image processing pipelines. Furthermore, PCM image segmentation was used to facilitate the interpretation and analysis of fluorescence microscopy data, enabling the determination of temporal and spatial expression patterns of a fluorescent reporter. We created a software toolbox (PHANTAST) that bundles all the algorithms and provides an easy to use graphical user interface. Source-code for MATLAB and ImageJ is freely available under a permissive open-source license. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2014;111: 504–517. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24037521

  4. Extending metabolome coverage for untargeted metabolite profiling of adherent cultured hepatic cells.

    PubMed

    García-Cañaveras, Juan Carlos; López, Silvia; Castell, José Vicente; Donato, M Teresa; Lahoz, Agustín

    2016-02-01

    MS-based metabolite profiling of adherent mammalian cells comprises several challenging steps such as metabolism quenching, cell detachment, cell disruption, metabolome extraction, and metabolite measurement. In LC-MS, the final metabolome coverage is strongly determined by the separation technique and the MS conditions used. Human liver-derived cell line HepG2 was chosen as adherent mammalian cell model to evaluate the performance of several commonly used procedures in both sample processing and LC-MS analysis. In a first phase, metabolite extraction and sample analysis were optimized in a combined manner. To this end, the extraction abilities of five different solvents (or combinations) were assessed by comparing the number and the levels of the metabolites comprised in each extract. Three different chromatographic methods were selected for metabolites separation. A HILIC-based method which was set to specifically separate polar metabolites and two RP-based methods focused on lipidome and wide-ranging metabolite detection, respectively. With regard to metabolite measurement, a Q-ToF instrument operating in both ESI (+) and ESI (-) was used for unbiased extract analysis. Once metabolite extraction and analysis conditions were set up, the influence of cell harvesting on metabolome coverage was also evaluated. Therefore, different protocols for cell detachment (trypsinization or scraping) and metabolism quenching were compared. This study confirmed the inconvenience of trypsinization as a harvesting technique, and the importance of using complementary extraction solvents to extend metabolome coverage, minimizing interferences and maximizing detection, thanks to the use of dedicated analytical conditions through the combination of HILIC and RP separations. The proposed workflow allowed the detection of over 300 identified metabolites from highly polar compounds to a wide range of lipids.

  5. African-Americans' perceptions of health care provider cultural competence that promote HIV medical self-care and antiretroviral medication adherence.

    PubMed

    Gaston, Gina B

    2013-01-01

    Most studies of cultural competence in healthcare examine healthcare providers' definitions of cultural competence practices. This study is unique in that it examines the relationship between African-American patients' perceptions of the cultural competence of their HIV healthcare providers and the adherence of these patients to medical self-care and antiretroviral therapy (ART). This cross-sectional, exploratory, descriptive study was conducted at the Ruth Rothstein CORE Center in Chicago, Illinois. The sample consisted of 202 HIV-positive African-Americans who completed surveys during clinic visits. Multiple measures were used, including the Patient Assessments of Cultural Competency survey instrument developed by the Department of Health and Human Services Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Medical self-care was measured using the advice and instructions scale and the self-care symptom management for people living with HIV/AIDS categorical scale. ART adherence was measured using the Adherence Behaviors Self-Report and Adherence Self-Report scales. The data revealed many significant correlations between variables. The more patients believed that providers should integrate culture in HIV treatment; the better their reported health (F1,138=0.151, P=0.05) and the more they followed their provider's advice and instructions (medical self-care; F1,138=0.029, P=0.05). Participants who trusted their providers engaged in more medical self-care (F1,138=0.280, P=0.01). More shared treatment decisions were reported among participants who had higher levels of education (F1,127=0.337, P=0.05). Findings of this study indicate the need for increased attention to the role of cultural competence in HIV/AIDS care. Understanding patient perceptions of provider cultural competence has the potential to improve HIV treatment adherence and health outcomes.

  6. Mass algal culture system

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, Lawrence P.

    1981-01-01

    An apparatus and process for the culture of algae in a liquid medium is disclosed. The medium circulates through an open trough and is exposed to an atmosphere which is temperature regulated. The nutrient content of the liquid medium is regulated to control the chemical composition growth and reproduction characteristics of the cultured algae. Before it is allowed to strike the medium, sunlight is passed through a filter to remove wavelengths which are not photosynthetically active. Heat energy can be recovered from the filter.

  7. Mass algal culture system

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, Lawrence P.

    1982-01-01

    An apparatus and process for the culture of algae in a liquid medium is disclosed. The medium circulates through an open trough and is exposed to an atmosphere which is temperature regulated. The nutrient content of the liquid medium is regulated to control the chemical composition growth and reproduction characteristics of the cultured algae. Before it is allowed to strike the medium, sunlight is passed through a filter to remove wavelengths which are not photosynthetically active. Heat energy can be recovered from the filter.

  8. Scalable expansion of human induced pluripotent stem cells in the defined xeno-free E8 medium under adherent and suspension culture conditions☆

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Chou, Bin-Kuan; Dowey, Sarah; He, Chaoxia; Gerecht, Sharon; Cheng, Linzhao

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale production of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) by robust and economic methods has been one of the major challenges for translational realization of hiPSC technology. Here we demonstrate a scalable culture system for hiPSC expansion using the E8 chemically defined and xeno-free medium under either adherent or suspension conditions. To optimize suspension conditions guided by a computational simulation, we developed a method to efficiently expand hiPSCs as undifferentiated aggregates in spinner flasks. Serial passaging of two different hiPSC lines in the spinner flasks using the E8 medium preserved their normal karyotype and expression of undifferentiated state markers of TRA-1–60, SSEA4, OCT4, and NANOG. The hiPSCs cultured in spinner flasks for more than 10 passages not only could be remained pluripotent as indicated by in vitro and in vivo assays, but also could be efficiently induced toward mesodermal and hematopoietic differentiation. Furthermore, we established a xeno-free protocol of single-cell cryopreservation and recovery for the scalable production of hiPSCs in spinner flasks. This system is the first to enable an efficient scale-up bioprocess in completely xeno-free condition for the expansion and cryopreservation of hiPSCs with the quantity and quality compliant for clinical applications. PMID:23973800

  9. High density cell culture system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An annular culture vessel for growing mammalian cells is constructed in a one piece integral and annular configuration with an open end which is closed by an endcap. The culture vessel is rotatable about a horizontal axis by use of conventional roller systems commonly used in culture laboratories. The end wall of the endcap has tapered access ports to frictionally and sealingly receive the ends of hypodermic syringes. The syringes permit the introduction of fresh nutrient and withdrawal of spent nutrients. The walls are made of conventional polymeric cell culture material and are subjected to neutron bombardment to form minute gas permeable perforations in the walls.

  10. Culture systems: embryo density.

    PubMed

    Reed, Michael L

    2012-01-01

    Embryo density is defined as the embryo-to-volume ratio achieved during in vitro culture; in other words, it is the number of embryos in a defined volume of culture medium. The same density can be achieved by manipulating either the number of embryos in a given volume of medium, or manipulating the volume of the medium for a given number of embryos: for example, a microdrop with five embryos in a 50 μl volume under oil has the same embryo-to-volume ratio (1:10 μl) as a microdrop with one embryo in a 10 μl volume under oil (1:10 μl). Increased embryo density can improve mammalian embryo development in vitro; however, the mechanism(s) responsible for this effect may be different with respect to which method is used to increase embryo density.Standard, flat sterile plastic petri dishes are the most common, traditional platform for embryo culture. Microdrops under a mineral oil overlay can be prepared to control embryo density, but it is critical that dish preparation is consistent, where appropriate techniques are applied to prevent microdrop dehydration during preparation, and results of any data collection are reliable, and repeatable. There are newer dishes available from several manufacturers that are specifically designed for embryo culture; most are readily available for use with human embryos. The concept behind these newer dishes relies on fabrication of conical and smaller volume wells into the dish design, so that embryos rest at the lowest point in the wells, and where putative embryotrophic factors may concentrate.Embryo density is not usually considered by the embryologist as a technique in and of itself; rather, the decision to culture embryos in groups or individually is protocol-driven, and is based more on convenience or the need to collect data on individual embryos. Embryo density can be controlled, and as such, it can be utilized as a simple, yet effective tool to improve in vitro development of human embryos. PMID:22829380

  11. A scoping review of studies comparing the medication event monitoring system (MEMS) with alternative methods for measuring medication adherence.

    PubMed

    El Alili, Mohamed; Vrijens, Bernard; Demonceau, Jenny; Evers, Silvia M; Hiligsmann, Mickael

    2016-07-01

    Different methods are available for measuring medication adherence. In this paper, we conducted a scoping review to identify and summarize evidence of all studies comparing the Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS) with alternative methods for measuring medication adherence. A literature search was performed using the open database www.iAdherence.org that includes all original studies reporting findings from the MEMS. Papers comparing methods for measuring adherence to solid oral formulations were included. Data was extracted using a standardized extraction table. A total of 117 articles fulfilled the inclusion criteria, including 251 comparisons. Most frequent comparisons were against self-report (n = 119) and pill count (n = 59). Similar outcome measures were used in 210 comparisons (84%), among which 78 used dichotomous variables (adherent or not) and 132 used continuous measures (adherence expressed as percentage). Furthermore, 32% of all comparisons did not estimate adherence over the same coverage period and 44% of all comparisons did not use a statistical method or used a suboptimal one. Only eighty-seven (35%) comparisons had similar coverage periods, similar outcome measures and optimal statistical methods. Compared to MEMS, median adherence was grossly overestimated by 17% using self-report, by 8% using pill count and by 6% using rating. In conclusion, among all comparisons of MEMS versus alternative methods for measuring adherence, only a few used adequate comparisons in terms of outcome measures, coverage periods and statistical method. Researchers should therefore use stronger methodological frameworks when comparing measurement methods and be aware that non-electronic measures could lead to overestimation of medication adherence. PMID:27005306

  12. Medication adherence in patients in treatment for rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus in a university hospital in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Prudente, Luciana Resende; Diniz, Juliana de Souza; Ferreira, Tatyana Xavier Almeida Matteucci; Lima, Dione Marçal; Silva, Nílzio Antônio; Saraiva, Guylherme; Silveira, Erika Aparecida; Dewulf, Nathalie de Lourdes Souza; Amaral, Rita Goreti

    2016-01-01

    Medication adherence is essential for the control of symptoms and progression of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The aim of the study was to investigate medication adherence in outpatients in treatment for RA and SLE in a university hospital in Brazil. This was a quantitative, cross-sectional analytical study. A total of 92 patients (55 RA patients and 37 SLE patients) were included in the study. A structured questionnaire for patients’ interview and a form for collecting data from medical records were used for data collection. Adherence to drug treatment was assessed by the Morisky scale questionnaire. Data storage and analysis were performed using Epi Info 3.5.4 and statistical analysis by Stata/SE 12.0. The Pearson’s chi-squared test and Fisher’s exact test were applied for statistical and bivariate analyses. For multivariate data analysis the Poisson regression and the Wald test were used. The prevalence of adherence to drug treatment was 16.4% in RA patients and 45.9% in SLE patients. The final model of the multivariate analysis demonstrated associations between medication adherence and the following covariates for both RA and SLE groups: duration of therapy for rheumatic disease at the institution greater than 15 years and presence of more than six chronic comorbidities. The parameter “acquisition of medication at the high-cost pharmacy” was differently associated with medication adherence by group, and for the SLE group, living outside the city of Goiânia was a protective factor associated with adherence. This study demonstrated a low prevalence of medication adherence in patients in treatment for RA and SLE treated at this institution. These findings will serve as a base for future studies to elucidate what factors may positively or negatively affect medication adherence in this population. In addition, multidisciplinary approaches are needed to enhance adherence to drug treatment in patients in treatment for

  13. A scoping review of studies comparing the medication event monitoring system (MEMS) with alternative methods for measuring medication adherence.

    PubMed

    El Alili, Mohamed; Vrijens, Bernard; Demonceau, Jenny; Evers, Silvia M; Hiligsmann, Mickael

    2016-07-01

    Different methods are available for measuring medication adherence. In this paper, we conducted a scoping review to identify and summarize evidence of all studies comparing the Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS) with alternative methods for measuring medication adherence. A literature search was performed using the open database www.iAdherence.org that includes all original studies reporting findings from the MEMS. Papers comparing methods for measuring adherence to solid oral formulations were included. Data was extracted using a standardized extraction table. A total of 117 articles fulfilled the inclusion criteria, including 251 comparisons. Most frequent comparisons were against self-report (n = 119) and pill count (n = 59). Similar outcome measures were used in 210 comparisons (84%), among which 78 used dichotomous variables (adherent or not) and 132 used continuous measures (adherence expressed as percentage). Furthermore, 32% of all comparisons did not estimate adherence over the same coverage period and 44% of all comparisons did not use a statistical method or used a suboptimal one. Only eighty-seven (35%) comparisons had similar coverage periods, similar outcome measures and optimal statistical methods. Compared to MEMS, median adherence was grossly overestimated by 17% using self-report, by 8% using pill count and by 6% using rating. In conclusion, among all comparisons of MEMS versus alternative methods for measuring adherence, only a few used adequate comparisons in terms of outcome measures, coverage periods and statistical method. Researchers should therefore use stronger methodological frameworks when comparing measurement methods and be aware that non-electronic measures could lead to overestimation of medication adherence.

  14. Health system barriers and facilitators to medication adherence for the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Amitava; Khandelwal, Shweta; Nambiar, Lavanya; Saxena, Malvika; Peck, Victoria; Moniruzzaman, Mohammed; Faria Neto, Jose Rocha; Quinto, Katherine Curi; Smyth, Andrew; Leong, Darryl; Werba, José Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Background Secondary prevention is cost-effective for cardiovascular disease (CVD), but uptake is suboptimal. Understanding barriers and facilitators to adherence to secondary prevention for CVD at multiple health system levels may inform policy. Objectives To conduct a systematic review of barriers and facilitators to adherence/persistence to secondary CVD prevention medications at health system level. Methods Included studies reported effects of health system level factors on adherence/persistence to secondary prevention medications for CVD (coronary artery or cerebrovascular disease). Studies considered at least one of β blockers, statins, angiotensin–renin system blockers and aspirin. Relevant databases were searched from 1 January 1966 until 1 October 2015. Full texts were screened for inclusion by 2 independent reviewers. Results Of 2246 screened articles, 25 studies were included (12 trials, 11 cohort studies, 1 cross-sectional study and 1 case–control study) with 132 140 individuals overall (smallest n=30, largest n=63 301). 3 studies included upper middle-income countries, 1 included a low middle-income country and 21 (84%) included high-income countries (9 in the USA). Studies concerned established CVD (n=4), cerebrovascular disease (n=7) and coronary heart disease (n=14). Three studies considered persistence and adherence. Quantity and quality of evidence was limited for adherence, persistence and across drug classes. Studies were concerned with governance and delivery (n=19, including 4 trials of fixed-dose combination therapy, FDC), intellectual resources (n=1), human resources (n=1) and health system financing (n=4). Full prescription coverage, reduced copayments, FDC and counselling were facilitators associated with higher adherence. Conclusions High-quality evidence on health system barriers and facilitators to adherence to secondary prevention medications for CVD is lacking, especially for low-income settings. Full prescription coverage

  15. Production of high-titer human influenza A virus with adherent and suspension MDCK cells cultured in a single-use hollow fiber bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Tapia, Felipe; Vogel, Thomas; Genzel, Yvonne; Behrendt, Ilona; Hirschel, Mark; Gangemi, J David; Reichl, Udo

    2014-02-12

    Hollow fiber bioreactors (HFBRs) have been widely described as capable of supporting the production of highly concentrated monoclonal antibodies and recombinant proteins. Only recently HFBRs have been proposed as new single-use platforms for production of high-titer influenza A virus. These bioreactors contain multiple hollow fiber capillary tubes that separate the bioreactor in an intra- and an extra-capillary space. Cells are usually cultured in the extra-capillary space and can grow to a very high cell concentration. This work describes the evaluation of the single-use hollow fiber bioreactor PRIMER HF (Biovest International Inc., USA) for production of influenza A virus. The process was setup, characterized and optimized by running a total of 15 cultivations. The HFBRs were seeded with either adherent or suspension MDCK cells, and infected with influenza virus A/PR/8/34 (H1N1), and the pandemic strain A/Mexico/4108/2009 (H1N1). High HA titers and TCID₅₀ of up to 3.87 log₁₀(HA units/100 μL) and 1.8 × 10(10)virions/mL, respectively, were obtained for A/PR/8/34 influenza strain. Influenza virus was collected by performing multiple harvests of the extra-capillary space during a virus production time of up to 12 days. Cell-specific virus yields between 2,000 and 8,000 virions/cell were estimated for adherent MDCK cells, and between 11,000 and 19,000 virions/cell for suspension MDCK.SUS2 cells. These results do not only coincide with the cell-specific virus yields obtained with cultivations in stirred tank bioreactors and other high cell density systems, but also demonstrate that HFBRs are promising and competitive single-use platforms that can be considered for commercial production of influenza virus.

  16. The Chinese Life-Steps Program: A Cultural Adaptation of a Cognitive-Behavioral Intervention to Enhance HIV Medication Adherence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiu, Cheng-Shi; Chen, Wei-Ti; Simoni, Jane; Fredriksen-Goldsen, Karen; Zhang, Fujie; Zhou, Hongxin

    2013-01-01

    China is considered to be the new frontier of the global AIDS pandemic. Although effective treatment for HIV is becoming widely available in China, adherence to treatment remains a challenge. This study aimed to adapt an intervention promoting HIV-medication adherence--favorably evaluated in the West--for Chinese HIV-positive patients. The…

  17. Long-term bone marrow culture as a model for host toxicity: the effect of methotrexate on hematopoiesis and adherent layer function.

    PubMed

    Williams, L H; Udupa, K B; Lipschitz, D A

    1988-01-01

    Long-term bone marrow culture was used to examine the hematopoietic toxicity of the chemotherapeutic agent methotrexate. A dose-related suppression in myelopoiesis was seen when cultures were treated with 10(-3), 10(-4), or 10(-5) M methotrexate followed by folinic acid rescue. Differential counts revealed an initial decrease of postmitotic myeloid cells followed by mitotic precursors and myeloid colony-forming units (CFU-C). Myelopoiesis had disappeared by 7-10 days when 10(-3) M methotrexate was studied, by day 21 with 10(-4) M methotrexate, and by day 28 with 10(-5) M methotrexate. Although 10(-3) M methotrexate caused a predictable suppression in myelopoiesis, the effect of 10(-5) M methotrexate was more variable. In some studies this dose caused significant suppression of myelopoiesis, whereas in others less suppression occurred. This provides some evidence for varying host susceptibility to drug. Microenvironmental (adherent layer) cells were also affected by methotrexate. An increase in proliferation of these cells occurred in proportion to the dose of methotrexate added to culture. Methotrexate did not affect the ability of the adherent cells to produce colony-stimulating activity (CSA), but high doses did prevent the layer's ability to support the proliferation of adherent cell-free marrow. These results indicate that long-term bone marrow culture can be used to successfully predict and define chemotherapeutic host toxicity.

  18. Milk digesta and milk protein fractions influence the adherence of Lactobacillus gasseri R and Lactobacillus casei FMP to human cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Volstatova, Tereza; Havlik, Jaroslav; Potuckova, Miroslava; Geigerova, Martina

    2016-08-10

    Adhesion to the intestinal epithelium is considered an important feature of probiotic bacteria, which may increase their persistence in the intestine, allowing them to exert their beneficial health effect or promote the colonisation process. However, this feature might be largely dependent on the host specificity or diet. In the present study, we investigated the effect of selected milks and milk protein fractions on the ability of selected lactobacilli to adhere to the cells of an intestinal model based on co-culture Caco-2/HT29-MTX cell lines. Most milk digesta did not significantly affect bacterial adhesion except for UHT-treated milk and sheep milk. The presence of UHT-treated milk digesta reduced the adhesion of Lactobacillus gasseri R by 61% but not that of Lactobacillus casei FMP. However, sheep milk significantly increased the adherence of L. casei FMP (P < 0.05) but not of L. gasseri R. Among the protein fractions, rennet casein (RCN) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) showed reproducible patterns and strain-specific effects on bacterial adherence. While RCN reduced the adherence of L. gasseri R to <50% compared to the control, it did not have a significant effect on L. casei FMP. In contrast, BSA reduced L. casei FMP adherence to a higher extent than that of L. gasseri R. Whey protein (WH) tended to increase the adherence of both strains by 130%-180%. Recently, interactions between the host diet and its microbiota have attracted considerable interest. Our results may explain one of the aspects of the role of milk in the development of microbiota or support of probiotic supplements. Based on our data, we conclude that the persistence of probiotic strains supplemented as part of dairy food or constitutional microbiota in the gut might be affected negatively or positively by the food matrix through complex strain or concentration dependent effects. PMID:27435508

  19. Milk digesta and milk protein fractions influence the adherence of Lactobacillus gasseri R and Lactobacillus casei FMP to human cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Volstatova, Tereza; Havlik, Jaroslav; Potuckova, Miroslava; Geigerova, Martina

    2016-08-10

    Adhesion to the intestinal epithelium is considered an important feature of probiotic bacteria, which may increase their persistence in the intestine, allowing them to exert their beneficial health effect or promote the colonisation process. However, this feature might be largely dependent on the host specificity or diet. In the present study, we investigated the effect of selected milks and milk protein fractions on the ability of selected lactobacilli to adhere to the cells of an intestinal model based on co-culture Caco-2/HT29-MTX cell lines. Most milk digesta did not significantly affect bacterial adhesion except for UHT-treated milk and sheep milk. The presence of UHT-treated milk digesta reduced the adhesion of Lactobacillus gasseri R by 61% but not that of Lactobacillus casei FMP. However, sheep milk significantly increased the adherence of L. casei FMP (P < 0.05) but not of L. gasseri R. Among the protein fractions, rennet casein (RCN) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) showed reproducible patterns and strain-specific effects on bacterial adherence. While RCN reduced the adherence of L. gasseri R to <50% compared to the control, it did not have a significant effect on L. casei FMP. In contrast, BSA reduced L. casei FMP adherence to a higher extent than that of L. gasseri R. Whey protein (WH) tended to increase the adherence of both strains by 130%-180%. Recently, interactions between the host diet and its microbiota have attracted considerable interest. Our results may explain one of the aspects of the role of milk in the development of microbiota or support of probiotic supplements. Based on our data, we conclude that the persistence of probiotic strains supplemented as part of dairy food or constitutional microbiota in the gut might be affected negatively or positively by the food matrix through complex strain or concentration dependent effects.

  20. Comparative analysis of non-adherence to medication treatment for systemic arterial hypertension in urban and rural populations 1

    PubMed Central

    Magnabosco, Patricia; Teraoka, Eliana Cavalari; de Oliveira, Edward Meirelles; Felipe, Elisangela Aparecida; Freitas, Dayana; Marchi-Alves, Leila Maria

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to evaluate the indexes and the main factors associated with non-adherence to medication treatment for systemic arterial hypertension between urban and rural areas. METHOD: analytical study based on an epidemiological survey with a sample of 247 hypertensive residents of rural and urban areas, with application of a socio-demographic and economic questionnaire, and treatment adherence assessment. The Pearson's Chi-square test was used and the odds ratio (OD) was calculated to analyze the factors related to non-adherence. RESULTS: the prevalence of non-adherence was 61.9% and it was higher in urban areas (63.4%). Factors significantly associated with non-adherence were: male gender (OR=1.95; 95% CI 1.08-3.50), age 20-59 years old (OR=2.51; 95% CI 1.44-4.39), low economic status (OR=1.95; 95% CI 1.09-3.47), alcohol consumption (OR=5.92, 95% CI 1.73-20.21), short time of hypertension diagnosis (OR=3.07; 95% CI 1.35-6.96) and not attending the health service for routine consultations (OR=2.45; 1.35-4.42). CONCLUSION: the socio-demographic/economic characteristics, lifestyle habits and how to relate to health services were the factors that presented association with non-adherence regardless of the place of residence. PMID:25806627

  1. Culture systems: low-oxygen culture.

    PubMed

    Kovačič, Borut

    2012-01-01

    The tension of oxygen measured in the oviducts of several mammals was 5-8.7 %, but this drops in the uterine milieu to <2 % in cows and primates. For embryo culture in human in vitro fertilization (IVF), a non-physiologic level of 20 % oxygen has been used for the past 30 years. However, several animal studies have shown that low levels of oxygen plays an important physiological role in reducing the high levels of detrimental reactive oxygen species within cells, influences the embryonic gene expression, helps with embryo metabolism of glucose, and enhances embryo development to blastocysts. However, clinical studies have given contradictory results. Nevertheless, in nearly all reports, some kind of improvement has been observed, either in embryo development or in implantation and no detriments have been reported. For these reasons, more and more IVF laboratories utilize low oxygen during embryo culture.

  2. Culture systems: embryo culture and monozygotic twinning.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Amy E

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of monozygotic twinning in pregnancies achieved with assisted reproductive technologies (ART) is significantly higher than spontaneously conceived pregnancies. The factors associated with ART that predispose the embryos to splitting are not well-characterized. Assisted hatching and extended embryo culture are two ART laboratory methods that have been risk factors for monozygotic twinning. The methods and strategies that may be employed to avoid monozygotic twinning are discussed in this chapter.

  3. Single cell dual adherent-suspension co-culture micro-environment for studying tumor-stromal interactions with functionally selected cancer stem-like cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Chih; Zhang, Zhixiong; Fouladdel, Shamileh; Deol, Yadwinder; Ingram, Patrick N; McDermott, Sean P; Azizi, Ebrahim; Wicha, Max S; Yoon, Euisik

    2016-08-01

    Considerable evidence suggests that cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are critical in tumor pathogenesis, but their rarity and transience has led to much controversy about their exact nature. Although CSCs can be functionally identified using dish-based tumorsphere assays, it is difficult to handle and monitor single cells in dish-based approaches; single cell-based microfluidic approaches offer better control and reliable single cell derived sphere formation. However, like normal stem cells, CSCs are heavily regulated by their microenvironment, requiring tumor-stromal interactions for tumorigenic and proliferative behaviors. To enable single cell derived tumorsphere formation within a stromal microenvironment, we present a dual adherent/suspension co-culture device, which combines a suspension environment for single-cell tumorsphere assays and an adherent environment for co-culturing stromal cells in close proximity by selectively patterning polyHEMA in indented microwells. By minimizing dead volume and improving cell capture efficiency, the presented platform allows for the use of small numbers of cells (<100 cells). As a proof of concept, we co-cultured single T47D (breast cancer) cells and primary cancer associated fibroblasts (CAF) on-chip for 14 days to monitor sphere formation and growth. Compared to mono-culture, co-cultured T47D have higher tumorigenic potential (sphere formation rate) and proliferation rates (larger sphere size). Furthermore, 96-multiplexed single-cell transcriptome analyses were performed to compare the gene expression of co-cultured and mono-cultured T47D cells. Phenotypic changes observed in co-culture correlated with expression changes in genes associated with proliferation, apoptotic suppression, tumorigenicity and even epithelial-to-mesechymal transition. Combining the presented platform with single cell transcriptome analysis, we successfully identified functional CSCs and investigated the phenotypic and transcriptome effects induced

  4. Adherence to treatment in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Taddeo, Danielle; Egedy, Maud; Frappier, Jean-Yves

    2008-01-01

    Health care professionals must be alert to the high prevalence of low adherence to treatment during adolescence. Low adherence increases morbidity and medical complications, contributes to poorer quality of life and an overuse of the health care system. Many different factors have an impact on adherence. However, critical factors to consider in teens are their developmental stage and challenges, emotional issues and family dysfunction. Direct and indirect methods have been described to assess adherence. Eliciting an adherence history is the most useful way for clinicians to evaluate adherence, and could be the beginning of a constructive dialogue with the adolescent. Interventions to improve adherence are multiple – managing mental health issues appropriately, building a strong relationship, customizing the treatment regimen if possible, empowering the adolescent to deal with adherence issues, providing information, ensuring family and peer support, and motivational enhancement therapy. Evaluation of adherence at regular intervals should be an important aspect of health care for adolescents. PMID:19119348

  5. The Influence of Parental Factors on Therapist Adherence in Multi-Systemic Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Mesha L.; Weiss, Bahr; Han, Susan; Gallop, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Therapist treatment adherence has received a great deal of attention in recent years, in part because of its relation to treatment outcomes. Although certain therapist behaviors have been found to be associated with treatment outcomes, little is known about client factors impacting on therapists' ability to adhere to treatment protocols. In this…

  6. Evaluation of Biocompatibility of Alloplastic Materials: Development of a Tissue Culture In Vitro Test System.

    PubMed

    Gerullis, Holger; Georgas, Evangelos; Eimer, Christoph; Goretzki, Peter E; Lammers, Bernhard J; Klosterhalfen, Bernd; Boros, Mihaly; Wishahi, Mohamed; Heusch, Gerd; Otto, Thomas

    2011-12-01

    Optimized biocompatibility is a major requirement for alloplastic materials currently applied in surgical approaches for hernia, incontinence, and prolapse situations. Tissue ingrowth/adherence and formation of connective tissue seem to have important influence in mesh incorporation at the implant site. In an in vitro approach we randomly investigated 7 different mesh types currently used in surgeries with various indications with regard to their adherence performance. Using a tissue culture approach, meshes were incubated with tissue representative of fibroblasts, muscle cells, and endothelial cells originating from 10 different patients. After 6 weeks, the meshes were assessed microscopically and a ranking of their adherence performance was established. Tissue culture was successful in 100% of the probes. We did not remark on interindividual differences concerning the growth and adherence performance after incubation with the different meshes in the investigated 10 patients. The ranking was consistent in all patients. In this test system, PVDF Dynamesh® (FEG Textiltechnik, Aachen, Germany) was the mesh with the best growth-in score. The test system was feasible and reproducible. Pore size seems to be a predictor of adherence performance. The test system may be a helpful tool for further investigations, and the predictive value should be assessed in further in vitro and in vivo experiments. PMID:22504966

  7. Non-adherent culture induces paclitaxel resistance in H460 lung cancer cells via ERK-mediated up-regulation of βIVa-tubulin.

    PubMed

    Atjanasuppat, Korakot; Lirdprapamongkol, Kriengsak; Jantaree, Phatcharida; Svasti, Jisnuson

    2015-10-23

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are metastasizing epithelial cancer cells that adapt to survive when floating in bloodstream during metastasis. This condition can be mimicked in vitro by using non-adherent cell culture. The chemosensitivity of CTCs appears to correlate with the response of metastatic cancer patients to therapy, but chemoresistance is also frequently observed in advanced stage cancer patients, who have never previously received chemotherapy. We hypothesize that adaptation of epithelial cancer cells to become floating CTCs could lead to development of chemoresistance. Here, we explore whether chemoresistance is induced in epithelial cancer cells when cultured under non-adherent conditions. Increased paclitaxel-specific resistance was observed in floating cells compared to attached cells in H460, MCF-7, and HepG2 human cancer cell lines, by 15.6-, 3.9-, and 2.6-fold increases in IC50 values, respectively. qRT-PCR analysis showed that a paclitaxel-resistant β-tubulin isotype, βIVa-tubulin, was the most up-regulated gene compared with other β-tubulin isotypes in H460 floating cells, concomitant with elevated ERK activation. ERK inhibitor treatment could attenuate the up-regulation of βIVa-tubulin, and decreased the paclitaxel resistance of H460 floating cells, even though other β-tubulin isotypes were up-regulated when the ERK activation was blocked. In conclusion, we show induction of paclitaxel resistance in epithelial cancer cells, when floating in non-adherent culture, and this might occur with CTCs of cancer patients.

  8. Sustaining a "culture of silence" in the neonatal intensive care unit during nonemergency situations: a grounded theory on ensuring adherence to behavioral modification to reduce noise levels.

    PubMed

    Swathi, S; Ramesh, A; Nagapoornima, M; Fernandes, Lavina M; Jisina, C; Rao, P N Suman; Swarnarekha, A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to generate a substantive theory explaining how the staff in a resource-limited neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) of a developing nation manage to ensure adherence to behavioral modification components of a noise reduction protocol (NsRP) during nonemergency situations. The study was conducted after implementation of an NsRP in a level III NICU of south India. The normal routine of the NICU is highly dynamic because of various categories of staff conducting clinical rounds followed by care-giving activities. This is unpredictably interspersed with very noisy emergency management of neonates who suddenly fall sick. In-depth interviews were conducted with 36 staff members of the NICU (20 staff nurses, six nursing aides, and 10 physicians). Group discussions were conducted with 20 staff nurses and six nursing aides. Data analysis was done in line with the reformulated grounded theory approach, which was based on inductive examination of textual information. The results of the analysis showed that the main concern was to ensure adherence to behavioral modification components of the NsRP. This was addressed by using strategies to "sustain a culture of silence in NICU during nonemergency situations" (core category). The main strategies employed were building awareness momentum, causing awareness percolation, developing a sense of ownership, expansion of caring practices, evolution of adherence, and displaying performance indicators. The "culture of silence" reconditions the existing staff and conditions new staff members joining the NICU. During emergency situations, a "noisy culture" prevailed because of pragmatic neglect of behavioral modification when life support overrode all other concerns. In addition to this, the process of operant conditioning should be formally conducted once every 18 months. The results of this study may be adapted to create similar strategies and establish context specific NsRPs in NICUs with resource constraints.

  9. Systemic Arterial Hypertension in the Emergency Service: medication adherence and understanding of this disease

    PubMed Central

    Vancini-Campanharo, Cássia Regina; Oliveira, Gabriella Novelli; Andrade, Thaisa Fernanda Landim; Okuno, Meiry Fernanda Pinto; Lopes, Maria Carolina Barbosa Teixeira; Batista, Ruth Ester Assayag

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to identify the epidemiological profile of hypertension patients, how much they understand about the disease and the rate of adherence to treatment by these patients who had been hospitalized in the Brazilian emergency service. Methods: this cross-sectional study was performed with 116 patients, both male and female and aged over 18 years, who had been hospitalized in the Emergency Service of a University Hospital between March and June, 2013. The studied variables were data referring to socio-demographics, comorbidities, physical activity and knowledge regarding the disease. Patient adherence to treatment and the identification of the barriers were respectively evaluated using the Morisky test and the Brief Medication Questionnaire. Results: most of the patients involved in this study were women (55%), with white skin color (55%), married (51%), retirees or pensioners (64%) and with a low educational level (58%). Adherence to treatment, in most cases (55%), was moderate and the most prevalent adherence barrier was recall (67%). When medication was acquired at no cost to the patient, there was greater adherence to treatment. Conclusion: this study's patients had a moderate understanding about the disease. The high correlation between the number of drugs used and the recall barrier suggests that monotherapy is an option that can facilitate treatment adherence and reduce how often the patients forget to take their medication. PMID:26626007

  10. Medication adherence: process for implementation

    PubMed Central

    Mendys, Phil; Zullig, Leah L; Burkholder, Rebecca; Granger, Bradi B; Bosworth, Hayden B

    2014-01-01

    Improving medication adherence is a critically important, but often enigmatic objective of patients, providers, and the overall health care system. Increasing medication adherence has the potential to reduce health care costs while improving care quality, patient satisfaction and health outcomes. While there are a number of papers that describe the benefits of medication adherence in terms of cost, safety, outcomes, or quality of life, there are limited reviews that consider how best to seamlessly integrate tools and processes directed at improving medication adherence. We will address processes for implementing medication adherence interventions with the goal of better informing providers and health care systems regarding the safe and effective use of medications. PMID:25114513

  11. Exploring the cultural context of HIV stigma on antiretroviral therapy adherence among people living with HIV/AIDS in southwest Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Okoror, Titilayo A; Falade, Catherine O; Olorunlana, Adetayo; Walker, Ebunlomo M; Okareh, Oladapo T

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the cultural context of HIV stigma on antiretroviral therapy adherence among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in southwest Nigeria. Using purposive sampling, participants were recruited through a community-based organization. Consenting PLWHA participated in in-depth interviews and focus group discussions that were audio-taped. Using Deacon's conceptual framework of stigma, four opinion guides facilitated the interviews and discussions. Interviews and discussions were conducted in three languages, and lasted from 45 min to 2 h. A total of 35 women and men participated in the study. Participants ranged in age from 22 to 58 years, with an average of 4 years since clinical diagnosis of HIV/AIDS. All participants were receiving ART, and self-reported high adherence level. Using thematic analysis, three themes emerged: life before ART, life after ART, and strategies used in ART adherence. In describing their lives before ART, participants reported experiencing self, anticipated and enacted stigmas due to their sickly appearance from HIV-related complications. After initiating ART, participants talked about friends and families "returning to them" and "apologizing for abandoning" them once they started "looking well." In response to anticipated stigma, many reported sticking to their medications. Drawing from the cultural milieu as part of their strategies, participants discussed the use of plastic bags for medications and àkònpó, as ways of diverting attention from their use of many medications. Implications for ART program policies and stigma interventions were discussed, along with limitation of a short-term ART study on stigma since long-term use of ART can contribute to stigma by way of lipoatrophy as PLWHA age.

  12. Determinants of medication non-adherence in Egyptian patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: Sharkia Governorate.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Sattar, Amal B; Abou El Magd, Sahar A

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the study was to identify the determinants of adherence to medication among Egyptian patients with SLE. A single-center cross-sectional study was conducted among Egyptian patients with SLE. Adherence to medication was measured via The Compliance Questionnaire for Rheumatology-19, and the patients were classified as non-adherers if they were taking <80% of their medication correctly. Predictors of adherence to SLE medication were determined by multiple logistic regressions. The mean age of participants was 30.9 ± 11.7 years. Females constituted 95% of all participants. Thirty-eight (%) were taking <80% of their medication correctly. On logistic regression analysis, the significant independent predictors of medication non-adherence were lower educational level (OR 5.6, 95% CI 2.1-7.3, P < 0.001), very low and low socioeconomic status (OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.6-4.3, P < 0.04), rural residency (OR 3.4, 95% CI 1.4-5, P < 0.01), more number of medications (OR 3.2, 95% CI 2.3-6.9, P < 0.01), and higher depressive symptoms (OR 3.7, 95% CI 1.4-10.2, P < 0.001). The adherence rate reported in this study was quite low. Appropriate adherence enhancing intervention strategies targeted at reducing pill load, minimizing depressive symptoms, and ensuring an uninterrupted access to free services regimen for patients with low socioeconomic status is strongly recommended. More attention should be given to SLE patients who live in rural regions.

  13. Medication adherence: WHO cares?

    PubMed

    Brown, Marie T; Bussell, Jennifer K

    2011-04-01

    The treatment of chronic illnesses commonly includes the long-term use of pharmacotherapy. Although these medications are effective in combating disease, their full benefits are often not realized because approximately 50% of patients do not take their medications as prescribed. Factors contributing to poor medication adherence are myriad and include those that are related to patients (eg, suboptimal health literacy and lack of involvement in the treatment decision-making process), those that are related to physicians (eg, prescription of complex drug regimens, communication barriers, ineffective communication of information about adverse effects, and provision of care by multiple physicians), and those that are related to health care systems (eg, office visit time limitations, limited access to care, and lack of health information technology). Because barriers to medication adherence are complex and varied, solutions to improve adherence must be multifactorial. To assess general aspects of medication adherence using cardiovascular disease as an example, a MEDLINE-based literature search (January 1, 1990, through March 31, 2010) was conducted using the following search terms: cardiovascular disease, health literacy, medication adherence, and pharmacotherapy. Manual sorting of the 405 retrieved articles to exclude those that did not address cardiovascular disease, medication adherence, or health literacy in the abstract yielded 127 articles for review. Additional references were obtained from citations within the retrieved articles. This review surveys the findings of the identified articles and presents various strategies and resources for improving medication adherence.

  14. Method and system for evaluating integrity of adherence of a conductor bond to a mating surface of a substrate

    DOEpatents

    Telschow, Kenneth L.; Siu, Bernard K.

    1996-01-01

    A method of evaluating integrity of adherence of a conductor bond to a substrate includes: a) impinging a plurality of light sources onto a substrate; b) detecting optical reflective signatures emanating from the substrate from the impinged light; c) determining location of a selected conductor bond on the substrate from the detected reflective signatures; d) determining a target site on the selected conductor bond from the detected reflective signatures; e) optically imparting an elastic wave at the target site through the selected conductor bond and into the substrate; f) optically detecting an elastic wave signature emanating from the substrate resulting from the optically imparting step; and g) determining integrity of adherence of the selected conductor bond to the substrate from the detected elastic wave signature emanating from the substrate. A system is disclosed which is capable of conducting the method.

  15. Effects of anti-odor automobile air-conditioning system products on adherence of Serratia marcescens to aluminum.

    PubMed

    Drago, G K; Simmons, R B; Price, D L; Crow, S A; Ahearn, D G

    2002-12-01

    Sixteen commercial products for use in automobile air-conditioning systems (ACS), most designated for abatement of malodors presumably of microbial origin, were examined for their potential to inhibit attachment and to detach cells of the Gram-negative bacterium Serratia marcescens on aluminum sections. Numbers of attached cells were appreciably reduced (>60%) following immersion in three alcohol-type and two acrylic-coating-type products. Several products had essentially no effect on the attached cells. Most of the products indicated for alleviation of associated microbial odors from ACS provided only short-term effects. When products were coated onto aluminum prior to exposure to the cells, water-insoluble coatings appeared to provide more consistent inhibition of primary adherence of S. marcescens. The differences in degrees of primary adherence of a selected strain of S. marcescens to variously treated aluminum provided a rapid and reproducible assessment of potential antimicrobial efficacy of ACS products. PMID:12483481

  16. Method and system for evaluating integrity of adherence of a conductor bond to a mating surface of a substrate

    DOEpatents

    Telschow, K.L.; Siu, B.K.

    1996-07-09

    A method of evaluating integrity of adherence of a conductor bond to a substrate includes: (a) impinging a plurality of light sources onto a substrate; (b) detecting optical reflective signatures emanating from the substrate from the impinged light; (c) determining location of a selected conductor bond on the substrate from the detected reflective signatures; (d) determining a target site on the selected conductor bond from the detected reflective signatures; (e) optically imparting an elastic wave at the target site through the selected conductor bond and into the substrate; (f) optically detecting an elastic wave signature emanating from the substrate resulting from the optically imparting step; and (g) determining integrity of adherence of the selected conductor bond to the substrate from the detected elastic wave signature emanating from the substrate. A system is disclosed which is capable of conducting the method. 13 figs.

  17. Implementation of culturally targeted patient navigation system for screening colonoscopy in a direct referral system.

    PubMed

    Jandorf, Lina; Cooperman, Julia L; Stossel, Lauren M; Itzkowitz, Steven; Thompson, Hayley S; Villagra, Cristina; Thélémaque, Linda D; McGinn, Thomas; Winkel, Gary; Valdimarsdottir, Heiddis; Shelton, Rachel C; Redd, William

    2013-10-01

    Low-income minorities often face system-based and personal barriers to screening colonoscopy (SC). Culturally targeted patient navigation (CTPN) programs employing professional navigators (Pro-PNs) or community-based peer navigators (Peer-PNs) can help overcome barriers but are not widely implemented. In East Harlem, NY, USA, where approximately half the residents participate in SC, 315 African American patients referred for SC at a primary care clinic with a Direct Endoscopic Referral System were recruited between May 2008 and May 2010. After medical clearance, 240 were randomized to receive CTPN delivered by a Pro-PN (n = 106) or Peer-PN (n = 134). Successful navigation was measured by SC adherence rate, patient satisfaction and navigator trust. Study enrollment was 91.4% with no significant differences in SC adherence rates between Pro-PN (80.0%) and Peer-PN (71.3%) (P = 0.178). Participants in both groups reported high levels of satisfaction and trust. These findings suggest that CTPN Pro-PN and Peer-PN programs are effective in this urban primary care setting. We detail how we recruited and trained navigators, how CTPN was implemented and provide a preliminary answer to our questions of the study aims: can peer navigators be as effective as professionals and what is the potential impact of patient navigation on screening adherence?

  18. Krüppel-Like Factor 4 Overexpression Initiates a Mesenchymal-to-Epithelial Transition and Redifferentiation of Human Pancreatic Cells following Expansion in Long Term Adherent Culture

    PubMed Central

    Docherty, Hilary M.; McGowan, Neil W. A.; Forbes, Shareen; Heremans, Yves; Forbes, Stuart J.; Heimberg, Harry; Casey, John; Docherty, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    A replenishable source of insulin-producing cells has the potential to cure type 1 diabetes. Attempts to culture and expand pancreatic β-cells in vitro have resulted in their transition from insulin-producing epithelial cells to mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) with high proliferative capacity but devoid of any hormone production. The aim of this study was to determine whether the transcription factor Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4), could induce a mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET) of the cultured cells. Islet-enriched pancreatic cells, allowed to dedifferentiate and expand in adherent cell culture, were transduced with an adenovirus containing KLF4 (Ad-Klf4). Cells were subsequently analysed for changes in cell morphology by light microscopy, and for the presence of epithelial and pancreatic markers by immunocytochemistry and quantitative RT/PCR. Infection with Ad-Klf4 resulted in morphological changes, down-regulation of mesenchymal markers, and re-expression of both epithelial and pancreatic cell markers including insulin and transcription factors specific to β-cells. This effect was further enhanced by culturing cells in suspension. However, the effects of Ad-KLf4 were transient and this was shown to be due to increased apoptosis in Klf4-expressing cells. Klf4 has been recently identified as a pioneer factor with the ability to modulate the structure of chromatin and enhance reprogramming/transdifferentiation. Our results show that Klf4 may have a role in the redifferentiation of expanded pancreatic cells in culture, but before this can be achieved the off-target effects that result in increased apoptosis would need to be overcome. PMID:26457418

  19. The rich detail of cultural symbol systems.

    PubMed

    Read, Dwight W

    2014-08-01

    The goal of forming a science of intentional behavior requires a more richly detailed account of symbolic systems than is assumed by the authors. Cultural systems are not simply the equivalent in the ideational domain of culture of the purported Baldwin Effect in the genetic domain. PMID:25162879

  20. Linguistic and Cultural Adaptation of a Computer-Based Counseling Program (CARE+ Spanish) to Support HIV Treatment Adherence and Risk Reduction for People Living With HIV/AIDS: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Chhun, Nok; Cleland, Charles M; Crespo-Fierro, Michele; Parés-Avila, José A; Lizcano, John A; Shedlin, Michele G; Johnston, Barbara E; Sharp, Victoria L

    2016-01-01

    Background Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease in the United States disproportionately affects minorities, including Latinos. Barriers including language are associated with lower antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence seen among Latinos, yet ART and interventions for clinic visit adherence are rarely developed or delivered in Spanish. Objective The aim was to adapt a computer-based counseling tool, demonstrated to reduce HIV-1 viral load and sexual risk transmission in a population of English-speaking adults, for use during routine clinical visits for an HIV-positive Spanish-speaking population (CARE+ Spanish); the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) was the theoretical framework guiding program development. Methods A longitudinal randomized controlled trial was conducted from June 4, 2010 to March 29, 2012. Participants were recruited from a comprehensive HIV treatment center comprising three clinics in New York City. Eligibility criteria were (1) adults (age ≥18 years), (2) Latino birth or ancestry, (3) speaks Spanish (mono- or multilingual), and (4) on antiretrovirals. Linear and generalized mixed linear effects models were used to analyze primary outcomes, which included ART adherence, sexual transmission risk behaviors, and HIV-1 viral loads. Exit interviews were offered to purposively selected intervention participants to explore cultural acceptability of the tool among participants, and focus groups explored the acceptability and system efficiency issues among clinic providers, using the TAM framework. Results A total of 494 Spanish-speaking HIV clinic attendees were enrolled and randomly assigned to the intervention (arm A: n=253) or risk assessment-only control (arm B, n=241) group and followed up at 3-month intervals for one year. Gender distribution was 296 (68.4%) male, 110 (25.4%) female, and 10 (2.3%) transgender. By study end, 433 of 494 (87.7%) participants were retained. Although intervention participants had reduced viral loads, increased

  1. Adherence to Asian and European American Cultural Values and Attitudes toward Seeking Professional Psychological Help among Asian American College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Bryan S. K.

    2007-01-01

    Possible relations among enculturation and acculturation to cultural values and attitudes toward seeking professional psychological help were examined among 146 Asian American college students. In addition, possible relations between various dimensions of Asian values and attitudes toward seeking professional psychological help were examined. As…

  2. HIV Medication Adherence

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment HIV Medication Adherence (Last updated 3/1/2016; last reviewed 3/1/2016) Key Points Medication adherence means sticking ... exactly as prescribed. Why is adherence to an HIV regimen important? Adherence to an HIV regimen gives ...

  3. Economic Systems: A Modular Approach. Cultural Anthropology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kassebaum, Peter

    Designed for use as supplementary instructional material in a cultural anthropology course, this learning module uses a systems approach to allow students to see the connections and similarities which most cultural groups share on the basis of the type of economic organization that they exhibit. The module begins with a general discussion of…

  4. Constructing a High Density Cell Culture System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An annular culture vessel for growing mammalian cells is constructed in a one piece integral and annular configuration with an open end which is closed by an endcap. The culture vessel is rotatable about a horizontal axis by use of conventional roller systems commonly used in culture laboratories. The end wall of the endcap has tapered access ports to frictionally and sealingly receive the ends of hypodermic syringes. The syringes permit the introduction of fresh nutrient and withdrawal of spent nutrients. The walls are made of conventional polymeric cell culture material and are subjected to neutron bombardment to form minute gas permeable perforations in the walls.

  5. [Observation on the biological behavior of human umbilical cord blood adherent cells].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi; Wang, Pin; Chen, Xing-Hua; Liu, Lin; Peng, Xian-Gui; Kong, Pei-Yan; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Qing-Yu

    2005-02-01

    To study the possibility of separation and culture of human umbilical cord blood adherent cell (HUCBAC), the umbilical cord blood CD34(+) cells were cultured in Dexter system in order to evaluate and observe the biological behavior of adherent cells in vitro. The results showed that all cells were cultured with Dexter system. By day 9-14 (at a median of 11.2 days), adherent cell colonies formed and reached their maximum at 15-22 days (mean 19.6 days), by day 28, all adherent cells spread over the bottom of Petri dish. By means of light microscopy, these cells were found to differentiate into three kinds of cells in culture of 28 days: fibroblast-liked cell, macrophage liked cell and small-round cells. The ratio of these three kinds of cells was 56.8%, 38%, 5.5% respectively. Cytochemistry assay revealed that the positive rate reached 100% in NSE stain and PAS stain; the adherent cell by ALP stain were shown 35% positive, but in POX stain the result was negative. Immunohistochemistry stain revealed that the positive rate of cord adherent cells for CD106, CD29, CD44, CD45, CD50, Fn, Ln, collagen IV etc reached 96%, 93%, 98%, 68%, 72%, 92%, 74%, 83% respectively. It is concluded there are hematopoietic adherent precursors in cord blood CD34(+) cells and the HUCBAC shows some biological behavior of hematopoietic stromal cells.

  6. Fibrin monomer increases platelet adherence to tumor cells in a flowing system: a possible role in metastasis?

    PubMed

    Biggerstaff, J P; Seth, N B; Meyer, T V; Amirkhosravi, A; Francis, J L

    1998-12-15

    Considerable evidence exists linking hemostasis and malignancy. Platelet adhesion to tumor cells has been implicated in the metastatic process. Plasma fibrinogen (Fg) and fibrin (Fn) monomer, increased in cancer, may play a role in tumor biology. Binding of Fn monomer to tumor cells and its effect on platelet-tumor cell adhesion in a flowing system were studied. Fn monomer was produced by adding thrombin (1 micro/mL) to FXIII- and plasminogen-free Fg in the presence of Gly-Pro-Arg-Pro (GPRP) amide. Fn monomer binding to live A375 cells was visualized by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Adherent cells were perfused for 1h with Fn monomer, washed and stained in situ with anti-human Fn (American Biogenetic Sciences, Inc.) followed by goat anti-mouse IgG(FITC). Platelet adherence to Fn monomer treated A375 cells was performed under flow conditions by passing platelets (5x10(4)/microl 0.25 mL/min; labeled with the carbocyanine dye DiI) over the tumor cells for 30 min. CLSM images were obtained after washing. There was considerable binding of Fn monomer, but not Fg alone. Platelets adhered relatively weakly to untreated A375 cells and this was not significantly affected by pre-treatment of the tumor cells with fibrinogen or thrombin. However, pre-treatment with Fn monomer resulted in extensive platelet binding to tumor cells, suggesting that coagulation activation and the subsequent increase in circulating Fn monomer may enhance platelet adhesion to circulating tumor cells and thereby facilitate metastatic spread.

  7. Fibrin monomer increases platelet adherence to tumor cells in a flowing system: a possible role in metastasis?

    PubMed

    Biggerstaff, J P; Seth, N B; Meyer, T V; Amirkhosravi, A; Francis, J L

    1998-12-15

    Considerable evidence exists linking hemostasis and malignancy. Platelet adhesion to tumor cells has been implicated in the metastatic process. Plasma fibrinogen (Fg) and fibrin (Fn) monomer, increased in cancer, may play a role in tumor biology. Binding of Fn monomer to tumor cells and its effect on platelet-tumor cell adhesion in a flowing system were studied. Fn monomer was produced by adding thrombin (1 micro/mL) to FXIII- and plasminogen-free Fg in the presence of Gly-Pro-Arg-Pro (GPRP) amide. Fn monomer binding to live A375 cells was visualized by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Adherent cells were perfused for 1h with Fn monomer, washed and stained in situ with anti-human Fn (American Biogenetic Sciences, Inc.) followed by goat anti-mouse IgG(FITC). Platelet adherence to Fn monomer treated A375 cells was performed under flow conditions by passing platelets (5x10(4)/microl 0.25 mL/min; labeled with the carbocyanine dye DiI) over the tumor cells for 30 min. CLSM images were obtained after washing. There was considerable binding of Fn monomer, but not Fg alone. Platelets adhered relatively weakly to untreated A375 cells and this was not significantly affected by pre-treatment of the tumor cells with fibrinogen or thrombin. However, pre-treatment with Fn monomer resulted in extensive platelet binding to tumor cells, suggesting that coagulation activation and the subsequent increase in circulating Fn monomer may enhance platelet adhesion to circulating tumor cells and thereby facilitate metastatic spread. PMID:9886911

  8. Antihypertensive medication adherence among elderly Chinese Americans.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ya-Hui; Mao, Chia-Ling; Wey, Mercy

    2010-10-01

    This study explored the level of antihypertensive medication adherence and examined certain demographic attributes and influential factors in relation to antihypertensive medication nonadherence among Chinese American elders using a descriptive cross-sectional survey design. Findings revealed that 52% of the elderly Chinese Americans adhered to their antihypertensive medications. Gender, education, years of residency in the United States, years of diagnosed hypertension, and perceived safety of taking antihypertensive medications did not contribute to the differences in medication adherence. Forgetfulness, medication adverse effects, language difficulties, and cultural barriers were the influential factors that hinder antihypertensive medication adherence. Developing effective and culturally appropriate strategies for Chinese American elders is recommended.

  9. In Situ Proximity Ligation Assay (PLA) Analysis of Protein Complexes Formed Between Golgi-Resident, Glycosylation-Related Transporters and Transferases in Adherent Mammalian Cell Cultures.

    PubMed

    Maszczak-Seneczko, Dorota; Sosicka, Paulina; Olczak, Teresa; Olczak, Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    In situ proximity ligation assay (PLA) is a novel, revolutionary technique that can be employed to visualize protein complexes in fixed cells and tissues. This approach enables demonstration of close (i.e., up to 40 nm) proximity between any two proteins of interest that can be detected using a pair of specific antibodies that have been raised in distinct species. Primary antibodies bound to the target proteins are subsequently recognized by two PLA probes, i.e., secondary antibodies conjugated with oligonucleotides that anneal when brought into close proximity in the presence of two connector oligonucleotides and a DNA ligase forming a circular DNA molecule. In the next step, the resulting circular DNA is amplified by a rolling circle polymerase. Finally, fluorescent oligonucleotide probes hybridize to complementary fragments of the amplified DNA molecule, forming a typical, spot-like pattern of PLA signal that reflects subcellular localization of protein complexes. Here we describe the use of in situ PLA in adherent cultures of mammalian cells in order to visualize interactions between Golgi-resident, functionally related glycosyltransferases and nucleotide sugar transporters relevant to N-glycan biosynthesis.

  10. In Situ Proximity Ligation Assay (PLA) Analysis of Protein Complexes Formed Between Golgi-Resident, Glycosylation-Related Transporters and Transferases in Adherent Mammalian Cell Cultures.

    PubMed

    Maszczak-Seneczko, Dorota; Sosicka, Paulina; Olczak, Teresa; Olczak, Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    In situ proximity ligation assay (PLA) is a novel, revolutionary technique that can be employed to visualize protein complexes in fixed cells and tissues. This approach enables demonstration of close (i.e., up to 40 nm) proximity between any two proteins of interest that can be detected using a pair of specific antibodies that have been raised in distinct species. Primary antibodies bound to the target proteins are subsequently recognized by two PLA probes, i.e., secondary antibodies conjugated with oligonucleotides that anneal when brought into close proximity in the presence of two connector oligonucleotides and a DNA ligase forming a circular DNA molecule. In the next step, the resulting circular DNA is amplified by a rolling circle polymerase. Finally, fluorescent oligonucleotide probes hybridize to complementary fragments of the amplified DNA molecule, forming a typical, spot-like pattern of PLA signal that reflects subcellular localization of protein complexes. Here we describe the use of in situ PLA in adherent cultures of mammalian cells in order to visualize interactions between Golgi-resident, functionally related glycosyltransferases and nucleotide sugar transporters relevant to N-glycan biosynthesis. PMID:27632007

  11. An Information System for European culture collections: the way forward.

    PubMed

    Casaregola, Serge; Vasilenko, Alexander; Romano, Paolo; Robert, Vincent; Ozerskaya, Svetlana; Kopf, Anna; Glöckner, Frank O; Smith, David

    2016-01-01

    Culture collections contain indispensable information about the microorganisms preserved in their repositories, such as taxonomical descriptions, origins, physiological and biochemical characteristics, bibliographic references, etc. However, information currently accessible in databases rarely adheres to common standard protocols. The resultant heterogeneity between culture collections, in terms of both content and format, notably hampers microorganism-based research and development (R&D). The optimized exploitation of these resources thus requires standardized, and simplified, access to the associated information. To this end, and in the interest of supporting R&D in the fields of agriculture, health and biotechnology, a pan-European distributed research infrastructure, MIRRI, including over 40 public culture collections and research institutes from 19 European countries, was established. A prime objective of MIRRI is to unite and provide universal access to the fragmented, and untapped, resources, information and expertise available in European public collections of microorganisms; a key component of which is to develop a dynamic Information System. For the first time, both culture collection curators as well as their users have been consulted and their feedback, concerning the needs and requirements for collection databases and data accessibility, utilised. Users primarily noted that databases were not interoperable, thus rendering a global search of multiple databases impossible. Unreliable or out-of-date and, in particular, non-homogenous, taxonomic information was also considered to be a major obstacle to searching microbial data efficiently. Moreover, complex searches are rarely possible in online databases thus limiting the extent of search queries. Curators also consider that overall harmonization-including Standard Operating Procedures, data structure, and software tools-is necessary to facilitate their work and to make high-quality data easily accessible

  12. An Information System for European culture collections: the way forward.

    PubMed

    Casaregola, Serge; Vasilenko, Alexander; Romano, Paolo; Robert, Vincent; Ozerskaya, Svetlana; Kopf, Anna; Glöckner, Frank O; Smith, David

    2016-01-01

    Culture collections contain indispensable information about the microorganisms preserved in their repositories, such as taxonomical descriptions, origins, physiological and biochemical characteristics, bibliographic references, etc. However, information currently accessible in databases rarely adheres to common standard protocols. The resultant heterogeneity between culture collections, in terms of both content and format, notably hampers microorganism-based research and development (R&D). The optimized exploitation of these resources thus requires standardized, and simplified, access to the associated information. To this end, and in the interest of supporting R&D in the fields of agriculture, health and biotechnology, a pan-European distributed research infrastructure, MIRRI, including over 40 public culture collections and research institutes from 19 European countries, was established. A prime objective of MIRRI is to unite and provide universal access to the fragmented, and untapped, resources, information and expertise available in European public collections of microorganisms; a key component of which is to develop a dynamic Information System. For the first time, both culture collection curators as well as their users have been consulted and their feedback, concerning the needs and requirements for collection databases and data accessibility, utilised. Users primarily noted that databases were not interoperable, thus rendering a global search of multiple databases impossible. Unreliable or out-of-date and, in particular, non-homogenous, taxonomic information was also considered to be a major obstacle to searching microbial data efficiently. Moreover, complex searches are rarely possible in online databases thus limiting the extent of search queries. Curators also consider that overall harmonization-including Standard Operating Procedures, data structure, and software tools-is necessary to facilitate their work and to make high-quality data easily accessible

  13. HBV culture and infectious systems.

    PubMed

    Hayes, C Nelson; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2016-07-01

    While an effective vaccine against hepatitis B virus (HBV) has long been available, chronic HBV infection remains a severe global public health concern. Current treatment options have limited effectiveness, and long-term therapy is required to suppress HBV replication; however, complete elimination of the virus is rare. The lack of suitable animal models and infection systems has hindered efforts to unravel the HBV life cycle, particularly the early events in HBV entry, which appear to be highly species- and tissue-specific. Human primary hepatocytes remain the gold standard for HBV replication studies but are limited by availability and variability. While the HepaRG cell line is permissive for HBV replication, other hepatoma cell lines such as HepG2 do not support HBV replication. The recent discovery of sodium taurocholate transporting peptide (NTCP) as a primary receptor for HBV binding has led to the development of replication-competent cell lines such as HepG2-NTCP. Human hepatocytes grown in chimeric mice have provided another approach that allows primary human hepatocytes to be used while overcoming many of their limitations. Although the difficulty in developing HBV infection systems has hindered development of effective treatments, the variability and limited replication efficiency among cell lines point to additional liver-specific factors involved in HBV infection. It is hoped that HBV infection studies will lead to novel drug targets and therapeutic options for the treatment of chronic HBV infection.

  14. Bisphosphonates adherence for treatment of osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Osteoporosis is a disease of bone metabolism in which bisphosphonates (BPS) are the most common medications used in its treatment, whose main objective is to reduce the risk of fractures. The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review on BPs adherence for treatment of osteoporosis. Methods Systematic review of articles on BPs adherence for treatment of osteoporosis, indexed on MEDLINE (via PubMed) databases, from inception of databases until January 2013. Search terms were “Adherence, Medication” (MeSH term), “Bisphosphonates” (MeSH term), and “Osteoporosis” (MeSH term). Results Of the 78 identified studies, 27 met the eligibility criteria. Identified studies covered a wide range of aspects regarding adherence and associated factors, adherence and fracture, adherence and BPs dosage. The studies are mostly observational, conducted with women over 45 years old, showing low rates of adherence to treatment. Several factors may influence adherence: socio-economic and cultural, participation of physicians when guidance is given to the patient, the use of bone turnover markers, and use of generic drugs. The monthly dosage is associated with greater adherence compared to weekly dosage. Conclusions Considering the methodological differences between the studies, the results converge to show that adherence to treatment of osteoporosis with BPs is still inadequate. Further experimental studies are needed to evaluate the adherence and suggest new treatment options. PMID:23705998

  15. Longitudinal cohort study to determine effectiveness of a novel simulated case and feedback system to improve clinical pathway adherence in breast, lung and GI cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kubal, Timothy; Letson, Doug G; Chiappori, Alberto A; Springett, Gregory M; Tamondong Lachica, Diana; Peabody, John W

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study examined whether a measurement and feedback system led to improvements in adherence to clinical pathways. Design The M-QURE (Moffitt—Quality, Understanding, Research and Evidence) Initiative was introduced in 2012 to enhance and improve adherence to pathways at Moffitt Cancer Center (MCC) in three broad clinical areas: breast, lung and gastrointestinal (GI) cancers. M-QURE used simulated patient vignettes based on MCC's Clinical Pathways to benchmark clinician adherence and monitor change over three rounds of implementation. Setting MCC, located in Tampa, Florida, a National Cancer Institute Comprehensive Cancer Center. Participants Three non-overlapping cohorts at MCC (one each in breast, lung and GI) totalling 48 providers participated in this study, with each member of the multidisciplinary team (composed of medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, surgeons and advanced practice providers) invited to participate. Interventions Each participant was asked to complete a set of simulated patient vignettes over three rounds within their own cancer specialty. Participants were required to complete all assigned vignettes over each of the three rounds, or they would be excluded from this study. Primary outcome measure Increased domain and overall provider care adherence to clinical pathways, as scored by blinded physician abstractors. Results We found significant improvements in pathway adherence between the third and first rounds of data collection particularly for workup and treatment of cancer cases. By clinical grouping, breast improved by 13.6% (p<0.001), and lung improved by 12.1% (p<0.001) over baseline, whereas GI showed a decrease of 1.4% (p=0.68). Conclusions Clinical pathway adherence improved in a short timeframe for breast and lung cancers using group-level measurement and individual feedback. This suggests that a measurement and feedback programme may be a useful tool to improve clinical pathway adherence. PMID:27625063

  16. Model of socio-cultural dimensions involved in adherence to antiretroviral therapy for HIV/AIDS in public health care centers in Chile.

    PubMed

    Stuardo Ávila, Valeria; Manriquez Urbina, Jose Manuel; Fajreldin Chuaqui, Valentina; Belmar Prieto, Julieta; Valenzuela Santibáñez, Victoria

    2016-11-01

    In Chile, over 14,000 adults are living with HIV receive antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Adequate adherence to HAART has a major impact on survival. There is little consensus on the causes of poor adherence, due to the unique and diverse sociocultural parameters involved in the issue. The objective of this study was to identify sociocultural dimensions that serve as barriers or facilitators to HAART adherence among persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLHIV) in Chile. A qualitative study design, with an exploratory followed by a descriptive phase was conducted. The study population consisted of adults living with HIV/AIDS, with and without HAART. A theoretical sample was designed and three gender profiles defined: women, men, and transwomen. Data collection methods included in-depth interviews by anthropologists in seven public health care centers for PLHIV. The model of sociocultural dimensions indicated that factors associated with family, expectations, gender/sexuality, affect, relationship with HIV, HAART, work, social support and networks, and stigma and discrimination influenced adherence, with different patterns among profiles. This study found that adherence is a dynamic category. It is crucial to consider sociocultural factors in developing strategies to improve HAART adherence.

  17. Use of bovine primary mammary epithelial cells for the comparison of adherence and invasion ability of Staphylococcus aureus strains.

    PubMed

    Hensen, S M; Pavicić, M J; Lohuis, J A; Poutrel, B

    2000-03-01

    Adherence and invasion of epithelial cells are thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of Staphylococcus aureus mastitis. A cell culture model with primary mammary epithelial cells originating from the secretory tissue from the bovine udder was used to study adherence and invasion of S. aureus. The cells were characterized with antibodies against several cell markers that had been validated on histologic cryostat sections of bovine mammary tissue. All cells stained positively with the anticytokeratin antibodies, which are restricted to epithelial cells. The cell cultures contained a small number of alpha-smooth-muscle-actin positive cells (< 1%), probably myoepithelial cells. The use of bovine primary mammary epithelial cells and bovine S. aureus isolates, which were cultured in milk serum, results in a system similar to in vivo. Strain differences for adherence and invasion of S. aureus strains cultured in milk serum were studied. In addition, the correlation between adherence and invasion was evaluated. The number of adhered and invaded bacteria was strain dependent. The percentage of adherence after 5 min of incubation was correlated to the percentage of adherence after 3 h of incubation (r = 0.94; Pearson's correlation test). Fourteen of the 20 strains were able to invade epithelial cells. The percentage of invasion was correlated to the percentage of adherence after 5 min and to the percentage adherence after 3 h (r = 0.95 and 0.90, respectively; Pearson's correlation test). Results indicate that strain differences of adherence and invasion exist for S. aureus and that the invasion is a post adherence event.

  18. Treatment adherence in psychoses.

    PubMed

    David, Anthony S

    2010-12-01

    A well-conducted randomised controlled trial of an intervention to improve treatment adherence in psychosis published in this issue shows beneficial effects on self- and observer-rated adherence and trends towards fewer hospital readmissions. Partial adherence is the single most important barrier to optimal treatment. National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence guidelines on adherence need to be revised.

  19. Inactivation of a Two-Component Signal Transduction System, SaeRS, Eliminates Adherence and Attenuates Virulence of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xudong; Yu, Chuanxin; Sun, Junsong; Liu, Hong; Landwehr, Christina; Holmes, David; Ji, Yinduo

    2006-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major human and animal pathogen. During infection, this organism not only is able to attach to and enter host cells by using its cell surface-associated factors but also exports toxins to induce apoptosis and kill invaded cells. In this study, we identified the regulon of a two-component signal transduction system, SaeRS, and demonstrated that the SaeRS system is required for S. aureus to cause infection both in vitro and in vivo. Using microarray and real-time reverse transcriptase PCR analyses, we found that SaeRS regulates the expression of genes involved in adhesion and invasion (such as those encoding fibronectin-binding proteins and fibrinogen-binding proteins) and genes encoding α-, β-, and γ-hemolysins. Surprisingly, we found that SaeRS represses the Agr regulatory system since the mutation of saeS up-regulates agrA expression, which was confirmed by using an agr promoter-reporter fusion system. More importantly, we demonstrated that inactivation of the SaeRS system significantly decreases the bacterium-induced apoptosis and/or death of lung epithelial cells (A549) and attenuates virulence in a murine infection model. Moreover, we found that inactivation of the SaeRS system eliminates staphylococcal adhesion and internalization of lung epithelial cells. We also found that both a novel hypothetical protein (the SA1000 protein) and a bifunctional protein (Efb), which binds to extracellular fibrinogen and complement factor C3, might partially contribute to bacterial adhesion to and invasion of epithelial cells. Our results indicate that activation of the SaeRS system may be required for S. aureus to adhere to and invade epithelial cells. PMID:16861653

  20. The use of glycylhistidyllysine in culture systems.

    PubMed

    Pickart, L

    1981-06-01

    Glycylhistidyllysine (GHL), a tripeptide isolated from plasma, has been shown to alter the growth rate of many cell types and organisms in culture systems. The tripeptide is optimally active at concentrations between 10 and 200 ng/ml. Some of the more interesting uses of GHL are highlighted in this paper. Present information suggests that GHL functions as a transporter of transition metals, in particular copper, to the cell surface for uptake into the cell. PMID:7021400

  1. Dynamic cell culture system (7-IML-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cogoli, Augusto

    1992-01-01

    This experiment is one of the Biorack experiments being flown on the International Microgravity Laboratory 1 (MIL-1) mission as part of an investigation studying cell proliferation and performance in space. One of the objectives of this investigation is to assess the potential benefits of bioprocessing in space with the ultimate goal of developing a bioreactor for continuous cell cultures in space. This experiment will test the operation of an automated culture chamber that was designed for use in a Bioreactor in space. The device to be tested is called the Dynamic Cell Culture System (DCCS). It is a simple device in which media are renewed or chemicals are injected automatically, by means of osmotic pumps. This experiment uses four Type I/O experiment containers. One DCCS unit, which contains a culture chamber with renewal of medium and a second chamber without a medium supply fits in each container. Two DCCS units are maintained under zero gravity conditions during the on-orbit period. The other two units are maintained under 1 gh conditions in a 1 g centrifuge. The schedule for incubator transfer is given.

  2. Effect of macrophage classical (M1) activation on implant-adherent macrophage interactions with Staphylococcus epidermidis: A murine in vitro model system.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyung R; Bryers, James D

    2012-08-01

    A model in vitro system was developed for eliciting classical (M1) activation of surface-adherent murine macrophages, which was then used to study the interaction of the M1 macrophages with Staphylococcus epidermidis. Glass substrata were first covalently grafted with a mixture of methoxy- and biotin-terminated silanated polyethylene glycol. Interferon (IFN)-γ and/or lipopolysaccharide (LPS), ligands known to induce the highly microbicidal M1 activation state in macrophages, were biotinylated and immobilized by way of a streptavidin intermediate to the biotin-PEG base substratum. Assessment of mouse bone marrow-derived macrophage (BMDM) interleukin (IL)-12(p40) and nitric oxide response to the fabricated surfaces confirmed that the model system achieved activation of adherent macrophage: IFN-γ-presenting surfaces primed cells for M1 activation, LPS-presenting surfaces elicited innate activation, and surface presenting a combination of IFN-γ and LPS induced M1 activation. The phagocytic and microbicidal capacity of activated, surface-adherent BMDM was evaluated using S. epidermidis, a bacterial species prevalent in implant-associated infections. Results indicate that M1 activation of implant-adherent macrophages trends towards diminishing their phagocytic capacity, but enhances their microbicidal capacity for S. epidermidis.

  3. Increasing Antiretroviral Adherence for HIV-Positive African Americans (Project Rise): A Treatment Education Intervention Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Bogart, Laura M; Mutchler, Matt G; McDavitt, Bryce; Mutepfa, Kieta D; Risley, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Background HIV-positive African Americans have been shown to have lower adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) than those of other races/ethnicities, yet adherence interventions have rarely been tailored to the needs of this population. Objective We developed and will evaluate a treatment education adherence intervention (called Rise) that was culturally adapted to address the needs of African Americans living with HIV. Methods This randomized controlled trial will examine the effects of the Rise intervention on ART adherence and HIV viral load. African Americans on ART who report adherence problems will be recruited from the community and randomly assigned to receive the intervention or usual care for 6 months. The intervention consists of 6-10 individual counseling sessions, with more sessions provided to those who demonstrate lower adherence. Primary outcomes include adherence as monitored continuously with Medication Event Monitoring Systems (MEMS) caps, and viral load data received from the participant’s medical provider. Survey assessments will be administered at baseline and month 6. Results The trial is ongoing. Conclusions If effective, the Rise intervention will provide community-based organizations with an intervention tailored to address the needs of African Americans for promoting optimal ART adherence and HIV clinical outcomes. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01350544; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01350544 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6fjqqnmn0). PMID:27025399

  4. Reminder systems to improve patient adherence to tuberculosis clinic appointments for diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qin; Abba, Katharine; Alejandria, Marissa M; Sinclair, David; Balanag, Vincent M; Lansang, Mary Ann D

    2014-01-01

    Background People with active tuberculosis (TB) require six months of treatment. Some people find it difficult to complete treatment, and there are several approaches to help ensure completion. One such system relies on reminders, where the health system prompts patients to attend for appointments on time, or re-engages people who have missed or defaulted on a scheduled appointment. Objectives To assess the effects of reminder systems on improving attendance at TB diagnosis, prophylaxis, and treatment clinic appointments, and their effects on TB treatment outcomes. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register, Cochrane Effective Practice andOrganization of Care Group Specialized Register, CENTRAL,MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, CINAHL, SCI-EXPANDED, SSCI, m RCT, and the Indian Journal of Tuberculosis without language restriction up to 29 August 2014. We also checked reference lists and contacted researchers working in the field. Selection criteria Randomized controlled trials (RCTs), including cluster RCTs and quasi-RCTs, and controlled before-and-after studies comparing reminder systems with no reminders or an alternative reminder system for people with scheduled appointments for TB diagnosis, prophylaxis, or treatment. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed the risk of bias in the included trials. We compared the effects of interventions by using risk ratios (RR) and presented RRs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Also we assessed the quality of evidence using the GRADE approach. Main results Nine trials, including 4654 participants, met our inclusion criteria. Five trials evaluated appointment reminders for people on treatment for active TB, two for people on prophylaxis for latent TB, and four for people undergoing TB screening using skin tests.We classified the interventions into 'pre-appointment' reminders (telephone calls or letters prior to a scheduled appointment) or

  5. Intraoperative blood glucose management: impact of a real-time decision support system on adherence to institutional protocol.

    PubMed

    Nair, Bala G; Grunzweig, Katherine; Peterson, Gene N; Horibe, Mayumi; Neradilek, Moni B; Newman, Shu-Fang; Van Norman, Gail; Schwid, Howard A; Hao, Wei; Hirsch, Irl B; Patchen Dellinger, E

    2016-06-01

    Poor perioperative glycemic management can lead to negative surgical outcome. Improved compliance to glucose control protocol could lead to better glucose management. An Anesthesia Information Management System based decision support system-Smart Anesthesia Manager™ (SAM) was used to generate real-time reminders to the anesthesia providers to closely adhere to our institutional glucose management protocol. Compliance to hourly glucose measurements and correct insulin dose adjustments was compared for the baseline period (12 months) without SAM and the intervention period (12 months) with SAM decision support. Additionally, glucose management parameters were compared for the baseline and intervention periods. A total of 1587 cases during baseline and 1997 cases during intervention met the criteria for glucose management (diabetic patients or non-diabetic patients with glucose level >140 mg/dL). Among the intervention cases anesthesia providers chose to use SAM reminders 48.7 % of the time primarily for patients who had diabetes, higher HbA1C or body mass index, while disabling the system for the remaining cases. Compliance to hourly glucose measurement and correct insulin doses increased significantly during the intervention period when compared with the baseline (from 52.6 to 71.2 % and from 13.5 to 24.4 %, respectively). In spite of improved compliance to institutional protocol, the mean glucose levels and other glycemic management parameters did not show significant improvement with SAM reminders. Real-time electronic reminders improved intraoperative compliance to institutional glucose management protocol though glycemic parameters did not improve even when there was greater compliance to the protocol. PMID:26067402

  6. Cost analysis of a patient navigation system to increase screening colonoscopy adherence among urban minorities

    PubMed Central

    Jandorf, Lina; Stossel, Lauren M.; Cooperman, Julia L.; Graff Zivin, Joshua; Ladabaum, Uri; Hall, Diana; Thélémaque, Linda D.; Redd, William; Itzkowitz, Steven H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Patient navigation (PN) is being increasingly used to help patients complete screening colonoscopy (SC) to prevent colorectal cancer. At our large urban academic medical center with an open access endoscopy system, we previously demonstrated that PN programs produced a colonoscopy completion rate of 78.5% in a cohort of 503 patients (predominantly African Americans and Latinos with public health insurance). Very little is known about the direct costs of implementing PN programs. The aim of this study was to perform a detailed cost analysis of our PN programs from an institutional perspective. Methods In two randomized controlled trials, average-risk patients referred for SC by primary care providers were recruited for PN between May 2008 and May 2010. Patients were randomized to one of four PN groups. The cost of PN and net income to the institution were determined in a cost analysis. Results Among 395 colonoscopy completers, 53.4% underwent SC alone, 30.1% underwent colonoscopy with biopsy, and 16.5% underwent snare polypectomy. Accounting for the average contribution margins of each procedure type, the total revenue was $95,266.00. The total cost of PN was $14,027.30. Net income was $81,238.70. In a model sample of 1000 patients, we compared net incomes for our completion rate (≈80%), our historical PN program (≈65%), and the national average (≈50%). Our current PN program generated additional net incomes of $35,035.50 and $44,956.00, respectively. Conclusion PN among minority patients with mostly public health insurance generated additional income to the institution, due mainly to increased colonoscopy completion rates. PMID:22833205

  7. Family systems theory, attachment theory, and culture.

    PubMed

    Rothbaum, Fred; Rosen, Karen; Ujiie, Tatsuo; Uchida, Nobuko

    2002-01-01

    Family systems theory and attachment theory have important similarities and complementarities. Here we consider two areas in which the theories converge: (a) in family system theorists' description of an overly close, or "enmeshed," mother-child dyad, which attachment theorists conceptualize as the interaction of children's ambivalent attachment and mothers' preoccupied attachment; (b) in family system theorists' description of the "pursuer-distance cycle" of marital conflict, which attachment theorists conceptualize as the interaction of preoccupied and dismissive partners. We briefly review family systems theory evidence, and more extensively review attachment theory evidence, pertaining to these points of convergence. We also review cross-cultural research, which leads us to conclude that the dynamics described in both theories reflect, in part, Western ways of thinking and Western patterns of relatedness. Evidence from Japan suggests that extremely close ties between mother and child are perceived as adaptive, and are more common, and that children experience less adverse effects from such relationships than do children in the West. Moreover, in Japan there is less emphasis on the importance of the exclusive spousal relationship, and less need for the mother and father to find time alone to rekindle romantic, intimate feelings and to resolve conflicts by openly communicating their differences. Thus, the "maladaptive" pattern frequently cited by Western theorists of an extremely close mother-child relationship, an unromantic, conflictual marriage characterized by little verbal communication and a peripheral, distant father, may function very differently in other cultures. While we believe that both theories will be greatly enriched by their integration, we caution against the application of either theory outside the cultures in which they were developed.

  8. Aspergillus Galactosaminogalactan Mediates Adherence to Host Constituents and Conceals Hyphal β-Glucan from the Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hong; Lee, Mark J.; Snarr, Brendan D.; Chen, Dan; Xu, Wenjie; Kravtsov, Ilia; Hoareau, Christopher M. Q.; Vanier, Ghyslaine; Urb, Mirjam; Campoli, Paolo; Al Abdallah, Qusai; Lehoux, Melanie; Chabot, Josée C.; Ouimet, Marie-Claude; Baptista, Stefanie D.; Fritz, Jörg H.; Nierman, William C.; Latgé, Jean Paul; Mitchell, Aaron P.; Filler, Scott G.; Fontaine, Thierry; Sheppard, Donald C.

    2013-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the most common cause of invasive mold disease in humans. The mechanisms underlying the adherence of this mold to host cells and macromolecules have remained elusive. Using mutants with different adhesive properties and comparative transcriptomics, we discovered that the gene uge3, encoding a fungal epimerase, is required for adherence through mediating the synthesis of galactosaminogalactan. Galactosaminogalactan functions as the dominant adhesin of A. fumigatus and mediates adherence to plastic, fibronectin, and epithelial cells. In addition, galactosaminogalactan suppresses host inflammatory responses in vitro and in vivo, in part through masking cell wall β-glucans from recognition by dectin-1. Finally, galactosaminogalactan is essential for full virulence in two murine models of invasive aspergillosis. Collectively these data establish a role for galactosaminogalactan as a pivotal bifunctional virulence factor in the pathogenesis of invasive aspergillosis. PMID:23990787

  9. Pulling on adhered vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Ana-Suncana; Goennenwein, Stefanie; Lorz, Barbara; Seifert, Udo; Sackmann, Erich

    2004-03-01

    A theoretical model describing pulling of vesicles adhered in a contact potential has been developed. Two different regimes have been recognized. For weak to middle-strength adhesive potentials, locally stable shapes are found in a range of applied forces, separated from the free shape by an energy barrier. The phase diagram contains regions with either a unique bound shape or an additional meta-stable shape. Upon pulling, these shapes unbind discontinuously since the vesicle disengage from the surface while still possessing a finite adhesion area (Smith 2003a). In a strong adhesion regime, a competition between adhesion and tether formation is observed. A critical onset force is identified where a tether spontaneously appears as a part of a second order shape transition. Further growth of a tether is followed by a detachment process which terminates at a finite force when a vesicle continuously unbinds from the substrate (Smith 2003b). Both critical forces, as well as all shape parameters, are calculated as a function of the reduced volume and the strength of adhesive potential. Analogous experimental study has been performed where a vertical magnetic tweezers are used in combination with micro-interferometric and confocal techniques to reproduce the same symmetry as in the theoretical investigation. Giant vesicles are bound to the substrate by numerous specific bonds formed between ligands and receptors incorporated into the vesicle and the substrate, respectively. Application of a constant force is inducing a new thermodynamic equilibrium of the system where the vesicle is partially unbound from the substrate (Goennenwein 2003). The shapes of vesicles are compared prior and during application of the force. Very good agreement is obtained, particularly in the middle-strength adhesion regime (Smith 2003c). References: 1. A.-S. Smith, E. Sackmann, U. Seifert: Effects of a pulling force on the shape of a bound vesicle, Europhys. Lett., 64, 2 (2003). 2. A.-S. Smith

  10. The substance of cultural evolution: culturally framed systems of social organization.

    PubMed

    Read, Dwight W

    2014-06-01

    Models of cultural evolution need to address not only the organizational aspects of human societies, but also the complexity and structure of cultural idea systems that frame their systems of organization. These cultural idea systems determine a framework within which behaviors take place and provide mutually understood meanings for behavior from the perspective of both agent and recipient that are critical for the coherence of human systems of social organization.

  11. Multiple roles of Activin/Nodal, bone morphogenetic protein, fibroblast growth factor and Wnt/β-catenin signalling in the anterior neural patterning of adherent human embryonic stem cell cultures

    PubMed Central

    Lupo, Giuseppe; Novorol, Claire; Smith, Joseph R.; Vallier, Ludovic; Miranda, Elena; Alexander, Morgan; Biagioni, Stefano; Pedersen, Roger A.; Harris, William A.

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have successfully produced a variety of neural cell types from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), but there has been limited systematic analysis of how different regional identities are established using well-defined differentiation conditions. We have used adherent, chemically defined cultures to analyse the roles of Activin/Nodal, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and Wnt/β-catenin signalling in neural induction, anteroposterior patterning and eye field specification in hESCs. We show that either BMP inhibition or activation of FGF signalling is required for effective neural induction, but these two pathways have distinct outcomes on rostrocaudal patterning. While BMP inhibition leads to specification of forebrain/midbrain positional identities, FGF-dependent neural induction is associated with strong posteriorization towards hindbrain/spinal cord fates. We also demonstrate that Wnt/β-catenin signalling is activated during neural induction and promotes acquisition of neural fates posterior to forebrain. Therefore, inhibition of this pathway is needed for efficient forebrain specification. Finally, we provide evidence that the levels of Activin/Nodal and BMP signalling have a marked influence on further forebrain patterning and that constitutive inhibition of these pathways represses expression of eye field genes. These results show that the key mechanisms controlling neural patterning in model vertebrate species are preserved in adherent, chemically defined hESC cultures and reveal new insights into the signals regulating eye field specification. PMID:23576785

  12. Multiple roles of Activin/Nodal, bone morphogenetic protein, fibroblast growth factor and Wnt/β-catenin signalling in the anterior neural patterning of adherent human embryonic stem cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Lupo, Giuseppe; Novorol, Claire; Smith, Joseph R; Vallier, Ludovic; Miranda, Elena; Alexander, Morgan; Biagioni, Stefano; Pedersen, Roger A; Harris, William A

    2013-04-01

    Several studies have successfully produced a variety of neural cell types from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), but there has been limited systematic analysis of how different regional identities are established using well-defined differentiation conditions. We have used adherent, chemically defined cultures to analyse the roles of Activin/Nodal, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and Wnt/β-catenin signalling in neural induction, anteroposterior patterning and eye field specification in hESCs. We show that either BMP inhibition or activation of FGF signalling is required for effective neural induction, but these two pathways have distinct outcomes on rostrocaudal patterning. While BMP inhibition leads to specification of forebrain/midbrain positional identities, FGF-dependent neural induction is associated with strong posteriorization towards hindbrain/spinal cord fates. We also demonstrate that Wnt/β-catenin signalling is activated during neural induction and promotes acquisition of neural fates posterior to forebrain. Therefore, inhibition of this pathway is needed for efficient forebrain specification. Finally, we provide evidence that the levels of Activin/Nodal and BMP signalling have a marked influence on further forebrain patterning and that constitutive inhibition of these pathways represses expression of eye field genes. These results show that the key mechanisms controlling neural patterning in model vertebrate species are preserved in adherent, chemically defined hESC cultures and reveal new insights into the signals regulating eye field specification. PMID:23576785

  13. An ontology for factors affecting tuberculosis treatment adherence behavior in sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Ogundele, Olukunle Ayodeji; Moodley, Deshendran; Pillay, Anban W; Seebregts, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Adherence behavior is a complex phenomenon influenced by diverse personal, cultural, and socioeconomic factors that may vary between communities in different regions. Understanding the factors that influence adherence behavior is essential in predicting which individuals and communities are at risk of nonadherence. This is necessary for supporting resource allocation and intervention planning in disease control programs. Currently, there is no known concrete and unambiguous computational representation of factors that influence tuberculosis (TB) treatment adherence behavior that is useful for prediction. This study developed a computer-based conceptual model for capturing and structuring knowledge about the factors that influence TB treatment adherence behavior in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Methods An extensive review of existing categorization systems in the literature was used to develop a conceptual model that captured scientific knowledge about TB adherence behavior in SSA. The model was formalized as an ontology using the web ontology language. The ontology was then evaluated for its comprehensiveness and applicability in building predictive models. Conclusion The outcome of the study is a novel ontology-based approach for curating and structuring scientific knowledge of adherence behavior in patients with TB in SSA. The ontology takes an evidence-based approach by explicitly linking factors to published clinical studies. Factors are structured around five dimensions: factor type, type of effect, regional variation, cross-dependencies between factors, and treatment phase. The ontology is flexible and extendable and provides new insights into the nature of and interrelationship between factors that influence TB adherence. PMID:27175067

  14. Intensive Quality Assurance of Therapist Adherence to Behavioral Interventions for Adolescent Substance Use Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holth, Per; Torsheim, Torbjorn; Sheidow, Ashli J.; Ogden, Terje; Henggeler, Scott W.

    2011-01-01

    This study was a cross-cultural replication of a study that investigated therapist adherence to behavioral interventions as a result of an intensive quality assurance system which was integrated into Multisystemic Therapy (MST). Thirty-three therapists and eight supervisors were block randomized to either an Intensive Quality Assurance or a…

  15. Evaluation of a Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) assay (Keystone Sym)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our goal is to establish an in vitro model system to evaluate chemical effects using a single stem cell culture technique that would improve throughput and provide quantitative markers of differentiation and cell number. To this end, we have used an adherent cell differentiation ...

  16. A 3D Sphere Culture System Containing Functional Polymers for Large-Scale Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Production

    PubMed Central

    Otsuji, Tomomi G.; Bin, Jiang; Yoshimura, Azumi; Tomura, Misayo; Tateyama, Daiki; Minami, Itsunari; Yoshikawa, Yoshihiro; Aiba, Kazuhiro; Heuser, John E.; Nishino, Taito; Hasegawa, Kouichi; Nakatsuji, Norio

    2014-01-01

    Summary Utilizing human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) in cell-based therapy and drug discovery requires large-scale cell production. However, scaling up conventional adherent cultures presents challenges of maintaining a uniform high quality at low cost. In this regard, suspension cultures are a viable alternative, because they are scalable and do not require adhesion surfaces. 3D culture systems such as bioreactors can be exploited for large-scale production. However, the limitations of current suspension culture methods include spontaneous fusion between cell aggregates and suboptimal passaging methods by dissociation and reaggregation. 3D culture systems that dynamically stir carrier beads or cell aggregates should be refined to reduce shearing forces that damage hPSCs. Here, we report a simple 3D sphere culture system that incorporates mechanical passaging and functional polymers. This setup resolves major problems associated with suspension culture methods and dynamic stirring systems and may be optimal for applications involving large-scale hPSC production. PMID:24936458

  17. Cultural systems for growing potatoes in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tibbitts, T.; Bula, R.; Corey, R.; Morrow, R.

    1988-01-01

    Higher plants are being evaluated for life support to provide needed food, oxygen and water as well as removal of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. The successful utilization of plants in space will require the development of not only highly productive growing systems but also highly efficient bioregenerative systems. It will be necessary to recycle all inedible plant parts and all human wastes so that the entire complement of elemental compounds can be reused. Potatoes have been proposed as one of the desirable crops because they are 1) extremely productive, yielding more than 100 metric tons per hectare from field plantings, 2) the edible tubers are high in digestible starch (70%) and protein (10%) on a dry weight basis, 3) up to 80% of the total plant production is in tubers and thus edible, 4) the plants are easily propagated either from tubers or from tissue culture plantlets, 5) the tubers can be utilized with a minimum of processing, and 6) potatoes can be prepared in a variety of different forms for the human diet (Tibbitts et al., 1982). However potatoes have a growth pattern that complicates the development of growing the plants in controlled systems. Tubers are borne on underground stems that are botanically termed 'rhizomes', but in common usage termed 'stolons'. The stolons must be maintained in a dark, moist area with sufficient provision for enlargement of tubers. Stems rapidly terminate in flowers forcing extensive branching and spreading of plants so that individual plants will cover 0.2 m2 or more area. Thus the growing system must be developed to provide an area that is darkened for tuber and root growth and of sufficient size for plant spread. A system developed for growing potatoes, or any plants, in space will have certain requirements that must be met to make them a useful part of a life support system. The system must 1) be constructed of materials, and involve media, that can be reused for many successive cycles of plant growth, 2

  18. Hepatitis B virus efficiently infects non-adherent hepatoma cells via human sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide

    PubMed Central

    Okuyama-Dobashi, Kaori; Kasai, Hirotake; Tanaka, Tomohisa; Yamashita, Atsuya; Yasumoto, Jun; Chen, Wenjia; Okamoto, Toru; Maekawa, Shinya; Watashi, Koichi; Wakita, Takaji; Ryo, Akihide; Suzuki, Tetsuro; Matsuura, Yoshiharu; Enomoto, Nobuyuki; Moriishi, Kohji

    2015-01-01

    Sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP) has been reported as a functional receptor for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. However, HBV could not efficiently infect HepG2 cells expressing NTCP (NTCP-HepG2 cells) under adherent monolayer-cell conditions. In this study, NTCP was mainly detected in the basolateral membrane region, but not the apical site, of monolayer NTCP-HepG2 cells. We hypothesized that non-adherent cell conditions of infection would enhance HBV infectivity. Non-adherent NTCP-HepG2 cells were prepared by treatment with trypsin and EDTA, which did not degrade NTCP in the membrane fraction. HBV successfully infected NTCP-HepG2 cells at a viral dose 10 times lower in non-adherent phase than in adherent phase. Efficient infection of non-adherent NTCP-HepG2 cells with blood-borne or cell-culture-derived HBV was observed and was remarkably impaired in the presence of the myristoylated preS1 peptide. HBV could also efficiently infect HepaRG cells under non-adherent cell conditions. We screened several compounds using our culture system and identified proscillaridin A as a potent anti-HBV agent with an IC50 value of 7.2 nM. In conclusion, non-adherent host cell conditions of infection augmented HBV infectivity in an NTCP-dependent manner, thus providing a novel strategy to identify anti-HBV drugs and investigate the mechanism of HBV infection. PMID:26592202

  19. Hepatitis B virus efficiently infects non-adherent hepatoma cells via human sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Okuyama-Dobashi, Kaori; Kasai, Hirotake; Tanaka, Tomohisa; Yamashita, Atsuya; Yasumoto, Jun; Chen, Wenjia; Okamoto, Toru; Maekawa, Shinya; Watashi, Koichi; Wakita, Takaji; Ryo, Akihide; Suzuki, Tetsuro; Matsuura, Yoshiharu; Enomoto, Nobuyuki; Moriishi, Kohji

    2015-01-01

    Sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP) has been reported as a functional receptor for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. However, HBV could not efficiently infect HepG2 cells expressing NTCP (NTCP-HepG2 cells) under adherent monolayer-cell conditions. In this study, NTCP was mainly detected in the basolateral membrane region, but not the apical site, of monolayer NTCP-HepG2 cells. We hypothesized that non-adherent cell conditions of infection would enhance HBV infectivity. Non-adherent NTCP-HepG2 cells were prepared by treatment with trypsin and EDTA, which did not degrade NTCP in the membrane fraction. HBV successfully infected NTCP-HepG2 cells at a viral dose 10 times lower in non-adherent phase than in adherent phase. Efficient infection of non-adherent NTCP-HepG2 cells with blood-borne or cell-culture-derived HBV was observed and was remarkably impaired in the presence of the myristoylated preS1 peptide. HBV could also efficiently infect HepaRG cells under non-adherent cell conditions. We screened several compounds using our culture system and identified proscillaridin A as a potent anti-HBV agent with an IC50 value of 7.2 nM. In conclusion, non-adherent host cell conditions of infection augmented HBV infectivity in an NTCP-dependent manner, thus providing a novel strategy to identify anti-HBV drugs and investigate the mechanism of HBV infection. PMID:26592202

  20. Capability of yeast derivatives to adhere enteropathogenic bacteria and to modulate cells of the innate immune system.

    PubMed

    Ganner, Anja; Schatzmayr, Gerd

    2012-07-01

    Yeast derivatives including yeast cell wall components are promising alternatives to antibiotics with respect to the promotion of health and performance in livestock, based on their capacity to bind enteropathogenic bacteria and to beneficially modulate the immune system. However, these mode(s) of action both in vitro and in vivo are still not well understood. Furthermore, standardization and reproducibility of in vitro techniques (microbiology, cell culture assays) are critical features for the application of yeast derivatives as well as for the proof of effectiveness. Yeast cell wall products are suggested as anti-adhesive agents and are thus proposed to prevent attachment of certain intestinal bacteria by providing alternative adhesion sites to enterobacteria, which contain mannose-specific type I fimbriae such as Escherichia coli or Salmonella spp. and which is well documented. Various in vitro assay techniques have become of paramount importance for biotechnological research since they allow for determination and quantification of potential mode(s) of action. However, in vitro assays may be criticized by product end users as not accurately reflecting in vivo responses. Pro and cons of different assays and their bias will be discussed specifically regarding yeast cell wall components and adhesion of enteropathogenic bacteria. Immunomodulation is a therapeutic approach intervening in auto-regulating processes of the defense system. Yeast derivatives such as beta-glucans are proposed to interact with cells of the innate immune system by receptor recognition. Controversial data in literature and mode(s) of action are reviewed and discussed here.

  1. New directions in capacity building: incorporating cultural competence into the interactive systems framework.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Henry; Van Orden, Onna; Jordan, Lisa; Portnoy, Galina A; Welsh, Elena; Betkowski, Jennifer; Charles, Jade Wolfman; DiClemente, Carlo C

    2012-12-01

    The UMBC Psychology Department's Center for Community Collaboration (CCC) provides training and support for capacity building to promote substance abuse and mental health treatment as well as adherence improvement in community agencies funded through the Ryan White Act serving persons living with HIV/AIDS. This article describes an approach to dissemination of Evidence Based Practices (EBPs) for these services that uses the Interactive Systems Framework (ISF) and incorporates a collaborative process involving trainer cultural competence, along with a comprehensive assessment of organizational needs, culture, and climate that culminates in tailored training and ongoing collaboration. This article provides: (1) an overview of the CCC's expanded ISF for the effective dissemination of two EBPs-motivational interviewing and the stages of change perspective; (2) an examination of the role of trainer cultural competence within the ISF framework, particularly attending to organizational culture and climate; and (3) case examples to demonstrate this approach for both general and innovation-specific capacity building in two community based organizations.

  2. Bacterial adherence to separated modular components in joint prosthesis: a clinical study.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Barrena, Enrique; Esteban, Jaime; Medel, Francisco; Molina-Manso, Diana; Ortiz-Pérez, Alberto; Cordero-Ampuero, Jose; Puértolas, José A

    2012-10-01

    Bacterial adherence on total joint replacement implants may lead to biofilm formation and implant-related osteoarticular infection. It is unclear if different biomaterials in the prosthetic components are more prone to facilitate this bacterial adherence, although ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) component exchange in modular systems has been clinically utilized in the early management of these infections. To clarify if the amount of clinically adhered microorganisms was related to the material or the component, we investigated retrieved implants from infected joint replacements. Thirty-two patients were revised after confirmed implant-related infection through positive cultures. Eighty-seven total joint components (hip and knee) were obtained and separately sonicated following a previously published protocol. Cultures were quantified, and detected colony forming units (CFU) were adjusted according to the component surface and compared based on the component material and location. Variable adherence of bacteria to chrome cobalt alloys, UHMWPE, hydroxyapatite coated components, and titanium alloys. The commonest isolated organisms were Staphylococcus epidermidis (23 of 87 components) and Staphylococcus aureus (10 of 87). Twelve components did not show any microorganism adhered despite location in an infected joint, with positive cultures in other components. A mixed linear model adjusted for random effects (the random effect being the infected patient) obtained convergence for the CFU/mm(2) variable, but could not confirm a significantly higher adherence to a particular component or to a particular biomaterial. Therefore, the bacterial adherence primarily depends on the infective microorganism and the response of each individual patient, rather than materials or components. PMID:22467526

  3. Use of purified F1845 fimbrial adhesin to study localization and expression of receptors for diffusely adhering Escherichia coli during enterocytic differentiation of human colon carcinoma cell lines HT-29 and Caco-2 in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Kerneis, S; Bilge, S S; Fourel, V; Chauviere, G; Coconnier, M H; Servin, A L

    1991-01-01

    Whole diffusely adhering Escherichia coli (DAEC) C1845 cells bearing the F1845 adhesive factor bind diffusely to differentiated human colon carcinoma cell lines HT-29 and Caco-2. By using antibodies directed against the purified fimbrial adhesin F1845 factor, the expression of the DAEC F1845-specific brush border receptors in the polarized human intestinal HT-29 and Caco-2 epithelial cells was studied by indirect immunofluorescence. A low level of DAEC F1845 receptors in undifferentiated intestinal cells was detected; they were localized in a cluster of cells. DAEC F1845 receptors were expressed at a high level in differentiated HT-29 and Caco-2 cells. DAEC F1845 receptors were expressed at a strikingly high level in the apical domains of the cells and developed during enterocytic differentiation in culture, in parallel with the apical expression of the intestinal brush border hydrolase, sucrase-isomaltase. Images PMID:1682255

  4. Cryopreservation of adherent neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wu; O'Shaughnessy, Thomas; Chang, Eddie

    2006-07-31

    Neuronal networks have been widely used for neurophysiology, drug discovery and toxicity testing. An essential prerequisite for future widespread application of neuronal networks is the development of efficient cryopreservation protocols to facilitate their storage and transportation. Here is the first report on cryopreservation of mammalian adherent neuronal networks. Dissociated spinal cord cells were attached to a poly-d-lysine/laminin surface and allowed to form neuronal networks. Adherent neuronal networks were embedded in a thin film of collagen gel and loaded with trehalose prior to transfer to a freezing medium containing DMSO, FBS and culture medium. This was followed by a slow rate of cooling to -80 degrees C for 24 h and then storage for up to 2 months in liquid nitrogen at -196 degrees C. The three components: DMSO, collagen gel entrapment and trehalose loading combined provided the highest post-thaw viability, relative to individual or two component protocols. The post-thaw cells with this protocol demonstrated similar neuronal and astrocytic markers and morphological structure as those detected in unfrozen cells. Fluorescent dye FM1-43 staining revealed active recycling of synaptic vesicles upon depolarizing stimulation in the post-thaw neuronal networks. These results suggest that a combination of DMSO, collagen gel entrapment and trehalose loading can significantly improve conventional slow-cooling methods in cryopreservation of adherent neuronal networks.

  5. Medication Adherence in Patients with Bipolar Disorder: A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Levin, Jennifer B; Krivenko, Anna; Howland, Molly; Schlachet, Rebecca; Sajatovic, Martha

    2016-09-01

    Poor medication adherence is a pervasive problem that causes disability and suffering as well as extensive financial costs among individuals with bipolar disorder (BD). Barriers to adherence are numerous and cross multiple levels, including factors related to bipolar pathology and those unique to an individual's circumstances. External factors, including treatment setting, healthcare system, and broader health policies, can also affect medication adherence in people with BD. Fortunately, advances in research have suggested avenues for improving adherence. A comprehensive review of adherence-enhancement interventions for the years 2005-2015 is included. Specific bipolar adherence-enhancement approaches that target knowledge gaps, cognitive patterns, specific barriers, and motivation may be helpful, as may approaches that capitalize on technology or novel drug-delivery systems. However, much work remains to optimally facilitate long-term medication adherence in people with BD. For adherence-enhancement approaches to be widely adapted, they need to be easily accessible, affordable, and practical. PMID:27435356

  6. Adherence to Guidelines for the Management of Local Anesthetic Systemic Toxicity Is Improved by an Electronic Decision Support Tool and Designated ‘Reader’

    PubMed Central

    McEvoy, Matthew D.; Hand, William R.; Stoll, W. David; Furse, Cory M.; Nietert, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives A hardcopy or paper cognitive aid has been shown to improve performance during the management of simulated local anesthetic systemic toxicity (LAST) when given to the team leader. However, there remains room for improvement in order to ensure a system that can achieve perfect adherence to the published guidelines for LAST management. Recent research has shown that implementing a checklist via a designated reader may be of benefit. Accordingly, we sought to investigate the effect of an electronic decision support tool (DST) and designated ‘Reader’ role on team performance during an in-situ simulation of LAST. Methods Participants were randomized to Reader+DST (N = 16, rDST) and Control (N = 15, memory alone). The rDST group received the assistance of a dedicated Reader on the response team who was equipped with an electronic DST. The primary outcome measure was adherence to guidelines. Results For overall and critical percent correct scores, the rDST group scored higher than Control (99.3% vs 72.2%, P < 0.0001; 99.5% vs 70%, P < 0.0001, respectively). In the LAST scenario, 0 of 15 (0%) in the control group performed 100% of critical management steps, while 15 of 16 (93.8%) in the rDST group did so (P < 0.0001). Conclusions In a prospective, randomized single-blinded study, a designated Reader with an electronic DST improved adherence to guidelines in the management of an in-situ simulation of LAST. Such tools are promising in the future of medicine, but further research is needed to ensure the best methods for implementing them in the clinical arena. PMID:24956454

  7. Adipose tissue engineering in three-dimensional levitation tissue culture system based on magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Daquinag, Alexes C; Souza, Glauco R; Kolonin, Mikhail G

    2013-05-01

    White adipose tissue (WAT) is becoming widely used in regenerative medicine/cell therapy applications, and its physiological and pathological importance is increasingly appreciated. WAT is a complex organ composed of differentiated adipocytes, stromal mesenchymal progenitors known as adipose stromal cells (ASC), as well as endothelial vascular cells and infiltrating leukocytes. Two-dimensional (2D) culture that has been typically used for studying adipose cells does not adequately recapitulate WAT complexity. Improved methods for reconstruction of functional WAT ex vivo are instrumental for understanding of physiological interactions between the composing cell populations. Here, we used a three-dimensional (3D) levitation tissue culture system based on magnetic nanoparticle assembly to model WAT development and growth in organoids termed adipospheres. We show that 3T3-L1 preadipocytes remain viable in spheroids for a long period of time, while in 2D culture, they lose adherence and die after reaching confluence. Upon adipogenesis induction in 3T3-L1 adipospheres, cells efficiently formed large lipid droplets typical of white adipocytes in vivo, while only smaller lipid droplet formation is achievable in 2D. Adiposphere-based coculture of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes with murine endothelial bEND.3 cells led to a vascular-like network assembly concomitantly with lipogenesis in perivascular cells. Adipocyte-depleted stromal vascular fraction (SVF) of mouse WAT cultured in 3D underwent assembly into organoids with vascular-like structures containing luminal endothelial and perivascular stromal cell layers. Adipospheres made from primary WAT cells displayed robust proliferation and complex hierarchical organization reflected by a matricellular gradient incorporating ASC, endothelial cells, and leukocytes, while ASC quickly outgrew other cell types in adherent culture. Upon adipogenesis induction, adipospheres derived from the SVF displayed more efficient lipid droplet

  8. Adipose tissue engineering in three-dimensional levitation tissue culture system based on magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Daquinag, Alexes C; Souza, Glauco R; Kolonin, Mikhail G

    2013-05-01

    White adipose tissue (WAT) is becoming widely used in regenerative medicine/cell therapy applications, and its physiological and pathological importance is increasingly appreciated. WAT is a complex organ composed of differentiated adipocytes, stromal mesenchymal progenitors known as adipose stromal cells (ASC), as well as endothelial vascular cells and infiltrating leukocytes. Two-dimensional (2D) culture that has been typically used for studying adipose cells does not adequately recapitulate WAT complexity. Improved methods for reconstruction of functional WAT ex vivo are instrumental for understanding of physiological interactions between the composing cell populations. Here, we used a three-dimensional (3D) levitation tissue culture system based on magnetic nanoparticle assembly to model WAT development and growth in organoids termed adipospheres. We show that 3T3-L1 preadipocytes remain viable in spheroids for a long period of time, while in 2D culture, they lose adherence and die after reaching confluence. Upon adipogenesis induction in 3T3-L1 adipospheres, cells efficiently formed large lipid droplets typical of white adipocytes in vivo, while only smaller lipid droplet formation is achievable in 2D. Adiposphere-based coculture of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes with murine endothelial bEND.3 cells led to a vascular-like network assembly concomitantly with lipogenesis in perivascular cells. Adipocyte-depleted stromal vascular fraction (SVF) of mouse WAT cultured in 3D underwent assembly into organoids with vascular-like structures containing luminal endothelial and perivascular stromal cell layers. Adipospheres made from primary WAT cells displayed robust proliferation and complex hierarchical organization reflected by a matricellular gradient incorporating ASC, endothelial cells, and leukocytes, while ASC quickly outgrew other cell types in adherent culture. Upon adipogenesis induction, adipospheres derived from the SVF displayed more efficient lipid droplet

  9. Functional Systems and Culturally-Determined Cognitive Differences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiseman, Richard L.

    Noting that one means of better understanding the nature of cultural differences is to elucidate the cognitive differences between members of differing cultures, this paper examines Alexander Luria's sociohistorical theory of functional cognitive systems. The paper first describes Luria's notion of functional systems, the crux of which postulates…

  10. Characteristics and response of mouse bone marrow derived novel low adherent mesenchymal stem cells acquired by quantification of extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Ri-Cheng; Heo, Seong-Joo; Koak, Jai-Young; Lee, Joo-Hee; Park, Ji-Man

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of present study was to identify characteristic and response of mouse bone marrow (BM) derived low-adherent bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) obtained by quantification of extracellular matrix (ECM). MATERIALS AND METHODS Non-adherent cells acquired by ECM coated dishes were termed low-adherent BMMSCs and these cells were analyzed by in vitro and in vivo methods, including colony forming unit fibroblast (CFU-f), bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), multi-potential differentiation, flow cytometry and transplantation into nude mouse to measure the bone formation ability of these low-adherent BMMSCs. Titanium (Ti) discs with machined and anodized surfaces were prepared. Adherent and low-adherent BMMSCs were cultured on the Ti discs for testing their proliferation. RESULTS The amount of CFU-f cells was significantly higher when non-adherent cells were cultured on ECM coated dishes, which was made by 7 days culturing of adherent BMMSCs. Low-adherent BMMSCs had proliferation and differentiation potential as adherent BMMSCs in vitro. The mean amount bone formation of adherent and low-adherent BMMSCs was also investigated in vivo. There was higher cell proliferation appearance in adherent and low-adherent BMMSCs seeded on anodized Ti discs than machined Ti discs by time. CONCLUSION Low-adherent BMMSCs acquired by ECM from non-adherent cell populations maintained potential characteristic similar to those of the adherent BMMSCs and therefore could be used effectively as adherent BMMSCs in clinic. PMID:25352957

  11. Adherence to Insulin Therapy.

    PubMed

    Sarbacker, G Blair; Urteaga, Elizabeth M

    2016-08-01

    IN BRIEF Six million people with diabetes use insulin either alone or in combination with an oral medication. Many barriers exist that lead to poor adherence with insulin. However, there is an underwhelming amount of data on interventions to address these barriers and improve insulin adherence. Until pharmacological advancements create easier, more acceptable insulin regimens, it is imperative to involve patients in shared decision-making. PMID:27574371

  12. SPI-9 of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi is constituted by an operon positively regulated by RpoS and contributes to adherence to epithelial cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Velásquez, Juan C; Hidalgo, Alejandro A; Villagra, Nicolás; Santiviago, Carlos A; Mora, Guido C; Fuentes, Juan A

    2016-08-01

    The genomic island 9 (SPI-9) from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) carries three ORFs (STY2876, STY2877, STY2878) presenting 98 % identity with a type 1 secretory apparatus (T1SS), and a single ORF (STY2875) similar to a large RTX-like protein exhibiting repeated Ig domains. BapA, the Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis orthologous to S. Typhi STY2875, has been associated with biofilm formation, and is described as a virulence factor in mice. Preliminary in silico analyses revealed that S. Typhi STY2875 ORF has a 600 bp deletion compared with S. Enteritidis bapA, suggesting that S. Typhi STY2875 might be non-functional. At present, SPI-9 has not been studied in S. Typhi. We found that the genes constituting SPI-9 are arranged in an operon whose promoter was up-regulated in high osmolarity and low pH in a RpoS-dependent manner. All the proteins encoded by S. Typhi SPI-9 were located at the membrane fraction, consistent with their putative role as T1SS. Furthermore, SPI-9 contributed to adherence of S. Typhi to epithelial cells when bacteria were grown under high osmolarity or low pH. Under the test conditions, S. Typhi SPI-9 did not participate in biofilm formation. SPI-9 is functional in S. Typhi and encodes an adhesin induced under conditions normally found in the intestine, such as high osmolarity. Hence, this is an example of a locus that might be designated a pseudogene by computational approaches but not by direct biological assays.

  13. Evaluation of Verigene Blood Culture Test Systems for Rapid Identification of Positive Blood Cultures.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Seok; Kang, Go-Eun; Kim, Han-Sung; Kim, Hyun Soo; Song, Wonkeun; Lee, Kyu Man

    2016-01-01

    The performance of molecular tests using the Verigene Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Blood Culture nucleic acid tests (BC-GP and BC-GN, resp.; Naosphere, Northbrook, IL, USA) was evaluated for the identification of microorganisms detected from blood cultures. Ninety-nine blood cultures containing Gram-positive bacteria and 150 containing Gram-negative bacteria were analyzed using the BC-GP and BC-GN assays, respectively. Blood cultures were performed using the Bactec blood culture system (BD Diagnostic Systems, Franklin Lakes, NJ, USA) and conventional identification and antibiotic-susceptibility tests were performed using a MicroScan system (Siemens, West Sacramento, CA, USA). When a single strain of bacteria was isolated from the blood culture, Verigene assays correctly identified 97.9% (94/96) of Gram-positive bacteria and 93.8% (137/146) of Gram-negative bacteria. Resistance genes mecA and vanA were correctly detected by the BC-GP assay, while the extended-spectrum β-lactamase CTX-M and the carbapenemase OXA resistance gene were detected from 30 cases cultures by the BC-GN assay. The BC-GP and BC-GN assays showed high agreement with conventional identification and susceptibility tests. These tests are useful for rapid identification of microorganisms and the detection of clinically important resistance genes from positive Bactec blood cultures.

  14. Performance of Gram staining on blood cultures flagged negative by an automated blood culture system.

    PubMed

    Peretz, A; Isakovich, N; Pastukh, N; Koifman, A; Glyatman, T; Brodsky, D

    2015-08-01

    Blood is one of the most important specimens sent to a microbiology laboratory for culture. Most blood cultures are incubated for 5-7 days, except in cases where there is a suspicion of infection caused by microorganisms that proliferate slowly, or infections expressed by a small number of bacteria in the bloodstream. Therefore, at the end of incubation, misidentification of positive cultures and false-negative results are a real possibility. The aim of this work was to perform a confirmation by Gram staining of the lack of any microorganisms in blood cultures that were identified as negative by the BACTEC™ FX system at the end of incubation. All bottles defined as negative by the BACTEC FX system were Gram-stained using an automatic device and inoculated on solid growth media. In our work, 15 cultures that were defined as negative by the BACTEC FX system at the end of the incubation were found to contain microorganisms when Gram-stained. The main characteristic of most bacteria and fungi growing in the culture bottles that were defined as negative was slow growth. This finding raises a problematic issue concerning the need to perform Gram staining of all blood cultures, which could overload the routine laboratory work, especially laboratories serving large medical centers and receiving a large number of blood cultures.

  15. Evaluation of Verigene Blood Culture Test Systems for Rapid Identification of Positive Blood Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Seok; Kang, Go-Eun; Kim, Han-Sung; Song, Wonkeun; Lee, Kyu Man

    2016-01-01

    The performance of molecular tests using the Verigene Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Blood Culture nucleic acid tests (BC-GP and BC-GN, resp.; Naosphere, Northbrook, IL, USA) was evaluated for the identification of microorganisms detected from blood cultures. Ninety-nine blood cultures containing Gram-positive bacteria and 150 containing Gram-negative bacteria were analyzed using the BC-GP and BC-GN assays, respectively. Blood cultures were performed using the Bactec blood culture system (BD Diagnostic Systems, Franklin Lakes, NJ, USA) and conventional identification and antibiotic-susceptibility tests were performed using a MicroScan system (Siemens, West Sacramento, CA, USA). When a single strain of bacteria was isolated from the blood culture, Verigene assays correctly identified 97.9% (94/96) of Gram-positive bacteria and 93.8% (137/146) of Gram-negative bacteria. Resistance genes mecA and vanA were correctly detected by the BC-GP assay, while the extended-spectrum β-lactamase CTX-M and the carbapenemase OXA resistance gene were detected from 30 cases cultures by the BC-GN assay. The BC-GP and BC-GN assays showed high agreement with conventional identification and susceptibility tests. These tests are useful for rapid identification of microorganisms and the detection of clinically important resistance genes from positive Bactec blood cultures. PMID:26904669

  16. Cultural Development through Human Resource Systems Integration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albert, Michael

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the framework for developing a cultural human resources management (HRM) perspective. Central to this framework is modifying HRM programs to reinforce the organization's preferred practices. Modification occurs through selection, orientation, training and development, performance appraisal, career development, and compensation and…

  17. [Guideline adherence - is more always better?].

    PubMed

    Nothacker, M J

    2016-09-01

    Guidelines play an increasing role in the health system. Guidelines are intended to provide guidance in the sense of ‟corridors for action and decision", whereby in certain justified cases actions can - or even must - deviate from them. "Cookbook medicine" is not the aim of guidelines.Guideline adherence can not necessarily be equated with guideline conformity. Adherence presumes an agreed treatment goal between patient and physician and focuses the behavior of the patient. Based on current studies on guideline adherence, the use of the term in studies on urological tumors is analyzed.

  18. Contrasting effects of inflammatory stimuli on neutrophil and monocyte adherence to endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kamp, D W; Bauer, K D; Knap, A; Dunn, M M

    1989-08-01

    Leukocyte adherence to endothelial cells (EC) is an important early event in inflammatory responses, which are often characterized by a predominance of either neutrophils (PMN) or monocytes. However, there is little information concerning the molecular events important in leukocyte adherence to EC. Intracellular activation of protein kinase C and the calcium-second messenger system leads to the stimulation of a number of important functions in PMN and monocytes. We compared the effects of members of these pathways on human PMN and monocyte adherence to cultured bovine aortic EC. We observed that phorbol myristate acetate, phorbol, 12,13-dibutyrate, L-alpha-1-oleoyl-2-acetoyl-sn-3-glycerol, and ionomycin each induced significant dose-dependent increases in PMN adherence to EC monolayers. In contrast, similar concentrations of each of these agents induced significant decreases in EC adherence of monocytes enriched by countercurrent centrifugal elutriation. Separate experiments determined that the differences in PMN and monocyte adherence to EC were not related to differences in oxidant production because 1) phorbol myristate acetate and L-alpha-1-oleoyl-2-acetoyl-sn-3-glycerol caused similar marked increases in both PMN and monocyte superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide production and 2) ionomycin, which had opposing effects on PMN and monocyte adherence, had no effect on PMN and monocyte superoxide anion or hydrogen peroxide release. We conclude that activators of protein kinase C and the Ca-second messenger pathway have opposite effects on PMN and monocyte adherence to EC and that these effects are mediated by O2 radical-independent mechanisms.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Growing B Lymphocytes in a Three-Dimensional Culture System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, J. H. David; Bottaro, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) culture system for growing long-lived B lymphocytes has been invented. The capabilities afforded by the system can be expected to expand the range of options for immunological research and related activities, including testing of immunogenicity of vaccine candidates in vitro, generation of human monoclonal antibodies, and immunotherapy. Mature lymphocytes, which are the effectors of adaptive immune responses in vertebrates, are extremely susceptible to apoptotic death, and depend on continuous reception of survival-inducing stimulation (in the forms of cytokines, cell-to-cell contacts, and antigen receptor signaling) from the microenvironment. For this reason, efforts to develop systems for long-term culture of functional, non-transformed and non-activated mature lymphocytes have been unsuccessful until now. The bone-marrow microenvironment supports the growth and differentiation of many hematopoietic lineages, in addition to B-lymphocytes. Primary bone-marrow cell cultures designed to promote the development of specific cell types in vitro are highly desirable experimental systems, amenable to manipulation under controlled conditions. However, the dynamic and complex network of stromal cells and insoluble matrix proteins is disrupted in prior plate- and flask-based culture systems, wherein the microenvironments have a predominantly two-dimensional (2D) character. In 2D bone-marrow cultures, normal B-lymphoid cells become progressively skewed toward precursor B-cell populations that do not retain a normal immunophenotype, and such mature B-lymphocytes as those harvested from the spleen or lymph nodes do not survive beyond several days ex vivo in the absence of mitogenic stimulation. The present 3D culture system is a bioreactor that contains highly porous artificial scaffolding that supports the long-term culture of bone marrow, spleen, and lymph-node samples. In this system, unlike in 2D culture systems, B-cell subpopulations developing

  20. Performance characteristics of two automated solid-phase red cell adherence systems for pretransfusion antibody screening: a cautionary tale.

    PubMed

    Quillen, K; Caron, J; Murphy, K

    2012-01-01

    Out institution has implemented two instruments, the Galileo and the Echo, that use different solid-phase red cell adherence assays for antibody screening in pretransfusion compatibility testing.During the initial implementation of these two instruments, we noticed very different problems: falsely positive results on the Galileo, and falsely negative results and lack of reproducibility on the Echo. Comparison of falsely positive antibody screen results from approximately equivalent numbers of samples run on the Galileo and samples tested by standard manual tube technique using low-ionic-strength saline enhancement showed a false-positive rate of 1.4 percent on the Galileo (defined as a positive screen with a negative panel). Testing using the Echo identified four cases of falsely negative antibody screens, (defined as a negative screen on a patient sample subsequently shown to be positive by the same method). In addition, we note a lack of reproducibility on the Echo, which emphasizes the importance of replicate testing during validation of automated antibody screening platforms.

  1. Always Adhere to Chairman Mao's Policy for Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsin, Yeh

    1976-01-01

    Must adhere to Mao's policy that education must serve proletarian politics, be combined with productive labor, enable everyone to develop fully, and enable workers to have both socialist consciousness and culture. (Author/ND)

  2. Adherence to Sublingual Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Incorvaia, Cristoforo; Mauro, Marina; Leo, Gualtiero; Ridolo, Erminia

    2016-02-01

    Adherence is a major issue in any medical treatment. Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is particularly affected by a poor adherence because a flawed application prevents the immunological effects that underlie the clinical outcome of the treatment. Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) was introduced in the 1990s, and the early studies suggested that adherence and compliance to such a route of administration was better than the traditional subcutaneous route. However, the recent data from manufacturers revealed that only 13% of patients treated with SLIT reach the recommended 3-year duration. Therefore, improved adherence to SLIT is an unmet need that may be achieved by various approaches. The utility of patient education and accurate monitoring during the treatment was demonstrated by specific studies, while the success of technology-based tools, including online platforms, social media, e-mail, and a short message service by phone, is currently considered to improve the adherence. This goal is of pivotal importance to fulfill the object of SLIT that is to modify the natural history of allergy, ensuring a long-lasting clinical benefit, and a consequent pharmaco-economic advantage, when patients complete at least a 3-year course of treatment. PMID:26758865

  3. Structural barriers to ART adherence in Southern Africa: challenges and potential ways forward

    PubMed Central

    KAGEE, A.; REMIEN, R.H.; BERKMAN, A.; HOFFMAN, S.; CAMPOS, L.; SWARTZ, L.

    2010-01-01

    Structural barriers to antiretroviral treatment (ART) adherence are economic, institutional, political and cultural factors, that collectively influence the extent to which persons living with HIV follow their medication regimens. We identify three sets of structural barriers to ART adherence that are salient in Southern Africa: poverty-related, institutional, and political and cultural. Examples of poverty-related barriers are competing demands in the context of resource-constrained settings, the lack of transport infrastructure, food insecurity, the role of disability grants and poor social support. Examples of institutional factors are logistical barriers, overburdened health care facilities, limited access to mental health services and difficulties in ensuring adequate counseling. Examples of political and cultural barriers are controversies in the provision of treatment for AIDS, migration, traditional beliefs about HIV and AIDS, poor health literacy and gender inequalities. In forging a way forward, we identify ways in which individuals, communities and health care systems may overcome some of these structural barriers. Finally, we make recommendations for further research on structural barriers to ART adherence. In all likelihood, enhancing adherence to ART requires the efforts of a variety of disciplines, including public health, psychology, anthropology, sociology and medicine. PMID:20509066

  4. Miniature Bioreactor System for Long-Term Cell Culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Kleis, Stanley J.; Geffert, Sandara K.

    2010-01-01

    A prototype miniature bioreactor system is designed to serve as a laboratory benchtop cell-culturing system that minimizes the need for relatively expensive equipment and reagents and can be operated under computer control, thereby reducing the time and effort required of human investigators and reducing uncertainty in results. The system includes a bioreactor, a fluid-handling subsystem, a chamber wherein the bioreactor is maintained in a controlled atmosphere at a controlled temperature, and associated control subsystems. The system can be used to culture both anchorage-dependent and suspension cells, which can be either prokaryotic or eukaryotic. Cells can be cultured for extended periods of time in this system, and samples of cells can be extracted and analyzed at specified intervals. By integrating this system with one or more microanalytical instrument(s), one can construct a complete automated analytical system that can be tailored to perform one or more of a large variety of assays.

  5. Stigma, discrimination and medication adherence in schizophrenia: results from the Swedish COAST study.

    PubMed

    Brain, Cecilia; Sameby, Birgitta; Allerby, Katarina; Quinlan, Patrick; Joas, Erik; Lindström, Eva; Burns, Tom; Waern, Margda

    2014-12-30

    The aims of this naturalistic non-interventional study were to quantify the level of stigma and discrimination in persons with schizophrenia and to test for potential associations between different types of stigma and adherence to antipsychotics. Antipsychotic medication use was electronically monitored with a Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS®) for 12 months in 111 outpatients with schizophrenia and schizophrenia-like psychosis (DSM-IV). Stigma was assessed at endpoint using the Discrimination and Stigma Scale (DISC). Single DISC items that were most frequently reported included social relationships in making/keeping friends (71%) and in the neighborhood (69%). About half of the patients experienced discrimination by their families, in intimate relationships, regarding employment and by mental health staff. Most patients (88%) wanted to conceal their mental health problems from others; 70% stated that anticipated discrimination resulted in avoidance of close personal relationships. Non-adherence (MEMS® adherence≤0.80) was observed in 30 (27.3%). When DISC subscale scores (SD) were entered in separate regression models, neither experienced nor anticipated stigma was associated with adherence. Our data do not support an association between stigma and non-adherence. Further studies in other settings are needed as experiences of stigma and levels of adherence and their potential associations might vary by a healthcare system or cultural and sociodemographic contexts.

  6. Differentiation of mammalian skeletal muscle cells cultured on microcarrier beads in a rotating cell culture system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torgan, C. E.; Burge, S. S.; Collinsworth, A. M.; Truskey, G. A.; Kraus, W. E.

    2000-01-01

    The growth and repair of adult skeletal muscle are due in part to activation of muscle precursor cells, commonly known as satellite cells or myoblasts. These cells are responsive to a variety of environmental cues, including mechanical stimuli. The overall goal of the research is to examine the role of mechanical signalling mechanisms in muscle growth and plasticity through utilisation of cell culture systems where other potential signalling pathways (i.e. chemical and electrical stimuli) are controlled. To explore the effects of decreased mechanical loading on muscle differentiation, mammalian myoblasts are cultured in a bioreactor (rotating cell culture system), a model that has been utilised to simulate microgravity. C2C12 murine myoblasts are cultured on microcarrier beads in a bioreactor and followed throughout differentiation as they form a network of multinucleated myotubes. In comparison with three-dimensional control cultures that consist of myoblasts cultured on microcarrier beads in teflon bags, myoblasts cultured in the bioreactor exhibit an attenuation in differentiation. This is demonstrated by reduced immunohistochemical staining for myogenin and alpha-actinin. Western analysis shows a decrease, in bioreactor cultures compared with control cultures, in levels of the contractile proteins myosin (47% decrease, p < 0.01) and tropomyosin (63% decrease, p < 0.01). Hydrodynamic measurements indicate that the decrease in differentiation may be due, at least in part, to fluid stresses acting on the myotubes. In addition, constraints on aggregate size imposed by the action of fluid forces in the bioreactor affect differentiation. These results may have implications for muscle growth and repair during spaceflight.

  7. Assessing adherence factors in patients under topical treatment: development of the Topical Therapy Adherence Questionnaire (TTAQ).

    PubMed

    Zschocke, Ina; Mrowietz, Ulrich; Lotzin, Annett; Karakasili, Eleni; Reich, Kristian

    2014-04-01

    Medication adherence rates strongly depend on favorable disease outcomes. It is known that medication adherence rates are lower for topical treatment than for systemic treatment. However, to date no validated instrument for the assessment of adherence factors in topical treatment is available. The aim of this study was to develop a new questionnaire to assess adherence risk factors in topical treatment. The development of the Topical Therapy Adherence Questionnaire (TTAQ) and Patient Preference Questionnaire (PPQ) was based on a systematic literature review, and qualitative patient focus interviews and expert focus groups' input. The psychometric properties and comprehensibility of the TTAQ and PPQ were assessed in a feasibility study with 59 psoriasis patients. Our first preliminary results indicate that the TTAQ and PPQ are psychometrically sound and reliable measures for the assessment of factors influencing topical treatment adherence. The questionnaires are currently being further developed and various parameters (e.g., time point of assessment) are currently being tested in an exploratory pilot study with ca. 2,000 psoriasis patients receiving topical treatment in a European clinical trial. The use of the final versions of TTAQ and PPQ in clinical practice may facilitate the early identification of specific non-adherence factors in patients under topical treatment, which could enable designing and applying adherence-enhancing interventions according to the patient's individual needs.

  8. Seven essential strategies for promoting and sustaining systemic cultural competence.

    PubMed

    Delphin-Rittmon, Miriam E; Andres-Hyman, Raquel; Flanagan, Elizabeth H; Davidson, Larry

    2013-03-01

    Racial and ethnic disparities are disturbing facets of the American healthcare system that document the reality of unequal treatment. Research consistently shows that patients of color experience poorer quality of care and health outcomes contributing to increased risks and accelerated mortality rates relative to their white counterparts. While initially conceptualized as an approach for increasing the responsiveness of children's behavioral health care, cultural competence has been adopted as a key strategy for eliminating racial and ethnic health disparities across the healthcare system. However, cultural competence research and practices largely focus on improving provider competencies, while agency and system level approaches for meeting the service needs of diverse populations are given less attention. In this article we offer seven essential strategies for promoting and sustaining organizational and systemic cultural competence. These strategies are to: (1) Provide executive level support and accountability, (2) Foster patient, community and stakeholder participation and partnerships, (3) Conduct organizational cultural competence assessments, (4) Develop incremental and realistic cultural competence action plans, (5) Ensure linguistic competence, (6) Diversify, develop, and retain a culturally competent workforce, and (7) Develop an agency or system strategy for managing staff and patient grievances. For each strategy we offer several recommendations for implementation. PMID:22581030

  9. Seven essential strategies for promoting and sustaining systemic cultural competence.

    PubMed

    Delphin-Rittmon, Miriam E; Andres-Hyman, Raquel; Flanagan, Elizabeth H; Davidson, Larry

    2013-03-01

    Racial and ethnic disparities are disturbing facets of the American healthcare system that document the reality of unequal treatment. Research consistently shows that patients of color experience poorer quality of care and health outcomes contributing to increased risks and accelerated mortality rates relative to their white counterparts. While initially conceptualized as an approach for increasing the responsiveness of children's behavioral health care, cultural competence has been adopted as a key strategy for eliminating racial and ethnic health disparities across the healthcare system. However, cultural competence research and practices largely focus on improving provider competencies, while agency and system level approaches for meeting the service needs of diverse populations are given less attention. In this article we offer seven essential strategies for promoting and sustaining organizational and systemic cultural competence. These strategies are to: (1) Provide executive level support and accountability, (2) Foster patient, community and stakeholder participation and partnerships, (3) Conduct organizational cultural competence assessments, (4) Develop incremental and realistic cultural competence action plans, (5) Ensure linguistic competence, (6) Diversify, develop, and retain a culturally competent workforce, and (7) Develop an agency or system strategy for managing staff and patient grievances. For each strategy we offer several recommendations for implementation.

  10. Development of Scalable Culture Systems for Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Azarin, Samira M.; Palecek, Sean P.

    2009-01-01

    The use of human pluripotent stem cells, including embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells, in therapeutic applications will require the development of robust, scalable culture technologies for undifferentiated cells. Advances made in large-scale cultures of other mammalian cells will facilitate expansion of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), but challenges specific to hESCs will also have to be addressed, including development of defined, humanized culture media and substrates, monitoring spontaneous differentiation and heterogeneity in the cultures, and maintaining karyotypic integrity in the cells. This review will describe our current understanding of environmental factors that regulate hESC self-renewal and efforts to provide these cues in various scalable bioreactor culture systems. PMID:20161686

  11. Strengths and limitations of the neurosphere culture system.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Josephine B; Parmar, Malin

    2006-12-01

    After the initial reports of free-floating cultures of neural stem cells termed neurospheres (1,2), a wide array of studies using this promising culture system emerged. In theory, this was a near-perfect system for large-scale production of neural cells for use in cell replacement therapies and to assay for and characterize neural stem cells. More than a decade later, after rigorous scrutiny and ample experimental testing of the neurosphere culture system, it has become apparent that the culture system suffers from several disadvantages, and its usefulness is limited for several applications. Nevertheless, the bulk of high-quality research produced over the last decade has also shown that under the right circumstances and for the appropriate purposes, neurospheres hold up to their initial promise. This article discusses the pros and cons of the neurosphere culture system regarding its three major applications: as an assay for neural stem cells, as a model system for neurogenesis and neural development, and for expansion of neural stem cells for transplantation purposes.

  12. Bayesian population modeling of drug dosing adherence.

    PubMed

    Fellows, Kelly; Stoneking, Colin J; Ramanathan, Murali

    2015-10-01

    Adherence is a frequent contributing factor to variations in drug concentrations and efficacy. The purpose of this work was to develop an integrated population model to describe variation in adherence, dose-timing deviations, overdosing and persistence to dosing regimens. The hybrid Markov chain-von Mises method for modeling adherence in individual subjects was extended to the population setting using a Bayesian approach. Four integrated population models for overall adherence, the two-state Markov chain transition parameters, dose-timing deviations, overdosing and persistence were formulated and critically compared. The Markov chain-Monte Carlo algorithm was used for identifying distribution parameters and for simulations. The model was challenged with medication event monitoring system data for 207 hypertension patients. The four Bayesian models demonstrated good mixing and convergence characteristics. The distributions of adherence, dose-timing deviations, overdosing and persistence were markedly non-normal and diverse. The models varied in complexity and the method used to incorporate inter-dependence with the preceding dose in the two-state Markov chain. The model that incorporated a cooperativity term for inter-dependence and a hyperbolic parameterization of the transition matrix probabilities was identified as the preferred model over the alternatives. The simulated probability densities from the model satisfactorily fit the observed probability distributions of adherence, dose-timing deviations, overdosing and persistence parameters in the sample patients. The model also adequately described the median and observed quartiles for these parameters. The Bayesian model for adherence provides a parsimonious, yet integrated, description of adherence in populations. It may find potential applications in clinical trial simulations and pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling. PMID:26319548

  13. Cultural selection drives the evolution of human communication systems.

    PubMed

    Tamariz, Monica; Ellison, T Mark; Barr, Dale J; Fay, Nicolas

    2014-08-01

    Human communication systems evolve culturally, but the evolutionary mechanisms that drive this evolution are not well understood. Against a baseline that communication variants spread in a population following neutral evolutionary dynamics (also known as drift models), we tested the role of two cultural selection models: coordination- and content-biased. We constructed a parametrized mixed probabilistic model of the spread of communicative variants in four 8-person laboratory micro-societies engaged in a simple communication game. We found that selectionist models, working in combination, explain the majority of the empirical data. The best-fitting parameter setting includes an egocentric bias and a content bias, suggesting that participants retained their own previously used communicative variants unless they encountered a superior (content-biased) variant, in which case it was adopted. This novel pattern of results suggests that (i) a theory of the cultural evolution of human communication systems must integrate selectionist models and (ii) human communication systems are functionally adaptive complex systems.

  14. Therapeutically important proteins from in vitro plant tissue culture systems.

    PubMed

    Doran, Pauline M

    2013-01-01

    Plant cells cultured in liquid medium in bioreactors are now being used commercially to produce biopharmaceutical proteins. The emergence of in vitro plant cell culture as a production vehicle reflects the importance of key biosafety and biocontainment concerns affecting the competitiveness of alternative systems such as mammalian cell culture and agriculture. Food plant species are particularly attractive as hosts for in vitro protein production: the risk of transgene escape and food chain contamination is eliminated using containment facilities, while regulatory approval for oral delivery of drugs may be easier than if non-edible species were used. As in whole plants, proteolysis in cultured plant cells can lead to significant degradation of foreign proteins after synthesis; however, substantial progress has been made to counter the destructive effects of proteases in plant systems. Although protein secretion into the culture medium is advantageous for product recovery and purification, measures are often required to minimise extracellular protease activity and product losses due to irreversible surface adsorption. Disposable plastic bioreactors, which are being used increasingly in mammalian cell bioprocessing, are also being adopted for plant cell culture to allow rapid scale-up and generation of saleable product. This review examines a range of technical and regulatory issues affecting the choice of industrial production platform for foreign proteins, and assesses progress in the development of in vitro plant systems for biopharmaceutical production. PMID:23210789

  15. HIV Treatment Adherence, Drug Resistance, Virologic Failure: Evolving Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Nachega, Jean B.; Marconi, Vincent C.; van Zyl, Gert U.; Gardner, Edward M.; Preiser, Wolfgang; Hong, Steven Y.; Mills, Edward J.; Gross, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Poor adherence to combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) has been shown to be a major determinant of virologic failure, emergence of drug resistant virus, disease progression, hospitalizations, mortality, and health care costs. While high adherence levels can be achieved in both resource-rich and resource-limited settings following initiation of cART, long-term adherence remains a challenge regardless of available resources. Barriers to optimal adherence may originate from individual (biological, socio-cultural, behavioral), pharmacological, and societal factors. Although patients and providers should continuously strive for maximum adherence to cART, there is accumulating evidence that each class of antiretroviral therapy has specific adherence-drug resistance relationship characteristics allowing certain regimens more flexibility than others. There is not a universally accepted measure for cART adherence, since each method has distinct advantages and disadvantages including cost, complexity, accuracy, precision, intrusiveness and bias. Development of a real-time cART adherence monitoring tool will enable the development of novel, pre-emptive adherence-improving strategies. The application of these strategies may ultimately prove to be the most cost-effective method to reduce morbidity and mortality for the individual and decrease the likelihood of HIV transmission and emergence of resistance in the community. PMID:21406048

  16. Method and system of culturing an algal mat

    DOEpatents

    Das, Keshav C; Cannon, Benjamin R; Bhatnagar, Ashish; Chinnasamy, Senthil

    2014-05-13

    A system and method for culturing algae are presented. The system and method utilize a fog of growth medium that is delivered to an algal mat generator along with a stream of CO.sub.2 to promote growth of algal cells contained in the generator.

  17. Closed system cell culture protocol using HYPERStack vessels with gas permeable material technology.

    PubMed

    Titus, Kim; Klimovich, Vitaly; Rothenberg, Mark; Pardo, Pilar; Tanner, Allison; Martin, Greg

    2010-11-29

    Large volume adherent cell culture is currently standardized on stacked plate cell growth products when microcarrier beads are not an optimal choice. HYPERStack vessels allow closed system scale up from the current stacked plate products and delivers >2.5X more cells in the same volumetric footprint. The HYPERStack vessels function via gas permeable material which allows gas exchange to occur, therefore eliminating the need for internal headspace within a vessel. The elimination of headspace allows the compartment where cell growth occurs to be minimized to reduce space, allowing more layers of cell growth surface area within the same volumetric footprint. For many applications such as cell therapy or vaccine production, a closed system is required for cell growth and harvesting. The HYPERStack vessel allows cell and reagent addition and removal via tubing from media bags or other methods. This protocol will explain the technology behind the gas permeable material used in the HYPERStack vessels, gas diffusion results to meet the metabolic needs of cells, closed system cell growth protocols, and various harvesting methods.

  18. Closed System Cell Culture Protocol Using HYPERStack Vessels with Gas Permeable Material Technology

    PubMed Central

    Rothenberg, Mark; Martin, Greg

    2010-01-01

    Large volume adherent cell culture is currently standardized on stacked plate cell growth products when microcarrier beads are not an optimal choice. HYPERStack vessels allow closed system scale up from the current stacked plate products and delivers >2.5X more cells in the same volumetric footprint. The HYPERStack vessels function via gas permeable material which allows gas exchange to occur, therefore eliminating the need for internal headspace within a vessel. The elimination of headspace allows the compartment where cell growth occurs to be minimized to reduce space, allowing more layers of cell growth surface area within the same volumetric footprint. For many applications such as cell therapy or vaccine production, a closed system is required for cell growth and harvesting. The HYPERStack vessel allows cell and reagent addition and removal via tubing from media bags or other methods. This protocol will explain the technology behind the gas permeable material used in the HYPERStack vessels, gas diffusion results to meet the metabolic needs of cells, closed system cell growth protocols, and various harvesting methods. PMID:21189467

  19. Culture and systems of oppression in abused women's lives.

    PubMed

    Phillips, D S

    1998-01-01

    Women's experiences of abuse are shaped by the social and cultural contexts in which they live. Recognition of the complex ways in which culture and systems of oppression interact, creating qualitatively different abuse experiences, is important nursing knowledge. Of particular concern are the ways in which women are constrained in their efforts to combat abuse as they experience the harsh and alienating effects of racism, sexism, classism, and other forms of social injustice. An understanding of the ways in which race and ethnicity, class, language and citizenship, religion, and culture intersect and shape women's experiences of abuse is critical to the provision of culturally competent nursing care. This understanding is the springboard from which more effective assessment and intervention strategies with vulnerable abused women of diverse backgrounds can emerge.

  20. Horizontally rotated cell culture system with a coaxial tubular oxygenator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, David A. (Inventor); Schwarz, Ray P. (Inventor); Trinh, Tinh T. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The present invention relates to a horizontally rotating bioreactor useful for carrying out cell and tissue culture. For processing of mammalian cells, the system is sterilized and fresh fluid medium, microcarrier beads, and cells are admitted to completely fill the cell culture vessel. An oxygen containing gas is admitted to the interior of the permeable membrane which prevents air bubbles from being introduced into the medium. The cylinder is rotated at a low speed within an incubator so that the circular motion of the fluid medium uniformly suspends the microbeads throughout the cylinder during the cell growth period. The unique design of this cell and tissue culture device was initially driven by two requirements imposed by its intended use for feasibility studies for three dimensional culture of living cells and tissues in space by JSC. They were compatible with microgravity and simulation of microgravity in one G. The vessels are designed to approximate the extremely quiescent low shear environment obtainable in space.

  1. Determinants of methotrexate adherence in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    De Cuyper, Ellen; De Gucht, Veronique; Maes, Stan; Van Camp, Yoleen; De Clerck, Luc S

    2016-05-01

    In rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, weekly intake of methotrexate (MTX) is the basic drug treatment. This observational study aims to investigate how many RA patients are adherent in terms of MTX intake and to identify determinants of non-adherence. Intake of MTX (orally or via injection) was recorded in 129 RA patients with an electronic monitoring system (MEMS(®)) during 16 weeks. In addition, two adherence questionnaires, the Medication Adherence Report Scale (MARS-5) and the Compliance-Questionnaire-Rheumatology (CQR) as well as a visual analogue scale (VAS) measuring MTX adherence, were administered to these patients. As possible determinants of adherence, data on demographics, disease and treatment characteristics, depression, illness cognitions, motivation, and social support were collected. Of all participants, 58 % were fully adherent and 75 % skipped at most one dose during 16 weeks. A better mental health status and suffering from comorbidities had a positive effect on adherence, while living alone had a negative effect. These three predictors explained 30 % of the variance in MTX adherence. Of the three self-report medication adherence measures, the VAS correlated the highest with the results of the electronic monitoring system (r = 0.552, p = 0.01). A relatively high adherence rate was observed in RA patients treated with MTX. The determinants identified by this study could be used to screen patients at risk for non-adherence. A simple VAS scale seems to be an acceptable way for a preliminary screening of MTX adherence. PMID:26781783

  2. Culturally competent systems of care with Latino children and families.

    PubMed

    Dettlaff, Alan J; Rycraft, Joan R

    2009-01-01

    The Latino population represents the fastest growing ethnic minority in the United States. As a result, child welfare agencies need to be prepared to provide culturally appropriate services to Latino families. This paper describes an evaluation of a federally funded initiative designed to train child welfare practitioners in using an existing evidence-based framework--systems of care--with Latino children and families to address the need for culturally competent, community-based services with this population. Results indicate that trained participants responded positively to the systems of care framework, increased their knowledge of systems of care, and reported positive benefits to their clients through using this framework. However, challenges to implementing systems of care were identified. Implications of these findings and the use of systems of care in child welfare are presented.

  3. Developing defined culture systems for human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Valamehr, Bahram; Tsutsui, Hideaki; Ho, Chih-Ming; Wu, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells hold promising potential in many therapeutics applications including regenerative medicine and drug discovery. Over the past three decades, embryonic stem cell research has illustrated that embryonic stem cells possess two important and distinct properties: the ability to continuously self-renew and the ability to differentiate into all specialized cell types. In this article, we will discuss the continuing evolution of human pluripotent stem cell culture by examining requirements needed for the maintenance of self-renewal in vitro. We will also elaborate on the future direction of the field toward generating a robust and completely defined culture system, which has brought forth collaborations amongst biologists and engineers. As human pluripotent stem cell research progresses towards identifying solutions for debilitating diseases, it will be critical to establish a defined, reproducible and scalable culture system to meet the requirements of these clinical applications. PMID:21916597

  4. The effect of three culture methods on intensive culture system of pacific white shrimp ( Litopenaeus vannamei)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zhen; Wan, Rong; Song, Xiefa; Gao, Lei

    2013-09-01

    Different culture methods may affect the intensive culture system of Pacific white shrimp ( Litopenaeus vannamei) regarding water quality and growth and economic performance. This study evaluated the potential effects of three culture methods through cultivation of juvenile shrimps under consistent tank management conditions for 84 d. The three methods involved shrimp cultivation in different tanks, i.e., outdoor tanks with cement bottom (mode-C), greenhouse tanks with cement bottom (mode-G) and outdoor tanks with mud-substrate (mode-M). Results showed that water temperature was significantly higher in mode-G than that in mode-C ( P < 0.05). In contrast to the other two treatments, mode-M had stable pH after 50 d cultivation of shrimps. In the mid-late period, the average concentrations of TAN, NO2-N, DIP and COD were significantly lower in mode-M and mode-G compared with those in mode-C ( P < 0.05). Despite lack of differences in the final shrimp weight among different treatments ( P > 0.05), mode-M had significantly higher shrimp yield, survival rate and feed conversion rate ( P < 0.05) than other modes. There were significant differences in revenue and net return among different treatments ( P < 0.05). These demonstrated that the treatments of mode-G and mode-M were conductive to the intensive culture system of L. vannamei.

  5. Moving Towards Culturally Competent Health Systems: Organizational and Market Factors

    PubMed Central

    Weech-Maldonado, Robert; Elliott, Marc; Pradhan, Rohit; Schiller, Cameron; Dreachslin, Janice; Hays, Ron D.

    2012-01-01

    Cultural competency has been proposed as an organizational strategy to address racial/ethnic disparities in the health care system; disparities are a long-standing policy challenge whose relevance is only increasing with the increasing population diversity of the US and across the world. Using an integrative conceptual framework based on the resource dependency and institutional theories, we examine the relationship between organizational and market factors and hospitals’ degree of cultural competency. Our sample consists of 119 hospitals located in the state of California (US) and is constructed using the following datasets for the year 2006: Cultural Competency Assessment Tool of Hospitals (CCATH) Survey, California’s Office of Statewide Health Planning & Development’s Hospital Inpatient Discharges and Annual Hospital Financial Data, American Hospital Association’s Annual Survey, and the Area Resource File. The dependent variable consists of the degree of hospital cultural competency, as assessed by the CCATH overall score. Organizational variables include ownership status, teaching hospital, payer mix, size, system membership, financial performance, and the proportion of inpatient racial/ethnic minorities. Market characteristics included hospital competition, the proportion of racial/ethnic minorities in the area, metropolitan area, and per capita income. Regression analyses were conducted to assess the relationship between the CCATH overall score and organizational and market variables. Our results show that hospitals which are not-for-profit, serve a more diverse inpatient population, and are located in more competitive and affluent markets exhibit a higher degree of cultural competency. Our results underscore the importance of both institutional and competitive market pressures in guiding hospital behavior. For instance, while not-for-profit may adopt innovative/progressive policies like cultural competency simply as a function of their organizational

  6. Optimization of Buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) Embryonic Stem Cell Culture System

    PubMed Central

    Zandi, Mohammad; Muzaffar, Musharifa; Shah, Syed Mohmad; Kumar Singh, Manoj; Palta, Prabhat; Kumar Singla, Suresh; Manik, Radheysham; Chauhan, Manmohan Singh

    2015-01-01

    Objective In order to retain an undifferentiated pluripotent state, embryonic stem (ES) cells have to be cultured on feeder cell layers. However, use of feeder layers limits stem cell research, since experimental data may result from a combined ES cell and feeder cell response to various stimuli. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, a buffalo ES cell line was established from in vitro derived blastocysts and characterized by the Alkaline phosphatase (AP) and immunoflourescence staining of various pluripotency markers. We examined the effect of various factors like fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2), leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and Y-27632 to support the growth and maintenance of bubaline ES cells on gelatin coated dishes, in order to establish feeder free culture systems. We also analyzed the effect of feeder-conditioned media on stem cell growth in gelatin based cultures both in the presence as well as in the absence of the growth factors. Results The results showed that Y-27632, in the presence of FGF-2 and LIF, resulted in higher colony growth and increased expression of Nanog gene. Feeder-Conditioned Medium resulted in a significant increase in growth of buffalo ES cells on gelatin coated plates, however, feeder layer based cultures produced better results than gelatin based cultures. Feeder layers from buffalo fetal fibroblast cells can support buffalo ES cells for more than two years. Conclusion We developed a feeder free culture system that can maintain buffalo ES cells in the short term, as well as feeder layer based culture that can support the long term maintenance of buffalo ES cells. PMID:26199905

  7. Parents' Cultural Belief Systems: Their Origins, Expressions, and Consequences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harkness, Sara, Ed.; Super, Charles M., Ed.

    This volume presents observations and thinking of scholars from a variety of disciplines about parental cultural belief systems. The chapters are concerned with the sources and consequences of parental ethnotheories in a number of societies. The following chapters are included: (1) "Introduction" (Sara Harkness and Charles M. Super); (2) "Parents'…

  8. Cultural Influences on Number Preferences: Christmas and Grading Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stieger, Stefan; Krizan, Zlatan

    2013-01-01

    People consistently prefer numbers associated with themselves (e.g., birth dates) over other numbers. We argue that such number preferences are also shaped by cultural influences, such as customs regarding the day on which Christmas is celebrated and customs regarding ranking of numerals used in national school's grading system. Across 6 different…

  9. World Culture in the Capitalist World-System in Transition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, Tom G.; Arnove, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    World culture theory (WCT) offers an explanatory framework for macro-level comparative analyses of systems of mass education, including their structures, accompanying policies and their curricular and pedagogical practices. WCT has contributed to broader efforts to overcome methodological nationalism in comparative research. In this paper, we…

  10. Pedagogical System of Future Teachers' Professional Thinking Culture Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abildina, Saltanat K.; Sarsekeyeva, Zhanar Y.; Aidarbekova, Kulzhan A.; Asetova, Zhannur B.; Adanov, Kuanysbek B.

    2016-01-01

    Research objective is to theoretically justify and to develop a pedagogical system of development of future teachers' professional thinking culture. In the research there are used a set of theoretical methods: systematic analysis of the philosophical, psychological and pedagogical literature on the researched topic; compilation and classification…

  11. Barriers to Excellence: The Culture of Silence in School Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rusch, Edith A.

    Little is known about how restructuring networks actually affect the cultures of school systems. This report examines the creation of an "island" of reform in a school district in northwest Ohio. The research emanated from the discovery of a new "island" in northwest Ohio called the Pathfinder Network. The group formed through like-minded…

  12. [Strategies for measuring medication adherence in patients with schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunfang; Huang, Zhiping; Xu, Dong; Gong, Wenjie; Tang, Yuan; Xiao, Shuiyuan

    2016-02-01

    Long-term therapy should be administrated for patients with schizophrenia and the medication adherence is very important for the prognosis and outcome in these patients. In this study, we screened the literatures from various databases in accordance with our search criteria. A total of 11 literatures with the results of reliability and validity regarding the measurement of schizophrenia medication adherence were enrolled in our analysis. Based on the measurements, they were classified into subjective methods and objective ones. The objective methods include blood plasma and urine concentrations, pharmacy records, pill counts and Medication Event Monitoring System. The subjective methods include Drug Attitude Inventory, Rating of Medication Influences Scale, Brief Evaluation of Medication Influences and Beliefs, the Brief Adherence Rating Scale, Medication Adherence Rating Scale, and Morisky scales. In general, single method for measuring medication adherence in patients with schizophrenia is limited. We recommend researchers to use 2 or more methods when measuring the medication adherence in patients with schizophrenia.

  13. Adherent endotoxin on dental implant surfaces: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Morra, Marco; Cassinelli, Clara; Bollati, Daniele; Cascardo, Giovanna; Bellanda, Marco

    2015-02-01

    Osteoimmunology is the crosstalk between cells from the immune and skeletal systems, suggesting a role of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the stimulation of osteoclast activity. Endotoxin or bacterial challenges to inflammatory cells are directly relevant to dental implant pathologies involving bone resorption, such as osseointegration failure and peri-implantitis. While the endotoxin amount on implant devices is regulated by standards, it is unknown whether commercially available dental implants elicit different levels of adherent-endotoxin stimulated cytokines. The objective of this work is to develop a model system and evaluate endotoxin-induced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes relevant to osteoclast activation on commercially available dental implants. Murine J774-A1 macrophages were cultured on Ti disks with different level of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) contamination to define the time-course of the inflammatory response to endotoxin, as evaluated by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis. The developed protocol was then used to measure adherent endotoxin on commercially available packaged and sterile dental implants in the "as-implanted" condition. Results show that tested dental implants induce variable expression of endotoxin-stimulated genes, sometimes above the level expected to promote bone resorption in vivo. Results are unaffected by the specific surface treatment; rather, they likely reflect care in cleaning and packaging protocols. In conclusion, expression of genes that enhance osteoclast activity through endotoxin stimulation of inflammatory cells is widely different on commercially available dental implants. A reappraisal of the clinical impact of adherent endotoxins on dental (and bone) implant devices is required in light of increasing knowledge on crosstalk between cells from the immune and skeletal systems.

  14. Materials Adherence Experiment: Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, P.P.; Landis, G.A.; Oberle, L.G.

    1997-12-31

    NASA`s Mars Pathfinder mission, launched December 4, 1996, reflects a new philosophy of exploiting new technologies to reduce mission cost and accelerate the pace of space exploration. Pathfinder will demonstrate a variety of new technologies aimed at reducing the cost of Mars exploration. Chief among these will be the demonstration of a solar-powered spacecraft on the surface of Mars. The Materials Adherence Experiment on Pathfinder was designed to measure the degradation of solar arrays due to dust settling out of the atmosphere and blocking light to the solar array, lowering the array power output.

  15. Anaerobic Co-Culture of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Anaerobic Pathogens - A New In Vitro Model System

    PubMed Central

    Kriebel, Katja; Biedermann, Anne; Kreikemeyer, Bernd; Lang, Hermann

    2013-01-01

    Background Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are multipotent by nature and are originally isolated from bone marrow. In light of a future application of hMSCs in the oral cavity, a body compartment with varying oxygen partial pressures and an omnipresence of different bacterial species i.e. periodontitis pathogens, we performed this study to gain information about the behavior of hMSC in an anaerobic system and the response in interaction with oral bacterial pathogens. Methodology/Principal Findings We established a model system with oral pathogenic bacterial species and eukaryotic cells cultured in anaerobic conditions. The facultative anaerobe bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans were studied. Their effects on hMSCs and primary as well as permanent gingival epithelial cells (Ca9-22, HGPEC) were comparatively analyzed. We show that hMSCs cope with anoxic conditions, since 40% vital cells remain after 72 h of anaerobic culture. The Ca9-22 and HGPEC cells are significantly more sensitive to lack of oxygen. All bacterial species reveal a comparatively low adherence to and internalization into hMSCs (0.2% and 0.01% of the initial inoculum, respectively). In comparison, the Ca9-22 and HGPEC cells present better targets for bacterial adherence and internalization. The production of the pro-inflammatory chemokine IL-8 is higher in both gingival epithelial cell lines compared to hMSCs and Fusobacterium nucleatum induce a time-dependent cytokine secretion in both cell lines. Porphyromonas gingivalis is less effective in stimulating secretion of IL-8 in the co-cultivation experiments. Conclusions/significance HMSCs are suitable for use in anoxic regions of the oral cavity. The interaction with local pathogenic bacteria does not result in massive pro-inflammatory cytokine responses. The test system established in this study allowed further investigation of parameters prior to set up of oral hMSC in vivo

  16. Acculturation and adherence: issues for health care providers working with clients of Mexican origin.

    PubMed

    Barron, Florencia; Hunter, Anita; Mayo, Rachel; Willoughby, Deborah

    2004-10-01

    Providing care to clients who come from different countries is a challenge for the American health care providers as they traverse the issues of cultural health beliefs and practices and language and knowledge deficits. It is just as difficult for the clients as they face new cultural customs, language barriers, and unfamiliar health care systems and medical management plans. Both parties face acculturation and adherence challenges. This article intends to address these issues as they pertain to clients of Mexican origin and to identify key points to be considered by providers when working with this population.

  17. Fabrication of micropatterned hydrogels for neural culture systems using dynamic mask projection photolithography.

    PubMed

    Curley, J Lowry; Jennings, Scott R; Moore, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    photocrosslinkable or self polymerizing hydrogel, or selectively adhered to the permeable support membrane using cell-restrictive photopatterning. Using the DMD, we created hydrogel constructs up to ~1mm thick, but thin film (<200 μm) PEG structures were limited by oxygen quenching of the free radical polymerization reaction. We subsequently developed a technique utilizing a layer of oil above the polymerization liquid which allowed thin PEG structure polymerization. In this protocol, we describe the expeditious creation of 3D hydrogel systems for production of microfabricated neural cell and tissue cultures. The dual hydrogel constructs demonstrated herein represent versatile in vitro models that may prove useful for studies in neuroscience involving cell survival, migration, and/or neurite growth and guidance. Moreover, as the protocol can work for many types of hydrogels and cells, the potential applications are both varied and vast.

  18. Topography Influences Adherent Cell Regulation of Osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, M; Cooper, L F; Ogino, Y; Mendonca, D; Liang, R; Yang, S; Mendonca, G; Uoshima, K

    2016-03-01

    The importance of osteoclast-mediated bone resorption in the process of osseointegration has not been widely considered. In this study, cell culture was used to investigate the hypothesis that the function of implant-adherent bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in osteoclastogenesis is influenced by surface topography. BMSCs isolated from femur and tibia of Sprague-Dawley rats were seeded onto 3 types of titanium surfaces (smooth, micro, and nano) and a control surface (tissue culture plastic) with or without osteogenic supplements. After 3 to 14 d, conditioned medium (CM) was collected. Subsequently, rat bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) were cultured in media supplemented with soluble receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) as well as BMSC CM from each of the 4 surfaces. Gene expression levels of soluble RANKL, osteoprotegerin, tumor necrosis factor α, and M-CSF in cultured BMSCs at different time points were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The number of differentiated osteoclastic cells was determined after tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining. Analysis of variance and t test were used for statistical analysis. The expression of prominent osteoclast-promoting factors tumor necrosis factor α and M-CSF was increased by BMSCs cultured on both micro- and nanoscale titanium topographies (P < 0.01). BMSC CM contained a heat-labile factor that increased BMMs osteoclastogenesis. CM from both micro- and nanoscale surface-adherent BMSCs increased the osteoclast number (P < 0.01). Difference in surface topography altered BMSC phenotype and influenced BMM osteoclastogenesis. Local signaling by implant-adherent cells at the implant-bone interface may indirectly control osteoclastogenesis and bone accrual around endosseous implants. PMID:26553885

  19. INTEGRATED SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM SAFETY CULTURE IMPROVEMENT INITIATIVE

    SciTech Connect

    MCDONALD JA JR

    2009-01-16

    In 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) identified safety culture as one of their top Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) related priorities. A team was formed to address this issue. The team identified a consensus set of safety culture principles, along with implementation practices that could be used by DOE, NNSA, and their contractors. Documented improvement tools were identified and communicated to contractors participating in a year long pilot project. After a year, lessons learned will be collected and a path forward determined. The goal of this effort was to achieve improved safety and mission performance through ISMS continuous improvement. The focus of ISMS improvement was safety culture improvement building on operating experience from similar industries such as the domestic and international commercial nuclear and chemical industry.

  20. Cell-friendly inverse opal-like hydrogels for a spatially separated co-culture system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaeyun; Bencherif, Sidi A; Li, Weiwei Aileen; Mooney, David J

    2014-09-01

    Three-dimensional macroporous scaffolds have extensively been studied for cell-based tissue engineering but their use is mostly limited to mechanical support for cell adhesion and growth on the surface of macropores. Here, a templated fabrication method is described to prepare cell-friendly inverse opal-like hydrogels (IOHs) allowing both cell encapsulation within the hydrogel matrix and cell seeding on the surface of macropores. Ionically crosslinked alginate microbeads and photocrosslinkable biocompatible polymers are used as a sacrificial template and as a matrix, respectively. The alginate microbeads are easily removed by a chelating agent, with minimal toxicity for the encapsulated cells during template removal. The outer surface of macropores in IOHs can also provide a space for cell adherence. The cells encapsulated or attached in IOHs are able to remain viable and to proliferate over time. The elastic modulus and cell-adhesion properties of IOHs can be easily controlled and tuned. Finally, it is demonstrated that IOH can be used to co-culture two distinct cell populations in different spatial positions. This cell-friendly IOH system provides a 3D scaffold for organizing different cell types in a controllable microenvironment to investigate biological processes such as stem cell niches or tumor microenvironments. PMID:25113941

  1. Cell-friendly inverse opal-like hydrogels for a spatially separated co-culture system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaeyun; Bencherif, Sidi A; Li, Weiwei Aileen; Mooney, David J

    2014-09-01

    Three-dimensional macroporous scaffolds have extensively been studied for cell-based tissue engineering but their use is mostly limited to mechanical support for cell adhesion and growth on the surface of macropores. Here, a templated fabrication method is described to prepare cell-friendly inverse opal-like hydrogels (IOHs) allowing both cell encapsulation within the hydrogel matrix and cell seeding on the surface of macropores. Ionically crosslinked alginate microbeads and photocrosslinkable biocompatible polymers are used as a sacrificial template and as a matrix, respectively. The alginate microbeads are easily removed by a chelating agent, with minimal toxicity for the encapsulated cells during template removal. The outer surface of macropores in IOHs can also provide a space for cell adherence. The cells encapsulated or attached in IOHs are able to remain viable and to proliferate over time. The elastic modulus and cell-adhesion properties of IOHs can be easily controlled and tuned. Finally, it is demonstrated that IOH can be used to co-culture two distinct cell populations in different spatial positions. This cell-friendly IOH system provides a 3D scaffold for organizing different cell types in a controllable microenvironment to investigate biological processes such as stem cell niches or tumor microenvironments.

  2. Slice Culture Modeling of Central Nervous System (CNS) Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dionne, Kalen R.; Tyler, Kenneth L.

    2016-01-01

    The complexity of the central nervous system (CNS) is not recapitulated in cell culture models. Thin slicing and subsequent culture of CNS tissue has become a valued means to study neuronal and glial biology within the context of the physiologically relevant tissue milieu. Modern membrane-interface slice culturing methodology allows straightforward access to both CNS tissue and feeding medium, enabling experimental manipulations and analyses that would otherwise be impossible in vivo. CNS slices can be successfully maintained in culture for up to several weeks for investigation of evolving pathology and long-term intervention in models of chronic neurologic disease. Herein, membrane-interface slice culture models for studying viral encephalitis and myelitis are detailed, with emphasis on the use of these models for investigation of pathogenesis and evaluation of novel treatment strategies. We describe techniques to (1) generate brain and spinal cord slices from rodent donors, (2) virally infect slices, (3) monitor viral replication, (4) assess virally induced injury/apoptosis, (5) characterize “CNS-specific” cytokine production, and (6) treat slices with cytokines/pharmaceuticals. Although our focus is on CNS viral infection, we anticipate that the described methods can be adapted to address a wide range of investigations within the fields of neuropathology, neuroimmunology, and neuropharmacology. PMID:23975824

  3. Culture and the Immune System: Cultural Consonance in Social Support and C-reactive Protein in Urban Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dressler, William W; Balieiro, Mauro C; Ribeiro, Rosane P; Dos Santos, José Ernesto

    2016-06-01

    In this article, we examine the distribution of a marker of immune system stimulation-C-reactive protein-in urban Brazil. Social relationships are associated with immunostimulation, and we argue that cultural dimensions of social support, assessed by cultural consonance, are important in this process. Cultural consonance is the degree to which individuals, in their own beliefs and behaviors, approximate shared cultural models. A measure of cultural consonance in social support, based on a cultural consensus analysis regarding sources and patterns of social support in Brazil, was developed. In a survey of 258 persons, the association of cultural consonance in social support and C-reactive protein was examined, controlling for age, sex, body mass index, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, depressive symptoms, and a social network index. Lower cultural consonance in social support was associated with higher C-reactive protein. Implications of these results for future research are discussed.

  4. Gender and cultural issues in psychiatric nosological classification systems.

    PubMed

    van de Water, Tanya; Suliman, Sharain; Seedat, Soraya

    2016-08-01

    Much has changed since the two dominant mental health nosological systems, the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), were first published in 1900 and 1952, respectively. Despite numerous modifications to stay up to date with scientific and cultural changes (eg, exclusion of homosexuality as a disorder) and to improve the cultural sensitivity of psychiatric diagnoses, the ICD and DSM have only recently renewed attempts at harmonization. Previous nosological iterations demonstrate the oscillation in the importance placed on the biological focus, highlighting the tension between a gender- and culture-free nosology (solely biological) and a contextually relevant understanding of mental illness. In light of the release of the DSM 5, future nosological systems, such as the ICD 11, scheduled for release in 2017, and the Research Development Criteria (RDoC), can learn from history and apply critiques. This article aims to critically consider gender and culture in previous editions of the ICD and DSM to inform forthcoming classifications.

  5. Gender and cultural issues in psychiatric nosological classification systems.

    PubMed

    van de Water, Tanya; Suliman, Sharain; Seedat, Soraya

    2016-08-01

    Much has changed since the two dominant mental health nosological systems, the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), were first published in 1900 and 1952, respectively. Despite numerous modifications to stay up to date with scientific and cultural changes (eg, exclusion of homosexuality as a disorder) and to improve the cultural sensitivity of psychiatric diagnoses, the ICD and DSM have only recently renewed attempts at harmonization. Previous nosological iterations demonstrate the oscillation in the importance placed on the biological focus, highlighting the tension between a gender- and culture-free nosology (solely biological) and a contextually relevant understanding of mental illness. In light of the release of the DSM 5, future nosological systems, such as the ICD 11, scheduled for release in 2017, and the Research Development Criteria (RDoC), can learn from history and apply critiques. This article aims to critically consider gender and culture in previous editions of the ICD and DSM to inform forthcoming classifications. PMID:27133577

  6. Cellulase production by a solid state culture system

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.H.; Hosobuchi, M.; Kishimoto, M.; Seki, T.; Yoshida, T.; Taguchi, H.; Ryu, D.D.Y.

    1985-10-01

    Production of cellulase using solid culture systems of Trichoderma reesei QM9414 and Sporotrichum cellulophilum on wheat bran was studied. By using moisture-controlled solid culture equipment, the effect of water content of wheat bran on cell growth and cellulase production was investigated. Cellular biomass grown on solid substrate was estimated by measuring oxygen consumption rate and glucosamine content the cells. These parameters were shown to have a good linear correlation with the specific growth rate. This reliable method of estimating the cell growth rate enabled us to simulate the enzyme production in a solid culture system by means of multiple linear regression analysis which takes into account of the water content, cell mass, and the oxygen consumption rate as variables. The cell growth and cellulase production were maximized at different water content of the medium. A high water content, 57% for T. reesei and 70% for S. cellulophilum, favored mycelial growth, while the maximum cellulase activity was obtained at a lower water content such as 50% for both fungi. It was observed that cellulase production by T. reesei depended on the culture conditions that support the optimal growth rate for the maximum enzyme production. 14 references.

  7. Information support systems for cultural heritage protection against flooding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedvedova, K.; Pergl, R.

    2015-08-01

    The goal of this paper is to present use of different kind of software applications to create complex support system for protection of cultural heritage against flooding. The project is very complex and it tries to cover the whole area of the problem from prevention to liquidation of aftermath effects. We used GIS for mapping the risk areas, ontology systems for vulnerability assessment application and the BORM method (Business Object Relation Modelling) for flood protection system planning guide. Those modern technologies helped us to gather a lot of information in one place and provide the knowledge to the broad audience.

  8. Towards tailored and targeted adherence assessment to optimise asthma management.

    PubMed

    van Boven, Job F M; Trappenburg, Jaap C A; van der Molen, Thys; Chavannes, Niels H

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we aim to emphasise the need for a more comprehensive and tailored approach to manage the broad nature of non-adherence, to personalise current asthma management. Although currently several methods are available to measure the extent of asthma patients' adherence, the vast majority do not incorporate confirmation of the actual inhalation, dose and inhalation technique. Moreover, most current measures lack detailed information on the individual consequences of non-adherence and on when and how to take action if non-adherence is identified. Notably, one has to realise there are several forms of non-adherence (erratic non-adherence, intelligent non-adherence and unwitting non-adherence), each requiring a different approach. To improve asthma management, more accurate methods are needed that integrate measures of non-adherence, asthma disease control and patient preferences. Integrating information from the latest inhaler devices and patient-reported outcomes using mobile monitoring- and feedback systems ('mHealth') is considered a promising strategy, but requires careful implementation. Key issues to be considered before large-scale implementation include patient preferences, large heterogeneity in patient and disease characteristics, economic consequences, and long-term persistence with new digital technologies.

  9. Towards tailored and targeted adherence assessment to optimise asthma management

    PubMed Central

    van Boven, Job FM; Trappenburg, Jaap CA; van der Molen, Thys; Chavannes, Niels H

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we aim to emphasise the need for a more comprehensive and tailored approach to manage the broad nature of non-adherence, to personalise current asthma management. Although currently several methods are available to measure the extent of asthma patients’ adherence, the vast majority do not incorporate confirmation of the actual inhalation, dose and inhalation technique. Moreover, most current measures lack detailed information on the individual consequences of non-adherence and on when and how to take action if non-adherence is identified. Notably, one has to realise there are several forms of non-adherence (erratic non-adherence, intelligent non-adherence and unwitting non-adherence), each requiring a different approach. To improve asthma management, more accurate methods are needed that integrate measures of non-adherence, asthma disease control and patient preferences. Integrating information from the latest inhaler devices and patient-reported outcomes using mobile monitoring- and feedback systems (‘mHealth’) is considered a promising strategy, but requires careful implementation. Key issues to be considered before large-scale implementation include patient preferences, large heterogeneity in patient and disease characteristics, economic consequences, and long-term persistence with new digital technologies. PMID:26181850

  10. Microfluidic cell culture system with on-chip hypoxic conditioning.

    PubMed

    Takano, Atsushi; Tanaka, Masato; Futai, Nobuyuki

    2013-01-01

    We have demonstrated a portable microfluidic cell culture system with multi-gas (CO2 and O2) incubation which we can cultivate under hypoxia without bulky peripheral apparatus such as gas tanks, regulators, and flow controllers. The system contains a chip of 26 mm × 48 mm which is capable to diffuse CO2 and absorb O2 through a gas-permeable wall of nested media reservoir. The media was water-jacketed with aqueous solution containing 0.8 M sodium bicarbonate as CO2 supply and 1 M sodium ascorbate as oxygen scavenger. The partial CO2 pressure (pCO2) in media reservoir stabilized at least 10.2% ± 0.11% for at least 72 hours. The partial O2 pressure (pO2) in the media reservoir decreased to 4.2%. Portable on-chip hypoxic culture of SV40-T2 cells for 72 h was also demonstrated. PMID:24110727

  11. Organisational culture matters for system integration in health care.

    PubMed

    Munir, Samina K; Kay, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    This paper illustrates the importance of organisational culture for Clinical Information Systems (CIS) integration. The study is based on data collected in intensive care units in the UK and Denmark. Data were collected using qualitative methods, i.e., observations, interviews and shadowing of health care providers, together with a questionnaire at each site. The data are analysed to extract salient variables for CIS integration, and it is shown that these variables can be separated into two categories that describe the 'Actual Usefulness' of the system and the 'Organisational Culture'. This model is then extended to show that CIS integration directly affects the work processes of the organisation, forming an iterative process of change as a CIS is introduced and integrated. PMID:14728220

  12. Multiplying steady-state culture in multi-reactor system.

    PubMed

    Erm, Sten; Adamberg, Kaarel; Vilu, Raivo

    2014-11-01

    Cultivation of microorganisms in batch experiments is fast and economical but the conditions therein change constantly, rendering quantitative data interpretation difficult. By using chemostat with controlled environmental conditions the physiological state of microorganisms is fixed; however, the unavoidable stabilization phase makes continuous methods resource consuming. Material can be spared by using micro scale devices, which however have limited analysis and process control capabilities. Described herein are a method and a system combining the high throughput of batch with the controlled environment of continuous cultivations. Microorganisms were prepared in one bioreactor followed by culture distribution into a network of bioreactors and continuation of independent steady state experiments therein. Accelerostat cultivation with statistical analysis of growth parameters demonstrated non-compromised physiological state following distribution, thus the method effectively multiplied steady state culture of microorganisms. The theoretical efficiency of the system was evaluated in inhibitory compound analysis using repeated chemostat to chemostat transfers.

  13. An Ex vivo Culture System to Study Thyroid Development

    PubMed Central

    Delmarcelle, Anne-Sophie; Villacorte, Mylah

    2014-01-01

    The thyroid is a bilobated endocrine gland localized at the base of the neck, producing the thyroid hormones T3, T4, and calcitonin. T3 and T4 are produced by differentiated thyrocytes, organized in closed spheres called follicles, while calcitonin is synthesized by C-cells, interspersed in between the follicles and a dense network of blood capillaries. Although adult thyroid architecture and functions have been extensively described and studied, the formation of the “angio-follicular” units, the distribution of C-cells in the parenchyma and the paracrine communications between epithelial and endothelial cells is far from being understood. This method describes the sequential steps of mouse embryonic thyroid anlagen dissection and its culture on semiporous filters or on microscopy plastic slides. Within a period of four days, this culture system faithfully recapitulates in vivo thyroid development. Indeed, (i) bilobation of the organ occurs (for e12.5 explants), (ii) thyrocytes precursors organize into follicles and polarize, (iii) thyrocytes and C-cells differentiate, and (iv) endothelial cells present in the microdissected tissue proliferate, migrate into the thyroid lobes, and closely associate with the epithelial cells, as they do in vivo. Thyroid tissues can be obtained from wild type, knockout or fluorescent transgenic embryos. Moreover, explants culture can be manipulated by addition of inhibitors, blocking antibodies, growth factors, or even cells or conditioned medium. Ex vivo development can be analyzed in real-time, or at any time of the culture by immunostaining and RT-qPCR. In conclusion, thyroid explant culture combined with downstream whole-mount or on sections imaging and gene expression profiling provides a powerful system for manipulating and studying morphogenetic and differentiation events of thyroid organogenesis. PMID:24961920

  14. Measurement of Psychiatric Treatment Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Sajatovic, Martha; Velligan, Dawn; Weiden, Peter J.; Valenstein, Marcia; Ogedegbe, Gbenga

    2014-01-01

    Objective Nonadherence to medications for mental disorders substantially limits treatment effectiveness and results in higher rates of relapse, hospitalization, and disability. Accurate measurement of medication adherence is important not only in adherence research, but also in clinical trials in which medications are being evaluated, and in clinical practice where failure to detect nonadherence results in premature medication changes, unnecessary polypharmacy, and greater likelihoods of functional deteriorations and hospitalizations. This is a review of psychiatric treatment adherence methods and measures arising from a meeting on “Methodological Challenges in Psychiatric Treatment Adherence Research” held on September 27-28, 2007 in Bethesda, MD and organized by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). Methods This paper reviews the range of modalities currently available for assessing adherence behavior including pill counts, pharmacy records, technology-assisted monitoring, biological assays, and a range of self-report and interviewer-rated scales. Measures of adherence attitudes are also reviewed. Results Each of the adherence measures described are imperfect estimates of actual medication ingestion but each provides informative estimates of adherence or the attitudinal factors associated with adherence. Measure selection depends on a range of factors including the patient sample, the context in which the measure is being used, and the clinical outcomes expected from various levels of nonadherence. The use of multiple measures of adherence is encouraged to balance the limitations of individual measures. Conclusion While adherence assessment has become increasingly sophisticated in recent years there remains a need for refinement and expansion on currently available methods and measures. PMID:21109048

  15. Biologic Influences on Exercise Adherence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dishman, Rod K.

    1981-01-01

    Diagnostic profiles of 362 male participants in an exercise program were analyzed to determine the biological variables between exercise adherence and symptoms of coronary disease. Findings indicated that individuals with lower metabolic capacity tended to adhere longer, to be less fit, were leaner, and began with more symptoms related to coronary…

  16. Adherence to nutritional therapy in obese adolescents; a review.

    PubMed

    França, Silvana Lima Guimarães; Sahade, Viviane; Nunes, Mônica; Adan, Luis F

    2013-01-01

    Considering the controversies existent on the subject, the aim of this review is to discuss adherence to diet in obese adolescents. The selection of articles was made in the SCOPUS, COCHRANE, APA Psyc Net, SciELO, LILACS, CAPES Journals, PUBMED/MEDLINE and GOOGLE ACADEMIC databases. Studies published between 2002 and 2012 were selected. There was lack of evidence of conceptual discussion about adherence to diet in obesity in the child-youth context, in addition to scarcity of data on adherence to diet itself in obese adolescents and the methods of evaluating this. Lastly, multiple interdependent factors were found which both facilitated and made the process of adherence to diet difficult for obese youngsters. The majority of these (factors) belong to the socioeconomic and cultural dimension, in addition to pointing out cognitive and psychological factors and those associated with health services and professionals.

  17. Gill cell culture systems as models for aquatic environmental monitoring.

    PubMed

    Bury, Nic R; Schnell, Sabine; Hogstrand, Christer

    2014-03-01

    A vast number of chemicals require environmental safety assessments for market authorisation. To ensure acceptable water quality, effluents and natural waters are monitored for their potential harmful effects. Tests for market authorisation and environmental monitoring usually involve the use of large numbers of organisms and, for ethical, cost and logistic reasons, there is a drive to develop alternative methods that can predict toxicity to fish without the need to expose any animals. There is therefore a great interest in the potential to use cultured fish cells in chemical toxicity testing. This review summarises the advances made in the area and focuses in particular on a system of cultured fish gill cells grown into an epithelium that permits direct treatment with water samples.

  18. Understanding how adherence goals promote adherence behaviours: a repeated measure observational study with HIV seropositive patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The extent to which patients follow treatments as prescribed is pivotal to treatment success. An exceptionally high level (> 95%) of HIV medication adherence is required to suppress viral replication and protect the immune system and a similarly high level (> 80%) of adherence has also been suggested in order to benefit from prescribed exercise programmes. However, in clinical practice, adherence to both often falls below the desirable level. This project aims to investigate a wide range of psychological and personality factors that may lead to adherence/non-adherence to medical treatment and exercise programmes. Methods HIV positive patients who are referred to the physiotherapist-led 10-week exercise programme as part of the standard care are continuously recruited. Data on social cognitive variables (attitude, intention, subjective norms, self-efficacy, and outcome beliefs) about the goal and specific behaviours, selected personality factors, perceived quality of life, physical activity, self-reported adherence and physical assessment are collected at baseline, at the end of the exercise programme and again 3 months later. The project incorporates objective measures of both exercise (attendance log and improvement in physical measures such as improved fitness level, weight loss, improved circumferential anthropometric measures) and medication adherence (verified by non-invasive hair analysis). Discussion The novelty of this project comes from two key aspects, complemented with objective information on exercise and medication adherence. The project assesses beliefs about both the underlying goal such as following prescribed treatment; and about the specific behaviours such as undertaking the exercise or taking the medication, using both implicit and explicit assessments of patients’ beliefs and attitudes. We predict that i) the way people think about the underlying goal of their treatments explains medication and exercise behaviours over and above

  19. Improving medication adherence among kidney transplant recipients: Findings from other industries, patient engagement, and behavioral economics-A scoping review.

    PubMed

    Oberlin, Shelley R; Parente, Stephen T; Pruett, Timothy L

    2016-01-01

    The immune system is a powerful barrier to successful organ transplantation, but one that has been routinely thwarted through modern pharmacotherapeutics. Despite the benefits of immunosuppressive therapy, medication non-adherence leads to an increased risk of graft rejection, higher hospital utilization and costs, and poor outcomes. We conduct a scoping review following Arksey and O'Malley's five-stage framework methodology to identify established or novel interventions that could be applied to kidney transplant recipients to improve medication adherence. As the desired outcome is a behavior (taking a pill), we assess three areas: behavioral-focused interventions in other industries, patient engagement theories, and behavioral economic principles. Search strategies included mining business, social sciences, and medical literature with additional guidance from six consultative interviews. Our review suggests that no intervention stands out as superior or likely to be more effective than any other intervention; yet promising strategies and interventions were identified across all three areas examined. Based on our findings, we believe there are five strategies that transplant centers and other organizations can implement to improve medication adherence: (1) Build a foundation of trust; (2) Employ multiple interventions; (3) Stratify the population; (4) Develop collaborative partnerships; and (5) Embed medication adherence into the organization's culture. The effectiveness of these interventions will need to be investigated further, but we believe they are a step in the right direction for organizations to consider in their efforts to improve medication adherence. PMID:26835016

  20. Improving medication adherence among kidney transplant recipients: Findings from other industries, patient engagement, and behavioral economics—A scoping review

    PubMed Central

    Oberlin, Shelley R; Parente, Stephen T; Pruett, Timothy L

    2016-01-01

    The immune system is a powerful barrier to successful organ transplantation, but one that has been routinely thwarted through modern pharmacotherapeutics. Despite the benefits of immunosuppressive therapy, medication non-adherence leads to an increased risk of graft rejection, higher hospital utilization and costs, and poor outcomes. We conduct a scoping review following Arksey and O’Malley’s five-stage framework methodology to identify established or novel interventions that could be applied to kidney transplant recipients to improve medication adherence. As the desired outcome is a behavior (taking a pill), we assess three areas: behavioral-focused interventions in other industries, patient engagement theories, and behavioral economic principles. Search strategies included mining business, social sciences, and medical literature with additional guidance from six consultative interviews. Our review suggests that no intervention stands out as superior or likely to be more effective than any other intervention; yet promising strategies and interventions were identified across all three areas examined. Based on our findings, we believe there are five strategies that transplant centers and other organizations can implement to improve medication adherence: (1) Build a foundation of trust; (2) Employ multiple interventions; (3) Stratify the population; (4) Develop collaborative partnerships; and (5) Embed medication adherence into the organization’s culture. The effectiveness of these interventions will need to be investigated further, but we believe they are a step in the right direction for organizations to consider in their efforts to improve medication adherence. PMID:26835016

  1. Improving medication adherence among kidney transplant recipients: Findings from other industries, patient engagement, and behavioral economics-A scoping review.

    PubMed

    Oberlin, Shelley R; Parente, Stephen T; Pruett, Timothy L

    2016-01-01

    The immune system is a powerful barrier to successful organ transplantation, but one that has been routinely thwarted through modern pharmacotherapeutics. Despite the benefits of immunosuppressive therapy, medication non-adherence leads to an increased risk of graft rejection, higher hospital utilization and costs, and poor outcomes. We conduct a scoping review following Arksey and O'Malley's five-stage framework methodology to identify established or novel interventions that could be applied to kidney transplant recipients to improve medication adherence. As the desired outcome is a behavior (taking a pill), we assess three areas: behavioral-focused interventions in other industries, patient engagement theories, and behavioral economic principles. Search strategies included mining business, social sciences, and medical literature with additional guidance from six consultative interviews. Our review suggests that no intervention stands out as superior or likely to be more effective than any other intervention; yet promising strategies and interventions were identified across all three areas examined. Based on our findings, we believe there are five strategies that transplant centers and other organizations can implement to improve medication adherence: (1) Build a foundation of trust; (2) Employ multiple interventions; (3) Stratify the population; (4) Develop collaborative partnerships; and (5) Embed medication adherence into the organization's culture. The effectiveness of these interventions will need to be investigated further, but we believe they are a step in the right direction for organizations to consider in their efforts to improve medication adherence.

  2. A subset of two adherence systems, acute pro-inflammatory pap genes and invasion coding dra, fim, or sfa, increases the risk of Escherichia coli translocation to the bloodstream.

    PubMed

    Szemiako, K; Krawczyk, B; Samet, A; Śledzińska, A; Nowicki, B; Nowicki, S; Kur, J

    2013-12-01

    An analysis of the phylogenetic distribution and virulence genes of Escherichia coli isolates which predispose this bacteria to translocate from the urinary tract to the bloodstream is presented. One-dimensional analysis indicated that the occurrence of P fimbriae and α-hemolysin coding genes is more frequent among the E. coli which cause bacteremia. However, a two-dimensional analysis revealed that a combination of genes coding two adherence factors, namely, P + Dr, P + S, S + Dr, S + fim, and hemolysin + one adherence factor, were associated with bacteremia and, therefore, with the risk of translocation to the vascular system. The frequent and previously unrecognized co-existence of pro-inflammatory P fimbriae with the invasion promoting Dr adhesin in the same E. coli isolate may represent high-risk and potentially lethal pathogens.

  3. Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1997

    Twelve conference papers on cultural aspects of second language instruction include: "Towards True Multiculturalism: Ideas for Teachers" (Brian McVeigh); Comparing Cultures Through Critical Thinking: Development and Interpretations of Meaningful Observations" (Laurel D. Kamada); "Authority and Individualism in Japan and the USA" (Alisa Woodring);…

  4. What the newspapers say about medication adherence: a content analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study investigates the coverage of adherence to medicine by the UK and US newsprint media. Adherence to medicine is recognised as an important issue facing healthcare professionals and the newsprint media is a key source of health information, however, little is known about newspaper coverage of medication adherence. Methods A search of the newspaper database Nexis®UK from 2004–2011 was performed. Content analysis of newspaper articles which referenced medication adherence from the twelve highest circulating UK and US daily newspapers and their Sunday equivalents was carried out. A second researcher coded a 15% sample of newspaper articles to establish the inter-rater reliability of coding. Results Searches of newspaper coverage of medication adherence in the UK and US yielded 181 relevant articles for each country. There was a large increase in the number of scientific articles on medication adherence in PubMed® over the study period, however, this was not reflected in the frequency of newspaper articles published on medication adherence. UK newspaper articles were significantly more likely to report the benefits of adherence (p = 0.005), whereas US newspaper articles were significantly more likely to report adherence issues in the elderly population (p = 0.004) and adherence associated with diseases of the central nervous system (p = 0.046). The most commonly reported barriers to adherence were patient factors e.g. poor memory, beliefs and age, whereas, the most commonly reported facilitators to adherence were medication factors including simplified regimens, shorter treatment duration and combination tablets. HIV/AIDS was the single most frequently cited disease (reported in 20% of newspaper articles). Poor quality reporting of medication adherence was identified in 62% of newspaper articles. Conclusion Adherence is not well covered in the newspaper media despite a significant presence in the medical literature. The mass media have the

  5. Concordance of adherence measurement using self-reported adherence questionnaires and medication monitoring devices.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lizheng; Liu, Jinan; Koleva, Yordanka; Fonseca, Vivian; Kalsekar, Anupama; Pawaskar, Manjiri

    2010-01-01

    The primary objective of this review was to identify and examine the literature on the association between medication adherence self-reported questionnaires (SRQs) and medication monitoring devices. The primary literature search was performed for 1980-2009 using PubMed, PubMed In Process and Non-Indexed, Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process, PsycINFO (EBSCO), CINAHL (EBSCO), Ovid HealthStar, EMBASE (Elsevier) and Cochrane Databases and using the following search terms: 'patient compliance', 'medication adherence', 'treatment compliance', 'drug monitoring', 'drug therapy', 'electronic', 'digital', 'computer', 'monitor', 'monitoring', 'drug', 'drugs', 'pharmaceutical preparations', 'compliance' and 'medications'. We identified studies that included SRQs and electronic monitoring devices to measure adherence and focused on the SRQs that were found to be moderately to highly correlated with the monitoring devices. Of the 1679 citations found via the primary search, 41 full-text articles were reviewed for correlation between monitoring devices and SRQs. A majority (68%) of articles reported high (27%), moderate (29%) or significant (12%) correlation between monitoring devices (37 using Medication Event Monitoring System [MEMS®] and four using other devices) and SRQs (11 identified and numerous other unnamed SRQs). The most commonly used SRQs were the Adult/Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trial Group (AACTG/PACTG; 24.4%, 10/41) followed by the 4-item Morisky (9.8%, 4/41), Brief Medication Questionnaire (9.8%, 4/41) and visual analogue scale (VAS; 7.3%, 3/41). Although study designs differed across the articles, SRQs appeared to report a higher rate of medication adherence (+14.9%) than monitoring devices. In conclusion, several medication adherence SRQs were validated using electronic monitoring devices. A majority of them showed high or moderate correlation with medication adherence measured using monitoring devices, and could be considered for measuring patient

  6. Methodologies for medication adherence evaluation: Focus on psoriasis topical treatment.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Ana; Teixeira, Maribel; Almeida, Vera; Torres, Tiago; Sousa Lobo, José Manuel; Almeida, Isabel Filipa

    2016-05-01

    Adherence to topical treatment has been less studied in comparison with systemic therapeutic regimens and is poorly understood. High-quality research on this area is essential to outline a strategy to increase medication adherence and clinical outcomes. For a more comprehensive understanding of this issue, a systematic review of the methodologies for topical treatment adherence evaluation in psoriasis was undertaken. Twenty one studies were selected from the literature which used six different adherence methodologies. Merely three studies used multiple adherence measurement methods. The most used method was questionnaire (44%) which was also associated with higher variability of the adherence results. One possible explanation is the lack of a validated questionnaire designed specifically for the evaluation of adherence to topical treatment. Only one method (medication weight) takes into consideration the applied dose. However, the estimation of the expected weight is complex, which renders this method, as used presently, less effective. The use of a dosing device could improve its accuracy and be helpful to clearly instruct the patients about the correct dose. As there is no single method that allows an accurate and complete assessment of adherence it is recommended to use a combination of methods, including self-report and medicines' weight measurements.

  7. Genetic factors in exercise adoption, adherence and obesity.

    PubMed

    Herring, M P; Sailors, M H; Bray, M S

    2014-01-01

    Physical activity and exercise play critical roles in energy balance. While many interventions targeted at increasing physical activity have demonstrated efficacy in promoting weight loss or maintenance in the short term, long term adherence to such programmes is not frequently observed. Numerous factors have been examined for their ability to predict and/or influence physical activity and exercise adherence. Although physical activity has been demonstrated to have a strong genetic component in both animals and humans, few studies have examined the association between genetic variation and exercise adherence. In this review, we provide a detailed overview of the non-genetic and genetic predictors of physical activity and adherence to exercise. In addition, we report the results of analysis of 26 single nucleotide polymorphisms in six candidate genes examined for association to exercise adherence, duration, intensity and total exercise dose in young adults from the Training Interventions and Genetics of Exercise Response (TIGER) Study. Based on both animal and human research, neural signalling and pleasure/reward systems in the brain may drive in large part the propensity to be physically active and to adhere to an exercise programme. Adherence/compliance research in other fields may inform future investigation of the genetics of exercise adherence.

  8. Tissue culture system for infection with human hepatitis delta virus.

    PubMed Central

    Sureau, C; Jacob, J R; Eichberg, J W; Lanford, R E

    1991-01-01

    An in vitro culture system was developed for assaying the infectivity of the human hepatitis delta virus (HDV). Hepatocytes were isolated from chimpanzee liver and grown in a serum-free medium. Cells were shown to be infectible by HDV and to remain susceptible to infection for at least 3 weeks in culture, as evidenced by the appearance of RNA species characteristic of HDV replication as early as 6 days postinfection. When repeated experiments were carried out on cells derived from an animal free of hepatitis B virus (HBV), HDV infection occurred in a consistent fashion but there was no indication of infection with the HBV that was present in the inoculum. Despite numerous attempts with different sources of HBV inocula free of HDV, there was no evidence that indicated susceptibility of these cells to HBV infection. This observation may indicate that HBV and HDV use different modes of entry into hepatocytes. When cells derived from an HBV-infected animal were exposed to HDV, synthesis and release of progeny HDV particles were obtained in addition to HBV replication and production of Dane particles. Although not infectible with HBV, primary cultures of chimpanzee hepatocytes are capable of supporting part of the life cycle of HBV and the entire life cycle of HDV. Images PMID:2041075

  9. Proliferative activity of vervet monkey bone marrow-derived adherent cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kramvis, A.; Garnett, H.M.

    1987-11-01

    Vervet monkey bone marrow-derived adherent cell population cultured in Fischer's medium supplemented with 12.5% fetal calf serum and 12.5% horse serum consists of two cell shapes: fusiform (type I) and polygonal (type II). Limiting-dilution cloning of the cells suggested that the two morphologically distinct cell types belong to the same cellular system even though they differ in their proliferative capabilities. The labeling index of type II cells, as measured by autoradiography, was found to be consistently lower than that of type I cells. It is probable that these two phenotypes represent different stages of differentiation, where progenitor type I gives rise to type II cells. The bone marrow-derived adherent cells were found to be cytokinetically at rest in vivo, using the thymidine suicide test, and relatively radioresistant with a D0 = 2.1 Gy and n = 2.36 at the time of explantation from the bone. Furthermore, in culture these cells are characterized by a relatively long cell cycle of 60 h, where the length of the S phase is 30 h, G2 is 12 h, M is 6 h, and G1 is 12 h. Thus, the vervet monkey bone marrow-derived adherent cells represent a cell population with a low turnover rate both in vivo and in vitro.

  10. Optimization of culture conditions for an efficient xeno-feeder free limbal cell culture system towards ocular surface regeneration.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Viji Mary; Prasad, Tilak; Kumary, T V

    2010-10-01

    Ex vivo expansion of limbal stem cells from a small biopsy and its subsequent transplantation is the golden choice of treatment for limbal stem cell deficiency. Use of murine 3T3 feeder layer is a prerequisite for this ex vivo expansion. There is an ever-increasing demand for feeder free cultures to avoid xenotoxicity and transmission of xeno-diseases to human system. This study was aimed to establish an efficient xeno-feeder free limbal culture system towards ocular surface regeneration. To study the effect of initial dispase treatment and culture system used, migratory distance of cells from explants was analyzed from phase contrast images using "interactive measurements" of Qwin software (Leica). Expression of p63 in different culture systems was studied by immunofluorescent staining, followed by quantitative confocal microscopy (Carl Zeiss). Results showed dispase treatment was not necessary for establishing limbal explant culture. A combination of Iscove's modified Dulbecco's medium and Panserin 801 resulted in formation of autofeeder layer with maintenance of progenitor characteristics, thus mimicking natural tissue architecture. Further analysis of this culture system showed that cells could be cultured till confluency. Immunofluorescent staining of ABCG2 revealed presence of stem cell marker in the confluent cell layer. Scanning Electron Micrographs demonstrated homogenous population of tightly packed cells in this culture system. Replacement of bovine serum with autologous serum did not affect morphology or growth of cells in this culture system. This study will be a major step in the development of xeno-feeder free epithelial equivalents towards ocular surface reconstruction. PMID:20196106

  11. The Cultural Erosion Metaphor and the Transcultural Impact of Media Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varan, Duane

    1998-01-01

    Contributes to scholarship on the transcultural impact of media systems (and draws on media effects, political economy, and cultural studies research) by applying the soil erosion metaphor to transcultural impact of television. Discusses four processes associated with this model: cultural abrasion, cultural deflation, cultural deposition, and…

  12. Defined Essential 8™ Medium and Vitronectin Efficiently Support Scalable Xeno-Free Expansion of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in Stirred Microcarrier Culture Systems

    PubMed Central

    Badenes, Sara M.; Fernandes, Tiago G.; Cordeiro, Cláudia S. M.; Boucher, Shayne; Kuninger, David; Vemuri, Mohan C.; Diogo, Maria Margarida; Cabral, Joaquim M. S.

    2016-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (hiPS) cell culture using Essential 8™ xeno-free medium and the defined xeno-free matrix vitronectin was successfully implemented under adherent conditions. This matrix was able to support hiPS cell expansion either in coated plates or on polystyrene-coated microcarriers, while maintaining hiPS cell functionality and pluripotency. Importantly, scale-up of the microcarrier-based system was accomplished using a 50 mL spinner flask, under dynamic conditions. A three-level factorial design experiment was performed to identify optimal conditions in terms of a) initial cell density b) agitation speed, and c) to maximize cell yield in spinner flask cultures. A maximum cell yield of 3.5 is achieved by inoculating 55,000 cells/cm2 of microcarrier surface area and using 44 rpm, which generates a cell density of 1.4x106 cells/mL after 10 days of culture. After dynamic culture, hiPS cells maintained their typical morphology upon re-plating, exhibited pluripotency-associated marker expression as well as tri-lineage differentiation capability, which was verified by inducing their spontaneous differentiation through embryoid body formation, and subsequent downstream differentiation to specific lineages such as neural and cardiac fates was successfully accomplished. In conclusion, a scalable, robust and cost-effective xeno-free culture system was successfully developed and implemented for the scale-up production of hiPS cells. PMID:26999816

  13. Fine bubble mixing (FBM) culture of E. coli: a highly cost-effective middle scale-size culture system.

    PubMed

    Yasumitsu, Hidetaro; Tajima, Hitoshi; Isobe, Masaharu; Kutsuna, Sinsuke; Kawsar, Sarkar M A; Fujii, Yuki; Kanaly, Robert A; Ozeki, Yasuhiro; Yokota, Eriko

    2013-02-01

    A highly cost-effective and easy-to-assemble cultivation system suitable for middle scale-size culturing of bacterial cells is described. In the culture, from a flat-shaped air-stone with large surface area, fine bubbles are generated with a low-cost air pump available in an aquarium fish shop, and cell-agitation and oxygen supply are efficiently conducted by fine bubbles simultaneously. Growth properties of the cells and their saturation density are comparable to those in a conventional culture system. The expression of recombinant protein was revealed to be similar to conventional methods. The system does not require any expensive machines or equipments. In addition, all equipments except plastic flat-shaped airstone are reusable after sterilization. Due to the low cost, the ease to use and multiple cultivations at once, our system may enable to find better culture conditions, to scale-up with ease and to perform timesaving efficient protein production. PMID:22894161

  14. Adhesion of human gingival fibroblasts/Streptococcus mitis co-culture on the nanocomposite system Chitlac-nAg.

    PubMed

    Cataldi, Amelia; Gallorini, Marialucia; Di Giulio, Mara; Guarnieri, Simone; Mariggiò, Maria Addolorata; Traini, Tonino; Di Pietro, Roberta; Cellini, Luigina; Marsich, Eleonora; Sancilio, Silvia

    2016-05-01

    Composite materials are increasingly used as dental restoration. In the field of biomaterials, infections remain the main reason of dental devices failure. Silver, in the form of nanoparticles (AgNPs), ions and salt, well known for its antimicrobial properties, is used in several medical applications in order to avoid bacterial infection. To reduce both bacterial adhesion to dental devices and cytotoxicity against eukaryotic cells, we coated BisGMA/TEGDMA methacrylic thermosets with a new material, Chitlac-nAg, formed by stabilized AgNPs with a polyelectrolyte solution containing Chitlac. Here we analyzed the proliferative and adhesive ability of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) on BisGMA/TEGDMA thermosets uncoated and coated with AgNPs in a coculture model system with Streptococcus mitis. After 48 h, HGFs well adhered onto both surfaces, while S. mitis cytotoxic response was higher in the presence of AgNPs coated thermosets. After 24 h thermosets coated with Chitlac as well as those coated with Chitlac-nAg exerted a minimal cytotoxic effect on HGFs, while after 48 h LDH release raised up to 20 %. Moreover the presence of S. mitis reduced this release mainly when HGFs adhered to Chitlac-nAg coated thermosets. The reduced secretion of collagen type I was significant in the presence of both surfaces with the co-culture system even more when saliva is added. Integrin β1 localized closely to cell membranes onto Chitlac-nAg thermosets and PKCα translocated into nuclei. These data confirm that Chitlac-nAg have a promising utilization in the field of restorative dentistry exerting their antimicrobial activity due to AgNPs without cytotoxicity for eukaryotic cells.

  15. Culturally Competent School Leaders: The Individual and the System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansuvadha, Nat; Slater, Charles L.

    2012-01-01

    Cultural competence is the knowledge, behaviors, and dispositions necessary to effectively interact with other cultural groups. Two case studies are presented which illustrate the cultural competence of administrators in urban settings. Theories are reviewed to investigate the themes of cultural competence that emerged from the professional…

  16. Lean management systems: creating a culture of continuous quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Clark, David M; Silvester, Kate; Knowles, Simon

    2013-08-01

    This is the first in a series of articles describing the application of Lean management systems to Laboratory Medicine. Lean is the term used to describe a principle-based continuous quality improvement (CQI) management system based on the Toyota production system (TPS) that has been evolving for over 70 years. Its origins go back much further and are heavily influenced by the work of W Edwards Deming and the scientific method that forms the basis of most quality management systems. Lean has two fundamental elements--a systematic approach to process improvement by removing waste in order to maximise value for the end-user of the service and a commitment to respect, challenge and develop the people who work within the service to create a culture of continuous improvement. Lean principles have been applied to a growing number of Healthcare systems throughout the world to improve the quality and cost-effectiveness of services for patients and a number of laboratories from all the pathology disciplines have used Lean to shorten turnaround times, improve quality (reduce errors) and improve productivity. Increasingly, models used to plan and implement large scale change in healthcare systems, including the National Health Service (NHS) change model, have evidence-based improvement methodologies (such as Lean CQI) as a core component. Consequently, a working knowledge of improvement methodology will be a core skill for Pathologists involved in leadership and management.

  17. Improving adherence to oral cancer therapy in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    McCue, Debbie A; Lohr, Lisa K; Pick, Amy M

    2014-05-01

    Adherence to oral chemotherapy regimens maximizes their effectiveness and minimizes any potential toxicities. Factors specifically related to the treatment, patient, and health care provider may influence medication adherence. Treatment-related factors include the complexity of the regimen, the cost of therapy, the possibility of side effects, and the delay in treatment benefits. Meanwhile, patients may not have an adequate support system or an understanding of the need for the medication, and providers may not fully succeed in communicating the importance of adherence and the types of side effects that may occur. Nonadherence may lead to an increased risk of toxicity, decreased effectiveness, and increased utilization of health care resources. Although various methods for measuring adherence are available, self-reporting is the most widely used. Studies describing adherence in a broad range of cancers are reviewed. Treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia has been revolutionized by the development of oral tyrosine kinase inhibitors that are highly effective in managing the disease when taken consistently. However, nonadherence is relatively common and can lead to reduced rates of response and increased medical costs. Similar effects of nonadherence on outcome and cost have also been observed in patients with various other hematologic malignancies and solid tumors. Interventions to improve adherence to oral chemotherapy regimens include communication about the importance of adherence and the potential consequences of nonadherence, simplification of the patient's medication schedule (if possible), and inclusion of a caregiver or family member in the conversation. Written materials should always be provided to accompany verbal instructions. This review summarizes factors influencing medication adherence, impact of nonadherence on patient outcomes, methods for measuring adherence, previous studies of nonadherence in patients with cancer, common barriers to access, and

  18. Determinants of patient adherence: a review of systematic reviews

    PubMed Central

    Kardas, Przemyslaw; Lewek, Pawel; Matyjaszczyk, Michal

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: A number of potential determinants of medication non-adherence have been described so far. However, the heterogenic quality of existing publications poses the need for the use of a rigorous methodology in building a list of such determinants. The purpose of this study was a systematic review of current research on determinants of patient adherence on the basis of a recently agreed European consensus taxonomy and terminology. Methods: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, IPA, and PsycINFO were systematically searched for systematic reviews published between 2000/01/01 and 2009/12/31 that provided determinants on non-adherence to medication. The searches were limited to reviews having adherence to medication prescribed by health professionals for outpatient as a major topic. Results: Fifty-one reviews were included in this review, covering 19 different disease categories. In these reviews, exclusively assessing non-adherence to chronic therapies, 771 individual factor items were identified, of which most were determinants of implementation, and only 47—determinants of persistence with medication. Factors with an unambiguous effect on adherence were further grouped into 8 clusters of socio-economic-related factors, 6 of healthcare team- and system-related factors, 6 of condition-related factors, 6 of therapy-related factors, and 14 of patient-related factors. The lack of standardized definitions and use of poor measurement methods resulted in many inconsistencies. Conclusions: This study provides clear evidence that medication non-adherence is affected by multiple determinants. Therefore, the prediction of non-adherence of individual patients is difficult, and suitable measurement and multifaceted interventions may be the most effective answer toward unsatisfactory adherence. The limited number of publications assessing determinants of persistence with medication, and lack of those providing determinants of adherence to short-term treatment identify

  19. Medication Adherence Measures: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Lam, Wai Yin; Fresco, Paula

    2015-01-01

    WHO reported that adherence among patients with chronic diseases averages only 50% in developed countries. This is recognized as a significant public health issue, since medication nonadherence leads to poor health outcomes and increased healthcare costs. Improving medication adherence is, therefore, crucial and revealed on many studies, suggesting interventions can improve medication adherence. One significant aspect of the strategies to improve medication adherence is to understand its magnitude. However, there is a lack of general guidance for researchers and healthcare professionals to choose the appropriate tools that can explore the extent of medication adherence and the reasons behind this problem in order to orchestrate subsequent interventions. This paper reviews both subjective and objective medication adherence measures, including direct measures, those involving secondary database analysis, electronic medication packaging (EMP) devices, pill count, and clinician assessments and self-report. Subjective measures generally provide explanations for patient's nonadherence whereas objective measures contribute to a more precise record of patient's medication-taking behavior. While choosing a suitable approach, researchers and healthcare professionals should balance the reliability and practicality, especially cost effectiveness, for their purpose. Meanwhile, because a perfect measure does not exist, a multimeasure approach seems to be the best solution currently.

  20. Medication Adherence Measures: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Wai Yin; Fresco, Paula

    2015-01-01

    WHO reported that adherence among patients with chronic diseases averages only 50% in developed countries. This is recognized as a significant public health issue, since medication nonadherence leads to poor health outcomes and increased healthcare costs. Improving medication adherence is, therefore, crucial and revealed on many studies, suggesting interventions can improve medication adherence. One significant aspect of the strategies to improve medication adherence is to understand its magnitude. However, there is a lack of general guidance for researchers and healthcare professionals to choose the appropriate tools that can explore the extent of medication adherence and the reasons behind this problem in order to orchestrate subsequent interventions. This paper reviews both subjective and objective medication adherence measures, including direct measures, those involving secondary database analysis, electronic medication packaging (EMP) devices, pill count, and clinician assessments and self-report. Subjective measures generally provide explanations for patient's nonadherence whereas objective measures contribute to a more precise record of patient's medication-taking behavior. While choosing a suitable approach, researchers and healthcare professionals should balance the reliability and practicality, especially cost effectiveness, for their purpose. Meanwhile, because a perfect measure does not exist, a multimeasure approach seems to be the best solution currently. PMID:26539470

  1. Medication Adherence Measures: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Lam, Wai Yin; Fresco, Paula

    2015-01-01

    WHO reported that adherence among patients with chronic diseases averages only 50% in developed countries. This is recognized as a significant public health issue, since medication nonadherence leads to poor health outcomes and increased healthcare costs. Improving medication adherence is, therefore, crucial and revealed on many studies, suggesting interventions can improve medication adherence. One significant aspect of the strategies to improve medication adherence is to understand its magnitude. However, there is a lack of general guidance for researchers and healthcare professionals to choose the appropriate tools that can explore the extent of medication adherence and the reasons behind this problem in order to orchestrate subsequent interventions. This paper reviews both subjective and objective medication adherence measures, including direct measures, those involving secondary database analysis, electronic medication packaging (EMP) devices, pill count, and clinician assessments and self-report. Subjective measures generally provide explanations for patient's nonadherence whereas objective measures contribute to a more precise record of patient's medication-taking behavior. While choosing a suitable approach, researchers and healthcare professionals should balance the reliability and practicality, especially cost effectiveness, for their purpose. Meanwhile, because a perfect measure does not exist, a multimeasure approach seems to be the best solution currently. PMID:26539470

  2. Development of a bovine luteal cell in vitro culture system suitable for co-culture with early embryos.

    PubMed

    Batista, M; Torres, A; Diniz, P; Mateus, L; Lopes-da-Costa, L

    2012-10-01

    The cross talk between the corpus luteum (CL) and the early embryo, potentially relevant to pregnancy establishment, is difficult to evaluate in the in vivo bovine model. In vitro co-culture of bovine luteal cells and early embryos (days 2-8 post in vitro fertilization) may allow the deciphering of this poorly understood cross talk. However, early embryos and somatic cells require different in vitro culture conditions. The objective of this study was to develop a bovine luteal cell in vitro culture system suitable for co-culture with early embryos in order to evaluate their putative steroidogenic and prostanoid interactions. The corpora lutea of the different stages of the estrous cycle (early, mid, and late) were recovered postmortem and enriched luteal cell populations were obtained. In experiments 1 and 2, the effects of CL stage, culture medium (TCM, DMEM-F12, or SOF), serum concentration (5 or 10%), atmosphere oxygen tension (5 or 20%), and refreshment of the medium on the ability of luteal cells to produce progesterone (P(4)) were evaluated. The production of P(4) was significantly increased in early CL cultures, and luteal cells adapted well to simple media (SOF), low serum concentrations (5%), and oxygen tensions (5%). In experiment 3, previous luteal cell cryopreservation did not affect the production of P(4), PGF(2α), and PGE(2) compared to fresh cell cultures. This enables the use of pools of frozen-thawed cells to decrease the variation in cell function associated with primary cell cultures. In experiment 4, mineral oil overlaying culture wells resulted in a 50-fold decrease of the P(4) quantified in the medium, but had no effect on PGF(2α) and PGE(2) quantification. In conclusion, a luteal cell in vitro culture system suitable for the 5-d-long co-culture with early embryos was developed.

  3. Development of a bovine luteal cell in vitro culture system suitable for co-culture with early embryos.

    PubMed

    Batista, M; Torres, A; Diniz, P; Mateus, L; Lopes-da-Costa, L

    2012-10-01

    The cross talk between the corpus luteum (CL) and the early embryo, potentially relevant to pregnancy establishment, is difficult to evaluate in the in vivo bovine model. In vitro co-culture of bovine luteal cells and early embryos (days 2-8 post in vitro fertilization) may allow the deciphering of this poorly understood cross talk. However, early embryos and somatic cells require different in vitro culture conditions. The objective of this study was to develop a bovine luteal cell in vitro culture system suitable for co-culture with early embryos in order to evaluate their putative steroidogenic and prostanoid interactions. The corpora lutea of the different stages of the estrous cycle (early, mid, and late) were recovered postmortem and enriched luteal cell populations were obtained. In experiments 1 and 2, the effects of CL stage, culture medium (TCM, DMEM-F12, or SOF), serum concentration (5 or 10%), atmosphere oxygen tension (5 or 20%), and refreshment of the medium on the ability of luteal cells to produce progesterone (P(4)) were evaluated. The production of P(4) was significantly increased in early CL cultures, and luteal cells adapted well to simple media (SOF), low serum concentrations (5%), and oxygen tensions (5%). In experiment 3, previous luteal cell cryopreservation did not affect the production of P(4), PGF(2α), and PGE(2) compared to fresh cell cultures. This enables the use of pools of frozen-thawed cells to decrease the variation in cell function associated with primary cell cultures. In experiment 4, mineral oil overlaying culture wells resulted in a 50-fold decrease of the P(4) quantified in the medium, but had no effect on PGF(2α) and PGE(2) quantification. In conclusion, a luteal cell in vitro culture system suitable for the 5-d-long co-culture with early embryos was developed. PMID:23054443

  4. The Relationship between National Culture and the Usability of an E-Learning System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downey, Steve; Wentling, Rose Mary; Wentling, Tim; Wadsworth, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    This study sought to measure the relationship between national culture and the usability of an e-Learning system by using Hofstede's cultural dimensions and Nielson's usability attributes. The study revealed that high uncertainty avoidance cultures found the system more frustrating to use. The study also revealed that individuals from cultures…

  5. A Neuronal Culture System to Detect Prion Synaptotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Cheng; Imberdis, Thibaut; Garza, Maria Carmen; Wille, Holger; Harris, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic pathology is an early feature of prion as well as other neurodegenerative diseases. Although the self-templating process by which prions propagate is well established, the mechanisms by which prions cause synaptotoxicity are poorly understood, due largely to the absence of experimentally tractable cell culture models. Here, we report that exposure of cultured hippocampal neurons to PrPSc, the infectious isoform of the prion protein, results in rapid retraction of dendritic spines. This effect is entirely dependent on expression of the cellular prion protein, PrPC, by target neurons, and on the presence of a nine-amino acid, polybasic region at the N-terminus of the PrPC molecule. Both protease-resistant and protease-sensitive forms of PrPSc cause dendritic loss. This system provides new insights into the mechanisms responsible for prion neurotoxicity, and it provides a platform for characterizing different pathogenic forms of PrPSc and testing potential therapeutic agents. PMID:27227882

  6. Response costs of mammography adherence: Iranian women’s perceptions

    PubMed Central

    Khodayarian, Mahsa; Mazloomi-Mahmoodabad, Seyed Saied; Lamyian, Minoor; Morowatisharifabad, Mohammad Ali; Tavangar, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mammography as the most common secondary prevention method has known to be helpful in detecting breast cancer at the early stages. Low level of participation among women toward mammography uptake due to cultural beliefs is a great concern. This study aimed at exploring the perceptions of women about response costs of mammography adherence (MA) in Yazd, Iran. Methods: A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews was performed. Fourteen women,one oncology nurse, and a breast cancer survivor were purposefully interviewed. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed by directed content analysis method based on protection motivation theory (PMT). Results: One main theme was emerged from the analysis namely called "response costs".Two main categories were also emerged from the data; (1) psychological barriers with six subcategories including "embarrassment," "worry about being diagnosed with cancer," "preoccupation with underlying disease," "misconception about mammography," "need for an accompanying person," and "internalizing the experiences of the others," and (2) maladaptive coping modes which encompassed three subcategories: "religious faith," "fatalism," and"avoidance and denial." Conclusion: Useful information was provided about the response costs of mammography utilization based on the perceptions of women. Cognitive barriers may be decreased by conducting modifications in women’s awareness and attitude toward MA as well as changing the national health system infrastructures. Incorporating religious and cultural belief systems into MA educational programs through motivational messages is recommended. PMID:27386423

  7. Biochemical Study of Mixed Culture Prototype in a Closed Ecological System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischer, R. G.

    1960-01-01

    Since June 1, 1960, the date of initiation of this research project, efforts have been directed toward studying cultural and fermentation patterns and the methodology of pure culture isolation of prototype microorganisms to be employed in closed ecological systems.

  8. Mobile system for in-situ imaging of cultural objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemlicka, J.; Jakubek, J.; Krejci, F.; Hradil, D.; Hradilova, J.; Mislerova, H.

    2012-01-01

    Non-invasive analytical techniques recently developed with the Timepix pixel detector have shown great potential for the inspection of objects of cultural heritage. We have developed new instrumentation and methodology for in-situ X-ray transmission radiography and X-ray fluorescence imaging and successfully tested and evaluated a mobile system for remote terrain tasks. The prototype portable imaging device comprises the radiation source tube and the spectral sensitive X-ray camera. Both components can be moreover mounted on independent motorized positioning systems allowing adaptation of irradiation geometry to the object shape. Both parts are placed onto a pair of universal portable holders (tripods). The detector is placed in a shielded box with exchangeable entrance window (beam filters and pinhole collimator). This adjustable setup allows performing in-situ measurements for both transmission and emission (XRF) radiography. The assembled system has been successfully tested in our laboratory with phantoms and real samples. The obtained and evaluated results are presented in this paper. Future work will include successive adaptation of the current system for real in-situ utilization and preparation of software allowing semi-automatic remote control of measurements.

  9. A Profile of Mexican-born Women Who Adhere to National Cervical Cancer Screening Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Christina M.; Wallace, Debra

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine Mexican-born women’s utilization and adherence to cervical cancer screening guidelines. Ninety-seven women in southeastern U.S. participated. Data was collected in Spanish. The majority of women met adherence guidelines for the Pap exam. Marital status, educational attainment, marianismo, blood pressure knowledge, fatalism, cultural cancer beliefs, trust in provider, and perceived provider communication abilities were not associated with utilization or adherence to screening guidelines. This study had higher than expected adherence to screening guidelines. Nearly all women received screenings through safety net services indicating the need to advocate for continued public health funding. PMID:25051321

  10. Enhancement of endothelial differentiation of adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells by a three-dimensional culture system of microwell.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xuefeng; Zhang, Yanting; Zhao, Xiaozhi; Zhang, Shiwei; Wu, Jinhui; Guo, Hongqian; Hu, Yiqiao

    2015-01-01

    Adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells (AdMSCs) have been demonstrated to have ability to differentiate into several cell lineages, including endothelial cells. The low endothelial differentiation efficiency, however, limits further clinical application of AdMSCs for therapeutic angiogenesis. This study was designed to investigate the feasibility to promote endothelial differentiation efficacy of AdMSCs using microwell array as a 3-D culture system. AdMSCs aggregates were prepared using photocrosslinkable polyethylene glycol dimethacrylate (PEGDM) derived microwell. AdMSCs aggregated and formed well defined 3-D aggregates following seeding. The microwell was effective in regulating the size of AdMSCs aggregates with low variation. AdMSCs within the 3-D aggregates maintained the cell surface epitopes of AdMSCs with high viability. Endothelial growth medium was used to induce the in vitro endothelial differentiation of AdMSCs. Both gene expression results from real time PCR and protein expression data from immunofluorescent staining revealed that 3-D cultured aggregates significantly promote the endothelial differentiation efficacy of AdMSCs. AdMSCs or AdMSCs aggregates were injected into the subcutaneous space of nu/nu mice to investigate the endothelial differentiation in vivo. The immunofluorescent staining data indicated promoted endothelial differentiation of 3-D aggregates compared with 2-D AdMSCs. Aggregates dissociated cells were obtained by transferring 3-D aggregates onto the adherent surfaces. Cells dissociated from induced aggregates were still positive for endothelial specific markers and were able to form endothelial-like tube structures on matrigel, indicating the endothelial properties. We conclude that microwell is an ideal 3-D culture system for promoting endothelial differentiation efficacy of AdMSCs. PMID:25890756

  11. Glaucoma Medication Adherence among African Americans: Program Development

    PubMed Central

    Dreer, Laura E.; Girkin, Christopher A.; Campbell, Lisa; Wood, Andy; Gao, Liyan; Owsley, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To elucidate barriers and facilitators related to glaucoma medication adherence among African Americans (AA) with glaucoma and to elicit input from a community-based participatory research team in order to guide the development of a culturally informed, health promotion program for improving glaucoma medication adherence among AA’s. Methods The nominal group technique (NGT), a highly structured focus group methodology, was implemented with 12 separate groups of AA’s patients with glaucoma (N = 89) to identify barriers and facilitators related to glaucoma medication usage. Participant rank-ordering votes were summed across groups and categorized into themes. Next, an individually and culturally targeted health promotion program promoting appropriate medication adherence was developed based on focus group results and input from a community-based participatory research team. Results The top five barriers included problems with 1) forgetfulness, 2) side effects, 3) cost/affordability, 4) eye drop administration, and 5) the eye drop schedule. The most salient top five facilitators were 1) fear or thoughts about the consequences of not taking eye drops, 2) use of memory aids, cues, or strategies, 3) maintaining a regular routine or schedule for eye drop administration, 4) ability to afford eye drops, and 5) keeping eye drops in the same area. The resulting health promotion program was based on a multi-component empowerment framework that included glaucoma education, motivational interviewing, and problem-solving training to improve glaucoma medication adherence. Conclusions Barriers and facilitators related to glaucoma medication adherence among AA’s are multifactorial. Based on the NGT themes and input from the community-based participatory research team, a culturally informed, health promotion program was designed and holds great promise for improving medication adherence among this vulnerable population. PMID:23873033

  12. Organotypic slice co-culture systems to study axon regeneration in the dopaminergic system ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Heine, Claudia; Franke, Heike

    2014-01-01

    Organotypic slice co-cultures are suitable tools to study axonal regeneration and development (growth or regrowth) of different projection systems of the CNS under ex vivo conditions.In this chapter, we describe in detail the reconstruction of the mesocortical and nigrostriatal dopaminergic projection system culturing tissue slices from the ventral tegmental area/substantia nigra (VTA/SN) with the prefrontal cortex (PFC) or the striatum (STR). The protocol includes the detailed slice preparation and incubation. Moreover, different application possibilities of the ex vivo model are mentioned; as an example, the substance treatment procedure and biocytin tracing are described to reveal the effect of applied substances on fiber outgrowth. PMID:24838961

  13. Adherent Raindrop Modeling, Detectionand Removal in Video.

    PubMed

    You, Shaodi; Tan, Robby T; Kawakami, Rei; Mukaigawa, Yasuhiro; Ikeuchi, Katsushi

    2016-09-01

    Raindrops adhered to a windscreen or window glass can significantly degrade the visibility of a scene. Modeling, detecting and removing raindrops will, therefore, benefit many computer vision applications, particularly outdoor surveillance systems and intelligent vehicle systems. In this paper, a method that automatically detects and removes adherent raindrops is introduced. The core idea is to exploit the local spatio-temporal derivatives of raindrops. To accomplish the idea, we first model adherent raindrops using law of physics, and detect raindrops based on these models in combination with motion and intensity temporal derivatives of the input video. Having detected the raindrops, we remove them and restore the images based on an analysis that some areas of raindrops completely occludes the scene, and some other areas occlude only partially. For partially occluding areas, we restore them by retrieving as much as possible information of the scene, namely, by solving a blending function on the detected partially occluding areas using the temporal intensity derivative. For completely occluding areas, we recover them by using a video completion technique. Experimental results using various real videos show the effectiveness of our method.

  14. Competition of Invertebrates Mixed Culture in the Closed Aquatic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisman, Tamara

    The study considers the experimental model of interactions between invertebrates (the cilates Paramecium caudatum, Paramecium bursaria and the rotifers Brachionis plicatilis) in the closed aquatic system. The infusoria P.caudatum can feed on yeast, bacteria and chlorella; in this experiment growth and reproduction were maintained by bacteria only. The P.bursaria - zoochlorella endosymbiosis is a natural model of a simple biotic cycle. P.bursaria consumes glucose and oxygen released by zoochlorella in the process of biosynthesis and releases nitrogenous compounds and carbon dioxide necessary for algal photosynthesis. The rotifers Br. plicatilis can consume algae, bacteria and detritus. Thus in experiment with the mixed culture of invertebrates they can use different food sources. However with any initial percentage of the invertebrates the end portion of P.bursaria reaches 90-99

  15. Induction of carcinoembryonic antigen expression in a three-dimensional culture system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jessup, J. M.; Brown, D.; Fitzgerald, W.; Ford, R. D.; Nachman, A.; Goodwin, T. J.; Spaulding, G.

    1994-01-01

    MIP-101 is a poorly differentiated human colon carcinoma cell line established from ascites that produces minimal amounts of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), a 180 kDa glycoprotein tumor marker, and nonspecific cross-reacting antigen (NCA), a related protein that has 50 and 90 kDa isoforms, in vitro in monolayer culture. MIP-101 produces CEA when implanted into the peritoneum of nude mice but not when implanted into subcutaneous tissue. We tested whether MIP-101 cells may be induced to express CEA when cultured on microcarrier beads in three-dimensional cultures, either in static cultures as non-adherent aggregates or under dynamic conditions in a NASA-designed low shear stress bioreactor. MIP- 101 cells proliferated well under all three conditions and increased CEA and NCA production 3 - 4 fold when grown in three-dimensional cultures compared to MIP-101 cells growing logarithmically in monolayers. These results suggest that three-dimensional growth in vitro simulates tumor function in vivo and that three-dimensional growth by itself may enhance production of molecules that are associated with the metastatic process.

  16. Measurement of adherent cell mass and growth

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kidong; Millet, Larry J.; Kim, Namjung; Li, Huan; Jin, Xiaozhong; Popescu, Gabriel; Aluru, N. R.; Hsia, K. Jimmy; Bashir, Rashid

    2010-01-01

    The characterization of physical properties of cells such as their mass and stiffness has been of great interest and can have profound implications in cell biology, tissue engineering, cancer, and disease research. For example, the direct dependence of cell growth rate on cell mass for individual adherent human cells can elucidate the mechanisms underlying cell cycle progression. Here we develop an array of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) resonant mass sensors that can be used to directly measure the biophysical properties, mass, and growth rate of single adherent cells. Unlike conventional cantilever mass sensors, our sensors retain a uniform mass sensitivity over the cell attachment surface. By measuring the frequency shift of the mass sensors with growing (soft) cells and fixed (stiff) cells, and through analytical modeling, we derive the Young’s modulus of the unfixed cell and unravel the dependence of the cell mass measurement on cell stiffness. Finally, we grew individual cells on the mass sensors and measured their mass for 50+ hours. Our results demonstrate that adherent human colon epithelial cells have increased growth rates with a larger cell mass, and the average growth rate increases linearly with the cell mass, at 3.25%/hr. Our sensitive mass sensors with a position-independent mass sensitivity can be coupled with microscopy for simultaneous monitoring of cell growth and status, and provide an ideal method to study cell growth, cell cycle progression, differentiation, and apoptosis. PMID:21068372

  17. Ferromagnetic Micropallets for Magnetic Capture of Single Adherent Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gunn, Nicholas M.; Chang, Ruth; Westerhof, Trisha; Li, Guann-Pyng; Bachman, Mark; Nelson, Edward L.

    2010-01-01

    We present a magnetic micropallet array and demonstration of its capacity to recover specific, individual adherent cells from large populations and deliver them for downstream single cell analysis. A ferromagnetic photopolymer was formulated, characterized, and used to fabricate magnetic micropallets, which are microscale pedestals that provide demarcated cell growth surfaces, with preservation of biophysical properties including photopatternability, biocompatibility, and optical clarity. Each micropallet holds a single adherent cell in culture and hundreds of thousands of micropallets compose a single micropallet array. Any micropallet in the array can be recovered on demand, carrying the adhered cell with it. We used this platform to selectively recover single cells, which were subsequently analyzed using single cell RT-qPCR. PMID:20968293

  18. Religious Dimensions of World Cultures as Related to the Holt Databank System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calderwood, Beatrice

    This resource unit, part of a series of guides by the Public Religion Studies Center at Wright State University, correlates with the Holt Databank System "Inquiring About Cultures." The unit covers many facets of many cultures ranging from primitive tribes to complex, urban societies and makes evident the religious dimensions of culture in both…

  19. Establishment of an adherent cell feeder layer from human umbilical cord blood for support of long-term hematopoietic progenitor cell growth.

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Z Q; Burkholder, J K; Qiu, P; Schultz, J C; Shahidi, N T; Yang, N S

    1994-01-01

    Previous attempts to establish a stromal cell feeder layer from human umbilical cord blood (HUCB) have met with very limited success. It has been suggested that there is an insufficient number of stromal precursor cells in HUCB to form a hematopoietic-supporting feeder layer in primary cultures. The present study shows that HUCB does contain a significant accessory cell population that routinely develops into a confluent, adherent cell layer under defined primary culture conditions. HUCB-derived adherent layers were shown to support long-term hematopoietic activity for an average of 4 months. This was achieved by using a customized coverslip with a modified surface structure as the cell attachment substratum and using a specialized culture feeding regime. We have characterized the various cell types (including fibroblasts, macrophages, and endothelial cells) and extracellular matrix proteins (including fibronectin, collagen III, and laminin) that were present in abundance in the HUCB-derived adherent cell layer. In contrast, oil red O-staining fat cells were rarely detected. ELISA and bioassays showed that stem cell factor and interleukin 6 were produced by the HUCB stromal cell cultures, but interleukin 3 or granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor was not detected. Application of this hematopoietic culture system to transgenic and gene therapy studies of stem cells is discussed. Images PMID:7527553

  20. Fully-automated roller bottle handling system for large scale culture of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Kunitake, R; Suzuki, A; Ichihashi, H; Matsuda, S; Hirai, O; Morimoto, K

    1997-01-20

    A fully automatic and continuous cell culture system based on roller bottles is described in this paper. The system includes a culture rack storage station for storing a large number of roller bottles filled with culture medium and inoculated with mammalian cells, mass-handling facility for extracting completed cultures from the roller bottles, and replacing the culture medium. The various component units of the system were controlled either by a general-purpose programmable logic controller or a dedicated controller. The system provided four subsequent operation modes: cell inoculation, medium change, harvesting, and medium change. The operator could easily select and change the appropriate mode from outside of the aseptic area. The development of the system made large-scale production of mammalian cells, and manufacturing and stabilization of high quality products such as erythropoietin possible under total aseptic control, and opened up the door for industrial production of physiologically active substances as pharmaceutical drugs by mammalian cell culture.

  1. Improving Patient's Primary Medication Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Leguelinel-Blache, Géraldine; Dubois, Florent; Bouvet, Sophie; Roux-Marson, Clarisse; Arnaud, Fabrice; Castelli, Christel; Ray, Valérie; Kinowski, Jean-Marie; Sotto, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Quality of transitions of care is one of the first concerns in patient safety. Redesigning the discharge process to incorporate clinical pharmacy activities could reduce the incidence of postdischarge adverse events by improving medication adherence. The present study investigated the value of pharmacist counseling sessions on primary medication adherence after hospital discharge. This study was conducted in a 1844-bed hospital in France. It was divided in an observational period and an interventional period of 3 months each. In both periods, ward-based clinical pharmacists performed medication reconciliation and inpatient follow-up. In interventional period, initial counseling and discharge counseling sessions were added to pharmaceutical care. The primary medication adherence was assessed by calling community pharmacists 7 days after patient discharge. We compared the measure of adherence between the patients from the observational period (n = 201) and the interventional period (n = 193). The rate of patients who were adherent increased from 51.0% to 66.7% between both periods (P < 0.01). When discharge counseling was performed (n = 78), this rate rose to 79.7% (P < 0.001). The multivariate regression performed on data from both periods showed that age of at least 78 years old, and 3 or less new medications on discharge order were predictive factors of adherence. New medications ordered at discharge represented 42.0% (n = 1018/2426) of all medications on discharge order. The rate of unfilled new medications decreased from 50.2% in the observational period to 32.5% in the interventional period (P < 10−7). However, patients included in the observational period were not significantly more often readmitted or visited the emergency department than the patients who experienced discharge counseling during the interventional period (45.3% vs. 46.2%; P = 0.89). This study highlights that discharge counseling sessions are

  2. Technique for Handling Cover Slips Used in Cell Culture Systems *

    PubMed Central

    Bowne, J. G.; Jochim, Michael M.

    1964-01-01

    A stainless steel, grooved rack was designed to handle large numbers of coverslips used in cell cultures. The rack separated and held the coverslips through the washing process and subsequent manipulations. Slips washed by this method allowed consistently good cell sheets to grow with no signs of cytotoxicity to the cultures. ImagesFIGURE 1.FIGURE 2. PMID:17649500

  3. Forgotten Millions: A Case of Cultural and Systemic Bias

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alur, Mithu

    2007-01-01

    In this article the author discusses concepts of exclusion and inclusion and how important it is to understand exclusionary practices in the context and culture specificity of each region to attempt to remove barriers to inclusive education. She specifically discusses the low status given to girls and women in the Indian culture and how this…

  4. Multispectral light metering system for cultural heritage diagnosis and conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miccoli, Matteo; Melis, Marcello

    2013-05-01

    In the world of Cultural Heritage the first concern is all about Conservation of the works of art. A piece of art in bad shape is meant to deteriorate to an irreversible stage. To avoid this, quite often it's needed to go through one or more cycles of restoration to clean and consolidate the various elements of the piece. The very second concern, once the work of art is restored and in good and stable shape, is its fruition. At the end of the day why one should do all that restoration work if nobody then can access and view? Yet viewing and enjoying an artwork means that a visitor would be able to see it at its best, and this means, almost always, to have a good lighting system. Today, both restoration and fruition can greatly benefit of all the available technologies, and achieve very high level quality. The goal of this paper is the development of an exposimetric system suitable to be extremely useful as a tool for the the non invasive analysis, as well as for the lighting design and lighting systems monitoring. Many diagnosis techniques that are used before the restoration stage, require a suitable lighting system to allow to extract from the painting the maximum amount of information through the acquisition of images in the range of visible as well as UV and IR light. A standard exposimeter is for its own nature, sensitive only to the visible light, constrained by the standard photometric sensitivity curve V(lambda). A wide band exposimeter would be, on the other hand, an invaluable tool to get higher precision and to speed up multispectral wide band images acquisition, avoiding time wasting fail and try cycles to record the subject under wide spectrum conditions. The same equipment can be used to monitor the quality of the light in a expo lighting system at, for example, a museum or a gallery. The light hitting a piece of art has to allow the visitor to see and appreciate all the color shades, and to appreciate the contrast of dark and bright areas due only to

  5. Culturing Human Pluripotent and Neural Stem Cells in an Enclosed Cell Culture System for Basic and Preclinical Research.

    PubMed

    Stover, Alexander E; Herculian, Siranush; Banuelos, Maria G; Navarro, Samantha L; Jenkins, Michael P; Schwartz, Philip H

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes how to use a custom manufactured, commercially available enclosed cell culture system for basic and preclinical research. Biosafety cabinets (BSCs) and incubators have long been the standard for culturing and expanding cell lines for basic and preclinical research. However, as the focus of many stem cell laboratories shifts from basic research to clinical translation, additional requirements are needed of the cell culturing system. All processes must be well documented and have exceptional requirements for sterility and reproducibility. In traditional incubators, gas concentrations and temperatures widely fluctuate anytime the cells are removed for feeding, passaging, or other manipulations. Such interruptions contribute to an environment that is not the standard for cGMP and GLP guidelines. These interruptions must be minimized especially when cells are utilized for therapeutic purposes. The motivation to move from the standard BSC and incubator system to a closed system is that such interruptions can be made negligible. Closed systems provide a work space to feed and manipulate cell cultures and maintain them in a controlled environment where temperature and gas concentrations are consistent. This way, pluripotent and multipotent stem cells can be maintained at optimum health from the moment of their derivation all the way to their eventual use in therapy. PMID:27341536

  6. Culturing Human Pluripotent and Neural Stem Cells in an Enclosed Cell Culture System for Basic and Preclinical Research

    PubMed Central

    Stover, Alexander E.; Herculian, Siranush; Banuelos, Maria G.; Navarro, Samantha L.; Jenkins, Michael P.; Schwartz, Philip H.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes how to use a custom manufactured, commercially available enclosed cell culture system for basic and preclinical research. Biosafety cabinets (BSCs) and incubators have long been the standard for culturing and expanding cell lines for basic and preclinical research. However, as the focus of many stem cell laboratories shifts from basic research to clinical translation, additional requirements are needed of the cell culturing system. All processes must be well documented and have exceptional requirements for sterility and reproducibility. In traditional incubators, gas concentrations and temperatures widely fluctuate anytime the cells are removed for feeding, passaging, or other manipulations. Such interruptions contribute to an environment that is not the standard for cGMP and GLP guidelines. These interruptions must be minimized especially when cells are utilized for therapeutic purposes. The motivation to move from the standard BSC and incubator system to a closed system is that such interruptions can be made negligible. Closed systems provide a work space to feed and manipulate cell cultures and maintain them in a controlled environment where temperature and gas concentrations are consistent. This way, pluripotent and multipotent stem cells can be maintained at optimum health from the moment of their derivation all the way to their eventual use in therapy. PMID:27341536

  7. Does the concept of safety culture help or hinder systems thinking in safety?

    PubMed

    Reiman, Teemu; Rollenhagen, Carl

    2014-07-01

    The concept of safety culture has become established in safety management applications in all major safety-critical domains. The idea that safety culture somehow represents a "systemic view" on safety is seldom explicitly spoken out, but nevertheless seem to linger behind many safety culture discourses. However, in this paper we argue that the "new" contribution to safety management from safety culture never really became integrated with classical engineering principles and concepts. This integration would have been necessary for the development of a more genuine systems-oriented view on safety; e.g. a conception of safety in which human, technological, organisational and cultural factors are understood as mutually interacting elements. Without of this integration, researchers and the users of the various tools and methods associated with safety culture have sometimes fostered a belief that "safety culture" in fact represents such a systemic view about safety. This belief is, however, not backed up by theoretical or empirical evidence. It is true that safety culture, at least in some sense, represents a holistic term-a totality of factors that include human, organisational and technological aspects. However, the departure for such safety culture models is still human and organisational factors rather than technology (or safety) itself. The aim of this paper is to critically review the various uses of the concept of safety culture as representing a systemic view on safety. The article will take a look at the concepts of culture and safety culture based on previous studies, and outlines in more detail the theoretical challenges in safety culture as a systems concept. The paper also presents recommendations on how to make safety culture more systemic. PMID:24275532

  8. Does the concept of safety culture help or hinder systems thinking in safety?

    PubMed

    Reiman, Teemu; Rollenhagen, Carl

    2014-07-01

    The concept of safety culture has become established in safety management applications in all major safety-critical domains. The idea that safety culture somehow represents a "systemic view" on safety is seldom explicitly spoken out, but nevertheless seem to linger behind many safety culture discourses. However, in this paper we argue that the "new" contribution to safety management from safety culture never really became integrated with classical engineering principles and concepts. This integration would have been necessary for the development of a more genuine systems-oriented view on safety; e.g. a conception of safety in which human, technological, organisational and cultural factors are understood as mutually interacting elements. Without of this integration, researchers and the users of the various tools and methods associated with safety culture have sometimes fostered a belief that "safety culture" in fact represents such a systemic view about safety. This belief is, however, not backed up by theoretical or empirical evidence. It is true that safety culture, at least in some sense, represents a holistic term-a totality of factors that include human, organisational and technological aspects. However, the departure for such safety culture models is still human and organisational factors rather than technology (or safety) itself. The aim of this paper is to critically review the various uses of the concept of safety culture as representing a systemic view on safety. The article will take a look at the concepts of culture and safety culture based on previous studies, and outlines in more detail the theoretical challenges in safety culture as a systems concept. The paper also presents recommendations on how to make safety culture more systemic.

  9. Enhancement of human polymorphonuclear leukocyte adherence to plastic and endothelium by phorbol myristate acetate. Comparison with human C5a.

    PubMed Central

    Webster, R. O.; Wysolmerski, R. B.; Lagunoff, D.

    1986-01-01

    The adherence of circulating neutrophils to vascular endothelium represents a necessary step in the chemotactic emigration of neutrophils to extravascular inflammatory sites. Studies of neutrophil adherence induced by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) were undertaken to determine the ability of a nonchemotactic neutrophil stimulus to provoke increased adherence. The authors found that the adherence of human neutrophils to plastic surfaces or confluent monolayers of endothelial cells is enhanced in a concentration-dependent fashion by exposure of neutrophils to PMA. The effect of PMA concentration (0.1-5.0 ng/ml) on increased neutrophil adherence parallels that observed for superoxide anion generation and release of lysosomal enzymes from specific granules. Whereas complement C5a-treated neutrophils exhibited a fourfold to fivefold increase in adherence to endothelial cells, PMA-treated neutrophils showed a 10-fold to 20-fold increase. The ability of PMA to cause increased neutrophil adherence to endothelium appeared to be directed primarily at the neutrophil. Pretreatment of neutrophils with PMA was as effective as coincubation in causing increased adherence to plastic surfaces or confluent cultured endothelial cells, but pretreatment of endothelial cells with PMA failed to promote neutrophil adherence. Alteration of neutrophil cytoskeletal structures by cytochalasin B treatment did not prevent subsequent PMA-stimulated neutrophil adherence. These results demonstrate that increased neutrophil adherence to surfaces can be induced by a nonchemotactic stimulus and that neutrophil adherence is independent of organized microfilaments. Images Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:3789092

  10. Ethanol production from starch by a coimmobilized mixed culture system of Aspergillus awamori and Zymomonas mobilis

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, H.; Kurosawa, H.; Murakami, H.

    1986-01-01

    The production of ethanol from starch by a coimmobilized mixed culture system of aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms in Ca-alginate gel beads was investigated. The mold Aspergillus awamori was used as an aerobic amylolytic microorganism and an anaerobic bacterium, Zymomonas mobilis, as an ethanol producer. By controlling the mixing ratio of the microorganisms in the inoculum size, a desirable coimmobilized mixed culture system, in which the aerobic mycelia grew on and near the oxygen-rich surface of the gel beads while the anaerobic bacterial cells mainly grew in the oxygen-deficient central part of the gel beads, was naturally established under the aerobic culture conditions, and ethanol could be directly produced from starch by the system. The ethanol productivity by the system in flask culture was particularly affected by the shear stress (dependent on the shaking speed) which controlled the mycelial growth on the surface of the gel beads. Under optimum culture conditions in the flask culture, the glucose produced was instantly consumed, and was not observed in the culture broth; the final concentration of ethanol produced from 100 g/L starch was 25 g/L and the yield coefficient for ethanol, Y/sub p/s/, was 0.38. The ethanol productivity by the coimmobilized mixed culture system was compared with those by other various culture systems and the advantages of the system were clarified.

  11. Contributions of EspA Filaments and Curli Fimbriae in Cellular Adherence and Biofilm Formation of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vijay K; Kudva, Indira T; Bearson, Bradley L; Stasko, Judith A

    2016-01-01

    In Escherichia coli O157:H7 (O157), the filamentous structure of the type III secretion system is produced from the polymerization of the EspA protein. EspA filaments are essential for O157 adherence to epithelial cells. In previous studies, we demonstrated that O157 hha deletion mutants showed increased adherence to HEp-2 cells and produced abundant biofilms. Transcriptional analysis revealed increased expression of espA as well as the csgA gene, which encodes curli fimbriae that are essential for biofilm formation. In the present study, we constructed hha espA, hha csgA, and hha csgA espA deletion mutants to determine the relative importance of EspA and CsgA in O157 adherence to HEp-2 cells and biofilm formation. In vitro adherence assays, conducted at 37°C in a tissue culture medium containing 0.1% glucose, showed that HEp-2 cell adherence required EspA because hha espA and hha csgA espA mutants adhered to HEp-2 cells at higher levels only when complemented with an espA-expressing plasmid. Biofilm assays performed at 28°C in a medium lacking glucose showed dependency of biofilm formation on CsgA; however EspA was not produced under these conditions. Despite production of detectable levels of EspA at 37°C in media supplemented with 0.1% glucose, the biofilm formation occurred independent of EspA. These results indicate dependency of O157 adherence to epithelial cells on EspA filaments, while CsgA promoted biofilm formation under conditions mimicking those found in the environment (low temperature with nutrient limitations) and in the digestive tract of an host animal (higher temperature and low levels of glucose).

  12. Contributions of EspA Filaments and Curli Fimbriae in Cellular Adherence and Biofilm Formation of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vijay K.; Kudva, Indira T.; Bearson, Bradley L.; Stasko, Judith A.

    2016-01-01

    In Escherichia coli O157:H7 (O157), the filamentous structure of the type III secretion system is produced from the polymerization of the EspA protein. EspA filaments are essential for O157 adherence to epithelial cells. In previous studies, we demonstrated that O157 hha deletion mutants showed increased adherence to HEp-2 cells and produced abundant biofilms. Transcriptional analysis revealed increased expression of espA as well as the csgA gene, which encodes curli fimbriae that are essential for biofilm formation. In the present study, we constructed hha espA, hha csgA, and hha csgA espA deletion mutants to determine the relative importance of EspA and CsgA in O157 adherence to HEp-2 cells and biofilm formation. In vitro adherence assays, conducted at 37°C in a tissue culture medium containing 0.1% glucose, showed that HEp-2 cell adherence required EspA because hha espA and hha csgA espA mutants adhered to HEp-2 cells at higher levels only when complemented with an espA-expressing plasmid. Biofilm assays performed at 28°C in a medium lacking glucose showed dependency of biofilm formation on CsgA; however EspA was not produced under these conditions. Despite production of detectable levels of EspA at 37°C in media supplemented with 0.1% glucose, the biofilm formation occurred independent of EspA. These results indicate dependency of O157 adherence to epithelial cells on EspA filaments, while CsgA promoted biofilm formation under conditions mimicking those found in the environment (low temperature with nutrient limitations) and in the digestive tract of an host animal (higher temperature and low levels of glucose). PMID:26900701

  13. A microdroplet cell culture based high frequency somatic embryogenesis system for pigeonpea, Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Nagan Udhaya; Gnanaraj, Muniraj; Sindhujaa, Vajravel; Viji, Maluventhen; Manoharan, Kumariah

    2015-09-01

    A protocol for high frequency production of somatic embryos was worked out in pigeonpea, Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp. The protocol involved sequential employment of embryogenic callus cultures, low density cell suspension cultures and a novel microdroplet cell culture system. The microdroplet cell cultures involved culture of a single cell in 10 μI of Murashige and Skoog's medium supplemented with phytohormones, growth factors and phospholipid precursors. By employing the microdroplet cell cultures, single cells in isolation were grown into cell clones which developed somatic embryos. Further, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, kinetin, polyethylene glycol, putrescine, spermine, spermidine, choline chloride, ethanolamine and LiCl were supplemented to the low density cell suspension cultures and microdroplet cell cultures to screen for their cell division and somatic embryogenesis activity. Incubation of callus or the inoculum employed for low density cell suspension cultures and microdroplet cell cultures with polyethylene glycol was found critical for induction of somatic embryogenesis. Somatic embryogenesis at a frequency of 1.19, 3.16 and 6.51 per 10(6) cells was achieved in the callus, low density cell suspension cultures and microdroplet cell cultures, respectively. Advantages of employing microdroplet cell cultures for high frequency production of somatic embryos and its application in genetic transformation protocols are discussed. PMID:26548080

  14. A microdroplet cell culture based high frequency somatic embryogenesis system for pigeonpea, Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Nagan Udhaya; Gnanaraj, Muniraj; Sindhujaa, Vajravel; Viji, Maluventhen; Manoharan, Kumariah

    2015-09-01

    A protocol for high frequency production of somatic embryos was worked out in pigeonpea, Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp. The protocol involved sequential employment of embryogenic callus cultures, low density cell suspension cultures and a novel microdroplet cell culture system. The microdroplet cell cultures involved culture of a single cell in 10 μI of Murashige and Skoog's medium supplemented with phytohormones, growth factors and phospholipid precursors. By employing the microdroplet cell cultures, single cells in isolation were grown into cell clones which developed somatic embryos. Further, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, kinetin, polyethylene glycol, putrescine, spermine, spermidine, choline chloride, ethanolamine and LiCl were supplemented to the low density cell suspension cultures and microdroplet cell cultures to screen for their cell division and somatic embryogenesis activity. Incubation of callus or the inoculum employed for low density cell suspension cultures and microdroplet cell cultures with polyethylene glycol was found critical for induction of somatic embryogenesis. Somatic embryogenesis at a frequency of 1.19, 3.16 and 6.51 per 10(6) cells was achieved in the callus, low density cell suspension cultures and microdroplet cell cultures, respectively. Advantages of employing microdroplet cell cultures for high frequency production of somatic embryos and its application in genetic transformation protocols are discussed.

  15. Improving medication adherence in migraine treatment.

    PubMed

    Seng, Elizabeth K; Rains, Jeanetta A; Nicholson, Robert A; Lipton, Richard B

    2015-06-01

    Medication adherence is integral to successful treatment of migraine and other headache. The existing literature examining medication adherence in migraine is small, and the methodologies used to assess adherence are limited. However, these studies broadly suggest poor adherence to both acute and preventive migraine medications, with studies using more objective monitoring reporting lower adherence rates. Methods for improving medication adherence are described, including organizational strategies, provider-monitoring and self-monitoring of adherence, regimen strategies, patient education, self-management skills training (e.g., stimulus control, behavioral contracts), and cognitive-behavioral therapy techniques. The article concludes by discussing the future of research regarding adherence to medications for migraine and other headaches.

  16. Detection by molecular hybridization of pap, afa, and sfa adherence systems in Escherichia coli strains associated with urinary and enteral infections.

    PubMed

    Archambaud, M; Courcoux, P; Labigne-Roussel, A

    1988-01-01

    The genetic determinants responsible for the adherence of Escherichia coli to uroepithelial cells have been identified in recent years by genetic and molecular methods. Specific DNA probes for each of the three operons which have been cloned so far (pap, afa, sfa/foc operons) have been used in colony hybridization experiments to detect the presence of each of these operons in the chromosomal DNA of 443 strains of E. coli; 186 strains were from patients with urinary tract infections (pyelonephritis, 106 strains; cystitis, 59; asymptomatic bacteriuria, 21) and 257 were strains from the stools of healthy subjects (61) or from patients with various enteral infections (196). E. coli strains harbouring the pap operon were found more frequently in the urine of patients with pyelonephritis (p less than 0.001) and cystitis (p less than 0.01) than in control stools. The presence of two operons (pap + afa) or (pap + sfa/foc) was only observed in uropathogenic strains (p less than 0.02). Pap and sfa/foc operons were never found in strains causing enteral infection; however, the afa operon was found in 7.6% of the enteropathogenic E. coli.

  17. Revisiting the Role of Cultural Capital in East Asian Educational Systems: The Case of South Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byun, Soo-yong; Schofer, Evan; Kim, Kyung-keun

    2012-01-01

    The concept of cultural capital has proved invaluable in understanding educational systems in Western countries, and recent work seeks to extend those insights to the diverse educational systems of other geographic regions. Using data from the 2000 Programme for International Student Assessment, the authors explored cultural capital in South Korea…

  18. Vaccine production: upstream processing with adherent or suspension cell lines.

    PubMed

    Genzel, Yvonne; Rödig, Jana; Rapp, Erdmann; Reichl, Udo

    2014-01-01

    The production of viral vaccines in cell culture can be accomplished with primary, diploid, or continuous (transformed) cell lines. Each cell line, each virus type, and each vaccine preparation require the specific design of upstream and downstream processing. Media have to be selected as well as production vessels, cultivation conditions, and modes of operation. Many viruses only replicate to high titers in adherently growing cells, but similar to processes established for recombinant protein production, an increasing number of suspension cell lines is being evaluated for future use. Here, we describe key issues to be considered for the establishment of large-scale virus production in bioreactors. As an example upstream processing of cell culture-derived influenza virus production is described in more detail for adherently growing and for suspension cells. In particular, use of serum-containing, serum-free, and chemically defined media as well as choice of cultivation vessel are considered. PMID:24297427

  19. Enhancing Adherence in Clinical Exercise Trials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neal, Heather A.; Blair, Steven N.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses exercise adherence from the perspective of adhering to an exercise treatment in a controlled trial, focusing on: adherence (to intervention and measurement); the development of randomized clinical trials; exemplary randomized clinical trials in exercise science (exercise training studies and physical activity interventions); and study…

  20. Adherence to oral anticoagulants in patients with atrial fibrillation—a population-based retrospective cohort study linking health information systems in the Valencia region, Spain: a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Sanfélix-Gimeno, G; Rodríguez-Bernal, C L; Hurtado, I; Baixáuli-Pérez, C; Librero, J; Peiró, S

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Adherence to oral anticoagulation (OAC) treatment, vitamin K antagonists or new oral anticoagulants, is an essential element for effectiveness. Information on adherence to OAC in atrial fibrillation (AF) and the impact of adherence on clinical outcomes using real-world data barely exists. We aim to describe the patterns of adherence to OAC over time in patients with AF, estimate the associated factors and their impact on clinical events, and assess the same issues with conventional measures of primary and secondary adherence—proportion of days covered (PDC) and persistence—in routine clinical practice. Methods and analysis This is a population-based retrospective cohort study including all patients with AF treated with OAC from 2010 to date in Valencia, Spain; data will be obtained from diverse electronic records of the Valencia Health Agency. Primary outcome measure: adherence trajectories. Secondary outcomes: (1) primary non-adherence; (2) secondary adherence: (a) PDC, (b) persistence. Clinical outcomes: hospitalisation for haemorrhagic or thromboembolic events and death during follow-up. Analysis: (1) description of baseline characteristics, adherence patterns (trajectory models or latent class growth analysis models) and conventional adherence measures; (2) logistic or Cox multivariate regression models, to assess the associations between adherence measures and the covariates, and logistic multinomial regression models, to identify characteristics associated with each trajectory; (3) Cox proportional hazard models, to assess the relationship between adherence and clinical outcomes, with propensity score adjustment applied to further control for potential confounders; (4) to estimate the importance of different healthcare levels in the variations of adherence, logistic or Cox multilevel regression models. Ethics and dissemination This study has been approved by the corresponding Clinical Research Ethics Committee. We plan to disseminate the

  1. An analysis of the productivity of a CELSS continuous algal culture system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radmer, R.; Behrens, P.; Fernandez, E.; Arnett, K.

    1986-01-01

    One of the most attractive aspects of using algal cultures as plant components for a Closed Ecological Life Support Systems (CELSS) is the efficiency with which they can be grown. Although algae are not necessarily intrinsically more efficient than higher plants, the ease which they can be handled and manipulated (more like chemical reagents than plants), and the culturing techniques available, result in much higher growth rates than are usually attainable with higher plants. Furthermore, preliminary experiments have demonstrated that algal growth and physiology is not detectable altered in a microgravity environment, (1) whereas the response of higher plants to zero gravity is unknown. In order to rationally design and operate culture systems, it is necessary to understand how the macroparameters of a culture system, e.g., productivity, are related to the physiological aspects of the algal culture. A first principles analysis of culture system is discussed, and a mathematical model that describes the relationship of culture productivity to the cell concentration of light-limited culture is derived. The predicted productivity vs cell concentration curve agrees well with the experimental data obtained to test this model, indicating that this model permits an accurate prediction of culture productivity given the growth parameters of the system.

  2. Ordered, adherent layers of nanofibers enabled by supramolecular interactions

    PubMed Central

    Highley, Christopher B.; Rodell, Christopher B.; Kim, Iris L.; Wade, Ryan J.; Burdick, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Aligned nanofibrous substrates can be created by electrospinning, but methods for creating multilamellar structures of aligned fibers are limited. Here, apposed nanofibrous scaffolds with pendant β-cyclodextrin (CD) were adhered together by adamantane (Ad) modified hyaluronic acid, exploiting the guest-host interactions of CD and Ad for macroscopic assembly. Stable user-defined multi-layered scaffolds were formed for cell culture or tissue engineering. PMID:25408916

  3. Growth detection failures by the nonradiometric Bactec MGIT 960 mycobacterial culture system.

    PubMed

    Peña, Jeremy A; Ferraro, Mary Jane; Hoffman, Colleen G; Branda, John A

    2012-06-01

    Mycobacterial growth in liquid culture can go undetected by automated, nonradiometric growth detection systems. In our laboratory, instrument-negative tubes from the Bactec MGIT 960 system are inspected visually for clumps suggestive of mycobacterial growth, which (if present) are examined by acid-fast smear analysis. A 3-year review demonstrated that ∼1% of instrument-negative MGIT cultures contained mycobacterial growth and that 10% of all cultures yielding mycobacteria were instrument negative. Isolates from instrument-negative MGIT cultures included both tuberculous and nontuberculous mycobacteria.

  4. Perceptions about the acceptability of assessments of HIV medication adherence in Lilongwe, Malawi and Chennai, India.

    PubMed

    Safren, Steven A; Kumarasamy, N; Hosseinipour, Mina; Harwood, Meaghan M; Hoffman, Irving; McCauley, Marybeth; Jumbe, Allan; Nyirenda, Christina; Mimiaga, Matthew J; Solomon, Suniti; Celentano, David; Mayer, Kenneth H

    2006-07-01

    Little research exists on acceptability issues related to assessments of adherence to ART in resource-poor settings. To help prepare for two large-scale, multisite ART intervention trials, this qualitative study of individuals in Chennai, India (49 men, 11 women; 33 taking ART, 27 not) and Lilongwe, Malawi (5 men, 5 women, all taking ART) examined potential limitations of different types of adherence assessments: an adherence questionnaire, a pill diary, a pillbox, an electronic pill cap, and a medication punch card. Many participants reported that the various assessments would be acceptable. Potential limitations included issues surrounding literacy, the desire to appease one's medical provider, privacy and stigma, and "cheating." These potential limitations are similar to the limitations of these assessments in Western settings. However, the data highlight the need to consider individual patient level concerns when assessing ART adherence in different cultural settings. Innovative ways of monitoring adherence while maintaining standardization across sites are required in multisite trials.

  5. Multifunctional encoding system for assessment of movable cultural heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tornari, V.; Bernikola, E.; Osten, W.; Groves, R. M.; Marc, G.; Hustinx, G. M.; Kouloumpi, E.; Hackney, S.

    2007-07-01

    This is an introductory paper of a recent EC project dealing with research in cultural heritage and aiming to communicate new fields of application for optical metrology techniques. The project is in its initial state and more conclusive information is expected to be available at the time of the perspective conference. Nowadays safety, ethical, economical and security issues as well as the increase demand for loaning of art objects for exhibitions in transit, are forcing the Conservation Community to undertake strong initiatives and actions against various types of mistreatment, damage or fraud, during transportation of movable Cultural Heritage. Therefore the interest directs to the development of innovative methodologies and instrumentation to respond to critical aspects of increased importance in cultural heritage preservation, among which of prior consideration are: to secure proper treatment, assess probable damage, fight fraud actions in transportation.

  6. A dual-color luciferase assay system reveals circadian resetting of cultured fibroblasts by co-cultured adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Takako; Ikeda, Masaaki; Ohmiya, Yoshihiro; Nakajima, Yoshihiro

    2012-01-01

    In mammals, circadian rhythms of various organs and tissues are synchronized by pacemaker neurons in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. Glucocorticoids released from the adrenal glands can synchronize circadian rhythms in other tissues. Many hormones show circadian rhythms in their plasma concentrations; however, whether organs outside the SCN can serve as master synchronizers to entrain circadian rhythms in target tissues is not well understood. To further delineate the function of the adrenal glands and the interactions of circadian rhythms in putative master synchronizing organs and their target tissues, here we report a simple co-culture system using a dual-color luciferase assay to monitor circadian rhythms separately in various explanted tissues and fibroblasts. In this system, circadian rhythms of organs and target cells were simultaneously tracked by the green-emitting beetle luciferase from Pyrearinus termitilluminans (ELuc) and the red-emitting beetle luciferase from Phrixothrix hirtus (SLR), respectively. We obtained tissues from the adrenal glands, thyroid glands, and lungs of transgenic mice that expressed ELuc under control of the promoter from a canonical clock gene, mBmal1. The tissues were co-cultured with Rat-1 fibroblasts as representative target cells expressing SLR under control of the mBmal1 promoter. Amplitudes of the circadian rhythms of Rat-1 fibroblasts were potentiated when the fibroblasts were co-cultured with adrenal gland tissue, but not when co-cultured with thyroid gland or lung tissue. The phases of Rat-1 fibroblasts were reset by application of adrenal gland tissue, whereas the phases of adrenal gland tissue were not influenced by Rat-1 fibroblasts. Furthermore, the effect of the adrenal gland tissue on the fibroblasts was blocked by application of a glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist. These results demonstrate that glucocorticoids are strong circadian synchronizers for fibroblasts and that this co-culture

  7. Visualization of adherent cell monolayers by cryo-electron microscopy: A snapshot of endothelial adherens junctions.

    PubMed

    Le Bihan, Olivier; Decossas, Marion; Gontier, Etienne; Gerbod-Giannone, Marie-Christine; Lambert, Olivier

    2015-12-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) allows the visualization of the cell architecture in its native state. We developed a robust solution to adapt cryo-electron microscopy of vitreous sections (CEMOVIS) to a monolayer of adherent cells using a functionalized polyacrylamide hydrogel growing substrate. We applied this method to reconstitute an endothelial cell monolayer to visualize the morphology of adherens junctions (AJs) which regulate permeability and integrity of the vascular barrier. The fine morphology and ultrastructure of AJs from cultured primary human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) were analyzed in their native state by using CEMOVIS. Doxycycline and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) are known as efficient regulators of endothelial permeability. Doxycycline and S1P treatments both led to a drastic morphological switch from very uneven to standardized 14-17 nm wide AJs over several microns indicative of a better membrane tethering. Repetitive structures were occasionally noticed within the AJ cleft reflecting a local improved structural organization of VE-cadherin molecules. The ultrastructural stabilization of AJs observed upon treatment likely indicates a better adhesion and thus provides structural clues on the mechanism by which these treatments improve the endothelial barrier function. This method was also successfully extended to a thick epithelial barrier model. We expect our strategy to extend the reliable application of CEMOVIS to virtually any adherent cultured cell systems.

  8. [Evaluation for anaerobic culture system: Anoxomat Mart II].

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Yuji; Sasaki, Hiromi; Furuhata, Yukie; Tazawa, Yoko; Horiuchi, Hajime; Okada, Jun

    2007-01-01

    Anoxomat Mart II (Mart Microbiology BV, Lichtenvooorde, Netherlands, Central Scientific Commerce Inc., Tokyo, Japan) is an anaerobic jar apparatus which uses a vacuum pump in combination with catalyst as gas replacement procedure to remove all traces of oxygen. As we had a chance to use Anoxomat Mart II, we compared it with other two anaerobic culture methods; namely AnaeroPack anaero (Mitsubishi Gas Chemical Co., Tokyo, Japan) which employs anaerobic jar method, and Concept400 (RUSKINN TECHNOLOGY LTD, England; Central Scientific Commerce INc., Tokyo, Japan) which uses anaerobic chamber method. We used 10 different species of anaerobic bacteria obtained from ATCC. One strain each of 10 species was cultured and examined for measurement of the sensitibity of an anaerobic indicator, th number of bacteria after 48 hour culture, the diameter of colonies, and MIC value. As a result, the time to reach the anaerobic condition was around 30 minutes by the Mart II against around 60 minutes by the AnaeroPack anaero. There was no difference concerning the number of bacteria after 48 hour culture among three methods. But anaerobic bacteria cultured by Mart II tended to make bigger colonies compared to other two methods in the 5 strains out of 9, except for one strain in which the diameter of colonies could not be measured. On the other hand, the comparison of MIC value showed good correlation in 11 antibiotics out of 12 among three methods. The MIC value of 11 antibiotics fitted within 1-fold difference, and 2-fold difference was observed in only one antibiotic. Mart II is so small that it does cheep consumables. From these reasons, we concluded that Mart II can be one of the useful anerobic culture methods.

  9. An Easy-to-Use Polystyrene Microchip-based Cell Culture System.

    PubMed

    Tazawa, Hidekatsu; Sunaoshi, Shohei; Tokeshi, Manabu; Kitamori, Takehiko; Ohtani-Kaneko, Ritsuko

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we developed an integrated, low-cost microfluidic cell culture system that is easy to use. This system consists of a disposable polystyrene microchip, a polytetrafluoroethylene valve, an air bubble trap, and an indium tin oxide temperature controller. Valve pressure resistance was validated with a manometer to be 3 MPa. The trap protected against bubble contamination. The temperature controller enabled the culture of Macaca mulatta RF/6A 135 vascular endothelial cells, which are difficult to culture in glass microchips, without a CO2 incubator. We determined the optimal coating conditions for these cells and were able to achieve stable, confluent culture within 1 week. This practical system is suitable for low-cost screening and has potential applications as circulatory cell culture systems and research platforms in cell biology. PMID:26960617

  10. Long-term maintenance of human induced pluripotent stem cells by automated cell culture system.

    PubMed

    Konagaya, Shuhei; Ando, Takeshi; Yamauchi, Toshiaki; Suemori, Hirofumi; Iwata, Hiroo

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells, such as embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, are regarded as new sources for cell replacement therapy. These cells can unlimitedly expand under undifferentiated conditions and be differentiated into multiple cell types. Automated culture systems enable the large-scale production of cells. In addition to reducing the time and effort of researchers, an automated culture system improves the reproducibility of cell cultures. In the present study, we newly designed a fully automated cell culture system for human iPS maintenance. Using an automated culture system, hiPS cells maintained their undifferentiated state for 60 days. Automatically prepared hiPS cells had a potency of differentiation into three germ layer cells including dopaminergic neurons and pancreatic cells. PMID:26573336

  11. Is adherence a relevant issue in the self-management education of diabetes? A mixed narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Debussche, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    While therapeutic patient education is now recognized as essential for optimizing the control of chronic diseases and patient well-being, adherence to treatment and medical recommendations is still a matter of debate. In type 2 diabetes, the nonadherence to therapy, estimated at more than 40%, is perceived as a barrier for improving the prognosis despite recent therapeutic advances. Interventional studies have barely begun to demonstrate the effectiveness of technical and behavioral actions. The aim of this review is to question the concept of adherence in terms of therapeutic education based on quantitative and qualitative data. The research on therapeutic education has shown the effectiveness of structured actions in type 2 diabetes, but adherence is rarely an end point in randomized trials. A positive but inconsistent or moderate effect of education actions on adherence has been shown in heterogeneous studies of varying quality. Program types, outlines, theoretical bases, and curricula to set up for action effectiveness are still being discussed. Qualitative studies, including sociological studies, provide a useful and constructive focus on this perspective. Adherence is a soft and flexible tool available to the patient in his/her singular chronic disease trajectory, and as such, integrates into individual therapeutic strategies, including socio-cultural interactions, beyond the medical explanation of the disease and the patient. Four key elements for the development of structured therapeutic education are discussed: 1) the access to health literacy, 2) the contextualization of education activities, 3) the long-term chronic dimension of self-management, and 4) the organizational aspects of health and care. Rather than focusing the objective on behavioral changes, structured therapeutic education actions should attempt to provide tools and resources aimed at helping individuals to manage their disease in their own context on a long-term basis, by developing

  12. An antagonist of the platelet-activating factor receptor inhibits adherence of both nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae to cultured human bronchial epithelial cells exposed to cigarette smoke

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Shakti D; Fairbairn, Rory L; Gell, David A; Latham, Roger D; Sohal, Sukhwinder S; Walters, Eugene H; O’Toole, Ronan F

    2016-01-01

    Background COPD is emerging as the third largest cause of human mortality worldwide after heart disease and stroke. Tobacco smoking, the primary risk factor for the development of COPD, induces increased expression of platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFr) in the lung epithelium. Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) and Streptococcus pneumoniae adhere to PAFr on the luminal surface of human respiratory tract epithelial cells. Objective To investigate PAFr as a potential drug target for the prevention of infections caused by the main bacterial drivers of acute exacerbations in COPD patients, NTHi and S. pneumoniae. Methods Human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells were exposed to cigarette smoke extract (CSE). PAFr expression levels were determined using immunocytochemistry and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The epithelial cells were challenged with either NTHi or S. pneumoniae labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate, and bacterial adhesion was measured using immunofluorescence. The effect of a well-evaluated antagonist of PAFr, WEB-2086, on binding of the bacterial pathogens to BEAS-2B cells was then assessed. In silico studies of the tertiary structure of PAFr and the binding pocket for PAF and its antagonist WEB-2086 were undertaken. Results PAFr expression by bronchial epithelial cells was upregulated by CSE, and significantly associated with increased bacterial adhesion. WEB-2086 reduced the epithelial adhesion by both NTHi and S. pneumoniae to levels observed for non-CSE-exposed cells. Furthermore, it was nontoxic toward the bronchial epithelial cells. In silico analyses identified a binding pocket for PAF/WEB-2086 in the predicted PAFr structure. Conclusion WEB-2086 represents an innovative class of candidate drugs for inhibiting PAFr-dependent lung infections caused by the main bacterial drivers of smoking-related COPD. PMID:27524890

  13. In vivo bone regeneration using tubular perfusion system bioreactor cultured nanofibrous scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Yeatts, Andrew B; Both, Sanne K; Yang, Wanxun; Alghamdi, Hamdan S; Yang, Fang; Fisher, John P; Jansen, John A

    2014-01-01

    The use of bioreactors for the in vitro culture of constructs for bone tissue engineering has become prevalent as these systems may improve the growth and differentiation of a cultured cell population. Here we utilize a tubular perfusion system (TPS) bioreactor for the in vitro culture of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and implant the cultured constructs into rat femoral condyle defects. Using nanofibrous electrospun poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffolds, hMSCs were cultured for 10 days in vitro in the TPS bioreactor with cellular and acellular scaffolds cultured statically for 10 days as a control. After 3 and 6 weeks of in vivo culture, explants were removed and subjected to histomorphometric analysis. Results indicated more rapid bone regeneration in defects implanted with bioreactor cultured scaffolds with a new bone area of 1.23 ± 0.35 mm(2) at 21 days compared to 0.99 ± 0.43 mm(2) and 0.50 ± 0.29 mm(2) in defects implanted with statically cultured scaffolds and acellular scaffolds, respectively. At the 21 day timepoint, statistical differences (p<0.05) were only observed between defects implanted with cell containing scaffolds and the acellular control. After 42 days, however, defects implanted with TPS cultured scaffolds had the greatest new bone area with 1.72 ± 0.40 mm(2). Defects implanted with statically cultured and acellular scaffolds had a new bone area of 1.26 ± 0.43 mm(2) and 1.19 ± 0.33 mm(2), respectively. The increase in bone growth observed in defects implanted with TPS cultured scaffolds was statistically significant (p<0.05) when compared to both the static and acellular groups at this timepoint. This study demonstrates the efficacy of the TPS bioreactor to improve bone tissue regeneration and highlights the benefits of utilizing perfusion bioreactor systems to culture MSCs for bone tissue engineering.

  14. Adherence is a multi-dimensional construct in the POUNDS LOST trial.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Donald A; Anton, Stephen D; Han, Hongmei; Champagne, Catherine M; Allen, Ray; LeBlanc, Eric; Ryan, Donna H; McManus, Katherine; Laranjo, Nancy; Carey, Vincent J; Loria, Catherine M; Bray, George A; Sacks, Frank M

    2010-02-01

    Research on the conceptualization of adherence to treatment has not addressed a key question: Is adherence best defined as being a uni-dimensional or multi-dimensional behavioral construct? The primary aim of this study was to test which of these conceptual models best described adherence to a weight management program. This ancillary study was conducted as a part of the POUNDS LOST trial that tested the efficacy of four dietary macronutrient compositions for promoting weight loss. A sample of 811 overweight/obese adults was recruited across two clinical sites, and each participant was randomly assigned to one of four macronutrient prescriptions: (1) Low fat (20% of energy), average protein (15% of energy); (2) High fat (40%), average protein (15%); (3) Low fat (20%), high protein (25%); (4) High fat (40%), high protein (25%). Throughout the first 6 months of the study, a computer tracking system collected data on eight indicators of adherence. Computer tracking data from the initial 6 months of the intervention were analyzed using exploratory and confirmatory analyses. Two factors (accounting for 66% of the variance) were identified and confirmed: (1) behavioral adherence and (2) dietary adherence. Behavioral adherence did not differ across the four interventions, but prescription of a high fat diet (vs. a low fat diet) was found to be associated with higher levels of dietary adherence. The findings of this study indicated that adherence to a weight management program was best conceptualized as being multi-dimensional, with two dimensions: behavioral and dietary adherence.

  15. Under-prescribing and non-adherence to medications after coronary bypass surgery in older adults: strategies to improve adherence.

    PubMed

    Sengstock, David; Vaitkevicius, Peter; Salama, Ahmed; Mentzer, Robert M

    2012-02-01

    The focus for this clinical review is under-prescribing and non-adherence to medication guidelines in older adults after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery. Non-adherence occurs in all age groups, but older adults have a unique set of challenges including difficulty hearing, comprehending, and remembering instructions; acquiring and managing multiple medications; and tolerating drug-drug and drug-disease interactions. Still, non-adherence leads to increased morbidity, mortality, and costs to the healthcare system. Factors contributing to non-adherence include failure to initiate therapy before hospital discharge; poor education about the importance of each medication by hospital staff; poor education about medication side effects; polypharmacy; multiple daily dosing; excessive cost; and the physician's lack of knowledge of clinical indicators for use of medications. To improve adherence, healthcare systems must ensure that (i) all patients are prescribed the appropriate medications at discharge; (ii) patients fill and take these medications post-operatively; and (iii) patients continue long-term use of these medications. Interventions must target central administrative policies within healthcare institutions, the difficulties facing providers, as well as the concerns of patients. Corrective efforts need to be started early during the hospitalization and involve practitioners who can follow patients after the date on which surgical care is no longer needed. A solid, ongoing relationship between patients and their primary-care physicians and cardiologists is essential. This review summarizes the post-operative medication guidelines for CABG surgery, describes barriers that limit the adherence to these guidelines, and suggests possible avenues to improve medication adherence in older cardiac surgery patients. PMID:22239673

  16. New modified polyetheretherketone membrane for liver cell culture in biohybrid systems: adhesion and specific functions of isolated hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    De Bartolo, L; Morelli, S; Rende, M; Gordano, A; Drioli, E

    2004-08-01

    There has been growing interest in innovative materials with physico-chemical properties that provide improved blood/cell compatibility. We propose new polymeric membranes made of modified polyetheretherketone (PEEK-WC) as materials with potential for use in biohybrid devices. PEEK-WC exhibits high chemical, thermal stability and mechanical resistance. Owing to its lack of crystallinity this polymer can be used for preparing membranes with cheap and flexible methods. We compared the properties of PEEK-WC membranes to polyurethane membranes prepared using the same phase inverse technique and commercial membranes. The physico-chemical properties of the membranes were characterised by contact angle measurements. The different parameters acid (gamma+), base (gamma-) and Lifshitz-van der Waals (gammaLW) of the surface free energy were calculated according to Good-van Oss's model. We evaluated the cytocompatibility of PEEK-WC membranes by culturing hepatocytes isolated from rat liver. Cell adhesion and metabolic behaviour in terms of ammonia elimination, urea synthesis and protein synthesis were evaluated during the first days of culture. Liver cells adhered and formed three-dimensional aggregates on the most tested membranes. PEEK-WC membranes promoted hepatocyte adhesion most effectively. Urea synthesis, ammonia elimination and protein synthesis improved significantly when cells adhered to PEEK-WC membrane. The considerable metabolic activities of cells cultured on this membrane confirmed the good structural and physico-chemical properties of the PEEK-WC membrane that could be a promising biomaterial for cell culture in biohybrid devices. PMID:15020136

  17. A Systemic Approach to Culturally Responsive Assessment Practices and Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slee, June

    2010-01-01

    In an earlier paper, Slee and Keenan demonstrated that it was possible for tertiary education institutions to design culturally responsive assessment procedures that complied with standardised assessment policy. The authors' paper described "Growing Our Own," an initiative between Charles Darwin University and Northern Territory Catholic…

  18. Design and Evaluation of a Cross-Cultural Training System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santarelli, Thomas; Stagl, Kevin C.

    2011-01-01

    Cross-cultural competency, and the underlying communication and affective skills required to develop such expertise, is becoming increasingly important for a wide variety of domains. To address this need, we developed a blended learning platform which combines virtual role-play with tutorials, assessment and feedback. A Middle-Eastern Curriculum (MEC) exemplar for cross-cultural training U.S. military personnel was developed to guide the refinement of an existing game-based training platform. To complement this curriculum, we developed scenario authoring tools to enable end-users to define training objectives, link performance measures and feedback/remediation to these objectives, and deploy experiential scenarios within a game-based virtual environment (VE). Lessons learned from the design and development of this exemplar cross-cultural competency curriculum, as well as formative evaluation results, are discussed. Initial findings suggest that the underlying training technology promotes deep levels of semantic processing of the key information of relevant cultural and communication skills.

  19. Bridging the Two Cultures: Disciplinary Divides and Educational Reward Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schiferl, E. I.

    2007-01-01

    In 1959 C.P. Snow believed that communication and education could span the cultural gap between the sciences and the humanities. In the twenty-first century, language, research models, and academic structures hinder intellectual communication between art history, cognitive neuroscience and perceptual psychology--three disciplines dedicated to…

  20. Educational Policy vs. Culturally Sensitive Programs in Turkish Educational System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arslan, Hasan

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the perceptions of elementary school teachers about the sensitiveness of principals, teachers, and curriculum on multicultural education. Education provides the transmission and the advancement of its culture while it is developing and enhancing the common values, the integrity and the progress of…

  1. Culture & Clay: The Reshaping of an Educational System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Linda Jean

    The validity of Bilingual Education in a multi-cultural preschool setting is examined and supported. Further, a discussion of how mental health may be linked to the recognition of a child's native language, in his aquisition of a positive self-concept, is delineated. Additionally, theoretical information is supported by a survey completed in 1976,…

  2. Modular plant culture systems for life support functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The current state of knowledge with regard to culture of higher plants in the zero-G environment is assessed; and concepts for the empirical development of small plant growth chambers for the production of salad type vegetables on space shuttle or space station are evaluated. American and Soviet space flight experiences in gravitational biology are summarized.

  3. Algal culture studies related to a Closed Ecological Life Support System (CELSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radmer, R.; Behrens, P.; Fernandez, E.; Ollinger, O.; Howell, C.; Venables, A.; Huggins, D.; Gladue, R.

    1984-01-01

    In many respects, algae would be the ideal plant component for a biologically based controlled life support system, since they are eminently suited to the closely coupled functions of atmosphere regeneration and food production. Scenedesmus obliquus and Spirulina platensis were grown in three continuous culture apparatuses. Culture vessels their operation and relative merits are described. Both light and nitrogen utilization efficiency are examined. Long term culture issues are detailed and a discussion of a plasmid search in Spirulina is included.

  4. Higher recovery rate of microorganisms from cerebrospinal fluid samples by the BACTEC culture system in comparison with agar culture.

    PubMed

    Calderaro, Adriana; Martinelli, Monica; Montecchini, Sara; Motta, Federica; Covan, Silvia; Larini, Sandra; Medici, Maria Cristina; Arcangeletti, Maria Cristina; Chezzi, Carlo; De Conto, Flora

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic value of the BACTEC FX blood culture (BC) system as compared to the agar culture (AC) of cerebrospinal fluid samples (CSF), evaluating the recovery rate and the time to detection of microorganisms in a 3.5-year period. From December 2011 to May 2015, 1326 CSF samples (694 patients) were submitted to both AC and BC. Among the 150 positive samples (96 patients), 165 microorganisms were detected: 81 by both the protocols, 77 by BC alone, and 7 by AC alone, demonstrating a higher detection rate of BC (95.8%) than AC (53.3%). Although BC presents some disadvantages, it is able to improve the yield of clinically significant microorganisms, and it could potentially reduce the reporting time as compared to AC. The results obtained highlighted the necessity of a combined approach for the successful detection of central nervous system microbial infections. PMID:26867963

  5. Higher recovery rate of microorganisms from cerebrospinal fluid samples by the BACTEC culture system in comparison with agar culture.

    PubMed

    Calderaro, Adriana; Martinelli, Monica; Montecchini, Sara; Motta, Federica; Covan, Silvia; Larini, Sandra; Medici, Maria Cristina; Arcangeletti, Maria Cristina; Chezzi, Carlo; De Conto, Flora

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic value of the BACTEC FX blood culture (BC) system as compared to the agar culture (AC) of cerebrospinal fluid samples (CSF), evaluating the recovery rate and the time to detection of microorganisms in a 3.5-year period. From December 2011 to May 2015, 1326 CSF samples (694 patients) were submitted to both AC and BC. Among the 150 positive samples (96 patients), 165 microorganisms were detected: 81 by both the protocols, 77 by BC alone, and 7 by AC alone, demonstrating a higher detection rate of BC (95.8%) than AC (53.3%). Although BC presents some disadvantages, it is able to improve the yield of clinically significant microorganisms, and it could potentially reduce the reporting time as compared to AC. The results obtained highlighted the necessity of a combined approach for the successful detection of central nervous system microbial infections.

  6. Adherence to Methotrexate therapy in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Arshad, Nasim; Ahmad, Nighat Mir; Saeed, Muhammad Ahmed; Khan, Saira; Batool, Shabnam; Farman, Sumaira

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine adherence to methotrexate (MTX) therapy in patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) and to identify factors that promote either adherence or non adherence. Methods: One hundred Rheumatoid Arthritis patients on MTX for at least two months were enrolled. Questionnaire was completed by direct interview. Details recorded were, demographics (age, sex, education, monthly income), disease duration, duration on MTX and current dose. Disease Activity Score on 28 joint counts (DAS 28) at the current visit, concomitant drugs taken and number of doses of MTX missed in the previous 8 weeks were noted. Non adherence was defined as omission of any three or more prescribed doses of MTX in previous 8 week. Patients were asked for the factors that motivated their adherence to MTX as well as factors for non adherence. Presence of side effects due to MTX was also recorded. Result: Non adherence was found among 23% of cases. Patients of low socioeconomic group (p <0.0001) and on MTX for longer duration (p <0.001) had higher non adherence. Non adherent patients had significantly higher disease activity as measured by DAS 28 (p<0.001). Good counseling and education by the doctor was a strong predictor of adherence (p <0.001). Lack of affordability (p <0.001); lack of availability at local pharmacy (p <0.001); lack of family support (p <0.001) and lack of awareness regarding need and importance of MTX (p < 0.001were found as significant factors for non adherence. Conclusion: MTX non adherence in RA is noted in about one fourth of study group. Various economical and social issues lead to non adherence but good patient education and counseling by doctor could promote adherence in this study group. PMID:27182251

  7. In vitro co-culture systems for studying molecular basis of cellular interaction between Aire-expressing medullary thymic epithelial cells and fresh thymocytes.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Yoshitaka; Kudoh, Jun; Yoshida, Tetsuhiko; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi

    2014-10-17

    We previously established three mouse cell lines (Aire(+)TEC1, Aire(+)TEC2 and Aire(+)DC) from the medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) and dendritic cells (mDCs). These cells constitutively expressed "autoimmune regulator (Aire) gene" and they exhibited various features of self antigen-presenting cells (self-APCs) present in the thymic medullary region. Here, we confirmed our previous observation that Aire(+) thymic epithelial cells adhere to fresh thymocytes and kill them by inducing apoptosis, thus potentially reproducing in vitro some aspects of the negative selection of T cells in vivo. In this system, a single Aire(+) cell appeared able to kill ∼30 thymocytes within 24 hrs. Moreover, we observed that ectopic expression of peripheral tissue-specific antigens (TSAs), and expression of several surface markers involved in mTEC development, increased as Aire(+) cell density increases toward confluency. Thus, these Aire(+) cells appear to behave like differentiating mTECs as if they pass through the developmental stages from intermediate state toward mature state. Surprisingly, an in vitro co-culture system consisting of Aire(+) cells and fractionated sub-populations of fresh thymocytes implied the possible existence of two distinct subtypes of thymocytes (named as CD4(+) killer and CD4(-) rescuer) that may determine the fate (dead or alive) of the differentiating Aire(+)mTECs. Thus, our in vitro co-culture system appears to mimic a part of "in vivo thymic crosstalk".

  8. Alcohol use, antiretroviral therapy adherence, and preferences regarding an alcohol-focused adherence intervention in patients with human immunodeficiency virus

    PubMed Central

    Kekwaletswe, Connie T; Morojele, Neo K

    2014-01-01

    need for alcohol-focused ART adherence interventions. Patients’ perceptions suggest their amenability to clinic-based brief motivational interviewing and cognitive behavioral therapy-type adherence interventions delivered by lay persons in group settings. Further research should investigate how best to implement such interventions in the existing health system. PMID:24729688

  9. Effective enrichment of cholangiocarcinoma secretomes using the hollow fiber bioreactor culture system.

    PubMed

    Weeraphan, Churat; Diskul-Na-Ayudthaya, Penchatr; Chiablaem, Khajeelak; Khongmanee, Amnart; Chokchaichamnankit, Daranee; Subhasitanont, Pantipa; Svasti, Jisnuson; Srisomsap, Chantragan

    2012-09-15

    The Northeastern region of Thailand is well known to have high incidence of bile duct cancer known as cholangiocarcinoma. So there is a continued need to improve diagnosis and treatment, and discovery of biomarkers for early detection of bile duct cancer should greatly improve treatment outcome for these patients. The secretome, a collection of proteins secreted from cells, is a useful source for identifying circulating biomarkers in blood secreted from cancer cells. Here a Hollow Fiber Bioreactor culture system was used for enrichment of cholangiocarcinoma secretomes, since this culture system mimics the dense three-dimensional microenvironment of the tumor found in vivo. Two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis using a sensitive Fluor saturation dye staining, followed by LC/MS/MS, was used to compare protein expression in the secretomes of cells cultured in the Hollow Fiber system and cells cultured in the monolayer culture system. For the first time, the 2D-patterns of cholangiocarcinoma secretomes from the two culture systems could be compared. The Hollow Fiber system improved the quality and quantity of cholangiocarcinoma secreted proteins compared to conventional monolayer system, showing less interference by cytoplasmic proteins and yielding more secreted proteins. Overall, 75 spots were analyzed by LC/MS/MS and 106 secreted proteins were identified. Two novel secreted proteins (C19orf10 and cystatin B) were found only in the Hollow Fiber system and were absent from the traditional monolayer culture system. Among the highly expressed proteins, 22 secreted soluble proteins were enriched by 5 fold in Hollow Fiber system compared to monolayer culture system. The Hollow Fiber system is therefore useful for preparing a wide range of proteins from low-abundance cell secretomes.

  10. Adherence of Veillonella Species Mediated by Extracellular Glucosyltransferase from Streptococcus salivarius

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, R. M.; Donkersloot, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of extracellular products from Streptococcus salivarius on sucrose-dependent adherence to smooth surfaces by other oral bacteria was studied in vitro. Strains of Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Veillonella parvula without innate ability to adhere to a steel wire were able to do so when incubated with sucrose and cell-free culture fluid from S. salivarius strains 9759, 25975, CNII, and MEPI. These culture fluids synthesized more adherent material and water-insoluble glucan than those from Streptococcus mutans C67-1 and seven other S. salivarius strains. Among the S. salivarius strains, glucosyltransferase (GT; dextransucrase, EC 2.4.1.5) activity varied more than 100-fold. Cells of Veillonella and S. mitis S3 that had been incubated in culture fluids from S. salivarius 25975 and 9759, respectively, and then washed adhered upon subsequent incubation with sucrose. This was due to adsorbed GT because (i) the adherence was sensitive to dextranase; (ii) it was observed only with the high-GT culture fluids; (iii) it was dependent on sucrose; and (iv) the washed Veillonella cells synthesized glucan, but not fructan, from sucrose. These results suggest that sucrose-dependent adherence of bacteria without such innate ability can be mediated by (i) entrapment in insoluble glucan synthesized by S. salivarius culture fluids, and (ii) prior adsorption of GT from S. salivarius culture fluids. The possibility that GT formed by high-yield strains of S. salivarius is distributed through the mouth by the action of salivary flow and contributes to sucrose-dependent adherence and plaque formation is considered. Images PMID:591064

  11. An adherent cell perifusion technique to study the overall and sequential response of rat alveolar macrophages to toxic substances.

    PubMed Central

    Forget, G; Lacroix, M J; Cadieux, A; Calvert, R; Grose, J H; Sirois, P

    1983-01-01

    Essentially pure (97%) alveolar macrophages were isolated by bronchoalveolar lavage of rats with warm (37 degrees C) PBS solution. These cells were allowed to adhere to the inside walls of open-ended glass cylinders which were closed off at each end by three-way stopcocks. The adhering cells were perifused with RPMI-1640 medium supplemented with 5% fetal bovine serum for 18 hr at the rate of 1 mL/hr, and the effluent medium was collected automatically in 2-mL aliquots. Cell recoveries and viabilities did not differ from those found for Petri cultures treated similarly, indicating that the perifusion method under study offered an adequate milieu for short-term primary cultures. The alveolar macrophages in culture were subjected to the presence of particulate (chrysotile asbestos) and soluble (phorbol myristate) toxicants, and their response was monitored in the effluent medium by measuring the release of prostaglandins (PGE) by radioimmunoassay. A significant increase in the sequential release of PGE was observed in the presence of asbestos (100 micrograms/mL) or phorbol myristate (200 ng/mL). Treatment of the cells with indomethacin (20 microM) completely abolished the release of PGE stimulated with phorbol myristate. A cumulative response to the toxicants was also observed when cells were harvested manually from the chambers: asbestos caused a 2-fold increase in cell mortality relative to control, while phorbol myristate brought about a 3-fold increase in the number of dead cells. This effect was not prevented by the presence of indomethacin. Cell aggregation was also observed when cells were perifused in the presence of phorbol myristate, whether indomethacin was present or absent. Our results indicate that the cell perifusion system combines the advantages of conventional adherent cell cultures (viability, aggregation) with those of perifusion techniques (sequential metabolism studies). Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 6. PMID:6641651

  12. Algal culture studies related to a Closed Ecological Life Support System (CELSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radmer, R. O.; Ollinger, O.; Venables, A.; Fernandez, E.

    1982-01-01

    Studies with algal cultures which relate to closed ecological life support systems (CELSS) are discussed. A description of a constant cell density apparatus for continuous culture of algae is included. Excretion of algal by-products, and nitrogen utilization and excretion are discussed.

  13. The Relationship between National Culture and the Usability of an E-Learning System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adeoye, Blessing; Wentling, Rose Mary

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate possible relationships between national culture and the usability of an e-learning system. The theoretical frameworks that were used to guide this study were Hofstede's (1980) cultural dimensions, and Nielson's (1993) usability attributes. The sample for this study was composed of 24 international…

  14. Multiple Embedded Inequalities and Cultural Diversity in Educational Systems: A Theoretical and Empirical Exploration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verhoeven, Marie

    2011-01-01

    This article explores the social construction of cultural diversity in education, with a view to social justice. It examines how educational systems organize ethno-cultural difference and how this process contributes to inequalities. Theoretical resources are drawn from social philosophy as well as from recent developments in social organisation…

  15. MOSAICA: A Web-2.0 Based System for the Preservation and Presentation of Cultural Heritage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barak, Miri; Herscoviz, Orit; Kaberman, Zvia; Dori, Yehudit J.

    2009-01-01

    The question of how to present cultural heritage resources in a way that attracts potential users is becoming important in our ever-changing world. This paper describes MOSAICA system--a web 2.0-based toolbox, dedicated for the preservation and presentation of cultural heritage. This paper also describes an evaluation study that examined MOSAICA…

  16. Improving adherence to medication regimens for children with asthma and its effect on clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    da Costa, I G; Rapoff, M A; Lemanek, K; Goldstein, G L

    1997-01-01

    We examined the effects of a combined education and token system intervention to improve adherence to inhaled corticosteroids for an 8-year-old girl and a 10-year-old boy with asthma. Adherence was measured by an electronic chronolog monitor, and disease outcome was assessed by repeated pulmonary function testing. A withdrawal design demonstrated improved adherence and, for 1 child, an associated improvement in pulmonary function occurred. Methodological and clinical implications are discussed, including variables other than adherence that may affect disease outcome.

  17. In vitro expansion and differentiation of rat pancreatic duct-derived stem cells into insulin secreting cells using a dynamicthree-dimensional cell culture system.

    PubMed

    Chen, X C; Liu, H; Li, H; Cheng, Y; Yang, L; Liu, Y F

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a dynamic three-dimensional cell culture technology was used to expand and differentiate rat pancreatic duct-derived stem cells (PDSCs) into islet-like cell clusters that can secrete insulin. PDSCs were isolated from rat pancreatic tissues by in situ collagenase digestion and density gradient centrifugation. Using a dynamic three-dimensional culture technique, the cells were expanded and differentiated into functional islet-like cell clusters, which were characterized by morphological and phenotype analyses. After maintaining 1 x 108 isolated rat PDSCs in a dynamic three-dimensional cell culture for 7 days, 1.5 x 109 cells could be harvested. Passaged PDSCs expressed markers of pancreatic endocrine progenitors, including CD29 (86.17%), CD73 (90.73%), CD90 (84.13%), CD105 (78.28%), and Pdx-1. Following 14 additional days of culture in serum-free medium with nicotinamide, keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), and b fibroblast growth factor (FGF), the cells were differentiated into islet-like cell clusters (ICCs). The ICC morphology reflected that of fused cell clusters. During the late stage of differentiation, representative clusters were non-adherent and expressed insulin indicated by dithizone (DTZ)-positive staining. Insulin was detected in the extracellular fluid and cytoplasm of ICCs after 14 days of differentiation. Additionally, insulin levels were significantly higher at this time compared with the levels exhibited by PDSCs before differentiation (P < 0.01). By using a dynamic three-dimensional cell culture system, PDSCs can be expanded in vitro and can differentiate into functional islet-like cell clusters. PMID:27420984

  18. Experience of changing between signal and Bactec 9240 blood culture systems in a children's hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Gray, J; Brockwell, M; Das, I

    1998-01-01

    AIM: To compare experience of positive blood cultures in successive years before and after changing from Signal (Unipath) to Bactec 9240 (Becton Dickinson) blood culture systems. METHODS: Analysis of data collected prospectively on 7967 Signal and 7062 Bactec blood culture sets. RESULTS: Significant growths occurred in 5.7% of Signal and 8.9% of Bactec cultures; 33.0% more significant isolates and 24.0% more episodes of bacteraemia were detected in the second year, following introduction of the Bactec system. Inpatient hospital activity increased by 8.2% between the first and second years, although the numbers of blood cultures received actually fell by 11.4%. There were striking increases in numbers of isolates of coagulase negative staphylococci (47.7%) and Enterobacteriaceae (56.8%) from Bactec cultures. Two anaerobic bacteraemias were detected in Signal blood cultures, whereas none was detected by the Bactec system, despite 12.1% of sets including an anaerobic bottle. Of significant positive cultures, 90.2% were detected within one day with the Bactec 9240, compared with only 50.0% of Signal cultures; 20.7% of significant positive Signal blood cultures were detected only on terminal subculture. Microorganisms that were not significant were isolated from 5.1% Signal and 3.8% Bactec cultures. CONCLUSIONS: Compared with the Signal system, the Bactec 9240 offers markedly more rapid and sensitive detection of bacteraemia, together with a lower rate of non-significant isolates. However, using a single PEDS PLUS/F bottle the few episodes of anaerobic bacteraemia that occur in children are likely to be missed. PMID:9659243

  19. Organoid culture systems for prostate epithelial and cancer tissue.

    PubMed

    Drost, Jarno; Karthaus, Wouter R; Gao, Dong; Driehuis, Else; Sawyers, Charles L; Chen, Yu; Clevers, Hans

    2016-02-01

    This protocol describes a strategy for the generation of 3D prostate organoid cultures from healthy mouse and human prostate cells (either bulk or FACS-sorted single luminal and basal cells), metastatic prostate cancer lesions and circulating tumor cells. Organoids derived from healthy material contain the differentiated luminal and basal cell types, whereas organoids derived from prostate cancer tissue mimic the histology of the tumor. We explain how to establish these cultures in the fully defined serum-free conditioned medium that is required to sustain organoid growth. Starting with the plating of digested tissue material, full-grown organoids can usually be obtained in ∼2 weeks. The culture protocol we describe here is currently the only one that allows the growth of both the luminal and basal prostatic epithelial lineages, as well as the growth of advanced prostate cancers. Organoids established using this protocol can be used to study many different aspects of prostate biology, including homeostasis, tumorigenesis and drug discovery.

  20. Does adherence therapy improve medication adherence among patients with schizophrenia? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hegedüs, Anna; Kozel, Bernd

    2014-12-01

    Non-adherence to medication is highly prevalent in patients with schizophrenia. Adherence therapy aims to improve medication adherence of these patients by applying techniques of cognitive behavioural therapy, psycho-education, and motivational interviewing. Even though adherence therapy is frequently discussed and researched, its effectiveness is still uncertain. This paper aims to review the effectiveness of adherence therapy on the medication adherence of patients with schizophrenia. To this end, six electronic databases were systematically searched for randomized, controlled trials on adherence therapy from January 2002 to March 2013. Four trials met the inclusion criteria and were incorporated into the review. The findings suggest that adherence therapy does not improve patients' medication adherence in comparison to treatment as usual or a control intervention. However, all the studies reviewed showed high-adherence ratings at baseline. Thus, further well-designed studies that target adherence therapy to patients who are non-adherent to their medication are needed for a more profound understanding of its effectiveness. In addition, if adherence therapy is aimed not only at improving medication adherence, but also to reach an agreement whereby the patient's decision not to take his medication is accepted, the shared decision-making process needs to be assessed as well.

  1. Adherence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to contact lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.J.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to examined the interactions of P. aeruginosa with hydrogel contact lenses and other substrata, and characterize adherence to lenses under various physiological and physicochemical conditions. Isolates adhered to polystyrene, glass, and hydrogel lenses. With certain lens types, radiolabeled cells showed decreased adherence with increasing water content of the lenses, however, this correlation with not found for all lenses. Adherence to rigid gas permeable lenses was markedly greater than adherence to hydrogels. Best adherence occurred near pH 7 and at a sodium chloride concentration of 50 mM. Passive adhesion of heat-killed cells to hydrogels was lower than the adherence obtained of viable cells. Adherence to hydrogels was enhanced by mucin, lactoferrin, lysozyme, IgA, bovine serum albumin, and a mixture of these macromolecules. Adherence to coated and uncoated lenses was greater with a daily-wear hydrogel when compared with an extended-wear hydrogel of similar polymer composition. Greater adherence was attributed to a higher concentration of adsorbed macromolecules on the 45% water-content lens in comparison to the 55% water-content lens.

  2. The Meanings in the messages: how SMS reminders and real-time adherence monitoring improve antiretroviral therapy adherence in rural Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Ware, Norma C.; Pisarski, Emily E.; Tam, Melanie; Wyatt, Monique A.; Atukunda, Esther; Musiimenta, Angella; Bangsberg, David R.; Haberer, Jessica E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To understand how a pilot intervention combining SMS reminders with real-time adherence monitoring improved adherence to HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART) for adults initiating treatment in rural Uganda. Design: Qualitative study, conducted with a pilot randomized controlled trial. Methods: Sixty-two pilot intervention study participants took part in qualitative interviews on: preferences for content; frequency and timing of SMS adherence reminders; understandings and experiences of SMS reminders; and understandings and experiences of real-time adherence monitoring. Analysis of interview data was inductive and derived categories describing how participants experienced the intervention, and what it meant to them. Results: SMS reminders prompted taking individual doses of antiretroviral therapy, and helped to develop a ‘habit’ of adherence. Real-time adherence monitoring was experienced as ‘being seen’; participants interpreted ‘being seen’ as an opportunity to demonstrate seriousness of commitment to treatment and ‘taking responsibility’ for adherence. Both SMS reminders and real-time monitoring were interpreted as signs of ‘caring’ by the healthcare system. Feeling ‘cared about’ offset depressed mood and invigorated adherence. Conclusion: Although serving as reminders, SMS messages and real-time adherence monitoring also had larger emotional and moral meanings for participants that they felt improved their adherence. Understanding the larger ‘meanings in the messages,’ as well as their more literal content and function, will be central in delineating how SMS reminders and other adherence interventions using cellular technology work or do not work in varying contexts. PMID:26807967

  3. Adherence With Therapeutic Regimens: Behavioral and Pharmacoeconomic Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Giannetti, Vincent J; Kamal, Khalid M

    2016-04-01

    There is an extensive literature regarding nonadherence with both therapeutic regimens and medication. This literature includes reviews of empirical research regarding the factors associated with nonadherence. Health care system, provider, and patient factors as well as the nature of the illness and therapeutic regimen all effect adherence rates. Different behavioral models for adherence counseling such as the Health Belief Model, the Theory of Reasoned Action, the Medication Interest Model, and Motivational Interviewing have also been reported in the research literature. This article will discuss the development of a brief model for patient counseling with specific techniques illustrated for pharmacists based on empirical findings that have demonstrated effectiveness in the adherence research literature. In addition, the article will address the measurement of the economic impact of medication nonadherence and propose a framework for assessing the cost-effectiveness of pharmacist counseling to increase adherence. The problem of nonadherence has significant effects upon health care expenditures through increase in physician's visits, emergency department incidents, rehospitalizations, and nursing home readmissions. Thus, the overall goal is to assist the pharmacist in developing a brief adherence counseling program in community pharmacy and evaluating the economic feasibility of the intervention demonstrating the value-added proposition of pharmacist intervention. PMID:25292442

  4. Revisiting the Role of Cultural Capital in East Asian Educational Systems: The Case of South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Soo-yong; Schofer, Evan; Kim, Kyung-keun

    2013-01-01

    The concept of cultural capital has proved invaluable in understanding educational systems in Western countries, and recent work seeks to extend those insights to the diverse educational systems of other geographic regions. We explored cultural capital in South Korea by investigating the relationships among family socioeconomic status (SES), cultural capital, and children's academic achievement using data from the 2000 Programme for International Student Assessment. South Korea was compared with Japan, France, and the United States to understand how institutional features of South Korean education shape the role of cultural capital in academic success. Results showed that family SES had a positive effect on both parental objectified cultural capital and children's embodied cultural capital in South Korea, consistent with evidence from the other countries. Moreover, parental objectified cultural capital had a positive effect on children's academic achievement in South Korea. In contrast to other countries, however, children's embodied cultural capital had a negative effect on academic achievement in South Korea controlling for the other variables. We highlighted several institutional features of South Korean education including a standardized curriculum, extreme focus on test preparation, and extensive shadow education, which may combine to suppress the effect of children's embodied cultural capital on academic achievement. PMID:24285909

  5. Effect of cultural system and essential oil treatment on antioxidant capacity in raspberries.

    PubMed

    Jin, Peng; Wang, Shiow Y; Gao, Haiyan; Chen, Hangjun; Zheng, Yonghua; Wang, Chien Y

    2012-05-01

    The effects of cultural system and essential oil treatment on antioxidant capacities in raspberries were evaluated. Raspberries were hand-harvested from organic and conventional farms in Maryland, USA, and were treated with essential oil including carvacrol, anethole, cinnamic acid, perillaldehyde, cinnamaldehyde, and linalool. Results from this study showed that raspberries grown from organic culture exhibited higher value of antioxidant capacities and individual flavonoids contents. Moreover, the organic culture also enhanced the activities of antioxidant enzymes. In addition, essential oil treatments promoted the antioxidant enzymes activities and antioxidant capacities of raspberries, and the most effective compound was perillaldehyde. In conclusion, raspberries produced from organic culture contained significantly higher antioxidant capacities than those produce from conventional culture. Postharvest essential oil treatments have positive effect on enhancing antioxidant capacities in raspberries from both organic and conventional cultures.

  6. Micro 3D cell culture systems for cellular behavior studies: Culture matrices, devices, substrates, and in-situ sensing methods.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jonghoon; Lee, Eun Kyu; Choo, Jaebum; Yuh, Junhan; Hong, Jong Wook

    2015-09-01

    Microfabricated systems equipped with 3D cell culture devices and in-situ cellular biosensing tools can be a powerful bionanotechnology platform to investigate a variety of biomedical applications. Various construction substrates such as plastics, glass, and paper are used for microstructures. When selecting a construction substrate, a key consideration is a porous microenvironment that allows for spheroid growth and mimics the extracellular matrix (ECM) of cell aggregates. Various bio-functionalized hydrogels are ideal candidates that mimic the natural ECM for 3D cell culture. When selecting an optimal and appropriate microfabrication method, both the intended use of the system and the characteristics and restrictions of the target cells should be carefully considered. For highly sensitive and near-cell surface detection of excreted cellular compounds, SERS-based microsystems capable of dual modal imaging have the potential to be powerful tools; however, the development of optical reporters and nanoprobes remains a key challenge. We expect that the microsystems capable of both 3D cell culture and cellular response monitoring would serve as excellent tools to provide fundamental cellular behavior information for various biomedical applications such as metastasis, wound healing, high throughput screening, tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and drug discovery and development. PMID:26358782

  7. Soil adherence to human skin

    SciTech Connect

    Driver, J.H.; Konz, J.J.; Whitmyre, G.K. )

    1989-12-01

    Dermal exposure to soils contaminated with toxic chemicals represents a potential public health hazard. These soils, contaminated with chemicals such as PCBs and dioxins, may be found at various locations throughout the US. Furthermore, dermal contact with pesticide-containing particles and contaminated soil particles is of importance for exposures to agricultural workers who reenter fields after pesticide application. With respect to dermal exposure to pesticide-contaminated particulate matter, several occurrences of human toxicity to ethyl parathion in citrus groves have been reported. These exposures resulted from dermal contact with high concentrations of the toxic transformation product paraoxon in soil dust contaminated as a result of application of pesticide to the overhead foliage of trees. To assess dermal exposure to chemically-contaminated soil at sites of concern, dermal adherence of soil must be determined prior to the assessment of dermal absorption. The purpose of the experiment reported herein was to determine the amount of soil (mg/cm{sup 2}) that adheres to adult hands under various soil conditions. These conditions include the type of soil, the organic content of the soil, and the particle size of the soil.

  8. Irreversible aggregation of flexible chainlike walkers without adherence.

    PubMed

    Mashiko, Takashi

    2008-07-01

    The flexible chainlike walker (FCW) model is proposed as a minimal model of a deformable moving object and as an extension of the regular random-walk model. The many-body system of FCWs is studied by numerical simulations on a square lattice. It is shown that FCWs aggregate spontaneously and irreversibly where no adherence is assumed, in contrast to the established aggregation models, where adherence is indispensable for their occurrence and irreversibility. This type of aggregation is enabled by and demonstrates the significance of the deformability of moving objects.

  9. Proliferation and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells in a three- dimensional culture system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, S.; Hu, J.; Long, M.; Tao, Z.

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have multi-differentiation potential and retain the capacity to proliferate and differentiate in vitro, which in turn holds the promise of being able to repair or replace damaged cells or tissues. Since MSCs are rare in amount in vivo, abundant cells usually need be obtained in time in clinic. T herefore, proliferation and differentiation of MSCs in vitro are necessary and important for future applications. Most current studies o MSCs are focused on the cellular andn molecular biology using a two-dimension (2-D) static culture system at unit gravity. The gravity-induced 2D culture of MSCs could potentially not reflect cell-cell- contacts important for proliferation and differentiation of MSCs in vivo. Here we developed a method to proliferate MSCs by using the rotating three-dimensional (3- D) culture system, which can provide low shear, 3-D environment with simulated microgravity. MSCs from human bone marrow were prepared on microcarrier beads and then were seeded in the 3-D culture system. Various rotation conditions were tested to screen out the most suitable one for proliferation of MSCs. 2-D cultures were prepared in routine cell culture dishes as a control. All cultures were uniformly inoculated and medium exchanged at standard intervals. Results were compared with microscopic and immunochemistrical techniques. The differentiation capacity of proliferated MSCs were also tested through induced differentiation experiments. It is found that simulated microgravity and three-dimensional culture condition is an active factor for proliferation of MSCs.

  10. Aggregate versus day level association between methamphetamine use and HIV medication non-adherence among gay and bisexual men

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Jeffrey T.; Kowalczyk, William; Botsko, Michael; Tomassilli, Julia; Golub, Sarit A.

    2013-01-01

    Methamphetamine use is associated with HIV infection, especially among gay and bisexual men. Methamphetamine use contributes to disease progression both directly, by increasing viral load and damaging the immune system, and indirectly, by decreasing medication adherence. Research examining the association of methamphetamine use and non-adherence has traditionally compared groups of users and nonusers on adherence, compared methamphetamine use between participants above or below some threshold level of adherence (e.g. >90% dose adherence), or examined aggregate relationships. Using Timeline Follow-back procedures, the present study examined aggregate, threshold, and day-level associations of methamphetamine use with non-adherence in 210 HIV-positive gay and bisexual methamphetamine-using men. Methamphetamine use was not associated with adherence behavior at the aggregate-level, but methamphetamine use on a given day was associated with 2.3 times the odds of non-adherence on that day. Threshold results were equivocal. These data suggest that the methamphetamine and non-adherence relationship is complicated: non-adherence is more likely to occur on days in which methamphetamine is used, but participants reported more non-adherence days in which methamphetamine was not used. This seeming paradox generates questions about the selection of analytical techniques and has important implications for behavioral interventions targeting substance use and adherence among HIV-positive individuals. PMID:23553345

  11. Neonatal rat heart cells cultured in simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akins, Robert E.; Schroedl, Nancy A.; Gonda, Steve R.; Hartzell, Charles R.

    1994-01-01

    In vitro characteristics of cardiac cells cultured in simulated microgravity are reported. Tissue culture methods performed at unit gravity constrain cells to propagate, differentiate, and interact in a two dimensional (2D) plane. Neonatal rat cardiac cells in 2D culture organize predominantly as bundles of cardiomyocytes with the intervening areas filled by non-myocyte cell types. Such cardiac cell cultures respond predictably to the addition of exogenous compounds, and in many ways they represent an excellent in vitro model system. The gravity-induced 2D organization of the cells, however, does not accurately reflect the distribution of cells in the intact tissue. We have begun characterizations of a three-dimensional (3D) culturing system designed to mimic microgravity. The NASA designed High-Aspect-Ratio-Vessel (HARV) bioreactors provide a low shear environment which allows cells to be cultured in static suspension. HARV-3D cultures were prepared on microcarrier beads and compared to control-2D cultures using a combination of microscopic and biochemical techniques. Both systems were uniformly inoculated and medium exchanged at standard intervals. Cells in control cultures adhered to the polystyrene surface of the tissue culture dishes and exhibited typical 2D organization. Cells in cultured in HARV's adhered to microcarrier beads, the beads aggregated into defined clusters containing 8 to 15 beads per cluster, and the clusters exhibited distinct 3D layers: myocytes and fibroblasts appeared attached to the surfaces of beads and were overlaid by an outer cell type. In addition, cultures prepared in HARV's using alternative support matrices also displayed morphological formations not seen in control cultures. Generally, the cells prepared in HARV and control cultures were similar, however, the dramatic alterations in 3D organization recommend the HARV as an ideal vessel for the generation of tissue-like organizations of cardiac cells in simulated microgravity.

  12. Neonatal rat heart cells cultured in simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akins, R. E.; Schroedl, N. A.; Gonda, S. R.; Hartzell, C. R.

    1997-01-01

    In vitro characteristics of cardiac cells cultured in simulated microgravity are reported. Tissue culture methods performed at unit gravity constrain cells to propagate, differentiate, and interact in a two-dimensional (2D) plane. Neonatal rat cardiac cells in 2D culture organize predominantly as bundles of cardiomyocytes with the intervening areas filled by nonmyocyte cell types. Such cardiac cell cultures respond predictably to the addition of exogenous compounds, and in many ways they represent an excellent in vitro model system. The gravity-induced 2D organization of the cells, however, does not accurately reflect the distribution of cells in the intact tissue. We have begun characterizations of a three-dimensional (3D) culturing system designed to mimic microgravity. The NASA-designed High-Aspect Ratio Vessel (HARV) bioreactors provide a low shear environment that allows cells to be cultured in static suspension. HARV-3D cultures were prepared on microcarrier beads and compared to control-2D cultures using a combination of microscopic and biochemical techniques. Both systems were uniformly inoculated and medium exchanged at standard intervals. Cells in control cultures adhered to the polystyrene surface of the tissue culture dishes and exhibited typical 2D organization. Cells cultured in HARVs adhered to microcarrier beads, the beads aggregated into defined clusters containing 8 to 15 beads per cluster, and the clusters exhibited distinct 3D layers: myocytes and fibroblasts appeared attached to the surfaces of beads and were overlaid by an outer cell type. In addition, cultures prepared in HARVs using alternative support matrices also displayed morphological formations not seen in control cultures. Generally, the cells prepared in HARV and control cultures were similar; however, the dramatic alterations in 3D organization recommend the HARV as an ideal vessel for the generation of tissuelike organization of cardiac cells in vitro.

  13. Performance of an automated solid-phase red cell adherence system compared with that of a manual gel microcolumn assay for the identification of antibodies eluted from red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Finck, R H; Davis, R J; Teng, S; Goldfinger, D; Ziman, A F; Lu, Q; Yuan, S

    2011-01-01

    IgG antibodies coating red blood cells (RBCs) can be removed by elution procedures and their specificity determined by antibody identification studies. Although such testing is traditionally performed using the tube agglutination assay, prior studies have shown that the gel microcolumn (GMC) assay may also be used with comparable results. The purpose of this study was to compare an automated solid-phase red cell adherence (SPRCA) system with a GMC assay for the detection of antibodies eluted from RBCs. Acid eluates from 51 peripheral blood (PB) and 7 cord blood (CB) samples were evaluated by both an automated SPRCA instrument and a manual GMC assay. The concordance rate between the two systems for peripheral RBC samples was 88.2 percent (45 of 51), including cases with alloantibodies (n = 8), warm autoantibodies (n = 12), antibodies with no identifiable specificity (n = 2), and negative results (n = 23). There were six discordant cases, of which four had alloantibodies (including anti-Jka, -E, and -e) demonstrable by the SPRCA system only. In the remaining 2 cases, anti-Fya and antibodies with no identifiable specificity were demonstrable by the GMC assay only. All seven CB specimens produced concordant results, showing anti-A (n = 3), -B (n = 1), maternal anti-Jka (n = 2), or a negative result (n = 1). Automated SPRCA technology has a performance that is comparable with that of a manual GMC assay for identifying antibodies eluted from PB and CB RBCs.

  14. What Do We Learn from Spheroid Culture Systems? Insights from Tumorspheres Derived from Primary Colon Cancer Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi-Baig, Komal; Ullmann, Pit; Rodriguez, Fabien; Frasquilho, Sónia; Nazarov, Petr V.; Haan, Serge; Letellier, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Due to their self-renewal and tumorigenic properties, tumor-initiating cells (TICs) have been hypothesized to be important targets for colorectal cancer (CRC). However the study of TICs is hampered by the fact that the identification and culturing of TICs is still a subject of extensive debate. Floating three-dimensional spheroid cultures (SC) that grow in serum-free medium supplemented with growth factors are supposed to be enriched in TICs. We generated SC from fresh clinical tumor specimens and compared them to SC isolated from CRC cell-lines as well as to adherent differentiated counterparts. Patient-derived SC display self-renewal capacity and can induce serial transplantable tumors in immuno-deficient mice, which phenotypically resemble the tumor of origin. In addition, the original tumor tissue and established SC retain several similar CRC-relevant mutations. Primary SC express key stemness proteins such as SOX2, OCT4, NANOG and LGR5 and importantly show increased chemoresistance ability compared to their adherent differentiated counterparts and to cell line-derived SC. Strikingly, cells derived from spheroid or adherent differentiating culture conditions displayed similar self-renewal capacity and equally formed tumors in immune-deficient mice, suggesting that self-renewal and tumor-initiation capacity of TICs is not restricted to phenotypically immature spheroid cells, which we describe to be highly plastic and able to reacquire stem-cell traits even after long differentiation processes. Finally, we identified two genes among a sphere gene expression signature that predict disease relapse in CRC patients. Here we propose that SC derived from fresh patient tumor tissue present interesting phenotypic features that may have clinical relevance for chemoresistance and disease relapse and therefore represent a valuable tool to test for new CRC-therapies that overcome drug resistance. PMID:26745821

  15. What Do We Learn from Spheroid Culture Systems? Insights from Tumorspheres Derived from Primary Colon Cancer Tissue.

    PubMed

    Qureshi-Baig, Komal; Ullmann, Pit; Rodriguez, Fabien; Frasquilho, Sónia; Nazarov, Petr V; Haan, Serge; Letellier, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Due to their self-renewal and tumorigenic properties, tumor-initiating cells (TICs) have been hypothesized to be important targets for colorectal cancer (CRC). However the study of TICs is hampered by the fact that the identification and culturing of TICs is still a subject of extensive debate. Floating three-dimensional spheroid cultures (SC) that grow in serum-free medium supplemented with growth factors are supposed to be enriched in TICs. We generated SC from fresh clinical tumor specimens and compared them to SC isolated from CRC cell-lines as well as to adherent differentiated counterparts. Patient-derived SC display self-renewal capacity and can induce serial transplantable tumors in immuno-deficient mice, which phenotypically resemble the tumor of origin. In addition, the original tumor tissue and established SC retain several similar CRC-relevant mutations. Primary SC express key stemness proteins such as SOX2, OCT4, NANOG and LGR5 and importantly show increased chemoresistance ability compared to their adherent differentiated counterparts and to cell line-derived SC. Strikingly, cells derived from spheroid or adherent differentiating culture conditions displayed similar self-renewal capacity and equally formed tumors in immune-deficient mice, suggesting that self-renewal and tumor-initiation capacity of TICs is not restricted to phenotypically immature spheroid cells, which we describe to be highly plastic and able to reacquire stem-cell traits even after long differentiation processes. Finally, we identified two genes among a sphere gene expression signature that predict disease relapse in CRC patients. Here we propose that SC derived from fresh patient tumor tissue present interesting phenotypic features that may have clinical relevance for chemoresistance and disease relapse and therefore represent a valuable tool to test for new CRC-therapies that overcome drug resistance. PMID:26745821

  16. Medical Devices; Obstetrical and Gynecological Devices; Classification of the Intravaginal Culture System. Final order.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is classifying the intravaginal culture system into class II (special controls). The special controls that will apply to the device are identified in this order and will be part of the codified language for the intravaginal culture system's classification. The Agency is classifying the device into class II (special controls) in order to provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device. PMID:26742184

  17. Paradigm Adherence and Personality Correlates across Mental Health Professions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rauscher, Laura Anne

    2012-01-01

    Paradigm adherence has been developed as a meta-theoretical approach to organize and to classify the multitude of different theories of counseling and psychotherapy. Four paradigms have been identified in the literature: The Organic-Medical, The Psychological, The Systemic-Relational, and the Social Constructivist paradigms. Only one other study…

  18. Apparatus for recovering matter adhered to a host surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paik, W. W.; Chapman, C. P. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    The development of an apparatus for removing and recovering matter adhered to a host surface is described. The device consists of a pickup head with an ultrasonic transducer adapted to deliver ultrasonic pressure waves against the material. The ultrasonic waves agitate the material and cause its separation from the surface. A vacuum system recovers the material and delivers it to suitable storage containers.

  19. The Role of State Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems in Promoting Cultural Competence and Effective Cross-Cultural Communication. Building State Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems Series, Number 8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sareen, Harvinder; Visencio, Diane; Russ, Shirley; Halfon, Neal

    2005-01-01

    If early childhood systems are to be effective at the population level then they must be able to provide family-centered care to all the racial, ethnic and cultural groups that they serve. Despite major policy driven and technological advances in healthcare, health disparities across different races and ethnicities persist. For example, the infant…

  20. Improving hand hygiene adherence among nursing staff.

    PubMed

    Harne-Britner, Sarah; Allen, Marianne; Fowler, Kimberly A

    2011-01-01

    This quasi-experimental study explored initial and sustained effects of educational and behavioral interventions on hand hygiene adherence and the relationships between hand hygiene adherence and health care-associated infections. Education paired with positive reinforcement behavioral interventions significantly improved hand hygiene adherence after the first month (χ² = 4.27; P = .039); however, the improvement was not sustained over 6 months. There were no significant differences in infection rates between the treatment and control groups. PMID:20407392

  1. Effect of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection on the adherence of pathogenic bacteria to human epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Faden, H.; Hong, J.J.; Ogra, P.L.

    1986-03-01

    The effect of RSV infection on the adherence of Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP), Haemophilus influenzae (HI) and Staphylococcus aureus (SA) to human epithelial cells was determined. RSV-infected Hep-2 cell cultures at different stages of expression of surface viral antigens and bacteria labeled with /sup 3/H-thymidine were employed to examine the kinetics of bacterial adherence to virus-infected cells. RSV infection did not alter the magnitude of adherence of HI or SA to HEp-2 cells. However, adherence of SP to HEp-2 cells was significantly (P < 0.01) enhanced by prior RSV infection. The degree of adherence was directly related to the amount of viral antigen expressed on the cell surface. The adherence was temperature dependent, with maximal adherence observed at 37/sup 0/C. Heat-inactivation of SP did not alter adherence characteristics. These data suggest that RSV infection increases adherence of SP to the surface of epithelial cells in vitro. Since attachment of bacteria to mucosal surfaces is the first step in many infections, it is suggested that viral infections of epithelial cells render them more susceptible to bacterial adherence. Thus, RSV infection in vivo may predispose children to SP infections, such as in otitis media, by increasing colonization with SP.

  2. [Effects of different culture system of isolating and passage of sheep embryonic stem-like cells].

    PubMed

    Bai, Changming; Liu, Chousheng; Wang, Zhigang; Wang, Xinzhuang

    2008-07-01

    In this research, we use mouse embryonic fibroblasts as feeder layers. To eliminate the influence of serum and mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) conditioned medium (ESCCM) on self-renewal of sheep embryonic stem-like cells, knockout serum replacement (KSR) was used to replace serum, then supplanted with ESCCM for the isolation and cloning of sheep embryonic stem-like cells. We found when inner cell masses (ICMs) cultured in the control group with medium supplanted with fetal bovine serum (FBS), sheep ES-like cells could not survive for more than 3 passages. However, sheep embryonic stem-like cells could remain undifferentiated for 5 passages when cultured in the medium that FBS was substituted by KSR. The result indicates that KSR culture system was more suitable for the isolation and cloning of sheep embryonic stem-like cells compared to FBS culture system. Finally we applied medium with 15% KSR as basic medium supplanted with 40% ESCCM as a new culture system to isolate sheep embryonic stem-like cells, we found one embryonic stem-like cell line still maintained undifferentiating for 8 passages, which characterized with a normal and stable karyotype and high expression of alkaline phosphatase. These results suggest that it is suitable to culture sheep ICM in the new culture system with 15% KSR as basic medium and supplanted with 40% ESCCM, which indicated that mouse ES cells might secrete factors playing important roles in promoting sheep ES-like cells' self-renewal. PMID:18837407

  3. [Effects of different culture system of isolating and passage of sheep embryonic stem-like cells].

    PubMed

    Bai, Changming; Liu, Chousheng; Wang, Zhigang; Wang, Xinzhuang

    2008-07-01

    In this research, we use mouse embryonic fibroblasts as feeder layers. To eliminate the influence of serum and mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) conditioned medium (ESCCM) on self-renewal of sheep embryonic stem-like cells, knockout serum replacement (KSR) was used to replace serum, then supplanted with ESCCM for the isolation and cloning of sheep embryonic stem-like cells. We found when inner cell masses (ICMs) cultured in the control group with medium supplanted with fetal bovine serum (FBS), sheep ES-like cells could not survive for more than 3 passages. However, sheep embryonic stem-like cells could remain undifferentiated for 5 passages when cultured in the medium that FBS was substituted by KSR. The result indicates that KSR culture system was more suitable for the isolation and cloning of sheep embryonic stem-like cells compared to FBS culture system. Finally we applied medium with 15% KSR as basic medium supplanted with 40% ESCCM as a new culture system to isolate sheep embryonic stem-like cells, we found one embryonic stem-like cell line still maintained undifferentiating for 8 passages, which characterized with a normal and stable karyotype and high expression of alkaline phosphatase. These results suggest that it is suitable to culture sheep ICM in the new culture system with 15% KSR as basic medium and supplanted with 40% ESCCM, which indicated that mouse ES cells might secrete factors playing important roles in promoting sheep ES-like cells' self-renewal.

  4. Manufacture of biopharmaceutical proteins by mammalian cell culture systems.

    PubMed

    Tolbert, W R

    1990-01-01

    In the last several years, dramatic advances have been in the development of new biopharmaceuticals including monoclonal antibodies for diagnosis and treatment and such genetically engineered proteins as tPA, Factor VIIIc, erythropoietin and soluble CD4, an anti-AIDS protein. Currently, there are several hundred such candidate drugs in human clinical trials. In most cases, these protein-based drugs will require manufacture by mammalian cell culture due to the inability of lower organisms to properly glycosylate, fold, make correct disulfide bonds and secrete active biomolecular forms. The need for large scale production from cell culture will greatly increase as more of the products in clinical trials are approved for commercial production. This will require significant reduction in manufacturing costs per gram, concomitant with increased capacity to hundreds or perhaps even thousands of kilograms annually. As an example, Invitron's multi-reactor manufacturing facility has operated at greater than one-half million liters per year and has experience with more than 250 mammalian cell lines for producing protein drug products.

  5. Lysine hydroxylation of collagen in a fibroblast cell culture system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uzawa, Katsuhiro; Yeowell, Heather N.; Yamamoto, Kazushi; Mochida, Yoshiyuki; Tanzawa, Hideki; Yamauchi, Mitsuo

    2003-01-01

    The lysine (Lys) hydroxylation pattern of type I collagen produced by human fibroblasts in culture was analyzed and compared. Fibroblasts were cultured from normal human skin (NSF), keloid (KDF), fetal skin (FDF), and skin tissues of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VIA and VIB patients (EDS-VIA and -VIB). The type I collagen alpha chains with or without non-helical telopeptides were purified from the insoluble matrix and analyzed. In comparison with NSFs, KDF and FDF showed significantly higher Lys hydroxylation, particularly in the telopeptide domains of both alpha chains. Both EDS-VIA and -VIB showed markedly lower Lys hydroxylation in the helical domains of both alpha chains whereas that in the telopeptides was comparable with those of NSFs. A similar profile was observed in the tissue sample of the EDS-VIB patient. These results demonstrate that the Lys hydroxylation pattern is domain-specific within the collagen molecule and that this method is useful to characterize the cell phenotypes in normal/pathological connective tissues.

  6. Control of galactosylated glycoforms distribution in cell culture system.

    PubMed

    McCracken, Neil A; Kowle, Ronald; Ouyang, Anli

    2014-01-01

    Cell culture process conditions including media components and bioreactor operation conditions have a profound impact on recombinant protein quality attributes. Considerable changes in the distribution of galactosylated glycoforms (G0F, G1F, and G2F) were observed across multiple CHO derived recombinant proteins in development at Eli Lilly and Company when switching to a new chemically defined (CD) media platform condition. In the new CD platform, significantly lower G0F percentages and higher G1F and G2F were observed. These changes were of interest as glycosylation heterogeneity can impact the effectiveness of a protein. A systematic investigation was done to understand the root cause of the change and control strategy for galactosylated glycoforms distribution. It was found that changes in asparagine concentration could result in a corresponding change in G0F, G1F, and G2F distribution. A follow-up study examined a wider range of asparagine concentration and it was found that G0F, G1F, and G2F percentage could be titrated by adjusting asparagine concentration. The observed changes in heterogeneity from changing asparagine concentration are due to resulting changes in ammonium metabolism. Further study ascertained that different integrated ammonium level during the cell culture process could control G0F, G1F, and G2F percentage distribution. A mechanism hypothesis is proposed that integrated ammonium level impacts intracellular pH, which further regulates β-1, 4 galactosyltransferase activity. PMID:24692242

  7. Adherence to Medication Regimens among Low-Income Patients with Multiple Comorbid Chronic Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishra, Shiraz I.; Gioia, Deborah; Childress, Saltanat; Barnet, Beth; Webster, Ramothea L.

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative study sought to explore facilitators and barriers to adherence to multiple medications among low-income patients with comorbid chronic physical and mental health conditions. The 50 focus group participants identified personal/contextual and health system factors as major impediments to adherence to multiple medications. These…

  8. Improving Adherence to Medication Regimens for Children with Asthma and Its Effect on Clinical Outcome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    da Costa, Irene G.; Rapoff, Michael A.; Lemanek, Kathleen; Goldstein, Gerald L.

    1997-01-01

    A study examined the effects of a combined education and token system intervention to improve adherence to inhaled corticosteroids for an 8-year-old girl and a 10-year-old boy with asthma. A withdrawal design demonstrated improved adherence and, for one child, an associated improvement in pulmonary function occurred. (Author/CR)

  9. Medication Adherence among Adolescents in a School-Based Health Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mears, Cynthia J.; Charlebois, Nicole M.; Holl, Jane L.

    2006-01-01

    School-based health centers are an integral part of the health care delivery system for low-income children. Medication adherence for these patients may be challenging because the student is often responsible for bringing home the prescription and receiving the instructions. This study assesses medication fill, initiation, and adherence rates…

  10. Histamine increases sickle erythrocyte adherence to endothelium.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Matthew C; Eckman, James R; Wick, Timothy M

    2006-02-01

    Complications of sickle cell anaemia include vascular occlusion triggered by the adherence of sickle erythrocytes to endothelium in the postcapillary venules. Adherence can be promoted by inflammatory mediators that induce endothelial cell adhesion molecule expression and arrest flowing erythrocytes. The present study characterised the effect of histamine stimulation on the kinetics of sickle cell adherence to large vessel and microvascular endothelium under physiological flow. Increased sickle cell adherence was observed within minutes of endothelial activation by histamine and reached a maximum value within 30 min. At steady state, sickle cell adherence to histamine-stimulated endothelium was 47 +/- 4 adherent cells/mm(2), 2.6-fold higher than sickle cell adherence to unstimulated endothelial cells. Histamine-induced sickle cell adherence occurred rapidly and transiently. Studies using histamine receptor agonists and antagonists suggest that histamine-induced sickle cell adhesion depends on simultaneous stimulation of the H(2) and H(4) histamine receptors and endothelial P-selectin expression. These data show that histamine release may promote sickle cell adherence and vaso-occlusion. In vivo histamine release should be studied to determine its role in sickle complications and whether blocking of specific histamine receptors may prevent clinical complications or adverse effects from histamine release stimulated by opiate analgesic treatment.

  11. Medication Adherence: A Call for Action

    PubMed Central

    Bosworth, Hayden B.; Granger, Bradi B.; Mendys, Phil; Brindis, Ralph; Burkholder, Rebecca; Czajkowski, Susan M.; Daniel, Jodi G.; Ekman, Inger; Ho, Michael; Johnson, Mimi; Kimmel, Stephen E.; Liu, Larry Z; Musaus, John; Shrank, William H.; Buono, Elizabeth Whalley; Weiss, Karen; Granger, Christopher B.

    2013-01-01

    Poor adherence to efficacious cardiovascular related medications has led to considerable morbidity, mortality, and avoidable health care costs. This paper provides results of a recent think tank meeting in which various stakeholder groups representing key experts from consumers, community health providers, the academic community, decision-making government officials (FDA, NIH, etc), and industry scientists met to evaluate the current status of medication adherence and provide recommendations for improving outcomes. Below, we review the magnitude of the problem of medication adherence, prevalence, impact, and cost. We then summarize proven effective approaches and conclude with a discussion of recommendations to address this growing and significant public health issue of medication non adherence. PMID:21884856

  12. [Treatment adherence and chronic inflammatory bowel diseases].

    PubMed

    Tahri, Nabil

    2007-09-01

    For inflammatory bowel disease, unlike other chronic illnesses, there are sparse data available about patients' adherence to medication. The few studies vary widely, but noncompliance rates tend to be high, about 30-40%. Psychiatric disorders, including depression and anxiety, and poor patient-physician relationships are the most common causes of these patients' lack of adherence. Failure to adhere to prescribed medications increases risk of relapse and of colorectal cancer. Strategies that can improve adherence include establishing a partnership with the patient, simplifying the treatment regimen and increasing awareness through education and feedback.

  13. Control and adherence: living with diabetes in Bangkok, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Naemiratch, Bhensri; Manderson, Lenore

    2006-09-01

    Diabetes is managed via a regimen of control. Physicians advise adults living with type 2 diabetes to control blood sugar levels by controlling diet, maintaining regular exercise, and complying with medication. The extent to which individuals are able to adhere to such recommendations varies. In this article, we explore lay perceptions of diabetes and its control, drawing on data from an ethnographic study conducted in Bangkok, Thailand. Between August 2001 and February 2003 the first author spent time with twelve man and women living with type 2 diabetes, their spouses, children and health providers. An additional 21 people were interviewed to extend the data and test for generalisibility. It was found that individual explanations of control, and adherence or resistance to medical advice, are interpreted and adapted in ways consistent with Buddhist philosophy and Thai norms that govern everyday life. Notions of moderation and cultural values of being and behaving, and ideals of interaction, provide a philosophical basis and practical guidelines for control.

  14. Development of practical investigation system for cultural properties based on a projector-camera system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyata, Kimiyoshi

    2009-01-01

    Huge number of historical materials and cultural properties in museums are investigated based on scientific and chemical analysis techniques, however these techniques require specific equipments with difficult operations. In this research, a practical investigation system is developed to provide convenient way for investigating color information in variety of materials as the first step of the investigation process. The system consists of a data projector and a digital camera, and the system is examined to detect metameric color area as an example of investigation purposes. In this research, the data projector has a role of illuminator to yield illuminant metamerism, and the camera takes sequential images under different illumination colors created by the projector. In the experiment, seven colors of illumination are created by the projector, then images are taken under each colored illumination. The Euclid distance in the RGB space between a predetermined reference pixel and test pixels is calculated in each of taken images. These distances are compared with thresholds determined by using a metamerism test chart. The proposed system was examined for the test charts and Japanese authentic wooden prints, and the experimental results showed that the system could offer convenience as the first investigation of the materials.

  15. Similarities and differences between asthma health care professional and patient views regarding medication adherence

    PubMed Central

    Peláez, Sandra; Bacon, Simon L; Aulls, Mark W; Lacoste, Guillaume; Lavoie, Kim L

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The recent literature has reported disparate views between patients and health care professionals regarding the roles of various factors affecting medication adherence. OBJECTIVE: To examine the perspectives of asthma patients, physicians and allied health professionals regarding adherence to asthma medication. METHODOLOGY: A qualitative, multiple, collective case study design with six focus-group interviews including 38 participants (13 asthma patients, 13 pulmonologist physicians and 12 allied health professionals involved in treating asthma patients) was conducted. RESULTS: Patients, physicians and allied health professionals understood adherence to be an active process. In addition, all participants believed they had a role in treatment adherence, and agreed that the cost of medication was high and that access to the health care system was restricted. Major disagreements regarding patient-related barriers to medication adherence were identified among the groups. For example, all groups referred to side effects; however, while patients expressed their legitimate concerns, health care professionals believed that patients’ opinions of medication side effects were based on inadequate perceptions. CONCLUSION: Differences regarding medication adherence and barriers to adherence among the groups examined in the present study will provide insight into how disagreements may be translated to overcome barriers to optimal asthma adherence. Furthermore, when designing an intervention to enhance medication adherence, it is important to acknowledge that perceptual gaps exist and must be addressed. PMID:24712015

  16. Cells and Culture Systems Used to Model the Small Airway Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Bhowmick, Rudra; Gappa-Fahlenkamp, Heather

    2016-06-01

    The pulmonary epithelium is divided into upper, lower, and alveolar (or small) airway epithelia and acts as the mechanical and immunological barrier between the external environment and the underlying submucosa. Of these, the small airway epithelium is the principal area of gas exchange and has high immunological activity, making it a major area of cell biology, immunology, and pharmaceutical research. As animal models do not faithfully represent the human pulmonary system and ex vivo human lung samples have reliability and availability issues, cell lines, and primary cells are widely used as small airway epithelial models. In vitro, these cells are mostly cultured as monolayers (2-dimensional cultures), either media submerged or at air-liquid interface. However, these 2-dimensional cultures lack a three dimension-a scaffolding extracellular matrix, which establishes the intercellular network in the in vivo airway epithelium. Therefore, 3-dimensional cell culture is currently a major area of development, where cells are cultured in a matrix or are cultured in a manner that they develop ECM-like scaffolds between them, thus mimicking the in vivo phenotype more faithfully. This review focuses on the commonly used small airway epithelial cells, their 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional culture techniques, and their comparative phenotype when cultured under these systems. PMID:27071933

  17. A Qualitative Study Exploring Factors Associated with Provider Adherence to Severe Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Brolliar, Sarah M; Moore, Megan; Thompson, Hilaire J; Whiteside, Lauren K; Mink, Richard B; Wainwright, Mark S; Groner, Jonathan I; Bell, Michael J; Giza, Christopher C; Zatzick, Douglas F; Ellenbogen, Richard G; Ng Boyle, Linda; Mitchell, Pamela H; Rivara, Frederick P; Vavilala, Monica S

    2016-08-15

    Despite demonstrated improvement in patient outcomes with use of the Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Guidelines (Guidelines), there are differential rates of adherence. Provider perspectives on barriers and facilitators to adherence have not been elucidated. This study aimed to identify and explore in depth the provider perspective on factors associated with adherence to the Guidelines using 19 focus groups with nurses and physicians who provided acute management for pediatric patients with TBI at five university-affiliated Level 1 trauma centers. Data were examined using deductive and inductive content analysis. Results indicated that three inter-related domains were associated with clinical adherence: 1) perceived guideline credibility and applicability to individual patients, 2) implementation, dissemination, and enforcement strategies, and 3) provider culture, communication styles, and attitudes towards protocols. Specifically, Guideline usefulness was determined by the perceived relevance to the individual patient given age, injury etiology, and severity and the strength of the evidence. Institutional methods to formally endorse, codify, and implement the Guidelines into the local culture were important. Providers wanted local protocols developed using interdisciplinary consensus. Finally, a culture of collaboration, including consistent, respectful communication and interdisciplinary cooperation, facilitated adherence. Provider training and experience, as well as attitudes towards other standardized care protocols, mirror the use and attitudes towards the Guidelines. Adherence was determined by the interaction of each of these guideline, institutional, and provider factors acting in concert. Incorporating provider perspectives on barriers and facilitators to adherence into hospital and team protocols is an important step toward improving adherence and ultimately patient outcomes. PMID:26760283

  18. Evaluation of a new biphasic culture system for the recovery of mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Giger, T; Burkardt, H J

    1990-06-01

    A newly developed biphasic culture system (MB-Check) for recovery of mycobacteria was evaluated. The biphasic system consists of a bottle containing selective modified Middlebrook 7H9 broth and a mounted dip slide with chocolate agar and modified Middlebrook 7H11 agar with and without NAP. The system was compared with culture on two egg-based media, Lowenstein medium and a selective Gottsacker medium, using 995 routine specimens and 90 artificially seeded sputa. Mycobacterium tuberculosis was detected in 17 of the 995 routine specimens by the biphasic system and in 14 specimens by the egg-based media together. In the artificially seeded sputa the biphasic system showed higher sensitivity in detection of both tuberculosis complex and non-tuberculous mycobacteria than the egg-based media. The recovery times of the new system were comparable to those of the two conventional culture methods. PMID:2387296

  19. Short report: Failure of Burkholderia pseudomallei to grow in an automated blood culture system.

    PubMed

    Teerawattanasook, Nittaya; Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Day, Nicholas P J; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn

    2014-12-01

    We compared the organisms isolated from 30,210 pairs of blood culture bottles by using BacT/Alert system and the conventional system. Overall, 2,575 (8.5%) specimens were culture positive for pathogenic organisms. The sensitivity for detection of pathogenic organisms with the BACT/Alert system (85.6%, 2,203 of 2,575) was significantly higher than that with the conventional method (74.1%, 1,908 of 2,575; P < 0.0001). However, Burkholderia pseudomallei was isolated less often with the BacT/ALERT system (73.5%, 328 of 446) than with the conventional system (90.3%, 403 of 446; P < 0.0001). This finding suggests that use of the conventional culture method in conjunction with the BacT/Alert system may improve the isolation rate for B. pseudomallei in melioidosis-endemic areas.

  20. Unique cell culture systems for ground based research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Marian L.

    1990-01-01

    The horizontally rotating fluid-filled, membrane oxygenated bioreactors developed at NASA Johnson for spacecraft applications provide a powerful tool for ground-based research. Three-dimensional aggregates formed by cells cultured on microcarrier beads are useful for study of cell-cell interactions and tissue development. By comparing electron micrographs of plant seedlings germinated during Shuttle flight 61-C and in an earth-based rotating bioreactor it is shown that some effects of microgravity are mimicked. Bioreactors used in the UAH Bioreactor Laboratory will make it possible to determine some of the effects of altered gravity at the cellular level. Bioreactors can be valuable for performing critical, preliminary-to-spaceflight experiments as well as medical investigations such as in vitro tumor cell growth and chemotherapeutic drug response; the enrichment of stem cells from bone marrow; and the effect of altered gravity on bone and muscle cell growth and function and immune response depression.

  1. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis for controlling and comparing culture supernatants of mammalian cell culture productions systems.

    PubMed

    Wimmer, K; Harant, H; Reiter, M; Blüml, G; Gaida, T; Katinger, H

    1994-01-01

    A recombinant Chinese hamster ovary cell line, producing human erythropoietin, was cultivated in a continuous mode in a stirred tank reactor applying different dilution rates. In order to monitor the stability of this expression system, product and non-product proteins of the cell culture supernatant were analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis. The consistency of the isoforms of the recombinant product was determined by western blot combined with specific staining. The same cell line was propagated in a high cell density cultivation system based on macro-cell-aggregates. The patterns of secreted proteins of the cell line cultivated in the different systems were compared in order to detect modifications in protein expression of the product and of non product proteins relevant for cell culture supernatant. Hardly any alterations in two-dimensional pattern were detectable. The isoforms of erythropoietin, as well as the overall pattern of secreted proteins, detectable with the two-dimensional electrophoresis method were remarkably stable under different cultivation conditions.

  2. Adherence of sputtered titanium carbides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Wheeler, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    The study searches for interface treatment that would increase the adhesion of TiC coating to nickel- and titanium-base alloys. Rene 41 (19 wt percent Cr, 11 wt percent Mo, 3 wt percent Ti, balance Ni) and Ti-6Al-4V (6 wt percent Al, 4 wt percent V, balance Ti) are considered. Adhesion of the coatings is evaluated in pin-and disk friction tests. The coatings and interface regions are examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Results suggest that sputtered refractory compound coatings adhere best when a mixed compound of coating and substrate metals is formed in the interfacial region. The most effective type of refractory compound interface appears to depend on both substrate and coating material. A combination of metallic interlayer deposition and mixed compound interface formation may be more effective for some substrate coating combinations than either alone.

  3. Micromolded Arrays for Separation of Adherent Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuli; Phillips, Colleen; Xu, Wei; Pai, Jeng-Hao; Dhopeshwarkar, Rahul; Sims, Christopher E.; Allbritton, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    We present an efficient, yet inexpensive, approach for isolating viable single cells or colonies from a mixed population. This cell microarray platform possesses innovations in both the array manufacture and the manner of target cell release. Arrays of microwells with bases composed of detachable concave elements, termed microrafts, were fabricated by a dip-coating process using a polydimethylsiloxane mold as the template and the array substrate. This manufacturing approach enabled the use of materials other than photoresists to create the array elements. Thus microrafts possessing low autofluorescence could be fabricated for fluorescence-based identification of cells. Cells plated on the microarray settled and attached at the center of the wells due to the microrafts’ concavity. Individual microrafts were readily dislodged by the action of a needle inserted through the compliant polymer substrate. The hard polymer material (polystyrene or epoxy resin) of which the microrafts were composed protected the cells from damage by the needle. For cell analysis and isolation, cells of interest were identified using a standard inverted microscope and microrafts carrying target cells were dislodged with the needle. The released cells/microrafts could be efficiently collected, cultured and clonally expanded. During the separation and collection procedures, the cells remained adherent and provided a measure of protection during manipulation, thus providing an extremely high single-cell cloning rate (>95%). Generation of a transfected cell line based on expression of a fluorescent protein demonstrated an important application for performing on-chip cell separations. PMID:20838672

  4. Blood culture examinations at a community hospital without a microbiology laboratory: using an automated blood culture system and performing a Gram stain on positive culture bottles in the institution.

    PubMed

    Saito, Takashi; Aoki, Yoji; Mori, Yoshihiro; Kohi, Fumikazu

    2004-08-01

    To elucidate the existence of microorganisms from blood culture bottles in hospitals without a microbiology laboratory, we changed the system of blood culture examinations. The Oxoid signal blood culture system and submission of all blood cultures to the clinical testing industry was used from July 2002 to December 2002 (first period). Use of the BacT/Alert system and performing of Gram stain for positive culture bottles in our institutions was conducted from January 2003 to June 2003 (latter period). A total of 210 and 193 blood cultures were processed during the first and latter periods, respectively. There were 40 (19.0%) positive cultures in the first period and 32 (16.6%) positive cultures in the latter period. The times from the specimen collection to the Gram stain result that were required were 3.8 and 1.0 days in the first period and the latter period, respectively. The times required for the final report of the blood cultures in the first period and in the latter period were 5.8 and 4.9 days, respectively. We conclude that using a continuous monitoring, automated blood culture system and performing Gram stain for positive culture bottles in institutions without microbiology laboratories may be useful for medical doctors to rapidly determine the existence of microorganisms and to begin adequate antiinfective therapy.

  5. Spatially monitoring oxygen level in 3D microfabricated cell culture systems using optical oxygen sensing beads.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Acosta, Miguel A; Leach, Jennie B; Carrier, Rebecca L

    2013-04-21

    Capability of measuring and monitoring local oxygen concentration at the single cell level (tens of microns scale) is often desirable but difficult to achieve in cell culture. In this study, biocompatible oxygen sensing beads were prepared and tested for their potential for real-time monitoring and mapping of local oxygen concentration in 3D micro-patterned cell culture systems. Each oxygen sensing bead is composed of a silica core loaded with both an oxygen sensitive Ru(Ph2phen3)Cl2 dye and oxygen insensitive Nile blue reference dye, and a poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) shell rendering biocompatibility. Human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells were cultivated on a series of PDMS and type I collagen based substrates patterned with micro-well arrays for 3 or 7 days, and then brought into contact with oxygen sensing beads. Using an image analysis algorithm to convert florescence intensity of beads to partial oxygen pressure in the culture system, tens of microns-size oxygen sensing beads enabled the spatial measurement of local oxygen concentration in the microfabricated system. Results generally indicated lower oxygen level inside wells than on top of wells, and local oxygen level dependence on structural features of cell culture surfaces. Interestingly, chemical composition of cell culture substrates also appeared to affect oxygen level, with type-I collagen based cell culture systems having lower oxygen concentration compared to PDMS based cell culture systems. In general, results suggest that oxygen sensing beads can be utilized to achieve real-time and local monitoring of micro-environment oxygen level in 3D microfabricated cell culture systems.

  6. Adherence to therapies in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    García-Pérez, Luis-Emilio; Alvarez, María; Dilla, Tatiana; Gil-Guillén, Vicente; Orozco-Beltrán, Domingo

    2013-12-01

    Adherence to therapy is defined as the extent to which a person's behavior in taking medication, following a diet, and/or executing lifestyle changes, corresponds with agreed recommendations from a healthcare provider. Patients presenting with type 2 diabetes mellitus are initially encouraged to maintain a healthy diet and exercise regimen, followed by early medication that generally includes one or more oral hypoglycemic agents and later may include an injectable treatment. To prevent the complications associated with type 2 diabetes, therapy frequently also includes medications for control of blood pressure, dyslipidemia and other disorders, since patients often have more than three or four chronic conditions. Despite the benefits of therapy, studies have indicated that recommended glycemic goals are achieved by less than 50% of patients, which may be associated with decreased adherence to therapies. As a result, hyperglycemia and long-term complications increase morbidity and premature mortality, and lead to increased costs to health services. Reasons for nonadherence are multifactorial and difficult to identify. They include age, information, perception and duration of disease, complexity of dosing regimen, polytherapy, psychological factors, safety, tolerability and cost. Various measures to increase patient satisfaction and increase adherence in type 2 diabetes have been investigated. These include reducing the complexity of therapy by fixed-dose combination pills and less frequent dosing regimens, using medications that are associated with fewer adverse events (hypoglycemia or weight gain), educational initiatives with improved patient-healthcare provider communication, reminder systems and social support to help reduce costs. In the current narrative review, factors that influence adherence to different therapies for type 2 diabetes are discussed, along with outcomes of poor adherence, the economic impact of nonadherence, and strategies aimed at improving

  7. Adherence of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae to cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Zielinski, G C; Young, T; Ross, R F; Rosenbusch, R F

    1990-03-01

    This work was an attempt to develop an in vitro adherence model for Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, using monolayers of human and porcine lung fibroblasts and porcine kidney cells. Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae grown in Friis mycoplasma broth was radiolabeled with 35[S]-methionine, washed, concentrated, and inoculated on the monolayers. After 15 minutes of centrifugation to facilitate adherence, monolayers were washed 3 times, dissolved with 0.1N NaOH, and suspended in scintillation liquid, and the radioactivity was determined in a liquid scintillation counter. Adherence, measured as a percentage of counts added, varied according to the mycoplasma strain and the cell line used. Comparison of strains J, 144L, and 232 of M hyopneumoniae revealed 7.5 +/- 5.9, 31.9 +/- 13, and 9.6 +/- 5% adherence to porcine kidney cells, respectively. Slightly different, but proportionally the same relationships were obtained with swine or human fibroblasts. Adherence was decreased slightly by repeated washings of the mycoplasma-treated cell monolayers; however, a plateau was reached, indicating irreversibility of the adherence process. Pretreatment of cell monolayers with nonlabeled organisms substantially blocked adherence by labeled organisms. Dilution of labeled organisms resulted in an increased proportion adhering. Therefore, it appears that the adherence was a receptor-dependent event. Treatment of the mycoplasmas with trypsin prior to the inoculation of monolayers resulted in a marked reduction in adherence. Treatment of the mycoplasmas with hyperimmune swine serum against M hyopneumoniae or normal swine serum resulted in 80 to 90% reduction of adherence; however, no inhibition occurred when mycoplasmas were treated with purified IgG from the hyperimmune serum.

  8. Adherence and Persistence With Oral Adjuvant Chemotherapy in Older Women With Early-Stage Breast Cancer in CALGB 49907: Adherence Companion Study 60104

    PubMed Central

    Partridge, Ann H.; Archer, Laura; Kornblith, Alice B.; Gralow, Julie; Grenier, Debjani; Perez, Edith; Wolff, Antonio C.; Wang, Xiaofei; Kastrissios, Helen; Berry, Donald; Hudis, Clifford; Winer, Eric; Muss, Hyman

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Patient adherence is critical in evaluating the effectiveness of an oral therapy. We sought to measure adherence among women randomly assigned to capecitabine in a preplanned substudy of a multicenter clinical trial. Patients and Methods Cancer and Leukemia Group B study CALGB 49907 was a randomly assigned trial comparing standard chemotherapy versus oral chemotherapy with capecitabine in patients age 65 years or older with early-stage breast cancer. We used microelectronic monitoring system (MEMS) caps on participants' capecitabine bottles to record pill bottle openings. Capecitabine was given in two divided daily doses for 14 consecutive days of a 21-day cycle for six cycles. Adherence was calculated as the number of doses taken divided by doses expected, taking into account toxicity-related dosing changes. A participant was defined as adherent if 80% or more of expected doses were recorded by MEMS. Results Overall, 161 patients were enrolled. Median age was 71 years (range, 65 to 89 years); 124 patients (83%) persisted with capecitabine to completion of planned protocol therapy. Adherence was 78% across all cycles, and adherence did not vary by cycle (P = .32). Twenty-five percent of participants took fewer than 80% of expected doses and were nonadherent. In a logistic regression model, participants with node-negative disease (P = .01) and mastectomy (P = .01) were more likely to be nonadherent. Adherence was not related to age, tumor stage, or hormone receptor status. Adherence was not significantly associated with relapse-free survival or grade 3 or 4 toxicity. Conclusion Most older women with early-stage breast cancer were adherent to short-term oral chemotherapy in a randomized clinical trial. Age was not associated with adherence. PMID:20368559

  9. Intent-to-adhere and adherence to malaria prevention recommendations in two travel clinics.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Irit; Grefat, Rami; Ephros, Moshe; Rishpon, Shmuel

    2015-01-01

    Malaria infects 30,000 travelers annually worldwide. At greatest risk are those who travel for long duration. Prevention of malaria includes chemoprophylaxis. This prospective study on 121 travelers who visited two travel clinics shows that adherence to prophylactic treatment was low, especially in long duration trips, and that adherence rate could be predicted by the much more available intent-to-adhere rate.

  10. Investigating Educational Systems, Leadership, and School Culture: A Holistic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratt, Jill Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Most populous school districts operate using a bureaucratic hierarchical organizational structure developed primarily for industry, a system structure that has remained intact for a century despite evolving from a manufacturing to a knowledge-based economy. Although strong for efficiency, this system structure is resistant to change and promotes…

  11. Tissue culture system using a PANDA ring resonator and wavelength router for hydroponic plant.

    PubMed

    Kamoldilok, Surachart; Suwanpayak, Nathaporn; Suttirak, Saisudawan; Yupapin, Preecha P

    2012-06-01

    A novel system of nanofluidics trapping and delivery, which is known as a tissue culture system is proposed. By using the intense optical pulse(i.e., a soliton pulse) and a system constructed by a liquid core waveguide, the optical vortices (gradient optical fields/wells) can be generated, where the trapping tools in the same way as the optical tweezers in the PANDA ring resonator can be formed. By controlling the suitable parameters, the intense optical vortices can be generated within the PANDA ring resonator, in which the nanofluidics can be trapped and moved (transported) dynamically within the Tissue culture system(a wavelength router), which can be used for tissue culture and delivery in the hydroponic plant system.

  12. Self-driven perfusion culture system using a paper-based double-layered scaffold.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Ai; Arisaka, Yoshinori; Takeda, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    Shear stress caused by fluid flow is known to promote tissue development from cells in vivo. Therefore, perfusion cultures have been studied to investigate the mechanisms involved and to fabricate engineered tissues in vitro, particularly those that include blood vessels. Microfluidic devices, which function with fine machinery of chambers and microsyringes for fluid flow and have small culture areas, are conventionally used for perfusion culture. In contrast, we have developed a self-driven perfusion culture system by using a paper-based double-layered scaffold as the fundamental component. Gelatin microfibers were electrospun onto a paper material to prepare the scaffold system, in which the constant perfusion of the medium and the scaffold for cell adhesion/proliferation were functionally divided into a paper and a gelatin microfiber layer, respectively. By applying both the capillary action and siphon phenomenon of the paper-based scaffold, which bridged two medium chambers at different height levels, a self-driven medium flow was achieved and the flow rate was also stable, constant, and quantitatively controllable. Moreover, the culture area was enlargeable to the cm(2) scale. The endothelial cells cultivated on this system oriented along the medium-flow direction, suggesting that the shear stress caused by medium flow was effectively applied. This perfusion culture system is expected to be useful for fabricating three-dimensional and large engineered tissues in the future. PMID:27550929

  13. Glycoprotein secretion in a tracheal organ culture system

    SciTech Connect

    Warunek, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    Glycoprotein secretion in the rat trachea was studied in vitro, utilizing a modified, matrix embed/perfusion chamber. Baseline parameters of the culture environment were determined by enzymatic and biochemical procedures. The effect of pilocarpine on the release of labelled glycoproteins from the tracheal epithelium was assessed. After a single stimulation with the drug, there was a significant increase in the release of /sup 14/C-glucosamine and /sup 3/H-fucose-labelled glycoprotein. The response was dose-dependent. Similar results were obtained after a second exposure to pilocarpine. However, no dose response was observed. Morphological analyses of the tracheal epithelial secretory cells by Alcian Blue/Periodic Acid Schiff staining showed a significant decrease in the total number of Alcian Blue staining cells and an increase in the mixed cell population after a single exposure to pilocarpine. Second stimulation with the drug showed that the trachea was able to respond again, this time with a further decrease in the number of Alcian Blue staining cells and a decrease in the PAS staining cells as well. Carbohydrate analyses after the first simulation with pilocarpine showed increased levels of N-acetyl neuraminic acid and the neutral carbohydrates, fucose and galactose, in the precipitated glycoproteins.

  14. Mixed culture polyhydroxyalkanoates production from sugar molasses: the use of a 2-stage CSTR system for culture selection.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, M G E; Concas, S; Bengtsson, S; Reis, M A M

    2010-09-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are promising biodegradable polymers. The use of mixed microbial cultures (MMC) and low cost feedstocks have a positive impact on the cost-effectiveness of the process. It has typically been carried out in Sequencing Batch Reactors (SBR). In this study, a 2-stage CSTR system (under Feast and Famine conditions) was used to effectively select for PHA-storing organisms using fermented molasses as feedstock. The effect of influent substrate concentration (60-120 Cmmol VFA/L) and HRT ratio between the reactors (0.2-0.5h/h) on the system's selection efficiency was assessed. It was shown that Feast reactor residual substrate concentration impacted on the selective pressure for PHA storage (due to substrate-dependent kinetic limitation). Moreover, a residual substrate concentration coming from the Feast to the Famine reactor did not jeopardize the physiological adaptation required for enhanced PHA storage. The culture reached a maximum PHA content of 61%. This success opens new perspectives to the use of wastewater treatment infrastructure for PHA production, thus valorizing either excess sludge or wastewaters.

  15. A Review of Treatment Adherence Measurement Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenwald, Sonja K.; Garland, Ann F.

    2013-01-01

    Fidelity measurement is critical for testing the effectiveness and implementation in practice of psychosocial interventions. Adherence is a critical component of fidelity. The purposes of this review were to catalogue adherence measurement methods and assess existing evidence for the valid and reliable use of the scores that they generate and the…

  16. In Vivo Bone Regeneration Using Tubular Perfusion System Bioreactor Cultured Nanofibrous Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Yeatts, Andrew B.; Both, Sanne K.; Yang, Wanxun; Alghamdi, Hamdan S.; Yang, Fang; Jansen, John A.

    2014-01-01

    The use of bioreactors for the in vitro culture of constructs for bone tissue engineering has become prevalent as these systems may improve the growth and differentiation of a cultured cell population. Here we utilize a tubular perfusion system (TPS) bioreactor for the in vitro culture of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and implant the cultured constructs into rat femoral condyle defects. Using nanofibrous electrospun poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/poly(ɛ-caprolactone) scaffolds, hMSCs were cultured for 10 days in vitro in the TPS bioreactor with cellular and acellular scaffolds cultured statically for 10 days as a control. After 3 and 6 weeks of in vivo culture, explants were removed and subjected to histomorphometric analysis. Results indicated more rapid bone regeneration in defects implanted with bioreactor cultured scaffolds with a new bone area of 1.23±0.35 mm2 at 21 days compared to 0.99±0.43 mm2 and 0.50±0.29 mm2 in defects implanted with statically cultured scaffolds and acellular scaffolds, respectively. At the 21 day timepoint, statistical differences (p<0.05) were only observed between defects implanted with cell containing scaffolds and the acellular control. After 42 days, however, defects implanted with TPS cultured scaffolds had the greatest new bone area with 1.72±0.40 mm2. Defects implanted with statically cultured and acellular scaffolds had a new bone area of 1.26±0.43 mm2 and 1.19±0.33 mm2, respectively. The increase in bone growth observed in defects implanted with TPS cultured scaffolds was statistically significant (p<0.05) when compared to both the static and acellular groups at this timepoint. This study demonstrates the efficacy of the TPS bioreactor to improve bone tissue regeneration and highlights the benefits of utilizing perfusion bioreactor systems to culture MSCs for bone tissue engineering. PMID:23865551

  17. Lab on a chip-based hepatic sinusoidal system simulator for optimal primary hepatocyte culture.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yoon Young; Kim, Jaehyung; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Dong-Sik

    2016-08-01

    Primary hepatocyte cultures have been used in studies on liver disease, physiology, and pharmacology. While they are an important tool for in vitro liver studies, maintaining liver-specific characteristics of hepatocytes in vitro is difficult, as these cells rapidly lose their unique characteristics and functions. Portal flow is an important condition to preserve primary hepatocyte functions and liver regeneration in vivo. We have developed a microfluidic chip that does not require bulky peripheral devices or an external power source to investigate the relationship between hepatocyte functional maintenance and flow rates. In our culture system, two types of microfluidic devices were used as scaffolds: a monolayer- and a concave chamber-based device. Under flow conditions, our chips improved albumin and urea secretion rates after 13 days compared to that of the static chips. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction demonstrated that hepatocyte-specific gene expression was significantly higher at 13 days under flow conditions than when using static chips. For both two-dimensional and three-dimensional culture on the chips, flow resulted in the best performance of the hepatocyte culture in vitro. We demonstrated that flow improves the viability and efficiency of long-term culture of primary hepatocytes and plays a key role in hepatocyte function. These results suggest that this flow system has the potential for long-term hepatocyte cultures as well as a technique for three-dimensional culture. PMID:27334878

  18. Magnetic field-magnetic nanoparticle culture system used to grow in vitro murine embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    de Freitas, Erika Regina Leal; Soares, Paula Roberta Otaviano; de Santos, Rachel Paula; dos Santos, Regiane Lopes; Porfírio, Elaine Paulucio; Báo, Sônia N; Lima, Emília Celma Oliveira; Guillo, Lídia Andreu

    2011-01-01

    The in vitro growth of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) is usually obtained in the presence of murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEF), but new methods for in vitro expansion of ESCs should be developed due to their potential clinical use. This study aims to establish a culture system to expand and maintain ESCs in the absence of MEF by using murine embryonic stem cells (mECS) as a model of embryonic stem cell. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were used for growing mESCs in the presence of an external magnetic field, creating the magnetic field-magnetic nanoparticle (MF-MNP) culture system. The growth characteristics were evaluated showing a doubling time slightly higher for mESCs cultivated in the presence of the system than in the presence of the MEF. The undifferentiated state was characterized by RT-PCR, immunofluorescence, alkaline phosphatase activity and electron microscopy. Murine embryonic stem cells cultivated in presence of the MF-MNP culture system exhibited Oct-4 and Nanog expression and high alkaline phosphatase activity. Ultrastructural morphology showed that the MF-MNP culture system did not interfere with processes that cause structural changes in the cytoplasm or nucleus. The MF-MNP culture system provides a tool for in vitro expansion of mESCs and could contribute to studies that aim the therapeutic use of embryonic stem cells. PMID:21446404

  19. System for measuring oxygen consumption rates of mammalian cells in static culture under hypoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Yuki; Miyahara, Hirotaka; Ota, Yuri; Tsuneda, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Estimating the oxygen consumption rates (OCRs) of mammalian cells in hypoxic environments is essential for designing and developing a three-dimensional (3-D) cell culture system. However, OCR measurements under hypoxic conditions are infrequently reported in the literature. Here, we developed a system for measuring OCRs at low oxygen levels. The system injects nitrogen gas into the environment and measures the oxygen concentration by an optical oxygen microsensor that consumes no oxygen. The developed system was applied to HepG2 cells in static culture. Specifically, we measured the spatial profiles of the local dissolved oxygen concentration in the medium, then estimated the OCRs of the cells. The OCRs, and also the pericellular oxygen concentrations, decreased nonlinearly as the oxygen partial pressure in the environment decreased from 19% to 1%. The OCRs also depended on the culture period and the matrix used for coating the dish surface. Using this system, we can precisely estimate the OCRs of various cell types under environments that mimic 3-D culture conditions, contributing crucial data for an efficient 3-D culture system design. PMID:26558344

  20. Dynamic cell culture system: a new cell cultivation instrument for biological experiments in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gmunder, F. K.; Nordau, C. G.; Tschopp, A.; Huber, B.; Cogoli, A.

    1988-01-01

    The prototype of a miniaturized cell cultivation instrument for animal cell culture experiments aboard Spacelab is presented (Dynamic cell culture system: DCCS). The cell chamber is completely filled and has a working volume of 200 microliters. Medium exchange is achieved with a self-powered osmotic pump (flowrate 1 microliter h-1). The reservoir volume of culture medium is 230 microliters. The system is neither mechanically stirred nor equipped with sensors. Hamster kidney (Hak) cells growing on Cytodex 3 microcarriers were used to test the biological performance of the DCCS. Growth characteristics in the DCCS, as judged by maximal cell density, glucose consumption, lactic acid secretion and pH, were similar to those in cell culture tubes.

  1. Motivating patient adherence to allergic rhinitis treatments.

    PubMed

    Bender, Bruce G

    2015-03-01

    Patient nonadherence significantly burdens the treatment of allergic rhinitis (AR). Fewer than half of prescribed doses of intranasal corticosteroid medication are taken. The challenges for immunotherapies are even greater. While sustained treatment for 3 to 5 years is required for full benefit, most patients receiving immunotherapy, either subcutaneous or sublingual, stop treatment within the first year. Although research into interventions to improve AR adherence is lacking, lessons learned from adherence interventions in other chronic health conditions can be applied to AR. Two well-established, overriding models of care-the chronic care model and patient-centered care-can improve adherence. The patient-centered care model includes important lessons for allergy providers in their daily practice, including understanding and targeting modifiable barriers to adherence. Additionally, recent studies have begun to leverage health information and communication technologies to reach out to patients and promote adherence, extending patient-centered interventions initiated by providers during office visits.

  2. Motivating patient adherence to allergic rhinitis treatments.

    PubMed

    Bender, Bruce G

    2015-03-01

    Patient nonadherence significantly burdens the treatment of allergic rhinitis (AR). Fewer than half of prescribed doses of intranasal corticosteroid medication are taken. The challenges for immunotherapies are even greater. While sustained treatment for 3 to 5 years is required for full benefit, most patients receiving immunotherapy, either subcutaneous or sublingual, stop treatment within the first year. Although research into interventions to improve AR adherence is lacking, lessons learned from adherence interventions in other chronic health conditions can be applied to AR. Two well-established, overriding models of care-the chronic care model and patient-centered care-can improve adherence. The patient-centered care model includes important lessons for allergy providers in their daily practice, including understanding and targeting modifiable barriers to adherence. Additionally, recent studies have begun to leverage health information and communication technologies to reach out to patients and promote adherence, extending patient-centered interventions initiated by providers during office visits. PMID:25956611

  3. Adherence to guidelines in gynecologic cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Ferron, Gwenael; Martinez, Alejandra; Gladieff, Laurence; Mery, Eliane; David, Isabelle; Delannes, Martine; Montastruc, Marion; Balagué, Gisèle; Picaud, Laetitia; Querleu, Denis

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to review the available evidence documenting the prognostic role of adherence to guidelines in gynecologic cancers. A systematic review of the PubMed database using "guideline," "adherence," and "cancer" was carried out on February 25, 2014. Two thousand one hundred twenty-three publications were identified. Only publications addressing the question of adherence to recommendations regarding surgical care and multidisciplinary management of gynecologic cancers were selected. Six studies were identified in endometrial cancer, 4 in ovarian cancer, and none in cervical cancer. Adoption of guidelines is an effective tool for disease control and must consequently be considered as a process measure of quality cancer care. It is urgent to develop reliable and reproducible tools to assess adherence to guidelines based on level 1 evidence in gynecologic cancer then to carry out investigations to document the prognostic impact of compliance with guidelines. The time has come to include adherence to guidelines in quality assurance programs. PMID:25340292

  4. Gibberellic acid production by free and immobilized cells in different culture systems.

    PubMed

    Durán-Páramo, Enrique; Molina-Jiménez, Héctor; Brito-Arias, Marco A; Robles-Martínez, Fabián

    2004-01-01

    Gibberellic acid production was studied in different fermentation systems. Free and immobilized cells of Gibberella fujikuroi cultures in shake-flask, stirred and fixed-bed reactors were evaluated for the production of gibberellic acid (GA3). Gibberellic acid production with free cells cultured in a stirred reactor reached 0.206 g/L and a yield of 0.078 g of GA3/g biomass.

  5. The fitness and functionality of culturally evolved communication systems.

    PubMed

    Fay, Nicolas; Garrod, Simon; Roberts, Leo

    2008-11-12

    This paper assesses whether human communication systems undergo the same progressive adaptation seen in animal communication systems and concrete artefacts. Four experiments compared the fitness of ad hoc sign systems created under different conditions when participants play a graphical communication task. Experiment 1 demonstrated that when participants are organized into interacting communities, a series of signs evolve that enhance individual learning and promote efficient decoding. No such benefits are found for signs that result from the local interactions of isolated pairs of interlocutors. Experiments 2 and 3 showed that the decoding benefits associated with community evolved signs cannot be attributed to superior sign encoding or detection. Experiment 4 revealed that naive overseers were better able to identify the meaning of community evolved signs when compared with isolated pair developed signs. Hence, the decoding benefits for community evolved signs arise from their greater residual iconicity. We argue that community evolved sign systems undergo a process of communicative selection and adaptation that promotes optimized sign systems. This results from the interplay between sign diversity and a global alignment constraint; pairwise interaction introduces a range of competing signs and the need to globally align on a single sign-meaning mapping for each referent applies selection pressure.

  6. The fitness and functionality of culturally evolved communication systems.

    PubMed

    Fay, Nicolas; Garrod, Simon; Roberts, Leo

    2008-11-12

    This paper assesses whether human communication systems undergo the same progressive adaptation seen in animal communication systems and concrete artefacts. Four experiments compared the fitness of ad hoc sign systems created under different conditions when participants play a graphical communication task. Experiment 1 demonstrated that when participants are organized into interacting communities, a series of signs evolve that enhance individual learning and promote efficient decoding. No such benefits are found for signs that result from the local interactions of isolated pairs of interlocutors. Experiments 2 and 3 showed that the decoding benefits associated with community evolved signs cannot be attributed to superior sign encoding or detection. Experiment 4 revealed that naive overseers were better able to identify the meaning of community evolved signs when compared with isolated pair developed signs. Hence, the decoding benefits for community evolved signs arise from their greater residual iconicity. We argue that community evolved sign systems undergo a process of communicative selection and adaptation that promotes optimized sign systems. This results from the interplay between sign diversity and a global alignment constraint; pairwise interaction introduces a range of competing signs and the need to globally align on a single sign-meaning mapping for each referent applies selection pressure. PMID:18799421

  7. Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy and Virologic Failure

    PubMed Central

    Bezabhe, Woldesellassie M.; Chalmers, Leanne; Bereznicki, Luke R.; Peterson, Gregory M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The often cited need to achieve ≥95% (nearly perfect) adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) for successful virologic outcomes in HIV may present a barrier to initiation of therapy in the early stages of HIV. This meta-analysis synthesized 43 studies (27,905 participants) performed across >26 countries, to determine the relationship between cut-off point for optimal adherence to ART and virologic outcomes. Meta-analysis was performed using a random-effect model to calculate pooled odds ratios with corresponding 95% confidence intervals. The mean rate of patients reporting optimal adherence was 63.4%. Compared with suboptimal adherence, optimal adherence was associated with a lower risk of virologic failure (0.34; 95% CI: 0.26–0.44). There were no significant differences in the pooled odds ratios among different optimal adherence thresholds (≥98–100%, ≥95%, ≥80–90%). Study design (randomized controlled trial vs observational study) (regression coefficient 0.74, 95% CI: 0.04–1.43, P < 0.05) and study region (developing vs developed countries; regression coefficient 0.56, 95% CI: 0.01–1.12, P < 0.05) remained as independent predictors of between-study heterogeneity, with more patients with optimal adherence from developing countries or randomized controlled trials experiencing virologic failure. The threshold for optimal adherence to achieve better virologic outcomes appears to be wider than the commonly used cut-off point (≥95% adherence). The cut-off point for optimal adherence could be redefined to a slightly lower level to encourage the prescribing ART at an early stage of HIV infection. PMID:27082595

  8. Intelligent mobile support for therapy adherence and behavior change.

    PubMed

    Klein, Michel; Mogles, Nataliya; van Wissen, Arlette

    2014-10-01

    Mobile applications have proven to be promising tools for supporting people in adhering to their health goals. Although coaching and reminder apps abound, few of them are based on established theories of behavior change. In the present work, a behavior change support system is presented that uses a computational model based on multiple psychological theories of behavior change. The system determines the user's reason for non-adherence using a mobile phone app and an online lifestyle diary. The user automatically receives generated messages with persuasive, tailored content. The system was designed to support chronic patients with type 2 diabetes, HIV, and cardiovascular disease, but can be applied to many health and lifestyle domains. The main focus of this work is the development of the model and the underlying reasoning method. Furthermore, the implementation of the system and some preliminary results of its functioning will be discussed.

  9. Patterns of analgesic adherence predict health care utilization among outpatients with cancer pain

    PubMed Central

    Meghani, Salimah H; Knafl, George J

    2016-01-01

    Background Studies in chronic noncancer pain settings have found that opioid use increases health care utilization. Despite the key role of analgesics, specifically opioids, in the setting of cancer pain, there is no literature to our knowledge about the relationship between adherence to prescribed around-the-clock (ATC) analgesics and acute health care utilization (hospitalization) among patients with cancer pain. Purpose To identify adherence patterns over time for cancer patients taking ATC analgesics for pain, cluster these patterns into adherence types, combine the types into an adherence risk factor for hospitalization, identify other risk factors for hospitalization, and identify risk factors for inconsistent analgesic adherence. Materials and methods Data from a 3-month prospective observational study of patients diagnosed with solid tumors or multiple myeloma, having cancer-related pain, and having at least one prescription of oral ATC analgesics were collected. Adherence data were collected electronically using the medication event-monitoring system. Analyses were conducted using adaptive modeling methods based on heuristic search through alternative models controlled by likelihood cross-validation scores. Results Six adherence types were identified and combined into the risk factor for hospitalization of inconsistent versus consistent adherence over time. Twenty other individually significant risk factors for hospitalization were identified, but inconsistent analgesic adherence was the strongest of these predictors (ie, generating the largest likelihood cross-validation score). These risk factors were adaptively combined into a model for hospitalization based on six pairwise interaction risk factors with exceptional discrimination (ie, area under the receiver-operating-characteristic curve of 0.91). Patients had from zero to five of these risk factors, with an odds ratio of 5.44 (95% confidence interval 3.09–9.58) for hospitalization, with a unit

  10. The Association Between Patient-Reported and Objective Oral Anticancer Medication Adherence Measures: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Thomas M.; Rodríguez, Vivian M.; Gordon, Mallorie; Avildsen, Isabelle K.; Emanu, Jessica C.; Jewell, Sarah T.; Anselmi, Kimberly A.; Ginex, Pamela K.

    2016-01-01

    Problem Identification Oral anticancer medication (OAM) use has been steadily increasing, leading to several patient benefits. A notable challenge for nurses is accurate monitoring of patient OAM regimens because nonadherence is associated with poor health outcomes and decreased survival. Currently, no gold standard measure of OAM adherence exists. The authors conducted a systematic review of the association between objective and patient-reported measures of OAM adherence. Literature Search A systematic electronic literature search was conducted using PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, PsycINFO®, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, and CINAHL® databases through November 2014. Data Evaluation Articles were independently reviewed to determine whether they included an original characterization of the level of association between objective and patient-reported measures of OAM adherence. Synthesis From a total of 11,135 articles retrieved, eight studies met inclusion criteria. Objective adherence was primarily assessed using pill counts or Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMSCap™). Patient-reported adherence was most commonly assessed using study-specific questionnaires. Significant positive correlations were observed between objective and patient-reported adherence across most studies, with three studies reporting higher rates of adherence via patient reporting. Conclusions Despite variation in the OAMs and measures used, patient-reported adherence rates were equal to or higher than objective adherence measures across studies. Social desirability bias may be a concern; however, given the significant concordance observed, using patient-reported methods in future studies of OAM adherence may be justified. Implications for Nursing This review provides evidence to support nursing use of patient-reported measures to accurately monitor OAM adherence and potentially improve the quality of patient–provider communication. PMID:27541550

  11. Adherence to wearing therapeutic shoes among people with diabetes: a systematic review and reflections

    PubMed Central

    Jarl, Gustav; Lundqvist, Lars-Olov

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Therapeutic shoes are prescribed to prevent diabetic foot ulcers, but adherence to wearing the shoes is often poor. Aim The aim of this study was to review the literature on factors that are associated with adherence to wearing therapeutic shoes and construct a model of adherence to aid future research and development in the field. Methods We conducted a systematic search in PubMed, CINAHL, and PsycINFO for quantitative studies on factors associated with adherence to wearing therapeutic shoes among people with diabetes. Results Six studies were included in the review. The studies focused mainly on patient-, therapy-, and condition-related adherence factors. There is some evidence (three to five studies) that sex, diabetes duration, and ulcer history are not associated with adherence. The evidence for or against the other factors was weak (only one or two studies) or conflicting. Conclusion There is no conclusive evidence for using any factor to predict adherence to wearing therapeutic shoes, but there is some evidence against using certain factors for predicting adherence. Future studies should include a broader range of factors, including health system and social/economic factors, and they should investigate perceived costs and benefits of wearing therapeutic shoes in comparison with other shoes or no shoes. A seesaw model is presented illustrating the complex phenomenon of adherence. Further research is needed to identify factors associated with adherence to wearing therapeutic shoes, to enable the development of interventions to improve adherence and thereby reduce ulceration rates among people with diabetic foot complications. PMID:27540284

  12. Efficient expansion of mesenchymal stromal cells in a disposable fixed bed culture system.

    PubMed

    Mizukami, Amanda; Orellana, Maristela D; Caruso, Sâmia R; de Lima Prata, Karen; Covas, Dimas T; Swiech, Kamilla

    2013-01-01

    The need for efficient and reliable technologies for clinical-scale expansion of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) has led to the use of disposable bioreactors and culture systems. Here, we evaluate the expansion of cord blood-derived MSC in a disposable fixed bed culture system. Starting from an initial cell density of 6.0 × 10(7) cells, after 7 days of culture, it was possible to produce of 4.2(±0.8) × 10(8) cells, which represents a fold increase of 7.0 (±1.4). After enzymatic retrieval from Fibra-Cell disks, the cells were able to maintain their potential for differentiation into adipocytes and osteocytes and were positive for many markers common to MSC (CD73, CD90, and CD105). The results obtained in this study demonstrate that MSC can be efficiently expanded in the culture system. This novel approach presents several advantages over the current expansion systems, based on culture flasks or microcarrier-based spinner flasks and represents a key element for MSC cellular therapy according to GMP compliant clinical-scale production system.

  13. Cometabolism of Monochloramine by Distribution System Relevant Mixed Culture Nitrifiers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monochloramine (NH2Cl) is increasingly used as a residual disinfectant. A major problem related to NH2Cl is nitrification in distribution systems, leading to rapid NH2Cl residual loss. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), which oxidize ammonia (NH3) to nitrite, can cometabolize chem...

  14. The Transformation of Ergonomic Affordances into Cultural Affordances: The Case of the Alnuset System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiappini, Giampaolo

    2012-01-01

    Is it possible to study the ergonomic affordances offered by a system designed for educational aims and their transformation into cultural affordances? To this purpose, what references can we adopt? This work describes the theoretical framework used to realise this study referring to AlNuSet, a system realised within the EC ReMath project to…

  15. Organizational Culture and the Design of Computer-Mediated Communication Systems: Issues for Organizational Communication Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hacker, Kenneth L.; And Others

    The study of computer mediated communication (CMC) systems in organizations is necessary for a complete examination and explanation of organizational culture and communication. Research has shown that the effects of CMC systems have been both positive and negative. Positively, they have helped to augment oral communication. Negatively, they have…

  16. Revisiting Bourdieu: Alternative Educational Systems in the Light of the Theory of Social and Cultural Reproduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azaola, Marta Cristina

    2012-01-01

    The paper reflects upon the principles and practice of an alternative educational system operating in rural Mexico in the light of Bourdieu's theory of cultural and social reproduction. Bourdieu's theory seeks to explain processes of reproduction of power relations within schools and society; whereas alternative educational systems seek to expand…

  17. Culture, Indigenous Knowledge Systems and Sustainable Development: A Critical View of Education in an African Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breidlid, Anders

    2009-01-01

    The article's focus is the relationship between culture, indigenous knowledge systems (IKS), sustainable development and education in Africa. It analyzes the concept of sustainability with particular reference to education and indigenous knowledge systems. In particular the article analyzes the documents from the World Summit in Johannesburg in…

  18. The cultural articulation of patriarchy: legal systems, Islam and women.

    PubMed

    Shaheed, F

    1986-01-01

    Patriarchy in Pakistan results in inequalities to women. Issues emphasized include Islamic customary laws, the movement to Islamize penal and social behavioral codes, the mislabeling of Islamic beliefs as "westernization", and the rising women's movement's attempt to oppose present trends. Many practices thought to reflect Muslim culture are really the infliction of Islamic religious principles on pre-existing behavioral codes in Pakistan; thus, such practices are not actually Islamic teachings and are used to control social behavior. It is necessary to separate Islamic institution and actual Pakistanian practices in order to identify Islamic ideology's role in sustaining and vindicating patriachary. 3 roots of shaping jurisprudence are customary law, religious law, and British civil and criminal law. Further investigation of customary and religious laws currently employed indicates acceptance of Muslim practices promoting superiority of men and rejection of Islamic teachings promoting women's rights. Such Islamic teachings include a marriage settlement requiring men to give money to their wives, acknowledgement of marriages as an agreement between consenting adults, and a woman's right to divorce. Customs contradicting Islamic teachings and leading to inequalities for women include denial of a woman's access to economic resources, the annulment of the marriage settlement, and the relative ease of Muslim men to divorce their wives. Some communities practice purdah in which women are secluded from men and excluded in economic and political decisions. Such social restrictions minimize women's involvement in political decision making and in the judiciary. Exercising their right to vote and participating in trade unions, women would influence decision making. Resistance to current practices has been trade unions, women could influence decision making. resistance to current practices has been primarily from upper and middle class women; but to be effective all classes

  19. The cultural articulation of patriarchy: legal systems, Islam and women.

    PubMed

    Shaheed, F

    1986-01-01

    Patriarchy in Pakistan results in inequalities to women. Issues emphasized include Islamic customary laws, the movement to Islamize penal and social behavioral codes, the mislabeling of Islamic beliefs as "westernization", and the rising women's movement's attempt to oppose present trends. Many practices thought to reflect Muslim culture are really the infliction of Islamic religious principles on pre-existing behavioral codes in Pakistan; thus, such practices are not actually Islamic teachings and are used to control social behavior. It is necessary to separate Islamic institution and actual Pakistanian practices in order to identify Islamic ideology's role in sustaining and vindicating patriachary. 3 roots of shaping jurisprudence are customary law, religious law, and British civil and criminal law. Further investigation of customary and religious laws currently employed indicates acceptance of Muslim practices promoting superiority of men and rejection of Islamic teachings promoting women's rights. Such Islamic teachings include a marriage settlement requiring men to give money to their wives, acknowledgement of marriages as an agreement between consenting adults, and a woman's right to divorce. Customs contradicting Islamic teachings and leading to inequalities for women include denial of a woman's access to economic resources, the annulment of the marriage settlement, and the relative ease of Muslim men to divorce their wives. Some communities practice purdah in which women are secluded from men and excluded in economic and political decisions. Such social restrictions minimize women's involvement in political decision making and in the judiciary. Exercising their right to vote and participating in trade unions, women would influence decision making. Resistance to current practices has been trade unions, women could influence decision making. resistance to current practices has been primarily from upper and middle class women; but to be effective all classes

  20. Patient and Provider Perspectives on Cellular Phone Based Technology to Improve HIV Treatment Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Baranoski, Amy S.; Meuser, Elizabeth; Hardy, Helene; Closson, Elizabeth F.; Mimiaga, Matthew J.; Safren, Steven A.; Virk, Pushwaz; Luk, Rowena; Skolnik, Paul R.; Kumar, Vikram S.

    2013-01-01

    Innovative techniques, potentially using technology, to improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART), may help patients with HIV who struggle with self-care. This qualitative study compared patient and provider participants’ perspectives on ART adherence and text messaging as a tool to promote adherence. Thirteen providers and 14 HIV-infected patients identified four main themes: 1). facilitators and 2). barriers to using text message reminders as a medium for ART medication reminders; 3). framing of text message reminders; and 4). patient responsibility and autonomy in management of their health and wellness. Ease of use, access, convenience, and confidentiality were cited as benefits of a text message based adherence intervention; while access, cost, difficulty manipulating cellular phones, lack of knowledge/education, and confidentiality were cited as potential barriers. Providers, but not patients, also identified patient apathy and time burden as potential barriers to a text message based adherence reminder system. Patients and providers felt that personalization of messages, attention to timing, and confidentiality of messages were key factors for a successful text message based adherence reminder system. Both providers and patients felt that patient responsibility and autonomy over an individual’s own health care is an important issue in adherence to medical care. The majority of patients and providers felt that a text message based adherence reminder system would be beneficial. While patients and providers had many similar views on factors influencing adherence with ART and the use of text messaging to improve adherence, there were some divergent views between the two groups. PMID:23742640

  1. Patient and provider perspectives on cellular phone-based technology to improve HIV treatment adherence.

    PubMed

    Baranoski, Amy S; Meuser, Elizabeth; Hardy, Helene; Closson, Elizabeth F; Mimiaga, Matthew J; Safren, Steven A; Virk, Pushwaz; Luk, Rowena; Skolnik, Paul R; Kumar, Vikram S

    2014-01-01

    Innovative techniques, potentially using technology, to improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) may help patients with HIV who struggle with self-care. This qualitative study compared patient and provider participants' perspectives on ART adherence and text messaging as a tool to promote adherence. Thirteen providers and 14 HIV-infected patients identified four main themes: (1) facilitators, (2) barriers to using text message reminders as a medium for ART medication reminders, (3) framing of text message reminders, and (4) patient responsibility and autonomy in the management of their health and wellness. Ease of use, access, convenience, and confidentiality were cited as benefits of a text message-based adherence intervention; while access, cost, difficulty manipulating cellular phones, lack of knowledge/education, and confidentiality were cited as potential barriers. Providers, but not patients, also identified patient apathy and time burden as potential barriers to a text message-based adherence reminder system. Patients and providers felt that personalization of messages, attention to timing, and confidentiality of messages were key factors for a successful text message-based adherence reminder system. Both providers and patients felt that patient responsibility and autonomy over an individual's own health care is an important issue in adherence to medical care. The majority of patients and providers felt that a text message-based adherence reminder system would be beneficial. While patients and providers had many similar views on factors influencing adherence with ART and the use of text messaging to improve adherence, there were some divergent views between the two groups.

  2. Development of a definition, classification system, and model for cultural geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Lloyd W., III

    The concept for this study is based upon a personal interest by the author, an American Indian, in promoting cultural perspectives in undergraduate college teaching and learning environments. Most academicians recognize that merged fields can enhance undergraduate curricula. However, conflict may occur when instructors attempt to merge social science fields such as history or philosophy with geoscience fields such as mining and geomorphology. For example, ideologies of Earth structures derived from scientific methodologies may conflict with historical and spiritual understandings of Earth structures held by American Indians. Specifically, this study addresses the problem of how to combine cultural studies with the geosciences into a new merged academic discipline called cultural geology. This study further attempts to develop the merged field of cultural geology using an approach consisting of three research foci: a definition, a classification system, and a model. Literature reviews were conducted for all three foci. Additionally, to better understand merged fields, a literature review was conducted specifically for academic fields that merged social and physical sciences. Methodologies concentrated on the three research foci: definition, classification system, and model. The definition was derived via a two-step process. The first step, developing keyword hierarchical ranking structures, was followed by creating and analyzing semantic word meaning lists. The classification system was developed by reviewing 102 classification systems and incorporating selected components into a system framework. The cultural geology model was created also utilizing a two-step process. A literature review of scientific models was conducted. Then, the definition and classification system were incorporated into a model felt to reflect the realm of cultural geology. A course syllabus was then developed that incorporated the resulting definition, classification system, and model. This

  3. African Americans’ Perceptions of Adherence to Medications and Lifestyle Changes Prescribed to Treat Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Pettey, Christina M.; McSweeney, Jean C.; Stewart, Katharine E.; Cleves, Mario A.; Price, Elvin T.; Heo, Seongkum; Souder, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    More than 80 million Americans have hypertension (HTN), and African Americans (AAs) are disproportionately affected. AAs also have lower rates of adherence to HTN treatment. It is important to understand AAs’ perceptions of adherence to develop effective interventions. The aim of this study is to examine AAs’ perceptions of adherence to medications and lifestyle changes prescribed to treat HTN. In this qualitative study, we used purposive sampling to recruit Southern AAs with HTN aged 21 and older from a free, faith-based clinic. We recorded individual, in-person interviews about perceptions related to adherence to treatment of HTN and analyzed verbatim transcripts using content analysis and constant comparison. We also conducted medical record audits. Twenty-nine AAs participated (52% female, 38% were <50 years of age, 52% had taken anti-HTN medications for ≥5 years). Audits indicated that 65% had uncontrolled HTN during the previous year. Two main themes included causes of HTN and ways to improve blood pressure. Perceived causes of HTN included diet, stress, unhealthy actions, genes, and obesity. Ways to improve HTN included using cultural treatments “passed down,” increasing exercise, reducing stress, and losing weight. Many reported using home remedies to control HTN, including drinking pickle juice. More than half of this sample had uncontrolled HTN. They identified influences of culture on perceptions of adherence including causes and treatment of HTN, and possibly detrimental home remedies. It is imperative that clinicians identify culturally appropriate interventions for this high-risk group. PMID:27148469

  4. The rat whole embryo culture assay using the Dysmorphology Score system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cindy; Panzica-Kelly, Julie; Augustine-Rauch, Karen

    2013-01-01

    The rat whole embryo culture (WEC) system has been used extensively for characterizing teratogenic properties of test chemicals. In this chapter, we describe the methodology for culturing rat embryos as well as a new morphological score system, the Dysmorphology Score (DMS) system for assessing morphology of mid gestation (gestational day 11) rat embryos. In contrast to the developmental stage focused scoring associated with the Brown and Fabro score system, this new score system assesses the respective degree of severity of dysmorphology, which delineates normal from abnormal morphology of specific embryonic structures and organ systems. This score system generates an approach that allows rapid identification and quantification of adverse developmental findings, making it conducive for characterization of compounds for teratogenic properties and screening activities.

  5. Adherence to Hip Protectors and Implications for U.S. Long-Term Care Settings

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Sheryl; Magaziner, Jay; Birge, Stanley J.; Barton, Bruce A.; Kronsberg, Shari S.; Kiel, Douglas P.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Determine nursing home characteristics related to adherence to use of a hip protector (HP) to prevent fracture; also describe adherence and related resident characteristics. Design: A multi-center, randomized controlled trial of a HP in which adherence to wearing the HP was monitored by research staff three times a week for up to 21 months; data were collected by interviews and chart review. Setting: Thirty-five nursing homes in Boston, St. Louis, and Baltimore. Participants: A total of 797 eligible residents, 633 (79%) of whom passed the run-in period, 397 (63%) of whom remained in the study until the end of follow-up. Intervention: Residents wore a single HP on their right or left side. Measurements: In addition to regular monitoring of adherence, data were collected regarding facility characteristics, staffing, policies and procedures, perception of HPs and related experience, and research staff ratings of environmental and overall quality; and also resident demographic characteristics, and function, health, and psychosocial status. Results: Facility characteristics related to more adherence were not being chain-affiliated; less Medicaid case-mix; fewer residents wearing HPs; more paraprofessional staff training; more rotating workers; and having administrators who were less involved in meetings. Conclusion: Efforts to increase adherence to the use of HPs should focus on facilities with more Medicaid case-mix to reduce disparities in care, and those that have less of a culture of training. Staff may need support to increase adherence, and when adherence cannot be maintained, HP use should be targeted to those who remain adherent. PMID:20142065

  6. Behavioral economics strategies for promoting adherence to sleep interventions.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Jack

    2015-10-01

    Cognitive-behavioral treatment for insomnia and continuous positive airway pressure therapy for obstructive sleep apnea are among the most efficacious sleep interventions. Unfortunately, adherence levels are disappointingly low for these interventions. Behavioral economics offers a promising framework for promoting adherence, often through relatively brief and straightforward strategies. The assumptions, goals, and key strategies of behavioral economics will be introduced. These strategies include providing social norms information, changing defaults, using the compromise effect, utilizing commitment devices, and establishing lottery-based systems. Then, this review will highlight specific behavioral economic approaches to promote patient adherence for three major sleep interventions: 1) behavioral treatment for pediatric insomnia, 2) cognitive-behavioral treatment for adult insomnia, and 3) continuous positive airway pressure for obstructive sleep apnea. Next, behavioral economic strategies will be discussed as ways to improve health care provider adherence to clinical practice guidelines regarding appropriate prescribing of hypnotics and ordering sleep-promoting practices for hospitalized inpatients. Finally, possible concerns that readers may have about behavioral economics strategies, including their efficacy, feasibility, and sustainability, will be addressed.

  7. Secondary preventive medication persistence and adherence 1 year after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Olson, D.M.; Zhao, X.; Pan, W.; Zimmer, L.O.; Goldstein, L.B.; Alberts, M.J.; Fagan, S.C.; Fonarow, G.C.; Johnston, S.C.; Kidwell, C.; LaBresh, K.A.; Ovbiagele, B.; Schwamm, L.; Peterson, E.D.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Data on long-term use of secondary prevention medications following stroke are limited. The Adherence eValuation After Ischemic stroke–Longitudinal (AVAIL) Registry assessed patient, provider, and system-level factors influencing continuation of prevention medications for 1 year following stroke hospitalization discharge. Methods: Patients with ischemic stroke or TIA discharged from 106 hospitals participating in the American Heart Association Get With The Guidelines–Stroke program were surveyed to determine their use of warfarin, antiplatelet, antihypertensive, lipid-lowering, and diabetes medications from discharge to 12 months. Reasons for stopping medications were ascertained. Persistence was defined as continuation of all secondary preventive medications prescribed at hospital discharge, and adherence as continuation of prescribed medications except those stopped according to health care provider instructions. Results: Of the 2,880 patients enrolled in AVAIL, 88.4% (2,457 patients) completed 1-year interviews. Of these, 65.9% were regimen persistent and 86.6% were regimen adherent. Independent predictors of 1-year medication persistence included fewer medications prescribed at discharge, having an adequate income, having an appointment with a primary care provider, and greater understanding of why medications were prescribed and their side effects. Independent predictors of adherence were similar to those for persistence. Conclusions: Although up to one-third of stroke patients discontinued one or more secondary prevention medications within 1 year of hospital discharge, self-discontinuation of these medications is uncommon. Several potentially modifiable patient, provider, and system-level factors associated with persistence and adherence may be targets for future interventions. PMID:21900638

  8. Early behavioral adherence predicts short and long-term weight loss in the POUNDS LOST study.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Donald A; Anton, Stephen D; Han, Hongmei; Champagne, Catherine M; Allen, Ray; Leblanc, Eric; Ryan, Donna H; Rood, Jennifer; McManus, Katherine; Laranjo, Nancy; Carey, Vincent J; Loria, Catherine M; Bray, George A; Sacks, Frank M

    2010-08-01

    The primary aim of this study was to test the association of early (first 6 months) adherence related to diet, self-monitoring, and attendance with changes in adiposity and cardiovascular risk factors. This study used data from the 24-month POUNDS LOST trial that tested the efficacy of four dietary macronutrient compositions for short-and long-term weight loss. A computer tracking system was used to record data on eight indicator variables related to adherence. Using canonical correlations at the 6 and 24 month measurement periods, early behavioral adherence was associated with changes in percent weight loss and waist circumference at 6 months (R = 0.52) and 24 months (R = 0.37), but was not associated with cardiovascular disease risk factor levels. Early dietary adherence was associated with changes in insulin at 6 months (R = 0.19), but not at 24 months (R = 0.08, ns). Early dietary adherence was not associated with changes in adiposity.

  9. The Role of Depression in Medication Adherence Among Heart Failure Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hsin-Yi (Jean); Sayers, Steven L.; Weissinger, Guy; Riegel, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore the association between depression and medication adherence in heart failure (HF) patients. Studies have shown that people with depression are likely to be nonadherent to their prescribed medication treatment. But other studies suggest that nonadherence may be overestimated by people with depression. A total of 244 adults with Stage C HF completed the study. Self-reported medication adherence was obtained using the Basel Assessment of Adherence Scale (BAAS); objective data on medication adherence were collected using the electronic Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS). Depression was measured via self-report with the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). There was a significant difference between depressed and nondepressed participants in self-reported medication nonadherence (p = .008), but not in objectively measured medication nonadherence (p = .72). The depressed sample was 2.3 times more likely to self-report poor medication adherence than those who were nondepressed (p = .006). PMID:23548500

  10. An alternative long-term culture system for highly-pure mouse spermatogonial stem cells.

    PubMed

    He, Bao-Rong; Lu, Fan; Zhang, Lingling; Hao, Ding-Jun; Yang, Hao

    2015-06-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) have great clinical potential to give rise to a variety of cell types besides all spermatogenic lineage cells. The development of an efficient method for long-term culture of highly-pure SSCs is essential for further studies related to SSC biological events. Here, we describe an in vitro culture system obtaining mouse SSC cultures of high purity, viability, and proliferation. For establishing long-term cultures of SSCs, we mainly focused on isolation procedures and culture conditions. These included co-coating of extracellular substrates, that is, poly-L-lysine (PLL) and laminin, as well as combinatiorial use of three milder enzymes and simultaneously less trypsin to minimize enzyme-mediated degradation of SSCs. Furthermore, a unique purification procedure was performed to effectively eliminate contaminating non-SSCs. Finally, a critical step is to ensure SSC maintenance and expansion by utilizing optimal culture medium. Obtained data suggest that applying our optimally modified method, SSCs can be cultured for over 90 days with high purity (around 93.5%). Moreover, SSCs isolated and expanded using our protocol fulfills all criteria of SSCs without losing their stemness-characterized by SSC-phenotypic gene expression and long-term self-renewal. This study describes for the first time a protocol allowing isolation and expansion of SSCs suitable for numerous studies related to SSC-based clinical therapies of various diseases.

  11. Adherence to cardiovascular medications in the South Asian population: A systematic review of current evidence and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Akeroyd, Julia M; Chan, Winston J; Kamal, Ayeesha K; Palaniappan, Latha; Virani, Salim S

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To review methods of assessing adherence and strategies to improve adherence to cardiovascular disease (CVD) medications, among South Asian CVD patients. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review of English language studies that examined CVD medication adherence in South Asian populations from 1966 to April 1, 2015 in SCOPUS and PubMed. Working in duplicate, we identified 61 studies. After exclusions, 26 studies were selected for full text review. Of these, 17 studies were included in the final review. We abstracted data on several factors including study design, study population, method of assessing adherence and adherence rate. RESULTS: These studies were conducted in India (n = 11), Pakistan (n = 3), Bangladesh (n = 1), Nepal (n = 1) and Sri Lanka (n = 1). Adherence rates ranged from 32%-95% across studies. Of the 17 total publications included, 10 focused on assessing adherence to CVD medications and 7 focused on assessing the impact of interventions on medication adherence. The validated Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS) was used as the primary method of assessing adherence in five studies. Three studies used validated questionnaires similar to the MMAS, and one study utilized Medication Event Monitoring System caps, with the remainder of the studies utilizing pill count and self-report measures. As expected, studies using non-validated self-report measures described higher rates of adherence than studies using validated scale measurements and pill count. The included intervention studies examined the use of polypill therapy, provider education and patient counseling to improve medication adherence. CONCLUSION: The overall medication adherence rates were low in the region, which suggest a growing need for future interventions to improve adherence. PMID:26730300

  12. Adherence to Antihypertensive Medications in Iranian Patients.

    PubMed

    Behnood-Rod, Azin; Rabbanifar, Omid; Pourzargar, Pirouz; Rai, Alireza; Saadat, Zahra; Saadat, Habibollah; Moharamzad, Yashar; Morisky, Donald E

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Appropriate adherence to medication is still a challenging issue for hypertensive patients. We determined adherence to antihypertensive(s) and its associated factors among 280 Iranian patients. Methods. They were recruited consecutively from private and university health centers and pharmacies in four cities. The validated Persian version of the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) was administered to measure adherence. Results. Mean (±SD) overall MMAS-8 score was 5.75 (±1.88). About half of the sample (139 cases, 49.6%) showed low adherence (MMAS-8 score < 6). There was a negative linear association between the MMAS-8 score and systolic BP (r = -0.231, P < 0.001) as well as diastolic BP (r = -0.280, P < 0.001). In linear regression model, overweight/obesity (B = -0.52, P = 0.02), previous history of admission to emergency services due to hypertensive crisis (B = -0.79, P = 0.001), and getting medication directly from drugstore without refill prescription in hand (B = -0.51, P = 0.04) were factors recognized to have statistically significant association with the MMAS-8 score. Conclusion. Antihypertensive adherence was unsatisfactory. We suggest that health care providers pay special attention and make use of the aforementioned findings in their routine visits of hypertensive patients to recognize those who are vulnerable to poor adherence. PMID:27069676

  13. Large-scale clinical comparison of the lysis-centrifugation and radiometric systems for blood culture

    SciTech Connect

    Brannon, P.; Kiehn, T.E.

    1985-12-01

    The Isolator 10 lysis-centrifugation blood culture system (E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Co., Inc., Wilmington, Del.) was compared with the BACTEC radiometric method (Johnston Laboratories, Inc., Towson, Md.) with 6B and 7D broth media for the recovery of bacteria and yeasts. From 11,000 blood cultures, 1,174 clinically significant organisms were isolated. The Isolator system recovered significantly more total organisms, members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, Staphylococcus spp., and yeasts. The BACTEC system recovered significantly more Pseudomonas spp., Streptococcus spp., and anaerobes. Of the Isolator colony counts, 87% measured less than 11 CFU/ml of blood. Organisms, on an average, were detected the same day from each of the two culture systems. Only 13 of the 975 BACTEC isolates (0.01%) were recovered by subculture of growth-index-negative bottles, and 12 of the 13 were detected in another broth blood culture taken within 24 h. Contaminants were recovered from 4.8% of the Isolator 10 and 2.3% of the BACTEC cultures.

  14. Garlic exerts allelopathic effects on pepper physiology in a hydroponic co-culture system

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Haiyan; Liu, Menglong; Hayat, Sikandar; Feng, Han

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A hydroponic co-culture system was adopted to determine the allelopathic potential of garlic on the growth of pepper plants. Different numbers of garlic plants (0, 2, 4, 8 and 12) were hydroponically co-cultured with two pepper plants to investigate allelopathic effects on the growth attributes and antioxidative defense system of the test pepper plants. The responses of the pepper plants depended on the number of garlic plants included in the co-culture system, indicating an association of pepper growth with the garlic root exudate concentration. When grown at a pepper/garlic ratio of 1:1 or 1:2, the pepper plant height, chlorophyll content, and peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT) and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) activities were significantly increased after 30 days of co-culture; in contrast, reduction in methane dicarboxylic aldehyde (MDA) content was observed. However, when the pepper/garlic ratio was 1:4 or higher, these morphological indices and protective enzyme activities were significantly inhibited, whereas MDA levels in the pepper leaves were significantly increased due to severe membrane lipid peroxidation. The results indicate that although low concentrations of garlic root exudates appear to induce protective enzyme systems and promote pepper growth, high concentrations have deleterious effects. These findings suggest that further investigations should optimize the co-culture pepper/garlic ratio to reduce continuous cropping obstacles in pepper production. PMID:27095440

  15. Garlic exerts allelopathic effects on pepper physiology in a hydroponic co-culture system.

    PubMed

    Ding, Haiyan; Cheng, Zhihui; Liu, Menglong; Hayat, Sikandar; Feng, Han

    2016-01-01

    A hydroponic co-culture system was adopted to determine the allelopathic potential of garlic on the growth of pepper plants. Different numbers of garlic plants (0, 2, 4, 8 and 12) were hydroponically co-cultured with two pepper plants to investigate allelopathic effects on the growth attributes and antioxidative defense system of the test pepper plants. The responses of the pepper plants depended on the number of garlic plants included in the co-culture system, indicating an association of pepper growth with the garlic root exudate concentration. When grown at a pepper/garlic ratio of 1:1 or 1:2, the pepper plant height, chlorophyll content, and peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT) and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) activities were significantly increased after 30 days of co-culture; in contrast, reduction in methane dicarboxylic aldehyde (MDA) content was observed. However, when the pepper/garlic ratio was 1:4 or higher, these morphological indices and protective enzyme activities were significantly inhibited, whereas MDA levels in the pepper leaves were significantly increased due to severe membrane lipid peroxidation. The results indicate that although low concentrations of garlic root exudates appear to induce protective enzyme systems and promote pepper growth, high concentrations have deleterious effects. These findings suggest that further investigations should optimize the co-culture pepper/garlic ratio to reduce continuous cropping obstacles in pepper production. PMID:27095440

  16. Garlic exerts allelopathic effects on pepper physiology in a hydroponic co-culture system.

    PubMed

    Ding, Haiyan; Cheng, Zhihui; Liu, Menglong; Hayat, Sikandar; Feng, Han

    2016-05-15

    A hydroponic co-culture system was adopted to determine the allelopathic potential of garlic on the growth of pepper plants. Different numbers of garlic plants (0, 2, 4, 8 and 12) were hydroponically co-cultured with two pepper plants to investigate allelopathic effects on the growth attributes and antioxidative defense system of the test pepper plants. The responses of the pepper plants depended on the number of garlic plants included in the co-culture system, indicating an association of pepper growth with the garlic root exudate concentration. When grown at a pepper/garlic ratio of 1:1 or 1:2, the pepper plant height, chlorophyll content, and peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT) and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) activities were significantly increased after 30 days of co-culture; in contrast, reduction in methane dicarboxylic aldehyde (MDA) content was observed. However, when the pepper/garlic ratio was 1:4 or higher, these morphological indices and protective enzyme activities were significantly inhibited, whereas MDA levels in the pepper leaves were significantly increased due to severe membrane lipid peroxidation. The results indicate that although low concentrations of garlic root exudates appear to induce protective enzyme systems and promote pepper growth, high concentrations have deleterious effects. These findings suggest that further investigations should optimize the co-culture pepper/garlic ratio to reduce continuous cropping obstacles in pepper production.

  17. Patient Attitudinal and Behavioral Factors Associated with Warfarin Non-adherence at Outpatient Anticoagulation Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Localio, A. Russell; Platt, Alec B.; Brensinger, Colleen M.; Christie, Jason D.; Gross, Robert; Parker, Catherine S.; Price, Maureen; Metlay, Joshua P.; Cohen, Abigail; Newcomb, Craig W.; Strom, Brian L.; Kimmel, Stephen E.

    2010-01-01

    Background Warfarin is an anticoagulant effective in preventing stroke, but it has a narrow therapeutic range requiring optimal adherence to achieve the most favorable effects. Purpose The goal of this study was to examine specific patient factors that might help explain warfarin non-adherence at outpatient anticoagulation clinics. Method In a prospective cohort study of 156 adults, we utilized logistic regression analyses to examine the relationship between the five Treatment Prognostics scales from the Millon Behavioral Medicine Diagnostic (MBMD), as well as three additional MBMD scales (Depression, Future Pessimism, and Social Isolation), and daily warfarin non-adherence assessed using electronic medication event monitoring systems caps over a median of 139 days. Results Four of the five Treatment Prognostic scales and greater social isolation were associated with warfarin non-adherence. When controlling for pertinent demographic and medical variables, the Information Discomfort scale remained significantly associated with warfarin non-adherence over time. Conclusion Although several factors were related to warfarin non-adherence, patients reporting a lack of receptivity to details regarding their medical illness seemed most at risk for warfarin non-adherence. This information might aid in the development of interventions to enhance warfarin adherence and perhaps reduce adverse medical events. PMID:19579066

  18. Interferon Response in Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Infection: Lessons from Cell Culture Systems of HCV Infection.

    PubMed

    Sung, Pil Soo; Shin, Eui-Cheol; Yoon, Seung Kew

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a positive-stranded RNA virus that infects approximately 130-170 million people worldwide. In 2005, the first HCV infection system in cell culture was established using clone JFH-1, which was isolated from a Japanese patient with fulminant HCV infection. JFH-1 replicates efficiently in hepatoma cells and infectious virion particles are released into the culture supernatant. The development of cell culture-derived HCV (HCVcc) systems has allowed us to understand how hosts respond to HCV infection and how HCV evades host responses. Although the mechanisms underlying the different outcomes of HCV infection are not fully understood, innate immune responses seem to have a critical impact on the outcome of HCV infection, as demonstrated by the prognostic value of IFN-λ gene polymorphisms among patients with chronic HCV infection. Herein, we review recent research on interferon response in HCV infection, particularly studies using HCVcc infection systems.

  19. An integrated system for synchronous culture of animal cells under controlled conditions.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Pérez, Elena; Hernández, Vanessa; Palomares, Laura A; Serrato, José A

    2016-01-01

    The cell cycle has fundamental effects on cell cultures and their products. Tools to synchronize cultured cells allow the study of cellular physiology and metabolism at particular cell cycle phases. However, cells are most often arrested by methods that alter their homeostasis and are then cultivated in poorly controlled environments. Cell behavior could then be affected by the synchronization method and culture conditions used, and not just by the particular cell cycle phase under study. Moreover, only a few viable cells are recovered. Here, we designed an integrated system where a large number of cells from a controlled bioreactor culture is separated by centrifugal elutriation at high viabilities. In contrast to current elutriation methods, cells are injected directly from a bioreactor into an injection loop, allowing the introduction of a large number of cells into the separation chamber without stressful centrifugation. A low pulsation peristaltic pump increases the stability of the elutriation chamber. Using this approach, a large number of healthy cells at each cell cycle phase were obtained, allowing their direct inoculation into fully instrumented bioreactors. Hybridoma cells synchronized and cultured in this system behaved as expected for a synchronous culture. PMID:27625207

  20. An integrated system for synchronous culture of animal cells under controlled conditions.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Pérez, Elena; Hernández, Vanessa; Palomares, Laura A; Serrato, José A

    2016-01-01

    The cell cycle has fundamental effects on cell cultures and their products. Tools to synchronize cultured cells allow the study of cellular physiology and metabolism at particular cell cycle phases. However, cells are most often arrested by methods that alter their homeostasis and are then cultivated in poorly controlled environments. Cell behavior could then be affected by the synchronization method and culture conditions used, and not just by the particular cell cycle phase under study. Moreover, only a few viable cells are recovered. Here, we designed an integrated system where a large number of cells from a controlled bioreactor culture is separated by centrifugal elutriation at high viabilities. In contrast to current elutriation methods, cells are injected directly from a bioreactor into an injection loop, allowing the introduction of a large number of cells into the separation chamber without stressful centrifugation. A low pulsation peristaltic pump increases the stability of the elutriation chamber. Using this approach, a large number of healthy cells at each cell cycle phase were obtained, allowing their direct inoculation into fully instrumented bioreactors. Hybridoma cells synchronized and cultured in this system behaved as expected for a synchronous culture.

  1. Consideration of the cellular microenvironment: physiologically relevant co-culture systems in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    L Berg, Ellen; Hsu, Yu-Chih; Lee, Jonathan A

    2014-04-01

    There is renewed interest in phenotypic approaches to drug discovery, using cell-based assays to select new drugs, with the goal of improving pharmaceutical success. Assays that are more predictive of human biology can help researchers achieve this goal. Primary cells are more physiologically relevant to human biology and advances are being made in methods to expand the available cell types and improve the potential clinical translation of these assays through the use of co-cultures or three-dimensional (3D) technologies. Of particular interest are assays that may be suitable for industrial scale drug discovery. Here we review the use of primary human cells and co-cultures in drug discovery and describe the characteristics of co-culture models for inflammation biology (BioMAP systems), neo-vascularization and tumor microenvironments. Finally we briefly describe technical trends that may enable and impact the development of physiologically relevant co-culture assays in the near future. PMID:24524933

  2. The response of mineralizing culture systems to microtextured and polished titanium surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hacking, S Adam; Harvey, Edward; Roughley, Peter; Tanzer, Michael; Bobyn, John

    2008-10-01

    The surface texture of titanium has a predictable effect on peri-implant tissue formation in vivo. When implanted in an osseous environment, smooth surfaces (R(a) < 0.5 mm) are generally apposed by fibrous tissue and textured surfaces (R(a) > 1.0 mm) are generally apposed by osseous tissue. Thus in vitro study assessed the mineralization and proliferation response of TF274, MC3T3-E1, murine femoral stromal cells and canine stromal cells to tissue culture plastic (R(a) = 0.001 mm), polished (R(a) = 0.01 mm) and irregularly textured (R(a) = 3.26 mm) titanium surfaces. Amongst all culture systems, proliferation was significantly decreased on textured vs. smooth surfaces. Midway through the culture of the canine marrow cells, the cell layer detached from the tissue culture plastic and polished titanium surfaces. The TF274, MC3T3-E1, murine femoral stromal cell systems formed a mineralized matrix on the tissue culture plastic and polished titanium surfaces which was not observed with the canine stromal cell system. Compared to the tissue culture plastic and polished titanium surfaces, matrix mineralization was significantly reduced on the textured titanium surfaces for the TF274, MC3T3-E1, murine femoral stromal systems, a result which was differed significantly in comparison to the canine stromal system. These results were surprising given the large number of reports concerning the in vivo response to titanium in clinical and pre-clinical studies. Further work is required to determine if the TF274, MC3T3-E1 and murine femoral stromal systems are suitable for the in vitro investigation of the effects of titanium surface texture on osteoblast activity.

  3. Proteomics analysis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell secretome using a hollow fiber culture system and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hsin-Yi; Chang, Ying-Hwa; Chang, Yu-Chen; Liao, Pao-Chi

    2009-01-01

    Secreted proteins, referred to as the secretome, are known to regulate a variety of biological functions and are involved in a multitude of pathological processes. However, some secreted proteins from cell cultures are difficult to detect because of their intrinsic low abundance. They are frequently masked by proteins shed from lysed cells and the substantial amounts of serum proteins used in culture medium. We have proposed an analytical platform for sensitive detection of secreted proteins by utilizing a hollow fiber culture (HFC) system coupled with proteomic approaches. The HFC system enables culture of high-density cells in a small volume where secreted proteins can be accumulated. In addition, cell lysis rates can be greatly reduced, which alleviates the contamination from lysed cells. In this study, nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cells were utilized to evaluate the efficiency of this system in the collection and analysis of the cell secretome. Cells were adapted to serum-free medium and inoculated into the HFC system. The cell lysis rate in the culture system was estimated to be 0.001-0.022%, as determined by probing four intracellular proteins in the conditioned medium (CM), while a cell lysis rate of 0.32-1.84% was observed in dish cultures. Proteins in the CM were analyzed using SDS-PAGE and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). A total of 134 proteins were identified in 62 gel bands, of which 61% possess a signal peptide and/or a transmembrane domain. In addition, 37% of the identified secretome were classified as extracellular or membrane proteins, whereas 98% of the lysate proteins were identified as intracellular proteins. We suggest that the HFC system may be used to collect secreted proteins efficiently and facilitate comprehensive characterization of cell secretome. PMID:19012429

  4. The Impact of National Cultural Differences on Nurses' Acceptance of Hospital Information Systems.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsien-Cheng

    2015-06-01

    This study aims to explore the influence of national cultural differences on nurses' perceptions of their acceptance of hospital information systems. This study uses the perspective of Technology Acceptance Model; national cultural differences in terms of masculinity/femininity, individualism/collectivism, power distance, and uncertainty avoidance are incorporated into the Technology Acceptance Model as moderators, whereas time orientation is a control variable on hospital information system acceptance. A quantitative research design was used in this study; 261 participants, US and Taiwan RNs, all had hospital information system experience. Data were collected from November 2013 to February 2014 and analyzed using a t test to compare the coefficients for each moderator. The results show that individualism/collectivism, power distance, and uncertainty avoidance all exhibit significant difference on hospital information system acceptance; however, both masculinity/femininity and time orientation factors did not show significance. This study verifies that national cultural differences have significant influence on nurses' behavioral intention to use hospital information systems. Therefore, hospital information system providers should emphasize the way in which to integrate different technological functions to meet the needs of nurses from various cultural backgrounds. PMID:25899441

  5. The Impact of National Cultural Differences on Nurses' Acceptance of Hospital Information Systems.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsien-Cheng

    2015-06-01

    This study aims to explore the influence of national cultural differences on nurses' perceptions of their acceptance of hospital information systems. This study uses the perspective of Technology Acceptance Model; national cultural differences in terms of masculinity/femininity, individualism/collectivism, power distance, and uncertainty avoidance are incorporated into the Technology Acceptance Model as moderators, whereas time orientation is a control variable on hospital information system acceptance. A quantitative research design was used in this study; 261 participants, US and Taiwan RNs, all had hospital information system experience. Data were collected from November 2013 to February 2014 and analyzed using a t test to compare the coefficients for each moderator. The results show that individualism/collectivism, power distance, and uncertainty avoidance all exhibit significant difference on hospital information system acceptance; however, both masculinity/femininity and time orientation factors did not show significance. This study verifies that national cultural differences have significant influence on nurses' behavioral intention to use hospital information systems. Therefore, hospital information system providers should emphasize the way in which to integrate different technological functions to meet the needs of nurses from various cultural backgrounds.

  6. Modelling and pathway identification involving the transport mechanism of a complex metabolic system in batch culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jinlong; Zhang, Xu; Zhu, Xi; Feng, Enmin; Yin, Hongchao; Xiu, Zhilong

    2014-06-01

    The bio-dissimilation of glycerol to 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PD) by Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae) can be characterized by a complex metabolic system of interactions among biochemical fluxes, metabolic compounds, key enzymes and genetic regulation. In this paper, in consideration of the fact that the transport ways of 1,3-PD and glycerol with different weights across cell membrane are still unclear in batch culture, we consider 121 possible metabolic pathways and establish a novel mathematical model which is represented by a complex metabolic system. Taking into account the difficulty in accurately measuring the concentration of intracellular substances and the absence of equilibrium point for the metabolic system of batch culture, the novel approach used here is to define quantitatively biological robustness of the intracellular substance concentrations for the overall process of batch culture. To determine the most possible metabolic pathway, we take the defined biological robustness as cost function and establish an identification model, in which 1452 system parameters and 484 pathway parameters are involved. Simultaneously, the identification model is subject to the metabolic system, continuous state constraints and parameter constraints. As such, solving the identification model by a serial program is a very complicated task. We propose a parallel migration particle swarm optimization algorithm (MPSO) capable of solving the identification model in conjunction with the constraint transcription and smoothing approximation techniques. Numerical results show that the most possible metabolic pathway and the corresponding metabolic system can reasonably describe the process of batch culture.

  7. A Novel 785-nm Laser Diode-Based System for Standardization of Cell Culture Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Camila F.; Guimarães, Orlando C.C.; Costa, Carlos A. de Souza; Kurachi, Cristina; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The purpose of this study was to develop a novel device that concatenates alignment of infrared lasers and parallel procedure of irradiation. The purpose of this is to seek standardization of in vitro cell irradiation, which allows analysis and credible comparisons between outcomes of different experiments. Background data: Experimental data obtained from infrared laser therapies have been strongly dependent upon the irradiation setup. Although further optical alignment is difficult to achieve, in contact irradiation it usually occurs. Moreover, these methods eventually use laser in a serial procedure, extending the time to irradiate experimental samples. Methods: A LASERTable (LT) device was designed to provide similar infrared laser irradiation in 12 wells of a 24 well test plate. It irradiated each well by expanding the laser beam until it covers the well bottom, as occurs with unexpanded irradiation. To evaluate the effectiveness of this device, the spatial distribution of radiation was measured, and the heating of plain culture medium was monitored during the LT operation. The irradiation of LT (up to 25 J/cm2 – 20 mW/cm2; 1.250 sec) was assessed on odontoblast-like cells adhered to the bottom of wells containing 1 mL of plain culture medium. Cell morphology and metabolism were also evaluated. Results: Irradiation with LT presented a Gaussian-like profile when the culture medium was not heated >1°C. It was also observed that the LT made it 10 times faster to perform the experiment than did serial laser irradiation. In addition, the data of this study revealed that the odontoblast-like cells exposed to low-level laser therapy (LLLT) using the LT presented higher metabolism and normal morphology. Conclusions: The experimental LASERTable assessed in this study provided parameters for standardization of infrared cell irradiation, minimizing the time spent to irradiate all samples. Therefore, this device is a helpful tool that can be

  8. Revised culture-based system for identification of Malassezia species.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Takamasa; Makimura, Koichi; Abe, Michiko; Shiota, Ryoko; Nakamura, Yuka; Kano, Rui; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko; Sugita, Takashi; Shibuya, Shuichi; Watanabe, Shinichi; Yamaguchi, Hideyo; Abe, Shigeru; Okamura, Noboru

    2007-11-01

    Forty-six strains of Malassezia spp. with atypical biochemical features were isolated from 366 fresh clinical isolates from human subjects and dogs. Isolates obtained in this study included 2 (4.7%) lipid-dependent M. pachydermatis isolates; 1 (2.4%) precipitate-producing and 6 (14.6%) non-polyethoxylated castor oil (Cremophor EL)-assimilating M. furfur isolates; and 37 (34.3%) M. slooffiae isolates that were esculin hydrolyzing, 17 (15.7%) that were non-tolerant of growth at 40 degrees C, and 2 (1.9%) that assimilated polyethoxylated castor oil. Although their colony morphologies and sizes were characteristic on CHROMagar Malassezia medium (CHROM), all strains of M. furfur developed large pale pink and wrinkled colonies, and all strains of M. slooffiae developed small (<1 mm) pale pink colonies on CHROM. These atypical strains were distinguishable by the appearance of their colonies grown on CHROM. Three clinically important Malassezia species, M. globosa, M. restricta, and M. furfur, were correctly identified by their biochemical characteristics and colony morphologies. The results presented here indicate that our proposed identification system will be useful as a routine tool for the identification of clinically important Malassezia species in clinical laboratories. PMID:17881545

  9. A 3D modeling and measurement system for cultural heritage preservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Guoguang; Zhou, Mingquan; Ren, Pu; Shui, Wuyang; Zhou, Pengbo; Wu, Zhongke

    2015-07-01

    Cultural Heritage reflects the human production, life style and environmental conditions of various historical periods. It exists as one of the major national carriers of national history and culture. In order to do better protection and utilization for these cultural heritages, a system of three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction and statistical measurement is proposed in this paper. The system solves the problems of cultural heritage's data storage, measurement and analysis. Firstly, for the high precision modeling and measurement problems, range data registration and integration algorithm used to achieve high precision 3D reconstruction. Secondly, multi-view stereo reconstruction method is used to solve the problem of rapid reconstruction by procedures such as the original image data pre-processing, camera calibration, point cloud modeling. At last, the artifacts' measure underlying database is established by calculating the measurements of the 3D model's surface. These measurements contain Euclidean distance between the points on the surface, geodesic distance between the points, normal and curvature in each point, superficial area of a region, volume of model's part and some other measurements. These measurements provide a basis for carrying out information mining of cultural heritage. The system has been applied to the applications of 3D modeling, data measurement of the Terracotta Warriors relics, Tibetan architecture and some other relics.

  10. Evaluation of mono or mixed cultures of lactic acid bacteria in type II sourdough system.

    PubMed

    Ekinci, Raci; Şimşek, Ömer; Küçükçuban, Ayca; Nas, Sebahattin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of mono and mixed lactic acid bacteria (LAB) cultures to determine suitable LAB combinations for a type II sourdough system. In this context, previously isolated sourdough LAB strains with antimicrobial activity, which included Lactobacillus plantarum PFC22, Lactobacillus brevis PFC31, Pediococcus acidilactici PFC38, and Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis PFC80, were used as mono or mixed culture combinations in a fermentation system to produce type II sourdough, and subsequently in bread dough production. Compared to the monoculture fermentation of dough, the use of mixed cultures shortened the adaptation period by half. In addition, the use of mixed cultures ensured higher microbial viability, and enhanced the fruity flavor during bread dough production. It was determined that the combination of L. plantarum PFC22 + P. acidilactici PFC38 + L. sanfranciscensis PFC80 is a promising culture mixture that can be used in the production of type II sourdough systems, and that may also contribute to an increase in metabolic activity during bread production process.

  11. Long-term culture system for selective growth of human B-cell progenitors.

    PubMed Central

    Rawlings, D J; Quan, S G; Kato, R M; Witte, O N

    1995-01-01

    We describe a simple reproducible system for enrichment and long-term culture of human B-cell progenitors. Enriched CD34+ cord blood mononuclear cells are seeded onto a murine stromal cell line to establish a biphasic culture system. These cultures are characterized by transient growth of myeloid cells followed by outgrowth of cells highly enriched for early B-cell progenitors. Cultures consisting of > 90% early B-lineage cells [expressing CD10, CD19, CD38, and CD45 but lacking CD20, CD22, CD23, and surface IgM] are maintained for > 12 weeks without growth factor addition. Cells remain predominantly germ line at the immunoglobulin locus and express only low levels of cytoplasmic mu chain, terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase, and recombination-activating gene 1 product. They are unresponsive to the pre-B-cell growth factors interleukin 7 or stem cell factor, or both, suggesting that growth support is provided by a cross-reactive murine stromal cell factor. Cultured B-cell progenitors are generated in large numbers ( > 10(8) cells from a typical cord blood specimen) suitable for use in biochemical analysis and gene-transfer studies. This system should be useful for study of normal and abnormal early human B-lymphopoiesis. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7533295

  12. Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) assay-Book Chapter*

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are thousands of environmental chemicals for which there is limited toxicological information, motivating the development and application of in vitro systems to profile the biological effects of xenobiotic exposure and predict their potential developmental hazard. An adhere...

  13. Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) Assay: Book Chapter

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are thousands of environmental chemicals for which there is limited toxicological information, motivating the development and application of in vitro systems to profile the biological effects of xenobiotic exposure and predict their potential developmental hazard. An adher...

  14. Assessment of carotenoid production by Dunaliella salina in different culture systems and operation regimes.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Ana; Pedro Cañavate, J; García-González, Mercedes

    2011-01-20

    The effect of operation regime and culture system on carotenoid productivity by the halotolerant alga Dunaliella salina has been analyzed. Operation strategies tested included batch and semi continuous regime, as well as a two-stage approach run simultaneously in both, open tanks and closed reactor. The best results were obtained with the closed tubular photobioreactor. The highest carotenoid production (328.8 mg carotenoid l⁻¹ culture per month) was achieved with this culture system operated following the two-stage strategy. Also, closed tubular photobioreactor provided the highest carotenoid contents (10% of dry weight) in Dunaliella biomass and β-carotene abundance (90% of total carotenoids) as well as the highest 9-cis to all-trans β-carotene isomer ratio (1.5 at sunrise).

  15. A pneumatic pressure-driven multi-throughput microfluidic circulation culture system.

    PubMed

    Satoh, T; Narazaki, G; Sugita, R; Kobayashi, H; Sugiura, S; Kanamori, T

    2016-06-21

    Here, we report a pneumatic pressure-driven microfluidic device capable of multi-throughput medium circulation culture. The circulation culture system has the following advantages for application in drug discovery: (i) simultaneous operation of multiple circulation units, (ii) use of a small amount of circulating medium (3.5 mL), (iii) pipette-friendly liquid handling, and (iv) a detachable interface with pneumatic pressure lines via sterile air-vent filters. The microfluidic device contains three independent circulation culture units, in which human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were cultured under physiological shear stress induced by circulation of the medium. Circulation of the medium in the three culture units was generated by programmed sequentially applied pressure from two pressure-control lines. HUVECs cultured in the microfluidic device were aligned under a one-way circulating flow with a shear stress of 10 dyn cm(-2); they exhibited a randomly ordered alignment under no shear stress and under reciprocating flow with a shear stress of 10 dyn cm(-2). We also observed 2.8- to 4.9-fold increases in expression of the mRNAs of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and thrombomodulin under one-way circulating flow with a shear stress of 10 dyn cm(-2) compared with conditions of no shear stress or reciprocating flow. PMID:27229626

  16. SALT-OVERLY SENSITIVE5 Mediates Arabidopsis Seed Coat Mucilage Adherence and Organization through Pectins.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Jonathan S; Tsai, Allen Yi-Lun; Xue, Hui; Voiniciuc, Cătălin; Sola, Krešimir; Seifert, Georg J; Mansfield, Shawn D; Haughn, George W

    2014-05-01

    Interactions between cell wall polymers are critical for establishing cell wall integrity and cell-cell adhesion. Here, we exploit the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seed coat mucilage system to examine cell wall polymer interactions. On hydration, seeds release an adherent mucilage layer strongly attached to the seed in addition to a nonadherent layer that can be removed by gentle agitation. Rhamnogalacturonan I (RG I) is the primary component of adherent mucilage, with homogalacturonan, cellulose, and xyloglucan constituting minor components. Adherent mucilage contains rays composed of cellulose and pectin that extend above the center of each epidermal cell. CELLULOSE SYNTHASE5 (CESA5) and the arabinogalactan protein SALT-OVERLY SENSITIVE5 (SOS5) are required for mucilage adherence through unknown mechanisms. SOS5 has been suggested to mediate adherence by influencing cellulose biosynthesis. We, therefore, investigated the relationship between SOS5 and CESA5. cesa5-1 seeds show reduced cellulose, RG I, and ray size in adherent mucilage. In contrast, sos5-2 seeds have wild-type levels of cellulose but completely lack adherent RG I and rays. Thus, relative to each other, cesa5-1 has a greater effect on cellulose, whereas sos5-2 mainly affects pectin. The double mutant cesa5-1 sos5-2 has a much more severe loss of mucilage adherence, suggesting that SOS5 and CESA5 function independently. Double-mutant analyses with mutations in MUCILAGE MODIFIED2 and FLYING SAUCER1 that reduce mucilage release through pectin modification suggest that only SOS5 influences pectin-mediated adherence. Together, these findings suggest that SOS5 mediates adherence through pectins and does so independently of but in concert with cellulose synthesized by CESA5.

  17. Medication adherence behaviors of Medicare beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    Carr-Lopez, Sian M; Shek, Allen; Lastimosa, Janine; Patel, Rajul A; Woelfel, Joseph A; Galal, Suzanne M; Gundersen, Berit

    2014-01-01

    Background Medication adherence is crucial for positive outcomes in the management of chronic conditions. Comprehensive medication consultation can improve medication adherence by addressing intentional and unintentional nonadherence. The Medicare Part D prescription drug benefit has eliminated some cost barriers. We sought to examine variables that impact self-reported medication adherence behaviors in an ambulatory Medicare-beneficiary population and to identify the factors that influence what information is provided during a pharmacist consultation. Methods Medicare beneficiaries who attended health fairs in northern California were offered medication therapy management (MTM) services during which demographic, social, and health information, and responses to survey questions regarding adherence were collected. Beneficiaries were also asked which critical elements of a consultation were typically provided by their community pharmacist. Survey responses were examined as a function of demographic, socioeconomic, and health-related factors. Results Of the 586 beneficiaries who were provided MTM services, 575 (98%) completed the adherence questions. Of responders, 406 (70%) reported taking medications “all of the time”. Of the remaining 169 (30%), the following reasons for nonadherence were provided: 123 (73%) forgetfulness; 18 (11%) side effects; and 17 (10%) the medication was not needed. Lower adherence rates were associated with difficulty paying for medication, presence of a medication-related problem, and certain symptomatic chronic conditions. Of the 532 who completed survey questions regarding the content of a typical pharmacist consultation, the topics included: 378 (71%) medication name and indication; 361 (68%) administration instructions; 307 (58%) side effects; 257 (48%) missed-dose instructions; and 245 (46%) interactions. Subsidy recipients and non-English speakers were significantly less likely to be counseled on drug name, indication, and side

  18. Adherence of Staphylococcus epidermidis to intraocular lenses.

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, P. G.; Elliot, T. S.; McTaggart, L.

    1989-01-01

    We have demonstrated, with an in vitro model, that Staphylococcus epidermidis is able to colonise intraocular lenses. Adherent organisms were quantitated by light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and viable counting. Bacterial adherence was associated with production of a polysaccharide glycocalyx. Organisms which were attached to the lenses were resistant to apparently bactericidal concentrations of antibiotics, as determined by conventional testing. We speculate on the role of colonisation in the pathogenesis of endophthalmitis. Images PMID:2751971

  19. Off-flavor characterization and depuration in Atlantic salmon cultured to food-size within closed-containment systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Atlantic salmon are typically cultured in marine net pens. However, technological advancements in recirculating aquaculture systems have increased the feasibility of culturing Atlantic salmon in land-based systems. One problem encountered when fish are harvested from recirculating systems is the pre...

  20. An adapted education program to increase adherence to the dietary guidelines for Americans: a feasibility study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) We Can! (Ways to Enhance Children's Activity and Nutrition) was culturally tailored in order to increase adherence to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, as the vehicle for preventing childhood overweight and obesity in Louisiana families. We Can! Louisiana ...

  1. Three-dimensional hydrogel cell culture systems for modeling neural tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frampton, John

    Two-dimensional (2-D) neural cell culture systems have served as physiological models for understanding the cellular and molecular events that underlie responses to physical and chemical stimuli, control sensory and motor function, and lead to the development of neurological diseases. However, the development of three-dimensional (3-D) cell culture systems will be essential for the advancement of experimental research in a variety of fields including tissue engineering, chemical transport and delivery, cell growth, and cell-cell communication. In 3-D cell culture, cells are provided with an environment similar to tissue, in which they are surrounded on all sides by other cells, structural molecules and adhesion ligands. Cells grown in 3-D culture systems display morphologies and functions more similar to those observed in vivo, and can be cultured in such a way as to recapitulate the structural organization and biological properties of tissue. This thesis describes a hydrogel-based culture system, capable of supporting the growth and function of several neural cell types in 3-D. Alginate hydrogels were characterized in terms of their biomechanical and biochemical properties and were functionalized by covalent attachment of whole proteins and peptide epitopes. Methods were developed for rapid cross-linking of alginate hydrogels, thus permitting the incorporation of cells into 3-D scaffolds without adversely affecting cell viability or function. A variety of neural cell types were tested including astrocytes, microglia, and neurons. Cells remained viable and functional for longer than two weeks in culture and displayed process outgrowth in 3-D. Cell constructs were created that varied in cell density, type and organization, providing experimental flexibility for studying cell interactions and behavior. In one set of experiments, 3-D glial-endothelial cell co-cultures were used to model blood-brain barrier (BBB) structure and function. This co-culture system was

  2. Emerging technologies for electronic monitoring of adherence, inhaler competence, and true adherence.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, John N; Nicholls, Clare

    2015-04-01

    Despite the availability of effective treatments for respiratory disorders, disease control is often suboptimal, due in part to the failure of patients to adhere to prescribed regimens, or to demonstrate competence with the often complex steps in the administration of inhaled medications. The cost of poor true adherence, a combined measure of adherence and inhaler competence, is considerable, both economically and in terms of health-related impact. While patient education is recognized as essential, there exist many barriers to healthcare professional-led monitoring and promotion of true adherence. Successful intervention remains a challenging task, dependent upon understanding and addressing the distinct issues associated with poor adherence and inhaler competence, and lessening the perceived burden on healthcare professionals. Electronic monitors provide an accurate and objective indication of adherence and may also be of value in assessing inhaler competence. The information provided by such devices is a helpful aid to understanding the challenging nature of true adherence, and may be crucial to the development and assessment of true adherence promoting interventions. This article provides a background to the impact of suboptimal adherence and inhaler competence, and the challenges associated with the promotion of true adherence, with an emphasis on respiratory therapies. Contemporary electronic monitors of adherence and inhaler competence are critically reviewed, and case studies of emerging technologies are provided to illustrate the use of innovative monitoring devices in the promotion of true adherence in practice. Potential future directions, including increased targeting and individualization, enhanced coordination of care, and a greater focus on inhaler competence are considered to be important additions to currently available technologies in this rapidly evolving field.

  3. Interventions to increase adherence to acne treatment

    PubMed Central

    Moradi Tuchayi, Sara; Alexander, Tiffany M; Nadkarni, Anish; Feldman, Steven R

    2016-01-01

    Background Adherence to acne medication is poor and is a major reason why treatment plans are ineffective. Recognizing solutions to nonadherence is critical. Objective The purpose of this study is to describe the hurdles associated with acne nonadherence and to provide mechanisms on how to ameliorate them. Methods PubMed database was searched. Of the 419 search results, 29 articles were reviewed to identify hurdles to adherence and corresponding solutions. Results Hurdles to primary nonadherence where the medication is not even started, include lack of knowledge, confusion about usage, weak physician–patient relationship, fear of adverse reactions, and cost. Secondary nonadherence hurdles where the medication is started but is not taken as directed include lack of results, complex regimens, side effects, busy lifestyle, forgetfulness, inconvenience, and psychiatric comorbidity. Solutions to these hurdles include treatment simplification, technology, and dynamic education. Limitations Adherence is affected by numerous factors, but available literature analyzing acne adherence and interventions to improve adherence to treatment is limited. Conclusion There are several hurdles in adhering to acne treatment. Recognition of these hurdles and finding appropriate solutions may be as important to treatment outcomes as choosing the right medication to prescribe. PMID:27784999

  4. Patient Perceptions of Voice Therapy Adherence

    PubMed Central

    van Leer, Eva; Connor, Nadine P.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Patient perspectives of behavioral voice therapy, including perspectives of treatment adherence, have not been formally documented. Because treatment adherence is to a large extent determined by patient beliefs, assessment of patient perspectives is integral to the study of adherence. Methods Fifteen patients who had undergone at least 2 sessions of direct voice therapy for a variety of voice disorders/complaints were interviewed about their perspectives on voice therapy, with a particular focus on adherence. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed for content according to qualitative methods. Results Three common content themes emerged from the transcripts: Voice Therapy is Hard, Make it Happen, and The Match Matters. Findings are compared to reports of patient experiences in other behavioral interventions such as diet and exercise, and related to existing theoretical models of behavior change and the therapeutic process. Conclusion This study yields information toward the development of scales to measure adherence-related constructs and strategies to improve treatment adherence in voice therapy. PMID:19775866

  5. Patient Education and Adherence to Aerosol Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ari, Arzu

    2015-06-01

    Nonadherence to prescribed medications results in disease instability and poor clinical control, with increases in hospital admissions, emergency room visits, school/work absenteeism, morbidity, and mortality. Poor patient adherence to therapy can be due to lack of cognition, competence, or contrivance. Patients who have not been trained or fail to understand use of drug and device combinations (cognition) often do not have the ability to use an aerosol device correctly (competence). Many patients have the competence to use the device correctly and know why they should use the device in the way they were taught; however, they still contrive to use it in an ineffective and suboptimal manner that reduces its efficiency and effectiveness. Ensuring effective aerosol therapy and optimizing its role in disease management involve not only delivery of aerosolized medications to the lungs, but also understanding why, when, and how to use the medications, competence to use the device, motivation to adhere to therapy, and not contriving to use the device in a way that will prevent effective drug delivery. This paper explains some of the problems with patient education and adherence to aerosol therapy and suggests strategies to evaluate, monitor, and improve patient adherence effectively in primary care. Factors affecting patient adherence to prescribed medications, effective educational interventions, and strategies to promote patient adherence to aerosol therapy are also discussed.

  6. Being as an iceberg: hypertensive treatment adherence experiences in southeast of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Nayeri, Nahid Dehghan; Dehghan, Mahlagha; Iranmanesh, Sedigheh

    2015-01-01

    Background Treatment adherence is often an important issue in the management of hypertension. Deep understanding of adherence behavior as well as its influential factors can expand knowledge about treatment adherence among hypertensives. Objective The aim of this study was to explore patients, their families, and healthcare providers’ experiences about hypertension treatment adherence in southeast of Iran. Design A qualitative study was conducted to explore the experience of patients, family members, and healthcare providers (n=18) by using a conventional content analysis. The purposive sampling method was used. Data were collected through semi-structured and deep interviews. Results Data analysis showed that hypertensive treatment adherence in an Iranian context is like an iceberg with two subthemes. The first subtheme relates to the upper and clear part of this iceberg and it consists of two categories, including 1) healthy and 2) unhealthy regimens. The second subtheme associates with under-water and unanticipated part and it consists of four categories, including 1) the nature of disease and treatment, 2) the individual resources, 3) the healthcare organization, and 4) the socio-cultural environment. Conclusions The treatment adherence features emerged in this study can be useful in designing and developing context-based hypertension interventions. Further qualitative and quantitative studies with a closer collaboration between the social, natural, and medical sciences in other Iranian populations are needed to confirm the findings. PMID:26395925

  7. The Seven Stages of Man: The Role of Developmental Stage on Medication Adherence in Respiratory Diseases.

    PubMed

    Costello, Richard W; Foster, Juliet M; Grigg, Jonathan; Eakin, Michelle N; Canonica, Walter; Yunus, Fasail; Ryan, Dermot

    2016-01-01

    The circumstances and drivers of the decision to initiate, implement, or persist with a medication differ for individuals at each developmental stage. For school-age children with asthma, the social environment of their family's cultural beliefs and the influence of peer networks and school policies are strong determinants of medication adherence. The stage of adolescence can be a particularly challenging time because there is a reduction in parental supervision of asthma management as the young person strives to become more autonomous. To illustrate the importance of such factors, adherence interventions in children and young adults with asthma have used peer-based supports and social supports, particularly social media platforms. In older patients, it is internal rather than external factors and age-related decline that pose challenges to medication adherence. Seniors face the challenges of polypharmacy, reduced social support, increased isolation, and loss of cognitive function. Strategies to promote adherence must be tailored to the developmental stage and respective behavioral determinants of the target group. This review considers the different attitudes toward medication and the different adherence behaviors in young and elderly patients with chronic respiratory conditions, specifically asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Opportunities to intervene to optimize adherence are suggested. PMID:27587315

  8. Comparison of defined culture systems for feeder cell free propagation of human embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Akopian, Veronika; Beil, Stephen; Benvenisty, Nissim; Brehm, Jennifer; Christie, Megan; Ford, Angela; Fox, Victoria; Gokhale, Paul J.; Healy, Lyn; Holm, Frida; Hovatta, Outi; Knowles, Barbara B.; Ludwig, Tenneille E.; McKay, Ronald D. G.; Miyazaki, Takamichi; Nakatsuji, Norio; Oh, Steve K. W.; Pera, Martin F.; Rossant, Janet; Stacey, Glyn N.; Suemori, Hirofumi

    2010-01-01

    There are many reports of defined culture systems for the propagation of human embryonic stem cells in the absence of feeder cell support, but no previous study has undertaken a multi-laboratory comparison of these diverse methodologies. In this study, five separate laboratories, each with experience in human embryonic stem cell culture, used a panel of ten embryonic stem cell lines (including WA09 as an index cell line common to all laboratories) to assess eight cell culture methods, with propagation in the presence of Knockout Serum Replacer, FGF-2, and mouse embryonic fibroblast feeder cell layers serving as a positive control. The cultures were assessed for up to ten passages for attachment, death, and differentiated morphology by phase contrast microscopy, for growth by serial cell counts, and for maintenance of stem cell surface marker expression by flow cytometry. Of the eight culture systems, only the control and those based on two commercial media, mTeSR1 and STEMPRO, supported maintenance of most cell lines for ten passages. Cultures grown in the remaining media failed before this point due to lack of attachment, cell death, or overt cell differentiation. Possible explanations for relative success of the commercial formulations in this study, and the lack of success with other formulations from academic groups compared to previously published results, include: the complex combination of growth factors present in the commercial preparations; improved development, manufacture, and quality control in the commercial products; differences in epigenetic adaptation to culture in vitro between different ES cell lines grown in different laboratories. PMID:20186512

  9. A primary culture system of mouse thick ascending limb cells with preserved function and uromodulin processing.

    PubMed

    Glaudemans, Bob; Terryn, Sara; Gölz, Nadine; Brunati, Martina; Cattaneo, Angela; Bachi, Angela; Al-Qusairi, Lama; Ziegler, Urs; Staub, Olivier; Rampoldi, Luca; Devuyst, Olivier

    2014-02-01

    The epithelial cells lining the thick ascending limb (TAL) of the loop of Henle perform essential transport processes and secrete uromodulin, the most abundant protein in normal urine. The lack of differentiated cell culture systems has hampered studies of TAL functions. Here, we report a method to generate differentiated primary cultures of TAL cells, developed from microdissected tubules obtained in mouse kidneys. The TAL tubules cultured on permeable filters formed polarized confluent monolayers in ∼12 days. The TAL cells remain differentiated and express functional markers such as uromodulin, NKCC2, and ROMK at the apical membrane. Electrophysiological measurements on primary TAL monolayers showed a lumen-positive transepithelial potential (+9.4 ± 0.8 mV/cm(2)) and transepithelial resistance similar to that recorded in vivo. The transepithelial potential is abolished by apical bumetanide and in primary cultures obtained from ROMK knockout mice. The processing, maturation and apical secretion of uromodulin by primary TAL cells is identical to that observed in vivo. The primary TAL cells respond appropriately to hypoxia, hypertonicity, and stimulation by desmopressin, and they can be transfected. The establishment of this primary culture system will allow the investigation of TAL cells obtained from genetically modified mouse models, providing a critical tool for understanding the role of that segment in health and disease. PMID:23887378

  10. Co-culture systems and technologies: taking synthetic biology to the next level.

    PubMed

    Goers, Lisa; Freemont, Paul; Polizzi, Karen M

    2014-07-01

    Co-culture techniques find myriad applications in biology for studying natural or synthetic interactions between cell populations. Such techniques are of great importance in synthetic biology, as multi-species cell consortia and other natural or synthetic ecology systems are widely seen to hold enormous potential for foundational research as well as novel industrial, medical and environmental applications with many proof-of-principle studies in recent years. What is needed for co-cultures to fulfil their potential? Cell-cell interactions in co-cultures are strongly influenced by the extracellular environment, which is determined by the experimental set-up, which therefore needs to be given careful consideration. An overview of existing experimental and theoretical co-culture set-ups in synthetic biology and adjacent fields is given here, and challenges and opportunities involved in such experiments are discussed. Greater focus on foundational technology developments for co-cultures is needed for many synthetic biology systems to realize their potential in both applications and answering biological questions. PMID:24829281

  11. Mini-scale bioprocessing systems for highly parallel animal cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Kim, Beum Jun; Diao, Jinpian; Shuler, Michael L

    2012-01-01

    Animal cells have been used extensively in therapeutic protein production. The growth of animal cells and the expression of therapeutic proteins are highly dependent on the culturing environments. A large number of experimental permutations need to be explored to identify the optimal culturing conditions. Miniaturized bioreactors are well suited for such tasks as they offer high-throughput parallel operation and reduce cost of reagents. They can also be automated and be coupled to downstream analytical units for online measurements of culture products. This review summarizes the current status of miniaturized bioreactors for animal cell cultivation based on the design categories: microtiter plates, flasks, stirred tank reactors, novel designs with active mixing, and microfluidic cell culture devices. We compare cell density and product titer, for batch or fed-batch modes for each system. Monitoring/controlling devices for engineering parameters such as pH, dissolved oxygen, and dissolved carbon dioxide, which could be applied to such systems, are summarized. Finally, mini-scale tools for process performance evaluation for animal cell cultures are discussed: total cell density, cell viability, product titer and quality, substrates, and metabolites profiles. PMID:22522970

  12. Co-culture systems and technologies: taking synthetic biology to the next level.

    PubMed

    Goers, Lisa; Freemont, Paul; Polizzi, Karen M

    2014-07-01

    Co-culture techniques find myriad applications in biology for studying natural or synthetic interactions between cell populations. Such techniques are of great importance in synthetic biology, as multi-species cell consortia and other natural or synthetic ecology systems are widely seen to hold enormous potential for foundational research as well as novel industrial, medical and environmental applications with many proof-of-principle studies in recent years. What is needed for co-cultures to fulfil their potential? Cell-cell interactions in co-cultures are strongly influenced by the extracellular environment, which is determined by the experimental set-up, which therefore needs to be given careful consideration. An overview of existing experimental and theoretical co-culture set-ups in synthetic biology and adjacent fields is given here, and challenges and opportunities involved in such experiments are discussed. Greater focus on foundational technology developments for co-cultures is needed for many synthetic biology systems to realize their potential in both applications and answering biological questions.

  13. The Problem of Cultural Fit--What Can We Learn from Borrowing the German Dual System?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Theodore

    2007-01-01

    Culture impedes educational transactions between developed countries, and is often an area of tension when developing countries try to borrow models, or have models imposed upon them. This article uses the German Dual System as a case for examining issues surrounding the adaptation of borrowed models. Since attempts at borrowing models can fail…

  14. Development of Quality Assurance System in Culture and Nation Character Education in Primary Education in Indonesia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Susilana, Rudi; Asra

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of national education is to develop skills and build dignified national character and civilization in educating nation life (Act No. 20, 2003). The paper describes a system of quality assurance in culture and character education in primary education. This study employs the six sigma model which consists of the formula DMAIC (Define,…

  15. From the World-Systems Perspective to Institutional World History: Culture and Economy in Global Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benton, Lauren

    1996-01-01

    Summarizes critical attacks on Immanuel Wallerstein's World Systems approach to history and offers new critical evaluations. Wallerstein argued that an emerging capitalist world economy dominated politics and history from the 16th century to the present. Defines two new approaches, institutional analysis and post colonial cultural theory, that…

  16. The Learning Transfer System Inventory (LTSI) in Ukraine: The Cross-Cultural Validation of the Instrument

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamkovenko, Bogdan V.; Holton, Elwood, III; Bates, R. A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is to expand cross-cultural research and validate the Learning Transfer System Inventory in Ukraine. The researchers seek to translate the LTSI into Ukrainian and investigate the internal structure of this translated version of the questionnaire. Design/methodology/approach: The LTSI is translated into…

  17. Organizing the Baby Boomer Construct: An Exploration of Marketing, Social Systems, and Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipschultz, Jeremy H.; Hilt, Michael L.; Reilly, Hugh J.

    2007-01-01

    Baby boomer trends are applied in the development of a conceptual framework that offers a social systems and cultural model for future studies. While there has been considerable recent attention paid to baby boomers, the studies lack a coherent theoretical base that would allow for more advanced and continuing research. Aging baby boomers heading…

  18. Raising Cultural Self-Efficacy among Faculty and Staff of a Private Native Hawaiian School System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fong, Randie Kamuela

    2012-01-01

    The Hawaiian cultural revitalization movement in Hawai`i is an important driver for many Hawaiian organizations as well as educational institutions that serve Native Hawaiians. One such organization is Kamehameha Schools, a private school system founded and endowed by Princess Bernice Pauahi Bishop in 1887 to educate Native Hawaiian children. From…

  19. Improving Achievement for Linguistically and Culturally Diverse Learners through an Inquiry-Based Earth Systems Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Julie; Ariza, Eileen N. Whelan

    2008-01-01

    This report describes an inquiry-based Earth systems curriculum and strategies for teaching diverse students, which were embedded in the curriculum. The curriculum was implemented with 5th-grade students with varied linguistic, cultural, and socioeconomic backgrounds in five schools in a large, southeastern U.S., urban school district. At the end…

  20. Cultural Influences and Corporate Decision Making: The Humanities/Information Systems Partnership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skovira, Robert J.

    Robert Morris College received a national Endowment for the Humanities grant to create a faculty study project to internationalize the humanities curriculum. The Humanities can play a role in building the cultural contexts and contributing to a deeper understanding of information-based corporate decision making in Information Systems courses,…

  1. Spearmint plantlet culture system as a means to study secondary metabolism in vitro

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The production of phytochemicals in vitro has been obtained from a variety of tissue types and organs. A plantlet culture system offers a means to study whole plant growth and development in a miniature scale and their corresponding phytochemical production. Plantlets resemble their in vivo counte...

  2. Social-Cultural-Historical Contradictions in an L2 Listening Lesson: A Joint Activity System Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    Informed and inspired by neo-Vygotskian theory, this article outlines a study exploiting a contemporary conceptualization of Wells's (2002) joint activity system model as an exploratory framework for examining and depicting the social-cultural-historical contradictions in second-language (L2) learners' joint activity. The participants were a pair…

  3. Improving Hospital Quality and Patient Safety an Examination of Organizational Culture and Information Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, John Wallace

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines the effects of safety culture, including operational climate and practices, as well as the adoption and use of information systems for delivering high quality healthcare and improved patient experience. Chapter 2 studies the influence of both general and outcome-specific hospital climate and quality practices on process…

  4. National Contexts Influencing Principals' Time Use and Allocation: Economic Development, Societal Culture, and Educational System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Moosung; Hallinger, Philip

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the impact of macro-context factors on the behavior of school principals. More specifically, the article illuminates how a nation's level of economic development, societal culture, and educational system influence the amount of time principals devote to their job role and shape their allocation of time to instructional…

  5. Cultural Competence, Systems of Care, and Students with Emotional and Behavioral Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Lakeisha D.; Anderson, Jeffrey A.; McQueen, Kand

    2013-01-01

    For youth with emotional and behavioral challenges, there is a trend of minority overrepresentation in restrictive settings. "System of care" refers to an approach that emphasizes cultural competence and providing services in the least restrictive setting. This study investigated the relationship between placement restrictiveness,…

  6. Cultural Capital in East Asian Educational Systems: The Case of Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamamoto, Yoko; Brinton, Mary C.

    2010-01-01

    Cultural capital has been an important but often elusive concept in the study of educational processes and social class reproduction. The authors suggest that this is partly because a country's educational system and ways of evaluating students at different educational transitions set the context for the mechanisms through which embodied and…

  7. An interdisciplinary framework for measuring and supporting adherence in HIV prevention trials of ARV-based vaginal rings

    PubMed Central

    MacQueen, Kathleen M; Tolley, Elizabeth E; Owen, Derek H; Amico, K Rivet; Morrow, Kathleen M; Moench, Thomas; Friend, David R; Friedland, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    along these three pathways will result in a comprehensive approach to product adherence within clinical trials. Conclusions Better measurement of adherence will not, by itself, ensure that future effectiveness trials will be able to address the most basic question: if the product is used per instructions, will it prevent HIV transmission? The challenges to adherence measurement must be addressed as one component of a more integrated system that has as its central focus adherence as a behaviour emerging from the social context of the user. PMID:25224617

  8. Culture characteristics of the atmospheric and room temperature plasma-mutated Spirulina platensis mutants in CO2 aeration culture system for biomass production.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yinyee; Fang, Mingyue; Jin, Lihua; Zhang, Chong; Li, He-Ping; Xing, Xin-Hui

    2015-10-01

    For biomass production of Spirulina platensis as feedstock of fermentation, the culture characteristics of three typical mutants of 3-A10, 3-B2 and 4-B3 generated by atmospheric and room temperature plasmas (ARTP) mutagenesis were systematically studied by using CO2 aeration culture system and compared with the wild strain. The specific growth rate of wild strain in the pure air aeration culture system exhibited a 76.2% increase compared with static culture, while the specific growth rates of the 3-A10, 3-B2 and 4-B3 in pure air aeration culture system were increased by 114.4%, 95.9% and 88.2% compared with their static cultures. Compared with static culture, the carbohydrate contents of wild strain, 3-A10, 3-B2 and 4-B3 in pure air aeration culture system dropped plainly by 51.0%, 79.3%, 85.5% and 26.1%. Increase of CO2 concentration enhanced carbohydrate content and productivity. Based on the carbohydrate productivity, the optimal inlet of CO2 concentration in aeration culture was determined to be 12% (v/v). Under this condition, 3-B2 exhibited the highest carbohydrate content (30.7%), CO2 fixation rate (0.120gCO2·g(-1)·d(-1)) and higher growth rate (0.093 g L(-1)·d(-1)), while 3-A10 showed the highest growth rate (0.118 g L(-1)·d(-1)) and higher CO2 fixation rate (0.117gCO2·g(-1)·d(-1)) but low carbohydrate content (24.5%), and 4-B3 showed the highest chlorophyll (Chl) content (3.82 mg·g(-1)). The most outstanding mutant by static culture in terms of growth rate and carbohydrate productivity (3-B2), was also demonstrated by CO2 aeration culture system. This study revealed that the ARTP mutagenesis could generate the S. platensis mutants suitable for CO2 aeration culture aiming at biomass production. PMID:25795571

  9. Culture characteristics of the atmospheric and room temperature plasma-mutated Spirulina platensis mutants in CO2 aeration culture system for biomass production.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yinyee; Fang, Mingyue; Jin, Lihua; Zhang, Chong; Li, He-Ping; Xing, Xin-Hui

    2015-10-01

    For biomass production of Spirulina platensis as feedstock of fermentation, the culture characteristics of three typical mutants of 3-A10, 3-B2 and 4-B3 generated by atmospheric and room temperature plasmas (ARTP) mutagenesis were systematically studied by using CO2 aeration culture system and compared with the wild strain. The specific growth rate of wild strain in the pure air aeration culture system exhibited a 76.2% increase compared with static culture, while the specific growth rates of the 3-A10, 3-B2 and 4-B3 in pure air aeration culture system were increased by 114.4%, 95.9% and 88.2% compared with their static cultures. Compared with static culture, the carbohydrate contents of wild strain, 3-A10, 3-B2 and 4-B3 in pure air aeration culture system dropped plainly by 51.0%, 79.3%, 85.5% and 26.1%. Increase of CO2 concentration enhanced carbohydrate content and productivity. Based on the carbohydrate productivity, the optimal inlet of CO2 concentration in aeration culture was determined to be 12% (v/v). Under this condition, 3-B2 exhibited the highest carbohydrate content (30.7%), CO2 fixation rate (0.120gCO2·g(-1)·d(-1)) and higher growth rate (0.093 g L(-1)·d(-1)), while 3-A10 showed the highest growth rate (0.118 g L(-1)·d(-1)) and higher CO2 fixation rate (0.117gCO2·g(-1)·d(-1)) but low carbohydrate content (24.5%), and 4-B3 showed the highest chlorophyll (Chl) content (3.82 mg·g(-1)). The most outstanding mutant by static culture in terms of growth rate and carbohydrate productivity (3-B2), was also demonstrated by CO2 aeration culture system. This study revealed that the ARTP mutagenesis could generate the S. platensis mutants suitable for CO2 aeration culture aiming at biomass production.

  10. Recurrent amoebic gill infestation in rainbow trout cultured in a semiclosed water recirculation system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Noble, A.C.; Herman, R.L.; Noga, E.J.; Bullock, G.L.

    1997-01-01

    Five lots of commercially purchased juvenile rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (17-44 g) stocked in a continuous-production water recirculation system became infested with gilt amoebae. The amoebae were introduced into the recirculation system, as evidenced by their presence on gills of fish held in quarantine tanks. Based on their morphology, as seen in histological sections and by electron microscopy, the amoebae appeared to be more closely related to the family Cochliopodiidae than to other taxa of free living amoebae. Attempts to culture the amoebae in different media, at different temperatures of incubation, and in fish cell culture were not successful. Initial treatment of the recirculation system with formalin at 167 parts per million (ppm) for 1 h eliminated amoebae from the gills. Subsequent treatments of the entire system with formalin at 50-167 ppm reduced the intensity of further infestations.

  11. Factors that Influence Adherence to Antiretroviral Treatment in an Urban Population, Jakarta, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Emma Rosamond Nony; Pane, Masdalina; Wandra, Toni; Windiyaningsih, Cicilia; Herlina; Samaan, Gina

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Although the number of people receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Indonesia has increased in recent years, little is known about the specific characteristics affecting adherence in this population. Indonesia is different from most of its neighbors given that it is a geographically and culturally diverse country, with a large Muslim population. We aimed to identify the current rate of adherence and explore factors that influence ART adherence. Methods Data were collected from ART-prescribed outpatients on an HIV registry at a North Jakarta hospital in 2012. Socio-demographic and behavioral characteristics were explored as factors associated with adherence using logistics regression analyses. Chi squared test was used to compare the difference between proportions. Reasons for missing medication were analyzed descriptively. Results Two hundred and sixty-one patients participated, of whom 77% reported ART adherence in the last 3 months. The level of social support experienced was independently associated with adherence where some social support (p = 0.018) and good social support (p = 0.039) improved adherence compared to poor social support. Frequently cited reasons for not taking ART medication included forgetting to take medication (67%), busy with something else (63%) and asleep at medication time (60%). Discussion This study identified that an increase in the level of social support experienced by ART-prescribed patients was positively associated with adherence. Social support may minimize the impact of stigma among ART prescribed patients. Based on these findings, if social support is not available, alternative support through community-based organizations is recommended to maximize treatment success. PMID:25229671

  12. Advances in cell culture: anchorage dependence

    PubMed Central

    Merten, Otto-Wilhelm

    2015-01-01

    Anchorage-dependent cells are of great interest for various biotechnological applications. (i) They represent a formidable production means of viruses for vaccination purposes at very large scales (in 1000–6000 l reactors) using microcarriers, and in the last decade many more novel viral vaccines have been developed using this production technology. (ii) With the advent of stem cells and their use/potential use in clinics for cell therapy and regenerative medicine purposes, the development of novel culture devices and technologies for adherent cells has accelerated greatly with a view to the large-scale expansion of these cells. Presently, the really scalable systems—microcarrier/microcarrier-clump cultures using stirred-tank reactors—for the expansion of stem cells are still in their infancy. Only laboratory scale reactors of maximally 2.5 l working volume have been evaluated because thorough knowledge and basic understanding of critical issues with respect to cell expansion while retaining pluripotency and differentiation potential, and the impact of the culture environment on stem cell fate, etc., are still lacking and require further studies. This article gives an overview on critical issues common to all cell culture systems for adherent cells as well as specifics for different types of stem cells in view of small- and large-scale cell expansion and production processes. PMID:25533097

  13. An aeroponic culture system for the study of root herbivory on Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Plant defense against herbivory has been studied primarily in aerial tissues. However, complex defense mechanisms have evolved in all parts of the plant to combat herbivore attack and these mechanisms are likely to differ in the aerial and subterranean environment. Research investigating defense responses belowground has been hindered by experimental difficulties associated with the accessibility and quality of root tissue and the lack of bioassays using model plants with altered defense profiles. Results We have developed an aeroponic culture system based on a calcined clay substrate that allows insect herbivores to feed on plant roots while providing easy recovery of the root tissue. The culture method was validated by a root-herbivore system developed for Arabidopsis thaliana and the herbivore Bradysia spp. (fungus gnat). Arabidopsis root mass obtained from aeroponically grown plants was comparable to that from other culture systems, and the plants were morphologically normal. Bradysia larvae caused considerable root damage resulting in reduced root biomass and water absorption. After feeding on the aeroponically grown root tissue, the larvae pupated and emerged as adults. Root damage of mature plants cultivated in aeroponic substrate was compared to that of Arabidopsis seedlings grown in potting mix. Seedlings were notably more susceptible to Bradysia feeding than mature plants and showed decreased overall growth and survival rates. Conclusions A root-herbivore system consisting of Arabidopsis thaliana and larvae of the opportunistic herbivore Bradysia spp. has been established that mimics herbivory in the rhizosphere. Bradysia infestation of Arabidopsis grown in this culture system significantly affects plant performance. The culture method will allow simple profiling and in vivo functional analysis of root defenses such as chemical defense metabolites that are released in response to belowground insect attack. PMID:21392399

  14. The culture of Chlorella vulgaris with human urine in multibiological life support system experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming; Liu, Hong; Tong, Ling; Fu, Yuming; He, Wenting; Hu, Enzhu; Hu, Dawei

    The Integrative Experimental System (IES) was established as a tool to evaluate the rela-tionship of the subsystems in Bioregenerative Life Support System, and Multibiological Life Support System Experiments (MLSSE) have been conducted in the IES. The IES consists of a higher plant chamber, an animal chamber and a plate photo bioreactor (PPB) which cultivated lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.), silkworm (Bombyx Mori L.) and microalgae (Chlorella vulgaris), respectively. In MLSSE, four volunteers took turns breathing the system air through a tube connected with the animal chamber periodically. According to the CO2 concentration in the IES, the automotive control system of the PPB changed the light intensity regulating the photosynthesis of Chlorella vulgaris to make CO2 /O2 in the system maintain at stable levels. Chlorella vulgaris grew with human urine by carrying certain amount of alga liquid out of the bioreactor every day with synthetic urine replenished into the system, and O2 was regenerated, at the same time human urine was purified. Results showed that this IES worked stably and Chlorella vulgaris grew well; The culture of Chlorella vulgaris could be used to keep the balance of CO2 and O2 , and the change of light intensity could control the gas composition in the IES; Microalgae culture could be used in emergency in the system, the culture of Chlorella vulgaris could recover to original state in 5 days; 15.6 ml of condensation water was obtained every day by the culture of Chlorella vulgaris; The removal efficiencies of N, P in human urine could reach to 98.2% and 99.5%.

  15. Using Electronic Data Sources to Understand the Determinants of Psychiatric Visit Non-Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Alafaireet, Patricia E.; Houghton, Howard L.; Savage, Grant T.; Gong, Yang

    2009-01-01

    Technology cannot be effectively used to drive improvements in health care quality and health care cost reduction until significantly more healthcare visits are attended. Visit attendance is often perceived as an intractable problem. This formative study identified and analyzed a set of visit adherence determinants to delineate a structure of adherence. The study is distinguished from previous work because it employs three types of determinants (socio-economic, diagnosis, and logistical), captured from an ADT system and an EMR, to predict visit non-adherence. PMID:20351813

  16. Health system factors affecting communication with pediatricians: gendered work culture in primary care.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Sean

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative study examined the roles that practice setting, education level, and gender may play in social workers' communication satisfaction with pediatricians. Taking an ethnographic approach, the researcher interviewed social workers and pediatricians who worked together to provide mental health services in primary care. The results suggested that gender at the health system level may be an issue and that gendered work culture in primary care was a factor in communication. In particular, reimbursement, an aspect of the gendered work culture, was a substantial communication barrier, and the implications for Medicaid billing are discussed. PMID:22085327

  17. Enhanced Geothermal System Development of the AmeriCulture Leasehold in the Animas Valley

    SciTech Connect

    Duchane, David V; Seawright, Gary L; Sewright, Damon E; Brown, Don; Witcher, James c.; Nichols, Kenneth E.

    2001-03-02

    Working under the grant with AmeriCulture, Inc., and its team of geothermal experts, assembled a plan to apply enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) techniques to increase both the temperature and flow rate of the geothermal waters on its leasehold. AmeriCulture operates a commercial aquaculture facility that will benefit from the larger quantities of thermal energy and low cost electric power that EGS technology can provide. The project brought together a team of specialists that, as a group, provided the full range of expertise required to successfully develop and implement the project.

  18. Comparative study of the radiobiological effects induced on adherent vs suspended cells by BNCT, neutrons and gamma rays treatments.

    PubMed

    Cansolino, L; Clerici, A M; Zonta, C; Dionigi, P; Mazzini, G; Di Liberto, R; Altieri, S; Ballarini, F; Bortolussi, S; Carante, M P; Ferrari, M; González, S J; Postuma, I; Protti, N; Santa Cruz, G A; Ferrari, C

    2015-12-01

    The present work is part of a preclinical in vitro study to assess the efficacy of BNCT applied to liver or lung coloncarcinoma metastases and to limb osteosarcoma. Adherent growing cell lines can be irradiated as adherent to the culture flasks or as cell suspensions, differences in radio-sensitivity of the two modalities of radiation exposure have been investigated. Dose related cell survival and cell cycle perturbation results evidenced that the radiosensitivity of adherent cells is higher than that of the suspended ones. PMID:26256647

  19. Comparative study of the radiobiological effects induced on adherent vs suspended cells by BNCT, neutrons and gamma rays treatments.

    PubMed

    Cansolino, L; Clerici, A M; Zonta, C; Dionigi, P; Mazzini, G; Di Liberto, R; Altieri, S; Ballarini, F; Bortolussi, S; Carante, M P; Ferrari, M; González, S J; Postuma, I; Protti, N; Santa Cruz, G A; Ferrari, C

    2015-12-01

    The present work is part of a preclinical in vitro study to assess the efficacy of BNCT applied to liver or lung coloncarcinoma metastases and to limb osteosarcoma. Adherent growing cell lines can be irradiated as adherent to the culture flasks or as cell suspensions, differences in radio-sensitivity of the two modalities of radiation exposure have been investigated. Dose related cell survival and cell cycle perturbation results evidenced that the radiosensitivity of adherent cells is higher than that of the suspended ones.

  20. Incubator embedded cell culture imaging system (EmSight) based on Fourier ptychographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinho; Henley, Beverley M; Kim, Charlene H; Lester, Henry A; Yang, Changhuei

    2016-08-01

    Multi-day tracking of cells in culture systems can provide valuable information in bioscience experiments. We report the development of a cell culture imaging system, named EmSight, which incorporates multiple compact Fourier ptychographic microscopes with a standard multiwell imaging plate. The system is housed in an incubator and presently incorporates six microscopes. By using the same low magnification objective lenses as the objective and the tube lens, the EmSight is configured as a 1:1 imaging system that, providing large field-of-view (FOV) imaging onto a low-cost CMOS imaging sensor. The EmSight improves the image resolution by capturing a series of images of the sample at varying illumination angles; the instrument reconstructs a higher-resolution image by using the iterative Fourier ptychographic algorithm. In addition to providing high-resolution brightfield and phase imaging, the EmSight is also capable of fluorescence imaging at the native resolution of the objectives. We characterized the system using a phase Siemens star target, and show four-fold improved coherent resolution (synthetic NA of 0.42) and a depth of field of 0.2 mm. To conduct live, long-term dopaminergic neuron imaging, we cultured ventral midbrain from mice driving eGFP from the tyrosine hydroxylase promoter. The EmSight system tracks movements of dopaminergic neurons over a 21 day period. PMID:27570701

  1. Incubator embedded cell culture imaging system (EmSight) based on Fourier ptychographic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinho; Henley, Beverley M.; Kim, Charlene H.; Lester, Henry A.; Yang, Changhuei

    2016-01-01

    Multi-day tracking of cells in culture systems can provide valuable information in bioscience experiments. We report the development of a cell culture imaging system, named EmSight, which incorporates multiple compact Fourier ptychographic microscopes with a standard multiwell imaging plate. The system is housed in an incubator and presently incorporates six microscopes. By using the same low magnification objective lenses as the objective and the tube lens, the EmSight is configured as a 1:1 imaging system that, providing large field-of-view (FOV) imaging onto a low-cost CMOS imaging sensor. The EmSight improves the image resolution by capturing a series of images of the sample at varying illumination angles; the instrument reconstructs a higher-resolution image by using the iterative Fourier ptychographic algorithm. In addition to providing high-resolution brightfield and phase imaging, the EmSight is also capable of fluorescence imaging at the native resolution of the objectives. We characterized the system using a phase Siemens star target, and show four-fold improved coherent resolution (synthetic NA of 0.42) and a depth of field of 0.2 mm. To conduct live, long-term dopaminergic neuron imaging, we cultured ventral midbrain from mice driving eGFP from the tyrosine hydroxylase promoter. The EmSight system tracks movements of dopaminergic neurons over a 21 day period. PMID:27570701

  2. A bladder cancer microenvironment simulation system based on a microfluidic co-culture model

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yang; Liu, Xiao-guang; Shi, Hao-qing; Hu, Ke-yao; Zhu, Guan-qun; Ma, Bo; Niu, Hai-tao

    2015-01-01

    A tumor microenvironment may promote tumor metastasis and progression through the dynamic interplay between neoplastic cells and stromal cells. In this work, the most representative and significant stromal cells, fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and macrophages were used as vital component elements and combined with bladder cancer cells to construct a bladder cancer microenvironment simulation system. This is the first report to explore bladder cancer microenvironments based on 4 types of cells co-cultured simultaneously. This simulation system comprises perfusion equipment, matrigel channel units, a medium channel and four indirect contact culture chambers, allowing four types of cells to simultaneously interact through soluble biological factors and metabolites. With this system, bladder cancer cells (T24) with a tendency to form a ‘reticular’ structure under 3 dimensional culture conditions were observed in real time. The microenvironment characteristics of paracrine interactions and cell motility were successfully simulated in this system. The phenotype change process in stromal cells was successfully reproduced in this system by testing the macrophage effector molecule Arg-1. Arg-1 was highly expressed in the simulated tumor microenvironment group. To develop “precision medicine” in bladder cancer therapy, bladder cancer cells were treated with different clinical ‘neo-adjuvant’ chemotherapy schemes in this system, and their sensitivity differences were fully reflected. This work provides a preliminary foundation for neo-adjuvant chemotherapy in bladder cancer, a theoretical foundation for tumor microenvironment simulation and promotes individual therapy in bladder cancer patients. PMID:26462177

  3. Use of a Closed Culture System to Improve the Safety of Lentiviral Vector Production.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tao; Bour, Gaëtan; Durand, Sarah; Lindner, Véronique; Gossé, Francine; Zona, Laetitia; Certoux, Jean-Marie; Diana, Michele; Baumert, Thomas F; Marescaux, Jacques; Mutter, Didier; Pessaux, Patrick; Robinet, Eric

    2015-12-01

    We evaluated the possibility of introducing a combination of six oncogenes into primary porcine hepatocytes (PPH) using a lentiviral vector (LV)-mediated gene transfer in order to develop a porcine hepatocellular carcinoma model based on autologous transplantation of ex vivo-transformed hepatocytes. The six oncogenes were introduced into three plasmids, hence enabling the production of LVs encoding a luciferase reporter gene and hTERT+p53(DD), cyclinD1+CDK4(R24C), and c-myc(T58A)+HRas(G21V) genes, respectively. In order to improve the protection of the laboratory personnel manipulating such LVs, we used a compact cell culture cassette (CliniCell(®) device) as a closed cell culture system. We demonstrated that the CliniCell device allows to produce LVs, through plasmid transfection of 293T cells, and, after transfer to a second cassette, to transduce PPH with a similar efficacy as conventional open cell culture systems such as flasks or Petri dishes. Additionally, it is possible to cryopreserve at -80°C the transduced cells, directly in the CliniCell device used for the transduction. In conclusion, the use of a closed culture system for the safe handling of oncogene-encoding LVs lays the foundation for the development of porcine tumor models based on the autologous transplantation of ex vivo-transformed primary cells. PMID:26467420

  4. Weight loss intervention adherence and factors promoting adherence: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lemstra, Mark; Bird, Yelena; Nwankwo, Chijioke; Rogers, Marla; Moraros, John

    2016-01-01

    Background Adhering to weight loss interventions is difficult for many people. The majority of those who are overweight or obese and attempt to lose weight are simply not successful. The objectives of this study were 1) to quantify overall adherence rates for various weight loss interventions and 2) to provide pooled estimates for factors associated with improved adherence to weight loss interventions. Methods We performed a systematic literature review and meta-analysis of all studies published between January 2004 and August 2015 that reviewed weight loss intervention adherence. Results After applying inclusion and exclusion criteria and checking the methodological quality, 27 studies were included in the meta-analysis. The overall adherence rate was 60.5% (95% confidence interval [CI] 53.6–67.2). The following three main variables were found to impact adherence: 1) supervised attendance programs had higher adherence rates than those with no supervision (rate ratio [RR] 1.65; 95% CI 1.54–1.77); 2) interventions that offered social support had higher adherence than those without social support (RR 1.29; 95% CI 1.24–1.34); and 3) dietary intervention alone had higher adherence than exercise programs alone (RR 1.27; 95% CI 1.19–1.35). Conclusion A substantial proportion of people do not adhere to weight loss interventions. Programs supervising attendance, offering social support, and focusing on dietary modification have better adherence than interventions not supervising attendance, not offering social support, and focusing exclusively on exercise. PMID:27574404

  5. Modelling of Microalgae Culture Systems with Applications to Control and Optimization.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Olivier; Mairet, Francis; Chachuat, Benoît

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical modeling is becoming ever more important to assess the potential, guide the design, and enable the efficient operation and control of industrial-scale microalgae culture systems (MCS). The development of overall, inherently multiphysics, models involves coupling separate submodels of (i) the intrinsic biological properties, including growth, decay, and biosynthesis as well as the effect of light and temperature on these processes, and (ii) the physical properties, such as the hydrodynamics, light attenuation, and temperature in the culture medium. When considering high-density microalgae culture, in particular, the coupling between biology and physics becomes critical. This chapter reviews existing models, with a particular focus on the Droop model, which is a precursor model, and it highlights the structure common to many microalgae growth models. It summarizes the main developments and difficulties towards multiphysics models of MCS as well as applications of these models for monitoring, control, and optimization purposes.

  6. B35 neuroblastoma cells: an easily transfected, cultured cell model of central nervous system neurons.

    PubMed

    Otey, Carol A; Boukhelifa, Malika; Maness, Patricia

    2003-01-01

    A panel of neuronal cell lines was derived from tumors of the neonatal rat central nervous system (CNS) in 1974, and two of these lines are in wide use today. Both the B35 and B50 lines offer a number of advantages to researchers who study CNS neurons in culture: they are simple to grow, to differentiate, and to transfect. B50 cells have been used extensively in the study of neuronal cell death, toxicology, and differentiation, whereas B35 cells have proven useful in the molecular analysis of endocytosis and of signaling pathways, in particular those that guide axonal outgrowth and cell motility. This chapter provides protocols for growing and transfecting B35 cells, selecting stable transfectants, exploring protein function using an antisense approach, and assaying cell motility in a Transwell chamber. All of these protocols have been written for researchers who have some skill in basic cell culture techniques, but previous experience with cultured neurons is not required.

  7. Biodegradation of haloacetic acids by bacterial isolates and enrichment cultures from drinking water systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ping; Lapara, Timothy M; Goslan, Emma H; Xie, Yuefeng; Parsons, Simon A; Hozalski, Raymond M

    2009-05-01

    Biodegradation is a potentially important loss process for haloacetic acids (HAAs), a class of chlorination byproducts, in water treatment and distribution systems, but little is known about the organisms involved (i.e., identity, substrate range, biodegradation kinetics). In this research, 10 biomass samples (i.e., tap water, distribution system biofilms, and prechlorinated granular activated carbon filters) from nine drinking water systems were used to inoculate a total of thirty enrichment cultures fed monochloroacetic acid (MCAA), dichloroacetic acid (DCAA), or trichloroacetic (TCAA) as sole carbon and energy source. HAA degraders were successfully enriched from the biofilm samples (GAC and distribution system) but rarely from tap water. Half of the MCAA and DCAA enrichment cultures were positive, whereas only one TCAA culture was positive (two were inconclusive). Eight unique HAA-degrading isolates were obtained including several Afipia spp. and a Methylobacterium sp.; all isolates were members of the phylum Proteobacteria. MCAA, monobromoacetic acid (MBAA), and monoiodoacetic acid (MIAA) were rapidly degraded by all isolates, and DCAA and tribromoacetic (TBAA) were also relatively labile. TCAA and dibromoacetic acid (DBAA)were degraded by only three isolates and degradation lagged behind the other HAAs. Detailed DCAA biodegradation kinetics were obtained for two selected isolates and two enrichment cultures. The maximum biomass-normalized degradation rates (Vm) were 0.27 and 0.97 microg DCAA/ microg protein/h for Methylobacterium fujisawaense strain PAWDI and Afipia felis strain EMD2, respectively, which were comparable to the values obtained for the enrichment cultures from which those organisms were isolated (0.39 and 1.37 microg DCAN/microg protein/h, respectively). The half-saturation constant (Km) values ranged from 4.38 to 77.91 microg DCAA/L and the cell yields ranged from 14.4 to 36.1 mg protein/g DCAA.

  8. [Identification of staphylococci directly from positive blood culture bottles by MALDI-TOF MS system].

    PubMed

    Kilic, Abdullah; Baysallar, Mehmet

    2014-07-01

    Bloodstream infections are substantial causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Staphylococcus species are the most commonly isolated microorganisms from blood cultures in clinical microbiology laboratories. MALDI-TOF MS (Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time- of- Flight Mass Spectrometry) system allows the identification of microorganisms directly from positive blood culture bottles. The aim of this study was to evaluate the MALDI-TOF MS system for the identification of staphylococci directly from the positive blood culture bottles which revealed the presence of gram-positive cocci by staining. A total of 96 positive blood culture bottles that yielded gram-positive cocci by Gram stain were evaluated. These blood cultures were obtained from 69 patients between December 2013-February 2014. Conventional methods and BD Phoenix™ automated bacterial identification system (Becton Dickinson, USA) were used for routine identification. The strains were also identified by real-time Taqman PCR (qPCR) which was considered as the reference method. In MALDI-TOF MS method, MALDI Sepsityper™ Kit was used for the bacterial identification and all measurements were carried out by using Microflex LT instrument and FlexControl 3.0 software (Bruker Daltonics, USA). Of 96 culture bottles positive for gram-positive cocci, 90 were correctly identified as staphylococci at genus level with all the three study methods (qPCR, BD Phoenix, Bruker MALDI-TOF MS). The other six samples were identified as Enterococcus faecium (n= 4) and Streptococcus pyogenes (n= 2) by both Phoenix and the MALDI-TOF systems. Of the 90 samples, 87 were identified at the species level (15 S.aureus, 33 S.epidermidis, 29 S.hominis, 10 S.haemolyticus) and three at the genus level by the reference qPCR method. When comparing the results obtained by qPCR and Bruker MALDI-TOF MS, incompatibility was detected for three isolates. Those isolates were identified as S.hominis by qPCR, however two of them were

  9. [Identification of staphylococci directly from positive blood culture bottles by MALDI-TOF MS system].

    PubMed

    Kilic, Abdullah; Baysallar, Mehmet

    2014-07-01

    Bloodstream infections are substantial causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Staphylococcus species are the most commonly isolated microorganisms from blood cultures in clinical microbiology laboratories. MALDI-TOF MS (Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time- of- Flight Mass Spectrometry) system allows the identification of microorganisms directly from positive blood culture bottles. The aim of this study was to evaluate the MALDI-TOF MS system for the identification of staphylococci directly from the positive blood culture bottles which revealed the presence of gram-positive cocci by staining. A total of 96 positive blood culture bottles that yielded gram-positive cocci by Gram stain were evaluated. These blood cultures were obtained from 69 patients between December 2013-February 2014. Conventional methods and BD Phoenix™ automated bacterial identification system (Becton Dickinson, USA) were used for routine identification. The strains were also identified by real-time Taqman PCR (qPCR) which was considered as the reference method. In MALDI-TOF MS method, MALDI Sepsityper™ Kit was used for the bacterial identification and all measurements were carried out by using Microflex LT instrument and FlexControl 3.0 software (Bruker Daltonics, USA). Of 96 culture bottles positive for gram-positive cocci, 90 were correctly identified as staphylococci at genus level with all the three study methods (qPCR, BD Phoenix, Bruker MALDI-TOF MS). The other six samples were identified as Enterococcus faecium (n= 4) and Streptococcus pyogenes (n= 2) by both Phoenix and the MALDI-TOF systems. Of the 90 samples, 87 were identified at the species level (15 S.aureus, 33 S.epidermidis, 29 S.hominis, 10 S.haemolyticus) and three at the genus level by the reference qPCR method. When comparing the results obtained by qPCR and Bruker MALDI-TOF MS, incompatibility was detected for three isolates. Those isolates were identified as S.hominis by qPCR, however two of them were

  10. A systematic review of patient self-reported barriers of adherence to antihypertensive medications using the world health organization multidimensional adherence model.

    PubMed

    AlGhurair, Suliman A; Hughes, Christine A; Simpson, Scot H; Guirguis, Lisa M

    2012-12-01

    Multiple barriers can influence adherence to antihypertensive medications. The aim of this systematic review was to determine what adherence barriers were included in each instrument and to describe the psychometric properties of the identified surveys. Barriers were characterized using the World Health Organization (WHO) Multidimensional Adherence Model with patient, condition, therapy, socioeconomic, and health care system/team-related barriers. Five databases (Medline, Embase, Health and Psychological Instruments, CINHAL, and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts [IPA]) were searched from 1980 to September 2011. Our search identified 1712 citations; 74 articles met inclusion criteria and 51 unique surveys were identified. The Morisky Medication Adherence Scale was the most commonly used survey. Only 20 surveys (39%) have established reliability and validity evidence. According to the WHO Adherence Model domains, patient-related barriers were most commonly addressed, while condition, therapy, and socioeconomic barriers were underrepresented. The complexity of adherence behavior requires robust self-report measurements and the inclusion of barriers relevant to each unique patient population and intervention.

  11. Factors Influencing Adherence to Antiretroviral Treatment in Nepal: A Mixed-Methods Study

    PubMed Central

    Wasti, Sharada P.; Simkhada, Padam; Randall, Julian; Freeman, Jennifer V.; van Teijlingen, Edwin

    2012-01-01

    instructions about regimens; and regimens tailored to individual patients’ lifestyles. Healthcare workers should address some of the practical and cultural issues around ART medicine whilst policy-makers should develop appropriate social policy to promote adherence among ART-prescribed patients. PMID:22563464

  12. Plasma-mediated inactivation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms grown on borosilicate surfaces under continuous culture system.

    PubMed

    Vandervoort, Kurt G; Brelles-Mariño, Graciela

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms are microbial communities attached to a surface and embedded in a matrix composed of exopolysaccharides and excreted nucleic acids. Bacterial biofilms are responsible for undesirable effects such as disease, prostheses colonization, biofouling, equipment damage, and pipe plugging. Biofilms are also more resilient than free-living cells to regular sterilization methods and therefore it is indispensable to develop better ways to control and remove them. The use of gas discharge plasmas is a good alternative since plasmas contain a mixture of reactive agents well-known for their decontamination potential against free microorganisms. We have previously reported that Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms were inactivated after a 1-min plasma exposure. We determined that the adhesiveness and the thickness of Pseudomonas biofilms grown on borosilicate were reduced. We also reported sequential morphological changes and loss of viability upon plasma treatment. However, the studies were carried out in batch cultures. The use of a continuous culture results in a more homogenous environment ensuring reproducible biofilm growth. The aim of this work was to study plasma-mediated inactivation of P. aeruginosa biofilms grown on borosilicate in a continuous culture system. In this paper we show that biofilms grown on glass under continuous culture can be inactivated by using gas discharge plasma. Both biofilm architecture and cell culturability are impacted by the plasma treatment. The inactivation kinetics is similar to previously described ones and cells go through sequential changes ranging from minimal modification without loss of viability at short plasma exposure times, to major structure and viability loss at longer exposure times. We report that changes in biofilm structure leading to the loss of culturability and viability are related to a decrease of the biofilm matrix adhesiveness. To our knowledge, there has been no attempt to evaluate the inactivation

  13. Assessment of patient safety culture in clinical laboratories in the Spanish National Health System

    PubMed Central

    Giménez-Marín, Angeles; Rivas-Ruiz, Francisco; García-Raja, Ana M.; Venta-Obaya, Rafael; Fusté-Ventosa, Margarita; Caballé-Martín, Inmaculada; Benítez-Estevez, Alfonso; Quinteiro-García, Ana I.; Bedini, José Luis; León-Justel, Antonio; Torra-Puig, Montserrat

    2015-01-01

    Introduction There is increasing awareness of the importance of transforming organisational culture in order to raise safety standards. This paper describes the results obtained from an evaluation of patient safety culture in a sample of clinical laboratories in public hospitals in the Spanish National Health System. Material and methods A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted among health workers employed in the clinical laboratories of 27 public hospitals in 2012. The participants were recruited by the heads of service at each of the participating centers. Stratified analyses were performed to assess the mean score, standardized to a base of 100, of the six survey factors, together with the overall patient safety score. Results 740 completed questionnaires were received (88% of the 840 issued). The highest standardized scores were obtained in Area 1 (individual, social and cultural) with a mean value of 77 (95%CI: 76-78), and the lowest ones, in Area 3 (equipment and resources), with a mean value of 58 (95%CI: 57-59). In all areas, a greater perception of patient safety was reported by the heads of service than by other staff. Conclusions We present the first multicentre study to evaluate the culture of clinical safety in public hospital laboratories in Spain. The results obtained evidence a culture in which high regard is paid to safety, probably due to the pattern of continuous quality improvement. Nevertheless, much remains to be done, as reflected by the weaknesses detected, which identify areas and strategies for improvement. PMID:26525595

  14. Practical Strategies for Enhancing Adherence to Treatment Regimen in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Greenley, Rachel N.; Kunz, Jennifer H.; Walter, Jennifer; Hommel, Kevin A.

    2013-01-01

    Promoting adherence to treatment among pediatric and adult patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a critical yet challenging task for health care providers. Several existing interventions to enhance adherence among individuals with IBD offer useful information about practical strategies to enhance adherence. The current review article has 3 goals. First, the review provides a context for understanding treatment regimen adherence in IBD by reviewing key definitional, measurement, and conceptual challenges in this area. Next, published studies focused on interventions to enhance adherence in IBD are briefly summarized, followed by a synthesis of practical adherence promotion strategies for use in IBD by health care providers. Strategies are distinguished by the level of evidence supporting their utility as well as by age group. Finally, recommendations for future research to facilitate the development and implementation of practical, evidence-based strategies for adherence promotion in IBD are provided. Findings from the literature review suggest that strategies including education, regimen simplification, and use of reminder systems and organizational strategies (e.g., pill boxes) are likely to be best suited for addressing accidental nonadherence. In contrast, addressing motivational issues, teaching problem-solving skills, and addressing problematic patterns of family functioning are more likely to benefit individuals displaying intentional nonadherence. PMID:23635715

  15. 3d Modeling of cultural heritage objects with a structured light system.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akca, Devrim

    3D modeling of cultural heritage objects is an expanding application area. The selection of the right technology is very important and strictly related to the project requirements, budget and user's experience. The triangulation based active sensors, e.g. structured light systems are used for many kinds of 3D object reconstruction tasks and in particular for 3D recording of cultural heritage objects. This study presents the experiences in the results of two such projects in which a close-range structured light system is used for the 3D digitization. The paper includes the essential steps of the 3D object modeling pipeline, i.e. digitization, registration, surface triangulation, editing, texture mapping and visualization. The capabilities of the used hardware and software are addressed. Particular emphasis is given to a coded structured light system as an option for data acquisition.

  16. Response of sago pondweed, a submerged aquatic macrophyte, to herbicides in three laboratory culture systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleming, W.J.; Ailstock, M.S.; Momot, J.J.; Norman, C.M.; Gorsuch, Joseph W.; Lower, William R.; Wang, Wun-cheng; Lewis, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    The phytotoxicity of atrazine, paraquat, glyphosate, and alachlor to sago pondweed (Potamogeton pectinatus), a submerged aquatic macrophyte, was tested under three types of laboratory culture conditions. In each case, tests were conducted in static systems, the test period was four weeks, and herbicide exposure was chronic, resulting from a single addition of herbicide to the test vessels at the beginning of the test period. The three sets of test conditions employed were(1) axenic cultures in 125-mL flasks containing a nutrient media and sucrose; (2) a microcosm system employing 18.9-L buckets containing a sand, shell, and peat substrate; and (3) an algae-free system employing O.95-L jars containing reconstituted freshwater and a nutrient agar substrate. The primary variable measured was biomass production. Plants grew well in all three test systems, with biomass of untreated plants increasing by a factor of about 5 to 6.5 during the four-week test period. Biomass production in response to herbicide exposure differed significantly among culture systems, which demonstrates the need for a standardized testing protocol for evaluating the effects of toxics on submerged aquatic plants.

  17. Formative research for mhealth HIV adherence: the iHAART app

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Rochelle K.; Ranney, Megan L.; Boyer, Edward W.

    2015-01-01

    Qualitative research was conducted to adapt and develop an mHealth app for HIV patients with histories of substance abuse. The app provides reactive, visual representations of adherence rates, viral load and CD4 counts. Two sets of focus groups were conducted with 22 participants. The first concentrated on use of reminder system and opinions about ideal adherence features. Results informed adaptation of an existing system, which was then presented to participants in the second set of focus groups. We describe participant responses to candidate app characteristics and their understanding of the HIV disease state based on these changing images. Qualitative results indicate that a balance of provided and requested information is important to maintain interest and support adherence. App characteristics and information can provoke positive and negative reactions and these emotional responses may affect adherence. Conclusion: User understanding of, and reaction to, app visual content was essential to adaptation and design. PMID:26644783

  18. Effect of Culture System on Developmental Competence, Cryosurvival and DNA-Fragmentation of In Vitro Bovine Blastocysts

    PubMed Central

    Hajian, Mahdi; Hosseini, Seyed Morteza; Asgari, Vajiheh; Ostadhoosseini, Somayyeh; Forouzanfar, Mohsen; Nasr Esfahani, Mohammad Hossein

    2011-01-01

    Background This study investigated the effect of two in vitro embryo culture systems (co-culture system versus cell-free sequential-media) on developmental competence, cryosurvival and DNA- fragmentation of in vitro developed bovine blastocysts. Materials and Methods Bovine presumptive zygotes were cultured in Ménézo's B2 (B2) plus vero-cells or sequential synthetic oviductal fluid (SOF) for eight days. Subsequently, half of the expanded blastocysts developed in both groups were vitrified, warmed within 30 minutes and post- warming embryos along with their corresponding non-vitrified embryos were cultured for two additional days in the same medium used before vitrification. Embryo development, cryosurvival and apoptosis were compared between the groups. Results For non-vitrified embryos, culture in SOF significantly promoted the potency of embryos to develop into blastocysts compared with the co-culture system. The difference in post vitrification survival rate of SOF blastocysts (83.3%) was insignificant compared with co-culture (84.3%). However, while total cell number of warmed blastocysts in the co-culture system was significantly higher in the co-culture versus the sequential system (215.4 vs. 170.4), the quality of survived embryos in terms of hatching ability and apoptosis was adversely affected by co-culture compared with SOF (65.0% vs. 74.3%, and 13.5% vs. 10.0%, respectively; p<0.05). Conclusion Although co-culture system may increase the viability of embryos following cryopreservation, the potency and dynamics of blastocyst formation significantly increased with sequential media compared to the co-culture system which can compensate for the lower efficiency of sequential media for vitrification/warming purposes. PMID:24917920

  19. The Impact of Corporate Culture, the Reward System, and Perceived Moral Intensity on Marketing Students' Ethical Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nill, Alexander; Schibrowsky, John A.

    2005-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to study how marketing students' ethical decision making was influenced by their perceived moral intensity (PMI), corporate culture, and the reward system. The findings indicate that levels of awareness of the ethical consequences of a decision, the corporate culture, and the reward system all significantly affect…

  20. Testing a theory of organizational culture, climate and youth outcomes in child welfare systems: a United States national study.

    PubMed

    Williams, Nathaniel J; Glisson, Charles

    2014-04-01

    Theories of organizational culture and climate (OCC) applied to child welfare systems hypothesize that strategic dimensions of organizational culture influence organizational climate and that OCC explains system variance in youth outcomes. This study provides the first structural test of the direct and indirect effects of culture and climate on youth outcomes in a national sample of child welfare systems and isolates specific culture and climate dimensions most associated with youth outcomes. The study applies multilevel path analysis (ML-PA) to a U.S. nationwide sample of 2,380 youth in 73 child welfare systems participating in the second National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-being. Youths were selected in a national, two-stage, stratified random sample design. Youths' psychosocial functioning was assessed by caregivers' responses to the Child Behavior Checklist at intake and at 18-month follow-up. OCC was assessed by front-line caseworkers' (N=1,740) aggregated responses to the Organizational Social Context measure. Comparison of the a priori and subsequent trimmed models confirmed a reduced model that excluded rigid organizational culture and explained 70% of the system variance in youth outcomes. Controlling for youth- and system-level covariates, systems with more proficient and less resistant organizational cultures exhibited more functional, more engaged, and less stressful climates. Systems with more proficient cultures and more engaged, more functional, and more stressful climates exhibited superior youth outcomes. Findings suggest child welfare administrators can support service effectiveness with interventions that improve specific dimensions of culture and climate.

  1. A three-dimensional culture system recapitulates placental syncytiotrophoblast development and microbial resistance

    PubMed Central

    McConkey, Cameron A.; Delorme-Axford, Elizabeth; Nickerson, Cheryl A.; Kim, Kwang Sik; Sadovsky, Yoel; Boyle, Jon P.; Coyne, Carolyn B.

    2016-01-01

    In eutherians, the placenta acts as a barrier and conduit at the maternal-fetal interface. Syncytiotrophoblasts, the multinucleated cells that cover the placental villous tree surfaces of the human placenta, are directly bathed in maternal blood and are formed by the fusion of progenitor cytotrophoblasts that underlie them. Despite their crucial role in fetal protection, many of the events that govern trophoblast fusion and protection from microbial infection are unknown. We describe a three-dimensional (3D)–based culture model using human JEG-3 trophoblast cells that develop syncytiotrophoblast phenotypes when cocultured with human microvascular endothelial cells. JEG-3 cells cultured in this system exhibit enhanced fusogenic activity and morphological and secretory activities strikingly similar to those of primary human syncytiotrophoblasts. RNASeq analyses extend the observed functional similarities to the transcriptome, where we observed significant overlap between syncytiotrophoblast-specific genes and 3D JEG-3 cultures. Furthermore, JEG-3 cells cultured in 3D are resistant to infection by viruses and Toxoplasma gondii, which mimics the high resistance of syncytiotrophoblasts to microbial infections in vivo. Given that this system is genetically manipulatable, it provides a new platform to dissect the mechanisms involved in syncytiotrophoblast development and microbial resistance. PMID:26973875

  2. Organotypic cultures as tool to test long-term effects of chemicals on the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Peña, F

    2010-01-01

    The study of neuroscience has vastly benefited from the use of brain slices. This preparation has been fundamental for the understanding of the cellular basis of nervous system function as well as for the study of the mechanisms involved in neuronal network dysfunction. This experimental model provides flexible access, and control of, specific neural circuits and maintains their basic properties, allowing them to reproduce most of their natural network activities. Brain slices permit the combination of sophisticated techniques such as electrophysiology, fluorescence imaging, pharmacology, molecular biology, etc. More recently, the development of organotypic brain slice cultures has expanded the use of modern technical approaches to the study neuronal networks, while increasing their possibilities of evaluating long-term effects of acute experimental conditions, as well as the effects of chronic treatments on neuronal network function in vitro. Here, I will provide an overview of the use of organotypic cultures to understand neuronal network function and dysfunction, as well as the pharmacological approaches used for these studies. As a final example, I will review the studies performed in organotypic cultures regarding the deleterious effects of long-term amyloid beta application on neuronal networks in vitro, as well as the use of drugs that may prevent or revert their deleterious effects on nervous system function. Overall, this review will provide elements to support the use of organotypic cultures as a very reliable model to explore long-term neuropharmacological studies in vitro. PMID:20156165

  3. An optogenetic approach for assessing formation of neuronal connections in a co-culture system.

    PubMed

    Su, Colin T E; Yoon, Su-In; Marcy, Guillaume; Chin, Eunice W M; Augustine, George J; Goh, Eyleen L K

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe a protocol to generate a co-culture consisting of 2 different neuronal populations. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are reprogrammed from human fibroblasts using episomal vectors. Colonies of iPSCs can be observed 30 days after initiation of fibroblast reprogramming. Pluripotent colonies are manually picked and grown in neural induction medium to permit differentiation into neural progenitor cells (NPCs). iPSCs rapidly convert into neuroepithelial cells within 1 week and retain the capability to self-renew when maintained at a high culture density. Primary mouse NPCs are differentiated into astrocytes by exposure to a serum-containing medium for 7 days and form a monolayer upon which embryonic day 18 (E18) rat cortical neurons (transfected with channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2)) are added. Human NPCs tagged with the fluorescent protein, tandem dimer Tomato (tdTomato), are then seeded onto the astrocyte/cortical neuron culture the following day and allowed to differentiate for 28 to 35 days. We demonstrate that this system forms synaptic connections between iPSC-derived neurons and cortical neurons, evident from an increase in the frequency of synaptic currents upon photostimulation of the cortical neurons. This co-culture system provides a novel platform for evaluating the ability of iPSC-derived neurons to create synaptic connections with other neuronal populations. PMID:25742527

  4. Differences in peroxidase localization of rabbit peritoneal macrophages after surface adherence.

    PubMed Central

    Bodel, P. T.; Nichols, B. A.; Bainton, D. F.

    1978-01-01

    Unlike resident peritoneal macrophages, which contain peroxidase in the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) and perinuclear cisternae (PN), macrophages elicited into the rabbit peritoneal cavity by various stimulants lack the enzyme. Since we had previously found that such peroxidase reactivity rapidly appears in the RER and PN of blood monocytes after surface adherence in vitro, we wondered whether the enzyme could be similarly produced in elicited macrophages by adherence. Cells from peritoneal exudates (96 hours after endotoxin injection) were harvested, suspended in culture medium, and allowed to adhere to fibrin-coated or plastic surfaces. Following culture for various intervals, they were fixed, incubated for peroxidase, and examined by electron microscopy. We observed that these elicited cells, which initially contained no cytochemically detectable peroxidase, acquired peroxidatic activity in the RER and PN within 2 hours after adherence in culture. Thus macrophages, like blood monocytes, may rapidly acquire peroxidase reactivity as a consequence of plasma membrane: external surface interaction. In view of this finding, it would seem unwise to use peroxidase localization as the basis for advocating the existence of two separate lines of peritoneal macrophages, as has been proposed by previous investigators. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 1 PMID:645814

  5. Characterization of a primary brown adipocyte culture system derived from human fetal interscapular fat

    PubMed Central

    Seiler, Sarah E; Xu, Dan; Ho, Jia-Pei; Lo, Kinyui Alice; Buehrer, Benjamin M; Ludlow, Y John W; Kovalik, Jean-Paul; Sun, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Brown fat has gained widespread attention as a potential therapeutic target to treat obesity and associated metabolic disorders. Indeed, the anti-obesity potential of multiple targets to stimulate both brown adipocyte differentiation and recruitment have been verified in rodent models. However, their therapeutic potential in humans is unknown due to the lack of a human primary brown adipocyte cell culture system. Likewise, the lack of a well-characterized human model has limited the discovery of novel targets for the activation of human brown fat. To address this current need, we aimed to identify and describe the first primary brown adipocyte cell culture system from human fetal interscapular brown adipose tissue. Pre-adipocytes isolated from non-viable human fetal interscapular tissue were expanded and cryopreserved. Cells were then thawed and plated alongside adult human subcutaneous and omental pre-adipocytes for subsequent differentiation and phenotypic characterization. Interscapular pre-adipocytes in cell culture differentiated into mature adipocytes that were morphologically indistinguishable from the adult white depots. Throughout differentiation, cultured human fetal interscapular adipocytes demonstrated increased expression of classical brown fat markers compared to subcutaneous and omental cells. Further, functional analysis revealed an elevation in fatty acid oxidation as well as maximal and uncoupled oxygen consumption in interscapular brown adipocytes compared to white control cells. These data collectively identify the brown phenotype of these cells. Thus, our primary cell culture system derived from non-viable human fetal interscapular brown adipose tissue provides a valuable tool for the study of human brown adipocyte biology and for the development of anti-obesity therapeutics. PMID:26451287

  6. Non-adherence to inhaled corticosteroids and the risk of asthma exacerbations in children

    PubMed Central

    Vasbinder, Erwin C; Belitser, Svetlana V; Souverein, Patrick C; van Dijk, Liset; Vulto, Arnold G; van den Bemt, Patricia MLA

    2016-01-01

    Background Non-adherence to inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) is a major risk factor for poor asthma control in children. However, little is known about the effect of adherence to ICS on the incidence of asthma exacerbations. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of poor adherence to ICS on the risk of exacerbations in children with asthma. Methods In this nested case–control study using data from the Dutch PHARMO Record Linkage System, children aged 5–12 years who had an asthma exacerbation needing oral corticosteroids or hospital admission were matched to patients without exacerbations. Refill adherence was calculated as medication possession ratio from ICS-dispensing records. Data were analyzed using a multivariable multiplicative intensity regression model. Results A total of 646 children were included, of whom 36 had one or more asthma exacerbations. The medication possession ratio was 67.9% (standard deviation [SD] 30.2%) in children with an exacerbation versus 54.2% (SD 35.6%) in the control group. In children using long-acting beta-agonist, good adherence to ICS was associated with a higher risk of asthma exacerbations: relative risk 4.34 (95% confidence interval: 1.20–15.64). Conclusion In children with persistent asthma needing long-acting beta-agonist, good adherence to ICS was associated with an increased risk of asthma exacerbations. Possible explanations include better motivation for adherence to ICS in children with more severe asthma, and reduced susceptibility to the consequences of non-adherence to ICS due to overprescription of ICS to children who are in clinical remission. Further study into the background of the complex interaction between asthma and medication adherence is needed. PMID:27110103

  7. Effectiveness and Cost-Effectiveness of Diabetes Prevention among Adherent Participants

    PubMed Central

    Herman, William H.; Edelstein, Sharon L.; Ratner, Robert E.; Montez, Maria G.; Ackermann, Ronald T.; Orchard, Trevor J.; Foulkes, Mary A.; Zhang, Ping; Saudek, Christopher D.; Brown, Morton B.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES We report the 10 year effectiveness and within-trial cost-effectiveness of the The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) and its Outcomes Study (DPPOS) interventions among participants who were adherent to the interventions. STUDY DESIGN DPP was a 3-year randomized clinical trial followed by 7-years of open-label modified intervention followup. METHODS Data on resource utilization, cost, and quality-of-life were collected prospectively. Economic analyses were performed from health system and societal perspectives. Lifestyle adherence was defined as achieving and maintaining a 5% reduction in initial body weight and metformin adherence as taking metformin at 80% of study visits. RESULTS The relative risk reduction was 49.4% among adherent lifestyle participants and 20.8% among adherent metformin participants compared to placebo. Over 10 years, the cumulative, undiscounted, per capita direct medical costs of the interventions, as implemented during the DPP, were greater for adherent lifestyle participants ($4,810) than adherent metformin participants ($2,934) or placebo ($768). Over 10 years, the cumulative, per capita non-intervention-related direct medical costs were $4,250 greater for placebo participants compared to adherent lifestyle participants and $3,251 greater compared to adherent metformin participants. The cumulative quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) accrued over 10 years were greater for lifestyle (6.80) than metformin (6.74) or placebo (6.67). Without discounting, from both a modified societal perspective (excluding participant time), lifestyle cost <$5,000 per QALY-gained and metformin was cost-saving compared to placebo. CONCLUSIONS Over 10 years, lifestyle intervention and metformin were cost-saving compared to placebo. These analyses confirm that lifestyle and metformin represent a good value for money. PMID:23544761

  8. Evaluation of isolator system and large-volume centrifugation method for culturing body fluids.

    PubMed Central

    Elston, H R; Wang, M; Philip, A

    1990-01-01

    The Isolator system was compared with the large-volume centrifugation method for processing and recovering organisms from body fluids other than blood, cerebrospinal fluid, and urine. A total of 155 body fluid samples were processed for the recovery of clinically significant organisms. Of the 55 positive cultures, Isolator detected 94% and the large-volume centrifugation method detected 64%. The time necessary to indicate positivity was not significantly different in the two methods; however, in five cases, the Isolator system yielded clinically significant organisms 24 h sooner than the conventional method. The Isolator system was found to be a more sensitive alternative than the conventional large-volume centrifugation method. PMID:2405006

  9. Epithelial monolayer culture system for real‐time single‐cell analyses

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jong Bae; Moody, Mark; Koh, Duk‐Su

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Many epithelial cells form polarized monolayers under in vivo and in vitro conditions. Typically, epithelial cells are cultured for differentiation on insert systems where cells are plated on a porous filter membrane. Although the cultured monolayers have been a standard system to study epithelial physiology, there are some limits: The epithelial cells growing inside the commercial inserts are not optimal to visualize directly through lenses on inverted microscopes. The cell images are optically distorted and background fluorescence is bright due to the filter membrane positioned between the cells and the lens. In addition, the cells are not easily accessible by electrodes due to the presence of tall side walls. Here, we present the design, fabrication, and practical applications of an improved system for analysis of polarized epithelial monolayers. This new system allows (1) direct imaging of cells without an interfering filter membrane, (2) electrophysiological measurements, and (3) detection of apical secretion with minimal d